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Sample records for redox metalloenzyme catalysis

  1. Bimetallic redox synergy in oxidative palladium catalysis.

    PubMed

    Powers, David C; Ritter, Tobias

    2012-06-19

    Polynuclear transition metal complexes, which are embedded in the active sites of many metalloenzymes, are responsible for effecting a diverse array of oxidation reactions in nature. The range of chemical transformations remains unparalleled in the laboratory. With few noteworthy exceptions, chemists have primarily focused on mononuclear transition metal complexes in developing homogeneous catalysis. Our group is interested in the development of carbon-heteroatom bond-forming reactions, with a particular focus on identifying reactions that can be applied to the synthesis of complex molecules. In this context, we have hypothesized that bimetallic redox chemistry, in which two metals participate synergistically, may lower the activation barriers to redox transformations relevant to catalysis. In this Account, we discuss redox chemistry of binuclear Pd complexes and examine the role of binuclear intermediates in Pd-catalyzed oxidation reactions. Stoichiometric organometallic studies of the oxidation of binuclear Pd(II) complexes to binuclear Pd(III) complexes and subsequent C-X reductive elimination from the resulting binuclear Pd(III) complexes have confirmed the viability of C-X bond-forming reactions mediated by binuclear Pd(III) complexes. Metal-metal bond formation, which proceeds concurrently with oxidation of binuclear Pd(II) complexes, can lower the activation barrier for oxidation. We also discuss experimental and theoretical work that suggests that C-X reductive elimination is also facilitated by redox cooperation of both metals during reductive elimination. The effect of ligand modification on the structure and reactivity of binuclear Pd(III) complexes will be presented in light of the impact that ligand structure can exert on the structure and reactivity of binuclear Pd(III) complexes. Historically, oxidation reactions similar to those discussed here have been proposed to proceed via mononuclear Pd(IV) intermediates, and the hypothesis of mononuclear Pd

  2. Design Strategies for Redox Active Metalloenzymes: Applications in Hydrogen Production.

    PubMed

    Alcala-Torano, R; Sommer, D J; Bahrami Dizicheh, Z; Ghirlanda, G

    2016-01-01

    The last decades have seen an increased interest in finding alternative means to produce renewable fuels in order to satisfy the growing energy demands and to minimize environmental impact. Nature can serve as an inspiration for development of these methodologies, as enzymes are able to carry out a wide variety of redox processes at high efficiency, employing a wide array of earth-abundant transition metals to do so. While it is well recognized that the protein environment plays an important role in tuning the properties of the different metal centers, the structure/function relationships between amino acids and catalytic centers are not well resolved. One specific approach to study the role of proteins in both electron and proton transfer is the biomimetic design of redox active peptides, binding organometallic clusters in well-understood protein environments. Here we discuss different strategies for the design of peptides incorporating redox active FeS clusters, [FeFe]-hydrogenase organometallic mimics, and porphyrin centers into different peptide and protein environments in order to understand natural redox enzymes.

  3. Mysteries of metals in metalloenzymes.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Crystal E; Smith, Quentin A; Nechay, Michael R; Alexandrova, Anastassia N

    2014-10-21

    Natural metalloenzymes are often the most proficient catalysts in terms of their activity, selectivity, and ability to operate at mild conditions. However, metalloenzymes are occasionally surprising in their selection of catalytic metals, and in their responses to metal substitution. Indeed, from the isolated standpoint of producing the best catalyst, a chemist designing from first-principles would likely choose a different metal. For example, some enzymes employ a redox active metal where a simple Lewis acid is needed. Such are several hydrolases. In other cases, substitution of a non-native metal leads to radical improvements in reactivity. For example, histone deacetylase 8 naturally operates with Zn(2+) in the active site but becomes much more active with Fe(2+). For β-lactamases, the replacement of the native Zn(2+) with Ni(2+) was suggested to lead to higher activity as predicted computationally. There are also intriguing cases, such as Fe(2+)- and Mn(2+)-dependent ribonucleotide reductases and W(4+)- and Mo(4+)-dependent DMSO reductases, where organisms manage to circumvent the scarcity of one metal (e.g., Fe(2+)) by creating protein structures that utilize another metal (e.g., Mn(2+)) for the catalysis of the same reaction. Naturally, even though both metal forms are active, one of the metals is preferred in every-day life, and the other metal variant remains dormant until an emergency strikes in the cell. These examples lead to certain questions. When are catalytic metals selected purely for electronic or structural reasons, implying that enzymatic catalysis is optimized to its maximum? When are metal selections a manifestation of competing evolutionary pressures, where choices are dictated not just by catalytic efficiency but also by other factors in the cell? In other words, how can enzymes be improved as catalysts merely through the use of common biological building blocks available to cells? Addressing these questions is highly relevant to the enzyme

  4. Production and removal of superoxide anion radical by artificial metalloenzymes and redox-active metals

    PubMed Central

    Kawano, Tomonori; Kagenishi, Tomoko; Kadono, Takashi; Bouteau, François; Hiramatsu, Takuya; Lin, Cun; Tanaka, Kenichiro; Tanaka, Licca; Mancuso, Stefano; Uezu, Kazuya; Okobira, Tadashi; Furukawa, Hiroka; Iwase, Junichiro; Inokuchi, Reina; Baluška, Frantisek; Yokawa, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species is useful for various medical, engineering and agricultural purposes. These include clinical modulation of immunological mechanism, enhanced degradation of organic compounds released to the environments, removal of microorganisms for the hygienic purpose, and agricultural pest control; both directly acting against pathogenic microorganisms and indirectly via stimulation of plant defense mechanism represented by systemic acquired resistance and hypersensitive response. By aiming to develop a novel classes of artificial redox-active biocatalysts involved in production and/or removal of superoxide anion radicals, recent attempts for understanding and modification of natural catalytic proteins and functional DNA sequences of mammalian and plant origins are covered in this review article. PMID:27066179

  5. STIR: Redox-Switchable Olefin Polymerization Catalysis: Electronically Tunable Ligands for Controlled Polymer Synthesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-28

    REPORT Final Report: STIR: Redox-Switchable Olefin Polymerization Catalysis : Electronically Tunable Ligands for Controlled Polymer Synthesis 14...2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS Catalysis , Redox-Switchable, Polymerization, Polyolefins Brian K. Long University of Tennessee at Knoxville Office of Research...Polymerization Catalysis : Electronically Tunable Ligands for Controlled Polymer Synthesis Report Title ABSTRACT Olefin polymerization catalysts containing

  6. Bioinspired design of redox-active ligands for multielectron catalysis: Effects of positioning pyrazine reservoirs on cobalt for electro- and photocatalytic generation of hydrogen from water

    SciTech Connect

    Jurss, Jonah W.; Khnayzer, Rony S.; Panetier, Julien A.; El Roz, Karim A.; Nichols, Eva M.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Long, Jeffrey R.; Castellano, Felix N.; Chang, Christopher J.

    2015-06-09

    Mononuclear metalloenzymes in nature can function in cooperation with precisely positioned redox-active organic cofactors in order to carry out multielectron catalysis. Inspired by the finely tuned redox management of these bioinorganic systems, we present the design, synthesis, and experimental and theoretical characterization of a homologous series of cobalt complexes bearing redox-active pyrazines. These donor moieties are locked into key positions within a pentadentate ligand scaffold in order to evaluate the effects of positioning redox non-innocent ligands on hydrogen evolution catalysis. Both metal- and ligand-centered redox features are observed in organic as well as aqueous solutions over a range of pH values, and comparison with analogs bearing redox-inactive zinc(II) allows for assignments of ligand-based redox events. Varying the geometric placement of redox non-innocent pyrazine donors on isostructural pentadentate ligand platforms results in marked effects on observed cobalt-catalyzed proton reduction activity. Electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution from weak acids in acetonitrile solution, under diffusion-limited conditions, reveals that the pyrazine donor of axial isomer 1-Co behaves as an unproductive electron sink, resulting in high overpotentials for proton reduction, whereas the equatorial pyrazine isomer complex 2-Co is significantly more active for hydrogen generation at lower voltages. Addition of a second equatorial pyrazine in complex 3-Co further minimizes overpotentials required for catalysis. The equatorial derivative 2-Co is also superior to its axial 1-Co congener for electrocatalytic and visible-light photocatalytic hydrogen generation in biologically relevant, neutral pH aqueous media. Density functional theory calculations (B3LYP-D2) indicate that the first reduction of catalyst isomers 1-Co, 2-Co, and 3-Co is largely metal-centered while the second reduction occurs at pyrazine. Taken together, the data establish that proper

  7. Bioinspired design of redox-active ligands for multielectron catalysis: Effects of positioning pyrazine reservoirs on cobalt for electro- and photocatalytic generation of hydrogen from water

    DOE PAGES

    Jurss, Jonah W.; Khnayzer, Rony S.; Panetier, Julien A.; ...

    2015-06-09

    Mononuclear metalloenzymes in nature can function in cooperation with precisely positioned redox-active organic cofactors in order to carry out multielectron catalysis. Inspired by the finely tuned redox management of these bioinorganic systems, we present the design, synthesis, and experimental and theoretical characterization of a homologous series of cobalt complexes bearing redox-active pyrazines. These donor moieties are locked into key positions within a pentadentate ligand scaffold in order to evaluate the effects of positioning redox non-innocent ligands on hydrogen evolution catalysis. Both metal- and ligand-centered redox features are observed in organic as well as aqueous solutions over a range of pHmore » values, and comparison with analogs bearing redox-inactive zinc(II) allows for assignments of ligand-based redox events. Varying the geometric placement of redox non-innocent pyrazine donors on isostructural pentadentate ligand platforms results in marked effects on observed cobalt-catalyzed proton reduction activity. Electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution from weak acids in acetonitrile solution, under diffusion-limited conditions, reveals that the pyrazine donor of axial isomer 1-Co behaves as an unproductive electron sink, resulting in high overpotentials for proton reduction, whereas the equatorial pyrazine isomer complex 2-Co is significantly more active for hydrogen generation at lower voltages. Addition of a second equatorial pyrazine in complex 3-Co further minimizes overpotentials required for catalysis. The equatorial derivative 2-Co is also superior to its axial 1-Co congener for electrocatalytic and visible-light photocatalytic hydrogen generation in biologically relevant, neutral pH aqueous media. Density functional theory calculations (B3LYP-D2) indicate that the first reduction of catalyst isomers 1-Co, 2-Co, and 3-Co is largely metal-centered while the second reduction occurs at pyrazine. Taken together, the data establish that proper

  8. Thiol Chemistry in Peroxidase Catalysis and Redox Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Fukuto, Jon M.; Forman, Henry Jay

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The oxidation chemistry of thiols and disulfides of biologic relevance is described. The review focuses on the interaction and kinetics of hydrogen peroxide with low-molecular-weight thiols and protein thiols and, in particular, on sulfenic acid groups, which are recognized as key intermediates in several thiol oxidation processes. In particular, sulfenic and selenenic acids are formed during the catalytic cycle of peroxiredoxins and glutathione peroxidases, respectively. In turn, these enzymes are in close redox communication with the thioredoxin and glutathione systems, which are the major controllers of the thiol redox state. Oxidants formed in the cell originate from several different sources, but the major producers are NADPH oxidases and mitochondria. However, a different role of the oxygen species produced by these sources is apparent as oxidants derived from NADPH oxidase are involved mainly in signaling processes, whereas those produced by mitochondria induce cell death in pathways including also the thioredoxin system, presently considered an important target for cancer chemotherapy. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 10, 1549–1564. PMID:18479206

  9. Dual catalysis for the redox annulation of nitroalkynes with indoles: enantioselective construction of indolin-3-ones bearing quaternary stereocenters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ren-Rong; Ye, Shi-Chun; Lu, Chuan-Jun; Zhuang, Gui-Lin; Gao, Jian-Rong; Jia, Yi-Xia

    2015-09-14

    The enantioselective redox annulation of nitroalkynes with indoles is enabled by gold/chiral phosphoric acid dual catalysis. A range of indolin-3-one derivatives bearing quaternary stereocenters at the C2 position were afforded in good yields and excellent enantioselectivities (up to 96 % ee) from readily available starting materials.

  10. Mechanistic understanding of surface plasmon assisted catalysis on a single particle: cyclic redox of 4-aminothiophenol

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Ping; Kang, Leilei; Mack, Nathan H.; ...

    2013-10-21

    We investigate surface plasmon assisted catalysis (SPAC) reactions of 4-aminothiophenol (4ATP) to and back from 4,4'-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB) by single particle surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, using a self-designed gas flow cell to control the reductive/oxidative environment over the reactions. Conversion of 4ATP into DMAB is induced by energy transfer (plasmonic heating) from surface plasmon resonance to 4ATP, where O2 (as an electron acceptor) is essential and H2O (as a base) can accelerate the reaction. In contrast, hot electron (from surface plasmon decay) induction drives the reverse reaction of DMAB to 4ATP, where H2O (or H2) acts as the hydrogen source. Moremore » interestingly, the cyclic redox between 4ATP and DMAB by SPAC approach has been demonstrated. Finally, this SPAC methodology presents a unique platform for studying chemical reactions that are not possible under standard synthetic conditions.« less

  11. Mechanistic understanding of surface plasmon assisted catalysis on a single particle: cyclic redox of 4-aminothiophenol

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ping; Kang, Leilei; Mack, Nathan H.; Schanze, Kirk S.; Han, Xijiang; Wang, Hsing-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Surface plasmon assisted catalysis (SPAC) reactions of 4-aminothiophenol (4ATP) to and back from 4,4′-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB) have been investigated by single particle surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, using a self-designed gas flow cell to control the reductive/oxidative environment over the reactions. Conversion of 4ATP into DMAB is induced by energy transfer (plasmonic heating) from surface plasmon resonance to 4ATP, where O2 (as an electron acceptor) is essential and H2O (as a base) can accelerate the reaction. In contrast, hot electron (from surface plasmon decay) induction drives the reverse reaction of DMAB to 4ATP, where H2O (or H2) acts as the hydrogen source. More interestingly, the cyclic redox between 4ATP and DMAB by SPAC approach has been demonstrated. This SPAC methodology presents a unique platform for studying chemical reactions that are not possible under standard synthetic conditions. PMID:24141289

  12. A simple method to engineer a protein-derived redox cofactor for catalysis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sooim; Choi, Moonsung; Williamson, Heather R; Davidson, Victor L

    2014-10-01

    The 6×-Histidine tag which is commonly used for purification of recombinant proteins was converted to a catalytic redox-active center by incorporation of Co(2+). Two examples of the biological activity of this engineered protein-derived cofactor are presented. After inactivation of the natural diheme cofactor of MauG, it was shown that the Co(2+)-loaded 6×His-tag could substitute for the hemes in the H2O2-driven catalysis of tryptophan tryptophylquinone biosynthesis. To further demonstrate that the Co(2+)-loaded 6×His-tag could mediate long range electron transfer, it was shown that addition of H2O2 to the Co(2+)-loaded 6×His-tagged Cu(1+) amicyanin oxidizes the copper site which is 20Å away. These results provide proof of principle for this simple method by which to introduce a catalytic redox-active site into proteins for potential applications in research and biotechnology.

  13. A simple method to engineer a protein-derived redox cofactor for catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sooim; Choi, Moonsung; Williamson, Heather R.; Davidson, Victor L.

    2014-01-01

    The 6x-Histidine tag which is commonly used for purification of recombinant proteins was converted to a catalytic redox-active center by incorporation of Co2+. Two examples of the biological activity of this engineered protein-derived cofactor are presented. After inactivation of the natural diheme cofactor of MauG, it was shown that the Co2+-loaded 6xHis-tag could substitute for the hemes in the H2O2-driven catalysis of tryptophan tryptophylquinone biosynthesis. To further demonstrate that the Co2+-loaded 6xHis-tag could mediate long range electron transfer, it was shown that addition of H2O2 to the Co2+-loaded 6xHis-tagged Cu1+ amicyanin oxidizes the copper site which is 20 Å away. These results provide proof of principle for this simple method by which to introduce a catalytic redox-active site into proteins for potential applications in research and biotechnology. PMID:24858537

  14. Designing Hydrolytic Zinc Metalloenzymes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Zinc is an essential element required for the function of more than 300 enzymes spanning all classes. Despite years of dedicated study, questions regarding the connections between primary and secondary metal ligands and protein structure and function remain unanswered, despite numerous mechanistic, structural, biochemical, and synthetic model studies. Protein design is a powerful strategy for reproducing native metal sites that may be applied to answering some of these questions and subsequently generating novel zinc enzymes. From examination of the earliest design studies introducing simple Zn(II)-binding sites into de novo and natural protein scaffolds to current studies involving the preparation of efficient hydrolytic zinc sites, it is increasingly likely that protein design will achieve reaction rates previously thought possible only for native enzymes. This Current Topic will review the design and redesign of Zn(II)-binding sites in de novo-designed proteins and native protein scaffolds toward the preparation of catalytic hydrolytic sites. After discussing the preparation of Zn(II)-binding sites in various scaffolds, we will describe relevant examples for reengineering existing zinc sites to generate new or altered catalytic activities. Then, we will describe our work on the preparation of a de novo-designed hydrolytic zinc site in detail and present comparisons to related designed zinc sites. Collectively, these studies demonstrate the significant progress being made toward building zinc metalloenzymes from the bottom up. PMID:24506795

  15. Mechanistic understanding of surface plasmon assisted catalysis on a single particle: cyclic redox of 4-aminothiophenol

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ping; Kang, Leilei; Mack, Nathan H.; Schanze, Kirk S.; Han, Xijiang; Wang, Hsing-Lin

    2013-10-21

    We investigate surface plasmon assisted catalysis (SPAC) reactions of 4-aminothiophenol (4ATP) to and back from 4,4'-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB) by single particle surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, using a self-designed gas flow cell to control the reductive/oxidative environment over the reactions. Conversion of 4ATP into DMAB is induced by energy transfer (plasmonic heating) from surface plasmon resonance to 4ATP, where O2 (as an electron acceptor) is essential and H2O (as a base) can accelerate the reaction. In contrast, hot electron (from surface plasmon decay) induction drives the reverse reaction of DMAB to 4ATP, where H2O (or H2) acts as the hydrogen source. More interestingly, the cyclic redox between 4ATP and DMAB by SPAC approach has been demonstrated. Finally, this SPAC methodology presents a unique platform for studying chemical reactions that are not possible under standard synthetic conditions.

  16. Carbon Dots as Versatile Photosensitizers for Solar-Driven Catalysis with Redox Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Hutton, Georgina A M; Reuillard, Bertrand; Martindale, Benjamin C M; Caputo, Christine A; Lockwood, Colin W J; Butt, Julea N; Reisner, Erwin

    2016-12-28

    Light-driven enzymatic catalysis is enabled by the productive coupling of a protein to a photosensitizer. Photosensitizers used in such hybrid systems are typically costly, toxic, and/or fragile, with limited chemical versatility. Carbon dots (CDs) are low-cost, nanosized light-harvesters that are attractive photosensitizers for biological systems as they are water-soluble, photostable, nontoxic, and their surface chemistry can be easily modified. We demonstrate here that CDs act as excellent light-absorbers in two semibiological photosynthetic systems utilizing either a fumarate reductase (FccA) for the solar-driven hydrogenation of fumarate to succinate or a hydrogenase (H2ase) for reduction of protons to H2. The tunable surface chemistry of the CDs was exploited to synthesize positively charged ammonium-terminated CDs (CD-NHMe2(+)), which were capable of transferring photoexcited electrons directly to the negatively charged enzymes with high efficiency and stability. Enzyme-based turnover numbers of 6000 mol succinate (mol FccA)(-1) and 43,000 mol H2 (mol H2ase)(-1) were reached after 24 h. Negatively charged carboxylate-terminated CDs (CD-CO2(-)) displayed little or no activity, and the electrostatic interactions at the CD-enzyme interface were determined to be essential to the high photocatalytic activity observed with CD-NHMe2(+). The modular surface chemistry of CDs together with their photostability and aqueous solubility make CDs versatile photosensitizers for redox enzymes with great scope for their utilization in photobiocatalysis.

  17. Redox and catalysis 'all-in-one' infinite coordination polymer for electrochemical immunosensor of tumor markers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing; Liu, Bingqian; Chen, Guonan; Tang, Dianping

    2015-02-15

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA), as a glycoprotein enzyme encoded in humans by the KLK3 gene, is one of the most important biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis of prostate cancer. Herein, a new electrochemical immunosensor for sensitive determination of PSA was designed by using redox and catalysis 'all-in-one' infinite coordination polymer (PtNP@ICP) as signal tag on the polyamidoamine dendrimers modified electrode interface. To construct such 'all-in-one' PtNP@ICP nanostructures, the coordination polymerization was fully carried between metal ions and polydentate bridging ligands, and the PtNP was encapsulated into the ICP in the process of polymerization. The prepared PtNP@ICP nanocatalyst was characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), ultraviolet and visible (UV-vis) spectrophotometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscope (FTIR). And the synthesized PtNP@ICP was utilized as signal tag for the label of PSA. With a sandwich-type immunoassay format, the conjugated signal tag on the transducer increased with the increasing PSA concentration in the sample thus enhancing the signal of the electrochemical immunosensor due to the catalytic reduction toward H2O2 of the enveloped PtNP. Under optimal conditions, the current was proportional to the logarithm of PSA concentration ranging from 0.001 to 60 ng/mL. The detection limit (LOD) was 0.3 pg/mL at 3 sB. The immunosensor displayed an acceptable reproducibility, stability and selectivity. In addition, the methodology was evaluated with human serum specimens receiving good correlation with results from commercialized enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method.

  18. Distinct Metal Isoforms Underlie Promiscuous Activity Profiles of Metalloenzymes.

    PubMed

    Baier, Florian; Chen, John; Solomonson, Matthew; Strynadka, Natalie C J; Tokuriki, Nobuhiko

    2015-07-17

    Within a superfamily, functionally diverged metalloenzymes often favor different metals as cofactors for catalysis. One hypothesis is that incorporation of alternative metals expands the catalytic repertoire of metalloenzymes and provides evolutionary springboards toward new catalytic functions. However, there is little experimental evidence that incorporation of alternative metals changes the activity profile of metalloenzymes. Here, we systematically investigate how metals alter the activity profiles of five functionally diverged enzymes of the metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) superfamily. Each enzyme was reconstituted in vitro with six different metals, Cd(2+), Co(2+), Fe(2+), Mn(2+), Ni(2+), and Zn(2+), and assayed against eight catalytically distinct hydrolytic reactions (representing native functions of MBL enzymes). We reveal that each enzyme metal isoform has a significantly different activity level for native and promiscuous reactions. Moreover, metal preferences for native versus promiscuous activities are not correlated and, in some cases, are mutually exclusive; only particular metal isoforms disclose cryptic promiscuous activities but often at the expense of the native activity. For example, the L1 B3 β-lactamase displays a 1000-fold catalytic preference for Zn(2+) over Ni(2+) for its native activity but exhibits promiscuous thioester, phosphodiester, phosphotriester, and lactonase activity only with Ni(2+). Furthermore, we find that the five MBL enzymes exist as an ensemble of various metal isoforms in vivo, and this heterogeneity results in an expanded activity profile compared to a single metal isoform. Our study suggests that promiscuous activities of metalloenzymes can stem from an ensemble of metal isoforms in the cell, which could facilitate the functional divergence of metalloenzymes.

  19. Operando X-ray absorption and EPR evidence for a single electron redox process in copper catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Qingquan; Zhang, Jian; Peng, Pan; Zhang, Guanghui; Huang, Zhiliang; Yi, Hong; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Lei, Aiwen

    2015-05-26

    An unprecedented single electron redox process in copper catalysis is confirmed using operando X-ray absorption and EPR spectroscopies. The oxidation state of the copper species in the interaction between Cu(II) and a sulfinic acid at room temperature, and the accurate characterization of the formed Cu(I) are clearly shown using operando X-ray absorption and EPR evidence. Further investigation of anion effects on Cu(II) discloses that bromine ions can dramatically increase the rate of the redox process. Moreover, it is proven that the sulfinic acids are converted into sulfonyl radicals, which can be trapped by 2-arylacrylic acids and various valuable β-keto sulfones are synthesized with good to excellent yields under mild conditions.

  20. Operando X-ray absorption and EPR evidence for a single electron redox process in copper catalysis

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, Qingquan; Zhang, Jian; Peng, Pan; ...

    2015-05-26

    An unprecedented single electron redox process in copper catalysis is confirmed using operando X-ray absorption and EPR spectroscopies. The oxidation state of the copper species in the interaction between Cu(II) and a sulfinic acid at room temperature, and the accurate characterization of the formed Cu(I) are clearly shown using operando X-ray absorption and EPR evidence. Further investigation of anion effects on Cu(II) discloses that bromine ions can dramatically increase the rate of the redox process. Moreover, it is proven that the sulfinic acids are converted into sulfonyl radicals, which can be trapped by 2-arylacrylic acids and various valuable β-keto sulfonesmore » are synthesized with good to excellent yields under mild conditions.« less

  1. Mutagenesis of the redox-active disulfide in mercuric ion reductase: Catalysis by mutant enzymes restricted to flavin redox chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Distefano, M.D.; Au, K.G.; Walsh, C.T. )

    1989-02-07

    Mercuric reductase, a flavoenzyme that possesses a redox-active cystine, Cys{sub 135}Cys{sub 140}, catalyzes the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0) by NADPH. As a probe of mechanism, the authors have constructed mutants lacking a redox-active disulfide by eliminating Cys{sub 135} (Ala{sub 135}Cys{sub 140}), Cys{sub 14} (Cys{sub 135}Ala{sub 140}), or both (Ala{sub 135}Ala{sub 140}). Additionally, they have made double mutants that lack Cys{sub 135} (Ala{sub 135}Cys{sub 139}Cys{sub 140}) or Cys{sub 140} (Cys{sub 135}Cys{sub 139}Ala{sub 140}) but introduce a new Cys in place of Gly{sub 139} with the aim of constructing dithiol pairs in the active site that do not form a redox-active disulfide. The resulting mutant enzymes all lack redox-active disulfides and are hence restricted to FAD/FADH{sub 2} redox chemistry. Each mutant enzyme possesses unique physical and spectroscopic properties that reflect subtle differences in the FAD microenvironment. Preliminary evidence for the Ala{sub 135}Cys{sub 139}Cys{sub 14} mutant enzyme suggests that this protein forms a disulfide between the two adjacent Cys residues. Hg(II) titration experiments that correlate the extent of charge-transfer quenching with Hg(II) binding indicate that the Ala{sub 135}Cys{sub 140} protein binds Hg(II) with substantially less avidity than does the wild-type enzyme. All mutant mercuric reductases catalyze transhydrogenation and oxygen reduction reactions through obligatory reduced flavin intermediates at rates comparable to or greater than that of the wild-type enzyme. In multiple-turnover assays which monitored the production of Hg(0), two of the mutant enzymes were observed to proceed through at least 30 turnovers at rates ca. 1000-fold slower than that of wild-type mercuric reductase. They conclude that the Cys{sub 135} and Cys{sub 140} thiols serve as Hg(II) ligands that orient the Hg(II) for subsequent reduction by a reduced flavin intermediate.

  2. Metalloenzyme Design and Engineering through Strategic Modifications of Native Protein Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Petrik, Igor D.; Liu, Jing; Lu, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Metalloenzymes are among the major targets of protein design and engineering efforts aimed at attaining novel and efficient catalysis for biochemical transformation and biomedical applications, due to the diversity of functions imparted by the metallo-cofactors along with the versatility of the protein environment. Naturally evolved protein scaffolds can often serve as robust foundations for sustaining artificial active sites constructed by rational design, directed evolution, or a combination of the two strategies. Accumulated knowledge of structure-function relationship and advancement of tools such as computational algorithms and unnatural amino acids incorporation all contribute to the design of better metalloenzymes with catalytic properties approaching the needs of practical applications. PMID:24513641

  3. Reconstituting redox active centers of heme-containing proteins with biomineralized gold toward peroxidase mimics with strong intrinsic catalysis and electrocatalysis for H2O2 detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liyan; Li, Shuai; Dong, Minmin; Jiang, Yao; Li, Ru; Zhang, Shuo; Lv, Xiaoxia; Chen, Lijun; Wang, Hua

    2017-01-15

    A facile and efficient enzymatic reconstitution methodology has been proposed for high-catalysis peroxidase mimics by remolding the redox active centers of heme-containing proteins with the in-site biomineralized gold using hemoglobin (Hb) as a model. Catalytic hemin (Hem) was extracted from the active centers of Hb for the gold biomineralization and then reconstituted into apoHb to yield the Hem-Au@apoHb nanocomposites showing dramatically improved intrinsic catalysis and electrocatalysis over natural Hb and Hem. The biomineralized gold, on the one hand, would act as "nanowires" to promote the electron transferring of the nanocomposites. On the other hand, it would create a reactivity pathway to pre-organize and accumulate more substrates towards the active sites of the peroxidase mimics. Steady-state kinetics studies indicate that Hem-Au@apoHb could present much higher substrate affinity (lower Michaelis constants) and intrinsic catalysis even than some natural peroxidases. Moreover, the application feasibility of the prepared artificial enzymes was demonstrated by colorimetric assays and direct electrocatalysis for H2O2 sensing, showing a detection limitation low as 0.45μM. Importantly, such a catalysis active-center reconstitution protocol may circumvent the substantial improvement of the intrinsic catalysis and electrocatalysis of diverse heme-containing proteins or enyzmes toward the extensive applications in the chemical, enviromental, and biomedical catalysis fields.

  4. Investigating the selectivity of metalloenzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Day, Joshua A; Cohen, Seth M

    2013-10-24

    The inhibitory activity of a broad group of known metalloenzyme inhibitors against a panel of metalloenzymes was evaluated. Clinically approved inhibitors were selected as well as several other reported metalloprotein inhibitors in order to represent a broad range of metal binding groups (MBGs), including hydroxamic acid, carboxylate, hydroxypyridinonate, thiol, and N-hydroxyurea functional groups. A panel of metalloenzymes, including carbonic anhydrase (hCAII), several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), histone deacetylase (HDAC-2), and tyrosinase (TY), was selected based on their clinical importance for a range of pathologies. In addition, each inhibitor was evaluated for its ability to remove Fe(3+) from holo-transferrin to gauge the ability of the inhibitors to access Fe(3+) from a primary transport protein. The results show that the metalloenzyme inhibitors are quite selective for their intended targets, suggesting that despite their ability to bind metal ions, metalloprotein inhibitors are not prone to widespread off-target enzyme inhibition activity.

  5. Metallopeptide catalysts and artificial metalloenzymes containing unnatural amino acids.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jared C

    2015-04-01

    Metallopeptide catalysts and artificial metalloenzymes built from peptide scaffolds and catalytically active metal centers possess a number of exciting properties that could be exploited for selective catalysis. Control over metal catalyst secondary coordination spheres, compatibility with library based methods for optimization and evolution, and biocompatibility stand out in this regard. A wide range of unnatural amino acids (UAAs) have been incorporated into peptide and protein scaffolds using several distinct methods, and the resulting UAAs containing scaffolds can be used to create novel hybrid metal-peptide catalysts. Promising levels of selectivity have been demonstrated for several hybrid catalysts, and these provide a strong impetus and important lessons for the design of and optimization of hybrid catalysts.

  6. Iron- and Cobalt-Catalyzed Alkene Hydrogenation: Catalysis with Both Redox-Active and Strong Field Ligands.

    PubMed

    Chirik, Paul J

    2015-06-16

    The hydrogenation of alkenes is one of the most impactful reactions catalyzed by homogeneous transition metal complexes finding application in the pharmaceutical, agrochemical, and commodity chemical industries. For decades, catalyst technology has relied on precious metal catalysts supported by strong field ligands to enable highly predictable two-electron redox chemistry that constitutes key bond breaking and forming steps during turnover. Alternative catalysts based on earth abundant transition metals such as iron and cobalt not only offer potential environmental and economic advantages but also provide an opportunity to explore catalysis in a new chemical space. The kinetically and thermodynamically accessible oxidation and spin states may enable new mechanistic pathways, unique substrate scope, or altogether new reactivity. This Account describes my group's efforts over the past decade to develop iron and cobalt catalysts for alkene hydrogenation. Particular emphasis is devoted to the interplay of the electronic structure of the base metal compounds and their catalytic performance. First generation, aryl-substituted pyridine(diimine) iron dinitrogen catalysts exhibited high turnover frequencies at low catalyst loadings and hydrogen pressures for the hydrogenation of unactivated terminal and disubstituted alkenes. Exploration of structure-reactivity relationships established smaller aryl substituents and more electron donating ligands resulted in improved performance. Second generation iron and cobalt catalysts where the imine donors were replaced by N-heterocyclic carbenes resulted in dramatically improved activity and enabled hydrogenation of more challenging unactivated, tri- and tetrasubstituted alkenes. Optimized cobalt catalysts have been discovered that are among the most active homogeneous hydrogenation catalysts known. Synthesis of enantiopure, C1 symmetric pyridine(diimine) cobalt complexes have enabled rare examples of highly enantioselective

  7. Real-time electrochemical monitoring of the polymerase chain reaction by mediated redox catalysis.

    PubMed

    Deféver, Thibaut; Druet, Michel; Rochelet-Dequaire, Murielle; Joannes, Martine; Grossiord, Céline; Limoges, Benoit; Marchal, Damien

    2009-08-19

    We described the proof-of-principle of a nonoptical real-time PCR that uses cyclic voltammetry for indirectly monitoring the amplified DNA product generated in the PCR reaction solution after each PCR cycle. To enable indirect measurement of the amplicon produced throughout PCR, we monitor electrochemically the progressive consumption (i.e., the decrease of concentration) of free electroactive deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) used for DNA synthesis. This is accomplished by exploiting the fast catalytic oxidation of native deoxyguanosine triphosphate (dGTP) or its unnatural analogue 7-deaza-dGTP by the one-electron redox catalysts Ru(bpy)(3)(3+) (with bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) or Os(bpy)(3)(3+) generated at an electrode. To demonstrate the feasibility of the method, a disposable array of eight miniaturized self-contained electrochemical cells (working volume of 50 microL) has been developed and implemented in a classical programmable thermal cycler and then tested with the PCR amplification of two illustrated examples of real-world biological target DNA sequences (i.e., a relatively long 2300-bp sequence from the bacterial genome of multidrug-resistant Achromobacter xylosoxidans and a shorter 283-bp target from the human cytomegalovirus). Although the method works with both mediator/base couples, the catalytic peak current responses recorded with the Ru(bpy)(3)(3+)/dGTP couple under real-time PCR conditions are significantly affected by a continuous current drift and interference with the background solvent discharge, thus leading to poorly reproducible data. Much more reproducible and reliable results are finally obtained with the Os(bpy)(3)(3+)/7-deaza-dGTP, a result that is attributed to the much lower anodic potential at which the catalytic oxidation of 7-deaza-dGTP by Os(bpy)(3)(3+) is detected. Under these conditions, an exponential decrease of the catalytic signal as a function of the number of PCR cycles is obtained, allowing definition of a cycle

  8. Catalytic formal [2+2+1] synthesis of pyrroles from alkynes and diazenes via Ti(II)/Ti(IV) redox catalysis.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Zachary W; Hue, Ryan J; Tonks, Ian A

    2016-01-01

    Pyrroles are structurally important heterocycles. However, the synthesis of polysubstituted pyrroles is often challenging. Here, we report a multicomponent, Ti-catalysed formal [2+2+1] reaction of alkynes and diazenes for the oxidative synthesis of penta- and trisubstituted pyrroles: a nitrenoid analogue to classical Pauson-Khand-type syntheses of cyclopentenones. Given the scarcity of early transition-metal redox catalysis, preliminary mechanistic studies are presented. Initial stoichiometric and kinetic studies indicate that the mechanism of this reaction proceeds through a formally Ti(II)/Ti(IV) redox catalytic cycle, in which an azatitanacyclobutene intermediate, resulting from [2+2] alkyne + Ti imido coupling, undergoes a second alkyne insertion followed by reductive elimination to yield pyrrole and a Ti(II) species. The key component for catalytic turnover is the reoxidation of the Ti(II) species to a Ti(IV) imido via the disproportionation of an η(2)-diazene-Ti(II) complex.

  9. Mouse aminoacylase 3: a metalloenzyme activated by cobalt and nickel

    PubMed Central

    Tsirulnikov, Kirill; Abuladze, Natalia; Newman, Debra; Ryazantsev, Sergey; Wolak, Talya; Magilnick, Nathaniel; Koag, Myong-Chul; Kurtz, Ira

    2009-01-01

    Aminoacylase 3 (AA3) deacetylates N-acetyl-aromatic amino acids and mercapturic acids including N-acetyl-1,2-dichlorovinyl-L-cysteine (Ac-DCVC), a metabolite of a xenobiotic trichloroethylene. Previous studies did not demonstrate metal-dependence of AA3 despite a high homology with a Zn2+-metalloenzyme aminoacylase 2 (AA2). A 3D model of mouse AA3 was created based on homology with AA2. The model showed a putative metal binding site formed by His21, Glu24 and His116, and Arg63, Asp68, Asn70, Arg71, Glu177 and Tyr287 potentially involved in catalysis/substrate binding. The mutation of each of these residues to alanine inactivated AA3 except Asn70 and Arg71, therefore the corrected 3D model of mouse AA3 was created. Wild type (wt) mouse AA3 expressed in E. coli contained ~0.35 zinc atoms per monomer. Incubation with Co2+ and Ni2+ activated wt-AA3. In the cobalt-activated AA3 zinc was replaced with cobalt. Metal removal completely inactivated wt-AA3, whereas addition of Zn2+, Mn2+ or Fe2+ restored initial activity. Co2+ and to a lesser extent Ni2+ increased activity several times in comparison with intact wt-AA3. Co2+ drastically increased the rate of deacetylation of Ac-DCVC and significantly increased the toxicity of Ac-DCVC in the HEK293T cells expressing wt-AA3. The results indicate that AA3 is a metalloenzyme significantly activated by Co2+ and Ni2+. PMID:19362172

  10. Mouse aminoacylase 3: a metalloenzyme activated by cobalt and nickel.

    PubMed

    Tsirulnikov, Kirill; Abuladze, Natalia; Newman, Debra; Ryazantsev, Sergey; Wolak, Talya; Magilnick, Nathaniel; Koag, Myong-Chul; Kurtz, Ira; Pushkin, Alexander

    2009-07-01

    Aminoacylase 3 (AA3) deacetylates N-acetyl-aromatic amino acids and mercapturic acids including N-acetyl-1,2-dichlorovinyl-L-cysteine (Ac-DCVC), a metabolite of a xenobiotic trichloroethylene. Previous studies did not demonstrate metal-dependence of AA3 despite a high homology with a Zn(2+)-metalloenzyme aminoacylase 2 (AA2). A 3D model of mouse AA3 was created based on homology with AA2. The model showed a putative metal binding site formed by His21, Glu24 and His116, and Arg63, Asp68, Asn70, Arg71, Glu177 and Tyr287 potentially involved in catalysis/substrate binding. The mutation of each of these residues to alanine inactivated AA3 except Asn70 and Arg71, therefore the corrected 3D model of mouse AA3 was created. Wild type (wt) mouse AA3 expressed in E. coli contained approximately 0.35 zinc atoms per monomer. Incubation with Co(2+) and Ni(2+) activated wt-AA3. In the cobalt-activated AA3 zinc was replaced with cobalt. Metal removal completely inactivated wt-AA3, whereas addition of Zn(2+), Mn(2+) or Fe(2+) restored initial activity. Co(2+) and to a lesser extent Ni(2+) increased activity several times in comparison with intact wt-AA3. Co(2+) drastically increased the rate of deacetylation of Ac-DCVC and significantly increased the toxicity of Ac-DCVC in the HEK293T cells expressing wt-AA3. The results indicate that AA3 is a metalloenzyme significantly activated by Co(2+) and Ni(2+).

  11. Solar-driven proton and carbon dioxide reduction to fuels—lessons from metalloenzymes.

    PubMed

    Bachmeier, Andreas; Armstrong, Fraser

    2015-04-01

    Metalloenzymes such as hydrogenases and carbon monoxide dehydrogenase can be attached to light-harvesting agents to produce informative photocatalytic systems of varying intricacy. Systematic studies yield important insight into mechanistic and design principles of artificial photosynthesis—one route to future renewable energy conversion, and the unconventional experiments reveal interesting new criteria for the catalytic performance of metals in biology. Recent advances are interpreted in terms of the importance of enzyme active centres that have evolved to perform fast and efficient catalysis using abundant elements, along with the ability of enzymes to trap photo-generated electrons by virtue of having receding, buried relay centres with low reorganisation energies.

  12. Engineering a dirhodium artificial metalloenzyme for selective olefin cyclopropanation

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Poonam; Yang, Hao; Ellis-Guardiola, Ken; Lewis, Jared C.

    2015-01-01

    Artificial metalloenzymes (ArMs) formed by incorporating synthetic metal catalysts into protein scaffolds have the potential to impart to chemical reactions selectivity that would be difficult to achieve using metal catalysts alone. In this work, we covalently link an alkyne-substituted dirhodium catalyst to a prolyl oligopeptidase containing a genetically encoded L-4-azidophenylalanine residue to create an ArM that catalyses olefin cyclopropanation. Scaffold mutagenesis is then used to improve the enantioselectivity of this reaction, and cyclopropanation of a range of styrenes and donor–acceptor carbene precursors were accepted. The ArM reduces the formation of byproducts, including those resulting from the reaction of dirhodium–carbene intermediates with water. This shows that an ArM can improve the substrate specificity of a catalyst and, for the first time, the water tolerance of a metal-catalysed reaction. Given the diversity of reactions catalysed by dirhodium complexes, we anticipate that dirhodium ArMs will provide many unique opportunities for selective catalysis. PMID:26206238

  13. Sunlight mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles using redox phytoprotein and their application in catalysis and colorimetric mercury sensing.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Khan Behlol Ayaz; Senthilnathan, Rajendran; Megarajan, Sengan; Anbazhagan, Veerappan

    2015-10-01

    Owing to the benign nature, plant extracts mediated green synthesis of metal nanoparticles (NPs) is rapidly expanding. In this study, we demonstrated the successful green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by utilizing natural sunlight and redox protein complex composed of ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (FNR) and ferredoxin (FD). The capping and stabilization of the AgNPs by the redox protein was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Light and redox protein is the prerequisite factor for the formation of AgNPs. The obtained result shows that the photo generated free radicals by the redox protein is responsible for the reduction of Ag(+) to Ag(0). Transmission electron microscopy revealed the formation of spherical AgNPs with size ranging from 10 to 15 nm. As-prepared AgNPs exhibit excellent catalytic activity toward the degradation of hazardous organic dyes, such as methylene blue, methyl orange and methyl red. These bio-inspired AgNPs is highly sensitive and selective in sensing hazardous mercury ions in the water at micromolar concentration. In addition, FNR/FD extract stabilized AgNPs showed good antimicrobial activity against gram positive and gram negative bacteria.

  14. Nafion-tris(2-2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) Ultrathin Langmuir-Schaefer films: redox catalysis and electrochemiluminescent properties.

    PubMed

    Bertoncello, Paolo; Dennany, Lynn; Forster, Robert J; Unwin, Patrick R

    2007-10-01

    A simple procedure to incorporate tris(2-2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II), [Ru(bpy)3]2+, into Nafion Langmuir-Schaefer (LS) films is described. Nafion LS films (tens of nanometers thick) were formed on quartz glass and indium tin oxide (ITO) directly from Nafion-[Ru(bpy)3]2+ Langmuir films assembled at the water-air interface. This procedure allowed the direct incorporation of [Ru(bpy)3]2+ into Nafion films without the need for subsequent loading. UV-vis spectroscopy confirmed the successful incorporation of [Ru(bpy)3]2+ within the LS films and showed that the amount of [Ru(bpy)3]2+ immobilized in this way scaled with film thickness. Voltammetric studies on ITO-modified electrodes confirmed the successful incorporation of [Ru(bpy)3]2+ and demonstrated that [Ru(bpy)3]2+ was retained within the ultrathin films over a long time scale. These electrodes were tested for the electrocatalytic reduction of tripropylamine. Significant catalysis was observed due to the rapid turnover of [Ru(bpy)3]2+/3+ between the electrode surface and outer boundary of the film, as a direct consequence of the ultrathin film dimensions. Concomitant electrochemiluminescence (ECL) was demonstrated highlighting the potential of this material for sensing applications.

  15. Enantioselective imine reduction catalyzed by imine reductases and artificial metalloenzymes.

    PubMed

    Gamenara, Daniela; Domínguez de María, Pablo

    2014-05-21

    Adding value to organic synthesis. Novel imine reductases enable the enantioselective reduction of imines to afford optically active amines. Likewise, novel bioinspired artificial metalloenzymes can perform the same reaction as well. Emerging proof-of-concepts are herein discussed.

  16. Directed evolution of artificial metalloenzymes for in vivo metathesis.

    PubMed

    Jeschek, Markus; Reuter, Raphael; Heinisch, Tillmann; Trindler, Christian; Klehr, Juliane; Panke, Sven; Ward, Thomas R

    2016-09-29

    The field of biocatalysis has advanced from harnessing natural enzymes to using directed evolution to obtain new biocatalysts with tailor-made functions. Several tools have recently been developed to expand the natural enzymatic repertoire with abiotic reactions. For example, artificial metalloenzymes, which combine the versatile reaction scope of transition metals with the beneficial catalytic features of enzymes, offer an attractive means to engineer new reactions. Three complementary strategies exist: repurposing natural metalloenzymes for abiotic transformations; in silico metalloenzyme (re-)design; and incorporation of abiotic cofactors into proteins. The third strategy offers the opportunity to design a wide variety of artificial metalloenzymes for non-natural reactions. However, many metal cofactors are inhibited by cellular components and therefore require purification of the scaffold protein. This limits the throughput of genetic optimization schemes applied to artificial metalloenzymes and their applicability in vivo to expand natural metabolism. Here we report the compartmentalization and in vivo evolution of an artificial metalloenzyme for olefin metathesis, which represents an archetypal organometallic reaction without equivalent in nature. Building on previous work on an artificial metallohydrolase, we exploit the periplasm of Escherichia coli as a reaction compartment for the 'metathase' because it offers an auspicious environment for artificial metalloenzymes, mainly owing to low concentrations of inhibitors such as glutathione, which has recently been identified as a major inhibitor. This strategy facilitated the assembly of a functional metathase in vivo and its directed evolution with substantially increased throughput compared to conventional approaches that rely on purified protein variants. The evolved metathase compares favourably with commercial catalysts, shows activity for different metathesis substrates and can be further evolved in

  17. Directed evolution of artificial metalloenzymes for in vivo metathesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeschek, Markus; Reuter, Raphael; Heinisch, Tillmann; Trindler, Christian; Klehr, Juliane; Panke, Sven; Ward, Thomas R.

    2016-09-01

    The field of biocatalysis has advanced from harnessing natural enzymes to using directed evolution to obtain new biocatalysts with tailor-made functions. Several tools have recently been developed to expand the natural enzymatic repertoire with abiotic reactions. For example, artificial metalloenzymes, which combine the versatile reaction scope of transition metals with the beneficial catalytic features of enzymes, offer an attractive means to engineer new reactions. Three complementary strategies exist: repurposing natural metalloenzymes for abiotic transformations; in silico metalloenzyme (re-)design; and incorporation of abiotic cofactors into proteins. The third strategy offers the opportunity to design a wide variety of artificial metalloenzymes for non-natural reactions. However, many metal cofactors are inhibited by cellular components and therefore require purification of the scaffold protein. This limits the throughput of genetic optimization schemes applied to artificial metalloenzymes and their applicability in vivo to expand natural metabolism. Here we report the compartmentalization and in vivo evolution of an artificial metalloenzyme for olefin metathesis, which represents an archetypal organometallic reaction without equivalent in nature. Building on previous work on an artificial metallohydrolase, we exploit the periplasm of Escherichia coli as a reaction compartment for the ‘metathase’ because it offers an auspicious environment for artificial metalloenzymes, mainly owing to low concentrations of inhibitors such as glutathione, which has recently been identified as a major inhibitor. This strategy facilitated the assembly of a functional metathase in vivo and its directed evolution with substantially increased throughput compared to conventional approaches that rely on purified protein variants. The evolved metathase compares favourably with commercial catalysts, shows activity for different metathesis substrates and can be further evolved in

  18. Electrochemical evidence that pyranopterin redox chemistry controls the catalysis of YedY, a mononuclear Mo enzyme.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Hope; Simonov, Alexandr N; Kierzek, Michelina; Rothery, Richard A; Weiner, Joel H; Bond, Alan M; Parkin, Alison

    2015-11-24

    A long-standing contradiction in the field of mononuclear Mo enzyme research is that small-molecule chemistry on active-site mimic compounds predicts ligand participation in the electron transfer reactions, but biochemical measurements only suggest metal-centered catalytic electron transfer. With the simultaneous measurement of substrate turnover and reversible electron transfer that is provided by Fourier-transformed alternating-current voltammetry, we show that Escherichia coli YedY is a mononuclear Mo enzyme that reconciles this conflict. In YedY, addition of three protons and three electrons to the well-characterized "as-isolated" Mo(V) oxidation state is needed to initiate the catalytic reduction of either dimethyl sulfoxide or trimethylamine N-oxide. Based on comparison with earlier studies and our UV-vis redox titration data, we assign the reversible one-proton and one-electron reduction process centered around +174 mV vs. standard hydrogen electrode at pH 7 to a Mo(V)-to-Mo(IV) conversion but ascribe the two-proton and two-electron transition occurring at negative potential to the organic pyranopterin ligand system. We predict that a dihydro-to-tetrahydro transition is needed to generate the catalytically active state of the enzyme. This is a previously unidentified mechanism, suggested by the structural simplicity of YedY, a protein in which Mo is the only metal site.

  19. Inactivation of metalloenzymes by food constituents.

    PubMed

    Friedman, M; Grosjean, O K; Zahnley, J C

    1986-09-01

    Phenylethylaminoalanine (PEAA), derived from biogenic phenylethylamine and dehydroalanine, inhibited the enzymatic activity of the metalloenzyme, carboxypeptidase A (CPA). The inhibition was maximal at pH 7.0 in the pH range 7-8.5. The extent of inhibition increased with time of treatment and PEAA concentration. N-AcetylPEAA did not inhibit the enzyme, suggesting that the free alpha-NH2 group is required for inhibition. PEAA also inactivated the copper enzyme, polyphenol oxidase (tyrosinase). Comparative studies with three other inhibitors, lysinoalanine, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and sodium phytate, suggest that the potency of PEAA as an inhibitor of CPA is similar to that of sodium phytate. Of these four inhibitors and three thiol compounds also tested, PEAA was the least and cysteine the most effective against tyrosinase. The pattern of observations in these studies suggests differences in the mechanisms of action of the inhibitors studied. The formation of PEAA, lysinoalanine and sodium phytate in foods is of possible nutritional and toxicological significance.

  20. Virtual screening against metalloenzymes for inhibitors and substrates.

    PubMed

    Irwin, John J; Raushel, Frank M; Shoichet, Brian K

    2005-09-20

    Molecular docking uses the three-dimensional structure of a receptor to screen databases of small molecules for potential ligands, often based on energetic complementarity. For many docking scoring functions, which calculate nonbonded interactions, metalloenzymes are challenging because of the partial covalent nature of metal-ligand interactions. To investigate how well molecular docking can identify potential ligands of metalloenzymes using a "standard" scoring function, we have docked the MDL Drug Data Report (MDDR), a functionally annotated database of 95,000 small molecules, against the X-ray crystal structures of five metalloenzymes. These enzymes included three zinc proteases, the nickel analogue of an iron enzyme, and a molybdenum metalloenzyme. The ability of the docking program to retrospectively enrich the annotated ligands as high-scoring hits for each enzyme and to calculate proper geometries was evaluated. In all five systems, the annotated ligands within the MDDR were enriched at least 20 times over random. To test the approach prospectively, a sixth target, the zinc beta-lactamase from Bacteroides fragilis, was screened against the fragment-like subset of the ZINC database. We purchased and tested 15 compounds from among the top 50 top-ranked ligands from docking, and found 5 inhibitors with apparent K(i) values less than 120 microM, the best of which was 2 microM. A more ambitious test still was predicting actual substrates for a seventh target, a Zn-dependent phosphotriesterase from Pseudomonas diminuta. Screening the Available Chemicals Directory (ACD) identified 25 thiophosphate esters as potential substrates within the top 100 ranked compounds. Eight of these, all previously uncharacterized for this enzyme, were acquired and tested, and all were confirmed experimentally as substrates. These results suggest that a simple, noncovalent scoring function may be used to identify inhibitors of at least some metalloenzymes.

  1. QM/MM X-ray Refinement of Zinc Metalloenzymes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue; Hayik, Seth A.; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2010-01-01

    Zinc metalloenzymes play an important role in biology. However, due to the limitation of molecular force field energy restraints used in X-ray refinement at medium or low resolutions, the precise geometry of the zinc coordination environment can be difficult to distinguish from ambiguous electron density maps. Due to the difficulties involved in defining accurate force fields for metal ions, the QM/MM (Quantum-Mechanical /Molecular-Mechanical) method provides an attractive and more general alternative for the study and refinement of metalloprotein active sites. Herein we present three examples that indicate that QM/MM based refinement yields a superior description of the crystal structure based on R and Rfree values and on the inspection of the zinc coordination environment. It is concluded that QM/MM refinement is a useful general tool for the improvement of the metal coordination sphere in metalloenzyme active sites. PMID:20116858

  2. Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vannice, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    Described is a graduate course in catalysis offered at Penn State University. A detailed course outline with 30 lecture topics is presented. A list of 42 references on catalysis used in place of a textbook is provided. (BT)

  3. Oxalates as Activating Groups for Alcohols in Visible Light Photoredox Catalysis: Formation of Quaternary Centers by Redox-Neutral Fragment Coupling

    PubMed Central

    MacMillan, David W. C.; Overman, Larry E.

    2015-01-01

    Alkyl oxalates are new bench-stable alcohol-activating groups for radical generation under visible light photoredox conditions. Using these precursors, the first net redox-neutral coupling of tertiary and secondary alcohols with electron-deficient alkenes is achieved. PMID:26322524

  4. Quantitative analysis of immobilized metalloenzymes by atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Opwis, Klaus; Knittel, Dierk; Schollmeyer, Eckhard

    2004-12-01

    A new, sensitive assay for the quantitative determination of immobilized metal containing enzymes has been developed using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). In contrast with conventionally used indirect methods the described quantitative AAS assay for metalloenzymes allows more exact analyses, because the carrier material with the enzyme is investigated directly. As an example, the validity and reliability of the method was examined by fixing the iron-containing enzyme catalase on cotton fabrics using different immobilization techniques. Sample preparation was carried out by dissolving the loaded fabrics in sulfuric acid before oxidising the residues with hydrogen peroxide. The iron concentrations were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry after calibration of the spectrometer with solutions of the free enzyme at different concentrations.

  5. On the antiquity of metalloenzymes and their substrates in bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Nitschke, Wolfgang; McGlynn, Shawn E; Milner-White, E James; Russell, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Many metalloenzymes that inject and extract reducing equivalents at the beginning and the end of electron transport chains involved in chemiosmosis are suggested, through phylogenetic analysis, to have been present in the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA). Their active centres are affine with the structures of minerals presumed to contribute to precipitate membranes produced on the mixing of hydrothermal solutions with the Hadean Ocean ~4 billion years ago. These mineral precipitates consist of transition element sulphides and oxides such as nickelian mackinawite ([Fe>Ni]2S2), a nickel-bearing greigite (~FeSS[Fe3NiS4]SSFe), violarite (~NiSS[Fe2Ni2S4]SSNi), a molybdenum bearing complex (~Mo(IV/VI)2Fe3S(0/2-)9) and green rust or fougerite (~[Fe(II)Fe(III)(OH)4](+)[OH](-)). They may be respectively compared with the active centres of Ni-Fe hydrogenase, carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH), acetyl coenzyme-A synthase (ACS), the complex iron-sulphur molybdoenzyme (CISM) superfamily and methane monooxygenase (MMO). With the look of good catalysts - a suggestion that gathers some support from prebiotic hydrothermal experimentation - and sequestered by short peptides, they could be thought of as the original building blocks of proto-enzyme active centres. This convergence of the makeup of the LUCA-metalloenzymes with mineral structure and composition of hydrothermal precipitates adds credence to the alkaline hydrothermal (chemiosmotic) theory for the emergence of life, specifically to the possibility that the first metabolic pathway - the acetyl CoA pathway - was initially driven from either end, reductively from CO2 to CO and oxidatively and reductively from CH4 through to a methane thiol group, the two entities assembled with the help of a further thiol on a violarite cluster sequestered by peptides. By contrast, the organic coenzymes were entirely a product of the first metabolic pathways. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Metals in Bioenergetics and

  6. Reversible structural transformation of FeO(x) nanostructures on Pt under cycling redox conditions and its effect on oxidation catalysis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Yao, Yunxi; Guo, Xiaoguang; Wei, Mingming; Ning, Yanxiao; Liu, Hongyang; Yang, Fan; Liu, Zhi; Bao, Xinhe

    2013-09-21

    Understanding dynamic changes of catalytically active nanostructures under reaction conditions is a pivotal challenge in catalysis research, which has been extensively addressed in metal nanoparticles but is less explored in supported oxide nanocatalysts. Here, structural changes of iron oxide (FeO(x)) nanostructures supported on Pt in a gaseous environment were examined by scanning tunneling microscopy, ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy using both model systems and real catalysts. O-Fe (FeO) bilayer nanostructures can be stabilized on Pt surfaces in reductive environments such as vacuum conditions and H2-rich reaction gas, which are highly active for low temperature CO oxidation. In contrast, exposure to H2-free oxidative gases produces a less active O-Fe-O (FeO2) trilayer structure. Reversible transformation between the FeO bilayer and FeO2 trilayer structures can be achieved under alternating reduction and oxidation conditions, leading to oscillation in the catalytic oxidation performance.

  7. Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, R.

    1989-01-01

    Described is a heterogeneous catalysis course which has elements of materials processing embedded in the classical format of catalytic mechanisms and surface chemistry. A course outline and list of examples of recent review papers written by students are provided. (MVL)

  8. Highly efficient redox isomerisation of allylic alcohols catalysed by pyrazole-based ruthenium(IV) complexes in water: mechanisms of bifunctional catalysis in water.

    PubMed

    Bellarosa, Luca; Díez, Josefina; Gimeno, José; Lledós, Agustí; Suárez, Francisco J; Ujaque, Gregori; Vicent, Cristian

    2012-06-18

    The catalytic activity of ruthenium(IV) ([Ru(η(3):η(3)-C(10)H(16))Cl(2)L]; C(10)H(16) = 2,7-dimethylocta-2,6-diene-1,8-diyl, L = pyrazole, 3-methylpyrazole, 3,5-dimethylpyrazole, 3-methyl-5-phenylpyrazole, 2-(1H-pyrazol-3-yl)phenol or indazole) and ruthenium(II) complexes ([Ru(η(6)-arene)Cl(2)(3,5-dimethylpyrazole)]; arene = C(6)H(6), p-cymene or C(6)Me(6)) in the redox isomerisation of allylic alcohols into carbonyl compounds in water is reported. The former show much higher catalytic activity than ruthenium(II) complexes. In particular, a variety of allylic alcohols have been quantitatively isomerised by using [Ru(η(3):η(3)-C(10)H(16))Cl(2)(pyrazole)] as a catalyst; the reactions proceeded faster in water than in THF, and in the absence of base. The isomerisations of monosubstituted alcohols take place rapidly (10-60 min, turn-over frequency = 750-3000 h(-1)) and, in some cases, at 35 °C in 60 min. The nature of the aqueous species formed in water by this complex has been analysed by ESI-MS. To analyse how an aqueous medium can influence the mechanism of the bifunctional catalytic process, DFT calculations (B3LYP) including one or two explicit water molecules and using the polarisable continuum model have been carried out and provide a valuable insight into the role of water on the activity of the bifunctional catalyst. Several mechanisms have been considered and imply the formation of aqua complexes and their deprotonated species generated from [Ru(η(3):η(3)-C(10)H(16))Cl(2)(pyrazole)]. Different competitive pathways based on outer-sphere mechanisms, which imply hydrogen-transfer processes, have been analysed. The overall isomerisation implies two hydrogen-transfer steps from the substrate to the catalyst and subsequent transfer back to the substrate. In addition to the conventional Noyori outer-sphere mechanism, which involves the pyrazolide ligand, a new mechanism with a hydroxopyrazole complex as the active species can be at work in water. The

  9. Seventh BES (Basic Energy Sciences) catalysis and surface chemistry research conference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    Research programs on catalysis and surface chemistry are presented. A total of fifty-seven topics are included. Areas of research include heterogeneous catalysis; catalysis in hydrogenation, desulfurization, gasification, and redox reactions; studies of surface properties and surface active sites; catalyst supports; chemical activation, deactivation; selectivity, chemical preparation; molecular structure studies; sorption and dissociation. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

  10. Enantioconvergent catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Justin T; Moore, Jared T

    2016-01-01

    Summary An enantioconvergent catalytic process has the potential to convert a racemic starting material to a single highly enantioenriched product with a maximum yield of 100%. Three mechanistically distinct approaches to effecting enantioconvergent catalysis are identified, and recent examples of each are highlighted. These processes are compared to related, non-enantioconvergent methods. PMID:27829909

  11. Mimicking the protein access channel to a metal center: effect of a funnel complex on dissociative versus associative copper redox chemistry.

    PubMed

    Le Poul, Nicolas; Douziech, Bénédicte; Zeitouny, Joceline; Thiabaud, Grégory; Colas, Hélène; Conan, Françoise; Cosquer, Nathalie; Jabin, Ivan; Lagrost, Corinne; Hapiot, Philippe; Reinaud, Olivia; Le Mest, Yves

    2009-12-16

    The control of metal-ligand exchange in a confined environment is of primary importance for understanding thermodynamics and kinetics of the electron transfer process governing the reactivity of enzymes. This study reveals an unprecedented change of the Cu(II)/Cu(I) binding and redox properties through a subtle control of the access to the labile site by a protein channel mimic. The cavity effect was estimated from cyclic voltammetry investigations by comparison of two complexes displaying the same coordination sphere (tmpa) and differing by the presence or absence of a calix[6]arene cone surrounding the metal labile site L. Effects on thermodynamics are illustrated by important shifts of E(1/2) toward higher values for the calix complexes. This is ascribable to the protection of the labile site of the open-shell system from the polar medium. Such a cavity control also generates specific stabilizations. This is exemplified by an impressively exalted affinity of the calixarene system for MeCN, and by the detection of a kinetic intermediate, a noncoordinated DMF guest molecule floating inside the cone. Kinetically, a unique dissymmetry between the Cu(I) and Cu(II) ligand exchange capacity is highlighted. At the CV time scale, the guest interconversion is only feasible after reduction of Cu(II) to Cu(I). Such a redox-switch mechanism results from the blocking of the associative process at the Cu(II) state, imposed by the calixarene funnel. All of this suggests that the embedment of a reactive redox metal ion in a funnel-like cavity can play a crucial role in catalysis, particularly for metallo-enzymes associating electron transfer and ligand exchange.

  12. Incorporation of manganese complexes into xylanase: new artificial metalloenzymes for enantioselective epoxidation.

    PubMed

    Allard, Mathieu; Dupont, Claude; Muñoz Robles, Victor; Doucet, Nicolas; Lledós, Agustí; Maréchal, Jean-Didier; Urvoas, Agathe; Mahy, Jean-Pierre; Ricoux, Rémy

    2012-01-23

    Here we report the best artificial metalloenzyme to date for the selective oxidation of aromatic alkenes; it was obtained by noncovalent insertion of Mn(III)-meso-tetrakis(p-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin [Mn(TpCPP), 1-Mn] into a host protein, xylanase 10A from Streptomyces lividans (Xln10A). Two metallic complexes-N,N'-ethylene bis(2-hydroxybenzylimine)-5,5'-dicarboxylic acid Mn(III) [(Mn-salen), 2-Mn] and 1-Mn-were associated with Xln10A, and the two hybrid biocatalysts were characterised by UV-visible spectroscopy, circular dichroism and molecular modelling. Only the artificial metalloenzyme based on 1-Mn and Xln10A was studied for its catalytic properties in the oxidation of various substituted styrene derivatives by KHSO(5): after optimisation, the 1-Mn-Xln10A artificial metalloenzyme was able to catalyse the oxidation of para-methoxystyrene by KHSO(5) with a 16 % yield and the best enantioselectivity (80 % in favour of the R isomer) ever reported for an artificial metalloenzyme.

  13. Unusual flavoenzyme catalysis in marine bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Teufel, Robin; Agarwal, Vinayak; Moore, Bradley S.

    2016-01-01

    Ever since the discovery of the flavin cofactor more than 80 years ago, flavin-dependent enzymes have emerged as ubiquitous and versatile redox catalysts in primary metabolism. Yet, the recent advances in the discovery and characterization of secondary metabolic pathways exposed new roles for flavin-mediated catalysis in the generation of structurally complex natural products. Here, we review a selection of key biosynthetic flavoenzymes from marine bacterial secondary metabolism and illustrate how their functional and mechanistic investigation expanded our view of the cofactor's chemical repertoire and led to the discovery of a previously unknown flavin redox state. PMID:26803009

  14. Asymmetric Anion-π Catalysis on Perylenediimides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Miros, François N; Mareda, Jiri; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan

    2016-11-07

    Anion-π catalysis, that is the stabilization of anionic transition states on π-acidic aromatic surfaces, has so far been developed with naphthalenediimides (NDIs). This report introduces perylenediimides (PDIs) to anion-π catalysis. The quadrupole moment of PDIs (+23.2 B) is found to exceed that of NDIs and reach new records with acceptors in the core (+70.9 B), and their larger surface provides space to better accommodate chemical transformations. Unlike NDIs, the activity of PDI catalysts for enolate and enamine addition is determined by the twist of their π surface rather than their reducibility. These results, further strengthened by nitrate inhibition and circular dichroism spectroscopy, support an understanding of anion-π interactions centered around quadrupole moments, i.e., electrostatic contributions, rather than redox potentials and charge transfer. The large PDI surfaces provide access to the highest enantioselectivities observed so far in anion-π catalysis (96 % ee).

  15. Catalysis of Photochemical Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albini, A.

    1986-01-01

    Offers a classification system of catalytic effects in photochemical reactions, contrasting characteristic properties of photochemical and thermal reactions. Discusses catalysis and sensitization, examples of catalyzed reactions of excepted states, complexing ground state substrates, and catalysis of primary photoproducts. (JM)

  16. Biologically inspired oxidation catalysis.

    PubMed

    Que, Lawrence; Tolman, William B

    2008-09-18

    The development of processes for selective hydrocarbon oxidation is a goal that has long been pursued. An additional challenge is to make such processes environmentally friendly, for example by using non-toxic reagents and energy-efficient catalytic methods. Excellent examples are naturally occurring iron- or copper-containing metalloenzymes, and extensive studies have revealed the key chemical principles that underlie their efficacy as catalysts for aerobic oxidations. Important inroads have been made in applying this knowledge to the development of synthetic catalysts that model enzyme function. Such biologically inspired hydrocarbon oxidation catalysts hold great promise for wide-ranging synthetic applications.

  17. Redox Redone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petty, John T.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an extension of the change in oxidation number method that is used for balancing skeletal redox reactions in aqueous solutions. Retains most of the simplicity of the change in oxidation number method but provides the additional step-by-step process necessary for the beginner to balance an equation. (JRH)

  18. Kinetics and Catalysis Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falconer, John L.; Britten, Jerald A.

    1984-01-01

    Eleven videotaped kinetics and catalysis demonstrations are described. Demonstrations include the clock reaction, oscillating reaction, hydrogen oxidation in air, hydrogen-oxygen explosion, acid-base properties of solids, high- and low-temperature zeolite reactivity, copper catalysis of ammonia oxidation and sodium peroxide decomposition, ammonia…

  19. 2-Aminoimidazole Amino Acids as Inhibitors of the Binuclear Manganese Metalloenzyme Human Arginase I

    SciTech Connect

    Ilies, M.; Di Costanzo, L; North, M; Scott, J; Christianson, D

    2010-01-01

    Arginase, a key metalloenzyme of the urea cycle that converts L-arginine into L-ornithine and urea, is presently considered a pharmaceutical target for the management of diseases associated with aberrant L-arginine homeostasis, such as asthma, cardiovascular diseases, and erectile dysfunction. We now report the design, synthesis, and evaluation of a series of 2-aminoimidazole amino acid inhibitors in which the 2-aminoimidazole moiety serves as a guanidine mimetic. These compounds represent a new class of arginase inhibitors. The most potent inhibitor identified in this study, 2-(S)-amino-5-(2-aminoimidazol-1-yl)pentanoic acid (A1P, 10), binds to human arginase I with K{sub d} = 2 {micro}M and significantly attenuates airways hyperresponsiveness in a murine model of allergic airways inflammation. These findings suggest that 2-aminoimidazole amino acids represent new leads for the development of arginase inhibitors with promising pharmacological profiles.

  20. Structure–function analysis of Plasmodium RNA triphosphatase and description of a triphosphate tunnel metalloenzyme superfamily that includes Cet1-like RNA triphosphatases and CYTH proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Chunling; Smith, Paul; Shuman, Stewart

    2006-01-01

    RNA triphosphatase catalyzes the first step in mRNA capping. The RNA triphosphatases of fungi and protozoa are structurally and mechanistically unrelated to the analogous mammalian enzyme, a situation that recommends RNA triphosphatase as an anti-infective target. Fungal and protozoan RNA triphosphatases belong to a family of metal-dependent phosphohydrolases exemplified by yeast Cet1. The Cet1 active site is unusually complex and located within a topologically closed hydrophilic β-barrel (the triphosphate tunnel). Here we probe the active site of Plasmodium falciparum RNA triphosphatase by targeted mutagenesis and thereby identify eight residues essential for catalysis. The functional data engender an improved structural alignment in which the Plasmodium counterparts of the Cet1 tunnel strands and active-site functional groups are located with confidence. We gain insight into the evolution of the Cet1-like triphosphatase family by noting that the heretofore unique tertiary structure and active site of Cet1 are recapitulated in recently deposited structures of proteins from Pyrococcus (PBD 1YEM) and Vibrio (PDB 2ACA). The latter proteins exemplify a CYTH domain found in CyaB-like adenylate cyclases and mammalian thiamine triphosphatase. We conclude that the tunnel fold first described for Cet1 is the prototype of a larger enzyme superfamily that includes the CYTH branch. This superfamily, which we name “triphosphate tunnel metalloenzyme,” is distributed widely among bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryal taxa. It is now clear that Cet1-like RNA triphosphatases did not arise de novo in unicellular eukarya in tandem with the emergence of caps as the defining feature of eukaryotic mRNA. They likely evolved by incremental changes in an ancestral tunnel enzyme that conferred specificity for RNA 5′-end processing. PMID:16809816

  1. Electrochemically responsive heterogeneous catalysis for controlling reaction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xianwen; Tian, Wenda; Wu, Jie; Rutledge, Gregory C; Hatton, T Alan

    2015-01-28

    We report a method to control reaction kinetics using electrochemically responsive heterogeneous catalysis (ERHC). An ERHC system should possess a hybrid structure composed of an electron-conducting porous framework coated with redox-switchable catalysts. In contrast to other types of responsive catalysis, ERHC combines all the following desired characteristics for a catalysis control strategy: continuous variation of reaction rates as a function of the magnitude of external stimulus, easy integration into fixed-bed flow reactors, and precise spatial and temporal control of the catalyst activity. Herein we first demonstrate a facile approach to fabricating a model ERHC system that consists of carbon microfibers with conformal redox polymer coating. Second, using a Michael reaction whose kinetics depends on the redox state of the redox polymer catalyst, we show that use of different electrochemical potentials permits continuous adjustment of the reaction rates. The dependence of the reaction rate on the electrochemical potential generally agrees with the Nernstian prediction, with minor discrepancies due to the multilayer nature of the polymer film. Additionally, we show that the ERHC system can be employed to manipulate the shape of the reactant concentration-time profile in a batch reactor through applying customized potential-time programs. Furthermore, we perform COMSOL simulation for an ERHC-integrated flow reactor, demonstrating highly flexible manipulation of reactant concentrations as a function of both location and time.

  2. Engineered Proteins: Redox Properties and Their Applications

    PubMed Central

    Prabhulkar, Shradha; Tian, Hui; Wang, Xiaotang; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Oxidoreductases and metalloproteins, representing more than one third of all known proteins, serve as significant catalysts for numerous biological processes that involve electron transfers such as photosynthesis, respiration, metabolism, and molecular signaling. The functional properties of the oxidoreductases/metalloproteins are determined by the nature of their redox centers. Protein engineering is a powerful approach that is used to incorporate biological and abiological redox cofactors as well as novel enzymes and redox proteins with predictable structures and desirable functions for important biological and chemical applications. The methods of protein engineering, mainly rational design, directed evolution, protein surface modifications, and domain shuffling, have allowed the creation and study of a number of redox proteins. This review presents a selection of engineered redox proteins achieved through these methods, resulting in a manipulation in redox potentials, an increase in electron-transfer efficiency, and an expansion of native proteins by de novo design. Such engineered/modified redox proteins with desired properties have led to a broad spectrum of practical applications, ranging from biosensors, biofuel cells, to pharmaceuticals and hybrid catalysis. Glucose biosensors are one of the most successful products in enzyme electrochemistry, with reconstituted glucose oxidase achieving effective electrical communication with the sensor electrode; direct electron-transfer-type biofuel cells are developed to avoid thermodynamic loss and mediator leakage; and fusion proteins of P450s and redox partners make the biocatalytic generation of drug metabolites possible. In summary, this review includes the properties and applications of the engineered redox proteins as well as their significance and great potential in the exploration of bioelectrochemical sensing devices. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 1796–1822. PMID:22435347

  3. Abiological catalysis by artificial haem proteins containing noble metals in place of iron.

    PubMed

    Key, Hanna M; Dydio, Paweł; Clark, Douglas S; Hartwig, John F

    2016-06-23

    Enzymes that contain metal ions--that is, metalloenzymes--possess the reactivity of a transition metal centre and the potential of molecular evolution to modulate the reactivity and substrate-selectivity of the system. By exploiting substrate promiscuity and protein engineering, the scope of reactions catalysed by native metalloenzymes has been expanded recently to include abiological transformations. However, this strategy is limited by the inherent reactivity of metal centres in native metalloenzymes. To overcome this limitation, artificial metalloproteins have been created by incorporating complete, noble-metal complexes within proteins lacking native metal sites. The interactions of the substrate with the protein in these systems are, however, distinct from those with the native protein because the metal complex occupies the substrate binding site. At the intersection of these approaches lies a third strategy, in which the native metal of a metalloenzyme is replaced with an abiological metal with reactivity different from that of the metal in a native protein. This strategy could create artificial enzymes for abiological catalysis within the natural substrate binding site of an enzyme that can be subjected to directed evolution. Here we report the formal replacement of iron in Fe-porphyrin IX (Fe-PIX) proteins with abiological, noble metals to create enzymes that catalyse reactions not catalysed by native Fe-enzymes or other metalloenzymes. In particular, we prepared modified myoglobins containing an Ir(Me) site that catalyse the functionalization of C-H bonds to form C-C bonds by carbene insertion and add carbenes to both β-substituted vinylarenes and unactivated aliphatic α-olefins. We conducted directed evolution of the Ir(Me)-myoglobin and generated mutants that form either enantiomer of the products of C-H insertion and catalyse the enantio- and diastereoselective cyclopropanation of unactivated olefins. The presented method of preparing artificial haem

  4. Catalysis seen in action.

    PubMed

    Tromp, Moniek

    2015-03-06

    Synchrotron radiation techniques are widely applied in materials research and heterogeneous catalysis. In homogeneous catalysis, its use so far is rather limited despite its high potential. Here, insights in the strengths and limitations of X-ray spectroscopy technique in the field of homogeneous catalysis are given, including new technique developments. A relevant homogeneous catalyst, used in the industrially important selective oligomerization of ethene, is taken as a worked-out example. Emphasis is placed on time-resolved operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy with outlooks to novel high energy resolution and emission techniques. All experiments described have been or can be done at the Diamond Light Source Ltd (Didcot, UK).

  5. Research on Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartholomew, Calvin H.; Hecker, William C.

    1984-01-01

    The objectives and philosophy of the Catalysis Laboratory at Brigham Young University are discussed. Also discusses recent and current research activities at the laboratory as well as educational opportunities, research facilities, and sources of research support. (JN)

  6. Electrostatically Embedded Many-Body Expansion for Neutral and Charged Metalloenzyme Model Systems.

    PubMed

    Kurbanov, Elbek K; Leverentz, Hannah R; Truhlar, Donald G; Amin, Elizabeth A

    2012-01-10

    The electrostatically embedded many-body (EE-MB) method has proven accurate for calculating cohesive and conformational energies in clusters, and it has recently been extended to obtain bond dissociation energies for metal-ligand bonds in positively charged inorganic coordination complexes. In the present paper, we present four key guidelines that maximize the accuracy and efficiency of EE-MB calculations for metal centers. Then, following these guidelines, we show that the EE-MB method can also perform well for bond dissociation energies in a variety of neutral and negatively charged inorganic coordination systems representing metalloenzyme active sites, including a model of the catalytic site of the zinc-bearing anthrax toxin lethal factor, a popular target for drug development. In particular, we find that the electrostatically embedded three-body (EE-3B) method is able to reproduce conventionally calculated bond-breaking energies in a series of pentacoordinate and hexacoordinate zinc-containing systems with an average absolute error (averaged over 25 cases) of only 0.98 kcal/mol.

  7. Identity and mechanisms of alkane-oxidizing metalloenzymes from deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Erin M; Keddis, Ramaydalis; Groves, John T; Vetriani, Costantino; Austin, Rachel Narehood

    2013-01-01

    Six aerobic alkanotrophs (organism that can metabolize alkanes as their sole carbon source) isolated from deep-sea hydrothermal vents were characterized using the radical clock substrate norcarane to determine the metalloenzyme and reaction mechanism used to oxidize alkanes. The organisms studied were Alcanivorax sp. strains EPR7 and MAR14, Marinobacter sp. strain EPR21, Nocardioides sp. strains EPR26w, EPR28w, and Parvibaculum hydrocarbonoclasticum strain EPR92. Each organism was able to grow on n-alkanes as the sole carbon source and therefore must express genes encoding an alkane-oxidizing enzyme. Results from the oxidation of the radical-clock diagnostic substrate norcarane demonstrated that five of the six organisms (EPR7, MAR14, EPR21, EPR26w, and EPR28w) used an alkane hydroxylase functionally similar to AlkB to catalyze the oxidation of medium-chain alkanes, while the sixth organism (EPR92) used an alkane-oxidizing cytochrome P450 (CYP)-like protein to catalyze the oxidation. DNA sequencing indicated that EPR7 and EPR21 possess genes encoding AlkB proteins, while sequencing results from EPR92 confirmed the presence of a gene encoding CYP-like alkane hydroxylase, consistent with the results from the norcarane experiments.

  8. Identity and mechanisms of alkane-oxidizing metalloenzymes from deep-sea hydrothermal vents

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Erin M.; Keddis, Ramaydalis; Groves, John T.; Vetriani, Costantino; Austin, Rachel Narehood

    2013-01-01

    Six aerobic alkanotrophs (organism that can metabolize alkanes as their sole carbon source) isolated from deep-sea hydrothermal vents were characterized using the radical clock substrate norcarane to determine the metalloenzyme and reaction mechanism used to oxidize alkanes. The organisms studied were Alcanivorax sp. strains EPR7 and MAR14, Marinobacter sp. strain EPR21, Nocardioides sp. strains EPR26w, EPR28w, and Parvibaculum hydrocarbonoclasticum strain EPR92. Each organism was able to grow on n-alkanes as the sole carbon source and therefore must express genes encoding an alkane-oxidizing enzyme. Results from the oxidation of the radical-clock diagnostic substrate norcarane demonstrated that five of the six organisms (EPR7, MAR14, EPR21, EPR26w, and EPR28w) used an alkane hydroxylase functionally similar to AlkB to catalyze the oxidation of medium-chain alkanes, while the sixth organism (EPR92) used an alkane-oxidizing cytochrome P450 (CYP)-like protein to catalyze the oxidation. DNA sequencing indicated that EPR7 and EPR21 possess genes encoding AlkB proteins, while sequencing results from EPR92 confirmed the presence of a gene encoding CYP-like alkane hydroxylase, consistent with the results from the norcarane experiments. PMID:23825470

  9. Homogeneous, Heterogeneous, and Enzymatic Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oyama, S. Ted; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses three areas of catalysis: homegeneous, heterogeneous, and enzymatic. Explains fundamentals and economic impact of catalysis. Lists and discusses common industrial catalysts. Provides a list of 107 references. (MVL)

  10. Catalysis and biocatalysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The annual report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1990 research activities and accomplishments for the Catalysis and Biocatalysis Program of the Advanced Industrial Concepts Division (AICD), Office of Industrial Technologies of the Department of Energy (DOE). The mission of the AICD is to create a balanced program of high risk, long term, directed interdisciplinary research and development that will improve energy efficiency and enhance fuel flexibility in the industrial sector. The Catalysis and Biocatalysis Program's technical activities were organized into five work elements: the Molecular Modeling and Catalysis by Design element; the Applied Microbiology and Genetics element; the Bioprocess Engineering element; the Separations and Novel Chemical Processes element; and the Process Design and Analysis element.

  11. On the origin of the catalytic power of carboxypeptidase A and other metalloenzymes.

    PubMed

    Kilshtain, Alexandra Vardi; Warshel, Arieh

    2009-11-15

    Zinc metalloenzymes play a major role in key biological processes and carboxypeptidase-A (CPA) is a major prototype of such enzymes. The present work quantifies the energetics of the catalytic reaction of CPA and its mutants using the empirical valence bond (EVB) approach. The simulations allow us to quantify the origin of the catalytic power of this enzyme and to examine different mechanistic alternatives. The first step of the analysis used experimental information to determine the activation energy of each assumed mechanism of the reference reaction without the enzyme. The next step of the analysis involved EVB simulations of the reference reaction and then a calibration of the simulations by forcing them to reproduce the energetics of the reference reaction, in each assumed mechanism. The calibrated EVB was then used in systematic simulations of the catalytic reaction in the protein environment, without changing any parameter. The simulations reproduced the observed rate enhancement in two feasible general acid-general base mechanisms (GAGB-1 and GAGB-2), although the calculations with the GAGB-2 mechanism underestimated the catalytic effect in some treatments. We also reproduced the catalytic effect in the R127A mutant. The mutation calculations indicate that the GAGB-2 mechanism is significantly less likely than the GAGB-1 mechanism. It is also found, that the enzyme loses all its catalytic effect without the metal. This and earlier studies show that the catalytic effect of the metal is not some constant electrostatic effect, that can be assessed from gas phase studies, but a reflection of the dielectric effect of the specific environment.

  12. Catalysis of Supramolecular Hydrogelation.

    PubMed

    Trausel, Fanny; Versluis, Frank; Maity, Chandan; Poolman, Jos M; Lovrak, Matija; van Esch, Jan H; Eelkema, Rienk

    2016-07-19

    One often thinks of catalysts as chemical tools to accelerate a reaction or to have a reaction run under more benign conditions. As such, catalysis has a role to play in the chemical industry and in lab scale synthesis that is not to be underestimated. Still, the role of catalysis in living systems (cells, organisms) is much more extensive, ranging from the formation and breakdown of small molecules and biopolymers to controlling signal transduction cascades and feedback processes, motility, and mechanical action. Such phenomena are only recently starting to receive attention in synthetic materials and chemical systems. "Smart" soft materials could find many important applications ranging from personalized therapeutics to soft robotics to name but a few. Until recently, approaches to control the properties of such materials were largely dominated by thermodynamics, for instance, looking at phase behavior and interaction strength. However, kinetics plays a large role in determining the behavior of such soft materials, for instance, in the formation of kinetically trapped (metastable) states or the dynamics of component exchange. As catalysts can change the rate of a chemical reaction, catalysis could be used to control the formation, dynamics, and fate of supramolecular structures when the molecules making up these structures contain chemical bonds whose formation or exchange are susceptible to catalysis. In this Account, we describe our efforts to use synthetic catalysts to control the properties of supramolecular hydrogels. Building on the concept of synthesizing the assembling molecule in the self-assembly medium from nonassembling precursors, we will introduce the use of catalysis to change the kinetics of assembler formation and thereby the properties of the resulting material. In particular, we will focus on the synthesis of supramolecular hydrogels where the use of a catalyst provides access to gel materials with vastly different appearance and mechanical

  13. Anion-π catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingjie; Beuchat, César; Domoto, Yuya; Gajewy, Jadwiga; Wilson, Adam; Mareda, Jiri; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan

    2014-02-05

    The introduction of new noncovalent interactions to build functional systems is of fundamental importance. We here report experimental and theoretical evidence that anion-π interactions can contribute to catalysis. The Kemp elimination is used as a classical tool to discover conceptually innovative catalysts for reactions with anionic transition states. For anion-π catalysis, a carboxylate base and a solubilizer are covalently attached to the π-acidic surface of naphthalenediimides. On these π-acidic surfaces, transition-state stabilizations up to ΔΔGTS = 31.8 ± 0.4 kJ mol(-1) are found. This value corresponds to a transition-state recognition of KTS = 2.7 ± 0.5 μM and a catalytic proficiency of 3.8 × 10(5) M(-1). Significantly increasing transition-state stabilization with increasing π-acidity of the catalyst, observed for two separate series, demonstrates the existence of "anion-π catalysis." In sharp contrast, increasing π-acidity of the best naphthalenediimide catalysts does not influence the more than 12 000-times weaker substrate recognition (KM = 34.5 ± 1.6 μM). Together with the disappearance of Michaelis-Menten kinetics on the expanded π-surfaces of perylenediimides, this finding supports that contributions from π-π interactions are not very important for anion-π catalysis. The linker between the π-acidic surface and the carboxylate base strongly influences activity. Insufficient length and flexibility cause incompatibility with saturation kinetics. Moreover, preorganizing linkers do not improve catalysis much, suggesting that the ideal positioning of the carboxylate base on the π-acidic surface is achieved by intramolecular anion-π interactions rather than by an optimized structure of the linker. Computational simulations are in excellent agreement with experimental results. They confirm, inter alia, that the stabilization of the anionic transition states (but not the neutral ground states) increases with the π-acidity of the

  14. Proteins as templates for complex synthetic metalloclusters: towards biologically programmed heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Fehl, Charlie; Davis, Benjamin G

    2016-05-01

    Despite nature's prevalent use of metals as prosthetics to adapt or enhance the behaviour of proteins, our ability to programme such architectural organization remains underdeveloped. Multi-metal clusters buried in proteins underpin the most remarkable chemical transformations in nature, but we are not yet in a position to fully mimic or exploit such systems. With the advent of copious, relevant structural information, judicious mechanistic studies and the use of accessible computational methods in protein design coupled with new synthetic methods for building biomacromolecules, we can envisage a 'new dawn' that will allow us to build de novo metalloenzymes that move beyond mono-metal centres. In particular, we highlight the need for systems that approach the multi-centred clusters that have evolved to couple electron shuttling with catalysis. Such hybrids may be viewed as exciting mid-points between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts which also exploit the primary benefits of biocatalysis.

  15. Proteins as templates for complex synthetic metalloclusters: towards biologically programmed heterogeneous catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Fehl, Charlie

    2016-01-01

    Despite nature’s prevalent use of metals as prosthetics to adapt or enhance the behaviour of proteins, our ability to programme such architectural organization remains underdeveloped. Multi-metal clusters buried in proteins underpin the most remarkable chemical transformations in nature, but we are not yet in a position to fully mimic or exploit such systems. With the advent of copious, relevant structural information, judicious mechanistic studies and the use of accessible computational methods in protein design coupled with new synthetic methods for building biomacromolecules, we can envisage a ‘new dawn’ that will allow us to build de novo metalloenzymes that move beyond mono-metal centres. In particular, we highlight the need for systems that approach the multi-centred clusters that have evolved to couple electron shuttling with catalysis. Such hybrids may be viewed as exciting mid-points between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts which also exploit the primary benefits of biocatalysis. PMID:27279776

  16. High-Temperature Heterogeneous Redox Catalysis for NOx Abatement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-23

    Initially Evaluated During Phase I. GSV = 3200 hŕ Table 3. Oxygen Dependence of NO Reduction Activity of ( Bi2O3 )0.8(Nb2O5)02. T = 750°C...46 CuW04 As Received 15.2147 +/- n0.0495 47 (2.6 From Oxides 900 2 48 ( Bi2O3 )0.8(WO3)0.2 From Oxides 750 2 0.2023 +/- 0.0185 49 ( Bi2O3 )08(Nb2O5...From Oxides 750 2 1.0465 +/-0.0177 53 ( Bi2O3 )06(Nb2O5)a4 From Oxides 750 2 54 ( Bi2O3 )05(Nb2O5)d5 From Oxides 750 2 55 ( Bi2O3 )04(Nb2O5)0.6 From

  17. Heterogeneous basic catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Hideshi

    1995-05-01

    Heterogeneous acid catalysis attracted much attention primarily because heterogeneous acidic catalysts act as catalysts in petroleum refinery and are known as a main catalyst in the cracking process which is the largest process among the industrial chemical processes. In contrast to these extensive studies of heterogeneous acidic catalysts, fewer efforts have been given to the study of heterogeneous basic catalysts. The types of heterogeneous basic catalysts are listed in Table 1. Except for non-oxide catalysts, the basic sites are believed to be surface O atoms. The studies of heterogeneous catalysis have been continuous and progressed steadily. They have never been reviewed in the chemical Reviews before. It is more useful and informative to describe the studies of heterogeneous basic catalysis performed for a long period. In the present article, therefore, the cited papers are not restricted to those published recently, but include those published for the last 25 years. The paper first describes the generation of basic sites before describing methods used in the characterization of basic surfaces. These are indicator methods, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of CO{sub 2}, UV absorption and luminescence spectroscopies, TPD of H{sub 2}, XPS, IR of CO{sub 2}, IR of pyrrole, and oxygen exchange between CO{sub 2} and the surface. The paper then discusses studies on the catalysis by heterogeneous basic catalysts. Some of these reactions are dehydration, dehydrogenation, hydrogenation, amination, alkylation, ring transformation, and reactions of organosilanes. Catalysts discussed are single component metal oxides, zeolites, non-oxide types, and superbasic catalysts. 141 refs.

  18. Concepts in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-06-01

    OxIdlaing Species In Heterogeneous Catalytic Oxidation. In the history of the study of heterogeneioum oxidation catalysis, reaction mechanisms have’ been...for sonti timie but recent workŔ’ onl the lplatitnum-rtothe~idina alloy systemn semi- s quite promising 10) lvad ito at bettr understanding. 1t wait...chemical nature of the catalyst, its previous history , and on the courac of the catalytic reaction itself. The energy spectrum of the active surface

  19. Catalysis and biocatalysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingham, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    This final report presents a summary of research activities and accomplishments for the Catalysis and Biocatalysis Program, which was renamed the Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program, currently of the Advanced Industrial Concepts Division (AICD), Office of Industrial Technologies of the Department of Energy (DOE). The Program was formerly under the Division of Energy Conversion and Utilization Technologies (ECUT) until the DOE reorganization in April, 1990. The goals of the BCTR Program are consistent with the initial ECUT goals, but represent an increased effort toward advances in chemical and biological technology transfer. In addition, the transition reflects a need for the BCTR Program to assume a greater R&D role in chemical catalysis as well as a need to position itself for a more encompassing involvement in a broader range of biological and chemical technology research. The mission of the AICD is to create a balanced Program of high risk, long-term, directed interdisciplinary research and development that will improve energy efficiency and enhance fuel flexibility in the industrial sector. Under AICD, the DOE Catalysis and Biocatalysis Program sponsors research and development in furthering industrial biotechnology applications and promotes the integrated participation of universities, industrial companies, and government research laboratories.

  20. Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms Part II: Homogeneous Catalysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, D. O.

    1976-01-01

    Suggests several mechanisms for catalysis by metal ion complexes. Discusses the principal factors of importance in these catalysis reactions and suggests reactions suitable for laboratory study. (MLH)

  1. The redox switch/redox coupling hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Cerdán, Sebastián; Rodrigues, Tiago B; Sierra, Alejandra; Benito, Marina; Fonseca, Luis L; Fonseca, Carla P; García-Martín, María L

    2006-01-01

    We provide an integrative interpretation of neuroglial metabolic coupling including the presence of subcellular compartmentation of pyruvate and monocarboxylate recycling through the plasma membrane of both neurons and glial cells. The subcellular compartmentation of pyruvate allows neurons and astrocytes to select between glucose and lactate as alternative substrates, depending on their relative extracellular concentration and the operation of a redox switch. This mechanism is based on the inhibition of glycolysis at the level of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase by NAD(+) limitation, under sufficiently reduced cytosolic NAD(+)/NADH redox conditions. Lactate and pyruvate recycling through the plasma membrane allows the return to the extracellular medium of cytosolic monocarboxylates enabling their transcellular, reversible, exchange between neurons and astrocytes. Together, intracellular pyruvate compartmentation and monocarboxylate recycling result in an effective transcellular coupling between the cytosolic NAD(+)/NADH redox states of both neurons and glial cells. Following glutamatergic neurotransmission, increased glutamate uptake by the astrocytes is proposed to augment glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle activity, balancing to a reduced cytosolic NAD(+)/NADH in the glia. Reducing equivalents are transferred then to the neuron resulting in a reduced neuronal NAD(+)/NADH redox state. This may eventually switch off neuronal glycolysis, favoring the oxidation of extracellular lactate in the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) equilibrium and in the neuronal tricarboxylic acid cycles. Finally, pyruvate derived from neuronal lactate oxidation, may return to the extracellular space and to the astrocyte, restoring the basal redox state and beginning a new loop of the lactate/pyruvate transcellular coupling cycle. Transcellular redox coupling operates through the plasma membrane transporters of monocarboxylates, similarly to the intracellular redox shuttles

  2. Recent advances of lanthanum-based perovskite oxides for catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Huiyuan; Zhang, Pengfei; Dai, Sheng

    2015-09-21

    There is a need to reduce the use of noble metal elements especially in the field of catalysis, where noble metals are ubiquitously applied. To this end, perovskite oxides, an important class of mixed oxide, have been attracting increasing attention for decades as potential replacements. Benefiting from the extraordinary tunability of their compositions and structures, perovskite oxides can be rationally tailored and equipped with targeted physical and chemical properties e.g. redox behavior, oxygen mobility, and ion conductivity for enhanced catalysis. Recently, the development of highly efficient perovskite oxide catalysts has been extensively studied. This review article summarizes the recent development of lanthanum-based perovskite oxides as advanced catalysts for both energy conversion applications and traditional heterogeneous reactions.

  3. Recent advances of lanthanum-based perovskite oxides for catalysis

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Huiyuan; Zhang, Pengfei; Dai, Sheng

    2015-09-21

    There is a need to reduce the use of noble metal elements especially in the field of catalysis, where noble metals are ubiquitously applied. To this end, perovskite oxides, an important class of mixed oxide, have been attracting increasing attention for decades as potential replacements. Benefiting from the extraordinary tunability of their compositions and structures, perovskite oxides can be rationally tailored and equipped with targeted physical and chemical properties e.g. redox behavior, oxygen mobility, and ion conductivity for enhanced catalysis. Recently, the development of highly efficient perovskite oxide catalysts has been extensively studied. This review article summarizes the recent developmentmore » of lanthanum-based perovskite oxides as advanced catalysts for both energy conversion applications and traditional heterogeneous reactions.« less

  4. Zeolite catalysis: technology

    SciTech Connect

    Heinemann, H.

    1980-07-01

    Zeolites have been used as catalysts in industry since the early nineteen sixties. The great majority of commercial applications employ one of three zeolite types: zeolite Y; Mordenite; ZSM-5. By far the largest use of zeolites is in catalytic cracking, and to a lesser extent in hydrocracking. This paper reviews the rapid development of zeolite catalysis and its application in industries such as: the production of gasoline by catalytic cracking of petroleum; isomerization of C/sub 5/ and C/sub 6/ paraffin hydrocarbons; alkylation of aromatics with olefins; xylene isomerization; and conversion of methanol to gasoline.

  5. Catalysis and prebiotic RNA synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, James P.

    1993-01-01

    The essential role of catalysis for the origins of life is discussed. The status of the prebiotic synthesis of 2',5'- and 3'5'-linked oligomers of RNA is reviewed. Examples of the role of metal ion and mineral catalysis in RNA oligomer formation are discussed.

  6. Paradigms of Sulfotransferase Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Cook, Ian; Falany, Charles N.; Leyh, Thomas S.

    2014-01-01

    Human cytosolic sulfotransferases (SULTs) regulate the activities of thousands of signaling small molecules via transfer of the sulfuryl moiety (-SO3) from 3′-phosphoadenosine 5′-phosphosulfate (PAPS) to the hydroxyls and primary amines of acceptors. Sulfonation controls the affinities of ligands for their targets, and thereby regulates numerous receptors, which, in turn, regulate complex cellular responses. Despite their biological and medical relevance, basic SULT mechanism issues remain unresolved. To settle these issues, and to create an in-depth model of SULT catalysis, the complete kinetic mechanism of a representative member of the human SULT family, SULT2A1, was determined. The mechanism is composed of eight enzyme forms that interconvert via 22 rate constants, each of which was determined independently. The result is a complete quantitative description of the mechanism that accurately predicts complex enzymatic behavior. This is the first description of a SULT mechanism at this resolution, and it reveals numerous principles of SULT catalysis and resolves previously ambiguous issues. The structures and catalytic behaviors SULTs are highly conserved; hence, the mechanism presented here should prove paradigmatic for the family. PMID:25056952

  7. Unravelling novel synergies between organometallic and biological partners: a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics study of an artificial metalloenzyme

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Carrasco, Elisabeth; Lledós, Agustí; Maréchal, Jean-Didier

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the design of artificial metalloenzymes obtained by the insertion of homogeneous catalysts into biological macromolecules has become a major field of research. These hybrids, and the corresponding X-ray structures of several of them, are offering opportunities to better understand the synergy between organometallic and biological subsystems. In this work, we investigate the resting state and activation process of a hybrid inspired by an oxidative haemoenzyme but presenting an unexpected reactivity and structural features. An extensive series of quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations show that the resting state and the activation processes of the novel enzyme differ from naturally occurring haemoenzymes in terms of the electronic state of the metal, participation of the first coordination sphere of the metal and the dynamic process. This study presents novel insights into the sensitivity of the association between organometallic and biological partners and illustrates the molecular challenge that represents the design of efficient enzymes based on this strategy. PMID:24829279

  8. Unravelling novel synergies between organometallic and biological partners: a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics study of an artificial metalloenzyme.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Carrasco, Elisabeth; Lledós, Agustí; Maréchal, Jean-Didier

    2014-07-06

    In recent years, the design of artificial metalloenzymes obtained by the insertion of homogeneous catalysts into biological macromolecules has become a major field of research. These hybrids, and the corresponding X-ray structures of several of them, are offering opportunities to better understand the synergy between organometallic and biological subsystems. In this work, we investigate the resting state and activation process of a hybrid inspired by an oxidative haemoenzyme but presenting an unexpected reactivity and structural features. An extensive series of quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations show that the resting state and the activation processes of the novel enzyme differ from naturally occurring haemoenzymes in terms of the electronic state of the metal, participation of the first coordination sphere of the metal and the dynamic process. This study presents novel insights into the sensitivity of the association between organometallic and biological partners and illustrates the molecular challenge that represents the design of efficient enzymes based on this strategy.

  9. Tearing down to build up: Metalloenzymes in the biosynthesis lincomycin, hormaomycin and the pyrrolo [1,4]benzodiazepines.

    PubMed

    Colabroy, Keri L

    2016-06-01

    The metabolic pathways for the production of lincomycin, hormaomycin and the antitumor pyrrolo [1,4] benzodiazepines share a vinyl substituted pyrroline carboxylic acid (3-vinyl-2,3-pyrroline-5-carboxylic acid, VPCA) as a common intermediate. Biosynthesis of this vinyl substituted pyrroline carboxylic acid intermediate requires a short, three-enzyme pathway containing two metalloenzymes: a heme-dependent l-tyrosine hydroxylase and a non-heme Fe(2+) dependent l-DOPA dioxygenase. The l-tyrosine hydroxylase is an unprecedented type of peroxidase that specifically monohydroxylates tyrosine, while the l-DOPA extradiol cleaving enzyme is a single-domain vicinal-oxygen-chelate (VOC) dioxygenase. The dioxygenase product subsequently undergoes an, as yet uncharacterized, C-C bond cleavage reaction. This mini-pathway demonstrates the use of metal-dependent chemistry typically associated with natural product degradation in order to build a compact, functionalized building block for larger, bioactive molecules.

  10. Asymmetric trienamine catalysis: new opportunities in amine catalysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Indresh; Ramaraju, Panduga; Mir, Nisar A

    2013-02-07

    Amine catalysis, through HOMO-activating enamine and LUMO-activating iminium-ion formation, is receiving increasing attention among other organocatalytic strategies, for the activation of unmodified carbonyl compounds. Particularly, the HOMO-raising activation concept has been applied to the greatest number of asymmetric transformations through enamine, dienamine, and SOMO-activation strategies. Recently, trienamine catalysis, an extension of amine catalysis, has emerged as a powerful tool for synthetic chemists with a novel activation strategy for polyenals/polyenones. In this review article, we discuss the initial developments of trienamine catalysis for highly asymmetric Diels-Alder reactions with different dienophiles and emerging opportunities for other types of cycloadditions and cascade reactions.

  11. Spin-modified catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhary, R.; Manchanda, P.; Enders, A.; Balamurugan, B.; Sellmyer, D. J.; Skomski, R.; Kashyap, A.; Sykes, E. C. H.

    2015-05-07

    First-principle calculations are used to explore the use of magnetic degrees of freedom in catalysis. We use the Vienna Ab-Initio Simulation Package to investigate both L1{sub 0}-ordered FePt and CoPt bulk materials and perform supercell calculations for FePt nanoclusters containing 43 atoms. As the catalytic activity of transition-metal elements and alloys involves individual d levels, magnetic alloying strongly affects the catalytic performance, because it leads to shifts in the local densities of states and to additional peaks due to magnetic-moment formation. The peak shift persists in nanoparticles but is surface-site specific and therefore depends on cluster size. Our research indicates that small modifications in stoichiometry and cluster size are a useful tool in the search for new catalysts.

  12. Simulations of chemical catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Gregory K.

    This dissertation contains simulations of chemical catalysis in both biological and heterogeneous contexts. A mixture of classical, quantum, and hybrid techniques are applied to explore the energy profiles and compare possible chemical mechanisms both within the context of human and bacterial enzymes, as well as exploring surface reactions on a metal catalyst. A brief summary of each project follows. Project 1 - Bacterial Enzyme SpvC The newly discovered SpvC effector protein from Salmonella typhimurium interferes with the host immune response by dephosphorylating mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) with a beta-elimination mechanism. The dynamics of the enzyme substrate complex of the SpvC effector is investigated with a 3.2 ns molecular dynamics simulation, which reveals that the phosphorylated peptide substrate is tightly held in the active site by a hydrogen bond network and the lysine general base is positioned for the abstraction of the alpha hydrogen. The catalysis is further modeled with density functional theory (DFT) in a truncated active-site model at the B3LYP/6-31 G(d,p) level of theory. The truncated model suggested the reaction proceeds via a single transition state. After including the enzyme environment in ab initio QM/MM studies, it was found to proceed via an E1cB-like pathway, in which the carbanion intermediate is stabilized by an enzyme oxyanion hole provided by Lys104 and Tyr158 of SpvC. Project 2 - Human Enzyme CDK2 Phosphorylation reactions catalyzed by kinases and phosphatases play an indispensable role in cellular signaling, and their malfunctioning is implicated in many diseases. Ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical studies are reported for the phosphoryl transfer reaction catalyzed by a cyclin-dependent kinase, CDK2. Our results suggest that an active-site Asp residue, rather than ATP as previously proposed, serves as the general base to activate the Ser nucleophile. The corresponding transition state features a

  13. A redox-mediated Kemp eliminase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Aitao; Wang, Binju; Ilie, Adriana; Dubey, Kshatresh D.; Bange, Gert; Korendovych, Ivan V.; Shaik, Sason; Reetz, Manfred T.

    2017-01-01

    The acid/base-catalysed Kemp elimination of 5-nitro-benzisoxazole forming 2-cyano-4-nitrophenol has long served as a design platform of enzymes with non-natural reactions, providing new mechanistic insights in protein science. Here we describe an alternative concept based on redox catalysis by P450-BM3, leading to the same Kemp product via a fundamentally different mechanism. QM/MM computations show that it involves coordination of the substrate's N-atom to haem-Fe(II) with electron transfer and concomitant N–O heterolysis liberating an intermediate having a nitrogen radical moiety Fe(III)–N· and a phenoxyl anion. Product formation occurs by bond rotation and H-transfer. Two rationally chosen point mutations cause a notable increase in activity. The results shed light on the prevailing mechanistic uncertainties in human P450-catalysed metabolism of the immunomodulatory drug leflunomide, which likewise undergoes redox-mediated Kemp elimination by P450-BM3. Other isoxazole-based pharmaceuticals are probably also metabolized by a redox mechanism. Our work provides a basis for designing future artificial enzymes. PMID:28348375

  14. A Survey Course in Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skaates, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    Describes a 10-week survey course in catalysis for chemical engineering and chemistry students designed to show how modern chemistry and chemical engineering interact in the ongoing development of industrial catalysts. Includes course outline and instructional strategies. (Author/JN)

  15. DNA-based hybrid catalysis.

    PubMed

    Rioz-Martínez, Ana; Roelfes, Gerard

    2015-04-01

    In the past decade, DNA-based hybrid catalysis has merged as a promising novel approach to homogeneous (asymmetric) catalysis. A DNA hybrid catalysts comprises a transition metal complex that is covalently or supramolecularly bound to DNA. The chiral microenvironment and the second coordination sphere interactions provided by the DNA are key to achieve high enantioselectivities and, often, additional rate accelerations in catalysis. Nowadays, current efforts are focused on improved designs, understanding the origin of the enantioselectivity and DNA-induced rate accelerations, expanding the catalytic scope of the concept and further increasing the practicality of the method for applications in synthesis. Herein, the recent developments will be reviewed and the perspectives for the emerging field of DNA-based hybrid catalysis will be discussed.

  16. A Superoxide Dismutase Maquette That Reproduces the Spectroscopic and Functional Properties of the Metalloenzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Shearer,J.; Long, L.

    2006-01-01

    Described herein is a nickel superoxide dismutase (NiSOD) maquette ([Ni(SOD{sup M1})]) based on the first 12 residues from the N-terminal sequence of Streptomyces coelicolor NiSOD. The apopeptide (SOD{sup M1}) was prepared by standard solid-phase Fmoc peptide synthesis. SOD{sup M1} will readily coordinate Ni{sup II} in a 1:1 ratio in slightly basic aqueous sodium phosphate buffer (0.1 M; pH = 7.2) forming a lightly colored beige/pink solution. Unlike NiSOD, which is isolated as a 1:1 mixture of oxidized (Ni{sup III}) and reduced (Ni{sup II}) forms, [Ni(SODM1)] can only be isolated in the NiII oxidation state. The UV/vis, X-ray absorption, and CD spectra of [Ni{sup II}(SOD{sup M1})] correspond well with those reported for the reduced form of NiSOD. Despite the fact that [Ni{sup III}(SOD{sup M1})] is not isolable, [Ni(SOD{sup M1})] has an appropriate redox potential to act as an SOD (E{sub 1/2} = 0.70(2) V vs. Ag/AgCl) and in fact will catalytically disproportionate >40 000 equiv of KO{sub 2}.

  17. Molecular ingredients of heterogeneous catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Somorjai, G.A.

    1982-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a review and status report to those in theoretical chemistry of the rapidly developing surface science of heterogeneous catalysis. The art of catalysis is developing into science. This profound change provides one with opportunities not only to understand the molecular ingredients of important catalytic systems but also to develop new and improved catalyst. The participation of theorists to find answers to important questions is sorely needed for the sound development of the field. It is the authors hope that some of the outstanding problems of heterogeneous catalysis that are identified in this paper will be investigated. For this purpose the paper is divided into several sections. The brief Introduction to the methodology and recent results of the surface science of heterogeneous catalysis is followed by a review of the concepts of heterogeneous catalysis. Then, the experimental results that identified the three molecular ingredients of catalysis, structure, carbonaceous deposit and the oxidation state of surface atoms are described. Each section is closed with a summary and a list of problems that require theoretical and experimental scrutiny. Finally attempts to build new catalyst systems and the theoretical and experimental problems that appeared in the course of this research are described.

  18. Redox regulation: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Karl-Josef; Scheibe, Renate

    2004-01-01

    The redox-state is a critical determinate of cell function, and any major imbalances can cause severe damage or death. The cellular redox status therefore needs to be sensed and modulated before such imbalances occur. Various redox-active components are involved in these processes, including thioredoxins, glutaredoxins and other thiol/disulphide-containing proteins. The cellular reactions for cytoprotection and for signalling are integrated with physiological redox-reactions in photosynthesis, assimilation and respiration. They also determine the developmental fate of the cell and finally decide on proliferation or cell death. An international workshop on redox regulation, organized by the research initiative FOR 387 of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, was held in Bielefeld, Germany in 2002. A selection of articles originating from the meeting is printed in this issue of Physiologia Plantarum.

  19. Entropy and Enzyme Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Åqvist, Johan; Kazemi, Masoud; Isaksen, Geir Villy; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2017-02-21

    The role played by entropy for the enormous rate enhancement achieved by enzymes has been debated for many decades. There are, for example, several confirmed cases where the activation free energy is reduced by around 10 kcal/mol due to entropic effects, corresponding to a rate enhancement of ∼10(7) compared to the uncatalyzed reaction. However, despite substantial efforts from both the experimental and theoretical side, no real consensus has been reached regarding the origin of such large entropic contributions to enzyme catalysis. Another remarkable instance of entropic effects is found in enzymes that are adapted by evolution to work at low temperatures, near the freezing point of water. These cold-adapted enzymes invariably show a more negative entropy and a lower enthalpy of activation than their mesophilic orthologs, which counteracts the exponential damping of reaction rates at lower temperature. The structural origin of this universal phenomenon has, however, remained elusive. The basic problem with connecting macroscopic thermodynamic quantities, such as activation entropy and enthalpy derived from Arrhenius plots, to the 3D protein structure is that the underlying detailed (microscopic) energetics is essentially inaccessible to experiment. Moreover, attempts to calculate entropy contributions by computer simulations have mostly focused only on substrate entropies, which do not provide the full picture. We have recently devised a new approach for accessing thermodynamic activation parameters of both enzyme and solution reactions from computer simulations, which turns out to be very successful. This method is analogous to the experimental Arrhenius plots and directly evaluates the temperature dependence of calculated reaction free energy profiles. Hence, by extensive molecular dynamics simulations and calculations of up to thousands of independent free energy profiles, we are able to extract activation parameters with sufficient precision for making

  20. Catalysis in solar energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maugh, T. H., II

    1983-09-01

    The progress of technologies to convert solar energy into useful work is reviewed, with particular attention given to the functional principles of solar cells and photoelectrochemical cells. The current in a solar cell is completely electronic, while in a photoelectric cell (PC) the current is partially ionic, i.e., the electrical contact between electrodes is accomplished chemically. The PC can be activated by photons to perform photoassisted electrolysis in the presence of an external potential, thus producing hydrogen fuel. Various materials are under study as photoanodes, with layered metal dichalcogenide semiconductors the best performers so far. The chalcogenides include MoS2, WS2, MoSe2, and WSe2, which could be applied to photochemical synthesis of redox products. Employment of Pt or Rh on the electrode surface has increased H2 production efficiency to 13.3 percent.

  1. Enhanced Micellar Catalysis LDRD.

    SciTech Connect

    Betty, Rita G.; Tucker, Mark D; Taggart, Gretchen; Kinnan, Mark K.; Glen, Crystal Chanea; Rivera, Danielle; Sanchez, Andres; Alam, Todd Michael

    2012-12-01

    The primary goals of the Enhanced Micellar Catalysis project were to gain an understanding of the micellar environment of DF-200, or similar liquid CBW surfactant-based decontaminants, as well as characterize the aerosolized DF-200 droplet distribution and droplet chemistry under baseline ITW rotary atomization conditions. Micellar characterization of limited surfactant solutions was performed externally through the collection and measurement of Small Angle X-Ray Scattering (SAXS) images and Cryo-Transmission Electron Microscopy (cryo-TEM) images. Micellar characterization was performed externally at the University of Minnesotas Characterization Facility Center, and at the Argonne National Laboratory Advanced Photon Source facility. A micellar diffusion study was conducted internally at Sandia to measure diffusion constants of surfactants over a concentration range, to estimate the effective micelle diameter, to determine the impact of individual components to the micellar environment in solution, and the impact of combined components to surfactant phase behavior. Aerosolized DF-200 sprays were characterized for particle size and distribution and limited chemical composition. Evaporation rates of aerosolized DF-200 sprays were estimated under a set of baseline ITW nozzle test system parameters.

  2. Conduction and Reactivity in Heterogeneous-Molecular Catalysis: New Insights in Water Oxidation Catalysis by Phosphate Cobalt Oxide Films.

    PubMed

    Costentin, Cyrille; Porter, Thomas R; Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2016-05-04

    Cyclic voltammetry of phosphate cobalt oxide (CoPi) films catalyzing O2-evolution from water oxidation as a function of scan rate, phosphate concentration and film thickness allowed for new insights into the coupling between charge transport and catalysis. At pH = 7 and low buffer concentrations, the film is insulating below 0.8 (V vs SHE) but becomes conductive above 0.9 (V vs SHE). Between 1.0 to 1.3 (V vs SHE), the mesoporous structure of the film gives rise to a large thickness-dependent capacitance. At higher buffer concentrations, two reversible proton-coupled redox couples appear over the capacitive response with 0.94 and 1.19 (V vs SHE) pH = 7 standard potentials. The latter is, at most, very weakly catalytic and not responsible for the large catalytic current observed at higher potentials. CV-response analysis showed that the amount of redox-active cobalt-species in the film is small, less than 10% of total. The catalytic process involves a further proton-coupled-electron-transfer and is so fast that it is controlled by diffusion of phosphate, the catalyst cofactor. CV-analysis with newly derived relationships led to a combination of the catalyst standard potential with the catalytic rate constant and a lower-limit estimation of these parameters. The large currents resulting from the fast catalytic reaction result in significant potential losses related to charge transport through the film. CoPi films appear to combine molecular catalysis with semiconductor-type charge transport. This mode of heterogeneous molecular catalysis is likely to occur in many other catalytic films.

  3. Metal ions in biological catalysis: from enzyme databases to general principles.

    PubMed

    Andreini, Claudia; Bertini, Ivano; Cavallaro, Gabriele; Holliday, Gemma L; Thornton, Janet M

    2008-11-01

    We analysed the roles and distribution of metal ions in enzymatic catalysis using available public databases and our new resource Metal-MACiE (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/thornton-srv/databases/Metal_MACiE/home.html). In Metal-MACiE, a database of metal-based reaction mechanisms, 116 entries covering 21% of the metal-dependent enzymes and 70% of the types of enzyme-catalysed chemical transformations are annotated according to metal function. We used Metal-MACiE to assess the functions performed by metals in biological catalysis and the relative frequencies of different metals in different roles, which can be related to their individual chemical properties and availability in the environment. The overall picture emerging from the overview of Metal-MACiE is that redox-inert metal ions are used in enzymes to stabilize negative charges and to activate substrates by virtue of their Lewis acid properties, whereas redox-active metal ions can be used both as Lewis acids and as redox centres. Magnesium and zinc are by far the most common ions of the first type, while calcium is relatively less used. Magnesium, however, is most often bound to phosphate groups of substrates and interacts with the enzyme only transiently, whereas the other metals are stably bound to the enzyme. The most common metal of the second type is iron, which is prevalent in the catalysis of redox reactions, followed by manganese, cobalt, molybdenum, copper and nickel. The control of the reactivity of redox-active metal ions may involve their association with organic cofactors to form stable units. This occurs sometimes for iron and nickel, and quite often for cobalt and molybdenum.

  4. Recent Advances in Nickel Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Tasker, Sarah Z.; Standley, Eric A.; Jamison, Timothy F.

    2015-01-01

    Preface The field of nickel catalysis has made tremendous advances in the past decade. There are several key properties of nickel that have allowed for a broad range of innovative reaction development, such as facile oxidative addition and ready access to multiple oxidation states. In recent years, these properties have been increasingly understood and leveraged to perform transformations long considered exceptionally challenging. Herein, we discuss some of the most recent and significant developments in homogeneous nickel catalysis with an emphasis on both synthetic outcome and mechanism. PMID:24828188

  5. Scanning probe microscopy in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Yeung, King Lun; Yao, Nan

    2004-09-01

    This review discusses the recent progress in the application of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) in catalysis. SPM proves to be an invaluable technique for imaging catalytic surfaces and interfaces. Most SPM research is related to the structural and morphological transformation associated with catalyst preparation and use. Real-time SPM observation of surface dynamics including adsorption, diffusion and reaction, provides invaluable insights to the mechanism of catalysis. SPM is also used to shape and manipulate surfaces and surface processes. Fabrication of nanostructured catalysts, direct manipulation of adsorbed atoms and molecules and tip-mediated reactions are some examples of new SPM approach in catalyst research.

  6. Photoredox Catalysis in Organic Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, photoredox catalysis has come to the forefront in organic chemistry as a powerful strategy for the activation of small molecules. In a general sense, these approaches rely on the ability of metal complexes and organic dyes to convert visible light into chemical energy by engaging in single-electron transfer with organic substrates, thereby generating reactive intermediates. In this Perspective, we highlight the unique ability of photoredox catalysis to expedite the development of completely new reaction mechanisms, with particular emphasis placed on multicatalytic strategies that enable the construction of challenging carbon–carbon and carbon–heteroatom bonds. PMID:27477076

  7. EMSL and Institute for Integrated Catalysis (IIC) Catalysis Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Charles T.; Datye, Abhaya K.; Henkelman, Graeme A.; Lobo, Raul F.; Schneider, William F.; Spicer, Leonard D.; Tysoe, Wilfred T.; Vohs, John M.; Baer, Donald R.; Hoyt, David W.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Mueller, Karl T.; Wang, Chong M.; Washton, Nancy M.; Lyubinetsky, Igor; Teller, Raymond G.; Andersen, Amity; Govind, Niranjan; Kowalski, Karol; Kabius, Bernd C.; Wang, Hongfei; Campbell, Allison A.; Shelton, William A.; Bylaska, Eric J.; Peden, Charles HF; Wang, Yong; King, David L.; Henderson, Michael A.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Szanyi, Janos; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Mei, Donghai; Garrett, Bruce C.; Ray, Douglas; Futrell, Jean H.; Laskin, Julia; DuBois, Daniel L.; Kuprat, Laura R.; Plata, Charity

    2011-05-24

    Within the context of significantly accelerating scientific progress in research areas that address important societal problems, a workshop was held in November 2010 at EMSL to identify specific and topically important areas of research and capability needs in catalysis-related science.

  8. Redox Species of Redox Flow Batteries: A Review.

    PubMed

    Pan, Feng; Wang, Qing

    2015-11-18

    Due to the capricious nature of renewable energy resources, such as wind and solar, large-scale energy storage devices are increasingly required to make the best use of the renewable power. The redox flow battery is considered suitable for large-scale applications due to its modular design, good scalability and flexible operation. The biggest challenge of the redox flow battery is the low energy density. The redox active species is the most important component in redox flow batteries, and the redox potential and solubility of redox species dictate the system energy density. This review is focused on the recent development of redox species. Different categories of redox species, including simple inorganic ions, metal complexes, metal-free organic compounds, polysulfide/sulfur and lithium storage active materials, are reviewed. The future development of redox species towards higher energy density is also suggested.

  9. A designed redox-controlled caspase

    SciTech Connect

    Witkowski, Witold A.; Hardy, Jeanne A.

    2011-09-15

    Caspases are a powerful class of cysteine proteases. Introduction of activated caspases in healthy or cancerous cells results in induction of apoptotic cell death. In this study, we have designed and characterized a version of caspase-7 that can be inactivated under oxidizing extracellular conditions and then reactivated under reducing intracellular conditions. This version of caspase-7 is allosterically inactivated when two of the substrate-binding loops are locked together via an engineered disulfide. When this disulfide is reduced, the protein regains its full function. The inactive loop-locked version of caspase-7 can be readily observed by immunoblotting and mass spectrometry. The reduced and reactivated form of the enzyme observed crystallographically is the first caspase-7 structure in which the substrate-binding groove is properly ordered even in the absence of an active-site ligand. In the reactivated structure, the catalytic-dyad cysteine-histidine are positioned 3.5 {angstrom} apart in an orientation that is capable of supporting catalysis. This redox-controlled version of caspase-7 is particularly well suited for targeted cell death in concert with redox-triggered delivery vehicles.

  10. Additive Effects on Asymmetric Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Liang; Sun, Wangsheng; Yang, Dongxu; Li, Guofeng; Wang, Rui

    2016-03-23

    This review highlights a number of additives that can be used to make asymmetric reactions perfect. Without changing other reaction conditions, simply adding additives can lead to improved asymmetric catalysis, such as reduced reaction time, improved yield, or/and increased selectivity.

  11. Enantioselective organo-cascade catalysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong; Walji, Abbas M; Larsen, Catharine H; MacMillan, David W C

    2005-11-02

    A new strategy for organocatalysis based on the biochemical blueprints of biosynthesis has enabled a new laboratory approach to cascade catalysis. Imidazolidinone-based catalytic cycles, involving iminium and enamine activation, have been successfully combined to allow a large diversity of nucleophiles (furans, thiophenes, indoles, butenolides, hydride sources, tertiary amino lactone equivalents) and electrophiles (fluorinating and chlorinating reagents) to undergo sequential addition with a wide array of alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes. These new cascade catalysis protocols allow the invention of enantioselective transformations that were previously unknown, including the asymmetric catalytic addition of the elements of HF across a trisubstituted olefin. Importantly, these domino catalysis protocols can be mediated by a single imidazolidinone catalyst or using cycle-specific amine catalysts. In the latter case, cascade catalysis pathways can be readily modulated to provide a required diastereo- and enantioselective outcome via the judicious selection of the enantiomeric series of the amine catalysts. A central benefit of combining multiple asymmetric organocatalytic events into one sequence is the intrinsic requirement for enantioenrichment in the second induction cycle, as demonstrated by the enantioselectivities obtained throughout this study (>/=99% ee in all cases).

  12. Binding Energy and Enzymatic Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, David E.; Raines, Ronald T.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the fundamental role that the favorable free energy of binding of the rate-determining transition state plays in catalysis. The principle that all of the catalytic factors discussed are realized by the use of this binding energy is reviewed. (CW)

  13. Chiral cyclopentadienylruthenium sulfoxide catalysts for asymmetric redox bicycloisomerization

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Michael C; Rao, Meera

    2016-01-01

    Summary A full account of our efforts toward an asymmetric redox bicycloisomerization reaction is presented in this article. Cyclopentadienylruthenium (CpRu) complexes containing tethered chiral sulfoxides were synthesized via an oxidative [3 + 2] cycloaddition reaction between an alkyne and an allylruthenium complex. Sulfoxide complex 1 containing a p-anisole moiety on its sulfoxide proved to be the most efficient and selective catalyst for the asymmetric redox bicycloisomerization of 1,6- and 1,7-enynes. This complex was used to synthesize a broad array of [3.1.0] and [4.1.0] bicycles. Sulfonamide- and phosphoramidate-containing products could be deprotected under reducing conditions. Catalysis performed with enantiomerically enriched propargyl alcohols revealed a matched/mismatched effect that was strongly dependent on the nature of the solvent. PMID:27559366

  14. Redox control of teratogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jason M; Harris, Craig

    2013-01-01

    A number of human teratogens elicit their deleterious effects through mechanisms involving the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress. However, classic definitions of oxidative stress do not fully coincide with basic fundamental principles of teratology. Newer definitions of oxidative stress focus on the targeted redox modification of cysteine/thiol functional groups found in the regulatory domains of critical signaling pathway proteins, suggesting that the targeted disruption of signaling through specific redox couples may account for the specificity of teratogen-induced malformations which previously could not be rationalized. Here, we review examples of teratogens that induce ROS and oxidative injury, describe oxidative stress-related teratogenic mechanisms, and provide rationale for developmental periods of sensitivity and species susceptibility. Understanding how chemicals disrupt redox status, induce oxidative stress leading to dysmorphogenesis becomes important to identify potential teratogens and develop therapeutic interventions for attenuation of harmful chemical effects in utero following exposure.

  15. Tuning the Redox Properties of a Nonheme Iron(III)-Peroxo Complex Binding Redox-Inactive Zinc Ions by Water Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yong-Min; Bang, Suhee; Yoon, Heejung; Bae, Seong Hee; Hong, Seungwoo; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Nam, Wonwoo

    2015-06-19

    Here we report redox-inactive metal ions play important roles in tuning chemical properties of metal–oxygen intermediates. We describe the effect of water molecules on the redox properties of a nonheme iron(III)–peroxo complex binding redox-inactive metal ions. The coordination of two water molecules to a Zn2+ ion in (TMC)FeIII-(O2)-Zn(CF3SO3)2 (1-Zn2+) decreases the Lewis acidity of the Zn2+ ion, resulting in the decrease of the one-electron oxidation and reduction potentials of 1-Zn2+. This further changes the reactivities of 1-Zn2+ in oxidation and reduction reactions; no reaction occurred upon addition of an oxidant (e.g., cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate (CAN)) to 1-Zn2+, whereas 1-Zn2+ coordinating two water molecules, (TMC)FeIII-(O2)-Zn(CF3SO3)2-(OH2)2 [1-Zn2+-(OH2)2], releases the O2 unit in the oxidation reaction. In the reduction reactions, 1-Zn2+ was converted to its corresponding iron(IV)–oxo species upon addition of a reductant (e.g., a ferrocene derivative), whereas such a reaction occurred at a much slower rate in the case of 1-Zn2+-(OH2)2. Finally, the present results provide the first biomimetic example showing that water molecules at the active sites of metalloenzymes may participate in tuning the redox properties of metal–oxygen intermediates.

  16. Tuning the Redox Properties of a Nonheme Iron(III)-Peroxo Complex Binding Redox-Inactive Zinc Ions by Water Molecules

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Yong-Min; Bang, Suhee; Yoon, Heejung; ...

    2015-06-19

    Here we report redox-inactive metal ions play important roles in tuning chemical properties of metal–oxygen intermediates. We describe the effect of water molecules on the redox properties of a nonheme iron(III)–peroxo complex binding redox-inactive metal ions. The coordination of two water molecules to a Zn2+ ion in (TMC)FeIII-(O2)-Zn(CF3SO3)2 (1-Zn2+) decreases the Lewis acidity of the Zn2+ ion, resulting in the decrease of the one-electron oxidation and reduction potentials of 1-Zn2+. This further changes the reactivities of 1-Zn2+ in oxidation and reduction reactions; no reaction occurred upon addition of an oxidant (e.g., cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate (CAN)) to 1-Zn2+, whereas 1-Zn2+ coordinatingmore » two water molecules, (TMC)FeIII-(O2)-Zn(CF3SO3)2-(OH2)2 [1-Zn2+-(OH2)2], releases the O2 unit in the oxidation reaction. In the reduction reactions, 1-Zn2+ was converted to its corresponding iron(IV)–oxo species upon addition of a reductant (e.g., a ferrocene derivative), whereas such a reaction occurred at a much slower rate in the case of 1-Zn2+-(OH2)2. Finally, the present results provide the first biomimetic example showing that water molecules at the active sites of metalloenzymes may participate in tuning the redox properties of metal–oxygen intermediates.« less

  17. Molecular catalysis science: Perspective on unifying the fields of catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Rong; Hurlburt, Tyler J.; Sabyrov, Kairat; Alayoglu, Selim; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2016-01-01

    Colloidal chemistry is used to control the size, shape, morphology, and composition of metal nanoparticles. Model catalysts as such are applied to catalytic transformations in the three types of catalysts: heterogeneous, homogeneous, and enzymatic. Real-time dynamics of oxidation state, coordination, and bonding of nanoparticle catalysts are put under the microscope using surface techniques such as sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy under catalytically relevant conditions. It was demonstrated that catalytic behavior and trends are strongly tied to oxidation state, the coordination number and crystallographic orientation of metal sites, and bonding and orientation of surface adsorbates. It was also found that catalytic performance can be tuned by carefully designing and fabricating catalysts from the bottom up. Homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts, and likely enzymes, behave similarly at the molecular level. Unifying the fields of catalysis is the key to achieving the goal of 100% selectivity in catalysis. PMID:27114536

  18. Molecular catalysis science: Perspective on unifying the fields of catalysis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Rong; Hurlburt, Tyler J; Sabyrov, Kairat; Alayoglu, Selim; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2016-05-10

    Colloidal chemistry is used to control the size, shape, morphology, and composition of metal nanoparticles. Model catalysts as such are applied to catalytic transformations in the three types of catalysts: heterogeneous, homogeneous, and enzymatic. Real-time dynamics of oxidation state, coordination, and bonding of nanoparticle catalysts are put under the microscope using surface techniques such as sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy under catalytically relevant conditions. It was demonstrated that catalytic behavior and trends are strongly tied to oxidation state, the coordination number and crystallographic orientation of metal sites, and bonding and orientation of surface adsorbates. It was also found that catalytic performance can be tuned by carefully designing and fabricating catalysts from the bottom up. Homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts, and likely enzymes, behave similarly at the molecular level. Unifying the fields of catalysis is the key to achieving the goal of 100% selectivity in catalysis.

  19. Redox Regulation of Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Handy, Diane E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Redox-dependent processes influence most cellular functions, such as differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Mitochondria are at the center of these processes, as mitochondria both generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that drive redox-sensitive events and respond to ROS-mediated changes in the cellular redox state. In this review, we examine the regulation of cellular ROS, their modes of production and removal, and the redox-sensitive targets that are modified by their flux. In particular, we focus on the actions of redox-sensitive targets that alter mitochondrial function and the role of these redox modifications on metabolism, mitochondrial biogenesis, receptor-mediated signaling, and apoptotic pathways. We also consider the role of mitochondria in modulating these pathways, and discuss how redox-dependent events may contribute to pathobiology by altering mitochondrial function. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 1323–1367. PMID:22146081

  20. Acridinium-Based Photocatalysts: A Sustainable Option in Photoredox Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Joshi-Pangu, Amruta; Lévesque, François; Roth, Hudson G; Oliver, Steven F; Campeau, Louis-Charles; Nicewicz, David; DiRocco, Daniel A

    2016-08-19

    The emergence of visible light photoredox catalysis has enabled the productive use of lower energy radiation, leading to highly selective reaction platforms. Polypyridyl complexes of iridium and ruthenium have served as popular photocatalysts in recent years due to their long excited state lifetimes and useful redox windows, leading to the development of diverse photoredox-catalyzed transformations. The low abundances of Ir and Ru in the earth's crust and, hence, cost make these catalysts nonsustainable and have limited their application in industrial-scale manufacturing. Herein, we report a series of novel acridinium salts as alternatives to iridium photoredox catalysts and show their comparability to the ubiquitous [Ir(dF-CF3-ppy)2(dtbpy)](PF6).

  1. Redox Flow Batteries, a Review

    SciTech Connect

    Knoxville, U. Tennessee; U. Texas Austin; U, McGill; Weber, Adam Z.; Mench, Matthew M.; Meyers, Jeremy P.; Ross, Philip N.; Gostick, Jeffrey T.; Liu, Qinghua

    2011-07-15

    Redox flow batteries are enjoying a renaissance due to their ability to store large amounts of electrical energy relatively cheaply and efficiently. In this review, we examine the components of redox flow batteries with a focus on understanding the underlying physical processes. The various transport and kinetic phenomena are discussed along with the most common redox couples.

  2. Supramolecular catalysis beyond enzyme mimics.

    PubMed

    Meeuwissen, Jurjen; Reek, Joost N H

    2010-08-01

    Supramolecular catalysis - the assembly of catalyst species by harnessing multiple weak intramolecular interactions - has, until recently, been dominated by enzyme-inspired approaches. Such approaches often attempt to create an enzyme-like 'active site' and have concentrated on reactions similar to those catalysed by enzymes themselves. Here, we discuss the application of supramolecular assembly to the more traditional transition metal catalysis and to small-molecule organocatalysis. The modularity of self-assembled multicomponent catalysts means that a relatively small pool of catalyst components can provide rapid access to a large number of catalysts that can be evaluated for industrially relevant reactions. In addition, we discuss how catalyst-substrate interactions can be tailored to direct substrates along particular reaction paths and selectivities.

  3. Asymmetric Ion-Pairing Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Brak, Katrien

    2014-01-01

    Charged intermediates and reagents are ubiquitous in organic transformations. The interaction of these ionic species with chiral neutral, anionic, or cationic small molecules has emerged as a powerful strategy for catalytic, enantioselective synthesis. This review describes developments in the burgeoning field of asymmetric ion-pairing catalysis with an emphasis on the insights that have been gleaned into the structural and mechanistic features that contribute to high asymmetric induction. PMID:23192886

  4. Reaction Selectivity in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2009-02-02

    The understanding of selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis is of paramount importance to our society today. In this review we outline the current state of the art in research on selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis. Current in-situ surface science techniques have revealed several important features of catalytic selectivity. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy has shown us the importance of understanding the reaction intermediates and mechanism of a heterogeneous reaction, and can readily yield information as to the effect of temperature, pressure, catalyst geometry, surface promoters, and catalyst composition on the reaction mechanism. DFT calculations are quickly approaching the ability to assist in the interpretation of observed surface spectra, thereby making surface spectroscopy an even more powerful tool. HP-STM has revealed three vitally important parameters in heterogeneous selectivity: adsorbate mobility, catalyst mobility, and selective site-blocking. The development of size controlled nanoparticles from 0.8 to 10 nm, of controlled shape, and of controlled bimetallic composition has revealed several important variables for catalytic selectivity. Lastly, DFT calculations may be paving the way to guiding the composition choice for multi-metallic heterogeneous catalysis for the intelligent design of catalysts incorporating the many factors of selectivity we have learned.

  5. Selenocysteine oxidation in glutathione peroxidase catalysis: an MS-supported quantum mechanics study.

    PubMed

    Orian, Laura; Mauri, Pierluigi; Roveri, Antonella; Toppo, Stefano; Benazzi, Louise; Bosello-Travain, Valentina; De Palma, Antonella; Maiorino, Matilde; Miotto, Giovanni; Zaccarin, Mattia; Polimeno, Antonino; Flohé, Leopold; Ursini, Fulvio

    2015-10-01

    Glutathione peroxidases (GPxs) are enzymes working with either selenium or sulfur catalysis. They adopted diverse functions ranging from detoxification of H(2)O(2) to redox signaling and differentiation. The relative stability of the selenoenzymes, however, remained enigmatic in view of the postulated involvement of a highly unstable selenenic acid form during catalysis. Nevertheless, density functional theory calculations obtained with a representative active site model verify the mechanistic concept of GPx catalysis and underscore its efficiency. However, they also allow that the selenenic acid, in the absence of the reducing substrate, reacts with a nitrogen in the active site. MS/MS analysis of oxidized rat GPx4 complies with the predicted structure, an 8-membered ring, in which selenium is bound as selenenylamide to the protein backbone. The intermediate can be re-integrated into the canonical GPx cycle by glutathione, whereas, under denaturing conditions, its selenium moiety undergoes β-cleavage with formation of a dehydro-alanine residue. The selenenylamide bypass prevents destruction of the redox center due to over-oxidation of the selenium or its elimination and likely allows fine-tuning of GPx activity or alternate substrate reactions for regulatory purposes.

  6. Nanometallic chemistry: deciphering nanoparticle catalysis from the perspective of organometallic chemistry and homogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ning; Yuan, Yuan; Dyson, Paul J

    2013-10-07

    Nanoparticle (NP) catalysis is traditionally viewed as a sub-section of heterogeneous catalysis. However, certain properties of NP catalysts, especially NPs dispersed in solvents, indicate that there could be benefits from viewing them from the perspective of homogeneous catalysis. By applying the fundamental approaches and concepts routinely used in homogeneous catalysis to NP catalysts it should be possible to rationally design new nanocatalysts with superior properties to those currently in use.

  7. Redox regulation of cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Sag, Can M; Santos, Celio X C; Shah, Ajay M

    2014-08-01

    It is increasingly evident that redox-dependent modifications in cellular proteins and signaling pathways (or redox signaling) play important roles in many aspects of cardiac hypertrophy. Indeed, these redox modifications may be intricately linked with the process of hypertrophy wherein there is not only a significant increase in myocardial O2 consumption but also important alterations in metabolic processes and in the local generation of O2-derived reactive species (ROS) that modulate and/or amplify cell signaling pathways. This article reviews our current knowledge of redox signaling pathways and their roles in cardiac hypertrophy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Redox Signalling in the Cardiovascular System".

  8. Cosmic strings and baryon decay catalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Ruth; Perkins, W. B.; Davis, A.-C.; Brandenberger, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    Cosmic strings, like monopoles, can catalyze proton decay. For integer charged fermions, the cross section for catalysis is not amplified, unlike in the case of monopoles. The catalysis processes are reviewed both in the free quark and skyrmion pictures and the implications for baryogenesis are discussed. A computation of the cross section for monopole catalyzed skyrmion decay is presented using classical physics. Also discussed are some effects which can screen catalysis processes.

  9. Colorimetric Strategy for Highly Sensitive and Selective Simultaneous Detection of Histidine and Cysteine Based on G-Quadruplex-Cu(II) Metalloenzyme.

    PubMed

    Wu, Changtong; Fan, Daoqing; Zhou, Chunyang; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Erkang

    2016-03-01

    In this present work, we proposed a colorimetric strategy for simultaneous detection of histidine and cysteine based on G-quadruplex-Cu(II) metalloenzyme for the first time. Because of the adding of histidine or cysteine, the formation of G-quadruplex-Cu(II) metalloenzyme will be disturbed, thus the catalytic activity to TMB-H2O2 reaction is inversely proportional to the concentration of histidine or cysteine. With this strategy, the limit of detection in experimental measurement for histidine and cysteine is 10 nM and 5 nM, respectively, which are both lower than previous colorimetric arrays. With the help of NEM, cysteine is alkylated and the reaction between Cu(2+) is inhibited, so the selectivity can also be guaranteed. The cost is quite low since the developed array is label free and enzyme free by using low-cost DNA and Cu(2+). More importantly, the colorimetric detection operation is very simple without any further modification process.

  10. Redox-capacitor to connect electrochemistry to redox-biology.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunkyoung; Leverage, W Taylor; Liu, Yi; White, Ian M; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2014-01-07

    It is well-established that redox-reactions are integral to biology for energy harvesting (oxidative phosphorylation), immune defense (oxidative burst) and drug metabolism (phase I reactions), yet there is emerging evidence that redox may play broader roles in biology (e.g., redox signaling). A critical challenge is the need for tools that can probe biologically-relevant redox interactions simply, rapidly and without the need for a comprehensive suite of analytical methods. We propose that electrochemistry may provide such a tool. In this tutorial review, we describe recent studies with a redox-capacitor film that can serve as a bio-electrode interface that can accept, store and donate electrons from mediators commonly used in electrochemistry and also in biology. Specifically, we (i) describe the fabrication of this redox-capacitor from catechols and the polysaccharide chitosan, (ii) discuss the mechanistic basis for electron exchange, (iii) illustrate the properties of this redox-capacitor and its capabilities for promoting redox-communication between biology and electrodes, and (iv) suggest the potential for enlisting signal processing strategies to "extract" redox information. We believe these initial studies indicate broad possibilities for enlisting electrochemistry and signal processing to acquire "systems level" redox information from biology.

  11. Microfluidic redox battery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Wook; Goulet, Marc-Antoni; Kjeang, Erik

    2013-07-07

    A miniaturized microfluidic battery is proposed, which is the first membraneless redox battery demonstrated to date. This unique concept capitalizes on dual-pass flow-through porous electrodes combined with stratified, co-laminar flow to generate electrical power on-chip. The fluidic design is symmetric to allow for both charging and discharging operations in forward, reverse, and recirculation modes. The proof-of-concept device fabricated using low-cost materials integrated in a microfluidic chip is shown to produce competitive power levels when operated on a vanadium redox electrolyte. A complete charge/discharge cycle is performed to demonstrate its operation as a rechargeable battery, which is an important step towards providing sustainable power to lab-on-a-chip and microelectronic applications.

  12. Redox theory of aging

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Dean P.

    2015-01-01

    Metazoan genomes encode exposure memory systems to enhance survival and reproductive potential by providing mechanisms for an individual to adjust during lifespan to environmental resources and challenges. These systems are inherently redox networks, arising during evolution of complex systems with O2 as a major determinant of bioenergetics, metabolic and structural organization, defense, and reproduction. The network structure decreases flexibility from conception onward due to differentiation and cumulative responses to environment (exposome). The redox theory of aging is that aging is a decline in plasticity of genome–exposome interaction that occurs as a consequence of execution of differentiation and exposure memory systems. This includes compromised mitochondrial and bioenergetic flexibility, impaired food utilization and metabolic homeostasis, decreased barrier and defense capabilities and loss of reproductive fidelity and fecundity. This theory accounts for hallmarks of aging, including failure to maintain oxidative or xenobiotic defenses, mitochondrial integrity, proteostasis, barrier structures, DNA repair, telomeres, immune function, metabolic regulation and regenerative capacity. PMID:25863726

  13. Ediacaran Redox Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, S. K.; Jiang, G.; Planavsky, N. J.; Kendall, B.; Owens, J. D.; Anbar, A. D.; Lyons, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    Evidence for pervasive oxic conditions, and likely even deep ocean oxygenation has been documented at three intervals in the lower (ca. 632 Ma), middle (ca. 580 Ma) and upper (ca. 551 Ma) Ediacaran. The Doushantuo Formation in South China hosts large enrichments of redox-sensitive trace element (e.g., molybdenum, vanadium and uranium) in anoxic shales, which are indicative of a globally oxic ocean-atmosphere system. However, ocean redox conditions between these periods continue to be a topic of debate and remain elusive. We have found evidence for widespread anoxic conditions through much of the Ediacaran in the deep-water Wuhe section in South China. During most of the Ediacaran-early Cambrian in basinal sections is characterized by Fe speciation data and pyrite morphologies that indicate deposition under euxinic conditions with near-crustal enrichments of redox-sensitive element and positive pyrite-sulfur isotope values, which suggest low levels of marine sulfate and widespread euxinia. Our work reinforces an emerging view that the early Earth, including the Ediacaran, underwent numerous rises and falls in surface oxidation state, rather than a unidirectional rise as originally imagined. The Ediacaran ocean thus experienced repetitive expansion and contraction of marine chalcophilic trace-metal levels that may have had fundamental impact on the slow evolution of early animals and ecosystems. Further, this framework forces us to re-examine the relationship between Neoproterozoic oxygenation and metazoan diversification. Varying redox conditions through the Cryogenian and Ediacaran may help explain molecular clock and biomarker evidence for an early appearance and initial diversification of metazoans but with a delay in the appearance of most major metazoan crown groups until close to Ediacaran-Cambrian boundary.

  14. Proton-coupled electron transfer: the mechanistic underpinning for radical transport and catalysis in biology.

    PubMed

    Reece, Steven Y; Hodgkiss, Justin M; Stubbe, JoAnne; Nocera, Daniel G

    2006-08-29

    Charge transport and catalysis in enzymes often rely on amino acid radicals as intermediates. The generation and transport of these radicals are synonymous with proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), which intrinsically is a quantum mechanical effect as both the electron and proton tunnel. The caveat to PCET is that proton transfer (PT) is fundamentally limited to short distances relative to electron transfer (ET). This predicament is resolved in biology by the evolution of enzymes to control PT and ET coordinates on highly different length scales. In doing so, the enzyme imparts exquisite thermodynamic and kinetic controls over radical transport and radical-based catalysis at cofactor active sites. This discussion will present model systems containing orthogonal ET and PT pathways, thereby allowing the proton and electron tunnelling events to be disentangled. Against this mechanistic backdrop, PCET catalysis of oxygen-oxygen bond activation by mono-oxygenases is captured at biomimetic porphyrin redox platforms. The discussion concludes with the case study of radical-based quantum catalysis in a natural biological enzyme, class I Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase. Studies are presented that show the enzyme utilizes both collinear and orthogonal PCET to transport charge from an assembled diiron-tyrosyl radical cofactor to the active site over 35A away via an amino acid radical-hopping pathway spanning two protein subunits.

  15. Electron transfer catalysis with monolayer protected Au25 clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonello, Sabrina; Hesari, Mahdi; Polo, Federico; Maran, Flavio

    2012-08-01

    Au25L18 (L = S(CH2)2Ph) clusters were prepared and characterized. The resulting monodisperse clusters were reacted with bis(pentafluorobenzoyl) peroxide in dichloromethane to form Au25L18+ quantitatively. The kinetics and thermodynamics of the corresponding electron transfer (ET) reactions were characterized via electrochemistry and thermochemical calculations. Au25L18+ was used in homogeneous redox catalysis experiments with a series of sym-substituted benzoyl peroxides, including the above peroxide, bis(para-cyanobenzoyl) peroxide, dibenzoyl peroxide, and bis(para-methoxybenzoyl) peroxide. Peroxide dissociative ET was catalyzed using both the Au25L18/Au25L18- and the Au25L18+/Au25L18 redox couples as redox mediators. Simulation of the CV curves led to determination of the ET rate constant (kET) values for concerted dissociative ET to the peroxides. The ET free energy ΔG° could be estimated for all donor-acceptor combinations, leading to observation of a nice activation-driving force (log kETvs. ΔG°) relationship. Comparison with the kET obtained using a ferrocene-type donor with a formal potential similar to that of Au25L18/Au25L18- showed that the presence of the capping monolayer affects the ET rate rather significantly, which is attributed to the intrinsic nonadiabaticity of peroxide acceptors.Au25L18 (L = S(CH2)2Ph) clusters were prepared and characterized. The resulting monodisperse clusters were reacted with bis(pentafluorobenzoyl) peroxide in dichloromethane to form Au25L18+ quantitatively. The kinetics and thermodynamics of the corresponding electron transfer (ET) reactions were characterized via electrochemistry and thermochemical calculations. Au25L18+ was used in homogeneous redox catalysis experiments with a series of sym-substituted benzoyl peroxides, including the above peroxide, bis(para-cyanobenzoyl) peroxide, dibenzoyl peroxide, and bis(para-methoxybenzoyl) peroxide. Peroxide dissociative ET was catalyzed using both the Au25L18/Au25L18- and

  16. Electrostatic catalysis of a Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Aragonès, Albert C; Haworth, Naomi L; Darwish, Nadim; Ciampi, Simone; Bloomfield, Nathaniel J; Wallace, Gordon G; Diez-Perez, Ismael; Coote, Michelle L

    2016-03-03

    It is often thought that the ability to control reaction rates with an applied electrical potential gradient is unique to redox systems. However, recent theoretical studies suggest that oriented electric fields could affect the outcomes of a range of chemical reactions, regardless of whether a redox system is involved. This possibility arises because many formally covalent species can be stabilized via minor charge-separated resonance contributors. When an applied electric field is aligned in such a way as to electrostatically stabilize one of these minor forms, the degree of resonance increases, resulting in the overall stabilization of the molecule or transition state. This means that it should be possible to manipulate the kinetics and thermodynamics of non-redox processes using an external electric field, as long as the orientation of the approaching reactants with respect to the field stimulus can be controlled. Here, we provide experimental evidence that the formation of carbon-carbon bonds is accelerated by an electric field. We have designed a surface model system to probe the Diels-Alder reaction, and coupled it with a scanning tunnelling microscopy break-junction approach. This technique, performed at the single-molecule level, is perfectly suited to deliver an electric-field stimulus across approaching reactants. We find a fivefold increase in the frequency of formation of single-molecule junctions, resulting from the reaction that occurs when the electric field is present and aligned so as to favour electron flow from the dienophile to the diene. Our results are qualitatively consistent with those predicted by quantum-chemical calculations in a theoretical model of this system, and herald a new approach to chemical catalysis.

  17. Indenylmetal Catalysis in Organic Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Trost, Barry M; Ryan, Michael C

    2017-03-06

    Synthetic organic chemists have a long-standing appreciation for transition metal cyclopentadienyl complexes, of which many have been used as catalysts for organic transformations. Much less well known are the contributions of the benzo-fused relative of the cyclopentadienyl ligand, the indenyl ligand, whose unique properties have in many cases imparted differential reactivity in catalytic processes toward the synthesis of small molecules. In this Review, we present examples of indenylmetal complexes in catalysis and compare their reactivity to their cyclopentadienyl analogues, wherever possible.

  18. Enzyme catalysis on solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Nicolas; Haddoub, Rose; Flitsch, Sabine L

    2008-06-01

    Enzyme-catalysed reactions in which substrates are bound (immobilised) to solid surfaces are becoming increasingly important in biotechnology. There is a general drive for miniaturisation and automation in chemistry and biology, and immobilisation of the reaction intermediates and substrates, for example on microarrays or nanoparticles, helps to address technical challenges in this area. In bionanotechnology, enzyme catalysis can provide highly selective and biocompatible tools for the modification of surfaces on the nano-scale. Here, we review the range of enzyme-catalysed reactions that have been successfully performed on the solid phase and discuss their application in biotechnology.

  19. DOE Laboratory Catalysis Research Symposium - Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, T.

    1999-02-01

    The conference consisted of two sessions with the following subtopics: (1) Heterogeneous Session: Novel Catalytic Materials; Photocatalysis; Novel Processing Conditions; Metals and Sulfides; Nuclear Magnetic Resonance; Metal Oxides and Partial Oxidation; Electrocatalysis; and Automotive Catalysis. (2) Homogeneous Catalysis: H-Transfer and Alkane Functionalization; Biocatalysis; Oxidation and Photocatalysis; and Novel Medical, Methods, and Catalyzed Reactions.

  20. Heterogeneous catalysis: More than skimming the surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    (Feng) Tao, Franklin; Tang, Yu

    2016-10-01

    The high temperatures and pressures used in heterogeneous catalysis make it difficult to observe catalysts using conventional techniques. Now, adsorbed product molecules on the surface of a single-crystal model catalyst have been observed during catalysis using a custom-built scanning tunnelling microscope that can work in situ.

  1. Carbohydrates as enantioinduction components in stereoselective catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate derivatives are readily available chiral molecules, yet they are infrequently employed as enantioinduction components in stereoselective catalysis. In this review, synthetic approaches to carbohydrate-based ligands and catalysts are outlined, along with example applications in enantioselective catalysis. A wide range of carbohydrate-based functionality is covered, and key trends and future opportunities are identified. PMID:27064817

  2. Super Brønsted acid catalysis.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Cheol Hong; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2011-03-21

    Brønsted acid catalysis has emerged as a new class of catalysis in modern organic synthesis. However, in order to make the utility of the Brønsted acid catalysis as broad as the well-developed Lewis acid catalysis, it is desirable to develop Brønsted acids demonstrating both high reactivities and selectivities. In this feature article, we will present our achievement in the design and development of strong Brønsted acids and their application to organic reactions. Furthermore, we will describe the Tf(2)NH-catalyzed Mukaiyama aldol reaction of super silyl enol ethers. We also will highlight the differences in reactivity and chemo- and stereo-selectivity between Brønsted and Lewis acid catalysis.

  3. "Nanocrystal bilayer for tandem catalysis"

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Yusuke; Tsung, Chia Kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Huo, Ziyang; E.Habas, Susan E; Soejima, Tetsuro; Aliaga, Cesar E; Samorjai, Gabor A; Yang, Peidong

    2011-01-24

    Supported catalysts are widely used in industry and can be optimized by tuning the composition and interface of the metal nanoparticles and oxide supports. Rational design of metal-metal oxide interfaces in nanostructured catalysts is critical to achieve better reaction activities and selectivities. We introduce here a new class of nanocrystal tandem catalysts that have multiple metal-metal oxide interfaces for the catalysis of sequential reactions. We utilized a nanocrystal bilayer structure formed by assembling platinum and cerium oxide nanocube monolayers of less than 10 nm on a silica substrate. The two distinct metal-metal oxide interfaces, CeO2-Pt and Pt-SiO2, can be used to catalyse two distinct sequential reactions. The CeO2-Pt interface catalysed methanol decomposition to produce CO and H2, which were subsequently used for ethylene hydroformylation catalysed by the nearby Pt-SiO2 interface. Consequently, propanal was produced selectively from methanol and ethylene on the nanocrystal bilayer tandem catalyst. This new concept of nanocrystal tandem catalysis represents a powerful approach towards designing high-performance, multifunctional nanostructured catalysts

  4. Aminomethylation of enals through carbene and acid cooperative catalysis: concise access to β(2)-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianfeng; Chen, Xingkuan; Wang, Ming; Zheng, Pengcheng; Song, Bao-An; Chi, Yonggui Robin

    2015-04-20

    A convergent, organocatalytic asymmetric aminomethylation of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes by N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) and (in situ generated) Brønsted acid cooperative catalysis is disclosed. The catalytically generated conjugated acid from the base plays dual roles in promoting the formation of azolium enolate intermediate, formaldehyde-derived iminium ion (as an electrophilic reactant), and methanol (as a nucleophilic reactant). This redox-neutral strategy is suitable for the scalable synthesis of enantiomerically enriched β(2) -amino acids bearing various substituents.

  5. Conformational selectivity in cytochrome P450 redox partner interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hollingsworth, Scott A.; Batabyal, Dipanwita; Nguyen, Brian D.; Poulos, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    The heme iron of cytochromes P450 must be reduced to bind and activate molecular oxygen for substrate oxidation. Reducing equivalents are derived from a redox partner, which requires the formation of a protein–protein complex. A subject of increasing discussion is the role that redox partner binding plays, if any, in favoring significant structural changes in the P450s that are required for activity. Many P450s now have been shown to experience large open and closed motions. Several structural and spectral studies indicate that the well-studied P450cam adopts the open conformation when its redox partner, putidaredoxin (Pdx), binds, whereas recent NMR studies indicate that this view is incorrect. Given the relevance of this discrepancy to P450 chemistry, it is important to determine whether Pdx favors the open or closed form of P450cam. Here, we have used both computational and experimental isothermal titration calorimetry studies that unequivocally show Pdx favors binding to the open form of P450cam. Analyses of molecular-dynamic trajectories also provide insights into intermediate conformational states that could be relevant to catalysis. PMID:27439869

  6. A metalloenzyme-like catalytic system for the chemoselective oxidative cross-coupling of primary amines to imines under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Largeron, Martine; Fleury, Maurice-Bernard

    2015-02-23

    The direct oxidative cross-coupling of primary amines is a challenging transformation as homocoupling is usually preferred. We report herein the chemoselective preparation of cross-coupled imines through the synergistic combination of low loadings of Cu(II) metal-catalyst and o-iminoquinone organocatalyst under ambient conditions. This homogeneous cooperative catalytic system has been inspired by the reaction of copper amine oxidases, a family of metalloenzymes with quinone organic cofactors that mediate the selective oxidation of primary amines to aldehydes. After optimization, the desired cross-coupled imines are obtained in high yields with broad substrate scope through a transamination process that leads to the homocoupled imine intermediate, followed by dynamic transimination. The ability to carry out the reactions at room temperature and with ambient air, rather than molecular oxygen as the oxidant, and equimolar amounts of each coupling partner is particularly attractive from an environmentally viewpoint.

  7. Cycloaddition reactivity studies of first-row transition metal-azide complexes and alkynes: an inorganic click reaction for metalloenzyme inhibitor synthesis.

    PubMed

    Evangelio, Emi; Rath, Nigam P; Mirica, Liviu M

    2012-07-14

    The studies described herein focus on the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction between first-row transition metal-azide complexes and alkyne reagents, i.e. an inorganic variant of the extensively used "click reaction". The reaction between the azide complexes of biologically-relevant metals (e.g., Fe, Co and Ni) found in metalloenzyme active sites and alkyne reagents has been investigated as a proof-of-principle for a novel method of developing metalloenzyme triazole-based inhibitors. Six Fe, Co and Ni mono-azide complexes employing salen- and cyclam-type ligands have been synthesized and characterized. The scope of the targeted inorganic azide-alkyne click reaction was investigated using the electron-deficient alkyne dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate. Of the six metal-azide complexes tested, the Co and Ni complexes of the 1,4,8,11-tetrametyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane (Me(4)cyclam) ligand showed a successful cycloaddition reaction and formation of the corresponding metal-triazolate products, which were crystallographically characterized. Moreover, use of less electron deficient alkynes resulted in a loss of cycloaddition reactivity. Analysis of the structural parameters of the investigated metal-azide complexes suggests that a more symmetric structure and charge distribution within the azide moiety is needed for the formation of a metal-triazolate product. Overall, these results suggest that a successful cycloaddition reaction between a metal-azide complex and an alkyne substrate is dependent both on the ligand and metal oxidation state, that determine the electronic properties of the bound azide, as well as the electron deficient nature of the alkyne employed.

  8. Mechanism of Copper/Azodicarboxylate-Catalyzed Aerobic Alcohol Oxidation: Evidence for Uncooperative Catalysis.

    PubMed

    McCann, Scott D; Stahl, Shannon S

    2016-01-13

    Cooperative catalysis between Cu(II) and redox-active organic cocatalysts is a key feature of important chemical and enzymatic aerobic oxidation reactions, such as alcohol oxidation mediated by Cu/TEMPO and galactose oxidase. Nearly 20 years ago, Markó and co-workers reported that azodicarboxylates, such as di-tert-butyl azodicarboxylate (DBAD), are effective redox-active cocatalysts in Cu-catalyzed aerobic alcohol oxidation reactions [Markó, I. E., et al. Science 1996, 274, 2044], but the nature of the cooperativity between Cu and azodicarboxylates is not well understood. Here, we report a mechanistic study of Cu/DBAD-catalyzed aerobic alcohol oxidation. In situ infrared spectroscopic studies reveal a burst of product formation prior to steady-state catalysis, and gas-uptake measurements show that no O2 is consumed during the burst. Kinetic studies reveal that the anaerobic burst and steady-state turnover have different rate laws. The steady-state rate does not depend on [O2] or [DBAD]. These results, together with other EPR and in situ IR spectroscopic and kinetic isotope effect studies, reveal that the steady-state mechanism consists of two interdependent catalytic cycles that operate in sequence: a fast Cu(II)/DBAD pathway, in which DBAD serves as the oxidant, and a slow Cu(II)-only pathway, in which Cu(II) is the oxidant. This study provides significant insight into the redox cooperativity, or lack thereof, between Cu and redox-active organic cocatalysts in aerobic oxidation reactions.

  9. Redox flow batteries: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Adam Z.; Mench, Matthew M; Meyers, Jeremy; Ross, Philip N.; Gostick, Jeffrey T.; Liu, Qinghua

    2011-01-01

    Redox flow batteries (RFBs) are enjoying a renaissance due to their ability to store large amounts of electrical energy relatively cheaply and efficiently. In this review, we examine the components of RFBs with a focus on understanding the underlying physical processes. The various transport and kinetic phenomena are discussed along with the most common redox couples.

  10. Magnetic monopole catalysis of proton decay

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.; Salvino, D.

    1986-09-01

    Catalysis of proton decay by GUT magnetic monopoles (the Rubakov-Callan effect) is discussed. Combining a short-distance cross section calculation by Bernreuther and Craigie with the long-distance velocity dependent distortion factors of Arafune and Fukugita, catalysis rate predictions which can be compared with experiment are obtained. At present, hydrogen rich detectors such as water (H/sub 2/O) and methane (CH/sub 4/) appear to be particularly well suited for observing catalysis by very slow monopoles. 17 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Asymmetric catalysis with short-chain peptides.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Bartosz; Wennemers, Helma

    2014-10-01

    Within this review article we describe recent developments in asymmetric catalysis with peptides. Numerous peptides have been established in the past two decades that catalyze a wide variety of transformations with high stereoselectivities and yields, as well as broad substrate scope. We highlight here catalytically active peptides, which have addressed challenges that had thus far remained elusive in asymmetric catalysis: enantioselective synthesis of atropoisomers and quaternary stereogenic centers, regioselective transformations of polyfunctional substrates, chemoselective transformations, catalysis in-flow and reactions in aqueous environments.

  12. Surface science and heterogeneous catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Somorjai, G.A.

    1980-05-01

    The catalytic reactions studied include hydrocarbon conversion over platinum, the transition metal-catalyzed hydrogenation of carbon monoxide, and the photocatalyzed dissociation of water over oxide surfaces. The method of combined surface science and catalytic studies is similar to those used in synthetic organic chemistry. The single-crystal models for the working catalyst are compared with real catalysts by comparing the rates of cyclopropane ring opening on platinum and the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide on rhodium single crystal surface with those on practical commercial catalyst systems. Excellent agreement was obtained for these reactions. This document reviews what was learned about heterogeneous catalysis from these surface science approaches over the past 15 years and present models of the active catalyst surface.

  13. Nanocrystal assembly for tandem catalysis

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; Somorjai, Gabor; Yamada, Yusuke; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Huang, Wenyu

    2014-10-14

    The present invention provides a nanocrystal tandem catalyst comprising at least two metal-metal oxide interfaces for the catalysis of sequential reactions. One embodiment utilizes a nanocrystal bilayer structure formed by assembling sub-10 nm platinum and cerium oxide nanocube monolayers on a silica substrate. The two distinct metal-metal oxide interfaces, CeO.sub.2--Pt and Pt--SiO.sub.2, can be used to catalyze two distinct sequential reactions. The CeO.sub.2--Pt interface catalyzed methanol decomposition to produce CO and H.sub.2, which were then subsequently used for ethylene hydroformylation catalyzed by the nearby Pt--SiO.sub.2 interface. Consequently, propanal was selectively produced on this nanocrystal bilayer tandem catalyst.

  14. Palladium catalysis for energy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pfefferle, L. D.; Datye, Abhaya

    2001-03-01

    Palladium (Pd) is an attractive catalyst for a range of new combustion applications comprising primary new technologies for future industrial energy needs, including gas turbine catalytic combustion, auto exhaust catalysts, heating and fuel cells. Pd poses particular challenges because it changes both chemical state and morphology as a function of temperature and reactant environment and those changes result in positive and negative changes in activity. Interactions with the support, additives, water, and contaminants as well as carbon formation have also been observed to affect Pd catalyst performance. This report describes the results of a 3.5 year project that resolves some of the conflicting reports in the literature about the performance of Pd-based catalysis.

  15. The system biology of thiol redox system in Escherichia coli and yeast: differential functions in oxidative stress, iron metabolism and DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Toledano, Michel B; Kumar, Chitranshu; Le Moan, Natacha; Spector, Dan; Tacnet, Frédérique

    2007-07-31

    By its ability to engage in a variety of redox reactions and coordinating metals, cysteine serves as a key residue in mediating enzymatic catalysis, protein oxidative folding and trafficking, and redox signaling. The thiol redox system, which consists of the glutathione and thioredoxin pathways, uses the cysteine residue to catalyze thiol-disulfide exchange reactions, thereby controlling the redox state of cytoplasmic cysteine residues and regulating the biological functions it subserves. Here, we consider the thiol redox systems of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, emphasizing the role of genetic approaches in the understanding of the cellular functions of these systems. We show that although prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems have a similar architecture, they profoundly differ in their overall cellular functions.

  16. Micelle Catalysis of an Aromatic Substitution Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corsaro, Gerald; Smith J. K.

    1976-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which the iodonation of aniline reaction is shown to undergo catalysis in solution of sodium lauryl sulfate which forms micelles with negatively charged pseudo surfaces. (MLH)

  17. A Course in Kinetics and Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartholomew, C. H.

    1981-01-01

    Describes a one-semester, three-credit hour course integrating the fundamentals of kinetics and the scientific/engineering principles of heterogeneous catalysis. Includes course outline, list of texts, background readings, and topical journal articles. (SK)

  18. Phosphine Catalysis of Allenes with Electrophiles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiming; Xu, Xingzhu; Kwon, Ohyun

    2014-01-01

    Nucleophilic phosphine catalysis of allenes with electrophiles is one of the most powerful and straightforward synthetic strategies for the generation of highly functionalized carbocycle or heterocycle structural motifs, which are present in a wide range of bioactive natural products and medicinally important substances. The reaction topologies can be controlled through judicious choice of the phosphine catalyst and the structural variations of starting materials. This Tutorial Review presents selected examples of nucleophilic phosphine catalysis using allenes and electrophiles. PMID:24663290

  19. Advancing Sustainable Catalysis with Magnetite Surface ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This article surveys the recent developments in the synthesis, surface modification, and synthetic applications of magnetitenanoparticles. The emergence of iron(II,III) oxide (triiron tetraoxide or magnetite; Fe3O4, or FeO•Fe2O3) nanoparticles as a sustainable support in heterogeneous catalysis is highlighted. Use of an oxide of earth-abundant iron for various applications in catalysis and environmental remediation.

  20. Recent advances in homogeneous nickel catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasker, Sarah Z.; Standley, Eric A.; Jamison, Timothy F.

    2014-05-01

    Tremendous advances have been made in nickel catalysis over the past decade. Several key properties of nickel, such as facile oxidative addition and ready access to multiple oxidation states, have allowed the development of a broad range of innovative reactions. In recent years, these properties have been increasingly understood and used to perform transformations long considered exceptionally challenging. Here we discuss some of the most recent and significant developments in homogeneous nickel catalysis, with an emphasis on both synthetic outcome and mechanism.

  1. Organic Synthesis and Catalysis in Microemulsions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-02

    RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUM •ER A ~ ~ I &j-/( N/A N/A 4. TITLE €,,,1 &"#I*) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERiO4 COVERED LAJ Organic Synthesis and Catalysis in...ey Dstq "Av: ’ijj,,i d i o I l UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY CLASSIFICATION Of THIS PAGEg’lrhn Date Entered) Organic Synthesis and Catalysis in

  2. Redox biology of the intestine

    PubMed Central

    Circu, Magdalena L.; Aw, Tak Yee

    2011-01-01

    The intestinal tract, known for its capability for self-renew, represents the first barrier of defense between the organism and its luminal environment. The thiol/disulfide redox systems comprising the glutathione/glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG), cysteine/cystine (Cys/CySS) and reduced and oxidized thioredoxin (Trx/TrxSS) redox couples play important roles in preserving tissue redox homeostasis, metabolic functions, and cellular integrity. Control of the thiol-disulfide status at the luminal surface is essential for maintaining mucus fluidity and absorption of nutrients, and protection against chemical-induced oxidant injury. Within intestinal cells, these redox couples preserve an environment that supports physiological processes and orchestrates networks of enzymatic reactions against oxidative stress. In this review, we focus on the intestinal redox and antioxidant systems, their subcellular compartmentation, redox signaling and epithelial turnover, and contribution of luminal microbiota, key aspects that are relevant to understanding redox-dependent processes in gut biology with implications for degenerative digestive disorders, such as inflammation and cancer. PMID:21831010

  3. A New Hybrid Redox Flow Battery with Multiple Redox Couples

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Li, Liyu; Nie, Zimin; Chen, Baowei; Luo, Qingtao; Shao, Yuyan; Wei, Xiaoliang; Chen, Feng; Xia, Guanguang; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-05-19

    A redox flow battery using V{sup 4+}/V{sup 5+} vs. V{sup 2+}/V{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} vs. V{sup 2+}/V{sup 3+} redox couples in chloric/sulphuric mixed acid supporting electrolyte was investigated for potential stationary energy storage applications. The Fe/V hybrid redox flow cell using mixed reactant solutions operated within a voltage window of 0.5-1.7 V demonstrated stable cycling over 100 cycles with energy efficiency {approx}80% and no capacity fading at room temperature. A 66% improvement in the energy density of the Fe/V hybrid cell was achieved compared with the previous reported Fe/V cell using only Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} vs. V{sup 2+}/V{sup 3+} redox couples.

  4. Acceptorless Dehydrogenation of N-Heterocycles by Merging Visible-Light Photoredox Catalysis and Cobalt Catalysis.

    PubMed

    He, Ke-Han; Tan, Fang-Fang; Zhou, Chao-Zheng; Zhou, Gui-Jiang; Yang, Xiao-Long; Li, Yang

    2017-03-06

    Herein, the first acceptorless dehydrogenation of tetrahydroquinolines (THQs), indolines, and other related N-heterocycles, by merging visible-light photoredox catalysis and cobalt catalysis at ambient temperature, is described. The potential applications to organic transformations and hydrogen-storage materials are demonstrated. Primary mechanistic investigations indicate that the catalytic cycle occurs predominantly by an oxidative quenching pathway.

  5. Advanced Resources for Catalysis Science; Recommendations for a National Catalysis Research Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Peden, Charles HF.; Ray, Douglas

    2005-10-05

    Catalysis is one of the most valuable contributors to our economy and historically an area where the United States has enjoyed, but is now losing, international leadership. While other countries are stepping up their work in this area, support for advanced catalysis research and development in the U.S. has diminished. Yet, more than ever, innovative and improved catalyst technologies are imperative for new energy production processes to ease our dependence on imported resources, for new energy-efficient and environmentally benign chemical production processes, and for new emission reduction technologies to minimize the environmental impact of an active and growing economy. Addressing growing concerns about the future direction of U.S. catalysis science, experts from the catalysis community met at a workshop to determine and recommend advanced resources needed to address the grand challenges for catalysis research and development. The workshop's primary conclusion: To recapture our position as the leader in catalysis innovation and practice, and promote crucial breakthroughs, the U.S. must establish one or more well-funded and well-equipped National Catalysis Research Institutes competitively selected, centered in the national laboratories and, by charter, networked to other national laboratories, universities, and industry. The Institute(s) will be the center of a national collaboratory that gives catalysis researchers access to the most advanced techniques available in the scientific enterprise. The importance of catalysis to our energy, economic, and environmental security cannot be overemphasized. Catalysis is a vital part of our core industrial infrastructure, as it is integral to chemical processing and petroleum refining, and is critical to proposed advances needed to secure a sustainable energy future. Advances in catalysis could reduce our need for foreign oil by making better use of domestic carbon resources, for example, allowing cost-effective and zero

  6. ISOTOPE METHODS IN HOMOGENEOUS CATALYSIS.

    SciTech Connect

    BULLOCK,R.M.; BENDER,B.R.

    2000-12-01

    The use of isotope labels has had a fundamentally important role in the determination of mechanisms of homogeneously catalyzed reactions. Mechanistic data is valuable since it can assist in the design and rational improvement of homogeneous catalysts. There are several ways to use isotopes in mechanistic chemistry. Isotopes can be introduced into controlled experiments and followed where they go or don't go; in this way, Libby, Calvin, Taube and others used isotopes to elucidate mechanistic pathways for very different, yet important chemistries. Another important isotope method is the study of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and equilibrium isotope effect (EIEs). Here the mere observation of where a label winds up is no longer enough - what matters is how much slower (or faster) a labeled molecule reacts than the unlabeled material. The most careti studies essentially involve the measurement of isotope fractionation between a reference ground state and the transition state. Thus kinetic isotope effects provide unique data unavailable from other methods, since information about the transition state of a reaction is obtained. Because getting an experimental glimpse of transition states is really tantamount to understanding catalysis, kinetic isotope effects are very powerful.

  7. Inverse magnetic/shear catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInnes, Brett

    2016-05-01

    It is well known that very large magnetic fields are generated when the Quark-Gluon Plasma is formed during peripheral heavy-ion collisions. Lattice, holographic, and other studies strongly suggest that these fields may, for observationally relevant field values, induce ;inverse magnetic catalysis;, signalled by a lowering of the critical temperature for the chiral/deconfinement transition. The theoretical basis of this effect has recently attracted much attention; yet so far these investigations have not included another, equally dramatic consequence of the peripheral collision geometry: the QGP acquires a large angular momentum vector, parallel to the magnetic field. Here we use holographic techniques to argue that the angular momentum can also, independently, have an effect on transition temperatures, and we obtain a rough estimate of the relative effects of the presence of both a magnetic field and an angular momentum density. We find that the shearing angular momentum reinforces the effect of the magnetic field at low values of the baryonic chemical potential, but that it can actually decrease that effect at high chemical potentials.

  8. Redox regulation of Ran GTPase

    SciTech Connect

    Heo, Jongyun

    2008-11-21

    Ran, a small Ras-like GTP-binding nuclear protein, plays a key role in modulation of various cellular signaling events including the cell cycle. This study shows that a cellular redox agent (nitrogen dioxide) facilitates Ran guanine nucleotide dissociation, and identifies a unique Ran redox architecture involved in that process. Sequence analysis suggests that Dexras1 and Rhes GTPases also possess the Ran redox architecture. As Ran releases an intact nucleotide, the redox regulation mechanism of Ran is likely to differ from the radical-based guanine nucleotide modification mechanism suggested for Ras and Rho GTPases. These results provide a mechanistic reason for the previously observed oxidative stress-induced perturbation of the Ran-mediated nuclear import, and suggest that oxidative stress could be a factor in the regulation of cell signal transduction pathways associated with Ran.

  9. Redox Properties of Free Radicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neta, P.

    1981-01-01

    Describes pulse radiolysis as a useful means in studing one-electron redox potentials. This method allows the production of radicals and the determination of their concentration and rates of reaction. (CS)

  10. Thiol-Based Redox Switches

    PubMed Central

    Groitl, Bastian; Jakob, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of protein function through thiol-based redox switches plays an important role in the response and adaptation to local and global changes in the cellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Redox regulation is used by first responder proteins, such as ROS-specific transcriptional regulators, chaperones or metabolic enzymes to protect cells against mounting levels of oxidants, repair the damage and restore redox homeostasis. Redox regulation of phosphatases and kinases is used to control the activity of select eukaryotic signaling pathways, making reactive oxygen species important second messengers that regulate growth, development and differentiation. In this review we will compare different types of reversible protein thiol modifications, elaborate on their structural and functional consequences and discuss their role in oxidative stress response and ROS adaptation. PMID:24657586

  11. Corynebacterium diphtheriae methionine sulfoxide reductase a exploits a unique mycothiol redox relay mechanism.

    PubMed

    Tossounian, Maria-Armineh; Pedre, Brandán; Wahni, Khadija; Erdogan, Huriye; Vertommen, Didier; Van Molle, Inge; Messens, Joris

    2015-05-01

    Methionine sulfoxide reductases are conserved enzymes that reduce oxidized methionines in proteins and play a pivotal role in cellular redox signaling. We have unraveled the redox relay mechanisms of methionine sulfoxide reductase A of the pathogen Corynebacterium diphtheriae (Cd-MsrA) and shown that this enzyme is coupled to two independent redox relay pathways. Steady-state kinetics combined with mass spectrometry of Cd-MsrA mutants give a view of the essential cysteine residues for catalysis. Cd-MsrA combines a nucleophilic cysteine sulfenylation reaction with an intramolecular disulfide bond cascade linked to the thioredoxin pathway. Within this cascade, the oxidative equivalents are transferred to the surface of the protein while releasing the reduced substrate. Alternatively, MsrA catalyzes methionine sulfoxide reduction linked to the mycothiol/mycoredoxin-1 pathway. After the nucleophilic cysteine sulfenylation reaction, MsrA forms a mixed disulfide with mycothiol, which is transferred via a thiol disulfide relay mechanism to a second cysteine for reduction by mycoredoxin-1. With x-ray crystallography, we visualize two essential intermediates of the thioredoxin relay mechanism and a cacodylate molecule mimicking the substrate interactions in the active site. The interplay of both redox pathways in redox signaling regulation forms the basis for further research into the oxidative stress response of this pathogen.

  12. Redox Reactions of Myoglobin

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Failure to maintain myoglobin (Mb) in the reduced state causes the formation of metMb, ferryl Mb species, and cross-linked Mb. Dissociation of ferriprotoporphyrin IX from the globin and release of iron atoms can also occur as oxidized Mb accumulates. These modifications may contribute to various oxidative pathologies in muscle and muscle foods. Recent Advances: The mechanism of ferryl Mb-mediated oxidative damage to nearby structures has been partially elucidated. Dissociation of ferriprotoporphyrin IX from metMb occurs more readily at acidic pH values. The dissociated ferriprotoporphyrin IX (also called hemin) readily decomposes preformed lipid hydroperoxides to reactive oxygen species. Heme oxygenase as well as lipophilic free radicals can degrade the protoporphyrin IX moiety, which results in the formation of free iron. Critical Issues: The multiple pathways by which Mb can incur toxicity create difficulties in determining the major cause of oxidative damage in a particular system. Peroxides and low pH activate each of the oxidative Mb forms, ferriprotoporphyrin IX, and released iron. Determining the relative concentration of these species is technically difficult, but essential to a complete understanding of oxidative pathology in muscle tissue. Future Directions: Improved methods to assess the different pathways of Mb toxicity are needed. Although significant advances have been made in the understanding of Mb interactions with other biomolecules, further investigation is needed to understand the physical and chemical nature of these interactions. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 2342–2351. PMID:22900975

  13. Redox Control of Cardiac Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Nitin T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been associated with various human diseases, and considerable attention has been paid to investigate their physiological effects. Various ROS are synthesized in the mitochondria and accumulate in the cytoplasm if the cellular antioxidant defense mechanism fails. The critical balance of this ROS synthesis and antioxidant defense systems is termed the redox system of the cell. Various cardiovascular diseases have also been affected by redox to different degrees. ROS have been indicated as both detrimental and protective, via different cellular pathways, for cardiac myocyte functions, electrophysiology, and pharmacology. Mostly, the ROS functions depend on the type and amount of ROS synthesized. While the literature clearly indicates ROS effects on cardiac contractility, their effects on cardiac excitability are relatively under appreciated. Cardiac excitability depends on the functions of various cardiac sarcolemal or mitochondrial ion channels carrying various depolarizing or repolarizing currents that also maintain cellular ionic homeostasis. ROS alter the functions of these ion channels to various degrees to determine excitability by affecting the cellular resting potential and the morphology of the cardiac action potential. Thus, redox balance regulates cardiac excitability, and under pathological regulation, may alter action potential propagation to cause arrhythmia. Understanding how redox affects cellular excitability may lead to potential prophylaxis or treatment for various arrhythmias. This review will focus on the studies of redox and cardiac excitation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 432–468. PMID:22897788

  14. Chemistry of precious metal oxides relevant to heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Kurzman, Joshua A; Misch, Lauren M; Seshadri, Ram

    2013-10-01

    The platinum group metals (PGMs) are widely employed as catalysts, especially for the mitigation of automotive exhaust pollutants. The low natural abundance of PGMs and increasing demand from the expanding automotive sector necessitates strategies to improve the efficiency of PGM use. Conventional catalysts typically consist of PGM nanoparticles dispersed on high surface area oxide supports. However, high PGM loadings must be used to counter sintering, ablation, and deactivation of the catalyst such that sufficient activity is maintained over the operating lifetime. An appealing strategy for reducing metal loading is the substitution of PGM ions into oxide hosts: the use of single atoms (ions) as catalytic active sites represents a highly atom-efficient alternative to the use of nanoparticles. This review addresses the crystal chemistry and reactivity of oxide compounds of precious metals that are, or could be relevant to developing an understanding of the role of precious metal ions in heterogeneous catalysis. We review the chemical conditions that facilitate stabilization of the notoriously oxophobic precious metals in oxide environments, and survey complex oxide hosts that have proven to be amenable to reversible redox cycling of PGMs.

  15. Redox Heterogenity in MORB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottrell, E.; Kelley, K. A.

    2012-12-01

    Mantle oxygen fugacity (fO2) has a first-order effect on the petrogenesis of mantle-derived melts and the speciation of mantle fluids. Current debate centers on the spatial uniformity of upper mantle fO2 and its constancy through geologic time. We use iron K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (μXANES) spectroscopy to provide Fe3+ /ΣFe ratios of submarine mantle-derived basalts from mid-ocean ridges (MORB) as a proxy for fO2. A global survey of primitive (>8.75 wt% MgO) MORB glasses at spreading centers, unaffected by plumes, reveals a decrease in Fe3+ /ΣFe ratio of 12% relative with indices of mantle enrichment such as 87/86Sr, 208/204Pb, Ba/La, and Rb/Sr ratios. The strong negative correlation between upper mantle fO2 and enrichment recorded by MORB glasses contrasts with the positive relationship hinted at by abyssal peridotite oxybarometry (e.g. Ballhaus, CMP, 1993) and the general prediction of a positive correlation born of the expectation that Fe3+ can be treated as more incompatible than Fe2+ during mantle melting. These data unequivocally link upper mantle oxidation state to mantle source enrichment. EMORB generation is commonly attributed to subduction-related processes. That EMORB is more reduced than NMORB implies that deeply subducted and recycled lithologies, such as anoxic sediment, may be more reduced than ambient mantle. Negative correlations between traditional tracers of recycled sediment (e.g. +Nb anomaly, high 87/86Sr, high LILE/LREE) and redox support this hypothesis. Preservation of redox signatures on plate-recycling timescales of hundreds of millions to billions of years would require the mantle to be very poorly buffered. Alternatively, MORB Fe3+ /ΣFe ratios may be generated in situ beneath ridges as a function of variable carbon content. The shallow MORB source is too oxidized to stabilize graphite (Cottrell and Kelley, EPSL, 2011) and carbon exists as oxides. Decreasing fO2 with increasing depth eventually stabilizes reduced

  16. Molecular modeling of heterogeneous catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gislason, Jason Joseph

    A novel method for modeling heterogeneous catalysis was developed to further facilitate the understanding of catalytic reactor mechanisms. The method employs molecular dynamics simulations, statistical mechanical, and Unity Bond Index - Quadratic Exponential Potential (UBI-QEP) calculations to calculate the rate constants for reactions on metal surfaces. The primary difficulty of molecular dynamics simulations on metal surfaces has been the lack of reliable reactive potential energy surfaces. We have overcome this through the development of the Normalized Bond Index - Reactive Potential Function (NBI-RPF), which can accurately describe the reaction of adsorbates on metal surfaces. The first calculations of rate constants for a reaction on a metal surface using molecular dynamics simulations are presented. This method is applied to the determination of the mechanism for selective hydrogenation of acetylene in an ethylene rich flow. It was determined that the selectivity for acetylene hydrogenation is attributable to the higher reactivity of acetylene versus ethylene with respect to hydrogenation by molecular hydrogen. It was shown that hydrogen transfer from the carbonaceous layer to acetylene or ethylene is insignificant in the hydrogenation process. Molecular dynamics simulations and molecular mechanics calculations were used to determine the diffusion rate constants for dimethylnaphthalene isomers is mordenite. 2,6-dimethylnaphthalene and 2,7-dimethylnaphthalene were found to have similar diffusion rate constants. Grand canonical Monte Carlo calculations were performed on the competitive adsorption of 2,6-dimethylnaphthalene and 2,7-dimethylnaphthalene in type X zeolites exchanged individually with barium, calcium, potassium, and rubidium ions, calcium exchanged MCM-22, and hydrogen form mordenite (MOR), X zeolite, Y zeolite, hypBEB, ZSM- 12, and MCM-22. These calculations showed that barium exchanged X zeolite was the most selective toward 2

  17. Synthesis of zinc, copper, nickel, cobalt, and iron complexes using tris(pyrazolyl)methane sulfonate ligands: a structural model for N,N,O binding in metalloenzymes.

    PubMed

    Papish, Elizabeth T; Taylor, Michael T; Jernigan, Finith E; Rodig, Michael J; Shawhan, Robert R; Yap, Glenn P A; Jové, Fernando A

    2006-03-06

    Ligands of intermediate steric bulk were designed to mimic metalloenzymes with histidine and carboxlyate binding sites. The reaction between tris(3-isopropylpyrazolyl)methane and butyllithium followed by SO3NMe3 in THF yielded the new ligand lithium tris(3-isopropylpyrazolyl)methane sulfonate (LiTpmsiPr). Various metal salts reacted with LiTpmsiPr to give the octahedral complexes M(TpmsiPr)2 (M = Zn, Cu, Ni, Co, Fe) in which each ligand has N,N,O binding to the metal. In the reaction between LiTpmsiPr and ZnCl2, in addition to the major product Zn(TpmsiPr)2, [LiTpmsiPrZnCl2].2THF was also formed as a minor product with a tetrahedral zinc atom coordinated to either N,N,Cl,Cl in the solid phase or N,N,N,Cl in acetonitrile solution. Although TpmsiPr is coordinatively flexible and can act as a bipodal or tripodal ligand, it appears to favor the formation of octahedral L2M complexes.

  18. Redox Pioneer: Professor Helmut Sies

    PubMed Central

    Radi, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Professor Helmut Sies Dr. Helmut Sies (MD, 1967) is recognized as a Redox Pioneer, because he authored five articles on oxidative stress, lycopene, and glutathione, each of which has been cited more than 1000 times, and coauthored an article on hydroperoxide metabolism in mammalian systems cited more than 5000 times (Google Scholar). He obtained preclinical education at the University of Tübingen and the University of Munich, clinical training at Munich (MD, 1967) and Paris, and completed Habilitation at Munich (Physiological Chemistry and Physical Biochemistry, 1972). In early research, he first identified hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as a normal aerobic metabolite and devised a method to quantify H2O2 concentration and turnover in cells. He quantified central redox systems for energy metabolism (NAD, NADP systems) and antioxidant GSH in subcellular compartments. He first described ebselen, a selenoorganic compound, as a glutathione peroxidase mimic. He contributed a fundamental discovery to the physiology of GSH, selenium nutrition, singlet oxygen biochemistry, and health benefits of dietary lycopene and cocoa flavonoids. He has published more than 600 articles, 134 of which are cited at least 100 times, and edited 28 books. His h-index is 115. During the last quarter of the 20th century and well into the 21st, he has served as a scout, trailblazer, and pioneer in redox biology. His formulation of the concept of oxidative stress stimulated and guided research in oxidants and antioxidants; his pioneering research on carotenoids and flavonoids informed nutritional strategies against cancer, cardiovascular disease, and aging; and his quantitative approach to redox biochemistry provides a foundation for modern redox systems biology. Helmut Sies is a true Redox Pioneer. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 2459–2468. The joy of exploring the unknown and finding something novel and noteworthy: what a privilege! —Prof. Helmut Sies PMID:25178739

  19. Progress towards bioorthogonal catalysis with organometallic compounds.

    PubMed

    Völker, Timo; Dempwolff, Felix; Graumann, Peter L; Meggers, Eric

    2014-09-22

    The catalysis of bioorthogonal transformations inside living organisms is a formidable challenge--yet bears great potential for future applications in chemical biology and medicinal chemistry. We herein disclose highly active organometallic ruthenium complexes for bioorthogonal catalysis under biologically relevant conditions and inside living cells. The catalysts uncage allyl carbamate protected amines with unprecedented high turnover numbers of up to 270 cycles in the presence of water, air, and millimolar concentrations of thiols. By live-cell imaging of HeLa cells and with the aid of a caged fluorescent probe we could reveal a rapid development of intense fluorescence within the cellular cytoplasm and therefore support the proposed bioorthogonality of the catalysts. In addition, to illustrate the manifold applications of bioorthogonal catalysis, we developed a method for catalytic in-cell activation of a caged anticancer drug, which efficiently induced apoptosis in HeLa cells.

  20. Redox electrode materials for supercapatteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Linpo; Chen, George Z.

    2016-09-01

    Redox electrode materials, including transition metal oxides and electronically conducting polymers, are capable of faradaic charge transfer reactions, and play important roles in most electrochemical energy storage devices, such as supercapacitor, battery and supercapattery. Batteries are often based on redox materials with low power capability and safety concerns in some cases. Supercapacitors, particularly those based on redox inactive materials, e.g. activated carbon, can offer high power output, but have relatively low energy capacity. Combining the merits of supercapacitor and battery into a hybrid, the supercapattery can possess energy as much as the battery and output a power almost as high as the supercapacitor. Redox electrode materials are essential in the supercapattery design. However, it is hard to utilise these materials easily because of their intrinsic characteristics, such as the low conductivity of metal oxides and the poor mechanical strength of conducting polymers. This article offers a brief introduction of redox electrode materials, the basics of supercapattery and its relationship with pseudocapacitors, and reviews selectively some recent progresses in the relevant research and development.

  1. RNA catalysis and the origins of life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orgel, Leslie E.

    1986-01-01

    The role of RNA catalysis in the origins of life is considered in connection with the discovery of riboszymes, which are RNA molecules that catalyze sequence-specific hydrolysis and transesterification reactions of RNA substrates. Due to this discovery, theories positing protein-free replication as preceding the appearance of the genetic code are more plausible. The scope of RNA catalysis in biology and chemistry is discussed, and it is noted that the development of methods to select (or predict) RNA sequences with preassigned catalytic functions would be a major contribution to the study of life's origins.

  2. Stabilizing metal nanoparticles for heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Anmin; Lu, Rongwen; Veser, Götz

    2010-11-07

    Metal nanoparticles hold great promise for heterogeneous catalysis due to their high dispersion, large concentration of highly undercoordinated surface sites, and the presence of quantum confinement effects, which can drastically alter their reactivity. However, the poor thermal stability of nano-sized particles limits their use to low temperature conditions and constitutes one of the key hurdles towards industrial application. The present perspective paper briefly reviews the mechanisms underlying nanoparticle sintering, and then gives an overview of emerging approaches towards stabilizing metal nanoparticles for heterogeneous catalysis. We conclude by highlighting the current needs for further developments in the field.

  3. Mouse redox histology using genetically encoded probes.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Yuuta; Roma, Leticia P; Sobotta, Mirko C; Rose, Adam J; Diaz, Mauricio Berriel; Locatelli, Giuseppe; Breckwoldt, Michael O; Misgeld, Thomas; Kerschensteiner, Martin; Herzig, Stephan; Müller-Decker, Karin; Dick, Tobias P

    2016-03-15

    Mapping the in vivo distribution of endogenous oxidants in animal tissues is of substantial biomedical interest. Numerous health-related factors, including diet, physical activity, infection, aging, toxins, or pharmacological intervention, may cause redox changes. Tools are needed to pinpoint redox state changes to particular organs, tissues, cell types, and subcellular organelles. We describe a procedure that preserves the in vivo redox state of genetically encoded redox biosensors within histological tissue sections, thus providing "redox maps" for any tissue and comparison of interest. We demonstrate the utility of the technique by visualizing endogenous redox differences and changes in the context of tumor growth, inflammation, embryonic development, and nutrient starvation.

  4. Redox Biology: Computational Approaches to the Investigation of Functional Cysteine Residues

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Stefano M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Cysteine (Cys) residues serve many functions, such as catalysis, stabilization of protein structure through disulfides, metal binding, and regulation of protein function. Cys residues are also subject to numerous post-translational modifications. In recent years, various computational tools aiming at classifying and predicting different functional categories of Cys have been developed, particularly for structural and catalytic Cys. On the other hand, given complexity of the subject, bioinformatics approaches have been less successful for the investigation of regulatory Cys sites. In this review, we introduce different functional categories of Cys residues. For each category, an overview of state-of-the-art bioinformatics methods and tools is provided, along with examples of successful applications and potential limitations associated with each approach. Finally, we discuss Cys-based redox switches, which modify the view of distinct functional categories of Cys in proteins. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 135–146. PMID:20812876

  5. NASA Redox Project status summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagedorn, N. H.

    1983-01-01

    This report is a summary of the results of the Redox Project effort during Cy 1982. It was presented at the Fifth U.S. Department of Energy Battery and Electrochemical Contractors Conference, Arlington, Va., Dec. 7-9, 1982. The major development during 1982 was the shift from Redox system operation at 25 C with unmixed reactants to operation at 65 C with mixed reactants. This change has made possible a two- or three-fold increase in operating current density, to about 65 mA/sq cm, and an increase in reactant utilization from 40% to about 90%. Both of these improvements will lead to significant system cost reductions. Contract studies have indicated that Redox reactant costs also will be moderate. A new catalyst for the chromuim electrode offers all the advantages of the conventional gold-lead catalyst while being easier to apply and more forgiving in use.

  6. Redox Regulation of Plant Development

    PubMed Central

    Considine, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: We provide a conceptual framework for the interactions between the cellular redox signaling hub and the phytohormone signaling network that controls plant growth and development to maximize plant productivity under stress-free situations, while limiting growth and altering development on exposure to stress. Recent Advances: Enhanced cellular oxidation plays a key role in the regulation of plant growth and stress responses. Oxidative signals or cycles of oxidation and reduction are crucial for the alleviation of dormancy and quiescence, activating the cell cycle and triggering genetic and epigenetic control that underpin growth and differentiation responses to changing environmental conditions. Critical Issues: The redox signaling hub interfaces directly with the phytohormone network in the synergistic control of growth and its modulation in response to environmental stress, but a few components have been identified. Accumulating evidence points to a complex interplay of phytohormone and redox controls that operate at multiple levels. For simplicity, we focus here on redox-dependent processes that control root growth and development and bud burst. Future Directions: The multiple roles of reactive oxygen species in the control of plant growth and development have been identified, but increasing emphasis should now be placed on the functions of redox-regulated proteins, along with the central roles of reductants such as NAD(P)H, thioredoxins, glutathione, glutaredoxins, peroxiredoxins, ascorbate, and reduced ferredoxin in the regulation of the genetic and epigenetic factors that modulate the growth and vigor of crop plants, particularly within an agricultural context. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1305–1326. PMID:24180689

  7. Direct sp(3)C-H acroleination of N-aryl-tetrahydroisoquinolines by merging photoredox catalysis with nucleophilic catalysis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhu-Jia; Xuan, Jun; Xia, Xu-Dong; Ding, Wei; Guo, Wei; Chen, Jia-Rong; Zou, You-Quan; Lu, Liang-Qiu; Xiao, Wen-Jing

    2014-04-07

    Sequence catalysis merging photoredox catalysis (PC) and nucleophilic catalysis (NC) has been realized for the direct sp(3) C-H acroleination of N-aryl-tetrahydroisoquinoline (THIQ). The reaction was performed under very mild conditions and afforded products in 50-91% yields. A catalytic asymmetric variant was proved to be successful with moderate enantioselectivities (up to 83 : 17 er).

  8. Catalysis by molten metals and molten alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, Y.

    1981-01-01

    Various reactors and techniques for activity measurement are described. Possible applications of the catalysis include the dehydrogenation of alcohols, amines, hydrocarbons, and coal liquefaction. Chemical reaction kinetics and electronic aspects of the reactions are discussed. 69 references, 28 figures, 7 tables.

  9. Energy resources through photochemistry and catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Graetzel, M.

    1983-01-01

    Topics included in this book are the development of molecular photocatalytic systems for solar-energy conversion, catalysis for oxygen and hydrogen evolution from water, photoelectrolysis of water, and sensitization of semiconductors. Examples are given for the photogeneration of hydrogen and oxygen from water.

  10. Homogeneous Catalysis by Transition Metal Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawby, Roger

    1988-01-01

    Examines four processes involving homogeneous catalysis which highlight the contrast between the simplicity of the overall reaction and the complexity of the catalytic cycle. Describes how catalysts provide circuitous routes in which all energy barriers are relatively low rather than lowering the activation energy for a single step reaction.…

  11. Diffusion and Surface Reaction in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baiker, A.; Richarz, W.

    1978-01-01

    Ethylene hydrogenation on a platinum catalyst, electrolytically applied to a tube wall, is a good system for the study of the interactions between diffusion and surface reaction in heterogeneous catalysis. Theoretical background, apparatus, procedure, and student performance of this experiment are discussed. (BB)

  12. Green Chemistry by Nano-Catalysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    The approach of using MW technique with nano-catalysis and benign aqueous reaction medium can offer an extraordinary synergistic effect with greater potential than these three individual components in isolation. To illustrate the ‘‘proof-of-concept’’ of this “Green and Sustainabl...

  13. Precise Formation of a Hollow Carbon Nitride Structure with a Janus Surface To Promote Water Splitting by Photoredox Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Dandan; Cao, Xu‐Ning

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The precise modification of redox species on the inner and outer surfaces of hollow nanostructures is relevant in catalysis, surface science, and nanotechnology, but has proven difficult to achieve. Herein, we develop a facile approach to specifically fabricate Pt and Co3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) onto the interior and exterior surface of hollow carbon nitride spheres (HCNS), respectively, to promote the surface redox functions of the polymer semiconductors. The photocatalytic water splitting activities of HCNS with spatially separated oxidation and reduction centers at their nanodomains were enhanced. The origin of the enhanced activity was attributed to the spatially separated reactive sites for the evolution of H2 and O2 and also to the unidirectional migration of the electron and hole on the Janus surfaces, thereby preventing the unwanted reverse reaction of water splitting and decreasing charge recombination. PMID:27533739

  14. Controlled Fluoroalkylation Reactions by Visible-Light Photoredox Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Tanmay; Iqbal, Naeem; You, Youngmin; Cho, Eun Jin

    2016-10-18

    Owing to their unique biological, physical, and chemical properties, fluoroalkylated organic substances have attracted significant attention from researchers in a variety of disciplines. Fluoroalkylated compounds are considered particularly important in pharmaceutical chemistry because of their superior lipophilicity, binding selectivity, metabolic stability, and bioavailability to those of their nonfluoroalkylated analogues. We have developed various methods for the synthesis of fluoroalkylated substances that rely on the use of visible-light photoredox catalysis, a powerful preparative tool owing to its environmental benignity and mechanistic versatility in promoting a large number of synthetically important reactions with high levels of selectivity. In this Account, we describe the results of our efforts, which have led to the development of visible-light photocatalytic methods for the introduction of a variety of fluoroalkyl groups (such as, -CF3, -CF2R, -CH2CF3, -C3F7, and -C4F9) and arylthiofluoroalkyl groups (such as, -CF2SPh, -C2F4SAr, and -C4F8SAr) to organic substances. In these studies, electron-deficient carbon-centered fluoroalkyl radicals were successfully generated by the appropriate choice of fluoroalkyl source, photocatalyst, additives, and solvent. The redox potentials of the photocatalysts and the fluoroalkyl sources and the choice of sacrificial electron donor or acceptor as the additive affected the photocatalytic pathway, determining whether an oxidative or reductive quenching pathway was operative for the generation of key fluoroalkyl radicals. Notably, we have observed that additives significantly affect the efficiencies and selectivities of these reactions and can even change the outcome of the reaction by playing additional roles during its course. For instance, a tertiary amine as an additive in the reaction medium can act not only as a sacrificial electron donor in photoredox catalysis but also as a hydrogen atom source, an elimination

  15. Redox-Active Metal-Organic Composites for Highly Selective Oxygen Separation Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wen; Banerjee, Debasis; Liu, Jian; Schaef, Herbert T.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Fernandez, Carlos A.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Nie, Zimin; Nune, Satish K.; Motkuri, Radha K.; Chapman, Karena W.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Hayes, James C.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Krishna, Rajamani; McGrail, B. Peter; Liu, Jun; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2016-03-08

    Incorporating, a redox active organometallic molIncorporating, a redox active organometallic molecule within a porous matrix is a useful strategy to form redox active composite materials for emerging applications such as energy storage, electro-catalysis and electro-magnetic separation. Herein we report a new class of stable, redox active metal organic composites for oxygen/air separation with exceptional efficiency. In particular, Ferrocene impregnated in a thermally stable hierarchical porous framework showed a saturation uptake capacity of >51 mg/g for oxygen at a very low relative saturation pressure (P/Po) of 0.06. The material shows excellent O2 selectivity from air as evident from experimental and simulated breakthrough experiments. In detail structural analysis using 57Fe-Mössbauer, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and pair distribution function (PDF) analysis show that of O2 adsorption affinity and selectivity originates by the formation Fe3+-O oxide due to the highly reactive nature of the organometallics imbedded in the porous matrix.

  16. Mitochondrially targeted fluorescent redox sensors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kylie; Kolanowski, Jacek L; New, Elizabeth J

    2017-04-06

    The balance of oxidants and antioxidants within the cell is crucial for maintaining health, and regulating physiological processes such as signalling. Consequently, imbalances between oxidants and antioxidants are now understood to lead to oxidative stress, a physiological feature that underlies many diseases. These processes have spurred the field of chemical biology to develop a plethora of sensors, both small-molecule and fluorescent protein-based, for the detection of specific oxidizing species and general redox balances within cells. The mitochondrion, in particular, is the site of many vital redox reactions. There is therefore a need to target redox sensors to this particular organelle. It has been well established that targeting mitochondria can be achieved by the use of a lipophilic cation-targeting group, or by utilizing natural peptidic mitochondrial localization sequences. Here, we review how these two approaches have been used by a number of researchers to develop mitochondrially localized fluorescent redox sensors that are already proving useful in providing insights into the roles of reactive oxygen species in the mitochondria.

  17. Implications of phosphorus redox geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasek, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    Phosphorus is the limiting nutrient in many environments. Until recently, redox changes to phosphorus speciation have been confined to the realm of chemical laboratories as phosphorus was considered to be synonymous with phosphate in the natural environment. The few known phosphorus species with a reduced redox state, such as phosphine gas, were considered novelties. Recent work has revealed a surprising role for low redox state organophosphorus compounds -- the phosphonates -- in biogeochemistry. Additionally, phosphite and hypophosphite (the lower oxyanions of phosphorus) have been identified from natural sources, and microbial genomics suggests these compounds may be ubiquitous in nature. Recent work from our laboratory suggests that reduced phosphorus compounds such as phosphite and hypophosphite may be ubiquitous (Pasek et al. 2014). If so, then these species maybe important in the global phosphorus biogeochemical cycle, and could influence global phosphorus sustainability. Additionally, these compounds could have been relevant on the early earth environment, priming the earth with reactive phosphorus for prebiotic chemistry. Reference: Pasek, M. A., Sampson, J. M., & Atlas, Z. (2014). Redox chemistry in the phosphorus biogeochemical cycle. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 111(43), 15468-15473.

  18. High-throughput screening of cellular redox sensors using modern redox proteomics approaches.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jingwen; Wang, Kui; Nice, Edouard C; Zhang, Tao; Huang, Canhua

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells are characterized by higher levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) due to metabolic aberrations. ROS are widely accepted as second messengers triggering pivotal signaling pathways involved in the process of cell metabolism, cell cycle, apoptosis, and autophagy. However, the underlying cellular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Recently, accumulating evidence has demonstrated that ROS initiate redox signaling through direct oxidative modification of the cysteines of key redox-sensitive proteins (termed redox sensors). Uncovering the functional changes underlying redox regulation of redox sensors is urgently required, and the role of different redox sensors in distinct disease states still remains to be identified. To assist this, redox proteomics has been developed for the high-throughput screening of redox sensors, which will benefit the development of novel therapeutic strategies for cancer treatment. Highlighted here are recent advances in redox proteomics approaches and their applications in identifying redox sensors involved in tumor development.

  19. Immobilization of polyoxometalates in crystalline solids for highly efficient heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ji-Jie; Wu, Chuan-De

    2016-06-21

    Polyoxometalates (POMs) are a unique class of molecular metal-oxygen clusters with attractive architecture and tunable properties. Due to their strong acidity, redox chemistry, photoactivity, charge distribution and multielectron transformation, POMs have been used as efficient catalysts in a variety of chemical reactions. To meet the requirement of sustainable chemistry, great effort has been focused on immobilization of the active POMs on different solid supports to realize heterogeneous catalysis. This short review summarizes the recent progress on immobilization of POM moieties in crystalline solids with defined crystal structures, including organic-inorganic hybrid materials, POM-based inorganic crystalline solids and POM-encapsulated metal-organic frameworks (POM@MOFs), and their catalytic properties in oxidation, hydrolysis, cyanosilylation, photocatalysis and electrocatalysis. As illustrated in the text, these crystalline solids exhibit interesting catalytic properties, such as high activity, stability and selectivity, and simple recovery and easy recycling, which are much superior to those of the corresponding constituent species in most cases.

  20. General and Efficient C-C Bond Forming Photoredox Catalysis with Semiconductor Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Jill A; Frenette, Leah C; Zhao, Norman; Sowers, Kelly L; Krauss, Todd D; Weix, Daniel J

    2017-03-29

    Photoredox catalysis has become an essential tool in organic synthesis because it enables new routes to important molecules. However, the best available molecular catalysts suffer from high catalyst loadings and rely on precious metals. Here we show that colloidal nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs) can serve as efficient and robust, precious-metal free, photoassisted redox catalysts. A single-sized CdSe quantum dot (3.0 ± 0.2 nm) can replace several different dye catalysts needed for five different photoredox reactions (β-alkylation, β-aminoalkylation, dehalogenation, amine arylation, and decarboxylative radical formation). Even without optimization of the QDs or the reaction conditions, efficiencies rivaling those of the best available metal dyes were obtained.

  1. Asymmetric supramolecular primary amine catalysis in aqueous buffer: connections of selective recognition and asymmetric catalysis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shenshen; Li, Jiuyuan; Xiang, Junfeng; Pan, Jie; Luo, Sanzhong; Cheng, Jin-Pei

    2010-05-26

    A new approach of asymmetric supramolecular catalysis has been developed by combining the supramolecular recognition of beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) and the superior property of a chiral primary amine catalyst. The resulted beta-CD enamine catalysts could effectively promote asymmetric direct aldol reactions with excellent enantioselectivity in an aqueous buffer solution (pH = 4.80). The identified optimal catalyst CD-1 shows interesting characteristics of supramolecular catalysis with selective recognition of aldol acceptors and donors. A detailed mechanistic investigation on such supramolecular catalysis was conducted with the aid of NMR, fluorescence, circular dichroism, and ESI-MS analysis. It is revealed that the reaction is initialized first by binding substrates into the cyclodextrin cavity via a synergistic action of hydrophobic interaction and noncovalent interaction with the CD-1 side chain. A rate-limiting enamine forming step is then involved which is followed by the product-generating C-C bond formation. A subsequent product release from the cavity completes the catalytic cycle. The possible connections between molecular recognition and asymmetric catalysis as well as their relevance to enamine catalysis in both natural enzymes and organocatalysts are discussed based on rational analysis.

  2. Solvent Structure and Hammerhead Ribozyme Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Martick, Monika; Lee, Tai-Sung; York, Darrin M.; Scott, William G.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Although the hammerhead ribozyme is regarded as a prototype for understanding RNA catalysis, the mechanistic roles of associated metal ions and water molecules in the cleavage reaction remain controversial. We have investigated the catalytic potential of observed divalent metal ions and water molecules bound to a 2 Å structure of the full-length hammerhead ribozyme by using X-ray crystallography in combination with molecular dynamics simulations. A single Mn2+ is observed to bind directly to the A9 phosphate in the active site, accompanying a hydrogen-bond network involving a well-ordered water molecule spanning N1 of G12 (the general base) and 2′-O of G8 (previously implicated in general acid catalysis) that we propose, based on molecular dynamics calculations, facilitates proton transfer in the cleavage reaction. Phosphate-bridging metal interactions and other mechanistic hypotheses are also tested with this approach. PMID:18420140

  3. Transition metal catalysis in confined spaces.

    PubMed

    Leenders, Stefan H A M; Gramage-Doria, Rafael; de Bruin, Bas; Reek, Joost N H

    2015-01-21

    Transition metal catalysis plays an important role in both industry and in academia where selectivity, activity and stability are crucial parameters to control. Next to changing the structure of the ligand, introducing a confined space as a second coordination sphere around a metal catalyst has recently been shown to be a viable method to induce new selectivity and activity in transition metal catalysis. In this review we focus on supramolecular strategies to encapsulate transition metal complexes with the aim of controlling the selectivity via the second coordination sphere. As we will discuss, catalyst confinement can result in selective processes that are impossible or difficult to achieve by traditional methods. We will describe the template-ligand approach as well as the host-guest approach to arrive at such supramolecular systems and discuss how the performance of the catalyst is enhanced by confining it in a molecular container.

  4. Heterogenous catalysis mediated by plasmon heating.

    PubMed

    Adleman, James R; Boyd, David A; Goodwin, David G; Psaltis, Demetri

    2009-12-01

    We introduce a new method for performing and miniaturizing many types of heterogeneous catalysis involving nanoparticles. The method makes use of the plasmon resonance present in nanoscale metal catalysts to provide the necessary heat of reaction when illuminated with a low-power laser. We demonstrate our approach by reforming a flowing, liquid mixture of ethanol and water over gold nanoparticle catalysts in a microfluidic channel. Plasmon heating of the nanoparticles provides not only the heat of reaction but the means to generate both water and ethanol vapor locally over the catalysts, which in turn allows the chip and the fluid lines to remain at room temperature. The measured products of the reaction, CO(2), CO, and H(2), are consistent with catalytic steam reforming of ethanol. The approach, which we refer to as plasmon-assisted catalysis, is general and can be used with a variety of endothermic catalytic processes involving nanoparticles.

  5. Solar fuels generation and molecular systems: is it homogeneous or heterogeneous catalysis?

    PubMed

    Artero, Vincent; Fontecave, Marc

    2013-03-21

    Catalysis is a key enabling technology for solar fuel generation. A number of catalytic systems, either molecular/homogeneous or solid/heterogeneous, have been developed during the last few decades for both the reductive and oxidative multi-electron reactions required for fuel production from water or CO(2) as renewable raw materials. While allowing for a fine tuning of the catalytic properties through ligand design, molecular approaches are frequently criticized because of the inherent fragility of the resulting catalysts, when exposed to extreme redox potentials. In a number of cases, it has been clearly established that the true catalytic species is heterogeneous in nature, arising from the transformation of the initial molecular species, which should rather be considered as a pre-catalyst. Whether such a situation is general or not is a matter of debate in the community. In this review, covering water oxidation and reduction catalysts, involving noble and non-noble metal ions, we limit our discussion to the cases in which this issue has been directly and properly addressed as well as those requiring more confirmation. The methodologies proposed for discriminating homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis are inspired in part by those previously discussed by Finke in the case of homogeneous hydrogenation reaction in organometallic chemistry [J. A. Widegren and R. G. Finke, J. Mol. Catal. A, 2003, 198, 317-341].

  6. A conformational sampling model for radical catalysis in pyridoxal phosphate- and cobalamin-dependent enzymes.

    PubMed

    Menon, Binuraj R K; Fisher, Karl; Rigby, Stephen E J; Scrutton, Nigel S; Leys, David

    2014-12-05

    Cobalamin-dependent enzymes enhance the rate of C-Co bond cleavage by up to ∼10(12)-fold to generate cob(II)alamin and a transient adenosyl radical. In the case of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) and cobalamin-dependent enzymes lysine 5,6-aminomutase and ornithine 4,5 aminomutase (OAM), it has been proposed that a large scale domain reorientation of the cobalamin-binding domain is linked to radical catalysis. Here, OAM variants were designed to perturb the interface between the cobalamin-binding domain and the PLP-binding TIM barrel domain. Steady-state and single turnover kinetic studies of these variants, combined with pulsed electron-electron double resonance measurements of spin-labeled OAM were used to provide direct evidence for a dynamic interface between the cobalamin and PLP-binding domains. Our data suggest that following ligand binding-induced cleavage of the Lys(629)-PLP covalent bond, dynamic motion of the cobalamin-binding domain leads to conformational sampling of the available space. This supports radical catalysis through transient formation of a catalytically competent active state. Crucially, it appears that the formation of the state containing both a substrate/product radical and Co(II) does not restrict cobalamin domain motion. A similar conformational sampling mechanism has been proposed to support rapid electron transfer in a number of dynamic redox systems.

  7. A Conformational Sampling Model for Radical Catalysis in Pyridoxal Phosphate- and Cobalamin-dependent Enzymes*

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Binuraj R. K.; Fisher, Karl; Rigby, Stephen E. J.; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Leys, David

    2014-01-01

    Cobalamin-dependent enzymes enhance the rate of C–Co bond cleavage by up to ∼1012-fold to generate cob(II)alamin and a transient adenosyl radical. In the case of the pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) and cobalamin-dependent enzymes lysine 5,6-aminomutase and ornithine 4,5 aminomutase (OAM), it has been proposed that a large scale domain reorientation of the cobalamin-binding domain is linked to radical catalysis. Here, OAM variants were designed to perturb the interface between the cobalamin-binding domain and the PLP-binding TIM barrel domain. Steady-state and single turnover kinetic studies of these variants, combined with pulsed electron-electron double resonance measurements of spin-labeled OAM were used to provide direct evidence for a dynamic interface between the cobalamin and PLP-binding domains. Our data suggest that following ligand binding-induced cleavage of the Lys629-PLP covalent bond, dynamic motion of the cobalamin-binding domain leads to conformational sampling of the available space. This supports radical catalysis through transient formation of a catalytically competent active state. Crucially, it appears that the formation of the state containing both a substrate/product radical and Co(II) does not restrict cobalamin domain motion. A similar conformational sampling mechanism has been proposed to support rapid electron transfer in a number of dynamic redox systems. PMID:25213862

  8. Acupuncture mechanism and redox equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiang-Hong; Li, Qian-Qian; Xu, Qian; Li, Fang; Liu, Cun-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress participates in the pathological process of various diseases. Acupuncture is a component of the health care system in China that can be traced back for at least 3000 years. Recently, increased evidences indicate that acupuncture stimulation could reduce oxidative damage in organisms under pathological state, but the exact mechanism remains unclear. This review focuses on the emerging links between acupuncture and redox modulation in various disorders, such as vascular dementia, Parkinson's disease, and hypertension, ranging from redox system, antioxidant system, anti-inflammatory system, and nervous system to signaling pathway. Although the molecular and cellular pathways studies of acupuncture effect on oxidative stress are preliminary, they represent an important step forward in the research of acupuncture antioxidative effect.

  9. Redox signaling in cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Celio X.C.; Anilkumar, Narayana; Zhang, Min; Brewer, Alison C.; Shah, Ajay M.

    2011-01-01

    The heart has complex mechanisms that facilitate the maintenance of an oxygen supply–demand balance necessary for its contractile function in response to physiological fluctuations in workload as well as in response to chronic stresses such as hypoxia, ischemia, and overload. Redox-sensitive signaling pathways are centrally involved in many of these homeostatic and stress-response mechanisms. Here, we review the main redox-regulated pathways that are involved in cardiac myocyte excitation–contraction coupling, differentiation, hypertrophy, and stress responses. We discuss specific sources of endogenously generated reactive oxygen species (e.g., mitochondria and NADPH oxidases of the Nox family), the particular pathways and processes that they affect, the role of modulators such as thioredoxin, and the specific molecular mechanisms that are involved—where this knowledge is available. A better understanding of this complex regulatory system may allow the development of more specific therapeutic strategies for heart diseases. PMID:21236334

  10. Cascade redox flow battery systems

    DOEpatents

    Horne, Craig R.; Kinoshita, Kim; Hickey, Darren B.; Sha, Jay E.; Bose, Deepak

    2014-07-22

    A reduction/oxidation ("redox") flow battery system includes a series of electrochemical cells arranged in a cascade, whereby liquid electrolyte reacts in a first electrochemical cell (or group of cells) before being directed into a second cell (or group of cells) where it reacts before being directed to subsequent cells. The cascade includes 2 to n stages, each stage having one or more electrochemical cells. During a charge reaction, electrolyte entering a first stage will have a lower state-of-charge than electrolyte entering the nth stage. In some embodiments, cell components and/or characteristics may be configured based on a state-of-charge of electrolytes expected at each cascade stage. Such engineered cascades provide redox flow battery systems with higher energy efficiency over a broader range of current density than prior art arrangements.

  11. Cosmic string catalysis of skyrmion decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Ruth; Davis, Anne-Christine; Brandenberger, Robert

    1988-01-01

    The Callan-Witten picture is developed for monopole catalyzed skyrmion decay in order to analyze the corresponding cosmic string scenario. It is discovered that cosmic strings (both ordinary and superconducting) can catalyze proton decay, but that this catalysis only occurs on the scale of the core of the string. In order to do this we have to develop a vortex model for the superconducting string. An argument is also given for the difference in the enhancement factors for monopoles and strings.

  12. USD Catalysis Group for Alternative Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Hoefelmeyer, James D.; Koodali, Ranjit; Sereda, Grigoriy; Engebretson, Dan; Fong, Hao; Puszynski, Jan; Shende, Rajesh; Ahrenkiel, Phil

    2012-03-13

    The South Dakota Catalysis Group (SDCG) is a collaborative project with mission to develop advanced catalysts for energy conversion with two primary goals: (1) develop photocatalytic systems in which polyfunctionalized TiO2 are the basis for hydrogen/oxygen synthesis from water and sunlight (solar fuels group), (2) develop new materials for hydrogen utilization in fuel cells (fuel cell group). In tandem, these technologies complete a closed chemical cycle with zero emissions.

  13. Nanoscale Advances in Catalysis and Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yimin; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2010-05-12

    In this perspective, we present an overview of nanoscience applications in catalysis, energy conversion, and energy conservation technologies. We discuss how novel physical and chemical properties of nanomaterials can be applied and engineered to meet the advanced material requirements in the new generation of chemical and energy conversion devices. We highlight some of the latest advances in these nanotechnologies and provide an outlook at the major challenges for further developments.

  14. Spatially Assisted Schwinger Mechanism and Magnetic Catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copinger, Patrick; Fukushima, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    Using the worldline formalism we compute an effective action for fermions under a temporally modulated electric field and a spatially modulated magnetic field. It is known that the former leads to an enhanced Schwinger mechanism, while we find that the latter can also result in enhanced particle production and even cause a reorganization of the vacuum to acquire a larger dynamical mass in equilibrium which spatially assists the magnetic catalysis.

  15. Nanoplasmonic Catalysis for Synthetic Fuel Production

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-22

    absorption/electron diffusion path length mismatch that has made photovoltaics and direct photocatalysts far too expensive to find broad applicability...Catalysis: Metal oxides (e.g., TiO2, Fe2O3, PbO) are promising photocatalysts for a number of applications, including solar fuel production, oxidation...drive the oxidation of the OH- ions, producing O2 gas. While TiO2 is one of the most promising photocatalysts , it does not absorb light in the

  16. Predictive Modeling in Actinide Chemistry and Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ping

    2016-05-16

    These are slides from a presentation on predictive modeling in actinide chemistry and catalysis. The following topics are covered in these slides: Structures, bonding, and reactivity (bonding can be quantified by optical probes and theory, and electronic structures and reaction mechanisms of actinide complexes); Magnetic resonance properties (transition metal catalysts with multi-nuclear centers, and NMR/EPR parameters); Moving to more complex systems (surface chemistry of nanomaterials, and interactions of ligands with nanoparticles); Path forward and conclusions.

  17. Continuous-variable entanglement via multiphoton catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Liyun; Liao, Zeyang; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the performance of multiphoton catalysis applied on the two-mode squeezed state by examining the entropy of entanglement, logarithmic negativity, Eistein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR), and Hillery-Zubairy (HZ) correlations, and the fidelity of teleportation. It is found that the entanglement increases with the number of catalysis operations if the squeezing parameter is low initially. Our comparisons show that the HZ correlation presents a better performance than the EPR correlation for detecting the entanglement, and the improvement of HZ correlation definitely results in the improvement of entropy of entanglement rather than negativity; the region of enhanced EPR correlation is a subregion of all other entanglement properties. In addition, we consider the performances of the fidelity by comparing such operations applied before or after the amplitude damping channel. It is shown that the catalysis operation of m =n =1 before the channel presents the best performance in the initial-low squeezing regime. This may provide a useful insight for a long-distance quantum communication.

  18. Decavanadate inhibits catalysis by ribonuclease A.

    PubMed

    Messmore, J M; Raines, R T

    2000-09-01

    Pentavalent organo-vanadates have been used extensively to mimic the transition state of phosphoryl group transfer reactions. Here, decavanadate (V(10)O(28)6-) is shown to be an inhibitor of catalysis by bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A). Isothermal titration calorimetry shows that the Kd for the RNase A decavanadate complex is 1.4 microM. This value is consistent with kinetic measurements of the inhibition of enzymatic catalysis. The interaction between RNase A and decavanadate has a coulombic component, as the affinity for decavanadate is diminished by NaCl and binding is weaker to variant enzymes in which one (K41A RNase A) or three (K7A/R10A/K66A RNase A) of the cationic residues near the active site have been replaced with alanine. Decavanadate is thus the first oxometalate to be identified as an inhibitor of catalysis by a ribonuclease. Surprisingly, decavanadate binds to RNase A with an affinity similar to that of the pentavalent organo-vanadate, uridine 2',3'-cyclic vanadate.

  19. Hybrid Amyloid Membranes for Continuous Flow Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Bolisetty, Sreenath; Arcari, Mario; Adamcik, Jozef; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2015-12-29

    Amyloid fibrils are promising nanomaterials for technological applications such as biosensors, tissue engineering, drug delivery, and optoelectronics. Here we show that amyloid-metal nanoparticle hybrids can be used both as efficient active materials for wet catalysis and as membranes for continuous flow catalysis applications. Initially, amyloid fibrils generated in vitro from the nontoxic β-lactoglobulin protein act as templates for the synthesis of gold and palladium metal nanoparticles from salt precursors. The resulting hybrids possess catalytic features as demonstrated by evaluating their activity in a model catalytic reaction in water, e.g., the reduction of 4-nitrophenol into 4-aminophenol, with the rate constant of the reduction increasing with the concentration of amyloid-nanoparticle hybrids. Importantly, the same nanoparticles adsorbed onto fibrils surface show improved catalytic efficiency compared to the same unattached particles, pointing at the important role played by the amyloid fibril templates. Then, filter membranes are prepared from the metal nanoparticle-decorated amyloid fibrils by vacuum filtration. The resulting membranes serve as efficient flow catalysis active materials, with a complete catalytic conversion achieved within a single flow passage of a feeding solution through the membrane.

  20. Nanostructured materials for applications in heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zaera, Francisco

    2013-04-07

    In this review, a brief survey is offered on the main nanotechnology synthetic approaches available to heterogeneous catalysis, and a few examples are provided of their usefulness for such applications. We start by discussing the use of colloidal, reverse micelle, and dendrimer chemistry in the production of active metal and metal oxide nanoparticles with well-defined sizes, shapes, and compositions, as a way to control the surface atomic ensembles available for selective catalysis. Next we introduce the use of sol-gel and atomic layer deposition chemistry for the production and modification of high-surface-area supports and active phases. Reference is then made to the more complex active sites that can be created or carved on such supports by using organic structure-directing agents. We follow with an examination of the ability to achieve multiple functionality in catalysis via the design of dumbbells, core@shell, and other complex nanostructures. Finally, we consider the mixed molecular-nanostructure approach that can be used to develop more demanding catalytic sites, by derivatizing the surface of solids or tethering or immobilizing homogeneous catalysts or other chemical functionalities. We conclude with a personal and critical perspective on the importance of fully exploiting the synergies between nanotechnology and surface science to optimize the search for new catalysts and catalytic processes.

  1. Shape-controlled nanostructures in heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zaera, Francisco

    2013-10-01

    Nanotechnologies have provided new methods for the preparation of nanomaterials with well-defined sizes and shapes, and many of those procedures have been recently implemented for applications in heterogeneous catalysis. The control of nanoparticle shape in particular offers the promise of a better definition of catalytic activity and selectivity through the optimization of the structure of the catalytic active site. This extension of new nanoparticle synthetic procedures to catalysis is in its early stages, but has shown some promising leads already. Here, we survey the major issues associated with this nanotechnology-catalysis synergy. First, we discuss new possibilities associated with distinguishing between the effects originating from nanoparticle size versus those originating from nanoparticle shape. Next, we survey the information available to date on the use of well-shaped metal and non-metal nanoparticles as active phases to control the surface atom ensembles that define the catalytic site in different catalytic applications. We follow with a brief review of the use of well-defined porous materials for the control of the shape of the space around that catalytic site. A specific example is provided to illustrate how new selective catalysts based on shape-defined nanoparticles can be designed from first principles by using fundamental mechanistic information on the reaction of interest obtained from surface-science experiments and quantum-mechanics calculations. Finally, we conclude with some thoughts on the state of the field in terms of the advances already made, the future potentials, and the possible limitations to be overcome.

  2. Plasma Catalysis: Synergistic Effects at the Nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Neyts, Erik C; Ostrikov, Kostya Ken; Sunkara, Mahendra K; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2015-12-23

    Thermal-catalytic gas processing is integral to many current industrial processes. Ever-increasing demands on conversion and energy efficiencies are a strong driving force for the development of alternative approaches. Similarly, synthesis of several functional materials (such as nanowires and nanotubes) demands special processing conditions. Plasma catalysis provides such an alternative, where the catalytic process is complemented by the use of plasmas that activate the source gas. This combination is often observed to result in a synergy between plasma and catalyst. This Review introduces the current state-of-the-art in plasma catalysis, including numerous examples where plasma catalysis has demonstrated its benefits or shows future potential, including CO2 conversion, hydrocarbon reforming, synthesis of nanomaterials, ammonia production, and abatement of toxic waste gases. The underlying mechanisms governing these applications, as resulting from the interaction between the plasma and the catalyst, render the process highly complex, and little is known about the factors leading to the often-observed synergy. This Review critically examines the catalytic mechanisms relevant to each specific application.

  3. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF–VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis. PMID:25778551

  4. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF-VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis.

  5. Redox Regulation of Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Thu H.; Carroll, Kate S.

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases represent one of the largest families of genes found in eukaryotes. Kinases mediate distinct cellular processes ranging from proliferation, differentiation, survival, and apoptosis. Ligand-mediated activation of receptor kinases can lead to the production of endogenous H2O2 by membrane-bound NADPH oxidases. In turn, H2O2 can be utilized as a secondary messenger in signal transduction pathways. This review presents an overview of the molecular mechanisms involved in redox regulation of protein kinases and its effects on signaling cascades. In the first half, we will focus primarily on receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), whereas the latter will concentrate on downstream non-receptor kinases involved in relaying stimulant response. Select examples from the literature are used to highlight the functional role of H2O2 regarding kinase activity, as well as the components involved in H2O2 production and regulation during cellular signaling. In addition, studies demonstrating direct modulation of protein kinases by H2O2 through cysteine oxidation will be emphasized. Identification of these redox-sensitive residues may help uncover signaling mechanisms conserved within kinase subfamilies. In some cases, these residues can even be exploited as targets for the development of new therapeutics. Continued efforts in this field will further basic understanding of kinase redox regulation, and delineate the mechanisms involved in physiologic and pathological H2O2 responses. PMID:23639002

  6. Shuttle Catalysis-New Strategies in Organic Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Bhawal, Benjamin N; Morandi, Bill

    2017-01-26

    Shuttle catalysis has recently emerged as a powerful new concept that provides a platform for performing both functionalization and defunctionalization reactions. In this concept article, applications of shuttle catalysis as a novel strategy in organic synthesis are discussed. This includes using forward shuttle catalysis reactions for challenging bond-forming processes that avoid the use of hazardous chemicals. Shuttle catalysis also facilitates the transfer of reactive functionality as a route to procure a broad range of compounds using one simple procedure. Reverse shuttle catalysis reactions are also discussed as a method for the valorization of biomass and waste materials. Another area of interest, shuttle-catalysis-assisted reactions, wherein the transfer of a small molecule is utilized in a catalytic cycle, is also described. Possible future directions in this exciting new field are also suggested.

  7. Redox-inactive metal ions modulate the reactivity and oxygen release of mononuclear non-haem iron(III)-peroxo complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, Suhee; Lee, Yong-Min; Hong, Seungwoo; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Nishida, Yusuke; Seo, Mi Sook; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Nam, Wonwoo

    2014-10-01

    Redox-inactive metal ions that function as Lewis acids play pivotal roles in modulating the reactivity of oxygen-containing metal complexes and metalloenzymes, such as the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II and its small-molecule mimics. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of non-haem iron(III)-peroxo complexes that bind redox-inactive metal ions, (TMC)FeIII-(μ,η2:η2-O2)-Mn+ (Mn+ = Sr2+, Ca2+, Zn2+, Lu3+, Y3+ and Sc3+; TMC, 1,4,8,11-tetramethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane). We demonstrate that the Ca2+ and Sr2+ complexes showed similar electrochemical properties and reactivities in one-electron oxidation or reduction reactions. However, the properties and reactivities of complexes formed with stronger Lewis acidities were found to be markedly different. Complexes that contain Ca2+ or Sr2+ ions were oxidized by an electron acceptor to release O2, whereas the release of O2 did not occur for complexes that bind stronger Lewis acids. We discuss these results in the light of the functional role of the Ca2+ ion in the oxidation of water to dioxygen by the oxygen-evolving complex.

  8. Redox-inactive metal ions modulate the reactivity and oxygen release of mononuclear non-haem iron(III)–peroxo complexes

    DOE PAGES

    Bang, Suhee; Lee, Yong -Min; Hong, Seungwoo; ...

    2014-09-14

    Redox-inactive metal ions that function as Lewis acids play pivotal roles in modulating the reactivity of oxygen-containing metal complexes and metalloenzymes, such as the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II and its small-molecule mimics. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of non-haem iron(III)–peroxo complexes that bind redox-inactive metal ions, (TMC)FeIII–(μ,η2:η2-O2)–Mn+ (Mn+ = Sr2+, Ca2+, Zn2+, Lu3+, Y3+ and Sc3+; TMC, 1,4,8,11-tetramethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane). We demonstrate that the Ca2+ and Sr2+ complexes showed similar electrochemical properties and reactivities in one-electron oxidation or reduction reactions. However, the properties and reactivities of complexes formed with stronger Lewis acidities were found to be markedly different. Inmore » conclusion, complexes that contain Ca2+ or Sr2+ ions were oxidized by an electron acceptor to release O2, whereas the release of O2 did not occur for complexes that bind stronger Lewis acids. Furthermore, we discuss these results in the light of the functional role of the Ca2+ ion in the oxidation of water to dioxygen by the oxygen-evolving complex.« less

  9. A new era of catalysis: efficiency, value, and sustainability.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Soofin; Lin, Shawn D

    2014-06-01

    Value proposition: Global warming and climate change urge the chemical industry to develop new processes, in which sustainability is a necessity and requirement. Catalysis is recognized to be one of the key technologies in enabling sustainability. This special issue, assembled by guest editors Soofing Chen and Shawn D. Lin, highlights some of the best work presented at "The 6th Asia-Pacific Congress on Catalysis (APCAT-6)", with as major theme "New Era of Catalysis: Efficiency, Value, and Sustainability".

  10. At-Resin Research: Biotechnical Support and Heterogeneous Catalysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-20

    Heterogeneous Catalysis 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Sachdeva, Yesh P. 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 113b. TIME COVERED T14. DATE OF REPORT (Year’MonthDay) 11S. PAGE...chiofh SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE UNCLASSIFIED AT-RESIN RESEARCH: BIOTECHNICAL SUPPORT AND HETEROGENEOUS CATALYSIS -ffE’i Technical Report...September 1, 1989 to July 15, 1990 c. .. AT-RESIN RESEARCH: BIOTECHNICAL SUPPORT AND HETEROGENEOUS CATALYSIS Contract #: FQ8671-8900317 Subject: Ilfr=N

  11. Neutrons for Catalysis: A Workshop on Neutron Scattering Techniques for Studies in Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Overbury, Steven {Steve} H; Coates, Leighton; Herwig, Kenneth W; Kidder, Michelle

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes the Workshop on Neutron Scattering Techniques for Studies in Catalysis, held at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on September 16 and 17, 2010. The goal of the Workshop was to bring experts in heterogeneous catalysis and biocatalysis together with neutron scattering experimenters to identify ways to attack new problems, especially Grand Challenge problems in catalysis, using neutron scattering. The Workshop locale was motivated by the neutron capabilities at ORNL, including the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and the new and developing instrumentation at the SNS. Approximately 90 researchers met for 1 1/2 days with oral presentations and breakout sessions. Oral presentations were divided into five topical sessions aimed at a discussion of Grand Challenge problems in catalysis, dynamics studies, structure characterization, biocatalysis, and computational methods. Eleven internationally known invited experts spoke in these sessions. The Workshop was intended both to educate catalyst experts about the methods and possibilities of neutron methods and to educate the neutron community about the methods and scientific challenges in catalysis. Above all, it was intended to inspire new research ideas among the attendees. All attendees were asked to participate in one or more of three breakout sessions to share ideas and propose new experiments that could be performed using the ORNL neutron facilities. The Workshop was expected to lead to proposals for beam time at either the HFIR or the SNS; therefore, it was expected that each breakout session would identify a few experiments or proof-of-principle experiments and a leader who would pursue a proposal after the Workshop. Also, a refereed review article will be submitted to a prominent journal to present research and ideas illustrating the benefits and possibilities of neutron methods for catalysis research.

  12. Magnetic catalysis and inverse magnetic catalysis in nonlocal chiral quark models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagura, V. P.; Gómez Dumm, D.; Noguera, S.; Scoccola, N. N.

    2017-02-01

    We study the behavior of strongly interacting matter under an external constant magnetic field in the context of nonlocal chiral quark models within the mean field approximation. We find that at zero temperature the behavior of the quark condensates shows the expected magnetic catalysis effect, our predictions being in good quantitative agreement with lattice QCD results. On the other hand, in contrast to what happens in the standard local Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, when the analysis is extended to the case of finite temperature, our results show that nonlocal models naturally lead to the inverse magnetic catalysis effect.

  13. Synergistic Catalysis: A Powerful Synthetic Strategy for New Reaction Development

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Anna E.; MacMillan, David W. C.

    2012-01-01

    Synergistic catalysis is a synthetic strategy wherein both the nucleophile and the electrophile are simultaneously activated by two separate and distinct catalysts to afford a single chemical transformation. This powerful catalysis strategy leads to several benefits, specifically synergistic catalysis can (i) introduce new, previously unattainable chemical transformations, (ii) improve the efficiency of existing transformations, and (iii) create or improve catalytic enantioselectivity where stereocontrol was previously absent or challenging. This perspective aims to highlight these benefits using many of the successful examples of synergistic catalysis found in the literature. PMID:22518271

  14. Ferrocene-based planar chiral imidazopyridinium salts for catalysis.

    PubMed

    Check, Christopher T; Jang, Ki Po; Schwamb, C Benjamin; Wong, Alexander S; Wang, Michael H; Scheidt, Karl A

    2015-03-27

    Planar chirality remains an underutilized control element in asymmetric catalysis. Factors that have limited its broader application in catalysis include poor catalyst performance and difficulties associated with the economical production of enantiopure planar chiral compounds. The construction of planar chiral azolium salts that incorporate a sterically demanding iron sandwich complex is now reported. Applications of this new N-heterocyclic carbene as both an organocatalyst and a ligand for transition-metal catalysis demonstrate its unprecedented versatility and potential broad utility in asymmetric catalysis.

  15. Complexation of Cp2MCl2 in a Chloroaluminate Molten Salt: Relevance to Homogeneous Ziegler-Natta Catalysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    Molecular aspects of heterogeneous catalysis and catalytic fundamentals of industrial processes) Editors Professor VV. Marconi, Assoreni, via E. Ramarini 32... heterogeneous catalysis , but homogeneous effects; methods of catalyst characterization when they catalysis and enzymatic catalysis may also be included are

  16. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics of thiol/disulfide redox systems: A perspective on redox systems biology

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Melissa; Go, Young-Mi; Jones, Dean P.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of redox elements in biologic systems remains a major challenge for redox signaling and oxidative stress research. Central redox elements include evolutionarily conserved subsets of cysteines and methionines of proteins which function as sulfur switches and labile reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) which function in redox signaling. The sulfur switches depend upon redox environments in which rates of oxidation are balanced with rates of reduction through the thioredoxins, glutathione/glutathione disulfide and cysteine/cystine redox couples. These central couples, which we term redox control nodes, are maintained at stable but non-equilibrium steady states, are largely independently regulated in different subcellular compartments and are quasi-independent from each other within compartments. Disruption of the redox control nodes can differentially affect sulfur switches, thereby creating a diversity of oxidative stress responses. Systems biology provides approaches to address the complexity of these responses. In the present review, we summarize thiol/disulfide pathway, redox potential and rate information as a basis for kinetic modeling of sulfur switches. The summary identifies gaps in knowledge especially related to redox communication between compartments, definition of redox pathways and discrimination between types of sulfur switches. A formulation for kinetic modeling of GSH/GSSG redox control indicates that systems biology could encourage novel therapeutic approaches to protect against oxidative stress by identifying specific redox-sensitive sites which could be targeted for intervention. PMID:18155672

  17. Redox Control of Renal Function and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Whaley-Connell, Adam; Sowers, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Loss of redox homeostasis and formation of excessive free radicals play an important role in the pathogenesis of kidney disease and hypertension. Free radicals such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) are necessary in physiologic processes. However, loss of redox homeostasis contributes to proinflammatory and profibrotic pathways in the kidney, which in turn lead to reduced vascular compliance and proteinuria. The kidney is susceptible to the influence of various extracellular and intracellular cues, including the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS), hyperglycemia, lipid peroxidation, inflammatory cytokines, and growth factors. Redox control of kidney function is a dynamic process with reversible pro– and anti-free radical processes. The imbalance of redox homeostasis within the kidney is integral in hypertension and the progression of kidney disease. An emerging paradigm exists for renal redox contribution to hypertension. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 2047–2089. PMID:18821850

  18. Rho GTPases, oxidation, and cell redox control

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, G Aaron; Zhou, Bingying; Cox, Adrienne D; Campbell, Sharon L

    2014-01-01

    While numerous studies support regulation of Ras GTPases by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, the Rho subfamily has received considerably less attention. Over the last few years, increasing evidence is emerging that supports the redox sensitivity of Rho GTPases. Moreover, as Rho GTPases regulate the cellular redox state by controlling enzymes that generate and convert reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, redox feedback loops likely exist. Here, we provide an overview of cellular oxidants, Rho GTPases, and their inter-dependence. PMID:24809833

  19. Redox conditions for mantle plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heister, L. E.; Lesher, C. E.

    2005-12-01

    The vanadium to scandium ratio (V/Sc) for basalts from mid-ocean ridge (MOR) and arc environments has been proposed as a proxy for fO2 conditions during partial melting (e.g. [1] and [2]). Contrary to barometric measurements of the fO2 of primitive lavas, the V/Sc ratio of the upper mantle at mid-ocean ridges and arcs is similar, leading previous authors to propose that the upper mantle has uniform redox potential and is well-buffered. We have attempted to broaden the applicability of the V/Sc parameter to plume-influenced localities (both oceanic and continental), where mantle heterogeneities associated with recycled sediments, mafic crust, and metasomatized mantle, whether of shallow or deep origin, exist. We find that primitive basalts from the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP), Hawaii (both the Loa and Kea trends), Deccan, Columbia River, and Siberian Traps show a range of V/Sc ratios that are generally higher (average ~9) than those for MOR (average ~ 6.7) or arc (average ~7) lavas. Based on forward polybaric decompression modeling, we attribute these differences to polybaric melting and melt segregation within the garnet stability field rather than the presence of a more oxidized mantle in plume-influenced settings. Like MORB, the V/Sc ratios for plume-influenced basalts can be accounted for by an oxidation state approximately one log unit below the Ni-NiO buffer (NNO-1). Our analysis suggests that source heterogeneities have little, if any, resolvable influence on mantle redox conditions, although they have significant influence on the trace element and isotopic composition of mantle-derived melts. We suggest that variations in the redox of erupted lavas is largely a function of shallow lithospheric processes rather than intrinsic to the mantle source, regardless of tectonic setting. [1] Li and Lee (2004) EPSL, [2] Lee et al. (2005) J. of Petrology

  20. [Redox Molecular Imaging Using ReMI].

    PubMed

    Hyodo, Fuminori; Ito, Shinji; Utsumi, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Tissue redox status is one of the most important parameters to maintain homeostasis in the living body. Numerous redox reactions are involved in metabolic processes, such as energy production in the mitochondrial electron transfer system. A variety of intracellular molecules such as reactive oxygen species, glutathione, thioredoxins, NADPH, flavins, and ascorbic acid may contribute to the overall redox status in tissues. Breakdown of redox balance may lead to oxidative stress and can induce many pathological conditions such as cancer, neurological disorders, and aging. Therefore imaging of tissue redox status and monitoring antioxidant levels in living organisms can be useful in the diagnosis of disease states and assessment of treatment response. In vivo redox molecular imaging technology such as electron spin resonance imaging (ESRI), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-MRI (redox molecular imaging; ReMI) is emerging as a viable redox status imaging modality. This review focuses on the application of magnetic resonance technologies using MRI or DNP-MRI and redox-sensitive contrast agents.

  1. Roles of the methane monooxygenase reductase component in the regulation of catalysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Nesheim, J C; Paulsen, K E; Stankovich, M T; Lipscomb, J D

    1997-04-29

    The reductase component (MMOR) of the soluble methane monooxygenase isolated from Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b catalyzes transfer of 2e- from NADH to the hydroxylase component (MMOH) where oxygen activation and substrate oxidation occur. It is shown here that MMOR can also exert regulatory effects on catalysis by binding to MMOH or to the binary complex of MMOH and component B (MMOB), another regulatory protein. MMOR alters the oxidation-reduction potentials of the dinuclear iron cluster at the active site of MMOH. Although little change is observed in the potential for the first electron transfer to the cluster (E(1)0' = 76 mV), the E(2)0' potential value for the second electron transfer is increased from 21 to 125 mV. This shift provides a larger driving force for electron transfer from MMOR and favors transfer of two rather than one electron as required by catalysis. Similar positive shifts in potential are observed even in the presence of MMOB which has been shown to cause a 132 mV negative shift in the midpoint potential of MMOH in the absence of MMOR. MMOR is also shown to decrease the rate of reaction between the fully reduced MMOH-MMOB and O2 approximately 20-fold at 4 degrees C. However, the time course of the key catalytic cycle intermediate that can react with substates, compound Q, is unaffected. This implies a compensating faster decay of one or more of the intermediates that occur between diferrous MMOH and compound Q in the reaction cycle, thereby limiting potential nonproductive autodecay of these intermediates. Accordingly, an increase in single turnover product yield is observed in the presence of MMOR. Interestingly, MMOR can cause the redox potential increases, changes in rates, and the increase in product yield when present at only 10% of the concentration of MMOH active sites. Substrate binding is shown to induce negligible changes in the redox potentials. Two alternative regulatory schemes are presented based on (i) thermodynamic coupling

  2. Redox-Inactive Metals Modulate the Reduction Potential in Heterometallic Manganese-Oxido Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, Emily Y.; Tran, Rosalie; Yano, Junko; Agapie, Theodor

    2013-01-01

    Redox-inactive metals are found in biological and heterogeneous water oxidation catalysts, but their roles in catalysis are currently not well understood. A series of high oxidation state tetranuclear-dioxido clusters comprised of three manganese centers and a redox-inactive metal (M) of various charge is reported. Crystallographic studies show an unprecedented Mn3M(μ4-O)(μ2-O) core that remains intact upon changing M or the manganese oxidation state. Electrochemical studies reveal that the reduction potentials span a window of 700 mV, dependent upon the Lewis acidity of the second metal. With the pKa of the redox-inactive metal-aqua complex as a measure of Lewis acidity, these compounds display a linear dependence between reduction potential and acidity with a slope of ca. 100 mV per pKa unit. The Sr2+ and Ca2+ compounds show similar potentials, an observation that correlates with the behavior of the OEC, which is active only in the presence of one of these two metals. PMID:23511417

  3. Magnetic Catalysis in Graphene Effective Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeTar, Carleton; Winterowd, Christopher; Zafeiropoulos, Savvas

    2016-12-01

    We report on the first calculation of magnetic catalysis at zero temperature in a fully nonperturbative simulation of the graphene effective field theory. Using lattice gauge theory, a nonperturbative analysis of the theory of strongly interacting, massless, (2 +1 )-dimensional Dirac fermions in the presence of an external magnetic field is performed. We show that in the zero-temperature limit, a nonzero value for the chiral condensate is obtained which signals the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry. This result implies a nonzero value for the dynamical mass of the Dirac quasiparticle.

  4. Catalysis on cobalt oxide-based nanocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shiran

    Heterogeneous catalysis, being the focus of attention in the realm of catalysis, plays a vital role in modern chemical and energy industries. A prototype of heterogeneous catalyst consists of metal nanoparticles dispersed and supported on a substrate. Transition metal oxide is one of the key components of heterogeneous catalyst and is frequently used as catalyst support for noble metal nanoparticle catalysts due to low cost. As a result of the high cost of noble metal elements, it is particularly favorable to design and develop transition metal oxide-based nanocatalysts mainly made of earthabundant elements with no or less noble metal with comparable or better catalytic performance than noble metal-based nanocatalysts in a catalytic reaction. In some cases, surface chemistry and structure of nanocatalysts are not invariable during catalysis. They evolve in terms of surface restructuring or phase change, which contributes to the complexity of catalyst surface under different catalytic conditions. Transition metal oxides, especially reducible transition metal oxides, have multiple cationic valence states and crystallographic structures. New catalytic active phases or sites could be formed upon surface restructuring under certain catalytic conditions while they may not be preserved if exposed to ambient conditions. Thus, it is essential to characterize catalyst surface under reaction conditions so that chemistry and structure of catalyst surface could be correlated with the corresponding catalytic performance. It also suggests a new route to design nanocatalysts through restructuring catalyst precursor under certain catalytic conditions tracked with in-situ analytical techniques. Catalysis occurs on catalyst surface. For noble metal nanoparticle catalysts, only atoms exposed on surface participate in catalytic processes, while atoms in bulk do not. In order to make full use of noble metal atoms, it is crucial to maximize the dispersion. A configuration of noble metal

  5. Protein conformational disorder and enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Schulenburg, Cindy; Hilvert, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Though lacking a well-defined three-dimensional structure, intrinsically unstructured proteins are ubiquitous in nature. These molecules play crucial roles in many cellular processes, especially signaling and regulation. Surprisingly, even enzyme catalysis can tolerate substantial disorder. This observation contravenes conventional wisdom but is relevant to an understanding of how protein dynamics modulates enzyme function. This chapter reviews properties and characteristics of disordered proteins, emphasizing examples of enzymes that lack defined structures, and considers implications of structural disorder for catalytic efficiency and evolution.

  6. Asymmetric catalysis with chiral ferrocene ligands.

    PubMed

    Dai, Li-Xin; Tu, Tao; You, Shu-Li; Deng, Wei-Ping; Hou, Xue-Long

    2003-09-01

    Chiral ferrocene ligands have been widely used in asymmetric catalysis. The advantages of using ferrocene as a scaffold for chiral ligands are described, particularly those regarding planar chirality, rigid bulkiness, and ease of derivatization. The role of planar chirality in 1,2- and 1,1'-disubstituted ferrocene systems is discussed. By using a bulky ferrocene fragment, novel ferrocene ligands were designed, and high enantioselectivity and regioselectivity were achieved in the allylic substitution reaction of monosubstituted allyl substrates. Using the tunable electronic properties of a diphosphine-oxazoline ferrocenyl ligand, the regioselectivity of the intermolecular asymmetric Heck reaction was also examined.

  7. Factors Affecting the Relative Efficiency of General Acid Catalysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwan, Eugene E.

    2005-01-01

    A simple framework for evaluating experimental kinetic data to provide support for Specific Acid Catalysis (SAC) and General Acid Catalysis (GAC) is described based on the factors affecting their relative efficiency. Observations reveal that increasing the SAC-to-GAC rate constant ratio reduces the effective pH range for GAC.

  8. Chromium electrodes for REDOX cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalan, V.; Reid, M. A.; Charleston, A. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An improved electrode having a gold coating for use in the anode compartment of a REDOX cell is described. The anode fluid utilizes a chromic/chromous couple. A carbon felt is soaked in methanol, rinsed in water, dried and then heated in KOH after which it is again washed in deionized water and dried. The felt is then moistened with a methanol water solution containing chloroauric acid and is stored in a dark place while still in contact with the gold-containing solution. After all the gold-containing solution is absorbed in the felt, the latter is dried by heat and then heat treated at a substantially greater temperature. The felt is then suitable for use as an electrode and is wetted with water or up to two molar HCl prior to installation in a REDOX cell. The novelty of the invention lies in the use of KOH for cleaning the felt and the use of alcohol as a carrier for the gold together with the heat treating procedure.

  9. Redox pioneer: professor Barry Halliwell.

    PubMed

    Pervaiz, Shazib

    2011-05-01

    Professor Barry Halliwell is recognized as a Redox Pioneer because he has published eight articles on redox biology that have been each cited more than 1000 times, and 158 articles that have been each cited more than 100 times. His contributions go back as far as 1976, when he was involved in elucidation of the Foyer-Halliwell-Asada cycle, an efficient mechanism for preventing oxidative damage to chloroplasts. His subsequent work established the important role of iron and zinc in free radical reactions and their relevance to human pathologies. Professor Halliwell is also a leader in developing novel methodology for detecting free radical intermediates in vivo, and his contributions to our knowledge of reactive nitrogen species are highly significant. His sustained excellence won him the top-cited scientist award in the United Kingdom in biomedical sciences in 1999, and in 2003 he was recognized as a highly cited scientist by Institute of Scientific Information (ISI) for work on plant antioxidants, and the same year ranked 28 out of 5494 biochemists/biologists for scientific impact. Two pieces of his scholarly work have been listed as Citation Classics by ISI, and in 2007 his laboratory was ranked number 1 worldwide based on highest citation score in research on free radicals.

  10. Mechanical catalysis on the centimetre scale

    PubMed Central

    Miyashita, Shuhei; Audretsch, Christof; Nagy, Zoltán; Füchslin, Rudolf M.; Pfeifer, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes play important roles in catalysing biochemical transaction paths, acting as logical machines through the morphology of the processes. A key challenge in elucidating the nature of these systems, and for engineering manufacturing methods inspired by biochemical reactions, is to attain a comprehensive understanding of the stereochemical ground rules of enzymatic reactions. Here, we present a model of catalysis that can be performed magnetically by centimetre-sized passive floating units. The designed system, which is equipped with permanent magnets only, passively obeys the local causalities imposed by magnetic interactions, albeit it shows a spatial behaviour and an energy profile analogous to those of biochemical enzymes. In this process, the enzyme units trigger physical conformation changes of the target by levelling out the magnetic potential barrier (activation potential) to a funnel type and, thus, induce cascading conformation changes of the targeted substrate units reacting in parallel. The inhibitor units, conversely, suppress such changes by increasing the potential. Because the model is purely mechanical and established on a physics basis in the absence of turbulence, each performance can be explained by the morphology of the unit, extending the definition of catalysis to systems of alternative scales. PMID:25652461

  11. Mechanical catalysis on the centimetre scale.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Shuhei; Audretsch, Christof; Nagy, Zoltán; Füchslin, Rudolf M; Pfeifer, Rolf

    2015-03-06

    Enzymes play important roles in catalysing biochemical transaction paths, acting as logical machines through the morphology of the processes. A key challenge in elucidating the nature of these systems, and for engineering manufacturing methods inspired by biochemical reactions, is to attain a comprehensive understanding of the stereochemical ground rules of enzymatic reactions. Here, we present a model of catalysis that can be performed magnetically by centimetre-sized passive floating units. The designed system, which is equipped with permanent magnets only, passively obeys the local causalities imposed by magnetic interactions, albeit it shows a spatial behaviour and an energy profile analogous to those of biochemical enzymes. In this process, the enzyme units trigger physical conformation changes of the target by levelling out the magnetic potential barrier (activation potential) to a funnel type and, thus, induce cascading conformation changes of the targeted substrate units reacting in parallel. The inhibitor units, conversely, suppress such changes by increasing the potential. Because the model is purely mechanical and established on a physics basis in the absence of turbulence, each performance can be explained by the morphology of the unit, extending the definition of catalysis to systems of alternative scales.

  12. Hydroxide catalysis bonding for astronomical instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Veggel, Anna-Maria A.; Killow, Christian J.

    2014-06-01

    Hydroxide catalysis bonding (HCB) as a jointing technique has been under development for astronomical applications since ˜1998 (patented by D.-H. Gwo). It uses an aqueous hydroxide solution to form a chemical bond between oxide or oxidisable materials (e.g., SiO2, sapphire, silicon and SiC). It forms strong, extremely thin bonds, and is suitable for room temperature bonding, precision alignment, operation in ultra-low vacuum and down to temperatures of 2.5 K. It has been applied in the NASA satellite mission Gravity Probe B and in the ground-based gravitational wave (GW) detector GEO600. It will soon fly again on the ESA LISA Pathfinder mission and is currently being implemented in the Advanced LIGO and Virgo ground-based GW detectors. This technique is also of considerable interest for use in other astronomical fields and indeed more broadly, due to its desirable, and adjustable, combination of properties. This paper gives an overview of how HCB has been and can be applied in astronomical instruments, including an overview of the current literature on the properties of hydroxide catalysis bonds.

  13. Hydrolytic catalysis and structural stabilization in a designed metalloprotein

    PubMed Central

    Zastrow, Melissa L.; Peacock, Anna F. A.; Stuckey, Jeanne A.; Pecoraro, Vincent L.

    2011-01-01

    Metal ions are an important part of many natural proteins, providing structural, catalytic and electron transfer functions. Reproducing these functions in a designed protein is the ultimate challenge to our understanding of them. Here, we present an artificial metallohydrolase, which has been shown by X-ray crystallography to contain two different metal ions – a Zn(II) ion which is important for catalytic activity and a Hg(II) ion which provides structural stability. This metallohydrolase displays catalytic activity that compares well with several characteristic reactions of natural enzymes. It catalyses p-nitrophenyl acetate hydrolysis (pNPA) to within ~100-fold of the efficiency of human carbonic anhydrase (CA)II and is at least 550-fold better than comparable synthetic complexes. Similarly, CO2 hydration occurs with an efficiency within ~500-fold of CAII. While histidine residues in the absence of Zn(II) exhibit pNPA hydrolysis, miniscule apopeptide activity is observed for CO2 hydration. The kinetic and structural analysis of this first de novo designed hydrolytic metalloenzyme uncovers necessary design features for future metalloenzymes containing one or more metals. PMID:22270627

  14. Method for characterization of the redox condition of cementitious materials

    SciTech Connect

    Almond, Philip M.; Langton, Christine A.; Stefanko, David B.

    2015-12-22

    Disclosed are methods for determining the redox condition of cementitious materials. The methods are leaching methods that utilize an in situ redox indicator that is present in the cementitious materials as formed. The in situ redox indicator leaches from cementitious material and, when the leaching process is carried out under anaerobic conditions can be utilized to determine the redox condition of the material. The in situ redox indicator can exhibit distinct characteristics in the leachate depending upon the redox condition of the indicator.

  15. Screening of redox couples and electrode materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giner, J.; Swette, L.; Cahill, K.

    1976-01-01

    Electrochemical parameters of selected redox couples that might be potentially promising for application in bulk energy storage systems were investigated. This was carried out in two phases: a broad investigation of the basic characteristics and behavior of various redox couples, followed by a more limited investigation of their electrochemical performance in a redox flow reactor configuration. In the first phase of the program, eight redox couples were evaluated under a variety of conditions in terms of their exchange current densities as measured by the rotating disk electrode procedure. The second phase of the program involved the testing of four couples in a redox reactor under flow conditions with a varity of electrode materials and structures.

  16. Redox cycling compounds generate H2O2 in HTS buffers containing strong reducing reagents--real hits or promiscuous artifacts?

    PubMed

    Johnston, Paul A

    2011-02-01

    Redox cycling compounds (RCCs) generate μM concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in the presence of strong reducing agents, common buffer components used to maintain the catalytic activity and/or folding of target proteins for high throughput screening (HTS) assays. H(2)O(2) generated by RCCs can indirectly inhibit the catalytic activity of proteins by oxidizing accessible cysteine, tryptophan, methionine, histidine, or selenocysteine residues, and indeed several important classes of protein targets are susceptible to H(2)O(2)-mediated inactivation; protein tyrosine phosphatases, cysteine proteases, and metalloenzymes. The main sources of H(2)O(2) in cells are the Nox enzyme/SOD systems, peroxisome metabolism, and the autoxidation of reactive chemicals by enzyme mediated redox cycling at both the microsomal and mitochondrial sites of electron transport. Given the role of H(2)O(2) as a second messenger involved in the regulation of many signaling pathways it is hardly surprising that compounds that can generate intracellular H(2)O(2) by enzyme mediated redox cycling would have pleiotropic effects. RCCs can therefore have serious negative consequences for the probe and/or lead generation process: primary HTS assay hit rates may be inflated by RCC false positives; crucial resources will be diverted to develop and implement follow up assays to distinguish RCCs from real hits; and screening databases will become annotated with the promiscuous activity of RCCs. In an attempt to mitigate the serious impact of RCCs on probe and lead generation, two groups have independently developed assays to indentify RCCs.

  17. Redox cycling compounds generate H2O2 in HTS buffers containing strong reducing reagents – real hits or promiscuous artifacts?

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Redox cycling compounds (RCCs) generate µM concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the presence of strong reducing agents, common buffer components used to maintain the catalytic activity and/or folding of target proteins for high throughput screening (HTS) assays. H2O2 generated by RCCs can indirectly inhibit the catalytic activity of proteins by oxidizing accessible cysteine, tryptophan, methionine, histidine or selenocysteine residues, and indeed several important classes of protein targets are susceptible to H2O2-mediated inactivation; protein tyrosine phosphatases, cysteine proteases, and metalloenzymes. The main sources of H2O2 in cells are the Nox enzyme/SOD systems, peroxisome metabolism, and the autoxidation of reactive chemicals by enzyme mediated redox cycling at both the microsomal and mitochondrial sites of electron transport. Given the role of H2O2 as a second messenger involved in the regulation of many signaling pathways it is hardly surprising that compounds which can generate intracellular H2O2 by enzyme mediated redox cycling would have pleiotropic effects. RCCs can therefore have serious negative consequences for the probe and/or lead generation process: primary HTS assay hit rates may be inflated by RCC false positives; critical resources will be diverted to develop and implement follow up assays to distinguish RCCs from real hits; and screening databases will become annotated with the promiscuous activity of RCCs. In an attempt to mitigate the serious impact of RCCs on probe and lead generation, two groups have independently developed assays to indentify RCCs. PMID:21075044

  18. Early-Late Heterobimetallic Complexes Linked by Phosphinoamide Ligands. Tuning Redox Potentials and Small Molecule Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Christine M.

    2015-08-01

    Recent attention in the chemical community has been focused on the energy efficient and environmentally benign conversion of abundant small molecules (CO2, H2O, etc.) to useful liquid fuels. This project addresses these goals by examining fundamental aspects of catalyst design to ultimately access small molecule activation processes under mild conditions. Specifically, Thomas and coworkers have targetted heterobimetallic complexes that feature metal centers with vastly different electronic properties, dictated both by their respective positions on the periodic table and their coordination environment. Unlike homobimetallic complexes featuring identical or similar metals, the bonds between metals in early/late heterobimetallics are more polarized, with the more electron-rich late metal center donating electron density to the more electron-deficient early metal center. While metal-metal bonds pose an interesting strategy for storing redox equivalents and stabilizing reactive metal fragments, the polar character of metal-metal bonds in heterobimetallic complexes renders these molecules ideally poised to react with small molecule substrates via cleavage of energy-rich single and double bonds. In addition, metal-metal interactions have been shown to dramatically affect redox potentials and promote multielectron redox activity, suggesting that metal-metal interactions may provide a mechanism to tune redox potentials and access substrate reduction/activation at mild overpotentials. This research project has provided a better fundamental understanding of how interactions between transition metals can be used as a strategy to promote and/or control chemical transformations related to the clean production of fuels. While this project focused on the study of homogeneous systems, it is anticipated that the broad conclusions drawn from these investigations will be applicable to heterogeneous catalysis as well, particularly on heterogeneous processes that occur at interfaces in

  19. Manganese enzymes with binuclear active sites

    SciTech Connect

    Dismukes, G.C.

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this article is twofold. First, to review the recent literature dealing with the mechanisms of catalysis by binuclear manganese enzymes. Second, to summarize and illustrate the general principles of catalysis which distinguish binuclear metalloenzymes from monometallic centers. This review covers primarily the published literature from 1991 up to May 1996. A summary of the major structurally characterized dimanganese enzymes is given. These perform various reaction types including several redox reactions, (de)hydrations, isomerizations, (de)phosphorylation, and phosphoryl transfer. 114 refs.

  20. Dual catalysis sees the light: combining photoredox with organo-, acid, and transition-metal catalysis.

    PubMed

    Hopkinson, Matthew N; Sahoo, Basudev; Li, Jun-Long; Glorius, Frank

    2014-04-01

    The photoredox activation of organic substrates with visible light is a powerful methodology that generates reactive radical species under very mild conditions. When combined with another catalytic process in a dual catalytic system, novel, visible-light-promoted transformations have been realized that do not proceed using either catalyst in isolation. In this minireview, the state of the art in organic reactions mediated by dual catalytic systems merging photoredox activation with organo-, acid or metal catalysis is discussed.

  1. Redox subpopulations and the risk of cancer progression: a new method for characterizing redox heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, He N.; Li, Lin Z.

    2016-02-01

    It has been shown that a malignant tumor is akin to a complex organ comprising of various cell populations including tumor cells that are genetically, metabolically and functionally different. Our redox imaging data have demonstrated intra-tumor redox heterogeneity in all mouse xenografts derived from human melanomas, breast, prostate, and colon cancers. Based on the signals of NADH and oxidized flavoproteins (Fp, including flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)) and their ratio, i.e., the redox ratio, which is an indicator of mitochondrial metabolic status, we have discovered several distinct redox subpopulations in xenografts of breast tumors potentially recapitulating functional/metabolic heterogeneity within the tumor. Furthermore, xenografts of breast tumors with higher metastatic potential tend to have a redox subpopulation whose redox ratio is significantly different from that of tumors with lower metastatic potential and usually have a bi-modal distribution of the redox ratio. The redox subpopulations from human breast cancer samples can also be very complex with multiple subpopulations as determined by fitting the redox ratio histograms with multi- Gaussian functions. In this report, we present a new method for identifying the redox subpopulations within individual breast tumor xenografts and human breast tissues, which may be used to differentiate between breast cancer and normal tissue and among breast cancer with different risks of progression.

  2. Organic Redox Species in Aqueous Flow Batteries: Redox Potentials, Chemical Stability and Solubility

    PubMed Central

    Wedege, Kristina; Dražević, Emil; Konya, Denes; Bentien, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Organic molecules are currently investigated as redox species for aqueous low-cost redox flow batteries (RFBs). The envisioned features of using organic redox species are low cost and increased flexibility with respect to tailoring redox potential and solubility from molecular engineering of side groups on the organic redox-active species. In this paper 33, mainly quinone-based, compounds are studied experimentially in terms of pH dependent redox potential, solubility and stability, combined with single cell battery RFB tests on selected redox pairs. Data shows that both the solubility and redox potential are determined by the position of the side groups and only to a small extent by the number of side groups. Additionally, the chemical stability and possible degradation mechanisms leading to capacity loss over time are discussed. The main challenge for the development of all-organic RFBs is to identify a redox pair for the positive side with sufficiently high stability and redox potential that enables battery cell potentials above 1 V. PMID:27966605

  3. Organic Redox Species in Aqueous Flow Batteries: Redox Potentials, Chemical Stability and Solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedege, Kristina; Dražević, Emil; Konya, Denes; Bentien, Anders

    2016-12-01

    Organic molecules are currently investigated as redox species for aqueous low-cost redox flow batteries (RFBs). The envisioned features of using organic redox species are low cost and increased flexibility with respect to tailoring redox potential and solubility from molecular engineering of side groups on the organic redox-active species. In this paper 33, mainly quinone-based, compounds are studied experimentially in terms of pH dependent redox potential, solubility and stability, combined with single cell battery RFB tests on selected redox pairs. Data shows that both the solubility and redox potential are determined by the position of the side groups and only to a small extent by the number of side groups. Additionally, the chemical stability and possible degradation mechanisms leading to capacity loss over time are discussed. The main challenge for the development of all-organic RFBs is to identify a redox pair for the positive side with sufficiently high stability and redox potential that enables battery cell potentials above 1 V.

  4. Mitochondria and redox homoeostasis as chemotherapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Briehl, Margaret M; Tome, Margaret E; Wilkinson, Sarah T; Jaramillo, Melba C; Lee, Kristy

    2014-08-01

    Characteristics of cancer cells include a more oxidized redox environment, metabolic reprogramming and apoptosis resistance. Our studies with a lymphoma model have explored connections between the cellular redox environment and cancer cell phenotypes. Alterations seen in lymphoma cells made resistant to oxidative stress include: a more oxidized redox environment despite increased expression of antioxidant enzymes, enhanced net tumour growth, metabolic changes involving the mitochondria and resistance to the mitochondrial pathway to apoptosis. Of particular importance, the cells show cross-resistance to multiple chemotherapeutic agents used to treat aggressive lymphomas. Analyses of clinical and tumour data reveal the worst prognosis when patients' lymphomas have gene expression patterns consistent with the most oxidized redox environment. Lymphomas from patients with the worst survival outcomes express increased levels of proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation, including cytochrome c. This is consistent with these cells functioning as metabolic opportunists. Using lymphoma cell models and primary lymphoma cultures, we observed enhanced killing using genetic and drug approaches which further oxidize the cellular redox environment. These approaches include increased expression of SOD2 (superoxide dismutase 2), treatment with a manganoporphyrin that oxidizes the glutathione redox couple, or treatment with a copper chelator that inhibits SOD1 and leads to peroxynitrite-dependent cell death. The latter approach effectively kills lymphoma cells that overexpress the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Given the central role of mitochondria in redox homoeostasis, metabolism and the intrinsic pathway to apoptosis, our studies support the development of new anti-cancer drugs to target this organelle.

  5. Functional aspects of redox control during neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Corral, Sergio; Reiter, Russel J; Tan, Dun-Xian; Ortiz, Genaro G; Lopez-Armas, Gabriela

    2010-07-15

    Neuroinflammation is a CNS reaction to injury in which some severe pathologies, regardless of their origin, converge. The phenomenon emphasizes crosstalk between neurons and glia and reveals a complex interaction with oxidizing agents through redox sensors localized in enzymes, receptors, and transcription factors. When oxidizing pressures cause reversible molecular changes, such as minimal or transitory proinflammatory cytokine overproduction, redox couples provide a means of translating the presence of reactive oxygen or nitrogen species into useful signals in the cell. Additionally, thiol-based redox sensors convey information about localized changes in redox potential induced by physiologic or pathologic situations. They are susceptible to oxidative changes and become key events during neuroinflammation, altering the course of a signaling response or the behavior of specific transcription factors. When oxidative stress augments the pressure on the intracellular environment, the effective reduction potential of redox pairs diminishes, and cell signaling shifts toward proinflammatory and proapoptotic signals, creating a vicious cycle between oxidative stress and neuroinflammation. In addition, electrophilic compounds derived from the oxidative cascade react with key protein thiols and interfere with redox signaling. This article reviews the relevant functional aspects of redox control during the neuroinflammatory process.

  6. Laser-Stimulated Surface Processes and Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    A07-AC94 337 ROCHESTER UNIV NY DEPT OF CI4EMISTRY F/* 7/5 LASER-STINULATED SURFACE PROCESSES AND HETEROGENEOUS CATALYSIS . (Ul UN, NOV 80 J LIN N00014...Contra" W014-80-C-OD472 Task No. NR 056-749 __ TECHNICAL REPORT NO. 8 I Laser-Stimulated Surface Processes) *.and Heterogeneous Catalysis .) by / J...Repor HETEROGENEOUS CATALYSIS InterimTechnical_______ 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(*) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMSER(.) Jui-teng Lin N00014

  7. One-dimensional metal oxide nanostructures for heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Hsin-Yi; Jia, Xinli; Liu, Bin; Yang, Yanhui

    2013-08-21

    Metal oxides are of paramount importance in heterogeneous catalysis as either supports or active phases. Controlled synthesis of one-dimensional (1D) metal oxide nanostructures has received enormous attention in heterogeneous catalysis due to the possibility of tailoring the properties of metal oxides by tuning their shapes, sizes, and compositions. This feature article highlights recent advances in shape controlled synthesis of 1D metal oxide nanostructures and their applications in heterogeneous catalysis, with the aim of introducing new insights into the heterogeneous catalyst design.

  8. Heterogeneous Organo-Catalysis: Sustainable Pathways to ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Glucose and fructose are among the most abundant plant-derived materials1 and have been converted into useful building units often used in the drug discovery and polymer architecture.2 Unfortunately, most of these conversions require mineral acids and complex heterogeneous catalysis systems which suffer from the diminished activity and recyclability issues.3 Herein, we report a highly reactive and inexpensive heterogeneous sulfonated graphitic carbon nitride (Sg-CN), endowed with strong acidity that readily transforms carbohydrates to furanics. The ready availability and benign nature of the material and its stability over the several reaction cycles renders this catalyst very useful in organic synthesis, polymer industry and in the preparation of drug precursors. Poster presentation at the 253rd American Chemical Society (ACS) National meeting in San Francisco, CA

  9. Multifunctional Ligands in Transition Metal Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    Sophisticated ligands are now being designed that do far more than just fulfil their traditional spectator roles by binding to the metal and providing a sterically-defined binding pocket for the substrate in homogeneous transition metal catalysis. This Focus review emphasizes selected cases in which ligands carry additional functional groups that change the properties of the ligand as a result of an external stimulus or undergo catalytically-relevant ligand-based reactivity. These include proton responsive ligands capable of gaining or losing one or more protons, ligands having a hydrogen bonding function, electroresponsive ligands capable of gaining or losing one or more electrons, and photoresponsive ligands capable of undergoing a useful change of properties upon irradiation. Molecular recognition ligands and proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) are briefly discussed.

  10. Multiple roles of graphene in heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaobin; Zhang, Guoliang; Zhang, Fengbao

    2015-05-21

    Scientific interest in graphene as a catalyst and as a catalyst support in heterogeneous catalytic reactions has grown dramatically over the past several years. The present critical review summarizes the multiple roles of graphene in heterogeneous catalysis and highlights the influence of defects, heteroatom-containing functionalities, and graphene's two-dimensional structure on catalytic performance. We first discuss the role and advantages of graphene as a catalyst support, with emphasis on its interactions with the catalytic phases and the influence of mass transfer processes. We then clarify the origin of the intrinsic catalytic activity of graphene in heterogeneous catalytic reactions. Finally we suggest challenges and potential practical applications for graphene in industrial processes.

  11. A simplified electrostatic model for hydrolase catalysis.

    PubMed

    Pessoa Filho, Pedro de Alcantara; Prausnitz, John M

    2015-07-01

    Toward the development of an electrostatic model for enzyme catalysis, the active site of the enzyme is represented by a cavity whose surface (and beyond) is populated by electric charges as determined by pH and the enzyme's structure. The electric field in the cavity is obtained from electrostatics and a suitable computer program. The key chemical bond in the substrate, at its ends, has partial charges with opposite signs determined from published force-field parameters. The electric field attracts one end of the bond and repels the other, causing bond tension. If that tension exceeds the attractive force between the atoms, the bond breaks; the enzyme is then a successful catalyst. To illustrate this very simple model, based on numerous assumptions, some results are presented for three hydrolases: hen-egg white lysozyme, bovine trypsin and bovine ribonuclease. Attention is given to the effect of pH.

  12. Novel Catalysis by Gold: A Modern Alchemy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruta, Masatake

    Gold has long been neglected as a catalyst because of its chemical inertness. However, when gold is deposited as nanoparticles on carbon and polymer materials as well as on base metal oxides and hydroxides, it exhibits unique catalytic properties for many reactions such as CO oxidation at a temperature as low as 200 K, gas phase direct epoxidation of propylene, and aerobic oxidation of glucose to gluconic acid. The structure-catalytic activity correlations are discussed with emphasis on the contact structure, support selection, and the size control of gold particles. Gold clusters with diameters smaller than 2 nm are expected to exhibit novel properties in catalysis, optics, and electronics depending on the size (number of atoms), shape, and the electronic and chemical interaction with the support materials. The above achievements and attempts can be regarded as a modern alchemy that creates valuables by means of the noblest element with little practical use.

  13. Linking protein motion to enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Priyanka; Abeysinghe, Thelma; Kohen, Amnon

    2015-01-13

    Enzyme motions on a broad range of time scales can play an important role in various intra- and intermolecular events, including substrate binding, catalysis of the chemical conversion, and product release. The relationship between protein motions and catalytic activity is of contemporary interest in enzymology. To understand the factors influencing the rates of enzyme-catalyzed reactions, the dynamics of the protein-solvent-ligand complex must be considered. The current review presents two case studies of enzymes-dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and thymidylate synthase (TSase)-and discusses the role of protein motions in their catalyzed reactions. Specifically, we will discuss the utility of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and their temperature dependence as tools in probing such phenomena.

  14. Redox Mediators in Visible Light Photocatalysis: Photocatalytic Radical Thiol–Ene Additions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Synthetically useful radical thiol–ene reactions can be initiated by visible light irradiation in the presence of transition metal polypyridyl photocatalysts. The success of this method relies upon the use of p-toluidine as an essential additive. Using these conditions, high-yielding thiol–ene reactions of cysteine-containing biomolecules can be accomplished using biocompatibile wavelengths of visible light, under aqueous conditions, and with the thiol component as the limiting reagent. We present evidence that p-toluidine serves as a redox mediator that is capable of catalyzing the otherwise inefficient photooxidation of thiols to the key thiyl radical intermediate. Thus, we show that co-catalytic oxidants can be important in the design of synthetic reactions involving visible light photoredox catalysis. PMID:24428433

  15. Surface and redox properties of cobalt-ceria binary oxides: On the effect of Co content and pretreatment conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konsolakis, Michalis; Sgourakis, Michalis; Carabineiro, Sónia A. C.

    2015-06-01

    Ceria-based transition metal catalysts have recently received considerable attention both in heterogeneous catalysis and electro-catalysis fields, due to their unique physicochemical characteristics. Their catalytic performance is greatly affected by the surface local chemistry and oxygen vacancies. The present study aims at investigating the impact of Co/Ce ratio and pretreatment conditions on the surface and redox properties of cobalt-ceria binary oxides. Co-ceria mixed oxides with different Co content (0, 20, 30, 60, 100 wt.%) were prepared by impregnation method and characterized by means of N2 adsorption at -196 °C, X-ray diffraction (XRD), H2 temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results shown the improved reducibility of Co/CeO2 mixed oxides compared to single oxides, due to a synergistic interaction between cobalt and cerium. Oxidation pretreatment results in a preferential localization of cerium species on the outer surface. In contrast, a uniform distribution of cobalt and cerium species over the entire catalyst surface is obtained by the reduction process, which facilitates the formation of oxygen vacancies though Co3+/Co2+ and Ce3+/Ce4+ redox cycles. Fundamental insights toward tuning the surface chemistry of cobalt-ceria binary oxides are provided, paving the way for real-life industrial applications.

  16. Prebiotic RNA Synthesis by Montmorillonite Catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jheeta, Sohan; Joshi, Prakash C.

    2014-08-01

    This review summarizes our recent findings on the role of mineral salts in prebiotic RNA synthesis, which is catalyzed by montmorillonite clay minerals. The clay minerals not only catalyze the synthesis of RNA but also facilitate homochiral selection. Preliminary data of these findings have been presented at the "Horizontal Gene Transfer and the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA)" conference at the Open University, Milton Keynes, UK, 5-6 September 2013. The objective of this meeting was to recognize the significance of RNA in LUCA. We believe that the prebiotic RNA synthesis from its monomers must have been a simple process. As a first step, it may have required activation of the 5'-end of the mononucleotide with a leaving group, e.g., imidazole in our model reaction (Figure 1). Wide ranges of activating groups are produced from HCN under plausible prebiotic Earth conditions. The final step is clay mineral catalysis in the presence of mineral salts to facilitate selective production of functional RNA. Both the clay minerals and mineral salts would have been abundant on early Earth. We have demonstrated that while montmorillonite (pH 7) produced only dimers from its monomers in water, addition of sodium chloride (1 M) enhanced the chain length multifold, as detected by HPLC. The effect of monovalent cations on RNA synthesis was of the following order: Li+ > Na+ > K+. A similar effect was observed with the anions, enhancing catalysis in the following order: Cl- > Br- > I-. The montmorillonite-catalyzed RNA synthesis was not affected by hydrophobic or hydrophilic interactions. We thus show that prebiotic synthesis of RNA from its monomers was a simple process requiring only clay minerals and a small amount of salt.

  17. Prebiotic RNA Synthesis by Montmorillonite Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Jheeta, Sohan; Joshi, Prakash C.

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes our recent findings on the role of mineral salts in prebiotic RNA synthesis, which is catalyzed by montmorillonite clay minerals. The clay minerals not only catalyze the synthesis of RNA but also facilitate homochiral selection. Preliminary data of these findings have been presented at the “Horizontal Gene Transfer and the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA)” conference at the Open University, Milton Keynes, UK, 5–6 September 2013. The objective of this meeting was to recognize the significance of RNA in LUCA. We believe that the prebiotic RNA synthesis from its monomers must have been a simple process. As a first step, it may have required activation of the 5'-end of the mononucleotide with a leaving group, e.g., imidazole in our model reaction (Figure 1). Wide ranges of activating groups are produced from HCN under plausible prebiotic Earth conditions. The final step is clay mineral catalysis in the presence of mineral salts to facilitate selective production of functional RNA. Both the clay minerals and mineral salts would have been abundant on early Earth. We have demonstrated that while montmorillonite (pH 7) produced only dimers from its monomers in water, addition of sodium chloride (1 M) enhanced the chain length multifold, as detected by HPLC. The effect of monovalent cations on RNA synthesis was of the following order: Li+ > Na+ > K+. A similar effect was observed with the anions, enhancing catalysis in the following order: Cl− > Br− > I−. The montmorillonite-catalyzed RNA synthesis was not affected by hydrophobic or hydrophilic interactions. We thus show that prebiotic synthesis of RNA from its monomers was a simple process requiring only clay minerals and a small amount of salt. PMID:25370375

  18. Earth abundant bimetallic nanoparticles for heterogeneous catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senn, Jonathan F., Jr.

    Polymer exchange membrane fuel cells have the potential to replace current fossil fuel-based technologies in terms of emissions and efficiency, but CO contamination of H2 fuel, which is derived from steam methane reforming, leads to system inefficiency or failure. Solutions currently under development are bimetallic nanoparticles comprised of earth-abundant metals in different architectures to reduce the concentration of CO by PROX during fuel cell operation. Chapter One introduces the Pt-Sn and Co-Ni bimetallic nanoparticle systems, and the intermetallic and core-shell architectures of interest for catalytic evaluation. Application, theory, and studies associated with the efficacy of these nanoparticles are briefly reviewed. Chapter Two describes the concepts of the synthetic and characterization methods used in this work. Chapter Three presents the synthetic, characterization, and catalytic findings of this research. Pt, PtSn, PtSn2, and Pt 3Sn nanoparticles have been synthesized and supported on gamma-Al2O3. Pt3Sn was shown to be an effective PROX catalyst in various gas feed conditions, such as the gas mixture incorporating 0.1% CO, which displayed a light-off temperatures of ˜95°C. Co and Ni monometallic and CoNi bimetallic nanoparticles have been synthesized and characterized, ultimately leading to the development of target Co Ni core-shell nanoparticles. Proposed studies of catalytic properties of these nanoparticles in preferential oxidation of CO (PROX) reactions will further elucidate the effects of different crystallographic phases, nanoparticle-support interactions, and architecture on catalysis, and provide fundamental understanding of catalysis with nanoparticles composed of earth abundant metals in different architectures.

  19. Strong correlations in actinide redox reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, S. E.; Marston, J. B.

    2011-02-01

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions of the redox couples An(VI)/An(V), An(V)/An(IV), and An(IV)/An(III), where An is an element in the family of early actinides (U, Np, and Pu), as well as Am(VI)/Am(V) and Am(V)/Am(III), are modeled by combining density functional theory with a generalized Anderson impurity model that accounts for the strong correlations between the 5f electrons. Diagonalization of the Anderson impurity model yields improved estimates for the redox potentials and the propensity of the actinide complexes to disproportionate.

  20. Redox polymer electrodes for advanced batteries

    DOEpatents

    Gregg, B.A.; Taylor, A.M.

    1998-11-24

    Advanced batteries having a long cycle lifetime are provided. More specifically, the present invention relates to electrodes made from redox polymer films and batteries in which either the positive electrode, the negative electrode, or both, comprise redox polymers. Suitable redox polymers for this purpose include pyridyl or polypyridyl complexes of transition metals like iron, ruthenium, osmium, chromium, tungsten and nickel; porphyrins (either free base or metallo derivatives); phthalocyanines (either free base or metallo derivatives); metal complexes of cyclams, such as tetraazacyclotetradecane; metal complexes of crown ethers and metallocenes such as ferrocene, cobaltocene and ruthenocene. 2 figs.

  1. Electrochemical cell for rebalancing REDOX flow system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, L. H. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    An electrically rechargeable REDOX cell or battery system including one of more rebalancing cells is described. Each rebalancing cell is divided into two chambers by an ion permeable membrane. The first chamber is fed with gaseous hydrogen and a cathode fluid which is circulated through the cathode chamber of the REDOX cell is also passed through the second chamber of the rebalancing cell. Electrochemical reactions take place on the surface of insert electrodes in the first and second chambers to rebalance the electrochemical capacity of the anode and cathode fluids of the REDOX system.

  2. Redox Flow Batteries: An Engineering Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Chalamala, Babu R.; Soundappan, Thiagarajan; Fisher, Graham R.; Anstey, Mitchell A.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Perry, Mike L.

    2014-10-01

    Redox flow batteries are well suited to provide modular and scalable energy storage systems for a wide range of energy storage applications. In this paper, we review the development of redox flow battery technology including recent advances in new redox active materials and systems. We discuss cost, performance, and reliability metrics that are critical for deployment of large flow battery systems. The technology, while relatively young, has the potential for significant improvement through reduced materials costs, improved energy and power efficiency, and significant reduction in the overall system cost.

  3. Bis(Dioxolene)(Bipyridine)Ruthenium Redox Series

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-11

    reactions with isosbestic points were generally observed in these redox processes. The electronic spectra of 02, 01, S, RI and R2 are shown Tor the (1...oOFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH Contract NOOOl4-84-G-0201 Task No. 0051-865 Technical Report *23 Bis(Dioxolene)(Bipyridine)Ruthenium Redox Series By...Classit’.’-tion) Bix(Dioxolene)(Bipyridine)Ruthenium Redox Series 12 PERSON4AL AUTHOR(S) A.B. P. Lever*, Pamela R. &uburn, Elaine S. Dodsworth, Masa-A

  4. Redox polymer electrodes for advanced batteries

    DOEpatents

    Gregg, Brian A.; Taylor, A. Michael

    1998-01-01

    Advanced batteries having a long cycle lifetime are provided. More specifically, the present invention relates to electrodes made from redox polymer films and batteries in which either the positive electrode, the negative electrode, or both, comprise redox polymers. Suitable redox polymers for this purpose include pyridyl or polypyridyl complexes of transition metals like iron, ruthenium, osmium, chromium, tungsten and nickel; porphyrins (either free base or metallo derivatives); phthalocyanines (either free base or metallo derivatives); metal complexes of cyclams, such as tetraazacyclotetradecane; metal complexes of crown ethers and metallocenes such as ferrocene, cobaltocene and ruthenocene.

  5. Strong correlations in actinide redox reactions.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, S E; Marston, J B

    2011-02-14

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions of the redox couples An(VI)/An(V), An(V)/An(IV), and An(IV)/An(III), where An is an element in the family of early actinides (U, Np, and Pu), as well as Am(VI)/Am(V) and Am(V)/Am(III), are modeled by combining density functional theory with a generalized Anderson impurity model that accounts for the strong correlations between the 5f electrons. Diagonalization of the Anderson impurity model yields improved estimates for the redox potentials and the propensity of the actinide complexes to disproportionate.

  6. The Role of Cysteine Residues in Redox Regulation and Protein Stability of Arabidopsis thaliana Starch Synthase 1

    PubMed Central

    Skryhan, Katsiaryna; Cuesta-Seijo, Jose A.; Nielsen, Morten M.; Marri, Lucia; Mellor, Silas B.; Glaring, Mikkel A.; Jensen, Poul E.; Palcic, Monica M.; Blennow, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Starch biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana is strictly regulated. In leaf extracts, starch synthase 1 (AtSS1) responds to the redox potential within a physiologically relevant range. This study presents data testing two main hypotheses: 1) that specific thiol-disulfide exchange in AtSS1 influences its catalytic function 2) that each conserved Cys residue has an impact on AtSS1 catalysis. Recombinant AtSS1 versions carrying combinations of cysteine-to-serine substitutions were generated and characterized in vitro. The results demonstrate that AtSS1 is activated and deactivated by the physiological redox transmitters thioredoxin f1 (Trxf1), thioredoxin m4 (Trxm4) and the bifunctional NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC). AtSS1 displayed an activity change within the physiologically relevant redox range, with a midpoint potential equal to -306 mV, suggesting that AtSS1 is in the reduced and active form during the day with active photosynthesis. Cys164 and Cys545 were the key cysteine residues involved in regulatory disulfide formation upon oxidation. A C164S_C545S double mutant had considerably decreased redox sensitivity as compared to wild type AtSS1 (30% vs 77%). Michaelis-Menten kinetics and molecular modeling suggest that both cysteines play important roles in enzyme catalysis, namely, Cys545 is involved in ADP-glucose binding and Cys164 is involved in acceptor binding. All the other single mutants had essentially complete redox sensitivity (98–99%). In addition of being part of a redox directed activity “light switch”, reactivation tests and low heterologous expression levels indicate that specific cysteine residues might play additional roles. Specifically, Cys265 in combination with Cys164 can be involved in proper protein folding or/and stabilization of translated protein prior to its transport into the plastid. Cys442 can play an important role in enzyme stability upon oxidation. The physiological and phylogenetic relevance of these findings

  7. Serial crystallography captures enzyme catalysis in copper nitrite reductase at atomic resolution from one crystal

    PubMed Central

    Horrell, Sam; Antonyuk, Svetlana V.; Eady, Robert R.; Hasnain, S. Samar; Hough, Michael A.; Strange, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    Relating individual protein crystal structures to an enzyme mechanism remains a major and challenging goal for structural biology. Serial crystallography using multiple crystals has recently been reported in both synchrotron-radiation and X-ray free-electron laser experiments. In this work, serial crystallography was used to obtain multiple structures serially from one crystal (MSOX) to study in crystallo enzyme catalysis. Rapid, shutterless X-ray detector technology on a synchrotron MX beamline was exploited to perform low-dose serial crystallography on a single copper nitrite reductase crystal, which survived long enough for 45 consecutive 100 K X-ray structures to be collected at 1.07–1.62 Å resolution, all sampled from the same crystal volume. This serial crystallography approach revealed the gradual conversion of the substrate bound at the catalytic type 2 Cu centre from nitrite to nitric oxide, following reduction of the type 1 Cu electron-transfer centre by X-ray-generated solvated electrons. Significant, well defined structural rearrangements in the active site are evident in the series as the enzyme moves through its catalytic cycle, namely nitrite reduction, which is a vital step in the global denitrification process. It is proposed that such a serial crystallography approach is widely applicable for studying any redox or electron-driven enzyme reactions from a single protein crystal. It can provide a ‘catalytic reaction movie’ highlighting the structural changes that occur during enzyme catalysis. The anticipated developments in the automation of data analysis and modelling are likely to allow seamless and near-real-time analysis of such data on-site at some of the powerful synchrotron crystallographic beamlines. PMID:27437114

  8. A model reaction assesses contribution of H-tunneling and coupled motions to enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Zhao, Yu; Hammann, Blake; Eilers, James; Lu, Yun; Kohen, Amnon

    2012-08-17

    To assess the contribution of physical features to enzyme catalysis, the enzymatic reaction has to be compared to a relevant uncatalyzed reaction. While such comparisons have been conducted for some hydrolytic and radical reactions, it is most challenging for biological hydride transfer and redox reactions in general. Here, the same experimental tools used to study the H-tunneling and coupled motions for enzymatic hydride transfer between two carbons were used in the study of an uncatalyzed model reaction. The enzymatic oxidations of benzyl alcohol and its substituted analogues mediated by alcohol dehydrogenases were compared to the oxidations by 9-phenylxanthylium cation (PhXn(+)). The PhXn(+) serves as an NAD(+) model, while the solvent, acetonitrile, models the protein environment. Experimental comparisons included linear free energy relations with Hammett reaction constant (ρ) of zero versus -2.7; temperature-independent versus temperature-dependent primary KIEs; deflated secondary KIEs with deuteride transfer (i.e., primary-secondary coupled motion) versus no coupling between secondary KIEs and H- or D-transfer; and large versus small secondary KIEs for the enzymatic versus uncatalyzed alcohol oxidation. Some of the differences may come from differences in the order of microscopic steps between the catalyzed versus uncatalyzed reactions. However, several of these comparative experiments indicate that in contrast to the uncatalyzed reaction the transition state of the enzymatic reaction is better reorganized for H-tunneling and its H-donor is better rehybridized prior to the C-H→C transfer. These findings suggest an important role for these physical features in enzyme catalysis.

  9. Metabolic Control of Redox and Redox Control of Metabolism in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Reduction-oxidation (Redox) status operates as a major integrator of subcellular and extracellular metabolism and is simultaneously itself regulated by metabolic processes. Redox status not only dominates cellular metabolism due to the prominence of NAD(H) and NADP(H) couples in myriad metabolic reactions but also acts as an effective signal that informs the cell of the prevailing environmental conditions. After relay of this information, the cell is able to appropriately respond via a range of mechanisms, including directly affecting cellular functioning and reprogramming nuclear gene expression. Recent Advances: The facile accession of Arabidopsis knockout mutants alongside the adoption of broad-scale post-genomic approaches, which are able to provide transcriptomic-, proteomic-, and metabolomic-level information alongside traditional biochemical and emerging cell biological techniques, has dramatically advanced our understanding of redox status control. This review summarizes redox status control of metabolism and the metabolic control of redox status at both cellular and subcellular levels. Critical Issues: It is becoming apparent that plastid, mitochondria, and peroxisome functions influence a wide range of processes outside of the organelles themselves. While knowledge of the network of metabolic pathways and their intraorganellar redox status regulation has increased in the last years, little is known about the interorganellar redox signals coordinating these networks. A current challenge is, therefore, synthesizing our knowledge and planning experiments that tackle redox status regulation at both inter- and intracellular levels. Future Directions: Emerging tools are enabling ever-increasing spatiotemporal resolution of metabolism and imaging of redox status components. Broader application of these tools will likely greatly enhance our understanding of the interplay of redox status and metabolism as well as elucidating and

  10. Effect of NaCl on catalysis of lipid oxidation by the soluble fraction of fish muscle.

    PubMed

    Osinchak, J E; Hultin, H O; Zajicek, O T; Kelleher, S D; Huang, C H

    1992-01-01

    Sodium chloride stimulated catalysis of oxidation of phosphatidylcholine liposomes by the soluble fraction of mackerel muscle. Chloride was determined to be the active component of the salt in this system. Sulfate also stimulated lipid oxidation. No difference was observed with either anion among sodium, potassium, or lithium cations. Redox iron was involved in the chloride stimulation of lipid oxidation by the press juice. Part of the chloride stimulation of the press juice was mediated through the high molecular weight (greater than 5 kdalton) fraction. Chloride improved the pro-oxidative effect of ascorbate on rat liver ferritin in vitro. It did not appear that production of chlorine radical by peroxidase was involved in the stimulatory effect of chloride.

  11. Metastable radical state, nonreactive with oxygen, is inherent to catalysis by respiratory and photosynthetic cytochromes bc1/b6f

    PubMed Central

    Bujnowicz, Łukasz; Bhaduri, Satarupa; Singh, Sandeep K.; Cramer, William A.; Osyczka, Artur

    2017-01-01

    Oxygenic respiration and photosynthesis based on quinone redox reactions face a danger of wasteful energy dissipation by diversion of the productive electron transfer pathway through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Nevertheless, the widespread quinone oxido-reductases from the cytochrome bc family limit the amounts of released ROS to a low, perhaps just signaling, level through an as-yet-unknown mechanism. Here, we propose that a metastable radical state, nonreactive with oxygen, safely holds electrons at a local energetic minimum during the oxidation of plastohydroquinone catalyzed by the chloroplast cytochrome b6f. This intermediate state is formed by interaction of a radical with a metal cofactor of a catalytic site. Modulation of its energy level on the energy landscape in photosynthetic vs. respiratory enzymes provides a possible mechanism to adjust electron transfer rates for efficient catalysis under different oxygen tensions. PMID:28115711

  12. Crystal Structure of 12-Lipoxygenase Catalytic-Domain-Inhibitor Complex Identifies a Substrate-Binding Channel for Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Shu; Mueser, Timothy C.; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Funk, Jr., Max O.

    2014-10-02

    Lipoxygenases are critical enzymes in the biosynthesis of families of bioactive lipids including compounds with important roles in the initiation and resolution of inflammation and in associated diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Crystals diffracting to high resolution (1.9 {angstrom}) were obtained for a complex between the catalytic domain of leukocyte 12-lipoxygenase and the isoform-specific inhibitor, 4-(2-oxapentadeca-4-yne)phenylpropanoic acid (OPP). In the three-dimensional structure of the complex, the inhibitor occupied a new U-shaped channel open at one end to the surface of the protein and extending past the redox-active iron site that is essential for catalysis. In models, the channel accommodated arachidonic acid, defining the binding site for the substrate of the catalyzed reaction. There was a void adjacent to the OPP binding site connecting to the surface of the enzyme and providing a plausible access channel for the other substrate, oxygen.

  13. Carbon-Hydrogen (C-H) Bond Activation at PdIV: A Frontier in C–H Functionalization Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Topczewski, Joseph J.; Sanford, Melanie S.

    2014-01-01

    The direct functionalization of carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bonds has emerged as a versatile strategy for the synthesis and derivatization of organic molecules. Among the methods for C-H bond activation, catalytic processes that utilize a PdII/PdIV redox cycle are increasingly common. The C-H activation step in most of these catalytic cycles is thought to occur at a PdII centre. However, a number of recent reports have suggested the feasibility of C-H cleavage occurring at PdIV complexes. Importantly, these latter processes often result in complementary reactivity and selectivity relative to analogous transformations at PdII. This Mini Review highlights proposed examples of C-H activation at PdIV centres. Applications of this transformation in catalysis as well as mechanistic details obtained from stoichiometric model studies are discussed. Furthermore, challenges and future perspectives for the field are reviewed. PMID:25544882

  14. GREEN CHEMICAL SYNTHESIS THROUGH CATALYSIS AND ALTERNATE REACTION CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Green chemical synthesis through catalysis and alternate reaction conditions

    Encompassing green chemistry techniques and methodologies, we have initiated several projects at the National Risk Management Research laboratory that focus on the design and development of chemic...

  15. Chemistry: The long and winding road to catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaera, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    In chemical catalysis, spillover is the process in which hydrogen atoms are made from hydrogen molecules at one site and then added to other atoms or molecules at another. A study reveals details of this effect. See Letter p.68

  16. Selective Oxidation and Ammoxidation of Olefins by Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grasselli, Robert K.

    1986-01-01

    Shows how the ammoxidation of olefins can be understood in terms of free radicals and surface bound organometallic intermediates. Also illustrates the close intellectual relationships between heterogeneous catalysis and organometallic chemistry. (JN)

  17. Applications of metal-organic frameworks in heterogeneous supramolecular catalysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiewei; Chen, Lianfen; Cui, Hao; Zhang, Jianyong; Zhang, Li; Su, Cheng-Yong

    2014-08-21

    This review summarizes the use of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as a versatile supramolecular platform to develop heterogeneous catalysts for a variety of organic reactions, especially for liquid-phase reactions. Following a background introduction about catalytic relevance to various metal-organic materials, crystal engineering of MOFs, characterization and evaluation methods of MOF catalysis, we categorize catalytic MOFs based on the types of active sites, including coordinatively unsaturated metal sites (CUMs), metalloligands, functional organic sites (FOS), as well as metal nanoparticles (MNPs) embedded in the cavities. Throughout the review, we emphasize the incidental or deliberate formation of active sites, the stability, heterogeneity and shape/size selectivity for MOF catalysis. Finally, we briefly introduce their relevance into photo- and biomimetic catalysis, and compare MOFs with other typical porous solids such as zeolites and mesoporous silica with regard to their different attributes, and provide our view on future trends and developments in MOF-based catalysis.

  18. Nanostructured Membranes for Green Synthesis of Nanoparticles and Enzyme Catalysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Macroporous membranes functionalized with ionizable macromolecules provide promising applications in toxic metal capture at high capacity, nanoparticle synthesis, and catalysis. Our low‐pressure membrane approach is marked by reaction and separation selectivity and their tunabili...

  19. Toward an Understanding of Catalysis by Supported Metal Nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect

    D. W. Goodman; J. Wang; B. K. Min; E. Ozensoy; F. Yang

    2002-01-01

    OAK (B204) The goal of this program is an atomic-level understanding of catalysis by supported metal nanoclusters, especially the surface intermediates in selective oxidation by noble metal nanocatalysts.

  20. Catalysis of Radical Reactions: A Radical Chemistry Perspective.

    PubMed

    Studer, Armido; Curran, Dennis P

    2016-01-04

    The area of catalysis of radical reactions has recently flourished. Various reaction conditions have been discovered and explained in terms of catalytic cycles. These cycles rarely stand alone as unique paths from substrates to products. Instead, most radical reactions have innate chains which form products without any catalyst. How do we know if a species added in "catalytic amounts" is a catalyst, an initiator, or something else? Herein we critically address both catalyst-free and catalytic radical reactions through the lens of radical chemistry. Basic principles of kinetics and thermodynamics are used to address problems of initiation, propagation, and inhibition of radical chains. The catalysis of radical reactions differs from other areas of catalysis. Whereas efficient innate chain reactions are difficult to catalyze because individual steps are fast, both inefficient chain processes and non-chain processes afford diverse opportunities for catalysis, as illustrated with selected examples.

  1. Nanostructured Membranes for Enzyme Catalysis and Green Synthesis of Nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Macroporous membranes functionalized with ionizable macromolecules provide promising applications in toxic metal capture at high capacity, nanoparticle synthesis, and catalysis. Our low-pressure membrane approach is marked by reaction and separation selectivity and their tunabil...

  2. Merging Visible Light Photoredox Catalysis with Metal Catalyzed C–H Activations: On the Role of Oxygen and Superoxide Ions as Oxidants

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Conspectus The development of efficient catalytic systems for direct aromatic C–H bond functionalization is a long-desired goal of chemists, because these protocols provide environmental friendly and waste-reducing alternatives to classical methodologies for C–C and C–heteroatom bond formation. A key challenge for these transformations is the reoxidation of the in situ generated metal hydride or low-valent metal complexes of the primary catalytic bond forming cycle. To complete the catalytic cycle and to regenerate the C–H activation catalyst, (super)stoichiometric amounts of Cu(II) or Ag(I) salts have often been applied. Recently, “greener” approaches have been developed by applying molecular oxygen in combination with Cu(II) salts, internal oxidants that are cleaved during the reaction, or solvents or additives enabling the metal hydride reoxidation. All these approaches improved the environmental friendliness but have not overcome the obstacles associated with the overall limited functional group and substrate tolerance. Hence, catalytic processes that do not feature the unfavorable aspects described above and provide products in a streamlined as well as economically and ecologically advantageous manner would be desirable. In this context, we decided to examine visible light photoredox catalysis as a new alternative to conventionally applied regeneration/oxidation procedures. This Account summarizes our recent advances in this expanding area and will highlight the new concept of merging distinct redox catalytic processes for C–H functionalizations through the application of visible light photoredox catalysis. Photoredox catalysis can be considered as catalytic electron-donating or -accepting processes, making use of visible-light absorbing homogeneous and heterogeneous metal-based catalysts, as well as organic dye sensitizers or polymers. As a consequence, photoredox catalysis is, in principle, an ideal tool for the recycling of any given metal

  3. Understanding the Kinetics and Spectroscopy of Photoredox Catalysis and Transition-Metal-Free Alternatives.

    PubMed

    Pitre, Spencer P; McTiernan, Christopher D; Scaiano, Juan C

    2016-06-21

    Over the past decade, the field of photoredox catalysis has gained increasing attention in synthetic organic chemistry because of its wide applicability in sustainable free-radical-mediated processes. Numerous examples have shown that under carefully optimized conditions, efficient and highly selective processes can be developed through excitation of a photosensitizer using inexpensive, readily available light sources. However, despite all of these recent advancements, some generalizations and/or misconceptions have become part of the photoredox culture, and often many of these discoveries lack in-depth investigations into the excited-state kinetics and underlying mechanisms. In this Account, we begin with a tutorial for understanding both the redox properties of excited states and how to measure the kinetics of excited-state processes. We discuss the generalization of direct excitation of closed-shell species to generate more potent reductive or oxidative excited states, using the helium atom as a quantitative example. We also outline how to apply redox potentials to calculate whether the proposed electron transfer events are thermodynamically feasible. In the second half of our tutorial, we discuss how to measure the kinetics of excited-state processes using techniques such as steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence and transient spectroscopy and how to apply the data using Stern-Volmer and kinetic analysis. Then we shift gears to discuss our recent contributions to the field of photoredox catalysis. Our lab focuses on developing transition-metal-free alternatives to ruthenium and iridium bipyridyl complexes for these transformations, with the goal of developing systems in which the reaction kinetics is more favorable. We have found that methylene blue, a member of the thiazine dye family, can be employed in photoredox processes such as oxidative hydroxylations of arylboronic acids to phenols. Interestingly, we were able to demonstrate that methylene blue is

  4. Arg375 Tunes Tetrahydrobiopterin Functions and Modulates Catalysis by Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Tejero, Jesús; Wei, Chin-Chuan; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Santolini, Jerome; Fadlalla, Mohammed; Biswas, Ashis; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2011-01-01

    NO synthase enzymes (NOS) support unique single-electron transitions of a bound H4B cofactor during catalysis. Previous studies showed that both the pterin structure and surrounding protein residues impact H4B redox function during catalysis. A conserved Arg residue (Arg375 in iNOS) forms hydrogen bonds with the H4B ring. In order to understand the role of this residue in modulating the function of H4B and overall NO synthesis of the enzyme, we generated and characterized three mutants R375D, R375K and R375N of the oxygenase domain of inducible NOS (iNOSoxy). The mutations affected the dimer stability of iNOSoxy and its binding affinity towards substrates and H4B to varying degrees. Optical spectra of the ferric, ferrous, ferrous dioxy, ferrous-NO, ferric-NO, and ferrous-CO forms of each mutant were similar to the wild-type. However, mutants displayed somewhat lower heme midpoint potentials and faster ferrous heme-NO complex reactivity with O2. Unlike the wild-type protein, mutants could not oxidize NOHA to nitrite in a H2O2-driven reaction. Mutation could potentially change the ferrous dioxy decay rate, H4B radical formation rate, and the amount of the Arg hydroxylation during single turnover Arg hydroxylation reaction. All mutants were able to form heterodimers with the iNOS G450A full-length protein and displayed lower NO synthesis activities and uncoupled NADPH consumption. We conclude that the conserved residue Arg375 (1) regulates the tempo and extent of the electron transfer between H4B and ferrous dioxy species and (2) controls the reactivity of the heme-based oxidant formed after electron transfer from H4B during steady state NO synthesis and in H2O2-driven NOHA oxidation. Thus, Arg375 modulates the redox function of H4B and is important in controlling the catalytic function of NOS enzymes. PMID:22173094

  5. Carbon fiber electrode for redox flow battery

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, M.; Tsuzuki, Y.; Iizuka, Y.; Shimada, M.

    1987-03-01

    Advanced secondary batteries have been developed as electrical energy storage systems for use in electrical utility load-levelling and stand-alone photovoltaic installations. Among them, the redox flow system based on aqueous iron and chromium redox couple is one of the most advanced. An important key to its feasibility is electrode fabrication. Woven and non-woven fabrics of carbon fibers have been used as thin but three dimensional electrodes of the redox flow system in view of their electric conductivity, chemical stability, and economy. One of the electrochemical problems of iron-chromium redox battery related to the electrode is the slow reaction rate of reduction and oxidation of chromium complex ion. As the electron transfer rate of chromium complex ion is lower than that of iron ion, the voltaic efficiency of the battery tends to decrease.

  6. Mitochondria and Redox Signaling in Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Morris, E. Matthew; Rector, R. Scott; Thyfault, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Alcoholic and nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases are potentially pathological conditions that can progress to steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. These conditions affect millions of people throughout the world in part through poor lifestyle choices of excess alcohol consumption, overnutrition, and lack of regular physical activity. Abnormal mitochondrial and cellular redox homeostasis has been documented in steatohepatitis and results in alterations of multiple redox-sensitive signaling cascades. Ultimately, these changes in signaling lead to altered enzyme function and transcriptional activities of proteins critical to mitochondrial and cellular function. In this article, we review the current hypotheses linking mitochondrial redox state to the overall pathophysiology of alcoholic and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and briefly discuss the current therapeutic options under investigation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 485–504. PMID:21128703

  7. High energy density redox flow device

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Carter, W. Craig; Ho, Bryan Y; Duduta, Mihai; Limthongkul, Pimpa

    2014-05-13

    Redox flow devices are described in which at least one of the positive electrode or negative electrode-active materials is a semi-solid or is a condensed ion-storing electroactive material, and in which at least one of the electrode-active materials is transported to and from an assembly at which the electrochemical reaction occurs, producing electrical energy. The electronic conductivity of the semi-solid is increased by the addition of conductive particles to suspensions and/or via the surface modification of the solid in semi-solids (e.g., by coating the solid with a more electron conductive coating material to increase the power of the device). High energy density and high power redox flow devices are disclosed. The redox flow devices described herein can also include one or more inventive design features. In addition, inventive chemistries for use in redox flow devices are also described.

  8. Redox Modulations, Antioxidants, and Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fraunberger, Erik A.; Scola, Gustavo; Laliberté, Victoria L. M.; Duong, Angela; Andreazza, Ana C.

    2016-01-01

    Although antioxidants, redox modulations, and neuropsychiatric disorders have been widely studied for many years, the field would benefit from an integrative and corroborative review. Our primary objective is to delineate the biological significance of compounds that modulate our redox status (i.e., reactive species and antioxidants) as well as outline their current role in brain health and the impact of redox modulations on the severity of illnesses. Therefore, this review will not enter into the debate regarding the perceived medical legitimacy of antioxidants but rather seek to clarify their abilities and limitations. With this in mind, antioxidants may be interpreted as natural products with significant pharmacological actions in the body. A renewed understanding of these often overlooked compounds will allow us to critically appraise the current literature and provide an informed, novel perspective on an important healthcare issue. In this review, we will introduce the complex topics of redox modulations and their role in the development of select neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26640614

  9. Redox Modulations, Antioxidants, and Neuropsychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Fraunberger, Erik A; Scola, Gustavo; Laliberté, Victoria L M; Duong, Angela; Andreazza, Ana C

    2016-01-01

    Although antioxidants, redox modulations, and neuropsychiatric disorders have been widely studied for many years, the field would benefit from an integrative and corroborative review. Our primary objective is to delineate the biological significance of compounds that modulate our redox status (i.e., reactive species and antioxidants) as well as outline their current role in brain health and the impact of redox modulations on the severity of illnesses. Therefore, this review will not enter into the debate regarding the perceived medical legitimacy of antioxidants but rather seek to clarify their abilities and limitations. With this in mind, antioxidants may be interpreted as natural products with significant pharmacological actions in the body. A renewed understanding of these often overlooked compounds will allow us to critically appraise the current literature and provide an informed, novel perspective on an important healthcare issue. In this review, we will introduce the complex topics of redox modulations and their role in the development of select neuropsychiatric disorders.

  10. Novel Redox Processes for Carbonaceous Fuel Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Feng

    The current study investigates oxygen carrier development, process intensification, and oxygen carrier attrition behaviors for a number of novel, redox-based energy conversion schemes. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  11. Redox regulation of intercellular transport.

    PubMed

    Benitez-Alfonso, Yoselin; Jackson, David; Maule, Andy

    2011-01-01

    Plant cells communicate with each other via plasmodesmata (PDs) in order to orchestrate specific responses to environmental and developmental cues. At the same time, environmental signals regulate this communication by promoting changes in PD structure that modify symplastic permeability and, in extreme cases, isolate damaged cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key messengers in plant responses to a range of biotic and abiotic stresses. They are also generated during normal metabolism, and mediate signaling pathways that modulate plant growth and developmental transitions. Recent research has suggested the participation of ROS in the regulation of PD transport. The study of several developmental and stress-induced processes revealed a co-regulation of ROS and callose (a cell wall polymer that regulates molecular flux through PDs). The identification of Arabidopsis mutants simultaneously affected in cell redox homeostasis and PD transport, and the histological detection of hydrogen peroxide and peroxidases in the PDs of the tomato vascular cambium provide new information in support of this novel regulatory mechanism. Here, we describe the evidence that supports a role for ROS in the regulation of callose deposition and/or in the formation of secondary PD, and discuss the potential importance of this mechanism during plant growth or defense against environmental stresses.

  12. Intermetallic compounds in heterogeneous catalysis-a quickly developing field.

    PubMed

    Armbrüster, Marc; Schlögl, Robert; Grin, Yuri

    2014-06-01

    The application of intermetallic compounds for understanding in heterogeneous catalysis developed in an excellent way during the last decade. This review provides an overview of concepts and developments revealing the potential of intermetallic compounds in fundamental as well as applied catalysis research. Intermetallic compounds may be considered as platform materials to address current and future catalytic challenges, e.g. in respect to the energy transition.

  13. Exactly Embedded Wavefunction Methods for Characterizing Nitrogen Reduction Catalysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-15

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0038 Exactly Embedded Wavefunction Methods for Characterizing Nitrogen THOMAS MILLER CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Final...SUBTITLE Exactly Embedded Wavefunction Methods for Characterizing Nitrogen Reduction Catalysis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER N/A 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550...catalysis, such as hydrogen and nitrogen reduction. In a significant methodological advance from the past year, we developed an accurate and

  14. Frontiers, Opportunities, and Challenges in Biochemical and Chemical Catalysis of CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, Aaron M.; Bercaw, John E.; Bocarsly, Andrew B.; Dobbek, Holger; DuBois, Daniel L.; Dupuis, Michel; Ferry, James G.; Fujita, Etsuko; Hille, Russ; Kenis, Paul; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.; Morris, Robert H.; Peden, Charles HF; Portis, Archie; Ragsdale, Steve; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.; Reek, Joost; Seefeldt, Lance C.; Thauer, Rudolf K.; Waldrop, Grover L.

    2013-08-14

    Our central premise is that catalytic scientists can learn by studying how these important metabolic processes occur in nature. Complementarily, biochemists can learn by studying how catalytic scientists view these same chemical transformations promoted by synthetic catalysts. From these studies, hypotheses can be developed and tested through manipulation of enzyme structure and by synthesizing simple molecular catalysts to incorporate different structural features of the enzymes. It is hoped that these studies will lead to new and useful concepts in catalyst design for fuel production and utilization. This paper describes the results of a workshop held to explore these concepts in regard to the development of new and more efficient catalytic processes for the conversion of CO2 to a variety of carbon-based fuels. The organization of this overview/review is as follows: 1) The first section briefly explores how interactions between the catalysis and biological communities have been fruitful in developing new catalysts for the reduction of protons to hydrogen, the simplest fuel generation reaction. 2) The second section assesses the state of the art in both biological and chemical reduction of CO2 by two electrons to form either carbon monoxide (CO) or formate (HCOO-). It also attempts to identify common principles between biological and synthetic catalysts and productive areas for future research. 3) The third section explores both biological and chemical processes that result in the reduction of CO2 beyond the level of CO and formate, again seeking to identify common principles and productive areas of future research. 4) The fourth section explores the formation of carbon-carbon bonds in biological and chemical systems in the same vein as the other sections. 5) A fifth section addresses the role of non-redox reactions of CO2 in biological systems and their role in carbon metabolism, with a parallel discussion of chemical systems. 6) In section 6, the topics of

  15. Inverse magnetic catalysis in bottom-up holographic QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Nick; Miller, Carlisson; Scott, Marc

    2016-10-01

    We explore the effect of magnetic field on chiral condensation in QCD via a simple bottom-up holographic model which inputs QCD dynamics through the running of the anomalous dimension of the quark bilinear. Bottom-up holography is a form of effective field theory and we use it to explore the dependence on the coefficients of the two lowest order terms linking the magnetic field and the quark condensate. In the massless theory, we identify a region of parameter space where magnetic catalysis occurs at zero temperature but inverse magnetic catalysis at temperatures of order the thermal phase transition. The model shows similar nonmonotonic behavior in the condensate with B at intermediate T as the lattice data. This behavior is due to the separation of the transition at which a thermal width develops for the mesons and the chiral transition in the holographic framework. The introduction of quark mass raises the scale of B where inverse catalysis takes over from catalysis until the inverse catalysis lies outside the regime of validity of the effective description leaving just catalysis.

  16. Dedicated Beamline Facilities for Catalytic Research. Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jingguang; Frenkel, Anatoly; Rodriguez, Jose; Adzic, Radoslav; Bare, Simon R.; Hulbert, Steve L.; Karim, Ayman; Mullins, David R.; Overbury, Steve

    2015-03-04

    Synchrotron spectroscopies offer unique advantages over conventional techniques, including higher detection sensitivity and molecular specificity, faster detection rate, and more in-depth information regarding the structural, electronic and catalytic properties under in-situ reaction conditions. Despite these advantages, synchrotron techniques are often underutilized or unexplored by the catalysis community due to various perceived and real barriers, which will be addressed in the current proposal. Since its establishment in 2005, the Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC) has coordinated significant efforts to promote the utilization of cutting-edge catalytic research under in-situ conditions. The purpose of the current renewal proposal is aimed to provide assistance, and to develop new sciences/techniques, for the catalysis community through the following concerted efforts: Coordinating the implementation of a suite of beamlines for catalysis studies at the new NSLS-II synchrotron source; Providing assistance and coordination for catalysis users at an SSRL catalysis beamline during the initial period of NSLS to NSLS II transition; Designing in-situ reactors for a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic studies; Assisting experimental set-up and data analysis by a dedicated research scientist; Offering training courses and help sessions by the PIs and co-PIs.

  17. Membranes for redox flow battery applications.

    PubMed

    Prifti, Helen; Parasuraman, Aishwarya; Winardi, Suminto; Lim, Tuti Mariana; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria

    2012-06-19

    The need for large scale energy storage has become a priority to integrate renewable energy sources into the electricity grid. Redox flow batteries are considered the best option to store electricity from medium to large scale applications. However, the current high cost of redox flow batteries impedes the wide spread adoption of this technology. The membrane is a critical component of redox flow batteries as it determines the performance as well as the economic viability of the batteries. The membrane acts as a separator to prevent cross-mixing of the positive and negative electrolytes, while still allowing the transport of ions to complete the circuit during the passage of current. An ideal membrane should have high ionic conductivity, low water intake and excellent chemical and thermal stability as well as good ionic exchange capacity. Developing a low cost, chemically stable membrane for redox flow cell batteries has been a major focus for many groups around the world in recent years. This paper reviews the research work on membranes for redox flow batteries, in particular for the all-vanadium redox flow battery which has received the most attention.

  18. Dynamic Redox Regulation of IL-4 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Gaurav; Gran, Margaret A.; Bagchi, Pritha; Kemp, Melissa L.

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying the magnitude and dynamics of protein oxidation during cell signaling is technically challenging. Computational modeling provides tractable, quantitative methods to test hypotheses of redox mechanisms that may be simultaneously operative during signal transduction. The interleukin-4 (IL-4) pathway, which has previously been reported to induce reactive oxygen species and oxidation of PTP1B, may be controlled by several other putative mechanisms of redox regulation; widespread proteomic thiol oxidation observed via 2D redox differential gel electrophoresis upon IL-4 treatment suggests more than one redox-sensitive protein implicated in this pathway. Through computational modeling and a model selection strategy that relied on characteristic STAT6 phosphorylation dynamics of IL-4 signaling, we identified reversible protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) oxidation as the primary redox regulatory mechanism in the pathway. A systems-level model of IL-4 signaling was developed that integrates synchronous pan-PTP oxidation with ROS-independent mechanisms. The model quantitatively predicts the dynamics of IL-4 signaling over a broad range of new redox conditions, offers novel hypotheses about regulation of JAK/STAT signaling, and provides a framework for interrogating putative mechanisms involving receptor-initiated oxidation. PMID:26562652

  19. Membranes for Redox Flow Battery Applications

    PubMed Central

    Prifti, Helen; Parasuraman, Aishwarya; Winardi, Suminto; Lim, Tuti Mariana; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The need for large scale energy storage has become a priority to integrate renewable energy sources into the electricity grid. Redox flow batteries are considered the best option to store electricity from medium to large scale applications. However, the current high cost of redox flow batteries impedes the wide spread adoption of this technology. The membrane is a critical component of redox flow batteries as it determines the performance as well as the economic viability of the batteries. The membrane acts as a separator to prevent cross-mixing of the positive and negative electrolytes, while still allowing the transport of ions to complete the circuit during the passage of current. An ideal membrane should have high ionic conductivity, low water intake and excellent chemical and thermal stability as well as good ionic exchange capacity. Developing a low cost, chemically stable membrane for redox flow cell batteries has been a major focus for many groups around the world in recent years. This paper reviews the research work on membranes for redox flow batteries, in particular for the all-vanadium redox flow battery which has received the most attention. PMID:24958177

  20. Spectrophotometric assays for measuring redox biomarkers in blood.

    PubMed

    Veskoukis, Aristidis S; Kyparos, Antonios; Paschalis, Vassilis; Nikolaidis, Michalis G

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of redox status is most frequently performed by measuring redox biomarkers. The spectrophotometer is the most commonly used analytical instrument in biochemistry. There is a huge number of spectrophotometric redox biomarkers and assays, thus distinguishing the most appropriate biomarkers and protocols is overwhelming. The aim of the present review is to propose valid and reliable spectrophotometric assays for measuring redox biomarkers in blood. It is hoped that this work will help researchers to select the most suitable redox biomarkers and assays.

  1. Superfamilies SDR and MDR: from early ancestry to present forms. Emergence of three lines, a Zn-metalloenzyme, and distinct variabilities.

    PubMed

    Jörnvall, Hans; Hedlund, Joel; Bergman, Tomas; Oppermann, Udo; Persson, Bengt

    2010-05-21

    Two large gene and protein superfamilies, SDR and MDR (short- and medium-chain dehydrogenases/reductases), were originally defined from analysis of alcohol and polyol dehydrogenases. The superfamilies contain minimally 82 and 25 genes, respectively, in humans, minimally 324 and 86 enzyme families when known lines in other organisms are also included, and over 47,000 and 15,000 variants in existing sequence data bank entries. SDR enzymes have one-domain subunits without metal and MDR two-domain subunits without or with zinc, and these three lines appear to have emerged in that order from the universal cellular ancestor. This is compatible with their molecular architectures, present multiplicity, and overall distribution in the kingdoms of life, with SDR also of viral occurrence. An MDR-zinc, when present, is often, but not always, catalytic. It appears also to have a structural role in inter-domain interactions, coenzyme binding and substrate pocket formation, as supported by domain variability ratios and ligand positions. Differences among structural and catalytic zinc ions may be relative and involve several states. Combined, the comparisons trace evolutionary properties of huge superfamilies, with partially redundant enzymes in cellular redox functions.

  2. Theory of chemical bonds in metalloenzymes IV: Hybrid-DFT study of Rieske-type [2Fe bond 2S] clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Mitsuo; Koizumi, Kenichi; Kitagawa, Yasutaka; Yamanaka, Shusuke; Okumura, Mitsutaka; Yamaguchi, Kizashi

    The Rieske-type [2Fe bond 2S] cores of electron-transfer (ET) proteins in the mitochondrial respiratory chain have unusual properties, such as redox potentials and spectroscopy. In this study, part IV of a series, the inherent molecular structures and characteristic electronic structures of the Rieske-type [2Fe bond 2S] clusters are investigated using broken-symmetry hybrid density functional theory (BS-HDFT). Geometry optimizations for the oxidized and reduced states were performed and their characteristic vibrational modes are assigned. Magnetic properties are investigated using model Hamiltonians to describe the electron delocalization and the unsymmetric property. The parameters of the model Hamiltonian, such as exchange coupling J, valence delocalization B, and potential energy difference ?, are evaluated from the BS-HDFT calculations. The valence localization and excitation energy (?E) of the Rieske-type [2Fe bond 2S] cluster are discussed. The chemical bond nature is characterized by chemical indices from natural orbital analysis. Our theoretical results are reasonably consistent with experimental results.

  3. Frustrated Lewis pairs: from concept to catalysis.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Douglas W

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Frustrated Lewis pair (FLP) chemistry has emerged in the past decade as a strategy that enables main-group compounds to activate small molecules. This concept is based on the notion that combinations of Lewis acids and bases that are sterically prevented from forming classical Lewis acid-base adducts have Lewis acidity and basicity available for interaction with a third molecule. This concept has been applied to stoichiometric reactivity and then extended to catalysis. This Account describes three examples of such developments: hydrogenation, hydroamination, and CO2 reduction. The most dramatic finding from FLP chemistry was the discovery that FLPs can activate H2, thus countering the long-existing dogma that metals are required for such activation. This finding of stoichiometric reactivity was subsequently evolved to employ simple main-group species as catalysts in hydrogenations. While the initial studies focused on imines, subsequent studies uncovered FLP catalysts for a variety of organic substrates, including enamines, silyl enol ethers, olefins, and alkynes. Moreover, FLP reductions of aromatic anilines and N-heterocycles have been developed, while very recent extensions have uncovered the utility of FLP catalysts for ketone reductions. FLPs have also been shown to undergo stoichiometric reactivity with terminal alkynes. Typically, either deprotonation or FLP addition reaction products are observed, depending largely on the basicity of the Lewis base. While a variety of acid/base combinations have been exploited to afford a variety of zwitterionic products, this reactivity can also be extended to catalysis. When secondary aryl amines are employed, hydroamination of alkynes can be performed catalytically, providing a facile, metal-free route to enamines. In a similar fashion, initial studies of FLPs with CO2 demonstrated their ability to capture this greenhouse gas. Again, modification of the constituents of the FLP led to the discovery of reaction

  4. Nanoparticles for heterogeneous catalysis: new mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Schauermann, Swetlana; Nilius, Niklas; Shaikhutdinov, Shamil; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2013-08-20

    Metallic nanoparticles finely dispersed over oxide supports have found use as heterogeneous catalysts in many industries including chemical manufacturing, energy-related applications and environmental remediation. The compositional and structural complexity of such nanosized systems offers many degrees of freedom for tuning their catalytic properties. However, fully rational design of heterogeneous catalysts based on an atomic-level understanding of surface processes remains an unattained goal in catalysis research. Researchers have used surface science methods and metal single crystals to explore elementary processes in heterogeneous catalysis. In this Account, we use more realistic materials that capture part of the complexity inherent to industrial catalysts. We assess the impacts on the overall catalytic performance of characteristics such as finite particle size, particle structure, particle chemical composition, flexibility of atoms in clusters, and metal-support interactions. To prepare these materials, we grew thin oxide films on metal single crystals under ultrahigh vacuum conditions and used these films as supports for metallic nanoparticles. We present four case studies on specifically designed materials with properties that expand our atomic-level understanding of surface chemistry. Specifically, we address (1) the effect of dopants in the oxide support on the growth of metal nanoclusters; (2) the effects of size and structural flexibility of metal clusters on the binding energy of gas-phase adsorbates and their catalytic activity; (3) the role of surface modifiers, such as carbon, on catalytic activity and selectivity; and (4) the structural and compositional changes of the active surface as a result of strong metal-support interaction. Using these examples, we demonstrate how studies of complex nanostructured materials can help revealing atomic processes at the solid-gas interface of heterogeneous catalysts. Among our findings is that doping of oxide

  5. Electrochemical immunoassay for thyroxine detection using cascade catalysis as signal amplified enhancer and multi-functionalized magnetic graphene sphere as signal tag.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Zhuo, Ying; Chai, Yaqin; Yu, Yanqing; Liao, Ni; Yuan, Ruo

    2013-08-06

    This paper constructed a reusable electrochemical immunosensor for the detection of thyroxine at an ultralow concentration using cascade catalysis of cytochrome c (Cyt c) and glucose oxidase (GOx) as signal amplified enhancer. It is worth pointing out that numerous Cyt c and GOx were firstly carried onto the double-stranded DNA polymers based on hybridization chain reaction (HCR), and then the amplified responses could be achieved by cascade catalysis of Cyt c and GOx recycling with the help of glucose. Moreover, multi-functionalized magnetic graphene sphere was synthesized and used as signal tag, which not only exhibited good mechanical properties, large surface area and an excellent electron transfer rate of graphene, but also possessed excellent redox activity and desirable magnetic property. With a sandwich-type immunoreaction, the proposed cascade catalysis amplification strategy could greatly enhance the sensitivity for the detection of thyroxine. Under the optimal conditions, the immunosensor showed a wide linear ranged from 0.05pg mL(-1) to 5ng mL(-1) and a low detection limit down to 15fg mL(-1). Importantly, the proposed method offers promise for reproducible and cost-effective analysis of biological samples.

  6. Enzyme Catalysis To Power Micro/Nanomachines

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes play a crucial role in many biological processes which require harnessing and converting free chemical energy into kinetic forces in order to accomplish tasks. Enzymes are considered to be molecular machines, not only because of their capability of energy conversion in biological systems but also because enzymatic catalysis can result in enhanced diffusion of enzymes at a molecular level. Enlightened by nature’s design of biological machinery, researchers have investigated various types of synthetic micro/nanomachines by using enzymatic reactions to achieve self-propulsion of micro/nanoarchitectures. Yet, the mechanism of motion is still under debate in current literature. Versatile proof-of-concept applications of these enzyme-powered micro/nanodevices have been recently demonstrated. In this review, we focus on discussing enzymes not only as stochastic swimmers but also as nanoengines to power self-propelled synthetic motors. We present an overview on different enzyme-powered micro/nanomachines, the current debate on their motion mechanism, methods to provide motion and speed control, and an outlook of the future potentials of this multidisciplinary field. PMID:27666121

  7. Mechanisms and Design in Homogeneous Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Clark R. Landis

    2010-05-26

    The major goal of this research is the determination of structure-activity relationships with respect to the elementary reactions that constitute catalytic alkene polymerization. Three classes of structure-activity relationships pertain to this work: (1) The influence of the nature of the propagating alkyl (secondary, primary, β-substituted) and alkene monomer on the rates and selectivity of propagation, termination, isomerization, hydrogenolysis, etc. Such analyses are possible by direct observation methods (2) Influence of Cp-ligand substituents on fundamental reaction steps by application of direct observation and quenched-flow methods (3) Influence of counterion and solvent polarity on rates and selectivities of elementary steps during polymerization. At this point our rate of progress is limited by a combination of inefficiencies in some data collection modes (particularly quenched-flow studies) and by a relatively narrow range of accessible rates (especially for the NMR methods). Therefore, the bulk of our work concerns the development NMR, mass spectrometric, and chromatographic methods for probing catalytic reactions in a high throughput mode. Although these methods will be applied in the context of alkene polymerization, the NMR and mass spectrometric methods are completely general and will benefit research in all areas of catalysis.

  8. Catalysis of Forster Resonances in Rubidium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Win, A. L.; Williams, W. D.; Sukenik, C. I.

    2016-05-01

    When two ultracold Rydberg atoms collide they may change their quantum state if the total electronic energy of the two atoms before and after the collision is about the same. This process can be made resonant by tuning the energy levels of the atoms with an electric field, via the Stark shift, so that the energy difference between incoming and outgoing channels vanishes. This condition is known as a ``Forster resonance.'' We have studied a particular Forster resonance in rubidium: 34p + 34p --> 34s + 35s, by investigating the time dependence of the state change in an ultracold environment. Furthermore, we have added 34d state atoms to the mix and observed an enhancement of 34s atom production. We attribute this enhancement to a catalysis effect whereby the 34d atoms alter the spatial distribution of 34p atoms that participate in the energy transfer interaction. We will present results from the experiment and compare them to model calculations. Present address: Department of Physics, Smith College, Northampton, MA.

  9. Constant domain-regulated antibody catalysis.

    PubMed

    Sapparapu, Gopal; Planque, Stephanie; Mitsuda, Yukie; McLean, Gary; Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Paul, Sudhir

    2012-10-19

    Some antibodies contain variable (V) domain catalytic sites. We report the superior amide and peptide bond-hydrolyzing activity of the same heavy and light chain V domains expressed in the IgM constant domain scaffold compared with the IgG scaffold. The superior catalytic activity of recombinant IgM was evident using two substrates, a small model peptide that is hydrolyzed without involvement of high affinity epitope binding, and HIV gp120, which is recognized specifically by noncovalent means prior to the hydrolytic reaction. The catalytic activity was inhibited by an electrophilic phosphonate diester, consistent with a nucleophilic catalytic mechanism. All 13 monoclonal IgMs tested displayed robust hydrolytic activities varying over a 91-fold range, consistent with expression of the catalytic functions at distinct levels by different V domains. The catalytic activity of polyclonal IgM was superior to polyclonal IgG from the same sera, indicating that on average IgMs express the catalytic function at levels greater than IgGs. The findings indicate a favorable effect of the remote IgM constant domain scaffold on the integrity of the V-domain catalytic site and provide a structural basis for conceiving antibody catalysis as a first line immune function expressed at high levels prior to development of mature IgG class antibodies.

  10. Some General Themes in Catalysis at LANL

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, John C.

    2012-07-19

    Some general themes in catalysis at LANL are: (1) Storage and release of energy within chemical bonds (e.g. H{sub 2} storage in and release from covalent bonds, N{sub 2} functionalization, CO{sub 2} functionalization, H{sub 2} oxidation/evolution, O{sub 2} reduction/evolution); (2) Can we control the chemistry of reactive substrates to effect energy relevant transformations in non-traditional media (e.g. can we promote C-C couplings, dehydrations, or hydrogenations in water under relatively mild conditions)? (3) Can we supplant precious metal or rare earth catalysts to effect these transformations, by using earth abundant metals/elements instead? Can we use organocatalysis and circumvent the use of metals completely? (4) Can we improve upon existing rare earth catalyst systems (e.g. in rare earth oxides pertinent to fluid cracking or polymerization) and reduce amounts required for catalytic efficacy? Carbohydrates can be accessed from non-food based biomass sources such as woody residues and switchgrass. After extracted from the plant source, our goal is to upgrade these classes of molecules into useful fuels.

  11. Molecular Crowding Accelerates Ribozyme Docking and Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    All biological processes take place in highly crowded cellular environments. However, the effect that molecular crowding agents have on the folding and catalytic properties of RNA molecules remains largely unknown. Here, we have combined single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) and bulk cleavage assays to determine the effect of a molecular crowding agents on the folding and catalysis of a model RNA enzyme, the hairpin ribozyme. Our single-molecule data reveal that PEG favors the formation of the docked (active) structure by increasing the docking rate constant with increasing PEG concentrations. Furthermore, Mg2+ ion-induced folding in the presence of PEG occurs at concentrations ∼7-fold lower than in the absence of PEG, near the physiological range (∼1 mM). Lastly, bulk cleavage assays in the presence of the crowding agent show that the ribozyme’s activity increases while the heterogeneity decreases. Our data is consistent with the idea that molecular crowding plays an important role in the stabilization of ribozyme active conformations in vivo. PMID:25399908

  12. Computational Investigations on Enzymatic Catalysis and Inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simard, Daniel

    Enzymes are the bimolecular "workhorses" of the cell due to their range of functions and their requirement for cellular success. The atomistic details of how they function can provide key insights into the fundamentals of catalysis and in turn, provide a blueprint for biotechnological advances. A wide range of contemporary computational techniques has been applied with the aim to characterize recently discovered intermediates or to provide insights into enzymatic mechanisms and inhibition. More specifically, an assessment of methods was conducted to evaluate the presence of the growing number 3-- and 4--coordinated sulfur intermediates in proteins/enzymes. Furthermore, two mechanisms have been investigated, the mu-OH mechanism of the hydrolysis of dimethylphosphate in Glycerophosphodiesterase (GpdQ) using five different homonuclear metal combinations Zn(II)/Zn(II), Co(II)/Co(II), Mn(II)/Mn(II), Cd(II)/Cd(II) and Ca(II)/Ca(II) as well as a preliminary study into the effectivness of boron as an inhibitor in the serine protease reaction of class A TEM-1 beta-lactamases.

  13. Ferroelectric based catalysis: Switchable surface chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakekhani, Arvin; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    2015-03-01

    We describe a new class of catalysts that uses an epitaxial monolayer of a transition metal oxide on a ferroelectric substrate. The ferroelectric polarization switches the surface chemistry between strongly adsorptive and strongly desorptive regimes, circumventing difficulties encountered on non-switchable catalytic surfaces where the Sabatier principle dictates a moderate surface-molecule interaction strength. This method is general and can, in principle, be applied to many reactions, and for each case the choice of the transition oxide monolayer can be optimized. Here, as a specific example, we show how simultaneous NOx direct decomposition (into N2 and O2) and CO oxidation can be achieved efficiently on CrO2 terminated PbTiO3, while circumventing oxygen (and sulfur) poisoning issues. One should note that NOx direct decomposition has been an open challenge in automotive emission control industry. Our method can expand the range of catalytically active elements to those which are not conventionally considered for catalysis and which are more economical, e.g., Cr (for NOx direct decomposition and CO oxidation) instead of canonical precious metal catalysts. Primary support from Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing, North America, Inc.

  14. Catalysis resolved using scanning tunnelling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bowker, Michael

    2007-10-01

    The technique of scanning tunnelling microscopy has revolutionised our understanding of surface chemistry, due to its ability to image at the atomic and molecular scale, the very realm at which chemistry operates. This critical review focuses on its contribution to the resolution of various problems in heterogeneous catalysis, including surface structure, surface intermediates, active sites and spillover. In the article a number of images of surfaces are shown, many at atomic resolution, and the insights which these give into surface reactivity are invaluable. The article should be of interest to catalytic chemists, surface and materials scientists and those involved with nanotechnology/nanoscience. (129 references.)The graphical abstract shows the reaction between gas phase methanol and oxygen islands on Cu(110), courtesy of Philip Davies of Cardiff University. The added-row island is shown as silver-coloured spheres (copper) and red (oxygen) on the copper surface. Methanol preferentially reacts with the terminal oxygen atoms in the island forming adsorbed methoxy and OH groups. Only the terminal oxygen atoms in the island are active sites for the reaction.

  15. Substrate catalysis enhances single-enzyme diffusion.

    PubMed

    Muddana, Hari S; Sengupta, Samudra; Mallouk, Thomas E; Sen, Ayusman; Butler, Peter J

    2010-02-24

    We show that diffusion of single urease enzyme molecules increases in the presence of urea in a concentration-dependent manner and calculate the force responsible for this increase. Urease diffusion measured using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy increased by 16-28% over buffer controls at urea concentrations ranging from 0.001 to 1 M. This increase was significantly attenuated when urease was inhibited with pyrocatechol, demonstrating that the increase in diffusion was the result of enzyme catalysis of urea. Local molecular pH changes as measured using the pH-dependent fluorescence lifetime of SNARF-1 conjugated to urease were not sufficient to explain the increase in diffusion. Thus, a force generated by self-electrophoresis remains the most plausible explanation. This force, evaluated using Brownian dynamics simulations, was 12 pN per reaction turnover. These measurements demonstrate force generation by a single enzyme molecule and lay the foundation for a further understanding of biological force generation and the development of enzyme-driven nanomotors.

  16. Redox interplay between mitochondria and peroxisomes

    PubMed Central

    Lismont, Celien; Nordgren, Marcus; Van Veldhoven, Paul P.; Fransen, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Reduction-oxidation or “redox” reactions are an integral part of a broad range of cellular processes such as gene expression, energy metabolism, protein import and folding, and autophagy. As many of these processes are intimately linked with cell fate decisions, transient or chronic changes in cellular redox equilibrium are likely to contribute to the initiation and progression of a plethora of human diseases. Since a long time, it is known that mitochondria are major players in redox regulation and signaling. More recently, it has become clear that also peroxisomes have the capacity to impact redox-linked physiological processes. To serve this function, peroxisomes cooperate with other organelles, including mitochondria. This review provides a comprehensive picture of what is currently known about the redox interplay between mitochondria and peroxisomes in mammals. We first outline the pro- and antioxidant systems of both organelles and how they may function as redox signaling nodes. Next, we critically review and discuss emerging evidence that peroxisomes and mitochondria share an intricate redox-sensitive relationship and cooperate in cell fate decisions. Key issues include possible physiological roles, messengers, and mechanisms. We also provide examples of how data mining of publicly-available datasets from “omics” technologies can be a powerful means to gain additional insights into potential redox signaling pathways between peroxisomes and mitochondria. Finally, we highlight the need for more studies that seek to clarify the mechanisms of how mitochondria may act as dynamic receivers, integrators, and transmitters of peroxisome-derived mediators of oxidative stress. The outcome of such studies may open up exciting new avenues for the community of researchers working on cellular responses to organelle-derived oxidative stress, a research field in which the role of peroxisomes is currently highly underestimated and an issue of discussion. PMID:26075204

  17. Thiol-based redox switches in prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Hillion, Melanie; Antelmann, Haike

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bacteria encounter reactive oxygen species (ROS) as consequence of the aerobic life or as oxidative burst of activated neutrophils during infections. In addition, bacteria are exposed to other redox-active compounds including hypochloric acid (HOCl) and reactive electrophilic species (RES), such as quinones and aldehydes. These reactive species often target the thiol groups of cysteines in proteins and lead to thiol-disulfide switches in redox-sensing regulators to activate specific detoxification pathways and to restore the redox balance. Here, we review bacterial thiol-based redox sensors that specifically sense ROS, RES and HOCl via thiol-based mechanisms and regulate gene transcription in Gram-positive model bacteria and in human pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We also pay particular attention to emerging widely conserved HOCl-specific redox regulators that have been recently characterized in Escherichia coli. Different mechanisms are used to sense and respond to ROS, RES and HOCl by 1-Cys-type and 2-Cys-type thiol-based redox sensors that include versatile thiol-disulfide switches (OxyR, OhrR, HypR, YodB, NemR, RclR, Spx, RsrA/RshA) or alternative Cys-phosphorylations (SarZ, MgrA, SarA), thiol-S-alkylation (QsrR), His-oxidation (PerR) and methionine oxidation (HypT). In pathogenic bacteria, these redox-sensing regulators are often important virulence regulators and required for adapation to the host immune defense. PMID:25720121

  18. Thiol-based redox switches in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Hillion, Melanie; Antelmann, Haike

    2015-05-01

    Bacteria encounter reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a consequence of the aerobic life or as an oxidative burst of activated neutrophils during infections. In addition, bacteria are exposed to other redox-active compounds, including hypochloric acid (HOCl) and reactive electrophilic species (RES) such as quinones and aldehydes. These reactive species often target the thiol groups of cysteines in proteins and lead to thiol-disulfide switches in redox-sensing regulators to activate specific detoxification pathways and to restore the redox balance. Here, we review bacterial thiol-based redox sensors that specifically sense ROS, RES and HOCl via thiol-based mechanisms and regulate gene transcription in Gram-positive model bacteria and in human pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We also pay particular attention to emerging widely conserved HOCl-specific redox regulators that have been recently characterized in Escherichia coli. Different mechanisms are used to sense and respond to ROS, RES and HOCl by 1-Cys-type and 2-Cys-type thiol-based redox sensors that include versatile thiol-disulfide switches (OxyR, OhrR, HypR, YodB, NemR, RclR, Spx, RsrA/RshA) or alternative Cys phosphorylations (SarZ, MgrA, SarA), thiol-S-alkylation (QsrR), His-oxidation (PerR) and methionine oxidation (HypT). In pathogenic bacteria, these redox-sensing regulators are often important virulence regulators and required for adapation to the host immune defense.

  19. Selenium- and tellurium-containing multifunctional redox agents as biochemical redox modulators with selective cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Jamier, Vincent; Ba, Lalla A; Jacob, Claus

    2010-09-24

    Various human diseases, including different types of cancer, are associated with a disturbed intracellular redox balance and oxidative stress (OS). The past decade has witnessed the emergence of redox-modulating compounds able to utilize such pre-existing disturbances in the redox state of sick cells for therapeutic advantage. Selenium- and tellurium-based agents turn the oxidizing redox environment present in certain cancer cells into a lethal cocktail of reactive species that push these cells over a critical redox threshold and ultimately kill them through apoptosis. This kind of toxicity is highly selective: normal, healthy cells remain largely unaffected, since changes to their naturally low levels of oxidizing species produce little effect. To further improve selectivity, multifunctional sensor/effector agents are now required that recognize the biochemical signature of OS in target cells. The synthesis of such compounds provides interesting challenges for chemistry in the future.

  20. NASA Redox Storage System Development Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagedorn, N. H.

    1984-01-01

    The Redox Storage System Technology Project was jointly supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and NASA. The objectives of the project were to develop the Redox flow battery concept and to probe its technical and economic viability. The iron and chromium redox couples were selected as the reactants. Membranes and electrodes were developed for the original mode of operating at 25 C with the reactants separated by an ion-exchange membrane. Analytical capabilities and system-level operating concepts were developed and verified in a 1-kW, 13-kWh preprototype system. A subsequent change was made in operating mode, going to 65 C and using mixed reactants. New membranes and a new electrode catalyst were developed, resulting in single cell operation as high as 80 mA/sq cm with energy efficiencies greater than 80 percent. Studies indicate a likely system cost of about $75/kWh. Standard Oil of Ohio (Sohio) has undertaken further development of the Redox system. An exclusive patent license was obtained from NASA by Sohio. Transfer of Redox technology to Sohio is supported by the NASA Technology Utilization Office.

  1. Mitochondrial Redox Signaling and Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuxin; Zhang, Haiqing; Zhou, Huanjiao Jenny; Ji, Weidong; Min, Wang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell can reprogram their energy production by switching mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis. However, mitochondria play multiple roles in cancer cells, including redox regulation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and apoptotic signaling. Moreover, these mitochondrial roles are integrated via multiple interconnected metabolic and redox sensitive pathways. Interestingly, mitochondrial redox proteins biphasically regulate tumor progression depending on cellular ROS levels. Low level of ROS functions as signaling messengers promoting cancer cell proliferation and cancer invasion. However, anti-cancer drug-initiated stress signaling could induce excessive ROS, which is detrimental to cancer cells. Mitochondrial redox proteins could scavenger basal ROS and function as “tumor suppressors” or prevent excessive ROS to act as “tumor promoter”. Paradoxically, excessive ROS often also induce DNA mutations and/or promotes tumor metastasis at various stages of cancer progression. Targeting redox-sensitive pathways and transcriptional factors in the appropriate context offers great promise for cancer prevention and therapy. However, the therapeutics should be cancer-type and stage-dependent. PMID:27023612

  2. Redox-inactive metal ions modulate the reactivity and oxygen release of mononuclear non-haem iron(III)–peroxo complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, Suhee; Lee, Yong -Min; Hong, Seungwoo; Cho, Kyung -Bin; Nishida, Yusuke; Seo, Mi Sook; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Nam, Wonwoo

    2014-09-14

    Redox-inactive metal ions that function as Lewis acids play pivotal roles in modulating the reactivity of oxygen-containing metal complexes and metalloenzymes, such as the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II and its small-molecule mimics. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of non-haem iron(III)–peroxo complexes that bind redox-inactive metal ions, (TMC)FeIII–(μ,η22-O2)–Mn+ (Mn+ = Sr2+, Ca2+, Zn2+, Lu3+, Y3+ and Sc3+; TMC, 1,4,8,11-tetramethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane). We demonstrate that the Ca2+ and Sr2+ complexes showed similar electrochemical properties and reactivities in one-electron oxidation or reduction reactions. However, the properties and reactivities of complexes formed with stronger Lewis acidities were found to be markedly different. In conclusion, complexes that contain Ca2+ or Sr2+ ions were oxidized by an electron acceptor to release O2, whereas the release of O2 did not occur for complexes that bind stronger Lewis acids. Furthermore, we discuss these results in the light of the functional role of the Ca2+ ion in the oxidation of water to dioxygen by the oxygen-evolving complex.

  3. Rh Nanoparticle Anchoring on Metal Phosphates: Fundamental Aspects and Practical Impacts on Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Machida, Masato

    2016-10-01

    Metal phosphates stabilize Rh nanoparticles on their surface via Rh-O-P bonds, in contrast to the Rh-O-M bonds formed on metal oxides (MOx ). The local structure, electronic structure, and redox properties of Rh nanoparticles anchored on metal phosphates, and their practical impacts on catalysis, are reviewed based on recent publications from the author's research group. Because of the covalency of the Rh-O-P bond, Rh oxide is readily reduced to metallic Rh having a higher catalytic activity, whereas Rh oxide on metal oxide supports is more difficult to reduce with an increase of the anchoring strength. Furthermore, Rh metal shows a higher tolerance to reoxidation when supported on metal phosphates because the Rh-O-P bond is preserved under reducing atmospheres. The electron deficiency of Rh metal is another feature that affects its catalytic properties, and the extent of the electron deficiency can be tuned by replacing the metal in the metal phosphate with one of higher basicity. Further impacts on practical performance (thermal stability, poisoning stability, and lean NOx purification) in automobile catalyst applications are also described.

  4. Dual binding sites for translocation catalysis by Escherichia coli glutathionylspermidine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Pai, Chien-Hua; Chiang, Bing-Yu; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Chou, Chia-Cheng; Chong, Cheong-Meng; Yen, Fang-Jiun; Chen, Shoujun; Coward, James K; Wang, Andrew H-J; Lin, Chun-Hung

    2006-12-13

    Most organisms use glutathione to regulate intracellular thiol redox balance and protect against oxidative stress; protozoa, however, utilize trypanothione for this purpose. Trypanothione biosynthesis requires ATP-dependent conjugation of glutathione (GSH) to the two terminal amino groups of spermidine by glutathionylspermidine synthetase (GspS) and trypanothione synthetase (TryS), which are considered as drug targets. GspS catalyzes the penultimate step of the biosynthesis-amide bond formation between spermidine and the glycine carboxylate of GSH. We report herein five crystal structures of Escherichia coli GspS in complex with substrate, product or inhibitor. The C-terminal of GspS belongs to the ATP-grasp superfamily with a similar fold to the human glutathione synthetase. GSH is likely phosphorylated at one of two GSH-binding sites to form an acylphosphate intermediate that then translocates to the other site for subsequent nucleophilic addition of spermidine. We also identify essential amino acids involved in the catalysis. Our results constitute the first structural information on the biochemical features of parasite homologs (including TryS) that underlie their broad specificity for polyamines.

  5. An unexplored role for Peroxiredoxin in exercise-induced redox signalling?

    PubMed Central

    Wadley, Alex J.; Aldred, Sarah; Coles, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin (PRDX) is a ubiquitous oxidoreductase protein with a conserved ionised thiol that permits catalysis of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) up to a million times faster than any thiol-containing signalling protein. The increased production of H2O2 within active tissues during exercise is thought to oxidise conserved cysteine thiols, which may in turn facilitate a wide variety of physiological adaptations. The precise mechanisms linking H2O2 with the oxidation of signalling thiol proteins (phosphates, kinases and transcription factors) are unclear due to these proteins' low reactivity with H2O2 relative to abundant thiol peroxidases such as PRDX. Recent work has shown that following exposure to H2O2 in vitro, the sulfenic acid of the PRDX cysteine can form mixed disulphides with transcription factors associated with cell survival. This implicates PRDX as an ‘active’ redox relay in transmitting the oxidising equivalent of H2O2 to downstream proteins. Furthermore, under oxidative stress, PRDX can form stable oxidised dimers that can be secreted into the extracellular space, potentially acting as an extracellular ‘stress’ signal. There is extensive literature assessing non-specific markers of oxidative stress in response to exercise, however the PRDX catalytic cycle may offer a more robust approach for measuring changes in redox balance following exercise. This review discusses studies assessing PRDX-mediated cellular signalling and integrates the recent advances in redox biology with investigations that have examined the role of PRDX during exercise in humans and animals. Future studies should explore the role of PRDX as a key regulator of peroxide mediated-signal transduction during exercise in humans. PMID:26748042

  6. Studies of Cobalt-Mediated Electrocatalytic CO2 Reduction Using a Redox-Active Ligand

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The cobalt complex [CoIIIN4H(Br)2]+ (N4H = 2,12-dimethyl-3,7,11,17-tetraazabicyclo-[11.3.1]-heptadeca-1(7),2,11,13,15-pentaene) was used for electrocatalytic CO2 reduction in wet MeCN with a glassy carbon working electrode. When water was employed as the proton source (10 M in MeCN), CO was produced (fCO= 45% ± 6.4) near the CoI/0 redox couple for [CoIIIN4H(Br)2]+ (E1/2 = −1.88 V FeCp2+/0) with simultaneous H2 evolution (fH2= 30% ± 7.8). Moreover, we successfully demonstrated that the catalytically active species is homogeneous through the use of control experiments and XPS studies of the working glassy-carbon electrodes. As determined by cyclic voltammetry, CO2 catalysis occurred near the formal CoI/0redox couple, and attempts were made to isolate the triply reduced compound (“[Co0N4H]”). Instead, the doubly reduced (“CoI”) compounds [CoN4] and [CoN4H(MeCN)]+ were isolated and characterized by X-ray crystallography. Their molecular structures prompted DFT studies to illuminate details regarding their electronic structure. The results indicate that reducing equivalents are stored on the ligand, implicating redox noninnocence in the ligands for H2 evolution and CO2 reduction electrocatalysis. PMID:24773584

  7. Amine Functionalization via Oxidative Photoredox Catalysis: Methodology Development and Complex Molecule Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Conspectus While the use of visible light to drive chemical reactivity is of high importance to the development of environmentally benign chemical transformations, the concomitant use of a stoichiometric electron donor or acceptor is often required to steer the desired redox behavior of these systems. The low-cost and ubiquity of tertiary amine bases has led to their widespread use as reductive additives in photoredox catalysis. Early use of trialkylamines in this context was focused on their role as reductive excited state quenchers of the photocatalyst, which in turn provides a more highly reducing catalytic intermediate. In this Account, we discuss some of the observations and thought processes that have led from our use of amines as reductive additives to their use as complex substrates and intermediates for natural product synthesis. Early attempts by our group to construct key carbon–carbon bonds via free-radical intermediates led to the observation that some trialkylamines readily behave as efficient hydrogen atom donors under redox-active photochemical conditions. In the wake of in-depth mechanistic studies published in the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s, this understanding has in turn allowed for a systematic approach to the design of a number of photochemical methodologies through rational tuning of the amine component. Minimization of the C–H donicity of the amine additive was found to promote desired C–C bond formation in a number of contexts, and subsequent elucidation of the amine’s redox fate has sparked a reevaluation of the amine’s role from that of reagent to that of substrate. The reactivity of tertiary amines in these photochemical systems is complex, and allows for a number of mechanistic possibilities that are not necessarily mutually exclusive. A variety of combinations of single-electron oxidation, C–H abstraction, deprotonation, and β-scission result in the formation of reactive intermediates such as α-amino radicals and iminium ions

  8. Amine Functionalization via Oxidative Photoredox Catalysis: Methodology Development and Complex Molecule Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Beatty, Joel W; Stephenson, Corey R J

    2015-05-19

    While the use of visible light to drive chemical reactivity is of high importance to the development of environmentally benign chemical transformations, the concomitant use of a stoichiometric electron donor or acceptor is often required to steer the desired redox behavior of these systems. The low-cost and ubiquity of tertiary amine bases has led to their widespread use as reductive additives in photoredox catalysis. Early use of trialkylamines in this context was focused on their role as reductive excited state quenchers of the photocatalyst, which in turn provides a more highly reducing catalytic intermediate. In this Account, we discuss some of the observations and thought processes that have led from our use of amines as reductive additives to their use as complex substrates and intermediates for natural product synthesis. Early attempts by our group to construct key carbon-carbon bonds via free-radical intermediates led to the observation that some trialkylamines readily behave as efficient hydrogen atom donors under redox-active photochemical conditions. In the wake of in-depth mechanistic studies published in the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s, this understanding has in turn allowed for a systematic approach to the design of a number of photochemical methodologies through rational tuning of the amine component. Minimization of the C-H donicity of the amine additive was found to promote desired C-C bond formation in a number of contexts, and subsequent elucidation of the amine's redox fate has sparked a reevaluation of the amine's role from that of reagent to that of substrate. The reactivity of tertiary amines in these photochemical systems is complex, and allows for a number of mechanistic possibilities that are not necessarily mutually exclusive. A variety of combinations of single-electron oxidation, C-H abstraction, deprotonation, and β-scission result in the formation of reactive intermediates such as α-amino radicals and iminium ions. These processes have

  9. Exhaust aftertreatment using plasma-assisted catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Penetrante, B

    2000-01-20

    In the field of catalysis, one application that has been classified as a breakthrough technology is the catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} in oxygen-rich environments using hydrocarbons. This breakthrough will require dramatic improvements in both catalyst and engine technology, but the benefits will be substantial for energy efficiency and a cleaner environment. Engine and automobile companies are placing greater emphasis on the diesel engine because of its potential for saving fuel resources and reducing CO{sub 2} emissions. The modern direct-injection diesel engine offers demonstrated fuel economy advantages unmatched by any other commercially-viable engine. The main drawback of diesel engines is exhaust emissions. A modification of existing oxidation catalyst/engine technology is being used to address the CO, hydrocarbon and particulates. However, no satisfactory solution currently exists for NO{sub x}. Diesel engines operate under net oxidizing conditions, thus rendering conventional three-way catalytic converters ineffective for the controlling the NO{sub x} emission. NO{sub x} reduction catalysts, using ammonia as a reductant, do exist for oxygen-rich exhausts; however, for transportation applications, the use of on-board hydrocarbon fuels is a more feasible, cost-effective, and environmentally-sound approach. Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) by hydrocarbons is one of the leading catalytic aftertreatment technologies for the reduction of NO{sub x} in lean-burn engine exhaust (often referred to as lean-NO{sub x}). The objective is to chemically reduce the pollutant molecules of NO{sub x} to benign molecules such as N{sub 2}. Aftertreatment schemes have focused a great deal on the reduction of NO because the NO{sub x} in engine exhaust is composed primarily of NO. Recent studies, however, have shown that the oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2} serves an important role in enhancing the efficiency for reduction of NO{sub x} to N{sub 2}. It has become apparent that

  10. Center for Catalysis at Iowa State University

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, George A.

    2006-10-17

    The overall objective of this proposal is to enable Iowa State University to establish a Center that enjoys world-class stature and eventually enhances the economy through the transfer of innovation from the laboratory to the marketplace. The funds have been used to support experimental proposals from interdisciplinary research teams in areas related to catalysis and green chemistry. Specific focus areas included: • Catalytic conversion of renewable natural resources to industrial materials • Development of new catalysts for the oxidation or reduction of commodity chemicals • Use of enzymes and microorganisms in biocatalysis • Development of new, environmentally friendly reactions of industrial importance These focus areas intersect with barriers from the MYTP draft document. Specifically, section 2.4.3.1 Processing and Conversion has a list of bulleted items under Improved Chemical Conversions that includes new hydrogenation catalysts, milder oxidation catalysts, new catalysts for dehydration and selective bond cleavage catalysts. Specifically, the four sections are: 1. Catalyst development (7.4.12.A) 2. Conversion of glycerol (7.4.12.B) 3. Conversion of biodiesel (7.4.12.C) 4. Glucose from starch (7.4.12.D) All funded projects are part of a soybean or corn biorefinery. Two funded projects that have made significant progress toward goals of the MYTP draft document are: Catalysts to convert feedstocks with high fatty acid content to biodiesel (Kraus, Lin, Verkade) and Conversion of Glycerol into 1,3-Propanediol (Lin, Kraus). Currently, biodiesel is prepared using homogeneous base catalysis. However, as producers look for feedstocks other than soybean oil, such as waste restaurant oils and rendered animal fats, they have observed a large amount of free fatty acids contained in the feedstocks. Free fatty acids cannot be converted into biodiesel using homogeneous base-mediated processes. The CCAT catalyst system offers an integrated and cooperative catalytic

  11. Catalysis by unsupported skeletal gold catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wittstock, Arne; Bäumer, Marcus

    2014-03-18

    Catalysis is one of the key technologies for the 21st century for achieving the required sustainability of chemical processes. Critical improvements are based on the development of new catalysts and catalytic concepts. In this context, gold holds great promise because it is more active and selective than other precious metal catalysts at low temperatures. However, gold becomes only chemically and catalytically active when it is nanostructured. Since the 1970s and 1980s, the first type of gold catalysts that chemists studied were small nanoparticles on oxidic supports. With the later onset of nanotechnology, a variety of nanostructured materials not requiring a support or organic stabilizers became available within about the last 10 years. Among these are gold nanofoams generated by combustion of gold compounds, nanotube membranes prepared by electroless deposition of gold inside a template, and corrosion-derived nanoporous gold. Even though these materials are macroscopic in their geometric dimensions (e.g., disks, cubes, and membranes with dimensions of millimeters), they are comprised of gold nanostructures, for example, in the form of ligaments as small as 15 nm in diameter (nanoporous gold, npAu). The nanostructure brings about a high surface to volume ratio and a large fraction of low coordinated surface atoms. In this Account, we discuss how unsupported materials are active catalysts for aerobic oxidation reaction in gas phase (oxidation of CO and primary alcohols), as well as liquid phase oxidation and reduction reactions. It turns out that the bonding and activation of molecular oxygen for gas phase oxidations strongly profits from trace amounts of an ad-metal residue such as silver. It is noteworthy that these catalysts still exhibit the special gold type chemistry, characterized by activity at very low temperatures and high selectivity for partial oxidations. For example, we can oxidize CO over these unsupported catalysts (npAu, nanotubes, and powder) at

  12. Transition metal catalysis and nucleophilic fluorination.

    PubMed

    Hollingworth, Charlotte; Gouverneur, Véronique

    2012-03-21

    Transition metal catalyzed transformations using fluorinating reagents have been developed extensively for the preparation of synthetically valuable fluorinated targets. This is a topic of critical importance to facilitate laboratory and industrial chemical synthesis of fluorine containing pharmaceuticals and agrochemicals. Translation to (18)F-radiochemistry is also emerging as a vibrant research field because functional imaging based on Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is increasingly used for both diagnosis and pharmaceutical development. This review summarizes how fluoride sources have been used for the catalytic nucleophilic fluorination of various substrates inclusive of aryl triflates, alkynes, allylic halides, allylic esters, allylic trichloroacetimidates, benzylic halides, tertiary alkyl halides and epoxides. Until recently, progress in this field of research has been slow in part because of the challenges associated with the dual reactivity profile of fluoride (nucleophile or base). Despite these difficulties, some remarkable breakthroughs have emerged. This includes the demonstration that Pd(0)/Pd(II)-catalyzed nucleophilic fluorination to access fluoroarenes from aryl triflates is feasible, and the first examples of Tsuji-Trost allylic alkylation with fluoride using either allyl chlorides or allyl precursors bearing O-leaving groups. More recently, allylic fluorides were also made accessible under iridium catalysis. Another reaction, which has been greatly improved based on careful mechanistic work, is the catalytic asymmetric hydrofluorination of meso epoxides. Notably, each individual transition metal catalyzed nucleophilic fluorination reported to date employs a different F-reagent, an observation indicating that this area of research will benefit from a larger pool of nucleophilic fluoride sources. In this context, a striking recent development is the successful design, synthesis and applications of a fluoride-derived electrophilic late stage

  13. High-Spin Cobalt Hydrides for Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Patrick L.

    2013-08-29

    Organometallic chemists have traditionally used catalysts with strong-field ligands that give low-spin complexes. However, complexes with a weak ligand field have weaker bonds and lower barriers to geometric changes, suggesting that they may lead to more rapid catalytic reactions. Developing our understanding of high-spin complexes requires the use of a broader range of spectroscopic techniques, but has the promise of changing the mechanism and/or selectivity of known catalytic reactions. These changes may enable the more efficient utilization of chemical resources. A special advantage of cobalt and iron catalysts is that the metals are more abundant and cheaper than those currently used for major industrial processes that convert unsaturated organic molecules and biofeedstocks into useful chemicals. This project specifically evaluated the potential of high-spin cobalt complexes for small-molecule reactions for bond rearrangement and cleavage reactions relevant to hydrocarbon transformations. We have learned that many of these reactions proceed through crossing to different spin states: for example, high-spin complexes can flip one electron spin to access a lower-energy reaction pathway for beta-hydride elimination. This reaction enables new, selective olefin isomerization catalysis. The high-spin cobalt complexes also cleave the C-O bond of CO2 and the C-F bonds of fluoroarenes. In each case, the detailed mechanism of the reaction has been determined. Importantly, we have discovered that the cobalt catalysts described here give distinctive selectivities that are better than known catalysts. These selectivities come from a synergy between supporting ligand design and electronic control of the spin-state crossing in the reactions.

  14. Snapshots of Enzymatic Baeyer-Villiger Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Orru, Roberto; Dudek, Hanna M.; Martinoli, Christian; Torres Pazmiño, Daniel E.; Royant, Antoine; Weik, Martin; Fraaije, Marco W.; Mattevi, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases catalyze the oxidation of carbonylic substrates to ester or lactone products using NADPH as electron donor and molecular oxygen as oxidative reactant. Using protein engineering, kinetics, microspectrophotometry, crystallography, and intermediate analogs, we have captured several snapshots along the catalytic cycle which highlight key features in enzyme catalysis. After acting as electron donor, the enzyme-bound NADP(H) forms an H-bond with the flavin cofactor. This interaction is critical for stabilizing the oxygen-activating flavin-peroxide intermediate that results from the reaction of the reduced cofactor with oxygen. An essential active-site arginine acts as anchoring element for proper binding of the ketone substrate. Its positively charged guanidinium group can enhance the propensity of the substrate to undergo a nucleophilic attack by the flavin-peroxide intermediate. Furthermore, the arginine side chain, together with the NADP+ ribose group, forms the niche that hosts the negatively charged Criegee intermediate that is generated upon reaction of the substrate with the flavin-peroxide. The fascinating ability of Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases to catalyze a complex multistep catalytic reaction originates from concerted action of this Arg-NADP(H) pair and the flavin subsequently to promote flavin reduction, oxygen activation, tetrahedral intermediate formation, and product synthesis and release. The emerging picture is that these enzymes are mainly oxygen-activating and “Criegee-stabilizing” catalysts that act on any chemically suitable substrate that can diffuse into the active site, emphasizing their potential value as toolboxes for biocatalytic applications. PMID:21697090

  15. Catalysis-by-design impacts assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Fassbender, L L; Young, J K; Sen, R K

    1991-05-01

    Catalyst researchers have always recognized the need to develop a detailed understanding of the mechanisms of catalytic processes, and have hoped that it would lead to developing a theoretical predictive base to guide the search for new catalysts. This understanding allows one to develop a set of hierarchical models, from fundamental atomic-level ab-initio models to detailed engineering simulations of reactor systems, to direct the search for optimized, efficient catalyst systems. During the last two decades, the explosions of advanced surface analysis techniques have helped considerably to develop the building blocks for understanding various catalytic reactions. An effort to couple these theoretical and experimental advances to develop a set of hierarchical models to predict the nature of catalytic materials is a program entitled Catalysis-by-Design (CRD).'' In assessing the potential impacts of CBD on US industry, the key point to remember is that the value of the program lies in developing a novel methodology to search for new catalyst systems. Industrial researchers can then use this methodology to develop proprietary catalysts. Most companies involved in catalyst R D have two types of ongoing projects. The first type, what we call market-driven R D,'' are projects that support and improve upon a company's existing product lines. Project of the second type, technology-driven R D,'' are longer term, involve the development of totally new catalysts, and are initiated through scientists' research ideas. The CBD approach will impact both types of projects. However, this analysis indicates that the near-term impacts will be on market-driven'' projects. The conclusions and recommendations presented in this report were obtained by the authors through personal interviews with individuals involved in a variety of industrial catalyst development programs and through the three CBD workshops held in the summer of 1989. 34 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. Carbon Redox-Polymer-Gel Hybrid Supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlad, A.; Singh, N.; Melinte, S.; Gohy, J.-F.; Ajayan, P. M.

    2016-02-01

    Energy storage devices that provide high specific power without compromising on specific energy are highly desirable for many electric-powered applications. Here, we demonstrate that polymer organic radical gel materials support fast bulk-redox charge storage, commensurate to surface double layer ion exchange at carbon electrodes. When integrated with a carbon-based electrical double layer capacitor, nearly ideal electrode properties such as high electrical and ionic conductivity, fast bulk redox and surface charge storage as well as excellent cycling stability are attained. Such hybrid carbon redox-polymer-gel electrodes support unprecedented discharge rate of 1,000C with 50% of the nominal capacity delivered in less than 2 seconds. Devices made with such electrodes hold the potential for battery-scale energy storage while attaining supercapacitor-like power performances.

  17. Biodiesel forming reactions using heterogeneous catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yijun

    Biodiesel synthesis from biomass provides a means for utilizing effectively renewable resources, a way to convert waste vegetable oils and animal fats to a useful product, a way to recycle carbon dioxide for a combustion fuel, and production of a fuel that is biodegradable, non-toxic, and has a lower emission profile than petroleum-diesel. Free fatty acid (FFA) esterification and triglyceride (TG) transesterification with low molecular weight alcohols constitute the synthetic routes to prepare biodiesel from lipid feedstocks. This project was aimed at developing a better understanding of important fundamental issues involved in heterogeneous catalyzed biodiesel forming reactions using mainly model compounds, representing part of on-going efforts to build up a rational base for assay, design, and performance optimization of solid acids/bases in biodiesel synthesis. As FFA esterification proceeds, water is continuously formed as a byproduct and affects reaction rates in a negative manner. Using sulfuric acid (as a catalyst) and acetic acid (as a model compound for FFA), the impact of increasing concentrations of water on acid catalysis was investigated. The order of the water effect on reaction rate was determined to be -0.83. Sulfuric acid lost up to 90% activity as the amount of water present increased. The nature of the negative effect of water on esterification was found to go beyond the scope of reverse hydrolysis and was associated with the diminished acid strength of sulfuric acid as a result of the preferential solvation by water molecules of its catalytic protons. The results indicate that as esterification progresses and byproduct water is produced, deactivation of a Bronsted acid catalyst like H2SO4 occurs. Using a solid composite acid (SAC-13) as an example of heterogeneous catalysts and sulfuric acid as a homogeneous reference, similar reaction inhibition by water was demonstrated for homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis. This similarity together with

  18. The Chemistry of Redox-Flow Batteries.

    PubMed

    Noack, Jens; Roznyatovskaya, Nataliya; Herr, Tatjana; Fischer, Peter

    2015-08-17

    The development of various redox-flow batteries for the storage of fluctuating renewable energy has intensified in recent years because of their peculiar ability to be scaled separately in terms of energy and power, and therefore potentially to reduce the costs of energy storage. This has resulted in a considerable increase in the number of publications on redox-flow batteries. This was a motivation to present a comprehensive and critical overview of the features of this type of batteries, focusing mainly on the chemistry of electrolytes and introducing a thorough systematic classification to reveal their potential for future development.

  19. Ligand-Assisted Gold-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling with Aryldiazonium Salts: Redox Gold Catalysis without an External Oxidant.

    PubMed

    Cai, Rong; Lu, Mei; Aguilera, Ellen Y; Xi, Yumeng; Akhmedov, Novruz G; Petersen, Jeffrey L; Chen, Hao; Shi, Xiaodong

    2015-07-20

    Gold-catalyzed C(sp)-C(sp(2)) and C(sp(2))-C(sp(2)) cross-coupling reactions are accomplished with aryldiazonium salts as the coupling partner. With the assistance of bpy ligand, gold(I) species were oxidized to gold(III) by diazonium without any external oxidants. Monitoring the reaction with NMR and ESI-MS provided strong evidence for the nitrogen extrusion followed by Au(III) reductive elimination as the key step.

  20. Catalysis and surface properties of liquid metals and alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, Y.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents a historical review of the subject in order to clarify its own role in advancing the study of heterogenous catalysis. In addition, this authoritative volume; discusses the catalytic properties of liquid metals and alloys, giving a useful, schematic account of various experimental techniques; examines the mechanism of catalysis at the atomic and particle levels, defining the structures of liquid metals; covers a variety of reactions, including dehydrogenation, hydrogen transfer, coal liquefaction, and other, suggesting practical uses and additional areas for investigation; addresses basic and microscopic aspects of catalysis, exploring such advanced topics as kinetics and stereochemistry as well as optical properties and surface transition zones; and provides examples of applications, illustrating fundamental research with specific technologies that extend the range of future research possibilities.

  1. Chiral poly-rare earth metal complexes in asymmetric catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2006-01-01

    Asymmetric catalysis is a powerful component of modern synthetic organic chemistry. To further broaden the scope and utility of asymmetric catalysis, new basic concepts for the design of asymmetric catalysts are crucial. Because most chemical reactions involve bond-formation between two substrates or moieties, high enantioselectivity and catalyst activity should be realized if an asymmetric catalyst can activate two reacting substrates simultaneously at defined positions. Thus, we proposed the concept of bifunctional asymmetric catalysis, which led us to the design of new asymmetric catalysts containing two functionalities (e.g. a Lewis acid and a Brønsted base or a Lewis acid and a Lewis base). These catalysts demonstrated broad reaction applicability with excellent substrate generality. Using our catalytic asymmetric reactions as keys steps, efficient total syntheses of pharmaceuticals and their biologically active lead natural products were achieved. PMID:25792774

  2. 2008 Gordon Research Conference on Catalysis [Conference summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Soled, Stuart L.; Gray, Nancy Ryan

    2009-01-01

    The GRC on Catalysis is one of the most prestigious catalysis conferences as it brings together leading researchers from around the world to discuss their latest, most exciting work in catalysis. The 2008 conference will continue this tradition. The conference will cover a variety of themes including new catalytic materials, theoretical and experimental approaches to improve understanding of kinetics and transport phenomena, and state of the art nanoscale characterization probes to monitor active sites. The conference promotes interactions among established researchers and young scientists. It provides a venue for students to meet, talk to and learn from some of the world leading researchers in the area. It also gives them a platform for displaying their own work during the poster sessions. The informal nature of the meeting, excellent quality of the presentations and posters, and ability to meet many outstanding colleagues makes this an excellent conference.

  3. Rare earth metal oxazoline complexes in asymmetric catalysis.

    PubMed

    Ward, Benjamin D; Gade, Lutz H

    2012-11-07

    Polydentate oxazolines have been employed as highly effective stereodirecting ligands for asymmetric catalysis with metals from across most of the periodic table. Despite their highly versatile coordination chemistry, the use of these ligands tends to be polarised towards late transition metals; their use with early transition metals and the f-elements is significantly less developed. This current article aims to review the coordination chemistry and catalytic applications of Group 3 and lanthanide complexes supported by ligands possessing oxazoline moieties. Oxazoline-containing ligands were first employed in molecular lanthanide catalysis as early as 1997, yet there is still a significant void in the chemical literature in this respect. The ligands generally employed include bis(oxazolinyl)methane ("BOX"), 2,6-bis(oxazolinyl)pyridine ("pybox"), 1,1,1-tris(oxazolinyl)ethane ("trisox"), and others. The complexes are employed in a wide-range of catalytic applications, especially in Lewis acid catalysis, but also in the stereospecific polymerisation of olefins.

  4. Chiral poly-rare earth metal complexes in asymmetric catalysis.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2006-04-01

    Asymmetric catalysis is a powerful component of modern synthetic organic chemistry. To further broaden the scope and utility of asymmetric catalysis, new basic concepts for the design of asymmetric catalysts are crucial. Because most chemical reactions involve bond-formation between two substrates or moieties, high enantioselectivity and catalyst activity should be realized if an asymmetric catalyst can activate two reacting substrates simultaneously at defined positions. Thus, we proposed the concept of bifunctional asymmetric catalysis, which led us to the design of new asymmetric catalysts containing two functionalities (e.g. a Lewis acid and a Brønsted base or a Lewis acid and a Lewis base). These catalysts demonstrated broad reaction applicability with excellent substrate generality. Using our catalytic asymmetric reactions as keys steps, efficient total syntheses of pharmaceuticals and their biologically active lead natural products were achieved.

  5. Metal-free heterogeneous catalysis for sustainable chemistry.

    PubMed

    Su, Dang Sheng; Zhang, Jian; Frank, Benjamin; Thomas, Arne; Wang, Xinchen; Paraknowitsch, Jens; Schlögl, Robert

    2010-02-22

    The current established catalytic processes used in chemical industries use metals, in many cases precious metals, or metal oxides as catalysts. These are often energy-consuming and not highly selective, wasting resources and producing greenhouse gases. Metal-free heterogeneous catalysis using carbon or carbon nitride is an interesting alternative to some current industrialized chemical processes. Carbon and carbon nitride combine environmental acceptability with inexhaustible resources and allow a favorable management of energy with good thermal conductivity. Owing to lower reaction temperatures and increased selectivity, these catalysts could be candidates for green chemistry with low emission and an efficient use of the chemical feedstock. This Review highlights some recent promising activities and developments in heterogeneous catalysis using only carbon and carbon nitride as catalysts. The state-of-the-art and future challenges of metal-free heterogeneous catalysis are also discussed.

  6. Steering Asymmetric Lewis Acid Catalysis Exclusively with Octahedral Metal-Centered Chirality.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lilu; Meggers, Eric

    2017-02-21

    fashion. This has been applied to the visible-light-induced α-alkylation of 2-acyl imidazoles (and in some instances 2-acylpyridines) with acceptor-substituted benzyl, phenacyl, trifluoromethyl, perfluoroalkyl, and trichloromethyl groups, in addition to photoinduced oxidative α-aminoalkylations and a photoinduced stereocontrolled radical-radical coupling, each employing a single iridium complex. In all photoinduced reaction schemes, the iridium complex serves as a chiral Lewis acid catalyst and at the same time as precursor of in situ assembled photoactive species. The nature of these photoactive intermediates then determines their photochemical properties and thereby the course of the asymmetric photoredox reactions. The bis-cyclometalated rhodium complexes are also very useful for asymmetric photoredox catalysis. Less efficient photochemical properties are compensated with a more rapid ligand exchange kinetics, which permits higher turnover frequencies of the catalytic cycle. This has been applied to a visible-light-induced enantioselective radical α-amination of 2-acyl imidazoles. In this reaction, an intermediate rhodium enolate is supposed to function as a photoactivatable smart initiator to initiate and reinitiate an efficient radical chain process. If a more efficient photoactivation is required, a rhodium-based Lewis acid can be complemented with a photoredox cocatalyst, and this has been applied to efficient catalytic asymmetric alkyl radical additions to acceptor-substituted alkenes. We believe that this class of chiral-only-at-metal Lewis acid catalysts will be of significant value in the field of asymmetric synthesis, in particular in combination with visible-light-induced redox chemistry, which has already resulted in novel strategies for asymmetric synthesis of chiral molecules. Hopefully, this work will also pave the way for the development of other asymmetric catalysts featuring exclusively octahedral centrochirality.

  7. Catalysis science of supported vanadium oxide catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wachs, Israel E

    2013-09-07

    Supported vanadium oxide catalysts contain a vanadium oxide phase deposited on a high surface area oxide support (e.g., Al2O3, SiO2, TiO2, etc.) and have found extensive applications as oxidation catalysts in the chemical, petroleum and environmental industries. This review of supported vanadium oxide catalysts focuses on the fundamental aspects of this novel class of catalytic materials (molecular structures, electronic structures, surface chemistry and structure-reactivity relationships). The molecular and electronic structures of the supported vanadium oxide phases were determined by the application of modern in situ characterization techniques (Raman, IR, UV-vis, XANES, EXAFS, solid state (51)V NMR and isotopic oxygen exchange). The characterization studies revealed that the supported vanadium oxide phase consists of two-dimensional surface vanadia sites dispersed on the oxide supports. Corresponding surface chemistry and reactivity studies demonstrated that the surface vanadia sites are the catalytic active sites for oxidation reactions by supported vanadia catalysts. Combination of characterization and reactivity studies demonstrate that the oxide support controls the redox properties of the surface vanadia sites that can be varied by as much as a factor of ~10(3).

  8. Biogeochemical Barriers: Redox Behavior of Metals and Metalloids

    EPA Science Inventory

    Redox conditions and pH are arguably the most important geochemical parameters that control contaminant transport and fate in groundwater systems. Oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions mediate the chemical behavior of both inorganic and organic chemical constituents by affecting...

  9. The Development of Visible-Light Photoredox Catalysis in Flow

    PubMed Central

    Garlets, Zachary J.; Nguyen, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Visible-light photoredox catalysis has recently emerged as a viable alternative for radical reactions otherwise carried out with tin and boron reagents. It has been recognized that by merging photoredox catalysis with flow chemistry, slow reaction times, lower yields, and safety concerns may be obviated. While flow reactors have been successfully applied to reactions carried out with UV light, only recent developments have demonstrated the same potential of flow reactors for the improvement of visible-light-mediated reactions. This review examines the initial and continuing development of visible-light-mediated photoredox flow chemistry by exemplifying the benefits of flow chemistry compared with conventional batch techniques. PMID:25484447

  10. Enantioselective conjugate additions of α-amino radicals via cooperative photoredox and Lewis acid catalysis.

    PubMed

    Ruiz Espelt, Laura; McPherson, Iain S; Wiensch, Eric M; Yoon, Tehshik P

    2015-02-25

    We report the highly enantioselective addition of photogenerated α-amino radicals to Michael acceptors. This method features a dual-catalyst protocol that combines transition metal photoredox catalysis with chiral Lewis acid catalysis. The combination of these two powerful modes of catalysis provides an effective, general strategy to generate and control the reactivity of photogenerated reactive intermediates.

  11. A conceptual translation of homogeneous catalysis into heterogeneous catalysis: homogeneous-like heterogeneous gold nanoparticle catalyst induced by ceria supporter.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen-Xing; Xue, Wei; Guan, Bing-Tao; Shi, Fu-Bo; Shi, Zhang-Jie; Jiang, Hong; Yan, Chun-Hua

    2013-02-07

    Translation of homogeneous catalysis into heterogeneous catalysis is a promising solution to green and sustainable development in chemical industry. For this purpose, noble metal nanoparticles represent a new frontier in catalytic transformations. Many challenges remain for researchers to transform noble metal nanoparticles of heterogeneous catalytic active sites into ionic species of homogeneous catalytic active sites. We report here a successful design on translating homogeneous gold catalysis into a heterogeneous system with a clear understanding of the catalytic pathway. This study initiates a novel concept to immobilize a homogeneous catalyst based on electron transfer between supporting base and supported nanoparticles. Meanwhile, on the basis of theoretical calculation, it has deepened the understanding of the interactions between noble metal nanoparticles and the catalyst support.

  12. Isoporphyrin Intermediate in Heme Oxygenase Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Evans, John P.; Niemevz, Fernando; Buldain, Graciela; de Montellano, Paul Ortiz

    2008-01-01

    Human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) catalyzes the O2- and NADPH-dependent oxidation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron. The first step involves regiospecific insertion of an oxygen atom at the α-meso carbon by a ferric hydroperoxide and is predicted to proceed via an isoporphyrin π-cation intermediate. Here we report spectroscopic detection of a transient intermediate during oxidation by hHO-1 of α-meso-phenylheme-IX, α-meso-(p-methylphenyl)-mesoheme-III, and α-meso-(p-trifluoromethylphenyl)-mesoheme-III. In agreement with previous experiments (Wang, J., Niemevz, F., Lad, L., Huang, L., Alvarez, D. E., Buldain, G., Poulos, T. L., and Ortiz de Montellano, P. R. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 42593–42604), only the α-biliverdin isomer is produced with concomitant formation of the corresponding benzoic acid. The transient intermediate observed in the NADPH-P450 reductase-catalyzed reaction accumulated when the reaction was supported by H2O2 and exhibited the absorption maxima at 435 and 930 nm characteristic of an isoporphyrin. Product analysis by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of the product generated with H2O2 identified it as an isoporphyrin that, on quenching, decayed to benzoylbiliverdin. In the presence of H218O2, one labeled oxygen atom was incorporated into these products. The hHO-1-isoporphyrin complexes were found to have half-lives of 1.7 and 2.4 h for the p-trifluoromethyl- and p-methyl-substituted phenylhemes, respectively. The addition of NADPH-P450 reductase to the H2O2-generated hHO-1-isoporphyrin complex produced α-biliverdin, confirming its role as a reaction intermediate. Identification of an isoporphyrin intermediate in the catalytic sequence of hHO-1, the first such intermediate observed in hemoprotein catalysis, completes our understanding of the critical first step of heme oxidation. PMID:18487208

  13. Guiding Principles of Hydrogenase Catalysis Instigated and Clarified by Protein Film Electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Fraser A; Evans, Rhiannon M; Hexter, Suzannah V; Murphy, Bonnie J; Roessler, Maxie M; Wulff, Philip

    2016-05-17

    Protein film electrochemistry (PFE) is providing cutting-edge insight into the chemical principles underpinning biological hydrogen. Attached to an electrode, many enzymes exhibit "reversible" electrocatalytic behavior, meaning that a catalyzed redox reaction appears reversible or quasi-reversible when viewed by cyclic voltammetry. This efficiency is most relevant for enzymes that are inspiring advances in renewable energy, such as hydrogen-activating and CO2-reducing enzymes. Exploiting the rich repertoire of available instrumental methods, PFE experiments yield both a general snapshot and fine detail, all from tiny samples of enzyme. The dynamic electrochemical investigations blaze new trails and add exquisite detail to the information gained from structural and spectroscopic studies. This Account describes recent investigations of hydrogenases carried out in Oxford, including ideas initiated with PFE and followed through with complementary techniques, all contributing to an eventual complete picture of fast and efficient H2 activation without Pt. By immobilization of an enzyme on an electrode, catalytic electron flow and the chemistry controlling it can be addressed at the touch of a button. The buried nature of the active site means that structures that have been determined by crystallography or spectroscopy are likely to be protected, retained, and fully relevant in a PFE experiment. An electrocatalysis model formulated for the PFE of immobilized enzymes predicts interesting behavior and gives insight into why some hydrogenases are H2 producers and others are H2 oxidizers. Immobilization also allows for easy addition and removal of inhibitors along with precise potential control, one interesting outcome being that formaldehyde forms a reversible complex with reduced [FeFe]-hydrogenases, thereby providing insight into the order of electron and proton transfers. Experiments on O2-tolerant [NiFe]-hydrogenases show that O2 behaves like a reversible inhibitor: it

  14. Energy storage: Redox flow batteries go organic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Sprenkle, Vince

    2016-03-01

    The use of renewable resources as providers to the electrical grid is hampered by the intermittent and irregular nature in which they generate energy. Electrical energy storage technology could provide a solution and now, by using an iterative design process, a promising anolyte for use in redox flow batteries has been developed.

  15. Methods for using redox liposome biosensors

    DOEpatents

    Cheng, Quan; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and compositions for detecting the presence of biologically-important analytes by using redox liposome biosensors. In particular, the present invention provides liposome/sol-gel electrodes suitable for the detection of a wide variety of organic molecules, including but not limited to bacterial toxins.

  16. Methane oxidation over dual redox catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Sojka, Z.

    1989-06-01

    The objective of this research is to develop the scientific background for direct catalytic oxidation of methane over oxides that are doubly doped with transition metal ions. The desired process aims at employing of a double redox mechanism, where one redox couple is utilized for activation of oxygen and another for the conversion of CH{sub 3} radicals to carbocations via electron transfer reaction. The latter species can react with surface OH{sup {minus}} groups to form methanol or formaldehyde. To establish the foundations for such a process, two groups of the catalysts, one containing dispersed redox centers (Cu{sup I}/Fe{sup III}/ZnO and Cu{sup I}/Sn{sup IV}/ZnO) and a second of delafossite-type oxides containing concentrated redox centers (CuFeO{sub 2}, CuCoO{sub 2}) were synthesized and chemically analyzed for composition. For the sake of comparison, undoped ZnO treated in the same way as doped zinc oxide catalysts was also prepared. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, BET surface area measurements and preliminarily by scanning electron microscopy. A catalytic testing unit and reactor to study the title reaction were designed and constructed.

  17. Redox flow cell energy storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, L. H.

    1979-01-01

    NASA-Redox systems are electrochemical storage devices that use two fully soluble Redox couples, anode and cathode fluids, as active electrode materials separated by a highly selective ion exchange membrane. The reactants are contained in large storage tanks and pumped through a stack of Redox flow cells where the electrochemical reactions (reduction and oxidation) take place at porous carbon felt electrodes. A string or stack of these power producing cells is connected in series in a bipolar manner. Redox energy storage systems promise to be inexpensive and possess many features that provide for flexible design, long life, high reliability and minimal operation and maintenance costs. These features include independent sizing of power and storage capacity requirements and inclusion within the cell stack of a cell that monitors the state of charge of the system as a whole, and a rebalance cell which permits continuous correction to be made for minor side reactions that would tend to result in the anode fluid and cathode fluids becoming electrochemically out of balance. These system features are described and discussed.

  18. Redox Transformations of Mercury in Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amyot, M.

    2007-12-01

    Wetlands are valued for their high biodiversity and for their ecosystem services. However, we still have a poor understanding of their role in the redox transformation of contaminants such as mercury. We first propose a brief overview of past studies conducted on wetlands from different latitudes. In most instances, photochemical processes are determinant in the upper portion of the water column. At the sediment/water interface, evidence is currently supporting a significant contribution of bacterial communities, as promoters of Hg(II) reduction, particularly in the presence of anoxia. A multi-year study was recently conducted on Hg redox cycling in a fluvial wetland of the St. Lawrence River, where wetland restoration could have unintended consequences. In addition to photochemistry and bacterial reduction, Hg redox cycling was affected by epiphytes living on macrophytes, through adsorption/absorption processes. Redox studies such as this one have been historically seen as having implication for water/air flux studies, since Hg(0) is volatile. We here also discuss the potential bioavailability of Hg(0) towards bacteria. An emerging axis of our wetland research effort deals with beaver dams, which are in expansion and shown to produce high levels of methylHg

  19. Redox regulation in cancer stem cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ROS-dependent (redox regulation) signaling pathways and transcriptional activities are thought to be critical in stem cell self-renewal and differentiation during growth and organogenesis. Aberrant ROS burst and dysregulation of those ROS-dependent cellular processe...

  20. Redox Control of Skeletal Muscle Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Le Moal, Emmeran; Pialoux, Vincent; Juban, Gaëtan; Groussard, Carole; Zouhal, Hassane; Chazaud, Bénédicte; Mounier, Rémi

    2017-02-06

    Skeletal muscle shows high plasticity in response to external demand. Moreover, adult skeletal muscle is capable of complete regeneration after injury, due to the properties of muscle stem cells (MuSCs), the satellite cells, which follow a tightly regulated myogenic program to generate both new myofibers and new MuSCs for further needs. Although reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) have long been associated with skeletal muscle physiology, their implication in the cell and molecular processes at work during muscle regeneration is more recent. This review focuses on redox regulation during skeletal muscle regeneration. An overview of the basics of ROS/RNS and antioxidant chemistry and biology occurring in skeletal muscle is first provided. Then, the comprehensive knowledge on redox regulation of MuSCs and their surrounding cell partners (macrophages, endothelial cells) during skeletal muscle regeneration is presented in normal muscle and in specific physiological (exercise-induced muscle damage, aging) and pathological (muscular dystrophies) contexts. Recent advances in the comprehension of these processes has led to the development of therapeutic assays using antioxidant supplementation, which result in inconsistent efficiency, underlying the need for new tools that are aimed at precisely deciphering and targeting ROS networks. This review should provide an overall insight of the redox regulation of skeletal muscle regeneration while highlighting the limits of the use of nonspecific antioxidants to improve muscle function. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  1. Redox-Directed Cancer Therapeutics: Molecular Mechanisms and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Redox dysregulation originating from metabolic alterations and dependence on mitogenic and survival signaling through reactive oxygen species represents a specific vulnerability of malignant cells that can be selectively targeted by redox chemotherapeutics. This review will present an update on drug discovery, target identification, and mechanisms of action of experimental redox chemotherapeutics with a focus on pro- and antioxidant redox modulators now in advanced phases of preclinal and clinical development. Recent research indicates that numerous oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes exert their functions in part through redox mechanisms amenable to pharmacological intervention by redox chemotherapeutics. The pleiotropic action of many redox chemotherapeutics that involves simultaneous modulation of multiple redox sensitive targets can overcome cancer cell drug resistance originating from redundancy of oncogenic signaling and rapid mutation. Moreover, some redox chemotherapeutics may function according to the concept of synthetic lethality (i.e., drug cytotoxicity is confined to cancer cells that display loss of function mutations in tumor suppressor genes or upregulation of oncogene expression). The impressive number of ongoing clinical trials that examine therapeutic performance of novel redox drugs in cancer patients demonstrates that redox chemotherapy has made the crucial transition from bench to bedside. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 3013–3069. PMID:19496700

  2. The Redox Stress Hypothesis of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Sohal, Rajindar S.; Orr, William C.

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of this review is to examine the role of the endogenous reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS) in the aging process. Until relatively recently, ROS were considered to be potentially toxic by-products of aerobic metabolism, which, if not eliminated, may inflict structural damage on various macromolecules. Accrual of such damage over time was postulated to be responsible for the physiological deterioration in the post-reproductive phase of life and eventually the death of the organism. This “structural damage-based oxidative stress” hypothesis has received support from the age-associated increases in the rates of ROS production and the steady-state amounts of oxidized macromolecules; however, there are increasing indications that structural damage alone is insufficient to satisfactorily explain the age-associated functional losses. The level of oxidative damage, accrued during aging, often does not match the magnitude of functional losses. Although experimental augmentations of antioxidant defenses tend to enhance resistance to induced oxidative stress, such manipulations are generally ineffective in the extension of life span of long-lived strains of animals. More recently, in a major conceptual shift, ROS have been found to be physiologically vital for signal transduction, gene regulation and redox regulation, among others, implying that their complete elimination would be harmful. An alternative notion, advocated here, termed “redox stress hypothesis”, proposes that aging-associated functional losses are primarily caused by a progressive pro-oxidizing shift in the redox state of the cells, which leads to the over-oxidation of redox-sensitive protein thiols and the consequent disruption of the redox-regulated signaling mechanisms. PMID:22080087

  3. Redox Control of Inflammation in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Dehne, Nathalie; Grossmann, Nina; Jung, Michaela; Namgaladze, Dmitry; Schmid, Tobias; von Knethen, Andreas; Weigert, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Macrophages are present throughout the human body, constitute important immune effector cells, and have variable roles in a great number of pathological, but also physiological, settings. It is apparent that macrophages need to adjust their activation profile toward a steadily changing environment that requires altering their phenotype, a process known as macrophage polarization. Formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), derived from NADPH-oxidases, mitochondria, or NO-producing enzymes, are not necessarily toxic, but rather compose a network signaling system, known as redox regulation. Formation of redox signals in classically versus alternatively activated macrophages, their action and interaction at the level of key targets, and the resulting physiology still are insufficiently understood. We review the identity, source, and biological activities of ROS produced during macrophage activation, and discuss how they shape the key transcriptional responses evoked by hypoxia-inducible transcription factors, nuclear-erythroid 2-p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ. We summarize the mechanisms how redox signals add to the process of macrophage polarization and reprogramming, how this is controlled by the interaction of macrophages with their environment, and addresses the outcome of the polarization process in health and disease. Future studies need to tackle the option whether we can use the knowledge of redox biology in macrophages to shape their mediator profile in pathophysiology, to accelerate healing in injured tissue, to fight the invading pathogens, or to eliminate settings of altered self in tumors. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 595–637. PMID:23311665

  4. Proton coupled electron transfer and redox-active tyrosine Z in the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex.

    PubMed

    Keough, James M; Jenson, David L; Zuniga, Ashley N; Barry, Bridgette A

    2011-07-27

    Proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions play an essential role in many enzymatic processes. In PCET, redox-active tyrosines may be involved as intermediates when the oxidized phenolic side chain deprotonates. Photosystem II (PSII) is an excellent framework for studying PCET reactions, because it contains two redox-active tyrosines, YD and YZ, with different roles in catalysis. One of the redox-active tyrosines, YZ, is essential for oxygen evolution and is rapidly reduced by the manganese-catalytic site. In this report, we investigate the mechanism of YZ PCET in oxygen-evolving PSII. To isolate YZ(•) reactions, but retain the manganese-calcium cluster, low temperatures were used to block the oxidation of the metal cluster, high microwave powers were used to saturate the YD(•) EPR signal, and YZ(•) decay kinetics were measured with EPR spectroscopy. Analysis of the pH and solvent isotope dependence was performed. The rate of YZ(•) decay exhibited a significant solvent isotope effect, and the rate of recombination and the solvent isotope effect were pH independent from pH 5.0 to 7.5. These results are consistent with a rate-limiting, coupled proton electron transfer (CPET) reaction and are contrasted to results obtained for YD(•) decay kinetics at low pH. This effect may be mediated by an extensive hydrogen-bond network around YZ. These experiments imply that PCET reactions distinguish the two PSII redox-active tyrosines.

  5. Dual redox catalysts for oxygen reduction and evolution reactions: towards a redox flow Li-O2 battery.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yun Guang; Jia, Chuankun; Yang, Jing; Pan, Feng; Huang, Qizhao; Wang, Qing

    2015-06-11

    A redox flow lithium-oxygen battery (RFLOB) by using soluble redox catalysts with good performance was demonstrated for large-scale energy storage. The new device enables the reversible formation and decomposition of Li2O2 via redox targeting reactions in a gas diffusion tank, spatially separated from the electrode, which obviates the passivation and pore clogging of the cathode.

  6. Synthetic applications of eosin Y in photoredox catalysis.

    PubMed

    Hari, Durga Prasad; König, Burkhard

    2014-06-28

    Eosin Y, a long known dye molecule, has recently been widely applied as a photoredox catalyst in organic synthesis. Low cost and good availability make eosin Y an attractive alternative to typical inorganic transition metal photocatalysts. We summarize the key photophysical properties of the dye and the recent synthetic applications in photoredox catalysis.

  7. Evidence for hydrophobic catalysis of DNA strand exchange.

    PubMed

    Feng, B; Westerlund, F; Nordén, B

    2015-04-30

    The catalytic role of hydrophobic co-solutes in DNA strand exchange is demonstrated by FRET kinetics. Two mechanisms that contribute to this are base stacking destabilisation and nucleation-promoted DNA strand invasion. We propose that hydrophobic catalysis is involved in the strand-exchange activity of recombination enzymes.

  8. GREENING OF OXIDATION CATALYSIS THROUGH IMPROVED CATALYST AND PROCESS DESIGN

    EPA Science Inventory


    Greening of Oxidation Catalysis Through Improved Catalysts and Process Design
    Michael A. Gonzalez*, Thomas Becker, and Raymond Smith

    United State Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, 26 W...

  9. A Course in Heterogeneous Catalysis Involving Video-Based Seminars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Mark G.

    1984-01-01

    A video-based format was used during a graduate seminar course designed to educate students on the nature of catalysis, to help transfer information among students working on similar problems, and to improve communication skills. The mechanics of and student reaction to this seminar course are discussed. (JN)

  10. New trends in (heterogeneous) catalysis for the fine chemicals industry.

    PubMed

    Bonrath, Werner

    2014-01-01

    New catalytic methods and modern trends for the synthesis of fine chemicals, especially vitamins, carotenoids, flavoring and fragrance compounds are presented. In particular the application of heterogeneous catalysis in the formation and production on industrial scale of these classes of organic compounds will be highlighted and its use in the replacement of former stoichiometric processes.

  11. Heterogeneous Catalysis: On Bathroom Mirrors and Boiling Stones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philipse, Albert P.

    2011-01-01

    Though heterogeneous nucleation of liquid droplets on a smooth surface (such as a bathroom mirror) is a classical topic in nucleation theory, it is not well-known that this topic is actually a pedagogical example of heterogeneous catalysis: the one and only effect of the surface is to lower the activation Gibbs energy of droplet formation. In…

  12. Aurophilicity in gold(I) catalysis: for better or worse?

    PubMed

    Weber, Dieter; Gagné, Michel R

    2015-01-01

    This book chapter discusses the effects of aurophilicity on gold catalysis. First, a brief historic account of aurophilicity in organogold chemistry is given, focusing on the pioneering results which set the stage for its association with catalytic intermediates (gold vinyl and gold aryl complexes); this is followed by an introduction to cationic gold(I) as an electrophilic catalyst, and the first isolation of organogold intermediates from catalysis. In the main section, the growing number of reports observing aurophilic interactions in catalysis or illustrative model systems is reviewed in a non-comprehensive tutorial way. The effects of aurophilicity are discussed in the following structures: (1) the geminal diauration of C(sp²)-atoms; (2) geminal diauration of other atoms; (3) σ-π-diauration of terminal alkynes. It is apparent that in most cases efficient catalysis is hindered by aurophilic effects as less active aggregates tend to be formed from more active species [LAu]⁺, but there are a growing number of reports using aurophilicity as a driving force to access new reactivity and selectivity.

  13. Robustness of the rotary catalysis mechanism of F1-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Rikiya; Matsukage, Yuki; Yukawa, Ayako; Tabata, Kazuhito V; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2014-07-11

    F1-ATPase (F1) is the rotary motor protein fueled by ATP hydrolysis. Previous studies have suggested that three charged residues are indispensable for catalysis of F1 as follows: the P-loop lysine in the phosphate-binding loop, GXXXXGK(T/S); a glutamic acid that activates water molecules for nucleophilic attack on the γ-phosphate of ATP (general base); and an arginine directly contacting the γ-phosphate (arginine finger). These residues are well conserved among P-loop NTPases. In this study, we investigated the role of these charged residues in catalysis and torque generation by analyzing alanine-substituted mutants in the single-molecule rotation assay. Surprisingly, all mutants continuously drove rotary motion, even though the rotational velocity was at least 100,000 times slower than that of wild type. Thus, although these charged residues contribute to highly efficient catalysis, they are not indispensable to chemo-mechanical energy coupling, and the rotary catalysis mechanism of F1 is far more robust than previously thought.

  14. Robustness of the Rotary Catalysis Mechanism of F1-ATPase*

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Rikiya; Matsukage, Yuki; Yukawa, Ayako; Tabata, Kazuhito V.; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    F1-ATPase (F1) is the rotary motor protein fueled by ATP hydrolysis. Previous studies have suggested that three charged residues are indispensable for catalysis of F1 as follows: the P-loop lysine in the phosphate-binding loop, GXXXXGK(T/S); a glutamic acid that activates water molecules for nucleophilic attack on the γ-phosphate of ATP (general base); and an arginine directly contacting the γ-phosphate (arginine finger). These residues are well conserved among P-loop NTPases. In this study, we investigated the role of these charged residues in catalysis and torque generation by analyzing alanine-substituted mutants in the single-molecule rotation assay. Surprisingly, all mutants continuously drove rotary motion, even though the rotational velocity was at least 100,000 times slower than that of wild type. Thus, although these charged residues contribute to highly efficient catalysis, they are not indispensable to chemo-mechanical energy coupling, and the rotary catalysis mechanism of F1 is far more robust than previously thought. PMID:24876384

  15. Surface Chemistry in Heterogeneous Catalysis: An Emerging Discipline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, J. M.; Campbell, Charles T.

    1980-01-01

    Provides background data on surface chemistry as an emerging discipline. Highlights the important role which surfaces play in catalysis by focusing on the catalyzed oxidation of carbon monoxide. Provides a demonstration of how surfaces exert their influences in heterogeneous phenomena and illustrates how experimental problems in this field are…

  16. Single-molecule force spectroscopy approach to enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Alegre-Cebollada, Jorge; Perez-Jimenez, Raul; Kosuri, Pallav; Fernandez, Julio M

    2010-06-18

    Enzyme catalysis has been traditionally studied using a diverse set of techniques such as bulk biochemistry, x-ray crystallography, and NMR. Recently, single-molecule force spectroscopy by atomic force microscopy has been used as a new tool to study the catalytic properties of an enzyme. In this approach, a mechanical force ranging up to hundreds of piconewtons is applied to the substrate of an enzymatic reaction, altering the conformational energy of the substrate-enzyme interactions during catalysis. From these measurements, the force dependence of an enzymatic reaction can be determined. The force dependence provides valuable new information about the dynamics of enzyme catalysis with sub-angstrom resolution, a feat unmatched by any other current technique. To date, single-molecule force spectroscopy has been applied to gain insight into the reduction of disulfide bonds by different enzymes of the thioredoxin family. This minireview aims to present a perspective on this new approach to study enzyme catalysis and to summarize the results that have already been obtained from it. Finally, the specific requirements that must be fulfilled to apply this new methodology to any other enzyme will be discussed.

  17. Enzyme dynamics during catalysis measured by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kern, Dorothee; Eisenmesser, Elan Z; Wolf-Watz, Magnus

    2005-01-01

    Many biological processes, in particular enzyme catalysis, occur in the microsecond to millisecond time regime. While the chemical events and static structural features of enzyme catalysis have been extensively studied, very little is known about dynamic processes of the enzyme during the catalytic cycle. Dynamic NMR methods such as ZZ-exchange, line-shape analysis, Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG), and rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation (R(1rho)) experiments are powerful in detecting conformational rearrangements with interconversion rates between 0.1 and 10(5) s(-1). In this chapter, the first application of these methods to enzymes during catalysis is described, in addition to studies on several other enzymes in their free states and in complex with ligands. From the experimental results of all systems, a picture arises in which flexibility in the microsecond to millisecond time regime is intrinsic and likely to be an essential property of the enzyme. Quantitative analysis of dynamics at multiple sites of the enzyme reveal large-scale collective motions. For several enzymes, the frequency of motion is comparable to the overall turnover rate, raising the possibility that conformational rearrangements may be rate limiting for catalysis in these enzymes.

  18. Multiphoton catalysis with coherent state input: nonclassicality and decoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Li-Yun; Wu, Jia-Ni; Liao, Zeyang; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2016-09-01

    We propose a scheme to generate a new kind of non-Gaussian state—the Laguerre polynomial excited coherent state (LPECS)—by using multiphoton catalysis with coherent state input. The nonclassical properties of the LPECS are studied in terms of nonclassical depth, Mandel’s parameter, second-order correlation, quadrature squeezing, and the negativity of the Wigner function (WF). It is found that the LPECS is highly nonclassical and its nonclassicality depends on the amplitude of the coherent state, the catalysis photon number, and the parameters of the unbalanced beam splitter (BS). In particular, the maximum degree of squeezing can be enhanced by increasing the catalysis photon number. In addition, we examine the effect of decoherence using the WF, which shows that the negative region, the characteristic time of decoherence, and the structure of the WF are affected by catalysis photon number and the parameters of the unbalanced BS. Our work provides general analysis on how to prepare polynomial quantum states, which may be useful in the fields of quantum information and quantum computation.

  19. Structural Basis for Redox Regulation of Cytoplasmic and Chloroplastic Triosephosphate Isomerases from Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    López-Castillo, Laura M.; Jiménez-Sandoval, Pedro; Baruch-Torres, Noe; Trasviña-Arenas, Carlos H.; Díaz-Quezada, Corina; Lara-González, Samuel; Winkler, Robert; Brieba, Luis G.

    2016-01-01

    In plants triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) interconverts glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (G3P) and dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) during glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and the Calvin-Benson cycle. The nuclear genome of land plants encodes two tpi genes, one gene product is located in the cytoplasm and the other is imported into the chloroplast. Herein we report the crystal structures of the TPIs from the vascular plant Arabidopsis thaliana (AtTPIs) and address their enzymatic modulation by redox agents. Cytoplasmic TPI (cTPI) and chloroplast TPI (pdTPI) share more than 60% amino acid identity and assemble as (β-α)8 dimers with high structural homology. cTPI and pdTPI harbor two and one accessible thiol groups per monomer respectively. cTPI and pdTPI present a cysteine at an equivalent structural position (C13 and C15 respectively) and cTPI also contains a specific solvent accessible cysteine at residue 218 (cTPI-C218). Site directed mutagenesis of residues pdTPI-C15, cTPI-C13, and cTPI-C218 to serine substantially decreases enzymatic activity, indicating that the structural integrity of these cysteines is necessary for catalysis. AtTPIs exhibit differential responses to oxidative agents, cTPI is susceptible to oxidative agents such as diamide and H2O2, whereas pdTPI is resistant to inhibition. Incubation of AtTPIs with the sulfhydryl conjugating reagents methylmethane thiosulfonate (MMTS) and glutathione inhibits enzymatic activity. However, the concentration necessary to inhibit pdTPI is at least two orders of magnitude higher than the concentration needed to inhibit cTPI. Western-blot analysis indicates that residues cTPI-C13, cTPI-C218, and pdTPI-C15 conjugate with glutathione. In summary, our data indicate that AtTPIs could be redox regulated by the derivatization of specific AtTPI cysteines (cTPI-C13 and pdTPI-C15 and cTPI-C218). Since AtTPIs have evolved by gene duplication, the higher resistance of pdTPI to redox agents may be an adaptive consequence to the

  20. The Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Iron Redox Metabolism in Hot Spring Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St Clair, B. E.; Shock, E.

    2012-12-01

    The oxidation of ferrous iron and the reduction of ferric minerals are widespread sources of metabolic energy for microorganisms in hot spring ecosystems. How these energy sources are used can be determined by combining thermodynamic calculations with kinetic experiments. By measuring concentrations of ferrous iron, total iron, pH, dissolved hydrogen and oxygen, as well as temperature and many other parameters in hot springs at Yellowstone National Park, we can calculate chemical affinities of iron redox reactions, which reveal the maximum amount of energy an organism can derive from the catalysis of a given reaction. Iron redox reactions typically involve protons, and energy yields are greatly affected by pH. The heterotrophic reduction of ferric minerals typically consumes a large stoichiometric number of protons compared to the other components. For example, the reduction of hematite (Fe2O3), to ferrous ions with glucose requires 48 moles of protons per mole of glucose oxidized. Calculations indicate this proton requirement increases the energy yield with decreasing pH. The opposite trend is observed for iron oxidation reactions. The autotrophic oxidation of ferrous iron to hematite releases four protons per mole of hematite formed. As a consequence, the energy yield from this reaction decreases with decreasing pH. How effectively energy sources are tapped depends on the efficiencies of microbial metabolism compared with the rates of abiotic mechanisms for the same redox reactions. Experiments were performed across the pH spectrum on isolated sediments incubated in situ and assayed for biological oxidation and reduction by monitoring changing concentrations of Fe2+. In hot springs with pH values <2, particularly those with large gas flows, abiological reduction is rapid. Biological reduction, nevertheless, occasionally proceeded faster than the abiological rate. The quick abiological reduction rate, combined with the high solubility of ferrous iron, leads to

  1. Probing the redox chemistry of titanium silicalite-1: formation of tetrahedral Ti3+ centers by reaction with triethylaluminum.

    PubMed

    Morra, Elena; Giamello, Elio; Chiesa, Mario

    2014-06-10

    Transition-metal ions with open-shell configurations hold promise in the development of novel coordination chemistry and potentially unprecedented redox catalysis. Framework-substituted Ti(3+) ions with tetrahedral coordination are generated by reductive activation of titanium silicalite-1 with triethylaluminum, an indispensable co-catalyst for heterogeneous Ziegler-Natta polymerization catalysts. Continuous-wave and pulse electron paramagnetic resonance methods are applied to unravel details on the local environment of the reduced transition metal-ions, which are shown to be part of the silica framework by detection of (29)Si hyperfine interactions. The chemical accessibility of the reduced sites is probed using ammonia as probe molecule. Evidence is found for the coordination of a single ammonia molecule. Comparison to similar systems, such as TiAlPO-5, reveals clear differences in the coordination chemistry of the reduced Ti sites in the two solids, which may be understood considering the different electronic properties of the solid frameworks.

  2. Mechanistic Details and Reactivity Descriptors in Oxidation and Acid Catalysis of Methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Deshlahra, Prashant; Carr, Robert T.; Chai, Song-Hai; Iglesia, Enrique

    2015-02-06

    Acid and redox reaction rates of CH₃OH-O₂ mixtures on polyoxometalate (POM) clusters, together with isotopic, spectroscopic, and theoretical assessments of catalyst properties and reaction pathways, were used to define rigorous descriptors of reactivity and to probe the compositional effects for oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) and dehydration reactions. ³¹P-MAS NMR, transmission electron microscopy and titrations of protons with di-tert-butylpyridine during catalysis showed that POM clusters retained their Keggin structure upon dispersion on SiO₂ and after use in CH₃OH reactions. The effects of CH₃OH and O₂ pressures and of D-substitution on ODH rates show that C-H activation in molecularly adsorbed CH₃OH is the sole kinetically relevant step and leads to reduced centers as intermediates present at low coverages; their concentrations, measured from UV-vis spectra obtained during catalysis, are consistent with the effects of CH₃OH/O₂ ratios predicted from the elementary steps proposed. First-order ODH rate constants depend strongly on the addenda atoms (Mo vs W) but weakly on the central atom (P vs Si) in POM clusters, because C-H activation steps inject electrons into the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (LUMO) of the clusters, which are the d-orbitals at Mo⁶⁺ and W⁶⁺ centers. H-atom addition energies (HAE) at O-atoms in POM clusters represent the relevant theoretical probe of the LUMO energies and of ODH reactivity. The calculated energies of ODH transition states at each O-atom depend linearly on their HAE values with slopes near unity, as predicted for late transition states in which electron transfer and C-H cleavage are essentially complete. HAE values averaged over all accessible O-atoms in POM clusters provide the appropriate reactivity descriptor for oxides whose known structures allow accurate HAE calculations. CH₃OH dehydration proceeds via parallel pathways mediated by late carbenium-ion transition states; effects of

  3. A General Approach to Catalytic Alkene Anti-Markovnikov Hydrofunctionalization Reactions via Acridinium Photoredox Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Margrey, Kaila A; Nicewicz, David A

    2016-09-20

    The development of methods for anti-Markovnikov alkene hydrofunctionalization has been a focal point of catalysis research for several decades. The vast majority of work on the control of regioselectivity for this reaction class has hinged on transition metal catalyst activation of olefin substrates. While progress has been realized, there are significant limitations to this approach, and a general solution for catalysis of anti-Markovnikov hydrofunctionalization reactions of olefins does not presently exist. In the past several years, this research lab has focused on alkene activation by single electron oxidation using organic photoredox catalysts to facilitate anti-Markovnikov hydrofunctionalization. By accessing reactive cation radical intermediates, we have realized a truly general approach to anti-Markovnikov olefin hydrofunctionalization reactions. We have identified a dual organic catalyst system consisting of an acridinium photooxidant, first reported by Fukuzumi, and a redox-active hydrogen atom donor that accomplishes a wide range of hydrofunctionalization reactions with complete anti-Markovnikov regiocontrol. This method relies on single electron oxidation of the alkene to reverse its polarity and results in the opposite regioselectivity for hydrofunctionalization. In 2012, we disclosed the anti-Markovnikov hydroetherification of alkenols employing an acridinium photocatalyst and a hydrogen atom donor that proceeds via interwoven polar and radical steps. This general catalyst system has enabled several important reactions in this area, including anti-Markovnikov alkene hydroacetoxylation, hydrolactonization, hydroamination, and hydrotrifluoromethylation reactions. More recently, we have also delineated conditions for intermolecular anti-Markovnikov hydroamination reactions of alkenes using either triflamide or nitrogen-containing heteroaromatic compounds such as pyrazole, indazole, imidazole, and 1,2,3-triazole. Further development led to a method for

  4. Redox Bulk Energy Storage System Study, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciprios, G.; Erskine, W., Jr.; Grimes, P. G.

    1977-01-01

    Opportunities were found for electrochemical energy storage devices in the U.S. electric utility industry. Application requirements for these devices were defined, including techno-economic factors. A new device, the Redox storage battery was analyzed. The Redox battery features a decoupling of energy storage and power conversion functions. General computer methods were developed to simulate Redox system operations. These studies showed that the Redox system is potentially attractive if certain performance goals can be achieved. Pathways for reducing the cost of the Redox system were identified.

  5. Excess mutual catalysis is required for effective evolvability.

    PubMed

    Markovitch, Omer; Lancet, Doron

    2012-01-01

    It is widely accepted that autocatalysis constitutes a crucial facet of effective replication and evolution (e.g., in Eigen's hypercycle model). Other models for early evolution (e.g., by Dyson, Gánti, Varela, and Kauffman) invoke catalytic networks, where cross-catalysis is more apparent. A key question is how the balance between auto- (self-) and cross- (mutual) catalysis shapes the behavior of model evolving systems. This is investigated using the graded autocatalysis replication domain (GARD) model, previously shown to capture essential features of reproduction, mutation, and evolution in compositional molecular assemblies. We have performed numerical simulations of an ensemble of GARD networks, each with a different set of lognormally distributed catalytic values. We asked what is the influence of the catalytic content of such networks on beneficial evolution. Importantly, a clear trend was observed, wherein only networks with high mutual catalysis propensity (p(mc)) allowed for an augmented diversity of composomes, quasi-stationary compositions that exhibit high replication fidelity. We have reexamined a recent analysis that showed meager selection in a single GARD instance and for a few nonstationary target compositions. In contrast, when we focused here on compotypes (clusters of composomes) as targets for selection in populations of compositional assemblies, appreciable selection response was observed for a large portion of the networks simulated. Further, stronger selection response was seen for high p(mc) values. Our simulations thus demonstrate that GARD can help analyze important facets of evolving systems, and indicate that excess mutual catalysis over self-catalysis is likely to be important for the emergence of molecular systems capable of evolutionlike behavior.

  6. Redox reactions of apo mammalian ferritin.

    PubMed

    Watt, R K; Frankel, R B; Watt, G D

    1992-10-13

    Apo horse spleen ferritin undergoes a 6.3 +/- 0.5 electron redox reaction at -310 mV at pH 6.0-8.5 and 25 degrees C to form reduced apoferritin (apoMFred). Reconstituted ferritin containing up to 50 ferric ions undergoes reduction at the same potential, taking up one electron per ferric ion and six additional electrons by the protein. We propose that apo mammalian ferritin (apoMF) contains six redox centers that can be fully oxidized forming oxidized apoferritin (apoMFox) or fully reduced forming apoMFred. ApoMFred can be prepared conveniently by dithionite or methyl viologen reduction. ApoMFred is slowly oxidized by molecular oxygen but more rapidly by Fe(CN)6(3-) to apoMFox. Fe(III)-cytochrome c readily oxidizes apoMFred to apoMFox with a stoichiometry of 6 Fe(III)-cytochrome c per apoMFred, demonstrating a rapid interprotein electron-transfer reaction. Both redox states of apoMF react with added Fe3+ and Fe2+. Addition of eight Fe2+ to apoMFox under anaerobic conditions produced apoMFred and Fe3+, as evidenced by the presence of a strong g = 4.3 EPR signal. Subsequent addition of bipyridyl produced at least six Fe(bipyd)3(2+) per MF, establishing the reversibility of this internal electron-transfer process between the redox centers of apoMF and bound iron. Incubation of apoMFred with the Fe(3+)-ATP complex under anaerobic conditions resulted in the formation and binding of two Fe2+ and four Fe3+ by the protein. The various redox states formed by the binding of Fe2+ and Fe3+ to apoMFox and apoMFred are proposed and discussed. The yellow color of apoMF appears to be an integral characteristic of the apoMF and is possibly associated with its redox activity.

  7. Expression of Xhdsi-1VOC, a novel member of the vicinal oxygen chelate (VOC) metalloenzyme superfamily, is up-regulated in leaves and roots during desiccation in the resurrection plant Xerophyta humilis (Bak) Dur and Schinz.

    PubMed

    Mulako, I; Farrant, J M; Collett, H; Illing, N

    2008-01-01

    The annotation of novel plant genes is frequently based on sequence and structural similarity to known protein motifs. Understanding the biological function of these genes is dependent on identifying conditions under which they are activated, however. The resurrection plant, Xerophyta humilis is a good model system for identifying and characterizing genes which are important for desiccation tolerance. Desiccation induced-1 (dsi-1(VOC)), a previously uncharacterized plant gene, is up-regulated during desiccation in leaves, roots, and seeds in X. humilis. The X. humilis desiccation induced-1 gene, Xhdsi-1(VOC), shares structural homology with the vicinal oxygen chelate (VOC) metalloenzyme superfamily. Proteins in this superfamily share little sequence similarity, but are characterized by a common betaalphabetabetabeta structural fold. A number of plant orthologues of XhDsi-1(VOC) have been identified, including Arabidopsis thaliana At1g07645, which is currently annotated as a glyoxalase I-like gene, and many ESTs derived from seed cDNA libraries. Xhdsi-1(VOC) and its orthologues do not, however, contain the glutathione and zinc binding sites conserved in glyoxalase I genes. Furthermore, expression of Xhdsi-1(VOC) in yeast failed to rescue a yeast glyoxalase I mutant. Messenger RNA transcripts for At1g07645 accumulate during seed maturation, but are not induced by water loss, salt or mannitol stress in vegetative tissue in Arabidopsis. It is concluded that dsi-1(VOC) is a seed-specific gene in desiccation-sensitive plants that is activated by water loss in vegetative tissues in the resurrection plant X. humilis and plays an important role in allowing plant tissues to survive loss of 95% of their relative water content.

  8. Redox proteomics in the mussel, Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, B; Tyther, R; Sheehan, D

    2006-07-01

    Pollutants (e.g. PAHs, metals) cause oxidative stress (OS) by forming reactive oxygen species. Redox proteomics provides a means for identifying protein-specific OS effects in Mytilus edulis. Groups of mussels were sampled from a clean site in Cork Harbour, Ireland and exposed to 1 mM H2O2 in holding tanks. Protein extracts of gill and digestive gland were separated by two dimensional electrophoresis and similar protein expression profiles were found. Effects of OS on disulphide bridge patterns were investigated in diagonal gels by separating proteins in non-reducing conditions followed by a second reducing dimension. Immunoprecipitation selected carbonylated and glutathionylated proteins. These methodologies can contribute to redox proteomic studies of pollutant responses in marine organisms.

  9. Cost projections for Redox Energy storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michaels, K.; Hall, G.

    1980-01-01

    A preliminary design and system cost analysis was performed for the redox energy storage system. A conceptual design and cost estimate was prepared for each of two energy applications: (1) electric utility 100-MWh requirement (10-MW for ten hours) for energy storage for utility load leveling application, and (2) a 500-kWh requirement (10-kW for 50 hours) for use with a variety of residential or commercial applications, including stand alone solar photovoltaic systems. The conceptual designs were based on cell performance levels, system design parameters, and special material costs. These data were combined with estimated thermodynamic and hydraulic analysis to provide preliminary system designs. Results indicate that the redox cell stack to be amenable to mass production techniques with a relatively low material cost.

  10. Cooperative redox activation for carbon dioxide conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Zhong; Nielsen, Dennis U.; Lindhardt, Anders T.; Daasbjerg, Kim; Skrydstrup, Troels

    2016-12-01

    A longstanding challenge in production chemistry is the development of catalytic methods for the transformation of carbon dioxide into useful chemicals. Silane and borane promoted reductions can be fined-tuned to provide a number of C1-building blocks under mild conditions, but these approaches are limited because of the production of stoichiometric waste compounds. Here we report on the conversion of CO2 with diaryldisilanes, which through cooperative redox activation generate carbon monoxide and a diaryldisiloxane that actively participate in a palladium-catalysed carbonylative Hiyama-Denmark coupling for the synthesis of an array of pharmaceutically relevant diarylketones. Thus the disilane reagent not only serves as the oxygen abstracting agent from CO2, but the silicon-containing `waste', produced through oxygen insertion into the Si-Si bond, participates as a reagent for the transmetalation step in the carbonylative coupling. Hence this concept of cooperative redox activation opens up for new avenues in the conversion of CO2.

  11. Neptunium redox speciation at the illite surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsac, Rémi; Banik, Nidhu lal; Lützenkirchen, Johannes; Marquardt, Christian Michael; Dardenne, Kathy; Schild, Dieter; Rothe, Joerg; Diascorn, Alexandre; Kupcik, Tomas; Schäfer, Thorsten; Geckeis, Horst

    2015-03-01

    Neptunium (Np(V)) sorption onto a purified illite is investigated as a function of pH (3-10) and [NpVO2+]tot(3 × 10-8-3 × 10-4 M) in 0.1 M NaCl under Ar atmosphere. After about one week reaction time, only insignificant variation of Np sorption is observed and the establishment of reaction equilibrium can be assumed. Surprisingly, solid-liquid distribution ratios (Rd) are clearly higher than those measured for Np(V) sorption onto illite under aerobic conditions. The observation that Rd increases with decreasing pe (pe = -log ae-) suggests partial reduction to Np(IV), although measured redox potentials (pe values) at a first glance suggest the predominance of Np(V). Reduction to Np(IV) at the illite surface could indeed be confirmed by X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES). Np speciation in presence of the purified Na-illite under given conditions is consistently described by applying the 2 sites protolysis non-electrostatic surface complexation and cation exchange model. Measured pe data are taken to calculate Np redox state and surface complexation constants for Np(IV) are derived by applying a data fitting procedure. Constants are very consistent with results obtained by applying an existing linear free energy relationship (LFER). Taking Np(IV) surface complexation constants into account shifts the calculated Np(V)/Np(IV) redox borderline in presence of illite surfaces by 3-5 pe units (0.2-0.3 V) towards redox neutral conditions. Our study suggests that Np(V) reduction in presence of a sorbing mineral phase is thermodynamically favored.

  12. Asymmetric Redox-Annulation of Cyclic Amines

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic amines such as 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline undergo regiodivergent annulation reactions with 4-nitrobutyraldehydes. These redox-neutral transformations enable the asymmetric synthesis of highly substituted polycyclic ring systems in just two steps from commercial materials. The utility of this process is illustrated in a rapid synthesis of (−)-protoemetinol. Computational studies provide mechanistic insights and implicate the elimination of acetic acid from an ammonium nitronate intermediate as the rate-determining step. PMID:26348653

  13. Proteostasis and REDOX state in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Christians, Elisabeth S.

    2012-01-01

    Force-generating contractile cells of the myocardium must achieve and maintain their primary function as an efficient mechanical pump over the life span of the organism. Because only half of the cardiomyocytes can be replaced during the entire human life span, the maintenance strategy elicited by cardiac cells relies on uninterrupted renewal of their components, including proteins whose specialized functions constitute this complex and sophisticated contractile apparatus. Thus cardiac proteins are continuously synthesized and degraded to ensure proteome homeostasis, also termed “proteostasis.” Once synthesized, proteins undergo additional folding, posttranslational modifications, and trafficking and/or become involved in protein-protein or protein-DNA interactions to exert their functions. This includes key transient interactions of cardiac proteins with molecular chaperones, which assist with quality control at multiple levels to prevent misfolding or to facilitate degradation. Importantly, cardiac proteome maintenance depends on the cellular environment and, in particular, the reduction-oxidation (REDOX) state, which is significantly different among cardiac organelles (e.g., mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum). Taking into account the high metabolic activity for oxygen consumption and ATP production by mitochondria, it is a challenge for cardiac cells to maintain the REDOX state while preventing either excessive oxidative or reductive stress. A perturbed REDOX environment can affect protein handling and conformation (e.g., disulfide bonds), disrupt key structure-function relationships, and trigger a pathogenic cascade of protein aggregation, decreased cell survival, and increased organ dysfunction. This review covers current knowledge regarding the general domain of REDOX state and protein folding, specifically in cardiomyocytes under normal-healthy conditions and during disease states associated with morbidity and mortality in humans. PMID:22003057

  14. Redox Regulation in Plant Immune Function

    PubMed Central

    Frederickson Matika, Debra E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) occurs rapidly in response to attempted pathogen invasion of potential host plants. Such reduction–oxidation (redox) changes are sensed and transmitted to engage immune function, including the hypersensitive response, a programmed execution of challenged plant cells. Recent Advances: Pathogen elicitors trigger changes in calcium that are sensed by calmodulin, calmodulin-like proteins, and calcium-dependent protein kinases, which activate ROS and RNS production. The ROS and RNS production is compartmentalized within the cell and occurs through multiple routes. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are engaged upstream and downstream of ROS and nitric oxide (NO) production. NO is increasingly recognized as a key signaling molecule, regulating downstream protein function through S-nitrosylation, the addition of an NO moiety to a reactive cysteine thiol. Critical Issues: How multiple sources of ROS and RNS are coordinated is unclear. The putative protein sensors that detect and translate fluxes in ROS and RNS into differential gene expression are obscure. Protein tyrosine nitration following reaction of peroxynitrite with tyrosine residues has been proposed as another signaling mechanism or as a marker leading to protein degradation, but the reversibility remains to be established. Future Directions: Research is needed to identify the full spectrum of NO-modified proteins with special emphasis on redox-activated transcription factors and their cognate target genes. A systems approach will be required to uncover the complexities integral to redox regulation of MAPK cascades, transcription factors, and defense genes through the combined effects of calcium, phosphorylation, S-nitrosylation, and protein tyrosine nitration. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1373–1388. PMID:24206122

  15. Proterozoic ocean redox and biogeochemical stasis

    PubMed Central

    Reinhard, Christopher T.; Planavsky, Noah J.; Robbins, Leslie J.; Partin, Camille A.; Gill, Benjamin C.; Lalonde, Stefan V.; Bekker, Andrey; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2013-01-01

    The partial pressure of oxygen in Earth’s atmosphere has increased dramatically through time, and this increase is thought to have occurred in two rapid steps at both ends of the Proterozoic Eon (∼2.5–0.543 Ga). However, the trajectory and mechanisms of Earth’s oxygenation are still poorly constrained, and little is known regarding attendant changes in ocean ventilation and seafloor redox. We have a particularly poor understanding of ocean chemistry during the mid-Proterozoic (∼1.8–0.8 Ga). Given the coupling between redox-sensitive trace element cycles and planktonic productivity, various models for mid-Proterozoic ocean chemistry imply different effects on the biogeochemical cycling of major and trace nutrients, with potential ecological constraints on emerging eukaryotic life. Here, we exploit the differing redox behavior of molybdenum and chromium to provide constraints on seafloor redox evolution by coupling a large database of sedimentary metal enrichments to a mass balance model that includes spatially variant metal burial rates. We find that the metal enrichment record implies a Proterozoic deep ocean characterized by pervasive anoxia relative to the Phanerozoic (at least ∼30–40% of modern seafloor area) but a relatively small extent of euxinic (anoxic and sulfidic) seafloor (less than ∼1–10% of modern seafloor area). Our model suggests that the oceanic Mo reservoir is extremely sensitive to perturbations in the extent of sulfidic seafloor and that the record of Mo and chromium enrichments through time is consistent with the possibility of a Mo–N colimited marine biosphere during many periods of Earth’s history. PMID:23515332

  16. Redox reaction rates using potentiostatic coulometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ramette, R.W.; Harris, R.Z.; Bengali, A.A.; Noll, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    A new method based on potentiostatic coulometry was used to study the kinetics of the aqueous redox reactions between the ions chlorate/iodide, bromate/iodide, and bromate/bromide. The halogen product was continuously and rapidly reduced back to halide at a large platinum gauze cathode, the current being a direct measure of reaction rate and the accumulated charge serving to measure the extent of reaction. The reactions were studied at several temperatures, and activation entropies and enthalpies were calculated.

  17. Redox equilibria of iron oxides in aqueous-based magnetite dispersions: effect of pH and redox potential.

    PubMed

    Pang, Suh Cem; Chin, Suk Fun; Anderson, Marc A

    2007-07-01

    The effect of pH and redox potential on the redox equilibria of iron oxides in aqueous-based magnetite dispersions was investigated. The ionic activities of each dissolved iron species in equilibrium with magnetite nanoparticles were determined and contoured within the Eh-pH framework of a composite stability diagram. Both standard redox potentials and equilibrium constants for all major iron oxide redox equilibria in magnetite dispersions were found to differ from values reported for noncolloidal systems. The "triple point" position of redox equilibrium among Fe(II) ions, magnetite, and hematite shifted to a higher standard redox potential and an equilibrium constant which was several orders of magnitude higher. The predominant area of magnetite stability was enlarged to cover a wider range of both pH and redox potentials as compared to that of a noncolloidal magnetite system.

  18. Fundamental Understanding of the Interaction of Acid Gases with CeO2 : From Surface Science to Practical Catalysis

    DOE PAGES

    Tumuluri, Uma; Rother, Gernot; Wu, Zili

    2016-03-21

    Acid gases including CO2, SO2, and NOx are ubiquitous in large-scale energy applications including heterogeneous catalysis. The adverse environmental and health effects of these acid gases have resulted in high interest in the research and development of technologies to remove or convert these acid gases. The main challenge for the development of these technologies is to develop catalysts that are highly efficient, stable, and cost-effective, and many catalysts have been reported in this regard. CeO2 and CeO2-based catalysts have gained prominence in the removal and conversion of CO2, SO2, and NOx because of their structural robustness and redox and acid–basemore » properties. In this article, we provide a brief overview of the application of CeO2 and CeO2-based catalysts for the removal of CO2, SO2, and NOx gases with an emphasis on the fundamental understanding of the interactions of these acid gases with CeO2. The studies summarized in this review range from surface science using single crystals and thin films with precise crystallographic planes to practical catalysis applications of nanocrystalline and polycrystalline CeO2 materials with defects and dopants. After an introduction to the properties of CeO2 surfaces, their catalytic properties for conversions of different acid gases are reviewed and discussed. Lastly, we find that the surface atomic structure, oxygen vacancies, and surface acid–base properties of CeO2 play vital roles in the surface chemistry and structure evolution during the interactions of acid gases with CeO2 and CeO2-based catalysts.« less

  19. Redox control of plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Kocsy, Gábor; Tari, Irma; Vanková, Radomíra; Zechmann, Bernd; Gulyás, Zsolt; Poór, Péter; Galiba, Gábor

    2013-10-01

    Redox changes determined by genetic and environmental factors display well-organized interactions in the control of plant growth and development. Diurnal and seasonal changes in the environmental conditions are important for the normal course of these physiological processes and, similarly to their mild irregular alterations, for stress adaptation. However, fast or large-scale environmental changes may lead to damage or death of sensitive plants. The spatial and temporal redox changes influence growth and development due to the reprogramming of metabolism. In this process reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and antioxidants are involved as components of signalling networks. The control of growth, development and flowering by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and antioxidants in interaction with hormones at organ, tissue, cellular and subcellular level will be discussed in the present review. Unsolved problems of the field, among others the need for identification of new components and interactions in the redox regulatory network at various organization levels using systems biology approaches will be also indicated.

  20. Redox alters yellow dragonflies into red.

    PubMed

    Futahashi, Ryo; Kurita, Ryoji; Mano, Hiroaki; Fukatsu, Takema

    2012-07-31

    Body color change associated with sexual maturation--so-called nuptial coloration--is commonly found in diverse vertebrates and invertebrates, and plays important roles for their reproductive success. In some dragonflies, whereas females and young males are yellowish in color, aged males turn vivid red upon sexual maturation. The male-specific coloration plays pivotal roles in, for example, mating and territoriality, but molecular basis of the sex-related transition in body coloration of the dragonflies has been poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that yellow/red color changes in the dragonflies are regulated by redox states of epidermal ommochrome pigments. Ratios of reduced-form pigments to oxidized-form pigments were significantly higher in red mature males than yellow females and immature males. The ommochrome pigments extracted from the dragonflies changed color according to redox conditions in vitro: from red to yellow in the presence of oxidant and from yellow to red in the presence of reductant. By injecting the reductant solution into live insects, the yellow-to-red color change was experimentally reproduced in vivo in immature males and mature females. Discontinuous yellow/red mosaicism was observed in body coloration of gynandromorphic dragonflies, suggesting a cell-autonomous regulation over the redox states of the ommochrome pigments. Our finding extends the mechanical repertoire of pigment-based body color change in animals, and highlights an impressively simple molecular mechanism that regulates an ecologically important color trait.

  1. Redox alters yellow dragonflies into red

    PubMed Central

    Futahashi, Ryo; Kurita, Ryoji; Mano, Hiroaki; Fukatsu, Takema

    2012-01-01

    Body color change associated with sexual maturation—so-called nuptial coloration—is commonly found in diverse vertebrates and invertebrates, and plays important roles for their reproductive success. In some dragonflies, whereas females and young males are yellowish in color, aged males turn vivid red upon sexual maturation. The male-specific coloration plays pivotal roles in, for example, mating and territoriality, but molecular basis of the sex-related transition in body coloration of the dragonflies has been poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that yellow/red color changes in the dragonflies are regulated by redox states of epidermal ommochrome pigments. Ratios of reduced-form pigments to oxidized-form pigments were significantly higher in red mature males than yellow females and immature males. The ommochrome pigments extracted from the dragonflies changed color according to redox conditions in vitro: from red to yellow in the presence of oxidant and from yellow to red in the presence of reductant. By injecting the reductant solution into live insects, the yellow-to-red color change was experimentally reproduced in vivo in immature males and mature females. Discontinuous yellow/red mosaicism was observed in body coloration of gynandromorphic dragonflies, suggesting a cell-autonomous regulation over the redox states of the ommochrome pigments. Our finding extends the mechanical repertoire of pigment-based body color change in animals, and highlights an impressively simple molecular mechanism that regulates an ecologically important color trait. PMID:22778425

  2. Measurement of Redox Potential in Nanoecotoxicological Investigations

    PubMed Central

    Tantra, Ratna; Cackett, Alex; Peck, Roger; Gohil, Dipak; Snowden, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    Redox potential has been identified by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) as one of the parameters that should be investigated for the testing of manufactured nanomaterials. There is still some ambiguity concerning this parameter, i.e., as to what and how to measure, particularly when in a nanoecotoxicological context. In this study the redox potentials of six nanomaterials (either zinc oxide (ZnO) or cerium oxide (CeO2)) dispersions were measured using an oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) electrode probe. The particles under testing differed in terms of their particle size and dispersion stability in deionised water and in various ecotox media. The ORP values of the various dispersions and how they fluctuate relative to each other are discussed. Results show that the ORP values are mainly governed by the type of liquid media employed, with little contributions from the nanoparticles. Seawater was shown to have reduced the ORP value, which was attributed to an increase in the concentration of reducing agents such as sulphites or the reduction of dissolved oxygen concentration. The lack of redox potential value contribution from the particles themselves is thought to be due to insufficient interaction of the particles at the Pt electrode of the ORP probe. PMID:22131988

  3. Membrane development for vanadium redox flow batteries.

    PubMed

    Schwenzer, Birgit; Zhang, Jianlu; Kim, Soowhan; Li, Liyu; Liu, Jun; Yang, Zhenguo

    2011-10-17

    Large-scale energy storage has become the main bottleneck for increasing the percentage of renewable energy in our electricity grids. Redox flow batteries are considered to be among the best options for electricity storage in the megawatt range and large demonstration systems have already been installed. Although the full technological potential of these systems has not been reached yet, currently the main problem hindering more widespread commercialization is the high cost of redox flow batteries. Nafion, as the preferred membrane material, is responsible for about 11% of the overall cost of a 1 MW/8 MWh system. Therefore, in recent years two main membrane related research threads have emerged: 1) chemical and physical modification of Nafion membranes to optimize their properties with regard to vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) application; and 2) replacement of the Nafion membranes with different, less expensive materials. This review summarizes the underlying basic scientific issues associated with membrane use in VRFBs and presents an overview of membrane-related research approaches aimed at improving the efficiency of VRFBs and making the technology cost-competitive. Promising research strategies and materials are identified and suggestions are provided on how materials issues could be overcome.

  4. Reactive oxygen species and redox compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Kaludercic, Nina; Deshwal, Soni; Di Lisa, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and signaling are of major importance and regulate a number of processes in physiological conditions. A disruption in redox status regulation, however, has been associated with numerous pathological conditions. In recent years it has become increasingly clear that oxidative and reductive modifications are confined in a spatio-temporal manner. This makes ROS signaling similar to that of Ca(2+) or other second messengers. Some subcellular compartments are more oxidizing (such as lysosomes or peroxisomes) whereas others are more reducing (mitochondria, nuclei). Moreover, although more reducing, mitochondria are especially susceptible to oxidation, most likely due to the high number of exposed thiols present in that compartment. Recent advances in the development of redox probes allow specific measurement of defined ROS in different cellular compartments in intact living cells or organisms. The availability of these tools now allows simultaneous spatio-temporal measurements and correlation between ROS generation and organelle and/or cellular function. The study of ROS compartmentalization and microdomains will help elucidate their role in physiology and disease. Here we will examine redox probes currently available and how ROS generation may vary between subcellular compartments. Furthermore, we will discuss ROS compartmentalization in physiological and pathological conditions focusing our attention on mitochondria, since their vulnerability to oxidative stress is likely at the basis of several diseases.

  5. The chemistry behind redox regulation with a focus on sulphur redox systems.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Claus; Anwar, Awais

    2008-07-01

    Sulphur metabolism in plants provides a wealth of natural products, including several chemically unusual substances, such as thiosulphinates, polysulphides and isothiocyanates. Many of these reactive sulphur species (RSS) exhibit a distinct redox behaviour in vitro, which translates into a rather interesting biological activity in vivo, such as antibiotic, fungicidal, pesticidal or anticancer activity. While the molecular basis for such activity has long remained obscure, research into sulphur-based redox systems during the past 5-10 years has achieved a better knowledge of the in vitro properties of RSS and has led to an improved understanding of their impact on intracellular redox signalling and control pathways in living cells. It has become apparent that the redox chameleon sulphur occurs in biological systems in about 10 different oxidation states, which give rise to an extensive and complicated network of sulphur-based redox events. Together, natural sulphur products from plants and their intracellular targets provide the basis for innovative design of novel antibiotics, fungicides, pesticides and anticancer agents.

  6. Tuning of Redox Regulatory Mechanisms, Reactive Oxygen Species and Redox Homeostasis under Salinity Stress

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, M. Sazzad; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2016-01-01

    Soil salinity is a crucial environmental constraint which limits biomass production at many sites on a global scale. Saline growth conditions cause osmotic and ionic imbalances, oxidative stress and perturb metabolism, e.g., the photosynthetic electron flow. The plant ability to tolerate salinity is determined by multiple biochemical and physiological mechanisms protecting cell functions, in particular by regulating proper water relations and maintaining ion homeostasis. Redox homeostasis is a fundamental cell property. Its regulation includes control of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, sensing deviation from and readjustment of the cellular redox state. All these redox related functions have been recognized as decisive factors in salinity acclimation and adaptation. This review focuses on the core response of plants to overcome the challenges of salinity stress through regulation of ROS generation and detoxification systems and to maintain redox homeostasis. Emphasis is given to the role of NADH oxidase (RBOH), alternative oxidase (AOX), the plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX) and the malate valve with the malate dehydrogenase isoforms under salt stress. Overwhelming evidence assigns an essential auxiliary function of ROS and redox homeostasis to salinity acclimation of plants. PMID:27242807

  7. Crossing redox boundaries--aquifer redox history and effects on iron mineralogy and arsenic availability.

    PubMed

    Banning, Andre; Rüde, Thomas R; Dölling, Bettina

    2013-11-15

    Cretaceous shallow marine sediments from northwestern Germany exhibit a distinct colour and geochemical boundary in a depth of several decametres, witnessing a terrestrial oxidative paleo redox process which resulted in cement loss and oxidation of Fe(II) phases. Sediment samples were obtained from boreholes drilled in near-coastal and further basinward paleo environments, including both reduced and oxidized redox facies, to characterize As and Fe occurrence in unaltered layers and redistributional consequences of the redox event. Geochemical and mineralogical composition and As fractionation were assessed. Arsenic resides in pyrite in the reduced section with a bulk rock maximum concentration of 39 μg g(-1), calculated Aspyrite is ~0.2 wt.%. Siderite concretions in the fine sands do not function as As sinks, neither does glauconite whose general As/Fe leaching behaviour was characterized. In the zone of redox transition, reduced and oxidized phases coexist and elevated As concentrations (up to 73 μg g(-1)) with high proportions of reactive As were detected. Arsenic behaviour changes from relatively homogeneous Fe sulphide-control in the unaltered sediments to very heterogeneous Fe hydroxide-control above the paleo redox boundary. The studied characteristics determine recent As availability in the subsurface and must be considered during groundwater extraction from this highly important aquifer.

  8. Redox Indicator Mice Stably Expressing Genetically Encoded Neuronal roGFP: Versatile Tools to Decipher Subcellular Redox Dynamics in Neuropathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Wagener, Kerstin C.; Kolbrink, Benedikt; Dietrich, Katharina; Kizina, Kathrin M.; Terwitte, Lukas S.; Kempkes, Belinda; Bao, Guobin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and downstream redox alterations not only mediate physiological signaling but also neuropathology. For long, ROS/redox imaging was hampered by a lack of reliable probes. Genetically encoded redox sensors overcame this gap and revolutionized (sub)cellular redox imaging. Yet, the successful delivery of sensor-coding DNA, which demands transfection/transduction of cultured preparations or stereotaxic microinjections of each subject, remains challenging. By generating transgenic mice, we aimed to overcome limiting cultured preparations, circumvent surgical interventions, and to extend effectively redox imaging to complex and adult preparations. Results: Our redox indicator mice widely express Thy1-driven roGFP1 (reduction–oxidation-sensitive green fluorescent protein 1) in neuronal cytosol or mitochondria. Negative phenotypic effects of roGFP1 were excluded and its proper targeting and functionality confirmed. Redox mapping by ratiometric wide-field imaging reveals most oxidizing conditions in CA3 neurons. Furthermore, mitochondria are more oxidized than cytosol. Cytosolic and mitochondrial roGFP1s reliably report cell endogenous redox dynamics upon metabolic challenge or stimulation. Fluorescence lifetime imaging yields stable, but marginal, response ranges. We therefore developed automated excitation ratiometric 2-photon imaging. It offers superior sensitivity, spatial resolution, and response dynamics. Innovation and Conclusion: Redox indicator mice enable quantitative analyses of subcellular redox dynamics in a multitude of preparations and at all postnatal stages. This will uncover cell- and compartment-specific cerebral redox signals and their defined alterations during development, maturation, and aging. Cross-breeding with other disease models will reveal molecular details on compartmental redox homeostasis in neuropathology. Combined with ratiometric 2-photon imaging, this will foster our mechanistic understanding

  9. Molecular-Level Design of Heterogeneous Chiral Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Francisco Zaera

    2012-03-21

    The following is a proposal to continue our multi-institutional research on heterogeneous chiral catalysis. Our team combines the use of surface-sensitive analytical techniques for the characterization of model systems with quantum and statistical mechanical calculations to interpret experimental data and guide the design of future research. Our investigation focuses on the interrelation among the three main mechanisms by which enantioselectivity can be bestowed to heterogeneous catalysts, namely: (1) by templating chirality via the adsorption of chiral supramolecular assemblies, (2) by using chiral modifiers capable of forming chiral complexes with the reactant and force enantioselective surface reactions, and (3) by forming naturally chiral surfaces using imprinting chiral agents. Individually, the members of our team are leaders in these various aspects of chiral catalysis, but the present program provides the vehicle to generate and exploit the synergies necessary to address the problem in a comprehensive manner. Our initial work has advanced the methodology needed for these studies, including an enantioselective titration procedure to identify surface chiral sites, infrared spectroscopy in situ at the interface between gases or liquids and solids to mimic realistic catalytic conditions, and DFT and Monte Carlo algorithms to simulate and understand chirality on surfaces. The next step, to be funded by the monies requested in this proposal, is to apply those methods to specific problems in chiral catalysis, including the identification of the requirements for the formation of supramolecular surface structures with enantioselective behavior, the search for better molecules to probe the chiral nature of the modified surfaces, the exploration of the transition from supramolecular to one-to-one chiral modification, the correlation of the adsorption characteristics of one-to-one chiral modifiers with their physical properties, in particular with their configuration

  10. Catalysis by Design: Well-Defined Single-Site Heterogeneous Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Jérémie D A; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2016-04-19

    Heterogeneous catalysis, a field important industrially and scientifically, is increasingly seeking and refining strategies to render itself more predictable. The main issue is due to the nature and the population of catalytically active sites. Their number is generally low to very low, their "acid strengths" or " redox properties" are not homogeneous, and the material may display related yet inactive sites on the same material. In many heterogeneous catalysts, the discovery of a structure-activity reationship is at best challenging. One possible solution is to generate single-site catalysts in which most, if not all, of the sites are structurally identical. Within this context and using the right tools, the catalyst structure can be designed and well-defined, to reach a molecular understanding. It is then feasible to understand the structure-activity relationship and to develop predictable heterogeneous catalysis. Single-site well-defined heterogeneous catalysts can be prepared using concepts and tools of surface organometallic chemistry (SOMC). This approach operates by reacting organometallic compounds with surfaces of highly divided oxides (or of metal nanoparticles). This strategy has a solid track record to reveal structure-activity relationship to the extent that it is becoming now quite predictable. Almost all elements of the periodical table have been grafted on surfaces of oxides (from simple oxides such as silica or alumina to more sophisticated materials regarding composition or porosity). Considering catalytic hydrocarbon transformations, heterogeneous catalysis outcome may now be predicted based on existing mechanistic proposals and the rules of molecular chemistry (organometallic, organic) associated with some concepts of surface sciences. A thorough characterization of the grafted metal centers must be carried out using tools spanning from molecular organometallic or surface chemistry. By selection of the metal, its ligand set, and the support taken

  11. Behavioral responses of Escherichia coli to changes in redox potential.

    PubMed

    Bespalov, V A; Zhulin, I B; Taylor, B L

    1996-09-17

    Escherichia coli bacteria sensed the redox state in their surroundings and they swam to a niche that had a preferred reduction potential. In a spatial redox gradient of benzoquinone/benzoquinol, E. coli cells migrated to form a sharply defined band. Bacteria swimming out of either face of the band tumbled and returned to the preferred conditions at the site of the band. This behavioral response was named redox taxis. Redox molecules, such as substituted quinones, that elicited redox taxis, interact with the bacterial electron transport system, thereby altering electron transport and the proton motive force. The magnitude of the behavioral response was dependent on the reduction potential of the chemoeffector. The Tsr, Tar, Trg, Tap, and CheR proteins, which have a role in chemotaxis, were not essential for redox taxis. A cheB mutant had inverted responses in redox taxis, as previously demonstrated in aerotaxis. A model is proposed in which a redox effector molecule perturbs the electron transport system, and an unknown sensor in the membrane detects changes in the proton motive force or the redox status of the electron transport system, and transduces this information into a signal that regulates phosphorylation of the CheA protein. A similar mechanism has been proposed for aerotaxis. Redox taxis may play an important role in the distribution of bacterial species in natural environments.

  12. Thiol/disulfide redox states in signaling and sensing

    PubMed Central

    Go, Young-Mi; Jones, Dean P.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid advances in redox systems biology are creating new opportunities to understand complexities of human disease and contributions of environmental exposures. New understanding of thiol-disulfide systems have occurred during the past decade as a consequence of the discoveries that thiol and disulfide systems are maintained in kinetically controlled steady-states displaced from thermodynamic equilibrium, that a widely distributed family of NADPH oxidases produces oxidants that function in cell signaling, and that a family of peroxiredoxins utilize thioredoxin as a reductant to complement the well-studied glutathione antioxidant system for peroxide elimination and redox regulation. This review focuses on thiol/disulfide redox state in biologic systems and the knowledge base available to support development of integrated redox systems biology models to better understand the function and dysfunction of thiol-disulfide redox systems. In particular, central principles have emerged concerning redox compartmentalization and utility of thiol/disulfide redox measures as indicators of physiologic function. Advances in redox proteomics show that, in addition to functioning in protein active sites and cell signaling, cysteine residues also serve as redox sensors to integrate biologic functions. These advances provide a framework for translation of redox systems biology concepts to practical use in understanding and treating human disease. Biological responses to cadmium, a widespread environmental agent, are used to illustrate the utility of these advances to the understanding of complex pleiotropic toxicities. PMID:23356510

  13. Conformational changes in redox pairs of protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Samuel W; George, Richard A; Haworth, Naomi L; Feng, Lina L; Liu, Jason Y; Wouters, Merridee A

    2009-01-01

    Disulfides are conventionally viewed as structurally stabilizing elements in proteins but emerging evidence suggests two disulfide subproteomes exist. One group mediates the well known role of structural stabilization. A second redox-active group are best known for their catalytic functions but are increasingly being recognized for their roles in regulation of protein function. Redox-active disulfides are, by their very nature, more susceptible to reduction than structural disulfides; and conversely, the Cys pairs that form them are more susceptible to oxidation. In this study, we searched for potentially redox-active Cys Pairs by scanning the Protein Data Bank for structures of proteins in alternate redox states. The PDB contains over 1134 unique redox pairs of proteins, many of which exhibit conformational differences between alternate redox states. Several classes of structural changes were observed, proteins that exhibit: disulfide oxidation following expulsion of metals such as zinc; major reorganisation of the polypeptide backbone in association with disulfide redox-activity; order/disorder transitions; and changes in quaternary structure. Based on evidence gathered supporting disulfide redox activity, we propose disulfides present in alternate redox states are likely to have physiologically relevant redox activity. PMID:19598234

  14. Organelle Redox of CF and CFTR-Corrected Airway Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzer, Christian; Illek, Beate; Suh, Jung H.; Remington, S. James; Fischer, Horst; Machen, Terry E.

    2014-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis reduced CFTR function may alter redox properties of airway epithelial cells. Redox-sensitive GFP (roGFP1) and imaging microscopy were used to measure redox potentials of cytosol, ER, mitochondria and cell surface of cystic fibrosis nasal epithelial cells and CFTR-corrected cells. We also measured glutathione and cysteine thiol redox states in cell lysates and apical fluids to provide coverage over a range of redox potentials and environments that might be affected by CFTR. As measured with roGFP1, redox potentials at the cell surface (~ -207 ±8 mV) and in the ER (~ -217 ±1 mV) and rates of regulation of the apical fluid and ER lumen following DTT treatment were similar for CF and CFTR-corrected cells. CF and CFTR-corrected cells had similar redox potentials in mitochondria (-344 ±9 mV) and cytosol (-322 ±7 mV). Oxidation of carboxy-dichlorodihydrofluoresceindiacetate and of apical Amplex Red occurred at equal rates in CF and CFTR-corrected cells. Glutathione and cysteine redox couples in cell lysates and apical fluid were equal in CF and CFTR-corrected cells. These quantitative estimates of organelle redox potentials combined with apical and cell measurements using small molecule couples confirmed there were no differences in redox properties of CF and CFTR-corrected cells. PMID:17603939

  15. EQCM Measurements: Redox-Induced Changes in Solvent and Ion Content in Anchored Redox Monolayers of Organosulfur Compounds and Their Electrocatalysis on Gold Electrodes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    EQCM Mwasurements: Redox-Induced Changes in Solvent and M0 Content in Anchored Redox Monolayers of Organosulfur CD Compounds and their Electrocatalysis ...REDOX-INDUCED CHANGES IN SOLVENT AND ION CONTENT IN ANCHORED REDOX MONOLAYERS OF ORGANOSULFUR COMPOUNDS AND THEIR ELECTROCATALYSIS ON GOLD...Measurements: Redox-Induced Changes in Solvent and Ion Content in Anchored Redox Monolayers of Organosulfur Compounds and their Electrocatalysis on

  16. Redox cycling with facing interdigitated array electrodes as a method for selective detection of redox species.

    PubMed

    Dam, V A T; Olthuis, W; van den Berg, A

    2007-04-01

    A pair of interdigitated ultramicroelectrodes (UMEs) is used to electrochemically detect a weak reductor (dopamine) in the presence of a stronger one (K(4)[Fe(CN)(6)]). In the mixture of both reductors, one of the two interdigitated electrodes (the generator electrode) is used to oxidize both species at 700 mV vs. Ag/AgCl, followed by subsequent (selective) reduction of the oxidized dopamine at 400 mV. A regenerated dopamine molecule can thus be oxidized several times (redox cycling) and enable selective detection even in the presence of the stronger reductor. In order to obtain high redox cycling efficiency, we designed and realized platinum electrodes with widths of 2 and 4 microm and spacing of 2 microm, which gave redox cycling efficiencies of 9 and 4 respectively. Using this electrode design, a dopamine/K(4)[Fe(CN)(6)] selectivity of 2 could be obtained.

  17. Redox properties of structural Fe in clay minerals: 3. Relationships between smectite redox and structural properties.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Christopher A; Klüpfel, Laura E; Voegelin, Andreas; Sander, Michael; Hofstetter, Thomas B

    2013-01-01

    Structural Fe in clay minerals is an important redox-active species in many pristine and contaminated environments as well as in engineered systems. Understanding the extent and kinetics of redox reactions involving Fe-bearing clay minerals has been challenging due to the inability to relate structural Fe(2+)/Fe(total) fractions to fundamental redox properties, such as reduction potentials (EH). Here, we overcame this challenge by using mediated electrochemical reduction (MER) and oxidation (MEO) to characterize the fraction of redox-active structural Fe (Fe(2+)/Fe(total)) in smectites over a wide range of applied EH-values (-0.6 V to +0.6 V). We examined Fe(2+)/Fe(total )- EH relationships of four natural Fe-bearing smectites (SWy-2, SWa-1, NAu-1, NAu-2) in their native, reduced, and reoxidized states and compared our measurements with spectroscopic observations and a suite of mineralogical properties. All smectites exhibited unique Fe(2+)/Fe(total) - EH relationships, were redox active over wide EH ranges, and underwent irreversible electron transfer induced structural changes that were observable with X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Variations among the smectite Fe(2+)/Fe(total) - EH relationships correlated well with both bulk and molecular-scale properties, including Fe(total) content, layer charge, and quadrupole splitting values, suggesting that multiple structural parameters determined the redox properties of smectites. The Fe(2+)/Fe(total) - EH relationships developed for these four commonly studied clay minerals may be applied to future studies interested in relating the extent of structural Fe reduction or oxidation to EH-values.

  18. Multiple redox states of multiheme cytochromes may enable bacterial response to changing redox environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbour, T.; Wrighton, K. C.; Mullin, S. W.; Castelle, C.; Luef, B.; Gilbert, B.; Banfield, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    Multiheme c-type cytochromes (MHCs) are key components in electron-transport pathways that enable some microorganisms to transfer electron byproducts of metabolism to a variety of minerals. As a response to changes in mineral redox potential, microbial communities may shift their membership, or individual organisms may adjust protein expression. Alternatively, the ability to respond may be conferred by the innate characteristics of certain electron-transport-chain components. Here, we used potentiostat-controlled microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to measure the timescale of response to imposed changes in redox conditions, thus placing constraints on the importance of these different mechanisms. In the experiments, a solid electrode acts as an electron-accepting mineral whose redox potential can be precisely controlled. We inoculated duplicate MFCs with a sediment/groundwater mixture from an aquifer at Rifle, Colorado, supplied acetate as an electron donor, and obtained stable, mixed-species biofilms dominated by Geobacter and a novel Geobacter-related family. We poised the anode at potentials spanning the range of natural Fe(III)-reduction, then performed cyclic voltammetry (CV) to characterize the overall biofilm redox signature. The apparent biofilm midpoint potential shifted directly with anode set potential when the latter was changed within the range from about -250 to -50 mV vs. SHE. Following a jump in set potential by 200 mV, the CV-midpoint shift by ~100 mV over a timescale of ~30 minutes to a few hours, depending on the direction of the potential change. The extracellular electron transfer molecules, whose overall CV signature is very similar to those of purified MHCs, appear to span a broad redox range (~200 mV), supporting the hypothesis that MHCs confer substantial redox flexibility. This flexibility may be a principle reason for the abundance of MHCs expressed by microorganisms capable of extracellular electron transfer to minerals.

  19. Harmless drainage of automobile exhaust gas under catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Qingying; Dai Qianhuan )

    1988-09-01

    In terms of an epidemiologic investigation in Beijing, a higher incidence of lung cancer appears in the population of traffic policemen and workers involved with automobile exhausts which might be a biomarker of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons contamination in their environment. Recently, a purification catalyst containing cheaper metal oxides and rare earth metal oxides for automobile exhaust has been developed in this laboratory. After catalysis the CO, benzene and lower hydrocarbons oxidize completely to form CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The mark of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) pollutant penteno(cd)pyrene, can not be found after the catalysis. Other PAH which have been carcinogenicity tested by animals or predicted in terms of Di region theory, were not found in the catalyzed exhaust.

  20. Carbocatalysis: the state of "metal-free" catalysis.

    PubMed

    Chua, Chun Kiang; Pumera, Martin

    2015-09-01

    The rise in global demand for crucial chemical compounds has driven immense research in the fundamental science of catalysis. Graphene and its derivatives (chemically modified graphene, CMGs) have recently emerged as a new class of heterogeneous catalyst that promises economically viable and greener routes to these compounds. Although CMGs possess unique catalytic properties, the actual active sites are often points of discussion. Current minimal understanding on the possible effects of metallic impurities on the electrocatalytic performances of these CMGs calls forth the need to raise awareness on possible metallic impurities misrepresenting the actual chemical catalytic performances of the CMGs. This Minireview highlights the latest advances in the application of CMGs as catalysts, with an emphasis on the possible effects of metallic impurities on CMG catalysis.

  1. The energy landscape of adenylate kinase during catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Kerns, S. Jordan; Agafonov, Roman V.; Cho, Young-Jin; Pontiggia, Francesco; Otten, Renee; Pachov, Dimitar V.; Kutter, Steffen; Phung, Lien A.; Murphy, Padraig N.; Thai, Vu; Alber, Tom; Hagan, Michael F.; Kern, Dorothee

    2014-01-01

    Kinases perform phosphoryl-transfer reactions in milliseconds; without enzymes, these reactions would take about 8000 years under physiological conditions. Despite extensive studies, a comprehensive understanding of kinase energy landscapes, including both chemical and conformational steps, is lacking. Here we scrutinize the microscopic steps in the catalytic cycle of adenylate kinase, through a combination of NMR measurements during catalysis, pre-steady-state kinetics, MD simulations, and crystallography of active complexes. We find that the Mg2+ cofactor activates two distinct molecular events, phosphoryl transfer (>105-fold) and lid-opening (103-fold). In contrast, mutation of an essential active-site arginine decelerates phosphoryl transfer 103-fold without substantially affecting lid-opening. Our results highlight the importance of the entire energy landscape in catalysis and suggest that adenylate kinases have evolved to activate key processes simultaneously by precise placement of a single, charged and very abundant cofactor in a pre-organized active site. PMID:25580578

  2. Hydrogen tunneling links protein dynamics to enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Klinman, Judith P; Kohen, Amnon

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between protein dynamics and function is a subject of considerable contemporary interest. Although protein motions are frequently observed during ligand binding and release steps, the contribution of protein motions to the catalysis of bond making/breaking processes is more difficult to probe and verify. Here, we show how the quantum mechanical hydrogen tunneling associated with enzymatic C-H bond cleavage provides a unique window into the necessity of protein dynamics for achieving optimal catalysis. Experimental findings support a hierarchy of thermodynamically equilibrated motions that control the H-donor and -acceptor distance and active-site electrostatics, creating an ensemble of conformations suitable for H-tunneling. A possible extension of this view to methyl transfer and other catalyzed reactions is also presented. The impact of understanding these dynamics on the conceptual framework for enzyme activity, inhibitor/drug design, and biomimetic catalyst design is likely to be substantial.

  3. Protein dynamics and enzyme catalysis: insights from simulations.

    PubMed

    McGeagh, John D; Ranaghan, Kara E; Mulholland, Adrian J

    2011-08-01

    The role of protein dynamics in enzyme catalysis is one of the most active and controversial areas in enzymology today. Some researchers claim that protein dynamics are at the heart of enzyme catalytic efficiency, while others state that dynamics make no significant contribution to catalysis. What is the biochemist - or student - to make of the ferocious arguments in this area? Protein dynamics are complex and fascinating, as molecular dynamics simulations and experiments have shown. The essential question is: do these complex motions have functional significance? In particular, how do they affect or relate to chemical reactions within enzymes, and how are chemical and conformational changes coupled together? Biomolecular simulations can analyse enzyme reactions and dynamics in atomic detail, beyond that achievable in experiments: accurate atomistic modelling has an essential part to play in clarifying these issues. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein Dynamics: Experimental and Computational Approaches.

  4. Metal-free transfer hydrogenation of olefins via dehydrocoupling catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Manuel; Caputo, Christopher B.; Dobrovetsky, Roman; Stephan, Douglas W.

    2014-01-01

    A major advance in main-group chemistry in recent years has been the emergence of the reactivity of main-group species that mimics that of transition metal complexes. In this report, the Lewis acidic phosphonium salt [(C6F5)3PF][B(C6F5)4] 1 is shown to catalyze the dehydrocoupling of silanes with amines, thiols, phenols, and carboxylic acids to form the Si-E bond (E = N, S, O) with the liberation of H2 (21 examples). This catalysis, when performed in the presence of a series of olefins, yields the concurrent formation of the products of dehydrocoupling and transfer hydrogenation of the olefin (30 examples). This reactivity provides a strategy for metal-free catalysis of olefin hydrogenations. The mechanisms for both catalytic reactions are proposed and supported by experiment and density functional theory calculations. PMID:25002489

  5. A Low Glutathione Redox State Couples with a Decreased Ascorbate Redox Ratio to Accelerate Flowering in Oncidium Orchid.

    PubMed

    Chin, Dan-Chu; Hsieh, Chia-Chi; Lin, Hsin-Yi; Yeh, Kai-Wun

    2016-02-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays multiple roles in plants, including stress defense and regulation of growth/development. Previous studies have demonstrated that the ascorbate (AsA) redox state is involved in flowering initiation in Oncidium orchid. In this study, we discovered that a significantly decreased GSH content and GSH redox ratio are correlated with a decline in the AsA redox state during flowering initiation and high ambient temperature-induced flowering. At the same time, the expression level and enzymatic activity of GSH redox-regulated genes, glutathione reductase (GR1), and the GSH biosynthesis genes γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (GSH1) and glutathione synthase (GSH2), are down-regulated. Elevating dehydroascorbate (DHA) content in Oncidium by artificial addition of DHA resulted in a decreased AsA and GSH redox ratio, and enhanced dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) activity. This demonstrated that the lower GSH redox state could be influenced by the lower AsA redox ratio. Moreover, exogenous application of buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), to inhibit GSH biosynthesis, and glutathione disulfide (GSSG), to decrease the GSH redox ratio, also caused early flowering. However, spraying plants with GSH increased the GSH redox ratio and delayed flowering. Furthermore, transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing Oncidium GSH1, GSH2 and GR1 displayed a high GSH redox ratio as well as delayed flowering under high ambient temperature treatment, while pad2, cad2 and gr1 mutants exhibited early flowering and a low GSH redox ratio. In conclusion, our results provide evidence that the decreased GSH redox state is linked to the decline in the AsA redox ratio and mediated by down-regulated expression of GSH metabolism-related genes to affect flowering time in Oncidium orchid.

  6. Cu/ZnO nanocatalysts in response to environmental conditions: surface morphology, electronic structure, redox state and CO2 activation.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Suárez, Luis; Frenzel, Johannes; Marx, Dominik

    2014-12-21

    Methanol synthesis is one of the landmarks of heterogeneous catalysis due to the great industrial significance of methanol as a clean liquid fuel and as a raw material for industry. Understanding in atomistic detail the properties of the underlying metal/oxide catalyst materials as a function of temperature and composition of the reactive gas phase is of utmost importance in order to eventually improve the production process. By performing extensive density functional theory based slab calculations in combination with a thermodynamic formalism we establish an atomistic understanding of gas phase-induced changes of surface morphology, redox properties and reactivity of ZnO supported Cu nanocatalysts. Extending our recent insights [Phys. Rev. Lett., 2013, 110, 086108], we explore surface stabilization mechanisms and site-dependent redox states of both catalyst components as well as the pronounced electronic charge transfer processes across the metal-support interface. Moreover, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations unveil the vital role played by dynamical shape fluctuations of the deposited Cu8 cluster. The pronounced structural flexibility of the metal nanoparticle is found to enhance CO2 activation over Cu8 at the elevated temperature conditions of the industrial methanol synthesis process, in addition to activation of CO2via electronic charge transfer from the ZnO support.

  7. Protruding interfacial OH groups and 'on-water' heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yousung; Marcus, R A

    2010-07-21

    The key aspect of the remarkable organic catalysis that is observed to occur at the organic/water phase boundary, the so-called 'on-water' catalysis (Narayan et al 2005 Angew. Chem. 44 3275), was recently proposed to be the protruding OH groups of water molecules at the interface that interact with the transition state (TS) via hydrogen bonding and lower activation barriers (Jung and Marcus 2007 J. Am. Chem. Soc. 129 5492). In particular, the cycloaddition reaction of quadricyclane (Q) with dimethyl azodicarboxylate (DMAD) on-water was calculated to be more than 100,000 times more efficient in terms of rate constant than the neat reaction. In this paper, we review and consider a related reaction of Q with dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate, where nitrogen, a good H-bond acceptor, in DMAD is replaced by carbon, a poor H-bond acceptor. A very low rate acceleration of acetylenedicarboxylate on-water relative to the neat reaction is obtained theoretically, as compared to DMAD on-water, due to the relatively low H-bonding ability of acetylenedicarboxylate with water at the TS relative to the reactants. We suggest that there may also be an 'intrinsic steric effect' or orientational advantage in the on-water catalysis in general, and both electronic and steric effects may be in operation for the smaller on-water catalysis for the cycloaddition reaction of quadricyclane and acetylenedicarboxylate. A preliminary quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulation including 1264 water molecules for the on-water reaction of DMAD + Q also suggests that there are indeed approximately two-four more H-bonds between the TS and the dangling OH groups than between the reactants and the surface.

  8. Observations of exoelectron emission associated with heterogeneous catalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoenig, S. A.; Utter, M. G.

    1977-01-01

    It is suggested that the exoelectron emission from the catalyst may be used to monitor the rate of oxidation of CO and CH4 over palladium catalysts. Indirect heating of the catalyst and atmospheric pressure have no effect upon this monitoring system. Although the mechanism relating catalysis to exoelectron emission is not clear, it is considered possible that electron emission is triggered by the adsorption-desorption cycle.

  9. Quasi-stationary distributions for models of heterogeneous catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Marcelo M.; Dickman, Ronald

    2004-11-01

    We construct the quasi-stationary (QS) distribution for two models of heterogeneous catalysis having two absorbing states: the ZGB model for the oxidation of CO, and a version with noninstantaneous reactions. Using a mean-field-like approximation, we study the quasi-stationary surface coverages, moment ratios and the lifetime of the QS state. We also derive an improved, consistent one-site mean-field theory for the ZGB model.

  10. Wall catalysis experiment on AFE. [Aeroassist Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, David A.; Kolodziej, Paul

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the wall catalysis experiment which is planned as part of the Aeroassist Flight experiments (AFE) that will be flown from the Space Shuttle Orbiter in late 1993. Research on candidate high-catalytic efficiency overcoats for the experiment conducted in an arc-jet air stream are discussed. The temperature distribution over the AFE heat shield is also predicted using a reacting boundary layer solution that includes surface kinetics and optical properties determined from these tests.

  11. Asymmetric photoredox transition-metal catalysis activated by visible light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Haohua; Shen, Xiaodong; Wang, Chuanyong; Zhang, Lilu; Röse, Philipp; Chen, Liang-An; Harms, Klaus; Marsch, Michael; Hilt, Gerhard; Meggers, Eric

    2014-11-01

    Asymmetric catalysis is seen as one of the most economical strategies to satisfy the growing demand for enantiomerically pure small molecules in the fine chemical and pharmaceutical industries. And visible light has been recognized as an environmentally friendly and sustainable form of energy for triggering chemical transformations and catalytic chemical processes. For these reasons, visible-light-driven catalytic asymmetric chemistry is a subject of enormous current interest. Photoredox catalysis provides the opportunity to generate highly reactive radical ion intermediates with often unusual or unconventional reactivities under surprisingly mild reaction conditions. In such systems, photoactivated sensitizers initiate a single electron transfer from (or to) a closed-shell organic molecule to produce radical cations or radical anions whose reactivities are then exploited for interesting or unusual chemical transformations. However, the high reactivity of photoexcited substrates, intermediate radical ions or radicals, and the low activation barriers for follow-up reactions provide significant hurdles for the development of efficient catalytic photochemical processes that work under stereochemical control and provide chiral molecules in an asymmetric fashion. Here we report a highly efficient asymmetric catalyst that uses visible light for the necessary molecular activation, thereby combining asymmetric catalysis and photocatalysis. We show that a chiral iridium complex can serve as a sensitizer for photoredox catalysis and at the same time provide very effective asymmetric induction for the enantioselective alkylation of 2-acyl imidazoles. This new asymmetric photoredox catalyst, in which the metal centre simultaneously serves as the exclusive source of chirality, the catalytically active Lewis acid centre, and the photoredox centre, offers new opportunities for the `green' synthesis of non-racemic chiral molecules.

  12. Selective catalysis utilizing bifunctionalized MCM-41 mesoporous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Strosahl, Kasey Jean

    2005-01-01

    Selective catalysis is a field that has been under intense investigation for the last 100 years. The most widely used method involves catalysts with stereochemical selectivity. In this type of catalysis, the catalyst controls which reactants will be transformed into the desired product. The secret to employing this type of catalysis, though, is to design the proper catalyst, which can be difficult. One may spend as much time developing the catalyst as spent separating the various products achieved. Another method of selective catalysis is now being explored. The method involves utilizing a multifunctional mesoporous silica catalyst with a gate-keeping capability. Properly functionalized mesoporous materials with well-defined pore morphology and surface properties can provide an ideal three-dimensional environment for anchoring various homogeneous catalysts. These materials can circumvent the multi-sited two-dimensional nature most heterogeneous systems have without adversely impacting the reactant diffusivity. These single-site nanostructured catalysts with ordered geometrical structure are advantageous in achieving high selectivity and reactivity. Mesoporous materials can be prepared to include pores lined homogeneously with tethered catalysts via co-condensation. Additionally, these materials can be reacted with another (RO)3Si~Z group by using the traditional grafting method; this group is anchored predominantly at the entrances to the pores rather than inside the pores. Thus, if these ~Z groups are chosen properly, they can select certain molecules to enter the pores and be converted to products (Scheme 1). In such multifunctional catalysts, the selectivity depends on the discrimination of the gatekeeper. Gate-keeping MCM-41 materials are at the forefront of catalytic substances.

  13. Dynamically achieved active site precision in enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Klinman, Judith P

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: The grand challenge in enzymology is to define and understand all of the parameters that contribute to enzymes' enormous rate accelerations. The property of hydrogen tunneling in enzyme reactions has moved the focus of research away from an exclusive focus on transition state stabilization toward the importance of the motions of the heavy atoms of the protein, a role for reduced barrier width in catalysis, and the sampling of a protein conformational landscape to achieve a family of protein substates that optimize enzyme-substrate interactions and beyond. This Account focuses on a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase for which the chemical step of hydride transfer is rate determining across a wide range of experimental conditions. The properties of the chemical coordinate have been probed using kinetic isotope effects, indicating a transition in behavior below 30 °C that distinguishes nonoptimal from optimal C-H activation. Further, the introduction of single site mutants has the impact of either enhancing or eliminating the temperature dependent transition in catalysis. Biophysical probes, which include time dependent hydrogen/deuterium exchange and fluorescent lifetimes and Stokes shifts, have also been pursued. These studies allow the correlation of spatially resolved transitions in protein motions with catalysis. It is now possible to define a long-range network of protein motions in ht-ADH that extends from a dimer interface to the substrate binding domain across to the cofactor binding domain, over a distance of ca. 30 Å. The ongoing challenge to obtaining spatial and temporal resolution of catalysis-linked protein motions is discussed.

  14. Organic non-aqueous cation-based redox flow batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, Andrew N.; Vaughey, John T.; Chen, Zonghai; Zhang, Lu; Brushett, Fikile R.

    2016-03-29

    The present invention provides a non-aqueous redox flow battery comprising a negative electrode immersed in a non-aqueous liquid negative electrolyte, a positive electrode immersed in a non-aqueous liquid positive electrolyte, and a cation-permeable separator (e.g., a porous membrane, film, sheet, or panel) between the negative electrolyte from the positive electrolyte. During charging and discharging, the electrolytes are circulated over their respective electrodes. The electrolytes each comprise an electrolyte salt (e.g., a lithium or sodium salt), a transition-metal free redox reactant, and optionally an electrochemically stable organic solvent. Each redox reactant is selected from an organic compound comprising a conjugated unsaturated moiety, a boron cluster compound, and a combination thereof. The organic redox reactant of the positive electrolyte is selected to have a higher redox potential than the redox reactant of the negative electrolyte.

  15. New tools for redox biology: From imaging to manipulation.

    PubMed

    Bilan, Dmitry S; Belousov, Vsevolod V

    2016-12-06

    Redox reactions play a key role in maintaining essential biological processes. Deviations in redox pathways result in the development of various pathologies at cellular and organismal levels. Until recently, studies on transformations in the intracellular redox state have been significantly hampered in living systems. The genetically encoded indicators, based on fluorescent proteins, have provided new opportunities in biomedical research. The existing indicators already enable monitoring of cellular redox parameters in different processes including embryogenesis, aging, inflammation, tissue regeneration, and pathogenesis of various diseases. In this review, we summarize information about all genetically encoded redox indicators developed to date. We provide the description of each indicator and discuss its advantages and limitations, as well as points that need to be considered when choosing an indicator for a particular experiment. One chapter is devoted to the important discoveries that have been made by using genetically encoded redox indicators.

  16. Quinap and congeners: atropos PN ligands for asymmetric catalysis.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Elena; Guiry, Patrick J; Connole, Kieran P T; Brown, John M

    2014-06-20

    Among the range of P,N-chelating ligands that have been employed in asymmetric catalysis, those relying on atropisomerism for the stability of individual enantiomers form a definable class. These APN (atropos P,N) ligands require a specific type of biaryl, with one component carrying a pendant phosphine unit, most commonly diaryl substituted, and the other bearing an sp(2)-nitrogen adjacent to the biaryl link. When substituents in the biaryl inhibit rotation about the linking bond, stable nonracemizing six-membered ring chelates can be formed. This Perspective relates the background to the initial synthesis in 1993 of Quinap, the original member of the series, and initial observations on its effectiveness in asymmetric catalysis. The current state of play in development of syntheses of this and other members of the APN ligand family is assessed, and their applications in asymmetric catalysis are presented. These include hydroboration and diboration of alkenes, 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions, alkynylation of iminium salts in a three-component (A(3)) condensation, and conjugate additions of Cu acetylides.

  17. Plasma Catalysis of Methane Decomposition in Pulse Microwave Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapkin, B.; Rusanov, V.; Jivotov, V.; Babaritski, A.; Potechin, S.; Etievant, C.

    1997-10-01

    Investigation of plasma catalysis effects in various chemical reactions, such as SO2 and hydrocarbons oxidation, ammonia and nitrogen oxides synthesis, has been of interest for many decades. Present work describes the first experimental observation and theoretical analysis of plasma catalysis effects in the case of endothermic methane decomposition into molecular hydrogen and carbon black. Process energy requirements are coverd mainly by low potential gas thermal energy while plasma is used for acceleration of chemical reactions via active species generation. The experiments were done as follows: (i) methane was preheated in a conventional heat exchanger up to about 40-65 ^oC where thermal methane decomposition is limited by process kinetics, (ii) methane was passed through a non-equilibrium pulse microwave discharge (9.04 GHz, pulse duration 1 μs). Experiments have shown a strong catalytic effect of plasma on methane decomposition. The degree of conversion after discharge increased drastically, despite gas cooling, because of heat absorption in the methane decomposition reaction. Theoretical analysis of process kinetics and energy balance gave clear evidence of the catalytic effect of plasma under experimental conditions. The estimated chain length was about 300. The possible mechanism of plasma catalysis, the ion-molecular chain Winchester mechanism, is proposed and described.

  18. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Catalysis Highlights for FY2007

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, Bruce C.

    2007-11-15

    To reduce the nation’s dependence on imported oil, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other federal and private agencies are investing in understanding catalysis. This report focuses on catalysis research conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and its collaborators. Using sophisticated instruments in DOE’s Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility, research was conducted to answer key questions related to the nation’s use of automotive fuels. Research teams investigated how hydrogen can be safely stored and efficiently released, critical questions to use this alternative fuel. Further, they are answering key questions to design molecular catalysts to control the transfer of hydrogen atoms, hydrides, and protons important to hydrogen production. In dealing with today’s fuels, researchers examined adsorption of noxious nitrous oxides in automotive exhaust. Beyond automotive fuel, researchers worked on catalysts to harness solar power. These catalysts include the rutile and anatase forms of titanium dioxide. Basic research was conducted on designing catalysts for these and other applications. Our scientists examined how to build catalysts with the desired properties atom by atom and molecule by molecule. In addition, this report contains brief descriptions of the outstanding accomplishments of catalysis experts at PNNL.

  19. The Hammerhead Ribozyme: Structure, Catalysis and Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Scott, William G.; Horan, Lucas H.; Martick, Monika

    2014-01-01

    The hammerhead ribozyme has long been considered a prototype for understanding RNA catalysis, but discrepancies between the earlier crystal structures of a minimal hammerhead self-cleaving motif and various biochemical investigations frustrated attempt to understand hammerhead ribozyme catalysis in terms of structure. With the discovery that a tertiary contact distal from the ribozyme’s active site greatly enhances its catalytic prowess, and the emergence of new corresponding crystal structures of full-length hammerhead ribozymes, a unified understanding of catalysis in terms of the structure is now possible. A mechanism in which the invariant residue G12 functions as a general base, and the 2′-OH moiety of the invariant G8, itself forming a tertiary base pair with the invariant C3, is the general acid, appears consistent with both the crystal structure and biochemical experimental results. Originally discovered in the context of plant satellite RNA viruses, the hammerhead more recently has been found embedded in the 3′-untranslated region of mature mammalian mRNAs, suggesting additional biological roles in genetic regulation. PMID:24156940

  20. Switching on elusive organometallic mechanisms with photoredox catalysis.

    PubMed

    Terrett, Jack A; Cuthbertson, James D; Shurtleff, Valerie W; MacMillan, David W C

    2015-08-20

    Transition-metal-catalysed cross-coupling reactions have become one of the most used carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bond-forming reactions in chemical synthesis. Recently, nickel catalysis has been shown to participate in a wide variety of C-C bond-forming reactions, most notably Negishi, Suzuki-Miyaura, Stille, Kumada and Hiyama couplings. Despite the tremendous advances in C-C fragment couplings, the ability to forge C-O bonds in a general fashion via nickel catalysis has been largely unsuccessful. The challenge for nickel-mediated alcohol couplings has been the mechanistic requirement for the critical C-O bond-forming step (formally known as the reductive elimination step) to occur via a Ni(III) alkoxide intermediate. Here we demonstrate that visible-light-excited photoredox catalysts can modulate the preferred oxidation states of nickel alkoxides in an operative catalytic cycle, thereby providing transient access to Ni(III) species that readily participate in reductive elimination. Using this synergistic merger of photoredox and nickel catalysis, we have developed a highly efficient and general carbon-oxygen coupling reaction using abundant alcohols and aryl bromides. More notably, we have developed a general strategy to 'switch on' important yet elusive organometallic mechanisms via oxidation state modulations using only weak light and single-electron-transfer catalysts.

  1. Switching on elusive organometallic mechanisms with photoredox catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrett, Jack A.; Cuthbertson, James D.; Shurtleff, Valerie W.; MacMillan, David W. C.

    2015-08-01

    Transition-metal-catalysed cross-coupling reactions have become one of the most used carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bond-forming reactions in chemical synthesis. Recently, nickel catalysis has been shown to participate in a wide variety of C-C bond-forming reactions, most notably Negishi, Suzuki-Miyaura, Stille, Kumada and Hiyama couplings. Despite the tremendous advances in C-C fragment couplings, the ability to forge C-O bonds in a general fashion via nickel catalysis has been largely unsuccessful. The challenge for nickel-mediated alcohol couplings has been the mechanistic requirement for the critical C-O bond-forming step (formally known as the reductive elimination step) to occur via a Ni(III) alkoxide intermediate. Here we demonstrate that visible-light-excited photoredox catalysts can modulate the preferred oxidation states of nickel alkoxides in an operative catalytic cycle, thereby providing transient access to Ni(III) species that readily participate in reductive elimination. Using this synergistic merger of photoredox and nickel catalysis, we have developed a highly efficient and general carbon-oxygen coupling reaction using abundant alcohols and aryl bromides. More notably, we have developed a general strategy to `switch on' important yet elusive organometallic mechanisms via oxidation state modulations using only weak light and single-electron-transfer catalysts.

  2. Surface chemistry and catalysis confined under two-dimensional materials.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Bao, Xinhe

    2016-10-07

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials are characterised by their strong intraplanar bonding but weak interplanar interaction. Interfaces between neighboring 2D layers or between 2D overlayers and substrate surfaces provide intriguing confined spaces for chemical processes, which have stimulated a new area of "chemistry under 2D cover". In particular, well-defined 2D material overlayers such as graphene, hexagonal boron nitride, and transition metal dichalcogenides have been deposited on solid surfaces, which can be used as model systems to understand the new chemistry. In the present review, we first show that many atoms and molecules can intercalate ultrathin 2D materials supported on solid surfaces and the space under the 2D overlayers has been regarded as a 2D nanocontainer. Moreover, chemical reactions such as catalytic reactions, surface adlayer growth, chemical vapor deposition, and electrochemical reactions occur in the 2D confined spaces, which further act as 2D nanoreactors. It has been demonstrated that surface chemistry and catalysis are strongly modulated by the 2D covers, resulting in weakened molecule adsorption and enhanced surface reactions. Finally, we conclude that the confinement effect of the 2D cover leads to new chemistry in a small space, such as "catalysis under cover" and "electrochemistry under cover". These new concepts enable us to design advanced nanocatalysts encapsulated with 2D material shells which may present improved performance in many important processes of heterogeneous catalysis, electrochemistry, and energy conversion.

  3. Switching on Elusive Organometallic Mechanisms with Photoredox Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Terrett, Jack A.; Cuthbertson, James D.; Shurtleff, Valerie W.; MacMillan, David W. C.

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions have become one of the most utilized carbon–carbon and carbon–heteroatom bond-forming reactions in chemical synthesis. More recently, nickel catalysis has been shown to participate in a wide variety of C–C bond forming reactions, most notably Negishi, Suzuki–Miyaura, Stille, Kumada, and Hiyama couplings1,2. Despite the tremendous advances in C–C fragment couplings, the ability to forge C–O bonds in a general fashion via nickel catalysis has been largely unsuccessful. The challenge for nickel-mediated alcohol couplings has been the mechanistic requirement for the critical C–O bond forming step (formally known as the reductive elimination step) to occur via a Ni(III) alkoxide intermediate. In this manuscript, we demonstrate that visible light-excited photoredox catalysts can modulate the preferred oxidation states of nickel alkoxides in an operative catalytic cycle, thereby providing transient access to Ni(III) species that readily participate in reductive elimination. Using this synergistic merger of photoredox and nickel catalysis, we have developed a highly efficient and general carbon–oxygen coupling reaction using abundant alcohols and aryl bromides. More significantly, we have developed a general strategy to “switch on” important yet elusive organometallic mechanisms via oxidation state modulations using only weak light and single-electron transfer (SET) catalysts. PMID:26266976

  4. Involvement of Redox State in the Aging of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Radyuk, Svetlana N.; Sohal, Rajindar S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The main objective of this review was to provide an exposition of investigations, conducted in Drosophila melanogaster, on the role of reactive oxygen species and redox state in the aging process. While early transgenic studies did not clearly support the validity of the oxidative stress hypothesis of aging, predicated on the accumulation of structural damage, they spawned a broader search for redox-related effects that might impact the aging process. Recent Advances: Initial evidence implicating the thiol redox state as a possible causative factor in aging has been obtained in Drosophila. Overexpression of genes, such as GCL, G6PD, Prx2, and Prx5, which are involved in the maintenance of thiol redox homeostasis, has strong positive effects on longevity. Further, the depletion of peroxiredoxin activity in the mitochondria through the double knockdown of Prx5 and Prx3 not only results in a redox crisis but also elicits a rapid aging phenotype. Critical Issues: Herein, we summarize the present status of knowledge about the main components of the machinery controlling thiol redox homeostasis and describe how age-related redox fluctuations might impact aging more acutely through disruption of the redox-sensitive signaling mechanisms rather than via the simple accumulation of structural damage. Future Directions: Based on these initial insights into the plausible impact of redox fluctuations on redox signaling, future studies should focus on the pathways that have been explicitly implicated in aging, such as insulin signaling, TOR, and JNK/FOXO, with particular attention to elements that are redox sensitive. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 788–803. PMID:23458359

  5. Redox homeostasis: The Golden Mean of healthy living

    PubMed Central

    Ursini, Fulvio; Maiorino, Matilde; Forman, Henry Jay

    2016-01-01

    The notion that electrophiles serve as messengers in cell signaling is now widely accepted. Nonetheless, major issues restrain acceptance of redox homeostasis and redox signaling as components of maintenance of a normal physiological steady state. The first is that redox signaling requires sudden switching on of oxidant production and bypassing of antioxidant mechanisms rather than a continuous process that, like other signaling mechanisms, can be smoothly turned up or down. The second is the misperception that reactions in redox signaling involve “reactive oxygen species” rather than reaction of specific electrophiles with specific protein thiolates. The third is that hormesis provides protection against oxidants by increasing cellular defense or repair mechanisms rather than by specifically addressing the offset of redox homeostasis. Instead, we propose that both oxidant and antioxidant signaling are main features of redox homeostasis. As the redox shift is rapidly reversed by feedback reactions, homeostasis is maintained by continuous signaling for production and elimination of electrophiles and nucleophiles. Redox homeostasis, which is the maintenance of nucleophilic tone, accounts for a healthy physiological steady state. Electrophiles and nucleophiles are not intrinsically harmful or protective, and redox homeostasis is an essential feature of both the response to challenges and subsequent feedback. While the balance between oxidants and nucleophiles is preserved in redox homeostasis, oxidative stress provokes the establishment of a new radically altered redox steady state. The popular belief that scavenging free radicals by antioxidants has a beneficial effect is wishful thinking. We propose, instead, that continuous feedback preserves nucleophilic tone and that this is supported by redox active nutritional phytochemicals. These nonessential compounds, by activating Nrf2, mimic the effect of endogenously produced electrophiles (parahormesis). In summary

  6. Factors Controlling Redox Speciation of Plutonium and Neptunium in Extraction Separation Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Paulenova, Alena; Vandegrift, III, George F.

    2013-09-24

    The objective of the project was to examine the factors controlling redox speciation of plutonium and neptunium in UREX+ extraction in terms of redox potentials, redox mechanism, kinetics and thermodynamics. Researchers employed redox-speciation extractions schemes in parallel to the spectroscopic experiments. The resulting distribution of redox species w studied uring spectroscopic, electrochemical, and spectro-electrochemical methods. This work reulted in collection of data on redox stability and distribution of redox couples in the nitric acid/nitrate electrolyte and the development of redox buffers to stabilize the desired oxidation state of separated radionuclides. The effects of temperature and concentrations on the redox behavior of neptunium were evaluated.

  7. Redox-iodometry: a new potentiometric method.

    PubMed

    Gottardi, Waldemar; Pfleiderer, Jörg

    2005-07-01

    A new iodometric method for quantifying aqueous solutions of iodide-oxidizing and iodine-reducing substances, as well as plain iodine/iodide solutions, is presented. It is based on the redox potential of said solutions after reaction with iodide (or iodine) of known initial concentration. Calibration of the system and calculations of unknown concentrations was performed on the basis of developed algorithms and simple GWBASIC-programs. The method is distinguished by a short analysis time (2-3 min) and a simple instrumentation consisting of pH/mV meter, platinum and reference electrodes. In general the feasible concentration range encompasses 0.1 to 10(-6) mol/L, although it goes down to 10(-8) mol/L (0.001 mg Cl2/L) for oxidants like active chlorine compounds. The calculated imprecision and inaccuracy of the method were found to be 0.4-0.9% and 0.3-0.8%, respectively, resulting in a total error of 0.5-1.2%. Based on the experiments, average imprecisions of 1.0-1.5% at c(Ox)>10(-5) M, 1.5-3% at 10(-5) to 10(-7) M, and 4-7% at <10(-7) M were found. Redox-iodometry is a simple, precise, and time-saving substitute for the more laborious and expensive iodometric titration method, which, like other well-established colorimetric procedures, is clearly outbalanced at low concentrations; this underlines the practical importance of redox-iodometry.

  8. Biogeochemical redox processes and their impact on contaminant dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borch, Thomas; Kretzschmar, Ruben; Kappler, Andreas; Van Cappellen, Philippe; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Campbell, Kate M.

    2010-01-01

    Life and element cycling on Earth is directly related to electron transfer (or redox) reactions. An understanding of biogeochemical redox processes is crucial for predicting and protecting environmental health and can provide new opportunities for engineered remediation strategies. Energy can be released and stored by means of redox reactions via the oxidation of labile organic carbon or inorganic compounds (electron donors) by microorganisms coupled to the reduction of electron acceptors including humic substances, iron-bearing minerals, transition metals, metalloids, and actinides. Environmental redox processes play key roles in the formation and dissolution of mineral phases. Redox cycling of naturally occurring trace elements and their host minerals often controls the release or sequestration of inorganic contaminants. Redox processes control the chemical speciation, bioavailability, toxicity, and mobility of many major and trace elements including Fe, Mn, C, P, N, S, Cr, Cu, Co, As, Sb, Se, Hg, Tc, and U. Redox-active humic substances and mineral surfaces can catalyze the redox transformation and degradation of organic contaminants. In this review article, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of biogeochemical redox processes and their impact on contaminant fate and transport, including future research needs.

  9. Redox and metal-regulated oligomeric state for human porphobilinogen synthase activation.

    PubMed

    Sawada, N; Nagahara, N; Arisaka, F; Mitsuoka, K; Minami, M

    2011-06-01

    The oligomeric state of human porphobilinogen synthase (PBGS) [EC.4.2.1.24] is homooctamer, which consists of conformationally heterogenous subunits in the tertiary structure under air-saturated conditions. When PBGS is activated by reducing agent with zinc ion, a reservoir zinc ion coordinated by Cys(223) is transferred in the active center to be coordinated by Cys(122), Cys(124), and Cys(132) (Sawada et al. in J Biol Inorg Chem 10:199-207, 2005). The latter zinc ion serves as an electrophilic catalysis. In this study, we investigated a conformational change associated with the PBGS activation by reducing agent and zinc ion using analytical ultracentrifugation, negative staining electron microscopy, native PAGE, and enzyme activity staining. The results are in good agreement with our notion that the main component of PBGS is octamer with a few percent of hexamer and that the octamer changes spatial subunit arrangement upon reduction and further addition of zinc ion, accompanying decrease in f/f (0). It is concluded that redox-regulated PBGS activation via cleavage of disulfide bonds among Cys(122), Cys(124), and Cys(132) and coordination with zinc ion is closely linked to change in the oligomeric state.

  10. Dihydrofolate reductase as a model for studies of enzyme dynamics and catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Kohen, Amnon

    2015-01-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase from Escherichia coli (ecDHFR) serves as a model system for investigating the role of protein dynamics in enzyme catalysis. We discuss calculations predicting a network of dynamic motions that is coupled to the chemical step catalyzed by this enzyme. Kinetic studies testing these predictions are presented, and their potential use in better understanding the role of these dynamics in enzyme catalysis is considered. The cumulative results implicate motions across the entire protein in catalysis. PMID:26918149

  11. Virtual special issue on catalysis at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Pruski, Marek; Sadow, Aaron D.; Slowing, Igor I.; Marshall, Christopher L.; Stair, Peter; Rodriguez, Jose; Harris, Alex; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Biener, Juergen; Matranga, Christopher; Wang, Congjun; Schaidle, Joshua A.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Ruddy, Daniel A.; Deutsch, Todd; Alia, Shaun M.; Narula, Chaitanya; Overbury, Steve; Toops, Todd; Bullock, R. Morris; Peden, Charles H. F.; Wang, Yong; Allendorf, Mark D.; Norskov, Jens; Bligaard, Thomas

    2016-04-21

    Here the catalysis research at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Laboratories covers a wide range of research topics in heterogeneous catalysis, homogeneous/molecular catalysis, biocatalysis, electrocatalysis, and surface science. Since much of the work at National Laboratories is funded by DOE, the research is largely focused on addressing DOE's mission to ensure America's security and prosperity by addressing its energy, environmental, and nuclear challenges through transformative science and technology solutions.

  12. Redox-sensitive probes for the measurement of redox chemistries within phagosomes of macrophages and dendritic cells☆

    PubMed Central

    Balce, Dale R.; Yates, Robin M.

    2013-01-01

    There is currently much interest in factors that affect redox chemistries within phagosomes of macrophages and dendritic cells. In addition to the antimicrobial role of reactive oxygen species generation within phagosomes, accumulating evidence suggests that phagosomal redox chemistries influence other phagosomal functions such as macromolecular degradation and antigen processing. Whilst the redox chemistries within many sub-cellular compartments are being heavily scrutinized with the increasing use of fluorescent probe technologies, there is a paucity of tools to assess redox conditions within phagosomes. Hence the systems that control redox homeostasis in these unique environments remain poorly defined. This review highlights current redox-sensitive probes that can measure oxidative or reductive activity in phagosomes and discusses their suitability and limitations of use. Probes that are easily targeted to the phagosome by using established approaches are emphasized. PMID:24191242

  13. Redox shuttles for lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Wei; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Amine, Khalil

    2014-11-04

    Compounds may have general Formula IVA or IVB. ##STR00001## where, R.sup.8, R.sup.9, R.sup.10, and R.sup.11 are each independently selected from H, F, Cl, Br, CN, NO.sub.2, alkyl, haloalkyl, and alkoxy groups; X and Y are each independently O, S, N, or P; and Z' is a linkage between X and Y. Such compounds may be used as redox shuttles in electrolytes for use in electrochemical cells, batteries and electronic devices.

  14. Sedimentary cobalt concentrations track marine redox evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanner, Elizabeth; Planavsky, Noah; Lalonde, Stefan; Robbins, Jamie; Bekker, Andrey; Rouxel, Olivier; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    2013-04-01

    Oxygen production by photosynthesis drove the redox evolution of the atmosphere and ocean. Primary productivity by oxygenic photosynthesizers in the modern surface ocean is limited by trace nutrients such as iron, but previous studies have also observed high Co uptake associated with natural cyanobacterial populations. Constraining the size and variation of the oceanic reservoir of Co through time will help to understand the regulation of primary productivity and hence oxygenation through time. In this study, Co concentrations from iron formations (IF), shales and marine pyrites deposited over nearly 4 billion years of Earth's history are utilized to reconstruct secular changes in the mechanisms of Co removal from the oceanic reservoir. The Co reservoir prior to ~2 Ga was dominated by hydrothermal inputs and Fe(III)oxyhydroxides were likely involved in the removal of Co from the water column. Fe(II) oxidation in the water column resulted in the deposition of IF in the Archean and Paleoproterozoic, and the Co inventory of IF records a large oceanic reservoir of Co during this time. Lower Co concentrations in sediments during the Middle Proterozoic signify a decrease in the oceanic reservoir due to the expansion euxinic environments, corresponding to the results of previous studies. A transition to an oxidized deep ocean in the Phanerozoic is evidenced by correlation between Co and manganese (Mn) concentrations in hydrothermal and exhalative deposits, and in marine pyrites. This relationship between Co and Mn, signifying deposition of Co in association with Mn(IV)oxides, does not occur in the Precambrian. Mn(II) oxidation occurs at higher redox potentials than that required for Fe(II) oxidation, and the extent of Mn redox cycling prior to full ventilation of the oceans at the end of the Neoproterozoic was likely limited to spatially restricted oxic surface waters. In this regard, Co is another valuable redox proxy for tracking the growth and decline in oxygenated

  15. Rebalancing electrolytes in redox flow battery systems

    DOEpatents

    Chang, On Kok; Pham, Ai Quoc

    2014-12-23

    Embodiments of redox flow battery rebalancing systems include a system for reacting an unbalanced flow battery electrolyte with a rebalance electrolyte in a first reaction cell. In some embodiments, the rebalance electrolyte may contain ferrous iron (Fe.sup.2+) which may be oxidized to ferric iron (Fe.sup.3+) in the first reaction cell. The reducing ability of the rebalance reactant may be restored in a second rebalance cell that is configured to reduce the ferric iron in the rebalance electrolyte back into ferrous iron through a reaction with metallic iron.

  16. Fe-V redox flow batteries

    DOEpatents

    Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Yang, Zhenguo; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Jianlu; Chen, Baowei; Nie, Zimin; Xia, Guanguang

    2014-07-08

    A redox flow battery having a supporting solution that includes Cl.sup.- anions is characterized by an anolyte having V.sup.2+ and V.sup.3+ in the supporting solution, a catholyte having Fe.sup.2+ and Fe.sup.3+ in the supporting solution, and a membrane separating the anolyte and the catholyte. The anolyte and catholyte can have V cations and Fe cations, respectively, or the anolyte and catholyte can each contain both V and Fe cations in a mixture. Furthermore, the supporting solution can contain a mixture of SO.sub.4.sup.2- and Cl.sup.- anions.

  17. Electronic Tongue Containing Redox and Conductivity Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The Electronic Tongue (E-tongue 2) is an assembly of sensors for measuring concentrations of metal ions and possibly other contaminants in water. Potential uses for electronic tongues include monitoring the chemical quality of water in a variety of natural, industrial, and laboratory settings, and detecting micro-organisms indirectly by measuring microbially influenced corrosion. The device includes a heater, a temperature sensor, an oxidation/reduction (redox) sensor pair, an electrical sensor, an array of eight galvanic cells, and eight ion-specific electrodes.

  18. Redox polymer mediation for enzymatic biofuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallaway, Joshua

    Mediated biocatalytic cathodes prepared from the oxygen-reducing enzyme laccase and redox-conducting osmium hydrogels were characterized for use as cathodes in enzymatic biofuel cells. A series of osmium-based redox polymers was synthesized with redox potentials spanning the range from 0.11 V to 0.85 V (SHE), and the resulting biocatalytic electrodes were modeled to determine reaction kinetic constants using the current response, measured osmium concentration, and measured apparent electron diffusion. As in solution-phase systems, the bimolecular rate constant for mediation was found to vary greatly with mediator potential---from 250 s-1M-1 when mediator and enzyme were close in potential to 9.4 x 10 4 s-1M-1 when this overpotential was large. Optimum mediator potential for a cell operating with a non-limiting platinum anode and having no mass transport limitation from bulk solution was found to be 0.66 V (SHE). Redox polymers were synthesized under different concentrations, producing osmium variation. An increase from 6.6% to 7.2% osmium increased current response from 1.2 to 2.1 mA/cm2 for a planar film in 40°C oxygen-saturated pH 4 buffer, rotating at 900 rpm. These results translated to high surface area electrodes, nearly doubling current density to 13 mA/cm2, the highest to date for such an electrode. The typical fungal laccase from Trametes versicolor was replaced by a bacterially-expressed small laccase from Streptomyces coelicolor, resulting in biocatalytic films that reduced oxygen at increased pH, with full functionality at pH 7, producing 1.5 mA/cm 2 in planar configuration. Current response was biphasic with pH, matching the activity profile of the free enzyme in solution. The mediated enzyme electrode system was modeled with respect to apparent electron diffusion, mediator concentration, and transport of oxygen from bulk solution, all of which are to some extent controlled by design. Each factor was found to limit performance in certain circumstances

  19. Performance Mapping Studies in Redox Flow Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoberecht, M. A.; Thaller, L. H.

    1981-01-01

    Pumping power requirements in any flow battery system constitute a direct parasitic energy loss. It is therefore useful to determine the practical lower limit for reactant flow rates. Through the use of a theoretical framework based on electrochemical first principles, two different experimental flow mapping techniques were developed to evaluate and compare electrodes as a function of flow rate. For the carbon felt electrodes presently used in NASA-Lewis Redox cells, a flow rate 1.5 times greater than the stoichiometric rate seems to be the required minimum.

  20. Critical roles of Asp40 at the haem proximal side of haem-regulated phosphodiesterase from Escherichia coli in redox potential, auto-oxidation and catalytic control.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Miki; Kurokawa, Hirofumi; Yoshimura-Suzuki, Tokiko; Sagami, Ikuko; Shimizu, Toru

    2004-10-01

    In haem-regulated phosphodiesterase (PDE) from Escherichia coli (Ec DOS), haem is bound to the PAS domain, and the redox state of the haem iron regulates catalysis by the PDE domain. We generated mutants of Asp40, which forms a hydrogen bond with His77 (a proximal haem axial ligand) via two water molecules, and a salt bridge with Arg85 at the protein surface. The redox potential of haem was markedly increased from 67 mV vs. the standard hydrogen electrode in the wild-type enzyme to 95 mV and 114 mV in the Ala and Asn mutants, respectively. Additionally, the auto-oxidation rate of Ec DOS PAS was significantly increased from 0.0053 to 0.051 and 0.033 min(-1), respectively. Interestingly, the catalytic activities of the Asp40 mutants were abolished completely. Thus, Asp40 appears to play a critical role in the electronic structure of the haem iron and redox-dependent catalytic control of the PDE domain. In this report, we discuss the mechanism of catalytic control of Ec DOS, based on the physico-chemical characteristics of the Asp40 mutants.

  1. Support for U.S. Participants at the 15th International Congress on Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wachs, Israel E.

    2013-08-05

    The grant was used to partially assist the travel expenses of U.S. academic scientists to attend the 15th International Congress on Catalysis. The conference was held in Munich, Germany from July 1-6, 2012. The importance of the International Congress was to bring together the international community of faculty members who participate in catalysis research, and to share information that would lead to further developments and directions in the field of study. Graduate students and Post Docs were invited to apply for travel assistance based on criteria established by the North American Catalysis Society (NACS) and the local Catalysis Clubs.

  2. Pyridine nucleotide redox abnormalities in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ido, Yasuo

    2007-07-01

    In addition to hyperglycemia, diabetes is associated with increased levels of circulating free fatty acids, lactate, and branched chain amino acids, all of which produce an excessive reduced form of pyridine nucleotides NADH (reductive stress) in the cytosol and mitochondria. Our studies suggest that cytosolic NADH reductive stress under high glucose is largely caused by increased flux of glucose through polyol (sorbitol) pathway consisting of aldose reductase and sorbitol dehydrogenase. Inhibition of aldose reductase that blocks the polyol pathway has been shown to ameliorate diabetic neuropathy in humans. Cytosolic NADH reductive stress is predicted to increase production of diglycerides, reactive oxygen species, and methylglyoxal. Recent studies indicate that increasing NADH affects gene expression through the NADH activating transcriptional co-repressor, C-terminal binding protein (CtBP). In addition, it has been shown that the NADH utilizing enzyme, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, participates as transcriptional regulator. These findings testify to the importance of NADH redox balance in cell biology and pathogenesis of diabetes and its complications. For example, through CtBP, the high NADH to NAD(+) ratio decreases an expression of SirT1, the protein inducing longevity and anti-apoptosis. This review covers metabolic cascades causing reductive stress and oxidative stress in diabetes after a brief introduction of the redox concept.

  3. Cooperative redox activation for carbon dioxide conversion

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Zhong; Nielsen, Dennis U.; Lindhardt, Anders T.; Daasbjerg, Kim; Skrydstrup, Troels

    2016-01-01

    A longstanding challenge in production chemistry is the development of catalytic methods for the transformation of carbon dioxide into useful chemicals. Silane and borane promoted reductions can be fined-tuned to provide a number of C1-building blocks under mild conditions, but these approaches are limited because of the production of stoichiometric waste compounds. Here we report on the conversion of CO2 with diaryldisilanes, which through cooperative redox activation generate carbon monoxide and a diaryldisiloxane that actively participate in a palladium-catalysed carbonylative Hiyama-Denmark coupling for the synthesis of an array of pharmaceutically relevant diarylketones. Thus the disilane reagent not only serves as the oxygen abstracting agent from CO2, but the silicon-containing ‘waste', produced through oxygen insertion into the Si–Si bond, participates as a reagent for the transmetalation step in the carbonylative coupling. Hence this concept of cooperative redox activation opens up for new avenues in the conversion of CO2. PMID:27981967

  4. Redox regulation of mammalian sperm capacitation

    PubMed Central

    O’Flaherty, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    Capacitation is a series of morphological and metabolic changes necessary for the spermatozoon to achieve fertilizing ability. One of the earlier happenings during mammalian sperm capacitation is the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that will trigger and regulate a series of events including protein phosphorylation, in a time-dependent fashion. The identity of the sperm oxidase responsible for the production of ROS involved in capacitation is still elusive, and several candidates are discussed in this review. Interestingly, ROS-induced ROS formation has been described during human sperm capacitation. Redox signaling during capacitation is associated with changes in thiol groups of proteins located on the plasma membrane and subcellular compartments of the spermatozoon. Both, oxidation of thiols forming disulfide bridges and the increase on thiol content are necessary to regulate different sperm proteins associated with capacitation. Reducing equivalents such as NADH and NADPH are necessary to support capacitation in many species including humans. Lactate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phospohate dehydrogenase, and isocitrate dehydrogenase are responsible in supplying NAD (P) H for sperm capacitation. Peroxiredoxins (PRDXs) are newly described enzymes with antioxidant properties that can protect mammalian spermatozoa; however, they are also candidates for assuring the regulation of redox signaling required for sperm capacitation. The dysregulation of PRDXs and of enzymes needed for their reactivation such as thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase system and glutathione-S-transferases impairs sperm motility, capacitation, and promotes DNA damage in spermatozoa leading to male infertility. PMID:25926608

  5. Statins: pleiotropic regulators of cardiovascular redox state.

    PubMed

    Antoniades, Charalambos; Channon, Keith M

    2014-03-10

    Lipid-lowering treatment with statins is one of the most effective therapeutic strategies in cardiovascular medicine because they reduce cardiovascular risk in both primary and secondary prevention. Despite the well-established links between low-density lipoprotein and cardiovascular risk, the clinical benefit from statin treatment is not fully explained by their lipid-lowering potential. A number of pleiotropic effects of statins have been described over the past decade, and their ability to suppress global oxidative stress is probably one of the most important mechanisms by which they exert their beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. In this Forum, there are review articles discussing the molecular mechanisms by which statins modify redox signaling in the vasculature and the heart. They exert direct effects on the vascular wall and the myocardium or indirect by targeting the interactions between the cardiovascular system and adipose tissue or circulating cell types. The review articles in this Forum follow a translational approach and link the molecular mechanisms by which statins modify cardiovascular redox signaling with their clinical benefit in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  6. Mitochondrial Redox Dysfunction and Environmental Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Caito, Samuel W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Mitochondria are structurally and biochemically diverse, even within a single type of cell. Protein complexes localized to the inner mitochondrial membrane synthesize ATP by coupling electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation. The organelles produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) from mitochondrial oxygen and ROS can, in turn, alter the function and expression of proteins used for aerobic respiration by post-translational and transcriptional regulation. Recent Advances: New interest is emerging not only into the roles of mitochondria in disease development and progression but also as a target for environmental toxicants. Critical Issues: Dysregulation of respiration has been linked to cell death and is a major contributor to acute neuronal trauma, peripheral diseases, as well as chronic neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Future Directions: Here, we discuss the mechanisms underlying the sensitivity of the mitochondrial respiratory complexes to redox modulation, as well as examine the effects of environmental contaminants that have well-characterized mitochondrial toxicity. The contaminants discussed in this review are some of the most prevalent and potent environmental contaminants that have been linked to neurological dysfunction, altered cellular respiration, and oxidation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 578–595. PMID:25826672

  7. Redox Regulation in Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shijie; Li, Chunbao; Cheng, Ninghui; Cui, Xiaojiang; Xu, Xinglian; Zhou, Guanghong

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ROS-dependent (redox regulation) signaling pathways and transcriptional activities are thought to be critical in stem cell self-renewal and differentiation during growth and organogenesis. Aberrant ROS burst and dysregulation of those ROS-dependent cellular processes are strongly associated with human diseases including many cancers. ROS levels are elevated in cancer cells partially due to their higher metabolism rate. In the past 15 years, the concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs) has been gaining ground as the subpopulation of cancer cells with stem cell-like properties and characteristics have been identified in various cancers. CSCs possess low levels of ROS and are responsible for cancer recurrence after chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Unfortunately, how CSCs control ROS production and scavenging and how ROS-dependent signaling pathways contribute to CSCs function remain poorly understood. This review focuses on the role of redox balance, especially in ROS-dependent cellular processes in cancer stem cells (CSCs). We updated recent advances in our understanding of ROS generation and elimination in CSCs and their effects on CSC self-renewal and differentiation through modulating signaling pathways and transcriptional activities. The review concludes that targeting CSCs by manipulating ROS metabolism/dependent pathways may be an effective approach for improving cancer treatment. PMID:26273424

  8. Mechanotransduction: Forces, Sensors, and Redox Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Shampa

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Mechanotransduction describes the molecular mechanisms by which cells response to changes in their physical environment by translating mechanical stimuli into biochemical signals. It is now clear that reactive oxygen species (ROS) and redox signaling play a crucial role in mechanotransduction analogous to their role in chemotransduction. This Forum has particular emphasis on ROS generation with altered mechanical stress, the upstream signal transduction pathways that initiate ROS production, and the downstream effectors that lead to physiological responses. There is particular emphasis on the role of ion channels in the initial response and the role of NADPH oxidases as the major source of ROS. The latter enzyme serves as the fulcrum of the mechanotransduction cascade. Although it seems likely that all cells are mechanosensitive to some degree, we have highlighted the responses of unicellular organisms (bacteria), bone cells, and particularly cells of the vasculature (endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells). These cell types have been useful for studying the responses to altered osmotic pressure, hemodynamic pressure, shear stress, and compressive forces while exploring the link between signal transduction and physiological/pathophysiological responses. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 868–871. PMID:24354342

  9. High-Potential Electrocatalytic O2 Reduction with Nitroxyl / NOx Mediators: Implications for Fuel Cells and Aerobic Oxidation Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gerken, James B.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2015-07-15

    Efficient reduction of O2 to water is a central challenge in energy conversion and aerobic oxidation catalysis. In the present study, we investigate the electrochemical reduction of O2 with soluble organic nitroxyl and nitrogen oxide (NOx) mediators. When used alone, neither organic nitroxyls, such as TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyl-N-oxyl), nor NOx species, such as sodium nitrite, are effective mediators of electrochemical O2 reduction. The combination of nitroxyl/NOx species, however, mediates sustained O2 reduction at electrochemical potentials of 0.19–0.33 V (vs. Fc/Fc+) in acetonitrile containing trifluoroacetic acid. Mechanistic analysis of the coupled redox reactions supports a process in which the nitrogen oxide catalyst drives aerobic oxidation of a nitroxyl mediator to an oxoammonium species, which then is reduced back to the nitroxyl at the cathode. The electrolysis potential is dictated by the oxoammonium/nitroxyl reduction potential. The high potentials observed with this ORR system benefit from the mechanism-based specificity for four-electron reduction of oxygen to water mediated by NOx species, together with kinetically efficient reduction of oxidized NOx species by TEMPO and other organic nitroxyls. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  10. "JCE" Classroom Activity #111: Redox Reactions in Three Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieves, Edgardo L. Ortiz; Barreto, Reizelie; Medina, Zuleika

    2012-01-01

    This activity introduces students to the concept of reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions. To help students obtain a thorough understanding of redox reactions, the concept is explored at three levels: macroscopic, submicroscopic, and symbolic. In this activity, students perform hands-on investigations of the three levels as they work at different…

  11. The mechanism of montmorillonite catalysis in RNA synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Prakash

    The formation of complex prebiotic molecules on the early Earth is likely to have involved a component of mineral catalysis. Amongst the variety of clay minerals that have been investigated by us for their ability to catalyze the formation of RNA oligomers is montmorillonite. These are 2:1 layer silicates that have a wide range of chemical compositions [(Na,Ca)0.33(Al,Fe,Mg)2(Si,Al)4O10(OH)2.nH2O]. They are commonly produced by the weathering of silicic volcanic ashes to form Bentonite. Once formed, montmorillonites gradually transform to Illites at a modest pressure and temperature. Of the many samples of montmorillonite that we have experimentally examined, a selected subset has been observed to be catalytic for RNA synthesis (Joshi et. al., 2009; Aldersley et al., 2011). Those that have been observed to be excellent catalysts come from a restricted range of elemental compositions. The recent identification of phyllosilicates including montmorillonite on Mars (Bishop et al., 2008) raises the possibility that such processes may have taken place there too. The extent of catalysis depended not only upon the magnitude of the negative charge on the montmorillonite lattice and the number of cations associated with it, but also on the pH at which the reaction is promoted. The isotherm and catalysis studies were extended to provide binding information and catalytic outcomes over a wide pH range. When cations in raw montmorillonite are completely replaced by sodium ions, the resulting Na+-montmorillonite does not catalyze oligomer formation because the ions saturate the interlayer between the platelets of montmorillonite, which blocks the binding of the activated monomers. Acid washed montmorillonite titrated to pH 6-8 with alkali metal ions, serves as the model catalyst for this RNA synthesis (Aldersley et. al., 2011). The optimal binding occurred in the region of maximal oligomer formation. X-ray diffraction studies revealed changes in layer separations of

  12. Redox properties of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from electroactive bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shan-Wei; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Yu, Han-Qing

    2016-12-01

    Although the capacity for electroactive bacteria to convert environmental metallic minerals and organic pollutants is well known, the role of the redox properties of microbial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in this process is poorly understood. In this work, the redox properties of EPS from two widely present electroactive bacterial strains (Shewanella oneidensis and Pseudomonas putida) were explored. Electrochemical analysis demonstrates that the EPS extracted from the two strains exhibited redox properties. Spectroelectrochemical and protein electrophoresis analyses indicate that the extracted EPS from S. oneidensis and P. putida contained heme-binding proteins, which were identified as the possible redox components in the EPS. The results of heme-mediated behavior of EPS may provide an insight into the important roles of EPS in electroactive bacteria to maximize their redox capability for biogeochemical cycling, environmental bioremediation and wastewater treatment.

  13. Redox properties of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from electroactive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shan-Wei; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Yu, Han-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Although the capacity for electroactive bacteria to convert environmental metallic minerals and organic pollutants is well known, the role of the redox properties of microbial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in this process is poorly understood. In this work, the redox properties of EPS from two widely present electroactive bacterial strains (Shewanella oneidensis and Pseudomonas putida) were explored. Electrochemical analysis demonstrates that the EPS extracted from the two strains exhibited redox properties. Spectroelectrochemical and protein electrophoresis analyses indicate that the extracted EPS from S. oneidensis and P. putida contained heme-binding proteins, which were identified as the possible redox components in the EPS. The results of heme-mediated behavior of EPS may provide an insight into the important roles of EPS in electroactive bacteria to maximize their redox capability for biogeochemical cycling, environmental bioremediation and wastewater treatment. PMID:27991531

  14. Energy Landscapes and Catalysis in Nitric-oxide Synthase*

    PubMed Central

    Sobolewska-Stawiarz, Anna; Leferink, Nicole G. H.; Fisher, Karl; Heyes, Derren J.; Hay, Sam; Rigby, Stephen E. J.; Scrutton, Nigel S.

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays diverse roles in mammalian physiology. It is involved in blood pressure regulation, neurotransmission, and immune response, and is generated through complex electron transfer reactions catalyzed by NO synthases (NOS). In neuronal NOS (nNOS), protein domain dynamics and calmodulin binding are implicated in regulating electron flow from NADPH, through the FAD and FMN cofactors, to the heme oxygenase domain, the site of NO generation. Simple models based on crystal structures of nNOS reductase have invoked a role for large scale motions of the FMN-binding domain in shuttling electrons from the FAD-binding domain to the heme oxygenase domain. However, molecular level insight of the dynamic structural transitions in NOS enzymes during enzyme catalysis is lacking. We use pulsed electron-electron double resonance spectroscopy to derive inter-domain distance relationships in multiple conformational states of nNOS. These distance relationships are correlated with enzymatic activity through variable pressure kinetic studies of electron transfer and turnover. The binding of NADPH and calmodulin are shown to influence interdomain distance relationships as well as reaction chemistry. An important effect of calmodulin binding is to suppress adventitious electron transfer from nNOS to molecular oxygen and thereby preventing accumulation of reactive oxygen species. A complex landscape of conformations is required for nNOS catalysis beyond the simple models derived from static crystal structures of nNOS reductase. Detailed understanding of this landscape advances our understanding of nNOS catalysis/electron transfer, and could provide new opportunities for the discovery of small molecule inhibitors that bind at dynamic protein interfaces of this multidimensional energy landscape. PMID:24610812

  15. The structural basis for specificity in lipoxygenase catalysis.

    PubMed

    Newcomer, Marcia E; Brash, Alan R

    2015-03-01

    Many intriguing facets of lipoxygenase (LOX) catalysis are open to a detailed structural analysis. Polyunsaturated fatty acids with two to six double bonds are oxygenated precisely on a particular carbon, typically forming a single chiral fatty acid hydroperoxide product. Molecular oxygen is not bound or liganded during catalysis, yet it is directed precisely to one position and one stereo configuration on the reacting fatty acid. The transformations proceed upon exposure of substrate to enzyme in the presence of O2 (RH + O2 → ROOH), so it has proved challenging to capture the precise mode of substrate binding in the LOX active site. Beginning with crystal structures with bound inhibitors or surrogate substrates, and most recently arachidonic acid bound under anaerobic conditions, a picture is consolidating of catalysis in a U-shaped fatty acid binding channel in which individual LOX enzymes use distinct amino acids to control the head-to-tail orientation of the fatty acid and register of the selected pentadiene opposite the non-heme iron, suitably positioned for the initial stereoselective hydrogen abstraction and subsequent reaction with O2 . Drawing on the crystal structures available currently, this review features the roles of the N-terminal β-barrel (C2-like, or PLAT domain) in substrate acquisition and sensitivity to cellular calcium, and the α-helical catalytic domain in fatty acid binding and reactions with O2 that produce hydroperoxide products with regio and stereospecificity. LOX structures combine to explain how similar enzymes with conserved catalytic machinery differ in product, but not substrate, specificities.

  16. Evolutionarily conserved linkage between enzyme fold, flexibility, and catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, Arvind; Agarwal, Pratul K

    2011-01-01

    Proteins are intrinsically flexible molecules. The role of internal motions in a protein's designated function is widely debated. The role of protein structure in enzyme catalysis is well established, and conservation of structural features provides vital clues to their role in function. Recently, it has been proposed that the protein function may involve multiple conformations: the observed deviations are not random thermodynamic fluctuations; rather, flexibility may be closely linked to protein function, including enzyme catalysis. We hypothesize that the argument of conservation of important structural features can also be extended to identification of protein flexibility in interconnection with enzyme function. Three classes of enzymes (prolyl-peptidyl isomerase, oxidoreductase, and nuclease) that catalyze diverse chemical reactions have been examined using detailed computational modeling. For each class, the identification and characterization of the internal protein motions coupled to the chemical step in enzyme mechanisms in multiple species show identical enzyme conformational fluctuations. In addition to the active-site residues, motions of protein surface loop regions (>10 away) are observed to be identical across species, and networks of conserved interactions/residues connect these highly flexible surface regions to the active-site residues that make direct contact with substrates. More interestingly, examination of reaction-coupled motions in non-homologous enzyme systems (with no structural or sequence similarity) that catalyze the same biochemical reaction shows motions that induce remarkably similar changes in the enzyme substrate interactions during catalysis. The results indicate that the reaction-coupled flexibility is a conserved aspect of the enzyme molecular architecture. Protein motions in distal areas of homologous and non-homologous enzyme systems mediate similar changes in the active-site enzyme substrate interactions, thereby impacting

  17. Evolutionarily conserved linkage between enzyme fold, flexibility, and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Arvind; Agarwal, Pratul K

    2011-11-01

    Proteins are intrinsically flexible molecules. The role of internal motions in a protein's designated function is widely debated. The role of protein structure in enzyme catalysis is well established, and conservation of structural features provides vital clues to their role in function. Recently, it has been proposed that the protein function may involve multiple conformations: the observed deviations are not random thermodynamic fluctuations; rather, flexibility may be closely linked to protein function, including enzyme catalysis. We hypothesize that the argument of conservation of important structural features can also be extended to identification of protein flexibility in interconnection with enzyme function. Three classes of enzymes (prolyl-peptidyl isomerase, oxidoreductase, and nuclease) that catalyze diverse chemical reactions have been examined using detailed computational modeling. For each class, the identification and characterization of the internal protein motions coupled to the chemical step in enzyme mechanisms in multiple species show identical enzyme conformational fluctuations. In addition to the active-site residues, motions of protein surface loop regions (>10 Å away) are observed to be identical across species, and networks of conserved interactions/residues connect these highly flexible surface regions to the active-site residues that make direct contact with substrates. More interestingly, examination of reaction-coupled motions in non-homologous enzyme systems (with no structural or sequence similarity) that catalyze the same biochemical reaction shows motions that induce remarkably similar changes in the enzyme-substrate interactions during catalysis. The results indicate that the reaction-coupled flexibility is a conserved aspect of the enzyme molecular architecture. Protein motions in distal areas of homologous and non-homologous enzyme systems mediate similar changes in the active-site enzyme-substrate interactions, thereby impacting

  18. MITOCHONDRIAL REDOX IMAGING FOR CANCER DIAGNOSTIC AND THERAPEUTIC STUDIES

    PubMed Central

    LI, LIN Z.; XU, HE N.; RANJI, MAHSA; NIOKA, SHOKO; CHANCE, BRITTON

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial redox states provide important information about energy-linked biological processes and signaling events in tissues for various disease phenotypes including cancer. The redox scanning method developed at the Chance laboratory about 30 years ago has allowed 3D high-resolution (~ 50 × 50 × 10 μm3) imaging of mitochondrial redox state in tissue on the basis of the fluorescence of NADH (reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) and Fp (oxidized flavoproteins including flavin adenine dinucleotide, i.e., FAD). In this review, we illustrate its basic principles, recent technical developments, and biomedical applications to cancer diagnostic and therapeutic studies in small animal models. Recently developed calibration procedures for the redox imaging using reference standards allow quantification of nominal NADH and Fp concentrations, and the concentration-based redox ratios, e.g., Fp/(Fp+NADH) and NADH/(Fp+NADH) in tissues. This calibration facilitates the comparison of redox imaging results acquired for different metabolic states at different times and/or with different instrumental settings. A redox imager using a CCD detector has been developed to acquire 3D images faster and with a higher in-plane resolution down to 10 μm. Ex vivo imaging and in vivo imaging of tissue mitochondrial redox status have been demonstrated with the CCD imager. Applications of tissue redox imaging in small animal cancer models include metabolic imaging of glioma and myc-induced mouse mammary tumors, predicting the metastatic potentials of human melanoma and breast cancer mouse xenografts, differentiating precancerous and normal tissues, and monitoring the tumor treatment response to photodynamic therapy. Possible future directions for the development of redox imaging are also discussed. PMID:26015810

  19. Catalysis of Protein Disulfide Bond Isomerization in a Homogeneous Substrate†

    PubMed Central

    Kersteen, Elizabeth A.; Barrows, Seth R.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2008-01-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) catalyzes the rearrangement of nonnative disulfide bonds in the endoplasmic reticulum of eukaryotic cells, a process that often limits the rate at which polypeptide chains fold into a native protein conformation. The mechanism of the reaction catalyzed by PDI is unclear. In assays involving protein substrates, the reaction appears to involve the complete reduction of some or all of its nonnative disulfide bonds followed by oxidation of the resulting dithiols. The substrates in these assays are, however, heterogeneous, which complicates mechanistic analyses. Here, we report the first analysis of disulfide bond isomerization in a homogeneous substrate. Our substrate is based on tachyplesin I, a 17-mer peptide that folds into a _-hairpin stabilized by two disulfide bonds. We describe the chemical synthesis of a variant of tachyplesin I in which its two disulfide bonds are in a nonnative state and side chains near its N-and C-terminus contain a fluorescence donor (tryptophan) and acceptor (N_-dansyllysine). Fluorescence resonance energy transfer from 280 to 465 nm increases by 28-fold upon isomerization of the disulfide bonds into their native state (which has a lower E°_ = -0.313 V than does PDI). We use this continuous assay to analyze catalysis by wild-type human PDI and a variant in which the C-terminal cysteine residue within each Cys—Gly—His—Cys active site is replaced with alanine. We find that wild-type PDI catalyzes the isomerization of the substrate with kcat/KM = 1.7 _ 105 M–1M s–1, which is the largest value yet reported for catalysis of disulfide bond isomerization. The variant, which is a poor catalyst of disulfide bond reduction and dithiol oxidation, retains virtually all of the activity of wild-type PDI in catalysis of disulfide bond isomerization. Thus, the C-terminal cysteine residues play an insignificant role in the isomerization of the disulfide bonds in nonnative tachyplesin I. We conclude that

  20. USD Catalysis Group for Alternative Energy - Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hoefelmeyer, James

    2014-10-03

    I. Project Summary Catalytic processes are a major technological underpinning of modern society, and are essential to the energy sector in the processing of chemical fuels from natural resources, fine chemicals synthesis, and energy conversion. Advances in catalyst technology are enormously valuable since these lead to reduced chemical waste, reduced energy loss, and reduced costs. New energy technologies, which are critical to future economic growth, are also heavily reliant on catalysts, including fuel cells and photo-electrochemical cells. Currently, the state of South Dakota is underdeveloped in terms of research infrastructure related to catalysis. If South Dakota intends to participate in significant economic growth opportunities that result from advances in catalyst technology, then this area of research needs to be made a high priority for investment. To this end, a focused research effort is proposed in which investigators from The University of South Dakota (USD) and The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology (SDSMT) will contribute to form the South Dakota Catalysis Group (SDCG). The multidisciplinary team of the (SDCG) include: (USD) Dan Engebretson, James Hoefelmeyer, Ranjit Koodali, and Grigoriy Sereda; (SDSMT) Phil Scott Ahrenkiel, Hao Fong, Jan Puszynski, Rajesh Shende, and Jacek Swiatkiewicz. The group is well suited to engage in a collaborative project due to the resources available within the existing programs. Activities within the SDCG will be monitored through an external committee consisting of three distinguished professors in chemistry. The committee will provide expert advice and recommendations to the SDCG. Advisory meetings in which committee members interact with South Dakota investigators will be accompanied by individual oral and poster presentations in a materials and catalysis symposium. The symposium will attract prominent scientists, and will enhance the visibility of research in the state of South Dakota. The SDCG requests