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Sample records for red supergiants powered

  1. Red supergiants as type II supernova progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negueruela, Ignacio; Dorda, Ricardo; González-Fernández, Carlos; Marco, Amparo

    2015-08-01

    Recent searches for supernova IIp progenitors in external galaxies have led to the identification of red objects with magnitudes and colours indicative of red supergiants, in most cases implying quite low luminosities and hence masses well below 10Msol. Stellar models, on the other hand, do not predict explosions from objects below 9 Msol. What does our knowledge of local red supergiants tells us about the expected properties of such objects?We have carried out a comprehensive spectroscopic and photometric study of a sample of hundreds of red supergiants in the Milky Way and both Magellanic Clouds. We have explored correlations between different parameters and the position of stars in the HR diagrams of open clusters. At solar metallicty, there is strong evidence for a phase of very heavy mass loss at the end of the red supergiant phase, but the existence of such a phase is still not confirmed at SMC metallicities. Objects of ~ 7Msol, on the other hand, become very dusty in the SMC, and appear as very luminous Miras.Among Milky Way clusters, we find a surprising lack of objects readily identifiable as the expected 7 to 10 Msol red supergiants or AGB stars. We are carrying out an open cluster survey aimed at filling this region of the HR diagram with reliable data. Finally, we will discuss the implications of all this findings for the expected properties of supernova progenitors, as it looks unlikely that typical red supergiants may explode without undergoing further evolution.

  2. THE TEMPERATURES OF RED SUPERGIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, Ben; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Gazak, Zach; Plez, Bertrand; Trager, Scott; Lancon, Ariane; Bergemann, Maria; Evans, Chris; Chiavassa, Andrea

    2013-04-10

    We present a re-appraisal of the temperatures of red supergiants (RSGs) using their optical and near-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs). We have obtained data of a sample of RSGs in the Magellanic Clouds using VLT+XSHOOTER, and we fit MARCS model atmospheres to different regions of the spectra, deriving effective temperatures for each star from (1) the TiO bands, (2) line-free continuum regions of the SEDs, and (3) the integrated fluxes. We show that the temperatures derived from fits to the TiO bands are systematically lower than the other two methods by several hundred kelvin. The TiO fits also dramatically overpredict the flux in the near-IR, and imply extinctions which are anomalously low compared to neighboring stars. In contrast, the SED temperatures provide good fits to the fluxes at all wavelengths other than the TiO bands, are in agreement with the temperatures from the flux integration method, and imply extinctions consistent with nearby stars. After considering a number of ways to reconcile this discrepancy, we conclude that three-dimensional effects (i.e., granulation) are the most likely cause, as they affect the temperature structure in the upper layers where the TiO lines form. The continuum, however, which forms at much deeper layers, is apparently more robust to such effects. We therefore conclude that RSG temperatures are much warmer than previously thought. We discuss the implications of this result for stellar evolution and supernova progenitors, and provide relations to determine the bolometric luminosities of RSGs from single-band photometry.

  3. Mass loss in red giants and supergiants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanner, F.

    1975-01-01

    The circumstellar envelopes surrounding late-type giants and supergiants were studied using high resolution, photoelectric scans of strong optical resonance lines. A method for extracting the circumstellar from the stellar components of the lines allowed a quantitative determination of the physical conditions in the envelopes and the rates of mass loss at various positions in the red giant region of the HR diagram. The observed strengthening of the circumstellar spectrum with increasing luminosity and later spectral type is probably caused by an increase in the mass of the envelopes. The mass loss rate for individual stars is proportional to the visual luminosity; high rates for the supergiants suggest that mass loss is important in their evolution. The bulk of the mass return to the interstellar medium in the red giant region comes from the normal giants, at a rate comparable to that of planetary nebulae.

  4. Red Supergiants as Cosmic Abundance Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, B.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Bergemann, M.; Evans, C.; Gazak, Z.; Lardo, C.; Patrick, L.; Plez, B.; Bastian, N.

    2015-09-01

    By studying a galaxy's present-day chemical abundances, we are effectively looking at its star-forming history. Cosmological simulations of galaxy evolution make predictions about the relative metal contents of galaxies as a function of their stellar mass, a trend known as the mass-metallicity relation. These predictions can be tested with observations of nearby galaxies. However, providing reliable, accurate abundance measurements at extragalactic distances is extremely challenging. In this project, we have developed a technique to extract abundance information from individual red supergiant stars at megaparsec distances. We are currently exploiting this technique using the unique capabilities of KMOS on the VLT.

  5. The Red Supergiant Content of M31*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Philip; Evans, Kate Anne

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the red supergiant (RSG) population of M31, obtaining the radial velocities of 255 stars. These data substantiate membership of our photometrically selected sample, demonstrating that Galactic foreground stars and extragalactic RSGs can be distinguished on the basis of B - V, V - R two-color diagrams. In addition, we use these spectra to measure effective temperatures and assign spectral types, deriving physical properties for 192 RSGs. Comparison with the solar metallicity Geneva evolutionary tracks indicates astonishingly good agreement. The most luminous RSGs in M31 are likely evolved from 25-30 M ⊙ stars, while the vast majority evolved from stars with initial masses of 20 M ⊙ or less. There is an interesting bifurcation in the distribution of RSGs with effective temperatures that increases with higher luminosities, with one sequence consisting of early K-type supergiants, and with the other consisting of M-type supergiants that become later (cooler) with increasing luminosities. This separation is only partially reflected in the evolutionary tracks, although that might be due to the mis-match in metallicities between the solar Geneva models and the higher-than-solar metallicity of M31. As the luminosities increase the median spectral type also increases; i.e., the higher mass RSGs spend more time at cooler temperatures than do those of lower luminosities, a result which is new to this study. Finally we discuss what would be needed observationally to successfully build a luminosity function that could be used to constrain the mass-loss rates of RSGs as our Geneva colleagues have suggested. Observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the University of Arizona and the Smithsonian Institution. This paper uses data products produced by the OIR Telescope Data Center, supported by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory.

  6. The Red Supergiant Content of M31*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Philip; Evans, Kate Anne

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the red supergiant (RSG) population of M31, obtaining the radial velocities of 255 stars. These data substantiate membership of our photometrically selected sample, demonstrating that Galactic foreground stars and extragalactic RSGs can be distinguished on the basis of B ‑ V, V ‑ R two-color diagrams. In addition, we use these spectra to measure effective temperatures and assign spectral types, deriving physical properties for 192 RSGs. Comparison with the solar metallicity Geneva evolutionary tracks indicates astonishingly good agreement. The most luminous RSGs in M31 are likely evolved from 25–30 M ⊙ stars, while the vast majority evolved from stars with initial masses of 20 M ⊙ or less. There is an interesting bifurcation in the distribution of RSGs with effective temperatures that increases with higher luminosities, with one sequence consisting of early K-type supergiants, and with the other consisting of M-type supergiants that become later (cooler) with increasing luminosities. This separation is only partially reflected in the evolutionary tracks, although that might be due to the mis-match in metallicities between the solar Geneva models and the higher-than-solar metallicity of M31. As the luminosities increase the median spectral type also increases; i.e., the higher mass RSGs spend more time at cooler temperatures than do those of lower luminosities, a result which is new to this study. Finally we discuss what would be needed observationally to successfully build a luminosity function that could be used to constrain the mass-loss rates of RSGs as our Geneva colleagues have suggested. Observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the University of Arizona and the Smithsonian Institution. This paper uses data products produced by the OIR Telescope Data Center, supported by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory.

  7. Supernova shock breakout from a red supergiant.

    PubMed

    Schawinski, Kevin; Justham, Stephen; Wolf, Christian; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Sullivan, Mark; Steenbrugge, Katrien C; Bell, Tony; Röser, Hermann-Josef; Walker, Emma S; Astier, Pierre; Balam, Dave; Balland, Christophe; Carlberg, Ray; Conley, Alex; Fouchez, Dominique; Guy, Julien; Hardin, Delphine; Hook, Isobel; Howell, D Andrew; Pain, Reynald; Perrett, Kathy; Pritchet, Chris; Regnault, Nicolas; Yi, Sukyoung K

    2008-07-11

    Massive stars undergo a violent death when the supply of nuclear fuel in their cores is exhausted, resulting in a catastrophic "core-collapse" supernova. Such events are usually only detected at least a few days after the star has exploded. Observations of the supernova SNLS-04D2dc with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer space telescope reveal a radiative precursor from the supernova shock before the shock reached the surface of the star and show the initial expansion of the star at the beginning of the explosion. Theoretical models of the ultraviolet light curve confirm that the progenitor was a red supergiant, as expected for this type of supernova. These observations provide a way to probe the physics of core-collapse supernovae and the internal structures of their progenitor stars.

  8. Hunting for exploding red supergiant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messineo, Maria; Menten, Karl M.; Figer, Donald F.; Ivanov, Valentin D.; Zhu, Qingfeng; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Davies, Ben; Clark, J. Simon; Rich, Michael; Chen, Rosie; Trombley, Christine; MacKenty, John W.; Habing, Harm; Churchwell, Edward

    2015-08-01

    Red supergiants (RSGs) are among the brightest Galactic stars at infrared wavelengths. They lose mass at high-rates and, eventually, explode as supernovae, enriching the interstellar medium. I would like to present results on our ongoing searches for candidate obscured-far-luminous late-type stars, which are based on 2MASS, UKIDSS, and GLIMPSE data, on extinction-free colors(Messineo et al. 2012, A&A, 537) and on the analysis of the extinction curve along a given line-of-sight with clump stars. Messineo et al. (2014, A&A, 571, 43) spectroscopically confirmed two clusters of red supergiants, one on the Sagittarius-Carina spiral arm at a distance of ~7 kpc, and another on the Scutum-Crux arm at a distance of ~4 kpc; while Messineo et al. (2014, A&A, 569, 20) have, found several RSGs in the core of SNRs W41 and within the area covered by the SNR G22.7-0.2 in the GMC G23.3-0.3. SNR G22.7-0.2 appears to be most likely a type II SNR.Messineo , M.; Menten, K. M.; Churchwell, E.; Habing, H. 2012A&A...537A..10MMessineo, Maria; Zhu, Qingfeng; Ivanov, Valentin D.; Figer, Donald F.; Davies, Ben; Menten, Karl M.; Kudritzki, Rolf P.; Chen, C.-H. Rosie 2014A&A...571A..43MMessineo, Maria; Menten, Karl M.; Figer, Donald F.; Davies, Ben; Clark, J. Simon; Ivanov, Valentin D.; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Rich, R. Michael; MacKenty, John W.; Trombley, Christine; 2014A&A...569A..20M

  9. Another cluster of red supergiants close to RSGC1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negueruela, I.; González-Fernández, C.; Marco, A.; Clark, J. S.; Martínez-Núñez, S.

    2010-04-01

    Context. Recent studies have revealed massive star clusters in a region of the Milky Way close to the tip of the Long Bar. These clusters are heavily obscured and are characterised by a population of red supergiants. Aims: We analyse a previously unreported concentration of bright red stars ~16' away from the cluster RSGC1 Methods: We utilised near IR photometry to identify candidate red supergiants and then K-band spectroscopy of a sample to characterise their properties. Results: We find a compact clump of eight red supergiants and five other candidates at some distance, one of which is spectroscopically confirmed as a red supergiant. These objects must form an open cluster, which we name Alicante 8. Because of the high reddening and strong field contamination, the cluster sequence is not clearly seen in 2MASS or UKIDSS near-IR photometry. From the analysis of the red supergiants, we infer an extinction AKS = 1.9 and an age close to 20 Myr. Conclusions: Though this cluster is smaller than the three known previously, its properties still suggest a mass in excess of 10 000 M⊙. Its discovery corroborates the hypothesis that star formation in this region has happened on a wide scale between ~10 and ~20 Myr ago.

  10. Magnetic braking of stellar cores in red giants and supergiants

    SciTech Connect

    Maeder, André; Meynet, Georges E-mail: georges.meynet@unige.ch

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic configurations, stable on the long term, appear to exist in various evolutionary phases, from main-sequence stars to white dwarfs and neutron stars. The large-scale ordered nature of these fields, often approximately dipolar, and their scaling according to the flux conservation scenario favor a fossil field model. We make some first estimates of the magnetic coupling between the stellar cores and the outer layers in red giants and supergiants. Analytical expressions of the truncation radius of the field coupling are established for a convective envelope and for a rotating radiative zone with horizontal turbulence. The timescales of the internal exchanges of angular momentum are considered. Numerical estimates are made on the basis of recent model grids. The direct magnetic coupling of the core to the extended convective envelope of red giants and supergiants appears unlikely. However, we find that the intermediate radiative zone is fully coupled to the core during the He-burning and later phases. This coupling is able to produce a strong spin down of the core of red giants and supergiants, also leading to relatively slowly rotating stellar remnants such as white dwarfs and pulsars. Some angular momentum is also transferred to the outer convective envelope of red giants and supergiants during the He-burning phase and later.

  11. Late-Type Red Supergiants: Too Cool for the Clouds?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levesque, Emily M.; Massey, P.; Olsen, K. A.; Plez, B.

    2006-12-01

    It has long been known that the median spectral types of red supergiants change from M2 I in the Milky Way to M1 I in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and to K5-7 I in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) (Elias et al 1985, Massey & Olsen 2002). This is now understood in terms of the shifting of the evolutionary tracks to warmer temperatures with decreasing metallicity. Stars falling below the temperatures of these tracks would no longer be in hydrostatic equilibrium. This region of the H-R diagram is known as the Hayashi "forbidden zone". Early work identified supergiants no later than M2 I in the SMC, while in the Milky Way supergiants of spectral class M4 I and later abound. However, our work has identified seven red supergiants in the LMC and four red supergiants in the SMC, all of which have spectral types that are considerably later than the average type observed in their parent galaxy. We find that these stars have radial velocities which are consistent with membership in the Clouds. By fitting our moderate-resolution spectrophotometry of these stars with MARCS stellar atmosphere models of the appropriate metallicities, we also determine their physical parameters and place them on the H-R diagram for comparison with the predictions of current stellar evolutionary tracks. We find that these stars are colder and more luminous than allowed by the predictions of stellar evolutionary theory at these low metallicities. Unsurprisingly, these stars also exhibit unusual variability in V. We then suggest that these stars have such unusual properties because they are in an unstable (and short-lived) phase of their evolutionary lives. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation through AST-0604569 to PM.

  12. A New Survey for Red Supergiants in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Fernández, C.; Negueruela, I.; Dorda, R.

    2016-10-01

    We present a pilot program focused on the red supergiant population of the Magellanic Clouds, with the intent of extending the current known sample to include the unexplored low end of the brightness distribution of these stars, building a more representative dataset with which to extrapolate their behavior to other Galactic and extra-galactic environments. For a pool of candidates selected over near-infrared photometry, we obtain medium resolution multi-object spectroscopy to confirm their nature and their membership in the clouds. Around two hundred new red supergiants have been detected, hinting at a yet-to-be-observed large population. Based on this sample, new a priori classification criteria are investigated, combining mid- and near-infrared photometry to improve the observational efficiency of programs similar to this. A more complete and detailed analysis of this dataset can be found in González- Fernández et al. (2015).

  13. Models for circumstellar nebulae around red and blue supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chita, S. M.

    2011-10-01

    In this thesis, we model the circumstellar medium of stars with initial masses of 8, 12, 18 and 20 solar masses, over their entire life from the main sequence until their supernova explosion. During the post-main-sequence stages, stars can evolve through several blue and red supergiant stages depending on their initial mass, composition and rotation rate. The models considered in the second Chapter have long-lasting RSG stages starting after the MS. In this phase, they develop shells of RSG wind material at the location where the free streaming RSG wind is stalled by the thermal pressure of the hot MS bubble, close to the central star. The RSG shells develop violent Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. Once these start to grow non-linear, the RSG shell becomes highly structured as clumps form, and shell material mixes with material in the hot bubble. Later, the stars evolve to the BSG stage, during which the RSG shells are completely destroyed. These models return to the RSG stage, and build new RSG shells, which are more massive than those formed earlier. RSG shells are essential for our understanding of bipolar emission nebulae around BSGs. In the third Chapter are shown the results of the wind-wind interaction model of single star with 12 solar masses. On a time scale of a few 10000 yr, a BSG hour-glas shaped nebula expands into the sphere defined by the RSG shell. The faster polar parts of the hour glass hit the inner edge of the RSG shell first. The collision creates a pair of hot and dense polar caps. As time passes, the collision zone moves to lower latitudes of the RSG shell and becomes more confined in latitude. At the same time, the interaction of the BSG wind with the equatorial disk defines a second, ring shaped collision zone in the equatorial plane. These structures are reminiscent of the observed nebulae around the blue supergiant Sher 25. In the Chapter 3 we present calculations that predict the properties of the circumstellar medium for rapidly rotating

  14. The Brightening of the Red Supergiant alpha Ori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasatonic, R. P.; Guinan, E. F.

    2016-09-01

    We have been carrying out V-band and Wing TiO-band and Near-IR photoelectric photometry of the semi-regular variable red supergiant alpha Ori (Betelgeuse) over last 20 yrs. Photometry obtained during early to mid September 2016 indicates that the star is at (or near) maximum light at = +0.29 mag. Measures of TiO-band and near-IR colors indicate that alpha Ori has undergone a temperature increase of about +120 K and has an estimated spectral type of M0.5 Iab. Because alpha Ori is one of the nearest Type II SN progenitors, it an important star to monitor.

  15. Red Supergiants as Cosmic Abundance Probes: The Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ben; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Gazak, Zach; Plez, Bertrand; Bergemann, Maria; Evans, Chris; Patrick, Lee

    2015-06-01

    Red Supergiants (RSGs) are cool (˜4000 K), highly luminous stars (L˜ {{10}5} L⊙ ), and are among the brightest near-IR sources in star-forming galaxies. This makes them powerful probes of the properties of their host galaxies, such as kinematics and chemical abundances. We have developed a technique whereby metallicities of RSGs may be extracted from a narrow spectral window around 1 μm from only moderate resolution data. The method is therefore extremely efficient, allowing stars at large distances to be studied, and so has tremendous potential for extragalactic abundance work. Here, we present an abundance study of the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC respectively) using samples of 9-10 RSGs in each. We find average abundances for the two galaxies of {{[Z]}LMC}=-0.37+/- 0.14 and {{[Z]}SMC}=-0.53+/- 0.16 (with respect to a solar metallicity of {{Z}⊙ }=0.012). These values are consistent with other studies of young stars in these galaxies, and though our result for the SMC may appear high it is consistent with recent studies of hot stars which find 0.5-0.8 dex below solar. Our best-fit temperatures are on the whole consistent with those from fits to the optical-infrared spectral energy distributions, which is remarkable considering the narrow spectral range being studied. Combined with our recent study of RSGs in the Galactic cluster Per OB1, these results indicate that this technique performs well over a range of metallicities, paving the way for forthcoming studies of more distant galaxies beyond the Local Group.

  16. THE YELLOW AND RED SUPERGIANTS OF M33

    SciTech Connect

    Drout, Maria R.; Massey, Philip; Meynet, Georges E-mail: phil.massey@lowell.edu

    2012-05-10

    Yellow and red supergiants are evolved massive stars whose numbers and locations on the Hertzsprung-Russell (H-R) diagram can provide a stringent test for models of massive star evolution. Previous studies have found large discrepancies between the relative number of yellow supergiants (YSGs) observed as a function of mass and those predicted by evolutionary models, while a disagreement between the predicted and observed locations of red supergiants (RSGs) on the H-R diagram was only recently resolved. Here, we extend these studies by examining the YSG and RSG populations of M33. Unfortunately, identifying these stars is difficult as this portion of the color-magnitude diagram is heavily contaminated by foreground dwarfs. We identify the RSGs through a combination of radial velocities and a two-color surface gravity discriminant, and after re-characterizing the rotation curve of M33 with our newly selected RSGs, we identify the YSGs through a combination of radial velocities and the strength of the O I {lambda}7774 triplet. We examine {approx}1300 spectra in total and identify 121 YSGs (a sample that is unbiased in luminosity above log (L/L{sub Sun }) {approx} 4.8) and 189 RSGs. After placing these objects on the H-R diagram, we find that the latest generation of Geneva evolutionary tracks shows excellent agreement with the observed locations of our RSGs and YSGs, the observed relative number of YSGs with mass, and the observed RSG upper mass limit. These models therefore represent a drastic improvement over previous generations.

  17. Interacting supernovae from photoionization-confined shells around red supergiant stars.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Jonathan; Mohamed, Shazrene; Gvaramadze, Vasilii V; Kotak, Rubina; Langer, Norbert; Meyer, Dominique M-A; Moriya, Takashi J; Neilson, Hilding R

    2014-08-21

    Betelgeuse, a nearby red supergiant, is a fast-moving star with a powerful stellar wind that drives a bow shock into its surroundings. This picture has been challenged by the discovery of a dense and almost static shell that is three times closer to the star than the bow shock and has been decelerated by some external force. The two physically distinct structures cannot both be formed by the hydrodynamic interaction of the wind with the interstellar medium. Here we report that a model in which Betelgeuse's wind is photoionized by radiation from external sources can explain the static shell without requiring a new understanding of the bow shock. Pressure from the photoionized wind generates a standing shock in the neutral part of the wind and forms an almost static, photoionization-confined shell. Other red supergiants should have much more massive shells than Betelgeuse, because the photoionization-confined shell traps up to 35 per cent of all mass lost during the red supergiant phase, confining this gas close to the star until it explodes. After the supernova explosion, massive shells dramatically affect the supernova light curve, providing a natural explanation for the many supernovae that have signatures of circumstellar interaction. PMID:25119040

  18. Interacting supernovae from photoionization-confined shells around red supergiant stars.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Jonathan; Mohamed, Shazrene; Gvaramadze, Vasilii V; Kotak, Rubina; Langer, Norbert; Meyer, Dominique M-A; Moriya, Takashi J; Neilson, Hilding R

    2014-08-21

    Betelgeuse, a nearby red supergiant, is a fast-moving star with a powerful stellar wind that drives a bow shock into its surroundings. This picture has been challenged by the discovery of a dense and almost static shell that is three times closer to the star than the bow shock and has been decelerated by some external force. The two physically distinct structures cannot both be formed by the hydrodynamic interaction of the wind with the interstellar medium. Here we report that a model in which Betelgeuse's wind is photoionized by radiation from external sources can explain the static shell without requiring a new understanding of the bow shock. Pressure from the photoionized wind generates a standing shock in the neutral part of the wind and forms an almost static, photoionization-confined shell. Other red supergiants should have much more massive shells than Betelgeuse, because the photoionization-confined shell traps up to 35 per cent of all mass lost during the red supergiant phase, confining this gas close to the star until it explodes. After the supernova explosion, massive shells dramatically affect the supernova light curve, providing a natural explanation for the many supernovae that have signatures of circumstellar interaction.

  19. On the atmospheric structure and fundamental parameters of red supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittkowski, M.; Arroyo-Torres, B.; Marcaide, J. M.; Abellan, F. J.; Chiavassa, A.; Freytag, B.; Scholz, M.; Wood, P. R.; Hauschildt, P. H.

    2015-01-01

    We present near-infrared spectro-interferometric studies of red supergiant (RSG) stars using the VLTI/AMBER instrument, which are compared to previously obtained similar observations of AGB stars. Our observations indicate spatially extended atmospheric molecular layers of water vapor and CO, similar as previously observed for Mira stars. Data of VY~CMa indicate that the molecular layers are asymmetric, possibly clumpy. Thanks to the spectro-interferometric capabilities of the VLTI/AMBER instrument, we can isolate continuum bandpasses, estimate fundamental parameters of our sources, locate them in the HR diagram, and compare their positions to recent evolutionary tracks. For the example of VY CMa, this puts it close to evolutionary tracks of initial mass 25-32 M ⊙. Comparisons of our data to hydrostatic model atmospheres, 3d simulations of convection, and 1d dynamic model atmospheres based on self-excited pulsation models indicate that none of these models can presently explain the observed atmospheric extensions for RSGs. The mechanism that levitates the atmospheres of red supergiant is thus a currently unsolved problem.

  20. YELLOW AND RED SUPERGIANTS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Neugent, Kathryn F.; Massey, Philip; Skiff, Brian; Meynet, Georges E-mail: phil.massey@lowell.edu E-mail: georges.meynet@unige.ch

    2012-04-20

    Due to their transitionary nature, yellow supergiants (YSGs) provide a critical challenge for evolutionary modeling. Previous studies within M31 and the Small Magellanic Cloud show that the Geneva evolutionary models do a poor job at predicting the lifetimes of these short-lived stars. Here, we extend this study to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) while also investigating the galaxy's red supergiant (RSG) content. This task is complicated by contamination by Galactic foreground stars that color and magnitude criteria alone cannot weed out. Therefore, we use proper-motions and the LMC's large systemic radial velocity ({approx}278 km s{sup -1}) to separate out these foreground dwarfs. After observing nearly 2000 stars, we identified 317 probable YSGs, 6 possible YSGs, and 505 probable RSGs. Foreground contamination of our YSG sample was {approx}80%, while that of the RSG sample was only 3%. By placing the YSGs on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram and comparing them against the evolutionary tracks, we find that new Geneva evolutionary models do an exemplary job at predicting both the locations and the lifetimes of these transitory objects.

  1. Detection of a red supergiant progenitor star of a type II-plateau supernova.

    PubMed

    Smartt, Stephen J; Maund, Justyn R; Hendry, Margaret A; Tout, Christopher A; Gilmore, Gerard F; Mattila, Seppo; Benn, Chris R

    2004-01-23

    We present the discovery of a red supergiant star that exploded as supernova 2003gd in the nearby spiral galaxy M74. The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the Gemini Telescope imaged this galaxy 6 to 9 months before the supernova explosion, and subsequent HST images confirm the positional coincidence of the supernova with a single resolved star that is a red supergiant of 8(+4)(-2) solar masses. This confirms both stellar evolution models and supernova theories predicting that cool red supergiants are the immediate progenitor stars of type II-plateau supernovae.

  2. Detection of a red supergiant progenitor star of a type II-plateau supernova.

    PubMed

    Smartt, Stephen J; Maund, Justyn R; Hendry, Margaret A; Tout, Christopher A; Gilmore, Gerard F; Mattila, Seppo; Benn, Chris R

    2004-01-23

    We present the discovery of a red supergiant star that exploded as supernova 2003gd in the nearby spiral galaxy M74. The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the Gemini Telescope imaged this galaxy 6 to 9 months before the supernova explosion, and subsequent HST images confirm the positional coincidence of the supernova with a single resolved star that is a red supergiant of 8(+4)(-2) solar masses. This confirms both stellar evolution models and supernova theories predicting that cool red supergiants are the immediate progenitor stars of type II-plateau supernovae. PMID:14739452

  3. Yellow and Red Supergiants in the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Philip; Neugent, Kathryn; Drout, Maria; Meynet, Georges

    2013-06-01

    Yellow and red supergiants are the "poor cousins" of massive star studies, often overlooked in favor of strong emission-lined Wolf-Rayets or the spectacular, enigmatic Luminous Blue Variables. Recent studies, however, are proving the truth of Kippenhahn & Weigert (1990)'s claim that these evolved stages act as a "sort of magnifying glass, revealing relentlessly the faults of calculations of earlier phases." Identifying complete samples of YSGs and RSGs among the galaxies of the Local Group is difficult, as foreground dwarfs are nearly indistinguishable from bona-fide extragalactic members. We have succeeded in this task only by using a combination of wide-area photometry surveys combined with spectroscopic followup. Since massive star evolution is greatly affected by mass-loss, and mass-loss rates depend upon metallicity, we have conducted such studies over a range of 10 in metallicity, including the SMC, LMC, M33, and M31. These studies not only allow us to test the stellar evolutionary models, but the identification of these stars provides interesting kinematic information on the youngest stellar populations in these galaxies. We will review here what we have learned over the past few years, and what new questions these studies are raising.

  4. Extinction and Scattering Properties of Dust Around Red Supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, Stacey; Clayton, G.; Massey, P.; Gordon, K.; Levesque, E.; Plez, B.

    2007-12-01

    We have been amassing a unique dataset which can be used to investigate the amount and nature of dust produced by red supergiants (RSGs) in very different environments. To this end, optical spectra are being obtained for RSGs in various galaxies in the Local Group. Moderate-resolution, high S/N, spectrophotometry, covering 3500-9000A, has been obtained for a sample of RSGs in the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds. Using the the MARCS stellar atmosphere models to fit the SEDs, we are deriving extinction curves from 3500A to the K-band for the Local Group RSGs. In particular, for the LMC and SMC stars, the problem is more tractable than for the Milky Way RSGs, given the small and relatively uniform foreground extinction of the Clouds. We will construct extinction curves using the classic "pair method". The feasibility of using the model SEDs as "unreddened" standards will be examined, as well as the more conventional pairing of stars that are closely matched in spectral type but have different reddenings. These extinction curves are actually attenuation curves since the RSG circumstellar dust shells are not resolved and light can be scattered back into the beam. In particular, we plan to examine the apparent NUV excess seen in the Galactic RSG extinction curves. The NUV excess is possibly due to scattering of the star's light by circumstellar dust and/or a larger average size than that typical of grains found in the diffuse interstellar medium. This project is being supported by NSF grant AST-0707691 and a LaSPACE Undergraduate Research Assistantship (NASA grant NNG05GH22H).

  5. Dust Around Red Supergiants in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, Stacey N.; Chatelain, J.; Freeman, W.; Clayton, G.; Gordon, K.; Nordhaus, J.; Massey, P.; Levesque, E.; Plez, B.; Olsen, K.; Silva, D.

    2009-01-01

    We have gathered together a unique dataset for red supergiants (RSGs) in the Magellanic Clouds, which can be used to investigate the amount and nature of dust produced by RSGs in different environments. For a sample of 40 RSGs in each of the LMC and the SMC, we have obtained visible spectrophotometry (4000-9000 A), 2MASS photometry (JHK), and photometry in the Spitzer IRAC and MIPS bands. In addition, we have obtained Spitzer/IRS spectra for 10 stars in each galaxy. We will use our Monte Carlo radiative transfer models to analyze the emission from dust in the circumstellar shells. We plan to use the IRS data to make a systematic study of the dust properties in RSG shells in the LMC and SMC so that we can probe how they may vary with a large range of galactic metallicities. The derived stellar SEDs and extinction curves will be combined with the IRAC and MIPS photometry and IRS spectra as inputs to our Monte Carlo codes which will be used to study the composition, size distributions and clumpiness of the dust. We will model the dust shells using amorphous carbon and silicate dust grains as well as PAHs appropriate to these shells. This modeling will allow us to infer the total circumstellar dust mass around the sample RSGs. We will also consider whether the large global metallicity differences between galaxies lead to observable differences in the dust being produced by their RSGs. This project is being supported by NSF grant AST-0707691 and a LaSPACE Undergraduate Research Assistantship (NASA grant NNG05GH22H).

  6. On the Explosion Geometry of Red Supergiant Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Douglas Christopher; Dessart, Luc; Pignata, Giuliano; Hillier, D. John; Williams, George Grant; Smith, Paul S.; Khandrika, Harish; Bilinski, Christopher; Duong, Nhieu; Flatland, Kelsi; Gonzalez, Luis; Hoffman, Jennifer L.; Horst, Chuck; Huk, Leah; Milne, Peter; Rachubo, Alisa A.; Smith, Nathan

    2015-08-01

    From progenitor studies, type II-Plateau supernovae (SNe II-P) have been decisively and uniquely determined to arise from isolated red supergiant (RSG) stars with initial masses ranging from 8 to 16 solar masses (Smartt 2009), establishing the most homogeneous -- and well understood -- progenitor class of any type of core-collapse supernova. However, we must admit a fundamental truth: We do not know how these stars explode. A basic discriminant among proposed explosion models is explosion geometry, since some models predict severe distortions from spherical symmetry. A primary method to gain such geometric information is through spectropolarimetry of the expanding (but, unresolved) atmosphere, with higher degrees of linear polarization generally demanding larger departures from spherical symmetry. Initially, as a class, SNe II-P were found to be only weakly polarized at the early epochs observed, suggesting a nearly spherical explosion for RSG stars. However, late-time observations of SN 2004dj captured a dramatic spike in polarization at just the moment the "inner core" of the ejecta was first revealed in this SN II-P (i.e., at the "drop" off of the photometric plateau; Leonard et al. 2006). This raised the possibility that the explosion of RSGs might be driven by a strongly non-spherical mechanism, with the evidence for the asphericity cloaked at early times by the massive, opaque, quasi-spherical hydrogen envelope. In this presentation we shall describe the continuing work on the explosion geometry of RSGs being carried out by the SuperNova SpectroPOLarimetry project (SNSPOL), with a particular focus on SN 2013ej -- an SN II-P that exhibited remarkably high polarization just days after the explosion (Leonard et al. 2013), and for which twelve epochs of spectropolarimetry trace an intriguing tale about its geometry deep into the nebular phase. We acknowledge support from NSF grants AST-1009571 and AST-1210311, under which part of this research was carried out.

  7. Tests of two convection theories for red giant and red supergiant envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, Richard B.; Chin, Chao-Wen

    1995-01-01

    Two theories of stellar envelope convection are considered here in the context of red giants and red supergiants of intermediate to high mass: Boehm-Vitense's standard mixing-length theory (MLT) and Canuto & Mazzitelli's new theory incorporating the full spectrum of turbulence (FST). Both theories assume incompressible convection. Two formulations of the convective mixing length are also evaluated: l proportional to the local pressure scale height (H(sub P)) and l proportional to the distance from the upper boundary of the convection zone (z). Applications to test both theories are made by calculating stellar evolutionary sequences into the red zone (z). Applications to test both theories are made by calculating stellar evolutionary sequences into the red phase of core helium burning. Since the theoretically predicted effective temperatures for cool stars are known to be sensitive to the assigned value of the mixing length, this quantity has been individually calibrated for each evolutionary sequence. The calibration is done in a composite Hertzsprung-Russell diagram for the red giant and red supergiant members of well-observed Galactic open clusters. The MLT model requires the constant of proportionality for the convective mixing length to vary by a small but statistically significant amount with stellar mass, whereas the FST model succeeds in all cases with the mixing lenghth simply set equal to z. The structure of the deep stellar interior, however, remains very nearly unaffected by the choices of convection theory and mixing lenghth. Inside the convective envelope itself, a density inversion always occurs, but is somewhat smaller for the convectively more efficient MLT model. On physical grounds the FST model is preferable, and seems to alleviate the problem of finding the proper mixing length.

  8. RED SUPERGIANTS IN THE ANDROMEDA GALAXY (M31)

    SciTech Connect

    Massey, Philip; Silva, David R.; Olsen, Knut A. G.; Levesque, Emily M.; Plez, Bertrand; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Meynet, Georges; Maeder, Andre E-mail: dsilva@noao.ed E-mail: emsque@ifa.hawaii.ed E-mail: gclayton@fenway.phys.lsu.ed E-mail: andre.maeder@unige.c

    2009-09-20

    Red supergiants (RSGs) are a short-lived stage in the evolution of moderately massive stars (10-25 M{sub sun}), and as such their location in the H-R diagram provides an exacting test of stellar evolutionary models. Since massive star evolution is strongly affected by the amount of mass loss a star suffers, and since the mass-loss rates depend upon metallicity, it is highly desirable to study the physical properties of these stars in galaxies of various metallicities. Here we identify a sample of RSGs in M31, the most metal-rich of the Local Group galaxies. We determine the physical properties of these stars using both moderate resolution spectroscopy and broadband V - K photometry. We find that on average the RSGs of our sample are variable in V by 0.5 mag, smaller but comparable to the 0.9 mag found for Magellanic Cloud (MC) RSGs. No such variability is seen at K, also in accord with what we know of Galactic and MC RSGs. We find that there is a saturation effect in the model TiO band strengths with metallicities higher than solar. The physical properties we derive for the RSGs from our analysis with stellar atmosphere models agree well with the current evolutionary tracks, a truly remarkable achievement given the complex physics involved in each. We do not confirm an earlier result that the upper luminosities of RSGs depend upon metallicity; instead, the most luminous RSGs have log L/L{sub sun}{approx}5.2-5.3, broadly consistent but slightly larger than that recently observed by Smartt et al. as the upper luminosity limit to Type II-P supernovae, believed to have come from RSGs. We find that, on average, the RSGs are considerably more reddened than O and B stars, suggesting that circumstellar dust is adding a significant amount of extra extinction, {approx}0.5 mag, on average. This is in accord with our earlier findings on Milky Way and Magellanic Cloud stars. Finally, we call attention to a peculiar star whose spectrum appears to be heavily veiled, possibly due

  9. SUPERNOVA 2008bk AND ITS RED SUPERGIANT PROGENITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Elias-Rosa, Nancy; and others

    2012-01-15

    We have obtained limited photometric and spectroscopic data for supernova (SN) 2008bk in NGC 7793, primarily at {approx}> 150 days after explosion. We find that it is a Type II-Plateau (II-P) SN that most closely resembles the low-luminosity SN 1999br in NGC 4900. Given the overall similarity between the observed light curves and colors of SNe 2008bk and 1999br, we infer that the total visual extinction to SN 2008bk (A{sub V} = 0.065 mag) must be almost entirely due to the Galactic foreground, similar to what has been assumed for SN 1999br. We confirm the identification of the putative red supergiant (RSG) progenitor star of the SN in high-quality g'r'i' images we had obtained in 2007 at the Gemini-South 8 m telescope. Little ambiguity exists in this progenitor identification, qualifying it as the best example to date, next to the identification of the star Sk -69 Degree-Sign 202 as the progenitor of SN 1987A. From a combination of photometry of the Gemini images with that of archival, pre-SN, Very Large Telescope JHK{sub s} images, we derive an accurate observed spectral energy distribution (SED) for the progenitor. We find from nebular strong-intensity emission-line indices for several H II regions near the SN that the metallicity in the environment is likely subsolar (Z Almost-Equal-To 0.6 Z{sub Sun }). The observed SED of the star agrees quite well with synthetic SEDs obtained from model RSG atmospheres with effective temperature T{sub eff} = 3600 {+-} 50 K. We find, therefore, that the star had a bolometric luminosity with respect to the Sun of log (L{sub bol}/L{sub Sun} ) = 4.57 {+-} 0.06 and radius R{sub *} = 496 {+-} 34 R{sub Sun} at {approx}6 months prior to explosion. Comparing the progenitor's properties with theoretical massive-star evolutionary models, we conclude that the RSG progenitor had an initial mass in the range of 8-8.5 M{sub Sun }. This mass is consistent with, albeit at the low end of, the inferred range of initial masses for SN II

  10. RED SUPERGIANT STARS AS COSMIC ABUNDANCE PROBES. II. NLTE EFFECTS IN J-BAND SILICON LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Bergemann, Maria; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Wuerl, Matthias; Plez, Bertrand; Davies, Ben; Gazak, Zach E-mail: Matthias.Wuerl@physik.uni-muenchen.de E-mail: zgazak@ifa.hawaii.edu E-mail: bdavies@ast.cam.ac.uk

    2013-02-20

    Medium-resolution J-band spectroscopy of individual red supergiant stars is a promising tool to investigate the chemical composition of the young stellar population in star-forming galaxies. As a continuation of recent work on iron and titanium, detailed non-LTE (NLTE) calculations are presented to investigate the influence of NLTE on the formation of silicon lines in the J-band spectra of red supergiants. Substantial effects are found resulting in significantly stronger absorption lines of neutral silicon in NLTE. As a consequence, silicon abundances determined in NLTE are significantly smaller than in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) with the NLTE abundance corrections varying smoothly between -0.4 dex and -0.1 dex for effective temperatures between 3400 K and 4400 K. The effects are largest at low metallicity. The physical reasons behind the NLTE effects and the consequences for extragalactic J-band abundance studies are discussed.

  11. Near-infrared spectroscopy of candidate red supergiant stars in clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messineo, Maria; Zhu, Qingfeng; Ivanov, Valentin D.; Figer, Donald F.; Davies, Ben; Menten, Karl M.; Kudritzki, Rolf P.; Chen, C.-H. Rosie

    2014-11-01

    Context. Clear identifications of Galactic young stellar clusters farther than a few kpc from the Sun are rare, despite the large number of candidate clusters. Aims: We aim to improve the selection of candidate clusters rich in massive stars with a multiwavelength analysis of photometric Galactic data that range from optical to mid-infrared wavelengths. Methods: We present a photometric and spectroscopic analysis of five candidate stellar clusters, which were selected as overdensities with bright stars (Ks< 7 mag) in GLIMPSE and 2MASS images. Results: A total of 48 infrared spectra were obtained. The combination of photometry and spectroscopy yielded six new red supergiant stars with masses from 10 M⊙ to 15 M⊙. Two red supergiants are located at Galactic coordinates (l,b) = (16.°7, -0.°63) and at a distance of about ~3.9 kpc; four other red supergiants are members of a cluster at Galactic coordinates (l,b) = (49.°3, + 0.°72) and at a distance of ~7.0 kpc. Conclusions: Spectroscopic analysis of the brightest stars of detected overdensities and studies of interstellar extinction along their line of sights are fundamental to distinguish regions of low extinction from actual stellar clusters. The census of young star clusters containing red supergiants is incomplete; in the existing all-sky near-infrared surveys, they can be identified as overdensities of bright stars with infrared color-magnitude diagrams characterized by gaps. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory (ESO Programme 60.A-9700(E), and 089.D-0876), and on observations collected at the UKIRT telescope (programme ID H243NS).MM is currently employed by the MPIfR. Part of this work was performed at RIT (2009), at ESA (2010), and at the MPIfR.Tables 3, 4, and 6 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  12. The evolution of Red Supergiants to supernova in the LMC cluster NGC 2100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasor, Emma R.; Davies, Ben

    2016-08-01

    The mass loss rates of red supergiants (RSGs) govern their evolution towards supernova and dictate the appearance of the resulting explosion. To study how mass-loss rates change with evolution we measure the mass-loss rates (dot{M}) and extinctions of 19 red supergiants in the young massive cluster NGC2100 in the Large Magellanic Cloud. By targeting stars in a coeval cluster we can study the mass-loss rate evolution whilst keeping the variables of mass and metallicity fixed. Mass-loss rates were determined by fitting DUSTY models to mid-IR photometry from WISE and Spitzer/IRAC. We find that the dot{M} in red supergiants increases as the star evolves, and is well described by dot{M} prescription of de Jager, used widely in stellar evolution calculations. We find the extinction caused by the warm dust is negligible, meaning the warm circumstellar material of the inner wind cannot explain the higher levels of extinction found in the RSGs compared to other cluster stars. We discuss the implications of this work in terms of supernova progenitors and stellar evolution theory. We argue there is little justification for substantially increasing the dot{M} during the RSG phase, as has been suggested recently in order to explain the absence of high mass Type IIP supernova progenitors. We also argue that an increase in reddening towards the end of the RSG phase, as observed for the two most evolved cluster stars, may provide a solution to the red supergiant problem.

  13. The Convection of Close Red Supergiant Stars Observed With Near-Infrared Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montargès, M.; Kervella, P.; Perrin, G.; Chiavassa, A.; Aurière, M.

    2015-12-01

    Our team has obtained observations of the photosphere of the two closest red supergiant stars Betelgeuse (α Ori) and Antares (α Sco) using near infrared interferometry. We have been monitoring the photosphere of Betelgeuse with the VLTI/PIONIER instrument for three years. On Antares, we obtained an unprecedented sampling of the visibility function. These data allow us to probe the convective photosphere of massive evolved stars.

  14. RED SUPERGIANT STARS AS COSMIC ABUNDANCE PROBES. III. NLTE EFFECTS IN J-BAND MAGNESIUM LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Bergemann, Maria; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Gazak, Zach; Davies, Ben; Plez, Bertrand E-mail: kud@ifa.hawaii.edu E-mail: bdavies@ast.cam.ac.uk

    2015-05-10

    Non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) calculations for Mg i in red supergiant stellar atmospheres are presented to investigate the importance of NLTE for the formation of Mg i lines in the NIR J-band. Recent work using medium resolution spectroscopy of atomic lines in the J-band of individual red supergiant stars has demonstrated this technique is a very promising tool for investigating the chemical composition of the young stellar population in star forming galaxies. As in previous work, where NLTE effects were studied for iron, titanium, and silicon, substantial effects are found resulting in significantly stronger Mg i absorption lines. For the quantitative spectral analysis the NLTE effects lead to magnesium abundances significantly smaller than in local thermodynamic equilibrium with the NLTE abundance corrections varying smoothly between −0.4 dex and −0.1 dex for effective temperatures between 3400 and 4400 K. We discuss the physical reasons of the NLTE effects and the consequences for extragalactic J-band abundance studies using individual red supergiants in the young massive galactic double cluster h and χ Persei.

  15. Evidence for Tidal Heating in the Dynamics of LMC Carbon Stars and Red Supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Knut A.; Massey, P.

    2006-12-01

    We present an analysis of the kinematics of the HI gas, carbon stars, and red supergiants of the Large Magellanic Cloud. After correcting the line-of-sight velocities for the recent accurate measurement of the LMC's space motion, we find that each kinematic tracer clearly defines a flat rotation curve with similar shape but different amplitude for each tracer: 61 km s-1 for the carbon stars, 80 km s-1 for the HI gas, and 107 km s-1 for the red supergiants. We suggest that noncircular motions of the stars and gas in the LMC can at least in part explain the different rotation amplitudes. A significant fraction, 7-15%, of the total sample of carbon stars appears to be associated with previously identified tidal HI streamers. In addition, although the local velocity dispersion of the red supergiants is small, 8 km s-1, their velocity dispersion about the carbon star rotation solution is 17 km s-1, equal to the velocity dispersion of the carbon stars themselves. We thus appear to be witnessing the tidal heating of the LMC's stellar populations.

  16. Luminous and Variable Stars in M31 and M33. III. The Yellow and Red Supergiants and Post-red Supergiant Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Michael S.; Humphreys, Roberta M.; Jones, Terry J.

    2016-07-01

    Recent supernova (SN) and transient surveys have revealed an increasing number of non-terminal stellar eruptions. Though the progenitor class of these eruptions includes the most luminous stars, little is known of the pre-SN mechanics of massive stars in their most evolved state, thus motivating a census of possible progenitors. From surveys of evolved and unstable luminous star populations in nearby galaxies, we select a sample of yellow and red supergiant (RSG) candidates in M31 and M33 for review of their spectral characteristics and spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Since the position of intermediate- and late-type supergiants on the color–magnitude diagram can be heavily contaminated by foreground dwarfs, we employ spectral classification and multi-band photometry from optical and near-infrared surveys to confirm membership. Based on spectroscopic evidence for mass loss and the presence of circumstellar (CS) dust in their SEDs, we find that 30%–40% of the yellow supergiants are likely in a post-RSG state. Comparison with evolutionary tracks shows that these mass-losing, post-RSGs have initial masses between 20 and 40 M ⊙. More than half of the observed RSGs in M31 and M33 are producing dusty CS ejecta. We also identify two new warm hypergiants in M31, J004621.05+421308.06 and J004051.59+403303.00, both of which are likely in a post-RSG state. Based on observations obtained with the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT), an international collaboration among institutions in the United States, Italy, and Germany. LBT Corporation partners are: The University of Arizona on behalf of the Arizona university system; Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Italy; LBT Beteiligungsgesellschaft, Germany, representing the Max-Planck Society, the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam, and Heidelberg University; The Ohio State University, and The Research Corporation, on behalf of The University of Notre Dame, University of Minnesota, and University of Virginia.

  17. Luminous and Variable Stars in M31 and M33. III. The Yellow and Red Supergiants and Post-red Supergiant Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Michael S.; Humphreys, Roberta M.; Jones, Terry J.

    2016-07-01

    Recent supernova (SN) and transient surveys have revealed an increasing number of non-terminal stellar eruptions. Though the progenitor class of these eruptions includes the most luminous stars, little is known of the pre-SN mechanics of massive stars in their most evolved state, thus motivating a census of possible progenitors. From surveys of evolved and unstable luminous star populations in nearby galaxies, we select a sample of yellow and red supergiant (RSG) candidates in M31 and M33 for review of their spectral characteristics and spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Since the position of intermediate- and late-type supergiants on the color-magnitude diagram can be heavily contaminated by foreground dwarfs, we employ spectral classification and multi-band photometry from optical and near-infrared surveys to confirm membership. Based on spectroscopic evidence for mass loss and the presence of circumstellar (CS) dust in their SEDs, we find that 30%-40% of the yellow supergiants are likely in a post-RSG state. Comparison with evolutionary tracks shows that these mass-losing, post-RSGs have initial masses between 20 and 40 M ⊙. More than half of the observed RSGs in M31 and M33 are producing dusty CS ejecta. We also identify two new warm hypergiants in M31, J004621.05+421308.06 and J004051.59+403303.00, both of which are likely in a post-RSG state. Based on observations obtained with the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT), an international collaboration among institutions in the United States, Italy, and Germany. LBT Corporation partners are: The University of Arizona on behalf of the Arizona university system; Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Italy; LBT Beteiligungsgesellschaft, Germany, representing the Max-Planck Society, the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam, and Heidelberg University; The Ohio State University, and The Research Corporation, on behalf of The University of Notre Dame, University of Minnesota, and University of Virginia.

  18. What does C II lambda 2325 A emission tell us about chromospheres of red supergiants? - A critical test using Zeta Aurigae-type K supergiants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, K.-P.; Reimers, D.; Carpenter, K. G.; Brown, A.

    1988-01-01

    The limitations of the Carpenter et al. (1985) C II intercombination multiplet method of determining the density and geometric extent of red giant chromospheres are presently tested through observation of the C II 2325 A emission of two K-type supergiants whose empirical model chromospheres have been derived by high-resolution IUE observations at eclipse phases. While the observed C II emission fluxes are well reproduced, much of this emission originates in the high-density lower chromosphere.

  19. DOUBLE BOW SHOCKS AROUND YOUNG, RUNAWAY RED SUPERGIANTS: APPLICATION TO BETELGEUSE

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, Jonathan; Mohamed, Shazrene; Neilson, Hilding R.; Langer, Norbert; Meyer, Dominique M.-A.

    2012-05-20

    A significant fraction of massive stars are moving supersonically through the interstellar medium (ISM), either due to disruption of a binary system or ejection from their parent star cluster. The interaction of their wind with the ISM produces a bow shock. In late evolutionary stages these stars may undergo rapid transitions from red to blue and vice versa on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, with accompanying rapid changes to their stellar winds and bow shocks. Recent three-dimensional simulations of the bow shock produced by the nearby runaway red supergiant (RSG) Betelgeuse, under the assumption of a constant wind, indicate that the bow shock is very young (<30, 000 years old), hence Betelgeuse may have only recently become an RSG. To test this possibility, we have calculated stellar evolution models for single stars which match the observed properties of Betelgeuse in the RSG phase. The resulting evolving stellar wind is incorporated into two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations in which we model a runaway blue supergiant (BSG) as it undergoes the transition to an RSG near the end of its life. We find that the collapsing BSG wind bubble induces a bow shock-shaped inner shell around the RSG wind that resembles Betelgeuse's bow shock, and has a similar mass. Surrounding this is the larger-scale retreating bow shock generated by the now defunct BSG wind's interaction with the ISM. We suggest that this outer shell could explain the bar feature located (at least in projection) just in front of Betelgeuse's bow shock.

  20. The Discovery of a Massive Cluster of Red Supergiants with GLIMPSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Michael J.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Clemens, Dan P.; Jameson, Katherine; Pinnick, April; Pavel, Michael

    2009-06-01

    We report the discovery of a previously unknown massive Galactic star cluster at ell = 29fdg22, b = -0fdg20. Identified visually in mid-IR images from the Spitzer GLIMPSE survey, the cluster contains at least eight late-type supergiants, based on follow-up near-IR spectroscopy, and an additional 3-6 candidate supergiant members having IR photometry consistent with a similar distance and reddening. The cluster lies at a local minimum in the 13CO column density and 8 μm emission. We interpret this feature as a hole carved by the energetic winds of the evolving massive stars. The 13CO hole seen in molecular maps at V LSR ~ 95 km s-1 corresponds to near/far kinematic distances of 6.1/8.7 ± 1 kpc. We calculate a mean spectrophotometric distance of 7.0+3.7 -2.4 kpc, broadly consistent with the kinematic distances inferred. This location places it near the northern end of the Galactic bar. For the mean extinction of AV = 12.6 ± 0.5 mag (AK = 1.5 ± 0.1 mag), the color-magnitude diagram of probable cluster members is well fit by isochrones in the age range 18-24 Myr. The estimated cluster mass is ~20,000 M sun. With the most massive original cluster stars likely deceased, no strong radio emission is detected in this vicinity. As such, this red supergiant (RSG) cluster is representative of adolescent massive Galactic clusters that lie hidden behind many magnitudes of dust obscuration. This cluster joins two similar RSG clusters as residents of the volatile region where the end of our Galaxy's bar joins the base of the Scutum-Crux spiral arm, suggesting a recent episode of widespread massive star formation there.

  1. THE DISCOVERY OF A MASSIVE CLUSTER OF RED SUPERGIANTS WITH GLIMPSE

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Michael J.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Clemens, Dan P.; Jameson, Katherine; Pinnick, April; Pavel, Michael

    2009-06-15

    We report the discovery of a previously unknown massive Galactic star cluster at l = 29.{sup 0}22, b = -0.{sup 0}20. Identified visually in mid-IR images from the Spitzer GLIMPSE survey, the cluster contains at least eight late-type supergiants, based on follow-up near-IR spectroscopy, and an additional 3-6 candidate supergiant members having IR photometry consistent with a similar distance and reddening. The cluster lies at a local minimum in the {sup 13}CO column density and 8 {mu}m emission. We interpret this feature as a hole carved by the energetic winds of the evolving massive stars. The {sup 13}CO hole seen in molecular maps at V {sub LSR} {approx} 95 km s{sup -1} corresponds to near/far kinematic distances of 6.1/8.7 {+-} 1 kpc. We calculate a mean spectrophotometric distance of 7.0{sup +3.7} {sub -2.4} kpc, broadly consistent with the kinematic distances inferred. This location places it near the northern end of the Galactic bar. For the mean extinction of A{sub V} = 12.6 {+-} 0.5 mag (A{sub K} = 1.5 {+-} 0.1 mag), the color-magnitude diagram of probable cluster members is well fit by isochrones in the age range 18-24 Myr. The estimated cluster mass is {approx}20,000 M {sub sun}. With the most massive original cluster stars likely deceased, no strong radio emission is detected in this vicinity. As such, this red supergiant (RSG) cluster is representative of adolescent massive Galactic clusters that lie hidden behind many magnitudes of dust obscuration. This cluster joins two similar RSG clusters as residents of the volatile region where the end of our Galaxy's bar joins the base of the Scutum-Crux spiral arm, suggesting a recent episode of widespread massive star formation there.

  2. The mass-loss rates of red supergiants at low metallicity: detection of rotational CO emission from two red supergiants in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Mikako; Sargent, B.; Swinyard, Bruce; Yates, Jeremy; Royer, P.; Barlow, M. J.; Boyer, Martha; Decin, L.; Khouri, Theo; Meixner, Margaret; van Loon, Jacco Th.; Woods, Paul M.

    2016-11-01

    Using the PACS and SPIRE spectrometers on-board the Herschel Space Observatory, we obtained spectra of two red supergiants (RSGs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Multiple rotational CO emission lines (J = 6-5 to 15-14) and 15 H2O lines were detected from IRAS 05280-6910, and one CO line was detected from WOH G64. This is the first time that CO rotational lines have been detected from evolved stars in the LMC. Their CO line intensities are as strong as those of the Galactic RSG, VY CMa. Modelling the CO lines and the spectral energy distribution results in an estimated mass-loss rate for IRAS 05280-6910 of 3 × 10-4 M⊙ yr-1. The model assumes a gas-to-dust ratio and a CO-to-H2 abundance ratio is estimated from the Galactic values scaled by the LMC metallicity ([Fe/H] ˜ -0.3), i.e. that the CO-to-dust ratio is constant for Galactic and LMC metallicities within the uncertainties of the model. The key factor determining the CO line intensities and the mass-loss rate found to be the stellar luminosity.

  3. Red-Supergiant and Supernova Rate Problems: Implication for the Relic Supernova Neutrino Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidaka, J.; Kajino, T.; Mathews, G. J.

    2016-08-01

    Direct observations of core-collapse supernovae (SNe) and their red supergiant (RSG) progenitors suggest that the upper mass limit of RSGs may be only about 16.5{--}18{M}ȯ , while the standard theoretical value is as much as 25{M}ȯ . We investigate the possibility that RSGs with m\\gt 16.5{--}18{M}ȯ end their lives as failed supernovae (fSNe) and analyze their contribution to the relic supernova neutrino spectrum. We show that adopting this mass limit simultaneously solves both the RSG problem and the supernova rate problem. In addition, energetic neutrinos that originated from fSNe are sensitive to the explosion mechanism, and in particular, to the nuclear equation of state (EOS). We show that this solution to the RSG problem might also be used to constrain the EOS for failed supernovae.

  4. Detection of Rotational CO Emission From the Red-supergiants in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, M.; Sargent, B.; Swinyard, B.; Yates, J. A.; Royer, P.; Barlow, M. J.; Boyer, M. L.; Decin, L.; Khouri, T.; Meixner, M.; van Loon, J. Th.; Woods, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    It is yet well understood how mass-loss rates from evolved stars depend on metallicities. With a half of the solar metallicity and the distance of only 50 kpc, the evolved stars of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) are an ideal target for studying mass loss at low metallicity. We have obtained spectra of red-supergiants in the LMC, using the Hershel Space Observatory, detecting CO thermal lines fro J=6-5 up to 15-14 lines. Modelling CO lines with non-LTE Radiative transfer code suggests that CO lines intensities can be well explained with high gas-to-dust ratio, with no obvious reduction in mass-loss rate at the LMC. We conclude that the luminosities of the stars are dominant factors on mass-loss rates, rather than the metallicity.

  5. RED SUPERGIANT STARS AS COSMIC ABUNDANCE PROBES: KMOS OBSERVATIONS IN NGC 6822

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, L. R.; Evans, C. J.; Ferguson, A. M. N.; Davies, B.; Kudritzki, R-P.; Gazak, J. Z.; Bergemann, M.; Plez, B.

    2015-04-10

    We present near-IR spectroscopy of red supergiant (RSG) stars in NGC 6822, obtained with the new K-band Multi-Object Spectrograph Very Large Telescope, Chile. From comparisons with model spectra in the J-band we determine the metallicity of 11 RSGs, finding a mean value of [Z] = −0.52 ± 0.21, which agrees well with previous abundance studies of young stars and H ii regions. We also find an indication for a low-significance abundance gradient within the central 1 kpc. We compare our results with those derived from older stellar populations and investigate the difference using a simple chemical evolution model. By comparing the physical properties determined for RSGs in NGC 6822 with those derived using the same technique in the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds, we show that there appears to be no significant temperature variation of RSGs with respect to metallicity, in contrast to recent evolutionary models.

  6. GIANO-TNG spectroscopy of red supergiants in the young star cluster RSGC3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Origlia, L.; Oliva, E.; Sanna, N.; Mucciarelli, A.; Dalessandro, E.; Scuderi, S.; Baffa, C.; Biliotti, V.; Carbonaro, L.; Falcini, G.; Giani, E.; Iuzzolino, M.; Massi, F.; Sozzi, M.; Tozzi, A.; Ghedina, A.; Ghinassi, F.; Lodi, M.; Harutyunyan, A.; Pedani, M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The Scutum complex in the inner disk of the Galaxy has a number of young star clusters dominated by red supergiants that are heavily obscured by dust extinction and observable only at infrared wavelengths. These clusters are important tracers of the recent star formation and chemical enrichment history in the inner Galaxy. Methods: During the technical commissioning and as a first science verification of the GIANO spectrograph at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, we secured high-resolution (R ≃ 50 000) near-infrared spectra of five red supergiants in the young Scutum cluster RSGC3. Results: Taking advantage of the full YJHK spectral coverage of GIANO in a single exposure, we were able to measure several tens of atomic and molecular lines that were suitable for determining chemical abundances. By means of spectral synthesis and line equivalent width measurements, we obtained abundances of Fe and iron-peak elements such as Ni, Cr, and Cu, alpha (O, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti), other light elements (C, N, F, Na, Al, and Sc), and some s-process elements (Y, Sr). We found average half-solar iron abundances and solar-scaled [X/Fe] abundance patterns for most of the elements, consistent with a thin-disk chemistry. We found depletion of [C/Fe] and enhancement of [N/Fe], consistent with standard CN burning, and low 12C /13C abundance ratios (between 9 and 11), which require extra-mixing processes in the stellar interiors during the post-main sequence evolution. We also found local standard of rest VLSR = 106 km s-1 and heliocentric Vhel = 90 km s-1 radial velocities with a dispersion of 2.3 km s-1. Conclusions: The inferred radial velocities, abundances, and abundance patterns of RSGC3 are very similar to those previously measured in the other two young clusters of the Scutum complex, RSGC1 and RSGC2, suggesting a common kinematics and chemistry within the Scutum complex.

  7. GIANO-TNG spectroscopy of red supergiants in the young star cluster RSGC2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Origlia, L.; Oliva, E.; Maiolino, R.; Mucciarelli, A.; Baffa, C.; Biliotti, V.; Bruno, P.; Falcini, G.; Gavriousev, V.; Ghinassi, F.; Giani, E.; Gonzalez, M.; Leone, F.; Lodi, M.; Massi, F.; Montegriffo, P.; Mochi, I.; Pedani, M.; Rossetti, E.; Scuderi, S.; Sozzi, M.; Tozzi, A.

    2013-12-01

    Aims: The inner disk of the Galaxy has a number of young star clusters dominated by red supergiants that are heavily obscured by dust extinction and observable only at infrared wavelengths. These clusters are important tracers of the recent star formation and chemical enrichment history in the inner Galaxy. Methods: During the technical commissioning and as a first science verification of the GIANO spectrograph at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, we secured high-resolution (R ≃ 50 000) near-infrared spectra of three red supergiants in the young Scutum cluster RSGC2. Results: Taking advantage of the full YJHK spectral coverage of GIANO in a single exposure, we were able to identify several tens of atomic and molecular lines suitable for chemical abundance determinations. By means of spectral synthesis and line equivalent width measurements, we obtained abundances of Fe and other iron-peak elements such as V, Cr, Ni, of alpha (O, Mg, Si, Ca and Ti) and other light elements (C, N, Na, Al, K, Sc), and of some s-process elements (Y, Sr). We found iron abundances between half and one third solar and solar-scaled [X/Fe] abundance patterns of iron-peak, alpha and most of the light elements, consistent with a thin-disk chemistry. We found a depletion of [C/Fe] and enhancement of [N/Fe], consistent with CN burning, and low 12C/13C abundance ratios (between 9 and 11), requiring extra-mixing processes in the stellar interiors during the post-main-sequence evolution. Finally, we found a slight [Sr/Fe] enhancement and a slight [Y/Fe] depletion (by a factor of ≤2), with respect to solar. Table 3 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  8. Impact of mass-loss on the evolution and pre-supernova properties of red supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meynet, G.; Chomienne, V.; Ekström, S.; Georgy, C.; Granada, A.; Groh, J.; Maeder, A.; Eggenberger, P.; Levesque, E.; Massey, P.

    2015-03-01

    Context. The post-main-sequence evolution of massive stars is very sensitive to many parameters of the stellar models. Key parameters are the mixing processes, the metallicity, the mass-loss rate, and the effect of a close companion. Aims: We study the change in the red supergiant (RSG) lifetimes, the tracks in the Hertzsprung-Russel diagram (HRD), the positions in this diagram of the pre-supernova progenitor and the structure of the stars at that time for various mass-loss rates during the RSG phase and for two different initial rotation velocities. Methods: Stellar models were computed with the Geneva code for initial masses between 9 and 25 M⊙ at solar metallicity (Z = 0.014) with 10 times and 25 times the standard mass-loss rates during the RSG phase, with and without rotation. Results: The surface abundances of RSGs are much more sensitive to rotation than to the mass-loss rates during that phase. A change of the RSG mass-loss rate has a strong impact on the RSG lifetimes and in turn on the luminosity function of RSGs. An observed RSG is associated with a model of higher initial mass when models with an enhanced RSG mass-loss rate are used to deduce that mass. At solar metallicity, models with an enhanced mass-loss rate produce significant changes in the populations of blue, yellow, and RSGs. When extended blue loops or blueward excursions are produced by enhanced mass-loss, the models predict that a majority of blue (yellow) supergiants are post-RSG objects. These post-RSG stars are predicted to show much lower surface rotational velocities than similar blue supergiants on their first crossing of the HR gap. Enhanced mass-loss rates during the RSG phase have little impact on the Wolf-Rayet populations. The position in the HRD of the end point of the evolution depends on the mass of the hydrogen envelope. More precisely, whenever at the pre-supernova stage the H-rich envelope contains more than about 5% of the initial mass, the star is a RSG, and whenever

  9. THE RED SUPERGIANT PROGENITOR OF SUPERNOVA 2012aw (PTF12bvh) IN MESSIER 95

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; and others

    2012-09-10

    We report on the direct detection and characterization of the probable red supergiant (RSG) progenitor of the intermediate-luminosity Type II-Plateau (II-P) supernova (SN) 2012aw in the nearby (10.0 Mpc) spiral galaxy Messier 95 (M95; NGC 3351). We have identified the star in both Hubble Space Telescope images of the host galaxy, obtained 17-18 yr prior to the explosion, and near-infrared ground-based images, obtained 6-12 yr prior to the SN. The luminous supergiant showed evidence for substantial circumstellar dust, manifested as excess line-of-sight extinction. The effective total-to-selective ratio of extinction to the star was R'{sub V} Almost-Equal-To 4.35, which is significantly different from that of diffuse interstellar dust (i.e., R{sub V} = 3.1), and the total extinction to the star was therefore, on average, A{sub V} Almost-Equal-To 3.1 mag. We find that the observed spectral energy distribution for the progenitor star is consistent with an effective temperature of 3600 K (spectral type M3), and that the star therefore had a bolometric magnitude of -8.29. Through comparison with recent theoretical massive-star evolutionary tracks we can infer that the RSG progenitor had an initial mass 15 {approx}< M{sub ini}(M{sub Sun }) < 20. Interpolating by eye between the available tracks, we surmise that the star had initial mass {approx}17-18 M{sub Sun }. The circumstellar dust around the progenitor must have been destroyed in the explosion, as the visual extinction to the SN is found to be low (A{sub V} = 0.24 mag with R{sub V} = 3.1).

  10. Discovery of a red supergiant counterpart to RX J004722.4-252051, a ULX in NGC 253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heida, M.; Torres, M. A. P.; Jonker, P. G.; Servillat, M.; Repetto, S.; Roberts, T. P.; Walton, D. J.; Moon, D.-S.; Harrison, F. A.

    2015-11-01

    We present two epochs of near-infrared spectroscopy of the candidate red supergiant counterpart to RX J004722.4-252051, a ULX in NGC 253. We measure radial velocities of the object and its approximate spectral type by cross-correlating our spectra with those of known red supergiants. Our VLT/X-shooter spectrum is best matched by that of early M-type supergiants, confirming the red supergiant nature of the candidate counterpart. The radial velocity of the spectrum, taken on 2014 August 23, is 417 ± 4 km s-1. This is consistent with the radial velocity measured in our spectrum taken with Magellan/MMIRS on 2013 June 28, of 410 ± 70 km s-1, although the large error on the latter implies that a radial velocity shift expected for a black hole of tens of M⊙ can easily be hidden. Using nebular emission lines we find that the radial velocity due to the rotation of NGC 253 is 351 ± 4 km s-1 at the position of the ULX. Thus the radial velocity of the counterpart confirms that the source is located in NGC 253, but also shows an offset with respect to the local bulk motion of the galaxy of 66 ± 6 km s-1. We argue that the most likely origin for this displacement lies either in a SN kick, requiring a system containing a ≳ 50 M⊙ black hole, and/or in orbital radial velocity variations in the ULX binary system, requiring a ≳ 100 M⊙ black hole. We therefore conclude that RX J004722.4-252051 is a strong candidate for a ULX containing a massive stellar black hole.

  11. Quantitative spectroscopic J-band study of red supergiants in Perseus OB-1

    SciTech Connect

    Gazak, J. Zachary; Kudritzki, Rolf; Davies, Ben; Bergemann, Maria; Plez, Bertrand

    2014-06-10

    We demonstrate how the metallicities of red supergiant (RSG) stars can be measured from quantitative spectroscopy down to resolutions of ≈3000 in the J-band. We have obtained high resolution spectra on a sample of the RSG population of h and χ Persei, a double cluster in the solar neighborhood. We show that careful application of the MARCS model atmospheres returns measurements of Z consistent with solar metallicity. Using two grids of synthetic spectra–one in pure LTE and one with non-LTE (NLTE) calculations for the most important diagnostic lines–we measure Z = +0.04 ± 0.10 (LTE) and Z = –0.04 ± 0.08 (NLTE) for the sample of eleven RSGs in the cluster. We degrade the spectral resolution of our observations and find that those values remain consistent down to resolutions of less than λ/δλ of 3000. Using measurements of effective temperatures we compare our results with stellar evolution theory and find good agreement. We construct a synthetic cluster spectrum and find that analyzing this composite spectrum with single-star RSG models returns an accurate metallicity. We conclude that the RSGs make ideal targets in the near infrared for measuring the metallicities of star forming galaxies out to 7-10 Mpc and up to 10 times farther by observing the integrated light of unresolved super star clusters.

  12. Discovery of an Extraordinary Number of Red Supergiants in the Inner Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messineo, Maria; Zhu, Qingfeng; Menten, Karl M.; Ivanov, Valentin D.; Figer, Donald F.; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Chen, C.-H. Rosie

    2016-05-01

    In this Letter, we present a search for Galactic red supergiant stars (RSGs) in the direction of the inner Galaxy. A total of 94 targets selected from the 2MASS and GLIMPSE I North catalogs—via their blue extinction-free Q1 and Q2 colors—were spectroscopically observed at infrared wavelengths (in the H- and K-bands at R ˜ 1000), and an extraordinary high detection rate of RSGs (\\gt 61%) was found. We identified spectroscopically 58 RSGs, based on their flat continua and large equivalent widths of the CO-band at 2.293 μm (EW > 45 Å). This increase corresponds to about 25% of previously known RSGs in the Galactic region 10° < l < 60°, -1.°1 < b < 1.°1. In order to confirm the location of the new RSGs in the inner Galaxy, distances were estimated for a subsample of 47 stars with the clump method and found to range from 3.6 ± 0.4 to 8.6 ± 0.7 kpc. The large new sample will allow us to investigate Galactic metallicity gradients as a function of galactocentric distances and azimuthal angles. Such information is currently an highly disputed issue to constrain models of Galaxy formation and evolution.

  13. Spectral Types of Red Supergiants in NGC 6822 and the Wolf-Lundmark-Melotte Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levesque, Emily M.; Massey, Philip

    2012-07-01

    We present moderate-resolution spectroscopic observations of red supergiants (RSGs) in the low-metallicity Local Group galaxies NGC 6822 (Z = 0.4 Z ⊙) and Wolf-Lundmark-Melotte (WLM; Z = 0.1 Z ⊙). By combining these observations with reduction techniques for multislit data reduction and flux calibration, we are able to analyze spectroscopic data of 16 RSGs in NGC 6822 and spectrophotometric data of 11 RSGs in WLM. Using these observations, we determine spectral types for these massive stars, comparing them to Milky Way and Magellanic Cloud RSGs and thus extending observational evidence of the abundance-dependent shift of RSG spectral types to lower metallicities. In addition, we have uncovered two RSGs with unusually late spectral types (J000158.14-152332.2 in WLM, with a spectral type of M3 I, and J194453.46-144552.6 in NGC 6822, with a spectral type of M4.5 I) and a third RSG (J194449.96-144333.5 in NGC 6822) whose spectral type has varied from an M2.5 in 1997 to a K5 in 2008. All three of these stars could potentially be members of a recently discovered class of extreme RSG variables. This paper is based on data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan telescopes located at Las Campanas, Chile.

  14. Wolf-Rayet, Yellow and Red Supergiant in the single massive stars perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgy, Cyril; Hirschi, R.; Ekstrom, S.; Meynet, G.

    2013-06-01

    Rotation and mass loss are the key ingredients determining the fate of single massive stars. In recent years, a large effort has been made to compute whole grids of stellar models at different metallicities, including or not the effects of rotation, with the Geneva evolution code. In this talk, I will focus on the evolved stages of massive star evolution (red and yellow supergiants, Wolf-Rayet stars), in the framework of these new grids of models. I will highlight the effects of rotation and mass loss on the post-main sequence evolution of massive stars at solar and lower metallicity. In particular, I will discuss their impact on the maximum mass for a star to end its life as a RSG (leading to a type IIP supernova), on the possibility for a star to finish as a YSG, and on the initial mass ranges leading to various WR star subtypes. I will then compare the results predicted by our code with observed populations of evolved massive stars, bringing constraints on our computations, as well as some indications on the binary star fraction needed to reproduce them.

  15. SPECTRAL TYPES OF RED SUPERGIANTS IN NGC 6822 AND THE WOLF-LUNDMARK-MELOTTE GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Levesque, Emily M.; Massey, Philip

    2012-07-15

    We present moderate-resolution spectroscopic observations of red supergiants (RSGs) in the low-metallicity Local Group galaxies NGC 6822 (Z = 0.4 Z{sub Sun} ) and Wolf-Lundmark-Melotte (WLM; Z = 0.1 Z{sub Sun} ). By combining these observations with reduction techniques for multislit data reduction and flux calibration, we are able to analyze spectroscopic data of 16 RSGs in NGC 6822 and spectrophotometric data of 11 RSGs in WLM. Using these observations, we determine spectral types for these massive stars, comparing them to Milky Way and Magellanic Cloud RSGs and thus extending observational evidence of the abundance-dependent shift of RSG spectral types to lower metallicities. In addition, we have uncovered two RSGs with unusually late spectral types (J000158.14-152332.2 in WLM, with a spectral type of M3 I, and J194453.46-144552.6 in NGC 6822, with a spectral type of M4.5 I) and a third RSG (J194449.96-144333.5 in NGC 6822) whose spectral type has varied from an M2.5 in 1997 to a K5 in 2008. All three of these stars could potentially be members of a recently discovered class of extreme RSG variables.

  16. RED SUPERGIANT STARS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD. I. THE PERIOD-LUMINOSITY RELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Ming; Jiang, B. W. E-mail: bjiang@bnu.edu.cn

    2011-01-20

    From previous samples of red supergiants (RSGs) by various groups, 191 objects are assembled to compose a large sample of RSG candidates in LMC. For 189 of them, the identity as an RSG is verified by their brightness and color indexes in several near- and mid-infrared bands related to the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) JHK{sub S} bands and the Spitzer/IRAC and Spitzer/MIPS bands. From the visual time-series photometric observations by the ASAS and MACHO projects which cover nearly 8-10 years, the period and amplitude of light variation are analyzed carefully using both the phase dispersion minimization and Period04 methods. According to the properties of light variation, these objects are classified into five categories: (1) 20 objects are saturated in photometry or located in crowded stellar field with poor photometric results, (2) 35 objects with too complex variation to have any certain period, (3) 23 objects with irregular variation, (4) 16 objects with semi-regular variation, and (5) 95 objects with long secondary period (LSP) among which 31 have distinguishable short period and 51 have a long period shorter than 3000 days that can be determined with reasonable accuracy. For the semi-regular variables and the LSP variables with distinguishable short periods, the period-luminosity (P-L) relation is analyzed in the visual, near-infrared, and mid-infrared bands. It is found that the P-L relation is tight in the infrared bands such as the 2MASS JHK{sub S} bands and the Spitzer/IRAC bands, in particular in the Spitzer/IRAC [3.6] and [4.5] bands; meanwhile, the P-L relation is relatively sparse in the V band which may be caused by inhomogeneous interstellar extinction. The results are compared with others' P-L relationships for RSGs and the P-L sequences of red giants in LMC.

  17. Imaging the dynamical atmosphere of the red supergiant Betelgeuse in the CO first overtone lines with VLTI/AMBER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnaka, K.; Weigelt, G.; Millour, F.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Driebe, T.; Schertl, D.; Chelli, A.; Massi, F.; Petrov, R.; Stee, Ph.

    2011-05-01

    Aims: We present one-dimensional aperture synthesis imaging of the red supergiant Betelgeuse (α Ori) with VLTI/AMBER. We reconstructed for the first time one-dimensional images in the individual CO first overtone lines. Our aim is to probe the dynamics of the inhomogeneous atmosphere and its time variation. Methods: Betelgeuse was observed between 2.28 and 2.31 μm with VLTI/AMBER using the 16-32-48 m telescope configuration with a spectral resolution up to 12 000 and an angular resolution of 9.8 mas. The good nearly one-dimensional uv coverage allows us to reconstruct one-dimensional projection images (i.e., one-dimensional projections of the object's two-dimensional intensity distributions). Results: The reconstructed one-dimensional projection images reveal that the star appears differently in the blue wing, line center, and red wing of the individual CO lines. The one-dimensional projection images in the blue wing and line center show a pronounced, asymmetrically extended component up to ~1.3 R⋆, while those in the red wing do not show such a component. The observed one-dimensional projection images in the lines can be reasonably explained by a model in which the CO gas within a region more than half as large as the stellar size is moving slightly outward with 0-5 km s-1, while the gas in the remaining region is infalling fast with 20-30 km s-1. A comparison between the CO line AMBER data taken in 2008 and 2009 shows a significant time variation in the dynamics of the CO line-forming region in the photosphere and the outer atmosphere. In contrast to the line data, the reconstructed one-dimensional projection images in the continuum show only a slight deviation from a uniform disk or limb-darkened disk. We derive a uniform-disk diameter of 42.05 ± 0.05 mas and a power-law-type limb-darkened disk diameter of 42.49 ± 0.06 mas and a limb-darkening parameter of (9.7 ± 0.5) × 10-2. This latter angular diameter leads to an effective temperature of 3690 ± 54 K

  18. HD 179821 (V1427 Aql, IRAS 19114+0002) - a massive post-red supergiant star?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahin, T.; Lambert, David L.; Klochkova, Valentina G.; Panchuk, Vladimir E.

    2016-10-01

    We have derived elemental abundances of a remarkable star, HD 179821, with unusual composition (e.g. [Na/Fe] = 1.0 ± 0.2 dex) and extra-ordinary spectral characteristics. Its metallicity at [Fe/H] = 0.4 dex places it among the most metal-rich stars yet analysed. The abundance analysis of this luminous star is based on high-resolution and high-quality (S/N ≈ 120-420) optical echelle spectra from McDonald Observatory and Special Astronomy Observatory. The data includes five years of observations over 21 epochs. Standard 1D local thermodynamic equilibrium analysis provides a fresh determination of the atmospheric parameters over all epochs: Teff = 7350 ± 200 K, log g= +0.6 ± 0.3, and a microturbulent velocity ξ = 6.6 ± 1.6 km s-1 and [Fe/H] = 0.4 ± 0.2, and a carbon abundance [C/Fe] = -0.19 ± 0.30. We find oxygen abundance [O/Fe] = -0.25 ± 0.28 and an enhancement of 0.9 dex in N. A supersonic macroturbulent velocity of 22.0 ± 2.0 km s-1 is determined from both strong and weak Fe I and Fe II lines. Elemental abundances are obtained for 22 elements. HD 179821 is not enriched in s-process products. Eu is overabundant relative to the anticipated [X/Fe] ≈ 0.0. Some peculiarities of its optical spectrum (e.g. variability in the spectral line shapes) is noticed. This includes the line profile variations for H α line. Based on its estimated luminosity, effective temperature and surface gravity, HD 179821 is a massive star evolving to become a red supergiant and finally a Type II supernova.

  19. The chromosphere of VV cephei and the distribution of circumstellar dust around red giants and supergiants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Wendy Hagen

    1992-01-01

    The work on this project has followed two separate paths of inquiry. The first project was entitled 'the Chromosphere of VV Cephei.' The examination of the archival spectra revealed significant changes in the spectra. Therefore, we obtained additional observing time with IUE to monitor the system during the summer of 1991. Short-term changes continue to be seen in both the overall spectrum and individual line profiles. Work continues on this object. The second project was entitled 'the Distribution of Circumstellar Dust around Red Giants and Supergiants.' A number of cool evolved stars are surrounded by dust shells of sufficient angular size as to appear extended in the IRAS survey data. The aim of this project has been to convolve the predictions of the flux distribution from model dust shells with the IRAS beam profiles in order to reproduce the observed IRAS scans. At the time of the last status report, the cross-scan profiles of the IRAS detectors had just been added to the modeling procedure. For scans in which the star passed near the detector center, there was no significant variation in predicted scan profile for different detectors. Scans in which the detector did not pass over the bright central star had been anticipated to be particularly useful in determining the dust distribution; however, significant differences in the predicted scan profiles were seen for different detector profiles. For this reason, and due to the cross-talk effects discussed in the previous status report, further work on the scans not including a central star has been postponed in favor of further analysis of scans passing over the central star.

  20. X-ray observation of the shocked red supergiant wind of Cassiopeia A

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae-Joon; Park, Sangwook; Hughes, John P.; Slane, Patrick O.

    2014-07-01

    Cas A is a Galactic supernova remnant whose supernova explosion is observed to be of Type IIb from spectroscopy of its light echo. Having its SN type known, observational constraints on the mass-loss history of Cas A's progenitor can provide crucial information on the final fate of massive stars. In this paper, we study X-ray characteristics of the shocked ambient gas in Cas A using the 1 Ms observation carried out with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory and try to constrain the mass-loss history of the progenitor star. We identify thermal emission from the shocked ambient gas along the outer boundary of the remnant. Comparison of measured radial variations of spectroscopic parameters of the shocked ambient gas to the self-similar solutions of Chevalier show that Cas A is expanding into a circumstellar wind rather than into a uniform medium. We estimate a wind density n {sub H} ∼ 0.9 ± 0.3 cm{sup –3} at the current outer radius of the remnant (∼3 pc), which we interpret as a dense slow wind from a red supergiant (RSG) star. Our results suggest that the progenitor star of Cas A had an initial mass around 16 M {sub ☉}, and its mass before the explosion was about 5 M {sub ☉}, with uncertainties of several tens of percent. Furthermore, the results suggest that, among the mass lost from the progenitor star (∼11 M {sub ☉}), a significant amount (more than 6 M {sub ☉}) could have been via its RSG wind.

  1. Chemistry and kinematics of red supergiant stars in the young massive cluster NGC 2100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, L. R.; Evans, C. J.; Davies, B.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Hénault-Brunet, V.; Bastian, N.; Lapenna, E.; Bergemann, M.

    2016-06-01

    We have obtained K-band Multi-Object Spectrograph (KMOS) near-IR spectroscopy for 14 red supergiant stars (RSGs) in the young massive star cluster NGC 2100 in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Stellar parameters including metallicity are estimated using the J-band analysis technique, which has been rigorously tested in the Local Universe. We find an average metallicity for NGC 2100 of [Z] = -0.43 ± 0.10 dex, in good agreement with estimates from the literature for the LMC. Comparing our results in NGC 2100 with those for a Galactic cluster (at Solar-like metallicity) with a similar mass and age we find no significant difference in the location of RSGs in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. We combine the observed KMOS spectra to form a simulated integrated-light cluster spectrum and show that, by analysing this spectrum as a single RSG, the results are consistent with the average properties of the cluster. Radial velocities are measured for the targets and the dynamical properties are estimated for the first time within this cluster. The data are consistent with a flat velocity dispersion profile, and with an upper limit of 3.9 kms-1, at the 95 per cent confidence level, for the velocity dispersion of the cluster. However, the intrinsic velocity dispersion is unresolved and could, therefore, be significantly smaller than the upper limit reported here. An upper limit on the dynamical mass of the cluster is derived as Mdyn ≤ 15.2 × 104 M⊙ assuming virial equilibrium.

  2. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCE PATTERNS IN THE INNER GALAXY: THE SCUTUM RED SUPERGIANT CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, Ben; Origlia, Livia; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Figer, Don F.; Rich, R. Michael; Najarro, Francisco; Negueruela, Ignacio; Clark, J. Simon

    2009-05-10

    The location of the Scutum Red Supergiant (RSG) clusters at the end of the Galactic Bar makes them an excellent probe of the Galaxy's secular evolution, while the clusters themselves are ideal testbeds in which to study the predictions of stellar evolutionary theory. To this end, we present a study of the RSG's surface abundances using a combination of high-resolution Keck/NIRSPEC H-band spectroscopy and spectral synthesis analysis. We provide abundance measurements for elements C, O, Si, Mg, Ti, and Fe. We find that the surface abundances of the stars studied are consistent with CNO burning and deep, rotationally enhanced mixing. The average {alpha}/Fe ratios of the clusters are solar, consistent with a thin-disk population. However, we find significantly subsolar Fe/H ratios for each cluster, a result which strongly contradicts a simple extrapolation of the Galactic metallicity gradient to lower Galactocentric distances. We suggest that a simple one-dimensional parameterization of the Galaxy's abundance patterns is insufficient at low Galactocentric distances, as large azimuthal variations may be present. Indeed, we show that the abundances of O, Si, and Mg are consistent with independent measurements of objects in similar locations in the Galaxy. In combining our results with other data in the literature, we present evidence for large-scale ({approx} kpc) azimuthal variations in abundances at Galactocentric distances of 3-5 kpc. While we cannot rule out that this observed behavior is due to systematic offsets between different measurement techniques, we do find evidence for similar behavior in a study of the barred spiral galaxy NGC 4736 which uses homogeneous methodology. We suggest that these azimuthal abundance variations could result from the intense but patchy star formation driven by the potential of the central bar.

  3. VLTI/AMBER Studies of the Atmospheric Structure and Fundamental Parameters of Red Giant and Supergiant Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroyo-Torres, B.; Wittkowski, M.; Marcaide, J. M.; Abellan, F. J.; Chiavassa, A.; Fabregat, J.; Freytag, B.; Guirado, J. C.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Marti-Vidal, I.; Quirrenbach, A.; Scholz, M.; Wood, P. R.

    2015-08-01

    We present recent near-IR interferometric studies of red giant and supergiant stars, which are aimed at obtaining information on the structure of the atmospheric layers and constraining the fundamental parameters of these objects. The observed visibilities of six red supergiants (RSGs), and also of one of the five red giants observed, indicate large extensions of the molecular layers, as previously observed for Mira stars. These extensions are not predicted by hydrostatic PHOENIX model atmospheres, hydrodynamical (RHD) simulations of stellar convection, or self-excited pulsation models. All these models based on parameters of RSGs lead to atmospheric structures that are too compact compared to our observations. We discuss how alternative processes might explain the atmospheric extensions for these objects. As the continuum appears to be largely free of contamination by molecular layers, we can estimate reliable Rosseland angular radii for our stars. Together with distances and bolometric fluxes, we estimate the effective temperatures and luminosities of our targets, locate them in the HR diagram, and compare their positions to recent evolutionary tracks.

  4. Luminous and Variable Stars in M31 and M33. I. The Warm Hypergiants and Post-red Supergiant Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, Roberta M.; Davidson, Kris; Grammer, Skyler; Kneeland, Nathan; Martin, John C.; Weis, Kerstin; Burggraf, Birgitta

    2013-08-01

    The progenitors of Type IIP supernovae (SNe) have an apparent upper limit to their initial masses of about 20 M ⊙, suggesting that the most massive red supergiants evolve to warmer temperatures before their terminal explosion. But very few post-red supergiants are known. We have identified a small group of luminous stars in M31 and M33 that are candidates for post-red supergiant evolution. These stars have A-F-type supergiant absorption line spectra and strong hydrogen emission. Their spectra are also distinguished by the Ca II triplet and [Ca II] doublet in emission formed in a low-density circumstellar environment. They all have significant near- and mid-infrared excess radiation due to free-free emission and thermal emission from dust. We estimate the amount of mass they have shed and discuss their wind parameters and mass loss rates, which range from a few × 10-6 to 10-4 M ⊙ yr-1. On an H-R diagram, these stars will overlap the region of the luminous blue variables (LBVs) at maximum light; however, the warm hypergiants are not LBVs. Their non-spherical winds are not optically thick, and they have not exhibited any significant variability. We suggest, however, that the warm hypergiants may be the progenitors of the "less luminous" LBVs such as R71 and even SN1987A. Based on observations with the Multiple Mirror Telescope, a joint facility of the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona and on observations obtained with the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT), an international collaboration among institutions in the United States, Italy, and Germany. LBT Corporation partners are: The University of Arizona on behalf of the Arizona University system; Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Italy; LBT Beteiligungsgesellschaft, Germany, representing the Max-Planck Society, the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam, and Heidelberg University; The Ohio State University, and The Research Corporation, on behalf of The University of Notre Dame, University of Minnesota

  5. Studies of Evolved Star Mass Loss: GRAMS Modeling of Red Supergiant and Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Benjamin A.; Srinivasan, S.; Riebel, D.; Boyer, M.; Meixner, M.

    2012-01-01

    As proposed in our NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program (ADAP) proposal, my colleagues and I are studying mass loss from evolved stars. Such stars lose their own mass in their dying stages, and in their expelled winds they form stardust. To model mass loss from these evolved stars, my colleagues and I have constructed GRAMS: the Grid of Red supergiant and Asymptotic giant branch star ModelS. These GRAMS radiative transfer models are fit to optical through mid-infrared photometry of red supergiant (RSG) stars and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. I will discuss our current studies of mass loss from AGB and RSG stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), fitting GRAMS models to the photometry of SMC evolved star candidates identified from the SAGE-SMC (PI: K. Gordon) Spitzer Space Telescope Legacy survey. This work will be briefly compared to similar work we have done for the LMC. I will also discuss Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) studies of the dust produced by AGB and RSG stars in the LMC. BAS is grateful for support from the NASA-ADAP grant NNX11AB06G.

  6. Spatially resolved dusty torus toward the red supergiant WOH G64 in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnaka, K.; Driebe, T.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Weigelt, G.; Wittkowski, M.

    2008-06-01

    Aims: We present N-band spectro-interferometric observations of the red supergiant WOH G64 in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using MIDI at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). While the very high luminosity (˜ 5 × 105 L⊙) previously estimated for WOH G64 suggests that it is a very massive star with an initial mass of ~40 M⊙, its low effective temperature (~3200 K) is in serious disagreement with the current stellar evolution theory. Methods: WOH G64 was observed with VLTI/MIDI using the UT2-UT3 and UT3-UT4 baseline configurations. Results: The dust envelope around WOH G64 has been spatially resolved with a baseline of ~60 m - the first MIDI observations to resolve an individual stellar source in an extragalactic system. The observed N-band visibilities show a slight decrease from 8 to ~10 μm and a gradual increase longward of ~10 μm, reflecting the 10 μm silicate feature in self-absorption. This translates into a steep increase of the uniform-disk diameter from 8 to 10 μm (from 18 to 26 mas) and a roughly constant diameter above 10 μm. The visibilities measured at four position angles differing by ~60° but at approximately the same baseline length (~60 m) do not show a noticeable difference, suggesting that the object appears nearly centrosymmetric. The observed N-band visibilities and spectral energy distribution can be reproduced by an optically and geometrically thick silicate torus model viewed close to pole-on. The luminosity of the central star is derived to be ˜ 2.8 × 105 L⊙, which is by a factor of 2 lower than the previous estimates based on spherical models. We also identify the H2O absorption features at 2.7 and 6 μm in the spectra obtained with the Infrared Space Observatory and the Spitzer Space Telescope. The 2.7 μm feature originates in the photosphere and/or the extended molecular layers, while the 6 μm feature is likely to be of circumstellar origin. Conclusions: The lower luminosity newly derived from our MIDI

  7. Properties of the CO and H2O MOLsphere of the red supergiant Betelgeuse from VLTI/AMBER observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montargès, M.; Kervella, P.; Perrin, G.; Ohnaka, K.; Chiavassa, A.; Ridgway, S. T.; Lacour, S.

    2014-12-01

    Context. Betelgeuse is the closest red supergiant (RSG); therefore, it is well suited for studying the complex processes in its atmosphere that lead to the chemical enrichment of the interstellar medium. Aims: We intend to investigate the shape and composition of the close molecular layer (also known as the MOLsphere) that surrounds the star. This analysis is part of a wider program that aims at understanding the dynamics of the circumstellar envelope of Betelgeuse. Methods: On January and February 2011, Betelgeuse was observed using the Astronomical Multi-BEam combineR (AMBER) instrument of the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) in the H and K bands. Using the medium spectral resolution of the instrument (R ~ 1500), we were able to investigate the carbon monoxide band heads and the water-vapor bands. We used two different approaches to analyse our data: a model fit in both the continuum and absorption lines and then a fit with a radiative hydrodynamics (RHD) simulation. Results: Using the continuum data, we derive a uniform disk diameter of 41.01 ± 0.41 mas, a power law type limb-darkened disk diameter of 42.28 ± 0.43 mas and a limb-darkening exponent of 0.155 ± 0.009. Within the absorption lines, using a single layer model, we obtain parameters of the MOLsphere. Using a RHD simulation, we unveil the convection pattern in the visibilities. Conclusions: We derived a new value of the angular diameter of Betelgeuse in the K band continuum. Our observations in the absorption lines are well reproduced by a molecular layer at 1.2 stellar radii containing both CO and H2O. The visibilities at higher spatial frequencies are matching a convection pattern in a RHD simulation. Based on AMBER observations made with ESO Telescopes at the Paranal Observatory under programmes ID 086.D-0351 and 286.D-5036(A).Table 1 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  8. RED SUPERGIANTS AS COSMIC ABUNDANCE PROBES: THE FIRST DIRECT METALLICITY DETERMINATION OF NGC 4038 IN THE ANTENNAE

    SciTech Connect

    Lardo, C.; Davies, B.; Kudritzki, R-P.; Gazak, J. Z.; Evans, C. J.; Patrick, L. R.; Bergemann, M.; Plez, B.

    2015-10-20

    We present a direct determination of the stellar metallicity in the close pair galaxy NGC 4038 (D = 20 Mpc) based on the quantitative analysis of moderate-resolution KMOS/Very Large Telescope spectra of three super star clusters. The method adopted in our analysis has been developed and optimized to measure accurate metallicities from atomic lines in the J-band of single red supergiant (RSG) or RSG-dominated star clusters. Hence, our metallicity measurements are not affected by the biases and poorly understood systematics inherent to strong line H ii methods, which are routinely applied to massive data sets of galaxies. We find [Z] = +0.07 ± 0.03 and compare our measurements to H ii strong line calibrations. Our abundances and literature data suggest the presence of a flat metallicity gradient, which can be explained as redistribution of metal-rich gas following the strong interaction.

  9. Red Supergiants as Cosmic Abundance Probes: The First Direct Metallicity Determination of NGC 4038 in the Antennae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lardo, C.; Davies, B.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Gazak, J. Z.; Evans, C. J.; Patrick, L. R.; Bergemann, M.; Plez, B.

    2015-10-01

    We present a direct determination of the stellar metallicity in the close pair galaxy NGC 4038 (D = 20 Mpc) based on the quantitative analysis of moderate-resolution KMOS/Very Large Telescope spectra of three super star clusters. The method adopted in our analysis has been developed and optimized to measure accurate metallicities from atomic lines in the J-band of single red supergiant (RSG) or RSG-dominated star clusters. Hence, our metallicity measurements are not affected by the biases and poorly understood systematics inherent to strong line H ii methods, which are routinely applied to massive data sets of galaxies. We find [Z] = +0.07 ± 0.03 and compare our measurements to H ii strong line calibrations. Our abundances and literature data suggest the presence of a flat metallicity gradient, which can be explained as redistribution of metal-rich gas following the strong interaction.

  10. A large population of red supergiants in the super star cluster NGC 1705-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, F.; Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Eisenhauer, F.; Lutz, D.

    2013-05-01

    We present near-infrared integral field observations of the super star cluster in the amorphous galaxy NGC1705. Data have been collected with SINFONI mounted on the VLT. Adaptive optics was used under good seeing conditions. Mosaics of the cluster and its immediate surrounding have been constructed. The cluster is not spatially resolved. Its radius is smaller than 2.85 ± 0.50pc. The K-band spectrum of the cluster is dominated by strong CO absorption bandheads. It is typical of a Galactic K 4-5 supergiant. Its age is estimated to be 12 ± 6Myr. The large error bar is rooted in the uncertainties of the input physics and ingredients of different evolutionary models.

  11. A semiempirical model for the red supergiant's wind in Zeta Aurigae systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuin, N. P. M.; Ahmad, I. A.

    1989-01-01

    A semiempirical model for the wind in four Zeta Aur binary systems is developed, basing the analyses on the velocity function, nonthermal velocities, and upper limits to Ne/N(H) inferred from observations of the winds from the cool supergiants. The model assumes that the energy fluxes needed to drive the wind are supplied by Alfven waves, since the acoustic wave flux estimated from line broadening is too low. The damping scale length of the waves, is found to change from very small values near the star to larger values of the order of the local radius further out in the wind. The temperature structure and hydrogen ionization are derived for these models. Limits to the stellar magnetic field are found, as well as a necessary constraint for the existence of cool massive winds, suggesting that the dividing line in the H-R diagram is where this constraint is violated.

  12. Identification of red supergiants in nearby galaxies with mid-IR photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britavskiy, N. E.; Bonanos, A. Z.; Mehner, A.; García-Álvarez, D.; Prieto, J. L.; Morrell, N. I.

    2014-02-01

    Context. The role of episodic mass loss in massive-star evolution is one of the most important open questions of current stellar evolution theory. Episodic mass loss produces dust and therefore causes evolved massive stars to be very luminous in the mid-infrared and dim at optical wavelengths. Aims: We aim to increase the number of investigated luminous mid-IR sources to shed light on the late stages of these objects. To achieve this we employed mid-IR selection criteria to identity dusty evolved massive stars in two nearby galaxies. Methods: The method is based on mid-IR colors, using 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm photometry from archival Spitzer Space Telescope images of nearby galaxies and J-band photometry from 2MASS. We applied our criteria to two nearby star-forming dwarf irregular galaxies, Sextans A and IC 1613, selecting eight targets, which we followed-up with spectroscopy. Results: Our spectral classification and analysis yielded the discovery of two M-type supergiants in IC 1613, three K-type supergiants and one candidate F-type giant in Sextans A, and two foreground M giants. We show that the proposed criteria provide an independent way for identifying dusty evolved massive stars that can be extended to all nearby galaxies with available Spitzer/IRAC images at 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm. Based on observations made with the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC), installed in the Spanish Observatorio de El Roque de Los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, on the island of La Palma, and the 2.5 m du Pont telescope in operation at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.Spectra are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/562/A75

  13. Imaging the outward motions of clumpy dust clouds around the red supergiant Antares with VLT/VISIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnaka, K.

    2014-08-01

    Aims: We present a 0."5-resolution 17.7 μm image of the red supergiant Antares. Our aim is to study the structure of the circumstellar envelope in detail. Methods: Antares was observed at 17.7 μm with the VLT mid-infrared instrument VISIR. Taking advantage of the BURST mode, in which a large number of short exposure frames are taken, we obtained a diffraction-limited image with a spatial resolution of 0."5. Results: The VISIR image shows six clumpy dust clouds located at 0."8-1."8 (43-96 R⋆ = 136-306 AU) away from the star. We also detected compact emission within a radius of 0."5 around the star. Comparison of our VISIR image taken in 2010 and the 20.8 μm image taken in 1998 with the Keck Telescope reveals the outward motions of four dust clumps. The proper motions of these dust clumps (with respect to the central star) amount to 0."2-0."6 in 12 years. This translates into expansion velocities (projected onto the plane of the sky) of 13-40 km s-1 with an uncertainty of ± 7 km s-1. The inner compact emission seen in the 2010 VISIR image is presumably newly formed dust, because it is not detected in the image taken in 1998. If we assume that the dust is ejected in 1998, the expansion velocity is estimated to be 34 km s-1, in agreement with the velocity of the outward motions of the clumpy dust clouds. The mass of the dust clouds is estimated to be (3-6) × 10-9 M⊙. These values are lower by a factor of 3-7 than the amount of dust ejected in one year estimated from the (gas+dust) mass-loss rate of 2 × 10-6 M⊙ yr-1, suggesting that the continuous mass loss is superimposed on the clumpy dust cloud ejection. Conclusions: The clumpy dust envelope detected in the 17.7 μm diffraction-limited image is similar to the clumpy or asymmetric circumstellar environment of other red supergiants. The velocities of the dust clumps cannot be explained by a simple accelerating outflow, implying the possible random nature of the dust cloud ejection mechanism. Based on VISIR

  14. Spitzer-IRS Spectroscopic Studies of Oxygen-Rich Asymptotic Giant Branch Star and Red Supergiant Star Dust Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Benjamin A.; Srinivasan, Sundar; Speck, Angela; Volk, Kevin; Kemper, Ciska; Reach, William T.; Lagadec, Eric; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; McDonald, Iain; Meixner, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the dust emission features seen in Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra of Oxygen-rich (O-rich) asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and red supergiant (RSG) stars. The spectra come from the Spitzer Legacy program SAGE-Spectroscopy (PI: F. Kemper) and other archival Spitzer-IRS programs. The broad 10 and 20 micron emission features attributed to amorphous dust of silicate composition seen in the spectra show evidence for systematic differences in the centroid of both emission features between O-rich AGB and RSG populations. Radiative transfer modeling using the GRAMS grid of models of AGB and RSG stars suggests that the centroid differences are due to differences in dust properties. We present an update of our investigation of differences in dust composition, size, shape, etc that might be responsible for these spectral differences. We explore how these differences may arise from the different circumstellar environments around RSG and O-rich AGB stars. BAS acknowledges funding from NASA ADAP grant NNX13AD54G.

  15. Comparative Studies of the Dust around Red Supergiant and Oxygen-Rich Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Benjamin; Srinivasan, Sundar; Speck, Angela K.; Volk, Kevin; Kemper, Ciska; Reach, William; Lagadec, Eric; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; McDonald, Iain; Meixner, Margaret; Sloan, Greg; Jones, Olivia

    2015-08-01

    We analyze the dust emission features seen in Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra of red supergiant (RSG) and oxygen-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud and Small Magellanic Cloud galaxies and in various Milky Way globular clusters. The spectra come from the Spitzer Legacy program SAGE-Spectroscopy (PI: F. Kemper), the Spitzer program SMC-Spec (PI: G. Sloan), and other archival Spitzer-IRS programs. The broad 10 and 20 μm emission features attributed to amorphous dust of silicate composition seen in the spectra show evidence for systematic differences in the centroid of both emission features between O-rich AGB and RSG populations. Radiative transfer modeling using the GRAMS grid of models of AGB and RSG stars suggests that the centroid differences are due to differences in dust properties. We investigate differences in dust composition, size, shape, etc that might be responsible for these spectral differences. We explore how these differences may arise from the different circumstellar environments around RSG and O-rich AGB stars and assess effects of varying metallicity (LMC versus SMC versus Milky Way globular cluster) and other properties (mass-loss rate, luminosity, etc.) on the dust originating from these stars. BAS acknowledges funding from NASA ADAP grant NNX13AD54G.

  16. The vast population of Wolf-Rayet and red supergiant stars in M101. I. Motivation and first results

    SciTech Connect

    Shara, Michael M.; Bibby, Joanne L.; Zurek, David; Crowther, Paul A.; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Drissen, Laurent

    2013-12-01

    Assembling a catalog of at least 10,000 Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars is an essential step in proving (or disproving) that these stars are the progenitors of Type Ib and Type Ic supernovae. To this end, we have used the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to carry out a deep, He II optical narrowband imaging survey of the ScI spiral galaxy M101. Almost the entire galaxy was imaged with the unprecedented depth and resolution that only the HST affords. Differenced with archival broadband images, the narrowband images allow us to detect much of the W-R star population of M101. We describe the extent of the survey and our images, as well as our data reduction procedures. A detailed broadband-narrowband imaging study of a field east of the center of M101, containing the giant star-forming region NGC 5462, demonstrates our completeness limits, how we find W-R candidates, their properties and spatial distribution, and how we rule out most contaminants. We use the broadband images to locate luminous red supergiant (RSG) candidates. The spatial distributions of the W-R and RSG stars near NGC 5462 are strikingly different. W-R stars dominate the complex core, while RSGs dominate the complex halo. Future papers in this series will describe and catalog more than a thousand W-R and RSG candidates that are detectable in our images, as well as spectra of many of those candidates.

  17. Mass Loss from Dusty AGB and Red Supergiant Stars in the Magellanic Clouds and in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Benjamin A.; Srinivasan, Sundar; Meixner, Margaret; Kastner, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and red supergiant (RSG) stars are evolved stars that eject large parts of their mass in outflows of dust and gas. As part of an ongoing effort to measure mass loss from evolved stars in our Galaxy and in the Magellanic Clouds, we are modeling mass loss from AGB and RSG stars in these galaxies. Our approach is twofold. We pursue radiative transfer modeling of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of AGB and RSG stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), and in the Galactic bulge and in globular clusters of the Milky Way. We are also constructing detailed dust opacity models of AGB and RSG stars in these galaxies for which we have infrared spectra; e.g., from the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph (IRS). Our sample of infrared spectra largely comes from Spitzer-IRS observations. The detailed dust modeling of spectra informs our choice of dust properties to use in radiative transfer modeling of SEDs. We seek to determine how mass loss from these evolved stars depends upon the metallicity of their host environments. BAS acknowledges funding from NASA ADAP grant NNX15AF15G.

  18. RED SUPERGIANT STARS AS COSMIC ABUNDANCE PROBES: NLTE EFFECTS IN J-BAND IRON AND TITANIUM LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Bergemann, Maria; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Lind, Karin; Plez, Bertrand; Davies, Ben; Gazak, Zach E-mail: klind@mpa-garching.mpg.de E-mail: zgazak@ifa.hawaii.edu E-mail: bdavies@ast.cam.ac.uk

    2012-06-01

    Detailed non-LTE (NLTE) calculations for red supergiant (RSG) stars are presented to investigate the influence of NLTE on the formation of atomic iron and titanium lines in the J band. With their enormous brightness at J band RSG stars are ideal probes of cosmic abundances. Recent LTE studies have found that metallicities accurate to 0.15 dex can be determined from medium-resolution spectroscopy of individual RSGs in galaxies as distant as 10 Mpc. The NLTE results obtained in this investigation support these findings. NLTE abundance corrections for iron are smaller than 0.05 dex for effective temperatures between 3400 K and 4200 K and 0.1 dex at 4400 K. For titanium the NLTE abundance corrections vary smoothly between -0.4 dex and +0.2 dex as a function of effective temperature. For both elements, the corrections also depend on stellar gravity and metallicity. The physical reasons behind the NLTE corrections and the consequences for extragalactic J-band abundance studies are discussed.

  19. The Vast Population of Wolf-Rayet and Red Supergiant Stars in M101. I. Motivation and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shara, Michael M.; Bibby, Joanne L.; Zurek, David; Crowther, Paul A.; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Drissen, Laurent

    2013-12-01

    Assembling a catalog of at least 10,000 Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars is an essential step in proving (or disproving) that these stars are the progenitors of Type Ib and Type Ic supernovae. To this end, we have used the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to carry out a deep, He II optical narrowband imaging survey of the ScI spiral galaxy M101. Almost the entire galaxy was imaged with the unprecedented depth and resolution that only the HST affords. Differenced with archival broadband images, the narrowband images allow us to detect much of the W-R star population of M101. We describe the extent of the survey and our images, as well as our data reduction procedures. A detailed broadband-narrowband imaging study of a field east of the center of M101, containing the giant star-forming region NGC 5462, demonstrates our completeness limits, how we find W-R candidates, their properties and spatial distribution, and how we rule out most contaminants. We use the broadband images to locate luminous red supergiant (RSG) candidates. The spatial distributions of the W-R and RSG stars near NGC 5462 are strikingly different. W-R stars dominate the complex core, while RSGs dominate the complex halo. Future papers in this series will describe and catalog more than a thousand W-R and RSG candidates that are detectable in our images, as well as spectra of many of those candidates.

  20. Evidence for the pulsational origin of the Long Secondary Periods: The red supergiant star V424 Lac (HD 216946)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, Sergio

    2007-10-01

    The results of a long-term UBV photometric monitoring of the red supergiant (RSG) star V424 Lac are presented. V424 Lac shows multiperiodic brightness variations which can be attributed to pulsational oscillations. A much longer period ( P = 1601 d), that allows us to classify this star as a long secondary period variable star (LSPV) has been also detected. The B - V and U - B color variations related to the long secondary period (LSP) are similar to those related to the shorter periods, supporting the pulsational nature of LSP. The long period brightness variation of V424 Lac is accompanied by a near-UV (NUV) excess, which was spectroscopically detected in a previous study [Massey, P., Plez, B., Levesque, E.M., et al., 2005. ApJ 634, 1286] and which is now found to be variable from photometry. On the basis of the results found for V424 Lac, the NUV excess recently found in a number of RSGs may be due not solely to circumstellar dust but may also have a contribution from a still undetected LSP variability.

  1. On the metallicity dependence of the winds from red supergiants and Asymptotic Giant Branch stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loon, J. Th.

    2006-12-01

    Over much of the initial mass function, stars are destined to become luminous and cool red giants. They may then be able to produce dust in an atmosphere which has been elevated by strong radial pulsations, and hence drive a wind. The amount of mass that is lost in this way can be a very significant fraction of the stellar mass, and especially in the case of intermediate-mass stars it is highly enriched. The delay between a star's birth and its feedback into the environment varies from several million years for massive stars to almost the age of the Universe for the least massive red giants we see today. I here present a review on the metallicity dependence of red giant winds. I show that recent measurements not only confirm theoretical expectations, but also admonish of common misconceptions with implications for feedback at low initial metallicity.

  2. Photometry of the Variable Bright Red Supergiant Betelgeuse from the Ground and from Space with the BRITE Nano-satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minor, Robert; Guinan, Edward F.

    2016-01-01

    Robert B. Minor, Edward Guinan, Richard Wasatonic Betelgeuse (Alpha Orionis) is a large, luminous semi-regular red supergiant of spectral class M1.5-2Iab. It is the 8th brightest star in the night sky. Betelgeuse is 30,000 times more luminous than the Sun and 700 times larger. It has an estimated age of ~8 +/- 2 Myr. Betelgeuse explode in a Type II supernova (anytime within the next million years). When it explodes, it will shine with about the intensity of a full moon and may be visible during the day. However, it is too far away to cause any major damage to Earth. Photometry of this pre-supernova star has been ongoing at Villanova for nearly 45 years. These observations are being used to define the complex brightness variations of this star. Semi-regular periodic light variations have been found with periods of 385 days up to many years. These light variations are used to study its unstable atmosphere and resulting complex pulsations. Over the last 15 years, it has been observed by Wasatonic who has accumulated a large photometric database. The ground-based observations are limited to precisions of 1.5%, and due to poor weather, limit observations to about 1-2 times per week. However, with the recent successful launch of the BRITE Nano-satellites (http://www.brite-constellation.at) during 2013-14, it is possible to secure high precision photometry of bright stars, including Betelgeuse, continuously for up to 3 months. Villanova has participated in the BRITE guest investigators program and has been awarded observing time and data rights many bright stars, including Betelgeuse. BRITE blue and red observations of Betelgeuse were carried out during the Nov-Feb 2013-14 season and the 2014-15. These datasets were given to Villanova and have been combined with coexistent photometry from Wasatonic. Although BRITE's red data is saturated, the blue data is useable. The BRITE datasets were combined with our ground-based V, red, and near-IR photometry. Problems were

  3. Evolved Massive Stars in the Local Group. I. Identification of Red Supergiants in NGC 6822, M31, and M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Philip

    1998-07-01

    Knowledge of the red supergiant (RSG) population of nearby galaxies allows us to probe massive star evolution as a function of metallicity; however, contamination by foreground Galactic dwarfs dominates surveys for red stars in Local Group galaxies beyond the Magellanic Clouds. Model atmospheres predict that low-gravity supergiants will have B-V values that are redder by several tenths of a magnitude than foreground dwarfs at a given V-R color, a result that is largely independent of reddening. We conduct a BVR survey of several fields in the Local Group galaxies NGC 6822, M33, and M31 as well as neighboring control fields and identify RSG candidates from CCD photometry. The survey is complete to V = 20.5, corresponding to MV = -4.5 or an Mbol of -6.3 for the reddest stars. Follow-up spectroscopy at the Ca II triplet of 130 stars is used to demonstrate that our photometric criterion for identifying RSGs is highly successful (96% for stars brighter than V = 19.5; 82% for V = 19.5-20.5). Classification spectra are also obtained for a number of stars in order to calibrate color with spectral type empirically. We find that there is a marked progression in the average (B-V)0 and (V-R)0 colors of RSGs in these three galaxies, with the higher metallicity systems having a later average spectral type, which is consistent with previous findings by Elias, Frogel, & Humphreys for the Milky Way and Magellanic Clouds. More significantly, we find that there is a clear progression with metallicity in the relative number of the highest luminosity RSGs, a trend that is apparent both in absolute visual magnitude and in bolometric luminosity. Thus any use of RSGs as distance indicators requires correction for the metallicity of the parent galaxy. Our findings are in accord with the predictions of the ``Conti scenario'' in which higher metallicities result in higher mass-loss rates, resulting in a star of a given luminosity spending an increasing fraction of its He-burning lifetime as

  4. Abundances of r-PROCESS Elements in the Photosphere of Red Supergiant Star PMMR23 in Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'Eva, S. V.; Gopka, V. F.; Yushchenko, A. V.; Andryevsky, S. M.

    Detailed analysis of chemical abundances determined from high-resolution CCD-spectrogram of supergiant star PMMR23 (K5 I) in SMC is presented. The observation were obtained at 3.6 meter ESO La Silla telescope by Hill (1997). Spectral resolving power is near R=30.000. The wavelength coverage is 5050-7200 A. The abundances of iron and 15 r-, s-processes elements are found. The abundances of Cu, Zr, Mo, Ru, Pr, Sm, Gd, Dy, Er are found for the first time. The abundances of elements with atomic numbers less than 55 are deficient with respect to the Sun. The mean underabundance is near 0.7 dex. The abundances of barium and lanthanides are near solar values. The overabundances of these elements with respect to iron are in the range from 0.4 tp 0.9 dex. The abundances of heavy lanthanides are higher than the abundances of light lanthanides. The abundance pattern of PMMR23 can be fitted by scaled solar r-process distribution. The atmosphere of PMMR23 is enriched by r-process elements.

  5. Neutral and ionised gas around the post-red supergiant IRC +10 420 at AU size scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oudmaijer, R. D.; de Wit, W. J.

    2013-03-01

    Context. IRC +10 420 is one of the few known massive stars in rapid transition from the red supergiant phase to the Wolf-Rayet or luminous blue variable phase. Aims: The star has an ionised wind and using the Brγ line we assess the mass-loss on spatial scales of ~1 AU. Methods: We present new VLT Interferometer AMBER data which are combined with all other AMBER data present in the literature. The final dataset covers a position angle range of ~180° and baselines up to 110 m. The spectrally dispersed visibilities, differential phases and line flux are conjointly analysed and modelled. We also present the first AMBER/FINITO observations which cover a larger wavelength range and allow us to observe the Na i doublet at 2.2 μm. The data are complemented by X-Shooter data, which provide a higher spectral resolution view. Results: The Brγ emission line and the Na i doublet are both spatially resolved. After correcting the AMBER data for the fact that the lines are not spectrally resolved, we find that Brγ traces a ring with a diameter of 4.18 mas, in agreement with higher spectral resolution data. We consider a geometric model in which the Brγ emission emerges from the top and bottom rings of an hour-glass shaped structure, viewed almost pole-on. It provides satisfactory fits to most visibilities and differential phases. The fact that we detect line emission from a neutral metal like Na i within the ionised region, a very unusual occurrence, suggests the presence of a dense pseudo-photosphere. Conclusions: The ionised wind can be reproduced with a polar wind, which could well have the shape of an hour-glass. Closer in, the resolved Na i emission is found to occur on scales barely larger than the continuum. This fact and that many yellow hypergiants exhibit this comparatively rare emission hints at the presence of a "Yellow" or even "White Wall" in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, preventing them from visibly evolving to the blue. Based on observations at ESO, and in

  6. "Red Power" and Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, G. Louis

    The document is the result of research conducted on 14 Indian reservations and one settlement in the Southwest, Midwest, West, and Pacific Northwest by Illinois State University in the summer of 1970. Some 124 Indians were interviewed, many of whom were leaders and participants in various Red Power organizations. As noted, the dominant impression…

  7. Hiding in plain sight - red supergiant imposters? Super-AGB stars - bridging the divide between low/intermediate-mass and high-mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, Carolyn Louise; Gil-Pons, Pilar; Lattanzio, John; Siess, Lionel

    2015-08-01

    Super Asymptotic Giant Branch (Super-AGB) stars reside in the mass range ~ 6.5-10 M⊙ and bridge the divide between low/intermediate-mass and massive stars. They are characterised by off-centre carbon ignition prior to a thermally pulsing phase which can consist of many tens to even thousands of thermal pulses. With their high luminosities and very large, cool, red stellar envelopes, these stars appear seemingly identical to their slightly more massive red supergiant counterparts. Due to their similarities, super-AGB stars may therefore act as stellar imposters and contaminate red supergiant surveys. Super-AGB stars undergo relatively extreme nucleosynthetic conditions, with very efficient proton-capture nucleosynthesis occurring at the base of the convective envelope and also heavy element (s-process) production during the thermal pulse to be later mixed to the surface during third dredge-up events. The surface enrichment from these two processes may result in a clear nucleosynthetic signature to differentiate these two classes of star.The final fate of super-AGB stars is also quite uncertain and depends primarily on the competition between the core growth and mass-loss rates. If the stellar envelope is removed prior to the core reaching the Chandrasekhar mass, an O-Ne white dwarf will remain, otherwise the star will undergo an electron-capture supernova leaving behind a neutron star. We describe the factors which influence these different final fate channels, such as the efficiency of convection, the mass-loss rates, the third dredge-up efficiency and the Fe-peak opacity instability which may lead to expulsion of the entire remaining stellar envelope. We determine the relative fraction of super-AGB stars that end life as either an O-Ne white dwarf or as a neutron star, and provide a mass limit for the lowest mass supernova over a broad range of metallicities from the earliest time (Z=0) right through until today (Z~0.04).

  8. Herschel SPIRE and PACS observations of the red supergiant VY CMa: analysis of the molecular line spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Mikako; Yates, J. A.; Barlow, M. J.; Swinyard, B. M.; Royer, P.; Cernicharo, J.; Decin, L.; Wesson, R.; Polehampton, E. T.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Van de Steene, G. C.; van Hoof, P. A. M.

    2014-01-01

    We present an analysis of the far-infrared and submillimetre molecular emission-line spectrum of the luminous M-supergiant VY CMa, observed with the Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) and Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer for Herschel spectrometers aboard the Herschel Space Observatory. Over 260 emission lines were detected in the 190-650 μm SPIRE Fourier Transform Spectrometer spectra, with one-third of the observed lines being attributable to H2O. Other detected species include CO, 13CO, H_2^{18}O, SiO, HCN, SO, SO2, CS, H2S and NH3. Our model fits to the observed 12CO and 13CO line intensities yield a 12C/13C ratio of 5.6 ± 1.8, consistent with measurements of this ratio for other M-supergiants, but significantly lower than previously estimated for VY CMa from observations of lower-J lines. The spectral line energy distribution for 20 SiO rotational lines shows two temperature components: a hot component at ˜1000 K, which we attribute to the stellar atmosphere and inner wind, plus a cooler ˜200 K component, which we attribute to an origin in the outer circumstellar envelope. We fit the line fluxes of 12CO, 13CO, H2O and SiO, using the SMMOL non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) line transfer code, with a mass-loss rate of 1.85 × 10-4 M⊙ yr-1 between 9R* and 350R*. We also fit the observed line fluxes of 12CO, 13CO, H2O and SiO with SMMOL non-LTE line radiative transfer code, along with a mass-loss rate of 1.85 × 10-4 M⊙ yr-1. To fit the high rotational lines of CO and H2O, the model required a rather flat temperature distribution inside the dust condensation radius, attributed to the high H2O opacity. Beyond the dust condensation radius the gas temperature is fitted best by an r-0.5 radial dependence, consistent with the coolant lines becoming optically thin. Our H2O emission-line fits are consistent with an ortho:para ratio of 3 in the outflow.

  9. DISTANCE AND PROPER MOTION MEASUREMENT OF THE RED SUPERGIANT, PZ CAS, IN VERY LONG BASELINE INTERFEROMETRY H{sub 2}O MASER ASTROMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Kusuno, K.; Asaki, Y.; Imai, H.; Oyama, T. E-mail: asaki@vsop.isas.jaxa.jp E-mail: t.oyama@nao.ac.jp

    2013-09-10

    We present the very long baseline interferometry H{sub 2}O maser monitoring observations of the red supergiant, PZ Cas, at 12 epochs from 2006 April to 2008 May. We fitted maser motions to a simple model composed of a common annual parallax and linear motions of the individual masers. The maser motions with the parallax subtracted were well modeled by a combination of a common stellar proper motion and a radial expansion motion of the circumstellar envelope. We obtained an annual parallax of 0.356 {+-} 0.026 mas and a stellar proper motion of {mu}{sub {alpha}}{sup *} cos {delta} = -3.7 {+-} 0.2 and {mu}{sup *}{sub {delta}}=-2.0{+-}0.3 mas yr{sup -1} eastward and northward, respectively. The annual parallax corresponds to a trigonometric parallax of 2.81{sup +0.22}{sub -0.19} kpc. By rescaling the luminosity of PZ Cas in any previous studies using our trigonometric parallax, we estimated the location of PZ Cas on a Hertzsprung-Russell diagram and found that it approaches a theoretically evolutionary track around an initial mass of {approx}25 M{sub Sun }. The sky position and the distance to PZ Cas are consistent with the OB association, Cas OB5, which is located in a molecular gas super shell. The proper motion of PZ Cas is close to that of the OB stars and other red supergiants in Cas OB5 measured by the Hipparcos satellite. We derived the peculiar motion of PZ Cas of U{sub s} = 22.8 {+-} 1.5, V{sub s} = 7.1 {+-} 4.4, and W{sub s} = -5.7 {+-} 4.4 km s{sup -1}. This peculiar motion has rather a large U{sub s} component, unlike those of near high-mass star-forming regions with negatively large V{sub s} motions. The uniform proper motions of the Cas OB5 member stars suggest random motions of giant molecular clouds moving into local potential minima in a time-dependent spiral arm, rather than a velocity field caused by the spiral arm density wave.

  10. Spitzer-IRS Spectroscopic Studies of the Properties of Dust from Oxygen-Rich Asymptotic Giant Branch and Red Supergiant Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Benjamin A.; Speck, A.; Volk, K.; Kemper, C.; Reach, W. T.; Lagadec, E.; Bernard, J.; McDonald, I.; Meixner, M.; Srinivasan, S.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the dust emission features seen in Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra of Oxygen-rich (O-rich) asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and red supergiant (RSG) stars. The spectra come from the Spitzer Legacy program SAGE-Spectroscopy (PI: F. Kemper) and other archival Spitzer-IRS programs. The broad 10 and 20 micron emission features attributed to amorphous dust of silicate composition seen in the spectra show evidence for systematic differences in the centroid of both emission features between O-rich AGB and RSG populations. Radiative transfer modeling using the GRAMS grid of models of AGB and RSG stars suggests that the centroid differences are due to differences in dust properties. We investigate differences in dust composition, size, shape, etc that might be responsible for these spectral differences. We explore how these differences may arise from the different circumstellar environments around RSG and O-rich AGB stars. BAS acknowledges funding from NASA ADAP grant NNX13AD54G.

  11. DUST PRODUCTION FACTORIES IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE: FORMATION OF CARBON GRAINS IN RED-SUPERGIANT WINDS OF VERY MASSIVE POPULATION III STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Nozawa, Takaya; Yoon, Sung-Chul; Maeda, Keiichi; Kozasa, Takashi; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Langer, Norbert

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the formation of dust in a stellar wind during the red-supergiant (RSG) phase of a very massive Population III star with a zero-age main sequence mass of 500 M {sub ☉}. We show that, in a carbon-rich wind with a constant velocity, carbon grains can form with a lognormal-like size distribution, and that all of the carbon available for dust formation finally condenses into dust for wide ranges of the mass-loss rate ((0.1-3) × 10{sup –3} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) and wind velocity (1-100 km s{sup –1}). We also find that the acceleration of the wind, driven by newly formed dust, suppresses the grain growth but still allows more than half of the gas-phase carbon to finally be locked up in dust grains. These results indicate that, at most, 1.7 M {sub ☉} of carbon grains can form during the RSG phase of 500 M {sub ☉} Population III stars. Such a high dust yield could place very massive primordial stars as important sources of dust at the very early epoch of the universe if the initial mass function of Population III stars was top-heavy. We also briefly discuss a new formation scenario of carbon-rich ultra-metal-poor stars, considering feedback from very massive Population III stars.

  12. The identification of extreme asymptotic giant branch stars and red supergiants in M33 with 24 μm variability

    SciTech Connect

    Montiel, Edward J.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Johnson, Christopher B.; Srinivasan, Sundar; Engelbracht, Charles W.

    2015-02-01

    We present the first detection of 24 μm variability in 24 sources in the Local Group galaxy M33. These results are based on 4 epochs of Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer observations, which are irregularly spaced over ∼750 days. We find that these sources are constrained exclusively to the Holmberg radius of the galaxy, which increases their chances of being members of M33. We have constructed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) ranging from the optical to the submillimeter to investigate the nature of these objects. We find that 23 of our objects are most likely heavily self-obscured, evolved stars, while the remaining source is the Giant H ii region, NGC 604. We believe that the observed variability is the intrinsic variability of the central star reprocessed through their circumstellar dust shells. Radiative transfer modeling was carried out to determine their likely chemical composition, luminosity, and dust production rate (DPR). As a sample, our modeling has determined an average luminosity of (3.8±0.9)×10{sup 4} L{sub ⊙} and a total DPR of (2.3±0.1)×10{sup −5} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}. Most of the sources, given the high DPRs and short wavelength obscuration, are likely extreme asymptotic giant branch (XAGB) stars. Five of the sources are found to have luminosities above the classical AGB limit (M{sub bol} <−7.1 mag, L > 54,000 L{sub ⊙}), which classifies them as probable red supergiants (RSGs). Almost all of the sources are classified as oxygen-rich. As also seen in the LMC, a significant fraction of the dust in M33 is produced by a handful of XAGB and RSG stars.

  13. The Contribution of Thermally-Pulsing Asymptotic Giant Branch and Red Supergiant Starts to the Luminosities of the Magellanic Clouds at 1-24 micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melbourne, J.; Boyer, Martha L.

    2013-01-01

    We present the near-through mid-infrared flux contribution of thermally-pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) and massive red supergiant (RSG) stars to the luminosities of the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC, respectively). Combined, the peak contribution from these cool evolved stars occurs at approx 3 - 4 micron, where they produce 32% of the SMC light, and 25% of the LMC flux. The TP-AGB star contribution also peaks at approx 3 - 4 micron and amounts to 21% in both galaxies. The contribution from RSG stars peaks at shorter wavelengths, 2.2 micron, where they provide 11% of the SMC flux, and 7% for the LMC. Both TP-AGB and RSG stars are short lived, and thus potentially impose a large stochastic scatter on the near-IR derived mass-to-light (M/L) ratios of galaxies at rest-frame 1 - 4 micron. To minimize their impact on stellar mass estimates, one can use the M/L ratio at shorter wavelengths (e.g., at 0.8 - 1 micron). At longer wavelengths (much > 8 micron), emission from dust in the interstellar medium dominates the flux. In the LMC, which shows strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission at 8 micron, TP-AGB and RSG contribute less than 4% of the 8 micron flux. However, 19% of the SMC 8 micron flux is from evolved stars, nearly half of which is produced by the rarest, dustiest, carbon-rich TP-AGB stars. Thus, star formation rates of galaxies, based on an 8 micron flux (e.g., observed-frame 24 micron at z = 2), may be biased modestly high, especially for galaxies with little PAH emission.

  14. What causes the large extensions of red supergiant atmospheres?. Comparisons of interferometric observations with 1D hydrostatic, 3D convection, and 1D pulsating model atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroyo-Torres, B.; Wittkowski, M.; Chiavassa, A.; Scholz, M.; Freytag, B.; Marcaide, J. M.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Wood, P. R.; Abellan, F. J.

    2015-03-01

    Aims: This research has two main goals. First, we present the atmospheric structure and the fundamental parameters of three red supergiants (RSGs), increasing the sample of RSGs observed by near-infrared spectro-interferometry. Additionally, we test possible mechanisms that may explain the large observed atmospheric extensions of RSGs. Methods: We carried out spectro-interferometric observations of the RSGs V602 Car, HD 95687, and HD 183589 in the near-infrared K-band (1.92-2.47 μm) with the VLTI/AMBER instrument at medium spectral resolution (R ~ 1500). To categorize and comprehend the extended atmospheres, we compared our observational results to predictions by available hydrostatic PHOENIX, available 3D convection, and new 1D self-excited pulsation models of RSGs. Results: Our near-infrared flux spectra of V602 Car, HD 95687, and HD 183589 are well reproduced by the PHOENIX model atmospheres. The continuum visibility values are consistent with a limb-darkened disk as predicted by the PHOENIX models, allowing us to determine the angular diameter and the fundamental parameters of our sources. Nonetheless, in the case of V602 Car and HD 95686, the PHOENIX model visibilities do not predict the large observed extensions of molecular layers, most remarkably in the CO bands. Likewise, the 3D convection models and the 1D pulsation models with typical parameters of RSGs lead to compact atmospheric structures as well, which are similar to the structure of the hydrostatic PHOENIX models. They can also not explain the observed decreases in the visibilities and thus the large atmospheric molecular extensions. The full sample of our RSGs indicates increasing observed atmospheric extensions with increasing luminosity and decreasing surface gravity, and no correlation with effective temperature or variability amplitude. Conclusions: The location of our RSG sources in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram is confirmed to be consistent with the red limits of recent evolutionary tracks

  15. UV emission from he M1 supergiant TV Gem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalitsianos, A. G.; Kafatos, M.

    1982-01-01

    Low and high dispersion ultraviolet spectra were obtained of the M1 supergiant TV Gem with IUE. Previous IUE observations of this late type supergiant revealed unexpected UV continuum emission, perhaps arising from an early B companion. Low resolution spectra obtained approximately one year apart suggest that the strong Si III in combination perhaps with O I at wavelengths approximately 1300 A varies considerably with time. Large variation in the column density is required to explain these changes. Sporadic mass expulsion with mass loss rates dM/dt approximately 0.00001 solar mass yr minus 1st power from the M supergiant could lead to a dense circumstellar wind near the hot early companion, and thus could account for these observed variations in equivalent width. The high resolution spectrum in the 2000 to 3200 A wavelength range is characterized by narrow absorption lines primarily due to Fe II, Mn II and Mg II (h and k), which are skewed in profile with an extended red wing. This profile structure is tentatively attributed to interstellar absorption and an intervening differentially moving cloud in the direction of Gem OB1, of which TV Gem is a known association member.

  16. V-Band, Near-IR, and TiO Photometry of the Semi-Regular Red Supergiant TV Geminorum: Long-Term Quasi-Periodic Changes in Temperature, Radius, and Luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasatonic, Richard P.; Guinan, Edward F.; Durbin, Allyn J.

    2015-10-01

    Seventeen years of V-band and intermediate Wing near-IR TiO (λ719-nm to λ1024-nm) time-series photometry of the M1-4 Iab supergiant TV Geminorum are presented. The observations were conducted from 1997 to 2014 with the primary goals of determining both long-term (years) and short-term (months) periodicities and estimating temporal changes in temperature, luminosity, and radius as the star varies in brightness. Our results suggest a dominant short-term V-band period of ~411 days (~1.12 years) that is superimposed on a long-term cycle of ~3137 days (~8.59 years). Over this long-term cycle, the effective temperature varies between ~3500 K to ~3850 K and, at an adopted distance of 1.5 ± 0.2 kpc, the luminosity varies from ~6.2 × 104 Lsolar to ~8.9 × 104 Lsolar and the radius varies from ~620 Rsolar to ~710 Rsolar. Variations in temperature and luminosity are indicative of a semi-regular long-term pulsation with imposed short-term periods similar to the V-band variations. However, the calculated radius variations are apparently not generally inversely correlated with respect to the long-term temperature and luminosity changes as typically found in Cepheids and Mira-type variables. This observation suggests other undetermined mechanisms, such as the formation and subsequent dissipation of supergranules or possible complex pulsations, are taking place in this evolved red supergiant to account for these variations. Like other young, massive luminous red supergiants such as Betelgeuse (α Orionis) and Antares (α Scorpii), TV Gem shows complicated light variations on time scales that range from months to several years. These evolved high massive stars are important to study because they are nearby, bright progenitors of core-collapsed Type II supernovae.

  17. Probing the mass-loss history of AGB and red supergiant stars from CO rotational line profiles. II. CO line survey of evolved stars: derivation of mass-loss rate formulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Beck, E.; Decin, L.; de Koter, A.; Justtanont, K.; Verhoelst, T.; Kemper, F.; Menten, K. M.

    2010-11-01

    Context. The evolution of intermediate and low-mass stars on the asymptotic giant branch is dominated by their strong dust-driven winds. More massive stars evolve into red supergiants with a similar envelope structure and strong wind. These stellar winds are a prime source for the chemical enrichment of the interstellar medium. Aims: We aim to (1) set up simple and general analytical expressions to estimate mass-loss rates of evolved stars, and (2) from those calculate estimates for the mass-loss rates of the asymptotic giant branch, red supergiant, and yellow hypergiant stars in our galactic sample. Methods: The rotationally excited lines of carbon monoxide (CO) are a classic and very robust diagnostic in the study of circumstellar envelopes. When sampling different layers of the circumstellar envelope, observations of these molecular lines lead to detailed profiles of kinetic temperature, expansion velocity, and density. A state-of-the-art, nonlocal thermal equilibrium, and co-moving frame radiative transfer code that predicts CO line intensities in the circumstellar envelopes of late-type stars is used in deriving relations between stellar and molecular-line parameters, on the one hand, and mass-loss rate, on the other. These expressions are applied to our extensive CO data set to estimate the mass-loss rates of 47 sample stars. Results: We present analytical expressions for estimating the mass-loss rates of evolved stellar objects for 8 rotational transitions of the CO molecule and thencompare our results to those of previous studies. Our expressions account for line saturation and resolving of the envelope, thereby allowing accurate determination of very high mass-loss rates. We argue that, for estimates based on a single rotational line, the CO(2-1) transition provides the most reliable mass-loss rate. The mass-loss rates calculated for the asympotic giant branch stars range from 4 × 10-8 M⊙ yr-1 up to 8 × 10-5 M⊙ yr-1. For red supergiants they reach

  18. YELLOW SUPERGIANTS IN THE ANDROMEDA GALAXY (M31)

    SciTech Connect

    Drout, Maria R.; Massey, Philip; Meynet, Georges; Tokarz, Susan; Caldwell, Nelson E-mail: Phil.Massey@lowell.ed E-mail: tokarz@cfa.harvard.ed

    2009-09-20

    The yellow supergiant content of nearby galaxies can provide a critical test of stellar evolution theory, bridging the gap between the hot, massive stars and the cool red supergiants. But, this region of the color-magnitude diagram is dominated by foreground contamination, requiring membership to somehow be determined. Fortunately, the large negative systemic velocity of M31, coupled to its high rotation rate, provides the means for separating the contaminating foreground dwarfs from the bona fide yellow supergiants within M31. We obtained radial velocities of {approx}2900 individual targets within the correct color-magnitude range corresponding to masses of 12 M{sub sun} and higher. A comparison of these velocities to those expected from M31's rotation curve reveals 54 rank-1 (near certain) and 66 rank-2 (probable) yellow supergiant members, indicating a foreground contamination >= 96%. We expect some modest contamination from Milky Way halo giants among the remainder, particularly for the rank-2 candidates, and indeed follow-up spectroscopy of a small sample eliminates four rank 2's while confirming five others. We find excellent agreement between the location of yellow supergiants in the H-R diagram and that predicted by the latest Geneva evolutionary tracks that include rotation. However, the relative number of yellow supergiants seen as a function of mass varies from that predicted by the models by a factor of >10, in the sense that more high-mass yellow supergiants are predicted than those are actually observed. Comparing the total number (16) of >20 M{sub sun} yellow supergiants with the estimated number (24,800) of unevolved O stars indicates that the duration of the yellow supergiant phase is {approx}3000 years. This is consistent with what the 12 M{sub sun} and 15 M{sub sun} evolutionary tracks predict, but disagrees with the 20,000-80,000 year timescales predicted by the models for higher masses.

  19. The Winds of B Supergiants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fullerton, A. W.; Massa, D. L.; Prinja, R. K.; Owocki, S. P.; Cranmer, S. R.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the work conducted under the program "The Winds of B Supergiants," conducted by Raytheon STX Corporation. The report consists of a journal article "Wind variability in B supergiants III. Corotating spiral structures in the stellar wind of HD 64760." The first step in the project was the analysis of the 1996 time series of 2 B supergiants and an O star. These data were analyzed and reported on at the ESO workshop, "Cyclical Variability in Stellar Winds."

  20. Mass-losing M supergiants in the solar neighborhood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.; Kleinmann, S. G.

    1990-01-01

    A list of the 21 mass-losing red supergiants (20 M type, one G type; L greater than 100,000 solar luminosities) within 2.5 kpc of the sun is compiled. These supergiants are highly evolved descendants of main-sequence stars with initial masses larger than 20 solar masses. The surface density is between about 1 and 2/sq kpc. As found previously, these stars are much less concentrated toward the Galactic center than W-R stars, which are also highly evolved massive stars. Although with considerable uncertainty, it is estimated that the mass return by the M supergiants is somewhere between 0.00001 and 0.00003 solar mass/sq kpc yr. In the hemisphere facing the Galactic center there is much less mass loss from M supergiants than from W-R stars, but, in the anticenter direction, the M supergiants return more mass than do the W-R stars. The duration of the M supergiant phase appears to be between 200,000 and 400,000 yr. During this phase, a star of initially at least 20 solar masses returns perhaps 3-10 solar masses into the interstellar medium.

  1. Spectral type, temperature, and evolutionary stage in cool supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorda, Ricardo; Negueruela, Ignacio; González-Fernández, Carlos; Tabernero, Hugo M.

    2016-07-01

    Context. In recent years, our understanding of red supergiants has been questioned by strong disagreements between stellar atmospheric parameters derived with different techniques. Temperature scales have been disputed, and the possibility that spectral types do not depend primarily on temperature has been raised. Aims: We explore the relations between different observed parameters, and we explore the ability to derive accurate intrinsic stellar parameters from these relations through the analysis of the largest spectroscopic sample of red supergiants to date. Methods: We obtained intermediate-resolution spectra of a sample of about 500 red supergiants in the Large and the Small Magellanic Cloud. From these spectra, we derive spectral types and measure a large set of photospheric atomic lines. We explore possible correlations between different observational parameters, also making use of near- and mid-infrared colours and literature on photometric variability. Results: Direct comparison between the behaviour of atomic lines (Fe i, Ti i, and Ca ii) in the observed spectra and a comprehensive set of synthetic atmospheric models provides compelling evidence that effective temperature is the prime underlying variable driving the spectral-type sequence between early G and M2 for supergiants. In spite of this, there is a clear correlation between spectral type and luminosity, with later spectral types tending to correspond to more luminous stars with heavier mass loss. This trend is much more marked in the LMC than in the SMC. The population of red supergiants in the SMC is characterised by a higher degree of spectral variability, early spectral types (centred on type K1) and low mass-loss rates (as measured by dust-sensitive mid-infrared colours). The population in the LMC displays less spectroscopic variability and later spectral types. The distribution of spectral types is not single-peaked. Instead, the brightest supergiants have a significantly different

  2. Red and Dead Supergiants: what X-ray and radio observations of type IIP supernovae reveal about the interaction of shocks with the medium the star explodes in

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Alak; Chakraborti, Sayan

    2015-08-01

    X-ray and radio emission from a class of supernovae that forms almost half of all core collapse supernovae, type II Plateau SNe (SNIIP) probe the interaction of the SN shock with the medium the parent star exploded in. We have carried out observations of a number of SN IIP with Chandra, EVLA and GMRT telescopes. Our Chandra observations of SN 2013ej and SN 2004dj measured the separate contributions of thermal emission from the SN shocks and the power-law nonthermal part arising out of accelerated particles undergoing inverse Compton scattering on low energy photons from the SN photosphere. The combination of radio and X-ray properties indicate the (lack of) equipartition between magnetic fields amplified by the shock and the relativistic particles accelerated by it. Since the SN shock travels through the circumstellar wind at a speed much higher than that of the wind set up by the progenitor, the X-ray observations track the long history of mass loss from the progenitor star. An interesting case is that of SN 2011ja, which suggests that a fraction of type IIP supernovae may interact with circumstellar medium set up by episodic or non-steady ejections from the progenitor.

  3. Red Supergiants in the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levesque, E. M.

    2013-05-01

    Galaxies in the Local Group span a factor of 15 in metallicity, ranging from the super-solar M 31 to the Wolf-Lundmark-Melotte (WLM) galaxy, which is the lowest-metallicity (0.1 Z⊙) Local Group galaxy currently forming stars. Studies of massive star populations across this broad range of environments have revealed important metal-licity-dependent evolutionary trends, allowing us to test the accuracy of stellar evolutionary tracks at these metallicities for the first time. The RSG population is particularly valuable as a key mass-losing phase of moderately massive stars and a source of core-collapse supernova progenitors. By reviewing recent work on the RSG populations in the Local Group, we are able to quantify limits on these stars' effective temperatures and masses and probe the relationship between RSG mass loss behaviors and host environments. Extragalactic surveys of RSGs have also revealed several unusual RSGs that display signs of unusual spectral variability and dust production, traits that may potentially also correlate with the stars' host environments. I will present some of the latest work that has advanced our understanding of RSGs in the Local Group, and consider the many new questions posed by our ever-evolving picture of these stars.

  4. Are blue supergiants descendants of magnetic main sequence stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petermann, Ilka; Langer, Norbert

    2013-06-01

    Red and blue supergiants are, together with luminous blue variables and Wolf-Rayet stars, evolved phases of massive (OB) stars. The position of blue supergiants (BSG) near the main sequence band cannot be reproduced by standard stellar evolution calculations. However, the assumption of a reduced convective core mass during the main sequence (MS) due to strong internal magnetic fields, established in roughly 10% of all stars on the upper MS, can recover this BSG population. For our calculations of the (non-rotating) massive stars at solar metallicity we used the 1D stellar evolution code MESA and compare their evolutionary tracks with positions from stars obtained from the VLT Flames survey of massive stars.

  5. The flux-weighted gravity-luminosity relationship of blue supergiant stars as a constraint for stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meynet, Georges; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Georgy, Cyril

    2015-09-01

    Context. The flux-weighted gravity-luminosity relationship (FGLR) of blue supergiant stars (BSG) links their absolute magnitude to the spectroscopically determined flux-weighted gravity log g/T_text{eff ^4}. BSG are the brightest stars in the universe at visual light and the application of the FGLR has become a powerful tool for determining extragalactic distances. Aims: Observationally, the FGLR is a tight relationship with only small scatter. It is, therefore, ideal for using as a constraint for stellar evolution models. The goal of this work is to investigate whether stellar evolution can reproduce the observed FGLR and to develop an improved foundation for the FGLR as an extragalactic distance indicator. Methods: We used different grids of stellar models for initial masses between 9 and 40 M⊙ and for metallicities between Z = 0.002 and 0.014, with and without rotation, which were computed with various mass loss rates during the red supergiant phase. For each of these models, we discuss the details of post-main sequence evolution and construct theoretical FGLRs by means of population synthesis models that we then compare with the observed FGLR. Results: In general, the stellar evolution model FGLRs agree reasonably well with the observed one. There are, however, differences between the models, in particular with regard to the shape and width (scatter) in the flux-weighted gravity-luminosity plane. The best agreement is obtained with models that include the effects of rotation and assume that the large majority, if not all, of the observed BSG evolve toward the red supergiant phase and that only a few are evolving back from this stage. The effects of metallicity on the shape and scatter of the FGLR are small. Conclusions: The shape, scatter, and metallicity dependence of the observed FGLR are explained well by stellar evolution models. This provides a solid theoretical foundation for using this relationship as a robust extragalactic distance indicator.

  6. The Winds of B Supergiants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massa, D.; Fullerton, A. W.; Prinja, R. K.

    1998-01-01

    This quarterly report is comprised of a paper, "Rotational Modulation of B Supergiant Winds" presented at the ESO workshop "Cyclical Variability in Stellar Winds." Presented is a 30-day IUE time series of the BO Ia HD 91969, a member of the Carina open cluster NGC 3293, which showed, among other things, that wind lines that probe more deeply into the wind vary more regularly.

  7. The Winds of B Supergiants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massa, D.; Oliversen, R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present the most suitable data sets available in the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) archive for the study of time-dependent stellar winds in early B supergiants. The UV line profile variability in 11 B0 to B3 stars is analyzed, compared and discussed, based on 16 separate data sets comprising over 600 homogeneously reduced high-resolution spectrograms. The targets include 'normal' stars with moderate rotation rates and examples of rapid rotators. A gallery of grey-scale images (dynamic spectra) is presented, which demonstrates the richness and range of wind variability and highlights different structures in the winds of these stars. This work emphasises the suitability of B supergiants for wind studies, under-pinned by the fact that they exhibit unsaturated wind lines for a wide range of ionization. The wind activity of B supergiants is substantial and has highly varied characteristics. The variability evident in individual stars is classified and described in terms of discrete absorption components, spontaneous absorption, bowed structures, recurrence, and ionization variability and stratification. Similar structures can occur in stars of different fundamental parameters, but also different structures may occur in the same star at a given epoch. We discuss the physical phenomena that may be associated with the spectral signatures, and highlight the challenges that these phenomena present to theoretical studies of time-dependent outflows in massive stars. In addition, SEI line-synthesis modelling of the UV wind lines is used to provide further information about the state of the winds in our program stars. Typically the range, implied by the line profile variability, in the product of mass-loss rate and ion fraction (M (dot) q(sub i)) is a factor of approximately 1.5, when integrated between 0.2 and 0.9 v infinity; it can however be several times larger over localized velocity regions. At a given effective temperature the mean relative ion ratios can

  8. The Winds of B Supergiants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massa, Derck; West, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present the most suitable data sets available in the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) archive for the study of time-dependent stellar winds in early B supergiants. The UV line profile variability in 11 B0 to B3 stars is analyzed, compared and discussed, based on 16 separate data sets comprising over 600 homogeneously reduced high-resolution spectrograms. The targets include 'normal' stars with moderate rotation rates and examples of rapid rotators. A gallery of grey-scale images (dynamic spectra) is presented, which demonstrates the richness and range of wind variability and highlights different structures in the winds of these stars. This work emphasizes the suitability of B supergiants for wind studies, under-pinned by the fact that they exhibit unsaturated wind lines for a wide range of ionization. The wind activity of B supergiants is substantial and has highly varied characteristics. The variability evident in individual stars is classified and described in terms of discrete absorption components, spontaneous absorption, bowed structures, recurrence, and ionization variability and stratification. Similar structures can occur in stars of different fundamental parameters but also different structures may occur in the same star at a given epoch. We discuss the physical phenomena that may be associated with the spectral signatures, and highlight the challenges that these phenomena present to theoretical studies of time-dependent outflows in massive stars. In addition, SEI line-synthesis modelling of the UV wind lines is used to provide further information about the state of the winds in our program stars. Typically the range, implied by the line profile variability, in the product of mass-loss rate and ion fraction (M qi) is a factor of approximately 1.5, when integrated between 0.2 and 0.9 v infinity; it it can however be several times larger over localized velocity regions. At a given effective temperature the mean relative ion ratios can differ by a

  9. Blue supergiants as descendants of magnetic main sequence stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petermann, I.; Langer, N.; Castro, N.; Fossati, L.

    2015-12-01

    About 10% of the massive main sequence stars have recently been found to host a strong, large scale magnetic field. Both, the origin and the evolutionary consequences of these fields are largely unknown. We argue that these fields may be sufficiently strong in the deep interior of the stars to suppress convection near the outer edge of their convective core. We performed parametrised stellar evolution calculations and assumed a reduced size of the convective core for stars in the mass range 16M⊙ to 28M⊙ from the zero age main sequence until core carbon depletion. We find that such models avoid the coolest part of the main sequence band, which is usually filled by evolutionary models that include convective core overshooting. Furthermore, our "magnetic" models populate the blue supergiant region during core helium burning, i.e., the post-main sequence gap left by ordinary single star models, and some of them end their life in a position near that of the progenitor of Supernova 1987A in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Further effects include a strongly reduced luminosity during the red supergiant stage, and downward shift of the limiting initial mass for white dwarf and neutron star formation.

  10. Observations of emission lines in M supergiants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    Copernicus observations of Mg 2 h and k emission lines from M giants and supergiants are described. Supergiants with extensive circumstellar gas shells show an asymmetric k line. The asymmetry is ascribed to superimposed lines of Fe 1 and Mn 1. The Mg 2 line width fit the Wilson-Bappu relation derived from observations of G and K Stars. Results of correlated ground-based observations include (1) the discovery of K 1 fluorescent emission from the Betelgeuse shell; (2) extimates of the mass-loss rates; and (3) the proposal that silicate dust grains must account for the major fraction of the Si atoms in the Betelgeuse shell.

  11. Clumpy wind accretion in supergiant neutron star high mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzo, E.; Oskinova, L.; Feldmeier, A.; Falanga, M.

    2016-05-01

    The accretion of the stellar wind material by a compact object represents the main mechanism powering the X-ray emission in classical supergiant high mass X-ray binaries and supergiant fast X-ray transients. In this work we present the first attempt to simulate the accretion process of a fast and dense massive star wind onto a neutron star, taking into account the effects of the centrifugal and magnetic inhibition of accretion ("gating") due to the spin and magnetic field of the compact object. We made use of a radiative hydrodynamical code to model the nonstationary radiatively driven wind of an O-B supergiant star and then place a neutron star characterized by a fixed magnetic field and spin period at a certain distance from the massive companion. Our calculations follow, as a function of time (on a total timescale of several hours), the transitions of the system through all different accretion regimes that are triggered by the intrinsic variations in the density and velocity of the nonstationary wind. The X-ray luminosity released by the system is computed at each time step by taking into account the relevant physical processes occurring in the different accretion regimes. Synthetic lightcurves are derived and qualitatively compared with those observed from classical supergiant high mass X-ray binaries and supergiant fast X-ray transients. Although a number of simplifications are assumed in these calculations, we show that taking into account the effects of the centrifugal and magnetic inhibition of accretion significantly reduces the average X-ray luminosity expected for any neutron star wind-fed binary. The present model calculations suggest that long spin periods and stronger magnetic fields are favored in order to reproduce the peculiar behavior of supergiant fast X-ray transients in the X-ray domain.

  12. A Census of B[e] Supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Robert

    2013-01-01

    B[e] supergiants are luminous, hot stars characterized by strong Balmer line emission, permitted emission lines like Fe II, forbidden (e.g., [Fe II]) optical emission lines, and large thermal IR excesses due to circumstellar dust. The relationship between B[e] supergiants and other classes of massive star is uncertain, as is the origin of their large masses of circumstellar material. The Magellanic Clouds (MCs) are presently known to host less than 20 objects classified as B[e] supergiants; yet these objects include most of the known members of the class. On the basis of a new search utilizing photometry from the Spitzer SAGE (Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution) and Galaxy Evolution Explorer (Galex) survey databases, we have identified an additional 25 B stars in the LMC and 11 B stars in the SMC whose UV through infrared spectral energy distributions strongly resemble those of the known B[e] supergiants. Model atmospheres were fit to the photometric measurements to estimate photospheric temperatures for these candidates. Future spectroscopic observations will confirm how many among our new list of candidates are in fact B[e]-type stars. This research is supported by the NSF, via a Research Experience for Undergraduates program operated at RIT's Center for Imaging Science and by NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program award NNX11AB06G to RIT.

  13. Fossil dust shells around luminous supergiants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, R.

    1975-01-01

    The observed frequency with which infrared excesses appear in F, G, and K supergiants of luminosity class Ia supports the idea that these excesses arise in a 'fossil' circumstellar dust shell that was formed during a prior M-super-giant phase of evolution. The required leftward evolution of the star on the H-R diagram would then imply that the Ledoux, rather than the Schwarzschild, criterion for convective mixing is the correct criterion to use in stellar evolution calculations.

  14. Revealing the power of the natural red pigment lycopene.

    PubMed

    Kong, Kin-Weng; Khoo, Hock-Eng; Prasad, K Nagendra; Ismail, Amin; Tan, Chin-Ping; Rajab, Nor Fadilah

    2010-02-23

    By-products derived from food processing are attractive source for their valuable bioactive components and color pigments. These by-products are useful for development as functional foods, nutraceuticals, food ingredients, additives, and also as cosmetic products. Lycopene is a bioactive red colored pigment naturally occurring in plants. Industrial by-products obtained from the plants are the good sources of lycopene. Interest in lycopene is increasing due to increasing evidence proving its preventive properties toward numerous diseases. In vitro, in vivo and ex vivo studies have demonstrated that lycopene-rich foods are inversely associated to diseases such as cancers, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and others. This paper also reviews the properties, absorption, transportation, and distribution of lycopene and its by-products in human body. The mechanism of action and interaction of lycopene with other bioactive compounds are also discussed, because these are the crucial features for beneficial role of lycopene. However, information on the effect of food processing on lycopene stability and availability was discussed for better understanding of its characteristics.

  15. Market power in the United States red meatpacking industry.

    PubMed

    Koontz, Stephen R

    2003-07-01

    The basic question asked in the beginning of this article was whether the evidence from research is persuasive enough to conclude that competition in the meatpacking industry is deficient. The literature review led to the conclusion that the answer is no. Research varies widely in terms of data and methodologic approaches. The research, however, clearly finds evidence of market power. Many SCP studies indicated the existence and exercise of market power, but the failure of the paradigm makes definitive conclusions dangerous. The NEIO studies showed a persistent gap between the price of livestock and marginal costs but the studies did not incorporate sufficient detail to prove specific behavior. Azzam and Anderson [4] conducted an extensive review of competition in meatpacking. In their summary, they offered criticisms of the SCP approach and the conduct parameter approach. These investigators concluded that the body of empiric evidence was insufficient to persuasively argue that the meatpacking industry was not competitive. Sexton [69] discussed more recent critiques of the conduct parameter appraoch. Despite its weaknesses, he concluded that market power estimates in meatpacking are modest but that structural changes on balance are beneficial, from an efficiency viewpoint. Examining the evidence either by data aggregation, methodology, or time period results in little difference in the qualitative interpretation. The research community has done what Nicholls [2] said was needed. The need remains relevant. The research leaves us with a clear picture and nagging questions. Azzam and Anderson [4] recommended that further research focus on the process of competition or the rivalrous interaction between competitors, and on competitors' strategies for responding to technologic and market forces, as the business history of the industry suggests. Specifically, they recommended two approaches. First, to develop empiric pricing models for short-term monitoring. Such models

  16. Long term variability of B supergiant winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massa, Derck L.

    1995-01-01

    The object of this observing proposal was to sample wind variability in B supergiants on a daily basis over a period of several days in order to determine the time scale with which density variability occurs in their winds. Three stars were selected for this project: 69 Cyg (B0 Ib), HD 164402 (B0 Ib), and HD 47240 (B1 Ib). Three grey scale representations of the Si IV lambda lambda 1400 doublet in each star are attached. In these figures, time (in days) increases upward, and the wavelength (in terms of velocity relative to the rest wavelength of the violet component of the doublet) is the abscissa. The spectra are normalized by a minimum absorption (maximum flux) template, so that all changes appear as absorptions. As a result of these observations, we can now state with some certainty that typical B supergiants develop significant wind inhomogeneities with recurrence times of a few days, and that some of these events show signs of strong temporal coherence.

  17. Cool giants and supergiants as probes of the chemical evolution of the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Origlia, Livia

    2015-08-01

    Evolved, cool giant and supergiant stars are among the brightest populations in any stellar system and easily observable out to large distances, especially at infrared wavelengths.These stars also dominate the integrated light of star clusters in a wide range of ages, making them powerful tracers of stellar populations in more distant galaxies.The current generation of medium-high resolution spectrographs in the optical and near IR with high throughput has allowed to get accurate abundances of the most important metals in giants and supergiants, also in high reddened environments like the inner Galaxy disk and bulge and the Galactic center.In this talk I will review some of the most important results obtained so far in tracing the chemical evolution of the inner Galaxy and future perspectives with the next generation of telescopes and instrumentation.

  18. On minimally parametric primordial power spectrum reconstruction and the evidence for a red tilt

    SciTech Connect

    Verde, Licia; Peiris, Hiranya E-mail: lverde@astro.princeton.edu

    2008-07-15

    The latest cosmological data seem to indicate a significant deviation from scale invariance of the primordial power spectrum when parameterized either by a power law or by a spectral index with non-zero 'running'. This deviation, by itself, serves as a powerful tool for discriminating among theories for the origin of cosmological structures such as inflationary models. Here, we use a minimally parametric smoothing spline technique to reconstruct the shape of the primordial power spectrum. This technique is well suited to searching for smooth features in the primordial power spectrum such as deviations from scale invariance or a running spectral index, although it would recover sharp features of high statistical significance. We use the WMAP three-year results in combination with data from a suite of higher resolution cosmic microwave background experiments (including the latest ACBAR 2008 release), as well as large-scale structure data from SDSS and 2dFGRS. We employ cross-validation to assess, using the data themselves, the optimal amount of smoothness in the primordial power spectrum consistent with the data. This minimally parametric reconstruction supports the evidence for a power law primordial power spectrum with a red tilt, but not for deviations from a power law power spectrum. Smooth variations in the primordial power spectrum are not significantly degenerate with the other cosmological parameters.

  19. Red, Straight, no bends: primordial power spectrum reconstruction from CMB and large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravenni, Andrea; Verde, Licia; Cuesta, Antonio J.

    2016-08-01

    We present a minimally parametric, model independent reconstruction of the shape of the primordial power spectrum. Our smoothing spline technique is well-suited to search for smooth features such as deviations from scale invariance, and deviations from a power law such as running of the spectral index or small-scale power suppression. We use a comprehensive set of the state-of the art cosmological data: Planck observations of the temperature and polarisation anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background, WiggleZ and Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 galaxy power spectra and the Canada-France-Hawaii Lensing Survey correlation function. This reconstruction strongly supports the evidence for a power law primordial power spectrum with a red tilt and disfavours deviations from a power law power spectrum including small-scale power suppression such as that induced by significantly massive neutrinos. This offers a powerful confirmation of the inflationary paradigm, justifying the adoption of the inflationary prior in cosmological analyses.

  20. A dark energy camera search for missing supergiants in the LMC after the advanced LIGO gravitational-wave event GW150914

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Annis, J.

    2016-05-27

    The collapse of a stellar core is expected to produce gravitational waves (GWs), neutrinos, and in most cases a luminous supernova. Sometimes, however, the optical event could be significantly less luminous than a supernova and a direct collapse to a black hole, where the star just disappears, is possible. The GW event GW150914 was detected by the LIGO Virgo Collaboration via a burst analysis that gave localization contours enclosing the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Shortly thereafter, we used DECam to observe 102 deg2 of the localization area, including 38 deg2 on the LMC for a missing supergiant search. We constructmore » a complete catalog of LMC luminous red supergiants, the best candidates to undergo invisible core collapse, and collected catalogs of other candidates: less luminous red supergiants, yellow supergiants, blue supergiants, luminous blue variable stars, and Wolf–Rayet stars. Of the objects in the imaging region, all are recovered in the images. The timescale for stellar disappearance is set by the free-fall time, which is a function of the stellar radius. Our observations at 4 and 13 days after the event result in a search sensitive to objects of up to about 200 solar radii. We conclude that it is unlikely that GW150914 was caused by the core collapse of a relatively compact supergiant in the LMC, consistent with the LIGO Collaboration analyses of the gravitational waveform as best interpreted as a high mass binary black hole merger. Lastly, we discuss how to generalize this search for future very nearby core-collapse candidates.« less

  1. A Dark Energy Camera Search for Missing Supergiants in the LMC after the Advanced LIGO Gravitational-wave Event GW150914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annis, J.; Soares-Santos, M.; Berger, E.; Brout, D.; Chen, H.; Chornock, R.; Cowperthwaite, P. S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doctor, Z.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Drout, M. R.; Farr, B.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Foley, R. J.; Frieman, J.; Gruendl, R. A.; Herner, K.; Holz, D.; Kessler, R.; Lin, H.; Marriner, J.; Neilsen, E.; Rest, A.; Sako, M.; Smith, M.; Smith, N.; Sobreira, F.; Walker, A. R.; Yanny, B.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cenko, S. B.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D’Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Eifler, T. F.; Evrard, A. E.; Fernandez, E.; Fischer, J.; Fong, W.; Fosalba, P.; Fox, D. B.; Fryer, C. L.; Garcia-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Karliner, I.; Kasen, D.; Kent, S.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Martini, P.; Metzger, B. D.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Peoples, J.; Petravic, D.; Plazas, A. A.; Quataert, E.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, R. C.; Stebbins, A.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, R. C.; Tucker, D. L.; Vikram, V.; Wechsler, R. H.; Weller, J.; Wester, W.; The DES Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    The collapse of a stellar core is expected to produce gravitational waves (GWs), neutrinos, and in most cases a luminous supernova. Sometimes, however, the optical event could be significantly less luminous than a supernova and a direct collapse to a black hole, where the star just disappears, is possible. The GW event GW150914 was detected by the LIGO Virgo Collaboration via a burst analysis that gave localization contours enclosing the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Shortly thereafter, we used DECam to observe 102 deg2 of the localization area, including 38 deg2 on the LMC for a missing supergiant search. We construct a complete catalog of LMC luminous red supergiants, the best candidates to undergo invisible core collapse, and collected catalogs of other candidates: less luminous red supergiants, yellow supergiants, blue supergiants, luminous blue variable stars, and Wolf–Rayet stars. Of the objects in the imaging region, all are recovered in the images. The timescale for stellar disappearance is set by the free-fall time, which is a function of the stellar radius. Our observations at 4 and 13 days after the event result in a search sensitive to objects of up to about 200 solar radii. We conclude that it is unlikely that GW150914 was caused by the core collapse of a relatively compact supergiant in the LMC, consistent with the LIGO Collaboration analyses of the gravitational waveform as best interpreted as a high mass binary black hole merger. We discuss how to generalize this search for future very nearby core-collapse candidates.

  2. A transient supergiant X-ray binary in IC 10: An extragalactic SFXT?

    SciTech Connect

    Laycock, Silas; Cappallo, Rigel; Oram, Kathleen; Balchunas, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    We report the discovery of a large amplitude (factor of ∼100) X-ray transient (IC 10 X-2, CXOU J002020.99+591758.6) in the nearby dwarf starburst galaxy IC 10 during our Chandra monitoring project. Based on the X-ray timing and spectral properties, and an optical counterpart observed with Gemini, the system is a high-mass X-ray binary consisting of a luminous blue supergiant and a neutron star. The highest measured luminosity of the source was 1.8 × 10{sup 37} erg s{sup –1}during an outburst in 2003. Observations before, during, and after a second outburst in 2010 constrain the outburst duration to be less than 3 months (with no lower limit). The X-ray spectrum is a hard power law (Γ = 0.3) with fitted column density (N{sub H} = 6.3 × 10{sup 21} atom cm{sup –2}), consistent with the established absorption to sources in IC 10. The optical spectrum shows hydrogen Balmer lines strongly in emission at the correct blueshift (-340 km s{sup –1}) for IC 10. The N III triplet emission feature is seen, accompanied by He II [4686] weakly in emission. Together these features classify the star as a luminous blue supergiant of the OBN subclass, characterized by enhanced nitrogen abundance. Emission lines of He I are seen, at similar strength to Hβ. A complex of Fe II permitted and forbidden emission lines are seen, as in B[e] stars. The system closely resembles galactic supergiant fast X-ray transients, in terms of its hard spectrum, variability amplitude, and blue supergiant primary.

  3. Chemical Abundances and the Evolutionary Status of 22 Galactic A-type Supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venn, Kim A.

    1996-03-01

    The A-type supergiants have an interesting location on the HR-diagram for testing stellar evolution theories since various evolution scenarios describe vastly different histories for these stars. In particular, the predicted abundances of carbon and nitrogen in the stellar atmospheres differ significantly since these stars may have evolved directly from the main-sequence or may be returning from the red giant branch where they would undergo the first dredge-up of CN-cycled H-burned gas from the stellar interior. This thesis provides new elemental abundances for a large group of Galactic A-type supergiants in the 5 to 20 solar mass range, while also addressing the difficulties in determining reliable abundances in these stars. The atmospheric analysis of each star was performed using the most recent Kurucz LTE model atmospheres. Atmospheric parameters (Teff and log g) have been determined from ionization equilibrium of weak Mg I and Mg II lines and fitting the wings of the H-gamma line profiles; the final parameters were chosen at the intersection of the loci of possible Teff-gravity values from each indicator. Calculations show that NLTE effects on the weak Mg I and Mg II spectral lines used in this analysis are small, therefore they are ideal atmospheric parameter indicators. The metal abundances, log epsilon (O, Mg, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni) are solar to within about $\\pm$0.2~dex, calculated assuming LTE. Overabundances of Na are found, which are discussed as a combination of possible NLTE effects and/or pollution of newly synthesized Na from a NeNa proton capture reaction that could occur in the stellar core. Otherwise, we see no evidence of slight overall metal enrichments in these young stars that might be expected due to Galactic chemical evolution. More details of the atmospheric and LTE metal abundance analyses can be found in Venn 1994 (ApJS, 99, 659). The carbon and nitrogen abundances are examined in order to study the evolutionary status of these

  4. Transgenic rats with green, red, and blue fluorescence: powerful tools for bioimaging, cell trafficking, and differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Takashi; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2005-04-01

    The rat represents a perfect animal for broadening medical experiments, because its physiology has been well understood in the history of experimental animals. In addition, its larger body size takes enough advantage for surgical manipulation, compared to the mouse. Many rat models mimicking human diseases, therefore, have been used in a variety of biomedical studies including physiology, pharmacology, transplantation, and immunology. In an effort to create the specifically designed rats for biomedical research and regenerative medicine, we have developed the engineered rat system on the basis of transgenic technology and succeeded in establishing various transgenic rat strains. The transgenic rats with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were generated in the two different strains (Wistar and Lewis), in which GFP is driven under the chicken beta-actin promoter and cytomegalovirus enhancer (CAG promoter). Their GFP expression levels were different in each organ, but the Lewis line expressed GFP strongly and ubiquitously in most of the organs compared with that of Wistar. For red fluorescence, DsRed2 was transduced to the Wistar rats: one line specifically expresses DsRed2 in the liver under the mouse albumin promoter, another is designed for the Cre/LoxP system as the double reporter rat (the initial DsRed2 expression turns on GFP in the presence of Cre recombinase). LacZ-transgenic rats represent blue color, and LacZ is driven the CAG (DA) or ROSA26 promoter (Lewis). Our unique transgenic rats" system highlights the powerful performance for the elucidation of many cellular processes in regenerative medicine, leading to innovative medical treatments.

  5. Master-oscillator power-amplifier in the red spectral range for holographic displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume, G.; Pohl, J.; Feise, D.; Wiedmann, J.; Ressel, P.; Eppich, B.; Sahm, A.; Ginolas, A.; Nedow, O.; Jendrzejewski, M.; Johne, P.; Hofmann, J.; Schiemangk, M.; Sumpf, B.; Erbert, G.; Paschke, K.

    2016-03-01

    RGB-light sources with a coherence length of several meters are required for holographic displays. Furthermore, these emitters must feature a high luminance and must be sufficiently small in size, to be employed in today's consumer market products. Therefore, an all-semiconductor based solution is preferred. We developed red-emitting semiconductor lasers at 635 nm and 647 nm with internal distributed Bragg reflectors and suitable amplifiers at these wavelengths to boost the lasers output power. We investigated tapered amplifiers containing a ridge-waveguide section as well as truncated tapered designs in master-oscillator power-amplifier configuration (MOPA). This allowed the generation of diffraction limited single mode emission by the MO-chip and subsequent amplification of the radiation by the PA-chip by more than 10 dB, without significantly degrading the coherence properties. We successfully demonstrated an optical output power of more than 300 mW at 635 nm and 500 mW at 647 nm. The radiation featured a linewidth below 10 MHz, which corresponds to a coherence length of at least several meters, well suited for a holographic system.

  6. Chemical abundances for A-and F-type supergiant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, R. E.; Rivera, H.

    2016-04-01

    We present the stellar parameters and elemental abundances of a set of A-F-type supergiant stars HD 45674, HD 180028, HD 194951 and HD 224893 using high resolution (R≈ 42,000) spectra taken from ELODIE library. We present the first results of the abundance analysis for HD 45674 and HD 224893. We reaffirm the abundances for HD 180028 and HD 194951 studied previously by Luck. Alpha-elements indicate that the objects belong to the thin disc population. Their abundances and their location on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram seem to indicate that HD 45675, HD 194951 and HD 224893 are in the post-first dredge-up (post-1DUP) phase, and that they are moving in the red-blue loop region. HD 180028, on the contary, shows typical abundances of Population I, but its evolutionary status cannot be satisfactorily defined.

  7. Radio frequency-power and the ring-mode to red-mode transition in an inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffer, J. G.; Camparo, J. C.

    2012-04-01

    The optical output of an alkali-metal inductively coupled plasma (alkali-ICP) plays an important role in both atomic magnetometers and atomic clocks, producing these devices' atomic signals through optical pumping. Unfortunately, though the alkali-ICP's optical pumping efficiency grows exponentially with temperature, at relatively high temperatures (˜140 °C) the discharge transitions from "ring mode" to "red mode," which is a spectral change in the plasma's output that corresponds broadly to a transition from "good emission" for optical pumping to "poor emission." Recently, evidence has accumulated pointing to radiation trapping as the mechanism driving the ring-mode to red-mode transition, suggesting that the phenomenon is primarily linked to the alkali vapor's temperature. However, observations of the transition made in the 1960 s, demonstrating that the ICP temperature associated with the transition depended on rf-power, would appear to cast doubt on this mechanism. Here, we carefully investigate the influence of rf-power on the ring-mode to red-mode transition, finding that rf-power only affects the transition through discharge heating. Thus, the present work shows that the primary effect of rf-power on the ring-mode to red-mode transition can be understood in terms of the radiation trapping mechanism.

  8. Radio frequency-power and the ring-mode to red-mode transition in an inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Coffer, J. G.; Camparo, J. C.

    2012-04-15

    The optical output of an alkali-metal inductively coupled plasma (alkali-ICP) plays an important role in both atomic magnetometers and atomic clocks, producing these devices' atomic signals through optical pumping. Unfortunately, though the alkali-ICP's optical pumping efficiency grows exponentially with temperature, at relatively high temperatures ({approx}140 deg. C) the discharge transitions from ''ring mode'' to ''red mode'', which is a spectral change in the plasma's output that corresponds broadly to a transition from ''good emission'' for optical pumping to ''poor emission.'' Recently, evidence has accumulated pointing to radiation trapping as the mechanism driving the ring-mode to red-mode transition, suggesting that the phenomenon is primarily linked to the alkali vapor's temperature. However, observations of the transition made in the 1960 s, demonstrating that the ICP temperature associated with the transition depended on rf-power, would appear to cast doubt on this mechanism. Here, we carefully investigate the influence of rf-power on the ring-mode to red-mode transition, finding that rf-power only affects the transition through discharge heating. Thus, the present work shows that the primary effect of rf-power on the ring-mode to red-mode transition can be understood in terms of the radiation trapping mechanism.

  9. The Type IIb Supernova 2013df and its Cool Supergiant Progenitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDyk, Schuyler D.; Zeng, Weikang; Fox, Ori D.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Filippenko, Alexei; Foley, Ryan J.; Miller, Adam A.; Smith, Nathan; Kelly, Patrick L.; Lee, William H.; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Gal-Yam, Avishay

    2014-01-01

    We have obtained early-time photometry and spectroscopy of supernova (SN) 2013df in NGC 4414. The SN is clearly of Type II b, with notable similarities to SN 1993J. From its luminosity at secondary maximum light, it appears that less Ni-56 (is approximately less than 0.06M) was synthesized in the SN 2013df explosion than was the case for the SNe II b 1993J, 2008ax, and 2011dh. Based on a comparison of the light curves, the SN 2013df progenitor must have been more extended in radius prior to explosion than the progenitor of SN 1993J. The total extinction for SN 2013dfis estimated to be A(sub V) = 0.30 mag. The metallicity at the SN location is likely to be solar. We have conducted Hubble Space Telescope(HST) Target of Opportunity observations of the SN with the Wide Field Camera 3, and from a precise comparison of these new observations to archival HST observations of the host galaxy obtained 14 yr prior to explosion, we have identified the progenitor of SN 2013df to be a yellow supergiant, somewhat hotter than a red supergiant progenitor for a normal Type II-Plateau SN. From its observed spectral energy distribution, assuming that the light is dominated by one star, the progenitor had effective temperature T(sub eff) = 4250+/-100 K and a bolometric luminosity L(sub bol) =10(exp 4.94+/-0.06) Solar Luminosity. This leads to an effective radius Reff = 545+/-65 Solar Radius. The star likely had an initial mass in the range of 13-17Solar Mass; however, if it was a member of an interacting binary system, detailed modeling of the system is required to estimate this mass more accurately. The progenitor star of SN 2013df appears to have been relatively similar to the progenitor of SN 1993J.

  10. Quantitative spectroscopy of blue supergiants in metal-poor dwarf galaxy NGC 3109

    SciTech Connect

    Hosek, Matthew W. Jr.; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Bresolin, Fabio; Urbaneja, Miguel A.; Przybilla, Norbert; Evans, Christopher J.; Pietrzyński, Grzegorz; Gieren, Wolfgang; Carraro, Giovanni E-mail: kud@ifa.hawaii.edu E-mail: Miguel.Urbaneja-Perez@uibk.ac.at E-mail: chris.evans@stfc.ac.uk E-mail: wgieren@astro-udec.cl

    2014-04-20

    We present a quantitative analysis of the low-resolution (∼4.5 Å) spectra of 12 late-B and early-A blue supergiants (BSGs) in the metal-poor dwarf galaxy NGC 3109. A modified method of analysis is presented which does not require use of the Balmer jump as an independent T {sub eff} indicator, as used in previous studies. We determine stellar effective temperatures, gravities, metallicities, reddening, and luminosities, and combine our sample with the early-B-type BSGs analyzed by Evans et al. to derive the distance to NGC 3109 using the flux-weighted gravity-luminosity relation (FGLR). Using primarily Fe-group elements, we find an average metallicity of [ Z-bar ] = –0.67 ± 0.13, and no evidence of a metallicity gradient in the galaxy. Our metallicities are higher than those found by Evans et al. based on the oxygen abundances of early-B supergiants ([ Z-bar ] = –0.93 ± 0.07), suggesting a low α/Fe ratio for the galaxy. We adjust the position of NGC 3109 on the BSG-determined galaxy mass-metallicity relation accordingly and compare it to metallicity studies of H II regions in star-forming galaxies. We derive an FGLR distance modulus of 25.55 ± 0.09 (1.27 Mpc) that compares well with Cepheid and tip of the red giant branch distances. The FGLR itself is consistent with those found in other galaxies, demonstrating the reliability of this method as a measure of extragalactic distances.

  11. Fast radio bursts counterparts in the scenario of supergiant pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, S. B.; Pshirkov, M. S.

    2016-10-01

    We discuss identification of possible counterparts and persistent sources related to fast radio bursts (FRBs) in the framework of the model of supergiant pulses from young neutron stars with large spin-down luminosities. In particular, we demonstrate that at least some of the sources of FRBs can be observed as ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs). At the moment no ULXs are known to be coincident with localization areas of FRBs. We searched for a correlation of FRB positions with galaxies in the 2MASS Redshift survey catalogue. Our analysis produced statistically insignificant overabundance (p-value ≈ 4 per cent) of galaxies in error boxes of FRBs. In the very near future with even modestly increased statistics of FRBs and with the help of dedicated X-ray observations and all-sky X-ray surveys it will be possible to decisively prove or falsify the supergiant pulses model.

  12. Chandra HETG Spectroscopy of the F0 Ib Supergiant Canopus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, A.; Ayres, T. R.; Osten, R. A.; Harper, G. M.

    2000-10-01

    The F0 supergiant Canopus (α Car) was observed by the Chandra X-ray Observatory on 2000 July 21 for 96 ksec using the High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) and the ACIS-S detector. Canopus is the nearest supergiant star at a distance of only 96 pc and undergoing He-burning, post-M-supergiant evolution. It has a hot (107 K) corona with log Lx ~ 29.8 erg s-1, even though it has only a thin convection zone. The HETG data show a coronal emission line spectrum with the strongest lines being from Fe XVII, Ne X, and O VIII. We shall present a detailed analysis of the HETG spectra and the first accurate description of this star's coronal temperature distribution. These coronal properties will be compared with those implied by earlier ASCA, EUVE, ROSAT, and Einstein observations. This work is supported by NASA LTSA grant NAG5-3226, NASA GSRP fellowship NGT5-50241, and the Chandra Guest Observer program.

  13. Luminosities for two yellow supergiants - Nonvariables and the instability strip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Nancy R.

    1993-01-01

    The luminosities for two yellow supergiants HD 183864 and Psi And = HD 223047 are determined from the IUE spectra of their hot companions. The absolute magnitudes of HD 183864 and HD 223047 are -2.3 and -2.1 mag, respectively, and their companions have spectral types of A0.0 V and B8.8 V. The companion of Psi And is compatible with the orbital motion tentatively detected by speckle interferometric observations. The supergiant luminosities are combined with the Cepheid luminosities determined in the same way, and also the variables and nonvariables from Schmidt's studies of open clusters. As found by Schmidt, the variable and nonvariable supergiants have almost no overlap in the HR diagram. The combined sample defines the locus of the helium burning blue loops of evolutionary tracks. Because no nonvariables are found to the blue of fainter Cepheids, the observed blue edge of the Cepheid region may be partly determined by the blue loops rather than by the region of pulsational instability.

  14. On the Dynamic Stability of Cool Supergiant Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobel, A.

    2001-09-01

    We have developed a new formalism to compute the thermodynamic coefficient Γ1 in the theory of stellar and atmospheric stability. We generalize the classical derivation of the first adiabatic index, which is based on the assumption of thermal ionization and equilibrium between gas and radiation temperature, toward an expression that incorporates photoionization due to radiation with a temperature Trad different from the local kinetic gas temperature. Our formalism considers the important non-LTE conditions in the extended atmospheres of supergiant stars. An application to the Kurucz grid of cool supergiant atmospheres demonstrates that models with Trad~=Teff between 6500 and 7500 K become most unstable against dynamic perturbations, according to Ledoux' stability integral <Γ1>. This results from Γ1 and <Γ1> acquiring very low values, below 4/3, throughout the entire stellar atmosphere, which causes very high gas compression ratios around these effective temperatures. Based on detailed non-LTE calculations, we discuss atmospheric instability of pulsating massive yellow supergiants, such as the hypergiant ρ Cas (Ia+), which exist in the extension of the Cepheid instability strip, near the Eddington luminosity limit.

  15. Effects of longitudinal body position and swimming speed on mechanical power of deep red muscle from skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis).

    PubMed

    Syme, Douglas A; Shadwick, Robert E

    2002-01-01

    The mechanical power output of deep, red muscle from skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) was studied to investigate (i) whether this muscle generates maximum power during cruise swimming, (ii) how the differences in strain experienced by red muscle at different axial body locations affect its performance and (iii) how swimming speed affects muscle work and power output. Red muscle was isolated from approximately mid-way through the deep wedge that lies next to the backbone; anterior (0.44 fork lengths, ANT) and posterior (0.70 fork lengths, POST) samples were studied. Work and power were measured at 25 degrees C using the work loop technique. Stimulus phases and durations and muscle strains (+/- 5.5 % in ANT and +/- 8 % in POST locations) experienced during cruise swimming at different speeds were obtained from previous studies and used during work loop recordings. In addition, stimulus conditions that maximized work were determined. The stimulus durations and phases yielding maximum work decreased with increasing cycle frequency (analogous to tail-beat frequency), were the same at both axial locations and were almost identical to those used by the fish during swimming, indicating that the muscle produces near-maximal work under most conditions in swimming fish. While muscle in the posterior region undergoes larger strain and thus produces more mass-specific power than muscle in the anterior region, when the longitudinal distribution of red muscle mass is considered, the anterior muscles appear to contribute approximately 40% more total power. Mechanical work per length cycle was maximal at a cycle frequency of 2-3 Hz, dropping to near zero at 15 Hz and by 20-50% at 1 Hz. Mechanical power was maximal at a cycle frequency of 5 Hz, dropping to near zero at 15 Hz. These fish typically cruise with tail-beat frequencies of 2.8-5.2 Hz, frequencies at which power from cyclic contractions of deep red muscles was 75-100% maximal. At any given frequency over this range, power

  16. Evidence for extended chromospheres surrounding red giant stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stencel, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    Observational evidence and theoretical arguments are summarized which indicate that regions of partially ionized hydrogen extending several stellar radii are an important feature of red giant and supergiant stars. The implications of the existence of extended chromospheres are examined in terms of the nature of the other atmospheres of, and mass loss from cool stars.

  17. Sharpest views of Betelgeuse reveal how supergiant stars lose mass-Unveiling the true face of a behemoth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-07-01

    supergiant star itself. Their unrivalled observations have led the astronomers to propose that these large-scale gas motions roiling under Betelgeuse's red surface are behind the ejection of the massive plume into space. Notes 1] If Betelgeuse were at the centre of our Solar System it would extend out almost to the orbit of Jupiter, engulfing Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars and the main asteroid belt. More information This research was presented in two papers to appear in Astronomy and Astrophysics: The close circumstellar environment of Betelgeuse: Adaptive optics spectro-imaging in the near-IR with VLT/NACO, by Pierre Kervella et al., and Spatially resolving the inhomogeneous structure of the dynamical atmosphere of Betelgeuse with VLTI/AMBER, by Keiichi Ohnaka et al. The teams are composed of P. Kervella, G. Perrin, S. Lacour, and X. Haubois (LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, France), T. Verhoelst (K. U. Leuven, Belgium), S. T. Ridgway (National Optical Astronomy Observatories, USA), and J. Cami (University of Western Ontario, Canada), and of K. Ohnaka, K.-H. Hofmann, T. Driebe, F. Millour, D. Schertl, and G. Weigelt (Max-Planck-Institute for Radio Astronomy, Bonn, Germany), M. Benisty (INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Firenze, Italy), A. Chelli (LAOG, Grenoble, France), R. Petrov and F. Vakili (Lab. H. Fizeau, OCA, Nice, France), and Ph. Stee (Lab. H. Fizeau, OCA, Grasse, France). ESO, the European Southern Observatory, is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world's most productive astronomical observatory. It is supported by 14 countries: Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. ESO carries out an ambitious programme focused on the design, construction and operation of powerful ground-based observing facilities enabling astronomers to make important scientific discoveries. ESO also plays a leading role in promoting and

  18. Spectroscopic studies of yellow supergiants in the open cluster NGC 129

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usenko, I. A.

    2015-09-01

    passed the red edge of the CIS and probably enters the asymptotic giant branch. The theoretical CNO abundance estimates based on evolutionary tracks approximately coincide with the observed ones, while the age estimates for the supergiants are close to the mean cluster age, (7.6 ± 0.4) × 107 yr.

  19. The characterization and risk assessment of the `Red Forest` radioactive waste burial site at Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Bungai, D.A.; Skalskij, A.S.; Dzhepo, S.P.; Waters, R.D.

    1996-06-01

    The `Red Forest` radioactive waste burials created during emergency clean-up activities at Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant represent a serious source of radioactive contamination of the local ground water system with 9OSr concentration in ground water exceeding the drinking water standard by 3-4 orders of magnitude. In this paper we present results of our hydrogeological and radiological `Red Forest` site characterization studies, which allow us to estimate 9OSr subsurface migration parameters. We use then these parameters to assess long terrain radionuclide transport to groundwater and surface water, and to analyze associated health risks. Our analyses indicate that 9OSr transport via ground water pathway from `Red Forest` burials to the adjacent Pripyat River is relatively insignificant due to slow release of 9OSr from the waste burials (less than 1% of inventory per year) and due to long enough ground water residence time in the subsurface, which allows substantial decay of the radioactive contaminant. Tins result and our previous analyses indicate, that though conditions of radioactive waste storage in burials do not satisfy Ukrainian regulation on radiation protection, health risks caused by radionuclide migration to ground water from `Red Forest` burials do not justify application of expensive countermeasures.

  20. Pulsations in B-type supergiants with masses M<20 M_{⊙} before and after core helium ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrowski, J.; Daszyńska-Daszkiewicz, J.

    2015-03-01

    Evolutionary tracks and pulsational analysis of models with masses of 13-18 M⊙ are presented. We address two important questions. The first one deals with one of the most unresolved problems in astrophysics, i.e. the existence of a blue loop after core helium ignition; the so-called to loop or not to loop problem. We show that inward overshooting from the outer convective zone in the red giant phase is prerequisite for the development of the blue loop. Our second question concerns pulsational instability of models in the core helium burning phase. We present for the first time that models on the blue loop can have unstable modes driven by the κ mechanism operating in the Z-bump. Contrary to post-main-sequence models in the shell hydrogen burning phases, pulsational instability of the blue loop models depends mainly on effective temperature and metallicity is of secondary importance. Finally, we try to interpret the oscillation spectrum of the blue supergiant HD 163899, the only member of the slowly pulsating B-type supergiant class and to get some clue on the evolutionary status of the star.

  1. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey. XIX. B-type supergiants: Atmospheric parameters and nitrogen abundances to investigate the role of binarity and the width of the main sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEvoy, C. M.; Dufton, P. L.; Evans, C. J.; Kalari, V. M.; Markova, N.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Vink, J. S.; Walborn, N. R.; Crowther, P. A.; de Koter, A.; de Mink, S. E.; Dunstall, P. R.; Hénault-Brunet, V.; Herrero, A.; Langer, N.; Lennon, D. J.; Maíz Apellániz, J.; Najarro, F.; Puls, J.; Sana, H.; Schneider, F. R. N.; Taylor, W. D.

    2015-03-01

    Context. Model atmosphere analyses have been previously undertaken for both Galactic and extragalactic B-type supergiants. By contrast, little attention has been given to a comparison of the properties of single supergiants and those that are members of multiple systems. Aims: Atmospheric parameters and nitrogen abundances have been estimated for all the B-type supergiants identified in the VLT-FLAMES Tarantula survey. These include both single targets and binary candidates. The results have been analysed to investigate the role of binarity in the evolutionary history of supergiants. Methods: tlusty non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) model atmosphere calculations have been used to determine atmospheric parameters and nitrogen abundances for 34 single and 18 binary supergiants. Effective temperatures were deduced using the silicon balance technique, complemented by the helium ionisation in the hotter spectra. Surface gravities were estimated using Balmer line profiles and microturbulent velocities deduced using the silicon spectrum. Nitrogen abundances or upper limits were estimated from the N ii spectrum. The effects of a flux contribution from an unseen secondary were considered for the binary sample. Results: We present the first systematic study of the incidence of binarity for a sample of B-type supergiants across the theoretical terminal age main sequence (TAMS). To account for the distribution of effective temperatures of the B-type supergiants it may be necessary to extend the TAMS to lower temperatures. This is also consistent with the derived distribution of mass discrepancies, projected rotational velocities and nitrogen abundances, provided that stars cooler than this temperature are post-red supergiant objects. For all the supergiants in the Tarantula and in a previous FLAMES survey, the majority have small projected rotational velocities. The distribution peaks at about 50 km s-1 with 65% in the range 30 km s-1 ≤ vesini ≤ 60 km s-1. About

  2. Abundance analysis of the supergiant stars HD 80057 and HD 80404 based on their UVES Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanrıverdi, T.; Baştürk, Ö.

    2016-08-01

    This study presents elemental abundances of the early A-type supergiant HD 80057 and the late A-type supergiant HD 80404. High resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio spectra published by the UVES Paranal Observatory Project (Bagnulo et al., 2003)1

  3. Magnetic main sequence stars as progenitors of blue supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petermann, I.; Castro, N.; Langer, N.

    2015-01-01

    Blue supergiants (BSGs) to the right the main sequence band in the HR diagram can not be reproduced by standard stellar evolution calculations. We investigate whether a reduced convective core mass due to strong internal magnetic fields during the main sequence might be able to recover this population of stars. We perform calculations with a reduced mass of the hydrogen burning convective core of stars in the mass range 3-30 M ⊙ in a parametric way, which indeed lead to BSGs. It is expected that these BSGs would still show large scale magnetic fields in the order of 10 G.

  4. Low Power, Red, Green and Blue Carbon Nanotube Enabled Vertical Organic Light Emitting Transistors for Active Matrix OLED Displays

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, M. A.; Liu, B.; Donoghue, E. P.; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Kim, D. Y.; So, Franky; Rinzler, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    Organic semiconductors are potential alternatives to polycrystalline silicon as the semiconductor used in the backplane of active matrix organic light emitting diode displays. Demonstrated here is a light-emitting transistor with an organic channel, operating with low power dissipation at low voltage, and high aperture ratio, in three colors: red, green and blue. The single-wall carbon nanotube network source electrode is responsible for the high level of performance demonstrated. A major benefit enabled by this architecture is the integration of the drive transistor, storage capacitor and light emitter into a single device. Performance comparable to commercialized polycrystalline-silicon TFT driven OLEDs is demonstrated.

  5. The Swift Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients outburst factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Patrizia; Kennea, Jamie; Barthelmy, Scott Douglas; Bozzo, Enrico; Burrows, David N.; Ducci, Lorenzo; Esposito, Paolo; Evans, Phil; Gehrels, Neil; Krimm, Hans A.; Vercellone, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    We present the Swift Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients project, which has been exploiting Swift's capabilities in a systematic study of SFXTs and classical supergiant X-ray binaries (SGXBs) since 2007. We performed an efficient long-term monitoring of 16 sources including both SFXTs and classical SGXBs and followed source activity across more than 4 orders of magnitude in X-ray luminosity, sampling the light curves on timescales spanning from few hundred seconds to years. We use our measurements of dynamic ranges, duty cycles as a function of luminosity, and luminosity distributions to highlight systematic differences that help discriminate between different theoretical models proposed to explain the differences between the wind accretion processes in SFXTs and classical SGXBs. Our follow-ups of the SFXT outbursts provide a steady advancement in the comprehension of the mechanisms triggering the high X-ray level emission of these sources. In particular, the recent observations of the outburst of the SFXT prototype IGR J17544-2619 on 2014 October 10, when the source reached a peak luminosity of 3x1038 erg s-1, challenged, for the first time, the maximum theoretical luminosity achievable by a wind-fed neutron star high mass X-ray binary. We propose that this giant outburst was due to the formation of a transient accretion disc around the compact object.

  6. High-power high-brightness semiconductor tapered diode lasers for the red and near infrared spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumpf, B.; Wenzel, H.; Erbert, G.

    2010-02-01

    The most promising concept to achieve high-output power together with a good beam quality is the tapered laser consisting of a straight ridge waveguide (RW) section and a tapered gain-region. The RW section should support only the fundamental guided mode and should suppress higher order modes. The taper angle has to be selected with respect to the lateral divergence of the beam propagating from the RW to the tapered section. High brightness tapered devices in the wavelength range between 635 nm and 1085 nm will be presented. For red emitting tapered lasers around 650 nm, the output power is limited to about 1 W due to the properties of the laser material. At this output power a beam propagation ratio M2 of 1.3 and a brightness of 100 MW•cm-2•sr-1 will be shown. Devices made from laser structures with low vertical divergence down to 25° (95% power included) without a significant deterioration of device parameters will be presented for the longer wavelength range near 1 μm. For tapered lasers manufactured from these structures, nearly diffraction limited output powers larger than 10 W and a brightness of 1 GW•cm-2•sr-1 were measured.

  7. The quest for blue supergiants : The evolution of the progenitor of SN 1987A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Athira; Heger, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    SN 1987A is historically one of the most remarkable supernova explosions to be seen from Earth. Due to the proximity of its location in the LMC, it remains the most well-studied object outside the solar system. It was also the only supernova whose progenitor was observed prior to its explosion.SN 1987A however, was a unique and enigmatic core collapse supernova. It was the first Type II supernova to have been observed to have exploded while its progenitor was a blue supergiant (BSG). Until then Type II supernovae were expected to originate from explosions of red supergiants (RSGs). A spectacular triple-ring nebula structure, rich in helium and nitrogen, was observed around the remnant, indicating a recent RSG phase before becoming a BSG. Even today it is not entirely understood what the evolutionary history may have been to cause a BSG to explode. The most commonly accepted hypothesis for its origin is the merger of a massive binary star system.An evolutionary scenario for such a binary system, was proposed by Podsiadlowski (1992) (P92). Through SPH simulations of the merger and the stellar evolution of the post-merger remnant, Ivanova & Podsiadlowski (2002) and (2003) (I&M) could successfully obtain the RSG to BSG transition of the progenitor.The aim of the present work is to produce the evolutionary history of the progenitor of SN 1987A and its explosion. We construct our models based on the results of P92 and I&M. Here, the secondary (less massive) star is accreted on the primary, while being simultaneously mixed in its envelope over a period of 100 years. The merged star is evolved until the onset of core collapse. For this work we use the 1-dimensional, implicit, hydrodynamical stellar evolution code, KEPLER. A large parameter space is explored, consisting of primary (16-20 Ms) and secondary masses (5-8 Ms), mixing boundaries, and accreting timescales. Those models whose end states match the observed properties of the progenitor of SN 1987A are exploded. The

  8. Core collapse supernovae from blue supergiant progenitors : The evolutionary history of SN 1987A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Athira

    2015-08-01

    SN 1987A is historically one of the most remarkable supernova explosions to be seen from Earth. Due to the proximity of its location in the LMC, it remains the most well-studied object outside the solar system. It was also the only supernova whose progenitor was observed prior to its explosion.SN 1987A however, was a unique and enigmatic core collapse supernova. It was the first Type II supernova to have been observed to have exploded while its progenitor was a blue supergiant (BSG). Until then Type II supernovae were expected to originate from explosions of red supergiants (RSGs). A spectacular triple-ring nebula structure, rich in helium and nitrogen, was observed around the remnant, indicating a recent RSG phase before becoming a BSG. Even today it is not entirely understood what the evolutionary history may have been to cause a BSG to explode. The most commonly accepted hypothesis for its origin is the merger of a massive binary star system.An evolutionary scenario for such a binary system, was proposed by Podsiadlowski (1992) (P92). Through SPH simulations of the merger and the stellar evolution of the post-merger remnant, Ivanova & Podsiadlowski (2002) and (2003) (I&M) could successfully obtain the RSG to BSG transition of the progenitor.The aim of the present work is to produce the evolutionary history of the progenitor of SN 1987A and its explosion. We construct our models based on the results of P92 and I&M. Here, the secondary (less massive) star is accreted on the primary, while being simultaneously mixed in its envelope over a period of 100 years. The merged star is evolved until the onset of core collapse. For this work we use the 1-dimensional, implicit, hydrodynamical stellar evolution code, KEPLER. A large parameter space is explored, consisting of primary (16-20 Ms) and secondary masses (5-8 Ms), mixing boundaries, and accreting timescales. Those models whose end states match the observed properties of the progenitor of SN 1987A are exploded. The

  9. Spectroscopic studies of four southern-hemisphere G-K supergiants: HD 192876 (α1 Cap), HD 194215 (HR 7801), HD 206834 (c Cap), and HD 222574 (104 Aqr)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usenko, I. A.; Kniazev, A. Yu.; Berdnikov, L. N.; Kravtsov, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    We have studied the high-resolution spectra taken with the 1.9-m telescope of the South African Astronomical Observatory for four supergiants that are deemed to be nonvariable and to lie beyond the red edge of the Cepheid instability strip (CIS): HD 192876, HD 194215, HD 206834, and HD 222574. The atmospheric parameters, reddenings, luminosities, distances, radii, and chemical composition have been determined for these stars. Based on these results, we have ascertained thatHD194215 is not a mainsequence star but an ordinary supergiant. All objects exhibit a nearly solar metallicity. The abundances of carbon and oxygen in HD 194215 and HD 206834 are nearly solar, while they are underabundant in HD 192876 and HD 222574. The abundances of sodium, magnesium, and aluminum are different for all objects, while those of the remaining elements are nearly solar. For HD 206834, the measured radial velocity exceeds its previously known values by a factor of 3, while the asymmetric knifelike profiles of the Ha and Hß absorption lines suggest the existence of an extended envelope around the star. Similar profiles of hydrogen absorption lines and strong lines of some metals with low lower-level excitation potentials have also been revealed in the spectrum of HD 222574. The positions of the supergiants on the effective temperature-luminosity diagram in comparison with the evolutionary tracks of the stars have shown their masses to lie within the range 3.4-4.3 M ⊙. HD 194215 and HD 206834 have crossed the CIS for the first time, with the latter object being near the stage of transformation into a red supergiant. HD 192876 and HD 222574 have already passed the first dredge-up and probably move from right to left, crossing the CIS for the second time. The position of HD 222574 near the red CIS edge is probably attributable to its Cepheid-like brightness and radial velocity variations.

  10. High-power red, orange, and green Pr³⁺:LiYF₄ lasers.

    PubMed

    Metz, Philip Werner; Reichert, Fabian; Moglia, Francesca; Müller, Sebastian; Marzahl, Daniel-Timo; Kränkel, Christian; Huber, Günter

    2014-06-01

    Laser experiments with Pr(3+):LiYF4 under excitation with a frequency doubled optically pumped semiconductor laser emitting 5 W at 479 nm were performed at seven different laser wavelengths of 523, 546, 604, 607, 640, 698, and 720 nm. At all these wavelengths the output power exceeded 1 W. The best performance at 523 nm with an output power of 2.9 W at a slope efficiency of 72% and an optical-to-optical efficiency of 67% with respect to the incident pump power represents the highest efficiency ever reported for a praseodymium-doped laser material. PMID:24876010

  11. Spectroscopic Analysis of the Supergiant Star HD 54605

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña, L.; Rosenzweig, P.; Guzmán, E.; Hearnshaw, J.

    2009-05-01

    The main purpose of the present study is to analyze a high resolution spectrum of the supergiant star HD 54605, obtained in the year 2003, with a CCD coupled with the spectrograph HERCULES, attached to the 1m reflector telescope of Mt. John Observatory of the University of Canterbury (New Zealand). This spectrum covers the region λλ ≈ 4505-7080Å, with R = 41000 and a dispersion of ≈ 2Å/mm. According to previous spectroscopic observations, of low dispersion, the radial velocity of this star showed that it does not vary in periods of time relatively short. Until the present, we have identified five hundred photospheric lines, from which, with no doubt, we will obtain a satisfactory result that will give an important contribution to the database of the values of the radial velocity of HD 54605. We observe that Hβ, shows a relatively wide and deep profile and is in complete absorption.

  12. Long-term spectropolarimetric monitoring of the cool supergiant betelgeuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedecarrax, I.; Petit, P.; Aurière, M.; Grunhut, J.; Wade, G.; Chiavassa, A.; Donati, J.-F.; Konstantinova-Antova, R.; Perrin, G.

    2013-05-01

    We report on a long-term monitoring of the cool supergiant Betelgeuse, using the NARVAL and ESPaDOnS high-resolution spectropolarimeters, respectively installed at Telescope Bernard Lyot (Pic du Midi Observatory, France) and at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (Mauna Kea Observatory, Hawaii). The data set, constituted of circularly polarized (Stokes V) and intensity (Stokes I) spectra, was collected between 2010 and 2012. We investigate here the temporal evolution of magnetic field, convection and temperature at photospheric level, using simultaneous measurements of the longitudinal magnetic field component, the core emission of the Ca II infrared triplet, the line-depth ratio of selected photospheric lines and the radial velocity of the star.

  13. Reanalysis with optimized power of red blood cell acetylcholinesterase activity from a 1-year dietary treatment of dogs to chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, J L; Holden, L; Eisenbrandt, D L; Gibson, J E

    2001-03-01

    A no-observed-effect level (NOEL) of 0.1 mg/kg/day was reported for inhibition of red blood cell (RBC) acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in two groups of Beagle dogs fed chlorpyrifos (0, 0.01, 0.03, 0.1, 1 or 3 mg/kg/day) in the diet for 1 or 2 years (McCollister et al., Food Cosmet. Toxicol. 12 (1974) 45-61). The statistical analyses were by t-test that had low statistical power due to small sample sizes. Common time points for blood samples in both phases allowed a reanalysis of the grouped data over a 1-year time period. The reanalysis increased statistical power by increasing the sample size to n=14 from n=3 or 4, and decreasing the variance, by statistical step-by-step aggregation of the data from both phases, both sexes, and four sample periods. Factors retained in the ANOVA were dose, sex, and phase (sex-by-dose was not significant). Contrasts with one-sided t-tests indicated the 1 and 3 mg/kg/day groups had significantly inhibited RBC AChE (P<0.0001). At alpha=0.05, the uncorrected one-sided model had 80% power to detect a 12% decrease, 93% power for a 15% decrease, and 99.5% power for a 20% decrease in AChE activity. Overall, the reanalysis had high power to detect a clinically significant decrease in RBC AChE activity, and substantiated the original NOEL for chronic treatment of dogs to dietary chlorpyrifos at 0.1 mg/kg/day. PMID:11246135

  14. Searching for supergiant fast X-ray transients with Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, P.; Bozzo, E.; Esposito, P.; Sbarufatti, B.; Haberl, F.; Ponti, G.; D'Avanzo, P.; Ducci, L.; Segreto, A.; Jin, C.; Masetti, N.; Del Santo, M.; Campana, S.; Mangano, V.

    2016-09-01

    Supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs) are high mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) hosting a neutron star and an OB supergiant companion. We examine the available Swift data, as well as other new or archival/serendipitous data, on three sources: IGR J17407-2808, 2XMM J185114.3-000004, and IGR J18175-2419, whose X-ray characteristics qualify them as candidate SFXT, to explore their properties and test whether they are consistent with an SFXT nature. Since IGR J17407-2808 and 2XMM J185114.3-000004 triggered the Burst Alert Telescope on board Swift, the Swift data enable us to provide their first arcsecond localisations, leading to an unequivocal identification of the source CXOU J174042.0-280724 as the soft X-ray counterpart of IGR J17407-2808, as well as their first broadband spectra, which can be fit with models generally describing accreting neutron stars in HMXBs. While still lacking optical spectroscopy to assess the spectral type of the companion, we propose 2XMM J185114.3-000004 as a very strong SFXT candidate. The nature of IGR J17407-2808 remains, instead, more uncertain. Its broadband properties cannot exclude the fact that the emission originates from either an HMXB (and in that case, an SFXT) or, more likely, a low-mass X-ray binary. Finally, based on the deep non-detection in our XRT monitoring campaign and a careful reanalysis of the original INTEGRAL data in which the discovery of the source was first reported, we show that IGR J18175-2419 is likely a spurious detection.

  15. Variability and mass loss in IA O-B-A supergiants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schild, R. E.; Garrison, R. F.; Hiltner, W. A.

    1983-01-01

    Recently completed catalogs of MK spectral types and UBV photometry of 1227 OB stars in the southern Milky Way have been analyzed to investigate brightness and color variability among the Ia supergiants. It is found that brightness variability is common among the O9-B1 supergiants with typical amplitudes about 0.1 and time scales longer than a week and shorter than 1000 days. Among the A supergiants fluctuations in U-B color are found on similar time scales and with amplitude about 0.1. For many early Ia supergiants there is a poor correlation between Balmer jump and spectral type, as had been known previously. An attempt to correlate the Balmer jump deficiency with mass loss rate yielded uncertain results.

  16. The energy distributions of B supergiants in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzpatrick, Edward L.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that line-blanketed, LTE, plane-parallel model atmosphere calculations provide excellent fits to the ultraviolet-through-visual energy distributions of B supergiants in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The models were computed using Kurucz's (1979) ATLAS atmosphere program, but with lower gravities than were contained in Kurucz's published model grid. The ultraviolet continua of low gravity stars are found to be sensitive to changes in temperature and gravity. Measurements of Teff and log g for ten LMC B supergiants from model atmosphere fits to the energy distributions yield estimates of their radii, luminosities, and masses. Model atmosphere fits suggest that the late B supergiants have significantly lower masses than the earlier B types of the same luminosity, contrary to stellar evolution theory which predicts that B supergiants are in a post-core hydrogen burning phase and should evolve very quickly and at essentially constant mass.

  17. An HST COS 'SNAPSHOT' spectrum of the K supergiant λ Vel (K4Ib-II)

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Harper, Graham M.; Kober, Gladys; Nielsen, Krister E.; Wahlgren, Glenn M.

    2014-10-10

    We present a far-ultraviolet spectrum of the K4 Ib-II supergiant λ Vel obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope's Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) as a part of the SNAPshot program 'SNAPing coronal iron' (GO 11687). The observation covers a wavelength region (1326-1467 Å) not previously recorded for λ Vel at a spectral resolving power of R ∼ 20,000 and displays strong emission and absorption features, superposed on a bright chromospheric continuum. Fluorescent excitation is responsible for much of the observed emission, mainly powered by strong H I Lyα and the O I (UV 2) triplet emission near λ1304. The molecular CO and H{sub 2} fluorescences are weaker than in the early-K giant α Boo while the Fe II and Cr II lines, also pumped by H I Lyα, are stronger in λ Vel. This pattern of relative line strengths between the two stars is explained by the lower iron-group element abundance in α Boo, which weakens that star's Fe II and Cr II emission without reducing the molecular fluorescences. The λ Vel spectrum shows fluorescent Fe II, Cr II, and H{sub 2} emission similar to that observed in the M supergiant α Ori, but more numerous well-defined narrow emissions from CO. The additional CO emissions are visible in the spectrum of λ Vel since that star does not have the cool, opaque circumstellar shells that surround α Ori and produce broad circumstellar CO (A-X) band absorptions that hide those emissions in the cooler star. The presence of Si IV emission in λ Vel indicates a ∼8 × 10{sup 4} K plasma that is mixed into the cooler chromosphere. Evidence of the stellar wind is seen in the C II λλ1334,1335 lines and in the blueshifted Fe II and Ni II wind absorption lines. Line modeling using Sobolev with Exact Integration for the C II lines indicates a larger terminal velocity (∼45 versus ∼30 km s{sup –1}) and turbulence (∼27 versus <21 km s{sup –1}) with a more quickly accelerating wind (β = 0.35 versus 0.7) at the time of this COS observation in

  18. The wind momentum-luminosity relationship of galactic A- and B-supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudritzki, R. P.; Puls, J.; Lennon, D. J.; Venn, K. A.; Reetz, J.; Najarro, F.; McCarthy, J. K.; Herrero, A.

    1999-10-01

    The Balmer lines of four A Ia-supergiants (spectral type A0 to A3) and fourteen B Ia and Ib-supergiants (spectral type B0 to B3) in the solar neighbourhood are analyzed by means of NLTE unified model atmospheres to determine the properties of their stellar winds, in particular their wind momenta. As in previous work for O-stars (Puls et al. \\cite{pul96}) a tight relationship between stellar wind momentum and luminosity (``WLR'') is found. However, the WLR varies as function of spectral type. Wind momenta are strongest for O-supergiants, then decrease from early B (B0 and B1) to mid B (B1.5 to B3) spectral types and become stronger again for A-supergiants. The slope of the WLR appears to be steeper for A- and mid B-supergiants than for O-supergiants. The spectral type dependence is interpreted as an effect of ionization changing the effective number and the line strength distribution function of spectral lines absorbing photon momentum around the stellar flux maximum. This interpretation needs to be confirmed by theoretical calculations for radiation driven winds. The ``Pistol-Star'' in the Galactic Centre, an extreme mid B-hypergiant recently identified as one of the most luminous stars (Figer et al. \\cite{fig99}) is found to coincide with the extrapolation of the mid B-supergiant WLR towards higher luminosities. However, the wind momentum of the Luminous Blue Variable P Cygni, a mid B-supergiant with extremely strong mass-loss, is 1.2 dex higher than the WLR of the ``normal'' supergiants. This significant difference is explained in terms of the well-known stellar wind bi-stability of supergiants very close to the Eddinton-limit in this particular range of effective temperatures. A-supergiants in M31 observed with HIRES at the Keck telescope have wind momenta compatible with their galactic counterparts. The potential of the WLR as a new, independent extragalactic distance indicator is discussed. It is concluded that with ten to twenty objects, photometry with HST

  19. Yb-fiber laser pumped high-power, broadly tunable, single-frequency red source based on a singly resonant optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Mukesh Kumar; Maji, Partha Sona; Das, Ritwick

    2016-07-01

    We present an efficient and tunable source generating multi-watt single-frequency red radiation by intra-cavity frequency doubling of the signal in a MgO-doped periodically poled LiNbO3 (MgO:PPLN)-based singly resonant optical parametric oscillator (SRO). By optimally designing the SRO cavity in a six-mirror configuration, we generate ≈276  nm tunable idler radiation in mid-infrared with a maximum power of Pi=2.05  W at a pump power of Pp=14.0  W. The resonant signal is frequency doubled using a 10 mm-long BiB3O6 (BiBO) crystal which resulted in tunability of a red beam from ≈753 to 780 nm band with maximum power Pr≈4.0  W recorded at λr≈756  nm. The deployment of a six-mirror SRO ensures single-frequency generation of red across the entire tuning range by inducing additional losses to Raman modes of LiNbO3 and, thus, inhibiting their oscillation. Using a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI), nominal linewidth of the red beam is measured to ≈3  MHz which changes marginally over the entire tuning range. Long-term (over 1 h) peak-to-peak frequency fluctuation of the generated red beam is estimated to be about 3.3 GHz under free-running conditions at Pp=14.0  W. The generated red beam is delivered in a TEM00 mode profile with M2≤1.32 at maximum power in a red beam.

  20. Yb-fiber laser pumped high-power, broadly tunable, single-frequency red source based on a singly resonant optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Mukesh Kumar; Maji, Partha Sona; Das, Ritwick

    2016-07-01

    We present an efficient and tunable source generating multi-watt single-frequency red radiation by intra-cavity frequency doubling of the signal in a MgO-doped periodically poled LiNbO3 (MgO:PPLN)-based singly resonant optical parametric oscillator (SRO). By optimally designing the SRO cavity in a six-mirror configuration, we generate ≈276  nm tunable idler radiation in mid-infrared with a maximum power of Pi=2.05  W at a pump power of Pp=14.0  W. The resonant signal is frequency doubled using a 10 mm-long BiB3O6 (BiBO) crystal which resulted in tunability of a red beam from ≈753 to 780 nm band with maximum power Pr≈4.0  W recorded at λr≈756  nm. The deployment of a six-mirror SRO ensures single-frequency generation of red across the entire tuning range by inducing additional losses to Raman modes of LiNbO3 and, thus, inhibiting their oscillation. Using a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI), nominal linewidth of the red beam is measured to ≈3  MHz which changes marginally over the entire tuning range. Long-term (over 1 h) peak-to-peak frequency fluctuation of the generated red beam is estimated to be about 3.3 GHz under free-running conditions at Pp=14.0  W. The generated red beam is delivered in a TEM00 mode profile with M2≤1.32 at maximum power in a red beam. PMID:27367094

  1. A possible energy source to power stable auroral red arcs - Precipitating electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, D. W.; Kleckner, E. W.; Gurgiolo, C.; Winningham, J. D.; Kozyra, J. U.

    1987-01-01

    Results of coincident measurements by ground-based photometers and the low-altitude plasma instrument on board the Dynamics Explorer 2 satellite are presented that demonstrate the association of precipitating low-energy electrons with stable auroral red (SAR) arcs. A search of available data has yielded 23 instances of DE 2 overflights during the presence of SAR arcs being monitored by the photometers. For each case, downward fluxes of electrons are found to be enhanced along field lines penetrating the arcs in relation to regions both north and south of the features. Modeling of the atmospheric response to these influxes indicates that these electrons can represent a major source of the energy required to establish temperature profiles within the ionospheric electron gas that are sufficient to produce the recorded 6300-A emission rates. The sensitivity of these results to uncertainties of the assumed spacecraft potential and thermospheric composition has been investigated and found to be important, but does not alter the conclusion that precipitating electrons are a fundamental link in the production of SAR arcs.

  2. PTF11iqb: cool supergiant mass-loss that bridges the gap between Type IIn and normal supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nathan; Mauerhan, Jon C.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Graham, Melissa L.; Leonard, Douglas C.; Horst, J. Chuck; Williams, G. Grant; Andrews, Jennifer E.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Nugent, Peter; Sullivan, Mark; Maguire, Kate; Xu, Dong; Ben-Ami, Sagi

    2015-05-01

    The supernova (SN) PTF11iqb was initially classified as a Type IIn event caught very early after explosion. It showed narrow Wolf-Rayet (WR) spectral features on day 2 (as in SN 1998S and SN 2013cu), but the narrow emission weakened quickly and the spectrum morphed to resemble Types II-L and II-P. At late times, Hα exhibited a complex, multipeaked profile reminiscent of SN 1998S. In terms of spectroscopic evolution, we find that PTF11iqb was a near twin of SN 1998S, although with somewhat weaker interaction with circumstellar material (CSM) at early times, and stronger interaction at late times. We interpret the spectral changes as caused by early interaction with asymmetric CSM that is quickly (by day 20) enveloped by the expanding SN ejecta photosphere, but then revealed again after the end of the plateau when the photosphere recedes. The light curve can be matched with a simple model for CSM interaction (with a mass-loss rate of roughly 10-4 M⊙ yr-1) added to the light curve of a normal SN II-P. The underlying plateau requires a progenitor with an extended hydrogen envelope like a red supergiant at the moment of explosion, consistent with the slow wind speed (<80 km s-1) inferred from narrow Hα emission. The cool supergiant progenitor is significant because PTF11iqb showed WR features in its early spectrum - meaning that the presence of such WR features does not necessarily indicate a WR-like progenitor. Overall, PTF11iqb bridges SNe IIn with weaker pre-SN mass-loss seen in SNe II-L and II-P, implying a continuum between these types.

  3. QUANTITATIVE SPECTROSCOPY OF BLUE SUPERGIANT STARS IN THE DISK OF M81: METALLICITY, METALLICITY GRADIENT, AND DISTANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Urbaneja, Miguel A.; Gazak, Zachary; Bresolin, Fabio; Przybilla, Norbert; Gieren, Wolfgang; Pietrzynski, Grzegorz E-mail: urbaneja@ifa.hawaii.edu E-mail: bresolin@ifa.hawaii.edu E-mail: wgieren@astro-udec.cl

    2012-03-01

    The quantitative spectral analysis of low-resolution ({approx}5 A) Keck LRIS spectra of blue supergiants in the disk of the giant spiral galaxy M81 is used to determine stellar effective temperatures, gravities, metallicities, luminosities, interstellar reddening, and a new distance using the flux-weighted gravity-luminosity relationship. Substantial reddening and extinction are found with E(B - V) ranging between 0.13 and 0.38 mag and an average value of 0.26 mag. The distance modulus obtained after individual reddening corrections is 27.7 {+-} 0.1 mag. The result is discussed with regard to recently measured tip of the red giant branch and Cepheid distances. The metallicities (based on elements such as iron, titanium, magnesium) are supersolar ( Almost-Equal-To 0.2 dex) in the inner disk (R {approx}< 5 kpc) and slightly subsolar ( Almost-Equal-To - 0.05 dex) in the outer disk (R {approx}> 10 kpc) with a shallow metallicity gradient of 0.034 dex kpc{sup -1}. The comparison with published oxygen abundances of planetary nebulae and metallicities determined through fits of Hubble Space Telescope color-magnitude diagrams indicates a late metal enrichment and a flattening of the abundance gradient over the last 5 Gyr. This might be the result of gas infall from metal-rich satellite galaxies. Combining these M81 metallicities with published blue supergiant abundance studies in the Local Group and the Sculptor Group, a galaxy mass-metallicity relationship based solely on stellar spectroscopic studies is presented and compared with recent studies of Sloan Digital Sky Survey star-forming galaxies.

  4. Neutrino mass constraint from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey power spectrum of luminous red galaxies and perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Shun; Takada, Masahiro; Taruya, Atsushi

    2011-02-01

    We compare the model power spectrum, computed based on perturbation theory, with the power spectrum of luminous red galaxies (LRG) measured from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 catalog, assuming a flat, cold dark matter-dominated cosmology. The model includes the effects of massive neutrinos, nonlinear matter clustering and nonlinear, scale-dependent galaxy bias in a self-consistent manner. We first test the accuracy of the perturbation theory model by comparing the model predictions with the halo power spectrum in real- and redshift-space, measured from 70 simulation realizations for a cold dark matter model without massive neutrinos. We show that the perturbation theory model with bias parameters being properly adjusted can fairly well reproduce the simulation results. As a result, the best-fit parameters obtained from the hypothetical parameter fitting recover, within statistical uncertainties, the input cosmological parameters in simulations, including an upper bound on neutrino mass, if the power spectrum information up to k≃0.15hMpc-1 is used. However, for the redshift-space power spectrum, the best-fit cosmological parameters show a sizable bias from the input values if using the information up to k≃0.2hMpc-1, probably due to nonlinear redshift distortion effect. Given these tests, we decided, as a conservative choice, to use the LRG power spectrum up to k=0.1hMpc-1 in order to minimize possible unknown nonlinearity effects. In combination with the recent results from Wilkinson Microwave Background Anisotropy Probe (WMAP), we derive a robust upper bound on the sum of neutrino masses, given as ∑mν≤0.81eV (95% C.L.), marginalized over other parameters including nonlinear bias parameters and dark energy equation of state parameter. The upper bound is only slightly improved to ∑mν≤0.80eV if including the LRG spectrum up to k=0.2hMpc-1, due to severe parameter degeneracies, although the constraint may be biased as discussed above. The

  5. A NEW DISTANCE TO M33 USING BLUE SUPERGIANTS AND THE FGLR METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    U, Vivian; Urbaneja, Miguel A.; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Jacobs, Bradley A.; Bresolin, Fabio; Przybilla, Norbert E-mail: urbaneja@ifa.hawaii.ed E-mail: bjacobs@ifa.hawaii.ed E-mail: przybilla@sternwarte.uni-erlangen.d

    2009-10-20

    The quantitative spectral analysis of medium resolution optical spectra of A and B supergiants obtained with DEIMOS and ESI at the Keck Telescopes is used to determine a distance modulus of 24.93 +- 0.11 mag (968 +- 50 kpc) for the Triangulum Galaxy M33. The analysis yields stellar effective temperatures, gravities, interstellar reddening, and extinction, the combination of which provides a distance estimate via the flux-weighted gravity-luminosity relationship (FGLR). This result is based on an FGLR calibration that is continually being polished. An average reddening of (E(B - V)) approx 0.08 mag is found, with a large variation ranging from 0.01 to 0.16 mag, however, demonstrating the importance of accurate individual reddening measurements for stellar distance indicators in galaxies with evident signatures of interstellar absorption. The large-distance modulus found is in good agreement with recent work on eclipsing binaries, planetary nebulae, long-period variables, RR Lyrae stars, and also with Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of Cepheids, if reasonable reddening assumptions are made for the Cepheids. Since distances based on the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) method found in the literature give conflicting results, we have used HST Advanced Camera for Surveys V- and I-band images of outer regions of M33 to determine a TRGB distance of 24.84 +- 0.10 mag, in basic agreement with the FGLR result. We have also determined stellar metallicities and discussed the metallicity gradient in the disk of M33. We find metallicity of Z {sub sun} at the center and 0.3 Z {sub sun} in the outskirts at a distance of one isophotal radius. The average logarithmic metallicity gradient is -0.07 +- 0.01 dex kpc{sup -1}. However, there is a large scatter around this average value, very similar to what has been found for the H II regions in M33.

  6. Hα Variability in the A0 Ia-Type Supergiant HR 1040

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, N. D.; Gordon, K. D.

    1995-12-01

    HR 1040 (= HD 21389) is a well-known example of a luminous star with mass loss, photometric and radial-velocity variability, and a variable Hα profile. Caplinger (1991, M. S. thesis, U. Toledo) found that the Hα profile shows, at various times, different morphologies: P Cygni, inverse P Cygni, and Type III P Cygni (emission on both sides of the absorption). This result indicates that this star's wind is not steady and/or not spherically symmetric. We studied 43 CCD echelle spectra obtained between 1993 Sep. and 1994 Dec. with the 1-m telescope of Ritter Observatory. The spectral resolution of this material is 0.23 Angstroms at lambda 5800, and the continuum SNR is usually comfortably above 100 in an exposure time of 20 min or less. The spectral coverage consists of 9 disjoint 70- Angstroms regions in the yellow and red; features of interest in these spectra are Hα , He I lambda 5876, and Si II lambda lambda 6347, 6371. In addition to confirming the morphological variability found by Caplinger, our data show two episodes of dramatic increases in the width and the equivalent width of the absorption component of Hα , with the equivalent width attaining values as large as 2 Angstroms, as compared to a baseline value around 0.5 Angstroms. During these episodes, the absorption feature often showed two or more sub-components. In addition, the equivalent width of Si II lambda 6347 increased by amounts up to 50%. Presumably, these events can be interpreted as episodes of enhanced mass loss. Collection and analysis of spectra of this star are continuing at Ritter Observatory. If this star is typical of A-type supergiants in the variability of its Hα profile, our results can be used to assess the accuracy of distance estimates to external galaxies based on mass loss as a luminosity indicator in these stars (Kudritzki et al. 1992, A&A 257, 655).

  7. Luminous and variable stars in M31 and M33. II. Luminous blue variables, candidate LBVs, Fe II emission line stars, and other supergiants

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, Roberta M.; Davidson, Kris; Weis, Kerstin; Bomans, D. J.; Burggraf, Birgitta E-mail: kweis@astro.rub.de

    2014-07-20

    An increasing number of non-terminal eruptions are being found in the numerous surveys for optical transients. Very little is known about these giant eruptions, their progenitors and their evolutionary state. A greatly improved census of the likely progenitor class, including the most luminous evolved stars, the luminous blue variables (LBVs), and the warm and cool hypergiants is now needed for a complete picture of the final pre-supernova stages of very massive stars. We have begun a survey of the evolved and unstable luminous star populations in several nearby resolved galaxies. In this second paper on M31 and M33, we review the spectral characteristics, spectral energy distributions, circumstellar ejecta, and evidence for mass loss for 82 luminous and variable stars. We show that many of these stars have warm circumstellar dust including several of the Fe II emission line stars, but conclude that the confirmed LBVs in M31 and M33 do not. The confirmed LBVs have relatively low wind speeds even in their hot, quiescent or visual minimum state compared to the B-type supergiants and Of/WN stars which they spectroscopically resemble. The nature of the Fe II emission line stars and their relation to the LBV state remains uncertain, but some have properties in common with the warm hypergiants and the sgB[e] stars. Several individual stars are discussed in detail. We identify three possible candidate LBVs and three additional post-red supergiant candidates. We suggest that M33-013406.63 (UIT301,B416) is not an LBV/S Dor variable, but is a very luminous late O-type supergiant and one of the most luminous stars or pair of stars in M33.

  8. CHARA/MIRC observations of two M supergiants in Perseus OB1: Temperature, bayesian modeling, and compressed sensing imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, F.; Monnier, J. D.; Anderson, M.; Aarnio, A.; Kiss, L. L.; Neilson, H. R.; Zhao, M.; Pedretti, E.; Thureau, N.; Ten Brummelaar, T. A.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Turner, N.; Ridgway, S. T.; McAlister, H. A.

    2014-04-10

    Two red supergiants (RSGs) of the Per OB1 association, RS Per and T Per, have been observed in the H band using the Michigan Infra-Red Combiner (MIRC) instrument at the CHARA array. The data show clear evidence of a departure from circular symmetry. We present here new techniques specially developed to analyze such cases, based on state-of-the-art statistical frameworks. The stellar surfaces are first modeled as limb-darkened disks based on SATLAS models that fit both MIRC interferometric data and publicly available spectrophotometric data. Bayesian model selection is then used to determine the most probable number of spots. The effective surface temperatures are also determined and give further support to the recently derived hotter temperature scales of RSGs. The stellar surfaces are reconstructed by our model-independent imaging code SQUEEZE, making use of its novel regularizer based on Compressed Sensing theory. We find excellent agreement between the model-selection results and the reconstructions. Our results provide evidence for the presence of near-infrared spots representing about 3%-5% of the stellar flux.

  9. X-ray Variability in the Hot Supergiant zgr Orionis.

    PubMed

    Berghöfer, T W; Schmitt, J H

    1994-09-16

    Hot massive stars represent only a small fraction of the stellar population of the galaxy, but their enormous luminosities make them visible over large distances. Therefore, they are ideal standard candles, used to determine distances of near galaxies. Their mass loss due to supersonic winds driven by radiation pressure contributes significantly to the interstellar medium and thus to the chemical evolution of galaxies. All hot stars are soft x-ray sources; in contrast to the sun with its highly variable x-ray flux, long time scale x-ray variability is not common among hot stars. An analysis is presented here of an unusual increase in x-ray flux observed with the roentgen observatory satellite during a period of 2 days for the hot supergiant zeta Orionis, the only episode of x-ray variability that has been found in a hot star. These observations provide the most direct evidence so far for the scenario of shock-heated gas in the winds of hot stars. PMID:17770897

  10. Accretion in supergiant High Mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manousakis, A.; Blondin, J.; Walter, R.

    2013-09-01

    Supergiant High Mass X-ray Binary systems (sgHMXBs) consist of a massive, late type, star and a neutron star. The massive stars exhibit strong, radiatively driven, stellar winds. Wind accretion onto compact object triggers X-ray emission, which alters the stellar wind significantly. Hydrodynamic simulation has been used to study the neutron star - stellar wind interaction it two sgHMXBs: i) A heavily obscured sgHMXB (IGR J17252-3616) discovered by INTEGRAL. To account for observable quantities (i.e., absorbing column density) we have to assume a very slow wind terminal velocity of about 500 km/s and a rather massive neutron star. If confirmed in other obscured systems, this could provide a completely new stellar wind diagnostics. ii) A classical sgHMXB (Vela X-1) has been studied in depth to understand the origin of the off-states observed in this system. Among many models used to account for this observed behavior (clumpy wind, gating mechanism) we propose that self-organized criticality of the accretion stream is the likely reason for the observed behavior. In conclusion, the neutron star, in these two examples, acts very efficiently as a probe to study stellar winds.

  11. Stellar winds in supergiant High Mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manousakis, Antonios; Walter, Roland

    2013-06-01

    Supergiant High Mass X-ray Binary systems (sgHMXBs) consist of a massive, late type, star and a neutron star. The massive stars exhibit strong, radiatively driven, stellar winds. Wind accretion onto compact object triggers X-ray emission, which alters the stellar wind significantly. Hydrodynamic simulation has been used to study the neutron star - stellar wind interaction it two sgHMXBs: i) A heavily obscured sgHMXB (IGR J17252-3616) discovered by INTEGRAL. To account for observable quantities (i.e., absorbing column density) we have to assume a very slow wind terminal velocity of about 500 km/s and a rather massive neutron star. If confirmed in other obscured systems, this could provide a completely new stellar wind diagnostics. ii) A classical sgHMXB (Vela X-1) has been studied in depth to understand the origin of the off-states observed in this system. Among many models used to account for this observed behavior (clumpy wind, gating mechanism) we propose that self-organized criticality of the accretion stream is the likely reason for the observed behavior.

  12. Accretion in supergiant High Mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manousakis, Antonios; Walter, Roland; Blondin, John

    2014-01-01

    Supergiant High Mass X-ray Binary systems (sgHMXBs) consist of a massive, late type, star and a neutron star. The massive stars exhibits strong, radiatively driven, stellar winds. Wind accretion onto compact object triggers X-ray emission, which alters the stellar wind significantly. Hydrodynamic simulation has been used to study the neutron star - stellar wind interaction it two sgHMXBs: i) A heavily obscured sgHMXB (IGR J17252-3616) discovered by INTEGRAL. To account for observable quantities (i.e., absorbing column density) we have to assume a very slow wind terminal velocity of about 500 km/s and a rather massive neutron star. If confirmed in other obscured systems, this could provide a completely new stellar wind diagnostics. ii) A classical sgHMXB (Vela X-1) has been studied in depth to understand the origin of the off-states observed in this system. Among many models used to account for this observed behavior (clumpy wind, gating mechanism) we propose that self-organized criticality of the accretion stream is the likely reason for the observed behavior. In conclusion, the neutron star, in these two examples, acts very effciently as a probe to study stellar winds.

  13. X-ray Variability in the Hot Supergiant zgr Orionis.

    PubMed

    Berghöfer, T W; Schmitt, J H

    1994-09-16

    Hot massive stars represent only a small fraction of the stellar population of the galaxy, but their enormous luminosities make them visible over large distances. Therefore, they are ideal standard candles, used to determine distances of near galaxies. Their mass loss due to supersonic winds driven by radiation pressure contributes significantly to the interstellar medium and thus to the chemical evolution of galaxies. All hot stars are soft x-ray sources; in contrast to the sun with its highly variable x-ray flux, long time scale x-ray variability is not common among hot stars. An analysis is presented here of an unusual increase in x-ray flux observed with the roentgen observatory satellite during a period of 2 days for the hot supergiant zeta Orionis, the only episode of x-ray variability that has been found in a hot star. These observations provide the most direct evidence so far for the scenario of shock-heated gas in the winds of hot stars.

  14. Supernovae from yellow, blue supergiants: origin and consequences for stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meynet, Georges; Georgy, Cyril; Saio, Hideyuki; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Groh, Jose

    2015-08-01

    A few core collapse supernovae progenitors have been found to be yellow or blue supergiants. We shall discuss possible scenarios involving single and close binary evolution allowing to explain this kind of core collapse supernova progenitors. According to stellar models for both single and close binaries, blue supergiants, at the end of their nuclear lifetimes and thus progenitors of core collapse supernovae, present very different characteristics for what concerns their surface compositions, rotational surface velocities and pulsational properties with respect to blue supergiants in their core helium burning phase. We discuss how the small observed scatter of the flux-weighted gravity-luminosity (FWGL) relation of blue supergiants constrains the evolution of massive stars after the Main-Sequence phase and the nature of the progenitors of supernovae in the mass range between 12 and 40 solar masses. The present day observed surface abundances of blue supergiants, of their pulsational properties, as well as the small scatter of the FWGL relation provide strong constraints on both internal mixing and mass loss in massive stars and therefore on the end point of their evolution.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Candidate red supergiants in Galactic clusters (Messineo+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messineo, M.; Zhu, Q. F.; Ivanov, V. D.; Figer, D. F.; Davies, B.; Menten, K. M.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Chen, C.-H. R.

    2015-01-01

    A set of spectroscopic data was taken with the UKIRT 1-5-micron Imager Spectrometer (UIST) on Mauna Kea under program ID H243NS (PI: Kudritzki) on 2008 July 24. For four of the targeted candidate clusters, additional low-resolution and medium-resolution spectra were obtained with the SofI spectrograph mounted on the NTT telescope. Data were taken under program 60.A-9700(E) at Paranal-La Silla Observatory on 2010 August 3, and under program 089.D-0876 on 2012 June 1. (3 data files).

  16. DISENTANGLING THE SYSTEM GEOMETRY OF THE SUPERGIANT FAST X-RAY TRANSIENT IGR J11215-5952 WITH SWIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, P.; Cusumano, G.; Vercellone, S.; Mangano, V.; Sidoli, L.; Krimm, H. A.

    2009-05-10

    IGR J11215-5952 is a hard X-ray transient source discovered in 2005 April with the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) and a member of the new class of high-mass X-ray binaries, the supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs). While INTEGRAL and Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer observations have shown that the outbursts occur with a periodicity of {approx}330 days, Swift data have recently demonstrated that the true outburst period is {approx}165 days. IGR J11215-5952 is the first discovered SFXT displaying periodic outbursts, which are possibly related to the orbital period. The physical mechanism responsible for the X-ray outbursts in SFXTs is still debated. The main hypotheses proposed to date involve the structure of the companion wind or gated mechanisms related to the properties of the compact object. We test our proposed model which explains the outbursts from SFXTs as being due to the passage of the neutron star inside the equatorially enhanced wind from the supergiant companion. We performed a Guest Investigator observation with Swift that lasted 20 ks and several follow-up Target of Opportunity (ToO) observations, for a total of {approx}32 ks, during the expected 'apastron' passage (defined assuming an orbital period of {approx}330 days), between 2008 June 16 and July 4. The characteristics of this 'apastron' outburst are quite similar to those previously observed during the 'periastron' outburst of 2007 February 9. The mean spectrum of the bright peaks can be fitted with an absorbed power-law model with a photon index of 1 and an absorbing column of {approx}10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}. This outburst reached luminosities of {approx}10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1} (1-10 keV), comparable with those measured in 2007. The light curve can be modeled with the parameters obtained by Sidoli et al. for the 2007 February 9 outburst, although some differences can be observed in its shape. The properties of the rise to this new outburst and the comparison with the

  17. Seven years with the Swift Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, P.

    2015-09-01

    Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXTs) are HMXBs with OB supergiant companions. I review the results of the Swift SFXT project, which since 2007 has been exploiting Swift's capabilities in a systematic study of SFXTs and supergiant X-ray binaries (SGXBs) by combining follow-ups of outbursts, when detailed broad-band spectroscopy is possible, with long-term monitoring campaigns, when the out-of-outburst fainter states can be observed. This strategy has led us to measure their duty cycles as a function of luminosity, to extract their differential luminosity distributions in the soft X-ray domain, and to compare, with unprecedented detail, the X-ray variability in these different classes of sources. I also discuss the "seventh year crisis", the challenges that the recent Swift observations are making to the prevailing models attempting to explain the SFXT behavior.

  18. Expected number of supergiant fast X-ray transients in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducci, L.; Doroshenko, V.; Romano, P.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.

    2014-08-01

    In the past fifteen years a new generation of X-ray satellites led to the discovery of a subclass of high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) with supergiant companions and a peculiar transient behaviour: supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs). We calculate the expected number of Galactic SFXTs for the first time, using two different statistical approaches and two sets of data based on Swift and INTEGRAL surveys, with the aim to determine how common the SFXT phenomenon really is. We find that the expected number of SFXTs in the Galaxy is 37+53-22, which shows that SFXTs constitute a large portion of X-ray binaries with supergiant companions in the Galaxy. We compare our estimate with the expected number of Galactic HMXBs predicted from observations and evolutionary models and discuss the implications for the nature of SFXTs.

  19. Dust around main-sequence and supergiant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvester, Roger James

    This thesis is a study of the properties of the dust around two rather different types of star. The first part is concerned with the mid-infrared emission from a sample of 16 M-type supergiants. As well as silicate emission features, seven of the stars showed the UIR (unidentified infrared) emission bands, associated with carbonaceous material. According to standard theory, all the carbon in the outflows from these oxygen-rich stars should be bound up in CO molecules, preventing the formation of carbonaceous dust. The results were interpreted in terms of a non-equilibrium chemical model, which invoked chromospheric UV photons to dissociate CO, allowing carbonaceous material to form, and to excite the observed UIR-band emission. The larger part of the thesis considers Vega-excess stars - main sequence stars with excess infrared emission from circumstellar dust discs. Photometric and spectroscopic observations were carried out. A number of the stars displayed excess near-IR emission, indicating the presence of hot material. Mid-infrared spectroscopy enabled the grain composition to be identified: both silicates and carbonaceous species were detected. Millimetre and submillimetre photometry indicated that large grains are present around many of our sources, implying that significant grain coagulation has occurred. Most of the sources were modelled using a radiative transfer code, with disc geometry and multiple grain sizes. Two grain materials, astronomical silicate and amorphous carbon, were considered. Successful fits to the spectral energy distributions at mid-IR and longer wavelengths were found. The temperatures needed to produce near-IR excess emission were too high for grains in thermal equilibrium to survive. A model was therefore developed with very small grains undergoing thermal spiking due to single-photon absorption, which provided satisfactory fits for the hottest stars; the others had insufficient UV flux to excite the small grains.

  20. The 13Carbon footprint of B[e] supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liermann, A.; Kraus, M.; Schnurr, O.; Fernandes, M. Borges

    2010-10-01

    We report on the first detection of 13C enhancement in two B[e] supergiants (B[e]SGs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Stellar evolution models predict the surface abundance in 13C to strongly increase during main-sequence and post-main-sequence evolution of massive stars. However, direct identification of chemically processed material on the surface of B[e]SGs is hampered by their dense, disc-forming winds, hiding the stars. Recent theoretical computations predict the detectability of enhanced 13C via the molecular emission in 13CO arising in the circumstellar discs of B[e]SGs. To test this potential method and to unambiguously identify a post-main-sequence B[e] SG by its 13CO emission, we have obtained high-quality K-band spectra of two known B[e] SGs in the Large Magellanic Cloud, using the Very Large Telescope's Spectrograph for INtegral Field Observation in the Near-Infrared (VLT/SINFONI). Both stars clearly show the 13CO band emission, whose strength implies a strong enhancement of 13C, in agreement with theoretical predictions. This first ever direct confirmation of the evolved nature of B[e]SGs thus paves the way to the first identification of a Galactic B[e]SG. Based on observations collected with the ESO VLT Paranal Observatory under programme 384.D-1078(A). E-mail: liermann@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de (AL); kraus@sunstel.asu.cas.cz (MK); oschnurr@aip.de (OS); borges@on.br (MBF)

  1. SN 2009ip and SN 2010mc: core-collapse Type IIn supernovae arising from blue supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nathan; Mauerhan, Jon C.; Prieto, Jose L.

    2014-02-01

    The recent supernova (SN) known as SN 2009ip had dramatic precursor eruptions followed by an even brighter explosion in 2012. Its pre-2012 observations make it the best documented SN progenitor in history, but have fuelled debate about the nature of its 2012 explosion - whether it was a true SN or some type of violent non-terminal event. Both could power shock interaction with circumstellar material (CSM), but only a core-collapse SN provides a self-consistent explanation. The persistent broad emission lines in the spectrum require a relatively large ejecta mass, and a corresponding kinetic energy of at least 1051 erg, while the faint 2012a event is consistent with published models of core-collapse SNe from compact (˜60 R⊙) blue supergiants. The light curves of SN 2009ip and another Type IIn, SN 2010mc, were nearly identical; we demonstrate that their spectra match as well, and that both are standard SNe IIn. Our observations contradict the recent claim that the late-time spectrum of SN 2009ip is returning to its progenitor's luminous blue variable-like state, and we show the that late-time spectra of SN 2009ip closely resemble the spectra of SN 1987A. Moreover, SN 2009ip's changing Hα equivalent width after explosion matches behaviour typically seen in core-collapse SNe IIn. Several key facts about SN 2009ip and SN 2010mc argue strongly in favour of a core-collapse interpretation, and make a non-terminal 1050 erg event implausible. The most straightforward and self-consistent interpretation is that SN 2009ip was an initially faint core-collapse explosion of a blue supergiant that produced about half as much 56Ni as SN 1987A, with most of the peak luminosity from CSM interaction.

  2. On the neutron stars in supergiant fast x-ray transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiangdong

    Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXTs) are a new class of high-mass X-ray binaries com-posed by a massive OB supergiant star as companion donor and a compact object, possibly a neutron star. SFXTs display short X-ray outbursts characterized by fast flares on brief timescales of hours and large flux variability typically in the range 103 - 105 . Based on the most recent observational features of SFXTs we discuss the evolution of the neutron stars in SFXTs, and suggest that they may be born with relatively long spin periods.

  3. Quantitative Studies of the Optical and UV Spectra of Galactic Early B Supergiants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Searle, S. C.; Prinja, R. K.; Massa, D.; Ryans, R.

    2008-01-01

    We undertake an optical and ultraviolet spectroscopic analysis of a sample of 20 Galactic B0-B5 supergiants of luminosity classes Ia, Ib, Iab, and II. Fundamental stellar parameters are obtained from optical diagnostics and a critical comparison of the model predictions to observed UV spectral features is made. Methods. Fundamental parameters (e.g., T(sub eff), log L(sub *), mass-loss rates and CNO abundances) are derived for individual stars using CMFGEN, a nLTE, line-blanketed model atmosphere code. The impact of these newly derived parameters on the Galactic B supergiant Ten scale, mass discrepancy, and wind-momentum luminosity relation is examined. Results. The B supergiant temperature scale derived here shows a reduction of about 1000-3000 K compared to previous results using unblanketed codes. Mass-loss rate estimates are in good agreement with predicted theoretical values, and all of the 20 BO-B5 supergiants analysed show evidence of CNO processing. A mass discrepancy still exists between spectroscopic and evolutionary masses, with the largest discrepancy occuring at log (L/(solar)L approx. 5.4. The observed WLR values calculated for B0-B0.7 supergiants are higher than predicted values, whereas the reverse is true for B1-B5 supergiants. This means that the discrepancy between observed and theoretical values cannot be resolved by adopting clumped (i.e., lower) mass-loss rates as for O stars. The most surprising result is that, although CMFGEN succeeds in reproducing the optical stellar spectrum accurately, it fails to precisely reproduce key UV diagnostics, such as the N v and C IV P Cygni profiles. This problem arises because the models are not ionised enough and fail to reproduce the full extent of the observed absorption trough of the P Cygni profiles. Conclusions. Newly-derived fundamental parameters for early B supergiants are in good agreement with similar work in the field. The most significant discovery, however, is the failure of CMFGEN to predict

  4. The galatic and LMC extreme line supergiants compared: IUE observations of the Henize-Carlson and Zoo star samples of massive supergiants. [Large Magellanic cloud (LMC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shore, S. N.; Sanduleak, N.; Brown, D. N.; Sonneborn, G.; Bopp, B. W.; Robinson, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    The Henize-Carlson sample of galactic massive supergiants, and a comparison between the Galactic and LMC samples are discussed. Several of the stars, notably He3-395 and S 127/LMC, have very similar shell characteristics. There appears to be little difference, other than luminosity, between the LMC and Galactic samples. One star, He3-1482, was detected with the Very Large Array at 6 cm. The UV data is combined with IRAS and optical information.

  5. IGR J16328-4726: A NEW CANDIDATE SUPERGIANT FAST X-RAY TRANSIENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fiocchi, M.; Bazzano, A.; Natalucci, L.; Ubertini, P.; Sguera, V.; Bassani, L.; Bird, A. J.

    2010-12-10

    The unidentified source IGR J16328-4726 was covered with INTEGRAL observations for a long period ({approx}9.8 Ms) and was undetectable for most of the time while showing a very recurrent micro-activity with a duration from tens of minutes to several hours. We report the discovery of two strong outbursts started at 53420.65 MJD and 54859.99 MJD, respectively, the first with a duration of {approx}1 hr and the second with a lower limit on the duration of {approx}3.5 hr. Furthermore, the sources have been detected in nine other short pointings with significance between 4{sigma} and 5{sigma} as well as in one of the revolutions (during the exposure {approx}130 ks) at a significance level of {approx}7{sigma}. The stronger outburst spectrum is well described by a power-law model with a photon index of {approx}2.0 and a flux of {approx}3.3 x10{sup -10} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} in the 20-50 keV energy band. The weaker outburst and revolution spectra show the same spectral shape and different fluxes. The combined timing and spectral properties observed during the outburst, the recurrent nature of this transient source, the Galactic plane location, a dynamic range >170 in the 0.3-10 keV band and >165 in the 20-50 keV, and the presence of an IR star in the error circle of a Swift X-ray Telescope pointing are suggesting this source as a member of the class of the supergiant fast X-ray transients.

  6. Unveiling Type IIb Supernova Progenitors: SN 2011hs from a Supergiant Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufano, F.

    2014-10-01

    Type IIb Supernovae are the final evolutionary stage of massive stars that were able to retain only a thin (lesssim 1 M_{odot}) H/He external envelope at the time of the explosion. The mechanism of mass-loss that made such final structure possible and the nature of such progenitor stars are still open issues. We present the results obtained from the study of a sample of Type IIb SNe, in particular, of SN 2011hs (Bufano et al., 2013, MNRAS submitted). SN 2011hs was a relatively faint (M_{B} = -15.6 mag) and red Type IIb SN, characterized by a narrow light curve shape. Its spectral evolution showed the metamorphosis typical of this class of SN, from spectra dominated by H I lines to spectra where He I features dominate, but with broad absorption line profiles indicating high expansion velocities. Modeling the light curve of SN 2011hs and its velocity evolution with hydrodynamical calculations, we estimated that the SN is consistent with the explosion of a 3-4 M_{odot} He-core star, from a main sequence mass of 12-15 M_{odot}, ejecting a ^{56}Ni mass equal to 0.04 M_{odot} and characterized by an explosion energy of E≍ 8.5× 10^{50} erg s^{-1}. Based on the light curve evolution, we assumed that the explosion occurred 6 days before the discovery (2,455,872 ± 4 JD), resulting in an adiabatic cooling phase lasting 8 days, similarly to SN 1993J. Since the duration and the decreasing rate of the cooling branch depends mainly on the progenitor size, we could infer from it a progenitor radius of ≍ 500-600 R_{odot}, like a supergiant star. Our modeling rules out models with He core mass >5 M_{odot}, i.e. main sequence masses above 20 M_{odot}. Such a lower limit for the progenitor mass could indicate the possibility of a binary origin, although the radio light curve does not show strong deviations, typically signature of the presence of a companion star.

  7. Spectrum of class-M supergiants in the region lambda lambda 7000-6000 angstrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlov, M. Y.; Rodriguez, M. H.; Shavrina, A. V.

    1973-01-01

    A general description is given of the spectrum of four M-supergiants in the region lambda lambda 7000-6000 A from high-dispersion spectrograms (6 A/mm). The equivalent widths of several hundred lines and depths of some molecular band heads were measured.

  8. CNO abundances in the quintuplet cluster M supergiant 5-7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, S. V.; Sellgren, K.; Blum, R.; Terndrup, D. M.

    2002-01-01

    We present and analyze infrared spectra of the supergiant VR 5-7, in the Quintuplet cluster 30 pc from the Galactic center. Within the uncertainties, the [C/H],[N/H], and [O/H] abundances in this star are equal of Ori, a star which exhibits mixing of CNO processed elements, but distinct from the abundance patterns in IRS 7.

  9. Quantitative studies of the optical and UV spectra of Galactic early B supergiants. I. Fundamental parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searle, S. C.; Prinja, R. K.; Massa, D.; Ryans, R.

    2008-04-01

    Aims: We undertake an optical and ultraviolet spectroscopic analysis of a sample of 20 Galactic B0-B5 supergiants of luminosity classes Ia, Ib, Iab, and II. Fundamental stellar parameters are obtained from optical diagnostics and a critical comparison of the model predictions to observed UV spectral features is made. Methods: Fundamental parameters (e.g., {T_eff}, {log L*}, mass-loss rates and CNO abundances) are derived for individual stars using CMFGEN, a nLTE, line-blanketed model atmosphere code. The impact of these newly derived parameters on the Galactic B supergiant {T_eff} scale, mass discrepancy, and wind-momentum luminosity relation is examined. Results: The B supergiant temperature scale derived here shows a reduction of about 1000-3000 K compared to previous results using unblanketed codes. Mass-loss rate estimates are in good agreement with predicted theoretical values, and all of the 20 B0-B5 supergiants analysed show evidence of CNO processing. A mass discrepancy still exists between spectroscopic and evolutionary masses, with the largest discrepancy occurring at {log (L/L⊙}) 5.4. The observed WLR values calculated for B0-B0.7 supergiants are higher than predicted values, whereas the reverse is true for B1-B5 supergiants. This means that the discrepancy between observed and theoretical values cannot be resolved by adopting clumped (i.e., lower) mass-loss rates as for O stars. The most surprising result is that, although CMFGEN succeeds in reproducing the optical stellar spectrum accurately, it fails to precisely reproduce key UV diagnostics, such as the N V and C IV P Cygni profiles. This problem arises because the models are not ionised enough and fail to reproduce the full extent of the observed absorption trough of the P Cygni profiles. Conclusions: Newly-derived fundamental parameters for early B supergiants are in good agreement with similar work in the field. The most significant discovery, however, is the failure of CMFGEN to predict the

  10. Radiative Transfer Modeling of Warm Transition Region Winds in F- and G-type Supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobel, A.; Avrett, E. H.; Aufdenberg, J. P.

    2004-12-01

    We present FUSE spectra of upper transition region emission lines of O VI in the dynamic atmosphere of the short-period classic Cepheid Beta Dor (F-G Ia). The far-UV O VI 1032 & 1037 Å lines indicate a heating mechanism in the outer atmospheres of strongly pulsating F- and G-type supergiants sustaining hot plasmas at kinetic gas temperatures between 100 kK and 300 kK. Our observation of prominent upper transition region emission lines in Beta Dor contrasts with the very low X-ray luminosities of Cepheid variables that signal only weak coronal plasmas. On the other hand, FUSE and HST-STIS observations of the non-variable yellow (hybrid) supergiants Alpha Aqr (G2 Ib) and Beta Aqr (G0 Ib), having large X-ray fluxes, reveal supersonic warm wind velocities of 140 km/s and 90 km/s, respectively, in lower transition region emission lines of C III 977 Å and Si III 1206 Å. Our semi-empiric radiative transfer models show that these optically thick winds occur at kinetic gas temperatures well above 70 kK, much larger than assumed for the chromospheres of cool supergiants. Remarkably, these emission lines reveal peculiar shapes reminiscent of P-Cygni type line profiles observed in UV spectra of hot supergiants. Both hybrid supergiants lack the strongly oscillating photospheres of Cepheids, suggesting that their transition region wind acceleration and heating do not result from a pure mechanical driving mechanism due to atmospheric pulsations. We present detailed semi-empiric radiative transfer models of the thermal and dynamic structures of the outer atmospheres of these luminous F- and G-type supergiants based on the FUSE and HST-STIS spectra. We investigate if warm accelerating winds observed in high ions of cool supergiants can (partly) be driven by radiation pressure. This research is based on data obtained with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, collected at the STScI, operated by AURA Inc., under contract NAS5-26555. Financial support has been provided by STSc

  11. The Wind of Rotating B Supergiants. I. Domains of Slow and Fast Solution Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venero, R. O. J.; Curé, M.; Cidale, L. S.; Araya, I.

    2016-05-01

    In the scenario of rotating radiation-driven wind theory for massive stars, three types of stationary hydrodynamic solutions are currently known: the classical (fast) m-CAK solution, the Ω-slow solution that arises for fast rotators, and the so-called δ-slow solution if high values of the δ line-force parameter are allowed independently of the rotation speed. Compared to the fast solution, both “slow solutions” have lower terminal velocities. As the study of the parameter domain for the slow solution is still incomplete, we perform a comprehensive analysis of the distinctive flow regimes for B supergiants that emerge from a fine grid of rotation values, Ω, and various ionization conditions in the wind (δ) parameter. The wind ionization defines two domains: one for fast outflowing winds and the other for slow expanding flows. Both domains are clear-cut by a gap, where a kink/plateau structure of the velocity law could exist for a finite interval of δ. The location and width of the gap depend on T eff and Ω. There is a smooth and continuous transition between the Ω-slow and δ-slow regimes, a single Ω δ-slow regime. We discuss different situations where the slow solutions can be found and the possibility of a switch between fast and slow solutions in B supergiant winds. We compare the theoretical terminal velocity with observations of B and A supergiants and find that the fast regime prevails mostly for early B supergiants while the slow wind regime matches better for A and B mid- and late-type supergiants.

  12. Comparative Spectroscopic Analysis of B[e] Supergiants and LBV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges Fernandes, M.

    2000-02-01

    The upper HRD is populated by massive stars. These objects have, as a characteristic, a substantial mass loss, due mostly to radiation pressure, throughout their whole lives. However about the evolution of these stars, the only secure informations are that they are B or O type stars in the zero age main sequence and they finish their lifes in a supernova explosion. The difficulties, to ascertain the others evolutive stages of these objects, are that they do not exhibit (in most cases) photosferic absorption lines, due to their complex circumstellar medium, preventing the estimate of the physical parameters. Moreover, these phases are relatively "shorts", and so we have a little sample of objects. Among the "short" phases, we detach the B[e] Supergiant (B[e]sg) and the Luminous Blue Variable (LBV) phases. The stars in these two evolutive stages show similar characteristics in the optical spectrum. They are, the presence in B type stars, of forbidden emission lines of [FeII], [OI] (in the B[e]sg) and [NII] (in the LBV). The presence of strong Balmer emission lines, low excitation permitted emission lines of predominantly low ionization metals, e.g. FeII in the optical spectrum and a strong near or mid-infrared excess due to hot circumstellar dust. In general, the Balmer lines (and sometimes HeI and FeII lines too) show P-Cygni profiles, due to mass loss. In despite of the similarities, the LBV are separated of the B[e]sg, due to strong spectral-photometric variability. Then it is necessary a detailed spectroscopical analysis of some objects, to obtain not only a better classification, like a B[e]sg or LBV, but useful informations to perform in the future a physical model. We have done such analysis for five stars in the Galaxy: HD 87643, HD 89249, HR Car, GG Car and CPD-529243. With our new data, others presented by literature, and a long time monitoring of these stars, we believe that in the near future, it will be possible to determine a correct classification to

  13. Luminous and Variable Stars in M31 and M33. II. Luminous Blue Variables, Candidate LBVs, Fe II Emission Line Stars, and Other Supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, Roberta M.; Weis, Kerstin; Davidson, Kris; Bomans, D. J.; Burggraf, Birgitta

    2014-07-01

    An increasing number of non-terminal eruptions are being found in the numerous surveys for optical transients. Very little is known about these giant eruptions, their progenitors and their evolutionary state. A greatly improved census of the likely progenitor class, including the most luminous evolved stars, the luminous blue variables (LBVs), and the warm and cool hypergiants is now needed for a complete picture of the final pre-supernova stages of very massive stars. We have begun a survey of the evolved and unstable luminous star populations in several nearby resolved galaxies. In this second paper on M31 and M33, we review the spectral characteristics, spectral energy distributions, circumstellar ejecta, and evidence for mass loss for 82 luminous and variable stars. We show that many of these stars have warm circumstellar dust including several of the Fe II emission line stars, but conclude that the confirmed LBVs in M31 and M33 do not. The confirmed LBVs have relatively low wind speeds even in their hot, quiescent or visual minimum state compared to the B-type supergiants and Of/WN stars which they spectroscopically resemble. The nature of the Fe II emission line stars and their relation to the LBV state remains uncertain, but some have properties in common with the warm hypergiants and the sgB[e] stars. Several individual stars are discussed in detail. We identify three possible candidate LBVs and three additional post-red supergiant candidates. We suggest that M33-013406.63 (UIT301,B416) is not an LBV/S Dor variable, but is a very luminous late O-type supergiant and one of the most luminous stars or pair of stars in M33. Based on observations with the Multiple Mirror Telescope, a joint facility of the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona and on observations obtained with the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT), an international collaboration among institutions in the United States, Italy and Germany. LBT Corporation partners are: The University

  14. A cool supergiant with anomalous behavior of the 2800 Mg II doublet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurzadian, G. A.; Rustambekian, S. S.; Kondo, Y.; Perez, Mario R.; Terzian, Yervant

    1991-01-01

    The IUE ultraviolet spectrum for a supergiant of type G Ia, HD 135345, is obtained for the wavelength region 2000-3000 A. In the spectrum, the continuum as well as the feature of the Mg II doublet at 2800 A is found to be anomalous. The observed level of continuum increases toward short wavelengths to 2000 A, verifying that this supergiant is actually a binary system with a hot companion. The anomalies in the magnesium doublet are the complete absence of the chromospheric emission and the very small equivalent width of the doublet absorption: the equivalent width is 4 A, which is 7.5 times smaller than that for a typical G5 star. The main parameters of the binary system are obtained, namely, spectral classes, effective temperatures, ratio of radii, and visible magnitudes.

  15. An observational evaluation of magnetic confinement in the winds of BA supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shultz, M.; Wade, G. A.; Petit, V.; Grunhut, J.; Neiner, C.; Hanes, D.; MiMeS Collaboration

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic wind confinement has been proposed as one explanation for the complex wind structures of supergiant stars of spectral types B and A. Observational investigation of this hypothesis was undertaken using high-resolution (λ/Δλ ˜ 65 000) circular polarization (Stokes V) spectra of six late B- and early A-type supergiants (β Ori, B8Iae; 4 Lac, B9Iab; η Leo, A0Ib; HR1040, A0Ib; α Cyg, A2Iae; ν Cep, A2Iab), obtained with the instruments ESPaDOnS and Narval at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and the Bernard Lyot Telescope. Least-squares deconvolution (LSD) analysis of the Stokes V spectra of all stars yields no evidence of a magnetic field, with best longitudinal field 1σ error bars ranging from ˜0.5 to ˜4.5 G for most stars. Spectrum synthesis analysis of the LSD profiles using Bayesian inference yields an upper limit with 95.4 per cent credibility on the polar strength of the (undetected) surface dipole fields of individual stars ranging from 3 to 30 G. These results strongly suggest that magnetic wind confinement due to organized dipolar magnetic fields is not the origin of the wind variability of BA supergiant stars. Upper limits for magnetic spots may also be inconsistent with magnetic wind confinement in the limit of large spot size and filling factor, depending on the adopted wind parameters. Therefore, if magnetic spots are responsible for the wind variability of BA supergiant stars, they likely occupy a small fraction of the photosphere.

  16. Do All Stars Form in Clusters?: Masses and Ages of Young Supergiants in Andromeda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Zareen; Debs, C.; Kirby, E. N.; Guhathakurta, P.

    2013-01-01

    Currently it is not understood whether seemingly isolated stars formed in situ or were ejected from star clusters as runaway stars. Previous studies determined the origins of isolated stars by measuring their velocities, but past research was limited to OB stars in the Milky Way and Magellanic Clouds due to the difficulty of computing velocities of distant objects. This study proposed an innovative velocity test to statistically determine whether six seemingly isolated BA-type supergiants in Andromeda are runaways. We calculated the minimum relative transverse velocity needed for each supergiant to travel to its current location from the nearest open cluster. By comparing the minimum velocity with Andromeda’s known velocity dispersion, a statistical measure of the stars’ actual velocities, we determined whether the star had the necessary velocity to be a runaway. Minimum velocity was computed from the age of the star, which was calculated from its effective temperature and surface gravity. To compute effective temperature and surface gravity, we applied three new techniques based on Balmer absorption features. The results suggest that all six supergiants had the necessary velocities to be runaways. Although the proposed velocity test is a statistical assessment, it offers a valuable new tool for future investigation of isolated stars beyond the Milky Way and its satellites. This research was supported by the Science Internship Program (SIP) at UCSC, the National Science Foundation, NASA, and Palomar Observatory.

  17. Probing the structure and dynamics of B[e] supergiant stars' disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, M.

    2016-08-01

    B[e] supergiants are a group of evolved massive stars in a short-lived transition phase. During this phase, these objects eject large amounts of material, which accumulates in a circumstellar ring or disk-like structure, revolving around the star on Keplerian orbits. In most objects, the disks seem to be stable over many decades. This guarantees these disks as ideal chemical laboratories to study molecule formation and dust condensation. Combining high-resolution optical and infrared spectroscopic data allows to search for emission features that trace the disk structure, kinematics, and chemical composition at different distances from the star. Certain forbidden emission lines of singly ionized or neutral metals, such as [Caii] and [Oi], are ideal tracers for the innermost gaseous (atomic) regions. Farther out, molecules form. While first-overtone bands of carbon monoxide (CO) mark the hot, inner rim of the molecular disk, more molecules are expected to form and to fill the space between the CO emitting region and the dust condensation zone. Observing campaigns have been initiated to search for these molecules and their emission features, in order to construct a global picture of the properties of the disks around B[e] supergiants. This paper presents an overview of the status of our knowledge about the structure and kinematics of B[e] supergiant stars' disks, based on currently available information from different observational tracers.

  18. On the Hα behaviour of blue supergiants: rise and fall over the bi-stability jump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Blagovest; Vink, Jorick S.; Gräfener, Götz

    2014-05-01

    Context. The evolutionary state of blue supergiants is still unknown. Stellar wind mass loss is one of the dominant processes determining the evolution of massive stars, and it may provide clues to the evolutionary properties of blue supergiants. As the Hα line is the most oft-used mass-loss tracer in the OB-star regime, we investigate Hα line formation as a function of Teff. Aims: We provide a detailed analysis of the Hα line for OB supergiant models over an Teff range between 30 000 and 12 500 K, with the aim of understanding the mass-loss properties of blue supergiants. Methods: We model the Hα line using the non-LTE code cmfgen, in the context of the bi-stability jump at Teff ~ 22 500 K. Results: We find a maximum in the Hα equivalent width at 22 500 K exactly at the location of the bi-stability jump. The Hα line-profile behaviour is characterised by two branches of effective temperature: (i) a hot branch between 30 000 and 22 500 K, where Hα emission becomes stronger with decreasing Teff; and (ii) a cool branch between 22 500 and 12 500 K, where the Hα line becomes weaker. Our models show that this non-monotonic Hα behaviour is related to the optical depth of Lyα, finding that at the "cool" branch the population of the 2nd level of hydrogen is enhanced in comparison to the 3rd level. This is expected to increase line absorption, leading to weaker Hα flux when Teff drops from 22 500 K downwards. We also show that for late B supergiants (at Teff below ~15 000 K), the differences in the Hα line between homogeneous and clumpy winds becomes insignificant. Moreover, we show that, at the bi-stability jump, Hα changes its character completely, from an optically thin to an optically thick line, implying that macro-clumping should play an important role at temperatures below the bi-stability jump. This would not only have consequences for the character of observed Hα line profiles, but also for the reported discrepancies between theoretical and empirical

  19. Clover, Red (Trifolium pretense)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic modification of plants by the insertion of transgenes can be a powerful experimental approach to answer basic questions about gene product function. This technology can also be used to make improved crop varieties for use in the field. To apply this powerful tool to red clover, an important ...

  20. Red Sea

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  The Red Sea     View Larger Image ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) image of the Red Sea was acquired on August 13, 2000. Located between the East African coast and the Saudi Arabian peninsula, the Red Sea got its name because the blooms of a type of algae,  Trichodesmium ...

  1. "Fastening" porphyrin in highly cross-linked polyphosphazene hybrid nanoparticles: powerful red fluorescent probe for detecting mercury ion.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ying; Meng, Lingjie; Lu, Qinghua

    2014-04-22

    It is a significant issue to overcome the concentration-quenching effect of the small fluorescent probes and maintain the high fluorescent efficiency at high concentration for sensitive and selective fluorescent mark or detection. We developed a new strategy to "isolate" and "fasten" porphyrin moieties in a highly cross-linked poly(tetraphenylporphyrin-co-cyclotriphosphazene) (TPP-PZS) by the polycondensation of hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene (HCCP) and 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-hydroxyphenyl)porphyrin (TPP-(OH)4) in a suitable solvent. The resulting TPP-PZS particles were characterized with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and ultraviolet and visible (UV-vis) absorption spectra. Remarkably, TPP-PZS particles obtained in acetone emitted a bright red fluorescence both in powder state and in solution because the aggregation of porphyrin moieties in "H-type" (face-to-face) and "J-type" (edge-to-edge) was effectively blocked. The fluorescent TPP-PZS particles also showed superior resistance to photobleaching, and had a high sensitivity and selectivity for the detection of Hg(2+) ions. The TPP-PZS particles were therefore used as an ideal material for preparing test strips to quickly detect/monitor the Hg(2+) ions in a facile way.

  2. Searching for Complex, Weak or Tangled Magnetic Fields in the Blue Supergiant Rigel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shultz, M.; Wade, G. A.; Neiner, C.; Manset, N.; Petit, V.; Grunhut, J.; Guinan, E.; Hanes, D.; Mimes Collaboration

    Seventy-eight high-resolution Stokes V, Q and U spectra of the B8 Iae supergiant Rigel were obtained with the ESPaDOnS instrument at the CFHT, and its clone NARVAL at the TBL in the context of the Magnetism in Massive Stars (MiMeS) Large Program, with the aim of scrutinizing this core-collapse supernova progenitor for direct evidence of weak and/or complex magnetic fields. In this paper we describe the reduction and analysis of the data, the constraints obtained on any magnetic field present in the stellar photosphere, and the variability of photospheric and wind lines.

  3. Microwave continuum measurements and estimates of mass loss rates for cool giants and supergiants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, S. A.; Linsky, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Attention is given to the results of a sensitive, 6-cm radio continuum survey conducted with the NRAO VLA of 39 of the nearest single cool giants and supergiants of G0-M5 spectral types; the survey was conducted in order to obtain accurate measurements of the mass loss rates of ionized gas for a representative sample of such stars, in order to furnish constraints for, and a better understanding of, the total mass loss rates. The inferred angular diameters for the cool giant sources are noted to be twice as large as photospheric angular diameters, implying that these stars are surrounded by extended chromospheres containing warm partially ionized gas.

  4. The circumstellar envelopes of F- and G-type supergiants in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagen, W.; Humphreys, R. M.; Stencel, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    The outer atmospheres of four F- and G-type supergiants in the LMC are compared with those of their Milky Way counterparts by means of 2.5 and 5.1 A/mm high dispersion Echelle spectra. Na I D line doubling indicates extensive circumstellar envelopes, mass loss rates greater than 0.00001 solar masses/year, and outflow velocities of 10-60 km/sec. The Ca II H and K lines yield new data on extragalactic star chromospheres.

  5. Estimation of Scatterer Diameter by Normalized Power Spectrum of High-Frequency Ultrasonic RF Echo for Assessment of Red Blood Cell Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Taku; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2011-07-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) aggregation, as one of the determinants of blood viscosity, plays an important role in blood rheology, including the condition of blood. RBC aggregation is induced by the adhesion of RBCs when the electrostatic repulsion between RBCs weakens owing to increases in protein and saturated fatty acid levels in blood, excessive RBC aggregation leads to various circulatory diseases. This study was conducted to establish a noninvasive quantitative method for assessment of RBC aggregation. The power spectrum of ultrasonic RF echoes from nonaggregating RBCs, which shows the frequency property of scattering, exhibits Rayleigh behavior. On the other hand, ultrasonic RF echoes from aggregating RBCs contain the components of reflection, which have no frequency dependence. By dividing the measured power spectrum of echoes from RBCs in the lumen by that of echoes from a posterior wall of the vein in the dorsum manus, the attenuation property of the propagating medium and the frequency responses of transmitting and receiving transducers are removed from the former spectrum. RBC aggregation was assessed by the diameter of a scatterer, which was estimated by minimizing the square difference between the measured normalized power spectrum and the theoretical power spectrum. In this study, spherical scatterers with diameters of 5, 11, 15, and 30 µm were measured in basic experiments. The estimated scatterer diameters were close to the actual diameters. Furthermore, the transient change of the scatterer diameters were measured in an in vivo experiment with respect to a 24-year-old healthy male during the avascularization using a cuff. The estimated diameters (12-22 µm) of RBCs during avascularization were larger than the diameters (4-8 µm) at rest and after recirculation. These results show the possibility of the use of the proposed method for noninvasive assessment of RBC aggregation.

  6. Observations of the O I lambda 7773 triplet in intermediate-type supergiants using a linear photodiode array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkinson, G. R.; Humrich, A.

    1981-05-01

    Partially resolved spectra of the infrared oxygen triplet in A-G supergiants have been obtained with a new self-scanned photodiode array system. Curve of growth analyses indicate that the lines are formed in non-LTE. A line is identified at 7777.9 A which is strong in A supergiants and which will complicate the analysis of low resolution spectra. At a resolution of 0.45 A/diode the CN lines which appear in G8 and later stars are blended with the O I triplet rendering its equivalent width unreliable as a luminosity indicator.

  7. X-RAY PHOTOIONIZED BUBBLE IN THE WIND OF VELA X-1 PULSAR SUPERGIANT COMPANION

    SciTech Connect

    Krticka, Jiri; Skalicky, Jan; Kubat, Jiri

    2012-10-01

    Vela X-1 is the archetype of high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), composed of a neutron star and a massive B supergiant. The supergiant is a source of a strong radiatively driven stellar wind. The neutron star sweeps up this wind and creates a huge amount of X-rays as a result of energy release during the process of wind accretion. Here, we provide detailed NLTE models of the Vela X-1 envelope. We study how the X-rays photoionize the wind and destroy the ions responsible for the wind acceleration. The resulting decrease of the radiative force explains the observed reduction of the wind terminal velocity in a direction to the neutron star. The X-rays create a distinct photoionized region around the neutron star filled with a stagnating flow. The existence of such photoionized bubbles is a general property of HMXBs. We unveil a new principle governing these complex objects, according to which there is an upper limit to the X-ray luminosity the compact star can have without suspending the wind due to inefficient line driving.

  8. SOFIA-EXES: Probing the Thermal Structure of M Supergiant Wind Acceleration Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Graham M.; O'Gorman, Eamon; Guinan, Edward F.; EXES Instrument Team, EXES Science Team

    2016-01-01

    There is no standard model for mass loss from cool evolved stars, particularly for non-pulsating giants and supergiants. For the early-M supergiants, radiation pressure, convective ejections, magnetic fields, and Alfven waves have all been put forward as potential mass loss mechanisms. A potential discriminator between these ideas is the thermal structure resulting from the heating-cooling balance in the acceleration zone - the most important region to study mass loss physics.We present mid-IR [Fe II] emission line profiles of Betelgeuse and Antares obtained with NASA-DLR SOFIA-EXES and NASA IRTF-TEXES that were obtained as part of a GO program (Harper: Cycle 2-0004) and EXES instrument commissioning observations. The intra-term transitions sample a range of excitation conditions, Texc=540K, 3,400K, and 11,700K, i.e., from the warm chromospheric plasma, that also emits in the cm-radio and ultraviolet, to the cold inner circumstellar envelope. The spectrally-resolved profiles, when combined with VLA cm-radio observations, provide new constraints on the temperature and flow velocity in the outflow accelerating region. The semi-empirical energy balance can be used to test theoretical predictions of wind heating.

  9. INTEGRAL study of temporal properties of bright flares in Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidoli, L.; Paizis, A.; Postnov, K.

    2016-04-01

    We have characterized the typical temporal behaviour of the bright X-ray flares detected from the three Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXTs) showing the most extreme transient behaviour (XTE J1739-302, IGR J17544-2619, SAX J1818.6-1703). We focus here on the cumulative distributions of the waiting-time (time interval between two consecutive X-ray flares), and the duration of the hard X-ray activity (duration of the brightest phase of an SFXT outburst), as observed by INTEGRAL/IBIS in the energy band 17-50 keV. Adopting the cumulative distribution of waiting-times, it is possible to identify the typical time-scale that clearly separates different outbursts, each composed by several single flares at ˜ks time-scale. This allowed us to measure the duration of the brightest phase of the outbursts from these three targets, finding that they show heavy-tailed cumulative distributions. We observe a correlation between the total energy emitted during SFXT outbursts and the time interval covered by the outbursts (defined as the elapsed time between the first and the last flare belonging to the same outburst as observed by INTEGRAL). We show that temporal properties of flares and outbursts of the sources, which share common properties regardless different orbital parameters, can be interpreted in the model of magnetized stellar winds with fractal structure from the OB-supergiant stars.

  10. Wind variability in the Large Magellanic Cloud B(e) supergiant HD 34664

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Ladbeck, R. E.; Clayton, G. C.

    1993-01-01

    We present optical linear spectropolarimetry of the B(e) supergiant HD 34664. The polarization and position angle display significant spectral features which correspond to the H-alpha and H-beta emission lines. We use the line polarizations to separate the interstellar foreground polarization from the intrinsic polarization of HD 34664. The intrinsic polarization is consistent with electron scattering in a circumstellar disk seen at high inclination and provides further and independent evidence for the two-component wind model of the B(e) supergiants. We compare the polarization and spectrum of HD 34664 to observations published in the literature. In our data the continuum polarization is by a factor of two larger and the H-alpha line-to-continuum ratio is by a factor of at least four increased over previous observations. Since both the polarization and the line intensity are measures of the electron density in the stellar wind, we suggest that the observed variations can be attributed to a rise in the stellar mass-loss rate.

  11. Spectroscopic and Photometric Variability in the A0 Supergiant HR 1040

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corliss, David J.; Morrison, Nancy D.; Adelman, Saul J.

    2015-12-01

    A time-series analysis of spectroscopic and photometric observables of the A0 Ia supergiant HR 1040 has been performed, including equivalent widths, radial velocities, and Strömgren photometric indices. The data, obtained from 1993 through 2007, include 152 spectroscopic observations from the Ritter Observatory 1 m telescope and 269 Strömgren photometric observations from the Four College Automated Photoelectric Telescope. Typical of late B- and early A-type supergiants, HR 1040 has a highly variable Hα profile. The star was found to have an intermittent active phase marked by correlation between the Hα absorption equivalent width and blue-edge radial velocity and by photospheric connections observed in correlations to equivalent width, second moment and radial velocity in Si ii λλ6347, 6371. High-velocity absorption (HVA) events were observed only during this active phase. HVA events in the wind were preceded by photospheric activity, including Si ii radial velocity oscillations 19–42 days prior to onset of an HVA event and correlated increases in Si ii Wλ and second moment from 13 to 23 days before the start of the HVA event. While increases in various line equivalent widths in the wind prior to HVA events have been reported in the past in other stars, our finding of precursors in enhanced radial velocity variations in the wind and at the photosphere is a new result.

  12. SPECTROSCOPIC AND PHOTOMETRIC VARIABILITY IN THE A0 SUPERGIANT HR 1040

    SciTech Connect

    Corliss, David J.; Morrison, Nancy D.; Adelman, Saul J.

    2015-12-15

    A time-series analysis of spectroscopic and photometric observables of the A0 Ia supergiant HR 1040 has been performed, including equivalent widths, radial velocities, and Strömgren photometric indices. The data, obtained from 1993 through 2007, include 152 spectroscopic observations from the Ritter Observatory 1 m telescope and 269 Strömgren photometric observations from the Four College Automated Photoelectric Telescope. Typical of late B- and early A-type supergiants, HR 1040 has a highly variable Hα profile. The star was found to have an intermittent active phase marked by correlation between the Hα absorption equivalent width and blue-edge radial velocity and by photospheric connections observed in correlations to equivalent width, second moment and radial velocity in Si ii λλ6347, 6371. High-velocity absorption (HVA) events were observed only during this active phase. HVA events in the wind were preceded by photospheric activity, including Si ii radial velocity oscillations 19–42 days prior to onset of an HVA event and correlated increases in Si ii W{sub λ} and second moment from 13 to 23 days before the start of the HVA event. While increases in various line equivalent widths in the wind prior to HVA events have been reported in the past in other stars, our finding of precursors in enhanced radial velocity variations in the wind and at the photosphere is a new result.

  13. The Intermediate Luminosity Optical Transient SN 2010da: The Progenitor, Eruption and Aftermath of an Unusual Supergiant High-mass X-ray Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villar, Victoria; Berger, Edo; Chornock, Ryan; Laskar, Tanmoy; Margutti, Raffaella; Brown, Peter J.

    2016-06-01

    We present high- and medium-resolution optical spectroscopy, optical/UV imaging and archival Chandra, Hubble and Spitzer observations of the intermediate luminosity optical transient (ILOT) SN 2010da, discovered in the nearby galaxy NGC 300 (d=1.86 Mpc). SN 2010da had a peak absolute magnitude of M ~ -10.4 mag, dimmer than other recent ILOTs and supernova impostors. We detect hydrogen Balmer, Paschen and Ca II emission lines in our high-resolution spectra, which indicate a dusty and complex circumstellar environment. Based on SN 2010da's light curve and multi-epoch SEDs, we conclude that the progenitor of SN 2010da is a ~10-12 Msol yellow supergiant possibly transitioning into a blue loop phase. Since the 2010 eruption, the star has brightened by a factor of ~5 and remains highly variable in the optical. SN 2010da is a unique ILOT which seems to stem from a different physical origin than red SN 2008S-like events and luminous blue variable outbursts. Furthermore, we detect SN 2010da in archival Swift observations as an ultraluminous X-ray source. We additionally attribute He II 4686 and coronal Fe emission in addition to a steady X-ray luminosity of ~10^{37} erg/s to the presence of a compact companion.

  14. A hot companion to Mu Sagittarii - An opportunity to sound the atmosphere of a B8 Ia supergiant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polidan, R. S.; Plavec, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    It is argued that the bright supergiant star Mu Sagittarii is accompanied by a smaller and hotter star, of spectral type approximately B1.5 V. The single-line radial-velocity curve of the B8 star leads to a fairly large mass function, f(m) = 2.64 solar masses, implying that the companion should have at least 50 percent of the mass of the visible star. Older optical observations indicated the presence of a shallow eclipse at the time of the conjunction with the supergiant behind the companion. Since the Copernicus, IUE, and Voyager observations show that the companion is the hotter component, that eclipse must have been the secondary eclipse (if it was an eclipse at all). A deeper, primary eclipse has been predicted by Plavec in 1978. It was indeed observed as a marked decrease of the far-ultraviolet flux from the system both with the Copernicus and the IUE satellites. The presence of a hotter but smaller component in Mu Sagittarii offers a unique opportunity to study the outer atmospheric layers of a supergiant which is of a much earlier spectral type than the supergiants in the Zeta Aurigae systems.

  15. IUE observations of the Henize-Carlson sample of peculiar emission line supergiants: The galactic analogs of the Magellanic Zoo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shore, Steven N.; Brown, Douglas N.; Sanduleak, N.

    1986-01-01

    Some 15 stars from the Carlson-Henize survey of southern peculiar emission line stars were studied. From both the optical and UV spectra, they appear to be galactic counterparts of the most extreme early-type emission line supergiants of the Magellanic Clouds.

  16. Red Sky with Red Mesa

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The Red Sky/Red Mesa supercomputing platform dramatically reduces the time required to simulate complex fuel models, from 4-6 months to just 4 weeks, allowing researchers to accelerate the pace at which they can address these complex problems. Its speed also reduces the need for laboratory and field testing, allowing for energy reduction far beyond data center walls.

  17. Red Sky with Red Mesa

    SciTech Connect

    2011-04-14

    The Red Sky/Red Mesa supercomputing platform dramatically reduces the time required to simulate complex fuel models, from 4-6 months to just 4 weeks, allowing researchers to accelerate the pace at which they can address these complex problems. Its speed also reduces the need for laboratory and field testing, allowing for energy reduction far beyond data center walls.

  18. Red Capes, Red Herrings, and Red Flags.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiske, Donald W.

    The argument that the personality structures obtained from retrospective ratings reflect semantic similarity structures has been as provocative as a red cape in the bull ring. High congruence between those two kinds of structures seems well established. What is less clear is how and why those structures differ from that for immediate judgments of…

  19. Birthmarks - red

    MedlinePlus

    Strawberry mark; Vascular skin changes; Angioma cavernosum; Capillary hemangioma; Hemangioma simplex ... There are two main categories of birthmarks: Red birthmarks are ... are called vascular birthmarks. Pigmented birthmarks are areas ...

  20. OBSERVATIONAL EVIDENCE FOR A CORRELATION BETWEEN MACROTURBULENT BROADENING AND LINE-PROFILE VARIATIONS IN OB SUPERGIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Simon-Diaz, S.; Herrero, A.; Castro, N.; Uytterhoeven, K.; Puls, J.

    2010-09-10

    The spectra of O and B supergiants (Sgs) are known to be affected by a significant form of extra line broadening (usually referred to as macroturbulence) in addition to that produced by stellar rotation. Recent analyses of high-resolution spectra have shown that the interpretation of this line broadening as a consequence of large-scale turbulent motions would imply highly supersonic velocity fields in photospheric regions, making this scenario quite improbable. Stellar oscillations have been proposed as a likely alternative explanation. As part of a long-term observational project, we are investigating the macroturbulent broadening in O and B Sgs and its possible connection with spectroscopic variability phenomena and stellar oscillations. In this Letter, we present the first encouraging results of our project, namely, firm observational evidence for a strong correlation between the extra broadening and photospheric line-profile variations in a sample of 13 Sgs with spectral types ranging from O9.5 to B8.

  1. The Swift Supergiant Fast X-Ray Transients Project:. [A Review, New Results and Future Perspectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romano, P.; Mangano, V.; Ducci, L.; Esposito, P.; Vercellone, S.; Bocchino, F.; Burrows, D. N.; Kennea, J. A.; Krimm, H. A.; Gehrels, N.; Farinelli, R.; Ceccobello, C.

    2013-01-01

    We present a review of the Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXT) Project, a systematic investigation of the properties of SFXTs with a strategy that combines Swift monitoring programs with outburst follow-up observations. This strategy has quickly tripled the available sets of broad-band data of SFXT outbursts, and gathered a wealth of out-of-outburst data, which have led us to a broad-band spectral characterization, an assessment of the fraction of the time these sources spend in each phase, and their duty cycle of inactivity. We present some new observational results obtained through our outburst follow-ups, as fitting examples of the exceptional capabilities of Swift in catching bright flares and monitor them panchromatically.

  2. IUE observations of HR 6902 - Effect of luminosity on supergiant chromospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Imad A.

    1990-01-01

    IUE observations of the most recently discovered Zeta Aurigae system, HR 6902, are reported to reveal profound differences in the spectrum of the chromosphere of the cool primary from those of all other Zeta Aurigae systems. Unlike its sister systems, HR 6902 shows evidence of neither strong wind nor an extended chromosphere for the cool primary. Instead, the spectrum is like that of a single blue dwarf. The most likely reason for this contrast to all other Zeta Aur systems observed with IUE is the lower luminosity of the HR 6902 primary: a type-II 'bright giant' as opposed to the type I (or Ib-II in the case of 22 Vul) 'supergiants' in the other Zeta Aur systems.

  3. The early-type strong emission-line supergiants of the Magellanic Clouds - A spectroscopic zoology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shore, S. N.; Sanduleak, N.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a spectroscopic survey of 21 early-type extreme emission line supergiants of the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds using IUE and optical spectra are presented. The combined observations are discussed and the literature on each star in the sample is summarized. The classification procedures and the methods by which effective temperatures, bolometric magnitudes, and reddenings were assigned are discussed. The derived reddening values are given along with some results concerning anomalous reddening among the sample stars. The derived mass, luminosity, and radius for each star are presented, and the ultraviolet emission lines are described. Mass-loss rates are derived and discussed, and the implications of these observations for the evolution of the most massive stars in the Local Group are addressed.

  4. Properties of Supergiant Fast X-Ray Transients as Observed by Swift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romano, P.; Vercellone, S.; Krimm, H. A.; Esposito, P.; Cusumano, C.; LaParola, V.; Mangano, V.; Kennea, J. A.; Burrows, D. N.; Pagani, C.; Gehrels, N.

    2011-01-01

    We present the most recent results from our investigation on Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients, a class of High-Mass X-ray Binaries, with a possible counterpart in the gamma-ray energy band. Since 2007 Swift has contributed to this new field by detecting outbursts from these fast transients with the BAT and by following them for days with the XRT. Thus, we demonstrated that while the brightest phase of the outburst only lasts a few hours, further activity is observed at lower fluxes for a remarkably longer time, up to weeks. Furthermore, we have performed several campaigns of intense monitoring with the XRT, assessing the fraction of the time these sources spend in each phase, and their duty cycle of inactivity.

  5. Two supergiants in the Large Magellanic Cloud with thick dust shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elias, J. H.; Frogel, J. A.; Schwering, P. B. W.

    1986-01-01

    Ground-based observations from 0.6 to 20 microns have identified two luminous, evolved stars surrounded by thick dust shells among the Magellanic Cloud sources detected by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite. Their energy distributions resemble those of typical Galactic OH/IR stars, but they have bolometric magnitudes brighter than -9 and the small-amplitude variability of supergiants. One star, IRAS 04553 - 6825, has a special type of M7.5 and a dust shell which absorbs and reradiates roughly 75 percent of the star's luminosity; its radial velocity confirms its LMC membership. The second star, IRAS 05346 - 6949, has an even thicker dust shell, and the central star is not observable.

  6. The Ultraviolet Spectral Morphology of a Sample of B Supergiants in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeil, R. C.; Borchers, A. L.; Sonneborn, G.; Fahey, R. P.

    1995-05-01

    A study of the ultraviolet spectra of a sample of B supergiants in the Small Magellanic Cloud is being undertaken as a means of addressing some questions about the nature and evolution of massive stars. All spectra are new or archival low-dispersion SWP spectra (1200

  7. Microvariability of line profiles in the spectra of OB stars: III. The supergiant ρ LEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholtygin, A. F.; Fabrika, S. N.; Burlakova, T. E.; Valyavin, G. G.; Chuntonov, G. A.; Kudryavtsev, D. O.; Kang, D.; Yushkin, M. V.; Galazutdinov, G. A.

    2007-11-01

    We observed the bright supergiant ρ Leo (B1 lab) in January-February 2004 using the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory (Russia) and the 1.8-m telescope of the Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory (South Korea). 47 spectra with high time resolution (4-10 min), signal-to-noise ratios 300-1000, and spectral resolutions 45 000-60 000 were obtained. We detected variability in the HeI, SiII, SiIII, and NII line profiles, which may be due to rotational modulation of the profiles and photospheric pulsations of ρ Leo. The possible influence of the stellar magnetic field on the line-profile variations is discussed.

  8. Dense Molecular Clumps Associated with the LMC Supergiant Shell LMC 4 & LMC 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, K.; Minamidani, T.; Mizuno, N.; Onishi, T.; Kawamura, A.; Muller, E.; Dawson, J.; Fukui, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The 12CO(J=3-2/1-0) and 13CO(J=3-2/1-0) observations with ASTE and Mopra telescopes have been carried out toward the giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in the N48/N49 regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), which are located at the boundary of two kpc-scale Supergiant Shell (SGS) LMC 4 & LMC 5. The star formation is relatively evolved in the N48 region, which is just located at the boundary of SGSs, than in the N49 region. The clumps in the N48 show higher n(H2) and Tkin than those in the N49, but their densities are not so high as the LMC cluster forming clumps. The collision of two SGSs actually enhances the star formation but further evolution seem to be necessary for subsequent cluster formation.

  9. Spectroscopic Study of HD 179821 (IRAS 19114+0002): Proto-Planetary Nebula or Supergiant?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, B. E.; Hrivnak, Bruce J.

    1999-01-01

    A detailed chemical composition analysis of the bright post-AGB candidate HD 179821 (IRAS 19114 + 0002) is presented. The LTE analysis, based on high-resolution (R approximately equal 50,000) and high-quality (S/N approximately equal 300) spectra, yields atmospheric parameters T(sub eff) = 6750 K, log g = 0.5, and xi(sub t) = 5.25 km/s. The elemental abundance results of HD 179821 are found to be [Fe/H] = -0.1, [C/Fe] = +0.2, [N/Fe] = +1.3, [O/Fe] = +0.2, [alpha-process/Fe] = +0.5, and [s-process/Fe] = +0.4. These values clearly differ from the elemental abundances of Population I F supergiants. The C, N, and O abundances and the total CNO abundance value relative to Fe, [C+N+O/Fe] = +0.5, indicate that the photosphere of HD 179821 is contaminated with both the H- and He-burning products of the AGB phase. The evidence for He burning through the 3.alpha process and deep AGB mixing also comes from the observed overabundances of s-process elements. Remarkably, the abundance of the element Na is found to be very large, [Na/Fe] = +0.9. The ratio O/C = 2.6 indicates that the atmosphere is oxygen rich. The results of this abundance study support the argument that HD 179821 is a proto-planetary nebula,. probably with an intermediate-mass progenitor. However, the strength of the O I triplet lines at 7774 A and the distance derived from the interstellar Na I D1 and D2 components imply that the star is a luminous object (M(sub bol) approximately -8.9 +/- 1) and thus a massive supergiant. Thus, while this study contributes important new observational results for this star, an unambiguous determination of its evolutionary status has yet to be achieved.

  10. TEXES OBSERVATIONS OF M SUPERGIANTS: DYNAMICS AND THERMODYNAMICS OF WIND ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, Graham M.; Richter, Matthew J.; Ryde, Nils; Brown, Alexander; Brown, Joanna; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Strong, Shadrian

    2009-08-20

    We have detected [Fe II] 17.94 {mu}m and 24.52 {mu}m emission from a sample of M supergiants ({mu} Cep, {alpha} Sco, {alpha} Ori, CE Tau, AD Per, and {alpha} Her) using the Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph on NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility. These low opacity emission lines are resolved at R {approx_equal} 50, 000 and provide new diagnostics of the dynamics and thermodynamics of the stellar wind acceleration zone. The [Fe II] lines, from the first excited term (a {sup 4} F), are sensitive to the warm plasma where energy is deposited into the extended atmosphere to form the chromosphere and wind outflow. These diagnostics complement previous Kuiper Airborne Observatory and Infrared Space Observatory observations which were sensitive to the cooler and more extended circumstellar envelopes. The turbulent velocities of V{sub turb} {approx_equal} 12-13 km s{sup -1} observed in the [Fe II] a {sup 4} F forbidden lines are found to be a common property of our sample, and are less than that derived from the hotter chromospheric C II] 2325 A lines observed in {alpha} Ori, where V{sub turb} {approx_equal} 17-19 km s{sup -1}. For the first time, we have dynamically resolved the motions of the dominant cool atmospheric component discovered in {alpha} Ori from multiwavelength radio interferometry by Lim et al. Surprisingly, the emission centroids are quite Gaussian and at rest with respect to the M supergiants. These constraints combined with model calculations of the infrared emission line fluxes for {alpha} Ori imply that the warm material has a low outflow velocity and is located close to the star. We have also detected narrow [Fe I] 24.04 {mu}m emission that confirms Fe II is the dominant ionization state in {alpha} Ori's extended atmosphere.

  11. Dust clouds around red giant stars - Evidence of sublimating comet disks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matese, J. J.; Whitmire, D. P.; Reynolds, R. T.

    1989-09-01

    The dust production by disk comets around intermediate mass stars evolving into red giants is studied, focusing on AGB supergiants. The model of Iben and Renzini (1983) is used to study the observed dust mass loss for AGB stars. An expression is obtained for the comet disk net dust production rate and values of the radius and black body temperature corresponding to peak sublimation are calculated for a range of stellar masses. Also, the fractional amount of dust released from a cometesimal disk during a classical nova outburst is estimated.

  12. INTEGRAL Long-Term Monitoring of the Supergiant Fast X-Ray Transient XTE J1739-302

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blay, P.; Martinez-Nunez, S.; Negueruela, I.; Pottschmidt, K.; Smith, D. M.; Torrejon, J. M.; Reig, P.; Kretschmar, P.; Kreykenbohm, I.

    2008-01-01

    Context. In the past few years, a new class of High Mass X-Ray Binaries (HMXRB) has been claimed to exist, the Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXT). These are X-ray binary systems with a compact companion orbiting a supergiant star which show very short and bright outbursts in a series of activity periods overimposed on longer quiescent periods. Only very recently the first attempts to model the behaviour of these sources have been published, some of them within the framework of accretion from clumpy stellar winds. Aims. Our goal is to analyze the properties of XTE J1739-302/IGR J17391-3021 within the context of the clumpy structure of the supergiant wind. Methods. We have used INTEGRAL and RXTE/PCA observations in order to obtain broad band (1 - 200 keV) spectra and light curves of XTE J1739-302 and investigate its X-ray spectrum and temporal variability. Results. We have found that XTE J1739-302 follows a much more complex behaviour than expected. Far from presenting a regular variability pattern, XTE J1739-302 shows periods of high, intermediate, and low flaring activity.

  13. The XMM-Newton1 and INTEGRAL2 Observations of the Supergiant Fast X-Ray Transient IGR J16328-4726

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiocchi, M.; Bazzano, A.; Natalucci, L.; Ubertini, P.; Sguera, V.; Bird, A. J.; Boon, C. M.; Persi, P.; Piro, L.

    2016-10-01

    The accretion mechanism producing the short flares observed from the Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXT) is still highly debated and forms a major part in our attempts to place these X-ray binaries in the wider context of the High Mass X-ray Binaries. We report on a 216 ks INTEGRAL observation of the SFXT IGR J16328-4726 (2014 August 24–27) simultaneous with two fixed-time observations with XMM-Newton (33 and 20 ks) performed around the putative periastron passage, in order to investigate the accretion regime and the wind properties during this orbital phase. During these observations, the source has shown luminosity variations, from ∼ 4× {10}34 to ∼ {10}36 {erg} {{{s}}}-1, linked to spectral properties changes. The soft X-ray continuum is well modeled by a power law with a photon index varying from ∼1.2 up to ∼1.7 and with high values of the column density in the range of ∼ 2{--}4× {10}23 {{cm}}-2. We report on the presence of iron lines at ∼6.8–7.1 keV, suggesting that the X-ray flux is produced by the accretion of matter from the companion wind characterized by density and temperature inhomogeneities.

  14. Multi-Frequency Photometric Analyses of Rigel, the nearest Blue Supergiant and Supernova Progenitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Heather A.; Guinan, E. F.; Wasatonic, R.; Engle, S. G.; McCook, G. P.

    2009-01-01

    As the 7th brightest star and the most luminous star in the solar neighborhood Rigel (β Orionis) is a very intriguing object. This blue supergiant (B8 Iab; 0.12-mag; B-V = -0.03) has been distanced at 240 +/-35 pc by a Hipparcos parallax and has a resulting average absolute magnitude -6.7 mag.has been distanced at 240 +/-35 pc by Hipparcos parallax and an average absolute magnitude -6.7 mag. The following physical properties were determined via spectroscopic, photometric, and interferometric studies: L/Lo 66,000; Teff = 12,000 K; M/Mo 17 +/- 3; R/Ro 70; age 3-10 Myr. Interestingly Rigel has similar physical properties with the 12th-mag blue supergiant progenitor of SN 1987A: Sanduleak -69° 202a. Thus Rigel (along with its co-asterism Betelgeuse) are likely to be the nearest progenitors of a Type II supernova. Such a nearby explosion would have an apparent magnitude of -17 mag (nearly 100 full moons). We report on initial results of intensive photometry of Rigel being conducted with telescopes in Pennsylvania and Arizona. Also studied are two years of Hipparcos photometry. These datasets indicate brightness variations on nearly all time scales - from minutes to weeks. The photometry is being analyzed for possible periodicities using FFT and CLEAN-est routines provides by Peranso. Evidence of cyclic/periodic oscillations appears present in some of the datasets in addition to stochastic variations. We present the initial results and implications for probing the interior of this important star. Our study indicates that Rigel will be an excellent target for asteroseismic studies with MOST and the upcoming BRITE-Constellation Mission. Continuous high precision photometry from space could yield important information on the possible presence of g- and p- mode oscillations in this star. We acknowledge support for this research from NSF/RUI Grants AST05-07542 and AST05-07536.

  15. Dynamical mass of the O-type supergiant in ζ Orionis A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, C. A.; Rivinius, Th.; Nieva, M.-F.; Stahl, O.; van Belle, G.; Zavala, R. T.

    2013-06-01

    Aims: A close companion of ζ Orionis A was found in 2000 with the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer (NPOI), and shown to be a physical companion. Because the primary is a supergiant of type O, for which dynamical mass measurements are very rare, the companion was observed with NPOI over the full 7-year orbit. Our aim was to determine the dynamical mass of a supergiant that, due to the physical separation of more than 10 AU between the components, cannot have undergone mass exchange with the companion. Methods: The interferometric observations allow measuring the relative positions of the binary components and their relative brightness. The data collected over the full orbital period allows all seven orbital elements to be determined. In addition to the interferometric observations, we analyzed archival spectra obtained at the Calar Alto, Haute Provence, Cerro Armazones, and La Silla observatories, as well as new spectra obtained at the VLT on Cerro Paranal. In the high-resolution spectra we identified a few lines that can be associated exclusively to one or the other component for the measurement of the radial velocities of both. The combination of astrometry and spectroscopy then yields the stellar masses and the distance to the binary star. Results: The resulting masses for components Aa of 14.0 ± 2.2 M⊙ and Ab of 7.4 ± 1.1 M⊙ are low compared to theoretical expectations, with a distance of 294 ± 21 pc which is smaller than a photometric distance estimate of 387 ± 54 pc based on the spectral type B0III of the B component. If the latter (because it is also consistent with the distance to the Orion OB1 association) is adopted, the mass of the secondary component Ab of 14 ± 3 M⊙ would agree with classifying a star of type B0.5IV. It is fainter than the primary by about 2.2 ± 0.1 magnitudes in the visual. The primary mass is then determined to be 33 ± 10 M⊙. The possible reasons for the distance discrepancy are most likely related to physical

  16. THE ULTRA-LONG GAMMA-RAY BURST 111209A: THE COLLAPSE OF A BLUE SUPERGIANT?

    SciTech Connect

    Gendre, B.; Cutini, S.; D'Elia, V.; Stratta, G.; Atteia, J. L.; Klotz, A.; Basa, S.; Boeer, M.; Coward, D. M.; Howell, E. J; Piro, L.

    2013-03-20

    We present optical, X-ray and gamma-ray observations of GRB 111209A, observed at a redshift of z = 0.677. We show that this event was active in its prompt phase for about 25000 s, making it the longest burst ever observed. This rare event could have been detected up to z {approx} 1.4 in gamma-rays. Compared to other long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), GRB 111209A is a clear outlier in the energy-fluence and duration plane. The high-energy prompt emission shows no sign of a strong blackbody component, the signature of a tidal disruption event, or a supernova shock breakout. Given the extreme longevity of this event, and lack of any significant observed supernova signature, we propose that GRB 111209A resulted from the core-collapse of a low-metallicity blue supergiant star. This scenario is favored because of the necessity to supply enough mass to the central engine over a duration of thousands of seconds. Hence, we suggest that GRB 111209A could have more in common with population III stellar explosions, rather than those associated with normal long GRBs.

  17. Complexes of triggered star formation in supergiant shell of Holmberg II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, Oleg V.; Lozinskaya, Tatiana A.; Moiseev, Alexei V.; Shchekinov, Yuri A.

    2016-09-01

    We report a detailed analysis of all regions of current star formation in the walls of the supergiant H I shell (SGS) in the galaxy Holmberg II based on observations with a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer at the 6-m SAO RAS telescope. We compare the structure and kinematics of ionized gas with that of atomic hydrogen and with the stellar population of the SGS. Our deep Hα images and archival images taken by the HST demonstrate that current star formation episodes are larger and more complicated than previously thought: they represent unified star-forming complexes with sizes of several hundred pc rather than `chains' of separate bright nebulae in the walls of the SGS. The fact that we are dealing with unified complexes is evidenced by identified faint shell-like structures of ionized and neutral gas which connect several distinct bright H II regions. Formation of such complexes is due to the feedback of stars with very inhomogeneous ambient gas in the walls of the SGS. The arguments supporting an idea about the triggering of star formation in SGS by the H I supershells collision are presented. We also found a faint ionized supershell inside the H I SGS expanding with a velocity of no greater than 10 - 15 km s-1. Five OB stars located inside the inner supershell are sufficient to account for its radiation, although a possibility of leakage of ionizing photons from bright H II regions is not ruled out as well.

  18. Multiple, short-lived ``stellar prominences'' on O stars: the supergiant λ Cephei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrichs, H. F.; Sudnik, N.

    2015-01-01

    Many OB stars show unexplained cyclical variability in their winds and in many optical lines, which are formed at the base of the wind. For these stars no dipolar magnetic fields have been detected. We propose that these cyclical variations are caused by the presence of multiple, transient, short-lived, corotating magnetic loops, which we call ``stellar prominences''. We present a simplified model representing these prominences as corotating spherical blobs and fit the rapid variability in the Heii λ4686 line of the O supergiant λ Cep for time-resolved spectra obtained in 1989. Our conclusions are: (1) From model fits we find that the life time of the prominences varies, and is between 2-7 h. (2) The adopted inclination angle is 68° with a rotation period of ~ 4.1 d (but not well constrained). (3) The contribution of non-radial pulsations is negligible (4) Similar behavior is observed in at least 4 other O stars. We propose that prominences are a common phenomenon among O stars.

  19. The eclipsing, double-lined, Of supergiant binary Cygnus OB2-B17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroud, V. E.; Clark, J. S.; Negueruela, I.; Roche, P.; Norton, A. J.; Vilardell, F.

    2010-02-01

    Context. Massive, eclipsing, double-lined, spectroscopic binaries are not common but are necessary to understand the evolution of massive stars as they are the only direct way to determine stellar masses. They are also the progenitors of energetic phenomena such as X-ray binaries and γ-ray bursts. Aims: We present a photometric and spectroscopic analysis of the candidate binary system Cyg OB2-B17 to show that it is indeed a massive evolved binary. Methods: We utilise V band and white-light photometry to obtain a light curve and period of the system, and spectra at different resolutions to calculate preliminary orbital parameters and spectral classes for the components. Results: Our results suggest that B17 is an eclipsing, double-lined, spectroscopic binary with a period of 4.0217±0.0004 days, with two massive evolved components with preliminary classifications of O7 and O9 supergiants. The radial velocity and light curves are consistent with a massive binary containing components with similar luminosities, and in turn with the preliminary spectral types and age of the association.

  20. The evolutionary status of the bright high-latitude supergiant HD 190390

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyniers, M.; Cuypers, J.

    2005-03-01

    Despite its mean apparent magnitude of mV = 6.39, the evolutionary status of HD 190390 (HR 7671), a luminous F-type supergiant at high galactic latitude, is still not very clear, but in most papers a post-AGB classification is assumed. New observational material has been obtained with four different instruments and is presented here. An extensive abundance analysis based on high resolution, high signal-to-noise NTT+EMMI spectra confirms the metal deficiency of this object ([Fe/H] = -1.6), together with a high lithium content (log ɛ(Li) = 1.9). A variability analysis based on Geneva photometry over seven years reveals beating with a period of ~3000 days. It is, however, not clear whether this beating is caused by a stable triplet, or it is the consequence of small changes in the main frequency. More recent data obtained with the HIPPARCOS satellite and the Mercator telescope not only confirm the main period, but also support the presence of a second periodicity of 11 days, which was also found in the Geneva photometry. A conclusive evolutionary status of this object is not given, but alternative to the UU Her (i.e. post-AGB) status, a W Vir classification is discussed. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile (programme 61.E-0426), and at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos, La Palma, Spain.

  1. X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE SUPERGIANT SHELL IN IC 2574

    SciTech Connect

    Yukita, Mihoko; Swartz, Douglas A.

    2012-05-01

    The M81 group member dwarf galaxy IC 2574 hosts a supergiant shell of current and recent star formation activity surrounding a 1000 Multiplication-Sign 500 pc hole in the ambient H I gas distribution. Chandra X-ray Observatory imaging observations reveal a luminous, L{sub X} {approx} 6.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1} in the 0.3-8.0 keV band, point-like source within the hole but offset from its center and fainter diffuse emission extending throughout and beyond the hole. The star formation history at the location of the point source indicates a burst of star formation beginning {approx}25 Myr ago and currently weakening and there is a young nearby star cluster, at least 5 Myr old, bracketing the likely age of the X-ray source at between 5 and {approx}25 Myr. The source is thus likely a bright high-mass X-ray binary-either a neutron star or black hole accreting from an early B star undergoing thermal-timescale mass transfer through Roche lobe overflow. The properties of the residual diffuse X-ray emission are consistent with those expected from hot gas associated with the recent star formation activity in the region.

  2. DISCOVERY OF THE FIRST B[e] SUPERGIANTS IN M 31

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, M.; Oksala, M. E.; Cidale, L. S.; Arias, M. L.; Borges Fernandes, M.

    2014-01-01

    B[e] supergiants (B[e]SGs) are transitional objects in the post-main sequence evolution of massive stars. The small number of B[e]SGs known so far in the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds indicates that this evolutionary phase is short. Nevertheless, the strong aspherical mass loss occurring during this phase, which leads to the formation of rings or disk-like structures, and the similarity to possible progenitors of SN1987 A emphasize the importance of B[e]SGs for the dynamics of the interstellar medium as well as stellar and galactic chemical evolution. The number of objects and their mass-loss behavior at different metallicities are essential ingredients for accurate predictions from stellar and galactic evolution calculations. However, B[e]SGs are not easily identified, as they share many characteristics with luminous blue variables (LBVs) in their quiescent (hot) phase. We present medium-resolution near-infrared K-band spectra for four stars in M 31, which have been assigned a hot LBV (candidate) status. Applying diagnostics that were recently developed to distinguish B[e]SGs from hot LBVs, we classify two of the objects as bonafide LBVs; one of them currently in outburst. In addition, we firmly classify the two stars 2MASS J00441709+4119273 and 2MASS J00452257+4150346 as the first B[e]SGs in M 31 based on strong CO band emission detected in their spectra, and infrared colors typical for this class of stars.

  3. Discovery of SiO Band Emission from Galactic B[e] Supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, M.; Oksala, M. E.; Cidale, L. S.; Arias, M. L.; Torres, A. F.; Borges Fernandes, M.

    2015-02-01

    B[e] supergiants (B[e]SGs) are evolved massive stars in a short-lived transition phase. During this phase, these objects eject large amounts of material, which accumulate in a circumstellar disk-like structure. The expelled material is typically dense and cool, providing the cradle for molecule and dust condensation and for a rich, ongoing chemistry. Very little is known about the chemical composition of these disks, beyond the emission from dust and CO revolving around the star on Keplerian orbits. As massive stars preserve an oxygen-rich surface composition throughout their life, other oxygen-based molecules can be expected to form. As SiO is the second most stable oxygen compound, we initiated an observing campaign to search for first-overtone SiO emission bands. We obtained high-resolution near-infrared L-band spectra for a sample of Galactic B[e]SGs with reported CO band emission. We clearly detect emission from the SiO first-overtone bands in CPD-52 9243 and indications for faint emission in HD 62623, HD 327083, and CPD-57 2874. From model fits, we find that in all these stars the SiO bands are rotationally broadened with a velocity lower than observed in the CO band forming regions, suggesting that SiO forms at larger distances from the star. Hence, searching for and analyzing these bands is crucial for studying the structure and kinematics of circumstellar disks, because they trace complementary regions to the CO band formation zone. Moreover, since SiO molecules are the building blocks for silicate dust, their study might provide insight in the early stage of dust formation. Based on observations collected with the ESO VLT Paranal Observatory under program 093.D-0248(A).

  4. Dense molecular clumps associated with the Large Magellanic Cloud supergiant shells LMC 4 and LMC 5

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Kosuke; Mizuno, Norikazu; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro; Onishi, Toshikazu; Muraoka, Kazuyuki; Kawamura, Akiko; Muller, Erik; Tatematsu, Ken'ichi; Hasegawa, Tetsuo; Miura, Rie E.; Ezawa, Hajime; Dawson, Joanne; Tosaki, Tomoka; Sakai, Takeshi; Tsukagoshi, Takashi; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Fukui, Yasuo

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the effects of supergiant shells (SGSs) and their interaction on dense molecular clumps by observing the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) star-forming regions N48 and N49, which are located between two SGSs, LMC 4 and LMC 5. {sup 12}CO (J = 3-2, 1-0) and {sup 13}CO(J = 1-0) observations with the ASTE and Mopra telescopes have been carried out toward these regions. A clumpy distribution of dense molecular clumps is revealed with 7 pc spatial resolution. Large velocity gradient analysis shows that the molecular hydrogen densities (n(H{sub 2})) of the clumps are distributed from low to high density (10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} cm{sup –3}) and their kinetic temperatures (T {sub kin}) are typically high (greater than 50 K). These clumps seem to be in the early stages of star formation, as also indicated from the distribution of Hα, young stellar object candidates, and IR emission. We found that the N48 region is located in the high column density H I envelope at the interface of the two SGSs and the star formation is relatively evolved, whereas the N49 region is associated with LMC 5 alone and the star formation is quiet. The clumps in the N48 region typically show high n(H{sub 2}) and T {sub kin}, which are as dense and warm as the clumps in LMC massive cluster-forming areas (30 Dor, N159). These results suggest that the large-scale structure of the SGSs, especially the interaction of two SGSs, works efficiently on the formation of dense molecular clumps and stars.

  5. Dense Molecular Clumps Associated with the Large Magellanic Cloud Supergiant Shells LMC 4 and LMC 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Kosuke; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro; Mizuno, Norikazu; Onishi, Toshikazu; Kawamura, Akiko; Muller, Erik; Dawson, Joanne; Tatematsu, Ken'ichi; Hasegawa, Tetsuo; Tosaki, Tomoka; Miura, Rie E.; Muraoka, Kazuyuki; Sakai, Takeshi; Tsukagoshi, Takashi; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Ezawa, Hajime; Fukui, Yasuo

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the effects of supergiant shells (SGSs) and their interaction on dense molecular clumps by observing the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) star-forming regions N48 and N49, which are located between two SGSs, LMC 4 and LMC 5. 12CO (J = 3-2, 1-0) and 13CO(J = 1-0) observations with the ASTE and Mopra telescopes have been carried out toward these regions. A clumpy distribution of dense molecular clumps is revealed with 7 pc spatial resolution. Large velocity gradient analysis shows that the molecular hydrogen densities (n(H2)) of the clumps are distributed from low to high density (103-105 cm-3) and their kinetic temperatures (T kin) are typically high (greater than 50 K). These clumps seem to be in the early stages of star formation, as also indicated from the distribution of Hα, young stellar object candidates, and IR emission. We found that the N48 region is located in the high column density H I envelope at the interface of the two SGSs and the star formation is relatively evolved, whereas the N49 region is associated with LMC 5 alone and the star formation is quiet. The clumps in the N48 region typically show high n(H2) and T kin, which are as dense and warm as the clumps in LMC massive cluster-forming areas (30 Dor, N159). These results suggest that the large-scale structure of the SGSs, especially the interaction of two SGSs, works efficiently on the formation of dense molecular clumps and stars.

  6. MOST Detects g- and p-Modes in the B Supergiant HD 163899 (B2 Ib/II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saio, H.; Kuschnig, R.; Gautschy, A.; Cameron, C.; Walker, G. A. H.; Matthews, J. M.; Guenther, D. B.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Rucinski, S. M.; Sasselov, D.; Weiss, W. W.

    2006-10-01

    The Microvariability and Oscillations of Stars (MOST) satellite observed the B supergiant HD 163899 (B2 Ib/II) for 37 days as a guide star and detected 48 frequencies <~2.8 cycles day-1 with amplitudes of a few millimagnitudes (mmag) and less. The frequency range embraces g- and p-mode pulsations. It was generally thought that no g-modes are excited in less luminous B supergiants because strong radiative damping is expected in the core. Our theoretical models, however, show that such g-modes are excited in massive post-main-sequence stars, in accordance with these observations. The nonradial pulsations excited in models between 20 Msolar at logTeff~4.41 and 15 Msolar at logTeff~4.36 are roughly consistent with the observed frequency range. Excitation by the Fe bump in opacity is possible because g-modes can be partially reflected at a convective zone associated with the hydrogen-burning shell, which significantly reduces radiative damping in the core. The MOST light curve of HD 163899 shows that such a reflection of g-modes actually occurs and reveals the existence of a previously unrecognized type of variable, slowly pulsating B supergiants (SPBsg) distinct from α Cyg variables. Such g-modes have great potential for asteroseismology. Based on data from the MOST satellite, a Canadian Space Agency mission, operated jointly by Dynacon, Inc., the University of Toronto Institute of Aerospace Studies, and the University of British Columbia, with the assistance of the University of Vienna.

  7. Geological and geochemical controls on the formation and distribution of supergiant gas fields in the Russian sedimentary basins

    SciTech Connect

    Lopatin, N.

    1996-12-31

    The West Siberian, Barents Sea and Northern Caspian sedimentary basins are the most prolific Russian gas producing regions and include 15 supergiant gas fields each of them content identified gas reserves between 1 x 10{sup 12} m{sup 3} to 11 x 10{sup 12} m{sup 3}. They are Urengoi, Yarnburg, Bovanenkov, Zapoljarnoye, Medvezhie, Charasavey, Kruzenshtern, N.Urengoi, S.Tambey, S.Russkoye, Rusanov, Shtockmanov, Lunin, Astrachan and Orenburg. The gas reserves in these basins exceed 70 x 10{sup 12} m{sup 3} and about 65% of them concentrated in supergiant fields. Among the geological prerequisites for largest gas accumulations note big size of trap (Urengoi 40x300 km{sup 2}; Astrachan l80x200 km{sup 2}), anticline type of tectonic structure (swell, megaswell, dome, arch) with amplitude from 110 m to 800 in. These tectonic structure were active long time include the latest period. The main gas productive reservoirs are slightly consulted non-marine sandstones of Cenomanian or Middle Jurassic ages (West Siberia and Barents Sea) or Middle Carboniferous reef carbonate buildups (Northern Caspian basin). The next geochemical parameters controlled of the gas accumulation histories: (1) West Siberia and Barents Sea regions gas genetically connect with dispersed or concentrated non-marine coal type kerogen distributed into productive complex under lower maturity conditions (before or early oil window zone). This is dry gas almost pure methane with {delta}{sup 13} C{sub 1} between -44,40{per_thousand}. In this case we observe widely distributed mainly sandstones reservoirs at same time gas source rocks also; (2) the Northern Caspian basin found supergiant wet gas-condensate accumulations into local distributed reef carbonate buildups. Gas source rocks is marine kerogen type II, which has a low concentration in marlaceous facies. It is gas high maturity zone.

  8. Geological and geochemical controls on the formation and distribution of supergiant gas fields in the Russian sedimentary basins

    SciTech Connect

    Lopatin, N. )

    1996-01-01

    The West Siberian, Barents Sea and Northern Caspian sedimentary basins are the most prolific Russian gas producing regions and include 15 supergiant gas fields each of them content identified gas reserves between 1 x 10[sup 12] m[sup 3] to 11 x 10[sup 12] m[sup 3]. They are Urengoi, Yarnburg, Bovanenkov, Zapoljarnoye, Medvezhie, Charasavey, Kruzenshtern, N.Urengoi, S.Tambey, S.Russkoye, Rusanov, Shtockmanov, Lunin, Astrachan and Orenburg. The gas reserves in these basins exceed 70 x 10[sup 12] m[sup 3] and about 65% of them concentrated in supergiant fields. Among the geological prerequisites for largest gas accumulations note big size of trap (Urengoi 40x300 km[sup 2]; Astrachan l80x200 km[sup 2]), anticline type of tectonic structure (swell, megaswell, dome, arch) with amplitude from 110 m to 800 in. These tectonic structure were active long time include the latest period. The main gas productive reservoirs are slightly consulted non-marine sandstones of Cenomanian or Middle Jurassic ages (West Siberia and Barents Sea) or Middle Carboniferous reef carbonate buildups (Northern Caspian basin). The next geochemical parameters controlled of the gas accumulation histories: (1) West Siberia and Barents Sea regions gas genetically connect with dispersed or concentrated non-marine coal type kerogen distributed into productive complex under lower maturity conditions (before or early oil window zone). This is dry gas almost pure methane with [delta][sup 13] C[sub 1] between -44,40[per thousand]. In this case we observe widely distributed mainly sandstones reservoirs at same time gas source rocks also; (2) the Northern Caspian basin found supergiant wet gas-condensate accumulations into local distributed reef carbonate buildups. Gas source rocks is marine kerogen type II, which has a low concentration in marlaceous facies. It is gas high maturity zone.

  9. ISOLATED WOLF-RAYET STARS AND O SUPERGIANTS IN THE GALACTIC CENTER REGION IDENTIFIED VIA PASCHEN-{alpha} EXCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Mauerhan, J. C.; Stolovy, S. R.; Cotera, A.; Dong, H.; Wang, Q. D.; Morris, M. R.; Lang, C.

    2010-12-10

    We report the discovery of 19 hot, evolved, massive stars near the Galactic center region (GCR). These objects were selected for spectroscopy owing to their detection as strong sources of Paschen-{alpha} (P{alpha}) emission-line excess, following a narrowband imaging survey of the central 0.{sup 0}65 x 0.{sup 0}25 (l, b) around Sgr A* with the Hubble Space Telescope. Discoveries include six carbon-type (WC) and five nitrogen-type (WN) Wolf-Rayet stars, six O supergiants, and two B supergiants. Two of the O supergiants have X-ray counterparts having properties consistent with solitary O stars and colliding-wind binaries. The infrared photometry of 17 stars is consistent with the Galactic center distance, but 2 of them are located in the foreground. Several WC stars exhibit a relatively large infrared excess, which is possibly thermal emission from hot dust. Most of the stars appear scattered throughout the GCR, with no relation to the three known massive young clusters; several others lie near the Arches and Quintuplet clusters and may have originated within one of these systems. The results of this work bring the total sample of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars in the GCR to 88. All sources of strong P{alpha} excess have been identified in the area surveyed with HST, which implies that the sample of WN stars in this region is near completion, and is dominated by late (WNL) types. The current WC sample, although probably not complete, is almost exclusively dominated by late (WCL) types. The observed WR subtype distribution in the GCR is a reflection of the intrinsic rarity of early subtypes (WNE and WCE) in the inner Galaxy, an effect that is driven by metallicity.

  10. Coronal Temperature and Emission Measure Distributions for he Active G Supergiant Beta Dra and other ASCA Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Alexander

    1998-01-01

    This NASA grant supported my ASCA observing and data analysis programs during AOs 1-4. This research involved four Guest Observer projects. Analysis of data from all four programs has been completed. This grant included the following ASCA GO programs: AO1 - "Coronal Temperature and Emission Measure Distributions for the Active G Supergiant Beta Dra" AO2 - "Contemporaneous ASCA, EUVE, IUE, and VLA/AT Observations of Atmospheric Structure of the RS CVn Binary HR1099". AO3 - "Coronal Temperature and Emission Measure Distributions for the hybrid-chromosphere star alpha TrA". AO4-"Activity on the edge of convection: The atmosphere of Canopus (alpha Car, FO Ib-II)".

  11. Seeing Red

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This New Horizons image of Jupiter's volcanic moon Io was taken at 13:05 Universal Time during the spacecraft's Jupiter flyby on February 28, 2007. It shows the reddish color of the deposits from the giant volcanic eruption at the volcano Tvashtar, near the top of the sunlit crescent, as well as the bluish plume itself and the orange glow of the hot lava at its source. The relatively unprocessed image on the left provides the best view of the volcanic glow and the plume deposits, while the version on the right has been brightened to show the much fainter plume, and the Jupiter-lit night side of Io.

    New Horizons' color imaging of Io's sunlit side was generally overexposed because the spacecraft's color camera, the super-sensitive Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC), was designed for the much dimmer illumination at Pluto. However, two of MVIC's four color filters, the blue and 'methane' filter (a special filter designed to map methane frost on the surface of Pluto at an infrared wavelength of 0.89 microns), are less sensitive than the others, and thus obtained some well-exposed views of the surface when illumination conditions were favorable. Because only two color filters are used, rather than the usual three, and because one filter uses infrared light, the color is only a rough approximation to what the human eye would see.

    The red color of the Tvashtar plume fallout is typical of Io's largest volcanic plumes, including the previous eruption of Tvashtar seen by the Galileo and Cassini spacecraft in 2000, and the long-lived Pele plume on the opposite side of Io. The color likely results from the creation of reddish three-atom and four-atom sulfur molecules (S3 and S4) from plume gases rich in two-atom sulfur molecules (S2 After a few months or years, the S3 and S4 molecules recombine into the more stable and familiar yellowish form of sulfur consisting of eight-atom molecules (S8), so these red deposits are only seen around recently-active Io

  12. Is red the colour of danger? Testing an implicit red-danger association.

    PubMed

    Pravossoudovitch, Karyn; Cury, Francois; Young, Steve G; Elliot, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Research using participant's self-reports has documented a link between red and danger. In this research, we used two different variants of a Stroop word evaluation task to test for the possibility of an implicit red-danger association using carefully controlled colour stimuli (equated on lightness and chroma). Experiment 1, using words as stimuli, yielded strong evidence of a link between red and danger, and weaker evidence of a green-safety association. Experiment 2, using symbols as stimuli, again yielded strong evidence of a link between red and danger; no green effects were observed. The findings were discussed in terms of the power and promise of red in signal communication.

  13. DISCOVERY OF A POSSIBLY SINGLE BLUE SUPERGIANT STAR IN THE INTRA-CLUSTER REGION OF VIRGO CLUSTER OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Ohyama, Youichi; Hota, Ananda

    2013-04-20

    IC 3418 is a dwarf irregular galaxy falling into the Virgo cluster, and a 17 kpc long trail is seen behind the galaxy, which is considered to have formed due to ram pressure stripping. The trail contains compact knots and diffuse blobs of ultraviolet and blue optical emission and, thus, it is a clear site of recent star formation but in an unusual environment, surrounded by a million degree intra-cluster medium. We report on our optical spectroscopy of a compact source in the trail, SDSS J122952.66+112227.8, and show that the optical spectrum is dominated by emission from a massive blue supergiant star. If confirmed, our report would mark the farthest star with spectroscopic observation. We interpret that a massive O-type star formed in situ in the trail has evolved recently out of the main sequence into this blue supergiant phase, and now lacks any detectable spectral sign of its associated H II region. We argue that turbulence within the ram pressure striped gaseous trail may play a dominant role for the star formation within such trails.

  14. A Spectroscopic Study of Blue Supergiant Stars in the Sculptor Galaxy NGC 55: Chemical Evolution and Distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudritzki, R. P.; Castro, N.; Urbaneja, M. A.; Ho, I.-T.; Bresolin, F.; Gieren, W.; Pietrzyński, G.; Przybilla, N.

    2016-10-01

    Low-resolution (4.5-5 Å) spectra of 58 blue supergiant stars distributed over the disk of the Magellanic spiral galaxy NGC 55 in the Sculptor group are analyzed by means of non-LTE techniques to determine stellar temperatures, gravities, and metallicities (from iron peak and α-elements). A metallicity gradient of -0.22 ± 0.06 dex/R 25 is detected. The central metallicity on a logarithmic scale relative to the Sun is [Z] = -0.37 ± 0.03. A chemical evolution model using the observed distribution of column densities of the stellar and interstellar medium gas mass reproduces the observed metallicity distribution well and reveals a recent history of strong galactic mass accretion and wind outflows with accretion and mass-loss rates of the order of the star formation rate. There is an indication of spatial inhomogeneity in metallicity. In addition, the relatively high central metallicity of the disk confirms that two extraplanar metal-poor H ii regions detected in previous work 1.13 to 2.22 kpc above the galactic plane are ionized by massive stars formed in situ outside the disk. For a subsample of supergiants, for which Hubble Space Telescope photometry is available, the flux-weighted gravity-luminosity relationship is used to determine a distance modulus of 26.85 ± 0.10 mag.

  15. Swift/XRT Monitoring of the Candidate Supergiant Fast X-ray Transient IGR J16418-4532

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romano, P.; Mangano, V.; Ducci, L.; Esposito, P.; Evans, P. A.; Vercellone, S.; Kennea, J. A.; Burrows, D. N.; Gehrels, N.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the Swift monitoring of the candidate supergiant fast X-ray transient (SFXT) IGR J16418.4532, for which both orbital and spin periods are known (approx. 3.7d and approx. 1250 s, respectively). Our observations, for a total of approx. 43 ks, span over three orbital periods and represent the most intense and complete sampling of the light curve of this source with a sensitive X-ray instrument. With this unique set of observations we can address the nature of this transient. By applying the clumpy wind model for blue supergiants to the observed X-ray light curve, and assuming a circular orbit, the X-ray emission from this source can be explained in terms of the accretion from a spherically symmetric clumpy wind, composed of clumps with different masses, ranging from 5 X 10(exp 16) g to 10(exp 21) g. Our data suggest, based on the X-ray behaviour, that this is an intermediate SFXT

  16. Swift-X-Ray Telescope Monitoring of the Candidate Supergiant Fast X-ray Transient IGR J16418-4532

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romano, P.; Mangano, V.; Ducci, L.; Esposito, P.; Evans, P. A.; Vercellone, S.; Kennea, J. A.; Burrows, D. N.; Gehrels, N.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the Swift monitoring of the candidate supergiant fast X-ray transient (SFXT) IGR J16418-4532, for which both orbital and spin periods are known (approx. 3.7 d and approx.1250 s, respectively). Our observations, for a total of approx. 43 ks, span over three orbital periods and represent the most intense and complete sampling of the light curve of this source with a sensitive X-ray instrument. With this unique set of observations, we can address the nature of this transient. By applying the clumpy wind model for blue supergiants to the observed X-ray light curve, and assuming a circular orbit, the X-ray emission from this source can be explained in terms of the accretion from a spherically symmetric clumpy wind, composed of clumps with different masses, ranging from approx. 5 × 10(exp 16) to 10(exp 21) g. Our data suggest, based on the X-ray behaviour, that this is an intermediate SFXT.

  17. Toward connecting core-collapse supernova theory with observations. I. Shock revival in a 15 M {sub ☉} blue supergiant progenitor with SN 1987A energetics

    SciTech Connect

    Handy, Timothy; Plewa, Tomasz; Odrzywołek, Andrzej

    2014-03-10

    We study the evolution of the collapsing core of a 15 M {sub ☉} blue supergiant supernova progenitor from the core bounce until 1.5 s later. We present a sample of hydrodynamic models parameterized to match the explosion energetics of SN 1987A. We find the spatial model dimensionality to be an important contributing factor in the explosion process. Compared to two-dimensional (2D) simulations, our three-dimensional (3D) models require lower neutrino luminosities to produce equally energetic explosions. We estimate that the convective engine in our models is 4% more efficient in 3D than in 2D. We propose that the greater efficiency of the convective engine found in 3D simulations might be due to the larger surface-to-volume ratio of convective plumes, which aids in distributing energy deposited by neutrinos. We do not find evidence of the standing accretion shock instability or turbulence being a key factor in powering the explosion in our models. Instead, the analysis of the energy transport in the post-shock region reveals characteristics of penetrative convection. The explosion energy decreases dramatically once the resolution is inadequate to capture the morphology of convection on large scales. This shows that the role of dimensionality is secondary to correctly accounting for the basic physics of the explosion. We also analyze information provided by particle tracers embedded in the flow and find that the unbound material has relatively long residency times in 2D models, while in 3D a significant fraction of the explosion energy is carried by particles with relatively short residency times.

  18. The weak magnetic field of the O9.7 supergiant ζOrionisA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouret, J.-C.; Donati, J.-F.; Martins, F.; Escolano, C.; Marcolino, W.; Lanz, T.; Howarth, I. D.

    2008-09-01

    We report here the detection of a weak magnetic field of 50-100G on the O9.7 supergiant ζOrionisA (ζOriA), using spectropolarimetric observations obtained with NARVAL at the 2-m Télescope Bernard Lyot atop Pic du Midi (France). ζOriA is the third O star known to host a magnetic field (along with θ1OriC and HD191612), and the first detection on a `normal' rapidly rotating O star. The magnetic field of ζOriA is the weakest magnetic field ever detected on a massive star. The measured field is lower than the thermal equipartition limit (about 100G). By fitting non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) model atmospheres to our spectra, we determined that ζOriA is a 40Msolar star with a radius of 25Rsolar and an age of about 5-6Myr, showing no surface nitrogen enhancement and losing mass at a rate of about 2 × 10-6Msolaryr-1. The magnetic topology of ζOriA is apparently more complex than a dipole and involves two main magnetic polarities located on both sides of the same hemisphere; our data also suggest that ζOriA rotates in about 7.0d and is about 40° away from pole-on to an Earth-based observer. Despite its weakness, the detected magnetic field significantly affects the wind structure; the corresponding Alfvén radius is however very close to the surface, thus generating a different rotational modulation in wind lines than that reported on the two other known magnetic O stars. The rapid rotation of ζOriA with respect to θ1OriC appears as a surprise, both stars having similar unsigned magnetic fluxes (once rescaled to the same radius); it may suggest that the subequipartition field detected on ζOriA is not a fossil remnant (as opposed to that of θ1 OriC and HD191612), but the result of an exotic dynamo action produced through magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) instabilities. Based on observations obtained at the Télescope Bernard Lyot (TBL), operated by the Institut National des Science de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France

  19. X-ray, UV and optical analysis of supergiants: ɛ Ori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puebla, Raul E.; Hillier, D. John; Zsargó, Janos; Cohen, David H.; Leutenegger, Maurice A.

    2016-03-01

    We present a multi-wavelength (X-ray to optical) analysis, based on non-local thermodynamic equilibrium photospheric+wind models, of the B0 Ia-supergiant: ɛ Ori. The aim is to test the consistency of physical parameters, such as the mass-loss rate and CNO abundances, derived from different spectral bands. The derived mass-loss rate is {dot {M}} / {√{f_{∞}}} {˜} 1.6 × 10-6 M⊙ yr-1 where f∞ is the volume filling factor. However, the S IV λλ1062,1073 profiles are too strong in the models; to fit the observed profiles it is necessary to use f∞ <0.01. This value is a factor of 5 to 10 lower than inferred from other diagnostics, and implies {dot{M}} ≲ 1 × 10^{-7} M⊙ yr-1. The discrepancy could be related to porosity-vorosity effects or a problem with the ionization of sulphur in the wind. To fit the UV profiles of N V and O VI it was necessary to include emission from an interclump medium with a density contrast (ρcl/ρICM) of ˜100. X-ray emission in H/He like and Fe L lines was modelled using four plasma components located within the wind. We derive plasma temperatures from 1 × 106 to 7 × 106 K, with lower temperatures starting in the outer regions (R0 ˜ 3-6 R*), and a hot component starting closer to the star (R0 ≲ 2.9 R*). From X-ray line profiles we infer {dot{M}} < 4.9 × 10-7 M⊙ yr-1. The X-ray spectrum (≥0.1 kev) yields an X-ray luminosity LX ˜ 2.0 × 10-7Lbol, consistent with the superion line profiles. X-ray abundances are in agreement with those derived from the UV and optical analysis: ɛ Ori is slightly enhanced in nitrogen and depleted in carbon and oxygen, evidence for CNO processed material.

  20. The B Supergiant Discontinuous Drop in X-ray Luminosity at Spectra Type B1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldron, Wayne L.; Cassinelli, J.; Oskinova, L.; Lamers, H.

    2007-12-01

    At spectral type B1, the stellar winds of B supergiants (SGs) display a discontinuous drop in their observed terminal velocities which is referred to as the "bi-stability jump". Similarly, Einstein satellite observations of B SG also revealed evidence for a discontinuous drop in their observed X-ray luminosities at B1. Since the X-ray emission is believed to arise from stellar wind shock structures, B SGs provide an excellent laboratory for testing the still uncertain relationships between the radiation forces, wind properties, and the resultant X-ray emission. This interesting coincidence at spectral type B1 has not been explored in depth mostly due to the insufficient number of B SGs with high S/N X-ray observations. To explore the significance and interconnection of the X-ray and wind discontinuous drops, we obtained high S/N XMM-Newton EPIC observations of a sample of B SGs in the vicinity of spectral type B1. The good sensitivity of EPIC allows us to carry out a thorough X-ray spectral analysis of these stars and extract well constrained X-ray parameters. Our observations confirmed the B1 discontinuous drop in X-ray luminosity by a factor of 4, and this X-ray drop is found to coincide with the same effective temperature of the wind bi-stability jump. Although current shock X-ray emission models are found to be roughly consistent with predicting the observed drop in the X-ray luminosity, our detailed X-ray analyses have revealed several discrepancies with these models. For example, since shock produced X-ray temperatures scale with the flow velocity squared, we expected to see a dramatic drop in the spectral hardness across the discontinuity due to the drop in wind speed, but this is not observed. We discuss the significance of our X-ray results with regards to understanding the wind-dynamics of B SGs and suggest alternative X-ray source models.

  1. Wind Variability of B Supergiants. No. 2; The Two-component Stellar Wind of gamma Arae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinja, R. K.; Massa, D.; Fullerton, A. W.; Howarth, I. D.; Pontefract, M.

    1996-01-01

    The stellar wind of the rapidly rotating early-B supergiant, gamma Ara, is studied using time series, high-resolution IUE spectroscopy secured over approx. 6 days in 1993 March. Results are presented based on an analysis of several line species, including N(N), C(IV), Si(IV), Si(III), C(II), and Al(III). The wind of this star is grossly structured, with evidence for latitude-dependent mass loss which reflects the role of rapid rotation. Independent, co-existing time variable features are identified at low-velocity (redward of approx. -750 km/s) and at higher-speeds extending to approx. -1500 km/s. The interface between these structures is 'defined' by the appearance of a discrete absorption component which is extremely sharp (in velocity space). The central velocity of this 'Super DAC' changes only gradually, over several days, between approx. -400 and -750 km/s in most of the ions. However, its location is shifted redward by almost 400 km/s in Al(III) and C(II), indicating that the physical structure giving rise to this feature has a substantial velocity and ionization jump. Constraints on the relative ionization properties of the wind structures are discussed, together with results based on SEI line-profile-fitting methods. The overall wind activity in gamma Ara exhibits a clear ion dependence, such that low-speed features are promoted in low-ionization species, including Al(III), C(II), and Si(III). We also highlight that - in contrast to most OB stars - there are substantial differences in the epoch-to-epoch time-averaged wind profiles of gamma Ara. We interpret the results in terms of a two-component wind model for gamma Ara, with an equatorially compressed low ionization region, and a high speed, higher-ionization polar outflow. This picture is discussed in the context of the predicted bi-stability mechanism for line-driven winds in rapidly rotating early-B type stars, and the formation of compressed wind regions in rapidly rotating hot stars. The apparent

  2. Discovery of the First B[e] Supergiants in M 31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, M.; Cidale, L. S.; Arias, M. L.; Oksala, M. E.; Borges Fernandes, M.

    2014-01-01

    B[e] supergiants (B[e]SGs) are transitional objects in the post-main sequence evolution of massive stars. The small number of B[e]SGs known so far in the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds indicates that this evolutionary phase is short. Nevertheless, the strong aspherical mass loss occurring during this phase, which leads to the formation of rings or disk-like structures, and the similarity to possible progenitors of SN1987 A emphasize the importance of B[e]SGs for the dynamics of the interstellar medium as well as stellar and galactic chemical evolution. The number of objects and their mass-loss behavior at different metallicities are essential ingredients for accurate predictions from stellar and galactic evolution calculations. However, B[e]SGs are not easily identified, as they share many characteristics with luminous blue variables (LBVs) in their quiescent (hot) phase. We present medium-resolution near-infrared K-band spectra for four stars in M 31, which have been assigned a hot LBV (candidate) status. Applying diagnostics that were recently developed to distinguish B[e]SGs from hot LBVs, we classify two of the objects as bonafide LBVs; one of them currently in outburst. In addition, we firmly classify the two stars 2MASS J00441709+4119273 and 2MASS J00452257+4150346 as the first B[e]SGs in M 31 based on strong CO band emission detected in their spectra, and infrared colors typical for this class of stars. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil) and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva

  3. Inhomogeneous molecular ring around the B[e] supergiant LHA 120-S 73

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, M.; Cidale, L. S.; Arias, M. L.; Maravelias, G.; Nickeler, D. H.; Torres, A. F.; Borges Fernandes, M.; Aret, A.; Curé, M.; Vallverdú, R.; Barbá, R. H.

    2016-10-01

    Context. B[e] supergiants are evolved massive stars, enshrouded in a dense wind and surrounded by a molecular and dusty disk. The mechanisms that drive phases of enhanced mass loss and mass ejections, responsible for the shaping of the circumstellar material of these objects, are still unclear. Aims: We aim to improve our knowledge on the structure and dynamics of the circumstellar disk of the Large Magellanic Cloud B[e] supergiant LHA 120-S 73. Methods: High-resolution optical and near-infrared spectroscopic data were obtained over a period of 16 and 7 yr, respectively. The spectra cover the diagnostic emission lines from [Ca ii] and [O i], as well as the CO bands. These features trace the disk at different distances from the star. We analyzed the kinematics of the individual emission regions by modeling their emission profiles. A low-resolution mid-infrared spectrum was obtained as well, which provides information on the composition of the dusty disk. Results: All diagnostic emission features display double-peaked line profiles, which we interpret as due to Keplerian rotation. We find that the profile of each forbidden line contains contributions from two spatially clearly distinct rings. In total, we find that LHA 120-S 73 is surrounded by at least four individual rings of material with alternating densities (or by a disk with strongly non-monotonic radial density distribution). Moreover, we find that the molecular ring must have gaps or at least strong density inhomogeneities, or in other words, a clumpy structure. The optical spectra additionally display a broad emission feature at 6160-6180 Å, which we interpret as molecular emission from TiO. The mid-infrared spectrum displays features of oxygen- and carbon-rich grain species, which indicates a long-lived, stable dusty disk. We cannot confirm the previously reported high value for the stellar rotation velocity. He i λ 5876 is the only clearly detectable pure atmospheric absorption line in our data. Its

  4. Temperature, gravity, and bolometric correction scales for non-supergiant OB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieva, M.-F.

    2013-02-01

    , and in extreme cases, + 6000 K and ± 0.4 dex, respectively. A parameter calibration for sub-spectral types is also proposed. Moreover, we present a new bolometric correction relation to temperature based on our empirical data, rather than on synthetic grids. Conclusions: The photometric calibrations presented here are useful tools to estimate effective temperatures and surface gravities of non-supergiant OB stars in a fast manner. This is also applicable to some single-line spectroscopic binaries, but caution has to be taken for undetected double-lined spectroscopic binaries and single objects with anomalous reddening-law, dubious photometric quantities and/or luminosity classes, for which the systematic uncertainties may increase significantly. We recommend to use these calibrations only as a first step of the parameter estimation, with subsequent refinements based on spectroscopy. A larger sample covering more uniformly the parameter space under consideration will allow refinements to the present calibrations. Based on observations collected at the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max- Planck Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), proposals H2001-2.2-011 and H2005-2.2-016.Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, ESO 074.B-0455(A) and from the ESO Archive.Based on spectral data retrieved from the ELODIE archive at Observatoire de Haute-Provence (OHP).Appendices A and B are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  5. Exploring the circumstellar disk-like structure of the B[e] supergiant LHA 120-S 73

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, A. F.; Cidale, L.; Kraus, M.; Arias, M. L.; Maravelias, G.; Borges Fernandes, M.; Vallverdú, R.

    2016-08-01

    The Large Magellanic Cloud hosts the peculiar B8-type star LHA 120-S 73. Belonging to the B[e] supergiant group, this star is surrounded by large amounts of material which forms a circumstellar disk-like structure, seen more or less pole-on. Within its dense and cool circumstellar disk, molecules form and dust condensates. Based on medium and high-resolution optical and infrared spectroscopic data, we study the structure, kinematics and physical properties of the disk using different tracers, as the emission lines of [Oi] and [Caii] for the innermost gaseous atomic region and the first-overtone bands of CO for the inner border of the molecular disk. We also analyze near-infrared mid-resolution spectra to search for the presence of other molecules and mid-infrared low-resolution spectroscopic observations to study the composition of the dust component.

  6. The supergiant amphipod Alicella gigantea (Crustacea: Alicellidae) from hadal depths in the Kermadec Trench, SW Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, A. J.; Lacey, N. C.; Lörz, A.-N.; Rowden, A. A.; Piertney, S. B.

    2013-08-01

    Here we provide the first record of the 'supergiant' amphipod Alicella gigantea Chevreux, 1899 (Alicellidae) from the Southern Hemisphere, and extend the known bathymetric range by over 1000 m to 7000 m. An estimated nine individuals were observed across 1500 photographs taken in situ by baited camera at 6979 m in the Kermadec Trench, SW Pacific Ocean. Nine specimens, ranging in length from 102 to 290 mm were recovered by baited trap at depths of 6265 m and 7000 m. Mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences obtained indicate a cosmopolitan distribution for the species. Data and observations from the study are used to discuss the reason for gigantism in this species, and its apparently disjunct geographical distribution.

  7. 2D Radiation-hydrodynamic Simulations of Supernova Shock Breakout in Bipolar Explosions of a Blue Supergiant Progenitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Akihiro; Maeda, Keiichi; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    2016-07-01

    A two-dimensional special relativistic radiation-hydrodynamics code is developed and applied to numerical simulations of supernova shock breakout in bipolar explosions of a blue supergiant. Our calculations successfully simulate the dynamical evolution of a blast wave in the star and its emergence from the surface. Results of the model with spherical energy deposition show a good agreement with previous simulations. Furthermore, we calculate several models with bipolar energy deposition and compare their results with the spherically symmetric model. The bolometric light curves of the shock breakout emission are calculated by a ray-tracing method. Our radiation-hydrodynamic models indicate that the early part of the shock breakout emission can be used to probe the geometry of the blast wave produced as a result of the gravitational collapse of the iron core.

  8. Synchrotron radiation from the winds of O supergiants - Tb = 10 to the 7. 6th K at 60 stellar radii

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, R.B.; Titus, M.A. )

    1990-08-01

    Results are presented on VLBI measurements of the nonthermal radio components around two O supergiant stars: Cyg OB2 No. 9 and HD 167971. The measurements were used to characterize the brightness temperature of the emission and to measure the size of compact 5-10 mJy components in these stars, reported by Bieging et al. (1989). The sizes found for the 5-10 mJy components are consistent with the free-free wind radii, indicating that the compact companions are not the sources of nonthermal radiation. Results suggest that there is a small fractional population (10 to the -4th to 10 to the -7th) of ultrarelativistic electrons (Teff of about 10 to the 11th K) coexisting with the stellar wind, which emit optically thin synchrotron radiation. This is in agreement with the synchrotron model of White (1985). 21 refs.

  9. Einstein Observatory magnitude-limited X-ray survey of late-type giant and supergiant stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maggio, A.; Vaiana, G. S.; Haisch, B. M.; Stern, R. A.; Bookbinder, J.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented of an extensive X-ray survey of 380 giant and supergiant stars of spectral types from F to M, carried out with the Einstein Observatory. It was found that the observed F giants or subgiants (slightly evolved stars with a mass M less than about 2 solar masses) are X-ray emitters at the same level of main-sequence stars of similar spectral type. The G giants show a range of emissions more than 3 orders of magnitude wide; some single G giants exist with X-ray luminosities comparable to RS CVn systems, while some nearby large G giants have upper limits on the X-ray emission below typical solar values. The K giants have an observed X-ray emission level significantly lower than F and F giants. None of the 29 M giants were detected, except for one spectroscopic binary.

  10. Line-profile microvariability in OB-star spectra: the Supergiant λ Cep (O6If(n))

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholtygin, A. F.; Sudnik, N. P.; Burlakova, T. E.; Valyavin, G. G.

    2011-12-01

    We observed the bright O6If(n) supergiant λ Cep in 1997 with the 6-m optical telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory and in 2007 with the 1.8-m telescope of the Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory (South Korea). A total of 90 spectra of the star were acquired, with good time resolution (10 minutes), signal-to-noise ratios 150-300, and spectral resolutions of 45 000-60 000. We detected line-profile variations of H, HeI, and HeII lines. It is suggested that the detected variations are due to non-radial photospheric pulsations and the star's rotation (rotational profile modulation).

  11. Fuel saving and emissions cut through shore-side power concept for high-speed crafts at the red sea in egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seddiek, Ibrahim S.; Mosleh, Mosaad A.; Banawan, Adel A.

    2013-12-01

    The progress of economic globalization, the rapid growth of international trade, and the maritime transportation has played an increasingly significant role in the international supply chain. As a result, worldwide seaports have suffered from a central problem, which appears in the form of massive amounts of fuel consumed and exhaust gas fumes emitted from the ships while berthed. Many ports have taken the necessary precautions to overcome this problem, while others still suffer due to the presence of technical and financial constraints. In this paper, the barriers, interconnection standards, rules, regulations, power sources, and economic and environmental analysis related to ships, shore-side power were studied in efforts to find a solution to overcome his problem. As a case study, this paper investigates the practicability, costs and benefits of switching from onboard ship auxiliary engines to shore-side power connection for high-speed crafts called Alkahera while berthed at the port of Safaga, Egypt. The results provide the national electricity grid concept as the best economical selection with 49.03 percent of annual cost saving. Moreover, environmentally, it could achieve an annual reduction in exhaust gas emissions of CO2, CO, NO x , P.M, and SO2 by 276, 2.32, 18.87, 0.825 and 3.84 tons, respectively.

  12. Gain chip design, power scaling and intra-cavity frequency doubling with LBO of optically pumped red-emitting AlGaInP-VECSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahle, Hermann; Mateo, Cherry M. N.; Brauch, Uwe; Bek, Roman; Schwarzbäck, Thomas; Jetter, Michael; Graf, Thomas; Michler, Peter

    2016-03-01

    The wide range of applications in biophotonics, television or projectors, spectroscopy and lithography made the optically-pumped semiconductor (OPS) vertical external cavity surface-emitting lasers (VECSELs) an important category of power scalable lasers. The possibility of bandgap engineering, inserting frequency selective and converting elements into the open laser cavity and laser emission in the fundamental Gaussian mode leads to ongoing growth of the area of applications for tuneable laser sources. We present an AlGaInP-VECSEL system with a multi quantum well structure consisting of compressively strained GaInP quantum wells in an AlxGa1-xInP separate confinement heterostructure with an emission wavelength around 665 nm. The VECSEL chip with its n-λ cavity is pumped by a 532nm Nd:YAG laser under an angle to the normal incidence of 50°. In comparison, a gain chip design for high absorption values at pump wavelengths around 640nm with the use of quantum dot layers as active material is also presented. Frequency doubling is now realized with an antireflection coated lithium borate crystal, while a birefringent filter, placed inside the laser cavity under Brewster's angle, is used for frequency tuning. Further, power-scaling methods like in-well pumping as well as embedding the active region of a VECSEL between two transparent ic heaspreaders are under investigation.

  13. RED-LETTER DAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The word "red-letter" is an adjective meaning "of special significance." It's origin is from the practice of marking Christian holy days in red letters on calendars. The "red-letter days" to which I refer occurred while I was a graduate student of ...

  14. Red blood cell production

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells are an important element of blood. Their job is to transport oxygen to the body’s tissues in exchange for carbon dioxide, which is carried to and eliminated by the lungs. Red blood cells are formed in the red bone marrow of bones. Stem cells in the red bone marrow called hemocytoblasts ...

  15. On the cosmic ray spectrum from type II Supernovae expanding in their red giant presupernova wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardillo, Martina

    2015-12-01

    While from the energetic point of view SNRs are viable sources of Galactic CRs, the issue of whether they can accelerate protons up to PeV remains unsolved. Here we discuss particle acceleration at the forward shock of SN and discuss the possibility that the escaping particle current may excite a non-resonant instability that in turn leads to the formation of resonant modes confining particles close to the shock and increasing the maximum energy. This mechanism works throughout the expansion of the SN explosion, from the ejecta dominated (ED) to the Sedov-Taylor (ST) phase. Because of their higher explosion rate,we focus on type II SNae expanding in the slow, dense red supergiant wind. When the explosion occurs in such winds, the transition between the ED and the ST phase is likely to take place within a few tens of years. As a result, the spectrum of accelerated particles shows a break in the slope, at the maximum energy (EM) achieved at the beginning of the ST phase. Above this energy, the spectrum becomes steeper but remains a power law than developing an exponential cutoff. We show that for type II SNae typical parameters, proton EM can easily reach PeV energies, confirming that type II SNRs are the best candidate sources for CRs at the knee. We have tried to fit KASCADE-Grande, ARGO -YBJ and YAC1-Tibet Array data with our model but we could not find any parameter combination that could explain all data sets. Indeed the recent measurement of the proton and helium spectra in the knee region, with the ARGO-YBJ and YAC1-Tibet Array, has made the situation very confused. These measurements suggest that the knee in the light component is at 650 TeV, appreciably below the overall spectrum knee. This finding would resolve the problem of reaching very high energies in SNae, but, on the other hand, it would open a critical issue in the transition region between Galactic and extragalactic CRs.

  16. Measuring the stellar wind parameters in IGR J17544-2619 and Vela X-1 constrains the accretion physics in supergiant fast X-ray transient and classical supergiant X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giménez-García, A.; Shenar, T.; Torrejón, J. M.; Oskinova, L.; Martínez-Núñez, S.; Hamann, W.-R.; Rodes-Roca, J. J.; González-Galán, A.; Alonso-Santiago, J.; González-Fernández, C.; Bernabeu, G.; Sander, A.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Classical supergiant X-ray binaries (SGXBs) and supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs) are two types of high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) that present similar donors but, at the same time, show very different behavior in the X-rays. The reason for this dichotomy of wind-fed HMXBs is still a matter of debate. Among the several explanations that have been proposed, some of them invoke specific stellar wind properties of the donor stars. Only dedicated empiric analysis of the donors' stellar wind can provide the required information to accomplish an adequate test of these theories. However, such analyses are scarce. Aims: To close this gap, we perform a comparative analysis of the optical companion in two important systems: IGR J17544-2619 (SFXT) and Vela X-1 (SGXB). We analyze the spectra of each star in detail and derive their stellar and wind properties. As a next step, we compare the wind parameters, giving us an excellent chance of recognizing key differences between donor winds in SFXTs and SGXBs. Methods: We use archival infrared, optical and ultraviolet observations, and analyze them with the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) Potsdam Wolf-Rayet model atmosphere code. We derive the physical properties of the stars and their stellar winds, accounting for the influence of X-rays on the stellar winds. Results: We find that the stellar parameters derived from the analysis generally agree well with the spectral types of the two donors: O9I (IGR J17544-2619) and B0.5Iae (Vela X-1). The distance to the sources have been revised and also agree well with the estimations already available in the literature. In IGR J17544-2619 we are able to narrow the uncertainty to d = 3.0 ± 0.2 kpc. From the stellar radius of the donor and its X-ray behavior, the eccentricity of IGR J17544-2619 is constrained to e< 0.25. The derived chemical abundances point to certain mixing during the lifetime of the donors. An important difference between the stellar winds of the

  17. Super-giant magnetoresistance at room-temperature in copper nanowires due to magnetic field modulation of potential barrier heights at nanowire-contact interfaces.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md I; Maksud, M; Palapati, N K R; Subramanian, A; Atulasimha, J; Bandyopadhyay, S

    2016-07-29

    We have observed a super-giant (∼10 000 000%) negative magnetoresistance at 39 mT field in Cu nanowires contacted with Au contact pads. In these nanowires, potential barriers form at the two Cu/Au interfaces because of Cu oxidation that results in an ultrathin copper oxide layer forming between Cu and Au. Current flows when electrons tunnel through, and/or thermionically emit over, these barriers. A magnetic field applied transverse to the direction of current flow along the wire deflects electrons toward one edge of the wire because of the Lorentz force, causing electron accumulation at that edge and depletion at the other. This lowers the potential barrier at the accumulated edge and raises it at the depleted edge, causing a super-giant magnetoresistance at room temperature.

  18. The dynamical state of the atmosphere of the supergiant Alpha Cygni (A2 Iae) derived from high-resolution ultraviolet spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boer, B.; de Jager, C.; Nieuwenhuijzen, H.

    1988-03-01

    In order to study the apparent near-instability of supergiant atmospheres, high-resolution BUSS (Balloon-borne Ultraviolet Stellar Spectometer) spectra of the supergiant Alpha Cyg have been investigated. Equivalent widths of lines yield the variation of the line-of-sight microturbulent velocity component zeta(mu) with optical depth tau. At tau(5) = 0.1, zeta(mu) equal to the velocity of sound is found. The consequent turbulent acceleration is directed outward. It increases outward and is about half the effective acceleration at tau(5) = 0.01. The macroturbulent velocity profile is double peaked with upward and downward velocities of 14 km/s. It is suggested that these motions are stochastic pulsations of large elements. At any time there are 30 to 40 such elements on the visible disk.

  19. NEAR-INFRARED COUNTERPARTS TO CHANDRA X-RAY SOURCES TOWARD THE GALACTIC CENTER. II. DISCOVERY OF WOLF-RAYET STARS AND O SUPERGIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Mauerhan, J. C.; Stolovy, S. R.; Muno, M. P.; Morris, M. R.; Cotera, A.

    2010-02-10

    We present new identifications of infrared counterparts to the population of hard X-ray sources near the Galactic center detected by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We have spectroscopically confirmed 16 new massive stellar counterparts to the X-ray population, including nitrogen-type (WN) and carbon-type (WC) Wolf-Rayet stars, and O supergiants. These discoveries increase the total sample of massive stellar X-ray sources in the Galactic center region to 30 (possibly 31). For the majority of these sources, the X-ray photometry is consistent with thermal emission from plasma having temperatures in the range of kT = 1-8 keV or non-thermal emission having power-law indices in the range of -1 {approx}< GAMMA {approx}< 3, and X-ray luminosities in the range of L{sub X} {approx} 10{sup 32}-10{sup 34} erg s{sup -1} (0.5-8.0 keV). Several sources have exhibited X-ray variability of several factors between observations. These X-ray properties are not a ubiquitous feature of single massive stars but are typical of massive binaries, in which the high-energy emission is generated by the collision of supersonic winds, or by accretion onto a compact companion. However, without direct evidence for companions, the possibility of intrinsic hard X-ray generation from single stars cannot be completely ruled out. The spectral energy distributions of these sources exhibit significant infrared excess, attributable to free-free emission from ionized stellar winds, supplemented by hot dust emission in the case of the WC stars. With the exception of one object located near the outer regions of the Quintuplet cluster, most of the new stars appear isolated or in loose associations. Seven hydrogen-rich WN and O stars are concentrated near the Sagittarius B H II region, while other similar stars and more highly evolved hydrogen-poor WN and WC stars lie scattered within {approx}50 pc, in projection, of Sagitarrius A West. We discuss various mechanisms capable of generating the observed X

  20. ON THE ORIGIN OF THE SUPERGIANT H I SHELL AND PUTATIVE COMPANION IN NGC 6822

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, John M.; O'Leary, Erin M.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Skillman, Evan D.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Bigiel, Frank; Cole, Andrew A.; Walter, Fabian; De Blok, W.J.G. E-mail: eoleary@macalester.edu E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu E-mail: bigiel@uni-heidelberg.de E-mail: edeblok@ast.uct.ac.za

    2012-03-10

    We present new Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging of six positions spanning 5.8 kpc of the H I major axis of the Local Group dIrr NGC 6822, including both the putative companion galaxy and the large H I hole. The resulting deep color-magnitude diagrams show that NGC 6822 has formed >50% of its stars in the last {approx}5 Gyr. The star formation histories of all six positions are similar over the most recent 500 Myr, including low-level star formation throughout this interval and a weak increase in star formation rate during the most recent 50 Myr. Stellar feedback can create the giant H I hole, assuming that the lifetime of the structure is longer than 500 Myr; such long-lived structures have now been observed in multiple systems and may be the norm in galaxies with solid-body rotation. The old stellar populations (red giants and red clump stars) of the putative companion are consistent with those of the extended halo of NGC 6822; this argues against the interpretation of this structure as a bona fide interacting companion galaxy and against its being linked to the formation of the H I hole via an interaction. Since there is no evidence in the stellar population of a companion galaxy, the most likely explanation of the extended H I structure in NGC 6822 is a warped disk inclined to the line of sight.

  1. Quantitative Studies of the Far-Ultraviolet, Ultraviolet, and Optical Spectra of Late O- and Early B-Type Supergiants in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, C. J.; Crowther, P. A.; Fullerton, A. W.; Hillier, D. J.

    2004-08-01

    We present quantitative studies of eight late O- and early B-type supergiants in the Magellanic Clouds using far-ultraviolet Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer, ultraviolet International Ultraviolet Explorer/Hubble Space Telescope, and optical VLT-UVES spectroscopy. Temperatures, mass-loss rates, and CNO abundances are obtained using the non-LTE, spherical, line-blanketed model atmosphere code of Hillier & Miller. We support recent results for lower temperatures of OB-type supergiants as a result of stellar winds and blanketing, which amounts to ~2000 K at B0 Ia. In general, Hα-derived mass-loss rates are consistent with UV and far-UV spectroscopy, although from consideration of the S IV λλ1063, 1073 doublet, clumped winds are preferred over homogenous models. AV 235 (B0 Iaw) is a notable exception, which has an unusually strong Hα profile that is inconsistent with the other Balmer lines and UV wind diagnostics. We also derive CNO abundances for our sample, revealing substantial nitrogen enrichment, with carbon and oxygen depletion. Our results are supported by comparison with the Galactic supergiant HD 2905 (BC0.7 Ia) for which near-solar CNO abundances are obtained. This bolsters previous suggestions that ``normal'' OB-type supergiants exhibit atmospheric compositions indicative of partial CNO processing. Based on observations made with the NASA-CNES-CSA Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. FUSE is operated by Johns Hopkins University under NASA contract NAS5-32985. Also based in part on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope in program 67.D-0238, plus archival data obtained with the NASA-ESA Hubble Space Telescope and the NASA-ESA-PPARC International Ultraviolet Explorer.

  2. Broad Balmer Wings in BA Hyper/Supergiants Distorted by Diffuse Interstellar Bands: Five Examples in the 30 Doradus Region from the VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walborn, Nolan R.; Sana, Hugues; Evans, Christopher J.; Taylor, William D.; Sabbi, Elena; Barbá, Rodolfo H.; Morrell, Nidia I.; Maíz Apellániz, Jesús; Sota, Alfredo; Dufton, Philip L.; McEvoy, Catherine M.; Clark, J. Simon; Markova, Nevena; Ulaczyk, Krzysztof

    2015-08-01

    Extremely broad emission wings at Hβ and Hα have been found in VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey data for five very luminous BA supergiants in or near 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The profiles of both lines are extremely asymmetrical, which we have found to be caused by very broad diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) in the longward wing of Hβ and the shortward wing of Hα. These DIBs are well known to interstellar but not to many stellar specialists, so that the asymmetries may be mistaken for intrinsic features. The broad emission wings are generally ascribed to electron scattering, although we note difficulties for that interpretation in some objects. Such profiles are known in some Galactic hyper/supergiants and are also seen in both active and quiescent Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs). No prior or current LBV activity is known in these 30 Dor stars, although a generic relationship to LBVs is not excluded; subject to further observational and theoretical investigation, it is possible that these very luminous supergiants are approaching the LBV stage for the first time. Their locations in the HRD and presumed evolutionary tracks are consistent with that possibility. The available evidence for spectroscopic variations of these objects is reviewed, while recent photometric monitoring does not reveal variability. A search for circumstellar nebulae has been conducted, with an indeterminate result for one of them.

  3. HST Studies of the Chromospheres, Wind, and Mass-Loss Rates of Cool Giant and Supergiant Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.

    2000-01-01

    UV spectra of K-M giant and supergiant stars and of carbon stars have been acquired with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These spectra have been used to measure chromospheric flow and turbulent velocities, study the acceleration of their stellar winds, acquire constraints on their outer atmospheric structure, and enable estimates of their mass-loss rates. Results from our observations of the giant stars Gamma Dra (K5 III hybrid), Alpha Tau (K5 III), Gamma Cru (M3.4 III), Mu Gem (M3 IIIab), and 30 Her (MG III), the supergiants Alpha Ori (M2 Iab) and Lambda Vel (K5 Ib), and the carbon stars TX Psc (NO; C6,2) and TW Hor (NO; C7,2) will be summarized and compared. The high resolution and wavelength accuracy of these data have allowed the direct measurement of the acceleration of the stellar winds in the chromospheres of several of these stars (from initial velocities of 3-9 km/s to upper velocities of 15-25 km/s) and of the chromospheric macroturbulence (-25-35 km/s). The high signal-to-noise and large dynamic range of these spectra have allowed the detection and identification of numerous new emission features, including weak C IV emission indicative of hot transition-region plasma in the non-coronal giant Alpha Tau, many new fluorescent lines of Fe II, and the first detection of fluorescent molecular hydrogen emission and of Ca II recombination lines in the UV spectrum of a giant star. The UV spectrum of two carbon stars have been studied with unprecedented resolution and reveal extraordinarily complicated Mg II lines nearly smothered by circumstellar absorptions. Finally, comparison of synthetic UV emission line profiles computed with the Lamers et al. (1987) Sobolev with Exact Integration (SEI) code with observations of chromospheric emission lines overlain with wind absorption features provides estimates of the mass-loss rates for four of these stars.

  4. Resolving the dusty circumstellar environment of the A[e] supergiant HD 62623 with the VLTI/MIDI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meilland, A.; Kanaan, S.; Borges Fernandes, M.; Chesneau, O.; Millour, F.; Stee, Ph.; Lopez, B.

    2010-03-01

    Context. B[e] stars are hot stars surrounded by circumstellar gas and dust which is responsible for the presence of emission lines and IR-excess in their spectra. How dust can be formed in this highly illuminated and diluted environment remains an open issue. Aims: HD 62623 is one of the very few A-type supergiants showing the B[e] phenomenon. We studied the geometry of its circumstellar envelope in the mid-infrared using long-baseline interferometry, which is the only observing technique able to spatially resolve objects smaller than a few tens of milliarcseconds. Methods: We obtained nine calibrated visibility measurements between October 2006 and January 2008 using the VLTI/MIDI instrument in SCI-PHOT mode and PRISM spectral dispersion mode with projected baselines ranging from 13 to 71 m and with various position angles (PA). We used geometrical models and physical modeling with a radiative transfer code to analyze these data. Results: The dusty circumstellar environment of HD 62623 is partially resolved by the VLTI/MIDI, even with the shortest baselines. The environment is flattened (a/b~1.3±0.1) and can be separated into two components: a compact one whose extension grows from 17 mas at 8 μm to 30 mas at 9.6 μm and stays almost constant up to 13 μm, and a more extended one that is over-resolved even with the shortest baselines. Using the radiative transfer code MC3D, we managed to model HD 62623's circumstellar environment as a dusty disk with an inner radius of 3.85±0.6 AU, an inclination angle of 60±10°, and a mass of 2 × 10-7 M_⊙. Conclusions: It is the first time that the dusty disk inner rim of a supergiant star exhibiting the B[e] phenomenon is significantly constrained. The inner gaseous envelope likely contributes up to 20% to the total N band flux and acts like a reprocessing disk. Finally, the hypothesis of a stellar wind deceleration by the companion's gravitational effects remains the most probable case since the bi-stability mechanism

  5. High-latitude supergiant V5112 Sgr: Enrichment of the envelope with heavy s-process metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochkova, V. G.

    2013-11-01

    High-resolution ( R = 60 000) echelle spectroscopy of the post-AGB supergiant V5112 Sgr performed in 1996-2012 with the 6-m BTA telescope has revealed peculiarities of the star's optical spectrum and has allowed the variability of the velocity field in the stellar atmosphere and envelope to be studied in detail. An asymmetry and splitting of strong absorption lines with a low lower-level excitation potential have been detected for the first time. The effect is maximal in Ba II lines whose profile is split into three components. The profile shape and positions of the split lines change with time. The short-wavelength components of the split absorption lines are shown to be formed in a structured circumstellar envelope, suggesting an efficient dredge-up of the heavy metals produced during the preceding evolution of this star into the envelope. The envelope expansion velocities have been estimated to be V exp ≈ 20 and 30 km s-1. The mean radial velocity from diffuse bands in the spectrum of V5112 Sgr coincides with that from the short-wavelength shell component of the Na I D lines, which leads to the conclusion about their formation in the circumstellar envelope. Analysis of the set of radial velocities V r based on symmetric absorption lines has confirmed the presence of pulsations in the stellar atmosphere with an amplitude Δ V r ≤ 8 km s-1.

  6. Super-giant oil fields and future prospects in the Middle East

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, L.; Johnston, D.

    1995-06-01

    Upper Jurassic carbonates, Lower Cretaceous sands, Lower Cretaceous carbonates and Tertiary carbonates of the Middle East contain more than 50% of the worlds oil. Our area of interest covers SE Turkey and Syria in the north to the borders of Yemen and Oman in the south, and from the Red Sea across Saudi Arabia, the Emirates and the Arabian/Persian Gulf to Iran in the East. There are over 80 fields in this region with over 1 billion barrels of recoverable reserves. Yet only around 30,000 wells have been drilled in this territory. Regional structure and stratigraphy are discussed within the context of three major plays in the region as well as a new play in the Permo-Carboniferous. Numerous opportunities are available and countries such as Iraq and Iran may one day open their doors more to the industry than is presently the case. The dramatic petroleum geology of the region will stamp its influence on the nature of business and opportunities for years to come. While fiscal systems here already offer some of the toughest terms in the world, future deals in the more prolific areas will be even tougher. But, the economies of Middle Eastern scale will provide some of the great mega-opportunities of future international exploration.

  7. Cobb's Red Cabbage Indicator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Vicki

    1998-01-01

    Describes the use of an indicator made from the pigment in red cabbage. Cabbage is grated then soaked in water. When the water is a strong red, the cabbage is strained out. The cabbage-juice indicator is then used to test for acids and bases. Includes a list of good foods to test for acidity and alkalinity. (PVD)

  8. Blue supergiant model for ultra-long gamma-ray burst with superluminous-supernova-like bump

    SciTech Connect

    Nakauchi, Daisuke; Nakamura, Takashi; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Suwa, Yudai

    2013-11-20

    Long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) have a typical duration of ∼30 s, and some of them are associated with hypernovae, such as Type Ic SN 1998bw. Wolf-Rayet stars are the most plausible LGRB progenitors, since the free fall time of the envelope is consistent with the duration, and the natural outcome of the progenitor is a Type Ic SN. While a new population of ultra-long GRBs (ULGRBs), GRB 111209A, GRB 101225A, and GRB 121027A, has a duration of ∼10{sup 4} s, two of them are accompanied by superluminous-supernova-like (SLSN-like) bumps, which are ≲ 10 times brighter than typical hypernovae. Wolf-Rayet progenitors cannot explain ULGRBs because of durations that are too long and SN-like bumps that are too bright. A blue supergiant (BSG) progenitor model, however, can explain the duration of ULGRBs. Moreover, SLSN-like bumps can be attributed to the so-called cocoon fireball photospheric emissions (CFPEs). Since a large cocoon is inevitably produced during the relativistic jet piercing though the BSG envelope, this component can be smoking gun evidence of the BSG model for ULGRBs. In this paper, we examine u-, g-, r-, i-, and J-band light curves of three ULGRBs and demonstrate that they can be fitted quite well by our BSG model with the appropriate choices of the jet opening angle and the number density of the ambient gas. In addition, we predict that for 121027A, SLSN-like bump could have been observed for ∼20-80 days after the burst. We also propose that some SLSNe might be CFPEs of off-axis ULGRBs without visible prompt emissions.

  9. The Orbit and Properties of the BD+60 73 + IGRJ00370+612 Supergiant X-Ray Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, C. T.; Grunhut, J. H.

    2007-08-01

    Spectrograms of the blue and H alpha regions of BD+60 73 obtained with the Cassegrain spectrograph on the David Dunlap Observatory 1.88 m telescope have been measured for radial velocities. These measures confirm that BD+60 73 is a single-line spectroscopic binary with the same period, 15.665 d, as the x-ray flux variations of IGRJ00370+612. The x-ray maxima occur at or just after the time of periastron passage, even though the eccentricity e=0.37 does not seem large enough to produce a large increase in the mass flux at the position of the compact object at the time of periastron passage. The mass function combined with a plausible range of possible masses for a neutron star companion yields primary masses within the range expected for the spectral type of BD+60 73. The compact companion cannot be a black hole unless the supergiant has an exceptionally high mass for its B1Ib spectral type or the inclination of the orbit is very low. The H alpha line shows weak, variable emission, but we have insufficient data to test whether these variations are correlated with orbital phase. We note, as have other authors, that BD+60_73 is projected on the sky within the bounds of Cas OB5. It also lies close to the "adolescent" supernova remnant CTB1. However, the binary system has a radial velocity of approximately -40 km/s with respect to Cas OB5.

  10. Soft X-ray characterisation of the long-term properties of supergiant fast X-ray transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, P.; Ducci, L.; Mangano, V.; Esposito, P.; Bozzo, E.; Vercellone, S.

    2014-08-01

    Context. Supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs) are high mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) that are characterised by a hard X-ray (≥ 15 keV) flaring behaviour. These flares reach peak luminosities of 1036-1037 erg s-1 and last a few hours in the hard X-rays. Aims: We investigate the long-term properties of SFXTs by examining the soft (0.3-10 keV) X-ray emission of the three least active SFXTs in the hard X-ray and by comparing them with the remainder of the SFXT sample. Methods: We performed the first high-sensitivity soft X-ray long-term monitoring with Swift/XRT of three relatively unexplored SFXTs, IGR J08408-4503, IGR J16328-4726, and IGR J16465-4507, whose hard X-ray duty cycles are the lowest measured among the SFXT sample. We assessed how long each source spends in each flux state and compared their properties with those of the prototypical SFXTs. Results: The behaviour of IGR J08408-4503 and IGR J16328-4726 resembles that of other SFXTs, and it is characterised by a relatively high inactivity duty cycle (IDC) and pronounced dynamic range (DR) in the X-ray luminosity. We found DR ~ 7400, IDC ~ 67% for IGR J08408-4503, and DR ~ 750, IDC ~ 61% for IGR J16328-4726 (in all cases the IDC is given with respect to the limiting flux sensitivity of XRT, that is 1-3 × 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1). In common with all the most extreme SFXT prototypes (IGR J17544-2619, XTE J1739-302, and IGR J16479-4514), IGR J08408-4503 shows two distinct flare populations. The first one is associated with the brightest outbursts (X-ray luminosity LX ≳ 1035 - 36 erg s-1), while the second comprises dimmer events with typical luminosities of LX ≲ 1035 erg s-1. This double-peaked distribution of the flares as a function of the X-ray luminosity seems to be a ubiquitous feature of the extreme SFXTs. The lower DR of IGR J16328-4726 suggests that this is an intermediate SFXT. IGR J16465-4507 is characterised by a low IDC ~ 5% and a relatively narrow DR ~ 40, reminiscent of classical supergiant

  11. A Suzaku X-ray Observation of One Orbit of the Supergiant Fast X-ray Transient IGR J16479-4514

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidoli, L.; Esposito, P.; Sguera, V.; Bodaghee, A.; Tomsick, J. A.; Pottschmidt, K.; Rodriguez, J.; Ramano, P.; Wilms, J.

    2013-01-01

    We report on a 250 ks long X-ray observation of the supergiant fast X-ray transient (SFXT) IGR J16479-4514 performed with Suzaku in 2012 February. During this observation, about 80% of the short orbital period (P(sub orb) approximates 3.32 days) was covered as continuously as possible for the first time. The source light curve displays variability of more than two orders of magnitude, starting with a very low emission state (10(exp -13) erg / sq cm/s; 1-10 keV) lasting the first 46 ks, consistent with being due to the X-ray eclipse by the supergiant companion. The transition to the uneclipsed X-ray emission is energy dependent. Outside the eclipse, the source spends most of the time at a level of 6-7X10)(exp-12) erg/sq. cm/s) punctuated by two structured faint flares with a duration of about 10 and 15 ks, respectively, reaching a peak flux of 3-4X10(exp -11) erg/sq. cm./S, separated by about 0.2 in orbital phase. Remarkably, the first faint flare occurs at a similar orbital phase of the bright flares previously observed in the system. This indicates the presence of a phase-locked large scale structure in the supergiant wind, driving a higher accretion rate onto the compact object. The average X-ray spectrum is hard and highly absorbed, with a column density, NH, of 10*exp 23)/sq cm, clearly in excess of the interstellar absorption. There is no evidence for variability of the absorbing column density, except that during the eclipse, where a less absorbed X-ray spectrum is observed. A narrow Fe K-alpha emission line at 6.4 keV is viewed along the whole orbit, with an intensity which correlates with the continuum emission above 7 keV. The scattered component visible during the X-ray eclipse allowed us to directly probe the wind density at the orbital separation, resulting in rho(sub w)=7X10(exp -14) g/cubic cm. Assuming a spherical geometry for the supergiant wind, the derived wind density translates into a ratio M(sub w)/v(sub infinity) = 7X10(exp -17) Solar M

  12. HD 74194, a new binary supergiant fast X-ray transient?, possible optical counterpart of INTEGRAL hard X-ray source IGR J08408-4503

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barba, Rodolfo; Gamen, Roberto; Morrell, Nidia

    2006-05-01

    HD 74194 is an O-type supergiant, classified as O8.5 Ib (f) (Walborn 1973, AJ 78, 1067), also suspected as single-lined binary (see Maiz Apellaniz et al. 2004, ApJS 151, 103). This star is being spectroscopically monitored as part of our program of study of massive binaries. We have obtained high-resolution spectra of HD 74194 with the Echelle spectrograph attached to the du Pont 2.5-m telescope at Las Campanas Observatory in 2006 May 18.00, 20.96, 22.00, and 22.97.

  13. IGR J17544-2619 IN DEPTH WITH SUZAKU: DIRECT EVIDENCE FOR CLUMPY WINDS IN A SUPERGIANT FAST X-RAY TRANSIENT

    SciTech Connect

    Rampy, Rachel A.; Smith, David M.; Negueruela, Ignacio

    2009-12-10

    We present direct evidence for dense clumps of matter in the companion wind in a Supergiant Fast X-ray Transient (SFXT) binary. This is seen as a brief period of enhanced absorption during one of the bright, fast flares that distinguish these systems. The object under study was IGR J17544-2619, and a total of 236 ks of data were accumulated with the Japanese satellite Suzaku. The activity in this period spans a dynamic range of almost 10{sup 4} in luminosity and gives a detailed look at SFXT behavior.

  14. Magnetic confinement, Alfven wave reflection, and the origins of X-ray and mass-loss 'dividing lines' for late-type giants and supergiants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, R.; An, C.-H.; Musielak, Z. E.; Moore, R. L.; Suess, S. T.

    1991-01-01

    A simple qualitative model for the origin of the coronal and mass-loss dividing lines separating late-type giants and supergiants with and without hot, X-ray-emitting corona, and with and without significant mass loss is discussed. The basic physical effects considered are the necessity of magnetic confinement for hot coronal material on the surface of such stars and the large reflection efficiency for Alfven waves in cool exponential atmospheres. The model assumes that the magnetic field geometry of these stars changes across the observed 'dividing lines' from being mostly closed on the high effective temperature side to being mostly open on the low effective temperature side.

  15. IGR J17544-2619 in Depth With Suzaku: Direct Evidence for Clumpy Winds in a Supergiant Fast X-ray Transient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampy, Rachel A.; Smith, David M.; Negueruela, Ignacio

    2009-12-01

    We present direct evidence for dense clumps of matter in the companion wind in a Supergiant Fast X-ray Transient (SFXT) binary. This is seen as a brief period of enhanced absorption during one of the bright, fast flares that distinguish these systems. The object under study was IGR J17544-2619, and a total of 236 ks of data were accumulated with the Japanese satellite Suzaku. The activity in this period spans a dynamic range of almost 104 in luminosity and gives a detailed look at SFXT behavior.

  16. Red Bull Stratos Presentation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Red Bull Stratos High Performance Director Andy Walshe & Technical Project Director Art Thompson share the Stratos story with JSC. Supported by a team of experts, Felix Baumgartner reached 128,100 ...

  17. Whence the red panda?

    PubMed

    Flynn, J J; Nedbal, M A; Dragoo, J W; Honeycutt, R L

    2000-11-01

    The evolutionary history of the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) plays a pivotal role in the higher-level phylogeny of the "bear-like" arctoid carnivoran mammals. Characters from morphology and molecules have provided inconsistent evidence for placement of the red panda. Whereas it certainly is an arctoid, there has been major controversy about whether it should be placed with the bears (ursids), ursids plus pinnipeds (seals, sea lions, walrus), raccoons (procyonids), musteloids (raccoons plus weasels, skunks, otters, and badgers [mustelids]), or as a monotypic lineage of uncertain phylogenetic affinities. Nucleotide sequence data from three mitochondrial genes and one nuclear intron were analyzed, with more complete taxonomic sampling of relevant taxa (arctoids) than previously available in analyses of primary molecular data, to clarify the phylogenetic relationships of the red panda to other arctoid carnivorans. This study provides detailed phylogenetic analyses (both parsimony and maximum-likelihood) of primary character data for arctoid carnivorans, including bootstrap and decay indices for all arctoid nodes, and three statistical tests of alternative phylogenetic hypotheses for the placement of the red panda. Combined phylogenetic analyses reject the hypotheses that the red panda is most closely related to the bears (ursids) or to the raccoons (procyonids). Rather, evidence from nucleotide sequences strongly support placement of the red panda within a broad Musteloidea (sensu lato) clade, including three major lineages (the red panda, the skunks [mephitids], and a clearly monophyletic clade of procyonids plus mustelids [sensu stricto, excluding skunks]). Within the Musteloidea, interrelationships of the three major lineages are unclear and probably are best considered an unresolved trichotomy. These data provide compelling evidence for the relationships of the red panda and demonstrate that small taxonomic sample sizes can result in misleading or possibly erroneous

  18. Whence the red panda?

    PubMed

    Flynn, J J; Nedbal, M A; Dragoo, J W; Honeycutt, R L

    2000-11-01

    The evolutionary history of the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) plays a pivotal role in the higher-level phylogeny of the "bear-like" arctoid carnivoran mammals. Characters from morphology and molecules have provided inconsistent evidence for placement of the red panda. Whereas it certainly is an arctoid, there has been major controversy about whether it should be placed with the bears (ursids), ursids plus pinnipeds (seals, sea lions, walrus), raccoons (procyonids), musteloids (raccoons plus weasels, skunks, otters, and badgers [mustelids]), or as a monotypic lineage of uncertain phylogenetic affinities. Nucleotide sequence data from three mitochondrial genes and one nuclear intron were analyzed, with more complete taxonomic sampling of relevant taxa (arctoids) than previously available in analyses of primary molecular data, to clarify the phylogenetic relationships of the red panda to other arctoid carnivorans. This study provides detailed phylogenetic analyses (both parsimony and maximum-likelihood) of primary character data for arctoid carnivorans, including bootstrap and decay indices for all arctoid nodes, and three statistical tests of alternative phylogenetic hypotheses for the placement of the red panda. Combined phylogenetic analyses reject the hypotheses that the red panda is most closely related to the bears (ursids) or to the raccoons (procyonids). Rather, evidence from nucleotide sequences strongly support placement of the red panda within a broad Musteloidea (sensu lato) clade, including three major lineages (the red panda, the skunks [mephitids], and a clearly monophyletic clade of procyonids plus mustelids [sensu stricto, excluding skunks]). Within the Musteloidea, interrelationships of the three major lineages are unclear and probably are best considered an unresolved trichotomy. These data provide compelling evidence for the relationships of the red panda and demonstrate that small taxonomic sample sizes can result in misleading or possibly erroneous

  19. Red cell metabolism in red and grey kangaroos.

    PubMed

    Agar, N S

    1977-12-15

    Glucose utilization, lactate production and glutathione regeneration were measured in the red blood cells of 2 species of Australian Marsupials, Eastern grey Kangaroo (Macropus gigantus) and red kangaroo (Macropus rufus), and were found to be significantly lower in the red blood cells from grey than that of red kangaroos.

  20. Application of database technology to red tide remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Xiuhua; Zhang, Jie; Ma, Yi; Zhang, Hongliang

    2003-05-01

    The red tide spectrum database is the basis and prerequisite for red tide hyperspectral remote sensing, a technical support for the field investigation on red tide and the main technical measure for red tide data management and application. The data in the database mentioned in this paper come mainly from the red tide mesocosm experiment, and include the simultaneously collected biological, chemical, hydrographic and meteorological data besides the spectrum data of red tide dominant species. The database has not only the conventional functions for data query, retrieval and plotting, but also the algorithmic functions for the ground object spectrum data processing in the Visual FoxPro system environment and the biological information extraction using the ground object spectrum data. This system is not only an effective application system for detecting the red tide organism, identifying the red tide dominant species and analyzing the characteristic amount of red tide organism, but also a powerful tool for the marine environmental protection and the red tide disaster reduction in the future.

  1. A FIVE-YEAR SPECTROSCOPIC AND PHOTOMETRIC CAMPAIGN ON THE PROTOTYPICAL {alpha} CYGNI VARIABLE AND A-TYPE SUPERGIANT STAR DENEB

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, N. D.; Morrison, N. D.; Kryukova, E. E.; Adelman, S. J. E-mail: nmorris@utnet.utoledo.edu E-mail: adelmans@citadel.edu

    2011-01-15

    Deneb is often considered the prototypical A-type supergiant and is one of the visually most luminous stars in the Galaxy. A-type supergiants are potential extragalactic distance indicators, but the variability of these stars needs to be better characterized before this technique can be considered reliable. We analyzed 339 high-resolution echelle spectra of Deneb obtained over the five-year span of 1997 through 2001 as well as 370 Stroemgren photometric measurements obtained during the same time frame. Our spectroscopic analysis included dynamical spectra of the H{alpha} profile, H{alpha} equivalent widths, and radial velocities measured from Si II {lambda}{lambda} 6347, 6371. Time-series analysis reveals no obvious cyclic behavior that proceeds through multiple observing seasons, although we found a suspected 40 day period in two, non-consecutive observing seasons. Some correlations are found between photometric and radial velocity data sets and suggest radial pulsations at two epochs. No correlation is found between the variability of the H{alpha} profiles and that of the radial velocities or the photometry. Lucy found evidence that Deneb was a long-period single-lined spectroscopic binary star, but our data set shows no evidence for radial velocity variations caused by a binary companion.

  2. Wind Variability of B Supergiants. No. 1; The Rapid Rotator HD 64760 (B0.5 Ib)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massa, Derck; Prinja, Raman K.; Fullerton, Alexander W.

    1995-01-01

    We present the results of a 6 day time series of observations of the rapidly rotating B0.5 Ib star HD 64760. We point out several reasons why such intermediate luminosity B supergiants are ideal targets for wind variability studies and then present our results that show the following: continuous wind activity throughout the 6 day run with the wind never in steady state for more than a few hr; wind variability very near nu = 0 km sec(exp -1) in the resonance lines from the lower ionization stages (Al III and C II); a distinct correlation between variability in the Si III ; lambda(lambda)1300 triplets, the strong C III (lambda)1247 singlet, and the onset of extremely strong wind activity, suggesting a connection between photospheric and wind activity; long temporal coherence in the behavior of the strong absorption events; evidence for large-scale spatial coherence, implied by a whole scale, simultaneous weakening in the wind absorption over a wide range in velocities; and ionization variability in the wind accompanying the largest changes in the absorption strengths of the wind lines. In addition, modeling of the wind lines provides the following information about the state the wind in HD 64760. The number of structures on the portion of a constant velocity surface occulting the stellar disk at a particular time must be quite small, while the number on the entire constant velocity surface throughout the wind must be large. The escape probability at low velocity is overestimated by a normal beta approx. 1 velocity law, perhaps due to the presence of low-velocity shocks deep in the wind or a shallow velocity gradient at low velocity. Estimates of the ionization structure in the wind indicate that the ionization ratios are not those expected from thermal equilibrium wind models or from an extrapolation of previous O star results. The large observed q(N V)/q(Si IV) ratio is almost certainly due to distributed X-rays, but the level of ionization predicted by distributed

  3. Observations of late-type variable stars in the water-vapor radio line. The supergiant VX Sagittarii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashchenko, M. I.; Rudnitskii, G. M.

    1999-05-01

    Observations of the circumstellar maser emission of the M supergiant VX Sgr in the water-vapor line at 1.35 cm are presented. The observations were carried out from 1981-1998 (JD 2 444 655-2 450 966) on the 22-m radio telescope of the Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory of the Astro Space Center of the Lebedev Institute of Physics. Throughout the 17 years of the observations, there were two groups of emission features in the H2O-line profile, which originate in the two oppositely directed lobes of a bipolar outflow from the star. A redistribution of the integrated flux F_int between the two groups of features was noted: in 1981-1987, the group with negative velocities (V_LSR < V_*, where V_* is the stellar velocity) dominated; starting from 1993, F_int for the features with V_LSR > V_* slightly exceeded that for features with V_LSR < V_*. This redistribution of F_int in the H2O-line profile may be associated with a change in the dominant direction for the bipolar outflow due to restructuring of the overall dipolar magnetic field of VX Sgr. A model for the VX Sgr H2O maser source with a circumstellar disk and bipolar outflow in two cones with half-opening angle theta ~ 60deg is discussed. The axis of the bipolar outflow also forms an angle i ~ 60deg to the line of sight. The estimated bipolar-outflow expansion velocity V_0 in the H2O-maser region (R = (1.5-5) x 10^15 cm) is ~10 km/s. The variability of the H2O maser is correlated with the visual light curve of VX Sgr. However, the phase delay delta phi of the F_int(H2O) variations relative to the optical variations changed form 0 to ~1 stellar period (P = 732d) over the time covered by the maser observations. If the variability of the H2O-maser source is the result of periodic impacts of shock waves driven by stellar pulsations, the travel time for the shock from the photosphere to the inner boundary of the H2O maser shell may be as long as (10-15)P.

  4. Superluminous supernovae: 56Ni power versus magnetar radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessart, Luc; Hillier, D. John; Waldman, Roni; Livne, Eli; Blondin, Stéphane

    2012-10-01

    Much uncertainty surrounds the origin of superluminous supernovae (SNe). Motivated by the discovery of the Type Ic SN 2007bi, we study its proposed association with a pair-instability SN (PISN). We compute stellar evolution models for primordial ˜200 M⊙ stars, simulating the implosion/explosion due to the pair-production instability, and use them as inputs for detailed non-local thermodynamic equilibrium time-dependent radiative transfer simulations that include non-local energy deposition and non-thermal processes. We retrieve the basic morphology of PISN light curves from red supergiant, blue supergiant and Wolf-Rayet (WR) star progenitors. Although we confirm that a progenitor 100 M⊙ helium core (PISN model He100) fits well the SN 2007bi light curve, the low ratios of its kinetic energy and 56Ni mass to the ejecta mass, similar to standard core-collapse SNe, conspire to produce cool photospheres, red spectra subject to strong line blanketing and narrow-line profiles, all conflicting with SN 2007bi observations. He-core models of increasing 56Ni-to-ejecta mass ratio have bluer spectra, but still too red to match SN 2007bi, even for model He125 - the effect of 56Ni heating is offset by the associated increase in blanketing. In contrast, the delayed injection of energy by a magnetar represents a more attractive alternative to reproduce the blue, weakly blanketed and broad-lined spectra of superluminous SNe. The extra heat source is free of blanketing and is not explicitly tied to the ejecta. Experimenting with an ˜9 M⊙ WR-star progenitor, initially exploded to yield an ˜1.6 B SN Ib/c ejecta but later influenced by tunable magnetar-like radiation, we produce a diversity of blue spectral morphologies reminiscent of SN 2007bi, the peculiar Type Ib SN 2005bf and superluminous SN 2005ap-like events.

  5. Research on the property improvement of PVC using red mud in industrial waste residue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Xiaopeng; Li, Xingang; Shuai, Songxian

    2015-07-01

    Red mud is a red solid power waste that is discharged in the aluminium refinery industry during production. It is a strong alkali and can be categorized as polluting industrial residue. How to make comprehensive use of red mud has become a worldwide issue. In this paper, we put red mud into PVC (polyvinyl chloride polymer), taking advantage of the complicated chemical properties of red mud derived from the Bayer process. The results are compared with silica fume, coal ash and calcium carbonate under the same experimental conditions, which shows that improvement of PVC plastication can be achieved by adding red mud.

  6. Red cell enzymes.

    PubMed

    Paniker, N V

    1975-03-01

    As compared to other cells of the body, the mammalian red cell has one of the simplest structural organizations. As a result, this cell has been extensively used in studies involving the structure, function, and integrity of cell membranes as well as cytoplasmic events. Additionally, the metabolic activities of the red blood cell are also relatively simple. During the past quarter century or so, an ocean of knowledge has been gathered on various aspects of red cell metabolism and function. The fields of enzymes, hemoglobin, membrane, and metabolic products comprise the major portion of this knowledge. These advances have made valuable contributions to biochemistry and medicine. Despite these favorable aspects of this simple, anucleated cell, it must be conceded that our knowledge about the red cell is far from complete. We are still in the dark concerning the mechanism involved in several aspects of its membrane, hemoglobin, enzymes, and a large number of other constituents. For example, a large number of enzymes with known catalytic activity but with unknown function have eluded investigators despite active pursuit. This review will be a consolidation of our present knowledge of human red cell enzymes, with particular reference to their usefulness in the diagnosis and therapy of disease. Owing to the multitude of publications by prominent investigators on each of the approximately 50 enzymes discussed in this review, it was impossible to cite a majority of them.

  7. Reviving red snapper.

    PubMed

    Estabrook, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Red snappers in the Gulf of Mexico once hovered on the brink of extinction, their population having dropped to 2 percent of what had historically swum in the Gulf. But thanks to a recently introduced plan that turns the conventional wisdom of fisheries management on its head, the picture has begun to change. Called Individual Fishing Quotas (IFQs), the new regulations, which give a guaranteed allotment of fish to each participant instead of applying industry-wide quotas, went into effect for Gulf of Mexico Red Snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) in early 2007. The results were immediate and so profound that the Gulf Fishery Management Council voted earlier this year to increase the annual limit on red snapper to nearly 7 million pounds from 5 million.

  8. Red-based cumulus.

    PubMed

    Gedzelman, Stanley David

    2015-02-01

    Observations and model simulations of cumulus clouds whose bases are tinted red when the Sun is well above the horizon are presented. Conditions for seeing red bases include (1) a red underlying surface (which may consist of dust clouds, as from haboobs) with high albedo, (2) small fractional cloud cover when the Sun is far enough below the zenith for direct sunlight to illuminate much of the surface directly below and around cloud base, (3) optically thick clouds so that the bases are dark, and (4) clouds with bases that are near enough to the observer to appear high in the sky so that the admixture of scattered light from the intervening atmosphere is minimized.

  9. The inner halo of M 87: a first direct view of the red-giant population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, S.; Harris, W. E.; Blakeslee, J. P.; Flynn, C.

    2010-12-01

    An unusually deep (V, I) imaging dataset for the Virgo supergiant M 87 with the Hubble Space Telescope ACS successfully resolves its brightest red-giant stars, reaching MI(lim) = -2.5. After assessing the photometric completeness and biasses, we use this material to estimate the metallicity distribution for the inner halo of M 87, finding that the distribution is very broad and likely to peak near [m/H] ≃ -0.4 and perhaps higher. The shape of the MDF strongly resembles that of the inner halo for the nearby giant E galaxy NGC 5128. As a byproduct of our study, we also obtain a preliminary measurement of the distance to M 87 with the TRGB (red-giant branch tip) method; the result is (m-M)0 = 31.12 ± 0.14 (d = 16.7 ± 0.9 Mpc). Averaging this result with three other recent techniques give a weighted mean d(M 87) = (16.4 ± 0.5) Mpc.

  10. 'Vintage' Red Raspberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    'Vintage' is a new primocane-fruiting red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) from the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture–Agricultural Research Service (USDA–ARS) breeding program in Corvallis, OR released in cooperation with the Oregon State Agricultural Experiment Station and the Washington State University Agricu...

  11. Red mud product development

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, D.B.

    1996-10-01

    Kaiser Alumina and Chemical Co. impounds red mud, the byproduct of alumina production, behind levees. Kaiser recognizes that this action cannot be maintained indefinitely. Therefore, a project is in progress to produce useful products from red mud that increase the profitability of the Gramercy facility. Before products could be developed, an obstacle had to be overcome. The annual rainfall in South Louisiana prevents evaporative drying of the mud lakes. Innovative methods were applied to dry the lake mud. Two products have been developed. A daily landfill cover and an absorbant, which are marketed under the Cajunite{trademark} banner. Both products are currently being tested by potential customers at their sites. Environmental concerns were addressed during development. Extensive TCLP results show no metal leachate problems. All pilot tests and plant trials received LADEQ approval. Products that are under development include levee core, road base, fertilizer fillers and synthetic soils. State and Federal agencies are interested in using red mud to remediate coastal erosion. Kaiser is also pursuing the recovery of metals from red mud.

  12. Red Cross Swimming Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlasich, Cynthia

    1989-01-01

    Six new aquatic courses, developed by the Red Cross, are described. They are: Infant and Preschool Aquatics, Longfellow's Whale Tales (classroom water safety lessons for K-Six), Basic Water Safety, Emergency Water Safety, Lifeguard Training, and Safety Training for Swim Coaches. (IAH)

  13. Red sea drillings.

    PubMed

    Ross, D A; Whitmarsh, R B; Ali, S A; Boudreaux, J E; Coleman, R; Fleisher, R L; Girdler, R; Manheim, F; Matter, A; Nigrini, C; Stoffers, P; Supko, P R

    1973-01-26

    Recent drilling in the Red Sea has shown that much of the basin is underlain by evaporites of a similar age to that of evaporites found in the Mediterranean Sea. These evaporites and their structural positions indicate that other brine areas are present-and, indeed, several others have been discovered. PMID:17843766

  14. Red sea drillings.

    PubMed

    Ross, D A; Whitmarsh, R B; Ali, S A; Boudreaux, J E; Coleman, R; Fleisher, R L; Girdler, R; Manheim, F; Matter, A; Nigrini, C; Stoffers, P; Supko, P R

    1973-01-26

    Recent drilling in the Red Sea has shown that much of the basin is underlain by evaporites of a similar age to that of evaporites found in the Mediterranean Sea. These evaporites and their structural positions indicate that other brine areas are present-and, indeed, several others have been discovered.

  15. SPIRITS: SPitzer InfraRed Intensive Transients Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasliwal, Mansi; Cao, Yi; Masci, Frank; Helou, George; Williams, Robert; Bally, John; Bond, Howard; Whitelock, Patricia; Cody, Ann Marie; Gehrz, Robert; Jencson, Jacob; Tinyanont, Samaporn; Smith, Nathan; Surace, Jason; Armus, Lee; Cantiello, Matteo; Langer, Norbert; Levesque, Emily; Mohamed, Shazrene; Ofek, Eran; Parthasarathy, Mudumba; van Dyk, Schuyler; Boyer, Martha; Phillips, Mark; Hsiao, Eric; Morrell, Nidia; Perley, Dan; Gonzalez, Consuelo; Contreras, Carlos

    2014-12-01

    The exploration of the dynamic mid-infrared sky has just begun. We propose to continue the SPitzer InfraRed Intensive Transients Survey (SPIRITS) --- a systematic search of 194 nearby galaxies within 20 Mpc, on timescales ranging between a week to a year, to a depth of 20 mag. During Cycle 10, SPIRITS has discovered over 40 infrared transients and over 1200 infrared variables. We are discovering explosive transients (ILRT, LRN, CNe, SNe), eruptive variables (LBV, RSG, YSG, AGB), and mysterious new infrared events devoid of optical counterparts (e.g. possible birth of a massive star system). Our Cycle 10 discoveries motivate our experiment design for Cycle 11 and 12. In particular, we request additional shorter cadence baselines to fill in missing pieces in our understanding of the end points of stellar evolution. Three years of SPIRITS will constitute the definitive study to ascertain the rate and origin of new classes of infrared transients, quantify the contribution of classical novae to galactic chemical evolution, and uncover supernovae buried in starbursts. We are also systematically probing mass-loss rates and dust formation in the most massive stars. SPIRITS yields a census of supergiant variability and asymptotic giant branch variability in diverse galaxy environments. The SPIRITS team continues to be committed to a concomitant ground-based NIR and optical survey and extensive spectroscopic follow-up: 308 nights of near-IR imaging, 135 nights of optical imaging and 34 nights of spectroscopy in Cycle 11 and 12. Follow-up will serve to maximize the discovery potential of our requested 795.3 hrs of Spitzer/IRAC and 10 orbits of HST/WFC3 observing time.

  16. Photometry and spectroscopy of the luminous red nova PSNJ14021678+5426205 in the galaxy M101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goranskij, V. P.; Barsukova, E. A.; Spiridonova, O. I.; Valeev, A. F.; Fatkhullin, T. A.; Moskvitin, A. S.; Vozyakova, O. V.; Cheryasov, D. V.; Safonov, B. S.; Zharova, A. V.; Hancock, T.

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of the study of a red nova from the observations carried out with the Russian 6-m telescope (BTA) along with other telescopes of SAO RAS and SAI MSU. To investigate the nova progenitor,we used the data from the Digital Sky Survey and amateur photos available on the Internet. In the period between April 1993 and July 2014, the brightness of the progenitor gradually increased by 2_ \\cdot ^m 2 in the V-band. At the peak of the first outburst in mid-November 2014, the star reached an absolute visual magnitude of - 12_ \\cdot ^m 75 but was discovered later, in February 2015, in a repeated outburst at the magnitude of - 11_ \\cdot ^m 65. The amplitude of the outburst was minimum among the red novae, only 5_ \\cdot ^m 6 in V-band. The Hα emission line and the background of a cool supergiant continuum with gradually decreasing surface temperature were observed in the spectra. Such process is typical for red novae, although the object under study showed extreme parameters: maximum luminosity, maximum outburst duration, minimum outburst amplitude, unusual shape of the light curve. This event is interpreted as a massive OB star system components'merging accompanied by formation of a common envelope and then the expansion of this envelope with minimal energy losses.

  17. The circumstellar environment and evolutionary state of the supergiant B[e] star Wd1-9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, J. S.; Ritchie, B. W.; Negueruela, I.

    2013-12-01

    Context. Historically, supergiant (sg)B[e] stars have been difficult to include in theoretical schemes for the evolution of massive OB stars. Aims: The location of Wd1-9 within the coeval starburst cluster Westerlund 1 means that it may be placed into a proper evolutionary context and we therefore aim to utilise a comprehensive multiwavelength dataset to determine its physical properties and consequently its relation to other sgB[e] stars and the global population of massive evolved stars within Wd1. Methods: Multi-epoch R- and I-band VLT/UVES and VLT/FORS2 spectra are used to constrain the properties of the circumstellar gas, while an ISO-SWS spectrum covering 2.45-45 μm is used to investigate the distribution, geometry and composition of the dust via a semi-analytic irradiated disk model. Radio emission enables a long term mass-loss history to be determined, while X-ray observations reveal the physical nature of high energy processes within the system. Results: Wd1-9 exhibits the rich optical emission line spectrum that is characteristic of sgB[e] stars. Likewise its mid-IR spectrum resembles those of the LMC sgB[e] stars R66 and 126, revealing the presence of equatorially concentrated silicate dust, with a mass of ~10-4 M⊙. Extreme historical and ongoing mass loss (≳10-4 M⊙ yr-1) is inferred from the radio observations. The X-ray properties of Wd1-9 imply the presence of high temperature plasma within the system and are directly comparable to a number of confirmed short-period colliding wind binaries within Wd1. Conclusions: The most complete explanation for the observational properties of Wd1-9 is that it is a massive interacting binary currently undergoing, or recently exited from, rapid Roche-lobe overflow, supporting the hypothesis that binarity mediates the formation of (a subset of) sgB[e] stars. The mass loss rate of Wd1-9 is consistent with such an assertion, while viable progenitor and descendent systems are present within Wd1 and comparable sg

  18. An optical and near-IR spectroscopic study of the extreme P Cygni-type supergiant HDE 316285

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, D. J.; Crowther, P. A.; Najarro, F.; Fullerton, A. W.

    1998-12-01

    A detailed study of the Galactic P Cygni-type supergiant HDE 316285, based on high quality optical (AAT, MSO, CTIO) and near-IR (UKIRT, CFHT, CTIO) spectroscopy, is presented. As has been noted previously, its spectrum is dominated by H, He I, and Fe Ii P Cygni profiles. Emission lines due to N I, N Ii, [N Ii], O I, Na I, Mg Ii, Al Ii, Ca Ii, Si Ii, Si Iii, Fe Ii and [Fe Ii] can also be readily identified. Many of the metal lines are produced by continuum fluorescence. The rich N spectrum, the paucity of the O spectrum (only 2 O lines can be identified), and the apparent absence of emission due to C, strongly suggest that the atmosphere of the star is contaminated by CNO processed material. A comparison of the spectrum of HDE 316285 with P Cygni and He 3-519 is presented. From a spectral analysis using the non-LTE atmosphere code of Hillier (1991), and assuming a distance of 1.85 kpc, our preferred model for HDE 316285 has the following parameters: T_* = 15 kK, log L_* / L_sun = 5.44, spose M = 2.4 x 10(-4) Msun yr(-1) , v_∞ = 410 {km s(-1) }, E_B-V=1.81 mag, and H/He ~ 1.5 by number. Due to the low degree of He ionization the derived H/He abundance ratio and mass-loss rate are strongly coupled. Models with H/He=10 to 0.5 are equally capable of explaining the H and He I\\ spectrum provided the mass-loss rate is scaled according to the approximate formula spose M = 9.1 + 26.3 (He/H -0.1) x 10(-5) M_{\\odot}yr. Preliminary work, however, indicates that a solar H/He ratio can be ruled out on the basis of line strengths of other species - particularly N, Mg, Al. The stellar wind from HDE 316285 is more extreme than P Cygni with a performance number (= ratio of wind momentum to radiative momentum) 30 times greater. The low H/He abundance ratio and high N/He abundance ratio confirms that HDE 316285 is evolved. Although we find no evidence in the literature for photometric variability, we find strong evidence for significant spectral variability. Because of the spectral

  19. Physiological effects of hunting red deer (Cervus elaphus).

    PubMed Central

    Bateson, P; Bradshaw, E L

    1997-01-01

    When red deer (Cervus elaphus) were hunted by humans with hounds the average distance travelled was at least 19 km. This study of 64 hunted red deer provides the first empirical evidence on their state at the time of death. Blood and muscle samples obtained from hunted deer after death were compared with samples from 50 non-hunted red deer that had been cleanly shot with rifles. The effects on deer of long hunts were (i) depletion of carbohydrate resources for powering muscles, (ii) disruption of muscle tissue, and (iii) elevated secretion of beta-endorphin. High concentrations of cortisol, typically associated with extreme physiological and psychological stress, were found. Damage to red blood cells occurred early in the hunts; possible mechanisms are discussed. Taken together, the evidence suggests that red deer are not well-adapted by their evolutionary or individual history to cope with the level of activity imposed on them when hunted with hounds. PMID:9447728

  20. Better to be red than blue in virtual competition.

    PubMed

    Ilie, Andrei; Ioan, Silvia; Zagrean, Leon; Moldovan, Mihai

    2008-06-01

    In the 2004 Olympic Games, opponents wearing red athletic uniforms were more likely to win against opponents wearing blue uniforms. To investigate whether this color bias extends to the world of virtual competition, we compared the performance of red and blue teams in a popular multiplayer first-person-shooter (FPS) computer game. For 3 consecutive months, we collected data from a publicly available global statistics server. Outcomes from 1,347 matches played by the top 10 players on the same virtual arena were included. Red teams won 54.9% of matches, and this effect was highly significant. Our data suggest that joining the red team may offer a slight advantage over the blue team in virtual competition, and this should be accounted for when designing FPS games. It is likely that "seeing red" may trigger a powerful psychological distractor signal in human aggressive competition that can affect the outcome of sports and virtual contests alike.

  1. Toward Connecting Core-Collapse Supernova Theory with Observations: Nucleosynthetic Yields and Distribution of Elements in a 15 M⊙ Blue Supergiant Progenitor with SN 1987A Energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plewa, Tomasz; Handy, Timothy; Odrzywolek, Andrzej

    2014-03-01

    We compute and discuss the process of nucleosynthesis in a series of core-collapse explosion models of a 15 solar mass, blue supergiant progenitor. We obtain nucleosynthetic yields and study the evolution of the chemical element distribution from the moment of core bounce until young supernova remnant phase. Our models show how the process of energy deposition due to radioactive decay modifies the dynamics and the core ejecta structure on small and intermediate scales. The results are compared against observations of young supernova remnants including Cas A and the recent data obtained for SN 1987A. The work has been supported by the NSF grant AST-1109113 and DOE grant DE-FG52-09NA29548. This research used resources of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, which is supported by the U.S. DoE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  2. Registration of 'Red Ruby' Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red Ruby’ soft red winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was developed by the Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station and released in 2007 via an exclusive licensing agreement through Michigan State University (MSU) Technologies. Red Ruby was selected from the cross Pioneer ‘2552’/Pioneer ‘2737W’ ma...

  3. Ultraviolet observations of close-binary and pulsating nuclei of planetary nebulae; Winds and shells around low-mass supergiants; The close-binary nucleus of the planetary nebula HFG-1; A search for binary nuclei of planetary nebulae; UV monitoring of irregularly variable planetary nuclei; and The pulsating nucleus of the planetary nebula Lo 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, Howard E.

    1992-01-01

    A brief summary of the research highlights is presented. The topics covered include the following: binary nuclei of planetary nebulae; other variable planetary nuclei; low-mass supergiants; and other IUE-related research.

  4. Great Red Spot (GRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A huge permanent anticyclone in Jupiter's southern hemisphere, visible as a reddish oval at just over 20 °S. The earliest unequivocal observation was by Heinrich Schwabe in 1831 (the often-quoted sighting by Robert Hooke in 1664 now seems to have been of a similar but different spot). The GRS became a striking feature around 1880, when it developed a deep red coloration. It was also prominent in ...

  5. Growth of the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under red and blue lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Sara S.; Cuello, Joel L.; Myhre, Graham; Pau, Stanley

    2011-03-01

    Red and blue lasers, holding promise as an electric light source for photosynthetic systems on account of being true monochromatic, high-power, and having high electrical-conversion efficiency, were employed in growing a green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The laser treatments tested included: 655-nm Red; 680-nm Red; 655-nm Red+474-nm Blue and 680-nm Red+474-nm Blue. A white cold cathode lamp with spectral output similar to that of white fluorescent lamp served as control. C. reinhardtii successfully grew and divided under the 655 and 680-nm red lasers as well as under the white-light control. Supplementing either red with blue laser, however, resulted in increased algae cell count that significantly exceeded those under both red lasers and the white-light control on average by 241%.

  6. Extreme Red Quasars in SDSS-BOSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, Fred; Zakamska, Nadia; Paris, Isabelle; Herbst, Hanna; Villforth, Carolin; Alexandroff, Rachael; Ross, Nicholas; Greene, Jenny; Strauss, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Red quasars are believed to mark a critical transition stage of massive galaxy evolution when a blowout of gas and dust truncates the initial starburst and provides our first visible views of a luminous central AGN. Red quasars could therefore have unusual properties associated with a young evolution stage, such as higher accretion rates, higher rates of mergers and interactions, and more common or more powerful outflows capable of driving a galaxy-wide blowout (e.g., compared to normal blue quasars in presumably more evolved galaxy hosts). The recently completed Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopy Survey (BOSS) of SDSS-III has discovered many more faint quasars with higher redshifts and redder colors than any previous large survey. We combine BOSS spectra with SDSS and Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) photometry of nearly 100,000 quasars to identify and characterize the red quasar population at redshifts >2. We find a number of strong trends with the amount of reddening/obscuration. For example, red quasars are 5 to 8 times more likely to have broad absorption lines and other "intrinsic" absorption lines that identify quasar-driven outflows. Perhaps most interesting is that extreme red quasars (ERQs), selected via rest-frame UV to near-IR colors similar to Dust Obscured Galaxies (DOGs), have uniquely exotic emission line properties that include extreme velocity shifts between lines and the broadest and most blueshifted [OIII] lines yet discovered (with FWHMs reaching >3000 km/s). We will discuss the implications of these results for models of the structure and evolution of quasars and their host galaxy environments.

  7. Red Spot Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This brief movie shows counterclockwise atmospheric motion around Jupiter's Great Red Spot. The clip was made from blue-filter images taken with the narrow-angle camera on NASA's Cassini spacecraft during seven separate rotations of Jupiter between Oct. 1 and Oct. 5, 2000.

    The clip also shows the eastward and westward motion of the zonal jets, seen as the horizontal stripes flowing in opposite directions. The zonal jets circle the planet. As far as can be determined from both Earth-based and spacecraft measurements, the positions and speeds of the jets have not changed for 100 years. Since Jupiter is a fluid planet without a solid boundary, the jet speeds are measured relative to Jupiter's magnetic field, which rotates, wobbling like a top because of its tilt, every 9 hours 55.5 minutes. The movie shows motions in the magnetic reference frame, so winds to the west correspond to features that are rotating a little slower than the magnetic field, and eastward winds correspond to features rotating a little faster.

    Because the Red Spot is in the southern hemisphere, the direction of motion indicates it is a high-pressure center. Small bright clouds appear suddenly to the west of the Great Red Spot. Scientists suspect these small white features are lightning storms. The storms eventually merge with the Red Spot and surrounding jets, and may be the main energy source for the large-scale features.

    The smallest features in the movie are about 500 kilometers (about 300 miles) across. The spacing of the movie frames in time is not uniform; some consecutive images are separated by two Jupiter rotations, and some by one. The images have been re-projected using a simple cylindrical map projection. They show an area from 50 degrees north of Jupiter's equator to 50 degrees south, extending 100 degrees east-west, about one quarter of Jupiter's circumference.

    Cassini is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet

  8. The Little Red Spot: Closest View Yet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This is a mosaic of three New Horizons images of Jupiter's Little Red Spot, taken with the spacecraft's Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) camera at 17:41 Universal Time on February 26 from a range of 3.5 million kilometers (2.1 million miles). The image scale is 17 kilometers (11 miles) per pixel, and the area covered measures 33,000 kilometers (20,000 miles) from top to bottom, two and one-half times the diameter of Earth.

    The Little Red Spot, a smaller cousin of the famous Great Red Spot, formed in the past decade from the merger of three smaller Jovian storms, and is now the second-largest storm on Jupiter. About a year ago its color, formerly white, changed to a reddish shade similar to the Great Red Spot, perhaps because it is now powerful enough to dredge up reddish material from deeper inside Jupiter. These are the most detailed images ever taken of the Little Red Spot since its formation, and will be combined with even sharper images taken by New Horizons 10 hours later to map circulation patterns around and within the storm.

    LORRI took the images as the Sun was about to set on the Little Red Spot. The LORRI camera was designed to look at Pluto, where sunlight is much fainter than it is at Jupiter, so the images would have been overexposed if LORRI had looked at the storm when it was illuminated by the noonday Sun. The dim evening illumination helped the LORRI camera obtain well-exposed images. The New Horizons team used predictions made by amateur astronomers in 2006, based on their observations of the motion of the Little Red Spot with backyard telescopes, to help them accurately point LORRI at the storm.

    These are among a handful of Jupiter system images already returned by New Horizons during its close approach to Jupiter. Most of the data being gathered by the spacecraft are stored onboard and will be downlinked to Earth during March and April 2007.

  9. The red ear syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Red Ear Syndrome (RES) is a very rare disorder, with approximately 100 published cases in the medical literature. Red ear (RE) episodes are characterised by unilateral or bilateral attacks of paroxysmal burning sensations and reddening of the external ear. The duration of these episodes ranges from a few seconds to several hours. The attacks occur with a frequency ranging from several a day to a few per year. Episodes can occur spontaneously or be triggered, most frequently by rubbing or touching the ear, heat or cold, chewing, brushing of the hair, neck movements or exertion. Early-onset idiopathic RES seems to be associated with migraine, whereas late-onset idiopathic forms have been reported in association with trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs). Secondary forms of RES occur with upper cervical spine disorders or temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction. RES is regarded refractory to medical treatments, although some migraine preventative treatments have shown moderate benefit mainly in patients with migraine-related attacks. The pathophysiology of RES is still unclear but several hypotheses involving peripheral or central nervous system mechanisms have been proposed. PMID:24093332

  10. Red - Take a Closer Look

    PubMed Central

    Buechner, Vanessa L.; Maier, Markus A.; Lichtenfeld, Stephanie; Schwarz, Sascha

    2014-01-01

    Color research has shown that red is associated with avoidance of threat (e.g., failure) or approach of reward (e.g., mating) depending on the context in which it is perceived. In the present study we explored one central cognitive process that might be involved in the context dependency of red associations. According to our theory, red is supposed to highlight the relevance (importance) of a goal-related stimulus and correspondingly intensifies the perceivers’ attentional reaction to it. Angry and happy human compared to non-human facial expressions were used as goal-relevant stimuli. The data indicate that the color red leads to enhanced attentional engagement to angry and happy human facial expressions (compared to neutral ones) - the use of non-human facial expressions does not bias attention. The results are discussed with regard to the idea that red induced attentional biases might explain the red-context effects on motivation. PMID:25254380

  11. Seeing red on the road.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Romnán, Amparo; Megías, Alberto; Díaz-Piedra, Carolina; Catena, Andrés; Di Stasi, Leandro L

    2015-01-01

    Human and animal research has found that red perception is associated with specific behavioral reactions, generally characterized by intense responses. Here, we explored whether red cars are perceived as more dangerous than other colored cars. One hundred Spanish drivers examined several road scenarios which involved hazardous cars with different colors: red, green, yellow, black, gray, and white. Driver's behavior (response time and probability of braking) and the perceived level of risk for each scenario were analyzed. Although car color affected participants' response times, contrary to expectations, red cars did not elicit faster responses or higher perceived levels of risk. PMID:26489219

  12. Red cell aging in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ganzoni, A. M.; Oakes, R.; Hillman, R. S.

    1971-01-01

    Previous studies of red cell structure and metabolism during the aging process have relied upon in vitro techniques of cell separation into various age populations. Probably the most common approach is to isolate the older red cells with the assumption that they are more dense. This may lead to a number of inconsistencies in observations, and may certainly raise questions about possible cell changes secondary to manipulative procedures. For this reason, an experimental system was devised where a normal red cell population could be studied, while aging, in an in vivo environment. The initial red cell mass of a large number of inbred rats was transferred repeatedly into an ever smaller number of animals, making it possible to follow an aging population of red cells up to 48 days while preventing contamination with newly produced cells by suppression of erythropoiesis with transfusion-induced polycythemia. During this period, samples of progressively older red cells could be obtained for measurements of red cell constant. It was noted that the normal rat red cell undergoes both volume reduction and significant hemoglobin content loss with aging. In addition, the hemoglobin concentration within the cell demonstrated an early rise after a return to nearly normal values. These findings are noteworthy in that they help to explain the characteristics of life-spans of cohort labeled red cell populations in small animals, and provide a possible example of a cell's remodeling process within the spleen. PMID:5090053

  13. Fade to Red

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Infrared Andromeda Galaxy (M31) Poster [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Stars Dust

    This animation shows the Andromeda galaxy, first as seen in visible light by the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, then as seen in infrared by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

    The visible-light image highlights the galaxy's population of about one trillion stars. The stars are so crammed into its core that this region blazes with bright starlight.

    In contrast, the false-colored Spitzer view reveals red waves of dust against a more tranquil sea of blue stars. The dust lanes can be seen twirling all the way into the galaxy's center. This dust is warmed by young stars and shines at infrared wavelengths , which are represented in red. The blue color signifies shorter-wavelength infrared light primarily from older stars.

    The Andromeda galaxy, also known affectionately by astronomers as Messier 31, is located 2.5 million light-years away in the constellation Andromeda. It is the closest major galaxy to the Milky Way, making it the ideal specimen for carefully examining the nature of galaxies. On a clear, dark night, the galaxy can be spotted with the naked eye as a fuzzy blob.

    Andromeda's entire disk spans about 260,000 light-years, which means that a light beam would take 260,000 years to travel from one end of the galaxy to the other. By comparison, the Milky Way is about 100,000 light-years across. When viewed from Earth, Andromeda occupies a portion of the sky equivalent to seven full moons.

    Because this galaxy is so large, the infrared images had to be stitched together out of about 3,000 separate Spitzer exposures. The light detected by Spitzer's infrared array camera at 3.6 and 4.5 microns is sensitive mostly to starlight and is shown in blue and green, respectively. The 8-micron light shows warm dust and is shown in red. The

  14. International red meat trade.

    PubMed

    Brester, Gary W; Marsh, John M; Plain, Ronald L

    2003-07-01

    The maturation of the US beef and pork markets and increasing consumer demands for convenience, safety, and nutrition suggests that the beef and pork industries must focus on product development and promotion. New marketing arrangements are developing that help coordinate production with consumer demands. The relative high levels of incomes in the United States are likely to increase the demands for branded products rather than increase total per capita consumption. Foreign markets represent the greatest opportunity for increased demand for commodity beef and pork products. Increasing incomes in developing countries will likely allow consumers to increase consumption of animal-source proteins. Real prices of beef and pork have declined substantially because of sagging domestic demand and increasing farm-level production technologies. Increasing US beef and pork exports have obviated some of the price declines. Pork attained a net export position from a quantity perspective in 1995. The United States continues to be a net importer of beef on a quantity basis but is close to becoming a net exporter in terms of value. By-products continue to play a critical role in determining the red meat trade balance and producer prices. The United States, however, must continue to become cost, price, and quality competitive with other suppliers and must secure additional market access if it is to sustain recent trade trends. Several trade tensions remain in the red meat industry. For example, mandated COOL will undoubtedly have domestic and international effects on the beef and pork sectors. Domestically, uncertainty regarding consumer demand responses or quality perceptions regarding product origin, as well as added processor-retailer costs will be nontrivial. How these factors balance out in terms of benefits versus costs to the industry is uncertain. From an international perspective, some beef and pork export suppliers to the United States could view required labeling as a

  15. International red meat trade.

    PubMed

    Brester, Gary W; Marsh, John M; Plain, Ronald L

    2003-07-01

    The maturation of the US beef and pork markets and increasing consumer demands for convenience, safety, and nutrition suggests that the beef and pork industries must focus on product development and promotion. New marketing arrangements are developing that help coordinate production with consumer demands. The relative high levels of incomes in the United States are likely to increase the demands for branded products rather than increase total per capita consumption. Foreign markets represent the greatest opportunity for increased demand for commodity beef and pork products. Increasing incomes in developing countries will likely allow consumers to increase consumption of animal-source proteins. Real prices of beef and pork have declined substantially because of sagging domestic demand and increasing farm-level production technologies. Increasing US beef and pork exports have obviated some of the price declines. Pork attained a net export position from a quantity perspective in 1995. The United States continues to be a net importer of beef on a quantity basis but is close to becoming a net exporter in terms of value. By-products continue to play a critical role in determining the red meat trade balance and producer prices. The United States, however, must continue to become cost, price, and quality competitive with other suppliers and must secure additional market access if it is to sustain recent trade trends. Several trade tensions remain in the red meat industry. For example, mandated COOL will undoubtedly have domestic and international effects on the beef and pork sectors. Domestically, uncertainty regarding consumer demand responses or quality perceptions regarding product origin, as well as added processor-retailer costs will be nontrivial. How these factors balance out in terms of benefits versus costs to the industry is uncertain. From an international perspective, some beef and pork export suppliers to the United States could view required labeling as a

  16. The phytochrome red/far-red photoreceptor superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Sharrock, Robert A

    2008-01-01

    Proteins of the phytochrome superfamily of red/far-red light receptors have a variety of biological roles in plants, algae, bacteria and fungi and demonstrate a diversity of spectral sensitivities and output signaling mechanisms. Over the past few years the first three-dimensional structures of phytochrome light-sensing domains from bacteria have been determined. PMID:18771590

  17. Classification of red variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattei, Janet A.; Foster, Grant; Hurwitz, Leora A.; Malatesta, Kerriann H.; Willson, Lee Anne; Mennessier, Marie-Odile

    1997-01-01

    Red variables are traditionally classified into Mira, semiregular (SR), and slow irregular (L) variables. The Mira variables are the best defined subgroup, whereas SR and L stars are more numerous. The SR subgroup is additionally subdivided into: SRa variables, which feature regular variability with smaller pulsation amplitudes than Miras; SRb variables, which are less regular; SRc variables, which are more luminous; and SRd variables, which are warmer. Relationships within each group are not clear. An analysis of long-term American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSP) light curves is reported on. It is found that Mira-type variables are clearly different and distinguishable from SR variables. Similarly, M-type Miras and C-type Miras feature different light curve properties. The M-Miras form a homogeneous group. The pulsations of SR variables are unstable.

  18. The Compton Effect Red Shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kierein, John

    2004-05-01

    In 1923 (Phil Mag. 46, 897.) A. H. Compton noted that the Compton effect produces a red shift for all wavelengths when the scattered electron is free and not bound to an atom or molecule. He suggested that the red shift in the visible spectrum at the limb of the sun is larger than that at the center due to the Compton effect from the greater number of free electrons in the sun's atmosphere along the line of sight. Kierein and Sharp (1968, Solar Physics 3, 450) quantified this and showed a good correlation of red shift observations with the variation in the number of these electrons along the line of sight from center to limb and suggested that the quasar red shift and cosmological red shift could be similarly explained. Grote Reber mapped and measured the background hectometric radiation and found it to be unexpectedly bright. In 1968 (J. Franklin Inst. 285,1), while describing these measurements and maps he explained this brightness as being due to the Compton effect causing the cosmological red shift and accelerating intergalactic electrons. The resulting universe is static. The predicted red shift from the Compton effect deviates from Hubble's law only at large red shifts.

  19. Red yeast rice for dysipidemia.

    PubMed

    Shamim, Shariq; Al Badarin, Firas J; DiNicolantonio, James J; Lavie, Carl J; O'Keefe, James H

    2013-01-01

    Red yeast rice is an ancient Chinese food product that contains monacolins, chemical substances that are similar to statins in their mechanisms of action and lipid lowering properties. Several studies have found red yeast rice to be moderately effective at improving the lipid profile, particularly for lowering the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. One large randomized controlled study from China found that red yeast rice significantly improved risk of major adverse cardiovascular events and overall survival in patients following myocardial infarction. Thus, red yeast rice is a potentially useful over-the-counter cholesterol-lowering agent. However, many red yeast rice formulations are non-standardized and unregulated food supplements, and there is a need for further research and regulation of production.

  20. Polysaccharides of the red algae.

    PubMed

    Usov, Anatolii I

    2011-01-01

    Red algae (Rhodophyta) are known as the source of unique sulfated galactans, such as agar, agarose, and carrageenans. The wide practical uses of these polysaccharides are based on their ability to form strong gels in aqueous solutions. Gelling polysaccharides usually have molecules built up of repeating disaccharide units with a regular distribution of sulfate groups, but most of the red algal species contain more complex galactans devoid of gelling ability because of various deviations from the regular structure. Moreover, several red algae may contain sulfated mannans or neutral xylans instead of sulfated galactans as the main structural polysaccharides. This chapter is devoted to a description of the structural diversity of polysaccharides found in the red algae, with special emphasis on the methods of structural analysis of sulfated galactans. In addition to the structural information, some data on the possible use of red algal polysaccharides as biologically active polymers or as taxonomic markers are briefly discussed.

  1. The Intermediate Luminosity Optical Transient SN 2010da: The Progenitor, Eruption, and Aftermath of a Peculiar Supergiant High-mass X-Ray Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villar, V. A.; Berger, E.; Chornock, R.; Margutti, R.; Laskar, T.; Brown, P. J.; Blanchard, P. K.; Czekala, I.; Lunnan, R.; Reynolds, M. T.

    2016-10-01

    We present optical spectroscopy, ultraviolet-to-infrared imaging, and X-ray observations of the intermediate luminosity optical transient (ILOT) SN 2010da in NGC 300 (d = 1.86 Mpc) spanning from ‑6 to +6 years relative to the time of outburst in 2010. Based on the light-curve and multi-epoch spectral energy distributions of SN 2010da, we conclude that the progenitor of SN 2010da is a ≈10–12 M ⊙ yellow supergiant possibly transitioning into a blue-loop phase. During outburst, SN 2010da had a peak absolute magnitude of M bol ≲ ‑10.4 mag, dimmer than other ILOTs and supernova impostors. We detect multi-component hydrogen Balmer, Paschen, and Ca ii emission lines in our high-resolution spectra, which indicate a dusty and complex circumstellar environment. Since the 2010 eruption, the star has brightened by a factor of ≈5 and remains highly variable in the optical. Furthermore, we detect SN 2010da in archival Swift and Chandra observations as an ultraluminous X-ray source (L X ≈ 6 × 1039 erg s‑1). We additionally attribute He ii 4686 Å and coronal Fe emission lines in addition to a steady X-ray luminosity of ≈1037 erg s‑1 to the presence of a compact companion.

  2. XMM-Newton and NuSTAR joint observation of the periodic Supergiant Fast X-ray Transient IGR J11215-5952

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidoli, L.; Paizis, A.; Sguera, V.

    2016-06-01

    IGRJ11215-5952 is the only Supergiant Fast X-ray Transient showing periodic outbursts (every 165 days, the orbital period of the system). The driving mechanism causing the transient X-ray emission in this sub-class of High Mass X-ray Binaries is still a matter of debate, after 10 years from the discovery of the class. To disentangle between magnetar-like neutron stars from models requiring more usual neutron star magnetic fields (1E12G), we observed the SFXT pulsar IGRJ11215-5952 with XMM-Newton coordinated with NuSTAR on 2016, February 14, during the expected peak of the outburst, for a net exposure time of 20 ks. The source was indeed caught in outburst (1E36 erg/s), with several bright flares repeating quasi-periodically with timescales of a few thousand seconds, spanning a dynamic range of two orders of magnitude. The overlapping observation with both XMM-Newton and NuSTAR enabled the study of the simultaneous broad band spectrum from 0.3 to 78 keV. The work is still in progress, given the extreme variability of the X-ray emission. X-ray pulsations were detected at 187.14 s, consistent with the last XMM-Newton observation, performed in 2007. We will discuss XMM+NuSTAR results in light of the different models proposed to explain the SFXTs behavior.

  3. RED AND DEAD: THE PROGENITOR OF SN 2012aw IN M95

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, M.; Maund, J. R.; Smartt, S. J.; Inserra, C.; Kotak, R.; Reilly, E.; Botticella, M.-T.; Dall'Ora, M.; Tomasella, L.; Benetti, S.; Ciroi, S.; Ochner, P.; Pastorello, A.; Valenti, S.; Eldridge, J. J.; Ergon, M.; Sollerman, J.; Taddia, F.; Mattila, S.; Stephens, A.

    2012-11-01

    Core-collapse supernovae (SNe) are the spectacular finale to massive stellar evolution. In this Letter, we identify a progenitor for the nearby core-collapse SN 2012aw in both ground-based near-infrared and space-based optical pre-explosion imaging. The SN itself appears to be a normal Type II Plateau event, reaching a bolometric luminosity of 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} and photospheric velocities of {approx}11,000 km s{sup -1} from the position of the H{beta} P-Cygni minimum in the early SN spectra. We use an adaptive optics image to show that the SN is coincident to within 27 mas with a faint, red source in pre-explosion HST+WFPC2, VLT+ISAAC, and NTT+SOFI images. The source has magnitudes F555W = 26.70 {+-} 0.06, F814W = 23.39 {+-} 0.02, J = 21.1 {+-} 0.2, K = 19.1 {+-} 0.4, which, when compared to a grid of stellar models, best matches a red supergiant. Interestingly, the spectral energy distribution of the progenitor also implies an extinction of A{sub V} > 1.2 mag, whereas the SN itself does not appear to be significantly extinguished. We interpret this as evidence for the destruction of dust in the SN explosion. The progenitor candidate has a luminosity between 5.0 and 5.6 log L/L{sub Sun }, corresponding to a zero-age main-sequence mass between 14 and 26 M{sub Sun} (depending on A{sub V} ), which would make this one of the most massive progenitors found for a core-collapse SN to date.

  4. DsRed as a Potential FRET Partner with CFP and GFP

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Michael G.; Moon, Daniel L.; Yue, David T.

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between mutant green fluorescent proteins (GFP) provides powerful means to monitor in vivo protein-protein proximity and intracellular messengers. However, the leading FRET pair of this class (CFP/YFP) entails suboptimal donor excitation by Argon lasers, thereby hindering FRET imaging on many confocal microscopes. Further challenges arise from the large spectral overlap of CFP/YFP emission. By contrast, DsRed, along with other members of a growing family of red-shifted sea coral fluorophores, features spectra that could obviate such limitations, using DsRed as FRET acceptor, and GFP or CFP as donor. Nonetheless, DsRed suffers from slow chromophore maturation, which confounds quantitative FRET. Here, we develop strategies minimizing the resulting complexity: 1), Pulsed activation of inducible promoters, driving expression of DsRed-tagged molecules, yields a uniform bolus of mature fluorophore; 2), The 33-FRET detection algorithm, adapted for CFP/DsRed and GFP/DsRed, proves insensitive to distortion by slow maturation. We thus show that DsRed supports strong FRET in CFP-DsRed or GFP-DsRed concatemers. These results reveal the promise of sea coral fluorophores like DsRed as FRET partners with GFP or CFP. PMID:12829514

  5. Red blood cells, multiple sickle cells (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Sickle cell anemia is an inherited disorder in which abnormal hemoglobin (the red pigment inside red blood cells) is produced. The abnormal hemoglobin causes red blood cells to assume a sickle shape, like the ones seen in this photomicrograph.

  6. Red Clump Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girardi, Léo

    2016-09-01

    Low-mass stars in their core-helium-burning stage define the sharpest feature present in the color-magnitude diagrams of nearby galaxy systems: the red clump (RC). This feature has given rise to a series of methods aimed at measuring the distributions of stellar distances and extinctions, especially in the Magellanic Clouds and Milky Way Bulge. Because the RC is easily recognizable within the data of large spectroscopic and asteroseismic surveys, it is a useful probe of stellar densities, kinematics, and chemical abundances across the Milky Way disk; it can be applied up to larger distances than that allowed by dwarfs; and it has better accuracy than is possible with other kinds of giants. Here, we discuss the reasons for the RC narrowness in several sets of observational data, its fine structure, and the presence of systematic changes in the RC properties as regards age, metallicity, and the observed passband. These factors set the limits on the validity and accuracy of several RC methods defined in the literature.

  7. Red blood cell morphology.

    PubMed

    Ford, J

    2013-06-01

    The foundation of laboratory hematologic diagnosis is the complete blood count and review of the peripheral smear. In patients with anemia, the peripheral smear permits interpretation of diagnostically significant red blood cell (RBC) findings. These include assessment of RBC shape, size, color, inclusions, and arrangement. Abnormalities of RBC shape and other RBC features can provide key information in establishing a differential diagnosis. In patients with microcytic anemia, RBC morphology can increase or decrease the diagnostic likelihood of thalassemia. In normocytic anemias, morphology can assist in differentiating among blood loss, marrow failure, and hemolysis-and in hemolysis, RBC findings can suggest specific etiologies. In macrocytic anemias, RBC morphology can help guide the diagnostic considerations to either megaloblastic or nonmegaloblastic causes. Like all laboratory tests, RBC morphologies must be interpreted with caution, particularly in infants and children. When used properly, RBC morphology can be a key tool for laboratory hematology professionals to recommend appropriate clinical and laboratory follow-up and to select the best tests for definitive diagnosis. PMID:23480230

  8. Red blood cell morphology.

    PubMed

    Ford, J

    2013-06-01

    The foundation of laboratory hematologic diagnosis is the complete blood count and review of the peripheral smear. In patients with anemia, the peripheral smear permits interpretation of diagnostically significant red blood cell (RBC) findings. These include assessment of RBC shape, size, color, inclusions, and arrangement. Abnormalities of RBC shape and other RBC features can provide key information in establishing a differential diagnosis. In patients with microcytic anemia, RBC morphology can increase or decrease the diagnostic likelihood of thalassemia. In normocytic anemias, morphology can assist in differentiating among blood loss, marrow failure, and hemolysis-and in hemolysis, RBC findings can suggest specific etiologies. In macrocytic anemias, RBC morphology can help guide the diagnostic considerations to either megaloblastic or nonmegaloblastic causes. Like all laboratory tests, RBC morphologies must be interpreted with caution, particularly in infants and children. When used properly, RBC morphology can be a key tool for laboratory hematology professionals to recommend appropriate clinical and laboratory follow-up and to select the best tests for definitive diagnosis.

  9. Red ginseng and cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong-Zhi; Anderson, Samantha; DU, Wei; He, Tong-Chuan; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2016-01-01

    The ginseng family, including Panax ginseng (Asian ginseng), Panax quinquefolius (American ginseng), and Panax notoginseng (notoginseng), is commonly used herbal medicine. White ginseng is prepared by air-drying after harvest, while red ginseng is prepared by a steaming or heating process. The anticancer activity of red ginseng is significantly increased, due to the production of active anticancer ginsenosides during the steaming treatment, compared with that of white ginseng. Thus far, anticancer studies have been mostly focused on Asian ginseng. In this article, we review the research progress made in the anticancer activities of red Asian ginseng, red American ginseng and red notoginseng. The major anticancer mechanisms of red ginseng compounds include cell cycle arrest, induction of apoptosis/paraptosis, and inhibition of angiogenesis. The structure-function relationship analysis has revealed that the protopanaxadiol group ginsenosides have more potent effects than the protopanaxatriol group. Sugar molecules in ginsenosides inversely impact the antiproliferative potential of these compounds. In addition, ginsenoside stereoselectivity and double bond position also influence the anticancer activity. Future studies should focus on characterizing active red ginseng derivatives as potential anticancer drugs. PMID:26850342

  10. Red ginseng and cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong-Zhi; Anderson, Samantha; DU, Wei; He, Tong-Chuan; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2016-01-01

    The ginseng family, including Panax ginseng (Asian ginseng), Panax quinquefolius (American ginseng), and Panax notoginseng (notoginseng), is commonly used herbal medicine. White ginseng is prepared by air-drying after harvest, while red ginseng is prepared by a steaming or heating process. The anticancer activity of red ginseng is significantly increased, due to the production of active anticancer ginsenosides during the steaming treatment, compared with that of white ginseng. Thus far, anticancer studies have been mostly focused on Asian ginseng. In this article, we review the research progress made in the anticancer activities of red Asian ginseng, red American ginseng and red notoginseng. The major anticancer mechanisms of red ginseng compounds include cell cycle arrest, induction of apoptosis/paraptosis, and inhibition of angiogenesis. The structure-function relationship analysis has revealed that the protopanaxadiol group ginsenosides have more potent effects than the protopanaxatriol group. Sugar molecules in ginsenosides inversely impact the antiproliferative potential of these compounds. In addition, ginsenoside stereoselectivity and double bond position also influence the anticancer activity. Future studies should focus on characterizing active red ginseng derivatives as potential anticancer drugs.

  11. Romantic red: red enhances men's attraction to women.

    PubMed

    Elliot, Andrew J; Niesta, Daniela

    2008-11-01

    In many nonhuman primates, the color red enhances males' attraction to females. In 5 experiments, the authors demonstrate a parallel effect in humans: Red, relative to other achromatic and chromatic colors, leads men to view women as more attractive and more sexually desirable. Men seem unaware of this red effect, and red does not influence women's perceptions of the attractiveness of other women, nor men's perceptions of women's overall likeability, kindness, or intelligence. The findings have clear practical implications for men and women in the mating game and, perhaps, for fashion consultants, product designers, and marketers. Furthermore, the findings document the value of extending research on signal coloration to humans and of considering color as something of a common language, both within and across species.

  12. Red Meat and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in men and the second in women worldwide. More than half of cases occur in more developed countries. The consumption of red meat (beef, pork, lamb, veal, mutton) is high in developed countries and accumulated evidence until today demonstrated a convincing association between the intake of red meat and especially processed meat and CRC risk. In this review, meta-analyses of prospective epidemiological studies addressed to this association, observed link of some subtypes of red meat with CRC risk, potential carcinogenic compounds, their mechanisms and actual recommendations of international guidelines are presented. PMID:26779313

  13. Powering the superwind in NGC 253

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Alan; Gallagher, Jay; Merrill, Michael; Keppel, Jean; Phillips, Mark

    1993-01-01

    NGC 253 is a prototypical moderate nuclear starburst galaxy. It is a barred SBc spiral galaxy at a distance of approximately 3 Mpc and can be studied on scales down to 15 pc in the optical and near IR. It is a bright IRAS source with a flux of 1000 Jy at 60 microns and a FIR luminosity of 3 x 10(exp 10) solar luminosity. It has a strong Br(gamma) emission line, a signature of ongoing massive star formation and deep CO absorption bands, which are indicative of the dominance of red supergiants in the near IR. It contains a population of compact radio sources, similar to those seen in M82. Optical spectra show that the nucleus is heavily reddened, with a Balmer decrement of approximately 30. NGC 253 possesses a 'superwind,' seen both in x-ray emission and in optical line emission. Nuclear ejection was first suggested to explain the kinematics of the nuclear region. We have obtained J, H, and K images of the entire galaxy at 1.3 arcsec/pixel (18 pc/pixel) using the superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) on the KPNO 1.3 m. We have constructed a mosaic of 180 s exposures which traces the galaxy over much of its optical extent. The data were shifted, rotated, magnified, and calibrated following normal practice.

  14. Red blood cells, spherocytosis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Spherocytosis is a hereditary disorder of the red blood cells (RBCs), which may be associated with a mild anemia. Typically, the affected RBCs are small, spherically shaped, and lack the light centers seen ...

  15. Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? RBC Antibody Identification Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Alloantibody Identification; Antibody ID, RBC; RBC Ab ID Formal name: Red Blood Cell ...

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey: B supergiants (McEvoy+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEvoy, C. M.; Dufton, P. L.; Evans, C. J.; Kalari, V. M.; Markova, N.; Simon-Diaz, S.; Vink, J. S.; Walborn, N. R.; Crowther, P. A.; de Koter, A.; de Mink, S. E.; Dunstall, P. R.; Henault-Brunet, V.; Herrero, A.; Langer, N.; Lennon, D. J.; Maiz Apellaniz, J.; Najarro, F.; Puls, J.; Sana, H.; Schneider, F. R. N.; Taylor, W. D.

    2015-06-01

    The majority of the VFTS data were obtained using the Medusa mode of FLAMES, which uses fibres to feed the light from up to 130 targets simultaneously to the Giraffe spectrograph. Nine Medusa configurations (Fields A to I) were observed in the 30 Dor region, with the targets sampling its different clusters and the local field population. The analysis presented here employs the FLAMES-Medusa observations obtained with two of the standard Giraffe settings (LR02 and LR03), giving coverage of the λλ3960-5050Å region at a resolving power of ~7000. (5 data files).

  17. Red Tide off Texas Coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Red tides (algae) bloomed late this summer along a 300-mile stretch of Texas' Gulf Coast, killing millions of fish and shellfish as well as making some people sick. State officials are calling this the worst red tide bloom in 14 years. The algae produces a poison that paralyzes fish and prevents them from breathing. There is concern that the deadly algae could impact or even wipe out this year's oyster harvest in Texas, which usually peaks during the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays. The red tides were first observed off the Texas coast in mid-August and have been growing steadily in size ever since. Red tides tend to bloom and subside rapidly, depending upon changes in wind speed and direction, water temperature, salinity, and rainfall patterns (as the algae doesn't do as well in fresher water). This true-color image of the Texas Gulf Coast was acquired on September 29, 2000, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The red tide can be seen as the dark reddish discoloration in the ocean running southwest to northeast along the coast. In this scene, the bloom appears to be concentrated north and east of Corpus Christi, just off Matagorda Island. The image was made at 500-meter resolution using a combination of MODIS' visible bands 1 (red), 4 (green), and 3 (blue). The city of Houston can be seen clearly as the large, greyish cluster of pixels to the north and west of Galveston Bay, which is about mid-way up the coastline in this image. Also visible in this image are plumes of smoke, perhaps wildfires, both to the north and northeast of Houston. For more information about red tides, refer to the Texas Red Tide Web site. Image courtesy Andrey Savtchenko, MODIS Data Support Team, and the MODIS Ocean Team, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

  18. Exploratory design in medical nanotechnology: a mechanical artificial red cell.

    PubMed

    Freitas, R A

    1998-07-01

    Molecular manufacturing promises precise control of matter at the atomic and molecular level, allowing the construction of micron-scale machines comprised of nanometer-scale components. Medical nanomachines will be among the earliest applications. The artificial red blood cell or "respirocyte" proposed here is a bloodborne spherical 1-micron diamondoid 1000-atm pressure vessel with active pumping powered by endogenous serum glucose, able to deliver 236 times more oxygen to the tissues per unit volume than natural red cells and to manage carbonic acidity. An onboard nanocomputer and numerous chemical and pressure sensors enable complex device behaviors remotely reprogrammable by the physician via externally applied acoustic signals.

  19. LUMINOUS SUPERNOVA-LIKE UV/OPTICAL/INFRARED TRANSIENTS ASSOCIATED WITH ULTRA-LONG GAMMA-RAY BURSTS FROM METAL-POOR BLUE SUPERGIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kashiyama, Kazumi; Yajima, Hidenobu; Nakauchi, Daisuke; Nakamura, Takashi; Suwa, Yudai

    2013-06-10

    Metal-poor massive stars typically end their lives as blue supergiants (BSGs). Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) from such progenitors could have an ultra-long duration of relativistic jets. For example, Population III (Pop III) GRBs at z {approx} 10-20 might be observable as X-ray-rich events with a typical duration of T{sub 90} {approx} 10{sup 4}(1 + z) s. The recent GRB111209A at z = 0.677 has an ultra-long duration of T{sub 90} {approx} 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} s and it has been suggested that its progenitor might have been a metal-poor BSG in the local universe. Here, we suggest that luminous UV/optical/infrared emission is associated with this new class of GRBs from metal-poor BSGs. Before the jet head breaks out of the progenitor envelope, the energy injected by the jet is stored in a hot plasma cocoon, which finally emerges and expands as a baryon-loaded fireball. We show that the photospheric emissions from the cocoon fireball could be intrinsically very bright (L{sub peak} {approx} 10{sup 42}-10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) in UV/optical bands ({epsilon}{sub peak} {approx} 10 eV) with a typical duration of {approx}100 days in the rest frame. Such cocoon emissions from Pop III GRBs might be detectable in infrared bands at {approx}years after Pop III GRBs at up to z {approx} 15 by upcoming facilities such as the James Webb Space Telescope. We also suggest that GRB111209A might have been rebrightening in UV/optical bands up to an AB magnitude of {approx}< 26. The cocoon emission from local metal-poor BSGs might have been observed previously as luminous supernovae without GRBs since they can be seen from the off-axis direction of the jet.

  20. APERTURE SYNTHESIS OBSERVATIONS OF CO, HCN, AND 89 GHz CONTINUUM EMISSION TOWARD NGC 604 IN M33: SEQUENTIAL STAR FORMATION INDUCED BY A SUPERGIANT H II REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Rie; Okumura, Sachiko K.; Kurono, Yasutaka; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Tosaki, Tomoka; Tamura, Yoichi; Kuno, Nario; Kawabe, Ryohei; Sakamoto, Seiichi; Hasegawa, Takashi

    2010-12-01

    We present the results from new Nobeyama Millimeter Array observations of CO(1-0), HCN(1-0), and 89 GHz continuum emission toward NGC 604, known as the supergiant H II region in the nearby galaxy M33. Our high spatial resolution images (4.''2 x 2.''6, corresponding to 17 pc x 11 pc physical size) of CO emission allowed us to uncover 10 individual molecular clouds that have masses of (0.8-7.4) x10{sup 5} M{sub sun} and sizes of 5-29 pc, comparable to those of typical Galactic giant molecular clouds. Moreover, we detected for the first time HCN emission in the two most massive clouds and 89 GHz continuum emission at the rims of the 'H{alpha} shells'. The HCN and 89 GHz continuum emission are offset from the CO peak and are distributed in the direction of the central cluster. Three out of ten CO clouds are well correlated with the H{alpha} shells both in spatial and velocity domains, implying an interaction between molecular gas and the expanding H II region. The CO clouds show varieties in star formation efficiencies (SFEs), which are estimated from the 89 GHz emission and combination of H{alpha} and Spitzer 24 {mu}m data. Furthermore, we found that the SFEs decrease with increasing projected distance measured from the heart of the central OB star cluster in NGC 604, suggesting radial changes in the evolutionary stages of the molecular clouds in the course of stellar cluster formation. Our results provide further support to the picture of sequential star formation in NGC 604 initially proposed by Tosaki et al. with the higher spatially resolved molecular clouds, in which an isotropic expansion of the H II region pushes gases outward, which accumulates to form dense molecular clouds, and then induces massive star formations.

  1. A new paradigm for the X-ray emission of O stars from XMM-Newton observations of the O9.7 supergiant ζ Orionis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, A. M. T.

    2007-03-01

    XMM-Newton observations of the O supergiant ζ Orionis (O9.7 Ib) extend knowledge of its high-resolution spectrum beyond the C VI line at 33.7 Å and suggest a new framework for the interpretation of the X-ray spectra of single hot stars. All the lines are broad and asymmetric with similar velocity profiles. X-rays probably originate in the wind's terminal velocity regime in collisionless shocks controlled by magnetic fields rather than in cooling shocks in the acceleration zone. During post-shock relaxation, exchange of energy between ions and electrons is so slow that electron heating does not take place before hot gas is quenched by the majority cool gas. The observed plasma is not in equilibrium and the electron bremsstrahlung continuum is weak. Charge exchange, ionization and excitation are likely to be produced by protons. Fully thermalized post-shock velocities ensure high cross-sections and account for the observed line widths, with some allowance probably necessary for non-thermal particle acceleration. In general, the form of X-ray spectra in both single and binary stars is likely to be determined principally by the amount of post-shock electron heating: magnetically confined X-ray plasma in binary systems can evolve further towards the higher electron temperatures of equilibrium while in single stars this does not take place. The long mean-free path for Coulomb energy exchange between fast-moving ions may also inhibit the development of line-driven instabilities. Based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and NASA.

  2. Habitability of planets around red dwarf stars.

    PubMed

    Heath, M J; Doyle, L R; Joshi, M M; Haberle, R M

    1999-08-01

    Recent models indicate that relatively moderate climates could exist on Earth-sized planets in synchronous rotation around red dwarf stars. Investigation of the global water cycle, availability of photosynthetically active radiation in red dwarf sunlight, and the biological implications of stellar flares, which can be frequent for red dwarfs, suggests that higher plant habitability of red dwarf planets may be possible.

  3. 39 CFR 259.2 - Red Cross.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Red Cross. 259.2 Section 259.2 Postal Service....2 Red Cross. (a) General. The Postal Service and the Red Cross cooperate to maintain communication... those caused by enemy action. (b) Role of Postal Service. The Postal Service and the Red Cross...

  4. Noninvasive optical inhibition with a red-shifted microbial rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Chuong, Amy S; Miri, Mitra L; Busskamp, Volker; Matthews, Gillian A C; Acker, Leah C; Sørensen, Andreas T; Young, Andrew; Klapoetke, Nathan C; Henninger, Mike A; Kodandaramaiah, Suhasa B; Ogawa, Masaaki; Ramanlal, Shreshtha B; Bandler, Rachel C; Allen, Brian D; Forest, Craig R; Chow, Brian Y; Han, Xue; Lin, Yingxi; Tye, Kay M; Roska, Botond; Cardin, Jessica A; Boyden, Edward S

    2014-01-01

    Optogenetic inhibition of the electrical activity of neurons enables the causal assessment of their contributions to brain functions. Red light penetrates deeper into tissue than other visible wavelengths. We present a red-shifted cruxhalorhodopsin, Jaws, derived from Haloarcula (Halobacterium) salinarum (strain Shark) and engineered to result in red light–induced photocurrents three times those of earlier silencers. Jaws exhibits robust inhibition of sensory-evoked neural activity in the cortex and results in strong light responses when used in retinas of retinitis pigmentosa model mice. We also demonstrate that Jaws can noninvasively mediate transcranial optical inhibition of neurons deep in the brains of awake mice. The noninvasive optogenetic inhibition opened up by Jaws enables a variety of important neuroscience experiments and offers a powerful general-use chloride pump for basic and applied neuroscience. PMID:24997763

  5. Red cell metabolism studies on Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengel, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    Blood samples from Spacelab crewmembers were studied for possible environment effects on red cell components. Analysis involved peroxidation of red cell lipids, enzymes of red cell metabolism, and levels of 2,3-diphosphoglyceric acid and adenosine triphosphate. Results show that there is no evidence of lipid peroxidation, that biochemical effect known to be associated with irreversible red cell damage. Changes observed in glycolytic intermediates and enzymes cannot be directly implicated as indicating evidence of red cell damage.

  6. 76 FR 22033 - Safety Zone; Red River Safety Zone, Red River, MN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-20

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AAOO Safety Zone; Red River Safety Zone, Red River, MN AGENCY... Safety Unit Duluth, MN is establishing a temporary safety zone on the Red River, MN. This safety zone is...-0263 to read as follows: Sec. 165.T09-0263 Safety zone; Red River Safety Zone, Red River, MN....

  7. How to Stay Safe When the Power Goes Out

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159742.html How to Stay Safe When the Power Goes Out American Red Cross advises keeping emergency ... 2016 WEDNESDAY, July 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Sudden power outages can be frustrating, but what if your ...

  8. Growth declines in red spruce

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, S.B. ); Adams, H.S. )

    1987-10-01

    In this letter, the authors take issue with Zedaker, Hyink, and Smith who have indicated that observed red spruce growth declines can be expected based on growth trends for even-aged stands of red spruce as documented in Meyer (1929). Recently, an examination was made of stand stocking levels at 750 sites where red spruce were cored and neither the rate of growth decline nor the extent of mortality were found to be related to stand stocking levels or previous disturbance history. The authors conclude that the Meyer data do not represent an appropriate model for stand dynamics of old-growth, high-elevation stands and no not adequately explain the growth declines observed at many of those sites.

  9. Red eyes in renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Klaassen-Broekema, N; van Bijsterveld, O P

    1992-01-01

    Of 57 patients with chronic renal failure who all had deposition of calcium salts in the conjunctival and corneal tissue two developed a brief episode of painful irritation and redness of the conjunctiva and subconjunctiva. This hyperaemia was adjacent to erosions of the corneal epithelium of the eye as a consequence of exfoliation of calcium concretions from the superficial corneal epithelium. Eight patients showed inflammatory reactions of the conjunctivae that were clinically identical to inflamed pingueculae. Three patients showed an inflammatory reaction of the eye that was characterised by a waxy red, more or less diffuse, episcleral and conjunctival hyperaemia extending beyond the palpebral fissure. The average value of the serum calcium concentration in these patients was particularly high and statistically significantly higher than in patients with calcification but without inflammatory signs and also higher than in patients who showed pingueculitis. We propose to reserve the term 'red eye of renal failure' for the latter group of patients. Images PMID:1390507

  10. 14 CFR 23.1549 - Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... instruments. For each required powerplant and auxiliary power unit instrument, as appropriate to the type of... that is restricted because of excessive vibration stresses must be marked with red arcs or red lines....

  11. 14 CFR 23.1549 - Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... instruments. For each required powerplant and auxiliary power unit instrument, as appropriate to the type of... that is restricted because of excessive vibration stresses must be marked with red arcs or red lines....

  12. 14 CFR 25.1549 - Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... powerplant and auxiliary power unit instrument, as appropriate to the type of instrument— (a) Each maximum... restricted because of excessive vibration stresses must be marked with red arcs or red lines....

  13. 14 CFR 25.1549 - Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... powerplant and auxiliary power unit instrument, as appropriate to the type of instrument— (a) Each maximum... restricted because of excessive vibration stresses must be marked with red arcs or red lines....

  14. Coleman v. American Red Cross.

    PubMed

    1990-04-01

    Cheryl Coleman became infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) after receiving a blood transfusion. Alleging that the blood she received was infected, she sued its supplier, the American Red Cross, to compel discovery of the donor's identity. Coleman asserted that without discovery of the donor's name, it would be impossible to determine whether the Red Cross adequately had screened blood donors (there was no test to identify HIV in blood at that time) and therefore to establish a claim of negligence and the necessary proximate cause. The District Court held that the potential danger to the nation's volunteer blood supply system outweighed Coleman's need to discover the donor's identity.

  15. Red facts: Ethylene. Fact sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    EPA is directed by the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act as amended in 1988 (FIFRA '88) to review all pesticide products containing active ingredients initially registered before November 1, 1984, and to reregister those products that have a substantially complete data base and do not pose unreasonable adverse effects to people or the environment. The pesticide reregistration program is to be completed by the late 1990's. The RED FACTS fact sheet summarizes EPA's conclusion, as set forth in the Reregistration Eligibility Document (or RED), that products containing a pesticide do not pose unreasonable risks when used as directed by Agency-approved labeling, and are eligible for reregistration.

  16. Red Plague Control Plan (RPCP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    SCOPE: Prescribes the minimum requirements for the control of cuprous / cupric oxide corrosion (a.k.a. Red Plague) of silver-coated copper wire, cable, and harness assemblies. PURPOSE: Targeted for applications where exposure to assembly processes, environmental conditions, and contamination may promote the development of cuprous / cupric oxide corrosion (a.k.a. Red Plague) in silver-coated copper wire, cable, and harness assemblies. Does not exclude any alternate or contractor-proprietary documents or processes that meet or exceed the baseline of requirements established by this document. Use of alternate or contractor-proprietary documents or processes shall require review and prior approval of the procuring NASA activity.

  17. Carbon abundance and the N/C ratio in atmospheres of A-, F- and G-type supergiants and bright giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubimkov, Leonid S.; Lambert, David L.; Korotin, Sergey A.; Rachkovskaya, Tamara M.; Poklad, Dmitry B.

    2015-02-01

    Based on our prior accurate determination of fundamental parameters for 36 Galactic A-, F- and G-type supergiants and bright giants (luminosity classes I and II), we undertook a non-LTE analysis of the carbon abundance in their atmospheres. It is shown that the non-LTE corrections to the C abundances derived from C I lines are negative and increase with the effective temperature Teff; the corrections are especially significant for the infrared C I lines with wavelengths 9060-9660 Å. The carbon underabundance as a general property of the stars in question is confirmed; a majority of the stars studied has the carbon deficiency [C/Fe] between -0.1 and -0.5 dex, with a minimum at -0.7 dex. When comparing the derived C deficiency with the N excess found by us for the same stars earlier, we obtain a pronounced N versus C anticorrelation, which could be expected from predictions of the theory. We found that the ratio [N/C] spans mostly the range from 0.3 to 1.7 dex. Both these enhanced [N/C] values and the C and N anomalies themselves are an obvious evidence of the presence on a star's surface of mixed material from stellar interiors; so, a majority of programme stars passed through the deep mixing during the main sequence (MS) and/or the first dredge-up (FD) phase. Comparison with theoretical predictions including rotationally induced mixing shows that the stars are either post-MS objects with the initial rotational velocities V0 = 200-300 km s-1 or post-FD objects with V0 = 0-300 km s-1. The observed N versus C anticorrelation reflects a dependence of the C and N anomalies on the V0 value: on average the higher V0 the greater the anomalies. It is shown that an absence of detectable lithium in the atmospheres of the stars, which is accompanied with the observed N excess and C deficiency, is quite explainable.

  18. Solar Power on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This chart illustrates the variation in available solar power for each of NASA's twin Mars Exploration Rovers over the course of approximately two Mars years. Two factors affect the amount of available power: the tilt of Mars' axis and the eccentricity of the Mars' orbit about the sun.

    The horizontal scale is the number of Martian days (sols) after the Jan. 4, 2004, (Universal Time) landing of Spirit at Mars' Gusev Crater. The vertical scale on the right indicates the amount of available solar power as a ratio of the amount available at the equator when Mars is closest to the sun (perihelion). The red line indicates power availability at Spirit's landing site (Gusev). The blue line indicates power availability at Opportunity's landing site (Meridiani).

    The vertical scale on the right applies to the dotted line, indicating the latitude north or south of Mars' equator where the noon sun is overhead at different times of the Martian year.

  19. Growth declines in red spruce

    SciTech Connect

    Zedaker, S.M.; Hyink, D.M.; Smith, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Over the past two decades second-growth red spruce stands in the Northeast have demonstrated declines in radial increment. Some observers are implicating air pollution as a primary cause of the declines, based on recently acquired increment cores from dominant trees. Various forms of air pollution (O/sub 3/, NO/sub x/, SO/sub 2/, and trace metals) are known to reduce growth and development of tree species, but few studies have provided concrete evidence of regional pollution-caused declines in forest ecosystems. Recently published evidence of a synchronous, consistent, and unprecedented regional decline in red spruce should be weighed against the realization that radial increment in red spruce declines naturally as stands age. Separating anthropogenic stress-caused growth patterns from natural stand dynamics requires an in-depth knowledge of forest growth and yield, tree silvics, and forest ecosystem processes. Detailed analyses of growth by stand characteristics - site index, density, elevation, stand history - will be necessary to implicate air pollution as a primary cause of red spruce decline.

  20. Chemical Contamination of Red Meat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chemical residues have been present in red meat products since meat eating began. Only in the last few decades, however has man been able to identify and quantify these residues in meat products and to ascribe to them specific risks to human health. For some residues, uncertainties with respect to q...

  1. Infra-red soft universality

    SciTech Connect

    Jack, I.

    1997-06-15

    In a special class of supersymmetric grand unified theories, the commonly assumed universal form of the soft supersymmetry-breaking terms is approached in the infra-red limit. The resulting universal scalar mass and trilinear coupling are predicted in terms of the gaugino mass.

  2. Still red light for red light cameras? An update.

    PubMed

    Høye, Alena

    2013-06-01

    The present study has replicated the results from a previous meta-analysis by Erke (2009) [Erke, A., 2009. Red light for red-light cameras? A meta-analysis of the effects of red-light cameras on crashes. Accident Analysis & Prevention 41 (5), 897-905.] based on a larger sample of RLC-studies, and provides answers to the criticisms that were raised by Lund et al. (2009) [Lund, A.K., Kyrychenko, S.Y., Retting, R.A., 2009. Caution: a comment on Alena Erke's red light for red-light cameras? A meta-analysis of the effects of red-light cameras on crashes. Accident Analysis and Prevention 41, 895-896.] against the previous meta-analysis. The addition of recent studies to the meta-analysis and a more thorough investigation of potential moderator variables lead to a slight improvement of the estimated effects of RLC in the previous meta-analysis. The present study found a non-significant increase of all crashes by 6% and a non-significant decrease of all injury crashes by 13%. Right-angle collisions were found to decrease by 13% and rear-end collisions were found to increase by 39%. For right-angle injury collisions a decrease by 33% was found and for rear-end injury collisions a smaller increase was found (+19%). The effects of RLC are likely to be more favorable when RLC-warning signs are set up at main entrances to areas with RLC enforcement than when each RLC-intersection is signposted. The effects of RLC may become more favorable over time, this could however not be investigated empirically. Several results indicate that spillover effects may occur for right-angle collisions, but most likely not for rear-end and other crashes. If spillover effects do not occur for rear-end crashes, which increase at RLC intersection, this would be a positive result for RLC. However, the results seem to be affected to some degree by publication bias and the effects may therefore be somewhat less favorable than indicated by the results from meta-analysis.

  3. Genetic Basis for Red Coloration in Birds.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Ricardo J; Johnson, James D; Toomey, Matthew B; Ferreira, Mafalda S; Araujo, Pedro M; Melo-Ferreira, José; Andersson, Leif; Hill, Geoffrey E; Corbo, Joseph C; Carneiro, Miguel

    2016-06-01

    The yellow and red feather pigmentation of many bird species [1] plays pivotal roles in social signaling and mate choice [2, 3]. To produce red pigments, birds ingest yellow carotenoids and endogenously convert them into red ketocarotenoids via an oxidation reaction catalyzed by a previously unknown ketolase [4-6]. We investigated the genetic basis for red coloration in birds using whole-genome sequencing of red siskins (Spinus cucullata), common canaries (Serinus canaria), and "red factor" canaries, which are the hybrid product of crossing red siskins with common canaries [7]. We identified two genomic regions introgressed from red siskins into red factor canaries that are required for red coloration. One of these regions contains a gene encoding a cytochrome P450 enzyme, CYP2J19. Transcriptome analysis demonstrates that CYP2J19 is significantly upregulated in the skin and liver of red factor canaries, strongly implicating CYP2J19 as the ketolase that mediates red coloration in birds. Interestingly, a second introgressed region required for red feathers resides within the epidermal differentiation complex, a cluster of genes involved in development of the integument. Lastly, we present evidence that CYP2J19 is involved in ketocarotenoid formation in the retina. The discovery of the carotenoid ketolase has important implications for understanding sensory function and signaling mediated by carotenoid pigmentation. PMID:27212400

  4. Genetic Basis for Red Coloration in Birds.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Ricardo J; Johnson, James D; Toomey, Matthew B; Ferreira, Mafalda S; Araujo, Pedro M; Melo-Ferreira, José; Andersson, Leif; Hill, Geoffrey E; Corbo, Joseph C; Carneiro, Miguel

    2016-06-01

    The yellow and red feather pigmentation of many bird species [1] plays pivotal roles in social signaling and mate choice [2, 3]. To produce red pigments, birds ingest yellow carotenoids and endogenously convert them into red ketocarotenoids via an oxidation reaction catalyzed by a previously unknown ketolase [4-6]. We investigated the genetic basis for red coloration in birds using whole-genome sequencing of red siskins (Spinus cucullata), common canaries (Serinus canaria), and "red factor" canaries, which are the hybrid product of crossing red siskins with common canaries [7]. We identified two genomic regions introgressed from red siskins into red factor canaries that are required for red coloration. One of these regions contains a gene encoding a cytochrome P450 enzyme, CYP2J19. Transcriptome analysis demonstrates that CYP2J19 is significantly upregulated in the skin and liver of red factor canaries, strongly implicating CYP2J19 as the ketolase that mediates red coloration in birds. Interestingly, a second introgressed region required for red feathers resides within the epidermal differentiation complex, a cluster of genes involved in development of the integument. Lastly, we present evidence that CYP2J19 is involved in ketocarotenoid formation in the retina. The discovery of the carotenoid ketolase has important implications for understanding sensory function and signaling mediated by carotenoid pigmentation.

  5. Publication Bias in "Red, Rank, and Romance in Women Viewing Men," by Elliot et al. (2010)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Elliot et al. (2010) reported multiple experimental findings that the color red modified women's ratings of attractiveness, sexual desirability, and status of a photographed man. An analysis of the reported statistics of these studies indicates that the experiments lack sufficient power to support these claims. Given the power of the experiments,…

  6. Race, Feminine Power, and the Vietnam War in Philip Red Eagle's "Red Earth"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Scott

    2004-01-01

    In her book "The Remasculinization of America," Susan Jeffords discusses the dynamics of how differences such as race and class are erased in filmic and literary representations of the Vietnam War. She asserts that one difference is not overcome by the battlefield: gender, a barrier that is depicted in the literature as natural and unalterable.…

  7. Red blood cells, sickle cell (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is an inherited blood disease in which the red blood cells produce abnormal pigment (hemoglobin). The abnormal hemoglobin causes deformity of the red blood cells into crescent or sickle-shapes, as ...

  8. Thermodynamic, energy efficiency, and power density analysis of reverse electrodialysis power generation with natural salinity gradients.

    PubMed

    Yip, Ngai Yin; Vermaas, David A; Nijmeijer, Kitty; Elimelech, Menachem

    2014-05-01

    Reverse electrodialysis (RED) can harness the Gibbs free energy of mixing when fresh river water flows into the sea for sustainable power generation. In this study, we carry out a thermodynamic and energy efficiency analysis of RED power generation, and assess the membrane power density. First, we present a reversible thermodynamic model for RED and verify that the theoretical maximum extractable work in a reversible RED process is identical to the Gibbs free energy of mixing. Work extraction in an irreversible process with maximized power density using a constant-resistance load is then examined to assess the energy conversion efficiency and power density. With equal volumes of seawater and river water, energy conversion efficiency of ∼ 33-44% can be obtained in RED, while the rest is lost through dissipation in the internal resistance of the ion-exchange membrane stack. We show that imperfections in the selectivity of typical ion exchange membranes (namely, co-ion transport, osmosis, and electro-osmosis) can detrimentally lower efficiency by up to 26%, with co-ion leakage being the dominant effect. Further inspection of the power density profile during RED revealed inherent ineffectiveness toward the end of the process. By judicious early discontinuation of the controlled mixing process, the overall power density performance can be considerably enhanced by up to 7-fold, without significant compromise to the energy efficiency. Additionally, membrane resistance was found to be an important factor in determining the power densities attainable. Lastly, the performance of an RED stack was examined for different membrane conductivities and intermembrane distances simulating high performance membranes and stack design. By thoughtful selection of the operating parameters, an efficiency of ∼ 37% and an overall gross power density of 3.5 W/m(2) represent the maximum performance that can potentially be achieved in a seawater-river water RED system with low

  9. Photoconversion in orange and red fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Kremers, Gert-Jan; Hazelwood, Kristin L; Murphy, Christopher S; Davidson, Michael W; Piston, David W

    2009-05-01

    We found that photoconversion is fairly common among orange and red fluorescent proteins, as in a screen of 12 proteins, 8 exhibited photoconversion. Specifically, three red fluorescent proteins could be switched to a green state, and two orange variants could be photoconverted to a far-red state. The orange proteins are ideal for dual-probe highlighter applications, and they exhibited the most red-shifted excitation of all fluorescent proteins described to date.

  10. 7 CFR 29.1053 - Red (R).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Red (R). 29.1053 Section 29.1053 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1053 Red (R). A brownish red....

  11. Grape (Vitis spp.) - Grapevine Red Blotch Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grapevine red blotch disease is caused by Grapevine red blotch-associated virus (GRBaV), which was first reported in 2012 from New York and subsequently in California, Washington, Oregon, Idaho and elsewhere in the U.S. The discovery occurred when grapevines with red leaf symptoms that tested negati...

  12. 27 CFR 9.167 - Red Mountain

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red Mountain 9.167 Section... Mountain (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Red Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate map for determining the boundaries of the Red Mountain viticultural area...

  13. 27 CFR 9.167 - Red Mountain

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red Mountain 9.167 Section... Mountain (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Red Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate map for determining the boundaries of the Red Mountain viticultural area...

  14. 27 CFR 9.167 - Red Mountain

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red Mountain 9.167 Section... Mountain (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Red Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate map for determining the boundaries of the Red Mountain viticultural area...

  15. 27 CFR 9.167 - Red Mountain

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red Mountain 9.167 Section... Mountain (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Red Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate map for determining the boundaries of the Red Mountain viticultural area...

  16. 27 CFR 9.167 - Red Mountain

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red Mountain 9.167 Section... Mountain (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Red Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate map for determining the boundaries of the Red Mountain viticultural area...

  17. Red-Cockaded Woodpecker Classroom Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Dept. of Parks and Wildlife, Austin.

    This packet provides information on the balance between the endangered red-cockaded woodpecker and modern forestry in Texas. A set of classroom activities about the Red-cockaded Woodpecker and its habitat for grades 3-6, and a booklet, a pamphlet, and a poster are featured. Sections of the booklet include: (1) "The Red-cockaded Woodpecker"; (2)…

  18. Registration of ‘Red Amber’ Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red Amber’ (Reg. No.__________ PI _______) soft red winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was developed by the Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station and released March 28, 2008 in a licensing agreement through Michigan State University (MSU) Technologies. Red Amber was selected from the cross ‘255...

  19. 7 CFR 29.1053 - Red (R).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Red (R). 29.1053 Section 29.1053 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1053 Red (R). A brownish red....

  20. 21 CFR 184.1121 - Red algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red algae. 184.1121 Section 184.1121 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1121 Red algae. (a) Red algae are seaweeds of the species...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1121 - Red algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Red algae. 184.1121 Section 184.1121 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1121 Red algae. (a) Red algae are seaweeds of the species...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1121 - Red algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red algae. 184.1121 Section 184.1121 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1121 Red algae. (a) Red algae are seaweeds of the species...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1121 - Red algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red algae. 184.1121 Section 184.1121 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1121 Red algae. (a) Red algae are seaweeds of the species...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1121 - Red algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red algae. 184.1121 Section 184.1121 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD....1121 Red algae. (a) Red algae are seaweeds of the species Gloiopeltis furcata, Porphyra...

  5. “AmaRosa,” a red skinned, red fleshed fingerling with high phytonutrient value

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    AmaRosa is a mid season specialty potato with red skin and red flesh. This selection is unique among commercially available potato varieties in that plants set a large number of smooth, small, fingerling-shaped tubers with red skin and red flesh. AmaRosa tubers have higher total anthocyanin and hyd...

  6. 33 CFR 165.T09-0263 - Safety zone; Red River Safety Zone, Red River, MN.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety zone; Red River Safety Zone, Red River, MN. 165.T09-0263 Section 165.T09-0263 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.T09-0263 Safety zone; Red River Safety Zone, Red River, MN. (a) Location. The following area is...

  7. Monomeric red fluorescent proteins with a large Stokes shift.

    PubMed

    Piatkevich, Kiryl D; Hulit, James; Subach, Oksana M; Wu, Bin; Abdulla, Arian; Segall, Jeffrey E; Verkhusha, Vladislav V

    2010-03-23

    Two-photon microscopy has advanced fluorescence imaging of cellular processes in living animals. Fluorescent proteins in the blue-green wavelength range are widely used in two-photon microscopy; however, the use of red fluorescent proteins is limited by the low power output of Ti-Sapphire lasers above 1,000 nm. To overcome this limitation we have developed two red fluorescent proteins, LSS-mKate1 and LSS-mKate2, which possess large Stokes shifts with excitation/emission maxima at 463/624 and 460/605 nm, respectively. These LSS-mKates are characterized by high pH stability, photostability, rapid chromophore maturation, and monomeric behavior. They lack absorbance in the green region, providing an additional red color to the commonly used red fluorescent proteins. Substantial overlap between the two-photon excitation spectra of the LSS-mKates and blue-green fluorophores enables multicolor imaging using a single laser. We applied this approach to a mouse xenograft model of breast cancer to intravitally study the motility and Golgi-nucleus alignment of tumor cells as a function of their distance from blood vessels. Our data indicate that within 40 mum the breast cancer cells show significant polarization towards vessels in living mice.

  8. GHRS Observations of Cool, Low-Gravity Stars. 5; The Outer Atmosphere and Wind of the Nearby K Supergiant Lambda Velorum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Robinson, Richard D.; Harper, Graham M.; Bennett, Philip D.; Brown, Alexander; Mullan, Dermott J.

    1999-01-01

    UV spectra of lambda Velorum taken with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) on the Hubble Space Telescope are used to probe the structure of the outer atmospheric layers and wind and to estimate the mass-loss rate from this K5 lb-II supergiant. VLA radio observations at lambda = 3.6 cm are used to obtain an independent check on the wind velocity and mass-loss rate inferred from the UV observations, Parameters of the chromospheric structure are estimated from measurements of UV line widths, positions, and fluxes and from the UV continuum flux distribution. The ratios of optically thin C II] emission lines indicate a mean chromospheric electron density of log N(sub e) approximately equal 8.9 +/- 0.2 /cc. The profiles of these lines indicate a chromospheric turbulence (v(sub 0) approximately equal 25-36 km/s), which greatly exceeds that seen in either the photosphere or wind. The centroids of optically thin emission lines of Fe II and of the emission wings of self-reversed Fe II lines indicate that they are formed in plasma approximately at rest with respect to the photosphere of the star. This suggests that the acceleration of the wind occurs above the chromospheric regions in which these emission line photons are created. The UV continuum detected by the GHRS clearly traces the mean flux-formation temperature as it increases with height in the chromosphere from a well-defined temperature minimum of 3200 K up to about 4600 K. Emission seen in lines of C III] and Si III] provides evidence of material at higher than chromospheric temperatures in the outer atmosphere of this noncoronal star. The photon-scattering wind produces self-reversals in the strong chromospheric emission lines, which allow us to probe the velocity field of the wind. The velocities to which these self-absorptions extend increase with intrinsic line strength, and thus height in the wind, and therefore directly map the wind acceleration. The width and shape of these self

  9. Triplet-triplet annihilation upconversion based nanocapsules for bioimaging under excitation by red and deep-red light.

    PubMed

    Wohnhaas, Christian; Mailänder, Volker; Dröge, Melanie; Filatov, Mikhail A; Busko, Dmitry; Avlasevich, Yuri; Baluschev, Stanislav; Miteva, Tzenka; Landfester, Katharina; Turshatov, Andrey

    2013-10-01

    Non-toxic and biocompatible triplet-triplet annihilation upconversion based nanocapsules (size less than 225 nm) were successfully fabricated by the combination of miniemulsion and solvent evaporation techniques. A first type of nanocapsules displays an upconversion spectrum characterized by the maximum of emission at λmax = 550 nm under illumination by red light, λexc = 633 nm. The second type of nanocapsules fluoresces at λmax = 555 nm when excited with deep-red light, λexc = 708 nm. Conventional confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and flow cytometry were applied to determine uptake and toxicity of the nanocapsules for various (mesenchymal stem and HeLa) cells. Red light (λexc = 633 nm) with extremely low optical power (less than 0.3 μW) or deep-red light (λexc = 708 nm) was used in CLSM experiments to generate green upconversion fluorescence. The cell images obtained with upconversion excitation demonstrate order of magnitude better signal to background ratio than the cell images obtained with direct excitation of the same fluorescence marker.

  10. Photochemical Formation of Hydroxyl Radical in Red-Soil-Polluted Seawater in Okinawa, Japan -Potential Impacts on Marine Organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakaki, T.; Hamdun, A. M.; Okada, K.; Kuroki, Y.; Ikota, H.; Fujimura, H.; Oomori, T.

    2004-12-01

    Development of pineapple farmlands and construction of recreational facilities caused runoff of red soil into coastal ocean (locally termed as red-soil-pollution) in the north of Okinawa Island, Japan. In an attempt to understand the impacts of red soil on oxidizing power of the seawater, we studied formation of hydroxyl radical (OH radical), the most potent oxidant in the environment, in red-soil-polluted seawaters, using 313 nm monochromatic light. Photo-formation rates of OH radical showed a good correlation with dissolved iron concentrations (R = 0.98). The major source of OH radical was found to be the Fenton reaction (a reaction between Fe(II) and HOOH). The un-filtered red-soil-polluted seawater samples exhibited faster OH radical formation rates than the filtered samples, suggesting that iron-bearing red soil particles enhanced formation of OH radical.

  11. Red giants: then and now

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulkner, John

    Fred Hoyle's work on the structure and evolution of red giants, particularly his pathbreaking contribution with Martin Schwarzschild (Hoyle and Schwarzschild 1955), is both lauded and critically assessed. In his later lectures and work with students in the early 1960s, Hoyle presented more physical ways of understanding some of the approximations used, and results obtained, in that seminal paper. Although later ideas by other investigators will be touched upon, Hoyle's viewpoint - that low-mass red giants are essentially white dwarfs with a serious mass-storage problem - is still extremely fruitful. Over the years, I have further developed his method of attack. Relatively recently, I have been able to deepen and broaden the approach, finally extending the theory to provide a unifying treatment of the structure of low-mass stars from the main sequence though both the red-giant and horizontal-branch phases of evolution. Many aspects of these stars that had remained puzzling, even mysterious, for decades have now fallen into place, and some questions have been answered that were not even posed before. With low-mass red giants as the simplest example, this recent work emphasizes that stars, in general, may have at least two distinct but very important centres: (I) a geometrical centre, and (II) a separate nuclear centre, residing in a shell outside a zero-luminosity dense core for example. This two-centre perspective leads to an explicit, analytical, asymptotic theory of low-mass red-giant structure. It enables one to appreciate that the problem of understanding why such stars become red giants is one of anticipating a remarkable yet natural structural bifurcation that occurs in them. This bifurcation occurs because of a combination of known and understandable facts just summarized namely that, following central hydrogen exhaustion, a thin nuclear-burning shell does develop outside a more-or-less dense core. In the resulting theory, both ρsh/ρolinec and

  12. Red facts: Dibromodicyanobutane. Fact sheet

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    This fact sheet summarizes the information in the RED document for reregistration case 2780, dibromodicyanobutane. Dibromodicyanobutane (1,2-dibromo-2,4-dicyanobutane) is a microbiocide/microbiostat used to control slime-forming bacteria and fungi in commercial/industrial water cooling systems (recirculating), oil recovery drilling muds/packer fluids, pulp/paper mill water systems, secondary oil recovery rejection water, industrial adhesives and coatings, resin/latex/polymer emulsions, metalworking cutting fluids, paints, specialty industrial products (including fiber processing fluids, waxes, polishes, and inks), and wet-end additives/industrial processing chemicals.

  13. Red is romantic, but only for feminine females: sexual dimorphism moderates red effect on sexual attraction.

    PubMed

    Wen, Fangfang; Zuo, Bin; Wu, Yang; Sun, Shan; Liu, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Previous researchers have documented that the color red enhances one's sexual attraction to the opposite sex. The current study further examined the moderating role of sexual dimorphism in red effects. The results indicated that red enhanced men's sexual attraction to women with more feminine facial characteristics but had no effect on ratings of perceived general attractiveness. Red clothing also had a marginally significant effect on men's sexual attractiveness. In addition, regardless of sexual dimorphism cues, male participants rated women with red as warmer and more competent. The underlying mechanisms of the red effect, the limitations of the current study, and suggestions for future directions are discussed. PMID:25300050

  14. Still from Red Spot Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This image is one of seven from the narrow-angle camera on NASA's Cassini spacecraft assembled as a brief movie of cloud movements on Jupiter. It was taken with a blue filter. The smallest features visible are about 500 kilometers (about 300 miles) across.

    Small bright clouds appear suddenly to the west of the Great Red Spot. Based on data from NASA's Galileo spacecraft, scientists suspect that these small white features are lightning storms, where falling raindrops create an electrical charge. The lightning storms eventually merge with the Red Spot and surrounding jets, and may be the main energy source for these large-scale features. Imaging observations of the darkside of the planet in the weeks following Cassini's closest approach to Jupiter on Dec. 30, 2000 will search for lightning storms like these.

    This image was re-projected by cylindrical-map projection of an image taken in the first week of October 2000. It shows an area from 50 degrees north of Jupiter's equator to 50 degrees south, extending 100 degrees east west, about one quarter of Jupiter's circumference.

    Cassini is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Cassini mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  15. Acquired loss of red cell Kell antigens.

    PubMed

    Vengelen-Tyler, V; Gonzalez, B; Garratty, G; Kruppe, C; Johnson, C L; Mueller, K A; Marsh, W L

    1987-02-01

    A 19-year-old patient with a long history of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura developed a potent antibody against a high-incidence antigen in the Kell blood group system. The direct antiglobulin test on his red cells was negative. His cells exhibited profound depression of Kell blood group antigens, but antigens of other blood groups were normal. Transfusion of incompatible blood was well tolerated and differential agglutination tests, using selected Rh antisera, showed in vivo survival of the transfused red cells for more than 8 weeks. However, the transfused red cells also showed acquired loss of Kell antigens. Five months after the initial findings, Kell-related antibody disappeared and Kell antigens reappeared on his red cells. The patient's serum stored from the initial investigation now reacted with his freshly collected red cells. These data suggest that an environmental agent in the patient's plasma was responsible for the temporary loss of Kell antigens from red cells in his circulation.

  16. Malignant Melanoma Arising in Red Tattoo Ink

    PubMed Central

    Duff, Gerald; McKenna, Dermot; Regan, Padraic James

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 33-year-old male who presented with a malignant melanoma on his anterior chest wall. The lesion was only found in the red ink pigment of the tattoo, as were several in-transit dermal metastases. Possible explanations include a pre-existing lesion which was seeded with red ink or the possibility of the red ink causing an inflammatory reaction leading to malignant transformation. This is the first reported case of a melanoma developing in the red ink pigment of a multi-colored tattoo. PMID:26217569

  17. Thiamin analysis in red wine by fluorescence reverse phase-HPLC.

    PubMed

    Liddicoat, Callum; Hucker, Barry; Liang, Hao; Vriesekoop, Frank

    2015-06-15

    The derivatization of thiamin vitamers to their respective thiochrome by ferricyanide to facilitate fluorescence detection following separation by HPLC provides a powerful analytical tool. However the polyphenolic compounds in red wine readily interact with ferricyanide, reducing the effectiveness of ferricyanide oxidation in the derivatization of thiamin. We describe a method to facilitate the removal of polyphenolic compounds that interfere with the ferricyanide derivatization of thiamin. Polyvinylpolypyrrolidone afforded the total removal of phenolic compounds from red wines and allowed a spike recovery of thiamin vitamers (101% for thiamin; 104% for TMP; and 100% for TDP) in a wide range of red wines. This research found that Merlot styles of red wine contained the highest concentration of total thiamin (29.01 ng/mL) while Pinot Noir wines contained the lowest total concentration (8.27 ng/mL).

  18. High-Throughput Nanofabrication of Infra-red and Chiral Metamaterials using Nanospherical-Lens Lithography

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yun-Chorng; Lu, Sih-Chen; Chung, Hsin-Chan; Wang, Shih-Ming; Tsai, Tzung-Da; Guo, Tzung-Fang

    2013-01-01

    Various infra-red and planar chiral metamaterials were fabricated using the modified Nanospherical-Lens Lithography. By replacing the light source with a hand-held ultraviolet lamp, its asymmetric light emission pattern produces the elliptical-shaped photoresist holes after passing through the spheres. The long axis of the ellipse is parallel to the lamp direction. The fabricated ellipse arrays exhibit localized surface plasmon resonance in mid-infra-red and are ideal platforms for surface enhanced infra-red absorption (SEIRA). We also demonstrate a way to design and fabricate complicated patterns by tuning parameters in each exposure step. This method is both high-throughput and low-cost, which is a powerful tool for future infra-red metamaterials applications. PMID:24284941

  19. SO and SO2 in mass-loss envelopes of red giants - Probes of nonequilibrium circumstellar chemistry and mass-loss rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Wannier, Peter G.

    1992-01-01

    SO emission was searched for in one or more of four transitions toward 23 oxygen-rich red giant or supergiant stars and one S star, selected primarily on the basis of their nonmaser SiO emission. SO was detected in a total of 14 circumstellar envelopes, 13 of which are new detections. The circumstellar abundance of SO (and SO2) is significantly enhanced over the equilibrium value achieved in the photospheres of these stars. In general, the SO abundances are significantly larger than predicted by nonequilibrium circumstellar chemistry models. Sulfur cannot be significantly depleted onto circumstellar grains, and probably exists as H2S (and/or SH) in the inner regions of the envelopes. The SO rotational-level population in most circumstellar envelopes observed is characterized by excitation temperatures less than or approximately equal to 50 K. The circumstellar abundance of SO2 is comparable to, or larger than, that of SO, ruling out the 'large' value adopted for the unshielded photodissociation rate for SO2 in recent models.

  20. Red beam generation based on aperiodically poled lithium niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figen, Ziya Gürkan; Akın, Onur

    2014-04-01

    We propose a novel device with a simple architecture for high-power red beam generation. The device is an optical parametric generator based on an aperiodically poled LiNbO3 grating in which both the optical parametric amplification and sum frequency generation processes are simultaneously phase matched. The pump is a quasi-continuous-wave laser operating at 1064 nm. Aperiodic gratings which enable simultaneous phase matching of the two processes were designed using a method that gives the flexibility to adjust the relative strength of these two processes. A model that takes the diffraction of the beams into account was developed to characterize the red beam generation performance of the device depending on the parameters: the relative strength of these processes, the length of the crystal, the average pump power, and the pump beam waist radius. If one uses the 2-D Fourier transform in the solution of the coupled-mode equations, the computation power required for performing such a characterization on a personal computer is prohibitively large. Owing to the circular symmetry of the system, we employ the Hankel transform to overcome this bottleneck.

  1. The effect of a red leaf pigment on the relationship between red edge and chlorophyll concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Paul J.; Dungan, Jennifer L.; Macler, Bruce A.; Plummer, Stephen E.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of a leaf pigment - red amaranthin - on red edge and chlorophyll concentration is investigated in amaranth leaves by means of treatments with nitrate and salts. A near-linear relationship between red edge and chlorophyll concentration is observed for leaves with low amaranthin concentration, and no relationship is noted at high concentrations. The study demonstrates the limitation inherent in estimating chlorophyll concentration by using remotely sensed red edge.

  2. Asteroseismology of Red Giant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarrant, N. J.; Chaplin, W. J.; Elsworth, Y. P.; Spreckley, S. A.; Stevens, I. R.

    2008-12-01

    Sun-like oscillations, that is p-modes excited stochastically by convective noise, have now been observed in a number of Red Giant stars. Compared to those seen in the Sun, these modes are of large amplitude and long period, making the oscillations attractive prospects for observation. However, the low Q-factor of these modes, and issues relating to the rising background at low frequencies, present some interesting challenges for identifying modes and determining the related asteroseismic parameters. We report on the analysis procedure adopted for peak-bagging by our group at Birming- ham, and the techniques used to robustly ensure these are not a product of noise. I also show results from a number of giants extracted from multi-year observations with the SMEI instrument

  3. Voyager 1 Red Spot Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This movie shows the portion of Jupiter around the Great Red Spot as it swirls through more than 60 Jupiter days. Notice the difference in speed and direction of the various zones of the atmosphere. The interaction of the atmospheric clouds and storm shows how dynamic the Jovian atmosphere is.

    As Voyager 1 approached Jupiter in 1979, it took images of the planet at regular intervals. This sequence is made from 66 images taken once every Jupiter rotation period (about 10 hours). This time-lapse movie uses images taken every time Jupiter longitude 68W passed under the spacecraft. These images were acquired in the Blue filter from Jan. 6 to Feb. 3 1979. The spacecraft flew from 58 million kilometers to 31 million kilometers from Jupiter during that time.

    This time-lapse movie was produced at JPL by the Image Processing Laboratory in 1979.

  4. Demonstration project cuts red tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzoff, Judith A.

    Results from a demonstration project aimed at cutting red tape in federal grants for basic research at universities are "very encouraging" so far, according to Don I. Phillips, executive director of the Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable. The roundtable is coordinating the experimental effort, with the participation of five major federal agencies as well as the Florida state university system and the University of Miami (a private institution in Coral Gables, Fla.).Under the project, special conditions apply to grants from the participating agencies to individual researchers at the participating universities: Investigators do not have to ask the agency's permission for changes in budget allocations, purchases of permanent equipment, or foreign travel. Grant money can be spent up to a year after the grant ends without a special request. Under this plan, researchers, with agency approval, can also ask to have their entire research program covered as a single administrative entity, rather than as several individual projects.

  5. Chemical toxicity of red cells.

    PubMed Central

    Piomelli, S

    1981-01-01

    Exposure to toxic chemicals may result in alterations of red cell function. In certain cases, the toxic effect requires a genetic predisposition and thus affects only a restricted number of individuals; in other instances, the toxic effect is exerted on the hematopoietic system of every person. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency is probably the most widespread genetic disorder. It is observed at highest frequency in populations from subtropical countries as a result of its selective advantage vis à vis falciparum malaria. The gene controlling this enzyme is located on the X-chromosome; thus, the defect is sex-linked. Individuals with a genetic defect of this enzyme are extremely susceptible to hemolysis, when exposed to oxidant drugs (such as certain antimalarials and sulfonamides) because of the inability of their red cells to regenerate NADPH. Lead poisoning result in profound effects on the process of heme synthesis. Among the steps most sensitive to lead toxicity are the enzyme delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase and the intramitochondrial step that leads to the incorporation of iron into protoporphyrin. By these mechanisms, in severe lead intoxication there is an accumulation of large amounts of delta-aminolevulinic acid (a compound with inherent neurotoxicity), and there are abnormalities of mitochondrial function in all cells of the body. Individuals living in an industrialized society are unavoidably exposed to some environmental lead. Recent evidence indicates that, even at levels of exposure which do not increase the blood lead level above values presently considered normal, abnormalities of heme synthesis are clearly detectable. PMID:7016524

  6. 33 CFR 117.135 - Red River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Red River. 117.135 Section 117.135 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Arkansas § 117.135 Red River. The draws of the bridges...

  7. 33 CFR 117.135 - Red River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Red River. 117.135 Section 117.135 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Arkansas § 117.135 Red River. The draws of the bridges...

  8. 33 CFR 117.135 - Red River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Red River. 117.135 Section 117.135 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Arkansas § 117.135 Red River. The draws of the bridges...

  9. 33 CFR 117.491 - Red River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Red River. 117.491 Section 117.491 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.491 Red River. (a) The draw of the Union...

  10. 33 CFR 117.491 - Red River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Red River. 117.491 Section 117.491 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.491 Red River. (a) The draw of the Union...

  11. 33 CFR 117.491 - Red River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Red River. 117.491 Section 117.491 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.491 Red River. (a) The draw of the Union...

  12. 33 CFR 117.135 - Red River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Red River. 117.135 Section 117.135 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Arkansas § 117.135 Red River. The draws of the bridges...

  13. 33 CFR 117.491 - Red River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Red River. 117.491 Section 117.491 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.491 Red River. (a) The draw of the Union...

  14. Biological control of red imported fire ants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two species of Imported Fire Ants (IFA), the Red Imported Fire Ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren, and the Black Imported Fire Ant, S. richteri Forel, were introduced into the United States in the early 1900s and currently inhabit over 320 million acres in the southern United States and Puerto Rico. Red ...

  15. Red eye emergencies in primary care.

    PubMed

    Ossorio, Anthony

    2015-12-12

    Severe red eye conditions can be the result of intraocular inflammation, corneal insults or inflammation, and acute glaucoma. These pathologies require the knowledge and assessment tools of an ophthalmologist. This article will discuss red eye emergencies that the NP should promptly recognize and refer to ophthalmology. PMID:26545092

  16. Public perceptions of Florida red tide risks.

    PubMed

    Kuhar, Sara E; Nierenberg, Kate; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Tobin, Graham A

    2009-07-01

    This research integrates theoretical frameworks of risk perception, social amplification of risk, and the role of place-specific contexts in order to explore the various perceptions surrounding Florida red tides. Florida red tides are naturally occurring events that are increasing in frequency, duration, and severity. This has implications for public health, the local economy, and ecosystem health. While many of the negative impacts of Florida red tides are not easily controlled, some of the secondary impacts may be mitigated through individuals' responses. However, public perception and consequent reactions to Florida red tides have not been investigated. This research uses questionnaire surveys, and semi-structured interviews, to explore the various perceptions of the risk surrounding red tides. Surveys and interviews were conducted along two Florida west coast beaches. The results indicate that the underlying foundations of the social amplification of the risk framework are applicable to understanding how individuals form perceptions of risk relative to red tide events. There are key differences between the spatial locations of individuals and corresponding perceptions, indicating that place-specific contexts are essential to understanding how individuals receive and interpret risk information. The results also suggest that individuals may be lacking efficient and up-to-date information about Florida red tides and their impacts because of inconsistent public outreach. Overall, social and spatial factors appear to be influential as to whether individuals amplify or attenuate the risks associated with Florida red tides.

  17. Seeing red to being red: conserved genetic mechanism for red cone oil droplets and co-option for red coloration in birds and turtles.

    PubMed

    Twyman, Hanlu; Valenzuela, Nicole; Literman, Robert; Andersson, Staffan; Mundy, Nicholas I

    2016-08-17

    Avian ketocarotenoid pigments occur in both the red retinal oil droplets that contribute to colour vision and bright red coloration used in signalling. Turtles are the only other tetrapods with red retinal oil droplets, and some also display red carotenoid-based coloration. Recently, the CYP2J19 gene was strongly implicated in ketocarotenoid synthesis in birds. Here, we investigate CYP2J19 evolution in relation to colour vision and red coloration in reptiles using genomic and expression data. We show that turtles, but not crocodiles or lepidosaurs, possess a CYP2J19 orthologue, which arose via gene duplication before turtles and archosaurs split, and which is strongly and specifically expressed in the ketocarotenoid-containing retina and red integument. We infer that CYP2J19 initially functioned in colour vision in archelosaurs and conclude that red ketocarotenoid-based coloration evolved independently in birds and turtles via gene regulatory changes of CYP2J19 Our results suggest that red oil droplets contributed to colour vision in dinosaurs and pterosaurs. PMID:27488652

  18. Red Dirt Thinking on Aspiration and Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, Sam; Guenther, John

    2013-01-01

    This article sets the scene for the series of five articles on "red dirt thinking". It first introduces the idea behind red dirt thinking as opposed to "blue sky thinking". Both accept that there are any number of creative and expansive solutions and possibilities to identified challenges--in this case, the challenge of…

  19. Seeing red to being red: conserved genetic mechanism for red cone oil droplets and co-option for red coloration in birds and turtles.

    PubMed

    Twyman, Hanlu; Valenzuela, Nicole; Literman, Robert; Andersson, Staffan; Mundy, Nicholas I

    2016-08-17

    Avian ketocarotenoid pigments occur in both the red retinal oil droplets that contribute to colour vision and bright red coloration used in signalling. Turtles are the only other tetrapods with red retinal oil droplets, and some also display red carotenoid-based coloration. Recently, the CYP2J19 gene was strongly implicated in ketocarotenoid synthesis in birds. Here, we investigate CYP2J19 evolution in relation to colour vision and red coloration in reptiles using genomic and expression data. We show that turtles, but not crocodiles or lepidosaurs, possess a CYP2J19 orthologue, which arose via gene duplication before turtles and archosaurs split, and which is strongly and specifically expressed in the ketocarotenoid-containing retina and red integument. We infer that CYP2J19 initially functioned in colour vision in archelosaurs and conclude that red ketocarotenoid-based coloration evolved independently in birds and turtles via gene regulatory changes of CYP2J19 Our results suggest that red oil droplets contributed to colour vision in dinosaurs and pterosaurs.

  20. 33 CFR 117.135 - Red River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Red River. 117.135 Section 117.135 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Arkansas § 117.135 Red River. The draws of the bridges...

  1. 33 CFR 117.491 - Red River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Red River. 117.491 Section 117.491 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.491 Red River. (a) The draw of the Union...

  2. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells...

  3. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells...

  4. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells...

  5. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells...

  6. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells...

  7. Red, Rank, and Romance in Women Viewing Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, Andrew J.; Niesta Kayser, Daniela; Greitemeyer, Tobias; Lichtenfeld, Stephanie; Gramzow, Richard H.; Maier, Markus A.; Liu, Huijun

    2010-01-01

    In many nonhuman species of vertebrates, females are attracted to red on male conspecifics. Red is also a signal of male status in many nonhuman vertebrate species, and females show a mating preference for high-status males. These red-attraction and red-status links have been found even when red is displayed on males artificially. In the present…

  8. Inflight Assay of Red Blood Cell Deformability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingram, M.; Paglia, D. E.; Eckstein, E. C.; Frazer, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Studies on Soviet and American astronauts have demonstrated that red blood cell production is altered in response to low gravity (g) environment. This is associated with changes in individual red cells including increased mean cell volume and altered membrane deformability. During long orbital missions, there is a tendency for the red cell mass deficit to be at least partly corrected although the cell shape anomalies are not. Data currently available suggest that the observed decrease in red cell mass is the result of sudden suppression of erythropoieses and that the recovery trend observed during long missions reflects re-establishment of erythropoietic homeostasis at a "set point" for the red cell mass that is slightly below the normal level at 1 g.

  9. Red blood cell decreases of microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. C.

    1985-01-01

    Postflight decreases in red blood cell mass (RBCM) have regularly been recorded after exposure to microgravity. These 5-25 percent decreases do not relate to the mission duration, workload, caloric intake or to the type of spacecraft used. The decrease is accompanied by normal red cell survivals, increased ferritin levels, normal radioactive iron studies, and increases in mean red blood cell volume. Comparable decreases in red blood cell mass are not found after bed rest, a commonly used simulation of the microgravity state. Inhibited bone marrow erythropoiesis has not been proven to date, although reticulocyte numbers in the peripheral circulation are decreased about 50 percent. To date, the cause of the microgravity induced decreases in RBCM is unknown. Increased splenic trapping of circulating red blood cells seem the most logical way to explain the results obtained.

  10. The Art of Red Tide Science.

    PubMed

    Hall, Emily R; Nierenberg, Kate; Boyes, Anamari J; Heil, Cynthia A; Flewelling, Leanne J; Kirkpatrick, Barbara

    2012-05-01

    Over the years, numerous outreach strategies by the science community, such as FAQ cards and website information, have been used to explain blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis that occur annually off the west coast of Florida to the impacted communities. Many state and federal agencies have turned to funded research groups for assistance in the development and testing of environmental outreach products. In the case of Florida red tide, the Fish and Wildlife Research Institute/Mote Marine Laboratory (MML) Cooperative Red Tide Agreement allowed MML to initiate a project aimed at developing innovative outreach products about Florida red tide. This project, which we coined "The Art of Red Tide Science," consisted of a team effort between scientists from MML and students from Ringling College of Art and Design. This successful outreach project focused on Florida red tide can be used as a model to develop similar outreach projects for equally complex ecological issues.

  11. The Art of Red Tide Science

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Emily R.; Nierenberg, Kate; Boyes, Anamari J.; Heil, Cynthia A.; Flewelling, Leanne J.; Kirkpatrick, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Over the years, numerous outreach strategies by the science community, such as FAQ cards and website information, have been used to explain blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis that occur annually off the west coast of Florida to the impacted communities. Many state and federal agencies have turned to funded research groups for assistance in the development and testing of environmental outreach products. In the case of Florida red tide, the Fish and Wildlife Research Institute/Mote Marine Laboratory (MML) Cooperative Red Tide Agreement allowed MML to initiate a project aimed at developing innovative outreach products about Florida red tide. This project, which we coined “The Art of Red Tide Science,” consisted of a team effort between scientists from MML and students from Ringling College of Art and Design. This successful outreach project focused on Florida red tide can be used as a model to develop similar outreach projects for equally complex ecological issues. PMID:22712002

  12. The Art of Red Tide Science.

    PubMed

    Hall, Emily R; Nierenberg, Kate; Boyes, Anamari J; Heil, Cynthia A; Flewelling, Leanne J; Kirkpatrick, Barbara

    2012-05-01

    Over the years, numerous outreach strategies by the science community, such as FAQ cards and website information, have been used to explain blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis that occur annually off the west coast of Florida to the impacted communities. Many state and federal agencies have turned to funded research groups for assistance in the development and testing of environmental outreach products. In the case of Florida red tide, the Fish and Wildlife Research Institute/Mote Marine Laboratory (MML) Cooperative Red Tide Agreement allowed MML to initiate a project aimed at developing innovative outreach products about Florida red tide. This project, which we coined "The Art of Red Tide Science," consisted of a team effort between scientists from MML and students from Ringling College of Art and Design. This successful outreach project focused on Florida red tide can be used as a model to develop similar outreach projects for equally complex ecological issues. PMID:22712002

  13. Watt-level red-emitting diode lasers and modules for display applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschke, Katrin; Blume, Gunnar; Feise, David; Pohl, Johannes; Sumpf, Bernd

    2016-02-01

    Red-emitting lasers for display applications require high output powers and a high visibility. We demonstrate diode lasers and modules in the red spectral range based on AlGaInP with optical output powers up to 1 W and a nearly diffraction limited beam. These high-luminance light sources based on tapered lasers are well suited for laser TVs and projectors for virtual reality simulators based on the flying spot technology. Additionally, we developed diode lasers with internal distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) surface gratings. These DBR tapered lasers and master-oscillator power-amplifiers based on DBR ridge-waveguide lasers and tapered amplifiers feature high power, single mode emission with coherence lengths up to several meters, which are suitable for the next-generation 3D displays based on holography.

  14. Red Sprites as the source of ELF emission from lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, J.

    2013-12-01

    Jagdish Rai Invertis University, NH-24, Bareilly, India and Manoj K. Paras Department of Applied Sciences, DIT University, Dehradun, India. ABSTRACT Rai (1974) discussed the possibility of upper atmospheric lightning discharges. These discharges were observed experimentally by sertman et al (1995), Lyons (1996), Stenback- Nielsen and Mc Harg (2008) and many others. Cummer et al (1998) and Cummer (2003) observed that the radiation from red sprites lie in the ELF range. From the knowledge of velocity and current expressions obtained by Paras and Rai (2011) for red sprites, authors obtained the frequency spectrum of emitted radiation. The radiation lies mainly in ELF range and peaks around 40Hz. A comparative study of radio emissions from red sprite and return stroke- lateral corona current system shows that the power radiated from the former is higher than the later. When subjected to the propagation in earth -ionosphere waveguide, authors find that the Schumann resonances are caused by red sprites and not by return strokes. References:- 1. Cummer, S.A., U.S. Inan, T.F. Bell and C.P. Barrington-Leigh, 1998, ELF radiation produced by electrical currents in sprites, Geophys. Res. Letters 25, 8. 2. Cummer, S.A. 2003, Current moment in sprite producing lightning , J. Atmos. Solar Terr. Phys., 65, 499-908. 3. Lyons W.A., 1996 Sprite observations above the U.S. high plains in relation to their parent thunderstorm systems, J. Geophys. Res. D101, 29641. 4. Paros M.K. and J. Rai, 2011 Electric and magnetic fields from return stroke- lateral corona system and red sprites J. Electromagnetic Analysis and Applications, 3. 5. Rai J., 1974 some studies on lighting, Ph.D. Thesis Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India. 6. Sentman D.D., E.M. Wescott, D.L. Osborne, D.L. Hampton and M.J. Heazener, 1995, Preliminary results from the sprites 94 Campaign, Red Sprites, Geophy. Res. Letters, 22, 1205. 7. Stenback- Nielson H.C. and Mc Harg M.G., 2008, High time resolution sprite imaging

  15. 170. Credit SHS. Northern California Power Company substation, Bully Hill ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    170. Credit SHS. Northern California Power Company substation, Bully Hill Mine area. Note lack of vegetation, caused by nearby copper smelting works. - Battle Creek Hydroelectric System, Battle Creek & Tributaries, Red Bluff, Tehama County, CA

  16. Toxicity induced by Basic Violet 14, Direct Red 28 and Acid Red 26 in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Shen, Bing; Liu, Hong-Cui; Ou, Wen-Bin; Eilers, Grant; Zhou, Sheng-Mei; Meng, Fan-Guo; Li, Chun-Qi; Li, Yong-Quan

    2015-12-01

    Basic Violet 14, Direct Red 28 and Acid Red 26 are classified as carcinogenic dyes in the European textile ecology standard, despite insufficient toxicity data. In this study, the toxicity of these dyes was assessed in a zebrafish model, and the underlying toxic mechanisms were investigated. Basic Violet 14 and Direct Red 28 showed acute toxicity with a LC50 value at 60.63 and 476.84 µg ml(-1) , respectively, whereas the LC50 of Acid Red 26 was between 2500 and 2800 µg ml(-1) . Treatment with Basic Violet 14, Direct Red 28 and Acid Red 26 resulted in common developmental abnormalities including delayed yolk sac absorption and swimming bladder deflation. Hepatotoxicity was observed in zebrafish treated with Basic Violet 14, and cardiovascular toxicity was found in zebrafish treated with Acid Red 26 at concentrations higher than 2500 µg ml(-1) . Basic Violet 14 also caused significant up-regulation of GCLC gene expression in a dose-dependent manner whereas Acid Red 26 induced significant up-regulation of NKX2.5 and down-regulation of GATA4 at a high concentration in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that Basic Violet 14, Direct Red 28 and Acid Red 26 induce developmental and organ-specific toxicity, and oxidative stress may play a role in the hepatotoxicity of Basic Violet 14, the suppressed GATA4 expression may have a relation to the cardiovascular toxicity of Acid Red 26.

  17. Red vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) for consumer applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggan, Geoffrey; Barrow, David A.; Calvert, Tim; Maute, Markus; Hung, Vincent; McGarvey, Brian; Lambkin, John D.; Wipiejewski, Torsten

    2008-02-01

    There are many potential applications of visible, red (650nm - 690nm) vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) including high speed (Gb) communications using plastic optical fiber (POF), laser mouse sensors, metrology, position sensing. Uncertainty regarding the reliability of red VCSELs has long been perceived as the most significant roadblock to their commercialization. In this paper we will present data on red VCSELs optimized for performance and reliability that will allow exploitation of this class of VCSEL in a wide range of high volume consumer, communication and medical applications. VCSELs operating at ~665nm have been fabricated on 4" GaAs substrates using MOCVD as the growth process and using standard VCSEL processing technology. The active region is AlGaInP-based and the DBR mirrors are made from AlGaAs. Threshold currents are typically less than 2mA, the devices operate up to >60C and the light output is polarized in a stable, linear characteristic over all normal operating conditions. The 3dB modulation bandwidth of the devices is in excess of 3GHz and we have demonstrated the operation of a transceiver module operating at 1.25Gb/s over both SI-POF and GI-POF. Ageing experiments carried out using a matrix of current and temperature stress conditions allows us to estimate that the time to failure of 1% of devices (TT1%F) is over 200,000h for reasonable use conditions - making these red VCSELs ready for commercial exploitation in a variety of consumer-type applications. Experiments using appropriate pulsed driving conditions have resulted in operation of 665nm VCSELs at a temperature of 85°C whilst still offering powers useable for eye-safe free space and POF communications.

  18. Modeling and simulation of Red Teaming. Part 1, Why Red Team M&S?

    SciTech Connect

    Skroch, Michael J.

    2009-11-01

    Red teams that address complex systems have rarely taken advantage of Modeling and Simulation (M&S) in a way that reproduces most or all of a red-blue team exchange within a computer. Chess programs, starting with IBM's Deep Blue, outperform humans in that red-blue interaction, so why shouldn't we think computers can outperform traditional red teams now or in the future? This and future position papers will explore possible ways to use M&S to augment or replace traditional red teams in some situations, the features Red Team M&S should possess, how one might connect live and simulated red teams, and existing tools in this domain.

  19. Red Giant Plunging Through Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster Version

    This image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope (left panel) shows the 'bow shock' of a dying star named R Hydrae, or R Hya, in the constellation Hydra.

    Bow shocks are formed where the stellar wind from a star are pushed into a bow shape (illustration, right panel) as the star plunges through the gas and dust between stars. Our own Sun has a bow shock, but prior to this image one had never been observed around this particular class of red giant star.

    R Hya moves through space at approximately 50 kilometers per second. As it does so, it discharges dust and gas into space. Because the star is relatively cool, that ejecta quickly assumes a solid state and collides with the interstellar medium. The resulting dusty nebula is invisible to the naked eye but can be detected using an infrared telescope. This bow shock is 16,295 astronomical units from the star to the apex and 6,188 astronomical units thick (an astronomical unit is the distance between the sun and Earth). The mass of the bow shock is about 400 times the mass of the Earth.

    The false-color Spitzer image shows infrared emissions at 70 microns. Brighter colors represent greater intensities of infrared light at that wavelength. The location of the star itself is drawn onto the picture in the black 'unobserved' region in the center.

  20. Reaching for the red planet

    PubMed

    David, L

    1996-05-01

    The distant shores of Mars were reached by numerous U.S. and Russian spacecraft throughout the 1960s to mid 1970s. Nearly 20 years have passed since those successful missions which orbited and landed on the Martian surface. Two Soviet probes headed for the planet in July, 1988, but later failed. In August 1993, the U.S. Mars Observer suddenly went silent just three days before it was to enter orbit around the planet and was never heard from again. In late 1996, there will be renewed activity on the launch pads with three probes departing for the red planet: 1) The U.S. Mars Global Surveyor will be launched in November on a Delta II rocket and will orbit the planet for global mapping purposes; 2) Russia's Mars '96 mission, scheduled to fly in November on a Proton launcher, consists of an orbiter, two small stations which will land on the Martian surface, and two penetrators that will plow into the terrain; and finally, 3) a U.S. Discovery-class spacecraft, the Mars Pathfinder, has a December launch date atop a Delta II booster. The mission features a lander and a microrover that will travel short distances over Martian territory. These missions usher in a new phase of Mars exploration, setting the stage for an unprecedented volley of spacecraft that will orbit around, land on, drive across, and perhaps fly at low altitudes over the planet.

  1. Synthetic biology as red herring.

    PubMed

    Preston, Beth

    2013-12-01

    It has become commonplace to say that with the advent of technologies like synthetic biology the line between artifacts and living organisms, policed by metaphysicians since antiquity, is beginning to blur. But that line began to blur 10,000 years ago when plants and animals were first domesticated; and has been thoroughly blurred at least since agriculture became the dominant human subsistence pattern many millennia ago. Synthetic biology is ultimately only a late and unexceptional offshoot of this prehistoric development. From this perspective, then, synthetic biology is a red herring, distracting us from more thorough philosophical consideration of the most truly revolutionary human practice-agriculture. In the first section of this paper I will make this case with regard to ontology, arguing that synthetic biology crosses no ontological lines that were not crossed already in the Neolithic. In the second section I will construct a parallel case with regard to cognition, arguing that synthetic biology as biological engineering represents no cognitive advance over what was required for domestication and the new agricultural subsistence pattern it grounds. In the final section I will make the case with regard to human existence, arguing that synthetic biology, even if wildly successful, is not in a position to cause significant existential change in what it is to be human over and above the massive existential change caused by the transition to agriculture. I conclude that a longer historical perspective casts new light on some important issues in philosophy of technology and environmental philosophy.

  2. Blue protein with red fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Swagatha; Yu, Chi-Li; Ferraro, Daniel J.; Sudha, Sai; Pal, Samir Kumar; Schaefer, Wayne F.; Gibson, David T.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2016-01-01

    The walleye (Sander vitreus) is a golden yellow fish that inhabits the Northern American lakes. The recent sightings of the blue walleye and the correlation of its sighting to possible increased UV radiation have been proposed earlier. The underlying molecular basis of its adaptation to increased UV radiation is the presence of a protein (Sandercyanin)–ligand complex in the mucus of walleyes. Degradation of heme by UV radiation results in the formation of Biliverdin IXα (BLA), the chromophore bound to Sandercyanin. We show that Sandercyanin is a monomeric protein that forms stable homotetramers on addition of BLA to the protein. A structure of the Sandercyanin–BLA complex, purified from the fish mucus, reveals a glycosylated protein with a lipocalin fold. This protein–ligand complex absorbs light in the UV region (λmax of 375 nm) and upon excitation at this wavelength emits in the red region (λmax of 675 nm). Unlike all other known biliverdin-bound fluorescent proteins, the chromophore is noncovalently bound to the protein. We provide here a molecular rationale for the observed spectral properties of Sandercyanin. PMID:27688756

  3. The Phylogeny of Little Red Riding Hood

    PubMed Central

    Tehrani, Jamshid J.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have long been fascinated by the strong continuities evident in the oral traditions associated with different cultures. According to the ‘historic-geographic’ school, it is possible to classify similar tales into “international types” and trace them back to their original archetypes. However, critics argue that folktale traditions are fundamentally fluid, and that most international types are artificial constructs. Here, these issues are addressed using phylogenetic methods that were originally developed to reconstruct evolutionary relationships among biological species, and which have been recently applied to a range of cultural phenomena. The study focuses on one of the most debated international types in the literature: ATU 333, ‘Little Red Riding Hood’. A number of variants of ATU 333 have been recorded in European oral traditions, and it has been suggested that the group may include tales from other regions, including Africa and East Asia. However, in many of these cases, it is difficult to differentiate ATU 333 from another widespread international folktale, ATU 123, ‘The Wolf and the Kids’. To shed more light on these relationships, data on 58 folktales were analysed using cladistic, Bayesian and phylogenetic network-based methods. The results demonstrate that, contrary to the claims made by critics of the historic-geographic approach, it is possible to identify ATU 333 and ATU 123 as distinct international types. They further suggest that most of the African tales can be classified as variants of ATU 123, while the East Asian tales probably evolved by blending together elements of both ATU 333 and ATU 123. These findings demonstrate that phylogenetic methods provide a powerful set of tools for testing hypotheses about cross-cultural relationships among folktales, and point towards exciting new directions for research into the transmission and evolution of oral narratives. PMID:24236061

  4. The phylogeny of Little Red Riding Hood.

    PubMed

    Tehrani, Jamshid J

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have long been fascinated by the strong continuities evident in the oral traditions associated with different cultures. According to the 'historic-geographic' school, it is possible to classify similar tales into "international types" and trace them back to their original archetypes. However, critics argue that folktale traditions are fundamentally fluid, and that most international types are artificial constructs. Here, these issues are addressed using phylogenetic methods that were originally developed to reconstruct evolutionary relationships among biological species, and which have been recently applied to a range of cultural phenomena. The study focuses on one of the most debated international types in the literature: ATU 333, 'Little Red Riding Hood'. A number of variants of ATU 333 have been recorded in European oral traditions, and it has been suggested that the group may include tales from other regions, including Africa and East Asia. However, in many of these cases, it is difficult to differentiate ATU 333 from another widespread international folktale, ATU 123, 'The Wolf and the Kids'. To shed more light on these relationships, data on 58 folktales were analysed using cladistic, Bayesian and phylogenetic network-based methods. The results demonstrate that, contrary to the claims made by critics of the historic-geographic approach, it is possible to identify ATU 333 and ATU 123 as distinct international types. They further suggest that most of the African tales can be classified as variants of ATU 123, while the East Asian tales probably evolved by blending together elements of both ATU 333 and ATU 123. These findings demonstrate that phylogenetic methods provide a powerful set of tools for testing hypotheses about cross-cultural relationships among folktales, and point towards exciting new directions for research into the transmission and evolution of oral narratives. PMID:24236061

  5. Decadal stability of Red Sea mangroves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almahasheer, Hanan; Aljowair, Abdulaziz; Duarte, Carlos M.; Irigoien, Xabier

    2016-02-01

    Across the Earth, mangroves play an important role in coastal protection, both as nurseries and carbon sinks. However, due to various human and environmental impacts, the coverage of mangroves is declining on a global scale. The Red Sea is in the northern-most area of the distribution range of mangroves. Little is known about the surface covered by mangroves at this northern limit or about the changes experienced by Red Sea mangroves. We sought to study changes in the coverage of Red Sea mangroves by using multi-temporal Landsat data (1972, 2000 and 2013). Interestingly, our results show that there has been no decline in mangrove stands in the Red Sea but rather a slight increase. The area covered by mangroves is about 69 Km2 along the African shore and 51 Km2 along the Arabian Peninsula shore. From 1972 to 2013, the area covered by mangroves increased by about 0.29% y-1. We conclude that the trend exhibited by Red Sea mangroves departs from the general global decline of mangroves. Along the Red Sea, mangroves expanded by 12% over the 41 years from 1972 to 2013. Losses to Red Sea mangroves, mostly due to coastal development, have been compensated by afforestation projects.

  6. THE NATURE OF LINER-LIKE EMISSION IN RED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Renbin; Blanton, Michael R.

    2012-03-01

    Passive red galaxies frequently contain warm ionized gas and have spectra similar to low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs). Here we investigate the nature of the ionizing sources powering this emission, by comparing nuclear spectroscopy from the Palomar survey with larger aperture data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We find the line emission in the majority of passive red galaxies is spatially extended; the H{alpha} surface brightness profile depends on radius r as r{sup -1.28}. We detect strong line ratio gradients with radius in [N II]/H{alpha}, [S II]/H{alpha}, and [O III]/[S II], requiring the ionization parameter to increase outward. Combined with a realistic gas density profile, this outward increasing ionization parameter convincingly rules out active galactic nuclei (AGNs) as the dominant ionizing source and strongly favors distributed ionizing sources. Sources that follow the stellar density profile can additionally reproduce the observed luminosity dependence of the line ratio gradient. Post-asymptotic giant branch stars provide a natural ionization source candidate, though they have an ionization parameter deficit. Velocity width differences among different emission lines disfavor shocks as the dominant ionization mechanism, and suggest that the interstellar medium in these galaxies contains multiple components. We conclude that the line emission in most LINER-like galaxies found in large-aperture (>100 pc) spectroscopy is not primarily powered by AGN activity and thus does not trace the AGN bolometric luminosity. However, they can be used to trace warm gas in these red galaxies.

  7. Anti-aromatase chemicals in red wine.

    PubMed

    Eng, E T; Williams, D; Mandava, U; Kirma, N; Tekmal, R R; Chen, S

    2002-06-01

    Estrogen synthesized in situ plays a more important role in breast cancer cell proliferation than does circulating estrogen. Aromatase is the enzyme that converts androgen to estrogen and is expressed at a higher level in breast cancer tissue than in surrounding noncancer tissue. A promising route of chemoprevention against breast cancer may be through the suppression of in situ estrogen formation using aromatase inhibitors. A diet high in fruits and vegetables may reduce the incidence of breast cancer, because they contain phytochemicals that can act as aromatase inhibitors. In our previous studies, we found that grapes and wine contain potent phytochemicals that can inhibit aromatase. We show that red wine was more effective than white wine in suppressing aromatase activity. Interestingly, our results from white wine studies suggest a weak inductive effect of alcohol on aromatase activity. On the other hand, the potent effect of anti-aromatase chemicals in red wine overcomes the weak inductive effect of alcohol in wine. Several purification procedures were performed on whole red wine to separate active aromatase inhibitors from non-active compounds. These techniques included liquid-liquid extraction, silica gel chromatography, various solid phase extraction (SPE) columns, and high performance liquid chromatography. An active Pinot Noir red wine SPE C18 column fraction (20% acetonitrile:water) was more effective than complete Pinot Noir wine in suppressing aromatase assay. This red wine extract was further analyzed in a transgenic mouse model in which aromatase was over-expressed in mammary tissue. Our gavaged red wine extract completely abrogated aromatase-induced hyperplasia and other neoplastic changes in mammary tissue. These results suggest that red wine or red wine extract may be a chemopreventive diet supplement for postmenopausal women who have a high risk of breast cancer. Further research is underway to purify and characterize the active compounds in red

  8. Florida Red Tide Perception: Residents versus Tourists.

    PubMed

    Nierenberg, Kate; Byrne, Margaret; Fleming, Lora E; Stephan, Wendy; Reich, Andrew; Backer, Lorraine C; Tanga, Elvira; Dalpra, Dana R; Kirkpatrick, Barbara

    2010-09-01

    The west coast of Florida has annual blooms of the toxin-producing dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis with Sarasota, FL considered the epicenter for these blooms. Numerous outreach materials, including Frequently Asked Question (FAQ) cards, exhibits for local museums and aquaria, public beach signs, and numerous websites have been developed to disseminate information to the public about this natural hazard. In addition, during intense onshore blooms, a great deal of media attention, primarily via newspaper (print and web) and television, is focused on red tide. However to date, the only measure of effectiveness of these outreach methods has been counts of the number of people exposed to the information, e.g., visits to a website or number of FAQ cards distributed. No formal assessment has been conducted to determine if these materials meet their goal of informing the public about Florida red tide. Also, although local residents have the opinion that they are very knowledgeable about Florida red tide, this has not been verified empirically. This study addressed these issues by creating and administering an evaluation tool for the assessment of public knowledge about Florida red tide. A focus group of Florida red tide outreach developers assisted in the creation of the evaluation tool. The location of the evaluation was the west coast of Florida, in Sarasota County. The objective was to assess the knowledge of the general public about Florida red tide. This assessment identified gaps in public knowledge regarding Florida red tides and also identified what information sources people want to use to obtain information on Florida red tide. The results from this study can be used to develop more effective outreach materials on Florida red tide.

  9. Antioxidant activity of pasteurized and sterilized commercial red orange juices.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Alberto; La Fauci, Luca; Cervellati, Rinaldo; Guerra, Maria Clelia; Speroni, Ester; Costa, Stefano; Galvano, Giacomo; De Lorenzo, Antonino; Bacchelli, Vanessa; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Galvano, Fabio

    2005-12-01

    Blood orange juice is a typical Italian product whose red color is primarily associated with anthocyanin pigments. Two orange-based products are present on the market: pasteurized pure juice with 40 days of shelf life, and sterilized beverage containing minimum 12% of concentrated fruit juice. The aim of the present paper is to verify the relationships between the antioxidant properties and the anthocyanins content in a sampling of pasteurized and sterilized commercial red orange juices. The anthocyanins composition was determined by HPLC-MS/MS, while the antioxidant activity was evaluated by the Briggs-Rauscher reaction, selected in order to acquire information at acid pH values, by three radical scavenging assays (DMPD, 2-2'-azinobis-(3-ethylenbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS), DPPH), and by FRAP assay to monitor the ferric reducing power. Results showed that antioxidant activity, particularly when measured by ABTS method, is positively related to the content of anthocyanins and that the reduction of anthocyanins content, typical of commercial long-shelf life juices, leads to a remarkable loss of antioxidant power.

  10. The anatomy of vocal divergence in North American Elk and European red deer.

    PubMed

    Frey, Roland; Riede, Tobias

    2013-03-01

    Loud and frequent vocalizations play an important role in courtship behavior in Cervus species. European red deer (Cervus elaphus) produce low-pitched calls, whereas North American elk (Cervus canadensis) produce high-pitched calls, which is remarkable for one of the biggest land mammals. Both species engage their vocal organs in elaborate maneuvers but the precise mechanism is unknown. Vocal organs were compared by macroscopic and microscopic dissection. The larynx is sexually dimorphic in red deer but not in elk. The laryngeal lumen is more constricted in elk, and narrows further during ontogeny. Several elements of the hyoid skeleton and two of four vocal tract segments are longer in red deer than in elk allowing greater vocal tract expansion and elongation. We conclude that elk submit the larynx and vocal tract to much higher tension than red deer, whereby, enormously stressed vocal folds of reduced effective length create a high resistance glottal source. The narrow, high impedance laryngeal vestibulum matches glottal and vocal tract impedance allowing maximum power transfer. In red deer longer and relaxed vocal folds create a less resistant glottal source and a wider vestibulum matches the low glottal impedance to the vocal tract, thereby also ensuring maximum power transfer. PMID:23225193

  11. Kick Dis Power Puck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, John E.

    2004-03-01

    There is a new toy available that can be used to demonstrate many interesting physics principles. It is called the "Kick Dis Power Puck" and is basically a round plastic hovercraft with a soft cushion material around the perimeter (Fig. 1). It is a product of the Estes Company, which is well known for their model rockets, and is available from advertisers in this journal.1,2 The puck has a diameter of 19.5 cm and comes in two colors, red or green. The two samples I purchased had masses of 307 g and 303 g, respectively. There is a forceful, built-in fan, which is run by a rechargeable battery and powers the puck for about 30 minutes. A 9-V battery charger completes the package, which sells for about 45.

  12. Pulsed power molten salt battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argade, Shyam D.

    1992-01-01

    It was concluded that carbon cathodes with chlorine work well. Lithium alloy chlorine at 450 C, 1 atm given high power capability, high energy density, DC + pulsing yields 600 pulses, no initial peak, and can go to red heat without burn-up. Electrochemical performance at the cell and cell stack level out under demanding test regime. Engineering and full prototype development for advancing this technology is warranted.

  13. Pulsed power molten salt battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argade, Shyam D.

    1992-02-01

    It was concluded that carbon cathodes with chlorine work well. Lithium alloy chlorine at 450 C, 1 atm given high power capability, high energy density, DC + pulsing yields 600 pulses, no initial peak, and can go to red heat without burn-up. Electrochemical performance at the cell and cell stack level out under demanding test regime. Engineering and full prototype development for advancing this technology is warranted.

  14. Granulation in Red Giants: Observations by the Kepler Mission and Three-dimensional Convection Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, S.; Hekker, S.; Trampedach, R.; Ballot, J.; Kallinger, T.; Buzasi, D.; García, R. A.; Huber, D.; Jiménez, A.; Mosser, B.; Bedding, T. R.; Elsworth, Y.; Régulo, C.; Stello, D.; Chaplin, W. J.; De Ridder, J.; Hale, S. J.; Kinemuchi, K.; Kjeldsen, H.; Mullally, F.; Thompson, S. E.

    2011-11-01

    The granulation pattern that we observe on the surface of the Sun is due to hot plasma rising to the photosphere where it cools down and descends back into the interior at the edges of granules. This is the visible manifestation of convection taking place in the outer part of the solar convection zone. Because red giants have deeper convection zones than the Sun, we cannot a priori assume that their granulation is a scaled version of solar granulation. Until now, neither observations nor one-dimensional analytical convection models could put constraints on granulation in red giants. With asteroseismology, this study can now be performed. We analyze ~1000 red giants that have been observed by Kepler during 13 months. We fit the power spectra with Harvey-like profiles to retrieve the characteristics of the granulation (timescale τgran and power P gran). We search for a correlation between these parameters and the global acoustic-mode parameter (the position of maximum power, νmax) as well as with stellar parameters (mass, radius, surface gravity (log g), and effective temperature (T eff)). We show that τeffvpropν-0.89 max and P granvpropν-1.90 max, which is consistent with the theoretical predictions. We find that the granulation timescales of stars that belong to the red clump have similar values while the timescales of stars in the red giant branch are spread in a wider range. Finally, we show that realistic three-dimensional simulations of the surface convection in stars, spanning the (T eff, log g) range of our sample of red giants, match the Kepler observations well in terms of trends.

  15. GRANULATION IN RED GIANTS: OBSERVATIONS BY THE KEPLER MISSION AND THREE-DIMENSIONAL CONVECTION SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, S.; Hekker, S.; Trampedach, R.; Ballot, J.; Kallinger, T.; Buzasi, D.; Garcia, R. A.; Jimenez, A.; Regulo, C.; Mosser, B.; Elsworth, Y.; Chaplin, W. J.; Hale, S. J.; De Ridder, J.; Kinemuchi, K.; Mullally, F.

    2011-11-10

    The granulation pattern that we observe on the surface of the Sun is due to hot plasma rising to the photosphere where it cools down and descends back into the interior at the edges of granules. This is the visible manifestation of convection taking place in the outer part of the solar convection zone. Because red giants have deeper convection zones than the Sun, we cannot a priori assume that their granulation is a scaled version of solar granulation. Until now, neither observations nor one-dimensional analytical convection models could put constraints on granulation in red giants. With asteroseismology, this study can now be performed. We analyze {approx}1000 red giants that have been observed by Kepler during 13 months. We fit the power spectra with Harvey-like profiles to retrieve the characteristics of the granulation (timescale {tau}{sub gran} and power P{sub gran}). We search for a correlation between these parameters and the global acoustic-mode parameter (the position of maximum power, {nu}{sub max}) as well as with stellar parameters (mass, radius, surface gravity (log g), and effective temperature (T{sub eff})). We show that {tau}{sub eff}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup -0.89}{sub max} and P{sub gran}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup -1.90}{sub max}, which is consistent with the theoretical predictions. We find that the granulation timescales of stars that belong to the red clump have similar values while the timescales of stars in the red giant branch are spread in a wider range. Finally, we show that realistic three-dimensional simulations of the surface convection in stars, spanning the (T{sub eff}, log g) range of our sample of red giants, match the Kepler observations well in terms of trends.

  16. Movie Trailer: 'Road to the Red Planet'

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA and the European Space Agency have announced three new joint science missions to Mars, including one that will return to Earth with a sample taken from the Martian surface. "Road to the Red Pl...

  17. Avoiding Anemia: Boost Your Red Blood Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Avoiding Anemia Boost Your Red Blood Cells If you’re ... and sluggish, you might have a condition called anemia. Anemia is a common blood disorder that many ...

  18. Red blood cells, sickle cells (image)

    MedlinePlus

    These crescent or sickle-shaped red blood cells (RBCs) are present with Sickle cell anemia, and stand out clearly against the normal round RBCs. These abnormally shaped cells may become entangled and ...

  19. Frozen red cells in Rhesus immunization.

    PubMed

    Cook, I A; Robb, A L; Mitchell, R; McLaren, E A; Urbaniak, S; Robertson, A E

    1980-04-01

    The use of frozen washed cells in varying doses in primary Rh immunization is compared to two groups of men with the use of fresh washed cells in a third group. In the first two groups, using frozen cells, doses ranging from 0.5 to 20 ml of whole blood (Group I) are compared with a 200.0 ml dose of red cell concentrate (Group II), while Group III served as a control using a 20 ml dose of fresh washed red cell suspension (9.0 ml concentrated red cell equivalent). The response rate was 93% in Group II compared with only 43% in Group I, suggesting the desirability of using relatively large doses of Rh-positive red cells for primary Rh immunization. The use of frozen washed cells from a special panel for 'booster' injections is also recommended.

  20. Territoriality in the Red-winged Blackbird

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newhouse, Chris

    1977-01-01

    Reports findings on research in Red-winged Blackbird territoriality and describes the educational potential of use of similar studies in the classroom. Territorial mapping and observational techniques are explained. (CS)

  1. Red in the Face: Understanding Rosacea

    MedlinePlus

    ... exit disclaimer . Subscribe Red in the Face Understanding Rosacea Some people think of a rosy complexion as ... more troubling—a long-lasting skin disorder called rosacea. Rosacea (pronounced ro-ZAY-she-ah) may start ...

  2. Red Shifts with Obliquely Approaching Light Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Head, C. E.; Moore-Head, M. E.

    1988-01-01

    Refutes the Doppler effect as the explanation of large red shifts in the spectra of distant galaxies and explains the relativistic effects in which the light sources approach the observer obliquely. Provides several diagrams and graphs. (YP)

  3. Doppler interpretation of quasar red shifts.

    PubMed

    Zapolsky, H S

    1966-08-01

    The hypothesis that the quasistellar sources (quasars) are local objects moving with velocities close to the speed of light is examined. Provided there is no observational cutoff on apparent bolometric magnitude for the quasars, the transverse Doppler effect leads to the expectation of fewer blue shifts than red shifts for an isotropic distribution of velocities. Such a distribution also yields a function N(z), the number of objects with red shift less than z which is not inconsistent with the present data. On the basis of two extreme assumptions concerning the origin of such rapidly moving sources, we computed curves of red shift plotted against magnitude. In particular, the curve obtained on the assumption that the quasars originated from an explosion in or nearby our own galaxy is in as good agreement with the observations as the curve of cosmological red shift plotted against magnitude.

  4. Day Pass Down the Red Sea

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video over the southeastern Mediterranean Sea and down the coastline of the Red Sea was taken by the crew of Expedition 29 aboard the International Space Station. This sequence of shots was ta...

  5. Variable Red Giants--The MACHO View

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, S C; Cook, K H

    2003-01-03

    The authors present a study of the MACHO red variable population in the Large Magellanic Cloud. This study reveals six period-luminosity relations among the red variable population. Only two of these were known prior to MACHO. The results are consistent with Mira pulsation in the fundamental mode. A sequence comprising 26% of the red variable population can not be explained by pulsation. They propose a dust {kappa}-mechanism in the circumstellar environment is responsible for the long period variation of these objects. The luminosity function of the variables shows a sharp edge at the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB). This is the first clear indication of a population of variable stars within the immediate vicinity of the TRGB. The results indicate this population amounts to 8% of the RGB population near the TRGB.

  6. Red wine asthma: a controlled challenge study.

    PubMed

    Dahl, R; Henriksen, J M; Harving, H

    1986-12-01

    Drinking red wine may provoke bronchospasm in subjects with asthma. In order to reveal some of the possible agents involved in this reaction, 18 patients with a history of red wine-induced asthma were studied. They received, in a double-blind fashion, red wine with low sulfur dioxide (SO2) and high amine, high SO2 and high amine and low SO2 and low amine content. In each challenge, the wine was administered in stepwise increasing quantities until a total of 385 ml or a fall in peak expiratory flow of greater than 15% was reached. Nine subjects demonstrated a significant fall in peak flow in one or more challenges. In all cases the most severe reaction was observed after the wine with high SO2 content. The study suggests that SO2 is the most important factor in red wine-induced asthma. It is recommended that wine labels provide information on the SO2 content.

  7. Host compounds for red phosphorescent OLEDs

    DOEpatents

    Xia, Chuanjun; Cheon, Kwang -Ohk

    2015-08-25

    Novel compounds containing a triphenylene moiety linked to an .alpha..beta. connected binaphthyl ring system are provided. These compounds have surprisingly good solubility in organic solvents and are useful as host compounds in red phosphorescent OLEDs.

  8. Evaluation of the in vivo genotoxicity of Allura Red AC (Food Red No. 40).

    PubMed

    Honma, Masamitsu

    2015-10-01

    Allura Red AC (Food Red No. 40) is a red azo dye that is used for food coloring in beverage and confectionary products. However, its genotoxic properties remain controversial. To clarify the in vivo genotoxicity, we treated mice with Allura Red AC and investigated the induction of DNA damage (liver, glandular stomach), clastogenicity/anuegenicity (bone marrow), and mutagenicity (liver, glandular stomach) using Comet assays, micronucleus tests, and transgenic gene mutation assays, respectively. All studies were conducted in accordance with the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) guideline. Although Allura Red AC was administered up to the maximum doses recommended by the OECD guideline, no genotoxic effect was observed in any of the genotoxic endpoints. These data clearly show no evidence of in vivo genotoxic potential of Allura Red AC administered up to the maximum doses in mice.

  9. Evaluation of the in vivo genotoxicity of Allura Red AC (Food Red No. 40).

    PubMed

    Honma, Masamitsu

    2015-10-01

    Allura Red AC (Food Red No. 40) is a red azo dye that is used for food coloring in beverage and confectionary products. However, its genotoxic properties remain controversial. To clarify the in vivo genotoxicity, we treated mice with Allura Red AC and investigated the induction of DNA damage (liver, glandular stomach), clastogenicity/anuegenicity (bone marrow), and mutagenicity (liver, glandular stomach) using Comet assays, micronucleus tests, and transgenic gene mutation assays, respectively. All studies were conducted in accordance with the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) guideline. Although Allura Red AC was administered up to the maximum doses recommended by the OECD guideline, no genotoxic effect was observed in any of the genotoxic endpoints. These data clearly show no evidence of in vivo genotoxic potential of Allura Red AC administered up to the maximum doses in mice. PMID:26364875

  10. Ultra-Long Crystalline Red Phosphorus Nanowires from Amorphous Red Phosphorus Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Smith, Joshua B; Hagaman, Daniel; DiGuiseppi, David; Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard; Ji, Hai-Feng

    2016-09-19

    Heating red phosphorus in sealed ampoules in the presence of a Sn/SnI4 catalyst mixture has provided bulk black phosphorus at much lower pressures than those required for allotropic conversion by anvil cells. Herein we report the growth of ultra-long 1D red phosphorus nanowires (>1 mm) selectively onto a wafer substrate from red phosphorus powder and a thin film of red phosphorus in the present of a Sn/SnI4 catalyst. Raman spectra and X-ray diffraction characterization suggested the formation of crystalline red phosphorus nanowires. FET devices constructed with the red phosphorus nanowires displayed a typical I-V curve similar to that of black phosphorus and a similar mobility reaching 300 cm(2)  V(-1)  s with an Ion /Ioff ratio approaching 10(2) . A significant response to infrared light was observed from the FET device. PMID:27553637

  11. Ultra-Long Crystalline Red Phosphorus Nanowires from Amorphous Red Phosphorus Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Smith, Joshua B; Hagaman, Daniel; DiGuiseppi, David; Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard; Ji, Hai-Feng

    2016-09-19

    Heating red phosphorus in sealed ampoules in the presence of a Sn/SnI4 catalyst mixture has provided bulk black phosphorus at much lower pressures than those required for allotropic conversion by anvil cells. Herein we report the growth of ultra-long 1D red phosphorus nanowires (>1 mm) selectively onto a wafer substrate from red phosphorus powder and a thin film of red phosphorus in the present of a Sn/SnI4 catalyst. Raman spectra and X-ray diffraction characterization suggested the formation of crystalline red phosphorus nanowires. FET devices constructed with the red phosphorus nanowires displayed a typical I-V curve similar to that of black phosphorus and a similar mobility reaching 300 cm(2)  V(-1)  s with an Ion /Ioff ratio approaching 10(2) . A significant response to infrared light was observed from the FET device.

  12. Metagenomic studies of the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Behzad, Hayedeh; Ibarra, Martin Augusto; Mineta, Katsuhiko; Gojobori, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Metagenomics has significantly advanced the field of marine microbial ecology, revealing the vast diversity of previously unknown microbial life forms in different marine niches. The tremendous amount of data generated has enabled identification of a large number of microbial genes (metagenomes), their community interactions, adaptation mechanisms, and their potential applications in pharmaceutical and biotechnology-based industries. Comparative metagenomics reveals that microbial diversity is a function of the local environment, meaning that unique or unusual environments typically harbor novel microbial species with unique genes and metabolic pathways. The Red Sea has an abundance of unique characteristics; however, its microbiota is one of the least studied among marine environments. The Red Sea harbors approximately 25 hot anoxic brine pools, plus a vibrant coral reef ecosystem. Physiochemical studies describe the Red Sea as an oligotrophic environment that contains one of the warmest and saltiest waters in the world with year-round high UV radiations. These characteristics are believed to have shaped the evolution of microbial communities in the Red Sea. Over-representation of genes involved in DNA repair, high-intensity light responses, and osmoregulation were found in the Red Sea metagenomic databases suggesting acquisition of specific environmental adaptation by the Red Sea microbiota. The Red Sea brine pools harbor a diverse range of halophilic and thermophilic bacterial and archaeal communities, which are potential sources of enzymes for pharmaceutical and biotechnology-based application. Understanding the mechanisms of these adaptations and their function within the larger ecosystem could also prove useful in light of predicted global warming scenarios where global ocean temperatures are expected to rise by 1-3°C in the next few decades. In this review, we provide an overview of the published metagenomic studies that were conducted in the Red Sea, and

  13. Metagenomic studies of the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Behzad, Hayedeh; Ibarra, Martin Augusto; Mineta, Katsuhiko; Gojobori, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Metagenomics has significantly advanced the field of marine microbial ecology, revealing the vast diversity of previously unknown microbial life forms in different marine niches. The tremendous amount of data generated has enabled identification of a large number of microbial genes (metagenomes), their community interactions, adaptation mechanisms, and their potential applications in pharmaceutical and biotechnology-based industries. Comparative metagenomics reveals that microbial diversity is a function of the local environment, meaning that unique or unusual environments typically harbor novel microbial species with unique genes and metabolic pathways. The Red Sea has an abundance of unique characteristics; however, its microbiota is one of the least studied among marine environments. The Red Sea harbors approximately 25 hot anoxic brine pools, plus a vibrant coral reef ecosystem. Physiochemical studies describe the Red Sea as an oligotrophic environment that contains one of the warmest and saltiest waters in the world with year-round high UV radiations. These characteristics are believed to have shaped the evolution of microbial communities in the Red Sea. Over-representation of genes involved in DNA repair, high-intensity light responses, and osmoregulation were found in the Red Sea metagenomic databases suggesting acquisition of specific environmental adaptation by the Red Sea microbiota. The Red Sea brine pools harbor a diverse range of halophilic and thermophilic bacterial and archaeal communities, which are potential sources of enzymes for pharmaceutical and biotechnology-based application. Understanding the mechanisms of these adaptations and their function within the larger ecosystem could also prove useful in light of predicted global warming scenarios where global ocean temperatures are expected to rise by 1-3°C in the next few decades. In this review, we provide an overview of the published metagenomic studies that were conducted in the Red Sea, and

  14. Constraining the expansion history of the universe from the red shift evolution of cosmic shear

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, Daniel; Brustein, Ram E-mail: ramyb@bgu.ac.il

    2010-09-01

    We present a quantitative analysis of the constraints on the total equation of state parameter that can be obtained from measuring the red shift evolution of the cosmic shear. We compare the constraints that can be obtained from measurements of the spin two angular multipole moments of the cosmic shear to those resulting from the two dimensional and three dimensional power spectra of the cosmic shear. We find that if the multipole moments of the cosmic shear are measured accurately enough for a few red shifts the constraints on the dark energy equation of state parameter improve significantly compared to those that can be obtained from other measurements.

  15. Stimulated emission in the red, green, and blue in a nanostructured glass ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Lahoz, F.; Haro-Gonzalez, P.; Martin, I. R.; Perez-Rodriguez, C.; Capuj, N.; Caceres, J. M.

    2011-02-15

    Red, green, and blue stimulated emissions have been achieved in Ho{sup 3+} doped oxyfluoride glass ceramic at room temperature. The material shows three emission bands at the red (650 nm), green (545 nm), and blue (488 nm) regions under infrared excitation at 750 nm. These emission bands are caused by a photon avalanche upconversion process previously reported. A pump and probe experimental setup has been designed to show stimulated emissions at the three bands. The pump power threshold for positive gain in the 490 nm band has been estimated around 2.7 kW/cm{sup 2}. Higher thresholds are expected for the other bands.

  16. Influence of laser diode red beams on germination rate of tomato seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niculita, P.; Danaila-Guidea, Silvana; Livadariu, Oana; Popa, M.; Ristici, M.; Ristici, Esofina

    2007-08-01

    Laser diodes are lighting devices in which the light is generated by stimulated emission rather than spontaneous emission, with high generation efficiency. A device using 20 red laser diodes is presented. Emission wavelengths are in the 650-670 nm range. Emission power for each laser diode is about 4 mW. This device is used to irradiate the tomato seeds with three different irradiating doses. There were three Petri vessels for each dose having 25 seeds each of them. Results show that the germination rate increases for irradiated seeds. The red light has a positive effect for vegetable cultivated in protected area.

  17. The Red Book through the ages.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Larry K; Peter, Georges; Shulman, Stanford T

    2013-11-01

    The first edition of the Red Book was published in 1938. Since then, there have been numerous advances in the fields of infectious diseases and public health that have decreased morbidity and mortality of infants, children, and adolescents. Over the years, emerging pathogens and disease complexes have been described, sophisticated diagnostic techniques developed, advances in antimicrobial therapy have occurred, and immunizations have been implemented to prevent previously deadly diseases. Of the 18 diseases or organisms in the 1938 edition, 13 are now vaccine-preventable. Since inception of the Red Book, the aims of the editors have been to keep pace with these innovations and to continue to inform the medical community. These goals have made the Red Book a fundamental resource for pediatricians and other health care professionals in terms of guiding diagnosis, therapy, and prevention of infectious diseases. The list of 18 diseases or organisms originally described in the 1938 Red Book has expanded to include over 160 diseases or organisms in the 2012 edition. The pace of biomedical discovery, as well as the amount of information available and the number of methods for its delivery, will continue to accelerate in the future. Integration of information into future editions of the Red Book will ensure that practitioners continue to rely on the Red Book in its various electronic formats for clinical guidance and support.

  18. The Junior Red Cross goes to Healthland.

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, J F

    1997-01-01

    An amusing reminder of earnest attempts to teach the principles of public health, Junior Red Cross Time brought plays and games about "Healthland" to schoolchildren in the 1920s. Explaining why health education became part of the mission of the Junior Red Cross raises larger issues, such as the ideology and practice of the American Red Cross in war and peace, the place of health in the moral education of children, and the transition from the activism of the Progressive Era to the markedly different social climate of the 1920s. The Junior Red Cross promoted Healthland largely because it was an innocuous concept that had been stripped of potentially controversial features to adapt it to the conservative mood of postwar America. This process of dilution mirrored the fate of the adult Red Cross, which briefly and unsuccessfully sought to reinvent itself as a national (and international) agency for the promotion of public health. The unreality of Healthland is no mere coincidence; its separation from the real world was a crucial part of its appeal to the Red Cross in the 1920s. PMID:9366639

  19. Red cell membrane: past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Patrick G.

    2008-01-01

    As a result of natural selection driven by severe forms of malaria, 1 in 6 humans in the world, more than 1 billion people, are affected by red cell abnormalities, making them the most common of the inherited disorders. The non-nucleated red cell is unique among human cell type in that the plasma membrane, its only structural component, accounts for all of its diverse antigenic, transport, and mechanical characteristics. Our current concept of the red cell membrane envisions it as a composite structure in which a membrane envelope composed of cholesterol and phospholipids is secured to an elastic network of skeletal proteins via transmembrane proteins. Structural and functional characterization of the many constituents of the red cell membrane, in conjunction with biophysical and physiologic studies, has led to detailed description of the way in which the remarkable mechanical properties and other important characteristics of the red cells arise, and of the manner in which they fail in disease states. Current studies in this very active and exciting field are continuing to produce new and unexpected revelations on the function of the red cell membrane and thus of the cell in health and disease, and shed new light on membrane function in other diverse cell types. PMID:18988878

  20. Diode-pumped Nd:YCOB self-frequency-doubling red laser at 666 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. F.; Xiao, S. C.; Sun, X. P.

    2011-08-01

    It is reported that efficient continuous-wave (CW) self-frequency-doubling red laser at 666 nm performed with a diode-pumped Nd3+:YCa4O(BO3)3 (Nd:YCOB) laser. With a diode pump power of 14.3 W, TEM00 mode red laser at 666 nm of 570 mW is obtained. At the output power level of 570 mW, the output stability is better than 3.5%. The beam quality M2 value is about 1.25. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest power laser at 666 nm generated by self-frequency doubling of a diode pumped Nd:YCOB laser.