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Sample records for red spectral edge

  1. Red edge spectral measurements from sugar maple leaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogelmann, J. E.; Rock, B. N.; Moss, D. M.

    1993-01-01

    Many sugar maple stands in the northeastern United States experienced extensive insect damage during the 1988 growing season. Chlorophyll data and high spectral resolution spectrometer laboratory reflectance data were acquired for multiple collections of single detached sugar maple leaves variously affected by the insect over the 1988 growing season. Reflectance data indicated consistent and diagnostic differences in the red edge portion (680-750 nm) of the spectrum among the various samples and populations of leaves. These included differences in the red edge inflection point (REIP), a ratio of reflectance at 740-720 nm (RE3/RE2), and a ratio of first derivative values at 715-705 nm (D715/D705). All three red edge parameters were highly correlated with variation in total chlorophyll content. Other spectral measures, including the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and the Simple Vegetation Index Ratio (VI), also varied among populations and over the growing season, but did not correlate well with total chlorophyll content. Leaf stacking studies on light and dark backgrounds indicated REIP, RE3/RE2 and D715/D705 to be much less influenced by differences in green leaf biomass and background condition than either NDVI or VI.

  2. SENTINEL-2A red-edge spectral indices suitability for discriminating burn severity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Manso, Alfonso; Fernández-Manso, Oscar; Quintano, Carmen

    2016-08-01

    Fires are a problematic and recurrent issue in Mediterranean ecosystems. Accurate discrimination between burn severity levels is essential for the rehabilitation planning of burned areas. Sentinel-2A MultiSpectral Instrument (MSI) record data in three red-edge wavelengths, spectral domain especially useful on agriculture and vegetation applications. Our objective is to find out whether Sentinel-2A MSI red-edge wavelengths are suitable for burn severity discrimination. As study area, we used the 2015 Sierra Gata wildfire (Spain) that burned approximately 80 km2. A Copernicus Emergency Management Service (EMS)-grading map with four burn severity levels was considered as reference truth. Cox and Snell, Nagelkerke and McFadde pseudo-R2 statistics obtained by Multinomial Logistic Regression showed the superiority of red-edge spectral indices (particularly, Modified Simple Ratio Red-edge, Chlorophyll Index Red-edge, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index Red-edge) over conventional spectral indices. Fisher's Least Significant Difference test confirmed that Sentinel-2A MSI red-edge spectral indices are adequate to discriminate four burn severity levels.

  3. Spectral red edge parameters for winter wheat under different nitrogen support levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yisong; Hu, Chunsheng; Dai, Hui; Lei, Yuping

    2005-09-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing is not only an important technical method in observing global ecosystems and vegetation cover change, but also a main aspect of studies on precision agriculture. In order to monitor crop nutrient supply condition and to realize precision fertilization, spectral red edge parameter for winter wheat was studied. Experiments were carried out through 8 years since 1997 under four nitrogen support levels in Luancheng Station, Hebei province (e.g., 0, 100, 200 and 300 kg N ha-1). Canopy reflectance spectrum was measured by ASD HandHeld Spectroradiometer (325-1075 nm) during 2002 and 2004. The dynamics of red edge parameters for physiological stages of winter wheat canopy were calculated using first derivative curve. Analyses revealed that the red edge of the wheat canopy reflectance spectrum locates between 720-740 nm. All the different trial had distinct "red shift" trait, but higher N stress had shorter "red edge" wavelength. Position of red edge turned "blue shift" after pregnant period. Red edge swing is a first-order derivative spectrum when wavelength reached red edge position, red edge swing double peak shape showed that the pregnant period was the best stage to detect nitrogen deficiency. Red edge swing correlated with relative chlorophyll content and leaf N content. Area of red edge peak is the value of first-order derivative spectra accumulative total between 680 and 750 nm. These parameters can be used to estimate LAI and N accumulating quantities, and these results provide information needed for the development of variable-rate N application technology.

  4. Assessments of SENTINEL-2 Vegetation Red-Edge Spectral Bands for Improving Land Cover Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, S.; He, B.; Yin, C.; Liao, Z.

    2017-09-01

    The Multi Spectral Instrument (MSI) onboard Sentinel-2 can record the information in Vegetation Red-Edge (VRE) spectral domains. In this study, the performance of the VRE bands on improving land cover classification was evaluated based on a Sentinel-2A MSI image in East Texas, USA. Two classification scenarios were designed by excluding and including the VRE bands. A Random Forest (RF) classifier was used to generate land cover maps and evaluate the contributions of different spectral bands. The combination of VRE bands increased the overall classification accuracy by 1.40 %, which was statistically significant. Both confusion matrices and land cover maps indicated that the most beneficial increase was from vegetation-related land cover types, especially agriculture. Comparison of the relative importance of each band showed that the most beneficial VRE bands were Band 5 and Band 6. These results demonstrated the value of VRE bands for land cover classification.

  5. Potential of the Sentinel-2 Red Edge Spectral Bands for Estimation of Eco-Physiological Plant Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malenovsky, Zbynek; Homolova, Lucie; Janoutova, Ruzena; Landier, Lucas; Gastellu-Etchegorry, Jean-Philippe; Berthelot, Beatrice; Huck, Alexis

    2016-08-01

    In this study we investigated importance of the space- borne instrument Sentinel-2 red edge spectral bands and reconstructed red edge position (REP) for retrieval of the three eco-physiological plant parameters, leaf and canopy chlorophyll content and leaf area index (LAI), in case of maize agricultural fields and beech and spruce forest stands. Sentinel-2 spectral bands and REP of the investigated vegetation canopies were simulated in the Discrete Anisotropic Radiative Transfer (DART) model. Their potential for estimation of the plant parameters was assessed through training support vector regressions (SVR) and examining their P-vector matrices indicating significance of each input. The trained SVR were then applied on Sentinel-2 simulated images and the acquired estimates were cross-compared with results from high spatial resolution airborne retrievals. Results showed that contribution of REP was significant for canopy chlorophyll content, but less significant for leaf chlorophyll content and insignificant for leaf area index estimations. However, the red edge spectral bands contributed strongly to the retrievals of all parameters, especially canopy and leaf chlorophyll content. Application of SVR on Sentinel-2 simulated images demonstrated, in general, an overestimation of leaf chlorophyll content and an underestimation of LAI when compared to the reciprocal airborne estimates. In the follow-up investigation, we will apply the trained SVR algorithms on real Sentinel-2 multispectral images acquired during vegetation seasons 2015 and 2016.

  6. Vegetation Red-edge Spectral Modeling for Solar-induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence Retrieval at O2-B Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.; Zhang, L.; Qiao, N.; Zhang, X.; Li, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Remotely sensed solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) has been considered an ideal probe in monitoring global vegetation photosynthesis. However, challenges in accurate estimate of faint SIF (less than 5% of the total reflected radiation in near infrared bands) from the observed apparent reflected radiation greatly limit its wide applications. Currently, the telluric O2-B (~688nm) and O2-A (~761nm) have been proved to be capable of SIF retrieval based on Fraunhofer line depth (FLD) principle. They may still work well even using conventional ground-based commercial spectrometers with typical spectral resolutions of 2~5 nm and high enough signal-to-noise ratio (e.g., the ASD spectrometer). Nevertheless, almost all current FLD based algorithms were mainly developed for O2-A, a few concentrating on the other SIF emission peak in O2-B. One of the critical reasons is that it is very difficult to model the sudden varying reflectance around O2-B band located in the red-edge spectral region (about 680-800 nm). This study investigates a new method by combining the established inverted Gaussian reflectance model (IGM) and FLD principle using diurnal canopy spectra with relative low spectral resolutions of 1 nm (FluorMOD simulations) and 3 nm (measured by ASD spectrometer) respectively. The IGM has been reported to be an objective and good method to characterize the entire vegetation red-edge reflectance. Consequently, the proposed SIF retrieval method (hereinafter called IGMFLD) could exploit all the spectral information along the whole red-edge (680-800 nm) to obtain more reasonable reflectance and fluorescence correction coefficients than traditional FLD methods such as the iFLD. Initial results show that the IGMFLD can better capture the spectrally non-linear characterization of the reflectance in 680-800 nm and thereby yields much more accurate SIFs in O2-B than typical FLD methods, including sFLD, 3FLD and iFLD (see figure 1). Finally, uncertainties and prospect

  7. Unravelling remote sensing signatures of plants contaminated with gasoline and diesel: an approach using the red edge spectral feature.

    PubMed

    Sanches, I D; Souza Filho, C R; Magalhães, L A; Quitério, G C M; Alves, M N; Oliveira, W J

    2013-03-01

    Pipeline systems used to transport petroleum products represent a potential source of soil pollution worldwide. The design of new techniques that may improve current monitoring of pipeline leakage is imperative. This paper assesses the remote detection of small leakages of liquid hydrocarbons indirectly, through the analysis of spectral features of contaminated plants. Leaf and canopy spectra of healthy plants were compared to spectra of plants contaminated with diesel and gasoline, at increasing rates of soil contamination. Contamination effects were observed both visually in the field and thorough changes in the spectral reflectance patterns of vegetation. Results indicate that the remote detection of small volumes of gasoline and diesel contaminations is feasible based on the red edge analysis of leaf and canopy spectra of plants. Brachiaria grass ranks as a favourable choice to be used as an indicator of HCs leakages along pipelines. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Red-Edge Spectral Reflectance as an Indicator of Surface Moisture Content in an Alaskan Peatland Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPartland, M.; Kane, E. S.; Turetsky, M. R.; Douglass, T.; Falkowski, M. J.; Montgomery, R.; Edwards, J.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic and boreal peatlands serve as major reservoirs of terrestrial organic carbon (C) because Net Primary Productivity (NPP) outstrips C loss from decomposition over long periods of time. Peatland productivity varies as a function of water table position and surface moisture content, making C storage in these systems particularly vulnerable to the climate warming and drying predicted for high latitudes. Detailed spatial knowledge of how aboveground vegetation communities respond to changes in hydrology would allow for ecosystem response to environmental change to be measured at the landscape scale. This study leverages remotely sensed data along with field measurements taken at the Alaska Peatland Experiment (APEX) at the Bonanza Creek Long Term Ecological Research site to examine relationships between plant solar reflectance and surface moisture. APEX is a decade-long experiment investigating the effects of hydrologic change on peatland ecosystems using water table manipulation treatments (raised, lowered, and control). Water table levels were manipulated throughout the 2015 growing season, resulting in a maximum separation of 35 cm between raised and lowered treatment plots. Water table position, soil moisture content, depth to seasonal ice, soil temperature, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), CO2 and CH4 fluxes were measured as predictors of C loss through decomposition and NPP. Vegetation was surveyed for percent cover of plant functional types. Remote sensing data was collected during peak growing season, when the separation between treatment plots was at maximum difference. Imagery was acquired via a SenseFly eBee airborne platform equipped with a Canon S110 red-edge camera capable of detecting spectral reflectance from plant tissue at 715 nm band center to within centimeters of spatial resolution. Here, we investigate empirical relationships between spectral reflectance, water table position, and surface moisture in relation to peat carbon balance.

  9. Natural and artificial spectral edges in exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingam, Manasvi; Loeb, Abraham

    2017-09-01

    Technological civilizations may rely upon large-scale photovoltaic arrays to harness energy from their host star. Photovoltaic materials, such as silicon, possess distinctive spectral features, including an 'artificial edge' that is characteristically shifted in wavelength shortwards of the 'red edge' of vegetation. Future observations of reflected light from exoplanets would be able to detect both natural and artificial edges photometrically, if a significant fraction of the planet's surface is covered by vegetation or photovoltaic arrays, respectively. The stellar energy thus tapped can be utilized for terraforming activities by transferring heat and light from the day side to the night side on tidally locked exoplanets, thereby producing detectable artefacts.

  10. High Sensitivity of Stark-Shift Voltage-Sensing Dyes by One- or Two-Photon Excitation Near the Red Spectral Edge

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Bernd; Fromherz, Peter; Denk, Winfried

    2004-01-01

    Sensitivity spectra of Stark-shift voltage sensitive dyes, such as ANNINE-6, suggest the use of the extreme red edges of the excitation spectrum to achieve large fractional fluorescence changes with membrane voltage. This was tested in cultured HEK293 cells. Cells were illuminated with light at the very red edge of the dye's excitation spectrum, where the absorption cross section is as much as 100 times smaller than at its peak. The small-signal fractional fluorescence changes were −0.17%/mV, −0.28%/mV, and −0.35%/mV for one-photon excitation at 458 nm, 488 nm, and 514 nm, respectively, and −0.29%/mV, −0.43%/mV, and −0.52%/mV for two-photon excitation at 960 nm, 1000 nm, and 1040 nm, respectively. For large voltage swings the fluorescence changes became nonlinear, reaching 50% and −28% for 100 mV hyper- and depolarization, respectively, at 514 nm and 70% and −40% at 1040 nm. Such fractional sensitivities are ∼5 times larger than what is commonly found with other voltage-sensing dyes and approach the theoretical limit given by the spectral Boltzmann tail. PMID:15240496

  11. The red edge of plant leaf reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horler, D. N. H.; Dockray, M.; Barber, J.

    1983-01-01

    A detailed study of the red edge spectral feature of green vegetation based on laboratory reflectance spectrophotometry is presented. A parameter lambda is defined as the wavelength is defined as the wavelength of maximum slope and found to be dependent on chlorophyll concentration. Species, development stage, leaf layering, and leaf water content of vegetation also influences lambda. The maximum slope parameter is found to be independent of simulated ground area coverage. The results are interpreted in terms of Beer's Law and Kubelka-Munk theory. The chlorophyll concentration dependence of lambda seems to be explained in terms of a pure absorption effect, and it is suggested that the existence of two lambda components arises from leaf scattering properties. The results indicate that red edge measurements will be valuable for assessment of vegetative chlorophyll status and leaf area index independently of ground cover variations, and will be particularly suitable for early stress detection.

  12. The red edge of plant leaf reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horler, D. N. H.; Dockray, M.; Barber, J.

    1983-01-01

    A detailed study of the red edge spectral feature of green vegetation based on laboratory reflectance spectrophotometry is presented. A parameter lambda is defined as the wavelength is defined as the wavelength of maximum slope and found to be dependent on chlorophyll concentration. Species, development stage, leaf layering, and leaf water content of vegetation also influences lambda. The maximum slope parameter is found to be independent of simulated ground area coverage. The results are interpreted in terms of Beer's Law and Kubelka-Munk theory. The chlorophyll concentration dependence of lambda seems to be explained in terms of a pure absorption effect, and it is suggested that the existence of two lambda components arises from leaf scattering properties. The results indicate that red edge measurements will be valuable for assessment of vegetative chlorophyll status and leaf area index independently of ground cover variations, and will be particularly suitable for early stress detection.

  13. Red edge measurements for remotely sensing plant chlorophyll content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horler, D. N. H.; Dockray, M.; Barber, J.; Barringer, A. R.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of using the wavelength of the maximum slope of the red edge of leaf reflectance spectra, Lambda(re), as an indication of plant chlorophyll status was examined in the laboratory for single leaves of several species. Lambda(re) for each sample was determined by derivative reflectance spectroscopy. A high positive correlation was found between Lambda(re) and leaf chlorophyll content for all species, although there were some differences in the quantitative nature of the relationship for plants of different types. The position of the red edge was found to be unaffected by simulated change in ground cover, but multiple leaf layers produced a shift in its position. Appropriate spectral measurements and processing for obtaining useful information from the red edge are discussed, and the potential of the red edge in relation to other spectral measurements is considered.

  14. Red edge measurements for remotely sensing plant chlorophyll content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horler, D. N. H.; Dockray, M.; Barber, J.; Barringer, A. R.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of using the wavelength of the maximum slope of the red edge of leaf reflectance spectra, Lambda(re), as an indication of plant chlorophyll status was examined in the laboratory for single leaves of several species. Lambda(re) for each sample was determined by derivative reflectance spectroscopy. A high positive correlation was found between Lambda(re) and leaf chlorophyll content for all species, although there were some differences in the quantitative nature of the relationship for plants of different types. The position of the red edge was found to be unaffected by simulated change in ground cover, but multiple leaf layers produced a shift in its position. Appropriate spectral measurements and processing for obtaining useful information from the red edge are discussed, and the potential of the red edge in relation to other spectral measurements is considered.

  15. The Red Edge Problem in asteroid band parameter analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, Sean S.; Dunn, Tasha L.; Emery, Joshua P.; Bowles, Neil E.

    2016-04-01

    Near-infrared reflectance spectra of S-type asteroids contain two absorptions at 1 and 2 μm (band I and II) that are diagnostic of mineralogy. A parameterization of these two bands is frequently employed to determine the mineralogy of S(IV) asteroids through the use of ordinary chondrite calibration equations that link the mineralogy to band parameters. The most widely used calibration study uses a Band II terminal wavelength point (red edge) at 2.50 μm. However, due to the limitations of the NIR detectors on prominent telescopes used in asteroid research, spectral data for asteroids are typically only reliable out to 2.45 μm. We refer to this discrepancy as "The Red Edge Problem." In this report, we evaluate the associated errors for measured band area ratios (BAR = Area BII/BI) and calculated relative abundance measurements. We find that the Red Edge Problem is often not the dominant source of error for the observationally limited red edge set at 2.45 μm, but it frequently is for a red edge set at 2.40 μm. The error, however, is one sided and therefore systematic. As such, we provide equations to adjust measured BARs to values with a different red edge definition. We also provide new ol/(ol+px) calibration equations for red edges set at 2.40 and 2.45 μm.

  16. Vegetation's red edge: a possible spectroscopic biosignature of extraterrestrial plants.

    PubMed

    Seager, S; Turner, E L; Schafer, J; Ford, E B

    2005-06-01

    Earth's deciduous plants have a sharp order-of-magnitude increase in leaf reflectance between approximately 700 and 750 nm wavelength. This strong reflectance of Earth's vegetation suggests that surface biosignatures with sharp spectral features might be detectable in the spectrum of scattered light from a spatially unresolved extrasolar terrestrial planet. We assess the potential of Earth's step-function-like spectroscopic feature, referred to as the "red edge," as a tool for astrobiology. We review the basic characteristics and physical origin of the red edge and summarize its use in astronomy: early spectroscopic efforts to search for vegetation on Mars and recent reports of detection of the red edge in the spectrum of Earthshine (i.e., the spatially integrated scattered light spectrum of Earth). We present Earthshine observations from Apache Point Observatory (New Mexico) to emphasize that time variability is key to detecting weak surface biosignatures such as the vegetation red edge. We briefly discuss the evolutionary advantages of vegetation's red edge reflectance, and speculate that while extraterrestrial "light-harvesting organisms" have no compelling reason to display the exact same red edge feature as terrestrial vegetation, they might have similar spectroscopic features at different wavelengths than terrestrial vegetation. This implies that future terrestrial-planet-characterizing space missions should obtain data that allow time-varying, sharp spectral features at unknown wavelengths to be identified. We caution that some mineral reflectance edges are similar in slope and strength to vegetation's red edge (albeit at different wavelengths); if an extrasolar planet reflectance edge is detected care must be taken with its interpretation.

  17. Red edge shift and biochemical content in grass canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutanga, Onisimo; Skidmore, Andrew K.

    The concentration of foliar nitrogen in tropical grass is one of the factors that explain the distribution of wildlife. Therefore, the remote sensing of foliar nitrogen contributes to a better understanding of wildlife feeding patterns. This study evaluated changes in the red edge position of the 680 nm continuum removed chlorophyll feature in the reflectance spectra of samples of Cenchus ciliaris grass grown in a greenhouse under three levels of nitrogen supply. Canopy spectral measurements from each treatment were recorded under controlled laboratory conditions over a four-week period using a GER 3700 spectroradiometer. Results indicate that the mean wavelength positions of the three fertilization treatments were statistically different. An increase in nitrogen supply yielded a shift in the red edge position to longer wavelengths. The red edge position, amplitude, slope at 713 nm and slope at 725 nm were significantly correlated to measured nitrogen concentration (bootstrapped r = 0.89, - 0.28, 0.63 and 0.75, respectively) even at canopy level. Based on these results, the red edge position is strongly correlated with biochemical concentration in plants compared to the other methods tested. The study provides conclusive evidence that confirms the strength of a red edge-nitrogen relationship that remains underused in remote sensing. This method is promising for estimating nutrient content in grasslands.

  18. New applications of Spectral Edge image fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Alex E.; Montagna, Roberto; Finlayson, Graham D.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present new applications of the Spectral Edge image fusion method. The Spectral Edge image fusion algorithm creates a result which combines details from any number of multispectral input images with natural color information from a visible spectrum image. Spectral Edge image fusion is a derivative-based technique, which creates an output fused image with gradients which are an ideal combination of those of the multispectral input images and the input visible color image. This produces both maximum detail and natural colors. We present two new applications of Spectral Edge image fusion. Firstly, we fuse RGB-NIR information from a sensor with a modified Bayer pattern, which captures visible and near-infrared image information on a single CCD. We also present an example of RGB-thermal image fusion, using a thermal camera attached to a smartphone, which captures both visible and low-resolution thermal images. These new results may be useful for computational photography and surveillance applications.

  19. Spectral methods in edge-diffraction theories

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, J.M. )

    1992-12-01

    Spectral methods for the construction of uniform asymptotic representations of the field diffracted by an aperture in a plane screen are reviewed. These are separated into contrasting approaches, roughly described as physical and geometrical. It is concluded that the geometrical methods provide a direct route to the construction of uniform representations that are formally identical to the equivalent-edge-current concept. Some interpretive and analytical difficulties that complicate the physical methods of obtaining uniform representations are analyzed. Spectral synthesis proceeds directly from the ray geometry and diffraction coefficients, without any intervening current representation, and the representation is uniform at shadow boundaries and caustics of the diffracted field. The physical theory of diffraction postulates currents on the diffracting screen that give rise to the diffracted field. The difficulties encountered in evaluating the current integrals are throughly examined, and it is concluded that the additional data provided by the physical theory of diffraction (diffraction coefficients off the Keller diffraction cone) are not actually required for obtaining uniform asymptotics at the leading order. A new diffraction representation that generalizes to arbitrary plane-convex apertures a formula given by Knott and Senior [Proc. IEEE 62, 1468 (1974)] for circular apertures is deduced. 34 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Evaluating the impact of red-edge band from Rapideye image for classifying insect defoliation levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelabu, Samuel; Mutanga, Onisimo; Adam, Elhadi

    2014-09-01

    The prospect of regular assessments of insect defoliation using remote sensing technologies has increased in recent years through advances in the understanding of the spectral reflectance properties of vegetation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the ability of the red edge channel of Rapideye imagery to discriminate different levels of insect defoliation in an African savanna by comparing the results of obtained from two classifiers. Random Forest and Support vector machine classification algorithms were applied using different sets of spectral analysis involving the red edge band. Results show that the integration of information from red edge increases classification accuracy of insect defoliation levels in all analysis performed in the study. For instance, when all the 5 bands of Rapideye imagery were used for classification, the overall accuracies increases about 19% and 21% for SVM and RF, respectively, as opposed to when the red edge channel was excluded. We also found out that the normalized difference red-edge index yielded a better accuracy result than normalized difference vegetation index. We conclude that the red-edge channel of relatively affordable and readily available high-resolution multispectral satellite data such as Rapideye has the potential to considerably improve insect defoliation classification especially in sub-Saharan Africa where data availability is limited.

  1. The effect of a red leaf pigment on the relationship between red edge and chlorophyll concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Paul J.; Dungan, Jennifer L.; Macler, Bruce A.; Plummer, Stephen E.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of a leaf pigment - red amaranthin - on red edge and chlorophyll concentration is investigated in amaranth leaves by means of treatments with nitrate and salts. A near-linear relationship between red edge and chlorophyll concentration is observed for leaves with low amaranthin concentration, and no relationship is noted at high concentrations. The study demonstrates the limitation inherent in estimating chlorophyll concentration by using remotely sensed red edge.

  2. The effect of a red leaf pigment on the relationship between red edge and chlorophyll concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Paul J.; Dungan, Jennifer L.; Macler, Bruce A.; Plummer, Stephen E.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of a leaf pigment - red amaranthin - on red edge and chlorophyll concentration is investigated in amaranth leaves by means of treatments with nitrate and salts. A near-linear relationship between red edge and chlorophyll concentration is observed for leaves with low amaranthin concentration, and no relationship is noted at high concentrations. The study demonstrates the limitation inherent in estimating chlorophyll concentration by using remotely sensed red edge.

  3. Spectral Tuning of Deep Red Cone Pigments†

    PubMed Central

    Amora, Tabitha L.; Ramos, Lavoisier S.; Galan, Jhenny F.; Birge, Robert R.

    2008-01-01

    Visual pigments are G-protein-coupled receptors that provide a critical interface between organisms and their external environment. Natural selection has generated vertebrate pigments that absorb light from the far-UV (360 nm) to the deep red (630 nm) while using a single chromophore, in either the A1 (11-cis-retinal) or A2 (11-cis-3,4-dehydroretinal) form. The fact that a single chromophore can be manipulated to have an absorption maximum across such an extended spectral region is remarkable. The mechanisms of wavelength regulation remain to be fully revealed, and one of the least well-understood mechanisms is that associated with the deep red pigments. We investigate theoretically the hypothesis that deep red cone pigments select a 6-s-trans conformation of the retinal chromophore ring geometry. This conformation is in contrast to the 6-s-cis ring geometry observed in rhodopsin and, through model chromophore studies, the vast majority of visual pigments. Nomographic spectral analysis of 294 A1 and A2 cone pigment literature absorption maxima indicates that the selection of a 6-s-trans geometry red shifts M/LWS A1 pigments by ~1500 cm−1 (~50 nm) and A2 pigments by ~2700 cm−1 (~100 nm). The homology models of seven cone pigments indicate that the deep red cone pigments select 6-s-trans chromophore conformations primarily via electrostatic steering. Our results reveal that the generation of a 6-s-trans conformation not only achieves a significant red shift but also provides enhanced stability of the chromophore within the deep red cone pigment binding sites. PMID:18370404

  4. Spectral tuning of deep red cone pigments.

    PubMed

    Amora, Tabitha L; Ramos, Lavoisier S; Galan, Jhenny F; Birge, Robert R

    2008-04-22

    Visual pigments are G-protein-coupled receptors that provide a critical interface between organisms and their external environment. Natural selection has generated vertebrate pigments that absorb light from the far-UV (360 nm) to the deep red (630 nm) while using a single chromophore, in either the A1 (11- cis-retinal) or A2 (11- cis-3,4-dehydroretinal) form. The fact that a single chromophore can be manipulated to have an absorption maximum across such an extended spectral region is remarkable. The mechanisms of wavelength regulation remain to be fully revealed, and one of the least well-understood mechanisms is that associated with the deep red pigments. We investigate theoretically the hypothesis that deep red cone pigments select a 6- s- trans conformation of the retinal chromophore ring geometry. This conformation is in contrast to the 6- s- cis ring geometry observed in rhodopsin and, through model chromophore studies, the vast majority of visual pigments. Nomographic spectral analysis of 294 A1 and A2 cone pigment literature absorption maxima indicates that the selection of a 6- s- trans geometry red shifts M/LWS A1 pigments by approximately 1500 cm (-1) ( approximately 50 nm) and A2 pigments by approximately 2700 cm (-1) ( approximately 100 nm). The homology models of seven cone pigments indicate that the deep red cone pigments select 6- s- trans chromophore conformations primarily via electrostatic steering. Our results reveal that the generation of a 6- s- trans conformation not only achieves a significant red shift but also provides enhanced stability of the chromophore within the deep red cone pigment binding sites.

  5. Exploring the Relationship Between Reflectance Red Edge and Chlorophyll Content in Slash Pine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Paul J.; Dungan, Jennifer L.; Gholz, Henry L.

    1990-01-01

    Chlorophyll is a key indicator of the physiological status of a forest canopy. However, its distribution may vary greatly in time and space, so that the estimation of chlorophyll content of canopies or branches by extrapolation from leaf values obtained by destructive sampling is labor intensive and potentially inaccurate. Chlorophy11 content is related positively to the point of maximum slope in vegetation reflectance spectra which occurs at wavelengths between 690-740 nm and is known as the "red edge." The red edge of needles on individual slash pine (Piniis elliottii Engelm.) branches and in whole forest canopies was measured with a spectroradiometer. Branches were measured on the ground against a spectrally flat reflectance target and canopies were measured from observation towers against a spectrally variable understory and forest floor. There was a linear relationship between red edge and chlorophyll content of branches (R(exp 2) = 0.91). Measurements of the red edge and this relationship were used to estimate the chlorophyll content of other branches with an error that was lower than that associated with the colorimetric (laboratory) method. There was no relationship between the red edge and the chlorophyll content of whole canopies. This can be explained by the overriding influence of the understory and forest floor, an influence that was illustrated by spectral mixture modeling. The results suggest that the red edge could be used to estimate the chlorophyll content in branches but it is unlikely to be of value for the estimation of chlorophyll content in canopies unless the canopy cover is high.

  6. Monitoring plant response to phenanthrene using the red edge of canopy hyperspectral reflectance.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Linhai; Chen, Zhongxin; Wang, Jianjian; Ding, Jinzhi; Yu, Yunjiang; Li, Junsheng; Xiao, Nengwen; Jiang, Lianhe; Zheng, Yuanrun; Rimmington, Glyn M

    2014-09-15

    To investigate the mechanisms and potential for the remote sensing of phenanthrene-induced vegetation stress, we measured field canopy spectra, and associated plant and soil parameters in the field controlled experiment in the Yellow River Delta of China. Two widely distributed plant communities, separately dominated by reed (Phragmites australis) and glaucous seepweed (Suaeda salsa), were treated with different doses of phenanthrene. The canopy spectral changes of plant community resulted from the decreases of biomass and foliar projective coverage, while leaf photosynthetic pigment concentrations showed no significance difference among treatments. The spectral response to phenanthrene included a flattened red edge, with decreased first derivative of reflectance. The red edge slope and area consistently responded to phenanthrene, showing a strong relationship with aboveground biomass, coverage and canopy pigments density. These results suggest the potential of remote sensing and the importance of field validation to correctly interpret the causes of the spectral changes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Dependence of red edge on eddy viscosity model parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deupree, R. G.; Cole, P. W.

    1980-01-01

    The dependence of the red edge location on the two fundamental free parameters in the eddy viscosity treatment was extensively studied. It is found that the convective flux is rather insensitive to any reasonable or allowed value of the two free parameters of the treatment. This must be due in part to the fact that the convective flux is determined more by the properties of the hydrogen ionization region than by differences in convective structure. The changes in the effective temperature of the red edge of the RR Lyrae gap resulting from these parameter variations is quite small (approximately 150 K). This is true both because the parameter variation causes only small changes and because large changes in the convective flux are required to produce any significant change in red edge location. The possible changes found are substantially less than the approximately 600 K required to change the predicted helium abundance mass fraction from 0.3 to 0.2.

  8. Spectral Information Retrieval for Sub-Pixel Building Edge Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avbelj, J.

    2012-07-01

    Building extraction from imagery has been an active research area for decades. However, the precise building detection from hyperspectral (HSI) images solely is a less often addressed research question due to the low spatial resolution of data. The building boundaries are usually represented by spectrally mixed pixels, and classical edge detector algorithms fail to detect borders with sufficient completeness. The idea of the proposed method is to use fraction of materials in mixed pixels to derive weights for adjusting building boundaries. The building regions are detected using seeded region growing and merging in a HSI image; for the initial seed point selection the digital surface model (DSM) is used. Prior to region growing, the seeds are statistically tested for outliers on the basis of their spectral characteristics. Then, the border pixels of building regions are compared in spectrum to the seed points by calculating spectral dissimilarity. From this spectral dissimilarity the weights for weighted and constrained least squares (LS) adjustment are derived. We used the Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) for spectral similarity measure, but the proposed boundary estimation method could benefit from soft classification or spectral unmixing results. The method was tested on a HSI image with spatial resolution of 4 m, and buildings of rectangular shape. The importance of constraints to the relations between building parts, e.g. perpendicularity is shown on example with a building with inner yards. The adjusted building boundaries are compared to the laser DSM, and have a relative accuracy of boundaries 1/4 of a pixel.

  9. Spectral Energy Distributions of Red Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glikman, Eilat

    We propose to study the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of a sample of dust-reddened quasars, which are transitional objects, triggered by and residing in recently-merged host galaxies, and are therefore ideal laboratories for addressing fundamental questions on the co-evolution of black holes and their host galaxies. We will obtain flux measurements at 89 and 154 microns - the expected peak of dust emission - with the HAWK+ instrument for a sample of these red quasars. We will combine these measurements with already-existing photometric data from SDSS, 2MASS and WISE to construct SEDs from the near-UV to the far-infrared. We will fit these SEDs to models of AGN and host galaxy emission as well as dust obscuration and re-radiation in the infrared using self-consistent Bayesian SED fitting codes to disentangle their underlying physical processes. Our current SEDs extend only to the WISE 22 micron band, resulting in model fits that underestimate the AGN contribution and overestimate the host galaxy's stellar mass and star formation rate. The proposed data will better constrain these properties, and when applied to the full sample, will produce a clearer picture of the complex processes of quasar/galaxy co-evolution. Furthermore, the SEDs for the targeted AGN can be leveraged to provide much-improved bolometric corrections for larger samples of AGN where no infrared data exist. This program utilizes the unique capabilities of SOFIA, the only facility able to observe at these long wavelengths.

  10. Solvent reorganizational red-edge effect in intramolecular electron transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Demchenko, A P; Sytnik, A I

    1991-01-01

    Polar solvents are characterized by statistical distributions of solute-solvent interaction energies that result in inhomogeneous broadening of the solute electronic spectra. This allows photoselection of the high interaction energy part of the distribution by excitation at the red (long-wavelength) edge of the absorption bands. We observe that intramolecular electron transfer in the bianthryl molecule from the locally excited (LE) to the charge-transfer (CT) state, which requires solvent relaxation and does not occur in vitrified polar solutions, is dramatically facilitated in low-temperature propylene glycol glass by the red-edge excitation. This allows one to obtain spectroscopically the pure CT form and observe its dependence upon the relaxational properties of the solvent. A qualitative potential model of this effect is presented. PMID:11607224

  11. Simulation of Sentinel-2A Red Edge Bands with RPAS Based Multispectral Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davids, Corine; Storvold, Rune; Haarpaintner, Jorg; Arnason, Kolbeinn

    2016-08-01

    Very high spatial and spectral resolution multispectral data was collected over the Hallormstađur test site in eastern Iceland using a fixed wing remotely piloted aerial system as part of the EU FP7 project North State (www.northstatefp7.eu). The North State project uses forest variable estimates derived from optical and radar satellite data as either input or validation for carbon flux models. The RPAS data from the Hallormsstađur forest test site in Iceland is here used to simulate Landsat and Sentinel-2A data and to explore the advantages of the new Sentinel-2A red edge bands for forest vegetation mapping. Simple supervised classification shows that the inclusion of the red edge bands improves the tree species classification considerably.

  12. Spectral CT Using Multiple Balanced K-Edge Filters

    PubMed Central

    Rakvongthai, Yothin; Worstell, William; Fakhri, Georges El; Bian, Junguo; Lorsakul, Auranuch; Ouyang, Jinsong

    2015-01-01

    Our goal is to validate a spectral CT system design that uses a conventional X-ray source with multiple balanced K-edge filters. By performing a simultaneously synthetic reconstruction in multiple energy bins, we obtained a good agreement between measurements and model expectations for a reasonably complex phantom. We performed simulation and data acquisition on a phantom containing multiple rods of different materials using a NeuroLogica CT scanner. Five balanced K-edge filters including Molybdenum, Cerium, Dysprosium, Erbium, and Tungsten were used separately proximal to the X-ray tube. For each sinogram bin, measured filtered vector can be defined as a product of a transmission matrix, which is determined by the filters and is independent of the imaging object, and energy-binned intensity vector. The energy-binned sinograms were then obtained by inverting the transmission matrix followed by a multiplication of the filter measurement vector. For each energy bin defined by two consecutive K-edges, a synthesized energy-binned attenuation image was obtained using filtered back-projection reconstruction. The reconstructed attenuation coefficients for each rod obtained from the experiment was in good agreement with the corresponding simulated results. Furthermore, the reconstructed attenuation coefficients for a given energy bin, agreed with National Institute of Standards and Technology reference values when beam hardening within the energy bin is small. The proposed cost-effective system design using multiple balanced K-edge filters can be used to perform spectral CT imaging at clinically relevant flux rates using conventional detectors and integrating electronics. PMID:25252276

  13. Spectral characteristics analysis of red tide water in mesocosm experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Tingwei; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Hongliang; Ma, Yi; Gao, Xuemin

    2003-05-01

    Mesocosm ecosystem experiment with seawater enclosed of the red tide was carried out from July to September 2001. We got four species of biology whose quantities of bion are dominant in the red tide. During the whole process from the beginning to their dying out for every specie, in situ spectral measurements were carried out. After data processing, characteristic spectra of red tide of different dominant species are got. Via comparison and analysis of characteristics of different spectra, we find that in the band region between 685 and 735 nanometers, spectral characteristics of red tide is apparently different from that of normal water. Compared to spectra of normal water, spectra of red tide have a strong reflectance peak in the above band region. As to spectra of red tide dominated by different species, the situations of reflectance peaks are also different: the second peak of Mesodinium rubrum spectrum lies between 726~732 nm, which is more than 21nm away from the other dominant species spectra"s Leptocylindrus danicus"s second spectral peak covers 686~694nm; that of Skeletonema costatum lies between 691~693 nm. Chattonella marina"s second spectral peak lies about 703~705 nm. Thus we can try to determine whether red tide has occurred according to its spectral data. In order to monitor the event of red tide and identify the dominant species by the application of the technology of hyperspectral remote sensing, acquiring spectral data of different dominant species of red tide as much as possible becomes a basic work to be achieved for spectral matching, information extraction and so on based on hyperspectral data.

  14. The red edge in arid region vegetation: 340-1060 nm spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Terrill W.; Murray, Bruce C.; Chehbouni, A.; Njoku, Eni

    1993-01-01

    The remote sensing study of vegetated regions of the world has typically been focused on the use of broad-band vegetation indices such as NDVI. Various modifications of these indices have been developed in attempts to minimize the effect of soil background, e.g., SAVI, or to reduce the effect of the atmosphere, e.g., ARVI. Most of these indices depend on the so-called 'red edge,' the sharp transition between the strong absorption of chlorophyll pigment in visible wavelengths and the strong scattering in the near-infrared from the cellular structure of leaves. These broadband indices tend to become highly inaccurate as the green canopy cover becomes sparse. The advent of high spectral resolution remote sensing instrument such as the Airborne Visible and Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) has allowed the detection of narrow spectral features in vegetation and there are reports of detection of the red edge even for pixels with very low levels of green vegetation cover by Vane et al. and Elvidge et al., and to characterize algal biomass in coastal areas. Spectral mixing approaches similar to those of Smith et al. can be extended into the high spectral resolution domain allowing for the analysis of more endmembers, and potentially, discrimination between material with narrow spectral differences. Vegetation in arid regions tends to be sparse, often with small leaves such as the creosote bush. Many types of arid region vegetation spend much of the year with their leaves in a senescent state, i.e., yellow, with lowered chlorophyll pigmentation. The sparseness of the leaves of many arid region plants has the dual effect of lowering the green leaf area which can be observed and of allowing more of the sub-shrub soil to be visible which further complicates the spectrum of a region covered with arid region vegetation. Elvidge examined the spectral characteristics of dry plant materials showing significant differences in the region of the red edge and the diagnostic ligno

  15. A novel spectral fingerprint analysis to discriminate dry red wines.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yan; Tao, Yong-Sheng; Hou, Xiao-Fan; Dizy, Marta

    2014-01-01

    A novel spectral fingerprint to discriminate different dry red wines was built using data visualization method. Twelve red wines with different vintages, cultivars and ageing methods from Changli and Shacheng were sampled. Nine fractions of each wine were collected with a reversed-phase C18 column, and then they were lyophilized. The residue of each fraction was resolved with synthetic wine of the same volume with the fraction sample. The transmittance spectra of wines and their fractions were recorded from 190 to 1100 nm. And the spectral data were visualized to show their visual differences directly. Mono-phenols in wine and fractions were analyzed by HPLC-DAD at wavelengths in the range where located the obvious differences of the spectral fingerprints. The results showed that the spectral differences of wine samples lied in the range of 190 to 600 nm. There were obvious differences in visual maps among wines with different vintages, mainly around 520 nm. The visualization differences among wines with distinct geographical origins lay in the F8 maps, and the differences from the aging methods almost cover the whole wavelength range visualized. However, wines from different grape cultivars had the similar visual characteristics. HPLC-DAD identified the possible monophenol groups for the spectral differences at 280, 313, 365 and 520 nm. It was concluded that the visualization of spectral data from 190 to 600 nm could be used to build red wine spectral fingerprint to distinguish dry red wines with different vintages, origins, and ageing methods.

  16. [Effects of water stress on red-edge parameters and yield in wheat cropping].

    PubMed

    He, Ke-Xun; Zaho, Shu-He; Lai, Jian-Bin; Luo, Yun-Xiao; Qin, Zhi-Hao

    2013-08-01

    The objective of the present paper is to study the influence of water stress on wheat spectrum red edge parameters by using field wheat spectrum data obtained from water stress experiment. Firstly, the authors analyzed the influence of water stress on wheat spectrum reflectance. Then the authors got the wheat red edge position and red edge peak through calculating wheat spectrum first-order differential and analyzed the influence of water stress on wheat red edge parameters. Finally the authors discussed the relationship between red peak and wheat yield. The results showed that the wheat red edge position shows "red shift" at the beginning of the wheat growth period and "blue shift" at the later period of the wheat growth period under the water stress experiment. Also, the red edge peak of the wheat showed that red edge peak increased with the water stress sharpening at the beginning of the wheat growth period, and then the red edge peak reduced with the water stress sharpening. The wheat red edge peak presented positive correlation with the wheat yield before the elongation period, and exhibited negative correlation after that period.

  17. NIMS Spectral Maps of Jupiter Great Red Spot

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-03-26

    The Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) instrument looks at Jupiter's Great Red Spot, in these views from June 26, 1996. NIMS studies infrared wavelengths of light that our eye cannot see. These maps are at four different infrared wavelengths, each one picked to reveal something different about the atmosphere. The top image is a false color map of a wavelength that is at the red edge of our ability to see. It shows the shapes of features that we would see with our eyes. The second map is of ammonia ice, red showing where the most ice is, blue where none exists. The differences between this and the first image are due to the amount and size of ammonia ice crystals. The third map down is from a wavelength that shows cloud heights, with the highest clouds in red, and the lowest in blue. The bottom map uses a wavelength that shows the hot Jupiter shining through the clouds. Red represents the thinnest clouds, and blue is thickest where it is more difficult to see below. Comparing the bottom two images, note that the highest clouds are in the center of the Great Red Spot, while there are relatively few clouds around the edges. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00501

  18. Multitaper and multisegment spectral estimation of line-edge roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yao; Savari, Serap A.

    2017-03-01

    Line-edge roughness (LER) has important impacts on the quality of semiconductor device performance, and power spectrum estimates are useful tools in characterizing it. These estimates are often obtained by taking measurements of many lines and averaging a classical power spectrum estimate from each one. While this approach improves the variance of the estimate there are disadvantages to the collection of many measurements with current microscopy techniques. We propose techniques with widespread application in other fields which simultaneously reduce data requirements and variance of LER power spectrum estimates over current approaches at the price of computational complexity. Multitaper spectral analysis uses an orthogonal collection of data windowing functions or tapers on a set of data to obtain a set of approximately statistically independent spectrum estimates. The Welch overlapped segment averaging spectrum estimate is an earlier approach to reusing data. There are known techniques to calculate error bars for these families of spectrum estimators, and we experiment with random rough lines simulated by Mack's technique based on the Thorsos method.

  19. Estimating fresh grass/herb biomass from HYMAP data using the red edge position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Moses A.; Sobhan, Istiak M.; Skidmore, Andrew K.

    2006-08-01

    Remote sensing of grass/herb quantity is essential for rangeland management of livestock and wildlife. Spectral indices such as NDVI, determined from red and near infrared bands are affected by variable soil and atmospheric conditions and saturate in dense vegetation. Alternatively, the wavelength of maximum slope in the red-NIR transition, termed the red edge position (REP) has potential to mitigate these effects. But the utility of the REP using air- and space-borne imagery is determined by the availability of narrow bands in the region of the red edge and the simplicity of the extraction method. Very recently, we proposed a simple technique for extracting the REP called the linear extrapolation method [Cho and Skidmore, Remote Sens. Environ., 101(2006)118.]. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of the linear extrapolation method for estimating fresh grass/herb biomass and compare its performance with the four-point linear interpolation and three-point Lagrangian interpolation methods. The REPs were derived from atmospherically corrected HYMAP images collected over Majella National Park, Italy in July 2004. The predictive capabilities of various REP linear regression models were evaluated using leave-one-out cross validation and test set validation methods. For both validation methods, the linear extrapolation REP models produced higher correlations with grass/herb biomass and lower prediction errors compared with the linear interpolation and Lagrangian REP models. This study demonstrates the potential of REPs extracted by the linear extrapolation method using HYMAP data for estimating fresh grass/herb biomass.

  20. Joint spatio-spectral based edge detection for multispectral infrared imagery.

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, Sanjay; Hayat, Majeed M.; Bender, Steven C.; Sharma, Yagya D.; Jang, Woo-Yong; Paskalva, Biliana S.

    2010-06-01

    Image segmentation is one of the most important and difficult tasks in digital image processing. It represents a key stage of automated image analysis and interpretation. Segmentation algorithms for gray-scale images utilize basic properties of intensity values such as discontinuity and similarity. However, it is possible to enhance edge-detection capability by means of using spectral information provided by multispectral (MS) or hyperspectral (HS) imagery. In this paper we consider image segmentation algorithms for multispectral images with particular emphasis on detection of multi-color or multispectral edges. More specifically, we report on an algorithm for joint spatio-spectral (JSS) edge detection. By joint we mean simultaneous utilization of spatial and spectral characteristics of a given MS or HS image. The JSS-based edge-detection approach, termed Spectral Ratio Contrast (SRC) edge-detection algorithm, utilizes the novel concept of matching edge signatures. The edge signature represents a combination of spectral ratios calculated using bands that enhance the spectral contrast between the two materials. In conjunction with a spatial mask, the edge signature give rise to a multispectral operator that can be viewed as a three-dimensional extension of the mask. In the extended mask, the third (spectral) dimension of each hyper-pixel can be chosen independently. The SRC is verified using MS and HS imagery from a quantum-dot in a well infrared (IR) focal plane array, and the Airborne Hyperspectral Imager.

  1. NIMS Spectral Maps of Jupiter's Great Red Spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) instrument looks at Jupiter's Great Red Spot, in these views from June 26, 1996. NIMS studies infrared wavelengths of light that our eye cannot see. These maps are at four different infrared wavelengths, each one picked to reveal something different about the atmosphere.

    The top image is a false color map of a wavelength that is at the red edge of our ability to see. It shows the shapes of features that we would see with our eyes.

    The second map is of ammonia ice, red showing where the most ice is, blue where none exists. The differences between this and the first image are due to the amount and size of ammonia ice crystals.

    The third map down is from a wavelength that shows cloud heights, with the highest clouds in red, and the lowest in blue.

    The bottom map uses a wavelength that shows the hot Jupiter shining through the clouds. Red represents the thinnest clouds, and blue is thickest where it is more difficult to see below. Comparing the bottom two images, note that the highest clouds are in the center of the Great Red Spot, while there are relatively few clouds around the edges.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  2. Dynamic insight into protein structure utilizing red edge excitation shift.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Amitabha; Haldar, Sourav

    2014-01-21

    Proteins are considered the workhorses in the cellular machinery. They are often organized in a highly ordered conformation in the crowded cellular environment. These conformations display characteristic dynamics over a range of time scales. An emerging consensus is that protein function is critically dependent on its dynamics. The subtle interplay between structure and dynamics is a hallmark of protein organization and is essential for its function. Depending on the environmental context, proteins can adopt a range of conformations such as native, molten globule, unfolded (denatured), and misfolded states. Although protein crystallography is a well established technique, it is not always possible to characterize various protein conformations by X-ray crystallography due to transient nature of these states. Even in cases where structural characterization is possible, the information obtained lacks dynamic component, which is needed to understand protein function. In this overall scenario, approaches that reveal information on protein dynamics are much appreciated. Dynamics of confined water has interesting implications in protein folding. Interfacial hydration combines the motion of water molecules with the slow moving protein molecules. The red edge excitation shift (REES) approach becomes relevant in this context. REES is defined as the shift in the wavelength of maximum fluorescence emission toward higher wavelengths, caused by a shift in the excitation wavelength toward the red edge of absorption spectrum. REES arises due to slow rates (relative to fluorescence lifetime) of solvent relaxation (reorientation) around an excited state fluorophore in organized assemblies such as proteins. Consequently, REES depends on the environment-induced motional restriction imposed on the solvent molecules in the immediate vicinity of the fluorophore. In the case of a protein, the confined water in the protein creates a dipolar field that acts as the solvent for a fluorophore

  3. Evaluation of Sentinel-2 Red-Edge Bands for Empirical Estimation of Green LAI and Chlorophyll Content

    PubMed Central

    Delegido, Jesús; Verrelst, Jochem; Alonso, Luis; Moreno, José

    2011-01-01

    ESA’s upcoming satellite Sentinel-2 will provide Earth images of high spatial, spectral and temporal resolution and aims to ensure continuity for Landsat and SPOT observations. In comparison to the latter sensors, Sentinel-2 incorporates three new spectral bands in the red-edge region, which are centered at 705, 740 and 783 nm. This study addresses the importance of these new bands for the retrieval and monitoring of two important biophysical parameters: green leaf area index (LAI) and chlorophyll content (Ch). With data from several ESA field campaigns over agricultural sites (SPARC, AgriSAR, CEFLES2) we have evaluated the efficacy of two empirical methods that specifically make use of the new Sentinel-2 bands. First, it was shown that LAI can be derived from a generic normalized difference index (NDI) using hyperspectral data, with 674 nm with 712 nm as best performing bands. These bands are positioned closely to the Sentinel-2 B4 (665 nm) and the new red-edge B5 (705 nm) band. The method has been applied to simulated Sentinel-2 data. The resulting green LAI map was validated against field data of various crop types, thereby spanning a LAI between 0 and 6, and yielded a RMSE of 0.6. Second, the recently developed “Normalized Area Over reflectance Curve” (NAOC), an index that derives Ch from hyperspectral data, was studied on its compatibility with simulated Sentinel-2 data. This index integrates the reflectance curve between 643 and 795 nm, thereby including the new Sentinel-2 bands in the red-edge region. We found that these new bands significantly improve the accuracy of Ch estimation. Both methods emphasize the importance of red-edge bands for operational estimation of biophysical parameters from Sentinel-2. PMID:22164004

  4. Evaluation of Sentinel-2 red-edge bands for empirical estimation of green LAI and chlorophyll content.

    PubMed

    Delegido, Jesús; Verrelst, Jochem; Alonso, Luis; Moreno, José

    2011-01-01

    ESA's upcoming satellite Sentinel-2 will provide Earth images of high spatial, spectral and temporal resolution and aims to ensure continuity for Landsat and SPOT observations. In comparison to the latter sensors, Sentinel-2 incorporates three new spectral bands in the red-edge region, which are centered at 705, 740 and 783 nm. This study addresses the importance of these new bands for the retrieval and monitoring of two important biophysical parameters: green leaf area index (LAI) and chlorophyll content (Ch). With data from several ESA field campaigns over agricultural sites (SPARC, AgriSAR, CEFLES2) we have evaluated the efficacy of two empirical methods that specifically make use of the new Sentinel-2 bands. First, it was shown that LAI can be derived from a generic normalized difference index (NDI) using hyperspectral data, with 674 nm with 712 nm as best performing bands. These bands are positioned closely to the Sentinel-2 B4 (665 nm) and the new red-edge B5 (705 nm) band. The method has been applied to simulated Sentinel-2 data. The resulting green LAI map was validated against field data of various crop types, thereby spanning a LAI between 0 and 6, and yielded a RMSE of 0.6. Second, the recently developed "Normalized Area Over reflectance Curve" (NAOC), an index that derives Ch from hyperspectral data, was studied on its compatibility with simulated Sentinel-2 data. This index integrates the reflectance curve between 643 and 795 nm, thereby including the new Sentinel-2 bands in the red-edge region. We found that these new bands significantly improve the accuracy of Ch estimation. Both methods emphasize the importance of red-edge bands for operational estimation of biophysical parameters from Sentinel-2.

  5. Simultaneous spectral/spatial detection of edges for hyperspectral imagery: the HySPADE algorithm revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resmini, Ronald G.

    2012-06-01

    The hyperspectral/spatial detection of edges (HySPADE) algorithm, originally published in 2004 [1], has been modified and applied to a wider diversity of hyperspectral imagery (HSI) data. As originally described in [1], HySPADE operates by converting the naturally two-dimensional edge detection process based on traditional image analysis methods into a series of one-dimensional edge detections based on spectral angle. The HySPADE algorithm: i) utilizes spectral signature information to identify edges; ii) requires only the spectral information of the HSI scene data and does not require a spectral library nor spectral matching against a library; iii) facilitates simultaneous use of all spectral information; iv) does not require endmember or training data selection; v) generates multiple, independent data points for statistical analysis of detected edges; vi) is robust in the presence of noise; and vii) may be applied to radiance, reflectance, and emissivity data--though it is applied to radiance and reflectance spectra (and their principal components transformation) in this report. HySPADE has recently been modified to use Euclidean distance values as an alternative to spectral angle. It has also been modified to use an N x N-pixel sliding window in contrast to the 2004 version which operated only on spatial subset image chips. HySPADE results are compared to those obtained using traditional (Roberts and Sobel) edge-detection methods. Spectral angle and Euclidean distance HySPADE results are superior to those obtained using the traditional edge detection methods; the best results are obtained by applying HySPADE to the first few, information-containing bands of principal components transformed data (both radiance and reflectance). However, in practice, both the Euclidean distance and spectral angle versions of HySPADE should be applied and their results compared. HySPADE results are shown; extensions of the HySPADE concept are discussed as are applications for Hy

  6. Characterisation of red supergiants in the Gaia spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorda, Ricardo; González-Fernández, Carlos; Negueruela, Ignacio

    2016-11-01

    Context. The infrared calcium triplet and its nearby spectral region have been used for spectral and luminosity classification of late-type stars, but the samples of cool supergiants (CSGs) used have been very limited (in size, metallicity range, and spectral types covered). The spectral range of the Gaia Radial Velocity Spectrograph (RVS) covers most of this region but does not reach the main TiO bands in this region, whose depths define the M sequence. Aims: We study the behaviour of spectral features around the calcium triplet and develop effective criteria to identify and classify CSGs, comparing their efficiency with other methods previously proposed. Methods: We measure the main spectral features in a large sample (almost 600) of red supergiants (RSGs) from three different galaxies, and we analyse their behaviour through a principal component analysis. Using the principal components, we develop an automatised method to differentiate CSGs from other bright late-type stars, and to classify them. Results: The proposed method identifies a high fraction (0.98 ± 0.04) of the supergiants in our test sample, which cover a wide metallicity range (supergiants from the Magellanic Clouds and the Milky Way) and with spectral types from G0 up to late-M. In addition, it is capable to separate most of the non-supergiants in the sample, identifying as supergiants only a very small fraction of them (0.02 ± 0.04). A comparison of this method with other previously proposed shows that it is more efficient and selects less interlopers. A way to automatically assign a spectral type to the supergiants is also developed. We apply this study to spectra at the resolution and spectral range of the Gaia RVS, with a similar success rate. Conclusions: The method developed identifies and classifies CSGs in large samples, with high efficiency and low contamination, even in conditions of wide metallicity and spectral-type ranges. As this method uses the infrared calcium triplet spectral

  7. Model-based edge detector for spectral imagery using sparse spatiospectral masks.

    PubMed

    Paskaleva, Biliana S; Godoy, Sebastián E; Jang, Woo-Yong; Bender, Steven C; Krishna, Sanjay; Hayat, Majeed M

    2014-05-01

    Two model-based algorithms for edge detection in spectral imagery are developed that specifically target capturing intrinsic features such as isoluminant edges that are characterized by a jump in color but not in intensity. Given prior knowledge of the classes of reflectance or emittance spectra associated with candidate objects in a scene, a small set of spectral-band ratios, which most profoundly identify the edge between each pair of materials, are selected to define a edge signature. The bands that form the edge signature are fed into a spatial mask, producing a sparse joint spatiospectral nonlinear operator. The first algorithm achieves edge detection for every material pair by matching the response of the operator at every pixel with the edge signature for the pair of materials. The second algorithm is a classifier-enhanced extension of the first algorithm that adaptively accentuates distinctive features before applying the spatiospectral operator. Both algorithms are extensively verified using spectral imagery from the airborne hyperspectral imager and from a dots-in-a-well midinfrared imager. In both cases, the multicolor gradient (MCG) and the hyperspectral/spatial detection of edges (HySPADE) edge detectors are used as a benchmark for comparison. The results demonstrate that the proposed algorithms outperform the MCG and HySPADE edge detectors in accuracy, especially when isoluminant edges are present. By requiring only a few bands as input to the spatiospectral operator, the algorithms enable significant levels of data compression in band selection. In the presented examples, the required operations per pixel are reduced by a factor of 71 with respect to those required by the MCG edge detector.

  8. Spectral characteristics of edge magnetic turbulence in COMPASS-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, W. E.; Thyagaraja, A.; Fielding, S. J.; Valovic, M.

    2000-02-01

    Edge fluctuation data from both COMPASS-D and calculations with the large-eddy simulation code CUTIE have been analysed with a number of techniques, revealing coherent structures which exhibit high-frequency, standing-wave oscillations; some of those observed during edge localized modes (ELMs) have an `inverse-chirp' character and these are related to a disturbance of the plasma boundary in the lower-inboard quadrant of the poloidal plane. A `precursor' mode, seen in Ohmic discharges at about 220 kHz just before large ELMs, appears to be outward ballooning in character. Although the CUTIE calculations do not yet include ELM simulations, the results seem to correspond qualitatively with those seen between ELMs or during ELM-free periods on COMPASS-D.

  9. Edge or face based spectral finite elements for electromagnetic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jevtic, Jovan Obrad

    This work describes the development and presents a study of a finite element method (FEM) specifically designed for vector electromagnetic wave problems. Three aspects make this formulation different from the conventional FEM, namely, the selection of the unknowns, the choice of shape functions, and the approach to field matching between the elements. First, the unknowns are closely related to the tangential field components on the boundary of a finite element, an edge of a triangle in two dimensions (2D) or a face of a tetrahedron in three- dimensions (3D). This reflects the uniqueness theorem for electromagnetic fields. Second, the unknown total fields are expanded in terms of vector eigenfunctions of the wave equation within a semi-infinite domain bounded by the exact element geometry in 2D or an approximation thereof in 3D. This leads to a low phase error across an element and allows for electrically large elements. Finally, the sole numerical part of the method consist of the enforcement of the tangential field continuity over inter-element boundaries. This reflects the natural electromagnetic field boundary conditions which allows for the discontinuity of the normal field components. The 2D formulation presented herein can be thought of as an extension to higher orders of the conventional edge elements, which are based on the low order shape functions, while at the same time preserving their advantages, such as the absence of spurious modes and the ability to handle sharp edges as well as material interfaces. Furthermore, a full advantage of the higher order absorbing boundary conditions can be made. The 3D problem proved significantly more difficult, not only in terms of the conceptual development of the novel formulation, but also in terms of the associated computational issues, such as real-time determination of the zeros of associated Legendre functions and the ambiguity of eigenfunction ordering. The resolution of these issues, therefore, occupies a

  10. Edge detection of red hind grouper vocalizations in the littorals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Cameron A.; Beaujean, Pierre-Philippe

    2016-05-01

    Littoral regions typically present to passive sensors as a high noise acoustic environment, particularly with respect to port and harbor regions where tidal variation, often characterized as pink, mixes with reverberation from on-shore business and commercial shipping, often characterized as white. Some fish in these regions, in particular epiphenalius Guttatus or more commonly the red hind grouper, emit relatively narrowband tones in low frequencies to communicate with other fish in such regions. The impact of anthropogenic noise sources on the red Hind and other fish is a topical area of interest for wildlife fisheries, private sportsmen and military offices that is not considered here; the fact that fish species continue to populate and communicate in these regions in the presence of high noise content lends some study to the signal content and modeling of a potential biologically inspired receiver structure.

  11. Early detection of calcium deficiency in plants using red edge position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bingqing; Liew, Oi Wah; Asundi, Anand K.

    2005-11-01

    Brassica chinensis var parachinensis was grown in a recirculating water culture system until the '6-leaf stage' when the plants were separated into two groups: a 'Control' group where plant growth was continued in complete nutrient solution and a '-Ca' group in which the plants were grown in calcium-deficient nutrient solution. Leaf reflectance data was collected daily for eight days, starting from the day before the two treatments were imposed. No visual difference was found between 'Control' and '-Ca' groups during the experimental period. Total calcium content in '-Ca' plants decreased significantly from about 20,000 ppm to steady-state levels at 5,000 ppm by Day 5 while leaf chlorophyll levels in both 'Control' and '-Ca' were relatively similar. However, as the plants matured in the two nutrient solutions, the position of the red edge inflection point (REIP defined as the maximum first derivative of the reflectance spectrum in the 680 nm to 750 nm region) in 'Control' plants shifted towards longer wavelengths, while that in the '-Ca' plants remained relatively unchanged. Good correlation was found between Δ[Ca] and Δ[REIP] of 'Control' and '-Ca' plants. Our results showed that monitoring REIP shifts can provide invaluable spectral cues for pre-visual diagnosis of calcium deficiency in plants.

  12. Spectral Comparison and Stability of Red Regions on Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, A. A.; Carlson, R. W.; Sanchez-Lavega, A.

    2013-01-01

    A study of absolute color on Jupiter from Hubble Space Telescope imaging data shows that the Great Red Spot (GRS) is not the reddest region of the planet. Rather, a transient red cyclone visible in 1995 and the North Equatorial Belt both show redder spectra than the GRS (i.e., more absorption at blue and green wavelengths). This cyclone is unique among vortices in that it is intensely colored yet low altitude, unlike the GRS. Temporal analysis shows that the darkest regions of the NEB are relative constant in color from 1995 to 2008, while the slope of the GRS core may vary slightly. Principal component analysis shows several spectral components are needed, in agreement with past work, and further highlights the differences between regions. These color differences may be indicative of the same chromophore(s) under different conditions, such as mixing with white clouds, longer UV irradiation at higher altitude, and thermal processing, or may indicate abundance variations in colored compounds. A single compound does not fit the spectrum of any region well and mixes of multiple compounds including NH4SH, photolyzed NH3, hydrocarbons, and possibly P4, are likely needed to fully match each spectrum.

  13. Joint demosaicking and zooming using moderate spectral correlation and consistent edge map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Dengwen; Dong, Weiming; Chen, Wengang

    2014-07-01

    The recently published joint demosaicking and zooming algorithms for single-sensor digital cameras all overfit the popular Kodak test images, which have been found to have higher spectral correlation than typical color images. Their performance perhaps significantly degrades on other datasets, such as the McMaster test images, which have weak spectral correlation. A new joint demosaicking and zooming algorithm is proposed for the Bayer color filter array (CFA) pattern, in which the edge direction information (edge map) extracted from the raw CFA data is consistently used in demosaicking and zooming. It also moderately utilizes the spectral correlation between color planes. The experimental results confirm that the proposed algorithm produces an excellent performance on both the Kodak and McMaster datasets in terms of both subjective and objective measures. Our algorithm also has high computational efficiency. It provides a better tradeoff among adaptability, performance, and computational cost compared to the existing algorithms.

  14. Red-edge position of habitable exoplanets around M-dwarfs.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Kenji; Minagawa, Jun; Tamura, Motohide; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Narita, Norio

    2017-08-08

    One of the possible signs of life on distant habitable exoplanets is the red-edge, which is a rise in the reflectivity of planets between visible and near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths. Previous studies suggested the possibility that the red-edge position for habitable exoplanets around M-dwarfs may be shifted to a longer wavelength than that for Earth. We investigated plausible red-edge position in terms of the light environment during the course of the evolution of phototrophs. We show that phototrophs on M-dwarf habitable exoplanets may use visible light when they first evolve in the ocean and when they first colonize the land. The adaptive evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis may eventually also use NIR radiation, by one of two photochemical reaction centers, with the other center continuing to use visible light. These "two-color" reaction centers can absorb more photons, but they will encounter difficulty in adapting to drastically changing light conditions at the boundary between land and water. NIR photosynthesis can be more productive on land, though its evolution would be preceded by the Earth-type vegetation. Thus, the red-edge position caused by photosynthetic organisms on habitable M-dwarf exoplanets could initially be similar to that on Earth and later move to a longer wavelength.

  15. Dynamic representation of spectral edges in guinea pig primary auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Montejo, Noelia; Noreña, Arnaud J

    2015-04-01

    The central representation of a given acoustic motif is thought to be strongly context dependent, i.e., to rely on the spectrotemporal past and present of the acoustic mixture in which it is embedded. The present study investigated the cortical representation of spectral edges (i.e., where stimulus energy changes abruptly over frequency) and its dependence on stimulus duration and depth of the spectral contrast in guinea pig. We devised a stimulus ensemble composed of random tone pips with or without an attenuated frequency band (AFB) of variable depth. Additionally, the multitone ensemble with AFB was interleaved with periods of silence or with multitone ensembles without AFB. We have shown that the representation of the frequencies near but outside the AFB is greatly enhanced, whereas the representation of frequencies near and inside the AFB is strongly suppressed. These cortical changes depend on the depth of the AFB: although they are maximal for the largest depth of the AFB, they are also statistically significant for depths as small as 10 dB. Finally, the cortical changes are quick, occurring within a few seconds of stimulus ensemble presentation with AFB, and are very labile, disappearing within a few seconds after the presentation without AFB. Overall, this study demonstrates that the representation of spectral edges is dynamically enhanced in the auditory centers. These central changes may have important functional implications, particularly in noisy environments where they could contribute to preserving the central representation of spectral edges. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  16. On the location of spectral edges in \\ {Z}-periodic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exner, Pavel; Kuchment, Peter; Winn, Brian

    2010-11-01

    Periodic second-order ordinary differential operators on \\ {R} are known to have the edges of their spectra to occur only at the spectra of periodic and anti-periodic boundary value problems. The multi-dimensional analog of this property is false, as was shown in a 2007 paper by some of the authors of this paper. However, one sometimes encounters the claims that in the case of a single periodicity (i.e., with respect to the lattice \\ {Z}), the 1D property still holds, and spectral edges occur at the periodic and anti-periodic spectra only. In this work, we show that even in the simplest case of quantum graphs this is not true. It is shown that this is true if the graph consists of a 1D chain of finite graphs connected by single edges, while if the connections are formed by at least two edges, the spectral edges can already occur away from the periodic and anti-periodic spectra. This paper is dedicated to the memory of P Duclos.

  17. K-edge ratio method for identification of multiple nanoparticulate contrast agents by spectral CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ghadiri, H; Ay, M R; Shiran, M B; Soltanian-Zadeh, H

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Recently introduced energy-sensitive X-ray CT makes it feasible to discriminate different nanoparticulate contrast materials. The purpose of this work is to present a K-edge ratio method for differentiating multiple simultaneous contrast agents using spectral CT. Methods: The ratio of two images relevant to energy bins straddling the K-edge of the materials is calculated using an analytic CT simulator. In the resulting parametric map, the selected contrast agent regions can be identified using a thresholding algorithm. The K-edge ratio algorithm is applied to spectral images of simulated phantoms to identify and differentiate up to four simultaneous and targeted CT contrast agents. Results: We show that different combinations of simultaneous CT contrast agents can be identified by the proposed K-edge ratio method when energy-sensitive CT is used. In the K-edge parametric maps, the pixel values for biological tissues and contrast agents reach a maximum of 0.95, whereas for the selected contrast agents, the pixel values are larger than 1.10. The number of contrast agents that can be discriminated is limited owing to photon starvation. For reliable material discrimination, minimum photon counts corresponding to 140 kVp, 100 mAs and 5-mm slice thickness must be used. Conclusion: The proposed K-edge ratio method is a straightforward and fast method for identification and discrimination of multiple simultaneous CT contrast agents. Advances in knowledge: A new spectral CT-based algorithm is proposed which provides a new concept of molecular CT imaging by non-iteratively identifying multiple contrast agents when they are simultaneously targeting different organs. PMID:23934964

  18. The recognition of ocean red tide with hyper-spectral-image based on EMD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wencang; Wei, Hongli; Shi, Changjiang; Ji, Guangrong

    2008-05-01

    A new technique is introduced in this paper regarding red tide recognition with remotely sensed hyper-spectral images based on empirical mode decomposition (EMD), from an artificial red tide experiment in the East China Sea in 2002. A set of characteristic parameters that describe absorbing crest and reflecting crest of the red tide and its recognition methods are put forward based on general picture data, with which the spectral information of certain non-dominant alga species of a red tide occurrence is analyzed for establishing the foundation to estimate the species. Comparative experiments have proved that the method is effective. Meanwhile, the transitional area between red-tide zone and non-red-tide zone can be detected with the information of thickness of algae influence, with which a red tide can be forecast.

  19. Simulation of spectral stabilization of high-power broad-area edge emitting semiconductor lasers.

    PubMed

    Holly, Carlo; Hengesbach, Stefan; Traub, Martin; Hoffmann, Dieter

    2013-07-01

    The simulation of spectral stabilization of broad-area edge-emitting semiconductor diode lasers is presented in this paper. In the reported model light-, temperature- and charge carrier-distributions are solved iteratively in frequency domain for transverse slices along the semiconductor heterostructure using wide-angle finite-difference beam propagation. Depending on the operating current the laser characteristics are evaluated numerically, including near- and far-field patterns of the astigmatic laser beam, optical output power and the emission spectra, with central wavelength and spectral width. The focus of the model lies on the prediction of influences on the spectrum and power characteristics by frequency selective feedback from external optical resonators. Results for the free running and the spectrally stabilized diode are presented.

  20. Evaluating the influence of the Red Edge band from RapidEye sensor in quantifying leaf area index for hydrological applications specifically focussing on plant canopy interception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dube, Timothy; Mutanga, Onisimo; Sibanda, Mbulisi; Shoko, Cletah; Chemura, Abel

    2017-08-01

    Reliable and accurate quantification of plant Leaf Area Index (LAI) is critical in understanding its role in reducing runoff. The main aim of the present study was to evaluate the ability of the Red Edge (RE) band derived from RapidEye in estimating LAI for applications in quantifying canopy interception at landscape scale. To achieve this objective, the study also compares the predictive power of two machine learning algorithms (Random Forest-RF and Stochastic Gradient Boosting-SGB) in estimating LAI. Comparatively, the results of the study have demonstrated that the inclusion of spectral information derived from the Red Edge band yields high accurate LAI estimates, when compared to the use of traditional traditional Red, Green, Blue and Near Infra-Red (traditional RGBNIR) spectral information. The results indicate that the use of the four traditional RGBNIR bands yielded comparatively lower R2 values and high Root Mean Squares, Mean Absolute Error (Pinus taeda: R2 of 0.60; the lowest RMSE (0.35 m2/m2) and MAE of 28); whereas the use of integration of traditional RGBNIR + RE in more accurate LAI estimates (Pinus taeda: R2 = 0.65; RMSE = 0.30 m2/m2) and the lowest MAE of 0.23). These findings therefore underscores the importance of new generation multispectral sensors with strategically-position bands and machine learning algorithms in estimating LAI for quantifying canopy interception, especially in resource-poor areas.

  1. Behaviour of spectral entropy, spectral edge frequency 90%, and alpha and beta power parameters during low-dose propofol infusion.

    PubMed

    Mahon, P; Greene, B R; Greene, C; Boylan, G B; Shorten, G D

    2008-08-01

    In this study we analyse the behaviour, potential clinical application and optimal cortical sampling location of the spectral parameters: (i) relative alpha and beta power; (ii) spectral edge frequency 90%; and (iii) spectral entropy as monitors of moderate propofol-induced sedation. Multi-channel EEG recorded from 12 ASA 1 (American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status 1) patients during low-dose, target effect-site controlled propofol infusion was used for this analysis. The initial target effect-site concentration was 0.5 microg ml(-1) and increased at 4 min intervals in increments of 0.5 to 2 microg ml(-1). EEG parameters were calculated for 2 s epochs in the frequency ranges 0.5-32 and 0.5-47 Hz. All parameters were calculated in the channels: P4-O2, P3-O1, F4-C4, F3-C3, F3-F4, and Fp1-Fp2. Sedation was assessed clinically using the OAA/S (observer's assessment of alertness/sedation) scale. Relative beta power and spectral entropy increased with increasing propofol effect-site concentration in both the 0.5-47 Hz [F(18, 90) = 3.455, P<0.05 and F(18, 90) = 3.33, P<0.05, respectively] and 0.5-32 Hz frequency range. This effect was significant in each individual channel (P<0.05). No effect was seen of increasing effect-site concentration on relative power in the alpha band. Averaged across all channels, spectral entropy did not outperform relative beta power in either the 0.5-32 Hz [Pk=0.79 vs 0.814 (P>0.05)] or 0.5-47 Hz range [Pk=0.81 vs 0.82 (P>0.05)]. The best performing indicator in any single channel was spectral entropy in the frequency range 0.5-47 Hz in the frontal channel F3-F4 (Pk=0.85). Relative beta power and spectral entropy when considered over the propofol effect-site range studied here increase in value, and correlate well with clinical assessment of sedation.

  2. Detectability of Red-Edge Shifted Vegetation on M-star Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinetti, G.; Rashby, S.; Yung, Y.

    2005-12-01

    We have explored the detectability of exo-vegetation on the surface of a terrestrial planet orbiting a M-star. The exo-vegetation is responsible for producing a red-edge like signature that is red-shifted with respect to the Earth vegetation red-edge. The red-shift was estimated using a model of leaf optical properties spectra (Jacquemoud, 1990) combined with a three photon photosynthetic scheme calculated by Wolstencroft and Raven (2002) for possible exo-vegetation growing on a M-star planet. To study the detectability of this surface biosignature on a M-star terrestrial planet, we have used the 3-D model developed by Tinetti et al. (2005) for the case of the Earth. This model can generate disk-averaged spectra and broad-band integrated fluxes, useful to future terrestrial planet exploration missions, such as NASA Terrestrial Planet Finder-Coronograph. Input to this model, were the atmospheric profiles and cloud distributions predicted by Joshi (2003) for a synchronous planet orbiting a M-star and the distinctive surface reflectance of the exo-vegetation. Finally, we discuss here the sensitivity of Earth tuned indicator of vegetation, such as Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), to these new exotic scenarios.

  3. A novel edge-preserving nonnegative matrix factorization method for spectral unmixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Wenxing; Ma, Ruishi

    2015-12-01

    Spectral unmixing technique is one of the key techniques to identify and classify the material in the hyperspectral image processing. A novel robust spectral unmixing method based on nonnegative matrix factorization(NMF) is presented in this paper. This paper used an edge-preserving function as hypersurface cost function to minimize the nonnegative matrix factorization. To minimize the hypersurface cost function, we constructed the updating functions for signature matrix of end-members and abundance fraction respectively. The two functions are updated alternatively. For evaluation purpose, synthetic data and real data have been used in this paper. Synthetic data is used based on end-members from USGS digital spectral library. AVIRIS Cuprite dataset have been used as real data. The spectral angle distance (SAD) and abundance angle distance(AAD) have been used in this research for assessment the performance of proposed method. The experimental results show that this method can obtain more ideal results and good accuracy for spectral unmixing than present methods.

  4. Active-Optical Sensors Using Red NDVI Compared to Red Edge NDVI for Prediction of Corn Grain Yield in North Dakota, U.S.A.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Lakesh K; Bu, Honggang; Denton, Anne; Franzen, David W

    2015-11-02

    Active-optical sensor readings from an N non-limiting area standard established within a farm field are used to predict yield in the standard. Lower yield predictions from sensor readings obtained from other parts of the field outside of the N non-limiting standard area indicate a need for supplemental N. Active-optical sensor algorithms for predicting corn (Zea mays, L.) yield to direct in-season nitrogen (N) fertilization in corn utilize red NDVI (normalized differential vegetative index). Use of red edge NDVI might improve corn yield prediction at later growth stages when corn leaves cover the inter-row space resulting in "saturation" of red NDVI readings. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the use of red edge NDVI in two active-optical sensors (GreenSeeker™ and Holland Scientific Crop Circle™) improved corn yield prediction. Nitrogen rate experiments were established at 15 sites in North Dakota (ND). Sensor readings were conducted at V6 and V12 corn. Red NDVI and red edge NDVI were similar in the relationship of readings with yield at V6. At V12, the red edge NDVI was superior to the red NDVI in most comparisons, indicating that it would be most useful in developing late-season N application algorithms.

  5. Active-Optical Sensors Using Red NDVI Compared to Red Edge NDVI for Prediction of Corn Grain Yield in North Dakota, U.S.A.

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Lakesh K.; Bu, Honggang; Denton, Anne; Franzen, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Active-optical sensor readings from an N non-limiting area standard established within a farm field are used to predict yield in the standard. Lower yield predictions from sensor readings obtained from other parts of the field outside of the N non-limiting standard area indicate a need for supplemental N. Active-optical sensor algorithms for predicting corn (Zea mays, L.) yield to direct in-season nitrogen (N) fertilization in corn utilize red NDVI (normalized differential vegetative index). Use of red edge NDVI might improve corn yield prediction at later growth stages when corn leaves cover the inter-row space resulting in “saturation” of red NDVI readings. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the use of red edge NDVI in two active-optical sensors (GreenSeeker™ and Holland Scientific Crop Circle™) improved corn yield prediction. Nitrogen rate experiments were established at 15 sites in North Dakota (ND). Sensor readings were conducted at V6 and V12 corn. Red NDVI and red edge NDVI were similar in the relationship of readings with yield at V6. At V12, the red edge NDVI was superior to the red NDVI in most comparisons, indicating that it would be most useful in developing late-season N application algorithms. PMID:26540057

  6. Coupling an ICRF core spectral solver to an edge FEM code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, J. C.; Shiraiwa, S.

    2015-12-01

    The finite element method (FEM) and the spectral approaches to simulation of ion cyclotron (IC) waves in toroidal plasmas each have strengths and weaknesses. For example, the spectral approach (eg TORIC) has a natural algebraic representation of the parallel wavenumber and hence the wave dispersion but does not easily represent complex geometries outside the last closed flux surface, whereas the FEM approach (eg LHEAF) naturally represents arbitrary geometries but does not easily represent thermal corrections to the plasma dispersion. The two domains: thermal core with flux surfaces and cold edge plasma with open field lines may be combined in such as way that each approach is used where it works naturally. Among the possible ways of doing this, we demonstrate the method of mode matching. This method provides an easy way of combining the two linear systems without significant modifications to the separate codes. We will present proof of principal cases and initial applications to minority heating.

  7. Coupling an ICRF core spectral solver to an edge FEM code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, John; Shirwaiwa, Syunichi; RF SciDAC Team

    2015-11-01

    The finite element method (FEM) and the spectral approaches to simulation of ion cyclotron (IC) waves in toroidal plasmas each have strengths and weaknesses. For example, the spectral approach (eg TORIC) has a natural algebraic representation of the parallel wavenumber and hence the wave dispersion but does not easily represent complex geometries outside the last closed flux surface, whereas the FEM approach (eg LHEAF) naturally represents arbitrary geometries but does not easily represent thermal corrections to the plasma dispersion. The two domains: thermal core with flux surfaces and cold edge plasma with open field lines may be combined in such as way that each approach is used where it works naturally. Among the possible ways of doing this, we demonstrate the method of mode matching. This method provides an easy way of combining the two linear systems without significant modifications to the separate codes. We will present proof of principal cases and initial applications to minority heating.

  8. Determination of optimal wavelet denoising parameters for red edge feature extraction from hyperspectral data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafri, Helmi Z. M.; Yusof, Mohd R. M.

    2009-05-01

    A study of wavelet denoising on hyperspectral reflectance data, specifically the red edge position (REP) and its first derivative is presented in this paper. A synthetic data set was created using a sigmoid to simulate the red edge feature for this study. The sigmoid is injected with Gaussian white noise to simulate noisy reflectance data from handheld spectroradiometers. The use of synthetic data enables better quantification and statistical study of the effects of wavelet denoising on the features of hyperspectral data, specifically the REP. The simulation study will help to identify the most suitable wavelet parameters for denoising and represents the applicability of the wavelet-based denoising procedure in hyperspectral sensing for vegetation. The suitability of the thresholding rules and mother wavelets used in wavelet denoising is evaluated by comparing the denoised sigmoid function with the clean sigmoid, in terms of the shift in the inflection point meant to represent the REP, and also the overall change in the denoised signal compared with the clean one. The VisuShrink soft threshold was used with rescaling based on the noise estimate, in conjunction with wavelets of the Daubechies, Symlet and Coiflet families. It was found that for the VisuShrink threshold with single level noise estimate rescaling, the Daubechies 9 and Symlet 8 wavelets produced the least distortion in the location of sigmoid inflection point and the overall curve. The selected mother wavelets were used to denoise oil palm reflectance data to enable determination of the red edge position by locating the peak of the first derivative.

  9. A comparison of habitat use and demography of red squirrels at the southern edge of their range

    Treesearch

    Katherine M. Leonard; John L. Koprowski

    2009-01-01

    Populations at the edge of their geographic range may demonstrate different population dynamics from central populations. Endangered Mt. Graham red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus grahamensis), endemic to southeastern Arizona, represent the southernmost red squirrel population and are found at lower densities than conspecifics in the center of the...

  10. Spectrally narrowed edge emission from leaky waveguide modes in organic light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Zhengqing; Tian, Yun; Lynch, David W.; Kang, Ji-hun; Park, Q-Han; and Shinar, Joseph

    2009-11-03

    A dramatic spectral line narrowing of the edge emission at room temperature from tris(quinolinolate) Al (Alq{sub 3}), N,N{prime}-diphenyl-N,N{prime}-bis(1-naphthylphenyl)-1,1{prime}-biphenyl-4,4{prime}-diamine (NPD), 4,4{prime}-bis(2,2{prime}-diphenyl-vinyl)-,1{prime}-biphenyl (DPVBi), and some guest-host small molecular organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), fabricated on indium tin oxide (ITO)-coated glass, is described. In all but the DPVBi OLEDs, the narrowed emission band emerges above a threshold thickness of the emitting layer, and narrows down to a full width at half maximum of only 5-10 nm. The results demonstrate that this narrowed emission is due to irregular waveguide modes that leak from the ITO to the glass substrate at a grazing angle. While measurements of variable stripe length l devices exhibit an apparent weak optical gain 0 {le} g {le} 1.86 cm{sup -1}, there is no observable threshold current or bias associated with this spectral narrowing. In addition, in the phosphorescent guest-host OLEDs, there is no decrease in the emission decay time of the narrowed edge emission relative to the broad surface emission. It is suspected that the apparent weak optical gain is due to misalignment of the axis of the waveguided mode and the axis of the collection lens of the probe.

  11. Red and near-infrared spectral reflectance of snow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, H. W.; Munis, R. H.

    1975-01-01

    The spectral reflectance of snow in the range of 0.60 to 2.50 microns wavelengths was studied in a cold laboratory using natural snow and simulated preparations of snow. A white barium sulfate powder was used as the standard for comparison. The high reflectance (usually nearly 100%) of fresh natural snow in visible wavelengths declines rapidly at wavelengths longer than the visible, as the spectral absorption coefficients of ice increase. Aging snow becomes only somewhat less reflective than fresh snow in the visible region and usually retains a reflectance greater than 80%. In the near infrared, aging snow tends to become considerably less reflective than fresh snow.

  12. Solvent effect on the spectral properties of Neutral Red

    PubMed Central

    Rauf, Muhammad A; Soliman, Ahmed A; Khattab, Muhammad

    2008-01-01

    Background The study was aimed at investigating the effect of various solvents on the absorption spectra of Neutral Red, a dye belonging to the quinone-imine class of dyes. The solvents chosen for the study were water, ethanol, acetonitrile, acetone, propan-1-ol, chloroform, nitrobenzene, ethyleneglycol, acetic acid, DMSO and DMF. Results The results have shown that the absorption maxima of dyes are dependent on solvent polarity. In non-hydrogen-bond donating solvents, solvation of dye molecules probably occurs via dipole-dipole interactions, whereas in hydrogen-bond donating solvents the phenomenon is more hydrogen bonding in nature. To estimate the contribution of the different variables on the wave number of the Neutral Red dye, regression analyses using the ECW model were compared with the π* scale model. This showed that the unified scale for estimating the solvent effect on the absorption of the Neutral Red dye is more adopted and more applicable than the π* scale model. Conclusion Absorption maxima of dyes are dependent on solvent polarity. Solvation of dye molecules probably occurs via dipole-dipole interactions in non-hydrogen-bond donating solvents, whereas in hydrogen-bond donating solvents the phenomenon is more hydrogen bonding in nature. The unified scale for estimating the solvent effect on the absorption of Neutral Red dye is more adopted and more applicable than the π* scale model. This may be due to complications from both π-π* charge transfer interactions and incomplete complexation of the solute; these effects are averaged out in the derived β and π parameters and thus limit their applicability. PMID:18799016

  13. Spectrally narrowed leaky waveguide edge emission and transient electrluminescent dynamics of OLEDs

    SciTech Connect

    Zhengqing, Gan

    2010-01-01

    In summary, there are two major research works presented in this dissertation. The first research project (Chapter 4) is spectrally narrowed edge emission from Organic Light Emitting Diodes. The second project (Chapter 5) is about transient electroluminescent dynamics in OLEDs. Chapter 1 is a general introduction of OLEDs. Chapter 2 is a general introduction of organic semiconductor lasers. Chapter 3 is a description of the thermal evaporation method for OLED fabrication. The detail of the first project was presented in Chapter 4. Extremely narrowed spectrum was observed from the edge of OLED devices. A threshold thickness exists, above which the spectrum is narrow, and below which the spectrum is broad. The FWHM of spectrum depends on the material of the organic thin films, the thickness of the organic layers, and length of the OLED device. A superlinear relationship between the output intensity of the edge emission and the length of the device was observed, which is probably due to the misalignment of the device edge and the optical fiber detector. The original motivation of this research is for organic semiconductor laser that hasn't been realized due to the extremely high photon absorption in OLED devices. Although we didn't succeed in fabricating an electrically pumped organic laser diode, we made a comprehensive research in edge emission of OLEDs which provides valuable results in understanding light distribution and propagation in OLED devices. Chapter 5 focuses on the second project. A strong spike was observed at the falling edge of a pulse, and a long tail followed. The spike was due to the recombination of correlated charge pair (CCP) created by trapped carriers in guest molecules of the recombination zone. When the bias was turned off, along with the decreasing of electric field in the device, the electric field induced quenching decreases and the recombination rate of the CCP increases which result in the spike. This research project provides a

  14. Measuring spectral effects of calcium fertilization in the red spruce foliage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, W. R.; Rock, B. N.; Hallett, R. A.

    2007-12-01

    Acidic precipitation has altered biogeochemical cycles in the forests of the Northeastern U.S., and has lead to an interest in the decline symptomology of tree species affected as a result of these changes. For instance, in red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) stands, leaching losses of calcium (Ca) may hamper root uptake capacities, wood structural properties, and tolerance of low temperature. The Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) is currently the site of a long-term Ca investigation, where an entire watershed was fertilized with wollastonite (CaSiO3) at the rate of 0.12 kg ha-1 in 1999. Preliminary data confirm that Ca-treated spruce foliage is higher in total foliar Ca as compared to foliage from trees in a reference watershed. Total foliar Ca concentration, as well as that of a bound Ca-oxalate pool, increase with needle age class. In order to test the utility of hyperspectral instruments for differentiating conifer stands of varying Ca availability, we used a Visible/Infrared Intelligent Spectrometer to measure reflectance spectra of fresh red spruce needles from trees at both Ca-amended and reference sites. Needles from Ca-amended sites were characterized by higher percent reflectance of incident radiation. Differences in spectral indices of needle health were apparent mostly in mixed-needle-year boughs (MNY), as opposed to current-year (CY), or third-year (3Y) needle classes. The Ca-amended spectra of MNY boughs had an average green peak of 7.32 ± 0.29 percent, while reference samples had a green peak of 6.37 ± 0.20 percent. The Red-edge Inflection Point (REIP) of MNY boughs was lower in Ca-amended than in reference treatments, occurring at 725.7 ± 0.7 nm and 727.3 ± 0.6 nm, respectively. The ratio of simulated Landsat band measurements (TM 5/4) of Ca-treated MNY needles was 0.440 ± 0.007, while that of reference was 0.421 ± 0.008.

  15. Organization and dynamics of membrane probes and proteins utilizing the red edge excitation shift.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Sourav; Chaudhuri, Arunima; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2011-05-19

    Dynamics of confined water has interesting implications in the organization and function of molecular assemblies such as membranes. A direct consequence of this type of organization is the restriction imposed on the mobility of the constituent structural units. Interestingly, this restriction (confinement) of mobility couples the motion of solvent (water) molecules with the slow moving molecules in the assembly. It is in this context that the red edge excitation shift (REES) represents a sensitive approach to monitor the environment and dynamics around a fluorophore in such organized assemblies. A shift in the wavelength of maximum fluorescence emission toward higher wavelengths, caused by a shift in the excitation wavelength toward the red edge of the absorption band, is termed REES. REES relies on slow solvent reorientation in the excited state of a fluorophore that can be used to monitor the environment and dynamics around a fluorophore in a host assembly. In this article, we focus on the application of REES to monitor organization and dynamics of membrane probes and proteins. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  16. Bulk-edge correspondence, spectral flow and Atiyah-Patodi-Singer theorem for the Z2-invariant in topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yue; Wu, Yong-Shi; Xie, Xincheng

    2017-03-01

    We study the bulk-edge correspondence in topological insulators by taking Fu-Kane spin pumping model as an example. We show that the Kane-Mele invariant in this model is Z2 invariant modulo the spectral flow of a single-parameter family of 1 + 1-dimensional Dirac operators with a global boundary condition induced by the Kramers degeneracy of the system. This spectral flow is defined as an integer which counts the difference between the number of eigenvalues of the Dirac operator family that flow from negative to non-negative and the number of eigenvalues that flow from non-negative to negative. Since the bulk states of the insulator are completely gapped and the ground state is assumed being no more degenerate except the Kramers, they do not contribute to the spectral flow and only edge states contribute to. The parity of the number of the Kramers pairs of gapless edge states is exactly the same as that of the spectral flow. This reveals the origin of the edge-bulk correspondence, i.e., why the edge states can be used to characterize the topological insulators. Furthermore, the spectral flow is related to the reduced η-invariant and thus counts both the discrete ground state degeneracy and the continuous gapless excitations, which distinguishes the topological insulator from the conventional band insulator even if the edge states open a gap due to a strong interaction between edge modes. We emphasize that these results are also valid even for a weak disordered and/or weak interacting system. The higher spectral flow to categorize the higher-dimensional topological insulators is expected.

  17. Hybrid orbital deformation (HOD) effect and spectral red-shift property of nonplanar porphyrin.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zaichun; Cao, Chenzhong; Liu, Qiuhua; Jiang, Rongqing

    2010-04-16

    A series of 5,15-meso,meso-strapped nonplanar porphyrins with different degrees of ruffling distortion, as a model system, have been synthesized and characterized. The spectral red-shift of the nonplanar porphyrins was experimentally demonstrated to mainly originate from the hybrid orbital deformation (HOD) effect due to the distortion in the tetrapyrrole macrocycle, which confirmed previous explanations to the red-shift phenomenon.

  18. High-Resolution Spectral Analysis of KI Lines in Unusually Red & Blue L Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Munazza Khalida; Camnasio, Sara; Rice, Emily L.; Cruz, Kelle L.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Mace, Gregory N.; Martin, Emily; Logsdon, Sarah E.; McLean, Ian S.; Brown Dwarfs in New York City (BDNYC)

    2015-01-01

    L dwarfs have a range of near-infrared colors at a given optically-defined spectral subtype. L dwarfs of the same spectral subtype are thought to have similar surface temperatures, and the presence of extreme near-IR colors in some L dwarfs suggests that parameters other than temperature influence their spectra. For some of these objects, diagnostic spectral features indicate the cause of extreme near-IR color. Blue L dwarfs that have low metallicity spectral features, called subdwarfs, are known to have old ages. Red L dwarfs that have low surface gravity spectral features are known to be young. The spectra of some blue and red L dwarfs do not show evidence for low metallicity or low gravity. This project investigates the cause of extreme color in these photometric outliers by comparing spectral line measurements for a sample of red, blue, and standard L dwarfs to elucidate their underlying atmospheric and physical properties. We use KI lines to make these comparisons because they are pressure-broadened and therefore sensitive to temperature, gravity, and metallicity. We use high-resolution NIRSPEC J band spectra to measure equivalent widths, line depths, and full width at half maximum (FWHM) of KI lines at 1.1773 um, 1.1776 um, 1.2436 um, and 1.2525 um. Consistent with trends in the literature, our preliminary results suggest that unusually blue L dwarfs are field age or older.

  19. Photon counting spectral CT: improved material decomposition with K-edge-filtered x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.

    2012-03-01

    Photon counting spectral computed tomography (PCSCT) provides material selective CT imaging at a single CT scan and fixed tube voltage. The PCSCT data are acquired in several energy ranges (bins) arranged over the x-ray spectrum. The quasi-monoenergetic CT images are acquired in these energy bins and are used for material decomposition. The PCSCT exhibits inherent limitations when material decomposition is performed using energy bins. For effective material decomposition, the energy bins used for material decomposition should be sufficiently narrow and well separated. However, when narrow bins are used, a large fraction of the detected x-ray counts is lost and statistical noise is increased. Alternatively, the x-ray spectrum can be split into a few larger bins with no gap in between and all detected x-ray photons can be used for material decomposition. However, in this case the energy bins are too wide and not well separated, which results in suboptimal material decomposition. The above contradictory requirements can be resolved if the x-ray photons are physically removed from the regions of the energy spectrum between the energy bins. Such a selective removal can be performed using filtration of the x-ray beam by high-Z filter materials with appropriate positions of K-edge energies. The K-edge filtration of x-rays can, therefore, provide necessary gaps between the energy bins with no dose penalty to the patient. In the current work, we proposed using selective K-edge filtration of x-rays in PCSCT and performed the first experimental investigation of this approach. The PCSCT system included a cadmium zinc telluride semiconductor detector with 2 × 256 pixels and 1 × 1 mm2 pixel size, and five energy bins. The CT phantom had 14 cm diameter and included contrast elements of iodine, gold and calcifications with clinically relevant concentrations. The tube voltages of 60, 90 and 120 kVp were used. K-edge filters based on Ba (Ek = 37.44 keV) were used for a 60 kVp tube

  20. Photon counting spectral CT: improved material decomposition with K-edge-filtered x-rays.

    PubMed

    Shikhaliev, Polad M

    2012-03-21

    Photon counting spectral computed tomography (PCSCT) provides material selective CT imaging at a single CT scan and fixed tube voltage. The PCSCT data are acquired in several energy ranges (bins) arranged over the x-ray spectrum. The quasi-monoenergetic CT images are acquired in these energy bins and are used for material decomposition. The PCSCT exhibits inherent limitations when material decomposition is performed using energy bins. For effective material decomposition, the energy bins used for material decomposition should be sufficiently narrow and well separated. However, when narrow bins are used, a large fraction of the detected x-ray counts is lost and statistical noise is increased. Alternatively, the x-ray spectrum can be split into a few larger bins with no gap in between and all detected x-ray photons can be used for material decomposition. However, in this case the energy bins are too wide and not well separated, which results in suboptimal material decomposition. The above contradictory requirements can be resolved if the x-ray photons are physically removed from the regions of the energy spectrum between the energy bins. Such a selective removal can be performed using filtration of the x-ray beam by high-Z filter materials with appropriate positions of K-edge energies. The K-edge filtration of x-rays can, therefore, provide necessary gaps between the energy bins with no dose penalty to the patient. In the current work, we proposed using selective K-edge filtration of x-rays in PCSCT and performed the first experimental investigation of this approach. The PCSCT system included a cadmium zinc telluride semiconductor detector with 2 × 256 pixels and 1 × 1 mm(2) pixel size, and five energy bins. The CT phantom had 14 cm diameter and included contrast elements of iodine, gold and calcifications with clinically relevant concentrations. The tube voltages of 60, 90 and 120 kVp were used. K-edge filters based on Ba (E(k) = 37.44 keV) were used for a 60 k

  1. Living on the edge: Space use of Eurasian red squirrels in marginal high-elevation habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, Claudia; Wauters, Lucas A.; Preatoni, Damiano; Tosi, Guido; Martinoli, Adriano

    2010-11-01

    In marginal habitats located at the edge of a species' range, environmental conditions are frequently extreme and individuals may be subject to different selective pressures compared to central populations. These so-called edge or marginal populations tend to have lower densities and reproductive rates than populations located in more suitable habitats, but little is known about local adaptations in spacing behavior. We studied space use and social organization in a population of Eurasian red squirrels ( Sciurus vulgaris) in a high-elevation marginal habitat of dwarf mountain pine ( Pinus mugo) and compared it with spacing patterns in high-quality Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris) forest at lower-elevation. Home ranges and core areas were larger in the marginal habitat. In both habitats, males used larger home ranges than females, but sex differences in core area size were significant only in the edge population. Patterns of core area overlap were similar in both habitats with intra-sexual territoriality among adult females and higher degrees of inter-sexual overlap, typical for the species throughout its range. However, low densities in the edge population resulted in higher female by males overlap in spring-summer, suggesting males increased home ranges and core areas during mating season to augment access to estrus females. Thus, in the marginal habitat, with low food abundance and low population densities, linked with extreme winter conditions, squirrels, especially males, used large home ranges. Finally, squirrels responded more strongly to variation in food availability (inverse relation between home range size and seed abundance), and even to fluctuations in density (inverse relation between core area size and density of animals of the same sex), in the marginal than in the high-quality habitat, suggesting high behavioral plasticity to respond to the ecological constraints in marginal habitats.

  2. Edge connectivity and the spectral gap of combinatorial and quantum graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkolaiko, Gregory; Kennedy, James B.; Kurasov, Pavel; Mugnolo, Delio

    2017-09-01

    We derive a number of upper and lower bounds for the first nontrivial eigenvalue of Laplacians on combinatorial and quantum graph in terms of the edge connectivity, i.e. the minimal number of edges which need to be removed to make the graph disconnected. On combinatorial graphs, one of the bounds corresponds to a well-known inequality of Fiedler, of which we give a new variational proof. On quantum graphs, the corresponding bound generalizes a recent result of Band and Lévy. All proofs are general enough to yield corresponding estimates for the p-Laplacian and allow us to identify the minimizers. Based on the Betti number of the graph, we also derive upper and lower bounds on all eigenvalues which are ‘asymptotically correct’, i.e. agree with the Weyl asymptotics for the eigenvalues of the quantum graph. In particular, the lower bounds improve the bounds of Friedlander on any given graph for all but finitely many eigenvalues, while the upper bounds improve recent results of Ariturk. Our estimates are also used to derive bounds on the eigenvalues of the normalized Laplacian matrix that improve known bounds of spectral graph theory.

  3. Simultaneous retrieval of soil, leaf, canopy, and atmospheric parameters from hyperspectral information in the red edge through model inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhoef, Wout

    1999-12-01

    In a modeling case study it has been investigated whether it would be possible to retrieve from optical remote sensing data the (bio)physical parameters of the coupled soil-vegetation- atmosphere system that have an effect on spectral radiances detected by spaceborne sensors. For this, optical data on single leaves generated by means of the PROSPECT model have been applied in the integrated optical soil-canopy-atmosphere radiation model OSCAR. The influences of 2 soil parameters, 2 leaf parameters, 4 canopy parameters and 3 atmospheric parameters on hyperspectral directional planetary reflectances have been simulated in a model inversion experiment. The simultaneous retrieval of the 11 parameters has been tested using classical model inversion by means of the Gauss-Newton method of non-linear least squares parameter estimation. Preliminary results indicate that this approach has some potential, as in a number of widely differing cases the retrieval of all model parameters from 10 nm resolution hyperspectral red edge planetary reflectance data under 5 directions was successful.

  4. High Broadband Spectral Resolving Transition-Edge Sensors for High Count-Rate Astrophysical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    We are developing arrays of transition-edge sensor (TES) X-ray detectors optimized for high count-rate solar astronomy applications where characterizing the high velocity motions of X-ray jets in solar flares is of particular interest. These devices are fabricated on thick Si substrates and consist of 35x35micron^2 TESs with 4.5micron thick, 60micron pitch, electroplated absorbers. We have tested devices fabricated with different geometric stem contact areas with the TES and surrounding substrate area, which allows us to investigate the loss of athermal phonons to the substrate. Results show a correlation between the stem contact area and a non-Gaussian broadening in the spectral line shape consistent with athermal phonon loss. When the contact area is minimized we have obtained remarkable board-band spectral resolving capabilities of 1.3 plus or minus 0.leV at an energy of 1.5 keV, 1.6 plus or minus 0.1 eV at 5.9 keV and 2.0 plus or minus 0.1 eV at 8 keV. This, coupled with a capability of accommodating 100's of counts per second per pixel makes these devices an exciting prospect of future x-ray astronomy applications.

  5. Small Pitch Transition-Edge Sensors with Broadband High Spectral Resolution for Solar Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. J.; Adams, J. S.; Eckart, M. E.; Smith, Adams; Bailey, C. N.; Bandler, S. R.; Chevenak, J. A.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We are developing small pitch transition-edge sensor (TES) X-ray detectors optimized for solar astronomy. These devices are fabricated on thick Si substrates with embedded Cu heat-sink layer. We use 35 x 35 square micrometers Mo/Au TESs with 4.5 micrometer thick Au absorbers. We have tested devices with different geometric absorber stem contact areas with the TES and surrounding substrate area. This allows us to investigate the loss of athermal phonons to the substrate. Results show a correlation between thc stem contact area and a broadening in the spectral line shape indicative of athermal phonon loss. When the contact area is minimized we have obtained exceptional broadband spectral resolution of 1.28 plus or minus 0.03 eV at an energy of 1.5 keV, 1.58 plus or minus 0.07 eV at 5.9 keV and 1.96 plus or minus 0.08 eV at 8 keV. The linearity in the measured gain scale is understood in the context of the longitudinal proximity effect from the electrical bias leads resulting in transition characteristics that are strongly dependent upon TES size.

  6. Small Pitch Transition-Edge Sensors with Broadband High Spectral Resolution for Solar Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. J.; Adams, J. S.; Eckart, M. E.; Smith, Adams; Bailey, C. N.; Bandler, S. R.; Chevenak, J. A.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J. E.

    2012-01-01

    We are developing small pitch transition-edge sensor (TES) X-ray detectors optimized for solar astronomy. These devices are fabricated on thick Si substrates with embedded Cu heat-sink layer. We use 35 x 35 square micrometers Mo/Au TESs with 4.5 micrometer thick Au absorbers. We have tested devices with different geometric absorber stem contact areas with the TES and surrounding substrate area. This allows us to investigate the loss of athermal phonons to the substrate. Results show a correlation between thc stem contact area and a broadening in the spectral line shape indicative of athermal phonon loss. When the contact area is minimized we have obtained exceptional broadband spectral resolution of 1.28 plus or minus 0.03 eV at an energy of 1.5 keV, 1.58 plus or minus 0.07 eV at 5.9 keV and 1.96 plus or minus 0.08 eV at 8 keV. The linearity in the measured gain scale is understood in the context of the longitudinal proximity effect from the electrical bias leads resulting in transition characteristics that are strongly dependent upon TES size.

  7. Room-temperature ionic liquids: slow dynamics, viscosity, and the red edge effect.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhonghan; Margulis, Claudio J

    2007-11-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) have recently attracted significant attention from academic and industrial sources. This is because, while their vapor pressures are negligible, many of them are liquids at room temperature and can dissolve a wide range of polar and nonpolar organic and inorganic molecules. In this Account, we discuss the progress of our laboratory in understanding the dynamics, spectroscopy, and fluid dynamics of selected imidazolium-based ILs using computational and analytical tools that we have recently developed. Our results indicate that the red edge effect, the non-Newtonian behavior, and the existence of locally heterogeneous environments on a time scale relevant to chemical and photochemical reactivity are closely linked to the viscosity and highly structured character of these liquids.

  8. Correlation analysis of simulated MODIS vegetation indices and the red edge and rice agricultural parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Qian; Wu, Xiuju

    2007-10-01

    In this study, Hyperspectral data of two variety of rice (common rice and hybrid rice) in whole growing stage during 2002 and 2003 was measured using the ASD FieldSpec UV/VNIR Spectroradiometer with resolution of 3 nm, and the LAI and leaf chlorophyll content of rice agricultural parameter were obtained. Analyses of the correlation between rice agricultural parameter, and hyperspectal data, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), enhanced vegetation index (EVI) and the red-edge position (REP) were studied. Results showed that a strong non-linear correlation was found between the rice LAI of two varieties and REP. The REP, EVI and NDVI were well related with LAI for the common rice, but the REP and EVI were more sensitive than the NDVI to rice LAI for the hybrid rice because of different body for two variety rice.

  9. Detectability of Red-Edge-shifted Vegetation on Terrestrial Planets Orbiting M Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Rashby, Sky; Yung, Yuk L.

    2006-06-01

    We have explored the detectability of exovegetation on the surface of a terrestrial planet orbiting an M star. The exovegetation is responsible for producing a pigment-derived surface signature that is redshifted with respect to the Earth vegetation's red edge. The redshift was estimated using a model of leaf optical property spectra (Jacquemoud & Baret) combined with a 3 photon photosynthetic scheme calculated by Wolstencroft & Raven for a possible exovegetation growing on an M star planet. To study the detectability of this surface biosignature on an M star terrestrial planet, we have used the three-dimensional model developed by Tinetti et al. for the case of the Earth. This model can generate disk-averaged spectra and broadband integrated fluxes, which will be useful for future terrestrial planet exploration missions, such as the NASA Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph. Input to this model were the atmospheric profiles and cloud distributions predicted by Joshi and coworkers for a synchronous planet orbiting an M dwarf and the distinctive surface reflectance of the exovegetation. While on Earth this pigment-derived surface feature would be almost completely masked by water absorption, even in a cloud-free atmosphere, we found that the strength of the edge feature on our simulated M star terrestrial planet can exceed that on Earth, given the right conditions. Obviously, the detectability of such biosignatures would be highly dependent on the extent of vegetation surface area, cloud cover, and viewing angle.

  10. Investigation of the mica x-ray absorption near-edge structure spectral features at the Al K-edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ziyu; Marcelli, A.; Cibin, G.; Mottana, A.; Della Ventura, G.

    2003-10-01

    Near-edge features of Al x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra in aluminosilicate compounds with mixed coordination number are usually assigned to a fourfold coordinated site contribution followed by a sixfold coordinated site contribution that is displaced towards higher energy because of the increasing ligand nucleus potentials, neglecting possible contributions due to bond distance variations and local geometrical distortion. Here we present and discuss the Al K-edge XANES spectra of synthetic micas with either fourfold coordinated Al (phlogopite), or with sixfold coordinated Al (polylithionite), as well as with mixed coordination (preiswerkite). Multiple scattering simulations of XANES spectra demonstrate that octahedral contributions may overlap the tetrahedral ones so that the lower energy structures in mixed coordination compounds may be associated with the octahedral sites. This unexpected behaviour can be described as due to the effect of a significant reduction of the ligand field strength (i.e. large local distortion and Al-O bond distances).

  11. High-Resolution Spectral Line Analysis of Unusually Red and Blue L Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Emily L.; Alam, Munazza Khalida; Camnasio, Sara; Cruz, Kelle L.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Mace, Gregory; Martin, Emily; Logsdon, Sarah E.; McLean, Ian S.; BDNYC

    2016-01-01

    L dwarfs, the warmest spectral class of brown dwarfs, have a wide range of near-infrared colors at a given spectral type. The presence of extreme colors for some L dwarfs suggests that secondary parameters like gravity, metallicity, and clouds influence their spectral morphology. Although some red L dwarfs have low-gravity signatures in their optical spectra (indicating a young object) and some blue L dwarfs have low metallicity spectral features (indicating a subdwarf), many color outliers do not exhibit clear-cut spectral diagnostics. We investigate the spread in color for these objects by comparing spectral line measurements for outliers with confirmed young objects, known subdwarfs, and near-infrared spectral standards to elucidate their underlying atmospheric and physical properties. We use high-resolution NIRSPEC J-band spectra to measure the equivalent width, line depth, and full width at half maximum of four KI absorption lines that are susceptible to pressure-broadening and therefore sensitive to differences in temperature, gravity, and metallicity. We examine trends in these measured line properties with spectral type, color deviation, and known physical properties (subdwarfs and young objects) in an attempt to disentangle the underlying causes of these color trends.

  12. Spectral Characterization of Suspected Acid Deposition Damage in Red Spruce (picea Rubens) Stands from Vermont

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogelmann, J. E.; Rock, B. N.

    1985-01-01

    In an attempt to demonstrate the utility of remote sensing systems to monitor sites of suspected acid rain deposition damage, intensive field activities, coupled with aircraft overflights, were centered on red spruce stands in Vermont during August and September of 1984. Remote sensing data were acquired using the Airborne Imaging Spectrometer, Thematic Mapper Simulator, Barnes Model 12 to 1000 Modular Multiband Radiometer and Spectron Engineering Spectrometer (the former two flown on the NASA C-130; the latter two on A Bell UH-1B Iroquois Helicopter). Field spectral data were acquired during the week of the August overflights using a high spectral resolution spectrometer and two broad-band radiometers. Preliminary analyses of these data indicate a number of spectral differences in vegetation between high and low damage sites. Some of these differences are subtle, and are observable only with high spectral resolution sensors; others are less subtle and are observable using broad-band sensors.

  13. Application of vegetation isoline equations for simultaneous retrieval of leaf area index and leaf chlorophyll content using reflectance of red edge band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuda, Kakuya; Taniguchi, Kenta; Miura, Munenori; Obata, Kenta; Yoshioka, Hiroki

    2016-09-01

    The remotely sensed reflectance spectra of vegetated surfaces contain information relating to the leaf area index (LAI) and the chlorophyll-a and -b concentrations (Cab) in a leaf. Difficulties associated with the retrieval of these two biophysical parameters from a single reflectance spectrum arise mainly from the choice of a suitable set of observation wavelengths and the development of a retrieval algorithm. Efforts have been applied toward the development of new algorithms, such as the numerical inversion of radiative transfer models, in addition to the development of simple approaches based on the spectral vegetation indices. This study explored a different approach: An equation describing band-to-band relationships (vegetation isoline equation) was used to retrieve the LAI and Cab simultaneously from a reflectance spectrum. The algorithm used three bands, including the red edge region, and an optimization cost function was constructed from two vegetation isoline equations in the red-NIR and red edge-NIR reflectance subspaces. A series of numerical experiments was conducted using the PROSPECT model to explore the numerical challenges associated with the use of the vegetation isoline equation during the parameter retrieval of the LAI and Cab. Overall, our results indicated the existence of a global minimum (and no local minima) over a wide swath of the LAI-Cab parameter subspace in most simulation cases. These results suggested that the use of the vegetation isoline equation in the simultaneous retrieval of the LAI and the Cab provides a viable alternative to the spectral vegetation index algorithms and the direct inversion of the canopy radiative transfer models.

  14. Suppression of edge localized mode crashes by multi-spectral non-axisymmetric fields in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jayhyun; Park, Gunyoung; Bae, Cheonho; Yoon, Siwoo; Han, Hyunsun; Yoo, Min-Gu; Park, Young-Seok; Ko, Won-Ha; Juhn, June-Woo; Na, Yong Su; The KSTAR Team

    2017-02-01

    Among various edge localized mode (ELM) crash control methods, only non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations (NAMPs) yield complete suppression of ELM crashes beyond their mitigation, and thus attract more attention than others. No other devices except KSTAR, DIII-D, and recently EAST have successfully achieved complete suppression with NAMPs. The underlying physics mechanisms of these successful ELM crash suppressions in a non-axisymmetric field environment, however, still remain uncertain. In this work, we investigate the ELM crash suppression characteristics of the KSTAR ELMy H-mode discharges in a controlled multi-spectral field environment, created by both n=2 middle reference and n=1 top/bottom proxy in-vessel control coils. Interestingly, the attempts have produced a set of contradictory findings, one expected (ELM crash suppression enhancement with the addition of n  =  1 to the n  =  2 field at relatively low heating discharges) and another unexpected (ELM crash suppression degradation at relatively high heating discharges) from the earlier findings in DIII-D. This contradiction indicates the dependence of the ELM crash suppression characteristics on the heating level and the associated kink-like plasma responses. Preliminary linear resistive MHD plasma response simulation shows the unexpected suppression performance degradation to be likely caused by the dominance of kink-like plasma responses over the island gap-filling effects.

  15. Spectral fluorescent properties of tissues in vivo with excitation in the red wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratonnikov, Alexander A.; Loschenov, Victor B.; Klimov, D. V.; Edinac, N. E.; Wolnukhin, V. A.; Strashkevich, I. A.

    1997-12-01

    The spectral fluorescence analysis is a promising method for differential tissue diagnostic. Usually the UV and visible light is used for fluorescence excitation with emission registration in the visible wavelength range. The light penetration length in this wavelength range is very small allowing one to analyze only the surface region of the tissue. Here we present the tissue fluorescent spectra in vivo excited in the red wavelength region. As excitation light source we used compact He-Ne laser (632.8 nm) and observed the fluorescence in 650 - 800 nm spectral range. The various tissues including normal skin, psoriasis, tumors, necrosis as well as photosensitized tissues have been measured.

  16. Field and airborne spectral characterization of suspected damage in red spruce (picea rubens) from Vermont

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, B. N.; Vogelmann, J. E.; Williams, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    The utilization of remote sensing to monitor forest damage due to acid deposition is investigated. Spectral and water measurements and aircraft radiance data of red spruce and balsam fir, collected in Camels Hump Mountain and Ripton, Vermont between August 13-20, 1984, are analyzed to evaluate the damage levels of the trees. Variations in reflectance features and canopy moisture content are studied. It is observed that damage correlates with elevation (greater damage at higher elevations); xylem water column tension is greater at higher damage sites; and a 'blue shift' is indicated in the spectral data at high damage sites.

  17. Field and airborne spectral characterization of suspected damage in red spruce (picea rubens) from Vermont

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, B. N.; Vogelmann, J. E.; Williams, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    The utilization of remote sensing to monitor forest damage due to acid deposition is investigated. Spectral and water measurements and aircraft radiance data of red spruce and balsam fir, collected in Camels Hump Mountain and Ripton, Vermont between August 13-20, 1984, are analyzed to evaluate the damage levels of the trees. Variations in reflectance features and canopy moisture content are studied. It is observed that damage correlates with elevation (greater damage at higher elevations); xylem water column tension is greater at higher damage sites; and a 'blue shift' is indicated in the spectral data at high damage sites.

  18. Ultrasound spectral analysis of photoacoustic signals from red blood cell populations at different optical wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadhel, Muhannad N.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2017-03-01

    Spectral analysis of photoacoustic (PA) signals in the ultrasound frequency domain is a method that analyzes the power spectrum of PA signals to quantify tissue microstructures. PA spectral analysis has been correlated to changes in the size, morphology and concentration of absorbers that are smaller than the system spatial resolution. However, the calculated spectral parameters are still not system independent due to difficulty in eliminating variations in the light distribution for different optical wavelengths. Changes in spectral parameters for the same absorber geometry but different optical illumination wavelengths needs to be carefully examined. A gelatin vessel phantom is used. The vessels contain red blood cells comprised of oxy, deoxy and methemoglobin induced using oxygen, sodium hydrosulfite and sodium nitrite, respectively. The samples were imaged using the VevoLAZR system at wavelengths 680 - 905 nm in steps of 15 nm. The radiofrequency (RF) signals were analyzed to calculate the spectral slope. The results were compared to simulated RF signals acquired using the mcxyz Monte Carlo package coupled to the solution of the PA wave equation using the Green's function approach. Changes in the spectral slope as a function of optical wavelength were detected. For longer optical wavelengths, the spectral slope increased for deoxyhemoglobin, but decreased for oxyhemoglobin and methemoglobin. The changes in the spectral slope were correlated to changes in the fluence distribution as optical properties change for different wavelengths. The change in the spectral slope as a function of optical wavelength and chromophore content can potentially be used in spectral unmixing for better estimation of hemoglobin content.

  19. Ranging, activity budget, and diet composition of red titi monkeys (Callicebus cupreus) in primary forest and forest edge.

    PubMed

    Kulp, Jenna; Heymann, Eckhard W

    2015-07-01

    Deforestation and fragmentation of tropical rainforests are increasingly creating forest edges and corresponding edge effects. Furthermore, primary forest is increasingly being replaced by secondary forest. The presence of high population densities of titi monkeys in fragmented and secondary forests suggests that they are capable of adapting to such habitat alterations. The aim of our study was to examine the ability of the red titi monkey (Callicebus cupreus) to adapt to forest edges and secondary forest. We compared home-range use, activity budgets, and diet composition in two groups of monkeys: one in primary forest and the other in primary forest with a long edge bordering secondary forest. The latter group avoided the secondary forest and used the edge in proportion to its availability. Groups did not differ in activity budgets but did show slight differences in diet composition. Taken together, our results suggest that there are no major effects of forest edges and secondary forest on red titi monkeys; however, given the relatively short study period, generalizations should be avoided until more comparative data become available. Furthermore, the age or successional stage of the secondary forest must be taken into consideration when drawing conclusions about its suitability as a primate habitat.

  20. [Comparison of red edge parameters of winter wheat canopy under late frost stress].

    PubMed

    Wu, Yong-feng; Hu, Xin; Lü, Guo-hua; Ren, De-chao; Jiang, Wei-guo; Song, Ji-qing

    2014-08-01

    In the present study, late frost experiments were implemented under a range of subfreezing temperatures (-1 - -9 degrees C) by using a field movable climate chamber (FMCC) and a cold climate chamber, respectively. Based on the spectra of winter wheat canopy measured at noon on the first day after the frost experiments, red edge parameters REP, Dr, SDr, Dr(min), Dr/Dr(min) and Dr/SDr were extracted using maximum first derivative spectrum method (FD), linear four-point interpolation method (FPI), polynomial fitting method (POLY), inverted Gaussian fitting method (IG) and linear extrapolation technique (LE), respectively. The capacity of the red edge parameters to detect late frost stress was explicated from the aspects of the early, sensitivity and stability through correlation analysis, linear regression modeling and fluctuation analysis. The result indicates that except for REP calculated from FPI and IG method in Experiment 1, REP from the other methods was correlated with frost temperatures (P < 0.05). Thereinto, significant levels (P) of POLY and LE methods all reached 0.01. Except for POLY method in Experiment 2, Dr/SDr from the other methods were all significantly correlated with frost temperatures (P < 0.01). REP showed a trend to shift to short-wave band with decreasing temperatures. The lower the temperature, the more obvious the trend is. Of all the REP, REP calculated by LE method had the highest correlation with frost temperatures which indicated that LE method is the best for REP extraction. In Experiment 1 and 2, only Dr(min) and Dr/Dr(min), calculated by FD method simultaneously achieved the requirements for the early (their correlations with frost temperatures showed a significant level P < 0.01), sensitivity (abso- lute value of the slope of fluctuation coefficient is greater than 2.0) and stability (their correlations with frost temperatures al- ways keep a consistent direction). Dr/SDr calculated from FD and IG methods always had a low sensitivity

  1. Towards realistic modelling of spectral line formation - lessons learnt from red giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Karin

    2015-08-01

    Many decades of quantitative spectroscopic studies of red giants have revealed much about the formation histories and interlinks between the main components of the Galaxy and its satellites. Telescopes and instrumentation are now able to deliver high-resolution data of superb quality for large stellar samples and Galactic archaeology has entered a new era. At the same time, we have learnt how simplifying physical assumptions in the modelling of spectroscopic data can bias the interpretations, in particular one-dimensional homogeneity and local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). I will present lessons learnt so far from non-LTE spectral line formation in 3D radiation-hydrodynamic atmospheres of red giants, the smaller siblings of red supergiants.

  2. SPECTRAL TYPES OF RED SUPERGIANTS IN NGC 6822 AND THE WOLF-LUNDMARK-MELOTTE GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Levesque, Emily M.; Massey, Philip

    2012-07-15

    We present moderate-resolution spectroscopic observations of red supergiants (RSGs) in the low-metallicity Local Group galaxies NGC 6822 (Z = 0.4 Z{sub Sun} ) and Wolf-Lundmark-Melotte (WLM; Z = 0.1 Z{sub Sun} ). By combining these observations with reduction techniques for multislit data reduction and flux calibration, we are able to analyze spectroscopic data of 16 RSGs in NGC 6822 and spectrophotometric data of 11 RSGs in WLM. Using these observations, we determine spectral types for these massive stars, comparing them to Milky Way and Magellanic Cloud RSGs and thus extending observational evidence of the abundance-dependent shift of RSG spectral types to lower metallicities. In addition, we have uncovered two RSGs with unusually late spectral types (J000158.14-152332.2 in WLM, with a spectral type of M3 I, and J194453.46-144552.6 in NGC 6822, with a spectral type of M4.5 I) and a third RSG (J194449.96-144333.5 in NGC 6822) whose spectral type has varied from an M2.5 in 1997 to a K5 in 2008. All three of these stars could potentially be members of a recently discovered class of extreme RSG variables.

  3. Red-edge vegetation indices for detecting and assessing disturbances in Norway spruce dominated mountain forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, Joanna; Osberger, Antonia

    2015-05-01

    Here we propose an approach to enhance the detection and assessment of forest disturbances in mountain areas based on red-edge reflectance. The research addresses the need for improved monitoring of areas included in the European Natura 2000 network. Thirty-eight vegetation indices (VI) are assessed for sensitivity to topographic variations. A separability analysis is performed for the resulting set of ten VI whereby two VI (PSSRc2, SR 800/550) are found most suitable for threshold-based OBIA classification. With a correlation analysis (SRCC) between VI and the training samples we identify Datt4 as suitable to represent the magnitude of forest disturbance. The provided information layers illustrate two combined phenomena that were derived by (1) an OBIA delineation and (2) continuous representation of the magnitude of forest disturbance. The satisfactory accuracy assessment results confirm that the approach is useful for operational tasks in the long-term monitoring of Norway spruce dominated forests in mountainous areas, with regard to forest disturbance.

  4. WREP: A wavelet-based technique for extracting the red edge position from reflectance spectra for estimating leaf and canopy chlorophyll contents of cereal crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dong; Cheng, Tao; Zhou, Kai; Zheng, Hengbiao; Yao, Xia; Tian, Yongchao; Zhu, Yan; Cao, Weixing

    2017-07-01

    of cereal crops. The new REP extraction technique provides us a new insight for understanding the spectral changes in the red edge region in response to chlorophyll variation from leaf to canopy levels.

  5. A cautionary (spectral) tail: red-shifted fluorescence by DAPI-DAPI interactions.

    PubMed

    Omelon, Sidney; Georgiou, John; Habraken, Wouter

    2016-02-01

    The fluorescent dye DAPI is useful for its association with and consequent amplification of an ∼460 nm emission maximum upon binding to dsDNA. Labelling with higher DAPI concentrations is a technique used to reveal Pi polymers [polyphosphate (polyP)], with a red-shift to ∼520-550 nm fluorescence emission. DAPI-polyP emissions of ∼580 nm are also generated upon 415 nm excitation. Red-shifted DAPI emission has been associated with polyP and RNA and has more recently been reported with polyadenylic acid (polyA), specific inositol phosphates (IPs) and heparin. We find that amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) also demonstrates red-shifted DAPI emission at high DAPI concentrations. This DAPI spectral shift has been attributed to DAPI-DAPI electrostatic interactions enabled by molecules with high negative charge density that increase the local DAPI concentration and favour DAPI molecular proximity, as observed by increasing the dye/phosphate ratio. Excitation of dry DAPI (∼360 nm) confirmed a red-shifted DAPI emission. Whereas enzymatic approaches to modify substrates can help define the nature of DAPI fluorescence signals, multiple approaches beyond red-shifted DAPI excitation/emission are advised before conclusions are drawn about DAPI substrate identification.

  6. Land cover classification in Ukrainian Carpathians using the MERIS Terrestrial Chlorophyl Index and red edge position from ENVISAT MERIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyalko, V. I.; Shportyuk, Z. M.; Sakhatskyi, O. L.; Sybirtseva, O. M.

    We present some results of a preliminary study of the possibility to use MERIS data for land cover classification in the Ukrainian Carpathians. The ENVISAT MERIS data (16 April 2004) with a rough space resolution of 1200m are used to calculate the red edge indices: the Red Edge Position (REP), MERIS Terrestrial Chlorophyll Index (MTCI) and NDVI. The classification using REP and MTCI images gives better results than with reflectance by the method of minimum distance to means (MMDM). The calculation results showed that the MERIS image with a rough space resolution provided moderate classification results: only coniferous forests and snow are well classified. MTCI is sensitive to a broad range of the chlorophyll contents and much less sensitive to topographical effect in mountain region. The investigation results show a good correlation between REP and MTCI and a high potential for monitoring for the ecosystems in mountain regions using a combination of both indices.

  7. Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging of Nile red for measurements of intracellular polarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitt, James A.; Chung, Pei-Hua; Suhling, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Spectrally resolved confocal microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging have been used to measure the polarity of lipid-rich regions in living HeLa cells stained with Nile red. The emission peak from the solvatochromic dye in lipid droplets is at a shorter wavelength than other, more polar, stained internal membranes, and this is indicative of a low polarity environment. We estimate that the dielectric constant, ɛ, is around 5 in lipid droplets and 25<ɛ<40 in other lipid-rich regions. Our spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) data show that intracellular Nile red exhibits complex, multiexponential fluorescence decays due to emission from a short lifetime locally excited state and a longer lifetime intramolecular charge transfer state. We measure an increase in the average fluorescence lifetime of the dye with increasing emission wavelength, as shown using phasor plots of the FLIM data. We also show using these phasor plots that the shortest lifetime decay components arise from lipid droplets. Thus, fluorescence lifetime is a viable contrast parameter for distinguishing lipid droplets from other stained lipid-rich regions. Finally, we discuss the FLIM of Nile red as a method for simultaneously mapping both polarity and relative viscosity based on fluorescence lifetime measurements.

  8. Molar absorptivity (ε) and spectral characteristics of cyanidin-based anthocyanins from red cabbage.

    PubMed

    Ahmadiani, Neda; Robbins, Rebecca J; Collins, Thomas M; Giusti, M Monica

    2016-04-15

    Red cabbage extract contains mono and di-acylated cyanidin (Cy) anthocyanins and is often used as food colorants. Our objectives were to determine the molar absorptivity (ε) of different red cabbage Cy-derivatives and to evaluate their spectral behaviors in acidified methanol (MeOH) and buffers pH 1-9. Major red cabbage anthocyanins were isolated using a semi-preparatory HPLC, dried and weighed. Pigments were dissolved in MeOH and diluted with either MeOH (0.1% HCl) or buffers to obtain final concentrations between 5×10(-5) and 1×10(-3) mol/L. Spectra were recorded and ε calculated using Lambert-Beer's law. The ε in acidified MeOH and buffer pH 1 ranged between ~16,000-30,000 and ~13,000-26,000 L/mol cm, respectively. Most pigments showed higher ε in pH 8 than pH 2, and lowest ε between pH 4 and 6. There were bathochromic shifts (81-105 nm) from pH 1 to 8 and hypsochromic shifts from pH 8 to 9 (2-19 nm). Anthocyanins molecular structures and the media were important variables which greatly influenced their ε and spectral behaviors.

  9. Brown carbon absorption in the red and near-infrared spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffer, András; Tóth, Ádám; Pósfai, Mihály; Eddy Chung, Chul; Gelencsér, András

    2017-06-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosols have often been assumed to be the only light-absorbing carbonaceous particles in the red and near-infrared spectral regions of solar radiation in the atmosphere. Here we report that tar balls (a specific type of organic aerosol particles from biomass burning) do absorb red and near-infrared radiation significantly. Tar balls were produced in a laboratory experiment, and their chemical and optical properties were measured. The absorption of these particles in the range between 470 and 950 nm was measured with an aethalometer, which is widely used to measure atmospheric aerosol absorption. We find that the absorption coefficient of tar balls at 880 nm is more than 10 % of that at 470 nm. The considerable absorption of red and infrared light by tar balls also follows from their relatively low absorption Ångström coefficient (and significant mass absorption coefficient) in the spectral range between 470 and 950 nm. Our results support the previous finding that tar balls may play an important role in global warming. Due to the non-negligible absorption of tar balls in the near-infrared region, the absorption measured in the field at near-infrared wavelengths cannot solely be due to soot particles.

  10. Influence of spectral resolution, spectral range and signal-to-noise ratio of Fourier transform infra-red spectra on identification of high explosive substances.

    PubMed

    Banas, Krzysztof; Banas, Agnieszka M; Heussler, Sascha P; Breese, Mark B H

    2018-01-05

    In the contemporary spectroscopy there is a trend to record spectra with the highest possible spectral resolution. This is clearly justified if the spectral features in the spectrum are very narrow (for example infra-red spectra of gas samples). However there is a plethora of samples (in the liquid and especially in the solid form) where there is a natural spectral peak broadening due to collisions and proximity predominately. Additionally there is a number of portable devices (spectrometers) with inherently restricted spectral resolution, spectral range or both, which are extremely useful in some field applications (archaeology, agriculture, food industry, cultural heritage, forensic science). In this paper the investigation of the influence of spectral resolution, spectral range and signal-to-noise ratio on the identification of high explosive substances by applying multivariate statistical methods on the Fourier transform infra-red spectral data sets is studied. All mathematical procedures on spectral data for dimension reduction, clustering and validation were implemented within R open source environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Dipolar relaxation within the protein matrix of the green fluorescent protein: a red edge excitation shift study.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Sourav; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2007-12-27

    The fluorophore in green fluorescent protein (GFP) is localized in a highly constrained environment, protected from the bulk solvent by the barrel-shaped protein matrix. We have used the wavelength-selective fluorescence approach (red edge excitation shift, REES) to monitor solvent (environment) dynamics around the fluorophore in enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under various conditions. Our results show that EGFP displays REES in buffer and glycerol, i.e., the fluorescence emission maxima exhibit a progressive shift toward the red edge, as the excitation wavelength is shifted toward the red edge of the absorption spectrum. Interestingly, EGFP displays REES when incorporated in reverse micelles of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT), independent of the hydration state. We interpret the observed REES to the constrained environment experienced by the EGFP fluorophore in the rigid protein matrix, rather than to the dynamics of the bulk solvent. These results are supported by the temperature dependence of REES and characteristic wavelength-dependent changes in fluorescence anisotropy.

  12. Long term Raman spectral study of power-dependent photodamage in red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Marcos A. S.; Smith, Zachary J.; Knorr, Florian; de Araujo, Renato E.; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2014-03-01

    We monitored time-dependent changes in the Raman spectra of optically trapped red blood cells. By fitting the Raman peaks of individual spectra over time, high-precision time evolutions of peak positions and intensities were obtained. These changes are dependent on the trapping laser power. Characteristic times for these changes were determined for each laser power by fitting the time courses with multi-exponential curves. Raman spectral dynamics showed significant and irreversible changes as a function of trapping duration that we attribute to a combination of photodamage of hemoglobin at short times followed by diffusion of hemoglobin out of the cell at longer times.

  13. Hand-held radiometer red and photographic infrared spectral measurements of agricultural crops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, C. J.; Fan, C. J.; Elgin, J. H., Jr.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III

    1978-01-01

    Red and photographic infrared radiance data, collected under a variety of conditions at weekly intervals throughout the growing season using a hand-held radiometer, were used to monitor crop growth and development. The vegetation index transformation was used to effectively compensate for the different irradiational conditions encountered during the study period. These data, plotted against time, compared the different crops measured by comparing their green leaf biomass dynamics. This approach, based entirely upon spectral inputs, closely monitors crop growth and development and indicates the promise of ground-based hand-held radiometer measurements of crops.

  14. Self-similar spectral structures and edge-locking hierarchy in open-boundary spin chains

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, Masudul

    2010-07-15

    For an anisotropic Heisenberg (XXZ) spin chain, we show that an open boundary induces a series of approximately self-similar features at different energy scales, high up in the eigenvalue spectrum. We present a nonequilibrium phenomenon related to this fractal structure, involving states in which a connected block near the edge is polarized oppositely to the rest of the chain. We show that such oppositely polarized blocks can be 'locked' to the edge of the spin chain and that there is a hierarchy of edge-locking effects at various orders of the anisotropy. The phenomenon enables dramatic control of quantum-state transmission and magnetization control.

  15. Spectral estimation of plasma fluctuations. II. Nonstationary analysis of edge localized mode spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Riedel, K.S.; Sidorenko, A. ); Bretz, N. ); Thomson, D.J. )

    1994-03-01

    Several analysis methods for nonstationary fluctuations are described and applied to the edge localized mode (ELM) instabilities of limiter H-mode plasmas. The microwave scattering diagnostic observes poloidal [ital k][sub [theta

  16. Infra-Red Characteristics of Faint Galactic Carbon Stars from the First Byurakan Spectral Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostandyan, G. R.; Gigoyan, K. S.

    2017-07-01

    Infra-Red (IR) astronomical databases, namely, IRAS, 2MASS, WISE, and Spitzer, are used to analyze photometric data of 126 carbon (C) stars whose spectra are visible in the First Byurakan Survey (FBS) (Markarian et al. 1989) low-resolution (lr) spectral plates. In this work several IR color-color diagrams are studied. Early and late-type C stars are separated in the JHK Near-Infra-Red (NIR) color-color plots, as well as in the WISE W3-W4 versus W1-W2 diagram. Late N-type Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars are redder in W1-W2, while early-types (CH and R giants) are redder in W3-W4 as expected. Objects with W2-W3 > 1.0m show double-peaked spectral energy distribution (SED), indicating the existence of the circumstellar envelopes around them. 26 N-type stars have IRAS Point Source Catalog (PSC) associations. The reddest object among the targets is N-type C star FBS 2213+421, which belong to the group of the cold post-AGB R Coronae Borealis (R CrB) variables (Rossi et al. 2016).

  17. [Spectral inversion models for prediction of red soil total nitrogen content in subtropical region (Fuzhou)].

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Zhu; Li, Xiao-Mei; Sha, Jin-Ming

    2013-11-01

    The present paper studied the hyperspectral response characteristics of red soil, with 135 soil samples in Fuzhou city. After monitoring the hypersectral reflection of soil samples with ASD (analytical spectral device) and total nitrogen contents with Vario MAX (for nitrogen and carbon analysis), the paper gained the spectral reflection data between 350-2 500 nm (resolution is 1 nm) and soil total nitrogen contents. Then the paper treated the hyperspectral reflection data with 5 mathematic conversions such as first derivative and second derivative conversions of original reflection, reciprocal logarithmic conversion and its first derivative and second derivative conversion in advance. The next step was to calculate the correlation coefficient of soil nitrogen and the above spectral information, and select the sensitive spectral bands according to the highest correlation coefficient. Finally, by designing different proportions of modeling and validation sample data sets, the paper established the quantitative linear models between soil total nitrogen contents and hyperspectral reflection and its 5 converted information, the final optimal mathematic model between soil nitrogen and hyperspectral information was significantly determined. Results showed that 634-688, 872, 873, 1 414 and 1 415 nm were the main sensitive bands for soil total nitrogen, and Y = 5.384X(664) -1.039 (Y represents soil nitrogen content, X664 is the soil spectral absorbance value at 664 nm) was the optimal soil total nitrogen predicting model (in the model, the determination coefficients R2 and the RMSE of total nitrogen were 0.616 and 0.422 mg X g(-1), the inspection coefficient R2 and the RMSE were 0.608 and 0.546 mg x g(-1) respectively). The model can be used to rapidly monitor soil total nitrogen with hyperspectral reflection in Fuzhou area.

  18. Spectral distribution of infrared synchrotron radiation by an insertion device and its edges: A comparison between experimental and simulated spectra

    PubMed

    Roy; Guidi Cestelli M; Nucara; Marcouille; Calvani; Giura; Paolone; Mathis; Gerschel

    2000-01-17

    The first measurements of the spectral distribution of infrared radiation emitted by an undulator are reported. They are compared with calculations including both velocity and acceleration terms. Measurements have been performed at the beam line SIRLOIN (Spectroscopie en InfraRouge Lointain). The agreement between the observations and this first exact numerical solution shows that the inclusion of the velocity term in the submillimeter frequency range is necessary. Moreover, structures due to undulator edges are observed in the far infrared and mid-infrared range, while the interference pattern due to redshifted harmonics of the undulator is dominating in the mid-infrared to near infrared.

  19. Space station image captures a red tide ciliate bloom at high spectral and spatial resolution

    PubMed Central

    Dierssen, Heidi; McManus, George B.; Chlus, Adam; Qiu, Dajun; Gao, Bo-Cai; Lin, Senjie

    2015-01-01

    Mesodinium rubrum is a globally distributed nontoxic ciliate that is known to produce intense red-colored blooms using enslaved chloroplasts from its algal prey. Although frequent enough to have been observed by Darwin, blooms of M. rubrum are notoriously difficult to quantify because M. rubrum can aggregate into massive clouds of rusty-red water in a very short time due to its high growth rates and rapid swimming behavior and can disaggregate just as quickly by vertical or horizontal dispersion. A September 2012 hyperspectral image from the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean sensor aboard the International Space Station captured a dense red tide of M. rubrum (106 cells per liter) in surface waters of western Long Island Sound. Genetic data confirmed the identity of the chloroplast as a cryptophyte that was actively photosynthesizing. Microscopy indicated extremely high abundance of its yellow fluorescing signature pigment phycoerythrin. Spectral absorption and fluorescence features were related to ancillary photosynthetic pigments unique to this organism that cannot be observed with traditional satellites. Cell abundance was estimated at a resolution of 100 m using an algorithm based on the distinctive yellow fluorescence of phycoerythrin. Future development of hyperspectral satellites will allow for better enumeration of bloom-forming coastal plankton, the associated physical mechanisms, and contributions to marine productivity. PMID:26627232

  20. Space station image captures a red tide ciliate bloom at high spectral and spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Dierssen, Heidi; McManus, George B; Chlus, Adam; Qiu, Dajun; Gao, Bo-Cai; Lin, Senjie

    2015-12-01

    Mesodinium rubrum is a globally distributed nontoxic ciliate that is known to produce intense red-colored blooms using enslaved chloroplasts from its algal prey. Although frequent enough to have been observed by Darwin, blooms of M. rubrum are notoriously difficult to quantify because M. rubrum can aggregate into massive clouds of rusty-red water in a very short time due to its high growth rates and rapid swimming behavior and can disaggregate just as quickly by vertical or horizontal dispersion. A September 2012 hyperspectral image from the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean sensor aboard the International Space Station captured a dense red tide of M. rubrum (10(6) cells per liter) in surface waters of western Long Island Sound. Genetic data confirmed the identity of the chloroplast as a cryptophyte that was actively photosynthesizing. Microscopy indicated extremely high abundance of its yellow fluorescing signature pigment phycoerythrin. Spectral absorption and fluorescence features were related to ancillary photosynthetic pigments unique to this organism that cannot be observed with traditional satellites. Cell abundance was estimated at a resolution of 100 m using an algorithm based on the distinctive yellow fluorescence of phycoerythrin. Future development of hyperspectral satellites will allow for better enumeration of bloom-forming coastal plankton, the associated physical mechanisms, and contributions to marine productivity.

  1. Operators associated with soft and hard spectral edges from unitary ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blower, Gordon

    2008-01-01

    Using Hankel operators and shift-invariant subspaces on Hilbert space, this paper develops the theory of the integrable operators associated with soft and hard edges of eigenvalue distributions of random matrices. Such Tracy-Widom operators are realized as controllability operators for linear systems, and are reproducing kernels for weighted Hardy spaces, known as Sonine spaces. Periodic solutions of Hill's equation give a new family of Tracy-Widom type operators. This paper identifies a pair of unitary groups that satisfy the von Neumann-Weyl anti-commutation relations and leave invariant the subspaces of L2 that are the ranges of projections given by the Tracy-Widom operators for the soft edge of the Gaussian unitary ensemble and hard edge of the Jacobi ensemble.

  2. Quantitative spectral K-edge imaging in preclinical photon-counting x-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Anke; Roessl, Ewald; Kneepkens, Esther; Thran, Axel; Brendel, Bernhard; Martens, Gerhard; Proska, Roland; Nicolay, Klaas; Grüll, Holger

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility and the accuracy of spectral computed tomography (spectral CT) to determine the tissue concentrations and localization of high-attenuation, iodine-based contrast agents in mice. Iodine tissue concentrations determined with spectral CT are compared with concentrations measured with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). All animal procedures were performed according to the US National Institutes of Health principles of laboratory animal care and were approved by the ethical review committee of Maastricht, The Netherlands. Healthy Swiss mice (n = 4) were injected with an iodinated emulsion radiolabeled with indium as multimodal contrast agent for CT and SPECT. The CT and SPECT scans were acquired using a dedicated small-animal SPECT/CT system. Subsequently, scans were performed with a preclinical spectral CT scanner equipped with a photon-counting detector and 6 energy threshold levels. Quantitative data analysis of SPECT and spectral CT scans were obtained using 3-dimensional volumes-of-interest drawing methods. The ICP-MS on dissected organs was performed to determine iodine uptake per organ and was compared with the amounts determined from spectral CT and SPECT. Iodine concentrations obtained with image-processed spectral CT data correlated well with data obtained either with noninvasive SPECT imaging (slope = 0.96, r = 0.75) or with ICP-MS (slope = 0.99, r = 0.89) in tissue samples. This preclinical proof-of-concept study shows the in vivo quantification of iodine concentrations in tissues using spectral CT. Our multimodal imaging approach with spectral CT and SPECT using radiolabeled iodinated emulsions together with ICP-based quantification allows a direct comparison of all methods. Benchmarked against ICP-MS data, spectral CT in the present implementation shows a slight underestimation of organ iodine concentrations compared

  3. Integration of environmental and spectral data for sunflower stress determination. [Red River Valley, Minnesota

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillesand, T.; Seeley, M.

    1983-01-01

    Stress in sunflowers was assessed in western and northwestern Minnesota. Weekly ground observations (acquired in 1980 and 1981) were analyzed in concert with large scale aerial photography and concurrent LANDSAT data. Using multidate supervised and unsupervised classification procedures, it was found that all crops grown in association with sunflowers in the study area are spectrally separable from one another. Under conditions of extreme drought, severely stressed plants were differentiable from those not severely stressed, but between-crop separation was not possible. Initial regression analyses to estimate sunflower seed yield showed a sensitivity to environmental stress during the flowering and seed development stages. One of the most important biological factors related to sunflower production in the Red River Valley area was found to be the extent and severity of insect infestations.

  4. Use of IRS-P4 Ocean Color Monitor (OCM) images for tracing the red edge of the terrestrial vegetation reflectance spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raychaudhuri, B.

    2016-04-01

    A methodology is put forward to retrieve the red edge for terrestrial vegetated regions of IRS P4 Ocean Color Monitor (OCM) images. The objective is to utilize land-related portions of the archived OCM images that contain a significant amount of digital information on land cover. OCM band data were simulated from spectroradiometric reflectance of fresh green leaves and hyperspectral reflectance of vegetated regions derived from EO-1 Hyperion images. The red edge recovered from these model data using numerical techniques of Lagrange interpolation and inverted Gaussian was compared with the original one and reasonable accuracy was obtained. The technique was then applied to the actual red and near-infrared bands of OCM images, and red edge reflectance curves were computed for evergreen, deciduous and mangrove forest regions of the images for winter and spring seasons. Consistent results were obtained for seasonal changes, and vegetated and non-vegetated areas could be distinguished.

  5. Evolution of the stellar-merger red nova V1309 Scorpii: Spectral energy distribution analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tylenda, R.; Kamiński, T.

    2016-08-01

    Context. One very important object for understanding the nature of red novae is V1309 Sco. Its pre-outburst observations showed that, before its red-nova eruption in 2008, it was a contact binary quickly evolving to the merger of the components. It thus provided us with a direct evidence that the red novae result from stellar mergers. Aims: We will study the evolution of the post-merger remnant of V1309 Sco over time. Methods: We analyse the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the object and its evolution with time. From various optical and infrared surveys and observing programmes carried out with OGLE, HST, VVV, Gemini South, WISE, Spitzer, and Herschel we constructed observed SED in 2010 and 2012. Some limited data are also available for the red-nova progenitor in 2007. We analyse the data with our model of a dusty envelope surrounding a central star. Results: Dust was present in the pre-outburst state of V1309 Sco. Its high temperature (900-1000 K) suggests that this was a freshly formed dust in a presumable mass-loss from the spiralling-in binary. Shortly after its 2008 eruption, V1309 Sco became almost completely embedded in dust. The parameters (temperature, dimensions) of the dusty envelope in 2010 and 2012 evidence that we then observed matter lost by the object during the 2008 outburst. Its mass is at least 10-3M⊙. The object remains quite luminous, although since its maximum brightness in September 2008, it has faded in luminosity by a factor of ~50 (in 2012). Far infrared data from Herschel reveal presence of a cold (~30 K) dust at a distance of a few thousand AU from the object. Conclusions: Similarly to other red novae, V1309 Sco formed a slowly-expanding, dense, and optically-thick dusty envelope during its 2008 outburst. The main remnant is thus hidden for us. Far infrared data suggests that the object passed an episode of intense mass loss in its recent history. This conclusion could be verified by submillimeter interferometric observations.

  6. Using the fluorescence red edge effect to assess the long-term stability of lyophilized protein formulations.

    PubMed

    Qian, Ken K; Grobelny, Pawel J; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Cicerone, Marcus T

    2015-04-06

    Nanosecond relaxation processes in sugar matrices are causally linked through diffusional processes to protein stability in lyophilized formulations. Long-term protein degradation rates track mean-squared displacement (⟨u(2)⟩) of hydrogen atoms in sugar glasses, a parameter describing dynamics on a time scale of picoseconds to nanoseconds. However, measurements of ⟨u(2)⟩ are usually performed by neutron scattering, which is not conducive to rapid formulation screening in early development. Here, we present a benchtop technique to derive a ⟨u(2)⟩ surrogate based on the fluorescence red edge effect. Glycerol, lyophilized trehalose, and lyophilized sucrose were used as model systems. Samples containing 10(-6) mole fraction of rhodamine 6G, a fluorophore, were excited at either 532 nm (main peak) or 566 nm (red edge), and the ⟨u(2)⟩ surrogate was determined based the corresponding Stokes shifts. Results showed reasonable agreement between ⟨u(2)⟩ from neutron scattering and the surrogate from fluorescence, although deviations were observed at very low temperatures. We discuss the sources of the deviations and suggest technique improvements to ameliorate these. We expect that this method will be a valuable tool to evaluate lyophilized sugar matrices with respect to their ability to protect proteins from diffusion-limited degradation processes during long-term storage. Additionally, the method may have broader applications in amorphous pharmaceutical solids.

  7. Spectral Invariant Behavior of Zenith Radiance Around Cloud Edges Observed by ARM SWS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, A.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Chiu, J. C.; Wiscombe, W. J.

    2009-01-01

    The ARM Shortwave Spectrometer (SWS) measures zenith radiance at 418 wavelengths between 350 and 2170 nm. Because of its 1-sec sampling resolution, the SWS provides a unique capability to study the transition zone between cloudy and clear sky areas. A spectral invariant behavior is found between ratios of zenith radiance spectra during the transition from cloudy to cloud-free. This behavior suggests that the spectral signature of the transition zone is a linear mixture between the two extremes (definitely cloudy and definitely clear). The weighting function of the linear mixture is a wavelength-independent characteristic of the transition zone. It is shown that the transition zone spectrum is fully determined by this function and zenith radiance spectra of clear and cloudy regions. An important result of these discoveries is that high temporal resolution radiance measurements in the clear-to-cloud transition zone can be well approximated by lower temporal resolution measurements plus linear interpolation.

  8. Spectral Invariant Behavior of Zenith Radiance Around Cloud Edges Observed by ARM SWS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, A.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Chiu, J. C.; Wiscombe, W. J.

    2009-01-01

    The ARM Shortwave Spectrometer (SWS) measures zenith radiance at 418 wavelengths between 350 and 2170 nm. Because of its 1-sec sampling resolution, the SWS provides a unique capability to study the transition zone between cloudy and clear sky areas. A spectral invariant behavior is found between ratios of zenith radiance spectra during the transition from cloudy to cloud-free. This behavior suggests that the spectral signature of the transition zone is a linear mixture between the two extremes (definitely cloudy and definitely clear). The weighting function of the linear mixture is a wavelength-independent characteristic of the transition zone. It is shown that the transition zone spectrum is fully determined by this function and zenith radiance spectra of clear and cloudy regions. An important result of these discoveries is that high temporal resolution radiance measurements in the clear-to-cloud transition zone can be well approximated by lower temporal resolution measurements plus linear interpolation.

  9. 3D LTE spectral line formation with scattering in red giant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayek, W.; Asplund, M.; Collet, R.; Nordlund, Å.

    2011-05-01

    Aims: We investigate the effects of coherent isotropic continuum scattering on the formation of spectral lines in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) using 3D hydrodynamical and 1D hydrostatic model atmospheres of red giant stars. Methods: Detailed radiative transfer with coherent and isotropic continuum scattering is computed for 3D hydrodynamical and 1D hydrostatic models of late-type stellar atmospheres using the SCATE code. Opacities are computed in LTE, while a coherent and isotropic scattering term is added to the continuum source function. We investigate the effects of scattering by comparing continuum flux levels, spectral line profiles and curves of growth for different species with calculations that treat scattering as absorption. Results: Rayleigh scattering is the dominant source of scattering opacity in the continuum of red giant stars. Photons may escape from deeper, hotter layers through scattering, resulting in significantly higher continuum flux levels beneath a wavelength of λ ≲ 5000 Å. The magnitude of the effect is determined by the importance of scattering opacity with respect to absorption opacity; we observe the largest changes in continuum flux at the shortest wavelengths and lowest metallicities; intergranular lanes of 3D models are more strongly affected than granules. Continuum scattering acts to increase the profile depth of LTE lines: continua gain more brightness than line cores due to their larger thermalization depth in hotter layers. We thus observe the strongest changes in line depth for high-excitation species and ionized species, which contribute significantly to photon thermalization through their absorption opacity near the continuum optical surface. Scattering desaturates the line profiles, leading to larger abundance corrections for stronger lines, which reach -0.5 dex at 3000 Å for Fe ii lines in 3D with excitation potential χ = 2 eV at [Fe/H] = -3.0. The corrections are less severe for low-excitation lines, longer

  10. Understanding Ion Spectral Dynamics Near the Inner Edge of the Plasma Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferradas, Cristian P.

    The inner magnetosphere is a highly dynamic space environment in which particles strongly interact with the magnetic and electric fields. During the last few decades, several missions have recorded the presence of dynamic spectral features of energetic ions in in situ measurements, which represent the observational signatures of ion transport, acceleration, and loss in the inner magnetosphere. These ion spectral features constitute the inner extent of access of the plasma sheet to the low L values and play an important role in the dynamics of the inner magnetosphere, yet no statistical results of their species dependence are available to date. This dissertation aims to examine the species dependence and preferred conditions for the formation of one type of ion spectral feature, the so-called nose structure. To achieve this objective, the research work combines extensive data analysis of ion flux measurements and numerical modeling of the observed spectral features. The spatial distribution, and dependence on energy, geomagnetic activity, and ion species (H+, He +, and O+) are established through large-scale statistical studies of ion nose structures using measurements from the Cluster and Van Allen Probes missions. To gain physical insight into the main observational results, these are interpreted employing numerical modeling of ion drift under a steady-state convection model with losses due to charge exchange. Moreover, the characteristics of ion noses during geomagnetic storms and the exact formation mechanism of multiple-nose structures are addressed for the first time in a case study of the geomagnetic storm of 2 October 2013. Van Allen Probes observations over the storm and simulations using a time-dependent convection model reveal the cyclic pattern of the storm-time nose structures. Furthermore, a detailed examination of the drift trajectories of ions composing multiple noses shows that multiple noses are formed by ions with resonant energies and whose

  11. Effects of spectral parameters on the light properties of red-green-blue white light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mingsheng; Zhang, Haoxiang; Zhou, Quanbin; Wang, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Red-green-blue white light-emitting diodes (RGB-WLEDs) have great potential as commercial solid-state lighting devices, as well as visible light communication because of their high color-rendering index (CRI) and high response frequency. The quality of light of an RGB-WLED strongly depends on its spectral parameters. In this study, we fabricated RGB-WLEDs with red, blue, and green LEDs and measured the spectral power distribution (SPD). The experimental SPD is consistent with the calculated spectrum. We also measured the SPDs of LEDs with different peak wavelengths and extracted the spectral parameters, which were then used for modeling. We studied the effect of the wavelength and the full width at half-maximum (FWHM) on both the color rendering index and the luminous efficiency (LE) of the RGB-WLED using simulations. We find that the LE improves as the wavelength of the blue LED increases and the wavelength of the red LED decreases. When the wavelength of the green LED increases, the LE increases first, but later decreases. The CRI of the RGB-WLED increases with the wavelengths of the red, blue, and green LEDs first, but then decreases. The optimal wavelengths and FWHMs for maximum color-rendering and LE of the blue, green, and red LEDs are 466, 536, 606 nm; and 26.0, 34.0, and 19.5 nm, respectively.

  12. Cutting Edge of Traumatic Maculopathy with Spectral-domain Optical Coherence Tomography – A Review

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Sílvia; Campos, António; Campos, Joana; Neves, Arminda; Beselga, Diana; Fernandes, Cristina; Castro Sousa, João Paulo

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews clinically relevant data regarding traumatic maculopathy (TM), frequently observed in clinical practice, especially due to sport or traffic accident injuries. It is characterized by transient gray-whitish retinal coloration and reduction of visual acuity (VA) with closed, blunt object globe trauma of their prior. It may be limited to the posterior pole (Berlin’s edema), or peripheral areas of the retina. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) provides detail insight using high resolution cross-sectional tomographs of the ocular tissue. It is a potent non-invasive tool for the clinician to follow-up. Clinicians are, thereby empowered with a tool that enables evaluation of the retinal status and allows for prediction of the prognosis. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography supports the idea that the major site of injury is in the photoreceptor and layers of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Depending on the severity of the trauma, SD-OCT may reveal differential optical densities of intraretinal spaces ranging from disappearance of the thin hyporeflective optical space in mild lesions, or areas of disruption of the inner segment/outer segment (IS/OS) junction and hyperreflectivity of the overlying retina, pigment disorders and retinal atrophy, in more severe cases. The prognosis for recovery of vision is generally good, and improvement occurs within 3-4 weeks. PMID:26060831

  13. A silicon detector in edge-on configuration for (spectral) Computed Tomography: proof of concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doni, M.; Visser, J.; Koffeman, E.; Herrmann, C.

    2016-12-01

    This project focuses on a hybrid silicon pixel detector for Computed Tomography. In order to improve the attenuation efficiency of silicon for high energies, the active volume per unit area is increased by using the detector in edge-on configuration. In this geometry the sensor is illuminated from the side, with the pixel matrix parallel to the X-ray beam direction. Our setup consists of a 500 μm thick silicon sensor, bump-bonded to a chip from the Medipix family. Aim of the project is to test the feasibility of this geometry, finding its benefits and limitations. In particular, in this paper we show an important advantage of this configuration: energy discrimination along the detector depth. We propose a method to exploit this information, by including the beam hardening model both in the forward and in the backprojector of an iterative reconstruction algorithm. The first results, obtained on simulated data, show convergence and prove the feasibility of such an approach.

  14. Spectral relationships for atmospheric correction. II. Improving NASA's standard and MUMM near infra-red modeling schemes.

    PubMed

    Goyens, C; Jamet, C; Ruddick, K G

    2013-09-09

    Spectral relationships, reflecting the spectral dependence of water-leaving reflectance, ρw(λ), can be easily implemented in current AC algorithms with the aim to improve ρw(λ) retrievals where the algorithms fail. The present study evaluates the potential of spectral relationships to improve the MUMM [Ruddick et al., 2006, Limnol. Oceanogr. 51, 1167-1179] and standard NASA [Bailey et al., 2010, Opt. Express 18, 7521-7527] near infra-red (NIR) modeling schemes included in the AC algorithm to account for non-zero ρw(λNIR), based on in situ coastal ρw(λ) and simulated Rayleigh corrected reflectance data. Two modified NIR-modeling schemes are investigated: (1) the standard NASA NIR-modeling scheme is forced with bounding relationships in the red spectral domain and with a NIR polynomial relationship and, (2) the constant NIR ρw(λ) ratio used in the MUMM NIR-modeling scheme is replaced by a NIR polynomial spectral relationship. Results suggest that the standard NASA NIR-modeling scheme performs better for all turbidity ranges and in particular in the blue spectral domain (percentage bias decreased by approximately 50%) when it is forced with the red and NIR spectral relationships. However, with these new constraints, more reflectance spectra are flagged due to non-physical Chlorophyll-a concentration estimations. The new polynomial-based MUMM NIR-modeling scheme yielded lower ρw(λ) retrieval errors and particularly in extremely turbid waters. However, including the polynomial NIR relationship significantly increased the sensitivity of the algorithm to errors on the selected aerosol model from nearby clear water pixels.

  15. Coastline change mapping using a spectral band method and Sobel edge operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Mansoori, Saeed; Al-Marzouqi, Fatima

    2016-10-01

    Coastline extraction has become an essential activity in wake of the natural disasters taking place in some regions such as tsunami, flooding etc. Salient feature of such catastrophes is lack of reaction time available for combating emergency, thus it is the endeavor of any country to develop constant monitoring mechanism of shorelines. This is a challenging task because of the magnitude of changes taking place to the coastline regularly. Previous research findings highlight a need of formulating automation driven methodology for timely and accurate detection of alterations in the coastline impacting sustainability of mankind operating in the coastal zone. In this study, we propose a new approach for automatic extraction of the coastline using remote sensing data. This approach is composed of three main stages. Firstly, classifying pixels of the image into two categories i.e. land and water body by applying two normalized difference indices i.e. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI). Then, the process of binary conversion of classified image takes place using a local threshold method. Finally, the coastline is extracted by applying Sobel edge operator with a pair of (3×3) kernels. The approach is tested using 2.5m DubaiSat-1 (DS1) and DubaiSat-2 (DS2) images captured to detect and monitor the changes occurring along Dubai coastal zone within a period of six years from 2009 till 2015. Experimental results prove that the approach is capable of extracting the coastlines from DS1 and DS2 images with moderate human interaction. The results of the study show an increase of 6% in Dubai shoreline resulting on account of numerous man-made infrastructure development projects in tourism and allied sectors.

  16. A Monte Carlo software bench for simulation of spectral k-edge CT imaging: Initial results.

    PubMed

    Nasirudin, Radin A; Penchev, Petar; Mei, Kai; Rummeny, Ernst J; Fiebich, Martin; Noël, Peter B

    2015-06-01

    Spectral Computed Tomography (SCT) systems equipped with photon counting detectors (PCD) are clinically desired, since such systems provide not only additional diagnostic information but also radiation dose reductions by a factor of two or more. The current unavailability of clinical PCDs makes a simulation of such systems necessary. In this paper, we present a Monte Carlo-based simulation of a SCT equipped with a PCD. The aim of this development is to facilitate research on potential clinical applications. Our MC simulator takes into account scattering interactions within the scanned object and has the ability to simulate scans with and without scatter and a wide variety of imaging parameters. To demonstrate the usefulness of such a MC simulator for development of SCT applications, a phantom with contrast targets covering a wide range of clinically significant iodine concentrations is simulated. With those simulations the impact of scatter and exposure on image quality and material decomposition results is investigated. Our results illustrate that scatter radiation plays a significant role in visual as well as quantitative results. Scatter radiation can reduce the accuracy of contrast agent concentration by up to 15%. We present a reliable and robust software bench for simulation of SCTs equipped with PCDs. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Remarkably enhanced red-NIR broad spectral absorption via gold nanoparticles: applications for organic photosensitive diodes.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiao; Du, Lili; Wen, Zhanwei; Lv, Wenli; Zhao, Feiyu; Jiang, Xinyu; Peng, Yingquan; Sun, Lei; Li, Yao; Rao, JinWei

    2015-09-14

    For organic films, remarkably enhanced red-NIR broad spectral absorption was achieved via the incorporation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using a simple and facile preparation. The relevant thermal evaporation method has produced size-controllable AuNPs in the range of 0-20 nm diameter. The potential use of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) enhanced organic photosensitive diodes (OPDs) as sensitive broadband sensors was discussed in this context. Here we showed that, by combining organic heterojunctions with size-controllable plasmonic AuNPs, the efficiency of organic photodetectors could be increased by up to one order of magnitude, because of LSPR and scattering effects of the AuNPs. Fabricated OPD devices showed a large photoresponse under radiation from wavelengths between 650 and 830 nm, accompanied by a low power consumption profile. A schematic energy level model combined with theoretical simulation analysis was proposed to explain the experimental data. More importantly, to the best of our knowledge, this work demonstrated the broadest photosensitivity with high responsivity from AuNP-based photodetectors, proving the potential of AuNPs as a promising material for efficient optoelectronic devices.

  18. Primer on Use of Multi-Spectral and Infra Red Imaging for On-Site Inspections

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, J R

    2010-10-26

    The purpose of an On-Site Inspection (OSI) is to determine whether a nuclear explosion has occurred in violation of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), and to gather information which might assist in identifying the violator (CTBT, Article IV, Paragraph 35) Multi-Spectral and Infra Red Imaging (MSIR) is allowed by the treaty to detect observables which might help reduce the search area and thus expedite an OSI and make it more effective. MSIR is permitted from airborne measurements, and at and below the surface to search for anomalies and artifacts (CTBT, Protocol, Part II, Paragraph 69b). The three broad types of anomalies and artifacts MSIR is expected to be capable of observing are surface disturbances (disturbed earth, plant stress or anomalous surface materials), human artifacts (man-made roads, buildings and features), and thermal anomalies. The purpose of this Primer is to provide technical information on MSIR relevant to its use for OSI. It is expected that this information may be used for general background information, to inform decisions about the selection and testing of MSIR equipment, to develop operational guidance for MSIR use during an OSI, and to support the development of a training program for OSI Inspectors. References are provided so readers can pursue a topic in more detail than the summary information provided here. The following chapters will provide more information on how MSIR can support an OSI (Section 2), a short summary what Multi-Spectral Imaging and Infra Red Imaging is (Section 3), guidance from the CTBT regarding the use of MSIR (Section 4), and a description of several nuclear explosion scenarios (Section 5) and consequent observables (Section 6). The remaining sections focus on practical aspects of using MSIR for an OSI, such as specification and selection of MSIR equipment, operational considerations for deployment of MISR equipment from an aircraft, and the conduct of field exercises to mature MSIR for an OSI

  19. Observation of the "Red Edge" Effect in the Luminescence of Water Suspensions of Detonation Nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolenko, T. A.; Burikov, S. A.; Vervald, A. M.; Khomich, A. A.; Kudryavtsev, O. S.; Shenderova, O. A.; Vlasov, I. I.

    2016-05-01

    The variations in the luminescence spectra of detonation nanodiamond (DND) with probe light wavelength are studied and these dependences are compared for water suspensions of DND and graphene oxide (GO). It is found that changing the laser excitation wavelength from 405 to 532 nm shifts the broad-band luminescence peaks of DND and GO from 530 to 615 nm and from 490 to 580 nm. The observed dependences are explained by the luminescence ″red edge″ effect, which shows up when the electrostatic interaction (solvation) times of a luminophore with a polar solvent are comparable to the luminescence lifetime. These data confirm the common origin of luminescence in nanodiamonds and oxidized graphene nanoclusters.

  20. Red/blue spectral shifts of laser-induced fluorescence emission due to different nanoparticle suspensions in various dye solutions.

    PubMed

    Bavali, A; Parvin, P; Mortazavi, S Z; Mohammadian, M; Mousavi Pour, M R

    2014-08-20

    Red/blue shifts of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) are investigated using several guest dielectric nanoscatterers, such as TiO2, ZnO, Al2O3, and SiO2, in the host Rd6G, RdB, Coumarin 4, and Coumarin 7 ethanolic solutions. A couple of inflection points are identified varying nanoparticle (NP) density into dye solutions based on LIF spectroscopy. The inflection of the spectral shift exhibits that the suspension of NPs in dye solutions significantly involves a couple of competitive chemical and optical mechanisms during photon traveling in scattering media regarding ballistic and diffusive transport. It is shown that the low, medium, and high NP additives in fluorescent suspension induce blue, red, and blue spectral shifts, respectively.

  1. The Relationship of Red and Photographic Infrared Spectral Data to Grain Yield Variation Within a Winter Wheat Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, C. J.; Holben, B. N.; Elgin, J. H., Jr.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III

    1979-01-01

    Two band hand-held radiometer data from a winter wheat field, collected on 21 dates during the spring growing season, were correlated within field final grain yield. Significant linear relationships were found between various combinations of the red and photographic infrared radiance data collected and the grain yield. The spectral data explained approximately 64 percent of the within field grain yield variation. This variation in grain yield could not be explained using meteorological data as these were similar for all areas of the wheat field. Most importantly, data collected early in the spring were highly correlated with grain yield, a five week time window existed from stem elongation through antheses in which the spectral data were most highly correlated with grain yield, and manifestations of wheat canopy water stress were readily apparent in the spectral data.

  2. High spectral resolution spectroscopy of the SiO fundamental lines in red giants and red supergiants with VLT/VISIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnaka, K.

    2014-01-01

    Context. The mass-loss mechanism in red giants and red supergiants is not yet understood well. The SiO fundamental lines near 8 μm are potentially useful for probing the outer atmosphere, which is essential for clarifying the mass-loss mechanism. However, these lines have been little explored until now. Aims: We present high spectral resolution spectroscopic observations of the SiO fundamental lines near 8.1 μm in 16 bright red giants and red supergiants. Our sample consists of seven normal (i.e., non-Mira) K-M giants (from K1.5 to M6.5), three Mira stars, three optically bright red supergiants, two dusty red supergiants, and the enigmatic object GCIRS3 near the Galactic center. Methods: Our program stars were observed between 8.088 μm and 8.112 μm with a spectral resolution of 30 000 using VLT/VISIR. Results: We detected SiO fundamental lines in all of our program stars except for GCIRS3. The SiO lines in normal K and M giants as well as optically bright (i.e., not dusty) red supergiants do not show P-Cyg profiles or blueshifts, which means the absence of systematic outflows in the SiO line forming region. We detected P-Cyg profiles in the SiO lines in the dusty red supergiants VY CMa and VX Sgr, with the latter object being a new detection. These SiO lines originate in the outflowing gas with the thermal dust continuum emission seen as the background. The outflow velocities of the SiO line forming region in VY CMa and VX Sgr are estimated to be 27 km s-1 and 17 km s-1, respectively. We derived basic stellar parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, luminosity, and mass) for the normal K-M giants and optically bright red supergiants in our sample and compared the observed VISIR spectra with synthetic spectra predicted from MARCS photospheric models. Most of the SiO lines observed in the program stars warmer than ~3400 K are reasonably reproduced by the MARCS models, which allowed us to estimate the silicon abundance as well as the 28Si/29Si and 28Si

  3. Numerical modelling of edge-driven convection during rift-to-drift transition: application to the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierro, Elisa; Capitanio, Fabio A.; Schettino, Antonio; Morena Salerno, V.

    2017-04-01

    We use numerical modeling to investigate the coupling of mantle instabilities and surface tectonics along lithospheric steps developing during rifting. We address whether edge driven convection (EDC) beneath rifted continental margins and shear flow during rift-drift transition can play a role in the observed post-rift compressive tectonic evolution of the divergent continental margins along the Red Sea. We run a series of 2D simulations to examine the relationship between the maximum compression and key geometrical parameters of the step beneath continental margins, such as the step height due to lithosphere thickness variation and the width of the margins, and test the effect of rheology varying temperature- and stress-dependent viscosity in the lithosphere and asthenosphere. The development of instabilities is initially illustrated as a function of these parameters, to show the controls on the lithosphere strain distribution and magnitude. We then address the transient evolution of the instabilities to characterize their duration. In an additional suite of models, we address the development of EDC during plate motions, thus accounting for the mantle shearing due to spreading. Our results show an increase of strain with the step height as well as with the margin width up to 200 km. After this value the influence of ridge margin can be neglected. Strain rates are, then, quantified for a range of laboratory-constrained constitutive laws for mantle and lithosphere forming minerals. These models propose a viable mechanism to explain the post-rift tectonic inversion observed along the Arabian continental margin and the episodic ultra-fast sea floor spreading in the central Red Sea, where the role of EDC has been invoked.

  4. The dynamic atmospheres of red giant stars. Spectral synthesis in high resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowotny, W.

    2005-11-01

    giant stars generally have extremely extended atmospheres with extensions on the same order as the radii of the stars themselves (a few 100 R_sol). Within these cool and relatively dense environments, molecules can efficiently form. They have many internal degrees of freedom leading to a large number of possible transitions (electronic, vibrational, and rotational) and numerous absorption lines/bands. Thus, molecules significantly determine the spectral appearance of late-type stars which have characteristic line-rich spectra in the visual and infrared. At the upper part of the AGB, the stars become unstable to strong radial pulsations (e.g. Mira variables). Due to the large size variations of the stellar interior, the outer layers are levitated and the atmospheric structure is periodically modulated. Triggered by the pulsation, shock waves emerge and propagate outwards through the atmosphere. Efficient dust condensation can take place in the wake of the shock waves ( post-shock regions). Due to the large absorptivity of the formed dust grains, radiation pressure results in an outwards directed acceleration with the outflowing dust particles dragging along the surrounding gas. This leads to the development of a rather slow but dense stellar wind. The just mentioned dynamic effects -- pulsations of the stellar interior and dust-driven winds -- have substantial influence on the evolution of the outer layers of these red giants. As a consequence, the atmospheres of evolved AGB stars can eventually become even more extended. Being time-dependently changed on global and local scales, the resulting atmospheric structure strongly deviates from a hydrostatic configuration (e.g. shock fronts). Especially important in the context of this thesis are the complex, non-monotonic velocity fields with macroscopic motions on the order of 10 km/s, severly affecting the shapes of individual spectral lines (Doppler effect). Observational studies have demonstrated that time series high

  5. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES IN FIELD RED GIANTS FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION H-BAND SPECTRA USING THE APOGEE SPECTRAL LINELIST

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Verne V.; Cunha, Katia; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Meszaros, Szabolcs; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Garcia Perez, Ana; Majewski, Steven R.; Schiavon, Ricardo; Holtzman, Jon; Johnson, Jennifer A.

    2013-03-01

    High-resolution H-band spectra of five bright field K, M, and MS giants, obtained from the archives of the Kitt Peak National Observatory Fourier transform spectrometer, are analyzed to determine chemical abundances of 16 elements. The abundances were derived via spectrum synthesis using the detailed linelist prepared for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Apache Point Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), which is a high-resolution near-infrared spectroscopic survey to derive detailed chemical abundance distributions and precise radial velocities for 100,000 red giants sampling all Galactic stellar populations. The red giant sample studied here was chosen to probe which chemical elements can be derived reliably from the H-band APOGEE spectral region. These red giants consist of two K-giants ({alpha} Boo and {mu} Leo), two M-giants ({beta} And and {delta} Oph), and one thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) star of spectral type MS (HD 199799). Measured chemical abundances include the cosmochemically important isotopes {sup 12}C, {sup 13}C, {sup 14}N, and {sup 16}O, along with Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu. The K and M giants exhibit the abundance signature of the first dredge-up of CN-cycle material, while the TP-AGB star shows clear evidence of the addition of {sup 12}C synthesized during {sup 4}He-burning thermal pulses and subsequent third dredge-up. A comparison of the abundances derived here with published values for these stars reveals consistent results to {approx}0.1 dex. The APOGEE spectral region and linelist is thus well suited for probing both Galactic chemical evolution, as well as internal nucleosynthesis and mixing in populations of red giants via high-resolution spectroscopy.

  6. Chemical Abundances in Field Red Giants from High-resolution H-band Spectra Using the APOGEE Spectral Linelist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Verne V.; Cunha, Katia; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Meszaros, Szabolcs; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Garcìa Pèrez, Ana; Majewski, Steven R.; Schiavon, Ricardo; Holtzman, Jon; Johnson, Jennifer A.

    2013-03-01

    High-resolution H-band spectra of five bright field K, M, and MS giants, obtained from the archives of the Kitt Peak National Observatory Fourier transform spectrometer, are analyzed to determine chemical abundances of 16 elements. The abundances were derived via spectrum synthesis using the detailed linelist prepared for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Apache Point Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), which is a high-resolution near-infrared spectroscopic survey to derive detailed chemical abundance distributions and precise radial velocities for 100,000 red giants sampling all Galactic stellar populations. The red giant sample studied here was chosen to probe which chemical elements can be derived reliably from the H-band APOGEE spectral region. These red giants consist of two K-giants (α Boo and μ Leo), two M-giants (β And and δ Oph), and one thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) star of spectral type MS (HD 199799). Measured chemical abundances include the cosmochemically important isotopes 12C, 13C, 14N, and 16O, along with Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu. The K and M giants exhibit the abundance signature of the first dredge-up of CN-cycle material, while the TP-AGB star shows clear evidence of the addition of 12C synthesized during 4He-burning thermal pulses and subsequent third dredge-up. A comparison of the abundances derived here with published values for these stars reveals consistent results to ~0.1 dex. The APOGEE spectral region and linelist is thus well suited for probing both Galactic chemical evolution, as well as internal nucleosynthesis and mixing in populations of red giants via high-resolution spectroscopy.

  7. Heterogeneity in a room-temperature ionic liquid: persistent local environments and the red-edge effect.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhonghan; Margulis, Claudio J

    2006-01-24

    In this work, we investigate the slow dynamics of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate, a very popular room-temperature ionic solvent. Our study predicts the existence of heterogeneity in the liquid and shows that this heterogeneity is the underlying microscopic cause for the recently reported "red-edge effect" (REE) observed in the study of fluorescence of the organic probe 2-amino-7-nitrofluorene. This theoretical work explains in microscopic terms the relation between REE and dynamic heterogeneity in a room-temperature ionic liquid (IL). The REE is typical of micellar or colloidal systems, which are characterized by microscopic environments that are structurally very different. In contrast, in the case of this room-temperature IL, the REE occurs because of the long period during which molecules are trapped in quasistatic local solvent cages. This trapping time, which is longer than the lifetime of the excited-state probe, together with the inability of the surroundings to adiabatically relax, induces a set of site-specific spectroscopic responses. Subensembles of fluorescent molecules associated with particular local environments absorb and emit at different frequencies. We describe in detail the absorption wavelength-dependent emission spectra of 2-amino-7-nitrofluorene and show that this dependence on lambda(ex) is characteristic of the IL and, as is to be expected, is absent in the case of a normal solvent such as methanol.

  8. Evaluation of spectral photon counting computed tomography K-edge imaging for determination of gold nanoparticle biodistribution in vivo.

    PubMed

    Si-Mohamed, Salim; Cormode, David P; Bar-Ness, Daniel; Sigovan, Monica; Naha, Pratap C; Langlois, Jean-Baptiste; Chalabreysse, Lara; Coulon, Philippe; Blevis, Ira; Roessl, Ewald; Erhard, Klaus; Boussel, Loic; Douek, Philippe

    2017-07-20

    Spectral photon counting computed tomography (SPCCT) is an emerging medical imaging technology. SPCCT scanners record the energy of incident photons, which allows specific detection of contrast agents due to measurement of their characteristic X-ray attenuation profiles. This approach is known as K-edge imaging. Nanoparticles formed from elements such as gold, bismuth or ytterbium have been reported as potential contrast agents for SPCCT imaging. Furthermore, gold nanoparticles have many applications in medicine, such as adjuvants for radiotherapy and photothermal ablation. In particular, longitudinal imaging of the biodistribution of nanoparticles would be highly attractive for their clinical translation. We therefore studied the capabilities of a novel SPCCT scanner to quantify the biodistribution of gold nanoparticles in vivo. PEGylated gold nanoparticles were used. Phantom imaging showed that concentrations measured on gold images correlated well with known concentrations (slope = 0.94, intercept = 0.18, RMSE = 0.18, R(2) = 0.99). The SPCCT system allowed repetitive and quick acquisitions in vivo, and follow-up of changes in the AuNP biodistribution over time. Measurements performed on gold images correlated with the inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) measurements in the organs of interest (slope = 0.77, intercept = 0.47, RMSE = 0.72, R(2) = 0.93). TEM results were in agreement with the imaging and ICP-OES in that much higher concentrations of AuNPs were observed in the liver, spleen, bone marrow and lymph nodes (mainly in macrophages). In conclusion, we found that SPCCT can be used for repetitive and non-invasive determination of the biodistribution of gold nanoparticles in vivo.

  9. Flow injection mass spectral fingerprints demonstrate chemical differences in rio red grapefruit with respect to year, harvest time, and conventional versus organic farming

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Spectral fingerprints were acquired for Ruby Red grapefruit using direct injection-electrospray ionization with time-of-flight and ion trap mass spectrometry (DI-ESI-TOF-MS and DI-ESI-IT-MS). Rio Red grapefruits were harvested 3 times a year (early, mid, and late harvests) in 2005 and 2006 from con...

  10. A comparison of median frequency, spectral edge frequency, a frequency band power ratio, total power, and dominance shift in the determination of depth of anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Drummond, J C; Brann, C A; Perkins, D E; Wolfe, D E

    1991-11-01

    Five numerical descriptors were derived from the electroencephalogram (EEG), recorded, and processed (Tracor Nomad) during emergence from isoflurane-nitrous oxide anesthesia. The five descriptors (median frequency, spectral edge frequency-90%, total power, a frequency band power ratio, and the ratio of frontal to occipital power) were compared for their ability to predict imminent arousal. Arousal was defined as spontaneous movement, coughing or eye opening. All of the descriptors except the frontal-occipital power ratio underwent significant (P less than 0.05) changes between the initial recordings made intraoperatively during surgical stimulus under anesthesia and later recordings in the 40 s preceding arousal. A post hoc analysis was performed to identify the threshold value for each parameter that best served to predict imminent arousal. For median frequency, spectral edge frequency-90%, total power, and the frequency band power ratio, thresholds that predicted imminent arousal with sensitivities of 90% and specificities of 82-90% could be identified. The data indicate that, even in the favorable circumstances of the present study (uniform anesthetic technique, post hoC identification of thresholds), none of several previously popularized EEG descriptors (median frequency, spectral edge frequency-90%, total power, a frequency band power ratio) can serve as a completely reliable sole predictor of imminent arousal. As presently derived, these EEG descriptors at best provide trend information to be used in concert with other clinical signs of depth of anesthesia.

  11. Efficient frequency downconversion at the single photon level from the red spectral range to the telecommunications C-band.

    PubMed

    Zaske, Sebastian; Lenhard, Andreas; Becher, Christoph

    2011-06-20

    We report on single photon frequency downconversion from the red part of the spectrum (738 nm) to the telecommunications C-band. By mixing attenuated laser pulses with an average photon number per pulse < 1 with a strong continuous light field at 1403 nm in a periodically poled Zn:LiNbO3 ridge waveguide an internal conversion efficiency of ∼ 73% is achieved. We further investigate the noise properties of the process by measuring the output spectrum. Our results indicate that by narrow spectral filtering a quantum interface should be feasible which bridges the wavelength gap between quantum emitters like color centers in diamond emitting in the red part of the spectrum and low-loss fiber-optic telecommunications wavelengths.

  12. Relationship of red and photographic infrared spectral radiances to alfalfa biomass, forage water content, percentage canopy cover, and severity of drought stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, C. J.; Elgin, J. H., Jr.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III

    1979-01-01

    Red and photographic infrared spectral data were collected using a handheld radiometer for two cuttings of alfalfa. Significant linear and non-linear correlation coefficients were found between the spectral variables and plant height, biomass, forage water content, and estimated canopy cover for the earlier alfalfa cutting. The alfalfa of later cutting experienced a period of severe drought stress which limited growth. The spectral variables were found to be highly correlated with the estimated drought scores for this alfalfa cutting.

  13. The red edge excitation shift phenomenon can be used to unmask protein structural ensembles: implications for NEMO-ubiquitin interactions.

    PubMed

    Catici, Dragana A M; Amos, Hope E; Yang, Yi; van den Elsen, Jean M H; Pudney, Christopher R

    2016-06-01

    To understand complex molecular interactions, it is necessary to account for molecular flexibility and the available equilibrium of conformational states. Only a small number of experimental approaches can access such information. Potentially steady-state red edge excitation shift (REES) spectroscopy can act as a qualitative metric of changes to the protein free energy landscape (FEL) and the equilibrium of conformational states. First, we validate this hypothesis using a single Trp-containing protein, NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO). We provide detailed evidence from chemical denaturation studies, macromolecular crowding studies, and the first report of the pressure dependence of the REES effect. Combination of these data demonstrate that the REES effect can report on the 'ruggedness' of the FEL and we present a phenomenological model, based on realistic physical interpretations, for fitting steady-state REES data to allow quantification of this aspect of the REES effect. We test the conceptual framework we have developed by correlating findings from NEMO ligand-binding studies with the REES data in a range of NEMO-ligand binary complexes. Our findings shed light on the nature of the interaction between NEMO and poly-ubiquitin, suggesting that NEMO is differentially regulated by poly-ubiquitin chain length and that this regulation occurs via a modulation of the available equilibrium of conformational states, rather than gross structural change. This study therefore demonstrates the potential of REES as a powerful tool for tackling contemporary issues in structural biology and biophysics and elucidates novel information on the structure-function relationship of NEMO and key interaction partners. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  14. Limitations and design considerations for donor-acceptor systems in luminescent solar concentrators: the effect of coupling-induced red-edge absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacQueen, Rowan W.; Tayebjee, Murad J. Y.; Webb, James E. A.; Falber, Alexander; Thordarson, Pall; Schmidt, Timothy W.

    2016-06-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) use luminescence and waveguiding to concentrate photons within thin dielectric slabs for use in photovoltaic, lighting, and photobioreactor applications. Donor-acceptor systems of organic chromophores are widely used in LSCs to broaden the sunlight absorption range and attempt to reduce loss-inducing reabsorption by the emitting chromophore. We use raytrace simulations across a large parameter space to model the performance of LSCs containing two novel donor-acceptor trimers based on the perylene moiety. We find that under certain conditions, trimers outperform single-dye LSCs as expected. However, at higher concentrations, a slight increase in red-edge absorption by the trimers increases reabsorption and has a deleterious effect on LSC performance. This underscores the large effect that even small changes in the red edge can have, and may discourage the use of donor-acceptor schemes with high interchromophore coupling that promotes red-edge absorption. Finally, we show that for a LSC-PV pair, selecting a PV cell that is well-matched with the LSC emission spectrum has a large effect on the flux gain of the system, and that the systems studied here are well-matched to emerging PV technologies.

  15. Spectral line shapes of U M2 - and As K -edge resonant x-ray scattering in the two antiferromagnetic phases of UAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normile, P. S.; Wilkins, S. B.; Detlefs, B.; Mannix, D.; Blackburn, E.; Bouchenoire, L.; Bernhoeft, N.; Lander, G. H.

    2007-05-01

    We present resonant x-ray scattering measurements on uranium arsenide at the U M2 and As K absorption edges. The studies at both edges relate to aspects of the hybridization (involving the 5f states) in UAs. At the U M2 edge, the spectral line shapes are found to differ between the two antiferromagnetic phases of UAs. In the “type-I” phase, the line shapes may be fitted using a single resonant component, whereas in the “type-IA” phase, a second resonant component, 3.5eV above the first component, is required to fit the line shapes in the rotated polarization (σ→π) scattering channel. The possibility that the single (first) component in the type-I (type-IA) phase corresponds to E2 scattering due to the ordered 5f magnetic-dipole moments and that in the type-IA phase the second component represents an E1 process involving polarized 6d (U) states is considered. Similar line shapes are observed for the two antiferromagnetic phases at the As K edge, a result which is in discordance with a recent theoretical prediction. The experimentally observed As K -edge line shape has an asymmetrical form in both phases, which possibly relates to As 4p -band effects unaccounted for in the theory.

  16. Stress assessment and spectral characterization of suspected acid deposition damage in red spruce (Picea Rubens) from Vermont

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, B. N.; Vogelmann, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of acid deposition on Picea rubens are studied. The Picea rubens located at Camels Hump Mt., Mt. Ascutney, and Ripton, VT were analyzed using stress level evaluations, in situ spectral data, pressure bomb analysis, and aircraft sensors. Spruce stress per circular plot and percent spruce mortality are calculated. The relation between stress levels and elevation and exposure and weather patterns is examined. It is observed that variations in the reflectance curves of the foliage and branches are related to cellular health, the type of cellular arrangement, and the degree of leaf tissue hydration; the leaf and twig specimens from high stress sites are more reflective in the red portion of the visible and less reflective in the NIR portion of the spectrum. The pressure bomb data reveal that the xylem water tension is higher in specimens from high stress sites. It is noted that remote sensing permits discrimination and mapping of suspected acid deposition damage.

  17. High-spectral-radiance, red-emitting tapered diode lasers with monolithically integrated distributed Bragg reflector surface gratings.

    PubMed

    Feise, David; John, Wilfred; Bugge, Frank; Fiebig, Christian; Blume, Gunnar; Paschke, Katrin

    2012-10-08

    A red-emitting tapered diode laser with a monolithically integrated distributed Bragg reflector grating is presented. The device is able to emit up to 1 W of spectrally stabilized optical output power at 5°C. Depending on the period of the tenth order surface grating the emission wavelengths of these devices from the same gain material are 635 nm, 637 nm, and 639 nm. The emission is as narrow as 9 pm (FWHM) at 637.6 nm. The lateral beam quality is M(2)(1/e(2)) = 1.2. Therefore, these devices simplify techniques such as wavelength multiplexing and fiber coupling dedicating them as light sources for µ-Raman spectroscopy, absolute distance interferometry, and holographic imaging.

  18. Photoelectric spectrophotometry of OQ 172 and OH 471. [spectral energy distributions for red shift quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oke, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    Absolute spectral energy distributions for the large redshift quasars OQ 172 and OH 471 are discussed along with similar data for two other quasars 4C05.34 and PHL 957. Assuming cosmological redshifts, OQ 172 and OH 471 are not as luminous as PHL 957. If these quasars are basically similar and if radiative processes dominate, the strength of Ly alpha and the behavior of the continuum at the Lyman limit strongly suggest that these objects consist of a central ionizing source surrounded by discrete clouds, filaments or a gaseous structure such as a disk. This gaseous matter does not cover the whole solid angle surrounding the source.

  19. Edge states, Aharonov-Bohm oscillations, and thermodynamic and spectral properties in a two-dimensional electron gas with an antidot

    SciTech Connect

    Bogachek, E.N.; Landman, U.

    1995-11-15

    The thermodynamic and spectral properties of a two-dimensional electron gas with an antidot in a strong magnetic field, {ital r}{sub {ital c}}{le}{ital r}{sub 0}, where {ital r}{sub {ital c}} is the cyclotron radius and {ital r}{sub 0} is the antidot effective radius, are studied via a solvable model with the antidot confinement potential {ital U}{similar_to}1/{ital r}{sup 2}. The edge states localized at the antidot boundary result in an Aharonov-Bohm-type oscillatory dependence of the magnetization as a function of the magnetic field flux through the antidot. These oscillations are superimposed on the de Haas--van Alphen oscillations. In the strong-field limit, {h_bar}{omega}{sub {ital c}}{similar_to}{epsilon}{sub {ital F}}, where {omega}{sub {ital c}} is the cyclotron frequency and {epsilon}{sub {ital F}} is the Fermi energy, the amplitude of the Aharonov-Bohm-type oscillations of the magnetization due to the contribution of the lowest edge state is {similar_to}{mu}{sub {ital B}}{ital k}{sub {ital F}}{ital r}{sub {ital c}} ({mu}{sub {ital B}} is the Bohr magneton and {ital k}{sub {ital F}} is the Fermi wave vector). When the magnetic field is decreased, higher edge states can contribute to the magnetization, leading to the appearance of a beating pattern in the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations. The role of temperature in suppressing the oscillatory contribution due to higher edge states is analyzed. Rapid oscillations of the magnetization as a function of the Aharonov-Bohm flux, occurring on a scale of a small fraction of the flux quantum {ital hc}/{ital e}, are demonstrated. The appearance of a manifold of non- equidistant frequencies in the magneto-optical-absorption spectrum, due to transitions between electronic edge states localized near the antidot boundary, is predicted.

  20. Spectral Diversity and Regulation of Coral Fluorescence in a Mesophotic Reef Habitat in the Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Eyal, Gal; Wiedenmann, Jörg; Grinblat, Mila; D’Angelo, Cecilia; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Treibitz, Tali; Ben-Zvi, Or; Shaked, Yonathan; Smith, Tyler B.; Harii, Saki; Denis, Vianney; Noyes, Tim; Tamir, Raz; Loya, Yossi

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of coral fluorescence in mesophotic reefs, although well described for shallow waters, remains largely unstudied. We found that representatives of many scleractinian species are brightly fluorescent at depths of 50–60 m at the Interuniversity Institute for Marine Sciences (IUI) reef in Eilat, Israel. Some of these fluorescent species have distribution maxima at mesophotic depths (40–100 m). Several individuals from these depths displayed yellow or orange-red fluorescence, the latter being essentially absent in corals from the shallowest parts of this reef. We demonstrate experimentally that in some cases the production of fluorescent pigments is independent of the exposure to light; while in others, the fluorescence signature is altered or lost when the animals are kept in darkness. Furthermore, we show that green-to-red photoconversion of fluorescent pigments mediated by short-wavelength light can occur also at depths where ultraviolet wavelengths are absent from the underwater light field. Intraspecific colour polymorphisms regarding the colour of the tissue fluorescence, common among shallow water corals, were also observed for mesophotic species. Our results suggest that fluorescent pigments in mesophotic reefs fulfil a distinct biological function and offer promising application potential for coral-reef monitoring and biomedical imaging. PMID:26107282

  1. Spectral Diversity and Regulation of Coral Fluorescence in a Mesophotic Reef Habitat in the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Eyal, Gal; Wiedenmann, Jörg; Grinblat, Mila; D'Angelo, Cecilia; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Treibitz, Tali; Ben-Zvi, Or; Shaked, Yonathan; Smith, Tyler B; Harii, Saki; Denis, Vianney; Noyes, Tim; Tamir, Raz; Loya, Yossi

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of coral fluorescence in mesophotic reefs, although well described for shallow waters, remains largely unstudied. We found that representatives of many scleractinian species are brightly fluorescent at depths of 50-60 m at the Interuniversity Institute for Marine Sciences (IUI) reef in Eilat, Israel. Some of these fluorescent species have distribution maxima at mesophotic depths (40-100 m). Several individuals from these depths displayed yellow or orange-red fluorescence, the latter being essentially absent in corals from the shallowest parts of this reef. We demonstrate experimentally that in some cases the production of fluorescent pigments is independent of the exposure to light; while in others, the fluorescence signature is altered or lost when the animals are kept in darkness. Furthermore, we show that green-to-red photoconversion of fluorescent pigments mediated by short-wavelength light can occur also at depths where ultraviolet wavelengths are absent from the underwater light field. Intraspecific colour polymorphisms regarding the colour of the tissue fluorescence, common among shallow water corals, were also observed for mesophotic species. Our results suggest that fluorescent pigments in mesophotic reefs fulfil a distinct biological function and offer promising application potential for coral-reef monitoring and biomedical imaging.

  2. A study of the time-resolved fluorescence spectrum and red edge effect of ANF in a room-temperature ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhonghan; Margulis, Claudio J

    2006-06-15

    In a recent article, we have analyzed using molecular dynamics simulations the steady-state red edge effect (REE) observed by Samanta and co-workers when the fluorescent probe 2-amino-7-nitrofluorene (ANF) is photoexcited at different wavelengths in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium ([BMIM+]) hexafluorophosphate ([PF6-]). In this letter, we predict the time- and wavelength-dependent emission spectra of ANF in the same ionic solvent. From the analysis of our simulated data, we are able to derive an approximate time scale for reorganization of the solvent around the solute probe. The effect that slow varying local liquid environments have on the overall time-dependent signal is also discussed.

  3. Quantitative analysis of morphological alterations in Plasmodium falciparum infected red blood cells through theoretical interpretation of spectral measurements.

    PubMed

    Serebrennikova, Yulia M; Patel, Janus; Milhous, Wilbur K; García-Rubio, Luis H

    2010-08-21

    Spectroscopic analysis can provide valuable insights into morphological and biochemical cellular transformations caused by diseases. However, traditional spectroscopic methods and the corresponding spectral interpretation approaches have been challenged by the complexities of the cell shape, orientation, and internal structure. Here we present an elegant spectral interpretation model that enables accurate quantitative analysis of the UV-visible spectra of red blood cells (RBCs) parasitized by the lethal human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. The model is based on the modified Mie theory (MMT) approach that incorporates the effects of the nonsphericity and orientation and multilayered cell structure to account for complex composition of the infected RBCs (IRBCs). We determine the structure and composition of the IRBCs and address unresolved matters over the alterations induced by the intraerythrocytic development of P. falciparum. The results indicate deformation and swelling of the IRBCs during the trophozoite stage of P. falciparum that is followed by substantial shrinkage during the schizont stages. We determine that up to 90% depletion of hemoglobin from the RBC cytosol does not lead to a net loss of iron from the infected cells. We quantitatively follow the morphological changes in the parasites during the intraerythrocytic development by applying the interpretation model to the UV-visible spectroscopic measurements of the IRBCs. We expect this method of quantitative spectroscopic characterization of the diseased cells to have practical clinical utility for rapid diagnosis, therapeutic monitoring, and drug susceptibility testing.

  4. New methods for retrieval of chlorophyll red fluorescence from hyper-spectral satellite instruments: simulations and application to GOME-2 and SCIAMACHY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joiner, J.; Yoshida, Y.; Guanter, L.; Middleton, E.

    2016-12-01

    Global satellite measurements of solar-induced fluorescence (SIF) from chlorophyll over land and ocean have proven useful for a number of different applications related to physiology, phenology, and productivity of plants and phytoplankton. Terrestrial chlorophyll fluorescence is emitted throughout the red and far-red spectrum, producing two broad peaks near 683 and 736nm. Phytoplankton in oceans emits entirely in the red (683nm peak). Studies using satellite-derived SIF over land have focused almost exclusively on measurements in the far-red (> 712nm), since those are the most easily obtained with existing instrumentation. We examine new ways to use existing hyper-spectral satellite data sets to retrieve red SIF (< 712nm) over both land and ocean, providing complementary information to that from the far-red for terrestrial vegetation. The satellite instruments that we use, GOME-2 and SCIAMACHY, were designed to make atmospheric trace-gas measurements and are therefore not optimal for observing SIF; they have coarse spatial resolution and only moderate spectral resolution (0.5nm), but offer a unique opportunity to compare red and far-red terrestrial SIF emissions. We conducted retrievals of red SIF using an extensive database of simulated radiances covering a wide range of conditions. Our new algorithm produces good agreement between the simulated truth and retrievals and shows the potential of the O2 bands for noise reduction in red SIF retrievals as compared with approaches that rely solely on solar Fraunhofer line filling. Biases seen with existing satellite data, most likely due to instrumental artifacts that vary in time, space, and with instrument, must be addressed in order to obtain reasonable results. Our 8+ year GOME-2 record of red SIF observations over land allows for the first time reliable global mapping of monthly anomalies. These anomalies have similar spatio-temporal structure as those in the far-red, particularly for drought-prone regions with a

  5. Dynamics of carbohydrate residues of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid) followed by red-edge excitation spectra and emission anisotropy studies of Calcofluor White.

    PubMed

    Albani, J R; Sillen, A; Coddeville, B; Plancke, Y D; Engelborghs, Y

    1999-11-23

    Dynamics studies on Calcofluor White bound to the carbohydrate residues of sialylated and asialylated alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid) have been performed. The interaction between the fluorophore and the protein was found to occur preferentially with the glycan residues with a dependence on their spatial conformation. In the presence of sialylated alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, excitation at the red edge of the absorption spectrum of calcofluor does not lead to a shift in the fluorescence emission maximum (440 nm) of the fluorophore. Thus, the emission of calcofluor occurs from a relaxed state. This is confirmed by anisotropy studies as a function of temperature (Perrin plot). In the presence of asialylated alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, red-edge excitation spectra show an important shift (8 nm) of the fluorescence emission maximum of the probe. This reveals that emission of calcofluor occurs before relaxation of the surrounding carbohydrate residues occurs. Emission from a non-relaxed state means that Calcofluor molecules are bound tightly to the carbohydrate residues, a result confirmed by anisotropy studies.

  6. Real-time and quantitative fluorescent live-cell imaging with quadruplex-specific red-edge probe (G4-REP).

    PubMed

    Yang, Sunny Y; Amor, Souheila; Laguerre, Aurélien; Wong, Judy M Y; Monchaud, David

    2016-12-10

    The development of quadruplex-directed molecular diagnostic and therapy rely on mechanistic insights gained at both cellular and tissue levels by fluorescence imaging. This technique is based on fluorescent reporters that label cellular DNA and RNA quadruplexes to spatiotemporally address their complex cell biology. The photophysical characteristics of quadruplex probes usually dictate the modality of cell imaging by governing the selection of the light source (lamp, LED, laser), the optical light filters and the detection modality. Here, we report the characterizations of prototype from a new generation of quadruplex dye termed G4-REP (for quadruplex-specific red-edge probe) that provides fluorescence responses regardless of the excitation wavelength and modality (owing to the versatility gained through the red-edge effect), thus allowing for diverse applications and most imaging facilities. This is demonstrated by cell images (and associated quantifications) collected through confocal and multiphoton microscopy as well as through real-time live-cell imaging system over extended period, monitoring both non-cancerous and cancerous human cell lines. Our results promote a new way of designing versatile, efficient and convenient quadruplex-reporting dyes for tracking these higher-order nucleic acid structures in living human cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "G-quadruplex" Guest Editor: Dr. Concetta Giancola and Dr. Daniela Montesarchio.

  7. Master-oscillator power-amplifier in the red spectral range for holographic displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume, G.; Pohl, J.; Feise, D.; Wiedmann, J.; Ressel, P.; Eppich, B.; Sahm, A.; Ginolas, A.; Nedow, O.; Jendrzejewski, M.; Johne, P.; Hofmann, J.; Schiemangk, M.; Sumpf, B.; Erbert, G.; Paschke, K.

    2016-03-01

    RGB-light sources with a coherence length of several meters are required for holographic displays. Furthermore, these emitters must feature a high luminance and must be sufficiently small in size, to be employed in today's consumer market products. Therefore, an all-semiconductor based solution is preferred. We developed red-emitting semiconductor lasers at 635 nm and 647 nm with internal distributed Bragg reflectors and suitable amplifiers at these wavelengths to boost the lasers output power. We investigated tapered amplifiers containing a ridge-waveguide section as well as truncated tapered designs in master-oscillator power-amplifier configuration (MOPA). This allowed the generation of diffraction limited single mode emission by the MO-chip and subsequent amplification of the radiation by the PA-chip by more than 10 dB, without significantly degrading the coherence properties. We successfully demonstrated an optical output power of more than 300 mW at 635 nm and 500 mW at 647 nm. The radiation featured a linewidth below 10 MHz, which corresponds to a coherence length of at least several meters, well suited for a holographic system.

  8. Genetic structure of a regionally endangered orchid, the dark red helleborine (Epipactis atrorubens) at the edge of its distribution.

    PubMed

    Hens, Hilde; Jäkäläniemi, Anne; Tali, Kadri; Efimov, Petr; Kravchenko, Alexey V; Kvist, Laura

    2017-04-01

    The genetic structure and diversity of species is determined by both current population dynamics and historical processes. Population genetic structure at the edge of the distribution is often expected to differ substantially from populations at the centre, as these edge populations are often small and fragmented. In addition, populations located in regions that have experienced repeated glaciations throughout the Pleistocene, may still carry imprints from the genetic consequences of frequent distribution shifts. Using chloroplast DNA sequences and nuclear microsatellite markers we studied the genetic structure of Epipactis atrorubens at the northern edge of its distribution. Contrary to populations in the centre of the distribution, populations at the northern range are regionally endangered as they are small and disjunct. Sequence data of 2 chloroplast loci and allelic data from 6 nuclear microsatellite markers were obtained from 297 samples from Finland, Estonia and Russia. We sought for genetic indicators of past population processes, such as post-glacial colonisation history of E. atrorubens. As expected, we observed low genetic variation, in terms of numbers of substitutions, haplotypes and alleles, and significant levels of differentiation, especially pronounced in the chloroplast DNA. These features suggest that the edge populations could be prone to extinction.

  9. Flow injection mass spectral fingerprints demonstrate chemical differences in Rio Red grapefruit with respect to year, harvest time, and conventional versus organic farming.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei; Harnly, James M; Lester, Gene E

    2010-04-28

    Spectral fingerprints were acquired for Rio Red grapefruit using flow injection electrospray ionization with ion trap and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (FI-ESI-IT-MS and FI-ESI-TOF-MS). Rio Red grapefruits were harvested 3 times a year (early, mid, and late harvests) in 2005 and 2006 from conventionally and organically grown trees. Data analysis using analysis of variance principal component analysis (ANOVA-PCA) demonstrated that, for both MS systems, the chemical patterns were different as a function of farming mode (conventional vs organic), as well as growing year and time of harvest. This was visually obvious with PCA and was shown to be statistically significant using ANOVA. The spectral fingerprints provided a more inclusive view of the chemical composition of the grapefruit and extended previous conclusions regarding the chemical differences between conventionally and organically grown Rio Red grapefruit.

  10. Fermi edge singularity and finite-frequency spectral features in a semi-infinite one-dimensional wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikhan, A.; Snyman, I.

    2012-08-01

    We theoretically study a charge qubit interacting with electrons in a semi-infinite one-dimensional wire. The system displays the physics of the Fermi edge singularity. Our results generalize known results for the Fermi edge system to the regime where excitations induced by the qubit can resolve the spatial structure of the scattering region. We find resonant features in the qubit tunneling rate as a function of the qubit level splitting. They occur at integer multiples of hvF/l. Here vF is the Fermi velocity of the electrons in the wire, and l is the distance from the tip of the wire to the point where it interacts with the qubit. These features are due to the constructive interference of the amplitudes for creating single coherent left- or right-moving charge fluctuation (plasmon) in the electron gas. As the coupling between the qubit and the wire is increased, the resonances are washed out. This is a clear signature of the increasingly violent Fermi sea shake-up, associated with the creation of many plasmons whose individual energies are too low to meet the resonance condition.

  11. Spectral energy distribution simulations of a possible ring structure around the young, red brown dwarf G 196-3 B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakhozhay, Olga V.; Zapatero Osorio, María Rosa; Béjar, Víctor J. S.; Boehler, Yann

    2017-01-01

    The origin of the very red optical and infrared colours of intermediate-age (˜10-500 Myr) L-type dwarfs remains unknown. It has been suggested that low-gravity atmospheres containing large amounts of dust may account for the observed reddish nature. We explored an alternative scenario by simulating debris disc around G 196-3 B, which is an L3 young brown dwarf with a mass of ˜15 MJup and an age in the interval 20-300 Myr. The best-fit solution to G 196-3 B's photometric spectral energy distribution from optical wavelengths through 24 μm corresponds to the combination of an unreddened L3 atmosphere (Teff ≈ 1870 K) and a warm (≈1280 K), narrow (≈0.07-0.11 R⊙) debris disc located at very close distances (≈0.12-0.20 R⊙) from the central brown dwarf. This putative, optically thick, dusty belt, whose presence is compatible with the relatively young system age, would have a mass ≥7 × 10-10 M⊕ comprised of submicron/micron characteristic dusty particles with temperatures close to the sublimation threshold of silicates. Considering the derived global properties of the belt and the disc-to-brown dwarf mass ratio, the dusty ring around G 196-3 B may resemble the rings of Neptune and Jupiter, except for its high temperature and thick vertical height (≈6 × 103 km). Our inferred debris disc model is able to reproduce G 196-3 B's spectral energy distribution to a satisfactory level of achievement.

  12. Drift paths of ions composing multiple-nose spectral structures near the inner edge of the plasma sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Ferradas, C. P.; Zhang, J. -C.; Spence, H. E.; Kistler, L. M.; Larsen, Brian Arthur; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Funsten, Herbert O.

    2016-11-05

    Here in this paper, we present a case study of the H+, He+, and O+ multiple-nose structures observed by the Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron instrument on board Van Allen Probe A over one complete orbit on 28 September 2013. Nose structures are observed near the inner edge of the plasma sheet and constitute the signatures of ion drift in the highly dynamic environment of the inner magnetosphere. We find that the multiple noses are intrinsically associated with variations in the solar wind. Backward ion drift path tracings show new details of the drift trajectories of these ions; i.e., multiple noses are formed by ions with a short drift time from the assumed source location to the inner region and whose trajectories (1) encircle the Earth different number of times or (2) encircle the Earth equal number of times but with different drift time, before reaching the observation site.

  13. Drift paths of ions composing multiple-nose spectral structures near the inner edge of the plasma sheet

    DOE PAGES

    Ferradas, C. P.; Zhang, J. -C.; Spence, H. E.; ...

    2016-11-05

    Here in this paper, we present a case study of the H+, He+, and O+ multiple-nose structures observed by the Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron instrument on board Van Allen Probe A over one complete orbit on 28 September 2013. Nose structures are observed near the inner edge of the plasma sheet and constitute the signatures of ion drift in the highly dynamic environment of the inner magnetosphere. We find that the multiple noses are intrinsically associated with variations in the solar wind. Backward ion drift path tracings show new details of the drift trajectories of these ions; i.e., multiplemore » noses are formed by ions with a short drift time from the assumed source location to the inner region and whose trajectories (1) encircle the Earth different number of times or (2) encircle the Earth equal number of times but with different drift time, before reaching the observation site.« less

  14. Drift paths of ions composing multiple-nose spectral structures near the inner edge of the plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferradas, C. P.; Zhang, J.-C.; Spence, H. E.; Kistler, L. M.; Larsen, B. A.; Reeves, G.; Skoug, R.; Funsten, H.

    2016-11-01

    We present a case study of the H+, He+, and O+ multiple-nose structures observed by the Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron instrument on board Van Allen Probe A over one complete orbit on 28 September 2013. Nose structures are observed near the inner edge of the plasma sheet and constitute the signatures of ion drift in the highly dynamic environment of the inner magnetosphere. We find that the multiple noses are intrinsically associated with variations in the solar wind. Backward ion drift path tracings show new details of the drift trajectories of these ions; i.e., multiple noses are formed by ions with a short drift time from the assumed source location to the inner region and whose trajectories (1) encircle the Earth different number of times or (2) encircle the Earth equal number of times but with different drift time, before reaching the observation site.

  15. Spectral analysis of the line-width and line-edge roughness transfer during self-aligned double patterning approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuy, E.; Pargon, E.; Fouchier, M.; Grampeix, H.; Pradelles, J.; Darnon, M.; Pimenta-Barros, P.; Barnola, S.; Joubert, O.

    2015-03-01

    We report a 20 nm half-pitch self-aligned double patterning (SADPP) process based on a resist-core approach. Line/space 20/20 nm features in silicon are successfully obtained with CDvariation, LWR and LER of 0.7 nm, 2.4 nm and 2.3 nm respectively. The LWR and LER are characterized at each technological step of the process using a power spectral density fitting method, which allows a spectral analysis of the roughness and the determination of unbiased roughness values. Although the SADP concept generates two asymmetric populations of lines, the final LLWR and LER are similar. We show that this SADP process allows to decrease significantly the LWR and the LER of about 62% and 48% compared to the initial photoresist patterns. This study also demonstrates that SADP is a very powerful concept to decrease CD uniformity and LWR especially in its low-frequency components to reach sub-20 nm node requirements. However, LER low-frequency components are still high and remain a key issue tot address for an optimized integration.

  16. FRET multiphoton spectral imaging microscopy of 7-ketocholesterol and Nile Red in U937 monocytic cells loaded with 7-ketocholesterol.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Edmond; Vejux, Anne; Dumas, Dominique; Montange, Thomas; Frouin, Frédérique; Robert, Vincent; Riedinger, Jean-Marc; Stoltz, Jean-François; Gambert, Philippe; Todd-Pokropek, Andrew; Lizard, Gérard

    2004-12-01

    To show the effect of 7-ketocholesterol (7KC) on cellular lipid content by means of flow cytometry and the interaction of 7KC with Nile Red (NR) via ultraviolet fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) excitation of NR on U937 monocytic cells by means of 2-photon excitation confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Untreated and 7KC-treated U937 cells were stained with NR and analyzed by flow cytometry and CLSM. 3D sequences of images were obtained by spectral analysis in a 2-photon excitation CLSM and analyzed by the factor analysis of medical image sequences (FAMIS) algorithm, which provides factor curves and images. Factor images are the result of the FAMIS image processing method, which handles emission spectra. In FRET analysis, preparations are screened at selected UV wavelengths to avoid emission of NR in the absence of 7KC. During 7KC-induced cell death,flow cytometry and CLSM revealed a modification of the cellular lipid content. Factor images show FRET occurrence and subsequent colocalization of 7KC and NR. This investigation established the utility of 2-photon excitation CLSM to assess colocalization of 7KC with NR by FRET and to identify and distinguish polar and neutral lipids stained by NR that accumulate from the effect of 7KC.

  17. Life on the edge: O2 binding in Atlantic cod red blood cells near their southern distribution limit is not sensitive to temperature or haemoglobin genotype.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Samantha L; Metcalfe, Julian; Righton, David A; Berenbrink, Michael

    2017-02-01

    Atlantic cod are a commercially important species believed to be threatened by warming seas near their southern, equatorward upper thermal edge of distribution. Limitations to circulatory O2 transport, in particular cardiac output, and the geographic distribution of functionally different haemoglobin (Hb) genotypes have separately been suggested to play a role in setting thermal tolerance in this species. The present study assessed the thermal sensitivity of O2 binding in Atlantic cod red blood cells with different Hb genotypes near their upper thermal distribution limit and modelled its consequences for the arterio-venous O2 saturation difference, Sa-vO2 , another major determinant of circulatory O2 supply rate. The results showed statistically indistinguishable red blood cell O2 binding between the three HbI genotypes in wild-caught Atlantic cod from the Irish Sea (53° N). Red blood cells had an unusually low O2 affinity, with reduced or even reversed thermal sensitivity between pH 7.4 and 7.9, and 5.0 and 20.0°C. This was paired with strongly pH-dependent affinity and cooperativity of red blood cell O2 binding (Bohr and Root effects). Modelling of Sa-vO2  at physiological pH, temperature and O2 partial pressures revealed a substantial capacity for increases in Sa-vO2  to meet rising tissue O2 demands at 5.0 and 12.5°C, but not at 20°C. Furthermore, there was no evidence for an increase of maximal Sa-vO2  with temperature. It is suggested that Atlantic cod at such high temperatures may solely depend on increases in cardiac output and blood O2 capacity, or thermal acclimatisation of metabolic rate, for matching circulatory O2 supply to tissue demand.

  18. Life on the edge: O2 binding in Atlantic cod red blood cells near their southern distribution limit is not sensitive to temperature or haemoglobin genotype

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Samantha L.; Metcalfe, Julian; Righton, David A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Atlantic cod are a commercially important species believed to be threatened by warming seas near their southern, equatorward upper thermal edge of distribution. Limitations to circulatory O2 transport, in particular cardiac output, and the geographic distribution of functionally different haemoglobin (Hb) genotypes have separately been suggested to play a role in setting thermal tolerance in this species. The present study assessed the thermal sensitivity of O2 binding in Atlantic cod red blood cells with different Hb genotypes near their upper thermal distribution limit and modelled its consequences for the arterio-venous O2 saturation difference, Sa–vO2, another major determinant of circulatory O2 supply rate. The results showed statistically indistinguishable red blood cell O2 binding between the three HbI genotypes in wild-caught Atlantic cod from the Irish Sea (53° N). Red blood cells had an unusually low O2 affinity, with reduced or even reversed thermal sensitivity between pH 7.4 and 7.9, and 5.0 and 20.0°C. This was paired with strongly pH-dependent affinity and cooperativity of red blood cell O2 binding (Bohr and Root effects). Modelling of Sa–vO2 at physiological pH, temperature and O2 partial pressures revealed a substantial capacity for increases in Sa–vO2 to meet rising tissue O2 demands at 5.0 and 12.5°C, but not at 20°C. Furthermore, there was no evidence for an increase of maximal Sa–vO2 with temperature. It is suggested that Atlantic cod at such high temperatures may solely depend on increases in cardiac output and blood O2 capacity, or thermal acclimatisation of metabolic rate, for matching circulatory O2 supply to tissue demand. PMID:28148818

  19. Monolithic integration of InGaN segments emitting in the blue, green, and red spectral range in single ordered nanocolumns

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, S.; Bengoechea-Encabo, A.; Sanchez-Garcia, M. A.; Calleja, E.

    2013-05-06

    This work reports on the selective area growth by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and characterization of InGaN/GaN nanocolumnar heterostructures. The optimization of the In/Ga and total III/V ratios, as well as the growth temperature, provides control on the emission wavelength, either in the blue, green, or red spectral range. An adequate structure tailoring and monolithic integration in a single nanocolumnar heterostructure of three InGaN portions emitting in the red-green-blue colors lead to white light emission.

  20. Synthesis and spectroscopic studies of 4-Formyl-4'-N,N-dimethylamino-1,1'-biphenyl: The unusual red edge effect and efficient laser generation.

    PubMed

    Chou, P T; Chang, C P; Clements, J H; Meng-Shin, K

    1995-12-01

    The synthesis and photophysics of 4-formyl-4'-N,N-dimethylamino-1,1'-biphenyl are reported. The emission spectrum in various solvent polarities demonstrates solvatochromism, indicating that the fluorescence originates from an electronically excited species with a strong charge transfer character. The change in Δ[Formula: see text] [[Formula: see text] max(absorption) -[Formula: see text] max(emission)] varies from ∼1500 cm(-1) inn-heptane to as much as ∼7500 cm(-1) in acetonitrile. In protic solvents, the unusual excitation energy-dependent steady-state emission (red edge effect), resulting from solvent dielectric relaxation, was observed in media with a low viscosity. The large Stokes-shifted and high-yield fluorescence led to the observation of the efficient lasing action. The frequency tunability of the laser output is strongly solvent dependent, generating a new charge transfer laser dye in the blue-green region.

  1. [A study of the effect of low-intensity laser radiation of the blue, green, and red spectral regions on the healing of experimental skin wounds in rats].

    PubMed

    Machneva, T V; Protopopov, D M; Vladimirov, Iu A; Osipov, A N

    2008-01-01

    The effect of low-intensity laser radiation of the blue (441.2 nm), green (532 nm), and red (632.8 nm) spectral regions on the healing of experimental skin wounds in rats has been studied. The effect of the traditionally applied laser radiation in the red region has been compared with the effect of laser radiation in the other spectral regions, assuming that, upon irradiation of wounds by lasers emitting in the blue and green regions, a similar effect can be achieved at lower doses. The following parameters characterizing the healing of experimental wounds were used: the functional activity of phagocytes of wound exudates, which was determined by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence, and their number; the antioxidant activity of wound exudates; and the rate of healing, which was determined as a change in the wound area. It was shown that irradiation with laser accelerated the healing of wounds in all cases. The exposure to laser radiations in the red (1.5 J/cm), blue, and green (0.75 J/cm2) spectral regions shortened the time of wound healing from 22 to 17 and 19 days, respectively. The functional activity of leukocytes after the exposure increased on day 5 after the infliction of the wound, whereas in the control it decreased. The superoxide dismutase activity increased in all experimental groups by day 5 after the operation. A maximum increase in the superoxide dismutase activity occurred after the exposure to laser radiation in the red region at a dose of 1.5 J/cm and in the blue and green spectral regions at a dose of 0.75 J/cm2.

  2. Comparability of Red/Near-Infrared Reflectance and NDVI Based on the Spectral Response Function between MODIS and 30 Other Satellite Sensors Using Rice Canopy Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weijiao; Huang, Jingfeng; Wang, Xiuzhen; Wang, Fumin; Shi, Jingjing

    2013-01-01

    Long-term monitoring of regional and global environment changes often depends on the combined use of multi-source sensor data. The most widely used vegetation index is the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), which is a function of the red and near-infrared (NIR) spectral bands. The reflectance and NDVI data sets derived from different satellite sensor systems will not be directly comparable due to different spectral response functions (SRF), which has been recognized as one of the most important sources of uncertainty in the multi-sensor data analysis. This study quantified the influence of SRFs on the red and NIR reflectances and NDVI derived from 31 Earth observation satellite sensors. For this purpose, spectroradiometric measurements were performed for paddy rice grown under varied nitrogen levels and at different growth stages. The rice canopy reflectances were convoluted with the spectral response functions of various satellite instruments to simulate sensor-specific reflectances in the red and NIR channels. NDVI values were then calculated using the simulated red and NIR reflectances. The results showed that as compared to the Terra MODIS, the mean relative percentage difference (RPD) ranged from −12.67% to 36.30% for the red reflectance, −8.52% to −0.23% for the NIR reflectance, and −9.32% to 3.10% for the NDVI. The mean absolute percentage difference (APD) compared to the Terra MODIS ranged from 1.28% to 36.30% for the red reflectance, 0.84% to 8.71% for the NIR reflectance, and 0.59% to 9.32% for the NDVI. The lowest APD between MODIS and the other 30 satellite sensors was observed for Landsat5 TM for the red reflectance, CBERS02B CCD for the NIR reflectance and Landsat4 TM for the NDVI. In addition, the largest APD between MODIS and the other 30 satellite sensors was observed for IKONOS for the red reflectance, AVHRR1 onboard NOAA8 for the NIR reflectance and IKONOS for the NDVI. The results also indicated that AVHRRs onboard NOAA7

  3. Comparability of red/near-infrared reflectance and NDVI based on the spectral response function between MODIS and 30 other satellite sensors using rice canopy spectra.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weijiao; Huang, Jingfeng; Wang, Xiuzhen; Wang, Fumin; Shi, Jingjing

    2013-11-26

    Long-term monitoring of regional and global environment changes often depends on the combined use of multi-source sensor data. The most widely used vegetation index is the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), which is a function of the red and near-infrared (NIR) spectral bands. The reflectance and NDVI data sets derived from different satellite sensor systems will not be directly comparable due to different spectral response functions (SRF), which has been recognized as one of the most important sources of uncertainty in the multi-sensor data analysis. This study quantified the influence of SRFs on the red and NIR reflectances and NDVI derived from 31 Earth observation satellite sensors. For this purpose, spectroradiometric measurements were performed for paddy rice grown under varied nitrogen levels and at different growth stages. The rice canopy reflectances were convoluted with the spectral response functions of various satellite instruments to simulate sensor-specific reflectances in the red and NIR channels. NDVI values were then calculated using the simulated red and NIR reflectances. The results showed that as compared to the Terra MODIS, the mean relative percentage difference (RPD) ranged from -12.67% to 36.30% for the red reflectance, -8.52% to -0.23% for the NIR reflectance, and -9.32% to 3.10% for the NDVI. The mean absolute percentage difference (APD) compared to the Terra MODIS ranged from 1.28% to 36.30% for the red reflectance, 0.84% to 8.71% for the NIR reflectance, and 0.59% to 9.32% for the NDVI. The lowest APD between MODIS and the other 30 satellite sensors was observed for Landsat5 TM for the red reflectance, CBERS02B CCD for the NIR reflectance and Landsat4 TM for the NDVI. In addition, the largest APD between MODIS and the other 30 satellite sensors was observed for IKONOS for the red reflectance, AVHRR1 onboard NOAA8 for the NIR reflectance and IKONOS for the NDVI. The results also indicated that AVHRRs onboard NOAA7-17 showed

  4. Comparative study of Poincaré plot analysis using short electroencephalogram signals during anaesthesia with spectral edge frequency 95 and bispectral index.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, K; Yamada, T; Sawa, T

    2015-03-01

    The return or Poincaré plot is a non-linear analytical approach in a two-dimensional plane, where a timed signal is plotted against itself after a time delay. Its scatter pattern reflects the randomness and variability in the signals. Quantification of a Poincaré plot of the electroencephalogram has potential to determine anaesthesia depth. We quantified the degree of dispersion (i.e. standard deviation, SD) along the diagonal line of the electroencephalogram-Poincaré plot (named as SD1/SD2), and compared SD1/SD2 values with spectral edge frequency 95 (SEF95) and bispectral index values. The regression analysis showed a tight linear regression equation with a coefficient of determination (R(2) ) value of 0.904 (p < 0.0001) between the Poincaré index (SD1/SD2) and SEF95, and a moderate linear regression equation between SD1/SD2 and bispectral index (R(2)  = 0.346, p < 0.0001). Quantification of the Poincaré plot tightly correlates with SEF95, reflecting anaesthesia-dependent changes in electroencephalogram oscillation.

  5. Fourier-spectral element approximation of the ion–electron Braginskii system with application to tokamak edge plasma in divertor configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Minjeaud, Sebastian; Pasquetti, Richard

    2016-09-15

    Due to the extreme conditions required to produce energy by nuclear fusion in tokamaks, simulating the plasma behavior is an important but challenging task. We focus on the edge part of the plasma, where fluid approaches are probably the best suited, and our approach relies on the Braginskii ion–electron model. Assuming that the electric field is electrostatic, this yields a set of 10 strongly coupled and non-linear conservation equations that exhibit multiscale and anisotropy features. The computational domain is a torus of complex geometrical section, that corresponds to the divertor configuration, i.e. with an “X-point” in the magnetic surfaces. To capture the complex physics that is involved, high order methods are used: The time-discretization is based on a Strang splitting, that combines implicit and explicit high order Runge–Kutta schemes, and the space discretization makes use of the spectral element method in the poloidal plane together with Fourier expansions in the toroidal direction. The paper thoroughly describes the algorithms that have been developed, provides some numerical validations of the key algorithms and exhibits the results of preliminary numerical experiments. In particular, we point out that the highest frequency of the system is intermediate between the ion and electron cyclotron frequencies.

  6. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS AND SYSTEMATIC VARIATIONS IN THE SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS OF LUMINOUS RED GALAXIES FROM SDSS DR7

    SciTech Connect

    Greisel, N.; Seitz, S.; Bender, R.; Saglia, R. P.; Snigula, J.; Drory, N.

    2013-05-10

    We describe the construction of a template set of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for the estimation of photometric redshifts of luminous red galaxies (LRGs) with a Bayesian template fitting method. By examining the color properties of several publicly available SED sets within a redshift range of 0 < z {approx}< 0.5 and comparing them to Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 data, we show that only some of the investigated SEDs approximately match the colors of the LRG data throughout the redshift range, however not at the quantitative level required for precise photometric redshifts. This is because the SEDs of galaxies evolve with time (and redshift) and because at fixed redshift the LRG colors have an intrinsic spread such that they cannot be matched by one SED only. We generate new SEDs by superposing model SEDs of composite stellar populations with a burst model, allowing both components to be reddened by dust, in order to match the data in five different redshift bins. We select a set of SEDs which represents the LRG data in color space within five redshift bins, thus defining our new SED template set for photometric redshift estimates. The results we obtain with the new template set and our Bayesian template fitting photometric redshift code (PhotoZ) are nearly unbiased, with a scatter of {sigma}{sub {Delta}z} = 0.027 (including outliers), a fraction of catastrophic outliers (|z{sub phot} - z{sub spec}|/(1 + z{sub spec}) > 0.15) of {eta} = 0.12%, and a normalized median absolute rest frame deviation (NMAD) of {sigma}{sub NMAD} = 1.48 Multiplication-Sign MAD = 0.017 for non-outliers. We show that templates that optimally describe the brightest galaxies (-24.5 {<=} M{sub R} {<=} -22.7) indeed vary from z = 0.1 to z = 0.5, consistent with aging of the stellar population. Furthermore, we find that templates that optimally describe galaxies at z < 0.1 strongly differ as a function of the absolute magnitude of the galaxies, indicating an increase in

  7. Photometric Redshifts and Systematic Variations in the Spectral Energy Distributions of Luminous Red Galaxies from SDSS DR7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greisel, N.; Seitz, S.; Drory, N.; Bender, R.; Saglia, R. P.; Snigula, J.

    2013-05-01

    We describe the construction of a template set of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for the estimation of photometric redshifts of luminous red galaxies (LRGs) with a Bayesian template fitting method. By examining the color properties of several publicly available SED sets within a redshift range of 0 < z <~ 0.5 and comparing them to Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 data, we show that only some of the investigated SEDs approximately match the colors of the LRG data throughout the redshift range, however not at the quantitative level required for precise photometric redshifts. This is because the SEDs of galaxies evolve with time (and redshift) and because at fixed redshift the LRG colors have an intrinsic spread such that they cannot be matched by one SED only. We generate new SEDs by superposing model SEDs of composite stellar populations with a burst model, allowing both components to be reddened by dust, in order to match the data in five different redshift bins. We select a set of SEDs which represents the LRG data in color space within five redshift bins, thus defining our new SED template set for photometric redshift estimates. The results we obtain with the new template set and our Bayesian template fitting photometric redshift code (PhotoZ) are nearly unbiased, with a scatter of σΔz = 0.027 (including outliers), a fraction of catastrophic outliers (|z phot - z spec|/(1 + z spec) > 0.15) of η = 0.12%, and a normalized median absolute rest frame deviation (NMAD) of σNMAD = 1.48 × MAD = 0.017 for non-outliers. We show that templates that optimally describe the brightest galaxies (-24.5 <= MR <= -22.7) indeed vary from z = 0.1 to z = 0.5, consistent with aging of the stellar population. Furthermore, we find that templates that optimally describe galaxies at z < 0.1 strongly differ as a function of the absolute magnitude of the galaxies, indicating an increase in star formation activity for less luminous galaxies. Our findings based on the

  8. THE ASSEMBLY OF THE RED SEQUENCE AT z {approx} 1: THE COLOR AND SPECTRAL PROPERTIES OF GALAXIES IN THE Cl1604 SUPERCLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Lemaux, B. C.; Gal, R. R.; Lubin, L. M.; Fassnacht, C. D.; and others

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the properties of the 525 spectroscopically confirmed members of the Cl1604 supercluster at z {approx} 0.9 as part of the Observations of Redshift Evolution in Large Scale Environments survey. In particular, we focus on the photometric, stellar mass, morphological, and spectral properties of the 305 member galaxies of the eight clusters and groups that comprise the Cl1604 supercluster. Using an extensive Keck Low-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (LRIS)/DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph (DEIMOS) spectroscopic database in conjunction with ten-band ground-based, Spitzer, and Hubble Space Telescope imaging, we investigate the buildup of the red sequence in groups and clusters at high redshift. Nearly all of the brightest and most massive red-sequence galaxies present in the supercluster environment are found to lie within the bounds of the cluster and group systems, with a surprisingly large number of such galaxies present in low-mass group systems. Despite the prevalence of these red-sequence galaxies, we find that the average cluster galaxy has a spectrum indicative of a star-forming galaxy, with a star formation rate between those of z {approx} 1 field galaxies and moderate-redshift cluster galaxies. The average group galaxy is even more active, exhibiting spectral properties indicative of a starburst. The presence of massive, red galaxies and the high fraction of starbursting galaxies present in the group environment suggest that significant processing is occurring in group environments at z {approx} 1 and earlier. There is a deficit of low-luminosity red-sequence galaxies in all Cl1604 clusters and groups, suggesting that such galaxies transition to the red sequence at later times. Extremely massive ({approx}10{sup 12} M{sub sun}) red-sequence galaxies routinely observed in rich clusters at z {approx} 0 are also absent from the Cl1604 clusters and groups. We suggest that such galaxies form at later times through merging processes. There are

  9. Evaluation of spectral light management on growth of container-grown willow oak, nuttall oak and summer red maple

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant response to blue, red, gray or black shade cloth was evaluated with willow oak (Quercus phellos L.), Nuttall oak (Quercus nuttallii Palmer, Nuttall) and Summer Red maple (Acer rubrum L. ‘Summer Red’) liners. Light transmitted through the colored shade cloth had no influence on germination of ...

  10. A Substantial Population of Red Galaxies at z > 2: Modeling of the Spectral Energy Distributions of an Extended Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster Schreiber, N. M.; van Dokkum, P. G.; Franx, M.; Labbé, I.; Rudnick, G.; Daddi, E.; Illingworth, G. D.; Kriek, M.; Moorwood, A. F. M.; Rix, H.-W.; Röttgering, H.; Trujillo, I.; van der Werf, P.; van Starkenburg, L.; Wuyts, S.

    2004-11-01

    We investigate the nature of the substantial population of high-redshift galaxies with Js-Ks>=2.3 colors recently discovered as part of our Faint Infrared Extragalactic Survey (FIRES). This color cut efficiently isolates galaxies at z>2 with red rest-frame optical colors (``distant red galaxies'' [DRGs]). We select Js-Ks>=2.3 objects in both FIRES fields, the ~2.5m×2.5m Hubble Deep Field-South (HDF-S) and the ~5'×5' field around the MS 1054-03 cluster at z=0.83; the surface densities at Ks,Vega<21 mag are 1.6+/-0.6 and 1.0+/-0.2 arcmin-2, respectively. We here discuss a subsample of 34 DRGs at 2<=z<=3.5: 11 at Ks,Vega<22.5 mag in HDF-S and 23 at Ks,Vega<21.7 mag in the MS 1054-03 field. This sample enables for the first time a robust assessment of the population properties of DRGs. We analyze the λ=0.3-2.2 μm spectral energy distributions (SEDs) constructed from our very deep near-infrared (NIR) and optical imaging collected at the ESO Very Large Telescope and from the Hubble Space Telescope. We develop diagnostics involving the I814-Js, Js-H, and H-Ks colors to argue that the red NIR colors of our DRG sample cannot be attributed solely to interstellar dust extinction and require for many the presence of an evolved stellar population with a prominent Balmer/4000 Å break. In the rest frame, the optical colors of DRGs fall within the envelope of normal nearby galaxies and the ultraviolet colors suggest a wide range in star formation activity and/or extinction. This is in stark contrast with the much bluer and more uniform SEDs of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs). From evolutionary synthesis modeling assuming constant star formation (CSF), we derive for the DRGs old ages, large extinctions, and high stellar masses, mass-to-light ratios, and star formation rates (SFRs). For solar metallicity, a Salpeter initial mass function (IMF) between 0.1 and 100 Msolar, and the Calzetti et al. extinction law, the median values for the HDF-S (MS 1054-03 field) sample are 1.7 (2

  11. Red-shift of spectral sensitivity due to screening pigment migration in the eyes of a moth, Adoxophyes orana.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Aya; Stewart, Finlay J; Koshitaka, Hisaharu; Akashi, Hiroshi D; Pirih, Primož; Sato, Yasushi; Arikawa, Kentaro

    2017-01-01

    We have found that the spectral sensitivity of the compound eye in the summer fruit tortrix moth (Adoxophyes orana) differs in laboratory strains originating from different regions of Japan. We have investigated the mechanisms underlying this anomalous spectral sensitivity. We applied electrophysiology, light and electron microscopy, opsin gene cloning, mathematical modeling, and behavioral analysis. The ERG-determined spectral sensitivity of dark-adapted individuals of all strains peaks around 520 nm. When light-adapted, the spectral sensitivity of the Nagano strain narrows and its peak shifts to 580 nm, while that in other strains remains unchanged. All tested strains appear to be identical in terms of the basic structure of the eye, the pigment migration in response to light- and dark-adaptation, and the molecular structure of long-wavelength absorbing visual pigments. However, the color of the perirhabdomal pigment clearly differs; it is orange in the Nagano strain and purple in the others. The action spectrum of phototaxis appears to be shifted towards longer wavelengths in the Nagano individuals. The spectral sensitivities of light-adapted eyes can be modeled under the assumption that this screening pigment plays a crucial role in determining the spectral sensitivity. The action spectrum of phototaxis indicates that the change in the eye spectral sensitivity is behaviorally relevant.

  12. Three-dimensional hydrodynamical CO5BOLD model atmospheres of red giant stars. II. Spectral line formation in the atmosphere of a giant located near the RGB tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kučinskas, A.; Steffen, M.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Dobrovolskas, V.; Ivanauskas, A.; Klevas, J.; Prakapavičius, D.; Caffau, E.; Bonifacio, P.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: We investigate the role of convection in the formation of atomic and molecular lines in the atmosphere of a red giant star. For this purpose we study the formation properties of spectral lines that belong to a number of astrophysically important tracer elements, including neutral and singly ionized atoms (Li I, N I, O I, Na I, Mg I, Al I, Si I, Si II, S I, K I, Ca I, Ca II, Ti I, Ti II, Cr I, Cr II, Mn I, Fe I, Fe II, Co I, Ni I, Zn I, Sr II, Ba II, and Eu II), and molecules (CH, CO, C2, NH, CN, and OH). Methods: We focus our investigation on a prototypical red giant located close to the red giant branch (RGB) tip (Teff = 3660 K, log g = 1.0, [M/H] = 0.0). We used two types of model atmospheres, 3D hydrodynamical and classical 1D, calculated with the CO5BOLD and LHD stellar atmosphere codes, respectively. Both codes share the same atmospheric parameters, chemical composition, equation of state, and opacities, which allowed us to make a strictly differential comparison between the line formation properties predicted in 3D and 1D. The influence of convection on the spectral line formation was assessed with the aid of 3D-1D abundance corrections, which measure the difference between the abundances of chemical species derived with the 3D hydrodynamical and 1D classical model atmospheres. Results: We find that convection plays a significant role in the spectral line formation in this particular red giant. The derived 3D-1D abundance corrections rarely exceed ± 0.1 dex when lines of neutral atoms and molecules are considered, which is in line with the previous findings for solar-metallicity red giants located on the lower RGB. The situation is different with lines that belong to ionized atoms, or to neutral atoms with high ionization potential. In both cases, the corrections for high-excitation lines (χ > 8 eV) may amount to Δ3D-1D ~ -0.4 dex. The 3D-1D abundance corrections generally show a significant wavelength dependence; in most cases they are smaller in

  13. Simple luminosity normalization of greenness, yellowness and redness/greenness for comparison of leaf spectral profiles in multi-temporally acquired remote sensing images.

    PubMed

    Doi, Ryoichi

    2012-09-01

    Observation of leaf colour (spectral profiles) through remote sensing is an effective method of identifying the spatial distribution patterns of abnormalities in leaf colour, which enables appropriate plant management measures to be taken. However, because the brightness of remote sensing images varies with acquisition time, in the observation of leaf spectral profiles in multi-temporally acquired remote sensing images, changes in brightness must be taken into account. This study identified a simple luminosity normalization technique that enables leaf colours to be compared in remote sensing images over time. The intensity values of green and yellow (green+red) exhibited strong linear relationships with luminosity (R2 greater than 0.926) when various invariant rooftops in Bangkok or Tokyo were spectralprofiled using remote sensing images acquired at different time points. The values of the coefficient and constant or the coefficient of the formulae describing the intensity of green or yellow were comparable among the single Bangkok site and the two Tokyo sites, indicating the technique's general applicability. For single rooftops, the values of the coefficient of variation for green, yellow, and red/green were 16% or less (n=6-11), indicating an accuracy not less than those of well-established remote sensing measures such as the normalized difference vegetation index. After obtaining the above linear relationships, raw intensity values were normalized and a temporal comparison of the spectral profiles of the canopies of evergreen and deciduous tree species in Tokyo was made to highlight the changes in the canopies' spectral profiles. Future aspects of this technique are discussed herein.

  14. Spectral characterization of forest damage occurring on Whiteface Mountain, NY - Studies with the Fluorescence Line Imager (FLI) and ground-based spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, B. N.; Moss, D. M.; Miller, J. R.; Freemantle, J. R.; Boyer, M. G.

    1990-01-01

    Ground-based spectral characteristics of fir wave damage and an analysis of calibrated FLI data acquired along the same fir wave utilized for the in situ measurements are presented. Derivative curve data were produced from both in situ and FLI reflectance measurements for the red edge spectral region for birch and for various portions of a fir wave. The results suggested that with proper atmospheric correction of airborne imaging spectrometer data sets, the derivative curve approach will provide an accurate means of assessing red edge parameters, and that such data will permit identification of specific types of forest damage on the basis of spectral fine features.

  15. (In,Ga,Al)P–GaP laser diodes grown on high-index GaAs surfaces emitting in the green, yellow and bright red spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledentsov, N. N.; Shchukin, V. A.; Shernyakov, Yu M.; Kulagina, M. M.; Payusov, A. S.; Gordeev, N. Yu; Maximov, M. V.; Cherkashin, N. A.

    2017-02-01

    We report on low threshold current density (<400 A cm‑2) injection lasing in (Al x Ga1–x )0.5In0.5P–GaAs-based diodes down to the green spectral range (<570 nm). The epitaxial structures are grown on high-index (611)A and (211)A GaAs substrates by metal–organic vapor phase epitaxy and contain tensile-strained GaP-enriched insertions aimed at reflection of the injected nonequilibrium electrons preventing their escape from the active region. Extended waveguide concept results in a vertical beam divergence with a full width at half maximum of 15° for (611)A substrates. The lasing at the wavelength of 569 nm is realized at 85 K. In an orange–red laser diode structure low threshold current density (190 A cm‑2) in the orange spectral range (598 nm) is realized at 85 K. The latter devices demonstrated room temperature lasing at 628 nm at ∼2 kA cm‑2 and a total power above 3 W. The red laser diodes grown on (211)A substrates demonstrated a far field characteristic for vertically multimode lasing indicating a lower optical confinement factor for the fundamental mode as compared to the devices grown on (611)A. However, as expected from previous research, the temperature stability of the threshold current and the wavelength stability were significantly higher for (211)A-grown structures.

  16. The photodissociation of CH(3)I in the red edge of the A-band: Comparison between slice imaging experiments and multisurface wave packet calculations.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Lago, L; García-Vela, A; Arregui, A; Amaral, G A; Bañares, L

    2009-11-07

    The photodissociation of methyl iodide at different wavelengths in the red edge of the A-band (286-333 nm) has been studied using a combination of slice imaging and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization detection of the methyl fragment in the vibrational ground state (nu=0). The kinetic energy distributions (KED) of the produced CH(3)(nu=0) fragments show a vibrational structure, both in the I((2)P(3/2)) and I( *)((2)P(1/2)) channels, due to the contribution to the overall process of initial vibrational excitation in the nu(3)(C-I) mode of the parent CH(3)I. The structures observed in the KEDs shift toward upper vibrational excited levels of CH(3)I when the photolysis wavelength is increased. The I((2)P(3/2))/I( *)((2)P(1/2)) branching ratios, photofragment anisotropies, and the contribution of vibrational excitation of the parent CH(3)I are explained in terms of the contribution of the three excited surfaces involved in the photodissociation process, (3)Q(0), (1)Q(1), and (3)Q(1), as well as the probability of nonadiabatic curve crossing (1)Q(1)<--(3)Q(0). The experimental results are compared with multisurface wave packet calculations carried out using the available ab initio potential energy surfaces, transition moments, and nonadiabatic couplings, employing a reduced dimensionality (pseudotriatomic) model. A general qualitative good agreement has been found between theory and experiment, the most important discrepancies being in the I((2)P(3/2))/[I((2)P(3/2))+I( *)((2)P(1/2))] branching ratios. Inaccuracies of the available potential energy surfaces are the main reason for the discrepancies.

  17. Protanopia (red color-blindness) in medaka: a simple system for producing color-blind fish and testing their spectral sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Homma, Noriko; Harada, Yumi; Uchikawa, Tamaki; Kamei, Yasuhiro; Fukamachi, Shoji

    2017-02-06

    Color perception is important for fish to survive and reproduce in nature. Visual pigments in the retinal photoreceptor cells are responsible for receiving light stimuli, but the function of the pigments in vivo has not been directly investigated in many animals due to the lack of color-blind lines and appropriate color-perception tests. In this study, we established a system for producing color-blind fish and testing their spectral sensitivity. First, we disrupted long-wavelength-sensitive (LWS) opsins of medaka (Oryzias latipes) using the CRISPR/Cas9 system to make red-color-blind lines. Single guide RNAs were designed using the consensus sequences between the paralogous LWSa and LWSb genes to simultaneously introduce double-frameshift mutations. Next, we developed a non-invasive and no-prior-learning test for spectral sensitivity by applying an optomotor response (OMR) test under an Okazaki Large Spectrograph (OLS), termed the O-O test. We constructed an electrical-rotary cylinder with black/white stripes, into which a glass aquarium containing one or more fish was placed under various monochromatic light conditions. The medaka were irradiated by the OLS every 10 nm, from wavelengths of 700 nm to 900 nm, and OMR was evaluated under each condition. We confirmed that the lws (-) medaka were indeed insensitive to red light (protanopia). While the control fish responded to wavelengths of up to 830 nm (λ = 830 nm), the lws (-) mutants responded up to λ = 740 nm; however, this difference was not observed after adaptation to dark: both the control and lws (-) fish could respond up to λ = 820 ~ 830 nm. These results suggest that the lws (-) mutants lost photopic red-cone vision, but retained scotopic rod vision. Considering that the peak absorption spectra (λmax) of medaka LWSs are about 560 nm, but the light-adapted control medaka could respond behaviorally to light at λ = 830 nm, red-cone vision could cover an unexpectedly wide range

  18. Near-Infrared high resolution spectral survey of comets with GIANO/TNG: The CN red-system at 1.1 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faggi, Sara; Villanueva, Geronimo Luis; Mumma, Michael J.; Tozzi, Gian-Paolo; Brucato, John Robert

    2016-10-01

    High-resolution spectroscopy in the near-infrared spectral range is a powerful tool to investigate chemical composition and isotopic fractionation.Comets are the best preserved relic of the enfant stages of the solar system. By targeting biologically relevant species in cometary comae and retrieving isotopic (e.g. D/H) and spin isomeric (e.g., ortho- and para- water) ratios, we can study the formation and evolution of solar system matter, address the origin of Earth's oceans and characterize the delivery of organic matter that was essential for the appearance of life on early Earth. We initiated the first high resolution spectral survey of comets ever conducted in the 0.9-2.5 μm range, targeting C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy), C/2013 US10 (Catalina) and C/2013 X1 (Panstarrs) with GIANO - the near-IR high resolution spectrograph on Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG). In comet Lovejoy, we detected eight ro-vibrational bands of H2O (Faggi et al., 2016, ApJ in press), emission from the red-system of CN, and many other emission lines whose precursors are now being identified. In this talk we will present a new quantum mechanical solar fluorescence model for the CN red system and the retrievals obtained with it from our cometary spectra. These observations open new pathways for cometary science in the near-infrared spectral range (0.9-2.5 μm) and establish the feasibility of astrobiology-related scientific investigations with future high resolution IR spectrographs on 30-m class telescopes, e.g., the HIRES spectrograph on the E-ELT telescope. This work is part of Sara Faggi's Ph.D. thesis project. NASA's Planetary Astronomy Program supported GLV and MJM through funding awarded under proposal 11-PAST11-0045 (M. J. Mumma, PI ).

  19. [Study on the relationship between spectral properties of oilseed rape leaves and their chlorophyll content].

    PubMed

    Fang, Hui; Song, Hai-Yan; Cao, Fang; He, Yong; Qiu, Zheng-Jun

    2007-09-01

    Chlorophyll is the important factors of the crop in its growth stage, and it is the favorable indicator of nutrition stress and photosynthesis. Site-specific crop nutrition diagnosis is the basics of the scientific fertilizer management, and it is essential for the practice of precision agriculture. Spectral properties of the oilseed rape leaves in different nitrogenous fertilizer levels were measured using visible-near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (Vis-NIRS) with natural illumination in the present study. According to the unique spectral properties of the crop, multiple stepwise regression technique was used to find the relationships between chlorophyll content and red edge, green edge. The result shows that the model with two independent variables (red edge, green edge) was better than with the one independeot variable (red edge). The correlation coefficient was 0.863, 0.848, and SEC was 5.273, 5.459, respectively. It can be seen the combination of the red edge and green edge can accurately predict chlorophyll content.

  20. Accurate Spectral Fits of Jupiter's Great Red Spot: VIMS Visual Spectra Modelled with Chromophores Created by Photolyzed Ammonia Reacting with Acetyleneχ±

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baines, Kevin; Sromovsky, Lawrence A.; Fry, Patrick M.; Carlson, Robert W.; Momary, Thomas W.

    2016-10-01

    We report results incorporating the red-tinted photochemically-generated aerosols of Carlson et al (2016, Icarus 274, 106-115) in spectral models of Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS). Spectral models of the 0.35-1.0-micron spectrum show good agreement with Cassini/VIMS near-center-meridian and near-limb GRS spectra for model morphologies incorporating an optically-thin layer of Carlson (2016) aerosols at high altitudes, either at the top of the tropospheric GRS cloud, or in a distinct stratospheric haze layer. Specifically, a two-layer "crème brûlée" structure of the Mie-scattering Carlson et al (2016) chromophore attached to the top of a conservatively scattering (hereafter, "white") optically-thick cloud fits the spectra well. Currently, best agreement (reduced χ2 of 0.89 for the central-meridian spectrum) is found for a 0.195-0.217-bar, 0.19 ± 0.02 opacity layer of chromophores with mean particle radius of 0.14 ± 0.01 micron. As well, a structure with a detached stratospheric chromophore layer ~0.25 bar above a white tropospheric GRS cloud provides a good spectral match (reduced χ2 of 1.16). Alternatively, a cloud morphology with the chromophore coating white particles in a single optically- and physically-thick cloud (the "coated-shell model", initially explored by Carlson et al 2016) was found to give significantly inferior fits (best reduced χ2 of 2.9). Overall, we find that models accurately fit the GRS spectrum if (1) most of the optical depth of the chromophore is in a layer near the top of the main cloud or in a distinct separated layer above it, but is not uniformly distributed within the main cloud, (2) the chromophore consists of relatively small, 0.1-0.2-micron-radius particles, and (3) the chromophore layer optical depth is small, ~ 0.1-0.2. Thus, our analysis supports the exogenic origin of the red chromophore consistent with the Carlson et al (2016) photolytic production mechanism rather than an endogenic origin, such as upwelling of material

  1. AMBER-NACO aperture-synthesis imaging of the half-obscured central star and the edge-on disk of the red giant L2 Puppis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnaka, K.; Schertl, D.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Weigelt, G.

    2015-09-01

    Aims: The red giant L2 Pup started a dimming event in 1994, which is considered to be caused by the ejection of dust clouds. We present near-IR aperture-synthesis imaging of L2 Pup achieved by combining data from VLT/NACO and the AMBER instrument of the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). Our aim is to spatially resolve the innermost region of the circumstellar environment. Methods: We carried out speckle interferometric observations at 2.27 μm with VLT/NACO and long-baseline interferometric observations with VLTI/AMBER at 2.2-2.35 μm with baselines of 15-81 m. We also extracted an 8.7 μm image from the mid-IR VLTI instrument MIDI. Results: The diffraction-limited image obtained by bispectrum speckle interferometry with NACO with a spatial resolution of 57 mas shows an elongated component. The aperture-synthesis imaging combining the NACO speckle data and AMBER data with a spatial resolution of 5.6 × 7.3 mas further resolves not only this elongated component, but also the central star. The reconstructed image reveals that the elongated component is a nearly edge-on disk with a size of ~180 × 50 mas lying in the E-W direction, and furthermore, that the southern hemisphere of the central star is severely obscured by the equatorial dust lane of the disk. The angular size of the disk is consistent with the distance that the dust clouds that were ejected at the onset of the dimming event should have traveled by the time of our observations, if we assume that the dust clouds moved radially. This implies that the formation of the disk may be responsible for the dimming event. The 8.7 μm image with a spatial resolution of 220 mas extracted from the MIDI data taken in 2004 (seven years before the AMBER and NACO observations) shows an approximately spherical envelope without a signature of the disk. This suggests that the mass loss before the dimming event may have been spherical. Based on AMBER, NACO, and MIDI observations made with the Very Large Telescope

  2. Cationic Silicon Nanocrystals with Colloidal Stability, pH‐Independent Positive Surface Charge and Size Tunable Photoluminescence in the Near‐Infrared to Red Spectral Range

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kenneth K.; Liao, Kristine; Casillas, Gilberto; Li, Yiying

    2016-01-01

    In this report, the synthesis of a novel class of cationic quaternary ammonium‐surface‐functionalized silicon nanocrystals (ncSi) using a novel and highly versatile terminal alkyl halide‐surface‐functionalized ncSi synthon is described. The distinctive features of these cationic ncSi include colloidal stability, pH‐independent positive surface charge, and size‐tunable photoluminescence (PL) in the biologically relevant near‐infrared‐to‐red spectral region. These cationic ncSi are characterized via a combination of high‐resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy with energy‐dispersive X‐ray analysis, Fourier transform infrared, X‐ray photoelectron, and photoluminescence spectroscopies, and zeta potential measurements. PMID:27812459

  3. Defect correlated fluorescent quenching and electron phonon coupling in the spectral transition of Eu3+ in CaTiO3 for red emission in display application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Som, S.; Kunti, A. K.; Kumar, Vinod; Kumar, Vijay; Dutta, S.; Chowdhury, M.; Sharma, S. K.; Terblans, J. J.; Swart, H. C.

    2014-05-01

    This paper reports on the defect correlated self-quenching and spectroscopic investigation of calcium titanate (CaTiO3) phosphors. A series of CaTiO3 phosphors doped with trivalent europium (Eu3+) and codoped with potassium (K+) ions were prepared by the solid state reaction method. The X-ray diffraction results revealed that the obtained powder phosphors consisted out of a single-phase orthorhombic structure and it also indicated that the incorporation of the dopants/co-dopants did not affect the crystal structure. The scanning electron microscopy images revealed the irregular morphology of the prepared phosphors consisting out of μm sized diameter particles. The Eu3+ doped phosphors illuminated with ultraviolet light showed the characteristic red luminescence corresponding to the 5D0→7FJ transitions of Eu3+. As a charge compensator, K+ ions were incorporated into the CaTiO3:Eu3+ phosphors, which enhanced the photoluminescence (PL) intensities depending on the doping concentration of K+. The concentration quenching of Eu3+ in this host is discussed in the light of ion-ion interaction, electron phonon coupling, and defect to ion energy transfer. The spectral characteristics and the Eu-O ligand behaviour were determined using the Judd-Ofelt theory from the PL spectra instead of the absorption spectra. The CIE (International Commission on Illumination) parameters were calculated using spectral energy distribution functions and McCamy's empirical formula. Photometric characterization indicated the suitability of K+ compensated the CaTiO3:Eu3+ phosphor for pure red emission in light-emitting diode applications.

  4. The characteristic analysis of spectral image for cabbage leaves damaged by diamondback moth pests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li-bo; Li, Hong-ning; Cao, Peng-fei; Qin, Feng; Yang, Shu-ming; Feng, Jie

    2015-02-01

    Cabbage growth and health diagnosis are important parts for cabbage fine planting, spectral imaging technology with the advantages of obtaining spectrum and space information of the target at the same time, which has become a research hotspot at home and abroad. The experiment measures the reflection spectrum at different stages using liquid crystal tunable filter (LCTF) and monochromatic CMOS camera composed of spectral imaging system for cabbage leaves damaged by diamondback moth pests, and analyzes its feature bands and the change of spectral parameters. The study shows that the feature bands of cabbage leaves damaged by diamondback moth pests have a tendency to blue light direction, the red edge towards blue shift, and red valley raising in spectral characteristic parameters, which have a good indication in diagnosing the extent of cabbage damaged by pests. Therefore, it has a unique advantage of monitoring the cabbage leaves damaged by diamondback moth pests by combinating feature bands and spectral characteristic parameters in spectral imaging technology.

  5. Study on the spectral characteristics of the damaged rice under brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiuju; Cheng, Qian

    2010-11-01

    The spectra of healthy leaves and leaves damaged by the rice brown planthopper (BPH, Nilaparvata lugens) were measured using a Spectroradiometer with spectral range of 350-1050 nm and resolution of 3 nm. The data was analyzed using the method of red edge methods. In the range of 430-530 nm and 560-730cnm, the band depth and slope were calculated. The damage degrees of rice plants caused by the BPH nymphae with different numbers were measured well by the spectral reflectance. The spectral characteristics of damaged rice under brown Planthopper, Nilaparvata lugenswere analyzed, and the reflectance was significantly negatively correlated with the number of BPHs. The red edge slope and edge area of the reflectance also significance correlated with the number of nymphae. The estimation models were constructed to estimate the BPHs using the spectral reflectance at the wavelengths of 550 nm and 760 nm and the red edge index. The results showed that accuracy of the estimation models were 66-81% and the spectral reflectance at R755 was efficient for estimating the number of BPHs.

  6. Influence of oxygen saturation on the optical scattering properties of human red blood cells in the spectral range 250 to 2,000 nm.

    PubMed

    Friebel, Moritz; Helfmann, Jürgen; Netz, Uwe; Meinke, Martina

    2009-01-01

    The intrinsic optical parameters absorption coefficient mu(a), scattering coefficient micros, anisotropy factor g, and effective scattering coefficient micros were determined for human red blood cell (RBC) suspensions of hematocrit 33.2% dependent on the oxygen saturation (SAT O(2)) in the wavelength range 250 to 2,000 nm, including the range above 1,100 nm, about which there are no data available in the literature. Integrating sphere measurements of light transmittance and reflectance in combination with inverse Monte Carlo simulation were carried out for SAT O(2) levels of 100 and 0%. In the wavelength range up to 1,200 nm, the absorption behavior is determined by the hemoglobin absorption. The spectral range above the cells' absorption shows no dependence on SAT O(2) and approximates the absorption of water with values 20 to 30% below the respective values for water. Parameters micros and g are significantly influenced by the SAT O(2)-induced absorption changes. Above 600 nm, micros decreases continuously from values of 85 mm(-1) to values of 30 mm(-1) at 2,000 nm. The anisotropy factor shows a slight decrease with wavelengths above 600 nm. In the spectral regions of 1,450 and 1,900 nm where water has local absorption maxima, g shows a significant decrease down to 0.85, whereas micros increases.

  7. Polarization pattern of freshwater habitats recorded by video polarimetry in red, green and blue spectral ranges and its relevance for water detection by aquatic insects

    PubMed

    HorvÁTh; VarjÚ

    1997-01-01

    The reflection-polarization patterns of small freshwater habitats under clear skies can be recorded by video polarimetry in the red, green and blue ranges of the spectrum. In this paper, the simple technique of rotating-analyzer video polarimetry is described and its advantages and disadvantages are discussed. It is shown that the polarization patterns of small water bodies are very variable in the different spectral ranges depending on the illumination conditions. Under clear skies and in the visible range of the spectrum, flat water surfaces reflecting light from the sky are most strongly polarized in the blue range. Under an overcast sky radiating diffuse white light, small freshwater habitats are characterized by a high level of horizontal polarization at or near the Brewster angle in all spectral ranges except that in which the contribution of subsurface reflection is large. In a given spectral range and at a given angle of view, the direction of polarization is horizontal if the light mirrored from the surface dominates and vertical if the light returning from the subsurface regions dominates. The greater the degree of dominance, the higher the net degree of polarization, the theoretical maximum value being 100 % at the Brewster angle for the horizontal E-vector component and approximately 30 % at flat viewing angles for the vertical E-vector component. We have made video polarimetric measurements of differently coloured fruits and vegetables to demonstrate that polarized light in nature follows this general rule. The consequences of the reflection-polarization patterns of small bodies of water for water detection by polarization-sensitive aquatic insects are discussed.

  8. Calculation of near-edge x-ray-absorption fine structure at finite temperatures: spectral signatures of hydrogen bond breaking in liquid water.

    PubMed

    Hetényi, Balázs; De Angelis, Filippo; Giannozzi, Paolo; Car, Roberto

    2004-05-08

    We calculate the near-edge x-ray-absorption fine structure of H(2)O in the gas, hexagonal ice, and liquid phases using heuristic density-functional based methods. We present a detailed comparison of our results with experiment. The differences between the ice and water spectra can be rationalized in terms of the breaking of hydrogen bonds around the absorbing molecule. In particular the increase in the pre-edge absorption feature from ice to water is shown to be due to the breaking of a donor hydrogen bond. We also find that in water approximately 19% of hydrogen bonds are broken. (c) 2004 American Institute of Physics.

  9. Spectral downshifting from blue to near infer red region in Ce3+-Nd3+ co-doped YAG phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawala, N. S.; Omanwar, S. K.

    2016-07-01

    The YAG phosphors co-doped with Ce3+-Nd3+ ions by varying concentration of Nd3+ ion from 1 mol% to 15 mol% were successfully synthesized by conventional solid state reaction method. The phosphors were characterized by powder X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and surface morphology was studied by scanning electronic microscope (SEM). The photoluminescence (PL) properties were studied in near infra red (NIR) and ultra violet visible (UV-VIS) region. The synthesized phosphors can convert a blue region photon (453 nm) into photons of NIR region (1063 nm). The energy transfer (ET) process was studied by time decay curve and PL spectra. The theoretical value of energy transfer efficiency (ETE) was calculated from time decay luminescence measurement and the maximum efficiency approached up to 82.23%. Hence this phosphor could be prime candidate as a downshifting (DS) luminescent convertor (phosphor) in front of crystalline silicon solar cell (c-Si) panels to reduce thermalization loss in the solar cells.

  10. A valence state evaluation of a positive electrode material in an Li-ion battery with first-principles K- and L-edge XANES spectral simulations and resonance photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubobuchi, Kei; Mogi, Masato; Matsumoto, Masashi; Baba, Teruhisa; Yogi, Chihiro; Sato, Chikai; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki; Mizoguchi, Teruyasu; Imai, Hideto

    2016-10-01

    X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis is an element-specific method for proving electronic state mostly in the field of applied physics, such as battery and catalysis reactions, where the valence change plays an important role. In particular, many results have been reported for the analysis of positive electrode materials of Li-ion batteries, where multiple transition materials contribute to the reactions. However, XANES analysis has been limited to identifying the valence state simply in comparison with reference materials. When the shape of XANES spectra shows complicated changes, we were not able to identify the valence states or estimate the valence quantitatively, resulting in insufficient reaction analysis. To overcome such issues, we propose a valence state evaluation method using K- and L-edge XANES analysis with first-principles simulations. By using this method, we demonstrated that the complicated reaction mechanism of Li(Ni1/3Co1/3Mn1/3)O2 can be successfully analyzed for distinguishing each contribution of Ni, Co, Mn, and O to the redox reactions during charge operation. In addition to the XANES analysis, we applied resonant photoelectron spectroscopy (RPES) and diffraction anomalous fine structure spectroscopy (DAFS) with first-principles calculations to the reaction analysis of Co and Mn, which shows no or very little contribution to the redox. The combination of RPES and first-principles calculations successfully enables us to confirm the contribution of Co at high potential regions by electively observing Co 3d orbitals. Through the DAFS analysis, we deeply analyzed the spectral features of Mn K-edges and concluded that the observed spectral shape change for Mn does not originate from the valence change but from the change in distribution of wave functions around Mn upon Li extraction.

  11. Spectral signatures of photosynthesis. I. Review of Earth organisms.

    PubMed

    Kiang, Nancy Y; Siefert, Janet; Govindjee; Blankenship, Robert E

    2007-02-01

    Why do plants reflect in the green and have a "red edge" in the red, and should extrasolar photosynthesis be the same? We provide (1) a brief review of how photosynthesis works, (2) an overview of the diversity of photosynthetic organisms, their light harvesting systems, and environmental ranges, (3) a synthesis of photosynthetic surface spectral signatures, and (4) evolutionary rationales for photosynthetic surface reflectance spectra with regard to utilization of photon energy and the planetary light environment. We found the "near-infrared (NIR) end" of the red edge to trend from blue-shifted to reddest for (in order) snow algae, temperate algae, lichens, mosses, aquatic plants, and finally terrestrial vascular plants. The red edge is weak or sloping in lichens. Purple bacteria exhibit possibly a sloping edge in the NIR. More studies are needed on pigment-protein complexes, membrane composition, and measurements of bacteria before firm conclusions can be drawn about the role of the NIR reflectance. Pigment absorbance features are strongly correlated with features of atmospheric spectral transmittance: P680 in Photosystem II with the peak surface incident photon flux density at approximately 685 nm, just before an oxygen band at 687.5 nm; the NIR end of the red edge with water absorbance bands and the oxygen A-band at 761 nm; and bacteriochlorophyll reaction center wavelengths with local maxima in atmospheric and water transmittance spectra. Given the surface incident photon flux density spectrum and resonance transfer in light harvesting, we propose some rules with regard to where photosynthetic pigments will peak in absorbance: (1) the wavelength of peak incident photon flux; (2) the longest available wavelength for core antenna or reaction center pigments; and (3) the shortest wavelengths within an atmospheric window for accessory pigments. That plants absorb less green light may not be an inefficient legacy of evolutionary history, but may actually satisfy

  12. Bimodal activation of different neuron classes with the spectrally red-shifted channelrhodopsin chimera C1V1 in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Erbguth, Karen; Prigge, Matthias; Schneider, Franziska; Hegemann, Peter; Gottschalk, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The C. elegans nervous system is particularly well suited for optogenetic analyses of circuit function: Essentially all connections have been mapped, and light can be directed at the neuron of interest in the freely moving, transparent animals, while behavior is observed. Thus, different nodes of a neuronal network can be probed for their role in controlling a particular behavior, using different optogenetic tools for photo-activation or -inhibition, which respond to different colors of light. As neurons may act in concert or in opposing ways to affect a behavior, one would further like to excite these neurons concomitantly, yet independent of each other. In addition to the blue-light activated Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), spectrally red-shifted ChR variants have been explored recently. Here, we establish the green-light activated ChR chimera C1V1 (from Chlamydomonas and Volvox ChR1's) for use in C. elegans. We surveyed a number of red-shifted ChRs, and found that C1V1-ET/ET (E122T; E162T) works most reliable in C. elegans, with 540-580 nm excitation, which leaves ChR2 silent. However, as C1V1-ET/ET is very light sensitive, it still becomes activated when ChR2 is stimulated, even at 400 nm. Thus, we generated a highly efficient blue ChR2, the H134R; T159C double mutant (ChR2-HR/TC). Both proteins can be used in the same animal, in different neurons, to independently control each cell type with light, enabling a further level of complexity in circuit analyses.

  13. Red but not dead: unveiling the star-forming far-infrared spectral energy distribution of SpARCS brightest cluster galaxies at 0 < z < 1.8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaventura, N. R.; Webb, T. M. A.; Muzzin, A.; Noble, A.; Lidman, C.; Wilson, G.; Yee, H. K. C.; Geach, J.; Hezaveh, Y.; Shupe, D.; Surace, J.

    2017-08-01

    We present the results of a Spitzer/Herschel infrared photometric analysis of the largest (716) and the highest-redshift (z = 1.8) sample of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs), those from the Spitzer Adaptation of the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey Given the tension that exists between model predictions and recent observations of BCGs at z < 2, we aim to uncover the dominant physical mechanism(s) guiding the stellar mass buildup of this special class of galaxies, the most massive in the Universe and uniquely residing at the centres of galaxy clusters. Through a comparison of their stacked, broad-band, infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to a variety of model templates in the literature, we identify the major sources of their infrared energy output, in multiple redshift bins between 0 < z < 1.8. We derive estimates of various BCG physical parameters from the stacked νLν SEDs, from which we infer a star-forming, as opposed to a 'red and dead' population of galaxies, producing tens to hundreds of solar masses per year down to z = 0.5. This discovery challenges the accepted belief that BCGs should only passively evolve through a series of gas-poor, minor mergers since z ˜ 4, but agrees with an improved semi-analytic model of hierarchical structure formation that predicts star-forming BCGs throughout the epoch considered. We attribute the star formation inferred from the stacked infrared SEDs to both major and minor 'wet' (gas-rich) mergers, based on a lack of key signatures (to date) of cooling-flow-induced star formation, as well as a number of observational and simulation-based studies that support this scenario.

  14. Bimodal Activation of Different Neuron Classes with the Spectrally Red-Shifted Channelrhodopsin Chimera C1V1 in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Erbguth, Karen; Prigge, Matthias; Schneider, Franziska; Hegemann, Peter; Gottschalk, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The C. elegans nervous system is particularly well suited for optogenetic analyses of circuit function: Essentially all connections have been mapped, and light can be directed at the neuron of interest in the freely moving, transparent animals, while behavior is observed. Thus, different nodes of a neuronal network can be probed for their role in controlling a particular behavior, using different optogenetic tools for photo-activation or –inhibition, which respond to different colors of light. As neurons may act in concert or in opposing ways to affect a behavior, one would further like to excite these neurons concomitantly, yet independent of each other. In addition to the blue-light activated Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), spectrally red-shifted ChR variants have been explored recently. Here, we establish the green-light activated ChR chimera C1V1 (from Chlamydomonas and Volvox ChR1′s) for use in C. elegans. We surveyed a number of red-shifted ChRs, and found that C1V1-ET/ET (E122T; E162T) works most reliable in C. elegans, with 540–580 nm excitation, which leaves ChR2 silent. However, as C1V1-ET/ET is very light sensitive, it still becomes activated when ChR2 is stimulated, even at 400 nm. Thus, we generated a highly efficient blue ChR2, the H134R; T159C double mutant (ChR2-HR/TC). Both proteins can be used in the same animal, in different neurons, to independently control each cell type with light, enabling a further level of complexity in circuit analyses. PMID:23056472

  15. Estimation of basis line-integrals in a spectral distortion-modeled photon counting detector using low-rank approximation-based x-ray transmittance modeling: K-edge imaging application.

    PubMed

    Lee, Okkyun; Kappler, Steffen; Polster, Christoph; Taguchi, Katsuyuki

    2017-08-29

    Photon counting detectors (PCD) provide multiple energy-dependent measurements for estimating basis lineintegrals. However, the measured spectrum is distorted from the spectral response effect (SRE) via charge sharing, K-fluorescence emission, etc. Thus, in order to avoid bias and artifacts in images, the SRE needs to be compensated. For this purpose, we recently developed a computationally efficient three-step algorithm for PCD-CT without contrast agents by approximating smooth x-ray transmittance using low-order polynomial bases. It compensated the SRE by incorporating the SRE model in a linearized estimation process and achieved nearly the minimum variance and unbiased (MVU) estimator. In this paper, we extend the three-step algorithm to K-edge imaging applications by designing optimal bases using a low-rank approximation to model x-ray transmittances with arbitrary shapes (i.e., smooth without the K-edge or discontinuous with the K-edge). The bases can be used to approximate the x-ray transmittance and to linearize the PCD measurement modeling and then the three-step estimator can be derived as in the previous approach: Estimating the xray transmittance in the first step, estimating basis line-integrals including that of the contrast agent in the second step, and correcting for a bias in the third step. We demonstrate that the proposed method is more accurate and stable than the low-order polynomial-based approaches with extensive simulation studies using gadolinium for the K-edge imaging application. We also demonstrate that the proposed method achieves nearly MVU estimator, and is more stable than the conventional maximum likelihood estimator in high attenuation cases with fewer photon counts.

  16. Improved EDGE2D-EIRENE simulations of JET ITER-like wall L-mode discharges utilising poloidal VUV/visible spectral emission profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, K. D.; Groth, M.; Belo, P.; Brezinsek, S.; Corrigan, G.; Czarnecka, A.; Delabie, E.; Drewelow, P.; Harting, D.; Książek, I.; Maggi, C. F.; Marchetto, C.; Meigs, A. G.; Menmuir, S.; Stamp, M. F.; Wiesen, S.

    2015-08-01

    A discrepancy in the divertor radiated powers between EDGE2D-EIRENE simulations, both with and without drifts, and JET-ILW experiments employing a set of NBI-heated L-mode discharges with step-wise density variation is investigated. Results from a VUV/visible poloidally scanning spectrometer are used together with bolometric measurements to determine the radiated power and its composition. The analysis shows the importance of D line radiation in contributing to the divertor radiated power, while contributions from D radiative recombination are smaller than expected. Simulations with W divertor plates underestimate the Be content in the divertor, since no allowance is made for Be previously deposited on the plates being re-eroded. An improved version of EDGE2D-EIRENE is used to test the importance of the deposited layer in which the sputtering yield from supposed pure Be divertor plates is reduced to match the spectroscopic signals, while keeping the sputtering yield for the Be main chamber walls unchanged.

  17. Use of a Remote Sensing Method to Estimate the Influence of Anthropogenic Factors on the Spectral Reflectance of Plant Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krezhova, Dora D.; Yanev, Tony K.

    2007-04-01

    Results from a remote sensing study of the influence of stress factors on the leaf spectral reflectance of wheat and tomato plants contaminated by viruses and pea plants treated with herbicides are presented and discussed. The changes arising in the spectral reflectance characteristics of control and treated plants are estimated through statistical methods as well as through derivative analysis to determine specific reflectance features in the red edge region.

  18. [Spectral features analysis of Pinus massoniana with pest of Dendrolimus punctatus Walker and levels detection].

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhang-Hua; Liu, Jian; Yu, Kun-Yong; Gong, Cong-Hong; Xie, Wan-Jun; Tang, Meng-Ya; Lai, Ri-Wen; Li, Zeng-Lu

    2013-02-01

    Taking 51 field measured hyperspectral data with different pest levels in Yanping, Fujian Province as objects, the spectral reflectance and first derivative features of 4 levels of healthy, mild, moderate and severe insect pest were analyzed. On the basis of 7 detecting parameters construction, the pest level detecting models were built. The results showed that (1) the spectral reflectance of Pinus massoniana with pests were significantly lower than that of healthy state, and the higher the pest level, the lower the reflectance; (2) with the increase in pest level, the spectral reflectance curves' "green peak" and "red valley" of Pinus massoniana gradually disappeared, and the red edge was leveleds (3) the pest led to spectral "green peak" red shift, red edge position blue shift, but the changes in "red valley" and near-infrared position were complicated; (4) CARI, RES, REA and REDVI were highly relevant to pest levels, and the correlations between REP, RERVI, RENDVI and pest level were weak; (5) the multiple linear regression model with the variables of the 7 detection parameters could effectively detect the pest levels of Dendrolimus punctatus Walker, with both the estimation rate and accuracy above 0.85.

  19. Close-packed arrays of transition-edge x-ray microcalorimeters with high spectral resolution at 5.9 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Iyomoto, N.; Bandler, S. R.; Brekosky, R. P.; Brown, A.-D.; Chervenak, J. A.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.

    2008-01-07

    We present measurements of high fill-factor arrays of superconducting transition-edge x-ray microcalorimeters designed to provide rapid thermalization of the x-ray energy. We designed an x-ray absorber that is cantilevered over the sensitive part of the thermometer itself, making contact only at normal-metal features. With absorbers made of electroplated gold, we have demonstrated an energy resolution between 2.4 and 3.1 eV at 5.9 keV on 13 separate pixels. We have determined the thermal and electrical parameters of the devices throughout the superconducting transition and, using these parameters, have modeled all aspects of the detector performance.

  20. Close-packed Arrays of Transition-edge X-ray Microcalorimeters with High Spectral Resolution at 5.9 keV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyomoto, N.; Bandler, S. R.; Brekosky, R. P.; Brown, A.-D.; Chervenak, J. A.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J. E.; hide

    2007-01-01

    We present measurements of high fill-factor arrays of superconducting transition-edge x-ray microcalorimeters designed to provide rapid thermalization of the x-ray energy. We designed an x-ray absorber that is cantilevered over the sensitive part of the thermometer itself, making contact only at normal metal-features. With absorbers made of electroplated gold, we have demonstrated an energy resolution between 2.4 and 3.1 eV at 5.9 keV on 13 separate pixels. We have determined the thermal and electrical parameters of the devices throughout the superconducting transition, and, using these parameters, have modeled all aspects of the detector performance.

  1. Adapting photosynthesis to the near-infrared: non-covalent binding of phycocyanobilin provides an extreme spectral red-shift to phycobilisome core-membrane linker from Synechococcus sp. PCC7335.

    PubMed

    Miao, Dan; Ding, Wen-Long; Zhao, Bao-Qing; Lu, Lu; Xu, Qian-Zhao; Scheer, Hugo; Zhao, Kai-Hong

    2016-06-01

    Phycobiliproteins that bind bilins are organized as light-harvesting complexes, phycobilisomes, in cyanobacteria and red algae. The harvested light energy is funneled to reaction centers via two energy traps, allophycocyanin B and the core-membrane linker, ApcE1 (conventional ApcE). The covalently bound phycocyanobilin (PCB) of ApcE1 absorbs near 660 nm and fluoresces near 675 nm. In cyanobacteria capable of near infrared photoacclimation, such as Synechococcus sp. PCC7335, there exist even further spectrally red shifted components absorbing >700 nm and fluorescing >710 nm. We expressed the chromophore domain of the extra core-membrane linker from Synechococcus sp. PCC7335, ApcE2, in E. coli together with enzymes generating the chromophore, PCB. The resulting chromoproteins, PCB-ApcE2(1-273) and the more truncated PCB-ApcE2(24-245), absorb at 700 nm and fluoresce at 714 nm. The red shift of ~40 nm compared with canonical ApcE1 results from non-covalent binding of the chromophore by which its full conjugation length including the Δ3,3(1) double bond is preserved. The extreme spectral red-shift could not be ascribed to exciton coupling: dimeric PCB-ApcE2(1-273) and monomeric-ApcE2(24-245) absorbed and fluoresced similarly. Chromophorylation of ApcE2 with phycoerythrobilin- or phytochromobilin resulted in similar red shifts (absorption at 615 and 711 nm, fluorescence at 628 or 726 nm, respectively), compared to the covalently bound chromophores. The self-assembled non-covalent chromophorylation demonstrates a novel access to red and near-infrared emitting fluorophores. Brightly fluorescent biomarking was exemplified in E. coli by single-plasmid transformation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Spectral reflectance pattern in soybean for assessing yellow mosaic disease.

    PubMed

    Gazala, I F Saad; Sahoo, R N; Pandey, Rakesh; Mandal, Bikash; Gupta, V K; Singh, Rajendra; Sinha, P

    2013-09-01

    Remote sensing technique is useful for monitoring large crop area at a single time point, which is otherwise not possible by visual observation alone. Yellow mosaic disease (YMD) is a serious constraint in soybean production in India. However, hardly any basic information is available for monitoring YMD by remote sensing. Present study examines spectral reflectance of soybean leaves due to Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) infection in order to identify YMD sensitive spectral ratio or reflectance. Spectral reflectance measurement indicated significant (p < 0.001) change in reflectance in the infected soybean canopy as compared to the healthy one. In the infected canopy, reflectance increased in visible region and decreased in near infra-red region of spectrum. Reflectance sensitivity analysis indicated wavelength ~642, ~686 and ~750 nm were sensitive to YMD infection. Whereas, in yellow leaves induced due to nitrogen deficiency, the sensitive wavelength was ~589 nm. Due to viral infection, a shift occurred in red and infra-red slope (called red edge) on the left in comparison to healthy one. Red edge shift was a good indicator to discriminate yellow mosaic as chlorophyll gets degraded due to MYMIV infection. Correlation of reflectance at 688 nm (R688) and spectral reflectance ratio at 750 and 445 nm (R750/R445) with the weighted mosaic index indicated that detection of yellow mosaic is possible based on these sensitive bands. Our study for the first time identifies the yellow mosaic sensitive band as R688 and R750/R445, which could be utilized to scan satellite data for monitoring YMD affected soybean cropping regions.

  3. An investigation into robust spectral indices for leaf chlorophyll estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Main, Russell; Cho, Moses Azong; Mathieu, Renaud; O'Kennedy, Martha M.; Ramoelo, Abel; Koch, Susan

    2011-11-01

    Quantifying photosynthetic activity at the regional scale can provide important information to resource managers, planners and global ecosystem modelling efforts. With increasing availability of both hyperspectral and narrow band multispectral remote sensing data, new users are faced with a plethora of options when choosing an optical index to relate to their chosen or canopy parameter. The literature base regarding optical indices (particularly chlorophyll indices) is wide ranging and extensive, however it is without much consensus regarding robust indices. The wider spectral community could benefit from studies that apply a variety of published indices to differing sets of species data. The consistency and robustness of 73 published chlorophyll spectral indices have been assessed, using leaf level hyperspectral data collected from three crop species and a variety of savanna tree species. Linear regression between total leaf chlorophyll content and bootstrapping were used to determine the leafpredictive capabilities of the various indices. The indices were then ranked based on the prediction error (the average root mean square error (RMSE)) derived from the bootstrapping process involving 1000 iterative resampling with replacement. The results show two red-edge derivative based indices (red-edge position via linear extrapolation index and the modified red-edge inflection point index) as the most consistent and robust, and that the majority of the top performing indices (in spite of species variability) were simple ratio or normalised difference indices that are based on off-chlorophyll absorption centre wavebands (690-730 nm).

  4. [Plant Spectral Discrimination Based on Phenological Features].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Jian-long; Jia, Kun; Li, Xiao-song

    2015-10-01

    Spectral analysis plays a significant role onplant characteristic identification and mechanism recognition, there were many papers published on the aspects of absorption features in the spectra of chlorophyll and moisture, spectral analysis onvegetation red edge effect, spectra profile feature extraction, spectra profile conversion, vegetation leaf structure and chemical composition impacts on the spectra in past years. However, fewer researches issued on spectral changes caused by plant seasonal changes of life form, chlorophyll, leaf area index. This paper studied on spectral observation of 11 plants of various life form, plant leaf structure and its size, phenological characteristics, they include deciduous forest with broad vertical leaf, needle leaf evergreen forest, needle leaf deciduous forest, deciduous forest with broadflat leaf, high shrub with big leaf, high shrub with little leaf, deciduous forest with broad little leaf, short shrub, meadow, steppe and grass. Field spectral data were observed with SVC-HR768 (Spectra Vista company, USA), the band width covers 350-2 500 nm, spectral resolution reaches 1-4 nm. The features of NDVI, spectral maximum absorption depth in green band, and spectral maximum absorption depth in red band were measured after continuum removal processing, the mean, amplitude and gradient of these features on seasonal change profile were analyzed, meanwhile, separability research on plant spectral feature of growth period and maturation period were compared. The paper presents a calculation method of separability of vegetation spectra which consider feature spatial distances. This index is carried on analysis of the vegetation discrimination. The results show that: the spectral features during plant growth period are easier to distinguish than them during maturation period. With the same features comparison, plant separability of growth period is 3 points higher than it during maturation period. The overall separabilityof vegetation

  5. Identification of cyanobacteriochromes detecting far-red light

    DOE PAGES

    Rockwell, Nathan C.; Martin, Shelley S.; Lagarias, J. Clark

    2016-06-13

    The opacity of mammalian tissue to visible light and the strong attenuation of infrared light by water at ≥900 nm have contributed to growing interest in the development of far-red and near-infrared absorbing tools for visualizing and actuating responses within live cells. Here we report the discovery of cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs) responsive to light in this far-red window. CBCRs are linear tetrapyrrole (bilin)-based light sensors distantly related to plant phytochrome sensors. Our studies reveal far-red (λmax = 725–755 nm)/orange (λmax = 590–600 nm) and far-red/red (λmax = 615–685 nm) photoswitches that are small (<200 amino acids) and can be genetically reconstitutedmore » in living cells. Phylogenetic analysis and characterization of additional CBCRs demonstrated that far-red/orange CBCRs evolved after a complex transition from green/red CBCRs known for regulating complementary chromatic acclimation. Incorporation of different bilin chromophores demonstrated that tuning mechanisms responsible for red-shifted chromophore absorption act at the A-, B-, and/ or C-rings, whereas photoisomerization occurs at the D-ring. Two such proteins exhibited detectable fluorescence extending well into the near-infrared region. In conclusion, this work extends the spectral window of CBCRs to the edge of the infrared, raising the possibility of using CBCRs in synthetic biology applications in the far-red region of the spectrum.« less

  6. Characterization of red-near infrared transition for wheat and chickpea using 3 nm bandwidth data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R. K.; Vijayan, D.; Prasad, T. S.

    2001-01-01

    Enhancement of space based capabilities to discriminate different crops and different varieties of a particular crop needs measurement of (i) the shift in red edge and (ii) the slope of the sudden rise of reflectance in 680 - 760 nm spectral region as a function of Days After Sowing (DAS). To develop the knowledge base for catering to the analysis of future space-based hyperspectral measurements, ground based measurements in 3 nm bandwidth in visible - near Infrared region together with corresponding Leaf Area Index (LAI) observations were taken over the Crop Growth Cycle (CGC) of Wheat and Chickpea. The red edge for wheat crop was at 679 nm for 25 DAS and reached the upper limit i.e., 693.7 nm at 84 DAS and thereafter shifted backward to 679 nm at 108 DAS. There was no change in red edge value of 684.9 nm during 40 to 49 DAS and of 687.8 nm during 55 to 71 DAS. The slope of Red to NIR transition for wheat varied from 0.457 to peak value of 0.784 during 25 to 71 DAS and thereafter decreased to 0.073 at 108 DAS. The peak of Red to Near Infrared (NIR) transition slope and Ratio Vegetation Index (RVI) occurred at the same time i.e., 71 DAS. However, the upper most value of red edge shift occurred at 84 DAS. Paper discusses the above aspects including role of mid point of Red to NIR transition, interrelationships among the Red-NIR transition Slope, Red Edge, LAI and RVI for wheat and chickpea.

  7. The Cenozoic rotational extrusion of the Chuan Dian Fragment: New paleomagnetic results from Paleogene red-beds on the southeastern edge of the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Ya-Bo; Yang, Zhenyu; Wang, Heng; Gao, Liang; An, Chun-Zhi; Zhang, Xu-Dong; Xu, Ying-Chao

    2015-09-01

    Paleomagnetic studies were conducted on the Eocene and Oligocene strata at the western part of the Chuan Dian Fragment in order to describe the crustal deformation induced by continuous penetration of the Indian plate into Eurasia during the late Cenozoic. High-temperature magnetic components with unblocking temperatures of ~ 680 °C were isolated, and positive fold and/or reversal tests reveal the primary nature of the magnetization. The tilt-corrected site-mean directions obtained from the Oligocene and middle-early Eocene strata are, respectively, Ds = 200.9°, Is = - 31.3°, k = 52.8, α95 = 7.7° and Ds = 29.7°, Is = 32.0°, k = 44.9, α95 = 5.6°. Comparison of these results with previous paleomagnetic data from the Chuan Dian Fragment shows that the western and central parts of the Chuan Dian Fragment experienced ~ 20° integral clockwise rotation relative to East Asia since the middle Miocene. However, the eastern part of the Chuan Dian Fragment has experienced different rotational deformation relative to East Asia since the Pliocene, because of the intense regional crustal deformation and activity on fault systems. The eastern boundary of the Chuan Dian Fragment was bounded by the Yuanmou-Luezhijiang left lateral strike-slip fault prior to the Pliocene, and then substituted by the Xiaojiang left lateral strike-slip fault since the Pliocene, due to the eastwards spreading of the clockwise rotational movement of the Chuan Dian Fragment. The evolutionary characteristics of the Ailaoshan-Red River and Xianshuihe-Xiaojiang strike-slip faults were controlled by the difference between the clockwise rotational extrusion velocities of the Chuan Dian Fragment and the Indochina Block.

  8. Effect of phosphorus deficiency on spectral reflectance and morphology of soybean plants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milton, N.M.; Eiswerth, B.A.; Ager, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    Soybean plants were grown in hydroponic solutions having three concentration levels of phosphorus. Spectral reflectance changes included higher reflectance in the green and yellow portions of the electromagnetic spectrum in phosphorus-deficient plants and a difference in position of the long wavelength edge (the red edge) of the chlorophyll absorption band centered near 0.68 ??m. Plants having the least phosphorus in the growing medium did not show the normal shift of the red edge to longer wavelength which occurs as leaves mature. Shoot and root biomass were significantly lower in the phosphorus-deficient plants. These results are consistent with those obtained when soybean plants are dosed with elevated concentrations of metallic elements. We hypothesize that nutrient imbalances or anomalous metal concentrations in the soil set up physiological conditions at the soil/root interface that are responsible for the reflectance differences observed in laboratory and field studies of plants growing in substrates enriched in metallic elements. ?? 1991.

  9. Arsenic- and selenium-induced changes in spectral reflectance and morphology of soybean plants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milton, N.M.; Ager, C.M.; Eiswerth, B.A.; Power, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) plants were grown in hydroponic solutions treated with high concentrations of either arsenic or selenium. Spectral reflectance changes in arsenic-dosed plants included a shift to shorter wavelengths in the long-wavelength edge of the chlorophyll absorption band centered at 680 nm (the red edge) and higher reflectance in the 550-650 nm region. These results are consistent with vegetation reflectance anomalies observed in previous greenhouse experiments and in airborne radiometer studies. The selenium-dosed plants contrast, exhibited a shift to longer wavelengths of the red edge and lower reflectance between 550 nm and 650 wh when compared with control plants. Morphological effects of arsenic uptake included lower overall biomass, stunted and discolored roots, and smaller leaves oriented more vertically than leaves of control plants. Selenium-dosed plants also displayed morphological changes, but root and leaf biomass were less affected than were those of arsenic-dosed plants when compared to control plants. ?? 1989.

  10. [High-spectral responses of Myrica rubra seedlings to UV-B radiation stress].

    PubMed

    Jin, Xin-Jie; Jiang, Hong; Chen, Jian; Shi, Qi-Long; Zhang, Qian-Qian

    2012-12-01

    A simulated field experiment with three treatments, i. e., ambient light (control), reduced UV-B radiation, and enhanced UV-B radiation, was conducted to evaluate the effects of solar ultraviolet (UV-B) radiation on the seedlings of Myrica rubra, a typical woody species in subtropical region. The leaf chlorophyll content, spectral reflectance and spectral characteristic parameters were measured and analyzed. As compared with the control, enhanced UV-B radiation decreased the seedling chlorophyll content while reduced UV-B radiation significantly increased the chlorophyll content, and these effects reflected in the spectral reflectance. Under the effects of the three gradients of UV-B radiation, the differences in the reflectance at visible region mainly occurred around the green peak and red edge on the reflectance curve, and the peak wavelength of the red edge shifted to longer wavelength. Enhanced UV-B radiation had an accumulated temporal effect on M. rubra. The inverted-Gaussian model parameters R0, lambda0, lambda(p), Rs, and 6 were the useful guides to reveal the spectral responses of M. rubra seedlings under UV-B radiation stress, among which, Rs performed the best. The differences in the spectral reflectance under different UV-B radiation levels could be effectively distinguished with the vegetation indices composed of the spectral reflectance of narrow wave bands or the reflectance at specific wavelengths.

  11. Edge Bioinformatics

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Chien-Chi

    2015-08-03

    Edge Bioinformatics is a developmental bioinformatics and data management platform which seeks to supply laboratories with bioinformatics pipelines for analyzing data associated with common samples case goals. Edge Bioinformatics enables sequencing as a solution and forward-deployed situations where human-resources, space, bandwidth, and time are limited. The Edge bioinformatics pipeline was designed based on following USE CASES and specific to illumina sequencing reads. 1. Assay performance adjudication (PCR): Analysis of an existing PCR assay in a genomic context, and automated design of a new assay to resolve conflicting results; 2. Clinical presentation with extreme symptoms: Characterization of a known pathogen or co-infection with a. Novel emerging disease outbreak or b. Environmental surveillance

  12. An unusual red-edge excitation and time-dependent Stokes shift in the single tryptophan mutant protein DD-carboxypeptidase from Streptomyces: the role of dynamics and tryptophan rotamers.

    PubMed

    Maglia, Giovanni; Jonckheer, Abel; De Maeyer, Marc; Frère, Jean-Marie; Engelborghs, Yves

    2008-02-01

    The fluorescence emission of the single tryptophan (W233) of the mutant protein DD-carboxypeptidase from streptomyces is characterized by a red-edge excitation shift (REES), i.e., the phenomenon that the wavelength of maximum emission depends on the excitation wavelength. This phenomenon is an indication for a strongly reduced dynamic environment of the single tryptophan, which has a very low accessibility to the solvent. The REES shows, however, an unusual temperature and time dependence. This, together with the fluorescence lifetime analysis, showing three resolvable lifetimes, can be explained by the presence of three rotameric states that can be identified using the Dead-End Elimination method. The three individual lifetimes increase with increasing emission wavelength, indicating the presence of restricted protein dynamics within the rotameric states. This is confirmed by time-resolved anisotropy measurements that show dynamics within the rotamers but not among the rotamers. The global picture is that of a protein with a single buried tryptophan showing strongly restricted dynamics within three distinct rotameric states with different emission spectra and an anisotropic environment.

  13. Correlating species and spectral diversities using hyperspectral remote sensing in early-successional fields.

    PubMed

    Aneece, Itiya P; Epstein, Howard; Lerdau, Manuel

    2017-05-01

    Advances in remote sensing technology can help estimate biodiversity at large spatial extents. To assess whether we could use hyperspectral visible near-infrared (VNIR) spectra to estimate species diversity, we examined the correlations between species diversity and spectral diversity in early-successional abandoned agricultural fields in the Ridge and Valley ecoregion of north-central Virginia at the Blandy Experimental Farm. We established plant community plots and collected vegetation surveys and ground-level hyperspectral data from 350 to 1,025 nm wavelengths. We related spectral diversity (standard deviations across spectra) with species diversity (Shannon-Weiner index) and evaluated whether these correlations differed among spectral regions throughout the visible and near-infrared wavelength regions, and across different spectral transformation techniques. We found positive correlations in the visible regions using band depth data, positive correlations in the near-infrared region using first derivatives of spectra, and weak to no correlations in the red-edge region using either of the two spectral transformation techniques. To investigate the role of pigment variability in these correlations, we estimated chlorophyll, carotenoid, and anthocyanin concentrations of five dominant species in the plots using spectral vegetation indices. Although interspecific variability in pigment levels exceeded intraspecific variability, chlorophyll was more varied within species than carotenoids and anthocyanins, contributing to the lack of correlation between species diversity and spectral diversity in the red-edge region. Interspecific differences in pigment levels, however, made it possible to differentiate these species remotely, contributing to the species-spectral diversity correlations. VNIR spectra can be used to estimate species diversity, but the relationships depend on the spectral region examined and the spectral transformation technique used.

  14. Spectral optimization of the color temperature tunable white light-emitting diode (LED) cluster consisting of direct-emission blue and red LEDs and a diphosphor conversion LED.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ping; He, Guoxing; Zhang, Minhao

    2012-09-10

    The correlated color temperature (CCT) tunable white-light LED cluster, which consists of direct-emission blue and red LEDs as well as phosphor-conversion (PC) LEDs packaged by combining green and orange phosphors with a blue LED die, has been obtained by nonlinear program for maximizing luminous efficacy (LE) of radiation (LER) under conditions of both color rendering index (CRI) and special CRI of R9 for strong red above 90 at CCTs of 2700 K to 6500 K. The optimal peak wavelengths of blue LED, red LED, blue LED die, green and orange phosphors are 465 nm, 628 nm, 452 nm, 530 nm and 586 nm, respectively. The real CCT tunable PC/red/blue LED cluster with CRIs of 90~96, R9s of 90~96, CQSs of 89~94, LERs of 303~358 lm/W, and LEs of 105~119 lm/W has been realized at CCTs of 2722 K to 6464 K. The deviation of the peak wavelength should be less than ± 5 nm for blue LED die, ± 1 nm for red LED, and ± 2 nm for blue LED to achieve the PC/R/B LED cluster with high optical performance.

  15. Optimized infra-red spectral response of surfaces for sub-ambient sky cooling as a function of humidity and operating temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentle, A. R.; Smith, G. B.

    2010-05-01

    The preferred surface spectral response for sub-ambient sky cooling varies according to the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere and the operating difference (Ta-Ts) between ambient and emitter surface temperatures. While all good candidates average high emittance from 7.9 μm to 13 μm, where the atmosphere is most transparent (the IR "sky window"), the preferred spectral response in the remainder of the Planck spectrum depends on a number of factors. Emittances E in studies to date have been near the two extremes of a high E ~ 0.85 to 0.95, and an E value between 0.3 to 0.4 for surfaces which emit strongly only in the sky window. Cooling rates and ideal spectral properties vary with operating conditions. The reasons behind this will be explained for select different coatings, using spectral densities for emitted outgoing radiation, which is Ts dependent, and the incoming radiation that is absorbed, which is fixed unless the atmosphere changes. Higher E surfaces always work best above and just below ambient but external factors that reduce incoming radiation from the atmosphere, including very low humidity or heat mirror apertures, extend this preference down to lower surface temperatures. Sky window spectrally selective coatings do not benefit as much because they already absorb little incoming radiation, but always have the potential to achieve very much colder temperatures if non-radiative heat gains are kept low.

  16. Zwitterionic [4]helicene: a water-soluble and reversible pH-triggered ECD/CPL chiroptical switch in the UV and red spectral regions.

    PubMed

    Pascal, Simon; Besnard, Céline; Zinna, Francesco; Di Bari, Lorenzo; Le Guennic, Boris; Jacquemin, Denis; Lacour, Jérôme

    2016-05-18

    The chiroptical switching properties of a readily accessible and water-soluble diaza [4]helicene are disclosed. This zwitterionic dye displays pH-dependent absorption and emission properties and this enables a reversible turn on/off of electronic circular dichroism at 300 nm and of circularly polarized luminescence in the red region upon protonation/deprotonation.

  17. The potential of Sentinel-2 spectral configuration to assess rangeland quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramoelo, Abel; Cho, Moses; Mathieu, Renaud; Skidmore, Andrew K.

    2014-10-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) has embarked on the development of the Sentinel constellation. Sentinel-2 is intended to improve vegetation assessment at local to global scale. Rangeland quality assessment is crucial for planning and management of grazing areas. Well managed and improved grazing areas lead to higher livestock production, which is a pillar of the rural economy and livelihoods, especially in many parts of the African continent. Leaf nitrogen (N) is an indicator of rangeland quality, and is crucial for understanding ecosystem function and services. Today, estimation of leaf N is possible using field and imaging spectroscopy. However, a few studies based on commercially available multispectral imageries such as WorldView-2 and RapidEye have shown the potential of a red-edge band for accurately predicting and mapping leaf N at the broad landscape scale. Sentinel-2 has two red edge bands. The objective of this study was to investigate the utility of the spectral configuration of Sentinel-2 for estimating leaf N concentration in rangelands and savannas of Southern Africa. Grass canopy reflectance was measured using the FieldSpec 3, Analytical Spectral Device (ASD) in concert with leaf sample collections for leaf N chemical analysis. ASD reflectances were resampled to the spectral bands of Sentinel-2 using published spectral response functions. Random Forest (RF) technique was used to predict leaf N using all thirteen bands. Using leave-one-out cross validation, the RF model explained 90% of leaf N variation, with the root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.04 (6% of the mean). Interestingly, spectral bands centred at 705 nm (red edge) and two shortwave infrared centred at 2190 and 1610 nm were found to be the most important bands in predicting leaf N. These findings concur with previous studies based on spectroscopy, airborne hyperspectral or multispectral imagery, e.g. RapidEye, on the importance of shortwave infrared and red-edge reflectance in the

  18. Edge Detection,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    PROJECT. T ASK0 Artificial Inteligence Laboratory AREA It WORK UNIT NUMBERS V 545 Technology Square ( Cambridge, HA 02139 I I* CONTOOL1LIN@4OFFICE NAME...ARD-A1t62 62 EDGE DETECTION(U) NASSACNUSETTS INST OF TECH CAMBRIDGE 1/1 ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LAB E C HILDRETH SEP 85 AI-M-8 N99SI4-8S-C-6595...used to carry out this analysis. cce~iO a N) ’.~" D LI’BL. P p ------------ Sj. t i MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY i ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

  19. The spectral quality of light is a key driver of photosynthesis and photoadaptation in Stylophora pistillata colonies from different depths in the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Mass, T; Kline, D I; Roopin, M; Veal, C J; Cohen, S; Iluz, D; Levy, O

    2010-12-01

    Depth zonation on coral reefs is largely driven by the amount of downwelling, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) that is absorbed by the symbiotic algae (zooxanthellae) of corals. The minimum light requirements of zooxanthellae are related to both the total intensity of downwelling PAR and the spectral quality of the light. Here we used Stylophora pistillata colonies collected from shallow (3 m) and deep (40 m) water; colonies were placed in a respirometer under both ambient PAR irradiance and a filter that only transmits blue light. We found that the colonies exhibited a clear difference in their photosynthetic rates when illuminated under PAR and filtered blue light, with higher photosynthetic performance when deep colonies were exposed to blue light compared with full-spectrum PAR for the same light intensity and duration. By contrast, colonies from shallow water showed the opposite trend, with higher photosynthetic performances under full-spectrum PAR than under filtered blue light. These findings are supported by the absorption spectra of corals, with deeper colonies absorbing higher energy wavelengths than the shallow colonies, with different spectral signatures. Our results indicate that S. pistillata colonies are chromatically adapted to their surrounding light environment, with photoacclimation probably occurring via an increase in photosynthetic pigments rather than algal density. The spectral properties of the downwelling light are clearly a crucial component of photoacclimation that should be considered in future transplantation and photoacclimation studies.

  20. Defect correlated fluorescent quenching and electron phonon coupling in the spectral transition of Eu{sup 3+} in CaTiO{sub 3} for red emission in display application

    SciTech Connect

    Som, S. E-mail: swarthc@ufs.ac.za; Kumar, Vinod; Kumar, Vijay; Terblans, J. J.; Swart, H. C. E-mail: swarthc@ufs.ac.za; Kunti, A. K.; Dutta, S.; Chowdhury, M.; Sharma, S. K.

    2014-05-21

    This paper reports on the defect correlated self-quenching and spectroscopic investigation of calcium titanate (CaTiO{sub 3}) phosphors. A series of CaTiO{sub 3} phosphors doped with trivalent europium (Eu{sup 3+}) and codoped with potassium (K{sup +}) ions were prepared by the solid state reaction method. The X-ray diffraction results revealed that the obtained powder phosphors consisted out of a single-phase orthorhombic structure and it also indicated that the incorporation of the dopants/co-dopants did not affect the crystal structure. The scanning electron microscopy images revealed the irregular morphology of the prepared phosphors consisting out of μm sized diameter particles. The Eu{sup 3+} doped phosphors illuminated with ultraviolet light showed the characteristic red luminescence corresponding to the {sup 5}D{sub 0}→{sup 7}F{sub J} transitions of Eu{sup 3+}. As a charge compensator, K{sup +} ions were incorporated into the CaTiO{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} phosphors, which enhanced the photoluminescence (PL) intensities depending on the doping concentration of K{sup +}. The concentration quenching of Eu{sup 3+} in this host is discussed in the light of ion-ion interaction, electron phonon coupling, and defect to ion energy transfer. The spectral characteristics and the Eu-O ligand behaviour were determined using the Judd-Ofelt theory from the PL spectra instead of the absorption spectra. The CIE (International Commission on Illumination) parameters were calculated using spectral energy distribution functions and McCamy's empirical formula. Photometric characterization indicated the suitability of K{sup +} compensated the CaTiO{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} phosphor for pure red emission in light-emitting diode applications.

  1. Unusual Spectral Properties of Bacteriophytochrome Agp2 Result from a Deprotonation of the Chromophore in the Red-absorbing Form Pr*

    PubMed Central

    Zienicke, Benjamin; Molina, Isabel; Glenz, René; Singer, Patrick; Ehmer, Dorothee; Escobar, Francisco Velazquez; Hildebrandt, Peter; Diller, Rolf; Lamparter, Tilman

    2013-01-01

    Phytochromes are widely distributed photoreceptors with a bilin chromophore that undergo a typical reversible photoconversion between the two spectrally different forms, Pr and Pfr. The phytochrome Agp2 from Agrobacterium tumefaciens belongs to the group of bathy phytochromes that have a Pfr ground state as a result of the Pr to Pfr dark conversion. Agp2 has untypical spectral properties in the Pr form reminiscent of a deprotonated chromophore as confirmed by resonance Raman spectroscopy. UV/visible absorption spectroscopy showed that the pKa is >11 in the Pfr form and ∼7.6 in the Pr form. Unlike other phytochromes, photoconversion thus results in a pKa shift of more than 3 units. The Pr/Pfr ratio after saturating irradiation with monochromatic light is strongly pH-dependent. This is partially due to a back-reaction of the deprotonated Pr chromophore at pH 9 after photoexcitation as found by flash photolysis. The chromophore protonation and dark conversion were affected by domain swapping and site-directed mutagenesis. A replacement of the PAS or GAF domain by the respective domain of the prototypical phytochrome Agp1 resulted in a protonated Pr chromophore; the GAF domain replacement afforded an inversion of the dark conversion. A reversion was also obtained with the triple mutant N12S/Q190L/H248Q, whereas each single point mutant is characterized by decelerated Pr to Pfr dark conversion. PMID:24036118

  2. Unusual spectral properties of bacteriophytochrome Agp2 result from a deprotonation of the chromophore in the red-absorbing form Pr.

    PubMed

    Zienicke, Benjamin; Molina, Isabel; Glenz, René; Singer, Patrick; Ehmer, Dorothee; Escobar, Francisco Velazquez; Hildebrandt, Peter; Diller, Rolf; Lamparter, Tilman

    2013-11-01

    Phytochromes are widely distributed photoreceptors with a bilin chromophore that undergo a typical reversible photoconversion between the two spectrally different forms, Pr and Pfr. The phytochrome Agp2 from Agrobacterium tumefaciens belongs to the group of bathy phytochromes that have a Pfr ground state as a result of the Pr to Pfr dark conversion. Agp2 has untypical spectral properties in the Pr form reminiscent of a deprotonated chromophore as confirmed by resonance Raman spectroscopy. UV/visible absorption spectroscopy showed that the pKa is >11 in the Pfr form and ∼7.6 in the Pr form. Unlike other phytochromes, photoconversion thus results in a pKa shift of more than 3 units. The Pr/Pfr ratio after saturating irradiation with monochromatic light is strongly pH-dependent. This is partially due to a back-reaction of the deprotonated Pr chromophore at pH 9 after photoexcitation as found by flash photolysis. The chromophore protonation and dark conversion were affected by domain swapping and site-directed mutagenesis. A replacement of the PAS or GAF domain by the respective domain of the prototypical phytochrome Agp1 resulted in a protonated Pr chromophore; the GAF domain replacement afforded an inversion of the dark conversion. A reversion was also obtained with the triple mutant N12S/Q190L/H248Q, whereas each single point mutant is characterized by decelerated Pr to Pfr dark conversion.

  3. Reduction of airfoil trailing edge noise by trailing edge blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, T.; Erbslöh, S.; Carolus, T.

    2014-06-01

    The paper deals with airfoil trailing edge noise and its reduction by trailing edge blowing. A Somers S834 airfoil section which originally was designed for small wind turbines is investigated. To mimic realistic Reynolds numbers the boundary layer is tripped on pressure and suction side. The chordwise position of the blowing slot is varied. The acoustic sources, i.e. the unsteady flow quantities in the turbulent boundary layer in the vicinity of the trailing edge, are quantified for the airfoil without and with trailing edge blowing by means of a large eddy simulation and complementary measurements. Eventually the far field airfoil noise is measured by a two-microphone filtering and correlation and a 40 microphone array technique. Both, LES-prediction and measurements showed that a suitable blowing jet on the airfoil suction side is able to reduce significantly the turbulence intensity and the induced surface pressure fluctuations in the trailing edge region. As a consequence, trailing edge noise associated with a spectral hump around 500 Hz could be reduced by 3 dB. For that a jet velocity of 50% of the free field velocity was sufficient. The most favourable slot position was at 90% chord length.

  4. Comparative study of Er3+ and Tm3+ co-doped YOF and Y2O3 powders as red spectrally pure upconverters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakov, Nikifor; Maciel, Glauco S.

    2013-10-01

    We prepared Er3+ and Tm3+ co-doped yttrium oxyfluoride (YOF) powder by combustion synthesis and we observed that under near-infrared (λ = 980 nm) laser excitation the characteristic green (2H11/2, 4S3/2 → 4I15/2) emission of Er3+ was suppressed by energy transfer (ET) mechanisms between Tm3+ and Er3+. The ET process observed in YOF was much more efficient than that observed in standard Y2O3 powder prepared under similar conditions. YOF combines the superior mechanical and thermal properties of oxides with low phonon energy of fluorides. Our results show that this material is a serious candidate for use as a red upconversion phosphor.

  5. Resonance light scattering spectral method for the determination of serum albumin with the interaction of neutral red-sodium dodecyl sulfonate.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Guoqing; Zhang, Lixia; Li, Chunya

    2009-06-01

    Based on the enhancement of resonance light scattering (RLS) of serum albumin interaction with neutral red (NR) and sodium dodecyl sulfonate (SDS), a novel sensitive assay of serum albumins has been developed. Experimental conditions such as mixing sequence of reagents, pH, NR and SDS concentrations have been optimized. Linear relationships between the enhanced RLS intensity and the protein concentration were observed for bovine serum albumin (BSA) within the range of 0.01-5.0 microg mL(-1) and human serum albumin (HAS) of 0.01-7.0 microg mL(-1). The detection limits (S/N=3) are 6.0 ng mL(-1) for BSA and 5.0 ng mL(-1) for HAS, respectively. The method was successfully applied to the determination of HSA in human blood plasma samples with recovery from 97.3 to 104.3%.

  6. Edge-based correlation image registration for multispectral imaging

    DOEpatents

    Nandy, Prabal

    2009-11-17

    Registration information for images of a common target obtained from a plurality of different spectral bands can be obtained by combining edge detection and phase correlation. The images are edge-filtered, and pairs of the edge-filtered images are then phase correlated to produce phase correlation images. The registration information can be determined based on these phase correlation images.

  7. The Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    6 April 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the edge (running diagonally from the lower left to the upper right) of a trough, which is part of a large pit crater complex in Noachis Terra. This type of trough forms through the collapse of surface materials into the subsurface, and often begins as a series of individual pit craters. Over time, continued collapse increases the diameter of individual pits until finally, adjacent pits merge to form a trough such as the one captured in this image. The deep shadowed area is caused in part by an overhang; layered rock beneath this overhang is less resistant to erosion, and thus has retreated tens of meters backward, beneath the overhang. A person could walk up inside this 'cave' formed by the overhanging layered material.

    Location near: 47.0oS, 355.7oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  8. Assessment of accuracy of the structure-factor-size-estimator method in determining red blood cell aggregate size from ultrasound spectral backscatter coefficient.

    PubMed

    Saha, Ratan K; Franceschini, Emilie; Cloutier, Guy

    2011-04-01

    A computer simulation study to produce ultrasonic backscatter coefficients (BSCs) from red blood cell (RBC) clusters is discussed. The simulation algorithm is suitable for generating non-overlapping, isotropic, and fairly identical RBC clusters. RBCs were stacked following the hexagonal close packing (HCP) structure to form a compact spherical aggregate. Such an aggregate was repeated and placed randomly under non-overlapping condition in the three-dimensional space to mimic an aggregated blood sample. BSCs were computed between 750 KHz and 200 MHz for samples of various cluster sizes at different hematocrits. Magnitudes of BSCs increased with mean aggregate sizes at low frequencies (<20 MHz). The accuracy of the structure-factor-size-estimator (SFSE) method in determining mean aggregate size and packing factor was also examined. A good correlation (R(2) ≥ 0.94) between the mean size of aggregates predicted by the SFSE and true size was found for each hematocrit. This study shows that for spherical aggregates there exists a region for each hematocrit where SFSE works most accurately. Typically, error of SFSE in estimating mean cluster size was <20% for dimensions between 14 and 17 μm at 40% hematocrit. This study suggests that the theoretical framework of SFSE is valid under the assumption of isotropic aggregates.

  9. Life on the edge: gastrointestinal parasites from the forest edge and interior primate groups.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Colin A; Speirs, Michaela L; Gillespie, Thomas R; Holland, Timothy; Austad, Kiersten M

    2006-04-01

    Humans are responsible for massive changes to primate habitats, and one unanticipated consequence of these alterations may be changes in host-parasite interactions. Edges are a ubiquitous aspect of human disturbance to forest landscapes. Here we examine how changes associated with the creation of edges in Kibale National Park, Uganda, alter the parasite community that is supported by two species of African colobines: the endangered red colobus (Piliocolobus tephrosceles) and the black-and-white colobus (Colobus guereza). An analysis of 822 fecal samples from edge and forest interior groups revealed no difference in the richness of parasite communities (i.e., the number of parasite species recovered from the host's fecal sample). However, for both species the proportion of individuals with multiple infections was greater in edge than forest interior groups. The prevalence of specific parasites also varied between edge and forest interior groups. Oesophagostomum sp., a potentially deleterious parasite, was 7.4 times more prevalent in red colobus on the edge than in those in the forest interior, and Entamoeba coli was four times more prevalent in red colobus on the edge than in animals from the forest interior. Environmental contamination with parasites (measured as parasite eggs/gm feces) by red colobus from the edge and forest interior differed in a similar fashion to prevalence for red colobus, but it did not differ for black-and-white colobus. For example, egg counts of Oesophagostomum sp. were 10 times higher in red colobus from the edge than in those from the interior. The less severe infections in the black-and-white colobus relative to the red colobus may reflect the fact that black-and-white colobus raid agricultural crops while red colobus do not. This nutritional gain may facilitate a more effective immune response to parasites by the black-and-white colobus. The fact that animals on the edge are likely not nutritionally stressed raises an intriguing

  10. Spectral changes in conifers subjected to air pollution and water stress: Experimental studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westman, Walter E.; Price, Curtis V.

    1988-01-01

    The roles of leaf anatomy, moisture and pigment content, and number of leaf layers on spectral reflectance in healthy, pollution-stressed, and water-stressed conifer needles were examined experimentally. Jeffrey pine (Pinus jeffreyi) and giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron gigantea) were exposed to ozone and acid mist treatments in fumigation chambers; red pine (Pinus resinosa) needles were artificially dried. Infrared reflectance from stacked needles rose with free water loss. In an air-drying experiment, cell volume reductions induced by loss of turgor caused near-infrared reflectance (TM band 4) to drop after most free water was lost. Under acid mist fumigation, stunting of tissue development similarly reduced band 4 reflectance. Both artificial drying and pollutant fumigation caused a blue shift of the red edge of spectral reflectance curves in conifers, attributable to chlorophyll denaturation. Thematic mapper band ratio 4/3 fell and 5/4 rose with increasing pollution stress on artificial drying. Loss of water by air-drying, freeze-drying, or oven-drying enhanced spectral features, due in part to greater scattering and reduced water absorption. Grinding of the leaf tissue further enhanced the spectral features by increasing reflecting surfaces and path length. In a leaf-stacking experiment, an asymptote in visible and infrared reflectance was reached at 7-8 needle layers of red pine.

  11. Spectral changes in conifers subjected to air pollution and water stress: Experimental studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westman, Walter E.; Price, Curtis V.

    1988-01-01

    The roles of leaf anatomy, moisture and pigment content, and number of leaf layers on spectral reflectance in healthy, pollution-stressed, and water-stressed conifer needles were examined experimentally. Jeffrey pine (Pinus jeffreyi) and giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron gigantea) were exposed to ozone and acid mist treatments in fumigation chambers; red pine (Pinus resinosa) needles were artificially dried. Infrared reflectance from stacked needles rose with free water loss. In an air-drying experiment, cell volume reductions induced by loss of turgor caused near-infrared reflectance (TM band 4) to drop after most free water was lost. Under acid mist fumigation, stunting of tissue development similarly reduced band 4 reflectance. Both artificial drying and pollutant fumigation caused a blue shift of the red edge of spectral reflectance curves in conifers, attributable to chlorophyll denaturation. Thematic mapper band ratio 4/3 fell and 5/4 rose with increasing pollution stress on artificial drying. Loss of water by air-drying, freeze-drying, or oven-drying enhanced spectral features, due in part to greater scattering and reduced water absorption. Grinding of the leaf tissue further enhanced the spectral features by increasing reflecting surfaces and path length. In a leaf-stacking experiment, an asymptote in visible and infrared reflectance was reached at 7-8 needle layers of red pine.

  12. Multi-dimensional edge detection operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Sungwook; Lee, Chulhee

    2014-05-01

    In remote sensing, modern sensors produce multi-dimensional images. For example, hyperspectral images contain hundreds of spectral images. In many image processing applications, segmentation is an important step. Traditionally, most image segmentation and edge detection methods have been developed for one-dimensional images. For multidimensional images, the output images of spectral band images are typically combined under certain rules or using decision fusions. In this paper, we proposed a new edge detection algorithm for multi-dimensional images using secondorder statistics. First, we reduce the dimension of input images using the principal component analysis. Then we applied multi-dimensional edge detection operators that utilize second-order statistics. Experimental results show promising results compared to conventional one-dimensional edge detectors such as Sobel filter.

  13. [Change of LAI and spectral response for rice under flood and waterlogging stress].

    PubMed

    Xu, Peng; Gu, Xiao-He; Meng, Lu-Min; Qiu, He; Wang, Hui-Fang

    2013-12-01

    In order to provide the foundational theoretical support for flood loss estimation of rice with RS, the change of leaf area index (LAI) and canopy spectral response during four developmental stages and three waterlogging depths were studied, and the LAI estimation model was established with spectra characteristics parameter using regression analysis method. The results show that LAI value decreases as water depth increases in tillering, jointing and heading stages, and LAI value under complete submergence decreased by 36. 36% than CK in jointing stages. "Double-Peak" presented in the canopy first derivative spectra of 680-760 nm where the red edge parameters existed, and the main peak is located in the 724-737 nm with 701 and 718 nm exhibiting secondary peak. With water depth increasing, "Triple-Peak" emerges especially. The red edge position moves to long-wavelength direction in each developmental stage. Blue shift of red edge amplitude and red edge area was detected in tillering, jointing and filling stages, while red shift appeared in heading stage. The relationship between spectra characteristics parameters and LAI were investigated during 4 growth stages, results were not consistently significant at any wavelengths, and the leaf area indices were significantly correlative to the spectra parameters before heading stage, so the spectra parameters before heading stage can be used to estimate the leaf area indices, and a regression model based on parameter D(lambda737)/D(lambda718) was recommended. Therefore the variation range of LAI for rice could response to the stress intensity directly, and the regression model LAI= 3. 138(D(lambda737)/D(lambda718))-0. 806 can precisely estimate the leaf area index under flooding and waterlogging stress.

  14. Few-photon color imaging using energy-dispersive superconducting transition-edge sensor spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Kazuki; Numata, Takayuki; Hattori, Kaori; Fukuda, Daiji

    2017-04-04

    Highly sensitive spectral imaging is increasingly being demanded in bioanalysis research and industry to obtain the maximum information possible from molecules of different colors. We introduce an application of the superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) technique to highly sensitive spectral imaging. A TES is an energy-dispersive photodetector that can distinguish the wavelength of each incident photon. Its effective spectral range is from the visible to the infrared (IR), up to 2800 nm, which is beyond the capabilities of other photodetectors. TES was employed in this study in a fiber-coupled optical scanning microscopy system, and a test sample of a three-color ink pattern was observed. A red-green-blue (RGB) image and a near-IR image were successfully obtained in the few-incident-photon regime, whereas only a black and white image could be obtained using a photomultiplier tube. Spectral data were also obtained from a selected focal area out of the entire image. The results of this study show that TES is feasible for use as an energy-dispersive photon-counting detector in spectral imaging applications.

  15. Spectral Reflectance and Vegetation Index Changes in Deciduous Forest Foliage Following Tree Removal: Potential for Deforestation Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, D.; Hu, Y.; Li, Z.

    2016-05-01

    It is important to detect and quantify deforestation to guide strategic decisions regarding environment, socioeconomic development, and climate change. In the present study, we conducted a field experiment to examine spectral reflectance and vegetation index changes in poplar and locust tree foliage with different leaf area indices over the course of three sunny days, following tree removal from the canopy. The spectral reflectance of foliage from harvested trees was measured using an ASD FieldSpec Prospectroradiometer; synchronous meteorological data were also obtained. We found that reflectance in short-wave infrared and red-edge reflectance was more time sensitive after tree removal than reflectance in other spectral regions, and that the normalized difference water index (NDWI) and the red-edge chlorophyll index (CIRE) were the preferred indicators of these changes from several indices evaluated. Synthesized meteorological environments were found to influence water and chlorophyll contents after tree removal, and this subsequently changed the spectral canopy reflectance. Our results indicate the potential for such tree removal to be detected with NDWI or CIRE from the second day of a deforestation event.

  16. Spectral characterization of the LANDSAT thematic mapper sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, B. L.; Barker, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    Data collected on the spectral characteristics of the LANDSAT-4 and LANDSAT-4 backup thematic mapper instruments, the protoflight (TM/PF) and flight (TM/F) models, respectively, are presented and analyzed. Tests were conducted on the instruments and their components to determine compliance with two sets of spectral specifications: band-by-band spectral coverage and channel-by-channel within-band spectral matching. Spectral coverage specifications were placed on: (1) band edges--points at 50% of peak response, (2) band edge slopes--steepness of rise and fall-off of response, (3) spectral flatness--evenness of response between edges, and (4) spurious system response--ratio of out-of-band response to in-band response. Compliance with the spectral coverage specifications was determined by analysis of spectral measurements on the individual components contributing to the overall spectral response: filters, detectors, and optical surfaces.

  17. [The canopy and leaf spectral characteristics and nutrition diagnosis of tomato in greenhouse].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Rui-jiao; Li, Min-zan; Yang, Ce; Yang, Wei; Sun, Hong

    2010-11-01

    .7511. Meanwhile, red edge inflection points were analyzed under four nutrition treatments based on the first derivative of canopy spectral reflectance. The analysis results illustrated that red edge inflection position moved to direction of red light (long wavelength) with the nutrition supply.

  18. Spectral segmentation via midlevel cues integrating geodesic and intensity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Huchuan; Zhang, Ruixuan; Li, Shifeng; Li, Xuelong

    2013-12-01

    Image segmentation still remains as a challenge in image processing and pattern recognition when involving complex natural scenes. In this paper, we present a new affinity model for spectral segmentation based on midlevel cues. In contrast to most existing methods that operate directly on low-level cues, we first oversegment the image into superpixel images and then integrate the geodesic line edge and intensity cue to form the similarity matrix W so that it more accurately describes the similarity between data. The geodesic line edge could avoid strong boundary and represent the true boundary between two superpixels while the mean red green blue vector could describe the intensity of superpixels better. As far as we know, this is a totally new kind of affinity model to represent superpixels. Based on this model, we use the spectral clustering in the superpixel level and then achieve the image segmentation in the pixel level. The experimental results show that the proposed method performs steadily and well on various natural images. The evaluation comparisons also prove that our method achieves comparable accuracy and significantly performs better than most state-of-the-art algorithms.

  19. Randomized SUSAN edge detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Zhi-Guo; Wang, Ping; Gao, Ying-Hui; Wang, Peng

    2011-11-01

    A speed up technique for the SUSAN edge detector based on random sampling is proposed. Instead of sliding the mask pixel by pixel on an image as the SUSAN edge detector does, the proposed scheme places the mask randomly on pixels to find edges in the image; we hereby name it randomized SUSAN edge detector (R-SUSAN). Specifically, the R-SUSAN edge detector adopts three approaches in the framework of random sampling to accelerate a SUSAN edge detector: procedure integration of response computation and nonmaxima suppression, reduction of unnecessary processing for obvious nonedge pixels, and early termination. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  20. Spectral and Spread Spectral Teleportation

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S

    2010-01-01

    We report how quantum information encoded into the spectral degree of freedom of a single-photon state is teleported using a finite spectrally entangled biphoton state. We further demonstrate how the bandwidth of a teleported waveform can be controllably and coherently dilated using a spread spectral variant of teleportation. We present analytical fidelities for spectral and spread spectral teleportation when complex-valued Gaussian states are prepared using a proposed experimental approach, and we discuss the utility of these techniques for integrating broad-bandwidth photonic qubits with narrow-bandwidth receivers in quantum communication systems.

  1. Spectral response of rice (Oryza sativa L.) leaves to Fe(2+) stress.

    PubMed

    Chi, GuangYu; Chen, Xin; Shi, Yi; Liu, XinHui

    2009-08-01

    In the management of lake eutrophication, the regulation effect of Fe is considered, in addition to the controlling nitrogen- and phosphorus input. Based on the "Fe hypothesis", this paper tentatively applied plant spectral response to the remote sensing early-warning mechanism of lake eutrophication. A laboratory water culture experiment with rice (Oryza sativa L.) was conducted to study Fe uptake by plants and the chlorophyll concentration and visible-near infrared spectrum of vegetable leaves as well as their interrelations under Fe(2+) stress. Three spectral indices, i.e., A (1) (integral value of the changes of spectral reflectivity in the range 460-670 nm under Fe(2+) stress), A (2) (integral value of the changes of spectral reflectivity in the range of 760-1000 nm under Fe(2+) stress) and S (blue-shift range of red edge curve under Fe(2+) stress), were used to establish quantitative models about the relationships between the rice leaf spectrum and Fe(2+) stress. With the increase of Fe(2+) in a culture solution, the Fe content in rice plants increased, while the chlorophyll concentration in vegetative leaves decreased. The spectral reflectivity of vegetable leaves increased in the visible light band but decreased in the near infrared band, and the blue-shift range of the red edge curve increased. The indices A (1), A (2) and S all had significant correlations with the Fe content in rice leaves, the correlation coefficient being respectively 0.951 (P < 0.01), -0.988 (P < 0.01) and 0.851 (P < 0.01), and simulated (multiple correlation coefficients R (2) > 0.96) and predict the Fe level in rice leaves.

  2. Brown and green LAI mapping through spectral indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delegido, Jesús; Verrelst, Jochem; Rivera, Juan P.; Ruiz-Verdú, Antonio; Moreno, José

    2015-03-01

    When crops senescence, leaves remain until they fall off or are harvested. Hence, leaf area index (LAI) stays high even when chlorophyll content degrades to zero. Current LAI approaches from remote sensing techniques are not optimized for estimating LAI of senescent vegetation. In this paper a two-step approach has been proposed to realize simultaneous LAI mapping over green and senescent croplands. The first step separates green from brown LAI by means of a newly proposed index, 'Green Brown Vegetation Index (GBVI)'. This index exploits two shortwave infrared (SWIR) spectral bands centred at 2100 and 2000 nm, which fall right in the dry matter absorption regions, thereby providing positive values for senescent vegetation and negative for green vegetation. The second step involves applying linear regression functions based on optimized vegetation indices to estimate green and brown LAI estimation respectively. While the green LAI index uses a band in the red and a band in the red-edge, the brown LAI index uses bands located in the same spectral region as GBVI, i.e. an absorption band located in the region of maximum absorption of cellulose and lignin at 2154 nm, and a reference band at 1635 nm where the absorption of both water and dry matter is low. The two-step approach was applied to a HyMap image acquired over an agroecosystem at the agricultural site Barrax, Spain.

  3. Proximal spectral sensing to monitor phytoremediation of metal-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Rathod, Paresh H; Rossiter, David G; Noomen, Marleen F; van der Meer, Freek D

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of soil contamination and its long-term monitoring are necessary to evaluate the effectiveness of phytoremediation systems. Spectral sensing-based monitoring methods promise obvious benefits compared to field-based methods: lower cost, faster data acquisition and better spatio-temporal monitoring. This paper reviews the theoretical basis whereby proximal spectral sensing of soil and vegetation could be used to monitor phytoremediation of metal-contaminated soils, and the eventual upscaling to imaging sensing. Both laboratory and field spectroscopy have been applied to sense heavy metals in soils indirectly via their intercorrelations with soil constituents, and also through metal-induced vegetation stress. In soil, most predictions are based on intercorrelations of metals with spectrally-active soil constituents viz., Fe-oxides, organic carbon, and clays. Spectral variations in metal-stressed plants is particularly associated with changes in chlorophyll, other pigments, and cell structure, all of which can be investigated by vegetation indices and red edge position shifts. Key shortcomings in obtaining satisfactory calibration for monitoring the metals in soils or metal-related plant stress include: reduced prediction accuracy compared to chemical methods, complexity of spectra, no unique spectral features associated with metal-related plant stresses, and transfer of calibrations from laboratory to field to regional scale. Nonetheless, spectral sensing promises to be a time saving, non-destructive and cost-effective option for long-term monitoring especially over large phytoremediation areas, and it is well-suited to phytoremediation networks where monitoring is an integral part.

  4. The spectral and image characteristics of vegetation in the presence of heavy metals in southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fengjie; Li, Na; Zhou, Guangzhu; Song, Cuiyu; Li, Qingting

    2008-10-01

    The principle and methodology to monitor the heavy metal pollution using hyperspectral remote sensing are put forward based on the study areas, copper mine in De-Xing and tin ore in GeJiu, and selected plants, China Sumac, Sweet Wormwood Herb, and Nephrolepis Cordifolia. In the areas defined by former information, vegetation samples and corresponding spectral data are gathered. The samples are then analyzed in chemical lab, telling us to what extent the vegetation is polluted by heavy metal. The spectral curves are also processed, and some spectral parameters are extracted, such as reflectance, blue-shift extent, position of red-edge, vegetation index, band-depth. Then the regression model from spectral characteristic parameters to heavy metal content can be built. At last, the conclusion can be attained. In copper mine area, the vegetation is polluted by seven kinds of heavy metals. As far as China Sumac, the reflectance of red band correlates the Pb content well. The reflectance of all study plants at 1240nm and 725/675(nm) correlates heavy metal content well. The reflectance of 450nm, 550nm, 670nm, 760nm, and 1240nm can be liner combined as a parameter to monitor heavy metal pollution. Besides, some band-depth can also be combined as parameters using "Enter". In a word, as an advanced technique to monitor environmental pollution, hyperspectral remote sensing has wild perspective.

  5. Seeing Red

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    volcanos. Though the plume deposits are red, the plume itself is blue, because it is composed of very tiny particles that preferentially scatter blue light, like smoke. Also faintly visible in the left image is the pale-colored Prometheus plume, almost on the edge of the disk on the equator at the 9 o'clock position.

    Io was 2.4 million kilometers from the spacecraft when the picture was taken, and the center of Io's disk is at 77 degrees West longitude, 5 degrees South latitude. The solar phase angle was 107 degrees.

  6. Seeing Red

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    volcanos. Though the plume deposits are red, the plume itself is blue, because it is composed of very tiny particles that preferentially scatter blue light, like smoke. Also faintly visible in the left image is the pale-colored Prometheus plume, almost on the edge of the disk on the equator at the 9 o'clock position.

    Io was 2.4 million kilometers from the spacecraft when the picture was taken, and the center of Io's disk is at 77 degrees West longitude, 5 degrees South latitude. The solar phase angle was 107 degrees.

  7. Nanoindentation near the edge

    Treesearch

    J.E. Jakes; C.R. Frihart; J.F. Beecher; R.J. Moon; P.J. Resto; Z.H. Melgarejo; O.M. Saurez; H. Baumgart; A.A. Elmustafa; D.S. Stone

    2009-01-01

    Whenever a nanoindent is placed near an edge, such as the free edge of the specimen or heterophase interface intersecting the surface, the elastic discontinuity associated with the edge produces artifacts in the load-depth data. Unless properly handled in the data analysis, the artifacts can produce spurious results that obscure any real trends in properties as...

  8. Red Sea

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  The Red Sea     View Larger Image ... 2000. Located between the East African coast and the Saudi Arabian peninsula, the Red Sea got its name because the blooms of a type of ... 2000 - The Red Sea between the East Africa coast and Saudi Arabian peninsula. project:  MISR category:  ...

  9. Edge Detection in Landing Budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus)

    PubMed Central

    Bhagavatula, Partha; Claudianos, Charles; Ibbotson, Michael; Srinivasan, Mandyam

    2009-01-01

    Background While considerable scientific effort has been devoted to studying how birds navigate over long distances, relatively little is known about how targets are detected, obstacles are avoided and smooth landings are orchestrated. Here we examine how visual features in the environment, such as contrasting edges, determine where a bird will land. Methodology/Principal Findings Landing in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) was investigated by training them to fly from a perch to a feeder, and video-filming their landings. The feeder was placed on a grey disc that produced a contrasting edge against a uniformly blue background. We found that the birds tended to land primarily at the edge of the disc and walk to the feeder, even though the feeder was in the middle of the disc. This suggests that the birds were using the visual contrast at the boundary of the disc to target their landings. When the grey level of the disc was varied systematically, whilst keeping the blue background constant, there was one intermediate grey level at which the budgerigar's preference for the disc boundary disappeared. The budgerigars then landed randomly all over the test surface. Even though this disc is (for humans) clearly distinguishable from the blue background, it offers very little contrast against the background, in the red and green regions of the spectrum. Conclusions We conclude that budgerigars use visual edges to target and guide landings. Calculations of photoreceptor excitation reveal that edge detection in landing budgerigars is performed by a color-blind luminance channel that sums the signals from the red and green photoreceptors, or, alternatively, receives input from the red double-cones. This finding has close parallels to vision in honeybees and primates, where edge detection and motion perception are also largely color-blind. PMID:19809500

  10. Spectroscopy of red dravite from northern Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taran, Michail N.; Dyar, M. Darby; Naumenko, Ievgen V.; Vyshnevsky, Olexij A.

    2015-07-01

    Low-Fe dravite with a formula of Na0.66Ca0.16Mg2.62Fe0.33Mn0.02Ti0.02Al5.95B3Si6.04O27(OH)4 is described from Engusero Sambu, northern Tanzania (On maps, Engusero Sambu may be found to be marked as belonging to Kenya, but in reality, it is located near the border in northern Tanzania). The sample has an unusual red color that is distinctly different from the red dravite from the Osarara, Narok district, in Kenya that was formerly studied by Mattson and Rossman (Phys Chem Miner 14:225-234, 1984) and Taran and Rossman (Am Mineral 87:1148-1153, 2002). This unique sample has been characterized by optical and Mössbauer spectral measurements to investigate underlying cause of the intense bands in absorption spectra that give rise to the red color. These features are shown to be caused by exchange-coupled Fe3+-Fe3+ interactions. Thermal annealing of the samples causes an increase in Fe3+ contents due to oxidation of [Y]Fe2+. However, heat treatment does not change the high-energy absorption edge, which is probably caused by intense ligand-to-Fe3+ charge-transfer UV bands. In fact, Mössbauer results show that high-temperature annealing initiates breakdown of the tourmaline into an Fe oxide and causes accompanying redistribution of Fe3+ within the structure. Because of the popularity of tourmaline as a gemstone, this work has implications for understanding the causes of color in tourmaline, facilitating recognition of the distinctions between naturally occurring and treated tourmalines in the gem industry and enabling heat treatments for color enhancement.

  11. Species Discrimination of Mangroves using Derivative Spectral Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, K. Arun; Gnanappazham, L.

    2014-11-01

    Mangroves are salt tolerant trees or shrubs commonly seen in mudflats of intertidal regions of tropical and subtropical coastlines. Recent advances in field spectroscopic techniques enabled the species level discrimination among closely related vegetation types. In this study we have analysed the laboratory spectroscopy data collected from eight species of Rhizophoraceaea family of mangroves. The spectral data ranges between the wavelength of 350 nm and 2500 nm at a very narrow bandwidth of 1 nm. Preprocessing techniques including smoothing were done on the spectra to remove the noise before compiling it to a spectral library. Derivative analysis of the spectra was done and its corresponding first and second derivatives were obtained. Statistical analysis such as parametric and non-parametric tests were implemented on the original processed spectra as well as their respective first and second order derivatives for the identification of significant bands for species discrimination. Results have shown that red edge region (680 nm - 720 nm) and water vapour absorption region around 1150 nm and 1400 nm are optimal as they were consistent in discriminating species in reflectance spectra as well as in its first and second derivative spectra. C. decandra species is found to be discriminable from other species while reflectance and its derivative spectra were used. Non-parametric statistical analysis gave better results than that of parametric statistical analysis especially in SWIR 2 spectral region (1831 nm - 2500 nm).

  12. [Vegetation index estimation by chlorophyll content of grassland based on spectral analysis].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Han; Chen, Xiu-Wan; Yang, Zhen-Yu; Li, Huai-Yu; Zhu, Han

    2014-11-01

    Comparing the methods of existing remote sensing research on the estimation of chlorophyll content, the present paper confirms that the vegetation index is one of the most practical and popular research methods. In recent years, the increasingly serious problem of grassland degradation. This paper, firstly, analyzes the measured reflectance spectral curve and its first derivative curve in the grasslands of Songpan, Sichuan and Gongger, Inner Mongolia, conducts correlation analysis between these two spectral curves and chlorophyll content, and finds out the regulation between REP (red edge position) and grassland chlorophyll content, that is, the higher the chlorophyll content is, the higher the REIP (red-edge inflection point) value would be. Then, this paper constructs GCI (grassland chlorophyll index) and selects the most suitable band for retrieval. Finally, this paper calculates the GCI by the use of satellite hyperspectral image, conducts the verification and accuracy analysis of the calculation results compared with chlorophyll content data collected from field of twice experiments. The result shows that for grassland chlorophyll content, GCI has stronger sensitivity than other indices of chlorophyll, and has higher estimation accuracy. GCI is the first proposed to estimate the grassland chlorophyll content, and has wide application potential for the remote sensing retrieval of grassland chlorophyll content. In addition, the grassland chlorophyll content estimation method based on remote sensing retrieval in this paper provides new research ideas for other vegetation biochemical parameters' estimation, vegetation growth status' evaluation and grassland ecological environment change's monitoring.

  13. Intensity Conserving Spectral Fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimchuk, J. A.; Patsourakos, S.; Tripathi, D.

    2016-01-01

    The detailed shapes of spectral-line profiles provide valuable information about the emitting plasma, especially when the plasma contains an unresolved mixture of velocities, temperatures, and densities. As a result of finite spectral resolution, the intensity measured by a spectrometer is the average intensity across a wavelength bin of non-zero size. It is assigned to the wavelength position at the center of the bin. However, the actual intensity at that discrete position will be different if the profile is curved, as it invariably is. Standard fitting routines (spline, Gaussian, etc.) do not account for this difference, and this can result in significant errors when making sensitive measurements. We have developed an iterative procedure that corrects for this effect. It converges rapidly and is very flexible in that it can be used with any fitting function. We present examples of cubic-spline and Gaussian fits and give special attention to measurements of blue-red asymmetries of coronal emission lines.

  14. Spectral stratigraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Harold R.

    1991-01-01

    A new approach to stratigraphic analysis is described which uses photogeologic and spectral interpretation of multispectral remote sensing data combined with topographic information to determine the attitude, thickness, and lithology of strata exposed at the surface. The new stratigraphic procedure is illustrated by examples in the literature. The published results demonstrate the potential of spectral stratigraphy for mapping strata, determining dip and strike, measuring and correlating stratigraphic sequences, defining lithofacies, mapping biofacies, and interpreting geological structures.

  15. Tasting edge effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocquet, Lydéric

    2007-02-01

    We show that the baking of potato wedges constitutes a crunchy example of edge effects, which are usually demonstrated in electrostatics. A simple model of the diffusive transport of water vapor around the potato wedges shows that the water vapor flux diverges at the sharp edges in analogy with its electrostatic counterpart. This increased evaporation at the edges leads to the crispy taste of these parts of the potatoes.

  16. Use of spectral analogy to evaluate canopy reflectance sensitivity to leaf optical property

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baret, Frederic; Vanderbilt, Vern C.; Steven, Michael D.; Jacquemoud, Stephane

    1993-01-01

    The spectral variation of canopy reflectance is mostly governed by the absorption properties of the elements, hence the leaves, since their intrinsic scattering properties show very little spectral variation. The relationship between canopy reflectance and leaf reflectance measured at the red edge over sugar beet canopies was used to simulate canopy reflectance from leaf reflectance spectra measured over the whole spectral domain. The results show that the spectral analogies found allows accurate reconstruction of canopy reflectance spectra. Explicit assumptions about the very low spectral variation of leaf intrinsic scattering properties are thus indirectly justified. The sensitivity of canopy reflectance (rho(sub c)) to leaf optical properties can then be investigated from concurrent spectral variations of canopy (delta rho(sub c)/delta lambda) and leaf reflectance (delta rho(sub l)/delta lambda): (delta rho(sub c))/(delta rho(sub l)) = ((delta rho(sub c))/(delta lambda) ((delta rho( sub l))/(delta lambda))(sup -1)). This expression is strictly valid only when the optical properties of the soil background or the other vegetation elements such as bark are either spectrally flat or do not contribute significantly to canopy reflectance. Simulations using the SAIL and PROSPECT models demonstrate that the sensitivity of canopy reflectance to leaf reflectance is significant for large vegetation cover fractions in spectral domains where absorption is low. In these conditions, multiple, scattering enhances the leaf absorption features by a factor that can be greater than 2.0. To override the limitations of the SAIL model for the description of the canopy architecture, we tested the previous findings on experimental data. Concurrent canopy and leaf reflectance spectra were measured for a range of sugar beet canopies. The results show good agreement with the theoretical findings. Conclusions are drawn about the applicability of these findings, with particular attention to

  17. Use of spectral analogy to evaluate canopy reflectance sensitivity to leaf optical property

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baret, Frederic; Vanderbilt, Vern C.; Steven, Michael D.; Jacquemoud, Stephane

    1993-01-01

    The spectral variation of canopy reflectance is mostly governed by the absorption properties of the elements, hence the leaves, since their intrinsic scattering properties show very little spectral variation. The relationship between canopy reflectance and leaf reflectance measured at the red edge over sugar beet canopies was used to simulate canopy reflectance from leaf reflectance spectra measured over the whole spectral domain. The results show that the spectral analogies found allows accurate reconstruction of canopy reflectance spectra. Explicit assumptions about the very low spectral variation of leaf intrinsic scattering properties are thus indirectly justified. The sensitivity of canopy reflectance (rho(sub c)) to leaf optical properties can then be investigated from concurrent spectral variations of canopy (delta rho(sub c)/delta lambda) and leaf reflectance (delta rho(sub l)/delta lambda): (delta rho(sub c))/(delta rho(sub l)) = ((delta rho(sub c))/(delta lambda) ((delta rho( sub l))/(delta lambda))(sup -1)). This expression is strictly valid only when the optical properties of the soil background or the other vegetation elements such as bark are either spectrally flat or do not contribute significantly to canopy reflectance. Simulations using the SAIL and PROSPECT models demonstrate that the sensitivity of canopy reflectance to leaf reflectance is significant for large vegetation cover fractions in spectral domains where absorption is low. In these conditions, multiple, scattering enhances the leaf absorption features by a factor that can be greater than 2.0. To override the limitations of the SAIL model for the description of the canopy architecture, we tested the previous findings on experimental data. Concurrent canopy and leaf reflectance spectra were measured for a range of sugar beet canopies. The results show good agreement with the theoretical findings. Conclusions are drawn about the applicability of these findings, with particular attention to

  18. Edge-on Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has imaged an unusual edge-on galaxy, revealing remarkable details of its warped dusty disc and showing how colliding galaxies trigger the birth of new stars.

    The image, taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), is online at http://heritage.stsci.edu and http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc. The camera was designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. During observations of the galaxy, the camera passed a milestone, taking its 100,000th image since shuttle astronauts installed it in Hubble in 1993.

    The dust and spiral arms of normal spiral galaxies, like our Milky Way, look flat when seen edge- on. The new image of the galaxy ESO 510-G13 shows an unusual twisted disc structure, first seen in ground-based photographs taken at the European Southern Observatory in Chile. ESO 510-G13 lies in the southern constellation Hydra, some 150 million light-years from Earth. Details of the galaxy's structure are visible because interstellar dust clouds that trace its disc are silhouetted from behind by light from the galaxy's bright, smooth central bulge.

    The strong warping of the disc indicates that ESO 510-G13 has recently collided with a nearby galaxy and is in the process of swallowing it. Gravitational forces distort galaxies as their stars, gas, and dust merge over millions of years. When the disturbances die out, ESO 510-G13 will be a single galaxy.

    The galaxy's outer regions, especially on the right side of the image, show dark dust and bright clouds of blue stars. This indicates that hot, young stars are forming in the twisted disc. Astronomers believe star formation may be triggered when galaxies collide and their interstellar clouds are compressed.

    The Hubble Heritage Team used WFPC2 to observe ESO 510-G13 in April 2001. Pictures obtained through blue, green, and red filters were combined to make this color-composite image, which emphasizes the contrast between the dusty

  19. Edge-on Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has imaged an unusual edge-on galaxy, revealing remarkable details of its warped dusty disc and showing how colliding galaxies trigger the birth of new stars.

    The image, taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), is online at http://heritage.stsci.edu and http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc. The camera was designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. During observations of the galaxy, the camera passed a milestone, taking its 100,000th image since shuttle astronauts installed it in Hubble in 1993.

    The dust and spiral arms of normal spiral galaxies, like our Milky Way, look flat when seen edge- on. The new image of the galaxy ESO 510-G13 shows an unusual twisted disc structure, first seen in ground-based photographs taken at the European Southern Observatory in Chile. ESO 510-G13 lies in the southern constellation Hydra, some 150 million light-years from Earth. Details of the galaxy's structure are visible because interstellar dust clouds that trace its disc are silhouetted from behind by light from the galaxy's bright, smooth central bulge.

    The strong warping of the disc indicates that ESO 510-G13 has recently collided with a nearby galaxy and is in the process of swallowing it. Gravitational forces distort galaxies as their stars, gas, and dust merge over millions of years. When the disturbances die out, ESO 510-G13 will be a single galaxy.

    The galaxy's outer regions, especially on the right side of the image, show dark dust and bright clouds of blue stars. This indicates that hot, young stars are forming in the twisted disc. Astronomers believe star formation may be triggered when galaxies collide and their interstellar clouds are compressed.

    The Hubble Heritage Team used WFPC2 to observe ESO 510-G13 in April 2001. Pictures obtained through blue, green, and red filters were combined to make this color-composite image, which emphasizes the contrast between the dusty

  20. Contrast edge colors under different natural illuminations.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Juan Luis; Nascimento, Sérgio M C; Romero, Javier

    2012-02-01

    Essential to sensory processing in the human visual system is natural illumination, which can vary considerably not only across space but also along the day depending on the atmospheric conditions and the sun's position in the sky. In this work, edges derived from the three postreceptoral Luminance, Red-Green, and Blue-Yellow signals were computed from hyperspectral images of natural scenes rendered with daylights of Correlated Color Temperatures (CCTs) from 2735 to 25,889 K; for low CCT, the same analysis was performed using Planckian illuminants up to 800 K. It was found that average luminance and chromatic edge contrasts were maximal for low correlated color temperatures and almost constants above 10,000 K. The magnitude of these contrast changes was, however, only about 2% across the tested daylights. Results suggest that the postreceptoral opponent and nonopponent color vision mechanisms produce almost constant responses for color edge detection under natural illumination.

  1. Paleomagnetism of Eocene red-beds in the eastern part of the Qiangtang Terrane and its implications for uplift and southward crustal extrusion in the southeastern edge of the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yabo; Yang, Zhenyu; Mao, Changping; Pei, Junling; Pu, Zongwen; Xu, Yingchao

    2017-10-01

    A primary magnetic component with the acquisition time of 56.0-43.2 Ma was isolated between 580 °C and 685 °C from the Eocene Gonjo and Ranmugou Formations in the eastern part of the Qiangtang Terrane, Tibetan Plateau. The tilt corrected site-mean direction is Ds = 35.5 °, Is = 29.3 °, k = 45.9, α95 = 3.2 °. The site-mean inclination increased from 29.3° to 41.6° after multiple inclination shallowing corrections, giving a paleopole of 57.9°N/192.1°E, A95 = 2.9 °. Comparison of the Paleogene paleomagnetic data for the Qiangtang Terrane and Lhasa Terrane reveals that both terranes experienced latitudinal crustal shortening before 54-43 Ma, indicating the uplift of southern and central Tibet in the early Eocene. Subsequently, since 35.4 ± 2.4 Ma, the north of the Qiangtang Terrane experienced ∼1300 ± 410 km of crustal shortening, indicating the uplift of the northern Tibetan Plateau. The Lhasa Terrane and Qiangtang Terrane have not experienced further crustal shortening since the late Eocene, and the southeastern part of Tibet cannot have provided abundant crustal material to accommodate the significant crustal southward extrusion in the southeastern edge of the Tibetan Plateau. The crust of the Tengchong Terrane and Shan-Thai Block did not experience significant southward extrusion since the late Oligocene-Early Miocene. The Indochina Block was situated in the north of the Qiangtang Terrane before the Oligocene, and since the early Oligocene, the Indochina Block began to experience southward extrusion from the north of the Qiangtang Terrane, which absorbed part of the crustal shortening in the north of the Qiangtang Terrane.

  2. Supersonic Leading Edge Receptivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maslov, Anatoly A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes experimental studies of leading edge boundary layer receptivity for imposed stream disturbances. Studies were conducted in the supersonic T-325 facility at ITAM and include data for both sharp and blunt leading edges. The data are in agreement with existing theory and should provide guidance for the development of more complete theories and numerical computations of this phenomena.

  3. The Edge, Fall 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edge, 1999

    1999-01-01

    "The Edge" is a Canadian publication for youth. The mandate of the Edge is to support and celebrate all career journeys embraced by youth. This issue contains career profile articles covering three jobs: crane operator, indoor climbing instructor, and product certification tester. Career trends and the state of today's workplace are also…

  4. Assessing the Spectral Properties of Sunlit and Shaded Components in Rice Canopies with Near-Ground Imaging Spectroscopy Data

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Kai; Deng, Xinqiang; Yao, Xia; Tian, Yongchao; Cao, Weixing; Zhu, Yan; Ustin, Susan L.; Cheng, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Monitoring the components of crop canopies with remote sensing can help us understand the within-canopy variation in spectral properties and resolve the sources of uncertainties in the spectroscopic estimation of crop foliar chemistry. To date, the spectral properties of leaves and panicles in crop canopies and the shadow effects on their spectral variation remain poorly understood due to the insufficient spatial resolution of traditional spectroscopy data. To address this issue, we used a near-ground imaging spectroscopy system with high spatial and spectral resolutions to examine the spectral properties of rice leaves and panicles in sunlit and shaded portions of canopies and evaluate the effect of shadows on the relationships between spectral indices of leaves and foliar chlorophyll content. The results demonstrated that the shaded components exhibited lower reflectance amplitude but stronger absorption features than their sunlit counterparts. Specifically, the reflectance spectra of panicles had unique double-peak absorption features in the blue region. Among the examined vegetation indices (VIs), significant differences were found in the photochemical reflectance index (PRI) between leaves and panicles and further differences in the transformed chlorophyll absorption reflectance index (TCARI) between sunlit and shaded components. After an image-level separation of canopy components with these two indices, statistical analyses revealed much higher correlations between canopy chlorophyll content and both PRI and TCARI of shaded leaves than for those of sunlit leaves. In contrast, the red edge chlorophyll index (CIRed-edge) exhibited the strongest correlations with canopy chlorophyll content among all vegetation indices examined regardless of shadows on leaves. These findings represent significant advances in the understanding of rice leaf and panicle spectral properties under natural light conditions and demonstrate the significance of commonly overlooked shaded

  5. Edge Detection By Differences Of Gaussians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marthon, Ph.; Thiesse, B.; Bruel, A.

    1986-06-01

    The Differences of Gaussians (DOGs) are of fundamental importance in edge detection. They belong to the human vision system as shown by Enroth-Cugell and Robson [ENR66]. The zero-crossings of their outputs mark the loci of the intensity changes. The set of descriptions from different operator sizes forms the input for later visual processes, such as stereopsis and motion analysis. We show that DOGs uniformly converge to the Laplacian of a Gaussian (ΔG2,σ) when both the inhibitory and excitatory variables converge to σ. Spatial and spectral properties of DOGs and ΔGs are compared: width and height of their central positive regions, bandiwidths... Finally, DOGs' responses to some features such as ideal edge, right angle corner, general corner..., are presented and magnitudes of error on edge position are given.

  6. Eye redness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blepharitis : swelling along the edge of the eyelid. Conjunctivitis : swelling or infection of the clear tissue that ... Mannis MJ, Plotnik RD. Bacterial conjunctivitis. In: Tasman W, ... PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2013:vol 4, chap 5. Rubenstein ...

  7. Red Sky with Red Mesa

    SciTech Connect

    2011-04-14

    The Red Sky/Red Mesa supercomputing platform dramatically reduces the time required to simulate complex fuel models, from 4-6 months to just 4 weeks, allowing researchers to accelerate the pace at which they can address these complex problems. Its speed also reduces the need for laboratory and field testing, allowing for energy reduction far beyond data center walls.

  8. Red Sky with Red Mesa

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The Red Sky/Red Mesa supercomputing platform dramatically reduces the time required to simulate complex fuel models, from 4-6 months to just 4 weeks, allowing researchers to accelerate the pace at which they can address these complex problems. Its speed also reduces the need for laboratory and field testing, allowing for energy reduction far beyond data center walls.

  9. Red Blood Cell Count Automation Using Microscopic Hyperspectral Imaging Technology.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingli; Zhou, Mei; Liu, Hongying; Wang, Yiting; Guo, Fangmin

    2015-12-01

    Red blood cell counts have been proven to be one of the most frequently performed blood tests and are valuable for early diagnosis of some diseases. This paper describes an automated red blood cell counting method based on microscopic hyperspectral imaging technology. Unlike the light microscopy-based red blood count methods, a combined spatial and spectral algorithm is proposed to identify red blood cells by integrating active contour models and automated two-dimensional k-means with spectral angle mapper algorithm. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has better performance than spatial based algorithm because the new algorithm can jointly use the spatial and spectral information of blood cells.

  10. Changes in spectral properties of detached leaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daughtry, C. S. T.; Biehl, L. L.

    1984-01-01

    If leaf senescence can be delayed for several days without significant changes in spectral properties, then samples of leaves at remote test sites could be prepared and shipped to laboratories to measure spectral properties. The changes in spectral properties of detached leaves were determined. Leaves from red birch and red pine were immersed in water or 0.001 M benzylaminopurine (BAP) and stored in plastic bags in the dark at either 5 or 25 C. Total directional-hemispherical reflectance and transmittance of the adaxial surface of birch leaves were measured over the 400 to 1100 nm wavelength region with a spectroradiometer and integrating sphere. Pine needles were taped together and reflectance of the mat of needles was measured. Spectral properties changed less than 5% of initial values during the first week when leaves were stored at 5 C. Storage at 25 C promoted rapid senescence and large changes in spectral properties. BAP delayed, but did not stop, senescence at 25 C.

  11. Red Emitting VCSEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jetter, Michael; Roßbach, Robert; Michler, Peter

    This chapter describes the progress in development of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSEL) emitting in the red spectral region around 650 nm for data transmission over polymer optical fibers (POF). First, growth issues of red VCSEL using two different material systems, namely AlGaAs and AlGaInP, are introduced. In particular, the optical and electrical state-of-the-art characteristics as low threshold currents ({≤} 1 mA) and high output powers (several mW) are presented with a special focus on emission wavelength. Also the thermal budget and heat removal in the devices are pointed out with regard to the geometry of the VCSEL. Small-signal modulation response in terms of maximum resonance frequency in dependance on temperature behavior are discussed. Applications of these devices in optical interconnects are described and digital data transmission at data rates up to 2.1 Gbit/s over step-index POF is reported. These properties make red emitting VCSEL perfectly suited for high-speed low power consuming light sources for optical data communication via POF. By introducing InP quantum dots as gain material in red emitting VCSEL nearly temperature independent record low threshold current densities of around 10 A/cm2 could be observed.

  12. Flap Edge Aeroacoustic Measurements and Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    An aeroacoustic model test has been conducted to investigate the mechanisms of sound generation on high-lift wing configurations. This paper presents an analysis of flap side-edge noise, which is often the most dominant source. A model of a main element wing section with a half-span flap was tested at low speeds of up to a Mach number of 0.17, corresponding to a wing chord Reynolds number of approximately 1.7 million. Results are presented for flat (or blunt), flanged, and round flap-edge geometries, with and without boundary-layer tripping, deployed at both moderate and high flap angles. The acoustic database is obtained from a Small Aperture Directional Array (SADA) of microphones, which was constructed to electronically steer to different regions of the model and to obtain farfield noise spectra and directivity from these regions. The basic flap-edge aerodynamics is established by static surface pressure data, as well as by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations and simplified edge flow analyses. Distributions of unsteady pressure sensors over the flap allow the noise source regions to be defined and quantified via cross-spectral diagnostics using the SADA output. It is found that shear layer instability and related pressure scatter is the primary noise mechanism. For the flat edge flap, two noise prediction methods based on unsteady surface pressure measurements are evaluated and compared to measured noise. One is a new causality spectral approach developed here. The other is a new application of an edge-noise scatter prediction method. The good comparisons for both approaches suggest that much of the physics is captured by the prediction models. Areas of disagreement appear to reveal when the assumed edge noise mechanism does not fully define the noise production. For the different edge conditions, extensive spectra and directivity are presented. Significantly, for each edge configuration, the spectra for different flow speeds, flap angles, and

  13. Flap Edge Aeroacoustic Measurements and Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    An aeroacoustic model test has been conducted to investigate the mechanisms of sound generation on high-lift wing configurations. This paper presents an analysis of flap side-edge noise, which is often the most dominant source. A model of a main element wing section with a half-span flap was tested at low speeds of up to a Mach number of 0.17, corresponding to a wing chord Reynolds number of approximately 1.7 million. Results are presented for flat (or blunt), flanged, and round flap-edge geometries, with and without boundary-layer tripping, deployed at both moderate and high flap angles. The acoustic database is obtained from a Small Aperture Directional Array (SADA) of microphones, which was constructed to electronically steer to different regions of the model and to obtain farfield noise spectra and directivity from these regions. The basic flap-edge aerodynamics is established by static surface pressure data, as well as by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations and simplified edge flow analyses. Distributions of unsteady pressure sensors over the flap allow the noise source regions to be defined and quantified via cross-spectral diagnostics using the SADA output. It is found that shear layer instability and related pressure scatter is the primary noise mechanism. For the flat edge flap, two noise prediction methods based on unsteady-surface-pressure measurements are evaluated and compared to measured noise. One is a new causality spectral approach developed here. The other is a new application of an edge-noise scatter prediction method. The good comparisons for both approaches suggest that much of the physics is captured by the prediction models. Areas of disagreement appear to reveal when the assumed edge noise mechanism does not fully define, the noise production. For the different edge conditions, extensive spectra and directivity are presented. Significantly, for each edge configuration, the spectra for different flow speeds, flap angles, and

  14. Spectrally-encoded color imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kang, DongKyun; Yelin, Dvir; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2010-01-01

    Spectrally-encoded endoscopy (SEE) is a technique for ultraminiature endoscopy that encodes each spatial location on the sample with a different wavelength. One limitation of previous incarnations of SEE is that it inherently creates monochromatic images, since the spectral bandwidth is expended in the spatial encoding process. Here we present a spectrally-encoded imaging system that has color imaging capability. The new imaging system utilizes three distinct red, green, and blue spectral bands that are configured to illuminate the grating at different incident angles. By careful selection of the incident angles, the three spectral bands can be made to overlap on the sample. To demonstrate the method, a bench-top system was built, comprising a 2400-lpmm grating illuminated by three 525-μm-diameter beams with three different spectral bands. Each spectral band had a bandwidth of 75 nm, producing 189 resolvable points. A resolution target, color phantoms, and excised swine small intestine were imaged to validate the system's performance. The color SEE system showed qualitatively and quantitatively similar color imaging performance to that of a conventional digital camera. PMID:19688002

  15. Red Hill

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility in Hawaii Administrative Order on Consent (AOC), an enforceable agreement of the Hawaii Department of Health, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the U.S. Navy -- Defense Logistics Agency.

  16. [Visible-NIR spectral feature of citrus greening disease].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiu-hua; Li, Min-zan; Won Suk, Lee; Reza, Ehsani; Ashish, Ratn Mishra

    2014-06-01

    Citrus greening (Huanglongbing, or HLB) is a devastating disease caused by Candidatus liberibacter which uses psyllids as vectors. It has no cure till now, and poses a huge threat to citrus industry around the world. In order to diagnose, assess and further control this disease, it is of great importance to first find a quick and effective way to detect it. Spectroscopy method, which was widely considered as a fast and nondestructive way, was adopted here to conduct a preliminary exploration of disease characteristics. In order to explore the spectral differences between the healthy and HLB infected leaves and canopies, this study measured the visible-NIR spectral reflectance of their leaves and canopies under lab and field conditions, respectively. The original spectral data were firstly preprocessed with smoothing (or moving average) and cluster average procedures, and then the first derivatives were also calculated to determine the red edge position (REP). In order to solve the multi-peak phenomenon problem, two interpolation methods (three-point Lagrangian interpolation and four-point linear extrapolation) were adopted to calculate the REP for each sample. The results showed that there were, obvious differences at the visible & NIR spectral reflectance between the healthy and HLB infected classes. Comparing with the healthy reflectance, the HLB reflectance was higher at the visible bands because of the yellowish symptoms on the infected leaves, and lower at NIR bands because the disease blocked water transportation to leaves. But the feature at NIR bands was easily affected by environmental factors such as light, background, etc. The REP was also a potential indicator to distinguish those two classes. The average REP was slowly moving toward red bands while the infection level was getting higher. The gap of the average REPs between the healthy and HLB classes reached to a maximum of 20 nm. Even in the dataset with relatively lower variation, the classification

  17. The Role of the Pattern Edge in Goldfish Visual Motion Detection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun-Hee

    2010-01-01

    To understand the function of edges in perception of moving objects, we defined four questions to answer. Is the focus point in visual motion detection of a moving object: (1) the body or the edge of the object, (2) the leading edge or trailing edge of the object, (3) different in scotopic, mesopic and photopic luminance levels, or (4) different for colored objects? We measured the Optomotor Response (OMR) and Edge Triggering Response (ETR) of goldfish. We used a square and sine wave patterns with black and red stripes and a square wave pattern with black and grey stripes to generate OMR's and ETR's in the goldfish. When we used black and red stripes, the black leading edges stimulated an ETR under scotopic conditions, red leading edges stimulated an ETR under photopic conditions, and both black and red leading edges stimulated an ETR under mesopic luminance levels. For black and gray stripes, only black leading edges stimulated an ETR in all three light illumination levels. We observed less OMR and ETR results using the sine wave pattern compared to using the square wave pattern. From these results, we deduced that the goldfish tend to prefer tracking the leading edge of the pattern. The goldfish can also detect the color of the moving pattern under photopic luminance conditions. We decided that ETR is an intriguing factor in OMR, and is suitable as a method of behavioral measurement in visual system research. PMID:21311683

  18. Hybrid spectral CT reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Darin P.

    2017-01-01

    Current photon counting x-ray detector (PCD) technology faces limitations associated with spectral fidelity and photon starvation. One strategy for addressing these limitations is to supplement PCD data with high-resolution, low-noise data acquired with an energy-integrating detector (EID). In this work, we propose an iterative, hybrid reconstruction technique which combines the spectral properties of PCD data with the resolution and signal-to-noise characteristics of EID data. Our hybrid reconstruction technique is based on an algebraic model of data fidelity which substitutes the EID data into the data fidelity term associated with the PCD reconstruction, resulting in a joint reconstruction problem. Within the split Bregman framework, these data fidelity constraints are minimized subject to additional constraints on spectral rank and on joint intensity-gradient sparsity measured between the reconstructions of the EID and PCD data. Following a derivation of the proposed technique, we apply it to the reconstruction of a digital phantom which contains realistic concentrations of iodine, barium, and calcium encountered in small-animal micro-CT. The results of this experiment suggest reliable separation and detection of iodine at concentrations ≥ 5 mg/ml and barium at concentrations ≥ 10 mg/ml in 2-mm features for EID and PCD data reconstructed with inherent spatial resolutions of 176 μm and 254 μm, respectively (point spread function, FWHM). Furthermore, hybrid reconstruction is demonstrated to enhance spatial resolution within material decomposition results and to improve low-contrast detectability by as much as 2.6 times relative to reconstruction with PCD data only. The parameters of the simulation experiment are based on an in vivo micro-CT experiment conducted in a mouse model of soft-tissue sarcoma. Material decomposition results produced from this in vivo data demonstrate the feasibility of distinguishing two K-edge contrast agents with a spectral

  19. Hybrid spectral CT reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Clark, Darin P; Badea, Cristian T

    2017-01-01

    Current photon counting x-ray detector (PCD) technology faces limitations associated with spectral fidelity and photon starvation. One strategy for addressing these limitations is to supplement PCD data with high-resolution, low-noise data acquired with an energy-integrating detector (EID). In this work, we propose an iterative, hybrid reconstruction technique which combines the spectral properties of PCD data with the resolution and signal-to-noise characteristics of EID data. Our hybrid reconstruction technique is based on an algebraic model of data fidelity which substitutes the EID data into the data fidelity term associated with the PCD reconstruction, resulting in a joint reconstruction problem. Within the split Bregman framework, these data fidelity constraints are minimized subject to additional constraints on spectral rank and on joint intensity-gradient sparsity measured between the reconstructions of the EID and PCD data. Following a derivation of the proposed technique, we apply it to the reconstruction of a digital phantom which contains realistic concentrations of iodine, barium, and calcium encountered in small-animal micro-CT. The results of this experiment suggest reliable separation and detection of iodine at concentrations ≥ 5 mg/ml and barium at concentrations ≥ 10 mg/ml in 2-mm features for EID and PCD data reconstructed with inherent spatial resolutions of 176 μm and 254 μm, respectively (point spread function, FWHM). Furthermore, hybrid reconstruction is demonstrated to enhance spatial resolution within material decomposition results and to improve low-contrast detectability by as much as 2.6 times relative to reconstruction with PCD data only. The parameters of the simulation experiment are based on an in vivo micro-CT experiment conducted in a mouse model of soft-tissue sarcoma. Material decomposition results produced from this in vivo data demonstrate the feasibility of distinguishing two K-edge contrast agents with a spectral

  20. Effects of Salinity on Leaf Spectral Reflectance and Biochemical Parameters of Nitrogen Fixing Soybean Plants (Glycine max L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krezhova, Dora D.; Kirova, Elisaveta B.; Yanev, Tony K.; Iliev, Ilko Ts.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of physiology and hyperspectral leaf reflectance were used to detect salinity stress in nitrogen fixing soybean plants. Seedlings were inoculated with suspension of Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain 273. Salinity was performed at the stage of 2nd-4th trifoliate expanded leaves by adding of NaCl in the nutrient solution of Helrigel in concentrations 40 mM and 80 mM. A comparative analysis was performed between the changes in the biochemical parameters - stress markers (phenols, proline, malondialdehyde, thiol groups), chlorophyll a and b, hydrogen peroxide, and leaf spectral reflectance in the spectral range 450-850 nm. The spectral measurements were carried out by an USB2000 spectrometer. The reflectance data of the control and treated plants in the red, green, red-edge and the near infrared ranges of the spectrum were subjected to statistical analysis. Statistically significant differences were found through the Student's t-criterion at the two NaCl concentrations in all of the ranges examined with the exception of the near infrared range at 40 mM NaCl concentration. Similar results were obtained through linear discriminant analysis. The tents of the phenols, malondialdehyde and chlorophyll a and b were found to decrease at both salinity treatments. In the spectral data this effect is manifested by decrease of the reflectance values in the green and red ranges. The contents of proline, hydrogen peroxide and thiol groups rose with the NaCl concentration increase. At 80 mM NaCl concentration the values of these markers showed a considerable increase giving evidence that the soybean plants were stressed in comparison with the control. This finding is in agreement with the results from the spectral reflectance analysis.

  1. The digital step edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haralick, R. M.

    1982-01-01

    The facet model was used to accomplish step edge detection. The essence of the facet model is that any analysis made on the basis of the pixel values in some neighborhood has its final authoritative interpretation relative to the underlying grey tone intensity surface of which the neighborhood pixel values are observed noisy samples. Pixels which are part of regions have simple grey tone intensity surfaces over their areas. Pixels which have an edge in them have complex grey tone intensity surfaces over their areas. Specially, an edge moves through a pixel only if there is some point in the pixel's area having a zero crossing of the second directional derivative taken in the direction of a non-zero gradient at the pixel's center. To determine whether or not a pixel should be marked as a step edge pixel, its underlying grey tone intensity surface was estimated on the basis of the pixels in its neighborhood.

  2. Spectral clustering with epidemic diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Laura M.; Lerman, Kristina; Garcia-Cardona, Cristina; Percus, Allon G.; Ghosh, Rumi

    2013-10-01

    Spectral clustering is widely used to partition graphs into distinct modules or communities. Existing methods for spectral clustering use the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the graph Laplacian, an operator that is closely associated with random walks on graphs. We propose a spectral partitioning method that exploits the properties of epidemic diffusion. An epidemic is a dynamic process that, unlike the random walk, simultaneously transitions to all the neighbors of a given node. We show that the replicator, an operator describing epidemic diffusion, is equivalent to the symmetric normalized Laplacian of a reweighted graph with edges reweighted by the eigenvector centralities of their incident nodes. Thus, more weight is given to edges connecting more central nodes. We describe a method that partitions the nodes based on the componentwise ratio of the replicator's second eigenvector to the first and compare its performance to traditional spectral clustering techniques on synthetic graphs with known community structure. We demonstrate that the replicator gives preference to dense, clique-like structures, enabling it to more effectively discover communities that may be obscured by dense intercommunity linking.

  3. Edge wave visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominek, Allen K.; Nguyen, Truong X.

    1991-01-01

    Scattering mechanisms that involve edge waves are addressed. The behavior of edge waves and their interaction with flat, perfectly conducting plates are depicted in the time domain through a visualization of surface currents that flow on the surface, as an incident Gaussian pulse of energy washes over the surface. Viewing these surface currents allows a very clear physical interpretation and appreciation of the scattering process.

  4. Spectral Predictors

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarria, L; Lindstrom, P; Rossignac, J

    2006-11-17

    Many scientific, imaging, and geospatial applications produce large high-precision scalar fields sampled on a regular grid. Lossless compression of such data is commonly done using predictive coding, in which weighted combinations of previously coded samples known to both encoder and decoder are used to predict subsequent nearby samples. In hierarchical, incremental, or selective transmission, the spatial pattern of the known neighbors is often irregular and varies from one sample to the next, which precludes prediction based on a single stencil and fixed set of weights. To handle such situations and make the best use of available neighboring samples, we propose a local spectral predictor that offers optimal prediction by tailoring the weights to each configuration of known nearby samples. These weights may be precomputed and stored in a small lookup table. We show that predictive coding using our spectral predictor improves compression for various sources of high-precision data.

  5. Spectral classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaschek, C.

    Taxonomic classification of astronomically observed stellar objects is described in terms of spectral properties. Stars receive a classification containing a letter, number, and a Roman numeral, which relates the star to other stars of higher or lower Roman numerals. The citation indicates the stellar chromatic emission in relation to the wavelengths of other stars. Standards are chosen from the available objects detected. Various classification schemes such as the MK, HD, and the Barbier-Chalonge-Divan systems are defined, including examples of indexing differences. Details delineating the separations between classifications are discussed with reference to the information content in spectral and in photometric classification schemes. The parameters usually used for classification include the temperature, luminosity, reddening, binarity, rotation, magnetic field, and elemental abundance or composition. The inclusion of recently discovered extended wavelength characteristics in nominal classifications is outlined, together with techniques involved in automated classification.

  6. [Monitoring spatio-temporal spectral characteristics of leaves of karst plant during dehydration using a field imaging spectrometer system].

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Tong, Qing-Xi; Zhang, Li-Fu; Zhang, Xia; Yue, Yue-Min; Zhang, Bing

    2012-06-01

    As the supplement of spaceborne and airborne imaging spectrometer system, field Imaging spectrometer system spans a very broad range of applications. Imaging spectrometer system of this new kind could provide vital information especially for which spaceborne or airborne remote sensing could not be competent, such as proximal detection of plant population, individual plant or plant organs for site-specific management in precision agriculture. A new self-developed imaging spectrometer system was utilized to monitor spatio-temporal dynamics of spectral changes of plant leaves in response to dehydration. lThe phenomenon of blue shift of red edge of plant leaves was successfully detected and visualized in the form of image series. The patterns of photochemical reflectance index (PRI) of leaves during dehydration were compared and confirmed by fluorescence parameter quantum yield. Our results show that FISS has good spectral and radiometric properties and could be used in quantitative researches and precise information mapping.

  7. Optimization of spectral indices and long-term separability analysis for classification of cereal crops using multi-spectral RapidEye imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerstmann, Henning; Möller, Markus; Gläßer, Cornelia

    2016-10-01

    Crop monitoring using remotely sensed image data provides valuable input for a large variety of applications in environmental and agricultural research. However, method development for discrimination between spectrally highly similar crop species remains a challenge in remote sensing. Calculation of vegetation indices is a frequently applied option to amplify the most distinctive parts of a spectrum. Since no vegetation index exist, that is universally best-performing, a method is presented that finds an index that is optimized for the classification of a specific satellite data set to separate two cereal crop types. The η2 (eta-squared) measure of association - presented as novel spectral separability indicator - was used for the evaluation of the numerous tested indices. The approach is first applied on a RapidEye satellite image for the separation of winter wheat and winter barley in a Central German test site. The determined optimized index allows a more accurate classification (97%) than several well-established vegetation indices like NDVI and EVI (<87%). Furthermore, the approach was applied on a RapidEye multi-spectral image time series covering the years 2010-2014. The optimized index for the spectral separation of winter barley and winter wheat for each acquisition date was calculated and its ability to distinct the two classes was assessed. The results indicate that the calculated optimized indices perform better than the standard indices for most seasonal parts of the time series. The red edge spectral region proved to be of high significance for crop classification. Additionally, a time frame of best spectral separability of wheat and barley could be detected in early to mid-summer.

  8. Spectral Searching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprouse, James F.

    1985-12-01

    Infrared Spectral Searching has progressed rapidly over the past two years since the last FT-IR Conference in Durham, England. In addition, if we compare the searching capabilities available to the Infrared Spectroscopist today with those that were available a short four years ago at the last North American Conference held in Columbia, South Carolina, then the advancements are even more impressive. In retrospect, I would describe the state-of-the-art in Spectral Searching at the 1981 FT-IR Conference as "Level 1 Searching", where the spectroscopist was limited to measuring a spectrum for his unknown material, and automatically searching it against very limited libraries at that time to obtain a search report. The report generally provided an ordered ranking of the best matches, chemical name, and a spectrum number so the reference spectrum could be located and reviewed in books. In 1981, there existed a total of three commercially available infrared search packages at the instrument level. Two of the packages were available for FT-IR instruments and the third was available on a dispersive instrument. Only the FT-IR packages allowed viewing the reference spectra on the CRT along with the unknown spectrum by automated spectral retrieval from the reference libraries stored on disk. However, the primary source of reference spectra was still predominantly hard copy.

  9. Spectral discrimination of an invasive species (Spartina alterniflora) in Min River wetland using field spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Jin-quan; Chen, Wen-hui; Chen, Li-quan

    2013-08-01

    Spartina alterniflora, an invasive plant, has been a threat to the local ecological security since it was introduced to Fujian coastal beach over 30 years ago. How to monitor its dynamic changes effectively is of great significance. Currently, hyperspectral remote sensing technology has become an important way to monitor invasive species dynamic changes. This paper investigates whether S. alterniflora could be discriminated from the other three native species using field spectrometer ranging from 350 nm to 2500 nm. In order to reduce and select the optimal bands for the potential discrimination of S. alterniflora, a hierarchical method is implemented to spectrally discriminate S. alterniflora from the other three native species. In the first level of the analysis using ANOVA, we found that there were statistically significance differences in spectral reflectance between S. alterniflora and the other three native species at different bands. The algorithm of classification and regression trees (CART) were used to further investigate in the second level of analysis to identify the most sensitive bands for spectral discrimination. We found that the greatest discrimination power for S. alterniflora is located in the red-edge, especially in the near infrared, and mid infrared regions. Subsequently, we used Jeffries-Matusita (JM) distance to assess spectral separability of bands selected by CART. Overall, results of this study offer the possibility of extending field measurements at canopy level to airborne and hyperspectral data for discriminating S. alterniflora in Min river wetland.

  10. Correlating Species and Spectral Diversity using Remote Sensing in Successional Fields in Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aneece, I.; Epstein, H. E.

    2015-12-01

    Conserving biodiversity can help preserve ecosystem properties and function. As the increasing prevalence of invasive plant species threatens biodiversity, advances in remote sensing technology can help monitor invasive species and their effects on ecosystems and plant communities. To assess whether we could study the effects of invasive species on biodiversity using remote sensing, we asked whether species diversity was positively correlated with spectral diversity, and whether correlations differed among spectral regions along the visible and near-infrared range. To answer these questions, we established community plots in secondary successional fields at the Blandy Experimental Farm in northern Virginia and collected vegetation surveys and ground-level hyperspectral data from 350 to 1025 nm wavelengths. Pearson correlation analysis revealed a positive correlation between spectral diversity and species diversity in the visible ranges of 350-499 nm (Pearson correlation=0.69, p=0.01), 500-589 nm (Pearson=0.64, p=0.03), and 590-674 nm (Pearson=0.70, p=0.01), slight positive correlation in the red edge range of 675-754 nm (Pearson=0.56, p=0.06), and no correlation in the near-infrared ranges of 755-924 nm (Pearson=-0.06, p=0.85) and 925-1025 nm (Pearson=0.30, p=0.34). These differences in correlations across spectral regions may be due to the elements that contribute to signatures in those regions and spectral data transformation methods. To investigate the role of pigment variability in these correlations, we estimated chlorophyll, carotenoid, and anthocyanin concentrations of five dominant species in the plots using vegetation indices. Although interspecific variability in pigment levels exceeded intraspecific variability, chlorophyll (F value=118) was more varied within species than carotenoids (F=322) and anthocyanins (F=126), perhaps contributing to the lack of correlation between species diversity and spectral diversity in the red edge region. Interspecific

  11. The Edge supersonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agosta, Roxana; Bilbija, Dushan; Deutsch, Marc; Gallant, David; Rose, Don; Shreve, Gene; Smario, David; Suffredini, Brian

    1992-01-01

    As intercontinental business and tourism volumes continue their rapid expansion, the need to reduce travel times becomes increasingly acute. The Edge Supersonic Transport Aircraft is designed to meet this demand by the year 2015. With a maximum range of 5750 nm, a payload of 294 passengers and a cruising speed of M = 2.4, The Edge will cut current international flight durations in half, while maintaining competitive first class, business class, and economy class comfort levels. Moreover, this transport will render a minimal impact upon the environment, and will meet all Federal Aviation Administration Part 36, Stage III noise requirements. The cornerstone of The Edge's superior flight performance is its aerodynamically efficient, dual-configuration design incorporating variable-geometry wingtips. This arrangement combines the benefits of a high aspect ratio wing at takeoff and low cruising speeds with the high performance of an arrow-wing in supersonic cruise. And while the structural weight concerns relating to swinging wingtips are substantial, The Edge looks to ever-advancing material technologies to further increase its viability. Heeding well the lessons of the past, The Edge design holds economic feasibility as its primary focus. Therefore, in addition to its inherently superior aerodynamic performance, The Edge uses a lightweight, largely windowless configuration, relying on a synthetic vision system for outside viewing by both pilot and passengers. Additionally, a fly-by-light flight control system is incorporated to address aircraft supersonic cruise instability. The Edge will be produced at an estimated volume of 400 aircraft and will be offered to airlines in 2015 at $167 million per transport (1992 dollars).

  12. [Monitoring of wheat leaf pigment concentration with hyper-spectral remote sensing].

    PubMed

    Feng, Wei; Zhu, Yan; Yao, Xia; Tian, Yong-Chao; Yao, Xin-Feng; Cao, Wei-Xing

    2008-05-01

    In a two-year field experiment with wheat cultivars under different application rates of fertilizer N, the wheat leaf pigment concentrations were monitored with hyper-spectral remote sensing, and quantitative monitoring models were established. The results showed that the pigment concentrations in wheat leaves increased with increasing N application rate, and differed significantly among test cultivars. With the growth of wheat, the relative concentration of chlorophyll a + b varied more obviously than those of chlorophyll b and carotenoid (Car), and the sensitive bands of the pigments occurred mostly within visible light range, especially in red-edge district. The analyses on the relationships between eight existing vegetation indices and leaf pigment concentrations indicated that the concentrations of chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, and chlorophyll a + b were highly correlated with red edge position, and the relationships to REP(LE) were better than to REP(IG), giving the determination coefficient R2 as 0.835, 0.841 and 0.840, and standard error SE as 0.264, 0.095 and 0.353, respectively. However, the R2 values between Car and different spectral indices decreased significantly, and the differences among the spectrum indices were very small. The tests of the monitoring models with independent datasets indicated that REP(LE) and REP(IG) were the best to predict leaf pigment concentrations. The R2 of chlorophyll a, chlorophyll a + b, and Car for REP(LE) were 0.805, 0.744 and 0.588, with the RE being 9.0%, 9.7% and 14.6%, respectively, and the R2 and RE of chlorophyll b for REP(IG) were 0.632 and 18.2%, respectively. It was suggested that the red-edge parameters of hyper-spectral reflectance had stable relationships with the pigment concentrations in wheat leaves, and especially, REP(LE) could be used to reliably estimate the concentrations of leaf chlorophyll a and chlorophyll a + b.

  13. Spectral characterization of a photonic bandgap fiber for sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Aref, S Hashem; Amezcua-Correac, Rodrigo; Carvalho, Joel P; Frazão, Orlando; Santos, José L; Araújo, Francisco M; Latifi, Hamid; Farahi, Faramarz; Ferreira, Luis A; Knight, Jonathan C

    2010-04-01

    We study the measurand-induced spectral shift of the photonic bandgap edge of a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. The physical measurands considered are strain, temperature, curvature, and twist. A noticeable sensitivity to strain, temperature, and twist is observed, with a blueshift to increase strain and twist. An increase in temperature induces a redshift. On the other hand, curvature has no observable effect on the spectral position of the photonic bandgap edge.

  14. Adaptable edge quality metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Robin N.; Chang, Dunkai K.

    1990-09-01

    A new quality metric for evaluating edges detected by digital image processing algorithms is presented. The metric is a weighted sum of measures of edge continuity smoothness thinness localization detection and noisiness. Through a training process we can design weights which optimize the metric for different users and applications. We have used the metric to compare the results of ten edge detectors when applied to edges degraded by varying degrees of blur and varying degrees and types of noise. As expected the more optimum Difference-of-Gaussians (DOG) and Haralick methods outperform the simpler gradient detectors. At high signal-to-noise (SNR) ratios Haralick''s method is the best choice although it exhibits a sudden drop in performance at lower SNRs. The DOG filter''s performance degrades almost linearly with SNR and maintains a reasonably high level at lower SNRs. The same relative performances are observed as blur is varied. For most of the detectors tested performance drops with increasing noise correlation. Noise correlated in the same direction as the edge is the most destructive of the noise types tested.

  15. Exploring Habitability Markers, Biosignatures, and Their False Positives Using Spectral Models of Terrestrial Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwieterman, Edward W.

    )2 feature in a variety of simulated atmospheres with different N2 abundances with both synthetic direct-imaging and transit transmission spectra. Third, I investigate observational indicators of planetary mechanisms that may generate abiotic oxygen (O2 or O3) on exoplanets, leading to potential "false positives" for life. Abiotic production of O2 from CO2 photolysis potentially leads to detectable amounts of CO as a byproduct. Oxygen build up from massive H-loss during a runaway greenhouse could leave behind more O2 than could be plausibly produced by biology. In this case density dependent O4 features would be strong and potentially indicative of this process. I investigate the strength and detectability of CO (at 2.35 and 4.6 mum) and O4 (at 0.345, 0.36, 0.38, 0.445, 0.475, 0.53, 0.57, 0.63, 1.06, and 1.27 mum) absorption for these abiotic oxygen scenarios in both transmission and direct-imaging spectroscopy. Finally, I present an interdisciplinary study of nonphotosynthetic pigments as alternative surface reflectance biosignatures, in contrast to direct photosynthetic signatures like the vegetation red edge. This study includes reflectance measurements of a variety of pigmented organisms in the laboratory, illustrating a wide range of spectral diversity. I also model the spectra of hypothetical planets containing nonphotosynthetic pigment biosignatures including the confounding spectral effects of the atmosphere. I find that these signatures could potentially be observable in disk-averaged spectra depending on the fraction of the planet containing the signature. Organisms with nonphotosynthetic pigments will produce reflectance signatures different than that of the commonly referenced vegetation red edge, and push us to broaden our understanding of what surface biosignatures might look like on Earth-like exoplanets once remote characterization of these worlds becomes possible.

  16. Using remotely sensed spectral reflectance to indicate leaf photosynthetic efficiency derived from active fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yi; Zeng, Aoli; Zhu, Tinge; Fang, Shenghui; Gong, Yan; Tao, Yanqi; Zhou, Ying; Liu, Kan

    2017-04-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) is an important signature of photosynthesis to evaluate plant response to the environment. We explored an approach to estimate an important leaf ChlF-derived parameter, the intrinsic efficiency of photosystem II photochemistry (Fv/Fm), using spectral indices calculated from leaf reflectance measured by a hyperspectral radiometer. It is observed that leaf chlorophyll content closely related to Fv/Fm in nonstressed leaves, thus the indices developed for chlorophyll estimation were successfully used to estimate Fv/Fm. For leaves under short-term stress, Fv/Fm dropped dramatically while leaf chlorophyll content remained almost the same. Compared to leaf chlorophyll content, reflectance was more sensitive to Fv/Fm variations. As Fv/Fm decreased, the slope of reflectance in the spectrum range of 700 to 900 nm obviously increased, and the first derivative reflectance in the red edge and infrared (NIR) regions was highly correlated with Fv/Fm. The indices using longwave red edge and NIR reflectance (NDRE740 and CI740) worked well for Fv/Fm retrieval in both stressed and nonstressed leaves with the coefficients of determination (R2) above 0.72 and normalized root-mean-square errors below 0.16. Note that the relationships NDRE740 and CI740 versus Fv/Fm were significantly different between nonstressed and stressed leaves, which may give a good implication to detect short-term stress occurrence.

  17. High Speed Edge Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokop, Norman F (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Analog circuits for detecting edges in pixel arrays are disclosed. A comparator may be configured to receive an all pass signal and a low pass signal for a pixel intensity in an array of pixels. A latch may be configured to receive a counter signal and a latching signal from the comparator. The comparator may be configured to send the latching signal to the latch when the all pass signal is below the low pass signal minus an offset. The latch may be configured to hold a last negative edge location when the latching signal is received from the comparator.

  18. High Speed Edge Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokop, Norman F (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Analog circuits for detecting edges in pixel arrays are disclosed. A comparator may be configured to receive an all pass signal and a low pass signal for a pixel intensity in an array of pixels. A latch may be configured to receive a counter signal and a latching signal from the comparator. The comparator may be configured to send the latching signal to the latch when the all pass signal is below the low pass signal minus an offset. The latch may be configured to hold a last negative edge location when the latching signal is received from the comparator.

  19. Automatic Color Sorting of Hardwood Edge-Glued Panel Parts

    Treesearch

    D. Earl Kline; Richard Conners; Qiang Lu; Philip A. Araman

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes an automatic color sorting system for red oak edge-glued panel parts. The color sorting system simultaneously examines both faces of a panel part and then determines which face has the "best" color, and sorts the part into one of a number of color classes at plant production speeds. Initial test results show that the system generated over...

  20. LOFTrelated semiscale test scene. Water has been dyed red. Hot ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LOFT-related semiscale test scene. Water has been dyed red. Hot steam blowdown exits semiscale at TAN-609 at A&M complex. Edge of building is along left edge of view. Date: 1971. INEEL negative no. 71-376 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  1. Swords with Blunt Edges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popham, W. James

    2004-01-01

    Many U.S. educators now wonder whether they're teachers or targets. This mentality stems from the specter of their school being sanctioned for failing the state accountability tests mandated under No Child Left Behind (NCLB). According to this author, most of those tests are like blunt-edged swords: They function badly in two directions. While…

  2. The Inner Urban Edge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferebee, Ann; Carpenter, Edward K.

    1974-01-01

    In this article, renewal of the inner urban edge is discussed. Norfolk (Virginia) is attempting to blur the difference between old and new neighbor hoods through zoning and architectural controls. Cincinnati (Ohio) is developing an environmentally sound hillside design. Reading (Pennsylvania) is utilizing old railyards for greenbelts of hiking and…

  3. Analysis of spectral identifier of fatty acid functional group of packaging frying oil and bulk frying oil with the effect of repeated heating using FTIR (Fourier Transform InfraRed) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putri, Vinda Dwi Dini; Nasution, Aulia M. T.

    2016-11-01

    Frying oil is a cooking medium that is commonly used in Indonesia. Frying process can lead changes in the properties of frying oil. Heating oil with high temperature and many repetition will cause degradation in oil and may cause health problems, such as cholesterol, induces heart disease, and cancer. Degradation of the frying oil can be determined based on changes in the cluster function of fatty acids due to the heating influence. Therefore, it is necessary to test the frying oil under treatments with variety of time heating using a spectrometer Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR). Spectra from FTIR was processed using derivative spectroscopy method to clearly see the difference in the measured spectra. Range spectra of interest is at wavelength of 13,500 to 14,200 nm i.e. indicating the double bond of carbon in molecule HC = CH. The analysis was performed by calculating the area of the spectral curve from the respected 2nd order derivative. Result show that the absorbance of packaging frying oil is higher than the bulk frying oil. In addition, heating of frying oil can decrease the area of respected 2nd order derivative. Packaging frying oil heating on 30 minutes which has the area of spectral curve of 0.904217 decrease become 0.881394 after 3 times heating. While the bulk frying oil heating 30 minutes, in the first heating which has area of spectral curve of 0.916089 decrease become 0.865379 after 3 times heating. The decline in the area of the curve occurs due to breakdown of the double bond of carbon in the molecule HC = CH that caused by heating at high temperatures and repeated heating.

  4. Spectral characterization of the LANDSAT Thematic Mapper sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, B. L.; Barker, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    The spectral coverage characteristics of the two thematic mapper instruments were determined by analyses of spectral measurements of the optics, filters, and detectors. The following results are presented: (1) band 2 and 3 flatness was slightly below specification, and band 7 flatness was below specification; (2) band 5 upper-band edge was higher than specifications; (3) band 2 band edges were shifted upward about 9 nm relative to nominal; and (4) band 4, 5, and 7 lower band edges were 16 to 18 nm higher then nominal.

  5. Spectral investigations on Eu(3+) ,Sm(3+) -doped and Sm(3+) /Eu(3+) co-doped potassium-fluoro-phosphate glass emitting intense orange-red for lighting applications.

    PubMed

    Anil Kumar, Kapuluri; Babu, Singarapu; Reddy Prasad, Vasanthapalli; Damodaraiah, Samadam; Ratnakaram, Yadala Chenchu

    2017-06-14

    Potassium fluoro-phosphate (KFP) glass singly doped with different concentrations of europium (Eu(3+) ) or samarium (Sm(3+) ) or co-doped (Sm(3+) /Eu(3+) ) was prepared, and their luminescence spectra were investigated. The phase composition of the product was verified by X-ray diffraction analysis. Optical transition properties of Eu(3+) in the studied potassium phosphate glass were evaluated in the framework of the Judd-Ofelt theory. The radiative transition rates (AR ), fluorescence branching ratios (β), stimulated emission cross-sections (σe ) and lifetimes (τexp ) for certain transitions or levels were evaluated. Red emission of Eu(3+) was exhibited mainly by the (5) D0 →(7) F2 transition located at 612 nm. Concentration quenching and energy transfer were observed from fluorescence spectra and decay curves, respectively. It was found that the lifetimes of the (5) D0 level increased with increase in concentration and then decreased. By co-doping with Sm(3+) , energy transfer from Sm(3+) to Eu(3+) occurred and contributed to the enhancement in emission intensity. Intense orange-red light emission was obtained upon sensitizing with Sm(3+) in KFP glass. This approach shows significant promise for use in reddish-orange lighting applications. The optimized properties of the Sm(3+) /Eu(3+) co-doped potassium phosphate glass might be promising for optical materials. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Superpixel edges for boundary detection

    SciTech Connect

    Moya, Mary M.; Koch, Mark W.

    2016-07-12

    Various embodiments presented herein relate to identifying one or more edges in a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image comprising a plurality of superpixels. Superpixels sharing an edge (or boundary) can be identified and one or more properties of the shared superpixels can be compared to determine whether the superpixels form the same or two different features. Where the superpixels form the same feature the edge is identified as an internal edge. Where the superpixels form two different features, the edge is identified as an external edge. Based upon classification of the superpixels, the external edge can be further determined to form part of a roof, wall, etc. The superpixels can be formed from a speckle-reduced SAR image product formed from a registered stack of SAR images, which is further segmented into a plurality of superpixels. The edge identification process is applied to the SAR image comprising the superpixels and edges.

  7. Shape of patch edges affects edge permeability for meadow voles.

    PubMed

    Nams, Vilis O

    2012-09-01

    Human development typically fragments natural habitats into patches, affecting population and metapopulation dynamics via changes in animal behavior. Emigration from one habitat patch to another has a large effect on population and metapopulation dynamics. One factor that affects emigration is permeability of patch edges. This study looks at the effects of edge shape (convex, concave, and straight) on edge permeability for meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus).. I tested five hypotheses for responses of animal movement to patch shape: (1) neutral edge response; (2) edge attraction; (3) edge avoidance; (4) time-minimizing, in which an animal attempts to minimize the time spent in inhospitable matrix, and thus travels as far as possible in the patch before crossing the edge; and (5) protection, in which an animal attempts to maximize protection while in the inhospitable matrix by keeping the patch close by. These hypotheses were tested by an experimental manipulation of meadow vole habitats. A strip was mowed with different edge shapes through an old field, and vole response was measured by tracking plates. Voles crossed edges at concave treatments twice as often compared to convex and straight shapes. Hypotheses (2) and (5) were supported. Although edge attraction causes a passive effect of a decrease in edge-crossing at concavities, this effect was eclipsed by the active effect of voles choosing to cross at concavities. The results can be generalized to edge tortuosity in general. Conservation biologists should consider edge shapes when exploring the effects of habitat fragmentation on animal populations.

  8. Clusters rich in red supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negueruela, Ignacio

    In the past few years, several clusters containing large numbers of red supergiants have been discovered. These clusters are amongst the most massive young clusters known in the Milky Way, with stellar masses reaching a few 104 M ⊙. They have provided us, for the first time, with large homogeneous samples of red supergiants of a given age. These large populations make them, despite heavy extinction along their sightlines, powerful laboratories to understand the evolutionary status of red supergiants. While some of the clusters, such as the eponymous RSGC1, are so obscured that their members are only observable in the near-IR, some of them are easily accessible, allowing for an excellent characterisation of cluster and stellar properties. The information gleaned so far from these clusters gives strong support to the idea that late-M type supergiants represent a separate class, characterised by very heavy mass loss. It also shows that the spectral-type distribution of red supergiants in the Milky Way is very strongly peaked towards M1, while suggesting a correlation between spectral type and evolutionary stage.

  9. Spectral Clustering of Hermean craters hollows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchetti, Alice; Pajola, Maurizio; Cremonese, Gabriele; Carli, Cristian; Marzo, Giuseppe; Roush, Ted

    2017-04-01

    The Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS, Hawkins et al., 2007) onboard NASA MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) spacecraft, provided high-resolution images of "hollows", i.e. shallow, irregular, rimless, flat-floored depressions with bright interiors and halos, often found on crater walls, rims, floors and central peaks (Blewett et al., 2011, 2013). The formation mechanism of these features was suggested to be related to the depletion of subsurface volatiles (Blewett et al., 2011, Vaughan et al., 2012). To understand the hollows' mineralogical composition, which can provide new insights on Mercury's surface characterization, we applied a spectral clustering method to different craters where hollows are present. We chose, as first test case, the 20 km wide Dominici crater due to previous multiple spectral detection (Vilas et al., 2016). We used the MDIS WAC dataset covering Dominici crater with a scale of 935 m/pixel through eight filters, ranging from 0.433 to 0.996 μm. First, the images have been photometrically corrected using the Hapke parameters (Hapke et al., 2002) derived in Domingue et al. (2015). We then applied a statistical clustering over the entire dataset based on a K-means partitioning algorithm (Marzo et al., 2006). This approach was developed and evaluated by Marzo et al. (2006, 2008, 2009) and makes use of the Calinski and Harabasz criterion (Calinski, T., Harabasz, J., 1974) to identify the intrinsically natural number of clusters, making the process unsupervised. The natural number of ten clusters was identified and spectrally separates the Dominici surrounding terrains from its interior, as well as the two hollows from their edges. The units located on the brightest part of the south wall/rim of Dominici crater clearly present a wide absorption band between 0.558 and 0.828 μm. Hollows surrounding terrains typically present a red slope in the VNIR with a possible weak absorption band centered at 0.748

  10. Measuring topological invariants from generalized edge states in polaritonic quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baboux, Florent; Levy, Eli; Lemaître, Aristide; Gómez, Carmen; Galopin, Elisabeth; Le Gratiet, Luc; Sagnes, Isabelle; Amo, Alberto; Bloch, Jacqueline; Akkermans, Eric

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the topological properties of Fibonacci quasicrystals using cavity polaritons. Composite structures made of the concatenation of two Fibonacci sequences allow one to investigate generalized edge states forming in the gaps of the fractal energy spectrum. We employ these generalized edge states to determine the topological invariants of the quasicrystal. When varying a structural degree of freedom (phason) of the Fibonacci sequence, the edge states spectrally traverse the gaps, while their spatial symmetry switches: The periodicity of this spectral and spatial evolution yields direct measurements of the gap topological numbers. The topological invariants that we determine coincide with those assigned by the gap-labeling theorem, illustrating the direct connection between the fractal and topological properties of Fibonacci quasicrystals.

  11. Edge detection by nonlinear dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Yiu-fai

    1994-07-01

    We demonstrate how the formulation of a nonlinear scale-space filter can be used for edge detection and junction analysis. By casting edge-preserving filtering in terms of maximizing information content subject to an average cost function, the computed cost at each pixel location becomes a local measure of edgeness. This computation depends on a single scale parameter and the given image data. Unlike previous approaches which require careful tuning of the filter kernels for various types of edges, our scheme is general enough to be able to handle different edges, such as lines, step-edges, corners and junctions. Anisotropy in the data is handled automatically by the nonlinear dynamics.

  12. A homogeneous survey of red supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marco, Amparo; Dorda, Ricardo; González-Fernández, Carlos; Negueruela, Ignacio

    2015-08-01

    We have carried out a comprehensive homogeneous spectroscopic and photometric study of a sample of a few hundred red supergiants in the Milky Way, the Large Magellanic Cloud and the Small Magellanic Cloud. Our results show that global trends can be derived for many spectroscopic features independently of metallicity. The intensity of atomic Ti lines is directly correlated to spectral type, suggesting a real temperature change in the photospheric temperature. We find that the shape of the spectral energy distribution stops being directly related to surface temperature around mid-K spectral types, and becomes strongly correlated to mass loss. The distribution of spectral types is markedly different for the subset of red supergiants above a given luminosity cut, giving very strong hints of a separate evolutionary phase.

  13. Universality in spectral statistics of open quantum graphs.

    PubMed

    Gutkin, B; Osipov, V Al

    2015-06-01

    The quantum evolution maps of closed chaotic quantum graphs are unitary and known to have universal spectral correlations matching predictions of random matrix theory. In chaotic graphs with absorption the quantum maps become nonunitary. We show that their spectral statistics exhibit universality at the soft edges of the spectrum. The same spectral behavior is observed in many classical nonunitary ensembles of random matrices with rotationally invariant measures.

  14. Universality in spectral statistics of open quantum graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutkin, B.; Osipov, V. Al.

    2015-06-01

    The quantum evolution maps of closed chaotic quantum graphs are unitary and known to have universal spectral correlations matching predictions of random matrix theory. In chaotic graphs with absorption the quantum maps become nonunitary. We show that their spectral statistics exhibit universality at the soft edges of the spectrum. The same spectral behavior is observed in many classical nonunitary ensembles of random matrices with rotationally invariant measures.

  15. Playing Along the Edge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-13

    Strands and arches of plasma streamed above the edge of the Sun for over a day, pulled by powerful magnetic forces (Aug. 11-12, 2016). The tug and pull of material heated to about 60,000 degrees C. was viewed in extreme ultraviolet light. This kind of dynamic flow of materials is rather common, though this grouping was larger than most. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA17913

  16. Comparison of glue-line quality between gang edging and straight-line ripping

    Treesearch

    Charles J. Gatchell; James R. Olson; James R. Olson

    1986-01-01

    Gang edging with a dip-chain fed gang ripsaw produces gluing surfaces equal to those from a straight-line ripsaw in yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) and red oak (Quercus rubra). Special care in gluing red oak was needed to get shear strengths equal to solid wood values. However, the strength comparisons between sawing methods showed no differences between gang...

  17. Edge turbulence in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedospasov, A. V.

    1992-12-01

    Edge turbulence is of decisive importance for the distribution of particle and energy fluxes to the walls of tokamaks. Despite the availability of extensive experimental data on the turbulence properties, its nature still remains a subject for discussion. This paper contains a review of the most recent theoretical and experimental studies in the field, including mainly the studies to which Wootton (A.J. Wooton, J. Nucl. Mater. 176 & 177 (1990) 77) referred to most in his review at PSI-9 and those published later. The available theoretical models of edge turbulence with volume dissipation due to collisions fail to fully interpret the entire combination of experimental facts. In the scrape-off layer of a tokamak the dissipation prevails due to the flow of current through potential shifts near the surface of limiters of divertor plates. The different origins of turbulence at the edge and in the core plasma due to such dissipation are discussed in this paper. Recent data on the electron temperature fluctuations enabled one to evaluate the electric probe measurements of turbulent flows of particles and heat critically. The latest data on the suppression of turbulence in the case of L-H transitions are given. In doing so, the possibility of exciting current instabilities in biasing experiments (rather than only to the suppression of existing turbulence) is given some attention. Possible objectives of further studies are also discussed.

  18. Spectral Behavior of Hematite at Visible/Near Infrared and Midinfrared Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, M. D.; Morris, R. V.; Christensen, P. R.

    1999-01-01

    The oxide mineral hematite alpha-Fe2O3) is present on Mars as evidenced by spectroscopy using visible/near infrared (VNIR) and midinfrared (MIR) wavelengths. The physical nature of this surficial hematite varies from fine-grained, crystalline red hematite (red-Hm) in certain martian bright regions, to coarser-grained, crystalline gray hematite (gray-Hm) in the Sinus Meridiani equatorial site discovered in the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (MGS-TES) data. The VNIR spectra require that the red hematite is present in amounts subordinate to a second ferric pigment, which accounts for the general shape and position of the martian ferric absorption edge. By analogy with palagonitic tephra and synthetic samples, the pigment is a nanophase ferric oxide, possibly nanophase hematite (np-Hm). The purpose of this abstract is to document the physicospectral properties of hematite in the VNIR (0.35 to 2.2 mm) and MIR (5 to 25 mm) with respect to the terms "nanophase" and "crystalline", "red" and "gray", and "fine-grained" and "coarse-grained". We will show that different "types" of hematite (np-, red-, and gray-Hm) have different spectral responses in the VNIR and MIR regions and that these differences are important for inferring the types of hematite and their relative proportions from remotely sensed spectra of Mars. Because hematite is an alteration product that forms through many different geologic processes, determination of the type of hematite provides important clues about the style and diversity of martian weathering processes. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  19. Spectral Behavior of Hematite at Visible/Near Infrared and Midinfrared Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Melissa D.; Christensen, Philip R.

    1999-01-01

    The oxide mineral hematite alpha-Fe2O3) is present on Mars as evidenced by spectroscopy using visible/near infrared (VNIR) and midinfrared (MIR) wavelengths. The physical nature of this surficial hematite varies from fine-grained, crystalline red hematite (red-Hm) in certain martian bright regions, to coarser-grained, crystalline gray hematite (gray-Hm) in the Sinus Meridiani equatorial site discovered in the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (MGS-TES) data. The VNIR spectra require that the red hematite is present in amounts subordinate to a second ferric pigment, which accounts for the general shape and position of the martian ferric absorption edge. By analogy with palagonitic tephra and synthetic samples, the pigment is a nanophase ferric oxide, possibly nanophase hematite (np-Hm). The purpose of this abstract is to document the physicospectral properties of hematite in the VNIR (0.35 to 2.2 microns) and MIR (5 to 25 microns) with respect to the terms "nanophase" and "crystalline", "red" and "gray", and "fine-grained" and "coarse-grained". We will show that different "types" of hematite (no-, red-, and gray-Hm) have different spectral responses in the VNIR and MIR regions and that these differences are important for inferring the types of hematite and their relative proportions from remotely sensed spectra of Mars. Because hematite is an alteration product that forms through many different geologic processes, determination of the type of hematite provides important clues about the style and diversity of martian weathering processes.

  20. Spectral Behavior of Hematite at Visible/Near Infrared and Midinfrared Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Melissa D.; Christensen, Philip R.

    1999-01-01

    The oxide mineral hematite alpha-Fe2O3) is present on Mars as evidenced by spectroscopy using visible/near infrared (VNIR) and midinfrared (MIR) wavelengths. The physical nature of this surficial hematite varies from fine-grained, crystalline red hematite (red-Hm) in certain martian bright regions, to coarser-grained, crystalline gray hematite (gray-Hm) in the Sinus Meridiani equatorial site discovered in the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (MGS-TES) data. The VNIR spectra require that the red hematite is present in amounts subordinate to a second ferric pigment, which accounts for the general shape and position of the martian ferric absorption edge. By analogy with palagonitic tephra and synthetic samples, the pigment is a nanophase ferric oxide, possibly nanophase hematite (np-Hm). The purpose of this abstract is to document the physicospectral properties of hematite in the VNIR (0.35 to 2.2 microns) and MIR (5 to 25 microns) with respect to the terms "nanophase" and "crystalline", "red" and "gray", and "fine-grained" and "coarse-grained". We will show that different "types" of hematite (no-, red-, and gray-Hm) have different spectral responses in the VNIR and MIR regions and that these differences are important for inferring the types of hematite and their relative proportions from remotely sensed spectra of Mars. Because hematite is an alteration product that forms through many different geologic processes, determination of the type of hematite provides important clues about the style and diversity of martian weathering processes.

  1. Spectral Behavior of Hematite at Visible/Near Infrared and Midinfrared Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, M. D.; Morris, R. V.; Christensen, P. R.

    1999-01-01

    The oxide mineral hematite alpha-Fe2O3) is present on Mars as evidenced by spectroscopy using visible/near infrared (VNIR) and midinfrared (MIR) wavelengths. The physical nature of this surficial hematite varies from fine-grained, crystalline red hematite (red-Hm) in certain martian bright regions, to coarser-grained, crystalline gray hematite (gray-Hm) in the Sinus Meridiani equatorial site discovered in the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (MGS-TES) data. The VNIR spectra require that the red hematite is present in amounts subordinate to a second ferric pigment, which accounts for the general shape and position of the martian ferric absorption edge. By analogy with palagonitic tephra and synthetic samples, the pigment is a nanophase ferric oxide, possibly nanophase hematite (np-Hm). The purpose of this abstract is to document the physicospectral properties of hematite in the VNIR (0.35 to 2.2 mm) and MIR (5 to 25 mm) with respect to the terms "nanophase" and "crystalline", "red" and "gray", and "fine-grained" and "coarse-grained". We will show that different "types" of hematite (np-, red-, and gray-Hm) have different spectral responses in the VNIR and MIR regions and that these differences are important for inferring the types of hematite and their relative proportions from remotely sensed spectra of Mars. Because hematite is an alteration product that forms through many different geologic processes, determination of the type of hematite provides important clues about the style and diversity of martian weathering processes. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  2. End-to-end sensor simulation for spectral band selection and optimization with application to the Sentinel-2 mission.

    PubMed

    Segl, Karl; Richter, Rudolf; Küster, Theres; Kaufmann, Hermann

    2012-02-01

    An end-to-end sensor simulation is a proper tool for the prediction of the sensor's performance over a range of conditions that cannot be easily measured. In this study, such a tool has been developed that enables the assessment of the optimum spectral resolution configuration of a sensor based on key applications. It employs the spectral molecular absorption and scattering properties of materials that are used for the identification and determination of the abundances of surface and atmospheric constituents and their interdependence on spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio as a basis for the detailed design and consolidation of spectral bands for the future Sentinel-2 sensor. The developed tools allow the computation of synthetic Sentinel-2 spectra that form the frame for the subsequent twofold analysis of bands in the atmospheric absorption and window regions. One part of the study comprises the assessment of optimal spatial and spectral resolution configurations for those bands used for atmospheric correction, optimized with regard to the retrieval of aerosols, water vapor, and the detection of cirrus clouds. The second part of the study presents the optimization of thematic bands, mainly driven by the spectral characteristics of vegetation constituents and minerals. The investigation is performed for different wavelength ranges because most remote sensing applications require the use of specific band combinations rather than single bands. The results from the important "red-edge" and the "short-wave infrared" domains are presented. The recommended optimum spectral design predominantly confirms the sensor parameters given by the European Space Agency. The system is capable of retrieving atmospheric and geobiophysical parameters with enhanced quality compared to existing multispectral sensors. Minor spectral changes of single bands are discussed in the context of typical remote sensing applications, supplemented by the recommendation of a few new bands for

  3. [Research on ground scenery spectral radiation source with tunable spectra].

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jin-rong; Ren, Jian-wei; Li, Bao-yong; Wan, Zhi; Liu, Ze-xun; Liu, Hong-xing; Li, Xian-sheng; Sun, Jing-xu

    2015-02-01

    A spectrum-tunable ground scenery spectrum radiation source, using LEDs and bromine tungsten lamp as luminescence media, was introduced. System structure and control of the spectrum radiation source was expounded in detail. In order to simulate various ground scenery spectrum distribution with different shapes, a ground scenery spectral database was established in the control system. An improved genetic algorithm was proposed, and a large number of ground scenery spectra were produced by the simulator. Spectral similarity and the average spectral matching error of several typical ground scenery spectra were further analyzed. Spectral similarity of red bands, green bands, blue bands and near-infrared spectral band also was discussed. When the radiance of the target was 50 W x (m2 x sr)(-1), the average spectral matching error was less than 10% and spectral similarity was greater than 0.9, up to 0.983. Spectral similarity of red band, green band, blue band and near-infrared band (especially green band and near-infrared band) was less than that of full-band. Compared with blue band and red band, spectral similarity of green band and near-infrared band low-amplitude maximum can rearch 50%. Ground scenery spectrum radiation source can be used as radiometric calibration source for optical remote sensor, and calibration error, which is caused by objectives and calibration sources spectral mismatch, can be effectively reduced.

  4. Spectral monitoring of moorland plant phenology to identify a temporal window for hyperspectral remote sensing of peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Beth; McMorrow, Julia; Evans, Martin

    2014-04-01

    Recognising the importance of the timing of image acquisition on the spectral response in remote sensing of vegetated ecosystems is essential. This study used full wavelength, 350-2500 nm, field spectroscopy to establish a spectral library of phenological change for key moorland species, and to investigate suitable temporal windows for monitoring upland peatland systems. Spectral responses over two consecutive growing seasons were recorded at single species plots for key moorland species and species sown to restore eroding peat. This was related to phenological change using narrowband vegetation indices (Red Edge Position, Photochemical Reflectance Index, Plant Senescence Reflection Index and Cellulose Absorption Index); that capture green-up and senescence related changes in absorption features in the visible to near infrared and the shortwave infrared. The selection of indices was confirmed by identifying the regions of maximum variation in the captured reflectance across the full spectrum. The indices show change in the degree of variation between species occurring from April to September, measured for plant functional types. A discriminant function analysis between indices and plant functional types determines how well each index was able to differentiate between the plant functional groups for each month. It identifies April and July as the two months where the species are most separable. What is presented here is not one single recommendation for the optimal temporal window for operational monitoring, but a fuller understanding of how the spectral response changes with the phenological cycle, including recommendations for what indices are important throughout the year.

  5. Spectral reflectance relationships to leaf water stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ripple, William J.

    1986-01-01

    Spectral reflectance data were collected from detached snapbean leaves in the laboratory with a multiband radiometer. Four experiments were designed to study the spectral response resulting from changes in leaf cover, relative water content of leaves, and leaf water potential. Spectral regions included in the analysis were red (630-690 nm), NIR (760-900 nm), and mid-IR (2.08-2.35 microns). The red and mid-IR bands showed sensitivity to changes in both leaf cover and relative water content of leaves. The NIR was only highly sensitive to changes in leaf cover. Results provided evidence that mid-IR reflectance was governed primarily by leaf moisture content, although soil reflectance was an important factor when leaf cover was less than 100 percent. High correlations between leaf water potentials and reflectance were attributed to covariances with relative water content of leaves and leaf cover.

  6. Spectral reflectance relationships to leaf water stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ripple, William J.

    1986-01-01

    Spectral reflectance data were collected from detached snapbean leaves in the laboratory with a multiband radiometer. Four experiments were designed to study the spectral response resulting from changes in leaf cover, relative water content of leaves, and leaf water potential. Spectral regions included in the analysis were red (630-690 nm), NIR (760-900 nm), and mid-IR (2.08-2.35 microns). The red and mid-IR bands showed sensitivity to changes in both leaf cover and relative water content of leaves. The NIR was only highly sensitive to changes in leaf cover. Results provided evidence that mid-IR reflectance was governed primarily by leaf moisture content, although soil reflectance was an important factor when leaf cover was less than 100 percent. High correlations between leaf water potentials and reflectance were attributed to covariances with relative water content of leaves and leaf cover.

  7. Spectral discrimination of giant reed (Arundo donax L.): A seasonal study in riparian areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Maria Rosário; Aguiar, Francisca C.; Silva, João M. N.; Ferreira, Maria Teresa; Pereira, José M. C.

    2013-06-01

    The giant reed (Arundo donax L.) is amongst the one hundred worst invasive alien species of the world, and it is responsible for biodiversity loss and failure of ecosystem functions in riparian habitats. In this work, field spectroradiometry was used to assess the spectral separability of the giant reed from the adjacent vegetation and from the common reed, a native similar species. The study was conducted at different phenological periods and also for the giant reed stands regenerated after mechanical cutting (giant reed_RAC). A hierarchical procedure using Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Classification and Regression Trees (CART) was used to select the minimum number of optimal bands that discriminate the giant reed from the adjacent vegetation. A new approach was used to identify sets of wavelengths - wavezones - that maximize the spectral separability beyond the minimum number of optimal bands. Jeffries Matusita and Bhattacharya distance were used to evaluate the spectral separability using the minimum optimal bands and in three simulated satellite images, namely Landsat, IKONOS and SPOT. Giant reed was spectrally separable from the adjacent vegetation, both at the vegetative and the senescent period, exception made to the common reed at the vegetative period. The red edge region was repeatedly selected, although the visible region was also important to separate the giant reed from the herbaceous vegetation and the mid infrared region to the discrimination from the woody vegetation. The highest separability was obtained for the giant reed_RAC stands, due to its highly homogeneous, dense and dark-green stands. Results are discussed by relating the phenological, morphological and structural features of the giant reed stands and the adjacent vegetation with their optical traits. Weaknesses and strengths of the giant reed spectral discrimination are highlighted and implications of imagery selection for mapping purposes are argued based on present results.

  8. Spectral EEG features for evaluating cognitive load.

    PubMed

    Zarjam, Pega; Epps, Julien; Chen, Fang

    2011-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate spectral features derived from EEG signals for measuring cognitive load. Measurements of this kind have important commercial and clinical applications for optimizing the performance of users working under high mental load conditions, or as cognitive tests. Based on EEG recordings for a reading task in which three different levels of cognitive load were induced, it is shown that a set of spectral features--the spectral entropy, weighted mean frequency and its bandwidth, and spectral edge frequency--are all able to discriminate the three load levels effectively. An interesting result is that spectral entropy, which reflects the distribution of spectral energy rather than its magnitude, provides very good discrimination between cognitive load levels. We also report those EEG channels for which statistical significance between load levels was achieved. The effect of frequency bands on the spectral features is also investigated here. The results indicate that the choice of optimal frequency band can be dependent on the spectral feature extracted.

  9. Competing edge networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Mark; Grindrod, Peter

    2012-06-01

    We introduce a model for a pair of nonlinear evolving networks, defined over a common set of vertices, subject to edgewise competition. Each network may grow new edges spontaneously or through triad closure. Both networks inhibit the other's growth and encourage the other's demise. These nonlinear stochastic competition equations yield to a mean field analysis resulting in a nonlinear deterministic system. There may be multiple equilibria; and bifurcations of different types are shown to occur within a reduced parameter space. This situation models competitive communication networks such as BlackBerry Messenger displacing SMS; or instant messaging displacing emails.

  10. Information theoretic analysis of canny edge detection in visual communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bo; Rahman, Zia-ur

    2011-06-01

    In general edge detection evaluation, the edge detectors are examined, analyzed, and compared either visually or with a metric for specific an application. This analysis is usually independent of the characteristics of the image-gathering, transmission and display processes that do impact the quality of the acquired image and thus, the resulting edge image. We propose a new information theoretic analysis of edge detection that unites the different components of the visual communication channel and assesses edge detection algorithms in an integrated manner based on Shannon's information theory. The edge detection algorithm here is considered to achieve high performance only if the information rate from the scene to the edge approaches the maximum possible. Thus, by setting initial conditions of the visual communication system as constant, different edge detection algorithms could be evaluated. This analysis is normally limited to linear shift-invariant filters so in order to examine the Canny edge operator in our proposed system, we need to estimate its "power spectral density" (PSD). Since the Canny operator is non-linear and shift variant, we perform the estimation for a set of different system environment conditions using simulations. In our paper we will first introduce the PSD of the Canny operator for a range of system parameters. Then, using the estimated PSD, we will assess the Canny operator using information theoretic analysis. The information-theoretic metric is also used to compare the performance of the Canny operator with other edge-detection operators. This also provides a simple tool for selecting appropriate edgedetection algorithms based on system parameters, and for adjusting their parameters to maximize information throughput.

  11. Edge Detection Techniques for Automatic Location of Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarate, N.; Labrie, K.

    2012-09-01

    To improve the processing of multi-object or cross-dispersed spectroscopic data, especially for systems resulting in curved 2-D spectra, we have implemented in Python edge detection techniques widely used in the photo processing and remote sensing world. The software uses the discontinuity found in a spectral image to precisely locate each dispersed 2-D spectrum on the pixel array. A valid spectrum image edge is defined as continuous and sharp. To this end the best input data is a well illuminated flat field. The algorithm applies a discontinuity detection filter to the image. We find that a 3 × 3 Sobel kernel reliably produces easily traceable edges on our data. Some instruments produce data with large background noise. In those cases, a mild smoothing filter is first applied to reduce noise spikes that would otherwise confuse the edge tracing algorithm. The edges highlighted by the filtering are traced using the SciPy function label. Each edge is represented by a second degree polynomial that follows each slit edge. Currently the software assumes that the spectra are nearly horizontal or nearly vertical. This constraint can easily be lifted with the choice of a different convolution kernel.

  12. Spectral and spread-spectral teleportation

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S.

    2010-06-15

    We report how quantum information encoded into the spectral degree of freedom of a single-photon state may be teleported using a finite spectrally entangled biphoton state. We further demonstrate how the bandwidth of the teleported wave form can be controllably and coherently dilated using a spread-spectral variant of teleportation. We calculate analytical expressions for the fidelities of spectral and spread-spectral teleportation when complex-valued Gaussian states are transferred using a proposed experimental approach. Finally, we discuss the utility of these techniques for integrating broad-bandwidth photonic qubits with narrow-bandwidth receivers in quantum communication systems.

  13. Detection of Spectral Features of Anomalous Vegetation From Reflectance Spectroscopy Related to Pipeline Leakages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meijde, M.; van der Werff, H. M.; Kooistra, J. F.

    2004-12-01

    Underground pipeline leakage inspection is an open problem with large economical and environmental impact. Traditional methods for investigating leakage and pollution, like drilling, are time consuming, destructive and expensive. A non-destructive and more economic exploration method would be a valuable complement to sub-surface investigative methods. Reflectance spectroscopy (or hyperspectral remote sensing) proved to be a tool that offers a non-destructive investigative method to identify anomalous spectral features in vegetation. One of the major environmental problems related to pipelines is the leakage of hydrocarbons into the environment. Hydrocarbons can establish locally anomalous zones that favor the development of a diverse array of chemical and mineralogical changes. Any vegetation present in these zones is likely to be influenced by the hostile and polluted environment. Geobotanical anomalies occur as a result of the effect of hydrocarbons on the growth of vegetation. The most likely changes in the vegetation are expected to occur in the chlorophyll concentrations which are an indicator of the health state. This is the main conclusion after an extensive field campaign in May 2004 in Holland investigating a 1 km trajectory of a 21 km long pipeline. The pipeline is `sweating' benzene condensates at approximately 50% of the connection points between the 9 meter segments of the pipeline. Spectral measurements were conducted at four different test locations in the 1 km trajectory. The test locations were covered by long grass, one of the fields was recently mown. Using different survey designs we can confirm the presence of geobotanical anomalies in different locations using various spectral interpretation techniques like linear red edge shifts, Carter stress indices, normalized difference vegetation index en yellowness index. After the interpretation of the geobotanical anomalies, derived from hyperspectral measurements, we compared the findings with

  14. Dramatic Change in Jupiter's Great Red Spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, A. A.; Wong, M. H.; Rogers, J. H.; Orton, G. S.; de Pater, I.; Asay-Davis, X.; Carlson, R. W.; Marcus, P. S.

    2015-01-01

    Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) is one of its most distinct and enduring features, having been continuously observed since the 1800's. It currently spans the smallest latitude and longitude size ever recorded. Here we show analyses of 2014 Hubble spectral imaging data to study the color, structure and internal dynamics of this long-live storm.

  15. Phosphorus K-edge XANES spectroscopy of mineral standards

    PubMed Central

    Ingall, Ellery D.; Brandes, Jay A.; Diaz, Julia M.; de Jonge, Martin D.; Paterson, David; McNulty, Ian; Elliott, W. Crawford; Northrup, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Phosphorus K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy was performed on phosphate mineral specimens including (a) twelve specimens from the apatite group covering a range of compositional variation and crystallinity; (b) six non-apatite calcium-rich phosphate minerals; (c) 15 aluminium-rich phosphate minerals; (d) ten phosphate minerals rich in either reduced iron or manganese; (e) four phosphate minerals rich in either oxidized iron or manganese; (f) eight phosphate minerals rich in either magnesium, copper, lead, zinc or rare-earth elements; and (g) four uranium phosphate minerals. The identity of all minerals examined in this study was independently confirmed using X-ray powder diffraction. Minerals were distinguished using XANES spectra with a combination of pre-edge features, edge position, peak shapes and post-edge features. Shared spectral features were observed in minerals with compositions dominated by the same specific cation. Analyses of apatite-group minerals indicate that XANES spectral patterns are not strongly affected by variations in composition and crystallinity typical of natural mineral specimens. PMID:21335905

  16. Phosphorus K-edge XANES Spectroscopy of Mineral Standards

    SciTech Connect

    E Ingall; J Brandes; J Diaz; M de Jonge; D Paterson; I McNulty; C Elliott; P Northrup

    2011-12-31

    Phosphorus K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy was performed on phosphate mineral specimens including (a) twelve specimens from the apatite group covering a range of compositional variation and crystallinity; (b) six non-apatite calcium-rich phosphate minerals; (c) 15 aluminium-rich phosphate minerals; (d) ten phosphate minerals rich in either reduced iron or manganese; (e) four phosphate minerals rich in either oxidized iron or manganese; (f) eight phosphate minerals rich in either magnesium, copper, lead, zinc or rare-earth elements; and (g) four uranium phosphate minerals. The identity of all minerals examined in this study was independently confirmed using X-ray powder diffraction. Minerals were distinguished using XANES spectra with a combination of pre-edge features, edge position, peak shapes and post-edge features. Shared spectral features were observed in minerals with compositions dominated by the same specific cation. Analyses of apatite-group minerals indicate that XANES spectral patterns are not strongly affected by variations in composition and crystallinity typical of natural mineral specimens.

  17. Carbon K-edge Spectra of Carbonate Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Brandes, J.; Wirick, S; Jacobsen, C

    2010-01-01

    Carbon K-edge X-ray spectroscopy has been applied to the study of a wide range of organic samples, from polymers and coals to interstellar dust particles. Identification of carbonaceous materials within these samples is accomplished by the pattern of resonances in the 280-320 eV energy region. Carbonate minerals are often encountered in the study of natural samples, and have been identified by a distinctive resonance at 290.3 eV. Here C K-edge and Ca L-edge spectra from a range of carbonate minerals are presented. Although all carbonates exhibit a sharp 290 eV resonance, both the precise position of this resonance and the positions of other resonances vary among minerals. The relative strengths of the different carbonate resonances also vary with crystal orientation to the linearly polarized X-ray beam. Intriguingly, several carbonate minerals also exhibit a strong 288.6 eV resonance, consistent with the position of a carbonyl resonance rather than carbonate. Calcite and aragonite, although indistinguishable spectrally at the C K-edge, exhibited significantly different spectra at the Ca L-edge. The distinctive spectral fingerprints of carbonates provide an identification tool, allowing for the examination of such processes as carbon sequestration in minerals, Mn substitution in marine calcium carbonates (dolomitization) and serpentinization of basalts.

  18. Raman identification of edge alignment of bilayer graphene down to the nanometer scale.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Li, Qiao-Qiao; Han, Wen-Peng; Lu, Yan; Shi, Wei; Wu, Jiang-Bin; Mikhaylushkin, Arkady S; Tan, Ping-Heng

    2014-07-07

    The ideal edges of bilayer graphene (BLG) are that the edges of the top and bottom graphene layers (GLs) of BLG are well-aligned. Actually, the alignment distance between the edges of the top and bottom GLs of a real BLG can be as large as the submicrometer scale or as small as zero, which cannot be distinguished using an optical microscope. Here, we present a detailed Raman study on BLG at its edges. If the alignment distance of the top and bottom GLs of BLG is larger than the laser spot, the measured D mode at the edge of the top GL of BLG shows a similar spectral profile to that of disordered BLG. If the alignment distance is smaller than the laser spot, the D mode at a real BLG edge shows three typical spectral profiles similar to that at the edge of SLG, that of the well-aligned edge of BLG, or a combination of both. We show the sensitivity and ability of Raman spectroscopy to acquire the alignment distance between two edges of top and bottom GLs of BLG as small as several nanometers, which is far beyond the diffraction limit of a laser spot. This work opens the possibility to probe the edge alignment of multi-layer graphene.

  19. On the Edge of the South Pole Layered Deposit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-05

    This image shows the edge of the Martian South Polar layered deposit. The stack of fine layering is highlighted by the rays of the polar sun. These layers show the pervasive red coloring of Mars which have built up over the ages. While this is a polar deposit, no ice or frost is visible on these layers, as they face the sun. However, if you look beyond the rim of the layered slope at the 'top' of the deposit, you can see that red rock and dust are covered with frost, as well as small radial channels that are evidence of polar spider networks. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21105

  20. Red Arcs on Tethys

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-07-29

    Unusual arc-shaped, reddish streaks cut across the surface of Saturn's ice-rich moon Tethys in this enhanced-color mosaic. The red streaks are narrow, curved lines on the moon's surface, only a few miles (or kilometers) wide but several hundred miles (or kilometers) long. The red streaks are among the most unusual color features on Saturn's moons to be revealed by Cassini's cameras. A few of the red arcs can be faintly seen in Cassini imaging observations made earlier in the mission, but the color images for this observation, which were obtained in April 2015, were the first to show large northern areas of Tethys under the illumination and viewing conditions necessary to see the features clearly. As the Saturn system moved into its northern hemisphere summer over the past few years, northern latitudes have become increasingly well illuminated. As a result, the red arc features have become clearly visible for the first time. The origin of the features and their reddish color is currently a mystery to Cassini scientists. Possibilities being studied include ideas that the reddish material is exposed ice with chemical impurities, or the result of outgassing from inside Tethys. The streaks could also be associated with features like fractures that are below the resolution of the available images. Except for a few small craters on Dione, reddish tinted features are rare on other moons of Saturn. However, many reddish features are observed on the geologically young surface of Jupiter's moon Europa. Images taken using clear, green, infrared and ultraviolet spectral filters were combined to create the view, which highlights subtle color differences across Tethys' surface at wavelengths not visible to human eyes. The moon's surface is fairly uniform in natural color. The yellowish tones on the left side of the view are a result of alteration of the moon's surface by high-energy particles from Saturn's magnetosphere. This particle radiation slams into the moon's trailing

  1. Are shrubland birds edge specialists?

    PubMed

    Schlossberg, Scott; King, David I

    2008-09-01

    In studies of forest fragmentation, birds of scrubby, early-successional habitats are considered edge specialists. Because these birds are assumed to thrive in fragmented, edge-dominated areas, their landscape ecology has received little attention from ecologists. With populations of shrubland birds declining throughout the eastern United States, the question of whether or not these birds really prefer edge habitats has important conservation implications. We used a meta-analysis to test how edges affect the abundance of shrubland birds in early-successional habitats. We analyzed data for 17 species from seven studies that compared the abundances of birds in the interiors and edges of regenerating clearcuts surrounded by mature forest. The meta-analysis clearly showed that shrubland birds avoid edges. All 17 species tested had higher abundances in patch centers than along edges, and edge effects were significant for 8 of 17 species. The key implication of this result is that small or irregular patches, dominated by edge, are unlikely to provide suitable habitat for shrubland birds. Thus, management for these declining species should involve providing large patches and minimizing edges. These findings demonstrate the importance of testing widely accepted ecological classifications and the need to view landscape ecology from the perspective of non-forest wildlife.

  2. Variable Red Giants--The MACHO View

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, S C; Cook, K H

    2003-01-03

    The authors present a study of the MACHO red variable population in the Large Magellanic Cloud. This study reveals six period-luminosity relations among the red variable population. Only two of these were known prior to MACHO. The results are consistent with Mira pulsation in the fundamental mode. A sequence comprising 26% of the red variable population can not be explained by pulsation. They propose a dust {kappa}-mechanism in the circumstellar environment is responsible for the long period variation of these objects. The luminosity function of the variables shows a sharp edge at the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB). This is the first clear indication of a population of variable stars within the immediate vicinity of the TRGB. The results indicate this population amounts to 8% of the RGB population near the TRGB.

  3. Growth and photomorphogenesis of pepper plants under red light-emitting diodes with supplemental blue or far-red lighting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, C. S.; Schuerger, A. C.; Sager, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are a potential irradiation source for intensive plant culture systems and photobiological research. They have small size, low mass, a long functional life, and narrow spectral output. In this study, we measured the growth and dry matter partitioning of 'Hungarian Wax' pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) plants grown under red LEDs compared with similar plants grown under red LEDs with supplemental blue or far-red radiation or under broad spectrum metal halide (MH) lamps. Additionally, we describe the thermal and spectral characteristics of these sources. The LEDs used in this study had a narrow bandwidth at half peak height (25 nm) and a focused maximum spectral output at 660 nm for the red and 735 nm for the far-red. Near infrared radiation (800 to 3000 nm) was below detection and thermal infrared radiation (3000 to 50,000 nm) was lower in the LEDs compared to the MH source. Although the red to far-red ratio varied considerably, the calculated phytochrome photostationary state (phi) was only slightly different between the radiation sources. Plant biomass was reduced when peppers were grown under red LEDs in the absence of blue wavelengths compared to plants grown under supplemental blue fluorescent lamps or MH lamps. The addition of far-red radiation resulted in taller plants with greater stem mass than red LEDs alone. There were fewer leaves under red or red plus far-red radiation than with lamps producing blue wavelengths. These results indicate that red LEDs may be suitable, in proper combination with other wavelengths of light, for the culture of plants in tightly controlled environments such as space-based plant culture systems.

  4. Growth and photomorphogenesis of pepper plants under red light-emitting diodes with supplemental blue or far-red lighting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, C. S.; Schuerger, A. C.; Sager, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are a potential irradiation source for intensive plant culture systems and photobiological research. They have small size, low mass, a long functional life, and narrow spectral output. In this study, we measured the growth and dry matter partitioning of 'Hungarian Wax' pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) plants grown under red LEDs compared with similar plants grown under red LEDs with supplemental blue or far-red radiation or under broad spectrum metal halide (MH) lamps. Additionally, we describe the thermal and spectral characteristics of these sources. The LEDs used in this study had a narrow bandwidth at half peak height (25 nm) and a focused maximum spectral output at 660 nm for the red and 735 nm for the far-red. Near infrared radiation (800 to 3000 nm) was below detection and thermal infrared radiation (3000 to 50,000 nm) was lower in the LEDs compared to the MH source. Although the red to far-red ratio varied considerably, the calculated phytochrome photostationary state (phi) was only slightly different between the radiation sources. Plant biomass was reduced when peppers were grown under red LEDs in the absence of blue wavelengths compared to plants grown under supplemental blue fluorescent lamps or MH lamps. The addition of far-red radiation resulted in taller plants with greater stem mass than red LEDs alone. There were fewer leaves under red or red plus far-red radiation than with lamps producing blue wavelengths. These results indicate that red LEDs may be suitable, in proper combination with other wavelengths of light, for the culture of plants in tightly controlled environments such as space-based plant culture systems.

  5. Edge remap for solids

    SciTech Connect

    Kamm, James R.; Love, Edward; Robinson, Allen C.; Young, Joseph G.; Ridzal, Denis

    2013-12-01

    We review the edge element formulation for describing the kinematics of hyperelastic solids. This approach is used to frame the problem of remapping the inverse deformation gradient for Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) simulations of solid dynamics. For hyperelastic materials, the stress state is completely determined by the deformation gradient, so remapping this quantity effectively updates the stress state of the material. A method, inspired by the constrained transport remap in electromagnetics, is reviewed, according to which the zero-curl constraint on the inverse deformation gradient is implicitly satisfied. Open issues related to the accuracy of this approach are identified. An optimization-based approach is implemented to enforce positivity of the determinant of the deformation gradient. The efficacy of this approach is illustrated with numerical examples.

  6. On the Edge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-02-04

    In today's image, Mercury's horizon cuts a striking edge against the stark blackness of space. On the right, sunlight harshly brings the landscape into relief while on the left, the surface is shrouded in the darkness of night. This image was acquired as part of MDIS's limb imaging campaign. Once per week, MDIS captures images of Mercury's limb, with an emphasis on imaging the southern hemisphere limb. These limb images provide information about Mercury's shape and complement measurements of topography made by the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) of Mercury's northern hemisphere. Date acquired: January 20, 2015 Image Mission Elapsed Time (MET): 64084239 Image ID: 7831084 Instrument: Wide Angle Camera (WAC) of the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) WAC filter: 7 (748 nanometers) Center Latitude: -54.45° Center Longitude: 90.52° E Center Resolution: 401 meters/pixel http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19192

  7. Red blood cell production

    MedlinePlus

    ... to one part of the body or another. Red blood cells are an important element of blood. Their job ... is carried to and eliminated by the lungs. Red blood cells are formed in the red bone marrow of ...

  8. Edge phonons in black phosphorus

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, H. B.; Villegas, C. E. P.; Bahamon, D. A.; Muraca, D.; Castro Neto, A. H.; de Souza, E. A. T.; Rocha, A. R.; Pimenta, M. A.; de Matos, C. J. S.

    2016-01-01

    Black phosphorus has recently emerged as a new layered crystal that, due to its peculiar and anisotropic crystalline and electronic band structures, may have important applications in electronics, optoelectronics and photonics. Despite the fact that the edges of layered crystals host a range of singular properties whose characterization and exploitation are of utmost importance for device development, the edges of black phosphorus remain poorly characterized. In this work, the atomic structure and behaviour of phonons near different black phosphorus edges are experimentally and theoretically studied using Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. Polarized Raman results show the appearance of new modes at the edges of the sample, and their spectra depend on the atomic structure of the edges (zigzag or armchair). Theoretical simulations confirm that the new modes are due to edge phonon states that are forbidden in the bulk, and originated from the lattice termination rearrangements. PMID:27412813

  9. Edge phonons in black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, H. B.; Villegas, C. E. P.; Bahamon, D. A.; Muraca, D.; Castro Neto, A. H.; de Souza, E. A. T.; Rocha, A. R.; Pimenta, M. A.; de Matos, C. J. S.

    2016-07-01

    Black phosphorus has recently emerged as a new layered crystal that, due to its peculiar and anisotropic crystalline and electronic band structures, may have important applications in electronics, optoelectronics and photonics. Despite the fact that the edges of layered crystals host a range of singular properties whose characterization and exploitation are of utmost importance for device development, the edges of black phosphorus remain poorly characterized. In this work, the atomic structure and behaviour of phonons near different black phosphorus edges are experimentally and theoretically studied using Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. Polarized Raman results show the appearance of new modes at the edges of the sample, and their spectra depend on the atomic structure of the edges (zigzag or armchair). Theoretical simulations confirm that the new modes are due to edge phonon states that are forbidden in the bulk, and originated from the lattice termination rearrangements.

  10. Quantum Spectral Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamhalter, Jan; Turilova, Ekaterina

    2017-02-01

    Quantum symmetries of spectral lattices are studied. Basic properties of spectral order on A W ∗-algebras are summarized. Connection between projection and spectral automorphisms is clarified by showing that, under mild conditions, any spectral automorphism is a composition of function calculus and Jordan ∗-automorphism. Complete description of quantum spectral symmetries on Type I and Type II A W ∗-factors are completely described.

  11. Colors of Jupiter's large anticyclones and the interaction of a Tropical Red Oval with the Great Red Spot in 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Lavega, A.; Legarreta, J.; García-Melendo, E.; Hueso, R.; Pérez-Hoyos, S.; Gómez-Forrellad, J. M.; Fletcher, L. N.; Orton, G. S.; Simon-Miller, A.; Chanover, N.; Irwin, P.; Tanga, P.; Cecconi, M.

    2013-12-01

    nature and mechanisms producing the chromophore agents that provide color to the upper clouds and hazes of the atmospheres of the giant planets are largely unknown. In recent times, the changes in red coloration that have occurred in large- and medium-scale Jovian anticyclones have been particularly interesting. In late June and early July 2008, a particularly color intense tropical red oval interacted with the Great Red Spot (GRS) leading to the destruction of the tropical red oval and cloud dispersion. We present a detailed study of the tropical vortices, usually white but sometimes red, and a characterization of their color spectral signatures and dynamics. From the spectral reflectivity in methane bands we study their vertical cloud structure compared to that of the GRS and BA. Using two spectral indices we found a near correlation between anticyclones cloud top altitudes and red color. We present detailed observations of the interaction of the red oval with the GRS and model simulations of the phenomena that allow us to constrain the relative vertical extent of the vortices. We conclude that the vertical cloud structure, vertical extent, and dynamics of Jovian anticyclones are not the causes of their coloration. We propose that the red chromophore forms when background material (a compound or particles) is entrained by the vortex, transforming into red once inside the vortex due to internal conditions, exposure to ultraviolet radiation, or to the mixing of two chemical compounds that react inside the vortex, confined by a potential vorticity ring barrier.

  12. A hybrid classification method using spectral, spatial, and textural features for remotely sensed images based on morphological filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Hiroshi; Yamaura, Makoto; Arai, Kohei

    2007-10-01

    "HYCLASS", a new hybrid classification method for remotely sensed multi-spectral images is proposed. This method consists of two procedures, the textural edge detection and texture classification. In the textural edge detection, the maximum likelihood classification (MLH) method is employed to find "the spectral edges", and the morphological filtering is employed to process the spectral edges into "the textural edges" by sharpening the opened curve parts of the spectral edges. In the texture classification, the supervised texture classification method based on normalized Zernike moment vector that the authors have already proposed. Some experiments using a simulated texture image and an actual airborne sensor image are conducted to evaluate the classification accuracy of the HYCLASS. The experimental results show that the HYCLASS can provide reasonable classification results in comparison with those by the conventional classification method.

  13. The Facilitator's Edge: Group Sessions for Edge-ucators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handcock, Helen

    The Facilitator's Edge is a workshop series based on the life/work messages of The Edge magazine. The workshops are deigned to help educators, youth workers, and their career practitioners facilitate conscious career building. This manual consists of five group sessions, each focusing on a different career-building theme. "Megatrends and…

  14. The Facilitator's Edge: Group Sessions for Edge-ucators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handcock, Helen

    The Facilitator's Edge is a workshop series based on the life/work messages of The Edge magazine. The workshops are deigned to help educators, youth workers, and their career practitioners facilitate conscious career building. This manual consists of five group sessions, each focusing on a different career-building theme. "Megatrends and…

  15. Flow cytometry using spectrally encoded confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Golan, Lior; Yelin, Dvir

    2010-07-01

    Flow cytometry techniques often rely on detecting fluorescence from single cells flowing through the cross section of a laser beam, providing invaluable information on vast numbers of cells. Such techniques, however, are often limited in their ability to resolve clusters of cells or parallel cell flow through large vessels. We present a confocal imaging technique that images unstained cells flowing in parallel through a wide channel, using spectrally encoded reflectance confocal microscopy that does not require mechanical scanning. Images of red blood cells from our system are compared to conventional transmission microscopy, and imaging of flowing red blood cells in vitro is experimentally demonstrated.

  16. Edge-edge interactions in stacked graphene nanoplatelets

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz Silva, Eduardo; Terrones Maldonado, Humberto; Terrones Maldonado, Mauricio; Jia, Xiaoting; Sumpter, Bobby G; Dresselhaus, M; Meunier, V.

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) studies show the dynamics of small graphene platelets on larger graphene layers. The platelets move nearly freely to eventually lock in at well-defined positions close to the edges of the larger underlying graphene sheet. While such movement is driven by a shallow potential energy surface described by an interplane interaction, the lock-in position occurs by via edge-edge interactions of the platelet and the graphene surface located underneath. Here we quantitatively study this behavior using van der Waals density functional calculations. Local interactions at the open edges are found to dictate stacking configurations that are different from Bernal (AB) stacking. These stacking configurations are known to be otherwise absent in edge-free two-dimensional (2D) graphene. The results explain the experimentally observed platelet dynamics and provide a detailed account of the new electronic properties of these combined systems.

  17. Giant edge state splitting at atomically precise graphene zigzag edges

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiyong; Talirz, Leopold; Pignedoli, Carlo A.; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Fasel, Roman; Ruffieux, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Zigzag edges of graphene nanostructures host localized electronic states that are predicted to be spin-polarized. However, these edge states are highly susceptible to edge roughness and interaction with a supporting substrate, complicating the study of their intrinsic electronic and magnetic structure. Here, we focus on atomically precise graphene nanoribbons whose two short zigzag edges host exactly one localized electron each. Using the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope, the graphene nanoribbons are transferred from the metallic growth substrate onto insulating islands of NaCl in order to decouple their electronic structure from the metal. The absence of charge transfer and hybridization with the substrate is confirmed by scanning tunnelling spectroscopy, which reveals a pair of occupied/unoccupied edge states. Their large energy splitting of 1.9 eV is in accordance with ab initio many-body perturbation theory calculations and reflects the dominant role of electron–electron interactions in these localized states. PMID:27181701

  18. Dramatic Change in Jupiter's Great Red Spot from Spacecraft Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Amy A.; Wong, Michael H.; Rogers, John H.; Orton, Glenn S.; de Pater, Imke; Asay-Davis, Xylar; Carlson, Robert W.; Marcus, Philip S.

    2015-01-01

    Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) is one of its most distinct and enduring features. Since the advent of modern telescopes, keen observers have noted its appearance and documented a change in shape from very oblong to oval, confirmed in measurements from spacecraft data. It currently spans the smallest latitude and longitude size ever recorded. Here we show that this change has been accompanied by an increase in cloud/haze reflectance as sensed in methane gas absorption bands, increased absorption at wavelengths shorter than 500 nanometers, and increased spectral slope between 500 and 630 nanometers. These changes occurred between 2012 and 2014, without a significant change in internal tangential wind speeds; the decreased size results in a 3.2 day horizontal cloud circulation period, shorter than previously observed. As the GRS has narrowed in latitude, it interacts less with the jets flanking its north and south edges, perhaps allowing for less cloud mixing and longer UV irradiation of cloud and aerosol particles. Given its long life and observational record, we expect that future modeling of the GRS's changes, in concert with laboratory flow experiments, will drive our understanding of vortex evolution and stability in a confined flow field crucial for comparison with other planetary atmospheres.

  19. DRAMATIC CHANGE IN JUPITER'S GREAT RED SPOT FROM SPACECRAFT OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Amy A.; Wong, Michael H.; De Pater, Imke; Rogers, John H.; Orton, Glenn S.; Carlson, Robert W.; Asay-Davis, Xylar; Marcus, Philip S.

    2014-12-20

    Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) is one of its most distinct and enduring features. Since the advent of modern telescopes, keen observers have noted its appearance and documented a change in shape from very oblong to oval, confirmed in measurements from spacecraft data. It currently spans the smallest latitude and longitude size ever recorded. Here we show that this change has been accompanied by an increase in cloud/haze reflectance as sensed in methane gas absorption bands, increased absorption at wavelengths shorter than 500 nm, and increased spectral slope between 500 and 630 nm. These changes occurred between 2012 and 2014, without a significant change in internal tangential wind speeds; the decreased size results in a 3.2 day horizontal cloud circulation period, shorter than previously observed. As the GRS has narrowed in latitude, it interacts less with the jets flanking its north and south edges, perhaps allowing for less cloud mixing and longer UV irradiation of cloud and aerosol particles. Given its long life and observational record, we expect that future modeling of the GRS's changes, in concert with laboratory flow experiments, will drive our understanding of vortex evolution and stability in a confined flow field crucial for comparison with other planetary atmospheres.

  20. Dramatic Change in Jupiter's Great Red Spot from Spacecraft Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Amy A.; Wong, Michael H.; Rogers, John H.; Orton, Glenn S.; de Pater, Imke; Asay-Davis, Xylar; Carlson, Robert W.; Marcus, Philip S.

    2014-12-01

    Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) is one of its most distinct and enduring features. Since the advent of modern telescopes, keen observers have noted its appearance and documented a change in shape from very oblong to oval, confirmed in measurements from spacecraft data. It currently spans the smallest latitude and longitude size ever recorded. Here we show that this change has been accompanied by an increase in cloud/haze reflectance as sensed in methane gas absorption bands, increased absorption at wavelengths shorter than 500 nm, and increased spectral slope between 500 and 630 nm. These changes occurred between 2012 and 2014, without a significant change in internal tangential wind speeds; the decreased size results in a 3.2 day horizontal cloud circulation period, shorter than previously observed. As the GRS has narrowed in latitude, it interacts less with the jets flanking its north and south edges, perhaps allowing for less cloud mixing and longer UV irradiation of cloud and aerosol particles. Given its long life and observational record, we expect that future modeling of the GRS's changes, in concert with laboratory flow experiments, will drive our understanding of vortex evolution and stability in a confined flow field crucial for comparison with other planetary atmospheres.

  1. A Spectral Map Of Mercury From MESSENGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izenberg, N. R.; Pahsai, P.; Klima, R. L.; Blewett, D. T.; Goudge, T. A.; Solomon, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    We use orbital data from the Mercury Surface and Atmospheric Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) Visible and Near Infrared Spectrograph (VIRS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft to study subtle compositional variations across the surface of Mercury. VIRS reflectance spectra obtained from orbit allow identification and classification of spectral units, many of which collocate with geologic features such as pyroclastic deposits; low-reflectance material (LRM); bright, fresh-appearing impact craters; and hollows. The vast majority of the surface is composed of plains units with brightness and spectral reflectance ratios (e.g., 415 nm / 750 nm and 310 nm / 390 nm) that vary within a small range about mean values for the planet. Analysis of VIRS reflectance data in the context of Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) color and high-resolution images enables identification of large regions with similar spectral properties. Our spectral map of Mercury covers approximately 70% of the planet (excluding polar regions and two regions for which calibration refinement is pending). On the basis of brightness, spectral ratio variations, and superposition relationships in the image data, we define four large-scale spectral units in Mercury plains, as well as six additional spectral units of smaller area. The four large-scale spectral units cover (1) 48.7% (brightness and spectral ratio parameters within a few percent of planetary mean values) (2) 31.6% (higher reflectance, higher 310 nm / 390 nm values than mean), (3) 12.9% (higher reflectance, lower 415 nm / 750 nm values than mean), and (4) 6.8% (lower reflectance and higher 310 nm / 390 nm values than mean) of the mapped area. Spectrally defined plains units correspond broadly to plains units defined by morphology and color imaging; e.g., unit 2 corresponds to the previously defined high-reflectance red plains (HRP), unit 3 to the northern smooth plains and the smooth plains

  2. The Spectral Shift Function and Spectral Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azamov, N. A.; Carey, A. L.; Sukochev, F. A.

    2007-11-01

    At the 1974 International Congress, I. M. Singer proposed that eta invariants and hence spectral flow should be thought of as the integral of a one form. In the intervening years this idea has lead to many interesting developments in the study of both eta invariants and spectral flow. Using ideas of [24] Singer’s proposal was brought to an advanced level in [16] where a very general formula for spectral flow as the integral of a one form was produced in the framework of noncommutative geometry. This formula can be used for computing spectral flow in a general semifinite von Neumann algebra as described and reviewed in [5]. In the present paper we take the analytic approach to spectral flow much further by giving a large family of formulae for spectral flow between a pair of unbounded self-adjoint operators D and D + V with D having compact resolvent belonging to a general semifinite von Neumann algebra {mathcal{N}} and the perturbation V in {mathcal{N}} . In noncommutative geometry terms we remove summability hypotheses. This level of generality is made possible by introducing a new idea from [3]. There it was observed that M. G. Krein’s spectral shift function (in certain restricted cases with V trace class) computes spectral flow. The present paper extends Krein’s theory to the setting of semifinite spectral triples where D has compact resolvent belonging to {mathcal{N}} and V is any bounded self-adjoint operator in {mathcal{N}} . We give a definition of the spectral shift function under these hypotheses and show that it computes spectral flow. This is made possible by the understanding discovered in the present paper of the interplay between spectral shift function theory and the analytic theory of spectral flow. It is this interplay that enables us to take Singer’s idea much further to create a large class of one forms whose integrals calculate spectral flow. These advances depend critically on a new approach to the calculus of functions of non

  3. USGS Spectral Library Version 7

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; Clark, Roger N.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Livo, K. Eric; Hoefen, Todd M.; Pearson, Neil C.; Wise, Richard A.; Benzel, William M.; Lowers, Heather A.; Driscoll, Rhonda L.; Klein, Anna J.

    2017-04-10

    We have assembled a library of spectra measured with laboratory, field, and airborne spectrometers. The instruments used cover wavelengths from the ultraviolet to the far infrared (0.2 to 200 microns [μm]). Laboratory samples of specific minerals, plants, chemical compounds, and manmade materials were measured. In many cases, samples were purified, so that unique spectral features of a material can be related to its chemical structure. These spectro-chemical links are important for interpreting remotely sensed data collected in the field or from an aircraft or spacecraft. This library also contains physically constructed as well as mathematically computed mixtures. Four different spectrometer types were used to measure spectra in the library: (1) Beckman™ 5270 covering the spectral range 0.2 to 3 µm, (2) standard, high resolution (hi-res), and high-resolution Next Generation (hi-resNG) models of Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD) field portable spectrometers covering the range from 0.35 to 2.5 µm, (3) Nicolet™ Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) interferometer spectrometers covering the range from about 1.12 to 216 µm, and (4) the NASA Airborne Visible/Infra-Red Imaging Spectrometer AVIRIS, covering the range 0.37 to 2.5 µm. Measurements of rocks, soils, and natural mixtures of minerals were made in laboratory and field settings. Spectra of plant components and vegetation plots, comprising many plant types and species with varying backgrounds, are also in this library. Measurements by airborne spectrometers are included for forested vegetation plots, in which the trees are too tall for measurement by a field spectrometer. This report describes the instruments used, the organization of materials into chapters, metadata descriptions of spectra and samples, and possible artifacts in the spectral measurements. To facilitate greater application of the spectra, the library has also been convolved to selected spectrometer and imaging spectrometers sampling and

  4. Spectrally Adaptable Compressive Sensing Imaging System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    with our DMD-SSI setup. Figure 5.22(a) shows the imaging target used in this experiment, which is a red chili pepper with a green stem. Figure 5.22(b...5.25 (a) Reconstructed and reference spectral curves measured at point-1 on the pepper target. (b) Reconstructed and reference spectral curves...measured at point-2 on the pepper target. 97 6.1 Discrete-time continuous-amplitude communications system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 6.2 RF testbed

  5. Use of a radiative transfer model to simulate the postfire spectral response to burn severity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuvieco, E.; RiañO, D.; Danson, F. M.; Martin, P.

    2006-12-01

    Burn severity is related to fire intensity and fire duration and provides a quantitative measure related to fire impact and biomass consumption. Traditional field-based methods to estimate burn severity are time consuming, labor intensive, and normally limited in spatial extent. Remotely sensed data may provide a means to estimate severity levels across large areas, but it is critical to understand the causes of variability in spectral response with variations in burn severity. To address this issue, a combined leaf (Prospect) and canopy (Kuusk) reflectance model was used to simulate the spectral response of a range of vegetation canopies with different burn severity levels. The key aspects examined in the simulations were change in soil color, change in foliage color from green to brown (burned), and change in leaf area index (LAI). For each simulation the composite burn index (CBI) was determined using the same rules used in the field to estimate burn severity levels. Statistical analyses examined the strength of the correlations between CBI and reflectance in individual wave bands in the 400-2500 nm range and CBI and a range of spectral indices combining pairs of wave bands. The results showed that wave bands in the near infrared (NIR) were most strongly related to the CBI of the simulated canopies because of their sensitivity to reduction in LAI. Spectral indices combining reflectance in wave bands in the NIR and shortwave infrared and red edge region showed stronger correlations with CBI. Forward stepwise regression with two to six terms selected wave bands in these regions and accounted for more than 90% of the variation in CBI.

  6. Ultrasharp ministop-band edge for subnanometer tuning resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahid, N.; Speijcken, N.; Naureen, S.; Li, M. Y.; Swillo, M.; Anand, S.

    2011-02-01

    We propose and demonstrate a method that enables spectral tuning with subnanometer accuracy, and is based on the transmission ministop-band (MSB) in line-defect multimode photonic crystal (PhC) waveguides. The fabricated MSB filter has ultrasharp edges which show a 30 dB drop in transmission in a 4 nm wavelength span. The use of the ultrasharp MSB edge to (optically) determine PhC fabrication accuracy is demonstrated. The wavelength position of the MSB could be tuned by temperature, with a coefficient of 0.1 nm/°C. The spectral characteristics of the MSB realized in this work are promising for sensing, tuning, and modulation applications.

  7. Microscopic study of the (2)/(5) fractional quantum Hall edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreejith, G. J.; Jolad, Shivakumar; Sen, Diptiman; Jain, Jainendra K.

    2011-12-01

    This paper reports on our study of the edge of the (2)/(5) fractional quantum Hall state, which is more complicated than the edge of the (1)/(3) state because of the presence of edge sectors corresponding to different partitions of composite fermions in the lowest two Λ levels. The addition of an electron at the edge is a nonperturbative process and it is not a priori obvious in what manner the added electron distributes itself over these sectors. We show, from a microscopic calculation, that when an electron is added at the edge of the ground state in the [N1,N2] sector, where N1 and N2 are the numbers of composite fermions in the lowest two Λ levels, the resulting state lies in either [N1+1,N2] or [N1,N2+1] sectors; adding an electron at the edge is thus equivalent to adding a composite fermion at the edge. The coupling to other sectors of the form [N1+1+k,N2-k], k integer, is negligible in the asymptotically low-energy limit. This study also allows a detailed comparison with the two-boson model of the (2)/(5) edge. We compute the spectral weights and find that while the individual spectral weights are complicated and nonuniversal, their sum is consistent with an effective two-boson description of the (2)/(5) edge.

  8. The Edge of Jupiter

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-04-19

    This enhanced color Jupiter image, taken by the JunoCam imager on NASA's Juno spacecraft, showcases several interesting features on the apparent edge (limb) of the planet. Prior to Juno's fifth flyby over Jupiter's mysterious cloud tops, members of the public voted on which targets JunoCam should image. This picture captures not only a fascinating variety of textures in Jupiter's atmosphere, it also features three specific points of interest: "String of Pearls," "Between the Pearls," and "An Interesting Band Point." Also visible is what's known as the STB Spectre, a feature in Jupiter's South Temperate Belt where multiple atmospheric conditions appear to collide. JunoCam images of Jupiter sometimes appear to have an odd shape. This is because the Juno spacecraft is so close to Jupiter that it cannot capture the entire illuminated area in one image -- the sides get cut off. Juno acquired this image on March 27, 2017, at 2:12 a.m. PDT (5:12 a.m. EDT), as the spacecraft performed a close flyby of Jupiter. When the image was taken, the spacecraft was about 12,400 miles (20,000 kilometers) from the planet. This enhanced color image was created by citizen scientist Bjorn Jonsson. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21389

  9. Widely tunable edge emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarlet, Gert; Wesstrom, Jan-Olof; Rigole, Pierre-Jean; Broberg, Bjoern

    2001-11-01

    We will present the current state-of-the-art in widely tunable edge emitting lasers for WDM applications. Typical applications for a tunable laser will be discussed, and the different types of tunable lasers available today will be compared with respect to the requirements posed by these applications. We will focus on the DBR-type tunable lasers - DBR, SG-DBR and GCSR - which at present seem to be the only tunable lasers mature enough for real-life applications. Their main advantages are that they are all monolithic, with no moving parts, and can be switched from one frequency to the other very rapidly since the tuning is based on carrier injection and not on thermal or mechanical changes. We will briefly discuss the working principle of each of these devices, and present typical performance characteristics. From a manufacturing point of view, rapid characterization of the lasers is crucial; therefore an overview will be given of different characterization schemes that have recently been proposed. For the end user, reliability is the prime issue. We will show results of degradation studies on these lasers and outline how the control electronics that drive the laser can compensate for any frequency drift. Finally, we will also discuss the impact of the requirement for rapid frequency switching on the design of the control electronics.

  10. The persistence of a chlorophyll spectral biosignature from Martian evaporite and spring analogues under Mars-like conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stromberg, J. M.; Applin, D. M.; Cloutis, E. A.; Rice, M.; Berard, G.; Mann, P.

    2014-07-01

    Spring and evaporite deposits are considered two of the most promising environments for past habitability on Mars and preservation of biosignatures. Manitoba, Canada hosts the East German Creek (EGC) hypersaline spring complex, and the post impact evaporite gypsum beds of the Lake St. Martin (LSM) impact. The EGC complex has microbial mats, sediments, algae and biofabrics, while endolithic communities are ubiquitous in the LSM gypsum beds. These communities are spectrally detectable based largely on the presence of a chlorophyll absorption band at 670 nm however, the robustness of this feature under Martian surface conditions was unclear. Biological and biology-bearing samples from EGC and LSM were exposed to conditions similar to the surface of present day Mars (high UV flux, 100 mbar, anoxic, CO2 rich) for up to 44 days, and preservation of the 670 nm chlorophyll feature and chlorophyll red-edge was observed. A decrease in band depth of the 670 nm band ranging from ~16 to 80% resulted, with correlations seen in the degree of preservation and the spatial proximity of samples to the spring mound and mineral shielding effects. The spectra were deconvolved to Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Pancam and Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Mastcam science filter bandpasses to investigate the detectability of the 670 nm feature and to compare with common mineral features. The red-edge and 670 nm feature associated with chlorophyll can be distinguished from the spectra of minerals with features below ~1000 nm, such as hematite and jarosite. However, distinguishing goethite from samples with the chlorophyll feature is more problematic, and quantitative interpretation using band depth data makes little distinction between iron oxyhydroxides and the 670 nm chlorophyll feature. The chlorophyll spectral feature is observable in both Pancam and Mastcam, and we propose that of the proposed EXOMARS Pancam filters, the PHYLL filter is best suited for its detection.

  11. Infant color vision: sharp chromatic edges are not required for chromatic discrimination in 4-month-olds.

    PubMed

    Thomasson, M A; Teller, D Y

    2000-01-01

    In our previous demonstrations of chromatic discrimination in infants, we have used test and surround fields of different chromaticities that abutted each other at sharp chromatic edges. In order to see whether sharp chromatic edges are necessary for infants to make chromatic discriminations, 16-week-old infants were tested with three stimulus configurations in which sharp chromatic edges were eliminated. The three edge manipulations involved black borders, a dark surround, or blurred edges around the chromatic test field. In each case red, green, and violet test fields were used. Although performance decreased when sharp chromatic edges were eliminated, observers' percent correct scores remained clearly above chance for eight of the nine discriminations (three colors x three edge manipulations). We argue that all three edge manipulations reduce the likelihood of mediation of chromatic discrimination by M (magnocellular) cells. These data thus provide evidence that young infants have functional P (parvocellular) pathways, and use them for making chromatic discriminations.

  12. Parallel phase-shifting digital holography using spectral estimation technique.

    PubMed

    Xia, Peng; Awatsuji, Yasuhiro; Nishio, Kenzo; Ura, Shogo; Matoba, Osamu

    2014-09-20

    We propose a parallel phase-shifting digital holography using a spectral estimation technique, which enables the instantaneous acquisition of spectral information and three-dimensional (3D) information of a moving object. In this technique, an interference fringe image that contains six holograms with two phase shifts for three laser lines, such as red, green, and blue, is recorded by a space-division multiplexing method with single-shot exposure. The 3D monochrome images of these three laser lines are numerically reconstructed by a computer and used to estimate the spectral reflectance distribution of object using a spectral estimation technique. Preliminary experiments demonstrate the validity of the proposed technique.

  13. Wing Leading Edge Debris Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Sandeep; Jerman, Gregory

    2004-01-01

    This is a slide presentation showing the Left Wing Leading Edge (WLE) heat damage observations: Heavy "slag" deposits on select RCC panels. Eroded and knife-edged RCC rib sections. Excessive overheating and slumping of carrier panel tiles. Missing or molten attachment bolts but intact bushing. Deposit mainly on "inside" RCC panel. Deposit on some fractured RCC surface

  14. Rock Segmentation through Edge Regrouping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burl, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Rockster is an algorithm that automatically identifies the locations and boundaries of rocks imaged by the rover hazard cameras (hazcams), navigation cameras (navcams), or panoramic cameras (pancams). The software uses edge detection and edge regrouping to identify closed contours that separate the rocks from the background.

  15. Improved Edge Performance in MRF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shorey, Aric; Jones, Andrew; Durnas, Paul; Tricard, Marc

    2004-01-01

    The fabrication of large segmented optics requires a polishing process that can correct the figure of a surface to within a short distance from its edges-typically, a few millimeters. The work here is to develop QED's Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF) precision polishing process to minimize residual edge effects.

  16. A comparative study of reflectance spectral indices and digital camera imagery to quantify in-vivo foliar chlorophyll concentration in common New England forest species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Michael T.

    Quantifying foliar chlorophyll content is an important procedure in ecosystem studies. Established extraction techniques for quantifying chlorophyll concentration were compared to hyperspectral reflectance indices collected with a GER2600 spectroradiometer, and digital image indices derived from digital camera imagery. Findings show REIP:(R 2=0.52) is a strong indicator reflectance changes associated with plant stress, but RE3/RE2:(R2=0.72), FD715/FD705:(R2=0.77) and CRI red-edge(d) :(R2=0.73) predicted differences in chlorophyll concentration across a range of species more accurately. Many spectral indices predict chlorophyll concentrations more accurately than the REIP, but fail to document the blue-shift associated with foliar stress. Camera imagery results show gray card normalized percent red (R-GC)/( R+GC):(R2=0.63) and percent green (G-GC)/(G+GC):(R 2=0.68) to be strong predictors of chlorophyll concentration across multiple species. For individual species (%Red-%Blue)/(%Red+%Blue) or ( RvB:%R) is a reliable camera index that tracks phenological changes in chlorophyll accurately. Pearson's r across the 2008 growing season for black oak (N=40) was (R2=-0.95), and sugar maple (N=33) was (R2=-0.64).

  17. TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF LINE STRUCTURE OF CADMIUM SULFIDE EDGE EMISSION

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The temperature dependence of the line structure in Cds edge emission stimulated by UV light was investigated from 4.2 K to 367 K. The spectral... dependence of the primary line groups is a linear function of temperature above 220 K with coefficients of change of 1.27 and 1.8 Angstroms degree K for the...lines observed. Below 220 K the dependence departs from linearity and approaches its limiting value more rapidly with decreasing temperature

  18. Line edge roughness frequency analysis for SAQP process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Levi, Shimon; Ge, Adam; Zhou, Hua; Wang, Wenhui; Krishnan, Navaneetha; Chen, Yulu; Verduijn, Erik; Kim, Ryoung-han

    2016-03-01

    The line edge roughness (LER) and line width roughness (LWR) transfer in a self-aligned quadruple patterning (SAQP) process is shown for the first time. Three LER characterization methods, including conventional standard deviation method, power spectral density (PSD) method and frequency domain 3-sigma method, are used in the analysis. The wiggling is also quantitatively characterized for each SAQP step with a wiggling factor. This work will benefit both process optimization and process monitoring.

  19. Dynamic fracture mechanics analysis for an edge delamination crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Doyle, James F.

    1994-01-01

    A global/local analysis is applied to the problem of a panel with an edge delamination crack subject to an impulse loading to ascertain the dynamic J integral. The approach uses the spectral element method to obtain the global dynamic response and local resultants to obtain the J integral. The variation of J integral along the crack front is shown. The crack behavior is mixed mode (Mode 2 and Mode 3), but is dominated by the Mode 2 behavior.

  20. The Robotic Edge Finishing Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Loucks, C.S.; Selleck, C.B.

    1990-08-01

    The Robotic Edge Finishing Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories is developing four areas of technology required for automated deburring, chamfering, and blending of machined edges: (1) the automatic programming of robot trajectories and deburring processes using information derived from a CAD database, (2) the use of machine vision for locating the workpiece coupled with force control to ensure proper tool contact, (3) robotic deburring, blending, and machining of precision chamfered edges, and (4) in-process automated inspection of the formed edge. The Laboratory, its components, integration, and results from edge finishing experiments to date are described here. Also included is a discussion of the issues regarding implementation of the technology in a production environment. 24 refs., 17 figs.

  1. Research on the relationship between the fractional coverage of the submerged plant Vallisneria spiralis and observed spectral parameters.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qian; Wu, Kunqi; Bai, Yan; Hu, Yueming

    2013-07-01

    The present paper discusses the relationship between the coverage fraction of submerged plants and the observed spectral characteristics. The purpose of this paper is to validate a remote sensing technology to monitor the change in the plant composition of a water body. In the current study, the reflectance spectra of the submerged plant Vallisneria spiralis at different fraction coverages of the wetland in Hangzhou Bay were measured. The relationships between the fraction coverage of V. spiralis and simulated Quickbird normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), red edge, and other spectral characteristic parameters were established. The results showed that the spectral reflectance characteristics of submerged plant V. spiralis were mainly in the visible light (490-650 nm) and near infrared (700-900 nm). The rate of change of the blue band curve and simulated Quickbird NDVI showed a higher correlation with the V. spiralis coverage, so estimation models of the fraction coverage were constructed using these parameters. The estimated fraction coverage of V. spiralis with different models were validated with ground data, and the accuracy of estimation models was assessed. The most suitable estimated fraction coverage of V. spiralis was obtained using the rate of change of the blue band curve and simulated Quickbird NDVI. The present work demonstrated a method to monitor the distribution and dynamical variation of submerged plants at the large scale.

  2. Terascale spectral element algorithms and implementations.

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, P. F.; Tufo, H. M.

    1999-08-17

    We describe the development and implementation of an efficient spectral element code for multimillion gridpoint simulations of incompressible flows in general two- and three-dimensional domains. We review basic and recently developed algorithmic underpinnings that have resulted in good parallel and vector performance on a broad range of architectures, including the terascale computing systems now coming online at the DOE labs. Sustained performance of 219 GFLOPS has been recently achieved on 2048 nodes of the Intel ASCI-Red machine at Sandia.

  3. Nitrogen K-edge x-ray absorption near edge structure of pyrimidine-containing nucleotides in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Hiroyuki Minami, Hirotake; Okuizumi, Naoto; Sakuma, Ichiro; Ukai, Masatoshi; Fujii, Kentaro; Yokoya, Akinari; Fukuda, Yoshihiro; Saitoh, Yuji

    2015-05-07

    X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) was measured at energies around the N K-edge of the pyrimidine-containing nucleotides, cytidine 5′-monophosphate (CMP), 2′-deoxythymidine 5′-monophosphate (dTMP), and uridine 5′-monophosphate (UMP), in aqueous solutions and in dried films under various pH conditions. The features of resonant excitations below the N K-edge in the XANES spectra for CMP, dTMP, and UMP changed depending on the pH of the solutions. The spectral change thus observed is systematically explained by the chemical shift of the core-levels of N atoms in the nucleobase moieties caused by structural changes due to protonation or deprotonation at different proton concentrations. This interpretation is supported by the results of theoretical calculations using density functional theory for the corresponding nucleobases in the neutral and protonated or deprotonated forms.

  4. Nitrogen K-edge x-ray absorption near edge structure of pyrimidine-containing nucleotides in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Hiroyuki; Minami, Hirotake; Okuizumi, Naoto; Sakuma, Ichiro; Ukai, Masatoshi; Fujii, Kentaro; Yokoya, Akinari; Fukuda, Yoshihiro; Saitoh, Yuji

    2015-05-07

    X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) was measured at energies around the N K-edge of the pyrimidine-containing nucleotides, cytidine 5'-monophosphate (CMP), 2'-deoxythymidine 5'-monophosphate (dTMP), and uridine 5'-monophosphate (UMP), in aqueous solutions and in dried films under various pH conditions. The features of resonant excitations below the N K-edge in the XANES spectra for CMP, dTMP, and UMP changed depending on the pH of the solutions. The spectral change thus observed is systematically explained by the chemical shift of the core-levels of N atoms in the nucleobase moieties caused by structural changes due to protonation or deprotonation at different proton concentrations. This interpretation is supported by the results of theoretical calculations using density functional theory for the corresponding nucleobases in the neutral and protonated or deprotonated forms.

  5. SPECTRAL SMILE CORRECTION IN CRISM HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceamanos, X.; Doute, S.

    2009-12-01

    The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) is affected by a common artifact in "push-broom" sensors, the so-called "spectral smile". As a consequence, both central wavelength and spectral width of the spectral response vary along the across-track dimension, thus giving rise to a shifting and smoothing of spectra (see Fig. 1 (left)). In fact, both effects are greater for spectra on the edges, while they are minimum for data acquired by central detectors, the so-called "sweet spot". The prior artifacts become particularly critical for Martian observations which contain steep spectra such as CO2 ice-rich polar images. Fig. 1 (right) shows the horizontal brightness gradient which appears in every band corresponding to a steep portion of spectra. The correction of CRISM spectral smile is addressed using a two-step method which aims at modifying data sensibly in order to mimic the optimal CRISM response. First, all spectra, which are previously interpolated by cubic splines, are resampled to the "sweet spot" wavelengths in order to overcome the spectra shift. Secondly, the non-uniform spectral width is overcome by mimicking an increase of spectral resolution thanks to a spectral sharpening. In order to minimize noise, only bands particularly suffering from smile are selected. First, bands corresponding to the outliers of the Minimum Noise Transformation (MNF) eigenvector, which corresponds to the MNF band related to smile (MNF-smile), are selected. Then, a spectral neighborhood Θi, which takes into account the local spectral convexity or concavity, is defined for every selected band in order to maximize spectral shape preservation. The proposed sharpening technique takes into account both the instrument parameters and the observed spectra. First, every reflectance value belonging to a Θi is reevaluated by a sharpening which depends on a ratio of the spectral width of the current detector and the "sweet spot" one. Then, the optimal degree of

  6. The influence of edge and corner evolution on plasmon properties and resonant edge effect in gold nanoplatelets.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xi-Bin; Luo, Jiang-Shan; Liu, Miao; Wang, Yu-Ying; Yi, Zao; Li, Xi-Bo; Yi, You-Gen; Tang, Yong-Jian

    2015-01-28

    In this paper a simulation of the properties of surface plasmons on gold nanoplatelets with various cross-sections inscribed in a circle and an investigation of their field distributions to assign multiple SPRs are described. The manipulated propagation can be obtained through the evolution of edges and corners. Furthermore, the particle morphology and the associated spectral positions alone do not uniquely reflect the important details of the local field distribution or the resonance modes. The plasmon modes were investigated and found to be mainly excited along the edges and in the side and sloped side surfaces. The strong field distributions can generally be found around the corners and how the plasmons transmit through the corners to adjacent edges was also investigated. Besides the plasmons excited along the edges as were found for the triangular nanoplatelets, plasmons were excited in the interior region of the triangular surfaces and were also investigated. Despite this in the infrared region, plasmon modes were found to be along the edges for the hexagonal nanoplatelets. Also, it can be seen that the change of nanoplatelet thickness can support different plasmon modes ranging from dipolar resonance mode to quadrupole resonance mode. The thickness far below the skin depth can display complex plasmon modes along the edges and on the side and sloping side surfaces as well as the strong coupling between the top and bottom surfaces. The observed plasmon resonance modes in this simulation reflect the interference of all these contributions including the plasmons along the edges and on the side surfaces. This is an essential step towards a thorough understanding of plasmon modes and the effect of edge and corner evolution in polygonous nanoplatelets.

  7. Modelling the spectral response of the desert tree Prosopis tamarugo to water stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chávez, R. O.; Clevers, J. G. P. W.; Herold, M.; Ortiz, M.; Acevedo, E.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we carried out a laboratory experiment to study changes in canopy reflectance of Tamarugo plants under controlled water stress. Tamarugo (Prosopis tamarugo Phil.) is an endemic and endangered tree species adapted to the hyper-arid conditions of the Atacama Desert, Northern Chile. Observed variation in reflectance during the day (due to leaf movements) as well as changes over the experimental period (due to water stress) were successfully modelled by using the Soil-Leaf-Canopy (SLC) radiative transfer model. Empirical canopy reflectance changes were mostly explained by the parameters leaf area index (LAI), leaf inclination distribution function (LIDF) and equivalent water thickness (EWT) as shown by the SLC simulations. Diurnal leaf movements observed in Tamarugo plants (as adaptation to decrease direct solar irradiation at the hottest time of the day) had an important effect on canopy reflectance and were explained by the LIDF parameter. The results suggest that remote sensing based assessment of this desert tree should consider LAI and canopy water content (CWC) as water stress indicators. Consequently, we tested fifteen different vegetation indices and spectral absorption features proposed in literature for detecting changes of LAI and CWC, considering the effect of LIDF variations. A sensitivity analysis was carried out using SLC simulations with a broad range of LAI, LIDF and EWT values. The Water Index was the most sensitive remote sensing feature for estimating CWC for values less than 0.036 g/cm2, while the area under the curve for the spectral range 910-1070 nm was most sensitive for values higher than 0.036 g/cm2. The red-edge chlorophyll index (CIred-edge) performed the best for estimating LAI. Diurnal leaf movements had an effect on all remote sensing features tested, particularly on those for detecting changes in CWC.

  8. General spectral utility metric for spectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Rulon E.; Elder, Timothy D.; Stewart, David J.; Cincotta, Eric J.; Kennedy, Carolyn S.; Van Nostrand, R. Craig

    2005-06-01

    Published approaches to assessing and predicting spectral image utility are generally based on regression methods which fit coefficients to an equation with terms representing spatial scale, spectral fidelity, and signal-to-noise. Such approaches are patterned after the National Imagery Interpretability Rating Scale General Image Quality Equation (NIIRS GIQE) designed for use with remotely-sensed panchromatic imagery. Preliminary testing of these approaches suggests that they will work for some subsets of spectral imagery applications but are not generally applicable to all spectral imaging problems. We present here an approach that gets at the heart of the general problem-assessing the confidence of an image analyst in performing a specified task with a specific spectral image. While applicable in other areas such as health imaging, our approach to spectral utility assessment is presented in this paper from a remote sensing point of view. Our approach allows trade-offs in tasking and system design across the "spectrum" of imagers including panchromatic, multispectral, hyperspectral, and even ultraspectral. Our approach is based on a fusion concept called "semantic transformation." We assume that spectral and spatial information are largely separable with both contributing to the overall utility of the image. The "semantic transformation" combines the spatial and spectral information in a common term (in our case confidence) to give an overall confidence in performing the specified task. Addressing the spatial and spectral information separately allows us the freedom to assess the information contained in each in ways that the information is actually assimilated (i.e., usually spatial information in exploited visually while spectral information consisting of more than three or four bands is usually exploited by computer algorithms). For the spectral information, we can use either generic exploitation algorithms or the specific algorithms that the image analyst

  9. Red luminescence of CsI crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Smol`skaya, L.P.; Kolesnikova, T.A.

    1995-12-01

    Emission in the red spectral range with the maximum at 670 nm and two decay components <5 ns and 1 {mu}s is found in the cathodoluminescence of CsI crystals excited by a pulsed electron beam with the 5-ns duration. The short component is assigned to the ultrafast luminescence caused by the transitions within the valence band. It is assumed that the microsecond component of the red luminescence is caused by the radiative exciton annihilation at the unstable defects produced by ionizing radiation. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Multidimensional spectral load balancing

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.

    1993-01-01

    We describe an algorithm for the static load balancing of scientific computations that generalizes and improves upon spectral bisection. Through a novel use of multiple eigenvectors, our new spectral algorithm can divide a computation into 4 or 8 pieces at once. These multidimensional spectral partitioning algorithms generate balanced partitions that have lower communication overhead and are less expensive to compute than those produced by spectral bisection. In addition, they automatically work to minimize message contention on a hypercube or mesh architecture. These spectral partitions are further improved by a multidimensional generalization of the Kernighan-Lin graph partitioning algorithm. Results on several computational grids are given and compared with other popular methods.

  11. Detecting red blotch disease in grape leaves using hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrubeoglu, Mehrube; Orlebeck, Keith; Zemlan, Michael J.; Autran, Wesley

    2016-05-01

    Red blotch disease is a viral disease that affects grapevines. Symptoms appear as irregular blotches on grape leaves with pink and red veins on the underside of the leaves. Red blotch disease causes a reduction in the accumulation of sugar in grapevines affecting the quality of grapes and resulting in delayed harvest. Detecting and monitoring this disease early is important for grapevine management. This work focuses on the use of hyperspectral imaging for detection and mapping red blotch disease in grape leaves. Grape leaves with known red blotch disease have been imaged with a portable hyperspectral imaging system both on and off the vine to investigate the spectral signature of red blotch disease as well as to identify the diseased areas on the leaves. Modified reflectance calculated at spectral bands corresponding to 566 nm (green) and 628 nm (red), and modified reflectance ratios computed at two sets of bands (566 nm / 628 nm, 680 nm / 738 nm) were selected as effective features to differentiate red blotch from healthy-looking and dry leaf. These two modified reflectance and two ratios of modified reflectance values were then used to train the support vector machine classifier in a supervised learning scheme. Once the SVM classifier was defined, two-class classification was achieved for grape leaf hyperspectral images. Identification of the red blotch disease on grape leaves as well as mapping different stages of the disease using hyperspectral imaging are presented in this paper.

  12. Remote Sensing Study of the Influence of Different Herbicides on the Leaf Spectral Reflectance and Fluorescence of Pea Plants (Pisum sativum L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krezhova, Dora; Yanev, Tony; Iliev, Ilko; Alexieva, Vera; Tsaneva, Mariana

    four specific for the green vegetation spectral intervals: 520÷580 nm (maximal reflectivity region), 640-680 nm (maximal leaf absorption region), 690÷720 nm (red edge region) and 730÷770 nm (near infrared region). Statistically significant differences were found between the spectral reflectance characteristics of leaves of control and treated with herbicides plants at a significance level p¡0.05 for all concentrations of every herbicide except for the low acifluorfen concentration. The differences in the fluorescence spectra were assessed by several indices. A comparative analysis of the influence of the applied herbicides on the spectral reflectance characteristics and the fluorescence was performed. The results render the possibility to clarify the sensitivity of spectral features as a tool to assess the physiological responses and adaptation of plants to changes in environment.

  13. Oscillations at B Ring Edge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-11-01

    This image obtained by NASA Cassini spacecraft of the outer edge of Saturn?s B ring, reveals the combined effects of a tugging moon and oscillations that can naturally occur in disks like Saturn rings and spiral galaxies.

  14. Fast tracking using edge histograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokita, Przemyslaw

    1997-04-01

    This paper proposes a new algorithm for tracking objects and objects boundaries. This algorithm was developed and applied in a system used for compositing computer generated images and real world video sequences, but can be applied in general in all tracking systems where accuracy and high processing speed are required. The algorithm is based on analysis of histograms obtained by summing along chosen axles pixels of edge segmented images. Edge segmentation is done by spatial convolution using gradient operator. The advantage of such an approach is that it can be performed in real-time using available on the market hardware convolution filters. After edge extraction and histograms computation, respective positions of maximums in edge intensity histograms, in current and previous frame, are compared and matched. Obtained this way information about displacement of histograms maximums, can be directly converted into information about changes of target boundaries positions along chosen axles.

  15. Edge Fracture in Complex Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemingway, Ewan J.; Kusumaatmaja, Halim; Fielding, Suzanne M.

    2017-07-01

    We study theoretically the edge fracture instability in sheared complex fluids, by means of linear stability analysis and direct nonlinear simulations. We derive an exact analytical expression for the onset of edge fracture in terms of the shear-rate derivative of the fluid's second normal stress difference, the shear-rate derivative of the shear stress, the jump in shear stress across the interface between the fluid and the outside medium (usually air), the surface tension of that interface, and the rheometer gap size. We provide a full mechanistic understanding of the edge fracture instability, carefully validated against our simulations. These findings, which are robust with respect to choice of rheological constitutive model, also suggest a possible route to mitigating edge fracture, potentially allowing experimentalists to achieve and accurately measure flows stronger than hitherto possible.

  16. Edge Fracture in Complex Fluids.

    PubMed

    Hemingway, Ewan J; Kusumaatmaja, Halim; Fielding, Suzanne M

    2017-07-14

    We study theoretically the edge fracture instability in sheared complex fluids, by means of linear stability analysis and direct nonlinear simulations. We derive an exact analytical expression for the onset of edge fracture in terms of the shear-rate derivative of the fluid's second normal stress difference, the shear-rate derivative of the shear stress, the jump in shear stress across the interface between the fluid and the outside medium (usually air), the surface tension of that interface, and the rheometer gap size. We provide a full mechanistic understanding of the edge fracture instability, carefully validated against our simulations. These findings, which are robust with respect to choice of rheological constitutive model, also suggest a possible route to mitigating edge fracture, potentially allowing experimentalists to achieve and accurately measure flows stronger than hitherto possible.

  17. High-resolution UV-visible spectroscopy of lunar red spots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruno, B. C.; Lucey, P. G.; Hawke, B. R.

    1991-01-01

    A spectral reflectance study of selected lunar 'red spots', highland areas characterized by an absorption in the ultraviolet relative to the visible was conducted. Some red spots were suggested to be the sites of ancient highland volcanism. High-resolution spectral data of eight red spots on the western portion of the moon over the wavelength region 0.39-0.82 micron were obtained. Much spectral variation among these red spots in the magnitude as well as the wavelength position of the ultraviolet absorption were found. Spectral structure at visible and near-infrared wavelength were also identified. These spectral differences indicate that red spots do not have a single mineralogical composition, which in turn suggests that red spots may have multiple origins. Additional imaging spectroscopic observations were taken of the Herigonius red spot, a morphologically complex region northeast of Mare Humorum. These data reveal significant spectral differences among the various morphological units within the Herigonius red spot. Although some of these are likely due to the effects of the maturation process, others appear to reflect differences in mineral abundances and composition.

  18. High-resolution UV-visible spectroscopy of lunar red spots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruno, B. C.; Lucey, P. G.; Hawke, B. R.

    1991-01-01

    A spectral reflectance study of selected lunar 'red spots', highland areas characterized by an absorption in the ultraviolet relative to the visible was conducted. Some red spots were suggested to be the sites of ancient highland volcanism. High-resolution spectral data of eight red spots on the western portion of the moon over the wavelength region 0.39-0.82 micron were obtained. Much spectral variation among these red spots in the magnitude as well as the wavelength position of the ultraviolet absorption were found. Spectral structure at visible and near-infrared wavelength were also identified. These spectral differences indicate that red spots do not have a single mineralogical composition, which in turn suggests that red spots may have multiple origins. Additional imaging spectroscopic observations were taken of the Herigonius red spot, a morphologically complex region northeast of Mare Humorum. These data reveal significant spectral differences among the various morphological units within the Herigonius red spot. Although some of these are likely due to the effects of the maturation process, others appear to reflect differences in mineral abundances and composition.

  19. Agile dual-channel spectral imaging with spectral zooming.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing; Wang, Michael R; Yang, Jame J

    2008-08-10

    A dual-channel spectral imaging system with agile spectral band access and spectral bandwidth tuning capability is presented. A diffractive grating and an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) are respectively used as spectral dispersion and spectral filtering elements for the two channels. A 4f spectral filtering channel using an adjustable slit is set up at the first diffraction order of the grating to realize coarse spectral band selection. The AOTF selectively filters the spectrum of the nondispersed zero order to realize fine spectral imaging. The spectral zooming function is achieved without increasing spectral frame number facilitating real-time spectral imaging operation. Feasibility of the spectral imaging has been demonstrated through preliminary experiments. Minimum 6 nm spectral resolution and 1.2 degrees field of view have been achieved. The real-time spectral imaging capable of wide spectral band operation without loosing desired fine spectral capability is particularly useful for a variety of defense, medical, and environmental monitoring applications.

  20. Light harvesting in photonic crystals revisited: why do slow photons at the blue edge enhance absorption?

    PubMed

    Deparis, O; Mouchet, S R; Su, B-L

    2015-11-11

    Light harvesting enhancement by slow photons in photonic crystal catalysts or dye-sensitized solar cells is a promising approach for increasing the efficiency of photoreactions. This structural effect is exploited in inverse opal TiO2 photocatalysts by tuning the red edge of the photonic band gap to the TiO2 electronic excitation band edge. In spite of many experimental demonstrations, the slow photon effect is not fully understood yet. In particular, observed enhancement by tuning the blue edge has remained unexplained. Based on rigorous couple wave analysis simulations, we quantify light harvesting enhancement in terms of absorption increase at a specific wavelength (monochromatic UV illumination) or photocurrent increase (solar light illumination), with respect to homogeneous flat slab of equivalent material thickness. We show that the commonly accepted explanation relying on light intensity confinement in high (low) dielectric constant regions at the red (blue) edge is challenged in the case of TiO2 inverse opals because of the sub-wavelength size of the material skeleton. The reason why slow photons at the blue edge are also able to enhance light harvesting is the loose confinement of the field, which leads to significant resonantly enhanced field intensity overlap with the skeleton in both red and blue edge tuning cases, yet with different intensity patterns.

  1. Radiative ablation with two ionizing fronts when opacity displays a sharp absorption edge.

    PubMed

    Poujade, Olivier; Bonnefille, Max; Vandenboomgaerde, Marc

    2015-11-01

    The interaction of a strong flux of photons with matter through an ionizing front (I-front) is an ubiquitous phenomenon in the context of astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion (ICF) where intense sources of radiation put matter into motion. When the opacity of the irradiated material varies continuously in the radiation spectral domain, only one single I-front is formed. In contrast, as numerical simulations tend to show, when the opacity of the irradiated material presents a sharp edge in the radiation spectral domain, a second I-front (an edge front) can form. A full description of the mechanism behind the formation of this edge front is presented in this article. It allows us to understand extra shocks (edge-shocks), displayed by ICF simulations, that might affect the robustness of the design of fusion capsules in actual experiments. Moreover, it may have consequences in various domains of astrophysics where ablative flows occur.

  2. Edge equilibrium code for tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xujing; Drozdov, Vladimir V.

    2014-01-15

    The edge equilibrium code (EEC) described in this paper is developed for simulations of the near edge plasma using the finite element method. It solves the Grad-Shafranov equation in toroidal coordinate and uses adaptive grids aligned with magnetic field lines. Hermite finite elements are chosen for the numerical scheme. A fast Newton scheme which is the same as implemented in the equilibrium and stability code (ESC) is applied here to adjust the grids.

  3. Hyper-spectral measurements using a compact SWIR camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayton, David; Nolasco, Rudolph; Myers, Michael; Sena, John-Paul; Oliver, Jeremy; Even, Detlev; Hill, Brian

    2012-10-01

    Recent advances in InGaAs camera technology has stimulated interest in the short wave infra-red (SWIR) band in the spectral region 0.84 - 1.7 μm. Located between the visible and thermal infra-red, the SWIR band shows interesting properties of both. Images tends to have the look of the visible and are less affected by scattering from aerosol haze, however the solar irradiance is dropping rapidly with wavelength in the SWIR. Spectral signatures, particularly of paints and dyes, may be different in the SWIR band compared to the visible. For these reasons we have chosen to investigate hyper-spectral measurements in this band using the NovaSol μHSI SWIR hyper-spectral imager system.

  4. Irradiance and spectral distribution control system for controlled environment chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krones, M. J.; Sager, J. C.; Johnson, A. T.; Knott, W. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a closed-loop control system for controlling the irradiance and spectral quality generated by fluorescent lamps in a controlled environment chamber. The 400 to 800 nm irradiance and the ratio of the red waveband (600 to 700 nm) to the far-red waveband (700 to 800 nm) were independently controlled and varied as functions of time. A suggested application is to investigate the possibility of synergistic effects of changing irradiance levels and changing spectral distributions on photoperiodism and photomorphogenesis.

  5. Edge instabilities of topological superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Johannes S.; Assaad, Fakher F.; Schnyder, Andreas P.

    2016-05-01

    Nodal topological superconductors display zero-energy Majorana flat bands at generic edges. The flatness of these edge bands, which is protected by time-reversal and translation symmetry, gives rise to an extensive ground-state degeneracy. Therefore, even arbitrarily weak interactions lead to an instability of the flat-band edge states towards time-reversal and translation-symmetry-broken phases, which lift the ground-state degeneracy. We examine the instabilities of the flat-band edge states of dx y-wave superconductors by performing a mean-field analysis in the Majorana basis of the edge states. The leading instabilities are Majorana mass terms, which correspond to coherent superpositions of particle-particle and particle-hole channels in the fermionic language. We find that attractive interactions induce three different mass terms. One is a coherent superposition of imaginary s -wave pairing and current order, and another combines a charge-density-wave and finite-momentum singlet pairing. Repulsive interactions, on the other hand, lead to ferromagnetism together with spin-triplet pairing at the edge. Our quantum Monte Carlo simulations confirm these findings and demonstrate that these instabilities occur even in the presence of strong quantum fluctuations. We discuss the implications of our results for experiments on cuprate high-temperature superconductors.

  6. Bifurcations of edge states—topologically protected and non-protected—in continuous 2D honeycomb structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fefferman, C. L.; Lee-Thorp, J. P.; Weinstein, M. I.

    2016-03-01

    Edge states are time-harmonic solutions to energy-conserving wave equations, which are propagating parallel to a line-defect or ‘edge’ and are localized transverse to it. This paper summarizes and extends the authors’ work on the bifurcation of topologically protected edge states in continuous two-dimensional (2D) honeycomb structures. We consider a family of Schrödinger Hamiltonians consisting of a bulk honeycomb potential and a perturbing edge potential. The edge potential interpolates between two different periodic structures via a domain wall. We begin by reviewing our recent bifurcation theory of edge states for continuous 2D honeycomb structures (http://arxiv.org/abs/1506.06111). The topologically protected edge state bifurcation is seeded by the zero-energy eigenstate of a one-dimensional Dirac operator. We contrast these protected bifurcations with (more common) non-protected bifurcations from spectral band edges, which are induced by bound states of an effective Schrödinger operator. Numerical simulations for honeycomb structures of varying contrasts and ‘rational edges’ (zigzag, armchair and others), support the following scenario: (a) for low contrast, under a sign condition on a distinguished Fourier coefficient of the bulk honeycomb potential, there exist topologically protected edge states localized transverse to zigzag edges. Otherwise, and for general edges, we expect long lived edge quasi-modes which slowly leak energy into the bulk. (b) For an arbitrary rational edge, there is a threshold in the medium-contrast (depending on the choice of edge) above which there exist topologically protected edge states. In the special case of the armchair edge, there are two families of protected edge states; for each parallel quasimomentum (the quantum number associated with translation invariance) there are edge states which propagate in opposite directions along the armchair edge.

  7. A new COmpact hyperSpectral Imaging system (COSI) for UAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sima, Aleksandra; Baeck, Pieter-Jan; Delalieux, Stephanie; Livens, Stefan; Blommaert, Joris; Delauré, Bavo; Boonen, Miet

    2016-04-01

    This presentation gives an overview of the new COmpact hyperSpectral Imaging (COSI) system recently developed at the Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO, Belgium) and suitable for multirotor Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) platforms. The camera is compact and lightweight, with a total mass of less than 500g including: an embedded computer, storage and power distribution unit. Such device miniaturization was possible thanks to the application of linear variable filters technology, in which image lines in the across flight direction correspond to different spectral bands as well as a different location on the ground (frame camera). The scanning motion is required to retrieve the complete spectrum for every point on the ground. The COSI camera captures data in 72 narrow (FWHM: 5nm to 10 nm) bands in the spectral range of 600-900 nm. Such spectral information is highly favourable for vegetation studies, since the main chlorophyll absorption feature centred around 680 nm is measured, as well as, the red-edge region (680 nm to 730 nm) which is often linked to plant stress. The NIR region furthermore reflects the internal plant structure, and is often linked to leaf area index and plant biomass. Next to the high spectral resolution, the COSI imager also provides a very high spatial data resolution i.e. images captured with a 9mm lens at 40m altitude cover a swath of ~40m with a ~2cm ground sampling distance. A dedicated data processing chain transforms the raw images into various information and action maps representing the status of the vegetation health and thus allowing for optimization of the management decisions within agricultural fields. In a number of test flights, hyperspectral COSI imager data were acquired covering diverse environments, e.g.: strawberry fields, natural grassland or pear orchards. Next to the COSI system overview, examples of collected data will be presented together with the results of the spectral data analysis. Lessons

  8. Seasonal spectral dynamics and carbon fluxes at core EOS sites using EO-1 Hyperion images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagomasino, D.; Campbell, P.; Price, R. M.

    2010-12-01

    phenology, as well as distinct spectral shapes for each vegetation type. Preliminary results suggest a high correlation (r=0.77-0.86) between CO2 flux and various biophysical indices that were primarily associated with the red-edge inflection point (i.e., 670-780 nm wavelength), regardless of vegetation type. Soil heat flux measurements also correlated well with the biophysical indices. These findings demonstrate the advantages of high-resolution spectral imaging for Earth observations, as well as for monitoring regional and global water and carbon fluxes to understand their affects on climate change.

  9. Ca L2,3-edge XANES and Sr K-edge EXAFS study of hydroxyapatite and fossil bone apatite.

    PubMed

    Zougrou, I M; Katsikini, M; Brzhezinskaya, M; Pinakidou, F; Papadopoulou, L; Tsoukala, E; Paloura, E C

    2016-08-01

    Upon burial, the organic and inorganic components of hard tissues such as bone, teeth, and tusks are subjected to various alterations as a result of interactions with the chemical milieu of soil, groundwater, and presence of microorganisms. In this study, simulation of the Ca L 2,3-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectrum of hydroxyapatite, using the CTM4XAS code, reveals that the different symmetry of the two nonequivalent Ca(1) and Ca(2) sites in the unit cell gives rise to specific spectral features. Moreover, Ca L 2,3-edge XANES spectroscopy is applied in order to assess variations in fossil bone apatite crystallinity due to heavy bacterial alteration and catastrophic mineral dissolution, compared to well-preserved fossil apatite, fresh bone, and geologic apatite reference samples. Fossilization-induced chemical alterations are investigated by means of Ca L 2,3-edge XANES and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and are related to histological evaluation using optical microscopy images. Finally, the variations in the bonding environment of Sr and its preference for substitution in the Ca(1) or Ca(2) sites upon increasing the Sr/Ca ratio is assessed by Sr K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy.

  10. Ca L2,3-edge XANES and Sr K-edge EXAFS study of hydroxyapatite and fossil bone apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zougrou, I. M.; Katsikini, M.; Brzhezinskaya, M.; Pinakidou, F.; Papadopoulou, L.; Tsoukala, E.; Paloura, E. C.

    2016-08-01

    Upon burial, the organic and inorganic components of hard tissues such as bone, teeth, and tusks are subjected to various alterations as a result of interactions with the chemical milieu of soil, groundwater, and presence of microorganisms. In this study, simulation of the Ca L 2,3-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectrum of hydroxyapatite, using the CTM4XAS code, reveals that the different symmetry of the two nonequivalent Ca(1) and Ca(2) sites in the unit cell gives rise to specific spectral features. Moreover, Ca L 2,3-edge XANES spectroscopy is applied in order to assess variations in fossil bone apatite crystallinity due to heavy bacterial alteration and catastrophic mineral dissolution, compared to well-preserved fossil apatite, fresh bone, and geologic apatite reference samples. Fossilization-induced chemical alterations are investigated by means of Ca L 2,3-edge XANES and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and are related to histological evaluation using optical microscopy images. Finally, the variations in the bonding environment of Sr and its preference for substitution in the Ca(1) or Ca(2) sites upon increasing the Sr/Ca ratio is assessed by Sr K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy.

  11. Spectral type, temperature, and evolutionary stage in cool supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorda, Ricardo; Negueruela, Ignacio; González-Fernández, Carlos; Tabernero, Hugo M.

    2016-07-01

    Context. In recent years, our understanding of red supergiants has been questioned by strong disagreements between stellar atmospheric parameters derived with different techniques. Temperature scales have been disputed, and the possibility that spectral types do not depend primarily on temperature has been raised. Aims: We explore the relations between different observed parameters, and we explore the ability to derive accurate intrinsic stellar parameters from these relations through the analysis of the largest spectroscopic sample of red supergiants to date. Methods: We obtained intermediate-resolution spectra of a sample of about 500 red supergiants in the Large and the Small Magellanic Cloud. From these spectra, we derive spectral types and measure a large set of photospheric atomic lines. We explore possible correlations between different observational parameters, also making use of near- and mid-infrared colours and literature on photometric variability. Results: Direct comparison between the behaviour of atomic lines (Fe i, Ti i, and Ca ii) in the observed spectra and a comprehensive set of synthetic atmospheric models provides compelling evidence that effective temperature is the prime underlying variable driving the spectral-type sequence between early G and M2 for supergiants. In spite of this, there is a clear correlation between spectral type and luminosity, with later spectral types tending to correspond to more luminous stars with heavier mass loss. This trend is much more marked in the LMC than in the SMC. The population of red supergiants in the SMC is characterised by a higher degree of spectral variability, early spectral types (centred on type K1) and low mass-loss rates (as measured by dust-sensitive mid-infrared colours). The population in the LMC displays less spectroscopic variability and later spectral types. The distribution of spectral types is not single-peaked. Instead, the brightest supergiants have a significantly different

  12. The Frequency of Anomalously Red Galaxies in SDSS Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearman, O.; Pimbblet, K. A.

    2014-09-01

    We present a systematic photometric search for spectroscopically confirmed anomalously red galaxies members of 748 low redshift clusters between 0.03 z 0.17 from the SDSS-C4 cluster catalogue (Miller et al. 2005). For each cluster we spectroscopically determine cluster membership, construct a colour-magnitude diagram and fit the red sequence using a robust bi-weight fit. We define an "anomalously red galaxy" as having a (g - r) colour of greater than 3σ redward of the fitted cluster colour-magnitude relation. We find that of 7485 galaxies at r ≤ 17.77 in (g - r), 7 galaxies are anomalously red - 0.0935 per cent of all galaxies in our sample. We show that two of the red outliers are caused by red contamination from nearby sources and are therefore not intrinsically anomalous red. However, 5 have no underlying cause to be so red and we speculate that they may have a high internal dust content. These intrinsically red galaxies are rare - comprising no more than 0.0668 per cent of all cluster galaxies. Most are morphologically early type galaxies, with a few probable late type galaxies that are viewed edge-on and one low surface brightness late type. One of our anomalously red galaxies appears to be a dust-shrouded starburst and we speculate that this may be a unique galaxy amoungst this galaxy set.

  13. Spectral Hounsfield units: a new radiological concept.

    PubMed

    Hurrell, Michael Anthony; Butler, Anthony Philip Howard; Cook, Nicholas James; Butler, Philip Howard; Ronaldson, J Paul; Zainon, Rafidah

    2012-05-01

    Computed tomography (CT) uses radiographical density to depict different materials; although different elements have different absorption fingerprints across the range of diagnostic X-ray energies, this spectral absorption information is lost in conventional CT. The recent development of dual energy CT (DECT) allows extraction of this information to a useful but limited extent. However, the advent of new photon counting chips that have energy resolution capabilities has put multi-energy or spectral CT (SCT) on the clinical horizon. This paper uses a prototype SCT system to demonstrate how CT density measurements vary with kilovoltage. While radiologists learn about linear attenuation curves during radiology training, they do not usually need a detailed understanding of this phenomenon in their clinical practice. However SCT requires a paradigm shift in how radiologists think about CT density. Because radiologists are already familiar with the Hounsfield Unit (HU), it is proposed that a modified HU be used that includes the mean energy used to obtain the image, as a conceptual bridge between conventional CT and SCT. A suggested format would be: HU(keV). • Spectral computed tomography uses K-edge and slope effects to identify element signatures. • New visualisation tools will be required to efficiently display spectral CT information. • This paper demonstrates HU variation with keV using the Medipix3 chip. • HU ( keV ) is a suggested format when stating spectral HU measurements.

  14. Open clusters rich in red supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negueruela, Ignacio

    2015-08-01

    In the past few years, several clusters containing large numbers of red supergiants have been discovered. These clusters are amongst the most massive young clusters known in the Milky Way, with stellar masses reaching a few tens of thousands of solar masses. They have provided us, for the first time, with large homogeneous samples of red supergiants of a given age. These large populations make them, despite heavy extinction along their sightlines, powerful laboratories to understand the evolutionary status of red supergiants. While some of the clusters, such as the eponymous RSGC1, are so obscured that their members are only observable in the near-IR, at least van der Bergh-Hagen 222 is observable even in the U band, allowing for an excellent characterisation of cluster and stellar properties. The information gleaned so far from these clusters gives strong support to the idea that late-M type supergiants represent a separate class, characterised by very heavy mass loss. It also shows that the spectral-type distribution of red supergiants in the Milky Way is very strongly peaked towards M1, while providing strong hints about the possible evolutionary sequence of red supergiants. In addition, the clusters of red supergiants represent ideal tools to study metallicity in the inner regions of the Milky Way.

  15. Spectral signature of the beam plasma discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Hallinan, T.J.; Deehr, C.S.; Hoch, E.; Viereck, R. ); Bernstein, W. ); Konradi, A. )

    1988-07-01

    Spectral measurements of the light emitted from a beam plasma discharge (BPD) in nitrogen show an abrupt increase in the ratio of N{sub 2} first positive emissions to the N{sub 2}{sup +} first negative emissions (red/blue ratio) at the onset of BPD. However, at beam currents substantially above BPD threshold, the red/blue ratio reverts to that produced by the beam itself (pre-BPD). This is interpreted as the appearance, at BPD onset, of a large suprathermal electron population, followed by a hardening of the suprathermal energy spectrum at higher beam currents. The new results are used to interpret previous white-light video images of BPD experiments. It is concluded that even larger red/blue ratios may occur at lower pressures and that a pre-BPD glow associated with radio-frequency emissions at the upper hybrid frequency is produced by a softer electron population than that occurring in BPD. In addition to the red/blue ratio, it was found that the ratio of the intensities of the 4-1 band and the 6-3 band of the first positive emissions varies systematically with beam current. The overall behavior is similar to that of the red/blue ratio--an abrupt increase followed by a steady decrease to the pre-BPD level. But the detailed dependence of the two ratios on current is different.

  16. Polarization and spectral action of narrow slit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleksyuk, M. V.; Felde, Ch. V.; Polyanskii, P. V.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental study of diffraction of coherent (laser, completely polarized) and incoherent (temporal, polychromatic, unpolarized) light radiation at slits whose width is restricted by a few wavelengths is made. It is shown that for diffraction at the edge of metallic half-plane screen, the angular dependences of diffraction field intensity are considerably different for orientation of the electric field vector parallel and perpendicular to the screen edge, so that metallic screen causes polarization action on the probing beam. It is shown that as the width of a slit formed by two metallic half-planes becomes less than ten wavelengths (being left larger than a wavelength), as the polarization effect is considerable even for the forward direction, i.e. for the zero diffraction angle. It causes also spectral effect, if polychromatic radiation diffracts at narrow slit at metallic screen. Namely, one observes pronounced blue shift of the maximum of the spectral distribution of the forward diffracted polychromatic ('white-light') beam. We apply for the first time the Berry's chromascopic technique for experimental data processing to elucidate such diffraction induced spectral changes.

  17. Polarization and spectral action of narrow slit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleksyuk, M. V.; Felde, Ch. V.; Polyanskii, P. V.

    2011-09-01

    Experimental study of diffraction of coherent (laser, completely polarized) and incoherent (temporal, polychromatic, unpolarized) light radiation at slits whose width is restricted by a few wavelengths is made. It is shown that for diffraction at the edge of metallic half-plane screen, the angular dependences of diffraction field intensity are considerably different for orientation of the electric field vector parallel and perpendicular to the screen edge, so that metallic screen causes polarization action on the probing beam. It is shown that as the width of a slit formed by two metallic half-planes becomes less than ten wavelengths (being left larger than a wavelength), as the polarization effect is considerable even for the forward direction, i.e. for the zero diffraction angle. It causes also spectral effect, if polychromatic radiation diffracts at narrow slit at metallic screen. Namely, one observes pronounced blue shift of the maximum of the spectral distribution of the forward diffracted polychromatic ('white-light') beam. We apply for the first time the Berry's chromascopic technique for experimental data processing to elucidate such diffraction induced spectral changes.

  18. RED-LETTER DAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The word "red-letter" is an adjective meaning "of special significance." It's origin is from the practice of marking Christian holy days in red letters on calendars. The "red-letter days" to which I refer occurred while I was a graduate student of ...

  19. On the Edge: Haptic Discrimination of Edge Sharpness

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Andy L.; Kent, Christopher; Rossiter, Jonathan M.; Benton, Christopher P.; Groen, Martin G. M.; Noyes, Jan M.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing ubiquity of haptic displays (e.g., smart phones and tablets) necessitates a better understanding of the perceptual capabilities of the human haptic system. Haptic displays will soon be capable of locally deforming to create simple 3D shapes. This study investigated the sensitivity of our haptic system to a fundamental component of shapes: edges. A novel set of eight high quality shape stimuli with test edges that varied in sharpness were fabricated in a 3D printer. In a two alternative, forced choice task, blindfolded participants were presented with two of these shapes side by side (one the reference, the other selected randomly from the remaining set of seven) and after actively exploring the test edge of each shape with the tip of their index finger, reported which shape had the sharper edge. We used a model selection approach to fit optimal psychometric functions to performance data, and from these obtained just noticeable differences and Weber fractions. In Experiment 1, participants performed the task with four different references. With sharpness defined as the angle at which one surface meets the horizontal plane, the four JNDs closely followed Weber’s Law, giving a Weber fraction of 0.11. Comparisons to previously reported Weber fractions from other haptic manipulations (e.g. amplitude of vibration) suggests we are sufficiently sensitive to changes in edge sharpness for this to be of potential utility in the design of future haptic displays. In Experiment 2, two groups of participants performed the task with a single reference but different exploration strategies; one was limited to a single touch, the other unconstrained and free to explore as they wished. As predicted, the JND in the free exploration condition was lower than that in the single touch condition, indicating exploration strategy affects sensitivity to edge sharpness. PMID:24023852

  20. More systematic errors in the measurement of power spectral density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, Chris A.

    2015-07-01

    Power spectral density (PSD) analysis is an important part of understanding line-edge and linewidth roughness in lithography. But uncertainty in the measured PSD, both random and systematic, complicates interpretation. It is essential to understand and quantify the sources of the measured PSD's uncertainty and to develop mitigation strategies. Both analytical derivations and simulations of rough features are used to evaluate data window functions for reducing spectral leakage and to understand the impact of data detrending on biases in PSD, autocovariance function (ACF), and height-to-height covariance function measurement. A generalized Welch window was found to be best among the windows tested. Linear detrending for line-edge roughness measurement results in underestimation of the low-frequency PSD and errors in the ACF and height-to-height covariance function. Measuring multiple edges per scanning electron microscope image reduces this detrending bias.

  1. Evaluating Spectral Signals to Identify Spectral Error

    PubMed Central

    Bazar, George; Kovacs, Zoltan; Tsenkova, Roumiana

    2016-01-01

    Since the precision and accuracy level of a chemometric model is highly influenced by the quality of the raw spectral data, it is very important to evaluate the recorded spectra and describe the erroneous regions before qualitative and quantitative analyses or detailed band assignment. This paper provides a collection of basic spectral analytical procedures and demonstrates their applicability in detecting errors of near infrared data. Evaluation methods based on standard deviation, coefficient of variation, mean centering and smoothing techniques are presented. Applications of derivatives with various gap sizes, even below the bandpass of the spectrometer, are shown to evaluate the level of spectral errors and find their origin. The possibility for prudent measurement of the third overtone region of water is also highlighted by evaluation of a complex data recorded with various spectrometers. PMID:26731541

  2. Spectral filtering for plant production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Roy E.; Mcmahon, Margaret J.; Rajapakse, Nihal C.; Decoteau, Dennis R.

    1994-01-01

    Both plants and animals have one general commonality in their perception of light. They both are sensitive primarily to the 400 to 700 nm wavelength portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. This is referred to as the visible spectrum for animals and as the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) spectrum for plants. Within this portion of the spectrum, animals perceive colors. Relatively recently it has been learned that within this same spectral range plants also demonstrate varying responses at different wavelengths, somewhat analogous to the definition of various colors at specific wavelengths. Although invisible to the human eye, portions of the electromagnetic spectrum on either side of the visible range are relatively inactive photosynthetically but have been found to influence important biological functions. These portions include the ultraviolet (UV approximately equal to 280-400 nm) and the far-red (FR approximately equal to 700-800 nm). The basic photoreceptor of plants for photosynthesis is chlorophyll. It serves to capture radiant energy which combined with carbon dioxide and water produces oxygen and assimulated carbon, used for the synthesis of cell wall polysaccarides, proteins, membrane lipids and other cellular constituents. The energy and carbon building blocks of photosynthesis sustain growth of plants. On the other hand, however, there are other photoreceptors, or pigments, that function as signal transducers to provide information that controls many physiological and morphological responses of how a plant grows. Known photomorphogenic receptors include phytochrome (the red/far-red sensor in the narrow bands of 655-665 nm and 725-735 nm ranges, respectively) and 'cryptochrome' (the hypothetical UV-B sensor in the 280-320 nm range). Since the USDA team of W. L. Butler, S. B. Hendricks, H. A. Borthwick, H. A. Siegleman and K. Norris in Beltsville, MD detected by spectroscopy, extracted and identified phytochrome as a protein in the 1950's, many

  3. Cascade trailing-edge noise modeling using a mode-matching technique and the edge-dipole theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roger, Michel; François, Benjamin; Moreau, Stéphane

    2016-11-01

    An original analytical approach is proposed to model the broadband trailing-edge noise produced by high-solidity outlet guide vanes in an axial turbomachine. The model is formulated in the frequency domain and first in two dimensions for a preliminary assessment of the method. In a first step the trailing-edge noise sources of a single vane are shown to be equivalent to the onset of a so-called edge dipole, the direct field of which is expanded in a series of plane-wave modes. A criterion for the distance of the dipole to the trailing-edge and a scaling of its amplitude is defined to yield a robust model. In a second step the diffraction of each plane-wave mode is derived considering the cascade as an array of bifurcated waveguides and using a mode-matching technique. The cascade response is finally synthesized by summing the diffracted fields of all cut-on modes to yield upstream and downstream sound power spectral densities. The obtained spectral shapes are physically consistent and the present results show that upstream radiation is typically 3 dB higher than downstream radiation, which has been experimentally observed previously. Even though the trailing-edge noise sources are not vane-to-vane correlated their radiation is strongly determined by a cascade effect that consequently must be accounted for. The interest of the approach is that it can be extended to a three-dimensional annular configuration without resorting to a strip theory approach. As such it is a promising and versatile alternative to previously published methods.

  4. Spectral methods for CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, Thomas A.; Streett, Craig L.; Hussaini, M. Yousuff

    1989-01-01

    One of the objectives of these notes is to provide a basic introduction to spectral methods with a particular emphasis on applications to computational fluid dynamics. Another objective is to summarize some of the most important developments in spectral methods in the last two years. The fundamentals of spectral methods for simple problems will be covered in depth, and the essential elements of several fluid dynamical applications will be sketched.

  5. Edge-Aware BMA Filters.

    PubMed

    Guang Deng

    2016-01-01

    There has been continuous research in edge-aware filters which have found many applications in computer vision and image processing. In this paper, we propose a principled-approach for the development of edge-aware filters. The proposed approach is based on two well-established principles: 1) optimal parameter estimation and 2) Bayesian model averaging (BMA). Using this approach, we formulate the problem of filtering a pixel in a local pixel patch as an optimal estimation problem. Since a pixel belongs to multiple local patches, there are multiple estimates of the same pixel. We combine these estimates into a final estimate using BMA. We demonstrate the versatility of this approach by developing a family of BMA filters based on different settings of cost functions and log-likelihood and log-prior functions. We also present a new interpretation of the guided filter and develop a BMA guided filter which includes the guided filter as a special case. We show that BMA filters can produce similar smoothing results as those of the state-of-the-art edge-aware filters. Two BMA filters are computationally as efficient as the guided filter which is one of the fastest edge-aware filters. We also demonstrate that the BMA guided filter is better than the guided filter in preserving sharp edges. A new feature of the BMA guided filter is that the filtered image is similar to that produced by a clustering process.

  6. Flap-Edge Blowing Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaeta, R. J.; Englar, R. J.; Ahuja, K. K.

    2003-01-01

    This Appendix documents the salient results from an effort to mitigate the so-called flap-edge noise generated at the split between a flap edge that is deployed and the undeployed flap. Utilizing a Coanda surface installed at the flap edge, steady blowing was used in an attempt to diminish the vortex strength resulting from the uneven lift distribution. The strength of this lifting vortex was augmented by steady blowing over the deployed flap. The test article for this study was the same 2D airfoil used in the steady blowing program reported earlier (also used in pulsed blowing tests, see Appendix G), however its trailing edge geometry was modified. An exact duplicate of the airfoil shape was made out of fiberglass with no flap, and in the clean configuration. It was attached to the existing airfoil to make an airfoil that has half of its flap deployed and half un-deployed. Figure 1 shows a schematic of the planform showing the two areas where steady blowing was introduced. The flap-edge blowing or the auxiliary blowing was in the direction normal to the freestream velocity vector. Slot heights for the blowing chambers were on the order of 0.0 14 inches.

  7. Anthropogenic fire history and red oak forests in south-central Ontario

    Treesearch

    Daniel C. Dey; Richard P. Guyette

    2000-01-01

    The regeneration and dominance of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) has been associated with fire throughout eastern North America. Red oak in central Ontario grows near the northern edge of its distribution in mixed hardwood - coniferous forests under mesic conditions where it competes with more shade-tolerant species. We hypothesized that the...

  8. Optimal network modification for spectral radius dependent phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Yonatan; Kirsch, Lior; Louzoun, Yoram

    2016-09-01

    The dynamics of contact processes on networks is often determined by the spectral radius of the networks adjacency matrices. A decrease of the spectral radius can prevent the outbreak of an epidemic, or impact the synchronization among systems of coupled oscillators. The spectral radius is thus tightly linked to network dynamics and function. As such, finding the minimal change in network structure necessary to reach the intended spectral radius is important theoretically and practically. Given contemporary big data resources such as large scale communication or social networks, this problem should be solved with a low runtime complexity. We introduce a novel method for the minimal decrease in weights of edges required to reach a given spectral radius. The problem is formulated as a convex optimization problem, where a global optimum is guaranteed. The method can be easily adjusted to an efficient discrete removal of edges. We introduce a variant of the method which finds optimal decrease with a focus on weights of vertices. The proposed algorithm is exceptionally scalable, solving the problem for real networks of tens of millions of edges in a short time.

  9. Chlorine-Free Red-Burning Pyrotechnics.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Jesse J; Koch, Ernst-Christian; Poret, Jay C; Moretti, Jared D; Harbol, Seth M

    2015-09-07

    The development of a red, chlorine-free pyrotechnic illuminant of high luminosity and spectral purity was investigated. Red-light emission based solely on transient SrOH(g) has been achieved by using either 5-amino-1H-tetrazole or hexamine to deoxidize the combustion flame of a Mg/Sr(NO3 )2 /Epon-binder composition and reduce the amount of both condensed and gaseous SrO, which emits undesirable orange-red light. The new formulations were found to possess high thermal onset temperatures. Avoiding chlorine in these formulations eliminates the risk of the formation of PCBs, PCDDs, and PCDFs. This finding, hence, will have a great impact on both military pyrotechnics and commercial firework sectors.

  10. Bosonization theory for tunneling spectra in smooth edges of quantum Hall systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Sergio; Vignale, Giovanni

    1998-01-01

    We calculate the spectral function of a smooth edge of a quantum Hall system in the lowest Landau level by means of a bosonization technique. We obtain a general relationship between the one electron spectral function and the dynamical structure factor. The resulting I-V characteristics exhibit, at low voltage and temperature, power law scaling, generally different from the one predicted by the chiral Luttinger liquid theory, and in good agreement with recent experimental results.

  11. Spectral properties of zinc sulfide sols stabilized by high-molecular polyvinylpyrrolidone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evstrop'ev, S. K.; Gatchin, Yu. A.; Evstrop'ev, K. S.; Dukel'skii, K. V.; Kislyakov, I. M.

    2015-12-01

    Spectral properties of zinc sulfide sols stabilized by high-molecular polyvinylpyrrolidone have been studied. It is shown that the absorption spectra of colloidal solutions in the UV spectral range are determined by the quantum-confinement effect, exhibiting a dependence of the absorption edge on the size of zinc sulfide nanocrystals.

  12. Supporting interactive graph exploration using edge plucking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Nelson; Carpendale, Sheelagh

    2007-01-01

    Excessive edge density in graphs can cause serious readability issues, which in turn can make the graphs difficult to understand or even misleading. Recently, we introduced the idea of providing tools that offer interactive edge bending as a method by which edge congestion can be disambiguated. We extend this direction, presenting a new tool, Edge Plucking, which offers new interactive methods to clarify node-edge relationships. Edge Plucking expands the number of situations in which interactive graph exploration tools can be used to address edge congestion.

  13. Role of Edges in Complex Network Epidemiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Jiang, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Hui; Xie, Fei; Chen, Chao

    2012-09-01

    In complex network epidemiology, diseases spread along contacting edges between individuals and different edges may play different roles in epidemic outbreaks. Quantifying the efficiency of edges is an important step towards arresting epidemics. In this paper, we study the efficiency of edges in general susceptible-infected-recovered models, and introduce the transmission capability to measure the efficiency of edges. Results show that deleting edges with the highest transmission capability will greatly decrease epidemics on scale-free networks. Basing on the message passing approach, we get exact mathematical solution on configuration model networks with edge deletion in the large size limit.

  14. Spectral optimization studies and schemes to enhance target detection and display for a three-band staring LWIR sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Rulon R.; Waterman, James; Schuler, Jonathon; Scribner, Dean

    2003-12-01

    To achieve enhanced target discrimination, prototype three- band long wave infrared (LWIR) focal plane arrays (FPA) for missile defense applications have recently been constructed. The cutoff wavelengths, widths, and spectral overlap of the bands are critical parameters for the multicolor sensor design. Previous calculations for sensor design did not account for target and clutter spectral features in determining the optimal band characteristics. The considerable spectral overlap and correlation between the bands and attendant reduction in color contrast is another unexamined issue. To optimize and simulate the projected behavior of three-band sensors, this report examined a hyperspectral LWIR image cube. Our study starts with 30 bands of the LWIR spectra of three man-made targets and natural backgrounds that were binned to 3 bands using weighted band binning. This work achieves optimal binning by using a genetic algorithm approach and the target-to-clutter-ratio (TCR) as the optimization criterion. Another approach applies a genetic algorithm to maximize discrimination among the spectral reflectivities in the Non-conventional Exploitation Factors Data System (NEFDS) library. Each candidate band was weighted using a Fermi function to represent four interacting band edges for three- bands. It is found that choice of target can significantly influence the optimal choice of bands as expressed through the TCR and the Receiver Operator Characteristic curve. This study shows that whitening the image data prominently displays targets relative to backgrounds by increasing color contrast and also maintains color constancy. Three-color images are displayed by assigning red, green, blue colors directly to the whitened data set. Achieving constant colors of targets and backgrounds over time can greatly aid human viewers in the interpretation of the images and discriminate targets.

  15. Spectral optimization studies and schemes to enhance target detection and display for a three-band staring LWIR sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Rulon R.; Waterman, James; Schuler, Jonathon; Scribner, Dean

    2004-01-01

    To achieve enhanced target discrimination, prototype three- band long wave infrared (LWIR) focal plane arrays (FPA) for missile defense applications have recently been constructed. The cutoff wavelengths, widths, and spectral overlap of the bands are critical parameters for the multicolor sensor design. Previous calculations for sensor design did not account for target and clutter spectral features in determining the optimal band characteristics. The considerable spectral overlap and correlation between the bands and attendant reduction in color contrast is another unexamined issue. To optimize and simulate the projected behavior of three-band sensors, this report examined a hyperspectral LWIR image cube. Our study starts with 30 bands of the LWIR spectra of three man-made targets and natural backgrounds that were binned to 3 bands using weighted band binning. This work achieves optimal binning by using a genetic algorithm approach and the target-to-clutter-ratio (TCR) as the optimization criterion. Another approach applies a genetic algorithm to maximize discrimination among the spectral reflectivities in the Non-conventional Exploitation Factors Data System (NEFDS) library. Each candidate band was weighted using a Fermi function to represent four interacting band edges for three- bands. It is found that choice of target can significantly influence the optimal choice of bands as expressed through the TCR and the Receiver Operator Characteristic curve. This study shows that whitening the image data prominently displays targets relative to backgrounds by increasing color contrast and also maintains color constancy. Three-color images are displayed by assigning red, green, blue colors directly to the whitened data set. Achieving constant colors of targets and backgrounds over time can greatly aid human viewers in the interpretation of the images and discriminate targets.

  16. Edge enhanced morphology for infrared image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xiangzhi; Liu, Haonan

    2017-01-01

    Edge information is one of the critical information for infrared images. Morphological operators have been widely used for infrared image analysis. However, the edge information in infrared image is weak and the morphological operators could not well utilize the edge information of infrared images. To strengthen the edge information in morphological operators, the edge enhanced morphology is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the edge enhanced dilation and erosion operators are given and analyzed. Secondly, the pseudo operators which are derived from the edge enhanced dilation and erosion operators are defined. Finally, the applications for infrared image analysis are shown to verify the effectiveness of the proposed edge enhanced morphological operators. The proposed edge enhanced morphological operators are useful for the applications related to edge features, which could be extended to wide area of applications.

  17. Forest edges and fire ants alter the seed shadow of an ant-dispersed plant.

    PubMed

    Ness, J H

    2004-02-01

    Exotic species invade fragmented, edge-rich habitats readily, yet the distinct impacts of habitat edges and invaders on native biota are rarely distinguished. Both appear detrimental to ant-dispersed plants such as bloodroot, Sanguinaria canadensis. Working in northeastern Georgia (USA), an area characterized by a rich ant-dispersed flora, fragmented forests, and invasions by the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, I monitored the interactions between ants and S. canadensis seeds in uninvaded forest interiors, uninvaded forest edges, invaded forest interiors, and invaded forest edges. I observed 95% of the seed dispersal events that occurred within the 60-min observation intervals. Seed collection rates were similar among all four (habitat x invasion) groups. The presence of invasive ants had a strong effect on seed dispersal distance: S. invicta collected most seeds in invaded sites, but was a poorer disperser than four of five native ant taxa. Habitat type (interior versus edge) had no effect on seed dispersal distance, but it had a strong effect on seed dispersal direction. Dispersal towards the edge was disproportionately rare in uninvaded forest edges, and ants in those habitats moved the average dispersed seed approximately 70 cm away from that edge. Dispersal direction was also skewed away from the edge in uninvaded forest interiors and invaded forest edges, albeit non-significantly. This biased dispersal may help explain the rarity of myrmecochorous plants in younger forests and edges, and their poor ability to disperse between fragments. This is the first demonstration that forest edges and S. invicta invasion influence seed dispersal destination and distance, respectively. These forces act independently.

  18. Triatomic Spectral Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 117 Triatomic Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 55 triatomic molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty and reference are given for each transition reported.

  19. Diatomic Spectral Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 114 Diatomic Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 121 diatomic molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty, and reference are given for each transition reported.

  20. Hydrocarbon Spectral Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 115 Hydrocarbon Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 91 hydrocarbon molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty and reference are given for each transition reported.

  1. Spectral collocation methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussaini, M. Y.; Kopriva, D. A.; Patera, A. T.

    1987-01-01

    This review covers the theory and application of spectral collocation methods. Section 1 describes the fundamentals, and summarizes results pertaining to spectral approximations of functions. Some stability and convergence results are presented for simple elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic equations. Applications of these methods to fluid dynamics problems are discussed in Section 2.

  2. Soybean Aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) Affects Soybean Spectral Reflectance

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Tavvs M.; Macrae, Ian V.; Koch, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae), is the most economically important insect pest of soybean in the north central United States. Scouting-based integrated pest management (IPM) programs could become more efficient and more widely adopted by using plant spectral reflectance to estimate soybean aphid injury. Our objective was to determine whether plant spectral reflectance is affected by soybean aphid feeding. Field trials were conducted in 2013 and 2014 using caged plots. Early-, late-, and noninfested treatments were established to create a gradient of soybean aphid pressure. Whole-plant soybean aphid densities were recorded weekly. Measurements of plant spectral reflectance occurred on two sample dates per year. Simple linear regression models were used to test the effect of cumulative aphid-days (CAD) on plant spectral reflectance at 680 nm (RED) and 800 nm (NIR), normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), and relative chlorophyll content. Data indicated that CAD had no effect on canopy-level RED reflectance, but CAD decreased canopy-level NIR reflectance and NDVI. Canopy- and leaf-level measurements typically indicated similar plant spectral response to increasing CAD. CAD generally had no effect on relative chlorophyll content. The present study provides the first documentation that remote sensing holds potential for detecting changes in plant spectral reflectance induced by soybean aphid. The use of plant spectral reflectance in soybean aphid management may assist future IPM programs to reduce sampling costs and prevent prophylactic insecticide sprays. PMID:26470392

  3. Red supergiants as supernova progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ben

    2017-09-01

    It is now well-established from pre-explosion imaging that red supergiants (RSGs) are the direct progenitors of Type-IIP supernovae. These images have been used to infer the physical properties of the exploding stars, yielding some surprising results. In particular, the differences between the observed and predicted mass spectrum has provided a challenge to our view of stellar evolutionary theory. However, turning what is typically a small number of pre-explosion photometric points into the physical quantities of stellar luminosity and mass requires a number of assumptions about the spectral appearance of RSGs, as well as their evolution in the last few years of life. Here I will review what we know about RSGs, with a few recent updates on how they look and how their appearance changes as they approach supernova. This article is part of the themed issue 'Bridging the gap: from massive stars to supernovae'.

  4. Automatic red eye correction and its quality metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safonov, Ilia V.; Rychagov, Michael N.; Kang, KiMin; Kim, Sang Ho

    2008-01-01

    The red eye artifacts are troublesome defect of amateur photos. Correction of red eyes during printing without user intervention and making photos more pleasant for an observer are important tasks. The novel efficient technique of automatic correction of red eyes aimed for photo printers is proposed. This algorithm is independent from face orientation and capable to detect paired red eyes as well as single red eyes. The approach is based on application of 3D tables with typicalness levels for red eyes and human skin tones and directional edge detection filters for processing of redness image. Machine learning is applied for feature selection. For classification of red eye regions a cascade of classifiers including Gentle AdaBoost committee from Classification and Regression Trees (CART) is applied. Retouching stage includes desaturation, darkening and blending with initial image. Several versions of approach implementation using trade-off between detection and correction quality, processing time, memory volume are possible. The numeric quality criterion of automatic red eye correction is proposed. This quality metric is constructed by applying Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) for consumer opinions about correction outcomes. Proposed numeric metric helped to choose algorithm parameters via optimization procedure. Experimental results demonstrate high accuracy and efficiency of the proposed algorithm in comparison with existing solutions.

  5. Spectral measures of bipartivity in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Ernesto; Rodríguez-Velázquez, Juan A

    2005-10-01

    We introduce a quantitative measure of network bipartivity as a proportion of even to total number of closed walks in the network. Spectral graph theory is used to quantify how close to bipartite a network is and the extent to which individual nodes and edges contribute to the global network bipartivity. It is shown that the bipartivity characterizes the network structure and can be related to the efficiency of semantic or communication networks, trophic interactions in food webs, construction principles in metabolic networks, or communities in social networks.

  6. Shape-dependent canny edge detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panetta, Karen A.; Agaian, Sos S.; Nercessian, Shahan C.; Almunstashri, Ali A.

    2011-08-01

    Edges characterize the boundaries of objects in images and are informative structural cues for computer vision and target/object detection and recognition systems. The Canny edge detector is widely regarded as the edge detection standard. It is fairly adaptable to different environments, as its parametric nature attempts to tailor the detection of edges based on image-dependent characteristics or the particular requirements of a given implementation. Though it has been used in a myriad of image processing tasks, the Canny edge detector is still vulnerable to edge losses, localization errors, and noise sensitivity. These issues are largely due to the key tradeoff made in the scale and size of the edge detection filters used by the algorithm. Small-scaled filters are sensitive to edges but also to noise, whereas large-scaled filters are robust to noise but could filter out fine details. In this paper, novel edge detection kernel generalizations and a shape-dependent edge detector are introduced to alleviate these shortcomings. While most standard edge detection algorithms are based on convolving the input image with fixed size square kernels, this paper will illustrate the benefits of different filter sizes, and more importantly, different kernel shapes for edge detection. Moreover, new edge fusion methods are introduced to more effectively combine the individual edge responses. Existing edge detectors, including the Canny edge detector, can be obtained from the generalized edge detector by specifying corresponding parameters and kernel shapes. The proposed representations and edge detector have been qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated on several different types of image data. Computer simulations demonstrate that nonsquare kernel approaches can outperform square kernel approaches such as Canny, Sobel, Prewitt, Roberts, and others, providing better tradeoffs between noise rejection, accurate edge localization, and resolution. Where possible, Pratt's figure of

  7. Laplacian operator-based edge detectors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin

    2007-05-01

    Laplacian operator is a second derivative operator often used in edge detection. Compared with the first derivative-based edge detectors such as Sobel operator, the Laplacian operator may yield better results in edge localization. Unfortunately, the Laplacian operator is very sensitive to noise. In this paper, based on the Laplacian operator, a model is introduced for making some edge detectors. Also, the optimal threshold is introduced for obtaining a Maximum a Posteriori (MAP) estimate of edges.

  8. High spectral resolution airborne short wave infrared hyperspectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Liqing; Yuan, Liyin; Wang, Yueming; Zhuang, Xiaoqiong

    2016-05-01

    Short Wave InfraRed(SWIR) spectral imager is good at detecting difference between materials and penetrating fog and mist. High spectral resolution SWIR hyperspectral imager plays a key role in developing earth observing technology. Hyperspectral data cube can help band selections that is very important for multispectral imager design. Up to now, the spectral resolution of many SWIR hyperspectral imagers is about 10nm. A high sensitivity airborne SWIR hyperspectral imager with narrower spectral band will be presented. The system consists of TMA telescope, slit, spectrometer with planar blazed grating and high sensitivity MCT FPA. The spectral sampling interval is about 3nm. The IFOV is 0.5mrad. To eliminate the influence of the thermal background, a cold shield is designed in the dewar. The pixel number of spatial dimension is 640. Performance measurement in laboratory and image analysis for flight test will also be presented.

  9. Testing a Missing Spectral Link in Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellay, Hamid; Tran, Tuan; Goldburg, Walter; Goldenfeld, Nigel; Gioia, Gustavo; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2012-12-01

    Although the cardinal attribute of turbulence is the velocity fluctuations, these fluctuations have been ignored in theories of the frictional drag of turbulent flows. Our goal is to test a new theory that links the frictional drag to the spectral exponent α, a property of the velocity fluctuations in a flow. We use a soap-film channel wherein for the first time the value of α can be switched between 3 and 5/3, the two theoretically possible values in soap-film flows. To induce turbulence with α=5/3, we make one of the edges of the soap-film channel serrated. Remarkably, the new theory of the frictional drag holds in both soap-film flows (for either value of the spectral exponent α) and ordinary pipe flows (where α=5/3), even though these types of flow are governed by different equations.

  10. High-performance spectral element algorithms and implementations.

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, P. F.; Tufo, H. M.

    1999-08-28

    We describe the development and implementation of a spectral element code for multimillion gridpoint simulations of incompressible flows in general two- and three-dimensional domains. Parallel performance is present on up to 2048 nodes of the Intel ASCI-Red machine at Sandia.

  11. Photovoltaic Systems Based on Spectrally Selective Holographic Concentrators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-01

    in the choice of materials for space applications, but that there are ample candidate materials that have long life with high stability in a space...3.0 3.2 Blue Red Wavelength, prm Spectral intensities of the extraterrestral and air mass one (sun directly overhead, measured at sea level) direct

  12. Phenol red-silk tyrosine cross-linked hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Sundarakrishnan, Aswin; Herrero Acero, Enrique; Coburn, Jeannine; Chwalek, Karolina; Partlow, Benjamin; Kaplan, David L

    2016-09-15

    Phenol red is a cytocompatible pH sensing dye that is commonly added to cell culture media, but removed from some media formulations due to its structural mimicry of estrogen. Phenol red free media is also used during live cell imaging, to avoid absorbance and fluorescence quenching of fluorophores. To overcome these complications, we developed cytocompatible and degradable phenol red-silk tyrosine cross-linked hydrogels using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) enzyme and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Phenol red added to silk during tyrosine crosslinking accelerated di-tyrosine formation in a concentration-dependent reaction. Phenol red diffusion studies and UV-Vis spectra of phenol red-silk tyrosine hydrogels at different pHs showed altered absorption bands, confirming entrapment of dye within the hydrogel network. LC-MS of HRP-reacted phenol red and N-acetyl-l-tyrosine reaction products confirmed covalent bonds between the phenolic hydroxyl group of phenol red and tyrosine on the silk. At lower phenol red concentrations, leak-proof hydrogels which did not release phenol red were fabricated and found to be cytocompatible based on live-dead staining and alamar blue assessments of encapsulated fibroblasts. Due to the spectral overlap between phenol red absorbance at 415nm and di-tyrosine fluorescence at 417nm, phenol red-silk hydrogels provide both absorbance and fluorescence-based pH sensing. With an average pKa of 6.8 and good cytocompatibiltiy, phenol red-silk hydrogels are useful for pH sensing in phenol red free systems, cellular microenvironments and bioreactors. Phenol red entrapped within hydrogels facilitates pH sensing in phenol red free environments. Leak-proof phenol red based pH sensors require covalent binding techniques, but are complicated due to the lack of amino or carboxyl groups on phenol red. Currently, there is no simple, reliable technique to covalently link phenol red to hydrogel matrices, for real-time pH sensing in cell culture environments. Herein

  13. Spectral-temporal description of dispersive wave emission and soliton trapping in micro-nano silicon-on-insulator waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Jin; Ma, Chengju; Fan, Wei; Fu, Haiwei

    2015-08-01

    We numerically investigate the dispersive wave emission and soliton trapping in the process of femtosecond soliton propagation in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguide. The cross-correlation frequency resolved optical gating (X-FROG) technique is employed to analyze the spectral-temporal dynamics of the soliton at different propagation distances. The numerical results show that dispersive wave emission can be blue-shifted (around 1300 nm) or red-shifted (around 1900 nm), which is determined by the dispersion slope for the pump wavelength (1550 nm). In addition, it can be found that red-shifted dispersive wave can supply contribution to the flatness of the supercontinuum generation. Through increasing the peak power of the soliton to 100 W, the soliton trapping can be observed by the edge of dispersive wave, which can be visualized in the form of multi-peak oscillation structure in the spectrogram when not considering the two-photon absorption (TPA). This work opens up the possibility for the realization of dispersive wave emission device in highly integrated circuit.

  14. Failure During Sheared Edge Stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, B. S.; van Tyne, C. J.

    2008-12-01

    Failure during sheared edge stretching of sheet steels is a serious concern, especially in advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) grades. The shearing process produces a shear face and a zone of deformation behind the shear face, which is the shear-affected zone (SAZ). A failure during sheared edge stretching depends on prior deformation in the sheet, the shearing process, and the subsequent strain path in the SAZ during stretching. Data from laboratory hole expansion tests and hole extrusion tests for multiple lots of fourteen grades of steel were analyzed. The forming limit curve (FLC), regression equations, measurement uncertainty calculations, and difference calculations were used in the analyses. From these analyses, an assessment of the primary factors that contribute to the fracture during sheared edge stretching was made. It was found that the forming limit strain with consideration of strain path in the SAZ is a major factor that contributes to the failure of a sheared edge during stretching. Although metallurgical factors are important, they appear to play a somewhat lesser role.

  15. The Problem of the Edge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faatz, Judith A.

    1998-01-01

    Describes a field study in a local ecosystem which allows high school students to investigate the edge effect, where a meadow and a forest meet. Students measure soil moisture content, soil temperature, air temperature, relative humidity, wind intensity, and illumination level. Teachers can help students apply their findings to understand problems…

  16. The Problem of the Edge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faatz, Judith A.

    1998-01-01

    Describes a field study in a local ecosystem which allows high school students to investigate the edge effect, where a meadow and a forest meet. Students measure soil moisture content, soil temperature, air temperature, relative humidity, wind intensity, and illumination level. Teachers can help students apply their findings to understand problems…

  17. Effect of Spectrally Varying Albedo of Vegetation Surfaces on Shortwave Radiation Fluxes and Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, L.; Martins, J. V.; Yu, H.

    2012-01-01

    This study develops an algorithm for representing detailed spectral features of vegetation albedo based on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) observations at 7 discrete channels, referred to as the MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Albedo (MEVA) algorithm. The MEVA algorithm empirically fills spectral gaps around the vegetation red edge near 0.7 micrometers and vegetation water absorption features at 1.48 and 1.92 micrometers which cannot be adequately captured by the MODIS 7 channels. We then assess the effects of applying MEVA in comparison to four other traditional approaches to calculate solar fluxes and aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) at the top of atmosphere (TOA) based on the MODIS discrete reflectance bands. By comparing the DRF results obtained through the MEVA method with the results obtained through the other four traditional approaches, we show that filling the spectral gap of the MODIS measurements around 0.7 micrometers based on the general spectral behavior of healthy green vegetation leads to significant improvement in the instantaneous aerosol DRF at TOA (up to 3.02Wm(exp -2) difference or 48% fraction of the aerosol DRF, .6.28Wm(exp -2), calculated for high spectral resolution surface reflectance from 0.3 to 2.5 micrometers for deciduous vegetation surface). The corrections of the spectral gaps in the vegetation spectrum in the near infrared, again missed by the MODIS reflectances, also contributes to improving TOA DRF calculations but to a much lower extent (less than 0.27Wm(exp -2), or about 4% of the instantaneous DRF). Compared to traditional approaches, MEVA also improves the accuracy of the outgoing solar flux between 0.3 to 2.5 micrometers at TOA by over 60Wm(exp -2) (for aspen 3 surface) and aerosol DRF by over 10Wm(exp -2) (for dry grass). Specifically, for Amazon vegetation types, MEVA can improve the accuracy of daily averaged aerosol radiative forcing in the spectral range of 0.3 to 2.5 micrometers at equator at the

  18. Robust edge states in amorphous gyromagnetic photonic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansha, Shampy; Chong, Y. D.

    2017-09-01

    We numerically study amorphous analogs of a two-dimensional photonic Chern insulator. The amorphous lattices consist of gyromagnetic rods that break time-reversal symmetry, with the lattice sites generated by a close-packing algorithm. The level of short-range order is adjustable, and there is no long-range order. The topologically nontrivial gaps of the photonic Chern insulator are found to persist into the amorphous regime, so long as there is sufficient short-range order. Strongly nonreciprocal robust transmission occurs via edge states, which are shown to propagate ballistically despite the absence of long-range order, and to be exponentially localized along the lattice edge. Interestingly, there is an enhancement of nonreciprocal transmission even at very low levels of short-range order, where there are no discernible spectral gaps.

  19. A biochemical-spectral leaf model and method for characterizing ozone-damaged pine trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Vittorio, Alan Vincent

    This dissertation provides biochemical and spectral bases for remotely monitoring ozone-damaged forest, and improves theoretical understanding of radiative properties of vegetation. I assembled 504 samples of Jeffrey and Ponderosa pine needles representing dominant needle conditions---green, winter fleck, sucking insect, scale insect, ozone damage---and a random mixture of non-ozone-damaged conditions. I measured visible reflectance and transmittance of these samples, and concentrations of total carotenoids and chlorophylls a and b. Ozone-damaged needles have significantly lower pigment concentrations and chlorophyll to carotenoid ratios than other needles. A biochemical marker comprising Chl a, Chl a/Car, and Chl a/Chl b distinguishes ozone-damaged Jeffrey pine needles from non-ozone-damaged Ponderosa and Jeffrey pine needles. This marker is manifest in the spectral properties of needles. Visible reflectance of ozone-damaged needles is significantly different from that of other needles. The spectral marker for ozone-damaged needles consists of increased visible reflectance, greater magnitude of reflectance slope from 516-527 nm and 637-669 nm, and a shift of the red edge (694-720 nm) to shorter wavelengths. This marker can be used with imaging spectroscopy and available aerial data to identify ozone-damaged forest. I incorporated three pigments in a leaf radiative transfer model to better understand the relationship between leaf biochemical and spectral properties. The model successfully estimates reflectance from known pigment concentrations, but transmittance estimates are poor, and pigment concentration estimates from known reflectance and transmittance range from good to poor. Estimates of in vivo SACs are qualitatively correct, but values are distorted by inconsistencies in model physics. This novel integration of leaf biochemistry and spectroscopy through application and theory is a significant step toward remotely measuring biophysical parameters

  20. Development of edge effects around experimental ecosystem hotspots is affected by edge density and matrix type

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ecological edge effects are sensitive to landscape context. In particular, edge effects can be altered by matrix type and by the presence of other nearby edges. We experimentally altered patch configurations in an African savanna to determine how edge density and matrix type influence edge effect de...

  1. Spectral Fingerprints for Authentication and Identification of Variation in Foods and Botanical Materials

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Spectral fingerprints were acquired using ultraviolet/visible (UV/Vis), infra-red (IR), near infra-red (NIR), and mass spectrometry (MS) for broccoli, dry beans, and Ginkgo biloba with no prior chromatographic separation of the samples. Patterns were elucidated from the complex overlapping spectra ...

  2. Robust demarcation of basal cell carcinoma by dependent component analysis-based segmentation of multi-spectral fluorescence images.

    PubMed

    Kopriva, Ivica; Persin, Antun; Puizina-Ivić, Neira; Mirić, Lina

    2010-07-02

    This study was designed to demonstrate robust performance of the novel dependent component analysis (DCA)-based approach to demarcation of the basal cell carcinoma (BCC) through unsupervised decomposition of the red-green-blue (RGB) fluorescent image of the BCC. Robustness to intensity fluctuation is due to the scale invariance property of DCA algorithms, which exploit spectral and spatial diversities between the BCC and the surrounding tissue. Used filtering-based DCA approach represents an extension of the independent component analysis (ICA) and is necessary in order to account for statistical dependence that is induced by spectral similarity between the BCC and surrounding tissue. This generates weak edges what represents a challenge for other segmentation methods as well. By comparative performance analysis with state-of-the-art image segmentation methods such as active contours (level set), K-means clustering, non-negative matrix factorization, ICA and ratio imaging we experimentally demonstrate good performance of DCA-based BCC demarcation in two demanding scenarios where intensity of the fluorescent image has been varied almost two orders of magnitude.

  3. Resolution-enhancing hybrid, spectral CT reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. P.; Badea, C. T.

    2016-04-01

    Spectral x-ray imaging based on photon-counting x-ray detectors (PCXD) is an area of growing interest. By measuring the energy of x-ray photons, a spectral CT system can better differentiate elements using a single scan. However, the spatial resolution achievable with most PCXDs limits their application, particularly in preclinical CT imaging. Consequently, our group is developing a hybrid micro-CT scanner based on a high-resolution, energy-integrating (EID) detector and a lower-resolution, PCXD. To complement this system, we propose and demonstrate a hybrid, spectral CT reconstruction algorithm which robustly combines the spectral contrast of the PCXD with the spatial resolution of the EID. Specifically, the high-resolution, spectrally resolved data (X) is recovered as the sum of two matrices: one with low column rank (XL) determined from the EID data and one with intensity gradient sparse columns (XS) corresponding to the upsampled spectral contrast obtained from the PCXD data. We test the proposed algorithm in a feasibility study focused on molecular imaging of atherosclerotic plaque using activatable iodine and gold nanoparticles. The results show accurate estimation of material concentrations at increased spatial resolution for a voxel size ratio between the PCXD and the EID of 500 μm3:100 μm3. Specifically, regularized, iterative reconstruction of the MOBY mouse phantom around the K-edges of iodine (33.2 keV) and gold (80.7 keV) reduces the reconstruction error by more than a factor of three relative to least-squares, algebraic reconstruction. Likewise, the material decomposition accuracy into iodine, gold, calcium, and water improves by more than a factor of two.

  4. Estimation of Wheat Agronomic Parameters using New Spectral Indices

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiu-liang; Diao, Wan-ying; Xiao, Chun-hua; Wang, Fang-yong; Chen, Bing; Wang, Ke-ru; Li, Shao-kun

    2013-01-01

    Crop agronomic parameters (leaf area index (LAI), nitrogen (N) uptake, total chlorophyll (Chl) content ) are very important for the prediction of crop growth. The objective of this experiment was to investigate whether the wheat LAI, N uptake, and total Chl content could be accurately predicted using spectral indices collected at different stages of wheat growth. Firstly, the product of the optimized soil-adjusted vegetation index and wheat biomass dry weight (OSAVI×BDW) were used to estimate LAI, N uptake, and total Chl content; secondly, BDW was replaced by spectral indices to establish new spectral indices (OSAVI×OSAVI, OSAVI×SIPI, OSAVI×CIred edge, OSAVI×CIgreen mode and OSAVI×EVI2); finally, we used the new spectral indices for estimating LAI, N uptake, and total Chl content. The results showed that the new spectral indices could be used to accurately estimate LAI, N uptake, and total Chl content. The highest R2 and the lowest RMSEs were 0.711 and 0.78 (OSAVI×EVI2), 0.785 and 3.98 g/m2 (OSAVI×CIred edge) and 0.846 and 0.65 g/m2 (OSAVI×CIred edge) for LAI, nitrogen uptake and total Chl content, respectively. The new spectral indices performed better than the OSAVI alone, and the problems of a lack of sensitivity at earlier growth stages and saturation at later growth stages, which are typically associated with the OSAVI, were improved. The overall results indicated that this new spectral indices provided the best approximation for the estimation of agronomic indices for all growth stages of wheat. PMID:24023639

  5. Groupers on the edge: Shelf edge spawning habitat in and around marine reserves of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coleman, F.C.; Scanlon, K.M.; Koenig, C.C.

    2011-01-01

    The northeastern Gulf of Mexico contains some of the most diverse and productive marine habitat in the United States. Much of this habitat, located on the shelf edge in depths of 50 to 120 m, supports spawning for many economically important species, including groupers. Here, we couple acoustic surveys with georeferenced videography to describe the primary spatial and geologic features of spawning aggregation sites for four economically important species: gag (Mycteroperca microlepis), scamp (M. phenax), red grouper (Epinephelus morio), and red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus), with notes on fish distribution and abundance and spawning activities. We provide information on movement patterns of reef fish determined using acoustic telemetry. Finally, we discuss the possible coupling of geomorphology with hydrographic features to influence the overall productivity of the region and the importance of spatial fishery management in sustaining that productivity. ?? 2011 by Association of American Geographers.

  6. First Principles Fe L2,3-Edge and O K-Edge XANES and XMCD Spectra for Iron Oxides.

    PubMed

    Sassi, Michel; Pearce, Carolyn I; Bagus, Paul S; Arenholz, Elke; Rosso, Kevin M

    2017-09-21

    X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) spectroscopies are tools in widespread use for providing detailed local atomic structure, oxidation state, and magnetic structure information for materials and organometallic complexes. Analysis of these spectra for transition metal L-edges is routinely performed on the basis of ligand-field multiplet theory because one- and two-particle mean field ab initio methods typically cannot describe the multiplet structure. Here we show that multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) calculations can satisfactorily reproduce measured XANES spectra for a range of complex iron oxide materials including hematite and magnetite. MRCI Fe L2,3-edge XANES and XMCD spectra of Fe(II)O6, Fe(III)O6 and Fe(III)O4 in magnetite are found to be in very good qualitative agreement with experiment and multiplet calculations. Point charge embedding and small distortions of the first shell oxygen ligands have only small effects. Oxygen K-edge XANES/XMCD spectra for magnetite investigated by a real-space Green's function approach completes the very good qualitative agreement with experiment. Material-specific differences in local coordination and site symmetry are well reproduced, making the approach useful for assigning spectral features to specific oxidation states and coordination environments.

  7. Spatially resolved spectroscopic ion temperature measurements at plasma edge of the T-10 tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyuchnikov, L. A.; Krupin, V. A.; Nurgaliev, M. R.; Nemets, A. R.; Zemtsov, I. A.; Tugarinov, S. N.; Naumenko, N. N.

    2017-09-01

    Spectroscopic diagnostics of the edge ion temperature were developed on the T-10 tokamak. Spatially resolved measurements of C5+ and other ionization states of carbon spectral line shapes are provided. Spectra were measured with high spectral resolution using 14 lines of sight in one poloidal section of the tokamak. Each measured line-integrated spectrum contains a combination of multiple local spectra with corresponding values of ion temperature. Modeling of spatial distribution of line emissivity and spectral line shapes along the lines of sight allows the reconstruction of the ion temperature profile on the basis of the closest match of measured and modeled spectra. The fine structure of spectral line, Zeeman effect, and apparatus function are taken into account during data processing. Obtained ion temperature profiles, Ti(r), at the plasma edge are in good agreement with ion temperature profiles measured by Charge eXchange Recombination Spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostics of T-10. Use of the CXRS equipment for measurements of passive spectra can provide additional information on the temporal evolution of the edge ion temperature. Developed diagnostics provide necessary data for the research of geodesic acoustic modes, which are strongly dependent on plasma edge ion temperature.

  8. Estimation of spectral kurtosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutawanir

    2017-03-01

    Rolling bearings are the most important elements in rotating machinery. Bearing frequently fall out of service for various reasons: heavy loads, unsuitable lubrications, ineffective sealing. Bearing faults may cause a decrease in performance. Analysis of bearing vibration signals has attracted attention in the field of monitoring and fault diagnosis. Bearing vibration signals give rich information for early detection of bearing failures. Spectral kurtosis, SK, is a parameter in frequency domain indicating how the impulsiveness of a signal varies with frequency. Faults in rolling bearings give rise to a series of short impulse responses as the rolling elements strike faults, SK potentially useful for determining frequency bands dominated by bearing fault signals. SK can provide a measure of the distance of the analyzed bearings from a healthy one. SK provides additional information given by the power spectral density (psd). This paper aims to explore the estimation of spectral kurtosis using short time Fourier transform known as spectrogram. The estimation of SK is similar to the estimation of psd. The estimation falls in model-free estimation and plug-in estimator. Some numerical studies using simulations are discussed to support the methodology. Spectral kurtosis of some stationary signals are analytically obtained and used in simulation study. Kurtosis of time domain has been a popular tool for detecting non-normality. Spectral kurtosis is an extension of kurtosis in frequency domain. The relationship between time domain and frequency domain analysis is establish through power spectrum-autocovariance Fourier transform. Fourier transform is the main tool for estimation in frequency domain. The power spectral density is estimated through periodogram. In this paper, the short time Fourier transform of the spectral kurtosis is reviewed, a bearing fault (inner ring and outer ring) is simulated. The bearing response, power spectrum, and spectral kurtosis are plotted to

  9. Electromagnetic modeling of edge coupled quantum well infrared photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, K. K.

    2012-06-01

    Edge coupling through a 45° facet is the standard approach in characterizing quantum well infrared photodetector materials. From the spectral responsivity, the material absorption coefficient can be deduced from a classical model. However, this classical model has not been closely examined by a rigorous theory. In this work, we apply finite element electromagnetic modeling to obtain the detec