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  1. Group Intervention to Reduce HIV Transmission Risk Behavior Among Persons Living With HIV/AIDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalichman, Seth C.; Rompa, David; Cage, Marjorie

    2005-01-01

    Results of a randomized controlled trial show that a behavioral intervention grounded in social cognitive theory reduces unprotected sexual behaviors among men and women living with HIV infection, with the greatest reductions in HIV transmission risk behaviors occurring with non-HIV-positive sex partners. In this article, the authors describe the…

  2. Group Intervention to Reduce HIV Transmission Risk Behavior Among Persons Living With HIV/AIDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalichman, Seth C.; Rompa, David; Cage, Marjorie

    2005-01-01

    Results of a randomized controlled trial show that a behavioral intervention grounded in social cognitive theory reduces unprotected sexual behaviors among men and women living with HIV infection, with the greatest reductions in HIV transmission risk behaviors occurring with non-HIV-positive sex partners. In this article, the authors describe the…

  3. Maternal or Infant Antiretroviral Drugs to Reduce HIV-1 Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Chasela, Charles S.; Hudgens, Michael G.; Jamieson, Denise J.; Kayira, Dumbani; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Kourtis, Athena P.; Martinson, Francis; Tegha, Gerald; Knight, Rodney J.; Ahmed, Yusuf I.; Kamwendo, Deborah D.; Hoffman, Irving F.; Ellington, Sascha R.; Kacheche, Zebrone; Soko, Alice; Wiener, Jeffrey B.; Fiscus, Susan A.; Kazembe, Peter; Mofolo, Innocent A.; Chigwenembe, Maggie; Sichali, Dorothy S.; van der Horst, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    Background We evaluated the efficacy of a maternal triple-drug antiretroviral regimen or infant nevirapine prophylaxis for 28 weeks during breast-feeding to reduce postnatal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in Malawi. Methods We randomly assigned 2369 HIV-1–positive, breast-feeding mothers with a CD4+ lymphocyte count of at least 250 cells per cubic millimeter and their infants to receive a maternal antiretroviral regimen, infant nevirapine, or no extended postnatal antiretroviral regimen (control group). All mothers and infants received perinatal prophylaxis with single-dose nevirapine and 1 week of zidovudine plus lamivudine. We used the Kaplan–Meier method to estimate the cumulative risk of HIV-1 transmission or death by 28 weeks among infants who were HIV-1–negative 2 weeks after birth. Rates were compared with the use of the log-rank test. Results Among mother–infant pairs, 5.0% of infants were HIV-1–positive at 2 weeks of life. The estimated risk of HIV-1 transmission between 2 and 28 weeks was higher in the control group (5.7%) than in either the maternal-regimen group (2.9%, P = 0.009) or the infant-regimen group (1.7%, P<0.001). The estimated risk of infant HIV-1 infection or death between 2 and 28 weeks was 7.0% in the control group, 4.1% in the maternal-regimen group (P = 0.02), and 2.6% in the infant-regimen group (P<0.001). The proportion of women with neutropenia was higher among those receiving the antiretroviral regimen (6.2%) than among those in either the nevirapine group (2.6%) or the control group (2.3%). Among infants receiving nevirapine, 1.9% had a hypersensitivity reaction. Conclusions The use of either a maternal antiretroviral regimen or infant nevirapine for 28 weeks was effective in reducing HIV-1 transmission during breast-feeding. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00164736.) PMID:20554982

  4. Maternal or infant antiretroviral drugs to reduce HIV-1 transmission.

    PubMed

    Chasela, Charles S; Hudgens, Michael G; Jamieson, Denise J; Kayira, Dumbani; Hosseinipour, Mina C; Kourtis, Athena P; Martinson, Francis; Tegha, Gerald; Knight, Rodney J; Ahmed, Yusuf I; Kamwendo, Deborah D; Hoffman, Irving F; Ellington, Sascha R; Kacheche, Zebrone; Soko, Alice; Wiener, Jeffrey B; Fiscus, Susan A; Kazembe, Peter; Mofolo, Innocent A; Chigwenembe, Maggie; Sichali, Dorothy S; van der Horst, Charles M

    2010-06-17

    We evaluated the efficacy of a maternal triple-drug antiretroviral regimen or infant nevirapine prophylaxis for 28 weeks during breast-feeding to reduce postnatal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in Malawi. We randomly assigned 2369 HIV-1-positive, breast-feeding mothers with a CD4+ lymphocyte count of at least 250 cells per cubic millimeter and their infants to receive a maternal antiretroviral regimen, infant nevirapine, or no extended postnatal antiretroviral regimen (control group). All mothers and infants received perinatal prophylaxis with single-dose nevirapine and 1 week of zidovudine plus lamivudine. We used the Kaplan-Meier method to estimate the cumulative risk of HIV-1 transmission or death by 28 weeks among infants who were HIV-1-negative 2 weeks after birth. Rates were compared with the use of the log-rank test. Among mother-infant pairs, 5.0% of infants were HIV-1-positive at 2 weeks of life. The estimated risk of HIV-1 transmission between 2 and 28 weeks was higher in the control group (5.7%) than in either the maternal-regimen group (2.9%, P=0.009) or the infant-regimen group (1.7%, P<0.001). The estimated risk of infant HIV-1 infection or death between 2 and 28 weeks was 7.0% in the control group, 4.1% in the maternal-regimen group (P=0.02), and 2.6% in the infant-regimen group (P<0.001). The proportion of women with neutropenia was higher among those receiving the antiretroviral regimen (6.2%) than among those in either the nevirapine group (2.6%) or the control group (2.3%). Among infants receiving nevirapine, 1.9% had a hypersensitivity reaction. The use of either a maternal antiretroviral regimen or infant nevirapine for 28 weeks was effective in reducing HIV-1 transmission during breast-feeding. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00164736.) 2010 Massachusetts Medical Society

  5. HIV Transmission

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV/AIDS HIV Transmission Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend ...

  6. 76 FR 58517 - Public Health Service Guideline for Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ... Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV... Guideline for Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), and... Draft Guideline provides evidence-based recommendations for reducing unexpected transmission of HIV,...

  7. 76 FR 72417 - Public Health Service Guideline for Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ... Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Through Solid Organ... (PHS) Guideline for Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV... evidence-based recommendations for reducing unexpected transmission of HIV, HBV and HCV from deceased...

  8. Maternal HIV-1 envelope-specific antibody responses and reduced risk of perinatal transmission.

    PubMed

    Permar, Sallie R; Fong, Youyi; Vandergrift, Nathan; Fouda, Genevieve G; Gilbert, Peter; Parks, Robert; Jaeger, Frederick H; Pollara, Justin; Martelli, Amanda; Liebl, Brooke E; Lloyd, Krissey; Yates, Nicole L; Overman, R Glenn; Shen, Xiaoying; Whitaker, Kaylan; Chen, Haiyan; Pritchett, Jamie; Solomon, Erika; Friberg, Emma; Marshall, Dawn J; Whitesides, John F; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Von Holle, Tarra; Martinez, David R; Cai, Fangping; Kumar, Amit; Xia, Shi-Mao; Lu, Xiaozhi; Louzao, Raul; Wilkes, Samantha; Datta, Saheli; Sarzotti-Kelsoe, Marcella; Liao, Hua-Xin; Ferrari, Guido; Alam, S Munir; Montefiori, David C; Denny, Thomas N; Moody, M Anthony; Tomaras, Georgia D; Gao, Feng; Haynes, Barton F

    2015-07-01

    Despite the wide availability of antiretroviral drugs, more than 250,000 infants are vertically infected with HIV-1 annually, emphasizing the need for additional interventions to eliminate pediatric HIV-1 infections. Here, we aimed to define humoral immune correlates of risk of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV-1, including responses associated with protection in the RV144 vaccine trial. Eighty-three untreated, HIV-1-transmitting mothers and 165 propensity score-matched nontransmitting mothers were selected from the Women and Infants Transmission Study (WITS) of US nonbreastfeeding, HIV-1-infected mothers. In a multivariable logistic regression model, the magnitude of the maternal IgG responses specific for the third variable loop (V3) of the HIV-1 envelope was predictive of a reduced risk of MTCT. Neutralizing Ab responses against easy-to-neutralize (tier 1) HIV-1 strains also predicted a reduced risk of peripartum transmission in secondary analyses. Moreover, recombinant maternal V3-specific IgG mAbs mediated neutralization of autologous HIV-1 isolates. Thus, common V3-specific Ab responses in maternal plasma predicted a reduced risk of MTCT and mediated autologous virus neutralization, suggesting that boosting these maternal Ab responses may further reduce HIV-1 MTCT.

  9. Maternal HIV-1 envelope–specific antibody responses and reduced risk of perinatal transmission

    PubMed Central

    Permar, Sallie R.; Fong, Youyi; Vandergrift, Nathan; Fouda, Genevieve G.; Gilbert, Peter; Parks, Robert; Jaeger, Frederick H.; Pollara, Justin; Martelli, Amanda; Liebl, Brooke E.; Lloyd, Krissey; Yates, Nicole L.; Overman, R. Glenn; Shen, Xiaoying; Whitaker, Kaylan; Chen, Haiyan; Pritchett, Jamie; Solomon, Erika; Friberg, Emma; Marshall, Dawn J.; Whitesides, John F.; Gurley, Thaddeus C.; Von Holle, Tarra; Martinez, David R.; Cai, Fangping; Kumar, Amit; Xia, Shi-Mao; Lu, Xiaozhi; Louzao, Raul; Wilkes, Samantha; Datta, Saheli; Sarzotti-Kelsoe, Marcella; Liao, Hua-Xin; Ferrari, Guido; Alam, S. Munir; Montefiori, David C.; Denny, Thomas N.; Moody, M. Anthony; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Gao, Feng; Haynes, Barton F.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the wide availability of antiretroviral drugs, more than 250,000 infants are vertically infected with HIV-1 annually, emphasizing the need for additional interventions to eliminate pediatric HIV-1 infections. Here, we aimed to define humoral immune correlates of risk of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV-1, including responses associated with protection in the RV144 vaccine trial. Eighty-three untreated, HIV-1–transmitting mothers and 165 propensity score–matched nontransmitting mothers were selected from the Women and Infants Transmission Study (WITS) of US nonbreastfeeding, HIV-1–infected mothers. In a multivariable logistic regression model, the magnitude of the maternal IgG responses specific for the third variable loop (V3) of the HIV-1 envelope was predictive of a reduced risk of MTCT. Neutralizing Ab responses against easy-to-neutralize (tier 1) HIV-1 strains also predicted a reduced risk of peripartum transmission in secondary analyses. Moreover, recombinant maternal V3–specific IgG mAbs mediated neutralization of autologous HIV-1 isolates. Thus, common V3-specific Ab responses in maternal plasma predicted a reduced risk of MTCT and mediated autologous virus neutralization, suggesting that boosting these maternal Ab responses may further reduce HIV-1 MTCT. PMID:26053661

  10. Interventions to reduce HIV transmission related to injecting drug use in prison.

    PubMed

    Jürgens, Ralf; Ball, Andrew; Verster, Annette

    2009-01-01

    The high prevalence of HIV infection and drug dependence among prisoners, combined with the sharing of injecting drug equipment, make prisons a high-risk environment for the transmission of HIV. Ultimately, this contributes to HIV epidemics in the communities to which prisoners return on their release. We reviewed the effectiveness of interventions to reduce injecting drug use risk behaviours and, consequently, HIV transmission in prisons. Many studies reported high levels of injecting drug use in prisons, and HIV transmission has been documented. There is increasing evidence of what prison systems can do to prevent HIV transmission related to injecting drug use. In particular, needle and syringe programmes and opioid substitution therapies have proven effective at reducing HIV risk behaviours in a wide range of prison environments, without resulting in negative consequences for the health of prison staff or prisoners. The introduction of these programmes in countries with an existing or emergent epidemic of HIV infection among injecting drug users is therefore warranted, as part of comprehensive programmes to address HIV in prisons.

  11. Behavioural strategies to reduce HIV transmission: how to make them work better.

    PubMed

    Coates, Thomas J; Richter, Linda; Caceres, Carlos

    2008-08-23

    This paper makes five key points. First is that the aggregate effect of radical and sustained behavioural changes in a sufficient number of individuals potentially at risk is needed for successful reductions in HIV transmission. Second, combination prevention is essential since HIV prevention is neither simple nor simplistic. Reductions in HIV transmission need widespread and sustained efforts, and a mix of communication channels to disseminate messages to motivate people to engage in a range of options to reduce risk. Third, prevention programmes can do better. The effect of behavioural strategies could be increased by aiming for many goals (eg, delay in onset of first intercourse, reduction in number of sexual partners, increases in condom use, etc) that are achieved by use of multilevel approaches (eg, couples, families, social and sexual networks, institutions, and entire communities) with populations both uninfected and infected with HIV. Fourth, prevention science can do better. Interventions derived from behavioural science have a role in overall HIV-prevention efforts, but they are insufficient when used by themselves to produce substantial and lasting reductions in HIV transmission between individuals or in entire communities. Fifth, we need to get the simple things right. The fundamentals of HIV prevention need to be agreed upon, funded, implemented, measured, and achieved. That, presently, is not the case.

  12. Behavioural strategies to reduce HIV transmission: how to make them work better

    PubMed Central

    Coates, Thomas J; Richter, Linda; Caceres, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    This paper makes five key points. First is that the aggregate effect of radical and sustained behavioural changes in a sufficient number of individuals potentially at risk is needed for successful reductions in HIV transmission. Second, combination prevention is essential since HIV prevention is neither simple nor simplistic. Reductions in HIV transmission need widespread and sustained efforts, and a mix of communication channels to disseminate messages to motivate people to engage in a range of options to reduce risk. Third, prevention programmes can do better. The effect of behavioural strategies could be increased by aiming for many goals (eg, delay in onset of first intercourse, reduction in number of sexual partners, increases in condom use, etc) that are achieved by use of multilevel approaches (eg, couples, families, social and sexual networks, institutions, and entire communities) with populations both uninfected and infected with HIV. Fourth, prevention science can do better. Interventions derived from behavioural science have a role in overall HIV-prevention efforts, but they are insufficient when used by themselves to produce substantial and lasting reductions in HIV transmission between individuals or in entire communities. Fifth, we need to get the simple things right. The fundamentals of HIV prevention need to be agreed upon, funded, implemented, measured, and achieved. That, presently, is not the case. PMID:18687459

  13. Antiretroviral Therapy Reduces HIV Transmission in Discordant Couples in Rural Yunnan, China

    PubMed Central

    He, Na; Duan, Song; Ding, Yingying; Rou, Keming; McGoogan, Jennifer M.; Jia, Manhong; Yang, Yuecheng; Wang, Jibao; Montaner, Julio S. G.; Wu, Zunyou

    2013-01-01

    Background Although HIV treatment as prevention (TasP) via early antiretroviral therapy (ART) has proven to reduce transmissions among HIV-serodiscordant couples, its full implementation in developing countries remains a challenge. In this study, we determine whether China's current HIV treatment program prevents new HIV infections among discordant couples in rural China. Methods A prospective, longitudinal cohort study was conducted from June 2009 to March 2011, in rural Yunnan. A total of 1,618 HIV-discordant couples were eligible, 1,101 were enrolled, and 813 were followed for an average of 1.4 person-years (PY). Routine ART was prescribed to HIV-positive spouses according to eligibility (CD4<350 cells/µl). Seroconversion was used to determine HIV incidence. Results A total of 17 seroconversions were documented within 1,127 PY of follow-up, for an overall incidence of 1.5 per 100 PY. Epidemiological and genetic evidence confirmed that all 17 seroconverters were infected via marital secondary sexual transmission. Having an ART-experienced HIV-positive partner was associated with a lower rate of seroconvertion compared with having an ART-naïve HIV-positive partner (0.8 per 100 PY vs. 2.4 per 100 PY, HR = 0.34, 95%CI = 0.12–0.97, p = 0.0436). While we found that ART successfully suppressed plasma viral load to <400 copies/ml in the majority of cases (85.0% vs. 19.5%, p<0.0001 at baseline), we did document five seroconversions among ART-experienced subgroup. Conclusions ART is associated with a 66% reduction in HIV incidence among discordant couples in our sample, demonstrating the effectiveness of China's HIV treatment program at preventing new infections, and providing support for earlier ART initiation and TasP implementation in this region. PMID:24236010

  14. Association of HIV-1 Envelope-Specific Breast Milk IgA Responses with Reduced Risk of Postnatal Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Pollara, Justin; McGuire, Erin; Fouda, Genevieve G.; Rountree, Wes; Eudailey, Josh; Overman, R. Glenn; Seaton, Kelly E.; Deal, Aaron; Edwards, R. Whitney; Tegha, Gerald; Kamwendo, Deborah; Kumwenda, Jacob; Nelson, Julie A. E.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Brinkley, Christie; Denny, Thomas N.; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Ellington, Sascha; King, Caroline C.; Jamieson, Denise J.; van der Horst, Charles; Kourtis, Athena P.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Ferrari, Guido

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infants born to HIV-1-infected mothers in resource-limited areas where replacement feeding is unsafe and impractical are repeatedly exposed to HIV-1 throughout breastfeeding. Despite this, the majority of infants do not contract HIV-1 postnatally, even in the absence of maternal antiretroviral therapy. This suggests that immune factors in breast milk of HIV-1-infected mothers help to limit vertical transmission. We compared the HIV-1 envelope-specific breast milk and plasma antibody responses of clade C HIV-1-infected postnatally transmitting and nontransmitting mothers in the control arm of the Malawi-based Breastfeeding Antiretrovirals and Nutrition Study using multivariable logistic regression modeling. We found no association between milk or plasma neutralization activity, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, or HIV-1 envelope-specific IgG responses and postnatal transmission risk. While the envelope-specific breast milk and plasma IgA responses also did not reach significance in predicting postnatal transmission risk in the primary model after correction for multiple comparisons, subsequent exploratory analysis using two distinct assay methodologies demonstrated that the magnitudes of breast milk total and secretory IgA responses against a consensus HIV-1 envelope gp140 (B.con env03) were associated with reduced postnatal transmission risk. These results suggest a protective role for mucosal HIV-1 envelope-specific IgA responses in the context of postnatal virus transmission. This finding supports further investigations into the mechanisms by which mucosal IgA reduces risk of HIV-1 transmission via breast milk and into immune interventions aimed at enhancing this response. IMPORTANCE Infants born to HIV-1-infected mothers are repeatedly exposed to the virus in breast milk. Remarkably, the transmission rate is low, suggesting that immune factors in the breast milk of HIV-1-infected mothers help to limit transmission. We compared the antibody

  15. Meta-analyses on behavioral interventions to reduce the risk of transmission of HIV.

    PubMed

    Vergidis, Paschalis I; Falagas, Matthew E

    2009-06-01

    Different behavioral interventions have found to be efficacious in reducing high-risk sexual activity. Interventions have been evaluated in both original research and meta-analytic reviews. Most of the studies have shown that interventions are efficacious among different study populations. In adolescents, both in- and out-of-the classroom interventions showed a decrease in the risk of unprotected sex. In African Americans, greater efficacy was found for interventions including peer education. For Latinos, effect was larger in interventions with segmentation in the same gender. Geographic and social isolation are barriers in approaching MSM. For IDUs, interventions provided within a treatment program have an impact on risk reduction above that produced by drug treatment alone. Finally, people diagnosed with HIV tend to reduce their sexual risk behavior. However, adherence to safe sex practices for life can be challenging. Relentless efforts for implementation of behavioral interventions to decrease high-risk behavior are necessary to decrease HIV transmission.

  16. Human breast milk and antiretrovirals dramatically reduce oral HIV-1 transmission in BLT humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Angela; Swanson, Michael D; Nochi, Tomonori; Olesen, Rikke; Denton, Paul W; Chateau, Morgan; Garcia, J Victor

    2012-01-01

    Currently, over 15% of new HIV infections occur in children. Breastfeeding is a major contributor to HIV infections in infants. This represents a major paradox in the field because in vitro, breast milk has been shown to have a strong inhibitory effect on HIV infectivity. However, this inhibitory effect has never been demonstrated in vivo. Here, we address this important paradox using the first humanized mouse model of oral HIV transmission. We established that reconstitution of the oral cavity and upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract of humanized bone marrow/liver/thymus (BLT) mice with human leukocytes, including the human cell types important for mucosal HIV transmission (i.e. dendritic cells, macrophages and CD4⁺ T cells), renders them susceptible to oral transmission of cell-free and cell-associated HIV. Oral transmission of HIV resulted in systemic infection of lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues that is characterized by the presence of HIV RNA in plasma and a gradual decline of CD4⁺ T cells in peripheral blood. Consistent with infection of the oral cavity, we observed virus shedding into saliva. We then evaluated the role of human breast milk on oral HIV transmission. Our in vivo results demonstrate that breast milk has a strong inhibitory effect on oral transmission of both cell-free and cell-associated HIV. Finally, we evaluated the effect of antiretrovirals on oral transmission of HIV. Our results show that systemic antiretrovirals administered prior to exposure can efficiently prevent oral HIV transmission in BLT mice.

  17. Vitamin A supplements for reducing mother-to-child HIV transmission.

    PubMed

    Wiysonge, Charles S; Ndze, Valantine N; Kongnyuy, Eugene J; Shey, Muki S

    2017-09-07

    Strategies to reduce the risk of mother-to-child transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) include lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV-positive women, exclusive breastfeeding from birth for six weeks plus nevirapine or replacement feeding plus nevirapine from birth for four to six weeks, elective Caesarean section delivery, and avoiding giving children chewed food. In some settings, these interventions may not be practical, feasible, or affordable. Simple, inexpensive, and effective interventions (that could potentially be implemented even in the absence of prenatal HIV testing programmes) would be valuable. Vitamin A, which plays a role in immune function, is one low-cost intervention that has been suggested in such settings. To summarize the effects of giving vitamin A supplements to HIV-positive women during pregnancy and after delivery. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, Embase, and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP) up to 25 August 2017, and checked the reference lists of relevant articles for eligible studies. We included randomized controlled trials conducted in any setting that compared vitamin A supplements to placebo or no intervention among HIV-positive women during pregnancy or after delivery, or both. At least two review authors independently assessed study eligibility and extracted data. We expressed study results as risk ratios (RR) or mean differences (MD) as appropriate, with their 95% confidence intervals (CI), and conducted random-effects meta-analyses. This is an update of a review last published in 2011. Five trials met the inclusion criteria. These were conducted in Malawi, South Africa, Tanzania, and Zimbabwe between 1995 and 2005 and none of the participants received ART. Women allocated to intervention arms received vitamin A supplements at a variety of doses (daily during pregnancy; a single dose immediately after

  18. Cost-effectiveness of a community-based intervention for reducing the transmission of Schistosoma haematobium and HIV in Africa.

    PubMed

    Ndeffo Mbah, Martial L; Kjetland, Eyrun F; Atkins, Katherine E; Poolman, Eric M; Orenstein, Evan W; Meyers, Lauren Ancel; Townsend, Jeffrey P; Galvani, Alison P

    2013-05-07

    Epidemiological studies from sub-Saharan Africa show that genital infection with Schistosoma haematobium [corrected] may increase the risk for HIV infection in young women. Therefore, preventing schistosomiasis has the potential to reduce HIV transmission in sub-Saharan Africa. We developed a transmission model of female genital schistosomiasis and HIV infections that we fit to epidemiological data of HIV and female genital schistosomiasis prevalence and coinfection in rural Zimbabwe. We used the model to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a multifaceted community-based intervention for preventing schistosomiasis and, consequently, HIV infections in rural Zimbabwe, from the perspective of a health payer. The community-based intervention combined provision of clean water, sanitation, and health education (WSH) with administration of praziquantel to school-aged children. Considering variation in efficacy between 10% and 70% of WSH for reducing S. haematobium [corrected] transmission, our model predicted that community-based intervention is likely to be cost-effective in Zimbabwe at an aggregated WSH cost corresponding to US $725-$1,000 per individual over a 20-y intervention period. These costs compare favorably with empirical measures of WSH provision in developing countries, indicating that integrated community-based intervention for reducing the transmission of S. haematobium [corrected] is an economically attractive strategy for reducing schistosomiasis and HIV transmission in sub-Saharan Africa that would have a powerful impact on averting infections and saving lives.

  19. Cost-effectiveness of a community-based intervention for reducing the transmission of Schistosoma haematobium and HIV in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Ndeffo Mbah, Martial L.; Kjetland, Eyrun F.; Atkins, Katherine E.; Poolman, Eric M.; Orenstein, Evan W.; Meyers, Lauren Ancel; Townsend, Jeffrey P.; Galvani, Alison P.

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies from sub-Saharan Africa show that genital infection with Schistosoma haematobium may increase the risk for HIV infection in young women. Therefore, preventing schistosomiasis has the potential to reduce HIV transmission in sub-Saharan Africa. We developed a transmission model of female genital schistosomiasis and HIV infections that we fit to epidemiological data of HIV and female genital schistosomiasis prevalence and coinfection in rural Zimbabwe. We used the model to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a multifaceted community-based intervention for preventing schistosomiasis and, consequently, HIV infections in rural Zimbabwe, from the perspective of a health payer. The community-based intervention combined provision of clean water, sanitation, and health education (WSH) with administration of praziquantel to school-aged children. Considering variation in efficacy between 10% and 70% of WSH for reducing S. haematobium transmission, our model predicted that community-based intervention is likely to be cost-effective in Zimbabwe at an aggregated WSH cost corresponding to US $725–$1,000 per individual over a 20-y intervention period. These costs compare favorably with empirical measures of WSH provision in developing countries, indicating that integrated community-based intervention for reducing the transmission of S. haematobium is an economically attractive strategy for reducing schistosomiasis and HIV transmission in sub-Saharan Africa that would have a powerful impact on averting infections and saving lives. PMID:23589884

  20. Reduced HIV transmission at subsequent pregnancy in a resource-poor setting.

    PubMed

    Gumbo, Felicity Zvanyadza; Kandawasvika, Gwendoline Quintoline; Duri, Kerina; Mapingure, Munyaradzi Paul; Kurewa, Nyaradzai Edith; Nathoo, Kusum; Rusakaniko, Simbarashe; Chirenje, Mike Zvavahera; Stray-Pedersen, Babill

    2011-07-01

    Several studies indicate that HIV-infected women continue to have children. We set out to determine the trend in HIV transmission at subsequent pregnancies. From 2002-2003, pregnant women were enrolled in a single dose nevirapine-based Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV (PMTCT) programme. Six years later, women with subsequent children in this cohort were identified and their children's HIV status determined. From 330 identified HIV-infected mothers, 73 had second/subsequent children with HIV results. Of these, nine (12.3%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.6-20.1%) children were HIV-infected. Of the 73 second children, 51 had older siblings who had been initially enrolled in the study with definitive HIV results with an infection rate of 17/51 (33.3%, 95% CI: 19.9-46.7). About 35% of the women had been on antiretroviral drugs. These results demonstrate lower subsequent HIV transmission rates in women on a national PMTCT programme in a resource-poor setting with the advent of antiretroviral therapy.

  1. Potential Cost-Effectiveness of Schistosomiasis Treatment for Reducing HIV Transmission in Africa – The Case of Zimbabwean Women

    PubMed Central

    Ndeffo Mbah, Martial L.; Poolman, Eric M.; Atkins, Katherine E.; Orenstein, Evan W.; Meyers, Lauren Ancel; Townsend, Jeffrey P.; Galvani, Alison P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Epidemiological data from Zimbabwe suggests that genital infection with Schistosoma haematobium may increase the risk of HIV infection in young women. Therefore, the treatment of Schistosoma haematobium with praziquantel could be a potential strategy for reducing HIV infection. Here we assess the potential cost-effectiveness of praziquantel as a novel intervention strategy against HIV infection. Methods We developed a mathematical model of female genital schistosomiasis (FGS) and HIV infections in Zimbabwe that we fitted to cross-sectional data of FGS and HIV prevalence of 1999. We validated our epidemic projections using antenatal clinic data on HIV prevalence. We simulated annual praziquantel administration to school-age children. We then used these model predictions to perform a cost-effectiveness analysis of annual administration of praziquantel as a potential measure to reduce the burden of HIV in sub-Saharan Africa. Findings We showed that for a variation of efficacy between 30–70% of mass praziquantel administration for reducing the enhanced risk of HIV transmission per sexual act due to FGS, annual administration of praziquantel to school-age children in Zimbabwe could result in net savings of US$16–101 million compared with no mass treatment of schistosomiasis over a ten-year period. For a variation in efficacy between 30–70% of mass praziquantel administration for reducing the acquisition of FGS, annual administration of praziquantel to school-age children could result in net savings of US$36−92 million over a ten-year period. Conclusions In addition to reducing schistosomiasis burden, mass praziquantel administration may be a highly cost-effective way of reducing HIV infections in sub-Saharan Africa. Program costs per case of HIV averted are similar to, and under some conditions much better than, other interventions that are currently implemented in Africa to reduce HIV transmission. As a cost-saving strategy, mass praziquantel

  2. HIV Drug Resistance Surveillance Among Jamaican Men Who Have Sex with Men Should Be Prioritized for Reducing HIV Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Ann M.; Nelson, Julie A.E.; Weir, Sharon S.; Figueroa, J. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is highest among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Jamaica but no genotypic data are available on the virus strains that are responsible for the epidemic among this key population. HIV-1 polymerase (pol) genes from 65 MSM were sequenced and used to predict drug resistance mutations. An HIV drug resistance prevalence of 28% (minimum 13%) was observed among this cohort, with the most frequent mutations conferring resistance to efavirenz, nevirapine, and lamivudine. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequences revealed 10 times the number of linked HIV infections among this cohort than respondent reporting. HIV treatment and prevention efforts in Jamaica could benefit significantly from Pol genotyping of the HIV strains infecting socially vulnerable MSM prior to initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART), as this would guide suppressive ART and unearth HIV transmission clusters to enable more effective delivery of treatment and prevention programs. PMID:26133540

  3. Compassionate Love as a Predictor of Reduced HIV Disease Progression and Transmission Risk

    PubMed Central

    Ironson, Gail; Stuetzle, Rick; Fletcher, Mary A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. This study examined if compassionate love (CL) predicts HIV disease progression and transmission risk. Scientific study of CL emerged with Underwood's working model of other-centered CL, defining five criteria: free choice, cognitive understanding, valuing/empowering, openness/receptivity for spirituality, and response of the heart. Method. This 10-year cohort study collected 6-monthly interviews/essays on coping with HIV and trauma of 177 people with HIV in South Florida. Secondary qualitative content analysis on other-centered CL inductively added the component of CL towards self. Deductively, we coded the presence of the five criteria of CL and rated the benefit of CL for the recipient on a 6-point Likert scale. Growth-curve modeling (reduced to 4 years due to cohort effects) investigated if CL predicts CD4 slope (HIV disease progression) and cumulative viral load detection (transmission risk). Results. Valuing/empowering and cognitive understanding were the essential criteria for CL to confer long-term benefits. CL had a higher benefit for recipients if given out of free choice. High scores of CL towards self were reciprocal with receiving (93%) and giving (77%) other-centered CL. Conversely, those rated low on CL towards self were least likely to score high on receiving (38%) and giving (49%) other-centered CL. Growth-curve modeling showed that CL towards self predicted 4-year cumulative undetectable viral load (independent from sociocultural differences, substance use disorder, baseline CD4 and viral load). Those high versus low on CL self were 2.25 times more likely to have undetectable viral load at baseline and 1.49 times more likely to maintain undetectable viral load over time. CL towards self predicted CD4 preservation after controlling for differences in CL giving. Conclusions. CL towards self is potentially the seed of being expressive and receptive of CL. Health care professionals prepared to walk the extra mile for those who neglect and

  4. Short-course AZT reduces HIV transmission to infants; Glaxo cuts AZT price for developing countries.

    PubMed

    Baker, R

    1998-04-01

    A four-week AZT treatment recently tested by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and health officials in Thailand revealed reductions in mother-to-infant transmission by 50 percent. The treatment offers hope to HIV-positive pregnant women in developing countries who do not have access to the full-course treatment common in the United States. Critics have charged that the study was unethical because some women were given placebos. The manufacturer, Glaxo Wellcome, is dropping AZT prices by 75 percent. The drug treatment and testing will cost about $100, instead of the $800 to $1,000 that the full treatment costs. Even with the price break, many feel that developed countries will need to heavily subsidize the programs to reduce the number of infant infections, now estimated at 550,000 per year.

  5. A Behavioral Intervention Reduces HIV Transmission Risk by Promoting Sustained Serosorting Practices Among HIV-Infected Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Stephen F.; Shade, Starley B.; Steward, Wayne T.; Carrico, Adam W.; Remien, Robert H.; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Kelly, Jeffrey A.; Charlebois, Edwin D.; Johnson, Mallory O.; Chesney, Margaret A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine factors that explain the effect of a cognitive-behavioral intervention on reductions in HIV transmission risk among HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM). Method Of the 1,910 HIV-infected MSM screened, 616 participants considered to be at risk of transmitting HIV were randomized to a 15-session, individually delivered cognitive-behavioral intervention (n = 301) or a wait-list control (n = 315). Results Consistent with previous intent-to-treat findings, there was an overall reduction in transmission risk acts among MSM in both intervention and control arms, with significant intervention effects observed at the 5, 10, 15, and 20 month assessments (Risk Ratios = .78, .62, .48, and .38, respectively). These intervention-related decreases in HIV transmission risk acts appeared to be partially due to sustained serosorting practices. MSM in the intervention condition reported a significantly greater proportion of sexual partners who were HIV-infected at the 5 and 10 month assessments (Risk Ratio = 1.14 and 1.18). Conclusions The Healthy Living Project, a cognitive-behavioral intervention, is efficacious in reducing transmission risk acts among MSM. This appears to have been due in large part to the fact that MSM in the intervention condition reported sustained serosorting practices. PMID:18989221

  6. Reducing pediatric HIV infection: estimating mother-to-child transmission rates in a program setting in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Torpey, Kwasi; Kasonde, Prisca; Kabaso, Mushota; Weaver, Mark A; Bryan, Gail; Mukonka, Victor; Bweupe, Maximillian; Zimba, Chilunje; Mwale, Felicitas; Colebunders, Robert

    2010-08-01

    Vertical transmission of HIV remains the main source of pediatric HIV infection in Africa with transmission rates as high as 25%-45% without intervention. Even though effective interventions to reduce vertical transmission of HIV are now available and remarkable progress has been made in scaling up prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) services, the effectiveness of PMTCT interventions is unknown in Zambia. In this study, we estimate HIV vertical transmission rates at different age bands among perinatally exposed children. The study analyzed program data of DNA polymerase chain reaction results and selected client information on dried blood spot samples from perinatally exposed children aged 0-12 months sent to the polymerase chain reaction laboratory from 5 provinces between September 2007 and January 2009. Samples of 8237 babies between 0 and 12 months were analyzed, with 84% of the mothers having ever breastfed their children. The observed transmission rate was 6.5% (5.1%, 7.8%) among infants aged 0-6 weeks when both mother and infant received interventions compared with 20.9% (12.3%, 29.5%) where no intervention was given to either mother or baby. Observed HIV transmission with single-dose nevirapine (sdNVP) was 8.5% (5.9%, 11.0%) among infants aged 0-6 weeks, whereas zidovudine with sdNVP (zidovudine + NVP) and highly active antiretroviral therapy were associated with observed transmission rates of 6.8% (4.5%, 9.1%) and 5.0% (3.0%, 7.0%), respectively; whereas these estimates were not significantly different from one another, they were all significantly lower than no intervention for which the estimated rate was 20.9%. Regardless of the intervention, the observed transmission rates were higher among infants aged 6-12 months. PMTCT interventions, including sdNVP, are working in program settings. However, postnatal transmission especially after 6 months through suboptimal feeding practises remains an important challenge to further reduce pediatric

  7. Lost opportunities to reduce periconception HIV transmission: safer conception counseling by South African providers addresses perinatal but not sexual HIV transmission.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Lynn T; Milford, Cecilia; Kaida, Angela; Ehrlich, Matthew J; Ng, Courtney; Greener, Ross; Mosery, F N; Harrison, Abigail; Psaros, Christina; Safren, Steven A; Bajunirwe, Francis; Wilson, Ira B; Bangsberg, David R; Smit, Jennifer A

    2014-12-01

    Safer conception strategies create opportunities for HIV-serodiscordant couples to realize fertility goals and minimize periconception HIV transmission. Patient-provider communication about fertility goals is the first step in safer conception counseling. We explored provider practices of assessing fertility intentions among HIV-infected men and women, attitudes toward people living with HIV (PLWH) having children, and knowledge and provision of safer conception advice. We conducted in-depth interviews (9 counselors, 15 nurses, 5 doctors) and focus group discussions (6 counselors, 7 professional nurses) in eThekwini District, South Africa. Data were translated, transcribed, and analyzed using content analysis with NVivo10 software. Among 42 participants, median age was 41 (range, 28-60) years, 93% (39) were women, and median years worked in the clinic was 7 (range, 1-27). Some providers assessed women's, not men's, plans for having children at antiretroviral therapy initiation, to avoid fetal exposure to efavirenz. When conducted, reproductive counseling included CD4 cell count and HIV viral load assessment, advising mutual HIV status disclosure, and referral to another provider. Barriers to safer conception counseling included provider assumptions of HIV seroconcordance, low knowledge of safer conception strategies, personal feelings toward PLWH having children, and challenges to tailoring safer sex messages. Providers need information about HIV serodiscordance and safer conception strategies to move beyond discussing only perinatal transmission and maternal health for PLWH who choose to conceive. Safer conception counseling may be more feasible if the message is distilled to delaying conception attempts until the infected partner is on antiretroviral therapy. Designated and motivated nurse providers may be required to provide comprehensive safer conception counseling.

  8. Lost Opportunities to Reduce Periconception HIV Transmission: Safer Conception Counseling By South African Providers Addresses Perinatal but not Sexual HIV Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Milford, Cecilia; Kaida, Angela; Ehrlich, Matthew J.; Ng, Courtney; Greener, Ross; Mosery, F. N.; Harrison, Abigail; Psaros, Christina; Safren, Steven A.; Bajunirwe, Francis; Wilson, Ira B.; Bangsberg, David R.; Smit, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Safer conception strategies create opportunities for HIV-serodiscordant couples to realize fertility goals and minimize periconception HIV transmission. Patient–provider communication about fertility goals is the first step in safer conception counseling. Methods: We explored provider practices of assessing fertility intentions among HIV-infected men and women, attitudes toward people living with HIV (PLWH) having children, and knowledge and provision of safer conception advice. We conducted in-depth interviews (9 counselors, 15 nurses, 5 doctors) and focus group discussions (6 counselors, 7 professional nurses) in eThekwini District, South Africa. Data were translated, transcribed, and analyzed using content analysis with NVivo10 software. Results: Among 42 participants, median age was 41 (range, 28–60) years, 93% (39) were women, and median years worked in the clinic was 7 (range, 1–27). Some providers assessed women's, not men's, plans for having children at antiretroviral therapy initiation, to avoid fetal exposure to efavirenz. When conducted, reproductive counseling included CD4 cell count and HIV viral load assessment, advising mutual HIV status disclosure, and referral to another provider. Barriers to safer conception counseling included provider assumptions of HIV seroconcordance, low knowledge of safer conception strategies, personal feelings toward PLWH having children, and challenges to tailoring safer sex messages. Conclusions: Providers need information about HIV serodiscordance and safer conception strategies to move beyond discussing only perinatal transmission and maternal health for PLWH who choose to conceive. Safer conception counseling may be more feasible if the message is distilled to delaying conception attempts until the infected partner is on antiretroviral therapy. Designated and motivated nurse providers may be required to provide comprehensive safer conception counseling. PMID:25436820

  9. “Computerized Counseling Reduces HIV-1 Viral Load and Sexual Transmission Risk: Findings from a Randomized Controlled Trial”

    PubMed Central

    KURTH, Ann E.; SPIELBERG, Freya; CLELAND, Charles M.; LAMBDIN, Barrot; BANGSBERG, David R.; FRICK, Pamela A.; SEVERYNEN, Anneleen O.; CLAUSEN, Marc; NORMAN, Robert G.; LOCKHART, David; SIMONI, Jane M.; HOLMES, King K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Evaluate a computerized intervention supporting antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and HIV transmission prevention. Design Longitudinal RCT. Settings An academic HIV clinic and a community-based organization in Seattle. Subjects 240 HIV-positive adults on ART; 209 completed nine-month follow-up (87% retention). Intervention Randomization to computerized counseling or assessment-only, 4 sessions over 9 months. Main Outcome Measures HIV-1 viral suppression, and self-reported ART adherence, and transmission risks, compared using generalized estimating equations. Results Overall, intervention participants had reduced viral load (VL): mean 0.17 log10 decline, versus 0.13 increase in controls, p = 0.053, and significant difference in ART adherence baseline to 9 months (p = 0.046). Their sexual transmission risk behaviors decreased (OR = 0.55, p = 0.020), a reduction not seen among controls (OR = 1.1, p = 0.664), and a significant difference in change (p = 0.040). Intervention effect was driven by those most in need: among those with detectable virus at baseline (>30 copies/milliliter, n=89), intervention effect was mean 0.60 log10 VL decline versus 0.15 increase in controls, p=0.034. ART adherence at the final follow-up was 13 points higher among intervention participants versus controls, p = 0.038. Conclusions Computerized counseling is promising for integrated ART adherence and safer sex, especially for individuals with problems in these areas. This is the first intervention to report improved ART adherence, viral suppression, and reduced secondary sexual transmission risk behavior. PMID:24384803

  10. Priority interventions to reduce HIV transmission in sex work settings in sub-Saharan Africa and delivery of these services.

    PubMed

    Chersich, Matthew F; Luchters, Stanley; Ntaganira, Innocent; Gerbase, Antonio; Lo, Ying-Ru; Scorgie, Fiona; Steen, Richard

    2013-03-04

    Virtually no African country provides HIV prevention services in sex work settings with an adequate scale and intensity. Uncertainty remains about the optimal set of interventions and mode of delivery. We systematically reviewed studies reporting interventions for reducing HIV transmission among female sex workers in sub-Saharan Africa between January 2000 and July 2011. Medline (PubMed) and non-indexed journals were searched for studies with quantitative study outcomes. We located 26 studies, including seven randomized trials. Evidence supports implementation of the following interventions to reduce unprotected sex among female sex workers: peer-mediated condom promotion, risk-reduction counselling and skills-building for safer sex. One study found that interventions to counter hazardous alcohol-use lowered unprotected sex. Data also show effectiveness of screening for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and syndromic STI treatment, but experience with periodic presumptive treatment is limited. HIV testing and counselling is essential for facilitating sex workers' access to care and antiretroviral treatment (ART), but testing models for sex workers and indeed for ART access are little studied, as are structural interventions, which create conditions conducive for risk reduction. With the exception of Senegal, persistent criminalization of sex work across Africa reduces sex workers' control over working conditions and impedes their access to health services. It also obstructs health-service provision and legal protection. There is sufficient evidence of effectiveness of targeted interventions with female sex workers in Africa to inform delivery of services for this population. With improved planning and political will, services - including peer interventions, condom promotion and STI screening - would act at multiple levels to reduce HIV exposure and transmission efficiency among sex workers. Initiatives are required to enhance access to HIV testing and ART for

  11. Heterosexual transmission of HIV.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A M; Laga, M

    1988-01-01

    Recent developments concerning heterosexual transmission of HIV (review of 1988 literature only) suggest improved understanding of the pattern of spread and role of risk behaviors and biological cofactors in its transmission. 3 distinct patterns if HIV infection are known: heterosexual spread in sub-Saharan Africa and the Caribbean, spread primarily among homosexuals and injecting drug users in Europe, North American and much of Latin America and Australia, and both homosexual and heterosexual transmission in Asia, the Pacific, the Middle East and Eastern Europe, where prevalence is low. In Africa an estimated 80% of cases are acquired heterosexually. Important risk factors are number of sex partners, sex with prostitutes, being a prostitute, being a sex partner of an infected person, and having a history of other sexually transmitted diseases. Prevalence rates have risen rapidly in Zaire and Kenya. In Africa, acquisition of HIV is related to sexual activity only. In contrast, in the U.S., heterosexual cases make up only 4% of all cases, and in Europe only 6%. Data on types of sexual transmission of HIV are mounting, in aggregate suggestive of a marked heterogeneity in infectivity and possibly susceptibility between individuals. Among couples where the man is positive, in some places individuals appear to be highly infective, notably those from Kinshasa, Zaire and Haiti, while other series of discordant couples the receptive partner remained seronegative for several years. Transmission from women to men appears to be less efficient than from men to women, as has been observed with other STDs such as gonorrhea. Biological cofactors implicated in enhanced HIV transmission appear to be advanced CDC Stage IV AIDS disease, with low T-helper lymphocyte counts and high antigenemia; concomitant STDS, especially those with genital ulceration; lack of circumcision; oral contraceptive use; practice of anal intercourse; inconsistent or no use of condoms. Theoretical models for

  12. Impact of Heterogeneity in Sexual Behavior on Effectiveness in Reducing HIV Transmission with Test-and-Treat Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Rozhnova, Ganna; van der Loeff, Maarten F. Schim; Heijne, Janneke C. M.; Kretzschmar, Mirjam E.

    2016-01-01

    The WHO’s early-release guideline for antiretroviral treatment (ART) of HIV infection based on a recent trial conducted in 34 countries recommends starting treatment immediately upon an HIV diagnosis. Therefore, the test-and-treat strategy may become more widely used in an effort to scale up HIV treatment and curb further transmission. Here we examine behavioural determinants of HIV transmission and how heterogeneity in sexual behaviour influences the outcomes of this strategy. Using a deterministic model, we perform a systematic investigation into the effects of various mixing patterns in a population of men who have sex with men (MSM), stratified by partner change rates, on the elimination threshold and endemic HIV prevalence. We find that both the level of overdispersion in the distribution of the number of sexual partners and mixing between population subgroups have a large influence on endemic prevalence before introduction of ART and on possible long term effectiveness of ART. Increasing heterogeneity in risk behavior may lead to lower endemic prevalence levels, but requires higher coverage levels of ART for elimination. Elimination is only feasible for populations with a rather low degree of assortativeness of mixing and requires treatment coverage of almost 80% if rates of testing and treatment uptake by all population subgroups are equal. In this case, for fully assortative mixing and 80% coverage endemic prevalence is reduced by 57%. In the presence of heterogeneity in ART uptake, elimination is easier to achieve when the subpopulation with highest risk behavior is tested and treated more often than the rest of the population, and vice versa when it is less. The developed framework can be used to extract information on behavioral heterogeneity from existing data which is otherwise hard to determine from population surveys. PMID:27479074

  13. Cultural feasibility studies in preparation for clinical trials to reduce maternal-infant HIV transmission in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Coreil, J; Losikoff, P; Pincu, R; Mayard, G; Ruff, A J; Hausler, H P; Desormeau, J; Davis, H; Boulos, R; Halsey, N A

    1998-02-01

    A cultural feasibility study is defined as one that investigates scientific as well as ethical, behavioral, and social issues in the design of clinical trials. The value of such a broadly defined assessment is illustrated through the presentation of two case studies conducted to prepare for clinical trials to reduce maternal-infant HIV transmission on Cité Soleil, Haiti. The first study addressed issues surrounding a trial of breast-feeding and exclusive bottle-feeding among HIV seropositive mothers. The second study focused on the implementation of a double-blind trial of HIV immune globulin and standard immune globulin to be administered to infants of seropositive mothers shortly after birth. Both cases used focus group interviews with mothers and in-depth interviews with key informants to investigate AIDS-related beliefs, acceptability of trial participation, risks to subjects, and community reactions and repercussions to the trial. Findings point to the difficulties posed by attempts to conduct trial involving complex research designs in socially disadvantaged populations. Recommendations highlight the need to consider the community-wide impact of a trial, and the need to undertake extensive educational preparation of participants to ensure informed consent and adherence to protocols.

  14. Guidelines for the care of pregnant women living with HIV and interventions to reduce perinatal transmission: executive summary.

    PubMed

    Money, Deborah; Tulloch, Karen; Boucoiran, Isabelle; Caddy, Sheila

    2014-08-01

    This guideline reviews the evidence relating to the care of pregnant women living with HIV and the prevention of perinatal HIV transmission. Prenatal care of pregnancies complicated by HIV infection should include monitoring by a multidisciplinary team with experts in this area. OUTCOMES evaluated include the impact of HIV on pregnancy outcome and the efficacy and safety of antiretroviral therapy and other measures to decrease the risk of vertical transmission. Published literature was retrieved through searches of PubMed and The Cochrane Library in 2012 and 2013 using appropriate controlled vocabulary (HIV, anti-retroviral agents, pregnancy, delivery) and key words (HIV, pregnancy, antiretroviral agents, vertical transmission, perinatal transmission). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies published in English or French. There were no date restrictions. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to June 2013. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. The quality of evidence in this document was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table 1).

  15. Biology of HIV Mucosal Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li

    2008-01-01

    Purpose of review HIV-1 mucosal transmission plays a critical role in HIV-1 infection and AIDS pathogenesis. This review summarizes the latest advances in biological studies of HIV-1 mucosal transmission, highlighting the implications of these studies in the development of microbicides to prevent HIV-1 transmission. Recent findings New studies of initial HIV-1 infection using improved culture models updated the current view of mucosal transmission. Mechanistic studies enhanced our understanding of cell-cell transmission of HIV-1 mediated by the major target cells, including dendritic cells, CD4+ T cells, and macrophages. Increasing evidence indicated the significance of host factors and immune responses in HIV-1 mucosal infection and transmission. Summary Recent progress in HIV-1 mucosal infection and transmission enriches our knowledge of virus-host interactions and viral pathogenesis. Functional studies of HIV-1 interactions with host cells can provide new insights into the design of more effective approaches to combat HIV-1 infection and AIDS. PMID:18802490

  16. Timely antiretroviral prophylaxis during pregnancy effectively reduces HIV mother-to-child transmission in eight counties in China: a prospective study during 2004-2011.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Wang, Linhong; Fang, Liwen; Wang, Ailing; Jin, Xi; Wang, Fang; Wang, Xiaoyan; Qiao, Yaping; Sullivan, Sheena G; Rutherford, Shannon; Zhang, Lei

    2016-10-10

    This study investigates the improvement of the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) in China during 2004-2011. A clinic-based prospective study was conducted among HIV-positive pregnant women and their children in eight counties across China. Associated factors of mother-to-child transmission were analyzed using regression analysis. A total of 1,387 HIV+ pregnant women and 1,377 HIV-exposed infants were enrolled. The proportion of pregnant women who received HIV testing increased significantly from 45.1% to 98.9% during 2004-2011. Among whom, the proportion that received antiretroviral (ARV) prophylaxis increased from 61% to 96%, and the corresponding coverage in children increased from 85% to 97% during the same period. In contrast, single-dose nevirapine treatment during delivery declined substantially from 97.9% to 12.7%. Vertical transmission of HIV declined from 11.1% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.7-23.3%) in 2004 to 1.2% (95% CI: 0.1-5.8%) in 2011. Women who had a vaginal delivery (compared to emergency caesarian section (odds ratio [OR] = 0.46; 0.23-0.96)) and mothers on multi-ARVs (OR = 0.11; 0.04-0.29) were less likely to transmit HIV to their newborns. Increasing HIV screening enabled timely HIV care and prophylaxis to reduce vertical transmission of HIV. Early and consistent treatment with multi-ARVs during pregnancy is vital for PMTCT.

  17. Randomized Controlled Trial of an Internet Application to Reduce HIV Transmission Behavior Among HIV Infected Men Who have Sex with Men.

    PubMed

    Milam, Joel; Morris, Sheldon; Jain, Sonia; Sun, Xiaoying; Dubé, Michael P; Daar, Eric S; Jimenez, Gustavo; Haubrich, Richard

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a prospective, randomized controlled trial of an internet-based safer-sex intervention to reduce HIV transmission risk behaviors. HIV-infected men who have sex with men (n = 179) were randomized to receive a monthly internet survey alone or a monthly survey plus tailored risk reduction messages over 12 months. The primary outcome was the cumulative sexually transmitted infection (STI) incidence over 12 months. Secondary outcomes included self-reported unprotected sex with an at risk partner and disclosure of HIV status to partners. In a modified intent to treat analysis, there was no difference in 12-month STI incidence between the intervention and control arms (30 vs. 25 %, respectively; p = 0.5). Unprotected sex decreased and disclosure increased over time in both study arms. These improvements suggest that addition of the risk-reduction messages provided little benefit beyond the self-monitoring of risky behavior via regular self-report risk behavior assessments (as was done in both study arms).

  18. Exploring the potential of expatriate social networks to reduce HIV and STI transmission: a protocol for a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Gemma; Bowser, Nicole Jasmine; Brown, Graham Ernest; Maycock, Bruce Richard

    2013-01-01

    HIV diagnoses acquired among Australian men working or travelling overseas including  Southeast Asia are increasing. This change within transmission dynamics means traditional approaches to prevention need to be considered in new contexts. The significance and role of social networks in mediating sexual risk behaviours may be influential. Greater understanding of expatriate and traveller behaviour is required to understand how local relationships are formed, how individuals enter and are socialised into networks, and how these networks may affect sexual intentions and behaviours. This paper describes the development of a qualitative protocol to investigate how social networks of Australian expatriates and long-term travellers might support interventions to reduce transmission of HIV and sexually transmitted infections. To explore the interactions of male expatriates and long-term travellers within and between their environments, symbolic interactionism will be the theoretical framework used. Grounded theory methods provide the ability to explain social processes through the development of explanatory theory. The primary data source will be interviews conducted in several rounds in both Australia and Southeast Asia. Purposive and theoretical sampling will be used to access participants whose data can provide depth and individual meaning. The role of expatriate and long-term traveller networks and their potential to impact health are uncertain. This study seeks to gain a deeper understanding of the Australian expatriate culture, behavioural contexts and experiences within social networks in  Southeast Asia. This research will provide tangible recommendations for policy and practice as the findings will be disseminated to health professionals and other stakeholders, academics and the community via local research and evaluation networks, conference presentations and online forums. The Curtin University Human Research Ethics Committee has granted approval for this

  19. Maternal Binding and Neutralizing IgG Responses Targeting the C-Terminal Region of the V3 Loop Are Predictive of Reduced Peripartum HIV-1 Transmission Risk.

    PubMed

    Martinez, David R; Vandergrift, Nathan; Douglas, Ayooluwa O; McGuire, Erin; Bainbridge, John; Nicely, Nathan I; Montefiori, David C; Tomaras, Georgia D; Fouda, Genevieve G; Permar, Sallie R

    2017-05-01

    The development of an effective maternal HIV-1 vaccine that could synergize with antiretroviral therapy (ART) to eliminate pediatric HIV-1 infection will require the characterization of maternal immune responses capable of blocking transmission of autologous HIV to the infant. We previously determined that maternal plasma antibody binding to linear epitopes within the variable loop 3 (V3) region of HIV envelope (Env) and neutralizing responses against easy-to-neutralize tier 1 viruses were associated with reduced risk of peripartum HIV infection in the historic U.S. Woman and Infant Transmission Study (WITS) cohort. Here, we defined the fine specificity and function of the potentially protective maternal V3-specific IgG antibodies associated with reduced peripartum HIV transmission risk in this cohort. The V3-specific IgG binding that predicted low risk of mother-to-child-transmission (MTCT) was dependent on the C-terminal flank of the V3 crown and particularly on amino acid position 317, a residue that has also been associated with breakthrough transmission in the RV144 vaccine trial. Remarkably, the fine specificity of potentially protective maternal plasma V3-specific tier 1 virus-neutralizing responses was dependent on the same region in the V3 loop. Our findings suggest that MTCT risk is associated with neutralizing maternal IgG that targets amino acid residues in the C-terminal region of the V3 loop crown, suggesting the importance of the region in immunogen design for maternal vaccines to prevent MTCT.IMPORTANCE Efforts to curb HIV-1 transmission in pediatric populations by antiretroviral therapy (ART) have been highly successful in both developed and developing countries. However, more than 150,000 infants continue to be infected each year, likely due to a combination of late maternal HIV diagnosis, lack of ART access or adherence, and drug-resistant viral strains. Defining the fine specificity of maternal humoral responses that partially protect against

  20. A Computer-Based Interactive Multimedia Program to Reduce HIV Transmission for Women with Intellectual Disability

    PubMed Central

    Delaine, Khaya

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite recent recognition of the need for preventive sexual health materials for people with intellectual disability (ID), there have been remarkably few health-based interventions designed for people with mild to moderate ID. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a computer-based interactive multimedia (CBIM) program to teach HIV/AIDS knowledge, skills, and decision-making. Methods Twenty-five women with mild to moderate intellectual disability evaluated the program. The study used a quasi-experimental within-subjects design to assess the efficacy of the CBIM program. Research participants completed five qualitative and quantitative instruments that assessed HIV knowledge, and decision-making skills regarding HIV prevention practices and condom application skills (i.e., demonstration of skills opening a condom and putting it on a model penis). In addition, 18 service providers who work with women with ID reviewed the program and completed a demographics questionnaire and a professional customer satisfaction survey. Results Women with ID showed statistically significant increases from pretest to posttest in all knowledge and skill domains. Furthermore, the statistical gains were accompanied by medium to large effect sizes. Overall, service providers rated the program highly on several outcome measures (stimulation, relevance, and usability). Conclusions The results of this study indicate the CBIM program was effective in increasing HIV/AIDS knowledge and skills among women with ID, who live both semi-independently and independently, in a single-session intervention. Since the CBIM program is not dependent on staff for instructional delivery, it is a highly efficient teaching tool; and CBIM is an efficacious means to provide behavioral health content, compensating for the dearth of available health promotion materials for people with ID. As such, it has a potential for broad distribution and implementation by medical practitioners, and

  1. A computer-based interactive multimedia program to reduce HIV transmission for women with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Wells, J; Clark, K D; Sarno, K

    2012-04-01

    Despite recent recognition of the need for preventive sexual health materials for people with intellectual disability (ID), there have been remarkably few health-based interventions designed for people with mild to moderate ID. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a computer-based interactive multimedia (CBIM) program to teach HIV/AIDS knowledge, skills and decision making. Twenty-five women with mild to moderate ID evaluated the program. The study used a quasi-experimental within-subjects design to assess the efficacy of the CBIM program. Research participants completed five qualitative and quantitative instruments that assessed HIV knowledge, and decision-making skills regarding HIV prevention practices and condom application skills (i.e. demonstration of skills opening a condom and putting it on a model penis). In addition, 18 service providers who work with women with ID reviewed the program and completed a demographics questionnaire and a professional customer satisfaction survey. Women with ID showed statistically significant increases from pre-test to post-test in all knowledge and skill domains. Furthermore, the statistical gains were accompanied by medium to large effect sizes. Overall, service providers rated the program highly on several outcome measures (stimulation, relevance and usability). The results of this study indicate the CBIM program was effective in increasing HIV/AIDS knowledge and skills among women with ID, who live both semi-independently and independently, in a single-session intervention. As the CBIM program is not dependent on staff for instructional delivery, it is a highly efficient teaching tool; and CBIM is an efficacious means to provide behavioural health content, compensating for the dearth of available health promotion materials for people with ID. As such, it has a potential for broad distribution and implementation by medical practitioners, and public health offices. People with ID are part of our society

  2. Can combination prevention strategies reduce HIV transmission in generalized epidemic settings in Africa? The HPTN 071 (PopART) study plan in South Africa and Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Vermund, Sten H.; Fidler, Sarah J.; Ayles, Helen; Beyers, Nulda; Hayes, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    The HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) is conducting the HPTN 071(PopART) study in 21 communities in Zambia and South Africa with support from a consortium of funders. HPTN 071(PopART) is a community-randomized trial of a combination prevention strategy to reduce HIV incidence in the context of the generalized epidemic of southern Africa. The full PopART intervention strategy is anchored in home-based HIV testing and facilitated linkage of HIV-infected persons to care through community health workers, and universal antiretroviral therapy for seropositive persons regardless of CD4+ cell count or HIV viral load. In order to further reduce risk of HIV acquisition among uninfected individuals, the study aims to expand voluntary medical male circumcision, diagnosis and treatment of sexually transmitted infections, behavioral counseling, and condom distribution. The full PopART intervention strategy also incorporates promotion of other interventions designed to reduce HIV and tuberculosis transmission, including optimization of the prevention of mother to child HIV transmission and enhanced individual and public health tuberculosis services. Success for the PopART strategy depends upon the ability to increase coverage for the study interventions whose uptake is a necessary antecedent to a prevention effect. Processes will be measured to assess the degree of penetration of the interventions into the communities. A randomly sampled population cohort from each community will be used to measure the impact of the PopART strategy on HIV incidence over three years. We describe the strategy being tested and progress to date in the HPTN 071(PopART) study. PMID:23764639

  3. Reducing perinatal HIV transmission in developing countries through antenatal and delivery care, and breastfeeding: supporting infant survival by supporting women's survival.

    PubMed Central

    Berer, M.

    1999-01-01

    In 1998, a joint UNAIDS/UNICEF/WHO working group announced an initiative to pilot test an intervention to reduce perinatal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), based on new guidelines on HIV and infant feeding. This intervention for developing countries includes short-course perinatal zidovudine (AZT) treatment and advice to HIV-positive women not to breastfeed their infants, where this can be done safely. The present paper raises questions about the extent of the public health benefit of this intervention, even though it may be cost-effective, due to the limited capacity of antenatal and delivery services to implement it fully. It argues that it is necessary to provide universal access to replacement feeding methods and support in their safe use, not only for women who have tested HIV-positive during pregnancy, but also for untested women who may also decide not to breastfeed, some of whom may be infected with HIV or may acquire HIV during the breastfeeding period. It further argues that additional funding, more staff, staff training, and improved capacity and resources are also needed to integrate this intervention successfully into antenatal and delivery care. The intervention will prevent some infants from getting HIV even in the absence of many of these changes. However, a comprehensive approach to HIV prevention and care in developing countries that includes both women and infants would promote better health and survival of women, which would in turn contribute to greater infant health and survival. If combination antiretroviral therapy in the latter part of pregnancy and/or during the breastfeeding period can be shown to be safe for infants, preliminary evidence suggests that it might reduce perinatal HIV transmission as effectively as the current intervention and, in addition, might allow the practice of breastfeeding to be preserved. PMID:10612882

  4. Reduce HIV Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... incidence could be reduced if people changed their sexual behaviors. Our research has demonstrated remarkable success in reducing HIV risk-associated sexual behaviors among African American adolescents and adults." Spring 2008 ...

  5. Moral Agency and the Sexual Transmission of HIV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Leary, Ann; Wolitski, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Sexual transmission of HIV occurs because an infected person has unprotected sex with a previously uninfected person. The majority of HIV infections are transmitted by individuals who are unaware of their infection, and most persons who are diagnosed with HIV significantly reduce or eliminate risk behaviors once they learn they have HIV. However,…

  6. Moral Agency and the Sexual Transmission of HIV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Leary, Ann; Wolitski, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Sexual transmission of HIV occurs because an infected person has unprotected sex with a previously uninfected person. The majority of HIV infections are transmitted by individuals who are unaware of their infection, and most persons who are diagnosed with HIV significantly reduce or eliminate risk behaviors once they learn they have HIV. However,…

  7. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Scully, C; Greenspan, J S

    2006-09-01

    HIV transmission in the health-care setting is of concern. To assess the current position in dentistry, we have reviewed the evidence to November 1, 2005. Transmission is evidently rare in the industrialized nations and can be significantly reduced or prevented by the use of standard infection control measures, appropriate clinical and instrument-handling procedures, and the use of safety equipment and safety needles. We hope that breaches in standard infection control will become vanishingly small. When occupational exposure to HIV is suspected, the application of post-exposure protocols for investigating the incident and protecting those involved from possible HIV infection further reduces the likelihood of HIV disease, and also stress and anxiety.

  8. Acute HIV infection detection and immediate treatment estimated to reduce transmission by 89% among men who have sex with men in Bangkok

    PubMed Central

    Kroon, Eugène D.M.B.; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Shattock, Andrew J.; Fletcher, James L.K.; Pinyakorn, Suteeraporn; Chomchey, Nitiya; Akapirat, Siriwat; de Souza, Mark S.; Robb, Merlin L.; Kim, Jerome H.; van Griensven, Frits; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Wilson, David P.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Antiretroviral treatment (ART) reduces HIV transmission. Despite increased ART coverage, incidence remains high among men who have sex with men (MSM) in many places. Acute HIV infection (AHI) is characterized by high viral replication and increased infectiousness. We estimated the feasible reduction in transmission by targeting MSM with AHI for early ART. Methods: We recruited a cohort of 88 MSM with AHI in Bangkok, Thailand, who initiated ART immediately. A risk calculator based on viral load and reported behaviour, calibrated to Thai epidemiological data, was applied to estimate the number of onwards transmissions. This was compared with the expected number without early interventions. Results: Forty of the MSM were in 4th-generation AHI stages 1 and 2 (4thG stage 1, HIV nucleic acid testing (NAT)+/4thG immunoassay (IA)-/3rdG IA–; 4thG stage 2, NAT+/4thG IA+/3rdG IA–) while 48 tested positive on third-generation IA but had negative or indeterminate western blot (4thG stage 3). Mean plasma HIV RNA was 5.62 log10 copies/ml. Any condomless sex in the four months preceding the study was reported by 83.7%, but decreased to 21.2% by 24 weeks on ART. After ART, 48/88 (54.6%) attained HIV RNA <50 copies/ml by week 8, increasing to 78/87 (89.7%), and 64/66 (97%) at weeks 24 and 48, respectively. The estimated number of onwards transmissions in the first year of infection would have been 27.3 (95% credible interval: 21.7–35.3) with no intervention, 8.3 (6.4–11.2) with post-diagnosis behaviour change only, 5.9 (4.4–7.9) with viral load reduction only and 3.1 (2.4–4.3) with both. The latter was associated with an 88.7% (83.8–91.1%) reduction in transmission. Conclusions: Disproportionate HIV transmission occurs during AHI. Diagnosis of AHI with early ART initiation can substantially reduce onwards transmission. PMID:28691441

  9. Correlates of Use of Timed Unprotected Intercourse to Reduce Horizontal Transmission Among Ugandan HIV Clients with Fertility Intentions

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Glenn J.; Goggin, Kathy; Mindry, Deborah; Beyeza-Kashesya, Jolly; Finocchario-Kessler, Sarah; Woldetsadik, Mahlet Atakilt; Khanakwa, Sarah; Wanyenze, Rhoda K.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the correlates of use of safer conception methods (SCM) in a sample of 400 Ugandan HIV clients (75% female; 61% on antiretroviral therapy; 61% with HIV-negative or unknown status partners) in heterosexual relationships with fertility intentions. SCM assessed included timed unprotected intercourse, manual self-insemination, sperm washing, and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). In the 6 months prior to baseline, 47 (12%) reported using timed unprotected intercourse to reduce risk of HIV infection (or re-infection), none had used manual self-insemination or sperm washing, and 2 had used PrEP. In multiple regression analysis, correlates of use of timed unprotected intercourse included greater perceptions of partner’s willingness to use SCM and providers’ stigma of childbearing among people living with HIV, higher SCM knowledge, and desire for a child within the next 6 months. These findings highlight the need for policy and provider training regarding integration of couples’ safer conception counselling into HIV care. PMID:25280448

  10. An Ecosystem-Based Intervention to Reduce HIV Transmission Risk and Increase Medication Adherence Among Prisoners Being Released to the Community

    PubMed Central

    Reznick, Olga Grinstead; McCartney, Kathleen; Gregorich, Steven; Zack, Barry; Feaster, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    HIV+ prisoners reentering their communities are at increased risk for poor health outcomes and to transmit HIV. We report on a randomized trial comparing an ecosystem-based intervention and an individually-focused intervention for reducing HIV transmission risk and improving medication adherence. Reincarceration was considered as a secondary variable. Both groups decreased sexual risk behavior over the 12-month follow-up period. Unexpectedly, the ecosystem intervention group was less likely to be taking medication or to be adherent and more likely to have been reincarcerated. Failure to demonstrate a significant advantage of the ecosystem intervention may have resulted from the difficulty of engaging family and other ecosystem members in the intervention. Implications for developing and applying interventions for this population are discussed. PMID:23657796

  11. HIV transmission rates from persons living with HIV who are aware and unaware of their infection.

    PubMed

    Hall, H Irene; Holtgrave, David R; Maulsby, Catherine

    2012-04-24

    Transmission rate modeling estimated secondary infections from those aware and unaware of their HIV infection. An estimated 49% of transmissions were from the 20% of persons living with HIV unaware of their infection. About eight transmissions would be averted per 100 persons newly aware of their infection; with more infections averted the higher the percentage of persons with viral suppression who can be linked to care. Improving all stages of HIV care would substantially reduce transmission rates.

  12. Ensuring a public health impact of programs to reduce HIV transmission from mothers to infants: the place of voluntary counseling and testing.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Mary Travis

    2002-03-01

    Since 1999, many African governments have launched programs to offer short-course antiretroviral drug regimens to reduce mother-to child transmission of HIV. HIV testing in prenatal care is the gateway to these antiretroviral regimens. Pilot projects in Africa show an uptake of antiretroviral drugs in 8% to 50% of pregnant women presumed to be HIV infected; often, a minority of eligible women in care received these regimens. Use of lay counselors and rapid onsite HIV testing may alleviate health service barriers. Community education to promote voluntary counseling and testing, which involves men, is the long-term solution. In the short term, possibilities to enhance delivery of an effective intervention include group pretest counseling, universal offer of testing with women having the right to "opt out," universal treatment (mass treatment for those whose HIV status is not determined by voluntary counseling and testing), universal testing with women having the right to "opt out" of learning their test results, and mass treatment for all without testing.

  13. Fears about HIV transmission in families with an HIV-infected parent: a qualitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Cowgill, Burton O; Bogart, Laura M; Corona, Rosalie; Ryan, Gery; Schuster, Mark A

    2008-11-01

    Children of HIV-infected parents may be affected by their parents' disease even if not infected themselves. Because of advances in HIV treatment that have reduced the risk for vertical HIV transmission from mother to child, more HIV-infected adults are having children. Few studies have examined whether families with an HIV-infected parent experience fears about transmission to children and how they address such fears. In this article, we describe transmission-related fears in families with an HIV-infected parent. We used semistructured qualitative interviews, conducted in person from March 2004 to March 2005, with 33 HIV-infected parents, 27 minor children who were 9 to 17 years of age, 19 adult children, and 15 caregivers (adult family members or friends who helped care for the children and/or parents) to investigate their fears about HIV transmission. The parents are a subset from the HIV Cost and Services Utilization Study, a study of people in care for HIV throughout the United States. We analyzed the interview transcripts for themes related to transmission fears. In many of the families, participants identified >or=1 HIV transmission-related fear. Themes included specific fears related to blood contact, bathroom items, kissing/hugging, and food. Families addressed their fears by educating children about modes of HIV transmission and establishing rules or taking precautions to reduce the risk for HIV transmission in the household. HIV-infected parents were also concerned about catching opportunistic infections from a sick child. Many of the fears experienced by HIV-infected parents and their children were based on misconceptions about modes of HIV transmission. Pediatricians and others who treat these children may be able to offer counseling to allay fears that family members have about household transmission of HIV.

  14. Interventions Delivered in Clinical Settings are Effective in Reducing Risk of HIV Transmission Among People Living with HIV: Results from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)’s Special Projects of National Significance Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Shade, Starley B.; Rose, Carol Dawson; Koester, Kimberly; Maiorana, Andre; Malitz, Faye E.; Bie, Jennifer; Kang-Dufour, Mi-Suk; Morin, Stephen F.

    2010-01-01

    To support expanded prevention services for people living with HIV, the US Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) sponsored a 5-year initiative to test whether interventions delivered in clinical settings were effective in reducing HIV transmission risk among HIV-infected patients. Across 13 demonstration sites, patients were randomized to one of four conditions. All interventions were associated with reduced unprotected vaginal and/or anal intercourse with persons of HIV-uninfected or unknown status among the 3,556 participating patients. Compared to the standard of care, patients assigned to receive interventions from medical care providers reported a significant decrease in risk after 12 months of participation. Patients receiving prevention services from health educators, social workers or paraprofessional HIV-infected peers reported significant reduction in risk at 6 months, but not at 12 months. While clinics have a choice of effective models for implementing prevention programs for their HIV-infected patients, medical provider-delivered methods are comparatively robust. PMID:20229132

  15. Changing sexual behaviour to reduce HIV transmission - a multi-faceted approach to HIV prevention and treatment in a rural South African setting.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Myra; Dlamini, Siyabonga B; Meyer-Weitz, Anna; Sathiparsad, Reshma; Jinabhai, Champak C; Esterhuizen, Tonya

    2010-11-01

    This community household survey undertaken in Melmoth, a rural area in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, investigated the influence of cumulative exposure of complementary interventions by a non-governmental organisation, LoveLife which aimed to bring changes in beliefs about HIV and AIDS prevention and treatment, and to reduce sexual risk behaviour. Amongst the 1294 respondents (15-40 years of age) increasing the number of exposures to different LoveLife interventions included use of television and radio messages, billboards, a free monthly magazine for youth, special school sports and community events, involvement of youth peer educators, and support for schools through classroom programmes and by linking clinic staff and peer educators. Cumulative exposure to LoveLife interventions resulted in more respondents believing that HIV could be prevented (p<0.005) and treated (p=0.007) and that people should test for HIV (p=0.03). Half of the respondents reported using a condom at last sex and cumulative exposure to LoveLife was associated with increased condom use (p<0.005). However, despite exposure to LoveLife, only 41.9% respondents had ever tested for HIV and cumulative exposure to LoveLife did not significantly influence respondents going to hospital for anti-retroviral treatment. The dose-response effect of cumulative LoveLife exposure appeared to have a positive influence on some beliefs and practices, but did not discriminate the extent of LoveLife exposure nor exposure to other HIV/AIDS interventions.

  16. Bipolar disorder is associated with HIV transmission risk behavior among patients in treatment for HIV

    PubMed Central

    Meade, Christina S.; Bevilacqua, Lisa A.; Key, Mary D.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined HIV transmission risk behavior among 63 patients with bipolar disorder (BD), major depressive disorder (MDD), and no mood disorder (NMD); half had substance use disorders (SUDs). Patients with BD were more likely than others to report unprotected intercourse with HIV-negative partners and < 95% adherence to antiretroviral medications. In multivariate models, BD and SUD were independent predictors of both risk behaviors. Participants with poorer medication adherence were more likely to have detectable HIV viral loads and unprotected intercourse with HIV-negative partners. Patients with BD deserve careful evaluation and HIV prevention services to reduce HIV transmission risk behaviors. PMID:22614744

  17. Using Pharmacies in a Structural Intervention to Distribute Low Dead Space Syringes to Reduce HIV and HCV Transmission in People Who Inject Drugs.

    PubMed

    Oramasionwu, Christine U; Johnson, Terence L; Zule, William A; Carda-Auten, Jessica; Golin, Carol E

    2015-06-01

    Ongoing injection drug use contributes to the HIV and HCV epidemics in people who inject drugs. In many places, pharmacies are the primary source of sterile syringes for people who inject drugs; thus, pharmacies provide a viable public health service that reduces blood-borne disease transmission. Replacing the supply of high dead space syringes with low dead space syringes could have far-reaching benefits that include further prevention of disease transmission in people who inject drugs and reductions in dosing inaccuracies, medication errors, and medication waste in patients who use syringes. We explored using pharmacies in a structural intervention to increase the uptake of low dead space syringes as part of a comprehensive strategy to reverse these epidemics.

  18. Using Pharmacies in a Structural Intervention to Distribute Low Dead Space Syringes to Reduce HIV and HCV Transmission in People Who Inject Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Terence L.; Zule, William A.; Carda-Auten, Jessica; Golin, Carol E.

    2015-01-01

    Ongoing injection drug use contributes to the HIV and HCV epidemics in people who inject drugs. In many places, pharmacies are the primary source of sterile syringes for people who inject drugs; thus, pharmacies provide a viable public health service that reduces blood-borne disease transmission. Replacing the supply of high dead space syringes with low dead space syringes could have far-reaching benefits that include further prevention of disease transmission in people who inject drugs and reductions in dosing inaccuracies, medication errors, and medication waste in patients who use syringes. We explored using pharmacies in a structural intervention to increase the uptake of low dead space syringes as part of a comprehensive strategy to reverse these epidemics. PMID:25880955

  19. Reduced HIV-stimulated T-helper cell reactivity in cord blood with short-course antiretroviral treatment for prevention of maternal–infant transmission

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, L; Meddows-Taylor, S; Gray, G; Trabattoni, D; Clerici, M; Shearer, G M; Tiemessen, C

    2001-01-01

    T-helper cell responses to HIV have been associated with protection against maternal-infant HIV transmission in the absence of antiretroviral treatment, but the effects of antiretroviral treatment, now widely used for prevention, on development of these cell-mediated responses is unknown. We tested whether development of T-helper cell responses to HIV and other antigens would be affected by exposure to short-course regimens of zidovudine-lamivudine (ZDV-3TC) given to prevent maternal-infant HIV transmission. Cord blood samples were collected from 41 infants of HIV-infected mothers enrolled in a clinical trial in which they were treated with regimens of ZDV-3TC and from 29 infants whose HIV-infected mothers were not treated with any antiretroviral drugs. T-helper cell reactivity to HIV envelope peptides and other antigens was measured in vitro using a sensitive culture supernatant titration assay based on IL-2-dependent proliferation. Infants in the clinical trial were followed to 18 months to determine their HIV infection status, and venous blood samples were re-tested at 4·5 and 9 months for T-cell reactivity to HIV. HIV-stimulated T-helper cell reactivity in cord blood was detected 10-fold less frequently among those exposed to antiretroviral prophylaxis (2·4%) than among those unexposed (24·1%) (P = 0·007). Reductions in HIV-stimulated responses in cord blood occurred despite detectable HIV RNA (mean 3·38 standard deviation 0·76 log10 copies per ml) at delivery among treated women and occurred independent of treatment duration. Our results suggest that short-course antiretroviral treatment given to prevent maternal-infant HIV transmission may attenuate HIV-stimulated T-cell memory responses in the neonate. PMID:11298132

  20. Efficacy of zidovudine and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) hyperimmune immunoglobulin for reducing perinatal HIV transmission from HIV-infected women with advanced disease: results of Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group protocol 185.

    PubMed

    Stiehm, E R; Lambert, J S; Mofenson, L M; Bethel, J; Whitehouse, J; Nugent, R; Moye, J; Glenn Fowler, M; Mathieson, B J; Reichelderfer, P; Nemo, G J; Korelitz, J; Meyer, W A; Sapan, C V; Jimenez, E; Gandia, J; Scott, G; O'Sullivan, M J; Kovacs, A; Stek, A; Shearer, W T; Hammill, H

    1999-03-01

    Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group protocol 185 evaluated whether zidovudine combined with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) hyperimmune immunoglobulin (HIVIG) infusions administered monthly during pregnancy and to the neonate at birth would significantly lower perinatal HIV transmission compared with treatment with zidovudine and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) without HIV antibody. Subjects had baseline CD4 cell counts Transmission was associated with lower maternal baseline CD4 cell count (odds ratio, 1.58 per 100-cell decrement; P=.005; 10.0% vs. 3.6% transmission for count <200 vs. >/=200/microL) but not with time of zidovudine initiation (5.6% vs. 4.8% if started before vs. during pregnancy; P=. 75). The Kaplan-Meier transmission rate for HIVIG recipients was 4. 1% (95% confidence interval, 1.5%-6.7%) and for IVIG recipients was 6.0% (2.8%-9.1%) (P=.36). The unexpectedly low transmission confirmed that zidovudine prophylaxis is highly effective, even for women with advanced HIV disease and prior zidovudine therapy, although it limited the study's ability to address whether passive immunization diminishes perinatal transmission.

  1. Preventing HIV transmission in "priority" countries.

    PubMed

    Finger, W R

    1993-05-01

    A recent $168 million 5-year cooperative agreement funded by the US Agency for International Development combines elements of its earlier AIDSTECH and AIDSCOM projects under the AIDS Control and Prevention Project (AIDSCAP). Instead of working to effect broad-scale behavior change toward the prevention of HIV transmission, AIDSCAP strategically targets locations for condom distribution, behavior change messages, and the treatment of sexually transmitted diseases. In Lagos and the states of Cross River and Jigawa where the AIDS epidemic is firmly established, for example, AIDSCAP is intervening to increase condom demand and accessibility; alter sexual behaviors which carry a high risk for HIV transmission; and reduce the prevalence of STDs which enhance the transmission of HIV. The project began in fall of 1991 and has expanded to include Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Brazil, Haiti, Jamaica, India, and Thailand; limited assistance is also provided to 7 other African countries, 4 Latin America countries, and 1 in Asia. 4 more countries are in the final stages of negotiations to be included in the project. The USAID mission in the host country and the government must invite AIDSCAP involvement in order for the country to attain priority status. Countries are selected based on the HIV prevalence rate, population size and distribution, level of commitment to HIV prevention/control, capacity to respond to the AIDSCAP plan of action, level of other donor support, the USAID Mission's development priorities, and the Mission's commitment of substantial funds from its own budget. Once involved, AIDSCAP is mandated to implement interventions through in-country agencies.

  2. Impact of Pre-adapted HIV Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Jonathan M.; Du, Victor Y.; Pfeifer, Nico; Bansal, Anju; Tan, Vincent Y.F.; Power, Karen; Brumme, Chanson J.; Kreimer, Anat; DeZiel, Charles E.; Fusi, Nicolo; Schaefer, Malinda; Brockman, Mark A.; Gilmour, Jill; Price, Matt A.; Kilembe, William; Haubrich, Richard; John, Mina; Mallal, Simon; Shapiro, Roger; Frater, John; Harrigan, P. Richard; Ndung’u, Thumbi; Allen, Susan; Heckerman, David; Sidney, John; Allen, Todd M.; Goulder, Philip J.R.; Brumme, Zabrina L.; Hunter, Eric; Goepfert, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Human Leukocyte Antigen class I (HLA) restricted CD8+ T lymphocyte (CTL) responses are critical to HIV-1 control. Although HIV can evade these responses, the longer-term impact of viral escape mutants remains unclear, since these variants can also reduce intrinsic viral fitness. To address this question, we here develop a metric to determine the degree of HIV adaptation to an HLA profile. We demonstrate that transmission of viruses pre-adapted to the HLA molecules expressed in the recipient is associated with impaired immunogenicity, elevated viral load and accelerated CD4 decline. Furthermore, the extent of pre-adaptation among circulating viruses explains much of the variation in outcomes attributed to expression of certain HLA alleles. Thus, viral pre-adaptation exploits “holes” in the immune response. Accounting for these holes may be critical for vaccine strategies seeking to elicit functional responses from viral variants, and to HIV cure strategies requiring broad CTL responses to achieve successful eradication of HIV reservoirs. PMID:27183217

  3. HIV transmission in a state prison system, 1988-2005.

    PubMed

    Jafa, Krishna; McElroy, Peter; Fitzpatrick, Lisa; Borkowf, Craig B; Macgowan, Robin; Margolis, Andrew; Robbins, Ken; Youngpairoj, Ae Saekhou; Stratford, Dale; Greenberg, Alan; Taussig, Jennifer; Shouse, R Luke; Lamarre, Madeleine; McLellan-Lemal, Eleanor; Heneine, Walid; Sullivan, Patrick S

    2009-01-01

    HIV prevalence among state prison inmates in the United States is more than five times higher than among nonincarcerated persons, but HIV transmission within U.S. prisons is sparsely documented. We investigated 88 HIV seroconversions reported from 1988-2005 among male Georgia prison inmates. We analyzed medical and administrative data to describe seroconverters' HIV testing histories and performed a case-crossover analysis of their risks before and after HIV diagnosis. We sequenced the gag, env, and pol genes of seroconverters' HIV strains to identify genetically-related HIV transmission clusters and antiretroviral resistance. We combined risk, genetic, and administrative data to describe prison HIV transmission networks. Forty-one (47%) seroconverters were diagnosed with HIV from July 2003-June 2005 when voluntary annual testing was offered. Seroconverters were less likely to report sex (OR [odds ratio] = 0.02, 95% CI [confidence interval]: 0-0.10) and tattooing (OR = 0.03, 95% CI: <0.01-0.20) in prison after their HIV diagnosis than before. Of 67 seroconverters' specimens tested, 33 (49%) fell into one of 10 genetically-related clusters; of these, 25 (76%) reported sex in prison before their HIV diagnosis. The HIV strains of 8 (61%) of 13 antiretroviral-naïve and 21 (40%) of 52 antiretroviral-treated seroconverters were antiretroviral-resistant. Half of all HIV seroconversions were identified when routine voluntary testing was offered, and seroconverters reduced their risks following their diagnosis. Most genetically-related seroconverters reported sex in prison, suggesting HIV transmission through sexual networks. Resistance testing before initiating antiretroviral therapy is important for newly-diagnosed inmates.

  4. HIV-1 transmission linkage in an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, Thomas; Campbell, Mary S; Mullins, James I; Hughes, James P; Wong, Kim G; Raugi, Dana N; Scrensen, Stefanie

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 sequencing has been used extensively in epidemiologic and forensic studies to investigate patterns of HIV-1 transmission. However, the criteria for establishing genetic linkage between HIV-1 strains in HIV-1 prevention trials have not been formalized. The Partners in Prevention HSV/HIV Transmission Study (ClinicaITrials.gov NCT00194519) enrolled 3408 HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual African couples to determine the efficacy of genital herpes suppression with acyclovir in reducing HIV-1 transmission. The trial analysis required laboratory confirmation of HIV-1 linkage between enrolled partners in couples in which seroconversion occurred. Here we describe the process and results from HIV-1 sequencing studies used to perform transmission linkage determination in this clinical trial. Consensus Sanger sequencing of env (C2-V3-C3) and gag (p17-p24) genes was performed on plasma HIV-1 RNA from both partners within 3 months of seroconversion; env single molecule or pyrosequencing was also performed in some cases. For linkage, we required monophyletic clustering between HIV-1 sequences in the transmitting and seroconverting partners, and developed a Bayesian algorithm using genetic distances to evaluate the posterior probability of linkage of participants sequences. Adjudicators classified transmissions as linked, unlinked, or indeterminate. Among 151 seroconversion events, we found 108 (71.5%) linked, 40 (26.5%) unlinked, and 3 (2.0%) to have indeterminate transmissions. Nine (8.3%) were linked by consensus gag sequencing only and 8 (7.4%) required deep sequencing of env. In this first use of HIV-1 sequencing to establish endpoints in a large clinical trial, more than one-fourth of transmissions were unlinked to the enrolled partner, illustrating the relevance of these methods in the design of future HIV-1 prevention trials in serodiscordant couples. A hierarchy of sequencing techniques, analysis methods, and expert adjudication contributed to the linkage

  5. Update: transmission of HIV-1 from mother to child.

    PubMed

    Fowler, M G

    1997-12-01

    Mother-to-child transmission near the time of birth is the primary route of HIV-1 infection among infants and young children. Throughout the world, 1000 babies a day become infected with HIV, and cumulative global estimates are that 3 million children have been infected since the HIV pandemic began. Although major advances have been made in reducing mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1 in the USA and Europe through the use of an intensive regimen of zidovudine, many research questions remain unresolved. These include (1) viral and host characteristics which hinder or facilitate perinatal HIV transmission (i.e. the role played by viral load, the placenta and obstetric risk factors); (2) the proportion of transmission occurring in utero, intrapartum or during the breast feeding period; and (3) the mode of action of the successful zidovudine regimen. Studies published within the past year have shed light on several of these research topics. In 1996-1997 a number of important studies were published which support a general correlation between maternal viral load and infant HIV infection. The most recent studies do not, however, support the theory that there is a threshold below which transmission cannot occur, and also indicate that zidovudine, given according to the US Public Health Service guidelines, can significantly reduce the risk of transmission across all levels of maternal viral load. Analyses of viral load data from the successful clinical trial with zidovudine (AIDS Clinical Trial Group 076) suggest that its primary action is not by reducing the viral load, and raise the possibility that administering antiretroviral prophylaxis to the infant at the time of highest exposure may be another reason for the reduction in transmission. Obstetric risk factors for mother-to-child HIV transmission have been evaluated in several large cohort studies. A duration of membrane rupture of more than 4 h, and procedures such as amniocentesis, preterm labor, and the presence

  6. Breast milk transmission of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Nduati, R; John, G

    1995-12-01

    Breast milk provides infants and children immunologic, nutritional, and child spacing benefits. Yet it also transmits some viruses, for example, HIV-1. The World Health Organization recommends that, in conditions with poor access to breast milk substitutes, HIV-positive women should still breast feed due to the nutritional and infectious risk of artificial feeding. It appears that breast fed infants experience a slower progression of AIDS and death. Vertical transmission of HIV-1 may occur during pregnancy, at delivery, or through breast milk. The HIV-1 transmission rate via breast milk from acutely infected women is estimated to be 29-36%. A meta-analysis of case reports and small case series of women with chronic HIV-1 infection indicated a breast feeding transmission rate of 14%. Studies suggest that the likelihood of HIV-1 transmission via breast milk increases as duration of breast feeding increases. Infants with detectable HIV-1 DNA tend to have mothers whose absolute CD4 counts are less than 400 and have severe vitamin A deficiency. Breast milk has HIV-1 specific immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA, and IgM). It appears that HIV-1 elicits a local immune response. Breast milk of HIV-1 positive mothers with non-infected children tends to still have IgM and IgA until 18 months. Potential risk factors for breast milk transmission of HIV-1 include cracked nipples and mastitis in the mother; oral thrush, malnutrition, inflammation of the lips, and mucosal compromise in the infant; and vigorous suction of the neonate and use of the wrong equipment for suctioning. Inhibiting factors of HIV-1 in breast milk are bovine and human lactoferrin and a membrane associated protein that attaches to the CD4 receptor and thus prevents attachment of the HIV antigen gp120 to the CD4 receptor on T-cells.

  7. Reducing lost to follow-up in a large clinical trial of prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV: the Breastfeeding, Antiretrovirals and Nutrition study experience.

    PubMed

    Sellers, Christopher J; Lee, Hana; Chasela, Charles; Kayira, Dumbani; Soko, Alice; Mofolo, Innocent; Ellington, Sascha; Hudgens, Michael G; Kourtis, Athena P; King, Caroline C; Jamieson, Denise J; van der Horst, Charles

    2015-04-01

    Retaining patients in prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV studies can be challenging in resource-limited settings, where high lost to follow-up rates have been reported. In this article, we describe the effectiveness of methods used to encourage retention in the Breastfeeding, Antiretrovirals, and Nutrition study and analyze factors associated with lost to follow-up in the study. The Breastfeeding, Antiretrovirals, and Nutrition clinical trial was designed to evaluate the efficacy of three different mother-to-child HIV transmission prevention strategies. Lower than expected participant retention prompted enhanced efforts to reduce lost to follow-up during the conduct of the trial. Following study completion, we employed regression modeling to determine predictors of perfect attendance and variables associated with being lost to follow-up. During the study, intensive tracing efforts were initiated after the first 1686 mother-infant pairs had been enrolled, and 327 pairs were missing. Of these pairs, 60 were located and had complete data obtained. Among the 683 participants enrolling after initiation of intensive tracing efforts, the lost to follow-up rate was 3.4%. At study's end, 290 (12.2%) of the 2369 mother-infant pairs were lost to follow-up. Among successfully traced missing pairs, relocation was common and three were deceased. Log-binomial regression modeling revealed higher maternal hemoglobin and older maternal age to be significant predictors of perfect attendance. These factors and the presence of food insecurity were also significantly associated with lower rates of lost to follow-up. In this large HIV prevention trial, intensive tracing efforts centered on reaching study participants at their homes succeeded in finding a substantial proportion of lost to follow-up participants and were very effective in preventing further lost to follow-up during the remainder of the trial. The association between food insecurity and lower rates of lost to

  8. Reducing mother-to-child transmission of HIV: findings from an early infant diagnosis program in south-south region of Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Early diagnosis of HIV in infants provides a critical opportunity to strengthen follow-up of HIV-exposed children and assure early access to antiretroviral (ARV) treatment for infected children. This study describes findings from an Early Infant Diagnosis (EID) program and the effectiveness of a prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) intervention in six health facilities in Cross-River and Akwa-Ibom states, south-south Nigeria. Methods This was a retrospective study. Records of 702 perinatally exposed babies aged six weeks to 18 months who had a DNA PCR test between November 2007 and July 2009 were reviewed. Details of the ARV regimen received to prevent mother-to-child transmission (MTCT), breastfeeding choices, HIV test results, turn around time (TAT) for results and post test ART enrolment status of the babies were analysed. Results Two-thirds of mother-baby pairs received ARVs and 560 (80%) babies had ever been breastfed. Transmission rates for mother-baby pairs who received ARVs for PMTCT was 4.8% (CI 1.3, 8.3) at zero to six weeks of age compared to 19.5% (CI 3.0, 35.5) when neither baby nor mother received an intervention. Regardless of intervention, the transmission rates for babies aged six weeks to six months who had mixed feeding was 25.6% (CI 29.5, 47.1) whereas the transmission rates for those who were exclusively breastfed was 11.8% (CI 5.4, 18.1). Vertical transmission of HIV was eight times (AOR 7.8, CI: 4.52-13.19) more likely in the sub-group of mother-baby pairs who did not receive ARVS compared with mother-baby pairs that did receive ARVs. The median TAT for test results was 47 days (IQR: 35-58). A follow-up of 125 HIV positive babies found that 31 (25%) were enrolled into a paediatric ART program, nine (7%) were known to have died before the return of their DNA PCR results, and 85 (67%) could not be traced and were presumed to be lost-to-follow-up. Conclusion Reduction of MTCT of HIV is possible with effective PMTCT

  9. Reducing mother-to-child transmission of HIV: findings from an early infant diagnosis program in south-south region of Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Anoje, Chukwuemeka; Aiyenigba, Bolatito; Suzuki, Chiho; Badru, Titilope; Akpoigbe, Kesiena; Odo, Michael; Odafe, Solomon; Adedokun, Oluwasanmi; Torpey, Kwasi; Chabikuli, Otto N

    2012-03-12

    Early diagnosis of HIV in infants provides a critical opportunity to strengthen follow-up of HIV-exposed children and assure early access to antiretroviral (ARV) treatment for infected children. This study describes findings from an Early Infant Diagnosis (EID) program and the effectiveness of a prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) intervention in six health facilities in Cross-River and Akwa-Ibom states, south-south Nigeria. This was a retrospective study. Records of 702 perinatally exposed babies aged six weeks to 18 months who had a DNA PCR test between November 2007 and July 2009 were reviewed. Details of the ARV regimen received to prevent mother-to-child transmission (MTCT), breastfeeding choices, HIV test results, turn around time (TAT) for results and post test ART enrolment status of the babies were analysed. Two-thirds of mother-baby pairs received ARVs and 560 (80%) babies had ever been breastfed. Transmission rates for mother-baby pairs who received ARVs for PMTCT was 4.8% (CI 1.3, 8.3) at zero to six weeks of age compared to 19.5% (CI 3.0, 35.5) when neither baby nor mother received an intervention. Regardless of intervention, the transmission rates for babies aged six weeks to six months who had mixed feeding was 25.6% (CI 29.5, 47.1) whereas the transmission rates for those who were exclusively breastfed was 11.8% (CI 5.4, 18.1). Vertical transmission of HIV was eight times (AOR 7.8, CI: 4.52-13.19) more likely in the sub-group of mother-baby pairs who did not receive ARVS compared with mother-baby pairs that did receive ARVs. The median TAT for test results was 47 days (IQR: 35-58). A follow-up of 125 HIV positive babies found that 31 (25%) were enrolled into a paediatric ART program, nine (7%) were known to have died before the return of their DNA PCR results, and 85 (67%) could not be traced and were presumed to be lost-to-follow-up. Reduction of MTCT of HIV is possible with effective PMTCT interventions, including improved access to

  10. Feasibility of an Emotion Regulation Intervention to Improve Mental Health and Reduce HIV Transmission Risk Behaviors for HIV-Positive Gay and Bisexual Men with Sexual Compulsivity.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Jeffrey T; Rendina, H Jonathon; Moody, Raymond L; Gurung, Sitaji; Starks, Tyrel J; Pachankis, John E

    2016-08-29

    Gay and bisexual men (GBM) report high rates of sexual compulsivity (SC), yet no empirically based treatments exist. An intervention based on the Unified Protocol for the Transdiagnostic Treatment of Emotional Disorders was pilot tested in a sample of 13 HIV-positive GBM with SC. Participants completed a baseline interview, and were offered up to ten intervention sessions. Of those, 11 completed a 3-month follow-up assessment. Despite problems with session attendance (only 4 men completed all 10 sessions), improvements were observed in all psychological outcomes, including SC, depression, and anxiety. Decreases were observed in drug use and HIV risk. The Unified Protocol may be useful in improving the health of HIV-positive GBM, however challenges with session attendance must be addressed. Future work should consider if fewer sessions produce similar results, whether barriers to attending all sessions could be alleviated, and how the intervention would perform compared to treatments.

  11. Protecting the unborn -- reducing mother-to-child transmission.

    PubMed

    Tapper, A

    1998-02-01

    HIV is transmitted to a child during pregnancy, at birth, or through the mother's milk during infancy. Since the beginning of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, 3.8 million children are estimated to have become infected with HIV and 2.7 million have died. More than 9% acquired HIV through their HIV-positive mothers and in 1997, 1600 children were infected daily. Since many women in developing countries do not have access to clean water, it is unsafe for them to bottle feed. As such, HIV-infected women in such settings have been encouraged to breast feed their infants despite the risk of perinatal HIV transmission. The most recent research, however, indicates that 10-25% of fetal/infant HIV infections occur intrauterine, 60-75% during delivery, and 20-40% postpartum. It is estimated that breast feeding increases the risk of infection by 5-40%. These findings have led the principal administrator of the European Union's HIV/AIDS program and other health experts to recommend that children be weaned from breast feeding at 4-6 months, a change from existing breast feeding guidelines. As several trials end in the near future, important results are expected in 1998 on how to prevent perinatal HIV transmission. The ethics of involving pregnant women in Africa and Asia in clinical trials to reduce perinatal HIV transmission and vitamin A supplements and vaginal lavages are discussed.

  12. A national review of vertical HIV transmission.

    PubMed

    Forbes, John C; Alimenti, Ariane M; Singer, Joel; Brophy, Jason C; Bitnun, Ari; Samson, Lindy M; Money, Deborah M; Lee, Terry C K; Lapointe, Normand D; Read, Stanley E

    2012-03-27

    Prevention of vertical HIV transmission has evolved significantly in Canada over the last two decades. The aim of this analysis is to describe the surveillance programme used, rate of vertical HIV transmission and changing epidemiology of HIV-affected pregnancies in Canada. National perinatal HIV surveillance programme. From 1990, annual retrospective data was collected on demographic and clinical characteristics of HIV-infected mothers and their infants referred to 22 participating sites across Canada either before/during pregnancy or within 3 months after delivery. Factors impacting HIV transmission and demographic features were explored. Two thousand, six hundred and ninety-two mother-infant pairs were identified. The overall rate of vertical HIV transmission was 5.2%, declining to 2.9% since 1997. The rate of transmission for mothers who received HAART was 1%, and 0.4% if more than 4 weeks of HAART was given. Forty percent of women delivered by caesarean section, with no difference in transmission rate compared with vaginal delivery for women treated with HAART (1.4 vs. 0.6%, P = 0.129) but significant risk reduction for those who did not receive HAART (3.8 vs. 10.3%, P = 0.016). Black women were the largest group; proportions of black and aboriginal women increased significantly over time (P < 0.001 for both). Heterosexual contact was the most common risk category for maternal infection (65%), followed by injection drug use (IDU) (25%). Vertical HIV transmission in Canada has decreased dramatically for women treated with HAART therapy. All pregnant women should be evaluated for HIV infection and programmes expanded to reach vulnerable populations including aboriginal, immigrant and IDU women.

  13. [Prevention of vertical HIV transmission--a success story].

    PubMed

    Rudin, Ch

    2004-10-01

    Thanks to very effective interventions vertical transmission of HIV has been reduced from over 20% ten years ago to less than 2% today in industrialised countries. This progress has been achieved by combined application of different strategies including antiretroviral treatment of pregnant women, elective caesarian section (prior to labour and rupture of membranes) and refraining from breastfeeding. Fortunately, the Swiss Mother & Child HIV Cohort Study (MoCHiV) has been able to support this evolution with several important contributions. Nevertheless the most important challenge in the prevention of vertical HIV transmission remains to be resolved in this decade. This impressive reduction in vertical transmission achieved in the industrialised world and delineated in this article still needs to be carried forward to those countries in the third world where HIV prevalence is much higher and interventions therefore much more needed.

  14. HIV-1 Transmission during Early Antiretroviral Therapy: Evaluation of Two HIV-1 Transmission Events in the HPTN 052 Prevention Study

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, Allen G.; Hudelson, Sarah E.; Piwowar-Manning, Estelle; Wang, Lei; Eshleman, Susan H.; Cohen, Myron S.; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    In the HPTN 052 study, transmission between HIV-discordant couples was reduced by 96% when the HIV-infected partner received suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). We examined two transmission events where the newly infected partner was diagnosed after the HIV-infected partner (index) initiated therapy. We evaluated the sequence complexity of the viral populations and antibody reactivity in the newly infected partner to estimate the dates of transmission to the newly infected partners. In both cases, transmission most likely occurred significantly before HIV-1 diagnosis of the newly infected partner, and either just before the initiation of therapy or before viral replication was adequately suppressed by therapy of the index. This study further strengthens the conclusion about the efficacy of blocking transmission by treating the infected partner of discordant couples. However, this study does not rule out the potential for HIV-1 transmission to occur shortly after initiation of ART, and this should be recognized when antiretroviral therapy is used for HIV-1 prevention. PMID:24086252

  15. Vertical transmission of HIV-an update.

    PubMed

    Lala, Mamatha M; Merchant, Rashid H

    2010-11-01

    One of the greatest successes in AIDS research to date has by far been the discovery of successful interventions that interrupt the transmission of HIV from mother to child. It is however important to note that these successes have occurred largely in countries with great resources and the least burden of perinatal transmission of HIV. In the developing world wherein currently 95% of vertical transmission of HIV occurs, it is highly condemnable that still every minute an infected infant is said to be born in spite of the fact that vertical transmission is largely preventable, mainly because translating knowledge into practice is not always possible or feasible; This has led to a continuous growing numbers of children with HIV, thereby making pediatric HIV a looming problem rapidly draining the already burdened health care system of these countries. It is the need of the hour to appropriately address the challenges to achieve zero percent transmission of HIV from an infected mother to her child thereby giving a hope for an AIDS-free new generation worldwide.

  16. HIV, Tat and dopamine transmission.

    PubMed

    Gaskill, Peter J; Miller, Douglas R; Gamble-George, Joyonna; Yano, Hideaki; Khoshbouei, Habibeh

    2017-09-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is a progressive infection that targets the immune system, affecting more than 37 million people around the world. While combinatorial antiretroviral therapy (cART) has lowered mortality rates and improved quality of life in infected individuals, the prevalence of HIV associated neurocognitive disorders is increasing and HIV associated cognitive decline remains prevalent. Recent research has suggested that HIV accessory proteins may be involved in this decline, and several studies have indicated that the HIV protein transactivator of transcription (Tat) can disrupt normal neuronal and glial function. Specifically, data indicate that Tat may directly impact dopaminergic neurotransmission, by modulating the function of the dopamine transporter and specifically damaging dopamine-rich regions of the CNS. HIV infection of the CNS has long been associated with dopaminergic dysfunction, but the mechanisms remain undefined. The specific effect(s) of Tat on dopaminergic neurotransmission may be, at least partially, a mechanism by which HIV infection directly or indirectly induces dopaminergic dysfunction. Therefore, precisely defining the specific effects of Tat on the dopaminergic system will help to elucidate the mechanisms by which HIV infection of the CNS induces neuropsychiatric, neurocognitive and neurological disorders that involve dopaminergic neurotransmission. Further, this will provide a discussion of the experiments needed to further these investigations, and may help to identify or develop new therapeutic approaches for the prevention or treatment of these disorders in HIV-infected individuals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Sexual transmission of HIV and the law: an Australian medical consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Mark; Cooper, David; Crock, Elizabeth A; Crooks, Levinia; Giles, Michelle L; Grulich, Andrew; Lewin, Sharon R; Nolan, David; Yarwood, Trent

    2016-11-07

    Criminal cases involving human immunodeficiency virus transmission or exposure require that courts correctly comprehend the rapidly evolving science of HIV transmission and the impact of an HIV diagnosis. This consensus statement, written by leading HIV clinicians and scientists, provides current scientific evidence to facilitate just outcomes in Australian criminal cases involving HIV.Main recommendations: Caution should be exercised when considering charges or prosecutions regarding HIV transmission or exposure because:Scientific evidence shows that the risk of HIV transmission during sex between partners of different HIV serostatus can be low, negligible or too low to quantify, even when the HIV-positive partner is not taking effective antiretroviral therapy, depending on the nature of the sexual act, the viral load of the partner with HIV, and whether a condom or pre-exposure prophylaxis is employed to reduce risk.The use of phylogenetic analysis in cases of suspected HIV transmission requires careful consideration of its limited probative value as evidence of causation of HIV infection, although such an approach may provide valuable information, particularly in relation to excluding HIV transmission between individuals.Most people recently infected with HIV are able to commence simple treatment providing them a normal and healthy life expectancy, largely comparable with their HIV-negative peers. Among people who have been diagnosed and are receiving treatment, HIV is rarely life threatening. People with HIV can conceive children with negligible risk to their partner and low risk to their child.Changes in management as result of the consensus statement: Given the limited risk of HIV transmission per sexual act and the limited long term harms experienced by most people recently diagnosed with HIV, appropriate care should be taken before HIV prosecutions are pursued. Careful attention should be paid to the best scientific evidence on HIV risk and harms, with

  18. Infant feeding practices before implementing alternatives to prolonged breastfeeding to reduce HIV transmission through breastmilk in Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire

    PubMed Central

    Becquet, Renaud; Castetbon, Katia; Viho, Ida; Ekouevi, Didier K.; Béquet, Laurence; Ehouo, Brigitte; Dabis, François; Leroy, Valériane

    2005-01-01

    SUMMARY The aim of this study was to describe baseline infant feeding practices in women of unknown HIV status in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire, before the implementation of infant feeding interventions aimed at the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV through breastmilk. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in March 2000 among 225 mothers attending community-run health facilities with their own child for either immunization or weighting. All but two children had ever been breastfed, of whom 94% were still being breastfed at six months of age. Exclusive breastfeeding was not practiced in this population since all women had given water to their child, starting in median one day after birth. Moreover, 20% of the mothers had introduced infant formula in median three weeks after delivery. This study provides useful information for planning purposes in this urban African population, where exclusive breastfeeding is rare and the use of infant formula relatively common. PMID:15967771

  19. Reduced potency and incomplete neutralization of broadly neutralizing antibodies against cell-to-cell transmission of HIV-1 with transmitted founder Envs.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongru; Zony, Chati; Chen, Ping; Chen, Benjamin K

    2017-02-01

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) have been isolated from HIV-1 patients and can potently block infection of a wide spectrum of HIV-1 subtypes. These antibodies define common epitopes shared by many viral isolates. While bNAbs potently antagonize infection with cell-free virus, inhibition of HIV-1 transmission from infected to uninfected CD4(+) T cells through virological synapses (VS), has been found to require greater amounts of antibody. In this study, we examined two well-studied molecular clones and two transmitted founder (T/F) viruses for their sensitivities to a panel of bNAbs in cell-free and cell-to-cell infection assays. We observed a relative resistance of cell-to-cell transmission to antibody neutralization that is reflected not only by reductions of antibody potency, but also by decreases in maximum neutralization capacity relative to cell-free infections. BNAbs targeting different epitopes exhibited incomplete neutralization against cell-associated virus with T/F Envs, which was not observed with cell-free form of the same virus. We further identified the membrane proximal internal tyrosine-based sorting motif as a determinant that can affect the incomplete neutralization of these T/F clones in cell-to-cell infection. These findings indicate that the signal that affects surface expression and/or internalization of Env from the plasma membrane can modulate the presentation of neutralizing epitopes on infected cells. These findings highlight that a fraction of virus can escape from high concentrations of antibody through cell-to-cell infection while maintaining sensitivity to neutralization in cell-free infection. The ability to fully inhibit cell-to-cell transmission may represent an important consideration in development of antibodies for treatment or prophylaxis.

  20. Antiretroviral treatment of HIV-1 prevents transmission of HIV-1: where do we go from here?

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Myron S; Smith, M Kumi; Muessig, Kathryn E; Hallett, Timothy B; Powers, Kimberly A; Kashuba, Angela D

    2013-01-01

    Antiretroviral drugs that inhibit viral replication were expected to reduce transmission of HIV by lowering the concentration of HIV in the genital tract. In 11 of 13 observational studies, antiretroviral therapy (ART) provided to an HIV-infected index case led to greatly reduced transmission of HIV to a sexual partner. In the HPTN 052 randomised controlled trial, ART used in combination with condoms and counselling reduced HIV transmission by 96·4%. Evidence is growing that wider, earlier initiation of ART could reduce population-level incidence of HIV. However, the full benefits of this strategy will probably need universal access to very early ART and excellent adherence to treatment. Challenges to this approach are substantial. First, not all HIV-infected individuals can be located, especially people with acute and early infection who are most contagious. Second, the ability of ART to prevent HIV transmission in men who have sex with men (MSM) and people who use intravenous drugs has not been shown. Indeed, the stable or increased incidence of HIV in MSM in some communities where widespread use of ART has been established emphasises the concern that not enough is known about treatment as prevention for this crucial population. Third, although US guidelines call for immediate use of ART, such guidelines have not been embraced worldwide. Some experts do not believe that immediate or early ART is justified by present evidence, or that health-care infrastructure for this approach is sufficient. These concerns are very difficult to resolve. Ongoing community-based prospective trials of early ART are likely to help to establish the population-level benefit of ART, and—if successful—to galvanise treatment as prevention. PMID:24152938

  1. Preventing Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV and Pregnancy Home Understanding HIV/AIDS Fact Sheets ... an email Preventing Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV Last Reviewed: May 16, 2017 Key Points Mother- ...

  2. High Rates of Transmission of Drug-resistant HIV in Aruba Resulting in Reduced Susceptibility to the WHO Recommended First-line Regimen in Nearly Half of Newly Diagnosed HIV-infected Patients.

    PubMed

    Hofstra, L Marije; Sánchez Rivas, Elena; Nijhuis, Monique; Bank, Leonie E A; Wilkinson, Eduan; Kelly, Karina; Mudrikova, Tania; Schuurman, Rob; de Oliveira, Tulio; de Kort, Jaclyn; Wensing, Annemarie M J

    2017-04-15

    In Western countries emergence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance has tremendously decreased, and transmission of drug resistance has merely stabilized in recent years. However, in many endemic settings with limited resources rates of emerging and transmitted drug resistance are not regularly assessed. We performed a survey including all HIV-infected individuals who received resistance testing in 2010-2015 in Aruba, a highly endemic HIV area in the Caribbean. Transmitted HIV drug resistance was determined using World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Transmission dynamics were investigated using phylogenetic analyses. In a subset, baseline samples were re-analyzed using next generation sequencing (NGS). Baseline resistance testing was performed in 104 newly diagnosed untreated individuals (54% of all newly diagnosed individuals in 2010-2015): 86% were men, 39% were foreign-born, and 22% had AIDS at diagnosis. And 33% (95% CI: 24-42%) was infected with a drug-resistant HIV variant. The prevalence of resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) reached 45% (95% CI: 27-64%) in 2015, all based on the prevalence of mutation K103N. NGS did not demonstrate additional minority K103N-variants compared to routine resistance testing. K103N-harboring strains were introduced into the therapy-unexposed population via at least 6 independent transmissions epidemiologically linked to the surrounding countries. Virological failure of the WHO-recommended first-line NNRTI-based regimen was higher in the presence of K103N. The prevalence of resistant HIV in Aruba has increased to alarming levels, compromising the WHO-recommended first-line regimen. As adequate surveillance as advocated by the WHO is limited, the Caribbean region could face an unidentified rise of NNRTI-resistant HIV.

  3. HIV-2 infection and chemokine receptors usage - clues to reduced virulence of HIV-2.

    PubMed

    Azevedo-Pereira, José Miguel; Santos-Costa, Quirina; Moniz-Pereira, José

    2005-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and type 2 (HIV-2) are the causative agents of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Without therapeutic intervention, HIV-1 or HIV-2 infections in humans are characterized by a gradual and irreversible immunologic failure that ultimately leads to the onset of a severe immunodeficiency that constitutes the hallmark of AIDS. In the last two decades AIDS has evolved into a global epidemic affecting millions of persons worldwide. Although sharing several identical properties, HIV-1 and HIV-2 have shown some important differences in vivo. In fact, a significant amount of epidemiologic, clinical and virologic data suggest that HIV-2 is in general less virulent than HIV-1. This reduced virulence is revealed by the longer asymptomatic period and the smaller transmission rate that characteristically are observed in HIV-2 infection. In this context, studies using HIV-2 as a model of a naturally less pathogenic infection could bring important new insights to HIV pathogenesis opening to new strategies to vaccines or therapeutic design. The reasons underlying the reduced pathogenicity of HIV-2 are still essentially unknown and surely are the outcome of a combination of distinct factors. In this review we will discuss the importance and the possible implications in HIV-2 pathogenesis, particularly during the asymptomatic period, of a less fitted interaction between viral envelope glycoproteins and cellular receptors that have been described in the way HIV-2 and HIV-1 use these receptors.

  4. The efficacy of serostatus disclosure for HIV Transmission risk reduction.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Ann A; Reed, Sandra J; Serovich, Julianne A

    2015-02-01

    Interventions to assist HIV+ persons in disclosing their serostatus to sexual partners can play an important role in curbing rates of HIV transmission among men who have sex with men (MSM). Based on the methods of Pinkerton and Galletly (AIDS Behav 11:698-705, 2007), we develop a mathematical probability model for evaluating effectiveness of serostatus disclosure in reducing the risk of HIV transmission and extend the model to examine the impact of serosorting. In baseline data from 164 HIV+ MSM participating in a randomized controlled trial of a disclosure intervention, disclosure is associated with a 45.0 % reduction in the risk of HIV transmission. Accounting for serosorting, a 61.2 % reduction in risk due to disclosure was observed in serodisconcordant couples. The reduction in risk for seroconcordant couples was 38.4 %. Evidence provided supports the value of serostatus disclosure as a risk reduction strategy in HIV+ MSM. Interventions to increase serostatus disclosure and that address serosorting behaviors are needed.

  5. The Efficacy of Serostatus Disclosure for HIV Transmission Risk Reduction

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Ann A.; Serovich, Julianne A.

    2015-01-01

    Interventions to assist HIV+ persons in disclosing their serostatus to sexual partners can play an important role in curbing rates of HIV transmission among men who have sex with men (MSM). Based on the methods of Pinkerton and Galletly (AIDS Behav 11:698–705, 2007), we develop a mathematical probability model for evaluating effectiveness of serostatus disclosure in reducing the risk of HIV transmission and extend the model to examine the impact of serosorting. In baseline data from 164 HIV+ MSM participating in a randomized controlled trial of a disclosure intervention, disclosure is associated with a 45.0 % reduction in the risk of HIV transmission. Accounting for serosorting, a 61.2 % reduction in risk due to disclosure was observed in serodisconcordant couples. The reduction in risk for seroconcordant couples was 38.4 %. Evidence provided supports the value of serostatus disclosure as a risk reduction strategy in HIV+ MSM. Interventions to increase serostatus disclosure and that address serosorting behaviors are needed. PMID:25164375

  6. Acyclovir and Transmission of HIV-1 from Persons Infected with HIV-1 and HSV-2

    PubMed Central

    Celum, Connie; Wald, Anna; Lingappa, Jairam R.; Magaret, Amalia S.; Wang, Richard S.; Mugo, Nelly; Mujugira, Andrew; Baeten, Jared M.; Mullins, James I.; Hughes, James P.; Bukusi, Elizabeth A.; Cohen, Craig R.; Katabira, Elly; Ronald, Allan; Kiarie, James; Farquhar, Carey; Stewart, Grace John; Makhema, Joseph; Essex, Myron; Were, Edwin; Fife, Kenneth H.; de Bruyn, Guy; Gray, Glenda E.; McIntyre, James A.; Manongi, Rachel; Kapiga, Saidi; Coetzee, David; Allen, Susan; Inambao, Mubiana; Kayitenkore, Kayitesi; Karita, Etienne; Kanweka, William; Delany, Sinead; Rees, Helen; Vwalika, Bellington; Stevens, Wendy; Campbell, Mary S.; Thomas, Katherine K.; Coombs, Robert W.; Morrow, Rhoda; Whittington, William L.H.; McElrath, M. Juliana; Barnes, Linda; Ridzon, Renee; Corey, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Most persons who are infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are also infected with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), which is frequently reactivated and is associated with increased plasma and genital levels of HIV-1. Therapy to suppress HSV-2 reduces the frequency of reactivation of HSV-2 as well as HIV-1 levels, suggesting that suppression of HSV-2 may reduce the risk of transmission of HIV-1. METHODS We conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of suppressive therapy for HSV-2 (acyclovir at a dose of 400 mg orally twice daily) in couples in which only one of the partners was seropositive for HIV-1 (CD4 count, ≥250 cells per cubic millimeter) and that partner was also infected with HSV-2 and was not taking antiretroviral therapy at the time of enrollment. The primary end point was transmission of HIV-1 to the partner who was not initially infected with HIV-1; linkage of transmissions was assessed by means of genetic sequencing of viruses. RESULTS A total of 3408 couples were enrolled at 14 sites in Africa. Of the partners who were infected with HIV-1, 68% were women, and the baseline median CD4 count was 462 cells per cubic millimeter. Of 132 HIV-1 seroconversions that occurred after randomization (an incidence of 2.7 per 100 person-years), 84 were linked within couples by viral sequencing: 41 in the acyclovir group and 43 in the placebo group (hazard ratio with acyclovir, 0.92, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.60 to 1.41; P = 0.69). Suppression with acyclovir reduced the mean plasma concentration of HIV-1 by 0.25 log10 copies per milliliter (95% CI, 0.22 to 0.29; P<0.001) and the occurrence of HSV-2–positive genital ulcers by 73% (risk ratio, 0.27; 95% CI, 0.20 to 0.36; P<0.001). A total of 92% of the partners infected with HIV-1 and 84% of the partners not infected with HIV-1 remained in the study for 24 months. The level of adherence to the dispensed study drug was 96%. No serious adverse events related to acyclovir

  7. Acyclovir and transmission of HIV-1 from persons infected with HIV-1 and HSV-2.

    PubMed

    Celum, C; Wald, A; Lingappa, J R; Magaret, A S; Wang, R S; Mugo, N; Mujugira, A; Baeten, J M; Mullins, J I; Hughes, J P; Bukusi, E A; Cohen, C R; Katabira, E; Ronald, A; Kiarie, J; Farquhar, C; Stewart, G J; Makhema, J; Essex, M; Were, E; Fife, K H; de Bruyn, G; Gray, G E; McIntyre, J A; Manongi, R; Kapiga, S; Coetzee, D; Allen, S; Inambao, M; Kayitenkore, K; Karita, E; Kanweka, W; Delany, S; Rees, H; Vwalika, B; Stevens, W; Campbell, M S; Thomas, K K; Coombs, R W; Morrow, R; Whittington, W L H; McElrath, M J; Barnes, L; Ridzon, R; Corey, L

    2010-02-04

    Most persons who are infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are also infected with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), which is frequently reactivated and is associated with increased plasma and genital levels of HIV-1. Therapy to suppress HSV-2 reduces the frequency of reactivation of HSV-2 as well as HIV-1 levels, suggesting that suppression of HSV-2 may reduce the risk of transmission of HIV-1. We conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of suppressive therapy for HSV-2 (acyclovir at a dose of 400 mg orally twice daily) in couples in which only one of the partners was seropositive for HIV-1 (CD4 count, > or = 250 cells per cubic millimeter) and that partner was also infected with HSV-2 and was not taking antiretroviral therapy at the time of enrollment. The primary end point was transmission of HIV-1 to the partner who was not initially infected with HIV-1; linkage of transmissions was assessed by means of genetic sequencing of viruses. A total of 3408 couples were enrolled at 14 sites in Africa. Of the partners who were infected with HIV-1, 68% were women, and the baseline median CD4 count was 462 cells per cubic millimeter. Of 132 HIV-1 seroconversions that occurred after randomization (an incidence of 2.7 per 100 person-years), 84 were linked within couples by viral sequencing: 41 in the acyclovir group and 43 in the placebo group (hazard ratio with acyclovir, 0.92, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.60 to 1.41; P=0.69). Suppression with acyclovir reduced the mean plasma concentration of HIV-1 by 0.25 log(10) copies per milliliter (95% CI, 0.22 to 0.29; P<0.001) and the occurrence of HSV-2-positive genital ulcers by 73% (risk ratio, 0.27; 95% CI, 0.20 to 0.36; P<0.001). A total of 92% of the partners infected with HIV-1 and 84% of the partners not infected with HIV-1 remained in the study for 24 months. The level of adherence to the dispensed study drug was 96%. No serious adverse events related to acyclovir were observed. Daily

  8. Novel device to conduct flash-heat treatment in efforts to reduce mother-to-child HIV transmission in low-resource areas.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Aneesha; Harn, Cassandra; Pollack, Erica; Kroon, Max; Poluta, Mladen; Kelso, David; Glucksberg, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this design project was to create a device to prevent mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV through breast milk in preterm infants. Our team created a robust and intuitive device which utilizes Flash Heat Treatment (FHT), an established method to inactivate HIV. The FHT method heats jarred breast milk in boiling water for a short amount of time, enough to denature HIV reverse transcriptase while preserving the nutritional value of breast milk. Thorough observation of users and available resources in Cape Town, South Africa enabled establishment of a design that can be used in urban/peri-urban areas. User research conveyed that low cost and effortless household adaptability were the most important elements of the design. As a result, a modified electric kettle was designed to function as a breast milk pasteurization device. Published data illustrating temperature curves during FHT with corresponding virology tests on the pasteurized milk were used to verify whether the device is likely to function effectively. Experimental results indicate that the device matches the required temperature profile. After virology experimentation is complete, the new device may be incorporated into hospitals as well as households in the Cape Town area, and may be expanded to other low resource periurban/urban areas as well.

  9. Antiretroviral prophylaxis of perinatal HIV-1 transmission and the potential impact of antiretroviral resistance.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Monica; Fowler, Mary Glenn; Mofenson, Lynne M

    2002-06-01

    Since 1994, trials of zidovudine, zidovudine and lamivudine, and nevirapine have demonstrated that these antiretroviral drugs can substantially reduce the risk of perinatal HIV-1 transmission. With reductions in drug price, identification of simple, effective antiretroviral regimens to prevent perinatal HIV-1 transmission, and an increasing international commitment to support health care infrastructure, antiretrovirals for both perinatal HIV-1 prevention and HIV-1 treatment will likely become more widely available to HIV-1-infected persons in resource-limited countries. In the United States, widespread antiretroviral usage has been associated with increased antiretroviral drug resistance. This raises concern that drug resistance may reduce the effectiveness of perinatal antiretroviral prophylaxis as well as therapeutic intervention strategies. The purpose of this article is to review what is known about resistance and risk of perinatal HIV transmission, assess the interaction between antiretroviral resistance and the prevention of perinatal HIV-1 transmission, and discuss implications for current global prevention and treatment strategies.

  10. Is poverty or wealth driving HIV transmission?

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Stuart; Kadiyala, Suneetha; Greener, Robert

    2007-11-01

    Evidence of associations between socioeconomic status and the spread of HIV in different settings and at various stages of the epidemic is still rudimentary. Few existing studies are able to track incidence and to control effectively for potentially confounding factors. This paper reviews the findings of recent studies, including several included in this volume, in an attempt to uncover the degree to which, and the pathways through which, wealth or poverty is driving transmission in sub-Saharan Africa. We investigate the question of whether the epidemic is transitioning from an early phase in which wealth was a primary driver, to one in which poverty is increasingly implicated. The paper concludes by demonstrating the complexity and context-specificity of associations and the critical influence of certain contextual factors such as location, gender and age asymmetries, the mobility of individuals, and the social ecology of HIV transmission. Whereas it is true that poor individuals and households are likely to be hit harder by the downstream impacts of AIDS, their chances of being exposed to HIV in the first place are not necessarily greater than wealthier individuals or households. What is clear is that approaches to HIV prevention need to cut across all socioeconomic strata of society and they need to be tailored to the specific drivers of transmission within different groups, with particular attention to the vulnerabilities faced by youth and women, and to the dynamic and contextual nature of the relationship between socioeconomic status and HIV.

  11. HIV transmission risk behaviors among HIV-infected persons who are successfully linked to care.

    PubMed

    Metsch, Lisa R; Pereyra, Margaret; Messinger, Shari; Del Rio, Carlos; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Anderson-Mahoney, Pamela; Rudy, Ellen; Marks, Gary; Gardner, Lytt

    2008-08-15

    We examined the relationship between receipt of medical care for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and HIV transmission risk behavior among persons who had received a recent diagnosis of HIV infection. We enrolled 316 participants from 4 US cities and prospectively followed up participants for 1 year. Generalized estimating equations were used to examine whether having at least 3 medical care visits in a 6-month period was associated with unprotected vaginal or anal intercourse with an HIV-negative partner or partner with unknown HIV status. A total of 27.5% of the participants (84 of 305) self-reported having unprotected sex with an HIV-negative or unknown status partner at enrollment, decreasing to 12% (31 of 258) and 14.2% (36 of 254) at 6-month and 12-month follow-ups, respectively. At follow-up, people who had received medical care for HIV infection at least 3 times had reduced odds of engaging in risk behavior, compared with those with fewer visits. Other factors associated with reduced risk behavior were being >30 years of age, male sex, not having depressive symptoms, and not using crack cocaine. Being in HIV care is associated with a reduced prevalence of sexual risk behavior among persons living with HIV infection. Persons linked to care can benefit from prevention services available in primary care settings.

  12. Court redefines standard for HIV transmission risk.

    PubMed

    1999-04-30

    The 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld Alabama's policy of segregating inmates by HIV status. The Alabama prison system tests all entering inmates; those who are HIV-positive are sent to one of two facilities. A range of prison services, including vocational training and sports competitions is often denied to them. The Department of Corrections argued that this policy has led to one of the lowest seroconversion rates of any State correctional system. The Court's ruling is a shift in its attitude on "significant" risk of HIV transmission in disallowing people from participation in employment, public services, or public accommodations. Rulings in dissenting cases are reviewed. The American Civil Liberties Union, representing the HIV-positive inmates, called the policy of segregating inmates blatant discrimination.

  13. Simplified antiviral prophylaxis with or and without artificial feeding to reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV in low and middle income countries: modelling positive and negative impact on child survival.

    PubMed

    Walley, J; Witter, S; Nicoll, A

    2001-01-01

    Antiviral prophylaxis is recommended for HIV positive mothers to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV. To date UNAIDS and WHO policy has been based on a study in Thailand which showed a reduction in transmission by half with short course AZT (Zidovudine) treatment together with artificial feeding. We modelled the possible positive and negative effects on child deaths in low and middle resource developing country settings of two interventions to reduce mother to child transmission (MTCT) of HIV: antenatal testing, short-course antivirals (zidovudine or nevirapine), firstly with and then without artificial feeding. Estimates are made of child lives likely to be saved by the programme by age ten years, balanced against increases in deaths due to more uninfected mothers choosing to use artificial feeds where these are part of the intervention. Mid-point values for variables affecting the balance of mortality gains and losses are taken from recent published data for low and middle income developing countries and a sensitivity analysis is undertaken. In low income settings the use of antivirals alone would result in an estimated gain in child survival of around 0.36%, representing 360 deaths avoided from a birth cohort of 100,000 by age 10 years. Adding artificial feeding could reduce the gain to 0.03% (30 deaths avoided). In middle income settings the gain from antivirals alone would be 0.26% but as 'spill-over' of artificial feeding to uninfected women was more likely it could result in a net increase of child deaths of up to 1.08% (1,080 additional deaths). A sensitivity analysis emphasised this potential for regimens using artificial feeding if progamme participation was low, and under most circumstances in middle income settings. HIV testing and use of antivirals by infected mothers, if well implemented, will be effective at a population level in reducing MTCT. However the addition of artificial feeding is potentially be a high risk strategy, especially in

  14. [Pregnancy: a model of prevention of HIV transmission].

    PubMed

    Mandelbrot, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Antiretroviral drugs are primarily used to treat people living with HIV but can also reduce the risk of transmission. The first application of this prophylactic approach was in the prevention of mother-to-child transmission, which comprises three components: 1) antiretroviral therapy during pregnancy to reduce maternal viral load, 2) pre-exposure prophylactic treatment of the fetus in utero and intrapartum, and 3) postexposure neonatal treatment. This has resulted in a sharp reduction in mother-to-child transmission, to well below 1 % in France today. "Treatment as prevention" (TASP) is now widely recommended to prevent sexual transmission to partners of people living with HIV articularly when a couple wishes to have children. Achieving and sustaining undetectable viral load is an important means of reducing the risk of sexual transmission in serodiscordant couples and also of controlling the pandemic worldwide. The other uses of antiretroviral drugs to protect HIV-negative people at risk include post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Prevention has both individual and collective dimensions and involves several components, including behavioral changes, serological testing, and use of antiretrovirals.

  15. [Prevention of HIV transmission (vertical, occupational and non-occupational)].

    PubMed

    Azkune, Harkaitz; Ibarguren, Maialen; Camino, Xabier; Iribarren, José Antonio

    2011-10-01

    In these almost thirty years since the epidemic of HIV infection strategies have been developed to decrease the transmission risk when a non-infected person comes into contact with HIV. One of the key landmarks was the use zidovudine was shown to reduce the risk of HIV infection by vertical transmission from 25% to 8% when given from the second trimester of pregnancy, during partum and for several weeks in the newborn. These strategies have been subsequently perfected until achieving vertical transmission rates less than 1%. Almost at the same time, strategies have been developed in an attempt to reduce the risk of transmission of infection after occupational accidents and, in the last few years prophylaxis after non-occupational exposure has been a field of particular concern. Even in this past year several experiments on pre-exposure prophylaxis have been published, which are generating an intense debate on is applicability. In this article, we analyse the state of the art in the prevention of vertical transmission and occupational and non-occupational prophylaxis, from a perspective of applying this in the developed world. We also review the published data on pre-exposure prophylaxis.

  16. HIV-1 Transmission Networks Across South Korea.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Mi Young; Wertheim, Joel O; Kim, Woo Joo; Kim, Shin-Woo; Lee, Jin Soo; Ann, Hea Won; Jeon, Yongduk; Ahn, Jin Young; Song, Je Eun; Oh, Dong Hyun; Kim, Yong Chan; Kim, Eun Jin; Jung, In Young; Kim, Moo Hyun; Jeong, Wooyoung; Jeong, Su Jin; Ku, Nam Su; Kim, June Myung; Smith, Davey M; Choi, Jun Yong

    2017-03-27

    Molecular epidemiology can help clarify the properties and dynamics of HIV-1 transmission networks in both global and regional scales. We studied 143 HIV-1-infected individuals recruited from four medical centers of three cities in South Korea between April 2013 and May 2014. HIV-1 env V3 sequence data were generated (337-793 bp) and analyzed using a pairwise distance-based clustering approach to infer putative transmission networks. Participants whose viruses were ≤2.0% divergent according to Tamura-Nei 93 genetic distance were defined as clustering. We collected demographic, risk, and clinical data and analyzed these data in relation to clustering. Among 143 participants, we identified nine putative transmission clusters of different sizes (range 2-4 participants). The reported risk factor of participants were concordant in only one network involving two participants, that is, both individuals reported homosexual sex as their risk factor. The participants in the other eight networks did not report concordant risk factors, although they were phylogenetically linked. About half of the participants refused to report their risk factor. Overall, molecular epidemiology provides more information to understand local transmission networks and the risks associated with these networks.

  17. Reducing the risk of HIV transmission among men who have sex with men: A feasibility study of the motivational interviewing counseling method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia; Li, Xianhong; Xiong, Yang; Fennie, Kristopher P; Wang, Honghong; Williams, Ann Bartley

    2016-09-01

    HIV prevalence among Chinese men who have sex with men has rapidly increased in recent years. In this randomized, controlled study, we tested the feasibility and efficacy of motivational interviewing to reduce high-risk sexual behaviors among this population in Changsha, China. Eighty men who have sex with men were randomly assigned to either the intervention group, in which participants received a three-session motivational interviewing intervention over 4 weeks, or the control group, in which participants received usual counseling from peer educators. High-risk behavior indicators and HIV knowledge level were evaluated at baseline and 3 months after the intervention. Motivational interviewing significantly improved consistent anal condom use. However, there was no significant change in consistent condom use for oral sex or in the number of sexual partners over time. HIV knowledge scores improved equally in both groups. This study demonstrated that an intervention using motivational interviewing is feasible and results in increased condom use during anal sex for Chinese men who have sex with men. However, further work must be done to increase the use of condoms during oral sexual encounters. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. Immunotherapies to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV.

    PubMed

    Hicar, Mark D

    2013-03-01

    Although pharmacological interventions have been successful in reducing prevention of maternal to child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV, there is concern that complete elimination through this mode of transmission will require other measures. Immunotherapies in infants or pregnant mothers may be able to eradicate this form of transmission. A recent vaccine trial in adults showed encouraging results, but as in most HIV safety and efficacy vaccine trials, the question of MTCT was not addressed. Concentrating transmission studies and vaccine studies in the setting of MTCT offers several advantages. MTCT has a generally reproducible known transmission rate and has been successfully used to assess pharmacological interventions on decreasing transmission. Even in resource poor settings, the infrastructure for neonatal vaccination is already in place. Although rare, both passive and active vaccination trials have been successfully completed in pediatric populations. Unfortunately, little success in affecting MTCT has been shown. Largely, a correlate of protection in any type of transmission, including MTCT, is unknown. Data supports a role for antibodies in effecting strain and transmission during MTCT. The role of antibodies in MTCT is reviewed with a focus on recent passive immunization and considerations for future studies.

  19. Prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1 in Africa.

    PubMed

    Wiktor, S Z; Ekpini, E; Nduati, R W

    1997-01-01

    With the prevalence of HIV among pregnant women higher than 35% in some parts of sub-Saharan Africa, the number of HIV-infected children will continue to grow. It is estimated that almost 70% of the approximately 500,000 children who became infected with HIV in 1995 were born in sub-Saharan Africa. An effective intervention to prevent the vertical transmission of HIV is therefore most urgently needed in Africa. Following the release of the results of the AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) 076 study, the routine use of zidovudine (AZT) among HIV-infected pregnant women in the US and Europe has resulted in a significant reduction in the rate of mother-to-child vertical HIV transmission. However, most women in Africa will not benefit from these advances in the immediate future due to inadequate prenatal health care, the unavailability of prenatal HIV testing, and the high cost and complexity of the recommended regimen. Researchers need to build upon the findings of developed countries to identify feasible, effective, and implementable interventions to reduce the vertical transmission of HIV as well as to prevent HIV infection among women and to protect the health of HIV-infected women in Africa. Rates and timing of vertical HIV transmission, risk factors associated with vertical HIV transmission, and prevention interventions are discussed.

  20. Controlling HIV sexual transmission: a major challenge for China's new leadership.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shibo; Li, Weihua; Lu, Lu

    2013-03-19

    China's new leadership has been on board recently and they will face a great challenge, how to control the spread of HIVAIDS in China. Recent studies have shown that sexual transmission has become the main route of HIV spread in China. Therefore, more strong and effective measures have to be taken to protect people from HIV infection via sexual transmission in order to reduce the mortality and morbidity of HIV infection and AIDS in China.

  1. Controlling HIV sexual transmission: a major challenge for China’s new leadership

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    China’s new leadership has been on board recently and they will face a great challenge, how to control the spread of HIVAIDS in China. Recent studies have shown that sexual transmission has become the main route of HIV spread in China. Therefore, more strong and effective measures have to be taken to protect people from HIV infection via sexual transmission in order to reduce the mortality and morbidity of HIV infection and AIDS in China. PMID:23510395

  2. Criminalization of HIV transmission: poor public health policy.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Edwin

    2009-12-01

    Criminalization of HIV transmission and exposure is an ineffective tool for combating AIDS and a costly distraction from programs that we know work--programs such as effective prevention, protection against discrimination, reducing stigma, empowering women and providing access to testing and treatment. In this article, which is based on a public lecture he gave at "From Evidence and Principle to Policy and Action," the 1st Annual Symposium on HIV, Law and Human Rights, held on 12-13 June 2009 in Toronto, Canada, Justice Edwin Cameron analyzes the surge in criminal prosecutions, discusses the role that stigma plays in these prosecutions and makes the case against criminalization.

  3. Public Health Service Task Force Recommendations for the Use of Antiretroviral Drugs in Pregnant Women Infected with HIV-1 for Maternal Health and for Reducing Perinatal HIV-1 Transmission in the United States. Vol. 47, No. RR-2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-30

    interventions that might reduce this risk. In addition, PHS recommends that infected women in the United States refrain from breastfeed - ing to avoid...076 regi- men , perinatal transmission is reduced by approximately 70%. The mechanism by which ZDV reduces transmission is not known, and available...hemoglobin is required at a minimum after the completion of the 6-week ZDV regi- men . Repeat measurement should be performed at 12 weeks of age, by

  4. HIV-1 LTR subtype and perinatal transmission.

    PubMed

    Blackard, J T; Renjifo, B; Fawzi, W; Hertzmark, E; Msamanga, G; Mwakagile, D; Hunter, D; Spiegelman, D; Sharghi, N; Kagoma, C; Essex, M

    2001-09-01

    Multiple subtypes of HIV-1 have been identified; however, there is little data on the relative transmissibility of viruses belonging to different subtypes. A matched case-control study addressed whether viruses with different long terminal repeat (LTR) subtypes were transmitted equally from mother to infant. The LTR subtype was determined for 45 matched cases and controls who participated in a clinical trial in Tanzania. HIV-1 subtypes A, C, and D and intersubtype recombinant sequences were identified. Exact matched logistic regression analysis showed that viruses containing subtype A or intersubtype recombinant LTRs were 3.2 and 4.8 times more likely to be transmitted from mother to infant than viruses with subtype D LTRs. Viruses containing subtype C LTRs were 6.1 times more likely to be transmitted than those with subtype D LTRs. These differences in transmission were independent of maternal CD4 at enrollment. Thus, it appears that HIV-1 subtype may be associated with differing rates of perinatal transmission in Tanzania. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  5. Transmission and prevention of HIV among heterosexual populations in Australia.

    PubMed

    Persson, Asha; Brown, Graham; McDonald, Ann; Körner, Henrike

    2014-06-01

    In Australia, unlike much of the rest of the world, HIV transmission through heterosexual contact remains a relatively rare occurrence. In consequence, HIV-prevention efforts have been firmly focused on male-to-male sex as the most frequent source of HIV transmission. There are emerging signs that this epidemiological landscape may be shifting, which raises questions about current and future HIV prevention strategies. Over the past decade, national surveillance data have shown an increase in HIV notifications for which exposure to HIV was attributed to heterosexual contact. This paper offers an epidemiological and sociocultural picture of heterosexual HIV transmission in Australia. We outline recent trends in heterosexually acquired HIV and discuss specific factors that shape transmission and prevention among people at risk of HIV infection through heterosexual contact. To illustrate the contextual dynamics surrounding HIV in this diverse population, we detail two key examples: HIV among people from minority ethnic backgrounds in New South Wales; and overseas-acquired HIV among men in Western Australia. We argue that, despite their differences, there are significant commonalities across groups at risk of HIV infection through heterosexual contact, which not only provide opportunities for HIV prevention, but also call for a rethink of the dominant HIV response in Australia.

  6. [HIV and syphilis coinfection in pregnancy and vertical HIV transmission: a study based on epidemiological surveillance data].

    PubMed

    Acosta, Lisiane M W; Gonçalves, Tonantzin Ribeiro; Barcellos, Nêmora Tregnago

    2016-12-01

    To estimate the rate of HIV and syphilis coinfection among pregnant women living in Porto Alegre, Brazil, as well as the association of coinfection with vertical HIV transmission and socioeconomic variables. This analytical retrospective cross-sectional study employed data from the regular epidemiological surveillance system for the period from 2010 to 2013. Data were obtained regarding pregnant women with HIV and exposed children, syphilis in pregnancy, and congenital syphilis. The study population included 1 500 HIV-positive women with deliveries from 2010 to 2013. Of these, 155 (10.3%) were also infected with syphilis, corresponding to an HIV and syphilis coinfection rate of 10.2% (± 1.5%). The coinfected group had lower education levels, higher prevalence of black women, and greater HIV exposure related to drug use by the woman or a partner. Coinfected women had more delayed HIV diagnosis (for example, during childbirth) and greater prevalence of lacking prenatal care (44%). Crude analysis showed an association between vertical HIV transmission and HIV and syphilis co-infection (PR = 2.1; 95%CI: 1.21-3.74; P = 0.01) that persisted in the adjusted analysis. A profile of increased vulnerability was identified among pregnant women with HIV and syphilis coinfection. A positive impact of the treatment to reduce congenital syphilis and eliminate vertical transmission of HIV depends on enhanced access to qualified health care.

  7. Strategies to prevent HIV transmission to serodiscordant couples.

    PubMed

    Hallal, Ronaldo Campos; Raxach, Juan Carlos; Barcellos, Nêmora Tregnago; Maksud, Ivia

    2015-09-01

    The use antiretroviral reduces the sexual transmission of HIV, expanding interventions for serodiscordant couples. This article aims to review the use of antiretroviral and other prevention interventions among serodiscordant couples and to analyze its use in Brazil. A retrospective review was performed through the MEDLINE database and bases included in the Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde. The articles recovered exhibit four main strategies: (1) condom; (2) reduction of risks in sexual practices; (3) use of antiretrovirals, particularly early initiation of antiretroviral therapy (TASP) and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP); (4) risk reduction in reproduction. TASP is highly effective in reducing sexual transmission, PrEP was tested in serodiscordant couples and both reduce the sexual transmission risk in different sexual practices, enabling individualized prevention strategies. When used in combination, antiretrovirals and sexual practices with condoms offer greater efficacy than any single strategy. The combined use of new and old strategies allows us to build a prevention policy for all.

  8. Mother-to-infant HIV transmission: timing, risk factors and prevention.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, L; Stein, Z A

    1995-01-01

    Identifying when--during pregnancy, delivery or the postnatal period--transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) from mother to infant usually takes place is critical to the development of methods to prevent maternal-infant transmission. Evidence is reviewed in this paper as to whether transmission occurs prepartum (early or late in gestation), intrapartum, or postpartum with breast feeding. Evidence in support of the notion of prepartum transmission has come from isolation of HIV from aborted fetal organs, comparison of maternal-child viral genotypes and study of neonatal cell-mediated immune responses. Evidence against prepartum transmission is that fewer than half of the children later known to be HIV-infected can be identified by virological tests carried out close to birth. A reduced rate of transmission in infants delivered by Caesarean section, and a reduced risk of transmission to second-born twins delivered vaginally, offers support to the view that intrapartum factors influence the risk of HIV transmission. Transmission through breast feeding can occur if a mother is infected postpartum and seems to pose some additional risk if she is already infected at parturition. The risk of infection increases with the stage of maternal HIV disease, but specific immunological, clinical and viral characteristics need to be investigated further. A clinical trial of zidovudine, used during late pregnancy and delivery and given to the infant at birth, has reported a significant reduction in transmission. Primary prevention of HIV infection in women remains a principal priority.

  9. An evolutionary role for HIV latency in enhancing viral transmission.

    PubMed

    Rouzine, Igor M; Weinberger, Ariel D; Weinberger, Leor S

    2015-02-26

    HIV latency is the chief obstacle to eradicating HIV but is widely believed to be an evolutionary accident providing no lentiviral fitness advantage. However, findings of latency being "hardwired" into HIV's gene-regulatory circuitry appear inconsistent with latency being an evolutionary accident, given HIV's rapid mutation rate. Here, we propose that latency is an evolutionary "bet-hedging" strategy whose frequency has been optimized to maximize lentiviral transmission by reducing viral extinction during mucosal infections. The model quantitatively fits the available patient data, matches observations of high-frequency latency establishment in cell culture and primates, and generates two counterintuitive but testable predictions. The first prediction is that conventional CD8-depletion experiments in SIV-infected macaques increase latent cells more than viremia. The second prediction is that strains engineered to have higher replicative fitness—via reduced latency—will exhibit lower infectivity in animal-model mucosal inoculations. Therapeutically, the theory predicts treatment approaches that may substantially enhance "activate-and-kill" HIV-cure strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. High risk behavior for HIV transmission among former injecting drug users: a survey from Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Injecting drug use is an increasingly important cause of HIV transmission in most countries worldwide, especially in eastern Europe, South America, and east and southeast Asia. Among people actively injecting drugs, provision of clean needles and opioid substitution reduce HIV-transmission. However, former injecting drug users (fIDUs) are often overlooked as a high risk group for HIV transmission. We compared HIV risk behavior among current and former injecting drug users (IDUs) in Indonesia, which has a rapidly growing HIV-epidemic largely driven by injecting drug use. Methods Current and former IDUs were recruited by respondent driven sampling in an urban setting in Java, and interviewed regarding drug use and HIV risk behavior using the European Addiction Severity Index and the Blood Borne Virus Transmission Questionnaire. Drug use and HIV transmission risk behavior were compared between current IDUs and former IDUs, using the Mann-Whitney and Pearson Chi-square test. Results Ninety-two out of 210 participants (44%) were self reported former IDUs. Risk behavior related to sex, tattooing or piercing was common among current as well as former IDUs, 13% of former IDUs were still exposed to contaminated injecting equipment. HIV-infection was high among former (66%) and current (60%) IDUs. Conclusion Former IDUs may contribute significantly to the HIV-epidemic in Indonesia, and HIV-prevention should therefore also target this group, addressing sexual and other risk behavior. PMID:20698979

  11. Trichomonas Vaginalis Treatment Reduces Vaginal HIV-1 Shedding

    PubMed Central

    KISSINGER, PATRICIA; AMEDEE, ANGELA; CLARK, REBECCA A.; DUMESTRE, JEANNE; THEALL, KATHERINE P.; MYERS, LEANN; HAGENSEE, MICHAEL E.; FARLEY, THOMAS A.; MARTIN, DAVID H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Vaginal HIV-1 shedding has been associated with Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) infection and could play a role in HIV transmission. The purpose of the study was to examine if effective TV treatment reduces the presence of vaginal HIV-1 RNA. Methods: TV+ women attending an HIV outpatient clinic in New Orleans, LA, who resolved infection (n = 58) and TV-negative controls (n = 92), matched on antiretroviral therapy (ART) were examined and interviewed at baseline, 1, and 3 months. TV status was tested by culture and the amount of cell free HIV-1 RNA in the vaginal fluids was determined by the Amplicor HIV-1 Monitor ultrasensitive assay. Results: Most women (81.3%) were black and the mean age was 37.5 (SD 8.7). At baseline, 46.0% had plasma HIV-1 RNA ≥10,000 copies/mL, 26.4% had CD4<200 cells/μL, 54.7% were taking ART, and only 26.0% had detectable HIV-1 RNA in their vaginal fluids. TV-positive women who were effectively treated for TV were less likely to shed HIV vaginally at 3-months post-treatment compared to baseline (R.R. 0.34, 95% CI: 0.12–0.92, P = 0.03), whereas there was no change for TV-negative women. Conclusion: This study provides additional support that reducing TV infection among HIV-positive women may have an impact on the prevention of HIV transmission. Reasons for the delayed treatment effect and the effect on cervical shedding need further investigation. PMID:19008776

  12. HIV sexual transmission risks in the context of clinical care: a prospective study of behavioural correlates of HIV suppression in a community sample, Atlanta, GA, USA

    PubMed Central

    Kalichman, Seth C; Cherry, Chauncey; Kalichman, Moira O; Washington, Christopher; Grebler, Tamar; Merely, Cindy; Welles, Brandi; Pellowski, Jennifer; Kegler, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Antiretroviral therapy (ART) improves the health of people living with HIV and has the potential to reduce HIV infectiousness, thereby preventing HIV transmission. However, the success of ART for HIV prevention hinges on sustained ART adherence and avoiding sexually transmitted infections (STI). Objectives To determine the sexual behaviours and HIV transmission risks of individuals with suppressed and unsuppressed HIV replication (i.e., viral load). Methods Assessed HIV sexual transmission risks among individuals with clinically determined suppressed and unsuppressed HIV. Participants were 760 men and 280 women living with HIV in Atlanta, GA, USA, who completed behavioural assessments, 28-daily prospective sexual behaviour diaries, one-month prospective unannounced pill counts for ART adherence, urine screening for illicit drug use and medical record chart abstraction for HIV viral load. Results Individuals with unsuppressed HIV demonstrated a constellation of behavioural risks for transmitting HIV to uninfected sex partners that included symptoms of STI and substance use. In addition, 15% of participants with suppressed HIV had recent STI symptoms/diagnoses, indicating significant risks for sexual infectiousness despite their HIV suppression in blood plasma. Overall, 38% of participants were at risk for elevated sexual infectiousness and just as many engaged in unprotected sexual intercourse with non-HIV-infected partners. Conclusions Implementation strategies for using HIV treatments as HIV prevention requires enhanced behavioural interventions that extend beyond ART to address substance use and sexual health that will otherwise undermine the potential preventive impact of early ART. PMID:26249127

  13. Analysis of HIV early infant diagnosis data to estimate rates of perinatal HIV transmission in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Torpey, Kwasi; Mandala, Justin; Kasonde, Prisca; Bryan-Mofya, Gail; Bweupe, Maximillian; Mukundu, Jonathan; Zimba, Chilunje; Mwale, Catherine; Lumano, Hilary; Welsh, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Mother-to-child transmission of HIV (MTCT) remains the most prevalent source of pediatric HIV infection. Most PMTCT (prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV) programs have concentrated monitoring and evaluation efforts on process rather than on outcome indicators. In this paper, we review service data from 28,320 children born to HIV-positive mothers to estimate MTCT rates. This study analyzed DNA PCR results and PMTCT data from perinatally exposed children zero to 12 months of age from five Zambian provinces between September 2007 and July 2010. The majority of children (58.6%) had a PCR test conducted between age six weeks and six months. Exclusive breastfeeding (56.8%) was the most frequent feeding method. An estimated 45.9% of mothers were below 30 years old and 93.3% had disclosed their HIV status. In terms of ARV regimen for PMTCT, 32.7% received AZT+single dose NVP (sdNVP), 30.9% received highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART), 19.6% received sdNVP only and 12.9% received no ARVs. Transmission rates at six weeks when ARVs were received by both mother and baby, mother only, baby only, and none were 5.8%, 10.5%, 15.8% and 21.8% respectively. Transmission rates at six weeks where mother received HAART, AZT+sd NVP, sdNVP, and no intervention were 4.2%, 6.8%, 8.7% and 20.1% respectively. Based on adjusted analysis including ARV exposures and non ARV-related parameters, lower rates of positive PCR results were associated with 1) both mother and infant receiving prophylaxis, 2) children never breastfed and 3) mother being 30 years old or greater. Overall between September 2007 and July 2010, 12.2% of PCR results were HIV positive. Between September 2007 and January 2009, then between February 2009 and July 2010, proportions of positive PCR results were 15.1% and 11% respectively, a significant difference. The use of ARV drugs reduces vertical transmission of HIV in a program setting. Non-chemoprophylactic factors also play a significant role in

  14. Transmission of HIV through blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Okpara, R

    1992-07-01

    HIV transmission in transfused blood is a high risk in Nigeria. Although official government policy directs that all blood be screened for HIV, and that all blood donation should be voluntary, there is no legal enforcement of quality of the blood supply, and at least 85% of blood is estimated to be sold by professional donors. About 75% of blood banks are based in hospitals, mostly in major cities and teaching centers. The rest of the blood banks are unregulated small commercial operations without quality control or standard refrigerators. In small health facilities it is usual to infuse 1 unit at a time, suggesting that indications for transfusion are not emergencies, but rather anemias that could be corrected with nutritional replacement. These blood units are usually donated on request by families, but more often by professional donors managed by agents. People have misconceptions about the hazards of donating blood, such as the fear that donation will bewitch, poison them, or turn them into criminals, or that it is immoral. Blood donors who may be HIV positive are rarely traceable for counseling, since they often change their names and addresses. The Nigerian government is now deliberating in committee about forming a National Blood Transfusion Service, though the efforts of the Nigerian Society of Haematology and Blood Transfusion.

  15. Can a $4 drug stop vertical HIV transmission?

    PubMed

    1999-11-01

    Researchers have determined that a $4 dose of Nevirapine, which is 70 times cheaper than a short course of AZT therapy, is more effective than the AZT treatment in reducing the transmission of HIV from mother to baby. About 1,800 infants are born each day with HIV infection, and an estimated 45 percent of pregnant women in South Africa will be infected by the end of the year. The Nevirapine therapy still remains too expensive for much of the world, and there are still many women who are not tested during pregnancy and do not know they are at risk of transmitting the disease. Because of the stigma, many African women decline testing even when it is free and treatment is available. A study in Uganda found that Nevirapine lowers the risk of HIV transmission by breast feeding by nearly 50 percent during a baby's first four months. Vertical transmission remains a difficult issue, especially where contaminated water supplies could put an infant at risk for other infections when they are fed formula mixed with contaminated water.

  16. Reducing lost to follow-up in a large clinical trial of prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV: The Breastfeeding, Antiretrovirals and Nutrition (BAN) study experience

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, Christopher J; Lee, Hana; Chasela, Charles; Kayira, Dumbani; Soko, Alice; Mofolo, Innocent; Ellington, Sascha; Hudgens, Michael G; Kourtis, Athena P; King, Caroline C; Jamieson, Denise J; van der Horst, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Retaining patients in prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV studies can be challenging in resource limited settings, where high lost to follow-up (LTFU) rates have been reported. In this paper, we describe the effectiveness of methods used to encourage retention in the Breastfeeding, Antiretrovirals, and Nutrition (BAN) study and analyze factors associated with LTFU in the study. Methods The BAN clinical trial was designed to evaluate the efficacy of 3 different mother-to-child HIV transmission prevention strategies. Lower than expected participant retention prompted enhanced efforts to reduce LTFU during the conduct of the trial. Following study completion, we employed regression modeling to determine predictors of perfect attendance and variables associated with being LTFU. Results During the study, intensive tracing efforts were initiated after the first 1686 mother-infant pairs had been enrolled, and 327 pairs were missing. Sixty of these pairs were located and had complete data obtained. Among the 683 participants enrolling after initiation of intensive tracing efforts, the LTFU rate was 3.4%. At study's end, 290 (12.2%) of the 2369 mother-infant pairs were LTFU. Among successfully traced missing pairs, relocation was common and three were deceased. Log-binomial regression modeling revealed higher maternal hemoglobin and older maternal age to be significant predictors of perfect attendance. These factors and the presence of food insecurity were also significantly associated with lower rates of LTFU. Conclusions In this large HIV prevention trial, intensive tracing efforts centered on reaching study participants at their homes succeeded in finding a substantial proportion of LTFU participants, and were very effective in preventing further LTFU during the remainder of the trial. The association between food insecurity and lower rates of LTFU is likely related to the study's provision of nutritional support, including a family maize

  17. Cell-associated HIV mucosal transmission: the neglected pathway.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Deborah J; Le Grand, Roger

    2014-12-15

    This supplement to The Journal of Infectious Diseases is devoted to the important and understudied topic of cell-associated human immunodeficiency virus Type 1 (HIV) mucosal transmission. It stems from a workshop held in Boston, Massachusetts, in October 2013, in which scientists discussed their research and insights regarding cell-associated HIV mucosal transmission. The 10 articles in this supplement present the case for cell-associated HIV transmission as an important element contributing to the HIV epidemic, review evidence for the efficacy of current HIV prevention strategies against cell-associated HIV transmission and opportunities for further development, and describe in vitro, ex vivo, and animal cell-associated transmission models that can be used to further elucidate the molecular mechanisms of cell-associated HIV mucosal transmission and test HIV prevention strategies. We hope that these articles will help to inform and invigorate the HIV prevention field and contribute to the development of more-effective vaccine, treatment, and microbicide strategies for HIV prevention.

  18. Dynamic characteristic analysis of HIV mother to child transmission in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun-Jie; Reilly, Kathleen Heather; Han, Hua; Peng, Zhi-Hang; Wang, Ning

    2010-10-01

    To explore dynamic characteristics of the HIV mother to child transmission (MTCT) epidemic in China. A deterministic dynamic transmission model was used to determine the effect of key parameters on the likely long-term trends of the HIV MTCT epidemic in China. Matlab 7.0 was used to develop the model. The number of the susceptibles (S), the transmission rate (β), and the screening proportion (α) of HIV positive pregnant women have the greatest impact on the HIV MTCT epidemic in China. The growth of the MTCT epidemic in China could not be controlled only by decreasing the MTCT transmission rate. The prevalence of HIV positive women should be reduced and more pregnant women should be tested for HIV. Prevention of MTCT (PMTCT) should focus not only on the reduction of HIV transmission rates and incidences of HIV among women but also on the increase of HIV testing for pregnant women. The most cost-effective PMTCT means for China should be investigated in future studies. Copyright © 2010 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Risk of HIV transmission during combined ART initiation for HIV-infected persons with severe immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Supervie, V; Assoumou, L; Breban, R; Lert, F; Costagliola, D; Pialoux, G; Landman, R; Girard, P M; Slama, L

    2017-08-14

    Individuals presenting for care with severe immunosuppression typically have high plasma HIV viral load (pVL) and may transmit HIV before and after initiation of combination antiretroviral therapies (cART). Using risk equations and data collected in the IMEA 040 DATA trial on sexual behaviour and pVL level of 84 HIV-infected patients (23 women), we estimated monthly rates of HIV transmission for each virologically unsuppressed participant (pVL >50 copies/mL) who reported sex with HIV-negative or unknown serostatus (HNUS) partners at cART initiation, 24 weeks (W24) and W48 after; rates were considered negligible for other participants. At cART initiation, median pVL was 5.4 log 10  copies/mL. The percentage of virologically unsuppressed patients decreased, from 100% at cART initiation to 27% (95% CI 16%-43%) for heterosexuals and 8% (95% CI 2%-22%) for MSM at W48 ( P  <   0.001). The percentage of patients reporting sex with HNUS partners increased between cART initiation and W48, from 23% (95% CI 10%-42%) to 42% (95% CI 25%-61%) for heterosexuals ( P  =   0.042) and from 41% (95% CI 21%-64%) to 73% (95% CI 52%-88%) for MSM ( P  =   0.004). Median monthly HIV transmission rates were 0.0540 (IQR 0.0339-0.0742) for MSM and 0.0018 (IQR 0.0014-0.0191) for heterosexuals at cART initiation, and were reduced by 95% (95% CI 87%-100%) for heterosexuals and 98% (95% CI 95%-100%) for MSM as early as W24. Risk of onward transmission for severely immunosuppressed individuals is high before and within the first weeks of cART, and persists, at a substantially reduced level, beyond 24 weeks of cART for some individuals. Earlier cART and protecting HIV-negative partners until full viral suppression is achieved could reduce HIV transmission.

  20. Intraprison HIV transmission: an assessment of whether it occurs, how it occurs, and who is at risk.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Christopher P; Simmons, Melanie

    2002-10-01

    The prevalence of AIDS infection is approximately five times higher in state and federal prisons than among the general U.S. population. It is also apparent that high-risk HIV transmission behaviors occur inside prison; however, data validly documenting instances of intraprison HIV transmission are rare. This study validly identifies 33 inmates in a large sample of state prison inmates who contracted HIV inside prison and presents data on how they likely contracted HIV. It further compares these inmates to inmates who did not contract HIV inside prison in terms of age, race, and level of education. Documenting the burden posed by HIV transmission inside prison, providing insight into how they contract HIV inside prison, and what types of inmates are at risk will help public and correctional health officials reform their current education and prevention practices and ultimately reduce or prevent HIV transmission both inside and outside prison.

  1. The HIV transmission gradient: relationship patterns of protection.

    PubMed

    Bell, David C; Atkinson, John S; Mosier, Victoria; Riley, Micah; Brown, Victoria L

    2007-11-01

    We describe a gradient of potential HIV transmission from HIV-infected persons to their partners and thence to uninfected populations. The effect of this newly discovered transmission gradient is to limit the spread of HIV. We roughly estimate a 2% long-term transmission probability for sex and 14% for drug injection for two-step transmission. Then we test theories to account for this pattern on a network sample of 267 inner city drug users and nonusers. Although HIV positive persons engaged in a high level of risk with one another, they engaged in less risk with HIV negative partners, and these partners engaged in even lower levels of risk with other HIV negative persons. Analyses suggest that the primary motivation for sexual risk reduction is partner protection, while emotional closeness is the major barrier. Hypotheses accounting for risk in terms of self protection, social norms, gender power, and drug use were weakly supported or unsupported.

  2. Gender inequality and HIV transmission: a global analysis

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Eugene T; Collins, Sean E; Kung, Tiffany; Jones, James H; Tram, Khai Hoan; Boggiano, Victoria L; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Zolopa, Andrew R

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The HIV pandemic disproportionately impacts young women. Worldwide, young women aged 15–24 are infected with HIV at rates twice that of young men, and young women alone account for nearly a quarter of all new HIV infections. The incommensurate HIV incidence in young – often poor – women underscores how social and economic inequalities shape the HIV epidemic. Confluent social forces, including political and gender violence, poverty, racism, and sexism impede equal access to therapies and effective care, but most of all constrain the agency of women. Methods HIV prevalence data was compiled from the 2010 UNAIDS Global Report. Gender inequality was assessed using the 2011 United Nations Human Development Report Gender Inequality Index (GII). Logistic regression models were created with predominant mode of transmission (heterosexual vs. MSM/IDU) as the dependent variable and GII, Muslim vs. non-Muslim, Democracy Index, male circumcision rate, log gross national income (GNI) per capita at purchasing power parity (PPP), and region as independent variables. Results and discussion There is a significant correlation between having a predominantly heterosexual epidemic and high gender inequality across all models. There is not a significant association between whether a country is predominantly Muslim, has a high/low GNI at PPP, has a high/low circumcision rate, and its primary mode of transmission. In addition, there are only three countries that have had a generalized epidemic in the past but no longer have one: Cambodia, Honduras, and Eritrea. GII data are available only for Cambodia and Honduras, and these countries showed a 37 and 34% improvement, respectively, in their Gender Inequality Indices between 1995 and 2011. During the same period, both countries reduced their HIV prevalence below the 1% threshold of a generalized epidemic. This represents limited but compelling evidence that improvements in gender inequality can lead to the abatement of

  3. Associations between breast milk viral load, mastitis, exclusive breast-feeding, and postnatal transmission of HIV.

    PubMed

    Lunney, Kevin M; Iliff, Peter; Mutasa, Kuda; Ntozini, Robert; Magder, Laurence S; Moulton, Lawrence H; Humphrey, Jean H

    2010-03-01

    . Exclusive breast-feeding is protective against postnatal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), compared with mixed breast-feeding. Accordingly, exclusive breast-feeding for 6 months is the World Health Organization's recommendation to HIV-infected mothers for whom exclusive replacement feeding is not acceptable, feasible, affordable, safe, or sustainable. The mechanism of exclusive breast-feeding protection is unknown but is hypothesized to be mediated through reduced mastitis. We compared breast milk and plasma specimens of exclusive breast-feeding and mixed breast-feeding HIV- positive mothers archived from the ZVITAMBO trial in which mixed breast-feeding was associated with a 2-fold increased risk of postnatal transmission at 18 months. Plasma HIV load, breast milk HIV load and sodium/potassium ratio were measured as a proxy for subclinical mastitis. Mixed breast-feeding was not associated with mastitis or breast milk HIV load. Mastitis was associated with breast milk HIV load, and this effect increased with increasing maternal plasma HIV load; mastitis was associated with postnatal transmission only when maternal plasma HIV load was high (>3.7 log(10) copies/mL). Initiation of breast-feeding within an hour of delivery was associated with exclusive breast-feeding (adjusted odds ratio, 1.62; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-2.58). Exclusive breast-feeding is associated with reduced postnatal transmission of HIV from mother to child, but this protection is not mediated by reduced mastitis or breast milk HIV load. The deleterious effect of mastitis increases as the mother's plasma HIV load increases.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of Antiretrovirals In Genital Secretions and Anatomic Sites of HIV Transmission: Implications for HIV Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Trezza, Christine R.; Kashuba, Angela D. M.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of HIV remains alarmingly high in many parts of the world. Prophylactic use of antiretrovirals, capable of concentrating in the anatomical sites of transmission, may reduce the risk of infection after an unprotected sexual exposure. To date, orally and topically administered antiretrovirals have exhibited variable success in preventing HIV transmission in large-scale clinical trials. Antiretroviral mucosal pharmacokinetics may help explain the outcomes of these investigations. Penetration and accumulation of antiretrovirals into sites of transmission can influence dosing strategies and pre-exposure prophylaxis clinical trial design. Antiretroviral tissue distribution varies widely within and between drug classes, attributed in part to their physicochemical properties and tissue-specific drug transporter expression. Nucleoside (-tide) reverse transcriptase inhibitors, the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc, and the integrase inhibitor raltegravir demonstrate the highest penetration into the male and female reproductive tracts and colorectal tissue relative to blood. This review will describe antiretroviral exposure in anatomic sites of transmission, and place these findings in context with the prevention of HIV and the efficacy of pre-exposure prophylactic strategies. PMID:24859035

  5. HIV testing and prophylaxis to prevent mother-to-child transmission in the United States.

    PubMed

    2008-11-01

    Universal HIV testing of pregnant women in the United States is the key to prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Repeat testing in the third trimester and rapid HIV testing at labor and delivery are additional strategies to further reduce the rate of perinatal HIV transmission. Prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV is most effective when antiretroviral drugs are received by the mother during her pregnancy and continued through delivery and then administered to the infant after birth. Antiretroviral drugs are effective in reducing the risk of mother-to-child transmission of HIV even when prophylaxis is started for the infant soon after birth. New rapid testing methods allow identification of HIV-infected women or HIV-exposed infants in 20 to 60 minutes. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends documented, routine HIV testing for all pregnant women in the United States after notifying the patient that testing will be performed, unless the patient declines HIV testing ("opt-out" consent or "right of refusal"). For women in labor with undocumented HIV-infection status during the current pregnancy, immediate maternal HIV testing with opt-out consent, using a rapid HIV antibody test, is recommended. Positive HIV antibody screening test results should be confirmed with immunofluorescent antibody or Western blot assay. For women with a positive rapid HIV antibody test result, antiretroviral prophylaxis should be administered promptly to the mother and newborn infant on the basis of the positive result of the rapid antibody test without waiting for results of confirmatory HIV testing. If the confirmatory test result is negative, then prophylaxis should be discontinued. For a newborn infant whose mother's HIV serostatus is unknown, the health care professional should perform rapid HIV antibody testing on the mother or on the newborn infant, with results reported to the health care professional no later than 12 hours after the infant's birth. If

  6. Indicators for sexual HIV transmission risk among people in Thailand attending HIV care: the importance of positive prevention.

    PubMed

    Tunthanathip, P; Lolekha, R; Bollen, L J M; Chaovavanich, A; Siangphoe, U; Nandavisai, C; Suksripanich, O; Sirivongrangson, P; Wiratchai, A; Inthong, Y; Eampokalap, B; Ausavapipit, J; Akarasewi, P; Fox, K K

    2009-02-01

    Almost half of all new HIV infections in Thailand occur among low-risk partners of people infected with HIV, so it is important to include people infected with HIV in prevention efforts. Risk for HIV transmission was assessed among people with HIV attending routine care at the National Infectious Disease Institute in Thailand. Sexual risk behaviour, sexually transmitted infection (STI-syphilis, gonorrhoea, chlamydia, trichomoniasis and genital ulcers) prevalence and HIV disclosure status were assessed. Patients were provided with STI care, risk-reduction and HIV disclosure counselling. Baseline data were assessed among 894 consecutive people with HIV (395 men and 499 women) from July 2005 to September 2006. Unprotected last sex with a partner of unknown or negative HIV status (unsafe sex) was common (33.2%) and more likely with casual, commercial or male-to-male sex partners than with steady heterosexual partners (p = 0.03). People receiving antiretroviral treatment were less likely to report unsafe sex (p<0.001). Overall, 10.7% of men and 7.2% of women had a STI (p = 0.08). More women than men had disclosed HIV status to their steady partners (82.5% vs 65.9%; p = 0.05). Indicators for HIV transmission risk were common among people attending HIV care in Bangkok. Efforts need to be strengthened to reduce unsafe casual and commercial sex and to increase HIV disclosure from men to their partners. A strategy for STI screening and treatment for people with HIV in Thailand should be developed.

  7. Periconception pre-exposure prophylaxis to prevent HIV transmission: benefits, risks, and challenges to implementation

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Lynn T; Baeten, Jared M; Celum, Connie; Bangsberg, David R

    2013-01-01

    HIV-serodiscordant couples face complicated choices between fulfilling reproductive desire and risking HIV transmission to their partners and children. Sexual HIV transmission can be dramatically reduced through artificial insemination and sperm washing, however most couples cannot access these resources. We propose that periconception pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) could offer an important, complementary therapy to harm reduction counseling programs that aim to decrease HIV transmission for couples who choose to conceive. In this paper we describe the potential benefits of periconception PrEP and define critical points of clarification prior to implementation of PrEP as part of a reproductive health program. We consider sexual transmission risk, current risk reduction options, PrEP efficacy, cost, adherence, resistance, fetal toxicity, and impact of PrEP counseling on entry into health services. We address PrEP in the context of other periconception HIV prevention strategies, including antiretroviral treatment of the HIV-infected partner. We conclude that, should PrEP prove safe and efficacious in ongoing trials, periconception PrEP may offer a useful approach to minimize risk of HIV transmission for individuals of reproductive age in HIV-endemic countries. PMID:20679759

  8. Using Molecular HIV Surveillance Data to Understand Transmission between Subpopulations in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Oster, Alexandra M.; Wertheim, Joel O.; Hernandez, Angela L.; Ocfemia, M. Cheryl Bañez; Saduvala, Neeraja; Hall, H. Irene

    2016-01-01

    Background Studying HIV transmission networks provides insight into the spread of HIV and opportunities for intervention. We identified transmission dynamics among risk groups and racial/ethnic groups in the United States. Methods For HIV-1 pol sequences reported to the U.S. National HIV Surveillance System during 2001–2012, we calculated pairwise genetic distance, identified linked pairs of sequences (those with distance ≤1.5%), and examined transmission category and race/ethnicity of these potential transmission partners. Results Of 40,950 sequences, 12,910 (32%) linked to ≥1 other sequence. Of men who have sex with men (MSM) who linked to ≥1 sequence, 88% were linked to other MSM and only 4% were linked to heterosexual women. Of heterosexual women for whom we identified potential transmission partners, 29% linked to MSM, 21% to heterosexual men, and 12% to persons who inject drugs. Older and black MSM were more likely to be linked to heterosexual women. Assortative mixing was present for all racial/ethnic groups; 81% of blacks/African Americans linked to other blacks. Conclusions This analysis is the first use of U.S. surveillance data to infer an HIV transmission network. Our data suggest that HIV infections among heterosexual women predominantly originate from MSM, followed by heterosexual men. Although few MSM were linked to women, suggesting that a minority of MSM are involved in transmission with heterosexual women, these transmissions represent a substantial proportion of HIV acquisitions by heterosexual women. Interventions that reduce transmissions involving MSM are likely to also reduce HIV acquisition among other risk groups. PMID:26302431

  9. HIV transmission law in the age of treatment-as-prevention.

    PubMed

    Haire, Bridget; Kaldor, John

    2015-12-01

    Evidence that treating people with HIV early in infection prevents transmission to sexual partners has reframed HIV prevention paradigms. The resulting emphasis on HIV testing as part of prevention strategies has rekindled the debate as to whether laws that criminalise HIV transmission are counterproductive to the human rights-based public health response. It also raises normative questions about what constitutes 'safe(r) sex' if a person with HIV has undetectable viral load, which has significant implications for sexual practice and health promotion. This paper discusses a recent high-profile Australian case where HIV transmission or exposure has been prosecuted, and considers how the interpretation of law in these instances impacts on HIV prevention paradigms. In addition, we consider the implications of an evolving medical understanding of HIV transmission, and particularly the ability to determine infectiousness through viral load tests, for laws that relate to HIV exposure (as distinct from transmission) offences. We conclude that defensible laws must relate to appreciable risk. Given the evidence that the transmissibility of HIV is reduced to negligible level where viral load is suppressed, this needs to be recognised in the framing, implementation and enforcement of the law. In addition, normative concepts of 'safe(r) sex' need to be expanded to include sex that is 'protected' by means of the positive person being virally suppressed. In jurisdictions where use of a condom has previously mitigated the duty of the person with HIV to disclose to a partner, this might logically also apply to sex that is 'protected' by undetectable viral load.

  10. [Changes in vertical HIV transmission: comparison between 1994 and 2004].

    PubMed

    Orío, Mireya; Peña, José M; Rives, M Teresa; Sanz, Mario; Bates, Isabel; Madero, Rosario; de José, M Isabel

    2007-03-10

    Vertical transmission (VT) is the main route of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in children. Since the publication of PACTG 076 study in 1994, several preventive methods against the vertical transmission of the HIV have been developed. In this study, we compare the clinical and epidemiological profile of HIV-infected pregnant women and the VT rate in the years 1994 and 2004. We looked at maternal, obstetric and pediatric variables of HIV-infected women and their children, born in 1994 and 2004, who were followed in Hospital La Paz. We included 40 mother-infant couples in 1994 and 35 couples in 2004. The HIV vertical transmission rate was 35% in 1994 and 0% in 2004. We did not find changes in Hepatitis C virus (HCV) vertical transmission. In 1994, HIV-infected mothers had a more advanced HIV-disease and the major route of HIV-transmission was the intravenous drug use. Vaginal delivery was more frequent and rupture of membranes was longer than in 2004. The main route of maternal HIV infection in 2004 was sexual contact. In this same year, the use of combination antiretroviral therapy, even during pregnancy, was generalized, the elective cesarean section was the most frequent form of delivery, and every newborn received zidovudine. In the last decade, there have been important epidemiological changes in HIV-infected mothers in our society. The administration of antiretroviral therapy during pregnancy and to the newborn, as well as other obstetric strategies, can prevent HIV vertical transmission. Nevertheless, we did not find any change in the risk of HCV vertical transmission.

  11. HIV Treatment: The Basics

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment HIV Treatment: The Basics (Last updated 2/24/2017; last reviewed 2/24/2017) Key Points Antiretroviral therapy (ART) ... reduces the risk of HIV transmission . How do HIV medicines work? HIV attacks and destroys the infection- ...

  12. Prostitutes, prostitution and STD/HIV transmission in mainland China.

    PubMed

    Gil, V E; Wang, M S; Anderson, A F; Lin, G M; Wu, Z O

    1996-01-01

    China's opening to the world has enabled massive social and economic transformations and the liberalization of many policies, but also the rise of coincident social problems and diseases. A revival of wide-scale female prostitution since the 1980s has now accelerated to a nationwide dilemma. Prostitutes have long been considered to be reservoirs, if not 'vectors' for the transmission of sexual diseases. A well established STD epidemic in the last decade, plus the presence of growing HIV infections in China now, underscore the need to evaluate the prostitute's role in STD and HIV propagation. This report examines unobtrusive data on female prostitutes in the People's Republic of China through an analysis of prison records from eight sexually segregated prisons (six in Sichuan Province and two in Guizhou Province), two female re-education institutions, and arrest records for convicted prostitutes from four counties in Sichuan Province and Chengdu City (also in Sichuan). Collectively, these data represent 2057 female prostitution cases, and span the years 1988-1990. Demographics are examined to enable a profile of the prostitute as based on data reviewed, and this is contrasted to the stereotype of the prostitute as described in government propaganda against prostitution. STD prevalence rates in the samples are examined and contrasted to two other studies on STDs in nonprostitution populations made available to the authors. Prostitute arrest records reveal a majority had active STD infection[s] at the time of their apprehension, with gonorrhea being the most common bacterium; in many instances, prostitutes also had a history of other sexually transmitted diseases. Thus, data examined support the notion of prostitution as an agent in STD transmission. Presence of HIV infection in prostitutes could not be corroborated through sampled records, nor could prostitution itself be confirmed as an agent in HIV transmission at present. However, given the type of clients

  13. Effects of Antiretroviral Therapy to Prevent HIV Transmission to Women in Couples Attempting Conception When the Man Has HIV Infection - United States, 2017.

    PubMed

    Brooks, John T; Kawwass, Jennifer F; Smith, Dawn K; Kissin, Dmitry M; Lampe, Margaret; Haddad, Lisa B; Boulet, Sheree L; Jamieson, Denise J

    2017-08-18

    Existing U.S. guidelines recommend that men with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection should achieve virologic suppression* with effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) before attempting conception (1). Clinical studies have demonstrated that effective ART profoundly reduces the risk for HIV transmission (2-4). This information might be useful for counseling couples planning a pregnancy in which the man has HIV infection and the woman does not (i.e., a mixed HIV-status couple, often referred to as a serodiscordant couple).

  14. Does cerumen have a risk for transmission of HIV?

    PubMed

    Hanege, F M; Kalcioglu, M T; Sargin, F; Cetinkaya, Z; Tekin, M; Vahaboglu, H

    2015-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is mainly transmitted via sexual activity, mother-to-child transmission, and contact with body fluids, such as saliva and semen. Cerumen, however, has not been investigated for its capability to transmit HIV. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of cerumen for transmission of HIV infection. This study was conducted among 42 treatment-naive HIV-infected patients with positive HIV RNA and 27 HIV-infected patients with negative HIV RNA receiving antiviral treatment. Simultaneous blood samples were studied as positive controls. Sixty-nine prospectively collected cerumen specimens were analyzed for the presence of HIV RNA by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). None of the 69 cerumen specimens were positive for HIV RNA. These results conclude that cerumen in HIV-positive patients with or without antiretroviral therapy (ART) carry only an insignificant risk of transmission. However, standard infection control precautions should be applied carefully in all examinations and surgical operations of the ears.

  15. Antiretroviral therapy for prevention of HIV transmission in HIV-discordant couples

    PubMed Central

    Anglemyer, Andrew; Rutherford, George W; Horvath, Tara; Baggaley, Rachel C; Egger, Matthias; Siegfried, Nandi

    2014-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral drugs have been shown to reduce risk of mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and are also widely used for post-exposure prophylaxis for parenteral and sexual exposures. Sexual transmission may be lower in couples in which one partner is infected with HIV and the other is not and the infected partner is on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Objectives To determine if ART use in an HIV-infected member of an HIV-discordant couple is associated with lower risk of HIV transmission to the uninfected partner compared to untreated discordant couples. Search methods We used standard Cochrane methods to search electronic databases and conference proceedings with relevant search terms without limits to language. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCT), cohort studies and case-control studies of HIV-discordant couples in which the HIV-infected member of the couple was being treated or not treated with ART Data collection and analysis Abstracts of all trials identified by electronic or bibliographic scanning were examined independently by two authors. We initially identified 3,833 references and examined 87 in detail for study eligibility. Data were abstracted independently using a standardised abstraction form. Main results One RCT and nine observational studies were included in the review. These ten studies identified 2,112 episodes of HIV transmission, 1,016 among treated couples and 1,096 among untreated couples. The rate ratio for the single randomised controlled trial was 0.04 [95% CI 0.00, 0.27]. All index partners in this study had CD4 cell counts at baseline of 350–550 cells/µL. Similarly, the summary rate ratio for the nine observational studies was 0.58 [95% CI 0.35, 0.96], with substantial heterogeneity (I2=64%). After excluding two studies with inadequate person-time data, we estimated a summary rate ratio of 0.36 [95%CI 0.17, 0.75] with substantial heterogeneity (I2=62%). We also performed

  16. Knowledge of pregnant women on transmission of HIV infection through breast feeding.

    PubMed

    Kasinga, F; Mogotlane, S M; van Rensburg, G H

    2008-09-01

    Although breast-feeding is nature's way of providing nutrition to the baby, in HIV positive mothers this has been identified as one of the means through which HIV infection is transmitted from the mother to the child. In Africa where children under the age of 5 are killed by preventable diseases like diarrhoea, the issue of HIV transmission through breast feeding poses an added huge problem. Research has, however shown that exclusive infant feeding, be it breast or formula, reduces the risk substantially. It is imperative that mothers be informed about safer methods of infant feeding so that HIV infection is kept to a minimum. The objective of the study was to explore and describe the knowledge that pregnant women had about mother to child transmission of HIV infection through breast-feeding. A non-experimental quantitative exploratory and descriptive research design was used to explore the knowledge women had on mother to child transmission of HIV infection through breast-feeding. From the data collected, it showed that although women were aware of the susceptibility of children to HIV infection if fed on breast and formula feeds simultaneously by HIV positive mothers, exclusive feeding was a problem as people associated the practise with a positive HIV status. Women who had not disclosed their HIV status and were HIV positive, found it difficult to comply with the requirement to exclusively feed their infants. These either continued with complementary feeds or did not collect the free formula milk supply preferring instead to buy the formula feeds privately. In this study it was recommended that information on transmission of HIV infection from mother to child through breast -feeding including the benefits of exclusive infant feeding, be it breast or formula, for the first three to six months be provided to the community so that relatives can support the mother on infant feeding method of choice.

  17. HIV prevention is not enough: child survival in the context of prevention of mother to child HIV transmission

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Clinical and epidemiologic research has identified increasingly effective interventions to reduce mother to child HIV transmission in resource-limited settings These scientific breakthroughs have been implemented in some programmes, although much remains to be done to improve coverage and quality of these programmes. But prevention of HIV transmission is not enough. It is necessary also to consider ways to improve maternal health and protect child survival. A win-win approach is to ensure that all pregnant and lactating women with CD4 counts of <350 cells/mm3 have access to antiretroviral therapy. On its own, this approach will substantially improve maternal health and markedly reduce mother to child HIV transmission during pregnancy and delivery and through breastfeeding. This approach can be combined with additional interventions for women with higher CD4 counts, either extended prophylaxis to infants or extended regimens of antiretroviral drugs to women, to reduce transmission even further. Attempts to encourage women to abstain from all breastfeeding or to shorten the optimal duration of breastfeeding have led to increases in mortality among both uninfected and infected children. A better approach is to support breastfeeding while strengthening programmes to provide antiretroviral therapy for pregnant and lactating women who need it and offering antiretroviral drug interventions through the duration of breastfeeding. This will lead to reduced HIV transmission and will protect the health of women without compromising the health and well-being of infants and young children. PMID:20015345

  18. [HIV infection : Reaching a zero risk of transmission].

    PubMed

    Henrard, S; Wyndham-Thomas, C; Van Vooren, J P; Goffard, J C

    2016-01-01

    Despite a global reduction in the prevalence of HIV-infection, the HIV-epidemic is far from over. The prevention of HIV-transmission in all its forms (sexual, mother-to-child etc) must therefore remain a pillar in the fight against AIDS, and both potent and accessible prevention strategies are required. In addition to the classical and wellknown methods such as the condom, ant iretroviral therapy represents a potent prevention tool and the residual risk of transmission of correctly treated HIV-positive persons is virtually nihil. Antiretroviral therapy may and should be used in the prevention of HIV-transmission as Treatment as Prevention (TasP), Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP), and Post- Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP). However, because of their exorbitant costs, the accessibility of these prevention strategies is limited, particularly for the most vulnerable populations.

  19. Prevention of perinatal HIV transmission: the Perinatal HIV Hotline perspective.

    PubMed

    Waldura, Jess Fogler

    2011-01-01

    Among the most frequently asked questions by callers to the National Perinatal HIV Hotline are those on the use of hormonal contraception in women receiving antiretroviral therapy. Estradiol levels are reduced by ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors (PIs), nelfinavir, and nevirapine and increased by non-ritonavir-boosted PIs (except nelfinavir), efavirenz, and etravirine. Oral contraceptives do not affect antiretroviral drug levels, and several options are available for hormonal contraception that can compensate for or avoid the effects of antiretroviral drugs on estrogen levels. Other common questions on the hotline involve interpretation and management issues that arise from indeterminate Western blot test results early and late in pregnancy and from positive rapid test results during labor. Many questions focus on appropriate selection of antiretroviral drugs in pregnancy and the need to change regimens to reduce risk of birth defects in the child. This articlesummarizes a presentation by Jess Fogler Waldura, MD, at the 13th Annual Clinical Conference for the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program held in August 2010 in Washington, DC.

  20. Comparison of Three Intervention Models for Promoting Circumcision among Migrant Workers in Western China to Reduce Local Sexual Transmission of HIV

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Li; Yang, Xiaobo; Wei, Bo; Deng, Wei; Wei, Suosu; Huang, Jiegang; Qin, Bo; Upur, Halmurat; Zhong, Chaohui; Wang, Qianqiu; Wang, Qian; Ruan, Yuhua; Wei, Fumei; Xu, Na; Xie, Peiyan; Hsi, Jenny H.; Shao, Yiming; Liang, Hao

    2013-01-01

    Objective Three models for promoting male circumcision (MC) as a preventative intervention against HIV infection were compared among migrant worker populations in western China. Methods A cohort study was performed after an initial cross-sectional survey among migrant workers in three provincial level districts with high HIV prevalence in western China. A total of 1,670 HIV seronegative male migrants were cluster-randomized into three intervention models, in which the dissemination of promotional materials and expert- and volunteer-led discussions are conducted in one, two, and three stage interventions. Changes in knowledge of MC, acceptability of MC, MC surgery uptake, and the costs of implementation were analyzed at 6-month and 9-month follow-up visits. Results All three models significantly increased the participants’ knowledge about MC. The three-stage model significantly increased the acceptability of MC among participants and led to greatest increase in MC uptake. At the end of follow-up, 9.2% (153/1,670) of participants underwent MC surgery; uptake among the one-, two-, and three-stage models were 4.9%, 9.3%, and 14.6%, respectively. Multivariable Cox regression analysis showed that three-stage model was the most effective method to scale up MC, with RR = 2.0 (95% CI, 1.3-3.1, P=0.002) compared to the on-site session model. The two-stage intervention model showed no significant difference with either the on-site session model (RR=1.5, 95% CI, 0.92-2.4, P=0.12) or three-stage model (P=0.10). Conclusions A three-stage intervention with gradual introduction of knowledge led to the significantly increase in MC uptake among migrant workers in western China, and was also the most cost-effective method among the three models. PMID:24098770

  1. Inflammation and HIV Transmission in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Rupert; Prodger, Jessica; Joag, Vineet; Shannon, Brett; Yegorov, Sergey; Galiwango, Ronald; McKinnon, Lyle

    2015-06-01

    While the per-contact risk of sexual HIV transmission is relatively low, it is fourfold higher in sub-Saharan Africa, and this may partly explain the major global disparities that exist in HIV prevalence. Genital immune parameters are key determinants of HIV transmission risk, including epithelial integrity and the presence of highly HIV-susceptible intraepithelial or submucosal CD4+ T cell target cells. Biological parameters that may enhance mucosal HIV susceptibility in highly HIV-affected regions of sub-Saharan Africa include increased levels of mucosal inflammation, which can affect both epithelial integrity and target cell availability, as well as the increased mucosal surface area that is afforded by an intact foreskin, contraceptive choices, and intravaginal practices. There are multifactorial causes for increased mucosal inflammation, with the prevalence and nature of common co-infections being particularly relevant.

  2. Reducing the cost of HIV antibody testing.

    PubMed

    Tamashiro, H; Maskill, W; Emmanuel, J; Fauquex, A; Sato, P; Heymann, D

    1993-07-10

    Available tests to detect antibody to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have a range of applications, and injudicious selection and inappropriate use can add a significant financial burden to budgets for AIDS programmes in developing countries. There are several ways by which the cost of HIV antibody testing can be reduced; they include use of tests appropriate for existing laboratory capabilities; adoption of cost-effective testing strategies; pooling of serum samples before testing; and ensuring best possible purchase prices. Each approach can significantly reduce the cost of HIV antibody testing alone or in combination, which increases the potential sustainability of antibody testing programmes, even in settings of limited resources.

  3. Evidence for the long-term stability of HIV transmission-associated sexual behavior after HIV diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Dombrowski, Julia C; Harrington, Robert D; Golden, Matthew R

    2013-01-01

    Most persons diagnosed as having HIV alter their sexual behavior in a way that reduces the risk of HIV transmission, but the durability of such behavior change is unknown. We conducted annual anonymous cross-sectional surveys in randomly selected patients with appointments at a large, public hospital HIV clinic in Seattle, Washington, from 2005 to 2009. We used logistic regression to assess the association between time since HIV diagnosis and self-report of unprotected anal or vaginal intercourse (UAVI) with partners of negative or unknown HIV status (nonconcordant UAVI), and quantile regression to evaluate the association between time since HIV diagnosis and number of anal or vaginal sex partners. We analyzed 845 surveys collected for 5 years. Men who have sex with men (MSM) had been diagnosed as having HIV a mean (standard deviation) of 12 (7) years and non-MSM a mean of 11 (6) years. Among 597 MSM, longer time since HIV diagnosis was associated with lower age-adjusted odds of reporting nonconcordant UAVI (odds ratio, 0.96 [95% confidence interval, 0.92-0.99]) and a lower age-adjusted number of sex partners (β coefficient = -0.03, P = 0.007). Among 248 women and heterosexual men, time since HIV diagnosis was not significantly associated with age-adjusted odds of nonconcordant UAVI (odds ratio 0.99 [95% confidence interval, 0.93-1.04]) or number of sex partners (β coefficient = -0.01, P = 0.48). These results indicate that HIV transmission-associated behavior is relatively stable following the first year after HIV diagnosis. Our findings suggest that behavior change in the first year after HIV diagnosis, reported in other studies, is durable.

  4. Evidence for the Long-Term Stability of HIV Transmission-Associated Sexual Behavior Following HIV Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Dombrowski, Julia C.; Harrington, Robert D.; Golden, Matthew R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Most persons diagnosed with HIV alter their sexual behavior in a way that reduces the risk of HIV transmission, but the durability of such behavior change is unknown. Methods We conducted annual anonymous cross-sectional surveys in randomly selected patients with appointments at a large, public hospital HIV Clinic in Seattle, Washington from 2005 to 2009. We used logistic regression to assess the association between time since HIV diagnosis and self-report of unprotected anal or vaginal intercourse (UAVI) with partners of negative or unknown HIV status (nonconcordant UAVI), and quantile regression to evaluate the association between time since HIV diagnosis and number of anal or vaginal sex partners. Results We analyzed 845 surveys collected over 5 years. MSM had been diagnosed with HIV a mean of 12 (SD 7) years and non-MSM a mean of 11 (SD 6) years. Among 597 MSM, longer time since HIV diagnosis was associated with lower age-adjusted odds of reporting nonconcordant UAVI [(OR 0.96 (95% CI: 0.92 – 0.99)] and a lower age-adjusted number of sex partners (β coefficient −0.03, p=0.007). Among 248 women and heterosexual men, time since HIV diagnosis was not significantly associated with age-adjusted odds of nonconcordant UAVI [OR 0.99 (95% CI: 0.93 – 1.04)] or number of sex partners (β coefficient −0.01, p=0.48). Conclusions These results indicate that HIV transmission-associated behavior is relatively stable following the first year after HIV diagnosis. Our findings suggest that behavior change in the first year after HIV diagnosis, reported in other studies, is durable. PMID:23254116

  5. Why Are Orphaned Adolescents More Likely to Be HIV Positive? Distinguishing Between Maternal and Sexual HIV Transmission Using 17 Nationally Representative Data Sets in Africa.

    PubMed

    Kidman, Rachel; Anglewicz, Philip

    2017-07-01

    Why do orphans have higher rates of HIV infection than nonorphaned peers? Research consistently assumes that orphans acquire HIV primarily through sexual behavior, but infections may instead be due to maternal transmission. Although these two pathways have very different implications for HIV programs and policies, their relative contribution has not been previously examined. In this research, we compare the contribution of maternal and sexual transmission to HIV infection among orphans in Africa. We use Demographic and Health Survey data for 21,463 women and 18,359 men from 17 countries. We propose a conceptual framework linking orphanhood to HIV, and use mediation analysis and structural equation modeling to compare the potential contribution of maternal transmission (measured through direct pathways from orphanhood to HIV) and sexual transmission (measured through reports of risky sexual behavior) to orphan HIV infection. Our results suggest that maternal transmission is the predominant pathway of HIV infection among orphaned adolescents: there is strong evidence for a direct pathway from maternal (odds ratio [OR]: 2.45; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.72-3.51 for females and OR: 2.45; 95% CI: 1.53-3.90 for males) and double orphanhood (OR: 2.69; 95% CI: 1.97-3.66 and OR: 2.53; 95% CI: 1.68-3.82, respectively) to HIV; greater excess HIV risk in maternal versus paternal orphans. The contribution of sexual behavior is largely not significant. We do not observe correspondingly high orphan disparities in other sexually transmitted diseases. Maternal transmission is a more likely explanation than sexual transmission for heightened HIV infection among orphans. These results suggest that programs designed to address HIV infection among adolescents should focus on reducing maternal transmission and on identifying and testing undiagnosed HIV among orphans. Copyright © 2017 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Male Circumcision and Risk of Male-to-Female HIV-1 Transmission: A Multinational Prospective Study in African HIV-1 Serodiscordant Couples

    PubMed Central

    Baeten, Jared M.; Donnell, Deborah; Kapiga, Saidi H.; Ronald, Allan; John-Stewart, Grace; Inambao, Mubiana; Manongi, Rachel; Vwalika, Bellington; Celum, Connie

    2010-01-01

    Objective Male circumcision reduces female-to-male HIV-1 transmission risk by approximately 60%. Data assessing the effect of circumcision on male-to-female HIV-1 transmission are conflicting, with one observational study among HIV-1 serodiscordant couples showing reduced transmission but a randomized trial suggesting no short-term benefit of circumcision. Design/Methods Data collected as part of a prospective study among African HIV-1 serodiscordant couples were analyzed for the relationship between circumcision status of HIV-1 seropositive men and risk of HIV-1 acquisition among their female partners. Circumcision status was determined by physical examination. Cox proportional hazards analysis was used. Results 1096 HIV-1 serodiscordant couples in which the male partner was HIV-1 infected were followed for a median of 18 months; 374 (34%) male partners were circumcised. Sixty-four female partners seroconverted to HIV-1 (incidence 3.8 per 100 person-years). Circumcision of the male partner was associated with a non-statistically significant ∼40% lower risk of HIV-1 acquisition by the female partner (hazard ratio [HR] 0.62, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.35-1.10, p=0.10). The magnitude of this effect was similar when restricted to the subset of HIV-1 transmission events confirmed by viral sequencing to have occurred within the partnership (n=50, HR 0.57, p=0.11), after adjustment for male partner plasma HIV-1 concentrations (HR 0.60, p=0.13), and when excluding follow-up time for male partners who initiated antiretroviral therapy (HR 0.53, p=0.07). Conclusions Among HIV-1 serodiscordant couples in which the HIV-1 seropositive partner was male, we observed no increased risk and potentially decreased risk from circumcision on male-to-female transmission of HIV-1. PMID:20042848

  7. Risk Factors for HIV Transmission and Barriers to HIV Disclosure: Metropolitan Atlanta Youth Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Wallins, Amy; Toledo, Lauren; Murray, Ashley; Gaul, Zaneta; Sutton, Madeline Y.; Gillespie, Scott; Leong, Traci; Graves, Chanda; Chakraborty, Rana

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Youth carry the highest incidence of HIV infection in the United States. Understanding adolescent and young adult (AYA) perspectives on HIV transmission risk is important for targeted HIV prevention. We conducted a mixed methods study with HIV-infected and uninfected youth, ages 18–24 years, from Atlanta, GA. We provided self-administered surveys to HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected AYAs to identify risk factors for HIV acquisition. By means of computer-assisted thematic analyses, we examined transcribed focus group responses on HIV education, contributors to HIV transmission, and pre-sex HIV status disclosure. The 68 participants had the following characteristics: mean age 21.5 years (standard deviation: 1.8 years), 85% male, 90% black, 68% HIV-infected. HIV risk behaviors included the perception of condomless sex (Likert scale mean: 8.0) and transactional sex (88% of participants); no differences were noted by HIV status. Qualitative analyses revealed two main themes: (1) HIV risk factors among AYAs, and (2) barriers to discussing HIV status before sex. Participants felt the use of social media, need for immediate gratification, and lack of concern about HIV disease were risk factors for AYAs. Discussing HIV status with sex partners was uncommon. Key reasons included: fear of rejection, lack of confidentiality, discussion was unnecessary in temporary relationships, and disclosure negatively affecting the mood. HIV prevention strategies for AYAs should include improving condom use frequency and HIV disclosure skills, responsible utilization of social media, and education addressing HIV prevention including the risks of transactional sex. PMID:26588663

  8. Risk Factors for HIV Transmission and Barriers to HIV Disclosure: Metropolitan Atlanta Youth Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Gonzalez, Andres F; Wallins, Amy; Toledo, Lauren; Murray, Ashley; Gaul, Zaneta; Sutton, Madeline Y; Gillespie, Scott; Leong, Traci; Graves, Chanda; Chakraborty, Rana

    2016-01-01

    Youth carry the highest incidence of HIV infection in the United States. Understanding adolescent and young adult (AYA) perspectives on HIV transmission risk is important for targeted HIV prevention. We conducted a mixed methods study with HIV-infected and uninfected youth, ages 18-24 years, from Atlanta, GA. We provided self-administered surveys to HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected AYAs to identify risk factors for HIV acquisition. By means of computer-assisted thematic analyses, we examined transcribed focus group responses on HIV education, contributors to HIV transmission, and pre-sex HIV status disclosure. The 68 participants had the following characteristics: mean age 21.5 years (standard deviation: 1.8 years), 85% male, 90% black, 68% HIV-infected. HIV risk behaviors included the perception of condomless sex (Likert scale mean: 8.0) and transactional sex (88% of participants); no differences were noted by HIV status. Qualitative analyses revealed two main themes: (1) HIV risk factors among AYAs, and (2) barriers to discussing HIV status before sex. Participants felt the use of social media, need for immediate gratification, and lack of concern about HIV disease were risk factors for AYAs. Discussing HIV status with sex partners was uncommon. Key reasons included: fear of rejection, lack of confidentiality, discussion was unnecessary in temporary relationships, and disclosure negatively affecting the mood. HIV prevention strategies for AYAs should include improving condom use frequency and HIV disclosure skills, responsible utilization of social media, and education addressing HIV prevention including the risks of transactional sex.

  9. Strategies for Preventing Mucosal Cell-Associated HIV Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Whaley, Kevin J.; Mayer, Kenneth H.

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) may be transmitted through either cell-free virions or leukocytes harboring intracellular HIV in bodily fluids. In recent years, the early initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy leading to virological suppression has resulted in decreased HIV transmission to uninfected partners. Additionally, the efficacy of primary chemoprophylaxis with oral or topical antiretroviral regimens containing tenofovir (with or without emtricitabine) has been demonstrated. However, the efficacy of these approaches may be compromised by suboptimal adherence, decreased drug concentrations in mucosal compartments in women, and genital inflammation. Furthermore, in vitro studies on the effects of tenofovir on cell-associated HIV transmission have produced conflicting results. Preclinical studies suggest that combination preventive approaches may be most effective in stopping the transmission of HIV after mucosal exposure. Since the development of antibodies were found to correlate with protection in the only effective HIV vaccine trial, the administration of preformed mucosal and systemic antibodies may inform the development of safe and effective antibody-based oral, topical, and/or systemic preexposure prophylaxis agents and provide guidance in the development of HIV vaccines that effectively block cell-associated HIV transmission. PMID:25414423

  10. HLA-G and mother-child perinatal HIV transmission.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ma; Czarnecki, Chris; Ramdahin, Suzie; Embree, Joanne; Plummer, Francis A

    2013-04-01

    Transplacental passage is a well-known phenomenon in HIV infection and immune responses at the maternal-fetal interface play a critical role in perinatal mother-to-child HIV transmission (MCHT). The high expression of HLA-G at the maternal-fetal interface and its role in mediating immune tolerance suggest that it could play an important role in MCHT. We investigated the role of HLA-G polymorphism in perinatal HIV transmission in 348 ART naïve mother-child pairs enrolled in a mother-child HIV transmission cohort, established in Nairobi, Kenya in 1986. Among the 348 children born to 266 HIV+ mothers, 258 were uninfected and 90 became infected perinatally. HLA-G exons 2 and 3 of 266 mothers and 251 children were sequenced and genotyped. Among 14 HLA-G alleles identified, only 4 alleles have a phenotype frequency above 10%. Correlation analysis showed that HLA-G(∗)01:03+ mothers were less likely to perinatally transmit HIV-1 to their children (p=0.038, Odds ratio:0.472, 95%CI:0.229-0.973). Mother-child HLA-G concordance was not associated with the increased perinatal HIV transmission. There was no significant difference in the general health between the transmitting mothers and the mothers who did not transmit HIV to their children.

  11. Vertical transmission in HIV infection/AIDS: a feminist perspective.

    PubMed

    Pinch, W J

    1994-01-01

    HIV infection and AIDS create a unique dilemma for women in their potential for vertical transmission of these conditions. Selected feminist perspectives in ontology, epistemology, and axiology are reviewed to illuminate possible social, cultural, and political circumstances of these women. Drawing both on these perspectives and various sources of data about women with HIV/AIDS, some implications for nursing complete this discussion.

  12. EFFECT OF HIV PREVENTION AND TREATMENT PROGRAM ON HIV AND HCV TRANSMISSION AND HIV MORTALITY AT AN INDONESIAN NARCOTIC PRISON.

    PubMed

    Nelwan, Erni J; Indrati, Agnes K; Isa, Ahmad; Triani, Nurlita; Alam, Nisaa Nur; Herlan, Maria S; Husen, Wahid; Pohan, Herdiman T; Alisjahbana, Bachti; Meheus, Andre; Van Crevel, Reinout; van der Ven, Andre Jam

    2015-09-01

    Validated data regarding HIV-transmission in prisons in developing countries is scarce. We examined sexual and injecting drug use behavior and HIV and HCV transmission in an Indonesian narcotic prison during the implementation of an HIV prevention and treatment program during 2004-2007 when the Banceuy Narcotic Prison in Indonesia conducted an HIV transmission prevention program to provide 1) HIV education, 2) voluntary HIV testing and counseling, 3) condom supply, 4) prevention of rape and sexual violence, 5) antiretroviral treatment for HIV-positive prisoners and 6) methadone maintenance treatment. During a first survey that was conducted between 2007 and 2009, new prisoners entered Banceuy Narcotics Prison were voluntary tested for HIV and HCV-infection after written informed consent was obtained. Information regarding sexual and injecting risk behavior and physical status were also recorded at admission to the prison. Participants who tested negative for both HIV and HCV during the first survey were included in a second survey conducted during 2008-2011. During both surveys, data on mortality among HIV-seropositive patients were also recorded. All HIV-seropositive participants receive treatment for HIV. HIV/ AIDS-related deaths decreased: 43% in 2006, 18% in 2007, 9% in 2008 and 0% in 2009. No HIV and HCV seroconversion inside Banceuy Narcotic Prison were found after a median of 23 months imprisonment (maximum follow-up: 38 months). Total of 484.8 person-years observation was done. Participants reported HIV transmission risk-behavior in Banceuy Prison during the second survey was low. After implementation of HIV prevention and treatment program, no new HIV or HCV cases were detected and HIV-related mortality decreased.

  13. HIV Transmission Rates in the United States, 2006-2008.

    PubMed

    Holtgrave, David R; Hall, H Irene; Prejean, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    National HIV incidence for a given year x [I(x)] equals prevalence [P(x)] times the transmission rate [T(x)]. Or, simply rearranging the terms, T(x) = [I(x)/P(x)]*100 (where T(x) is the number of HIV transmissions per 100 persons living with HIV in a given year). The transmission rate is an underutilized measure of the speed at which the epidemic is spreading. Here, we utilize recently updated information about HIV incidence and prevalence in the U.S. to estimate the national HIV transmission rate for 2006 through 2008, and present a novel method to express the level of uncertainty in these estimates. Transmission rate estimates for 2006 through 2008 are as follows (respectively): 4.39 (4.01 to 4.73); 4.90 (4.49 to 5.28); and 4.06 (3.70 to 4.38). Although there are methodological challenges inherent in making these estimates, they do give some indications that the U.S. HIV transmission rate is at a historically low level.

  14. The contribution of maternal HIV seroconversion during late pregnancy and breastfeeding to mother-to-child transmission of HIV

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Leigh F.; Stinson, Kathryn; Newell, Marie-Louise; Bland, Ruth M.; Moultrie, Harry; Davies, Mary-Ann; Rehle, Thomas M.; Dorrington, Rob E.; Sherman, Gayle G.

    2012-01-01

    Background The prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV has been focused mainly on women who are HIV-positive at their first antenatal visit, but there is uncertainty regarding the contribution to overall transmission from mothers who seroconvert after their first antenatal visit and before weaning. Method A mathematical model was developed to simulate changes in mother-to-child transmission of HIV over time, in South Africa. The model allows for changes in infant feeding practices as infants age, temporal changes in the provision of antiretroviral prophylaxis and counselling on infant feeding, as well as temporal changes in maternal HIV prevalence and incidence. Results The proportion of MTCT from mothers who seroconverted after their first antenatal visit was 26% (95% CI: 22-30%) in 2008, or 15 000 out of 57 000 infections. It is estimated that by 2014, total MTCT will reduce to 39 000 per annum, and transmission from mothers seroconverting after their first antenatal visit will reduce to 13 000 per annum, accounting for 34% (95% CI: 29-39%) of MTCT. If maternal HIV incidence during late pregnancy and breastfeeding were reduced by 50% after 2010, and HIV screening were repeated in late pregnancy and at 6-week immunization visits after 2010, the average annual number of MTCT cases over the 2010-15 period would reduce by 28% (95% CI: 25-31%), from 39 000 to 28 000 per annum. Conclusion Maternal seroconversion during late pregnancy and breastfeeding contributes significantly to the paediatric HIV burden, and needs greater attention in the planning of PMTCT programmes. PMID:22193774

  15. Absence of transmission from HIV-infected individuals with HAART to their heterosexual serodiscordant partners.

    PubMed

    Del Romero, Jorge; Río, Isabel; Castilla, Jesús; Baza, Begoña; Paredes, Vanessa; Vera, Mar; Rodríguez, Carmen

    2015-12-01

    Further studies are needed to evaluate the level of effectiveness and durability of HAART to reduce the risk of HIV sexual transmission in serodiscordant couples having unprotected sexual practices. A cross-sectional study was conducted with prospective cohort of heterosexual HIV serodiscordant couples where the only risk factor for HIV transmission to the uninfected partner (sexual partner) was the sexual relationship with the infected partner (index case). HIV prevalence in sexual partners at enrolment and seroconversions in follow-up were compared by antiretroviral treatment in the index partner, HIV plasma viral load in index cases and sexual risk exposures in sexual partners. In each visit, an evaluation of the risks for HIV transmission, preventive counselling and screening for genitourinary infections in the sexual partner was performed, as well as the determination of the immunological and virological situation and antiretroviral treatment in the index case. At enrolment no HIV infection was detected in 202 couples where the index case was taking HAART. HIV prevalence in sexual partners was 9.6% in 491 couples where the index case was not taking antiretroviral treatment (p<0.001). During follow-up there was no HIV seroconversion among 199 partners whose index case was taking HAART, accruing 7600 risky sexual exposures and 85 natural pregnancies. Among 359 couples whose index case was not under antiretroviral treatment, over 13,000 risky sexual exposures and 5 HIV seroconversions of sexual partners were recorded. The percentage of seroconversion among couples having risky sexual intercourse was 2.5 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1-5.6) when the index case did not undergo antiretroviral treatment and zero (95% CI: 0-3.2) when the index case received HAART. The risk of sexual transmission of HIV from individuals with HAART to their heterosexual partners can become extremely low. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  16. From prenatal HIV testing of the mother to prevention of sexual HIV transmission within the couple.

    PubMed

    Desgrées-du-Loû, Annabel; Brou, Hermann; Traore, Annick Tijou; Djohan, Gerard; Becquet, Renaud; Leroy, Valeriane

    2009-09-01

    The first step in preventing mother-to-child HIV transmission (PMTCT) programmes is offering HIV counselling and testing to pregnant women. In developing countries where HIV testing remains rare, it represents a unique opportunity for many women to learn their HIV status. This prenatal HIV testing is not only the entry point to prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission, but also an occasion for women to sensitize their male partner to sexual risks. Here we explore if these women, HIV-tested as mothers, apply the prevention recommendations they also receive as women. In the Ditrame Plus PMTCT program in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire, two cohorts of women (475 HIV-infected women and 400 HIV-negative women) were followed up two years after the pregnancy when they were offered prenatal HIV testing. In each cohort, we compared the proportion of women who communicated with their regular partner on sexual risks, prior to and after prenatal HIV testing. We analysed socio-demographic factors related to this communication. We measured two potential conjugal outcomes of women HIV testing: the level of condom use at sex resumption after delivery and the risk of union break-up. Prenatal HIV testing increased conjugal communication regarding sexual risks, whatever the woman's serostatus. This communication was less frequent for women in a polygamous union or not residing with their partner. Around 30% of women systematically used condoms at sex resumption. Among HIV infected ones, conjugal talk on sexual risks was related to improved condom use. After HIV testing, more HIV-infected women separated from their partners than HIV-uninfected women, despite very few negative reactions from the notified partners. In conclusion, offering prenatal HIV counselling and testing is an efficient tool for sensitizing women and their partners to HIV prevention. But sexual prevention in a conjugal context remains difficult and need to be specifically addressed.

  17. Human milk oligosaccharide concentration and risk of postnatal transmission of HIV through breastfeeding123

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Louise; Kim, Hae-Young; Hsiao, Lauren; Nissan, Caroline; Sinkala, Moses; Kankasa, Chipepo; Mwiya, Mwiya; Thea, Donald M; Aldrovandi, Grace M

    2012-01-01

    Background: The inefficiency of HIV breast-milk transmission may be caused by the presence of immunologically active factors, including human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs). Objective: We investigated whether HMO concentrations are associated with a reduced risk of postnatal HIV transmission. Design: A nested case-control study was conducted within a larger cohort study of HIV-infected women and their infants followed from birth to 24 mo in Lusaka, Zambia. Breast-milk samples collected at 1 mo from 81 HIV-infected women who transmitted via breastfeeding, a random sample of 86 HIV-infected women who did not transmit despite breastfeeding, and 36 uninfected breastfeeding women were selected. Total and specific HMO concentrations were measured by HPLC and compared between groups with adjustment for confounders by using logistic regression. Results: HIV-infected women with total HMOs above the median (1.87 g/L) were less likely to transmit via breastfeeding (OR: 0.45; 95% CI: 0.21, 0.97; P = 0.04) after adjustment for CD4 count and breast-milk HIV RNA concentrations; a trend toward higher concentrations of lacto-N-neotetraose being associated with reduced transmission (OR: 0.49; 95% CI: 0.23, 1.04; P = 0.06) was also observed. The proportion of 3′-sialyllactose (3′-SL) per total HMOs was higher among transmitting than among nontransmitting women (P = 0.003) and correlated with higher plasma and breast-milk HIV RNA and lower CD4 counts. Neither Secretor nor Lewis status distinguished between transmitting and nontransmitting women. Conclusions: Higher concentrations of non-3′-SL HMOs were associated with protection against postnatal HIV transmission independent of other known risk factors. Further study of these novel, potentially anti-HIV components of breast milk is warranted. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00310726. PMID:22894939

  18. HLA-G 14 bp deletion/insertion polymorphism and mother-to-child transmission of HIV.

    PubMed

    Segat, L; Zupin, L; Kim, H-Y; Catamo, E; Thea, D M; Kankasa, C; Aldrovandi, G M; Kuhn, L; Crovella, S

    2014-03-01

    The human leukocyte antigen HLA-G, highly expressed at the maternal-fetal interface, has a pivotal role in mediating immune tolerance. In this study we investigated the influence of HLA-G 14 bp insertion polymorphism in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 mother-to-child HIV-1 transmission. The 14 bp insertion polymorphism was analyzed among 99 HIV-1 positive mothers and 329 infants born to HIV-positive mothers in Zambia, among whom vertical transmission status and timing had been determined. HLA-G 14 bp insertion polymorphism was detected using a custom TaqMan single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyping assay. Logistic regression was conducted to examine the associations between HLA-G alleles and the risk of HIV transmission. The 14 bp insertion allele was more frequent in HIV exposed-uninfected (EU) infants than in infected infants, and was associated with reduced risk of both in utero (IU) and intrapartum (IP) HIV transmission, after adjusting for maternal cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) cell count and plasma viral load. Maternal HLA-G 14 bp insertion genotype and HLA-G concordance between mother and child were not associated with the risk of perinatal HIV transmission. The presence of the 14 bp insertion associates with protection toward IU and IP HIV infection in children from Zambia, suggesting that HLA-G could be involved in the vertical transmission of HIV.

  19. Effectiveness of semen washing to prevent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission and assist pregnancy in HIV-discordant couples: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zafer, Maryam; Horvath, Hacsi; Mmeje, Okeoma; van der Poel, Sheryl; Semprini, Augusto E; Rutherford, George; Brown, Joelle

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of semen washing in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-discordant couples in which the male partner is infected. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Not applicable. Forty single-arm open-label studies among HIV-discordant couples that underwent intrauterine insemination (IUI) or in vitro fertilization (IVF) with or without intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) using washed semen. Semen washing followed by IUI, IVF, or IVF/ICSI. HIV transmission to HIV-uninfected women; secondary outcomes: HIV transmission to newborns and proportion of couples achieving a clinical pregnancy. No HIV transmission occurred in 11,585 cycles of assisted reproduction with the use of washed semen among 3,994 women. Among the subset of HIV-infected men without plasma viral suppression at the time of semen washing, no HIV seroconversions occurred among 1,023 women after 2,863 cycles of assisted reproduction with the use of washed semen. Studies that measured HIV transmission to infants reported no cases of vertical transmission. Overall, 56.3% of couples (2,357/4,184) achieved a clinical pregnancy with the use of washed semen. Semen washing appears to significantly reduce the risk of transmission in HIV-discordant couples desiring children, regardless of viral suppression in the male partner. There are no randomized controlled studies or studies from low-income countries, especially those with a large burden of HIV. Continued development of lower-cost semen washing and assisted reproduction technologies is needed. Integration of semen washing into HIV prevention interventions could help to further reduce the spread of HIV. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effectiveness of semen washing to prevent HIV transmission and assist pregnancy in HIV-discordant couples: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zafer, Maryam; Horvath, Hacsi; Mmeje, Okeoma; van der Poel, Sheryl; Semprini, Augusto; Rutherford, George; Brown, Joelle

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of semen washing in HIV-discordant couples in which the male partner is infected Design Systematic review and meta-analysis Setting All countries Patient(s) Forty single-arm, open label studies among HIV-discordant couples that underwent intrauterine insemination (IUI) or in vitro fertilization (IVF) with or without intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) using washed semen Intervention(s) Semen washing followed by IUI, IVF, or IVF/ICSI Main outcome measure(s) Primary outcome: HIV transmission to HIV-uninfected women; secondary outcomes: HIV transmission to newborns and proportion of couples achieving a clinical pregnancy Result(s) No HIV transmission occurred in 11,585 cycles of assisted reproduction using washed semen among 3,994 women (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0–0.0001). Among the subset of HIV-infected men without plasma viral suppression at the time of semen washing, no HIV seroconversions occurred among 1,023 women following 2,863 cycles of assisted reproduction using washed semen (95%CI= 0–0.0006). Studies that measured HIV transmission to infants reported no cases of vertical transmission (0/1,026, 95% CI= 0–0.0029). Overall, 56.3% (2,357/4,184, 95%CI=54.8%–57.8%) of couples achieved a clinical pregnancy using washed semen. Conclusion(s) Semen washing appears to significantly reduce the risk of transmission in HIV-discordant couples desiring children, regardless of viral suppression in the male partner. There are no randomized, controlled studies or studies from low-income countries, especially those with a large burden of HIV. Continued development of lower-cost semen washing and assisted reproduction technologies is needed. Integration of semen washing into HIV prevention interventions could help further reduce the spread of HIV. PMID:26688556

  1. Elimination of mother-to-child transmission of HIV: lessons learned from success in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Thisyakorn, Usa

    2017-05-01

    In 1988, the generalised HIV/AIDS epidemic in Thailand began and in the same year the first HIV-exposed infant in Thailand was born at King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Bangkok. From the early to mid-1990s, an epidemic wave of HIV-infected women and infants occurred. Heterosexual HIV transmission, as described in the Asian Epidemic Model, was the major mode of spread in Thailand, causing an increasing number of HIV-infected pregnant women. The early and concerted multi-sectoral response of Thai society reduced the prevalence of HIV infection in pregnant women from 2% in the mid-1990s to 0.6% in 2015 and mother-to-child transmission of HIV (MTCT) from an estimated 20-40% to 1.9%. Thus, Thailand became the first Asian country to achieve the World Health Organization's (WHO) targets for the elimination of MTCT. In this narrative review, the key historic evolutions of the science and policy of prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) in Thailand that addressed the four prongs of the recommended WHO PMTCT strategy are described, and the lessons learned are discussed.

  2. Funding antiretroviral treatment for HIV-positive temporary residents in Australia prevents transmission and is inexpensive.

    PubMed

    Gray, Richard T; Watson, Jo; Cogle, Aaron J; Smith, Don E; Hoy, Jennifer F; Bastian, Lisa A; Finlayson, Robert; Drummond, Fraser M; Whittaker, Bill; Law, Matthew G; Petoumenos, Kathy

    2017-09-06

    Background: The aim of this study is to estimate the reduction in new HIV infections and resultant cost outcomes of providing antiretroviral treatment (ART) through Australia's 'universal access' health scheme to all temporary residents with HIV infection living legally in Australia, but currently deemed ineligible to access subsidised ART via this scheme. Methods: A mathematical model to estimate the number of new HIV infections averted and the associated lifetime costs over 5 years if all HIV-positive temporary residents in Australia had access to ART and subsidised medical care was developed. Input data came from a cohort of 180 HIV-positive temporary residents living in Australia who are receiving free ART donated by pharmaceutical companies for up to 4 years. Results: Expanding ART access to an estimated total 450 HIV+ temporary residents in Australia for 5 years could avert 80 new infections. The model estimated the total median discounted (5%) cost for ART and associated care to be A$36million, while the total savings in lifetime-discounted costs for the new infections averted was A$22million. Conclusions: It is estimated that expanded access to ART for all HIV-positive temporary residents in Australia will substantially reduce HIV transmission to their sexual partners at little additional cost. In the context of Australia's National HIV strategy and Australia's endorsement of global goals to provide universal access to ART for all people with HIV, this is an important measure to remove inequities in the provision of HIV-related treatment and care.

  3. Heterosexual HIV transmission dynamics: implications for prevention and control.

    PubMed

    Chin, James; Bennett, Anthony

    2007-08-01

    Understanding the epidemiologic definition of epidemic versus non-epidemic spread of an infectious disease agent and the different patterns of heterosexual HIV transmission are needed to fully understand the low potential for heterosexual HIV epidemics in most heterosexual populations. Epidemic sexual HIV transmission can occur only in populations where there are large numbers of persons who have unprotected sex with multiple and concurrent sex partners. How high HIV prevalence may reach in these populations depends on the size and overlap of sex networks, and the prevalence of facilitating and protective factors that can greatly increase or limit the amount of infected blood and sexual fluids exchanged during intercourse. The wide difference in potentials for heterosexual HIV epidemics that exists within and between countries must be recognized, accepted and monitored in order to design and focus prevention strategies where they are most needed and most effective.

  4. Lower levels of HIV RNA in semen in HIV-2 compared with HIV-1 infection: implications for differences in transmission

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, Geoffrey S.; Hawes, Stephen E.; Agne, Habibatou D.; Stern, Joshua E.; Critchlow, Cathy W.; Kiviat, Nancy B.; Sow, Papa Salif

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives HIV-2 infection, in comparison with HIV-1, is characterized by lower plasma viral loads, slower CD4 cell count decline, decreased AIDS-related mortality, and lower rates of mother-to-child and sexual transmission. To gain further insight into why HIV-1 is more readily transmitted as compared with HIV-2, we analyzed semen and plasma HIV RNA levels in HIV-1 and HIV-2-positive men from Senegal. Design and methods Twenty-two HIV-1 and 10 HIV-2-infected subjects from the University of Dakar donated semen and blood samples for this analysis. HIV-1 and HIV-2 viral loads in semen and plasma were quantified using type-specific polymerase chain reaction assays. Results The mean age of the subjects was 37 and 40 years; mean CD4 cell count was 222 and 276 cells/µl and the mean plasma viral load was 4.7 and 3.0 log10 copies/ml for HIV-1 and HIV-2, respectively (P = 0.002). HIV RNA was detected in semen in 21 of 22 (95%) of HIV-1 and seven of 10 (70%) of HIV-2-infected subjects; P = 0.07). However, the levels of HIV RNA present in semen were markedly different between those with HIV-1 and HIV-2, with a mean of 4.4 log10 copies/ml among those with HIV-1 and a mean of 2.6 log10 copies/ml among those with HIV-2 (P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, plasma viral load and HIV type, but not CD4 cell count, were independently predictive of semen viral load (P = 0.03, 0.05, 0.48, respectively) Conclusions These data suggest that differences in semen viral load between HIV-1 and HIV-2 may be in part responsible for the markedly different transmission rates of these two viruses. In addition, risk of male genital tract shedding strongly correlates with plasma viral loads. Interventions that decrease viral load may help decrease transmission of both HIV-1 and HIV-2. PMID:16549974

  5. African infants’ CCL3 gene copies influence perinatal HIV transmission in the absence of maternal nevirapine

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Louise; Schramm, Diana B.; Donninger, Samantha; Meddows-Taylor, Stephen; Coovadia, Ashraf H.; Sherman, Gayle G.; Gray, Glenda E.; Tiemessen, Caroline T.

    2008-01-01

    Background Individuals with more copies of CCL3L1 (CCR5 ligand) than their population median have been found to be less susceptible to HIV infection. We investigated whether maternal or infant CCL3L1 gene copy numbers are associated with perinatal HIV transmission when single-dose nevirapine is given for prevention. Method A nested case–control study was undertaken combining data from four cohorts including 849 HIV-infected mothers and their infants followed prospectively in Johannesburg, South Africa. Access to antiretroviral drugs for the prevention of perinatal transmission differed across the cohorts. Maternal and infant CCL3L1 gene copy numbers per diploid genome (pdg) were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction for 79 out of 83 transmitting pairs (~10% transmission rate) and 235 randomly selected non-transmitting pairs. Results Higher numbers of infant, but not maternal, CCL3L1 gene copies were associated with reduced HIV transmission (P=0.004) overall, but the association was attenuated if mothers took single-dose nevirapine or if the maternal viral load was low. Maternal nevirapine was also associated with reduced spontaneously released CCL3 (P=0.007) and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated CCL3 (P=0.005) production in cord blood mononuclear cells from uninfected infants. Conclusion We observed a strong association between higher infant CCL3L1 gene copies and reduced susceptibility to HIV in the absence of maternal nevirapine. We also observed a reduction in newborn CCL3 production with nevirapine exposure. Taken together, we hypothesize that nevirapine may have direct or indirect effects that partly modify the role of the CCR5 ligand CCL3 in HIV transmission, obscuring the relationship between this genetic marker and perinatal HIV transmission. PMID:17690574

  6. Exploring the Impact of Prostitution on HIV/AIDS Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Bhunu, C. P.; Mhlanga, A. N.; Mushayabasa, S.

    2014-01-01

    HIV/AIDS has been somehow linked to prostitution for decades now. A mathematical model is presented to assess the link between prostitution and HIV transmission. The epidemic thresholds known as the reproduction numbers and equilibria for the model are determined and stabilities analyzed. Analysis of the reproduction numbers suggests that HIV/AIDS control using antiretroviral therapy is more effective in the absence of prostitution. Numerical simulations further show high levels of HIV/AIDS when percentage of prostitutes in the community is high. Results from this study suggest that effectively controlling HIV/AIDS requires strategies that address both prostitution and HIV/AIDS transmission. Addressing HIV/AIDS through condom use and antiretroviral therapy may not be enough to stem HIV/AIDS in the community as some drug/alcohol misusing prostitutes may not be able to negotiate for safe sex while they are in drunken stupor. Furthermore, prostitutes are likely to get infected by different HIV strains some of which may be resistant to the antiretroviral therapy regimen in use. PMID:27471746

  7. Mother-to-Child HIV-1 Transmission Events Are Differentially Impacted by Breast Milk and Its Components from HIV-1-Infected Women.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ruizhong; Achenbach, Jenna; Shen, Yue; Palaia, Jana; Rahkola, Jeremy T; Nick, Heidi J; Smythies, Lesley E; McConnell, Michelle; Fowler, Mary G; Smith, Phillip D; Janoff, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    Breast milk is a vehicle of infection and source of protection in post-natal mother-to-child HIV-1 transmission (MTCT). Understanding the mechanism by which breast milk limits vertical transmission will provide critical insight into the design of preventive and therapeutic approaches to interrupt HIV-1 mucosal transmission. However, characterization of the inhibitory activity of breast milk in human intestinal mucosa, the portal of entry in postnatal MTCT, has been constrained by the limited availability of primary mucosal target cells and tissues to recapitulate mucosal transmission ex vivo. Here, we characterized the impact of skimmed breast milk, breast milk antibodies (Igs) and non-Ig components from HIV-1-infected Ugandan women on the major events of HIV-1 mucosal transmission using primary human intestinal cells and tissues. HIV-1-specific IgG antibodies and non-Ig components in breast milk inhibited the uptake of Ugandan HIV-1 isolates by primary human intestinal epithelial cells, viral replication in and transport of HIV-1- bearing dendritic cells through the human intestinal mucosa. Breast milk HIV-1-specific IgG and IgA, as well as innate factors, blocked the uptake and transport of HIV-1 through intestinal mucosa. Thus, breast milk components have distinct and complementary effects in reducing HIV-1 uptake, transport through and replication in the intestinal mucosa and, therefore, likely contribute to preventing postnatal HIV-1 transmission. Our data suggests that a successful preventive or therapeutic approach would require multiple immune factors acting at multiple steps in the HIV-1 mucosal transmission process.

  8. Five-year trends in epidemiology and prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission, St. Petersburg, Russia: results from perinatal HIV surveillance

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The HIV epidemic in Russia has increasingly involved reproductive-aged women, which may increase perinatal HIV transmission. Methods Standard HIV case-reporting and enhanced perinatal HIV surveillance systems were used for prospective assessment of HIV-infected women giving birth in St. Petersburg, Russia, during 2004-2008. Trends in social, perinatal, and clinical factors influencing mother-to-child HIV transmission stratified by history of injection drug use, and rates of perinatal HIV transmission were assessed using two-sided χ2 or Cochran-Armitage tests. Results Among HIV-infected women who gave birth, the proportion of women who self-reported ever using injection drugs (IDUs) decreased from 62% in 2004 to 41% in 2008 (P < 0.0001). Programmatic improvements led to increased uptake of the following clinical services from 2004 to 2008 (all P < 0.01): initiation of antiretroviral prophylaxis at ≤28 weeks gestation (IDUs 44%-54%, non-IDUs 45%-72%), monitoring of immunologic (IDUs 48%-64%, non-IDUs 58%-80%) and virologic status (IDUs 8%-58%, non-IDUs 10%-75%), dual/triple antiretroviral prophylaxis (IDUs 9%-44%, non-IDUs 14%-59%). After initial increase from 5.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.5%-7.8%) in 2004 to 8.5% (CI 6.1%-11.7%) in 2005 (P < 0.05), perinatal HIV transmission decreased to 5.3% (CI 3.4%-8.3%) in 2006, and 3.2% (CI 1.7%-5.8%) in 2007 (P for trend <0.05). However, the proportion of women without prenatal care and without HIV testing before labor and delivery remained unchanged. Conclusions Reduced proportion of IDUs and improved clinical services among HIV-infected women giving birth were accompanied by decreased perinatal HIV transmission, which can be further reduced by increasing outreach and HIV testing of women before and during pregnancy. PMID:22032196

  9. A culturally specific educational program to reduce the risk of HIV and HBV transmission among Ethiopian immigrants to Israel II: Evaluating the effect of the training program on veteran immigrant trainees.

    PubMed

    Shtarkshall, R; Soskolne, V; Chemtov, D; Rosen, H

    1993-10-01

    We describe the evaluation of a program for training veteran Ethiopian immigrants to be health educators/cultural mediators. This educational intervention project was designed to lower the risk of transmission of HIV and HBV among the immigrants who arrived in Israel in "Operation Solomon", May 1991. The training program was designed to teach the biomedical model of HIV transmission and its prevention, and to allow the trainees to explore their feelings about people with HIV/AIDS in order to enable them to teach these issues appropriately to the general community of immigrants from Ethiopia, and to work with individuals with HIV among them. It also trained them in teaching skills and in imparting the knowledge in a culturally appropriate manner. The evaluation of changes in knowledge was done at three time points: at the beginning of a 3-day training seminar (A), its end (B) and after 7 half-day training sessions comprising the whole training program 4 months later (C). We also evaluated the changes in their attitudes and feelings about teaching these subjects and their estimate of their teaching skills at two time points (B and C). The data were collected from a written questionnaire. We also monitored their teaching through direct observation by people who spoke Amharic, and through the trainees completing a self-monitoring form. The monitoring and evaluation efforts were built into the structure of the program (including the interventions themselves). They include several complementary approaches: qualitative and quantitative, structured and semi-structured, reported and observed.

  10. Sexual Behaviors and Transmission Risks Among People Living with HIV: Beliefs, Perceptions, and Challenges to Using Treatments as Prevention.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, Seth C; Cherry, Chauncey; Kalichman, Moira O; Washington, Christopher; Grebler, Tamar; Hoyt, Ginger; Merely, Cindy; Welles, Brandi

    2016-08-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) improves the health of people living with HIV and can reduce infectiousness, preventing HIV transmission. The potential preventive benefits of ART are undermined by beliefs that it is safe to have condomless sex when viral load is below levels of detection (infectiousness beliefs and risk perceptions). In this study, we hypothesized that infectiousness beliefs and HIV transmission risk perceptions would prospectively predict people living with HIV engaging in more condomless sex with HIV-negative and unknown HIV status sex partners. Sexually active HIV-positive men (n = 538, 76 %) and women (n = 166, 24 %) completed computerized interviews of sexually transmitted infection (STI) symptoms and diagnoses, unannounced pill counts for medication adherence, medical chart-abstracted HIV viral load, and 28 daily cell-phone-delivered prospective sexual behavior assessments. Results showed that a total of 313 (44 %) participants had engaged in condomless sex with HIV-negative/unknown status sex partners, and these individuals demonstrated higher rates of STI symptoms and diagnoses. Two-thirds of participants who had condomless sex with HIV-negative/unknown status partners had not disclosed their HIV status. Multivariable logistic regression models showed that beliefs regarding viral load and HIV infectiousness and perceptions of lower risk of HIV transmission resulting from HIV viral suppression predicted condomless sex with potentially uninfected partners over and above sex behaviors with HIV-positive partners and STI symptoms/diagnoses. Interventions that address HIV status disclosure and aggressively treat STI in sexually active people living with HIV should routinely accompany the use of HIV treatments as prevention.

  11. Creating an African HIV Clinical Research and Prevention Trials Network: HIV Prevalence, Incidence and Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Kamali, Anatoli; Price, Matt A.; Lakhi, Shabir; Karita, Etienne; Inambao, Mubiana; Sanders, Eduard J.; Anzala, Omu; Latka, Mary H.; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Asiki, Gershim; Ssetaala, Ali; Ruzagira, Eugene; Allen, Susan; Farmer, Paul; Hunter, Eric; Mutua, Gaudensia; Makkan, Heeran; Tichacek, Amanda; Brill, Ilene K.; Fast, Pat; Stevens, Gwynn; Chetty, Paramesh; Amornkul, Pauli N.; Gilmour, Jill

    2015-01-01

    HIV epidemiology informs prevention trial design and program planning. Nine clinical research centers (CRC) in sub-Saharan Africa conducted HIV observational epidemiology studies in populations at risk for HIV infection as part of an HIV prevention and vaccine trial network. Annual HIV incidence ranged from below 2% to above 10% and varied by CRC and risk group, with rates above 5% observed in Zambian men in an HIV-discordant relationship, Ugandan men from Lake Victoria fishing communities, men who have sex with men, and several cohorts of women. HIV incidence tended to fall after the first three months in the study and over calendar time. Among suspected transmission pairs, 28% of HIV infections were not from the reported partner. Volunteers with high incidence were successfully identified and enrolled into large scale cohort studies. Over a quarter of new cases in couples acquired infection from persons other than the suspected transmitting partner. PMID:25602351

  12. Creating an African HIV clinical research and prevention trials network: HIV prevalence, incidence and transmission.

    PubMed

    Kamali, Anatoli; Price, Matt A; Lakhi, Shabir; Karita, Etienne; Inambao, Mubiana; Sanders, Eduard J; Anzala, Omu; Latka, Mary H; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Asiki, Gershim; Ssetaala, Ali; Ruzagira, Eugene; Allen, Susan; Farmer, Paul; Hunter, Eric; Mutua, Gaudensia; Makkan, Heeran; Tichacek, Amanda; Brill, Ilene K; Fast, Pat; Stevens, Gwynn; Chetty, Paramesh; Amornkul, Pauli N; Gilmour, Jill

    2015-01-01

    HIV epidemiology informs prevention trial design and program planning. Nine clinical research centers (CRC) in sub-Saharan Africa conducted HIV observational epidemiology studies in populations at risk for HIV infection as part of an HIV prevention and vaccine trial network. Annual HIV incidence ranged from below 2% to above 10% and varied by CRC and risk group, with rates above 5% observed in Zambian men in an HIV-discordant relationship, Ugandan men from Lake Victoria fishing communities, men who have sex with men, and several cohorts of women. HIV incidence tended to fall after the first three months in the study and over calendar time. Among suspected transmission pairs, 28% of HIV infections were not from the reported partner. Volunteers with high incidence were successfully identified and enrolled into large scale cohort studies. Over a quarter of new cases in couples acquired infection from persons other than the suspected transmitting partner.

  13. Role of semen in HIV-1 transmission: inhibitor or facilitator?

    PubMed

    Doncel, Gustavo F; Joseph, Theresa; Thurman, Andrea R

    2011-03-01

    Sexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) accounts for 60-90% of new infections, especially in developing countries. During male-to-female transmission, the virus is typically deposited in the vagina as cell-free and cell-associated virions carried by semen. But semen is more than just a carrier for HIV-1. Evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies supports both inhibitory and enhancing effects. Intrinsic antiviral activity mediated by cationic antimicrobial peptides, cytotoxicity, and blockage of HIV-dendritic cell interactions are seminal plasma properties that inhibit HIV-1 infection. On the contrary, neutralization of vaginal acidic pH, enhanced virus-target cell attachment by seminal amyloid fibrils, opsonization by complement fragments, and electrostatic interactions are factors that facilitate HIV-1 infection. The end result, i.e., inhibition or enhancement of HIV mucosal infection, in vivo, likely depends on the summation of all these biological effects. More research is needed, especially in animal models, to dissect the role of these factors and establish their relevance in HIV-1 transmission. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Vaginal microbicides and the prevention of HIV transmission

    PubMed Central

    Cutler, Blayne; Justman, Jessica

    2009-01-01

    Worldwide, nearly half of all individuals living with HIV are now women, who acquire the virus largely by heterosexual exposure. With an HIV vaccine likely to be years away, topical microbicide formulations applied vaginally or rectally are being investigated as another strategy for HIV prevention. A review of preclinical and clinical research on the development of microbicides formulated to prevent vaginal HIV transmission yielded 118 studies: 73 preclinical and 45 clinical. Preclinical research included in-vitro assays and cervical explant models, as well as animal models. Clinical research included phase I and II/IIb safety studies, and phase III efficacy studies. Whereas most phase I and phase II clinical trials have found microbicide compounds to be safe and well tolerated, phase III trials completed to date have not demonstrated efficacy in preventing HIV transmission. Topical microbicides are grouped into five classes of agents, based on where they disrupt the pathway of sexual transmission of HIV. These classes include surfactants/membrane disruptors, vaginal milieu protectors, viral entry inhibitors, reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and a fifth group whose mechanism is unknown. The trajectory of microbicide development has been toward agents that block more specific virus—host cell interactions. Microbicide clinical trials face scientifically and ethically complex issues, such as the choice of placebo gel, the potential for viral resistance, and the inclusion of HIV-infected participants. Assessment of combination agents will most likely advance this field of research. PMID:18992405

  15. [A study on the risk and its determinants of HIV transmission by syringe sharing among HIV-positive drug users].

    PubMed

    Bao, Yugang; Zhang, Yanhui; Liang, Ying; Chen, Mengshi; Sun, Jiangping; Tan, Hongzhuan

    2015-06-01

    subjects sharing syringes every time of using drugs was 47.8% (89/186) in the case group, which was higher than that in the control group (36.8%, 86/234). The proportion of subjects having AIDS awareness was 21.0% (39/186) in the case group, which was lower than that in the control group (64.5%, 151/234); the proportion of subjects having close contact with HIV-positive persons for more than 106 days was 60.2% (112/186) in the case group, which was higher than that in the control group (31.6%, 74/234). The proportion of subjects maintaining the original drug use method after being infected with HIV was 50.5% (94/186) in the case group, which was higher than that in the control group (16.7%, 39/234) (all P values < 0.05). The multivariate logistic regression analysis was carried out to analyse high correlate factors of HIV transmission by sources of transmission, and the AIDS awareness, duration of contact between sources of transmission and vulnerable population, access to support following confirmed HIV infection were protective factors, OR (95% CI) values were 0.155 (0.104-0.262), 0.170 (0.106-0.253), and 0.306 (0.189-0.450), respectively; while the frequency of syringe sharing and continuous drug use after being infected with HIV were risk factors, and the OR (95% CI) values were 3.06 (1.77-5.29), and 3.54 (2.16-5.80), respectively. HIV transmission by IDUs-HIV+ might be contained by raising AIDS awareness, providing comprehensive psychological support, conducting needle exchange and methadone maintenance treatment and reducing syringe sharing.

  16. Maternal HIV infection and vertical transmission of pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cutland, Clare L; Schrag, Stephanie J; Zell, Elizabeth R; Kuwanda, Locadiah; Buchmann, Eckhardt; Velaphi, Sithembiso C; Groome, Michelle J; Adrian, Peter V; Madhi, Shabir A

    2012-09-01

    HIV-exposed newborns may be at higher risk of sepsis because of immune system aberrations, impaired maternal antibody transfer and altered exposure to pathogenic bacteria. We performed a secondary analysis of a study (clinicaltrials.gov, number NCT00136370) conducted between April 2004 and October 2007 in South Africa. We used propensity score matching to evaluate the association between maternal HIV infection and (1) vaginal colonization with bacterial pathogens; (2) vertical transmission of pathogens to the newborn; and (3) sepsis within 3 days of birth (EOS) or between 4-28 days of life (LOS). Colonization with group B Streptococcus (17% vs 23%, P = .0002), Escherichia coli (47% vs 45%, P = .374), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (7% vs 10%, P = .008) differed modestly between HIV-infected and uninfected women, as did vertical transmission rates. Maternal HIV infection was not associated with increased risk of neonatal EOS or LOS, although culture-confirmed EOS was >3 times higher among HIV-exposed infants (P = .05). When compared with HIV-unexposed, neonates, HIV-exposed, uninfected neonates (HEU) had a lower risk of EOS (20.6 vs 33.7 per 1000 births; P = .046) and similar rate of LOS (5.8 vs 4.1; P = .563). HIV-infected newborns had a higher risk than HEU of EOS (134 vs 21.5; P < .0001) and LOS (26.8 vs 5.6; P = .042). Maternal HIV infection was not associated with increased risk of maternal bacterial colonization, vertical transmission, EOS, or LOS. HIV-infected neonates, however, were at increased risk of EOS and LOS.

  17. Preventing mother-to-child HIV transmission in the new millennium: the challenge of breast feeding.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Louise; Stein, Zena; Susser, Mervyn

    2004-01-01

    Short courses of antiretroviral drugs have greatly enhanced the prospect of reducing mother-to-child HIV transmission. Yet transmission by breast feeding clouds hopes for this seemingly simple intervention. We revisit mathematical models to assess the competing risks associated with feeding by breast vs. formula. These indicate that, in the less developed world where the HIV epidemic predominates, neither option, unmodified, offers a reasonable choice for HIV-positive women. Where infant mortality rates are greater than about 40 per 1000 live births, if formula were made available to HIV-infected women only, the excess number of deaths that would result from formula use would be approximately the same or greater than the number of HIV infections that might be prevented. Only at lower infant mortality rates, less than about 40 per 1000, is the risk greater on the breast. There are thus no good grounds for the total avoidance of breast feeding under all conditions. Research to develop and test safer infant feeding alternatives is an urgent priority. On the one hand, ways to reduce HIV transmission while preserving breast feeding, as exclusive breast feeding could do, need to be fully tested. On the other hand, ways to reduce non-HIV morbidity and mortality associated with formula feeding, as educational or sanitary interventions could do, equally need testing. With either approach, a necessary foundation for implementing all the core components of preventing mother-to-child HIV transmission is competent counselling for mothers. Innovative approaches are needed to mobilise and train effective counsellors among health care workers and, as appropriate, community members.

  18. The Impact of Human Mobility on HIV Transmission in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Isdory, Augustino

    2015-01-01

    Disease spreads as a result of people moving and coming in contact with each other. Thus the mobility patterns of individuals are crucial in understanding disease dynamics. Here we study the impact of human mobility on HIV transmission in different parts of Kenya. We build an SIR metapopulation model that incorporates the different regions within the country. We parameterise the model using census data, HIV data and mobile phone data adopted to track human mobility. We found that movement between different regions appears to have a relatively small overall effect on the total increase in HIV cases in Kenya. However, the most important consequence of movement patterns was transmission of the disease from high infection to low prevalence areas. Mobility slightly increases HIV incidence rates in regions with initially low HIV prevalences and slightly decreases incidences in regions with initially high HIV prevalence. We discuss how regional HIV models could be used in public-health planning. This paper is a first attempt to model spread of HIV using mobile phone data, and we also discuss limitations to the approach. PMID:26599277

  19. The Impact of Human Mobility on HIV Transmission in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Isdory, Augustino; Mureithi, Eunice W; Sumpter, David J T

    2015-01-01

    Disease spreads as a result of people moving and coming in contact with each other. Thus the mobility patterns of individuals are crucial in understanding disease dynamics. Here we study the impact of human mobility on HIV transmission in different parts of Kenya. We build an SIR metapopulation model that incorporates the different regions within the country. We parameterise the model using census data, HIV data and mobile phone data adopted to track human mobility. We found that movement between different regions appears to have a relatively small overall effect on the total increase in HIV cases in Kenya. However, the most important consequence of movement patterns was transmission of the disease from high infection to low prevalence areas. Mobility slightly increases HIV incidence rates in regions with initially low HIV prevalences and slightly decreases incidences in regions with initially high HIV prevalence. We discuss how regional HIV models could be used in public-health planning. This paper is a first attempt to model spread of HIV using mobile phone data, and we also discuss limitations to the approach.

  20. The Effect of HIV-Related Immunosuppression on the Risk of Tuberculosis Transmission to Household Contacts

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chuan-Chin; Tchetgen, Eric Tchetgen; Becerra, Mercedes C.; Cohen, Ted; Hughes, Katherine C.; Zhang, Zibiao; Calderon, Roger; Yataco, Rosa; Contreras, Carmen; Galea, Jerome; Lecca, Leonid; Murray, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Background. Coinfection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) may modify the risk of transmitting tuberculosis. Some previous investigations suggest that patients coinfected with HIV and tuberculosis are less likely to transmit infection, whereas others do not support this conclusion. Here, we estimated the relative risk of tuberculosis transmission from coinfected patients compared to HIV-negative patients with tuberculosis. Methods. Between September 2009 and August 2012, we identified and enrolled 4841 household contacts of 1608 patients with drug-sensitive tuberculosis in Lima, Peru. We assessed the HIV status and CD4 counts of index patients, as well as other risk factors for infection specific to the index patient, the household, and the exposed individuals. Contacts underwent tuberculin skin testing to determine tuberculosis infection status. Results. After adjusting for covariates, we found that household contacts of HIV-infected tuberculosis patients with a CD4 count ≤250 cells/µL were less likely to be infected with tuberculosis (risk ratio = 0.49 [95% confidence interval, .24–.96]) than the contacts of HIV-negative tuberculosis patients. No children younger than 15 years who were exposed to HIV-positive patients with a CD4 count ≤250 cells/µL were infected with tuberculosis, compared to 22% of those exposed to non-HIV-infected patients. There was no significant difference in the risk of infection between contacts of HIV-infected index patients with CD4 counts >250 cells/µL and contacts of index patients who were not HIV-infected. Conclusions. We found a reduced risk of tuberculosis infection among the household contacts of patients with active tuberculosis who had advanced HIV-related immunosuppression, suggesting reduced transmission from these index patients. PMID:24368620

  1. Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV and Paediatric HIV Care and Treatment Monitoring: From Measuring Process to Impact and Elimination of Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV.

    PubMed

    Idele, Priscilla; Hayashi, Chika; Porth, Tyler; Mamahit, Awandha; Mahy, Mary

    2017-01-06

    Progress towards achievement of global targets for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) and paediatric HIV care and treatment is an integral part of global and national HIV and AIDS responses. This paper documents the development of the global and national monitoring and reporting systems for PMTCT and paediatric HIV care and treatment programmes, achievements and remaining challenges. A review of the development of the monitoring and reporting process since 2002-2016 was conducted using existing published literature and taking into account changes in WHO HIV treatment guidelines, global HIV goals and targets, programmatic and methodological developments, and increased need for interagency partnerships, coordination and harmonization of global monitoring and reporting mechanisms. The number and type of indicators reported increased and evolved from monitoring of existence of national policies and guidelines, service delivery sites and trained health workers and coverage of PMTCT and paediatric HIV interventions to measuring outcomes and impact in reducing new HIV infections and AIDS related deaths, including efforts to validate elimination of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. These changes were required to mirror changes in WHO and national PMTCT and HIV treatment guidelines. The number of countries reporting PMTCT coverage increased from 53 in 2003 to over 130 in 2015. National monitoring processes have also expanded in scope and the capacity to report on disaggregated data by type of ARV regimen and for paediatric HIV care and treatment has increased. Monitoring of PMTCT and paediatric HIV programmes has contributed a rich body of evidence that helped monitor how quickly countries were adopting and implementing the latest WHO HIV treatment guidelines for pregnant and breastfeeding women and children. The reported data and experiences were instrumental in shaping global policies, national programmes, and investment choices.

  2. Modelling HIV/AIDS epidemics in Botswana and India: impact of interventions to prevent transmission.

    PubMed Central

    Nagelkerke, Nico J. D.; Jha, Prabhat; de Vlas, Sake J.; Korenromp, Eline L.; Moses, Stephen; Blanchard, James F.; Plummer, Frank A.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe a dynamic compartmental simulation model for Botswana and India, developed to identify the best strategies for preventing spread of HIV/AIDS. METHODS: The following interventions were considered: a behavioural intervention focused on female sex workers; a conventional programme for the treatment of sexually transmitted infections; a programme for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission; an antiretroviral treatment programme for the entire population, based on a single regimen; and an antiretroviral treatment programme for sex workers only, also based on a single regimen. FINDINGS: The interventions directed at sex workers as well as those dealing with sexually transmitted infections showed promise for long-term prevention of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, although their relative ranking was uncertain. In India, a sex worker intervention would drive the epidemic to extinction. In Botswana none of the interventions alone would achieve this, although the prevalence of HIV would be reduced by almost 50%. Mother-to-child transmission programmes could reduce HIV transmission to infants, but would have no impact on the epidemic itself. In the long run, interventions targeting sexual transmission would be even more effective in reducing the number of HIV-infected children than mother-to-child transmission programmes. Antiretroviral therapy would prevent transmission in the short term, but eventually its effects would wane because of the development of drug resistance. CONCLUSION: Depending on the country and how the antiretroviral therapy was targeted, 25-100% of HIV cases would be drug- resistant after 30 years of use. PMID:11953786

  3. Inactivation of HCV and HIV by microwave: a novel approach for prevention of virus transmission among people who inject drugs.

    PubMed

    Siddharta, Anindya; Pfaender, Stephanie; Malassa, Angelina; Doerrbecker, Juliane; Anggakusuma; Engelmann, Michael; Nugraha, Boya; Steinmann, Joerg; Todt, Daniel; Vondran, Florian W R; Mateu-Gelabert, Pedro; Goffinet, Christine; Steinmann, Eike

    2016-11-18

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) transmissions among people who inject drugs (PWID) continue to pose a challenging global health problem. Here, we aimed to analyse a universally applicable inactivation procedure, namely microwave irradiation, as a safe and effective method to reduce the risk of viral transmission. The exposure of HCV from different genotypes to microwave irradiation resulted in a significant reduction of viral infectivity. Furthermore, microwave irradiation reduced viral infectivity of HIV-1 and of HCV/HIV-1 suspensions indicating that this inactivation may be effective at preventing co-infections. To translate microwave irradiation as prevention method to used drug preparation equipment, we could further show that HCV as well as HIV-1 infectivity could be abrogated in syringes and filters. This study demonstrates the power of microwave irradiation for the reduction of viral transmission and establishment of this safety strategy could help reduce the transmission of blood-borne viruses.

  4. Inactivation of HCV and HIV by microwave: a novel approach for prevention of virus transmission among people who inject drugs

    PubMed Central

    Siddharta, Anindya; Pfaender, Stephanie; Malassa, Angelina; Doerrbecker, Juliane; Anggakusuma; Engelmann, Michael; Nugraha, Boya; Steinmann, Joerg; Todt, Daniel; Vondran, Florian W. R.; Mateu-Gelabert, Pedro; Goffinet, Christine; Steinmann, Eike

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) transmissions among people who inject drugs (PWID) continue to pose a challenging global health problem. Here, we aimed to analyse a universally applicable inactivation procedure, namely microwave irradiation, as a safe and effective method to reduce the risk of viral transmission. The exposure of HCV from different genotypes to microwave irradiation resulted in a significant reduction of viral infectivity. Furthermore, microwave irradiation reduced viral infectivity of HIV-1 and of HCV/HIV-1 suspensions indicating that this inactivation may be effective at preventing co-infections. To translate microwave irradiation as prevention method to used drug preparation equipment, we could further show that HCV as well as HIV-1 infectivity could be abrogated in syringes and filters. This study demonstrates the power of microwave irradiation for the reduction of viral transmission and establishment of this safety strategy could help reduce the transmission of blood-borne viruses. PMID:27857152

  5. Low-cost drug cuts perinatal HIV-transmission rate.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, M

    1999-07-24

    Researchers in Uganda and the US report their discovery of nevirapine, an inexpensive antiretroviral drug that cuts perinatal HIV transmission rate. The price (about US$4) of a two-dose treatment with this drug is suited for developing countries, and application of this regimen could save 300,000-400,000 newborns in developing countries from HIV infection annually. These findings are based on the researchers' study comparing nevirapine with another antiretroviral drug, zidovudine, in terms of effectiveness and cost. The two drugs were compared in a tested of 600 HIV-infected pregnant women. Without antiretroviral treatment, about 25-35% of infants of HIV-infected mothers will be born infected. Results revealed that the percentage of children infected with HIV at 14-16 weeks of age was 13.1% in the nevirapine group and 25.1% in the zidovudine group, demonstrating a 47% reduction of incidence among those treated with nevirapine.

  6. Viral piracy: HIV-1 targets dendritic cells for transmission.

    PubMed

    Lekkerkerker, Annemarie N; van Kooyk, Yvette; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H

    2006-04-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), the professional antigen presenting cells, are critical for host immunity by inducing specific immune responses against a broad variety of pathogens. Remarkably the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) subverts DC function leading to spread of the virus. At an early phase of HIV-1 transmission, DCs capture HIV-1 at mucosal surfaces and transmit the virus to T cells in secondary lymphoid tissues. Capture of the virus on DCs takes place via C-type lectins of which the dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 (ICAM-3) grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) is the best studied. DC-SIGN-captured HIV-1 particles accumulate in CD81(+) multivesicular bodies (MVBs) in DCs and are subsequently transmitted to CD4+ T cells resulting in infection of T cells. The viral cell-to-cell transmission takes place at the DC-T cell interface termed the infectious synapse. Recent studies demonstrate that direct infection of DCs contributes to the transmission to T cells at a later phase. Moreover, the infected DCs may function as cellular reservoirs for HIV-1. This review discusses the different processes that govern viral piracy of DCs by HIV-1, emphasizing the intracellular routing of the virus from capture on the cell surface to egress in the infectious synapse.

  7. Vitamin A and HIV infection: disease progression, mortality, and transmission.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, C M; Kuhn, L; Stein, Z

    2000-10-01

    Among HIV-infected individuals, many nutritional factors that influence disease progress, mortality, and transmission are not well understood. Of particular interest is the role of vitamin A. The benefits of vitamin A have been recognized since ancient times by Egyptian physicians who successfully treated night blindness with vitamin A. Contemporary scientists have since recognized the importance of vitamin A and have provided evidence that it may help in repairing damaged mucosal surfaces; what remains unclear, however, is its role during HIV infection. In this review, we examine the evidence provided in both observational studies and randomized controlled trials that assessed the effect of vitamin A during HIV infection.

  8. Effect of a preventive vaccine on the dynamics of HIV transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumel, A. B.; Moghadas, S. M.; Mickens, R. E.

    2004-12-01

    A deterministic mathematical model for the transmission dynamics of HIV infection in the presence of a preventive vaccine is considered. Although the equilibria of the model could not be expressed in closed form, their existence and threshold conditions for their stability are theoretically investigated. It is shown that the disease-free equilibrium is locally-asymptotically stable if the basic reproductive number R<1 (thus, HIV disease can be eradicated from the community) and unstable if R>1 (leading to the persistence of HIV within the community). A robust, positivity-preserving, non-standard finite-difference method is constructed and used to solve the model equations. In addition to showing that the anti-HIV vaccine coverage level and the vaccine-induced protection are critically important in reducing the threshold quantity R, our study predicts the minimum threshold values of vaccine coverage and efficacy levels needed to eradicate HIV from the community.

  9. Vectored immunoprophylaxis protects humanized mice from mucosal HIV transmission.

    PubMed

    Balazs, Alejandro B; Ouyang, Yong; Hong, Christin M; Chen, Joyce; Nguyen, Steven M; Rao, Dinesh S; An, Dong Sung; Baltimore, David

    2014-03-01

    The vast majority of new HIV infections result from relatively inefficient transmission of the virus across mucosal surfaces during sexual intercourse. A consequence of this inefficiency is that small numbers of transmitted founder viruses initiate most heterosexual infections. This natural bottleneck to transmission has stimulated efforts to develop interventions that are aimed at blocking this step of the infection process. Despite the promise of this strategy, clinical trials of preexposure prophylaxis have had limited degrees of success in humans, in part because of lack of adherence to the recommended preexposure treatment regimens. In contrast, a number of existing vaccines elicit systemic immunity that protects against mucosal infections, such as the vaccines for influenza and human papilloma virus. We recently demonstrated the ability of vectored immunoprophylaxis (VIP) to prevent intravenous transmission of HIV in humanized mice using broadly neutralizing antibodies. Here we demonstrate that VIP is capable of protecting humanized mice from intravenous as well as vaginal challenge with diverse HIV strains despite repeated exposures. Moreover, animals receiving VIP that expresses a modified VRC07 antibody were completely resistant to repetitive intravaginal challenge by a heterosexually transmitted founder HIV strain, suggesting that VIP may be effective in preventing vaginal transmission of HIV between humans.

  10. The Relationship between Substance Use and HIV Transmission in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Massa, Alfredo A.; Rosen, Marc I.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The primary aim of this article is to review literature regarding the relationship between substance use and HIV transmission in Peru. Methods Detailed search of published literature completed in PubMed and Google-Scholar and other local Peruvian publications. Mesh words: “Peru”; “substance-related-disorders”; “HIV”; “sexual-behavior” and their combinations. From 3921 articles, 150 were chosen for more careful review and only 26 were used for the review. No date limit was used in this review. Results Peruvian HIV epidemic is limited to MSM and its prevalence goes up to 33% in certain MSM-subpopulations. Transmission is mainly through sexual contact. Drug use doubled the risk for casual sex, decreased by half the chances of using condoms, increased the number of partners per year and the risk for STD’s. Peruvian HIV-positive populations have higher rates drug use and using drugs have been associated with a higher prevalence of being HIV-positive. This may be also true for other populations such as pregnant women in which there is an association between drug use and HIV. Conclusions Although the amount of Peruvian research in this area limits the review, there seems to be a relationship between using drugs, having risky-sexual-behaviors and being HIV positive in Peru. HIV-prevention strategies for Peruvians must address the link between sex and substance use. PMID:25264494

  11. Breast-feeding and Transmission of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    John-Stewart, Grace; Mbori-Ngacha, Dorothy; Ekpini, Rene; Janoff, Edward N; Nkengasong, John; Read, Jennifer S; Van de Perre, Phillippe; Newell, Marie-Louise

    2004-02-01

    Breast-feeding substantially increases the risk of HIV-1 transmission from mother to child, and although peripartum antiretroviral therapy prophylaxis significantly decreases the risk of mother-to-child transmission around the time of delivery, this approach does not affect breast-feeding transmission. Increased maternal RNA viral load in plasma and breast milk is strongly associated with increased risk of transmission through breast-feeding, as is breast health, and it has been suggested that exclusive breast-feeding could be associated with lower rates of breast-feeding transmission than mixed feeding of both breast- and other milk or feeds. Transmission through breast-feeding can take place at any point during lactation, and the cumulative probability of acquisition of infection increases with duration of breast-feeding. HIV-1 has been detected in breast milk in cell-free and cellular compartments; infant gut mucosal surfaces are the most likely site at which transmission occurs. Innate and acquired immune factors may act most effectively in combination to prevent primary HIV-1 infection by breast milk.

  12. Breast-feeding and Transmission of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    John-Stewart, Grace; Mbori-Ngacha, Dorothy; Ekpini, Rene; Janoff, Edward N.; Nkengasong, John; Read, Jennifer S.; Van de Perre, Phillippe; Newell, Marie-Louise

    2012-01-01

    Breast-feeding substantially increases the risk of HIV-1 transmission from mother to child, and although peripartum antiretroviral therapy prophylaxis significantly decreases the risk of mother-to-child transmission around the time of delivery, this approach does not affect breast-feeding transmission. Increased maternal RNA viral load in plasma and breast milk is strongly associated with increased risk of transmission through breast-feeding, as is breast health, and it has been suggested that exclusive breast-feeding could be associated with lower rates of breast-feeding transmission than mixed feeding of both breast- and other milk or feeds. Transmission through breast-feeding can take place at any point during lactation, and the cumulative probability of acquisition of infection increases with duration of breast-feeding. HIV-1 has been detected in breast milk in cell-free and cellular compartments; infant gut mucosal surfaces are the most likely site at which transmission occurs. Innate and acquired immune factors may act most effectively in combination to prevent primary HIV-1 infection by breast milk. PMID:14722454

  13. Modelling the impact of chlamydia screening on the transmission of HIV among men who have sex with men

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent studies have found high prevalences of asymptomatic rectal chlamydia among HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM). Chlamydia could increase the infectivity of HIV and the susceptibility to HIV infection. We investigate the role of chlamydia in the spread of HIV among MSM and the possible impact of routine chlamydia screening among HIV-infected MSM at HIV treatment centres on the incidence of chlamydia and HIV in the overall MSM population. Methods A mathematical model was developed to describe the transmission of HIV and chlamydia among MSM. Parameters relating to sexual behaviour were estimated from data from the Amsterdam Cohort Study among MSM. Uncertainty analysis was carried out for model parameters without confident estimates. The effects of different screening strategies for chlamydia were investigated. Results Among all new HIV infections in MSM, 15% can be attributed to chlamydia infection. Introduction of routine chlamydia screening every six months among HIV-infected MSM during regular HIV consultations can reduce the incidence of both infections among MSM: after 10 years, the relative percentage reduction in chlamydia incidence would be 15% and in HIV incidence 4%, compared to the current situation. Chlamydia screening is more effective in reducing HIV incidence with more frequent screening and with higher participation of the most risky MSM in the screening program. Conclusions Chlamydia infection could contribute to the transmission of HIV among MSM. Preventive measures reducing chlamydia prevalence, such as routine chlamydia screening of HIV-infected MSM, can result in a decline in the incidence of chlamydia and HIV. PMID:24047261

  14. Modelling the impact of chlamydia screening on the transmission of HIV among men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Xiridou, Maria; Vriend, Henrike J; Lugner, Anna K; Wallinga, Jacco; Fennema, Johannes S; Prins, Jan M; Geerlings, Suzanne E; Rijnders, Bart J A; Prins, Maria; de Vries, Henry J C; Postma, Maarten J; van Veen, Maaike G; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F; van der Sande, Marianne A B

    2013-09-18

    Recent studies have found high prevalences of asymptomatic rectal chlamydia among HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM). Chlamydia could increase the infectivity of HIV and the susceptibility to HIV infection. We investigate the role of chlamydia in the spread of HIV among MSM and the possible impact of routine chlamydia screening among HIV-infected MSM at HIV treatment centres on the incidence of chlamydia and HIV in the overall MSM population. A mathematical model was developed to describe the transmission of HIV and chlamydia among MSM. Parameters relating to sexual behaviour were estimated from data from the Amsterdam Cohort Study among MSM. Uncertainty analysis was carried out for model parameters without confident estimates. The effects of different screening strategies for chlamydia were investigated. Among all new HIV infections in MSM, 15% can be attributed to chlamydia infection. Introduction of routine chlamydia screening every six months among HIV-infected MSM during regular HIV consultations can reduce the incidence of both infections among MSM: after 10 years, the relative percentage reduction in chlamydia incidence would be 15% and in HIV incidence 4%, compared to the current situation. Chlamydia screening is more effective in reducing HIV incidence with more frequent screening and with higher participation of the most risky MSM in the screening program. Chlamydia infection could contribute to the transmission of HIV among MSM. Preventive measures reducing chlamydia prevalence, such as routine chlamydia screening of HIV-infected MSM, can result in a decline in the incidence of chlamydia and HIV.

  15. Contraceptive Methods and Risk of HIV Acquisition or Female-to-Male Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Polis, Chelsea B.; Sheth, Anandi N.; Brown, Jennifer; Kourtis, Athena P.; King, Caroline; Chakraborty, Rana; Ofotokun, Igho

    2015-01-01

    Effective family planning with modern contraception is an important intervention to prevent unintended pregnancies which also provides personal, familial, and societal benefits. Contraception is also the most cost-effective strategy to reduce the burden of mother-to-child HIV transmission for women living with HIV who wish to prevent pregnancy. There are concerns, however, that certain contraceptive methods, in particular the injectable contraceptive depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA), may increase a woman's risk of acquiring HIV or transmitting it to uninfected males. These concerns, if confirmed, could potentially have large public health implications. This paper briefly reviews the literature on use of contraception among women living with HIV or at high risk of HIV infection. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations place no restrictions on the use of hormonal contraceptive methods by women with or at high risk of HIV infection, although a clarification recommends that, given uncertainty in the current literature, women at high risk of HIV who choose progestogen-only injectable contraceptives should be informed that it may or may not increase their risk of HIV acquisition and should also be informed about and have access to HIV preventive measures, including male or female condoms. PMID:25297973

  16. Contraceptive methods and risk of HIV acquisition or female-to-male transmission.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Lisa B; Polis, Chelsea B; Sheth, Anandi N; Brown, Jennifer; Kourtis, Athena P; King, Caroline; Chakraborty, Rana; Ofotokun, Igho

    2014-12-01

    Effective family planning with modern contraception is an important intervention to prevent unintended pregnancies which also provides personal, familial, and societal benefits. Contraception is also the most cost-effective strategy to reduce the burden of mother-to-child HIV transmission for women living with HIV who wish to prevent pregnancy. There are concerns, however, that certain contraceptive methods, in particular the injectable contraceptive depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA), may increase a woman's risk of acquiring HIV or transmitting it to uninfected males. These concerns, if confirmed, could potentially have large public health implications. This paper briefly reviews the literature on use of contraception among women living with HIV or at high risk of HIV infection. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations place no restrictions on the use of hormonal contraceptive methods by women with or at high risk of HIV infection, although a clarification recommends that, given uncertainty in the current literature, women at high risk of HIV who choose progestogen-only injectable contraceptives should be informed that it may or may not increase their risk of HIV acquisition and should also be informed about and have access to HIV preventive measures, including male or female condoms.

  17. Ongoing HIV Transmission and the HIV Care Continuum in North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Cope, Anna B.; Powers, Kimberly A.; Kuruc, JoAnn D.; Leone, Peter A.; Anderson, Jeffrey A.; Ping, Li-Hua; Kincer, Laura P.; Swanstrom, Ronald; Mobley, Victoria L.; Foust, Evelyn; Gay, Cynthia L.; Eron, Joseph J.; Cohen, Myron S.; Miller, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective HIV transmission is influenced by status awareness and receipt of care and treatment. We analyzed these attributes of named partners of persons with acute HIV infection (index AHI cases) to characterize the transmission landscape in North Carolina (NC). Design Secondary analysis of programmatic data. Methods We used data from the NC Screening and Tracing of Active Transmission Program (2002–2013) to determine HIV status (uninfected, AHI, or chronic HIV infection [CHI]), diagnosis status (new or previously-diagnosed), and care and treatment status (not in care, in care and not on treatment, in care and on treatment) of index AHI cases' named partners. We developed an algorithm identifying the most likely transmission source among known HIV-infected partners to estimate the proportion of transmissions arising from contact with persons at different HIV continuum stages. We conducted a complementary analysis among a subset of index AHI cases and partners with phylogenetically-linked viruses. Results Overall, 358 index AHI cases named 932 partners, of which 218 were found to be HIV-infected (162 (74.3%) previously-diagnosed, 11 (5.0%) new AHI, 45 (20.6%) new CHI). Most transmission events appeared attributable to previously-diagnosed partners (77.4%, 95% confidence interval 69.4–85.3%). Among these previously-diagnosed partners, 23.2% (14.0–32.3%) were reported as in care and on treatment near the index AHI case diagnosis date. In the subset study of 33 phylogenetically-linked cases and partners, 60.6% of partners were previously diagnosed (43.9–77.3%). Conclusions A substantial proportion of HIV transmission in this setting appears attributable to contact with previously-diagnosed partners, reinforcing the need for improved engagement in care after diagnosis. PMID:26042804

  18. Ongoing HIV Transmission and the HIV Care Continuum in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Cope, Anna B; Powers, Kimberly A; Kuruc, JoAnn D; Leone, Peter A; Anderson, Jeffrey A; Ping, Li-Hua; Kincer, Laura P; Swanstrom, Ronald; Mobley, Victoria L; Foust, Evelyn; Gay, Cynthia L; Eron, Joseph J; Cohen, Myron S; Miller, William C

    2015-01-01

    HIV transmission is influenced by status awareness and receipt of care and treatment. We analyzed these attributes of named partners of persons with acute HIV infection (index AHI cases) to characterize the transmission landscape in North Carolina (NC). Secondary analysis of programmatic data. We used data from the NC Screening and Tracing of Active Transmission Program (2002-2013) to determine HIV status (uninfected, AHI, or chronic HIV infection [CHI]), diagnosis status (new or previously-diagnosed), and care and treatment status (not in care, in care and not on treatment, in care and on treatment) of index AHI cases' named partners. We developed an algorithm identifying the most likely transmission source among known HIV-infected partners to estimate the proportion of transmissions arising from contact with persons at different HIV continuum stages. We conducted a complementary analysis among a subset of index AHI cases and partners with phylogenetically-linked viruses. Overall, 358 index AHI cases named 932 partners, of which 218 were found to be HIV-infected (162 (74.3%) previously-diagnosed, 11 (5.0%) new AHI, 45 (20.6%) new CHI). Most transmission events appeared attributable to previously-diagnosed partners (77.4%, 95% confidence interval 69.4-85.3%). Among these previously-diagnosed partners, 23.2% (14.0-32.3%) were reported as in care and on treatment near the index AHI case diagnosis date. In the subset study of 33 phylogenetically-linked cases and partners, 60.6% of partners were previously diagnosed (43.9-77.3%). A substantial proportion of HIV transmission in this setting appears attributable to contact with previously-diagnosed partners, reinforcing the need for improved engagement in care after diagnosis.

  19. Characterization of HIV Transmission in South-East Austria.

    PubMed

    Hoenigl, Martin; Chaillon, Antoine; Kessler, Harald H; Haas, Bernhard; Stelzl, Evelyn; Weninger, Karin; Little, Susan J; Mehta, Sanjay R

    2016-01-01

    To gain deeper insight into the epidemiology of HIV-1 transmission in South-East Austria we performed a retrospective analysis of 259 HIV-1 partial pol sequences obtained from unique individuals newly diagnosed with HIV infection in South-East Austria from 2008 through 2014. After quality filtering, putative transmission linkages were inferred when two sequences were ≤1.5% genetically different. Multiple linkages were resolved into putative transmission clusters. Further phylogenetic analyses were performed using BEAST v1.8.1. Finally, we investigated putative links between the 259 sequences from South-East Austria and all publicly available HIV polymerase sequences in the Los Alamos National Laboratory HIV sequence database. We found that 45.6% (118/259) of the sampled sequences were genetically linked with at least one other sequence from South-East Austria forming putative transmission clusters. Clustering individuals were more likely to be men who have sex with men (MSM; p<0.001), infected with subtype B (p<0.001) or subtype F (p = 0.02). Among clustered males who reported only heterosexual (HSX) sex as an HIV risk, 47% clustered closely with MSM (either as pairs or within larger MSM clusters). One hundred and seven of the 259 sequences (41.3%) from South-East Austria had at least one putative inferred linkage with sequences from a total of 69 other countries. In conclusion, analysis of HIV-1 sequences from newly diagnosed individuals residing in South-East Austria revealed a high degree of national and international clustering mainly within MSM. Interestingly, we found that a high number of heterosexual males clustered within MSM networks, suggesting either linkage between risk groups or misrepresentation of sexual risk behaviors by subjects.

  20. Advances in therapy for the prevention of HIV transmission from mother to child.

    PubMed

    Moretton, Marcela A; Bertera, Facundo; Lagomarsino, Eduardo; Riedel, Jennifer; Chiappetta, Diego A; Höcht, Christian

    2017-05-01

    Actually, ~17.8 million women and 1.8 million children (<15 years) are currently infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Particularly, the majority of pediatric infections (>90%) resulted from 'HIV mother-to-child transmission' (MTCT), both in pregnancy, labour, delivery and later by breastfeeding. Due to its high pediatric incidence, MTCT represents a public health concern. Areas covered: In this review, we focus on available treatments and antiretroviral drugs recommended by the World Health Organization, and the main clinical investigations in antiretroviral pharmacotherapy to prevent the MTCT. Expert opinion: The MTCT has been improved dramatically in the last few years mainly due to prophylactic perinatal antiretroviral therapy for pregnant women living with HIV. However, there is still a milestone to reach since HIV MTCT remains as a public health challenge associated with MTCT though breastfeeding (post-natal transmission). In this context, different strategies could be employed as an attempt to reduce pediatric HIV infections. One of them involves the improvement of patient adherence to the HIV therapy. One possible solution is the development of novel long-acting formulations for prophylaxis of mothers and children, and a second possible solution is increase the inclusion of mothers and infants in care programs to more effectively prevent the vertical transmission.

  1. Three-Dimensional Imaging of HIV-1 Virological Synapses Reveals Membrane Architectures Involved in Virus Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Do, Thao; Murphy, Gavin; Earl, Lesley A.; Del Prete, Gregory Q.; Grandinetti, Giovanna; Li, Guan-Han; Estes, Jacob D.; Rao, Prashant; Trubey, Charles M.; Thomas, James; Spector, Jeffrey; Bliss, Donald; Nath, Avindra; Lifson, Jeffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV transmission efficiency is greatly increased when viruses are transmitted at virological synapses formed between infected and uninfected cells. We have previously shown that virological synapses formed between HIV-pulsed mature dendritic cells (DCs) and uninfected T cells contain interdigitated membrane surfaces, with T cell filopodia extending toward virions sequestered deep inside invaginations formed on the DC membrane. To explore membrane structural changes relevant to HIV transmission across other types of intercellular conjugates, we used a combination of light and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) to determine the three-dimensional (3D) architectures of contact regions between HIV-1-infected CD4+ T cells and either uninfected human CD4+ T cells or human fetal astrocytes. We present evidence that in each case, membrane extensions that originate from the uninfected cells, either as membrane sheets or filopodial bridges, are present and may be involved in HIV transmission from infected to uninfected cells. We show that individual virions are distributed along the length of astrocyte filopodia, suggesting that virus transfer to the astrocytes is mediated, at least in part, by processes originating from the astrocyte itself. Mechanisms that selectively disrupt the polarization and formation of such membrane extensions could thus represent a possible target for reducing viral spread. IMPORTANCE Our findings lead to new insights into unique aspects of HIV transmission in the brain and at T cell-T cell synapses, which are thought to be a predominant mode of rapid HIV transmission early in the infection process. PMID:24965444

  2. Relationship Characteristics and HIV Transmission Risk in Same-sex Male Couples in HIV Serodiscordant Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Starks, Tyrel J.; Gamarel, Kristi E.; Johnson, Mallory O.

    2014-01-01

    Unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) remains a main risk factor for HIV among men who have sex with men (MSM) and this is of particular concern for partners of HIV serodiscordant status. However, HIV transmission risk has been demonstrated to vary by the sexual position adopted among partners. Guided by interdependence theory, this study examined how relational factors were differentially associated with risk taking (HIV-positive/insertive and HIV-negative/receptive) and strategic positioning (HIV-positive/receptive and HIV-negative/insertive) UAI withinserodiscordant same-sex male couples. HIV-positive men and their HIV-negative partners (ncouples=91; nindividuals=182) simultaneously but independently completed computerized questionnaires and HIV-positive men had blood drawn for viral load.A minority of couples (30%) engaged in risk taking and/or strategicpositioning unprotected anal sex. Results of multinomial logistic regressionindicated that HIV-negative partners’ levels of relationship commitment were positively associated with the odds of engaging in both risk taking and strategic positioning sexual behaviors. For HIV-negative partners, reports of relationship intimacy, autonomy, and sexual satisfaction were negatively associated with odds of reporting risk taking behavior. In contrast, HIV-positive partners’reported sexual satisfaction was positively associated with odds of engaging in risk taking behavior. Findings suggested that aspects of relational quality may be differentially associated with sexual decision making for same-sex male couples in serodiscordant relationships. Study findings lend support for the incorporation ofdiscussions of HIV risk reduction strategies, enhancing communication between partners, and support for general relationship functioning in HIV care. PMID:24243004

  3. Relationship characteristics and HIV transmission risk in same-sex male couples in HIV serodiscordant relationships.

    PubMed

    Starks, Tyrel J; Gamarel, Kristi E; Johnson, Mallory O

    2014-01-01

    Unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) remains a main risk factor for HIV among men who have sex with men (MSM) and this is of particular concern for partners of HIV serodiscordant status. However, HIV transmission risk has been demonstrated to vary by the sexual position adopted among partners. Guided by interdependence theory, this study examined how relational factors were differentially associated with risk taking (HIV-positive/insertive and HIV-negative/receptive) and strategic positioning (HIV-positive/receptive and HIV-negative/insertive) UAI within serodiscordant same-sex male couples. HIV-positive men and their HIV-negative partners (n couples = 91; n individuals = 182) simultaneously but independently completed computerized questionnaires and HIV-positive men had blood drawn for viral load. A minority of couples (30 %) engaged in risk taking and/or strategic positioning unprotected anal sex. Results of multinomial logistic regression indicated that HIV-negative partners' levels of relationship commitment were positively associated with the odds of engaging in strategic positioning sexual behaviors. For HIV-negative partners, reports of relationship intimacy, and sexual satisfaction were negatively associated with odds of reporting risk taking behavior. In contrast, HIV-positive partners' reported sexual satisfaction was positively associated with odds of engaging in risk taking behavior. Findings suggested that aspects of relational quality may be differentially associated with sexual decision making for same-sex male couples in serodiscordant relationships. Study findings lend support for the incorporation of discussions of HIV risk reduction strategies, enhancing communication between partners, and support for general relationship functioning in HIV care.

  4. HIV drug resistance transmission threshold survey in Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Sirivichayakul, Sunee; Phanuphak, Praphan; Pankam, Tippawan; O-Charoen, Rachanee; Sutherland, Donald; Ruxrungtham, Kiat

    2008-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) began in Thailand in the Bangkok Metropolitan Area (BMA) in 1988 and scale-up began in 2001. The national first-line regimen is stavudine, lamivudine and nevirapine in fixed-dose combination, which is a regimen with a low genetic barrier for resistance. Because viral load and resistance testing are not widely available, unidentified HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) may occur during treatment and could be transmitted. We undertook a threshold survey to assess HIVDR transmission in two subsets of recently infected individuals in the BMA. The first group consisted of returning blood donors tested at the Thai Red Cross National Blood Centre who seroconverted within the past 12 months. The second group comprised recently infected (as defined by BED assay) clients of the Thai Red Cross voluntary counselling and testing centre (VCT). Genotyping of 50 consecutive specimens each from blood donors and VCT clients during 2005-2006 showed no mutations associated with HIVDR in the reverse transcriptase or protease regions of the HIV pol gene. These results are categorized by the WHO HIV drug resistance threshold survey method as representing a low prevalence (<5%) of transmitted HIV drug resistance. Every effort should be made to minimize the emergence of resistance in treated individuals and to prevent primary and secondary HIV transmission. To continue to monitor HIVDR transmission, Thailand has planned additional surveys--including longitudinal surveys--in these and additional groups of individuals.

  5. Molecular epidemiology of HIV transmission in a dental practice.

    PubMed

    Ou, C Y; Ciesielski, C A; Myers, G; Bandea, C I; Luo, C C; Korber, B T; Mullins, J I; Schochetman, G; Berkelman, R L; Economou, A N

    1992-05-22

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission from infected patients to health-care workers has been well documented, but transmission from an infected health-care worker to a patient has not been reported. After identification of an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patient who had no known risk factors for HIV infection but who had undergone an invasive procedure performed by a dentist with AIDS, six other patients of this dentist were found to be HIV-infected. Molecular biologic studies were conducted to complement the epidemiologic investigation. Portions of the HIV proviral envelope gene from each of the seven patients, the dentist, and 35 HIV-infected persons from the local geographic area were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. Three separate comparative genetic analyses--genetic distance measurements, phylogenetic tree analysis, and amino acid signature pattern analysis--showed that the viruses from the dentist and five dental patients were closely related. These data, together with the epidemiologic investigation, indicated that these patients became infected with HIV while receiving care from a dentist with AIDS.

  6. Vaginal microbiota and its role in HIV transmission and infection.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Mariya I; van den Broek, Marianne; Balzarini, Jan; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah

    2013-09-01

    The urogenital tract appears to be the only niche of the human body that shows clear differences in microbiota between men and women. The female reproductive tract has special features in terms of immunological organization, an epithelial barrier, microbiota, and influence by sex hormones such as estrogen. While the upper genital tract is regarded as free of microorganisms, the vagina is colonized by bacteria dominated by Lactobacillus species, although their numbers vary considerably during life. Bacterial vaginosis is a common pathology characterized by dysbiosis, which increases the susceptibility for HIV infection and transmission. On the other hand, HIV infections are often characterized by a disturbed vaginal microbiota. The endogenous vaginal microbiota may protect against HIV by direct production of antiviral compounds, through blocking of adhesion and transmission by ligands such as lectins, and/or by stimulation of immune responses. The potential role of probiotics in the prevention of HIV infections and associated symptoms, by introducing them to the vaginal and gastrointestinal tract (GIT), is also discussed. Of note, the GIT is a site of considerable HIV replication and CD4(+) T-cell destruction, resulting in both local and systemic inflammation. Finally, genetically engineered lactobacilli show promise as new microbicidal agents against HIV. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Impact of viral load and the duration of primary infection on HIV transmission: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    BLASER, Nello; WETTSTEIN, Celina; ESTILL, Janne; VIZCAYA, Luisa SALAZAR; WANDELER, Gilles; EGGER, Matthias; KEISER, Olivia

    2014-01-01

    Objectives HIV ‘treatment as prevention’ (TasP) describes early treatment of HIV-infected patients intended to reduce viral load (VL) and transmission. Crucial assumptions for estimating TasP's effectiveness are the underlying estimates of transmission risk. We aimed to determine transmission risk during primary infection, and of the relation of HIV transmission risk to VL. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods We searched PubMed and Embase databases for studies that established a relationship between VL and transmission risk, or primary infection and transmission risk, in serodiscordant couples. We analyzed assumptions about the relationship between VL and transmission risk, and between duration of primary infection and transmission risk. Results We found 36 eligible articles, based on six different study populations. Studies consistently found that larger VLs lead to higher HIV transmission rates, but assumptions about the shape of this increase varied from exponential increase to saturation. The assumed duration of primary infection ranged from 1.5 to 12 months; for each additional month, the log10 transmission rate ratio between primary and asymptomatic infection decreased by 0.40. Conclusions Assumptions and estimates of the relationship between VL and transmission risk, and the relationship between primary infection and transmission risk, vary substantially and predictions of TasP's effectiveness should take this uncertainty into account. PMID:24691205

  8. IFITMs: Important Factors In Trans-Mission of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Daniel; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2016-10-12

    IFITMs inhibit various enveloped viral pathogens in vitro, but their relevance in vivo has remained unclear. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Foster et al. (2016) show that IFITMs constitute a barrier to HIV-1 transmission and that escape from adaptive immune responses increases viral sensitivity to IFITM restriction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. HIV Infection: Transmission, Effects on Early Development, and Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowenthal, Barbara

    1997-01-01

    Describes the modes of transmission of HIV and the course of the disease in infants and toddlers. Information is provided on its effects on early development, medical screening and treatments, therapies, psychosocial assistance, and interventions, including nutritional therapy, occupational and physical therapies, and speech and language therapy.…

  10. HIV Infection: Transmission, Effects on Early Development, and Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowenthal, Barbara

    1997-01-01

    Describes the modes of transmission of HIV and the course of the disease in infants and toddlers. Information is provided on its effects on early development, medical screening and treatments, therapies, psychosocial assistance, and interventions, including nutritional therapy, occupational and physical therapies, and speech and language therapy.…

  11. Interleukin-7 Facilitates HIV-1 Transmission to Cervico-Vaginal Tissue ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    Introini, Andrea; Vanpouille, Christophe; Lisco, Andrea; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Margolis, Leonid

    2013-01-01

    The majority of HIV-1 infections in women occur through vaginal intercourse, in which virus-containing semen is deposited on the cervico-vaginal mucosa. Semen is more than a mere carrier of HIV-1, since it contains many biological factors, in particular cytokines, that may affect HIV-1 transmission. The concentration of interleukin (IL)-7, one of the most prominent cytokines in semen of healthy individuals, is further increased in semen of HIV-1-infected men. Here, we investigated the potential role of IL-7 in HIV-1 vaginal transmission in an ex vivo system of human cervico-vaginal tissue. We simulated an in vivo situation by depositing HIV-1 on cervico-vaginal tissue in combination with IL-7 at concentrations comparable with those measured in semen of HIV-1-infected individuals. We found that IL-7 significantly enhanced virus replication in ex vivo infected cervico-vaginal tissue. Similarly, we observed an enhancement of HIV-1 replication in lymphoid tissue explants. Analysis of T cells isolated from infected tissues showed that IL-7 reduced CD4+ T cell depletion preventing apoptosis, as shown by the decrease in the number of cells expressing the apoptotic marker APO2.7 and the increase in the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2. Also, IL-7 increased the fraction of cycling CD4+ T cells, as evidenced by staining for the nuclear factor Ki-67. High levels of seminal IL-7 in vivo may be relevant to the survival of the founder pool of HIV-1-infected cells in the cervico-vaginal mucosa at the initial stage of infection, promoting local expansion and dissemination of HIV infection. PMID:23408885

  12. Primaquine for reducing Plasmodium falciparum transmission.

    PubMed

    Graves, Patricia M; Gelband, Hellen; Garner, Paul

    2012-09-12

    Mosquitoes become infected with malaria when they ingest gametocyte stages of the parasite from the blood of a human host. Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes are sensitive to the drug primaquine (PQ). The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends giving a single dose or short course of PQ alongside primary treatment for people ill with P. falciparum infection to reduce malaria transmission. Gametocytes themselves cause no symptoms, so this intervention does not directly benefit individuals. PQ causes haemolysis in some people with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency so may not be safe.   To assess whether a single dose or short course of PQ added to treatments for malaria caused by P. falciparum infection reduces malaria transmission and is safe. We searched the following databases up to 10 April 2012 for studies: the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), published in The Cochrane Library; MEDLINE; EMBASE; LILACS; metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) and the WHO trials search portal using 'malaria*', 'falciparum', and 'primaquine' as search terms. In addition, we searched conference proceedings and reference lists of included studies, and we contacted likely researchers and organizations for relevant trials. Trials of mass treatment of whole populations (or actively detected fever or malaria cases within such populations) with antimalarial drugs, compared to treatment with the same drug plus PQ; or patients with clinical malaria being treated for malaria at health facilities randomized to short course/single dose PQ versus no PQ. Two authors (PMG and HG) independently screened all abstracts, applied inclusion criteria, and abstracted data. We sought data on the effect of PQ on malaria transmission intensity, participant infectiousness, the number of participants with gametocytes, and gametocyte density over time. We stratified results by primary treatment drug as

  13. HIV molecular epidemiology: transmission and adaptation to human populations

    PubMed Central

    Woodman, Zenda; Williamson, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review To provide an update on the origin of the HIV epidemic and insights into how the immune response is shaping virus evolution. Recent findings Characterization of archival samples showed that by the 1960s, HIV had already diverged within humans. It is now estimated that HIV has been in humans since at least the early 1900s. However, despite the potential for different divergent viruses to spread, surprisingly few viruses successfully expanded to cause the global epidemic. In approximately 80% of cases, productive infection is the result of infection with only a single virus or single virus-infected cell. After transmission, HIV evolves at a rapid rate driven by the immune pressure until the virus reaches a delicate survival balance: on one hand avoiding elimination through the development of cytotoxic T-cell immune escape mutations, and on the other sacrificing replication fitness as these mutations may come with a severe fitness cost to the virus. People infected with these ‘attenuated’ cytotoxic T-cell escape viruses can have a survival advantage. Cytotoxic T-cell responses are molding HIV diversity at a population level resulting in a loss of some of the common immune epitopes. Summary Insights into the origin of HIV and its evolution between populations and within individuals is essential to understanding HIV pathogenesis and imperative for the design of effective biomedical interventions such as vaccines. PMID:19532060

  14. HIV molecular epidemiology: transmission and adaptation to human populations.

    PubMed

    Woodman, Zenda; Williamson, Carolyn

    2009-07-01

    To provide an update on the origin of the HIV epidemic and insights into how the immune response is shaping virus evolution. Characterization of archival samples showed that by the 1960s, HIV had already diverged within humans. It is now estimated that HIV has been in humans since at least the early 1900s. However, despite the potential for different divergent viruses to spread, surprisingly few viruses successfully expanded to cause the global epidemic. In approximately 80% of cases, productive infection is the result of infection with only a single virus or single virus-infected cell. After transmission, HIV evolves at a rapid rate driven by the immune pressure until the virus reaches a delicate survival balance: on one hand avoiding elimination through the development of cytotoxic T-cell immune escape mutations, and on the other sacrificing replication fitness as these mutations may come with a severe fitness cost to the virus. People infected with these 'attenuated' cytotoxic T-cell escape viruses can have a survival advantage. Cytotoxic T-cell responses are molding HIV diversity at a population level resulting in a loss of some of the common immune epitopes. Insights into the origin of HIV and its evolution between populations and within individuals is essential to understanding HIV pathogenesis and imperative for the design of effective biomedical interventions such as vaccines.

  15. Tracing HIV-1 transmission: envelope traits of HIV-1 transmitter and recipient pairs.

    PubMed

    Oberle, Corinna S; Joos, Beda; Rusert, Peter; Campbell, Nottania K; Beauparlant, David; Kuster, Herbert; Weber, Jacqueline; Schenkel, Corinne D; Scherrer, Alexandra U; Magnus, Carsten; Kouyos, Roger; Rieder, Philip; Niederöst, Barbara; Braun, Dominique L; Pavlovic, Jovan; Böni, Jürg; Yerly, Sabine; Klimkait, Thomas; Aubert, Vincent; Trkola, Alexandra; Metzner, Karin J; Günthard, Huldrych F

    2016-09-05

    Mucosal HIV-1 transmission predominantly results in a single transmitted/founder (T/F) virus establishing infection in the new host despite the generally high genetic diversity of the transmitter virus population. To what extent HIV-1 transmission is a stochastic process or driven by selective forces that allow T/F viruses best to overcome bottlenecks in transmission has not been conclusively resolved. Building on prior investigations that suggest HIV-1 envelope (Env) features to contribute in the selection process during transmission, we compared phenotypic virus characteristics of nine HIV-1 subtype B transmission pairs, six men who have sex with men and three male-to-female transmission pairs. All recipients were identified early in acute infection and harbored based on extensive sequencing analysis a single T/F virus allowing a controlled analysis of virus properties in matched transmission pairs. Recipient and transmitter viruses from the closest time point to transmission showed no signs of selection for specific Env modifications such as variable loop length and glycosylation. Recipient viruses were resistant to circulating plasma antibodies of the transmitter and also showed no altered sensitivity to a large panel of entry inhibitors and neutralizing antibodies. The recipient virus did not consistently differ from the transmitter virus in terms of entry kinetics, cell-cell transmission and replicative capacity in primary cells. Our paired analysis revealed a higher sensitivity of several recipient virus isolates to interferon-α (IFNα) which suggests that resistance to IFNα cannot be a general driving force in T/F establishment. With the exception of increased IFNα sensitivity, none of the phenotypic virus properties we investigated clearly distinguished T/F viruses from their matched transmitter viruses supporting the notion that at least in subtype B infection HIV-1 transmission is to a considerable extent stochastic.

  16. Taxonomy of Caribbean tourism alcohol venues: implications for HIV transmission.

    PubMed

    Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent; Jaccard, James; McCarthy, Katharine; Quiñones, Zahira; Lushin, Viktor; Skinner-Day, Molly; Padilla, Mark; Meisterlin, Leah

    2013-09-01

    Tourism areas represent ecologies of heightened HIV vulnerability characterized by a disproportionate concentration of alcohol venues. Limited research has explored how alcohol venues facilitate HIV transmission. We spatially mapped locations of alcohol venues in a Dominican tourism town and conducted a venue-based survey of key informants (n=135) focused on three facets of alcohol venues: structural features, type of patrons, and HIV risk behaviors. Using latent class analysis, we identified evidence-based typologies of alcohol venues for each of the three facets. Focused contrasts identified the co-occurrence of classes of structural features, classes of types of patrons, and classes of HIV risk behavior, thus elaborating the nature of high risk venues. We identified three categories of venue structural features, three for venue patrons, and five for HIV risk behaviors. Analysis revealed that alcohol venues with the greatest structural risks (e.g. sex work on-site with lack of HIV prevention services) were most likely frequented by the venue patron category characterized by high population-mixing between locals and foreign tourists, who were in turn most likely to engage in the riskiest behaviors. Our results highlight the stratification of venue patrons into groups who engage in behaviors of varying risk in structural settings that vary in risk. The convergence of high-risk patron groups in alcohol venues with the greatest structural risk suggests these locations have potential for HIV transmission. Policymakers and prevention scientists can use these methods and data to target HIV prevention resources to identified priority areas. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Taxonomy of Caribbean Tourism Alcohol Venues: Implications for HIV Transmission*

    PubMed Central

    GUILAMO-RAMOS, Vincent; JACCARD, James; MCCARTHY, Katharine; QUIÑONES, Zahira; LUSHIN, Viktor; SKINNER-DAY, Molly; PADILLA, Mark; MEISTERLIN, Leah

    2013-01-01

    Background Tourism areas represent ecologies of heightened HIV vulnerability characterized by a disproportionate concentration of alcohol venues. Limited research has explored how alcohol venues facilitate HIV transmission. Methods We spatially mapped locations of alcohol venues in a Dominican tourism town and conducted a venue-based survey of key informants (n=135) focused on three facets of alcohol venues: structural features, type of patrons, and HIV risk behaviors. Using latent class analysis, we identified evidence-based typologies of alcohol venues for each of the three facets. Focused contrasts identified the co-occurrence of classes of structural features, classes of types of patrons, and classes of HIV risk behavior, thus elaborating the nature of high risk venues. Results We identified three categories of venue structural features, three for venue patrons, and five for HIV risk behaviors. Analysis revealed that alcohol venues with the greatest structural risks (e.g., sex work on site with lack of HIV prevention services) were most likely frequented by the venue patron category characterized by high population-mixing between locals and foreign tourists, who were in turn most likely to engage in the riskiest behaviors. Conclusion Our results highlight the stratification of venue patrons into groups who engage in behaviors of varying risk in structural settings that vary in risk. The convergence of high-risk patron groups in alcohol venues with the greatest structural risk suggests these locations have potential for HIV transmission. Policymakers and prevention scientists can use these methods and data to target HIV prevention resources to identified priority areas. PMID:23478154

  18. Evaluation of factors associated with vertical HIV-1 transmission.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Matheus Costa da; Lobato, Rubens Caurio; Gonçalves, Carla Vitola; Silva, Naylê Maria Oliveira da; Barral, Maria Fernanda Martínez; Martinez, Ana Maria Barral de; Hora, Vanusa Pousada da

    2015-01-01

    To compare the prevalence and factors associated with vertical transmission of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) among pregnant women treated in the periods of 1998-2004 and 2005-2011 in a reference service for the care of HIV-infected patients in southern Brazil. This was a descriptive and analytical study that used the databases of laboratories from the CD4 and STDs/AIDS Viral Load National Laboratory Network of the Brazilian Ministry of Health. HIV-1-infected pregnant women were selected after an active search for clinical information and obstetric and neonatal data from their medical records between the years of 1998 and 2011. 102 pregnant women were analyzed between 1998 and 2004 and 251 in the period between 2005 and 2011, totaling 353 children born to pregnant women with HIV-1. It was observed that the vertical transmission rate was 11.8% between 1998 and 2004 and 3.2% between 2005 and 2011 (p<0.001). The increased use of antiretroviral drugs (p=0.02), the decrease in viral load (p<0.001), and time of membrane rupture lower than 4h (p<0.001) were associated with the decrease of vertical transmission factors when comparing the two periods. It was observed a decrease in the rate of vertical transmission in recent years. According to the studied variables, is suggested that the risk factors for vertical transmission of HIV-1 were absence of antiretroviral therapy, high viral load in the pregnant women, and membrane rupture time >4h. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Reducing HIV infection in people who inject drugs is impossible without targeting recently-infected subjects

    PubMed Central

    Vasylyeva, Tetyana I.; Friedman, Samuel R.; Lourenco, Jose; Gupta, Sunetra; Hatzakis, Angelos; Pybus, Oliver G.; Katzourakis, Aris; Smyrnov, Pavlo; Karamitros, Timokratis; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; Magiorkinis, Gkikas

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Although our understanding of viral transmission among people who inject drugs (PWID) has improved, we still know little about when and how many times each injector transmits HIV throughout the duration of infection. We describe HIV dynamics in PWID to evaluate which preventive strategies can be efficient. Design: Due to the notably scarce interventions, HIV-1 spread explosively in Russia and Ukraine in 1990s. By studying this epidemic between 1995 and 2005, we characterized naturally occurring transmission dynamics of HIV among PWID. Method: We combined publicly available HIV pol and env sequences with prevalence estimates from Russia and Ukraine under an evolutionary epidemiology framework to characterize HIV transmissibility between PWID. We then constructed compartmental models to simulate HIV spread among PWID. Results: In the absence of interventions, each injector transmits on average to 10 others. Half of the transmissions take place within 1 month after primary infection, suggesting that the epidemic will expand even after blocking all the post–first month transmissions. Primary prevention can realistically target the first month of infection, and we show that it is very efficient to control the spread of HIV-1 in PWID. Treating acutely infected on top of primary prevention is notably effective. Conclusion: As a large proportion of transmissions among PWID occur within 1 month after infection, reducing and delaying transmissions through scale-up of harm reduction programmes should always form the backbone of HIV control strategies in PWID. Growing PWID populations in the developing world, where primary prevention is scarce, constitutes a public health time bomb. PMID:27824626

  20. Human Herpesviruses as Copathogens of HIV Infection, Their Role in HIV Transmission, and Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Munawwar, Arshi; Singh, Sarman

    2016-01-01

    Of eight human herpesviruses (HHVs), often, only herpes simplex virus types 1 (HSV-1) and 2 (HSV-2) find mention in medical literature as both of these viruses are commonly associated with genital lesions and oral ulcers, commonly known as cold sores. However, role of human herpesviruses as copathogens and in aggravation and in the transmission of other human diseases, especially the Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) has only very recently been recognized. Therefore, screening and treating subclinical HHV infections may offer slowing of HIV infection, disease progression, and its transmission. Beside HSV-1 and HSV-2, HHV-3 a causative agent of herpes zoster remained one of the first manifestations of HIV disease before the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). HHV-5 also known as human Cytomegalovirus infection remains a significant risk factor for HIV-associated mortality and morbidity even in HAART era. It is proposed that Cytomegalovirus viremia could be a better predictor of HIV disease progression than CD4+ T-lymphocyte count. The role of HHV-4 or Epstein–Burr virus and HHV-6, HHV-7, and HHV-8 is still being investigated in HIV disease progression. This review provides insight into the current understanding about these 8 HHVs, their co-pathogenesis, and role in HIV/AIDS disease progression. The review also covers recent literature in favor and against administering anti-HHV treatment along with HAART for slower AIDS progression and interrupted sexual transmission. PMID:27013807

  1. Human Herpesviruses as Copathogens of HIV Infection, Their Role in HIV Transmission, and Disease Progression.

    PubMed

    Munawwar, Arshi; Singh, Sarman

    2016-01-01

    Of eight human herpesviruses (HHVs), often, only herpes simplex virus types 1 (HSV-1) and 2 (HSV-2) find mention in medical literature as both of these viruses are commonly associated with genital lesions and oral ulcers, commonly known as cold sores. However, role of human herpesviruses as copathogens and in aggravation and in the transmission of other human diseases, especially the Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) has only very recently been recognized. Therefore, screening and treating subclinical HHV infections may offer slowing of HIV infection, disease progression, and its transmission. Beside HSV-1 and HSV-2, HHV-3 a causative agent of herpes zoster remained one of the first manifestations of HIV disease before the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). HHV-5 also known as human Cytomegalovirus infection remains a significant risk factor for HIV-associated mortality and morbidity even in HAART era. It is proposed that Cytomegalovirus viremia could be a better predictor of HIV disease progression than CD4+ T-lymphocyte count. The role of HHV-4 or Epstein-Burr virus and HHV-6, HHV-7, and HHV-8 is still being investigated in HIV disease progression. This review provides insight into the current understanding about these 8 HHVs, their co-pathogenesis, and role in HIV/AIDS disease progression. The review also covers recent literature in favor and against administering anti-HHV treatment along with HAART for slower AIDS progression and interrupted sexual transmission.

  2. Sexual risk behaviour for transmission of HIV in men who have sex with men: recent findings and potential interventions.

    PubMed

    McDaid, Lisa M; Hart, Graham J

    2010-07-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) remain one of the groups most at risk of HIV, particularly in countries with concentrated epidemics. Here, we review findings from behavioural research with MSM and discuss the potential of behavioural interventions. Increasing sexual risk behaviour and HIV transmission among MSM is apparent. Although risk reduction strategies, including serosorting and strategic positioning, are being widely reported, these appear to offer limited protection to HIV-negative MSM. There are emerging HIV epidemics among MSM in low-income and middle-income countries, with reported high levels of HIV and sexual risk behaviour. Studies of African MSM report higher HIV prevalence than that in the adult male general population. Evidence of effective behavioural interventions is growing. However, further trials, incorporating biological endpoints, are required. Reducing HIV transmission among MSM remains a significant challenge. Risk reduction strategies, other than condom use, could reduce the risk, but their efficacy is questionable, particularly when knowledge of HIV status may be inaccurate. Behaviour change alone is unlikely to produce the sustained reductions in HIV transmission necessary to change the course of the epidemic. 'Combination prevention', which incorporates biomedical, behavioural, social and structural interventions, should be explored further.

  3. Exogenous and endogenous hyaluronic acid reduces HIV infection of CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Peilin; Fujimoto, Katsuya; Bourguingnon, Lilly; Yukl, Steven; Deeks, Steven; Wong, Joseph K

    2014-10-01

    Preventing mucosal transmission of HIV is critical to halting the HIV epidemic. Novel approaches to preventing mucosal transmission are needed. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a major extracellular component of mucosa and the primary ligand for the cell surface receptor CD44. CD44 enhances HIV infection of CD4(+) T cells, but the role of HA in this process is not clear. To study this, virions were generated with CD44 (HIVCD44) or without CD44 (HIVmock). Exogenous HA reduced HIV infection of unstimulated CD4(+) T cells in a CD44-dependent manner. Conversely, hyaluronidase-mediated reduction of endogenous HA on the cell surface enhanced HIV binding to and infection of unstimulated CD4(+) T cells. Exogenous HA treatment reduced activation of protein kinase C alpha via CD44 on CD4(+) T cells during infection with HIVCD44. These results reveal new roles for HA during the interaction of HIV with CD4(+) T cells that may be relevant to mucosal HIV transmission and could be exploitable as a future strategy to prevent HIV infection.

  4. Compartmentalized Cytomegalovirus Replication and Transmission in the Setting of Maternal HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Slyker, Jennifer; Farquhar, Carey; Atkinson, Claire; Ásbjörnsdóttir, Kristjana; Roxby, Alison; Drake, Alison; Kiarie, James; Wald, Anna; Boeckh, Michael; Richardson, Barbra; Odem-Davis, Katherine; John-Stewart, Grace; Emery, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Background. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is associated with adverse outcomes in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–exposed infants. Determinants of vertical CMV transmission in the setting of maternal HIV-1 infection are not well-defined. Methods. CMV and HIV-1 levels were measured in plasma, cervical secretions, and breast milk of 147 HIV-1–infected women to define correlates of maternal CMV replication and infant CMV acquisition. Results. Although few women had detectable CMV in plasma (4.8%), the majority had detectable CMV DNA in cervical secretions (66%) and breast milk (99%). There was a strong association between cervical CMV detection during pregnancy and later breast milk levels (β = 0.47; P = .005). Plasma HIV-1 level and CD4 counts were associated with CMV in the cervix and breast milk. However HIV-1 levels within the cervix and breast milk were not associated with CMV within these compartments. Maternal breast milk CMV levels (hazard ratio [HR], 1.4; P = .003) and maternal CD4 < 450 cells/mm3 (HR, 1.8; P = .008) were independently associated with infant CMV acquisition; each log10 increase in breast milk CMV was associated with a 40% increase in infant infection. The breast milk CMV level required to attain a 50% probability of CMV transmission increased with higher maternal CD4 counts, increasing from 3.55 log10 CMV DNA copies/mL at a CD4 count of 350 cells/mm3 to 5.50 log10 CMV DNA copies/mL at a CD4 count of 1000 cells/mm3. Conclusions. Breast milk CMV levels and maternal CD4 count are major determinants of CMV transmission in the setting of maternal HIV-1. Maternal immune reconstitution or lowering breast milk CMV levels may reduce vertical CMV transmission. PMID:24192386

  5. Compartmentalized cytomegalovirus replication and transmission in the setting of maternal HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Slyker, Jennifer; Farquhar, Carey; Atkinson, Claire; Ásbjörnsdóttir, Kristjana; Roxby, Alison; Drake, Alison; Kiarie, James; Wald, Anna; Boeckh, Michael; Richardson, Barbra; Odem-Davis, Katherine; John-Stewart, Grace; Emery, Vincent

    2014-02-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is associated with adverse outcomes in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-exposed infants. Determinants of vertical CMV transmission in the setting of maternal HIV-1 infection are not well-defined. CMV and HIV-1 levels were measured in plasma, cervical secretions, and breast milk of 147 HIV-1-infected women to define correlates of maternal CMV replication and infant CMV acquisition. Although few women had detectable CMV in plasma (4.8%), the majority had detectable CMV DNA in cervical secretions (66%) and breast milk (99%). There was a strong association between cervical CMV detection during pregnancy and later breast milk levels (β = 0.47; P = .005). Plasma HIV-1 level and CD4 counts were associated with CMV in the cervix and breast milk. However HIV-1 levels within the cervix and breast milk were not associated with CMV within these compartments. Maternal breast milk CMV levels (hazard ratio [HR], 1.4; P = .003) and maternal CD4 < 450 cells/mm(3) (HR, 1.8; P = .008) were independently associated with infant CMV acquisition; each log10 increase in breast milk CMV was associated with a 40% increase in infant infection. The breast milk CMV level required to attain a 50% probability of CMV transmission increased with higher maternal CD4 counts, increasing from 3.55 log10 CMV DNA copies/mL at a CD4 count of 350 cells/mm(3) to 5.50 log10 CMV DNA copies/mL at a CD4 count of 1000 cells/mm(3). Breast milk CMV levels and maternal CD4 count are major determinants of CMV transmission in the setting of maternal HIV-1. Maternal immune reconstitution or lowering breast milk CMV levels may reduce vertical CMV transmission.

  6. Behavioral Interventions to Reduce Sexual Risk Behavior in Adults with HIV/AIDS Receiving HIV Care: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Laisaar, Kaja-Triin; Raag, Mait; Rosenthal, Marika; Uusküla, Anneli

    2015-05-01

    Regular interactions with people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) who are receiving care provide caregivers opportunities to deliver interventions to reduce HIV-related risks. We conducted a systematic review of behavioral interventions for PLWHA (provided at individual level by caregivers at HIV care settings) to determine their efficacy in reducing sexual risk behavior. Conference websites and biomedical literature databases were searched for studies from 1981 to 2013. Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials (with standard-of-care control groups), considering at least one of a list of HIV-related behavioral or biological outcomes in PLWHA aged ≥18 receiving HIV care with at least 3-month follow-up were included. No language or publication status restrictions were set. Standardized search, data abstraction, and evaluation methods were used. Five randomized controlled trials were included in the review. We found limited evidence that sexual risk reduction interventions increase condom use consistency in HIV transmission risk acts, and reduce the number of (casual) sexual partners. We still believe that regular interactions between HIV care providers and PLWHA provide valuable opportunities for theory-based sexual risk reduction interventions to restrain the spread of HIV.

  7. Behavioral Interventions to Reduce Sexual Risk Behavior in Adults with HIV/AIDS Receiving HIV Care: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Raag, Mait; Rosenthal, Marika; Uusküla, Anneli

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Regular interactions with people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) who are receiving care provide caregivers opportunities to deliver interventions to reduce HIV-related risks. We conducted a systematic review of behavioral interventions for PLWHA (provided at individual level by caregivers at HIV care settings) to determine their efficacy in reducing sexual risk behavior. Conference websites and biomedical literature databases were searched for studies from 1981 to 2013. Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials (with standard-of-care control groups), considering at least one of a list of HIV-related behavioral or biological outcomes in PLWHA aged ≥18 receiving HIV care with at least 3-month follow-up were included. No language or publication status restrictions were set. Standardized search, data abstraction, and evaluation methods were used. Five randomized controlled trials were included in the review. We found limited evidence that sexual risk reduction interventions increase condom use consistency in HIV transmission risk acts, and reduce the number of (casual) sexual partners. We still believe that regular interactions between HIV care providers and PLWHA provide valuable opportunities for theory-based sexual risk reduction interventions to restrain the spread of HIV. PMID:25844941

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission in a country with low tuberculosis incidence: role of immigration and HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Fenner, Lukas; Gagneux, Sebastien; Helbling, Peter; Battegay, Manuel; Rieder, Hans L; Pfyffer, Gaby E; Zwahlen, Marcel; Furrer, Hansjakob; Siegrist, Hans H; Fehr, Jan; Dolina, Marisa; Calmy, Alexandra; Stucki, David; Jaton, Katia; Janssens, Jean-Paul; Stalder, Jesica Mazza; Bodmer, Thomas; Ninet, Beatrice; Böttger, Erik C; Egger, Matthias

    2012-02-01

    Immigrants from high-burden countries and HIV-coinfected individuals are risk groups for tuberculosis (TB) in countries with low TB incidence. Therefore, we studied their role in transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Switzerland. We included all TB patients from the Swiss HIV Cohort and a sample of patients from the national TB registry. We identified molecular clusters by spoligotyping and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit-variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) analysis and used weighted logistic regression adjusted for age and sex to identify risk factors for clustering, taking sampling proportions into account. In total, we analyzed 520 TB cases diagnosed between 2000 and 2008; 401 were foreign born, and 113 were HIV coinfected. The Euro-American M. tuberculosis lineage dominated throughout the study period (378 strains; 72.7%), with no evidence for another lineage, such as the Beijing genotype, emerging. We identified 35 molecular clusters with 90 patients, indicating recent transmission; 31 clusters involved foreign-born patients, and 15 involved HIV-infected patients. Birth origin was not associated with clustering (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.73 to 3.43; P = 0.25, comparing Swiss-born with foreign-born patients), but clustering was reduced in HIV-infected patients (aOR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.26 to 0.93; P = 0.030). Cavitary disease, male sex, and younger age were all associated with molecular clustering. In conclusion, most TB patients in Switzerland were foreign born, but transmission of M. tuberculosis was not more common among immigrants and was reduced in HIV-infected patients followed up in the national HIV cohort study. Continued access to health services and clinical follow-up will be essential to control TB in this population.

  9. Nanoformulations of Rilpivirine for Topical Pericoital and Systemic Coitus-Independent Administration Efficiently Prevent HIV Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Date, Abhijit A.; Long, Julie M.; Nochii, Tomonori; Belshan, Michael; Shibata, Annemarie; Vincent, Heather; Baker, Caroline E.; Thayer, William O.; Kraus, Guenter; Lachaud-Durand, Sophie; Williams, Peter; Destache, Christopher J.; Garcia, J. Victor

    2015-01-01

    Vaginal HIV transmission accounts for the majority of new infections worldwide. Currently, multiple efforts to prevent HIV transmission are based on pre-exposure prophylaxis with various antiretroviral drugs. Here, we describe two novel nanoformulations of the reverse transcriptase inhibitor rilpivirine for pericoital and coitus-independent HIV prevention. Topically applied rilpivirine, encapsulated in PLGA nanoparticles, was delivered in a thermosensitive gel, which becomes solid at body temperature. PLGA nanoparticles with encapsulated rilpivirine coated the reproductive tract and offered significant protection to BLT humanized mice from a vaginal high-dose HIV-1 challenge. A different nanosuspension of crystalline rilpivirine (RPV LA), administered intramuscularly, protected BLT mice from a single vaginal high-dose HIV-1 challenge one week after drug administration. Using transmitted/founder viruses, which were previously shown to establish de novo infection in humans, we demonstrated that RPV LA offers significant protection from two consecutive high-dose HIV-1 challenges one and four weeks after drug administration. In this experiment, we also showed that, in certain cases, even in the presence of drug, HIV infection could occur without overt or detectable systemic replication until levels of drug were reduced. We also showed that infection in the presence of drug can result in acquisition of multiple viruses after subsequent exposures. These observations have important implications for the implementation of long-acting antiretroviral formulations for HIV prevention. They provide first evidence that occult infections can occur, despite the presence of sustained levels of antiretroviral drugs. Together, our results demonstrate that topically- or systemically administered rilpivirine offers significant coitus-dependent or coitus-independent protection from HIV infection. PMID:26271040

  10. Targeting early infection to prevent HIV-1 mucosal transmission.

    PubMed

    Haase, Ashley T

    2010-03-11

    Measures to prevent sexual mucosal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 are urgently needed to curb the growth of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) pandemic and ultimately bring it to an end. Studies in animal models and acute HIV-1 infection reviewed here reveal potential viral vulnerabilities at the mucosal portal of entry in the earliest stages of infection that might be most effectively targeted by vaccines and microbicides, thereby preventing acquisition and averting systemic infection, CD4 T-cell depletion and pathologies that otherwise rapidly ensue.

  11. Narrative review: antiretroviral therapy to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Myron S; Gay, Cynthia; Kashuba, Angela D M; Blower, Sally; Paxton, Lynn

    2007-04-17

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has prolonged and improved the lives of persons infected with HIV. Theoretically, it can also be used to prevent the transmission of HIV. The pharmacology of ART in the male and female genital tract can be expected to affect the success of the intervention, and ART agents differ considerably in their ability to concentrate in genital tract secretions. Emergency ART is considered to be the standard of care after occupational exposures to fluids or tissues infected with HIV. More recently, ART for prophylaxis after nonoccupational HIV exposures has been widely used and most countries have developed specific guidelines for its implementation. However, developing clinical trials to prove the efficacy of ART postexposure prophylaxis has not been possible. Experiments with rhesus macaques suggest that therapy must be offered as soon as possible after exposure (within 72 hours) and must be continued for 28 days. Additional nonhuman primate experiments have demonstrated protection from HIV infection with ART preexposure prophylaxis, and several clinical trials are under way to evaluate the safety and efficacy of this approach. The degree to which ART offered to infected persons reduces infectiousness is of considerable public health importance, but the question has not been sufficiently answered. This article provides a review of the data on the use of ART to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV and identify challenges to improving and clarifying this approach.

  12. The Transmission Dynamics of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, R. M.; Anderson, R. M.

    1988-10-01

    The paper first reviews data on HIV infections and AIDS disease among homosexual men, heterosexuals, intravenous (IV) drug abusers and children born to infected mothers, in both developed and developing countries. We survey such information as is currently available about the distribution of incubation times that elapse between HIV infection and the appearance of AIDS, about the fraction of those infected with HIV who eventually go on to develop AIDS, about time-dependent patterns of infectiousness and about distributions of rates of acquiring new sexual or needle-sharing partners. With this information, models for the transmission dynamics of HIV are developed, beginning with deliberately oversimplified models and progressing - on the basis of the understanding thus gained - to more complex ones. Where possible, estimates of the model's parameters are derived from the epidemiological data, and predictions are compared with observed trends. We also combine these epidemiological models with demographic considerations to assess the effects that heterosexually-transmitted HIV/AIDS may eventually have on rates of population growth, on age profiles and on associated economic and social indicators, in African and other countries. The degree to which sexual or other habits must change to bring the `basic reproductive rate', R_0, of HIV infections below unity is discussed. We conclude by outlining some research needs, both in the refinement and development of models and in the collection of epidemiological data.

  13. Chlamydia and Gonorrhea in HIV-infected Pregnant Women and Infant HIV Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Kristina; Klausner, Jeffrey D.; Bristow, Claire C.; Xu, Jiahong; Ank, Bonnie; Morgado, Mariza G; Watts, D. Heather; Weir, Fred; Persing, David; Mofenson, Lynne M.; Veloso, Valdilea G.; Pilotto, Jose Henrique; Joao, Esau; Nielsen-Saines, Karin

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) such as Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) can lead to adverse pregnancy and neonatal outcomes. STI prevalence and its association with HIV mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) were evaluated in a sub-study analysis from a randomized, multi-center clinical trial. METHODOLOGY Urine samples from HIV-infected pregnant women collected at the time of labor and delivery were tested using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing for the detection of CT and NG (Xpert® CT/NG, Cepheid, Sunnyvale, CA). Infant HIV infection was determined by HIV DNA PCR at 3 months. RESULTS Of the 1373 urine specimens, 249 (18.1%) were positive for CT and 63 (4.6%) for NG; 35 (2.5%) had both CT and NG detected. Among 117 cases of HIV MTCT (8.5% transmission) the lowest transmission rate occurred among infants born to CT and NG uninfected mothers (8.1%) as compared to those infected with only CT (10.7%) and both CT and NG (14.3%), (p = 0.04). Infants born to CT-infected mothers had almost a 1.5-fold increased risk for HIV acquisition (OR 1.47, 95% CI 0.9–2.3, p=0.09). CONCLUSION This cohort of HIV-infected pregnant women are at high risk for infection with CT and NG. Analysis suggests that STIs may predispose to an increased HIV MTCT risk in this high risk cohort of HIV-infected women. PMID:26372927

  14. A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of an Integrated In-person and Mobile Phone Delivered Counseling and Text Messaging Intervention to Reduce HIV Transmission Risk among Male Sex Workers in Chennai, India.

    PubMed

    Mimiaga, Matthew J; Thomas, Beena; Biello, Katie; Johnson, Blake E; Swaminathan, Soumya; Navakodi, Pandiyaraja; Balaguru, S; Dhanalakshmi, A; Closson, Elizabeth F; Menon, Sunil; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Mayer, Kenneth H; Safren, Steven A

    2017-08-22

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) are at increased risk for HIV infection in India, particularly those who engage in transactional sex with other men (i.e., male sex workers; MSW). Despite the need, HIV prevention efforts for Indian MSW are lacking. As in other settings, MSW in India increasingly rely on the use of mobile phones for sex work solicitation. Integrating mobile phone technology into an HIV prevention intervention for Indian MSW may mitigate some of the challenges associated with face-to face approaches, such as implementation, lack of anonymity, and time consumption, while at the same time proving to be both feasible and useful. This is a pilot randomized controlled trial to examine participant acceptability, feasibility of study procedures, and preliminary efficacy for reducing sexual risk for HIV. MSW (N = 100) were equally randomized to: (1) a behavioral HIV prevention intervention integrating in-person and mobile phone delivered HIV risk reduction counseling, and daily, personalized text or voice messages as motivating "cognitive restructuring" cues for reducing condomless anal sex (CAS); or (2) a standard of care (SOC) comparison condition. Both groups received HIV counseling and testing at baseline and 6-months, and completed ACASI-based, behavioral and psychosocial assessments at baseline, 3, and 6 months. Mixed-effects regression procedures specifying a Poisson distribution and log link with a random intercept and slope for month of follow-up was estimated to assess the intervention effect on the primary outcomes: (1) CAS acts with male clients who paid them for sex, and (2) CAS acts with male non-paying sexual partners-both outcomes assessed over the past month. The intervention was both feasible (98% retention at 6-months) and acceptable (>96% of all intervention sessions attended); all intervention participants rated the intervention as "acceptable" or "very acceptable." A reduction in the reported number of CAS acts with male clients who

  15. Prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV: challenges for the current decade.

    PubMed Central

    Newell, M. L.

    2001-01-01

    In June 2001 the United Nations Special Assembly on HIV/AIDS set reduction targets of 20% and 50% for the numbers of children newly infected with HIV by 2005 and 2010 respectively. Are these targets achievable? Antiretroviral monotherapy during pregnancy, delivery, and the neonatal period can reduce the rate of mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1 by two-thirds in non-breastfeeding populations. Shorter and simpler regimens of monotherapy have been associated with a reduction of 50% in such transmission among non-breastfeeding populations and of up to 40% in breastfeeding populations. Delivery by elective caesarean section is associated with a halving of the risk of mother-to-child transmission. However, breastfeeding poses a substantial additional risk of acquisition of HIV, and if prolonged it more than doubles the overall rate of transmission. Rates below 2% are being reported from settings where combination therapy is applied during pregnancy and delivery, delivery is by elective caesarean section, and breastfeeding does not take place. In breastfeeding populations where elective caesarean delivery is not an option but peripartum antiretroviral therapy is used, rates at six weeks are about 10% but can be 25% or more after 18 months of breastfeeding. More widely applicable interventions are being developed, such as cleansing of the birth canal and antiretroviral therapy during the breastfeeding period. PMID:11799446

  16. Assessing the impact of national anti-HIV sexual health campaigns: trends in the transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections in England

    PubMed Central

    Nicoll, A.; Hughes, G.; Donnelly, M.; Livingstone, S.; De Angelis, D.; Fenton, K.; Evans, B.; Gill, O; Catchpole, M.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To assess the impact of the sexual component of AIDS and HIV campaigns on transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Design: Comparison of time series data. Setting: England, 1971–1999. Outcome measures: HIV transmission and diagnoses among men who have sex with men (MSMs), rates of attendances and specific STI diagnoses (per 100 000 total population) at genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinics. Results: Awareness of AIDS and campaigns in 1983–4 among homosexual men coincided with substantial declines in transmission of HIV and diagnoses of syphilis among MSMs. During general population campaigns in 1986-7 new GUM clinic attendances requiring treatment fell by 117/105 in men and 42/105 in women. Rates for gonorrhoea fell by 81/105 and 43/105 and genital herpes by 6/105 and 4/105, respectively. Previous rises in genital wart rates were interrupted, while rates of attendances not requiring treatment (the "worried well") increased by 47/105 and 58/105 for men and women, respectively. Since 1987 diagnoses of HIV among MSMs have not declined, averaging 1300–1400 annually. Following a period of unchanging rates there have been substantial increases in GUM attendances requiring treatment, notably for gonorrhoea, syphilis, and viral STIs since 1995. Conclusions: Self help initiatives and awareness among homosexual men in 1983–4 contributed significantly to a fall in HIV transmission among MSMs, and the general campaigns of 1986–7 were associated with similar effects on all STI transmission. Both effects seem to have occurred through changing sexual behaviour, and probably contributed to the UK's low national HIV prevalence. Bacterial STI incidence has increased significantly since 1995 and there is no evidence that recent prevention initiatives have reduced HIV transmission among MSMs, hence sexual health initiatives need to be comprehensively reinvigorated in England. Key Words: HIV; gonorrhoea; syphilis; interventions; health

  17. Understanding HIV transmission risk behavior among HIV-infected South Africans receiving antiretroviral therapy: an information--motivation--behavioral skills model analysis.

    PubMed

    Kiene, Susan M; Fisher, William A; Shuper, Paul A; Cornman, Deborah H; Christie, Sarah; Macdonald, Susan; Pillay, Sandy; Mahlase, Gethwana; Fisher, Jeffrey D

    2013-08-01

    The current study applied the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills (IMB) model (Fisher & Fisher, 1992; Fisher & Fisher, 1993) to identify factors associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission risk behavior among HIV-infected South Africans receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART), a population of considerable significance for curtailing, or maintaining, South Africa's generalized HIV epidemic. HIV prevention information, HIV prevention motivation, HIV prevention behavioral skills, and HIV transmission risk behavior were assessed in a sample of 1,388 South Africans infected with HIV and receiving ART in 16 clinics in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Findings confirmed the assumptions of the IMB model and demonstrated that HIV prevention information and HIV prevention motivation work through HIV prevention behavioral skills to affect HIV transmission risk behavior in this population. Subanalyses confirmed these relationships for HIV transmission risk behavior overall and for HIV transmission risk behavior with partners perceived to be HIV-negative or HIV-status unknown. A consistent pattern of gender differences showed that for men, HIV prevention information and HIV prevention motivation may have direct links with HIV preventive behavior, whereas for women, the effect of HIV prevention motivation works through HIV prevention behavioral skills to affect HIV preventive behavior. These IMB model-based findings suggest directions for HIV prevention interventions with South African men and women living with HIV and on ART as an important component of overall strategies to contain South Africa's generalized HIV epidemic. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. Acupuncture to Reduce HIV-Associated Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Barbara; Keithley, Joyce K.; Johnson, Angela; Fogg, Louis; Adeyemi, Oluwatoyin; Sha, Beverly E.; Snell, Kimberly A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. HIV infection is associated with systemic inflammation that can increase risk for cardiovascular events. Acupuncture has been shown to have immunomodulatory effects and to improve symptoms in persons with inflammatory conditions. Objective. To test the anti-inflammatory effects of an acupuncture protocol that targets the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAIP), a neural mechanism whose activation has been shown to reduce the release of proinflammatory cytokines, in persons with HIV-associated inflammation. Design, Setting, Participants, and Interventions. Double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial conducted in an outpatient clinic located in a medically underserved urban neighborhood. Twenty-five clinically-stable HIV-infected persons on antiretroviral therapy were randomized to receive once weekly CAIP-based acupuncture or sham acupuncture. Main Outcome Measures. Outcomes included plasma concentrations of high sensitivity C-reactive protein and D-dimer and fasting lipids. Results. Twenty-five participants completed the protocol (treatment group n = 12, control group n = 13). No adverse events related to the acupuncture protocol were observed. Compared to baseline values, the two groups did not significantly differ in any outcome measures at the end of the acupuncture protocol. Conclusions. CAIP-based acupuncture did not favorably modulate inflammatory or lipid parameters. Additional studies are warranted of CAIP-based protocols of different frequencies/durations. PMID:25922615

  19. Acupuncture to Reduce HIV-Associated Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Barbara; Keithley, Joyce K; Johnson, Angela; Fogg, Louis; Adeyemi, Oluwatoyin; Sha, Beverly E; Snell, Kimberly A

    2015-01-01

    Background. HIV infection is associated with systemic inflammation that can increase risk for cardiovascular events. Acupuncture has been shown to have immunomodulatory effects and to improve symptoms in persons with inflammatory conditions. Objective. To test the anti-inflammatory effects of an acupuncture protocol that targets the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAIP), a neural mechanism whose activation has been shown to reduce the release of proinflammatory cytokines, in persons with HIV-associated inflammation. Design, Setting, Participants, and Interventions. Double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial conducted in an outpatient clinic located in a medically underserved urban neighborhood. Twenty-five clinically-stable HIV-infected persons on antiretroviral therapy were randomized to receive once weekly CAIP-based acupuncture or sham acupuncture. Main Outcome Measures. Outcomes included plasma concentrations of high sensitivity C-reactive protein and D-dimer and fasting lipids. Results. Twenty-five participants completed the protocol (treatment group n = 12, control group n = 13). No adverse events related to the acupuncture protocol were observed. Compared to baseline values, the two groups did not significantly differ in any outcome measures at the end of the acupuncture protocol. Conclusions. CAIP-based acupuncture did not favorably modulate inflammatory or lipid parameters. Additional studies are warranted of CAIP-based protocols of different frequencies/durations.

  20. HIV and mucosal barrier interactions: consequences for transmission and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Burgener, Adam; McGowan, Ian; Klatt, Nichole R

    2015-10-01

    The mucosal barrier plays an integral function in human health as it is the primary defense against pathogens, and provides a critical transition between the external environment and the human internal body. In the context of HIV infection, the most relevant mucosal surfaces include those of the gastrointestinal (GI) and genital tract compartments. Several components help maintain the effectiveness of this mucosal surface, including the physical anatomy of the barrier, cellular immunity, soluble factors, and interactions between the epithelial barrier and the local microenvironment, including mucus and host microbiota. Any defects in barrier integrity or function can rapidly lead to an increase in acquisition risk, or with established infection may result in increased pathogenesis, morbidities, or mortality. Indeed, a key feature to all aspects of HIV infection from transmission to pathogenesis is disruption and/or dysfunction of mucosal barriers. Herein, we will detail the host-pathogen relationship of HIV and mucosal barriers in both of these scenarios.

  1. [Preventing the transmission of HIV-1 from mother to child in Africa in the year 2000].

    PubMed

    Castetbon, K; Leroy, V; Spira, R; Dabis, F

    2000-01-01

    African women of childbearing age are particularly vulnerable to HIV infection, and this has led to an increase in the number of pediatric HIV infections reported due to the risk of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV during pregnancy, delivery and breastfeeding. Various approaches to preventing MTCT have been, or are being, evaluated in developing countries, especially in Africa. New data from these trials are becoming available and have implications for population-based intervention programs that require urgent consideration. We performed a critical review of 18 randomized trials and other relevant studies from developing and industrialized countries, to assess public health perspectives and to identify new research issues. Most African results relate to trials of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) given to mothers during the last month of pregnancy, and for up to one week after delivery, and to the neonate during the first week of life, or simpler and shorter regimens. They indicate that zidovudine treatment, with or without lamivudine, and nevirapine treatment given alone, reduce transmission during the first six months of life by 30 % to 50%. Preliminary results suggest that zidovudine treatment is effective in the long term. One randomized study showed that the replacement of breast feeding with breast milk substitutes was effective at reducing the overall risk of MTCT. Antiseptic disinfection and micronutrient supplementation have been shown to reduce maternal and infant mortality and morbidity, but not the MTCT of HIV. Voluntary, confidential HIV counseling and testing for pregnant women, a short course of peripartum ARVs and alternatives to breast feeding such as early weaning and breast milk substitutes from birth, are currently the best means of reducing the MTCT of HIV in Africa. Pilot programs based on these findings are currently being implemented in several African countries. Prevention of the MTCT of HIV should also be considered as part of the

  2. Venue-Based Networks May Underpin HCV Transmissions amongst HIV-Infected Gay and Bisexual Men.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Daniel; Raghwani, Jayna; Jacka, Brendan; Sacks-Davis, Rachel; Lamoury, Francois; Down, Ian; Prestage, Garrett; Applegate, Tanya L; Hellard, Margaret; Sasadeusz, Joe; Dore, Gregory J; Pybus, Oliver G; Matthews, Gail V; Danta, Mark

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the potential influence of venue-based networks on HCV transmission in HIV-positive gay and bisexual men (GBM). This was a prospectively recruited cohort of HIV-infected GBM with recently-acquired HCV infection resident in Melbourne and Sydney. Clinical and demographic data were collected together with blood samples for HCV sequencing. Phylogenies were inferred and clusters of individuals infected with HCV with genetic sequence homology were identified. Venues used for sourcing sexual partners were identified; sourcing partners from the same venue was considered a potential social link. Using the Jaccard similarity coefficient, associations were identified between the network of sites where men sourced sex partners and transmission relationships as defined by phylogenetic clustering. Forty individuals were recruited, of whom 62.5% were considered to have sexually- and 37.5% IDU-acquired HCV. Venue use was consistent with men being members of a more sexually adventurous gay community subculture. Six phylogenetically-determined pairs or clusters were identified, comprising fifteen (15/28, 53.6%) individuals. Participants belonging to phylogenetic clusters were observed within the same networks. There was a significant correlation between the network and phylogenetic clustering when both cities were considered simultaneously (p = 0.005), raising the possibility that social connections may be important for HCV transmissions. Venue-based network elicitation is a promising approach for elucidating HCV transmissions amongst HIV-infected GBM. Public health approaches targeting individuals and venues prominent within networks may reduce onward HCV transmission.

  3. Planning for pre-exposure prophylaxis to prevent HIV transmission: challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    There are currently several ongoing or planned trials evaluating the efficacy of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) as a preventative approach to reducing the transmission of HIV. PrEP may prove ineffective, demonstrate partial efficacy, or show high efficacy and have the potential to reduce HIV infection in a significant way. However, in addition to the trial results, it is important that issues related to delivery, implementation and further research are also discussed. As a part of the ongoing discussion, in June 2009, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation sponsored a Planning for PrEP conference with stakeholders to review expected trial results, outline responsible educational approaches, and develop potential delivery and implementation strategies. The conference reinforced the need for continued and sustained dialogue to identify where PrEP implementation may fit best within an integrated HIV prevention package. This paper identifies the key action points that emerged from the Planning for PrEP meeting. PMID:20624303

  4. Panel: challenging criminal charges for HIV transmission and exposure.

    PubMed

    Edwardh, Marlys; Adam, Barry; Joncas, Lucie; Clayton, Michaela

    2009-12-01

    Justice Edwin Cameron, of the Constitutional Court of South Africa, served as moderator. He said that this topic was particularly relevant for "an African/Canadian setting" because African countries may use Canadian developments as justification for their efforts to address HIV transmission and exposure through criminal law. Justice Cameron said that Canada is internationally perceived as a human rights-respecting state and, thus, sets an example, particularly for African nations, on how to comply with human rights issues. He added that in this particular case, however, Canada was sending the wrong message. This article contains summaries of the four presentations made during this panel. Marlys Edwardh reviews how the Supreme Court of Canada in Cuerrier interpreted the concepts of "endangering life" and "fraud". Barry Adam discusses the notion of a "duty to disclose" and how this affects HIV prevention. Lucie Joncas examines how the Supreme Court defined "fraud" in Cuerrier and describes a case before the Quebec Court of Appeal which may turn on whether the use of a condom or having a low viral load is considered not to constitute a significant risk of transmission. Finally, Michaela Clayton describes the trend in Southern African countries to adopt laws criminalizing HIV transmission or exposure, and explains that criminalization endangers women's health and lives.

  5. Maternal-infant HIV transmission and circumstances of delivery.

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, L; Stein, Z A; Thomas, P A; Singh, T; Tsai, W Y

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Circumstances of delivery among children with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were investigated to assess whether they were consistent with predictions that intrapartum factors affect the risk of maternal-infant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission. METHODS. Pediatric AIDS patients (maternal-infant transmission; n = 632) reported to the New York City Health Department through 1991 were compared with a series of infants born to predominantly uninfected women. For each case patient, five control subjects were selected and matched from birth certificate files. Hypothesized case-control comparisons for mode of delivery and preselected complications were tested. RESULTS. Compared with control subjects, case patients were less likely to have been delivered by cesarean section without complications (odds ratio [OR] = 0.77; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.59, 1.01) and more likely to have been delivered with complications, whether delivery was by cesarean section (OR = 1.54; 95% CI = 0.98, 2.43) or vaginal (OR = 1.66; 95% CI = 1.15, 2.39). CONCLUSIONS. Assuming that HIV-infected and uninfected women have comparable circumstances of delivery, conditional on sociomedical characteristics, these results suggest that intrapartum events may be associated with maternal-infant HIV transmission. PMID:8017534

  6. Selecting HIV infection prevention interventions in the mature HIV epidemic in Malawi using the mode of transmission model.

    PubMed

    Maleta, Kenneth; Bowie, Cameron

    2010-08-19

    Malawi is reassessing its HIV prevention strategy in the light of a limited reduction in the epidemic. No community based incidence studies have been carried out in Malawi, so estimates of where new infections are occurring require the use of mathematical models and knowledge of the size and sexual behaviour of different groups. The results can help to choose where HIV prevention interventions are most needed. The UNAIDS Mode of Transmission model was populated with Malawi data and estimates of incident cases calculated for each exposure group. Scenarios of single and multiple interventions of varying success were used to identify those interventions most likely to reduce incident cases. The groups accounting for most new infections were the low-risk heterosexual group - the discordant couples (37%) and those who had casual sex and their partners (a further 16% and 27% respectively) of new cases.Circumcision, condoms with casual sex and bar girls and improved STI treatment had limited effect in reducing incident cases, while condom use with discordant couples, abstinence and a zero-grazing campaign had major effects. The combination of a successful strategy to eliminate multiple concurrent partners and a successful strategy to eliminate all infections between discordant couples would reduce incident cases by 99%. A revitalised HIV prevention strategy will need to include interventions which tackle the two modes of transmission now found to be so important in Malawi - concurrency and discordancy.

  7. Thoughts, Attitudes, and Feelings of HIV-Positive MSM Associated with High Transmission-Risk Sex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinta, Matthew D.; Murphy, Jessie L.; Paul, Jay P.; Schwarcz, Sandra K.; Dilley, James W.

    2012-01-01

    This study presents survey data collected from a sample of HIV-positive men (N = 182) who had high transmission-risk sex, defined as unprotected anal intercourse with a man whose HIV-status was negative or unknown, in the previous 6 months. Despite the tremendous changes in HIV treatment and their impact on people living with HIV, little recent…

  8. Thoughts, Attitudes, and Feelings of HIV-Positive MSM Associated with High Transmission-Risk Sex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinta, Matthew D.; Murphy, Jessie L.; Paul, Jay P.; Schwarcz, Sandra K.; Dilley, James W.

    2012-01-01

    This study presents survey data collected from a sample of HIV-positive men (N = 182) who had high transmission-risk sex, defined as unprotected anal intercourse with a man whose HIV-status was negative or unknown, in the previous 6 months. Despite the tremendous changes in HIV treatment and their impact on people living with HIV, little recent…

  9. Preventing perinatal transmission of HIV--costs and effectiveness of a recommended intervention.

    PubMed Central

    Gorsky, R D; Farnham, P G; Straus, W L; Caldwell, B; Holtgrave, D R; Simonds, R J; Rogers, M F; Guinan, M E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. To calculate the national costs of reducing perinatal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus through counseling and voluntary testing of pregnant women and zidovudine treatment of infected women and their infants, as recommended by the Public Health Service, and to compare these costs with the savings from reducing the number of pediatric infections. METHOD. The authors analyzed the estimated costs of the intervention and the estimated cost savings from reducing the number of pediatric infections. The outcome measures are the number of infections prevented by the intervention and the net cost (cost of intervention minus the savings from a reduced number of pediatric HIV infections). The base model assumed that intervention participation and outcomes would resemble those found in the AIDS Clinical Trials Group Protocol 076. Assumptions were varied regarding maternal seroprevalence, participation by HIV-infected women, the proportion of infected women who accepted and completed the treatment, and the efficacy of zidovudine to illustrate the effect of these assumptions on infections prevented and net cost. RESULTS. Without the intervention, a perinatal HIV transmission rate of 25% would result in 1750 HIV-infected infants born annually in the United States, with lifetime medical-care costs estimated at $282 million. The cost of the intervention (counseling, testing, and zidovudine treatment) was estimated to be $ 67.6 million. In the base model, the intervention would prevent 656 pediatric HIV infections with a medical care cost saving of $105.6 million. The net cost saving of the intervention was $38.1 million. CONCLUSION. Voluntary HIV screening of pregnant women and ziovudine treatment for infected women and their infants resulted in cost savings under most of the assumptions used in this analysis. These results strongly support implementation of the Public Health Service recommendations for this intervention. PMID:8711101

  10. DC-SIGN-mediated infectious synapse formation enhances X4 HIV-1 transmission from dendritic cells to T cells.

    PubMed

    Arrighi, Jean-François; Pion, Marjorie; Garcia, Eduardo; Escola, Jean-Michel; van Kooyk, Yvette; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B; Piguet, Vincent

    2004-11-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are essential for the early events of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Model systems of HIV sexual transmission have shown that DCs expressing the DC-specific C-type lectin DC-SIGN capture and internalize HIV at mucosal surfaces and efficiently transfer HIV to CD4+ T cells in lymph nodes, where viral replication occurs. Upon DC-T cell clustering, internalized HIV accumulates on the DC side at the contact zone (infectious synapse), between DCs and T cells, whereas HIV receptors and coreceptors are enriched on the T cell side. Viral concentration at the infectious synapse may explain, at least in part, why DC transmission of HIV to T cells is so efficient.Here, we have investigated the role of DC-SIGN on primary DCs in X4 HIV-1 capture and transmission using small interfering RNA-expressing lentiviral vectors to specifically knockdown DC-SIGN. We demonstrate that DC-SIGN- DCs internalize X4 HIV-1 as well as DC-SIGN+ DCs, although binding of virions is reduced. Strikingly, DC-SIGN knockdown in DCs selectively impairs infectious synapse formation between DCs and resting CD4+ T cells, but does not prevent the formation of DC-T cells conjugates. Our results demonstrate that DC-SIGN is required downstream from viral capture for the formation of the infectious synapse between DCs and T cells. These findings provide a novel explanation for the role of DC-SIGN in the transfer and enhancement of HIV infection from DCs to T cells, a crucial step for HIV transmission and pathogenesis.

  11. Influenza vaccine oculorespiratory syndrome incidence is reduced in HIV.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Curtis; Thorne, Anona

    2011-10-19

    Clinical experience suggests Oculorespiratory Syndrome (ORS) following influenza vaccination is rare in HIV but this is not well evaluated. We assessed ORS incidence in a randomized influenza vaccine trial of HIV participants. The overall incidence was 0.8% suggesting that influenza vaccine ORS incidence is reduced in HIV.

  12. Vertical HIV-1 transmission: prophylaxis and paediatric follow-up.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, M; Sanchéz, A; Maneiro, P; Angelosante, W; Pérez, C; Valleé, M

    2001-04-01

    To study the effectiveness of anti-HIV therapy for vertical HIV-1 transmission based on the PACTG protocol 076, modified and adapted to Venezuela. Between March 1997 and March 2000, 74 HIV-1-infected women (15-42 years old) with 77 singleton pregnancies were evaluated. Zidovudine (ZDV) 500 mg/day (average 8 weeks) was begun after Western blot confirmatory tests, independent of CD4+ count or viral load. ZDV was administered as follows: 47 patients (61 per cent) received prenatal, perinatal and postnatal therapy; 13 (17 per cent) received prenatal and postnatal therapy; two (3 per cent) received prenatal and perinatal therapy; one patient received perinatal and postnatal therapy; seven (9 per cent) received only postnatal therapy. Seven HIV-1 infected women received no treatment. Thirty-two newborns were obtained by C-section (45.7 per cent), while 38 were delivered vaginally (54.2 per cent). Due to advanced maternal illness, seven HIV-1-infected women received ZDV+3TC, two women received ZDV+ddI and one woman received ZDV+3TC+ Ritonavir. Breastfeeding was avoided in all cases. Outcomes showed 65 term newborns and five preterm newborns; three abortions; one fetal loss and one preterm death. Two maternal/fetal deaths were secondary to complications related to AIDS at 27 and 29 weeks, respectively. Twenty-one children over 18 months old were considered uninfected. Thirty-five infants below 15 months of age were considered with the status of indeterminate HIV-1 infection (PO). Three infants fewer than 5 months of age with multiple risk factors were considered infected (P2). Two infants were asymptomatic and HIV positive at 12 months of age (P1). Eight children were lost to follow-up. Independent of maternal status and delivery type, confirmed vertical transmission of HIV-1-infected women who received ZDV is 4.25 per cent. Prenatal care with a multidisciplinary team is necessary for good obstetric and newborn outcomes. Copyright 2001 IFPA and Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  13. Bottlenecks in HIV-1 transmission: insights from the study of founder viruses.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Sarah B; Swanstrom, Ronald; Kashuba, Angela D M; Cohen, Myron S

    2015-07-01

    HIV-1 infection typically results from the transmission of a single viral variant, the transmitted/founder (T/F) virus. Studies of these HIV-1 variants provide critical information about the transmission bottlenecks and the selective pressures acting on the virus in the transmission fluid and in the recipient tissues. These studies reveal that T/F virus phenotypes are shaped by stochastic and selective forces that restrict transmission and may be targets for prevention strategies. In this Review, we highlight how studies of T/F viruses contribute to a better understanding of the biology of HIV-1 transmission and discuss how these findings affect HIV-1 prevention strategies.

  14. Dual-Rate Transmission Reduces Weather Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posner, E. C.

    1984-01-01

    Scheme ensures maximum data received on average. Dual-rate scheme for maximizing data returned during spacecraft mission, adaptable, as is or with modifications, to high-frequency terrestrial data transmission. Data rate fixed in advance at minimum value guarantees reasonable prospect of success during bad weather. Dualrate strategy yields net data rate 2.5 times best achievable with single transmission rate.

  15. Dual-Rate Transmission Reduces Weather Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posner, E. C.

    1984-01-01

    Scheme ensures maximum data received on average. Dual-rate scheme for maximizing data returned during spacecraft mission, adaptable, as is or with modifications, to high-frequency terrestrial data transmission. Data rate fixed in advance at minimum value guarantees reasonable prospect of success during bad weather. Dualrate strategy yields net data rate 2.5 times best achievable with single transmission rate.

  16. HIV-1 envelope, integrins and co-receptor use in mucosal transmission of HIV.

    PubMed

    Cicala, Claudia; Arthos, James; Fauci, Anthony S

    2011-01-27

    It is well established that HIV-1 infection typically involves an interaction between the viral envelope protein gp120/41 and the CD4 molecule followed by a second interaction with a chemokine receptor, usually CCR5 or CXCR4. In the early stages of an HIV-1 infection CCR5 using viruses (R5 viruses) predominate. In some viral subtypes there is a propensity to switch to CXCR4 usage (X4 viruses). The receptor switch occurs in ~ 40% of the infected individuals and is associated with faster disease progression. This holds for subtypes B and D, but occurs less frequently in subtypes A and C. There are several hypotheses to explain the preferential transmission of R5 viruses and the mechanisms that lead to switching of co-receptor usage; however, there is no definitive explanation for either. One important consideration regarding transmission is that signaling by R5 gp120 may facilitate transmission of R5 viruses by inducing a permissive environment for HIV replication. In the case of sexual transmission, infection by HIV requires the virus to breach the mucosal barrier to gain access to the immune cell targets that it infects; however, the immediate events that follow HIV exposure at genital mucosal sites are not well understood. Upon transmission, the HIV quasispecies that is replicating in an infected donor contracts through a "genetic bottleneck", and often infection results from a single infectious event. Many details surrounding this initial infection remain unresolved. In mucosal tissues, CD4(+) T cells express high levels of CCR5, and a subset of these CD4(+)/CCR5(high) cells express the integrin α₄β₇, the gut homing receptor. CD4(+)/CCR5(high)/ α4β7(high) T cells are highly susceptible to infection by HIV-1 and are ideal targets for an efficient productive infection at the point of transmission. In this context we have demonstrated that the HIV-1 envelope protein gp120 binds to α₄β₇ on CD4(+) T cells. On CD4(+)/CCR5(high)/ α4β7(high) T cells,

  17. Transmission clustering among newly diagnosed HIV patients in Chicago, 2008 to 2011: using phylogenetics to expand knowledge of regional HIV transmission patterns

    PubMed Central

    Lubelchek, Ronald J.; Hoehnen, Sarah C.; Hotton, Anna L.; Kincaid, Stacey L.; Barker, David E.; French, Audrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction HIV transmission cluster analyses can inform HIV prevention efforts. We describe the first such assessment for transmission clustering among HIV patients in Chicago. Methods We performed transmission cluster analyses using HIV pol sequences from newly diagnosed patients presenting to Chicago’s largest HIV clinic between 2008 and 2011. We compared sequences via progressive pairwise alignment, using neighbor joining to construct an un-rooted phylogenetic tree. We defined clusters as >2 sequences among which each sequence had at least one partner within a genetic distance of ≤ 1.5%. We used multivariable regression to examine factors associated with clustering and used geospatial analysis to assess geographic proximity of phylogenetically clustered patients. Results We compared sequences from 920 patients; median age 35 years; 75% male; 67% Black, 23% Hispanic; 8% had a Rapid Plasma Reagin (RPR) titer ≥ 1:16 concurrent with their HIV diagnosis. We had HIV transmission risk data for 54%; 43% identified as men who have sex with men (MSM). Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated 123 patients (13%) grouped into 26 clusters, the largest having 20 members. In multivariable regression, age < 25, Black race, MSM status, male gender, higher HIV viral load, and RPR ≥ 1:16 associated with clustering. We did not observe geographic grouping of genetically clustered patients. Discussion Our results demonstrate high rates of HIV transmission clustering, without local geographic foci, among young Black MSM in Chicago. Applied prospectively, phylogenetic analyses could guide prevention efforts and help break the cycle of transmission. PMID:25321182

  18. Transmission clustering among newly diagnosed HIV patients in Chicago, 2008 to 2011: using phylogenetics to expand knowledge of regional HIV transmission patterns.

    PubMed

    Lubelchek, Ronald J; Hoehnen, Sarah C; Hotton, Anna L; Kincaid, Stacey L; Barker, David E; French, Audrey L

    2015-01-01

    HIV transmission cluster analyses can inform HIV prevention efforts. We describe the first such assessment for transmission clustering among HIV patients in Chicago. We performed transmission cluster analyses using HIV pol sequences from newly diagnosed patients presenting to Chicago's largest HIV clinic between 2008 and 2011. We compared sequences through progressive pairwise alignment, using neighbor joining to construct an unrooted phylogenetic tree. We defined clusters as >2 sequences among which each sequence had at least 1 partner within a genetic distance of ≤1.5%. We used multivariable regression to examine factors associated with clustering and used geospatial analysis to assess geographic proximity of phylogenetically clustered patients. We compared sequences from 920 patients, median age of 35 years, 75% male, 67% black, 23% Hispanic, and 8% had a rapid plasma reagin titer ≥1:16 concurrent with their HIV diagnosis. We had HIV transmission risk data for 54%; 43% identified as men who have sex with men (MSM). Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated 123 patients (13%) grouped into 26 clusters, the largest having 20 members. In multivariable regression, age <25, black race, MSM status, male gender, higher HIV viral load, and rapid plasma reagin ≥1:16 associated with clustering. We did not observe geographic grouping of genetically clustered patients. Our results demonstrate high rates of HIV transmission clustering, without local geographic foci, among young black MSM in Chicago. Applied prospectively, phylogenetic analyses could guide prevention efforts and help break the cycle of transmission.

  19. Role of intestinal mucosal integrity in HIV transmission to infants through breast-feeding: the BAN study.

    PubMed

    Kourtis, Athena P; Ibegbu, Chris C; Wiener, Jeffrey; King, Caroline C; Tegha, Gerald; Kamwendo, Deborah; Kumwenda, Jacob; Kaur, Surinder P; Flax, Valerie; Ellington, Sascha; Kacheche, Zebrone; Kayira, Dumbani; Chasela, Charles; van der Horst, Charles; Jamieson, Denise J

    2013-08-15

    Increased intestinal permeability may be one of the mechanisms of transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to infants through breast-feeding. Intestinal permeability correlates with microbial translocation, which can be measured through quantification of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We evaluated levels of plasma LPS (by the Limulus amebocyte lysate assay) and immune activation markers in serial specimens from infants exposed to but uninfected with HIV and infants infected with HIV from the Breastfeeding, Antiretrovirals, and Nutrition (BAN) study. Plasma LPS levels increased after infants in the BAN study were weaned from the breast, at 24 weeks of age. Cotrimoxazole prophylaxis was associated with higher plasma LPS levels (P = .004). Infants with HIV infection had higher LPS levels, compared with uninfected infants (P = .004). Higher preinfection plasma LPS levels were a significant predictor of infant HIV infection through breast-feeding (hazard ratio = 1.60 for every unit increase in plasma LPS level; P = .01) and of lower infant length-for-age z scores (P = .02). These findings suggest that disruption in intestinal integrity is a mechanism of HIV transmission to infants through breast-feeding. Weaning from breast milk and use of antibiotic prophylaxis was associated with increased levels of microbial translocation, which could facilitate HIV entry through the intestine. Complementary approaches to enhance intestinal mucosal integrity in the infant may further reduce breast-feeding transmission of HIV.

  20. Role of Intestinal Mucosal Integrity in HIV Transmission to Infants Through Breast-feeding: The BAN Study

    PubMed Central

    Kourtis, Athena P.; Ibegbu, Chris C.; Wiener, Jeffrey; King, Caroline C.; Tegha, Gerald; Kamwendo, Deborah; Kumwenda, Jacob; Kaur, Surinder P.; Flax, Valerie; Ellington, Sascha; Kacheche, Zebrone; Kayira, Dumbani; Chasela, Charles; van der Horst, Charles; Jamieson, Denise J.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Increased intestinal permeability may be one of the mechanisms of transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to infants through breast-feeding. Intestinal permeability correlates with microbial translocation, which can be measured through quantification of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Methods. We evaluated levels of plasma LPS (by the Limulus amebocyte lysate assay) and immune activation markers in serial specimens from infants exposed to but uninfected with HIV and infants infected with HIV from the Breastfeeding, Antiretrovirals, and Nutrition (BAN) study. Results. Plasma LPS levels increased after infants in the BAN study were weaned from the breast, at 24 weeks of age. Cotrimoxazole prophylaxis was associated with higher plasma LPS levels (P = .004). Infants with HIV infection had higher LPS levels, compared with uninfected infants (P = .004). Higher preinfection plasma LPS levels were a significant predictor of infant HIV infection through breast-feeding (hazard ratio = 1.60 for every unit increase in plasma LPS level; P = .01) and of lower infant length-for-age z scores (P = .02). Conclusions. These findings suggest that disruption in intestinal integrity is a mechanism of HIV transmission to infants through breast-feeding. Weaning from breast milk and use of antibiotic prophylaxis was associated with increased levels of microbial translocation, which could facilitate HIV entry through the intestine. Complementary approaches to enhance intestinal mucosal integrity in the infant may further reduce breast-feeding transmission of HIV. PMID:23687226

  1. α-Defensins in the Prevention of HIV Transmission Among Breastfed Infants

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Louise; Trabattoni, Daria; Kankasa, Chipepo; Semrau, Katherine; Kasonde, Prisca; Lissoni, Francesca; Sinkala, Moses; Ghosh, Mrinal; Vwalika, Cheswa; Aldrovandi, Grace M.; Thea, Donald M.; Clerici, Mario

    2006-01-01

    Summary: α-Defensins have been observed to have anti-HIV activity but have not been investigated in relation to mother-to-child HIV transmission. We measured the concentration of α-defensins in breast milk of HIV-positive mothers and tested whether the concentrations were associated with HIV transmission. A nested case-control study of 32 HIV-positive women who transmitted HIV to their infants and 52 randomly selected HIV-positive women who did not transmit HIV to their infants was conducted in Lusaka, Zambia. α-Defensins were detected in most (79%) of the milk samples tested. Concentrations of α-defensins increased as breast milk HIV RNA quantity increased, and breast milk HIV RNA quantity was, in turn, a strong and significant predictor of HIV transmission. After adjustment for milk HIV RNA quantity, however, α-defensin concentration was significantly associated with a decreased risk of intrapartum and postnatal HIV transmission (odds ratio = 0.3, 95% confidence interval: 0.09-0.93). Our data suggest that there may be a role for α-defensins in prevention of HIV transmission to breastfed infants. PMID:15905728

  2. Nutritional indicators of adverse pregnancy outcomes and mother-to-child transmission of HIV among HIV-infected women2

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Saurabh; Manji, Karim P; Young, Alicia M; Brown, Elizabeth R; Chasela, Charles; Taha, Taha E; Read, Jennifer S; Goldenberg, Robert L; Fawzi, Wafaie W

    2008-01-01

    Background Poor nutrition may be associated with mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV and other adverse pregnancy outcomes. Objective The objective was to examine the relation of nutritional indicators with adverse pregnancy outcomes among HIV-infected women in Tanzania, Zambia, and Malawi. Design Body mass index (BMI; in kg/m2) and hemoglobin concentrations at enrollment and weight change during pregnancy were prospectively related to fetal loss, neonatal death, low birth weight, preterm birth, and MTCT of HIV. Results In a multivariate analysis, having a BMI < 21.8 was significantly associated with preterm birth [odds ratio (OR): 1.82; 95% CI: 1.34, 2.46] and low birth weight (OR: 2.09; 95% CI: 1.41, 3.08). A U-shaped relation between weight change during pregnancy and preterm birth was observed. Severe anemia was significantly associated with fetal loss or stillbirth (OR: 3.67; 95% CI: 1.16, 11.66), preterm birth (OR: 2.08; 95% CI: 1.39, 3.10), low birth weight (OR: 1.76; 95% CI: 1.07, 2.90), and MTCT of HIV by the time of birth (OR: 2.26; 95% CI: 1.18, 4.34) and by 4−6 wk among those negative at birth (OR: 2.33; 95% CI: 1.15, 4.73). Conclusions Anemia, poor weight gain during pregnancy, and low BMI in HIV-infected pregnant women are associated with increased risks of adverse infant outcomes and MTCT of HIV. Interventions that reduce the risk of wasting or anemia during pregnancy should be evaluated to determine their possible effect on the incidence of adverse pregnancy outcomes and MTCT of HIV. PMID:18541551

  3. Control of sexually transmitted infections and prevention of HIV transmission: mending a fractured paradigm.

    PubMed

    Steen, Richard; Wi, Teodora Elvira; Kamali, Anatoli; Ndowa, Francis

    2009-11-01

    Control of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) is feasible, leads to improved sexual and reproductive health and contributes to preventing HIV transmission. The most advanced HIV epidemics have developed under conditions of poor STI control, particularly where ulcerative STIs were prevalent. Several countries that have successfully controlled STIs have documented stabilization or reversal of their HIV epidemics. STI control is a public health outcome measured by reduced incidence and prevalence. The means to achieve this include: (i) targeting and outreach to populations at greatest risk; (ii) promoting and providing condoms and other means of prevention; (iii) effective clinical interventions; (iv) an enabling environment; and (v) reliable data. Clinical services include STI case management, screening and management of STIs in sex partners. Syndromic case management is effective for most symptomatic curable STIs and screening strategies exist to detect some asymptomatic infections. Presumptive epidemiologic treatment of sex partners and sex workers complement efforts to interrupt transmission and reduce prevalence. Clinical services alone are insufficient for control since many people with STIs do not attend clinics. Outreach and peer education have been effectively used to reach such populations. STI control requires effective interventions with core populations whose rates of partner change are high enough to sustain transmission. Effective, appropriate targeting is thus necessary and often sufficient to reduce prevalence in the general population. Such efforts are most effective when combined with structural interventions to ensure an enabling environment for prevention. Reliable surveillance and related data are critical for designing and evaluating interventions and for assessing control efforts.

  4. Antiretroviral Therapy for the Prevention of HIV-1 Transmission.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Myron S; Chen, Ying Q; McCauley, Marybeth; Gamble, Theresa; Hosseinipour, Mina C; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Hakim, James G; Kumwenda, Johnstone; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Pilotto, Jose H S; Godbole, Sheela V; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Santos, Breno R; Mayer, Kenneth H; Hoffman, Irving F; Eshleman, Susan H; Piwowar-Manning, Estelle; Cottle, Leslie; Zhang, Xinyi C; Makhema, Joseph; Mills, Lisa A; Panchia, Ravindre; Faesen, Sharlaa; Eron, Joseph; Gallant, Joel; Havlir, Diane; Swindells, Susan; Elharrar, Vanessa; Burns, David; Taha, Taha E; Nielsen-Saines, Karin; Celentano, David D; Essex, Max; Hudelson, Sarah E; Redd, Andrew D; Fleming, Thomas R

    2016-09-01

    An interim analysis of data from the HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) 052 trial showed that antiretroviral therapy (ART) prevented more than 96% of genetically linked infections caused by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in serodiscordant couples. ART was then offered to all patients with HIV-1 infection (index participants). The study included more than 5 years of follow-up to assess the durability of such therapy for the prevention of HIV-1 transmission. We randomly assigned 1763 index participants to receive either early or delayed ART. In the early-ART group, 886 participants started therapy at enrollment (CD4+ count, 350 to 550 cells per cubic millimeter). In the delayed-ART group, 877 participants started therapy after two consecutive CD4+ counts fell below 250 cells per cubic millimeter or if an illness indicative of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (i.e., an AIDS-defining illness) developed. The primary study end point was the diagnosis of genetically linked HIV-1 infection in the previously HIV-1-negative partner in an intention-to-treat analysis. Index participants were followed for 10,031 person-years; partners were followed for 8509 person-years. Among partners, 78 HIV-1 infections were observed during the trial (annual incidence, 0.9%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.7 to 1.1). Viral-linkage status was determined for 72 (92%) of the partner infections. Of these infections, 46 were linked (3 in the early-ART group and 43 in the delayed-ART group; incidence, 0.5%; 95% CI, 0.4 to 0.7) and 26 were unlinked (14 in the early-ART group and 12 in the delayed-ART group; incidence, 0.3%; 95% CI, 0.2 to 0.4). Early ART was associated with a 93% lower risk of linked partner infection than was delayed ART (hazard ratio, 0.07; 95% CI, 0.02 to 0.22). No linked infections were observed when HIV-1 infection was stably suppressed by ART in the index participant. The early initiation of ART led to a sustained decrease in genetically linked HIV-1

  5. Antiretroviral Therapy for the Prevention of HIV-1 Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Myron S.; Chen, Ying Q.; McCauley, Marybeth; Gamble, Theresa; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Hakim, James G.; Kumwenda, Johnstone; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Pilotto, Jose H.S.; Godbole, Sheela V.; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Santos, Breno R.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Hoffman, Irving F.; Eshleman, Susan H.; Piwowar-Manning, Estelle; Cottle, Leslie; Zhang, Xinyi C.; Makhema, Joseph; Mills, Lisa A.; Panchia, Ravindre; Faesen, Sharlaa; Eron, Joseph; Gallant, Joel; Havlir, Diane; Swindells, Susan; Elharrar, Vanessa; Burns, David; Taha, Taha E.; Nielsen-Saines, Karin; Celentano, David D.; Essex, Max; Hudelson, Sarah E.; Redd, Andrew D.; Fleming, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND An interim analysis of data from the HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) 052 trial showed that antiretroviral therapy (ART) prevented more than 96% of genetically linked infections caused by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in serodiscordant couples. ART was then offered to all patients with HIV-1 infection (index participants). The study included more than 5 years of follow-up to assess the durability of such therapy for the prevention of HIV-1 transmission. METHODS We randomly assigned 1763 index participants to receive either early or delayed ART. In the early-ART group, 886 participants started therapy at enrollment (CD4+ count, 350 to 550 cells per cubic millimeter). In the delayed-ART group, 877 participants started therapy after two consecutive CD4+ counts fell below 250 cells per cubic millimeter or if an illness indicative of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (i.e., an AIDS-defining illness) developed. The primary study end point was the diagnosis of genetically linked HIV-1 infection in the previously HIV-1– negative partner in an intention-to-treat analysis. RESULTS Index participants were followed for 10,031 person-years; partners were followed for 8509 person-years. Among partners, 78 HIV-1 infections were observed during the trial (annual incidence, 0.9%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.7 to 1.1). Viral-linkage status was determined for 72 (92%) of the partner infections. Of these infections, 46 were linked (3 in the early-ART group and 43 in the delayed-ART group; incidence, 0.5%; 95% CI, 0.4 to 0.7) and 26 were unlinked (14 in the early-ART group and 12 in the delayed-ART group; incidence, 0.3%; 95% CI, 0.2 to 0.4). Early ART was associated with a 93% lower risk of linked partner infection than was delayed ART (hazard ratio, 0.07; 95% CI, 0.02 to 0.22). No linked infections were observed when HIV-1 infection was stably suppressed by ART in the index participant. CONCLUSIONS The early initiation of ART led to a sustained

  6. Maternal transmission of HIV infection: a crime against my child?

    PubMed

    Stanton, Catherine

    2015-05-01

    This paper considers whether section 20 of the Offences Against the Person Act 1861, which has been used to prosecute those who transmit the HIV virus in sexual relationships (eg, R v Konzani), could be used to prosecute women (in England and Wales) who transmit the virus to their child during pregnancy, delivery or via breast feeding. The discussion concludes that prosecution for transmission in pregnancy/delivery is unlikely. However, it is argued that there might be scope to prosecute the transmission of the virus via breast feeding in the event that there was sufficient evidence. However, this would also be subject to the Crown Prosecution Service deeming such a prosecution to be in the public interest. The paper does not seek to examine the ethical issues involved. However, it acknowledges that this issue is part of a broader debate as to whether, and if so, when, it is appropriate to criminalise the transmission of disease.

  7. Hormonal contraception decreases bacterial vaginosis but oral contraception may increase candidiasis: implications for HIV transmission.

    PubMed

    van de Wijgert, Janneke H H M; Verwijs, Marijn C; Turner, Abigail Norris; Morrison, Charles S

    2013-08-24

    A 2012 WHO consultation concluded that combined oral contraception (COC) does not increase HIV acquisition in women, but the evidence for depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) is conflicting. We evaluated the effect of COC and DMPA use on the vaginal microbiome because current evidence suggests that any deviation from a 'healthy' vaginal microbiome increases women's susceptibility to HIV. We conducted a systematic review and reanalysed the Hormonal Contraception and HIV Acquisition (HC-HIV) study. Vaginal microbiome outcomes included bacterial vaginosis by Nugent scoring, vaginal candidiasis by culture or KOH wet mount and microbiome compositions as characterized by molecular techniques. Our review of 36 eligible studies found that COC and DMPA use reduce bacterial vaginosis by 10-20 and 18-30%, respectively. The HC-HIV data showed that COC and DMPA use also reduce intermediate microbiota (Nugent score of 4-6) by 11% each. In contrast, COC use (but not DMPA use) may increase vaginal candidiasis. Molecular vaginal microbiome studies (n=4) confirm that high oestrogen levels favour a vaginal microbiome composition dominated by 'healthy' Lactobacillus species; the effects of progesterone are less clear and not well studied. DMPA use does not increase HIV risk by increasing bacterial vaginosis or vaginal candidiasis. COC use may predispose for vaginal candidiasis, but is not believed to be associated with increased HIV acquisition. However, the potential role of Candida species, and vaginal microbiome imbalances other than bacterial vaginosis or Candida species, in HIV transmission cannot yet be ruled out. Further in-depth molecular studies are needed.

  8. Human breast milk: is it the best milk to prevent HIV transmission?

    PubMed

    Palma, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    A significant proportion of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV still occurs during breastfeeding in settings where replacement feeding is unsafe and impractical. However, very few babies born to HIV-infected women and breastfed during the first 6 months of life become infected postnatally. The fact that the majority of babies who are breastfed by HIV-infected mothers remain uninfected even after several months of breastfeeding constitutes one of the major enigmas of HIV transmission via breast milk.

  9. Male sex workers: practices, contexts, and vulnerabilities for HIV acquisition and transmission.

    PubMed

    Baral, Stefan David; Friedman, M Reuel; Geibel, Scott; Rebe, Kevin; Bozhinov, Borche; Diouf, Daouda; Sabin, Keith; Holland, Claire E; Chan, Roy; Cáceres, Carlos F

    2015-01-17

    Male sex workers who sell or exchange sex for money or goods encompass a very diverse population across and within countries worldwide. Information characterising their practices, contexts where they live, and their needs is limited, because these individuals are generally included as a subset of larger studies focused on gay men and other men who have sex with men (MSM) or even female sex workers. Male sex workers, irrespective of their sexual orientation, mostly offer sex to men and rarely identify as sex workers, using local or international terms instead. Growing evidence indicates a sustained or increasing burden of HIV among some male sex workers within the context of the slowing global HIV pandemic. Several synergistic facilitators could be potentiating HIV acquisition and transmission among male sex workers, including biological, behavioural, and structural determinants. Criminalisation and intersectional stigmas of same-sex practices, commercial sex, and HIV all augment risk for HIV and sexually transmitted infections among male sex workers and reduce the likelihood of these people accessing essential services. These contexts, taken together with complex sexual networks among male sex workers, define this group as a key population underserved by current HIV prevention, treatment, and care services. Dedicated efforts are needed to make those services available for the sake of both public health and human rights. Evidence-based and human rights-affirming services dedicated specifically to male sex workers are needed to improve health outcomes for these men and the people within their sexual networks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. HIV Transmission Dynamics among Foreign-born Persons in the United States.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Eduardo E; Oster, Alexandra M; Xu, Songli; Wertheim, Joel O; Hernandez, Angela L

    2017-09-07

    In the United States (U.S.), foreign-born persons are disproportionately affected by HIV and differ epidemiologically from U.S.-born persons with diagnosed HIV infection. Understanding HIV transmission dynamics among foreign-born persons is important to guide HIV prevention efforts for these populations. We conducted molecular transmission network analysis to describe HIV transmission dynamics among foreign-born persons with diagnosed HIV. Using HIV-1 polymerase nucleotide sequences reported to the U.S. National HIV Surveillance System for persons with diagnosed HIV infection during 2001-2013, we constructed a genetic distance based transmission network using HIV-TRACE and examined the birth region of potential transmission partners in this network. Of 77,686 people, 12,064 (16%) were foreign-born. Overall, 28% of foreign-born persons linked to at least one other person in the transmission network. Of potential transmission partners, 62% were born in the United States, 31% were born in the same region as the foreign-born person, and 7% were born in another region of the world. The majority of transmission partners of male foreign-born persons (63%) were born in the United States, whereas the majority of transmission partners of female foreign-born (57%) were born in their same world region. These finding suggests that a majority of HIV infections among foreign-born persons in our network occurred after immigrating to the United States. Efforts to prevent HIV infection among foreign-born persons in the U.S. should include information of the transmission networks in which these individuals acquire or transmit HIV in order to develop more targeted HIV prevention interventions.

  11. Preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV in Vietnam and Indonesia: diverging care dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hardon, Anita Petra; Oosterhoff, Pauline; Imelda, Johanna D; Anh, Nguyen Thu; Hidayana, Irwan

    2009-09-01

    How do women and frontline health workers engage in preventing mother-to-child HIV transmission (PMTCT) in urban areas of Vietnam and Indonesia, where HIV is highly stigmatized and is associated with injecting drug use and sex work? This qualitative study explores local dynamics of care, using a mix of observations, focus group discussions, and interviews. In Indonesia the study was conducted in a community-based PMTCT program run by an NGO, while in Vietnam the study explored the care dynamics in routine PMTCT services, implemented by district and provincial public health facilities. In both of these PMTCT arrangements (the routine provider initiated approach in Vietnam and a more client-oriented system in Indonesia), pregnant women value the provision of HIV tests in antenatal care (ANC). Concerns are raised, however, by the unhappy few who test positive. These women are unsatisfied with the quality of counselling, and the failure to provide antiretroviral treatments. Acceptability of HIV testing in ANC is high, but the key policy issue from the perspective of pregnant women is whether the PMTCT services can provide good quality counselling and the necessary follow-up care. We find local level providers of PMTCT are pleased with the PMTCT program. In Vietnam, the PMTCT program offers health workers protection against HIV, since they can refer women away from the district health service for delivery. In Indonesia, community cadres are pleased with the financial incentives gained by mobilizing clients for the program. We conclude that achieving the global aims of reducing HIV infections in children by 50% requires a tailoring of globally designed public health programs to context-specific gendered transmission pathways of HIV, as well as local opportunities for follow-up care and social support.

  12. [The homosexual transmission of HIV/AIDS in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Izazola-Licea, J A; Avila-Figueroa, R C; Gortmaker, S L; del Río-Chiriboga, C

    1995-01-01

    To analyze HIV homosexual transmission in Mexico, epidemic trends and biological and social risk factors. This analysis is based on 19,090 notifications of AIDS cases and on a review of two previous studies that include 3,029 behavioral interviews (together with HIV serological screening tests) carried out at the Information Center of the Mexican Council for Control and Prevention of AIDS (CONASIDA) (1988-89) and during a 1988 study in six Mexican cities. Cities were included because they were the larger in the country and/or because they were the larger in the country and/or because they were touristic places (Mexico City, Guadalajara, Monterrey, Acapulco, Tijuana and Merida). Logistic regressions were used to estimate the odds ratios for HIV seropositivity and for condom use. Seventy-two percent of the total reported AIDS cases (19,090) up to June 30, 1994, were associated with male homosexual behaviors. In absolute numbers, cases under this category exhibited a rising trend until the end of 1993. HIV seroprevalence was 31% in 2,314 men with homosexual practices who attended "FLORA", the AIDS Information Center in Mexico, from January 1988 to June 30, 1989. The main predictive variables for seropositivity were exclusive homosexual behavior, more than 40 lifetime sexual partners, mixed sexual behavior (both insertive and receptive and intercourse), sex with a person with AIDS, history of syphilis, and anal or genital warts. In general, these risk factors (data from the Information Center) are similar to those found in the six Mexican cities study. There were significant differences in HIV prevalence among the high-risk city samples (the highest in Mexico City with 25% and the lowest in Monterrey with 2.4%). Reported condom use was very low in both studies: only 5% used a condom in all of their sexual relationships. A statistically significant protective effect for HIV infection was found only for those who reported using a condom in all sexual encounters. In the

  13. [Mechanisms of resistance to sexual transmission of HIV-1].

    PubMed

    Eberhard, A; Ponceau, B; Biron, F; Verrier, B

    2005-11-01

    Sexual transmission is the most common pathway for HIV-1; nevertheless some individuals remain seronegative despite repeated high risk sexual exposure. These were grouped in cohorts of "highly exposed but persistently seronegative" individuals, mostly prostitutes and flailing couples. Three lines of defence were observed in these cohorts. The first one is the mucosal barrier, the determining factors of which are the type of epithelium (monolayer or multilayer), epithelial integrity, and the pre-existing microflora. The second one is linked to innate immunity directly related to the genetic and/or immune predispositions of the individual: mutations affecting the CCR5 chemokine receptor, secretion of protective soluble factors, and particular HLA alleles. The third one is acquired immunity via the mechanisms of humoral and/or specific cellular immunity. These studies suggest anti HIV-1 vaccinal strategies aiming at a local immunization combining the different types of responses observed in these individuals.

  14. Alcohol’s Role in HIV Transmission and Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Pandrea, Ivona; Happel, Kyle I.; Amedee, Angela M.; Bagby, Gregory J.; Nelson, Steve

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol use has negative effects on HIV disease progression through several mechanisms, including transmission, viral replication, host immunity, and treatment efficacy. Research with animal models has explored the effect of alcohol intake on several aspects of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) disease progression. Data suggest that the increased SIV levels observed in alcohol-consuming animals may represent an increase in virus production as opposed to a decrease in host defense. Results also suggest that changes in nutritional balance and metabolism, as a possible consequence of a proinflammatory state, together with increased virus production in animals consuming alcohol, accelerate SIV and possibly HIV disease progression. Further studies using the animal model are necessary. PMID:23584062

  15. Effects of postnatal interventions for the reduction of vertical HIV transmission on infant growth and non-HIV infections: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Zunza, Moleen; Mercer, Gareth D; Thabane, Lehana; Esser, Monika; Cotton, Mark F

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Guidelines in resource-poor settings have progressively included interventions to reduce postnatal HIV transmission through breast milk. In addition to HIV-free survival, infant growth and non-HIV infections should be considered. Determining the effect of these interventions on infant growth and non-HIV infections will inform healthcare decisions about feeding HIV-exposed infants. We synthesize findings from studies comparing breast to formula feeding, early weaning to standard-duration breastfeeding, breastfeeding with extended antiretroviral (ARV) to short-course ARV prophylaxis, and alternative preparations of infant formula to standard formula in HIV-exposed infants, focusing on infant growth and non-HIV infectious morbidity outcomes. The review objectives were to collate and appraise evidence of interventions to reduce postnatal vertical HIV transmission, and to estimate their effect on growth and non-HIV infections from birth to two years of age among HIV-exposed infants. Methods We searched PubMed, SCOPUS, and Cochrane CENTRAL Controlled Trials Register. We included randomized trials and prospective cohort studies. Two authors independently extracted data and evaluated risk of bias. Rate ratios and mean differences were used as effect measures for dichotomous and continuous outcomes, respectively. Where pooling was possible, we used fixed-effects meta-analysis to pool results across studies. Quality of evidence was assessed using the GRADE approach. Results and discussion Prospective cohort studies comparing breast- versus formula-fed HIV-exposed infants found breastfeeding to be protective against diarrhoea in early life [risk ratio (RR)=0.31; 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.13 to 0.74]. The effect of breastfeeding against diarrhoea [hazard ratio (HR)=0.74; 95% CI=0.57 to 0.97] and respiratory infections (HR=0.65; 95% CI=0.41 to 1.00) was significant through two years of age. The only randomized controlled trial (RCT) available showed that

  16. Effects of patient load and travel distance on HIV transmission in rural China: Implications for treatment as prevention.

    PubMed

    Smith, M Kumi; Miller, William C; Liu, Huixin; Ning, Chuanyi; He, Wensheng; Cohen, Myron S; Wang, Ning

    2017-01-01

    Sustained viral suppression through ART reduces sexual HIV transmission risk, but may require routine access to reliable and effective medical care which may be difficult to obtain in resource constrained areas. We investigated the roles of patient load and travel distance to HIV care clinic on transmission risk in HIV serodiscordant couples in Henan Province, China. Cox proportional hazard models were used to compare HIV transmission events across couples living near, medium, or farther distances from their assigned HIV care clinics, as well as those attending clinics where clinicians bore high versus low patient loads. Most (84·4%) of the 3695 serodiscordant couples lived within 10 kilometers of their assigned HIV clinic, and most (73·5%) attended clinics with patient-to-provider ratios of at least 100:1. In adjusted Cox models, attending clinics where clinicians bore average patient loads of 100 or more elevated HIV transmission risk (aHR, 1·50, 95% CI, 1·00-4·84), an effect amplified in village tier clinics (aHR = 1·55; 95% CI, 1·23-6·78). Travel distance was associated with HIV transmission only after stratification; traveling medium distances to village clinics (5-10km) increased transmission risk (aHR = 1·83, 95% CI, 1·04-3·21) whereas traveling longer distances to township or county level clinics lowered transmission risk (aHR = 0·10, 95% CI, 0·01-0·75). Higher patient loads at HIV clinics was associated with risk of HIV transmission in our population, particularly at village level clinics. Farther travel distance had divergent effects based on clinic tier, suggesting unique mechanisms operating across levels of resource availability. The resource intensity of long-term HIV treatment may place significant strains on small rural clinics, for which investments in additional support staff or time-saving tools such as point-of-care laboratory testing may bring about impactful change in treatment outcomes.

  17. Strategies to prevent HIV transmission among heterosexual African-American women

    PubMed Central

    Essien, E James; Meshack, Angela F; Peters, Ronald J; Ogungbade, GO; Osemene, Nora I

    2005-01-01

    Background African-American women are disproportionately affected by HIV, accounting for 60% of all cases among women in the United States. Although their race is not a precursor for HIV, the socioeconomic and cultural disparities associated with being African American may increase their risk of infection. Prior research has shown that interventions designed to reduce HIV infection among African-American women must address the life demands and social problems they encounter. The present study used a qualitative exploratory design to elicit information about strategies to prevent HIV transmission among young, low-income African-American women. Methods Twenty five low income African American women, ages 18–29, participated in five focus groups of five women each conducted at a housing project in Houston, Texas, a large demographically diverse metropolitan area that is regarded as one of the HIV/AIDS epicenters in the United States. Each group was audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed using theme and domain analysis. Results The participants revealed that they had most frequently placed themselves at risk for HIV infection through drugs and drinking and they also reported drug and alcohol use as important barriers to practicing safer sex. The women also reported that the need for money and having sex for money to buy food or drugs had placed them at risk for HIV transmission. About one-third of the participants stated that a barrier to their practicing safe sex was their belief that there was no risk based on their being in a monogamous relationship and feeling no need to use protection, but later learning that their mate was unfaithful. Other reasons given were lack of concern, being unprepared, partner's refusal to use a condom, and lack of money to buy condoms. Finally, the women stated that they were motivated to practice safe sex because of fear of contracting sexually transmitted diseases and HIV, desire not to become pregnant, and personal experience with

  18. Role of sexual transmission of HIV among young noninjection and injection opiate users: a respondent-driven sampling study.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Liu, Hongjie; Li, Jianhua; Luo, Jian; Jarlais, Don Des; Koram, Nana

    2011-12-01

    Sexual transmissibility of HIV among young drug users in China has been investigated in few studies. The objective of this study was to examine the role of sexual transmission on HIV infection among injection drug users (IDUs) and noninjection drug users (NIDUs). Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) was used to recruit 426 young heroin/opium drug users in Yunnan, China. Logistic regression modeling was performed to examine interrelationships among risky sexual behaviors, drug-use modes, and drug-use practices. Substantial proportions of NIDUs and IDUs reported engagement in risky sexual behaviors including: (1) multiple sexual partners (42% of NIDUs vs. 37% of IDUs), (2) concurrent sexual partnerships (48% vs. 46%), (3) commercial sex partners (23% vs. 24%), and sex partners who were NIDUs (14% vs. 17%). Both NIDUs and IDUs reported low levels of condom use with nonregular partners (48% vs. 42%) and regular partner (24% vs. 27%), and having a history of recent methamphetamine use (21% vs. 18%). Compared to IDUs, NIDUs reported having had fewer sex partners who were IDUs, fewer IDU network peers, more NIDU network peers, and having lower levels of HIV knowledge and self-perceived HIV risk. Generalization of the HIV epidemic from high-risk groups to the general population may be driven by risky sexual behavior among drug users. Reducing sexual transmission of HIV among both IDUs and NIDUs is the next major challenge for HIV intervention among drug users in China.

  19. The spectrum of HIV mother-to-child transmission risk.

    PubMed

    Reliquet, Veronique; Winer, Norbert; Chereau, Natacha; Launay, Elise; Lamberet, Aurore; Andre-Garnier, Elisabeth; Raffi, Francois; Brunet, Cecile

    2014-01-01

    With the implementation of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) and prevention of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) we observed dramatic decreases in rates of perinatal MTCT of HIV, 0.3% in France in women with plasma viral load (pVL) <50 c/mL at delivery. We describe a case of MTCT which occurred despite virologic suppression of the mother at delivery, the first case in our centre since 2002. A 26-year-old black woman, Guinea-native, living in France since 2007, was diagnosed with HIV-1 CRF02 in 2008 and lost to follow-up since November 2012 after second delivery (2 female born in March 2009 and October 2012, uninfected). Third pregnancy began in July 2013 and baseline characteristics in September were as follows: week 13 of gestational age (GA), CDC stage A, CD4 317/mm(3), pVL 4.89 log c/mL. cART with abacavir/lamivudine and atazanavir/ritonavir 300/100 mg daily (qd) was introduced. VL decreased to 2.4 log c/mL in 4 weeks and CD4 increased to 456/mm(3). In December, at week 22 of GA, viral rebound at 4.14 log c/mL due to sub-optimal maternal adherence was observed. After counselling, pVL decreased to 1.69 log c/mL in March 2014, at week 35 of GA and 1.3 log c/mL at delivery. As pVL was <400 c/mL at week 36 of GA, vaginal delivery with IV zidovudine was decided. However, because of poor/uncertain maternal adherence to cART, the neonate was treated with a combination of 2 drugs (lamivudine-nevirapine) with the 4-week zidovudine regimen, until the result of delivery pVL. This combination was stopped at day 2 when maternal delivery pVL (22 c/mL) was received and standard oral zidovudine prophylaxis was continued. Infant was tested for HIV infection at baseline (day 3) and found to be HIV-infected (HIV-RNA 60 c/mL) attesting in-utero HIV transmission. On day 15, zidovudine prophylaxis was discontinued and treatment for HIV infection initiated with standard cART according to the French Paediatric Antiretroviral Guidelines. The risk of HIV acquisition is low in

  20. Oligovalent Amyloid-Binding Agents Reduce SEVI-Mediated Enhancement of HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Capule, Christina C.; Brown, Caitlin; Olsen, Joanna S.; Dewhurst, Stephen; Yang, Jerry

    2012-01-01

    This paper evaluates the use of oligovalent amyloid-binding molecules as potential agents that can reduce the enhancement of HIV-1 infection in cells by SEVI fibrils. These naturally occurring amyloid fibrils found in semen have been implicated as mediators that can facilitate the attachment and internalization of HIV-1 virions to immune cells. Molecules that are capable of reducing the role of SEVI in HIV-1 infection may, therefore, represent a novel strategy to reduce the rate of sexual transmission of HIV-1 in humans. Here, we evaluated a set of synthetic, oligovalent derivatives of BTA (a known amyloid-binding molecule) for their capability to bind cooperatively to aggregated amyloid peptides and to neutralize the effects of SEVI in HIV-1 infection. We demonstrate that these BTA derivatives exhibit a general trend of increased binding to aggregated amyloids as a function of increasing valence number of the oligomer. Importantly, we find that oligomers of BTA show improved capability to reduce SEVI-mediated infection of HIV-1 in cells compared to a BTA monomer, with the pentamer exhibiting a 65-fold improvement in efficacy compared to a previously reported monomeric BTA derivative. These results, thus, support the use of amyloid-targeting molecules as potential supplements for microbicides to curb the spread of HIV-1 through sexual contact. PMID:22239120

  1. Canadian consensus statement on HIV and its transmission in the context of criminal law

    PubMed Central

    Loutfy, Mona; Tyndall, Mark; Baril, Jean-Guy; Montaner, Julio SG; Kaul, Rupert; Hankins, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A poor appreciation of the science related to HIV contributes to an overly broad use of the criminal law against individuals living with HIV in cases of HIV nondisclosure. METHOD: To promote an evidence-informed application of the law in Canada, a team of six Canadian medical experts on HIV and transmission led the development of a consensus statement on HIV sexual transmission, HIV transmission associated with biting and spitting, and the natural history of HIV infection. The statement is based on a literature review of the most recent and relevant scientific evidence (current as of December 2013) regarding HIV and its transmission. It has been endorsed by >70 additional Canadian HIV experts and the Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease Canada. RESULTS: Scientific and medical evidence clearly indicate that HIV is difficult to transmit during sex. For the purpose of informing the justice system, the per-act possibility of HIV transmission through sex, biting or spitting is described along a continuum from low possibility, to negligible possibility, to no possibility of transmission. This possibility takes into account the impact of factors such as the type of sexual acts, condom use, antiretroviral therapy and viral load. Dramatic advances in HIV therapy have transformed HIV infection into a chronic manageable condition. DISCUSSION: HIV physicians and scientists have a professional and ethical responsibility to assist those in the criminal justice system to understand and interpret the science regarding HIV. This is critical to prevent miscarriage of justice and to remove unnecessary barriers to evidence-based HIV prevention strategies. PMID:25285108

  2. Condom use and perceived risk of HIV transmission among sexually active HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Belcher, Lisa; Sternberg, Maya R; Wolitski, Richard J; Halkitis, Perry; Hoff, Colleen

    2005-02-01

    This study examined the association between HIV transmission risk perception and the sexual risk behaviors of HIV-positive men who have sex with men. Respondents rated the degree of risk of transmitting HIV through insertive anal intercourse and insertive oral sex. We examined (a) the perceived level of HIV transmission risk assigned to each sexual behavior and (b) the association between perceived risk for HIV transmission and condom use during insertive anal intercourse and insertive oral sex. We found for behaviors that have achieved less risk consensus that as transmission risk perception increases, so too does the likelihood of condom use. This study highlights the need for more research in understanding how perceived health risk to others influences protective behaviors.

  3. Intercontinental Dispersal of HIV-1 Subtype B Associated with Transmission among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Naito, Yuki; Raghwani, Jayna; Fearnhill, Esther; Sano, Takako; Kusagawa, Shigeru; Mbisa, Jean L.; Zhang, Hongyi; Matano, Tetsuro; Leigh Brown, Andrew J.; Pybus, Oliver G.; Dunn, David; Kondo, Makiko

    2014-01-01

    HIV lineages and highlights the importance of strengthening HIV monitoring efforts and the need for implementing effective control measures to reduce HIV transmission on a global scale. PMID:24942575

  4. Intercontinental dispersal of HIV-1 subtype B associated with transmission among men who have sex with men in Japan.

    PubMed

    Takebe, Yutaka; Naito, Yuki; Raghwani, Jayna; Fearnhill, Esther; Sano, Takako; Kusagawa, Shigeru; Mbisa, Jean L; Zhang, Hongyi; Matano, Tetsuro; Brown, Andrew J Leigh; Pybus, Oliver G; Dunn, David; Kondo, Makiko

    2014-09-01

    highlights the importance of strengthening HIV monitoring efforts and the need for implementing effective control measures to reduce HIV transmission on a global scale. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Elimination of Mother-To-Child Transmission of HIV Infection: The Drug Resource Enhancement against AIDS and Malnutrition Model

    PubMed Central

    Liotta, Giuseppe; Marazzi, Maria Cristina; Mothibi, Khethimipilo E.; Zimba, Ines; Amangoua, Evelyne E.; Bonje, Esther K.; Bossiky, Bernard N. B.; Robinson, Precious A.; Scarcella, Paola; Musokotwane, Kebby; Palombi, Leonardo; Germano, Paola; Narciso, Pasquale; de Luca, Andrea; Alumando, Elard; Mamary, Sangare H.; Magid, Nurja A.; Guidotti, Giovanni; Mancinelli, Sandro; Orlando, Stefano; Peroni, Marco; Buonomo, Ersilia; Nielsen-Saines, Karin

    2015-01-01

    The Drug Resource Enhancement against AIDS and Malnutrition Program (DREAM) gathered professionals in the field of Elimination of HIV-Mother-To-Child Transmission (EMTCT) in Maputo in 2013 to discuss obstacles and solutions for the elimination of HIV vertical transmission in sub-Saharan Africa. During this workshop, the benefits of administrating combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) to HIV positive women from pregnancy throughout breastfeeding were reviewed. cART is capable of reducing vertical transmission to less than 5% at 24 months of age, as well as maternal mortality and infant mortality in both HIV infected and exposed populations to levels similar to those of uninfected individuals. The challenge for programs targeting eMTCT in developing countries is retention in care and treatment adherence. Both are intrinsically related to the model of care. The drop-out from eMTCT programs before cART initiation ranges from 33%–88% while retention rates at 18–24 months are less than 50%. Comprehensive strategies including peer-to-peer education, social support and laboratory monitoring can reduce refusals to less than 5% and attain retention rates approaching 90%. Several components of the model of care for reduction of HIV-1 MTCT are feasible and implementable in scale-up strategies. A review of this model of care for HIV eMTCT is provided. PMID:26506365

  6. Elimination of Mother-To-Child Transmission of HIV Infection: The Drug Resource Enhancement against AIDS and Malnutrition Model.

    PubMed

    Liotta, Giuseppe; Marazzi, Maria Cristina; Mothibi, Khethimipilo E; Zimba, Ines; Amangoua, Evelyne E; Bonje, Esther K; Bossiky, Bernard N B; Robinson, Precious A; Scarcella, Paola; Musokotwane, Kebby; Palombi, Leonardo; Germano, Paola; Narciso, Pasquale; de Luca, Andrea; Alumando, Elard; Mamary, Sangare H; Magid, Nurja A; Guidotti, Giovanni; Mancinelli, Sandro; Orlando, Stefano; Peroni, Marco; Buonomo, Ersilia; Nielsen-Saines, Karin

    2015-10-21

    The Drug Resource Enhancement against AIDS and Malnutrition Program (DREAM) gathered professionals in the field of Elimination of HIV-Mother-To-Child Transmission (EMTCT) in Maputo in 2013 to discuss obstacles and solutions for the elimination of HIV vertical transmission in sub-Saharan Africa. During this workshop, the benefits of administrating combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) to HIV positive women from pregnancy throughout breastfeeding were reviewed. cART is capable of reducing vertical transmission to less than 5% at 24 months of age, as well as maternal mortality and infant mortality in both HIV infected and exposed populations to levels similar to those of uninfected individuals. The challenge for programs targeting eMTCT in developing countries is retention in care and treatment adherence. Both are intrinsically related to the model of care. The drop-out from eMTCT programs before cART initiation ranges from 33%-88% while retention rates at 18-24 months are less than 50%. Comprehensive strategies including peer-to-peer education, social support and laboratory monitoring can reduce refusals to less than 5% and attain retention rates approaching 90%. Several components of the model of care for reduction of HIV-1 MTCT are feasible and implementable in scale-up strategies. A review of this model of care for HIV eMTCT is provided.

  7. Factors affecting sexual transmission of HIV-1: current evidence and implications for prevention.

    PubMed

    Chan, Derek J

    2005-07-01

    The predominant mode of HIV-1 transmission globally is from sexual practices. The risk of HIV-1 transmission by sexual means is a function of infectivity, susceptibility and mode of transmission (type of sexual practice). In addition, transmission may be significantly increased or decreased by factors relating to the HIV-1 per se, sexual behaviour, other sexually transmissible infections (STIs), antiretroviral therapy (ART), spermicidal microbicides and HIV-1 vaccines, the host immune system, genital anatomy and nutritional deficiencies. Current research into the factors affecting sexual transmission of HIV-1 appears to benefit developed nations more than developing nations because of structured public health systems and the capacity to translate research findings into prevention strategies. A redistribution of global aid funding would do much to alleviate the pandemic in developed countries.

  8. Vaginal Microbiota and Sexually Transmitted Infections That May Influence Transmission of Cell-Associated HIV

    PubMed Central

    Cone, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Vaginal microbiota and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are likely to influence the transmission of cell-associated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Lactic acid produced by Lactobacillus-dominated microbiota (Nugent score 0–3) will likely inhibit transmission, especially female-to-male transmission. In contrast, polymicrobial microbiota (Nugent score 4–10), community state types IV-A and IV-B, and STIs will likely increase transmission of cell-associated HIV. PMID:25414415

  9. Assessing the Role of Masculinity in the Transmission of HIV: A Systematic Review to Inform HIV Risk Reduction Counseling Interventions for MSM

    PubMed Central

    Zeglin, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    HIV affects over 1.2 million people in the United States; a substantial number are men who have sex with men (MSM). Despite an abundance of literature evaluating numerous social/structural and individual risk factors associated with HIV for this population, relatively little is known regarding the individual-level role of masculinity in community-level HIV transmission risk. To address this gap, the current analysis systematically reviewed the masculinity and HIV literature for MSM. The findings of 31 sources were included. Seven themes were identified: 1) Number of partners, 2) Attitudes toward condoms, 3) Drug use, 4) Sexual positioning, 5) Condom decision-making, 6) Attitudes toward testing, and 7) Treatment compliance. These factors, representing the enactment of masculine norms, potentiate the spread of HIV. The current article aligns these factors into a Masculinity Model of Community HIV Transmission. Opportunities for counseling interventions include identifying how masculinity informs a client’s cognitions, emotions, and behaviors as well as adapting gender transformative interventions to help create new conceptualizations of masculinity for MSM clients. This approach could reduce community-level HIV incidence. PMID:25917411

  10. Assessing the role of masculinity in the transmission of HIV: a systematic review to inform HIV risk reduction counseling interventions for men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Zeglin, Robert J

    2015-10-01

    HIV affects over 1.2 million people in the United States; a substantial number are men who have sex with men (MSM). Despite an abundance of literature evaluating numerous social/structural and individual risk factors associated with HIV for this population, relatively little is known regarding the individual-level role of masculinity in community-level HIV transmission risk. To address this gap, the current analysis systematically reviewed the masculinity and HIV literature for MSM. The findings of 31 sources were included. Seven themes were identified: (1) number of partners, (2) attitudes toward condoms, (3) drug use, (4) sexual positioning, (5) condom decision-making, (6) attitudes toward testing, and (7) treatment compliance. These factors, representing the enactment of masculine norms, potentiate the spread of HIV. The current article aligns these factors into a masculinity model of community HIV transmission. Opportunities for counseling interventions include identifying how masculinity informs a client's cognitions, emotions, and behaviors as well as adapting gender-transformative interventions to help create new conceptualizations of masculinity for MSM clients. This approach could reduce community-level HIV incidence.

  11. Injection drug use and HIV/AIDS transmission in China.

    PubMed

    Chu, Tian Xin; Levy, Judith A

    2005-01-01

    After nearly three decades of being virtually drug free, use of heroin and other illicit drugs has re-emerged in China as a major public health problem. One result is that drug abuse, particularly heroin injection, has come to play a predominant role in fueling China's AIDS epidemic. The first outbreak of HIV among China's IDUs was reported in the border area of Yunnan province between China and Myanmar where drug trafficking is heavy. Since then drug-related HIV has spread to all 31 provinces, autonomous regions and municipalities. This paper provides an overview to HIV/AIDS transmission through injection drug use in China. It begins with a brief history of the illicit drug trade in China, followed by a discussion of the emergence of drug related AIDS, and a profile of drug users and their sexual partners who have contracted the virus or who are vulnerable to infection. It ends by summarizing three national strategies being used by China to address both drug use and AIDS as major health threats.

  12. Knowledge of AIDS and HIV transmission among drug users in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Proper knowledge of HIV transmission is not enough for people to adopt protective behaviors, but deficits in this information may increase HIV/AIDS vulnerability. Objective To assess drug users' knowledge of HIV/AIDS and the possible association between knowledge and HIV testing. Methods A Cross-sectional study conducted in 2006/7 with a convenience sample of 295 illicit drug users in Rio de Janeiro, assessing knowledge on AIDS/HIV transmission and its relationship with HIV testing. Information from 108 randomly selected drug users who received an educational intervention using cards illustrating situations potentially associated with HIV transmission were assessed using Multidimensional Scaling (MDS). Results Almost 40% of drug users reported having never used condoms and more than 60% reported not using condoms under the influence of substances. Most drug users (80.6%) correctly answered that condoms make sex safer, but incorrect beliefs are still common (e.g. nearly 44% believed HIV can be transmitted through saliva and 55% reported that HIV infection can be transmitted by sharing toothbrushes), with significant differences between drug users who had and who had not been tested for HIV. MDS showed queries on vaginal/anal sex and sharing syringes/needles were classified in the same set as effective modes of HIV transmission. The event that was further away from this core of properly perceived risks referred to blood donation, perceived as risky. Other items were found to be dispersed, suggesting inchoate beliefs on transmission modes. Conclusions Drug users have an increased HIV infection vulnerability compared to the general population, this specific population expressed relevant doubts about HIV transmission, as well as high levels of risky behavior. Moreover, the findings suggest that possessing inaccurate HIV/AIDS knowledge may be a barrier to timely HIV testing. Interventions should be tailored to such specific characteristics. PMID:21324119

  13. Drugs of abuse and HIV infection/replication: implications for mother-fetus transmission

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2011-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and progression of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) can be modulated by a number of cofactors, including drugs of abuse. Opioids, cocaine, cannabinoids, methamphetamine (METH), alcohol, and other substances of abuse have been implicated as risk factors for HIV infection, as they all have the potential to compromise host immunity and facilitate viral replication. Although epidemiologic evidence regarding the impact of drugs of abuse on HIV disease progression is mixed, in vitro studies as well as studies using in vivo animal models have indicated that drugs of abuse have the ability to enhance HIV infection/replication. Drugs of abuse may also be a risk factor for perinatal transmission of HIV. Because high levels of viral load in maternal blood are associated with increased risk of HIV vertical transmission, it is likely that drugs of abuse play an important role in promoting mother-fetus transmission. Furthermore, because the neonatal immune system differs qualitatively from the adult system, it is possible that maternal exposure to drugs of abuse would exacerbate neonatal immunity defects, facilitating HIV infection of neonate immune cells and promoting HIV vertical transmission. The availability and use of antiretroviral therapy for women infected with HIV increase, there is an increasing interest in determining the impact of drug abuse on efficacy of AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) -standardized treatment regimens for woman infected with HIV in the context of HIV vertical transmission. PMID:21056582

  14. The Potential Impact of Expanding Antiretroviral Therapy and Combination Prevention in Vietnam: Towards Elimination of HIV Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Granich, Reuben; Bui, Duong D.; Tran, Hoang V.; Nadol, Patrick; Jacka, David; Sabin, Keith; Suthar, Amitabh B.; Mesquita, Fabio; Lo, Ying Ru; Williams, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Background: Few studies have assessed the effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART) to prevent HIV transmission in Asian HIV epidemics. Vietnam has a concentrated HIV epidemic with the highest prevalence among people who inject drugs. We investigated the impact of expanded HIV testing and counseling (HTC) and early ART, combined with other prevention interventions on HIV transmission. Methods: A deterministic mathematical model was developed using HIV prevalence trends in Can Tho province, Vietnam. Scenarios included offering periodic HTC and immediate ART with and without targeting subpopulations and examining combined strategies with methadone maintenance therapy and condom use. Results: From 2011 to 2050, maintaining current interventions will incur an estimated 18,115 new HIV infections and will cost US $22.1 million (reference scenario). Annual HTC and immediate treatment, if offered to all adults, will reduce new HIV infections by 14,513 (80%) and will cost US $76.9 million. Annual HTC and immediate treatment offered only to people who inject drugs will reduce new infections by 13,578 (75%) and will cost only US $23.6 million. Annual HTC and immediate treatment for key populations, combined with scale-up of methadone maintenance therapy and condom use, will reduce new infections by 14,723 (81%) with similar costs (US $22.7 million). This combination prevention scenario will reduce the incidence to less than 1 per 100,000 in 14 years and will result in a relative cost saving after 19 years. Conclusions: Targeted periodic HTC and immediate ART combined with other interventions is cost-effective and could lead to potential elimination of HIV in Can Tho. PMID:23714739

  15. HIV transmission during paediatric health care in sub-Saharan Africa--risks and evidence.

    PubMed

    Gisselquist, David; Potterat, John J; Brody, Stuart

    2004-02-01

    Health care systems in sub-Saharan Africa are challenged not only to improve care for the increasing number of HIV-infected children, but also to prevent transmission of HIV to other children and health care workers through contaminated medical procedures and needlestick accidents. HIV-infected children aged to 1 year typically have high viral loads, making them dangerous reservoirs for iatrogenic transmission. Most vertically infected children experience HIV-related symptoms early, though many survive beyond 5 years. This leads to high HIV prevalence among inpatient and outpatient children. In nine African studies, HIV prevalence in inpatient children ranged from 8.2% to 63%, roughly 1-3 times the prevalence in antenatal women. Investigations of large iatrogenic outbreaks in Russia, Romania, and Libya demonstrate efficient HIV transmission through paediatric health care. Unexplained HIV infections in African children are not rare-studies published through 2003 have recorded more than 300 HIV-infected children with HIV-negative mothers. In addition, several studies have reported much higher HIV prevalence in children 5-14 years old than could be expected from mother-to-child transmission alone. Research is required to determine the extent of iatrogenic HIV infection among African children as well as to identify high-risk procedures and settings. Such research can motivate and direct prevention efforts.

  16. HIV-1 reservoirs in breast milk and challenges to elimination of breast-feeding transmission of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Van de Perre, Philippe; Rubbo, Pierre-Alain; Viljoen, Johannes; Nagot, Nicolas; Tylleskär, Thorkild; Lepage, Philippe; Vendrell, Jean-Pierre; Tuaillon, Edouard

    2012-07-18

    By compensating for the relative immaturity of the neonatal immune system, breast milk and breast-feeding prevent deaths in children. Nevertheless, transmission of HIV-1 through breast-feeding is responsible for more than half of new pediatric HIV infections. Recent studies of possible HIV-1 reservoirs in breast milk shed new light on features that influence HIV-1 transmission through breast-feeding. The particular characteristics of breast milk CD4(+) T cells that distinguish them from circulating blood lymphocytes (high frequency of cell activation and expression of memory and mucosal homing markers) facilitate the establishment of HIV-1 replication. Breast milk also contains a plethora of factors with anti-infectious, immunomodulatory, or anti-inflammatory properties that can regulate both viral replication and infant susceptibility. In addition, CD8(+) T lymphocytes, macrophages, and epithelial cells in breast milk can alter the dynamics of HIV-1 transmission. Even during efficient antiretroviral therapy, a residual stable, CD4(+) T cell-associated reservoir of HIV-1 is persistently present in breast milk, a likely source of infection. Only prophylactic treatment in infants--ideally with a long-acting drug, administered for the entire duration of breast-feeding--is likely to protect HIV-exposed babies against all forms of HIV transmission from breast milk, including cell-to-cell viral transfer.

  17. Identification of major routes of HIV transmission throughout Mesoamerica.

    PubMed

    Chaillon, Antoine; Avila-Ríos, Santiago; Wertheim, Joel O; Dennis, Ann; García-Morales, Claudia; Tapia-Trejo, Daniela; Mejía-Villatoro, Carlos; Pascale, Juan M; Porras-Cortés, Guillermo; Quant-Durán, Carlos J; Lorenzana, Ivette; Meza, Rita I; Palou, Elsa Y; Manzanero, Marvin; Cedillos, Rolando A; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo; Mehta, Sanjay R

    2017-06-20

    Migration and travel are major drivers of the spread of infectious diseases. Geographic proximity and a common language facilitate travel and migration in Mesoamerica, which in turn could affect the spread of HIV in the region. 6092 HIV-1 subtype B partial pol sequences sampled from unique antiretroviral treatment-naïve individuals from Mexico (40.7%), Guatemala (24.4%), Honduras (19%), Panama (8.2%), Nicaragua (5.5%), Belize (1.4%), and El Salvador (0.7%) between 2011 and 2016 were included. Phylogenetic and genetic network analyses were performed to infer putative relationships between HIV sequences. The demographic and geographic associations with clustering were analyzed and viral migration patterns were inferred using the Slatkin-Maddison approach on 100 iterations of random subsets of equal number of sequences per location. A total of 1685/6088 (27.7%) of sequences linked with at least one other sequence, forming 603 putative transmission clusters (range: 2-89 individuals). Clustering individuals were significantly more likely to be younger (median age 29 vs 33years, p<0.01) and men-who-have-sex-with-men (40.4% vs 30.3%, p<0.01). Of the 603 clusters, 30 (5%) included sequences from multiple countries with commonly observed linkages between Mexican and Honduran sequences. Eight of the 603 clusters included >10 individuals, including two comprised exclusively of Guatemalans (52 and 89 individuals). Phylogenetic and migration analyses suggested that the Central and Southern regions of Mexico along with Belize were major sources of HIV throughout the region (p<0.01) with genetic flow southward from Mexico to the other nations of Mesoamerica. We also found evidence of significant viral migration within Mexico. International clusters were infrequent, suggesting moderate migration between HIV epidemics of the different Mesoamerican countries. Nevertheless, we observed important sources of transnational HIV spread in the region, including Southern and Central Mexico

  18. High Concentrations of Interleukin 15 in Breast Milk Are Associated with Protection against Postnatal HIV Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Jan; Ghosh, Mrinal K.; Kuhn, Louise; Semrau, Katherine; Sinkala, Moses; Kankasa, Chipepo; Thea, Donald M.; Aldrovandi, Grace M.

    2009-01-01

    Given the central role that interleukin 15 (IL-15) plays in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) immunity, we hypothesized that IL-15 in breast milk may protect against postnatal HIV transmission. In a nested case-control study, we compared breast milk IL-15 levels in 22 HIV-infected women who transmitted HIV to their infants to those in 72 nontransmitters. Samples were collected in the first month of life, prior to HIV infection. IL-15 concentrations were associated with a decreased risk of HIV transmission in unadjusted analysis and after adjusting for milk viral load, CD4 cell count, and other cytokines in breast milk. IL-15–mediated immunity may protect against HIV transmission during breast-feeding. PMID:19835475

  19. High concentrations of interleukin 15 in breast milk are associated with protection against postnatal HIV transmission.

    PubMed

    Walter, Jan; Ghosh, Mrinal K; Kuhn, Louise; Semrau, Katherine; Sinkala, Moses; Kankasa, Chipepo; Thea, Donald M; Aldrovandi, Grace M

    2009-11-15

    Given the central role that interleukin 15 (IL-15) plays in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) immunity, we hypothesized that IL-15 in breast milk may protect against postnatal HIV transmission. In a nested case-control study, we compared breast milk IL-15 levels in 22 HIV-infected women who transmitted HIV to their infants to those in 72 nontransmitters. Samples were collected in the first month of life, prior to HIV infection. IL-15 concentrations were associated with a decreased risk of HIV transmission in unadjusted analysis and after adjusting for milk viral load, CD4 cell count, and other cytokines in breast milk. IL-15-mediated immunity may protect against HIV transmission during breast-feeding.

  20. Effectiveness of prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission programmes in Kilimanjaro region, northern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Mwendo, Emanuel M; Mtuy, Tara B; Renju, Jenny; Rutherford, George W; Nondi, Joseph; Sichalwe, Aifello W; Todd, Jim

    2014-03-01

    To monitor the effectiveness of the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) components in reducing mother-to-child transmission of HIV in Kilimanjaro region, Tanzania. We conducted a retrospective registry-based cohort study of HIV-exposed children aged 4 weeks to 18 months. Eligible children had a DNA polymerase chain reaction HIV antigen test between January 2009 and August 2012. We collected and analysed the data on the PMTCT components provided. We used logistic regression to explore factors associated with successful PMTCT usage and with infant infection. We studied 561 children; 283 (50.5%) were from rural areas. Breastfeeding was reported by 519 (92.5%) of mothers. In 469 (83.6%) mother-baby pairs, both received chemoprophylaxis, whereas in 9 (1.6%) pairs, neither mother nor baby received any chemoprophylaxis. Of the 522 (93.0%) infants with known outcomes at 6 months, 227 (43.5%) were alive, 258 (49.4%) were lost to follow-up, 34 (6.5%) had transferred and 3 (0.6%) had died. A total of 54 (9.6%) children were infected. Transmission rates of HIV when only the mother (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.49, 95% CI: 0.47-4.77) or only the baby (aOR 1.06, 95% CI: 0.23-5.01) received chemoprophylaxis were not significantly different from transmission rates when both mother and baby received antiretroviral chemoprophylaxis. Mixed feeding practices were not associated with significantly increased risk (aOR 4.09, 95% CI: 0.58-28.76) compared with exclusive breastfeeding. This study showed that rate of MTCT of HIV was 9.6% in Tanzania between 2009 and 2012. The intrapartum and child chemoprophylaxis components of the PMTCT programme were well implemented with 84% of both mothers and their babies getting full chemoprophylaxis, and effective in reducing mother-to-child transmission. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Deciphering Multiplicity of HIV-1C Infection: Transmission of Closely Related Multiple Viral Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Novitsky, Vlad; Moyo, Sikhulile; Wang, Rui; Gaseitsiwe, Simani; Essex, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background A single viral variant is transmitted in the majority of HIV infections. However, about 20% of heterosexually transmitted HIV infections are caused by multiple viral variants. Detection of transmitted HIV variants is not trivial, as it involves analysis of multiple viral sequences representing intra-host HIV-1 quasispecies. Methodology We distinguish two types of multiple virus transmission in HIV infection: (1) HIV transmission from the same source, and (2) transmission from different sources. Viral sequences representing intra-host quasispecies in a longitudinally sampled cohort of 42 individuals with primary HIV-1C infection in Botswana were generated by single-genome amplification and sequencing and spanned the V1C5 region of HIV-1C env gp120. The Maximum Likelihood phylogeny and distribution of pairwise raw distances were assessed at each sampling time point (n = 217; 42 patients; median 5 (IQR: 4–6) time points per patient, range 2–12 time points per patient). Results Transmission of multiple viral variants from the same source (likely from the partner with established HIV infection) was found in 9 out of 42 individuals (21%; 95 CI 10–37%). HIV super-infection was identified in 2 patients (5%; 95% CI 1–17%) with an estimated rate of 3.9 per 100 person-years. Transmission of multiple viruses combined with HIV super-infection at a later time point was observed in one individual. Conclusions Multiple HIV lineages transmitted from the same source produce a monophyletic clade in the inferred phylogenetic tree. Such a clade has transiently distinct sub-clusters in the early stage of HIV infection, and follows a predictable evolutionary pathway. Over time, the gap between initially distinct viral lineages fills in and initially distinct sub-clusters converge. Identification of cases with transmission of multiple viral lineages from the same source needs to be taken into account in cross-sectional estimation of HIV recency in epidemiological and

  2. The International Dimension of the U.S. HIV Transmission Network and Onward Transmission of HIV Recently Imported into the United States.

    PubMed

    Wertheim, Joel O; Oster, Alexandra M; Hernandez, Angela L; Saduvala, Neeraja; Bañez Ocfemia, M Cheryl; Hall, H Irene

    The majority of HIV infections in the United States can be traced back to a single introduction in late 1960s or early 1970s. However, it remains unclear whether subsequent introductions of HIV into the United States have given rise to onward transmission. Genetic transmission networks can aid in understanding HIV transmission. We constructed a genetic distance-based transmission network using HIV-1 pol sequences reported to the U.S. National HIV Surveillance System (n = 41,539) and all publicly available non-U.S. HIV-1 pol sequences (n = 86,215). Of the 13,145 U.S. persons clustered in the network, 457 (3.5%) were genetically linked to a potential transmission partner outside the United States. For internationally connected persons residing in but born outside the United States, 61% had a connection to their country of birth or to another country that shared a language with their country of birth. Bayesian molecular clock phylogenetic analyses indicate that introduced nonsubtype B infections have resulted in onward transmission within the United States.

  3. Venue-Based Networks May Underpin HCV Transmissions amongst HIV-Infected Gay and Bisexual Men

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Daniel; Raghwani, Jayna; Jacka, Brendan; Sacks-Davis, Rachel; Lamoury, Francois; Down, Ian; Prestage, Garrett; Applegate, Tanya L.; Hellard, Margaret; Sasadeusz, Joe; Dore, Gregory J.; Pybus, Oliver G.; Matthews, Gail V.; Danta, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to investigate the potential influence of venue-based networks on HCV transmission in HIV-positive gay and bisexual men (GBM). Methods This was a prospectively recruited cohort of HIV-infected GBM with recently-acquired HCV infection resident in Melbourne and Sydney. Clinical and demographic data were collected together with blood samples for HCV sequencing. Phylogenies were inferred and clusters of individuals infected with HCV with genetic sequence homology were identified. Venues used for sourcing sexual partners were identified; sourcing partners from the same venue was considered a potential social link. Using the Jaccard similarity coefficient, associations were identified between the network of sites where men sourced sex partners and transmission relationships as defined by phylogenetic clustering. Results Forty individuals were recruited, of whom 62.5% were considered to have sexually- and 37.5% IDU-acquired HCV. Venue use was consistent with men being members of a more sexually adventurous gay community subculture. Six phylogenetically-determined pairs or clusters were identified, comprising fifteen (15/28, 53.6%) individuals. Participants belonging to phylogenetic clusters were observed within the same networks. There was a significant correlation between the network and phylogenetic clustering when both cities were considered simultaneously (p = 0.005), raising the possibility that social connections may be important for HCV transmissions. Conclusions Venue-based network elicitation is a promising approach for elucidating HCV transmissions amongst HIV-infected GBM. Public health approaches targeting individuals and venues prominent within networks may reduce onward HCV transmission. PMID:27584149

  4. HIV rapid testing as a key strategy for prevention of mother-to-child transmission in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Veloso, Valdiléa G; Bastos, Francisco I; Portela, Margareth Crisóstomo; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; João, Esau Custodio; da Silva Pilotto, Jose Henrique; Araújo, Ana Beatriz Busch; Santos, Breno Riegel; da Fonseca, Rosana Campos; Kreitchmann, Regis; Derrico, Monica; Friedman, Ruth Khalili; Cunha, Cynthia B; Morgado, Mariza Gonçalves; Saines, Karin Nielsen; Bryson, Yvonne J

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the feasibility of HIV rapid testing for pregnant women at maternity hospital admission and of subsequent interventions to reduce perinatal HIV transmission. METHODS Study based on a convenience sample of women unaware of their HIV serostatus when they were admitted to delivery in public maternity hospitals in Rio de Janeiro and Porto Alegre, Brazil, between March 2000 and April 2002. Women were counseled and tested using the Determine HIV1/2 Rapid Test. HIV infection was confirmed using the Brazilian algorithm for HIV infection diagnosis. In utero transmission of HIV was determined using HIVDNA-PCR. There were performed descriptive analyses of sociodemographic data, number of previous pregnancies and abortions, number of prenatal care visits, timing of HIV testing, HIV rapid test result, neonatal and mother-to-child transmission interventions, by city studied. RESULTS HIV prevalence in women was 6.5% (N=1,439) in Porto Alegre and 1.3% (N=3.778) in Rio de Janeiro. In Porto Alegre most of women were tested during labor (88.7%), while in Rio de Janeiro most were tested in the postpartum (67.5%). One hundred and forty-four infants were born to 143 HIV-infected women. All newborns but one in each city received at least prophylaxis with oral zidovudine. It was possible to completely avoid newborn exposure to breast milk in 96.8% and 51.1% of the cases in Porto Alegre and Rio de Janeiro, respectively. Injectable intravenous zidovudine was administered during labor to 68.8% and 27.7% newborns in Porto Alegre and Rio de Janeiro, respectively. Among those from whom blood samples were collected within 48 hours of birth, in utero transmission of HIV was confirmed in 4 cases in Rio de Janeiro (4/47) and 6 cases in Porto Alegre (6/79). CONCLUSIONS The strategy proved feasible in maternity hospitals in Rio de Janeiro and Porto Alegre. Efforts must be taken to maximize HIV testing during labor. There is a need of strong social support to provide this

  5. Prevention of perinatal HIV I transmission by protease inhibitor based triple drug antiretroviral therapy versus nevirapine as single dose at the time of delivery.

    PubMed

    Bendle, Meenakshi; Bajpai, Smrati; Choudhary, Ashwini; Pazare, Amar

    2012-12-01

    In India, parent to child transmission is the most important source of HIV infection in children below fifteen years of age. Transmission of HIV from mother to child can occur even at low or undetectable HIV virus levels. CD4 count or HIV RNA levels should not be the determining factor when deciding whether to use antiretroviral drugs for prevention of perinatal transmission of HIV. Use of single dose nevirapine during labour, in prevention of parent to child transmission (PPTCT) programme for pregnant females with CD4 count > 250 cells/cumm has less efficacy in reducing perinatal transmission. And there are high chances of development of nevirapine resistance to both mother and baby after single dose nevirapine exposure. Short course Protease inhibitor(PI) based triple drug combination ART from 28 weeks till delivery for perinatal prophylaxis is effective in reducing perinatal HIV transmission. PI's are safe in pregnancy and also have less chances of development of resistance when used for perinatal prophylaxis and stopped post delivery.Hence, it is opined that PI based combination ART should be offered to pregnant females in PPTCT programme, thereby preventing occurrence of paediatric HIV infection in India. This can have significant impact on the society at large.

  6. Slit2N Inhibits Transmission of HIV-1 from Dendritic Cells to T-cells by Modulating Novel Cytoskeletal Elements

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Ashutosh; Prasad, Anil; Kuzontkoski, Paula M.; Yu, Jinlong; Groopman, Jerome E.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells are among the first cells to encounter sexually acquired human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1), in the mucosa, and they can transmit HIV-1 to CD4+ T-cells via an infectious synapse. Recent studies reveal that actin-rich membrane extensions establish direct contact between cells at this synapse and facilitate virus transmission. Genesis of these contacts involves signaling through c-Src and Cdc42, which modulate actin polymerization and filopodia formation via the Arp2/3 complex and Diaphanous 2 (Diaph2). We found that Slit2N, a ligand for the Roundabout (Robo) receptors, blocked HIV-1-induced signaling through Arp2/3 and Diaph2, decreased filopodial extensions on dendritic cells, and inhibited cell-to-cell transmission of HIV-1 in a Robo1-dependent manner. Employing proteomic analysis, we identified Flightless-1 as a novel, Robo1-interacting protein. Treatment with shRNAs reduced levels of Flightless-1 and demonstrated its role in efficient cell-to-cell transfer of HIV-1. These results suggest a novel strategy to limit viral infection in the host by targeting the Slit/Robo pathway with modulation of cytoskeletal elements previously unrecognized in HIV-1 transmission. PMID:26582347

  7. Attitudes toward opioid substitution therapy and pre-incarceration HIV transmission behaviors among HIV-infected prisoners in Malaysia: Implications for secondary prevention

    PubMed Central

    Bachireddy, Chethan; Bazazi, Alexander R.; Kavasery, Ravi; Govindasamy, Sumathi; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Altice, Frederick L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Pre-incarceration HIV transmission behaviors and current attitudes toward opioid substitution therapy (OST) among HIV-infected male prisoners in Malaysia have important implications for secondary HIV prevention efforts. Methods In June 2007, 102 HIV-infected male prisoners within 6 months of community-release were anonymously surveyed in Kota Bharu, Malaysia. Results Nearly all subjects (95%) met criteria for opioid dependence. Overall, 66% of participants reported sharing needles, and 37% reported unprotected sex in the 30 days prior to incarceration. During this period, 77% reported injection drug use, with 71% injecting daily and 65% injecting more than one substance. Injection of buprenorphine (28%), benzodiazepines (28%) and methamphetamines (49%) was reported. Nearly all (97%) reporting unprotected sex did so with someone not known to be HIV-infected. While 51% believed that opioid substitution therapy (OST) would be helpful, only 33% believed they needed it to prevent relapse after prison release. Most participants (70%) expressed interest in learning more about OST. Those reporting the highest injection risks were more likely to believe OST would be helpful (p<.05), to believe that it was needed to prevent relapse post-release (p<.05), and to express interest in learning more about OST (p<.01). Conclusions Secondary HIV prevention among prisoners in Malaysia is crucial to reduce community HIV transmission after release. Effectively reducing HIV risk associated with opioid injection will require OST expansion, including social marketing to improve its acceptability and careful monitoring. Access to sterile injection equipment, particularly for non-opioid injectors, and behavioral interventions that reduce sexual risk will also be required. PMID:21232882

  8. Inference of Transmission Network Structure from HIV Phylogenetic Trees

    DOE PAGES

    Giardina, Federica; Romero-Severson, Ethan Obie; Albert, Jan; ...

    2017-01-13

    Phylogenetic inference is an attractive means to reconstruct transmission histories and epidemics. However, there is not a perfect correspondence between transmission history and virus phylogeny. Both node height and topological differences may occur, depending on the interaction between within-host evolutionary dynamics and between-host transmission patterns. To investigate these interactions, we added a within-host evolutionary model in epidemiological simulations and examined if the resulting phylogeny could recover different types of contact networks. To further improve realism, we also introduced patient-specific differences in infectivity across disease stages, and on the epidemic level we considered incomplete sampling and the age of the epidemic.more » Second, we implemented an inference method based on approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) to discriminate among three well-studied network models and jointly estimate both network parameters and key epidemiological quantities such as the infection rate. Our ABC framework used both topological and distance-based tree statistics for comparison between simulated and observed trees. Overall, our simulations showed that a virus time-scaled phylogeny (genealogy) may be substantially different from the between-host transmission tree. This has important implications for the interpretation of what a phylogeny reveals about the underlying epidemic contact network. In particular, we found that while the within-host evolutionary process obscures the transmission tree, the diversification process and infectivity dynamics also add discriminatory power to differentiate between different types of contact networks. We also found that the possibility to differentiate contact networks depends on how far an epidemic has progressed, where distance-based tree statistics have more power early in an epidemic. Finally, we applied our ABC inference on two different outbreaks from the Swedish HIV-1 epidemic.« less

  9. Inference of Transmission Network Structure from HIV Phylogenetic Trees.

    PubMed

    Giardina, Federica; Romero-Severson, Ethan Obie; Albert, Jan; Britton, Tom; Leitner, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Phylogenetic inference is an attractive means to reconstruct transmission histories and epidemics. However, there is not a perfect correspondence between transmission history and virus phylogeny. Both node height and topological differences may occur, depending on the interaction between within-host evolutionary dynamics and between-host transmission patterns. To investigate these interactions, we added a within-host evolutionary model in epidemiological simulations and examined if the resulting phylogeny could recover different types of contact networks. To further improve realism, we also introduced patient-specific differences in infectivity across disease stages, and on the epidemic level we considered incomplete sampling and the age of the epidemic. Second, we implemented an inference method based on approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) to discriminate among three well-studied network models and jointly estimate both network parameters and key epidemiological quantities such as the infection rate. Our ABC framework used both topological and distance-based tree statistics for comparison between simulated and observed trees. Overall, our simulations showed that a virus time-scaled phylogeny (genealogy) may be substantially different from the between-host transmission tree. This has important implications for the interpretation of what a phylogeny reveals about the underlying epidemic contact network. In particular, we found that while the within-host evolutionary process obscures the transmission tree, the diversification process and infectivity dynamics also add discriminatory power to differentiate between different types of contact networks. We also found that the possibility to differentiate contact networks depends on how far an epidemic has progressed, where distance-based tree statistics have more power early in an epidemic. Finally, we applied our ABC inference on two different outbreaks from the Swedish HIV-1 epidemic.

  10. Inference of Transmission Network Structure from HIV Phylogenetic Trees

    PubMed Central

    Britton, Tom; Leitner, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Phylogenetic inference is an attractive means to reconstruct transmission histories and epidemics. However, there is not a perfect correspondence between transmission history and virus phylogeny. Both node height and topological differences may occur, depending on the interaction between within-host evolutionary dynamics and between-host transmission patterns. To investigate these interactions, we added a within-host evolutionary model in epidemiological simulations and examined if the resulting phylogeny could recover different types of contact networks. To further improve realism, we also introduced patient-specific differences in infectivity across disease stages, and on the epidemic level we considered incomplete sampling and the age of the epidemic. Second, we implemented an inference method based on approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) to discriminate among three well-studied network models and jointly estimate both network parameters and key epidemiological quantities such as the infection rate. Our ABC framework used both topological and distance-based tree statistics for comparison between simulated and observed trees. Overall, our simulations showed that a virus time-scaled phylogeny (genealogy) may be substantially different from the between-host transmission tree. This has important implications for the interpretation of what a phylogeny reveals about the underlying epidemic contact network. In particular, we found that while the within-host evolutionary process obscures the transmission tree, the diversification process and infectivity dynamics also add discriminatory power to differentiate between different types of contact networks. We also found that the possibility to differentiate contact networks depends on how far an epidemic has progressed, where distance-based tree statistics have more power early in an epidemic. Finally, we applied our ABC inference on two different outbreaks from the Swedish HIV-1 epidemic. PMID:28085876

  11. Outcome of Prevention of Parent-to-Child Transmission of HIV in an Urban Population in Southern India.

    PubMed

    Seenivasan, Subramani; Vaitheeswaran, Natarajan; Seetha, Viswanathan; Anbalagan, Selvaraj; Karunaianantham, Ramesh; Swaminathan, Soumya

    2015-09-01

    To analyze the outcomes of Prevention of Parent to Child Transmission (PPTCT) of HIV program in an urban Southern Indian setting. Observational study. Anti-retroviral Therapy (ART) Centers/ Integrated Counseling and Testing Centers (ICTC) at four government Obstetrics Institutes in an urban area. 100 HIV-positive pregnant women and their infants delivered in the study centers. Triple drug ART to HIV-positive pregnant women was started for maternal indications only. Rest of the pregnant women were given single dose Nevirapine (200 mg) at the onset of labor. All infants were given single dose Nevirapine (2 mg/kg) prophylaxis, according to National AIDS Control Organization guidelines. Mothers were counseled regarding breastfeeding and artificial feeding, and the choice was left to them. Whole blood HIV 1 DNA PCR was done for all infants at 6 weeks of life. A second PCR was done at 6 months or 6 weeks after stopping breastfeeds. PCR-positive infants were started on ART, and were followed-up till18 months of life. Four infants were PCR-positive for HIV. All of them were breastfed. They were born to mothers of HIV stage 1 or 2 who were not on ART as CD4 counts were >350 cells/mm3. Among the mothers in Stage 3 or 4 or CD4 count <200 cells/mm3 and on ART, none of the infants was HIV-positive. The cumulative HIV-free survival at 18 months was 94%. Parent-to-child transmission rate in HIV was low with the currently used strategies. Triple drug ART to mother reduces mother-to-child transmission despite advanced maternal stage or low CD4 counts.

  12. Hormonal Contraceptive Use Among HIV-Positive Women and HIV Transmission Risk to Male Partners, Zambia, 1994–2012

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Kristin M.; Kilembe, William; Vwalika, Bellington; Ravindhran, Preeti; Khu, Naw Htee; Brill, Ilene; Chomba, Elwyn; Johnson, Brent A.; Haddad, Lisa B.; Tichacek, Amanda; Allen, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Evidence on the association between female-to-male human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission risk and hormonal contraception is sparse and conflicting. Methods. Heterosexual HIV-discordant couples from Lusaka, Zambia, were followed longitudinally at 3 month-intervals from 1994 to 2012. The impact of hormonal contraception on time to HIV transmission from HIV-positive women to their HIV-negative male partners (M−F+) was evaluated. Results. Among 1601 M−F+ couples, 171 genetically linked HIV transmissions occurred in men over 3216 couple-years (5.3 transmissions/100 couple-years; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.5–6.2). In multivariable Cox models, neither injectable (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 0.6; 95% CI, .4–1.2), oral contraceptive pill (aHR, 0.8; 95% CI, .3–2.1), nor implant (aHR, 0.8; 95% CI, .5–1.4) use was associated with HIV transmission, relative to nonhormonal methods, after controlling for the man's age at baseline and time-varying measures of pregnancy, self-reported unprotected sex with the study partner, sperm present on a vaginal swab wet mount, genital inflammation of either partner, genital ulceration of the man, and first follow-up interval. Sensitivity analyses, including marginal structural modeling and controlling for viral load and fertility intentions available in a subset of couples, led to similar conclusions. Conclusions. Our findings suggest null associations between hormonal contraception and risk of female-to-male HIV transmission. We support efforts to increase the contraceptive method mix for all women, regardless of HIV serostatus, along with reinforced condom counseling for HIV-serodiscordant couples. PMID:27462093

  13. Hormonal Contraceptive Use Among HIV-Positive Women and HIV Transmission Risk to Male Partners, Zambia, 1994-2012.

    PubMed

    Wall, Kristin M; Kilembe, William; Vwalika, Bellington; Ravindhran, Preeti; Khu, Naw Htee; Brill, Ilene; Chomba, Elwyn; Johnson, Brent A; Haddad, Lisa B; Tichacek, Amanda; Allen, Susan

    2016-10-01

    Evidence on the association between female-to-male human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission risk and hormonal contraception is sparse and conflicting. Heterosexual HIV-discordant couples from Lusaka, Zambia, were followed longitudinally at 3 month-intervals from 1994 to 2012. The impact of hormonal contraception on time to HIV transmission from HIV-positive women to their HIV-negative male partners (M-F+) was evaluated. Among 1601 M-F+ couples, 171 genetically linked HIV transmissions occurred in men over 3216 couple-years (5.3 transmissions/100 couple-years; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.5-6.2). In multivariable Cox models, neither injectable (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 0.6; 95% CI, .4-1.2), oral contraceptive pill (aHR, 0.8; 95% CI, .3-2.1), nor implant (aHR, 0.8; 95% CI, .5-1.4) use was associated with HIV transmission, relative to nonhormonal methods, after controlling for the man's age at baseline and time-varying measures of pregnancy, self-reported unprotected sex with the study partner, sperm present on a vaginal swab wet mount, genital inflammation of either partner, genital ulceration of the man, and first follow-up interval. Sensitivity analyses, including marginal structural modeling and controlling for viral load and fertility intentions available in a subset of couples, led to similar conclusions. Our findings suggest null associations between hormonal contraception and risk of female-to-male HIV transmission. We support efforts to increase the contraceptive method mix for all women, regardless of HIV serostatus, along with reinforced condom counseling for HIV-serodiscordant couples. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  14. HIV drug resistance in mothers and infants following use of antiretrovirals to prevent mother-to-child transmission.

    PubMed

    Ton, Quy; Frenkel, Lisa

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to review prominent studies on HIV drug-resistance in mothers and their infants after the use of antiretroviral drugs to prevent mother-to-child-transmission in resource-limited communities. The effects of drug-resistance on subsequent combination antiretroviral therapy are discussed, as are the probable mechanisms of acquisition and decay or persistence of drug-resistant mutants. Differences in the rates of HIV drug-resistance from interventions used to prevent mother-to-child-transmission in North America and Europe are contrasted to the simplified regimens used in resource-limited settings. Unresolved issues related to HIV drug-resistance are reviewed, including: whether maternal zidovudine monotherapy selects significant resistance; the clinical relevance of HIV drug-resistant variants selected by single-dose nevirapine that persist as minority viral variants and can affect the outcome of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based therapy; and the use of maternal combination antiretroviral therapy during breastfeeding. Finally, the current and upcoming strategies to reduce HIV drug-resistance related to use of antiretrovirals to prevent mother-to-child-transmission are discussed and contrasted with the challenges of financing and administering antiretrovirals to prevent mother-to-child-transmission in resource-limited communities.

  15. Mucosal HIV transmission and vaccination strategies through oral compared to vaginal and rectal routes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mingke; Vajdy, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field There are currently over thirty million people infected with HIV and there are no vaccines available to prevent HIV infections or disease. The genitourinary, rectal and oral mucosa are the mucosal HIV transmission routes. An effective vaccine that can induce both systemic and local mucosal immunity is generally accepted as a major means of protection against mucosal HIV transmission and AIDS. What the reader will gain Structure and cells that comprise the oral, vaginal and rectal mucosa pertaining to HIV transmission and vaccination strategies through each mucosal route to prevent mucosal and systemic infection will be discussed. Areas covered in this review Covering publications from 1980’s through 2010, mucosal transmission of HIV and current and previous approaches to vaccinations are discussed. Take home message Although oral transmission of HIV is far less common than vaginal and rectal transmissions, infections through this route do occur through oral sex as well as vertically from mother to child. Mucosal vaccination strategies against oral and other mucosal HIV transmissions are under intense research but the lack of consensus on immune correlates of protection and lack of safe and effective mucosal adjuvants and delivery systems hamper progress towards a licensed vaccine. PMID:20624114

  16. Reducing infection transmission in solid organ transplantation through donor nucleic acid testing: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Lai, J C; Kahn, J G; Tavakol, M; Peters, M G; Roberts, J P

    2013-10-01

    For solid organ transplant (SOT) donors, nucleic acid-amplification testing (NAT) may reduce human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) transmission over antibody (Ab) testing given its shorter detection window period. We compared SOT donor NAT + Ab versus Ab alone using decision models to estimate incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs; cost per quality-adjusted life year [QALY] gained) from the societal perspective across a range of HIV/HCV prevalence values and NAT costs. The cost per QALY gained was calculated for two scenarios: (1) favorable: low cost ($150/donor)/high prevalence (HIV: 1.5%; HCV: 18.2%) and (2) unfavorable: high cost ($500/donor)/low prevalence (HIV: 0.1%; HCV: 1.5%). In the favorable scenario, adding NAT screening cost $161 013 per QALY gained for HIV was less costly) for HCV, and cost $86 653 per QALY gained for HIV/HCV combined. For the unfavorable scenario, the costs were $15 568 484, $221 006 and $10 077 599 per QALY gained, respectively. Universal HCV NAT + Ab for donors appears cost-effective to reduce infection transmission from SOT donors, while HIV NAT + Ab is not, except where HIV NAT is ≤$150/donor and prevalence is ≥1.5%. Our analyses provide important data to facilitate the decision to implement HIV and HCV NAT for deceased SOT donors and shape national policy regarding how to reduce infection transmission in SOT. © Copyright 2013 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  17. Preventing postnatal transmission of HIV-1 through breast-feeding: modifying infant feeding practices.

    PubMed

    Rollins, Nigel; Meda, Nicolas; Becquet, Renaud; Coutsoudis, Anna; Humphrey, Jean; Jeffrey, Barbara; Kanshana, Siripon; Kuhn, Louise; Leroy, Valeriane; Mbori-Ngacha, Dorothy; McIntyre, James; Newell, Marie-Louise

    2004-02-01

    Approaches to reducing or preventing the risk of postnatal transmission through breast-feeding include the avoidance of all breast-feeding and the use of exclusive replacement feeds or exclusive breast-feeding for a limited duration with early and rapid cessation of breast-feeding around 4-6 months of age. The efficacy and safety of the latter approach have not been established and studies are in progress to provide further information. In addition, inactivation of HIV in breast milk would allow breast-feeding to continue while reducing the risk of postnatal transmission of HIV and may be usefully applied in certain circumstances, such as for premature infants or while a mother recovers from mastitis. In this review, experience is reported from clinical trials or studies additional to their main objective of assessing rates and risk factors for mother-to-child transmission. This may inform policy, programming, and training options and may be especially valuable in the absence of conclusive data on the efficacy of the interventions to be applied during the breast-feeding period.

  18. Selective transmission of R5 HIV-1 variants: where is the gatekeeper?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    To enter target cells HIV-1 uses CD4 and a coreceptor. In vivo the coreceptor function is provided either by CCR5 (for R5) or CXCR4 (for X4 HIV-1). Although both R5 and X4 HIV-1 variants are present in body fluids (semen, blood, cervicovaginal and rectal secretions), R5 HIV-1 appears to transmit infection and dominates early stages of HIV disease. Moreover, recent sequence analysis of virus in acute infection shows that, in the majority of cases of transmission, infection is initiated by a single virus. Therefore, the existence of a “gatekeeper” that selects R5 over X4 HIV-1 and that operates among R5 HIV-1 variants has been suggested. In the present review we consider various routes of HIV-transmission and discuss potential gatekeeping mechanisms associated with each of these routes. Although many mechanisms have been identified none of them explains the almost perfect selection of R5 over X4 in HIV-1 transmission. We suggest that instead of one strong gatekeeper there are multiple functional gatekeepers and that their superimposition is sufficient to protect against X4 HIV-1 infection and potentially select among R5 HIV-1 variants. In conclusion, we propose that the principle of multiple barriers is more general and not restricted to protection against X4 HIV-1 but rather can be applied to other phenomena when one factor has a selective advantage over the other(s). In the case of gatekeepers for HIV-1 transmission, the task is to identify them and to decipher their molecular mechanisms. Knowledge of the gatekeepers‘ localization and function may enable us to enhance existing barriers against R5 transmission and to erect the new ones against all HIV-1 variants. PMID:21284905

  19. Modeling and prediction of HIV in China: transmission rates structured by infection ages.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yican; Shao, Yiming; Ruan, Yuhua; Xu, Jianqing; Ma, Zhien; Mei, Changlin; Wu, Jianhong

    2008-04-01

    HIV transmission process involves a long incubation and infection period, and the transmission rate varies greatly with infection stage. Consequently, modeling analysis based on the assumption of a constant transmission rate during the entire infection period yields an inaccurate description of HIV transmission dynamics and long-term projections. Here we develop a general framework of mathematical modeling that takes into account this heterogeneity of transmission rate and permits rigorous estimation of important parameters using a regression analysis of the twenty-year reported HIV infection data in China. Despite the large variation in this statistical data attributable to the knowledge of HIV, surveillance efforts, and uncertain events, and although the reported data counts individuals who might have been infected many years ago, our analysis shows that the model structured on infection age can assist us in extracting from this data set very useful information about transmission trends and about effectiveness of various control measures.

  20. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Reduce HIV Production in Elite Controllers

    PubMed Central

    Machmach, K.; Leal, M.; Gras, C.; Viciana, P.; Genebat, M.; Franco, E.; Boufassa, F.; Lambotte, O.; Herbeuval, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    HIV elite controllers (EC) are a rare group of HIV-infected patients who are able to maintain undetectable viral loads during a long period of time in the absence of antiretroviral treatment. Adaptive immunity and host genetic factors, although implicated, do not entirely explain this phenomenon. On the other hand, plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are the principal type I interferon (IFN) producers in response to viral infection, and it is unknown whether pDCs are involved in the control of HIV infection in EC. In our study, we analyzed peripheral pDC levels and IFN-α production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in EC compared to other groups of HIV-infected patients, the ability of pDCs to reduce HIV production in vitro, and the mechanisms potentially involved. We showed preserved pDC counts and IFN-α production in EC. We also observed a higher capacity of pDCs from EC to reduce HIV production and to induce T cell apoptosis, whereas pDCs from viremic patients barely responded without previous Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR-9) stimulus. The preserved functionality of pDCs from EC to reduce viral production may be one of the mechanisms involved in the control of HIV viremia in these subjects. These results demonstrate the importance of innate immunity in HIV pathogenesis, and an understanding of pDC mechanisms would be helpful for the design of new therapies. PMID:22318133

  1. Preventing HIV transmission among Iranian prisoners: Initial support for providing education on the benefits of harm reduction practices

    PubMed Central

    Eshrati, Babak; Asl, Rahim Taghizadeh; Dell, Colleen Anne; Afshar, Parviz; Millson, Peggy Margaret E; Kamali, Mohammad; Weekes, John

    2008-01-01

    Background Harm reduction is a health-centred approach that seeks to reduce the health and social harms associated with high-risk behaviors, such as illicit drug use. The objective of this study is to determine the association between the beliefs of a group of adult, male prisoners in Iran about the transmission of HIV and their high-risk practices while in prison. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2004. The study population was a random selection of 100 men incarcerated at Rajaei-Shahr prison. The data were collected through a self-administered questionnaire. Focus group discussions were held at the prison to guide the design of the questionnaire. The relationship between components of the Health Belief Model (HBM) and prisoners' risky HIV-related behaviors was examined. Results Calculating Pearson's correlation coefficient, a significant, positive association was found between the benefit component of the HBM and prisoners not engaging in HIV high-risk behaviors. Conclusion Educational harm reduction initiatives that promote the effectiveness of strategies designed to reduce the risk of HIV transmission may decrease prisoners' high-risk behaviors. This finding provides initial support for the Iran prison system's current offering of HIV/AIDS harm reduction programming and suggests the need to offer increased education about the effectiveness of HIV prevention practices. PMID:18541032

  2. Preventing HIV transmission among Iranian prisoners: initial support for providing education on the benefits of harm reduction practices.

    PubMed

    Eshrati, Babak; Asl, Rahim Taghizadeh; Dell, Colleen Anne; Afshar, Parviz; Millson, Peggy Margaret E; Kamali, Mohammad; Weekes, John

    2008-06-09

    Harm reduction is a health-centred approach that seeks to reduce the health and social harms associated with high-risk behaviors, such as illicit drug use. The objective of this study is to determine the association between the beliefs of a group of adult, male prisoners in Iran about the transmission of HIV and their high-risk practices while in prison. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2004. The study population was a random selection of 100 men incarcerated at Rajaei-Shahr prison. The data were collected through a self-administered questionnaire. Focus group discussions were held at the prison to guide the design of the questionnaire. The relationship between components of the Health Belief Model (HBM) and prisoners' risky HIV-related behaviors was examined. Calculating Pearson's correlation coefficient, a significant, positive association was found between the benefit component of the HBM and prisoners not engaging in HIV high-risk behaviors. Educational harm reduction initiatives that promote the effectiveness of strategies designed to reduce the risk of HIV transmission may decrease prisoners' high-risk behaviors. This finding provides initial support for the Iran prison system's current offering of HIV/AIDS harm reduction programming and suggests the need to offer increased education about the effectiveness of HIV prevention practices.

  3. HSV-2 co-infection as a driver of HIV transmission among heterosexual non-injecting drug users in New York City.

    PubMed

    Des Jarlais, Don C; Arasteh, Kamyar; McKnight, Courtney; Perlman, David C; Feelemyer, Jonathan; Hagan, Holly; Cooper, Hannah L F

    2014-01-01

    To examine herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2)/HIV co-infection as a contributing factor in the increase in HIV infection among non-injecting heroin and cocaine users in New York City. Subjects were recruited from the Beth Israel Medical Center drug detoxification and methadone maintenance programs in New York City in 1995-1999 and 2005-2011. All reported current heroin and/or cocaine use and no injection drug use. A structured questionnaire was administered and serum samples collected for HIV and HSV-2 testing. Population-attributable risk percentages (PAR%s) were estimated for associations between HSV-2 and increased susceptibility to and increased transmissibility of HIV among female NIDUs. 785 subjects were recruited from 1995-1999, and 1764 subjects from 2005-2011. HIV prevalence increased from 7% to 13%, with nearly uniform increases among all demographic subgroups. HSV-2/HIV co-infection was common in both time periods, with an average (over the two time periods) of 80% of HIV negative females infected with HSV-2, an average of 43% of HIV negative males infected with HSV-2; an average of 97% of HIV positive females also infected with HSV-2 and an average of 67% of HIV positive males also infected with HSV-2. The increase in HIV prevalence was predominantly an increase in HSV-2/HIV co-infection, with relatively little HIV mono-infection in either time period. The estimated PAR%s indicate that approximately half of HIV acquisition among females was caused by HSV-2 infection and approximately 60% of HIV transmission from females was due to HSV-2 co-infection. The increase in HIV infection among these non-injecting drug users is better considered as an increase in HSV-2/HIV co-infection rather than simply an increase in HIV prevalence. Additional interventions (such as treatment as prevention and suppressing the effects of HSV-2 on HIV transmission) are needed to reduce further HIV transmission from HSV-2/HIV co-infected non-injecting drug users.

  4. Transmission of HIV drug resistance: lessons from sensitive screening assays.

    PubMed

    Geretti, Anna Maria; Paredes, Roger; Kozal, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    The review discusses new technologies for the sensitive detection of HIV drug resistance, with a focus on applications in antiretroviral treatment (ART)-naïve populations. Conventional sequencing is well established for detecting HIV drug resistance in routine care and guides optimal treatment selection in patients starting ART. Access to conventional sequencing is nearly universal in Western countries, but remains limited in Asia, Latin America, and Africa. Technological advances now allow detection of resistance with greatly improved sensitivity compared with conventional sequencing, variably increasing the yield of resistance testing in ART-naïve populations. There is strong cumulative evidence from retrospective studies that sensitive detection of resistant mutants in baseline plasma samples lacking resistance by conventional sequencing more than doubles the risk of virological failure after starting efavirenz-based or nevirapine-based ART. Sensitive resistance testing methods are mainly confined to research applications and in this context have provided great insight into the dynamics of drug resistance development, persistence, and transmission. Adoption in care settings is becoming increasingly possible, although important challenges remain. Platforms for diagnostic use must undergo technical improvements to ensure good performance and ease of use, and clinical validation is required to ensure utility.

  5. Female-controlled methods to prevent sexual transmission of HIV.

    PubMed

    Elias, C J; Coggins, C

    1996-12-01

    THE NEED FOR PREVENTION: Women throughout the world face a growing risk of infection with HIV. Consistent condom use, one cornerstone of primary prevention strategy, is not always feasible for many women. Consequently, women urgently need infection prevention technology that is within their personal control. This session will review current efforts to develop and test female-controlled methods for preventing sexual transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted pathogens. Both physical and chemical methods will be summarized, including recent findings concerning the efficacy and acceptability of the vaginal pouch (female condom), as well as an overview of research on vaginal microbicides. Data from studies of existing over-the-counter spermicides will be reviewed. The wide range of novel microbicidal products currently being evaluated in the laboratory and early clinical trials demonstrate the breadth of possibilities presented by chemical barrier methods. However, formidible challenges face public and private sector research and development efforts. This session will conclude by highlighting several issues related to the clinical evaluation and introduction of female-controlled prevention technology.

  6. Preventing HIV Transmission in Chinese Internal Migrants: A Behavioral Approach

    PubMed Central

    Erasmus, Vicki; Sun, Xinying; Shi, Yuhui; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    This study is a step towards a behavioral intervention to prevent HIV transmission among Chinese internal migrants. To explore important and changeable determinants of condom use and inspect effective and feasible methods to increase condom use for the target population, we conducted a three-round web-based Delphi study among a panel of 62 experts between October 2012 and March 2013. The panelists were purposely selected using a stepwise procedure to represent topic-related areas of expertise. The response rate per round ranges from 21% to 81%. The panelists identified 19 possible determinants of condom use and reported 16 intervention methods they considered successful. They agreed that attitude towards condom use was the most important and changeable determinant, while applying behavioral theory, increasing sexual education and condom access, performing worksite health promotion, detecting risk factors, and working closely with relevant organizations and the government were effective and feasible methods to increase condom use among internal migrants in China. In conclusion, results of this study highlight the importance of attitude in changing condom use and underscore the need to apply behavior theory and integrate multiple educational approaches for developing behavioral HIV prevention interventions targeting internal migrants in China. PMID:25610903

  7. Therapeutic vaccination reduces HIV sequence variability.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Dieter; Seebach, Judith; Cosma, Antonio; Goebel, Frank D; Strimmer, Korbinian; Schätzl, Hermann M; Erfle, Volker

    2008-02-01

    With HIV persisting lifelong in infected persons, therapeutic vaccination is a novel alternative concept to control virus replication. Even though CD8 and CD4 cell responses to such immunizations have been demonstrated, their effects on virus replication are still unclear. In view of this fact, we studied the impact of a therapeutic vaccination with HIV nef delivered by a recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara vector on viral diversity. We investigated HIV sequences derived from chronically infected persons before and after therapeutic vaccination. Before immunization the mean +/- se pairwise variability of patient-derived Nef protein sequences was 0.1527 +/- 0.0041. After vaccination the respective value was 0.1249 +/- 0.0042, resulting in a significant (P<0.0001) difference between the two time points. The genes vif and 5'gag tested in parallel and nef sequences in control persons yielded a constant amino acid sequence variation. The data presented suggest that Nef immunization induced a selective pressure, limiting HIV sequence variability. To our knowledge this is the first report directly linking therapeutic HIV vaccination to decreasing diversity in patient-derived virus isolates.

  8. Contraceptive methods and the transmission of HIV: implications for family planning.

    PubMed Central

    Daly, C C; Helling-Giese, G E; Mati, J K; Hunter, D J

    1994-01-01

    Heterosexual transmission is the predominant mode of spread of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) in most of the world. Whether the use of hormonal contraceptives, IUDs and spermicides is associated with an increased or decreased risk for HIV acquisition remains controversial. Several mechanisms whereby contraceptive methods may influence the transmission of HIV have been proposed. As contraceptive use increases among women of reproductive age, the group most vulnerable to HIV infection, any associations between contraceptive method and HIV risk become even more important. The available studies of these associations are predominantly cross-sectional and give conflicting results. We review the published evidence for associations between HIV and individual contraceptive methods. At this time no definitive conclusions regarding these associations can be drawn. Further research, especially prospective epidemiological studies and basic biological research on mechanisms of heterosexual transmission and the effect of contraceptives on these mechanisms, is urgently needed. PMID:8206468

  9. People who inject drugs in prison: HIV prevalence, transmission and prevention.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Kate; Moazen, Babak; Noori, Atefeh; Rahimzadeh, Shadi; Farzadfar, Farshad; Hariga, Fabienne

    2015-02-01

    In 2011, over 10.1 million people were held in prisons around the world. HIV prevalence is elevated in prison and this is due to the over representation of people who inject drugs (PWID). Yet HIV prevention programs for PWID are scarce in the prison setting. With a high proportion of drug users and few prevention programs, HIV transmission occurs and sometimes at an alarming rate. This commentary focuses primarily on drug users in prison; their risk behaviours and levels of infection. It also comments on the transmission of HIV including outbreaks and the efforts to prevent transmission within the prison setting. The spread of HIV in prison has substantial public health implications as virtually all prisoners return to the community. HIV prevention and treatment strategies known to be effective in community settings, such as methadone maintenance treatment, needle and syringe programs, condoms and antiretroviral therapy should be provided to prisoners as a matter of urgency.

  10. HIV-1 Transmission During Recent Infection and During Treatment Interruptions as Major Drivers of New Infections in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Marzel, Alex; Shilaih, Mohaned; Yang, Wan-Lin; Böni, Jürg; Yerly, Sabine; Klimkait, Thomas; Aubert, Vincent; Braun, Dominique L; Calmy, Alexandra; Furrer, Hansjakob; Cavassini, Matthias; Battegay, Manuel; Vernazza, Pietro L; Bernasconi, Enos; Günthard, Huldrych F; Kouyos, Roger D; Aubert, V; Battegay, M; Bernasconi, E; Böni, J; Bucher, H C; Burton-Jeangros, C; Calmy, A; Cavassini, M; Dollenmaier, G; Egger, M; Elzi, L; Fehr, J; Fellay, J; Furrer, H; Fux, C A; Gorgievski, M; Günthard, H F; Haerry, D; Hasse, B; Hirsch, H H; Hoffmann, M; Hösli, I; Kahlert, C; Kaiser, L; Keiser, O; Klimkait, T; Kouyos, R D; Kovari, H; Ledergerber, B; Martinetti, G; de Tejada, B Martinez; Metzner, K; Müller, N; Nadal, D; Nicca, D; Pantaleo, G; Rauch, A; Regenass, S; Rickenbach, M; Rudin, C; Schöni-Affolter, F; Schmid, P; Schüpbach, J; Speck, R; Tarr, P; Trkola, A; Vernazza, P L; Weber, R; Yerly, S

    2016-01-01

    Reducing the fraction of transmissions during recent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is essential for the population-level success of "treatment as prevention". A phylogenetic tree was constructed with 19 604 Swiss sequences and 90 994 non-Swiss background sequences. Swiss transmission pairs were identified using 104 combinations of genetic distance (1%-2.5%) and bootstrap (50%-100%) thresholds, to examine the effect of those criteria. Monophyletic pairs were classified as recent or chronic transmission based on the time interval between estimated seroconversion dates. Logistic regression with adjustment for clinical and demographic characteristics was used to identify risk factors associated with transmission during recent or chronic infection. Seroconversion dates were estimated for 4079 patients on the phylogeny, and comprised between 71 (distance, 1%; bootstrap, 100%) to 378 transmission pairs (distance, 2.5%; bootstrap, 50%). We found that 43.7% (range, 41%-56%) of the transmissions occurred during the first year of infection. Stricter phylogenetic definition of transmission pairs was associated with higher recent-phase transmission fraction. Chronic-phase viral load area under the curve (adjusted odds ratio, 3; 95% confidence interval, 1.64-5.48) and time to antiretroviral therapy (ART) start (adjusted odds ratio 1.4/y; 1.11-1.77) were associated with chronic-phase transmission as opposed to recent transmission. Importantly, at least 14% of the chronic-phase transmission events occurred after the transmitter had interrupted ART. We demonstrate a high fraction of transmission during recent HIV infection but also chronic transmissions after interruption of ART in Switzerland. Both represent key issues for treatment as prevention and underline the importance of early diagnosis and of early and continuous treatment. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For

  11. Universal access to HIV treatment versus universal 'test and treat': transmission, drug resistance & treatment costs.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Bradley G; Blower, Sally

    2012-01-01

    In South Africa (SA) universal access to treatment for HIV-infected individuals in need has yet to be achieved. Currently ~1 million receive treatment, but an additional 1.6 million are in need. It is being debated whether to use a universal 'test and treat' (T&T) strategy to try to eliminate HIV in SA; treatment reduces infectivity and hence transmission. Under a T&T strategy all HIV-infected individuals would receive treatment whether in need or not. This would require treating 5 million individuals almost immediately and providing treatment for several decades. We use a validated mathematical model to predict impact and costs of: (i) a universal T&T strategy and (ii) achieving universal access to treatment. Using modeling the WHO has predicted a universal T&T strategy in SA would eliminate HIV within a decade, and (after 40 years) cost ~$10 billion less than achieving universal access. In contrast, we predict a universal T&T strategy in SA could eliminate HIV, but take 40 years and cost ~$12 billion more than achieving universal access. We determine the difference in predictions is because the WHO has under-estimated survival time on treatment and ignored the risk of resistance. We predict, after 20 years, ~2 million individuals would need second-line regimens if a universal T&T strategy is implemented versus ~1.5 million if universal access is achieved. Costs need to be realistically estimated and multiple evaluation criteria used to compare 'treatment as prevention' with other prevention strategies. Before implementing a universal T&T strategy, which may not be sustainable, we recommend striving to achieve universal access to treatment as quickly as possible. We predict achieving universal access to treatment would be a very effective 'treatment as prevention' approach and bring the HIV epidemic in SA close to elimination, preventing ~4 million infections after 20 years and ~11 million after 40 years.

  12. Should nevirapine be used to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV among women of unknown serostatus?

    PubMed Central

    Sint, Tin Tin; Dabis, François; Kamenga, Claude; Shaffer, Nathan; de Zoysa, Isabelle F.

    2005-01-01

    At present, HIV testing and counselling during pregnancy represent the key entry point for women to learn their serostatus and for them to access, if they are HIV-positive, specific interventions to reduce mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV. However, the provision and uptake of testing and counselling services are inadequate, and many pregnant women in countries most affected by the HIV/AIDS epidemic remain unaware of their HIV status. The offer of single-dose nevirapine prophylaxis to women whose HIV status is unknown at the time of delivery has been proposed to circumvent these problems in high-prevalence settings. The potential advantages and disadvantages of three different programme approaches are considered: targeted programmes in which antiretroviral drugs are offered only to women who are known to be HIV-positive; combined programmes in which nevirapine prophylaxis is offered to women whose serostatus remains unknown at the time of delivery despite targeted programme inputs; and universal nevirapine prophylaxis programmes in which HIV testing and counselling are not available and all pregnant women, regardless of their serostatus, are offered nevirapine prophylaxis. PMID:15798847

  13. Sexual partner selectiveness effects on homosexual HIV transmission dynamics.

    PubMed

    Koopman, J; Simon, C; Jacquez, J; Joseph, J; Sattenspiel, L; Park, T

    1988-01-01

    Deterministic simulation models are used to show that HIV transmission dynamics in homosexual populations can be strongly affected by sexual partner selectiveness. The type of selectiveness or biased mixing examined is where individuals with similar new partnership formation rates are more likely to form a pair than would be expected by chance. The effect of such selectiveness could be strong even when the total number and distribution of new sexual partnerships and sex acts remains constant. This means that in order to predict the future course of HIV transmission and identify the populations at highest risk, we must have information not only on the frequency of new sexual partnerships and types of sex acts, but also on who has sex with whom. Given high sexual partner selectiveness, some groups of homosexuals with low rates of sex and new sex partners would take many decades before a single introduction would generate an epidemic. Epidemics in these groups can be markedly accelerated by only modest contact with higher risk groups. Even in very low activity groups, which if isolated would have no epidemic, an important proportion of their members can be infected when they are not selective. The relative risks of AIDS in groups making high numbers of new sexual partnerships compared to groups making low numbers are markedly affected by sexual partner selectiveness. The models developed were examined using information collected in 1984 from the Coping and Change Study in collaboration with the Chicago Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study. This population was divided into activity groups by the rate at which individuals established new sexual partnerships and then a structure of new sexual partnerships between these activity groups was defined consistent with available data. Even without introducing any behavior change in the models, the proportion of the homosexual population infected was seen to level off temporarily at around 50% after several years as a consequence of

  14. HIV transmission through breastmilk: the science behind the understanding of current trends and future research.

    PubMed

    Prameela, K K

    2012-12-01

    Breastmilk protects the infant from many diseases and many short- term and long- term benefits accrue. At the same time it is also known that breastfeeding acts as a vehicle for some infective agents. It is now accepted that breastmilk transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus- 1 (HIV-1) is an important mode of paediatric infection . Despite this fact, many researchers have observed that corresponding to the volume of milk consumed by the infant, maternal transmission via breastmilk is still comparatively low. Some have noted the long latency period of breastmilk HIV transmission with evidence of numerous anti-HIV factors in breastmilk. Although there are accepted standard guidelines on infant feeding in mothers who are HIV positive in many countries, it maybe equally important to realize gaps in our knowledge of mother- to -child HIV transmission. From an evolutionary perspective, the role of the mammary epithelial cell (MEC) and of breastmilk , in contributing to and possibly in influencing HIV-1 transmission is intriguing. The presence of HIV-1 or of other viruses in maternal milk seem to be a requisite to spur immunological defenses to optimize necessary protection to the infant. This article reviews some aspects of the science of HIV transmission through breastmilk and reflects the concept -based understanding of current policies on HIV and breastfeeding. At the same time, it highlights uncertainties in this field and the urgency for future research in this direction. Accepting current notions of breastmilk HIV transmission, greater deliberation by research may throw more light on why breastfeeding with its abundant advantages is fraught with the hazards of transmission of a deadly disease.

  15. Challenges in virological diagnosis of HIV -1 transmission from sexual abuse--HIV-1 genetic links are mandatory.

    PubMed

    Ehrnst, Anneka

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to set forth possible strategies and techniques of analysis to diagnose or identify the source of HIV transmission in victims of sexual abuse. Diagnosis of HIV-1 transmission from sexual abuse is complicated. Timely blood samples are important. The right to confidentiality of the HIV diagnosis may prevent sampling from the offender. Hideous rapes occur during war, which victimize many women. Women delivering a child, seeking an abortion, or having a miscarriage may include victims of sexual abuse. HIV-infected children, where vertical transmission has been excluded, are important for investigation. Men who have sex with men may abuse young men. HIV-infected teenagers with signs of early infection should also be considered. Hundreds of single HIV-1 sequences can be created from one or more blood samples from the case and the alleged abuser. The more HIV-1 genes and sequences that are included, the better the outcomes of the phylogenetic relation. Evidence in support of transmission may be obtained from phylogenetic tree analysis and may also free someone from suspicion.

  16. Sociocultural Influences on the Transmission of HIV From Husbands to Wives in Cambodia: The Male Point of View.

    PubMed

    Yang, Youngran; Thai, Sopheak

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore, within cultural and societal contexts, the factors of spousal HIV transmission as described by the experiences of HIV-positive Cambodian men. Using qualitative research methods, the researchers collected data from in-depth interviews with 15 HIV-positive Cambodian men of seroconcordant couples recruited from an HIV/AIDS clinic in Phnom Penh. Using a model of HIV transmission from husbands to wives, the questions were designed to elicit the men's perspectives on the topics of promiscuity, masculinity, condom use in marriage, the image of the ideal Cambodian woman, and attitudes toward sex and marriage. Directed content analysis was used to analyze the interview data. The main results were as follows: (a) men involved with sex workers perceived this as a natural behavior and a necessary part of being an approved member in a male peer group, (b) married men never used condoms during sex with their wives prior to their HIV diagnosis, (c) men perceived a good wife as one who is diligent and loyal to her husband, and (4) men's attitudes toward sex and marriage (e.g., sex perceived as a part of life pleasure) differed from those of their wives. Promoting honest spousal communication about sexuality, maintaining men's marital fidelity, and increasing women's comfort in the use of sexual techniques are suggested as strategies for reducing HIV transmission within marriage in Cambodia. Future interventions should focus on reshaping men's behaviors and changing cultural norms to protect them and their spouses from HIV infection.

  17. Preventing Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV during Childbirth

    MedlinePlus

    HIV and Pregnancy HIV Medicines During Pregnancy and Childbirth (Last updated 3/7/2017; last reviewed 11/14/2016) Key Points All pregnant ... a woman’s expected due date). Should women with HIV take HIV medicines during pregnancy? Yes. All pregnant ...

  18. Modeling the impact of Trichomonas vaginalis infection on HIV transmission in HIV-infected individuals in medical care

    PubMed Central

    Quinlivan, E. Byrd; Patel, Shilpa N.; Grodensky, Catherine A.; Golin, Carol E.; Tien, Hsiao-Chuan; Hobbs, Marcia M.

    2012-01-01

    Background To assess factors associated with having a Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) infection among persons receiving care for HIV and estimate the number of transmitted HIV infections attributable to TV. Methods HIV clinic patients were recruited from two secondary prevention studies, screened by urine nucleic-acid amplification tests for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and interviewed about risk factors (baseline, 6 and 12 months). We conducted mathematical modeling of the results to estimate the number of transmitted HIV infections attributable to TV among a cohort of HIV-infected patients receiving medical care in North Carolina. Results TV was prevalent in 7.4%, and incident in 2% – 3% of subjects at follow-up. Individuals with HIV RNA less than 400 copies/ml (OR 0.32, 95% CI: 0.14 – 0.73) and at least 13 years of education (OR 0.24, 95% CI: 0.08 –0.70) were less likely to have TV. Mathematical modeling predicted that 0.062 HIV transmission events occur per 100 HIV infected women in the absence of TV infection and 0.076 HIV infections per 100 HIV and TV-infected women (estimate range: 0.070 – 0.079), indicating that 23% of the HIV transmission events from HIV-infected women may be attributable to TV infection when 22% of women are co-infected with TV. Conclusions The data suggest the need for improved diagnosis of TV infection and suggest that HIV-infected women in medical care may be appropriate targets for enhanced testing and treatment. PMID:22902662

  19. Lesotho's Minimum PMTCT Package: lessons learned for combating vertical HIV transmission using co-packaged medicines

    PubMed Central

    McDougal, Lotus; Moteetee, Mpolai M; Mohai, Florence; Mphale, Malisebo; Mahanty, Binod; Motaung, Blandinah; Ankrah, Victor; Reynolds, Makaria; Legins, Kenneth; Tiam, Appolinaire; Luo, Chewe; McClure, Craig; Binkin, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Mother-to-child transmission of HIV can be reduced to<5% with appropriate antiretroviral medications. Such reductions depend on multiple health system encounters during antenatal care (ANC), delivery and breastfeeding; in countries with limited access to care, transmission remains high. In Lesotho, where 28% of women attending ANC are HIV positive but where geographic and other factors limit access to ANC and facility deliveries, a Minimum PMTCT Package was launched in 2007 as an alternative to the existing facility-based approach. Distributed at the first ANC visit, it packaged together all necessary pregnancy, delivery and early postnatal antiretroviral medications for mother and infant. Methods To examine the availability, feasibility, acceptability and possible negative consequences of the Minimum PMTCT Package, data from a 2009 qualitative and quantitative study and a 2010 facility assessment were used. To examine the effects on ANC and facility-based delivery rates, a difference-in-differences analytic approach was applied to 2009 Demographic and Health Survey data for HIV-tested women who gave birth before and after Minimum PMTCT Package implementation. Results The Minimum PMTCT Package was feasible and acceptable to providers and clients. Problems with test kit and medicine stock-outs occurred, and 46% of women did not receive the Minimum PMTCT Package until at least their second ANC visit. Providing adequate instruction on the use of multiple medications represented a challenge. The proportion of HIV-positive women delivering in facilities declined after Minimum PMTCT Package implementation, although it increased among HIV-negative women (difference-in-differences=14.5%, p=0.05). The mean number of ANC visits declined more among HIV-positive women than among HIV-negative women after implementation, though the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.09). Changes in the percentage of women receiving≥4 ANC visits did not differ

  20. Detectable signals of episodic risk effects on acute HIV transmission: strategies for analyzing transmission systems using genetic data.

    PubMed

    Alam, Shah Jamal; Zhang, Xinyu; Romero-Severson, Ethan Obie; Henry, Christopher; Zhong, Lin; Volz, Erik M; Brenner, Bluma G; Koopman, James S

    2013-03-01

    Episodic high-risk sexual behavior is common and can have a profound effect on HIV transmission. In a model of HIV transmission among men who have sex with men (MSM), changing the frequency, duration and contact rates of high-risk episodes can take endemic prevalence from zero to 50% and more than double transmissions during acute HIV infection (AHI). Undirected test and treat could be inefficient in the presence of strong episodic risk effects. Partner services approaches that use a variety of control options will be likely to have better effects under these conditions, but the question remains: What data will reveal if a population is experiencing episodic risk effects? HIV sequence data from Montreal reveals genetic clusters whose size distribution stabilizes over time and reflects the size distribution of acute infection outbreaks (AIOs). Surveillance provides complementary behavioral data. In order to use both types of data efficiently, it is essential to examine aspects of models that affect both the episodic risk effects and the shape of transmission trees. As a demonstration, we use a deterministic compartmental model of episodic risk to explore the determinants of the fraction of transmissions during acute HIV infection (AHI) at the endemic equilibrium. We use a corresponding individual-based model to observe AIO size distributions and patterns of transmission within AIO. Episodic risk parameters determining whether AHI transmission trees had longer chains, more clustered transmissions from single individuals, or different mixes of these were explored. Encouragingly for parameter estimation, AIO size distributions reflected the frequency of transmissions from acute infection across divergent parameter sets. Our results show that episodic risk dynamics influence both the size and duration of acute infection outbreaks, thus providing a possible link between genetic cluster size distributions and episodic risk dynamics.

  1. Detectable signals of episodic risk effects on acute HIV transmission: Strategies for analyzing transmission systems using genetic data

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Shah Jamal; Zhang, Xinyu; Romero-Severson, Ethan Obie; Henry, Christopher; Zhong, Lin; Volz, Erik M.; Brenner, Bluma G.; Koopman, James S.

    2013-01-01

    Episodic high-risk sexual behavior is common and can have a profound effect on HIV transmission. In a model of HIV transmission among men who have sex with men (MSM), changing the frequency, duration and contact rates of high-risk episodes can take endemic prevalence from zero to 50% and more than double transmissions during acute HIV infection (AHI). Undirected test and treat could be inefficient in the presence of strong episodic risk effects. Partner services approaches that use a variety of control options will be likely to have better effects under these conditions, but the question remains: What data will reveal if a population is experiencing episodic risk effects? HIV sequence data from Montreal reveals genetic clusters whose size distribution stabilizes over time and reflects the size distribution of acute infection outbreaks (AIOs). Surveillance provides complementary behavioral data. In order to use both types of data efficiently, it is essential to examine aspects of models that affect both the episodic risk effects and the shape of transmission trees. As a demonstration, we use a deterministic compartmental model of episodic risk to explore the determinants of the fraction of transmissions during acute HIV infection (AHI) at the endemic equilibrium. We use a corresponding individual-based model to observe AIO size distributions and patterns of transmission within AIO. Episodic risk parameters determining whether AHI transmission trees had longer chains, more clustered transmissions from single individuals, or different mixes of these were explored. Encouragingly for parameter estimation, AIO size distributions reflected the frequency of transmissions from acute infection across divergent parameter sets. Our results show that episodic risk dynamics influence both the size and duration of acute infection outbreaks, thus providing a possible link between genetic cluster size distributions and episodic risk dynamics. PMID:23438430

  2. Exploring migratory dynamics on HIV transmission: the case of Mexicans in New York City and Puebla, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Yumary; Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent; McCarthy, Katharine; Muñoz-Laboy, Miguel A; de Lourdes Rosas López, Maria

    2014-06-01

    Migration and population movement are increasingly viewed as important factors associated with HIV transmission risk. With growing awareness of the potential impact of migration on HIV transmission, several perspectives have emerged that posit differing dynamics of risk. We considered available data on the role of migration on HIV transmission among Mexican migrants in New York City and Puebla, Mexico. Specifically, we examined 3 distinct models of migratory dynamics of HIV transmission-namely, the structural model, the local contextual model, and the interplay model. In doing so, we reframed current public health perspectives on the role of migration on HIV transmission.

  3. The potential effects of changing HIV treatment policy on tuberculosis outcomes in South Africa: results from three tuberculosis-HIV transmission models.

    PubMed

    Pretorius, Carel; Menzies, Nicolas A; Chindelevitch, Leonid; Cohen, Ted; Cori, Anne; Eaton, Jeffrey W; Fraser, Christophe; Gopalappa, Chaitra; Hallett, Timothy B; Salomon, Joshua A; Stover, John; White, Richard G; Dodd, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Many countries are considering expanding HIV treatment following recent findings emphasizing the effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on reducing HIV transmission in addition to already established survival benefits. Given the close interaction of tuberculosis (TB) and HIV epidemics, ART expansion could have important ramifications for TB burden. Previous studies suggest a wide range of possible TB impacts following ART expansion. We used three independently developed TB-HIV models to estimate the TB-related impact of expanding ART in South Africa. We considered two dimensions of ART expansion--improving coverage of pre-ART and ART services, and expanding CD4-based ART eligibility criteria (from CD4 <350 to CD4 <500 or all HIV-positive). Three independent mathematical models were calibrated to the same data pertaining to the South African HIV-TB epidemic, and used to assess standardized ART policy changes. Key TB impact indicators were projected from 2014 to 2033. Compared with current eligibility and coverage, cumulative TB incidence was projected to decline by 6-30% over the period 2014-2033 if ART eligibility were expanded to all HIV positive individuals, and by 28-37% if effective ART coverage were additionally increased to 80%. Overall, expanding ART was estimated to avert one TB case for each 10-13 additional person-years of ART. All models showed that TB incidence and mortality reductions would grow over time, but would stabilize towards the end of the projection period. ART expansion could substantially reduce TB incidence and mortality in South Africa and could provide a platform for collaborative HIV-TB programs to effectively halt HIV-associated TB.

  4. "There's No Place Like Home": Perceptions of Home-Based HIV Testing in Lesotho

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mantell, J. E.; DiCarlo, A. L.; Remien, R. H.; Zerbe, A.; Morris, D.; Pitt, B.; Nkonyana, J. P.; Abrams, E. J.; El-Sadr, W.

    2014-01-01

    HIV testing has the potential to reduce HIV transmission by identifying and counseling individuals with HIV, reducing risk behaviors, linking persons with HIV to care and earlier treatment, and reducing perinatal transmission. In Lesotho, a high HIV prevalence country in which a large proportion of the population has never tested for HIV,…

  5. "There's No Place Like Home": Perceptions of Home-Based HIV Testing in Lesotho

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mantell, J. E.; DiCarlo, A. L.; Remien, R. H.; Zerbe, A.; Morris, D.; Pitt, B.; Nkonyana, J. P.; Abrams, E. J.; El-Sadr, W.

    2014-01-01

    HIV testing has the potential to reduce HIV transmission by identifying and counseling individuals with HIV, reducing risk behaviors, linking persons with HIV to care and earlier treatment, and reducing perinatal transmission. In Lesotho, a high HIV prevalence country in which a large proportion of the population has never tested for HIV,…

  6. Role of Semen on Vaginal HIV-1 Transmission and Maraviroc Protection

    PubMed Central

    Council, Olivia D.; Swanson, Michael D.; Spagnuolo, Rae Ann

    2015-01-01

    We used bone marrow/liver/thymus (BLT) humanized mice to establish the effect of semen on vaginal HIV infection and on the efficacy of topically applied maraviroc. Our results demonstrate that vaginal transmission of cell-free HIV occurs efficiently in the presence of semen and that topically applied maraviroc efficiently prevents HIV transmission in the presence of semen. We also show that semen has no significant effect on the transmission of transmitted/founder viruses or cell-associated viruses. PMID:26392489

  7. Predicting HIV-1 transmission and antibody neutralization efficacy in vivo from stoichiometric parameters

    PubMed Central

    Rusert, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The potential of broadly neutralizing antibodies targeting the HIV-1 envelope trimer to prevent HIV-1 transmission has opened new avenues for therapies and vaccines. However, their implementation remains challenging and would profit from a deepened mechanistic understanding of HIV-antibody interactions and the mucosal transmission process. In this study we experimentally determined stoichiometric parameters of the HIV-1 trimer-antibody interaction, confirming that binding of one antibody is sufficient for trimer neutralization. This defines numerical requirements for HIV-1 virion neutralization and thereby enables mathematical modelling of in vitro and in vivo antibody neutralization efficacy. The model we developed accurately predicts antibody efficacy in animal passive immunization studies and provides estimates for protective mucosal antibody concentrations. Furthermore, we derive estimates of the probability for a single virion to start host infection and the risks of male-to-female HIV-1 transmission per sexual intercourse. Our work thereby delivers comprehensive quantitative insights into both the molecular principles governing HIV-antibody interactions and the initial steps of mucosal HIV-1 transmission. These insights, alongside the underlying, adaptable modelling framework presented here, will be valuable for supporting in silico pre-trial planning and post-hoc evaluation of HIV-1 vaccination or antibody treatment trials. PMID:28472201

  8. The Oral Mucosa Immune Environment and Oral Transmission of HIV/SIV

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Lianna F.; Chahroudi, Ann; Chen, Hui-Ling; Jaspan, Heather B.; Sodora, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The global spread of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is dependent on the ability of this virus to efficiently cross from one host to the next by traversing a mucosal membrane. Unraveling how mucosal exposure of HIV results in systemic infection is critical for the development of effective therapeutic strategies. This review focuses on understanding the immune events associated with the oral route of transmission (via breastfeeding or sexual oral intercourse), which occurs across the oral and/or gastrointestinal mucosa. Studies in both humans and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) monkey models have identified viral changes and immune events associated with oral HIV/SIV exposure. This review covers our current knowledge of HIV oral transmission in both infants and adults, the use of SIV models in understanding early immune events, oral immune factors that modulate HIV/SIV susceptibility (including mucosal inflammation), and interventions that may impact oral HIV transmission rates. Understanding the factors that influence oral HIV transmission will provide the foundation for developing immune therapeutic and vaccine strategies that can protect both infants and adults from oral HIV transmission. PMID:23772613

  9. Persistent operational challenges lead to non-reduction in maternal-infant transmission of HIV.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Regina Célia de Souza Campos; Ribas, Gustavo Fernandes; Pires e Silva, Danielli; Gomes, Alexandre Machado; Medina-Acosta, Enrique

    2010-01-01

    To determine impediments to the effective reduction of maternal-infant transmission of HIV in the municipality of Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ, Brazil. This is a cohort study, with medical follow-up, of pregnant women with confirmed diagnosis of HIV infection, and their infant children, assisted at the Municipal Specialized Service of Sexually Transmitted Diseases/AIDS from January 2004 to April 2007. Information regarding exposure and outcome variables was collected from their medical records. Frequencies of variables were determined and bivariate analysis performed for exposure factors and transmission of HIV. Relative risks of HIV transmission associated with exposure variables were calculated using 95% confidence intervals. Statistical significance of risk associations was evaluated. Seventy-eight mother-child pairs were studied; the rate of maternal-infant transmission of HIV was 7.7%. Variables showing significant association with maternal-infant transmission of HIV were the non-utilization of antiretrovirals for prophylaxis or treatment during pregnancy (RR = 21.00; 95%CI 2.64-166.74, p = 0.001) and diagnosis of maternal disease after pregnancy (RR = 6.80; 95%CI 1.59-29.17, p = 0.025). New pregnancies in women with other children also exposed to HIV occurred in 19.12% (15/78) of cases. There was no reduction in the rate of maternal-infant transmission of HIV in the period 2004-2007 in relation to the preceding triennium. The following were recognized as impediments to the effective reduction of maternal-infant transmission of HIV: low prenatal screening coverage of maternal HIV infection, impairing maternal treatment or prophylaxis; and the incorrect use of the rapid screening test at admission for delivery.

  10. Promoting African American women and sexual assertiveness in reducing HIV/AIDS: an analytical review of the research literature.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Bernice Roberts; Jenkins, Chalice C

    2011-01-01

    African American women, including adolescents and adults, are disproportionately affected by the transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). HIV/AID is a health disparity issue for African American females in comparison to other ethnic groups. According to data acquired from 33 states in 2005, 64% of women who have HIV/ AIDS are African American women. It is estimated that during 2001-2004, 61% of African Americans under the age of 25 had been living with HIV/AIDS. This article is an analytical review of the literature emphasizing sexual assertiveness of African American women and the gap that exists in research literature on this population. The multifaceted model of HIV risk posits that an interpersonal predictor of risky sexual behavior is sexual assertiveness. The critical themes extracted from a review of the literature reveal the following: (a) sexual assertiveness is related to HIV risk in women, (b) sexual assertiveness and sexual communication are related, and (c) women with low sexual assertiveness are at increased risk of HIV As a result of this comprehensive literature, future research studies need to use models in validating sexual assertiveness interventions in reducing the risk of HIV/AIDS in African American women. HIV/AIDs prevention interventions or future studies need to target reducing the risk factors of HIV/AIDS of African Americans focusing on gender and culture-specific strategies.

  11. Knowledge about HIV prevention and transmission among recently diagnosed tuberculosis patients: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with Tuberculosis (TB) are a vulnerable group for acquiring HIV infection. Therefore, countries with a concentrated HIV epidemic and high prevalence of TB should provide adequate information about HIV prevention to TB patients. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study to evaluate the level of knowledge on HIV prevention and transmission among newly diagnosed TB patients in Lima, Peru. The survey evaluated knowledge about HIV infection and prevention and was administered before HIV counseling and blood sampling for HIV testing were performed. Results A total of 171 TB patients were enrolled; mean age was 31.1 years, 101 (59%) were male. The overall mean level of knowledge of HIV was 59%; but the specific mean level of knowledge on HIV transmission and prevention was only 33.3% and 41.5%, respectively. Age and level of education correlated with overall level of knowledge in the multivariate model (P-value: 0.02 and <0.001 respectively). Conclusions The study shows inadequate levels of knowledge about HIV transmission and prevention among newly-diagnosed TB patients in this setting, and underscores the need for implementing educational interventions in this population. PMID:24373517

  12. Frequency and predictors of estimated HIV transmissions and bacterial STI acquisition among HIV-positive patients in HIV care across three continents

    PubMed Central

    Safren, Steven A; Hughes, James P; Mimiaga, Matthew J; Moore, Ayana T; Friedman, Ruth Khalili; Srithanaviboonchai, Kriengkrai; Limbada, Mohammed; Williamson, Brian D; Elharrar, Vanessa; Cummings, Vanessa; Magidson, Jessica F; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Celentano, David D; Mayer, Kenneth H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Successful global treatment as prevention (TasP) requires identifying HIV-positive individuals at high risk for transmitting HIV, and having impact via potential infections averted. This study estimated the frequency and predictors of numbers of HIV transmissions and bacterial sexually transmitted infection (STI) acquisition among sexually active HIV-positive individuals in care from three representative global settings. Methods HIV-positive individuals (n=749), including heterosexual men, heterosexual women and men who have sex with men (MSM) in HIV care, were recruited from Chiang Mai (Thailand), Rio De Janeiro (Brazil) and Lusaka (Zambia). Participants were assessed on HIV and STI sexual transmission risk variables, psychosocial characteristics and bacterial STIs at enrolment and quarterly for 12 months (covering 15 months). Estimated numbers of HIV transmissions per person were calculated using reported numbers of partners and sex acts together with estimates of HIV transmissibility, accounting for ART treatment and condom use. Results An estimated 3.81 (standard error, (SE)=0.63) HIV transmissions occurred for every 100 participants over the 15 months, which decreased over time. The highest rate was 19.50 (SE=1.68) for every 100 MSM in Brazil. In a multivariable model, country×risk group interactions emerged: in Brazil, MSM had 2.85 (95% CI=1.45, 4.25, p<0.0001) more estimated transmissions than heterosexual men and 3.37 (95% CI=2.01, 4.74, p<0.0001) more than heterosexual women over the 15 months. For MSM and heterosexual women, the combined 12-month STI incidence rate for the sample was 22.4% (95% CI=18.1%, 27.3%; incidence deemed negligible in heterosexual men). In the multivariable model, MSM had 12.3 times greater odds (95% CI=4.44, 33.98) of acquiring an STI than women, but this was not significant in Brazil. Higher alcohol use on the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (OR=1.04, 95% CI=1.01, 1.08) was also significantly associated

  13. [Consensus statement on monitoring of HIV: pregnancy, birth, and prevention of mother-to-child transmission].

    PubMed

    Polo Rodríguez, Rosa; Muñoz Galligo, Eloy; Iribarren, José Antonio; Domingo Pedrol, Pere; Leyes García, María; Maiques Montesinos, Vicente; Miralles Martín, Pilar; Noguera Julian, Antoni; Ocampo Hernández, Antonio; Péres Bares, María Lourdes; López Rojano, Marta; Suy Franch, Anna; Viñuela Beneitez, María Carmen; González Tomé, María Isabel

    2014-05-01

    The main objective in the management of HIV-infected pregnant women is prevention of mother-to-child transmission; therefore, it is essential to provide universal antiretroviral treatment, regardless of CD4 count. All pregnant women must receive adequate information and undergo HIV serology testing at the first visit. We assembled a panel of experts appointed by the Secretariat of the National AIDS Plan (SPNS) and the other participating Scientific Societies, which included internal medicine physicians with expertise in the field of HIV infection, gynecologists, pediatricians and psychologists. Four panel members acted as coordinators. Scientific information was reviewed in publications and conference reports up to November 2012. In keeping with the criteria of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 2levels of evidence were applied to support the proposed recommendations: the strength of the recommendation according to expert opinion (A, B, C), and the level of empirical evidence (I, II, III). This approach has already been used in previous documents from SPNS. The aim of this paper was to review current scientific knowledge, and, accordingly, develop a set of recommendations regarding antiretroviral therapy (ART), regarding the health of the mother, and from the perspective of minimizing mother-to-child transmission (MTCT), also taking into account the rest of the health care of pregnant women with HIV infection. We also discuss and evaluate other strategies to reduce the MTCT (elective Cesarean, child's treatment…), and different aspects of the topic (ARV regimens, their toxicity, monitoring during pregnancy and postpartum, etc.). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  14. Transmission of drug-resistant HIV-1 in Europe remains limited to single classes.

    PubMed

    2008-03-12

    The spread of drug-resistant HIV-1 might compromise the future success of current first-line regimens. To analyse the extent and impact of transmission of drug-resistant HIV-1 variants in Europe. The European prospective programme (SPREAD) collected demographic, clinical and virological data from 1245 HIV-1-infected individuals in 17 countries diagnosed in 2002-2003. The potential impact of transmitted drug resistance mutations (TDRMs) on therapy response was determined by using genotypic interpretation algorithms. The overall prevalence of viruses with drug-resistance mutations was 9.1% [96/1050; 95% confidence interval: 7.5-11.1]. The majority (71%) harboured only a single amino acid substitution with limited effect on predicted drug susceptibility. Mutations associated with resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors were observed most frequently [57/1050 (5.4%)], followed by mutations related to protease inhibitors [32/1050 (3.0%)] and mutations related to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) [27/1050 (2.6%)]. In some cases, however, resistance was quite extensive. Four individuals were infected with viruses with reduced susceptibility to all nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, 3 to all protease inhibitors and 20 to both NNRTIs. Remarkably, in one individual, the resistance pattern was so extensive that none of the available current antiretroviral drugs was predicted to be fully active. The prevalence of TDRM-HIV is quite prominent (9.1%) but did not increase in comparison with a large retrospective European study. Particularly the presence of single NNRTI mutations may impact the efficacy of the first-line regimens. Continuous prospective monitoring remains indicated to explore the patterns and factors contributing to the transmission of TDRMs as well as the potential clinical consequences.

  15. Combining social and genetic networks to study HIV transmission in mixing risk groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarrabi, Narges; Prosperi, Mattia C. F.; Belleman, Robbert G.; Di Giambenedetto, Simona; Fabbiani, Massimiliano; De Luca, Andrea; Sloot, Peter M. A.

    2013-09-01

    Reconstruction of HIV transmission networks is important for understanding and preventing the spread of the virus and drug resistant variants. Mixing risk groups is important in network analysis of HIV in order to assess the role of transmission between risk groups in the HIV epidemic. Most of the research focuses on the transmission within HIV risk groups, while transmission between different risk groups has been less studied. We use a proposed filter-reduction method to infer hypothetical transmission networks of HIV by combining data from social and genetic scales. We modified the filtering process in order to include mixing risk groups in the model. For this, we use the information on phylogenetic clusters obtained through phylogenetic analysis. A probability matrix is also defined to specify contact rates between individuals form the same and different risk groups. The method converts the data form each scale into network forms and combines them by overlaying and computing their intersection. We apply this method to reconstruct networks of HIV infected patients in central Italy, including mixing between risk groups. Our results suggests that bisexual behavior among Italian MSM and IDU partnership are relatively important in heterosexual transmission of HIV in central Italy.

  16. Risk Denial and Socio-Economic Factors Related to High HIV Transmission in a Fishing Community in Rakai, Uganda: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Lubega, Muhamadi; Nakyaanjo, Neema; Nansubuga, Sumaya; Hiire, Edgar; Kigozi, Godfrey; Nakigozi, Gertrude; Lutalo, Tom; Nalugoda, Fred; Serwadda, David; Gray, Ronald; Wawer, Maria; Kennedy, Caitylin; Reynolds, Steven James

    2015-01-01

    In Kasensero fishing community, home of the first recorded case of HIV in Uganda, HIV transmission is still very high with an incidence of 4.3 and 3.1 per 100 person-years in women and men, respectively, and an HIV prevalence of 44%, reaching up to 74% among female sex workers. We explored drivers for the high HIV transmission at Kasensero from the perspective of fishermen and other community members to inform future policy and preventive interventions. 20 in-depth interviews including both HIV positive and HIV negative respondents, and 12 focus-group discussions involving a total of 92 respondents from the Kasensero fishing community were conducted during April-September 2014. Content analysis was performed to identify recurrent themes. The socio-economic risk factors for high HIV transmission in Kasensero fishing community cited were multiple and cross-cutting and categorized into the following themes: power of money, risk denial, environmental triggers and a predisposing lifestyle and alcoholism and drug abuse. Others were: peer pressure, poor housing and the search for financial support for both the men and women which made them vulnerable to HIV exposure and or risk behavior. There is a need for context specific combination prevention interventions in Kasensero that includes the fisher folk and other influential community leaders. Such groups could be empowered with the knowledge and social mobilization skills to fight the negative and risky behaviors, perceptions, beliefs, misconceptions and submission attitudes to fate that exposes the community to high HIV transmission. There is also need for government/partners to ensure effective policy implementation, life jackets for all fishermen, improve the poor housing at the community so as to reduce overcrowding and other housing related predispositions to high HIV rates at the community. Work place AIDS-competence teams have been successfully used to address high HIV transmission in similar settings.

  17. Risk Denial and Socio-Economic Factors Related to High HIV Transmission in a Fishing Community in Rakai, Uganda: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Lubega, Muhamadi; Nakyaanjo, Neema; Nansubuga, Sumaya; Hiire, Edgar; Kigozi, Godfrey; Nakigozi, Gertrude; Lutalo, Tom; Nalugoda, Fred; Serwadda, David; Gray, Ronald; Wawer, Maria; Kennedy, Caitylin; Reynolds, Steven James

    2015-01-01

    Background In Kasensero fishing community, home of the first recorded case of HIV in Uganda, HIV transmission is still very high with an incidence of 4.3 and 3.1 per 100 person-years in women and men, respectively, and an HIV prevalence of 44%, reaching up to 74% among female sex workers. We explored drivers for the high HIV transmission at Kasensero from the perspective of fishermen and other community members to inform future policy and preventive interventions. Methods 20 in-depth interviews including both HIV positive and HIV negative respondents, and 12 focus-group discussions involving a total of 92 respondents from the Kasensero fishing community were conducted during April-September 2014. Content analysis was performed to identify recurrent themes. Results The socio-economic risk factors for high HIV transmission in Kasensero fishing community cited were multiple and cross-cutting and categorized into the following themes: power of money, risk denial, environmental triggers and a predisposing lifestyle and alcoholism and drug abuse. Others were: peer pressure, poor housing and the search for financial support for both the men and women which made them vulnerable to HIV exposure and or risk behavior. Conclusions There is a need for context specific combination prevention interventions in Kasensero that includes the fisher folk and other influential community leaders. Such groups could be empowered with the knowledge and social mobilization skills to fight the negative and risky behaviors, perceptions, beliefs, misconceptions and submission attitudes to fate that exposes the community to high HIV transmission. There is also need for government/partners to ensure effective policy implementation, life jackets for all fishermen, improve the poor housing at the community so as to reduce overcrowding and other housing related predispositions to high HIV rates at the community. Work place AIDS-competence teams have been successfully used to address high HIV

  18. Bacterial Vaginosis Associated with Increased Risk of Female-to-Male HIV-1 Transmission: A Prospective Cohort Analysis among African Couples

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Craig R.; Lingappa, Jairam R.; Baeten, Jared M.; Ngayo, Musa O.; Spiegel, Carol A.; Hong, Ting; Donnell, Deborah; Celum, Connie; Kapiga, Saidi; Delany, Sinead; Bukusi, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacterial vaginosis (BV), a disruption of the normal vaginal flora, has been associated with a 60% increased risk of HIV-1 acquisition in women and higher concentration of HIV-1 RNA in the genital tract of HIV-1–infected women. However, whether BV, which is present in up to half of African HIV-1–infected women, is associated with an increase in HIV-1 transmission to male partners has not been assessed in previous studies. Methods and Findings We assessed the association between BV on female-to-male HIV-1 transmission risk in a prospective study of 2,236 HIV-1–seropositive women and their HIV-1 uninfected male partners from seven African countries from a randomized placebo-controlled trial that enrolled heterosexual African adults who were seropositive for both HIV-1 and herpes simplex virus (HSV)-2, and their HIV-1–seronegative partners. Participants were followed for up to 24 months; every three months, vaginal swabs were obtained from female partners for Gram stain and male partners were tested for HIV-1. BV and normal vaginal flora were defined as a Nugent score of 7–10 and 0–3, respectively. To reduce misclassification, HIV-1 sequence analysis of viruses from seroconverters and their partners was performed to determine linkage of HIV-1 transmissions. Overall, 50 incident HIV-1 infections occurred in men in which the HIV-1–infected female partner had an evaluable vaginal Gram stain. HIV-1 incidence in men whose HIV-1–infected female partners had BV was 2.91 versus 0.76 per 100 person-years in men whose female partners had normal vaginal flora (hazard ratio 3.62, 95% CI 1.74–7.52). After controlling for sociodemographic factors, sexual behavior, male circumcision, sexually transmitted infections, pregnancy, and plasma HIV-1 RNA levels in female partners, BV was associated with a greater than 3-fold increased risk of female-to-male HIV-1 transmission (adjusted hazard ratio 3.17, 95% CI 1.37–7.33). Conclusions This study identified an

  19. Heterosexual Transmission of Subtype C HIV-1 Selects Consensus-Like Variants without Increased Replicative Capacity or Interferon-α Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Fenton-May, Angharad E.; Dilernia, Dario A.; Kilembe, William; Allen, Susan A.; Borrow, Persephone; Hunter, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Heterosexual transmission of HIV-1 is characterized by a genetic bottleneck that selects a single viral variant, the transmitted/founder (TF), during most transmission events. To assess viral characteristics influencing HIV-1 transmission, we sequenced 167 near full-length viral genomes and generated 40 infectious molecular clones (IMC) including TF variants and multiple non-transmitted (NT) HIV-1 subtype C variants from six linked heterosexual transmission pairs near the time of transmission. Consensus-like genomes sensitive to donor antibodies were selected for during transmission in these six transmission pairs. However, TF variants did not demonstrate increased viral fitness in terms of particle infectivity or viral replicative capacity in activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC). In addition, resistance of the TF variant to the antiviral effects of interferon-α (IFN-α) was not significantly different from that of non-transmitted variants from the same transmission pair. Thus neither in vitro viral replicative capacity nor IFN-α resistance discriminated the transmission potential of viruses in the quasispecies of these chronically infected individuals. However, our findings support the hypothesis that within-host evolution of HIV-1 in response to adaptive immune responses reduces viral transmission potential. PMID:26378795

  20. Vaccines and microbicides preventing HIV-1, HSV-2, and HPV mucosal transmission.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Damjan S; Piguet, Vincent

    2010-02-01

    HIV-1, herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), and human papillomavirus (HPV), among other sexually transmitted infections, represent a major burden for global health. Initial insights into the mucosal transmission of these viral pathogens have raised optimism with regard to the rapid generation of protective vaccines. Nevertheless, setbacks for HIV-1 and HSV-2 vaccines have seriously challenged the initial enthusiasm. Recently, two new vaccines that efficiently prevented HPV infection have renewed the hope that vaccinal prevention of viral mucosal sexually transmitted infections is possible. HIV-1 and HSV-2 differ from HPV, and each virus needs to be tackled with a distinct approach. However, vaccines are not the only possible answer. Topically applied agents (microbicides) are an attractive alternative in the prevention of HIV-1 and HSV-2 mucosal transmission. Progress in understanding the mechanisms of genital transmission of HIV-1 and HSV-2 is required for successful vaccine or microbicide candidates to emerge from current approaches.

  1. The other STDs. Linked with HIV transmission, they are attracting new attention.

    PubMed

    Lande, R E

    1992-12-01

    Health officials began neglecting sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) (syphilis, gonorrhea, chlamydia, trichomoniasis, and chancroid) when the AIDS epidemic began. They now refocus efforts on STDs because data indicate that STDs facilitate HIV transmission. Even though the risk of HIV transmission is lower in people with nonulcerative STDs than those with genital ulcers (0-4 vs. 2-5 times), the link between nonulcerative STDs and HIV transmission is a greater problem since nonulcerative STD cases occur more often than genital ulcers. Many AIDS control programs execute STD control activities. Countries must improve existing STD control programs. They should strengthen STD surveillance. Viet Nam has established surveillance sites at STD clinics in 4 cities. Training different health providers in STD control would make STD services accessible to more people. These providers include nurses, midwives, pharmacists, and even traditional healers and should be based at pharmacies and primary health care, maternal and child health, and family planning clinics. Primary health care workers should use symptoms to diagnose and treat STDs rather than laboratory tests. 1 drawback of this syndromic approach is that about 50% of women do not exhibit STD symptoms. STD control programs must guarantee a steady reserve of drugs. In Zimbabwe, primary health clinics receive STD drugs from a decentralized drug distribution system (5-8 warehouses) rather than the older centralized system (1 warehouse). This has reduced the waiting time from 6 months to 4-6 weeks. Programs need to encourage individuals to seek early treatment of STDs via health education campaigns (e.g., mass media), outreach to high risk groups such as prostitutes and the patron, and contact tracing. STD counselors should promote condom use. An STD program in Nairobi, Kenya informs patients to use a condom during sex with any causal sex partner, shows patients how to put on and take off the condom, and tells them where

  2. Topical application of entry inhibitors as "virustats" to prevent sexual transmission of HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Lederman, Michael M; Jump, Robin; Pilch-Cooper, Heather A; Root, Michael; Sieg, Scott F

    2008-01-01

    With the continuing march of the AIDS epidemic and little hope for an effective vaccine in the near future, work to develop a topical strategy to prevent HIV infection is increasingly important. This stated, the track record of large scale "microbicide" trials has been disappointing with nonspecific inhibitors either failing to protect women from infection or even increasing HIV acquisition. Newer strategies that target directly the elements needed for viral entry into cells have shown promise in non-human primate models of HIV transmission and as these agents have not yet been broadly introduced in regions of highest HIV prevalence, they are particularly attractive for prophylaxis. We review here the agents that can block HIV cellular entry and that show promise as topical strategies or "virustats" to prevent mucosal transmission of HIV infection PMID:19094217

  3. Factors associated with mother to child transmission of HIV despite overall low transmission rates in HIV-exposed infants in rural Kenya.

    PubMed

    Okoko, Nicollate A; Owuor, Kevin O; Kulzer, Jayne L; Owino, George O; Ogolla, Irene A; Wandera, Ronald W; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Cohen, Craig R; Abuogi, Lisa L

    2017-01-01

    Despite the availability of efficacious prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) interventions and improved access to preventive services in many developing countries, vertical HIV transmission persists. A matched case-control study of HIV-exposed infants between January and June 2012 was conducted at 20 clinics in Kenya. Cases were HIV-infected infants and controls were exposed, uninfected infants. Conditional logistic regression analysis was conducted to determine characteristics associated with HIV infection. Forty-five cases and 45 controls were compared. Characteristics associated with HIV-infection included poor PMTCT service uptake such as late infant enrollment (odds ratio [OR]: 7.1, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.6-16.7) and poor adherence to infant prophylaxis (OR: 8.3, 95%CI: 3.2-21.4). Maternal characteristics associated with MTCT included lack of awareness of HIV status (OR: 5.6, 95%CI: 2.2-14.5), failure to access antiretroviral prophylaxis (OR: 22.2, 95%CI: 5.8-84.6), and poor adherence (OR: 8.1, 95%CI: 3.7-17.8). Lack of clinic-based HIV education (OR: 7.7, 95%CI: 2.0-25.0) and counseling (OR: 8.3, 95%CI: 2.2-33.3) were reported by mothers of cases. Poor uptake of PMTCT services and a reported absence of HIV education and counseling at the clinic were associated with MTCT. More emphasis on high-quality, comprehensive PMTCT service provision are urgently needed to minimize HIV transmission to children.

  4. Cytomegalovirus upregulates expression of CCR5 in central memory cord blood mononuclear cells, which may facilitate in utero HIV type 1 transmission.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Erica L; Howard, Chanie L; Thurman, Joy; Pontiff, Kyle; Johnson, Elan S; Chakraborty, Rana

    2015-01-15

    Administration of combination antiretroviral therapy to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected pregnant women significantly reduces vertical transmission. In contrast, maternal co-opportunistic infection with primary or reactivated cytomegalovirus (CMV) or other pathogens may facilitate in utero transmission of HIV-1 by activation of cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs). Here we examine the targets and mechanisms that affect fetal susceptibility to HIV-1 in utero. Using flow cytometry, we demonstrate that the fraction of CD4(+)CD45RO(+) and CD4(+)CCR5(+) CBMCs is minimal, which may account for the low level of in utero HIV-1 transmission. Unstimulated CD4(+) CBMCs that lack CCR5/CD45RO showed reduced levels of HIV-1 infection. However, upon in vitro stimulation with CMV, CBMCs undergo increased proliferation to upregulate the fraction of T central memory cells and expression of CCR5, which enhances susceptibility to HIV-1 infection in vitro. These data suggest that activation induced by CMV in vivo may alter CCR5 expression in CD4(+) T central memory cells to promote in utero transmission of HIV-1. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. HIV Transmission Risk Persists During the First 6 Months of Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mujugira, Andrew; Celum, Connie; Coombs, Robert W.; Campbell, James D.; Ndase, Patrick; Ronald, Allan; Were, Edwin; Bukusi, Elizabeth A.; Mugo, Nelly; Kiarie, James; Baeten, Jared M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) decreases the risk of sexual HIV transmission by suppressing blood and genital HIV RNA concentrations. We sought to determine HIV transmission risk prior to achieving complete viral suppression. Design Prospective cohort study. Methods Using data from the Partners PrEP Study, a prospective study of 4747 heterosexual HIV-serodiscordant couples in Kenya and Uganda, we examined multiple markers of HIV transmission risk during the first months after ART initiation: time to viral suppression in blood, persistence of HIV RNA in genital specimens, sexual risk behavior, pregnancy incidence, and HIV transmission using survival analysis and GEE logistic regression. Results The cumulative probabilities of achieving blood viral suppression (<80 copies/ml) 3, 6 and 9-months after ART initiation were 65.3%, 84.8% and 89.1%, respectively. Endocervical and seminal HIV RNA were detectable in 12% and 21% of samples obtained within 6-months of ART. Pregnancy incidence was 8.8 per 100 person-years during the first 6-months of ART, and sex unprotected by condoms was reported at 10.5% of visits. Among initially uninfected partners, HIV incidence before ART was 2.08 per 100 person-years (55 infections; 2644 person-years), 1.79 for 0–6 months after ART initiation (3 infections; 168 person-years), and 0.00 with >6 months of ART (0 infections; 167 person-years). Conclusions Residual HIV transmission risk persists during the first 6-months of ART, with incomplete viral suppression in blood and genital compartments. For HIV-serodiscordant couples in which the infected partner starts ART, other prevention options are needed, such as pre-exposure prophylaxis, until viral suppression is achieved. PMID:27070123

  6. Does opioid substitution treatment in prisons reduce injecting-related HIV risk behaviours? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Larney, Sarah

    2010-02-01

    To review systematically the evidence on opioid substitution treatment (OST) in prisons in reducing injecting-related human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk behaviours. Systematic review in accordance with guidelines of the Cochrane Collaboration. Electronic databases were searched to identify studies of prison-based opioid substitution treatment programmes that included assessment of effects of prison OST on injecting drug use, sharing of needles and syringes and HIV incidence. Published data were used to calculate risk ratios for outcomes of interest. Risk ratios were not pooled due to the low number of studies and differences in study designs. Five studies were included in the review. Poor follow-up rates were reported in two studies, and representativeness of the sample was uncertain in the remaining three studies. Compared to inmates in control conditions, for treated inmates the risk of injecting drug use was reduced by 55-75% and risk of needle and syringe sharing was reduced by 47-73%. No study reported a direct effect of prison OST on HIV incidence. There may be a role for OST in preventing HIV transmission in prisons, but methodologically rigorous research addressing this question specifically is required. OST should be implemented in prisons as part of comprehensive HIV prevention programmes that also provide condoms and sterile injecting and tattooing equipment.

  7. Short Communication: Phylogenetic Evidence of HIV-1 Transmission Between Adult and Adolescent Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Elizabeth; Herbeck, Joshua T; Van Rompaey, Stephen; Kitahata, Mari; Thomas, Katherine; Pepper, Gregory; Frenkel, Lisa

    2017-04-01

    HIV-1 incidence among youth, especially men who have sex with men (MSM), is increasing in the United States. We aimed to better understand the patterns of adolescent HIV-1 acquisition, to help guide future prevention interventions. We conducted a study combining epidemiologic and HIV-1 pol sequence data from a retrospective cohort of HIV-infected adults and adolescents in Seattle, WA between 2000 and 2013. Adolescents were defined as 13-24 years of age at the time of first HIV-1 care. Maximum-likelihood phylogenetic trees were reconstructed to identify putative viral transmission clusters of two or more individuals, followed by multivariable regression tests of associations between clustering and demographic and clinical parameters. The dataset included 3,102 sequences from 1,953 individuals; 72 putative transmission clusters were identified, representing 168 individuals (8.6%). MSM and MSM/intravenous drug use (IDU) were positively associated with clustering, with aOR 3.18 (95% CI: 1.34-7.55) and 2.59 (95% CI: 1.04-6.49), respectively. African American race was negatively associated with clustering (aOR 0.54 95% CI: 0.32-0.91). Twenty-five clusters contained one adolescent and five clusters contained two adolescents. Other individuals who clustered with adolescents were predominantly male (95%), white (85%), and either MSM (66%) or MSM/IDU (16%), with a greater mean age (34 years vs. 22 years; p < .01). In this Seattle cohort, HIV-1 transmission linkages were identified between white male adolescents and older MSM adults. Interventions aimed at age-discrepant pairs may reduce HIV-1 infections in adolescent males.

  8. Effects of a behavioral intervention to reduce serodiscordant unsafe sex among HIV positive men who have sex with men: the Positive Connections randomized controlled trial study.

    PubMed

    Rosser, B R Simon; Hatfield, Laura A; Miner, Michael H; Ghiselli, Margherita E; Lee, Brian R; Welles, Seth L

    2010-04-01

    Few behavioral interventions have been conducted to reduce high-risk sexual behavior among HIV-positive Men who have Sex with Men (HIV+ MSM). Hence, we lack well-proven interventions for this population. Positive Connections is a randomized controlled trial (n = 675 HIV+ MSM) comparing the effects of two sexual health seminars--for HIV+ MSM and all MSM--with a contrast prevention video arm. Baseline, 6-, 12- and 18-month follow-up surveys assessed psychosexual variables and frequency of serodiscordant unprotected anal intercourse (SDUAI). At post-test, intentions to avoid transmission were significantly higher in the sexual health arms. However, SDUAI frequency decreased equally across arms. HIV+ MSM engaging in SDUAI at baseline were more likely to leave the study. Tailoring interventions to HIV+ MSM did not increase their effectiveness in this study. A sexual health approach appeared as effective as an untailored video-based HIV prevention intervention in reducing SDUAI among HIV+ MSM.

  9. Different subtype distributions in two cities in Myanmar: evidence for independent clusters of HIV-1 transmission.

    PubMed

    Motomura, Kazushi; Kusagawa, Shigeru; Lwin, Hla Htut; Thwe, Min; Kato, Kayoko; Oishi, Kazunori; Yamamoto, Naoki; Zaw, Myint; Nagatake, Tsuyoshi; Takebe, Yutaka

    2003-03-07

    A molecular epidemiological investigation was conducted in two major cities in Myanmar (Yangon and Mandalay). The study revealed a unique predominance of HIV-1 subtype B' (Thailand variant of subtype B) among injecting drug users in Yangon, indicating the strong founder effect of this variant. In contrast, multiple lineages of HIV-1 strains were found in Mandalay, leading to the evolution of various forms of intersubtype recombinants. The results showed independent clusters of HIV-1 transmission in Myanmar.

  10. Understanding the effects of different HIV transmission models in individual-based microsimulation of HIV epidemic dynamics in people who inject drugs.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, J F G; Escudero, D J; Weinreb, C; Flanigan, T; Galea, S; Friedman, S R; Marshall, B D L

    2016-06-01

    We investigated how different models of HIV transmission, and assumptions regarding the distribution of unprotected sex and syringe-sharing events ('risk acts'), affect quantitative understanding of HIV transmission process in people who inject drugs (PWID). The individual-based model simulated HIV transmission in a dynamic sexual and injecting network representing New York City. We constructed four HIV transmission models: model 1, constant probabilities; model 2, random number of sexual and parenteral acts; model 3, viral load individual assigned; and model 4, two groups of partnerships (low and high risk). Overall, models with less heterogeneity were more sensitive to changes in numbers risk acts, producing HIV incidence up to four times higher than that empirically observed. Although all models overestimated HIV incidence, micro-simulations with greater heterogeneity in the HIV transmission modelling process produced more robust results and better reproduced empirical epidemic dynamics.

  11. Cellular and viral mechanisms of HIV-1 transmission mediated by dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Christopher M; Gelais, Corine St; Wu, Li

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in the initial infection and cell-to-cell transmission events that occur upon HIV-1 infection. DCs interact closely with CD4(+) T cells, the main target of HIV-1 replication. HIV-1 challenged DCs and target CD4(+) T cells form a virological synapse that allows highly efficient transmission of HIV-1 to the target CD4(+) T cells, in the absence of productive HIV-1 replication in the DCs. Immature and subsets of mature DCs show distinct patterns of HIV-1 replication and cell-to-cell transmission, depending upon the maturation stimulus that is used. The cellular and viral mechanisms that promote formation of the virological synapse have been the subject of intense study and the most recent progress is discussed here. Characterizing the cellular and viral factors that affect DC-mediated cell-to-cell transmission of HIV-1 to CD4(+) T cells is vitally important to understanding, and potentially blocking, the initial dissemination of HIV-1 in vivo.

  12. HIV-1 VAGINAL TRANSMISSION: CELL-FREE OR CELL-ASSOCIATED VIRUS?

    PubMed Central

    Barreto-de-Souza, Victor; Arakelyan, Anush; Margolis, Leonid; Vanpouille, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of new HIV infections in male-to-female transmission occurs through semen, where HIV-1 is present in two different forms: as free and as cell-associated virus. In the female lower genital tract, semen mixes with female genital secretions that contain various factors, some of which facilitate or inhibit HIV-1 transmission. Next, HIV-1 crosses the genital epithelia, reaches the regional lymph nodes, and disseminates through the female host. Cervico-vaginal mucosa contains multiple barriers, resulting in a low probability of vaginal transmission. However, in some cases HIV-1 is able to break these barriers. Although the exact mechanisms of how these barriers function remain unclear, their levels of efficiency against cell-free and cell-associated HIV-1 are different, and both cell-free and cell-associated virions seem to use different strategies to overcome these barriers. Understanding the basic mechanisms of HIV-1 vaginal transmission is required for the development of new antiviral strategies to contain HIV-1 epidemics. PMID:24730358

  13. Monoclonal And Single Domain Antibodies Targeting β-Integrin Subunits Block Sexual Transmission of HIV-1 in in vitro and in vivo Model Systems

    PubMed Central

    Guedon, Janet Tai; Luo, Kun; Zhang, Hong; Markham, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Poor adherence to prevention regimens for gel-based anti-HIV-1 microbicides has been a major obstacle to more effective pre-exposure prophylaxis. Concern persists that the antiretroviral drug containing microbicides might promote development of antiretroviral resistance. Methods Using in vitro transwell systems and a humanized mouse model of HIV-1 sexual transmission, we examined, as candidate microbicides, antibodies targeting the heterodimeric leukocyte function associated antigen 1 (LFA-1), a non-virally encoded protein acquired by the virus that also plays a critical role cell movement across endothelial and epithelial barriers. LFA-1 specific single domain variable regions from alpaca heavy-chain only antibodies (VHH) were identified and evaluated for their ability to inhibit HIV-1 transmission in the in vitro transwell system. Results Monoclonal antibodies targeting the CD11a and CD18 components of LFA-1 significantly reduced cell-free and cell-associated HIV-1 transmission in the in vitro transwell culture system and prevented virus transmission in the humanized mouse model of vaginal transmission. The broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody b12 was unable to block transmission of cell-free virus. CD11a-specific VHH were isolated and expressed and the purified variable region protein domains reduced in vitro transepithelial transmission with an efficacy comparable to that of the CD11a monoclonal antibody. Conclusions Targeting integrins acquired by HIV-1 during budding and which are critical to interactions between epithelial cells and lymphocytes can reduce viral movement across epithelial barriers and prevent transmission in a humanized mouse model of sexual transmission. VHH capable of being produced by transformed bacteria can significantly reduce transepithelial virus transmission in in vitro model systems. PMID:25828964

  14. Vaginal microbiota and sexually transmitted infections that may influence transmission of cell-associated HIV.

    PubMed

    Cone, Richard A

    2014-12-15

    Vaginal microbiota and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are likely to influence the transmission of cell-associated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Lactic acid produced by Lactobacillus-dominated microbiota (Nugent score 0-3) will likely inhibit transmission, especially female-to-male transmission. In contrast, polymicrobial microbiota (Nugent score 4-10), community state types IV-A and IV-B, and STIs will likely increase transmission of cell-associated HIV. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Transmission of cell-free and cell-associated HIV-1 through breast-feeding.

    PubMed

    Koulinska, Irene N; Villamor, Eduardo; Chaplin, Beth; Msamanga, Gernard; Fawzi, Wafaie; Renjifo, Boris; Essex, Max

    2006-01-01

    Transmission through breast-feeding is an important cause of infant HIV-1 infections in developing countries; however, its mechanism remains largely unknown. We have explored the association between cell-free virus (CFV) and cell-associated virus (CAV) levels in breast milk (BM), as reflected by viral RNA and proviral DNA, respectively, and the risk of infant HIV-1 infection after 6 weeks postpartum. Sixty-one HIV-positive mothers who transmitted HIV-1 by BM were matched to 61 HIV-positive nontransmitting mothers based on their infant's age at sample collection. CFV and CAV were quantified in a single milk specimen per mother preceding the infant's first HIV-positive result. After adjusting for maternal CD4 cell counts and disease stage, each 10-fold increase in CFV or CAV load was associated with an almost 3-fold increase in BM transmission. Whereas CAV load was predictive of transmission before and after 9 months postpartum, CFV was a significant predictor of transmission occurring only after 9 months. Phylogenetic analyses of the C2 to C5 env region showed that 85% of infants (11 of 13 infants) harboring viruses that clustered with CFV in their mother's milk were infected after 9 months postpartum. A reduction in milk CAV and CFV loads might significantly decrease HIV-1 transmission by breast-feeding.

  16. Exploring Migratory Dynamics on HIV Transmission: The Case of Mexicans in New York City and Puebla, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent; McCarthy, Katharine; Muñoz-Laboy, Miguel A.; de Lourdes Rosas López, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Migration and population movement are increasingly viewed as important factors associated with HIV transmission risk. With growing awareness of the potential impact of migration on HIV transmission, several perspectives have emerged that posit differing dynamics of risk. We considered available data on the role of migration on HIV transmission among Mexican migrants in New York City and Puebla, Mexico. Specifically, we examined 3 distinct models of migratory dynamics of HIV transmission—namely, the structural model, the local contextual model, and the interplay model. In doing so, we reframed current public health perspectives on the role of migration on HIV transmission. PMID:24825203

  17. How Many HIV Infections May Be Averted by Targeting Primary Infection in Men Who Have Sex With Men? Quantification of Changes in Transmission-Risk Behavior, Using an Individual-Based Model

    PubMed Central

    White, Peter J.; Fox, Julie; Weber, Jonathan; Fidler, Sarah; Ward, Helen

    2014-01-01

    In the United Kingdom, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission among men who have sex with men (MSM) is not under control, despite readily available treatment, highlighting the need to design a cost-effective combination prevention package. MSM report significantly reduced transmission risk behavior following HIV diagnosis. To assess the effectiveness of HIV diagnosis in averting transmission during highly infectious primary HIV infection (PHI), we developed a stochastic individual-based model to calculate the number of HIV-transmission events expected to occur from a cohort of recently infected MSM with and those without the behavior changes reported after diagnosis. The model incorporates different types of sex acts, incorporates condom use, and distinguishes between regular and casual sex partners. The impact on transmission in the 3 months after infection depends on PHI duration and testing frequency. If PHI lasts for 3 months and testing is performed monthly, then behavior changes after diagnosis would have reduced estimated transmission events by 49%–52%, from 31–45 to 15–23 events; a shorter duration of PHI and/or a lower testing frequency reduces the number of infections averted. Diagnosing HIV during PHI can markedly reduce transmission by changing transmission-risk behavior. Because of the high infectivity but short duration of PHI, even short-term behavior change can significantly reduce transmission. Our quantification of the number of infections averted is an essential component of assessment of the cost-effectiveness of strategies to increase detection and diagnoses of PHI. PMID:25381380

  18. Predictors of Early and Late Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV in a Breastfeeding Population: HIV Network for Prevention Trials 012 Experience, Kampala, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Mmiro, Francis A.; Aizire, Jim; Mwatha, Anthony K.; Eshleman, Susan H.; Donnell, Deborah; Fowler, Mary Glenn; Nakabiito, Clemensia; Musoke, Philippa M.; Jackson, J. Brooks; Guay, Laura A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine the predictors for early versus later (breastfeeding) transmission of HIV-1. Methods: Secondary data analysis was performed on HIV Network for Prevention Trials 012, a completed randomized clinical trial assessing the relative efficacy of nevirapine (NVP) versus zidovudine in reducing mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV-1. We used Cox regression analysis to assess risk factors for MTCT. The ViroSeq HIV genotyping and a sensitive point mutation assay were used to detect NVP resistance mutations. Results: In this subset analyses, 122 of 610 infants were HIV infected, of whom 99 (81.1%) were infected early (first positive polymerase chain reaction ≤56 days). Incidence of MTCT after 56 days was low [0.7% per month (95% confidence interval, CI: 0.4 to 1.0)], but continued through 18 months. In multivariate analyses, early MTCT “factors” included NVP versus zidovudine (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.57, 95% CI: 0.38 to 0.86), pre-entry maternal viral load (VL, HR = 1.76, 95% CI: 1.28 to 2.41), and CD4 cell count (HR = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.05 to 1.28). Maternal VL (6–8 weeks) was associated with late MTCT (HR = 3.66, 95% CI: 1.78 to 7.50), whereas maternal NVP resistance (6–8 weeks) was not. Conclusions: Maternal VL was the best predictor of both early and late transmission. Maternal NVP resistance at 6–8 weeks did not predict late transmission. PMID:19617849

  19. A connectivity model for assessment of HIV transmission risk in injection drug users (IDUs).

    PubMed

    Flaer, Paul J; Cistone, Peter J; Younis, Mustafa Z; Parkash, Jai

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to produce models composed of mapping of connectivity networks of HIV transmission risk in injection drug users (IDUs). This methodology provided a novel approach and diagnostic tool for understanding HIV infection transmission risk and drug use in the typical niche of IDUs, i.e., a "shooting gallery" (a gathering site for injection drug activity). Furthermore, component IDUs may have memberships in multiple "shooting galleries" revealing subsequent interconnectivities. Charting of IDU connectivity diagrams illustrated the relationships of peripheral sites to the critical central core of high HIV transmission risk. Members of this highly interlinked and infectious central core of IDUs had high HIV transmission risk and severe drug use-producing high morbidity and mortality that resulted in great public health concern. In addition, connectivity diagrams reveal very high HIV transmission risk in component IDUs in "dual memberships", i.e., membership in more than one central core (with the highest number of partners). Therefore, IDUs with "dual memberships" were the most infectious members of the "shooting gallery". In summation, network mapping of HIV transmission risk in IDUs allows for subsequent socio-behavioral analysis and the development of focused individual and programmatic interventions.

  20. Identifying and characterizing places for the targeted control of heterosexual HIV transmission in urban areas.

    PubMed

    Polk, Sarah; Ellen, Jonathan M; Fichtenberg, Caroline; Huettner, Steven; Reilly, Meredith; Parekh, Jenita; Jennings, Jacky M

    2014-08-01

    Places with active HIV transmission may serve as key locations for targeted control. In 2008-2009, heterosexual sex partner venues in Baltimore, MD were identified using a three-phase process and characterized by the presence or absence of HIV cases. 1,594 participants aged 18-35 years were enrolled at 87 venues. The study yielded an overall HIV prevalence of 3.7 %; 42 % of venues had ≥1 case of HIV (i.e., HIV positive venues). In final age-adjusted models, HIV positive venues had 10 % more high HIV-risk sexual partnering (95 % CI 1.01, 1.19) and more than twice as much drug market activity (95 % CI 1.04, 6.46) compared to HIV negative venues. Commercial sex work, parenteral risk behavior and venue-level sex market activity were not significantly associated with HIV status of the venues. This study highlights characteristics of venues, such as drug market activity, that may be important in identifying places with active HIV transmission.

  1. Identifying and characterizing places for the targeted control of heterosexual HIV transmission in urban areas

    PubMed Central

    Polk, Sarah; Ellen, Jonathan M; Fichtenberg, Caroline; Huettner, Steven; Reilly, Meredith; Parekh, Jenita; Jennings, Jacky M

    2014-01-01

    Places with active HIV transmission may serve as key locations for targeted control. In 2008–2009, heterosexual sex partner venues in Baltimore, MD were identified using a three-phase process and characterized by the presence or absence of HIV cases. 1,594 participants aged 18–35 years were enrolled at 87 venues. The study yielded an overall HIV prevalence of 3.7%; 42% of venues had ≥1 case of HIV (i.e., HIV positive venues). In final age-adjusted models, HIV positive venues had 10% more high HIV-risk sexual partnering (95% CI: 1.01, 1.19) and more than twice as much drug market activity (95% CI: 1.04, 6.46) compared to HIV negative venues. Commercial sex work, parenteral risk behavior and venue-level sex market activity were not significantly associated with HIV status of the venues. This study highlights characteristics of venues, such as drug market activity, that may be important in identifying places with active HIV transmission. PMID:24526225

  2. Association of HIV transmission categories with sociodemographic, viroimmunological and clinical parameters of HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Collazos, J; Asensi, V; Carton, J A

    2010-07-01

    To analyse sociodemographic, viroimmunological and clinical parameters in different HIV-transmission categories at baseline and during treatment, 3039 patients were followed up for 12 months after the initiation of a nelfinavir-based regimen. Multiple baseline parameters were significantly different in the diverse categories, including CD4 counts (P<0.0001) and viral load (P=0.02). There were differences in the groups regarding the CD4 response (P=0.01), but not the virological response (P=0.4), to therapy over time. Multivariate analyses revealed that transmission categories were significantly related to baseline CD4 counts (P=0.01), viral load at 12 months (P=0.0006), poorer adherence to therapy of injecting drug users (IDUs) vs. each of the other groups (P<0.001) and failure to complete the 12-month evaluation of IDU vs. heterosexual (P=0.003) and men who have sex with men (MSM) groups (P=0.02). We conclude that transmission categories had a significant influence on several baseline parameters and viroimmunological outcomes following highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), as well as on adherence to therapy and to medical appointments.

  3. HIV medical care provider practices for reducing high-risk sexual behavior: results of a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Drainoni, Mari-Lynn; Dekker, Debra; Lee-Hood, Elizabeth; Boehmer, Ulrike; Relf, Michael

    2009-05-01

    A first step in ensuring that HIV-infected persons practice the safer sexual behaviors that reduce disease transmission is to make certain that they receive accurate information about the relationship between sexual risk behaviors and HIV transmission. Health care providers can play a pivotal role in preventing secondary transmission of HIV; federal agencies and professional guidelines encourage providers to counsel HIV-infected patients about safer sex practices and transmission risks, particularly since the health care encounter may be the only time that HIV-infected persons receive information about prevention and risk reduction interventions. Yet research indicates that these opportunities are often missed. Prior to implementing a prevention demonstration project in an urban HIV and STD clinic, we conducted a qualitative investigation with providers, including physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and nurses. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the current status of prevention education and counseling efforts at the clinic, examine the barriers and facilitators to providing prevention counseling, and identify key areas where providers believed that they needed additional training.

  4. Acute Alcohol Consumption Directly Increases HIV Transmission Risk: A Randomized Controlled Experiment.

    PubMed

    Shuper, Paul A; Joharchi, Narges; Monti, Peter M; Loutfy, Mona; Rehm, Jürgen

    2017-09-18

    Alcohol consumption has frequently been purported as a driver of condomless sex and HIV transmission, but to date, experimental evidence for the causal risk-taking impact of alcohol among HIV-positive populations is lacking. The present experiment sought to determine whether acute alcohol consumption has a direct causal impact on condomless sex intentions among HIV-positive men-who-have-sex-with-men (MSM), and to assess whether alcohol's impact differs between MSM who are HIV-positive versus HIV-negative. In a randomized controlled alcohol administration experiment, HIV-positive and HIV-negative MSM were brought into a specialized barroom laboratory and randomly assigned to beverage consumption condition: alcohol (target BAC=.080%), placebo alcohol (target BAC=.000%), or water (control). Participants then underwent a video-based sexual arousal manipulation (sexually aroused/non-aroused) and indicated their intentions to engage in condom-protected and condomless sexual acts in a standardized paradigm. The primary outcome entailed intentions to engage in condomless receptive and condomless insertive anal sex. A total of 282 MSM (141 HIV-positive; 141 HIV-negative) completed experimental procedures. MSM who received alcohol reported significantly stronger intentions to engage in condomless sex than those who received placebo alcohol or water (F(1,274)=9.43, p=0.002). The impact of alcohol did not differ between HIV-positive and HIV-negative MSM (F(1,274)=1.86, p=0.174). The present investigation entailed the first risk-focused alcohol administration experiment to involve an HIV-positive sample, and results demonstrated that consuming alcohol had an independent, causal impact on intentions to engage in sexual behaviors that can result in HIV transmission. Findings strongly suggest that alcohol-focused initiatives should be incorporated into HIV prevention efforts.

  5. Organizing Asian Pacific Islanders in an urban community to reduce HIV risk: a case study.

    PubMed

    Loue, S; Lloyd, L S; Phoombour, E

    1996-10-01

    We present a case study of community organization efforts within the Asian Pacific Islander communities of San Diego County to reduce the risk of HIV transmission. We utilized a five-phase process to implement the strategies of locality development, social planning, and social action: community analysis, program design and initiation, program implementation, program maintenance and consolidation, and program reassessment. An evaluation of the process indicates that there were increases over time in the project's activities as well as in the levels of interagency connectedness. This is one of the few reported efforts to organize Asian Pacific Islander groups to address HIV transmission. Key elements that led to the successful organization of the original project into a tax-exempt nonprofit entity (the Asian Pacific Islander Community AIDS Project) were emphasis on community ownership, reliance on group consensus, use of "gatekeepers" to access communities, simultaneous multilevel programming, and service to the community as a "coordinating" entity.

  6. A time lag insensitive approach for estimating HIV-1 transmission direction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Ge, Meng; Pan, Xian-Ming

    2012-05-15

    Identifying the direction of transmission in transmission pairs is important both for forensic investigations and for the monitoring of HIV epidemics, however, reliable methods are not yet available due to the long time lag between infection and sampling in most real cases. Based on bottleneck effect and coreceptor switching, we aimed at identifying an estimator from sequences of viral gp120 proteins to determine transmission direction between transmission pairs. The estimator should be changed with HIV transmission but was independent of disease progression in an individual. Here, we present a novel and reliable approach for identifying transmission direction. We derived a set of conserved patterns, called common patterns, from the sequences of viruses, which differed in their coreceptor usage. The number of unique common patterns in viral sequences decreased with transmission but remained almost constant with the progress of disease in an individual. We used this number as an estimator to determine transmission direction in 73 transmission pairs for which the transmission direction was already known. Our method predicted transmission direction with an accuracy of up to 94.5%. Of greater importance, our approach was not influenced by time lags between infection and sampling, and even transmission direction for transmission pairs with long time lags ranging from 2 years to more than 18 years were correctly determined. Our approach for accurately determining transmission direction between transmission pairs is irrespective of the time lag between infection and sampling, which means a promising applications prospect.

  7. HIV DNA Set Point is Rapidly Established in Acute HIV Infection and Dramatically Reduced by Early ART.

    PubMed

    Ananworanich, Jintanat; Chomont, Nicolas; Eller, Leigh Ann; Kroon, Eugene; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Bose, Meera; Nau, Martin; Fletcher, James L K; Tipsuk, Somporn; Vandergeeten, Claire; O'Connell, Robert J; Pinyakorn, Suteeraporn; Michael, Nelson; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Robb, Merlin L

    2016-09-01

    HIV DNA is a marker of HIV persistence that predicts HIV progression and remission, but its kinetics in early acute HIV infection (AHI) is poorly understood. We longitudinally measured the frequency of peripheral blood mononuclear cells harboring total and integrated HIV DNA in 19 untreated and 71 treated AHI participants, for whom 50 were in the earliest Fiebig I/II (HIV IgM-) stage, that is ≤2weeks from infection. Without antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV DNA peaked at 2weeks after enrollment, reaching a set-point 2weeks later with little change thereafter. There was a marked divergence of HIV DNA values between the untreated and treated groups that occurred within the first 2weeks of ART and increased with time. ART reduced total HIV DNA levels by 20-fold after 2weeks and 316-fold after 3years. Therefore, very early ART offers the opportunity to significantly reduce the frequency of cells harboring HIV DNA.

  8. Implementation and Operational Research: Effect of Integration of HIV Care and Treatment Into Antenatal Care Clinics on Mother-to-Child HIV Transmission and Maternal Outcomes in Nyanza, Kenya: Results From the SHAIP Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Washington, Sierra; Owuor, Kevin; Turan, Janet M; Steinfeld, Rachel L; Onono, Maricianah; Shade, Starley B; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Ackers, Marta L; Cohen, Craig R

    2015-08-15

    Many HIV-infected pregnant women identified during antenatal care (ANC) do not enroll in long-term HIV care, resulting in deterioration of maternal health and continued risk of HIV transmission to infants. We performed a cluster randomized trial to evaluate the effect of integrating HIV care into ANC clinics in rural Kenya. Twelve facilities were randomized to provide either integrated services (ANC, prevention of mother-to-child transmission, and HIV care delivered in the ANC clinic; n = 6 intervention facilities) or standard ANC services (including prevention of mother-to-child transmission and referral to a separate clinic for HIV care; n = 6 control facilities). There were high patient attrition rates over the course of this study. Among study participants who enrolled in HIV care, there was 12-month follow-up data for 256 of 611 (41.8%) women and postpartum data for only 325 of 1172 (28%) women. By 9 months of age, 382 of 568 (67.3%) infants at intervention sites and 338 of 594 (57.0%) at control sites had tested for HIV [odds ratio (OR) 1.45, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.71 to 2.82]; 7.3% of infants tested HIV positive at intervention sites compared with 8.0% of infants at control sites (OR 0.89, 95% CI: 0.56 to 1.43). The composite clinical/immunologic progression into AIDS was similar in both arms (4.9% vs. 5.1%, OR 0.83, 95% CI: 0.41 to 1.68). Despite the provision of integrated services, patient attrition was substantial in both arms, suggesting barriers beyond lack of service integration. Integration of HIV services into the ANC clinic was not associated with a reduced risk of HIV transmission to infants and did not appear to affect short-term maternal health outcomes.

  9. Social and Genetic Networks of HIV-1 Transmission in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Wertheim, Joel O.; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L.; Forgione, Lisa A.; Mehta, Sanjay R.; Murrell, Ben; Shah, Sharmila; Smith, Davey M.; Scheffler, Konrad; Torian, Lucia V.

    2017-01-01

    Background Sexually transmitted infections spread across contact networks. Partner elicitation and notification are commonly used public health tools to identify, notify, and offer testing to persons linked in these contact networks. For HIV-1, a rapidly evolving pathogen with low per-contact transmission rates, viral genetic sequences are an additional source of data that can be used to infer or refine transmission networks. Methods and Findings The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene interviews individuals newly diagnosed with HIV and elicits names of sexual and injection drug using partners. By law, the Department of Health also receives HIV sequences when these individuals enter healthcare and their physicians order resistance testing. Our study used both HIV sequence and partner naming data from 1342 HIV-infected persons in New York City between 2006 and 2012 to infer and compare sexual/drug-use named partner and genetic transmission networks. Using these networks, we determined a range of genetic distance thresholds suitable for identifying potential transmission partners. In 48% of cases, named partners were infected with genetically closely related viruses, compatible with but not necessarily representing or implying, direct transmission. Partner pairs linked through the genetic similarity of their HIV sequences were also linked by naming in 53% of cases. Persons who reported high-risk heterosexual contact were more likely to name at least one partner with a genetically similar virus than those reporting their risk as injection drug use or men who have sex with men. Conclusions We analyzed an unprecedentedly large and detailed partner tracing and HIV sequence dataset and determined an empirically justified range of genetic distance thresholds for identifying potential transmission partners. We conclude that genetic linkage provides more reliable evidence for identifying potential transmission partners than partner naming, highlighting the

  10. Developing a Brief Scale to Measure HIV Transmission Risk Among Injecting Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Shahesmaeili, Armita; Haghdoost, Ali Akbar; Soori, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background: One of the main concerns of policymakers is to measure the impact of harm reduction programs and different interventions on the risk of HIV transmission among Injecting Drug Users (IDUs). Looking simultaneously at multiple factors and conditions that affect the risk of HIV transmission may provide policymakers a better insight into the mixed nature of HIV transmission. Objectives: The present study aimed to design a simple, brief, and multi-dimensional scale for measuring HIV transmission risk among IDUs. Patients and Methods: From October 2013 to March 2014, we conducted face-to-face interviews with 147 IDUs. Eligible participants were individuals 18 years or older who had injected drugs at least once during the last year and had not participated in similar studies within the 2 months before the interview. To design a scale for measuring HIV transmission risk, we specified 11 items, which address different dimensions of HIV risk taking behaviors/situations based on experts’ opinion. We applied exploratory factor analysis (EFA) with principal component extraction to develop scales. Eigen values greater than 1 were used as a criterion for factor extraction. Results: We extracted 7 items based on first factor, which were accounted for 21% of the variations. The final scale contained 7 items: 4 items were related to injecting practice and 3 items related to sexual behaviors. The Cronbach’s α coefficient was 0.66, acceptable for such a brief scale. Conclusions: Applying a simple and brief scale that incorporates the different dimensions of HIV transmission risk may provide policymakers and harm reductionists with a better understanding of HIV transmission in this key group and may be advantageous for evaluating intervention programs. PMID:26870713

  11. A network intervention that locates and intervenes with recently HIV-infected persons: The Transmission Reduction Intervention Project (TRIP).

    PubMed

    Nikolopoulos, Georgios K; Pavlitina, Eirini; Muth, Stephen Q; Schneider, John; Psichogiou, Mina; Williams, Leslie D; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; Sypsa, Vana; Magiorkinis, Gkikas; Smyrnov, Pavlo; Korobchuk, Anya; Vasylyeva, Tetyana I; Skaathun, Britt; Malliori, Melpomeni; Kafetzopoulos, Evangelos; Hatzakis, Angelos; Friedman, Samuel R

    2016-12-05

    Early treatment, soon after infection, reduces HIV transmissions and benefits patients. The Transmission Reduction Intervention Project (TRIP) evaluated a network intervention to detect individuals recently infected (in the past 6 months). TRIP was conducted in Greece (2013-2015) and focused on drug injector networks. Based on HIV status, testing history, and the results of an assay to detect recent infections, TRIP classified drug injector "Seeds" into groups: Recent Seeds (RS), and Control Seeds with Long-term HIV infection (LCS). The network members of RS and LCS were traced for two steps. The analysis included 23 RS, 171 network members of the RS, 19 LCS, and 65 network members of the LCS. The per-seed number of recents detected in the network of RS was 5 times the number in the network of LCS (Ratio RS vs. LCS: 5.23; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.54-27.61). The proportion of recents among HIV positives in the network of RS (27%) was approximately 3 times (Ratio RS vs. LCS: 3.30; 95% CI: 1.04-10.43) that in the network of LCS (8%). Strategic network tracing that starts with recently infected persons could support public health efforts to find and treat people early in their HIV infection.

  12. A network intervention that locates and intervenes with recently HIV-infected persons: The Transmission Reduction Intervention Project (TRIP)

    PubMed Central

    Nikolopoulos, Georgios K.; Pavlitina, Eirini; Muth, Stephen Q.; Schneider, John; Psichogiou, Mina; Williams, Leslie D.; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; Sypsa, Vana; Magiorkinis, Gkikas; Smyrnov, Pavlo; Korobchuk, Anya; Vasylyeva, Tetyana I.; Skaathun, Britt; Malliori, Melpomeni; Kafetzopoulos, Evangelos; Hatzakis, Angelos; Friedman, Samuel R.

    2016-01-01

    Early treatment, soon after infection, reduces HIV transmissions and benefits patients. The Transmission Reduction Intervention Project (TRIP) evaluated a network intervention to detect individuals recently infected (in the past 6 months). TRIP was conducted in Greece (2013–2015) and focused on drug injector networks. Based on HIV status, testing history, and the results of an assay to detect recent infections, TRIP classified drug injector “Seeds” into groups: Recent Seeds (RS), and Control Seeds with Long-term HIV infection (LCS). The network members of RS and LCS were traced for two steps. The analysis included 23 RS, 171 network members of the RS, 19 LCS, and 65 network members of the LCS. The per-seed number of recents detected in the network of RS was 5 times the number in the network of LCS (Ratio RS vs. LCS: 5.23; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.54–27.61). The proportion of recents among HIV positives in the network of RS (27%) was approximately 3 times (Ratio RS vs. LCS: 3.30; 95% CI: 1.04–10.43) that in the network of LCS (8%). Strategic network tracing that starts with recently infected persons could support public health efforts to find and treat people early in their HIV infection. PMID:27917890

  13. Lack of HIV transmission in the practice of a dentist with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, H W; McCurdy, J M; Kalish, M L; Liberti, T; Metellus, G; Bowman, B H; Richards, S B; Neasman, A R; Witte, J J

    1994-12-01

    To determine whether dentist-to-patient or patient-to-patient transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) occurred in the practice of a dentist who had the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Retrospective epidemiologic investigation supported by molecular virology studies. The practice of a dentist with AIDS in an area with a high AIDS prevalence. A dentist with AIDS, his former employees, and his former patients, including 28 patients with HIV infection. Identification of potential risks for acquisition of HIV infection, genetic relatedness among HIV strains, and infection-control practices. A dentist with known behavioral risks for HIV infection, who was practicing in an area of Miami, Florida, that had a high rate of reported AIDS cases, disclosed that he frequently did invasive procedures and did not always follow recommended infection-control procedures. Of 6474 patients who had records of receiving care from the dentist during his last 5 years of practice, 1279 (19.8%) were known to have been tested for HIV infection and 24 of those (1.9%) were seropositive. Four other patients with HIV infection were identified through additional case-finding activities. Of these 28 patients with HIV infection, all but 4 had potential behavioral risk factors for infection. Phylogenetic tree analysis of HIV genetic sequences from the dentist and 24 of the patients with HIV infection showed an absence of strong bootstrap support for any grouping and therefore did not indicate that the virus strains were linked. Despite identifying numerous patients with HIV infection, we found no evidence of dentist-to-patient or patient-to-patient transmission of HIV during dental care. Our findings are consistent with those of all previous studies in this area, with the exception of one that did identify such transmission.

  14. Prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV in Kenya: challenges to implementation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevention of mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is lauded as one of the more successful HIV prevention measures. However, despite some gains in the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) in sub-Saharan Africa, mother-to-child transmission rates are still high. In Kenya, mother-to-child transmission is considered one of the greatest health challenges and scaling up PMTCT services is crucial to its elimination by 2015. However, guideline implementation faces barriers that challenge scale-up of services. The objective of this paper is to identify barriers to PMTCT implementation in the context of a randomized control trial on the use of structured mobile phone messages in PMTCT. Methods The preliminary analysis presented here is based on survey data collected during enrolment in PMTCT services at one of two health facilities in Nairobi, Kenya, with overall number of antenatal care (ANC) visits determined from 48 hour follow up data. Results Data was collected for 503 women. Despite significant differences in the type of facility and sample characteristics between sites, all women presented to care at 20 weeks gestation or later and 88.8% attended less than four ANC visits. PMTCT counselling at first visit had high coverage (86%), however less than a third of women (31.34%) reported receiving contraception counselling. Although 60.8% of women had reportedly disclosed their status to their partners, only 40% were aware of their partner’s status. Very few women had been tested for TB (10%) or received single dose nevirapine during their first antenatal care appointment (20%). Conclusion Revised PMTCT guidelines aim to reduce the inequity between PMTCT services in high and low resource settings in efforts to eliminate mother-to-child transmission. However, guideline implementation in low resource settings continues to be confronted with challenges related to late presentation, less than four ANC visits

  15. Partners at risk: motivations, strategies, and challenges to HIV transmission risk reduction among HIV-infected men and women in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Lifshay, Julie; Nakayiwa, Sylvia; King, Rachel; Reznick, Olga Grinstead; Katuntu, David; Batamwita, Richard; Ezati, Enoch; Coutinho, Alex; Kazibwe, Cissy; Bunnell, Rebecca

    2009-06-01

    Prevention with positives (PWP) is a fundamental component of HIV prevention in industrialized countries. Despite the estimated 22.4 million HIV-infected adults in Africa (UNAIDS, 2006), culturally appropriate PWP guidelines have not been developed for this region. In order to inform these guidelines, we conducted 37 interviews (17 women, 20 men, no couples) from October 2003 to May 2004 with purposefully selected HIV-infected individuals in care in Uganda. Participants reported increased condom use and reduced intercourse frequency and numbers of partners after testing HIV-positive. Motivations for behavior change included concerns for personal health and the health of others, and decreased libido. Gender-power inequities (sometimes manifesting in forced sex), pain experienced by women while using condoms, decreased pleasure for men while using condoms, lack of social support, and desire for children appear to have resulted in increased risk for uninfected partners. Interventions addressing domestic violence, partner negotiation, use of lubricants and alternative sexual activities could increase condom use and/or decrease sexual activity and/or numbers of partners, thereby reducing HIV transmission risk.

  16. Historical development of vaginal microbicides to prevent sexual transmission of HIV in women: from past failures to future hopes

    PubMed Central

    Notario-Pérez, Fernando; Ruiz-Caro, Roberto; Veiga-Ochoa, María-Dolores

    2017-01-01

    Infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remains a global public health concern and is particularly serious in low- and middle-income countries. Widespread sexual violence and poverty, among other factors, increase the risk of infection in women, while currently available prevention methods are outside the control of most. This has driven the study of vaginal microbicides to prevent sexual transmission of HIV from men to women in recent decades. The first microbicides evaluated were formulated as gels for daily use and contained different substances such as surfactants, acidifiers and monoclonal antibodies, which failed to demonstrate efficacy in clinical trials. A gel containing the reverse transcriptase inhibitor tenofovir showed protective efficacy in women. However, the lack of adherence by patients led to the search for dosage forms capable of releasing the active principle for longer periods, and hence to the emergence of the vaginal ring loaded with dapivirine, which requires a monthly application and is able to reduce the sexual transmission of HIV. The future of vaginal microbicides will feature the use of alternative dosage forms, nanosystems for drug release and probiotics, which have emerged as potential microbicides but are still in the early stages of development. Protecting women with vaginal microbicide formulations would, therefore, be a valuable tool for avoiding sexual transmission of HIV. PMID:28670111

  17. Combining epidemiological and genetic networks signifies the importance of early treatment in HIV-1 transmission.

    PubMed

    Zarrabi, Narges; Prosperi, Mattia; Belleman, Robert G; Colafigli, Manuela; De Luca, Andrea; Sloot, Peter M A

    2012-01-01

    Inferring disease transmission networks is important in epidemiology in order to understand and prevent the spread of infectious diseases. Reconstruction of the infection transmission networks requires insight into viral genome data as well as social interactions. For the HIV-1 epidemic, current research either uses genetic information of patients' virus to infer the past infection events or uses statistics of sexual interactions to model the network structure of viral spreading. Methods for a reliable reconstruction of HIV-1 transmission dynamics, taking into account both molecular and societal data are still lacking. The aim of this study is to combine information from both genetic and epidemiological scales to characterize and analyse a transmission network of the HIV-1 epidemic in central Italy.We introduce a novel filter-reduction method to build a network of HIV infected patients based on their social and treatment information. The network is then combined with a genetic network, to infer a hypothetical infection transmission network. We apply this method to a cohort study of HIV-1 infected patients in central Italy and find that patients who are highly connected in the network have longer untreated infection periods. We also find that the network structures for homosexual males and heterosexual populations are heterogeneous, consisting of a majority of 'peripheral nodes' that have only a few sexual interactions and a minority of 'hub nodes' that have many sexual interactions. Inferring HIV-1 transmission networks using this novel combined approach reveals remarkable correlations between high out-degree individuals and longer untreated infection periods. These findings signify the importance of early treatment and support the potential benefit of wide population screening, management of early diagnoses and anticipated antiretroviral treatment to prevent viral transmission and spread. The approach presented here for reconstructing HIV-1 transmission networks

  18. Transmission of Tuberculosis in a South African Community With a High Prevalence of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Middelkoop, Keren; Mathema, Barun; Myer, Landon; Shashkina, Elena; Whitelaw, Andrew; Kaplan, Gilla; Kreiswirth, Barry; Wood, Robin; Bekker, Linda-Gail

    2015-01-01

    Background. In settings of high tuberculosis transmission, little is known of the interaction between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive and HIV-negative tuberculosis disease and of the impact of antiretroviral treatment (ART) programs on tuberculosis transmission dynamics. Methods. Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates were collected from patients with tuberculosis who resided in a South African township with a high burden of tuberculosis and HIV infection. Demographic and clinical data were extracted from clinic records. Isolates underwent IS6110-based restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Patients with unique (nonclustered) M. tuberculosis genotypes and cluster index cases (ie, the first tuberculosis case in a cluster) were defined as having tuberculosis due to reactivation of latent M. tuberculosis infection. Secondary cases in clusters were defined as having tuberculosis due to recent M. tuberculosis infection. Results. Overall, 311 M. tuberculosis genotypes were identified among 718 isolates from 710 patients; 224 (31%) isolates were unique strains, and 478 (67%) occurred in 87 clusters. Cluster index cases were significantly more likely than other tuberculosis cases to be HIV negative. HIV-positive patients were more likely to be secondary cases (P = .001), including patients receiving ART (P = .004). Only 8% of cases of adult-adult transmission of tuberculosis occurred on shared residential plots. Conclusions. Recent infection accounted for the majority of tuberculosis cases, particularly among HIV-positive patients, including patients receiving ART. HIV-negative patients may be disproportionally responsible for ongoing transmission. PMID:25053739

  19. HIV RNA level in early infection is predicted by viral load in the transmission source

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, Frederick M.; Hartogensis, Wendy; Bragg, Larry; Bacchetti, Peter; Atchison, Robert; Grant, Robert; Barbour, Jason; Deeks, Steven G.

    2010-01-01

    Objective HIV-1 viral load in early infection predicts the risk of subsequent disease progression but the factors responsible for the differences between individuals in viral load during this period have not been fully identified. We sought to determine the relationship between HIV-1 RNA levels in the source partner and recently infected recipient partners within transmission pairs. Methods We recruited donor partners of persons who presented with acute or recent (< 6 months) HIV infection. Transmission was confirmed by phyologenetic comparison of virus sequence in the donor and recipient partners. We compared viral load in the donor partner and the recipient in the first 6 months of HIV infection. Results We identified 24 transmission pairs. The median estimated time from infection to evaluation in acutely/recently infected recipient individuals was 72 days. The viral load in the donor was closely associated with viral load at presentation in the recipient case (r=0.55, P=0.006). Conclusion The strong correlation between HIV-1 RNA levels within HIV transmission pairs indicates that virus characteristics are an important determinant of viral load in early HIV infection. PMID:20168202

  20. Oral manifestations of HIV infection by gender and transmission category in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Amador, V; Esquivel-Pedraza, L; Sierra-Madero, J; Ponce-de-Leon, S; Ponce-de-Leon, S

    1998-03-01

    A cross-sectional analysis was conducted in Mexico City from September 1989 to March 1996, to determine the prevalence of HIV-related oral manifestations by gender and route of HIV transmission. The diagnosis of HIV-associated oral lesions was based on preestablished criteria. For the statistical analysis chi-squared and Fisher's exact tests were used where appropriate. Odds ratios were calculated as estimates of the relative risks. Control of confounding factors was performed by logistic regression models. Oral lesions were present in 75% of 436 HIV+ patients. Hairy leukoplakia, erythematous and pseudomembranous candidosis, angular cheilitis and oral ulcers were frequently found. Patients who contracted HIV through blood transfusion were more likely to present erythematous candidosis (P=0.005) than subjects who acquired HIV through sexual transmission. Oral ulcers were seen only in men (P=0.02) and in individuals who contracted HIV through sexual transmission (P=0.02). This study brings valuable data in regard to differences in the type and prevalence of HIV-related oral lesions by gender and the risk categories analysed, particularly blood transfusion.

  1. Prevention of virus transmission to macaque monkeys by a vaginally applied monoclonal antibody to HIV-1 gp120.

    PubMed

    Veazey, Ronald S; Shattock, Robin J; Pope, Melissa; Kirijan, J Christian; Jones, Jennifer; Hu, Qinxue; Ketas, Tom; Marx, Preston A; Klasse, Per Johan; Burton, Dennis R; Moore, John P

    2003-03-01

    A topical microbicide reduces the probability of virus transmission when applied to the vagina or rectum of a person at risk of sexually acquiring HIV-1 infection. An effective microbicide could significantly reduce the global spread of HIV-1, particularly if women were able to use it covertly to protect themselves. A microbicide could target the incoming virus and either permanently inactivate it or reduce its infectivity, or it could block receptors on susceptible cells near the sites of transmission. We describe here how vaginal administration of the broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibody b12 can protect macaques from simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) infection through the vagina. Only 3 of 12 animals receiving 5 mg b12 vaginally in either saline or a gel and then challenged vaginally (up to 2 h later) with SHIV-162P4 became infected. In contrast, infection occurred in 12 of 13 animals given various control agents under similar conditions. Lower amounts of b12 were less effective, suggesting that protection was dose dependent. These observations support the concept that viral entry inhibitors can help prevent the sexual transmission of HIV-1 to humans.

  2. Classification of transmission risk in the national HIV/AIDS surveillance system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lisa M; McKenna, Matthew T; Janssen, Robert S

    2003-01-01

    Risk behavior information is essential for allocating resources and developing effective HIV prevention strategies. Over time, transmission risk information on HIV/AIDS cases has been less likely to be reported to the national surveillance system. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) invited approximately 30 experts in HIV/AIDS and behavioral research from state and local health departments, academia, community-based organizations, and the CDC to participate in a consultation in December 2001 to generate ideas on how best to deal with the lack of risk data. The group was charged with providing recommendations on methods for classifying and reporting risk information and for identifying methods and sources for improving ascertainment of transmission risk behaviors for individuals infected with HIV. This report describes the recommendations and the effects of implementing such recommended procedures on the national HIV/AIDS surveillance database.

  3. Human milk galectin-3 binding protein and breast-feeding-associated HIV transmission.

    PubMed

    Chan, Christina S; Kim, Hae-Young; Autran, Chloe; Kim, Jae H; Sinkala, Moses; Kankasa, Chipepo; Mwiya, Mwiya; Thea, Donald M; Aldrovandi, Grace M; Kuhn, Louise; Bode, Lars

    2013-12-01

    Analysis of milk from 247 HIV-infected Zambian mothers showed that galectin-3 binding protein concentrations were significantly higher among HIV-infected mothers who transmitted HIV through breast-feeding (6.51 ± 2.12 μg/mL) than among nontransmitters but were also correlated with higher milk and plasma HIV RNA copies/mL and lower CD4+ cell counts. The association between galectin-3 binding protein and postnatal transmission was attenuated after adjustment for milk and plasma HIV load and CD4+ cell counts. This suggests that although milk galectin-3 binding protein is a marker of advanced maternal disease, it does not independently modify transmission risk.

  4. Classification of transmission risk in the national HIV/AIDS surveillance system.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lisa M.; McKenna, Matthew T.; Janssen, Robert S.

    2003-01-01

    Risk behavior information is essential for allocating resources and developing effective HIV prevention strategies. Over time, transmission risk information on HIV/AIDS cases has been less likely to be reported to the national surveillance system. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) invited approximately 30 experts in HIV/AIDS and behavioral research from state and local health departments, academia, community-based organizations, and the CDC to participate in a consultation in December 2001 to generate ideas on how best to deal with the lack of risk data. The group was charged with providing recommendations on methods for classifying and reporting risk information and for identifying methods and sources for improving ascertainment of transmission risk behaviors for individuals infected with HIV. This report describes the recommendations and the effects of implementing such recommended procedures on the national HIV/AIDS surveillance database. PMID:12941852

  5. HIV transmission among male inmates in a state prison system--Georgia, 1992-2005.

    PubMed

    2006-04-21

    The estimated prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is nearly five times higher for incarcerated populations (2.0%) than for the general U.S. population (0.43%). In 1988, the Georgia Department of Corrections (GDC) initiated mandatory HIV testing of inmates upon entry into prison and voluntary HIV testing of inmates on request or if clinically indicated. GDC offered voluntary HIV testing to inmates annually during July 2003-June 2005 and currently offers testing to inmates on request. During July 1988-February 2005, a total of 88 male inmates were known to have had both a negative HIV test result upon entry into prison and a subsequent confirmed positive HIV test result (i.e., seroconversion) during incarceration. Of these 88 inmates, 37 (42%) had had more than one negative HIV test result before their HIV diagnosis. In October 2004, GDC and the Georgia Division of Public Health invited CDC to assist with an epidemiologic investigation of HIV risk behaviors and transmission patterns among male inmates within GDC facilities and to make HIV prevention recommendations for the prison population. This report describes the results of that investigation, which identified the following characteristics as associated with HIV seroconversion in prison: male-male sex in prison, tattooing in prison, older age (i.e., age of >26 years at date of interview), having served > or =5 years of the current sentence, black race, and having a body mass index (BMI) of < or =25.4 kg/m2 on entry into prison. Findings from the investigation demonstrated that risk behaviors such as male-male sex and tattooing were associated with HIV transmission among inmates, highlighting the need for HIV prevention programs for this population.

  6. Sexual Violence and HIV Transmission: Summary Proceedings of a Scientific Research Planning Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Klot, Jennifer F.; Auerbach, Judith D.; Berry, Miranda R.

    2013-01-01

    This summarizes proceedings of a Scientific Research Planning Meeting on Sexual Violence and HIV transmission, convened by the Social Science Research Council on 19–20 March 2012 at the Greentree Foundation in New York