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Sample records for reduce excess amyloid

  1. Nanomaterials for reducing amyloid cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Mao, Xiaobo; Yu, Yue; Wang, Chen-Xuan; Yang, Yan-Lian; Wang, Chen

    2013-07-26

    This review is intended to reflect the recent progress on therapeutic applications of nanomaterials in amyloid diseases. The progress on anti-amyloid functions of various nanomaterials including inorganic nanoparticles, polymeric nanoparticles, carbon nanomaterials and biomolecular aggregates, is reviewed and discussed. The main functionalization strategies for general nanoparticle modifications are reviewed for potential applications of targeted therapeutics. The interaction mechanisms between amyloid peptides and nanomaterials are discussed from the perspectives of dominant interactions and kinetics. The encapsulation of anti-amyloid drugs, targeted drug delivery, controlled drug release and drug delivery crossing blood brain barrier by application of nanomaterials would also improve the therapeutics of amyloid diseases.

  2. Amyloid β-sheet mimics that antagonize protein aggregation and reduce amyloid toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Pin-Nan; Liu, Cong; Zhao, Minglei; Eisenberg, David; Nowick, James S.

    2012-11-01

    The amyloid protein aggregation associated with diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and type II diabetes (among many others) features a bewildering variety of β-sheet-rich structures in transition from native proteins to ordered oligomers and fibres. The variation in the amino-acid sequences of the β-structures presents a challenge to developing a model system of β-sheets for the study of various amyloid aggregates. Here, we introduce a family of robust β-sheet macrocycles that can serve as a platform to display a variety of heptapeptide sequences from different amyloid proteins. We have tailored these amyloid β-sheet mimics (ABSMs) to antagonize the aggregation of various amyloid proteins, thereby reducing the toxicity of amyloid aggregates. We describe the structures and inhibitory properties of ABSMs containing amyloidogenic peptides from the amyloid-β peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease, β2-microglobulin associated with dialysis-related amyloidosis, α-synuclein associated with Parkinson's disease, islet amyloid polypeptide associated with type II diabetes, human and yeast prion proteins, and Tau, which forms neurofibrillary tangles.

  3. Brazilin inhibits amyloid β-protein fibrillogenesis, remodels amyloid fibrils and reduces amyloid cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Wen-Jie; Guo, Jing-Jing; Gao, Ming-Tao; Hu, Sheng-Quan; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Han, Yi-Fan; Liu, Fu-Feng; Jiang, Shaoyi; Sun, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Soluble amyloid β-protein (Aβ) oligomers, the main neurotoxic species, are predominantly formed from monomers through a fibril-catalyzed secondary nucleation. Herein, we virtually screened an in-house library of natural compounds and discovered brazilin as a dual functional compound in both Aβ42 fibrillogenesis inhibition and mature fibril remodeling, leading to significant reduction in Aβ42 cytotoxicity. The potent inhibitory effect of brazilin was proven by an IC50 of 1.5 +/- 0.3 μM, which was smaller than that of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate in Phase III clinical trials and about one order of magnitude smaller than those of curcumin and resveratrol. Most importantly, it was found that brazilin redirected Aβ42 monomers and its mature fibrils into unstructured Aβ aggregates with some β-sheet structures, which could prevent both the primary nucleation and the fibril-catalyzed secondary nucleation. Molecular simulations demonstrated that brazilin inhibited Aβ42 fibrillogenesis by directly binding to Aβ42 species via hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonding and remodeled mature fibrils by disrupting the intermolecular salt bridge Asp23-Lys28 via hydrogen bonding. Both experimental and computational studies revealed a different working mechanism of brazilin from that of known inhibitors. These findings indicate that brazilin is of great potential as a neuroprotective and therapeutic agent for Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Reducing Available Soluble β-Amyloid Prevents Progression of Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Julia L.; Prada, Claudia M.; Fine, Sara J.; Garcia-Alloza, Monica; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Arbel-Ornath, Michal; Greenberg, Steven M.; Bacskai, Brian J.; Frosch, Matthew P.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), the accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) in the walls of leptomeningeal and cortical blood vessels of the brain, is a major cause of intracerebral hemorrhage and cognitive impairment, and is commonly associated with Alzheimer disease (AD). CAA progression, as measured in transgenic mice by longitudinal imaging with multiphoton microscopy, occurs in a predictable linear manner. The dynamics of Aβ deposition in and clearance from vascular walls and their relationship to the concentration of Aβ in the brain is poorly understood. We manipulated Aβ levels in the brain using 2 approaches: peripheral clearance via administration of the amyloid binding “peripheral sink” protein gelsolin, and direct inhibition of its formation via administration of LY-411575, a small molecule γ-secretase inhibitor. We found that gelsolin and LY-411575 both reduced the rate of CAA progression in Tg2576 mice from untreated rates of 0.58 ± 0.15% and 0.52 ± 0.09% to 0.11 ± 0.18% (p = 0.04) and −0.17 ± 0.09% (p < 0.001) of affected vessel per day, respectively, in the absence of an immune response. CAA progression was also halted when gelsolin was combined with LY-411575 (−0.004 ± 0.10%, p < 0.003). These data suggest that CAA progression can be prevented with non-immune approaches that may reduce the availability of soluble Aβ, but without evidence of substantial amyloid clearance from vessels. PMID:23095848

  5. Docosahexaenoic Acid Reduces Amyloid β Production via Multiple Pleiotropic Mechanisms*

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Marcus O. W.; Kuchenbecker, Johanna; Grösgen, Sven; Burg, Verena K.; Hundsdörfer, Benjamin; Rothhaar, Tatjana L.; Friess, Petra; de Wilde, Martijn C.; Broersen, Laus M.; Penke, Botond; Péter, Mária; Vígh, László; Grimm, Heike S.; Hartmann, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is characterized by accumulation of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) generated by β- and γ-secretase processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). The intake of the polyunsaturated fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has been associated with decreased amyloid deposition and a reduced risk in Alzheimer disease in several epidemiological trials; however, the exact underlying molecular mechanism remains to be elucidated. Here, we systematically investigate the effect of DHA on amyloidogenic and nonamyloidogenic APP processing and the potential cross-links to cholesterol metabolism in vivo and in vitro. DHA reduces amyloidogenic processing by decreasing β- and γ-secretase activity, whereas the expression and protein levels of BACE1 and presenilin1 remain unchanged. In addition, DHA increases protein stability of α-secretase resulting in increased nonamyloidogenic processing. Besides the known effect of DHA to decrease cholesterol de novo synthesis, we found cholesterol distribution in plasma membrane to be altered. In the presence of DHA, cholesterol shifts from raft to non-raft domains, and this is accompanied by a shift in γ-secretase activity and presenilin1 protein levels. Taken together, DHA directs amyloidogenic processing of APP toward nonamyloidogenic processing, effectively reducing Aβ release. DHA has a typical pleiotropic effect; DHA-mediated Aβ reduction is not the consequence of a single major mechanism but is the result of combined multiple effects. PMID:21324907

  6. Peripherally expressed neprilysin reduces brain amyloid burden: A novel approach for treating Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Hanjun; Liu, Yinxing; Daily, Abigail; Police, Sara; Kim, Myung-Hee; Oddo, Salvatore; LaFerla, Frank M.; Pauly, James R.; Murphy, M. Paul; Hersh, Louis B.

    2009-01-01

    A number of therapeutic strategies for treating Alzheimer’s disease have focused on reducing amyloid burden in the brain. Amongst these approaches, the expression of amyloid β peptide (Aβ)-degrading enzymes in the brain has been shown to be effective, but to date not practical for treating patients. We report here a novel strategy for lowering amyloid burden in the brain by peripherally expressing the Aβ-degrading enzyme neprilysin on leukocytes in the 3×Tg-AD mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease. Through transplantation of lentivirus transduced bone marrow cells, the Aβ-degrading protease neprilysin was expressed on the surface of leukocytes. This peripheral neprilysin reduced soluble brain amyloid β peptide levels by ~30% and lowered the accumulation of amyloid β peptides by 50–60% when transplantation was performed at both young and early adult age. In addition, peripheral neprilysin expression reduced amyloid dependent performance deficits as measured by the Morris Water Maze. Unlike other methods designed to lower amyloid β peptide levels in blood, which cause a net increase in peptide, neprilysin expression results in the catabolism of the amyloid β peptide to small innocuous peptide fragments. These findings demonstrate that peripherally expressed neprilysin, and likely other amyloid β peptide degrading enzymes, has the potential for being utilized as a therapeutic approach to prevent and treat Alzheimer’s disease and suggest this approach should be further explored. PMID:19021293

  7. Adeno-associated Virus Gene Therapy With Cholesterol 24-Hydroxylase Reduces the Amyloid Pathology Before or After the Onset of Amyloid Plaques in Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hudry, Eloise; Van Dam, Debby; Kulik, Wim; De Deyn, Peter P; Stet, Femke S; Ahouansou, Ornella; Benraiss, Abdellatif; Delacourte, André; Bougnères, Pierre; Aubourg, Patrick; Cartier, Nathalie

    2009-01-01

    The development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is closely connected with cholesterol metabolism. Cholesterol increases the production and deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides that result in the formation of amyloid plaques, a hallmark of the pathology. In the brain, cholesterol is synthesized in situ but cannot be degraded nor cross the blood–brain barrier. The major exportable form of brain cholesterol is 24S-hydroxycholesterol, an oxysterol generated by the neuronal cholesterol 24-hydroxylase encoded by the CYP46A1 gene. We report that the injection of adeno-associated vector (AAV) encoding CYP46A1 in the cortex and hippocampus of APP23 mice before the onset of amyloid deposits markedly reduces Aβ peptides, amyloid deposits and trimeric oligomers at 12 months of age. The Morris water maze (MWM) procedure also demonstrated improvement of spatial memory at 6 months, before the onset of amyloid deposits. AAV5-wtCYP46A1 vector injection in the cortex and hippocampus of amyloid precursor protein/presenilin 1 (APP/PS) mice after the onset of amyloid deposits also reduced markedly the number of amyloid plaques in the hippocampus, and to a less extent in the cortex, 3 months after the injection. Our data demonstrate that neuronal overexpression of CYP46A1 before or after the onset of amyloid plaques significantly reduces Aβ pathology in mouse models of AD. PMID:19654569

  8. A behavioral intervention to reduce excessive gestational weight gain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) is a key modifiable risk factor for negative maternal and child health. We examined the efficacy of a behavioral intervention in preventing excessive GWG. 230 participants (87.8% Caucasian, mean age= 29.1 years; second parity) completed the 36 week gestational...

  9. Curcumin Reduces Amyloid Fibrillation of Prion Protein and Decreases Reactive Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chi-Fen; Yu, Kun-Hua; Jheng, Cheng-Ping; Chung, Raymond; Lee, Cheng-I

    2013-01-01

    Misfolding and aggregation into amyloids of the prion protein (PrP) is responsible for the development of fatal transmissible neurodegenerative diseases. Various studies on curcumin demonstrate promise for the prevention of Alzheimer’s disease and inhibition of PrPres accumulation. To evaluate the effect of curcumin on amyloid fibrillation of prion protein, we first investigated the effect of curcumin on mouse prion protein (mPrP) in a cell-free system. Curcumin reduced the prion fibril formation significantly. Furthermore, we monitored the change in apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) level upon curcumin treatment in mouse neuroblastoma cells (N2a). Curcumin effectively rescues the cells from apoptosis and decreases the ROS level caused by subsequent co-incubation with prion amyloid fibrils. The assays in cell-free mPrP and in N2a cells of this work verified the promising effect of curcumin on the prevention of transmissible neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25437204

  10. Long-term dantrolene treatment reduced intraneuronal amyloid in aged Alzheimer triple transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhen; Yang, Bin; Liu, Chunxia; Liang, Ge; Liu, Weixia; Pickup, Stephen; Meng, Qingcheng; Tian, Yuke; Li, Shitong; Eckenhoff, Maryellen F; Wei, Huafeng

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the long-term treatment of dantrolene on amyloid and tau neuropathology, brain volume, and cognitive function in aged triple transgenic Alzheimer (3xTg-AD) mice. Fifteen-month old 3xTg-AD mice and wild-type controls were treated with oral dantrolene (5 mg/kg) or vehicle control twice a week for 6 months. Learning and memory were examined using the Morris Water Maze at 21 and 22 months of age. After the behavioral testing, hippocampal and cortical brain volumes were calculated with magnetic resonance imaging and motor function was evaluated using the rotorod. The amyloid burden and tau neurofibrillary tangles in the hippocampus were determined using immunohistochemistry. We found that dantrolene significantly decreased the intraneuronal amyloid accumulation by as much as 76% compared with its corresponding vehicle control, together with a trend to reduce phosphorylated tau in the hippocampus. No significant differences could be detected in hippocampal or cortical brain volume, motor function or cognition among all experimental groups, indicating that the mice were still presymptomatic for Alzheimer disease. Thus, presymptomatic and long-term dantrolene treatment significantly decreased the intraneuronal amyloid burden in aged 3xTg-AD mice before significant changes in brain volume, or cognition.

  11. Increased expression of reticulon 3 in neurons leads to reduced axonal transport of β site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1.

    PubMed

    Deng, Minzi; He, Wanxia; Tan, Ya; Han, Hailong; Hu, Xiangyou; Xia, Kun; Zhang, Zhuohua; Yan, Riqiang

    2013-10-18

    BACE1 is the sole enzyme responsible for cleaving amyloid precursor protein at the β-secretase site, and this cleavage initiates the generation of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ). Because amyloid precursor protein is predominantly expressed by neurons and deposition of Aβ aggregates in the human brain is highly correlated with the Aβ released at axonal terminals, we focused our investigation of BACE1 localization on the neuritic region. We show that BACE1 was not only enriched in the late Golgi, trans-Golgi network, and early endosomes but also in both axons and dendrites. BACE1 was colocalized with the presynaptic vesicle marker synaptophysin, indicating the presence of BACE1 in synapses. Because the excessive release of Aβ from synapses is attributable to an increase in amyloid deposition, we further explored whether the presence of BACE1 in synapses was regulated by reticulon 3 (RTN3), a protein identified previously as a negative regulator of BACE1. We found that RTN3 is not only localized in the endoplasmic reticulum but also in neuritic regions where no endoplasmic reticulum-shaping proteins are detected, implicating additional functions of RTN3 in neurons. Coexpression of RTN3 with BACE1 in cultured neurons was sufficient to reduce colocalization of BACE1 with synaptophysin. This reduction correlated with decreased anterograde transport of BACE1 in axons in response to overexpressed RTN3. Our results in this study suggest that altered RTN3 levels can impact the axonal transport of BACE1 and demonstrate that reducing axonal transport of BACE1 in axons is a viable strategy for decreasing BACE1 in axonal terminals and, perhaps, reducing amyloid deposition.

  12. Flavonoid-mediated presenilin-1 phosphorylation reduces Alzheimer's disease β-amyloid production

    PubMed Central

    Rezai-Zadeh, Kavon; Douglas Shytle, R; Bai, Yun; Tian, Jun; Hou, Huayan; Mori, Takashi; Zeng, Jin; Obregon, Demian; Town, Terrence; Tan, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) dysregulation is implicated in the two Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathological hallmarks: β-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. GSK-3 inhibitors may abrogate AD pathology by inhibiting amyloidogenic γ-secretase cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP). Here, we report that the citrus bioflavonoid luteolin reduces amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide generation in both human ‘Swedish’ mutant APP transgene-bearing neuron-like cells and primary neurons. We also find that luteolin induces changes consistent with GSK-3 inhibition that (i) decrease amyloidogenic γ-secretase APP processing, and (ii) promote presenilin-1 (PS1) carboxyl-terminal fragment (CTF) phosphorylation. Importantly, we find GSK-3α activity is essential for both PS1 CTF phosphorylation and PS1-APP interaction. As validation of these findings in vivo, we find that luteolin, when applied to the Tg2576 mouse model of AD, decreases soluble Aβ levels, reduces GSK-3 activity, and disrupts PS1-APP association. In addition, we find that Tg2576 mice treated with diosmin, a glycoside of a flavonoid structurally similar to luteolin, display significantly reduced Aβ pathology. We suggest that GSK-3 inhibition is a viable therapeutic approach for AD by impacting PS1 phosphorylation-dependent regulation of amyloidogenesis. PMID:18410522

  13. Analysis of the ability of pramlintide to inhibit amyloid formation by human islet amyloid polypeptide reveals a balance between optimal recognition and reduced amyloidogenicity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Ridgway, Zachary; Cao, Ping; Ruzsicska, Bela; Raleigh, Daniel P

    2015-11-10

    The hormone human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP or amylin) plays a role in glucose metabolism, but forms amyloid in the pancreas in type 2 diabetes (T2D) and is associated with β-cell death and dysfunction in the disease. Inhibitors of islet amyloid have therapeutic potential; however, there are no clinically approved inhibitors, and the mode of action of existing inhibitors is not well understood. Rat IAPP (rIAPP) differs from hIAPP at six positions, does not form amyloid, and is an inhibitor of amyloid formation by hIAPP. Five of the six differences are located within the segment of residues 20-29, and three of them are Pro residues, which are well-known disruptors of β-sheet structure. rIAPP is thus a natural example of a "β-breaker inhibitor", a molecule that combines a recognition element with an entity that inhibits β-sheet formation. Pramlintide (PM) is a peptide drug approved for use as an adjunct to insulin therapy for treatment of diabetes. PM was developed by introducing the three Pro substitutions found in rIAPP into hIAPP. Thus, it more closely resembles the human peptide than does rIAPP. Here we examine and compare the ability of rIAPP, PM, and a set of designed analogues of hIAPP to inhibit amyloid formation by hIAPP, to elucidate the factors that lead to effective peptide-based inhibitors. Our results reveal, for this class of molecules, a balance between the reduced amyloidogenicity of the inhibitory sequence on one hand and its ability to recognize hIAPP on the other.

  14. Reduced aggregation and cytotoxicity of amyloid peptides by graphene oxide/gold nanocomposites prepared by pulsed laser ablation in water.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingying; Han, Qiusen; Wang, Xinhuan; Yu, Ning; Yang, Lin; Yang, Rong; Wang, Chen

    2014-11-12

    A novel and convenient method to synthesize the nanocomposites combining graphene oxides (GO) with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is reported and their applications to modulate amyloid peptide aggregation are demonstrated. The nanocomposites produced by pulsed laser ablation (PLA) in water show good biocompatibility and solubility. The reduced aggregation of amyloid peptides by the nanocomposites is confirmed by Thioflavin T fluorescence and atomic force microscopy. The cell viability experiments reveals that the presence of the nanocomposites can significantly reduce the cytotoxicity of the amyloid peptides. Furthermore, the depolymerization of peptide fibrils and inhibition of their cellular cytotoxicity by GO/AuNPs is also observed. These observations suggest that the nanocomposites combining GO and AuNPs have a great potential for designing new therapeutic agents and are promising for future treatment of amyloid-related diseases.

  15. Matrix metalloproteinase inhibition reduces oxidative stress associated with cerebral amyloid angiopathy in vivo in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Alloza, Monica; Prada, Claudia; Lattarulo, Carli; Fine, Sara; Borrelli, Laura A; Betensky, Rebecca; Greenberg, Steven M; Frosch, Matthew P; Bacskai, Brian J

    2009-06-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), characterized by extracellular beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) deposits in vessel walls, is present in the majority of cases of Alzheimer's disease and is a major cause of hemorrhagic stroke. Although the molecular pathways activated by vascular Abeta are poorly understood, extracellular matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and Abeta-induced oxidative stress appear to play important roles. We adapted fluorogenic assays for MMP activity and reactive oxygen species generation for use in vivo. Using multiphoton microscopy in APPswe/PS1dE9 and Tg-2576 transgenic mice, we observed strong associations between MMP activation, oxidative stress, and CAA deposition in leptomeningeal vessels. Antioxidant treatment with alpha-phenyl-N-tert-butyl-nitrone reduced oxidative stress associated with CAA (approximately 50% reduction) without affecting MMP activation. Conversely, a selection of agents that inhibit MMP by different mechanisms of action, including minocycline, simvastatin, and GM6001, reduced not only CAA-associated MMP activation (approximately 30-40% reduction) but also oxidative stress (approximately 40% reduction). The inhibitors of MMP did not have direct antioxidant effects. Treatment of animals with alpha-phenyl-N-tert-butyl-nitrone or minocycline did not have a significant effect on CAA progression rates. These data suggest a close association between Abeta-related MMP activation and oxidative stress in vivo and raise the possibility that treatment with MMP inhibitors may have beneficial effects by indirectly reducing the oxidative stress associated with CAA.

  16. Small Bifunctional Chelators That Do Not Disaggregate Amyloid β Fibrils Exhibit Reduced Cellular Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Multifunctional metal chelators that can modulate the amyloid β (Aβ) peptide aggregation and its interaction with metal ions such as copper and zinc hold considerable promise as therapeutic agents for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, specific rather than systemic metal chelation by these compounds is needed in order to limit any side effects. Reported herein are two novel small bifunctional chelators, 2-[2-hydroxy-4-(diethylamino)phenyl]benzothiazole (L1) and 2-(2-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)benzothiazole (L2), in which the metal-binding donor atoms are integrated within a molecular framework derived from the amyloid-binding fluorescent dye thioflavin T (ThT). The metal-binding properties of L1 and L2 were probed by pH spectrophotometric titrations to determine their pKa values and the corresponding metal complex stability constants, and the isolated metal complexes were structurally characterized. The amyloid-fibril-binding properties of L1 and L2 were investigated by fluorescence titrations and ThT competition assays. Interestingly, L1 and L2 do not lead to the formation of neurotoxic Aβ42 oligomers in the presence or absence of metal ions, as observed by native gel electrophoresis, Western blotting, and transmission electron microscopy. In addition, L1 and L2 were able to reduce the cell toxicity of preformed Aβ42 oligomers and of the copper-stabilized Aβ42 oligomers. Given their ability to reduce the toxicity of soluble Aβ42 and Cu-Aβ42 species, L1 and L2 are promising lead compounds for the development of chemical agents that can control the neurotoxicity of soluble Aβ42 species in AD. PMID:25333939

  17. Formation of Amyloid Fibers by Monomeric Light Chain Variable Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Brumshtein, Boris; Esswein, Shannon R.; Landau, Meytal; Ryan, Christopher M.; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Phillips, Martin L.; Cascio, Duilio; Sawaya, Michael R.; Eisenberg, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic light chain amyloidosis is a lethal disease characterized by excess immunoglobulin light chains and light chain fragments composed of variable domains, which aggregate into amyloid fibers. These fibers accumulate and damage organs. Some light chains induce formation of amyloid fibers, whereas others do not, making it unclear what distinguishes amyloid formers from non-formers. One mechanism by which sequence variation may reduce propensity to form amyloid fibers is by shifting the equilibrium toward an amyloid-resistant quaternary structure. Here we identify the monomeric form of the Mcg immunoglobulin light chain variable domain as the quaternary unit required for amyloid fiber assembly. Dimers of Mcg variable domains remain stable and soluble, yet become prone to assemble into amyloid fibers upon disassociation into monomers. PMID:25138218

  18. SNX27 and SORLA Interact to Reduce Amyloidogenic Subcellular Distribution and Processing of Amyloid Precursor Protein

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Timothy Y.; Zhao, Yingjun; Li, Xiaoguang; Wang, Xin; Tseng, I-Chu; Thompson, Robert; Tu, Shichun; Willnow, Thomas E.; Zhang, Yun-wu

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic generation of amyloidogenic amyloid β (Aβ) fragments from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) significantly contributes to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although amyloidogenic APP proteolysis can be affected by trafficking through genetically associated AD components such as SORLA, how SORLA functionally interacts with other trafficking components is yet unclear. Here, we report that SNX27, an endosomal trafficking/recycling factor and a negative regulator of the γ-secretase complex, binds to the SORLA cytosolic tail to form a ternary complex with APP. SNX27 enhances cell surface SORLA and APP levels in human cell lines and mouse primary neurons, and depletion of SNX27 or SORLA reduces APP endosome-to-cell surface recycling kinetics. SNX27 overexpression enhances the generation of cell surface APP cleavage products such as soluble alpha-APP C-terminal fragment (CTFα) in a SORLA-dependent manner. SORLA-mediated Aβ reduction is attenuated by downregulation of SNX27. This indicates that an SNX27/SORLA complex functionally interacts to limit APP distribution to amyloidogenic compartments, forming a non-amyloidogenic shunt to promote APP recycling to the cell surface. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Many genes have been identified as risk factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD), and a large proportion of these genes function to limit production or toxicity of the AD-associated amyloid β (Aβ) peptide. Whether and how these genes precisely operate to limit AD onset remains an important question. We identify binding and trafficking interactions between two of these factors, SORLA and SNX27, and demonstrate that SNX27 can direct trafficking of SORLA and the Aβ precursor APP to the cell surface to limit the production of Aβ. Diversion APP to the cell surface through modulation of this molecular complex may represent a complimentary strategy for future development in AD treatment. PMID:27466343

  19. Caffeine protects Alzheimer's mice against cognitive impairment and reduces brain beta-amyloid production.

    PubMed

    Arendash, G W; Schleif, W; Rezai-Zadeh, K; Jackson, E K; Zacharia, L C; Cracchiolo, J R; Shippy, D; Tan, J

    2006-11-03

    A recent epidemiological study suggested that higher caffeine intake over decades reduces the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The present study sought to determine any long-term protective effects of dietary caffeine intake in a controlled longitudinal study involving AD transgenic mice. Caffeine (an adenosine receptor antagonist) was added to the drinking water of amyloid precursor protein, Swedish mutation (APPsw) transgenic (Tg) mice between 4 and 9 months of age, with behavioral testing done during the final 6 weeks of treatment. The average daily intake of caffeine per mouse (1.5 mg) was the human equivalent of 500 mg caffeine, the amount typically found in five cups of coffee per day. Across multiple cognitive tasks of spatial learning/reference memory, working memory, and recognition/identification, Tg mice given caffeine performed significantly better than Tg control mice and similar to non-transgenic controls. In both behaviorally-tested and aged Tg mice, long-term caffeine administration resulted in lower hippocampal beta-amyloid (Abeta) levels. Expression of both Presenilin 1 (PS1) and beta-secretase (BACE) was reduced in caffeine-treated Tg mice, indicating decreased Abeta production as a likely mechanism of caffeine's cognitive protection. The ability of caffeine to reduce Abeta production was confirmed in SweAPP N2a neuronal cultures, wherein concentration-dependent decreases in both Abeta1-40 and Abeta1-42 were observed. Although adenosine A(1) or A(2A) receptor densities in cortex or hippocampus were not affected by caffeine treatment, brain adenosine levels in Tg mice were restored back to normal by dietary caffeine and could be involved in the cognitive protection provided by caffeine. Our data demonstrate that moderate daily intake of caffeine may delay or reduce the risk of AD.

  20. Tongxinluo improves the cognition by reducing β-amyloid accumulation in spontaneous hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Fei, Yu-Lang; Lv, Hong-Jun; Li, Yan-Bo; Liu, Jie; Qian, Yi-Hua; Yang, Wei-Na; Ma, Kai-Ge; Li, Hong-Bao; Qu, Qiu-Min

    2017-03-05

    β-amyloid (Aβ) accumulation in the brain is the major pathophysiology of Alzheimer disease (AD). Hypertension is a risk factor for AD by promoting Aβ deposition. Traditional Chinese medicinal compound tongxinluo (TXL) can improve blood circulation and endothelium-dependent vasodilation. This study investigates the effects of TXL on cognition and Aβ accumulation using spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). TXL was intragastrically administered to SHRs at low-dose, mid-dose and high-dose for 15, 30 or 60 days. Cognition was evaluated with a Morris Water Maze (MWM). Aβ accumulation in the brain was detected by Thioflavin-S staining and ELISA. Western blot and RT-PCR were employed to exam the expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1) and amyloid precursor protein (APP). After TXL treatment for 60 days, compared with the vehicle, the number of crossed platform and the time spent in the target quadrant increased in parallel with the increasing length of treatment in MWM. Moreover, the Aβ accumulation in the hippocampus significantly decreased compared to the vehicle group, both in Thioflavin-S staining and ELISA. Additionally, TXL reduced RAGE expression in a dose- and time-depended manner, but LRP-1 expression had no difference between TXL groups and vehicle groups. Furthermore, the β-secretase expression was significantly decreased compared to the vehicle group, but APP expression had no difference. In conclusion, TXL improved cognition and reduced Aβ accumulation in SHRs in a dose- and time-dependent manner, the underlying mechanism may involved in inhibiting RAGE and β-secretase expression.

  1. Reduced oligomeric and vascular amyloid-beta following immunization of TgCRND8 mice with an Alzheimer's DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    DaSilva, Kevin A; Brown, Mary E; McLaurin, JoAnne

    2009-02-25

    Immunization with amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide reduces amyloid load in animal studies and in humans; however clinical trials resulted in the development of a pro-inflammatory cellular response to Abeta. Apoptosis has been employed to stimulate humoral and Th2-biased cellular immune responses. Thus, we sought to investigate whether immunization using a DNA vaccine encoding Abeta in conjunction with an attenuated caspase generates therapeutically effective antibodies. Plasmids encoding Abeta and an attenuated caspase were less effective in reducing amyloid pathology than those encoding Abeta alone. Moreover, use of Abeta with an Arctic mutation (E22G) as an immunogen was less effective than wild-type Abeta in terms of improvements in pathology. Low levels of IgG and IgM were generated in response to immunization with a plasmid encoding wild-type Abeta. These antibodies decreased plaque load by as much as 36+/-8% and insoluble Abeta42 levels by 56+/-3%. Clearance of Abeta was most effective when antibodies were directed against N-terminal epitopes of Abeta. Moreover, immunization reduced CAA by as much as 69+/-12% in TgCRND8 mice. Finally, high-molecular-weight oligomers and Abeta trimers were significantly reduced with immunization. Thus, immunization with a plasmid encoding Abeta alone drives an attenuated immune response that is sufficient to clear amyloid pathology in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) reduces amyloid-β protein misfolding in vitro.

    PubMed

    Coskuner, Orkid; Murray, Ian V J

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating disease of aging that initiates decades prior to clinical manifestation and represents an impending epidemic. Two early features of AD are metabolic dysfunction and changes in amyloid-β protein (Aβ) levels. Since levels of ATP decrease over the course of the disease and Aβ is an early biomarker of AD, we sought to uncover novel linkages between the two. First and remarkably, a GxxxG motif is common between both Aβ (oligomerization motif) and nucleotide binding proteins (Rossmann fold). Second, ATP was demonstrated to protect against Aβ mediated cytotoxicity. Last, there is structural similarity between ATP and amyloid binding/inhibitory compounds such as ThioT, melatonin, and indoles. Thus, we investigated whether ATP alters misfolding of the pathologically relevant Aβ42. To test this hypothesis, we performed computational and biochemical studies. Our computational studies demonstrate that ATP interacts strongly with Tyr10 and Ser26 of Aβ fibrils in solution. Experimentally, both ATP and ADP reduced Aβ misfolding at physiological intracellular concentrations, with thresholds at ~500 μM and 1 mM respectively. This inhibition of Aβ misfolding is specific; requiring Tyr10 of Aβ and is enhanced by magnesium. Last, cerebrospinal fluid ATP levels are in the nanomolar range and decreased with AD pathology. This initial and novel finding regarding the ATP interaction with Aβ and reduction of Aβ misfolding has potential significance to the AD field. It provides an underlying mechanism for published links between metabolic dysfunction and AD. It also suggests a potential role of ATP in AD pathology, as the occurrence of misfolded extracellular Aβ mirrors lowered extracellular ATP levels. Last, the findings suggest that Aβ conformation change may be a sensor of metabolic dysfunction.

  3. Statins reduce amyloid β-peptide production by modulating amyloid precursor protein maturation and phosphorylation through a cholesterol-independent mechanism in cultured neurons.

    PubMed

    Hosaka, Ai; Araki, Wataru; Oda, Akiko; Tomidokoro, Yasushi; Tamaoka, Akira

    2013-03-01

    Statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, have been reported to attenuate amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) production in various cellular models. However, the mechanisms by which statins affect neuronal Aβ production have not yet been clarified. Here, we investigated this issue in rat primary cortical neurons using two statins, pitavastatin (PV) and atorvastatin (AV). Treatment of neurons with 0.2-2.5 μM PV or AV for 4 days induced a concentration- and time-dependent reduction in the secretion of both Aβ40 and Aβ42. Moreover, Western blot analyses of cell lysates showed that treatment with PV or AV significantly reduced expression levels of the mature form of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and Thr668-phosphorylated APP (P-APP), but not immature form of APP; the decreases in P-APP levels were more notable than those of mature APP levels. The statin treatment did not alter expression of BACE1 (β-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1) or γ-secretase complex proteins (presenilin 1, nicastrin, APH-1, and PEN-2). In neurons overexpressing APP via recombinant adenoviruses, PV or AV similarly reduced Aβ secretion and the levels of mature APP and P-APP. Statins also markedly reduced cellular cholesterol content in neurons in a concentration-dependent manner. Co-treatment with mevalonate reversed the statin-induced decreases in Aβ secretion and mature APP and P-APP levels, whereas co-treatment with cholesterol did not, despite recovery of cellular cholesterol levels. Finally, cell-surface biotinylation experiments revealed that both statins significantly reduced the levels of cell-surface P-APP without changing those of cell surface mature APP. These results suggest that statins reduce Aβ production by selectively modulating APP maturation and phosphorylation through a mechanism independent of cholesterol reduction in cultured neurons.

  4. Identifying opportunities to reduce excess nitrogen in croplands while maintaining current crop yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, P. C.; Mueller, N. D.; Foley, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    Use of synthetic nitrogen fertilizer has greatly contributed to the increased crop yields brought about by the Green Revolution. Unfortunately, it also has also contributed to substantial excess nitrogen in the environment. Application of excess nitrogen not only is a waste of energy and other resources used to produce, transport and apply it, it also pollutes aquatic ecosystems and has led to the development of more than 200 hypoxic-or "dead"-zones in coastal areas around the world. How can we decrease use of excess nitrogen without compromising crop yields? To help address this challenge, our study (1) quantified hot spots of excess nitrogen, and (2) estimated how much nitrogen reduction is possible in these areas while still maintaining yields. We estimated excess nitrogen for major crops using a mass balance approach and global spatial data sets of crop area and yield, fertilizer application rates, and nitrogen deposition. Hot spots of excess nitrogen were identified by quantifying the smallest area within large river basins that contributed 25% and 50% of the total load within each basin. Nitrogen reduction scenarios were developed using a yield response model to estimate nitrogen application rates needed to maintain current yields. Our research indicated that excess nitrogen is concentrated in very small portions of croplands within river basins, with 25% of the total nitrogen load in each basin from ~10% of the cropland, and 50% of the total nitrogen load in each basin from ~25% of the cropland. Targeting reductions in application rates in these hot spots can allow us to maintain current crop yields while greatly reducing nitrogen loading to coastal areas and creating the opportunity to reallocate resources to boost yields on nitrogen-limited croplands elsewhere.

  5. Cooking rice in excess water reduces both arsenic and enriched vitamins in the cooked grain.

    PubMed

    Gray, Patrick J; Conklin, Sean D; Todorov, Todor I; Kasko, Sasha M

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the effects of rinsing rice and cooking it in variable amounts of water on total arsenic, inorganic arsenic, iron, cadmium, manganese, folate, thiamin and niacin in the cooked grain. We prepared multiple rice varietals both rinsed and unrinsed and with varying amounts of cooking water. Rinsing rice before cooking has a minimal effect on the arsenic (As) content of the cooked grain, but washes enriched iron, folate, thiamin and niacin from polished and parboiled rice. Cooking rice in excess water efficiently reduces the amount of As in the cooked grain. Excess water cooking reduces average inorganic As by 40% from long grain polished, 60% from parboiled and 50% from brown rice. Iron, folate, niacin and thiamin are reduced by 50-70% for enriched polished and parboiled rice, but significantly less so for brown rice, which is not enriched.

  6. The effectiveness of tax policy interventions for reducing excessive alcohol consumption and related harms.

    PubMed

    Elder, Randy W; Lawrence, Briana; Ferguson, Aneeqah; Naimi, Timothy S; Brewer, Robert D; Chattopadhyay, Sajal K; Toomey, Traci L; Fielding, Jonathan E

    2010-02-01

    A systematic review of the literature to assess the effectiveness of alcohol tax policy interventions for reducing excessive alcohol consumption and related harms was conducted for the Guide to Community Preventive Services (Community Guide). Seventy-two papers or technical reports, which were published prior to July 2005, met specified quality criteria, and included evaluation outcomes relevant to public health (e.g., binge drinking, alcohol-related crash fatalities), were included in the final review. Nearly all studies, including those with different study designs, found that there was an inverse relationship between the tax or price of alcohol and indices of excessive drinking or alcohol-related health outcomes. Among studies restricted to underage populations, most found that increased taxes were also significantly associated with reduced consumption and alcohol-related harms. According to Community Guide rules of evidence, these results constitute strong evidence that raising alcohol excise taxes is an effective strategy for reducing excessive alcohol consumption and related harms. The impact of a potential tax increase is expected to be proportional to its magnitude and to be modified by such factors as disposable income and the demand elasticity for alcohol among various population groups.

  7. Excessive hydrogen peroxide enhances the attachment of amyloid β1-42 in the lens epithelium of UPL rats, a hereditary model for cataracts.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Noriaki; Ito, Yoshimasa

    2014-01-06

    Several studies have reported that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is related to the toxicity of amyloid β (Aβ), and that the accumulation of Aβ in the lenses of humans causes lens opacification. In this study, we investigate the accumulation of Aβ1-42 in the lenses of UPL rats, which then leads to lens opacification. In addition, we demonstrate the effect of disulfiram eye drops (DSF), a potent radical scavenger, on Aβ1-42 accumulation in the lenses of UPL rats. The H2O2 levels in 46- to 60-day-old UPL rat lenses are significantly higher than in normal rats, and the Aβ1-42 levels in 53- and 60-day-old UPL rats are also increased only in lens epithelium containing capsules (capsule-epithelium), not in the lens cortex and nucleus. However, no increases in amyloid precursor protein (APP), β- or γ-secretase mRNA were observed in lenses of the corresponding ages. It has been thought that Aβ1-42 that accumulates in the lenses of UPL rats is actually produced in another tissue containing neuronal cells, such as brain or retina. Aβ1-42 levels in the brain and retina rise with aging, and the levels of APP, β- and γ-secretase mRNA in the retinas of 53-day-old UPL rats with opaque lenses are significantly higher than in 25-day-old UPL rats with transparent lenses. In contrast to the results in retinas, the levels of APP, β- and γ-secretase mRNA in the brains of 25- and 53-day-old UPL rats are similar. On the other hand, in an in vitro study, Aβ1-42 attachment in the lens capsule-epithelium of UPL rats was found to increase in H2O2. In addition, in an in vivo study, the inhibition of H2O2 by DSF was found to attenuate the increase in Aβ1-42 in the lens capsule-epithelium of 60-day-old UPL rats. Taken together, we hypothesize that excessive H2O2 in the lens enhances the attachment of Aβ1-42 in the lens capsule-epithelium of UPL rats, and that the instillation of DSF has the ability to attenuate the attachment of Aβ1-42 by inhibiting H2O2 production in lens. These

  8. Metabolic Characterization of Intact Cells Reveals Intracellular Amyloid Beta but Not Its Precursor Protein to Reduce Mitochondrial Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Patrick M.; von Einem, Bjoern; Walther, Paul; Calzia, Enrico; von Arnim, Christine A. F.

    2016-01-01

    One hallmark of Alzheimer´s disease are senile plaques consisting of amyloid beta (Aβ), which derives from the processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer´s disease and both Aβ and APP have been reported to affect mitochondrial function in isolated systems. However, in intact cells, considering a physiological localization of APP and Aβ, it is pending what triggers the mitochondrial defect. Thus, the aim of this study was to dissect the impact of APP versus Aβ in inducing mitochondrial alterations with respect to their subcellular localization. We performed an overexpression of APP or beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), increasing APP and Aβ levels or Aβ alone, respectively. Conducting a comprehensive metabolic characterization we demonstrate that only APP overexpression reduced mitochondrial respiration, despite lower extracellular Aβ levels compared to BACE overexpression. Surprisingly, this could be rescued by a gamma secretase inhibitor, oppositionally indicating an Aβ-mediated mitochondrial toxicity. Analyzing Aβ localization revealed that intracellular levels of Aβ and an increased spatial association of APP/Aβ with mitochondria are associated with reduced mitochondrial respiration. Thus, our data provide marked evidence for a prominent role of intracellular Aβ accumulation in Alzheimer´s disease associated mitochondrial dysfunction. Thereby it highlights the importance of the localization of APP processing and intracellular transport as a decisive factor for mitochondrial function, linking two prominent hallmarks of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28005987

  9. Phenylbutyric acid reduces amyloid plaques and rescues cognitive behavior in AD transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Jesse C; Pettan-Brewer, Christina; Ladiges, Warren C

    2011-06-01

    Trafficking through the secretory pathway is known to regulate the maturation of the APP-cleaving secretases and APP proteolysis. The coupling of stress signaling and pathological deterioration of the brain in Alzheimer's disease (AD) supports a mechanistic connection between endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and neurodegeneration. Consequently, small molecular chaperones, which promote protein folding and minimize ER stress, might be effective in delaying or attenuating the deleterious progression of AD. We tested this hypothesis by treating APPswePS1delta9 AD transgenic mice with the molecular chaperone phenylbutyric acid (PBA) for 14 months at a dose of 1 mg PBA g(-1) of body weight in the drinking water. Phenylbutyric acid treatment increased secretase-mediated APP cleavage, but was not associated with any increase in amyloid biosynthesis. The PBA-treated AD transgenic mice had significantly decreased incidence and size of amyloid plaques throughout the cortex and hippocampus. There was no change in total amyloid levels suggesting that PBA modifies amyloid aggregation or pathogenesis independently of biogenesis. The decrease in amyloid plaques was paralleled by increased memory retention, as PBA treatment facilitated cognitive performance in a spatial memory task in both wild-type and AD transgenic mice. The molecular mechanism underlying the cognitive facilitation of PBA is not clear; however, increased levels of both metabotropic and ionotropic glutamate receptors, as well as ADAM10 and TACE, were observed in the cortex and hippocampus of PBA-treated mice. The data suggest that PBA ameliorates the cognitive and pathological features of AD and supports the investigation of PBA as a therapeutic for AD.

  10. The ACAT inhibitor CP-113,818 markedly reduces amyloid pathology in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Huttunen, Henri J; Puglielli, Luigi; Eckman, Christopher B; Kim, Doo Yeon; Hofmeister, Alexander; Moir, Robert D; Domnitz, Sarah B; Frosch, Matthew P; Windisch, Manfred; Kovacs, Dora M

    2004-10-14

    Amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) accumulation in specific brain regions is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have previously reported that a well-characterized acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitor, CP-113,818, inhibits Abeta production in cell-based experiments. Here, we assessed the efficacy of CP-113,818 in reducing AD-like pathology in the brains of transgenic mice expressing human APP(751) containing the London (V717I) and Swedish (K670M/N671L) mutations. Two months of treatment with CP-113,818 reduced the accumulation of amyloid plaques by 88%-99% and membrane/insoluble Abeta levels by 83%-96%, while also decreasing brain cholesteryl-esters by 86%. Additionally, soluble Abeta(42) was reduced by 34% in brain homogenates. Spatial learning was slightly improved and correlated with decreased Abeta levels. In nontransgenic littermates, CP-113,818 also reduced ectodomain shedding of endogenous APP in the brain. Our results suggest that ACAT inhibition may be effective in the prevention and treatment of AD by inhibiting generation of the Abeta peptide.

  11. Reduced expression of citrate synthase leads to excessive superoxide formation and cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Quanxiang; Zhao, Mengmeng; Liu, Xiang; Wang, Xiaochun; Nie, Yao; Li, Ping; Liu, Tingyan; Ge, Ruli; Han, Fengchan

    2017-02-16

    A/J mice are a mouse model of age-related hearing loss. It has been demonstrated that a mutation in gene of citrate synthase (CS) contributes to the early onset of hearing loss occurring at about one month of age. To understand the effects of a decreased CS activity that results from the mutation in Cs gene on hearing loss in A/J mice, human kidney cell line (293T) was transiently transfected with short hairpin RNA for Cs (shRNA-Cs) to reduce expression of CS. In comparison with those of cells transfected with a scrambled sequence (shRNA-NC), the oxygen consumption rate and adenosine trisphosphate (ATP) production level were decreased in 293T cells transfected with shRNA-Cs. Meanwhile, excessive superoxide production was induced as determined by mitochondrial superoxide formation assay (MitoSOX) and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) detection. Moreover, the expression levels of BIP (binding immunoglobulin protein) and CHOP (CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-homologous protein), markers of endoplasmic reticulum stress, were upregulated. Furthermore, apoptosis related molecule caspase-3 and the mitochondrial membrane potential were reduced. It is therefore concluded that downregulation of Cs expression in 293T cells leads to low level of ATP production, excessive superoxide formation and cell apoptosis, which implies a possible mechanism for hearing loss in A/J mice.

  12. Amyloid Dysmetabolism Relates to Reduced Glucose Uptake in White Matter Hyperintensities

    PubMed Central

    Kalheim, Lisa Flem; Selnes, Per; Bjørnerud, Atle; Coello, Christopher; Vegge, Kjetil; Fladby, Tormod

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most prevalent neurodegenerative disorder and cause of dementia and is characterized by amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. AD has traditionally been considered to primarily affect gray matter, but multiple lines of evidence also indicate white matter (WM) pathology and associated small-vessel cerebrovascular disease. WM glucose delivery and metabolism may have implications for local tissue integrity, and [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) may be helpful to assess neuroglial and axonal function in WM. Hypothesizing that affection of oligodendroglia will be associated with loss of glucose uptake, we aimed to investigate glucose metabolism in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) and normal-appearing WM in patients with and without evidence of amyloid plaques. Subjects with mild cognitive impairment or subjective cognitive decline were included and dichotomized according to pathological (Aβ+) or normal (Aβ−) concentrations of cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β 1–42. A total of 50 subjects were included, of whom 30 subjects were classified as Aβ(+) and 20 subjects as Aβ(−). All subjects were assessed with MRI and FDG-PET. FDG-PET images were corrected for effects of partial voluming and normalized to cerebellar WM, before determining WMH FDG-uptake. Although there were no significant differences between the groups in terms of age, WMH volume, number of individual WMHs, or WMH distribution, we found significantly lower (p = 0.021) FDG-uptake in WMHs in Aβ(+) subjects (mean = 0.662, SD = 0.113) compared to Aβ(−) subjects (mean = 0.596, SD = 0.073). There were no significant group differences in the FDG-uptake in normal-appearing WM. Similar results were obtained without correction for effects of partial voluming. Our findings add to the evidence for a link between Aβ dysmetabolism and WM pathology in AD. PMID:27917152

  13. Dietary copper in excess of nutritional requirement reduces plasma and breast muscle cholesterol of chickens.

    PubMed

    Bakalli, R I; Pesti, G M; Ragland, W L; Konjufca, V

    1995-02-01

    Male commercial broiler strain chickens were fed from hatching to 42 d of age either a control diet (based on corn and soybean meal) or the control diet supplemented with 250 mg copper/kg diet from cupric sulfate pentahydrate (for 35 or 42 d). Hypocholesterolemia (11.8% reduction) and decreased breast muscle cholesterol (20.4% reduction) were observed in copper-supplemented birds. There was a slight increase (P > .05) in breast muscle copper (14.5%), and all levels were very low (< .5 mg/kg). Feeding copper for 42 vs 35 d resulted in lower levels of cholesterol in the plasma (12.9 vs 10.8% reduction) and breast muscle (24.6 vs 16.2% reduction). Very similar results were found in two additional experiments in which hypocholesterolemia and reduced breast muscle cholesterol were associated with reduced plasma triglycerides and blood reduced glutathione. It is well known that hypercholesterolemia is a symptom of dietary copper deficiency. The data presented here indicate that blood and breast muscle cholesterol are inversely related to dietary copper in excess of the dietary requirement for maximal growth. The cholesterol content of the edible muscle tissue of broiler chickens can be reduced by approximately 25% after feeding a supranormal level of copper for 42 d without altering the growth of the chickens or substantially increasing the copper content of the edible meat.

  14. Cerebrolysin reduces amyloid-β deposits, apoptosis and autophagy in the thalamus and improves functional recovery after cortical infarction.

    PubMed

    Xing, Shihui; Zhang, Jian; Dang, Chao; Liu, Gang; Zhang, Yusheng; Li, Jingjing; Fan, Yuhua; Pei, Zhong; Zeng, Jinsheng

    2014-02-15

    Focal cerebral infarction causes amyloid-β (Aβ) deposits and secondary thalamic neuronal degeneration. The present study aimed to determine the protective effects of Cerebrolysin on Aβ deposits and secondary neuronal damage in thalamus after cerebral infarction. At 24h after distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), Cerebrolysin (5 ml/kg) or saline as control was once daily administered for consecutive 13 days by intraperitoneal injection. Sensory function and secondary thalamic damage were assessed with adhesive-removal test, Nissl staining and immunofluorescence at 14 days after MCAO. Aβ deposits, activity of β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), apoptosis and autophagy were determined by TUNEL staining, immunofluorescence and immunoblot. The results showed that Cerebrolysin significantly improved sensory deficit compared to controls (p<0.05). Aβ deposits and BACE1 were obviously reduced by Cerebrolysin, which was accompanied by decreases in neuronal loss and astroglial activation compared to controls (all p < 0.05). Coincidently, Cerebrolysin markedly inhibited cleaved caspase-3, conversion of LC3-II, downregulation of Bcl-2 and upregulation of Bax in the ipsilateral thalamus compared to controls (all p<0.05). These findings suggest that Cerebrolysin reduces Aβ deposits, apoptosis and autophagy in the ipsilateral thalamus, which may be associated with amelioration of secondary thalamic damage and functional recovery after cerebral infarction.

  15. Icariside II Effectively Reduces Spatial Learning and Memory Impairments in Alzheimer's Disease Model Mice Targeting Beta-Amyloid Production.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lingli; Deng, Yuanyuan; Gao, Jianmei; Liu, Yuangui; Li, Fei; Shi, Jingshan; Gong, Qihai

    2017-01-01

    Icariside II (ICS II) is a broad-spectrum anti-cancer natural compound extracted from Herba Epimedii Maxim. Recently, the role of ICS II has been investigated in central nervous system, especially have a neuroprotective effect in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, we attempted to investigate the effects of ICS II, on cognitive deficits and beta-amyloid (Aβ) production in APPswe/PS1dE9 (APP/PS1) double transgenic mice. It was found that chronic ICS II administrated not only effectively ameliorated cognitive function deficits, but also inhibited neuronal degeneration and reduced the formation of plaque burden. ICS II significantly suppressed Aβ production via promoting non-amyloidogenic APP cleavage process by up-regulating a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain 10 (ADAM10) expression, inhibited amyloidogenic APP processing pathway by down-regulating amyloid precursor protein (APP) and β-site amyloid precursor protein cleavage enzyme 1 (BACE1) expression in APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Meanwhile, ICS II attenuated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) degradation as well as inhibition of eukaryotic initiation factor α phosphorylation (p-eIF2α) and PKR endoplasmic reticulum regulating kinase phosphorylation (p-PERK). Moreover, phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5-Is) have recently emerged as a possible therapeutic target for cognitive enhancement via inhibiting Aβ levels, and we also found that ICS II markedly decreased phosphodiesterase-5A (PDE5A) expression. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that ICS II could attenuate spatial learning and memory impairments in APP/PS1 transgenic mice. This protection appears to be due to the increased ADAM10 expression and decreased expression of both APP and BACE1, resulting in inhibition of Aβ production in the hippocampus and cortex. Inhibition of PPARγ degradation and PERK/eIF2α phosphorylation are involved in the course, therefore suggesting that ICS II might be a promising

  16. Inhibition of Cholesterol Biosynthesis Reduces γ-Secretase Activity and Amyloid-β Generation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoonhee; Kim, Chaeyoung; Jang, Hye Young; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) is one of major molecules contributing to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aβ is derived from amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) through sequential cleavages by β- and γ-secretases. Regulation of these components is thought to be an important factor in Aβ generation during the pathogenesis of AD. AβPP, β-secretase, and γ-secretase reside in lipid rafts, where cholesterol regulates the integrity and flexibility of membrane proteins and Aβ is generated. However, the relationship between cholesterol and Aβ generation is controversial. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the direct effects of cholesterol depletion on AβPP processing using AY9944, which blocks the last step of cholesterol biosynthesis and thus minimizes the unknown side effects of upstream inhibitors, such as HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors. Treatment with AY9944 decreased γ-secretase activity and Aβ generation. These results suggested that changes in membrane composition by lowering cholesterol with AY9944 affected γ-secretase activity and Aβ generation, which is associated with AD pathogenesis.

  17. Heat shock treatment reduces beta amyloid toxicity in vivo by diminishing oligomers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanjue; Cao, Zhiming; Klein, William L; Luo, Yuan

    2010-06-01

    Heat shock response, mediated by heat shock proteins, is a highly conserved physiological process in multicellular organisms for reestablishment of cellular homeostasis. Expression of heat shock factors and subsequent heat shock protein plays a role in protection against proteotoxicity in invertebrate and vertebrate models. Proteotoxicity due to beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) oligomerization has been linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Previously, we demonstrated that progressive paralysis induced by expression of human Abeta(1-42) in transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans was alleviated by Abeta oligomer inhibitors Ginkgo biloba extract and its constituents [Wu, Y., Wu, Z., Butko, P., Christen, Y., Lambert, M.P., Klein, W.L., Link, C.D., Luo, Y., 2006. Amyloid-beta-induced pathological behaviors are suppressed by Ginkgo biloba extract EGb 761 and ginkgolides in transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans. J. Neurosci. 26(50): 13102-13113]. In this study, we apply a protective heat shock to the transgenic C. elegans and demonstrate: (1) a delay in paralysis, (2) increased expression of small heat shock protein HSP16.2, and (3) significant reduction of Abeta oligomers in a heat shock time-dependent manner. These results suggest that transient heat shock lessens Abeta toxicity by diminishing Abeta oligomerization, which provides a link between up regulation of endogenous chaperone proteins and protection against Abeta proteotoxicity in vivo.

  18. Beta-amyloid auto-antibodies are reduced in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Qu, Bao-Xi; Gong, Yunhua; Moore, Carol; Fu, Min; German, Dwight C; Chang, Ling-Yu; Rosenberg, Roger; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon

    2014-09-15

    Accumulation and cytotoxicity of amyloid beta (Aβ) are understood as the major cause of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There is evidence that naturally occurring antibodies against amyloid beta (Aβ) protein play a role in Aβ-clearance, and such a mechanism appears to be impaired in AD. In the present study, the anti-Aβ antibodies in the serum from individuals with and without late onset AD were measured using ELISA and dot-blot methods. Aβ auto-antibodies in serum were mainly targeted to Aβ1-15 epitope and its titer was significantly lower in AD patients than elderly non-AD controls (NC). The dot-blot analysis further demonstrated that auto-antibodies against fibrillar Aβ42, Aβ1-15 and Aβ16-30 epitopes were all in a lower level in AD than in NC. The isotypes of the auto-antibodies were mainly non-inflammatory IgG2 type. We also analyzed the relationship of auto-Aβ antibody levels with the genotypes of apolipoprotein E (ApoE) and ANKK1/DRD2 gene.

  19. Ryanodine receptors blockade reduces Amyloid-beta load and memory impairments in Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Oulès, Bénédicte; Del Prete, Dolores; Greco, Barbara; Zhang, Xuexin; Lauritzen, Inger; Sevalle, Jean; Moreno, Sebastien; Paterlini-Bréchot, Patrizia; Trebak, Mohamed; Checler, Frédéric; Benfenati, Fabio; Chami, Mounia

    2012-01-01

    In Alzheimer disease (AD), the perturbation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis has been linked to presenilins (PS), the catalytic core in γ-secretase complexes cleaving the amyloid precursor protein (APP) thereby generating amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. Here we investigate whether APP contributes to ER Ca2+ homeostasis and whether ER Ca2+ could in turn influence Aβ production. We show that overexpression of wild-type human APP (APP695), or APP harboring the Swedish double mutation (APPswe) triggers increased Ryanodine receptors (RyR) expression and enhances RyR-mediated ER Ca2+ release in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells and in APPswe-expressing (Tg2576) mice. Interestingly, dantrolene-induced lowering of RyR-mediated Ca2+ release leads to the reduction of both intracellular and extracellular Aβ load in neuroblastoma cells as well as in primary cultured neurons derived from Tg2576 mice. This Aβ reduction can be accounted for by decreased Thr-668-dependent APP phosphorylation and β- and γ-secretases activities. Importantly, dantrolene diminishes Aβ load, reduces Aβ-related histological lesions and slows down learning and memory deficits in Tg2576 mice. Overall, our data document a key role of RyR in Aβ production and learning and memory performances, and delineate RyR-mediated control of Ca2+ homeostasis as a physiological paradigm that could be targeted for innovative therapeutic approaches. PMID:22915123

  20. Increased onset of vergence adaptation reduces excessive accommodation during the orthoptic treatment of convergence insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasan, Vidhyapriya; Bobier, William R

    2015-06-01

    This research tested the hypothesis that the successful treatment of convergence insufficiency (CI) with vision-training (VT) procedures, leads to an increased capacity of vergence adaptation (VAdapt) allowing a more rapid downward adjustment of the convergence accommodation cross-link. Nine subjects with CI were recruited from a clinical population, based upon reduced fusional vergence amplitudes, receded near point of convergence or symptomology. VAdapt and the resulting changes to convergence accommodation (CA) were measured at specific intervals over 15 min (pre-training). Separate clinical measures of the accommodative convergence cross link, horizontal fusion limits and near point of convergence were taken and a symptomology questionnaire completed. Subjects then participated in a VT program composed of 2.5h at home and 1h in-office weekly for 12-14 weeks. Clinical testing was done weekly. VAdapt and CA measures were retaken once clinical measures normalized for 2 weeks (mid-training) and then again when symptoms had cleared (post-training). VAdapt and CA responses as well as the clinical measures were taken on a control group showing normal clinical findings. Six subjects provided complete data sets. CI clinical findings reached normal levels between 4 and 7 weeks of training but symptoms, VAdapt, and CA output remained significantly different from the controls until 12-14 weeks. The hypothesis was retained. The reduced VAdapt and excessive CA found in CI were normalized through orthoptic treatment. This time course was underestimated by clinical findings but matched symptom amelioration.

  1. Reduced expression of pain mediators and pain sensitivity in amyloid precursor protein over-expressing CRND8 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Shukla, M; Quirion, R; Ma, W

    2013-10-10

    β-Amyloid (Aβ) peptides are derived from the sequential cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). They are enriched in plaques present in Alzheimer's brains and thus play important roles in the pathogenesis of this disease. APP is also known to be expressed in the neurons of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and contributes to neuronal survival and axonal growth during development. However, whether APP and Aβ peptides are involved in nociception and pathological pain states is mostly unknown. In the present study, we have used behavioral, biochemical and morphological approaches to address this issue in both adult rats and APP over-expressing CRND8 transgenic mice. We observed that the Aβ peptide (17-24) was predominantly expressed in small-sized DRG neurons of rats. Following intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of complete Freud's adjuvant (CFA), the levels of APP and Aβ peptides were significantly reduced in the ipsilateral lumbar 4-6 rat DRG. In 3-, 12- and 24-month-old CRND8 mice, pain sensitivity in response to heat and mechanical stimulation was significantly dampened compared to their age-matched wild-type littermates. In parallel with reduced pain sensitivity, the expression of pain mediators such as substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide and transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 was significantly reduced in L4-6 DRG of CRND8 mice. Although i.pl. injection of CFA induced a rather similar pattern of inflammatory pain in 3-month-old CRND8 mice and their wild-type littermates, recovery from inflammatory pain seemed faster in 12-month-old CRND8 mice than wild-type mice. These findings suggest that APP and Aβ peptides suppress both nociception and inflammatory pain and are likely involved in blunt pain perception of Alzheimer's patients in clinical settings.

  2. Antioxidant supplementation can reduce the survival costs of excess amino acid intake in honeybees.

    PubMed

    Archer, C Ruth; Köhler, Angela; Pirk, Christian W W; Oosthuizen, Vinette; Apostolides, Zeno; Nicolson, Susan W

    2014-12-01

    Over-consuming amino acids is associated with reduced survival in many species, including honeybees. The mechanisms responsible for this are unclear but one possibility is that excessive intake of amino acids increases oxidative damage. If this is the case, antioxidant supplementation may help reduce the survival costs of high amino acid intake. We tested this hypothesis in African honeybees (Apis mellifera scutellata) using the major antioxidant in green tea, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). We first determined the dose-range of EGCG that improved survival of caged honeybees fed sucrose solution. We then provided bees with eight diets that differed in their ratio of essential amino acids (EAA) to carbohydrate (C) (0:1, 1:250, 1:100, 1:75, 1:50, 1:25, 1:10, 1:5 EAA:C) and also in their EGCG dose (0.0 or 0.4 mM). We found that bees fed sucrose only solution survived better than bees fed EAA diets. Despite this, bees preferred a diet that contained intermediate ratios of EAA:C (ca. 1:25), which may represent the high demands for nitrogen of developing nurse bees. EGCG supplementation improved honeybee survival but only at an intermediate dose (0.3-0.5 mM) and in bees fed low EAA diets (1:250, 1:100 EAA:C). That EGCG counteracted the lifespan reducing effects of eating low EAA diets suggests that oxidative damage may be involved in the association between EAAs and lifespan in honeybees. However, that EGCG had no effect on survival in bees fed high EAA diets suggests that there are other physiological costs of over-consuming EAAs in honeybees.

  3. Excess coenzyme A reduces skeletal muscle performance and strength in mice overexpressing human PANK2.

    PubMed

    Corbin, Deborah R; Rehg, Jerold E; Shepherd, Danielle L; Stoilov, Peter; Percifield, Ryan J; Horner, Linda; Frase, Sharon; Zhang, Yong-Mei; Rock, Charles O; Hollander, John M; Jackowski, Suzanne; Leonardi, Roberta

    2017-02-03

    Coenzyme A (CoA) is a cofactor that is central to energy metabolism and CoA synthesis is controlled by the enzyme pantothenate kinase (PanK). A transgenic mouse strain expressing human PANK2 was derived to determine the physiological impact of PANK overexpression and elevated CoA levels. The Tg(PANK2) mice expressed high levels of the transgene in skeletal muscle and heart; however, CoA was substantially elevated only in skeletal muscle, possibly associated with the comparatively low endogenous levels of acetyl-CoA, a potent feedback inhibitor of PANK2. Tg(PANK2) mice were smaller, had less skeletal muscle mass and displayed significantly impaired exercise tolerance and grip strength. Skeletal myofibers were characterized by centralized nuclei and aberrant mitochondria. Both the content of fully assembled complex I of the electron transport chain and ATP levels were reduced, while markers of oxidative stress were elevated in Tg(PANK2) skeletal muscle. These abnormalities were not detected in the Tg(PANK2) heart muscle, with the exception of spotty loss of cristae organization in the mitochondria. The data demonstrate that excessively high CoA may be detrimental to skeletal muscle function.

  4. Antioxidant activity, delayed aging, and reduced amyloid-β toxicity of methanol extracts of tea seed pomace from Camellia tenuifolia.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chia-Cheng; Yu, Chan-Wei; Yen, Pei-Ling; Lin, Huan-You; Chang, Shang-Tzen; Hsu, Fu-Lan; Liao, Vivian Hsiu-Chuan

    2014-11-05

    There is a growing interest in the exploitation of the residues generated by plants. This study explored the potential beneficial health effects from the main biowaste, tea seed pomace, produced when tea seed is processed. DPPH radical scavenging and total phenolic content assays were performed to evaluate the in vitro activities of the extracts. Caenorhabditis elegans was used as in vivo model to evaluate the beneficial health effects, including antioxidant activity, delayed aging, and reduced amyloid-β toxicity. Among all soluble fractions obtained from the extracts of tea seed pomace from Camellia tenuifolia, the methanol (MeOH)-soluble fraction has the best in vivo antioxidant activities. The MeOH-soluble extraction was further divided into six fractions by chromatography with a Diaion HP-20 column eluted with water/MeOH, and fraction 3 showed the best in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activities. Further analysis in C. elegans showed that the MeOH extract (fraction 3) of tea seed pomace significantly decreased intracellular reactive oxygen species, prolonged C. elegans lifespan, and reduced amyloid-β (Aβ) toxicity in transgenic C. elegans expressing human Aβ. Moreover, bioactivity-guided fractionation yielded two potent constituents from fraction 3 of the MeOH extract, namely, kaempferol 3-O-(2″-glucopyranosyl)-rutinoside and kaempferol 3-O-(2″-xylopyranosyl)-rutinoside, and both compounds exhibited excellent in vivo antioxidant activity. Taken together, MeOH extracts of tea seed pomace from C. tenuifolia have multiple beneficial health effects, suggesting that biowaste might be valuable to be explored for further development as nutraceutical products. Furthermore, the reuse of agricultural byproduct tea seed pomace also fulfills the environmental perspective.

  5. p75 reduces beta-amyloid-induced sympathetic innervation deficits in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Bengoechea, Tasha G; Chen, Zhijiang; O'Leary, Debra A; O'Leary, Deborah; Masliah, Eliezer; Lee, Kuo-Fen

    2009-05-12

    Beta-amyloid (Abeta) has adverse effects on brain cells, but little is known about its effects on the peripheral nervous system in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Several lines of in vitro evidence suggest that the neurotrophin receptor p75 mediates or exacerbates Abeta-induced neurotoxicity. Here, we show that p75-deficient sympathetic neurons are more sensitive to Abeta-induced neurite growth inhibition. To investigate the role of p75 in the sympathetic nervous system of AD, p75 mutant mice were crossed with a mouse line of AD model. The majority of p75-deficient AD mice died by 3 weeks of age. The lethality is associated with severe defects in sympathetic innervation to multiple organs. When 1 copy of the BACE1 gene encoding a protein essential in Abeta production was deleted in p75-deficient AD mice, sympathetic innervation was significantly restored. These results suggest that p75 is neuroprotective for the sympathetic nervous system in a mouse model of AD.

  6. Curcumin mediates presenilin-1 activity to reduce β-amyloid production in a model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zhang; Hongmei, Zhang; Lu, Si; Yu, Li

    2011-01-01

    Curcumin has been reported to inhibit the generation of Aβ, but the underlying mechanisms by which this occurs remain unknown. Aβ is thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The amyloid hypothesis argues that aggregates of Aβ trigger a complex pathological cascade that leads to neurodegeneration. Aβ is generated by the processing of APP (amyloid precursor protein) by β- and γ-secretases. Presenilin 1 (PS1) is central to γ-secretase activity and is a substrate for GSK-3β, both of which are implicated in the pathogenesis of AD. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of curcumin on the generation of Aβ in cultured neuroblastoma cells and on the in vitro expression of PS1 and GSK-3β. To stimulate Aβ production, a plasmid expressing APP was transfected into human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. The transfected cells were then treated with curcumin at 0-20 μM for 24 h or with 5 μM curcumin for 0-48 h, and the extracellular levels of Aβ(40/42) were determined by ELISA. The levels of PS1 and GSK-3β mRNA were measured by RT-PCR, and the expression of the PS1 and GSK-3β proteins (including the phosphorylated form of GSK-3β, p-GSK-3β-Ser9) were evaluated by western blotting. Curcumin treatment was found to markedly reduce the production of Aβ(40/42). Treatment with curcumin also decreased both PS1 and GSK-3β mRNA and protein levels in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, curcumin increased the inhibitory phosphorylation of GSK-3β protein at Ser9. Therefore, we propose that curcumin decreases Aβ production by inhibiting GSK-3β-mediated PS1 activation.

  7. Ryanodine receptor blockade reduces amyloid-β load and memory impairments in Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Oulès, Bénédicte; Del Prete, Dolores; Greco, Barbara; Zhang, Xuexin; Lauritzen, Inger; Sevalle, Jean; Moreno, Sebastien; Paterlini-Bréchot, Patrizia; Trebak, Mohamed; Checler, Frédéric; Benfenati, Fabio; Chami, Mounia

    2012-08-22

    In Alzheimer disease (AD), the perturbation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium (Ca²⁺) homeostasis has been linked to presenilins, the catalytic core in γ-secretase complexes cleaving the amyloid precursor protein (APP), thereby generating amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. Here we investigate whether APP contributes to ER Ca²⁺ homeostasis and whether ER Ca²⁺ could in turn influence Aβ production. We show that overexpression of wild-type human APP (APP(695)), or APP harboring the Swedish double mutation (APP(swe)) triggers increased ryanodine receptor (RyR) expression and enhances RyR-mediated ER Ca²⁺ release in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells and in APP(swe)-expressing (Tg2576) mice. Interestingly, dantrolene-induced lowering of RyR-mediated Ca²⁺ release leads to the reduction of both intracellular and extracellular Aβ load in neuroblastoma cells as well as in primary cultured neurons derived from Tg2576 mice. This Aβ reduction can be accounted for by decreased Thr-668-dependent APP phosphorylation and β- and γ-secretases activities. Importantly, dantrolene diminishes Aβ load, reduces Aβ-related histological lesions, and slows down learning and memory deficits in Tg2576 mice. Overall, our data document a key role of RyR in Aβ production and learning and memory performances, and delineate RyR-mediated control of Ca²⁺ homeostasis as a physiological paradigm that could be targeted for innovative therapeutic approaches.

  8. CX3CR1 Deficiency Alters Microglial Activation and Reduces Beta-Amyloid Deposition in Two Alzheimer’s Disease Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sungho; Varvel, Nicholas H.; Konerth, Megan E.; Xu, Guixiang; Cardona, Astrid E.; Ransohoff, Richard M.; Lamb, Bruce T.

    2010-01-01

    Microglia, the primary immune effector cells in the brain, continually monitor the tissue parenchyma for pathological alterations and become activated in Alzheimer’s disease. Loss of signaling between neurons and microglia via deletion of the microglial receptor, CX3CR1, worsens phenotypes in various models of neurodegenerative diseases. In contrast, CX3CR1 deficiency ameliorates pathology in murine stroke models. To examine the role of CX3CR1 in Alzheimer’s disease–related β-amyloid pathology, we generated APPPS1 and R1.40 transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease deficient for CX3CR1. Surprisingly, CX3CR1 deficiency resulted in a gene dose-dependent reduction in β-amyloid deposition in both the APPPS1 and R1.40 mouse models of AD. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed reduced staining for CD68, a marker of microglial activation. Furthermore, quantitative immunohistochemical analysis revealed reduced numbers of microglia surrounding β-amyloid deposits in the CX3CR1-deficient APPPS1 animals. The reduced β-amyloid pathology correlated with reduced levels of TNFα and CCL2 mRNAs, but elevated IL1β mRNA levels, suggesting an altered neuroinflammatory milieu. Finally, to account for these seemingly disparate results, both in vitro and in vivo studies provided evidence that CX3CL1/CX3CR1 signaling alters the phagocytic capacity of microglia, including the uptake of Aβ fibrils. Taken together, these results demonstrate that loss of neuron-microglial fractalkine signaling leads to reduced β-amyloid deposition in mouse models of AD that is potentially mediated by altered activation and phagocytic capability of CX3CR1-deficient microglia. PMID:20864679

  9. The FDA-approved natural product dihydroergocristine reduces the production of the Alzheimer’s disease amyloid-β peptides

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Xiling; Yu, Jing; Niu, Qi; Liu, Jianhua; Fraering, Patrick C.; Wu, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Known γ-secretase inhibitors or modulators display an undesirable pharmacokinetic profile and toxicity and have therefore not been successful in clinical trials for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). So far, no compounds from natural products have been identified as direct inhibitors of γ-secretase. To search for bioactive molecules that can reduce the amount of amyloid-beta peptides (Aβ) and that have better pharmacokinetics and an improved safety profile, we completed a screen of ~400 natural products by using cell-based and cell-free γ-secretase activity assays. We identified dihydroergocristine (DHEC), a component of an FDA- (Food and Drug Administration)-approved drug, to be a direct inhibitor of γ-secretase. Micromolar concentrations of DHEC substantially reduced Aβ levels in different cell types, including a cell line derived from an AD patient. Structure-activity relationship studies implied that the key moiety for inhibiting γ-secretase is the cyclized tripeptide moiety of DHEC. A Surface Plasmon Resonance assay showed that DHEC binds directly to γ-secretase and Nicastrin, with equilibrium dissociation constants (Kd) of 25.7 nM and 9.8 μM, respectively. This study offers DHEC not only as a new chemical moiety for selectively modulating the activity of γ-secretase but also a candidate for drug repositioning in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26567970

  10. Reduced nitric oxide bioavailability mediates cerebroarterial dysfunction independent of cerebral amyloid angiopathy in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Merlini, Mario; Shi, Yi; Keller, Stephan; Savarese, Gianluigi; Akhmedov, Alexander; Derungs, Rebecca; Spescha, Remo D; Kulic, Luka; Nitsch, Roger M; Lüscher, Thomas F; Camici, Giovanni G

    2017-02-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), cerebral arteries, in contrast to cerebral microvessels, show both cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) -dependent and -independent vessel wall pathology. However, it remains unclear whether CAA-independent vessel wall pathology affects arterial function, thereby chronically reducing cerebral perfusion, and, if so, which mechanisms mediate this effect. To this end, we assessed the ex vivo vascular function of the basilar artery and a similar-sized peripheral artery (femoral artery) in the Swedish-Arctic (SweArc) transgenic AD mouse model at different disease stages. Furthermore, we used quantitative immunohistochemistry to analyze CAA, endothelial morphology, and molecular pathways pertinent to vascular relaxation. We found that endothelium-dependent, but not smooth muscle-dependent, vasorelaxation was significantly impaired in basilar and femoral arteries of 15-mo-old SweArc mice compared with that of age-matched wild-type and 6-mo-old SweArc mice. This impairment was accompanied by significantly reduced levels of cyclic GMP, indicating a reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. However, no age- and genotype-related differences in oxidative stress as measured by lipid peroxidation were observed. Although parenchymal capillaries, arterioles, and arteries showed abundant CAA in the 15-mo-old SweArc mice, no CAA or changes in endothelial morphology were detected histologically in the basilar and femoral artery. Thus our results suggest that, in this AD mouse model, dysfunction of large intracranial, extracerebral arteries important for brain perfusion is mediated by reduced NO bioavailability rather than by CAA. This finding supports the growing body of evidence highlighting the therapeutic importance of targeting the cerebrovasculature in AD.

  11. Apigenin modulates the expression levels of pro-inflammatory mediators to reduce the human insulin amyloid-induced oxidant damages in SK-N-MC cells.

    PubMed

    Amini, R; Yazdanparast, R; Ghaffari, S H

    2015-06-01

    Amyloid depositions of proteins play crucial roles in a wide variety of degenerative disorders called amyloidosis. Although the exact mechanisms involved in amyloid-mediated cytotoxicity remain unknown, increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitrogen species and overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines are believed to play key roles in the process. In that regard, we investigated the effect of apigenin, a common dietary flavonoid with high antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties on potential factors involved in cytotoxicity of human insulin amyloids. Pretreatment of SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells with apigenin increased cell viability and reduced the apoptosis induced by insulin fibrils. In addition, apigenin attenuated insulin fibril-induced ROS production and lipid peroxidation. Our result also demonstrated that pretreatment of the fibril-affected cells with apigenin caused an increase in catalase activity and the intracellular glutathione content along with reduction in nitric oxide production and nuclear factor κB, tumor necrosis factor α, and interleukin 6 gene expression based on real-time polymerase chain reaction evaluation. In accordance with these results, apigenin could be a promising candidate in the design of natural-based drugs for treatment or prevention of amyloid-related disorders.

  12. Reducing Potentially Excess Deaths from the Five Leading Causes of Death in the Rural United States

    PubMed

    Garcia, Macarena C; Faul, Mark; Massetti, Greta; Thomas, Cheryll C; Hong, Yuling; Bauer, Ursula E; Iademarco, Michael F

    2017-01-13

    In 2014, the all-cause age-adjusted death rate in the United States reached a historic low of 724.6 per 100,000 population (1). However, mortality in rural (nonmetropolitan) areas of the United States has decreased at a much slower pace, resulting in a widening gap between rural mortality rates (830.5) and urban mortality rates (704.3) (1). During 1999–2014, annual age-adjusted death rates for the five leading causes of death in the United States (heart disease, cancer, unintentional injury, chronic lower respiratory disease (CLRD), and stroke) were higher in rural areas than in urban (metropolitan) areas (Figure 1). In most public health regions (Figure 2), the proportion of deaths among persons aged <80 years (U.S. average life expectancy) (2) from the five leading causes that were potentially excess deaths was higher in rural areas compared with urban areas (Figure 3). Several factors probably influence the rural-urban gap in potentially excess deaths from the five leading causes, many of which are associated with sociodemographic differences between rural and urban areas. Residents of rural areas in the United States tend to be older, poorer, and sicker than their urban counterparts (3). A higher proportion of the rural U.S. population reports limited physical activity because of chronic conditions than urban populations (4). Moreover, social circumstances and behaviors have an impact on mortality and potentially contribute to approximately half of the determining causes of potentially excess deaths (5).

  13. Diet rich in date palm fruits improves memory, learning and reduces beta amyloid in transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Subash, Selvaraju; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed; Braidy, Nady; Awlad-Thani, Kathyia; Vaishnav, Ragini; Al-Adawi, Samir; Al-Asmi, Abdullah; Guillemin, Gilles J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: At present, the treatment options available to delay the onset or slow down the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are not effective. Recent studies have suggested that diet and lifestyle factors may represent protective strategies to minimize the risk of developing AD. Date palm fruits are a good source of dietary fiber and are rich in total phenolics and natural antioxidants, such as anthocyanins, ferulic acid, protocatechuic acid and caffeic acid. These polyphenolic compounds have been shown to be neuroprotective in different model systems. Objective: We investigated whether dietary supplementation with 2% and 4% date palm fruits (grown in Oman) could reduce cognitive and behavioral deficits in a transgenic mouse model for AD (amyloid precursor protein [APPsw]/Tg2576). Materials and Methods: The experimental groups of APP-transgenic mice from the age of 4 months were fed custom-mix diets (pellets) containing 2% and 4% date fruits. We assessed spatial memory and learning ability, psychomotor coordination, and anxiety-related behavior in all the animals at the age of 4 months and after 14 months of treatment using the Morris water maze test, rota-rod test, elevated plus maze test, and open-field test. We have also analyzed the levels of amyloid beta (Aβ) protein (1–40 and 1–42) in plasma of control and experimental animals. Results: Standard diet-fed Tg mice showed significant memory deficits, increased anxiety-related behavior, and severe impairment in spatial learning ability, position discrimination learning ability and motor coordination when compared to wild-type on the same diet and Tg mice fed 2% and 4% date supplementation at the age of 18 months. The levels of both Aβ proteins were significantly lowered in date fruits supplemented groups than the Tg mice without the diet supplement. The neuroprotective effect offered by 4% date fruits diet to AD mice is higher than 2% date fruits diet. Conclusions: Our results suggest that date

  14. Green tea aroma fraction reduces β-amyloid peptide-induced toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans transfected with human β-amyloid minigene.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Atsushi; Watanabe, Tatsuro; Fujita, Takashi; Hasegawa, Toshio; Saito, Michio; Suganuma, Masami

    2014-01-01

    Green tea is a popular world-wide beverage with health benefits that include preventive effects on cancer as well as cardiovascular, liver and Alzheimer's diseases (AD). This study will examine the preventive effects on AD of a unique aroma of Japanese green tea. First, a transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) CL4176 expressing human β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) was used as a model of AD. A hexane extract of processed green tea was further fractionated into volatile and non-volatile fractions, named roasty aroma and green tea aroma fractions depending on their aroma, by microscale distillation. Both hexane extract and green tea aroma fraction were found to inhibit Aβ-induced paralysis, while only green tea aroma fraction extended lifespan in CL4176. We also found that green tea aroma fraction has antioxidant activity. This paper indicates that the green tea aroma fraction is an additional component for prevention of AD.

  15. A multimodal RAGE-specific inhibitor reduces amyloid β-mediated brain disorder in a mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Deane, Rashid; Singh, Itender; Sagare, Abhay P; Bell, Robert D; Ross, Nathan T; LaRue, Barbra; Love, Rachal; Perry, Sheldon; Paquette, Nicole; Deane, Richard J; Thiyagarajan, Meenakshisundaram; Zarcone, Troy; Fritz, Gunter; Friedman, Alan E; Miller, Benjamin L; Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2012-04-01

    In Alzheimer disease (AD), amyloid β peptide (Aβ) accumulates in plaques in the brain. Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) mediates Aβ-induced perturbations in cerebral vessels, neurons, and microglia in AD. Here, we identified a high-affinity RAGE-specific inhibitor (FPS-ZM1) that blocked Aβ binding to the V domain of RAGE and inhibited Aβ40- and Aβ42-induced cellular stress in RAGE-expressing cells in vitro and in the mouse brain in vivo. FPS-ZM1 was nontoxic to mice and readily crossed the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In aged APPsw/0 mice overexpressing human Aβ-precursor protein, a transgenic mouse model of AD with established Aβ pathology, FPS-ZM1 inhibited RAGE-mediated influx of circulating Aβ40 and Aβ42 into the brain. In brain, FPS-ZM1 bound exclusively to RAGE, which inhibited β-secretase activity and Aβ production and suppressed microglia activation and the neuroinflammatory response. Blockade of RAGE actions at the BBB and in the brain reduced Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels in brain markedly and normalized cognitive performance and cerebral blood flow responses in aged APPsw/0 mice. Our data suggest that FPS-ZM1 is a potent multimodal RAGE blocker that effectively controls progression of Aβ-mediated brain disorder and that it may have the potential to be a disease-modifying agent for AD.

  16. Monoacylated Cellular Prion Proteins Reduce Amyloid-β-Induced Activation of Cytoplasmic Phospholipase A2 and Synapse Damage

    PubMed Central

    West, Ewan; Osborne, Craig; Nolan, William; Bate, Clive

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) and the loss of synapses. Aggregation of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) by Aβ oligomers induced synapse damage in cultured neurons. PrPC is attached to membranes via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor, the composition of which affects protein targeting and cell signaling. Monoacylated PrPC incorporated into neurons bound “natural Aβ”, sequestering Aβ outside lipid rafts and preventing its accumulation at synapses. The presence of monoacylated PrPC reduced the Aβ-induced activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) and Aβ-induced synapse damage. This protective effect was stimulus specific, as treated neurons remained sensitive to α-synuclein, a protein associated with synapse damage in Parkinson’s disease. In synaptosomes, the aggregation of PrPC by Aβ oligomers triggered the formation of a signaling complex containing the cPLA2.a process, disrupted by monoacylated PrPC. We propose that monoacylated PrPC acts as a molecular sponge, binding Aβ oligomers at the neuronal perikarya without activating cPLA2 or triggering synapse damage. PMID:26043272

  17. Orally Administrated Cinnamon Extract Reduces β-Amyloid Oligomerization and Corrects Cognitive Impairment in Alzheimer's Disease Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Farfara, Dorit; Benromano, Tali; Scherzer-Attali, Roni; Peled, Sivan; Vassar, Robert; Segal, Daniel; Gazit, Ehud; Frenkel, Dan; Ovadia, Michael

    2011-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence indicates that accumulation of soluble oligomeric assemblies of β-amyloid polypeptide (Aβ) play a key role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. Specifically, 56 kDa oligomeric species were shown to be correlated with impaired cognitive function in AD model mice. Several reports have documented the inhibition of Aβ plaque formation by compounds from natural sources. Yet, evidence for the ability of common edible elements to modulate Aβ oligomerization remains an unmet challenge. Here we identify a natural substance, based on cinnamon extract (CEppt), which markedly inhibits the formation of toxic Aβ oligomers and prevents the toxicity of Aβ on neuronal PC12 cells. When administered to an AD fly model, CEppt rectified their reduced longevity, fully recovered their locomotion defects and totally abolished tetrameric species of Aβ in their brain. Furthermore, oral administration of CEppt to an aggressive AD transgenic mice model led to marked decrease in 56 kDa Aβ oligomers, reduction of plaques and improvement in cognitive behavior. Our results present a novel prophylactic approach for inhibition of toxic oligomeric Aβ species formation in AD through the utilization of a compound that is currently in use in human diet. PMID:21305046

  18. Ablation of the microglial protein DOCK2 reduces amyloid burden in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cimino, Patrick J; Yang, Yue; Li, Xianwu; Hemingway, Jake F; Cherne, Makenzie K; Khademi, Shawn B; Fukui, Yoshinori; Montine, Kathleen S; Montine, Thomas J; Keene, C Dirk

    2013-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology is characterized by innate immune activation primarily through prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) signaling. Dedicator of cytokinesis 2 (DOCK2) is a guanyl nucleotide exchange factor expressed exclusively in microglia in the brain and is regulated by PGE2 receptor EP2. DOCK2 modulates microglia cytokine secretion, phagocytosis, and paracrine neurotoxicity. EP2 ablation in experimental AD results in reduced oxidative damage and amyloid beta (Aβ) burden. This discovery led us to hypothesize that genetic ablation of DOCK2 would replicate the anti-Aβ effects of loss of EP2 in experimental AD. To test this hypothesis, we crossed mice that lacked DOCK2 (DOCK2-/-), were hemizygous for DOCK2 (DOCK2+/-), or that expressed two DOCK2 genes (DOCK2+/+) with APPswe-PS1Δe9 mice (a model of AD). While we found no DOCK2-dependent differences in cortex or in hippocampal microglia density or morphology in APPswe-PS1Δe9 mice, cerebral cortical and hippocampal Aβ plaque area and size were significantly reduced in 10-month-old APPswe-PS1Δe9/DOCK2-/- mice compared with APPswe-PS1Δe9/DOCK2+/+ controls. DOCK2 hemizygous APPswe-PS1Δe9 mice had intermediate Aβ plaque levels. Interestingly, soluble Aβ42 was not significantly different among the three genotypes, suggesting the effects were mediated specifically in fibrillar Aβ. In combination with earlier cell culture results, our in vivo results presented here suggest DOCK2 contributes to Aβ plaque burden via regulation of microglial innate immune function and may represent a novel therapeutic target for AD.

  19. Multifunctional Liposomes Reduce Brain β-Amyloid Burden and Ameliorate Memory Impairment in Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Balducci, Claudia; Mancini, Simona; Minniti, Stefania; La Vitola, Pietro; Zotti, Margherita; Sancini, Giulio; Mauri, Mario; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Colombo, Laura; Fiordaliso, Fabio; Grigoli, Emanuele; Salmona, Mario; Snellman, Anniina; Haaparanta-Solin, Merja; Forloni, Gianluigi; Re, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the accumulation and deposition of plaques of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide in the brain. Given its pivotal role, new therapies targeting Aβ are in demand. We rationally designed liposomes targeting the brain and promoting the disaggregation of Aβ assemblies and evaluated their efficiency in reducing the Aβ burden in Alzheimer's disease mouse models. Liposomes were bifunctionalized with a peptide derived from the apolipoprotein-E receptor-binding domain for blood–brain barrier targeting and with phosphatidic acid for Aβ binding. Bifunctionalized liposomes display the unique ability to hinder the formation of, and disaggregate, Aβ assemblies in vitro (EM experiments). Administration of bifunctionalized liposomes to APP/presenilin 1 transgenic mice (aged 10 months) for 3 weeks (three injections per week) decreased total brain-insoluble Aβ1–42 (−33%), assessed by ELISA, and the number and total area of plaques (−34%) detected histologically. Also, brain Aβ oligomers were reduced (−70.5%), as assessed by SDS-PAGE. Plaque reduction was confirmed in APP23 transgenic mice (aged 15 months) either histologically or by PET imaging with [11C]Pittsburgh compound B (PIB). The reduction of brain Aβ was associated with its increase in liver (+18%) and spleen (+20%). Notably, the novel-object recognition test showed that the treatment ameliorated mouse impaired memory. Finally, liposomes reached the brain in an intact form, as determined by confocal microscopy experiments with fluorescently labeled liposomes. These data suggest that bifunctionalized liposomes destabilize brain Aβ aggregates and promote peptide removal across the blood–brain barrier and its peripheral clearance. This all-in-one multitask therapeutic device can be considered as a candidate for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25319699

  20. Multifunctional liposomes reduce brain β-amyloid burden and ameliorate memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease mouse models.

    PubMed

    Balducci, Claudia; Mancini, Simona; Minniti, Stefania; La Vitola, Pietro; Zotti, Margherita; Sancini, Giulio; Mauri, Mario; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Colombo, Laura; Fiordaliso, Fabio; Grigoli, Emanuele; Salmona, Mario; Snellman, Anniina; Haaparanta-Solin, Merja; Forloni, Gianluigi; Masserini, Massimo; Re, Francesca

    2014-10-15

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the accumulation and deposition of plaques of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide in the brain. Given its pivotal role, new therapies targeting Aβ are in demand. We rationally designed liposomes targeting the brain and promoting the disaggregation of Aβ assemblies and evaluated their efficiency in reducing the Aβ burden in Alzheimer's disease mouse models. Liposomes were bifunctionalized with a peptide derived from the apolipoprotein-E receptor-binding domain for blood-brain barrier targeting and with phosphatidic acid for Aβ binding. Bifunctionalized liposomes display the unique ability to hinder the formation of, and disaggregate, Aβ assemblies in vitro (EM experiments). Administration of bifunctionalized liposomes to APP/presenilin 1 transgenic mice (aged 10 months) for 3 weeks (three injections per week) decreased total brain-insoluble Aβ1-42 (-33%), assessed by ELISA, and the number and total area of plaques (-34%) detected histologically. Also, brain Aβ oligomers were reduced (-70.5%), as assessed by SDS-PAGE. Plaque reduction was confirmed in APP23 transgenic mice (aged 15 months) either histologically or by PET imaging with [(11)C]Pittsburgh compound B (PIB). The reduction of brain Aβ was associated with its increase in liver (+18%) and spleen (+20%). Notably, the novel-object recognition test showed that the treatment ameliorated mouse impaired memory. Finally, liposomes reached the brain in an intact form, as determined by confocal microscopy experiments with fluorescently labeled liposomes. These data suggest that bifunctionalized liposomes destabilize brain Aβ aggregates and promote peptide removal across the blood-brain barrier and its peripheral clearance. This all-in-one multitask therapeutic device can be considered as a candidate for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Asiaticoside ameliorates β-amyloid-induced learning and memory deficits in rats by inhibiting mitochondrial apoptosis and reducing inflammatory factors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhuo; Li, Xiaobin; Li, Duo; Luo, Mao; Li, Yongjie; Song, Li; Jiang, Xian

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of asiaticoside (AS) on the pathology and associated mechanisms of β-amyloid (Aβ)-induced Alzheimer's disease (AD) in rats. An AD rat model was established by lateral intracerebroventricular injection of Aβ 1–42 oligomers. Learning and memory function were evaluated by Morris water maze (MWM) test. In addition, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), immunohistochemistry, ELISA and western blot analysis were performed to evaluate the disease pathogenesis. The results indicated that AS exerted protective effects in rats treated with Aβ oligomers, in a dose-dependent manner, as evidenced by the improved learning and memory function in the MWM test. In addition, H&E staining of hippocampal tissue showed that the histological structure was damaged in the model group, which was restored by AS treatment. Aβ deposition was dramatically increased in the model group, and the pathological changes were reversed by AS treatment. TEM revealed that the subcellular structure was injured by Aβ oligomers, however, the structure was ameliorated by AS treatment. Furthermore, AS was found to reduce the elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α, in the brains of Aβ-treated rats. In addition, AS treatment resulted in a significant decrease in the expression of caspases-3, whereas the expression of B-cell lymphoma-2 was significantly increased, in these Aβ-treated rats. According to the findings of the observed study, AS has a marked protective effect on Aβ-induced AD pathology, and the underlying mechanism may be associated with the alleviation of the mitochondrial injuries, the anti-inflammatory activities, and the influence on the expression levels of apoptosis-associated proteins. PMID:28352309

  2. N-terminal region of myelin basic protein reduces fibrillar amyloid-β deposition in Tg-5xFAD mice.

    PubMed

    Ou-Yang, Ming-Hsuan; Xu, Feng; Liao, Mei-Chen; Davis, Judianne; Robinson, John K; Van Nostrand, William E

    2015-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by extensive deposition of fibrillar amyloid-β (Aβ) in the brain. Previously, myelin basic protein (MBP) was identified to be a potent inhibitor to Aβ fibril formation, and this inhibitory activity was localized to the N-terminal residues 1-64, a fragment designated MBP1. Here, we show that the modest neuronal expression of a fusion protein of the biologically active MBP1 fragment and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (MBP1-EGFP) significantly improved the performance of spatial learning memory in Tg-5xFAD mice, a model of pathologic Aβ accumulation in brain. The levels of insoluble Aβ and fibrillar amyloid were significantly reduced in bigenic Tg-5xFAD/Tg-MBP1-EGFP mice. Quantitative stereological analysis revealed that the reduction in amyloid was because of a reduction in the size of fibrillar plaques rather than a decrease in plaque numbers. The current findings support previous studies showing that MBP1 inhibits Aβ fibril formation in vitro and demonstrate the ability of MBP1 to reduce Aβ pathology and improve behavioral performance.

  3. Excess boron reduces polyphenol oxidase activities in embryo and endosperm of maize seed during germination.

    PubMed

    Olçer, Hillya; Kocaçaliskan, Ismail

    2007-01-01

    The effects of increasing concentrations of boron (0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 20 mM) as boric acid on the rate of germination and polyphenol oxidase activities in embryo and endosperm tissues of maize seeds (Zea mays L. cv. Arifiye) were studied. The germination percentage of maize seeds was not affected by boron concentrations up to 10 mM, and decreased by 20 mM. Distilled water and lower boron concentrations (0.1 and 1 mM) increased polyphenol oxidase activities at the beginning of germination up to 12 h whereas its excess levels (10 and 20 mM) decreased polyphenol oxidase activities in embryos and endosperm during germination. Polyphenol oxidase activities with o-diphenolic substrates (caffeic acid, catechol and dopa) were found to be higher than with a monophenolic substrat (tyrosine) in both embryos and endosperms. Further, caffeic acid oxidizing polyphenol oxidase was found to show more activity in embryos of the seeds germinating in distilled water when compared to other substrates.

  4. Excess nitrate loads to coastal waters reduces nitrate removal efficiency: mechanism and implications for coastal eutrophication.

    PubMed

    Lunau, Mirko; Voss, Maren; Erickson, Matthew; Dziallas, Claudia; Casciotti, Karen; Ducklow, Hugh

    2013-05-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems are becoming increasingly nitrogen-saturated due to anthropogenic activities, such as agricultural loading with artificial fertilizer. Thus, more and more reactive nitrogen is entering streams and rivers, primarily as nitrate, where it is eventually transported towards the coastal zone. The assimilation of nitrate by coastal phytoplankton and its conversion into organic matter is an important feature of the aquatic nitrogen cycle. Dissolved reactive nitrogen is converted into a particulate form, which eventually undergoes nitrogen removal via microbial denitrification. High and unbalanced nitrate loads to the coastal zone may alter planktonic nitrate assimilation efficiency, due to the narrow stochiometric requirements for nutrients typically shown by these organisms. This implies a cascade of changes for the cycling of other elements, such as carbon, with unknown consequences at the ecosystem level. Here, we report that the nitrate removal efficiency (NRE) of a natural phytoplankton community decreased under high, unbalanced nitrate loads, due to the enhanced recycling of organic nitrogen and subsequent production and microbial transformation of excess ammonium. NRE was inversely correlated with the amount of nitrate present, and mechanistically controlled by dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), and organic carbon (Corg) availability. These findings have important implications for the management of nutrient runoff to coastal zones.

  5. Cilostazol Upregulates Autophagy via SIRT1 Activation: Reducing Amyloid-β Peptide and APP-CTFβ Levels in Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye Rin; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Park, So Youn; Kim, Hye Young; Bae, Sun Sik; Lee, Won Suk; Rhim, Byung Yong; Hong, Ki Whan; Kim, Chi Dae

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a vital pathway for the removal of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) and the aggregated proteins that cause Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We previously found that cilostazol induced SIRT1 expression and its activity in neuronal cells, and thus, we hypothesized that cilostazol might stimulate clearances of Aβ and C-terminal APP fragment β subunit (APP-CTFβ) by up-regulating autophagy.When N2a cells were exposed to soluble Aβ1–42, protein levels of beclin-1, autophagy-related protein5 (Atg5), and SIRT1 decreased significantly. Pretreatment with cilostazol (10–30 μM) or resveratrol (20 μM) prevented these Aβ1–42 evoked suppressions. LC3-II (a marker of mammalian autophagy) levels were significantly increased by cilostazol, and this increase was reduced by 3-methyladenine. To evoke endogenous Aβ overproduction, N2aSwe cells (N2a cells stably expressing human APP containing the Swedish mutation) were cultured in medium with or without tetracycline (Tet+ for 48 h and then placed in Tet- condition). Aβ and APP-CTFβ expressions were increased after 12~24 h in Tet- condition, and these increased expressions were significantly reduced by pretreating cilostazol. Cilostazol-induced reductions in the expressions of Aβ and APP-CTFβ were blocked by bafilomycin A1 (a blocker of autophagosome to lysosome fusion). After knockdown of the SIRT1 gene (to ~40% in SIRT1 protein), cilostazol failed to elevate the expressions of beclin-1, Atg5, and LC3-II, indicating that cilostazol increases these expressions by up-regulating SIRT1. Further, decreased cell viability induced by Aβ was prevented by cilostazol, and this inhibition was reversed by 3-methyladenine, indicating that the protective effect of cilostazol against Aβ induced neurotoxicity is, in part, ascribable to the induction of autophagy. In conclusion, cilostazol modulates autophagy by increasing the activation of SIRT1, and thereby enhances Aβ clearance and increases cell viability. PMID:26244661

  6. Excessive zinc intake increases systemic blood pressure and reduces renal blood flow via kidney angiotensin II in rats.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Miyoko; Miyazaki, Takashi; Takenaka, Tsuneo; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hiromichi

    2012-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of excess zinc intake on the mean arterial pressure (MAP), renal blood flow (RBF), inulin clearance (IC), serum zinc level, serum angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity, and kidney angiotensin II (AT II) levels in rats. Experiments were performed on male Sprague-Dawley rats maintained for 4 weeks on a diet containing either 5 mg/100 g (control group), 50 mg/100 g (Zn50 group), or 200 mg/100 g (Zn200 group) zinc carbonate. Serum zinc levels significantly increased to 126.5 % in the Zn50 group and 198.1 % in the Zn200 group compared with controls. MAP significantly increased to 107.8 % in the Zn50 group and 114.5 % in the Zn200 group again compared with controls. Although the difference in serum ACE activity was independent of the serum zinc levels, the kidney AT II levels increased significantly to 137.2 % in the Zn50 group and 174.4 % in the Zn200 group compared with the controls. RBF was decreased significantly to 74.4 % in the Zn50 group and 69.7 % in the Zn200 group compared with the controls. IC values were significantly decreased to 69.6 % in the Zn50 group and 52.7 % in the Zn200 group as compared with control levels. Combined together, these results show that excessive Zn intake reduced IC and RBF and increased MAP and kidney AT II levels, suggesting that excessive Zn intake reduces renal function.

  7. Expression of neprilysin in skeletal muscle reduces amyloid burden in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yinxing; Studzinski, Christa; Beckett, Tina; Guan, Hanjun; Hersh, Matthew A; Murphy, M Paul; Klein, Ronald; Hersh, Louis B

    2009-08-01

    Neprilysin (NEP) is a zinc metallopeptidase that efficiently degrades the amyloid beta (Abeta) peptides believed to be involved in the etiology of Alzheimer disease (AD). The focus of this study was to develop a new and tractable therapeutic approach for treating AD using NEP gene therapy. We have introduced adeno-associated virus (AAV) expressing the mouse NEP gene into the hindlimb muscle of 6-month-old human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP) (3X-Tg-AD) mice, an age which correlates with early stage AD. Overexpression of NEP in muscle decreased brain soluble Abeta peptide levels by approximately 60% and decreased amyloid deposits by approximately 50%, with no apparent adverse effects. Expression of NEP on muscle did not affect the levels of a number of other physiological peptides known to be in vitro substrates. These findings demonstrate that peripheral expression of NEP and likely other peptidases represents an alternative to direct administration into brain and illustrates the potential for using NEP expression in muscle for the prevention and treatment of AD.

  8. Reversal of paralysis and reduced inflammation from peripheral administration of β-amyloid in TH1 and TH17 versions of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Grant, Jacqueline L; Ghosn, Eliver Eid Bou; Axtell, Robert C; Herges, Katja; Kuipers, Hedwich F; Woodling, Nathan S; Andreasson, Katrin; Herzenberg, Leonard A; Herzenberg, Leonore A; Steinman, Lawrence

    2012-08-01

    β-Amyloid 42 (Aβ42) and β-amyloid 40 (Aβ40), major components of senile plaque deposits in Alzheimer's disease, are considered neurotoxic and proinflammatory. In multiple sclerosis, Aβ42 is up-regulated in brain lesions and damaged axons. We found, unexpectedly, that treatment with either Aβ42 or Aβ40 peptides reduced motor paralysis and brain inflammation in four different models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) with attenuation of motor paralysis, reduction of inflammatory lesions in the central nervous system (CNS), and suppression of lymphocyte activation. Aβ42 and Aβ40 treatments were effective in reducing ongoing paralysis induced with adoptive transfer of either autoreactive T helper 1 (T(H)1) or T(H)17 cells. High-dimensional 14-parameter flow cytometry of peripheral immune cell populations after in vivo Aβ42 and Aβ40 treatment revealed substantial modulations in the percentage of lymphoid and myeloid subsets during EAE. Major proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines were reduced in the blood after Aβ peptide treatment. Protection conferred by Aβ treatment did not require its delivery to the brain: Adoptive transfer with lymphocytes from donors treated with Aβ42 attenuated EAE in wild-type recipient mice, and Aβ deposition in the brain was not detected in treated EAE mice by immunohistochemical analysis. In contrast to the improvement in EAE with Aβ treatment, EAE was worse in mice with genetic deletion of the amyloid precursor protein. Therefore, in the absence of Aβ, there is exacerbated clinical EAE disease progression. Because Aβ42 and Aβ40 ameliorate experimental autoimmune inflammation targeting the CNS, we might now consider its potential anti-inflammatory role in other neuropathological conditions.

  9. Chronic treatment with lithium and pretreatment with excess inositol reduce inositol pool size in astrocytes by different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wolfson, M; Hertz, E; Belmaker, R H; Hertz, L

    1998-03-16

    Chronic treatment with a lithium salt is the classical treatment for manic-depressive disorder. It is hypothesized that the therapeutic action of lithium is caused by its inhibition of inositol phosphatases which leads to a relative deficiency of inositol and, therefore, an impairment of inositol recycling and production of precursor for the second messengers inositol triphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG). However, peculiarly enough, treatment with high doses of inositol also has an antidepressant effect. In the present work, we have studied the acute and chronic effects of lithium and of excess inositol, in separation or together, on accumulation of 50 microM [3H]inositol (a physiologically relevant concentration) into primary cultures of mouse astrocytes. Two parameters were investigated: (1) rate of unidirectional uptake across the cell membrane (measured during short-term exposure to the radioisotope), and (2) magnitude of the intracellular pool of inositol, equilibrating with extracellular inositol (measured during long-term exposure to the radioisotope). Inositol uptake was highly concentrative and occurred with a Km of approximately 500 microM and a Vmax of 1.5 nmol/min/mg protein. The uptake rate was not affected by either acute or chronic treatment with LiCl (or both), but it was substantially reduced ('down-regulated') after pretreatment with a high concentration of inositol. The inositol pool size was decreased to a similar extent as the uptake rate by previous exposure to excess inositol. In spite of the fact that inositol uptake rate was unaffected by lithium, the magnitude of the inositol pool was significantly decreased by chronic treatment with a pharmacologically relevant concentration of LiCl (1 mM), but not by treatment with lower concentrations. This decrease is likely to reflect a reduction in either inositol synthesis or replenishment of inositol from IP3, due to the inhibition of inositol phosphatases by the lithium ion. In agreement

  10. Efficacy of humidity retention bags for the reduced adsorption and improved cleaning of tissue proteins including prion-associated amyloid to surgical stainless steel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Secker, T J; Pinchin, H E; Hervé, R C; Keevil, C W

    2015-01-01

    Increasing drying time adversely affects attachment of tissue proteins and prion-associated amyloid to surgical stainless steel, and reduces the efficacy of commercial cleaning chemistries. This study tested the efficacy of commercial humidity retention bags to reduce biofouling on surgical stainless steel and to improve subsequent cleaning. Surgical stainless steel surfaces were contaminated with ME7-infected brain homogenates and left to dry for 15 to 1,440 min either in air, in dry polythene bags or within humidity retention bags. Residual contamination pre/post cleaning was analysed using Thioflavin T/SYPRO Ruby dual staining and microscope analysis. An increase in biofouling was observed with increased drying time in air or in sealed dry bags. Humidity retention bags kept both protein and prion-associated amyloid minimal across the drying times both pre- and post-cleaning. Therefore, humidity bags demonstrate a cheap, easy to implement solution to improve surgical instrument reprocessing and to potentially reduce associated hospital acquired infections.

  11. Erythropoietin improves memory function with reducing endothelial dysfunction and amyloid-beta burden in Alzheimer's disease models.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soon-Tae; Chu, Kon; Park, Jung-Eun; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Jeon, Daejong; Lim, Ji-Youn; Lee, Sang Kun; Kim, Manho; Roh, Jae-Kyu

    2012-01-01

    Neurovascular degeneration contributes to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Because erythropoietin (EPO) promotes endothelial regeneration, we investigated the therapeutic effects of EPO in animal models of AD. In aged Tg2576 mice, EPO receptors (EPORs) were expressed in the cortex and hippocampus. Tg2576 mice were treated with daily injection of EPO (5000 IU/kg/day) for 5 days. At 14 days, EPO improved contextual memory as measured by fear-conditioning test. EPO enhanced endothelial proliferation and the level of synaptophysin expression in the brain. EPO also increased capillary density, and decreased the level of the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) in the brain, while decreasing in the amount of amyloid plaque and amyloid-β (Aβ). In cultured human endothelial cells, EPO enhanced angiogenesis and suppressed the expression of the RAGE. These results show that EPO improves memory and ameliorates endothelial degeneration induced by Aβ in AD models. This pre-clinical evidence suggests that EPO may be useful for the treatment of AD.

  12. Human Umbilical Cord Stem Cell Xenografts Improve Cognitive Decline and Reduce the Amyloid Burden in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Boutajangout, Allal; Noorwali, Abdulwahab; Atta, Hazem; Wisniewski, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia. The search for new treatments is made more urgent given its increasing prevalence resulting from the aging of the global population. Over the past 20 years, stem cell technologies have become an increasingly attractive option to both study and potentially treat neurodegenerative diseases. Several investigators reported a beneficial effect of different types of stem or progenitor cells on the pathology and cognitive function in AD models. Mouse models are one of the most important research tools for finding new treatment for AD. We aimed to explore the possible therapeutic potential of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell xenografts in a transgenic (Tg) mouse model of AD. Methods APP/PS1 Tg AD model mice received human umbilical cord stem cells, directly injected into the carotid artery. To test the efficacy of the umbilical cord stem cells in this AD model, behavioral tasks (sensorimotor and cognitive tests) and immunohistochemical quantitation of the pathology was performed. Results Treatment of the APP/PS1 AD model mice, with human umbilical cord stem cells, produced a reduction of the amyloid beta burden in the cortex and the hippocampus which correlated with a reduction of the cognitive loss. Conclusion Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells appear to reduce AD pathology in a transgenic mouse model as documented by a reduction of the amyloid plaque burden compared to controls. This amelioration of pathology correlates with improvements on cognitive and sensorimotor tasks. PMID:27719629

  13. Brain pyroglutamate amyloid-β is produced by cathepsin B and is reduced by the cysteine protease inhibitor E64d, representing a potential Alzheimer's disease therapeutic.

    PubMed

    Hook, Gregory; Yu, Jin; Toneff, Thomas; Kindy, Mark; Hook, Vivian

    2014-01-01

    Pyroglutamate amyloid-β peptides (pGlu-Aβ) are particularly pernicious forms of amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) present in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. pGlu-Aβ peptides are N-terminally truncated forms of full-length Aβ peptides (flAβ(1-40/42)) in which the N-terminal glutamate is cyclized to pyroglutamate to generate pGlu-Aβ(3-40/42). β-secretase cleavage of amyloid-β precursor protein (AβPP) produces flAβ(1-40/42), but it is not yet known whether the β-secretase BACE1 or the alternative β-secretase cathepsin B (CatB) participate in the production of pGlu-Aβ. Therefore, this study examined the effects of gene knockout of these proteases on brain pGlu-Aβ levels in transgenic AβPPLon mice, which express AβPP isoform 695 and have the wild-type (wt) β-secretase activity found in most AD patients. Knockout or overexpression of the CatB gene reduced or increased, respectively, pGlu-Aβ(3-40/42), flAβ(1-40/42), and pGlu-Aβ plaque load, but knockout of the BACE1 gene had no effect on those parameters in the transgenic mice. Treatment of AβPPLon mice with E64d, a cysteine protease inhibitor of CatB, also reduced brain pGlu-Aβ(3-42), flAβ(1-40/42), and pGlu-Aβ plaque load. Treatment of neuronal-like chromaffin cells with CA074Me, an inhibitor of CatB, resulted in reduced levels of pGlu-Aβ(3-40) released from the activity-dependent, regulated secretory pathway. Moreover, CatB knockout and E64d treatment has been previously shown to improve memory deficits in the AβPPLon mice. These data illustrate the role of CatB in producing pGlu-Aβ and flAβ that participate as key factors in the development of AD. The advantages of CatB inhibitors, especially E64d and its derivatives, as alternatives to BACE1 inhibitors in treating AD patients are discussed.

  14. Microbial Manipulation of the Amyloid Fold

    PubMed Central

    DePas, William H.

    2012-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are encased in a protein, DNA and polysaccharide matrix that protects the community, promotes interactions with the environment, and helps cells to adhere together. The protein component of these matrices is often a remarkably stable, β-sheet-rich polymer called amyloid. Amyloids form ordered, self-templating fibers that are highly aggregative, making them a valuable biofilm component. Some eukaryotic proteins inappropriately adopt the amyloid fold and these misfolded protein aggregates disrupt normal cellular proteostasis, which can cause significant cytotoxicity. Indeed, until recently amyloids were considered solely the result of protein misfolding. However, research over the past decade has revealed how various organisms have capitalized on the amyloid fold by developing sophisticated biogenesis pathways that coordinate gene expression, protein folding, and secretion so that amyloid-related toxicities are minimized. How microbes manipulate amyloids, by augmenting their advantageous properties and by reducing their undesirable properties, will be the subject of this review. PMID:23108148

  15. The Kunitz-protease inhibitor domain in amyloid precursor protein reduces cellular mitochondrial enzymes expression and function.

    PubMed

    Chua, Li-Min; Lim, Mei-Li; Wong, Boon-Seng

    2013-08-09

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a prominent feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and this can be contributed by aberrant metabolic enzyme function. But, the mechanism causing this enzymatic impairment is unclear. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is known to be alternatively spliced to produce three major isoforms in the brain (APP695, APP751, APP770). Both APP770 and APP751 contain the Kunitz Protease Inhibitory (KPI) domain, but the former also contain an extra OX-2 domain. APP695 on the other hand, lacks both domains. In AD, up-regulation of the KPI-containing APP isoforms has been reported. But the functional contribution of this elevation is unclear. In the present study, we have expressed and compared the effect of the non-KPI containing APP695 and the KPI-containing APP751 on mitochondrial function. We found that the KPI-containing APP751 significantly decreased the expression of three major mitochondrial metabolic enzymes; citrate synthase, succinate dehydrogenase and cytochrome c oxidase (COX IV). This reduction lowers the NAD(+)/NADH ratio, COX IV activity and mitochondrial membrane potential. Overall, this study demonstrated that up-regulation of the KPI-containing APP isoforms is likely to contribute to the impairment of metabolic enzymes and mitochondrial function in AD.

  16. Non-fibrillar amyloid-{beta} peptide reduces NMDA-induced neurotoxicity, but not AMPA-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Niidome, Tetsuhiro; Goto, Yasuaki; Kato, Masaru; Wang, Pi-Lin; Goh, Saori; Tanaka, Naoki; Akaike, Akinori; Kihara, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Hachiro

    2009-09-04

    Amyloid-{beta} peptide (A{beta}) is thought to be linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Recent studies suggest that A{beta} has important physiological roles in addition to its pathological roles. We recently demonstrated that A{beta}42 protects hippocampal neurons from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity, but the relationship between A{beta}42 assemblies and their neuroprotective effects remains largely unknown. In this study, we prepared non-fibrillar and fibrillar A{beta}42 based on the results of the thioflavin T assay, Western blot analysis, and atomic force microscopy, and examined the effects of non-fibrillar and fibrillar A{beta}42 on glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. Non-fibrillar A{beta}42, but not fibrillar A{beta}42, protected hippocampal neurons from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. Furthermore, non-fibrillar A{beta}42 decreased both neurotoxicity and increases in the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), but not by {alpha}-amino-3-hydrozy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA). Our results suggest that non-fibrillar A{beta}42 protects hippocampal neurons from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity through regulation of the NMDA receptor.

  17. Icariside II Effectively Reduces Spatial Learning and Memory Impairments in Alzheimer’s Disease Model Mice Targeting Beta-Amyloid Production

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Lingli; Deng, Yuanyuan; Gao, Jianmei; Liu, Yuangui; Li, Fei; Shi, Jingshan; Gong, Qihai

    2017-01-01

    Icariside II (ICS II) is a broad-spectrum anti-cancer natural compound extracted from Herba Epimedii Maxim. Recently, the role of ICS II has been investigated in central nervous system, especially have a neuroprotective effect in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In this study, we attempted to investigate the effects of ICS II, on cognitive deficits and beta-amyloid (Aβ) production in APPswe/PS1dE9 (APP/PS1) double transgenic mice. It was found that chronic ICS II administrated not only effectively ameliorated cognitive function deficits, but also inhibited neuronal degeneration and reduced the formation of plaque burden. ICS II significantly suppressed Aβ production via promoting non-amyloidogenic APP cleavage process by up-regulating a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain 10 (ADAM10) expression, inhibited amyloidogenic APP processing pathway by down-regulating amyloid precursor protein (APP) and β-site amyloid precursor protein cleavage enzyme 1 (BACE1) expression in APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Meanwhile, ICS II attenuated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) degradation as well as inhibition of eukaryotic initiation factor α phosphorylation (p-eIF2α) and PKR endoplasmic reticulum regulating kinase phosphorylation (p-PERK). Moreover, phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5-Is) have recently emerged as a possible therapeutic target for cognitive enhancement via inhibiting Aβ levels, and we also found that ICS II markedly decreased phosphodiesterase-5A (PDE5A) expression. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that ICS II could attenuate spatial learning and memory impairments in APP/PS1 transgenic mice. This protection appears to be due to the increased ADAM10 expression and decreased expression of both APP and BACE1, resulting in inhibition of Aβ production in the hippocampus and cortex. Inhibition of PPARγ degradation and PERK/eIF2α phosphorylation are involved in the course, therefore suggesting that ICS II might be a promising

  18. Rescue of Early bace-1 and Global DNA Demethylation by S-Adenosylmethionine Reduces Amyloid Pathology and Improves Cognition in an Alzheimer’s Model

    PubMed Central

    Do Carmo, Sonia; Hanzel, Cecilia E.; Jacobs, Marie L.; Machnes, Ziv; Iulita, M. Florencia; Yang, Jingyun; Yu, Lei; Ducatenzeiler, Adriana; Danik, Marc; Breuillaud, Lionel S.; Bennett, David A.; Szyf, Moshe; Cuello, A. Claudio

    2016-01-01

    General DNA hypomethylation is associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), but it is unclear when DNA hypomethylation starts or plays a role in AD pathology or whether DNA re-methylation would rescue early amyloid-related cognitive impairments. In an APP transgenic mouse model of AD-like amyloid pathology we found that early intraneuronal amyloid beta build-up is sufficient to unleash a global and beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (bace-1) DNA demethylation in AD-vulnerable brain regions. S-adenosylmethionine administration at these early stages abolished this hypomethylation, diminished the amyloid pathology and restored cognitive capabilities. To assess a possible human significance of findings, we examined the methylation at 12 CpGs sites in the bace-1 promoter, using genome-wide DNA methylation data from 740 postmortem human brains. Thus, we found significant associations of bace-1 promoter methylation with β-amyloid load among persons with AD dementia, and PHFtau tangle density. Our results support a plausible causal role for the earliest amyloid beta accumulation to provoke DNA hypomethylation, influencing AD pathological outcomes. PMID:27681803

  19. Does Usage of an eHealth Intervention Reduce the Risk of Excessive Gestational Weight Gain? Secondary Analysis From a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Strawderman, Myla S; Demment, Margaret; Olson, Christine Marie

    2017-01-01

    Background Excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) contributes to the development of obesity in mother and child. Internet-based interventions have the potential for delivering innovative and interactive options for prevention of excessive GWG to large numbers of people. Objective The objective of this study was to create a novel measure of Internet-based intervention usage patterns and examine whether usage of an Internet-based intervention is associated with reduced risk of excessive GWG. Methods The website featured blogs, local resources, articles, frequently asked questions (FAQs), and events that were available to women in both the intervention and control arm. Weekly reminders to use the website and to highlight new content were emailed to participants in both arms. Only intervention arm participants had access to the weight gain tracker and diet and physical activity goal-setting tools. A total of 1335 (898 intervention and 437 control) relatively diverse and healthy pregnant women were randomly assigned to the intervention arm or control arm. Usage patterns were examined for both intervention and control arm participants using latent class analysis. Regression analyses were used to estimate the association between usage patterns and three GWG outcomes: excessive total GWG, excessive GWG rate, and GWG. Results Five usage patterns best characterized the usage of the intervention by intervention arm participants. Three usage patterns best characterized control arm participants’ usage. Control arm usage patterns were not associated with excessive GWG, whereas intervention arm usage patterns were associated with excessive GWG. Conclusions The control and intervention arm usage pattern characterization is a unique methodological contribution to process evaluations for self-directed Internet-based interventions. In the intervention arm some usage patterns were associated with GWG outcomes. ClinicalTrial ClinicalTrials.gov; Clinical Trials Number: NCT01331564

  20. Tau elevations in the brain extracellular space correlate with reduced amyloid-β levels and predict adverse clinical outcomes after severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Magnoni, Sandra; Esparza, Thomas J; Conte, Valeria; Carbonara, Marco; Carrabba, Giorgio; Holtzman, David M; Zipfel, Greg J; Stocchetti, Nino; Brody, David L

    2012-04-01

    Axonal injury is believed to be a major determinant of adverse outcomes following traumatic brain injury. However, it has been difficult to assess acutely the severity of axonal injury in human traumatic brain injury patients. We hypothesized that microdialysis-based measurements of the brain extracellular fluid levels of tau and neurofilament light chain, two low molecular weight axonal proteins, could be helpful in this regard. To test this hypothesis, 100 kDa cut-off microdialysis catheters were placed in 16 patients with severe traumatic brain injury at two neurological/neurosurgical intensive care units. Tau levels in the microdialysis samples were highest early and fell over time in all patients. Initial tau levels were >3-fold higher in patients with microdialysis catheters placed in pericontusional regions than in patients in whom catheters were placed in normal-appearing right frontal lobe tissue (P = 0.005). Tau levels and neurofilament light-chain levels were positively correlated (r = 0.6, P = 0.013). Neurofilament light-chain levels were also higher in patients with pericontusional catheters (P = 0.04). Interestingly, initial tau levels were inversely correlated with initial amyloid-β levels measured in the same samples (r = -0.87, P = 0.000023). This could be due to reduced synaptic activity in areas with substantial axonal injury, as amyloid-β release is closely coupled with synaptic activity. Importantly, high initial tau levels correlated with worse clinical outcomes, as assessed using the Glasgow Outcome Scale 6 months after injury (r = -0.6, P = 0.018). Taken together, our data add support for the hypothesis that axonal injury may be related to long-term impairments following traumatic brain injury. Microdialysis-based measurement of tau levels in the brain extracellular space may be a useful way to assess the severity of axonal injury acutely in the intensive care unit. Further studies with larger numbers of

  1. A multimodal RAGE-specific inhibitor reduces amyloid β–mediated brain disorder in a mouse model of Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Deane, Rashid; Singh, Itender; Sagare, Abhay P.; Bell, Robert D.; Ross, Nathan T.; LaRue, Barbra; Love, Rachal; Perry, Sheldon; Paquette, Nicole; Deane, Richard J.; Thiyagarajan, Meenakshisundaram; Zarcone, Troy; Fritz, Gunter; Friedman, Alan E.; Miller, Benjamin L.; Zlokovic, Berislav V.

    2012-01-01

    In Alzheimer disease (AD), amyloid β peptide (Aβ) accumulates in plaques in the brain. Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) mediates Aβ-induced perturbations in cerebral vessels, neurons, and microglia in AD. Here, we identified a high-affinity RAGE-specific inhibitor (FPS-ZM1) that blocked Aβ binding to the V domain of RAGE and inhibited Aβ40- and Aβ42-induced cellular stress in RAGE-expressing cells in vitro and in the mouse brain in vivo. FPS-ZM1 was nontoxic to mice and readily crossed the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In aged APPsw/0 mice overexpressing human Aβ-precursor protein, a transgenic mouse model of AD with established Aβ pathology, FPS-ZM1 inhibited RAGE-mediated influx of circulating Aβ40 and Aβ42 into the brain. In brain, FPS-ZM1 bound exclusively to RAGE, which inhibited β-secretase activity and Aβ production and suppressed microglia activation and the neuroinflammatory response. Blockade of RAGE actions at the BBB and in the brain reduced Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels in brain markedly and normalized cognitive performance and cerebral blood flow responses in aged APPsw/0 mice. Our data suggest that FPS-ZM1 is a potent multimodal RAGE blocker that effectively controls progression of Aβ-mediated brain disorder and that it may have the potential to be a disease-modifying agent for AD. PMID:22406537

  2. Natural polyphenols binding to amyloid: a broad class of compounds to treat different human amyloid diseases.

    PubMed

    Ngoungoure, Viviane L Ndam; Schluesener, Jan; Moundipa, Paul F; Schluesener, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Polyphenols are a large group of phytonutrients found in herbal beverages and foods. They have manifold biological activities, including antioxidative, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory properties. Interestingly, some polyphenols bind to amyloid and substantially ameliorate amyloid diseases. Misfolding, aggregation, and accumulation of amyloid fibrils in tissues or organs leads to a group of disorders, called amyloidoses. Prominent diseases are Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's disease, but there are other, less well-known diseases wherein accumulation of misfolded protein is a prominent feature. Amyloidoses are a major burden to public health. In particular, Alzheimer's disease shows a strong increase in patient numbers. Accelerated development of effective therapies for amyloidoses is a necessity. A viable strategy can be the prevention or reduction of protein misfolding, thus reducing amyloid build-up by restoring the cellular aggretome. Amyloid-binding polyphenols affect amyloid formation on various levels, e.g. by inhibiting fibril formation or steering oligomer formation into unstructured, nontoxic pathways. Consequently, preclinical studies demonstrate reduction of amyloid-formation by polyphenols. Amyloid-binding polyphenols might be suitable lead structures for development of imaging agents for early detection of disease and monitoring amyloid deposition. Intake of dietary polyphenols might be relevant to the prevention of amyloidoses. Nutraceutical strategies might be a way to reduce amyloid diseases.

  3. AMYLOID NEUROPATHIES

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Susan C.; Robinson-Papp, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of many of the systemic amyloidoses. Although the cause of neuropathy is not entirely clear, it is likely related to amyloid deposition within the nerve. This may lead to focal, multifocal, or diffuse neuropathies involving sensory, motor and/or autonomic fibers. The presenting symptoms depend on the distribution of nerves affected. One of the most common phenotypes is sensorimotor polyneuropathy, which is characterized by symptoms of neuropathic pain, numbness, and in advanced cases weakness. Symptoms begin in the feet and ultimately progress to the proximal legs and hands. The most common focal neuropathy is a median neuropathy at the wrist, or clinically known as carpal tunnel syndrome. Carpal tunnel symptoms may include pain and sensory disturbances in the lateral palm and fingers; hand weakness may ensue if the focal neuropathy is severe. Autonomic neuropathy may affect a variety of organ systems such as the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary systems. Symptoms may be non-specific making the diagnosis of autonomic neuropathy more difficult to identify. However, it is important to recognize and distinguish autonomic neuropathy from diseases of the end-organs themselves. This chapter reviews the inherited and acquired amyloidoses that affect the peripheral nervous system including familial amyloid polyneuropathy, and primary, secondary and senile amyloidosis. We emphasize the clinical presentation of the neurologic aspects of these diseases, physical examination findings, appropriate diagnostic evaluation, treatment and prognosis. PMID:23239211

  4. Personalized health planning with integrative health coaching to reduce obesity risk among women gaining excess weight during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nancy Y; Wroth, Shelley; Parham, Catherine; Strait, Melva; Simmons, Leigh Ann

    2013-07-01

    Health coaching is an emerging behavioral intervention to improve outcomes in chronic disease management and prevention; however, no studies have investigated its utility in postpartum women who have gained excess weight during pregnancy. A 32-year-old primigravida woman who was overweight at conception and gained 23 lbs more than Institute of Medicine recommendations for her pre-pregnancy body mass index participated in a 6-month personalized health planning with integrative health coaching (PHPIHC) intervention. The intervention included a baseline health risk assessment review with a healthcare provider and eight biweekly, 30-minute telephonic health coaching sessions. The participant demonstrated improvement in physical activity, energy expenditure, knowledge, and confidence to engage in healthpromoting behaviors. Although the participant did not reach the target weight by completion of the health coaching sessions, follow up 8 months later indicated she achieved the target goal (within 5% of prepregnancy weight). This case report suggests that PHP-IHC can support postpartum women in returning to pre-pregnancy weight after gaining excess gestational weight. Future research and clinical trials are needed to determine the best timing, length, and medium (online, in-person, telephonic) of PHP-IHC for postpartum women.

  5. Minocycline reduces inflammatory parameters in the brain structures and serum and reverses memory impairment caused by the administration of amyloid β (1-42) in mice.

    PubMed

    Garcez, Michelle Lima; Mina, Francielle; Bellettini-Santos, Tatiani; Carneiro, Franciellen Gonçalves; Luz, Aline Pereira; Schiavo, Gustavo Luis; Andrighetti, Matheus Scopel; Scheid, Maylton Grégori; Bolfe, Renan Pereira; Budni, Josiane

    2017-03-21

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder and the most common type of age-related dementia. Cognitive decline, beta-amyloid (Aβ) accumulation, neurofibrillary tangles, and neuroinflammation are the main pathophysiological characteristics of AD. Minocycline is a tetracycline derivative with anti-inflammatory properties that has a neuroprotective effect. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of minocycline on memory, neurotrophins and neuroinflammation in an animal model of AD induced by the administration of Aβ (1-42) oligomer. Male BALB/c mice were treated with minocycline (50mg/kg) via the oral route for a total of 17days, 24h after intracerebroventricular administration of Aβ (1-42) oligomer. At the end of this period, was performed the radial maze test, and 24h after the last minocycline administration, serum was collected and the cortex and hippocampus were dissected for biochemical analysis. The administration of minocycline reversed the memory impairment caused by Aβ (1-42). In the hippocampus, minocycline reversed the increases in the levels of interleukin (IL-1β), Tumor Necrosis Factor- alpha (TNF-α) and, IL-10 caused by Aβ (1-42). In the cortex, AD-like model increase the levels of IL-1β, TNF-α and, IL-4. Minocycline treatment reversed this. In the serum, Aβ (1-42) increased the levels of IL-1β and IL-4, and minocycline was able to reverse this action, but not to reverse the decrease of IL-10 levels. Minocycline also reversed the increase in the levels of Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus caused by Aβ (1-42), and reduced Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) increases in the total cortex. Therefore, our results indicate that minocycline causes improvements in the spatial memory, and cytokine levels were correlated with this effect in the brain it. Besides this, minocycline reduced BDNF and NGF levels, highlighting the promising effects of minocycline in treating AD-like dementia.

  6. Amyloidreduces the expression of neuronal FAIM-L, thereby shifting the inflammatory response mediated by TNFα from neuronal protection to death

    PubMed Central

    Carriba, P; Jimenez, S; Navarro, V; Moreno-Gonzalez, I; Barneda-Zahonero, B; Moubarak, R S; Lopez-Soriano, J; Gutierrez, A; Vitorica, J; Comella, J X

    2015-01-01

    The brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) present elevated levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), a cytokine that has a dual function in neuronal cells. On one hand, TNFα can activate neuronal apoptosis, and on the other hand, it can protect these cells against amyloid-β (Aβ) toxicity. Given the dual behavior of this molecule, there is some controversy regarding its contribution to the pathogenesis of AD. Here we examined the relevance of the long form of Fas apoptotic inhibitory molecule (FAIM) protein, FAIM-L, in regulating the dual function of TNFα. We detected that FAIM-L was reduced in the hippocampi of patients with AD. We also observed that the entorhinal and hippocampal cortex of a mouse model of AD (PS1M146LxAPP751sl) showed a reduction in this protein before the onset of neurodegeneration. Notably, cultured neurons treated with the cortical soluble fractions of these animals showed a decrease in endogenous FAIM-L, an effect that is mimicked by the treatment with Aβ-derived diffusible ligands (ADDLs). The reduction in the expression of FAIM-L is associated with the progression of the neurodegeneration by changing the inflammatory response mediated by TNFα in neurons. In this sense, we also demonstrate that the protection afforded by TNFα against Aβ toxicity ceases when endogenous FAIM-L is reduced by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) or by treatment with ADDLs. All together, these results support the notion that levels of FAIM-L contribute to determine the protective or deleterious effect of TNFα in neuronal cells. PMID:25675299

  7. Cortical bone loss caused by glucocorticoid excess requires RANKL production by osteocytes and is associated with reduced OPG expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Piemontese, Marilina; Xiong, Jinhu; Fujiwara, Yuko; Thostenson, Jeff D; O'Brien, Charles A

    2016-09-01

    Glucocorticoid excess is a major cause of low bone mass and fractures. Glucocorticoid administration decreases cortical thickness and increases cortical porosity in mice, and these changes are associated with increased osteoclast number at the endocortical surface. Receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) produced by osteocytes is required for osteoclast formation in cancellous bone as well as the increase in cortical bone resorption caused by mechanical unloading or dietary calcium deficiency. However, whether osteocyte-derived RANKL also participates in the increase in bone resorption caused by glucocorticoid excess is unknown. To address this question, we examined the effects of prednisolone on cortical bone of mice lacking RANKL production in osteocytes. Prednisolone administration increased osteoclast number at the endocortical surface, increased cortical porosity, and reduced cortical thickness in control mice, but none of these effects occurred in mice lacking RANKL in osteocytes. Prednisolone administration did not alter RANKL mRNA abundance but did reduce osteoprotegerin (OPG) mRNA abundance in osteocyte-enriched cortical bone. Similarly, dexamethasone suppressed OPG but did not increase RANKL production in cortical bone organ cultures and primary osteoblasts. These results demonstrate that RANKL produced by osteocytes is required for the cortical bone loss caused by glucocorticoid excess but suggest that the changes in endocortical resorption are driven by reduced OPG rather than elevated RANKL expression.

  8. Traditional Chinese Nootropic Medicine Radix Polygalae and Its Active Constituent Onjisaponin B Reduce β-Amyloid Production and Improve Cognitive Impairments

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaohang; Cui, Jin; Yu, Yang; Li, Wei; Hou, Yujun; Wang, Xin; Qin, Dapeng; Zhao, Cun; Yao, Xinsheng; Zhao, Jian; Pei, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Decline of cognitive function is the hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), regardless of the pathological mechanism. Traditional Chinese medicine has been used to combat cognitive impairments and has been shown to improve learning and memory. Radix Polygalae (RAPO) is a typical and widely used herbal medicine. In this study, we aimed to follow the β-amyloid (Aβ) reduction activity to identify active constituent(s) of RAPO. We found that Onjisaponin B of RAPO functioned as RAPO to suppress Aβ production without direct inhibition of β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) and γ-secretase activities. Our mechanistic study showed that Onjisaponin B promoted the degradation of amyloid precursor protein (APP). Further, oral administration of Onjisaponin B ameliorated Aβ pathology and behavioral defects in APP/PS1 mice. Taken together, our results indicate that Onjisaponin B is effective against AD, providing a new therapeutic agent for further drug discovery. PMID:26954017

  9. Traditional Chinese Nootropic Medicine Radix Polygalae and Its Active Constituent Onjisaponin B Reduce β-Amyloid Production and Improve Cognitive Impairments.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaohang; Cui, Jin; Yu, Yang; Li, Wei; Hou, Yujun; Wang, Xin; Qin, Dapeng; Zhao, Cun; Yao, Xinsheng; Zhao, Jian; Pei, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Decline of cognitive function is the hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD), regardless of the pathological mechanism. Traditional Chinese medicine has been used to combat cognitive impairments and has been shown to improve learning and memory. Radix Polygalae (RAPO) is a typical and widely used herbal medicine. In this study, we aimed to follow the β-amyloid (Aβ) reduction activity to identify active constituent(s) of RAPO. We found that Onjisaponin B of RAPO functioned as RAPO to suppress Aβ production without direct inhibition of β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) and γ-secretase activities. Our mechanistic study showed that Onjisaponin B promoted the degradation of amyloid precursor protein (APP). Further, oral administration of Onjisaponin B ameliorated Aβ pathology and behavioral defects in APP/PS1 mice. Taken together, our results indicate that Onjisaponin B is effective against AD, providing a new therapeutic agent for further drug discovery.

  10. A controlled intervention to promote a healthy body image, reduce eating disorder risk and prevent excessive exercise among trainee health education and physical education teachers.

    PubMed

    Yager, Zali; O'Dea, Jennifer

    2010-10-01

    This study examined the impact of two interventions on body image, eating disorder risk and excessive exercise among 170 (65% female) trainee health education and physical education (HE&PE) teachers of mean (standard deviation) age 21.6 (2.3) who were considered an 'at-risk' population for poor body image and eating disorders. In the first year of the study, the control group cohort (n = 49 females, 20 males) received the regular didactic health education curriculum; in the second year of the study, the Intervention 1 cohort (n = 31 females, 21 males) received a self-esteem and media literacy health education program and in the third year of the study, the Intervention 2 cohort (n = 30 females, 19 males) received a combined self-esteem, media literacy and dissonance program using online and computer-based activities. Intervention 2 produced the best results, with males improving significantly in self-esteem, body image and drive for muscularity. Intervention 2 females improved significantly on Eating Disorders Inventory Drive for Thinness, Eating Disorder Examination and excessive exercise. The improvements were consistent at 6-month follow-up for females. It is feasible to promote body image, reduce body dissatisfaction and reduce excessive exercise among trainee HE&PE teachers via a health education curriculum.

  11. Icariside II, a Broad-Spectrum Anti-cancer Agent, Reverses Beta-Amyloid-Induced Cognitive Impairment through Reducing Inflammation and Apoptosis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yuanyuan; Long, Long; Wang, Keke; Zhou, Jiayin; Zeng, Lingrong; He, Lianzi; Gong, Qihai

    2017-01-01

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ) deposition, associated neuronal apoptosis and neuroinflammation are considered as the important factors which lead to cognitive deficits in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Icariside II (ICS II), an active flavonoid compound derived from Epimedium brevicornum Maxim, has been extensively used to treat erectile dysfunction, osteoporosis and dementia in traditional Chinese medicine. Recently, ICS II attracts great interest due to its broad-spectrum anti-cancer property. ICS II shows an anti-inflammatory potential both in cancer treatment and cerebral ischemia-reperfusion. It is not yet clear whether the anti-inflammatory effect of ICS II could delay progression of AD. Therefore, the current study aimed to investigate the effects of ICS II on the behavioral deficits, Aβ levels, neuroinflammatory responses and apoptosis in Aβ25-35-treated rats. We found that bilateral hippocampal injection of Aβ25-35 induced cognitive impairment, neuronal damage, along with increase of Aβ, inflammation and apoptosis in hippocampus of rats. However, treatment with ICS II 20 mg/kg could improve the cognitive deficits, ameliorate neuronal death, and reduce the levels of Aβ in the hippocampus. Furthermore, ICS II could suppress microglial and astrocytic activation, inhibit expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, COX-2, and iNOS mRNA and protein, and attenuate the Aβ induced Bax/Bcl-2 ratio elevation and caspase-3 activation. In conclusion, these results showed that ICS II could reverse Aβ-induced cognitive deficits, possibly via the inhibition of neuroinflammation and apoptosis, which suggested a potential protective effect of ICS II on AD. PMID:28210222

  12. Soluble intracellular adhesion molecule-1 secreted by human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cell reduces amyloid-β plaques.

    PubMed

    Kim, J-Y; Kim, D H; Kim, J H; Lee, D; Jeon, H B; Kwon, S-J; Kim, S M; Yoo, Y J; Lee, E H; Choi, S J; Seo, S W; Lee, J I; Na, D L; Yang, Y S; Oh, W; Chang, J W

    2012-04-01

    Presently, co-culture of human umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) with BV2 microglia under amyloid-β42 (Aβ42) exposure induced a reduction of Aβ42 in the medium as well as an overexpression of the Aβ-degrading enzyme neprilysin (NEP) in microglia. Cytokine array examinations of co-cultured media revealed elevated release of soluble intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) from hUCB-MSCs. Administration of human recombinant ICAM-1 in BV2 cells and wild-type mice brains induced NEP expression in time- and dose-dependent manners. In co-culturing with BV2 cells under Aβ42 exposure, knockdown of ICAM-1 expression on hUCB-MSCs by small interfering RNA (siRNA) abolished the induction of NEP in BV2 cells as well as reduction of added Aβ42 in the co-cultured media. By contrast, siRNA-mediated inhibition of the sICAM-1 receptor, lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), on BV2 cells reduced NEP expression by ICAM-1 exposure. When hUCB-MSCs were transplanted into the hippocampus of a 10-month-old transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease for 10, 20, or 40 days, NEP expression was increased in the mice brains. Moreover, Aβ42 plaques in the hippocampus and other regions were decreased by active migration of hUCB-MSCs toward Aβ deposits. These data suggest that hUCB-MSC-derived sICAM-1 decreases Aβ plaques by inducing NEP expression in microglia through the sICAM-1/LFA-1 signaling pathway.

  13. St. John's Wort reduces beta-amyloid accumulation in a double transgenic Alzheimer's disease mouse model-role of P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Brenn, Anja; Grube, Markus; Jedlitschky, Gabriele; Fischer, Andrea; Strohmeier, Barbara; Eiden, Martin; Keller, Markus; Groschup, Martin H; Vogelgesang, Silke

    2014-01-01

    The adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transport protein P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) is involved in the export of beta-amyloid from the brain into the blood, and there is evidence that age-associated deficits in cerebral P-glycoprotein content may be involved in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. P-glycoprotein function and expression can be pharmacologically induced by a variety of compounds including extracts of Hypericum perforatum (St. John's Wort). To clarify the effect of St. John's Wort on the accumulation of beta-amyloid and P-glycoprotein expression in the brain, St. John's Wort extract (final hyperforin concentration 5%) was fed to 30-day-old male C57BL/6J-APP/PS1(+/-) mice over a period of 60 or 120 days, respectively. Age-matched male C57BL/6J-APP/PS1(+/-) mice receiving a St. John's Wort-free diet served as controls. Mice receiving St. John's Wort extract showed (i) significant reductions of parenchymal beta-amyloid 1-40 and 1-42 accumulation; and (ii) moderate, but statistically significant increases in cerebrovascular P-glycoprotein expression. Thus, the induction of cerebrovascular P-glycoprotein may be a novel therapeutic strategy to protect the brain from beta-amyloid accumulation, and thereby impede the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Reduced pathology and improved behavioral performance in Alzheimer’s disease mice vaccinated with HSV amplicons expressing amyloid-beta and interleukin-4

    PubMed Central

    Frazer, Maria E.; Hughes, Jennifer E.; Mastrangelo, Michael A.; Tibbens, Jennifer L.; Federoff, Howard J.; Bowers, William J.

    2008-01-01

    Immunotherapeutics designed to dissolve existing amyloid plaques or to interrupt amyloid-beta (Aβ) accumulation may be feasible for treatment and/or prevention of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). “Shaping” immune responses elicited against Aβ is requisite to generate an efficacious and safe outcome by minimizing the possibility of deleterious inflammatory reactions in the brain as observed in clinical testing of Aβ peptide/adjuvant-based modalities. Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV)-based amplicons can co-express multiple antigens and/or immunomodulatory genes due to their large genetic size capacity, thereby facilitating antigen-specific immune response shaping. We have constructed an amplicon (HSVIEAβCMVIL-4) that co-delivers Aβ1-42 with interleukin-4, a cytokine that promotes the generation of Th2-like T cell responses, which are favored in the setting of AD immunotherapy. Triple-transgenic AD (3xTg-AD) mice, which progressively develop both amyloid and neurofibrillary tangle pathology, were vaccinated thrice with HSVIEAβCMVIL-4, or a set of control amplicon vectors. Increased Th2-related, Aβ-specific antibodies, improved learning and memory functioning, and prevention of AD-related amyloid and tau pathological progression were observed in HSVIEAβCMVIL-4 vaccinated mice as compared to the other experimental groups. Our study underscores the potential of Aβ immunotherapy for AD and highlights the potency of amplicons to facilitate immune response modulation to a disease-relevant antigen. PMID:18388924

  15. Multiple low-dose infusions of human umbilical cord blood cells improve cognitive impairments and reduce amyloid-β-associated neuropathology in Alzheimer mice.

    PubMed

    Darlington, Donna; Deng, Juan; Giunta, Brian; Hou, Huayan; Sanberg, Cyndy D; Kuzmin-Nichols, Nicole; Zhou, Hua-Dong; Mori, Takashi; Ehrhart, Jared; Sanberg, Paul R; Tan, Jun

    2013-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common progressive age-related dementia in the elderly and the fourth major cause of disability and mortality in that population. The disease is pathologically characterized by deposition of β-amyloid plaques neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. Current strategies for the treatment of AD are symptomatic only. As such, they are less than efficacious in terms of significantly slowing or halting the underlying pathophysiological progression of the disease. Modulation by cell therapy may be new promising disease-modifying therapy. Recently, we showed reduction in amyloid-β (Aβ) levels/β-amyloid plaques and associated astrocytosis following low-dose infusions of mononuclear human umbilical cord blood cells (HUCBCs). Our current study extended our previous findings by examining cognition via (1) the rotarod test, (2) a 2-day version of the radial-arm water maze test, and (3) a subsequent observation in an open pool platform test to characterize the effects of monthly peripheral HUCBC infusion (1×10(6) cells/μL) into the transgenic PSAPP mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis (bearing mutant human APP and presenilin-1 transgenes) from 6 to 12 months of age. We show that HUCBC therapy correlates with decreased (1) cognitive impairment, (2) Aβ levels/β-amyloid plaques, (3) amyloidogenic APP processing, and (4) reactive microgliosis after a treatment of 6 or 10 months. As such, this report lays the groundwork for an HUCBC therapy as potentially novel alternative to oppose AD at the disease-modifying level.

  16. Mixed oligomers and monomeric amyloid-β disrupts endothelial cells integrity and reduces monomeric amyloid-β transport across hCMEC/D3 cell line as an in vitro blood-brain barrier model.

    PubMed

    Qosa, Hisham; LeVine, Harry; Keller, Jeffrey N; Kaddoumi, Amal

    2014-09-01

    Senile amyloid plaques are one of the diagnostic hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the severity of clinical symptoms of AD is weakly correlated with the plaque load. AD symptoms severity is reported to be more strongly correlated with the level of soluble amyloid-β (Aβ) assemblies. Formation of soluble Aβ assemblies is stimulated by monomeric Aβ accumulation in the brain, which has been related to its faulty cerebral clearance. Studies tend to focus on the neurotoxicity of specific Aβ species. There are relatively few studies investigating toxic effects of Aβ on the endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We hypothesized that a soluble Aβ pool more closely resembling the in vivo situation composed of a mixture of Aβ40 monomer and Aβ42 oligomer would exert higher toxicity against hCMEC/D3 cells as an in vitro BBB model than either component alone. We observed that, in addition to a disruptive effect on the endothelial cells integrity due to enhancement of the paracellular permeability of the hCMEC/D3 monolayer, the Aβ mixture significantly decreased monomeric Aβ transport across the cell culture model. Consistent with its effect on Aβ transport, Aβ mixture treatment for 24h resulted in LRP1 down-regulation and RAGE up-regulation in hCMEC/D3 cells. The individual Aβ species separately failed to alter Aβ clearance or the cell-based BBB model integrity. Our study offers, for the first time, evidence that a mixture of soluble Aβ species, at nanomolar concentrations, disrupts endothelial cells integrity and its own transport across an in vitro model of the BBB.

  17. Four-Week Consumption of Malaysian Honey Reduces Excess Weight Gain and Improves Obesity-Related Parameters in High Fat Diet Induced Obese Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kanyan Enchang, Francis; Nor Hussein, Fuzina

    2017-01-01

    Many studies revealed the potential of honey consumption in controlling obesity. However, no study has been conducted using Malaysian honey. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of two local Malaysian honey types: Gelam and Acacia honey in reducing excess weight gain and other parameters related to obesity. The quality of both honey types was determined through physicochemical analysis and contents of phenolic and flavonoid. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were induced to become obese using high fat diet (HFD) prior to introduction with/without honey or orlistat for four weeks. Significant reductions in excess weight gain and adiposity index were observed in rats fed with Gelam honey compared to HFD rats. Moreover, levels of plasma glucose, triglycerides, and cholesterol, plasma leptin and resistin, liver enzymes, renal function test, and relative organ weight in Gelam and Acacia honey treated groups were reduced significantly when compared to rats fed with HFD only. Similar results were also displayed in rats treated with orlistat, but with hepatotoxicity effects. In conclusion, consumption of honey can be used to control obesity by regulating lipid metabolism and appears to be more effective than orlistat. PMID:28246535

  18. Four-Week Consumption of Malaysian Honey Reduces Excess Weight Gain and Improves Obesity-Related Parameters in High Fat Diet Induced Obese Rats.

    PubMed

    Samat, Suhana; Kanyan Enchang, Francis; Nor Hussein, Fuzina; Wan Ismail, Wan Iryani

    2017-01-01

    Many studies revealed the potential of honey consumption in controlling obesity. However, no study has been conducted using Malaysian honey. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of two local Malaysian honey types: Gelam and Acacia honey in reducing excess weight gain and other parameters related to obesity. The quality of both honey types was determined through physicochemical analysis and contents of phenolic and flavonoid. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were induced to become obese using high fat diet (HFD) prior to introduction with/without honey or orlistat for four weeks. Significant reductions in excess weight gain and adiposity index were observed in rats fed with Gelam honey compared to HFD rats. Moreover, levels of plasma glucose, triglycerides, and cholesterol, plasma leptin and resistin, liver enzymes, renal function test, and relative organ weight in Gelam and Acacia honey treated groups were reduced significantly when compared to rats fed with HFD only. Similar results were also displayed in rats treated with orlistat, but with hepatotoxicity effects. In conclusion, consumption of honey can be used to control obesity by regulating lipid metabolism and appears to be more effective than orlistat.

  19. Reducing environmental risk of excessively fertilized soils and improving cucumber growth by Caragana microphylla-straw compost application in long-term continuous cropping systems.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yongqiang; Wang, Qing; Zhang, Weihua; Gao, Lihong

    2016-02-15

    Continuous cropping is a common agricultural practice in the word. In China, farmers often apply excessive fertilizers to fields in an attempt to maintain yields in continuous cropping systems. However, this practice often results in high nutrient concentrations in soils, nutrient pollution in leaching water and more crop disease. Here, we investigated 8 different soils from continuously cropped cucumbers in Northern China that grouped into those with extremely high nutrient levels (EHNL) and those with lower nutrient levels (LNL). All soils were treated with Caragana microphylla-straw (CMS) compost addition, and then were used to measure soil physiochemical and microbial properties, leaching water quality, plant root growth and cucumber fruit yield. In general, the EHNL-soil showed higher nitrate, phosphorus and potassium concentrations in the leaching water compared to the LNL-soil. However, the CMS compost application increased soil nutrient and water holding capacities, total microbial biomass (bacteria and fungi), root length, plant biomass and fruit yields, but decreased nutrient concentrations in the leaching water from the EHNL-soil. In addition, the CMS compost decreased the number of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cucumerinum in soils with very high concentration of mineral nitrogen. Our results infer that CMS compost application was an effective method for reducing environmental risk of excessively fertilized soils.

  20. Functional amyloids in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Romero, Diego; Kolter, Roberto

    2014-06-01

    The term amyloidosis is used to refer to a family of pathologies altering the homeostasis of human organs. Despite having a name that alludes to starch content, the amyloid accumulations are made up of proteins that polymerize as long and rigid fibers. Amyloid proteins vary widely with respect to their amino acid sequences but they share similarities in their quaternary structure; the amyloid fibers are enriched in β-sheets arranged perpendicular to the axis of the fiber. This structural feature provides great robustness, remarkable stability, and insolubility. In addition, amyloid proteins specifically stain with certain dyes such as Congo red and thioflavin-T. The aggregation into amyloid fibers, however, it is not restricted to pathogenic processes, rather it seems to be widely distributed among proteins and polypeptides. Amyloid fibers are present in insects, fungi and bacteria, and they are important in maintaining the homeostasis of the organism. Such findings have motivated the use of the term "functional amyloid" to differentiate these amyloid proteins from their toxic siblings. This review focuses on systems that have evolved in bacteria that control the expression and assembly of amyloid proteins on cell surfaces, such that the robustness of amyloid proteins are used towards a beneficial end.

  1. Excessive Tanning

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, Lori A.

    2010-01-01

    Excessive tanning appears to be evident in about one quarter of regular sunbathers. Susceptible individuals are likely to be young Caucasians from Western societies. Despite ongoing education by the media to the public about the risks of excessive exposure to ultraviolet radiation and the availability of potent sunscreens, there seems to be a concurrent proliferation of tanning facilities. What might be potential psychological explanations for excessive or pathological tanning? Psychopathological explanations may exist on both Axes I and II and include substance use, obsessive-compulsive, body dysmorphic, and borderline personality disorders. While there is no known treatment for pathological sunbathing, we discuss several treatment interventions from the literature that have been successfully used for the general public. PMID:20622941

  2. Exercise reduces appetite and traffics excess nutrients away from energetically efficient pathways of lipid deposition during the early stages of weight regain.

    PubMed

    Steig, Amy J; Jackman, Matthew R; Giles, Erin D; Higgins, Janine A; Johnson, Ginger C; Mahan, Chad; Melanson, Edward L; Wyatt, Holly R; Eckel, Robert H; Hill, James O; MacLean, Paul S

    2011-09-01

    The impact of regular exercise on energy balance, fuel utilization, and nutrient availability, during weight regain was studied in obese rats, which had lost 17% of their weight by a calorie-restricted, low-fat diet. Weight reduced rats were maintained for 6 wk with and without regular treadmill exercise (1 h/day, 6 days/wk, 15 m/min). In vivo tracers and indirect calorimetry were then used in combination to examine nutrient metabolism during weight maintenance (in energy balance) and during the first day of relapse when allowed to eat ad libitum (relapse). An additional group of relapsing, sedentary rats were provided just enough calories to create the same positive energy imbalance as the relapsing, exercised rats. Exercise attenuated the energy imbalance by 50%, reducing appetite and increasing energy requirements. Expenditure increased beyond the energetic cost of the exercise bout, as exercised rats expended more energy to store the same nutrient excess in sedentary rats with the matched energy imbalance. Compared with sedentary rats with the same energy imbalance, exercised rats exhibited the trafficking of dietary fat toward oxidation and away from storage in adipose tissue, as well as a higher net retention of fuel via de novo lipogenesis in adipose tissue. These metabolic changes in relapse were preceded by an increase in the skeletal muscle expression of genes involved in lipid uptake, mobilization, and oxidation. Our observations reveal a favorable shift in fuel utilization with regular exercise that increases the energetic cost of storing excess nutrients during relapse and alterations in circulating nutrients that may affect appetite. The attenuation of the biological drive to regain weight, involving both central and peripheral aspects of energy homeostasis, may explain, in part, the utility of regular exercise in preventing weight regain after weight loss.

  3. Curcumin could reduce the monomer of TTR with Tyr114Cys mutation via autophagy in cell model of familial amyloid polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Zhang, Yu; Cao, Li; Xiong, Ran; Zhang, Bei; Wu, Li; Zhao, Zongbo; Chen, Sheng-Di

    2014-01-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) is an autosomal dominant inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by various mutations in the transthyretin gene. We aimed to identify the mechanisms underlying TTR FAP with Tyr114Cys (Y114C) mutation. Our study showed that TTR Y114C mutation led to an increase in monomeric TTR and impaired autophagy. Treatment with curcumin resulted in a significant decrease of monomeric TTR by recovering autophagy. Our research suggests that impairment of autophagy might be involved in the pathogenesis of TTR FAP with Y114C mutation, and curcumin might be a potential therapeutic approach for TTR FAP. PMID:25382970

  4. Regional cerebral blood flow estimated by early PiB uptake is reduced in mild cognitive impairment and associated with age in an amyloid-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Gietl, Anton F; Warnock, Geoffrey; Riese, Florian; Kälin, Andrea M; Saake, Antje; Gruber, Esmeralda; Leh, Sandra E; Unschuld, Paul G; Kuhn, Felix P; Burger, Cyrill; Mu, Linjing; Seifert, Burkhardt; Nitsch, Roger M; Schibli, Roger; Ametamey, Simon M; Buck, Alfred; Hock, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Early uptake of [(11)C]-Pittsburgh Compound B (ePiB, 0-6 minutes) estimates cerebral blood flow. We studied ePiB in 13 PiB-negative and 10 PiB-positive subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI, n = 23) and 11 PiB-positive and 74 PiB-negative cognitively healthy elderly control subjects (HCS, n = 85) in 6 bilateral volumes of interest: posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), hippocampus (hipp), temporoparietal region, superior parietal gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus (parahipp), and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) for the associations with cognitive status, age, amyloid deposition, and apolipoprotein E ε4-allele. We observed no difference in ePiB between PiB-positive and -negative subjects and carriers and noncarriers. EPiB decreased with age in PiB-positive subjects in bilateral superior parietal gyrus, bilateral temporoparietal region, right IFG, right PCC, and left parahippocampal gyrus but not in PiB-negative subjects. MCI had lower ePiB than HCS (left PCC, left IFG, and left and right hipp). Lowest ePiB values were found in MCI of 70 years and older, who also displayed high cortical PiB binding. This suggests that lowered regional cerebral blood flow indicated by ePiB is associated with age in the presence but not in the absence of amyloid pathology.

  5. MicroRNA-339-5p down-regulates protein expression of β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) in human primary brain cultures and is reduced in brain tissue specimens of Alzheimer disease subjects.

    PubMed

    Long, Justin M; Ray, Balmiki; Lahiri, Debomoy K

    2014-02-21

    Alzheimer disease (AD) results, in part, from the excess accumulation of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide as neuritic plaques in the brain. The short Aβ peptide is derived from the large transmembrane Aβ precursor protein (APP). The rate-limiting step in the production of Aβ from APP is mediated by the β-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1). Dysregulation of BACE1 levels leading to excess Aβ deposition is implicated in sporadic AD. Thus, elucidating the full complement of regulatory pathways that control BACE1 expression is key to identifying novel drug targets central to the Aβ-generating process. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are expected to participate in this molecular network. Here, we identified a known miRNA, miR-339-5p, as a key contributor to this regulatory network. Two distinct miR-339-5p target sites were predicted in the BACE1 3'-UTR by in silico analyses. Co-transfection of miR-339-5p with a BACE1 3'-UTR reporter construct resulted in significant reduction in reporter expression. Mutation of both target sites eliminated this effect. Delivery of the miR-339-5p mimic also significantly inhibited expression of BACE1 protein in human glioblastoma cells and human primary brain cultures. Delivery of target protectors designed against the miR-339-5p BACE1 3'-UTR target sites in primary human brain cultures significantly elevated BACE1 expression. Finally, miR-339-5p levels were found to be significantly reduced in brain specimens isolated from AD patients as compared with age-matched controls. Therefore, miR-339-5p regulates BACE1 expression in human brain cells and is most likely dysregulated in at least a subset of AD patients making this miRNA a novel drug target.

  6. An amyloid lung

    PubMed Central

    Zundel, W. E.; Prior, A. P.

    1971-01-01

    A 55-year-old housewife died from an illness characterized by progressive respiratory incapacity. Changes were confined to the lungs and consisted of a diffuse infiltration by amyloid. No adequate cause was found for this amyloid, and we suggest that this is a case of primary alveolar septal amyloidosis. Images PMID:5559913

  7. Islet Amyloid Polypeptide Membrane Interactions: Effects of Membrane Composition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxue; St Clair, Johnna R; London, Erwin; Raleigh, Daniel P

    2017-01-17

    Amyloid formation by islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) contributes to β-cell dysfunction in type 2 diabetes. Perturbation of the β-cell membrane may contribute to IAPP-induced toxicity. We examine the effects of lipid composition, salt, and buffer on IAPP amyloid formation and on the ability of IAPP to induce leakage of model membranes. Even low levels of anionic lipids promote amyloid formation and membrane permeabilization. Increasing the percentage of the anionic lipids, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-l-serine (POPS) or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho(1'-rac-glycerol), enhances the rate of amyloid formation and increases the level of membrane permeabilization. The choice of zwitterionic lipid has no noticeable effect on membrane-catalyzed amyloid formation but in most cases affects leakage, which tends to decrease in the following order: 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine > 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine > sphingomyelin. Uncharged lipids that increase the level of membrane order weaken the ability of IAPP to induce leakage. Leakage is due predominately to pore formation rather than complete disruption of the vesicles under the conditions used in these studies. Cholesterol at or below physiological levels significantly reduces the rate of vesicle-catalyzed IAPP amyloid formation and decreases the susceptibility to IAPP-induced leakage. The effects of cholesterol on amyloid formation are masked by 25 mol % POPS. Overall, there is a strong inverse correlation between the time to form amyloid and the extent of vesicle leakage. NaCl reduces the rate of membrane-catalyzed amyloid formation by anionic vesicles, but accelerates amyloid formation in solution. The implications for IAPP membrane interactions are discussed, as is the possibility that the loss of phosphatidylserine asymmetry enhances IAPP amyloid formation and membrane damage in vivo via a positive feedback loop.

  8. Fibril Fragmentation Enhances Amyloid Cytotoxicity*♦

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Wei-Feng; Hellewell, Andrew L.; Gosal, Walraj S.; Homans, Steve W.; Hewitt, Eric W.; Radford, Sheena E.

    2009-01-01

    Fibrils associated with amyloid disease are molecular assemblies of key biological importance, yet how cells respond to the presence of amyloid remains unclear. Cellular responses may not only depend on the chemical composition or molecular properties of the amyloid fibrils, but their physical attributes such as length, width, or surface area may also play important roles. Here, we report a systematic investigation of the effect of fragmentation on the structural and biological properties of amyloid fibrils. In addition to the expected relationship between fragmentation and the ability to seed, we show a striking finding that fibril length correlates with the ability to disrupt membranes and to reduce cell viability. Thus, despite otherwise unchanged molecular architecture, shorter fibrillar samples show enhanced cytotoxic potential than their longer counterparts. The results highlight the importance of fibril length in amyloid disease, with fragmentation not only providing a mechanism by which fibril load can be rapidly increased but also creating fibrillar species of different dimensions that can endow new or enhanced biological properties such as amyloid cytotoxicity. PMID:19808677

  9. Excess of Methyl Donor in the Perinatal Period Reduces Postnatal Leptin Secretion in Rat and Interacts with the Effect of Protein Content in Diet

    PubMed Central

    Giudicelli, Fanny; Brabant, Anne-Laure; Grit, Isabelle; Parnet, Patricia; Amarger, Valérie

    2013-01-01

    Methionine, folic acid, betaine and choline interact in the one-carbon metabolism which provides methyl groups for methylation reactions. An optimal intake of these nutrients during pregnancy is required for successful completion of fetal development and evidence is growing that they could be involved in metabolic long-term programming. However, the biological pathways involved in the action of these nutrients are still poorly known. This study investigated the interaction between methyl donors and protein content in maternal diet during the preconceptual, pregnancy and lactation periods and the consequences on the rat offspring in the short and long term. Methyl donor supplementation reduced leptin secretion in offspring, whereas insulin levels were mostly affected by protein restriction. The joint effect of protein restriction and methyl donor excess strongly impaired postnatal growth in both gender and long term weight gain in male offspring only, without affecting food intake. In addition, rats born from protein restricted and methyl donor supplemented dams gained less weight when fed a hypercaloric diet. Methylation of the leptin gene promoter in adipose tissue was increased in methyl donor supplemented groups but not affected by protein restriction only. These results suggest that maternal methyl donor supplementation may influence energy homeostasis in a gender-dependent manner, without affecting food intake. Moreover, we showed that macronutrients and micronutrients in maternal diet interact to influence the programming of the offspring. PMID:23840890

  10. Effects of lovastatin and pravastatin on amyloid processing and inflammatory response in TgCRND8 brain.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Neelima B; Siegel, George J; Feinstein, Douglas L

    2004-10-01

    Previous studies suggest that treatment with statins reduce beta amyloid (Abeta) deposition in brains of mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and may reduce the prevalence of AD in humans. Since lipophilicity influences the biological efficacy of statins, we compared the effects of lovastatin, a lipophilic statin, to effects of the hydrophilic pravastatin on amyloid processing and inflammatory responses in brain. Three-month old TgCRND8 mice expressing mutant human amyloid precursor protein (mHuAPP) were treated daily with various doses of either statin. After 1 month, levels of cerebral soluble and fibrillar Abeta peptides, soluble sAPPalpha, and inflammatory cytokines were measured. Both statins caused dose-dependent reductions in total Abeta peptides with parallel increases in total sAPPalpha. At all doses, slightly greater effects were observed with lovastatin than with pravastatin. In contrast, only lovastatin significantly increased levels of IL-1beta and of TNFalpha in a dose-dependent manner. Lovastatin, but not pravastatin, decreased succinic dehydrogenase and increased lactate dehydrogenase activities in skeletal muscle and increased TUNEL staining in liver. Our data demonstrate that both statins shift the balance of APP processing from excessive beta-toward the normal alpha-cleavage while reducing the total amyloid burden in TgCRND8 brain and that lovastatin, but not pravastatin, potentiates cerebral inflammation and is associated with liver and muscle histotoxicity in these animals. These data show that pravastatin can reduce amyloid burden without potentiating inflammatory responses in brain and, therefore, may have a wider dose-range of safety than have lipophilic statins in the treatment or prevention of AD.

  11. Peptide Detection of Fungal Functional Amyloids in Infected Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Sherman, Melissa C.; Lysak, Nataliya; Filonenko, Alexandra; Richards, Hazel; Sobonya, Richard E.; Klotz, Stephen A.; Lipke, Peter N.

    2014-01-01

    Many fungal cell adhesion proteins form functional amyloid patches on the surface of adhering cells. The Candida albicans Agglutinin-like sequence (Als) adhesins are exemplars for this phenomenon, and have amyloid forming sequences that are conserved between family members. The Als5p amyloid sequence mediates amyloid fibril formation and is critical for cell adhesion and biofilm formation, and is also present in the related adhesins Als1p and Als3p. We have developed a fluorescent peptide probe containing the conserved Als amyloid-forming sequence. This peptide bound specifically to yeast expressing Als5p, but not to cells lacking the adhesin. The probe bound to both yeast and hyphal forms of C. albicans. Δals1/Δals3 single and double deletion strains exhibited reduced fluorescence, indicating that probe binding required expression of these proteins. Additionally, the Als peptide specifically stained fungal cells in abscesses in autopsy sections. Counterstaining with calcofluor white showed colocalization with the amyloid peptide. In addition, fungi in autopsy sections derived from the gastrointestinal tract showed colocalization of the amyloid-specific dye thioflavin T and the fluorescent peptide. Collectively, our data demonstrate that we can exploit amyloid sequence specificity for detection of functional amyloids in situ. PMID:24465872

  12. Contrasting effects of nanoparticle-protein attraction on amyloid aggregation.

    PubMed

    Radic, Slaven; Davis, Thomas P; Ke, Pu Chun; Ding, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been experimentally found to either promote or inhibit amyloid aggregation of proteins, but the molecular mechanisms for such complex behaviors remain unknown. Using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated the effects of varying the strength of nonspecific NP-protein attraction on amyloid aggregation of a model protein, the amyloid-beta peptide implicated in Alzheimer's disease. Specifically, with increasing NP-peptide attraction, amyloid aggregation on the NP surface was initially promoted due to increased local protein concentration on the surface and destabilization of the folded state. However, further increase of NP-peptide attraction decreased the stability of amyloid fibrils and reduced their lateral diffusion on the NP surface necessary for peptide conformational changes and self-association, thus prohibiting amyloid aggregation. Moreover, we found that the relative concentration between protein and NPs also played an important role in amyloid aggregation. With a high NP/protein ratio, NPs that intrinsically promote protein aggregation may display an inhibitive effect by depleting the proteins in solution while having a low concentration of the proteins on each NP's surface. Our coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation study offers a molecular mechanism for delineating the contrasting and seemingly conflicting effects of NP-protein attraction on amyloid aggregation and highlights the potential of tailoring anti-aggregation nanomedicine against amyloid diseases.

  13. Altered theca and cumulus oocyte complex gene expression, follicular arrest and reduced fertility in cows with dominant follicle follicular fluid androgen excess

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To date, animal models with naturally occurring androgen excess have not been identified. Serendipitously, we discovered two subpopulations of cows with dramatically different follicular fluid androgen concentrations in dominant follicles within our research herd. In the cow, androstenedione is the...

  14. Peptide Amyloid Surface Display

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Homomeric self-assembly of peptides into amyloid fibers is a feature of many diseases. A central role has been suggested for the lateral fiber surface affecting gains of toxic function. To investigate this, a protein scaffold that presents a discrete, parallel β-sheet surface for amyloid subdomains up to eight residues in length has been designed. Scaffolds that present the fiber surface of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) were prepared. The designs show sequence-specific surface effects apparent in that they gain the capacity to attenuate rates of IAPP self-assembly in solution and affect IAPP-induced toxicity in insulin-secreting cells. PMID:25541905

  15. Structure-Based Design of Functional Amyloid Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dan; Jones, Eric M.; Sawaya, Michael R.; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Luo, Fang; Ivanova, Magdalena; Sievers, Stuart A.; Wang, Wenyuan; Yaghi, Omar M.; Liu, Cong; Eisenberg, David S.

    2014-12-04

    We report that amyloid fibers, once exclusively associated with disease, are acquiring utility as a class of biological nanomaterials. We introduce a method that utilizes the atomic structures of amyloid peptides, to design materials with versatile applications. As a model application, we designed amyloid fibers capable of capturing carbon dioxide from flue gas, to address the global problem of excess anthropogenic carbon dioxide. By measuring dynamic separation of carbon dioxide from nitrogen, we show that fibers with designed amino acid sequences double the carbon dioxide binding capacity of the previously reported fiber formed by VQIVYK from Tau protein. In a second application, we designed fibers that facilitate retroviral gene transfer. Finally, by measuring lentiviral transduction, we show that designed fibers exceed the efficiency of polybrene, a commonly used enhancer of transduction. The same procedures can be adapted to the design of countless other amyloid materials with a variety of properties and uses.

  16. Structure-Based Design of Functional Amyloid Materials

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Dan; Jones, Eric M.; Sawaya, Michael R.; ...

    2014-12-04

    We report that amyloid fibers, once exclusively associated with disease, are acquiring utility as a class of biological nanomaterials. We introduce a method that utilizes the atomic structures of amyloid peptides, to design materials with versatile applications. As a model application, we designed amyloid fibers capable of capturing carbon dioxide from flue gas, to address the global problem of excess anthropogenic carbon dioxide. By measuring dynamic separation of carbon dioxide from nitrogen, we show that fibers with designed amino acid sequences double the carbon dioxide binding capacity of the previously reported fiber formed by VQIVYK from Tau protein. In amore » second application, we designed fibers that facilitate retroviral gene transfer. Finally, by measuring lentiviral transduction, we show that designed fibers exceed the efficiency of polybrene, a commonly used enhancer of transduction. The same procedures can be adapted to the design of countless other amyloid materials with a variety of properties and uses.« less

  17. When amyloids become prions.

    PubMed

    Sabate, Raimon

    2014-01-01

    The conformational diseases, linked to protein aggregation into amyloid conformations, range from non-infectious neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer disease (AD), to highly infectious ones, such as human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). They are commonly known as prion diseases. However, since all amyloids could be considered prions (from those involved in cell-to-cell transmission to those responsible for real neuronal invasion), it is necessary to find an underlying cause of the different capacity to infect that each of the proteins prone to form amyloids has. As proposed here, both the intrinsic cytotoxicity and the number of nuclei of aggregation per cell could be key factors in this transmission capacity of each amyloid.

  18. When amyloids become prions

    PubMed Central

    Sabate, Raimon

    2014-01-01

    The conformational diseases, linked to protein aggregation into amyloid conformations, range from non-infectious neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), to highly infectious ones, such as human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). They are commonly known as prion diseases. However, since all amyloids could be considered prions (from those involved in cell-to-cell transmission to those responsible for real neuronal invasion), it is necessary to find an underlying cause of the different capacity to infect that each of the proteins prone to form amyloids has. As proposed here, both the intrinsic cytotoxicity and the number of nuclei of aggregation per cell could be key factors in this transmission capacity of each amyloid. PMID:24831240

  19. Nucleofection of Rat Pheochromocytoma PC-12 Cells with Human Mutated Beta-Amyloid Precursor Protein Gene (APP-sw) Leads to Reduced Viability, Autophagy-Like Process, and Increased Expression and Secretion of Beta Amyloid

    PubMed Central

    Pająk, Beata; Kania, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma PC-12 cells are immune to physiological stimuli directed to evoke programmed cell death. Besides, metabolic inhibitors are incapable of sensitizing PC-12 cells to extrinsic or intrinsic apoptosis unless they are used in toxic concentrations. Surprisingly, these cells become receptive to cell deletion after human APP-sw gene expression. We observed reduced cell viability in GFP vector + APP-sw-nucleofected cells (drop by 36%) but not in GFP vector − or GFP vector + APP-wt-nucleofected cells. Lower viability was accompanied by higher expression of Aβ 1-16 and elevated secretion of Aβ 1-40 (in average 53.58 pg/mL). At the ultrastructural level autophagy-like process was demonstrated to occur in APP-sw-nucleofected cells with numerous autophagosomes and multivesicular bodies but without autolysosomes. Human APP-sw gene is harmful to PC-12 cells and cells are additionally driven to incomplete autophagy-like process. When stimulated by TRAIL or nystatin, CLU protein expression accompanies early phase of autophagy. PMID:25821818

  20. Nonaccommodative convergence excess.

    PubMed

    von Noorden, G K; Avilla, C W

    1986-01-15

    Nonaccommodative convergence excess is a condition in which a patient has orthotropia or a small-angle esophoria or esotropia at distance and a large-angle esotropia at near, not significantly reduced by the addition of spherical plus lenses. The AC/A ratio, determined with the gradient method, is normal or subnormal. Tonic convergence is suspected of causing the convergence excess in these patients. Nonaccommodative convergence excess must be distinguished from esotropia with a high AC/A ratio and from hypoaccommodative esotropia. In 24 patients treated with recession of both medial recti muscles with and without posterior fixation or by posterior fixation alone, the mean correction of esotropia was 7.4 prism diopters at distance and 17 prism diopters at near.

  1. A Controlled Intervention to Promote a Healthy Body Image, Reduce Eating Disorder Risk and Prevent Excessive Exercise among Trainee Health Education and Physical Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yager, Zali; O'Dea, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the impact of two interventions on body image, eating disorder risk and excessive exercise among 170 (65% female) trainee health education and physical education (HE & PE) teachers of mean (standard deviation) age 21.6 (2.3) who were considered an "at-risk" population for poor body image and eating disorders. In the first year…

  2. Amyloid Beta Mediates Memory Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Osta, Ana; Alberini, Cristina M.

    2009-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) undergoes sequential cleavages to generate various polypeptides, including the amyloid [beta] (1-42) peptide (A[beta][1-42]), which is believed to play a major role in amyloid plaque formation in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we provide evidence that, in contrast with its pathological role when accumulated,…

  3. Characterization of amyloid in equine recurrent uveitis as AA amyloid.

    PubMed

    Ostevik, L; de Souza, G A; Wien, T N; Gunnes, G; Sørby, R

    2014-01-01

    Two horses with chronic uveitis and histological lesions consistent with equine recurrent uveitis (ERU) were examined. Microscopical findings in the ciliary body included deposits of amyloid lining the non-pigmented epithelium, intracytoplasmic, rod-shaped, eosinophilic inclusions and intraepithelial infiltration of T lymphocytes. Ultrastructural examination of the ciliary body of one horse confirmed the presence of abundant extracellular deposits of non-branching fibrils (9-11 nm in diameter) consistent with amyloid. Immunohistochemistry revealed strong positive labelling for AA amyloid and mass spectrometry showed the amyloid to consist primarily of serum amyloid A1 in both cases. The findings suggest that localized, intraocular AA amyloidosis may occur in horses with ERU.

  4. Insulin amyloid at injection sites of patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Melanie R

    2016-09-01

    The formation of insulin amyloid can dramatically impact glycemic control in patients with diabetes, making it an important therapeutic consideration. In addition, the cost associated with the excess insulin required by patients with amyloid is estimated to be $3K per patient per year, which adds to the growing financial burden of this disease. Insulin amyloid has been observed with every mode of therapeutic insulin administration (infusion, injection and inhalation), and the number of reported cases has increased significantly since 2002. The new cases represent a much broader demographic, and include many patients who have used exclusively human insulin and human insulin analogs. The reason for the increase in case reports is unknown, but this review explores the possibility that changes in patient care, improved differential diagnosis and/or changes in insulin type and insulin delivery systems may be important factors. The goal of this review is to raise key questions that will inspire proactive measures to prevent, identify and treat insulin amyloid. Furthermore, this comprehensive examination of insulin amyloid can provide insight into important considerations for other injectable drugs that are prone to form amyloid deposits.

  5. Amyloid Fibril Solubility.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, L G; Auer, S

    2015-11-19

    It is well established that amyloid fibril solubility is protein specific, but how solubility depends on the interactions between the fibril building blocks is not clear. Here we use a simple protein model and perform Monte Carlo simulations to directly measure the solubility of amyloid fibrils as a function of the interaction between the fibril building blocks. Our simulations confirms that the fibril solubility depends on the fibril thickness and that the relationship between the interactions and the solubility can be described by a simple analytical formula. The results presented in this study reveal general rules how side-chain-side-chain interactions, backbone hydrogen bonding, and temperature affect amyloid fibril solubility, which might prove to be a powerful tool to design protein fibrils with desired solubility and aggregation properties in general.

  6. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits Amyloid Formation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are large aggregates of misfolded proteins, which are often associated with various neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, and vascular dementia. The amount of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is known to be significantly reduced in the brain tissue of people diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease relative to that of healthy individuals. These findings prompted us to investigate the effects of H2S on the formation of amyloids in vitro using a model fibrillogenic protein hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL). HEWL forms typical β-sheet rich fibrils during the course of 70 min at low pH and high temperatures. The addition of H2S completely inhibits the formation of β-sheet and amyloid fibrils, as revealed by deep UV resonance Raman (DUVRR) spectroscopy and ThT fluorescence. Nonresonance Raman spectroscopy shows that disulfide bonds undergo significant rearrangements in the presence of H2S. Raman bands corresponding to disulfide (RSSR) vibrational modes in the 550–500 cm–1 spectral range decrease in intensity and are accompanied by the appearance of a new 490 cm–1 band assigned to the trisulfide group (RSSSR) based on the comparison with model compounds. The formation of RSSSR was proven further using a reaction with TCEP reduction agent and LC-MS analysis of the products. Intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence study shows a strong denaturation of HEWL containing trisulfide bonds. The presented evidence indicates that H2S causes the formation of trisulfide bridges, which destabilizes HEWL structure, preventing protein fibrillation. As a result, small spherical aggregates of unordered protein form, which exhibit no cytotoxicity by contrast with HEWL fibrils. PMID:25545790

  7. Accumulation of murine amyloid-β mimics early Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Krohn, Markus; Bracke, Alexander; Avchalumov, Yosef; Schumacher, Toni; Hofrichter, Jacqueline; Paarmann, Kristin; Fröhlich, Christina; Lange, Cathleen; Brüning, Thomas; von Bohlen Und Halbach, Oliver; Pahnke, Jens

    2015-08-01

    Amyloidosis mouse models of Alzheimer's disease are generally established by transgenic approaches leading to an overexpression of mutated human genes that are known to be involved in the generation of amyloid-β in Alzheimer's families. Although these models made substantial contributions to the current knowledge about the 'amyloid hypothesis' of Alzheimer's disease, the overproduction of amyloid-β peptides mimics only inherited (familiar) Alzheimer's disease, which accounts for <1% of all patients with Alzheimer's disease. The inherited form is even regarded a 'rare' disease according to the regulations for funding of the European Union (www.erare.eu). Here, we show that mice that are double-deficient for neprilysin (encoded by Mme), one major amyloid-β-degrading enzyme, and the ABC transporter ABCC1, a major contributor to amyloid-β clearance from the brain, develop various aspects of sporadic Alzheimer's disease mimicking the clinical stage of mild cognitive impairment. Using behavioural tests, electrophysiology and morphological analyses, we compared different ABC transporter-deficient animals and found that alterations are most prominent in neprilysin × ABCC1 double-deficient mice. We show that these mice have a reduced probability to survive, show increased anxiety in new environments, and have a reduced working memory performance. Furthermore, we detected morphological changes in the hippocampus and amygdala, e.g. astrogliosis and reduced numbers of synapses, leading to defective long-term potentiation in functional measurements. Compared to human, murine amyloid-β is poorly aggregating, due to changes in three amino acids at N-terminal positions 5, 10, and 13. Interestingly, our findings account for the action of early occurring amyloid-β species/aggregates, i.e. monomers and small amyloid-β oligomers. Thus, neprilysin × ABCC1 double-deficient mice present a new model for early effects of amyloid-β-related mild cognitive impairment that allows

  8. Specific binding of DNA to aggregated forms of Alzheimer's disease amyloid peptides.

    PubMed

    Camero, Sergio; Ayuso, Jose M; Barrantes, Alejandro; Benítez, María J; Jiménez, Juan S

    2013-04-01

    Anomalous protein aggregation is closely associated to age-related mental illness. Extraneuronal plaques, mainly composed of aggregated amyloid peptides, are considered as hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. According to the amyloid cascade hypothesis, this disease starts as a consequence of an abnormal processing of the amyloid precursor protein resulting in an excess of amyloid peptides. Nuclear localization of amyloid peptide aggregates together with amyloid-DNA interaction, have been repeatedly reported. In this paper we have used surface plasmon resonance and electron microscopy to study the structure and behavior of different peptides and proteins, including β-lactoglobulin, bovine serum albumin, myoglobin, histone, casein and the amyloid-β peptides related to Alzheimer's disease Aβ25-35 and Aβ1-40. The main purpose of this study is to investigate whether proneness to DNA interaction is a general property displayed by aggregated forms of proteins, or it is an interaction specifically related to the aggregated forms of those particular proteins and peptides related to neurodegenerative diseases. Our results reveal that those aggregates formed by amyloid peptides show a particular proneness to interact with DNA. They are the only aggregated structures capable of binding DNA, and show more affinity for DNA than for other polyanions like heparin and polyglutamic acid, therefore strengthening the hypothesis that amyloid peptides may, by means of interaction with nuclear DNA, contribute to the onset of Alzheimer's disease.

  9. β-asarone improves learning and memory and reduces Acetyl Cholinesterase and Beta-amyloid 42 levels in APP/PS1 transgenic mice by regulating Beclin-1-dependent autophagy.

    PubMed

    Deng, Minzhen; Huang, Liping; Ning, Baile; Wang, Nanbu; Zhang, Qinxin; Zhu, Caixia; Fang, Yongqi

    2016-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder in the elderly, and studies have suggested that β-asarone has pharmacological effects on beta-amyloid (Aβ) injected in the rat hippocampus. However, the effect of β-asarone on autophagy in the APP/PS1 transgenic mouse is unreported. APP/PS1 transgenic mice were randomly divided into six groups (n=10/group): an untreated group, an Aricept-treated group, a 3-MA-treated group, a rapamycin-treated group, an LY294002-treated group, a β-asarone-treated group. The control group consisted of wild-type C57BL/6 mice. All treatments were administered to the mice for 30 days. Spatial learning and memory were assessed by water maze, passive avoidance, and step-down tests. AChE and Aβ42 levels in the hippocampus were determined by ELISA. p-Akt, p-mTOR, and LC3B expression were detected by flow cytometry. The expression of p-Akt, p-mTOR, Beclin-1, and p62 proteins was assessed by western blot. Changes in autophagy were viewed using a transmission electron microscope. APP and Beclin-1 mRNA levels were measured by Real-Time PCR. The learning and memory of APP/PS1 transgenic mice were improved significantly after β-asarone treatment compared with the untreated group. In addition, β-asarone treatment reduced AChE and Aβ42 levels, increased p-mTOR and p62 expression, decreased p-Akt, Beclin-1, and LC3B expression, decreased the number of autophagosomes and reduced APP mRNA and Beclin-1 mRNA levels compared with the untreated group. That is, β-asarone treatment can improve the learning and memory abilities of APP/PS1 transgenic mouse by inhibiting Beclin-1-dependent autophagy via the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway.

  10. Amyloid-β and Astrocytes Interplay in Amyloid-β Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Batarseh, Yazan S.; Duong, Quoc-Viet; Mousa, Youssef M.; Al Rihani, Sweilem B.; Elfakhri, Khaled; Kaddoumi, Amal

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology is known to promote chronic inflammatory responses in the brain. It was thought previously that Aβ is only associated with Alzheimer’s disease and Down syndrome. However, studies have shown its involvement in many other neurological disorders. The role of astrocytes in handling the excess levels of Aβ has been highlighted in the literature. Astrocytes have a distinctive function in both neuronal support and protection, thus its involvement in Aβ pathological process may tip the balance toward chronic inflammation and neuronal death. In this review we describe the involvement of astrocytes in Aβ related disorders including Alzheimer’s disease, Down syndrome, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and frontotemporal dementia. PMID:26959008

  11. Targeting the γ-/β-secretase interaction reduces β-amyloid generation and ameliorates Alzheimer’s disease-related pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jin; Wang, Xiaoyin; Li, Xiaohang; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Chenlu; Li, Wei; Zhang, Yangming; Gu, Haifeng; Xie, Xin; Nan, Fajun; Zhao, Jian; Pei, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of intense global effort, no disease-modifying drugs for Alzheimer’s disease have emerged. Molecules targeting catalytic activities of γ-secretase or β-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) have been beset by undesired side effects. We hypothesized that blocking the interaction between BACE1 and γ-secretase subunit presenilin-1 (PS1) might offer an alternative strategy to selectively suppress Aβ generation. Through high-throughput screening, we discovered that 3-α-akebonoic acid (3AA) interferes with PS1/BACE1 interaction and reduces Aβ production. Structural analogs of 3AA were systematically synthesized and the functional analog XYT472B was identified. Photo-activated crosslinking and biochemical competition assays showed that 3AA and XYT472B bind to PS1, interfere with PS1/BACE1 interaction, and reduce Aβ production, whereas sparing secretase activities. Furthermore, treatment of APP/PS1 mice with XYT472B alleviated cognitive dysfunction and Aβ-related pathology. Together, our results indicate that chemical interference of PS1/BACE1 interaction is a promising strategy for Alzheimer’s disease therapeutics. PMID:27462420

  12. Origins of amyloid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Amyloid-β plaques are a defining characteristic of Alzheimer Disease. However, Amyloid-β deposition is also found in other forms of dementia and in non-pathological contexts. Amyloid-β deposition is variable among vertebrate species and the evolutionary emergence of the amyloidogenic property is currently unknown. Evolutionary persistence of a pathological peptide sequence may depend on the functions of the precursor gene, conservation or mutation of nucleotides or peptide domains within the precursor gene, or a species-specific physiological environment. Results In this study, we asked when amyloidogenic Amyloid-β first arose using phylogenetic trees constructed for the Amyloid-β Precursor Protein gene family and by modeling the potential for Amyloid-β aggregation across species in silico. We collected the most comprehensive set of sequences for the Amyloid-β Precursor Protein family using an automated, iterative meta-database search and constructed a highly resolved phylogeny. The analysis revealed that the ancestral gene for invertebrate and vertebrate Amyloid-β Precursor Protein gene families arose around metazoic speciation during the Ediacaran period. Synapomorphic frequencies found domain-specific conservation of sequence. Analyses of aggregation potential showed that potentially amyloidogenic sequences are a ubiquitous feature of vertebrate Amyloid-β Precursor Protein but are also found in echinoderm, nematode, and cephalochordate, and hymenoptera species homologues. Conclusions The Amyloid-β Precursor Protein gene is ancient and highly conserved. The amyloid forming Amyloid-β domains may have been present in early deuterostomes, but more recent mutations appear to have resulted in potentially unrelated amyoid forming sequences. Our results further highlight that the species-specific physiological environment is as critical to Amyloid-β formation as the peptide sequence. PMID:23627794

  13. Amyloid Aggregation and Membrane Disruption by Amyloid Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2013-03-01

    Amyloidogenesis has been the focus of intense basic and clinical research, as an increasing number of amyloidogenic proteins have been linked to common and incurable degenerative diseases including Alzheimer's, type II diabetes, and Parkinson's. Recent studies suggest that the cell toxicity is mainly due to intermediates generated during the assembly process of amyloid fibers, which have been proposed to attack cells in a variety of ways. Disruption of cell membranes is believed to be one of the key components of amyloid toxicity. However, the mechanism by which this occurs is not fully understood. Our research in this area is focused on the investigation of the early events in the aggregation and membrane disruption of amyloid proteins, Islet amyloid polypeptide protein (IAPP, also known as amylin) and amyloid-beta peptide, on the molecular level. Structural insights into the mechanisms of membrane disruption by these amyloid proteins and the role of membrane components on the membrane disruption will be presented.

  14. White matter hyperintensities predict amyloid increase in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Grimmer, Timo; Faust, Maximilian; Auer, Florian; Alexopoulos, Panagiotis; Förstl, Hans; Henriksen, Gjermund; Perneczky, Robert; Sorg, Christian; Yousefi, Behrooz H; Drzezga, Alexander; Kurz, Alexander

    2012-12-01

    Impaired amyloid clearance probably contributes to increased amyloid deposition in sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). Diminished perivascular drainage due to cerebral small-vessel disease (CSVD) has been proposed as a cause of reduced amyloid clearance. White matter hyperintensities (WMHs) are considered to reflect CSVD and can be measured using fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Amyloid deposition can be determined in vivo using Pittsburgh compound B ([11C]PiB) positron emission tomography (PET). We aimed to elucidate the association between WMH and the progression of amyloid deposition in patients with AD. Twenty-two patients with probable AD underwent FLAIR-MRI and [11C]PiB-PET examinations at baseline (BL) and after a mean follow-up (FU) interval of 28 months. The relationship between BL-WMH and the progression of cerebral amyloid between BL and FU was examined using a regions-of-interest (ROI) approach. The region-specific variability of this relationship was analyzed using a voxel-based method. The longitudinal analysis revealed a statistically significant association between the amount of BL-WMH and the progression of amyloid load between BL and FU (p = 0.006, adjusted R2 = 0.375, standardized coefficient β = 0.384). The association was particularly observed in parieto-occipital regions and tended to be closer in regions adjacent to the brain surface. According to our knowledge, this is the first in vivo study in human being supporting the hypothesis that impaired amyloid clearance along perivascular drainage pathways may contribute to β-amyloid deposition in sporadic AD. The extent of WMH might be a relevant factor to be assessed in antiamyloid drug trials.

  15. Taxifolin inhibits amyloid-β oligomer formation and fully restores vascular integrity and memory in cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

    PubMed

    Saito, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Yumi; Maki, Takakuni; Hattori, Yorito; Ito, Hideki; Mizuno, Katsuhiko; Harada-Shiba, Mariko; Kalaria, Raj N; Fukushima, Masanori; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Ihara, Masafumi

    2017-04-04

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) induces various forms of cerebral infarcts and hemorrhages from vascular amyloid-β accumulation, resulting in acceleration of cognitive impairment, which is currently untreatable. Soluble amyloid-β protein likely impairs cerebrovascular integrity as well as cognitive function in early stage Alzheimer's disease. Taxifolin, a flavonol with strong anti-oxidative and anti-glycation activities, has been reported to disassemble amyloid-β in vitro but the in vivo relevance remains unknown. Here, we investigated whether taxifolin has therapeutic potential in attenuating CAA, hypothesizing that inhibiting amyloid-β assembly may facilitate its clearance through several elimination pathways. Vehicle- or taxifolin-treated Tg-SwDI mice (commonly used to model CAA) were used in this investigation. Cognitive and cerebrovascular function, as well as the solubility and oligomerization of brain amyloid-β proteins, were investigated. Spatial reference memory was assessed by water maze test. Cerebral blood flow was measured with laser speckle flowmetry and cerebrovascular reactivity evaluated by monitoring cerebral blood flow changes in response to hypercapnia. Significantly reduced cerebrovascular pan-amyloid-β and amyloid-β1-40 accumulation was found in taxifolin-treated Tg-SwDI mice compared to vehicle-treated counterparts (n = 5). Spatial reference memory was severely impaired in vehicle-treated Tg-SwDI mice but normalized after taxifolin treatment, with scoring similar to wild type mice (n = 10-17). Furthermore, taxifolin completely restored decreased cerebral blood flow and cerebrovascular reactivity in Tg-SwDI mice (n = 4-6). An in vitro thioflavin-T assay showed taxifolin treatment resulted in efficient inhibition of amyloid-β1-40 assembly. In addition, a filter trap assay and ELISA showed Tg-SwDI mouse brain homogenates exhibited significantly reduced levels of amyloid-β oligomers in vivo after taxifolin treatment (n

  16. Targeting CCR3 to Reduce Amyloid-β Production, Tau Hyperphosphorylation, and Synaptic Loss in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chunyan; Xu, Bing; Sun, Xiaohong; Zhu, Qiwen; Sui, Yi

    2016-11-23

    The majority of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients have a late onset, and chronic neuroinflammation, characterized by glial activation and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, plays a role in the pathogenesis of AD. The chemokine CCL11 has been shown to be a causative factor of cognitive decline in the process of aging, but little is known whether it is involved in the pathogenesis of AD. In the present study, we showed that CCR3, the receptor for CCL11, was expressed by hippocampal neurons and treatment of primary hippocampal neuronal cultures (14 days in vitro) with CCL11 resulted in activation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 and glycogen synthase kinase-3β, associated with elevated tau phosphorylation at multiple sites. CCL11 treatment also induced the production of Aβ and dendritic spine loss in the hippocampal neuronal cultures. All these effects were blocked by the CCR3 specific antagonist, GW766994. An age-dependent increase in CCL11, predominantly expressed by the activated microglia, was observed in the cerebrospinal fluid of both APP/PS1 double transgenic mice and wild-type (WT) littermates, with a markedly higher level in APP/PS1 double transgenic mice than that in WT littermates. Deletion of CCR3 in APP/PS1 double transgenic mice significantly reduced the phosphorylation of CDK5 and GSK3β, tau hyperphosphorylation, Aβ deposition, microgliosis, astrogliosis, synaptic loss, and spatial learning and memory deficits. Thus, the age-related increase in CCL11 may be a risk factor of AD, and antagonizing CCR3 may bring therapeutic benefits to AD.

  17. Amyloids: from Pathogenesis to Function.

    PubMed

    Nizhnikov, A A; Antonets, K S; Inge-Vechtomov, S G

    2015-09-01

    The term "amyloids" refers to fibrillar protein aggregates with cross-β structure. They have been a subject of intense scrutiny since the middle of the previous century. First, this interest is due to association of amyloids with dozens of incurable human diseases called amyloidoses, which affect hundreds of millions of people. However, during the last decade the paradigm of amyloids as pathogens has changed due to an increase in understanding of their role as a specific variant of quaternary protein structure essential for the living cell. Thus, functional amyloids are found in all domains of the living world, and they fulfill a variety of roles ranging from biofilm formation in bacteria to long-term memory regulation in higher eukaryotes. Prions, which are proteins capable of existing under the same conditions in two or more conformations at least one of which having infective properties, also typically have amyloid features. There are weighty reasons to believe that the currently known amyloids are only a minority of their real number. This review provides a retrospective analysis of stages in the development of amyloid biology that during the last decade resulted, on one hand, in reinterpretation of the biological role of amyloids, and on the other hand, in the development of systems biology of amyloids, or amyloidomics.

  18. Protective properties of lysozyme on β-amyloid pathology: implications for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Helmfors, Linda; Boman, Andrea; Civitelli, Livia; Nath, Sangeeta; Sandin, Linnea; Janefjord, Camilla; McCann, Heather; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Halliday, Glenda; Brorsson, Ann-Christin; Kågedal, Katarina

    2015-11-01

    The hallmarks of Alzheimer disease are amyloid-β plaques and neurofibrillary tangles accompanied by signs of neuroinflammation. Lysozyme is a major player in the innate immune system and has recently been shown to prevent the aggregation of amyloid-β1-40 in vitro. In this study we found that patients with Alzheimer disease have increased lysozyme levels in the cerebrospinal fluid and lysozyme co-localized with amyloid-β in plaques. In Drosophila neuronal co-expression of lysozyme and amyloid-β1-42 reduced the formation of soluble and insoluble amyloid-β species, prolonged survival and improved the activity of amyloid-β1-42 transgenic flies. This suggests that lysozyme levels rise in Alzheimer disease as a compensatory response to amyloid-β increases and aggregation. In support of this, in vitro aggregation assays revealed that lysozyme associates with amyloid-β1-42 and alters its aggregation pathway to counteract the formation of toxic amyloid-β species. Overall, these studies establish a protective role for lysozyme against amyloid-β associated toxicities and identify increased lysozyme in patients with Alzheimer disease. Therefore, lysozyme has potential as a new biomarker as well as a therapeutic target for Alzheimer disease.

  19. Specific combinations of ion channel inhibitors reduce excessive Ca(2+) influx as a consequence of oxidative stress and increase neuronal and glial cell viability in vitro.

    PubMed

    O'Hare Doig, Ryan L; Bartlett, Carole A; Smith, Nicole M; Hodgetts, Stuart I; Dunlop, Sarah A; Hool, Livia; Fitzgerald, Melinda

    2016-12-17

    Combinations of Ca(2+) channel inhibitors have been proposed as an effective means to prevent excess Ca(2+) flux and death of neurons and glia following neurotrauma in vivo. However, it is not yet known if beneficial outcomes such as improved viability have been due to direct effects on intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations. Here, the effects of combinations of Lomerizine (Lom), 2,3-dioxo-7-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)6-nitro-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-1-quinoxalinyl]acetic acid monohydrate (YM872), 3,5-dimethyl-1-adamantanamine (memantine (Mem)) and/or adenosine 5'-triphosphate periodate oxidized sodium salt (oxATP) to block voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels, Ca(2+) permeable α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors, NMDA receptors and purinergic P2X7 receptors (P2X7R) respectively, on Ca(2+) concentration and viability of rat primary mixed cortical (MC) cultures exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) insult, were assessed. The contribution of ryanodine-sensitive intracellular stores to intracellular Ca(2+) concentration was also assessed. Live cell calcium imaging revealed that a 30min H2O2 insult induced a slow increase in intracellular Ca(2+), in part from intracellular sources, associated with loss of cell viability by 6h. Most combinations of inhibitors that included oxATP significantly decreased Ca(2+) influx and increased cell viability when administered simultaneously with H2O2. However, reductions in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration were not always linked to improved cell viability. Examination of the density of specific cell subpopulations demonstrated that most combinations of inhibitors that included oxATP preserved NG2+ non-oligodendroglial cells, but preservation of astrocytes and neurons required additional inhibitors. Olig2(+) oligodendroglia and ED-1(+) activated microglia/macrophages were not preserved by any of the inhibitor combinations. These data indicate that following H2O2 insult, limiting intracellular Ca(2+) entry via P2X7R is

  20. Human islet amyloid polypeptide expression in COS-1 cells. A model of intracellular amyloidogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, T. D.; Butler, P. C.; Kreutter, D. K.; Kane, L. A.; Eberhardt, N. L.

    1995-01-01

    Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus is characterized by concurrent loss of beta-cells and deposition of islet amyloid derived from islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP). We have previously demonstrated that IAPP-derived amyloid forms intracellularly in humans with chronic excess insulin expression (eg, insulinoma and insulin receptor antibody-induced insulin resistance). To determine whether overexpression of IAPP results in intracellular amyloid in mammalian cells, we transfected COS cells with vectors expressing amyloidogenic human IAPP or non-amyloidogenic rat IAPP. Transfected COS-1 cells secreted comparable amounts of human IAPP and rat IAPP (2.1 to 2.8 nmol/L/48 hours). After 96 hours, 90% of cells expressing human IAPP contained amyloid fibrils and were degenerating or dead, whereas cells transfected with rat IAPP lacked amyloid and were viable. Thus, overexpression of human IAPP can result in intracellular amyloid formation that is associated with cell death, suggesting that intracellular amyloid may play a role in beta-cell loss in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7677175

  1. Double-dose β-glucan treatment in WSSV-challenged shrimp reduces viral replication but causes mortality possibly due to excessive ROS production.

    PubMed

    Thitamadee, Siripong; Srisala, Jiraporn; Taengchaiyaphum, Suparat; Sritunyalucksana, Kallaya

    2014-10-01

    In our research efforts to reduce the impact of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) disease outbreaks in shrimp aquaculture, we studied the effect of β-glucan administration to activate the prophenoloxidase (proPO) enzymatic cascade prior to WSSV challenge. Injection of a single dose of β-glucan (5 μg/g) prior to WSSV challenge resulted in activation of the proPO system and reduced shrimp mortality (25-50%) when compared to controls (100%). By contrast, no significant reduction was observed using yellow head virus (YHV) in a similar protocol. We subsequently hypothesized that administration of a second dose of β-glucan after WSSV challenge might reduce shrimp mortality further. Surprisingly, the opposite occurred, and mortality of the WSSV-infected shrimp increased to 100% after the second β-glucan dose. Both immunofluorescence and RT-PCR assays revealed low WSSV levels in hemocytes of shrimp collected after the second dose of β-glucan administration, suggesting that the cause of increased mortality was unlikely to be increased WSSV replication. We found from measured phenoloxidase acitivity (PO) and H2O2 production that the higher mortality may have resulted from a combination of WSSV infection plus over-production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) stimulated by two doses of β-glucan. Thus, caution may be prudent in continuous or prolonged activation of the shrimp immune system by β-glucan administration lest it exacerbate shrimp mortality in the event of WSSV infection.

  2. Effect of trehalose on amyloid β (29-40)-membrane interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Allam S.; Izmitli, Aslin; de Pablo, J. J.

    2009-08-01

    A growing body of experimental evidence indicates that the interaction between amyloid β peptide and lipid bilayer membranes plays an important role in the development of Alzheimer disease. Recent experimental evidence also suggests that trehalose, a simple disaccharide, reduces the toxicity of amyloid β peptide. Molecular simulations are used to examine the effect of trehalose on the conformational stability of amyloid β peptide in aqueous solution and its effect on the interaction between amyloid β peptide and a model phospholipid bilayer membrane. It is found that, in aqueous solution, the peptide exhibits a random coil conformation but, in the presence of trehalose, it adopts an alpha helical conformation. It is then shown that the insertion of amyloid β peptide into a membrane is more favorable when the peptide is folded into an α-helix than in a random coil conformation, thereby suggesting that trehalose promotes the insertion of α-helical amyloid β into biological membranes.

  3. Effect of trehalose on amyloid beta (29-40)-membrane interaction.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Allam S; Izmitli, Aslin; de Pablo, J J

    2009-08-28

    A growing body of experimental evidence indicates that the interaction between amyloid beta peptide and lipid bilayer membranes plays an important role in the development of Alzheimer disease. Recent experimental evidence also suggests that trehalose, a simple disaccharide, reduces the toxicity of amyloid beta peptide. Molecular simulations are used to examine the effect of trehalose on the conformational stability of amyloid beta peptide in aqueous solution and its effect on the interaction between amyloid beta peptide and a model phospholipid bilayer membrane. It is found that, in aqueous solution, the peptide exhibits a random coil conformation but, in the presence of trehalose, it adopts an alpha helical conformation. It is then shown that the insertion of amyloid beta peptide into a membrane is more favorable when the peptide is folded into an alpha-helix than in a random coil conformation, thereby suggesting that trehalose promotes the insertion of alpha-helical amyloid beta into biological membranes.

  4. Ovine colostrum nanopeptide affects amyloid beta aggregation.

    PubMed

    Janusz, Maria; Woszczyna, Mirosław; Lisowski, Marek; Kubis, Adriana; Macała, Józefa; Gotszalk, Teodor; Lisowski, Józef

    2009-01-05

    A colostral proline-rich polypeptide complex (PRP) consisting of over 30 peptides shows beneficial effects in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients when administered in the form of sublinqual tablets called Colostrinin. The aim of the present studies was to investigate whether nanopeptide fragment of PRP (NP) - one of the PRP complex components can affect aggregation of amyloid beta (Abeta1-42). The effect of NP on Abeta aggregation was studied using Thioflavin T (ThT) binding, atomic force microscopy, and analyzing circular dichroism spectra. Results presented suggest that NP can directly interact with amyloid beta, inhibit its aggregation and disrupt existing aggregates acting as a beta sheet breaker and reduce toxicity induced by aggregated forms of Abeta.

  5. Towards a Pharmacophore for Amyloid

    SciTech Connect

    Landau, Meytal; Sawaya, Michael R.; Faull, Kym F.; Laganowsky, Arthur; Jiang, Lin; Sievers, Stuart A.; Liu, Jie; Barrio, Jorge R.; Eisenberg, David

    2011-09-16

    Diagnosing and treating Alzheimer's and other diseases associated with amyloid fibers remains a great challenge despite intensive research. To aid in this effort, we present atomic structures of fiber-forming segments of proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease in complex with small molecule binders, determined by X-ray microcrystallography. The fiber-like complexes consist of pairs of {beta}-sheets, with small molecules binding between the sheets, roughly parallel to the fiber axis. The structures suggest that apolar molecules drift along the fiber, consistent with the observation of nonspecific binding to a variety of amyloid proteins. In contrast, negatively charged orange-G binds specifically to lysine side chains of adjacent sheets. These structures provide molecular frameworks for the design of diagnostics and drugs for protein aggregation diseases. The devastating and incurable dementia known as Alzheimer's disease affects the thinking, memory, and behavior of dozens of millions of people worldwide. Although amyloid fibers and oligomers of two proteins, tau and amyloid-{beta}, have been identified in association with this disease, the development of diagnostics and therapeutics has proceeded to date in a near vacuum of information about their structures. Here we report the first atomic structures of small molecules bound to amyloid. These are of the dye orange-G, the natural compound curcumin, and the Alzheimer's diagnostic compound DDNP bound to amyloid-like segments of tau and amyloid-{beta}. The structures reveal the molecular framework of small-molecule binding, within cylindrical cavities running along the {beta}-spines of the fibers. Negatively charged orange-G wedges into a specific binding site between two sheets of the fiber, combining apolar binding with electrostatic interactions, whereas uncharged compounds slide along the cavity. We observed that different amyloid polymorphs bind different small molecules, revealing that a cocktail of compounds

  6. Hacking the code of amyloid formation: the amyloid stretch hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Pastor, M Teresa; Esteras-Chopo, Alexandra; Serrano, Luis

    2007-01-01

    Many research efforts in the last years have been directed towards understanding the factors determining protein misfolding and amyloid formation. Protein stability and amino acid composition have been identified as the two major factors in vitro. The research of our group has been focused on understanding the relationship between amino acid sequence and amyloid formation. Our approach has been the design of simple model systems that reproduce the biophysical properties of natural amyloids. An amyloid sequence pattern was extracted that can be used to detect amyloidogenic hexapeptide stretches in proteins. We have added evidence supporting that these amyloidogenic stretches can trigger amyloid formation by nonamyloidogenic proteins. Some experimental results in other amyloid proteins will be analyzed under the conclusions obtained in these studies. Our conclusions together with evidences from other groups suggest that amyloid formation is the result of the interplay between a decrease of protein stability, and the presence of highly amyloidogenic regions in proteins. As many of these results have been obtained in vitro, the challenge for the next years will be to demonstrate their validity in in vivo systems.

  7. Familial amyloid polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Planté-Bordeneuve, Violaine; Said, Gerard

    2011-12-01

    Familial amyloid polyneuropathies (FAPs) are a group of life-threatening multisystem disorders transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. Nerve lesions are induced by deposits of amyloid fibrils, most commonly due to mutated transthyretin (TTR). Less often the precursor of amyloidosis is mutant apolipoprotein A-1 or gelsolin. The first identified cause of FAP-the TTR Val30Met mutation-is still the most common of more than 100 amyloidogenic point mutations identified worldwide. The penetrance and age at onset of FAP among people carrying the same mutation vary between countries. The symptomatology and clinical course of FAP can be highly variable. TTR FAP typically causes a nerve length-dependent polyneuropathy that starts in the feet with loss of temperature and pain sensations, along with life-threatening autonomic dysfunction leading to cachexia and death within 10 years on average. TTR is synthesised mainly in the liver, and liver transplantation seems to have a favourable effect on the course of neuropathy, but not on cardiac or eye lesions. Oral administration of tafamidis meglumine, which prevents misfolding and deposition of mutated TTR, is under evaluation in patients with TTR FAP. In future, patients with FAP might benefit from gene therapy; however, genetic counselling is recommended for the prevention of all types of FAP.

  8. Failure of Aβ(1-40) amyloid fibrils under tensile loading.

    PubMed

    Paparcone, Raffaella; Buehler, Markus J

    2011-05-01

    Amyloid fibrils and plaques are detected in the brain tissue of patients affected by Alzheimer's disease, but have also been found as part of normal physiological processes such as bacterial adhesion. Due to their highly organized structures, amyloid proteins have also been used for the development of nanomaterials, for a variety of applications including biomaterials for tissue engineering, nanolectronics, or optical devices. Past research on amyloid fibrils resulted in advances in identifying their mechanical properties, revealing a remarkable stiffness. However, the failure mechanism under tensile loading has not been elucidated yet, despite its importance for the understanding of key mechanical properties of amyloid fibrils and plaques as well as the growth and aggregation of amyloids into long fibers and plaques. Here we report a molecular level analysis of failure of amyloids under uniaxial tensile loading. Our molecular modeling results demonstrate that amyloid fibrils are extremely stiff with a Young's modulus in the range of 18-30 GPa, in good agreement with previous experimental and computational findings. The most important contribution of our study is our finding that amyloid fibrils fail at relatively small strains of 2.5%-4%, and at stress levels in the range of 1.02 to 0.64 GPa, in good agreement with experimental findings. Notably, we find that the strength properties of amyloid fibrils are extremely length dependent, and that longer amyloid fibrils show drastically smaller failure strains and failure stresses. As a result, longer fibrils in excess of hundreds of nanometers to micrometers have a greatly enhanced propensity towards spontaneous fragmentation and failure. We use a combination of simulation results and simple theoretical models to define critical fibril lengths where distinct failure mechanisms dominate.

  9. Peptide p5 binds both heparinase-sensitive glycosaminoglycans and fibrils in patient-derived AL amyloid extracts.

    PubMed

    Martin, Emily B; Williams, Angela; Heidel, Eric; Macy, Sallie; Kennel, Stephen J; Wall, Jonathan S

    2013-06-21

    In previously published work, we have described heparin-binding synthetic peptides that preferentially recognize amyloid deposits in a mouse model of reactive systemic (AA) amyloidosis and can be imaged by using positron and single photon emission tomographic imaging. We wanted to extend these findings to the most common form of visceral amyloidosis, namely light chain (AL); however, there are no robust experimental animal models of AL amyloidosis. To further define the binding of the lead peptide, p5, to AL amyloid, we characterized the reactivity in vitro of p5 with in situ and patient-derived AL amyloid extracts which contain both hypersulfated heparan sulfate proteoglycans as well as amyloid fibrils. Histochemical staining demonstrated that the peptide specifically localized with tissue-associated AL amyloid deposits. Although we anticipated that p5 would undergo electrostatic interactions with the amyloid-associated glycosaminoglycans expressing heparin-like side chains, no significant correlation between peptide binding and glycosaminoglycan content within amyloid extracts was observed. In contrast, following heparinase I treatment, although overall binding was reduced, a positive correlation between peptide binding and amyloid fibril content became evident. This interaction was further confirmed using synthetic light chain fibrils that contain no carbohydrates. These data suggest that p5 can bind to both the sulfated glycosaminoglycans and protein fibril components of AL amyloid. Understanding these complex electrostatic interactions will aid in the optimization of synthetic peptides for use as amyloid imaging agents and potentially as therapeutics for the treatment of amyloid diseases.

  10. Engineering theranostic nanovehicles capable of targeting cerebrovascular amyloid deposits.

    PubMed

    Agyare, Edward K; Jaruszewski, Kristen M; Curran, Geoffry L; Rosenberg, Jens T; Grant, Samuel C; Lowe, Val J; Ramakrishnan, Subramanian; Paravastu, Anant K; Poduslo, Joseph F; Kandimalla, Karunya K

    2014-07-10

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is characterized by the deposition of amyloid beta (Aβ) proteins within the walls of the cerebral vasculature with subsequent aggressive vascular inflammation leading to recurrent hemorrhagic strokes. The objective of the study was to develop theranostic nanovehicles (TNVs) capable of a) targeting cerebrovascular amyloid; b) providing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast for the early detection of CAA; and c) treating cerebrovascular inflammation resulting from CAA. The TNVs comprised of a polymeric nanocore made from Magnevist (MRI contrast agent) conjugated chitosan. The nanocore was also loaded with cyclophosphamide (CYC), an immunosuppressant shown to reduce the cerebrovascular inflammation in CAA. Putrescine modified F(ab')2 fragment of anti-amyloid antibody, IgG4.1 (pF(ab')24.1) was conjugated to the surface of the nanocore to target cerebrovascular amyloid. The average size of the control chitosan nanoparticles (conjugated with albumin and are devoid of Magnevist, CYC, and pF(ab')24.1) was 164±1.2 nm and that of the TNVs was 239±4.1 nm. The zeta potential values of the CCNs and TNVs were 21.6±1.7 mV and 11.9±0.5 mV, respectively. The leakage of Magnevist from the TNVs was a modest 0.2% over 4 days, and the CYC release from the TNVs followed Higuchi's model that describes sustained drug release from polymeric matrices. The studies conducted in polarized human microvascular endothelial cell monolayers (hCMEC/D3) in vitro as well as in mice in vivo have demonstrated the ability of TNVs to target cerebrovascular amyloid. In addition, the TNVs provided contrast for imaging cerebrovascular amyloid using MRI and single photon emission computed tomography. Moreover, the TNVs were shown to reduce pro-inflammatory cytokine production by the Aβ challenged blood brain barrier (BBB) endothelium more effectively than the cyclophosphamide alone.

  11. The effect of tachykinin neuropeptides on amyloid {beta} aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Flashner, Efrat; Raviv, Uri; Friedler, Assaf

    2011-04-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Mechanistic explanation of how tachykinin neuropeptides reduce A{beta}-induced neurotoxicity. {yields} Biophysical studies suggest that tachykinins do not modulate the distribution of A{beta} oligomeric states, but rather may incorporate into the fibrils. {yields} A possible strategy to inhibit toxicity of amyloid fibrils. -- Abstract: A hallmark of Alzheimer's disease is production of amyloid {beta} peptides resulting from aberrant cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein. Amyloid {beta} assembles into fibrils under physiological conditions, through formation of neurotoxic intermediate oligomers. Tachykinin peptides are known to affect amyloid {beta} neurotoxicity in cells. To understand the mechanism of this effect, we studied how tachykinins affect A{beta}(1-40) aggregation in vitro. Fibrils grown in the presence of tachykinins exhibited reduced thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence, while their morphology, observed in transmission electron microscopy (TEM), did not alter. Cross linking studies revealed that the distribution of low molecular weight species was not affected by tachykinins. Our results suggest that there may be a specific interaction between tachykinins and A{beta}(1-40) that allows them to co-assemble. This effect may explain the reduction of A{beta}(1-40) neurotoxicity in cells treated with tachykinins.

  12. Reducing Excessive Deadline Obligations Act of 2013

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Gardner, Cory [R-CO-4

    2013-06-06

    01/13/2014 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Environment and Public Works. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  13. Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy: Emerging Concepts

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) involves cerebrovascular amyloid deposition and is classified into several types according to the amyloid protein involved. Of these, sporadic amyloid β-protein (Aβ)-type CAA is most commonly found in older individuals and in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Cerebrovascular Aβ deposits accompany functional and pathological changes in cerebral blood vessels (CAA-associated vasculopathies). CAA-associated vasculopathies lead to development of hemorrhagic lesions [lobar intracerebral macrohemorrhage, cortical microhemorrhage, and cortical superficial siderosis (cSS)/focal convexity subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)], ischemic lesions (cortical infarction and ischemic changes of the white matter), and encephalopathies that include subacute leukoencephalopathy caused by CAA-associated inflammation/angiitis. Thus, CAA is related to dementia, stroke, and encephalopathies. Recent advances in diagnostic procedures, particularly neuroimaging, have enabled us to establish a clinical diagnosis of CAA without brain biopsies. Sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods, such as gradient-echo T2* imaging and susceptibility-weighted imaging, are useful for detecting cortical microhemorrhages and cSS. Amyloid imaging with amyloid-binding positron emission tomography (PET) ligands, such as Pittsburgh Compound B, can detect CAA, although they cannot discriminate vascular from parenchymal amyloid deposits. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid markers may be useful, including levels of Aβ40 for CAA and anti-Aβ antibody for CAA-related inflammation. Moreover, cSS is closely associated with transient focal neurological episodes (TFNE). CAA-related inflammation/angiitis shares pathophysiology with amyloid-related imaging abnormalities (ARIA) induced by Aβ immunotherapies in AD patients. This article reviews CAA and CAA-related disorders with respect to their epidemiology, pathology, pathophysiology, clinical features, biomarkers, diagnosis

  14. ABCA7 Mediates Phagocytic Clearance of Amyloid-β in the Brain.

    PubMed

    Fu, YuHong; Hsiao, Jen-Hsiang T; Paxinos, George; Halliday, Glenda M; Kim, Woojin Scott

    2016-09-06

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by dementia and abnormal deposits of aggregated amyloid-β in the brain. Recent genome-wide association studies have revealed that ABCA7 is strongly associated with AD. In vitro evidence suggests that the role of ABCA7 is related to phagocytic activity. Deletion of ABCA7 in a mouse model of AD exacerbates cerebral amyloid-β plaque load. However, the biological role of ABCA7 in AD brain pathogenesis is unknown. We show that ABCA7 is highly expressed in microglia and when monocytes are differentiated into macrophages. We hypothesized that ABCA7 plays a protective role in the brain that is related to phagocytic clearance of amyloid-β. We isolated microglia and macrophages from Abca7-/- and wild type mice and tested them for their capacity to phagocytose amyloid-β oligomers. We found that the phagocytic clearance of amyloid-β was substantially reduced in both microglia and macrophages from Abca7-/- mice compared to wild type mice. Consistent with these results, in vivo phagocytic clearance of amyloid-β oligomers in the hippocampus was reduced in Abca7-/- mice. Furthermore, ABCA7 transcription was upregulated in AD brains and in amyloidogenic mouse brains specifically in the hippocampus as a response to the amyloid-β pathogenic state. Together these results indicate that ABCA7 mediates phagocytic clearance of amyloid-β in the brain, and reveal a mechanism by which loss of function of ABCA7 increases the susceptibility to AD.

  15. Invariant NKT cells modulate the suppressive activity of Serum Amyloid A-differentiated IL-10-secreting neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    De Santo, Carmela; Arscott, Ramon; Booth, Sarah; Karydis, Ioannis; Jones, Margaret; Asher, Ruth; Salio, Mariolina; Middleton, Mark; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    Neutrophils are the primary effector cells during inflammation, but can also control excessive inflammatory responses by secreting anti-inflammatory cytokines. However, the mechanisms modulating their plasticity remain unclear. We now show that systemic serum amyloid A-1 (SAA-1) controls the plasticity of neutrophil differentiation. SAA-1 not only induced anti-inflammatory IL-10-secreting neutrophils but also promoted invariant NKT (iNKT) cell interaction with these neutrophils, a process that limits their suppressive activity by reducing IL-10 and enhancing IL-12 production. Because SAA-1-producing melanomas promote differentiation of IL-10-secreting neutrophils, harnessing iNKT cells could be useful therapeutically by reducing the frequency of immunosuppressive neutrophils and restoring tumor specific immune responses. PMID:20890286

  16. Overexpression of heparanase lowers the amyloid burden in amyloid-β precursor protein transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Jendresen, Charlotte B; Cui, Hao; Zhang, Xiao; Vlodavsky, Israel; Nilsson, Lars N G; Li, Jin-Ping

    2015-02-20

    Heparan sulfate (HS) and HS proteoglycans (HSPGs) colocalize with amyloid-β (Aβ) deposits in Alzheimer disease brain and in Aβ precursor protein (AβPP) transgenic mouse models. Heparanase is an endoglycosidase that specifically degrades the unbranched glycosaminoglycan side chains of HSPGs. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that HS and HSPGs are active participators of Aβ pathogenesis in vivo. We therefore generated a double-transgenic mouse model overexpressing both human heparanase and human AβPP harboring the Swedish mutation (tgHpa*Swe). Overexpression of heparanase did not affect AβPP processing because the steady-state levels of Aβ1-40, Aβ1-42, and soluble AβPP β were the same in 2- to 3-month-old double-transgenic tgHpa*Swe and single-transgenic tgSwe mice. In contrast, the Congo red-positive amyloid burden was significantly lower in 15-month-old tgHpa*Swe brain than in tgSwe brain. Likewise, the Aβ burden, measured by Aβx-40 and Aβx-42 immunohistochemistry, was reduced significantly in tgHpa*Swe brain. The intensity of HS-stained plaques correlated with the Aβx-42 burden and was reduced in tgHpa*Swe mice. Moreover, the HS-like molecule heparin facilitated Aβ1-42-aggregation in an in vitro Thioflavin T assay. The findings suggest that HSPGs contribute to amyloid deposition in tgSwe mice by increasing Aβ fibril formation because heparanase-induced fragmentation of HS led to a reduced amyloid burden. Therefore, drugs interfering with Aβ-HSPG interactions might be a potential strategy for Alzheimer disease treatment.

  17. Problems of Excess Capacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, G.

    1972-01-01

    The problems of excess capacity in the airline industry are discussed with focus on the following topics: load factors; fair rate of return on investment; service-quality rivalry among airlines; pricing (fare) policies; aircraft production; and the impacts of excess capacity on operating costs. Also included is a discussion of the interrelationships among these topics.

  18. Excessive acquisition in hoarding.

    PubMed

    Frost, Randy O; Tolin, David F; Steketee, Gail; Fitch, Kristin E; Selbo-Bruns, Alexandra

    2009-06-01

    Compulsive hoarding (the acquisition of and failure to discard large numbers of possessions) is associated with substantial health risk, impairment, and economic burden. However, little research has examined separate components of this definition, particularly excessive acquisition. The present study examined acquisition in hoarding. Participants, 878 self-identified with hoarding and 665 family informants (not matched to hoarding participants), completed an Internet survey. Among hoarding participants who met criteria for clinically significant hoarding, 61% met criteria for a diagnosis of compulsive buying and approximately 85% reported excessive acquisition. Family informants indicated that nearly 95% exhibited excessive acquisition. Those who acquired excessively had more severe hoarding; their hoarding had an earlier onset and resulted in more psychiatric work impairment days; and they experienced more symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression, and anxiety. Two forms of excessive acquisition (buying and free things) each contributed independent variance in the prediction of hoarding severity and related symptoms.

  19. Amyloid-β Oligomers Interact with Neurexin and Diminish Neurexin-mediated Excitatory Presynaptic Organization

    PubMed Central

    Naito, Yusuke; Tanabe, Yuko; Lee, Alfred Kihoon; Hamel, Edith; Takahashi, Hideto

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by excessive production and deposition of amyloid-beta (Aβ) proteins as well as synapse dysfunction and loss. While soluble Aβ oligomers (AβOs) have deleterious effects on synapse function and reduce synapse number, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Here we screened synaptic organizer proteins for cell-surface interaction with AβOs and identified a novel interaction between neurexins (NRXs) and AβOs. AβOs bind to NRXs via the N-terminal histidine-rich domain (HRD) of β-NRX1/2/3 and alternatively-spliced inserts at splicing site 4 of NRX1/2. In artificial synapse-formation assays, AβOs diminish excitatory presynaptic differentiation induced by NRX-interacting proteins including neuroligin1/2 (NLG1/2) and the leucine-rich repeat transmembrane protein LRRTM2. Although AβOs do not interfere with the binding of NRX1β to NLG1 or LRRTM2, time-lapse imaging revealed that AβO treatment reduces surface expression of NRX1β on axons and that this reduction depends on the NRX1β HRD. In transgenic mice expressing mutated human amyloid precursor protein, synaptic expression of β-NRXs, but not α-NRXs, decreases. Thus our data indicate that AβOs interact with NRXs and that this interaction inhibits NRX-mediated presynaptic differentiation by reducing surface expression of axonal β-NRXs, providing molecular and mechanistic insights into how AβOs lead to synaptic pathology in AD. PMID:28211900

  20. Amyloid mediates the association of apolipoprotein E e4 allele to cognitive function in older people

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, D; Schneider, J; Wilson, R; Bienias, J; Berry-Kravis, E; Arnold, S

    2005-01-01

    Background: The neurobiological changes underlying the association of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) e4 allele with level of cognition are poorly understood. Objective: To test the hypothesis that amyloid load can account for (mediate) the association of the APOE e4 allele with level of cognition assessed proximate to death. Methods: There were 44 subjects with clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease and 50 without dementia, who had participated in the Religious Orders Study. They underwent determination of APOE allele status, had comprehensive cognitive testing in the last year of life, and brain autopsy at death. The percentage area of cortex occupied by amyloid beta and the density of tau positive neurofibrillary tangles were quantified from six brain regions and averaged to yield summary measures of amyloid load and neurofibrillary tangles. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine whether amyloid load could account for the effect of allele status on level of cognition, controlling for age, sex, and education. Results: Possession of at least one APOE e4 allele was associated with lower level of cognitive function proximate to death (p = 0.04). The effect of the e4 allele was reduced by nearly 60% and was no longer significant after controlling for the effect of amyloid load, whereas there was a robust inverse association between amyloid and cognition (p = 0.001). Because prior work had suggested that neurofibrillary tangles could account for the association of amyloid on cognition, we next examined whether amyloid could account for the effect of allele status on tangles. In a series of regression analyses, e4 was associated with density of tangles (p = 0.002), but the effect of the e4 allele was reduced by more than 50% and was no longer significant after controlling for the effect of amyloid load. Conclusion: These findings are consistent with a sequence of events whereby the e4 allele works through amyloid deposition and subsequent tangle formation to

  1. Porcine prion protein amyloid.

    PubMed

    Hammarström, Per; Nyström, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian prions are composed of misfolded aggregated prion protein (PrP) with amyloid-like features. Prions are zoonotic disease agents that infect a wide variety of mammalian species including humans. Mammals and by-products thereof which are frequently encountered in daily life are most important for human health. It is established that bovine prions (BSE) can infect humans while there is no such evidence for any other prion susceptible species in the human food chain (sheep, goat, elk, deer) and largely prion resistant species (pig) or susceptible and resistant pets (cat and dogs, respectively). PrPs from these species have been characterized using biochemistry, biophysics and neurobiology. Recently we studied PrPs from several mammals in vitro and found evidence for generic amyloidogenicity as well as cross-seeding fibril formation activity of all PrPs on the human PrP sequence regardless if the original species was resistant or susceptible to prion disease. Porcine PrP amyloidogenicity was among the studied. Experimentally inoculated pigs as well as transgenic mouse lines overexpressing porcine PrP have, in the past, been used to investigate the possibility of prion transmission in pigs. The pig is a species with extraordinarily wide use within human daily life with over a billion pigs harvested for human consumption each year. Here we discuss the possibility that the largely prion disease resistant pig can be a clinically silent carrier of replicating prions.

  2. Porcine prion protein amyloid

    PubMed Central

    Hammarström, Per; Nyström, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mammalian prions are composed of misfolded aggregated prion protein (PrP) with amyloid-like features. Prions are zoonotic disease agents that infect a wide variety of mammalian species including humans. Mammals and by-products thereof which are frequently encountered in daily life are most important for human health. It is established that bovine prions (BSE) can infect humans while there is no such evidence for any other prion susceptible species in the human food chain (sheep, goat, elk, deer) and largely prion resistant species (pig) or susceptible and resistant pets (cat and dogs, respectively). PrPs from these species have been characterized using biochemistry, biophysics and neurobiology. Recently we studied PrPs from several mammals in vitro and found evidence for generic amyloidogenicity as well as cross-seeding fibril formation activity of all PrPs on the human PrP sequence regardless if the original species was resistant or susceptible to prion disease. Porcine PrP amyloidogenicity was among the studied. Experimentally inoculated pigs as well as transgenic mouse lines overexpressing porcine PrP have, in the past, been used to investigate the possibility of prion transmission in pigs. The pig is a species with extraordinarily wide use within human daily life with over a billion pigs harvested for human consumption each year. Here we discuss the possibility that the largely prion disease resistant pig can be a clinically silent carrier of replicating prions. PMID:26218890

  3. In Vivo Detection of Amyloid Plaques by Gadolinium-Stained MRI Can Be Used to Demonstrate the Efficacy of an Anti-amyloid Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Santin, Mathieu D.; Vandenberghe, Michel E.; Herard, Anne-Sophie; Pradier, Laurent; Cohen, Caroline; Debeir, Thomas; Delzescaux, Thierry; Rooney, Thomas; Dhenain, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular deposition of β amyloid plaques is an early event associated to Alzheimer’s disease. Here, we have used in vivo gadolinium-stained high resolution (29∗29∗117 μm3) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to follow-up in a longitudinal way individual amyloid plaques in APP/PS1 mice and evaluate the efficacy of a new immunotherapy (SAR255952) directed against protofibrillar and fibrillary forms of Aβ. APP/PS1 mice were treated for 5 months between the age of 3.5 and 8.5 months. SAR255952 reduced amyloid load in 8.5-months-old animals, but not in 5.5-months animals compared to mice treated with a control antibody (DM4). Histological evaluation confirmed the reduction of amyloid load and revealed a lower density of amyloid plaques in 8.5-months SAR255952-treated animals. The longitudinal follow-up of individual amyloid plaques by MRI revealed that plaques that were visible at 5.5 months were still visible at 8.5 months in both SAR255952 and DM4-treated mice. This suggests that the amyloid load reduction induced by SAR255952 is related to a slowing down in the formation of new plaques rather than to the clearance of already formed plaques. PMID:27047372

  4. Excessive Blinking in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... scratch on the front surface of the eye), conjunctivitis (pink eye), foreign body in the eye, or ... is excessive blinking treated? If an abrasion or conjunctivitis is diagnosed, eye drops or ointment may be ...

  5. Blocking the Apolipoprotein E/Amyloid β Interaction in Triple Transgenic Mice Ameliorates Alzheimer’s Disease Related Amyloid β and Tau Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shan; Breitbart, Ariel; Sun, Yanjie; Mehta, Pankaj D.; Boutajangout, Allal; Scholtzova, Henrieta; Wisniewski, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Inheritance of the apolipoprotein E4 (apoE4) genotype has been identified as the major genetic risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Studies have shown that the binding between apoE and amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides occurs at residues 244–272 of apoE and residues 12–28 of Aβ. ApoE4 has been implicated in promoting Aβ deposition and impairing clearance of Aβ. We hypothesized that blocking the apoE/Aβ interaction would serve as an effective new approach to AD therapy. We have previously shown that treatment with Aβ12–28P can reduce amyloid plaques in APP/PS1 transgenic (Tg) mice and vascular amyloid in TgSwDI mice with congophilic amyloid angiopathy (CAA). In the present study, we investigated whether the Aβ12–28P elicits a therapeutic effect on tau-related pathology in addition to amyloid pathology using old triple transgenic Alzheimer’s disease mice (3xTg, with PS1M146V, APPSwe and tauP30IL transgenes) with established pathology from the ages of 21 to 26 months. We show that treatment with Aβ12–28P substantially reduces tau pathology both immunohistochemically and biochemically, as well as reducing the amyloid burden and suppressing the activation of astrocytes and microglia. These affects correlate with a behavioral amelioration in the treated Tg mice. PMID:24117759

  6. A novel retro-inverso peptide inhibitor reduces amyloid deposition, oxidation and inflammation and stimulates neurogenesis in the APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Parthsarathy, Vadivel; McClean, Paula L; Hölscher, Christian; Taylor, Mark; Tinker, Claire; Jones, Glynn; Kolosov, Oleg; Salvati, Elisa; Gregori, Maria; Masserini, Massimo; Allsop, David

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we have developed a retro-inverso peptide inhibitor (RI-OR2, rGffvlkGr) that blocks the in vitro formation and toxicity of the Aβ oligomers which are thought to be a cause of neurodegeneration and memory loss in Alzheimer's disease. We have now attached a retro-inverted version of the HIV protein transduction domain 'TAT' to RI-OR2 to target this new inhibitor (RI-OR2-TAT, Ac-rGffvlkGrrrrqrrkkrGy-NH(2)) into the brain. Following its peripheral injection, a fluorescein-labelled version of RI-OR2-TAT was found to cross the blood brain barrier and bind to the amyloid plaques and activated microglial cells present in the cerebral cortex of 17-months-old APPswe/PS1ΔE9 transgenic mice. Daily intraperitoneal injection of RI-OR2-TAT (at 100 nmol/kg) for 21 days into 10-months-old APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice resulted in a 25% reduction (p<0.01) in the cerebral cortex of Aβ oligomer levels, a 32% reduction (p<0.0001) of β-amyloid plaque count, a 44% reduction (p<0.0001) in the numbers of activated microglial cells, and a 25% reduction (p<0.0001) in oxidative damage, while the number of young neurons in the dentate gyrus was increased by 210% (p<0.0001), all compared to control APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice injected with vehicle (saline) alone. Our data suggest that oxidative damage, inflammation, and inhibition of neurogenesis are all a downstream consequence of Aβ aggregation, and identify a novel brain-penetrant retro-inverso peptide inhibitor of Aβ oligomer formation for further testing in humans as a potential disease-modifying treatment for Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Deamidation accelerates amyloid formation and alters amylin fiber structure

    PubMed Central

    Dunkelberger, Emily B.; Buchanan, Lauren E.; Marek, Peter; Cao, Ping; Raleigh, Daniel P.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2012-01-01

    Deamidation of asparagine and glutamine is the most common non-enzymatic, post-translational modification. Deamidation can influence the structure, stability, folding, and aggregation of proteins and has been proposed to play a role in amyloid formation. However there are no structural studies of the consequences of deamidation on amyloid fibers, in large part because of the difficulty of studying these materials using conventional methods. Here we examine the effects of deamidation on the kinetics of amyloid formation by amylin, the causative agent of type 2 diabetes. We find that deamidation accelerates amyloid formation and the deamidated material is able to seed amyloid formation by unmodified amylin. Using site-specific isotope labeling and two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy, we show that fibers formed by samples that contain deamidated polypeptide contain reduced amounts of β-sheet. Deamidation leads to disruption of the N-terminal β-sheet between Ala-8 and Ala-13, but β-sheet is still retained near Leu-16. The C-terminal sheet is disrupted near Leu-27. Analysis of potential sites of deamidation together with structural models of amylin fibers reveals that deamidation in the N-terminal β-sheet region may be the cause for the disruption of the fiber structure at both the N- and C-terminal β-sheet. Thus, deamidation is a post-translational modification that creates fibers which have an altered structure, but can still act as a template for amylin aggregation. Deamidation is very difficult to detect with standard methods used to follow amyloid formation, but isotope labeled IR spectroscopy provides a means for monitoring sample degradation and investigating the structural consequences of deamidation. PMID:22734583

  8. The biochemical aftermath of anti-amyloid immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Active and passive immunotherapy in both amyloid-beta precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice and Alzheimer's Disease (AD) patients have resulted in remarkable reductions in amyloid plaque accumulation, although the degree of amyloid regression has been highly variable. Nine individuals with a clinical diagnosis of AD dementia were actively immunized with the Aβ peptide 1-42 (AN-1792) and subjected to detailed postmortem biochemical analyses. These patients were compared to 6 non-immunized AD cases and 5 non-demented control (NDC) cases. Results All patients were assessed for the presence of AD pathology including amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles and vascular amyloidosis. This effort revealed that two immunotherapy recipients had dementia as a consequence of diseases other than AD. Direct neuropathological examination consistently demonstrated small to extensive areas in which amyloid plaques apparently were disrupted. Characterization of Aβ species remnants by ELISA suggested that total Aβ levels may have been reduced, although because the amounts of Aβ peptides among treated individuals were extremely variable, those data must be regarded as tentative. Chromatographic analysis and Western blots revealed abundant dimeric Aβ peptides. SELDI-TOF mass spectrometry demonstrated a substantive number of Aβ-related peptides, some of them with elongated C-terminal sequences. Pro-inflammatory TNF-α levels were significantly increased in the gray matter of immunized AD cases compared to the NDC and non-immunized AD groups. Conclusions Immunotherapy responses were characterized by extreme variability. Considering the broad range of biological variation that characterizes aging and complicates the recognition of reliable AD biomarkers, such disparities will make the interpretation of outcomes derived from epidemiologic and therapeutic investigations challenging. Although in some cases the apparent removal of amyloid plaques by AN-1792 was impressive

  9. Independent information from cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β and florbetapir imaging in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Insel, Philip S.; Donohue, Michael; Landau, Susan; Jagust, William J.; Shaw, Leslie M.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Weiner, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Reduced cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 and increased retention of florbetapir positron emission tomography are biomarkers reflecting cortical amyloid load in Alzheimer's disease. However, these measurements do not always agree and may represent partly different aspects of the underlying Alzheimer's disease pathology. The goal of this study was therefore to test if cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β biomarkers are independently related to other Alzheimer's disease markers, and to examine individuals who are discordantly classified by these two biomarker modalities. Cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β were measured at baseline in 769 persons [161 healthy controls, 68 subjective memory complaints, 419 mild cognitive impairment and 121 Alzheimer's disease dementia, mean age 72 years (standard deviation 7 years), 47% females] and used to predict diagnosis, APOE ε4 carriage status, cerebral blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid total-tau and phosphorylated-tau levels (cross-sectionally); and hippocampal volume, fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography results and Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale scores (longitudinally). Cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β were highly correlated, but adjusting one of these predictors for the other revealed that they both provided partially independent information when predicting diagnosis, APOE ε4, hippocampal volume, metabolism, cognition, total-tau and phosphorylated-tau (the 95% confidence intervals of the adjusted effects did not include zero). Cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β was more strongly related to APOE ε4 whereas positron emission tomography amyloid-β was more strongly related to tau levels (P < 0.05). Discordance (mainly isolated cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β positivity) differed by diagnostic group (P < 0.001) and was seen in 21% of cognitively healthy people but only 6% in dementia patients. The finding that

  10. Independent information from cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β and florbetapir imaging in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Niklas; Insel, Philip S; Donohue, Michael; Landau, Susan; Jagust, William J; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Weiner, Michael W

    2015-03-01

    Reduced cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 and increased retention of florbetapir positron emission tomography are biomarkers reflecting cortical amyloid load in Alzheimer's disease. However, these measurements do not always agree and may represent partly different aspects of the underlying Alzheimer's disease pathology. The goal of this study was therefore to test if cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β biomarkers are independently related to other Alzheimer's disease markers, and to examine individuals who are discordantly classified by these two biomarker modalities. Cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β were measured at baseline in 769 persons [161 healthy controls, 68 subjective memory complaints, 419 mild cognitive impairment and 121 Alzheimer's disease dementia, mean age 72 years (standard deviation 7 years), 47% females] and used to predict diagnosis, APOE ε4 carriage status, cerebral blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid total-tau and phosphorylated-tau levels (cross-sectionally); and hippocampal volume, fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography results and Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale scores (longitudinally). Cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β were highly correlated, but adjusting one of these predictors for the other revealed that they both provided partially independent information when predicting diagnosis, APOE ε4, hippocampal volume, metabolism, cognition, total-tau and phosphorylated-tau (the 95% confidence intervals of the adjusted effects did not include zero). Cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β was more strongly related to APOE ε4 whereas positron emission tomography amyloid-β was more strongly related to tau levels (P < 0.05). Discordance (mainly isolated cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β positivity) differed by diagnostic group (P < 0.001) and was seen in 21% of cognitively healthy people but only 6% in dementia patients. The finding that

  11. Nanomechanical properties of single amyloid fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweers, K. K. M.; Bennink, M. L.; Subramaniam, V.

    2012-06-01

    Amyloid fibrils are traditionally associated with neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease or Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. However, the ability to form amyloid fibrils appears to be a more generic property of proteins. While disease-related, or pathological, amyloid fibrils are relevant for understanding the pathology and course of the disease, functional amyloids are involved, for example, in the exceptionally strong adhesive properties of natural adhesives. Amyloid fibrils are thus becoming increasingly interesting as versatile nanobiomaterials for applications in biotechnology. In the last decade a number of studies have reported on the intriguing mechanical characteristics of amyloid fibrils. In most of these studies atomic force microscopy (AFM) and atomic force spectroscopy play a central role. AFM techniques make it possible to probe, at nanometer length scales, and with exquisite control over the applied forces, biological samples in different environmental conditions. In this review we describe the different AFM techniques used for probing mechanical properties of single amyloid fibrils on the nanoscale. An overview is given of the existing mechanical studies on amyloid. We discuss the difficulties encountered with respect to the small fibril sizes and polymorphic behavior of amyloid fibrils. In particular, the different conformational packing of monomers within the fibrils leads to a heterogeneity in mechanical properties. We conclude with a brief outlook on how our knowledge of these mechanical properties of the amyloid fibrils can be exploited in the construction of nanomaterials from amyloid fibrils.

  12. Functional amyloid formation within mammalian tissue.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Douglas M; Koulov, Atanas V; Alory-Jost, Christelle; Marks, Michael S; Balch, William E; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2006-01-01

    Amyloid is a generally insoluble, fibrous cross-beta sheet protein aggregate. The process of amyloidogenesis is associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington disease. We report the discovery of an unprecedented functional mammalian amyloid structure generated by the protein Pmel17. This discovery demonstrates that amyloid is a fundamental nonpathological protein fold utilized by organisms from bacteria to humans. We have found that Pmel17 amyloid templates and accelerates the covalent polymerization of reactive small molecules into melanin-a critically important biopolymer that protects against a broad range of cytotoxic insults including UV and oxidative damage. Pmel17 amyloid also appears to play a role in mitigating the toxicity associated with melanin formation by sequestering and minimizing diffusion of highly reactive, toxic melanin precursors out of the melanosome. Intracellular Pmel17 amyloidogenesis is carefully orchestrated by the secretory pathway, utilizing membrane sequestration and proteolytic steps to protect the cell from amyloid and amyloidogenic intermediates that can be toxic. While functional and pathological amyloid share similar structural features, critical differences in packaging and kinetics of assembly enable the usage of Pmel17 amyloid for normal function. The discovery of native Pmel17 amyloid in mammals provides key insight into the molecular basis of both melanin formation and amyloid pathology, and demonstrates that native amyloid (amyloidin) may be an ancient, evolutionarily conserved protein quaternary structure underpinning diverse pathways contributing to normal cell and tissue physiology.

  13. RESTORED STREAMS ENHANCE ABILITY TO REMOVE EXCESS NITROGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Issue: Excess nitrogen from fertilizer, septic tanks, animal feedlots, and runoff from pavement can threaten human and aquatic ecosystem health. Furthermore, degraded ecosystems like those impacted by urbanization have reduced ability to process and remove excess nitrogen from t...

  14. [Excessive daytime sleepiness].

    PubMed

    Bittencourt, Lia Rita Azeredo; Silva, Rogério Santos; Santos, Ruth Ferreira; Pires, Maria Laura Nogueira; Mello, Marco Túlio de

    2005-05-01

    Sleepiness is a physiological function, and can be defined as increased propension to fall asleep. However, excessive sleepiness (ES) or hypersomnia refer to an abnormal increase in the probability to fall asleep, to take involuntary naps, or to have sleep atacks, when sleep is not desired. The main causes of excessive sleepiness is chronic sleep deprivation, sleep apnea syndrome, narcolepsy, movement disorders during sleep, circadian sleep disorders, use of drugs and medications, or idiopathic hypersomnia. Social, familial, work, and cognitive impairment are among the consequences of hypersomnia. Moreover, it has also been reported increased risk of accidents. The treatment of excessive sleepiness includes treating the primary cause, whenever identified. Sleep hygiene for sleep deprivation, positive pressure (CPAP) for sleep apnea, dopaminergic agents and exercises for sleep-related movement disorders, phototherapy and/or melatonin for circadian disorders, and use of stimulants are the treatment modalities of first choice.

  15. Amyloid Features and Neuronal Toxicity of Mature Prion Fibrils Are Highly Sensitive to High Pressure*

    PubMed Central

    El Moustaine, Driss; Perrier, Veronique; Van Ba, Isabelle Acquatella-Tran; Meersman, Filip; Ostapchenko, Valeriy G.; Baskakov, Ilia V.; Lange, Reinhard; Torrent, Joan

    2011-01-01

    Prion proteins (PrP) can aggregate into toxic and possibly infectious amyloid fibrils. This particular macrostructure confers on them an extreme and still unexplained stability. To provide mechanistic insights into this self-assembly process, we used high pressure as a thermodynamic tool for perturbing the structure of mature amyloid fibrils that were prepared from recombinant full-length mouse PrP. Application of high pressure led to irreversible loss of several specific amyloid features, such as thioflavin T and 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonate binding, alteration of the characteristic proteinase K digestion pattern, and a significant decrease in the β-sheet structure and cytotoxicity of amyloid fibrils. Partial disaggregation of the mature fibrils into monomeric soluble PrP was observed. The remaining amyloid fibrils underwent a change in secondary structure that led to morphologically different fibrils composed of a reduced number of proto-filaments. The kinetics of these reactions was studied by recording the pressure-induced dissociation of thioflavin T from the amyloid fibrils. Analysis of the pressure and temperature dependence of the relaxation rates revealed partly unstructured and hydrated kinetic transition states and highlighted the importance of collapsing and hydrating inter- and intramolecular cavities to overcome the high free energy barrier that stabilizes amyloid fibrils. PMID:21357423

  16. Disruption of Functional Connectivity in Clinically Normal Older Adults Harboring Amyloid Burden

    PubMed Central

    Hedden, Trey; Van Dijk, Koene R. A.; Becker, J. Alex; Mehta, Angel; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Buckner, Randy L.

    2009-01-01

    Amyloid deposition is present in 20–50% of nondemented older adults yet the functional consequences remain unclear. The current study found that amyloid accumulation is correlated with functional disruption of the default network as measured by intrinsic activity correlations. Clinically normal participants (n=38, aged 60–88) were characterized using [11C]-Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) PET imaging to estimate fibrillar amyloid burden and, separately, underwent functional MRI (fMRI). The integrity of the default network was estimated by correlating rest-state fMRI time courses extracted from a priori regions including the posterior cingulate, lateral parietal, and medial prefrontal cortices. Clinically normal participants with high amyloid burden displayed significantly reduced functional correlations within the default network relative to participants with low amyloid burden. These reductions were also observed when amyloid burden was treated as a continuous, rather than a dichotomous, measure and when controlling for age and structural atrophy. Whole-brain analyses initiated by seeding the posterior cingulate cortex, a region of high amyloid burden in Alzheimer1s disease (AD), revealed significant disruption in the default network including functional disconnection of the hippocampal formation. PMID:19812343

  17. Addiction as excessive appetite.

    PubMed

    Orford, J

    2001-01-01

    The excessive appetite model of addiction is summarized. The paper begins by considering the forms of excessive appetite which a comprehensive model should account for: principally, excessive drinking, smoking, gambling, eating, sex and a diverse range of drugs including at least heroin, cocaine and cannabis. The model rests, therefore, upon a broader concept of what constitutes addiction than the traditional, more restricted, and arguably misleading definition. The core elements of the model include: very skewed consumption distribution curves; restraint, control or deterrence; positive incentive learning mechanisms which highlight varied forms of rapid emotional change as rewards, and wide cue conditioning; complex memory schemata; secondary, acquired emotional regulation cycles, of which 'chasing', 'the abstinence violation effect' and neuroadaptation are examples; and the consequences of conflict. These primary and secondary processes, occurring within diverse sociocultural contexts, are sufficient to account for the development of a strong attachment to an appetitive activity, such that self-control is diminished, and behaviour may appear to be disease-like. Giving up excess is a natural consequence of conflict arising from strong and troublesome appetite. There is much supportive evidence that change occurs outside expert treatment, and that when it occurs within treatment the change processes are more basic and universal than those espoused by fashionable expert theories.

  18. HIV Excess Cancers JNCI

    Cancer.gov

    In 2010, an estimated 7,760 new cancers were diagnosed among the nearly 900,000 Americans known to be living with HIV infection. According to the first comprehensive study in the United States, approximately half of these cancers were in excess of what wo

  19. The contribution of neuroinflammation to amyloid toxicity in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Minter, Myles R; Taylor, Juliet M; Crack, Peter J

    2016-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease and the most common cause of dementia. Deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) remains a hallmark feature of the disease, yet the precise mechanism(s) by which this peptide induces neurotoxicity remain unknown. Neuroinflammation has long been implicated in AD pathology, yet its contribution to disease progression is still not understood. Recent evidence suggests that various Aβ complexes interact with microglial and astrocytic expressed pattern recognition receptors that initiate innate immunity. This process involves secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and generation of reactive oxygen species that, in excess, drive a dysregulated immune response that contributes to neurodegeneration. The mechanisms by which a neuroinflammatory response can influence Aβ production, aggregation and eventual clearance are now becoming key areas where future therapeutic intervention may slow progression of AD. This review will focus on evidence supporting the combined neuroinflammatory-amyloid hypothesis for pathogenesis of AD, describing the key cell types, pathways and mediators involved. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder and the leading cause of dementia worldwide. Deposition of intracellular plaques containing amyloid-beta (Aβ) is a hallmark proteinopathy of the disease yet the precise mechanisms by which this peptide induces neurotoxicity remains unknown. A neuroinflammatory response involving polarized microglial activity, enhanced astrocyte reactivity and elevated pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine load has long been implicated in AD and proposed to facilitate neurodegeneration. In this issue we discuss key receptor systems of innate immunity that detect Aβ, drive pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production and influence Aβ aggregation and clearance. Evidence summarized in this review supports the combined neuroinflammatory-amyloid hypothesis for

  20. An energy-reduced dietary pattern, including moderate protein and increased nonfat dairy intake combined with walking promotes beneficial body composition and metabolic changes in women with excess adiposity: a randomized comparative trial

    PubMed Central

    Shlisky, Julie D; Durward, Carrie M; Zack, Melissa K; Gugger, Carolyn K; Campbell, Jessica K; Nickols-Richardson, Sharon M

    2015-01-01

    Moderate protein and nonfat dairy intake within an energy-reduced diet (ERD) may contribute to health benefits achieved with body weight (BW) loss. The current study examined the effectiveness of a weight-loss/weight-loss maintenance intervention using an ERD with moderate dietary protein (30% of kcals) and increased nonfat dairy intake (4–5 svg/d), including yogurt (INT group) and daily walking compared to an ERD with standard protein (16–17% of kcals) and standard nonfat dairy intake (3 svg/d) (COM group) with daily walking. A randomized comparative trial with 104 healthy premenopausal women with overweight/obesity was conducted in a university setting. Women were randomized to INT group or COM group. Anthropometric measurements, as well as dietary intake, selected vital signs, resting energy expenditure, blood lipids, glucose, insulin, and selected adipose-derived hormones were measured at baseline, and weeks 2, 12, and 24. Targets for dietary protein and nonfat dairy intake, while initially achieved, were not sustained in the INT group. There were no significant effects of diet group on anthropometric measurements. Women in the INT group and COM group, respectively, reduced BW (−4.9 ± 3.2 and −4.3 ± 3.3 kg, P < 0.001) and fat mass (−3.0 ± 2.2 and −2.3 ± 2.3 kg, P < 0.001) during the 12-week weight-loss phase and maintained these losses at 24 weeks. Both groups experienced significant decreases in body mass index, fat-free soft tissue mass, body fat percentage, waist and hip circumferences and serum triglycerides, total cholesterol, and leptin (all P < 0.001). Healthy premenopausal women with excess adiposity effectively lost BW and fat mass and improved some metabolic risk factors following an ERD with approximately 20% protein and 3 svg/d of nonfat dairy intake. PMID:26405524

  1. An energy-reduced dietary pattern, including moderate protein and increased nonfat dairy intake combined with walking promotes beneficial body composition and metabolic changes in women with excess adiposity: a randomized comparative trial.

    PubMed

    Shlisky, Julie D; Durward, Carrie M; Zack, Melissa K; Gugger, Carolyn K; Campbell, Jessica K; Nickols-Richardson, Sharon M

    2015-09-01

    Moderate protein and nonfat dairy intake within an energy-reduced diet (ERD) may contribute to health benefits achieved with body weight (BW) loss. The current study examined the effectiveness of a weight-loss/weight-loss maintenance intervention using an ERD with moderate dietary protein (30% of kcals) and increased nonfat dairy intake (4-5 svg/d), including yogurt (INT group) and daily walking compared to an ERD with standard protein (16-17% of kcals) and standard nonfat dairy intake (3 svg/d) (COM group) with daily walking. A randomized comparative trial with 104 healthy premenopausal women with overweight/obesity was conducted in a university setting. Women were randomized to INT group or COM group. Anthropometric measurements, as well as dietary intake, selected vital signs, resting energy expenditure, blood lipids, glucose, insulin, and selected adipose-derived hormones were measured at baseline, and weeks 2, 12, and 24. Targets for dietary protein and nonfat dairy intake, while initially achieved, were not sustained in the INT group. There were no significant effects of diet group on anthropometric measurements. Women in the INT group and COM group, respectively, reduced BW (-4.9 ± 3.2 and -4.3 ± 3.3 kg, P < 0.001) and fat mass (-3.0 ± 2.2 and -2.3 ± 2.3 kg, P < 0.001) during the 12-week weight-loss phase and maintained these losses at 24 weeks. Both groups experienced significant decreases in body mass index, fat-free soft tissue mass, body fat percentage, waist and hip circumferences and serum triglycerides, total cholesterol, and leptin (all P < 0.001). Healthy premenopausal women with excess adiposity effectively lost BW and fat mass and improved some metabolic risk factors following an ERD with approximately 20% protein and 3 svg/d of nonfat dairy intake.

  2. The otherness of sexuality: excess.

    PubMed

    Stein, Ruth

    2008-03-01

    The present essay, the second of a series of three, aims at developing an experience-near account of sexuality by rehabilitating the idea of excess and its place in sexual experience. It is suggested that various types of excess, such as excess of excitation (Freud), the excess of the other (Laplanche), excess beyond symbolization and the excess of the forbidden object of desire (Leviticus; Lacan) work synergistically to constitute the compelling power of sexuality. In addition to these notions, further notions of excess touch on its transformative potential. Such notions address excess that shatters psychic structures and that is actively sought so as to enable new ones to evolve (Bersani). Work is quoted that regards excess as a way of dealing with our lonely, discontinuous being by using the "excessive" cosmic energy circulating through us to achieve continuity against death (Bataille). Two contemporary analytic thinkers are engaged who deal with the object-relational and intersubjective vicissitudes of excess.

  3. Early identification of amyloid heart disease by technetium-99m-pyrophosphate scintigraphy: a study with familial amyloid polyneuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Hongo, M.; Hirayama, J.; Fujii, T.; Yamada, H.; Okubo, S.; Kusama, S.; Ikeda, S.

    1987-03-01

    To determine whether technetium-99m-pyrophosphate (Tc-99m-PYP) scanning or two-dimensional echocardiography can detect amyloid heart disease in an earlier stage of familial amyloid polyneuropathy, 15 patients were examined. Although 10 of the 15 patients had no clinical evidence of congestive heart failure, as well as normal ventricular wall thickness and normal values for left ventricular systolic function, five (50%) of them showed mild or moderate myocardial uptake. On the other hand, none had characteristic highly refractile myocardial echoes on the two-dimensional echocardiographic images (p less than 0.01), and values for diastolic function were reduced in four of the five and normal in the remaining one. In 85 control subjects, diffuse positive pyrophosphate scans of the heart were found in four (5%) of them (three with dilated cardiomyopathy and one with sarcoidosis), and highly refractile granular sparkling echoes were observed in nine (11%) (five with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, three with aortic stenosis, and one with hypereosinophilic syndrome). We conclude that Tc-99m-PYP scanning is a more sensitive and specific method and may have the potential ability to detect amyloid heart disease in the earlier stage of familial amyloid polyneuropathy than two-dimensional echocardiography.

  4. Attenuation of β-Amyloid Deposition and Neurotoxicity by Chemogenetic Modulation of Neural Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant neural hyperactivity has been observed in early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and may be a driving force in the progression of amyloid pathology. Evidence for this includes the findings that neural activity may modulate β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide secretion and experimental stimulation of neural activity can increase amyloid deposition. However, whether long-term attenuation of neural activity prevents the buildup of amyloid plaques and associated neural pathologies remains unknown. Using viral-mediated delivery of designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs (DREADDs), we show in two AD-like mouse models that chronic intermittent increases or reductions of activity have opposite effects on Aβ deposition. Neural activity reduction markedly decreases Aβ aggregation in regions containing axons or dendrites of DREADD-expressing neurons, suggesting the involvement of synaptic and nonsynaptic Aβ release mechanisms. Importantly, activity attenuation is associated with a reduction in axonal dystrophy and synaptic loss around amyloid plaques. Thus, modulation of neural activity could constitute a potential therapeutic strategy for ameliorating amyloid-induced pathology in AD. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT A novel chemogenetic approach to upregulate and downregulate neuronal activity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) mice was implemented. This led to the first demonstration that chronic intermittent attenuation of neuronal activity in vivo significantly reduces amyloid deposition. The study also demonstrates that modulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) release can occur at both axonal and dendritic fields, suggesting the involvement of synaptic and nonsynaptic Aβ release mechanisms. Activity reductions also led to attenuation of the synaptic pathology associated with amyloid plaques. Therefore, chronic attenuation of neuronal activity could constitute a novel therapeutic approach for AD. PMID:26758850

  5. Amyloid Structures as Biofilm Matrix Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Taglialegna, Agustina; Lasa, Iñigo

    2016-01-01

    Recent insights into bacterial biofilm matrix structures have induced a paradigm shift toward the recognition of amyloid fibers as common building block structures that confer stability to the exopolysaccharide matrix. Here we describe the functional amyloid systems related to biofilm matrix formation in both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria and recent knowledge regarding the interaction of amyloids with other biofilm matrix components such as extracellular DNA (eDNA) and the host immune system. In addition, we summarize the efforts to identify compounds that target amyloid fibers for therapeutic purposes and recent developments that take advantage of the amyloid structure to engineer amyloid fibers of bacterial biofilm matrices for biotechnological applications. PMID:27185827

  6. Insight into Amyloid Structure Using Chemical Probes

    PubMed Central

    Reinke, Ashley A.; Gestwicki, Jason E.

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the deposition of amyloids in the brain. One prominent form of amyloid is composed of repeating units of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide. Over the past decade, it has become clear that these Aβ amyloids are not homogeneous; rather, they are composed of a series of structures varying in their overall size and shape and the number of Aβ peptides they contain. Recent theories suggest that these different amyloid conformations may play distinct roles in disease, although their relative contributions are still being discovered. Here, we review how chemical probes, such as congo red, thioflavin T and their derivatives, have been powerful tools for better understanding amyloid structure and function. Moreover, we discuss how design and deployment of conformationally selective probes might be used to test emerging models of AD. PMID:21457473

  7. Amyloid deposition in 2 feline thymomas.

    PubMed

    Burrough, E R; Myers, R K; Hostetter, S J; Fox, L E; Bayer, B J; Felz, C L; Waller, K R; Whitley, E M

    2012-07-01

    Two cases of feline thymoma with amyloid deposition were encountered between 1982 and 2010. Neoplastic cells were separated by abundant, pale eosinophilic, homogeneous material that was congophilic and birefringent. Ultrastructurally, the neoplastic cells were connected by desmosomes, and the extracellular deposits were composed of nonbranching, hollow-cored fibrils, 8-10 nm in diameter. In the case with sufficient archived tissue for additional sections, the amyloid remained congophilic following potassium permanganate incubation, and the neoplastic cells were immunoreactive for pancytokeratin. The histologic, histochemical, ultrastructural, and immunohistochemical features of both neoplasms are consistent with epithelial-predominant thymoma with the unusual feature of intratumoral amyloid deposition. The affinity of the amyloid for Congo red following potassium permanganate incubation is consistent with non-AA amyloid. The ultrastructural findings were consistent with amyloid production by the neoplastic epithelial cells.

  8. Surgical considerations about amyloid goiter.

    PubMed

    García Villanueva, Augusto; García Villanueva, María Jesús; García Villanueva, Mercedes; Rojo Blanco, Roberto; Collado Guirao, María Vicenta; Cabañas Montero, Jacobo; Beni Pérez, Rafael; Moreno Montes, Irene

    2013-05-01

    Amyloidosis is an uncommon syndrome consisting of a number of disorders having in common an extracellular deposit of fibrillary proteins. This results in functional and structural changes in the affected organs, depending on deposit location and severity. Amyloid infiltration of the thyroid gland may occur in 50% and up to 80% of patients with primary and secondary amyloidosis respectively. Amyloid goiter (AG) is a true rarity, usually found associated to secondary amyloidosis. AG may require surgical excision, usually because of compressive symptoms. We report the case of a patient with a big AG occurring in the course of a secondary amyloidosis associated to polyarticular onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis who underwent total thyroidectomy. Current literature is reviewed, an attempt is made to provide action guidelines, and some surgical considerations on this rare condition are given.

  9. The yin and yang of amyloid aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Falsone, S Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Intra- and extra-cellular amyloid protein fibers are traditionally coupled to a series of devastating and incurable neurodegenerative disorders. Since the discovery of physiologically useful amyloids, our attention has been shifting from pure pathology to function, as amyloid aggregation seems to constitute a basis for the functional and dynamic assembly of biological structures. The following article summarizes how the cell profits from such an unconventional high-risk aggregation at the rim of physiologic utility and pathologic catastrophe. PMID:28031869

  10. The Human Disease-Associated Aβ Amyloid Core Sequence Forms Functional Amyloids in a Fungal Adhesin

    PubMed Central

    Rameau, Rachele D.; Jackson, Desmond N.; Beaussart, Audrey; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT There is increasing evidence that many amyloids in living cells have physiological functions. On the surfaces of fungal cells, amyloid core sequences in adhesins can aggregate into 100- to 1,000-nm-wide patches to form high-avidity adhesion nanodomains on the cell surface. The nanodomains form through interactions that have amyloid-like properties: binding of amyloid dyes, perturbation by antiamyloid agents, and interaction with homologous sequences. To test whether these functional interactions are mediated by typical amyloid interactions, we substituted an amyloid core sequence, LVFFA, from human Aβ protein for the native sequence IVIVA in the 1,419-residue Candida albicans adhesin Als5p. The chimeric protein formed cell surface nanodomains and mediated cellular aggregation. The native sequence and chimeric adhesins responded similarly to the amyloid dye thioflavin T and to amyloid perturbants. However, unlike the native protein, the nanodomains formed by the chimeric protein were not force activated and formed less-robust aggregates under flow. These results showed the similarity of amyloid interactions in the amyloid core sequences of native Als5p and Aβ, but they also highlighted emergent properties of the native sequence. Also, a peptide composed of the Aβ amyloid sequence flanked by amino acids from the adhesin formed two-dimensional sheets with sizes similar to the cell surface patches of the adhesins. These results inform an initial model for the structure of fungal cell surface amyloid nanodomains. PMID:26758179

  11. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Testing Registry: Dementia, familial Danish Genetic Testing Registry: Hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy, Icelandic type Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (2 links) Johns Hopkins Medicine: ...

  12. Epigallocatechin Gallate Remodels Overexpressed Functional Amyloids in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Increases Biofilm Susceptibility to Antibiotic Treatment.

    PubMed

    Stenvang, Marcel; Dueholm, Morten S; Vad, Brian S; Seviour, Thomas; Zeng, Guanghong; Geifman-Shochat, Susana; Søndergaard, Mads T; Christiansen, Gunna; Meyer, Rikke Louise; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Otzen, Daniel E

    2016-12-16

    Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is the major polyphenol in green tea. It has antimicrobial properties and disrupts the ordered structure of amyloid fibrils involved in human disease. The antimicrobial effect of EGCG against the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been shown to involve disruption of quorum sensing (QS). Functional amyloid fibrils in P. aeruginosa (Fap) are able to bind and retain quorum-sensing molecules, suggesting that EGCG interferes with QS through structural remodeling of amyloid fibrils. Here we show that EGCG inhibits the ability of Fap to form fibrils; instead, EGCG stabilizes protein oligomers. Existing fibrils are remodeled by EGCG into non-amyloid aggregates. This fibril remodeling increases the binding of pyocyanin, demonstrating a mechanism by which EGCG can affect the QS function of functional amyloid. EGCG reduced the amyloid-specific fluorescent thioflavin T signal in P. aeruginosa biofilms at concentrations known to exert an antimicrobial effect. Nanoindentation studies showed that EGCG reduced the stiffness of biofilm containing Fap fibrils but not in biofilm with little Fap. In a combination treatment with EGCG and tobramycin, EGCG had a moderate effect on the minimum bactericidal eradication concentration against wild-type P. aeruginosa biofilms, whereas EGCG had a more pronounced effect when Fap was overexpressed. Our results provide a direct molecular explanation for the ability of EGCG to disrupt P. aeruginosa QS and modify its biofilm and strengthens the case for EGCG as a candidate in multidrug treatment of persistent biofilm infections.

  13. Bacterial Chaperones CsgE and CsgC Differentially Modulate Human α-Synuclein Amyloid Formation via Transient Contacts

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Margery L.; Jain, Neha; Götheson, Anna; Åden, Jörgen; Chapman, Matthew R.; Almqvist, Fredrik; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid formation is historically associated with cytotoxicity, but many organisms produce functional amyloid fibers (e.g., curli) as a normal part of cell biology. Two E. coli genes in the curli operon encode the chaperone-like proteins CsgC and CsgE that both can reduce in vitro amyloid formation by CsgA. CsgC was also found to arrest amyloid formation of the human amyloidogenic protein α-synuclein, which is involved in Parkinson’s disease. Here, we report that the inhibitory effects of CsgC arise due to transient interactions that promote the formation of spherical α-synuclein oligomers. We find that CsgE also modulates α-synuclein amyloid formation through transient contacts but, in contrast to CsgC, CsgE accelerates α-synuclein amyloid formation. Our results demonstrate the significance of transient protein interactions in amyloid regulation and emphasize that the same protein may inhibit one type of amyloid while accelerating another. PMID:26465894

  14. Excess flow shutoff valve

    DOEpatents

    Kiffer, Micah S.; Tentarelli, Stephen Clyde

    2016-02-09

    Excess flow shutoff valve comprising a valve body, a valve plug, a partition, and an activation component where the valve plug, the partition, and activation component are disposed within the valve body. A suitable flow restriction is provided to create a pressure difference between the upstream end of the valve plug and the downstream end of the valve plug when fluid flows through the valve body. The pressure difference exceeds a target pressure difference needed to activate the activation component when fluid flow through the valve body is higher than a desired rate, and thereby closes the valve.

  15. Review: history of the amyloid fibril.

    PubMed

    Sipe, J D; Cohen, A S

    2000-06-01

    Rudolph Virchow, in 1854, introduced and popularized the term amyloid to denote a macroscopic tissue abnormality that exhibited a positive iodine staining reaction. Subsequent light microscopic studies with polarizing optics demonstrated the inherent birefringence of amyloid deposits, a property that increased intensely after staining with Congo red dye. In 1959, electron microscopic examination of ultrathin sections of amyloidotic tissues revealed the presence of fibrils, indeterminate in length and, invariably, 80 to 100 A in width. Using the criteria of Congophilia and fibrillar morphology, 20 or more biochemically distinct forms of amyloid have been identified throughout the animal kingdom; each is specifically associated with a unique clinical syndrome. Fibrils, also 80 to 100 A in width, have been isolated from tissue homogenates using differential sedimentation or solubility. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed the fibrils to be ordered in the beta pleated sheet conformation, with the direction of the polypeptide backbone perpendicular to the fibril axis (cross beta structure). Because of the similar dimensions and tinctorial properties of the fibrils extracted from amyloid-laden tissues and amyloid fibrils in tissue sections, they have been assumed to be identical. However, the spatial relationship of proteoglycans and amyloid P component (AP), common to all forms of amyloid, to the putative protein only fibrils in tissues, has been unclear. Recently, it has been suggested that, in situ, amyloid fibrils are composed of proteoglycans and AP as well as amyloid proteins and thus resemble connective tissue microfibrils. Chemical and physical definition of the fibrils in tissues will be needed to relate the in vitro properties of amyloid protein fibrils to the pathogenesis of amyloid fibril formation in vivo.

  16. The influence of biological and technical factors on quantitative analysis of amyloid PET: Points to consider and recommendations for controlling variability in longitudinal data.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Mark E; Chiao, Ping; Klein, Gregory; Matthews, Dawn; Thurfjell, Lennart; Cole, Patricia E; Margolin, Richard; Landau, Susan; Foster, Norman L; Mason, N Scott; De Santi, Susan; Suhy, Joyce; Koeppe, Robert A; Jagust, William

    2015-09-01

    In vivo imaging of amyloid burden with positron emission tomography (PET) provides a means for studying the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's and related diseases. Measurement of subtle changes in amyloid burden requires quantitative analysis of image data. Reliable quantitative analysis of amyloid PET scans acquired at multiple sites and over time requires rigorous standardization of acquisition protocols, subject management, tracer administration, image quality control, and image processing and analysis methods. We review critical points in the acquisition and analysis of amyloid PET, identify ways in which technical factors can contribute to measurement variability, and suggest methods for mitigating these sources of noise. Improved quantitative accuracy could reduce the sample size necessary to detect intervention effects when amyloid PET is used as a treatment end point and allow more reliable interpretation of change in amyloid burden and its relationship to clinical course.

  17. Characterization of Amyloid Cores in Prion Domains

    PubMed Central

    Sant’Anna, Ricardo; Fernández, Maria Rosario; Batlle, Cristina; Navarro, Susanna; de Groot, Natalia S.; Serpell, Louise; Ventura, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Amyloids consist of repetitions of a specific polypeptide chain in a regular cross-β-sheet conformation. Amyloid propensity is largely determined by the protein sequence, the aggregation process being nucleated by specific and short segments. Prions are special amyloids that become self-perpetuating after aggregation. Prions are responsible for neuropathology in mammals, but they can also be functional, as in yeast prions. The conversion of these last proteins to the prion state is driven by prion forming domains (PFDs), which are generally large, intrinsically disordered, enriched in glutamines/asparagines and depleted in hydrophobic residues. The self-assembly of PFDs has been thought to rely mostly on their particular amino acid composition, rather than on their sequence. Instead, we have recently proposed that specific amyloid-prone sequences within PFDs might be key to their prion behaviour. Here, we demonstrate experimentally the existence of these amyloid stretches inside the PFDs of the canonical Sup35, Swi1, Mot3 and Ure2 prions. These sequences self-assemble efficiently into highly ordered amyloid fibrils, that are functionally competent, being able to promote the PFD amyloid conversion in vitro and in vivo. Computational analyses indicate that these kind of amyloid stretches may act as typical nucleating signals in a number of different prion domains. PMID:27686217

  18. ESCRTs regulate amyloid precursor protein sorting in multivesicular bodies and intracellular amyloid-β accumulation.

    PubMed

    Edgar, James R; Willén, Katarina; Gouras, Gunnar K; Futter, Clare E

    2015-07-15

    Intracellular amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation is a key feature of early Alzheimer's disease and precedes the appearance of Aβ in extracellular plaques. Aβ is generated through proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP), but the intracellular site of Aβ production is unclear. APP has been localized to multivesicular bodies (MVBs) where sorting of APP onto intraluminal vesicles (ILVs) could promote amyloidogenic processing, or reduce Aβ production or accumulation by sorting APP and processing products to lysosomes for degradation. Here, we show that APP localizes to the ILVs of a subset of MVBs that also traffic EGF receptor (EGFR), and that it is delivered to lysosomes for degradation. Depletion of the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) components, Hrs (also known as Hgs) or Tsg101, inhibited targeting of APP to ILVs and the subsequent delivery to lysosomes, and led to increased intracellular Aβ accumulation. This was accompanied by dramatically decreased Aβ secretion. Thus, the early ESCRT machinery has a dual role in limiting intracellular Aβ accumulation through targeting of APP and processing products to the lysosome for degradation, and promoting Aβ secretion.

  19. Betaine suppressed Aβ generation by altering amyloid precursor protein processing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiu-Ping; Qian, Xiang; Xie, Yue; Qi, Yan; Peng, Min-Feng; Zhan, Bi-Cui; Lou, Zheng-Qing

    2014-07-01

    Betaine was an endogenous catabolite of choline, which could be isolated from vegetables and marine products. Betaine could promote the metabolism of homocysteine in healthy subjects and was used for hyperlipidemia, coronary atherosclerosis, and fatty liver in clinic. Recent findings shown that Betaine rescued neuronal damage due to homocysteine induced Alzheimer's disease (AD) like pathological cascade, including tau hyperphosphorylation and amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition. Aβ was derived from amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing, and was a triggering factor for AD pathological onset. Here, we demonstrated that Betaine reduced Aβ levels by altering APP processing in N2a cells stably expressing Swedish mutant of APP. Betaine increased α-secretase activity, but decreased β-secretase activity. Our data indicate that Betaine might play a protective role in Aβ production.

  20. Early Detection of Autism (ASD) by a Non-invasive Quick Measurement of Markedly Reduced Acetylcholine & DHEA and Increased β-Amyloid (1-42), Asbestos (Chrysotile), Titanium Dioxide, Al, Hg & often Coexisting Virus Infections (CMV, HPV 16 and 18), Bacterial Infections etc. in the Brain and Corresponding Safe Individualized Effective Treatment.

    PubMed

    Omura, Yoshiaki; Lu, Dominic; Jones, Marilyn K; Nihrane, Ahdallah; Duvvi, Harsha; Shimotsuura, Yasuhiro; Ohki, Motomu

    2015-01-01

    A brief historical background on Autism & some of the important symptoms associated with Autism are summarized. Using strong Electro Magnetic Field Resonance Phenomenon between 2 identical molecules with identical weight (which received U.S. Patent) non-invasively & rapidly we can detect various molecules including neurotransmitters, bacteria, virus, fungus, metals & abnormal molecules. Simple non- invasive measurement of various molecules through pupils & head of diagnosed or suspected Autism patients indicated that in Autism patients following changes were often found: 1) Acetylcholine is markedly reduced; 2) Alzheimer's disease markers (i.e. β-Amyloid (1-42), Tau Protein, Apolipoprotein (Apo E4)) are markedly increased; 3) Chrysotile Asbestos is increased; 4) Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) is moderately increased; 5) Al is moderately increased; 6) Hg is moderately increased; 7) Dopamine, Serotonin & GABA are significantly reduced (up to about 1/10 of normal); 8) Often viral infections (such as CMV, HHV-6, HPV-16, HPV-18, etc.), and Bacterial infections (such as Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycobacterium TB, Borrelia Burgdorferi, etc.) coexist. Research by others on Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) shows that it is a group of complex neurodevelopmental disorders, with about 70% of ASD patients also suffering from gastro-intestinal problems. While Alzheimer disease (AD) is characterized by formation of 1) Amyloid plaques, 2) Neurofibrillary tangles inside of neurons, and 3) Loss of connections between neurons. More than 90% of AD develops in people over the age of 65. These 3 characteristics often progressively worsen over time. Although Autism Spectrum Disorder and Alzheimer's disease are completely different diseases they have some similar biochemical changes. Eight examples of such measurement & analysis are shown for comparison. Most of Autism patients improved significantly by removing the source or preventing intake of Asbestos, TiO2, Al & Hg or enhancing urinary output

  1. Soluble β-Amyloid Induction of Alzheimer's Phenotype for Human Fibroblast K^+ Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etcheberrigaray, Rene; Ito, Etsuro; Kim, Christopher S.; Alkon, Daniel L.

    1994-04-01

    Although β-amyloid is the main constituent of neurite plaques and may play a role in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease, mechanisms by which soluble β-amyloid might produce early symptoms such as memory loss before diffuse plaque deposition have not been implicated. Treatment of fibroblasts with β-amyloid (10 nM) induced the same potassium channel dysfunction previously shown to occur specifically in fibroblasts from patients with Alzheimer's disease-namely, the absence of a 113-picosiemen potassium channel. A tetraethylammonium-induced increase of intracellular concentrations of calcium, [Ca2+]_i, a response that depends on functional 113-picosiemen potassium channels, was also eliminated or markedly reduced by 10 nM β-amyloid. Increased [Ca2+]_i induced by high concentrations of extracellular potassium and 166-picosiemen potassium channels were unaffected by 10 nM β-amyloid. In Alzheimer's disease, then, β-amyloid might alter potassium channels and thus impair neuronal function to produce symptoms such as memory loss by a means other than plaque formation.

  2. Specific Inhibition of β-Secretase Processing of the Alzheimer Disease Amyloid Precursor Protein.

    PubMed

    Ben Halima, Saoussen; Mishra, Sabyashachi; Raja, K Muruga Poopathi; Willem, Michael; Baici, Antonio; Simons, Kai; Brüstle, Oliver; Koch, Philipp; Haass, Christian; Caflisch, Amedeo; Rajendran, Lawrence

    2016-03-08

    Development of disease-modifying therapeutics is urgently needed for treating Alzheimer disease (AD). AD is characterized by toxic β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides produced by β- and γ-secretase-mediated cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). β-secretase inhibitors reduce Aβ levels, but mechanism-based side effects arise because they also inhibit β-cleavage of non-amyloid substrates like Neuregulin. We report that β-secretase has a higher affinity for Neuregulin than it does for APP. Kinetic studies demonstrate that the affinities and catalytic efficiencies of β-secretase are higher toward non-amyloid substrates than toward APP. We show that non-amyloid substrates are processed by β-secretase in an endocytosis-independent manner. Exploiting this compartmentalization of substrates, we specifically target the endosomal β-secretase by an endosomally targeted β-secretase inhibitor, which blocked cleavage of APP but not non-amyloid substrates in many cell systems, including induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neurons. β-secretase inhibitors can be designed to specifically inhibit the Alzheimer process, enhancing their potential as AD therapeutics without undesired side effects.

  3. β-amyloid disrupts human NREM slow waves and related hippocampus-dependent memory consolidation

    PubMed Central

    Mander, Bryce A.; Marks, Shawn M.; Vogel, Jacob W.; Rao, Vikram; Lu, Brandon; Saletin, Jared M.; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Jagust, William J.; Walker, Matthew P.

    2015-01-01

    Independent evidence associates β-amyloid pathology with both NREM sleep disruption and memory impairment in older adults. However, whether the influence of β-amyloid pathology on hippocampus-dependent memory is, in part, driven by impairments of NREM slow wave activity (SWA) and associated overnight memory consolidation is unknown. Here, we show that β-amyloid burden within medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is significantly correlated with the severity of impairment in NREM SWA generation. Moreover, reduced NREM SWA generation was further associated with impaired overnight memory consolidation and impoverished hippocampal-neocortical memory transformation. Furthermore, structural equation models revealed that the association between mPFC β-amyloid pathology and impaired hippocampus-dependent memory consolidation is not direct, but instead, statistically depends on the intermediary factor of diminished NREM SWA. By linking β-amyloid pathology with impaired NREM SWA, these data implicate sleep disruption as a novel mechanistic pathway through which β-amyloid pathology may contribute to hippocampus-dependent cognitive decline in the elderly. PMID:26030850

  4. Amyloid fibrils compared to peptide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zganec, Matjaž; Zerovnik, Eva

    2014-09-01

    Prefibrillar oligomeric states and amyloid fibrils of amyloid-forming proteins qualify as nanoparticles. We aim to predict what biophysical and biochemical properties they could share in common with better researched peptide nanotubes. We first describe what is known of amyloid fibrils and prefibrillar aggregates (oligomers and protofibrils): their structure, mechanisms of formation and putative mechanism of cytotoxicity. In distinction from other neuronal fibrillar constituents, amyloid fibrils are believed to cause pathology, however, some can also be functional. Second, we give a review of known biophysical properties of peptide nanotubes. Finally, we compare properties of these two macromolecular states side by side and discuss which measurements that have already been done with peptide nanotubes could be done with amyloid fibrils as well.

  5. Anemia Due to Excessive Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anemia Due to Excessive Bleeding Iron Deficiency Anemia Vitamin Deficiency Anemia Anemia of Chronic Disease Aplastic Anemia Autoimmune ... Anemia Due to Excessive Bleeding Iron Deficiency Anemia Vitamin Deficiency Anemia Anemia of Chronic Disease Aplastic Anemia Autoimmune ...

  6. Consequences of excess iodine

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Angela M.; Braverman, Lewis E.

    2014-01-01

    Iodine is a micronutrient that is essential for the production of thyroid hormones. The primary source of iodine is the diet via consumption of foods that have been fortified with iodine, including salt, dairy products and bread, or that are naturally abundant in the micronutrient, such as seafood. Recommended daily iodine intake is 150 μg in adults who are not pregnant or lactating. Ingestion of iodine or exposure above this threshold is generally well-tolerated. However, in certain susceptible individuals, including those with pre-existing thyroid disease, the elderly, fetuses and neonates, or patients with other risk factors, the risk of developing iodine-induced thyroid dysfunction might be increased. Hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism as a result of supraphysiologic iodine exposure might be either subclinical or overt, and the source of the excess iodine might not be readily apparent. PMID:24342882

  7. Amyloid beta peptide immunotherapy in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Delrieu, J; Ousset, P J; Voisin, T; Vellas, B

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis have led to the development of numerous compounds that might modify the disease process. Amyloid β peptide represents an important molecular target for intervention in Alzheimer's disease. The main purpose of this work is to review immunotherapy studies in relation to the Alzheimer's disease. Several types of amyloid β peptide immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease are under investigation, active immunization and passive administration with monoclonal antibodies directed against amyloid β peptide. Although immunotherapy approaches resulted in clearance of amyloid plaques in patients with Alzheimer's disease, this clearance did not show significant cognitive effect for the moment. Currently, several amyloid β peptide immunotherapy approaches are under investigation but also against tau pathology. Results from amyloid-based immunotherapy studies in clinical trials indicate that intervention appears to be more effective in early stages of amyloid accumulation in particular solanezumab with a potential impact at mild Alzheimer's disease, highlighting the importance of diagnosing Alzheimer's disease as early as possible and undertaking clinical trials at this stage. In both phase III solanezumab and bapineuzumab trials, PET imaging revealed that about a quarter of patients lacked fibrillar amyloid pathology at baseline, suggesting that they did not have Alzheimer's disease in the first place. So a new third phase 3 clinical trial for solanezumab, called Expedition 3, in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and evidence of amyloid burden has been started. Thus, currently, amyloid intervention is realized at early stage of the Alzheimer's disease in clinical trials, at prodromal Alzheimer's disease, or at asymptomatic subjects or at risk to develop Alzheimer's disease and or at asymptomatic subjects with autosomal dominant mutation.

  8. Chiral recognition in amyloid fiber growth.

    PubMed

    Torbeev, Vladimir; Grogg, Marcel; Ruiz, Jérémy; Boehringer, Régis; Schirer, Alicia; Hellwig, Petra; Jeschke, Gunnar; Hilvert, Donald

    2016-05-01

    Insoluble amyloid fibers represent a pathological signature of many human diseases. To treat such diseases, inhibition of amyloid formation has been proposed as a possible therapeutic strategy. d-Peptides, which possess high proteolytic stability and lessened immunogenicity, are attractive candidates in this context. However, a molecular understanding of chiral recognition phenomena for d-peptides and l-amyloids is currently incomplete. Here we report experiments on amyloid growth of individual enantiomers and their mixtures for two distinct polypeptide systems of different length and structural organization: a 44-residue covalently-linked dimer derived from a peptide corresponding to the [20-41]-fragment of human β2-microglobulin (β2m) and the 99-residue full-length protein. For the dimeric [20-41]β2m construct, a combination of electron paramagnetic resonance of nitroxide-labeled constructs and (13) C-isotope edited FT-IR spectroscopy of (13) C-labeled preparations was used to show that racemic mixtures precipitate as intact homochiral fibers, i.e. undergo spontaneous Pasteur-like resolution into a mixture of left- and right-handed amyloids. In the case of full-length β2m, the presence of the mirror-image d-protein affords morphologically distinct amyloids that are composed largely of enantiopure domains. Removal of the l-component from hybrid amyloids by proteolytic digestion results in their rapid transformation into characteristic long straight d-β2m amyloids. Furthermore, the full-length d-enantiomer of β2m was found to be an efficient inhibitor of l-β2m amyloid growth. This observation highlights the potential of longer d-polypeptides for future development into inhibitors of amyloid propagation. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Thermodynamics and dynamics of amyloid peptide oligomerization are sequence dependent.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan; Derreumaux, Philippe; Guo, Zhi; Mousseau, Normand; Wei, Guanghong

    2009-06-01

    Aggregation of the full-length amyloid-beta (Abeta) and beta2-microglobulin (beta2m) proteins is associated with Alzheimer's disease and dialysis-related amyloidosis, respectively. This assembly process is not restricted to full-length proteins, however, many short peptides also assemble into amyloid fibrils in vitro. Remarkably, the kinetics of amyloid-fibril formation of all these molecules is generally described by a nucleation-polymerization process characterized by a lag phase associated with the formation of a nucleus, after which fibril elongation occurs rapidly. In this study, we report using long molecular dynamics simulations with the OPEP coarse-grained force field, the thermodynamics and dynamics of the octamerization for two amyloid 7-residue peptides: the beta2m83-89 NHVTLSQ and Abeta16-22 KLVFFAE fragments. Based on multiple trajectories run at 310 K, totaling 2.2 mus (beta2m83-89) and 4.8 mus (Abeta16-22) and starting from random configurations and orientations of the chains, we find that the two peptides not only share common but also very different aggregation properties. Notably, an increase in the hydrophobic character of the peptide, as observed in Abeta16-22 with respect to beta2m83-89 impacts the thermodynamics by reducing the population of bilayer beta-sheet assemblies. Higher hydrophobicity is also found to slow down the dynamics of beta-sheet formation by enhancing the averaged lifetime of all configuration types (CT) and by reducing the complexity of the CT transition probability matrix. Proteins 2009. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Age and Amyloid Effects on Human CNS Amyloid-Beta Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Bruce W.; Elbert, Donald L.; Mawuenyega, Kwasi G.; Kasten, Tom; Ovod, Vitaliy; Ma, Shengmei; Xiong, Chengjie; Chott, Robert; Yarasheski, Kevin; Sigurdson, Wendy; Zhang, Lily; Goate, Alison; Phil, D.; Benzinger, Tammie; Morris, John C.; Holtzman, David; Bateman, Randall J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Age is the single greatest risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease with the incidence doubling every 5 years after age 65. However, our understanding of the mechanistic relationship between increasing age and the risk for Alzheimer’s disease is currently limited. We therefore sought to determine the relationship between age, amyloidosis, and amyloid-beta kinetics in the central nervous system (CNS) of humans Methods Amyloid-beta kinetics were analyzed in 112 participants and compared to the ages of participants and the amount of amyloid deposition. Results We found a highly significant correlation between increasing age and slowed amyloid-beta turnover rates (2.5-fold longer half-life over five decades of age). In addition, we found independent effects on amyloid-beta42 kinetics specifically in participants with amyloid deposition. Amyloidosis was associated with a higher (>50%) irreversible loss of soluble amyloid-beta42 and a 10-fold higher amyloid-beta42 reversible exchange rate. Interpretation These findings reveal a mechanistic link between human aging and the risk of amyloidosis which may be due to a dramatic slowing of amyloid-beta turnover, increasing the likelihood of protein misfolding that leads to deposition. Alterations in amyloid-beta kinetics associated with aging and amyloidosis suggest opportunities for diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. More generally, this study provides an example of how changes in protein turnover kinetics can be used to detect physiologic and pathophysiologic changes and may be applicable to other proteinopathies. PMID:26040676

  11. Intermediate Tyrosyl Radical and Amyloid Structure in Peroxide-Activated Cytoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Juliana C.; Marcondes, Marcelo F.; Icimoto, Marcelo Y.; Cardoso, Thyago H. S.; Tofanello, Aryane; Pessoto, Felipe S.; Miranda, Erica G. A.; Prieto, Tatiana; Nascimento, Otaciro R.; Oliveira, Vitor; Nantes, Iseli L.

    2015-01-01

    We characterized the peroxidase mechanism of recombinant rat brain cytoglobin (Cygb) challenged by hydrogen peroxide, tert-butylhydroperoxide and by cumene hydroperoxide. The peroxidase mechanism of Cygb is similar to that of myoglobin. Cygb challenged by hydrogen peroxide is converted to a Fe4+ oxoferryl π cation, which is converted to Fe4+ oxoferryl and tyrosyl radical detected by direct continuous wave-electron paramagnetic resonance and by 3,5-dibromo-4-nitrosobenzene sulfonate spin trapping. When organic peroxides are used as substrates at initial reaction times, and given an excess of peroxide present, the EPR signals of the corresponding peroxyl radicals precede those of the direct tyrosyl radical. This result is consistent with the use of peroxide as a reducing agent for the recycling of Cygb high-valence species. Furthermore, we found that the Cygb oxidation by peroxides leads to the formation of amyloid fibrils. This result suggests that Cygb possibly participates in the development of degenerative diseases; our findings also support the possible biological role of Cygb related to peroxidase activity. PMID:26312997

  12. Intermediate Tyrosyl Radical and Amyloid Structure in Peroxide-Activated Cytoglobin.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Juliana C; Marcondes, Marcelo F; Icimoto, Marcelo Y; Cardoso, Thyago H S; Tofanello, Aryane; Pessoto, Felipe S; Miranda, Erica G A; Prieto, Tatiana; Nascimento, Otaciro R; Oliveira, Vitor; Nantes, Iseli L

    2015-01-01

    We characterized the peroxidase mechanism of recombinant rat brain cytoglobin (Cygb) challenged by hydrogen peroxide, tert-butylhydroperoxide and by cumene hydroperoxide. The peroxidase mechanism of Cygb is similar to that of myoglobin. Cygb challenged by hydrogen peroxide is converted to a Fe4+ oxoferryl π cation, which is converted to Fe4+ oxoferryl and tyrosyl radical detected by direct continuous wave-electron paramagnetic resonance and by 3,5-dibromo-4-nitrosobenzene sulfonate spin trapping. When organic peroxides are used as substrates at initial reaction times, and given an excess of peroxide present, the EPR signals of the corresponding peroxyl radicals precede those of the direct tyrosyl radical. This result is consistent with the use of peroxide as a reducing agent for the recycling of Cygb high-valence species. Furthermore, we found that the Cygb oxidation by peroxides leads to the formation of amyloid fibrils. This result suggests that Cygb possibly participates in the development of degenerative diseases; our findings also support the possible biological role of Cygb related to peroxidase activity.

  13. Anti-amyloid precursor protein immunoglobulins inhibit amyloid-β production by steric hindrance.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Rhian S; Liddell, J Eryl; Kidd, Emma J

    2011-01-01

    The cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β- and γ-secretases results in the production of amyloid-β (Aβ) in Alzheimer's disease. We raised two monoclonal antibodies, 2B3 and 2B12, that recognize the β-secretase cleavage site on APP but not Aβ. We hypothesized that these antibodies would reduce Aβ levels via steric hindrance of β-secretase. Both antibodies decreased extracellular Aβ levels from astrocytoma cells, but 2B3 was more potent than 2B12. Levels of soluble sAPPα from the nonamyloidogenic α-secretase pathway and intracellular APP were not affected by either antibody nor were there any effects on cell viability. 2B3 exhibited a higher affinity for APP than 2B12 and its epitope appeared to span the cleavage site, whereas 2B12 bound slightly upstream. Both of these factors probably contribute to its greater effect on Aβ levels. After 60 min incubation at pH 4.0, most 2B3 and 2B12 remained bound to their antigen, suggesting that the antibodies will remain bound to APP in the acidic endosomes where β-secretase cleavage probably occurs. Only 2B3 and 2B12, but not control antibodies, inhibited the cleavage of sAPPα by β-secretase in a cell-free assay where the effects of antibody internalization and intracellular degradation were excluded. 2B3 virtually abolished this cleavage. In addition, levels of C-terminal APP fragments, generated following β-secretase cleavage (βCTF), were significantly reduced in cells after incubation with 2B3. These results strongly suggest that anti-cleavage site IgGs can generically reduce Aβ levels via inhibition of β-secretase by steric hindrance and may provide a novel alternative therapy for Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Cognitive and cortical plasticity deficits correlate with altered amyloid-β CSF levels in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mori, Francesco; Rossi, Silvia; Sancesario, Giulia; Codecà, Claudia; Mataluni, Giorgia; Monteleone, Fabrizia; Buttari, Fabio; Kusayanagi, Hajime; Castelli, Maura; Motta, Caterina; Studer, Valeria; Bernardi, Giorgio; Koch, Giacomo; Bernardini, Sergio; Centonze, Diego

    2011-02-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is of frequent observation in multiple sclerosis (MS). It is associated with gray matter pathology, brain atrophy, and altered connectivity, and recent evidence showed that acute inflammation can exacerbate mental deficits independently of the primary functional system involved. In this study, we measured cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of amyloid-β(1-42) and τ protein in MS and in clinically isolated syndrome patients, as both proteins have been associated with cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In AD, amyloid-β(1-42) accumulates in the brain as insoluble extracellular plaques, possibly explaining why soluble amyloid-β(1-42) is reduced in the CSF of these patients. In our sample of MS patients, amyloid-β(1-42) levels were significantly lower in patients cognitively impaired (CI) and were inversely correlated with the number of Gadolinium-enhancing (Gd+) lesions at the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Positive correlations between amyloid-β(1-42) levels and measures of attention and concentration were also found. Furthermore, abnormal neuroplasticity of the cerebral cortex, explored with θ burst stimulation (TBS), was observed in CI patients, and a positive correlation was found between amyloid-β(1-42) CSF contents and the magnitude of long-term potentiation-like effects induced by TBS. No correlation was conversely found between τ protein concentrations and MRI findings, cognitive parameters, and TBS effects in these patients. Together, our results indicate that in MS, central inflammation is able to alter amyloid-β metabolism by reducing its concentration in the CSF and leading to impairment of synaptic plasticity and cognitive function.

  15. Development of amyloid burden in African green monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Kalinin, Sergey; Willard, Stephanie L.; Shively, Carol A; Kaplan, Jay R; Register, Tom; Jorgensen, Matthew J; Polak, Paul E; Rubinstein, Israel; Feinstein, Douglas L

    2013-01-01

    The vervet is an old world monkey increasingly being used as a model for human diseases. In addition to plaques and tangles, an additional hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease is damage to neurons that synthesize noradrenaline (NA). We characterized amyloid burden in the posterior temporal lobe of young and aged vervets, and compared that to changes in NA levels and astrocyte activation. Total Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels were increased in the aged group, as were numbers of amyloid plaques detected using antibody 6E10. Low levels of Aβ42 were detected in 1 of 5 younger animals, although diffusely stained plaques were observed in 4 of these. Increased GFAP staining and mRNA levels were significantly correlated with increased age, as were cortical NA levels. Levels of Aβ42 and Aβ40, and the number of 6E10+ plaques, were correlated with NA levels. Interestingly mRNA levels of glial derived neurotrophic factor, important for noradrenergic neuronal survival, were reduced with age. These findings suggest that amyloid pathology in aged vervets is associated with astrocyte activation and higher NA levels. PMID:23601810

  16. Amyloid-beta fibrillogenesis: structural insight and therapeutic intervention.

    PubMed

    Dasilva, Kevin A; Shaw, James E; McLaurin, Joanne

    2010-06-01

    Structural insight into the conformational changes associated with aggregation and assembly of fibrils has provided a number of targets for therapeutic intervention. Solid-state NMR, hydrogen/deuterium exchange and mutagenesis strategies have been used to probe the secondary and tertiary structure of amyloid fibrils and key intermediates. Rational design of peptide inhibitors directed against key residues important for aggregation and stabilization of fibrils has demonstrated effectiveness at inhibiting fibrillogenesis. Studies on the interaction between Abeta and cell membranes led to the discovery that inositol, the head group of phosphatidylinositol, inhibits fibrillogenesis. As a result, scyllo-inositol is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of AD. Additional small-molecule inhibitors, including polyphenolic compounds such as curcumin, (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), and grape seed extract have been shown to attenuate Abeta aggregation through distinct mechanisms, and have shown effectiveness at reducing amyloid levels when administered to transgenic mouse models of AD. Although the results of ongoing clinical trials remain to be seen, these compounds represent the first generation of amyloid-based therapeutics, with the potential to alter the progression of AD and, when used prophylactically, alleviate the deposition of Abeta.

  17. Early-onset amyloid deposition and cognitive deficits in transgenic mice expressing a double mutant form of amyloid precursor protein 695.

    PubMed

    Chishti, M A; Yang, D S; Janus, C; Phinney, A L; Horne, P; Pearson, J; Strome, R; Zuker, N; Loukides, J; French, J; Turner, S; Lozza, G; Grilli, M; Kunicki, S; Morissette, C; Paquette, J; Gervais, F; Bergeron, C; Fraser, P E; Carlson, G A; George-Hyslop, P S; Westaway, D

    2001-06-15

    We have created early-onset transgenic (Tg) models by exploiting the synergistic effects of familial Alzheimer's disease mutations on amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) biogenesis. TgCRND8 mice encode a double mutant form of amyloid precursor protein 695 (KM670/671NL+V717F) under the control of the PrP gene promoter. Thioflavine S-positive Abeta amyloid deposits are present at 3 months, with dense-cored plaques and neuritic pathology evident from 5 months of age. TgCRND8 mice exhibit 3,200-4,600 pmol of Abeta42 per g brain at age 6 months, with an excess of Abeta42 over Abeta40. High level production of the pathogenic Abeta42 form of Abeta peptide was associated with an early impairment in TgCRND8 mice in acquisition and learning reversal in the reference memory version of the Morris water maze, present by 3 months of age. Notably, learning impairment in young mice was offset by immunization against Abeta42 (Janus, C., Pearson, J., McLaurin, J., Mathews, P. M., Jiang, Y., Schmidt, S. D., Chishti, M. A., Horne, P., Heslin, D., French, J., Mount, H. T. J., Nixon, R. A., Mercken, M., Bergeron, C., Fraser, P. E., St. George-Hyslop, P., and Westaway, D. (2000) Nature 408, 979-982). Amyloid deposition in TgCRND8 mice was enhanced by the expression of presenilin 1 transgenes including familial Alzheimer's disease mutations; for mice also expressing a M146L+L286V presenilin 1 transgene, amyloid deposits were apparent by 1 month of age. The Tg mice described here suggest a potential to investigate aspects of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, prophylaxis, and therapy within short time frames.

  18. Modeling of chemical inhibition from amyloid protein aggregation kinetics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Backgrounds The process of amyloid proteins aggregation causes several human neuropathologies. In some cases, e.g. fibrillar deposits of insulin, the problems are generated in the processes of production and purification of protein and in the pump devices or injectable preparations for diabetics. Experimental kinetics and adequate modelling of chemical inhibition from amyloid aggregation are of practical importance in order to study the viable processing, formulation and storage as well as to predict and optimize the best conditions to reduce the effect of protein nucleation. Results In this manuscript, experimental data of insulin, Aβ42 amyloid protein and apomyoglobin fibrillation from recent bibliography were selected to evaluate the capability of a bivariate sigmoid equation to model them. The mathematical functions (logistic combined with Weibull equation) were used in reparameterized form and the effect of inhibitor concentrations on kinetic parameters from logistic equation were perfectly defined and explained. The surfaces of data were accurately described by proposed model and the presented analysis characterized the inhibitory influence on the protein aggregation by several chemicals. Discrimination between true and apparent inhibitors was also confirmed by the bivariate equation. EGCG for insulin (working at pH = 7.4/T = 37°C) and taiwaniaflavone for Aβ42 were the compounds studied that shown the greatest inhibition capacity. Conclusions An accurate, simple and effective model to investigate the inhibition of chemicals on amyloid protein aggregation has been developed. The equation could be useful for the clear quantification of inhibitor potential of chemicals and rigorous comparison among them. PMID:24572069

  19. Photoreceptor damage following exposure to excess riboflavin.

    PubMed

    Eckhert, C D; Hsu, M H; Pang, N

    1993-12-15

    Flavins generate oxidants during metabolism and when exposed to light. Here we report that the photoreceptor layer of retinas from black-eyed rats is reduced in size by a dietary regime containing excess riboflavin. The effect of excess riboflavin was dose-dependent and was manifested by a decrease in photoreceptor length. This decrease was due in part to a reduction in the thickness of the outer nuclear layer, a structure formed from stacked photoreceptor nuclei. These changes were accompanied by an increase in photoreceptor outer segment autofluorescence following illumination at 328 nm, a wavelength that corresponds to the excitation maxima of oxidized lipopigments of the retinal pigment epithelium.

  20. Amyloid domains in the cell nucleus controlled by nucleoskeletal protein lamin B1 reveal a new pathway of mercury neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Arnhold, Florian; Gührs, Karl-Heinz; von Mikecz, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a bioaccumulating trace metal that globally circulates the atmosphere and waters in its elemental, inorganic and organic chemical forms. While Hg represents a notorious neurotoxicant, the underlying cellular pathways are insufficiently understood. We identify amyloid protein aggregation in the cell nucleus as a novel pathway of Hg-bio-interactions. By mass spectrometry of purified protein aggregates, a subset of spliceosomal components and nucleoskeletal protein lamin B1 were detected as constituent parts of an Hg-induced nuclear aggregome network. The aggregome network was located by confocal imaging of amyloid-specific antibodies and dyes to amyloid cores within splicing-speckles that additionally recruit components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Hg significantly enhances global proteasomal activity in the nucleus, suggesting that formation of amyloid speckles plays a role in maintenance of protein homeostasis. RNAi knock down showed that lamin B1 for its part regulates amyloid speckle formation and thus likewise participates in nuclear protein homeostasis. As the Hg-induced cascade of interactions between the nucleoskeleton and protein homeostasis reduces neuronal signalling, amyloid fibrillation in the cell nucleus is introduced as a feature of Hg-neurotoxicity that opens new avenues of future research. Similar to protein aggregation events in the cytoplasm that are controlled by the cytoskeleton, amyloid fibrillation of nuclear proteins may be driven by the nucleoskeleton.

  1. Amyloid domains in the cell nucleus controlled by nucleoskeletal protein lamin B1 reveal a new pathway of mercury neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Arnhold, Florian; Gührs, Karl-Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a bioaccumulating trace metal that globally circulates the atmosphere and waters in its elemental, inorganic and organic chemical forms. While Hg represents a notorious neurotoxicant, the underlying cellular pathways are insufficiently understood. We identify amyloid protein aggregation in the cell nucleus as a novel pathway of Hg-bio-interactions. By mass spectrometry of purified protein aggregates, a subset of spliceosomal components and nucleoskeletal protein lamin B1 were detected as constituent parts of an Hg-induced nuclear aggregome network. The aggregome network was located by confocal imaging of amyloid-specific antibodies and dyes to amyloid cores within splicing-speckles that additionally recruit components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Hg significantly enhances global proteasomal activity in the nucleus, suggesting that formation of amyloid speckles plays a role in maintenance of protein homeostasis. RNAi knock down showed that lamin B1 for its part regulates amyloid speckle formation and thus likewise participates in nuclear protein homeostasis. As the Hg-induced cascade of interactions between the nucleoskeleton and protein homeostasis reduces neuronal signalling, amyloid fibrillation in the cell nucleus is introduced as a feature of Hg-neurotoxicity that opens new avenues of future research. Similar to protein aggregation events in the cytoplasm that are controlled by the cytoskeleton, amyloid fibrillation of nuclear proteins may be driven by the nucleoskeleton. PMID:25699204

  2. Glutamine Acts as a Neuroprotectant against DNA Damage, Beta-Amyloid and H2O2-Induced Stress

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianmin; Herrup, Karl

    2012-01-01

    Glutamine is the most abundant free amino acid in the human blood stream and is ‘conditionally essential’ to cells. Its intracellular levels are regulated both by the uptake of extracellular glutamine via specific transport systems and by its intracellular synthesis by glutamine synthetase (GS). Adding to the regulatory complexity, when extracellular glutamine is reduced GS protein levels rise. Unfortunately, this excess GS can be maladaptive. GS overexpression is neurotoxic especially if the cells are in a low-glutamine medium. Similarly, in low glutamine, the levels of multiple stress response proteins are reduced rendering cells hypersensitive to H2O2, zinc salts and DNA damage. These altered responses may have particular relevance to neurodegenerative diseases of aging. GS activity and glutamine levels are lower in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain, and a fraction of AD hippocampal neurons have dramatically increased GS levels compared with control subjects. We validated the importance of these observations by showing that raising glutamine levels in the medium protects cultured neuronal cells against the amyloid peptide, Aβ. Further, a 10-day course of dietary glutamine supplementation reduced inflammation-induced neuronal cell cycle activation, tau phosphorylation and ATM-activation in two different mouse models of familial AD while raising the levels of two synaptic proteins, VAMP2 and synaptophysin. Together, our observations suggest that healthy neuronal cells require both intracellular and extracellular glutamine, and that the neuroprotective effects of glutamine supplementation may prove beneficial in the treatment of AD. PMID:22413000

  3. Hunger, escaping excess.

    PubMed

    Gardner, G; Halweil, B

    2000-01-01

    According to the WHO, in spite of decades of global food surpluses, half of humanity, in both rich and poor nations, is still malnourished. Malnutrition has become a significant impediment to development in rich and poor countries, alike. At the individual level, both hunger and poor eating habits reduce a person's physical fitness, increase susceptibility to illness, and shorten lifespan. In addition, children deprived of adequate nutrients during development can suffer from permanently reduced mental capacity. At the national level, poor eating hampers educational performance, curtails economic productivity, increases the burden on health care, and reduces well-being. Confronting this epidemic of poor eating will have widespread benefits, but the myths and misconceptions permeating humanity¿s understanding of malnutrition should be addressed first. It is noted that the major cause of hunger is poverty, not scarcity of food; it is the lack of access to the goods and services essential for a healthy life. On the other hand, for those who have access to plenty of food, dietary intake includes meat, dairy products, and highly processed items loaded with fat and sugar. This leads to the problem of obesity, a condition that increases susceptibility to disease and disability, reduces worker productivity, and shortens lifespan. In view of this, efforts to improve nutrition should focus on poverty eradication, health education, agricultural change, and policy change towards promotion of good nutrition.

  4. Emerging roles for the amyloid precursor protein and derived peptides in the regulation of cellular and systemic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Czeczor, Juliane K; McGee, Sean L

    2017-03-28

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a transmembrane protein that can be cleaved by proteases through two different pathways to yield a number of small peptides, each with distinct physiological properties and functions. It has been extensively studied in the context of Alzheimer's disease, with the APP-derived amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide being a major constituent of the amyloid plaques observed in this disease. It has been known for some time that APP can regulate neuronal metabolism, however this review will examine evidence that APP and its peptides can also regulate key metabolic processes such as insulin action, lipid synthesis and storage and mitochondrial function in peripheral tissues. This review will present a hypothesis that amyloidogenic processing of APP in peripheral tissues plays a key role in the response to nutrient excess and that this could contribute to the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Spatially controlled amyloid reactions using organic electronics.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsson, Erik O; Tybrandt, Klas; Hammarström, Per; Berggren, Magnus; Nilsson, K Peter R

    2010-10-04

    Abnormal protein aggregates, so called amyloid fibrils, are mainly known as pathological hallmarks of a wide range of diseases, but in addition these robust well-ordered self-assembled natural nanostructures can also be utilized for creating distinct nanomaterials for bioelectronic devices. However, current methods for producing amyloid fibrils in vitro offer no spatial control. Herein, we demonstrate a new way to produce and spatially control the assembly of amyloid-like structures using an organic electronic ion pump (OEIP) to pump distinct cations to a reservoir containing a negatively charged polypeptide. The morphology and kinetics of the created proteinaceous nanomaterials depends on the ion and current used, which we leveraged to create layers incorporating different conjugated thiophene derivatives, one fluorescent (p-FTAA) and one conducting (PEDOT-S). We anticipate that this new application for the OEIP will be useful for both biological studies of amyloid assembly and fibrillogenesis as well as for creating new bioelectronic nanomaterials and devices.

  6. Association of brain amyloid-β with cerebral perfusion and structure in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Niklas; Tosun, Duygu; Insel, Philip S; Simonson, Alix; Jack, Clifford R; Beckett, Laurel A; Donohue, Michael; Jagust, William; Schuff, Norbert; Weiner, Michael W

    2014-05-01

    Patients with Alzheimer's disease have reduced cerebral blood flow measured by arterial spin labelling magnetic resonance imaging, but it is unclear how this is related to amyloid-β pathology. Using 182 subjects from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative we tested associations of amyloid-β with regional cerebral blood flow in healthy controls (n = 51), early (n = 66) and late (n = 41) mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease with dementia (n = 24). Based on the theory that Alzheimer's disease starts with amyloid-β accumulation and progresses with symptoms and secondary pathologies in different trajectories, we tested if cerebral blood flow differed between amyloid-β-negative controls and -positive subjects in different diagnostic groups, and if amyloid-β had different associations with cerebral blood flow and grey matter volume. Global amyloid-β load was measured by florbetapir positron emission tomography, and regional blood flow and volume were measured in eight a priori defined regions of interest. Cerebral blood flow was reduced in patients with dementia in most brain regions. Higher amyloid-β load was related to lower cerebral blood flow in several regions, independent of diagnostic group. When comparing amyloid-β-positive subjects with -negative controls, we found reductions of cerebral blood flow in several diagnostic groups, including in precuneus, entorhinal cortex and hippocampus (dementia), inferior parietal cortex (late mild cognitive impairment and dementia), and inferior temporal cortex (early and late mild cognitive impairment and dementia). The associations of amyloid-β with cerebral blood flow and volume differed across the disease spectrum, with high amyloid-β being associated with greater cerebral blood flow reduction in controls and greater volume reduction in late mild cognitive impairment and dementia. In addition to disease stage, amyloid-β pathology affects cerebral blood flow across the span from controls to

  7. The Luminescent Oligothiophene p-FTAA Converts Toxic Aβ1–42 Species into Nontoxic Amyloid Fibers with Altered Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Civitelli, Livia; Sandin, Linnea; Nelson, Erin; Khattak, Sikander Iqbal; Kågedal, Katarina

    2016-01-01

    Aggregation of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) in the brain leads to the formation of extracellular amyloid plaques, which is one of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer disease (AD). It is a general hypothesis that soluble prefibrillar assemblies of the Aβ peptide, rather than mature amyloid fibrils, cause neuronal dysfunction and memory impairment in AD. Thus, reducing the level of these prefibrillar species by using molecules that can interfere with the Aβ fibrillation pathway may be a valid approach to reduce Aβ cytotoxicity. Luminescent-conjugated oligothiophenes (LCOs) have amyloid binding properties and spectral properties that differ when they bind to protein aggregates with different morphologies and can therefore be used to visualize protein aggregates. In this study, cell toxicity experiments and biophysical studies demonstrated that the LCO p-FTAA was able to reduce the pool of soluble toxic Aβ species in favor of the formation of larger insoluble nontoxic amyloid fibrils, there by counteracting Aβ-mediated cytotoxicity. Moreover, p-FTAA bound to early formed Aβ species and induced a rapid formation of β-sheet structures. These p-FTAA generated amyloid fibrils were less hydrophobic and more resistant to proteolysis by proteinase K. In summary, our data show that p-FTAA promoted the formation of insoluble and stable Aβ species that were nontoxic which indicates that p-FTAA might have therapeutic potential. PMID:26907684

  8. Hybrid Amyloid Membranes for Continuous Flow Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Bolisetty, Sreenath; Arcari, Mario; Adamcik, Jozef; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2015-12-29

    Amyloid fibrils are promising nanomaterials for technological applications such as biosensors, tissue engineering, drug delivery, and optoelectronics. Here we show that amyloid-metal nanoparticle hybrids can be used both as efficient active materials for wet catalysis and as membranes for continuous flow catalysis applications. Initially, amyloid fibrils generated in vitro from the nontoxic β-lactoglobulin protein act as templates for the synthesis of gold and palladium metal nanoparticles from salt precursors. The resulting hybrids possess catalytic features as demonstrated by evaluating their activity in a model catalytic reaction in water, e.g., the reduction of 4-nitrophenol into 4-aminophenol, with the rate constant of the reduction increasing with the concentration of amyloid-nanoparticle hybrids. Importantly, the same nanoparticles adsorbed onto fibrils surface show improved catalytic efficiency compared to the same unattached particles, pointing at the important role played by the amyloid fibril templates. Then, filter membranes are prepared from the metal nanoparticle-decorated amyloid fibrils by vacuum filtration. The resulting membranes serve as efficient flow catalysis active materials, with a complete catalytic conversion achieved within a single flow passage of a feeding solution through the membrane.

  9. Amyloid imaging in prodromal Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Patients with mild cognitive impairment are at an increased risk of progression to Alzheimer's disease. However, not all patients with mild cognitive impairment progress, and it is difficult to accurately identify those patients who are in the prodromal stage of Alzheimer's disease. In a recent paper, Koivunen and colleagues report that Pittsburgh compound-B, an amyloid-beta positron emission tomography ligand, predicts the progression of patients with mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer's disease. Of 29 subjects with mild cognitive impairment, 21 (72%) had a positive Pittsburgh compound-B positron emission tomography baseline scan. In their study, 15 of these 21 (71%) patients progressed to Alzheimer's disease, whilst only 1 out of 8 (12.5%) Pittsburgh compound-B-negative patients with mild cognitive impairment did so. Moreover, in these mild cognitive impairment patients, the overall amyloid burden increased approximately 2.5% during the follow-up period. This is consistent with other longitudinal amyloid imaging studies that found a similar increase in amyloid deposition over time in patients with mild cognitive impairment. These studies together challenge current theories that propose a flattening of the increase of brain amyloid deposition already in the preclinical stage of Alzheimer's disease. These findings may have important implications for the design of future clinical trials aimed at preventing progression to Alzheimer's disease by lowering the brain amyloid-beta burden in patients with mild cognitive impairment. PMID:21936965

  10. Primary amyloid goiter mimicking rapid growing thyroid malignancy.

    PubMed

    Joung, Kyong Hye; Park, Jae-Yong; Kim, Koon Soon; Koo, Bon Seok

    2014-02-01

    Amyloid accumulation in the thyroid gland leading to a clinically detectable mass, known as amyloid goiter, is a rare condition associated with primary amyloidosis. Moreover, a localized primary amyloid goiter involving only the thyroid gland is rarer still. Here, we report a patient with a localized primary amyloid goiter that had grown rapidly, causing dysphagia and dyspnea on exercise, and confused us with malignancy such as anaplastic carcinoma. After surgery, no further symptoms occurred. A diagnosis of amyloid goiter was established on microscopic examination. In patients with a rapidly enlarging thyroid gland presenting with dysphagia, dyspnea, or hoarseness, amyloid goiter and malignancy should both be suspected, even when systemic amyloidosis is not suspected.

  11. MR microscopy of human amyloid-β deposits: characterization of parenchymal amyloid, diffuse plaques, and vascular amyloid.

    PubMed

    Nabuurs, Rob J A; Natté, Remco; de Ronde, Fenna M; Hegeman-Kleinn, Ingrid; Dijkstra, Jouke; van Duinen, Sjoerd G; Webb, Andrew G; Rozemuller, Annemieke J; van Buchem, Mark A; van der Weerd, Louise

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral deposits of amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) form the neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). In the brain, Aβ can aggregate as insoluble fibrils present in amyloid plaques and vascular amyloid, or as diffuse plaques consisting of mainly non-fibrillar Aβ. Previously, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be capable of detecting individual amyloid plaques, not only via the associated iron, but also Aβ itself has been suggested to be responsible for a decrease in the image intensity. In this current study we aim to investigate the MRI properties of the different cerebral Aβ deposits including diffuse plaques and vascular amyloid. Postmortem 60-μm-thick brain sections of AD, CAA, and Down's syndrome patients, known to contain Aβ, were studied. High resolution T2*- and T2-weighted MRI scans and quantitative relaxation maps were acquired using a microcoil on a Bruker 9.4T MRI system. Specific MRI characteristics of each type of Aβ deposit were examined by co-registration of the MRI with Congo Red and Aβ-immunostainings of the same sections. Our results show that only fibrillar Aβ, present in both vascular and parenchymal amyloid, induced a significant change in T2* and T2 values. However, signal changes were not as consistent for all of the vessels affected by CAA, irrespective of possible dyshoric changes. In contrast, the non-fibrillar diffuse plaques did not create any detectable MRI signal changes. These findings are relevant for the interpretation and further development of (quantitative) MRI methods for the detection and follow-up of AD and CAA.

  12. Androgen excess in cystic acne.

    PubMed

    Marynick, S P; Chakmakjian, Z H; McCaffree, D L; Herndon, J H

    1983-04-28

    We measured hormone levels in 59 women and 32 men with longstanding cystic acne resistant to conventional therapy. Affected women had higher serum levels of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, testosterone, and luteinizing hormone and lower levels of sex-hormone-binding globulin than controls. Affected men had higher levels of serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and 17-hydroxyprogesterone and lower levels of sex-hormone-binding globulin than controls. To lower dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, dexamethasone was given to men, and dexamethasone or an oral contraceptive pill, Demulen (or both), was given to women. Of the patients treated for six months, 97 per cent of the women and 81 per cent of the men had resolution or marked improvement in their acne. The dose of dexamethasone required to reduce dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels was low, rarely exceeding the equivalent of 20 mg of hydrocortisone per day. We conclude that most patients with therapeutically resistant cystic acne have androgen excess and that lowering elevated dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate results in improvement or remission of acne in most instances.

  13. Inhibition of Wnt signaling induces amyloidogenic processing of amyloid precursor protein and the production and aggregation of Amyloid-β (Aβ)42 peptides.

    PubMed

    Tapia-Rojas, Cheril; Burgos, Patricia V; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder and the most frequent cause of dementia in the aged population. According to the amyloid hypothesis, the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide plays a key role in the pathogenesis of AD. Aβ is generated from the amyloidogenic processing of amyloid precursor protein and can aggregate to form oligomers, which have been described as a major synaptotoxic agent in neurons. Dysfunction of Wnt signaling has been linked to increased Aβ formation; however, several other studies have argued against this possibility. Herein, we use multiple experimental approaches to confirm that the inhibition of Wnt signaling promoted the amyloidogenic proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein. We also demonstrate that inhibiting Wnt signaling increases the production of the Aβ42 peptide, the Aβ42 /Aβ40 ratio, and the levels of Aβ oligomers such as trimers and tetramers. Moreover, we show that activating Wnt signaling reduces the levels of Aβ42 and its aggregates, increases Aβ40 levels, and reduces the Aβ42 /Aβ40 ratio. Finally, we show that the protective effects observed in response to activation of the Wnt pathway rely on β-catenin-dependent transcription, which is demonstrated experimentally via the expression of various 'mutant forms of β-catenin'. Together, our findings indicate that loss of the Wnt signaling pathway may contribute to the pathogenesis of AD.

  14. Ablation of TRPM5 in Mice Results in Reduced Body Weight Gain and Improved Glucose Tolerance and Protects from Excessive Consumption of Sweet Palatable Food when Fed High Caloric Diets.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Marie H; Håkansson, Pernilla; Jansen, Frank P; Magnell, Kerstin; Brodin, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The calcium activated cation channel transient receptor potential channel type M5 (TRPM5) is part of the downstream machinery of the taste receptors and have been shown to play a central role in taste signalling. In addition it is also found in other types of chemosensory cells in various parts of the body as well as in pancreatic β-cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of TRPM5 gene ablation on body weight, insulin sensitivity and other metabolic parameters in long-term high caloric diet induced obesity. Trpm5-/- mice gained significantly less body weight and fat mass on both palatable carbohydrate and fat rich cafeteria diet and 60% high fat diet (HFD) and developed less insulin resistance compared to wild type mice. A main finding was the clearly improved glucose tolerance in Trpm5-/- mice compared to wild type mice on cafeteria diet, which was independent of body weight. In addition, it was shown that Trpm5-/- mice consumed the same amount of calories when fed a HFD only or a HFD in combination with a palatable chocolate ball, which is in contrast to wild type mice that increased their caloric intake when fed the combination, mainly due to excessive consumption of the chocolate ball. Thus the palatable sugar containing diet induced overeating was prevented in Trpm5-/- mice. This indicates that sweet taste induced overeating may be a cause for the increased energy intake and glucose intolerance development seen for wild type mice on a sugar and high fat rich cafeteria diet compared to when on a high fat diet. This study point to an important role for the taste signalling system and TRPM5 in diet induced glucose intolerance.

  15. Ablation of TRPM5 in Mice Results in Reduced Body Weight Gain and Improved Glucose Tolerance and Protects from Excessive Consumption of Sweet Palatable Food when Fed High Caloric Diets

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Marie H.; Håkansson, Pernilla; Jansen, Frank P.; Magnell, Kerstin; Brodin, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The calcium activated cation channel transient receptor potential channel type M5 (TRPM5) is part of the downstream machinery of the taste receptors and have been shown to play a central role in taste signalling. In addition it is also found in other types of chemosensory cells in various parts of the body as well as in pancreatic β-cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of TRPM5 gene ablation on body weight, insulin sensitivity and other metabolic parameters in long-term high caloric diet induced obesity. Trpm5-/- mice gained significantly less body weight and fat mass on both palatable carbohydrate and fat rich cafeteria diet and 60% high fat diet (HFD) and developed less insulin resistance compared to wild type mice. A main finding was the clearly improved glucose tolerance in Trpm5-/- mice compared to wild type mice on cafeteria diet, which was independent of body weight. In addition, it was shown that Trpm5-/- mice consumed the same amount of calories when fed a HFD only or a HFD in combination with a palatable chocolate ball, which is in contrast to wild type mice that increased their caloric intake when fed the combination, mainly due to excessive consumption of the chocolate ball. Thus the palatable sugar containing diet induced overeating was prevented in Trpm5-/- mice. This indicates that sweet taste induced overeating may be a cause for the increased energy intake and glucose intolerance development seen for wild type mice on a sugar and high fat rich cafeteria diet compared to when on a high fat diet. This study point to an important role for the taste signalling system and TRPM5 in diet induced glucose intolerance. PMID:26397098

  16. Chronic copper exposure exacerbates both amyloid and tau pathology and selectively dysregulates cdk5 in a mouse model of AD.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Masashi; Cheng, David; Laferla, Frank M

    2009-03-01

    Excess copper exposure is thought to be linked to the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology. However, the mechanism by which copper affects the CNS remains unclear. To investigate the effect of chronic copper exposure on both beta-amyloid and tau pathologies, we treated young triple transgenic (3xTg-AD) mice with 250 ppm copper-containing water for a period of 3 or 9 months. Copper exposure resulted in altered amyloid precursor protein processing; increased accumulation of the amyloid precursor protein and its proteolytic product, C99 fragment, along with increased generation of amyloid-beta peptides and oligomers. These changes were found to be mediated via up-regulation of BACE1 as significant increases in BACE1 levels and deposits were detected around plaques in mice following copper exposure. Furthermore, tau pathology within hippocampal neurons was exacerbated in copper-exposed 3xTg-AD group. Increased tau phosphorylation was closely correlated with aberrant cdk5/p25 activation, suggesting a role for this kinase in the development of copper-induced tau pathology. Taken together, our data suggest that chronic copper exposure accelerates not only amyloid pathology but also tau pathology in a mouse model of AD.

  17. Anxiety symptoms, cerebral amyloid burden and memory decline in healthy older adults without dementia: 3-year prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Pietrzak, Robert H; Scott, J Cobb; Neumeister, Alexander; Lim, Yen Ying; Ames, David; Ellis, Kathryn A; Harrington, Karra; Lautenschlager, Nicola T; Szoeke, Cassandra; Martins, Ralph N; Masters, Colin L; Villemagne, Victor L; Rowe, Christopher C; Maruff, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Although beta-amyloid, anxiety and depression have linked cross-sectionally to reduced memory function in healthy older adults without dementia, prospective data evaluating these associations are lacking. Using data an observational cohort study of 178 healthy older adults without dementia followed for 3 years, we found that anxiety symptoms significantly moderated the relationship between beta-amyloid level and decline in verbal (Cohen's d = 0.65) and episodic (Cohen's d = 0.38) memory. Anxiety symptoms were additionally linked to greater decline in executive function, irrespective of beta-amyloid and other risk factors. These findings suggest that interventions to mitigate anxiety symptoms may help delay memory decline in otherwise healthy older adults with elevated beta-amyloid.

  18. Carnosine's Effect on Amyloid Fibril Formation and Induced Cytotoxicity of Lysozyme

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Josephine W.; Liu, Kuan-Nan; How, Su-Chun; Chen, Wei-An; Lai, Chia-Min; Liu, Hwai-Shen; Hu, Chaur-Jong; Wang, Steven S. -S.

    2013-01-01

    Carnosine, a common dipeptide in mammals, has previously been shown to dissemble alpha-crystallin amyloid fibrils. To date, the dipeptide's anti-fibrillogensis effect has not been thoroughly characterized in other proteins. For a more complete understanding of carnosine's mechanism of action in amyloid fibril inhibition, we have investigated the effect of the dipeptide on lysozyme fibril formation and induced cytotoxicity in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Our study demonstrates a positive correlation between the concentration and inhibitory effect of carnosine against lysozyme fibril formation. Molecular docking results show carnosine's mechanism of fibrillogenesis inhibition may be initiated by binding with the aggregation-prone region of the protein. The dipeptide attenuates the amyloid fibril-induced cytotoxicity of human neuronal cells by reducing both apoptotic and necrotic cell deaths. Our study provides solid support for carnosine's amyloid fibril inhibitory property and its effect against fibril-induced cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. The additional insights gained herein may pave way to the discovery of other small molecules that may exert similar effects against amyloid fibril formation and its associated neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24349167

  19. Investigating the effects of erythrosine B on amyloid fibril formation derived from lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chun-Tien; Chen, Yi-Lin; Hsu, Wei-Tse; How, Su-Chun; Cheng, Yu-Hong; Hsueh, Shu-Shun; Liu, Hwai-Shen; Lin, Ta-Hsien; Wu, Josephine W; Wang, Steven S-S

    2017-05-01

    Formation of amyloid fibrils has been associated with at least 30 different protein aggregation diseases. The 129-residue polypeptide hen lysozyme, which is structurally homologous to human lysozyme, has been demonstrated to exhibit amyloid fibril-forming propensity in vitro. This study is aimed at exploring the influence of erythrosine B on the in vitro amyloid fibril formation of hen lysozyme at pH 2.0 and 55°C using ThT binding assay, transmission electron microscopy, far-UV circular dichroism absorption spectroscopy, 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid fluorescence spectroscopy, and synchronous fluorescence study. We found that lysozyme fibrillogenesis was dose-dependently suppressed by erythrosine B. In addition, our far-UV CD and ANS fluorescence data showed that, as compared with the untreated lysozyme control, the α-to-ß transition and exposure of hydrophobic clusters in lysozyme were reduced upon treatment with erythrosine B. Moreover, it could be inferred that the binding of erythrosine B occurred in the vicinity of the tryptophan residues. Finally, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations were further employed to gain some insights into the possible binding site(s) and interactions between lysozyme and erythrosine B. We believe the results obtained here may contribute to the development of potential strategies/approaches for the suppression of amyloid fibrillogenesis, which is implicated in amyloid pathology.

  20. Alzheimer disease therapy--moving from amyloid-β to tau.

    PubMed

    Giacobini, Ezio; Gold, Gabriel

    2013-12-01

    Disease-modifying treatments for Alzheimer disease (AD) have focused mainly on reducing levels of amyloid-β (Aβ) in the brain. Some compounds have achieved this goal, but none has produced clinically meaningful results. Several methodological issues relating to clinical trials of these agents might explain this failure; an additional consideration is that the amyloid cascade hypothesis--which places amyloid plaques at the heart of AD pathogenesis--does not fully integrate a large body of data relevant to the emergence of clinical AD. Importantly, amyloid deposition is not strongly correlated with cognition in multivariate analyses, unlike hyperphosphorylated tau, neurofibrillary tangles, and synaptic and neuronal loss, which are closely associated with memory deficits. Targeting tau pathology, therefore, might be more clinically effective than Aβ-directed therapies. Furthermore, numerous immunization studies in animal models indicate that reduction of intracellular levels of tau and phosphorylated tau is possible, and is associated with improved cognitive performance. Several tau-related vaccines are in advanced preclinical stages and will soon enter clinical trials. In this article, we present a critical analysis of the failure of Aβ-directed therapies, discuss limitations of the amyloid cascade hypothesis, and suggest the potential value of tau-targeted therapy for AD.

  1. Cupric-amyloid beta peptide complex stimulates oxidation of ascorbate and generation of hydroxyl radical.

    PubMed

    Dikalov, Sergey I; Vitek, Michael P; Mason, Ronald P

    2004-02-01

    A growing body of evidence supports an important role for oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Recently, a number of papers have shown a synergistic neurotoxicity of amyloid beta peptide and cupric ions. We hypothesized that complexes of cupric ions with neurotoxic amyloid beta peptides (Abeta) can stimulate copper-mediated free radical formation. We found that neurotoxic Abeta (1-42), Abeta (1-40), and Abeta (25-35) stimulated copper-mediated oxidation of ascorbate, whereas nontoxic Abeta (40-1) did not. Formation of ascorbate free radical was significantly increased by Abeta (1-42) in the presence of ceruloplasmin. Once cupric ion is reduced to cuprous ion, it can be oxidized by oxygen to generate superoxide radical or it can react with hydrogen peroxide to form hydroxyl radical. Hydrogen peroxide greatly increased the oxidation of cyclic hydroxylamines and ascorbate by cupric-amyloid beta peptide complexes, implying redox cycling of copper ions. Using the spin-trapping technique, we have shown that toxic amyloid beta peptides led to a 4-fold increase in copper-mediated hydroxyl radical formation. We conclude that toxic Abeta peptides do indeed stimulate copper-mediated oxidation of ascorbate and generation of hydroxyl radicals. Therefore, cupric-amyloid beta peptide-stimulated free radical generation may be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Identifying structural features of fibrillar islet amyloid polypeptide using site-directed spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Jayasinghe, Sajith A; Langen, Ralf

    2004-11-12

    Pancreatic amyloid deposits, composed primarily of the 37-residue islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP), are a characteristic feature found in more than 90% of patients with type II diabetes. Although IAPP amyloid deposits are associated with areas of pancreatic islet beta-cell dysfunction and depletion and are thought to play a role in disease, their structure is unknown. We used electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to analyze eight spin-labeled derivatives of IAPP in an effort to determine structural features of the peptide. In solution, all eight derivatives gave rise to electron paramagnetic resonance spectra with sharp lines indicative of rapid motion on the sub-nanosecond time scale. These spectra are consistent with a rapidly tumbling and highly dynamic peptide. In contrast, spectra for the fibrillar form exhibit reduced mobility and the presence of strong intermolecular spin-spin interactions. The latter implies that the peptide subunits are ordered and that the same residues from neighboring peptides are in close proximity to one another. Our data are consistent with a parallel arrangement of IAPP peptides within the amyloid fibril. Analysis of spin label mobility indicates a high degree of order throughout the peptide, although the N-terminal region is slightly less ordered. Possible similarities with respect to the domain organization and parallelism of Alzheimer's amyloid beta peptide fibrils are discussed.

  3. Role of gut microbiota and nutrients in amyloid formation and pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Pistollato, Francesca; Sumalla Cano, Sandra; Elio, Iñaki; Masias Vergara, Manuel; Giampieri, Francesca; Battino, Maurizio

    2016-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that alterations in the composition of the gut microbiota might be associated with the onset of certain human pathologies, such as Alzheimer disease, a neurodegenerative syndrome associated with cerebral accumulation of amyloid-β fibrils. It has been shown that bacteria populating the gut microbiota can release significant amounts of amyloids and lipopolysaccharides, which might play a role in the modulation of signaling pathways and the production of proinflammatory cytokines related to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. Additionally, nutrients have been shown to affect the composition of the gut microbiota as well as the formation and aggregation of cerebral amyloid-β. This suggests that modulating the gut microbiome and amyloidogenesis through specific nutritional interventions might prove to be an effective strategy to prevent or reduce the risk of Alzheimer disease. This review examines the possible role of the gut in the dissemination of amyloids, the role of the gut microbiota in the regulation of the gut-brain axis, the potential amyloidogenic properties of gut bacteria, and the possible impact of nutrients on modulation of microbiota composition and amyloid formation in relation to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease.

  4. Amyloid Imaging in Mild Cognitive Impairment Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Wolk, David A.; Price, Julie C.; Saxton, Judy A.; Snitz, Beth E.; James, Jeffrey A.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Cohen, Ann D.; Weissfeld, Lisa A.; Mathis, Chester A.; Klunk, William E.; DeKosky, Steven T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective We utilized the amyloid imaging ligand Pittsburgh Compound-B (PiB) to determine the presence of AD pathology in different MCI subtypes and to relate elevated PiB binding to other markers of early AD and longitudinal outcome. Methods Twenty-six patients with MCI – 13 single domain amnestic-MCI (sd a-MCI), 6 multiple domain amnestic-MCI (md a-MCI), and 7 non-amnestic MCI (na-MCI) – underwent PiB imaging. Twenty-three had clinical follow-up [21.2 ± 16.0 (SD) months] subsequent to their PiB scan. Results Using cutoffs established from a control cohort, 14 (54%) had elevated levels of PiB retention and were considered “amyloid-positive.” All subtypes were associated with a significant proportion of amyloid-positive patients (6/13 sd a-MCI, 5/6 md a-MCI, 3/7 na-MCI). There were no obvious differences in the distribution of PiB retention in the na-MCI group despite their atypical early AD phenotype. Predictors of conversion to clinical AD in a-MCI, including poorer episodic memory, increased age, and medial temporal atrophy, were found in the amyloid-positive relative to amyloid-negative a-MCI patients. Longitudinal follow-up revealed 5/13 amyloid-positive patients, but 0/10 amyloid-negative patients, converted to clinical AD. Further, 3/10 amyloid-negative patients “reverted to normal” on follow-up. Interpretation These data support the notion that amyloid-positive patients are likely to have early AD and that the use of amyloid imaging may have an important role in determining which patients are likely to benefit from disease-specific therapies. In addition, our data is consistent with longitudinal studies suggesting that a significant percentage of all MCI subtypes will develop clinical AD. PMID:19475670

  5. Aging and cerebrovascular dysfunction: contribution of hypertension, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Vasilevko, Vitaly; Passos, Giselle F; Quiring, Daniel; Head, Elizabeth; Kim, Richard C; Fisher, Mark; Cribbs, David H

    2010-10-01

    Age-related cerebrovascular dysfunction contributes to ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhages (ICHs), microbleeds, cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), and cognitive decline. Importantly, there is increasing recognition that this dysfunction plays a critical secondary role in many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Atherosclerosis, hypertension, and CAA are the most common causes of blood-brain barrier (BBB) lesions. The accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ) in the cerebrovascular system is a significant risk factor for ICH and has been linked to endothelial transport failure and blockage of perivascular drainage. Moreover, recent anti-Aβ immunotherapy clinical trials demonstrated efficient clearance of parenchymal amyloid deposits but have been plagued by CAA-associated adverse events. Although management of hypertension and atherosclerosis can reduce the incidence of ICH, there are currently no approved therapies for attenuating CAA. Thus, there is a critical need for new strategies that improve BBB function and limit the development of β-amyloidosis in the cerebral vasculature.

  6. Cyclic N-terminal loop of amylin forms non amyloid fibers.

    PubMed

    Cope, Stephanie M; Shinde, Sandip; Best, Robert B; Ghirlanda, Giovanna; Vaiana, Sara M

    2013-10-01

    We report for the first time, to our knowledge, that the N-terminal loop (N_loop) of amylin (islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) residues 1-8) forms extremely long and stable non-β-sheet fibers in solution under the same conditions in which human amylin (hIAPP) forms amyloid fibers. This observation applies to the cyclic, oxidized form of the N_loop but not to the linear, reduced form, which does not form fibers. Our findings indicate a potential role of direct N_loop-N_loop interactions in hIAPP aggregation, which has not been previously explored, with important implications for the mechanism of hIAPP amyloid fiber formation, the inhibitory action of IAPP variants, and the competition between ordered and disordered aggregation in peptides of the calcitonin peptide family.

  7. Cyclic N-Terminal Loop of Amylin Forms Non Amyloid Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Cope, Stephanie M.; Shinde, Sandip; Best, Robert B.; Ghirlanda, Giovanna; Vaiana, Sara M.

    2013-01-01

    We report for the first time, to our knowledge, that the N-terminal loop (N_loop) of amylin (islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) residues 1–8) forms extremely long and stable non-β-sheet fibers in solution under the same conditions in which human amylin (hIAPP) forms amyloid fibers. This observation applies to the cyclic, oxidized form of the N_loop but not to the linear, reduced form, which does not form fibers. Our findings indicate a potential role of direct N_loop-N_loop interactions in hIAPP aggregation, which has not been previously explored, with important implications for the mechanism of hIAPP amyloid fiber formation, the inhibitory action of IAPP variants, and the competition between ordered and disordered aggregation in peptides of the calcitonin peptide family. PMID:24094407

  8. Inhibition of Amyloid-like Fibril Formation of Trypsin by Red Wines.

    PubMed

    Kotormán, Márta; Kasi, Phanindra Babu; Halász, László; Borics, Attila

    2017-02-14

    The aim of the present study was to examine the potential role and applicability of dietary supplements in reducing the risk of development of amyloid diseases associated with the gastrointestinal tract, such as type II diabetes. Trypsin, a well-known serine protease was used as a model protein in our experiments. The effect of various red wines on the formation of amyloid-like fibrils of trypsin was studied in vitro, in aqueous ethanol, at pH 7.0. Turbidity measurements, aggregation kinetics experiments, Congo red binding assays and electronic circular dichroism spectroscopic measurements were used to follow the aggregation process in the presence or absence of various red wines. The results suggest that red wines effectively inhibit the formation of amyloid-like fibrils of trypsin and the inhibitory effect is dose-dependent. The extent of inhibition was found to be proportional to the total concentration of phenolic compounds.

  9. Tau, Amyloid, and Hypometabolism in a Patient with Posterior Cortical Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ossenkoppele, Rik; Schonhaut, Daniel R.; Baker, Suzanne L.; O'Neil, James P.; Janabi, Mustafa; Ghosh, Pia M.; Santos, Miguel; Miller, Zachary A.; Bettcher, Brianne M.; Gorno-Tempini, Maria L.; Miller, Bruce L.; Jagust, William J.; Rabinovici, Gil D.

    2015-01-01

    Determining the relative contribution of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles to brain dysfunction in Alzheimer disease is critical for therapeutic approaches, but until recently could only be assessed at autopsy. We report a patient with posterior cortical atrophy (visual variant of Alzheimer disease) who was studied using the novel tau tracer [18F]AV-1451 in conjunction with [11C]Pittsburgh compound B (PIB; amyloid) and [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography. Whereas [11C]PIB bound throughout association neocortex, [18F]AV-1451 was selectively retained in posterior brain regions that were affected clinically and showed markedly reduced [18F]FDG uptake. This provides preliminary in vivo evidence that tau is more closely linked to hypometabolism and symptomatology than amyloid. PMID:25448043

  10. Sigma-1 (σ₁) receptor deficiency reduces β-amyloid(25-35)-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death and cognitive deficits through suppressing phosphorylation of the NMDA receptor NR2B.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Sha, Sha; Chen, Tingting; Wang, Conghui; Hong, Juan; Jie, Pinghui; Zhou, Rong; Li, Lin; Sokabe, Masahiro; Chen, Ling

    2015-02-01

    In early Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain, reduction of sigma-1 receptors (σ1R) is detected. In this study, we employed male heterozygous σ1R knockout (σ1R(+/-)) mice showing normal cognitive performance to investigate association of σ1R deficiency with AD risk. Herein we report that a single injection (i.c.v.) of Aβ(25-35) impaired spatial memory with approximately 25% death of pyramidal cells in the hippocampal CA1 region of WT mice (Aβ(25-35)-WT mice), whereas it did not cause such impairments in σ1R(+/-) mice (Aβ(25-35)-σ1R(+/-) mice). Compared with WT mice, Aβ(25-35)-WT mice showed increased levels of NMDA-activated currents (INMDA) and NR2B phosphorylation (phospho-NR2B) in the hippocampal CA1 region at 48 h after Aβ25-35-injection (post-Aβ(25-35)) followed by approximately 40% decline at 72 h post-Aβ(25-35) of their respective control levels, which was inhibited by the σ1R antagonist NE100. In Aβ(25-35)-WT mice, the administration of NR2B inhibitor Ro25-6981 or NE100 on day 1-4 post-Aβ(25-35) attenuated the memory deficits and loss of pyramidal cells. By contrast, Aβ(25-35)-σ1R(+/-) mice showed a slight increase in the INMDA density and the phospho-NR2B at 48 h or 72 h post-Aβ25-35 compared to σ1R(+/-) mice. Treatment with σ1R agonist PRE084 in Aβ(25-35)-σ1R(+/-) mice caused the same changes in the INMDA density and the phospho-NR2B as those in Aβ(25-35)-WT mice. Furthermore, Aβ(25-35)-σ1R(+/-) mice treated with the NMDA receptor agonist NMDA or PRE084 on day 1-4 post-Aβ(25-35) showed a loss of neuronal cells and memory impairment. These results indicate that the σ1R deficiency can reduce Aβ(25-35)-induced neuronal cell death and cognitive deficits through suppressing Aβ(25-35)-enhanced NR2B phosphorylation.

  11. Increased in vivo amyloid-β42 production, exchange, and loss in presenilin mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Potter, Rachel; Patterson, Bruce W; Elbert, Donald L; Ovod, Vitaliy; Kasten, Tom; Sigurdson, Wendy; Mawuenyega, Kwasi; Blazey, Tyler; Goate, Alison; Chott, Robert; Yarasheski, Kevin E; Holtzman, David M; Morris, John C; Benzinger, Tammie L S; Bateman, Randall J

    2013-06-12

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is hypothesized to be caused by an overproduction or reduced clearance of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide. Autosomal dominant AD (ADAD) caused by mutations in the presenilin (PSEN) gene have been postulated to result from increased production of Aβ42 compared to Aβ40 in the central nervous system (CNS). This has been demonstrated in rodent models of ADAD but not in human mutation carriers. We used compartmental modeling of stable isotope labeling kinetic (SILK) studies in human carriers of PSEN mutations and related noncarriers to evaluate the pathophysiological effects of PSEN1 and PSEN2 mutations on the production and turnover of Aβ isoforms. We compared these findings by mutation status and amount of fibrillar amyloid deposition as measured by positron emission tomography (PET) using the amyloid tracer Pittsburgh compound B (PIB). CNS Aβ42 to Aβ40 production rates were 24% higher in mutation carriers compared to noncarriers, and this was independent of fibrillar amyloid deposits quantified by PET PIB imaging. The fractional turnover rate of soluble Aβ42 relative to Aβ40 was 65% faster in mutation carriers and correlated with amyloid deposition, consistent with increased deposition of Aβ42 into plaques, leading to reduced recovery of Aβ42 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Reversible exchange of Aβ42 peptides with preexisting unlabeled peptide was observed in the presence of plaques. These findings support the hypothesis that Aβ42 is overproduced in the CNS of humans with PSEN mutations that cause AD, and demonstrate that soluble Aβ42 turnover and exchange processes are altered in the presence of amyloid plaques, causing a reduction in Aβ42 concentrations in the CSF.

  12. Cell Adhesion on Amyloid Fibrils Lacking Integrin Recognition Motif*

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Reeba S.; George, Edna; Singh, Pradeep K.; Salot, Shimul; Anoop, Arunagiri; Jha, Narendra Nath; Sen, Shamik; Maji, Samir K.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloids are highly ordered, cross-β-sheet-rich protein/peptide aggregates associated with both human diseases and native functions. Given the well established ability of amyloids in interacting with cell membranes, we hypothesize that amyloids can serve as universal cell-adhesive substrates. Here, we show that, similar to the extracellular matrix protein collagen, amyloids of various proteins/peptides support attachment and spreading of cells via robust stimulation of integrin expression and formation of integrin-based focal adhesions. Additionally, amyloid fibrils are also capable of immobilizing non-adherent red blood cells through charge-based interactions. Together, our results indicate that both active and passive mechanisms contribute to adhesion on amyloid fibrils. The present data may delineate the functional aspect of cell adhesion on amyloids by various organisms and its involvement in human diseases. Our results also raise the exciting possibility that cell adhesivity might be a generic property of amyloids. PMID:26742841

  13. Amyloid-degrading ability of nattokinase from Bacillus subtilis natto.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ruei-Lin; Lee, Kung-Ta; Wang, Jung-Hao; Lee, Lily Y-L; Chen, Rita P-Y

    2009-01-28

    More than 20 unrelated proteins can form amyloid fibrils in vivo which are related to various diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, prion disease, and systematic amyloidosis. Amyloid fibrils are an ordered protein aggregate with a lamellar cross-beta structure. Enhancing amyloid clearance is one of the targets of the therapy of these amyloid-related diseases. Although there is debate on whether the toxicity is due to amyloids or their precursors, research on the degradation of amyloids may help prevent or alleviate these diseases. In this study, we explored the amyloid-degrading ability of nattokinase, a fibrinolytic subtilisin-like serine protease, and determined the optimal conditions for amyloid hydrolysis. This ability is shared by proteinase K and subtilisin Carlsberg, but not by trypsin or plasmin.

  14. Superresolution Imaging of Amyloid Fibrils with Binding-Activated Probes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Protein misfolding into amyloid-like aggregates underlies many neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, insights into the structure and function of these amyloids will provide valuable information on the pathological mechanisms involved and aid in the design of improved drugs for treating amyloid-based disorders. However, determining the structure of endogenous amyloids at high resolution has been difficult. Here we employ binding-activated localization microscopy (BALM) to acquire superresolution images of α-synuclein amyloid fibrils with unprecedented optical resolution. We propose that BALM imaging can be extended to study the structure of other amyloids, for differential diagnosis of amyloid-related diseases and for discovery of drugs that perturb amyloid structure for therapy. PMID:23594172

  15. Brain amyloid-β oligomers in ageing and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lesné, Sylvain E; Sherman, Mathew A; Grant, Marianne; Kuskowski, Michael; Schneider, Julie A; Bennett, David A; Ashe, Karen H

    2013-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease begins about two decades before the onset of symptoms or neuron death, and is believed to be caused by pathogenic amyloid-β aggregates that initiate a cascade of molecular events culminating in widespread neurodegeneration. The microtubule binding protein tau may mediate the effects of amyloid-β in this cascade. Amyloid plaques comprised of insoluble, fibrillar amyloid-β aggregates are the most characteristic feature of Alzheimer's disease. However, the correspondence between the distribution of plaques and the pattern of neurodegeneration is tenuous. This discrepancy has stimulated the investigation of other amyloid-β aggregates, including soluble amyloid-β oligomers. Different soluble amyloid-β oligomers have been studied in several mouse models, but not systematically in humans. Here, we measured three amyloid-β oligomers previously described in mouse models-amyloid-β trimers, Aβ*56 and amyloid-β dimers-in brain tissue from 75 cognitively intact individuals, ranging from young children to the elderly, and 58 impaired subjects with mild cognitive impairment or probable Alzheimer's disease. As in mouse models, where amyloid-β trimers appear to be the fundamental amyloid-β assembly unit of Aβ*56 and are present in young mice prior to memory decline, amyloid-β trimers in humans were present in children and adolescents; their levels rose gradually with age and were significantly above baseline in subjects in their 70s. Aβ*56 levels were negligible in children and young adults, rose significantly above baseline in subjects in their 40s and increased steadily thereafter. Amyloid-β dimers were undetectable until subjects were in their 60s; their levels then increased sharply and correlated with plaque load. Remarkably, in cognitively intact individuals we found strong positive correlations between Aβ*56 and two pathological forms of soluble tau (tau-CP13 and tau-Alz50), and negative correlations between Aβ*56 and two postsynaptic

  16. [Conservative and surgical treatment of convergence excess].

    PubMed

    Ehrt, O

    2016-07-01

    Convergence excess is a common finding especially in pediatric strabismus. A detailed diagnostic approach has to start after full correction of any hyperopia measured in cycloplegia. It includes measurements of manifest and latent deviation at near and distance fixation, near deviation after relaxation of accommodation with addition of +3 dpt, assessment of binocular function with and without +3 dpt as well as the accommodation range. This diagnostic approach is important for the classification into three types of convergence excess, which require different therapeutic approaches: 1) hypo-accommodative convergence excess is treated with permanent bifocal glasses, 2) norm-accommodative patients should be treated with bifocals which can be weaned over years, especially in patients with good stereopsis and 3) non-accommodative convergence excess and patients with large distance deviations need a surgical approach. The most effective operations include those which reduce the muscle torque, e. g. bimedial Faden operations or Y‑splitting of the medial rectus muscles.

  17. Surface Effects on Amyloid Fibril Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moores, Brad; Simons, Janet; Leonenko, Zoya

    2009-03-01

    Amyloid fibrils are insoluble aggregates composed of proteins in beta-sheet conformation, which are implicated in at least 20 diseases for which no cure is currently available. Although fibril plaque formation is associated with biological membranes in vivo, most of earlier research on fibrillogenesis has been performed in a solution phase, in which only a protein-protein interactions are considered. On the other hand, the surface of plasma membrane could provide the environment in which amyloid forming proteins could cluster. In order to get an insight into the understanding of the effect of the surface of plasma membrane, and the surfaces in general, on amyloid fibril formation, we used Atomic force microscopy to study binding of amyloid beta 1-42 peptide and amyloid fibril formation on model surfaces, such as chemically modified positively charged, negatively charged and hydrophobic substrates. The results show that structure, size and amount of larger fibrils and smaller aggregates depend on the type of surface, and differ from aggregation observed in solution.

  18. Chirality and chiroptical properties of amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Dzwolak, Wojciech

    2014-09-01

    Chirality of amyloid fibrils-linear beta-sheet-rich aggregates of misfolded protein chains-often manifests in morphological traits such as helical twist visible in atomic force microscopy and in chiroptical properties accessible to vibrational circular dichroism (VCD). According to recent studies the relationship between molecular chirality of polypeptide building blocks and superstructural chirality of amyloid fibrils may be more intricate and less deterministic than previously assumed. Several puzzling experimental findings have put into question earlier intuitive ideas on: 1) the bottom-up chirality transfer upon amyloidogenic self-assembly, and 2) the structural origins of chiroptical properties of protein aggregates. For example, removal of a single amino acid residue from an amyloidogenic all-L peptide was shown to reverse handedness of fibrils. On the other hand, certain types of amyloid aggregates revealed surprisingly strong VCD spectra with the sign and shape dependent on the conditions of fibrillation. Hence, microscopic and chiroptical studies have highlighted chirality as one more aspect of polymorphism of amyloid fibrils. This brief review is intended to outline the current state of research on amyloid-like fibrils from the perspective of their structural and superstructural chirality and chiroptical properties.

  19. Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a disorder characterized by amyloid deposition in the walls of leptomeningeal and cortical arteries, arterioles, and less often capillaries and veins of the central nervous system. CAA occurs mostly as a sporadic condition in the elderly, its incidence associating with advancing age. All sporadic CAA cases are due to deposition of amyloid-β, originating from proteolytic cleavage of the Amyloid Precursor Protein. Hereditary forms of CAA are generally familial (and therefore rare in the general population), more severe and earlier in onset. CAA-related lobar intracerebral hemorrhage is the most well-studied clinical condition associated with brain amyloid deposition. Despite ever increasing understanding of CAA pathogenesis and availability of reliable clinical and diagnostic tools, preventive and therapeutic options remain very limited. Further research efforts are required in order to identify biological targets for novel CAA treatment strategies. We present a systematic review of existing evidence regarding the epidemiology, genetics, pathogenesis, diagnosis and clinical management of CAA. PMID:21519520

  20. [Excessive sweating related to hydromorphone].

    PubMed

    Vinit, J; Devilliers, H; Audia, S; Leguy, V; Mura, H; Falvo, N; Berthier, S; Besancenot, J-F; Bonnotte, B; Lorcerie, B

    2009-02-01

    Diffuse and abundant sweating in a middle age patient evolving for several weeks should raise suspicion of malignant lymphoma and infectious or neuroendocrine disorders before considering a drug origin. We report a patient who presented with severe and invalidating excessive sweating related to hydromorphone therapy for vertebral pain. Amongst their many reported side-effects, excessive sweating disappearing with discontinuation of the drug have been reported with some opiates.

  1. Antagonistic effects of beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzymes 1 and 2 on beta-amyloid peptide production in cells.

    PubMed

    Basi, Guriqbal; Frigon, Normand; Barbour, Robin; Doan, Tam; Gordon, Grace; McConlogue, Lisa; Sinha, Sukanto; Zeller, Michelle

    2003-08-22

    The deposition of extracellular beta-amyloid peptide (A beta) in the brain is a pathologic feature of Alzheimer's disease. The beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), an integral membrane aspartyl protease responsible for cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) at the beta-site, promotes A beta production. A second integral membrane aspartyl protease related to BACE1, referred to as beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 2 (BACE2) has also been demonstrated to cleave APP at the beta-cleavage site in transfected cells. The role of endogenous BACE2 in A beta production remains unresolved. We investigated the role of endogenous BACE2 in A beta production in cells by selective inactivation of its transcripts using RNA interference. We are able to reduce steady state levels for mRNA for each enzyme by >85%, and protein amounts by 88-94% in cells. Selective inactivation of BACE1 by RNA interference results in decreased beta-cleaved secreted APP and A beta peptide secretion from cells, as expected. Selective inactivation of BACE2 by RNAi results in increased beta-cleaved secreted APP and A beta peptide secretion from cells. Simultaneous targeting of both enzymes by RNA interference does not have any net effect on A beta released from cells. Our observations of changes in APP metabolism and A beta are consistent with a role of BACE2 in suppressing A beta production in cells that co-express both enzymes.

  2. Amyloid Beta Peptides Differentially Affect Hippocampal Theta Rhythms In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Lerma, Armando I.; Ordaz, Benito; Peña-Ortega, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Soluble amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) is responsible for the early cognitive dysfunction observed in Alzheimer's disease. Both cholinergically and glutamatergically induced hippocampal theta rhythms are related to learning and memory, spatial navigation, and spatial memory. However, these two types of theta rhythms are not identical; they are associated with different behaviors and can be differentially modulated by diverse experimental conditions. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to investigate whether or not application of soluble Aβ alters the two types of theta frequency oscillatory network activity generated in rat hippocampal slices by application of the cholinergic and glutamatergic agonists carbachol or DHPG, respectively. Due to previous evidence that oscillatory activity can be differentially affected by different Aβ peptides, we also compared Aβ25−35 and Aβ1−42 for their effects on theta rhythms in vitro at similar concentrations (0.5 to 1.0 μM). We found that Aβ25−35 reduces, with less potency than Aβ1−42, carbachol-induced population theta oscillatory activity. In contrast, DHPG-induced oscillatory activity was not affected by a high concentration of Aβ25−35 but was reduced by Aβ1−42. Our results support the idea that different amyloid peptides might alter specific cellular mechanisms related to the generation of specific neuronal network activities, instead of exerting a generalized inhibitory effect on neuronal network function. PMID:23878547

  3. Investigation of the inhibitory effects of TiO(2) on the β-amyloid peptide aggregation.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mukhtar H; Byrne, John A; Keyes, Tia E

    2014-06-01

    TiO2 thin films are of great interest as biocompatible coatings and also as photocatalytic self-cleaning and antimicrobial coatings. In this work we used β-amyloid as a model for infectious protein to investigate the attachment and photocatalytic degradation. TiO2 films were prepared on stainless steel substrates using magnetron sputtering. The films were characterised before and after exposure to β-amyloid (1-42), using XRD, Raman spectroscopy, XPS and AFM. The TiO2 film was mostly composed of the anatase phase with a relatively high surface roughness. The presence of Raman peaks at 1668cm(-1) and 1263cm(-1), with the XPS spectral feature for nitrogen at 400eV, confirmed the adsorption of amyloid on surface. Following exposure of the β-amyloid contaminated TiO2 to UV-B irradiation a slight shift of amide modes was observed. Furthermore, the amide I spectra show an overall decrease in α-helix content with presence of a minor peak around 1591cm(-1), which is related to tryptophanyl and tyrosinyl radicals, which can lead to conformational change of β-amyloid. The C1s band at 292.2eV suggests the formation of free carboxylic acid. The loss in the crucial structure of β-amyloid leads to reduce the fibril formation, thought to be induced through a photocatalytic process.

  4. Cosolute effects on amyloid aggregation in a nondiffusion limited regime: intrinsic osmolyte properties and the volume exclusion principle.

    PubMed

    Murray, Brian; Rosenthal, Joseph; Zheng, Zhongli; Isaacson, David; Zhu, Yingxi; Belfort, Georges

    2015-04-14

    The effects of cosolutes on amyloid aggregation kinetics in vivo are critical and not fully understood. To explore the effects of cosolute additives, the in vitro behavior of destabilizing and stabilizing osmolytes with polymer cosolutes on the aggregation of a model amyloid, human insulin, is probed using experiments coupled with an amyloid aggregation reaction model. The destabilizing osmolyte, guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl), induces biphasic behavior on the amyloid aggregation rate exhibited by an enhancement of the aggregation kinetics at low concentrations of GuHCl (<0.6 M) and a reduction in kinetics at higher GuHCl concentrations. Stabilizing osmolytes, glycerol, sorbitol and trimethylamine N-oxide, slow the rate of aggregation by reducing the rate of monomer unfolding. Polymer cosolutes, polyvinylpyrrolidone 3.5 kDa and 40 kDa, delay amyloid aggregation mainly through a decrease in the nucleation reaction. These results are in good agreement with the volume exclusion principle for polymer crowding and supports the need to include conformational rearrangement of monomers prior to nucleation. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we demonstrate that amyloid aggregation is nondiffusion limited, except during fibril accumulation in the presence of high concentrations of long chain polymers. Lastly, the neutral surface area of osmolytes correlates well with the time to initiate fibril formation, tlag, which implicates an intrinsic osmolyte property underlying preferential interactions.

  5. α-Synuclein increases β-amyloid secretion by promoting β-/γ-secretase processing of APP

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Hazel L.; Schneider, Bernard L.; Brown, David R.

    2017-01-01

    α-Synuclein misfolding and aggregation is often accompanied by β-amyloid deposition in some neurodegenerative diseases. We hypothesised that α-synuclein promotes β-amyloid production from APP. β-Amyloid levels and APP amyloidogenic processing were investigated in neuronal cell lines stably overexpressing wildtype and mutant α-synuclein. γ-Secretase activity and β-secretase expression were also measured. We show that α-synuclein expression induces β-amyloid secretion and amyloidogenic processing of APP in neuronal cell lines. Certain mutations of α-synuclein potentiate APP amyloidogenic processing. γ-Secretase activity was not enhanced by wildtype α-synuclein expression, however β-secretase protein levels were induced. Furthermore, a correlation between α-synuclein and β-secretase protein was seen in rat brain striata. Iron chelation abolishes the effect of α-synuclein on neuronal cell β-amyloid secretion, whereas overexpression of the ferrireductase enzyme Steap3 is robustly pro-amyloidogenic. We propose that α-synuclein promotes β-amyloid formation by modulating β-cleavage of APP, and that this is potentially mediated by the levels of reduced iron and oxidative stress. PMID:28187176

  6. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Chi-cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-09-01

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 - 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 - 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  7. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Chi -cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-05-08

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 – 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 – 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  8. Antimicrobial activity of human islet amyloid polypeptides: an insight into amyloid peptides' connection with antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lan; Liu, Qian; Chen, Jin-Chun; Cui, Yi-Xian; Zhou, Bing; Chen, Yong-Xiang; Zhao, Yu-Fen; Li, Yan-Mei

    2012-07-01

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) shows an antimicrobial activity towards two types of clinically relevant bacteria. The potency of hIAPP varies with its aggregation states. Circular dichroism was employed to determine the interaction between hIAPP and bacteria lipid membrane mimic. The antimicrobial activity of each aggregate species is associated with their ability to induce membrane disruption. Our findings provide new evidence revealing the antimicrobial activity of amyloid peptide, which suggest a possible connection between amyloid peptides and antimicrobial peptides.

  9. In vitro and in vivo insulin amyloid degradation mediated by Serratiopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Metkar, Sanjay Kisan; Girigoswami, Agnishwar; Murugesan, Ramachandran; Girigoswami, Koyeli

    2017-01-01

    A transition of amyloidogenic protein by alternative folding pathway under certain conditions leads to the formation of protease resistant amyloid fibrils, having predominantly cross β structure. These amyloids are related to various neurodegenerative diseases and clearance of such amyloids may be a therapeutic approach for amyloid-related diseases. Insulin, that can form amyloids, is widely used as a model amyloidogenic protein for the study of various amyloid related diseases. In this study, insulin amyloids were formed in vitro and the potential of Serratiopeptidase (SP), a fibrinolytic-like serine protease, towards the dissociation of insulin amyloids was explored. The dissociation of the amyloids was demonstrated using in vitro and in vivo using zebrafish model. The amyloid dissociation property was compared with a standard amyloid dissociating enzyme nattokinase (NK). SP shows better amyloid dissociation ability than NK and therefore, SP can be considered as amyloid dissociating agent with potential as a drug candidate for different amyloid related disorders.

  10. Pharmacological removal of serum amyloid P component from intracerebral plaques and cerebrovascular Aβ amyloid deposits in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Millar, David J.; Richard-Londt, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Human amyloid deposits always contain the normal plasma protein serum amyloid P component (SAP), owing to its avid but reversible binding to all amyloid fibrils, including the amyloid β (Aβ) fibrils in the cerebral parenchyma plaques and cerebrovascular amyloid deposits of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). SAP promotes amyloid fibril formation in vitro, contributes to persistence of amyloid in vivo and is also itself directly toxic to cerebral neurons. We therefore developed (R)-1-[6-[(R)-2-carboxy-pyrrolidin-1-yl]-6-oxo-hexanoyl]pyrrolidine-2-carboxylic acid (CPHPC), a drug that removes SAP from the blood, and thereby also from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), in patients with AD. Here we report that, after introduction of transgenic human SAP expression in the TASTPM double transgenic mouse model of AD, all the amyloid deposits contained human SAP. Depletion of circulating human SAP by CPHPC administration in these mice removed all detectable human SAP from both the intracerebral and cerebrovascular amyloid. The demonstration that removal of SAP from the blood and CSF also removes it from these amyloid deposits crucially validates the strategy of the forthcoming ‘Depletion of serum amyloid P component in Alzheimer's disease (DESPIAD)’ clinical trial of CPHPC. The results also strongly support clinical testing of CPHPC in patients with CAA. PMID:26842068

  11. Independent contribution of temporal beta-amyloid deposition to memory decline in the pre-dementia phase of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Chételat, Gaël; Villemagne, Victor L; Pike, Kerryn E; Ellis, Kathryn A; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Jones, Gareth; O'Keefe, Graeme J; Salvado, Olivier; Szoeke, Cassandra; Martins, Ralph N; Ames, David; Masters, Colin L; Rowe, Christopher C

    2011-03-01

    neocortical β-amyloid. In the pre-dementia stage of Alzheimer's disease, subtle episodic memory impairment is related to β-amyloid deposition, especially in the temporal neocortex, and independently from hippocampal atrophy, suggesting that both factors should be independently targeted in therapeutic trials aimed at reducing cognitive decline.

  12. Molecular Structure of Amyloid Fibrils Controls the Relationship between Fibrillar Size and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Jin; Savtchenko, Regina; Ostapchenko, Valeriy G.; Makarava, Natallia; Baskakov, Ilia V.

    2011-01-01

    Background According to the prevailing view, soluble oligomers or small fibrillar fragments are considered to be the most toxic species in prion diseases. To test this hypothesis, two conformationally different amyloid states were produced from the same highly pure recombinant full-length prion protein (rPrP). The cytotoxic potential of intact fibrils and fibrillar fragments generated by sonication from these two states was tested using cultured cells. Methodology/Principal Findings For one amyloid state, fibril fragmentation was found to enhance its cytotoxic potential, whereas for another amyloid state formed within the same amino acid sequence, the fragmented fibrils were found to be substantially less toxic than the intact fibrils. Consistent with the previous studies, the toxic effects were more pronounced for cell cultures expressing normal isoform of the prion protein (PrPC) at high levels confirming that cytotoxicity was in part PrPC-dependent. Silencing of PrPC expression by small hairpin RNAs designed to silence expression of human PrPC (shRNA-PrPC) deminished the deleterious effects of the two amyloid states to a different extent, suggesting that the role of PrPC-mediated and PrPC-independent mechanisms depends on the structure of the aggregates. Conclusions/Significance This work provides a direct illustration that the relationship between an amyloid's physical dimension and its toxic potential is not unidirectional but is controlled by the molecular structure of prion protein (PrP) molecules within aggregated states. Depending on the structure, a decrease in size of amyloid fibrils can either enhance or abolish their cytotoxic effect. Regardless of the molecular structure or size of PrP aggregates, silencing of PrPC expression can be exploited to reduce their deleterious effects. PMID:21625461

  13. Amyloids or prions? That is the question.

    PubMed

    Sabate, Raimon; Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost; Batlle, Cristina; Ventura, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    Despite major efforts devoted to understanding the phenomenon of prion transmissibility, it is still poorly understood how this property is encoded in the amino acid sequence. In recent years, experimental data on yeast prion domains allow to start at least partially decrypting the sequence requirements of prion formation. These experiments illustrate the need for intrinsically disordered sequence regions enriched with a particularly high proportion of glutamine and asparagine. Bioinformatic analysis suggests that these regions strike a balance between sufficient amyloid nucleation propensity on the one hand and disorder on the other, which ensures availability of the amyloid prone regions but entropically prevents unwanted nucleation and facilitates brittleness required for propagation.

  14. Quenched Hydrogen Exchange NMR of Amyloid Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Alexandrescu, Andrei T

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are associated with a number of human diseases. These aggregatively misfolded intermolecular β-sheet assemblies constitute some of the most challenging targets in structural biology because to their complexity, size, and insolubility. Here, protocols and controls are described for experiments designed to study hydrogen-bonding in amyloid fibrils indirectly, by transferring information about amide proton occupancy in the fibrils to the dimethyl sulfoxide-denatured state. Since the denatured state is amenable to solution NMR spectroscopy, the method can provide residue-level-resolution data on hydrogen exchange for the monomers that make up the fibrils.

  15. Amyloids or prions? That is the question

    PubMed Central

    Sabate, Raimon; Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost; Batlle, Cristina; Ventura, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite major efforts devoted to understanding the phenomenon of prion transmissibility, it is still poorly understood how this property is encoded in the amino acid sequence. In recent years, experimental data on yeast prion domains allow to start at least partially decrypting the sequence requirements of prion formation. These experiments illustrate the need for intrinsically disordered sequence regions enriched with a particularly high proportion of glutamine and asparagine. Bioinformatic analysis suggests that these regions strike a balance between sufficient amyloid nucleation propensity on the one hand and disorder on the other, which ensures availability of the amyloid prone regions but entropically prevents unwanted nucleation and facilitates brittleness required for propagation. PMID:26039159

  16. Designed amyloid fibers as materials for selective carbon dioxide capture.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Deng, Hexiang; Liu, Cong; Yaghi, Omar M; Eisenberg, David S

    2014-01-07

    New materials capable of binding carbon dioxide are essential for addressing climate change. Here, we demonstrate that amyloids, self-assembling protein fibers, are effective for selective carbon dioxide capture. Solid-state NMR proves that amyloid fibers containing alkylamine groups reversibly bind carbon dioxide via carbamate formation. Thermodynamic and kinetic capture-and-release tests show the carbamate formation rate is fast enough to capture carbon dioxide by dynamic separation, undiminished by the presence of water, in both a natural amyloid and designed amyloids having increased carbon dioxide capacity. Heating to 100 °C regenerates the material. These results demonstrate the potential of amyloid fibers for environmental carbon dioxide capture.

  17. Activation of extrasynaptic, but not synaptic, NMDA receptors modifies amyloid precursor protein expression pattern and increases amyloid-ß production.

    PubMed

    Bordji, Karim; Becerril-Ortega, Javier; Nicole, Olivier; Buisson, Alain

    2010-11-24

    Calcium is a key mediator controlling essential neuronal functions depending on electrical activity. Altered neuronal calcium homeostasis affects metabolism of amyloid precursor protein (APP), leading to increased production of β-amyloid (Aβ), and contributing to the initiation of Alzheimer's disease (AD). A linkage between excessive glutamate receptor activation and neuronal Aβ release was established, and recent reports suggest that synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDA receptor (NMDAR) activation may have distinct consequences in plasticity, gene regulation, and neuronal death. Here, we report for the first time that prolonged activation of extrasynaptic NMDAR, but not synaptic NMDAR, dramatically increased the neuronal production of Aβ. This effect was preceded by a shift from APP695 to Kunitz protease inhibitory domain (KPI) containing APPs (KPI-APPs), isoforms exhibiting an important amyloidogenic potential. Conversely, after synaptic NMDAR activation, we failed to detect any KPI-APP expression and neuronal Aβ production was not modified. Calcium imaging data showed that intracellular calcium concentration after extrasynaptic NMDAR stimulation was lower than after synaptic activation. This suggests distinct signaling pathways for each pool of receptors. We found that modification of neuronal APP expression pattern triggered by extrasynaptic NMDAR activation was regulated at an alternative splicing level involving calcium-/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV, but overall APP expression remained identical. Finally, memantine dose-dependently inhibited extrasynaptic NMDAR-induced KPI-APPs expression as well as neuronal Aβ release. Altogether, these data suggest that a chronic activation of extrasynaptic NMDAR promotes amyloidogenic KPI-APP expression leading to neuronal Aβ release, representing a causal risk factor for developing AD.

  18. Coffee components inhibit amyloid formation of human islet amyloid polypeptide in vitro: possible link between coffee consumption and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Biao; Liu, Xinran; Gong, Hao; Huang, Lianqi; Chen, Hong; Zhang, Xin; Li, Chuanzhou; Yang, Muyang; Ma, Bingjun; Jiao, Lihua; Zheng, Ling; Huang, Kun

    2011-12-28

    Global epidemic studies have suggested that coffee consumption is reversely correlated with the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), a metabolic disease. The misfolding of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) is regarded as one of the causative factors of T2DM. Coffee extracts have three major active components: caffeine, caffeic acid (CA), and chlorogenic acid (CGA). In this study, the effects of these major coffee components, as well as dihydrocaffeic acid (DHCA) (a major metabolite of CGA and CA), on the amyloidogenicity of hIAPP were investigated by thioflavin-T based fluorescence emission, transmission electronic microscopy, circular dichroism, light-induced cross-linking, dynamic light scattering, and MTT-based cell viability assays. The results suggest that all components show varied inhibitory effects on the formation of toxic hIAPP amyloids, in which CA shows the highest potency in delaying the conformational transition of the hIAPP molecule with the most prolonged lag time, whereas caffeine shows the lowest potency. At a 5-fold excess molar ratio of compound to hIAPP, all coffee-derived compounds affect the secondary structures of incubated hIAPP as suggested by the circular dichroism spectra and CDPro deconvolution analysis. Further photoinduced cross-linking based oligomerization and dynamic light scattering studies suggested CA and CGA significantly suppressed the formation of hIAPP oligomers, whereas caffeine showed no significant effect on oligomerization. Cell protection effects were also observed for all three compounds, with the protection efficiency being greatest for CA and least for CGA. These findings suggest that the beneficial effects of coffee consumption on T2DM may be partly due to the ability of the major coffee components and metabolites to inhibit the toxic aggregation of hIAPP.

  19. Amyloid precursor-like protein 1 (APLP1) exhibits stronger zinc-dependent neuronal adhesion than amyloid precursor protein and APLP2.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Magnus C; Schauenburg, Linda; Thompson-Steckel, Greta; Dunsing, Valentin; Kaden, Daniela; Voigt, Philipp; Schaefer, Michael; Chiantia, Salvatore; Kennedy, Timothy E; Multhaup, Gerhard

    2016-04-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its paralogs, amyloid precursor-like protein 1 (APLP1) and APLP2, are metalloproteins with a putative role both in synaptogenesis and in maintaining synapse structure. Here, we studied the effect of zinc on membrane localization, adhesion, and secretase cleavage of APP, APLP1, and APLP2 in cell culture and rat neurons. For this, we employed live-cell microscopy techniques, a microcontact printing adhesion assay and ELISA for protein detection in cell culture supernatants. We report that zinc induces the multimerization of proteins of the amyloid precursor protein family and enriches them at cellular adhesion sites. Thus, zinc facilitates the formation of de novo APP and APLP1 containing adhesion complexes, whereas it does not have such influence on APLP2. Furthermore, zinc-binding prevented cleavage of APP and APLPs by extracellular secretases. In conclusion, the complexation of zinc modulates neuronal functions of APP and APLPs by (i) regulating formation of adhesion complexes, most prominently for APLP1, and (ii) by reducing the concentrations of neurotrophic soluble APP/APLP ectodomains. Earlier studies suggest a function of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) family proteins in neuronal adhesion. We report here that adhesive function of these proteins is tightly regulated by zinc, most prominently for amyloid precursor-like protein 1 (APLP1). Zinc-mediated APLP1 multimerization, which induced formation of new neuronal contacts and decreased APLP1 shedding. This suggests that APLP1 could function as a zinc receptor processing zinc signals to stabilized or new neuronal contacts.

  20. 24 CFR 236.60 - Excess Income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Excess Income. 236.60 Section 236... § 236.60 Excess Income. (a) Definition. Excess Income consists of cash collected as rent from the... Rent. The unit-by-unit requirement necessitates that, if a unit has Excess Income, the Excess...

  1. Structure and function of amyloid in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Carlos; Colombres, Marcela; Nuñez, Marco Tulio; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2004-12-01

    This review is focused on the structure and function of Alzheimer's amyloid deposits. Amyloid formation is a process in which normal well-folded cellular proteins undergo a self-assembly process that leads to the formation of large and ordered protein structures. Amyloid deposition, oligomerization, and higher order polymerization, and the structure adopted by these assemblies, as well as their functional relationship with cell biology are underscored. Numerous efforts have been directed to elucidate these issues and their relation with senile dementia. Significant advances made in the last decade in amyloid structure, dynamics and cell biology are summarized and discussed. The mechanism of amyloid neurotoxicity is discussed with emphasis on the Wnt signaling pathway. This review is focused on Alzheimer's amyloid fibrils in general and has been divided into two parts dealing with the structure and function of amyloid.

  2. Amyloid fibril formation by macrophage migration inhibitory factor

    SciTech Connect

    Lashuel, Hilal A. . E-mail: hilal.lashuel@epfl.ch; Aljabari, Bayan; Sigurdsson, Einar M.; Metz, Christine N.; Leng Lin; Callaway, David J.E.; Bucala, Richard

    2005-12-16

    We demonstrate herein that human macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a pro-inflammatory cytokine expressed in the brain and not previously considered to be amyloidogenic, forms amyloid fibrils similar to those derived from the disease associated amyloidogenic proteins {beta}-amyloid and {alpha}-synuclein. Acid denaturing conditions were found to readily induce MIF to undergo amyloid fibril formation. MIF aggregates to form amyloid-like structures with a morphology that is highly dependent on pH. The mechanism of MIF amyloid formation was probed by electron microscopy, turbidity, Thioflavin T binding, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and analytical ultracentrifugation. The fibrillar structures formed by MIF bind Congo red and exhibit the characteristic green birefringence under polarized light. These results are consistent with the notion that amyloid fibril formation is not an exclusive property of a select group of amyloidogenic proteins, and contribute to a better understanding of the factors which govern protein conformational changes and amyloid fibril formation in vivo.

  3. Islet amyloid polypeptide forms rigid lipid-protein amyloid fibrils on supported phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Domanov, Yegor A; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2008-02-08

    Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) forms fibrillar amyloid deposits in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and its misfolding and aggregation are thought to contribute to beta-cell death. Increasing evidence suggests that IAPP fibrillization is strongly influenced by lipid membranes and, vice versa, that the membrane architecture and integrity are severely affected by amyloid growth. Here, we report direct fluorescence microscopic observations of the morphological transformations accompanying IAPP fibrillization on the surface of supported lipid membranes. Within minutes of application in submicromolar concentrations, IAPP caused extensive remodeling of the membrane including formation of defects, vesiculation, and tubulation. The effects of IAPP concentration, ionic strength, and the presence of amyloid seeds on the bilayer perturbation and peptide aggregation were examined. Growth of amyloid fibrils was visualized using fluorescently labeled IAPP or thioflavin T staining. Two-color imaging of the peptide and membranes revealed that the fibrils were initially composed of the peptide only, and vesiculation occurred in the points where growing fibers touched the lipid membrane. Interestingly, after 2-5 h of incubation, IAPP fibers became "wrapped" by lipid membranes derived from the supported membrane. Progressive increase in molecular-level association between amyloid and membranes in the maturing fibers was confirmed by Förster resonance energy transfer spectroscopy.

  4. Immunoglobulin light chains, glycosaminoglycans and amyloid.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, F. J.; Kisilevsky, R.; Biosciences Division; Queen's Univ.

    2000-03-01

    Immunoglobulin light chains are the precursor proteins for fibrils that are formed during primary amyloidosis and in amyloidosis associated with multiple myeloma. As found for the approximately 20 currently described forms of focal, localized, or systemic amyloidoses, light chain-related fibrils extracted from physiological deposits are invariably associated with glycosaminoglycans, predominantly heparan sulfate. Other amyloid-related proteins are either structurally normal, such as g2-microglobulin and islet amyloid polypeptide, fragments of normal proteins such as serum amyloid A protein or the precursor protein of the g peptide involved in Alzheimer's disease, or are inherited forms of single amino acid variants of a normal protein such as found in the familial forms of amyloid associated with transthyretin. In contrast, the primary structures of light chains involved in fibril formation exhibit extensive mutational diversity rendering some proteins highly amyloidogenic and others non-pathological. The interactions between light chains and glycosaminoglycans are also affected by amino acid variation and may influence the clinical course of disease by enhancing fibril stability and contributing to resistance to protease degradation. Relatively little is currently known about the mechanisms by which glycosaminoglycans interact with light chains and light-chain fibrils. It is probable that future studies of this uniquely diverse family of proteins will continue o shed light on the processes of amyloidosis, and contribute as well to a greater understanding of the normal physiological roles of glycosaminoglycans.

  5. Serum amyloid P inhibits dermal wound healing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The repair of open wounds depends on granulation tissue formation and contraction, which is primarily mediated by myofibroblasts. A subset of myofibroblasts originates from bone-marrow-derived monocytes which differentiate into fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes. Serum amyloid P (SAP) inhibits ...

  6. Nanoparticles and amyloid systems: A fatal encounter?

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, Bernd

    2014-10-06

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are used in many products of our daily life, however, there has been concern that they may also be harmful to human health. Recently NPs have been found to accelerate the fibrillation kinetics of amyloid systems. In the past this has been preliminarily attributed to a nucleation effect. Nanoparticle surfaces and interfaces appear to limit the degrees of freedom of amyloid systems (i.e., peptides and proteins) due to a phase space constraint such that rapid cross-beta structures are formed faster than without interface interactions and in turn fibril formation is enhanced significantly. Here we explore if lipid bilayers in the form of liposomes (140nm) also accelerate fibril formation for amyloid systems. We have investigated a fragment NNFGAIL of the Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) in contact with 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPhPC) liposomes in aqueous solution. We found that the lipid bilayer vesicles do accelerate fibril formation in time-resolved off-line detected atomic force microscopy experiments. Characteristic Thioflavine-T fluorescence on the same structures verify that the structures consist of aggregated peptides in a typical cross-β-structure arrangement.

  7. Nanoparticles and amyloid systems: A fatal encounter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Bernd

    2014-10-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are used in many products of our daily life, however, there has been concern that they may also be harmful to human health. Recently NPs thave been found to accelerate the fibrillation kinetics of amyloid systems. In the past this has been preliminarily attributed to a nucleation effect. Nanoparticle surfaces and interfaces appear to limit the degrees of freedom of amyloid systems (i.e., peptides and proteins) due to a phase space constraint such that rapid cross-beta structures are formed faster than without interface interactions and in turn fibril formation is enhanced significantly. Here we explore if lipid bilayers in the form of liposomes (140nm) also accelerate fibril formation for amyloid systems. We have investigated a fragment NNFGAIL of the Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) in contact with 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPhPC) liposomes in aqueous solution. We found that the lipid bilayer vesicles do accelerate fibril formation in time-resolved off-line detected atomic force microscopy experiments. Characteristic Thioflavine-T fluorescence on the same structures verify that the structures consist of aggregated peptides in a typical cross-β-structure arrangement.

  8. Amyloid fibril networks nucleated under oscillatory shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batzli, Kiersten; Love, Brian

    2013-03-01

    The process of amyloid fibril formation is of interest due to the link between these self-aggregating proteins and the progression of neurodegenerative disease. More recently, research has been directed at the exploitation of self-assembly properties of amyloid proteins for use as templates for nanowires and fibrillar networks. Insulin is an ideal protein for these purposes due to the ease of aggregation, as well as the large aspect ratio and high chemical stability of the produced fibrils. Insulin in pH 2 solution quickly forms aggregates in the presence of 65 °C heat. We have investigated the effect of oscillatory shear on the nucleation and growth of amyloid fibrillar networks using rheology and TEM to characterize the mechanical properties and structure of the network respectively. We contrast networks nucleated under oscillatory shear with networks nucleated in static and agitated conditions, and discuss network properties in the context of use in templating nanostructures. We find that the structural characteristics of the formed networks, including the density of fibrils, are affected by shear during the nucleation phase of amyloid growth.

  9. Interactions between Amyloid-β and Tau Fragments Promote Aberrant Aggregates: Implications for Amyloid Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated at the oligomeric level interactions between Aβ(25–35) and Tau(273–284), two important fragments of the amyloid-β and Tau proteins, implicated in Alzheimer’s disease. We are able to directly observe the coaggregation of these two peptides by probing the conformations of early heteroligomers and the macroscopic morphologies of the aggregates. Ion-mobility experiment and theoretical modeling indicate that the interactions of the two fragments affect the self-assembly processes of both peptides. Tau(273–284) shows a high affinity to form heteroligomers with existing Aβ(25–35) monomer and oligomers in solution. The configurations and characteristics of the heteroligomers are determined by whether the population of Aβ(25–35) or Tau(273–284) is dominant. As a result, two types of aggregates are observed in the mixture with distinct morphologies and dimensions from those of pure Aβ(25–35) fibrils. The incorporation of some Tau into β-rich Aβ(25–35) oligomers reduces the aggregation propensity of Aβ(25–35) but does not fully abolish fibril formation. On the other hand, by forming complexes with Aβ(25–35), Tau monomers and dimers can advance to larger oligomers and form granular aggregates. These heteroligomers may contribute to toxicity through loss of normal function of Tau or inherent toxicity of the aggregates themselves. PMID:25153942

  10. Amyloid-carbon hybrid membranes for universal water purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolisetty, Sreenath; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2016-04-01

    Industrial development, energy production and mining have led to dramatically increased levels of environmental pollutants such as heavy metal ions, metal cyanides and nuclear waste. Current technologies for purifying contaminated waters are typically expensive and ion specific, and there is therefore a significant need for new approaches. Here, we report inexpensive hybrid membranes made from protein amyloid fibrils and activated porous carbon that can be used to remove heavy metal ions and radioactive waste from water. During filtration, the concentration of heavy metal ions drops by three to five orders of magnitude per passage and the process can be repeated numerous times. Notably, their efficiency remains unaltered when filtering several ions simultaneously. The performance of the membrane is enabled by the ability of the amyloids to selectively absorb heavy metal pollutants from solutions. We also show that our membranes can be used to recycle valuable heavy metal contaminants by thermally reducing ions trapped in saturated membranes, leading to the creation of elemental metal nanoparticles and films.

  11. Amyloid-carbon hybrid membranes for universal water purification.

    PubMed

    Bolisetty, Sreenath; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2016-04-01

    Industrial development, energy production and mining have led to dramatically increased levels of environmental pollutants such as heavy metal ions, metal cyanides and nuclear waste. Current technologies for purifying contaminated waters are typically expensive and ion specific, and there is therefore a significant need for new approaches. Here, we report inexpensive hybrid membranes made from protein amyloid fibrils and activated porous carbon that can be used to remove heavy metal ions and radioactive waste from water. During filtration, the concentration of heavy metal ions drops by three to five orders of magnitude per passage and the process can be repeated numerous times. Notably, their efficiency remains unaltered when filtering several ions simultaneously. The performance of the membrane is enabled by the ability of the amyloids to selectively absorb heavy metal pollutants from solutions. We also show that our membranes can be used to recycle valuable heavy metal contaminants by thermally reducing ions trapped in saturated membranes, leading to the creation of elemental metal nanoparticles and films.

  12. Amyloid-ß-directed immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lannfelt, L; Relkin, N R; Siemers, E R

    2014-03-01

    Current treatment options for Alzheimer's disease (AD) are limited to medications that reduce dementia symptoms. Given the rapidly ageing populations in most areas of the world, new therapeutic interventions for AD are urgently needed. In recent years, a number of drug candidates targeting the amyloid-ß (Aß) peptide have advanced into clinical trials; however, most have failed because of safety issues or lack of efficacy. The Aß peptide is central to the pathogenesis, and immunotherapy against Aß has attracted considerable interest. It offers the possibility to reach the target with highly specific drugs. Active immunization and passive immunization have been the most widely studied approaches to immunotherapy of AD. A favourable aspect of active immunization is the capacity for a small number of vaccinations to generate a prolonged antibody response. A potential disadvantage is the variability in the antibody response across patients. The potential advantages of passive immunotherapy include the reproducible delivery of a known amount of therapeutic antibodies to the patient and rapid clearance of those antibodies if side effects develop. A disadvantage is the requirement for repeated infusions of antibodies over time. After more than a decade of research, anti-amyloid immunotherapy remains one of the most promising emerging strategies for developing disease-modifying treatments for AD. In this review, we examine the presently ongoing Aß-directed immunotherapies that have passed clinical development Phase IIa.

  13. Excessive or unwanted hair in women

    MedlinePlus

    Hypertrichosis; Hirsutism; Hair - excessive (women); Excessive hair in women; Hair - women - excessive or unwanted ... Women normally produce low levels of male hormones (androgens). If your body makes too much of this ...

  14. Light and Excess Manganese1

    PubMed Central

    González, Alonso; Steffen, Kenneth L.; Lynch, Jonathan P.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of light intensity on antioxidants, antioxidant enzymes, and chlorophyll content was studied in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) exposed to excess Mn. Leaves of bean genotypes contrasting in Mn tolerance were exposed to two different light intensities and to excess Mn; light was controlled by shading a leaflet with filter paper. After 5 d of Mn treatment ascorbate was depleted by 45% in leaves of the Mn-sensitive genotype ZPV-292 and by 20% in the Mn-tolerant genotype CALIMA. Nonprotein sulfhydryl groups and glutathione reductase were not affected by Mn or light treatment. Ten days of Mn-toxicity stress increased leaf ascorbate peroxidase activity of cv ZPV-292 by 78% in low light and by 235% in high light, and superoxide dismutase activity followed a similar trend. Increases of ascorbate peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activity observed in cv CALIMA were lower than those observed in the susceptible cv ZPV-292. The cv CALIMA had less ascorbate oxidation under excess Mn-toxicity stress. Depletion of ascorbate occurred before the onset of chlorosis in Mn-stressed plants, especially in cv ZPV-292. Lipid peroxidation was not detected in floating leaf discs of mature leaves exposed to excess Mn. Our results suggest that Mn toxicity may be mediated by oxidative stress, and that the tolerant genotype may maintain higher ascorbate levels under stress than the sensitive genotype. PMID:9765534

  15. Excessive masturbation after epilepsy surgery.

    PubMed

    Ozmen, Mine; Erdogan, Ayten; Duvenci, Sirin; Ozyurt, Emin; Ozkara, Cigdem

    2004-02-01

    Sexual behavior changes as well as depression, anxiety, and organic mood/personality disorders have been reported in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients before and after epilepsy surgery. The authors describe a 14-year-old girl with symptoms of excessive masturbation in inappropriate places, social withdrawal, irritability, aggressive behavior, and crying spells after selective amygdalohippocampectomy for medically intractable TLE with hippocampal sclerosis. Since the family members felt extremely embarrassed, they were upset and angry with the patient which, in turn, increased her depressive symptoms. Both her excessive masturbation behavior and depressive symptoms remitted within 2 months of psychoeducative intervention and treatment with citalopram 20mg/day. Excessive masturbation is proposed to be related to the psychosocial changes due to seizure-free status after surgery as well as other possible mechanisms such as Kluver-Bucy syndrome features and neurophysiologic changes associated with the cessation of epileptic discharges. This case demonstrates that psychiatric problems and sexual changes encountered after epilepsy surgery are possibly multifactorial and in adolescence hypersexuality may be manifested as excessive masturbation behavior.

  16. OUTFLOWS IN SODIUM EXCESS OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jongwon; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Jeong, Hyunjin

    2015-08-10

    Van Dokkum and Conroy revisited the unexpectedly strong Na i lines at 8200 Å found in some giant elliptical galaxies and interpreted them as evidence for an unusually bottom-heavy initial mass function. Jeong et al. later found a large population of galaxies showing equally extraordinary Na D doublet absorption lines at 5900 Å (Na D excess objects: NEOs) and showed that their origins can be different for different types of galaxies. While a Na D excess seems to be related to the interstellar medium (ISM) in late-type galaxies, smooth-looking early-type NEOs show little or no dust extinction and hence no compelling signs of ISM contributions. To further test this finding, we measured the Doppler components in the Na D lines. We hypothesized that the ISM would have a better (albeit not definite) chance of showing a blueshift Doppler departure from the bulk of the stellar population due to outflow caused by either star formation or AGN activities. Many of the late-type NEOs clearly show blueshift in their Na D lines, which is consistent with the former interpretation that the Na D excess found in them is related to gas outflow caused by star formation. On the contrary, smooth-looking early-type NEOs do not show any notable Doppler components, which is also consistent with the interpretation of Jeong et al. that the Na D excess in early-type NEOs is likely not related to ISM activities but is purely stellar in origin.

  17. Current and future treatment of amyloid diseases.

    PubMed

    Ankarcrona, M; Winblad, B; Monteiro, C; Fearns, C; Powers, E T; Johansson, J; Westermark, G T; Presto, J; Ericzon, B-G; Kelly, J W

    2016-08-01

    There are more than 30 human proteins whose aggregation appears to cause degenerative maladies referred to as amyloid diseases or amyloidoses. These disorders are named after the characteristic cross-β-sheet amyloid fibrils that accumulate systemically or are localized to specific organs. In most cases, current treatment is limited to symptomatic approaches and thus disease-modifying therapies are needed. Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder with extracellular amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) fibrils and intracellular tau neurofibrillary tangles as pathological hallmarks. Numerous clinical trials have been conducted with passive and active immunotherapy, and small molecules to inhibit Aβ formation and aggregation or to enhance Aβ clearance; so far such clinical trials have been unsuccessful. Novel strategies are therefore required and here we will discuss the possibility of utilizing the chaperone BRICHOS to prevent Aβ aggregation and toxicity. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is symptomatically treated with insulin. However, the underlying pathology is linked to the aggregation and progressive accumulation of islet amyloid polypeptide as fibrils and oligomers, which are cytotoxic. Several compounds have been shown to inhibit islet amyloid aggregation and cytotoxicity in vitro. Future animal studies and clinical trials have to be conducted to determine their efficacy in vivo. The transthyretin (TTR) amyloidoses are a group of systemic degenerative diseases compromising multiple organ systems, caused by TTR aggregation. Liver transplantation decreases the generation of misfolded TTR and improves the quality of life for a subgroup of this patient population. Compounds that stabilize the natively folded, nonamyloidogenic, tetrameric conformation of TTR have been developed and the drug tafamidis is available as a promising treatment.

  18. Cannabidiol promotes amyloid precursor protein ubiquitination and reduction of beta amyloid expression in SHSY5YAPP+ cells through PPARγ involvement.

    PubMed

    Scuderi, Caterina; Steardo, Luca; Esposito, Giuseppe

    2014-07-01

    The amyloidogenic cascade is regarded as a key factor at the basis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. The aberrant cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) induces an increased production and a subsequent aggregation of beta amyloid (Aβ) peptide in limbic and association cortices. As a result, altered neuronal homeostasis and oxidative injury provoke tangle formation with consequent neuronal loss. Cannabidiol (CBD), a Cannabis derivative devoid of psychotropic effects, has attracted much attention because it may beneficially interfere with several Aβ-triggered neurodegenerative pathways, even though the mechanism responsible for such actions remains unknown. In the present research, the role of CBD was investigated as a possible modulating compound of APP processing in SHSY5Y(APP+) neurons. In addition, the putative involvement of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) was explored as a candidate molecular site responsible for CBD actions. Results indicated the CBD capability to induce the ubiquitination of APP protein which led to a substantial decrease in APP full length protein levels in SHSY5Y(APP+) with the consequent decrease in Aβ production. Moreover, CBD promoted an increased survival of SHSY5Y(APP+) neurons, by reducing their long-term apoptotic rate. Obtained results also showed that all, here observed, CBD effects were dependent on the selective activation of PPARγ.

  19. Modeling the Interaction between β-Amyloid Aggregates and Choline Acetyltransferase Activity and Its Relation with Cholinergic Dysfunction through Two-Enzyme/Two-Compartment Model

    PubMed Central

    Fgaier, Hedia; Mustafa, Ibrahim H. I.; Awad, Asmaa A. R.; Elkamel, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The effect of β-amyloid aggregates on activity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) which is responsible for synthesizing acetylcholine (ACh) in human brain is investigated through the two-enzyme/two-compartment (2E2C) model where the presynaptic neuron is considered as compartment 1 while both the synaptic cleft and the postsynaptic neuron are considered as compartment 2 through suggesting three different kinetic mechanisms for the inhibition effect. It is found that the incorporation of ChAT inhibition by β-amyloid aggregates into the 2E2C model is able to yield dynamic solutions for concentrations of generated β-amyloid, ACh, choline, acetate, and pH in addition to the rates of ACh synthesis and ACh hydrolysis in compartments 1 and 2. It is observed that ChAT activity needs a high concentration of β-amyloid aggregates production rate. It is found that ChAT activity is reduced significantly when neurons are exposed to high levels of β-amyloid aggregates leading to reduction in levels of ACh which is one of the most significant physiological symptoms of AD. Furthermore, the system of ACh neurocycle is dominated by the oscillatory behavior when ChAT enzyme is completely inhibited by β-amyloid. It is observed that the direct inactivation of ChAT by β-amyloid aggregates may be a probable mechanism contributing to the development of AD. PMID:26413144

  20. A Cultivated Form of a Red Seaweed (Chondrus crispus), Suppresses β-Amyloid-Induced Paralysis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Sangha, Jatinder Singh; Wally, Owen; Banskota, Arjun H.; Stefanova, Roumiana; Hafting, Jeff T.; Critchley, Alan T.; Prithiviraj, Balakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    We report here the protective effects of a methanol extract from a cultivated strain of the red seaweed, Chondrus crispus, against β-amyloid-induced toxicity, in a transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans, expressing human Aβ1-42 gene. The methanol extract of C. crispus (CCE), delayed β-amyloid-induced paralysis, whereas the water extract (CCW) was not effective. The CCE treatment did not affect the transcript abundance of amy1; however, Western blot analysis revealed a significant decrease of Aβ species, as compared to untreated worms. The transcript abundance of stress response genes; sod3, hsp16.2 and skn1 increased in CCE-treated worms. Bioassay guided fractionation of the CCE yielded a fraction enriched in monogalactosyl diacylglycerols (MGDG) that significantly delayed the onset of β-amyloid-induced paralysis. Taken together, these results suggested that the cultivated strain of C. crispus, whilst providing dietary nutritional value, may also have significant protective effects against β-amyloid-induced toxicity in C. elegans, partly through reduced β-amyloid species, up-regulation of stress induced genes and reduced accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). PMID:26492254

  1. The Effect of Milk Constituents and Crowding Agents on Amyloid Fibril Formation by κ-Casein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jihua; Dehle, Francis C; Liu, Yanqin; Bahraminejad, Elmira; Ecroyd, Heath; Thorn, David C; Carver, John A

    2016-02-17

    When not incorporated into the casein micelle, κ-casein, a major milk protein, rapidly forms amyloid fibrils at physiological pH and temperature. In this study, the effects of milk components (calcium, lactose, lipids, and heparan sulfate) and crowding agents on reduced and carboxymethylated (RCM) κ-casein fibril formation was investigated using far-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy, thioflavin T binding assays, and transmission electron microscopy. Longer-chain phosphatidylcholine lipids, which form the lining of milk ducts and milk fat globules, enhanced RCM κ-casein fibril formation irrespective of whether the lipids were in a monomeric or micellar state, whereas shorter-chain phospholipids and triglycerides had little effect. Heparan sulfate, a component of the milk fat globule membrane and catalyst of amyloid deposition in extracellular tissue, had little effect on the kinetics of RCM κ-casein fibril formation. Major nutritional components such as calcium and lactose also had no significant effect. Macromolecular crowding enhances protein-protein interactions, but in contrast to other fibril-forming species, the extent of RCM κ-casein fibril formation was reduced by the presence of a variety of crowding agents. These data are consistent with a mechanism of κ-casein fibril formation in which the rate-determining step is dissociation from the oligomer to give the highly amyloidogenic monomer. We conclude that the interaction of κ-casein with membrane-associated phospholipids along its secretory pathway may contribute to the development of amyloid deposits in mammary tissue. However, the formation of spherical oligomers such as casein micelles is favored over amyloid fibrils in the crowded environment of milk, within which the occurrence of amyloid fibrils is low.

  2. Excess attenuation of an acoustic beam by turbulence.

    PubMed

    Pan, Naixian

    2003-12-01

    A theory based on the concept of a spatial sinusoidal diffraction grating is presented for the estimation of the excess attenuation in an acoustic beam. The equation of the excess attenuation coefficient shows that the excess attenuation of acoustic beam not only depends on the turbulence but also depends on the application parameters such as the beam width, the beam orientation and whether for forward propagation or back scatter propagation. Analysis shows that the excess attenuation appears to have a frequency dependence of cube-root. The expression for the excess attenuation coefficient has been used in the estimations of the temperature structure coefficient, C(T)2, in sodar sounding. The correction of C(T)2 values for excess attenuation reduces their errors greatly. Published profiles of temperature structure coefficient and the velocity structure coefficient in convective conditions are used to test our theory, which is compared with the theory by Brown and Clifford. The excess attenuation due to scattering from turbulence and atmospheric absorption are both taken into account in sodar data processing for deducing the contribution of the lower atmosphere to seeing, which is the sharpness of a telescope image determined by the degree of turbulence in the Earth's atmosphere. The comparison between the contributions of the lowest 300-m layer to seeing with that of the whole atmosphere supports the reasonableness of our estimation of excess attenuation.

  3. Intracellular amyloid formation in muscle cells of Aβ-transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans: determinants and physiological role in copper detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Minniti, Alicia N; Rebolledo, Daniela L; Grez, Paula M; Fadic, Ricardo; Aldunate, Rebeca; Volitakis, Irene; Cherny, Robert A; Opazo, Carlos; Masters, Colin; Bush, Ashley I; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2009-01-01

    Background The amyloid β-peptide is a ubiquitous peptide, which is prone to aggregate forming soluble toxic oligomers and insoluble less-toxic aggregates. The intrinsic and external/environmental factors that determine Aβ aggregation in vivo are poorly understood, as well as the cellular meaning of this process itself. Genetic data as well as cell biological and biochemical evidence strongly support the hypothesis that Aβ is a major player in the onset and development of Alzheimer's disease. In addition, it is also known that Aβ is involved in Inclusion Body Myositis, a common myopathy of the elderly in which the peptide accumulates intracellularly. Results In the present work, we found that intracellular Aβ aggregation in muscle cells of Caenorhabditis elegans overexpressing Aβ peptide is affected by two single amino acid substitutions, E22G (Arctic) and V18A (NIC). Both variations show decrease intracellular amyloidogenesis compared to wild type Aβ. We show that intracellular amyloid aggregation of wild type Aβ is accelerated by Cu2+ and diminished by copper chelators. Moreover, we demonstrate through toxicity and behavioral assays that Aβ-transgenic worms display a higher tolerance to Cu2+ toxic effects and that this resistance may be linked to the formation of amyloid aggregates. Conclusion Our data show that intracellular Aβ amyloid aggregates may trap excess of free Cu2+ buffering its cytotoxic effects and that accelerated intracellular Aβ aggregation may be part of a cell protective mechanism. PMID:19126228

  4. Nanoparticle-chelator conjugates as inhibitors of amyloid-beta aggregation and neurotoxicity: a novel therapeutic approach for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Men, Ping; Kudo, Wataru; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A

    2009-05-22

    Oxidative stress and amyloid-beta are considered major etiological and pathological factors in the initiation and promotion of neurodegeneration in Alzheimer disease (AD). Insomuch as causes of such oxidative stress, transition metals, such as iron and copper, which are found in high concentrations in the brains of AD patients and accumulate specifically in the pathological lesions, are viewed as key contributors to the altered redox state. Likewise, the aggregation and toxicity of amyloid-beta is dependent upon transition metals. As such, chelating agents that selectively bind to and remove and/or "redox silence" transition metals have long been considered as attractive therapies for AD. However, the blood-brain barrier and neurotoxicity of many traditional metal chelators has limited their utility in AD or other neurodegenerative disorders. To circumvent this, we previously suggested that nanoparticles conjugated to iron chelators may have the potential to deliver chelators into the brain and overcome such issues as chelator bioavailability and toxic side-effects. In this study, we synthesized a prototype nanoparticle-chelator conjugate (Nano-N2PY) and demonstrated its ability to protect human cortical neurons from amyloid-beta-associated oxidative toxicity. Furthermore, Nano-N2PY nanoparticle-chelator conjugates effectively inhibited amyloid-beta aggregate formation. Overall, this study indicates that Nano-N2PY, or other nanoparticles conjugated to metal chelators, may provide a novel therapeutic strategy for AD and other neurodegenerative diseases associated with excess transition metals.

  5. Oral Administration of Thioflavin T Prevents Beta Amyloid Plaque Formation in Double Transgenic AD Mice.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sumit; Raymick, James; Ray, Balmiki; Lahiri, Debomoy K; Paule, Merle G; Schmued, Larry

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder and the fourth leading cause of death in the United States and most common cause of adult-onset dementia. The major hallmarks of AD are the formation of senile amyloid plaques made of beta amyloid and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) which are primarily composed of phosphorylated tau protein. Although numerous agents have been considered as providing protection against AD, identification of potential agents with neuroprotective ability is limited. Thioflavin T has been used in the past to stain amyloid beta plaques in brain. In this study, Thioflavin T (ThT) and vehicle (infant formula) were administered orally by gavage to transgenic (B6C3 APP PS1; AD-Tg) mice beginning at 4 months age and continuing until sacrifice at 9 months of age at 40 mg/kg dose. The number of amyloid plaques was reduced dramatically by ThT treatment in both male and female transgenic mice compared to those in control mice. Additionally, GFAP and Amylo-Glo labeling suggest that astrocytic hypertrophy is minimized in ThT-treated animals. Similarly, CD68 labeling, which detects activated microglia, along with Amylo-Glo labeling, suggests that microglial activation is significantly less in ThT-treated mice. Both Aβ-40 and Aβ-42 concentrations in blood rose significantly in the ThT-treated animals suggesting that ThT may inhibit the deposition, degradation, and/or clearance of Aβ plaques in brain.

  6. Ethyl ether fraction of Gastrodia elata Blume protects amyloid beta peptide-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon-Ju; Moon, Kwang-Deog; Lee, Dong-Seok; Lee, Sang-Han

    2003-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. Recently, it has been reported that Alzheimer's disease is associated with cell death in neuronal cells including the hippocampus. Amyloid beta-peptide stimulates neuronal cell death, but the underlying signaling pathways are poorly understood. In order to develop anti-dementia agents with potential therapeutic value, we examined the effect of the herbal compound Gastrodia elata Blume (GEB) on neuronal cell death induced by amyloid beta-peptide in IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells. The fractionation of GEB was carried out in various solvents. The hydroxyl radical scavenging effect of the ethyl ether fraction was more potent than any other fractions. In cells treated with amyloid beta-peptide, the neuroprotective effect of the ethyl ether, chloroform, and butanol fractions was 92, 44, and 39%, respectively, compared with control. Taken together, these results suggest that the ethyl ether fraction of GEB contains one or more compounds that dramatically reduce amyloid beta-peptide induced neuronal cell death in vitro.

  7. Endoplasmic Reticulum Quality Control and Systemic Amyloid Disease: Impacting Protein Stability from the Inside Out

    PubMed Central

    Chen, John J.; Genereux, Joseph C.; Wiseman, R. Luke

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is responsible for regulating proteome integrity throughout the secretory pathway. The ER protects downstream secretory environments such as the extracellular space by partitioning proteins between ER protein folding, trafficking and degradation pathways in a process called ER quality control. In this process, ER quality control factors identify misfolded, aggregation-prone protein conformations and direct them towards ER protein folding or degradation, reducing their secretion to the extracellular space where they could further misfold or aggregate into proteotoxic conformations. Despite the general efficiency of ER quality control, many human diseases, such as the systemic amyloidoses, involve aggregation of destabilized, aggregation-prone proteins in the extracellular space. A common feature for all systemic amyloid diseases is the ability for amyloidogenic proteins to evade ER quality control and be efficiently secreted. The efficient secretion of these amyloidogenic proteins increases their serum concentrations available for the distal proteotoxic aggregation characteristic of these diseases. This indicates that ER quality control, and the regulation thereof, is a critical determinant in defining the onset and pathology of systemic amyloid diseases. Here, we discuss the pathologic and potential therapeutic relationship between ER quality control, protein secretion and distal deposition of amyloidogenic proteins involved in systemic amyloid diseases. Furthermore, we present evidence that the Unfolded Protein Response, the stress-responsive signaling pathway that regulates ER quality control, is involved in the pathogenesis of systemic amyloid diseases and represents a promising emerging therapeutic target to intervene in this class of human disease. PMID:26018985

  8. Amyloid Beta as a Modulator of Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Parihar, Mordhwaj S; Brewer, Gregory J

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is associated with synapse loss, memory dysfunction and pathological accumulation of amyloid beta in plaques. However, an exclusively pathological role for amyloid beta is being challenged by new evidence for an essential function of amyloid beta at the synapse. Amyloid beta protein exists in different assembly states in the central nervous system and plays distinct roles ranging from synapse and memory formation to memory loss and neuronal cell death. Amyloid beta is present in the brain of symptom-free people where it likely performs important physiological roles. New evidence indicates that synaptic activity directly evokes the release of amyloid beta at the synapse. At physiological levels, amyloid beta is a normal, soluble product of neuronal metabolism that regulates synaptic function beginning early in life. Monomeric amyloid beta 40 and 42 are the predominant forms required for synaptic plasticity and neuronal survival. With age, some assemblies of amyloid beta are associated with synaptic failure and Alzheimer’s disease pathology, possibly targeting the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor through the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR), mitochondrial amyloid-β alcohol dehydrogenase (ABAD) and cyclophilin D. But emerging data suggests a distinction between age effects on the target response in contrast to the assembly state or the accumulation of the peptide. Both aging and beta amyloid independently decrease neuronal plasticity. Our laboratory has reported that amyloid beta, glutamate and lactic acid are each increasingly toxic with neuron age. The basis of the age-related toxicity partly resides in age-related mitochondrial dysfunction and an oxidative shift in mitochondrial and cytoplasmic redox potential. In turn, signaling through phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (pERK) is affected along with an age-independent increase in phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (p

  9. Association of Elevated Amyloid Levels With Cognition and Biomarkers in Cognitively Normal People From the Community

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Ronald C.; Wiste, Heather J.; Weigand, Stephen D.; Rocca, Walter A.; Roberts, Rosebud O.; Mielke, Michelle M.; Lowe, Val J.; Knopman, David S.; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Machulda, Mary M.; Geda, Yonas E.; Jack, Clifford R.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The role of amyloid in the progression of Alzheimer disease (AD) pathophysiology is of central interest to the design of randomized clinical trials. The presence of amyloid has become a prerequisite for enrollment in several secondary prevention trials for AD, yet the precise effect of elevated amyloid levels on subsequent clinical and biomarker events is less certain. OBJECTIVE To explore the effect of elevated amyloid levels on subsequent changes in cognition and biomarkers. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A total of 564 cognitively normal individuals (median age, 78 years) from the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging, a population-based longitudinal study in Olmsted County, Minnesota, with serial cognitive data were selected for this study. The data used in this study were collected from January 12, 2006, to January 9, 2014. Individuals included in this study had undergone magnetic resonance imaging, fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), and Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) PET at baseline were not cognitively impaired at baseline and had at least 1 clinical follow-up. A subset of 286 individuals also underwent serial imaging. Elevated amyloid level was defined as a standardized uptake value ratio of greater than 1.5 on PiB PET. Associations with baseline amyloid status and baseline and longitudinal change in clinical and imaging measures were evaluated after adjusting for age and hippocampal volume. APOE4 effects were also evaluated. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Cognitive measures of memory, language, attention/executive function, visuospatial skills, PiB levels, hippocampal and ventricular volumes, and FDG-PET measures. RESULTS At baseline, 179 (31.7%) individuals with elevated amyloid levels had poorer cognition in all domains measured, reduced hippocampal volume, and greater FDG-PET hypometabolism. Elevated amyloid levels at baseline were associated with a greater rate of cognitive decline in all domains (0.04 to 0.09 z score units per year

  10. Development of magnetic resonance imaging based detection methods for beta amyloids via sialic acid-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouyoumdjian, Hovig

    The development of a non-invasive method for the detection of Alzheimer's disease is of high current interest, which can be critical in early diagnosis and in guiding preventive treatment of the disease. The aggregates of beta amyloids are a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Carbohydrates such as sialic acid terminated gangliosides have been shown to play significant roles in initiation of amyloid aggregation. Herein, we report a biomimetic approach using sialic acid coated iron oxide superparamagnetic nanoparticles for in vitro detection in addition to the assessment of the in vivo mouse-BBB (Blood brain barrier) crossing of the BSA (bovine serum albumin)-modified ones. The sialic acid functionalized dextran nanoparticles were shown to bind with beta amyloids through several techniques including ELISA (enzyme linked immunosorbent assay), MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), TEM (transmission electron microscopy), gel electrophoresis and tyrosine fluorescence assay. The superparamagnetic nature of the nanoparticles allowed easy detection of the beta amyloids in mouse brains in both in vitro and ex vivo model by magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, the sialic acid nanoparticles greatly reduced beta amyloid induced cytotoxicity to SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, highlighting the potential of the glyconanoparticles for detection and imaging of beta amyloids. Sialic acid functionalized BSA (bovine serum albumin) nanoparticles also showed significant binding to beta amyloids, through ELISA and ex vivo mouse brain MRI experiments. Alternatively, the BBB crossing was demonstrated by several techniques such as confocal microscopy, endocytosis, exocytosis assays and were affirmed by nanoparticles transcytosis assays through bEnd.3 endothelial cells. Finally, the BBB crossing was confirmed by analyzing the MRI signal of nanoparticle-injected CD-1 mice.

  11. The Cosmic Ray Electron Excess

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, J.; Adams, J. H.; Ahn, H. S.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Christl, M.; Ganel, O.; Guzik, T. G.; Isbert, J.; Kim, K. C.; Kuznetsov, E. N.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Panov, A. D.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Seo, E. S.; Sokolskaya, N. V.; Watts, J. W.; Wefel, J. P.; Wu, J.; Zatsepin, V. I.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the possible sources for the apparent excess of Cosmic Ray Electrons. The presentation reviews the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) instrument, the various parts, how cosmic ray electrons are measured, and shows graphs that review the results of the ATIC instrument measurement. A review of Cosmic Ray Electrons models is explored, along with the source candidates. Scenarios for the excess are reviewed: Supernova remnants (SNR) Pulsar Wind nebulae, or Microquasars. Each of these has some problem that mitigates the argument. The last possibility discussed is Dark Matter. The Anti-Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) mission is to search for evidence of annihilations of dark matter particles, to search for anti-nuclei, to test cosmic-ray propagation models, and to measure electron and positron spectra. There are slides explaining the results of Pamela and how to compare these with those of the ATIC experiment. Dark matter annihilation is then reviewed, which represent two types of dark matter: Neutralinos, and kaluza-Kline (KK) particles, which are next explained. The future astrophysical measurements, those from GLAST LAT, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), and HEPCAT are reviewed, in light of assisting in finding an explanation for the observed excess. Also the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) could help by revealing if there are extra dimensions.

  12. Excess carbon in silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, X.; Oxley, M. P.; Puzyrev, Y.; Tuttle, B. R.; Duscher, G.; Pantelides, S. T.

    2010-12-01

    The application of SiC in electronic devices is currently hindered by low carrier mobility at the SiC/SiO2 interfaces. Recently, it was reported that 4H-SiC/SiO2 interfaces might have a transition layer on the SiC substrate side with C/Si ratio as high as 1.2, suggesting that carbon is injected into the SiC substrate during oxidation or other processing steps. We report finite-temperature quantum molecular dynamics simulations that explore the behavior of excess carbon in SiC. For SiC with 20% excess carbon, we find that, over short time (˜24 ps), carbon atoms bond to each other and form various complexes, while the silicon lattice is largely unperturbed. These results, however, suggest that at macroscopic times scale, C segregation is likely to occur; therefore a transition layer with 20% extra carbon would not be stable. For a dilute distribution of excess carbon, we explore the pairing of carbon interstitials and show that the formation of dicarbon interstitial cluster is kinetically very favorable, which suggests that isolated carbon clusters may exist inside SiC substrate.

  13. 34 CFR 300.16 - Excess costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Excess costs. 300.16 Section 300.16 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.16 Excess costs. Excess costs means those costs that... for an example of how excess costs must be calculated.) (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1401(8))...

  14. 34 CFR 300.16 - Excess costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Excess costs. 300.16 Section 300.16 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.16 Excess costs. Excess costs means those costs that... for an example of how excess costs must be calculated.) (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1401(8))...

  15. 12 CFR 925.23 - Excess stock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Excess stock. 925.23 Section 925.23 Banks and... BANKS Stock Requirements § 925.23 Excess stock. (a) Sale of excess stock. Subject to the restriction in paragraph (b) of this section, a member may purchase excess stock as long as the purchase is approved by...

  16. 10 CFR 904.9 - Excess capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Excess capacity. 904.9 Section 904.9 Energy DEPARTMENT OF... Marketing § 904.9 Excess capacity. (a) If the Uprating Program results in Excess Capacity, Western shall be entitled to such Excess Capacity to integrate the operation of the Boulder City Area Projects and...

  17. Amyloid plaque structure and cell surface interactions of β-amyloid fibrils revealed by electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Han, Shen; Kollmer, Marius; Markx, Daniel; Claus, Stephanie; Walther, Paul; Fändrich, Marcus

    2017-02-27

    The deposition of amyloid fibrils as plaques is a key feature of several neurodegenerative diseases including in particular Alzheimer's. This disease is characterized, if not provoked, by amyloid aggregates formed from Aβ peptide that deposit inside the brain or are toxic to neuronal cells. We here used scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to determine the fibril network structure and interactions of Aβ fibrils within a cell culture model of Alzheimer's disease. STEM images taken from the formed Aβ amyloid deposits revealed three main types of fibril network structures, termed amorphous meshwork, fibril bundle and amyloid star. All three were infiltrated by different types of lipid inclusions from small-sized exosome-like structures (50-100 nm diameter) to large-sized extracellular vesicles (up to 300 nm). The fibrils also presented strong interactions with the surrounding cells such that fibril bundles extended into tubular invaginations of the plasma membrane. Amyloid formation in the cell model was previously found to have an intracellular origin and we show here that it functionally destroys the integrity of the intracellular membranes as it leads to lysosomal leakage. These data provide a mechanistic link to explain why intracellular fibril formation is toxic to the cell.

  18. Amyloid plaque structure and cell surface interactions of β-amyloid fibrils revealed by electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shen; Kollmer, Marius; Markx, Daniel; Claus, Stephanie; Walther, Paul; Fändrich, Marcus

    2017-01-01

    The deposition of amyloid fibrils as plaques is a key feature of several neurodegenerative diseases including in particular Alzheimer’s. This disease is characterized, if not provoked, by amyloid aggregates formed from Aβ peptide that deposit inside the brain or are toxic to neuronal cells. We here used scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to determine the fibril network structure and interactions of Aβ fibrils within a cell culture model of Alzheimer’s disease. STEM images taken from the formed Aβ amyloid deposits revealed three main types of fibril network structures, termed amorphous meshwork, fibril bundle and amyloid star. All three were infiltrated by different types of lipid inclusions from small-sized exosome-like structures (50–100 nm diameter) to large-sized extracellular vesicles (up to 300 nm). The fibrils also presented strong interactions with the surrounding cells such that fibril bundles extended into tubular invaginations of the plasma membrane. Amyloid formation in the cell model was previously found to have an intracellular origin and we show here that it functionally destroys the integrity of the intracellular membranes as it leads to lysosomal leakage. These data provide a mechanistic link to explain why intracellular fibril formation is toxic to the cell. PMID:28240273

  19. Amyloid-β-Induced Dysregulation of AMPA Receptor Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Guntupalli, Sumasri; Widagdo, Jocelyn; Anggono, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Evidence from neuropathological, genetic, animal model, and biochemical studies has indicated that the accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) is associated with, and probably induces, profound neuronal changes in brain regions critical for memory and cognition in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There is considerable evidence that synapses are particularly vulnerable to AD, establishing synaptic dysfunction as one of the earliest events in pathogenesis, prior to neuronal loss. It is clear that excessive Aβ levels can disrupt excitatory synaptic transmission and plasticity, mainly due to dysregulation of the AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptors in the brain. Importantly, AMPA receptors are the principal glutamate receptors that mediate fast excitatory neurotransmission. This is essential for synaptic plasticity, a cellular correlate of learning and memory, which are the cognitive functions that are most disrupted in AD. Here we review recent advances in the field and provide insights into the molecular mechanisms that underlie Aβ-induced dysfunction of AMPA receptor trafficking. This review focuses primarily on NMDA receptor- and metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated signaling. In particular, we highlight several mechanisms that underlie synaptic long-term depression as common signaling pathways that are hijacked by the neurotoxic effects of Aβ. PMID:27073700

  20. Direct observation of amyloid nucleation under nanomechanical stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varongchayakul, Nitinun

    Self-assembly of amyloid nanofiber is associated with functional and pathological processes such as in neurodegenerative diseases. Despite intensive studies, stochastic nature of the process has made it difficult to elucidate molecular mechanisms for the key amyloid nucleation. Here, we investigated the amyloid nucleation of silk-elastin-like peptide (SELP) using time-lapse lateral force microscopy (LFM). By repeated scanning a single line on a SELP-coated mica surface, we observed sudden stepwise height increases, corresponds to nucleation of an amyloid fiber. The lateral force profiles followed either a worm-like chain model or an exponential function, suggesting that the atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip stretches a single or multiple SELP molecules along the scanning direction, serves as the template for further self-assembly perpendicular to the scan direction. Such mechanically induced nucleation of amyloid fibrils allows positional and directional control of amyloid assembly in vitro , which we demonstrate by generating single nanofibers at predetermined nucleation sites.

  1. Extension of the generic amyloid hypothesis to nonproteinaceous metabolite assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Shaham-Niv, Shira; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Schnaider, Lee; Gazit, Ehud

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of amyloid fibrils is the hallmark of several major human diseases. Although the formation of these supramolecular entities has previously been associated with proteins and peptides, it was later demonstrated that even phenylalanine, a single amino acid, can form fibrils that have amyloid-like biophysical, biochemical, and cytotoxic properties. Moreover, the generation of antibodies against these assemblies in phenylketonuria patients and the correlating mice model suggested a pathological role for the assemblies. We determine that several other metabolites that accumulate in metabolic disorders form ordered amyloid-like ultrastructures, which induce apoptotic cell death, as observed for amyloid structures. The formation of amyloid-like assemblies by metabolites implies a general phenomenon of amyloid formation, not limited to proteins and peptides, and offers a new paradigm for metabolic diseases. PMID:26601224

  2. Atomic View of a Toxic Amyloid Small Oligomer

    SciTech Connect

    Laganowsky, Arthur; Liu, Cong; Sawaya, Michael R.; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Park, Jiyong; Zhao, Minglei; Pensalfini, Anna; Soriaga, Angela B.; Landau, Meytal; Teng, Poh K.; Cascio, Duilio; Glabe, Charles; Eisenberg, David

    2012-04-30

    Amyloid diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and the prion conditions, are each associated with a particular protein in fibrillar form. These amyloid fibrils were long suspected to be the disease agents, but evidence suggests that smaller, often transient and polymorphic oligomers are the toxic entities. Here, we identify a segment of the amyloid-forming protein {alpha}{beta} crystallin, which forms an oligomeric complex exhibiting properties of other amyloid oligomers: {beta}-sheet-rich structure, cytotoxicity, and recognition by an oligomer-specific antibody. The x-ray-derived atomic structure of the oligomer reveals a cylindrical barrel, formed from six antiparallel protein strands, that we term a cylindrin. The cylindrin structure is compatible with a sequence segment from the {beta}-amyloid protein of Alzheimer's disease. Cylindrins offer models for the hitherto elusive structures of amyloid oligomers.

  3. Naturally occurring polyphenolic inhibitors of amyloid beta aggregation.

    PubMed

    Churches, Quentin I; Caine, Joanne; Cavanagh, Kate; Epa, Vidana Chandana; Waddington, Lynne; Tranberg, C Elisabet; Meyer, Adam G; Varghese, Jose N; Streltsov, Victor; Duggan, Peter J

    2014-07-15

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common neurodegenerative disease and is one of the main causes of death in developed countries. Consumption of foods rich in polyphenolics is strongly correlated with reduced incidence of Alzheimer's disease. Our study has investigated the biological activity of previously untested polyphenolic compounds in preventing amyloid β aggregation. The anti-aggregatory potential of these compounds was assessed using the Thioflavin-T assay, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and size exclusion chromatography. Two structurally related compounds, luteolin and transilitin were identified as potent inhibitors of Aβ fibril formation. Computational docking studies with an X-ray derived oligomeric structure offer a rationale for the inhibitory activity observed and may facilitate development of improved inhibitors of Aβ aggregation and toxicity.

  4. ACAT inhibition and amyloid beta reduction.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Raja; Kovacs, Dora M

    2010-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder. Accumulation and deposition of the beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptide generated from its larger amyloid precursor protein (APP) is one of the pathophysiological hallmarks of AD. Intracellular cholesterol was shown to regulate Abeta production. Recent genetic and biochemical studies indicate that not only the amount, but also the distribution of intracellular cholesterol is critical to regulate Abeta generation. Acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyl-transferase (ACAT) is a family of enzymes that regulates the cellular distribution of cholesterol by converting membrane cholesterol into hydrophobic cholesteryl esters for cholesterol storage and transport. Using pharmacological inhibitors and transgenic animal models, we and others have identified ACAT1 as a potential therapeutic target to lower Abeta generation and accumulation. Here we discuss data focusing on ACAT inhibition as an effective strategy for the prevention and treatment of AD.

  5. APOE and Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy in Community Dwelling Older Persons

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lei; Boyle, Patricia A.; Nag, Sukriti; Leurgans, Sue; Buchman, Aron S.; Wilson, Robert S.; Arvanitakis, Zoe; Farfel, Jose M.; De Jager, Philip L.; Bennett, David A.; Schneider, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Both cerebral amyloid angiopathy and Alzheimer’s disease pathology involve abnormal β-amyloid processing. We aim to elucidate the relationship of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotypes with amyloid angiopathy in the presence of variable amounts of Alzheimer’s pathology. Data came from 1,062 autopsied subjects from two community-based studies of aging. Common neuropathologies including Alzheimer’s disease and amyloid angiopathy were assessed using uniform methods. APOE was genotyped by sequencing the two polymorphisms in codons 112 and 158 of exon 4. We examined the associations of APOE with amyloid angiopathy using ordinal logistic regression analyses, controlling for demographics and subsequently Alzheimer’s and other common pathologies. Moderate to severe amyloid angiopathy was identified in 35.2% (n=374) of the subjects. 15.3% (n=162) of the subjects were APOE ε2 carriers and 26.1% (n=277) ε4 carriers. Adjusting for demographics, the presence of ε4 allele, but not ε2, was associated with more severe amyloid angiopathy. After further adjustment for Alzheimer’s pathology, both ε2 (odds ratio 1.707, 95% confidence interval 1.236–2.358, p=0.001) and ε4 (odds ratio 2.284, 95% confidence interval 1.730–3.014, p<0.001) were independently associated with amyloid angiopathy. The results were confirmed by path analysis. Further, APOE ε4 carriers, but not ε2 carriers, were more likely to have capillary amyloid angiopathy. Accounting for capillary involvement did not alter the APOE associations with amyloid angiopathy. We conclude that both APOE ε2 and ε4 alleles are associated with more severe cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and the direct effect of ε2 is masked by the allele’s negative association with comorbid Alzheimer’s pathology. APOE ε4, but not ε2, is associated with capillary amyloid angiopathy. PMID:26341746

  6. Inhibition of Alzheimer amyloid β aggregation by polyvalent trehalose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Yoshiko; You, Chouga; Ohnishi, Reiko

    2008-04-01

    A glycopolymer carrying trehalose was found to suppress the formation of amyloid fibrils from the amyloid β peptide (1-42) (Aβ), as evaluated by thioflavin T assay and atomic force microscopy. Glycopolymers carrying sugar alcohols also changed the aggregation properties of Aβ, and the inhibitory effect depended on the type of sugar and alkyl side chain. Neutralization activity was confirmed by in vitro assay using HeLa cells. The glycopolymer carrying trehalose strongly inhibited amyloid formation and neutralized cytotoxicity.

  7. Inhibition of Alzheimer amyloid β aggregation by polyvalent trehalose.

    PubMed

    Miura, Yoshiko; You, Chouga; Ohnishi, Reiko

    2008-04-01

    A glycopolymer carrying trehalose was found to suppress the formation of amyloid fibrils from the amyloid β peptide (1-42) (Aβ), as evaluated by thioflavin T assay and atomic force microscopy. Glycopolymers carrying sugar alcohols also changed the aggregation properties of Aβ, and the inhibitory effect depended on the type of sugar and alkyl side chain. Neutralization activity was confirmed by in vitro assay using HeLa cells. The glycopolymer carrying trehalose strongly inhibited amyloid formation and neutralized cytotoxicity.

  8. Technical aspects of amyloid imaging for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Edison, Paul; Hinz, Rainer; Brooks, David J

    2011-08-31

    [11C]Pittsburgh Compound B positron emission tomography has now been extensively used to evaluate the amyloid load in different types of dementia and has become a powerful research tool in the field of neurodegenerative diseases. In the present short review we discuss the properties of amyloid imaging agent [11C]Pittsburgh Compound B, the different modalities of molecular imaging, image processing and data analysis, and newer amyloid imaging agents.

  9. Elucidating the Role of Disulfide Bond on Amyloid Formation and Fibril Reversibility of Somatostatin-14

    PubMed Central

    Anoop, Arunagiri; Ranganathan, Srivastav; Dhaked, Bhagwan Das; Jha, Narendra Nath; Pratihar, Supriya; Ghosh, Saikat; Sahay, Shruti; Kumar, Santosh; Das, Subhadeep; Kombrabail, Mamata; Agarwal, Kumud; Jacob, Reeba S.; Singru, Praful; Bhaumik, Prasenjit; Padinhateeri, Ranjith; Kumar, Ashutosh; Maji, Samir K.

    2014-01-01

    The storage of protein/peptide hormones within subcellular compartments and subsequent release are crucial for their native function, and hence these processes are intricately regulated in mammalian systems. Several peptide hormones were recently suggested to be stored as amyloids within endocrine secretory granules. This leads to an apparent paradox where storage requires formation of aggregates, and their function requires a supply of non-aggregated peptides on demand. The precise mechanism behind amyloid formation by these hormones and their subsequent release remain an open question. To address this, we examined aggregation and fibril reversibility of a cyclic peptide hormone somatostatin (SST)-14 using various techniques. After proving that SST gets stored as amyloid in vivo, we investigated the role of native structure in modulating its conformational dynamics and self-association by disrupting the disulfide bridge (Cys3–Cys14) in SST. Using two-dimensional NMR, we resolved the initial structure of somatostatin-14 leading to aggregation and further probed its conformational dynamics in silico. The perturbation in native structure (S-S cleavage) led to a significant increase in conformational flexibility and resulted in rapid amyloid formation. The fibrils formed by disulfide-reduced noncyclic SST possess greater resistance to denaturing conditions with decreased monomer releasing potency. MD simulations reveal marked differences in the intermolecular interactions in SST and noncyclic SST providing plausible explanation for differential aggregation and fibril reversibility observed experimentally in these structural variants. Our findings thus emphasize that subtle changes in the native structure of peptide hormone(s) could alter its conformational dynamics and amyloid formation, which might have significant implications on their reversible storage and secretion. PMID:24782311

  10. Development and characterization of a TAPIR-like mouse monoclonal antibody to amyloid-beta.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Hara, Hideo; Makifuchi, Takao; Tabira, Takeshi

    2008-06-01

    Tissue amyloid plaque immuno-reactive (TAPIR) antibody was better related to the effect of immunotherapy in Alzheimer's disease (AD) than ELISA antibody. Here we used a hybridoma technique to develop a TAPIR-like anti-human amyloid-beta (Abeta) mouse monoclonal antibody. The obtained monoclonal antibody, 3.4A10, was an IgG2b isotype and recognized N-terminal portion of Abeta1-42 without binding denatured or native amyloid-beta protein precursor. It had higher affinity to Abeta1-42 than to Abeta1-40 by Biacore affinity analysis and stained preferably the peripheral part of senile plaques and recognized the plaque core less than 4G8. It inhibited the Abeta1-42 fibril formation as well as degraded pre-aggregated Abeta1-42 peptide in a thioflavin T fluorescence spectrophotometry assay. The in vivo studies showed that 3.4A10 treatment decreased amyloid burden compared to the control group and significantly reduced Abeta42 levels rather than Abeta40 levels in brain lysates as well as the Abeta*56 oligomer (12mer) in TBS fraction of the brain lysates. 3.4A10 entered brain and decorated some plaques, which is surrounded by more Iba1-positive microglia. 3.4A10 therapy did not induce lymphocytic infiltration and obvious increase in microhemorrhage. We conclude that 3.4A10 is a TAPIR-like anti-human amyloid monoclonal antibody, and has a potential of therapeutic application for AD.

  11. An update on the amyloid hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Eckman, Christopher B; Eckman, Elizabeth A

    2007-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease. To rationally develop novel therapeutic and/or preventative agents for AD, an understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of this complex disease is necessary. This article examines the evidence for the amyloid hypothesis of AD pathogenesis and discusses how it relates to the neurological and neuropathological features of AD, the known genetic risk factors and causative mutations, and the heightened risk associated with advanced age.

  12. NOVEL AMYLOID-BETA SPECIFIC scFv and VH ANTIBODY FRAGMENTS FROM HUMAN AND MOUSE PHAGE DISPLAY ANTIBODY LIBRARIES

    PubMed Central

    Medecigo, M.; Manoutcharian, K.; Vasilevko, V.; Govezensky, T.; Munguia, M. E.; Becerril, B.; Luz-Madrigal, A.; Vaca, L.; Cribbs, D. H.; Gevorkian, G.

    2010-01-01

    Anti-amyloid immunotherapy has been proposed as an appropriate therapeutic approach for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Significant efforts have been made towards the generation and assessment of antibody-based reagents capable of preventing and clearing amyloid aggregates as well as preventing their synaptotoxic effects. In this study, we selected a novel set of human anti-amyloid-beta peptide 1-42 (Aβ1-42) recombinant monoclonal antibodies in a single chain fragment variable (scFv) and a single domain (VH) formats. We demonstrated that these antibody fragments recognize in a specific manner amyloid beta deposits in APP/Tg mouse brains, inhibit toxicity of oligomeric Aβ1-42 in neuroblastoma cell cultures in a concentration-dependently manner and reduced amyloid deposits in APP/Tg2576 mice after intracranial administration. These antibody fragments recognize epitopes in the middle/C-terminus region of Aβ, which makes them strong therapeutic candidates due to the fact that most of the Aβ species found in the brains of AD patients display extensive N-terminus truncations/modifications. PMID:20451261

  13. Combined Treatment with a BACE Inhibitor and Anti-Aβ Antibody Gantenerumab Enhances Amyloid Reduction in APPLondon Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ozmen, Laurence; Caruso, Antonello; Narquizian, Robert; Hilpert, Hans; Jacobsen, Bjoern; Terwel, Dick; Tanghe, An

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic approaches for prevention or reduction of amyloidosis are currently a main objective in basic and clinical research on Alzheimer‘s disease. Among the agents explored in clinical trials are anti-Aβ peptide antibodies and secretase inhibitors. Most anti-Aβ antibodies are considered to act via inhibition of amyloidosis and enhanced clearance of existing amyloid, although secretase inhibitors reduce the de novo production of Aβ. Limited information is currently available on the efficacy and potential advantages of combinatorial antiamyloid treatment. We performed a chronic study in APPLondon transgenic mice that received treatment with anti-Aβ antibody gantenerumab and BACE inhibitor RO5508887, either as mono- or combination treatment. Treatment aimed to evaluate efficacy on amyloid progression, similar to preexisting amyloidosis as present in Alzheimer's disease patients. Mono-treatments with either compound caused a dose-dependent reduction of total brain Aβ and amyloid burden. Combination treatment with both compounds significantly enhanced the antiamyloid effect. The observed combination effect was most pronounced for lowering of amyloid plaque load and plaque number, which suggests effective inhibition of de novo plaque formation. Moreover, significantly enhanced clearance of pre-existing amyloid plaques was observed when gantenerumab was coadministered with RO5508887. BACE inhibition led to a significant time- and dose-dependent decrease in CSF Aβ, which was not observed for gantenerumab treatment. Our results demonstrate that combining these two antiamyloid agents enhances overall efficacy and suggests that combination treatments may be of clinical relevance. PMID:25164658

  14. HIGH-RESOLUTION ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC ANALYSIS OF THE AMYLOID FIBRIL

    PubMed Central

    Shirahama, Tsuranobu; Cohen, Alan S.

    1967-01-01

    The ultrastructural organization of the fibrous component of amyloid has been analyzed by means of high resolution electron microscopy of negatively stained isolated amyloid fibrils and of positively stained amyloid fibrils in thin tissue sections. It was found that a number of subunits could be resolved according to their dimensions. The following structural organization is proposed. The amyloid fibril, the fibrous component of amyloid as seen in electron microscopy of thin tissue sections, consists of a number of filaments aggregated side-by-side. These amyloid filaments are approximately 75–80 A in diameter and consist of five (or less likely six) subunits (amyloid protofibrils) which are arranged parallel to each other, longitudinal or slightly oblique to the long axis of the filament. The filament has often seemed to disperse into several longitudinal rows. The amyloid protofibril is about 25–35 A wide and appears to consist of two or three subunit strands helically arranged with a 35–50-A repeat (or, less likely, is composed of globular subunits aggregated end-to-end). These amyloid subprotofibrillar strands measure approximately 10–15 A in diameter. PMID:6036530

  15. Benzothiazole-Based Neutral Ratiometric Fluorescence Sensor for Amyloid Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Mora, Aruna K; Murudkar, Sushant; Alamelu, A; Singh, Prabhat K; Chattopadhyay, Subrata; Nath, Sukhendu

    2016-11-07

    Early detection of amyloid fibrils is very important for the timely diagnosis of several neurological diseases. Thioflavin-T (ThT) is a gold standard fluorescent probe for amyloid fibrils and has been used for the last few decades. However, due to its positive charge, ThT is incapable of crossing the blood-brain barrier and cannot be used for in vivo imaging of fibrils. In the present work, we synthesized a neutral ThT derivative, 2-[2'-Me,4'-(dimethylamino)phenyl]benzothiazole (2Me-DABT), which showed a strong affinity towards the amyloid fibrils. On association with the amyloid fibrils, 2Me-DABT not only showed a large increase in its emission intensity, but also, unlike ThT, a large blueshift in its emission spectrum was observed. Thus, unlike ThT, 2Me-DABT is a potential candidate for the ratiometric sensor of the amyloid fibrils. Detailed photophysical properties of 2Me-DABT in amyloid fibrils and different solvent media were studied to understand its sensory activity. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) studies suggested that the sites of localization for ThT and 2Me-DABT in amyloid fibrils are not same and their average distance of separation in amyloid fibrils was determined. The experimental data was nicely supported by molecular docking studies, which confirmed the binding of 2Me-DABT in the inner core of the amyloid fibrils.

  16. Pramipexole prevents neurotoxicity induced by oligomers of beta-amyloid.

    PubMed

    Uberti, Daniela; Bianchi, Irene; Olivari, Luca; Ferrari-Toninelli, Giulia; Canonico, PierLuigi; Memo, Maurizio

    2007-08-27

    Here we demonstrate that pramipexole, an antiparkinsonian dopamine receptor agonist drug, exerts neuroprotective effects against beta-amyloid neurotoxicity. Using a specific protocol to test individually oligomers, fibrils, or unaggregated amyloid beta-peptide, we found pramipexole able to protect cells against oligomers and fibrils. Unaggregated amyloid beta-peptide was found unable to cause cell death. Fibrils and oligomers were also found to produce elevated amount of free radicals, and this effect was prevented by pramipexole. We propose pramipexole may become in the future a coadjuvant in the treatment of neuropathologies, besides Parkinson's disease, where amyloid beta-peptide-mediated oxidative injury exerts a relevant role.

  17. Specific Chaperones and Regulatory Domains in Control of Amyloid Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Landreh, Michael; Rising, Anna; Presto, Jenny; Jörnvall, Hans; Johansson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins can form amyloid-like fibrils in vitro, but only about 30 amyloids are linked to disease, whereas some proteins form physiological amyloid-like assemblies. This raises questions of how the formation of toxic protein species during amyloidogenesis is prevented or contained in vivo. Intrinsic chaperoning or regulatory factors can control the aggregation in different protein systems, thereby preventing unwanted aggregation and enabling the biological use of amyloidogenic proteins. The molecular actions of these chaperones and regulators provide clues to the prevention of amyloid disease, as well as to the harnessing of amyloidogenic proteins in medicine and biotechnology. PMID:26354437

  18. Partial Volume Correction in Quantitative Amyloid Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yi; Blazey, Tyler M.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Raichle, Marcus E.; Marcus, Daniel S.; Ances, Beau M.; Bateman, Randall J.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Aldea, Patricia; Cash, Lisa; Christensen, Jon J.; Friedrichsen, Karl; Hornbeck, Russ C.; Farrar, Angela M.; Owen, Christopher J.; Mayeux, Richard; Brickman, Adam M.; Klunk, William; Price, Julie C.; Thompson, Paul M.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Saykin, Andrew J.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Schofield, Peter R.; Buckles, Virginia; Morris, John C.; Benzinger, Tammie. LS.

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid imaging is a valuable tool for research and diagnosis in dementing disorders. As positron emission tomography (PET) scanners have limited spatial resolution, measured signals are distorted by partial volume effects. Various techniques have been proposed for correcting partial volume effects, but there is no consensus as to whether these techniques are necessary in amyloid imaging, and, if so, how they should be implemented. We evaluated a two-component partial volume correction technique and a regional spread function technique using both simulated and human Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) PET imaging data. Both correction techniques compensated for partial volume effects and yielded improved detection of subtle changes in PiB retention. However, the regional spread function technique was more accurate in application to simulated data. Because PiB retention estimates depend on the correction technique, standardization is necessary to compare results across groups. Partial volume correction has sometimes been avoided because it increases the sensitivity to inaccuracy in image registration and segmentation. However, our results indicate that appropriate PVC may enhance our ability to detect changes in amyloid deposition. PMID:25485714

  19. Iatrogenic amyloid polyneuropathy after domino liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Mnatsakanova, Diana; Živković, Saša A

    2017-01-01

    Liver transplantation has been used in treatment of transthyretin amyloidosis, and some patients undergo domino liver transplantation (DLT) with explanted liver being transplanted to another patient with liver failure as the liver is otherwise usually functionally normal. Until end of 2015, there were 1154 DLT performed worldwide. DLT for transthyretin amyloidosis is associated with the risk of developing de novo systemic amyloidosis and amyloid neuropathy, and the risk may be greater with some non-Val30Met mutations. De novo amyloid neuropathy has been described in up to 23% of transplant recipients. Neuropathy may be preceded by asymptomatic amyloid deposition in various tissues and symptoms of neuropathy started after a median of 7 years following DLT (5.7 ± 3.2 years; range 2 mo to 10 years). Typical initial symptoms include neuropathic pain and sensory loss, while dysautonomia usually starts later. Progression of neuropathy may necessitate liver re-transplantation, and subsequent improvement of neuropathy has been reported in some patients. Explant allograft recipients need close monitoring for signs of systemic amyloidosis, neuropathy and dysautonomia as progressive symptoms may require re-transplantation. PMID:28217248

  20. Cooperative Hydrogen Bonding in Amyloid Formation.

    SciTech Connect

    Tsemekhman, Kiril L.; Goldschmidt, Lukasz; Eisenberg, Dvaid; Baker, David

    2007-04-01

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Amyloid diseases, including Alzheimer's and prion diseases, are each associated with unbranched protein fibrils. Each fibril is made of a particular protein, yet they share common properties. One such property is nucleation-dependent fibril growth. Monomers of amyloid-forming proteins can remain in dissolved form for long periods, before rapidly assembly into fibrils. The lag before growth has been attributed to slow kinetics of formation of a nucleus, on which other molecules can deposit to form the fibril. We have explored the energetics of fibril formation, based on the known molecular structure of a fibril-forming peptide from the yeast prion, Sup35, using both classical and quantum (density functional theory) methods. We find that the energetics of fibril formation for the first three layers are cooperative using both methods. This cooperativity is consistent with the observation that formation of amyloid fibrils involves slow nucleation and faster growth.

  1. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    DOE PAGES

    Chiu, Chi -cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-05-08

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 – 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 – 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimentalmore » and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.« less

  2. Amyloid-beta Alzheimer targets — protein processing, lipid rafts, and amyloid-beta pores

    PubMed Central

    Arbor, Sage C.; LaFontaine, Mike; Cumbay, Medhane

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ), the hallmark of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), now appears to be deleterious in its low number aggregate form as opposed to the macroscopic Aβ fibers historically seen postmortem. While Alzheimer targets, such as the tau protein, amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing, and immune system activation continue to be investigated, the recent discovery that amyloid beta aggregates at lipid rafts and likely forms neurotoxic pores has led to a new paradigm regarding why past therapeutics may have failed and how to design the next round of compounds for clinical trials. An atomic resolution understanding of Aβ aggregates, which appear to exist in multiple conformations, is most desirable for future therapeutic development. The investigative difficulties, structures of these small Aβ aggregates, and current therapeutics are summarized in this review. PMID:27505013

  3. Amyloid precursor protein and amyloid precursor-like protein 2 in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Poomy; Sliker, Bailee; Peters, Haley L.; Tuli, Amit; Herskovitz, Jonathan; Smits, Kaitlin; Purohit, Abhilasha; Singh, Rakesh K.; Dong, Jixin; Batra, Surinder K.; Coulter, Donald W.; Solheim, Joyce C.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its family members amyloid precursor-like protein 1 (APLP1) and amyloid precursor-like protein 2 (APLP2) are type 1 transmembrane glycoproteins that are highly conserved across species. The transcriptional regulation of APP and APLP2 is similar but not identical, and the cleavage of both proteins is regulated by phosphorylation. APP has been implicated in Alzheimer's disease causation, and in addition to its importance in neurology, APP is deregulated in cancer cells. APLP2 is likewise overexpressed in cancer cells, and APLP2 and APP are linked to increased tumor cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. In this present review, we discuss the unfolding account of these APP family members’ roles in cancer progression and metastasis. PMID:26840089

  4. Amylin Amyloid Inhibition by Flavonoid Baicalein: Key Roles of Its Vicinal Dihydroxyl Groups of the Catechol Moiety.

    PubMed

    Velander, Paul; Wu, Ling; Ray, W Keith; Helm, Richard F; Xu, Bin

    2016-08-09

    Amyloid formation of the 37-residue amylin is involved in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes and, potentially, diabetes-induced neurological deficits. Numerous flavonoids exhibit inhibitory effects against amylin amyloidosis, but the mechanisms of inhibition remain unclear. Screening a library of natural compounds uncovered a potent lead compound, the flavone baicalein. Baicalein inhibits amylin amyloid formation and reduces amylin-induced cytotoxicity. Analogue analyses demonstrated, for the first time, key roles of the vicinal hydroxyl groups on the A-ring. We provided mass spectrometric evidence that incubating baicalein and amylin leads to their conjugation, consistent with a Schiff base mechanism.

  5. Identification of Core Segment of Amyloidal Peptide Mediated by Chaperone Molecules by using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yue; Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen

    2015-10-05

    We illustrate in this work that pristine assemblies of amyloidal peptides can be obtained by perturbations of reduced scanning bias, and show a broad distribution in peptide length. In contrast, the chaperone-mediated peptide co-assembly presents ordered lamellar structures with a homogeneous distribution in length, which could be attributed to the core segment of the peptide. The efforts are beneficial for gaining insight into the aggregation propensity of peptides and inter-peptide interactions.

  6. Prevalence of excessive screen time and associated factors in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    de Lucena, Joana Marcela Sales; Cheng, Luanna Alexandra; Cavalcante, Thaísa Leite Mafaldo; da Silva, Vanessa Araújo; de Farias, José Cazuza

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of excessive screen time and to analyze associated factors among adolescents. Methods: This was a cross-sectional school-based epidemiological study with 2874 high school adolescents with age 14-19 years (57.8% female) from public and private schools in the city of João Pessoa, PB, Northeast Brazil. Excessive screen time was defined as watching television and playing video games or using the computer for more than 2 h/day. The associated factors analyzed were: sociodemographic (gender, age, economic class, and skin color), physical activity and nutritional status of adolescents. Results: The prevalence of excessive screen time was 79.5% (95%CI 78.1-81.1) and it was higher in males (84.3%) compared to females (76.1%; p<0.001). In multivariate analysis, adolescent males, those aged 14-15 year old and the highest economic class had higher chances of exposure to excessive screen time. The level of physical activity and nutritional status of adolescents were not associated with excessive screen time. Conclusions: The prevalence of excessive screen time was high and varied according to sociodemographic characteristics of adolescents. It is necessary to develop interventions to reduce the excessive screen time among adolescents, particularly in subgroups with higher exposure. PMID:26298661

  7. Beta-amyloid oligomers induce early loss of presynaptic proteins in primary neurons by caspase-dependent and proteasome-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Jang, Bong Geum; In, Sua; Choi, Boyoung; Kim, Min-Ju

    2014-11-12

    Beta-amyloid is a major pathogenic molecule for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and can be aggregated into a soluble oligomer, which is a toxic intermediate, before amyloid fibril formation. Beta-amyloid oligomers are associated closely with early synaptic loss in AD. However, it is still unknown which synaptic proteins are involved in the synaptotoxicity, and a direct comparison among the synaptic proteins should also be addressed. Here, we investigated changes in the expression of several presynaptic and postsynaptic proteins in primary neurons after treatment with a low-molecular weight and a high-molecular weight beta-amyloid oligomer. Both oligomers induced early neuronal dysfunction after 4 h and significantly reduced presynaptic protein (synaptophysin, syntaxin, synapsin, and synaptotagmin) expression. However, the expression of postsynaptic proteins (PSD95, NMDAR2A/B, and GluR2/3), except NMDAR1 was not reduced, and some protein expression levels were increased. Glutamate treatment, which is correlated with postsynaptic activation, showed more postsynaptic-specific protein loss compared with beta-amyloid oligomer treatment. Finally, the caspase inhibitor zVAD and the proteasomal inhibitor MG132 attenuated presynaptic protein loss. Thus, our data showed changes in synaptic proteins by beta-amyloid oligomers, which provides an understanding of early synaptotoxicity and suggests new approaches for AD treatment.

  8. Excess deferred taxes: an update

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, S.

    1985-04-04

    The states originally split on whether to accelerate refunds to customers for overpaid taxes resulting from the decrease in corporate income taxes, but recent regulatory decisions favor a quick payback of excess deferred taxes. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) indicates that this may violate normalization rules for accounting and threaten the utility's eligibility for accelerated depreciation deductions. After reviewing the positions of the IRS, state commissions, and the courts, the author concludes that the debate will continue until the Treasury Department issues definitive regulations. 1 table.

  9. Acceleration and inhibition of amyloid-β fibril formation by peptide-conjugated fluorescent-maghemite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skaat, Hadas; Shafir, Gilead; Margel, Shlomo

    2011-08-01

    The formation of amyloid aggregates by association of peptides into ordered structures is hallmark of certain neurodegenerative disorders. Exploring the effect of specific nanoparticles on the formation of amyloid fibrils may contribute toward a mechanistic understanding of the aggregation processes, leading to design nanoparticles that modulate the formation of toxic amyloid plaques. Uniform maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) magnetic nanoparticles, containing fluorescein covalently encapsulated within (F-γ-Fe2O3), were prepared. These F-γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles of 14.0 ± 4.0 nm were then coated with human serum albumin (HSA) via a precipitation process. Covalent conjugation of the spacer arm succinimidyl polyethylene glycol succinimidyl ester (NHS-PEG-NHS) to the F-γ-Fe2O3 HSA nanoparticles was then accomplished by interacting the primary amine groups of the HSA coating with excess NHS-PEG-NHS molecules. Covalent conjugation of the peptides amyloid-β 40 (Aβ40) or Leu-Pro-Phe-Phe-Asp (LPFFD) onto the surface of the former fluorescent nanoparticles was then performed, by interacting the terminal activated NHS groups of the PEG derivatized F-γ-Fe2O3 HSA nanoparticles with primary amino groups of the peptides. Kinetics of the Aβ40 fibrillation process in the absence and presence of varying concentrations of the Aβ40 or LPFFD conjugated nanoparticles were also elucidated. The non-peptide conjugated fluorescent nanoparticles do not affect the Aβ40 fibrillation process significantly. However, the Aβ40-conjugated nanoparticles (F-γ-Fe2O3 HSA-PEG-Aβ40) accelerate the fibrillation process while the LPFFD-conjugated nanoparticles (F-γ-Fe2O3 HSA-PEG-LPFFD) inhibit it. By applying MRI and fluorescence imaging techniques simultaneously these bioactive fluorescent magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles can be used as an efficient tool to study and control the Aβ40 amyloid fibril formation process.

  10. Regional brain hypometabolism is unrelated to regional amyloid plaque burden

    PubMed Central

    Altmann, Andre; Ng, Bernard; Landau, Susan M.; Jagust, William J.

    2015-01-01

    See Sorg and Grothe (doi:10.1093/brain/awv302) for a scientific commentary on this article. In its original form, the amyloid cascade hypothesis of Alzheimer’s disease holds that fibrillar deposits of amyloid are an early, driving force in pathological events leading ultimately to neuronal death. Early clinicopathological investigations highlighted a number of inconsistencies leading to an updated hypothesis in which amyloid plaques give way to amyloid oligomers as the driving force in pathogenesis. Rather than focusing on the inconsistencies, amyloid imaging studies have tended to highlight the overlap between regions that show early amyloid plaque signal on positron emission tomography and that also happen to be affected early in Alzheimer’s disease. Recent imaging studies investigating the regional dependency between metabolism and amyloid plaque deposition have arrived at conflicting results, with some showing regional associations and other not. We extracted multimodal neuroimaging data from the Alzheimer’s disease neuroimaging database for 227 healthy controls and 434 subjects with mild cognitive impairment. We analysed regional patterns of amyloid deposition, regional glucose metabolism and regional atrophy using florbetapir (18F) positron emission tomography, 18F-fluordeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, respectively. Specifically, we derived grey matter density and standardized uptake value ratios for both positron emission tomography tracers in 404 functionally defined regions of interest. We examined the relation between regional glucose metabolism and amyloid plaques using linear models. For each region of interest, correcting for regional grey matter density, age, education and disease status, we tested the association of regional glucose metabolism with (i) cortex-wide florbetapir uptake; (ii) regional (i.e. in the same region of interest) florbetapir uptake; and (iii) regional florbetapir uptake

  11. On the association between amyloid fibrils and glycosaminoglycans; possible interactive role of Ca2+ and amyloid P-component.

    PubMed Central

    Stenstad, T; Magnus, J H; Syse, K; Husby, G

    1993-01-01

    We have previously reported the specific association of glycosaminoglycans (GAG) and proteoglycans (PG) with amyloid fibrils and characterized the polysaccharides directly extracted from amyloid-laden tissues. In the present study we further elucidate the association between purified amyloid fibrils and GAG/PG with special reference to those GAG/PG associated with amyloid P-component (AP) and the interactive role of Ca2+ ions. Amyloid fibrils were isolated from human hepatic AA amyloid employing water extraction with and without preceding removal of AP, an extrafibrillar protein component of all amyloids, using sodium citrate. GAG/PG co-isolated with the amyloid extracts, with and without AP, were isolated and characterized. Agarose-affinity chromatography of extracts containing AP was performed, and the GAG associated with this extrafibrillary protein were characterized as well. Several different GAG/PG populations were demonstrated in the various extracts. The abolition of calcium-dependent binding markedly influenced the amount of GAG/PG recovered in the fibril extracts, as well as the total amount of amyloid material obtained. Thus, it seems that calcium plays an important role in the association between the fibrils and the sugar moieties, and that a significant fraction of the GAG found in amyloid exhibits a Ca(2+)-dependent fibril-GAG interaction. No significant difference in the proportion between galactosaminoglycans and glucosamines was, however, disclosed when the two extraction protocols were compared, suggesting that no particular GAG species has a higher affinity for the fibrils themselves. Both dermatan/chondroitin sulphate and heparan sulphate identified in the present study exhibited a Ca(2+)-dependent interaction with AP, supporting previous findings. However, the amyloid-associated galactosaminoglycans found, especially the large PG appearing in small amounts, seemed to have a higher affinity for the extrafibrillar AP than the other GAG. Images

  12. The effect of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) on amyloid aggregation and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Iannuzzi, Clara; Irace, Gaetano; Sirangelo, Ivana

    2015-02-02

    Amyloidosis is a protein folding disorder in which normally soluble proteins are deposited extracellularly as insoluble fibrils, impairing tissue structure and function. Charged polyelectrolytes such as glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are frequently found associated with the proteinaceous deposits in tissues of patients affected by amyloid diseases. Experimental evidence indicate that they can play an active role in favoring amyloid fibril formation and stabilization. Binding of GAGs to amyloid fibrils occurs mainly through electrostatic interactions involving the negative polyelectrolyte charges and positively charged side chains residues of aggregating protein. Similarly to catalyst for reactions, GAGs favor aggregation, nucleation and amyloid fibril formation functioning as a structural templates for the self-assembly of highly cytotoxic oligomeric precursors, rich in β-sheets, into harmless amyloid fibrils. Moreover, the GAGs amyloid promoting activity can be facilitated through specific interactions via consensus binding sites between amyloid polypeptide and GAGs molecules. We review the effect of GAGs on amyloid deposition as well as proteins not strictly related to diseases. In addition, we consider the potential of the GAGs therapy in amyloidosis.

  13. Collapsed state of polyglutamic acid results in amyloid spherulite formation

    PubMed Central

    Stehli, Daniel; Mulaj, Mentor; Miti, Tatiana; Traina, Joshua; Foley, Joseph; Muschol, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly of proteins and peptides into amyloid fibrils involves multiple distinct intermediates and late-stage fibrillar polymorphs. Understanding the conditions and mechanisms that promote the formation of one type of intermediate and polymorph over the other represents a fundamental challenge. Answers to this question are also of immediate biomedical relevance since different amyloid aggregate species have been shown to have distinct pathogenic potencies. One amyloid polymorph that has received comparatively little attention are amyloid spherulites. Here we report that self-assembly of the intrinsically disordered polymer poly(L-glutamic) acid (PLE) can generate amyloid spherulites. We characterize spherulite growth kinetics, as well as the morphological, optical and tinctorial features of this amyloid polymorph previously unreported for PLE. We find that PLE spherulites share both tinctorial and structural characteristics with their amyloid fibril counterparts. Differences in PLE's molecular weight, polydispersity or chemistry could not explain the selective propensity toward either fibril or spherulite formation. Instead, we provide evidence that PLE polymers can exist in either a collapsed globule or an extended random coil conformation. The collapsed globule consistently produces spherulites while the extended coil assembles into disordered fibril bundles. This results suggests that these 2 PLE conformers directly affect the morphology of the resulting macroscopic amyloid assembly.

  14. Cardiac resynchronization therapy in a patient with amyloid cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Zizek, David; Cvijić, Marta; Zupan, Igor

    2013-06-01

    Cardiac involvement in systemic light chain amyloidosis carries poor prognosis. Amyloid deposition in the myocardium can alter regional left ventricular contraction and cause dyssynchrony. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an effective treatment strategy for patients with advanced heart failure and echocardiographic dyssynchrony. We report a clinical and echocardiographic response of a patient with amyloid cardiomyopathy, treated with a combination of chemotherapy and CRT.

  15. Functional bacterial amyloid increases Pseudomonas biofilm hydrophobicity and stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Guanghong; Vad, Brian S.; Dueholm, Morten S.; Christiansen, Gunna; Nilsson, Martin; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Nielsen, Per H.; Meyer, Rikke L.; Otzen, Daniel E.

    2015-01-01

    The success of Pseudomonas species as opportunistic pathogens derives in great part from their ability to form stable biofilms that offer protection against chemical and mechanical attack. The extracellular matrix of biofilms contains numerous biomolecules, and it has recently been discovered that in Pseudomonas one of the components includes β-sheet rich amyloid fibrils (functional amyloid) produced by the fap operon. However, the role of the functional amyloid within the biofilm has not yet been investigated in detail. Here we investigate how the fap-based amyloid produced by Pseudomonas affects biofilm hydrophobicity and mechanical properties. Using atomic force microscopy imaging and force spectroscopy, we show that the amyloid renders individual cells more resistant to drying and alters their interactions with hydrophobic probes. Importantly, amyloid makes Pseudomonas more hydrophobic and increases biofilm stiffness 20-fold. Deletion of any one of the individual members of in the fap operon (except the putative chaperone FapA) abolishes this ability to increase biofilm stiffness and correlates with the loss of amyloid. We conclude that amyloid makes major contributions to biofilm mechanical robustness. PMID:26500638

  16. Amyloid goiter: preoperative scintigraphic diagnosis using Tc-99m pyrophosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, V.W.; Rubinow, A.; Pehrson, J.; Skinner, M.; Cohen, A.S.

    1984-04-01

    Amyloid goiter is a rare clinical entity. The diagnosis is rarely made preoperatively because clinical and laboratory findings are nonspecific. The authors report two cases of amyloid goiter in whom the diagnosis was made preoperatively using Tc-99m pyrophosphate scintigraphy.

  17. The effects of excessive humidity.

    PubMed

    Williams, R B

    1998-06-01

    Humidification devices and techniques can expose the airway mucosa to a wide range of gas temperatures and humidities, some of which are excessive and may cause injury. Humidified gas is a carrier of both water and energy. The volume of water in the gas stream depends on whether the water is in a molecular form (vapor), particulate form (aerosol), or bulk form (liquid). The energy content of gas stream is the sum of the sensible heat (temperature) of the air and any water droplets in it and the heat of vaporization (latent energy) of any water vapor present. Latent heat energy is much larger than sensible heat energy, so saturated air contains much more energy than dry air. Thus every breath contains a water volume and energy (thermal) challenge to the airway mucosa. When the challenge exceeds the homeostatic mechanisms airway dysfunction begins, starting at the cellular and secretion level and progressing to whole airway function. A large challenge will result in quick progression of dysfunction. Early dysfunction is generally reversible, however, so large challenges with short exposure times may not cause irreversible injury. The mechanisms of airway injury owing to excess water are not well studied. The observation of its effects lends itself to some general conclusions, however. Alterations in the ventilation-perfusion ratio, decrease in vital capacity and compilance, and atelectasis are suggestive of partial or full occlusion of small airways. Changes in surface tension and alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient are consistent with flooding of alveoli. There also may be osmotic challenges to mucosal cell function as evidenced by the different reaction rates with hyper- and hypotonic saline. The reaction to nonisotonic saline also may partly explain increases in specific airway resistance. Aerosolized water and instilled water may be hazardous because of their demonstrated potential for delivering excessive water to the airway. Their use for airway humidification or

  18. Self-folding and aggregation of amyloid nanofibrils.

    PubMed

    Paparcone, Raffaella; Cranford, Steven W; Buehler, Markus J

    2011-04-01

    Amyloids are highly organized protein filaments, rich in β-sheet secondary structures that self-assemble to form dense plaques in brain tissues affected by severe neurodegenerative disorders (e.g. Alzheimer's Disease). Identified as natural functional materials in bacteria, in addition to their remarkable mechanical properties, amyloids have also been proposed as a platform for novel biomaterials in nanotechnology applications including nanowires, liquid crystals, scaffolds and thin films. Despite recent progress in understanding amyloid structure and behavior, the latent self-assembly mechanism and the underlying adhesion forces that drive the aggregation process remain poorly understood. On the basis of previous full atomistic simulations, here we report a simple coarse-grain model to analyze the competition between adhesive forces and elastic deformation of amyloid fibrils. We use simple model system to investigate self-assembly mechanisms of fibrils, focused on the formation of self-folded nanorackets and nanorings, and thereby address a critical issue in linking the biochemical (Angstrom) to micrometre scales relevant for larger-scale states of functional amyloid materials. We investigate the effect of varying the interfibril adhesion energy on the structure and stability of self-folded nanorackets and nanorings and demonstrate that these aggregated amyloid fibrils are stable in such states even when the fibril-fibril interaction is relatively weak, given that the constituting amyloid fibril length exceeds a critical fibril length-scale of several hundred nanometres. We further present a simple approach to directly determine the interfibril adhesion strength from geometric measures. In addition to providing insight into the physics of aggregation of amyloid fibrils our model enables the analysis of large-scale amyloid plaques and presents a new method for the estimation and engineering of the adhesive forces responsible of the self-assembly process of amyloid

  19. Nanoliposomes protect against human arteriole endothelial dysfunction induced by β-amyloid peptide

    PubMed Central

    Truran, Seth; Weissig, Volkmar; Madine, Jillian; Davies, Hannah A; Guzman-Villanueva, Diana; Franco, Daniel A; Karamanova, Nina; Burciu, Camelia; Serrano, Geidy; Beach, Thomas G

    2015-01-01

    We tested whether nanoliposomes containing phosphatidylcholine, cholesterol and phosphatidic acid (NLPA) prevent β-amyloid 1-42 (Aβ42) fibrillation and Aβ42-induced human arteriole endothelial dysfunction. NLPA abolished Aβ42 fibril formation (thioflavin-T fluorescence/electron microscopy). In ex-vivo human adipose and leptomeningeal arterioles, Aβ42 impaired dilator response to acetylcholine that was reversed by NLPA; this protection was abolished by L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester. Aβ42 reduced human umbilical vein endothelial cell NO production that was restored by NLPA. Nanoliposomes prevented Aβ42 amyloid formation, reversed Aβ42-induced human microvascular endothelial dysfunction and may be useful in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26661197

  20. Trehalose Alters Subcellular Trafficking and the Metabolism of the Alzheimer-associated Amyloid Precursor Protein.

    PubMed

    Tien, Nguyen T; Karaca, Ilker; Tamboli, Irfan Y; Walter, Jochen

    2016-05-13

    The disaccharide trehalose is commonly considered to stimulate autophagy. Cell treatment with trehalose could decrease cytosolic aggregates of potentially pathogenic proteins, including mutant huntingtin, α-synuclein, and phosphorylated tau that are associated with neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we demonstrate that trehalose also alters the metabolism of the Alzheimer disease-related amyloid precursor protein (APP). Cell treatment with trehalose decreased the degradation of full-length APP and its C-terminal fragments. Trehalose also reduced the secretion of the amyloid-β peptide. Biochemical and cell biological experiments revealed that trehalose alters the subcellular distribution and decreases the degradation of APP C-terminal fragments in endolysosomal compartments. Trehalose also led to strong accumulation of the autophagic marker proteins LC3-II and p62, and decreased the proteolytic activation of the lysosomal hydrolase cathepsin D. The combined data indicate that trehalose decreases the lysosomal metabolism of APP by altering its endocytic vesicular transport.

  1. Competitive Mirror Image Phage Display Derived Peptide Modulates Amyloid Beta Aggregation and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Stephan; Klein, Antonia Nicole; Tusche, Markus; Schlosser, Christine; Elfgen, Anne; Brener, Oleksandr; Teunissen, Charlotte; Gremer, Lothar; Funke, Susanne Aileen; Kutzsche, Janine; Willbold, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer´s disease is the most prominent type of dementia and currently no causative treatment is available. According to recent studies, oligomeric species of the amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide appear to be the most toxic Aβ assemblies. Aβ monomers, however, may be not toxic per se and may even have a neuroprotective role. Here we describe a competitive mirror image phage display procedure that allowed us to identify preferentially Aβ1–42 monomer binding and thereby stabilizing peptides, which destabilize and thereby eliminate toxic oligomer species. One of the peptides, called Mosd1 (monomer specific d-peptide 1), was characterized in more detail. Mosd1 abolished oligomers from a mixture of Aβ1–42 species, reduced Aβ1–42 toxicity in cell culture, and restored the physiological phenotype in neuronal cells stably transfected with the gene coding for human amyloid precursor protein. PMID:26840229

  2. Tafamidis for the Treatment of Hereditary Transthyretin Amyloid Cardiomyopathy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Teppei; Inomata, Takayuki; Kaida, Toyoji; Iida, Yuichirou; Ikeda, Yuki; Nabeta, Takeru; Ishii, Shunsuke; Maekawa, Emi; Naruke, Takashi; Koitabashi, Toshimi; Kitamura, Eiji; Sekijima, Yoshiki; Ako, Junya

    2017-02-03

    Tafamidis meglumine is a novel medicine that has been shown to slow the progression of peripheral neurological impairment in patients with hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTR). However, the efficacy of tafamidis against ATTR-related cardiac amyloidosis remains unclear. A 72-year-old woman had cardiac hypertrophy and axonopathy in her lower legs. Endomyocardial biopsy revealed an infiltrative cardiomyopathy consistent with amyloidosis. Immunostaining and genetic studies confirmed the diagnosis of ATTR, and tafamidis was started subsequently. Two years after the initiation of tafamidis treatment, electromyography demonstrated no change in the axonopathy in her lower legs; however, electrocardiography displayed QRS prolongation, and echocardiography disclosed an increase in interventricular septal thickness. Endomyocardial biopsy indicated that transthyretin amyloid infiltration of the myocardium was not reduced. In this case, there was no apparent progression of axonopathy, although there were signs of worsening amyloid cardiomyopathy during the treatment with tafamidis.

  3. Dietary exposure to an environmental toxin triggers neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid deposits in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Paul Alan; Davis, David A.; Mash, Deborah C.; Metcalf, James S.; Banack, Sandra Anne

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) and β-amyloid plaques are the neurological hallmarks of both Alzheimer's disease and an unusual paralytic illness suffered by Chamorro villagers on the Pacific island of Guam. Many Chamorros with the disease suffer dementia, and in some villages one-quarter of the adults perished from the disease. Like Alzheimer's, the causal factors of Guamanian amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS/PDC) are poorly understood. In replicated experiments, we found that chronic dietary exposure to a cyanobacterial toxin present in the traditional Chamorro diet, β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), triggers the formation of both NFT and β-amyloid deposits similar in structure and density to those found in brain tissues of Chamorros who died with ALS/PDC. Vervets (Chlorocebus sabaeus) fed for 140 days with BMAA-dosed fruit developed NFT and sparse β-amyloid deposits in the brain. Co-administration of the dietary amino acid l-serine with l-BMAA significantly reduced the density of NFT. These findings indicate that while chronic exposure to the environmental toxin BMAA can trigger neurodegeneration in vulnerable individuals, increasing the amount of l-serine in the diet can reduce the risk. PMID:26791617

  4. The Kringle-like Domain Facilitates Post-endoplasmic Reticulum Changes to Premelanosome Protein (PMEL) Oligomerization and Disulfide Bond Configuration and Promotes Amyloid Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Tina; Watt, Brenda; Spruce, Lynn A.; Seeholzer, Steven H.; Marks, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    The formation of functional amyloid must be carefully regulated to prevent the accumulation of potentially toxic products. Premelanosome protein (PMEL) forms non-toxic functional amyloid fibrils that assemble into sheets upon which melanins ultimately are deposited within the melanosomes of pigment cells. PMEL is synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum but forms amyloid only within post-Golgi melanosome precursors; thus, PMEL must traverse the secretory pathway in a non-amyloid form. Here, we identified two pre-amyloid PMEL intermediates that likely regulate the timing of fibril formation. Analyses by non-reducing SDS-PAGE, size exclusion chromatography, and sedimentation velocity revealed two native high Mr disulfide-bonded species that contain Golgi-modified forms of PMEL. These species correspond to disulfide bond-containing dimeric and monomeric PMEL isoforms that contain no other proteins as judged by two-dimensional PAGE of metabolically labeled/immunoprecipitated PMEL and by mass spectrometry of affinity-purified complexes. Metabolic pulse-chase analyses, small molecule inhibitor treatments, and evaluation of site-directed mutants suggest that the PMEL dimer forms around the time of endoplasmic reticulum exit and is resolved by disulfide bond rearrangement into a monomeric form within the late Golgi or a post-Golgi compartment. Mutagenesis of individual cysteine residues within the non-amyloid cysteine-rich Kringle-like domain stabilizes the disulfide-bonded dimer and impairs fibril formation as determined by electron microscopy. Our data show that the Kringle-like domain facilitates the resolution of disulfide-bonded PMEL dimers and promotes PMEL functional amyloid formation, thereby suggesting that PMEL dimers must be resolved to monomers to generate functional amyloid fibrils. PMID:26694611

  5. Laser-induced propagation and destruction of amyloid beta fibrils.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Hisashi; Ozawa, Daisaku; Sakurai, Kazumasa; Kawakami, Toru; Kuyama, Hiroki; Nishimura, Osamu; Shimanouchi, Toshinori; Kuboi, Ryoichi; Naiki, Hironobu; Goto, Yuji

    2010-06-18

    The amyloid deposition of amyloid beta (Abeta) peptides is a critical pathological event in Alzheimer disease (AD). Preventing the formation of amyloid deposits and removing preformed fibrils in tissues are important therapeutic strategies against AD. Previously, we reported the destruction of amyloid fibrils of beta(2)-microglobulin K3 fragments by laser irradiation coupled with the binding of amyloid-specific thioflavin T. Here, we studied the effects of a laser beam on Abeta fibrils. As was the case for K3 fibrils, extensive irradiation destroyed the preformed Abeta fibrils. However, irradiation during spontaneous fibril formation resulted in only the partial destruction of growing fibrils and a subsequent explosive propagation of fibrils. The explosive propagation was caused by an increase in the number of active ends due to breakage. The results not only reveal a case of fragmentation-induced propagation of fibrils but also provide insights into therapeutic strategies for AD.

  6. Inhibition of Toxic IAPP Amyloid by Extracts of Common Fruits.

    PubMed

    Kao, Pei-Yu; Green, Evangeline; Pereira, Catalina; Ekimura, Shauna; Juarez, Dennis; Whyte, Travis; Arhar, Taylor; Malaspina, Bianca; Nogaj, Luiza A; Moffet, David A

    2015-01-01

    The aggregation of the 37-amino acid polypeptide islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP, amylin), as either insoluble amyloid or as small oligomers, appears to play a direct role in the death of pancreatic β-islet cells in type 2 diabetes. It is believed that inhibiting the aggregation of IAPP may slow down, if not prevent entirely, the progression of this disease. Extracts of thirteen different common fruits were analyzed for their ability to prevent the aggregation of amyloidogenic IAPP. Thioflavin T binding, immuno-detection and circular dichroism assays were performed to test the in vitro inhibitory potential of each extract. Atomic force microscopy was used to visualize the formation of amyloid fibrils with and without each fruit extract. Finally, extracts were tested for their ability to protect living mammalian cells from the toxic effects of amyloid IAPP. Several fruits showed substantial ability to inhibit IAPP aggregation and protect living cells from toxic IAPP amyloid.

  7. Metastable Amyloid Phases and their Conversion to Mature Fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muschol, Martin; Miti, Tatiana; Mulaj, Mentor; Schmit, Jeremy

    Self-assembly of proteins into amyloid fibrils plays a key role in both functional biological responses and pathogenic disorders which include Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Amyloid fibril assembly frequently generates compact oligomeric and curvilinear polymeric intermediates which are implicated to be toxic to cells. Yet, the relation between these early-stage oligomeric aggregates and late-stage rigid fibrils, which are the hallmark structure of amyloid plaques, has remained unclear. Our measurements indicate that lysozyme amyloid oligomers and their curvilinear fibrils only form after crossing a salt and protein concentration dependent threshold. These oligomeric aggregates are structurally distinct from rigid fibrils and are metastable against nucleation and growth of rigid fibrils. Our experimental transition boundaries match well with colloidal model predictions accounting for salt-modulated charge repulsion. We also report our preliminary findings on the mechanism by which these metastable oligomeric phases are converted into stable amyloid fibrils.

  8. Conformational dynamics of amyloid proteins at the aqueous interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armbruster, Matthew; Horst, Nathan; Aoki, Brendy; Malik, Saad; Soto, Patricia

    2013-03-01

    Amyloid proteins is a class of proteins that exhibit distinct monomeric and oligomeric conformational states hallmark of deleterious neurological diseases for which there are not yet cures. Our goal is to examine the extent of which the aqueous/membrane interface modulates the folding energy landscape of amyloid proteins. To this end, we probe the dynamic conformational ensemble of amyloids (monomer prion protein and Alzheimer's Ab protofilaments) interacting with model bilayers. We will present the results of our coarse grain molecular modeling study in terms of the existence of preferential binding spots of the amyloid to the bilayer and the response of the bilayer to the interaction with the amyloid. NSF Nebraska EPSCoR First Award

  9. Designed amyloid fibers as materials for selective carbon dioxide capture

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Deng, Hexiang; Liu, Cong; Yaghi, Omar M.; Eisenberg, David S.

    2014-01-01

    New materials capable of binding carbon dioxide are essential for addressing climate change. Here, we demonstrate that amyloids, self-assembling protein fibers, are effective for selective carbon dioxide capture. Solid-state NMR proves that amyloid fibers containing alkylamine groups reversibly bind carbon dioxide via carbamate formation. Thermodynamic and kinetic capture-and-release tests show the carbamate formation rate is fast enough to capture carbon dioxide by dynamic separation, undiminished by the presence of water, in both a natural amyloid and designed amyloids having increased carbon dioxide capacity. Heating to 100 °C regenerates the material. These results demonstrate the potential of amyloid fibers for environmental carbon dioxide capture. PMID:24367077

  10. Development of [F-18]-Labeled Amyloid Imaging Agents for PET

    SciTech Connect

    Mathis, CA

    2007-05-09

    The applicant proposes to design and synthesize a series of fluorine-18-labeled radiopharmaceuticals to be used as amyloid imaging agents for positron emission tomography (PET). The investigators will conduct comprehensive iterative in vitro and in vivo studies based upon well defined acceptance criteria in order to identify lead agents suitable for human studies. The long term goals are to apply the selected radiotracers as potential diagnostic agents of Alzheimer's disease (AD), as surrogate markers of amyloid in the brain to determine the efficacy of anti-amyloid therapeutic drugs, and as tools to help address basic scientific questions regarding the progression of the neuropathology of AD, such as testing the "amyloid cascade hypothesis" which holds that amyloid accumulation is the primary cause of AD.

  11. Exploring amyloid formation by a de novo design.

    PubMed

    Kammerer, Richard A; Kostrewa, Dirk; Zurdo, Jesús; Detken, Andreas; García-Echeverría, Carlos; Green, Janelle D; Müller, Shirley A; Meier, Beat H; Winkler, Fritz K; Dobson, Christopher M; Steinmetz, Michel O

    2004-03-30

    Protein deposition as amyloid fibrils underlies many debilitating human disorders. The complexity and size of disease-related polypeptides, however, often hinders a detailed rational approach to study effects that contribute to the process of amyloid formation. We report here a simplified peptide sequence successfully designed de novo to fold into a coiled-coil conformation under ambient conditions but to transform into amyloid fibrils at elevated temperatures. We have determined the crystal structure of the coiled-coil form and propose a detailed molecular model for the peptide in its fibrillar state. The relative stabilities of the two structural forms and the kinetics of their interconversion were found to be highly sensitive to small sequence changes. The results reveal the importance of specific packing interactions on the kinetics of amyloid formation and show the potential of this exceptionally favorable system for probing details of the molecular origins of amyloid disease.

  12. Determination of amyloid core structure using chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Skora, Lukasz; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2012-12-01

    Amyloid fibrils are the pathological hallmark of a large variety of neurodegenerative disorders. The structural characterization of amyloid fibrils, however, is challenging due to their non-crystalline, heterogeneous, and often dynamic nature. Thus, the structure of amyloid fibrils of many proteins is still unknown. We here show that the structure calculation program CS-Rosetta can be used to obtain insight into the core structure of amyloid fibrils. Driven by experimental solid-state NMR chemical shifts and taking into account the polymeric nature of fibrils CS-Rosetta allows modeling of the core of amyloid fibrils. Application to the Y145X stop mutant of the human prion protein reveals a left-handed β-helix.

  13. 10 CFR 904.10 - Excess energy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Excess energy. 904.10 Section 904.10 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE CHARGES FOR THE SALE OF POWER FROM THE BOULDER CANYON PROJECT Power Marketing § 904.10 Excess energy. (a) If excess Energy is determined by the United States to be...

  14. 10 CFR 904.10 - Excess energy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Excess energy. 904.10 Section 904.10 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE CHARGES FOR THE SALE OF POWER FROM THE BOULDER CANYON PROJECT Power Marketing § 904.10 Excess energy. (a) If excess Energy is determined by the United States to be...

  15. 7 CFR 945.44 - Excess funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Excess funds. 945.44 Section 945.44 Agriculture... Assessments § 945.44 Excess funds. (a) The funds remaining at the end of a fiscal period which are in excess... amount not to exceed approximately one fiscal period's budgeted expenses. Funds in such reserve shall...

  16. 12 CFR 1263.23 - Excess stock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Excess stock. 1263.23 Section 1263.23 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS MEMBERS OF THE BANKS Stock Requirements § 1263.23 Excess stock. (a) Sale of excess stock. Subject to the restriction in paragraph (b) of...

  17. 12 CFR 1263.23 - Excess stock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Excess stock. 1263.23 Section 1263.23 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS MEMBERS OF THE BANKS Stock Requirements § 1263.23 Excess stock. (a) Sale of excess stock. Subject to the restriction in paragraph (b) of...

  18. 12 CFR 1263.23 - Excess stock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Excess stock. 1263.23 Section 1263.23 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS MEMBERS OF THE BANKS Stock Requirements § 1263.23 Excess stock. (a) Sale of excess stock. Subject to the restriction in paragraph (b)...

  19. 12 CFR 1263.23 - Excess stock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Excess stock. 1263.23 Section 1263.23 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS MEMBERS OF THE BANKS Stock Requirements § 1263.23 Excess stock. (a) Sale of excess stock. Subject to the restriction in paragraph (b) of...

  20. 10 CFR 904.9 - Excess capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Excess capacity. 904.9 Section 904.9 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE CHARGES FOR THE SALE OF POWER FROM THE BOULDER CANYON PROJECT Power Marketing § 904.9 Excess capacity. (a) If the Uprating Program results in Excess Capacity, Western shall...

  1. 10 CFR 904.9 - Excess capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Excess capacity. 904.9 Section 904.9 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE CHARGES FOR THE SALE OF POWER FROM THE BOULDER CANYON PROJECT Power Marketing § 904.9 Excess capacity. (a) If the Uprating Program results in Excess Capacity, Western shall...

  2. 10 CFR 904.9 - Excess capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Excess capacity. 904.9 Section 904.9 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE CHARGES FOR THE SALE OF POWER FROM THE BOULDER CANYON PROJECT Power Marketing § 904.9 Excess capacity. (a) If the Uprating Program results in Excess Capacity, Western shall...

  3. 10 CFR 904.9 - Excess capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Excess capacity. 904.9 Section 904.9 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE CHARGES FOR THE SALE OF POWER FROM THE BOULDER CANYON PROJECT Power Marketing § 904.9 Excess capacity. (a) If the Uprating Program results in Excess Capacity, Western shall...

  4. 10 CFR 904.10 - Excess energy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Excess energy. 904.10 Section 904.10 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE CHARGES FOR THE SALE OF POWER FROM THE BOULDER CANYON PROJECT Power Marketing § 904.10 Excess energy. (a) If excess Energy is determined by the United States to be...

  5. 10 CFR 904.10 - Excess energy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Excess energy. 904.10 Section 904.10 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE CHARGES FOR THE SALE OF POWER FROM THE BOULDER CANYON PROJECT Power Marketing § 904.10 Excess energy. (a) If excess Energy is determined by the United States to be...

  6. 10 CFR 904.10 - Excess energy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Excess energy. 904.10 Section 904.10 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE CHARGES FOR THE SALE OF POWER FROM THE BOULDER CANYON PROJECT Power Marketing § 904.10 Excess energy. (a) If excess Energy is determined by the United States to be...

  7. 7 CFR 985.56 - Excess oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Excess oil. 985.56 Section 985.56 Agriculture... HANDLING OF SPEARMINT OIL PRODUCED IN THE FAR WEST Order Regulating Handling Volume Limitations § 985.56 Excess oil. Oil of any class in excess of a producer's applicable annual allotment shall be identified...

  8. 7 CFR 985.56 - Excess oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Excess oil. 985.56 Section 985.56 Agriculture... HANDLING OF SPEARMINT OIL PRODUCED IN THE FAR WEST Order Regulating Handling Volume Limitations § 985.56 Excess oil. Oil of any class in excess of a producer's applicable annual allotment shall be identified...

  9. 7 CFR 985.56 - Excess oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Excess oil. 985.56 Section 985.56 Agriculture... HANDLING OF SPEARMINT OIL PRODUCED IN THE FAR WEST Order Regulating Handling Volume Limitations § 985.56 Excess oil. Oil of any class in excess of a producer's applicable annual allotment shall be identified...

  10. 7 CFR 985.56 - Excess oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Excess oil. 985.56 Section 985.56 Agriculture... HANDLING OF SPEARMINT OIL PRODUCED IN THE FAR WEST Order Regulating Handling Volume Limitations § 985.56 Excess oil. Oil of any class in excess of a producer's applicable annual allotment shall be identified...

  11. 7 CFR 985.56 - Excess oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Excess oil. 985.56 Section 985.56 Agriculture... HANDLING OF SPEARMINT OIL PRODUCED IN THE FAR WEST Order Regulating Handling Volume Limitations § 985.56 Excess oil. Oil of any class in excess of a producer's applicable annual allotment shall be identified...

  12. 43 CFR 426.12 - Excess land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Excess land. 426.12 Section 426.12 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ACREAGE LIMITATION RULES AND REGULATIONS § 426.12 Excess land. (a) The process of designating excess...

  13. 43 CFR 426.12 - Excess land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Excess land. 426.12 Section 426.12 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ACREAGE LIMITATION RULES AND REGULATIONS § 426.12 Excess land. (a) The process of designating excess...

  14. 43 CFR 426.12 - Excess land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Excess land. 426.12 Section 426.12 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ACREAGE LIMITATION RULES AND REGULATIONS § 426.12 Excess land. (a) The process of designating excess...

  15. 43 CFR 426.12 - Excess land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Excess land. 426.12 Section 426.12 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ACREAGE LIMITATION RULES AND REGULATIONS § 426.12 Excess land. (a) The process of designating excess...

  16. A chemical analog of curcumin as an improved inhibitor of amyloid Abeta oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Robert A; Gonzales, Amanda M; Royer, Robert E; Deck, Lorraine M; Vander Jagt, David L

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid-like plaques are characteristic lesions defining the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The size and density of these plaques are closely associated with cognitive decline. To combat this disease, the few therapies that are available rely on drugs that increase neurotransmission; however, this approach has had limited success as it has simply slowed an imminent decline and failed to target the root cause of AD. Amyloid-like deposits result from aggregation of the Aβ peptide, and thus, reducing amyloid burden by preventing Aβ aggregation represents an attractive approach to improve the therapeutic arsenal for AD. Recent studies have shown that the natural product curcumin is capable of crossing the blood-brain barrier in the CNS in sufficient quantities so as to reduce amyloid plaque burden. Based upon this bioactivity, we hypothesized that curcumin presents molecular features that make it an excellent lead compound for the development of more effective inhibitors of Aβ aggregation. To explore this hypothesis, we screened a library of curcumin analogs and identified structural features that contribute to the anti-oligomerization activity of curcumin and its analogs. First, at least one enone group in the spacer between aryl rings is necessary for measureable anti-Aβ aggregation activity. Second, an unsaturated carbon spacer between aryl rings is essential for inhibitory activity, as none of the saturated carbon spacers showed any margin of improvement over that of native curcumin. Third, methoxyl and hydroxyl substitutions in the meta- and para-positions on the aryl rings appear necessary for some measure of improved inhibitory activity. The best lead inhibitors have either their meta- and para-substituted methoxyl and hydroxyl groups reversed from that of curcumin or methoxyl or hydroxyl groups placed in both positions. The simple substitution of the para-hydroxy group on curcumin with a methoxy substitution improved inhibitor function by 6

  17. Stability and cytotoxicity of crystallin amyloid nanofibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Manmeet; Healy, Jackie; Vasudevamurthy, Madhusudan; Lassé, Moritz; Puskar, Ljiljana; Tobin, Mark J.; Valery, Celine; Gerrard, Juliet A.; Sasso, Luigi

    2014-10-01

    Previous work has identified crystallin proteins extracted from fish eye lenses as a cheap and readily available source for the self-assembly of amyloid nanofibrils. However, before exploring potential applications, the biophysical aspects and safety of this bionanomaterial need to be assessed so as to ensure that it can be effectively and safely used. In this study, crude crystallin amyloid fibrils are shown to be stable across a wide pH range, in a number of industrially relevant solvents, at both low and high temperatures, and in the presence of proteases. Crystallin nanofibrils were compared to well characterised insulin and whey protein fibrils using Thioflavin T assays and TEM imaging. Cell cytotoxicity assays suggest no adverse impact of both mature and fragmented crystallin fibrils on cell viability of Hec-1a endometrial cells. An IR microspectroscopy study supports long-term structural integrity of crystallin nanofibrils.Previous work has identified crystallin proteins extracted from fish eye lenses as a cheap and readily available source for the self-assembly of amyloid nanofibrils. However, before exploring potential applications, the biophysical aspects and safety of this bionanomaterial need to be assessed so as to ensure that it can be effectively and safely used. In this study, crude crystallin amyloid fibrils are shown to be stable across a wide pH range, in a number of industrially relevant solvents, at both low and high temperatures, and in the presence of proteases. Crystallin nanofibrils were compared to well characterised insulin and whey protein fibrils using Thioflavin T assays and TEM imaging. Cell cytotoxicity assays suggest no adverse impact of both mature and fragmented crystallin fibrils on cell viability of Hec-1a endometrial cells. An IR microspectroscopy study supports long-term structural integrity of crystallin nanofibrils. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: ThT fluorescence graphs of buffers and solvents used for

  18. Novel aminobenzanthrone dyes for amyloid fibril detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vus, Kateryna; Trusova, Valeriya; Gorbenko, Galyna; Kirilova, Elena; Kirilov, Georgiy; Kalnina, Inta; Kinnunen, Paavo

    2012-04-01

    A series of novel fluorescent aminobenzanthrone dyes have been tested for their ability to identify and characterize the oligomeric and fibrillar aggregates of lysozyme. The parameters of the dye binding to native, oligomeric and fibrillar protein have been calculated from the results of fluorimetric titration. Furthermore, several additional quantities reflecting the preference of the probe to either pre-fibrillar or fibrillar protein aggregates, have been evaluated. Based on the comparative analysis of the recovered parameters, AM4 was recommended for selective detection of protein pre-fibrillar assemblies, while the dyes AM1, AM2, AM3 were selected as the most prospective amyloid tracers.

  19. Design and Optimization of Anti-amyloid Domain Antibodies Specific for β-Amyloid and Islet Amyloid Polypeptide*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Christine C.; Julian, Mark C.; Tiller, Kathryn E.; Meng, Fanling; DuConge, Sarah E.; Akter, Rehana; Raleigh, Daniel P.; Tessier, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies with conformational specificity are important for detecting and interfering with polypeptide aggregation linked to several human disorders. We are developing a motif-grafting approach for designing lead antibody candidates specific for amyloid-forming polypeptides such as the Alzheimer peptide (Aβ). This approach involves grafting amyloidogenic peptide segments into the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) of single-domain (VH) antibodies. Here we have investigated the impact of polar mutations inserted at the edges of a large hydrophobic Aβ42 peptide segment (Aβ residues 17–42) in CDR3 on the solubility and conformational specificity of the corresponding VH domains. We find that VH expression and solubility are strongly enhanced by introducing multiple negatively charged or asparagine residues at the edges of CDR3, whereas other polar mutations are less effective (glutamine and serine) or ineffective (threonine, lysine, and arginine). Moreover, Aβ VH domains with negatively charged CDR3 mutations show significant preference for recognizing Aβ fibrils relative to Aβ monomers, whereas the same VH domains with other polar CDR3 mutations recognize both Aβ conformers. We observe similar behavior for a VH domain grafted with a large hydrophobic peptide from islet amyloid polypeptide (residues 8–37) that contains negatively charged mutations at the edges of CDR3. These findings highlight the sensitivity of antibody binding and solubility to residues at the edges of CDRs, and provide guidelines for designing other grafted antibody fragments with hydrophobic binding loops. PMID:26601942

  20. Design and Optimization of Anti-amyloid Domain Antibodies Specific for β-Amyloid and Islet Amyloid Polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christine C; Julian, Mark C; Tiller, Kathryn E; Meng, Fanling; DuConge, Sarah E; Akter, Rehana; Raleigh, Daniel P; Tessier, Peter M

    2016-02-05

    Antibodies with conformational specificity are important for detecting and interfering with polypeptide aggregation linked to several human disorders. We are developing a motif-grafting approach for designing lead antibody candidates specific for amyloid-forming polypeptides such as the Alzheimer peptide (Aβ). This approach involves grafting amyloidogenic peptide segments into the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) of single-domain (VH) antibodies. Here we have investigated the impact of polar mutations inserted at the edges of a large hydrophobic Aβ42 peptide segment (Aβ residues 17-42) in CDR3 on the solubility and conformational specificity of the corresponding VH domains. We find that VH expression and solubility are strongly enhanced by introducing multiple negatively charged or asparagine residues at the edges of CDR3, whereas other polar mutations are less effective (glutamine and serine) or ineffective (threonine, lysine, and arginine). Moreover, Aβ VH domains with negatively charged CDR3 mutations show significant preference for recognizing Aβ fibrils relative to Aβ monomers, whereas the same VH domains with other polar CDR3 mutations recognize both Aβ conformers. We observe similar behavior for a VH domain grafted with a large hydrophobic peptide from islet amyloid polypeptide (residues 8-37) that contains negatively charged mutations at the edges of CDR3. These findings highlight the sensitivity of antibody binding and solubility to residues at the edges of CDRs, and provide guidelines for designing other grafted antibody fragments with hydrophobic binding loops.

  1. Immunization with the SDPM1 peptide lowers amyloid plaque burden and improves cognitive function in the APPswePSEN1(A246E) transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chiou-Miin; Devries, Sarah; Camboni, Marybeth; Glass, Matthew; Martin, Paul T

    2010-09-01

    Vaccination has become an important therapeutic approach to the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD), however, immunization with Abeta amyloid can have unwanted, potentially lethal, side effects. Here we demonstrate an alternative peptide-mimotope vaccine strategy using the SDPM1 peptide. SDPM1 is a 20 amino acid peptide bounded by cysteines that binds tetramer forms of Abeta(1-40)- and Abeta(1-42)-amyloids and blocks subsequent Abeta amyloid aggregation. Immunization of mice with SDPM1 induced peptide-mimotope antibodies with the same biological activity as the SDPM1 peptide. When done prior to the onset of amyloid plaque formation, SDPM1 vaccination of APPswePSEN1(A246E) transgenic mice reduced amyloid plaque burden and Abeta(1-40) and Abeta(1-42) levels in the brain, improved cognitive performance in Morris water maze tests, and resulted in no increased T cell responses to immunogenic or Abeta peptides or brain inflammation. When done after plaque burden was already significant, SDPM1 immunization still significantly reduced amyloid plaque burden and Abeta(1-40/1-42) peptide levels in APPswePSEN1(A246E) brain without inducing encephalitogenic T cell responses or brain inflammation, but treatment at this stage did not improve cognitive function. These experiments demonstrate the efficacy of a novel vaccine approach for Alzheimer's disease where immunization with an Abeta(1-40/1-42) amyloid-specific binding and blocking peptide is used to inhibit the development of neuropathology and cognitive dysfunction.

  2. Proximal weakness of the extremities as main feature of amyloid myopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Jennekens, F G; Wokke, J H

    1987-01-01

    Two patients with muscle weakness caused by amyloid myopathy are described. Characteristic features such as pseudohypertrophy and abnormal firmness, and tumours of muscles were absent. It is suggested that muscle weakness in amyloid myopathy is caused by layers of amyloid covering muscle fibres. In middle aged or elderly patients with proximal muscle weakness the diagnosis of amyloid myopathy should be considered. Images PMID:3681315

  3. Longitudinal influence of microglial activation and amyloid on neuronal function in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhen; Okello, Aren A; Brooks, David J; Edison, Paul

    2015-12-01

    's disease process with associated synaptic dysfunction and reduced glucose metabolism. Voxel-wise correlation analysis suggests that neuroinflammation is associated with localized amyloid deposition and glucose metabolism over time, however, the level of inflammation could also occur independently of amyloid pathology, especially in the later stages of Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Dynamic relationships between age, amyloid-β deposition, and glucose metabolism link to the regional vulnerability to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hwamee; Madison, Cindee; Baker, Suzanne; Rabinovici, Gil; Jagust, William

    2016-08-01

    = 10.62, P < 0.001), but, only the Pittsburgh compound B-positive cognitively normal older subjects group showed significantly higher Pittsburgh compound B retention in the highest compared to the lowest glucose metabolism regions defined in young adults (T = 2.05, P < 0.05). Regional differences in age and amyloid-β-dependent changes in glucose metabolism were found such that frontal glucose metabolism was reduced with age, while glucose metabolism in the precuneus was maintained across the lifespan (right hemisphere: F = 7.69, P < 0.001; left hemisphere: F = 8.69, P < 0.001). Greater Alzheimer's disease-related hypometabolism was observed in brain regions that showed both age-invariance and amyloid-β-related increases in glucose metabolism. Our results indicate that although early and life-long regional variation in glucose metabolism relates to the regional vulnerability to amyloid-β accumulation, Alzheimer's disease-related hypometabolism is more specific to brain regions showing age-invariant glucose metabolism and amyloid-β-related hypermetabolism.

  5. Alzheimer-related decrease in CYFIP2 links amyloid production to tau hyperphosphorylation and memory loss

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Sachin Suresh; Mizuno, Keiko; Ghosh, Anshua; Aziz, Wajeeha; Troakes, Claire; Daoud, Jason; Golash, Vidushi; Noble, Wendy; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    Characteristic features of Alzheimer’s disease are memory loss, plaques resulting from abnormal processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP), and presence of neurofibrillary tangles and dystrophic neurites containing hyperphosphorylated tau. Currently, it is not known what links these abnormalities together. Cytoplasmic FMR1 interacting protein 2 (CYFIP2) has been suggested to regulate mRNA translation at synapses and this may include local synthesis of APP and alpha-calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II, a kinase that can phosphorylate tau. Further, CYFIP2 is part of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein-family verprolin-homologous protein complex, which has been implicated in actin polymerization at synapses, a process thought to be required for memory formation. Our previous studies on p25 dysregulation put forward the hypothesis that CYFIP2 expression is reduced in Alzheimer’s disease and that this contributes to memory impairment, abnormal APP processing and tau hyperphosphorylation. Here, we tested this hypothesis. First, in post-mortem tissue CYFIP2 expression was reduced by ∼50% in severe Alzheimer’s hippocampus and superior temporal gyrus when normalized to expression of a neuronal or synaptic marker protein. Interestingly, there was also a trend for decreased expression in mild Alzheimer’s disease hippocampus. Second, CYFIP2 expression was reduced in old but not in young Tg2576 mice, a model of familial Alzheimer’s disease. Finally, we tested the direct impact of reduced CYFIP2 expression in heterozygous null mutant mice. We found that in hippocampus this reduced expression causes an increase in APP and β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) protein, but not mRNA expression, and elevates production of amyloid-β42. Reduced CYFIP2 expression also increases alpha-calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II protein expression, and this is associated with hyperphosphorylation of tau at serine-214. The reduced expression also

  6. Patients that have Undergone Hemodialysis Exhibit Lower Amyloid Deposition in the Brain: Evidence Supporting a Therapeutic Strategy for Alzheimer's Disease by Removal of Blood Amyloid.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kazuyoshi; Senda, Takao; Hata, Ryuji; Kuroda, Makoto; Hasegawa, Midori; Kato, Masao; Abe, Masato; Kawaguchi, Kazunori; Nakai, Shigeru; Hiki, Yoshiyuki; Yuzawa, Yukio; Kitaguchi, Nobuya

    2016-01-01

    As a proof of concept that removal of blood amyloid-β (Aβ) can reduce Aβ deposition in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease, cortices of patients who had undergone hemodialysis (HD), which removes Aβ from the blood, were histochemically analyzed; postmortem brain sections were stained with anti-Aβ antibodies. Brains from patients who had undergone HD had significantly fewer senile plaques than those of patient who had not undergone HD. This significant difference was also confirmed by silver staining. Our findings suggest that removal of blood Aβ by hemodialysis results in lower accumulation of Aβ in the brain.

  7. Amyloid precursor protein modulates β-catenin degradation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuzhi; Bodles, Angela M

    2007-01-01

    Background The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is genetically associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Elucidating the function of APP should help understand AD pathogenesis and provide insights into therapeutic designs against this devastating neurodegenerative disease. Results We demonstrate that APP expression in primary neurons induces β-catenin phosphorylation at Ser33, Ser37, and Thr41 (S33/37/T41) residues, which is a prerequisite for β-catenin ubiquitinylation and proteasomal degradation. APP-induced phosphorylation of β-catenin resulted in the reduction of total β-catenin levels, suggesting that APP expression promotes β-catenin degradation. In contrast, treatment of neurons with APP siRNAs increased total β-catenin levels and decreased β-catenin phosphorylation at residues S33/37/T41. Further, β-catenin was dramatically increased in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells from APP knockout animals. Acute expression of wild type APP or of familial AD APP mutants in primary neurons downregulated β-catenin in membrane and cytosolic fractions, and did not appear to affect nuclear β-catenin or β-catenin-dependent transcription. Conversely, in APP knockout CA1 pyramidal cells, accumulation of β-catenin was associated with the upregulation of cyclin D1, a downstream target of β-catenin signaling. Together, these data establish that APP downregulates β-catenin and suggest a role for APP in sustaining neuronal function by preventing cell cycle reactivation and maintaining synaptic integrity. Conclusion We have provided strong evidence that APP modulates β-catenin degradation in vitro and in vivo. Future studies may investigate whether APP processing is necessary for β-catenin downregulation, and determine if excessive APP expression contributes to AD pathogenesis through abnormal β-catenin downregulation. PMID:18070361

  8. Magnetite nanoparticle interactions with insulin amyloid fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yun-Wen; Chang, Chiung-Wen; Hung, Huey-Shan; Kung, Mei-Lang; Yeh, Bi-Wen; Hsieh, Shuchen

    2016-10-01

    Accumulation of amyloid fibrils is one of the likely key factors leading to the development of Alzheimer’s disease and other amyloidosis associated diseases. Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) have been developed as promising medical materials for many medical applications. In this study, we have explored the effects of Fe3O4 NPs on the fibrillogenesis process of insulin fibrils. When Fe3O4 NPs were co-incubated with insulin, Fe3O4 NPs had no effect on the structural transformation into amyloid-like fibrils but had higher affinity toward insulin fibrils. We demonstrated that the zeta potential of insulin fibrils and Fe3O4 NPs were both positive, suggesting the binding forces between Fe3O4 NPs and insulin fibrils were van der Waals forces but not surface charge. Moreover, a different amount of Fe3O4 NPs added had no effect on secondary structural changes of insulin fibrils. These results propose the potential use of Fe3O4 NPs as therapeutic agents against diseases related to protein aggregation or contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

  9. Functional Hydrogel Materials Inspired by Amyloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Joel

    2012-02-01

    Protein assembly resulting in the formation of amyloid fibrils, assemblies rich in cross beta-sheet structure, is normally thought of as a deleterious event associated with disease. However, amyloid formation is also involved in a diverse array of normal biological functions such as cell adhesion, melanin synthesis, insect defense mechanism and modulation of water surface tension by fungi and bacteria. These findings indicate that Nature has evolved to take advantage of large, proteinaceous fibrillar assemblies to elicit function. We are designing functional materials, namely hydrogels, from peptides that self-assembled into fibrillar networks, rich in cross beta-sheet structure. These gels can be used for the direct encapsulation and delivery of small molecule-, protein- and cell-based therapeutics. Loaded gels exhibit shear-thinning/self-healing mechanical properties enabling their delivery via syringe. In addition to their use for delivery, we have found that some of these gels display antibacterial activity. Although cytocompatible towards mammalian cells, the hydrogels can kill a broad spectrum of bacteria on contact.

  10. Mammalian prion amyloid formation in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Bruno; Cordeiro, Yraima; Ventura, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mammalian prion proteins (PrPs) that cause transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are misfolded conformations of the host cellular PrP. The misfolded form, the scrapie PrP (PrPSc), can aggregate into amyloid fibrils that progressively accumulate in the brain, evolving to a pathological phenotype. A particular characteristic of PrPSc is to be found as different strains, related to the diversity of conformational states it can adopt. Prion strains are responsible for the multiple phenotypes observed in prion diseases, presenting different incubation times and diverse deposition profiles in the brain. PrP biochemical properties are also strain-dependent, such as different digestion pattern after proteolysis and different stability. Although they have long been studied, strain formation is still a major unsolved issue in prion biology. The recreation of strain-specific conformational features is of fundamental importance to study this unique pathogenic phenomenon. In our recent paper, we described that murine PrP, when expressed in bacteria, forms amyloid inclusion bodies that possess different strain-like characteristics, depending on the PrP construct. Here, we present an extra-view of these data and propose that bacteria might become a successful model to generate preparative amounts of prion strain-specific assemblies for high-resolution structural analysis as well as for addressing the determinants of infectivity and transmissibility. PMID:26910379

  11. Cutaneous Manifestations of Familial Transthyretin Amyloid Polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Lanoue, Julien; Wei, Nancy; Gorevic, Peter; Phelps, Robert G

    2016-10-01

    Familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) is a rare inherited autosomal dominant form of systemic amyloidosis, which classically presents with severe motor, sensory, and autonomic dysfunction. Cutaneous involvement does not become clinically apparent until late stage symptomatic disease and is rarely reported in modern literature. Here, the authors review the clinical and histologic cutaneous findings of FAP previously described in the literature and report on 3 patients with unique genetic mutations (Thr60Ala and Gly6Ser; Trp41Leu; Glu89Gln) for which cutaneous involvement has not previously been described. Histologically, our patients showed variable amyloid deposition in the subcutaneous adipose tissue, papillary dermis, and dermal blood vessel walls. A review of the literature suggests cutaneous transthyretin deposition is an underrecognized feature of FAP that occurs early on in disease, even before neural involvement and related symptoms as seen in one of our patients. As such, a cutaneous punch biopsy can serve as quick, easy, and relatively noninvasive diagnostic tool in suspected cases.

  12. Three-dimensional structures of the amyloid beta peptide (25-35) in membrane-mimicking environment.

    PubMed

    Kohno, T; Kobayashi, K; Maeda, T; Sato, K; Takashima, A

    1996-12-17

    The three-dimensional structure of amyloid beta peptide (25-35), which has neurotoxic activity, in lithium dodecyl sulfate micelles was determined by two-dimensional 1H NMR spectroscopy with simulated annealing calculations. A total of 20 converged amyloid beta peptide structures were obtained on the basis of 110 experimental constraints, including 106 distance constraints reduced from the nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) connectivities and four torsion angle (phi) constraints. The atomic root mean square difference about averaged coordinates is 1.04 +/- 0.25 A for the backbone atoms (N, C alpha, C) and 1.39 +/- 0.27 A for all heavy atoms of the entire peptide. The molecular structure of amyloid beta peptide in membrane-mimicking environment is composed of a short alpha helix in the C terminal position. The three residues from the N-terminus are disordered, but the remaining eight C-terminal residues are well-ordered, which is supported by the RMSD values of the C-terminal region, Lys28-Leu34. In this region, the RMS differences from averaged coordinates are 0.26 +/- 0.11 A for the backbone atoms (N, C alpha, C) and 0.77 +/- 0.21 A for all heavy atoms, which is very low compared with those for the entire peptide. The four amino acid residues from the N-terminus are hydrophilic and the other seven amino acid residues in C-terminus are hydrophobic. So, our results show that the C-terminal region of amyloid beta peptide (25-35) is buried in the membrane and assumes alpha-helical structure, whereas the N-terminal region is exposed to the solvent with a flexible structure. This structure is very similar to membrane-mediated structure of substance P previously reported. The three-dimensional structure of a non-neurotoxic mutant of amyloid beta peptide (25-35), where Asn27 is replaced by Ala, in lithium dodecyl sulfate micelles was also determined. The structure is similar to that of the wild type amyloid beta peptide (25-35) in the C-terminal region, but the N

  13. Life cycle of yeast prions: propagation mediated by amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yuji

    2009-01-01

    Currently, prion phenomena have been detected in various organisms, in addition to mammals affected by transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, various proteins have prion properties and adopt atypical phenotypes as genetic elements, such as the Sup35 and Ure2 proteins, corresponding to the [PSI+] and [URE3] phenotypes, respectively. Each yeast prion protein has a prion-forming region rich in glutamines and/or asparagines, and can form amyloid fibrils in its prion conformation. Studies on yeast prions have revealed that the amyloid fibrils play critical roles in the life cycle of the yeast prion. First, the amyloid fibril binds the normal prion protein and catalyzes a structural conversion into the abnormal form, the key event of the prion phenomenon. Second, the amyloid fibril is related to the strain differences of the prion phenotypes, by its substructural differences. Third, the number of prion elements multiplies by the fragmentation of amyloid fibrils, which is mediated by a chaperone system in which Hsp104 plays a central role, and the prion elements are distributed to the daughter cells during cell division. Moreover, heterologous prion-prion communications may occur, probably by cross-seeding of amyloid fibrils among different prion proteins in the same yeast cell. Findings achieved by yeast prion studies are making great contributions toward understanding the characteristics of amyloid fibrils and prions.

  14. Using bacterial inclusion bodies to screen for amyloid aggregation inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The amyloid-β peptide (Aβ42) is the main component of the inter-neuronal amyloid plaques characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The mechanism by which Aβ42 and other amyloid peptides assemble into insoluble neurotoxic deposits is still not completely understood and multiple factors have been reported to trigger their formation. In particular, the presence of endogenous metal ions has been linked to the pathogenesis of AD and other neurodegenerative disorders. Results Here we describe a rapid and high-throughput screening method to identify molecules able to modulate amyloid aggregation. The approach exploits the inclusion bodies (IBs) formed by Aβ42 when expressed in bacteria. We have shown previously that these aggregates retain amyloid structural and functional properties. In the present work, we demonstrate that their in vitro refolding is selectively sensitive to the presence of aggregation-promoting metal ions, allowing the detection of inhibitors of metal-promoted amyloid aggregation with potential therapeutic interest. Conclusions Because IBs can be produced at high levels and easily purified, the method overcomes one of the main limitations in screens to detect amyloid modulators: the use of expensive and usually highly insoluble synthetic peptides. PMID:22553999

  15. Self-assembled amyloid fibrils with controllable conformational heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gyudo; Lee, Wonseok; Lee, Hyungbeen; Lee, Chang Young; Eom, Kilho; Kwon, Taeyun

    2015-11-01

    Amyloid fibrils are a hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases and exhibit a conformational diversity that governs their pathological functions. Despite recent findings concerning the pathological role of their conformational diversity, the way in which the heterogeneous conformations of amyloid fibrils can be formed has remained elusive. Here, we show that microwave-assisted chemistry affects the self-assembly process of amyloid fibril formation, which results in their conformational heterogeneity. In particular, microwave-assisted chemistry allows for delicate control of the thermodynamics of the self-assembly process, which enabled us to tune the molecular structure of β-lactoglobulin amyloid fibrils. The heterogeneous conformations of amyloid fibrils, which can be tuned with microwave-assisted chemistry, are attributed to the microwave-driven thermal energy affecting the electrostatic interaction during the self-assembly process. Our study demonstrates how microwave-assisted chemistry can be used to gain insight into the origin of conformational heterogeneity of amyloid fibrils as well as the design principles showing how the molecular structures of amyloid fibrils can be controlled.

  16. Recommended treatment strategies for patients with excessive daytime sleepiness.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Russell P

    2015-10-01

    Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is a common and bothersome phenomenon. It can be associated with insufficient sleep syndrome, narcolepsy, idiopathic hypersomnia, obstructive sleep apnea, shift work disorder, Kleine-Levin syndrome, or Parkinson's disease. Once the underlying cause of the excessive sleepiness is determined, clinicians must select the most appropriate behavioral and pharmacologic interventions to reduce daytime sleepiness, alleviate other symptoms, improve functioning, and ensure the safety of patients and those around them. Patient history, adverse effects, and efficacy in specific conditions should be considered in pharmacologic treatment options for patients with EDS.

  17. The roles of amyloid precursor protein (APP) in neurogenesis: Implications to pathogenesis and therapy of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhi-dong; Chan, Christine Hui-shan; Ma, Quan-hong; Xu, Xiao-hong; Xiao, Zhi-cheng; Tan, Eng-king

    2011-01-01

    The amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide is the derivative of amyloid precursor protein (APP) generated through sequential proteolytic processing by β- and γ-secretases. Excessive accumulation of Aβ, the main constituent of amyloid plaques, has been implicated in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). It was found recently that the impairments of neurogenesis in brain were associated with the pathogenesis of AD. Furthermore recent findings implicated that APP could function to influence proliferation of neural progenitor cells (NPC) and might regulate transcriptional activity of various genes. Studies demonstrated that influence of neurogenesis by APP is conferred differently via its two separate domains, soluble secreted APPs (sAPPs, mainly sAPPα) and APP intracellular domain (AICD). The sAPPα was shown to be neuroprotective and important to neurogenesis, whereas AICD was found to negatively modulate neurogenesis. Furthermore, it was demonstrated recently that microRNA could function to regulate APP expression, APP processing, Aβ accumulation and subsequently influence neurotoxicity and neurogenesis related to APP, which was implicated to AD pathogenesis, especially for sporadic AD. Based on data accumulated, secretase balances were proposed. These secretase balances could influence the downstream balance related to regulation of neurogenesis by AICD and sAPPα as well as balance related to influence of neuron viability by Aβ and sAPPα. Disruption of these secretase balances could be culprits to AD onset.

  18. Plasma β-amyloid in Alzheimer’s disease and vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Janelidze, Shorena; Stomrud, Erik; Palmqvist, Sebastian; Zetterberg, Henrik; van Westen, Danielle; Jeromin, Andreas; Song, Linan; Hanlon, David; Tan Hehir, Cristina A.; Baker, David; Blennow, Kaj; Hansson, Oskar

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of amyloid biomarkers in clinical practice would be accelerated if such biomarkers could be measured in blood. We analyzed plasma levels of Aβ42 and Aβ40 in a cohort of 719 individuals (the Swedish BioFINDER study), including patients with subjective cognitive decline (SCD), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), Alzheimer’s disease (AD) dementia and cognitively healthy elderly, using a ultrasensitive immunoassay (Simoa platform). There were weak positive correlations between plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels for both Aβ42 and Aβ40, and negative correlations between plasma Aβ42 and neocortical amyloid deposition (measured with PET). Plasma levels of Aβ42 and Aβ40 were reduced in AD dementia compared with all other diagnostic groups. However, during the preclinical or prodromal AD stages (i.e. in amyloid positive controls, SCD and MCI) plasma concentration of Aβ42 was just moderately decreased whereas Aβ40 levels were unchanged. Higher plasma (but not CSF) levels of Aβ were associated with white matter lesions, cerebral microbleeds, hypertension, diabetes and ischemic heart disease. In summary, plasma Aβ is overtly decreased during the dementia stage of AD indicating that prominent changes in Aβ metabolism occur later in the periphery compared to the brain. Further, increased levels of Aβ in plasma are associated with vascular disease. PMID:27241045

  19. Tetracycline and its analogues protect Caenorhabditis elegans from β amyloid-induced toxicity by targeting oligomers.

    PubMed

    Diomede, Luisa; Cassata, Giuseppe; Fiordaliso, Fabio; Salio, Monica; Ami, Diletta; Natalello, Antonino; Doglia, Silvia Maria; De Luigi, Ada; Salmona, Mario

    2010-11-01

    The accumulation and deposition of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide in extracellular dense plaques in the brain is a key phase in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Small oligomeric forms of Aβ are responsible for the toxicity and the early cognitive impairment observed in patients before the amyloid plaque deposits appear. It is essential for the development of an efficient cure for AD to identify compounds that interfere with Aβ aggregation, counteracting the molecular mechanisms involved in conversion of the monomeric amyloid protein into oligomeric and fibrillar forms. Tetracyclines have been proposed for AD therapy, although their effects on the aggregation of Aβ protein, particularly their ability to interact in vivo with the Aβ oligomers and/or aggregates, remain to be understood. Using transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans as a simplified invertebrate model of AD, we evaluated the ability of tetracyclines to interfere with the sequence of events leading to Aβ proteotoxicity. The drugs directly interact with the Aβ assemblies in vivo and reduce Aβ oligomer deposition, protecting C. elegans from oxidative stress and the onset of the paralysis phenotype. These effects were specific, dose-related and not linked to any antibiotic activity, suggesting that the drugs might offer an effective therapeutic strategy to target soluble Aβ aggregates.

  20. Amyloid Plaques in PSAPP Mice Bind Less Metal than Plaques in Human Alzheimer's Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Leskovjan, A.; Lanzirotti, A; Miller, L

    2009-01-01

    Amyloid beta (A{Beta}) is the primary component of Alzheimer's disease (AD) plaques, a key pathological feature of the disease. Metal ions of zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), and calcium (Ca) are elevated in human amyloid plaques and are thought to be involved in neurodegeneration. Transgenic mouse models of AD also exhibit amyloid plaques, but fail to exhibit the high degree of neurodegeneration observed in humans. In this study, we imaged the Zn, Cu, Fe, and Ca ion distribution in the PSAPP transgenic mouse model representing end-stage AD (N = 6) using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microprobe. In order to account for differences in density in the plaques, the relative protein content was imaged with synchrotron Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM) on the same samples. FTIRM results revealed a 61% increase in protein content in the plaques compared to the surrounding tissue. After normalizing to protein density, we found that the PSAPP plaques contained only a 29% increase in Zn and there was actually less Cu, Fe, and Ca in the plaque compared to the surrounding tissue. Since metal binding to A{beta} is thought to induce redox chemistry that is toxic to neurons, the reduced metal binding in PSAPP mice is consistent with the lack of neurodegeneration in these animals. These findings were in stark contrast to the high metal ion content observed in human AD plaques, further implicating the role of metal ions in human AD pathology.

  1. From synaptic spines to nuclear signaling: nuclear and synaptic actions of the amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Octave, Jean-Noël; Pierrot, Nathalie; Ferao Santos, Susana; Nalivaeva, Natalia N; Turner, Anthony J

    2013-07-01

    Despite intensive studies of the secretase-mediated processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) to form the amyloid β-peptide (Aβ), in relation to Alzheimer's disease (AD), no new therapeutic agents have reached the clinics based on reducing Aβ levels through the use of secretase inhibitors or immunotherapy. Furthermore, the normal neuronal functions of APP and its various metabolites still remain under-investigated and unclear. Here, we highlight emerging areas of APP function that may provide new insights into synaptic development, cognition, and gene regulation. By modulating expression levels of endogenous APP in primary cortical neurons, the frequency and amplitude of calcium oscillations is modified, implying a key role for APP in maintaining neuronal calcium homeostasis essential for synaptic transmission. Disruption of this homeostatic mechanism predisposes to aging and AD. Synaptic spine loss is a feature of neurogeneration resulting in learning and memory deficits, and emerging evidence indicates a role for APP, probably mediated via one or more of its metabolites, in spine structure and functions. The intracellular domain of APP (AICD) has also emerged as a key epigenetic regulator of gene expression controlling a diverse range of genes, including APP itself, the amyloid-degrading enzyme neprilysin, and aquaporin-1. A fuller understanding of the physiological and pathological actions of APP and its metabolic network could provide new opportunities for therapeutic intervention in AD.

  2. Mechanical deformation mechanisms and properties of amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bumjoon; Yoon, Gwonchan; Lee, Sang Woo; Eom, Kilho

    2015-01-14

    Amyloid fibrils have recently received attention due to their remarkable mechanical properties, which are highly correlated with their biological functions. We have studied the mechanical deformation mechanisms and properties of amyloid fibrils as a function of their length scales by using atomistic simulations. It is shown that the length of amyloid fibrils plays a role in their deformation and fracture mechanisms in such a way that the competition between shear and bending deformations is highly dependent on the fibril length, and that as the fibril length increases, so does the bending strength of the fibril while its shear strength decreases. The dependence of rupture force for amyloid fibrils on their length is elucidated using the Bell model, which suggests that the rupture force of the fibril is determined from the hydrogen bond rupture mechanism that critically depends on the fibril length. We have measured the toughness of amyloid fibrils, which is shown to depend on the fibril length. In particular, the toughness of the fibril with its length of ∼3 nm is estimated to be ∼30 kcal mol(-1) nm(-3), comparable to that of a spider silk crystal with its length of ∼2 nm. Moreover, we have shown the important effect of the pulling rate on the mechanical deformation mechanisms and properties of amyloid fibril. It is found that as the pulling rate increases, so does the contribution of the shear effect to the elastic deformation of the amyloid fibril with its length of <10 nm. However, we found that the deformation mechanism of the amyloid fibril with its length of >15 nm is almost independent of the pulling rate. Our study sheds light on the role of the length scale of amyloid fibrils and the pulling rate in their mechanical behaviors and properties, which may provide insights into how the excellent mechanical properties of protein fibrils can be determined.

  3. Androgen excess: Investigations and management.

    PubMed

    Lizneva, Daria; Gavrilova-Jordan, Larisa; Walker, Walidah; Azziz, Ricardo

    2016-11-01

    Androgen excess (AE) is a key feature of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and results in, or contributes to, the clinical phenotype of these patients. Although AE will contribute to the ovulatory and menstrual dysfunction of these patients, the most recognizable sign of AE includes hirsutism, acne, and androgenic alopecia or female pattern hair loss (FPHL). Evaluation includes not only scoring facial and body terminal hair growth using the modified Ferriman-Gallwey method but also recording and possibly scoring acne and alopecia. Moreover, assessment of biochemical hyperandrogenism is necessary, particularly in patients with unclear or absent hirsutism, and will include assessing total and free testosterone (T), and possibly dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) and androstenedione, although these latter contribute limitedly to the diagnosis. Assessment of T requires use of the highest quality assays available, generally radioimmunoassays with extraction and chromatography or mass spectrometry preceded by liquid or gas chromatography. Management of clinical hyperandrogenism involves primarily either androgen suppression, with a hormonal combination contraceptive, or androgen blockade, as with an androgen receptor blocker or a 5α-reductase inhibitor, or a combination of the two. Medical treatment should be combined with cosmetic treatment including topical eflornithine hydrochloride and short-term (shaving, chemical depilation, plucking, threading, waxing, and bleaching) and long-term (electrolysis, laser therapy, and intense pulse light therapy) cosmetic treatments. Generally, acne responds to therapy relatively rapidly, whereas hirsutism is slower to respond, with improvements observed as early as 3 months, but routinely only after 6 or 8 months of therapy. Finally, FPHL is the slowest to respond to therapy, if it will at all, and it may take 12 to 18 months of therapy for an observable response.

  4. Vergence adaptation in subjects with convergence excess.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Maria; Brautaset, Rune L

    2011-03-01

    The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the vergence adaptive ability in subjects diagnosed with convergence excess (CE) phoria (ie, subjects with an esophoric shift from distance to near but without an intermittent tropia at near). Vergence adaptation was measured at far and near with both base-in and base-out prisms using a "flashed" Maddox rod technique in 20 control subjects and 16 subjects with CE. In addition, accommodative adaptation and the stimulus AC/A and CA/C cross-links were measured. The AC/A and CA/C ratios were found to be high and low, respectively, and accommodative adaptation was found to be reduced in CE subjects as compared with the controls (P<0.005), all as predicted by the present theory. However, vergence adaptive ability was found to be reduced in the CE subjects at both distance and near and in response to both base-in and base-out prisms (P=0.002). This finding is not in accordance with and is difficult to reconcile with the present theory of CE.

  5. Altered autonomic inputs as a cause of pancreatic β-cell amyloid.

    PubMed

    Watve, Milind; Bodas, Arushi; Diwekar, Manawa

    2014-01-01

    A partial loss of β-cell mass and β-cell dysfunction in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) is associated with amyloid deposition but whether it is causal or consequential is debated. Although the in vitro polymerization of amylin has been studied in detail, the exact trigger for the mechanism in vivo has not been identified. One suggestion is that an increased load on β-cells results in inefficient handling of proteins leading to misfolding and aggregation, but this hypothesis is faced with certain paradoxes. We suggest an alternative mechanism based on the assumption that polymerization is a spontaneous process. The concentration of the polypeptide in β-cell granules is shown to be sufficient to allow polymerization. However if the rate of turnover in normal cells is greater than the rate of polymerization, amyloid deposition will not be observed. If this is true, it follows that amyloid deposition could be a result of increased retention time of amylin in the β-cell granules. In T2D, the sympathetic inputs are known to increase which could result in suppression of the secretion process. The increase in the retention time due to this suppression can allow polymerization. In addition to this in a prediabetic state parasympathetic stimulation increases β-cell proliferation. This reduces the insulin demand per cell thereby increasing the mean retention time. Thus a combination of contrasting actions of sympathetic and parasympathetic systems could lead to increase in the amyloid deposition. We suggest testable predictions of the alternative hypotheses and the lines of research needed to test them.

  6. Nitrous oxide plus isoflurane induces apoptosis and increases β-amyloid protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Yu; Dong, Yuanlin; Wu, Xu; Xu, Zhipeng; Lu, Yan; Zhang, Yiying; Norton, David; Tian, Ming; Li, Shuren; Xie, Zhongcong

    2009-01-01

    Background Some anesthetics have been suggested to induce neurotoxicity including promotion of Alzheimer’s disease neuropathogenesis. Nitrous oxide and isoflurane are common anesthetics. Here, we set out to assess effects of nitrous oxide and/or isoflurane on apoptosis and β-amyloid (Aβ) levels in H4 human neuroglioma cells and primary neurons from naïve mice. Methods The cells or neurons were exposed to 70% nitrous oxide and/or 1% isoflurane for six hours. The cells or neurons and conditioned media were harvested at the end of the treatment. Caspase-3 activation, apoptosis, processing of amyloid precursor protein, and Aβ levels were determined. Results Treatment with a combination of 70% nitrous oxide and 1% isoflurane for six hours induced caspase-3 activation and apoptosis in H4 naïve cells and primary neurons from naïve mice. The 70% nitrous oxide plus 1% isoflurane, but neither alone, for six hours induced caspase-3 activation and apoptosis, and increased levels of β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme and Aβ in H4-amyloid precursor protein cells. In addition, the nitrous oxide plus isoflurane-induced Aβ generation was reduced by a broad caspase inhibitor Z-VAD. Finally, the nitrous oxide plus isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation was attenuated by γ-secretase inhibitor L-685,458, but potentiated by exogenously added Aβ. Conclusion These results suggest that common anesthetics nitrous oxide plus isoflurane may promote neurotoxicity by inducing apoptosis and increasing Aβ levels. The generated Aβ may further potentiate apoptosis to form another round of apoptosis and Aβ generation. More studies, especially the in vivo confirmation of these in vitro findings, are needed. PMID:19741497

  7. Serum amyloid A impairs the antiinflammatory properties of HDL

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chang Yeop; Tang, Chongren; Guevara, Myriam E.; Wei, Hao; Wietecha, Tomasz; Shao, Baohai; Subramanian, Savitha; Omer, Mohamed; Wang, Shari; O’Brien, Kevin D.; Marcovina, Santica M.; Wight, Thomas N.; Vaisar, Tomas; de Beer, Maria C.; de Beer, Frederick C.; Osborne, William R.; Elkon, Keith B.; Chait, Alan

    2015-01-01

    HDL from healthy humans and lean mice inhibits palmitate-induced adipocyte inflammation; however, the effect of the inflammatory state on the functional properties of HDL on adipocytes is unknown. Here, we found that HDL from mice injected with AgNO3 fails to inhibit palmitate-induced inflammation and reduces cholesterol efflux from 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Moreover, HDL isolated from obese mice with moderate inflammation and humans with systemic lupus erythematosus had similar effects. Since serum amyloid A (SAA) concentrations in HDL increase with inflammation, we investigated whether elevated SAA is a causal factor in HDL dysfunction. HDL from AgNO3-injected mice lacking Saa1.1 and Saa2.1 exhibited a partial restoration of antiinflammatory and cholesterol efflux properties in adipocytes. Conversely, incorporation of SAA into HDL preparations reduced antiinflammatory properties but not to the same extent as HDL from AgNO3-injected mice. SAA-enriched HDL colocalized with cell surface–associated extracellular matrix (ECM) of adipocytes, suggesting impaired access to the plasma membrane. Enzymatic digestion of proteoglycans in the ECM restored the ability of SAA-containing HDL to inhibit palmitate-induced inflammation and cholesterol efflux. Collectively, these findings indicate that inflammation results in a loss of the antiinflammatory properties of HDL on adipocytes, which appears to partially result from the SAA component of HDL binding to cell-surface proteoglycans, thereby preventing access of HDL to the plasma membrane. PMID:26642365

  8. Experimental Manipulation of the Microbial Functional Amyloid Called Curli

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yizhou; Smith, Daniel R.; Hufnagel, David A.; Chapman, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    Curli are proteinaceous fibrous structures produced on the surface of many gram-negative bacteria. As a major constituent of the extracellular matrix, curli mediate interactions between the bacteria and its environment, and as such, curli play a critical role in bio film formation. Curli fibers share biophysical properties with a growing number of remarkably stable and ordered protein aggregates called amyloid. Here we describe experimental methods to study the biogenesis and assembly of curli by exploiting their amyloid properties. We also present methods to analyze curli-mediated biofilm formation. These approaches are straightforward and can easily be adapted to study other bacterially produced amyloids. PMID:23299728

  9. Self-folding and aggregation of amyloid nanofibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paparcone, Raffaella; Cranford, Steven W.; Buehler, Markus J.

    2011-04-01

    Amyloids are highly organized protein filaments, rich in β-sheet secondary structures that self-assemble to form dense plaques in brain tissues affected by severe neurodegenerative disorders (e.g. Alzheimer's Disease). Identified as natural functional materials in bacteria, in addition to their remarkable mechanical properties, amyloids have also been proposed as a platform for novel biomaterials in nanotechnology applications including nanowires, liquid crystals, scaffolds and thin films. Despite recent progress in understanding amyloid structure and behavior, the latent self-assembly mechanism and the underlying adhesion forces that drive the aggregation process remain poorly understood. On the basis of previous full atomistic simulations, here we report a simple coarse-grain model to analyze the competition between adhesive forces and elastic deformation of amyloid fibrils. We use simple model system to investigate self-assembly mechanisms of fibrils, focused on the formation of self-folded nanorackets and nanorings, and thereby address a critical issue in linking the biochemical (Angstrom) to micrometre scales relevant for larger-scale states of functional amyloid materials. We investigate the effect of varying the interfibril adhesion energy on the structure and stability of self-folded nanorackets and nanorings and demonstrate that these aggregated amyloid fibrils are stable in such states even when the fibril-fibril interaction is relatively weak, given that the constituting amyloid fibril length exceeds a critical fibril length-scale of several hundred nanometres. We further present a simple approach to directly determine the interfibril adhesion strength from geometric measures. In addition to providing insight into the physics of aggregation of amyloid fibrils our model enables the analysis of large-scale amyloid plaques and presents a new method for the estimation and engineering of the adhesive forces responsible of the self-assembly process of

  10. The Cerebrovascular Basement Membrane: Role in the Clearance of β-amyloid and Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Alan W. J.; Carare, Roxana O.; Schreiber, Stefanie; Hawkes, Cheryl A.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), the accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides in the walls of cerebral blood vessels, is observed in the majority of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brains and is thought to be due to a failure of the aging brain to clear Aβ. Perivascular drainage of Aβ along cerebrovascular basement membranes (CVBMs) is one of the mechanisms by which Aβ is removed from the brain. CVBMs are specialized sheets of extracellular matrix that provide structural and functional support for cerebral blood vessels. Changes in CVBM composition and structure are observed in the aged and AD brain and may contribute to the development and progression of CAA. This review summarizes the properties of the CVBM, its role in mediating clearance of interstitial fluids and solutes from the brain, and evidence supporting a role for CVBM in the etiology of CAA. PMID:25285078

  11. The Amyloid Precursor Protein Forms Plasmalemmal Clusters via Its Pathogenic Amyloid-β Domain

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Arne; Fischer, Sebastian; Lang, Thorsten

    2012-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a large, ubiquitous integral membrane protein with a small amyloid-β (Aβ) domain. In the human brain, endosomal processing of APP produces neurotoxic Aβ-peptides, which are involved in Alzheimer's disease. Here, we show that the Aβ sequence exerts a physiological function when still present in the unprocessed APP molecule. From the extracellular site, Aβ concentrates APP molecules into plasmalemmal membrane protein clusters. Moreover, Aβ stabilization of clusters is a prerequisite for their targeting to endocytic clathrin structures. Therefore, we conclude that the Aβ domain directly mediates a central step in APP trafficking, driving its own conversion into neurotoxic peptides. PMID:22455924

  12. Eugenol prevents amyloid formation of proteins and inhibits amyloid-induced hemolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Kriti; Anand, Bibin G.; Shekhawat, Dolat Singh; Kar, Karunakar

    2017-02-01

    Eugenol has attracted considerable attention because of its potential for many pharmaceutical applications including anti-inflammatory, anti-tumorigenic and anti-oxidant properties. Here, we have investigated the effect of eugenol on amyloid formation of selected globular proteins. We find that both spontaneous and seed-induced aggregation processes of insulin and serum albumin (BSA) are significantly suppressed in the presence of eugenol. Isothermal titration calorimetric data predict a single binding site for eugenol-insulin complex confirming the affinity of eugenol for native soluble insulin species. We also find that eugenol suppresses amyloid-induced hemolysis. Our findings reveal the inherent ability of eugenol to stabilize native proteins and to delay the conversion of protein species of native conformation into β-sheet assembled mature fibrils, which seems to be crucial for its inhibitory effect.

  13. Eugenol prevents amyloid formation of proteins and inhibits amyloid-induced hemolysis

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Kriti; Anand, Bibin G.; Shekhawat, Dolat Singh; Kar, Karunakar

    2017-01-01

    Eugenol has attracted considerable attention because of its potential for many pharmaceutical applications including anti-inflammatory, anti-tumorigenic and anti-oxidant properties. Here, we have investigated the effect of eugenol on amyloid formation of selected globular proteins. We find that both spontaneous and seed-induced aggregation processes of insulin and serum albumin (BSA) are significantly suppressed in the presence of eugenol. Isothermal titration calorimetric data predict a single binding site for eugenol-insulin complex confirming the affinity of eugenol for native soluble insulin species. We also find that eugenol suppresses amyloid-induced hemolysis. Our findings reveal the inherent ability of eugenol to stabilize native proteins and to delay the conversion of protein species of native conformation into β-sheet assembled mature fibrils, which seems to be crucial for its inhibitory effect. PMID:28145454

  14. Cerebrospinal Fluid Anti-Amyloid-β Autoantibodies and Amyloid PET in Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy-Related Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Carmona-Iragui, María; Fernández-Arcos, Ana; Alcolea, Daniel; Piazza, Fabrizio; Morenas-Rodriguez, Estrella; Antón-Aguirre, Sofía; Sala, Isabel; Clarimon, Jordi; Dols-Icardo, Oriol; Camacho, Valle; Sampedro, Frederic; Munuera, Josep; Nuñez-Marin, Fidel; Lleó, Alberto; Fortea, Juan; Gómez-Ansón, Beatriz; Blesa, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    We report a biomarker and genetic evaluation of four patients with cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation (CAA-ri) treated with corticosteroids. Patients presented with focal symptomatology and cognitive impairment. MRI revealed cortical microbleeds and asymmetrical hyperintense white matter lesions (WML). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker analyses showed increased anti-Aβ autoantibodies, t-Tau, and p-Tau and decreased Aβ40 and Aβ42. After treatment, focal symptomatology disappeared, and WML and anti-Aβ autoantibodies decreased. The APOEɛ4 allele was overrepresented. Florbetapir-PET showed cortical deposition with lower retention in swollen areas. In the case of suspected CAA-ri, both CSF anti-Aβ autoantibodies levels and Florbetapir-PET could provide highly useful data to guide the correct diagnosis.

  15. Cerebral vascular amyloid seeds drive amyloid β-protein fibril assembly with a distinct anti-parallel structure

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Fu, Ziao; Dass, Sharmila; Kotarba, AnnMarie E.; Davis, Judianne; Smith, Steven O.; Van Nostrand, William E.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrovascular accumulation of amyloid β-protein (Aβ), a condition known as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), is a common pathological feature of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Familial Aβ mutations, such as Dutch-E22Q and Iowa-D23N, can cause severe cerebrovascular accumulation of amyloid that serves as a potent driver of vascular cognitive impairment and dementia. The distinctive features of vascular amyloid that underlie its unique pathological properties remain unknown. Here, we use transgenic mouse models producing CAA mutants (Tg-SwDI) or overproducing human wild-type Aβ (Tg2576) to demonstrate that CAA-mutant vascular amyloid influences wild-type Aβ deposition in brain. We also show isolated microvascular amyloid seeds from Tg-SwDI mice drive assembly of human wild-type Aβ into distinct anti-parallel β-sheet fibrils. These findings indicate that cerebrovascular amyloid can serve as an effective scaffold to promote rapid assembly and strong deposition of Aβ into a unique structure that likely contributes to its distinctive pathology. PMID:27869115

  16. The beta-amyloid domain is essential for axonal sorting of amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed Central

    Tienari, P J; De Strooper, B; Ikonen, E; Simons, M; Weidemann, A; Czech, C; Hartmann, T; Ida, N; Multhaup, G; Masters, C L; Van Leuven, F; Beyreuther, K; Dotti, C G

    1996-01-01

    We have analysed the axonal sorting signals of amyloid precursor protein (APP). Wild-type and mutant versions of human APP were expressed in hippocampal neurons using the Semliki forest virus system. We show that wild-type APP and mutations implicated in Alzheimer's disease and another brain beta-amyloidosis are sorted to the axon. By analysis of deletion mutants we found that the membrane-inserted APP ectodomain but not the cytoplasmic tail is required for axonal sorting. Systematic deletions of the APP ectodomain identified two regions required for axonal delivery: one encoded by exons 11-15 in the carbohydrate domain, the other encoded by exons 16-17 in the juxtamembraneous beta-amyloid domain. Treatment of the cells with the N-glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin induced missorting of wild-type APP, supporting the importance of glycosylation in axonal sorting of APP. The data revealed a hierarchy of sorting signals on APP: the beta-amyloid-dependent membrane proximal signal was the major contributor to axonal sorting, while N-glycosylation had a weaker effect. Furthermore, recessive somatodendritic signals, most likely in the cytoplasmic tail, directed the protein to the dendrites when the ectodomain was deleted. Analysis of detergent solubility of APP and another axonally delivered protein, hemagglutinin, demonstrated that only hemagglutinin formed CHAPS-insoluble complexes, suggesting distinct mechanisms of axonal sorting for these two proteins. This study is the first delineation of sorting requirements of an axonally targeted protein in polarized neurons and indicates that the beta-amyloid domain plays a major role in axonal delivery of APP. Images PMID:8895567

  17. Early oligomerization stages for the non-amyloid component of α-synuclein amyloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugene, Cindie; Laghaei, Rozita; Mousseau, Normand

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, much effort has focused on the early stages of aggregation and the formation of amyloid oligomers. Aggregation processes for these proteins are complex and their non-equilibrium nature makes any experimental study very difficult. Under these conditions, simulations provide a useful alternative for understanding the dynamics of the early stages of oligomerization. Here, we focus on the non-Aβ amyloid component (NAC) of the monomer, dimer, and trimer of α-synuclein, an important 35-residue sequence involved in the aggregation and fibrillation of this protein associated with Parkinson's disease. Using Hamiltonian and temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations combined with the coarse grained Optimized Potential for Efficient peptide structure Prediction potential, we identify the role of the various regions and the secondary structures for the onset of oligomerization. For this sequence, we clearly observe the passage from α-helix to β-sheet, a characteristic transition of amyloid proteins. More precisely, we find that the NAC monomer is highly structured with two α-helical regions, between residues 2-13 and 19-25. As the dimer and trimer form, β-sheet structures between residues 2-14 and 26-34 appear and rapidly structure the system. The resulting conformations are much more structured than similar dimers and trimers of β-amyloid and amylin proteins and yet display a strong polymorphism at these early stages of aggregation. In addition to its inherent experimental interest, comparison with other sequences shows that NAC could be a very useful numerical model for understanding the onset of aggregation.

  18. Amyloid β Oligomeric Species Present in the Lag Phase of Amyloid Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Martin; Unuchek, Dmitry; Zhang, Bo; Gordeliy, Valentin; Willbold, Dieter; Nagel-Steger, Luitgard

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD)-associated amyloid β peptide (Aβ) is one of the main actors in AD pathogenesis. Aβ is characterized by its high tendency to self-associate, leading to the generation of oligomers and amyloid fibrils. The elucidation of pathways and intermediates is crucial for the understanding of protein assembly mechanisms in general and in conjunction with neurodegenerative diseases, e.g., for the identification of new therapeutic targets. Our study focused on Aβ42 and its oligomeric assemblies in the lag phase of amyloid formation, as studied by sedimentation velocity (SV) centrifugation. The assembly state of Aβ during the lag phase, the time required by an Aβ solution to reach the exponential growth phase of aggregation, was characterized by a dominant monomer fraction below 1 S and a population of oligomeric species between 4 and 16 S. From the oligomer population, two major species close to a 12-mer and an 18-mer with a globular shape were identified. The recurrence of these two species at different initial concentrations and experimental conditions as the smallest assemblies present in solution supports the existence of distinct, energetically favored assemblies in solution. The sizes of the two species suggest an Aβ42 aggregation pathway that is based on a basic hexameric building block. The study demonstrates the potential of SV analysis for the evaluation of protein aggregation pathways. PMID:26024352

  19. Self-Assembly and Anti-Amyloid Cytotoxicity Activity of Amyloid beta Peptide Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Castelletto, V; Ryumin, P; Cramer, R; Hamley, I W; Taylor, M; Allsop, D; Reza, M; Ruokolainen, J; Arnold, T; Hermida-Merino, D; Garcia, C I; Leal, M C; Castaño, E

    2017-03-08

    The self-assembly of two derivatives of KLVFF, a fragment Aβ(16-20) of the amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide, is investigated and recovery of viability of neuroblastoma cells exposed to Aβ (1-42) is observed at sub-stoichiometric peptide concentrations. Fluorescence assays show that NH2-KLVFF-CONH2 undergoes hydrophobic collapse and amyloid formation at the same critical aggregation concentration (cac). In contrast, NH2-K(Boc)LVFF-CONH2 undergoes hydrophobic collapse at a low concentration, followed by amyloid formation at a higher cac. These findings are supported by the β-sheet features observed by FTIR. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry indicates that NH2-K(Boc)LVFF-CONH2 forms a significant population of oligomeric species above the cac. Cryo-TEM, used together with SAXS to determine fibril dimensions, shows that the length and degree of twisting of peptide fibrils seem to be influenced by the net peptide charge. Grazing incidence X-ray scattering from thin peptide films shows features of β-sheet ordering for both peptides, along with evidence for lamellar ordering of NH2-KLVFF-CONH2. This work provides a comprehensive picture of the aggregation properties of these two KLVFF derivatives and shows their utility, in unaggregated form, in restoring the viability of neuroblastoma cells against Aβ-induced toxicity.

  20. Yeast and Fungal Prions: Amyloid-Handling Systems, Amyloid Structure, and Prion Biology.

    PubMed

    Wickner, R B; Edskes, H K; Gorkovskiy, A; Bezsonov, E E; Stroobant, E E

    2016-01-01

    Yeast prions (infectious proteins) were discovered by their outré genetic properties and have become important models for an array of human prion and amyloid diseases. A single prion protein can become any of many distinct amyloid forms (called prion variants or strains), each of which is self-propagating, but with different biological properties (eg, lethal vs mild). The folded in-register parallel β sheet architecture of the yeast prion amyloids naturally suggests a mechanism by which prion variant information can be faithfully transmitted for many generations. The yeast prions rely on cellular chaperones for their propagation, but can be cured by various chaperone imbalances. The Btn2/Cur1 system normally cures most variants of the [URE3] prion that arise. Although most variants of the [PSI+] and [URE3] prions are toxic or lethal, some are mild in their effects. Even the most mild forms of these prions are rare in the wild, indicating that they too are detrimental to yeast. The beneficial [Het-s] prion of Podospora anserina poses an important contrast in its structure, biology, and evolution to the yeast prions characterized thus far.

  1. Tensile deformation and failure of amyloid and amyloid-like protein fibrils.

    PubMed

    Solar, Max; Buehler, Markus J

    2014-03-14

    Here we report a series of full atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of six amyloid or amyloid-like protein fibrils in order to systematically understand the effect of different secondary structure motifs on the mechanical tensile and failure response of cross-β protein fibrils. We find a similar failure behavior across the six structures; an initial failure event occurs at small strains involving cooperative rupture of a group of hydrogen bonds, followed by a slow one-by-one hydrogen bond rupture process as the remaining β-sheets peel off with very low applied stress. We also find that the ultimate tensile strength of the protein fibrils investigated scales directly with the number of hydrogen bonds per unit area which break in the initial rupture event. Our results provide insights into structure-property relationships in protein fibrils important for disease and engineering applications and lay the groundwork for the development of materials selection criteria for the design of de novo amyloid-based functional biomaterials.

  2. Self-Assembly and Anti-Amyloid Cytotoxicity Activity of Amyloid beta Peptide Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Castelletto, V.; Ryumin, P.; Cramer, R.; Hamley, I. W.; Taylor, M.; Allsop, D.; Reza, M.; Ruokolainen, J.; Arnold, T.; Hermida-Merino, D.; Garcia, C. I.; Leal, M. C.; Castaño, E.

    2017-01-01

    The self-assembly of two derivatives of KLVFF, a fragment Aβ(16–20) of the amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide, is investigated and recovery of viability of neuroblastoma cells exposed to Aβ (1–42) is observed at sub-stoichiometric peptide concentrations. Fluorescence assays show that NH2-KLVFF-CONH2 undergoes hydrophobic collapse and amyloid formation at the same critical aggregation concentration (cac). In contrast, NH2-K(Boc)LVFF-CONH2 undergoes hydrophobic collapse at a low concentration, followed by amyloid formation at a higher cac. These findings are supported by the β-sheet features observed by FTIR. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry indicates that NH2-K(Boc)LVFF-CONH2 forms a significant population of oligomeric species above the cac. Cryo-TEM, used together with SAXS to determine fibril dimensions, shows that the length and degree of twisting of peptide fibrils seem to be influenced by the net peptide charge. Grazing incidence X-ray scattering from thin peptide films shows features of β-sheet ordering for both peptides, along with evidence for lamellar ordering of NH2-KLVFF-CONH2. This work provides a comprehensive picture of the aggregation properties of these two KLVFF derivatives and shows their utility, in unaggregated form, in restoring the viability of neuroblastoma cells against Aβ-induced toxicity. PMID:28272542

  3. Dynamics of the formation of a hydrogel by a pathogenic amyloid peptide: islet amyloid polypeptide

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Létitia; Lee, Chiu Fan; Hodder, Peter; Hawkins, Nick; Vaux, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Many chronic degenerative diseases result from aggregation of misfolded polypeptides to form amyloids. Many amyloidogenic polypeptides are surfactants and their assembly can be catalysed by hydrophobic-hydrophilic interfaces (an air-water interface in-vitro or membranes in-vivo). We recently demonstrated the specificity of surface-induced amyloidogenesis but the mechanisms of amyloidogenesis and more specifically of adsorption at hydrophobic-hydrophilic interfaces remain poorly understood. Thus, it is critical to determine how amyloidogenic polypeptides behave at interfaces. Here we used surface tensiometry, rheology and electron microscopy to demonstrate the complex dynamics of gelation by full-length human islet amyloid polypeptide (involved in type II diabetes) both in the bulk solution and at hydrophobic-hydrophilic interfaces (air-water interface and phospholipids). We show that the hydrogel consists of a 3D supramolecular network of fibrils. We also assessed the role of solvation and dissected the evolution over time of the assembly processes. Amyloid gelation could have important pathological consequences for membrane integrity and cellular functions. PMID:27535008

  4. Excess noise in tunable diode lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowland, C. W.

    1981-01-01

    The method and the apparatus for identifying excess-noise regions in tunable diode lasers are described. These diode lasers exhibit regions of excess noise as their wavelength is tuned. If a tunable diode laser is to be used as a local oscillator in a superheterodyne optical receiver, these excess-noise regions severely degrade the performance of the receiver. Measurement results for several tunable diode lasers are given. These results indicate that excess noise is not necessarily associated with a particular wavelength, and that it is possible to select temperature and injection current such that the most ideal performance is achieved.

  5. Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide N-Terminus Fragment Self-Assembly: Effect of Conserved Disulfide Bond on Aggregation Propensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilitchev, Alexandre I.; Giammona, Maxwell J.; Do, Thanh D.; Wong, Amy G.; Buratto, Steven K.; Shea, Joan-Emma; Raleigh, Daniel P.; Bowers, Michael T.

    2016-06-01

    Amyloid formation by human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) has long been implicated in the pathogeny of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and failure of islet transplants, but the mechanism of IAPP self-assembly is still unclear. Numerous fragments of hIAPP are capable of self-association into oligomeric aggregates, both amyloid and non-amyloid in structure. The N-terminal region of IAPP contains a conserved disulfide bond between cysteines at position 2 and 7, which is important to hIAPP's in vivo function and may play a role in in vitro aggregation. The importance of the disulfide bond in this region was probed using a combination of ion mobility-based mass spectrometry experiments, molecular dynamics simulations, and high-resolution atomic force microscopy imaging on the wildtype 1-8 hIAPP fragment, a reduced fragment with no disulfide bond, and a fragment with both cysteines at positions 2 and 7 mutated to serine. The results indicate the wildtype fragment aggregates by a different pathway than either comparison peptide and that the intact disulfide bond may be protective against aggregation due to a reduction of inter-peptide hydrogen bonding.

  6. Nano-structured metallic amyloid fibril networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batzli, Kiersten; Love, Brian

    2014-03-01

    Amyloid proteins form high aspect ratio fibrillar structures with great chemical and physical stability under specific conditions. By examining the produced networks as novel materials we can envision uses for these high aspect ratio fibrillar structures. Produced fibril networks can be used as templates for the creation of high surface area metallic meshes that may be of use as catalysts or in electronic applications. We have formed fibrillar networks from porcine insulin and have characterized them by TEM, showing that by varying environmental conditions, such as strain rate, the resulting network morphologies may be influenced. We have used electroless deposition techniques to coat insulin fibrils with platinum to produce metallized networks thought to have high catalytic activity. We will present our experience using these coated fibrils to facilitate the reduction of nitrophenol to aminophenol using UV-visible spectroscopy as a gauge.

  7. Membrane effects of lysozyme amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Kastorna, Anna; Trusova, Valeriya; Gorbenko, Galyna; Kinnunen, Paavo

    2012-04-01

    The influence of mature lysozyme fibrils on the structural and physical properties of model membranes composed of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and its mixtures with cardiolipin (CL) (10 mol%) and cholesterol (Chol) (30 mol%) was studied using fluorescent probes DPH, pyrene, Laurdan and MBA. Analysis of pyrene fluorescence spectra along with the measurements of DPH fluorescence anisotropy revealed that the structure of hydrocarbon chains region of lipid bilayer is not affected by the fibrillar aggregates of lysozyme. In contrast, probing the membrane effects by Laurdan and MBA showed the rise of both the generalized polarization of Laurdan and the MBA fluorescence anisotropy, suggesting that amyloid protein induces reduction of bilayer hydration and increase of lipid packing in the interfacial region of model membranes.

  8. Alzheimer's Disease and the Amyloid Cascade Hypothesis: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Reitz, Christiane

    2012-01-01

    Since 1992, the amyloid cascade hypothesis has played the prominent role in explaining the etiology and pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). It proposes that the deposition of β-amyloid (Aβ) is the initial pathological event in AD leading to the formation of senile plaques (SPs) and then to neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), neuronal cell death, and ultimately dementia. While there is substantial evidence supporting the hypothesis, there are also limitations: (1) SP and NFT may develop independently, and (2) SPs and NFTs may be the products rather than the causes of neurodegeneration in AD. In addition, randomized clinical trials that tested drugs or antibodies targeting components of the amyloid pathway have been inconclusive. This paper provides a critical overview of the evidence for and against the amyloid cascade hypothesis in AD and provides suggestions for future directions. PMID:22506132

  9. Phosphorylation modifies the molecular stability of β-amyloid deposits

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei-Ghaleh, Nasrollah; Amininasab, Mehriar; Kumar, Sathish; Walter, Jochen; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation plays a crucial role in neurodegenerative diseases. A key feature of protein aggregates is their ubiquitous modification by phosphorylation. Little is known, however, about the molecular consequences of phosphorylation of protein aggregates. Here we show that phosphorylation of β-amyloid at serine 8 increases the stability of its pathogenic aggregates against high-pressure and SDS-induced dissociation. We further demonstrate that phosphorylation results in an elevated number of hydrogen bonds at the N terminus of β-amyloid, the region that is critically regulated by a variety of post-translational modifications. Because of the increased lifetime of phosphorylated β-amyloid aggregates, phosphorylation can promote the spreading of β-amyloid in Alzheimer pathogenesis. Our study suggests that regulation of the molecular stability of protein aggregates by post-translational modifications is a crucial factor for disease progression in the brain. PMID:27072999

  10. Amyloid detection using a Peltier-based device.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Miguel A; Ferreyra, Martin G; Cortez, Leonardo; Grupalli, Silvina A; Alvarez, L Leguina; Chehin, Rosana

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid aggregation of polypeptides is related to a growing number of pathologic states known as amyloid disorders. At present, it is clear that any proteins submitted to appropriate physicochemical environment can acquire fibrilar conformation. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) has been a widely used technique to study temperature- induced amyloid-fibrils formation in vitro. In this way, strict changes and temperature controls are required to characterize the physicochemical basis of the amyloid-fibrils formation. In this article, the development of a highly efficient and accurate Peltier-based system to improve FTIR measurements is presented (see An Old Physics Phenomenon Applied to a Serious Biomedical Pathology. The accuracy of the thermostatic control was tested with biophysical parameters on biological samples probing its reproducibility. The design of the present device contributes to maintain the FTIR environment stable, which represents a real contribution to improve the spectral quality and thus, the reliability of the results.

  11. Bacterial enzymes effectively digest Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide.

    PubMed

    Danilova, Yuliya Vasilyevna; Shagimardanova, Elena Ilyasovna; Margulis, Anna Borisovna; Toymentseva, Anna Aleksandrovna; Balaban, Nelly Pavlovna; Rudakova, Nataliya Leonidovna; Rizvanov, Albert Anatolyevich; Sharipova, Margarita Rashidovna; Palotás, András

    2014-09-01

    Aggregated β-amyloid peptides play key roles in the development of Alzheimer's disease, and recent evidence suggests that microbial particles, among others, can facilitate their polymerization. Bacterial enzymes, however, have been proved to be beneficial in degrading pathological fibrillar structures in clinical settings, such as strepto-kinases in resolving blood-clots. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of bacterial substances to effectively hydrolyze β-amyloid peptides. Degrading products of several proteinases from Bacillus pumilus were evaluated using MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometry, and their toxicity was assessed in vitro using cell-culture assays and morphological studies. These enzymes have proved to be non-toxic and were demonstrated to cleave through the functional domains of β-amyloid peptide. By yielding inactive fragments, proteinases of Bacillus pumilus may be used as candidate anti-amyloid agents.

  12. Phosphorylation modifies the molecular stability of β-amyloid deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei-Ghaleh, Nasrollah; Amininasab, Mehriar; Kumar, Sathish; Walter, Jochen; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Protein aggregation plays a crucial role in neurodegenerative diseases. A key feature of protein aggregates is their ubiquitous modification by phosphorylation. Little is known, however, about the molecular consequences of phosphorylation of protein aggregates. Here we show that phosphorylation of β-amyloid at serine 8 increases the stability of its pathogenic aggregates against high-pressure and SDS-induced dissociation. We further demonstrate that phosphorylation results in an elevated number of hydrogen bonds at the N terminus of β-amyloid, the region that is critically regulated by a variety of post-translational modifications. Because of the increased lifetime of phosphorylated β-amyloid aggregates, phosphorylation can promote the spreading of β-amyloid in Alzheimer pathogenesis. Our study suggests that regulation of the molecular stability of protein aggregates by post-translational modifications is a crucial factor for disease progression in the brain.

  13. Amyloid A amyloidosis secondary to rheumatoid arthritis: pathophysiology and treatments.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of biological therapies targeting specific inflammatory mediators revolutionised the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Targeting key components of the immune system allows efficient suppression of the pathological inflammatory cascade that leads to RA symptoms and subsequent joint destruction. Reactive amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis, one of the most severe complications of RA, is a serious, potentially life-threatening disorder caused by deposition of AA amyloid fibrils in multiple organs. These AA amyloid fibrils derive from the circulatory acute-phase reactant serum amyloid A protein (SAA), and may be controlled by treatment. New biologics may permit AA amyloidosis secondary to RA to become a treatable, manageable disease. Rheumatologists, when diagnosing and treating patients with AA amyloidosis secondary to RA, must understand the pathophysiology and clinical factors related to development and progression of the disease, including genetic predisposition and biological versatility of SAA.

  14. Scanning ion conductance microscopy studies of amyloid fibrils at nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuai; Cho, Sang-Joon; Busuttil, Katerina; Wang, Chen; Besenbacher, Flemming; Dong, Mingdong

    2012-05-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has developed to become a very versatile nano-scale technique to reveal the three-dimensional (3D) morphology of amyloid aggregates under physiological conditions. However, the imaging principle of AFM is based on measuring the `force' between a sharp tip and a given nanostructure, which may cause mechanical deformation of relatively soft objects. To avoid the deformation, scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is an alternative scanning probe microscopy technique, operating with alternating current mode. Here we can indeed reveal the 3D morphology of amyloid fibrils and it is capable of exploring proteins with nanoscale resolution. Compared with conventional AFM, we show that SICM can provide precise height measurements of amyloid protein aggregates, a feature that enables us to obtain unique insight into the detailed nucleation and growth mechanisms behind amyloid self-assembly.

  15. Interactions driving the collapse of islet amyloid polypeptide: Implications for amyloid aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cope, Stephanie M.

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), also known as amylin, is a 37-residue intrinsically disordered hormone involved in glucose regulation and gastric emptying. The aggregation of hIAPP into amyloid fibrils is believed to play a causal role in type 2 diabetes. To date, not much is known about the monomeric state of hIAPP or how it undergoes an irreversible transformation from disordered peptide to insoluble aggregate. IAPP contains a highly conserved disulfide bond that restricts hIAPP(1-8) into a short ring-like structure: N_loop. Removal or chemical reduction of N_loop not only prevents cell response upon binding to the CGRP receptor, but also alters the mass per length distribution of hIAPP fibers and the kinetics of fibril formation. The mechanism by which N_loop affects hIAPP aggregation is not yet understood, but is important for rationalizing kinetics and developing potential inhibitors. By measuring end-to-end contact formation rates, Vaiana et al. showed that N_loop induces collapsed states in IAPP monomers, implying attractive interactions between N_loop and other regions of the disordered polypeptide chain . We show that in addition to being involved in intra-protein interactions, the N_loop is involved in inter-protein interactions, which lead to the formation of extremely long and stable beta-turn fibers. These non-amyloid fibers are present in the 10 muM concentration range, under the same solution conditions in which hIAPP forms amyloid fibers. We discuss the effect of peptide cyclization on both intra- and inter-protein interactions, and its possible implications for aggregation. Our findings indicate a potential role of N_loop-N_loop interactions in hIAPP aggregation, which has not previously been explored. Though our findings suggest that N_loop plays an important role in the pathway of amyloid formation, other naturally occurring IAPP variants that contain this structural feature are incapable of forming amyloids. For example, hIAPP readily

  16. Destroying activity of magnetoferritin on lysozyme amyloid fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopcansky, Peter; Siposova, Katarina; Melnikova, Lucia; Bednarikova, Zuzana; Timko, Milan; Mitroova, Zuzana; Antosova, Andrea; Garamus, Vasil M.; Petrenko, Viktor I.; Avdeev, Mikhail V.; Gazova, Zuzana

    2015-03-01

    Presence of protein amyloid aggregates (oligomers, protofilaments, fibrils) is associated with many diseases as diabetes mellitus or Alzheimer's disease. The interaction between lysozyme amyloid fibrils and magnetoferritin loaded with different amount of iron atoms (168 or 532 atoms) has been investigated by small-angle X-rays scattering and thioflavin T fluorescence measurements. Results suggest that magnetoferritin caused an iron atom-concentration dependent reduction of lysozyme fibril size.

  17. 7 CFR 929.59 - Excess cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Excess cranberries. 929.59 Section 929.59 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF... LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order Regulating Handling Regulations § 929.59 Excess...

  18. 7 CFR 929.59 - Excess cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Excess cranberries. 929.59 Section 929.59 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF... LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order Regulating Handling Regulations § 929.59 Excess...

  19. 7 CFR 929.59 - Excess cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Excess cranberries. 929.59 Section 929.59 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF... LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order Regulating Handling Regulations § 929.59 Excess...

  20. 7 CFR 929.59 - Excess cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Excess cranberries. 929.59 Section 929.59 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF... LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order Regulating Handling Regulations § 929.59 Excess...

  1. 7 CFR 929.59 - Excess cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Excess cranberries. 929.59 Section 929.59 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF... LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order Regulating Handling Regulations § 929.59 Excess...

  2. 43 CFR 426.12 - Excess land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... as excess is binding on the land. However, the landowner may change the designation under the...) If the status of land is changed by law or regulations. (1) If the district had a contract with... 25, 1926 (43 U.S.C. 423e); (ii) If the status of this land changes from nonexcess into excess after...

  3. 24 CFR 236.60 - Excess Income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... INSURANCE AND INTEREST REDUCTION PAYMENT FOR RENTAL PROJECTS Eligibility Requirements for Mortgage Insurance... Section 236 interest reduction payments may apply to retain Excess Income for project use unless the mortgagor owes prior Excess Income and is not current in payments under a HUD-approved Workout or...

  4. 30 CFR 57.6902 - Excessive temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Excessive temperatures. 57.6902 Section 57.6902... Requirements-Surface and Underground § 57.6902 Excessive temperatures. (a) Where heat could cause premature... shall— (1) Measure an appropriate number of blasthole temperatures in order to assess the specific...

  5. 30 CFR 56.6902 - Excessive temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Excessive temperatures. 56.6902 Section 56.6902... Requirements § 56.6902 Excessive temperatures. (a) Where heat could cause premature detonation, explosive... an appropriate number of blasthole temperatures in order to assess the specific mine conditions...

  6. 30 CFR 56.6902 - Excessive temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Excessive temperatures. 56.6902 Section 56.6902... Requirements § 56.6902 Excessive temperatures. (a) Where heat could cause premature detonation, explosive... an appropriate number of blasthole temperatures in order to assess the specific mine conditions...

  7. 30 CFR 57.6902 - Excessive temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Excessive temperatures. 57.6902 Section 57.6902... Requirements-Surface and Underground § 57.6902 Excessive temperatures. (a) Where heat could cause premature... shall— (1) Measure an appropriate number of blasthole temperatures in order to assess the specific...

  8. 30 CFR 56.6902 - Excessive temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Excessive temperatures. 56.6902 Section 56.6902... Requirements § 56.6902 Excessive temperatures. (a) Where heat could cause premature detonation, explosive... an appropriate number of blasthole temperatures in order to assess the specific mine conditions...

  9. 30 CFR 57.6902 - Excessive temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Excessive temperatures. 57.6902 Section 57.6902... Requirements-Surface and Underground § 57.6902 Excessive temperatures. (a) Where heat could cause premature... shall— (1) Measure an appropriate number of blasthole temperatures in order to assess the specific...

  10. 30 CFR 57.6902 - Excessive temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Excessive temperatures. 57.6902 Section 57.6902... Requirements-Surface and Underground § 57.6902 Excessive temperatures. (a) Where heat could cause premature... shall— (1) Measure an appropriate number of blasthole temperatures in order to assess the specific...

  11. 30 CFR 57.6902 - Excessive temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Excessive temperatures. 57.6902 Section 57.6902... Requirements-Surface and Underground § 57.6902 Excessive temperatures. (a) Where heat could cause premature... shall— (1) Measure an appropriate number of blasthole temperatures in order to assess the specific...

  12. 30 CFR 56.6902 - Excessive temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Excessive temperatures. 56.6902 Section 56.6902... Requirements § 56.6902 Excessive temperatures. (a) Where heat could cause premature detonation, explosive... an appropriate number of blasthole temperatures in order to assess the specific mine conditions...

  13. 30 CFR 56.6902 - Excessive temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Excessive temperatures. 56.6902 Section 56.6902... Requirements § 56.6902 Excessive temperatures. (a) Where heat could cause premature detonation, explosive... an appropriate number of blasthole temperatures in order to assess the specific mine conditions...

  14. 24 CFR 236.60 - Excess income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... mortgagor owes prior Excess Income and is not current in payments under a HUD-approved Workout or Repayment... current in payments under a HUD-approved Workout or Repayment Agreement or the mortgagor falls within any... of Excess Income that was: (i) Repaid in accordance with a Workout or Repayment Agreement with...

  15. 24 CFR 236.60 - Excess Income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... mortgagor owes prior Excess Income and is not current in payments under a HUD-approved Workout or Repayment... current in payments under a HUD-approved Workout or Repayment Agreement or the mortgagor falls within any... of Excess Income that was: (i) Repaid in accordance with a Workout or Repayment Agreement with...

  16. Bladder calculus presenting as excessive masturbation.

    PubMed

    De Alwis, A C D; Senaratne, A M R D; De Silva, S M P D; Rodrigo, V S D

    2006-09-01

    Masturbation in childhood is a normal behaviour which most commonly begins at 2 months of age, and peaks at 4 years and in adolescence. However excessive masturbation causes anxiety in parents. We describe a boy with a bladder calculus presenting as excessive masturbation.

  17. Part B Excess Cost Quick Reference Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Wayne; Beridon, Virginia; Hamre, Kent; Morse, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    This Quick Reference Document has been prepared by the Regional Resource Center Program ARRA/Fiscal Priority Team to aid RRCP State Liaisons and other (Technical Assistance) TA providers in understanding the general context of state questions surrounding excess cost. As a "first-stop" for TA providers in investigating excess cost…

  18. PMEL Amyloid Fibril Formation: The Bright Steps of Pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Bissig, Christin; Rochin, Leila; van Niel, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    In pigment cells, melanin synthesis takes place in specialized organelles, called melanosomes. The biogenesis and maturation of melanosomes is initiated by an unpigmented step that takes place prior to the initiation of melanin synthesis and leads to the formation of luminal fibrils deriving from the pigment cell-specific pre-melanosomal protein (PMEL). In the lumen of melanosomes, PMEL fibrils optimize sequestration and condensation of the pigment melanin. Interestingly, PMEL fibrils have been described to adopt a typical amyloid-like structure. In contrast to pathological amyloids often associated with neurodegenerative diseases, PMEL fibrils represent an emergent category of physiological amyloids due to their beneficial cellular functions. The formation of PMEL fibrils within melanosomes is tightly regulated by diverse mechanisms, such as PMEL traffic, cleavage and sorting. These mechanisms revealed increasing analogies between the formation of physiological PMEL fibrils and pathological amyloid fibrils. In this review we summarize the known mechanisms of PMEL fibrillation and discuss how the recent understanding of physiological PMEL amyloid formation may help to shed light on processes involved in pathological amyloid formation. PMID:27589732

  19. Direct observation of amyloid nucleation under nanomechanical stretching.

    PubMed

    Varongchayakul, Nitinun; Johnson, Sara; Quabili, Trina; Cappello, Joseph; Ghandehari, Hamidreza; Solares, Santiago De Jesus; Hwang, Wonmuk; Seog, Joonil

    2013-09-24

    Self-assembly of amyloid nanofiber is associated with both functional biological and pathological processes such as those in neurodegenerative diseases. Despite intensive studies, the stochastic nature of the process has made it difficult to elucidate a molecular mechanism for the key amyloid nucleation event. Here we investigated nucleation of the silk-elastin-like peptide (SELP) amyloid using time-lapse lateral force microscopy (LFM). By repeated scanning of a single line on a SELP-coated mica surface, we observed a sudden stepwise height increase. This corresponds to nucleation of an amyloid fiber, which subsequently grew perpendicular to the scanning direction. The lateral force profiles followed either a worm-like chain model or an exponential function, suggesting that the atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip stretches a single or multiple SELP molecules along the scanning direction. The probability of nucleation correlated with the maximum stretching force and extension, implying that stretching of SELP molecules is a key molecular event for amyloid nucleation. The mechanically induced nucleation allows for positional and directional control of amyloid assembly in vitro, which we demonstrate by generating single nanofibers at predetermined nucleation sites.

  20. Thermal Stability Threshold for Amyloid Formation in Light Chain Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Poshusta, Tanya L.; Katoh, Nagaaki; Gertz, Morie A.; Dispenzieri, Angela; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Light chain (AL) amyloidosis is a devastating disease characterized by amyloid deposits formed by immunoglobulin light chains. Current available treatments involve conventional chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant. We have recently concluded a phase III trial comparing these two treatments. AL amyloidosis patients who achieve hematological complete response (CR) do not necessarily achieve organ response regardless of the treatment they received. In order to investigate the possible correlation between amyloid formation kinetics and organ response, we selected AL amyloidosis patients from the trial with kidney involvement and CR after treatment. Six patients were selected and their monoclonal immunoglobulin light chains were characterized. The proteins showed differences in their stability and their kinetics of amyloid formation. A correlation was detected at pH 7.4, showing that less stable proteins are more likely to form amyloid fibrils. AL-T03 is too unstable to form amyloid fibrils at pH 7.4. This protein was found in the only patient in the study that had organ response, suggesting that partially folded species are required for amyloid formation to occur in AL amyloidosis. PMID:24248061

  1. Light Chain Amyloid Fibrils Cause Metabolic Dysfunction in Human Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams-Koeppen, Helen P.; Foster, James S.; Hackenbrack, Nicole; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina; Donohoe, Dallas; Williams, Angela; Macy, Sallie; Wooliver, Craig; Wortham, Dale; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer; Foster, Carmen M.; Kennel, Stephen J.; Wall, Jonathan S.

    2015-01-01

    Light chain (AL) amyloidosis is the most common form of systemic amyloid disease, and cardiomyopathy is a dire consequence, resulting in an extremely poor prognosis. AL is characterized by the production of monoclonal free light chains that deposit as amyloid fibrils principally in the heart, liver, and kidneys causing organ dysfunction. We have studied the effects of amyloid fibrils, produced from recombinant λ6 light chain variable domains, on metabolic activity of human cardiomyocytes. The data indicate that fibrils at 0.1 μM, but not monomer, significantly decrease the enzymatic activity of cellular NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductase, without causing significant cell death. The presence of amyloid fibrils did not affect ATP levels; however, oxygen consumption was increased and reactive oxygen species were detected. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that fibrils bound to and remained at the cell surface with little fibril internalization. These data indicate that AL amyloid fibrils severely impair cardiomyocyte metabolism in a dose dependent manner. These data suggest that effective therapeutic intervention for these patients should include methods for removing potentially toxic amyloid fibrils. PMID:26393799

  2. Toxic species in amyloid disorders: Oligomers or mature fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Meenakshi; Vats, Abhishek; Taneja, Vibha

    2015-01-01

    Protein aggregation is the hallmark of several neurodegenerative disorders. These protein aggregation (fibrillization) disorders are also known as amyloid disorders. The mechanism of protein aggregation involves conformation switch of the native protein, oligomer formation leading to protofibrils and finally mature fibrils. Mature fibrils have long been considered as the cause of disease pathogenesis; however, recent evidences suggest oligomeric intermediates formed during fibrillization to be toxic. In this review, we have tried to address the ongoing debate for these toxic amyloid species. We did an extensive literature search and collated information from Pubmed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) and Google search using various permutations and combinations of the following keywords: Neurodegeneration, amyloid disorders, protein aggregation, fibrils, oligomers, toxicity, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease. We describe different instances showing the toxicity of mature fibrils as well as oligomers in Alzheimer's Disease and Parkinson's Disease. Distinct structural framework and morphology of amyloid oligomers suggests difference in toxic effect between oligomers and fibrils. We highlight the difference in structure and proposed toxicity pathways for fibrils and oligomers. We also highlight the evidences indicating that intermediary oligomeric species can act as potential diagnostic biomarker. Since the formation of these toxic species follow a common structural switch among various amyloid disorders, the protein aggregation events can be targeted for developing broad-range therapeutics. The therapeutic trials based on the understanding of different protein conformers (monomers, oligomers, protofibrils and fibrils) in amyloid cascade are also described. PMID:26019408

  3. Amyloid Goiter Associated with Amyloidosis Secondary to Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Uzum, Gungor; Kaya, Fatih Oner; Uzum, Ayse Kubat; Kucukyilmaz, Meltem; Duzkoylu, Yigit; Leblebici, Cem; Koc, Oguz

    2013-01-01

    Amyloidosis refers to a variety of conditions in which amyloid proteins are abnormally deposited in organs and/or tissues. The most common forms of systemic amyloidosis are primary amyloidosis (PA) of light chains and secondary amyloidosis (SA) caused by chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Although involvement of the thyroid gland by amyloid is a relatively common phenomenon, clinically significant enlargement of the thyroid owing to amyloid deposition is a rare occurrence. In SA, the deposition of amyloid associated (AA) protein is associated with atrophy of thyroid follicles. The clinical picture of these patients is characterized by rapid, painless thyroid gland enlargement which may be associated with dysphagia, dyspnea, or hoarseness. Thyroid function is not impaired in most cases. Although amyloid goitre secondary to systemic amyloidosis due to chronic inflammatory diseases is relatively common, specifically related to RA is much more uncommon one and it is reported less in the literature. In this report, A 52-old-year female patient with amyloid goiter associated with amyloidosis secondary to rheumatoid arthritis is presented. PMID:24368922

  4. Switchable photooxygenation catalysts that sense higher-order amyloid structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Atsuhiko; Shimizu, Yusuke; Oisaki, Kounosuke; Sohma, Youhei; Kanai, Motomu

    2016-10-01

    Proteins can misfold into amyloid structures that are associated with diseases; however, the same proteins often have important biological roles. To degrade selectively the amyloid form without affecting the fraction of functional protein is, therefore, an attractive goal. Here we report target-state-dependent photooxygenation catalysts that are active only when bound to the cross-β-sheet structure that is characteristic of pathogenic aggregated amyloid proteins. We show these catalysts can selectively oxygenate the amyloid form of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) 1-42 in the presence of non-amyloid off-target substrates. Furthermore, photooxygenation with a catalyst that bears an Aβ-binding peptide attenuated the Aβ pathogenicity in the presence of cells. We also show that selective photooxygenation is generally applicable to other amyloidogenic proteins (amylin, insulin, β2-microglobulin, transthyretin and α-synuclein) and does not affect the physiologically functional non-aggregate states of these proteins. This is the first report of an artificial catalyst that can be selectively and reversibly turned on and off depending on the structure and aggregation state of the substrate protein.

  5. Light Chain Amyloid Fibrils Cause Metabolic Dysfunction in Human Cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect

    McWilliams-Koeppen, Helen P.; Foster, James S.; Hackenbrack, Nicole; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina; Donohoe, Dallas; Williams, Angela; Macy, Sallie; Wooliver, Craig; Wortham, Dale; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer; Foster, Carmen M.; Kennel, Stephen J.; Wall, Jonathan S.

    2015-09-22

    Light chain (AL) amyloidosis is the most common form of systemic amyloid disease, and cardiomyopathy is a dire consequence, resulting in an extremely poor prognosis. AL is characterized by the production of monoclonal free light chains that deposit as amyloid fibrils principally in the heart, liver, and kidneys causing organ dysfunction. We have studied the effects of amyloid fibrils, produced from recombinant λ6 light chain variable domains, on metabolic activity of human cardiomyocytes. The data indicate that fibrils at 0.1 μM, but not monomer, significantly decrease the enzymatic activity of cellular NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductase, without causing significant cell death. The presence of amyloid fibrils did not affect ATP levels; however, oxygen consumption was increased and reactive oxygen species were detected. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that fibrils bound to and remained at the cell surface with little fibril internalization. Ultimately, these data indicate that AL amyloid fibrils severely impair cardiomyocyte metabolism in a dose dependent manner. These data suggest that effective therapeutic intervention for these patients should include methods for removing potentially toxic amyloid fibrils.

  6. Light Chain Amyloid Fibrils Cause Metabolic Dysfunction in Human Cardiomyocytes

    DOE PAGES

    McWilliams-Koeppen, Helen P.; Foster, James S.; Hackenbrack, Nicole; ...

    2015-09-22

    Light chain (AL) amyloidosis is the most common form of systemic amyloid disease, and cardiomyopathy is a dire consequence, resulting in an extremely poor prognosis. AL is characterized by the production of monoclonal free light chains that deposit as amyloid fibrils principally in the heart, liver, and kidneys causing organ dysfunction. We have studied the effects of amyloid fibrils, produced from recombinant λ6 light chain variable domains, on metabolic activity of human cardiomyocytes. The data indicate that fibrils at 0.1 μM, but not monomer, significantly decrease the enzymatic activity of cellular NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductase, without causing significant cell death. The presencemore » of amyloid fibrils did not affect ATP levels; however, oxygen consumption was increased and reactive oxygen species were detected. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that fibrils bound to and remained at the cell surface with little fibril internalization. Ultimately, these data indicate that AL amyloid fibrils severely impair cardiomyocyte metabolism in a dose dependent manner. These data suggest that effective therapeutic intervention for these patients should include methods for removing potentially toxic amyloid fibrils.« less

  7. Increased body temperature accelerates aggregation of the Leu-68-->Gln mutant cystatin C, the amyloid-forming protein in hereditary cystatin C amyloid angiopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Abrahamson, M; Grubb, A

    1994-01-01

    Hereditary cystatin C amyloid angiopathy is a dominantly inherited disorder, characterized by dementia, paralysis, and death from cerebral hemorrhage in early adult life. A variant of the cysteine proteinase inhibitor, cystatin C, is deposited as amyloid in the tissues of the patients and their spinal-fluid level of cystatin C is abnormally low. The disease-associated Leu-68-->Gln mutant (L68Q) cystatin C has been produced in an Escherichia coli expression system and isolated by use of denaturing buffers, immunosorption, and gel filtration. Parallel physicochemical and functional investigations of L68Q-cystatin C and wild-type cystatin C revealed that both proteins effectively inhibit the cysteine proteinase cathepsin B (equilibrium constants for dissociation, 0.4 and 0.5 nM, respectively) but differ considerably in their tendency to dimerize and form aggregates. While wild-type cystatin C is monomeric and functionally active even after prolonged storage at elevated temperatures, L68Q-cystatin C starts to dimerize and lose biological activity immediately after it is transferred to a nondenaturing buffer. The dimerization of L68Q-cystatin C is highly temperature-dependent, with a rise in incubation temperature from 37 to 40 degrees C resulting in a 150% increase in dimerization rate. The aggregation at physiological concentrations is likewise increased at 40 compared to 37 degrees C, by approximately 60%. These properties of L68Q-cystatin C have bearing upon our understanding of the pathophysiological process of hereditary cystatin C amyloid angiopathy. They might also be of clinical relevance, since medical intervention to abort febrile periods of carriers of the disease trait may reduce the in vivo formation of L68Q-cystatin C aggregates. Images PMID:8108423

  8. Repeated administration of the noradrenergic neurotoxin N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4) modulates neuroinflammation and amyloid plaque load in mice bearing amyloid precursor protein and presenilin-1 mutant transgenes

    PubMed Central

    Pugh, Perdita L; Vidgeon-Hart, Martin P; Ashmeade, Tracey; Culbert, Ainsley A; Seymour, Zoe; Perren, Marion J; Joyce, Flora; Bate, Simon T; Babin, Anna; Virley, David J; Richardson, Jill C; Upton, Neil; Sunter, David

    2007-01-01

    Background Data indicates anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and pro-cognitive properties of noradrenaline and analyses of post-mortem brain of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients reveal major neuronal loss in the noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC), the main source of CNS noradrenaline (NA). The LC has projections to brain regions vulnerable to amyloid deposition and lack of LC derived NA could play a role in the progression of neuroinflammation in AD. Previous studies reveal that intrape