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Sample records for reduce organophosphate pesticide

  1. Modeling effectiveness of agricultural BMPs to reduce sediment load and organophosphate pesticides in surface runoff.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuyang; Zhang, Minghua

    2011-04-15

    Quantifying effectiveness of agricultural BMPs at the watershed scale is a challenging issue, requiring robust algorithms to simulate not only the agricultural production system but also pollutant transport and fate. This research addresses the challenge to simulate performances of BMPs in reducing organophosphates (OPs) runoff at the watershed scale. The SWAT model is calibrated and validated following a sensitivity analysis combining Latin Hypercube sampling and One-factor-At-a-Time simulation. The calibrated model is then applied in the Orestimba Creek Watershed to simulate BMPs including buffer strips, sediment ponds, vegetated ditches, use reduction, and their combinations. BMP simulation suggested that sediment ponds trap 54-85% of sediment from field runoff, but less than 10% of dissolved diazinon and chlorpyrifos. Use reduction can reduce pesticide load in a close-to-linear fashion. Effectiveness of vegetated ditches and buffers depends on their physical dimension and vegetation cover. Combining individual BMPs provides enhanced mitigation effects. The combination of vegetated ditches, buffer strips and use reduction decreases diazinon and chlorpyrifos load by over 94%. This study has suggested that the SWAT model reasonably predicts BMP effectiveness at the watershed scale. Results will assist decision making in implementing BMPs to reduce pesticide loads in surface runoff. PMID:21377192

  2. Zero valent iron reduces toxicity and concentrations of organophosphate pesticides in contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Fjordbøge, Annika S; Baun, Anders; Vastrup, Troels; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The potential of zero valent iron (ZVI) for remediation of contaminated groundwater from an abandoned chemical disposal site was examined through batch and column experiments. The key contaminants were organophosphate pesticides but the chemical analysis also comprised additional 22 compounds including synthesis intermediates and degradation products of organophosphates. The ZVI treatment showed that all the contaminants were degraded with the exception of two diesters (phosphorothioates). The most rapid reduction was found for methyl parathion, ethyl parathion and malathion, which had first-order degradation rate constants on the order of 10(-3) min(-1). In the study, acute toxicity towards freshwater crustaceans (Daphnia magna) was included to evaluate the overall efficiency of ZVI treatment of the complex mixture. The acute toxicity tests with D. magna showed that the untreated groundwater was highly toxic. Thus, 50% of the daphnids were unable to swim upon 24h exposure to groundwater diluted 770 times. ZVI facilitated degradation resulted in a complete toxicity removal for the first four pore volumes, where after a three times dilution caused 50% inhibition of the mobility of the daphnids. The rapid degradation of the highly toxic organophosphates combined with the significant decrease in the ecotoxicological potential shows a promising potential for site remediation of organophosphates with ZVI technologies.

  3. Microbial biosensors for organophosphate pesticides.

    PubMed

    Mulchandani, Ashok; Rajesh

    2011-09-01

    Organophosphates, amongst the most toxic substance known, are used widely in agriculture around the world. Their extensive use, however, has resulted in their occurrence in the water and food supply threatening humans and animals. Therefore, there is a need for determination of these neurotoxic compounds sensitively, selectively, and rapidly in the field. The present work is a brief review on the recent advancements in amperometric, potentiometric, and optical biosensors using genetically engineered microorganisms expressing organophosphate hydrolyzing enzyme intracellularly or anchored on the cell surface for the detection of organophosphate pesticides. The benefits and limitations associated with such microbial biosensors are delineated.

  4. Organophosphate pesticide exposure and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Santed, Fernando; Colomina, Maria Teresa; Herrero Hernández, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Organophosphate pesticides (OPs) are used extensively throughout the world. The main sources of contamination for humans are dietary ingestion and occupational exposures. The major concerns related to OP exposure are delayed effects following high level exposures as well as the impact of low level exposures during the lifespan which are suggested to be a risk factor for nervous system chronic diseases. Both high and low level exposures may have a particularly high impact in population subgroups such as aged or genetically vulnerable populations. Apart from the principle action of OPs which involves inhibition of the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme, several molecular targets, such as hormones; neurotransmitters; neurotrophic factors; enzymes related to the metabolism of beta amyloid protein as well as inflammatory changes have been identified for OP compounds. Here we review the main neurological and/or cognitive deficits described and the experimental and epidemiological relationships found between pesticide exposure and Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) diseases. This report also focuses on possible individual differences making groups resilient or vulnerable to these toxicants. A critical discussion of the evidence obtained from experimental models and possible sources of bias in epidemiological studies is included. In particular this review aims to discuss common targets and pathways identified which may underlie the functional deficits associated with both pesticide exposure and neurodegeneration. PMID:26687930

  5. The effectiveness of an educational intervention to improve knowledge and perceptions for reducing organophosphate pesticide exposure among Indonesian and South Australian migrant farmworkers

    PubMed Central

    Suratman, Suratman; Ross, Kirstin E; Babina, Kateryna; Edwards, John William

    2016-01-01

    Background Farmworkers are at risk of exposure to organophosphate pesticides (OPs). Improvements of knowledge and perceptions about organophosphate (OP) exposure may be of benefit for the reduction in OP exposure. Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of an educational intervention to improve knowledge and perceptions for reducing OP exposure among Indonesian and South Australian (SA) migrant farmworkers. Methods This was a quasi-experimental study. The educational intervention used a method of group communication for 30 Indonesian farmworkers and individual communication for seven SA migrant farmworkers. Knowledge and perceptions about OP exposure were measured pre-intervention and 3 months after the intervention. Results Unadjusted intervention effects at follow-up showed statistically significantly improved scores of knowledge (both adverse effects of OPs and self-protection from OP exposure), perceived susceptibility, and perceived barriers among Indonesian farmworkers compared with SA migrant farmworkers. Furthermore, these four significant variables in the unadjusted model and the two other variables (perceived severity and perceived benefits) were statistically significant after being adjusted for the level of education and years working as a farmworker. In contrast, knowledge about adverse effects of OPs was the only variable that was statistically significantly improved among SA migrant farmworkers. The results of this study suggests educational interventions using a method of group communication could be more effective than using individual intervention. Conclusion These improvements provide starting points to change health behavior of farmworkers, particularly to reduce OP exposure, both at the workplace and at home. PMID:26855602

  6. ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDE DEGRADATION PATHWAYS DURING DRINKING WATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Free chlorine has been found to react with organophosphate (OP) pesticides resulting in the more toxic oxon products. We will discuss OP pesticide degradation pathways and modeling in the presence of chlorine and chloramines, as well as present a relationship between structure a...

  7. Organophosphate pesticide concentrations in coral tissues of Indonesian coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Sabdono, Agus; Kang, Suil; Hur, Hor-Gil; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Simon, Meinhard; Radjasa, Ocky Kama

    2007-06-01

    In this study we evaluated the persistence of diazinon, chlorpyrifos, profenofos, parathion, malathion and ethion in dead coral tissues of Indonesian coastal waters (Java, Bali, Sulawesi and Komodo). Comparison of the residue levels in coral tissues showed that the highest presence of organophosphate concentrations was detected in a coral sample collected from Java coastal waters. While medium amounts of a contaminant diazinon can still lead to detectable in Bali and Sulawesi coastal waters. Prominent contamination of organophosphate was not found in a sample collected from Komodo. Neither parathion nor malathion were detected in any of the samples. This result implies that the geographical variations of organophosphate compounds are determined by the possible usage of these chemicals around coastal waters at the present or in the past. There is need for further work to identify sources and fate of pesticide contaminants, as well as to improve monitoring of pesticide use. PMID:19086563

  8. Piezoelectric Biosensors for Organophosphate and Carbamate Pesticides: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Marrazza, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Due to the great amount of pesticides currently being used, there is an increased interest for developing biosensors for their detection. Among all the physical transducers, piezoelectric systems have emerged as the most attractive due to their simplicity, low instrumentation costs, possibility for real-time and label-free detection and generally high sensitivity. This paper presents an overview of biosensors based on the quartz crystal microbalance, which have been reported in the literature for organophosphate and carbamate pesticide analysis. PMID:25587424

  9. ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDE EXPOSURES - WHERE ARE THE HIGH RISK CHILDREN?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods to identify children at high-risk for organophosphate (OP) pesticide exposure are difficult to develop because biological markers reflect only recent "snapshots" of exposure due to the short half-life of OP compounds (generally about 24 hours). We conducted a series of p...

  10. ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDE DEGRADATION UNDER DRINKING WATER TREATMENT CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorpyrifos (CP) was used as a model compound to develop experimental methods and prototype modeling tools to forecast the fate of organophosphate (OP) pesticides under drinking water treatment conditions. CP was found to rapidly oxidize to chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) in the presen...

  11. Pesticide loadings of select organophosphate and pyrethroid pesticides in urban public housing.

    EPA Science Inventory

    We investigated the magnitude and distribution of pyrethroid and organophosphate pesticide loadings within public housing dwellings in Boston, Massachusetts and compared the results using various sampling methods. We collected dust matrices from living room and kitchen in 42 apar...

  12. Organophosphate Hydrolase in Conductometric Biosensor for the Detection of Organophosphate Pesticides.

    PubMed

    Mulyasuryani, Ani; Prasetyawan, Sasangka

    2015-01-01

    The research has developed an enzyme biosensor for the detection organophosphate pesticide residues. The biosensor consists of a pair of screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCEs). One of electrodes contains immobilized organophosphate hydrolase (OPH) on a chitosan membrane by cross-linking it with glutaraldehyde. The area of the electrodes was optimized to 3, 5, and 7 mm(2). The OPH was isolated from Pseudomonas putida, and was purified by the ammonium sulfate precipitation method, with 6444 ppm (A) and 7865 ppm (B). The organophosphate pesticide samples were 0-100 ppb in tris-acetate buffer 0.05 M, pH 8.5. The results showed that the best performance of the biosensor was achieved by the enzyme A with an electrode area of 5 mm(2). The sensitivity of the biosensor was between 3 and 32 µS/ppb, and the detection limit for the organophosphate pesticides was 40 ppb (diazinon), 30 ppb (malathion), 20 ppb (chlorpyrifos), and 40 ppm (profenofos). PMID:26483607

  13. Organophosphate Hydrolase in Conductometric Biosensor for the Detection of Organophosphate Pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Mulyasuryani, Ani; Prasetyawan, Sasangka

    2015-01-01

    The research has developed an enzyme biosensor for the detection organophosphate pesticide residues. The biosensor consists of a pair of screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCEs). One of electrodes contains immobilized organophosphate hydrolase (OPH) on a chitosan membrane by cross-linking it with glutaraldehyde. The area of the electrodes was optimized to 3, 5, and 7 mm2. The OPH was isolated from Pseudomonas putida, and was purified by the ammonium sulfate precipitation method, with 6444 ppm (A) and 7865 ppm (B). The organophosphate pesticide samples were 0–100 ppb in tris-acetate buffer 0.05 M, pH 8.5. The results showed that the best performance of the biosensor was achieved by the enzyme A with an electrode area of 5 mm2. The sensitivity of the biosensor was between 3 and 32 µS/ppb, and the detection limit for the organophosphate pesticides was 40 ppb (diazinon), 30 ppb (malathion), 20 ppb (chlorpyrifos), and 40 ppm (profenofos). PMID:26483607

  14. Multi-organ Dysfunction Syndrome with Dual Organophosphate Pesticides Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Ajay; Pandya, Himanshu V; Dave, Nikhil; Mehta, Manan

    2013-09-01

    Organophosphate (OP) pesticide self-poisoning is common in developing countries. Poisoning with dual OP compounds is rare. Multi-organ dysfunction after OP poisoning has a high mortality rate. We report the case of a 27-year-old man who developed multi-organ dysfunction syndrome with fatal outcome after intentional ingestion of 50:50 mixture of two OP compounds, dichlorvos and profenofos.

  15. Multi-organ Dysfunction Syndrome with Dual Organophosphate Pesticides Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Ajay; Pandya, Himanshu V.; Dave, Nikhil; Mehta, Manan

    2013-01-01

    Organophosphate (OP) pesticide self-poisoning is common in developing countries. Poisoning with dual OP compounds is rare. Multi-organ dysfunction after OP poisoning has a high mortality rate. We report the case of a 27-year-old man who developed multi-organ dysfunction syndrome with fatal outcome after intentional ingestion of 50:50 mixture of two OP compounds, dichlorvos and profenofos. PMID:24403738

  16. ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDE DEGRADATION IN THE PRESENCE OF NATURALLY OCCURRING AQUATIC CONSTITUENTS UNDER DRINKING WATER TREATMENT CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little work to date has solely investigated the kinetics and pathways of pesticide transformations under drinking water treatment conditions. Free chlorine has been found to react with s-triazine, carbamate, and organophosphate pesticides. However, these experimental conditions...

  17. INCREASED SUSCEPTIBILITY OF THE SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RAT TO CHLORPYRIFOS, AN ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hypertension and hypothermia are common symptoms in rats exposed to chlorpyrifos (CHP), an organophosphate (OP)-based pesticide. CHP inhibits acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity resulting in central and peripheral stimulation of cholinergic pathways involved in blood pressure ...

  18. Interpreting population estimates of birds following pesticide applications--behavior of male starlings exposed to an organophosphate pesticide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grue, C.E.; Shipley, B.J.; Ralph, C. John; Scott, J. Michael

    1981-01-01

    We determined activity budgets for 10 pairs of captive male Starlings between 7 May and 18 July 1980. Our objective was to quantify changes in behavior after exposure to an organophosphate (OP) pesticide and to assess the impact of changes in behavior on the interpretation of population estimates of birds following pesticide applications. We observed each pair of males for an hour at 07:30 and 09:30 for four days and classified their behavior into one of four categories: flying, perching, foraging, or singing and displaying. At 06:30 on day 2, one male received a single oral dose of 2.5 mg dicrotophos (3-hydroxy-N, N-dimethyl-cis-crotonamide dimethyl phosphate) per kg of body weight; the other male received an equivalent exposure of corn oil. Changes in the activity budgets of OP-dosed and control males were compared using t-tests. Activity of OP-dosed males was significantly (P _ 0.05) reduced within the 2-4 h following exposure. OP-dosed males spent more time perching (46.1%) than controls and less time flying (-96.6%), foraging (-28.5%), and singing and displaying (-49.5%). The frequency of perching (-75.3%), flying (-83.8%), foraging (-54.1%), and singing and displaying (- 59.2%) was significantly reduced. Activity in OP-dosed males returned to normal by 26-28 h posttreatment. Results suggest that movement and vocalization may be significantly reduced in birds exposed to organophosphate and carbamate pesticides. Conventional censusing techniques and population estimating procedures may, therefore, be inadequate to assess changes in bird populations after pesticide applications because of the difficulty in separating decreases in density due to mortality or emigration from reductions in activity.

  19. Central nervous system function and organophosphate insecticide use among pesticide applicators in the Agricultural Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Starks, Sarah E; Gerr, Fred; Kamel, Freya; Lynch, Charles F; Jones, Michael P; Alavanja, Michael C; Sandler, Dale P; Hoppin, Jane A

    2011-01-01

    Acute organophosphate (OP) pesticide exposure is associated with adverse central nervous system (CNS) outcomes, however, little is known about the neurotoxicity of chronic exposures that do not result in acute poisoning. To examine associations between long-term pesticide use and CNS function, neurobehavioral (NB) tests were administered to licensed pesticide applicators enrolled in the Agricultural Health Study (AHS) in Iowa and North Carolina. Between 2006 and 2008, 701 male participants completed nine NB tests to assess memory, motor speed and coordination, sustained attention, verbal learning and visual scanning and processing. Data on ever-use and lifetime days of use of 16 OP pesticides were obtained from AHS interviews conducted before testing between 1993 and 2007 and during the NB visit. The mean age of participants was 61 years (SD = 12). Associations between pesticide use and NB test performance were estimated with linear regression controlling for age and outcome-specific covariates. NB test performance was associated with lifetime days of use of some pesticides. Ethoprop was significantly associated with reduced performance on a test of motor speed and visual scanning. Malathion was significantly associated with poor performance on a test of visual scanning and processing. Conversely, we observed significantly better test performance for five OP pesticides. Specifically, chlorpyrifos, coumaphos, parathion, phorate, and tetrachlorvinphos were associated with better verbal learning and memory; coumaphos was associated with better performance on a test of motor speed and visual scanning; and parathion was associated with better performance on a test of sustained attention. Several associations varied by state. Overall, our results do not provide strong evidence that long-term OP pesticide use is associated with adverse CNS-associated NB test performance among this older sample of pesticide applicators. Potential reasons for these mostly null associations

  20. Response of common grackles to dietary concentrations of four organophosphate pesticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grue, C.E.

    1982-01-01

    Behavioral and physiological responses of common grackles to dietary concentrations of dicrotophos, fenitrothion, fenthion, and methyl parathion suggest mortality was largely due to pesticide-induced anorexia. Mortality was dose related, though consumption of treated diets was reduced such that birds on different geometrically arranged concentrations of the same pesticide ingested about the same amount of toxicant. Grackles that died lost an average of 28 to 36% of their initial body weight; visible fat was absent and muscle tissue was reduced on the sternum. Mortality of birds exposed to dicrotophos increased between May and August, although chemical intake remained relatively constant, and was associated with a natural decrease in fat and flesh condition in response to increased ambient temperatures and post-nuptial molt. Food consumption in songbirds exposed to organophosphates may be reduced significantly up to 12 hr after exposure ceases because of an unknown effect of these chemicals on their feeding behavior, but not repellency. The results caution against using median lethal dietary concentrations for other than ranking chemicals based on their relative toxicity, particularly in establishing safe environmental levels, and suggest that anorexia and physiological condition may be important factors in mortality of wild birds exposed to organophosphates.

  1. Exposures of children to organophosphate pesticides and their potential adverse health effects.

    PubMed Central

    Eskenazi, B; Bradman, A; Castorina, R

    1999-01-01

    Recent studies show that young children can be exposed to pesticides during normal oral exploration of their environment and their level of dermal contact with floors and other surfaces. Children living in agricultural areas may be exposed to higher pesticide levels than other children because of pesticides tracked into their homes by household members, by pesticide drift, by breast milk from their farmworker mother, or by playing in nearby fields. Nevertheless, few studies have assessed the extent of children's pesticide exposure, and no studies have examined whether there are adverse health effects of chronic exposure. There is substantial toxicologic evidence that repeated low-level exposure to organophosphate (OP) pesticides may affect neurodevelopment and growth in developing animals. For example, animal studies have reported neurobehavorial effects such as impairment on maze performance, locomotion, and balance in neonates exposed (italic)in utero(/italic) and during early postnatal life. Possible mechanisms for these effects include inhibition of brain acetylcholinesterase, downregulation of muscarinic receptors, decreased brain DNA synthesis, and reduced brain weight in offspring. Research findings also suggest that it is biologically plausible that OP exposure may be related to respiratory disease in children through dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system. The University of California Berkeley Center for Children's Environmental Health Research is working to build a community-university partnership to study the environmental health of rural children. This Center for the Health Assessment of Mothers and Children of Salinas, or CHAMACOS in Monterey County, California, will assess (italic)in utero(/italic) and postnatal OP pesticide exposure and the relationship of exposure to neurodevelopment, growth, and symptoms of respiratory illness in children. The ultimate goal of the center is to translate research findings into a reduction of children

  2. DETERMINING ACTIVE OXIDANT SPECIES REACTING WITH ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDES IN CHLORINATED DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorpyrifos (CP) is an organophosphate (OP) pesticide that was used as a model compound to investigate the transformation of OP pesticides at low pH and in the presence of bromide and natural organic matter (NOM) under drinking water treatment conditions. Raman spectroscopy was...

  3. [Health risk control for organophosphate pesticides in Mexico: challenges under the Free Trade Treaty].

    PubMed

    Ortega-Ceseña, J; Espinosa-Torres, F; López-Carrillo, L

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses recent trends concerning the commercialization of pesticides in Mexico and focuses on organophosphates and their potential health risk impact. It points out the existing lack of knowledge on health effects associated to chronic exposure to organophosphate pesticides. A need for both toxicological and epidemiologic studies of chronic exposure is identified. Regulatory programs for pesticides in Mexico and the United States are also compared. The paper also addresses the possibility of effective enforcement of environmental and health regulations in Mexico as a result of more rigorous surveillance under NAFTA.

  4. Estimates of Tiber River organophosphate pesticide loads to the Tyrrhenian Sea and ecological risk.

    PubMed

    Montuori, Paolo; Aurino, Sara; Garzonio, Fatima; Sarnacchiaro, Pasquale; Polichetti, Salvatore; Nardone, Antonio; Triassi, Maria

    2016-07-15

    The organophosphate pesticides pollution in the Tiber River and its environmental impact on the Tyrrhenian Sea (Central Mediterranean Sea) were estimated. Eight selected organophosphate pesticides (diazinon, dimethoate, malathion, chlorpyrifos, pirimiphos-methyl, fenitrothion, methidathion, tolclofos-methyl) were determined in the water dissolved phase, suspended particulate matter and sediment samples collected from 21 sites in different seasons. Total organophosphate pesticides concentrations ranged from 0.40 to 224.48ngL(-1) in water (as the sum of the water dissolved phase and suspended particulate matter) and from 1.42 to 68.46ngg(-1) in sediment samples. Contaminant discharges of organophosphate pesticides into the sea were calculated in about 545.36kgyear(-1) showing that this river should be consider as one of the main contribution sources of organophosphate pesticides to the Tyrrhenian Sea. In relation to the eco-toxicological assessment, the concentrations of most OPPs in the water and sediments from the Tiber River and its estuary were lower than guideline values. PMID:27065443

  5. Gold-Nanoparticle-Based Colorimetric Sensor Array for Discrimination of Organophosphate Pesticides.

    PubMed

    Fahimi-Kashani, Nafiseh; Hormozi-Nezhad, M Reza

    2016-08-16

    There is a growing interest in developing high-performance sensors monitoring organophosphate pesticides, primarily due to their broad usage and harmful effects on mammals. In the present study, a colorimetric sensor array consisting of citrate-capped 13 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) has been proposed for the detection and discrimination of several organophosphate pesticides (OPs). The aggregation-induced spectral changes of AuNPs upon OP addition has been analyzed with pattern recognition techniques, including hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). In addition, the proposed sensor array has the capability to identify individual OPs or mixtures of them in real samples. PMID:27412472

  6. Urinary Metabolites of Organophosphate and Pyrethroid Pesticides and Behavioral Problems in Canadian Children

    PubMed Central

    Oulhote, Youssef

    2013-01-01

    Background: Exposure to organophosphate pesticides has been associated with neurobehavioral deficits in children, although data on low levels of exposure experienced by the general population are sparse. Pyrethroids are insecticides rapidly gaining popularity, and epidemiological evidence on their potential effects is lacking. Objective: We examined the association between exposure to organophosphate and pyrethroid pesticides, indicated by urinary metabolites, and parentally reported behavioral problems in children. Methods: We used data on children 6–11 years of age from the Canadian Health Measures Survey (2007–2009). We used logistic regressions to estimate odds ratios (ORs) for high scores on the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), which may indicate behavioral problems, in association with concentrations of pyrethroid and organophosphate metabolites in the urine of 779 children, adjusting for covariates (sex, age, race/ethnicity, income, parental education, blood lead levels, maternal smoking during pregnancy, and others). Results: At least one urinary metabolite for organophosphates was detected in 91% of children, and for pyrethroids in 97% of children. Organophosphate metabolites were not significantly associated with high SDQ scores. The pyrethroid metabolite cis-DCCA [3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylycyclopropane carboxylic acid] was significantly associated with high scores for total difficulties on the SDQ (OR for a 10-fold increase = 2.0; 95% CI: 1.1, 3.6), and there was a nonsignificant association with trans-DCCA (OR = 1.6; 95% CI: 0.9, 3.0). Conclusion: In contrast with previous studies, we did not observe an association between exposure to organophosphate pesticides and behavioral scores in children. However, some pyrethroid urinary metabolites were associated with a high level of parent-reported behavioral problems. Longitudinal studies should be conducted on the potential risks of pyrethroids. Citation: Oulhote Y, Bouchard MF

  7. Association between organophosphate pesticides exposure and thyroid hormones in floriculture workers

    SciTech Connect

    Lacasana, Marina; Lopez-Flores, Inmaculada; Rodriguez-Barranco, Miguel; Aguilar-Garduno, Clemente; Blanco-Munoz, Julia; Perez-Mendez, Oscar; Gamboa, Ricardo; Bassol, Susana; Cebrian, Mariano E.

    2010-02-15

    The ability of organophosphate pesticides to disturb thyroid gland function has been demonstrated by experimental studies on animal, but evidence of such effects on human remains scarce. The aim of this study was to assess the association between exposure to organophosphate compounds and serum levels of thyroid hormones in floriculture workers. A longitudinal study was conducted on 136 male subjects from the State of Mexico and Morelos, Mexico, occupationally exposed to organophosphate pesticides, during agricultural periods of high (rainy season) and low (dry season) levels of pesticide application. Using a structured questionnaire, a survey was carried out on sociodemographic characteristics, anthropometry, clinical history, alcohol and tobacco consumption, residential chemical exposure, and occupational history. Urine and blood samples were taken the day after pesticide application to determine urine dialkylphosphate (DAP) levels, serum levels of TSH, total T{sub 3}, total T{sub 4}, serum PON1 activity, and serum p,p'-DEE levels. The analysis of the association between DAP levels and thyroid hormonal profile was carried out using multivariate generalized estimating equation (GEE) models. Our results showed an increase in both TSH and T{sub 4} hormones in serum associated with a increase in total dimethylphosphate levels (SIGMADMP) in urine (p-trend < 0.001) and a decrease in total T{sub 3} serum levels with an increase of SIGMADMP levels in the urine (p-trend = 0.053). These results suggest that exposure to organophosphate pesticides may be responsible of increasing TSH and T{sub 4} serum hormone levels and decreasing T{sub 3} serum hormone levels, therefore supporting the hypothesis that organophosphate pesticides act as endocrine disruptors in humans.

  8. Association between organophosphate pesticides exposure and thyroid hormones in floriculture workers.

    PubMed

    Lacasaña, Marina; López-Flores, Inmaculada; Rodríguez-Barranco, Miguel; Aguilar-Garduño, Clemente; Blanco-Muñoz, Julia; Pérez-Méndez, Oscar; Gamboa, Ricardo; Bassol, Susana; Cebrian, Mariano E

    2010-02-15

    The ability of organophosphate pesticides to disturb thyroid gland function has been demonstrated by experimental studies on animal, but evidence of such effects on human remains scarce. The aim of this study was to assess the association between exposure to organophosphate compounds and serum levels of thyroid hormones in floriculture workers. A longitudinal study was conducted on 136 male subjects from the State of Mexico and Morelos, Mexico, occupationally exposed to organophosphate pesticides, during agricultural periods of high (rainy season) and low (dry season) levels of pesticide application. Using a structured questionnaire, a survey was carried out on sociodemographic characteristics, anthropometry, clinical history, alcohol and tobacco consumption, residential chemical exposure, and occupational history. Urine and blood samples were taken the day after pesticide application to determine urine dialkylphosphate (DAP) levels, serum levels of TSH, total T(3), total T(4), serum PON1 activity, and serum p,p'-DEE levels. The analysis of the association between DAP levels and thyroid hormonal profile was carried out using multivariate generalized estimating equation (GEE) models. Our results showed an increase in both TSH and T(4) hormones in serum associated with a increase in total dimethylphosphate levels (SigmaDMP) in urine (p-trend<0.001) and a decrease in total T(3) serum levels with an increase of SigmaDMP levels in the urine (p-trend=0.053). These results suggest that exposure to organophosphate pesticides may be responsible of increasing TSH and T(4) serum hormone levels and decreasing T(3) serum hormone levels, therefore supporting the hypothesis that organophosphate pesticides act as endocrine disruptors in humans.

  9. CAN FLU-LIKE ILLNESS BE AN INDICATION OF RECENT ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDE EXPOSURE IN PRESCHOOL CHILDREN?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Can flu-like illness be an indication of recent organophosphate pesticide exposure in preschool children? P Mendola*, D Barr, D Walsh, S Hern, S Rhoney, L Needham, E Hilborn, M Gonzales, C Carty, G Robertson, J Creason (US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711)
    <...

  10. RESIDENTIAL PESTICIDE USE AND URINARY ORGANOPHOSPHATE METABOLITES IN PRE-SCHOOL CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Residential Pesticide Use and Urinary Organophosphate Metabolites in Pre-School Children
    CL Carty1, P Mendola1, D Barr2, L Needham2, D Walsh1

    1Epidemiology and Biomarkers Branch, Human Studies Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S....

  11. ORGANOPHOSPHORUS HYDROLASE-BASED ASSAY FOR ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report a rapid and versatile Organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH)-based method for measurement of organophosphates. This assay is based on a substrate-dependent change in pH at the local vicinity of the enzyme. The pH change is monitored using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), ...

  12. Pyrethroid and organophosphate pesticide-associated toxicity in two coastal watersheds (California, USA).

    PubMed

    Phillips, Bryn M; Anderson, Brian S; Hunt, John W; Siegler, Katie; Voorhees, Jennifer P; Tjeerdema, Ron S; McNeill, Katie

    2012-07-01

    Portions of the Santa Maria River and Oso Flaco Creek watersheds in central California, USA, are listed as impaired under section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act and require development of total maximum daily load (TMDL) allocations. These listings are for general pesticide contamination, but are largely based on historic monitoring of sediment and fish tissue samples that showed contamination by organochlorine pesticides. Recent studies have shown that toxicity in these watersheds is caused by organophosphate pesticides (water and sediment) and pyrethroid pesticides (sediment). The present study was designed to provide information on the temporal and spatial variability of toxicity associated with these pesticides to better inform the TMDL process. Ten stations were sampled in four study areas, one with urban influences, and the remaining in agriculture production areas. Water toxicity was assessed with the water flea Ceriodaphnia dubia, and sediment toxicity was assessed with the amphipod Hyalella azteca. Stations in the lower Santa Maria River had the highest incidence of toxicity, followed by stations influenced by urban inputs. Toxicity identification evaluations and chemical analysis demonstrated that the majority of the observed water toxicity was attributed to organophosphate pesticides, particularly chlorpyrifos, and that sediment toxicity was caused by mixtures of pyrethroid pesticides. The results demonstrate that both agriculture and urban land uses are contributing toxic concentrations of these pesticides to adjacent watersheds, and regional water quality regulators are now using this information to develop management objectives. PMID:22549911

  13. Pyrethroid and organophosphate pesticide-associated toxicity in two coastal watersheds (California, USA).

    PubMed

    Phillips, Bryn M; Anderson, Brian S; Hunt, John W; Siegler, Katie; Voorhees, Jennifer P; Tjeerdema, Ron S; McNeill, Katie

    2012-07-01

    Portions of the Santa Maria River and Oso Flaco Creek watersheds in central California, USA, are listed as impaired under section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act and require development of total maximum daily load (TMDL) allocations. These listings are for general pesticide contamination, but are largely based on historic monitoring of sediment and fish tissue samples that showed contamination by organochlorine pesticides. Recent studies have shown that toxicity in these watersheds is caused by organophosphate pesticides (water and sediment) and pyrethroid pesticides (sediment). The present study was designed to provide information on the temporal and spatial variability of toxicity associated with these pesticides to better inform the TMDL process. Ten stations were sampled in four study areas, one with urban influences, and the remaining in agriculture production areas. Water toxicity was assessed with the water flea Ceriodaphnia dubia, and sediment toxicity was assessed with the amphipod Hyalella azteca. Stations in the lower Santa Maria River had the highest incidence of toxicity, followed by stations influenced by urban inputs. Toxicity identification evaluations and chemical analysis demonstrated that the majority of the observed water toxicity was attributed to organophosphate pesticides, particularly chlorpyrifos, and that sediment toxicity was caused by mixtures of pyrethroid pesticides. The results demonstrate that both agriculture and urban land uses are contributing toxic concentrations of these pesticides to adjacent watersheds, and regional water quality regulators are now using this information to develop management objectives.

  14. Organophosphate pesticide exposure and neurobehavioral performance in agricultural and non-agricultural Hispanic workers.

    PubMed

    Rothlein, Joan; Rohlman, Diane; Lasarev, Michael; Phillips, Jackie; Muniz, Juan; McCauley, Linda

    2006-05-01

    Our understanding of the health risks of farmworkers exposed to pesticides in their work and home environments is rapidly increasing, although studies designed to examine the possible neurobehavioral effects of low-level chronic pesticide exposure are limited. We measured dialkyl phosphate urinary metabolite levels, collected environmental dust samples from a subset of homes, obtained information on work practices, and conducted neurobehavioral tests on a sample of farmworkers in Oregon. Significant correlations between urinary methyl metabolite levels and total methyl organophosphate (azinphos-methyl, phosmet, malathion) house dust levels were observed. We found the neurobehavioral performance of Hispanic immigrant farmworkers to be lower than that observed in a nonagricultural Hispanic immigrant population, and within the sample of agricultural workers there was a positive correlation between urinary organophosphate metabolite levels and poorer performance on some neurobehavioral tests. These findings add to an increasing body of evidence of the association between low levels of pesticide exposure and deficits in neurobehavioral performance. PMID:16675422

  15. Occupational determinants of serum cholinesterase inhibition among organophosphate-exposed agricultural pesticide handlers in Washington State

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Jonathan N; Keifer, Matthew C; De Roos, Anneclaire J; Fenske, Richard A; Furlong, Clement E; van Belle, Gerald; Checkoway, Harvey

    2010-01-01

    Objective To identify potential risk factors for serum cholinesterase (BuChE) inhibition among agricultural pesticide handlers exposed to organophosphate (OP) and N-methyl-carbamate (CB) insecticides. Methods We conducted a longitudinal study among 154 agricultural pesticide handlers who participated in the Washington State cholinesterase monitoring program in 2006 and 2007. BuChE inhibition was analyzed in relation to reported exposures before and after adjustment for potential confounders using linear regression. Odds ratios estimating the risk of ‘BuChE depression’ (>20% from baseline) were also calculated for selected exposures based on unconditional logistic regression analyses. Results An overall decrease in mean BuChE activity was observed among study participants at the time of follow-up testing during the OP/CB spray season relative to pre-season baseline levels (mean decrease of 5.6%, P < 0.001). Score for estimated cumulative exposure to OP/CB insecticides in the past 30 days was a significant predictor of BuChE inhibition (β = −1.74, P < 0.001). Several specific work practices and workplace conditions were associated with greater BuChE inhibition, including mixing/loading pesticides and cleaning spray equipment. Factors that were protective against BuChE inhibition included full-face respirator use, wearing chemical-resistant boots, and storing personal protective equipment in a locker at work. Conclusions Despite existing regulations, agricultural pesticide handlers continue to be exposed to OP/CB insecticides at levels resulting in BuChE inhibition. These findings suggest that modifying certain work practices could potentially reduce BuChE inhibition. Replication from other studies will be valuable. PMID:19819864

  16. Interaction between organophosphate pesticide exposure and PON1 activity on thyroid function

    SciTech Connect

    Lacasana, Marina; Lopez-Flores, Inmaculada; Rodriguez-Barranco, Miguel; Aguilar-Garduno, Clemente; Blanco-Munoz, Julia; Perez-Mendez, Oscar; Gamboa, Ricardo; Gonzalez-Alzaga, Beatriz; Bassol, Susana; Cebrian, Mariano E.

    2010-11-15

    Organophosphate pesticides are widely used in agricultural purposes. Recently, a few studies have demonstrated the ability of these chemicals to alter the function of the thyroid gland in human. Moreover, the paraoxonase-1 enzyme (PON1) plays an important role in the toxicity of some organophosphate pesticides, with low PON1 activity being associated with higher pesticide sensitivity. This study evaluates the interaction between exposure to organophosphate compounds and PON1 enzyme activity on serum levels of TSH and thyroid hormones in a population of workers occupationally exposed to pesticides. A longitudinal study was conducted on a population of floriculture workers from Mexico, during two periods of high and low-intensity levels of pesticide application. A structured questionnaire was completed by workers containing questions on sociodemographic characteristics and other variables of interest. Urine and blood samples were taken, and biomarkers of exposure (dialkylphosphates), susceptibility (PON1 polymorphisms and activity) and effect (thyroid hormone levels) were determined. Interaction between dialkylphosphates and PON1 polymorphisms or PON1 activity on hormone levels was evaluated by generalized estimating equation (GEE) models. A significant interaction was found between serum diazoxonase activity and total dialkylphosphates ({Sigma}DAP) on TSH levels. Thus, when PON1 activity was increased we observed a decrease in the percentage of variation of TSH level for each increment in one logarithmic unit of the {Sigma}DAP levels. This interaction was also observed with the PON1{sub 192}RR genotype. These results suggest a stronger association between organophosphate pesticides and thyroid function in individuals with lower PON1 activity.

  17. Peripheral Nervous System Function and Organophosphate Pesticide Use among Licensed Pesticide Applicators in the Agricultural Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Starks, Sarah E.; Hoppin, Jane A.; Kamel, Freya; Lynch, Charles F.; Jones, Michael P.; Alavanja, Michael C.; Sandler, Dale P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Evidence is limited that long-term human exposure to organophosphate (OP) pesticides, without poisoning, is associated with adverse peripheral nervous system (PNS) function. Objective: We investigated associations between OP pesticide use and PNS function by administering PNS tests to 701 male pesticide applicators in the Agricultural Health Study (AHS). Methods: Participants completed a neurological physical examination (NPx) and electrophysiological tests as well as tests of hand strength, sway speed, and vibrotactile threshold. Self-reported information on lifetime use of 16 OP pesticides was obtained from AHS interviews and a study questionnaire. Associations between pesticide use and measures of PNS function were estimated with linear and logistic regression controlling for age and outcome-specific covariates. Results: Significantly increased odds ratios (ORs) were observed for associations between ever use of 10 of the 16 OP pesticides and one or more of six NPx outcomes. Most notably, abnormal toe proprioception was significantly associated with ever use of 6 OP pesticides, with ORs ranging from 2.03 to 3.06; monotonic increases in strength of association with increasing use was observed for 3 of the 6 pesticides. Mostly null associations were observed between OP pesticide use and electrophysiological tests, hand strength, sway speed, and vibrotactile threshold. Conclusions: This study provides some evidence that long-term exposure to OP pesticides is associated with signs of impaired PNS function among pesticide applicators. PMID:22262687

  18. Semen quality in Peruvian pesticide applicators: association between urinary organophosphate metabolites and semen parameters

    PubMed Central

    Yucra, Sandra; Gasco, Manuel; Rubio, Julio; Gonzales, Gustavo F

    2008-01-01

    Background Organophosphates are broad class of chemicals widely used as pesticides throughout the world. We performed a cross-sectional study of associations between dialkylphosphate metabolites of organophosphates and semen quality among pesticide applicators in Majes (Arequipa), Peru. Methods Thirty-one men exposed to organophosphate (OP) pesticides and 31 non-exposed were recruited (age, 20–60 years). In exposed subjects, semen and a blood sample were obtained one day after the last pesticide application. Subjects were grouped according to levels of OP metabolites in urine. Semen samples were analyzed for sperm concentration, percentage of sperm motility, percentage of normal morphology, semen leucocytes and concentrations of fructose and zinc. Exposure to OP was assessed by measuring six urinary OP metabolites (dimethyl and diethyl phosphates and thiophosphates) by gas chromatography using a single flame photometric detector. Results Diethyldithiophosphate (p = 0.04) and diethylthiophosphate (p = 0.02) better reflected occupational pesticide exposure than other OP metabolites. Semen analysis revealed a significant reduction of semen volume and an increase in semen pH in men with OP metabolites. Multiple regression analysis showed that both occupational exposure to pesticides and the time of exposure to pesticides were more closely related to alterations in semen quality parameters than the single measurement of OP metabolites in urine. Conclusion The study demonstrated that occupational exposure to OP pesticides was more closely related to alterations in semen quality than a single measurement of urine OP metabolites. Current measurement of OP metabolites in urine may not reflect the full risk. PMID:19014632

  19. An Observational Study to Evaluate Associations Between Low-Level Gestational Exposure to Organophosphate Pesticides and Cognition During Early Childhood.

    PubMed

    Donauer, Stephanie; Altaye, Mekibib; Xu, Yingying; Sucharew, Heidi; Succop, Paul; Calafat, Antonia M; Khoury, Jane C; Lanphear, Bruce; Yolton, Kimberly

    2016-09-01

    Prenatal exposure to organophosphate pesticides, which is ubiquitous, may be detrimental to neurological development. We examined 327 mother/infant pairs in Cincinnati, Ohio, between 2003 and 2006 to determine associations between prenatal exposure to organophosphate pesticides and neurodevelopment. Twice during pregnancy urinary concentrations of 6 common dialkylphosphates, nonspecific metabolites of organophosphate pesticides, were measured. Aggregate concentrations of diethylphosphates, dimethylphosphates, and total dialkylphosphates were calculated. Bayley Scales of Infant Development, Second Edition-Mental and Psychomotor Developmental indices were administered at ages 1, 2, and 3 years, the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals-Preschool, Second Edition, at age 4, and the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence, Third Edition, at age 5. Mothers with higher urinary total dialkylphosphate concentrations reported higher levels of socioeconomic status and increased fresh fruit and vegetable intake. We found no associations between prenatal exposure to organophosphate pesticides and cognition at 1-5 years of age. In our cohort, exposure to organophosphate pesticides during pregnancy was not associated with cognition during early childhood. It is possible that a higher socioeconomic status and healthier diet may protect the fetus from potential adverse associations with gestational organophosphate pesticide exposure, or that dietary exposure to the metabolites is innocuous and not an ideal measure of exposure to the parent compound. PMID:27539379

  20. Organophosphate pesticides-induced changes in the redox status of rat tissues and protective effects of antioxidant vitamins.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Vibhuti; Srivastava, Nalini

    2015-04-01

    Organophosphates (OPs) pesticides are among the most toxic synthetic chemicals purposefully added in the environment. The common use of OP insecticides in public health and agriculture results in an environmental pollution and a number of acute and chronic poisoning events. Present study was aimed to evaluate the potential of monocrotophos and quinalphos to effect the redox status and glutathione (GSH) homeostasis in rat tissues and find out whether antioxidant vitamins have some protection on the pesticide-induced alterations. The results showed that these pesticides alone or in combination, caused decrease in the levels of GSH and the corresponding increase in the levels of GSSG, decreasing the GSH/GSSG ratio. The results also showed that NADPH/NADP(+) and NADH/NAD(+) ratios were decreased in the liver and brain of rats on exposure with mococrotophos, quinalphos, and their mixture. These pesticides, alone or in combination, caused alterations in the activities of GSH reductase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the rat tissues. However, the expression of the GSH recycling enzymes did not show significant alterations as compared to control. From the results, it can be concluded that these pesticides generate oxidative stress but their effects were not synergistic when given together and prior feeding of antioxidant vitamins tend to reduce the toxicities of these pesticides.

  1. Organophosphate pesticides exposure among farmworkers: pathways and risk of adverse health effects.

    PubMed

    Suratman, Suratman; Edwards, John William; Babina, Kateryna

    2015-01-01

    Organophosphate (OP) compounds are the most widely used pesticides with more than 100 OP compounds in use around the world. The high-intensity use of OP pesticides contributes to morbidity and mortality in farmworkers and their families through acute or chronic pesticides-related illnesses. Many factors contributing to adverse health effects have been investigated by researchers to determine pathways of OP-pesticide exposure among farmers in developed and developing countries. Factors like wind/agricultural pesticide drift, mixing and spraying pesticides, use of personal protective equipment (PPE), knowledge, perceptions, washing hands, taking a shower, wearing contaminated clothes, eating, drinking, smoking, and hot weather are common in both groups of countries. Factors including low socioeconomic status areas, workplace conditions, duration of exposure, pesticide safety training, frequency of applying pesticides, spraying against the wind, and reuse of pesticide containers for storage are specific contributors in developing countries, whereas housing conditions, social contextual factors, and mechanical equipment were specific pathways in developed countries. This paper compares existing research in environmental and behavioural exposure modifying factors and biological monitoring between developing and developed countries. The main objective of this review is to explore the current depth of understanding of exposure pathways and factors increasing the risk of exposure potentially leading to adverse health effects specific to each group of countries.

  2. Bioactive Paper Sensor Based on the Acetylcholinesterase for the Rapid Detection of Organophosphate and Carbamate Pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Badawy, Mohamed E. I.; El-Aswad, Ahmed F.

    2014-01-01

    In many countries, people are becoming more concerned about pesticide residues which are present in or on food and feed products. For this reason, several methods have been developed to monitor the pesticide residue levels in food samples. In this study, a bioactive paper-based sensor was developed for detection of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors including organophosphate and carbamate pesticides. Based on the Ellman colorimetric assay, the assay strip is composed of a paper support (1 × 10 cm), onto which a biopolymer chitosan gel immobilized in crosslinking by glutaraldehyde with AChE and 5,5′-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic) acid (DTNB) and uses acetylthiocholine iodide (ATChI) as an outside reagent. The assay protocol involves introducing the sample to sensing zone via dipping of a pesticide-containing solution. Following an incubation period, the paper is placed into ATChI solution to initiate enzyme catalyzed hydrolysis of the substrate, causing a yellow color change. The absence or decrease of the yellow color indicates the levels of the AChE inhibitors. The biosensor is able to detect organophosphate and carbamate pesticides with good detection limits (methomyl = 6.16 × 10−4 mM and profenofos = 0.27 mM) and rapid response times (~5 min). The results show that the paper-based biosensor is rapid, sensitive, inexpensive, portable, disposable, and easy-to-use. PMID:25484901

  3. Care of nestlings by wild female starlings exposed to an organophosphate pesticide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grue, C.E.; Powell, G.V.N.; McChesney, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    (1) Our objective was to determine the effect of exposure to an organophosphate pesticide (OP), dicrotophos (3-hydroxy-N,N-dimethyl-cis-scrotonamide dimethyl phosphate), on care of nestlings by wild female starlings (Sturnus vulgaris)....(2) We selected twelve pairs of active nests based on synchrony in the reproductive cycle. When nestlings were 10 days old (day 10), adult males were captured and killed and brood size was adjusted to four. The frequency and temporal distribution of sorties made by each pair of females to feed their young were recorded for 2 h at 18.00 hours on day 11 and 06.00 hours on day 12. One female from each pair was given a single oral dose of dicrotophos (2.5 mg/kg of body weight) dissolved in corn oil; the second female received an equivalent exposure of pure corn oil. Birds were released and their nestlings weighed. Parental care was again monitored between 18.00 and 20.00 hours on day 12 and 06.00 and 08.00 hours on day 13. Females were then captured and they with their young were weighed and killed. Changes in parental care in OP-dosed and control females were compared using paired t-tests. ....(3) The OP-dosed females made significantly (P < 0.5) fewer sorties to feed their young and remained away from their boxes for longer periods of time than controls. Nestlings of OP-treated females lost significantly more weight (X = 9.3%) than nestlings of controls (X = 3.2%). Brain ChE activity in OP-treated females was inhibited an average of 50.7% compared with controls. Weight changes in OP-dosed (X = -8.9%) and control females (X = -8.3%) were similar.....(4) Results indicate that parental care may be significantly reduced in songbirds receiving severe but sublethal exposure to organophosphate pesticides. The potential for a reduction or modification in parental care to alter reproductive success in passerines is discussed..... (5) Techniques utilized, or modifications thereof, may be useful in collecting the additional data needed to

  4. In vitro studies on organophosphate pesticides induced oxidative DNA damage in rat lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ojha, A; Srivastava, N

    2014-02-01

    Organophosphate (OP) pesticides are widely used for agricultural and household pest control. We studied the genotoxicity of the commonly used OP pesticides chlorpyrifos (CPF), methyl parathion (MPT), and malathion (MLT), individually and in combination, in Wistar rat peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro. DNA single-strand and double-strand breaks were measured by single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE; comet assay). To test whether the DNA lesions were caused by oxidative stress, the DNA repair enzymes formamidoaminopyrimidineglycosylase (Fpg) and endonuclease (Endo III), which convert base damages to strand breaks, were used. Significant increases in strand breaks and in levels of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide were observed in lymphocytes treated with pesticides. MPT exposure caused the greatest DNA damage and ROS production, followed by CPF and ML. Our results demonstrate genotoxic potential of these OP pesticides.

  5. Electrochemical Stripping Analysis of Organophosphate Pesticides and Nerve Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2005-03-17

    A sensitive electrochemical stripping voltammetric method for analyzing organophosphate (OP) compounds was developed using a carbon paste electrochemical (CPE) transducer. OPs strongly adsorb on a CPE surface and provide facile electrochemical quantitative methods for electroactive OP compounds. Operational parameters have been optimized, and the stripping voltammetric performance has been studied using square wave voltammetry. The adsorptive stripping voltammetric response is highly linear over the 1-60 μM methyl parathion range examined (2-min adsorption), with a detection limit of 0.05 μmol/L (10 min accumulation) and good precision (RSD=3.2%, n =10). These findings can lead to a widespread use of electrochemical sensors to detect OP contaminates.

  6. Population-Based Biomonitoring of Exposure to Organophosphate and Pyrethroid Pesticides in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, J. Bryan; Kass, Daniel; Barr, Dana Boyd; Davis, Mark; Calafat, Antonia M.; Aldous, Kenneth M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Organophosphates and pyrethroids are the most common classes of insecticides used in the United States. Widespread use of these compounds to control building infestations in New York City (NYC) may have caused higher exposure than in less-urban settings. Objectives: The objectives of our study were to estimate pesticide exposure reference values for NYC and identify demographic and behavioral characteristics that predict exposures. Methods: The NYC Health and Nutrition Examination Survey was a population-based, cross-sectional study conducted in 2004 among adults ≥ 20 years of age. It measured urinary concentrations of organophosphate metabolites [dimethylphosphate (DMP), dimethylthiophosphate (DMTP), dimethyldithiophosphate, diethylphosphate, diethylthiophosphate, and diethyldithiophosphate] in 883 participants, and pyrethroid metabolites [3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA), trans-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (trans-DCCA), 4-fluoro-3-phenoxybenzoic acid, and cis-3-(2,2-dibromovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid] in 1,452 participants. We used multivariable linear regression to estimate least-squares geometric mean total dialkylphospate (ΣDAP) and 3-PBA concentrations across categories of predictors. Results: The dimethyl organophosphate metabolites had the highest 95th percentile concentrations (87.4 μg/L and 74.7 μg/L for DMP and DMTP, respectively). The highest 95th percentiles among pyrethroid metabolites were measured for 3-PBA and trans-DCCA (5.23 μg/L and 5.94 μg/L, respectively). Concentrations of ΣDAP increased with increasing age, non-Hispanic white or black compared with Hispanic race/ethnicity, professional pesticide use, and increasing frequency of fruit consumption; they decreased with non-green vegetable consumption. Absolute differences in geometric mean urinary 3-PBA concentrations across categories of predictors were too small to be meaningful. Conclusion: Estimates of exposure to

  7. ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDE DEGRADATION UNDER DRINKING WATER TREATMENT CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Food Quality Protection Act (FQPA) of 1996 requires that all tolerances for pesticide chemical residuals in or on food be considered for anticipated exposure. Drinking water is considered a potential pathway for dietary exposure and there is reliable monitoring data for the ...

  8. Investigation of gastrointestinal effects of organophosphate and carbamate pesticide residues on young children.

    PubMed

    Jones, K; Everard, M; Harding, A-H

    2014-03-01

    This prospective study was designed to investigate whether there is any association between gastrointestinal effects and pesticide residue exposure (as measured by metabolite levels in urine and faecal samples) in young children and to describe background levels of pesticide residues in samples from healthy children in the UK. Children (N=136) between the ages of 1.0 and 4.2 years were recruited. Of these, 107 provided background baseline samples and 26 provided samples when suffering from gastrointestinal symptoms. Urine samples (from all populations) were positive for (non-specific) carbaryl metabolite (urine 19/78, faeces 9/99), organophosphate metabolites (urine 103/135, faeces 47/111) and pirimicarb metabolite (urine 72/175, faeces 45/135). There were no statistically significant differences between samples from children when healthy or unwell. The urinary 95th percentile values for the healthy population of young children in this study were 31 nmol/l (carbaryl metabolite), 2156 nmol/l (total organophosphate metabolites) and 139 nmol/l (pirimicarb metabolite). In this study, samples from children suffering gastrointestinal symptoms were no more associated with anti-cholinergic pesticide metabolite levels or rotaviral infection than samples from healthy children. Background levels of anti-cholinergic pesticide metabolites in healthy UK children were in agreement with previously reported levels from the US and Germany.

  9. Inhalation exposure of organophosphate pesticides by vegetable growers in the Bang-Rieng subdistrict in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Jaipieam, Somsiri; Visuthismajarn, Parichart; Siriwong, Wattasit; Borjan, Marija; Robson, Mark G

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated inhalation exposure to organophosphate pesticides (OPPs) and evaluated the associated health risks to vegetable growers living in the Bang-Rieng agricultural community. Air samples were collected by using personal sampling pumps with sorbent tubes placed in the vegetable growers' breathing zone. Samples were collected during both wet and dry seasons. Residues of organophosphate pesticides, that is, chlorpyrifos, dicrotofos, and profenofos, were analyzed from 33 vegetable growers and 17 reference subjects. Results showed that median concentrations of OPPs in air in farm areas were in the range of 0.022-0.056 mg/m(3) and air in nonfarm areas in the range of <0.0016-<0.005 mg/m(3). The concentration of the three pesticides in the vegetable growers was significantly higher than that of the references during both seasons. The results also indicate that the vegetable growers may be at risk for acute adverse effects via the inhalation of chlorpyrifos and dicrotofos during pesticide application, mixing, loading, and spraying. It is suggested that authorities and the community should implement appropriate strategies concerning risk reduction and risk management. PMID:20168980

  10. Atropine maintenance dosage in patients with severe organophosphate pesticide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Thiermann, Horst; Steinritz, Dirk; Worek, Franz; Radtke, Maria; Eyer, Peter; Eyer, Florian; Felgenhauer, Norbert; Zilker, Thomas

    2011-09-25

    Although the importance of atropine in therapy of organophosphate (OP) poisoning is generally recognized, its dosing is a matter of debate. A retrospective analysis of atropine dosing was undertaken in 34 patients who had been enrolled in a clinical study assessing obidoxime effectiveness in OP-poisoning. All patients were severely intoxicated (suicidal attempts) and required artificial ventilation. Atropine was administered routinely by intensive care physicians for life-threatening muscarinic symptoms, with the recommendation to favor low dosage. The pharmacological active enantiomere S-hyoscyamine was determined by a radioreceptor assay. When RBC-AChE activity ranged between 10% and 30%, S-hyoscyamine plasma concentrations of approx. 5 nmol L⁻¹ were sufficient. This concentration could be maintained with about 0.005 mg h⁻¹ kg⁻¹ atropine. Only when RBC-AChE was completely inhibited, therapy of cholinergic crisis required atropine doses up to 0.06 mg h⁻¹ kg⁻¹. Elimination half-life of S-hyoscyamine was 1.5 h, showing occasionally a second slow elimination phase with t(½)=12 h. Malignant arrhythmias were observed in some 10% of our cases, which occurred late and often in the absence of relevant glandular cholinergic signs, when the S-hyoscyamine concentration was below 2.5 nmol L⁻¹. Arrhythmias mostly resolved on reinstitution of atropine.

  11. Airborne organophosphate pesticides drift in Mediterranean climate: The importance of secondary drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zivan, Ohad; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Dubowski, Yael

    2016-02-01

    Pesticide application is a short-term air-pollution episode with near and far field effects due to atmospheric drift. In order to better evaluate resulting air concentrations in nearby communities following pesticide application, measurements of airborne pesticides were conducted at ∼70 m from field edge. This was done following three different application events of the organophosphate pesticide Chlorpyrifos in a persimmon orchard. Complementary information on larger spatial scale was obtained using CALPUFF modeling in which application and meteorological data was used to better evaluate dispersion patterns. Measurements indicated high airborne concentrations during application hours (few μg m-3 for 8 h average), which dropped to tens of ng m-3 in the following days. Measured atmospheric concentrations show that secondary drift (i.e., post-application drift) involves significant loads of pesticides and hence should not be ignored in exposure considerations. Furthermore, CALPUFF modeling revealed the complex dispersion pattern when weak winds prevailed, and showed that during the 24 h after application air concentrations reached levels above the hourly Texas effect screening level (0.1 μg m-3). Interestingly, weak winds on the night after application resulted in a secondary peak in measured and modeled air concentrations. Long exposure time (when secondary drift is considered) and concentrations measured following such common air-assisted orchard application, suggest pesticide drift may have health repercussions that are currently unknown, and emphasize the need for further epidemiological studies.

  12. Investigation on acute toxicity and behavioral changes in Channa punctatus (Bloch) due to organophosphate pesticide profenofos.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Atindra Kumar; Nagpure, N S; Trivedi, Sunil P; Kumar, Ravindra; Kushwaha, Basdeo; Lakra, Wazir S

    2011-10-01

    Acute toxicity of an organophosphate pesticide profenofos (O-4-bromo-2- chlorophenyl-O-ethyl S-propyl phosphorothioate) to freshwater fish, Channa punctatus (Bloch), was studied in a static bioassay. Estimated 96-hour LC(50) of profenofos was found to be 2.68 μgL(-1). On the basis of the obtained LC(50) values for 96-hour exposure intervals, profenofos can be rated as highly toxic to C. punctatus. Fish exposed to profenofos showed hyper excitability, discoloration, erratic swimming, and secretion of excess amounts of mucus on the body and gills with eventual exhaustion and death. PMID:21770742

  13. Development of Immunochromatographic Assay for Identification of Organophosphate Pesticides in Environmental Samples.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Shruti; Ghorpade, Ramrao; Sathe, Manisha

    2016-01-01

    Microtiter plate enzyme linked immunoassay (ELISA) experiments in competitive format were performed utilizing polyclonal antibody for establishing a detection system for organophosphate pesticides. IC50 value of and limit of detection (LOD) value was determined by standard inhibition curve and value obtained were 0.05 μgmL(-1) and 0.001 μgmL(-1), respectively. Specificity of antibody was investigated with different organophosphate pesticides. Immunochromatographic assay (ICA) experiments were also designed in competitive format by making use of immunochromatographic strip which was assembly of three main components: conjugate pad, membrane and adsorbent pad. Membrane was coated with hapten-OVA conjugate (test line) and antirabbit IgG (control line). ICA experiments were performed by employing gold-labeled antibody as a detector reagent which was applied over conjugate pad. Visual detection limit obtained from ICA was 0.5 μgmL(-1). Major advantage of strip assay was rapid result, i.e., less than 10 min. which makes it suitable for onsite applications.

  14. Longitudinal trends in organophosphate incidents reported to the National Pesticide Information Center, 1995–2007

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Regulatory decisions to phase-out the availability and use of common organophosphate pesticides among the general public were announced in 2000 and continued through 2004. Based on revised risk assessments, chlorpyrifos and diazinon were determined to pose unacceptable risks. To determine the impact of these decisions, organophosphate (OP) exposure incidents reported to the National Pesticide Information Center (NPIC) were analyzed for longitudinal trends. Methods Non-occupational human exposure incidents reported to NPIC were grouped into pre- (1995–2000) and post-announcement periods (2001–2007). The number of total OP exposure incidents, as well as reports for chlorpyrifos, diazinon and malathion, were analyzed for significant differences between these two periods. The number of informational inquiries from the general public was analyzed over time as well. Results The number of average annual OP-related exposure incidents reported to NPIC decreased significantly between the pre- and post-announcement periods (p < 0.001). A significant decrease in the number of chlorpyrifos and diazinon reports was observed over time (p < 0.001). No significant difference in the number of incident reports for malathion was observed (p = 0.4), which was not phased-out of residential use. Similar to exposure incidents, the number of informational inquiries received by NPIC declined over time following the phase-out announcement. Conclusion Consistent with other findings, the number of chlorpyrifos and diazinon exposure incidents reported to NPIC significantly decreased following public announcement and targeted regulatory action. PMID:19379510

  15. Urinary Metabolites of Organophosphate and Pyrethroid Pesticides and Neurobehavioral Effects in Chinese Children.

    PubMed

    Wang, Na; Huang, Mengying; Guo, Xinyan; Lin, Ping

    2016-09-01

    Organophosphate (OP) and pyrethroid (PYR) pesticides are widely used in China. However, few studies have investigated the neurobehavioral outcomes of Chinese children exposed to low levels of OP and PYR. We investigated urinary metabolite levels and their association with exposure characteristics and the neurobehavior of children. For all children, biomarker measurements were made in the same interval relative to neurobehavioral testing. We analyzed the morning urine samples of 406 children aged 3-6 years from Nanjing, China. The Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon rank sum tests were used to identify the associations between urinary metabolite levels and exposure characteristics. Multiple linear regression models were used to test the associations between urinary metabolite levels and neurobehavioral test scores after adjusting for covariates (e.g., sex, age, and education expense). The detection of 3,5,6-trichloropyridinol (TCP) and 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA) in the urine was positively associated with living areas adjacent to agricultural fields and using indoor mosquito repellent incense. These two metabolites were negatively associated with the soaking time of fruits and vegetables. When treated as dichotomous variables, TCP was significantly associated with arithmetic test scores in adjusted models, and 3-PBA was significantly associated with the scores on the Chinese Binet and arithmetic tests. When treated as a continuous variable, higher urinary 3-PBA levels were significantly associated with lower cancellation test scores. Our findings suggest that exposure to organophosphate and pyrethroid pesticides may have a significant impact on children's working memory and verbal comprehension. PMID:27524288

  16. Association of in Utero Organophosphate Pesticide Exposure and Fetal Growth and Length of Gestation in an Agricultural Population

    PubMed Central

    Eskenazi, Brenda; Harley, Kim; Bradman, Asa; Weltzien, Erin; Jewell, Nicholas P.; Barr, Dana B.; Furlong, Clement E.; Holland, Nina T.

    2004-01-01

    Although pesticide use is widespread, little is known about potential adverse health effects of in utero exposure. We investigated the effects of organophosphate pesticide exposure during pregnancy on fetal growth and gestational duration in a cohort of low-income, Latina women living in an agricultural community in the Salinas Valley, California. We measured nonspecific metabolites of organophosphate pesticides (dimethyl and diethyl phosphates) and metabolites specific to malathion (malathion dicarboxylic acid), chlorpyrifos [O,O-diethyl O-(3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinyl) phosphoro-thioate], and parathion (4-nitrophenol) in maternal urine collected twice during pregnancy. We also measured levels of cholinesterase in whole blood and butyryl cholinesterase in plasma in maternal and umbilical cord blood. We failed to demonstrate an adverse relationship between fetal growth and any measure of in utero organophosphate pesticide exposure. In fact, we found increases in body length and head circumference associated with some exposure measures. However, we did find decreases in gestational duration associated with two measures of in utero pesticide exposure: urinary dimethyl phosphate metabolites [βadjusted = −0.41 weeks per log10 unit increase; 95% confidence interval (CI), −0.75–−0.02; p = 0.02], which reflect exposure to dimethyl organophosphate compounds such as malathion, and umbilical cord cholinesterase (βadjusted = 0.34 weeks per unit increase; 95% CI, 0.13–0.55; p = 0.001). Shortened gestational duration was most clearly related to increasing exposure levels in the latter part of pregnancy. These associations with gestational age may be biologically plausible given that organophosphate pesticides depress cholinesterase and acetylcholine stimulates contraction of the uterus. However, despite these observed associations, the rate of preterm delivery in this population (6.4%) was lower than in a U.S. reference population. PMID:15238287

  17. Mishandling and exposure of farm workers in Qatar to organophosphate pesticides.

    PubMed

    Shomar, Basem; Al-Saad, Khalid; Nriagu, Jerome

    2014-08-01

    We used a combination of subjective (questionnaire) and objective (urinary metabolites) measurements to evaluate factors that can predict the exposure of farm workers in Qatar to organophosphate pesticides and to assess whether the levels of exposure are associated with any self-reported health outcomes. The results show that pesticides were being extensively mishandled in the farms. Very few (<2%) of the farm workers knew the names of the pesticide they were using, and about one-third of the participants did not know the amount of pesticides to be applied to the crops. Nearly all (96%) of the participants had participated in mixing pesticides together before use and few (29%) used protective clothing while engaged in this operation. A significant number of participants (18%) had no knowledge that pesticides are a health hazard. At least one dialkyllphosphate (DAP) metabolite was detected in every worker. The geometric mean (GM) concentration of the dimethylalkylphosphates (DMAP) was 108 nM (range, from below the limit of detection (LOD) to 351 nM), and the GM for the diethylalkylphosphates (DEAP) was 43 nM (range, LOD-180 nM). The GM for total concentration of the metabolites (DAP) of 146 nM (maximum value estimated to be 531 nM) is below the values that have been reported for farmers in some countries, but higher than the levels in the general populations of many countries. We explored the influence of metal exposure and found consistent and negative relationships between the DAP metabolites and the concentrations of most of the trace elements in the urine of the farm workers; the negative associations were statistically significant for Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, As, and Pb. We suspect that the negative associations are not source-dependent but may be reflective of antagonistic relationships in human metabolism of OPPs and trace metals; hence we recommend that metals should be included as co-factors in assessing the health effects of OPP exposure.

  18. Nanoparticle-Based Electrochemical Immunosensor for the Detection of Phosphorylated Acetylcholinesterase: An Exposure Biomarker of Organophosphate Pesticides and Nerve AgentsOrganophosphate Pesticides and Nerve Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Wang, Jun; Barry, Richard C.; Petersen, Catherine E.; Timchalk, Charles; Gassman, Paul L.; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-11-01

    A nanoparticle-based electrochemical immunosensor has been developed for the detection of phosphorylated acetylcholinesterase (AChE) adducts, which is a potential exposure biomarker for organophosphate pesticides (OP) and chemical warfare nerve agent exposures. Zirconia nanoparticles (ZrO2 NPs) were used as selective sorbents to capture the phosphorylated AChE adduct, and quantum dots (ZnS@CdS, QDs) were used as tags to label monoclonal anti-AChE antibody to track the immunorecognition events. The sandwich-like immunoreactions were performed among the ZrO2 NPs, which were pre-coated on a screen printed electrode (SPE) by electrodeposition, phosphorylated AChE and QD-anti-AChE. The captured QD tags were determined on the SPE by electrochemical stripping analysis of its metallic component (cadmium) after an acid-dissolution step. Paraoxon was used as a model OP insecticide to prepare the phosphorylated AChE adduct to demonstrate the proof of principle for this sensor technology. The paraoxon-AChE adduct was characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrum, and the binding affinity of anti-AChE to the paraoxon-AChE was validated with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The parameters (e.g., amount of ZrO2 NP, QD-anti-AChE concentration,) that govern the electrochemical response of immunosensors were optimized. The voltammetric response of the immunosensor is highly linear over the range of 10 pM to 4 nM paraoxon-AChE, and the limit of detection is estimated to be 8 pM. This new nanoparticle-based electrochemical immunosensor thus provides a sensitive and quantitative tool for biomonitoring exposure to OP pesticides and nerve agents.

  19. Bioconcentration and Acute Intoxication of Brazilian Freshwater Fishes by the Methyl Parathion Organophosphate Pesticide

    PubMed Central

    Bosco de Salles, João; Matos Lopes, Renato; de Salles, Cristiane M. C.; Cassano, Vicente P. F.; de Oliveira, Manildo Marcião; Cunha Bastos, Vera L. F.; Bastos, Jayme Cunha

    2015-01-01

    Three species of freshwater Brazilian fishes (pacu, Piaractus mesopotamicus; piavussu, Leporinus macrocephalus, and curimbatá, Prochilodus lineatus) were exposed to an acute dose of 5 ppm methyl parathion organophosphate pesticide. Three to five individuals per species were exposed, one at a time, to 40 liters tap water spiked with Folidol 600. Pesticide concentrations and cholinesterase (ChE) activities were evaluated in serum, liver, brain, heart, and muscle. The bioconcentration of methyl parathion was similar for all studied fishes. Brain tissue showed the highest pesticide concentration, reaching 80 ppm after exposure for 30 min to methyl parathion. Three to 5 hours of 5 ppm methyl parathion exposure provoked the death of all P. lineatus at 92% brain AChE inhibition, whereas fish from the other two species survived for up to 78 hours with less than 80% brain AChE inhibition. Our results indicate that acute toxic effects of methyl parathion to fish are correlated with brain AChE sensitivity to methyl paraoxon. PMID:26339593

  20. Predictors of exposure to organophosphate pesticides in schoolchildren in the Province of Talca, Chile

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Quezada, Maria Teresa; Iglesias, Verónica; Lucero, Boris; Steenland, Kyle; Barr, Dana Boyd; Levy, Karen; Ryan, P. Barry; Alvarado, Sergio; Concha, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Background Few data exist in Latin America concerning the association between organophosphate (OP) urinary metabolites and the consumption of fruits and vegetables and other exposure risk variables in schoolchildren. Methods We collected samples of urine from 190 Chilean children aged 6-12 years, fruits and vegetables, water and soil from schools and homes, and sociodemographic data through a questionnaire. We measured urinary dialkylphosphate (DAP) OP metabolites and OP pesticide residues in food consumed by these 190 children during two seasons: December 2010 (summer) and May 2011(fall). We analyzed the relationship between urinary DAP concentrations and pesticide residues in food, home pesticide use, and residential location. Results Diethylalkylphosphates (DEAP) and dimethylalkylphosphates (DMAP) were detected in urine in 76% and 27% of samples, respectively. Factors associated with urinary DEAP included chlorpyrifos in consumed fruits (p<0.0001), urinary creatinine (p<0.0001), rural residence (p=0.02) and age less than 9 years (p=0.004). Factors associated with urinary DMAP included the presence of phosmet residues in fruits (p<0.0001), close proximity to a farm (p=0.002), home fenitrothion use (p=0.009), and season (p<0.0001). Conclusions Urinary DAP levels in Chilean school children were high compared previously reported studies. The presence of chlorpyrifos and phosmet residues in fruits was the major factor predicting urinary DAP metabolite concentrations in children. PMID:22732215

  1. Bioconcentration and Acute Intoxication of Brazilian Freshwater Fishes by the Methyl Parathion Organophosphate Pesticide.

    PubMed

    de Salles, João Bosco; Lopes, Renato Matos; de Salles, Cristiane M C; Cassano, Vicente P F; de Oliveira, Manildo Marcião; Bastos, Vera L F Cunha; Bastos, Jayme Cunha

    2015-01-01

    Three species of freshwater Brazilian fishes (pacu, Piaractus mesopotamicus; piavussu, Leporinus macrocephalus, and curimbatá, Prochilodus lineatus) were exposed to an acute dose of 5 ppm methyl parathion organophosphate pesticide. Three to five individuals per species were exposed, one at a time, to 40 liters tap water spiked with Folidol 600. Pesticide concentrations and cholinesterase (ChE) activities were evaluated in serum, liver, brain, heart, and muscle. The bioconcentration of methyl parathion was similar for all studied fishes. Brain tissue showed the highest pesticide concentration, reaching 80 ppm after exposure for 30 min to methyl parathion. Three to 5 hours of 5 ppm methyl parathion exposure provoked the death of all P. lineatus at 92% brain AChE inhibition, whereas fish from the other two species survived for up to 78 hours with less than 80% brain AChE inhibition. Our results indicate that acute toxic effects of methyl parathion to fish are correlated with brain AChE sensitivity to methyl paraoxon. PMID:26339593

  2. Neurodevelopmental effects in children associated with exposure to organophosphate pesticides: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Quezada, María Teresa; Lucero, Boris A.; Barr, Dana B.; Steenland, Kyle; Levy, Karen; Ryan, P. Barry; Iglesias, Veronica; Alvarado, Sergio; Concha, Carlos; Rojas, Evelyn; Vega, Catalina

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have investigated the neurodevelopmental effects of prenatal and early childhood exposures to organophosphate (OP) pesticides among children, but they have not been collectively evaluated. The aim of the present article is to synthesize reported evidence over the last decade on OP exposure and neurodevelopmental effects in children. The Data Sources were PubMed, Web of Science, EBSCO, SciVerse Scopus, SpringerLink, SciELO and DOAJ. The eligibility criteria considered were studies assessing exposure to OP pesticides and neurodevelopmental effects in children from birth to 18 years of age, published between 2002 and 2012 in English or Spanish. Twenty-seven articles met the eligibility criteria. Studies were rated for evidential consideration as high, intermediate, or low based upon the study design, number of participants, exposure measurement, and neurodevelopmental measures. All but one of the 27 studies evaluated showed some negative effects of pesticides on neurobehavioral development. A positive dose–response relationship between OP exposure and neurodevelopmental outcomes was found in all but one of the 12 studies that assessed dose–response. In the ten longitudinal studies that assessed prenatal exposure to OPs, cognitive deficits (related to working memory) were found in children at age 7 years, behavioral deficits (related to attention) seen mainly in toddlers, and motor deficits (abnormal reflexes) seen mainly in neonates. No meta-analysis was possible due to different measurements of exposure assessment and outcomes. Eleven studies (all longitudinal) were rated high, 14 studies were rated intermediate, and two studies were rated low. Evidence of neurological deficits associated with exposure to OP pesticides in children is growing. The studies reviewed collectively support the hypothesis that exposure to OP pesticides induces neurotoxic effects. Further research is needed to understand effects associated with exposure in critical windows

  3. Neurodevelopmental effects in children associated with exposure to organophosphate pesticides: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Quezada, María Teresa; Lucero, Boris A; Barr, Dana B; Steenland, Kyle; Levy, Karen; Ryan, P Barry; Iglesias, Veronica; Alvarado, Sergio; Concha, Carlos; Rojas, Evelyn; Vega, Catalina

    2013-12-01

    Many studies have investigated the neurodevelopmental effects of prenatal and early childhood exposures to organophosphate (OP) pesticides among children, but they have not been collectively evaluated. The aim of the present article is to synthesize reported evidence over the last decade on OP exposure and neurodevelopmental effects in children. The Data Sources were PubMed, Web of Science, EBSCO, SciVerse Scopus, SpringerLink, SciELO and DOAJ. The eligibility criteria considered were studies assessing exposure to OP pesticides and neurodevelopmental effects in children from birth to 18 years of age, published between 2002 and 2012 in English or Spanish. Twenty-seven articles met the eligibility criteria. Studies were rated for evidential consideration as high, intermediate, or low based upon the study design, number of participants, exposure measurement, and neurodevelopmental measures. All but one of the 27 studies evaluated showed some negative effects of pesticides on neurobehavioral development. A positive dose-response relationship between OP exposure and neurodevelopmental outcomes was found in all but one of the 12 studies that assessed dose-response. In the ten longitudinal studies that assessed prenatal exposure to OPs, cognitive deficits (related to working memory) were found in children at age 7 years, behavioral deficits (related to attention) seen mainly in toddlers, and motor deficits (abnormal reflexes) seen mainly in neonates. No meta-analysis was possible due to different measurements of exposure assessment and outcomes. Eleven studies (all longitudinal) were rated high, 14 studies were rated intermediate, and two studies were rated low. Evidence of neurological deficits associated with exposure to OP pesticides in children is growing. The studies reviewed collectively support the hypothesis that exposure to OP pesticides induces neurotoxic effects. Further research is needed to understand effects associated with exposure in critical windows of

  4. Case histories of organophosphate pesticides killing birds of prey in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henny, C.J.; Kolbe, E.J.; Hill, E.F.; Blus, L.J.

    1985-01-01

    Since 1982 when secondary. poisoning of Red-tailed Hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) was documented following the recommended use of famphur on cattle, the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center has tested for organophosphate (OP) poisoning in selected birds of prey found dead. This report documents the circumstances for a number of. cases where birds of prey were killed by OP pesticides in the United States. Many of the cases were brought to our attention by the U S. Fish and Wildlife Service Division of Law Enforcement The cases may be divided into three categories: misuse, approved use, and unknown. Now that we are looking for OP poisoning of birds of prey, we are finding it more frequently than previously suspected.

  5. Recent advancements in sensing techniques based on functional materials for organophosphate pesticides.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pawan; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Deep, Akash

    2015-08-15

    The use of organophosphate pesticides (OPs) for pest control in agriculture has caused serious environmental problems throughout the world. OPs are highly toxic with the potential to cause neurological disorders in humans. As the application of OPs has greatly increased in various agriculture activities, it has become imperative to accurately monitor their concentration levels for the protection of ecological systems and food supplies. Although there are many conventional methods available for the detection of OPs, the development of portable sensors is necessary to facilitate routine analysis with more convenience. Some of these potent alternative techniques based on functional materials include fluorescence nanomaterials based sensors, molecular imprinted (MIP) sensors, electrochemical sensors, and biosensors. This review explores the basic features of these sensing approaches through evaluation of their performance. The discussion is extended further to describe the challenges and opportunities for these unique sensing techniques.

  6. Early-life Exposure to Organophosphate Pesticides and Pediatric Respiratory Symptoms in the CHAMACOS Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Harley, Kim G.; Balmes, John R.; Bradman, Asa; Lipsett, Michael; Eskenazi, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although pesticide use is widespread, the possible effect of early-life exposure to organophosphate (OP) on pediatric respiratory health is not well described. Objectives: We investigated the relationship between early-life exposure to OPs and respiratory outcomes. Methods: Participants included 359 mothers and children from the CHAMACOS birth cohort. Dialkyl phosphate (DAP) metabolites of OP pesticides, specifically diethyl (DE) and dimethyl (DM) phosphate metabolites, were measured in urine from mothers twice during pregnancy (mean = 13 and 26 weeks gestation) and from children five times during childhood (0.5–5 years). Childhood DAP concentrations were estimated by the area under curve (AUC). Mothers reported their child’s respiratory symptoms at 5 and 7 years of age. We used generalized estimating equations (GEE) to examine associations of prenatal and childhood DAP concentrations with repeated measures of respiratory symptoms and exercise-induced coughing at 5 and 7 years of age, adjusting for child’s sex and age, maternal smoking during pregnancy, secondhand tobacco smoke, season of birth, PM2.5, breastfeeding, mold and cockroaches in home, and distance from highway. Results: Higher prenatal DAP concentrations, particularly DE, were nonsignificantly associated with respiratory symptoms in the previous 12 months at 5 or 7 years of age [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) per 10-fold increase = 1.44; 95% CI: 0.98, 2.12]. This association was strongest with total DAP and DE from the second half of pregnancy (aOR per 10-fold increase = 1.77; 95% CI: 1.06, 2.95; and 1.61; 95% CI: 1.08, 2.39, respectively). Childhood DAP, DE, and DM concentrations were associated with respiratory symptoms and exercise-induced coughing in the previous 12 months at 5 or 7 years of age (total DAPs: aOR per 10-fold increase = 2.53; 95% CI: 1.32, 4.86; and aOR = 5.40; 95% CI: 2.10, 13.91, respectively). Conclusions: Early-life exposure to OP pesticides was associated with

  7. Dynamic modeling of organophosphate pesticide load in surface water in the northern San Joaquin Valley watershed of California.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuzhou; Zhang, Xuyang; Liu, Xingmei; Ficklin, Darren; Zhang, Minghua

    2008-12-01

    The hydrology, sediment, and pesticide transport components of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) were evaluated on the northern San Joaquin Valley watershed of California. The Nash-Sutcliffe coefficients for monthly stream flow and sediment load ranged from 0.49 to 0.99 over the watershed during the study period of 1992-2005. The calibrated SWAT model was applied to simulate fate and transport processes of two organophosphate pesticides of diazinon and chlorpyrifos at watershed scale. The model generated satisfactory predictions of dissolved pesticide loads relative to the monitoring data. The model also showed great success in capturing spatial patterns of dissolved diazinon and chlorpyrifos loads according to the soil properties and landscape morphology over the large agricultural watershed. This study indicated that curve number was the major factor influencing the hydrology while pesticide fate and transport were mainly affected by surface runoff and pesticide application and in the study area. PMID:18457909

  8. Long-term neurobehavioral effects of mild poisonings with organophosphate and n-methyl carbamate pesticides among banana workers.

    PubMed

    Wesseling, Catharina; Keifer, Matthew; Ahlbom, Anders; McConnell, Rob; Moon, Jai-Dong; Rosenstock, Linda; Hogstedt, Christer

    2002-01-01

    Organophosphate poisoning has been associated with chronic neurobehavioral dysfunction, but no epidemiologic data exist with regard to long-term consequences from carbamate poisoning. This cross-sectional study evaluated the neurobehavioral performances of 81 banana workers who, on average 27 months earlier, had received medical attention not requiring hospitalization for mild occupational poisoning by either an organophosphate or a carbamate pesticide. These performances were compared with those of 130 banana workers who had never sought medical attention for pesticide poisoning. Poisoned subjects did less well than controls on tests measuring psychomotor and visuomotor skills, language function, and affect, the differences being significant for coding skills on the Digit-Symbol test and two tests of neuropsychiatric symptoms. These deficits, in particular a marked increase of neuropsychiatric symptoms, occurred among the organophosphate-poisoned subjects, but small deficits in performance were also seen in the carbamate-poisoned subjects. The performances of the previously poisoned subjects who had had contact with cholinesterase inhibitors within three months before testing were particularly poor. These findings in workers with mild poisoning are consistent with previous findings of persistent damage to the central nervous system from organophosphate poisoning. The possibility of persistent neurobehavioral effects associated with poisonings by nmethyl carbamate insecticides cannot be excluded. Workers with histories of poisoning may be more susceptible to neurobehavioral effects with subsequent exposures.

  9. Atmospheric transport of organophosphate pesticides from California's Central Valley to the Sierra Nevada Mountains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zabik, John M.; Seiber, James N.

    1993-01-01

    Atmospheric transport of organophosphate pesticides from California's Central Valley to the Sierra Nevada mountains was assessed by collecting air- and wet-deposition samples during December, January, February, and March, 1990 to 1991. Large-scale spraying of these pesticides occurs during December and January to control insect infestations in valley orchards. Sampling sites were placed at 114- (base of the foothills), 533-, and 1920-m elevations. Samples acquired at these sites contained chlorpyrifos [phosphorothioic acid; 0,0-diethyl 0-(3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinyl) ester], parathion [phosphorothioic acid, 0-0-diethylo-(4-nitrophenyl) ester], diazinon {phosphorothioic acid, 0,0-diethyl 0-[6-methyl-2-(1-methylethyl)-4-pyrimidinyl] ester} diazinonoxon {phosphoric acid, 0,0-diethyl 0-[6-methyl-2-(1-methylethyl)-4-pyrimidinyl] ester}, and paraoxon [phosphoric acid, 0,0-diethyl 0-(4-nitrophenyl) ester] in both air and wet deposition samples. Air concentrations of chloropyrifos, diazinon and parathion ranged from 13 to 13 000 pg/m3 at the base of the foothills. At 533-m air concentrations were below the limit of quantification (1.4 pg/m3) to 83 pg/m3 and at 1920 m concentrations were below the limit of quantification. Concentrations in wet deposition varied with distance and elevation from the Central Valley. Rainwater concentrations at the base of the foot hills ranged from 16 to 7600 pg/mL. At 533-m rain and snow water concentrations ranged from below the limit of quantification (1.3 pg/mL) to 140 pg/mL and at 1920 m concentrations ranged from below the limit of quantification to 48 pg/mL. These findings indicate that atmospheric transport of pesticides applied in the valley to the Sierra Nevada mountains is occurring, but the levels decrease as distance and elevation increase from the valley floor.

  10. Prenatal Exposure to Organophosphate Pesticides and IQ in 7-Year-Old Children

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Maryse F.; Chevrier, Jonathan; Harley, Kim G.; Kogut, Katherine; Vedar, Michelle; Calderon, Norma; Trujillo, Celina; Johnson, Caroline; Bradman, Asa; Barr, Dana Boyd

    2011-01-01

    Context: Organophosphate (OP) pesticides are neurotoxic at high doses. Few studies have examined whether chronic exposure at lower levels could adversely affect children’s cognitive development. Objective: We examined associations between prenatal and postnatal exposure to OP pesticides and cognitive abilities in school-age children. Methods: We conducted a birth cohort study (Center for the Health Assessment of Mothers and Children of Salinas study) among predominantly Latino farmworker families from an agricultural community in California. We assessed exposure to OP pesticides by measuring dialkyl phosphate (DAP) metabolites in urine collected during pregnancy and from children at 6 months and 1, 2, 3.5, and 5 years of age. We administered the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, 4th edition, to 329 children 7 years of age. Analyses were adjusted for maternal education and intelligence, Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment score, and language of cognitive assessment. Results: Urinary DAP concentrations measured during the first and second half of pregnancy had similar relations to cognitive scores, so we used the average of concentrations measured during pregnancy in further analyses. Averaged maternal DAP concentrations were associated with poorer scores for Working Memory, Processing Speed, Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning, and Full-Scale intelligence quotient (IQ). Children in the highest quintile of maternal DAP concentrations had an average deficit of 7.0 IQ points compared with those in the lowest quintile. However, children’s urinary DAP concentrations were not consistently associated with cognitive scores. Conclusions: Prenatal but not postnatal urinary DAP concentrations were associated with poorer intellectual development in 7-year-old children. Maternal urinary DAP concentrations in the present study were higher but nonetheless within the range of levels measured in the general U.S. population. PMID:21507776

  11. Paper-based acetylcholinesterase inhibition assay combining a wet system for organophosphate and carbamate pesticides detection

    PubMed Central

    Apilux, Amara; Isarankura-Na-Ayudhya, Chartchalerm; Tantimongcolwat, Tanawut; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2015-01-01

    A dramatic increase in pesticide usage in agriculture highlights the need for on-site monitoring for public health and safety. Here, a paper-based sensor combined with a wet system was developed for the simple and rapid screening of organophosphate (OP) and carbamate (CM) pesticides based on the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The paper-based sensor was designed as a foldable device consisting of a cover and detection sheets pre-prepared with indoxyl acetate and AChE, respectively. The paper-based sensor requires only the incubation of a sample on the test zone for 10 minutes, followed by closing of the foldable sheet to initiate the enzymatic reaction. Importantly, the buffer loading hole was additionally designed on the cover sheet to facilitate the interaction of the coated substrate and the immobilized enzyme. This subsequently facilitates the mixing of indoxyl acetate with AChE, resulting in the improved analytical performance of the sensor. The absence or decrease in blue color produced by the AChE hydrolysis of indoxyl acetate can be observed in the presence of OPs and CMs. Under optimized conditions and using image analysis, the limit of detection (LOD) of carbofuran, dichlorvos, carbaryl, paraoxon, and pirimicarb are 0.003, 0.3, 0.5, 0.6, and 0.6 ppm, respectively. The assay could be applied to determine OP and CM residues in spiked food samples. Visual interpretation of the color signal was clearly observed at the concentration of 5 mg/kg. Furthermore, a self-contained sample pre-concentration approach greatly enhanced the detection sensitivity. The paper-based device developed here is low-cost, requires minimal reagents and is easy to handle. As such, it would be practically useful for pesticide screening by non-professional end-users. PMID:26417364

  12. Paper-based acetylcholinesterase inhibition assay combining a wet system for organophosphate and carbamate pesticides detection.

    PubMed

    Apilux, Amara; Isarankura-Na-Ayudhya, Chartchalerm; Tantimongcolwat, Tanawut; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2015-01-01

    A dramatic increase in pesticide usage in agriculture highlights the need for on-site monitoring for public health and safety. Here, a paper-based sensor combined with a wet system was developed for the simple and rapid screening of organophosphate (OP) and carbamate (CM) pesticides based on the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The paper-based sensor was designed as a foldable device consisting of a cover and detection sheets pre-prepared with indoxyl acetate and AChE, respectively. The paper-based sensor requires only the incubation of a sample on the test zone for 10 minutes, followed by closing of the foldable sheet to initiate the enzymatic reaction. Importantly, the buffer loading hole was additionally designed on the cover sheet to facilitate the interaction of the coated substrate and the immobilized enzyme. This subsequently facilitates the mixing of indoxyl acetate with AChE, resulting in the improved analytical performance of the sensor. The absence or decrease in blue color produced by the AChE hydrolysis of indoxyl acetate can be observed in the presence of OPs and CMs. Under optimized conditions and using image analysis, the limit of detection (LOD) of carbofuran, dichlorvos, carbaryl, paraoxon, and pirimicarb are 0.003, 0.3, 0.5, 0.6, and 0.6 ppm, respectively. The assay could be applied to determine OP and CM residues in spiked food samples. Visual interpretation of the color signal was clearly observed at the concentration of 5 mg/kg. Furthermore, a self-contained sample pre-concentration approach greatly enhanced the detection sensitivity. The paper-based device developed here is low-cost, requires minimal reagents and is easy to handle. As such, it would be practically useful for pesticide screening by non-professional end-users. PMID:26417364

  13. A Complex Interaction Between Reduced Reelin Expression and Prenatal Organophosphate Exposure Alters Neuronal Cell Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Mullen, Brian R.; Ross, Brennan; Chou, Joan Wang; Khankan, Rana; Khialeeva, Elvira; Bui, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Genetic and environmental factors are both likely to contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders including schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorders, and major depressive disorders. Prior studies from our laboratory and others have demonstrated that the combinatorial effect of two factors—reduced expression of reelin protein and prenatal exposure to the organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos oxon—gives rise to acute biochemical effects and to morphological and behavioral phenotypes in adolescent and young adult mice. In the current study, we examine the consequences of these factors on reelin protein expression and neuronal cell morphology in adult mice. While the cell populations that express reelin in the adult brain appear unchanged in location and distribution, the levels of full length and cleaved reelin protein show persistent reductions following prenatal exposure to chlorpyrifos oxon. Cell positioning and organization in the hippocampus and cerebellum are largely normal in animals with either reduced reelin expression or prenatal exposure to chlorpyrifos oxon, but cellular complexity and dendritic spine organization is altered, with a skewed distribution of immature dendritic spines in adult animals. Paradoxically, combinatorial exposure to both factors appears to generate a rescue of the dendritic spine phenotypes, similar to the mitigation of behavioral and morphological changes observed in our prior study. Together, our observations support an interaction between reelin expression and chlorpyrifos oxon exposure that is not simply additive, suggesting a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors in regulating brain morphology. PMID:27364165

  14. [Isolation and identification of a bacterial strain JS018 capable of degrading several kinds of organophosphate pesticides].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu-Ji; Deng, You-Jin; Liu, Xin-Rui; Xie, Bao-Gui; Hu, Fang-Ping

    2006-06-01

    Organophosphate pesticides are used widely all over the world and play an important role in plant pest control. However these pesticides are considered as pollutants and harmful to human health. To search for microorganisms that can degrade organophosphate pesticides with high efficiency, a bacterial strain, coded as JS018, was isolated and screened from the soil in the vicinity of Shanming Pesticides Factory, Shanming, Fujian. Laboratory tests showed that the bacterium could degrade several kinds of organophosphate pesticides, such as Parathion-methyl and phoxin. The strain's degrading rates on phoxin, Parathion-methyl, hostathion and dichlorvos in LB liquid fermentation medium for 36 h were 99%, 96%, 80.4% and 69.0% respectively. The bacterial colonies on LB plate appeared shiny and pale-pink in color. The bacteria were Gram-negative coccoids, 0.5 - 0.7 microm in diameter. They grew well at 30 - 38 degrees C and pH 7.0 - 9.0. The optimal temperature and pH for cell growth was 32 degrees C and pH 7.5 - 8.0, respectively. They did not grow in medium containing 6% or more NaCl. The antibiotic susceptibility tests showed that the strain was resistant to ampicillin, penicillin and lincomycin. It was sensitive to kanamycin, tetracycline and gentamicin. Laboratory tests also showed that the strain could ferment D-glucose, trehalose, melezitose and ethanol. It was negative in the production of indole and hydrogen sulfide. It could not liquefy gelatin, utilize citrate, nor ferment L-arabinose, sucrose, D-mannitol, D-xylose, fructose, D-galactose, maltose or lactose. The catalase, urease and nitrate reduction were positive. Based on its morphological, physiological and biochemical properties as well as the 16S rDNA sequence analysis result, the strain was tentatively identified as Roseomonas sp. PMID:16933622

  15. Ecotoxicity of two organophosphate pesticides chlorpyrifos and dichlorvos on non-targeting cyanobacteria Microcystis wesenbergii.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kai-Feng; Xu, Xiang-Rong; Duan, Shun-Shan; Wang, You-Shao; Cheng, Hao; Zhang, Zai-Wang; Zhou, Guang-Jie; Hong, Yi-Guo

    2015-10-01

    Organophosphate pesticides (OPs), as a replacement for the organochlorine pesticides, are generally considered non-toxic to plants and algae. Chlorpyrifos and dichlorvos are two OPs used for pest control all over the world. In this study, the dose-response of cyanobacteria Microcystis wesenbergii on OPs exposure and the stimulating effect of OPs with and without phosphorus source were investigated. The results showed that high concentrations of chlorpyrifos and dichlorvos caused significant decrease of chlorophyll a content. The median inhibitory concentrations (EC50) of chlorpyrifos and dichlorvos at 96 h were 15.40 and 261.16 μmol L(-1), respectively. Growth of M. wesenbergii under low concentration of OPs (ranged from 1/10,000 to 1/20 EC50), was increased by 35.85 % (chlorpyrifos) and 41.83 % (dichlorvos) at 120 h, respectively. Correspondingly, the highest enhancement on the maximum quantum yield (F v/F m) was 4.20 % (24 h) and 9.70 % (48 h), respectively. Chlorophyll fluorescence kinetics, known as O-J-I-P transients, showed significant enhancements in the O-J, J-I, and I-P transients under low concentrations of dichlorvos at 144 h, while enhancements of chlorophyll fluorescence kinetics induced by low concentrations of chlorpyrifos were only observed in the J-I transient at 144 h. Significant decreases of chlorophyll content, F v/F m and O-J-I-P transients with OPs as sole phosphorus source were found when they were compared with inorganic phosphate treatments. The results demonstrated an evidently hormetic dose-response of M. wesenbergii to both chlorpyrifos and dichlorvos, where high dose (far beyond environmental concentrations) exposure caused growth inhibition and low dose exposure induced enhancement on physiological processes. The stimulating effect of two OPs on growth of M. wesenbergii was negligible under phosphate limitation.

  16. Signal-on electrochemiluminescence of biofunctional CdTe quantum dots for biosensing of organophosphate pesticides.

    PubMed

    Liang, Han; Song, Dandan; Gong, Jingming

    2014-03-15

    A new, highly sensitive and selective ECL assay biosensor based on target induced signal on has been developed for the detection of organophosphate pesticides (OPs), whereby the smart integration of graphene nanosheets (GNs), CdTe quantum dots (CdTe QDs), and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzymatic reaction yields a biofunctional AChE-GNs-QDs hybrid as cathodic ECL emitters for OPs sensing. The electrochemically synthesized GNs were selected as a supporting material to anchor CdTe QDs, exhibiting a significantly amplified ECL signal of QDs. On the basis of the effect of OPs on the ECL signal of AChE-QDs-GNs modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE), a highly sensitive GNs-anchored-QDs-based signal-on ECL biosensor was developed for sensing OPs, combined with the enzymatic reactions and the dissolved oxygen as coreactant. The conditions for OPs detection were optimized by using methyl parathion (MP) as a model OP compound. Under the optimized experimental conditions, such a newly designed system shows remarkably improved sensitivity and selectivity for the sensing of OPs. The detection limit was found to be as low as about 0.06 ng mL(-1) (S/N=3). Toward the goal for practical applications, the resulting sensor was further evaluated by monitoring MP in spiked vegetable samples, showing fine applicability for the detection of MP in real samples.

  17. Electrochemical Sensor for Organophosphate Pesticides and Nerve Agents Using Zirconia Nanoparticles as Selective Sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2005-09-15

    Electrochemical sensor for detection of organophosphate (OP) pesticides and nerve agents using zirconia (ZrO₂) nanoparticles as selective sorbents is presented. Zirconia nanoparticles were electrodynamically deposited onto the polycrystalline gold electrode by cyclic voltammetry. Because of a strong affinity of zirconia to the phosphoric group, nitroaromatic OPs strongly bind to the ZrO₂ nanoparticle surface. The electrochemical characterization and anodic stripping voltammetric performance of bound OPs were evaluated using cyclic voltammetric and square-wave voltammetric (SWV) analysis. SWV was used to monitor the amount of bound OPs and provide simple, fast, and facile quantitative methods for nitroaromatic OP compounds. The sensor surface can be regenerated by successively running SWV scanning. Operational parameters, including the amount of nanoparticles, adsorption time, and the pH of the reaction medium have been optimized. The stripping voltammetric response is highly linear over the 5–200 ng/mL (ppb) methyl parathion range examined (2-min adsorption), with a detection limit of 1 ng/mL (10 min accumulation), and good precision (RSD=5.3 %, n = 10). The promising stripping voltammetric performances open new opportunities for fast, simple, and sensitive analyzing of OPs in environmental and biological samples. These findings can lead to a widespread use of electrochemical sensors to detect OP contaminates.

  18. Effects of organophosphate and carbamate pesticides on acetylcholinesterase and choline acetyltransferase activities of the polychaete Nereis diversicolor.

    PubMed

    Scaps, P; Demuynck, S; Descamps, M; Dhainaut, A

    1997-08-01

    A toxicity test for organophosphates (OP) and carbamates (C) was improved with the adult ragworm Nereis diversicolor. Animals were maintained in U-shaped glass tubes of 4-mm inner diameter fixed vertically on a plastic plate and placed in glass aquaria. Each tank was covered with glass in order to reduce evaporation and heat dissipation. Temperature varied between 15 and 16 degrees C and salinity was constant (34 per thousand) during the entire length of the experiment. Experiments were performed with a fixed day length of 12 h and seawater was gently aerated. The maintenance system allowed the administration of OP and C compounds via the seawater. An acclimatization period of 48 h was not sufficient to accomodate worms to their artificial burrows; accordingly, we chose to acclimate worms for a week before beginning the exposure. Choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activity was very low and was not significantly modified by two OP compounds: malathion and parathion-ethyl. ChAT is not a target for these pesticides and should not be used for future studies about OP and C toxicity. On the other hand, inhibitory effects on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity were determined at concentrations of 10(-6) M for three OP compounds-malathion, parathion-ethyl, and phosalone-and a carbamate pesticide-carbaryl. We measured only short-term effects and no cumulative effect was determined, the maximum percentage of AChE activity inhibition being between 2 (carbaryl) and 7 (OP compounds) days after exposure and then remaining stable. Mortality occured only after a period of intoxication of 14 days. N diversicolor, which can be easily maintained at the laboratory, seems to be a good candidate for future laboratory studies to test the toxicity of other pollutants.

  19. Prenatal Exposure to Organophosphate Pesticides and Reciprocal Social Behavior in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Furlong, Melissa A.; Engel, Stephanie M.; Barr, Dana Boyd; Wolff, Mary S.

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to organophosphate pesticides (OPs) has been associated with adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes in childhood, including low IQ, Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD), attention problems and ADHD. Many of these disorders involve impairments in social functioning. Thus, we investigated the relationship between biomarkers of prenatal OP exposure and impaired reciprocal social behavior in childhood, as measured by the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS). Using a multi-ethnic urban prospective cohort of mother-infant pairs in New York City recruited between 1998 and 2002 (n=404) we examined the relation between third trimester maternal urinary levels of dialkylphosphate (ΣDAP) OP metabolites and SRS scores among 136 children who returned for the 7–9 year visit. Overall, there was no association between OPs and SRS scores, although in multivariate adjusted models, associations were heterogeneous by race and by sex. Among blacks, each 10-fold increase in total diethylphosphates (ΣDEP) was associated with poorer social responsiveness (β = 5.1 points, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.8, 9.4). There was no association amongst whites or Hispanics, or for total ΣDAP or total dimethylphosphate (ΣDMP) biomarker levels. Additionally, stratum-specific models supported a stronger negative association among boys for ΣDEPs (β = 3.5 points, 95% CI 0.2, 6.8), with no notable association among girls. Our results support an association of prenatal OP exposure with deficits in social functioning among blacks and among boys, although this may be in part reflective of differences in exposure patterns. PMID:24934853

  20. Environmental exposure to organophosphate pesticides: assessment of endocrine disruption and hepatotoxicity in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Cecchi, A; Rovedatti, M G; Sabino, G; Magnarelli, G G

    2012-06-01

    In utero exposure is the first point of contact with environmental xenobiotics that may affect the maternal-placental-fetal balance. Considering that maternal pathophysiological changes affect intrauterine development, this pilot study was conducted to address how environmental exposure to organophosphate pesticides (OPs) during pregnancy may contribute to maternal endocrine disruption and disturbed hepatic function. A prospective study was carried out with pregnant women (n=97) living in a rural area of the Rio Negro province where OPs are intensively applied throughout 6 months of the year. Blood samples were obtained and biomarkers of OPs exposure (cholinesterases and β-glucuronidase), cortisol (CT) and progesterone (PG) levels, as well as glycemia, were determined. Parameters of liver injury were assayed by measuring aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT); liver function was assayed by measuring albumin. Biomonitoring carried out during the pre-spraying period (PreS) and spraying period (SP) showed that the population studied was exposed to OPs, proven by the fact that plasma (PCh) and erythrocyte cholinesterase (AChE) decreased very significantly (p<0.01) during SP. CT values increased very significantly (p<0.01) in the first trimester of pregnancy during SP with respect to PreS. Individual values above the upper limit of the CT and PG reference range were found both in PreS and SP. This finding could be associated with changes in hormone metabolism pathways produced by OPs exposure. During the second trimester of pregnancy there were increases in ALT values and the AST/ALT ratio in SP, suggesting subclinical hepatotoxicity. In SP, glycemia was unchanged while albuminemia increased. Although anthropometric newborn parameters and pregnancy alterations were within normal values for the general population, the increase in CT in the maternal compartment may lead to impaired newborn health later in life.

  1. A systematic review of the influence of occupational organophosphate pesticides exposure on neurological impairment

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Noriko; Hashizume, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the published literature and to estimate whether or not there is a causal relationship between occupational exposure to organophosphate pesticides (OPs) and either neurological impairment or depressive symptoms. Data sources EMBASE, MEDLINE, Global Health and PsycINFO (1980 to April 2014). Setting Observational studies (cross-sectional, cohort and case–control studies) with exposed and unexposed groups. Participants People who occupationally use OPs for more than 1 month and their family. Primary outcome Results of neurological core test batteries or depressive symptoms such as headaches, anxiety and dizziness. Study appraisal and synthesis methods After an extensive search of various literature databases, one author screened titles and abstracts, searched the relevant publications manually and conducted data extraction. All extracted data from the selected articles were synthesised for analysis. Quality appraisal was conducted using the Newcastle Ottawa Scale. Results Of the 1024 articles retrieved by database search, 24 studies that met the inclusion and exclusion criteria were selected for analysis. Of the selected studies, 17 were cross-sectional and the remaining 7 were cohort and nested case–control studies. The geographical areas included in the studies were the USA (10 studies), the UK (4 studies), Africa (4 studies), Asia (3 studies), Europe (2 studies) and South America (1 study). Each of the included studies used different exposure and outcome assessments such as neurological scores and depressive symptoms, making it difficult to compare the results exactly. Most studies showed that exposed groups had poorer results than unexposed groups; however, owing to the inconsistent neurological test batteries, there was not enough pooling evidence to conduct a meta-analysis. Conclusions The findings of this literature review indicate that it is necessary to standardise the neurological or

  2. Prenatal exposure to organophosphate pesticides and reciprocal social behavior in childhood.

    PubMed

    Furlong, Melissa A; Engel, Stephanie M; Barr, Dana Boyd; Wolff, Mary S

    2014-09-01

    Prenatal exposure to organophosphate pesticides (OPs) has been associated with adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes in childhood, including low IQ, pervasive developmental disorder (PDD), attention problems and ADHD. Many of these disorders involve impairments in social functioning. Thus, we investigated the relationship between biomarkers of prenatal OP exposure and impaired reciprocal social behavior in childhood, as measured by the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS). Using a multi-ethnic urban prospective cohort of mother-infant pairs in New York City recruited between 1998 and 2002 (n=404) we examined the relation between third trimester maternal urinary levels of dialkylphosphate (ΣDAP) OP metabolites and SRS scores among 136 children who returned for the 7-9year visit. Overall, there was no association between OPs and SRS scores, although in multivariate adjusted models, associations were heterogeneous by race and by sex. Among blacks, each 10-fold increase in total diethylphosphates (ΣDEP) was associated with poorer social responsiveness (β=5.1 points, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.8, 9.4). There was no association among whites or Hispanics, or for total ΣDAP or total dimethylphosphate (ΣDMP) biomarker levels. Additionally, stratum-specific models supported a stronger negative association among boys for ΣDEPs (β=3.5 points, 95% CI 0.2, 6.8), with no notable association among girls. Our results support an association of prenatal OP exposure with deficits in social functioning among blacks and among boys, although this may be in part reflective of differences in exposure patterns. PMID:24934853

  3. Interaction of organophosphate pesticides and related compounds with the androgen receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Hiroto; Yoshikawa, Hiromichi; Gaido, Kevin W; Ross, Susan M; DeLisle, Robert K; Welsh, William J; Richard, Ann M

    2003-01-01

    Identification of several environmental chemicals capable of binding to the androgen receptor (AR) and interfering with its normal function has heightened concern about adverse effects across a broad spectrum of environmental chemicals. We previously demonstrated AR antagonist activity of the organophosphate (OP) pesticide fenitrothion. In this study, we characterized AR activity of analogues of fenitrothion to probe the structural requirements for AR activity among related chemicals. AR activity was measured using HepG2 human hepatoma cells transfected with human AR plus an androgen-responsive luciferase reporter gene, MMTV-luc. AR antagonist activity decreased as alkyl chain length of the phosphoester increased, whereas electron-donating properties of phenyl substituents of the tested compounds did not influence AR activity. Oxon derivatives of fenitrothion, which are more likely to undergo hydrolytic degradation, had no detectable AR antagonist activity. Molecular modeling results suggest that hydrogen-bond energies and the maximum achievable interatomic distance between two terminal H-bond capable sites may influence both the potential to interact with the AR and the nature of the interaction (agonist vs. antagonist) within this series of chemicals. This hypothesis is supported by the results of recent AR homology modeling and crystallographic studies relative to agonist- and antagonist-bound AR complexes. The present results are placed in the context of structure-activity knowledge derived from previous modeling studies as well as studies aimed toward designing nonsteroidal antiandrogen pharmaceuticals. Present results extend understanding of the structural requirements for AR activity to a new class of nonsteroidal, environmental, OP-related chemicals. PMID:12676613

  4. Organophosphate Pesticide Exposure and Neurodevelopment in Young Mexican-American Children

    PubMed Central

    Eskenazi, Brenda; Marks, Amy R.; Bradman, Asa; Harley, Kim; Barr, Dana B.; Johnson, Caroline; Morga, Norma; Jewell, Nicholas P.

    2007-01-01

    Background Organophosphate (OP) pesticides are widely used in agriculture and homes. Animal studies suggest that even moderate doses are neurodevelopmental toxicants, but there are few studies in humans. Objectives We investigated the relationship of prenatal and child OP urinary metabolite levels with children’s neurodevelopment. Methods Participating children were from a longitudinal birth cohort of primarily Latino farm-worker families in California. We measured six nonspecific dialkylphosphate (DAP) metabolites in maternal and child urine as well as metabolites specific to malathion (MDA) and chlorpyrifos (TCPy) in maternal urine. We examined their association with children’s performance at 6 (n = 396), 12 (n = 395), and 24 (n = 372) months of age on the Bayley Scales of Infant Development [Mental Development (MDI) and Psychomotor Development (PDI) Indices] and mother’s report on the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) (n = 356). Results Generally, pregnancy DAP levels were negatively associated with MDI, but child measures were positively associated. At 24 months of age, these associations reached statistical significance [per 10-fold increase in prenatal DAPs: β = −3.5 points; 95% confidence interval (CI), −6.6 to −0.5; child DAPs: β = 2.4 points; 95% CI, 0.5 to 4.2]. Neither prenatal nor child DAPs were associated with PDI or CBCL attention problems, but both prenatal and postnatal DAPs were associated with risk of pervasive developmental disorder [per 10-fold increase in prenatal DAPs: odds ratio (OR) = 2.3, p = 0.05; child DAPs OR = 1.7, p = 0.04]. MDA and TCPy were not associated with any outcome. Conclusions We report adverse associations of prenatal DAPs with mental development and pervasive developmental problems at 24 months of age. Results should be interpreted with caution given the observed positive relationship with postnatal DAPs. PMID:17520070

  5. DETOXIFICATION OF ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDES BY IMMOBILIZED ESCHERICHIA COLI EXPRESSING ORGANOPHOSPHORUS HYDROLASE ON CELL SURFACE. (R823663)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An improved whole-cell technology for detoxifying organophosphate nerve agents was recently developed based on genetically engineered Escherichia coli with organophosphorus hydrolase anchored on the surface. This article reports the immobilization of these novel biocatalys...

  6. Histopathological alterations, biochemical responses and acetylcholinesterase levels in Clarias gariepinus as biomarkers of exposure to organophosphates pesticides.

    PubMed

    Doherty, V F; Ladipo, M K; Aneyo, I A; Adeola, A; Odulele, W Y

    2016-05-01

    Organophosphate pesticides, commonly used in large scale farming, have been found to be major contaminants in aquatic environment. Clarias gariepinus was exposed to acute and sublethal concentrations of phostoxin and DD Force to evaluate single and joint action toxicity of the organophosphates. Effects of phostoxin and DD force on antioxidant enzymes, fish organs and acetylcholinesterase levels in fingerlings and juveniles of C. gariepinus were also investigated. The lethal concentrations (96 h LC50) for phostoxin and DD Force were 0.631 and 1.759 mg/l, respectively. The results obtained from the bioassay showed that phostoxin was 2.8× more toxic than DD Force after exposure of C. gariepinus. Joint action toxicity evaluations of phostoxin and DD Force showed that the interaction between the chemicals was synergistic (RTU >1). The biochemical responses in the exposed fish differed significantly (P < 0.05) from the control fish. The result of acetylcholinesterase study revealed significant difference between acetylcholinesterase levels in the exposed fish and control, with reduction in the acetylcholineterase level in fish exposed to sublethal concentrations of phostoxin and DD Force. Haematological studies revealed an increase in WBC, RBC, PCV and platelets in the exposed fish. Histopathology of the gills showed shortened primary lamellae, loss of secondary lamellae and loss of ceratobrachial bones. In the acute toxicity studies, respiratory stress, erratic swimming and instant death of fish were observed in the exposed fish. This study reveals that changes in histopathology and acetylcholinesterase level are good biomarkers and can be successfully used to detect exposure to organophosphates pesticides in fish. PMID:27121169

  7. Self assembly of acetylcholinesterase on a gold nanoparticles–graphene nanosheet hybrid for organophosphate pesticide detection using polyelectrolyte as a linker

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Sheng; Du, Dan; Shao, Yuyan; Li, Zhaohui; Wang, Jun; Engelhard, Mark H.; Li, Jinghong; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-04-14

    A nanohybrid of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) and chemically reduced graphene oxide nanosheets (cr-Gs) was synthesized by in situ growth of Au NPs on the surface of graphene nanosheets in the presence of poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA), which not only improved the dispersion of Au NPs but also stabilized cholinesterase with high activity and loading efficiency. The obtained nanohybrid was characterized by TEM, XRD, XPS, and electrochemistry. Then an enzyme nanoassembly (AChE/Au NPs/cr-Gs) was prepared by self-assembling acetylcholinesterase (AChE) on Au NP/cr-Gs nanohybrid. An electrochemical sensor based on AChE/Au NPs/cr-Gs was further developed for ultrasensitive detection of organophosphate pesticide. The results demonstrate that the developed approach provides a promising strategy to improve the sensitivity and enzyme activity of electrochemical biosensors.

  8. Paraoxonase-1 genetic polymorphisms and susceptibility to DNA damage in workers occupationally exposed to organophosphate pesticides.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satyender; Kumar, Vivek; Thakur, Sachin; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Rautela, Rajender Singh; Grover, Shyam Sunder; Rawat, Devendra Singh; Pasha, Syed Tazeen; Jain, Sudhir Kumar; Ichhpujani, Rattan Lal; Rai, Arvind

    2011-04-15

    Human paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a lipoprotein-associated enzyme involved in the detoxification of organophosphate pesticides (OPs) by hydrolyzing the bioactive oxons. Polymorphisms of the PON1 gene are responsible for variation in the expression and catalytic activity of PON1 enzyme. In the present study, we have determined (a) the prevalence of two common PON1 polymorphisms, (b) the activity of PON1 and acetylcholinesterase enzymes, and (c) the influence of PON1 genotypes and phenotypes variation on DNA damage in workers exposed to OPs. We examined 230 subjects including 115 workers exposed to OPs and an equal number of normal healthy controls. The results revealed that PON1 activity toward paraoxon (179.19±39.36 vs. 241.52±42.32nmol/min/ml in controls) and phenylacetate (112.74±17.37 vs. 134.28±25.49μmol/min/ml in controls) was significantly lower in workers than in control subjects (p<0.001). No significant difference was observed in the distribution of genotypes and allelic frequencies of PON1(192)QR (Gln/Arg) and PON1(55)LM (Leu/Met) in workers and control subjects (p>0.05). The PON1 activity toward paraoxonase was found to be significantly higher in the R/R (Arg/Arg) genotypes than Q/R (Gln/Arg) and lowest in Q/Q (Gln/Gln) genotypes in both workers and control subjects (p<0.001). For PON1(55)LM (Leu/Met), PON1 activity toward paraoxonase was observed to be higher in individuals with L/L (Leu/Leu) genotypes and lowest in individuals with M/M (Met/Met) genotypes in both groups (p<0.001). No influence of PON1 genotypes and phenotypes was seen on the activity of acetylcholinesterase and arylesterase. The DNA damage was observed to be significantly higher in workers than in control subjects (p<0.05). Further, the individuals who showed least paraoxonase activity i.e., those with (Q/Q [Gln/Gln] and M/M [Met/Met]) genotypes showed significantly higher DNA damage compared to other isoforms in workers exposed to OPs (p<0.05). The results indicate that the

  9. Paraoxonase-1 genetic polymorphisms and susceptibility to DNA damage in workers occupationally exposed to organophosphate pesticides

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Satyender; Kumar, Vivek; Thakur, Sachin; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Rautela, Rajender Singh; Grover, Shyam Sunder; Rawat, Devendra Singh; Pasha, Syed Tazeen; Jain, Sudhir Kumar; Ichhpujani, Rattan Lal; Rai, Arvind

    2011-04-15

    Human paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a lipoprotein-associated enzyme involved in the detoxification of organophosphate pesticides (OPs) by hydrolyzing the bioactive oxons. Polymorphisms of the PON1 gene are responsible for variation in the expression and catalytic activity of PON1 enzyme. In the present study, we have determined (a) the prevalence of two common PON1 polymorphisms, (b) the activity of PON1 and acetylcholinesterase enzymes, and (c) the influence of PON1 genotypes and phenotypes variation on DNA damage in workers exposed to OPs. We examined 230 subjects including 115 workers exposed to OPs and an equal number of normal healthy controls. The results revealed that PON1 activity toward paraoxon (179.19 {+-} 39.36 vs. 241.52 {+-} 42.32 nmol/min/ml in controls) and phenylacetate (112.74 {+-} 17.37 vs. 134.28 {+-} 25.49 {mu}mol/min/ml in controls) was significantly lower in workers than in control subjects (p < 0.001). No significant difference was observed in the distribution of genotypes and allelic frequencies of PON1{sub 192}QR (Gln/Arg) and PON1{sub 55}LM (Leu/Met) in workers and control subjects (p > 0.05). The PON1 activity toward paraoxonase was found to be significantly higher in the R/R (Arg/Arg) genotypes than Q/R (Gln/Arg) and lowest in Q/Q (Gln/Gln) genotypes in both workers and control subjects (p < 0.001). For PON1{sub 55}LM (Leu/Met), PON1 activity toward paraoxonase was observed to be higher in individuals with L/L (Leu/Leu) genotypes and lowest in individuals with M/M (Met/Met) genotypes in both groups (p < 0.001). No influence of PON1 genotypes and phenotypes was seen on the activity of acetylcholinesterase and arylesterase. The DNA damage was observed to be significantly higher in workers than in control subjects (p < 0.05). Further, the individuals who showed least paraoxonase activity i.e., those with (Q/Q [Gln/Gln] and M/M [Met/Met]) genotypes showed significantly higher DNA damage compared to other isoforms in workers exposed to OPs (p < 0

  10. Multimedia transport and risk assessment of organophosphate pesticides and a case study in the northern San Joaquin Valley of California.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuzhou; Zhang, Minghua

    2009-05-01

    This paper presents a framework for cumulative risk characterization of human exposure to pesticides through multiple exposure pathways. This framework is illustrated through a case study of selected organophosphate (OP) pesticides in the northern San Joaquin Valley of California. Chemical concentrations in environmental media were simulated using a multimedia environmental fate model, and converted to contamination levels in exposure media. The risk characterization in this study was based on a residential-scale exposure to residues of multiple pesticides through everyday activities. Doses from a mixture of OP pesticides that share a common mechanism of toxicity were estimated following US Environmental Protection Agency guidelines for cumulative risk analysis. Uncertainty in the human exposure parameters was included in the Monte Carlo simulation in order to perform stochastic calculations for intakes and corresponding risks of OP pesticides. Risk of brain acetylcholinesterase inhibition was reported as margins of exposure (MOEs) of the 99.9th population percentile for two age groups living in the northern San Joaquin Valley during 1992-2005. Diet was identified as the dominant exposure pathway in cumulative exposure and risk, while the temporal trend and spatial variation in total MOE levels were associated with exposures to contaminated drinking water and ambient air. Uniformly higher risks were observed for children because of their greater inhalation and ingestion rates per body weight, relative to adults. The results indicated that exposures for children were about twice of those estimated for adults. Concerns over children's exposure to OP pesticide through food and water ingestion were suggested based on the spatiotemporal variations predicted for the subchronic MOEs at the 99.9th percentile of exposure in the study area.

  11. Gas chromatography with pulsed flame photometric detection multiresidue method for organophosphate pesticide and metabolite residues at the parts-per-billion level in representatives commodities of fruits and vegetable crop groups.

    PubMed

    Podhorniak, L V; Negron, J F; Griffith, F D

    2001-01-01

    A gas chromatographic method with a pulsed flame photometric detector (P-FPD) is presented for the analysis of 28 parent organophosphate (OP) pesticides and their OP metabolites. A total of 57 organophosphates were analyzed in 10 representative fruit and vegetable crop groups. The method is based on a judicious selection of known procedures from FDA sources such as the Pesticide Analytical Manual and Laboratory Information Bulletins, combined in a manner to recover the OPs and their metabolite(s) at the part-per-billion (ppb) level. The method uses an acetone extraction with either miniaturized Hydromatrix column partitioning or alternately a miniaturized methylene dichloride liquid-liquid partitioning, followed by solid-phase extraction (SPE) cleanup with graphitized carbon black (GCB) and PSA cartridges. Determination of residues is by programmed temperature capillary column gas chromatography fitted with a P-FPD set in the phosphorus mode. The method is designed so that a set of samples can be prepared in 1 working day for overnight instrumental analysis. The recovery data indicates that a daily column-cutting procedure used in combination with the SPE extract cleanup effectively reduces matrix enhancement at the ppb level for many organophosphates. The OPs most susceptible to elevated recoveries around or greater than 150%, based on peak area calculations, were trichlorfon, phosmet, and the metabolites of dimethoate, fenamiphos, fenthion, and phorate. PMID:11417651

  12. Oregon Indigenous Farmworkers: Results of Promotor Intervention on Pesticide Knowledge and Organophosphate Metabolite Levels

    PubMed Central

    McCauley, Linda; Runkle, Jennifer D.; Samples, Julie; Williams, Bryan; Muniz, Juan F; Semple, Marie; Shadbeh, Nargess

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Examine changes in health beliefs, pesticide safety knowledge, and biomarkers of pesticide exposure in indigenous farmworker who received enhanced pesticide safety training compared to those receiving the standard training. Methods Farmworkers in Oregon were randomly assigned to either a promotores pesticide safety training program or a standard video-based training. Spot urine samples were analyzed for dialkylphosphate (DAP) urinary metabolites. Pre/post intervention questionnaires were used to measure pesticide safety knowledge, health beliefs and work practices. Results Baseline to follow-up improvements in total pesticide knowledge scores were higher in the promotor group compared to the video. Pairwise differences in mean concentrations of DAP metabolite levels showed declines from baseline to follow-up for both intervention groups. Conclusions Results showed reductions in pesticide exposure in indigenous-language speaking farmworkers who receive enhanced pesticide safety training. PMID:24064776

  13. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of organophosphate pesticides in filtered water by gas chromatography with flame photometric detection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jha, Virendra K.; Wydoski, Duane S.

    2002-01-01

    A method for the isolation of 20 parent organophosphate pesticides and 5 pesticide degradates from filtered natural-water samples is described. Seven of these compounds are reported permanently with an estimated concentration because of performance issues. Water samples are filtered to remove suspended particulate matter, and then 1 liter of filtrate is pumped through disposable solid-phase extraction columns that contain octadecyl-bonded porous silica to extract the compounds. The C-18 columns are dried with nitrogen gas, and method compounds are eluted from the columns with ethyl acetate. The extract is analyzed by dual capillary-column gas chromatography with flame photometric detection. Single-operator method detection limits in all three water-matrix samples ranged from 0.004 to 0.012 microgram per liter. Method performance was validated by spiking all compounds into three different matrices at three different concentrations. Eight replicates were analyzed at each concentration level in each matrix. Mean recoveries of method compounds spiked in surface-water samples ranged from 39 to 149 percent and those in ground-water samples ranged from 40 to 124 percent for all pesticides except dimethoate. Mean recoveries of method compounds spiked in reagent-water samples ranged from 41 to 119 percent for all pesticides except dimethoate. Dimethoate exhibited reduced recoveries (mean of 43 percent in low- and medium-concentration level spiked samples and 20 percent in high-concentration level spiked samples) in all matrices because of incomplete collection on the C-18 column. As a result, concen-trations of dimethoate and six other compounds (based on performance issues) in samples are reported in this method with an estimated remark code.

  14. Reliability of concentrations of organophosphate pesticide metabolites in serial urine specimens from pregnancy in the Generation R Study.

    PubMed

    Spaan, Suzanne; Pronk, Anjoeka; Koch, Holger M; Jusko, Todd A; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Shaw, Pamela A; Tiemeier, Henning M; Hofman, Albert; Pierik, Frank H; Longnecker, Matthew P

    2015-05-01

    The widespread use of organophosphate (OP) pesticides has resulted in ubiquitous exposure in humans, primarily through their diet. Exposure to OP pesticides may have adverse health effects, including neurobehavioral deficits in children. The optimal design of new studies requires data on the reliability of urinary measures of exposure. In the present study, urinary concentrations of six dialkyl phosphate (DAP) metabolites, the main urinary metabolites of OP pesticides, were determined in 120 pregnant women participating in the Generation R Study in Rotterdam. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) across serial urine specimens taken at <18, 18-25, and >25 weeks of pregnancy were determined to assess reliability. Geometric mean total DAP metabolite concentrations were 229 (GSD 2.2), 240 (GSD 2.1), and 224 (GSD 2.2) nmol/g creatinine across the three periods of gestation. Metabolite concentrations from the serial urine specimens in general correlated moderately. The ICCs for the six DAP metabolites ranged from 0.14 to 0.38 (0.30 for total DAPs), indicating weak to moderate reliability. Although the DAP metabolite levels observed in this study are slightly higher and slightly more correlated than in previous studies, the low to moderate reliability indicates a high degree of within-person variability, which presents challenges for designing well-powered epidemiological studies. PMID:25515376

  15. Organophosphate Pesticide Residues in Drinking Water from Artesian Wells and Health Risk Assessment of Agricultural Communities, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Jaipieam, S; Visuthismajarn, P; Sutheravut, P; Siriwong, W; Thoumsang, S; Borjan, M; Robson, M

    2009-01-01

    Organophosphate pesticide (OPPs) concentrations in artesian wells located in Thai agricultural and non-agricultural communities were studied during both wet and dry seasons. A total of 100 water samples were collected and subjects were asked to complete a survey. Gas chromatography flame photometric detector was used for OPP analysis. The average OPP concentration in the agricultural communities (0.085 and 0.418 microg/l in dry and wet season) was higher than in the non-agricultural communities (0.004 microg/l in both seasons). Ingestion of OPPs in contaminated water in the agricultural communities were estimated to be 0.187 and 0.919 microg/day during the dry and wet seasons, respectively, and 0.008 microg/day during both seasons in the non-agricultural communities. Agricultural communities were exposed to pesticide residues under the oral chronic reference dose. This study suggests that people in agricultural communities may be exposed to significantly greater levels of pesticides than non-agricultural populations during the dry and wet seasons (p < .001, .001).

  16. Acute poisoning in a child following topical treatment of head lice (pediculosis capitis) with an organophosphate pesticide.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Muddathir H; Adeel, Ahmed Awad; Alhaboob, Ali Abdu N; Ashri, Ahmed M; Salih, Mustafa A

    2016-01-01

    This is a case report of acute organophosphate poisoning in a child treated with topical application of Diazinon-60 (WHO Class II toxicity) for head lice (pediculosis capitis). The patient presented with neurological symptoms and signs. After emergency respiratory and circulatory resuscitation the patient underwent dermal decontamination and was treated with atropine, high flow oxygen and pralidoxime. Scanning electron micrographs of scalp hair specimens revealed both viable and empty head lice nits (lice eggs that attach to the hair shaft). The patient was hospitalized for seven days and discharged after full recovery. The case highlights the importance of raising the awareness of health workers and the community about the danger of misusing pesticides for the treatment of head lice. PMID:27651556

  17. Spatial distribution and partitioning of organophosphates pesticide in water and sediment from Sarno River and Estuary, Southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Montuori, Paolo; Aurino, Sara; Nardone, Antonio; Cirillo, Teresa; Triassi, Maria

    2015-06-01

    The organophosphates pesticide (OPP) pollution in the Sarno River and its environmental impact on the Gulf of Naples (Tyrrhenian Sea, Central Mediterranean Sea) were estimated. Nine selected OPPs (diazinon, dimethoate, malathion, chlorpyrifos, dichlorvos, fenitrothion, methidathion, tolclofos-methyl, azinphos-methyl) were determined in the water dissolved phase (DP), suspended particulate matter (SPM) and sediment samples. Total OPP concentrations ranged from 5.58 to 39.25 ng L(-1) in water (as the sum of the DP and SPM) and from 0.19 to 3.98 ng g(-1) in sediment samples. Contaminant discharges of OPPs into the sea were calculated in about 48,064.08 g year(-1), showing that this river should account as one of the main contribution sources of OPPs to the Tyrrhenian Sea.

  18. Acute poisoning in a child following topical treatment of head lice (pediculosis capitis) with an organophosphate pesticide

    PubMed Central

    Adeel, Ahmed Awad; Alhaboob, Ali Abdu N; Ashri, Ahmed M; Salih, Mustafa A

    2016-01-01

    This is a case report of acute organophosphate poisoning in a child treated with topical application of Diazinon-60 (WHO Class II toxicity) for head lice (pediculosis capitis). The patient presented with neurological symptoms and signs. After emergency respiratory and circulatory resuscitation the patient underwent dermal decontamination and was treated with atropine, high flow oxygen and pralidoxime. Scanning electron micrographs of scalp hair specimens revealed both viable and empty head lice nits (lice eggs that attach to the hair shaft). The patient was hospitalized for seven days and discharged after full recovery. The case highlights the importance of raising the awareness of health workers and the community about the danger of misusing pesticides for the treatment of head lice. PMID:27651556

  19. Spatial distribution and partitioning of organophosphates pesticide in water and sediment from Sarno River and Estuary, Southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Montuori, Paolo; Aurino, Sara; Nardone, Antonio; Cirillo, Teresa; Triassi, Maria

    2015-06-01

    The organophosphates pesticide (OPP) pollution in the Sarno River and its environmental impact on the Gulf of Naples (Tyrrhenian Sea, Central Mediterranean Sea) were estimated. Nine selected OPPs (diazinon, dimethoate, malathion, chlorpyrifos, dichlorvos, fenitrothion, methidathion, tolclofos-methyl, azinphos-methyl) were determined in the water dissolved phase (DP), suspended particulate matter (SPM) and sediment samples. Total OPP concentrations ranged from 5.58 to 39.25 ng L(-1) in water (as the sum of the DP and SPM) and from 0.19 to 3.98 ng g(-1) in sediment samples. Contaminant discharges of OPPs into the sea were calculated in about 48,064.08 g year(-1), showing that this river should account as one of the main contribution sources of OPPs to the Tyrrhenian Sea. PMID:25561261

  20. A screen-printed, amperometric biosensor array incorporated into a novel automated system for the simultaneous determination of organophosphate pesticides.

    PubMed

    Crew, A; Lonsdale, D; Byrd, N; Pittson, R; Hart, J P

    2011-02-15

    Organophosphate pesticides present serious risks to human and environmental health. A rapid reliable, economical and portable analytical system will be of great benefit in the detection and prevention of contamination. A biosensor array based on six acetylcholinesterase enzymes for use in a novel automated instrument incorporating a neural network program is described. Electrochemical analysis was carried out using chronoamperometry and the measurement was taken 10s after applying a potential of 0 V vs. Ag/AgCl. The total analysis time for the complete assay was less than 6 min. The array was used to produce calibration data with six organophosphate pesticides (OPs) in the concentration range of 10(-5) M to 10(-9) M to train a neural network. The output of the neural network was subsequently evaluated using different sample matrices. There were no detrimental matrix effects observed from water, phosphate buffer, food or vegetable extracts. Furthermore, the sensor system was not detrimentally affected by the contents of water samples taken from each stage of the water treatment process. The biosensor system successfully identified and quantified all samples where an OP was present in water, food and vegetable extracts containing different OPs. There were no false positives or false negatives observed during the evaluation of the analytical system. The biosensor arrays and automated instrument were evaluated in situ in field experiments where the instrument was successfully applied to the analysis of a range of environmental samples. It is envisaged that the analytical system could provide a rapid detection system for the early warning of contamination in water and food.

  1. Organophosphate Pesticide Exposures, Nitric Oxide Synthase Gene Variants, and Gene–Pesticide Interactions in a Case–Control Study of Parkinson’s Disease, California (USA)

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Kimberly C.; Sinsheimer, Janet S.; Rhodes, Shannon L.; Cockburn, Myles; Bronstein, Jeff; Ritz, Beate

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) genes are candidates for Parkinson’s disease (PD) because NOS enzymes produce nitric oxide (NO), a pro-oxidant that can damage neurons. Widely used organophosphate (OP) pesticides can induce oxidative stress and are reported to increase PD risk. Additionally, two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the PON1 (paraoxonase 1) gene influence the ability to metabolize OPs. Objective: Here, we investigated contributions of NOS genes and OP pesticides to PD risk, controlling for PON1 status. Methods: In 357 incident PD cases and 495 population controls, we investigated eight NOS SNPs and interactions with both household and ambient agricultural OP exposures assessed with geographic information system (GIS). Results: In comparing PD in homozygous variant carriers of NOS2A rs1060826 versus homozygous wild-type or heterozygotes, we estimate an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 1.51 (95% CI: 0.95, 2.41). When considering interactions between NOS1 rs2682826 and OP exposure from household use, the OR for frequent OP use alone was 1.30 (95% CI: 0.72, 2.34) and for the CT+TT genotype alone was 0.89 (95% CI: 0.58, 1.39), and for frequent OP use combined with the CT+TT genotype the OR was 2.84 (95% CI: 1.49, 5.40) (interaction p-value 0.04). Similar results were seen for ambient OP exposure. Interactions between OP exposure and three other NOS1 SNPs and a genetic risk score combining all NOS1 SNPs reached statistical significance. Conclusions: We found that OP pesticides were more strongly associated with PD among participants with variant genotypes in NOS1, consistent with the importance of oxidative stress-inducing mechanisms. Our data provide evidence for NOS1 modifying PD risk in OP exposed populations. Citation: Paul KC, Sinsheimer JS, Rhodes SL, Cockburn M, Bronstein J, Ritz B. 2016. Organophosphate pesticide exposures, nitric oxide synthase gene variants, and gene–pesticide interactions in a case–control study of Parkinson

  2. Use of biomarkers to indicate exposure of children to organophosphate pesticides: implications for a longitudinal study of children's environmental health.

    PubMed Central

    Wessels, Denise; Barr, Dana B; Mendola, Pauline

    2003-01-01

    Because of their history of widespread use in the United States and unknown long-term health effects, organophosphate pesticides (OPs) are being considered as a chemical class of interest in planning for the National Children's Study, a longitudinal study of children's environmental health. The availability and appropriate use of biomarkers to determine absorbed doses of environmental chemicals such as OPs are critical issues. Biomarkers of OP exposure are typically measured in blood and urine; however, postpartum meconium has been shown to be a promising matrix for assessing cumulative in utero exposure to the fetus, and studies are currently in progress to determine the utility of using saliva and amniotic fluid as matrices. In this article, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the currently available OP exposure monitoring methods (cholinesterase inhibition in blood, pesticides in blood, metabolites in urine and alternative matrices); study design issues for a large, long-term study of children's environmental health; and current research and future research needs. Because OPs are rapidly metabolized and excreted, the utility of one-time spot measurements of OP biomarkers is questionable unless background exposure levels are relatively stable over time or a specific time frame of interest for the study is identified and samples are collected accordingly. Biomarkers of OP exposure can be a valuable tool in epidemiology of children's environmental health, as long as they are applied and interpreted appropriately. PMID:14644670

  3. Associations of maternal organophosphate pesticide exposure and PON1 activity with birth outcomes in SAWASDEE birth cohort, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Naksen, Warangkana; Prapamontol, Tippawan; Mangklabruks, Ampica; Chantara, Somporn; Thavornyutikarn, Prasak; Srinual, Niphan; Panuwet, Parinya; Ryan, P Barry; Riederer, Anne M; Barr, Dana Boyd

    2015-10-01

    Prenatal organophosphate (OP) pesticide exposure has been reported to be associated with adverse birth outcomes and neurodevelopment. However, the mechanisms of toxicity of OP pesticides on human fetal development have not yet been elucidated. Our pilot study birth cohort, the Study of Asian Women and Offspring's Development and Environmental Exposures (SAWASDEE cohort) aimed to evaluate environmental chemical exposures and their relation to birth outcomes and infant neurodevelopment in 52 pregnant farmworkers in Fang district, Chiang Mai province, Thailand. A large array of data was collected multiple times during pregnancy including approximately monthly urine samples for evaluation of pesticide exposure, three blood samples for pesticide-related enzyme measurements and questionnaire data. This study investigated the changes in maternal acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activities and their relation to urinary diakylphosphates (DAPs), class-related metabolites of OP pesticides, during pregnancy. Maternal AChE, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and PON1 activities were measured three times during pregnancy and urinary DAP concentrations were measured, on average, 8 times from enrollment during pregnancy until delivery. Among the individuals in the group with low maternal PON1 activity (n=23), newborn head circumference was negatively correlated with log10 maternal ∑DEAP and ∑DAP at enrollment (gestational age=12±3 weeks; β=-1.0 cm, p=0.03 and β=-1.8 cm, p<0.01, respectively) and at 32 weeks pregnancy (β=-1.1cm, p=0.04 and β=-2.6 cm, p=0.01, respectively). Furthermore, among these mothers, newborn birthweight was also negatively associated with log10 maternal ∑DEAP and ∑DAP at enrollment (β=-219.7 g, p=0.05 and β=-371.3g, p=0.02, respectively). Associations between maternal DAP levels and newborn outcomes were not observed in the group of participants with high maternal PON1 activity. Our results support previous findings from US birth

  4. A single method for detecting 11 organophosphate pesticides in human plasma and breastmilk using GC-FPD.

    PubMed

    Naksen, Warangkana; Prapamontol, Tippawan; Mangklabruks, Ampica; Chantara, Somporn; Thavornyutikarn, Prasak; Robson, Mark G; Ryan, P Barry; Barr, Dana Boyd; Panuwet, Parinya

    2016-07-01

    Organophosphate (OP) pesticides are widely used for crop protection in many countries including Thailand. Aside from causing environmental contamination, they affect human health especially by over-stimulating of the neurotransmission system. OP pesticides, as with other non-persistent pesticides, degrade quickly in the environment as well as are metabolized quite rapidly in humans. Assessing human exposures to these compounds requires analytical methods that are sensitive, robust, and most importantly, suitable for specific laboratory settings. The aim of this study was to develop and validate an analytical method for measuring 11 OP pesticide residues in human plasma and breast milk. Analytes in both plasma and breast milk samples were extracted with acetone and methylene chloride, cleaned-up using aminopropyl solid phase extraction cartridges, and analyzed by gas chromatography with flame photometric detection. The optimized method exhibited good linearity, with the coefficients of determination of 0.996-0.999 and <7% error about the slope. Extraction recoveries from spiked plasma and breast milk samples at low and medium concentrations (0.8-5.0 and 1.6-10ngmL(-1), respectively) ranged from 59.4% (ethion) to 94.0% (chlorpyrifos). Intra-batch and inter-batch precisions ranged from 2.3-18.9% and 5.8-19.5%, respectively. Method detection limits of plasma and breast milk ranged from 0.18-1.36 and 0.09-2.66ngmL(-1), respectively. We analyzed 63 plasma and 30 breastmilk samples collected from farmworkers in Chiang Mai Province to determine the suitability of this method for occupational exposure assessment. Of the 11 pesticides measured, seven were detected in plasma samples and five were detected in breast milk samples. Mass spectrometry was used to confirm results. Overall, this method is rapid and reliable. It offers the laboratories with limited access to mass spectrometry a capacity to investigate levels OP pesticides in plasma and breastmilk in those

  5. Organophosphate and carbamate pesticide poisoning: the usefulness of a computerized clinical information system.

    PubMed

    Lerman, Y; Hirshberg, A; Shteger, Z

    1984-01-01

    Organophosphate (OP) and carbamate poisoning are still a worldwide health problem causing numerous fatalities in humans. Physicians who have no clinical toxicological experience with these compounds may have difficulties in promptly identifying the etiologic agent and managing the acute phase of the poisoning. We describe the potential use of a computerized medical information system that includes clinical data on 236 cases of OP and carbamate poisoning, and may improve the management of such poisoning. The methods of constructing the system, the first results of using the system, and the medical institutions that can benefit from such systems are discussed.

  6. LEVELS OF ORGANOCHLORINE, ORGANOPHOSPHATE, AND PYRETHROID PESTICIDES IN CTEPP NORTH CAROLINA MULTIMEDIA SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    CTEPP (Children's Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Organic Pollutants) is a pilot study of the possible exposures of 257 preschool children and their primary adult caregivers to pollutants commonly found in their everyday environments. Sampling was p...

  7. Effects of organophosphate pesticides and other drugs on subcortical mechanisms of visual integration.

    PubMed

    Revzin, A M

    1976-06-01

    Atropine, scopolamine, mevinphos, and eserine selectively block directional sensitivity of visual integrative neurones in the thalamus. Cholinergic drugs that do not penetrate the blood-brain barrier are without effect. The neurones studied are important links in reflex brain systems controlling visual attention and eye movements. The results suggest that any cholinergic drug that can get into the brain will disturb visual functions. Since the changes are qualitative and the system is reflex, the affected individual may be unaware of dysfunction. The resultant dangers to aerial applicator personnel are discussed, particularly with respect to atropine, which is necessary in the therapy of organophosphate and carbamate poisoning but is potentially harmful if self-administered for either pro-phylaxis or treatment.

  8. Evaluation of exposure to organophosphate, carbamate, phenoxy acid, and chlorophenol pesticides in pregnant women from 10 Caribbean countries.

    PubMed

    Forde, Martin S; Robertson, Lyndon; Laouan Sidi, Elhadji A; Côté, Suzanne; Gaudreau, Eric; Drescher, Olivia; Ayotte, Pierre

    2015-09-01

    Pesticides are commonly used in tropical regions such as the Caribbean for both household and agricultural purposes. Of particular concern is exposure during pregnancy, as these compounds can cross the placental barrier and interfere with fetal development. The objective of this study was to evaluate exposure of pregnant women residing in 10 Caribbean countries to the following commonly used classes of pesticides in the Caribbean: organophosphates (OPs), carbamates, phenoxy acids, and chlorophenols. Out of 438 urine samples collected, 15 samples were randomly selected from each Caribbean country giving a total of 150 samples. Samples were analyzed for the following metabolites: six OP dialkylphosphate metabolites [dimethylphosphate (DMP), dimethylthiophosphate (DMTP), dimethyldithiophosphate (DMDTP), diethylphosphate (DEP), diethylthiophosphate (DETP) and diethyldithiophosphate (DEDTP)]; two carbamate metabolites [2-isopropoxyphenol (2-IPP) and carbofuranphenol]; one phenoxy acid 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D); and five chlorophenols [2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP), 2,5-dichlorophenol (2,5-DCP), 2,4,5-trichlorophenol (TCP), 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP), and pentachlorophenol (PCP)]. OP metabolites were consistently detected in ≥60% of the samples from Antigua and Barbuda, Bermuda, and Jamaica. Of the carbamate metabolites, 2-IPP was detected in seven of the 10 Caribbean countries with a detection frequency around 30%, whereas carbofuranphenol was detected in only one sample. The detection frequency for the phenoxy acid 2,4-D ranged from 20% in Grenada to a maximum of 67% in Belize. Evidence of exposure to chlorophenol pesticides was also established with 2,4-DCP by geometric means ranging from 0.52 μg L(-1) in St Lucia to a maximum of 1.68 μg L(-1) in Bermuda. Several extreme concentrations of 2,5-DCP were detected in four Caribbean countries-Belize (1100 μg L(-1)), Bermuda (870 μg L(-1)), Jamaica (1300 μg L(-1)), and St Kitts and Nevis (1400 μg L(-1

  9. Biosensor based on acetylcholinesterase immobilized onto layered double hydroxides for flow injection/amperometric detection of organophosphate pesticides.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jingming; Guan, Zhangqiong; Song, Dandan

    2013-01-15

    We developed a highly sensitive flow injection/amperometric biosensor for the detection of organophosphate pesticides (OPs) using layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as the immobilization matrix of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). LDHs provided a biocompatible microenvironment to keep the bioactivity of AChE, due to the intrinsic properties of LDHs (such as a regular structure, good mechanical, chemical and thermal stabilities, and swelling properties). By integrating the flow injection analysis (FIA) with amperometric detection, the resulting AChE-LDHs modified electrode greatly catalyzed the oxidation of the enzymatically generated thiocholine product, and facilitated the detection automation, thus increasing the detection sensitivity. The analytical conditions for the FIA/amperometric detection of OPs were optimized by using methyl parathion (MP) as a model. The inhibition of MP was proportional to its concentration ranging from 0.005 to 0.3μg mL(-1) and 0.3 to 4.0μg mL(-1) with a detection limit 0.6ng mL(-1) (S/N=3). The developed biosensor exhibited good reproducibility and acceptable stability.

  10. Health and environmental hazards of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Iyaniwura, T T

    1991-01-01

    The increase in world population and in demand for food and economic crops has put a pesticide burden on man and the environment. Pesticide residues from vector control and agricultural uses contaminate the terrestrial and aquatic surroundings and contribute to the pollution problem of the environment. Various human toxicoses have resulted from pesticide use. The major pathogenic pesticides are chlorinated hydrocarbons and organophosphates. With careful and enlightened use, pesticide toxicity, to both man and the environment, could be significantly reduced.

  11. Organophosphate Pesticide Exposure and Residential Proximity to Nearby Fields: Evidence for the Drift Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Coronado, Gloria D.; Holte, Sarah; Vigoren, Eric; Griffith, William C; Faustman, Elaine; Thompson, Beti

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Residential proximity to pesticide-treated farmland is an important pesticide exposure pathway. Methods In-person interviews and biological samples were collected from 100 farmworker and 100 non-farmworker adults and children living in Eastern Washington State. We examined the relationship of residential proximity to farmland to urinary metabolite concentrations of dimethylphosphate (DMTP) and levels of pesticide residues in house dust. Results DMTP concentrations were higher in farmworkers than non-farmworkers (71 μg/L vs 6 μg/L) and in farmworker children than non-farmworker children (17 μg/L vs 8 μg/L). Compared to non-farmworker households, farmworker households had higher levels of azinphos-methyl (643 ng/g vs 121 ng/g) and phosmet (153 ng/g vs 50 ng/g). Overall, a 20% reduction in DMTP concentration was observed per mile increase in distance from farmland. Conclusions Lower OP metabolite concentrations correlated with increasing distance from farmland. PMID:21775902

  12. Integrated Use of Biomarkers (O : N Ratio and Acetylcholinesterase Inhibition) on Aulacomya ater (Molina, 1782) (Bivalvia: Mytilidae) as a Criteria for Effects of Organophosphate Pesticide Exposition

    PubMed Central

    Führer, Eduardo; Rudolph, Anny; Espinoza, Claudio; Díaz, Rodrigo; Gajardo, Marisol; Camaño, Nuria

    2012-01-01

    The effect of residual concentrations of organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos (Lorsban 4E) on the activity of the acetylcholinesterase enzyme and oxygen : nitrogen ratio in the mussel Aulacomya ater was analyzed. Toxicity tests show a sensitivity to the pesticide in the bivalve estimated at 16 μg L−1 (LC50−96 hours). Concentrations between 0.2 and 1.61 μg L−1 were able to inhibit significantly the AChE activity, and concentrations between 0.8 and 1.61 μg L−1 stimulate ammonia excretion and decrease oxygen : ammonia-N (O : N) ratio, with respect to the control group. A. ater proved to be a species sensitive to pesticide exposure and easy to handle in lab conditions. Thus, it is recommended as a bioindicator for use in programs of environmental alertness in the Eastern South Pacific coastal zone. PMID:22619673

  13. Sensitivity of nestling and adult starlings to dicrotophos, an organophosphate pesticide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grue, C.E.; Shipley, B.K.

    1984-01-01

    The 24-hr median lethal dose (LD50) of dicrotophos (3-hydroxy-N,N-dimethyl-cis-crotonamide dimethyl phosphate) for free-living 5-day-old nestling European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris, LDso = 4.92 mg/kg body wt) was about one-half that obtained for free-living 15day-old nestlings (9.59 mg/kg) and captive adult males (8.37 mg/kg) and females (8.47 mg/ kg). Nestlings and adults with low pretreatment body weights appeared to be more vulnerable to organophosphate (OP) exposure. Brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity was severely depressed in all birds that died (74-94%); the degree of inhibition did not vary with age or sex. Inhibition of brain ChE in 5-day-old nestlings alive 24 hr post dose (X = 28-43%) was lower than that of 15-day-old (X = 55-68%) and adult (X = 55-77%) survivors. Body weights of OP-dosed birds that died were depressed an average of 20 to 46% in 5-day-olds, 7 to 20% in 15-day-olds, and 0 to 10% in adults; weight losses varied inversely with age and dosage, and directly with time to death. Average weight losses in 5- and 15-day-old survivors (X < 31 and 26%, respectively) varied directly with dose and exceeded comparable values for adults (X = 3-15%). Results suggest that (1) young nestling songbirds may be nearly twice as sensitive as adults to OPs, (2) growth of nestlings may be severely depressed following OP exposure, and (3) recovery of brain ChE activity following exposure to ChE inhibitors may be more rapid in nestlings than adults.

  14. In Vitro Rat Hepatic and Intestinal Metabolism of the Organophosphate Pesticides Chlorpyrifos and Diazinon

    SciTech Connect

    Poet, Torka S. ); Wu, Hong ); Kousba, Ahmed A. ); Timchalk, Charles

    2003-04-01

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) and diazinon (DZN) are thionophosphorus organophosphate, insecticides; their toxicity is mediated through CYP450 metabolism to CPF-oxon and DZN-oxon, respectively. Conversely, CYP450s also detoxify these OPs to trichloropyridinol (TCP) and 2-isopropyl-4-methyl-6-hydroxypyrimidine (IMHP), respectively. In addition, A-esterase metabolism of CPF- and DZN-oxon also form TCP and IMHP. This study evaluated the role intestinal and hepatic metabolism may play in the first-pass elimination of CPF and DZN. Similar CYP450- and A-esterase-mediated metabolic profiles were demonstrated in microsomes from liver or isolated intestinal enterocytes. In enterocyte microsomes, the CYP450 metabolic efficiency (Vmax/Km) for metabolism to the oxon metabolites was~5-fold greater for CPF than DZN. Compared on a per nmol P450 basis, the Vmax for CPF in enterocytes was~2-3 times higher than in liver microsomes for the production of CPF-oxon and TCP. The affinity (Km) for the metabolism of CPF to CPF-oxon was comparable in liver and enterocyte microsomes, however the enterocyte Km for TCP production was higher (lower affinity). The smaller volume of intestine, lower amount of CYP450, and higher Km for TCP in the enterocyte microsomes, resulted in a lower catalytic efficiency (2 and 62 times) than in liver for oxon and TCP. A-esterase-mediated metabolism of CPF- and DZN-oxon was also demonstrated in liver and enterocyte microsomes. Although A-esterase affinity for the substrates were comparable in hepatic and enterocyte microsomes, the Vmax were 48 - to 275-fold, in the liver. These results suggest that intestinal metabolism may impact first-pass metabolism of CPF and DZN, especially following low-dose oral exposures.

  15. Single-Step Production of a Recyclable Nanobiocatalyst for Organophosphate Pesticides Biodegradation Using Functionalized Bacterial Magnetosomes

    PubMed Central

    Ginet, Nicolas; Pardoux, Romain; Adryanczyk, Géraldine; Garcia, Daniel; Brutesco, Catherine; Pignol, David

    2011-01-01

    Enzymes are versatile catalysts in laboratories and on an industrial scale; improving their immobilization would be beneficial to broadening their applicability and ensuring their (re)use. Lipid-coated nano-magnets produced by magnetotactic bacteria are suitable for a universally applicable single-step method of enzyme immobilization. By genetically functionalizing the membrane surrounding these magnetite particles with a phosphohydrolase, we engineered an easy-to-purify, robust and recyclable biocatalyst to degrade ethyl-paraoxon, a commonly used pesticide. For this, we genetically fused the opd gene from Flavobacterium sp. ATCC 27551 encoding a paraoxonase to mamC, an abundant protein of the magnetosome membrane in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1. The MamC protein acts as an anchor for the paraoxonase to the magnetosome surface, thus producing magnetic nanoparticles displaying phosphohydrolase activity. Magnetosomes functionalized with Opd were easily recovered from genetically modified AMB-1 cells: after cellular disruption with a French press, the magnetic nanoparticles are purified using a commercially available magnetic separation system. The catalytic properties of the immobilized Opd were measured on ethyl-paraoxon hydrolysis: they are comparable with the purified enzyme, with Km (and kcat) values of 58 µM (and 178 s−1) and 43 µM (and 314 s−1) for the immobilized and purified enzyme respectively. The Opd, a metalloenzyme requiring a zinc cofactor, is thus properly matured in AMB-1. The recycling of the functionalized magnetosomes was investigated and their catalytic activity proved to be stable over repeated use for pesticide degradation. In this study, we demonstrate the easy production of functionalized magnetic nanoparticles with suitably genetically modified magnetotactic bacteria that are efficient as a reusable nanobiocatalyst for pesticides bioremediation in contaminated effluents. PMID:21738665

  16. Effect of an organophosphate pesticide, monocrotophos, on phosphate-solubilizing efficiency of soil fungal isolates.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rachna; Garg, Veena; Saxena, Jyoti

    2015-01-01

    Soil is a sink of pesticide residues as well as microorganisms. Fungi are well known for solubilization of inorganic phosphates, and this activity of fungal isolates may be affected by the presence of pesticide residues in the soil. In the present study, five generically different fungal isolates, viz. Aspergillus niger JQ660373, Aspergillus flavus, Penicillium aculeatum JQ660374, Fusarium pallidoroseum and Macrophomina sp., were tested and compared for their phosphate-solubilizing ability in the absence and presence of monocrotophos (500 mg L(-1)). After 168 h of incubation, four times high amount of tricalcium phosphate was solubilized by isolates in the growth medium containing monocrotophos in comparison to control (without monocrotophos). Concurrently, 78 % of the applied monocrotophos was degraded by these fungal isolates. Kinetics of phosphate solubilization shifted from logarithmic to power model in the presence of monocrotophos. Similarly, the phosphatase activity was also found significantly high in the presence of monocrotophos. The combined order of phosphate solubilization as well as monocrotophos degradation was found to be A. niger JQ660373 > P. aculeatum JQ660374 > A. flavus > F. pallidoroseum > Macrophomina sp. On the contrary, phosphate solubilization negatively correlated with the pH of the growth medium. Hence, it could be concluded that these fungal species efficiently solubilize inorganic phosphates and monocrotophos poses a positive effect on their ability and in turn degraded by them. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on P solubilization by Macrophomina sp. and F. pallidoroseum. PMID:25344433

  17. Mechanism for the acute effects of organophosphate pesticides on the adult 5-HT system

    PubMed Central

    Judge, Sarah J.; Savy, Claire Y.; Campbell, Matthew; Dodds, Rebecca; Gomes, Larissa Kruger; Laws, Grace; Watson, Anna; Blain, Peter G.; Morris, Christopher M.; Gartside, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) is involved in mood disorder aetiology and it has been reported that (organophosphate) OP exposure affects 5-HT turnover. The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanism underlying OP effects on the adult 5-HT system. First, acute in vivo administration of the OP diazinon (0, 1.3, 13 or 39 mg/kg i.p.) to male Hooded Lister rats inhibited the activity of the cholinergic enzyme acetylcholinesterase in blood and in the hippocampus, dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), striatum and prefrontal cortex. Diazinon-induced cholinesterase inhibition was greatest in the DRN, the brain's major source of 5-HT neurones. Second, acute in vivo diazinon exposure (0 or 39 mg/kg i.p.) increased the basal firing rate of DRN neurones measured ex vivo in brain slices. The excitatory responses of DRN neurones to α1-adrenoceptor or AMPA/kainate receptor activation were not affected by in vivo diazinon exposure but the inhibitory response to 5-HT was attenuated, indicating 5-HT1A autoreceptor down-regulation. Finally, direct application of the diazinon metabolite diazinon oxon to naive rat brain slices increased the firing rate of DRN 5-HT neurones, as did chlorpyrifos-oxon, indicating the effect was not unique to diazinon. The oxon-induced augmentation of firing was blocked by the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist mecamylamine and the AMPA/kainate glutamate receptor antagonist DNQX. Together these data indicate that 1) acute OP exposure inhibits DRN cholinesterase, leading to acetylcholine accumulation, 2) the acetylcholine activates nicotinic receptors on 5-HT neurones and also on glutamatergic neurones, thus releasing glutamate and activating 5-HT neuronal AMPA/kainate receptors 3) the increase in 5-HT neuronal activity, and resulting 5-HT release, may lead to 5-HT1A autoreceptor down-regulation. This mechanism may be involved in the reported increase in risk of developing anxiety and depression following occupational OP exposure. PMID

  18. Biosensor Based on Self-Assembling Acetylcholinesterase on Carbon Nanotubes for Flow injection/Amperometric Detection of Organophosphate Pesticides and Nerve Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2006-02-01

    A highly sensitive flow-injection amperometric biosensor for organophosphate pesticides and nerve agents based on self-assembly of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) on carbon nanotube (CNT)-modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode is described. AChE is immobilized on the negatively-charged CNT surface by alternatively assembling a cationic polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (PDDA) layer and an AChE layer. Transmission electron microscopy images confirm the formation of layer-by-layer nanostructures on carboxyl functionalized CNTs. The unique sandwich-like structure (PDDA/AChE/PDDA) on the CNT surface formed by self-assembly provides a favorable microenvironment to keep the bioactivity of AChE and to prevent enzyme molecule leakage. The electrocatalytic activity of CNT leads to a greatly improved electrochemical detection of the enzymatically generated thiocholine product, including a low oxidation overvoltage (+150 mV), higher sensitivity, and stability. The developed PDDA/AChE/PDDA/CNT/GC biosensor integrated into a flow injection system was used to monitor organophosphate pesticides and nerve agents, such as paraoxon. The sensor performance, including inhibition time and regeneration conditions, was optimized with respect to operating conditions. Under the optimal conditions, the biosensor was used to measure as low as 0.4 pM paraoxon with a 6-min inhibition time. The biosensor had excellent operational lifetime stability with no decrease in the activity of enzymes for more than 20 repeated measurements over a 1-week period. The developed biosensor system is an ideal tool for online monitoring of organophosphate pesticides and nerve agents.

  19. Plant Esterase-Chitosan/Gold Nanoparticles-Graphene Nanosheet Composite-Based Biosensor for the Ultrasensitive Detection of Organophosphate Pesticides.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jing; Hou, Changjun; Chen, Mei; Li, Junjie; Huo, Danqun; Yang, Mei; Luo, Xiaogang; Lei, Yu

    2015-12-01

    As broad-spectrum pesticides, organophosphates (OPs) are widely used in agriculture all over the world. However, due to their neurotoxicity in humans and their increasing occurrence in the environment, there is growing interest in their sensitive and selective detection. This paper reports a new cost-effective plant esterase-chitosan/gold nanoparticles-graphene nanosheet (PLaE-CS/AuNPs-GNs) biosensor for the sensitive detection of methyl parathion and malathion. Highly pure plant esterase is produced from plants at low cost and shares the same inhibition mechanism with OPs as acetylcholinesterase, and then it was used to prepare PLaE-CS/AuNPs-GNs nanocomposites, which were systematically characterized using SEM, TEM, and UV-vis. The PLaE-CS/AuNPs-GNs composite-based biosensor measured as low as 50 ppt (0.19 nM) of methyl parathion and 0.5 ppb (1.51 nM) of malathion (S/N = 3) with a calibration curve up to 200 ppb (760 nM) and 500 ppb (1513.5 nM) for methyl parathion and malathion, respectively. There is also no interference observed from most of common species such as metal ions, inorganic ions, glucose, and citric acid. In addition, its applicability to OPs-contaminated real samples (carrot and apple) was also demonstrated with excellent response recovery. The developed simple, sensitive, and reliable PLaE-CS/AuNPs-GNs composite-based biosensor holds great potential in OPs detection for food and environmental safety.

  20. Plant Esterase-Chitosan/Gold Nanoparticles-Graphene Nanosheet Composite-Based Biosensor for the Ultrasensitive Detection of Organophosphate Pesticides.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jing; Hou, Changjun; Chen, Mei; Li, Junjie; Huo, Danqun; Yang, Mei; Luo, Xiaogang; Lei, Yu

    2015-12-01

    As broad-spectrum pesticides, organophosphates (OPs) are widely used in agriculture all over the world. However, due to their neurotoxicity in humans and their increasing occurrence in the environment, there is growing interest in their sensitive and selective detection. This paper reports a new cost-effective plant esterase-chitosan/gold nanoparticles-graphene nanosheet (PLaE-CS/AuNPs-GNs) biosensor for the sensitive detection of methyl parathion and malathion. Highly pure plant esterase is produced from plants at low cost and shares the same inhibition mechanism with OPs as acetylcholinesterase, and then it was used to prepare PLaE-CS/AuNPs-GNs nanocomposites, which were systematically characterized using SEM, TEM, and UV-vis. The PLaE-CS/AuNPs-GNs composite-based biosensor measured as low as 50 ppt (0.19 nM) of methyl parathion and 0.5 ppb (1.51 nM) of malathion (S/N = 3) with a calibration curve up to 200 ppb (760 nM) and 500 ppb (1513.5 nM) for methyl parathion and malathion, respectively. There is also no interference observed from most of common species such as metal ions, inorganic ions, glucose, and citric acid. In addition, its applicability to OPs-contaminated real samples (carrot and apple) was also demonstrated with excellent response recovery. The developed simple, sensitive, and reliable PLaE-CS/AuNPs-GNs composite-based biosensor holds great potential in OPs detection for food and environmental safety. PMID:26554573

  1. Determination of Organophosphate Pesticides at a Carbon Nanotube/Organophosphorus Hydrolase Electrochemical Biosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Deo, R P.; Wang, Joseph; Block, I; Mulchandani, Ashok; Joshi, K; Trojanowicz, M; Scholz, F; Chen, Wilfred; Lin, Yuehe

    2005-02-08

    An amperometric biosensor for organophosphorus (OP) pesticides based on a carbon-nanotube (CNT) modified transducer and an organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) biocatalyst is described. A bilayer approach with the OPH layer atop of the CNT film was used for preparing the CNT/OPH biosensor. The CNT layer leads to a greatly improved anodic detection of the enzymatically-generated p-nitrophenol product, including higher sensitivity and stability. The sensor performance was optimized with respect to the surface modification and operating conditions. Under the optimal conditions the biosensor was used to measure as low as 0.15 {micro}M paraoxon and 0.8 {micro}M methyl parathion with sensitivities of 25 and 6 nA/{micro}M, respectively.

  2. Organophosphate pesticide exposure in school-aged children living in rice and aquacultural farming regions of Thailand.

    PubMed

    Rohitrattana, Juthasiri; Siriwong, Wattasit; Tunsaringkarn, Tanasorn; Panuwet, Parinya; Ryan, P Barry; Barr, Dana Boyd; Robson, Mark G; Fiedler, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Organophosphate pesticides (OPs) are widely used in agricultural sectors in Thailand. Previous studies have documented that children residing in agricultural areas have higher exposure to OPs than children living in other residential areas. The objective of this study was to quantify urinary biomarkers of OP exposure and determine the environmental conditions and activities that predict their levels among children living in Central Thailand farming regions. In October 2011, 53 6-8-year-old participants were recruited from Pathum Thani Province, Thailand. Twenty-four lived in rice farming communities at Khlong Luang District where OPs are the pesticides used frequently. Twenty-nine participants, living in aquacultural farming communities at Lum Luk Ka District where OPs are not used, were recruited to serve as controls for pathways of exposure (e.g., residential, dietary) other than occupational/paraoccupational exposures encountered in rice farming. Household environments and participants' activities were assessed using a parental structured interview. Urine samples (first morning voids) were collected from participants for OP urinary metabolite (i.e., dialkylphosphates [DAPs] and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol [TCPy]) measurements. The levels of most urinary OP metabolites were significantly higher in participants who lived in a rice farming community than those who lived in an aquacultural farming community (P < .05). The results from linear regression analysis revealed that the frequency of OP application on rice farms (∑DAP: P = .001; TCPy: P = .001) and living in a rice farming community (∑DAP: P = .009; TCPy: P < .001) were significant predictors of urinary DAP metabolite levels in participants. Increasing TCPy levels were significantly related to proximity to rice farm (P = .03), being with parent while working on a farm (P = .02), playing on a farm (P = .03), and the presence of observable dirt accumulated on the child's body (P = .02). In conclusion, OP

  3. Agent orange herbicides, organophosphate and triazinic pesticides analysis in olive oil and industrial oil mill waste effluents using new organic phase immunosensors.

    PubMed

    Martini, Elisabetta; Merola, Giovanni; Tomassetti, Mauro; Campanella, Luigi

    2015-02-15

    New immunosensors working in organic solvent mixtures (OPIEs) for the analysis of traces of different pesticides (triazinic, organophosphates and chlorurates) present in hydrophobic matrices such as olive oil were developed and tested. A Clark electrode was used as transducer and peroxidase enzyme as marker. The competitive process took place in a chloroform-hexane 50% (V/V) mixture, while the subsequent enzymatic final measurement was performed in decane and using tert-butylhydroperoxide as substrate of the enzymatic reaction. A linear response of between about 10nM and 5.0μM was usually obtained in the presence of olive oil. Recovery tests were carried out in commercial or artisanal extra virgin olive oil. Traces of pesticides were also checked in the oily matrix, in pomace and mill wastewaters from an industrial oil mill. Immunosensors show good selectivity and satisfactory precision and recovery tests performed in olive oil gave excellent results. PMID:25236238

  4. Agent orange herbicides, organophosphate and triazinic pesticides analysis in olive oil and industrial oil mill waste effluents using new organic phase immunosensors.

    PubMed

    Martini, Elisabetta; Merola, Giovanni; Tomassetti, Mauro; Campanella, Luigi

    2015-02-15

    New immunosensors working in organic solvent mixtures (OPIEs) for the analysis of traces of different pesticides (triazinic, organophosphates and chlorurates) present in hydrophobic matrices such as olive oil were developed and tested. A Clark electrode was used as transducer and peroxidase enzyme as marker. The competitive process took place in a chloroform-hexane 50% (V/V) mixture, while the subsequent enzymatic final measurement was performed in decane and using tert-butylhydroperoxide as substrate of the enzymatic reaction. A linear response of between about 10nM and 5.0μM was usually obtained in the presence of olive oil. Recovery tests were carried out in commercial or artisanal extra virgin olive oil. Traces of pesticides were also checked in the oily matrix, in pomace and mill wastewaters from an industrial oil mill. Immunosensors show good selectivity and satisfactory precision and recovery tests performed in olive oil gave excellent results.

  5. Pesticides in Schools: Reducing the Risks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Office of the Attorney General, Albany.

    This report presents findings of state-wide use of pesticides in New York public schools along with a description of the survey, information about the potential dangers of these chemicals, and the steps schools and communities can take to minimize pesticide use. Findings show that 87 percent of New York's schools use pesticides that contain…

  6. Cumulative organophosphate pesticide exposure and risk assessment among pregnant women living in an agricultural community: a case study from the CHAMACOS cohort.

    PubMed Central

    Castorina, Rosemary; Bradman, Asa; McKone, Thomas E; Barr, Dana B; Harnly, Martha E; Eskenazi, Brenda

    2003-01-01

    Approximately 230,000 kg of organophosphate (OP) pesticides are applied annually in California's Salinas Valley. These activities have raised concerns about exposures to area residents. We collected three spot urine samples from pregnant women (between 1999 and 2001) enrolled in CHAMACOS (Center for the Health Assessment of Mothers and Children of Salinas), a longitudinal birth cohort study, and analyzed them for six dialkyl phosphate metabolites. We used urine from 446 pregnant women to estimate OP pesticide doses with two deterministic steady-state modeling methods: method 1, which assumed the metabolites were attributable entirely to a single diethyl or dimethyl OP pesticide; and method 2, which adapted U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) draft guidelines for cumulative risk assessment to estimate dose from a mixture of OP pesticides that share a common mechanism of toxicity. We used pesticide use reporting data for the Salinas Valley to approximate the mixture to which the women were exposed. Based on average OP pesticide dose estimates that assumed exposure to a single OP pesticide (method 1), between 0% and 36.1% of study participants' doses failed to attain a margin of exposure (MOE) of 100 relative to the U.S. EPA oral benchmark dose(10) (BMD(10)), depending on the assumption made about the parent compound. These BMD(10) values are doses expected to produce a 10% reduction in brain cholinesterase activity compared with background response in rats. Given the participants' average cumulative OP pesticide dose estimates (method 2) and regardless of the index chemical selected, we found that 14.8% of the doses failed to attain an MOE of 100 relative to the BMD(10) of the selected index. An uncertainty analysis of the pesticide mixture parameter, which is extrapolated from pesticide application data for the study area and not directly quantified for each individual, suggests that this point estimate could range from 1 to 34%. In future analyses, we

  7. Developmental toxicity in the rat after ingestion or gavage of organophosphate pesticides (Dipterex, Imidan) during pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Staples, R E; Kellam, R G; Haseman, J K

    1976-01-01

    The structural development of fetuses was altered when Dipterex was administered by diet to pregnant rats from days 6 through 15 of gestation. Major external and skeletal alterations occurred after consumption of 432 or 519 mg/kg body weight per day, only minor skeletal changes occurred in the 375 mg/kg dose group and the incidence of alterations in the 145 mg/kg dose group was not significantly different from that in the pair-fed controls. The malformations seen at the two highest doses did not result directly from the associated decrease in food consumed. Dipterex was not shown to have teratogenic potential when given for the same time span, once daily by gavage, even at levels that produced maternal lethality. Imidan was not teratogenic when similarly given, either by diet at concentrations that resulted in a 45% reduction in food consumption, or by gavage at dose levels that resulted in some maternal lethality. Data collected from pair-fed control females revealed that limitation of food consumption to 13--15 g/rat per day from days 6 through 15 of gestation did not result in increased fetal mortality or stunting. However, fetal weight was reduced slightly, and the incidence of minor skeletal changes was approximately three to four times that among fetuses of control dams that were not pair-fed. PMID:944629

  8. Organophosphate pesticide method development and presence of chlorpyrifos in the feet of nearctic-neotropical migratory songbirds from Canada that over-winter in Central America agricultural areas.

    PubMed

    Alharbi, Hattan A; Letcher, Robert J; Mineau, Pierre; Chen, Da; Chu, Shaogang

    2016-02-01

    Recent modeling analysis suggests that numerous birds may be at risk of acute poisoning in insecticide-treated fields. Although the majority of avian field studies on pesticides have focused on treated seed, granule, insect or vegetation (oral exposure) ingestion, dermal exposure is an important exposure route when birds come into contact with deposited pesticides on foliage and other surfaces. Some nearctic-neotropical migratory songbirds are likely exposed to pesticides on their non-breeding habitats and include treated crops, plantations or farmlands. In the present study, we developed a method for four environmentally-relevant organophosphate (OP) pesticides (fenthion, fenamiphos, chlorpyrifos and diazinon) in the feet of migratory songbirds (i.e. Common yellowthroat, Gray catbird, Indigo bunting, America redstart, Northern waterthrush, Northern parula, and an additional 12 species of warblers). A total of 190 specimens of the 18 species of songbirds were sampled from available window-killed birds (spring of 2007 and 2011) in downtown Toronto, Canada. The species that were available most likely over-wintered in Mexican/Central American crops such as citrus, coffee and cacao. The feet of the dead birds were sampled and where OP foot exposure likely occurred during over-wintering foraging on pesticide-treated crops. Chlorpyrifos was the only measurable OP (pg mg feet weight(-1)) and in the 2011-collected feet of Black throated blue warbler (0.5), Tennessee warbler (1.0), Northern parula (1.2), Northern waterthrush (0.6), Common yellowthroat (1.0) and the Blue winged warbler (0.9). Dermal contact with OP pesticides during over-wintering in agricultural areas resulted in low levels of chlorpyrifos and long time retention on the feet of a subset of songbirds. PMID:26421621

  9. Organophosphate pesticide method development and presence of chlorpyrifos in the feet of nearctic-neotropical migratory songbirds from Canada that over-winter in Central America agricultural areas.

    PubMed

    Alharbi, Hattan A; Letcher, Robert J; Mineau, Pierre; Chen, Da; Chu, Shaogang

    2016-02-01

    Recent modeling analysis suggests that numerous birds may be at risk of acute poisoning in insecticide-treated fields. Although the majority of avian field studies on pesticides have focused on treated seed, granule, insect or vegetation (oral exposure) ingestion, dermal exposure is an important exposure route when birds come into contact with deposited pesticides on foliage and other surfaces. Some nearctic-neotropical migratory songbirds are likely exposed to pesticides on their non-breeding habitats and include treated crops, plantations or farmlands. In the present study, we developed a method for four environmentally-relevant organophosphate (OP) pesticides (fenthion, fenamiphos, chlorpyrifos and diazinon) in the feet of migratory songbirds (i.e. Common yellowthroat, Gray catbird, Indigo bunting, America redstart, Northern waterthrush, Northern parula, and an additional 12 species of warblers). A total of 190 specimens of the 18 species of songbirds were sampled from available window-killed birds (spring of 2007 and 2011) in downtown Toronto, Canada. The species that were available most likely over-wintered in Mexican/Central American crops such as citrus, coffee and cacao. The feet of the dead birds were sampled and where OP foot exposure likely occurred during over-wintering foraging on pesticide-treated crops. Chlorpyrifos was the only measurable OP (pg mg feet weight(-1)) and in the 2011-collected feet of Black throated blue warbler (0.5), Tennessee warbler (1.0), Northern parula (1.2), Northern waterthrush (0.6), Common yellowthroat (1.0) and the Blue winged warbler (0.9). Dermal contact with OP pesticides during over-wintering in agricultural areas resulted in low levels of chlorpyrifos and long time retention on the feet of a subset of songbirds.

  10. Home-based community health worker intervention to reduce pesticide exposures to farmworkers' children: A randomized-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Alicia L; Castorina, Rosemary; Camacho, José; Morga, Norma; López, Jesús; Nishioka, Marcia; Barr, Dana B; Eskenazi, Brenda; Bradman, Asa

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a randomized-controlled trial of a home-based intervention to reduce pesticide exposures to farmworkers' children in Monterey County, California (n=116 families). The intervention consisted of three home-based educational sessions delivered by community health workers in Spanish. Measurements of organophosphate (OP) insecticide metabolites in child urine (n=106) and pesticides in home floor wipes (n=103) were collected before and after the intervention. Median child urinary dialkyl phosphate (DAP) metabolite levels were slightly lower among the intervention group children at follow-up compared with baseline, albeit nonsignificantly. DAP metabolite levels in the control group children were markedly higher at follow-up compared with baseline. In adjusted models, intervention participation was associated with a 51% decrease in total DAP metabolite levels. Carbaryl, chlorpyrifos, cypermethrin, dacthal, diazinon, malathion, and trans-permethrin were commonly detected in the floor wipes. In adjusted models, intervention participation was significantly associated with a 37% decrease in trans-permethrin floor wipe levels in homes, but not OP or other agricultural pesticides. In summary, intervention group children had slightly reduced pesticide exposures, whereas child exposures were higher among the control group. Additional intervention studies evaluating methods to reduce pesticide exposures to farmworker families and children are needed.

  11. Vortex-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of organophosphate pesticides in environmental water samples and wines.

    PubMed

    Zacharis, Constantinos K; Christophoridis, Christophoros; Fytianos, Konstantinos

    2012-09-01

    A simple vortex-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction protocol followed by GC-MS is proposed for the determination of 12 organophosphate pesticides residues in environmental water samples and wines. The sample pretreatment employs the usage of low-density organic solvent. The parameters affecting the extraction efficiency (type and volume of organic extraction solvent, sample pH, ionic strength, extraction time, and centrifugation speed) were carefully examined. A mild emulsification process was involved by the addition of 40 μL toluene into 10 mL sample followed by sequential vortex-based agitation and manual shaking for 3 min. Following the extraction, the pesticide-rich organic solvent was recovered by centrifugation at 4000 rpm for 5 min. A fraction of the floated toluene was then collected and analyzed by GC-MS in SIM mode. Under the optimized conditions, the enrichment factor ranged between 65 and 389. Satisfactory linearity was observed for all pesticides tested with correlation coefficients higher than 0.9945 while the LODs were in the range of 2-11 ng L(-1) . The main advantages of the proposed method are the simplicity of operation, rapidity, low cost, and high sensitivity.

  12. Residues of organophosphate pesticides used in vegetable cultivation in ambient air, surface water and soil in Bueng Niam Subdistrict, Khon Kaen, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Harnpicharnchai, Kallaya; Chaiear, Naesinee; Charerntanyarak, Lertchai

    2013-11-01

    Agricultural pesticide utilization is one of the important problems in rural and urban crop-cultivated areas, with the majority of pollutants dispersing via ambient air, water and other natural pathways. This study was therefore conducted in a specially selected village which is known to be a leading vegetable growing area in Khon Kaen Province. The aim of the study was to assess pesticide residues, and measure the seasonal fluctuations in organophosphate concentrations during 2010 in the environment of a risk area. Samples from selected sites were collected in two phases: Phase I was in summer (during March to May) and Phase II was in winter (during October to December). A total of 150 samples were analyzed using gas chromatography with flame photometric detection. The results showed that dicrotophos, chlorpyrifos, profenofos and ethion were found at the highest concentrations in soil and at the lowest concentrations in ambient air (p<0.001). The highest mean concentration of a pesticide in ambient air samples was 0.2580 +/- 0.2686 mg/m(3) for chlorpyrifos in summer and 0.1003 +/- 0.0449 mg/m(3) for chlorpyrifos in winter. In surface water samples, the highest mean concentration of a pesticide was 1.3757 +/- 0.5014 mg/l for dicrotophos in summer and 0.3629 +/- 0.4338 mg/l for ethion in winter. The highest mean concentration of a pesticide in soil samples was 42.2893 +/- 39.0711 mg/kg ethion in summer and 90.0000 +/- 24.1644 mg/kg of ethion in winter. PMID:24450247

  13. Pesticides reduce regional biodiversity of stream invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Beketov, Mikhail A; Kefford, Ben J; Schäfer, Ralf B; Liess, Matthias

    2013-07-01

    The biodiversity crisis is one of the greatest challenges facing humanity, but our understanding of the drivers remains limited. Thus, after decades of studies and regulation efforts, it remains unknown whether to what degree and at what concentrations modern agricultural pesticides cause regional-scale species losses. We analyzed the effects of pesticides on the regional taxa richness of stream invertebrates in Europe (Germany and France) and Australia (southern Victoria). Pesticides caused statistically significant effects on both the species and family richness in both regions, with losses in taxa up to 42% of the recorded taxonomic pools. Furthermore, the effects in Europe were detected at concentrations that current legislation considers environmentally protective. Thus, the current ecological risk assessment of pesticides falls short of protecting biodiversity, and new approaches linking ecology and ecotoxicology are needed. PMID:23776226

  14. Pesticides reduce regional biodiversity of stream invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Beketov, Mikhail A.; Kefford, Ben J.; Schäfer, Ralf B.; Liess, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    The biodiversity crisis is one of the greatest challenges facing humanity, but our understanding of the drivers remains limited. Thus, after decades of studies and regulation efforts, it remains unknown whether to what degree and at what concentrations modern agricultural pesticides cause regional-scale species losses. We analyzed the effects of pesticides on the regional taxa richness of stream invertebrates in Europe (Germany and France) and Australia (southern Victoria). Pesticides caused statistically significant effects on both the species and family richness in both regions, with losses in taxa up to 42% of the recorded taxonomic pools. Furthermore, the effects in Europe were detected at concentrations that current legislation considers environmentally protective. Thus, the current ecological risk assessment of pesticides falls short of protecting biodiversity, and new approaches linking ecology and ecotoxicology are needed. PMID:23776226

  15. Analysis of the detection of organophosphate pesticides in aqueous solutions using polymer-coated single IDT sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Michael

    The single interdigital transducer (IDT) device was investigated as a micro-chemical sensor for the detection of organophosphates compounds in aqueous solutions. The compounds of interest are: parathion, parathion-methyl, and paraoxon. The polymers used as a partially-selective coating for the direct detection of these compounds are 2,2'-diallylbisphenol A- 1,1,3,3,5,5-hexamethyltrisiloxane (BPA-HMTS) and polyepichlorohydrin (PECH). BPA-HMTS is synthesized here at Marquette University. The measurement of interest for the single IDT is the change radiation resistance. The radiation resistance represents the energy stored in the propagating acoustic wave. As analyte absorbs into the polymer coating, changes in the film's properties will undergo resulting in a change in the radiation resistance i.e the acoustic wave properties. The film's properties changing include: added mass, viscoelastic properties, thickness, and dielectric properties. These properties will contribute to an overall change in the radiation resistance. A linear change in the radiation resistance is expected to occur for increasing concentrations of an organophosphate. The experimental results indicate that BPA-HMTS shows greater sensitivity towards the organophosphates than PECH. Both polymers showed greatest to lowest sensitivity to parathion, parathion-methyl, and paraoxon respectively. Thicker films tested for both polymers, 0.75μm thick, show a higher response due to a more pronounced effect of mass loading than the thinner films tested, 0.50μm. The response times for BPA-HMTS were much faster than for PECH. Both films showed fastest to slowest response time to paraoxon, parathion-methyl, and parathion respectively. The sensor is tested for reproducibility for the polymer BP-HMTS. A sensor array consisting of separately tested devices from this work as well as work done by a previous student is utilized to increase the selectivity of the three organophosphates. Radial plots are performed for

  16. Development of an ion-pair liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry method for determination of organophosphate pesticide metabolites in large-scale biomonitoring studies.

    PubMed

    Cequier, Enrique; Sakhi, Amrit Kaur; Haug, Line Småstuen; Thomsen, Cathrine

    2016-07-01

    Organophosphate based pesticides are widely used in the agricultural sector, and exposure to these chemicals is common for the general population. Pesticides are toxic due to the inhibition of acetylcholinesterases, and the potential for adverse health effects have been investigated in past and recent studies. Human biomonitoring of organophosphate pesticide exposure is carried out through the determination of the metabolites in urine (dialkylphosphates, DAPs). Hereby we present a new method for determination of the 6 non-specific metabolites dimethyl phosphate (DMP), diethyl phosphate (DEP), dimethyl thiophosphate (DMTP), diethyl thiophosphate (DETP), dimethyl dithiophosphate (DMDTP), and diethyl dithiophosphate (DEDTP) in urine based on off-line solid phase extraction (anion exchange, 96-well plates) followed by ion-pair ultra-performance liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Recoveries and accuracies in control urine spiked at 5ng/mL ranged from 48% to109% and from 91% to 115%, respectively. The method limits of detection for the DAPs were 1.2ng/mL for DMP, 0.38ng/mL for DEP, 0.20ng/mL for DMTP, 0.33ng/mL for DETP, 0.64ng/mL for DMDTP, and 0.15ng/mL for DEDTP. The method was applied to samples from a Norwegian mother/child study group (n=48/56) and the DAPs detection frequencies in urine from mothers and children were about: 40% for DMP, 95% for DEP, 96% for DMTP, 50% for DETP, 15% for DMDTP, and 1% for DEDTP. In both mothers and children, the most abundant DAPs were DMTP (median 2.4/5.2ng/mL) and DEP (median 2.6/3.4ng/mL) followed by DMP (median 1.5/2.1ng/mL). The SG corrected concentrations of DEP and DETP in mothers were statistically higher than in children (p-value<0.05; Mann-Whitney test) which might suggest a higher exposure to pesticides in these mothers, or significant differences in toxicokinetics between adults and children. The method was proven robust and suitable for large-scale biomonitoring studies. PMID:27264744

  17. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory : determination of organophosphate pesticides in bottom sediment by gas chromatography with flame photometric detection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jha, Virendra Kumar; Wydoski, Duane S.

    2003-01-01

    A method for the isolation of 20 parent organophosphate pesticides and 5 pesticide degradates from bottom-sediment samples is described. The compound O-ethyl-O-methyl-S-proplyphosphorothioate is reported as an estimated concentration because of variable performance. In this method, the sediment samples are centrifuged to remove excess waster mixed with anhydrous sodium sulfate and Soxhlet extracted overnight with dichloromethane (93 percent) and methanol (7 percent). The extract is concentrated and then filtered through a 0.2-micrometer polytetrafluoroethylene membrane syringe filter. An aliquot of the sample extract is quantitatively injected onto two polystyrene-divinylbenzene gel-permeation chromatographic columns connected in series. The compounds are eluted with dichloromethane and a fraction is collected for analysis, with some coextracted interferences, including elemental sulfur, separated and discarded. The aliquot is concentrated and solvent exchanged to ethyl acetate. The extract is analyzed by dual capillary-column gas chromatography with flame photometric detection. Single-operator method detection limits in sodium sulfate matrix samples ranged from 0.81 to 2 micrograms per kilogram. Method performance was validated by spiking all compounds into three different solid matrices (sodium sulfate, bed sediment from Clear Creek, and bed sediment from Evergreen Lake) at three different concentrations. Eight replicates were analyzed at each concentration in each matrix. Mean recoveries of method compounds spiked in Clear Creek samples ranged from 43 to 110 percent, and those in Evergreen Lake samples ranged from 62 to 118 percent for all pesticides. Mean recoveries of method compounds spiked in reagent sodium sulfate samples ranged from 41 to 101 percent for all pesticides. The only exception was O-ethyl-O-methyl-S-propylphosphorothioate, which had an average recovery of 35 percent, and, thus, sample concentration is reported as estimated ('E' remark code).

  18. Development of a Computer-Based Survey Instrument for Organophosphate and N-Methyl-Carbamate Exposure Assessment among Agricultural Pesticide Handlers

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Jonathan N.; Checkoway, Harvey; Borges, Ofelio; Servin, Flor; Fenske, Richard A.; Keifer, Matthew C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Assessment of occupational pesticide exposures based on self-reported information can be challenging, particularly with immigrant farm worker populations for whom specialized methods are needed to address language and cultural barriers and account for limited literacy. An audio computer-assisted self-interview (A-CASI) survey instrument was developed to collect information about organophosphate (OP) and N-methyl-carbamate (CB) exposures and other personal characteristics among male agricultural pesticide handlers for an ongoing cholinesterase biomonitoring study in Washington State. Objectives: To assess the feasibility of collecting data using the A-CASI instrument and evaluate reliability for a subset of survey items. Methods: The survey consisted of 64 items administered in Spanish or English on a touch-screen tablet computer. Participants listened to digitally recorded questions on headphones and selected responses on the screen, most of which were displayed as images or icons to facilitate participation of low literacy respondents. From 2006–2008, a total of 195 participants completed the survey during the OP/CB application seasons on at least one occasion. Percent agreement and kappa coefficients were calculated to evaluate test–retest reliability for selected characteristics among 45 participants who completed the survey on two separate occasions within the same year. Results: Almost all participants self-identified as Hispanic or Latino (98%), and 97% completed the survey in Spanish. Most participants completed the survey in a half-hour or less, with minimal assistance from on-site research staff. Analyses of test–retest reliability showed substantial agreement for most demographic, work history, and health characteristics and at least moderate agreement for most variables related to personal protective equipment use during pesticide applications. Conclusions: This A-CASI survey instrument is a novel method that has been used successfully

  19. THE EFFECTS OF AN ORGANOPHOSPHATE (OP)-CARBAMATE (CB) PESTICIDE MIXTURE ON CORE TEMPERATURE AND MOTOR ACTIVITY IN THE RAT.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pesticide risk assessment has traditionally been based on the toxicological response to single agents. Dose-additivity has been the default in risk assessment evaluations of pesticides with a common mechanism of action, but there could be supra-additive or infra-additive inter...

  20. Application of ultraperformance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry-based metabonomic techniques to analyze the joint toxic action of long-term low-level exposure to a mixture of organophosphate pesticides on rat urine profile.

    PubMed

    Du, Longfei; Wang, Hong; Xu, Wei; Zeng, Yan; Hou, Yurong; Zhang, Yuqiu; Zhao, Xiujuan; Sun, Changhao

    2013-07-01

    In previously published articles, we evaluated the toxicity of four organophosphate (OP) pesticides (dichlorvos, dimethoate, acephate, and phorate) to rats using metabonomic technology at their corresponding no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL). Results show that a single pesticide elicits no toxic response. This study aimed to determine whether chronic exposure to a mixture of the above four pesticides (at their corresponding NOAEL) can lead to joint toxic action in rats using the same technology. Pesticides were administered daily to rats through drinking water for 24 weeks. The above mixture of the four pesticides showed joint toxic action at the NOAEL of each pesticide. The metabonomic profiles of rats urine were analyzed by ultraperformance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. The 16 metabolites statistically significantly changed in all treated groups compared with the control group. Dimethylphosphate and dimethyldithiophosphate exclusively detected in all treated groups can be used as early, sensitive biomarkers for exposure to a mixture of the OP pesticides. Moreover, exposure to the OP pesticides resulted in increased 7-methylguanine, ribothymidine, cholic acid, 4-pyridoxic acid, kynurenine, and indoxyl sulfate levels, as well as decreased hippuric acid, creatinine, uric acid, gentisic acid, C18-dihydrosphingosine, phytosphingosine, suberic acid, and citric acid. The results indicated that a mixture of OP pesticides induced DNA damage and oxidative stress, disturbed the metabolism of lipids, and interfered with the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Ensuring food safety requires not only the toxicology test data of each pesticide for the calculation of the acceptable daily intake but also the joint toxic action.

  1. Reduced plant uptake of pesticides with biochar additions to soil.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiang-Yang; Ying, Guang-Guo; Kookana, Rai S

    2009-07-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of two types of biochars in reducing the bioavailability of two soil-applied insecticides (chlorpyrifos and carbofuran) to Spring onion (Allium cepa). The biochars prepared from the pyrolysis of Eucalyptus spp. wood chips at 450 and 850 degrees C (BC850) were thoroughly mixed into the soil to achieve 0%, 0.1%, 0.5% and 1% by soil weight. A spring onion crop was grown for 5 wk in the biochar-amended soils spiked with 50 mgkg(-1) of each pesticide. The loss of both pesticides due to degradation and or sequestration in soils decreased significantly with increasing amounts of biochars in soil. Over 35 d, 86-88% of the pesticides were lost from the control soil, whereas it was only 51% of carbofuran and 44% of chlorpyrifos from the soil amended with 1.0% BC850. Despite greater persistence of the pesticide residues in biochar-amended soils, the plant uptake of pesticides decreased markedly with increasing biochar content of the soil. With 1% of BC850 soil amendment, the total plant residues for chlorpyrifos and carbofuran decreased to 10% and 25% of that in the control treatment, respectively. The BC850 was particularly effective in reducing phytoavailability of both pesticides from soil, due to its high affinity for and ability to sequester pesticide residues.

  2. Reduced plant uptake of pesticides with biochar additions to soil.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiang-Yang; Ying, Guang-Guo; Kookana, Rai S

    2009-07-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of two types of biochars in reducing the bioavailability of two soil-applied insecticides (chlorpyrifos and carbofuran) to Spring onion (Allium cepa). The biochars prepared from the pyrolysis of Eucalyptus spp. wood chips at 450 and 850 degrees C (BC850) were thoroughly mixed into the soil to achieve 0%, 0.1%, 0.5% and 1% by soil weight. A spring onion crop was grown for 5 wk in the biochar-amended soils spiked with 50 mgkg(-1) of each pesticide. The loss of both pesticides due to degradation and or sequestration in soils decreased significantly with increasing amounts of biochars in soil. Over 35 d, 86-88% of the pesticides were lost from the control soil, whereas it was only 51% of carbofuran and 44% of chlorpyrifos from the soil amended with 1.0% BC850. Despite greater persistence of the pesticide residues in biochar-amended soils, the plant uptake of pesticides decreased markedly with increasing biochar content of the soil. With 1% of BC850 soil amendment, the total plant residues for chlorpyrifos and carbofuran decreased to 10% and 25% of that in the control treatment, respectively. The BC850 was particularly effective in reducing phytoavailability of both pesticides from soil, due to its high affinity for and ability to sequester pesticide residues. PMID:19419749

  3. Determination of 17 organophosphate pesticide residues in mango by modified QuEChERS extraction method using GC-NPD/GC-MS and hazard index estimation in Lucknow, India.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Ashutosh K; Rai, Satyajeet; Srivastava, M K; Lohani, M; Mudiam, M K R; Srivastava, L P

    2014-01-01

    A total of 162 samples of different varieties of mango: Deshehari, Langra, Safeda in three growing stages (Pre-mature, Unripe and Ripe) were collected from Lucknow, India, and analyzed for the presence of seventeen organophosphate pesticide residues. The QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe) method of extraction coupled with gas chromatography was validated for pesticides and qualitatively confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The method was validated with different concentrations of mixture of seventeen organophosphate pesticides (0.05, 0.10, 0.50 mg kg(-1)) in mango. The average recovery varied from 70.20% to 95.25% with less than 10% relative standard deviation. The limit of quantification of different pesticides ranged from 0.007 to 0.033 mg kg(-1). Out of seventeen organophosphate pesticides only malathion and chlorpyriphos were detected. Approximately 20% of the mango samples have shown the presence of these two pesticides. The malathion residues ranged from ND-1.407 mg kg(-1) and chlorpyriphos ND-0.313 mg kg(-1) which is well below the maximum residues limit (PFA-1954). In three varieties of mango at different stages from unpeeled to peeled sample reduction of malathion and chlorpyriphos ranged from 35.48%-100% and 46.66%-100% respectively. The estimated daily intake of malathion ranged from 0.032 to 0.121 µg kg(-1) and chlorpyriphos ranged from zero to 0.022 µg kg(-1) body weight from three different stages of mango. The hazard indices ranged from 0.0015 to 0.0060 for malathion and zero to 0.0022 for chlorpyriphos. It is therefore indicated that seasonal consumption of these three varieties of mango may not pose any health hazards for the population of Lucknow, city, India because the hazard indices for malathion and chlorpyriphos residues were below to one. PMID:24809911

  4. Determination of 17 Organophosphate Pesticide Residues in Mango by Modified QuEChERS Extraction Method Using GC-NPD/GC-MS and Hazard Index Estimation in Lucknow, India

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Ashutosh K.; Rai, Satyajeet; Srivastava, M. K.; Lohani, M.; Mudiam, M. K. R.; Srivastava, L. P.

    2014-01-01

    A total of 162 samples of different varieties of mango: Deshehari, Langra, Safeda in three growing stages (Pre-mature, Unripe and Ripe) were collected from Lucknow, India, and analyzed for the presence of seventeen organophosphate pesticide residues. The QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe) method of extraction coupled with gas chromatography was validated for pesticides and qualitatively confirmed by gas chromatography- mass spectrometry. The method was validated with different concentrations of mixture of seventeen organophosphate pesticides (0.05, 0.10, 0.50 mg kg−1) in mango. The average recovery varied from 70.20% to 95.25% with less than 10% relative standard deviation. The limit of quantification of different pesticides ranged from 0.007 to 0.033 mg kg−1. Out of seventeen organophosphate pesticides only malathion and chlorpyriphos were detected. Approximately 20% of the mango samples have shown the presence of these two pesticides. The malathion residues ranged from ND-1.407 mg kg−1 and chlorpyriphos ND-0.313 mg kg−1 which is well below the maximum residues limit (PFA-1954). In three varieties of mango at different stages from unpeeled to peeled sample reduction of malathion and chlorpyriphos ranged from 35.48%–100% and 46.66%–100% respectively. The estimated daily intake of malathion ranged from 0.032 to 0.121 µg kg−1 and chlorpyriphos ranged from zero to 0.022 µg kg−1 body weight from three different stages of mango. The hazard indices ranged from 0.0015 to 0.0060 for malathion and zero to 0.0022 for chlorpyriphos. It is therefore indicated that seasonal consumption of these three varieties of mango may not pose any health hazards for the population of Lucknow, city, India because the hazard indices for malathion and chlorpyriphos residues were below to one. PMID:24809911

  5. Pesticides

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACMT Recognition Awards Annual Scientific Meeting Travel Scholarships Pesticides Public Health > Public > Toxicology FAQ's > Pesticides Pesticides What are pesticides ? How do pesticides work ? How ...

  6. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Native Grass Riparian Buffer Strips to Reduce Pesticide Runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, K.; Brown, D. L.

    2007-12-01

    Organophosphate pesticides such as diazinon have been a major source of non-point source water pollution in the Sacramento Valley watershed of central California. Diazinon is commonly listed as a pollutant for many tributaries of the Sacramento River on the US Clean Water Act section 303(d) list of impaired waterways. This pesticide is applied either aerially or as a foliar spray to nut and stone-fruit orchards during dormancy, which coincides with the rainy season in northern California. A study was conducted to determine if planting native grasses in the riparian zone was effective in reducing the amount of diazinon entering the surface water in streams flowing through these orchards. Native grasses have deeper root systems and were hypothesized to be more effective in sorbing diazinon and preventing its runoff than non-native grasses. In 2004, nine 20 foot by 20 foot riparian buffer plots were constructed along the banks of the South Fork of Walker Creek, west of the town of Orland in the Sacramento Valley. Three of the nine plots were maintained as bare ground, three were left with resident weeds including dense non-native grasses, and three were planted with native grasses, which included purple needlegrass (Nassella pulchra), creeping wildrye (Elymus triticoides), and deergrass (Muhlenbergia rigens). The experimental design simulated orchard runoff by applying mixtures of water and diazinon at observed field concentrations. The pesticide load was evenly applied across the top of each buffer plot at a rate consistent with local runoff rates in an average storm. Rainfall on the buffer plots was simulated with overhead sprinklers at a rate of 0.75 inches per hour, also an average storm for this area. Runoff was monitored at the downslope side of the plots with flumes funneled to large holding tanks. From these tanks, composite water samples were collected after runoff had ceased. The samples were analyzed for diazinon concentration, nitrates, and total suspended

  7. Seizure activity post organophosphate exposure.

    PubMed

    Tattersall, John

    2009-01-01

    Electrographic seizures are a feature of organophosphate anticholinesterase intoxication. Clinical studies of pesticide poisonings suggest that seizures are more common in children than in adults. Since flaccid paralysis, a characteristic sign of organophosphate poisoning, can mask convulsions, the most reliable indicator of seizures is the electroencephalogram, but this has not been widely used in clinical studies. Seizures can rapidly progress to status epilepticus, contributing to mortality and, in survivors, to neuronal damage and neurological impairment. Anticonvulsant drugs can significantly reduce the lethal and toxic effects of these compounds. A benzodiazepine, usually diazepam, is the treatment currently indicated for control of seizures. Animal studies have indicated that the early phase of seizure activity (0-5 min after seizure onset) is purely cholinergic, predominantly involving muscarinic mechanisms. Seizure activity subsequently progresses through mixed cholinergic and noncholinergic modulation (5-40 min) into a final noncholinergic phase. Neuropathology caused by seizures is most likely associated with glutamatergic excitotoxicity. Future prospects for improved treatments include new benzodiazepines, glutamate receptor antagonists, antimuscarinics with additional antiglutamatergic activity and adenosine receptor antagonists.

  8. Influence of CYP2C9, GSTM1, GSTT1 and NAT2 genetic polymorphisms on DNA damage in workers occupationally exposed to organophosphate pesticides.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satyender; Kumar, Vivek; Singh, Priyanka; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Rautela, Rajender Singh; Grover, Shyam Sunder; Rawat, Devendra Singh; Pasha, Syed Tazeen; Jain, Sudhir Kumar; Rai, Arvind

    2012-01-24

    Previous studies have revealed that organophosphate pesticides (OPs) are primarily metabolized by xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (XMEs). Very few studies have explored genetic polymorphisms of XMEs and their association with DNA damage in pesticides-exposed workers. Present study was designed to determine the influence of CYP2C9, GSTM1, GSTT1 and NAT2 genetic polymorphisms on DNA damage in workers occupationally exposed to OPs. We examined 268 subjects including 134 workers occupationally exposed to OPs and an equal number of normal healthy controls. The DNA damage was evaluated using alkaline comet assay and genotyping was done using individual polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Acetylcholinesterase and paraoxonase activity were found to be significantly lowered in workers as compared to control subjects which were analyzed as biomarkers of toxicity due to OPs exposure (p<0.001). Workers showed significantly higher DNA tail moment (TM) compared to control subjects (14.32±2.17 vs. 6.24±1.37 tail % DNA, p<0.001). GSTM1 null genotype was found to influence DNA TM in workers (p<0.05). DNA TM was also found to be increased with concomitant presence of NAT2 slow acetylation and CYP2C9*3/*3 or GSTM1 null genotypes (p<0.05). DNA TM was found increased in NAT2 slow acetylators with mild and heavy smoking habits in control subjects and workers, respectively (p<0.05). The results of this study suggest that GSTM1 null genotypes, and an association of NAT2 slow acetylation genotypes with CYP2C9*3/*3 or GSTM1 null genotypes may modulate DNA damage in workers occupationally exposed to OPs.

  9. Determination of residual carbamate, organophosphate, and phenyl urea pesticides in drinking and surface water by high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hao, Chunyan; Nguyen, Bick; Zhiao, Xiaoming; Chen, Ernie; Yang, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Methods using SPE followed by HPLC/MS/MS analysis were developed and validated for the determination of 39 pesticides in different aquatic environmental matrixes. The target pesticides included 12 carbamates, 15 organophosphates, and 12 phenyl ureas, out of which 16 are regulated in North America. Method detection limits were in the low ng/L range using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's protocol and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) data acquisition, meeting the regulatory needs in the United States, Canada, and European Union. Isotope-labeled compounds were used as injection internal standards, as well as method surrogates to improve the data quality. QC/QA data (e.g., method recovery and within-run and between-run method precision) derived from multiyear monitoring activities were used to demonstrate method ruggedness. The same QC/QA data also showed that the method exerted no obvious matrix effect on the target analytes. Parameters that affect method performance, such as preservatives, pH values, sample storage time, and sample extract storage time, were also studied in detail. Accredited by the Canadian Association for Laboratory Accreditation and licensed by the Ontario government for drinking water analysis, these methods have been applied to the analysis of drinking water, ground water, and surface water samples collected in the province of Ontario, Canada, to ensure the pristine nature of Ontario's aquatic environment. Using the scheduled MRM (sMRM) data acquisition algorithm, it was demonstrated that sMRM improved the S/N of extracted ion chromatograms by at least two- to six-fold and, therefore, enhanced the short- and long-term instrument precision, demonstrated the ability to offer high throughput multiresidue analysis, and allowed the use of two MRM transitions for each compound to achieve higher confidence for compound identification.

  10. Construction of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-marked multifunctional pesticide-degrading bacterium for simultaneous degradation of organophosphates and γ-hexachlorocyclohexane.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Liu, Ruihua; Yuan, Yulan; Liu, Jianli; Cao, Xiangyu; Qiao, Chuanling; Song, Cunjiang

    2013-02-13

    An autofluorescent whole-cell biocatalyst capable of simultaneously degrading organophosphates (OPs) and γ-hexachlorocyclohexane (γ-HCH) was constructed by display of organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion on the cell surface of a γ-HCH-degrading Sphingobium japonicum UT26 using the truncated ice nucleation protein (INPNC) as an anchoring motif. The surface localization of INPNC-OPH-GFP fusion was verified by cell fractionation, Western blot, proteinase accessibility, and immunofluorescence microscopy. Surface display of macromolecular OPH-GFP fusion (63 kDa) neither inhibits cell growth nor affects cell viability. In sterile and nonsterile soil samples, a mixture of parathion (100 mg kg(-1)) and γ-HCH (10 mg kg(-1)) could be degraded completely within 15 days when inoculated with the engineered UT26, and the strain could be easily monitored by fluorescence during bioremediation. These results indicate that the engineered UT26 is a promising multifunctional bacterium that could be used for the bioremediation of environments contaminated with multiple pesticides.

  11. Reduced expression of exocytotic proteins caused by anti-cholinesterase pesticides in Brachionus calyciflorus (Rotifera: Monogononta).

    PubMed

    Pérez-Legaspi, I A; Rico-Martínez, R; Quintanar, J L

    2015-08-01

    The organophosphate and carbamate pesticides methyl-parathion and carbaryl have a common action mechanism: they inhibit acetylcholinesterase enzyme by blocking the transmission of nerve impulses. However, they can alter the expression of exocytotic membrane proteins (SNARE), by modifying release of neurotransmitters and other substances. This study evaluated the adverse effects of the pesticides methyl-parathion and carbaryl on expression of SNARE proteins: Syntaxin-1, Syntaxin-4 and SNAP-23 in freshwater rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus. Protein expression of these three proteins was analyzed before and after exposure to these two pesticides by Western Blot. The expression of Syntaxin-1, Syntaxin-4 and SNAP-23 proteins in B. calyciflorussignificantly decreases with increasing concentration of either pesticides. This suggests that organophosphates and carbamates have adverse effects on expression of membrane proteins of exocytosis by altering the recognition, docking and fusion of presynaptic and vesicular membranes involved in exocytosis of neurotransmitters. Our results demonstrate that the neurotoxic effect of anticholinesterase pesticides influences the interaction of syntaxins and SNAP-25 and the proper assembly of the SNARE complex.

  12. Genetic polymorphisms of GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 and susceptibility to DNA damage in workers occupationally exposed to organophosphate pesticides.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satyender; Kumar, Vivek; Singh, Priyanka; Thakur, Sachin; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Rautela, Rajender Singh; Grover, Shyam Sunder; Rawat, Devendra Singh; Pasha, Syed Tazeen; Jain, Sudhir Kumar; Rai, Arvind

    2011-10-01

    GSTM1, T1 and P1 are important enzymes of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), involved in the metabolism of many endogenous and exogenous compounds. Individual genetic variation in these metabolizing enzymes may influence the metabolism of their substrates. The present study was designed to determine the genotoxic effects using DNA damage and its association with GSTM1, GSTT1, and GSTP1 (Ile105Val) genetic polymorphisms in workers occupationally exposed to organophosphate pesticides (OPs). We examined 230 subjects including 115 workers occupationally exposed to OPs and an equal number of normal healthy controls. The DNA damage was evaluated using the alkaline comet assay and genotyping was done using individual PCR or PCR-RFLP. Significantly higher DNA tail moment (TM) was observed in workers as compared to control subjects (14.41 ± 2.25 vs. 6.36 ± 1.41 tail % DNA, p<0.001). The results revealed significantly higher DNA TM in workers with GSTM1 null genotype than those with GSTM1 positive (15.18 vs. 14.15 tail % DNA, p=0.03). A significantly higher DNA TM was also observed in workers with homozygous Ile-Ile GSTP1 genotype than heterozygous (Ile-Val) and mutant (Val-Val) GSTP1 genotype (p=0.02). In conclusion, the results show that null deletion of GSTM1 and homozygote wild GSTP1 genotype could be related to inter-individual differences in DNA damage arises from the gene-environment interactions in workers occupationally exposed to OPs.

  13. Enzymatic reaction modulated gold nanorod end-to-end self-assembly for ultrahigh sensitively colorimetric sensing of cholinesterase and organophosphate pesticides in human blood.

    PubMed

    Lu, Linlin; Xia, Yunsheng

    2015-08-18

    We present herein the first reported self-assembly modulation of gold nanorods (AuNRs) by enzymatic reaction, which is further employed for colorimetric assays of cholinesterase (ChE) and organophosphate pesticides (OPs) in human blood. ChE catalyzes its substrate (acetylthiocholine) and produces thiocholine and acetate acid. The resulting thiols then react with the tips of the AuNRs by S-Au conjunction and prevent subsequent cysteine-induced AuNR end-to-end (EE) self-assembly. Correspondingly, the AuNR surface plasmon resonance is regulated, which results in a distinctly ratiometric signal output. Under optimal conditions, the linear range is 0.042 to 8.4 μU/mL, and the detection limit is as low as 0.018 μU/mL. As ChE is incubated with OPs, the enzymatic activity is inhibited. So, the cysteine-induced assembly is observed again. On the basis of this principle, OPs can be well determined ranging from 0.12 to 40 pM with a 0.039 pM detection limit. To our knowledge, the present quasi pU/mL level sensitivity for ChE and the quasi femtomolar level sensitivity for OPs are at least 500 and 7000 times lower than those of previous colorimetric methods, respectively. The ultrahigh sensitivity results from (1) the rational choice of anisotropic AuNRs as building blocks and reporters and (2) the specific structure of the enzymatic thiocholine. Because of ultrahigh sensitivity, serum samples are allowed to be extremely diluted in the assay. Accordingly, various nonspecific interactions, even from glutathione/cysteine, are well avoided. So, both ChE and OPs in human blood can be directly assayed without any prepurification, indicating the simplicity and practical promise of the proposed method.

  14. Dicationic polymeric ionic-liquid-based magnetic material as an adsorbent for the magnetic solid-phase extraction of organophosphate pesticides and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qiong; Liu, Qin; Chen, Qiliang; Zhao, Wenjie; Xiang, Guoqiang; He, Lijun; Jiang, Xiuming; Zhang, Shusheng

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic particles modified with a dicationic polymeric ionic liquid are described as a new adsorbent in magnetic solid-phase extraction. They were obtained through the copolymerization of a 1,8-di(3-vinylimidazolium)octane-based ionic liquid with vinyl-modified SiO2 @Fe3 O4 , and were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and vibrating sample magnetometry. The modified magnetic particles are effective in the extraction of organophosphate pesticides and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Also, they can provide different extraction performance for the selected analytes including fenitrothion, parathion, fenthion, phoxim, phenanthrene, and fluoranthene, where the extraction efficiency is found to be in agreement with the hydrophobicity of analytes. Various factors influencing the extraction efficiency, such as, the amount of adsorbent, extraction, and desorption time, and type and volume of the desorption solvent, were optimized. Under the optimized conditions, a good linearity ranging from 1-100 μg/L is obtained for all analytes, except for parathion (2-200 μg/L), where the correlation coefficients varied from 0.9960 to 0.9998. The limits of detection are 0.2-0.8 μg/L, and intraday and interday relative standard deviations are 1.7-7.4% (n = 5) and 3.8-8.0% (n = 3), respectively. The magnetic solid-phase extraction combined with high-performance liquid chromatography can be applied for the detection of trace targets in real water samples with satisfactory relative recoveries and relative standard deviations. PMID:27357486

  15. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory : determination of organophosphate pesticides in whole water by continuous liquid-liquid extraction and capillary-column gas chromatography with flame photometric detection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jha, Virendra K.; Wydoski, Duane S.

    2003-01-01

    A method for the isolation of 20 parent organophosphate pesticides and 5 organophosphate pesticide degradates from natural-water samples is described. Compounds are extracted from water samples with methylene chloride using a continuous liquid-liquid extractor for 6 hours. The solvent is evaporated using heat and a flow of nitrogen to a volume of 1 milliliter and solvent exchanged to ethyl acetate. Extracted compounds are determined by capillary-column gas chromatography with flame photometric detection. Single-operator derived method detection limits in three water-matrix samples ranged from 0.003 to 0.009 microgram per liter. Method performance was validated by spiking all compounds in three different matrices at three different concentrations. Eight replicates were analyzed at each concentration in each matrix. Mean recoveries of most method compounds spiked in surface-water samples ranged from 54 to 137 percent and those in ground-water samples ranged from 40 to 109 percent for all pesticides. Recoveries in reagent-water samples ranged from 42 to 104 percent for all pesticides. The only exception was O-ethyl-O-methyl-S-propylphosphorothioate, which had variable recovery in all three matrices ranging from 27 to 79 percent. As a result, the detected concentration of O-ethyl-O-methyl-S-propylphosphorothioate in samples is reported in this method with an estimated remark code. Based on the performance issue, two more compounds, disulfoton and ethion monoxon, also will be reported in this method with an estimated remark code. Estimated-value compounds, which are ?E-coded? in the data base, do not meet the performance criteria for unqualified quantification, but are retained in the method because the compounds are important owing to high use or potential environmental effects and because analytical performance has been consistent and reproducible.

  16. Genetic factors potentially reducing fitness cost of organophosphate-insensitive acetylcholinesterase(s) in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acaricidal activity of organophosphate (OP) and carbamate acaricides is believed to result from inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Previous studies in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus demonstrated the presence of three presumptive AChE genes (BmAChEs). Biochemical characterization of re...

  17. ANDROGEN RECEPTOR ANTAGONISM BY THE ORGANOPHOSPHATE INSECTICIDE FENITROTHION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Androgen receptor antagonism by the organophosphate insecticide fenitrothion. Tamura, H., Maness, S.C., Reischmann, K. Dorman, D.C., Gray, L.E., and Gaido, K.W. (2000). Toxicol. Sci.

    Organophosphate insecticides represent one of the most widely used classes of pesticide...

  18. The influence of tomato processing on residues of organochlorine and organophosphate insecticides and their associated dietary risk.

    PubMed

    Reiler, Emilie; Jørs, Erik; Bælum, Jesper; Huici, Omar; Alvarez Caero, Maria Mercedes; Cedergreen, Nina

    2015-09-15

    Due to the increasing food demand, the use of pesticides in agriculture is increasing. Particularly in low income countries poor training among farmers, combined with the use of obsolete pesticides may result in a high risk for the consumers. In this study six organochlorines and five organophosphates were analyzed in 54 samples of tomatoes from small scale farmers in Bolivia. The analyses were done on unprocessed, stored, washed and peeled tomatoes. The cumulated risk associated with consumption of the tomatoes after different storage times and processing treatments was evaluated using the Hazard Index (HI) for acute risk assessment. All 11 pesticides were detected in the analyses although several of them are obsolete and included in the Stockholm convention ratified by Bolivia. The organochlorines were found in the μg pesticide/kg tomato range and below the HI, while the organophosphates were present in the mg pesticide/kg tomato range and most often above the HI. The low organochlorine concentrations were not significantly affected by time or treatment, but storage significantly decreased the concentrations of organophosphates. Washing decreased the initial concentrations to between 53% (malathion) down to 2% (ethyl parathion), while peeling had a larger effect reducing the initial concentrations to between 33% (malathion) and 0.7% (chlorpyriphos). Both the acute and chronic cumulative risk assessment of organophosphates showed a dietary risk for unprocessed tomatoes three days after harvest. For children, also the consumption of washed tomatoes constituted a dietary risk. To reduce the dietary risk of pesticide residues in Bolivia, there is an urgent need of farmer education and introduction of less hazardous pesticides as well as resources for surveillance and enforcement of legislation in order to ensure public health. PMID:25965039

  19. Persistent Cognitive Alterations in Rats after Early Postnatal Exposure to Low Doses of the Organophosphate Pesticide, Diazinon

    PubMed Central

    Timofeeva, Olga A.; Roegge, Cindy S.; Seidler, Frederic J.; Slotkin, Theodore A.; Levin, Edward D.

    2008-01-01

    Background Developmental neurotoxicity of organophosphorous insecticides (OPs) involves multiple mechanisms in addition to cholinesterase inhibition. We have found persisting effects of developmental chlorpyrifos (CPF) and diazinon (DZN) on cholinergic and serotonergic neurotransmitter systems and gene expression as well as behavioral function. Both molecular/neurochemical and behavioral effects of developmental OP exposure have been seen at doses below those which cause appreciable cholinesterase inhibition. Objectives We sought to determine if developmental DZN exposure at doses which do not produce significant acetylcholinesterase inhibition cause cognitive deficits. Methods Rats were exposed to DZN on postnatal days 1-4 at doses (0.5 and 2 mg/kg/d) that span the threshold for cholinesterase inhibition. They were later examined with a cognitive battery tests similar to that used with CPF. Results In the T-maze DZN caused significant hyperactivity in the initial trials of the session, but not later. In a longer assessment of locomotor activity no DZN-induced changes were seen over a 1-hour session. Prepulse inhibition was reduced by DZN exposure selectively in males vs. females; DZN eliminated the sex difference present in controls. In the radial maze, the lower but not higher DZN dose significantly impaired spatial learning. This has previously been seen with CPF as well. The lower dose DZN group also showed significantly greater sensitivity to the memory-impairing effects of the anticholinergic drug scopolamine. Conclusions Neonatal DZN exposure below the threshold for appreciable cholinesterase inhibition caused neurocognitive deficits in adulthood. The addition of some inhibition of AChE with a higher dose reversed the cognitive impairment. This non-monotonic dose-effect function has also been seen with neurochemical effects. Some of the DZN effects on cognition resemble those seen earlier for CPF, some differ. Our data suggest that DZN and CPF affect

  20. Organophosphate and carbamate poisoning.

    PubMed

    King, Andrew M; Aaron, Cynthia K

    2015-02-01

    Organophosphates (OPs) and carbamates have a wide variety of applications, most commonly as pesticides used to eradicate agricultural pests or control populations of disease-carrying vectors. Some OP and carbamates have therapeutic indications such as physostigmine. Certain organophosphorus compounds, known as nerve agents, have been employed in chemical warfare and terrorism incidents. Both classes inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzymes, leading to excess acetylcholine accumulation at nerve terminals. In the setting of toxicity from either agent class, clinical syndromes result from excessive nicotinic and muscarinic neurostimulation. The toxic effects from OPs and carbamates differ with respect to reversibility, subacute, and chronic effects. Decontamination, meticulous supportive care, aggressive antimuscarinic therapy, seizure control, and administration of oximes are cornerstones of management.

  1. Pesticides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherma, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    This review is devoted to methods for the determination of residues of pesticides and some related industrial chemicals. Topics include: residue methods, sampling, chromatography, organochlorine pesticides, organophosphorus pesticides, carbamate insecticides, herbicides, fungicides, pyrethrins, fumigants, and related chemicals. (MVL)

  2. A visible light photoelectrochemical biosensor coupling enzyme-inhibition for organophosphates monitoring based on a dual-functional Cd(0.5)Zn(0.5)S-reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Cai, Jianrong; Huan, Juan; Dong, Xiaoya; Wang, Chengke; Qiu, Baijing; Wang, Kun

    2014-03-01

    A novel visible light photoelectrochemical (PEC) platform coupled with enzyme-inhibition for rapid and sensitive determination of organophosphates (OPs) was constructed based on a dual-functional Cd0.5Zn0.5S-reduced graphene oxide (Cd0.5Zn0.5S-rGO) nanocomposite. Due to the inherent biocompatibility of the Cd0.5Zn0.5S-rGO nanocomposite, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) immobilized on the Cd0.5Zn0.5S-rGO modified electrode can hydrolyze acetylthiocholine chloride into thiocholine, which could increase the photocurrent of the enzyme electrode, and the further inhibition of OPs on the enzyme electrode could decrease the photocurrent response. Based on the notable change in the PEC response of the AChE-Cd0.5Zn0.5S-rGO modified electrode and using Dursban as a model, a simple and effective way for PEC monitoring of OPs is proposed, which showed a wide linear range of 0.001-1 μg mL(-1) with a low detection limit of 0.3 ng mL(-1) (S/N = 3). Moreover, the biosensor was successfully challenged with water samples, demonstrating a new method for rapid and sensitive screening/evaluating exposure to organophosphorus pesticides and other hazardous substances.

  3. Levels of metabolites of organophosphate pesticides, phthalates, and bisphenol A in pooled urine specimens from pregnant women participating in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).

    PubMed

    Ye, Xibiao; Pierik, Frank H; Angerer, Jürgen; Meltzer, Helle Margrete; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Tiemeier, Henning; Hoppin, Jane A; Longnecker, Matthew P

    2009-09-01

    Concerns about reproductive and developmental health risks of exposure to organophosphate (OP) pesticides, phthalates, and bisphenol A (BPA) among the general population are increasing. Six dialkyl phosphate (DAP) metabolites, 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy), BPA, and fourteen phthalate metabolites were measured in 10 pooled urine samples representing 110 pregnant women who participated in the Norwegian Mother and Child Birth Cohort (MoBa) study in 2004. Daily intakes were estimated from urinary data and compared with reference doses (RfDs) and daily tolerable intakes (TDIs). The MoBa women had a higher mean BPA concentration (4.50 microg/L) than the pregnant women in the Generation R Study (Generation R) in the Netherlands and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) in the United States. The mean concentration of total DAP metabolites (24.20 microg/L) in MoBa women was higher than that in NHANES women but lower than that in Generation R women. The diethyl phthalate metabolite mono-ethyl phthalate (MEP) was the dominant phthalate metabolite in all three studies, with the mean concentrations of greater than 300 microg/L. The MoBa and Generation R women had higher mean concentrations of mono-n-butyl phthalate (MnBP) and mono-isobutyl phthalate (MiBP) than the NHANES women. The estimated average daily intakes of BPA, chlorpyrifos/chlorpyrifos-methyl and phthalates in MoBa (and the other two studies) were below the RfDs and TDIs. The higher levels of metabolites in the MoBa participants may have been from intake via pesticide residues in food (organophosphates), consumption of canned food, especially fish/seafood (BPA), and use of personal care products (selected phthalates).

  4. Pesticides

    MedlinePlus

    ... or cause harm to crops, people, or animals. Pesticides can help get rid of them. Pesticides are not just insect killers. They also include ... mildew, germs, and more. Many household products contain pesticides. Pesticides can protect your health by killing germs, ...

  5. Exposure to an organophosphate pesticide, individually or in combination with other Gulf War agents, impairs synaptic integrity and neuronal differentiation, and is accompanied by subtle microvascular injury in a mouse model of Gulf War agent exposure.

    PubMed

    Ojo, Joseph O; Abdullah, Laila; Evans, James; Reed, Jon Mike; Montague, Hannah; Mullan, Michael J; Crawford, Fiona C

    2014-04-01

    Gulf War illness (GWI) is a currently untreatable multi-symptom disorder experienced by 1990-1991 Persian Gulf War (GW) veterans. The characteristic hallmarks of GWI include cognitive dysfunction, tremors, migraine, and psychological disturbances such as depression and anxiety. Meta-analyses of epidemiological studies have consistently linked these symptomatic profiles to the combined exposure of GW agents such as organophosphate-based and pyrethroid-based pesticides (e.g. chlorpyrifos (CPF) and permethrin (PER) respectively) and the prophylactic use of pyridostigmine bromide (PB) as a treatment against neurotoxins. Due to the multi-symptomatic presentation of this illness and the lack of available autopsy tissue from GWI patients, very little is currently known about the distinct early pathological profile implicated in GWI (including its influence on synaptic function and aspects of neurogenesis). In this study, we used preclinical models of GW agent exposure to investigate whether 6-month-old mice exposed to CPF alone, or a combined dose of CPF, PB and PER daily for 10 days, demonstrate any notable pathological changes in hippocampal, cortical (motor, piriform) or amygdalar morphometry. We report that at an acute post-exposure time point (after 3 days), both exposures resulted in the impairment of synaptic integrity (reducing synaptophysin levels) in the CA3 hippocampal region and altered neuronal differentiation in the dentate gyrus (DG), demonstrated by a significant reduction in doublecortin positive cells. Both exposures also significantly increased astrocytic GFAP immunoreactivity in the piriform cortex, motor cortex and the basolateral amygdala and this was accompanied by an increase in (basal) brain acetylcholine (ACh) levels. There was no evidence of microglial activation or structural deterioration of principal neurons in these regions following exposure to CPF alone or in combination with PB and PER. Evidence of subtle microvascular injury was

  6. Adverse Respiratory Health and Hematological Alterations among Agricultural Workers Occupationally Exposed to Organophosphate Pesticides: A Cross-Sectional Study in North India

    PubMed Central

    Fareed, Mohd.; Pathak, Manoj Kumar; Bihari, Vipin; Kamal, Ritul; Srivastava, Anup Kumar; Kesavachandran, Chandrasekharan Nair

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-protective work practices followed by farm workers during spraying of pesticides lead to occupational exposure among them. Objective This study is designed to explore the respiratory health and hematological profile of agricultural workers occupationally exposed to OP pesticides. Materials and Methods A cross sectional study was undertaken among 166 pesticide sprayers working in mango orchards of Lucknow district in North India compared with 77 controls to assess the respiratory illness, lung functions, cholinesterase levels and hematological profile. A questionnaire based survey and clinical examination for respiratory health were conducted among study subjects. Lung function test was conducted among study subjects by using spirometer. Cholinesterase level as biomarker of OP pesticides and hematological profile of study subjects were investigated in the laboratory by following the standard protocols. Results Overall respiratory morbidity observed among exposed subjects was 36.75%. Symptoms for respiratory illness like dry cough, productive cough, wheezing, irritation of throat and blood stained sputum were found to be significantly more (p<0.05) among pesticide sprayers than controls. Lung function parameters viz. PEFR, FEV1, %PEFR predicted, %FEV1 predicted and FEV1/FVC were found to be significantly decreased (p<0.05) among pesticide sprayers as compared to controls. Exposure wise distribution of respiratory illness and lung functions among pesticide sprayers show that the exposure duration significantly elevates (p<0.05) the respiratory problems and significantly decreases (p<0.001) lung functions among pesticide sprayers. Activities of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase were found to be significantly depleted (p<0.001) among pesticide sprayers as compared to controls which show the exposure of OP pesticides among them. The hematological profile viz. RBC, WBC, monocytes, neutrophils, MCV, MCH, MCHC and platelet count were

  7. Pesticides

    MedlinePlus

    ... and rats. Because of the widespread use of agricultural chemicals in food production, people are exposed to ... effects of these pesticide residues. Results from the Agricultural Health Study, an ongoing study of pesticide exposures ...

  8. Evaluation of vegetable production management practices to reduce the ecological risk of pesticides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of agricultural management practices to reduce the ecological risks of pesticides was evaluated. Risk quotients, a mathematical description of the relationship between exposure and toxicity, and hazard ratings, a rank of potential risk of pesticides to aquatic environments, were calculat...

  9. Reducing the pollution risk of pesticide using nano networks induced by irradiation and hydrothermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao; Liu, Zuojun; Zhang, Guilong; Qiu, Guannan; Zhong, Naiqin; Wu, Lifang; Cai, Dongqing; Wu, Zhengyan

    2015-01-01

    Traditional pesticides (TP) often do not adhere tightly to crop foliage. They can easily enter the surrounding environment through precipitation and volatilization. This can result in the pollution of the surrounding soil, water, and air. To reduce pesticide pollution, we developed a loss-control pesticide (LCP) by adding attapulgite with a nano networks structure fabricated using high energy electron beam (HEEB) irradiation and hydrothermal treatment to TP. HEEB irradiation effectively dispersed originally aggregated attapulgite through modified thermal, charge, and physical effects. Hydrothermal treatment further enhanced the dispersion of attapulgite to form nano porous networks via thermal and wet expansion effects, which are beneficial for pesticide binding. An LCP has improved retention on crop leaf surfaces. It has a higher adhesion capacity, reduced leaching and volatilization, and extended residual activity compared with the TP formulation. The treatment increases the residual activity of pesticides on crop foliage and decreases environmental pollution.

  10. Managing pesticide chronic health risks: U.S. policies.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Lynn R

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of U.S. government pesticide risk management efforts over time and in recent years, relevant to chronic health risks of pesticides. Pesticides are in widespread usage in the U.S. With hundreds of active ingredients and thousands of products on the market, management of pesticide risks has been a daunting challenge. The first legislation providing federal authority for regulating pesticides was enacted in 1910. With the establishment of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 1970 and amendments to the pesticide law in 1972, the federal government was for the first time given the authority to regulate health and environmental risks of pesticides. However, older pesticide risks were not addressed until legislation was enacted in 1988, requiring "reregistration" and 1996, requiring that pesticide food standards are safe for children. In result, the U.S. has seen an expansion of development of pesticide products that are registered as "reduced risk" or are biologicals. Additionally a large number of older pesticides have been cancelled or reduced from the market and/or from individual food uses. Through biomonitoring data, the U.S. may now be seeing trends in reduction of exposure to certain pesticides, the organophosphate insecticides. However, pesticide sales data through 2001 do not provide evidence for such trends. PMID:18032337

  11. Role of paraoxonase 1 (PON1) in organophosphate metabolism: Implications in neurodegenerative diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Androutsopoulos, Vasilis P.; Kanavouras, Konstantinos; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M.

    2011-11-15

    Organophosphate pesticides are a class of compounds that are widely used in agricultural and rural areas. Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a phase-I enzyme that is involved in the hydrolysis of organophosphate esters. Environmental poisoning by organophosphate compounds has been the main driving force of previous research on PON1 enzymes. Recent discoveries in animal models have revealed the important role of the enzyme in lipid metabolism. However although PON1 function is well established in experimental models, the contribution of PON1 in neurodegenerative diseases remains unclear. In this minireview we summarize the involvement of PON1 genotypes in the occurrence of Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. A brief overview of latest epidemiological studies, regarding the two most important PON1 coding region polymorphisms PON1-L55M and PON1-Q192R is presented. Positive and negative associations of PON1 with disease occurrence are reported. Notably the MM and RR alleles contribute a risk enhancing effect for the development of some neurodegenerative diseases, which may be explained by the reduced lipoprotein free radical scavenging activity that may give rise to neuronal damage, through distinct mechanism. Conflicting findings that fail to support this postulate may represent the human population ethnic heterogeneity, different sample size and environmental parameters affecting PON1 status. We conclude that further epidemiological studies are required in order to address the exact contribution of PON1 genome in combination with organophosphate exposure in populations with neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Role of genetic polymorphisms of CYP1A1, CYP3A5, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, and PON1 in the modulation of DNA damage in workers occupationally exposed to organophosphate pesticides.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satyender; Kumar, Vivek; Vashisht, Kapil; Singh, Priyanka; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Rautela, Rajender Singh; Grover, Shyam Sunder; Rawat, Devendra Singh; Pasha, Syed Tazeen; Jain, Sudhir Kumar; Rai, Arvind

    2011-11-15

    Organophosphate pesticides (OPs) are primarily metabolized by several xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (XMEs). Very few studies have explored genetic polymorphisms of XMEs and their association with DNA damage in pesticide-exposed workers. The present study was designed to determine the role of genetic polymorphisms of CYP1A1, CYP3A5, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, and PON1 in the modulation of DNA damage in workers occupationally exposed to OPs. We examined 284 subjects including 150 workers occupationally exposed to OPs and 134 normal healthy controls. The DNA damage was evaluated using the alkaline comet assay and genotyping was done using PCR-RFLP. The results revealed that the PONase activity toward paraoxonase and AChE activity was found significantly lowered in workers as compared to control subjects (p<0.001). Workers showed significantly higher DNA damage compared to control subjects (14.37±2.15 vs. 6.24±1.37 tail% DNA, p<0.001). Further, the workers with CYP2D6*3PM and PON1 (QQ and MM) genotypes were found to have significantly higher DNA damage when compared to other genotypes (p<0.05). In addition, significant increase in DNA damage was also observed in workers with concomitant presence of certain CYP2D6 and PON1 (Q192R and L55M) genotypes which need further extensive studies. In conclusion, the results indicate that the PON1 and CYP2D6 genotypes can modulate DNA damage elicited by some OPs possibly through gene-environment interactions.

  13. Transformation of nitroaromatic pesticides under sulfate-reducing condition (SRC)

    SciTech Connect

    Gui, L.; Bouwer, E.J.

    1996-10-01

    Nitroaromatic pesticides are widely used and have been detected in various environments. Little is known about their fate under SRC where H{sub 2}S levels are elevated due to microbial activity. Nitroaromatics are highly susceptible to biotic and abiotic transformation under SRC. The objectives of this research were to evaluate the importance of biotic and abiotic transformation processes and to determine factors affecting transformation rates under SRC. Trifluralin, dicloran, PCNB, and dinoseb were examined. Biotic and abiotic transformation of PCNB and trifluralin occurred rapidly, while dicloran could only be biotically transformed. Dinoseb transformation was affected by bacterial growth conditions (the presence of co-substrates and yeast extract) for biotic transformation and the availability of H{sub 2}S and trace metals for abiotic transformation. Trace metals served as electron mediators. All pesticide transformations followed pseudo-first order kinetics. The initial transformation step appeared to be nitroreduction. This information provides ways to manipulate environmental conditions to enhance anaerobic remediation of nitroaromatic pesticides.

  14. Scenario of organophosphate pollution and toxicity in India: A review.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shardendu; Kaushik, Garima; Villarreal-Chiu, Juan Francisco

    2016-05-01

    The present study on organophosphate deals with the reports on pollution and toxicity cases throughout India. The use of pesticides was introduced in India during the 1960s which are now being used on a large scale and represents the common feature of Indian agriculture. Use of organophosphates as a pesticide came as an alternative to chlorinated hydrocarbons due to their easy degradability. Although these xenobiotics degrade under natural condition, their residues have been detected in soil, sediments, and water due to their non-regulated usage practice. The over-reliance on pesticides has not only threatened our environment but contaminations of organophosphate residues have been also detected in certain agricultural products like tea, sugars, vegetables, and fruits throughout India. This paper highlights many of the cases where different organophosphates have been detected exceeding their respective MRL values. Some organophosphates detected are so hazardous that even WHO has listed them in class 1a and class 1b hazardous group. Presence of their residues in blood, milk, honey, and tissues of human and animals revealed their excessive use and bioaccumulating capabilities. Their intentional or unintentional uptake is causing thousands of deaths and severity each year. Most of the toxicity cases presented here are due to their uptake during a suicidal attempt. This shows how easily these harmful substances are available in the market. PMID:26916265

  15. Probiotic lactobacilli: a potential prophylactic treatment for reducing pesticide absorption in humans and wildlife.

    PubMed

    Trinder, M; Bisanz, J E; Burton, J P; Reid, G

    2015-01-01

    Numerous pesticides are used in agriculture, gardening, and wildlife-control. Despite their intended toxicity to pests, these compounds can also cause harm to wildlife and humans due to their ability to potentially bioaccumulate, leach into soils, and persist in the environment. Humans and animals are commonly exposed to these compounds through agricultural practices and consumption of contaminated foods and water. Pesticides can cause a range of adverse effects in humans ranging from minor irritation, to endocrine or nervous system disruption, cancer, or even death. A convenient and cost-effective method to reduce unavoidable pesticide absorption in humans and wildlife could be the use of probiotic lactobacilli. Lactobacillus is a genus of Gram-positive gut commensal bacteria used in the production of functional foods, such as yoghurt, cheese, sauerkraut and pickles, as well as silage for animal feed. Preliminary in vitro experiments suggested that lactobacilli are able to degrade some pesticides. Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1-supplemented yoghurt reduced the bioaccumulation of mercury and arsenic in pregnant women and children. A similar study is warranted to test if this approach can reduce pesticide absorption in vivo, given that the lactobacilli can also attenuate reactive oxygen production, enhance gastrointestinal barrier function, reduce inflammation, and modulate host xenobiotic metabolism. PMID:26123785

  16. Probiotic lactobacilli: a potential prophylactic treatment for reducing pesticide absorption in humans and wildlife.

    PubMed

    Trinder, M; Bisanz, J E; Burton, J P; Reid, G

    2015-01-01

    Numerous pesticides are used in agriculture, gardening, and wildlife-control. Despite their intended toxicity to pests, these compounds can also cause harm to wildlife and humans due to their ability to potentially bioaccumulate, leach into soils, and persist in the environment. Humans and animals are commonly exposed to these compounds through agricultural practices and consumption of contaminated foods and water. Pesticides can cause a range of adverse effects in humans ranging from minor irritation, to endocrine or nervous system disruption, cancer, or even death. A convenient and cost-effective method to reduce unavoidable pesticide absorption in humans and wildlife could be the use of probiotic lactobacilli. Lactobacillus is a genus of Gram-positive gut commensal bacteria used in the production of functional foods, such as yoghurt, cheese, sauerkraut and pickles, as well as silage for animal feed. Preliminary in vitro experiments suggested that lactobacilli are able to degrade some pesticides. Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1-supplemented yoghurt reduced the bioaccumulation of mercury and arsenic in pregnant women and children. A similar study is warranted to test if this approach can reduce pesticide absorption in vivo, given that the lactobacilli can also attenuate reactive oxygen production, enhance gastrointestinal barrier function, reduce inflammation, and modulate host xenobiotic metabolism.

  17. Role of genetic polymorphisms of CYP1A1, CYP3A5, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, and PON1 in the modulation of DNA damage in workers occupationally exposed to organophosphate pesticides

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Satyender; Kumar, Vivek; Vashisht, Kapil; Singh, Priyanka; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Rautela, Rajender Singh; Grover, Shyam Sunder; Rawat, Devendra Singh; Pasha, Syed Tazeen; Jain, Sudhir Kumar; Rai, Arvind

    2011-11-15

    Organophosphate pesticides (OPs) are primarily metabolized by several xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (XMEs). Very few studies have explored genetic polymorphisms of XMEs and their association with DNA damage in pesticide-exposed workers. The present study was designed to determine the role of genetic polymorphisms of CYP1A1, CYP3A5, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, and PON1 in the modulation of DNA damage in workers occupationally exposed to OPs. We examined 284 subjects including 150 workers occupationally exposed to OPs and 134 normal healthy controls. The DNA damage was evaluated using the alkaline comet assay and genotyping was done using PCR-RFLP. The results revealed that the PONase activity toward paraoxonase and AChE activity was found significantly lowered in workers as compared to control subjects (p < 0.001). Workers showed significantly higher DNA damage compared to control subjects (14.37 {+-} 2.15 vs. 6.24 {+-} 1.37 tail% DNA, p < 0.001). Further, the workers with CYP2D6*3 PM and PON1 (QQ and MM) genotypes were found to have significantly higher DNA damage when compared to other genotypes (p < 0.05). In addition, significant increase in DNA damage was also observed in workers with concomitant presence of certain CYP2D6 and PON1 (Q192R and L55M) genotypes which need further extensive studies. In conclusion, the results indicate that the PON1 and CYP2D6 genotypes can modulate DNA damage elicited by some OPs possibly through gene-environment interactions. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Role of CYP1A1, CYP3A5, CYP2C, CYP2D6 and PON1 genotypes on DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Workers exposed to some OPs demonstrated increased DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CYP2D6 *3 PM and PON1 (Q192R and L55M) genotypes are associated with DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concomitant presence of certain CYP2D6 and PON1 genotypes can increase DNA damage.

  18. Persistence of selected organophosphate and carbamate insecticides in waters from a coastal watershed.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, Svetlana; Gan, Jianying; Haver, Darren L; Kabashima, John N

    2004-11-01

    Organophosphate and carbamate compounds are among the most widely used pesticides. Contamination of surface water by these compounds is of concern because of potential toxicity to aquatic organisms, especially those at lower trophic levels. In this study we evaluated the persistence of diazinon, chlorpyrifos, malathion, and carbaryl in waters from various sites in the Newport Bay-San Diego Creek watershed in southern California (USA). The persistence of diazinon and chlorpyrifos was much longer than that of malathion or carbaryl and was further prolonged in seawater. Microbial degradation contributed significantly to the dissipation of diazinon and chlorpyrifos in freshwater, but was inhibited in seawater, leading to increased persistence. In contrast, degradation of malathion and carbaryl was rapid and primarily abiotic. A greater temperature dependence was observed for carbaryl degradation in all waters and for diazinon degradation in freshwater. The interactions of pesticide persistence with water location, temperature, and type of pesticides suggest that site- and compound-specific information is needed when evaluating the overall ecotoxicological risks of pesticide pollution in a watershed. Because the persistence of diazinon and chlorpyrifos may increase significantly in seawater, mitigation should occur before the pesticides reach seawater. The relatively short persistence of these compounds in freshwater suggests that practices aimed at extending residence time (e.g., diversion to wetlands) may effectively reduce pesticide output to downstream water bodies.

  19. Mitigation strategies to reduce pesticide inputs into ground- and surface water and their effectiveness; a review.

    PubMed

    Reichenberger, Stefan; Bach, Martin; Skitschak, Adrian; Frede, Hans-Georg

    2007-10-01

    In this paper, the current knowledge on mitigation strategies to reduce pesticide inputs into surface water and groundwater, and their effectiveness when applied in practice is reviewed. Apart from their effectiveness in reducing pesticide inputs into ground- and surface water, the mitigation measures identified in the literature are evaluated with respect to their practicability. Those measures considered both effective and feasible are recommended for implementing at the farm and catchment scale. Finally, recommendations for modelling are provided using the identified reduction efficiencies. Roughly 180 publications directly dealing with or being somehow related to mitigation of pesticide inputs into water bodies were examined. The effectiveness of grassed buffer strips located at the lower edges of fields has been demonstrated. However, this effectiveness is very variable, and the variability cannot be explained by strip width alone. Riparian buffer strips are most probably much less effective than edge-of-field buffer strips in reducing pesticide runoff and erosion inputs into surface waters. Constructed wetlands are promising tools for mitigating pesticide inputs via runoff/erosion and drift into surface waters, but their effectiveness still has to be demonstrated for weakly and moderately sorbing compounds. Subsurface drains are an effective mitigation measure for pesticide runoff losses from slowly permeable soils with frequent waterlogging. For the pathways drainage and leaching, the only feasible mitigation measures are application rate reduction, product substitution and shift of the application date. There are many possible effective measures of spray drift reduction. While sufficient knowledge exists for suggesting default values for the efficiency of single drift mitigation measures, little information exists on the effect of the drift reduction efficiency of combinations of measures. More research on possible interactions between different drift

  20. A derivative photoelectrochemical sensing platform for 4-nitrophenolate contained organophosphates pesticide based on carboxylated perylene sensitized nano-TiO2.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongbo; Li, Jing; Xu, Qin; Yang, Zhanjun; Hu, Xiaoya

    2013-03-01

    A novel visible light sensitized photoelectrochemical sensing platform was constructed based on the perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic acid/titanium dioxide (PTCA/TiO(2)) heterojunction as the photoelectric beacon. PTCA was synthesized via facile steps of hydrolysis and neutralization reaction, and then the PTCA/TiO(2) heterojunction was easily prepared by coating PTCA on nano-TiO(2) surface. The resulting photoelectric beacon was characterized by transmission electron microscope, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, FTIR spectroscopy, and ultraviolet and visible spectrophotometer. Using parathion-methyl as a model, after a simple hydrolyzation process, p-nitrophenol as the hydrolysate of parathion-methyl could be obtained, the fabricated derivative photoelectrochemical sensor showed good performances with a rapid response, instrument simple and portable, low detection limit (0.08 nmol L(-1)) at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3, and good selectivity against other pesticides and possible interferences. It had been successfully applied to the detection of parathion-methyl in green vegetables and the results agreed well with that by GC-MS. This strategy not only extends the application of PTCA, but also presents a simple, economic and novel methodology for photoelectrochemical sensing.

  1. Perspectives of Mothers in Farmworker Households on Reducing the Take-Home Pathway of Pesticide Exposure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Larkin L.; Starks, Helene E.; Meischke, Hendrika; Thompson, Beti

    2009-01-01

    Farmworkers carry pesticide residue home on their clothing, boots, and skin, placing other household members at risk, particularly children. Specific precautions are recommended to reduce this take-home pathway, yet few studies have examined the perspectives of farmworkers and other household members regarding these behaviors and the reasons for…

  2. The investigation of the LED-activated FeFNS-TiO2 nanocatalyst for photocatalytic degradation and mineralization of organophosphate pesticides in water.

    PubMed

    Hossaini, Hiwa; Moussavi, Gholamreza; Farrokhi, Mehrdad

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluated the preparation and characterization of an efficient doped TiO2 as a novel catalyst for degradation of diazinon model pesticide using LED-activated photocatalysis. TiO2 was doped using N, NS, FeNS, and FeFNS. The FeFNS-doped TiO2 showed the highest catalytic activity in LED/photocatalysis. FeFNS-doped TiO2 is a mesoporous nanocrystal powder with a mean pore diameter of 10.2 nm, a specific surface area of 104.4 m(2)/g and a crystallite size of 6.7 nm. LED/photocatalysis using FeFNS-doped TiO2 improved diazinon degradation by 52.3% over that of as-made plain TiO2 at an optimum solution pH of 7. The diazinon degradation in LED/photocatalysis using FeFNS-doped TiO2 increased from 44.8% to 96.3% when the catalyst concentration increased from 25% to 300%at a reaction time of 100 min. The degradation and mineralization of diazinon during LED/photocatalysis with FeFNS-doped TiO2 catalyst followed the pseudo-first-order reaction model with the rate constants of 0.973 h(-1) and 0.541 h(-1), respectively. The FeFNS-doped TiO2 was found to be an efficient catalyst that was photoactivated using UV-LED lamps. LED/photocatalysis with FeFNS-doped TiO2 catalyst is a promising alternative to conventional UV/TiO2photocatalysis for producing free OH radicals for use in the degradation and mineralization of water toxic contaminants.

  3. Perspectives of Mothers in Farmworker Households on Reducing the Take-Home Pathway of Pesticide Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Strong, Larkin L.; Sharks, Helene E.; Meischke, Hendrika; Thompson, Beti

    2014-01-01

    Farmworkers carry pesticide residue home on their clothing, boots, and skin, placing other household members at risk, particularly children. Specific precautions are recommended to reduce this take-home pathway, yet few studies have examined the perspectives of farmworkers and other household members regarding these behaviors and the reasons for or against adoption. The authors conducted semistructured interviews with 37 Mexican/Mexican-American women in farmworker households to explore the family and cultural context in which pesticide safety practices are performed and to identify factors that facilitate or hinder their adoption. Whereas women could describe the take-home pathway, they were less able to connect it with their family’s susceptibility to pesticide exposure. Women experienced difficulty integrating the prevention behaviors into their everyday lives because of competing responsibilities, conflicts with their husbands’ intentions and with cultural health beliefs, perceived lack of control, and community barriers that interfered with women’s motivations. Implications for practice are discussed. PMID:19136611

  4. Acute pesticide poisoning and pesticide registration in Central America.

    PubMed

    Wesseling, Catharina; Corriols, Marianela; Bravo, Viria

    2005-09-01

    The International Code of Conduct on the Distribution and Use of Pesticides of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations has been for 20 years the most acknowledged international initiative for reducing negative impact from pesticide use in developing countries. We analyzed pesticide use and poisoning in Central America, particularly in Costa Rica and Nicaragua, and evaluated whether registration decisions are based on such data, in accordance with the FAO Code. Extensive use of very hazardous pesticides continues in Central America and so do poisonings with organophosphates, carbamates, endosulfan and paraquat as the main causative agents. Central American governments do not carry out or commission scientific risk assessments. Instead, guidelines from international agencies are followed for risk management through the registration process. Documentation of pesticide poisonings during several decades never induced any decision to ban or restrict a pesticide. However, based on the official surveillance systems, in 2000, the ministers of health of the seven Central American countries agreed to ban or restrict twelve of these pesticides. Now, almost 4 years later, restrictions have been implemented in El Salvador and in Nicaragua public debate is ongoing. Chemical and agricultural industries do not withdraw problematic pesticides voluntarily. In conclusion, the registration processes in Central America do not comply satisfactorily with the FAO Code. However, international regulatory guidelines are important in developing countries, and international agencies should strongly extend its scope and influence, limiting industry involvement. Profound changes in international and national agricultural policies, steering towards sustainable agriculture based on non-chemical pest management, are the only way to reduce poisonings.

  5. Acute pesticide poisoning and pesticide registration in Central America

    SciTech Connect

    Wesseling, Catharina . E-mail: cwesseli@una.ac.cr; Corriols, Marianela; Bravo, Viria

    2005-09-01

    The International Code of Conduct on the Distribution and Use of Pesticides of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations has been for 20 years the most acknowledged international initiative for reducing negative impact from pesticide use in developing countries. We analyzed pesticide use and poisoning in Central America, particularly in Costa Rica and Nicaragua, and evaluated whether registration decisions are based on such data, in accordance with the FAO Code. Extensive use of very hazardous pesticides continues in Central America and so do poisonings with organophosphates, carbamates, endosulfan and paraquat as the main causative agents. Central American governments do not carry out or commission scientific risk assessments. Instead, guidelines from international agencies are followed for risk management through the registration process. Documentation of pesticide poisonings during several decades never induced any decision to ban or restrict a pesticide. However, based on the official surveillance systems, in 2000, the ministers of health of the seven Central American countries agreed to ban or restrict twelve of these pesticides. Now, almost 4 years later, restrictions have been implemented in El Salvador and in Nicaragua public debate is ongoing. Chemical and agricultural industries do not withdraw problematic pesticides voluntarily. In conclusion, the registration processes in Central America do not comply satisfactorily with the FAO Code. However, international regulatory guidelines are important in developing countries, and international agencies should strongly extend its scope and influence, limiting industry involvement. Profound changes in international and national agricultural policies, steering towards sustainable agriculture based on non-chemical pest management, are the only way to reduce poisonings.

  6. Effects of reduced-risk pesticides and plant growth regulators on rove beetle (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae) adults.

    PubMed

    Echegaray, Erik R; Cloyd, Raymond A

    2012-12-01

    In many regions, pest management of greenhouse crops relies on the use of biological control agents; however, pesticides are also widely used, especially when dealing with multiple arthropod pests and attempting to maintain high esthetic standards. As such, there is interest in using biological control agents in conjunction with chemical control. However, the prospects of combining natural enemies and pesticides are not well known in many systems. The rove beetle, Atheta coriaria (Kraatz), is a biological control agent mainly used against fungus gnats (Bradysia spp.). This study evaluated the effects of reduced-risk pesticides and plant growth regulators on A. coriaria adult survival, development, and prey consumption under laboratory conditions. Rove beetle survival was consistently higher when adults were released 24 h after rather than before applying pesticides. The pesticides acetamiprid, lambda-cyhalothrin, and cyfluthrin were harmful to rove beetle adults, whereas Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) Vuillemin, azadirachtin, and organic oils (cinnamon oils, rosemary oil, thyme oil, and clove oil) were nontoxic to A. coriaria adults. Similarly, the plant growth regulators acymidol, paclobutrazol, and uniconazole were not harmful to rove beetle adults. In addition, B. bassiana, azadirachtin, kinoprene, organic oils, and the plant growth regulators did not negatively affect A. coriaria development. However, B. bassiana did negatively affect adult prey consumption. This study demonstrated that A. coriaria may not be used when applying the pesticides, acetamiprid, lambda-cyhalothrin, and cyfluthrin, whereas organic oils, B. bassiana, azadirachtin, and the plant growth regulators evaluated may be used in conjunction with A. coriaria adults. As such, these compounds may be used in combination with A. coriaria in greenhouse production systems.

  7. [Acute poisoning by pesticides in children].

    PubMed

    Leveau, P

    2016-07-01

    Acute pesticide poisoning in children is rare but potentially serious. Some clinical patterns (toxidromes) are suggestive of the drug class: cholinergic crisis for organophosphate or carbamate insecticides; neurological syndrome for rodenticides; digestive and respiratory syndrome for herbicides. Treatment is symptomatic and only a few patients are treated with an antidote: atropine and pralidoxime for organophosphate insecticides, vitamin K for anticoagulant rodenticides. PMID:27266642

  8. A site-specific farm-scale GIS approach for reducing groundwater contamination by pesticides

    SciTech Connect

    Mulla, D.J.; Perillo, C.A.; Cogger, C.G.

    1996-05-01

    It has been proposed to vary pesticide applications by patterns in surface organic C to reduce the potential for contamination of groundwater. To evaluate the feasibility of this {open_quotes}precision farming{close_quotes} approach, data for carbofuran concentrations from 57 locations sampled to a depth of 180 cm were fit to the convective-dispersive equation. Fitted values for pore water velocity (v) ranged from 0.17 to 1.92 cm d{sup -1}, with a mean of 0.68 cm d{sup -1}. Values for dispersion (D) ranged from 0.29 to 13.35 cm{sup 2} d{sup -1}, with a mean of 2.57. With this data, risks of pesticide leaching were estimated at each location using the attenuation factor (AF) model, and a dispersion based leached factor (LF) model. Using the AF model gave two locations with a very high pesticide leaching risk, 6 with a low risk, and 2 with no risk. Using the LF model, 6 had a high risk, 13 had a medium risk, 18 had a low risk, and 20 had no risk. Pesticide leaching risks were not correlated with any measured surface soil properties. Much of the variability in leaching risk was because of velocity variations, so it would be incorrect to assume that surface organic C content controls the leaching risk. 30 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  9. Microbiological and biotechnological aspects of metabolism of carbamates and organophosphates.

    PubMed

    Chapalamadugu, S; Chaudhry, G R

    1992-01-01

    Several carbamate and organophosphate compounds are used to control a wide variety of insect pests, weeds, and disease-transmitting vectors. These chemicals were introduced to replace the recalcitrant and hazardous chlorinated pesticides. Although newly introduced pesticides were considered to be biodegradable, some of them are highly toxic and their residues are found in certain environments. In addition, degradation of some of the carbamates generates metabolites that are also toxic. In general, hydrolysis of the carbamate and organophosphates yields less toxic metabolites compared with the metabolites produced from oxidation. Although microorganisms capable of degrading many of these pesticides have been isolated, knowledge about the biochemical pathways and respective genes involved in the degradation is sparse. Recently, a great deal of interest in the mechanisms of biodegradation of carbamate and organophosphate compounds has been shown because (1) an efficient mineralization of the pesticides used for insect control could eliminate the problems of environmental pollution, (2) a balance between degradation and efficacy of pesticides could result in safer application and effective insect control, and (3) knowledge about the mechanisms of biodegradation could help to deal with situations leading to the generation of toxic metabolites and bioremediation of polluted environments. In addition, advances in genetic engineering and biotechnology offer great potential to exploit the degradative properties of microorganisms in order to develop bioremediation strategies and novel applications such as development of economic plants tolerant to herbicides. In this review, recent advances in the biochemical and genetic aspects of microbial degradation of carbamate and organophosphates are discussed and areas in need of further investigation identified.

  10. [Pesticide poisoning].

    PubMed

    Ferrer, A

    2003-01-01

    Pesticides are one of the families of chemical products most widely used by man. They have been used above all to combat pests because of their effect on harvests and as vectors of transmissible diseases. Pesticides can be classified according to their use (insecticides, fungicides, herbicides, raticides em leader ) or by their chemical family (organochlorates, organophosphates, carbamates, pyrethroids, Bipyridilium compounds, inorganic salts em leader ). All of them are biocides, which normally implies a high toxicity for humans, which has been a cause for concern since the mid-XX century due to the widespread and indiscriminate use of these products. Exposure to pesticides can have effects that are acute, chronic and long-term. Some organochlorate compounds (such as DDT) were the first to be used in massive fumigations to fight malaria and have had to be banned because of their capacity for bioaccumulation and environmental persistence. The danger represented by the widespread presence of these agents has been demonstrated in numerous episodes of human toxic epidemics, producers of a high morbidity/mortality, described for nearly all chemical families: organochlorate insecticides and fungicides, organophosphate and carbamate insecticides, organomercurial fungicides and inorganic salts. These episodes have above all been caused through the ingestion of foodstuffs and in the occupational field. Other causes of health concern are their carcinogenic capacity and occasional reproductive alterations. The principal characteristics of some of the most relevant families are presented. PMID:12813483

  11. Environmental impact of pesticides in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Sameeh A

    2008-01-01

    The first use of petroleum-derived pesticides in Egyptian agriculture was initiated in 1950. Early applications consisted of distributing insecticidal dusts containing DDT/BHC/S onto cotton fields. This practice was followed by use of toxaphene until 1961. Carbamates, organophosphates, and synthetic pyrethroids were subsequently used, mainly for applications to cotton. In addition to the use of about 1 million metric tons (t) of pesticides in the agricultural sector over a 50-yr period, specific health and environmental problems are documented in this review. Major problems represented and discussed in this review are human poisoning, incidental toxicity to farm animals, insect pest resistance, destruction of beneficial parasites and predators, contamination of food by pesticide residues, and pollution of environmental ecosystems. Several reports reveal that chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticide residues are still detectable in several environmental compartments; however, these residues are in decline. Since 1990, there is a growing movement toward reduced consumption of traditional pesticides and a tendency to expand use of biopesticides, including "Bt," and plant incorporated protectants (PIPs). On the other hand, DDT and lindane were used for indoor and hygienic purposes as early as 1952. Presently, indoor use of pesticides for pest control is widespread in Egypt. Accurate information concerning the types and amounts of Egyptian household pesticide use, or numbers of poisoning or contamination incidents, is unavailable. Generally, use of indoor pesticides is inadequately managed. The results of a survey of Egyptian farmers' attitudes toward pesticides and their behavior in using them garnered new insights as to how pesticides should be better controlled and regulated in Egypt.

  12. An unusual case of homicide by use of repeated administration of organophosphate insecticides.

    PubMed

    De Letter, E A; Cordonnier, J A C M; Piette, M H A

    2002-03-01

    We present an unusual murder case by use of repeated administration of organophosphate insecticides. A 49-year-old woman suffering from mental retardation, epileptic fits and acromegaly was poisoned by her husband. At first, her death was considered as a 'sudden and unexpected' natural death. Abdominal abscesses of pancreatic origin found at autopsy were compatible with repeated administration of pesticides with anticholinergic action. In her medical history at least one episode consistent with an organophosphate intoxication was retrieved. Thorough inquiry revealed that the victim had ingested phosphamidon and/or omethoate orally. Organophosphate intoxication should be considered when unexplained neurological symptoms are associated with pancreatic disturbances.

  13. Use of farming and agro-industrial wastes as versatile barriers in reducing pesticide leaching through soil columns.

    PubMed

    Fenoll, J; Ruiz, E; Flores, P; Vela, N; Hellín, P; Navarro, S

    2011-03-15

    Increased interest has been recently focused on assessing the influence of the addition of organic wastes related to movement of pesticides in soils of low organic matter (OM) content. This study reports the effect of two different amendments, animal manure (composted sheep manure) and agro-industrial waste (spent coffee grounds) on the mobility of 10 pesticides commonly used for pepper protection on a clay-loam soil (OM = 0.22%). The tested compounds were azoxystrobin, cyprodinil, fludioxonil, hexaconazole, kresoxim-methyl, pyrimethanil, tebuconazole, and triadimenol (fungicides), pirimicarb (insecticide), and propyzamide (herbicide). Breakthrough curves were obtained from disturbed soil columns. Cumulative curves obtained from unamended soil show a leaching of all pesticides although in different proportions (12-65% of the total mass of compound applied), showing triadimenol and pirimicarb the higher leachability. Significant correlation (r = 0.93, p<0.01) was found between the observed and bibliographical values of GUS index. The addition of the amendments used drastically reduced the movement of the studied pesticides. Only two pesticides were found in leachates from amended soils, pyrimethanil (<1%) for both, and pirimicarb (44%) in the soil amended with spent coffee grounds. A decrease in pesticide leaching was observed with the increase in dissolved organic matter (DOM) of leachates. The results obtained point to the interest in the use of organic wastes in reducing the pollution of groundwater by pesticide drainage.

  14. Reduced birth weight in relation to pesticide mixtures detected in cord blood of full-term infants

    PubMed Central

    Wickerham, Erin L.; Lozoff, Betsy; Shao, Jie; Kaciroti, Niko; Xia, Yankai; Meeker, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has shown that prenatal exposure to pesticides may be associated with decreased fetal growth. The specific pesticides investigated and results reported across studies have been inconsistent, and there is a mounting need for the consideration of mixtures rather than individual agents in studies of health outcomes in relation to environmental exposures. There are also many individual pesticides that have not been investigated in human health studies to date. We conducted a pilot study in rural Zhejiang province, China, measuring 20 non-persistent pesticides (10 insecticides, 6 herbicides, 3 fungicides, and 1 repellant) in umbilical cord blood of 112 full term (>37 weeks) infants. The pesticides detected with the greatest frequency were diethyltoluamide (DEET) (73%), a repellant, and vinclozolin (49%), a fungicide. The samples had detectable concentrations for a mean of 4.6 pesticides (SD=1.9) with a maximum of 10. Adjusting for potential confounders, newborn birth weight was inversely associated with the number of pesticides detected in cord blood (p = 0.04); birth weight decreased by a mean of 37.1 grams (95% CI, −72.5 to −1.8) for each detected pesticide. When assessing relationships by pesticide type, detection of fungicides was also associated with decreased birth weight (adjusted β = −116 grams [95% CI, −212 to −19.2]). For individual pesticides analyzed as dichotomous (detect vs. non-detect) variables, only vinclozolin (adjusted β = −174 grams [95% CI, −312 to −36.3] and acetochlor (adjusted β = −165 grams [95% CI, −325 to −5.7]) were significantly associated with reduced birth weight. No significant associations were seen between birth weight and individual pesticides assessed as continuous or 3-level ordinal variables. Our findings from this pilot investigation suggest that exposure to fungicides may adversely impact fetal growth. Exposure to mixtures of multiple pesticides is also of concern and should be explored

  15. A community-based participatory worksite intervention to reduce pesticide exposures to farmworkers and their families.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Alicia L; Chevrier, Jonathan; Bradman, Asa; Camacho, José; López, Jesús; Kavanagh-Baird, Geri; Minkler, Meredith; Eskenazi, Brenda

    2009-11-01

    We evaluated a community-based participatory research worksite intervention intended to improve farmworkers' behaviors at work and after work to reduce occupational and take-home pesticide exposures. The workers received warm water and soap for hand washing, gloves, coveralls, and education. Self-reported assessments before and after the intervention revealed that glove use, wearing clean work clothes, and hand washing at the midday break and before going home improved significantly. Some behaviors, such as hand washing before eating and many targeted after-work behaviors, did not improve, indicating a need for additional intervention. PMID:19890160

  16. Neurotoxicity of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Keifer, Matthew C; Firestone, Jordan

    2007-01-01

    Several pesticides such as organophosphates, carbamates and the organochlorine pesticides directly target nervous tissue as their mechanism of toxicity. In several others, such as the fumigants, the nervous system is affected by toxicological mechanisms that diffusely affect most or all tissues in the body. Both the central and peripheral nervous system are involved in the acute toxidromes of many pesticides resulting in acute short-term effects. There is strong human epidemiological evidence for persistent nervous system damage following acute intoxication with several important pesticide groups such as organophosphates and certain fumigants. However, whether persistent nervous system damage follows chronic low-level exposure to pesticides in adults (particularly organophosphpates), and whether in utero and/or early childhood exposure leads to persistent nervous system damage, is a subject of study at present. Parkinson's Disease, one of the most common chronic central nervous system diseases, has been linked to pesticide exposure in some studies, but other studies have failed to find an association. Several new pesticidal chemicals such as the neo-nicotinoids and fipronil have central nervous system effects, but only case reports are available to date on acute human intoxications with several of these. Little data are yet available on whether long-term effects result from these chemicals. Several ongoing or recently completed studies should add valuable insight into the effects of pesticides on the human nervous system particularly the effect of low-dose, chronic exposure both in adults and children.

  17. Biosensor based on Prussian blue nanocubes/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite for detection of organophosphorus pesticides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Aidong; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-07-13

    We demonstrate a facile procedure to efficiently prepare Prussian blue nanocubes/reduced graphene oxide (PBNCs/rGO) nanocomposite by directly mixing Fe3+ and [Fe(CN)6]3 in the presence of GO in polyethyleneimine aqueous solution, resulting in a novel acetylcholinesterase (AChE) biosensor for detection of organophosphorus pesticides (OPs). The obtained nanocomposite was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalysis. It was clearly observed that the nanosheet has been decorated with cubic PB nanoparticles and nearly all the nanoparticles are distributed uniformly only on the surface of the reduced GO. No isolated PB nanoparticles were observed, indicating the strong interaction between PB nanocubes and the reduced GO and the formation of PBNCs/rGO nanocomposite. The obtained PBNCs/rGO based AChE biosensor make the peak potential shift negatively to 220 mV. The AChE biosensor shows rapid response and high sensitivity for detection of monocrotophos. These results suggest that the PBNCs/rGO hybrids nanocomposite exhibited high electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of thiocholine, which lead to the sensitive detection of OP pesticides.

  18. Community uptake of safe storage boxes to reduce self-poisoning from pesticides in rural Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Konradsen, Flemming; Pieris, Ravi; Weerasinghe, Manjula; van der Hoek, Wim; Eddleston, Michael; Dawson, Andrew H

    2007-01-01

    Background Acute poisoning by agricultural pesticides is a well established global public health problem. Keeping pesticides under safe storage is now promoted as a potential way to reduce the number of severe poisoning cases. However, there have been no published studies documenting the feasibility of such an approach. Therefore, the objective of the study presented here was to determine community perceptions and use of in-house safe storage boxes for pesticides in rural Sri Lanka. Methods Boxes with a lock, to be used for the in-house safe storage of pesticides, were distributed to 200 randomly selected farming households in two agricultural communities. A baseline survey determined pesticide storage practices and household characteristics prior to distribution. The selected households were encouraged to make use of the box at community meetings and during a single visit to each household one month after distribution. No further encouragement was offered. A follow-up survey assessed storage practices seven months into the project. Results Following the distribution of the boxes the community identified a number of benefits including the protection of pesticide containers against exposure from the rain and sun and a reduced risk of theft. Data were analysed for 172 households that reported agricultural use of pesticides at follow-up. Of these, 141 (82%) kept pesticides in the house under lock against 3 (2%) at baseline. As expected, the distribution of boxes significantly reduced the number of households storing pesticides in the field, from 79 (46%) at baseline to 4 (2%) at follow-up. There was a significant increase in the number of households keeping pesticides safe from children between baseline (64%) and seven months after the distribution of boxes (89%). The same was true for adults although less pronounced with 51% at baseline and 66% at follow-up. Conclusion The farming community appreciated the storage boxes and made storage of pesticides safer

  19. Pesticides and oncogenic modulation.

    PubMed

    Vakonaki, Elena; Androutsopoulos, Vasilis P; Liesivuori, Jyrki; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2013-05-10

    Pesticides constitute a diverse class of chemicals used for the protection of agricultural products. Several lines of evidence demonstrate that organochlorine and organophosphate pesticides can cause malignant transformation of cells in in vitro and in vivo models. In the current minireview a comprehensive summary of recent in vitro findings is presented along with data reported from human population studies, regarding the impact of pesticide exposure on activation or dysregulation of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Substantial mechanistic work suggests that pesticides are capable of inducing mutations in oncogenes and increase their transcriptional expression in vitro, whereas human population studies indicate associations between pesticide exposure levels and mutation occurrence in cancer-related genes. Further work is required to fully explore the exact mechanisms by which pesticide exposure affects the integrity and normal function of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in human populations.

  20. Pesticides reduce symbiotic efficiency of nitrogen-fixing rhizobia and host plants.

    PubMed

    Fox, Jennifer E; Gulledge, Jay; Engelhaupt, Erika; Burow, Matthew E; McLachlan, John A

    2007-06-12

    Unprecedented agricultural intensification and increased crop yield will be necessary to feed the burgeoning world population, whose global food demand is projected to double in the next 50 years. Although grain production has doubled in the past four decades, largely because of the widespread use of synthetic nitrogenous fertilizers, pesticides, and irrigation promoted by the "Green Revolution," this rate of increased agricultural output is unsustainable because of declining crop yields and environmental impacts of modern agricultural practices. The last 20 years have seen diminishing returns in crop yield in response to increased application of fertilizers, which cannot be completely explained by current ecological models. A common strategy to reduce dependence on nitrogenous fertilizers is the production of leguminous crops, which fix atmospheric nitrogen via symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing rhizobia bacteria, in rotation with nonleguminous crops. Here we show previously undescribed in vivo evidence that a subset of organochlorine pesticides, agrichemicals, and environmental contaminants induces a symbiotic phenotype of inhibited or delayed recruitment of rhizobia bacteria to host plant roots, fewer root nodules produced, lower rates of nitrogenase activity, and a reduction in overall plant yield at time of harvest. The environmental consequences of synthetic chemicals compromising symbiotic nitrogen fixation are increased dependence on synthetic nitrogenous fertilizer, reduced soil fertility, and unsustainable long-term crop yields.

  1. Reducing Farmworker Residential Pesticide Exposure: Evaluation of a Lay Health Advisor Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Arcury, Thomas A.; Marín, Antonio; Snively, Beverly M.; Hernández-Pelletier, Mercedes; Quandt, Sara A.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this analysis is to evaluate the effectiveness of a promotora program for teaching women in Latino farmworker families about pesticide safety and increasing pesticide safety behaviors. Volunteer promotoras delivered a pesticide safety curriculum (intervention) and nutrition curriculum (control) to farmworker women residing in western North Carolina and Virginia. Pre- and post-intervention interviews assessed differences in delivery of the intervention, recognition of the intervention, pesticide knowledge, pesticide exposures behaviors, and integrated pest management behaviors. Participants in the intervention group reported significantly more receipt of pesticide education and greater recognition of the key messages. However, their knowledge, pesticide exposure behaviors, and integrated pest management behaviors did not change. A more structured program is needed to be sure that the dose of interventions is large enough to overcome educational and cultural characteristics of immigrant communities. Policy changes are needed to address circumstances outside of farmworkers’ control that affect pesticide exposure. PMID:18287581

  2. Sperm viability and gene expression in honey bee queens (Apis mellifera) following exposure to the neonicotinoid insecticide Imidacloprid and the organophosphate Acaricide Coumaphos

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Honey bee population declines are a global concern. Numerous factors appear to cause the decline including parasites, pathogens, malnutrition and pesticides. Residues of the organophosphate acaricide coumaphos and the neonicotinoid insecticide imidacloprid, widely used to combat Varroa mites and for...

  3. Mechanisms by which pesticides affect insect immunity.

    PubMed

    James, R R; Xu, J

    2012-02-01

    The current state of knowledge regarding the effect of pesticides on insect immunity is reviewed here. A basic understanding of these interactions is needed for several reasons, including to improve methods for controlling pest insects in agricultural settings, for controlling insect vectors of human diseases, and for reducing mortality in beneficial insects. Bees are particularly vulnerable to sublethal pesticide exposures because they gather nectar and pollen, concentrating environmental toxins in their nests in the process. Pesticides do have effects on immunity. Organophosphates and some botanicals have been found to impact hemocyte number, differentiation, and thus affect phagocytosis. The phenoloxidase cascade and malanization have also been shown to be affected by several insecticides. Many synthetic insecticides increase oxidative stress, and this could have severe impacts on the production of some antimicrobial peptides in insects, but research is needed to determine the actual effects. Pesticides can also affect grooming behaviors, rendering insects more susceptible to disease. Despite laboratory data documenting pesticide/pathogen interactions, little field data is available at the population level.

  4. Management-oriented sensitivity analysis for pesticide transport in watershed-scale water quality modeling using SWAT.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuzhou; Zhang, Minghua

    2009-12-01

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was calibrated for hydrology conditions in an agricultural watershed of Orestimba Creek, California, and applied to simulate fate and transport of two organophosphate pesticides chlorpyrifos and diazinon. The model showed capability in evaluating pesticide fate and transport processes in agricultural fields and instream network. Management-oriented sensitivity analysis was conducted by applied stochastic SWAT simulations for pesticide distribution. Results of sensitivity analysis identified the governing processes in pesticide outputs as surface runoff, soil erosion, and sedimentation in the study area. By incorporating sensitive parameters in pesticide transport simulation, effects of structural best management practices (BMPs) in improving surface water quality were demonstrated by SWAT modeling. This study also recommends conservation practices designed to reduce field yield and in-stream transport capacity of sediment, such as filter strip, grassed waterway, crop residue management, and tailwater pond to be implemented in the Orestimba Creek watershed. PMID:19616876

  5. A meta-analysis synthesizing the effects of pesticides on swim speed and activity of aquatic vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Shuman-Goodier, Molly E; Propper, Catherine R

    2016-09-15

    Pesticide contaminants are ubiquitous in aquatic environments and pose a threat to biodiversity. Pesticides also have diverse mechanisms of action that make it difficult to identify impacts on exposed wildlife. Behavioral measures represent an important link between physiological and ecological processes, and are often used to generalize sub-lethal effects of pesticide exposure. In order to bridge the toxicological and behavioral literature, and identify chemical classes that denote the largest threat, we conducted a meta-analysis summarizing the effects of pesticides on swim speed and activity of aquatic vertebrates. We found that exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of pesticides reduced the swim speed of exposed amphibians and fish by 35%, and reduced overall activity by 72%. There were also differences in the magnitude of this effect across chemical classes, which likely reflect underlying physiological processes. Pyrethroids, carbamates, and organophosphates all produced a large decrease in swim speed, where as phosphonoglycines and triazines showed no overall effect. Pyrethroids, carbamates, organophosphates, organochlorines, and organotins also produced a large decrease in activity, while phosphonoglycines had no overall effect, and triazines had the opposite effect of increasing activity. Our results indicate that even sub-lethal concentrations of pesticides have a strong effect on critical behaviors of aquatic vertebrates, which can affect fitness and alter species interactions. We expect our synthesis can be used to identify chemical classes producing the largest sub-lethal effects for further research and management. PMID:27261557

  6. Biosensor based on Prussian blue nanocubes/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite for detection of organophosphorus pesticides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Aidong; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-08-01

    We demonstrate a facile procedure to efficiently prepare Prussian blue nanocubes/reduced graphene oxide (PBNCs/rGO) nanocomposite by directly mixing Fe(3+) and [Fe(CN)(6)]((3)-) in the presence of GO in polyethyleneimine aqueous solution, resulting in a novel acetylcholinesterase (AChE) biosensor for detection of organophosphorus pesticides (OPs). The obtained nanocomposite was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalysis. It was clearly observed that the nanosheet has been decorated with cubic PB nanoparticles and nearly all the nanoparticles are distributed uniformly only on the surface of the reduced GO. No isolated PB nanoparticles were observed, indicating the strong interaction between PB nanocubes and the reduced GO and the formation of PBNCs/rGO nanocomposite. The obtained PBNCs/rGO based AChE biosensor make the peak potential shift negatively to 220 mV. The over-potential decreases ∼460 mV compared to that on a bare electrode, suggesting that PBNCs/rGO has a high electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of thiocholine. The AChE biosensor shows rapid response and high sensitivity for detection of monocrotophos with a linear range from 1.0 to 600 ng mL(-1) and a detection limit of 0.1 ng mL(-1). These results suggest that the PBNCs/rGO hybrids nanocomposite exhibited high electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of thiocholine, which lead to the sensitive detection of OP pesticides.

  7. Developmental exposure of zebrafish larvae to organophosphate flame retardants causes neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liwei; Xu, Wenbin; Peng, Tao; Chen, Haigang; Ren, Lin; Tan, Hana; Xiao, Dan; Qian, Haifeng; Fu, Zhengwei

    2016-01-01

    With the gradual ban on brominated flame retardants (FRs), the application of organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) has increased remarkably. Considering the structural similarity between OPFRs and organophosphate pesticides, hypotheses that OPFRs may interfere with neurodevelopment as organophosphate pesticides are reasonable. In this study, the neurotoxicity of three OPFRs, including tri-n-butyl phosphate (TNBP), tris (2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP) and tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), was evaluated in zebrafish larvae and then compared with the neurotoxicity of organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos (CPF). The results showed that similar to CPF, exposure to OPFRs for 5days resulted in significant changes in locomotor behavior, either in free swimming or in photomotor response. However, given the transcriptional changes that occur in nervous system genes in response to OPFRs and CPF, as well as the altered enzyme activity of AChE and its mRNA level, the underlying mechanisms for neurotoxicity among these organophosphate chemicals might be varied. In summary, the results confirm the potential neurodevelopmental toxicity of OPFRs and underscore the importance of identifying the mechanistic targets of the OPFRs with specific moieties. Furthermore, as the neurobehavioral responses are well conserved among vertebrates and the exposure of children to OPFRs is significant, a thorough assessment of the risk of OPFRs exposure during early development should be highly emphasized in future studies. PMID:27018022

  8. Developmental exposure of zebrafish larvae to organophosphate flame retardants causes neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liwei; Xu, Wenbin; Peng, Tao; Chen, Haigang; Ren, Lin; Tan, Hana; Xiao, Dan; Qian, Haifeng; Fu, Zhengwei

    2016-01-01

    With the gradual ban on brominated flame retardants (FRs), the application of organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) has increased remarkably. Considering the structural similarity between OPFRs and organophosphate pesticides, hypotheses that OPFRs may interfere with neurodevelopment as organophosphate pesticides are reasonable. In this study, the neurotoxicity of three OPFRs, including tri-n-butyl phosphate (TNBP), tris (2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP) and tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), was evaluated in zebrafish larvae and then compared with the neurotoxicity of organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos (CPF). The results showed that similar to CPF, exposure to OPFRs for 5days resulted in significant changes in locomotor behavior, either in free swimming or in photomotor response. However, given the transcriptional changes that occur in nervous system genes in response to OPFRs and CPF, as well as the altered enzyme activity of AChE and its mRNA level, the underlying mechanisms for neurotoxicity among these organophosphate chemicals might be varied. In summary, the results confirm the potential neurodevelopmental toxicity of OPFRs and underscore the importance of identifying the mechanistic targets of the OPFRs with specific moieties. Furthermore, as the neurobehavioral responses are well conserved among vertebrates and the exposure of children to OPFRs is significant, a thorough assessment of the risk of OPFRs exposure during early development should be highly emphasized in future studies.

  9. Recognition and Management of Pesticide Poisonings. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Donald P.

    This manual aids health professionals in recognizing and treating pesticide poisonings. Suggested treatments are appropriate for implementation in the small hospitals and clinics which usually receive the victims of pesticide poisoning. Classes of compounds covered include: (1) organophosphate cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides; (2) carbamate…

  10. Evaluation of Candidate Genes for cholinesterase Activity in Farmworkers Exposed to organophosphorous Pesticides-Association of SNPs in BCHE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Organophosphate pesticides act as cholinesterase inhibitors, and as such may give rise to potential neurological effects. Cholinesterase activity is a useful, indirect measurement of pesticide exposure, especially in high-risk individuals such as farmworkers. To und...

  11. COMPARISON OF FIVE EXTRACTION METHODS ON INCURRED AND FORTIFIED PESTICIDES IN COMPOSITE DIETS: BLENDER, SOXHLET, ASE, MICROWAVE AND SFE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA National Exposure Research Laboratory studies dietary exposure to a diverse group of semi-volatile pesticides by analyzing 24 hour duplicate composite diets. The pesticides of interest include organochlorines, organophosphates, anilines, and triazines. Currently, there ...

  12. Quantitative structure-toxicity relationship (QSTR) studies on the organophosphate insecticides.

    PubMed

    Can, Alper

    2014-11-01

    Organophosphate insecticides are the most commonly used pesticides in the world. In this study, quantitative structure-toxicity relationship (QSTR) models were derived for estimating the acute oral toxicity of organophosphate insecticides to male rats. The 20 chemicals of the training set and the seven compounds of the external testing set were described by means of using descriptors. Descriptors for lipophilicity, polarity and molecular geometry, as well as quantum chemical descriptors for energy were calculated. Model development to predict toxicity of organophosphate insecticides in different matrices was carried out using multiple linear regression. The model was validated internally and externally. In the present study, QSTR model was used for the first time to understand the inherent relationships between the organophosphate insecticide molecules and their toxicity behavior. Such studies provide mechanistic insight about structure-toxicity relationship and help in the design of less toxic insecticides.

  13. Transcriptional profiles for glutamate transporters reveal differences between organophosphates but similarities with unrelated neurotoxicants.

    PubMed

    Slotkin, Theodore A; Lobner, Doug; Seidler, Frederic J

    2010-08-30

    The developmental neurotoxicity of organophosphates involves mechanisms other than their shared property as cholinesterase inhibitors, among which are excitotoxicity and oxidative stress. We used PC12 cells as a neurodevelopmental model to compare the effects of chlorpyrifos and diazinon on the expression of genes encoding glutamate transporters. Chlorpyrifos had a greater effect in cells undergoing nerve growth factor-induced neurodifferentiation as compared to undifferentiated PC12 cells, with peak sensitivity at the initiation of differentiation, reflecting a global upregulation of all the glutamate transporter genes expressed in this cell line. In differentiating cells, chlorpyrifos had a significantly greater effect than did diazinon and concordance analysis indicated no resemblance in their expression patterns. At the same time, the smaller effects of diazinon were highly concordant with those of an organochlorine pesticide (dieldrin) and a metal (divalent nickel). We also performed similar evaluations for the cystine/glutamate exchanger, which provides protection against oxidative stress by moving cystine into the cell; again, chlorpyrifos had the greatest effect, in this case reducing expression in undifferentiated and differentiating cells. Our results point to excitotoxicity and oxidative stress as major contributors to the noncholinesterase mechanisms that distinguish the neurodevelopmental outcomes between different organophosphates while providing a means whereby apparently unrelated neurotoxicants may produce similar outcomes. PMID:20600679

  14. Organophosphate and carbamate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Bardin, P G; van Eeden, S F; Moolman, J A; Foden, A P; Joubert, J R

    1994-07-11

    Organophosphate insecticides may cause serious poisoning either accidentally or by deliberate ingestion. Toxic symptoms are produced by acetylcholine accumulation at cholinergic receptors. Diagnosis is based on history of exposure or ingestion, symptoms and signs of cholinergic overactivity and a decrease in serum pseudocholinesterase levels. Following diagnosis, grading of disease severity may identify patients with serious poisoning who should receive treatment in intensive care using adequate doses of anticholinergic drugs. Complications, particularly ventricular arrhythmias, central nervous system depression or seizures, and respiratory failure, should be anticipated and treated. Relapse may occur after seemingly successful treatment. Public education with regard to symptoms of toxicity must be encouraged, and physicians must provide skilled treatment for a potentially lethal condition.

  15. Pesticide exposure in children.

    PubMed

    Roberts, James R; Karr, Catherine J

    2012-12-01

    Pesticides are a collective term for a wide array of chemicals intended to kill unwanted insects, plants, molds, and rodents. Food, water, and treatment in the home, yard, and school are all potential sources of children's exposure. Exposures to pesticides may be overt or subacute, and effects range from acute to chronic toxicity. In 2008, pesticides were the ninth most common substance reported to poison control centers, and approximately 45% of all reports of pesticide poisoning were for children. Organophosphate and carbamate poisoning are perhaps the most widely known acute poisoning syndromes, can be diagnosed by depressed red blood cell cholinesterase levels, and have available antidotal therapy. However, numerous other pesticides that may cause acute toxicity, such as pyrethroid and neonicotinoid insecticides, herbicides, fungicides, and rodenticides, also have specific toxic effects; recognition of these effects may help identify acute exposures. Evidence is increasingly emerging about chronic health implications from both acute and chronic exposure. A growing body of epidemiological evidence demonstrates associations between parental use of pesticides, particularly insecticides, with acute lymphocytic leukemia and brain tumors. Prenatal, household, and occupational exposures (maternal and paternal) appear to be the largest risks. Prospective cohort studies link early-life exposure to organophosphates and organochlorine pesticides (primarily DDT) with adverse effects on neurodevelopment and behavior. Among the findings associated with increased pesticide levels are poorer mental development by using the Bayley index and increased scores on measures assessing pervasive developmental disorder, inattention, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Related animal toxicology studies provide supportive biological plausibility for these findings. Additional data suggest that there may also be an association between parental pesticide use and adverse birth

  16. Pesticide exposure in children.

    PubMed

    Roberts, James R; Karr, Catherine J

    2012-12-01

    Pesticides are a collective term for a wide array of chemicals intended to kill unwanted insects, plants, molds, and rodents. Food, water, and treatment in the home, yard, and school are all potential sources of children's exposure. Exposures to pesticides may be overt or subacute, and effects range from acute to chronic toxicity. In 2008, pesticides were the ninth most common substance reported to poison control centers, and approximately 45% of all reports of pesticide poisoning were for children. Organophosphate and carbamate poisoning are perhaps the most widely known acute poisoning syndromes, can be diagnosed by depressed red blood cell cholinesterase levels, and have available antidotal therapy. However, numerous other pesticides that may cause acute toxicity, such as pyrethroid and neonicotinoid insecticides, herbicides, fungicides, and rodenticides, also have specific toxic effects; recognition of these effects may help identify acute exposures. Evidence is increasingly emerging about chronic health implications from both acute and chronic exposure. A growing body of epidemiological evidence demonstrates associations between parental use of pesticides, particularly insecticides, with acute lymphocytic leukemia and brain tumors. Prenatal, household, and occupational exposures (maternal and paternal) appear to be the largest risks. Prospective cohort studies link early-life exposure to organophosphates and organochlorine pesticides (primarily DDT) with adverse effects on neurodevelopment and behavior. Among the findings associated with increased pesticide levels are poorer mental development by using the Bayley index and increased scores on measures assessing pervasive developmental disorder, inattention, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Related animal toxicology studies provide supportive biological plausibility for these findings. Additional data suggest that there may also be an association between parental pesticide use and adverse birth

  17. Coronary artery bypass grafting in a patient with organophosphate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Pieris, Rajeeva R; Fernando, Ravindra

    2015-01-01

    A 43-year-old male, with no previous history of mental illness, was diagnosed with coronary heart disease, after which he became acutely depressed and attempted suicide by ingesting an organophosphate pesticide. He was admitted to an intensive care unit and treated with pralidoxime, atropine, and oxygen. His coronary occlusion pattern required early coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery. His family, apprehensive of a repeat suicidal attempt, requested surgery be performed as soon as possible. He recovered well from the OP poisoning and was mentally fit to express informed consent 2 weeks after admission. Seventeen days after poisoning, he underwent coronary artery bypass grafting and recovered uneventfully. Six years later, he remains in excellent health. We report this case because to the best of our knowledge there is no literature regarding CABG performed soon after organophosphate poisoning.

  18. Fluorescence Spectroscopy Approaches for the Development of a Real-Time Organophosphate Detection System Using an Enzymatic Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Carullo, Paola; Cetrangolo, Giovanni Paolo; Mandrich, Luigi; Manco, Giuseppe; Febbraio, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    Organophosphates are organic substances that contain a phosphoryl or a thiophosphoryl bond. They are mainly used around the world as pesticides, but can also be used as chemical warfare agents. Their detection is normally entrusted to techniques like GC- and LC-MS that, although sensitive, do not allow their identification on site and in real time. We have approached their identification by exploiting the high-affinity binding of these compounds with the esterase 2 from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius. Using an in silico analysis to evaluate the binding affinities of the enzyme with organophosphate inhibitors, like paraoxon, and other organophosphate compounds, like parathion, chlorpyriphos, and other organophosphate thio-derivatives, we have designed fluorescence spectroscopy experiments to study the quenching of the tryptophan residues after esterase 2 binding with the organophosphate pesticides. The changes in the fluorescence signals permitted an immediate and quantitative identification of these compounds from nano- to picomolar concentrations. A fluorescence based polarity-sensitive probe (ANS) was also employed as a means to understand the extent of the interactions involved, as well as to explore other ways to detect organophosphate pesticides. Finally, we designed a framework for the development of a biosensor that exploits fluorescence technology in combination with a sensitive and very stable bio-receptor. PMID:25671511

  19. Evaluation of core cultivation practices to reduce ecological risk of pesticides in runoff from turf

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stormwater runoff and surface waters have been shown to contain pesticides associated with turfgrass management, which has raised concern of their affect on water quality and aquatic organisms. We compared pesticide transport in runoff from bentgrass (Agrostis palustris) fairway turf managed with s...

  20. The Drosophila vesicular monoamine transporter reduces pesticide-induced loss of dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lawal, Hakeem O.; Chang, Hui-Yun; Terrell, Ashley N.; Brooks, Elizabeth S.; Pulido, Dianne; Simon, Anne F.; Krantz, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Dopamine is cytotoxic and may play a role in the development of Parkinson’s disease. However, its interaction with environmental risk factors such as pesticides remains poorly understood. The vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT) regulates intracellular dopamine content, and we have tested the neuroprotective effects of VMAT in vivo using the model organism Drosophila melanogaster. We find that Drosophila VMAT (dVMAT) mutants contain fewer dopaminergic neurons than wild type, consistent with a developmental effect, and that dopaminergic cell loss in the mutant is exacerbated by the pesticides rotenone and paraquat. Over-expression of DVMAT protein does not increase the survival of animals exposed to rotenone, but blocks the loss of dopaminergic neurons caused by this pesticide. These results are the first to demonstrate an interaction between a VMAT and pesticides in vivo, and provide an important model to investigate the mechanisms by which pesticides and cellular DA may interact to kill dopaminergic cells. PMID:20472063

  1. Does further clean-up reduce the matrix enhancement effect in gas chromatographic analysis of pesticide residues in food?

    PubMed

    Schenck, F J; Lehotay, S J

    2000-01-28

    Sample extracts of apples, peas, green beans, oranges, raspberries, clementines, carrots, and wheat obtained using the Food and Drug Administration (acetone extraction) and Canadian Pest Management Regulatory Agency (acetonitrile extraction) multiresidue methods for pesticides were subjected to clean-up using different solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges in an attempt to reduce or eliminate the matrix enhancement effect. The matrix enhancement effect is related to the blocking of active sites on the injector liner by matrix components, thereby increasing signal in the presence of matrix versus standards in solvent in which the pesticides themselves interact with the active sites. Graphitized carbon black (GCB) was often used in combination with various anion-exchange SPE cartridges. The extracts were then spiked with organophosphorus insecticides. These process standards were then compared to standards in acetone of the same concentration using gas chromatography with flame photometric detection or ion trap mass spectrometric detection. Sample matrix enhancement varied from little to no effect for some pesticides (e.g. chlorpyrifos, malathion) to >200% in the case of certain susceptible pesticides. The GCB removed color components but showed little effect in reducing matrix enhancement by itself. The anion-exchange cartridges in combination with GCB or not, substantially reduced the matrix enhancement effect but did not eliminate it. PMID:10677079

  2. Cognitive disorders and occupational exposure to organophosphates: results from the PHYTONER study.

    PubMed

    Blanc-Lapierre, Audrey; Bouvier, Ghislaine; Gruber, Anne; Leffondré, Karen; Lebailly, Pierre; Fabrigoule, Colette; Baldi, Isabelle

    2013-05-15

    The involvement of organophosphate insecticides in cognitive disorders is supported by epidemiologic and biological evidence, but the effects of long-term exposure remain debated. We studied the association between organophosphate exposure and cognitive performance in vine workers from the PHYTONER study cohort in the Bordeaux area of France. Results from interviews of 614 subjects conducted at the 4-year follow-up between 2001 and 2003 were analyzed. Exposure to pesticides since 1950 was assessed with cumulative exposure scores for 34 organophosphates combining an historical crop-exposure pesticide matrix and field exposure studies, taking into account the characteristics of treatment (mixing, spraying, equipment cleaning) and reentry tasks. For the 11 organophosphates retained in the analysis, exposure (ever vs. never) was associated with low cognitive performance. No dose-effect relationship was found, but an increased risk was observed with a 50-mg increase in the cumulative score, which was greater with mevinphos (Benton Visual Retention Test: odds ratio = 3.26, 95% confidence interval: 1.54, 6.88; Trail Making Test, part A: odds ratio = 3.03, 95% confidence interval: 1.39, 6.62). Our results support the hypothesis that cognitive disorders observed in vine workers may be associated with exposure to specific organophosphates. PMID:23535900

  3. Evaluating organophosphate poisoning in human serum with paper.

    PubMed

    Yen, Tzung-Hai; Chen, Kuan-Hung; Hsu, Min-Yen; Fan, Shu-Ting; Huang, Yu-Fen; Chang, Chia-Ling; Wang, Yu-Ping; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2015-11-01

    This manuscript describes the development and clinical testing of a paper-based, metabolic assay designed for rapid, semi-quantitative measurement of organophosphate poisoning. Paper-based platforms, including point-of-care devices and 96-well plates, provided semi-quantitative information regarding the concentration of AchE (a biomarker for organophosphate poisoning). The paper-based 96-well-plate developed and implemented in this study was used to measure the level of organophosphate poisoning in three different clinical patients. Results were comparable to those obtained using conventional hospital methods currently considered the "gold standard". This diagnostic device offers several advantages over conventional methods, including short operating time (twice as fast as conventional methods), procedure simplicity, and reduced fabrication cost. With further commercialization efforts, the methods described in this manuscript could be applied to a wide range of potential diagnostic applications in the field.

  4. Reprint of 'Evaluating organophosphate poisoning in human serum with paper'.

    PubMed

    Yen, Tzung-Hai; Chen, Kuan-Hung; Hsu, Min-Yen; Fan, Shu-Ting; Huang, Yu-Fen; Chang, Chia-Ling; Wang, Yu-Ping; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2015-12-01

    This manuscript describes the development and clinical testing of a paper-based, metabolic assay designed for rapid, semi-quantitative measurement of organophosphate poisoning. Paper-based platforms, including point-of-care devices and 96-well plates, provided semi-quantitative information regarding the concentration of AchE (a biomarker for organophosphate poisoning). The paper-based 96-well-plate developed and implemented in this study was used to measure the level of organophosphate poisoning in three different clinical patients. Results were comparable to those obtained using conventional hospital methods currently considered the "gold standard". This diagnostic device offers several advantages over conventional methods, including short operating time (twice as fast as conventional methods), procedure simplicity, and reduced fabrication cost. With further commercialization efforts, the methods described in this manuscript could be applied to a wide range of potential diagnostic applications in the field.

  5. Community-Based Intervention to Reduce Pesticide Exposure to Farmworkers and Potential Take-Home Exposure to their Families

    PubMed Central

    Bradman, Asa; Salvatore, Alicia L.; Boeniger, Mark; Castorina, Rosemary; Snyder, John; Barr, Dana B.; Jewell, Nicholas P.; Kavanagh-Baird, Geri; Striley, Cynthia; Eskenazi, Brenda

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. EPA Worker Protection Standard requires pesticide safety training for farmworkers. Combined with re-entry intervals, these regulations are designed to reduce pesticide exposure. Little research has been conducted on whether additional steps may reduce farmworker exposure and the potential for take-home exposure to their families. We conducted an intervention with 44 strawberry harvesters (15 control and 29 intervention group members) to determine whether education, encouragement of handwashing, and the use of gloves and removable coveralls reduced exposure. Post-intervention, we collected foliage and urine samples, as well as hand rinse, lower-leg skin patch, and clothing patch samples. Post-intervention loading of malathion on hands was lower among workers who wore gloves compared to those who did not (median = 8.2 vs 777.2 μg/pair, respectively (p<0.001)); similarly, median MDA levels in urine were lower among workers who wore gloves (45.3 vs 131.2 μg/g creatinine, p<0.05). Malathion was detected on clothing (median = 0.13 μg/cm2), but not on skin. Workers who ate strawberries had higher MDA levels in urine (median=114.5 vs 39.4 μg/g creatinine, p<0.01). These findings suggest that wearing gloves reduces pesticide exposure to workers contacting strawberry foliage containing dislodgeable residues. Additionally, wearing gloves and removing work clothes before returning home could reduce transport of pesticides to worker homes. Behavioral interventions are needed to reduce consumption of strawberries in the field. PMID:18368011

  6. Correlation between Cholinesterase and Paraoxonase 1 Activities:Case Series of Pesticide Poisoning Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Richard, S Austin; Frank, Elizabeth A; D'Souza, Cletus J M

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Acute exposure to pesticide due to suicidal poisoning is the most extensive cause of pesticide exposure, compared with all other causes including agricultural or industrial exposure. Organophosphate (OP) and carbamate group of pesticides can inhibit acetylcholinesterase; on the other hand, paraoxonase1 can detoxify organophosphate poisoning by hydrolyzing organophosphate metabolites. Methods: We have compared the serum paraoxonase1 status and cholinesterase activity of subjects who attempted to commit suicide by consuming OP pesticide. Cholinesterase and paraoxonase1 activity were measured spectrophotometrically using butyrylthiocholine and phenyl acetate as substrates, respectively. Results: A positive correlation was found between serum paraoxonase1 activity and cholinesterase activity among pesticide consumed subjects. Conclusion: Our results suggest that subjects with higher paraoxonase1 activity may have a better chance of detoxifying the lethal effect of acute organophosphate poisoning. PMID:24163803

  7. Municipal bylaw to reduce cosmetic/non-essential pesticide use on household lawns - a policy implementation evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pesticide use on urban lawns and gardens contributes to environmental contamination and human exposure. Municipal policies to restrict use and educate households on viable alternatives deserve study. We describe the development and implementation of a cosmetic/non-essential pesticide bylaw by a municipal health department in Toronto, Ontario, Canada and assess changes in resident practices associated with bylaw implementation. Methods Implementation indicators built on a logic model and were elaborated through key informant interviews. Bylaw impacts on awareness and practice changes were documented through telephone surveys administered seasonally pre, during and post implementation (2003-2008). Multivariable logistic regression models assessed associations of demographic variables and gardening season with respondent awareness and practices. Results Implementation indicators documented multiple municipal health department activities and public involvement in complaints from commencement of the educational phase. During the enforcement phases only 40 warning letters and 7 convictions were needed. The number of lawn care companies increased. Among survey respondents, awareness of the bylaw and the Natural Lawn campaign reached 69% and 76% respectively by 2008. Substantial decreases in the proportion of households applying pesticides (25 to 11%) or hiring lawn care companies for application (15 to 5%) occurred. Parallel absolute increases in use of natural lawn care methods occurred among households themselves (21%) and companies they contracted (7%). Conclusions Bylaws or ordinances implemented through education and enforcement are a viable policy option for reducing urban cosmetic pesticide use. PMID:21867501

  8. A meta-analysis of the effects of pesticides and fertilizers on survival and growth of amphibians.

    PubMed

    Baker, Nick J; Bancroft, Betsy A; Garcia, Tiffany S

    2013-04-01

    The input of agrochemicals has contributed to alteration of community composition in managed and associated natural systems, including amphibian biodiversity. Pesticides and fertilizers negatively affect many amphibian species and can cause mortality and sublethal effects, such as reduced growth and increased susceptibility to disease. However, the effect of pesticides and fertilizers varies among amphibian species. We used meta-analytic techniques to quantify the lethal and sublethal effects of pesticides and fertilizers on amphibians in an effort to review the published work to date and produce generalized conclusions. We found that pesticides and fertilizers had a negative effect on survival of -0.9027 and growth of -0.0737 across all reported amphibian species. We also observed differences between chemical classes in their impact on amphibians: inorganic fertilizers, organophosphates, chloropyridinyl, phosphonoglycines, carbamates, and triazines negatively affected amphibian survival, while organophosphates and phosphonoglycines negatively affected amphibian growth. Our results suggest that pesticides and fertilizers are an important stressor for amphibians in agriculturally dominated systems. Furthermore, certain chemical classes are more likely to harm amphibians. Best management practices in agroecosystems should incorporate amphibian species-specific response to agrochemicals as well as life stage dependent susceptibility to best conserve amphibian biodiversity in these landscapes.

  9. Fe2O3 nanoparticles for airborne organophosphate detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Joshua; Soliz, Jennifer; Hauser, Adam

    Dire need for early detection of organophosphates (OP) exists in both civilian (pesticide/herbicide buildup) and military (G/V nerve agents) spheres. Nanoparticle materials are excellent candidates for the detection and/or decontamination of hazardous materials, owing to their large surface to volume ratios and tailored surface functionality. Within this category, metal oxides include structures that are stable with the range of normal environmental conditions (temperature, humidity), but have strong, specific reaction mechanisms (hydrolysis, oxidation, catalysis, stoichiometric reaction) with toxic compounds. In this talk, we will present on the suitability of Fe2O3 nanoparticles as airborne organophosphate detectors. 23 nm particles were exposed to a series of organophosphate compounds (dimethyl methylphosphonate, dimethyl chlorophosphonate, diisopropyl methylphosphonate), and studied by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and x-ray absorption spectroscopy to confirm the stoichiometric Fe2O3 to FeO mechanism and determine magnetic sensor feasibility. AC Impedance Spectroscopy shows both high sensitivity and selectivity via frequency dependence in both impedance and resistivity, suggesting some feasibility for impedimetric devices. We acknowledge funding under Army Research Office STIR Award #W911F-15-1-0104. J.R.S. acknowledges funding from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency under Projects BA13PHM210 and BA07PRO104. J.R.S. also acknowledges funding under a NRC fellowship.

  10. Determination of carbamate and organophosphorus pesticides in vegetable samples and the efficiency of gamma-radiation in their removal.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Muhammed Alamgir Zaman; Jahan, Iffat; Karim, Nurul; Alam, Mohammad Khorshed; Abdur Rahman, Mohammad; Moniruzzaman, Mohammed; Gan, Siew Hua; Fakhruddin, Abu Naieum Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, the residual pesticide levels were determined in eggplants (Solanum melongena) (n = 16), purchased from four different markets in Dhaka, Bangladesh. The carbamate and organophosphorus pesticide residual levels were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and the efficiency of gamma radiation on pesticide removal in three different types of vegetables was also studied. Many (50%) of the samples contained pesticides, and three samples had residual levels above the maximum residue levels determined by the World Health Organisation. Three carbamates (carbaryl, carbofuran, and pirimicarb) and six organophosphates (phenthoate, diazinon, parathion, dimethoate, phosphamidon, and pirimiphos-methyl) were detected in eggplant samples; the highest carbofuran level detected was 1.86 mg/kg, while phenthoate was detected at 0.311 mg/kg. Gamma radiation decreased pesticide levels proportionately with increasing radiation doses. Diazinon, chlorpyrifos, and phosphamidon were reduced by 40-48%, 35-43%, and 30-45%, respectively, when a radiation strength of 0.5 kGy was utilized. However, when the radiation dose was increased to 1.0 kGy, the levels of the pesticides were reduced to 85-90%, 80-91%, and 90-95%, respectively. In summary, our study revealed that pesticide residues are present at high amounts in vegetable samples and that gamma radiation at 1.0 kGy can remove 80-95% of some pesticides.

  11. Determination of Carbamate and Organophosphorus Pesticides in Vegetable Samples and the Efficiency of Gamma-Radiation in Their Removal

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Muhammed Alamgir Zaman; Jahan, Iffat; Karim, Nurul; Alam, Mohammad Khorshed; Rahman, Mohammad Abdur; Moniruzzaman, Mohammed; Gan, Siew Hua; Fakhruddin, Abu Naieum Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, the residual pesticide levels were determined in eggplants (Solanum melongena) (n = 16), purchased from four different markets in Dhaka, Bangladesh. The carbamate and organophosphorus pesticide residual levels were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and the efficiency of gamma radiation on pesticide removal in three different types of vegetables was also studied. Many (50%) of the samples contained pesticides, and three samples had residual levels above the maximum residue levels determined by the World Health Organisation. Three carbamates (carbaryl, carbofuran, and pirimicarb) and six organophosphates (phenthoate, diazinon, parathion, dimethoate, phosphamidon, and pirimiphos-methyl) were detected in eggplant samples; the highest carbofuran level detected was 1.86 mg/kg, while phenthoate was detected at 0.311 mg/kg. Gamma radiation decreased pesticide levels proportionately with increasing radiation doses. Diazinon, chlorpyrifos, and phosphamidon were reduced by 40–48%, 35–43%, and 30–45%, respectively, when a radiation strength of 0.5 kGy was utilized. However, when the radiation dose was increased to 1.0 kGy, the levels of the pesticides were reduced to 85–90%, 80–91%, and 90–95%, respectively. In summary, our study revealed that pesticide residues are present at high amounts in vegetable samples and that gamma radiation at 1.0 kGy can remove 80–95% of some pesticides. PMID:24711991

  12. Quantitative structure-activity relationships for organophosphates binding to acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Ruark, Christopher D; Hack, C Eric; Robinson, Peter J; Anderson, Paul E; Gearhart, Jeffery M

    2013-02-01

    Organophosphates are a group of pesticides and chemical warfare nerve agents that inhibit acetylcholinesterase, the enzyme responsible for hydrolysis of the excitatory neurotransmitter acetylcholine. Numerous structural variants exist for this chemical class, and data regarding their toxicity can be difficult to obtain in a timely fashion. At the same time, their use as pesticides and military weapons is widespread, which presents a major concern and challenge in evaluating human toxicity. To address this concern, a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) was developed to predict pentavalent organophosphate oxon human acetylcholinesterase bimolecular rate constants. A database of 278 three-dimensional structures and their bimolecular rates was developed from 15 peer-reviewed publications. A database of simplified molecular input line entry notations and their respective acetylcholinesterase bimolecular rate constants are listed in Supplementary Material, Table I. The database was quite diverse, spanning 7 log units of activity. In order to describe their structure, 675 molecular descriptors were calculated using AMPAC 8.0 and CODESSA 2.7.10. Orthogonal projection to latent structures regression, bootstrap leave-random-many-out cross-validation and y-randomization were used to develop an externally validated consensus QSAR model. The domain of applicability was assessed by the William's plot. Six external compounds were outside the warning leverage indicating potential model extrapolation. A number of compounds had residuals >2 or <-2, indicating potential outliers or activity cliffs. The results show that the HOMO-LUMO energy gap contributed most significantly to the binding affinity. A mean training R (2) of 0.80, a mean test set R (2) of 0.76 and a consensus external test set R (2) of 0.66 were achieved using the QSAR. The training and external test set RMSE values were found to be 0.76 and 0.88. The results suggest that this QSAR model can be used in

  13. "Mommy, I'm Dying": Learning from a School Pesticide Tragedy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Becky

    1991-01-01

    Presented is a case in which a child was poisoned on school grounds by organophosphates used to control aphids. Details of the case and the role parents can play in the safety of pesticide use at schools are discussed. (CW)

  14. Detoxification of Organophosphate Poisoning Using Nanoparticle Bioscavengers

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Zhiqing; Hu, Che-Ming J.; Fang, Ronnie H.; Luk, Brian T.; Gao, Weiwei; Wang, Fei; Chuluun, Erdembileg; Angsantikul, Pavimol; Thamphiwatana, Soracha; Lu, Weiyue; Jiang, Xinguo; Zhang, Liangfang

    2016-01-01

    Organophosphate poisoning is highly lethal as organophosphates, which are commonly found in insecticides and nerve agents, cause irreversible phosphorylation and inactivation of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), leading to neuromuscular disorders via accumulation of acetylcholine in the body. Direct interception of organophosphates in the systemic circulation thus provides a desirable strategy in treatment of the condition. Inspired by the presence of acetylcholinesterase on red blood cell (RBC) membranes, we explored a biomimetic nanoparticle consisting of a polymeric core surrounded by RBC membranes to serve as an anti-organophosphate agent. Through in vitro studies, we demonstrated that the biomimetic nanoparticles retain the enzymatic activity of membrane-bound AChE and are able to bind to a model organophosphate, dichlorvos, precluding its inhibitory effect on other enzymatic substrates. In a mouse model of organophosphate poisoning, the nanoparticles were shown to improve the AChE activity in the blood and markedly improved the survival of dichlorvos-challenged mice. PMID:26053868

  15. Limitations on the role of incorporated organic matter in reducing pesticide leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worrall, F.; Fernandez-Perez, M.; Johnson, A. C.; Flores-Cesperedes, F.; Gonzalez-Pradas, E.

    2001-06-01

    The use of organic amendments has been suggested as a method of controlling pesticide leaching through soils. The enarenados soils of the intensive horticulture of the Almeria province of southern Spain contain buried organic matter horizons above a soil layer amended with clay. This region is ideal for understanding the potential for and limitations of organic amendments in preventing pesticide pollution. This study measured the sorption and degradation potential of carbofuran in this soil system and the hydrological behaviour of the soil horizons. The sorption of carbofuran was controlled by the organic carbon content, the degradation was strongly pH-dependent and the acidic organic layer protected the sorbed carbofuran against degradation. Hydrologically, the soil system is dominated by ponding above an amended clay layer and by the presence of macropores that can transport water through this clay. A simple model is proposed on this basis and shows that although high levels of dissolved organic carbon can be released by buried organic horizons, the major control on re-release of sorbed pesticide is the potential for sorption hysteresis in this organic layer. A comparison of sorption and degradation data for carbamate insecticides used in the region with groundwater observations for these compounds shows that no amount of incorporated organic would protect against pollution from highly water-soluble compounds.

  16. Diagnosis & Treatment of Poisoning by Pesticides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Pesticide Programs.

    This report succinctly discusses the steps necessary to diagnose and treat poisoning from pesticides, especially organophosphates, carbamates and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Immediate and continuing steps in the care of poisoning victims are outlined with supportive information on where to locate emergency assistance. (CS)

  17. [Neurotoxicology of pesticides].

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Hiroo

    2015-01-01

    Pesticides have been used for many years for preventing, destroying, repelling, or mitigating pests such as insects, rodents, and weeds. However, most pesticides are not completely specific for pests and can also induce damage to the human nervous system. In particular, insecticides often directly targets the nervous system by affecting major targets such as the neuro-transmitter metabolism, neuronal receptors, and ion channels; acetylcholine (ACh) esterase for organo-phosphates and carbamates, nicotinic ACh receptor for neonicotinoids, γ-aminobutyric acid receptors/chloride channels for organochlorides and fipronil, and voltage-gated sodium channel for pyrethroids. Additional targets include sites in the sodium channels, glutamate-gated chloride channels, and octopamine and ryanodine receptors. Several pesticides also produce adverse neurological effects indirectly by disrupting the general cellular mechanisms that support the high metabolic activity of the nervous system. Nowadays, more potent pesticides are being developed as replacements for the older, harmful ones. Pesticide neurotoxicity in humans may involve the central or peripheral nervous system or both and may induce typical neuronal damage in case of acute poisoning even by new agents. However, whether effect of exposure to pesticides at below acute-poisoning threshold level remains unclear. Moreover, neurotoxicology for behavioral and higher-brain function remains an unresolved and a challenging problem.

  18. Pesticides and reduced-risk insecticides, native bees and pantropical stingless bees: pitfalls and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Wagner F; Smagghe, Guy; Guedes, Raul Narciso C

    2015-08-01

    Although invertebrates generally have a low public profile, the honey bee, Apis mellifera L., is a flagship species whose popularity likely derives from the products it provides and its perceived ecological services. Therefore, the raging debate regarding honey bee decline has surpassed the realm of beekeepers, academia, industry and regulatory agencies and now also encompasses non-governmental agencies, media, fiction writers and the general public. The early interest and concern about honey bee colony collapse disorder (CCD) soon shifted to the bigger issue of pollinator decline, with a focus on the potential involvement of pesticides in such a phenomenon. Pesticides were previously recognised as the potential culprits of the reported declines, particularly the neonicotinoid insecticides owing to their widespread and peculiar use in agriculture. However, the evidence for the potential pivotal role of these neonicotinoids in honey bee decline remains a matter of debate, with an increased recognition of the multifactorial nature of the problem and the lack of a direct association between the noted decline and neonicotinoid use. The focus on the decline of honey bee populations subsequently spread to other species, and bumblebees became another matter of concern, particularly in Europe and the United States. Other bee species, ones that are particularly important in other regions of the world, remain the object of little concern (unjustifiably so). Furthermore, the continuous focus on neonicotinoids is also in need of revision, as the current evidence suggests that a broad spectrum of compounds deserve attention. Here we address both shortcomings.

  19. Pesticides and reduced-risk insecticides, native bees and pantropical stingless bees: pitfalls and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Wagner F; Smagghe, Guy; Guedes, Raul Narciso C

    2015-08-01

    Although invertebrates generally have a low public profile, the honey bee, Apis mellifera L., is a flagship species whose popularity likely derives from the products it provides and its perceived ecological services. Therefore, the raging debate regarding honey bee decline has surpassed the realm of beekeepers, academia, industry and regulatory agencies and now also encompasses non-governmental agencies, media, fiction writers and the general public. The early interest and concern about honey bee colony collapse disorder (CCD) soon shifted to the bigger issue of pollinator decline, with a focus on the potential involvement of pesticides in such a phenomenon. Pesticides were previously recognised as the potential culprits of the reported declines, particularly the neonicotinoid insecticides owing to their widespread and peculiar use in agriculture. However, the evidence for the potential pivotal role of these neonicotinoids in honey bee decline remains a matter of debate, with an increased recognition of the multifactorial nature of the problem and the lack of a direct association between the noted decline and neonicotinoid use. The focus on the decline of honey bee populations subsequently spread to other species, and bumblebees became another matter of concern, particularly in Europe and the United States. Other bee species, ones that are particularly important in other regions of the world, remain the object of little concern (unjustifiably so). Furthermore, the continuous focus on neonicotinoids is also in need of revision, as the current evidence suggests that a broad spectrum of compounds deserve attention. Here we address both shortcomings. PMID:25892651

  20. Unequal Efficacy of Pyridinium Oximes in Acute Organophosphate Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Antonijevic, Biljana; Stojiljkovic, Milos P.

    2007-01-01

    The use of organophosphorus pesticides results in toxicity risk to non-target organisms. Organophosphorus compounds share a common mode of action, exerting their toxic effects primarily via acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition. Consequently, acetylcholine accumulates in the synaptic clefts of muscles and nerves, leading to overstimulation of cholinergic receptors. Acute cholinergic crisis immediately follows exposure to organophosphate and includes signs and symptoms resulting from hyperstimulation of central and peripheral muscarinic and nicotinic receptors. The current view of the treatment of organophosphate poisoning includes three strategies, i.e. the use of an anticholinergic drug (e.g., atropine), cholinesterase-reactivating agents (e.g., oximes) and anticonvulsant drugs (e.g., benzodiazepines). Oximes, as a part of antidotal therapy, ensure the recovery of phosphylated enzymes via a process denoted as reactivation of inhibited AChE. However, both experimental results and clinical findings have demonstrated that different oximes are not equally effective against poisonings caused by structurally different organophosphorus compounds. Therefore, antidotal characteristics of conventionally used oximes can be evaluated regarding how close the certain substance is to the theoretical concept of the universal oxime. Pralidoxime (PAM-2), trimedoxime (TMB-4), obidoxime (LüH-6), HI-6 and HLö-7 have all been demonstrated to be very effective in experimental poisonings with sarin and VX. TMB-4 and LüH-6 may reactivate tabun-inhibited AChE, whereas HI-6 possesses the ability to reactivate the soman-inhibited enzyme. An oxime HLö-7 seems to be an efficient reactivator of AChE inhibited by any of the four organophosphorus warfare agents. According to the available literature, the oximes LüH-6 and TMB-4, although relatively toxic, are the most potent to induce reactivation of AChE inhibited by the majority of organophosphorus pesticides. Since there are no reports of

  1. Interactions of organophosphates with keratins in the cornified epithelium of human skin.

    PubMed

    Verstappen, Daan R W; Hulst, Albert G; Fidder, Alex; Vermeulen, Nico P E; Noort, Daan

    2012-05-30

    Methods to unequivocally assess and quantify exposure to organophosphate anti-cholinesterase agents are highly valuable, either from a biomonitoring or a forensic perspective. Since for both OP pesticides and various nerve agents the skin is a predominant route of entry, we hypothesized that proteins in the skin might represent an ideal source of unequivocal and persistent biomarkers for exposure to these compounds. In this exploratory study we show that keratin proteins in human skin are relevant binding sites for organophosphates. The thick cornified epithelium of human plantar skin (callus) was exposed to a selection of relevant organophosphorus compounds and keratin proteins were subsequently extracted. After carboxymethylation of cysteine residues, enzymatic digestion of the keratins with pronase and trypsin was performed and the resulting amino acid and peptides were analyzed to assess whether covalent adducts had formed. LC-tandem MS analysis of the pronase digests demonstrated that tyrosine and to a lesser extent serine residues were selectively modified by organophosphate pesticides (both phosphorothioates and the corresponding oxon forms) under physiological conditions. In addition, modification of tyrosine with the nerve agent VX was unequivocally assessed. In order to elucidate specific binding sites, LC-tandem MS analysis of trypsin digests showed two separate tryptic keratin fragments, i.e. LASY*LDK and SLY*GLGGSK, with Y* the modified tyrosine residues, originating from keratin 1/6 and keratin 10, respectively. These preliminary findings, revealing novel binding targets for anti-cholinesterase organophosphates, will form a firm basis for the development of novel (non-invasive) methods for assessment of exposure to organophosphates. Whether this binding will also have biological implications remains an issue for further investigations.

  2. An agriculture and health inter-sectorial research process to reduce hazardous pesticide health impacts among smallholder farmers in the Andes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The use of highly hazardous pesticides by smallholder farmers constitutes a classic trans-sectoral ‘wicked problem’. We share our program of research in potato and vegetable farming communities in the Andean highlands, working with partners from multiple sectors to confront this problem over several projects. Methods We engaged in iterative cycles of mixed methods research around particular questions, actions relevant to stakeholders, new proposal formulation and implementation followed by evaluation of impacts. Capacity building occurred among farmers, technical personnel, and students from multiple disciplines. Involvement of research users occurred throughout: women and men farmers, non-governmental development organizations, Ministries of Health and Agriculture, and, in Ecuador, the National Council on Social Participation. Results Pesticide poisonings were more widespread than existing passive surveillance systems would suggest. More diversified, moderately developed agricultural systems had lower pesticide use and better child nutrition. Greater understanding among women of crop management options and more equal household gender relations were associated with reduced farm pesticide use and household pesticide exposure. Involvement in more organic agriculture was associated with greater household food security and food sovereignty. Markets for safer produce supported efforts by smallholder farmers to reduce hazardous pesticide use. Participatory interventions included: promoting greater access to alternative methods and inputs in a store co-sponsored by the municipality; producing less harmful inputs such as compost by women farmers; strengthening farmer organizations around healthier and more sustainable agriculture; marketing safer produce among social sectors; empowering farmers to act as social monitors; and using social monitoring results to inform decision makers. Uptake by policy makers has included: the Ecuadorian Ministry of Health

  3. AUTOMATED PRESSURIZED FLUID EXTRACTION WITH IN-LINE CLEAN-UP FOR DETERMINATION OF PESTICIDES IN COMPOSITE DIETS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    USEPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory conducts research to measure the exposure of individuals to chemical pollutants through the diet, as well as other media. In support of this research, methods are being evaluated for determination of organophosphate pesticides in co...

  4. Pesticides and pesticide degradation products in stormwater runoff: Sacramento River Basin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Domagalski, J.

    1996-01-01

    Pesticides in stormwater runoff, within the Sacramento River Basin, California, were assessed during a storm that occurred in January 1994. Two organophosphate insecticides (diazinon and methidathion), two carbamate pesticides (molinate and carbofuran), and one triazine herbicide (simazine) were detected. Organophosphate pesticide concentrations increased with the rising stage of the hydrographs; peak concentrations were measured near peak discharge. Diazinon oxon, a toxic degradation product of diazinon, made up approximately 1 to 3 percent of the diazinon load. The Feather River was the principal source of organophosphate pesticides to the Sacramento River during this storm. The concentrations of molinate and carbofuran, pesticides applied to rice fields during May and June, were relatively constant during and after the storm. Their presence in surface water was attributed to the flooding and subsequent drainage, as a management practice to degrade rice stubble prior to the next planting. A photodegradation product of molinate, 4-keto molinate, was in all samples where molinate was detected and made up approximately 50 percent of the total molinate load. Simazine, a herbicide used in orchards and to control weeds along the roadways, was detected in the storm runoff, but it was not possible to differentiate the two sources of that pesticide to the Sacramento River.

  5. Organophosphate and carbamate poisoning in infants and children.

    PubMed

    Zwiener, R J; Ginsburg, C M

    1988-01-01

    The clinical and laboratory features of moderate to severe organophosphate and carbamate toxicity in 37 infants and children are presented. Ingestion of an improperly stored liquid pesticide was the most common route of intoxication (76% of patients); five (14%) children became intoxicated after playing on carpets and floors of homes that had been sprayed or fogged by unlicensed exterminators. The transfer diagnoses were incorrect for 16 or 20 patients who were transferred to our center from another institution. Miosis (73%), excessive salivation (70%), muscle weakness (68%), and lethargy (54%) were the most common abnormal signs; 49% and 22% of patients had tachycardia and seizures, respectively, and 38% of children had respiratory insufficiency that required endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. The results of erythrocyte and serum cholinesterase activity assays were concordant in 83% of patients. Thirty-four (92%) patients were treated with atropine and/or pralidoxime; three patients required only supportive care. Most patients had a prompt response to therapy; however, two patients with organophosphate toxicity required multiple doses of atropine during a 24-hour period; in both instances, the doses of atropine were subtherapeutic. There were no deaths. Pneumonitis and/or atelectasis developed in ten patients, including six who had ingested a petroleum distillate-containing insecticide.

  6. Organophosphate toxicity in wild turkeys.

    PubMed

    Nettles, V F

    1976-10-01

    An accidental poisoning of wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo silvestris) by O,O-Diethyl O-[p-(methylsulfinyl) phenyl] phosphorothioate is reported. Diagnosis was achieved by history, clinical observations, postmortem lesions, diagnostic therapy and pesticide analysis.

  7. Photocatalytic oxidation of pesticide rinsate.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Wen S

    2002-01-01

    Pesticide rinsate has been considered as one of the major threats for the environment. In this study, photocatalysts such as TiO2 and O3 were used to promote the efficiency of direct UV photolysis to prevent such wastewater pollution. Carbofuran (a carbamate pesticide) and mevinphos (an organophosphate pesticide) with a concentration of 100 mg/L were selected as the test pesticide rinsates. Parent pesticide compound, COD, and microtoxicity analysis were employed to investigate the effect of photocatalyst on the degradation efficiency of pesticide in rinsate. It was found that the photocatalytic oxidation process (UV/O3, UV/TiO2) showed much higher COD removal and microtoxicity reduction efficiency for pesticide rinsate than did direct UV photolysis under the imposed conditions, suggesting that photocatalytic oxidation processes such as UV/O3 and UV/TiO2 could be a better alternative to treat pesticide rinsate. In addition, it was noted that increasing the initial pH of mevinphos rinsate to a basic level was required to reach higher COD removal efficiency and positive microtoxicity reduction efficiency while it was not necessary for the treatment of carbofuran rinsate.

  8. Role of the calcium plateau in neuronal injury and behavioral morbidities following organophosphate intoxication.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Laxmikant S; Blair, Robert E; Phillips, Kristin F; DeLorenzo, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    Organophosphate (OP) chemicals include nerve agents and pesticides, and there is a growing concern of OP-based chemical attacks against civilians. Current antidotes are essential in limiting immediate mortality associated with OP exposure. However, further research is needed to identify the molecular mechanisms underlying long-term neurological deficits following survival of OP toxicity in order to develop effective therapeutics. We have developed rat survival models of OP-induced status epilepticus (SE) that mimic chronic mortality and morbidity following OP intoxication. We have observed significant elevations in hippocampal calcium levels after OP SE that persisted for weeks following initial survival. Drugs inhibiting intracellular calcium-induced calcium release, such as dantrolene, levetiracetam, and carisbamate, lowered OP SE-mediated protracted calcium elevations. Given the critical role of calcium signaling in modulating behavior and cell death mechanisms, drugs targeted at preventing the development of the calcium plateau could enhance neuroprotection, help reduce morbidity, and improve outcomes following survival of OP SE. PMID:27327161

  9. Pharmacological blockade of the calcium plateau provides neuroprotection following organophosphate paraoxon induced status epilepticus in rats.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Laxmikant S; Blair, Robert E; Huang, Beverly A; Phillips, Kristin F; DeLorenzo, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Organophosphate (OP) compounds which include nerve agents and pesticides are considered chemical threat agents. Currently approved antidotes are crucial in limiting OP mediated acute mortality. However, survivors of lethal OP exposure exhibit delayed neuronal injury and chronic behavioral morbidities. In this study, we investigated neuroprotective capabilities of dantrolene and carisbamate in a rat survival model of paraoxon (POX) induced status epilepticus (SE). Significant elevations in hippocampal calcium levels were observed 48-h post POX SE survival, and treatment with dantrolene (10mg/kg, i.m.) and carisbamate (90mg/kg, i.m.) lowered these protracted calcium elevations. POX SE induced delayed neuronal injury as characterized by Fluoro Jade C labeling was observed in critical brain areas including the dentate gyrus, parietal cortex, amygdala, and thalamus. Dantrolene and carisbamate treatment provided significant neuroprotection against delayed neuronal damage in these brain regions when administered one-hour after POX-SE. These results indicate that dantrolene or carisbamate could be effective adjuvant therapies to the existing countermeasures to reduce neuronal injury and behavioral morbidities post OP SE survival. PMID:27224207

  10. The Association Between Ambient Exposure to Organophosphates and Parkinson’s Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Anthony; Cockburn, Myles; Ly, Thomas T.; Bronstein, Jeff; Ritz, Beate

    2014-01-01

    Objectives There is a general consensus that pesticides are involved in the etiology of Parkinson’s disease (PD), although associations between specific pesticides and the risk of developing Parkinson’s disease have not been well studied. This study examines the risk of developing PD associated with specific organophosphate pesticides and their mechanisms of toxicity. Methods This case-control study uses a geographic information system (GIS)-based exposure assessment tool to estimate ambient exposure to 36 commonly used organophosphates (OPs) from 1974-1999. All selected OPs were analyzed individually and also in groups formed according to their presumed mechanisms of toxicity. Results The study included 357 incident PD cases and 752 population controls living in the Central Valley of California. Ambient exposure to each OP evaluated separately increased the risk of developing PD. However, most participants were exposed to combinations of OPs rather than a single pesticide. Risk estimates for OPs grouped according to different presumed functionalities and toxicities were similar and did not allow us to distinguish between them. However, we observed exposure-response patterns with exposure to an increasing number of OPs. Conclusions This study adds strong evidence that OPs are implicated in the etiology of idiopathic PD. However, studies of OPs at low doses reflective of real-world ambient exposure are needed to determine the mechanisms of neurotoxicity. PMID:24436061

  11. Use of formulated Trichoderma sp. Tri-1 in combination with reduced rates of chemical pesticide for control of Sclerotinia sclerotiorium on oilseed rape

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sustainable strategies for control of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum on oilseed rape are needed. Here we tested combinations of Trichoderma sp. Tri-1, formulated with oilseed rape seedcake and straw, with reduced application rates of the chemical pesticide Carbendazim for control of this pathogen on oils...

  12. Review of Pesticide Urinary Biomarker Measurements from Selected US EPA Children's Observational Exposure Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Children are exposed to a wide variety of pesticides originating from both outdoor and indoor sources. Several studies were conducted or funded by the EPA over the past decade to investigate children’s exposure to organophosphate and pyrethroid pesticides and the factors that im...

  13. Changes in male hormone profile after occupational organophosphate exposure. A longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Garduño, C; Lacasaña, M; Blanco-Muñoz, J; Rodríguez-Barranco, M; Hernández, A F; Bassol, S; González-Alzaga, B; Cebrián, M E

    2013-05-10

    There is a growing concern about the endocrine effects of long-term, low-level exposure to organophosphate (OP) compounds. Studies on experimental animals have found that OP pesticides have an impact on the endocrine system and a few clinical and epidemiological studies have also shown that OPs may affect the male hormone profile, although results are inconsistent. We have evaluated the effect of exposure to OP pesticides, measured through urinary levels of six dialkylphosphate (DAP) metabolites, on male hormone profile in 136 floriculture workers from the State of Mexico and Morelos during two agricultural periods with different degree of pesticide exposure. Generalized estimated equations (GEE) models were developed and adjusted for several potential confounders, including PON1 enzyme activity, as a biomarker of susceptibility, and serum levels of p,p'-DDE, a metabolite of the pesticide DDT widely used in Mexico until 1999 for control of agricultural pests and malaria. Exposure of male floriculture workers to OP pesticides was associated with increased serum levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and prolactin and with decreased serum testosterone and inhibin B levels. Among all DAPs tested, only DETP was inversely associated with luteinizing hormone (LH). Estradiol showed a marginally significant positive trend with DEP and DETP derivatives. In conclusion, OP pesticides may have an impact on the endocrine function because of their potential to modify the male hormone profile as a function of the type of pesticide used as well as the magnitude of exposure.

  14. Biological detection and analysis of toxicity of organophosphate- and azadirachtin-based insecticides in Lathyrus sativus L.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Susmita; Bhattacharya, Sima; Mandi, Sukumar; Tarafdar, Jayanta

    2010-01-01

    In this study, attention was paid to investigate the effect of organophosphate insecticides, profenofos 40% EC, methyl parathion (metacid) 50% EC, and neem-based product nimbecidine 0.03% EC (from Azadirachta indica) on somatic chromosomal behavior, level of leaf protein, and activity of antioxidant enzymes in Lathyrus sativus L., the leguminous herb. The experiments on somatic chromosomes of root tip cells of L. sativus L. revealed that most common type of abnormalities were anaphase bridge, chromosome fragment, breaks, giant interphase, etc. Also, the mitotic index reduced and abnormality index enhanced, which were directly proportional to the rise in concentration as well as time period of exposure of chemicals. The profenofos and metacid induced drastic changes in mitotic index when compared with nimbecidine. The electrophoretic studies of leaf protein of L. sativus L. showed alteration of some major and minor protein bands subjected to spraying of organophosphate insecticides and induced to synthesize additional high molecular mass protein compared to untreated control. Analysis of SOD, EST, and POD activity by non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed different patterns of the isoforms. Complete inhibition of EST was observed in profenofos-treated plants, while with metacid- and nimbecidine-treated plants EST was suppressed. Induction and/or increased activities of SOD and POD were generally enhanced. Our present study not only provides the important information for better understanding of the toxic and tolerance mechanisms, but as well can be used as a bio-indicator for contamination by pesticides, which could cause genetic instabilities of natural plant populations and in crop varieties.

  15. Biological detection and analysis of toxicity of organophosphate- and azadirachtin-based insecticides in Lathyrus sativus L.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Susmita; Bhattacharya, Sima; Mandi, Sukumar; Tarafdar, Jayanta

    2010-01-01

    In this study, attention was paid to investigate the effect of organophosphate insecticides, profenofos 40% EC, methyl parathion (metacid) 50% EC, and neem-based product nimbecidine 0.03% EC (from Azadirachta indica) on somatic chromosomal behavior, level of leaf protein, and activity of antioxidant enzymes in Lathyrus sativus L., the leguminous herb. The experiments on somatic chromosomes of root tip cells of L. sativus L. revealed that most common type of abnormalities were anaphase bridge, chromosome fragment, breaks, giant interphase, etc. Also, the mitotic index reduced and abnormality index enhanced, which were directly proportional to the rise in concentration as well as time period of exposure of chemicals. The profenofos and metacid induced drastic changes in mitotic index when compared with nimbecidine. The electrophoretic studies of leaf protein of L. sativus L. showed alteration of some major and minor protein bands subjected to spraying of organophosphate insecticides and induced to synthesize additional high molecular mass protein compared to untreated control. Analysis of SOD, EST, and POD activity by non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed different patterns of the isoforms. Complete inhibition of EST was observed in profenofos-treated plants, while with metacid- and nimbecidine-treated plants EST was suppressed. Induction and/or increased activities of SOD and POD were generally enhanced. Our present study not only provides the important information for better understanding of the toxic and tolerance mechanisms, but as well can be used as a bio-indicator for contamination by pesticides, which could cause genetic instabilities of natural plant populations and in crop varieties. PMID:19618265

  16. Microplate assay analysis of the distribution of organophosphate and carbamate resistance in Guatemalan Anopheles albimanus

    PubMed Central

    Brogdon, W. G.; Beach, R. F.; Stewart, J. M.; Castanaza, L.

    1988-01-01

    Simple microplate assay methods for determining the frequency of insecticide resistance in single mosquitos were used to study the distribution and localization of organophosphate and carbamate resistance in field populations of Anopheles albimanus Weidemann in Guatemala, where such resistance, caused by heavy use of agricultural pesticides, has long been assumed to be widespread. Areas of complete susceptibility to organophosphates and carbamates were observed, as well as areas where the resistant phenotypes represented up to 98% of the population. Overall, the resistance levels were lower and more localized than expected. Two mechanisms of resistance were identified by the microassay methods. These were the elevated esterase (nonspecific esterase) and insensitive acetylcholinesterase mechanisms which were selected independently, the former (documented for the first time in Central American anophelines) being predominant. These methods represent a promising new technology for the detection and assessment of resistance and will facilitate improved control strategy decisions. PMID:3262440

  17. Biodegradation of pesticides. (Latest citations from the Biobusiness data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the biological degradation of pesticides. Pesticides such as malathion, parathion and DDT, organophosphates and carbamates, herbicides, fungicides, and rodenticides are examined. Coverage includes the isolation of enzymes specifically able to degrade pesticides, field studies of natural degradation and migration of pesticides, and test tube examination of microbial organisms with the ability to digest pesticides. Degradation products, effects of available nutrients on microbial degradation, and pesticide resistance in natural ecosystems are also discussed. (Contains a minimum of 190 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  18. Feasibility of hair sampling to assess levels of organophosphate metabolites in rural areas of Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Knipe, D.W.; Jayasumana, C.; Siribaddana, S.; Priyadarshana, C.; Pearson, M.; Gunnell, D.; Metcalfe, C.; Tzatzarakis, M.N.; Tsatsakis, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Measuring chronic pesticide exposure is important in order to investigate the associated health effects. Traditional biological samples (blood/urine) are difficult to collect, store and transport in large epidemiological studies in settings such as rural Asia. We assessed the acceptability of collecting hair samples from a rural Sri Lankan population and found that this method of data collection was feasible. We also assessed the level of non-specific metabolites (DAPS) of organophosphate pesticides in the hair samples. The median concentration (pg/mg) of each DAP was: diethyl phosphate: 83.3 (IQI 56.0, 209.4); diethyl thiophosphate: 34.7 (IQI 13.8, 147.9); diethyl dithiophosphate: 34.5 (IQI 23.4, 55.2); and dimethyl phosphate: 3 (IQI 3, 109.7). Total diethylphosphates were recovered in >80% of samples and were positively correlated with self-reported pesticide exposure. PMID:26894816

  19. Feasibility of hair sampling to assess levels of organophosphate metabolites in rural areas of Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Knipe, D W; Jayasumana, C; Siribaddana, S; Priyadarshana, C; Pearson, M; Gunnell, D; Metcalfe, C; Tzatzarakis, M N; Tsatsakis, A M

    2016-05-01

    Measuring chronic pesticide exposure is important in order to investigate the associated health effects. Traditional biological samples (blood/urine) are difficult to collect, store and transport in large epidemiological studies in settings such as rural Asia. We assessed the acceptability of collecting hair samples from a rural Sri Lankan population and found that this method of data collection was feasible. We also assessed the level of non-specific metabolites (DAPS) of organophosphate pesticides in the hair samples. The median concentration (pg/mg) of each DAP was: diethyl phosphate: 83.3 (IQI 56.0, 209.4); diethyl thiophosphate: 34.7 (IQI 13.8, 147.9); diethyl dithiophosphate: 34.5 (IQI 23.4, 55.2); and dimethyl phosphate: 3 (IQI 3, 109.7). Total diethylphosphates were recovered in >80% of samples and were positively correlated with self-reported pesticide exposure.

  20. Modern pesticides and bobwhite populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stromborg, K.L.; Schitoskey, Frank=; Schitoskey, Elizabeth C.; Talent, Larry G.

    1982-01-01

    Bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) are frequently used as test animals for wildlife tests of pesticides. The organophosphate and carbamate pesticides that have replaced the organochlorines have many desirable properties, but they span a wide range of acute toxicities and some of them affe,ct survival, reproduction, food consumption, behavior, and nervous system enzymes in laboratory tests. Applying these laboratory findings to the field requires assumptions about the severity of exposure in the field. Direct field measurements show that birds may be exposed to significant amounts of these pesticides or even more toxic degradation products under some conditions. Adverse population effects may also result from depression of insect populations during the seasons when bobwhites rely on insects for food.

  1. Association of Pesticide Exposure with Neurologic Dysfunction and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kamel, Freya; Hoppin, Jane A.

    2004-01-01

    Poisoning by acute high-level exposure to certain pesticides has well-known neurotoxic effects, but whether chronic exposure to moderate levels of pesticides is also neurotoxic is more controversial. Most studies of moderate pesticide exposure have found increased prevalence of neurologic symptoms and changes in neurobehavioral performance, reflecting cognitive and psychomotor dysfunction. There is less evidence that moderate exposure is related to deficits in sensory or motor function or peripheral nerve conduction, but fewer studies have considered these outcomes. It is possible that the most sensitive manifestation of pesticide neurotoxicity is a general malaise lacking in specificity and related to mild cognitive dysfunction, similar to that described for Gulf War syndrome. Most studies have focused on organophosphate insecticides, but some found neuro-toxic effects from other pesticides, including fungicides, fumigants, and organochlorine and carbamate insecticides. Pesticide exposure may also be associated with increased risk of Parkinson disease; several classes of pesticides, including insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides, have been implicated. Studies of other neurodegenerative diseases are limited and inconclusive. Future studies will need to improve assessment of pesticide exposure in individuals and consider the role of genetic susceptibility. More studies of pesticides other than organophosphates are needed. Major unresolved issues include the relative importance of acute and chronic exposure, the effect of moderate exposure in the absence of poisoning, and the relationship of pesticide-related neurotoxicity to neurodegenerative disease. PMID:15198914

  2. DETERMINATION OF ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDES IN COMPOSITE DIET SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    USEPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory conducts research to measure the exposure of individuals to chemical pollutants through the diet, as well as other media. In support of this research, methods are being evaluated for determination of pollutants, including organophosp...

  3. BIOSENSORS FOR DIRECT DETERMINATION OF ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDES. (R828160)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  4. Occurrence of pesticide residues in Lebanon's water resources.

    PubMed

    Kouzayha, Abir; Al Ashi, Aisha; Al Akoum, Rami; Al Iskandarani, Mohamad; Budzinski, Hélène; Jaber, Farouk

    2013-11-01

    Contamination of water sources by pesticides is one of the most critical environmental problems. The present work is designed to address the occurrence of 67 pesticides in the Lebanese waters. Chemical analysis was performed by a solid-phase extraction followed by a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using programmed temperature vaporization injection. In drinking water and groundwater samples, organochlorine and organophosphate pesticides were frequently detected with a maximal sum concentration of up to 31.8 ng L(-1). High pesticide ecotoxicological risk was noticed in many surface waters, while this risk was driven mainly by diazinon, chlorpyrifos, fenpropathrin and bifenthrin insecticides.

  5. Reconcilable differences: the use of reference material to reduce methodological artifacts in the reporting of organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls.

    PubMed

    de Solla, Shane R; Weseloh, D V Chip; Letcher, Robert J; Hebert, Craig E

    2010-01-01

    Numerous long-term monitoring programs have assessed spatial and temporal trends of organochlorine (OC) pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Changes in analytical approaches (e.g., gas chromatography coupled with electron capture detection [GC-ECD] versus mass spectrometric detection [GC-MSD]) can reveal artifacts in the reported concentrations. In-house reference material (RM) was used to determine the analytical artifacts in the measurement of OCs and PCBs in Great Lake herring gull eggs previously analyzed from 1994 to 1996 (GC-ECD) and 1997 to 1999 (GC-MSD). Approximately 19.0% of the variability of PCB congeners in gull eggs was associated with analytical artifacts, and differences among colonies were obscured. Although the discrepancy in sum PCBs (SigmaPCBs) was fairly small (2.1%), some congeners varied considerably between methods (> 60%). After statistically removing the artifacts, only 1.4% of the variability in PCBs of herring gull eggs was associated with artifacts, and differences among gull colonies became apparent. After excluding OCs near the detection limit in the RM, statistically removing the artifacts reduced some of the differences between methods for OCs. Analytical artifacts may potentially render inferences difficult, confounded, and erroneous. When combining contaminant data obtained using different methods, the methods should be assumed to give different results unless demonstrated otherwise. Assessments of the compatibility of analytical methodologies should be made using an appropriate RM.

  6. Reconcilable differences: the use of reference material to reduce methodological artifacts in the reporting of organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls.

    PubMed

    de Solla, Shane R; Weseloh, D V Chip; Letcher, Robert J; Hebert, Craig E

    2010-01-01

    Numerous long-term monitoring programs have assessed spatial and temporal trends of organochlorine (OC) pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Changes in analytical approaches (e.g., gas chromatography coupled with electron capture detection [GC-ECD] versus mass spectrometric detection [GC-MSD]) can reveal artifacts in the reported concentrations. In-house reference material (RM) was used to determine the analytical artifacts in the measurement of OCs and PCBs in Great Lake herring gull eggs previously analyzed from 1994 to 1996 (GC-ECD) and 1997 to 1999 (GC-MSD). Approximately 19.0% of the variability of PCB congeners in gull eggs was associated with analytical artifacts, and differences among colonies were obscured. Although the discrepancy in sum PCBs (SigmaPCBs) was fairly small (2.1%), some congeners varied considerably between methods (> 60%). After statistically removing the artifacts, only 1.4% of the variability in PCBs of herring gull eggs was associated with artifacts, and differences among gull colonies became apparent. After excluding OCs near the detection limit in the RM, statistically removing the artifacts reduced some of the differences between methods for OCs. Analytical artifacts may potentially render inferences difficult, confounded, and erroneous. When combining contaminant data obtained using different methods, the methods should be assumed to give different results unless demonstrated otherwise. Assessments of the compatibility of analytical methodologies should be made using an appropriate RM. PMID:20821415

  7. Plant consumption by grizzly bears reduces biomagnification of salmon-derived polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, and organochlorine pesticides.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Jennie R; Yunker, Mark B; MacDuffee, Misty; Ross, Peter S

    2013-04-01

    The present study characterizes the uptake and loss of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) by sampling and analyzing their terrestrial and marine foods and fecal material from a remote coastal watershed in British Columbia, Canada. The authors estimate that grizzly bears consume 341 to 1,120 µg of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and 3.9 to 33 µg of polybrominated diphenyl ethers daily in the fall when they have access to an abundant supply of returning salmon. The authors also estimate that POP elimination by grizzly bears through defecation is very low following salmon consumption (typically <2% of intake) but surprisingly high following plant consumption (>100% for PCBs and organochlorine pesticides). Excretion of individual POPs is largely driven by a combination of fugacity (differences between bear and food concentrations) and the digestibility of the food. The results of the present study are substantiated by a principal components analysis, which also demonstrates a strong role for log KOW in governing the excretion of different POPs in grizzly bears. Collectively, the present study's results reveal that grizzly bears experience a vegetation-associated drawdown of POPs previously acquired through the consumption of salmon, to such an extent that net biomagnification is reduced.

  8. Plant consumption by grizzly bears reduces biomagnification of salmon-derived polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, and organochlorine pesticides.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Jennie R; Yunker, Mark B; MacDuffee, Misty; Ross, Peter S

    2013-04-01

    The present study characterizes the uptake and loss of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) by sampling and analyzing their terrestrial and marine foods and fecal material from a remote coastal watershed in British Columbia, Canada. The authors estimate that grizzly bears consume 341 to 1,120 µg of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and 3.9 to 33 µg of polybrominated diphenyl ethers daily in the fall when they have access to an abundant supply of returning salmon. The authors also estimate that POP elimination by grizzly bears through defecation is very low following salmon consumption (typically <2% of intake) but surprisingly high following plant consumption (>100% for PCBs and organochlorine pesticides). Excretion of individual POPs is largely driven by a combination of fugacity (differences between bear and food concentrations) and the digestibility of the food. The results of the present study are substantiated by a principal components analysis, which also demonstrates a strong role for log KOW in governing the excretion of different POPs in grizzly bears. Collectively, the present study's results reveal that grizzly bears experience a vegetation-associated drawdown of POPs previously acquired through the consumption of salmon, to such an extent that net biomagnification is reduced. PMID:23401324

  9. Deaths from pesticide poisoning in Spain from 1991 to 1996.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Repetto, R; Soria, M L; Gimenez, M P; Menendez, M; Repetto, M

    1998-06-01

    Data on 184 deaths from pesticide poisonings that occurred in Spain from 1991 to 1996 have been collated via a survey from the National Institute of Toxicology, Sevilla. Organophosphates and carbamates accounted for the majority of the cases. Other substances involved were organochlorines such as endosulfan and the herbicide paraquat.

  10. Effects of pesticides on songbird productivity in conjunction with pecan cultivation in southern Georgia: A multiple-exposure experimental design

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patnode, K.A.; White, D.H.

    1991-01-01

    A prototypic experimental design was used to assess sublethal effects of multiple and varied organophosphates and carbamates on reproduction in birds. The design allowed for classification of pesticide exposure according to toxicity of applied compounds and type and frequency of applications. Daily survival rates (DSRs) of nests, eggs, and nestlings were determined for northern mockingbirds (Mimus polyglottos), brown thrashers (Toxostoma rufum), and northern cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis) nesting along edges of pecan orchards and row crops in southern Georgia [USA]. Egg and nestling DSRs for all species combined varied inversely (P 0.05) among three exposure levels. Brain cholinesterase activities were age-dependent and substantiated adult, but not nestling, exposure. Results suggest that increasing exposure to pesticides may reduce songbird productivity.

  11. Comparative toxicities of organophosphate and pyrethroid insecticides to aquatic macroarthropods.

    PubMed

    Halstead, Neal T; Civitello, David J; Rohr, Jason R

    2015-09-01

    As agricultural expansion and intensification increase to meet the growing global food demand, so too will insecticide use and thus the risk of non-target effects. Insecticide pollution poses a particular threat to aquatic macroarthropods, which play important functional roles in freshwater ecosystems. Thus, understanding the relative toxicities of insecticides to non-target functional groups is critical for predicting effects on ecosystem functions. We exposed two common macroarthropod predators, the crayfish Procambarus alleni and the water bug Belostoma flumineum, to three insecticides in each of two insecticide classes (three organophosphates: chlorpyrifos, malathion, and terbufos; and three pyrethroids: esfenvalerate, λ-cyhalothrin, and permethrin) to assess their toxicities. We generated 150 simulated environmental exposures using the US EPA Surface Water Contamination Calculator to determine the proportion of estimated peak environmental concentrations (EECs) that exceeded the US EPA level of concern (0.5×LC50) for non-endangered aquatic invertebrates. Organophosphate insecticides generated consistently low-risk exposure scenarios (EECs<0.5×LC50) for both P. alleni and B. flumineum. Pyrethroid exposure scenarios presented consistently high risk (EECs>0.5×LC50) to P. alleni, but not to B. flumineum, where only λ-cyhalothrin produced consistently high-risk exposures. Survival analyses demonstrated that insecticide class accounted for 55.7% and 91.1% of explained variance in P. alleni and B. flumineum survival, respectively. Thus, risk to non-target organisms is well predicted by pesticide class. Identifying insecticides that pose low risk to aquatic macroarthropods might help meet increased demands for food while mitigating against potential negative effects on ecosystem functions.

  12. Comparative toxicities of organophosphate and pyrethroid insecticides to aquatic macroarthropods.

    PubMed

    Halstead, Neal T; Civitello, David J; Rohr, Jason R

    2015-09-01

    As agricultural expansion and intensification increase to meet the growing global food demand, so too will insecticide use and thus the risk of non-target effects. Insecticide pollution poses a particular threat to aquatic macroarthropods, which play important functional roles in freshwater ecosystems. Thus, understanding the relative toxicities of insecticides to non-target functional groups is critical for predicting effects on ecosystem functions. We exposed two common macroarthropod predators, the crayfish Procambarus alleni and the water bug Belostoma flumineum, to three insecticides in each of two insecticide classes (three organophosphates: chlorpyrifos, malathion, and terbufos; and three pyrethroids: esfenvalerate, λ-cyhalothrin, and permethrin) to assess their toxicities. We generated 150 simulated environmental exposures using the US EPA Surface Water Contamination Calculator to determine the proportion of estimated peak environmental concentrations (EECs) that exceeded the US EPA level of concern (0.5×LC50) for non-endangered aquatic invertebrates. Organophosphate insecticides generated consistently low-risk exposure scenarios (EECs<0.5×LC50) for both P. alleni and B. flumineum. Pyrethroid exposure scenarios presented consistently high risk (EECs>0.5×LC50) to P. alleni, but not to B. flumineum, where only λ-cyhalothrin produced consistently high-risk exposures. Survival analyses demonstrated that insecticide class accounted for 55.7% and 91.1% of explained variance in P. alleni and B. flumineum survival, respectively. Thus, risk to non-target organisms is well predicted by pesticide class. Identifying insecticides that pose low risk to aquatic macroarthropods might help meet increased demands for food while mitigating against potential negative effects on ecosystem functions. PMID:25966044

  13. Carbamate and organophosphate poisoning in early childhood.

    PubMed

    Sofer, S; Tal, A; Shahak, E

    1989-12-01

    Twenty-five infants and young children intoxicated by carbamate and organophosphorus compounds are described. Presenting signs and symptoms in children differed from those described in adults and were mainly related to severe CNS depression, coma and stupor, dyspnea, and flaccidity. Other clinical signs such as miosis, excessive salivation and tearing, sweaty, cold skin, and gastrointestinal symptoms were less frequent, while fasciculations and bradycardia were quite uncommon on arrival. Only two patients presented with all typical signs of organophosphate poisoning as described in adults. Signs of carbamate poisoning were indistinguishable from those of organophosphate poisoning and included signs of myoneural and CNS cholinergic receptor involvement, in addition to parasympathetic muscarinic dysfunction. Atropine sulfate was found to have a clear beneficial CNS effect in addition to its known peripheral antimuscarinic effect. Our data suggest that the clinical presentation of carbamate and organophosphate poisoning in early childhood and its response to therapy are quite different from those of adults and older children.

  14. Farmers' knowledge, practices and injuries associated with pesticide exposure in rural farming villages in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pesticides in Tanzania are extensively used for pest control in agriculture. Their usage and unsafe handling practices may potentially result in high farmer exposures and adverse health effects. The aim of this study was to describe farmers’ pesticide exposure profile, knowledge about pesticide hazards, experience of previous poisoning, hazardous practices that may lead to Acute Pesticide Poisoning (APP) and the extent to which APP is reported. Methods The study involved 121 head- of-household respondents from Arumeru district in Arusha region. Data collection involved administration of a standardised questionnaire to farmers and documentation of storage practices. Unsafe pesticide handling practices were assessed through observation of pesticide storage, conditions of personal protective equipment (PPE) and through self-reports of pesticide disposal and equipment calibration. Results Past lifetime pesticide poisoning was reported by 93% of farmers. The agents reported as responsible for poisoning were Organophosphates (42%) and WHO Class II agents (77.6%). Storage of pesticides in the home was reported by 79% of farmers. Respondents with higher education levels were significantly less likely to store pesticides in their home (PRR High/Low = 0.3; 95% CI = 0.1-0.7) and more likely to practice calibration of spray equipment (PRR High/Low = 1.2; 95% CI = 1.03-1.4). However, knowledge of routes of exposure was not associated with safety practices particularly for disposal, equipment wash area, storage and use of PPE . The majority of farmers experiencing APP in the past (79%) did not attend hospital and of the 23 farmers who did so in the preceding year, records could be traced for only 22% of these cases. Conclusions The study found a high potential for pesticide exposure in the selected community in rural Tanzania, a high frequency of self-reported APP and poor recording in hospital records. Farmers’ knowledge levels appeared to be unrelated to their

  15. The role of the connectivity in the implementation of mitigation measures to reduce the impact of pesticides in the environment under Mediterranean conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Getino García, Ana Patricia; Alonso Prados, Elena; Alonso Prados, José Luis

    2014-05-01

    Regulation 1107/2009 of the European Commission, establishes the procedure and criteria for approval of active substances and authorization of plant protection products in Europe. One of the aspects to be considered is the assessment of the fate and behavior in the environment of pesticides In this assessment a tiered modeling approach is followed according to the models and scenarios developed by the FOrum for the Co-ordination of pesticide fate models and Their USe, (named as FOCUS models/scenarios). They consider different European scenarios to determine the predicted environmental concentration (PEC) in soil, ground water, surface water and sediment at in-field or edge-of-field scales. During the evaluation process, it is frequent to establish different mitigation measures to reduce the impact of pesticides and to ensure an acceptable risk to non-target species. Parallel to this regulatory process, the directive of sustainable use of pesticides (Directive 2009/128/EC) establishes a framework to reduce the impact of use of pesticides where the implementation of mitigation measures to protect aquatic systems and vulnerable areas will play a main role. Therefore, there is a main need to assess how the risk mitigation measures established at field level under regulation 1107/2009 are acting at landscape/catchment level. The characteristics of the climate, relief and soils in Mediterranean region provoke that soil erosion by water is common at different scales. In arable lands soil rates due to inter-rill, rill and gully erosion may exceed 10 ton/ha/year. This process may be modified by human actions. In this scheme, connectivity concept emerges as essential to understand the transfer process of surface water, sediment and micropollutants throughout catchments and the success of the implemented measures for the sustainable management of pesticides at different scales (field, landscape and catchment levels). In this work a review of published monitoring programs of

  16. Respiratory failure of acute organophosphate and carbamate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Tsao, T C; Juang, Y C; Lan, R S; Shieh, W B; Lee, C H

    1990-09-01

    Respiratory failure (RF) developed in 43 (40.2 percent) of 107 patients with acute organophosphate or carbamate poisoning; 22 (51.2 percent) died. The 64 patients who did not develop RF survived. All cases of RF developed within 96 hours after poisoning: within 24 hours in 35 patients (acute onset) and between 24 and 96 hours in eight patients (subacute onset). Severity of poisoning was the primary determinating factor for RF. Cardiovascular collapse and pneumonia were also associated with RF. In 19 patients with cardiovascular collapse, 17 had acute onset of RF and two had subacute onset. In 28 patients with pneumonia, 17 developed acute onset of RF and eight developed subacute onset. No organophosphorus compound caused RF more frequently than another. The duration of ventilator support for subacute RF was significantly longer than for acute RF (287 +/- 186 vs 115 +/- 103 hours, p = 0.02). The use of pralidoxime did not reduce the incidence of RF. We found that severity of poisoning, cardiovascular collapse, and pneumonia were the predisposing factors to RF. The golden time for treatment of acute organophosphate or carbamate poisoning was the initial 96 hours. No RF occurred after this time. Aggressive treatment and prevention of the above three factors will reduce the incidence of RF, or in other words, reduce the mortality.

  17. AN ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) TESTING OF ENZYMATIC TEST KITS FOR WARFARE AGENTS AND PESTICIDES IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enzymatic test kits, generally designed to be handheld and portable, detect the presence of chemical agents, carbamate pesticides, and/or organophosphate pesticides by relying on the reaction of the cholinesterase enzyme. Under normal conditions, the enzyme reacts as expected wi...

  18. Phyt'Eaux Cités: application and validation of a programme to reduce surface water contamination with urban pesticides.

    PubMed

    Botta, Fabrizio; Fauchon, Nils; Blanchoud, Hélène; Chevreuil, Marc; Guery, Bénédicte

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents first results of Phyt'Eaux Cités, a program put in place by the local water supply agency, the SEDIF (Syndicat des Eaux d'Ile-de-France), in collaboration with 73 local authorities, private societies and institutional offices (365 km(2)). The challenges included: measurement of the previous surface water contamination, control of urban pesticide applications, prevention of pesticide hazard on users and finally a overall reduction of surface water contamination. An inquiry on urban total pesticide amount was coupled with a surface water bi-weekly monitoring to establish the impact of more than 200 molecules upon the Orge River. For 2007, at least 4400 kg and 92 type of pesticides (essentially herbicides) were quantified for all urban users in the Phyt'Eaux Cités perimeter. At the outlet of the Orge River (bi-weekly sampling in 2007), 11 molecules were always detected above 0.1 μg L(-1). They displayed the mainly urban origin of pesticide surface water contamination. Amitrole, AMPA (Aminomethyl Phosphonic Acid), demethyldiuron, diuron, glyphosate and atrazine were quantified with a 100% of frequency in 2007 and 2008 at the Orge River outlet. During the year, peaks of contamination were also registered for MCCP, 2,4 MCPA, 2,4 D, triclopyr, dichlorprop, diflufènican, active substances used in large amount in the urban area. However, some other urban molecules, such as isoxaben or flazasulfuron, were detected with low frequency. During late spring and summer, contamination patterns and load were dominated by glyphosate, amitrole and diuron, essentially applied by cities and urban users. Both isoproturon and chlortoluron were quantified during autumn and winter months according to upstream agricultural practices. In conclusion, 3 years after the beginning of this programme, the cities reduced the use of 68% of the total pesticide amount. An improvement on surface water quality was found from 2008 and during 2009 for all pesticides. In particular

  19. Cut flowers: a potential pesticide hazard.

    PubMed

    Morse, D L; Baker, E L; Landrigan, P J

    1979-01-01

    Following reports of ten cases of possible organophosphate pesticide poisoning in florists exposed to pesticide residues on cut flowers, we conducted a prospective random-sample survey to determine residual pesticide levels on flowers imported into the United States via Miami, Florida. A sample of all flowers imported into Miami on three days in January 1977 showed that 18 (17.7 per cent) of 105 lots contained pesticide residue levels greater than 5 ppm, and that three lots had levels greater than 400 ppm. Azodrin (monocrotophos) was the most important contaminant with levels of 7.7--4,750 ppm detected in nine lots. We examined 20 quarantine workers in Miami and 12 commercial florists exposed to contaminated flowers. Occasional nonspecific symptoms compatible with possible organophosphate exposure were noted, but we found no abnormalities in plasma or red blood cell cholinesterase levels. This study documents a previously unrecognized potential source of occupational pesticide exposure and suggests that safety standards should be set for residue levels on cut flowers.

  20. Reproductive effects in birds exposed to pesticides and industrial chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, D.M.

    1995-10-01

    Environmental contamination by agricultural chemicals and industrial waste disposal results in adverse effects on reproduction of exposed birds. The diversity of pollutants results in physiological effects at several levels, including direct effects on breeding adults as well as developmental effects on embryos. The effects on embryos include mortality or reduced hatchability, failure of chicks to thrive (wasting syndrome), and teratological effects producing skeletal abnormalities and impaired differentiation of the reproductive and nervous systems through mechanisms of hormonal mimicking of estrogens. The range of chemical effects on adult birds covers acute mortality, sublethal stress, reduced fertility, suppression of egg formation, eggshell thinning, and impaired incubation and chick rearing behaviors. The types of pollutants shown to cause reproductive effects include organochlorine pesticides and industrial pollutants, organophosphate pesticides, petroleum hydrocarbons, heavy metals, and in a fewer number of reports, herbicides, and fungicides. o,p`-DDT, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and mixtures of organochlorines have been identified as environmental estrogens affecting populations of gulls breeding in polluted {open_quotes}hot spots{close_quotes} in southern California, the Great Lakes, and Puget Sound. Estrogenic organochlorines represent an important class of toxicants to birds because differentiation of the avian reproductive system is estrogen dependent. 85 refs.

  1. Reproductive effects in birds exposed to pesticides and industrial chemicals.

    PubMed

    Fry, D M

    1995-10-01

    Environmental contamination by agricultural chemicals and industrial waste disposal results in adverse effects on reproduction of exposed birds. The diversity of pollutants results in physiological effects at several levels, including direct effects on breeding adults as well as developmental effects on embryos. The effects on embryos include mortality or reduced hatchability, failure of chicks to thrive (wasting syndrome), and teratological effects producing skeletal abnormalities and impaired differentiation of the reproductive and nervous systems through mechanisms of hormonal mimicking of estrogens. The range of chemical effects on adult birds covers acute mortality, sublethal stress, reduced fertility, suppression of egg formation, eggshell thinning, and impaired incubation and chick rearing behaviors. The types of pollutants shown to cause reproductive effects include organochlorine pesticides and industrial pollutants, organophosphate pesticides, petroleum hydrocarbons, heavy metals, and in a fewer number of reports, herbicides, and fungicides. o,p'-DDT, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and mixtures of organochlorines have been identified as environmental estrogens affecting populations of gulls breeding in polluted "hot spots" in southern California, the Great Lakes, and Puget Sound. Estrogenic organochlorines represent an important class of toxicants to birds because differentiation of the avian reproductive system is estrogen dependent. PMID:8593865

  2. Possible role for anisodamine in organophosphate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Eisenkraft, Arik; Falk, Avshalom

    2016-06-01

    In cases of organophosphate poisoning, patients are treated with a combination of antidotes. In addition to these poison-directed antidotes, patients may require extra oxygen and artificial ventilation; other modalities may also be needed due to the wide range of toxic effects. Anisodamine is a belladonna alkaloid, and like other drugs from this family is non subtype-selective muscarinic, and a nicotinic cholinoceptor antagonist, which has been employed in traditional Chinese medicine. As a muscarinic antagonist, it displays similar pharmacological effects to atropine and scopolamine. However, anisodamine is not only less potent than atropine and scopolamine but also less toxic. Current in vitro and animal model studies have demonstrated that anisodamine has protective effects in a variety of diseases. Organophosphate poisoning involves not only the central and peripheral nervous systems, but also the cardiac and respiratory systems, as well as activation of inflammatory processes and oxidative stress. Therefore, the anticholinergic and additional activities of anisodamine appear to be relevant and justify its consideration as an addition to the existing remedies. However, more research is needed, as at present data on the role of anisodamine in the management of organophosphate poisoning are limited. Here, we review the beneficial effects of anisodamine on processes relevant to organophosphate poisoning.

  3. DETERMINATION OF PESTICIDES IN COMPOSITE DIETARY SAMPLES BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY IN THE SELECTED ION MONITORING MODE USING A TEMPERATURE PROGRAMMABLE LARGE VOLUME INJECTOR WITH PRE-SEPARATION COLUMN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of a temperature-programmable pre-separation column in the gas chromatographic injection port permits determination of a wide range of semi-volatile pesticides including organochlorines, organophosphates, triazines, and anilines in fatty composite dietary samples while reduci...

  4. Pesticide exposure in children.

    PubMed

    2012-12-01

    This statement presents the position of the American Academy of Pediatrics on pesticides. Pesticides are a collective term for chemicals intended to kill unwanted insects, plants, molds, and rodents. Children encounter pesticides daily and have unique susceptibilities to their potential toxicity. Acute poisoning risks are clear, and understanding of chronic health implications from both acute and chronic exposure are emerging. Epidemiologic evidence demonstrates associations between early life exposure to pesticides and pediatric cancers, decreased cognitive function, and behavioral problems. Related animal toxicology studies provide supportive biological plausibility for these findings. Recognizing and reducing problematic exposures will require attention to current inadequacies in medical training, public health tracking, and regulatory action on pesticides. Ongoing research describing toxicologic vulnerabilities and exposure factors across the life span are needed to inform regulatory needs and appropriate interventions. Policies that promote integrated pest management, comprehensive pesticide labeling, and marketing practices that incorporate child health considerations will enhance safe use. PMID:23184103

  5. Cholinergic pesticides cause mushroom body neuronal inactivation in honeybees

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Mary J.; Moffat, Christopher; Saranzewa, Nastja; Harvey, Jenni; Wright, Geraldine A.; Connolly, Christopher N.

    2013-01-01

    Pesticides that target cholinergic neurotransmission are highly effective, but their use has been implicated in insect pollinator population decline. Honeybees are exposed to two widely used classes of cholinergic pesticide: neonicotinoids (nicotinic receptor agonists) and organophosphate miticides (acetylcholinesterase inhibitors). Although sublethal levels of neonicotinoids are known to disrupt honeybee learning and behaviour, the neurophysiological basis of these effects has not been shown. Here, using recordings from mushroom body Kenyon cells in acutely isolated honeybee brain, we show that the neonicotinoids imidacloprid and clothianidin, and the organophosphate miticide coumaphos oxon, cause a depolarization-block of neuronal firing and inhibit nicotinic responses. These effects are observed at concentrations that are encountered by foraging honeybees and within the hive, and are additive with combined application. Our findings demonstrate a neuronal mechanism that may account for the cognitive impairments caused by neonicotinoids, and predict that exposure to multiple pesticides that target cholinergic signalling will cause enhanced toxicity to pollinators. PMID:23535655

  6. Cholinergic pesticides cause mushroom body neuronal inactivation in honeybees.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Mary J; Moffat, Christopher; Saranzewa, Nastja; Harvey, Jenni; Wright, Geraldine A; Connolly, Christopher N

    2013-01-01

    Pesticides that target cholinergic neurotransmission are highly effective, but their use has been implicated in insect pollinator population decline. Honeybees are exposed to two widely used classes of cholinergic pesticide: neonicotinoids (nicotinic receptor agonists) and organophosphate miticides (acetylcholinesterase inhibitors). Although sublethal levels of neonicotinoids are known to disrupt honeybee learning and behaviour, the neurophysiological basis of these effects has not been shown. Here, using recordings from mushroom body Kenyon cells in acutely isolated honeybee brain, we show that the neonicotinoids imidacloprid and clothianidin, and the organophosphate miticide coumaphos oxon, cause a depolarization-block of neuronal firing and inhibit nicotinic responses. These effects are observed at concentrations that are encountered by foraging honeybees and within the hive, and are additive with combined application. Our findings demonstrate a neuronal mechanism that may account for the cognitive impairments caused by neonicotinoids, and predict that exposure to multiple pesticides that target cholinergic signalling will cause enhanced toxicity to pollinators.

  7. Effects of organophosphate compounds on a soil protist, Colpoda inflata (Ciliophora, Colpodidae).

    PubMed

    Trielli, Francesca; Chessa, Maria Giovanna; Amaroli, Andrea; Ognibene, Marzia; Delmonte Corrado, Maria Umberta

    2006-12-01

    Many investigations on protists indicate that they play an important role in agricultural soils. We have tested the effects of three organophosphate (OP) pesticides, basudin, cidial, and fenix, on the soil ciliate Colpoda inflata, and examined its viability, fission rate, ability to excyst and extrude macronuclear chromatin into cytoplasm. Exposure to these OPs caused a dose-dependent effect on cell viability, and significantly reduced the mean fission rate at a concentration of 1/10(5) v/v. After exposure of resting cysts to 1/10(5) v/v or 1/10(6) v/v concentrations of basudin or cidial, the number of excysted cells was significantly lower than that of the controls. Conversely, exposure to a 1/10(5) v/v fenix concentration did not affect excystment and exposure to 1/10(6) v/v was found to promote excystment. Moreover, exposure to these OPs (1/10(4) v/v or 1/10(5) v/v) interferred with the ability to extrude macronuclear chromatin. The median lethal concentration in 60 min for each OPs tested was at least a hundred times lower than the doses recommended by the manufacturer. Finally, as the inhibition of cholinesterase (ChE) activity is the first target of OPs, the presence of ChE activity was checked in C. inflata. Three ChE activities were found, hydrolyzing the substrates acetyl-beta-methyl thiocholine iodide, propionyl thiocholine iodide and butyryl thiocholine iodide, that appeared to be very low and not inhibited by OP-exposure.

  8. Primary and complex stressors in polluted mediterranean rivers: Pesticide effects on biological communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricart, Marta; Guasch, Helena; Barceló, Damià; Brix, Rikke; Conceição, Maria H.; Geiszinger, Anita; José López de Alda, Maria; López-Doval, Julio C.; Muñoz, Isabel; Postigo, Cristina; Romaní, Anna M.; Villagrasa, Marta; Sabater, Sergi

    2010-03-01

    SummaryWe examined the presence of pesticides in the Llobregat river basin (Barcelona, Spain) and their effects on benthic biological communities (invertebrates and diatoms). The Llobregat river is one of Barcelona's major drinking water resources. It has been highly polluted by industrial, agricultural, and urban wastewaters, and—as a typical Mediterranean river—is regularly subjected to periodic floods and droughts. Water scarcity periods result in reduced water flow and dilution capacity, increasing the potential environmental risk of pollutants. Seven sites were selected, where we analysed the occurrence of 22 pesticides (belonging to the classes of triazines, organophosphates, phenylureas, anilides, chloroacetanilides, acidic herbicides and thiocarbamates) in the water and sediment, and the benthic community structure. Biofilm samples were taken to measure several metrics related to both the algal and bacterial components of fluvial biofilms. Multivariate analyses revealed a potential relationship between triazine-type herbicides and the distribution of the diatom community, although no evidence of disruption in the invertebrate community distribution was found. Biofilm metrics were used as response variables rather than abundances of individual species to identify possible cause-effect relationships between pesticide pollution and biotic responses. Certain effects of organophosphates and phenylureas in both structural and functional aspects of the biofilm community were suggested, but the sensitivity of each metric to particular stressors must be assessed before we can confidently assign causality. Complemented with laboratory experiments, which are needed to confirm causality, this approach could be successfully incorporated into environmental risk assessments to better summarise biotic integrity and improve the ecological management.

  9. Intranasal delivery of obidoxime to the brain prevents mortality and CNS damage from organophosphate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Jishnu K S; Arun, Peethambaran; Appu, Abhilash P; Vijayakumar, Nivetha; Figueiredo, Taíza H; Braga, Maria F M; Baskota, Sudikshya; Olsen, Cara H; Farkas, Natalia; Dagata, John; Frey, William H; Moffett, John R; Namboodiri, Aryan M A

    2016-03-01

    Intranasal delivery is an emerging method for bypassing the blood brain barrier (BBB) and targeting therapeutics to the CNS. Oximes are used to counteract the effects of organophosphate poisoning, but they do not readily cross the BBB. Therefore, they cannot effectively counteract the central neuropathologies caused by cholinergic over-activation when administered peripherally. For these reasons we examined intranasal administration of oximes in an animal model of severe organophosphate poisoning to determine their effectiveness in reducing mortality and seizure-induced neuronal degeneration. Using the paraoxon model of organophosphate poisoning, we administered the standard treatment (intramuscular pralidoxime plus atropine sulphate) to all animals and then compared the effectiveness of intranasal application of obidoxime (OBD) to saline in the control groups. Intranasally administered OBD was effective in partially reducing paraoxon-induced acetylcholinesterase inhibition in the brain and substantially reduced seizure severity and duration. Further, intranasal OBD completely prevented mortality, which was 41% in the animals given standard treatment plus intranasal saline. Fluoro-Jade-B staining revealed extensive neuronal degeneration in the surviving saline-treated animals 24h after paraoxon administration, whereas no detectable degenerating neurons were observed in any of the animals given intranasal OBD 30min before or 5min after paraoxon administration. These findings demonstrate that intranasally administered oximes bypass the BBB more effectively than those administered peripherally and provide an effective method for protecting the brain from organophosphates. The addition of intranasally administered oximes to the current treatment regimen for organophosphate poisoning would improve efficacy, reducing both brain damage and mortality. PMID:26751814

  10. Organophosphates dysregulate dopamine signaling, glutamatergic neurotransmission, and induce neuronal injury markers in striatum.

    PubMed

    Torres-Altoro, Melissa I; Mathur, Brian N; Drerup, Justin M; Thomas, Rachel; Lovinger, David M; O'Callaghan, James P; Bibb, James A

    2011-10-01

    The neurological effects of organophosphate (OP) pesticides, commonly used on foods and in households, are an important public health concern. Furthermore, subclinical exposure to combinations of organophosphates is implicated in Gulf War illness. Here, we characterized the effects of the broadly used insecticide chlorpyrifos (CPF) on dopamine and glutamatergic neurotransmission effectors in corticostriatal motor/reward circuitry. CPF potentiated protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent phosphorylation of the striatal protein dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of M(r) 32 kDa (DARPP-32) and the glutamate receptor 1 (GluR1) subunit of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors in mouse brain slices. It also increased GluR1 phosphorylation by PKA when administered systemically. This correlated with enhanced glutamate release from cortical projections in rat striatum. Similar effects were induced by the sarin congener, diisopropyl fluorophosphate, alone or in combination with the putative neuroprotectant, pyridostigmine bromide and the pesticide N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET). This combination, meant to mimic the neurotoxicant exposure encountered by veterans of the 1991 Persian Gulf War, also induced hyperphosphorylation of the neurofibrillary tangle-associated protein tau. Diisopropyl fluorophosphate and pyrodostigmine bromide, alone or in combination, also increased the aberrant activity of the protein kinase, Cdk5, as indicated by conversion of its activating cofactor p35 to p25. Thus, consistent with recent findings in humans and animals, organophosphate exposure causes dysregulation in the motor/reward circuitry and invokes mechanisms associated with neurological disorders and neurodegeneration.

  11. Acetylcholinesterase Inhibition as an Indicator of Organophosphate and Carbamate Poisoning in Kenyan Agricultural Workers.

    PubMed

    Ohayo-Mitoko; Heederik; Kromhout; Omondi; Boleij

    1997-07-01

    Acetylcholinesterase inhibition was determined for 666 Kenyan agricultural workers; 390 (58.6%) mainly pesticide applicators exposed to organophosphate and carbamate pesticides and 276 (41.4%) unexposed controls from four rural agricultural areas during 1993 and 1994. Baseline levels were depressed in the exposed group (6.1 +/- 0.84; 4.09 +/- 0.84) but not in the unexposed group (5.83 +/- 0.91; 5.60 +/- 0.87). Acetylcholinesterase inhibition was found in all exposed individuals and led, on average, to a decrease of baseline acetylcholinesterase levels of 33% (+/-12%). The control groups had a nonsignificant decrease of only 4% (+/- 8%). The exposed subjects in Naivasha (flower growers) had the largest inhibition (36%), followed by Homabay (cotton growers) (35%) and Wundanyi (vegetable growers) (33%). Those in Migori (tobacco growers) had, by far, the least inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity (26%), indicating inherent factors that led to less inhibition. Acetylcholinesterase activity levels of 115 exposed individuals (29.6%) and no controls were depressed to values below 60% of baseline levels. The dramatic inhibition observed could lead to chronic clinical and subclinical intoxication. These findings show that acetylcholinesterase inhibition can be used as an indicator of organophosphate and carbamate poisoning in occupationally exposed agricultural workers. There is, therefore, an urgent need for primary prevention programs to monitor and address occupational exposures to these hazardous substances in agriculture in Kenya and other developing countries, as well as to use integrated pest management strategies in crop protection.

  12. Cardiac manifestations of acute carbamate and organophosphate poisoning.

    PubMed Central

    Saadeh, A. M.; Farsakh, N. A.; al-Ali, M. K.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the frequency, extent, and pathogenesis of the cardiac complications accompanying organophosphate and carbamate poisoning. DESIGN: Retrospective study. SETTING: A medical intensive care unit (MICU) of a general hospital. SUBJECTS: 46 adult patients admitted over a five year period with a diagnosis of organophosphate or carbamate poisoning. RESULTS: Cardiac complications developed in 31 patients (67%). These were: non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema, 20 (43%); cardiac arrhythmias, 11 (24%); electrocardiographic abnormalities including prolonged Q-Tc interval, 31 (67%); ST-T changes, 19 (41%); and conduction defects, 4 (9%). Sinus tachycardia occurred in 16 patients (35%) and sinus bradycardia in 13 (28%). Hypertension developed in 10 patients (22%) and hypotension in eight (17%). Eight patients (17%) needed respiratory support because of respiratory depression. Although more than two thirds of the patients (67%) had a prolonged Q-Tc interval, none had polymorphic ventricular tachycardia of the torsade de pointes type. Two patients died from ventricular fibrillation, an in hospital mortality of 4%. CONCLUSIONS: Cardiac complications often accompany poisoning with these compounds, particularly during the first few hours. Hypoxaemia, acidosis, and electrolyte derangements are major predisposing factors. Intensive supportive treatment in intensive or coronary care facilities with administration of atropine in adequate doses early in the course of the illness will reduce the mortality. PMID:9196418

  13. Changing sources and environmental factors reduce the rates of decline of organochlorine pesticides in the Arctic atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, S.; Halsall, C. J.; Tych, W.; Kallenborn, R.; Schlabach, M.; Manø, S.

    2012-05-01

    An extensive database of organochlorine (OC) pesticide concentrations measured at the Norwegian Arctic monitoring station at Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, was analysed to assess longer-term trends in the Arctic atmosphere. Dynamic Harmonic Regression (DHR) is employed to investigate the seasonal and cyclical behaviour of chlordanes, DDTs and hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and to isolate underlying inter-annual trends. Although a simple comparison of annual mean concentrations (1994-2005) suggest a decline for all of the OCs investigated, the longer-term trends identified by DHR only show a significant decline for p,p'-DDT. Indeed, HCB shows an increase from 2003-2005. This is thought to be due to changes in source types and the presence of impurities in current use pesticides, together with retreating sea ice affecting air-water exchange. Changes in source types were revealed by using isomeric ratios for the chlordanes and DDTs. Declining trends in ratios of trans-chlordane/cis-chlordane (TC/CC) indicate a shift from primary sources, to more "weathered" secondary sources, whereas an increasing trend in o,p'-DDT/p,p'-DDT ratios indicate a shift from use of technical DDT to dicofol. Continued monitoring of these OC pesticides is required to fully understand the influence of a changing climate on the behaviour and environmental cycling of these chemicals in the Arctic as well as possible impacts from "new" sources.

  14. Pesticides and the Third World.

    PubMed

    Forget, G

    1991-01-01

    Many developing countries are importing industrial processes that make use of toxic chemicals. By the same token, pesticides, which are toxic by design, are also used increasingly in agriculture and in public health programs to control pests and vector-borne diseases. Recent estimates suggest that pesticides account for more than 20,000 fatalities yearly, and that most of these will have occurred in developing countries. This may actually be a gross underreporting. Although organophosphate and carbamate insecticides are still responsible for many of those poisoning cases, herbicides such as paraquat are also increasingly being implicated in fatal poisoning cases. Newer pesticides such as the synthetic derivatives of pyrethrin, which were believed to be relatively safe to humans, now appear to be implicated in some serious cases of intoxication. Community-based pest control using locally available botanical pesticides could have severe consequences unless the toxicity of these compounds is carefully assessed relative to nontarget organisms. A high proportion of pesticide intoxications appear to be due to lack of knowledge, unsafe attitudes, and dangerous practices. The technology available to small farmers for pesticide application is often inappropriate: faulty sprayers, lack of protective equipment adapted to tropical conditions, nonexistent first-aid provisions. Agricultural extension is often not oriented to the transfer of information relative to the dangers inherent in the use of pesticides. The lack of information at all levels may be one of the most important causative factors of chemical intoxication in developing countries. Research should at this time concentrate on behaviors leading to chemical intoxication. This should be done concurrently with proper prospective and retrospective surveys of poisonings in developing country communities. More information should be sought relative to the decision processes of import, legislation, and licensing. Research

  15. Fact Sheets on Pesticides in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Coalition against the Misuse of Pesticides, Washington, DC.

    This document consists of a collection of fact sheets about the use of pesticides in schools and how to reduce it. The sheets are: (1) "Alternatives to Using Pesticides in Schools: What Is Integrated Pest Management?"; (2) "Health Effects of 48 Commonly Used Pesticides in Schools"; (3) "The Schooling of State Pesticide Laws--2002 Update: A Review…

  16. Metabolic complications of organophosphate and carbamate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Saadeh, A M

    2001-07-01

    The clinical manifestations of acute organophosphate (OP) and carbamate poisoning have already been well described. Most of these reports were on the cardiac, neurologic, respiratory and other clinical complications of these compounds. However, very little attention has been given to the metabolic aspects of this problem, particularly those accompanying carbamate poisoning. This paper describes the metabolic complications seen in 84 adult patients after acute poisoning with these compounds.

  17. Mutagenicity Assessment of Organophosphates using Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Assay

    PubMed Central

    Bhinder, Preety; Chaudhry, Asha

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: In this study we have evaluated the mutagenicity of organophosphate pesticides acephate, chlorpyrifos, and profenofos using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay with the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus taken as an experimental model. Materials and Methods: Second instar larvae were treated with LC20 of each pesticide for 24 h and mutations induced in the sequence of mitochondrial COII gene (690bp) were studied from restriction patterns generated with AluI, PacI, and PsiI restriction endonucleases. Results: Variations in the number and size of digested fragments were recorded from treated individuals compared with controls showing that the restriction enzymes created a cut at different locations. In addition, sequences of COII gene from control and treated individuals were also used to confirm the RFLP patterns. From the sequence alignment data, it was found that mutations caused the destruction and generation of restriction sites in the gene sequence of treated individuals. Conclusion: This study indicates that all the three pesticides had potential to induce mutations in the normal sequence of COII gene and also advocates the use of PCR-RFLP assay as an efficient, rapid, and sensitive technique to detect mutagenicity of pesticides. PMID:24403735

  18. Enantioselective environmental toxicology of chiral pesticides.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jing; Zhao, Meirong; Niu, Lili; Liu, Weiping

    2015-03-16

    The enantioselective environmental toxic effect of chiral pesticides is becoming more important. As the industry develops, increasing numbers of chiral insecticides and herbicides will be introduced into use, potentially posing toxic effects on nontarget living beings. Chiral pesticides, including herbicides such as acylanilides, phenoxypropanoic acids, and imidazolinones, and insecticides such as synthetic pyrethroids, organophosphates, and DDT often behave enantioselectively during agricultural use. These compounds also pose unpredictable enantioselective ecological threats to nontarget living beings and/or humans, affecting the food chain and entire ecosystems. Thus, to investigate the enantioselective toxic effects of chiral insecticides and herbicides is necessary during environmental protection. The environmental toxicology of chiral pesticides, especially the findings obtained from studies conducted in our laboratory during the past 10 years, is reviewed. PMID:25643169

  19. Antimicrobial Pesticides

    MedlinePlus

    ... menu Learn the Issues Air Chemicals and Toxics Climate Change Emergencies Greener Living Health and Safety Land and Cleanup Pesticides Waste Water Science & Technology Air Climate Change Ecosystems Health Land, Waste and Cleanup Pesticides Substances ...

  20. Organophosphorus pesticide exposure and neurobehavioral performance in Latino children living in an orchard community.

    PubMed

    Butler-Dawson, Jaime; Galvin, Kit; Thorne, Peter S; Rohlman, Diane S

    2016-03-01

    Children living in agricultural communities have a greater risk from pesticides due to para-occupational pathways. The goal of this study was to assess the impact of exposure to organophosphorus pesticides on the neurobehavioral performance of school-aged Latino children over time. Two exposure measures were used to estimate children's pesticide exposure: parent's occupation (agricultural or non-agricultural) and organophosphate residues in home carpet dust samples. During 2008-2011, 206 school-aged children completed a battery of neurobehavioral tests two times, approximately one year apart. The associations between both exposure measures and neurobehavioral performance were examined. Pesticide residues were detected in dust samples from both agricultural and non-agricultural homes, however, pesticides were detected more frequently and in higher concentrations in agricultural homes compared to non-agricultural homes. Although few differences were found between agricultural and non-agricultural children at both visits, deficits in learning from the first visit to the second visit, or less improvement, was found in agricultural children relative to non-agricultural children. These differences were significant for the Divided Attention and Purdue Pegboard tests. These findings are consistent with previous research showing deficits in motor function. A summary measure of organophosphate residues was not associated with neurobehavioral performance. Results from this study indicate that children in agricultural communities are at increased risk from pesticides as a result of a parent working in agricultural. Our findings suggest that organophosphate exposure may be associated with deficits in learning on neurobehavioral performance, particularly in tests of with motor function. In spite of regulatory phasing out of organophosphates in the U.S., we still see elevated levels and higher detection rates of several organophosphates in agricultural households than non

  1. Engineering Pseudomonas putida KT2440 for simultaneous degradation of organophosphates and pyrethroids and its application in bioremediation of soil.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Zhenqiang; Gong, Ting; Che, You; Liu, Ruihua; Xu, Ping; Jiang, Hong; Qiao, Chuanling; Song, Cunjiang; Yang, Chao

    2015-06-01

    Agricultural soils are usually co-contaminated with organophosphate (OP) and pyrethroid pesticides. To develop a stable and marker-free Pseudomonas putida for co-expression of two pesticide-degrading enzymes, we constructed a suicide plasmid with expression cassettes containing a constitutive promoter J23119, an OP-degrading gene (mpd), a pyrethroid-hydrolyzing carboxylesterase gene (pytH) that utilizes the upp gene as a counter-selectable marker for upp-deficient P. putida. By introduction of suicide plasmid and two-step homologous recombination, both mpd and pytH genes were integrated into the chromosome of a robust soil bacterium P. putida KT2440 and no selection marker was left on chromosome. Functional expression of mpd and pytH in P. putida KT2440 was demonstrated by Western blot analysis and enzyme activity assays. Degradation experiments with liquid cultures showed that the mixed pesticides including methyl parathion, fenitrothion, chlorpyrifos, permethrin, fenpropathrin, and cypermethrin (0.2 mM each) were degraded completely within 48 h. The inoculation of engineered strain (10(6) cells/g) to soils treated with the above mixed pesticides resulted in a higher degradation rate than in noninoculated soils. All six pesticides could be degraded completely within 15 days in fumigated and nonfumigated soils with inoculation. Theses results highlight the potential of the engineered strain to be used for in situ bioremediation of soils co-contaminated with OP and pyrethroid pesticides.

  2. An unusual case of organophosphate intoxication of a worker in a plastic bottle recycling plant: an important reminder.

    PubMed

    Wang, C L; Chuang, H Y; Chang, C Y; Liu, S T; Wu, M T; Ho, C K

    2000-11-01

    A young man was sent to our emergency unit because he had suffered from vomiting and cold sweating for 2 days. At the time he was admitted, he had no acute abdominal pains or gastrointestinal symptoms, and a physical examination revealed nothing but a faster heart rate and moist, flushing skin. The patient had worked for 6 years at a plastic bottle-recycling factory, but none of his co-workers had the same symptoms. Nevertheless, because the plant also recycled pesticide bottles, we suspected organophosphate pesticide intoxication. The patient's plasma acetylcholinesterase level was checked, revealing 1498.6 microU/L (normal range: 2,000-5, 000) on the first day and 1,379 microU/L on the second day. Upon questioning, the patient recalled that one of his shoe soles had been damaged and that his foot had been wet from walking all day in rain collected on the factory floor on the day that his symptoms first occurred. We conducted a study in the change of preshift and postshift acetylcholinesterase levels among six of his co-workers on a rainy day. We used the Wilcoxon signed rank test to compare the preshift and postshift plasma acetylcholinesterase levels; no significant difference was revealed (p = 0.600), leaving contamination via the damaged shoe sole suspect. We reviewed the literature on organophosphate intoxication; pesticide bottle-recycling factories were reported to be at a low risk of organophosphate toxicity in the working environment. However, because the potential risk of intoxication is still present, protective equipment such as clothing, gloves, and water-proof shoes should be worn, and employees should be educated on the potential risks.

  3. Detoxification of organophosphate nerve agents by bacterial phosphotriesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Ghanem, Eman; Raushel, Frank M. . E-mail: raushel@tamu.edu

    2005-09-01

    Organophosphates have been widely used as insecticides and chemical warfare agents. The health risks associated with these agents have necessitated the need for better detoxification and bioremediation tools. Bacterial enzymes capable of hydrolyzing the lethal organophosphate nerve agents are of special interest. Phosphotriesterase (PTE) isolated from the soil bacteria Pseudomonas diminuta displays a significant rate enhancement and substrate promiscuity for the hydrolysis of organophosphate triesters. Directed evolution and rational redesign of the active site of PTE have led to the identification of new variants with enhanced catalytic efficiency and stereoselectivity toward the hydrolysis of organophosphate neurotoxins. PTE has been utilized to protect against organophosphate poisoning in vivo. Biotechnological applications of PTE for detection and decontamination of insecticides and chemical warfare agents are developing into useful tools. In this review, the catalytic properties and potential applications of this remarkable enzyme are discussed.

  4. 75 FR 41482 - Methyl Parathion; Cancellation Order for Certain Pesticide Registrations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-16

    ...; the chemical industry; pesticide users; and members of the public interested in the sale, distribution... organophosphates as a class of chemicals, and does not specifically refer to this cancellation action for methyl... methyl parathion. USA Rice would like EPA to expedite a replacement chemical for methyl parathion,...

  5. Pesticides and childhood cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Zahm, S H; Ward, M H

    1998-01-01

    Children are exposed to potentially carcinogenic pesticides from use in homes, schools, other buildings, lawns and gardens, through food and contaminated drinking water, from agricultural application drift, overspray, or off-gassing, and from carry-home exposure of parents occupationally exposed to pesticides. Parental exposure during the child's gestation or even preconception may also be important. Malignancies linked to pesticides in case reports or case-control studies include leukemia, neuroblastoma, Wilms' tumor, soft-tissue sarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and cancers of the brain, colorectum, and testes. Although these studies have been limited by nonspecific pesticide exposure information, small numbers of exposed subjects, and the potential for case-response bias, it is noteworthy that many of the reported increased risks are of greater magnitude than those observed in studies of pesticide-exposed adults, suggesting that children may be particularly sensitive to the carcinogenic effects of pesticides. Future research should include improved exposure assessment, evaluation of risk by age at exposure, and investigation of possible genetic-environment interactions. There is potential to prevent at least some childhood cancer by reducing or eliminating pesticide exposure. PMID:9646054

  6. Differentiation between organophosphate and carbamate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Rotenberg, M; Shefi, M; Dany, S; Dore, I; Tirosh, M; Almog, S

    1995-01-31

    We propose a novel and simple assay for the real-time differentiation between carbamate and organophosphate inhibition of cholinesterase, based on our observations of the kinetic behavior of inhibited enzyme. The assay of carbamylated cholinesterase activity over time follows a non-linear kinetic pattern, whereas that of phosphorylated enzyme activity is linear. This feature can be exploited to differentiate between carbamate and organophosphate cholinesterase inhibition. The non-linear pattern characteristic of carbamates is easily discernible at degrees of inhibition of 40% or more. In this setting, cholinesterase activity ought to be measured continuously for about 1 h to obtain the kinetic pattern of enzyme activity. The initial activity, measured during the first 5 min of assay, represents the activity of enzyme in vivo. In vitro reactivation of inhibited cholinesterase allows the estimation of full potential activity of enzyme prior to poisoning, so that percentage of inhibition can be calculated. Reactivation of carbamylated cholinesterase is obtained by the incubation of diluted enzyme at 37 degrees C for 2.5 h prior to assay, whereas phosphorylated (non-aged) enzyme is reactivated by a 30 min incubation with oximes. In cases of mild exposure to cholinesterase inhibitors (< 40% inhibition), the response of enzyme to in vitro reactivation serves as a complementary test for exposure and for the nature of the inhibitor. All the results presented in this work refer to plasma cholinesterase. Erythrocyte cholinesterase was found to behave very similarly to plasma enzyme and its results have not been reported here.

  7. Chiral Pesticides: Identification, Description and Environmental Implications

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anthropogenic chemicals, including pesticides, are a major source of contamination and pollution in the environment. Pesticides have many positive uses: increased food production, decreased damage to crops and structures, reduced disease vector populations, and more. Nevertheless...

  8. Safety measures associated with the use of organophosphate insecticides in the Haitian malaria control programme*

    PubMed Central

    Warren, McWilson; Ruebush, Trenton K.; Hobbs, Jesse H.; Hippolyte, Robert; Miller, Steve

    1985-01-01

    A programme emphasizing intensive training, use of protective equipment and uniforms, daily supervision of safety measures at work, and weekly monitoring of blood cholinesterase levels by the tintometric method was instituted to prevent toxicity in Haitian malaria workers during spraying with the organophosphate insecticides fenitrothion and malathion. The programme functioned well, depressed cholinesterase activity (≤ 50% of normal) being detected rapidly prior to the development of serious symptoms. Evidence of fenitrothion overexposure appeared in spraymen early in the first spray cycle, and was associated with faulty protective clothing and a failure to observe strictly the recommended safety measures at work. After these deficiencies were corrected, insecticide application continued without serious incidents or interruption of the programme. No serious reduction of cholinesterase activity was seen in a more limited study of spraymen using malathion. It is strongly recommended that similar training and monitoring programmes should be instituted whenever organophosphate pesticides are used as residual sprays for malaria control. This is particularly important in areas where the more toxic compound, fenitrothion, is to be used. PMID:3874715

  9. Agricultural pesticide usage and prioritization in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Cha, Eun Shil; Jeong, Mihye; Lee, Won Jin

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to review agricultural pesticide usage and trends and to identify hazardous pesticides for regulation, in terms of public health, in South Korea. The authors collected data on usage and trends of agricultural pesticides through agriculture-related databases. Criteria from the US Environmental Protection Agency classification for carcinogenicity, World Health Organization classification for acute toxicity, and European Union prioritization list for endocrine-disrupting chemicals were used for the hazard categorization of identified individual active ingredients. Pesticides to be prioritized among all pesticides used in South Korea between 2007 and 2011 were selected by taking into account the volume of usage, toxicity, and epidemiological evidence. Annual agricultural use of pesticides has increased rapidly from the 1970s to 1990s in South Korea, but has declined since 2001. The quantity of pesticides used in 2011 was reported as 19,131 tons, and was comprised of 34.7% insecticides, 28.0% fungicides, and 27.1% herbicides. The 50 pesticides with the greatest volume of usage accounted for 82.6% of the total volume of pesticides used between 2007 and 2011, with the most-used active ingredient being machine oil, followed by mancozeb and then paraquat. Organophosphates were the most used among the top 50 pesticides. A total of 24 pesticides were selected for recommendation of intensive regulation in South Korea. In conclusion, the authors described the usage and trends of overall agricultural pesticides, which would serve as a fundamental step forward in managing pesticide in terms of public health. Intensive efforts are required for the prevention of potential health effects from the 24 identified pesticides.

  10. Agricultural pesticide usage and prioritization in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Cha, Eun Shil; Jeong, Mihye; Lee, Won Jin

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to review agricultural pesticide usage and trends and to identify hazardous pesticides for regulation, in terms of public health, in South Korea. The authors collected data on usage and trends of agricultural pesticides through agriculture-related databases. Criteria from the US Environmental Protection Agency classification for carcinogenicity, World Health Organization classification for acute toxicity, and European Union prioritization list for endocrine-disrupting chemicals were used for the hazard categorization of identified individual active ingredients. Pesticides to be prioritized among all pesticides used in South Korea between 2007 and 2011 were selected by taking into account the volume of usage, toxicity, and epidemiological evidence. Annual agricultural use of pesticides has increased rapidly from the 1970s to 1990s in South Korea, but has declined since 2001. The quantity of pesticides used in 2011 was reported as 19,131 tons, and was comprised of 34.7% insecticides, 28.0% fungicides, and 27.1% herbicides. The 50 pesticides with the greatest volume of usage accounted for 82.6% of the total volume of pesticides used between 2007 and 2011, with the most-used active ingredient being machine oil, followed by mancozeb and then paraquat. Organophosphates were the most used among the top 50 pesticides. A total of 24 pesticides were selected for recommendation of intensive regulation in South Korea. In conclusion, the authors described the usage and trends of overall agricultural pesticides, which would serve as a fundamental step forward in managing pesticide in terms of public health. Intensive efforts are required for the prevention of potential health effects from the 24 identified pesticides. PMID:24959760

  11. Pesticides and healthy public policy.

    PubMed

    Labonte, R N

    1989-01-01

    Despite concern over long-term human and environmental health risks, Canadian and international pesticide use continues to increase. Enormous gaps in pesticide toxicity data persist and, though equivocal, there is mounting evidence that certain pesticide families are carcinogenic. Farmworkers are at greatest risk of pesticide poisoning and long-term health effects, and unions representing farmworkers have initiated a boycott of California grapes to draw attention to the need to reduce pesticide use and improve health and safety conditions. The boycott is a model of "healthy public policy" in action, and can be one element in a public health strategy to reduce significantly pesticide use and promote less toxic alternatives and less chemically dependent forms of agriculture and silviculture. PMID:2790629

  12. Creation of a protective pulmonary bioshield against inhaled organophosphates using an aerosolized bioscavenger.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Yvonne J; Fink, James B

    2016-06-01

    In addition to the global use of organophosphate (OP) pesticides for agriculture, OP nerve agents and pesticides have been employed on battlefields and by terrorists (e.g., a recent sarin attack in Syria). These occurrences highlight the need for an effective countermeasure against OP exposure. Human butyrylcholinesterase (HuBChE) is a leading candidate, but injection of the high doses required for protection present pharmacokinetic challenges. An aerosolized recombinant form (aer-rHuBChE) that can neutralize inhaled OPs at the portal of entry has been assessed for its efficacy in protecting macaques against respiratory toxicity following inhalation exposure to the pesticide paraoxon (aer-Px). While protection in macaques has been demonstrated using the MicroSprayer® delivery device, administration to humans will likely employ a vibrating mesh nebulizer (VMN). Compared to the 50-70% lung deposition achieved in adult humans with a VMN, deposition in macaques is <5%, an initial major obstacle to demonstrating protection. Such problems have been partly overcome by using a more efficient modified VMN and proportionally higher doses, which together generate an effective rHuBChE pulmonary bioshield and protect against high levels of inhaled Px. PMID:27371808

  13. Effects of a pesticide and a parasite on neurological, endocrine, and behavioral responses of an estuarine fish.

    PubMed

    Renick, Violet Compton; Weinersmith, Kelly; Vidal-Dorsch, Doris E; Anderson, Todd W

    2016-01-01

    In coastal waters, pesticides and parasites are widespread stressors that may separately and interactively affect the physiology, behavior, and survival of resident organisms. We investigated the effects of the organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos and the trematode parasite Euhaplorchis californiensis on three important traits of California killifish (Fundulus parvipinnis): neurotransmitter activity, release of the stress hormone cortisol, and behavior. Killifish were collected from a population without E. californiensis, and then half of the fish were experimentally infected. Following a 30 day period for parasite maturation, infected and uninfected groups were exposed to four concentrations of chlorpyrifos (solvent control, 1-3ppb) prior to behavior trials to quantify activity, feeding behavior, and anti-predator responses. Water-borne cortisol release rates were measured non-invasively from each fish prior to infection, one-month post-infection, and following pesticide exposure. Killifish exposed to 3ppb chlorpyrifos exhibited a 74.6±6.8% and 60.5±8.3% reduction in brain and muscle acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity relative to controls. The rate of cortisol release was suppressed by each chlorpyrifos level relative to controls. Killifish exposed to the medium (2ppb) and high (3ppb) pesticide concentrations exhibited reduced activity and a decrease in mean swimming speed following a simulated predator attack. Muscle AChE was positively related to swimming activity while brain AChE was positively related to foraging behavior. ​No effects of the parasite were observed, possibly because of low metacercariae densities achieved through controlled infections. We found that sublethal pesticide exposure has the potential to modify several organismal endpoints with consequences for reduced fitness, including neurological, endocrine, and behavioral responses in an ecologically abundant fish. PMID:26454718

  14. Discovery of New Classes of Compounds that Reactivate Acetylcholinesterase Inhibited by Organophosphates

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Laura; Zhu, Zhengxiang; Ton-That, Long; Luzac, Michal; Zlatanic, Viktor; Damera, Shivani; Macdonald, Joanne; Landry, Donald W.; Tong, Liang; Stojanovic, Milan N.

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) that has been covalently inhibited by organophosphate compounds (OPCs), such as nerve agents and pesticides, has traditionally been reactivated by using nucleophilic oximes. There is, however, a clearly recognized need for new classes of compounds with the ability to reactivate inhibited AChE with improved in vivo efficacy. Here we describe our discovery of new functional groups—Mannich phenols and general bases—that are capable of reactivating OPC-inhibited AChE more efficiently than standard oximes and we describe the cooperative mechanism by which these functionalities are delivered to the active site. These discoveries, supported by preliminary in vivo results and crystallographic data, significantly broaden the available approaches for reactivation of AChE. PMID:26350723

  15. Phosphate-bound structure of an organophosphate-degrading enzyme from Agrobacterium radiobacter.

    PubMed

    Ely, Fernanda; Pedroso, Marcelo M; Gahan, Lawrence R; Ollis, David L; Guddat, Luke W; Schenk, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    OpdA is a binuclear metalloenzyme that can hydrolyze organophosphate pesticides and nerve agents. In this study the crystal structure of the complex between OpdA and phosphate has been determined to 2.20 Å resolution. The structure shows the phosphate bound in a tripodal mode to the metal ions whereby two of the oxygen atoms of PO(4) are terminally bound to each metal ion and a third oxygen bridges the two metal ions, thus displacing the μOH in the active site. In silico modelling demonstrates that the phosphate moiety of a reaction product, e.g. diethyl phosphate, may bind in the same orientation, positioning the diethyl groups neatly into the substrate binding pocket close to the metal center. Thus, similar to the binuclear metallohydrolases urease and purple acid phosphatase the tripodal arrangement of PO(4) is interpreted in terms of a role of the μOH as a reaction nucleophile.

  16. Current and emerging strategies for organophosphate decontamination: special focus on hyperstable enzymes.

    PubMed

    Jacquet, Pauline; Daudé, David; Bzdrenga, Janek; Masson, Patrick; Elias, Mikael; Chabrière, Eric

    2016-05-01

    Organophosphorus chemicals are highly toxic molecules mainly used as pesticides. Some of them are banned warfare nerve agents. These compounds are covalent inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase, a key enzyme in central and peripheral nervous systems. Numerous approaches, including chemical, physical, and biological decontamination, have been considered for developing decontamination methods against organophosphates (OPs). This work is an overview of both validated and emerging strategies for the protection against OP pollution with special attention to the use of decontaminating enzymes. Considerable efforts have been dedicated during the past decades to the development of efficient OP degrading biocatalysts. Among these, the promising biocatalyst SsoPox isolated from the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus is emphasized in the light of recently published results. This hyperthermostable enzyme appears to be particularly attractive for external decontamination purposes with regard to both its catalytic and stability properties. PMID:26832878

  17. Toxicity of pesticides to aquatic microorganisms: a review.

    PubMed

    DeLorenzo, M E; Scott, G I; Ross, P E

    2001-01-01

    Microorganisms contribute significantly to primary production, nutrient cycling, and decomposition in estuarine eco-systems; therefore, detrimental effects of pesticides on microbial species may have subsequent impacts on higher trophic levels. Pesticides may affect estuarine microorganisms via spills, runoff, and drift. Both the structure and the function of microbial communities may be impaired by pesticide toxicity. Pesticides may also be metabolized or bioaccumulated by microorganisms. Mechanisms of toxicity vary, depending on the type of pesticide and the microbial species exposed. Herbicides are generally most toxic to phototrophic microorganisms, exhibiting toxicity by disrupting photosynthesis. Atrazine is the most widely used and most extensively studied herbicide. Toxic effects of organophosphate and organochlorine insecticides on microbial species have also been demonstrated, although their mechanisms of toxicity in such nontarget species remain unclear. There is a great deal of variability in the toxicity of even a single pesticide among microbial species. When attempting to predict the toxicity of pesticides in estuarine ecosystems, effects of pesticide mixtures and interactions with nutrients should be considered. The toxicity of pesticides to aquatic microorganisms, especially bacteria and protozoa, is an area of research requiring further study.

  18. Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Exposure to Pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Soldin, Offie P.; Nsouly-Maktabi, Hala; Genkinger, Jeanine M.; Loffredo, Christopher A.; Ortega-Garcia, Juan Antonio; Colantino, Drew; Barr, Dana B.; Luban, Naomi L.; Shad, Aziza T.; Nelson, David

    2013-01-01

    Organophosphates are pesticides ubiquitous in the environment and have been hypothesized as one of the risk factors for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In this study, we evaluated the associations of pesticide exposure in a residential environment with the risk for pediatric ALL. This is a case–control study of children newly diagnosed with ALL, and their mothers (n = 41 child–mother pairs) were recruited from Georgetown University Medical Center and Children's National Medical Center in Washington, DC, between January 2005 and January 2008. Cases and controls were matched for age, sex, and county of residence. Environmental exposures were determined by questionnaire and by urinalysis of pesticide metabolites using isotope dilution gas chromatography–high-resolution mass spectrometry. We found that more case mothers (33%) than controls (14%) reported using insecticides in the home (P < 0.02). Other environmental exposures to toxic substances were not significantly associated with the risk of ALL. Pesticide levels were higher in cases than in controls (P < 0.05). Statistically significant differences were found between children with ALL and controls for the organophosphate metabolites diethylthiophosphate (P < 0.03) and diethyldithiophosphate (P < 0.05). The association of ALL risk with pesticide exposure merits further studies to confirm the association. PMID:19571777

  19. Reusable fiber optic immunofluorosensor for rapid detection of pesticides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anis, Nabil A.; Valdes, James J.; Thompson, Roy G.; Menking, Darrell E.; Wong, Rosie B.; Eldefrawi, Mohyee E.

    1993-05-01

    Quartz fibers coated with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) or antibody (Ab) are used as biosensors utilizing total reflectance fluorescence for the rapid detection of pesticides. The enzyme biosensor was constructed by immobilizing fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-tagged eel electric organ AChE on quartz fibers. The fluorescent signal was generated by hydrolysis of acetylcholine (ACh) that is present in the perfusate. Organophosphate (OP) and carbamate anticholinesterase (AntiChE) insecticides inhibited AChE and reduced the fluorescent quenching resulting from AChE hydrolysis. A parathion biosensor was constructed by immobilizing casein-parathion on the quartz fibers, that bound rabbit antiparathion antibody. The optical signal was generated by perfusing the fibers with fluorescein-labeled goat antirabbit IgG. Free parathion inhibited the binding of antiparathion Abs and reduced the optical signal and provided the basis for detection of parathion. Another immunosensor developed detected the herbicide PursuitR by utilizing the reversible binding of a fluorescein-Pursuit derivative to antiPursuit Abs immobilized on the fiber. Unlabeled Pursuit competed effectively and displaced the bound fluorescent compound in a dose-dependent manner. The sensor discriminated effectively between Pursuit-like and structurally unrelated herbicides. The immunosensor offers the advantage of continuous monitoring, ease of operation, speed of detection, low cost, stability, specificity, matrix transparency, and reusability.

  20. Pesticides and Human Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Control a pest Integrated Pest Management What are pesticides? Herbicides Disinfectants Fungicides Insecticides Natural and Biological Pesticides ... Rodenticides Other types of pesticides Disponible en español Pesticides and Human Health Pesticides have a specific purpose ...

  1. Organic Pesticide Ingredients

    MedlinePlus

    ... Control a pest Integrated Pest Management What are pesticides? Herbicides Disinfectants Fungicides Insecticides Natural and Biological Pesticides ... Other types of pesticides Disponible en español Organic Pesticide Ingredients Organic foods are not necessarily pesticide-free. ...

  2. Tolerance of ARPE 19 cells to organophosphorus pesticide chlorpyrifos is limited to concentration and time of exposure.

    PubMed

    Gomathy, Narayanan; Sumantran, Venil N; Shabna, A; Sulochana, K N

    2015-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration is a blinding disease common in elder adults. The prevalence of age related macular degeneration has been found to be 1.8% in the Indian population. Organophosphates are widely used insecticides with well documented neurological effects, and the persistent nature of these compounds in the body results in long term health effects. Farmers exposed to organophosphorus pesticides in USA had an earlier onset of age related macular degeneration when compared to unexposed controls. A recent study found significant levels of an organophosphate, termed chlorpyrifos, in the blood samples of Indian farmers. Therefore, in understanding the link between age related macular degeneration and chlorpyrifos, the need for investigation is important. Our data show that ARPE-19 (retinal pigment epithelial cells) exhibit a cytoprotective response to chlorpyrifos as measured by viability, mitochondrial membrane potential, superoxide dismutase activity, and increased levels of glutathione peroxidase and reduced glutathione, after 24 h exposure to chlorpyrifos. However, this cytoprotective response was absent in ARPE-19 cells exposed to the same range of concentrations of chlorpyrifos for 48 h. These results have physiological significance, since HPLC analysis showed that effects of chlorpyrifos were mediated through its entry into ARPE-19 cells. HPLC analysis also showed that chlorpyrifos remained stable, as we recovered up to 80% of the chlorpyrifos added to 6 different ocular tissues. PMID:25619908

  3. Pesticides and inner-city children: exposures, risks, and prevention.

    PubMed Central

    Landrigan, P J; Claudio, L; Markowitz, S B; Berkowitz, G S; Brenner, B L; Romero, H; Wetmur, J G; Matte, T D; Gore, A C; Godbold, J H; Wolff, M S

    1999-01-01

    Six million children live in poverty in America's inner cities. These children are at high risk of exposure to pesticides that are used extensively in urban schools, homes, and day-care centers for control of roaches, rats, and other vermin. The organophosphate insecticide chlorpyrifos and certain pyrethroids are the registered pesticides most heavily applied in cities. Illegal street pesticides are also in use, including tres pasitos (a carbamate), tiza china, and methyl parathion. In New York State in 1997, the heaviest use of pesticides in all counties statewide was in the urban boroughs of Manhattan and Brooklyn. Children are highly vulnerable to pesticides. Because of their play close to the ground, their hand-to-mouth behavior, and their unique dietary patterns, children absorb more pesticides from their environment than adults. The long persistence of semivolatile pesticides such as chlorpyrifos on rugs, furniture, stuffed toys, and other absorbent surfaces within closed apartments further enhances urban children's exposures. Compounding these risks of heavy exposures are children's decreased ability to detoxify and excrete pesticides and the rapid growth, development, and differentiation of their vital organ systems. These developmental immaturities create early windows of great vulnerability. Recent experimental data suggest, for example, that chlorpyrifos may be a developmental neurotoxicant and that exposure in utero may cause biochemical and functional aberrations in fetal neurons as well as deficits in the number of neurons. Certain pyrethroids exert hormonal activity that may alter early neurologic and reproductive development. Assays currently used for assessment of the toxicity of pesticides are insensitive and cannot accurately predict effects to children exposed in utero or in early postnatal life. Protection of American children, and particularly of inner-city children, against the developmental hazards of pesticides requires a comprehensive

  4. Study of Inhibition, Reactivation and Aging Processes of Pesticides Using Graphene Nanosheets/Gold Nanoparticles-Based Acetylcholinesterase Biosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lin; Long, Linjuan; Zhang, Weiying; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-09-10

    Organophosphate (OP) and carbamate pesticides exert their toxicity via attacking the hydroxyl moiety of serine in the 'active site' of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). In this paper we developed a stable AChE biosensor based on self-assembling AChE to graphene nanosheet (GN)-gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) nanocomposite electrode for investigation of inhibition, reactivation and aging processes of different pesticides. It is confirmed that pesticides can inhibit AChE in a short time. OPs poisoning is treatable with oximes while carbarmates exposure is insensitive to oximes. The proposed electrochemical approach thus provides a new simple tool for comparison of pesticide sensitivity and guide of therapeutic intervention.

  5. Measurement of organophosphate metabolites in postpartum meconium as a potential biomarker of prenatal exposure: a validation study.

    PubMed Central

    Whyatt, R M; Barr, D B

    2001-01-01

    Experimental data have linked exposure to prenatal organophosphates to adverse neurocognitive sequalae. However, epidemiologic research has been hampered by lack of reliable dosimeters. Existing biomarkers reflect short-term exposure only. Measurements of pesticides in postpartum meconium may yield a longer-term dosimeter of prenatal exposure. As the initial step in biomarker validation, this research determined background levels, detection limits, and stabilities of six organophosphate metabolites in meconium: diethylphosphate (DEP), diethylthiophosphate (DETP), diethyldithiophosphate (DEDTP), dimethylphosphate (DMP), dimethylthiophosphate (DMTP), and dimethyldithiophosphate (DMDTP). Calibration curves were also constructed. The meconium was collected from 20 newborns at New York Presbyterian Hospital; analyses were undertaken at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). DEP was detected in 19/20 samples (range 0.8-3.2 microg/g) and DETP was detected in 20/20 (range 2.0-5.6 microg/g). DMP and DEDTP were each detected in 1/20 (at 16 and 1.8 microg/g, respectively). DMTP and DMDTP were not detected. Detection limits were comparable to or lower than those in urine; levels were similar to those seen in adult urine in population-based research. Metabolites were stable at room temperature over 12 hr. Calibration curves were linear over the range tested (0.5-400 microg/g); recoveries ranged from 18% to 66%. Using isotope dilution, recoveries of each analyte in individual samples can be corrected automatically based on the recovery of the respective stable isotope-labeled analogue, making this method fully quantitative. Results indicate that measurements of organophosphate metabolites in meconium have promise as biomarkers of prenatal exposure. Further research is needed to determine the time frame of exposure represented by pesticide levels in meconium and to evaluate the dose-response relationship. PMID:11335191

  6. Accidental organophosphate insecticide intoxication in children: a reminder

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Misuse of organophosphate insecticides, even in case of domestic application, can be life threatening. We report the case of siblings admitted with respiratory distress, pinpoint pupils and slurred speech. The symptoms appear after spraying the skin by insecticides. Plasma pseudocholinesterase level appeared to be very low, consistent with acute intoxication with organophosphate insecticide. Management of organophosphate poisoning consists of airway management, administration of oxygen and fluid, as well as atropine in increasing doses and pralidoxime. Decontamination of the patient's skin and the removal of the patient's clothes are mandatory in order to avoid recontamination of the patient as well as the surrounding healthcare personnel. Plasma pseudocholinesterase analysis is a cheap and an easy indicator for organophosphate insecticides intoxications and could be used for diagnosis and treatment monitoring. PMID:21676238

  7. Analysis of organo-chlorine pesticides residue in raw coffee with a modified "quick easy cheap effective rugged and safe" extraction/clean up procedure for reducing the impact of caffeine on the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry measurement.

    PubMed

    Bresin, Bruno; Piol, Maria; Fabbro, Denis; Mancini, Maria Antonietta; Casetta, Bruno; Del Bianco, Clorinda

    2015-01-01

    The control of pesticide residues on raw coffee is a task of great importance due to high consumption of this beverage in Italy and in many other countries. High caffeine content can hamper extraction and measurement of any pesticide residue. A tandem extraction protocol has been devised by exploiting the quick easy cheap effective rugged and safe (QuEChERS) scheme for extraction, coupled to a dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction (DLLME) in order to drastically reduce caffeine content in the final extract. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been used for quantification of organo-chlorine pesticides in single ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Method has been validated and performances meet the criteria prescribed by European Union regulations. PMID:25537171

  8. Monitoring of seasonal vegetables for pesticide residues.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Beena; Madan, V K; Kumar, R; Kathpal, T S

    2002-03-01

    Market samples (60) of six seasonal vegetables were monitored during 1996-1997 to determine the magnitude of pesticidal contamination. The estimation of insecticide residues representing four major chemical groups i.e. organochlorine, organophosphorous, synthetic pyrethroid and carbamate, was done by adopting a multiresidue analytical technique employing GC-ECD and GC-NPD systems with capillary columns. The tested samples showed 100% contamination with low but measurable amounts of residues. Among the four chemical groups, the organophosphates were dominant followed by organochlorines, synthetic pyrethroids and carbamates. About 23% of the samples showed contamination with organophosphorous compounds above their respective MRL values. More extensive studies covering different regions of Haryana state are suggested to get a clear idea of the magnitude of vegetable contamination with pesticide residues.

  9. Determination of Stability from Multicomponent Pesticide Mixes.

    PubMed

    Dorweiler, Kelly J; Gurav, Jagdish N; Walbridge, James S; Ghatge, Vishwas S; Savant, Rahul H

    2016-08-10

    A study was conducted to evaluate the stability of 528 pesticides, metabolites, and contaminants prepared in large multicomponent mixes to enhance laboratory efficiency by allowing maximum use of the useful shelf life of the mixtures. Accelerated aging at 50 °C simulated 6 month, 1 year, and 2 year storage periods at -20 °C. Initial mixture composition was based on the instrument of analysis. After preliminary stability data had been obtained, mixtures were reformulated and re-evaluated. In all, 344 compounds showed satisfactory stability across all treatment groups, 100 compounds showed statistically significant changes between the control and the 6 month simulated storage period (27 with losses >20%), and the remainder showed borderline stability or were tested in one protocol. Stability behavior for organophosphates agreed with the proposed reaction mechanism responsible for acetylcholinesterase inhibition. A small number of compounds increased in response over time, suggesting the occurrence of degradation of precursor pesticides into these respective compounds.

  10. Utility of population models to reduce uncertainty and increase value relevance in ecological risk assessments of pesticides: an example based on acute mortality data for daphnids.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Niklas; Stark, John D

    2012-04-01

    Traditionally, ecological risk assessments (ERA) of pesticides have been based on risk ratios, where the predicted concentration of the chemical is compared to the concentration that causes biological effects. The concentration that causes biological effect is mostly determined from laboratory experiments using endpoints on the level of the individual (e.g., mortality and reproduction). However, the protection goals are mostly defined at the population level. To deal with the uncertainty in the necessary extrapolations, safety factors are used. Major disadvantages with this simplified approach is that it is difficult to relate a risk ratio to the environmental protection goals, and that the use of fixed safety factors can result in over- as well as underprotective assessments. To reduce uncertainty and increase value relevance in ERA, it has been argued that population models should be used more frequently. In the present study, we have used matrix population models for 3 daphnid species (Ceriodaphnia dubia, Daphnia magna, and D. pulex) to reduce uncertainty and increase value relevance in the ERA of a pesticide (spinosad). The survival rates in the models were reduced in accordance with data from traditional acute mortality tests. As no data on reproductive effects were available, the conservative assumption that no reproduction occurred during the exposure period was made. The models were used to calculate the minimum population size and the time to recovery. These endpoints can be related to the European Union (EU) protection goals for aquatic ecosystems in the vicinity of agricultural fields, which state that reversible population level effects are acceptable if there is recovery within an acceptable (undefined) time frame. The results of the population models were compared to the acceptable (according to EU documents) toxicity exposure ratio (TER) that was based on the same data. At the acceptable TER, which was based on the most sensitive species (C. dubia

  11. Environmental fate of fungicides and other current-use pesticides in a central California estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smalling, Kelly L.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.; Orlando, James L.; Phillips, Bryn M.; Anderson, Brian S.; Siegler, Katie; Hunt, John W.; Hamilton, Mary

    2013-01-01

    The current study documents the fate of current-use pesticides in an agriculturally-dominated central California coastal estuary by focusing on the occurrence in water, sediment and tissue of resident aquatic organisms. Three fungicides (azoxystrobin, boscalid, and pyraclostrobin), one herbicide (propyzamide) and two organophosphate insecticides (chlorpyrifos and diazinon) were detected frequently. Dissolved pesticide concentrations in the estuary corresponded to the timing of application while bed sediment pesticide concentrations correlated with the distance from potential sources. Fungicides and insecticides were detected frequently in fish and invertebrates collected near the mouth of the estuary and the contaminant profiles differed from the sediment and water collected. This is the first study to document the occurrence of many current-use pesticides, including fungicides, in tissue. Limited information is available on the uptake, accumulation and effects of current-use pesticides on non-target organisms. Additional data are needed to understand the impacts of pesticides, especially in small agriculturally-dominated estuaries.

  12. Application of brain cholinesterase reactivation to differentiate between organophosphorus and carbamate pesticide exposure in wild birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, M.R.; Thomas, N.J.; Hulse, C.

    1995-01-01

    Brain cholinesterase activity was measured to evaluate pesticide exposure in wild birds. Thermal reactivation of brain cholinesterase was used to differentiate between carbamate and organophosphorus pesticide exposure. Brain cholinesterase activity was compared with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry of stomach contents. Pesticides were identified and confirmed in 86 of 102 incidents of mortality from 29 states within the USA from 1986 through 1991. Thermal reactivation of cholinesterase activity was used to correctly predict carbamates in 22 incidents and organophosphates in 59 incidents. Agreement (P < 0.001) between predictions based on cholinesterase activities and GC/MS results was significant.

  13. Acetylcholinesterase biosensor based on a gold nanoparticle-polypyrrole-reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite modified electrode for the amperometric detection of organophosphorus pesticides.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuqi; Asiri, Abdullah Mohamed; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2014-06-21

    A nanohybrid of gold nanoparticles, polypyrrole, and reduced graphene oxide sheets (named as Au-PPy-rGO) was achieved by electrochemical deposition of reduced graphene oxide with pyrrole and the introduction of gold nanoparticles. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) was further encapsulated in a silica matrix and immobilized on the Au-PPy-rGO nanocomposite by co-deposition with (NH4)2SiF6. The presence of PPy helped to avoid the aggregation of rGO caused by van der Waals interactions between individual sheets and significantly increased the surface area of the modified electrode. The obtained Au-PPy-rGO nanocomposite not only showed excellent conductivity but also exhibited a high electrocatalytic activity and specific affinity for thiocholine, the hydrolysis product of the enzyme, and thus an improved detection sensitivity. Since AChE molecules were protected by the circumambient silica matrix, which provided a biocompatible environment and facilitated mass transport, the fabricated AChE biosensor displayed high stability and excellent activity together with a fast response to organophosphorus pesticides. Under optimum conditions, the biosensor led to the rapid and sensitive detection of paraoxon-ethyl from 1.0 nM to 5 μM with a detection limit of 0.5 nM.

  14. Toxicity Assessment of Expired Pesticides to Green Algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata

    PubMed Central

    Satyavani, G.; Chandrasehar, G.; Varma, K. Krishna; Goparaju, A.; Ayyappan, S.; Reddy, P. Neelakanta; Murthy, P. Balakrishna

    2012-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of expired pesticides on the yield and growth rate of green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, a study was conducted as per the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) guideline number 201. Fifteen expired pesticide formulations, most commonly used in Indian agriculture, were tested in comparison with their unexpired counterparts. The expired pesticide formulations studied belonged to various class and functional groups: organophosphate, pyrethroid-based insecticides; azole-based fungicides; acetamide, propionate, acetic acid-based herbicides; fungicides mixtures containing two actives—azole and dithiocarbamate. The toxicity endpoints of yield (EyC50: 0–72 h) and growth rate (ErC50: 0–72 h) of Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata for each pesticide formulation (both expired and unexpired pesticides) were determined statistically using TOXSTAT 3.5 version software. The results pointed out that some expired pesticide formulations exhibited higher toxicity to tested algal species, as compared to the corresponding unexpired pesticides. These data thus stress the need for greater care to dispose expired pesticides to water bodies, to avoid the effects on aquatic ecospecies tested. PMID:23762633

  15. Pesticide sales in low-income, minority neighborhoods.

    PubMed

    Carlton, Elizabeth J; Moats, Harmon L; Feinberg, Marian; Shepard, Peggy; Garfinkel, Robin; Whyatt, Robin; Evans, David

    2004-06-01

    The US EPA has phased-out residential use of two organophosphate pesticides commonly used to control cockroaches-retail sales of chlorpyrifos were scheduled to end on 12/31/01, and diazinon on 12/31/02. In light of recent findings highlighting the associations between pests, pesticides and health, we surveyed stores in low-income, minority neighborhoods in New York City to determine whether the phase-outs have been effective and to assess the availability of alternatives to spray pesticides. In summer 2002, when sales of chlorpyrifos were illegal and diazinon still legal, we surveyed 106 stores selling pesticides. Four percent sold products containing chlorpyrifos and 40 percent sold products containing diazinon. One year later, when sales of both pesticides were to have ended, we surveyed 109 stores selling pesticides in the same neighborhoods and found chlorpyrifos in only one store and diazinon in 18 percent of stores, including 80 percent of supermarkets surveyed. At least one form of lower toxicity pesticides, including gels, bait stations and boric acid was available in 69 percent of stores in 2002. However sprays were most widely available, found in 94 percent of stores in 2002 and less expensive than lower toxicity baits and gels. In a separate survey of storekeeper recommendations conducted in 2002, storekeepers recommended lower toxicity pesticides as the best way to control cockroaches 79% of the time. The EPA's phase-outs have nearly eliminated sales of chlorpyrifos, but the diazinon phase-out appears to be less effective.

  16. Linking Exposure Science to Current and Future Pesticide Risk Assessment: From Biomonitoring to PBPK Modeling to High Throughput Screens

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organophosphate (OP) and pyrethroid (PYR) pesticides are amongst the most widely used insecticides. While useful in their ability to control and remove insects from cattle, crops, and homes, they are inherently linked to varying degrees of toxicity as a result of their actions on...

  17. USE OF MICRO-DAMS IN POTATO FURROWS TO REDUCE EROSION AND RUNOFF AND MINIMISE SURFACE WATER CONTAMINATION THROUGH PESTICIDES.

    PubMed

    Olivier, C; Goffart, J P; Baets, D; Xanthoulis, D; Fonder, N; Lognay, G; Barthélemy, J P; Lebrun, P

    2014-01-01

    The use of micro-dams in potato furrows is an interesting technology to reduce erosion and runoff in hilly areas. These phenomena are major sources of surface water contamination by nutrients and plant protection products (Gillijns et al., 2005). In 2011 Bayer CropScience set up a trial in collaboration with the Walloon Agricultural Research Centre (CRA-W) and ULg-Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech in Huldenberg (Belgium) to demonstrate this technique in potatoes. Micro-dams create barriers between furrows in order to encourage rainwater to infiltrate in the soil rather than to run off. The results from the trial over this year confirm that the application of micro-dams is effective in reducing erosion and runoff significantly. The total loss of plant protection products (PPP) to surface water is dramatically reduced and also strongly depends on the physic-chemical characteristics of the active ingredients. In addition, the technique tends to produce a higher yield of potato tubers as an effect of an optimised utilisation of the available rainwater and nutrients.

  18. (Pesticide chemistry)

    SciTech Connect

    Barnthouse, L.W.

    1990-09-04

    This report summarizes a trip by L. W. Barnthouse of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), to Hamburg, Federal Republic of Germany (FRG), where he participated in the 7th International Congress of Pesticide Chemistry. He chaired a workshop on experimental systems for determining effects of pesticides on nontarget organisms and gave an oral presentation at a symposium on pesticide risk assessment. Before returning to the United States, Dr. Barnthouse visited the Netherlands Institute for Sea Research in Texel, the Netherlands.

  19. Evaluation of the genetic activity profiles of 65 pesticides

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, N.E.; Stack, H.F.; Waters, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    This report focuses on the quantitative profiles of genetic activity produced by 65 pesticides and efforts to classify them according to their genotoxic effects and chemical structures. Three main categories may be distinguished based on the qualitative results: Category 1 pesticides were active in most of the in vitro and in vivo assays employed. These nine compounds include the structurally similar organophosphate insecticides, acephate, demeton, monocrotophos, and trichlorfon; the phthalimid fungicide analogues, captan and folpet; and the thiocarbamate herbicide analogues, dialiate, sulfallate and triallate. The 26 Category 2 compounds demonstrated fewer positive results and may be subdivided into two parts, one of which contains 12 halogenated aromatic or heterocyclic ring compounds, including the phenoxy herbicides, 2,4-D, 2,4-DB, and 2,4,5-T. The remaining part of Category 2 (14 compounds) consists of structurally similar organophosphate insecticides, azinphos-methyl, crotoxyphos, disulfoton, methyl parathion; three similar ethylenebisdithiocarbamate fungicides, maneb, mancozeb, and zineb; three similar pyrethroid insecticides, allethrin, chrysanthemic acid, and ethy chrysanthemate; and four structurally diverse compounds, cacodylic acid, dinoseb, sec-butylamine and benomyl. The third category of 30 pesticides gave negative results in all tests and represents structurally diverse compounds. Using the computerized profile matching methodology, from 2080 possible pairwise chemical combinations of the 65 pesticides, 20 statistically significant pairs were selected.

  20. Citizen's Guide to Pesticides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Pesticide Programs.

    This guide provides suggestions on pest control and safety rules for pesticide use at home. Pest prevention may be possible by modification of pest habitat: removal of food and water sources, removal or destruction of pest shelter and breeding sites, and good horticultural practices that reduce plant stress. Nonchemical alternatives to pesticides…

  1. Pesticides and myocardial infarction incidence and mortality among male pesticide applicators in the Agricultural Health Study.

    PubMed

    Mills, Katherine T; Blair, Aaron; Freeman, Laura E Beane; Sandler, Dale P; Hoppin, Jane A

    2009-10-01

    Acute organophosphate and carbamate pesticide poisonings result in adverse cardiac outcomes. The cardiac effects of chronic low-level pesticide exposure have not been studied. The authors analyzed self-reported lifetime use of pesticides reported at enrollment (1993-1997) and myocardial infarction mortality through 2006 and self-reported nonfatal myocardial infarction through 2003 among male pesticide applicators in the Agricultural Health Study. Using proportional hazard models, the authors estimated the association between lifetime use of 49 pesticides and fatal and nonfatal myocardial infarction. There were 476 deaths from myocardial infarction among 54,069 men enrolled in the study and 839 nonfatal myocardial infarctions among the 32,024 participants who completed the follow-up interview. Fatal and nonfatal myocardial infarctions were associated with commonly reported risk factors, including age and smoking. There was little evidence of an association between having used pesticides, individually or by class, and myocardial infarction mortality (e.g., insecticide hazard ratio (HR) = 0.91, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.67, 1.24; herbicide HR = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.49, 1.10) or nonfatal myocardial infarction incidence (e.g., insecticide HR = 0.85, 95% CI: 0.66, 1.09; herbicide HR = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.61, 1.36). There was no evidence of a dose response with any pesticide measure. In a population with low risk for myocardial infarction, the authors observed little evidence of increased risk of myocardial infarction mortality or nonfatal myocardial infarction associated with the occupational use of pesticides.

  2. Pesticides and Myocardial Infarction Incidence and Mortality Among Male Pesticide Applicators in the Agricultural Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Katherine T.; Blair, Aaron; Freeman, Laura E. Beane; Sandler, Dale P.

    2009-01-01

    Acute organophosphate and carbamate pesticide poisonings result in adverse cardiac outcomes. The cardiac effects of chronic low-level pesticide exposure have not been studied. The authors analyzed self-reported lifetime use of pesticides reported at enrollment (1993–1997) and myocardial infarction mortality through 2006 and self-reported nonfatal myocardial infarction through 2003 among male pesticide applicators in the Agricultural Health Study. Using proportional hazard models, the authors estimated the association between lifetime use of 49 pesticides and fatal and nonfatal myocardial infarction. There were 476 deaths from myocardial infarction among 54,069 men enrolled in the study and 839 nonfatal myocardial infarctions among the 32,024 participants who completed the follow-up interview. Fatal and nonfatal myocardial infarctions were associated with commonly reported risk factors, including age and smoking. There was little evidence of an association between having used pesticides, individually or by class, and myocardial infarction mortality (e.g., insecticide hazard ratio (HR) = 0.91, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.67, 1.24; herbicide HR = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.49, 1.10) or nonfatal myocardial infarction incidence (e.g., insecticide HR = 0.85, 95% CI: 0.66, 1.09; herbicide HR = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.61, 1.36). There was no evidence of a dose response with any pesticide measure. In a population with low risk for myocardial infarction, the authors observed little evidence of increased risk of myocardial infarction mortality or nonfatal myocardial infarction associated with the occupational use of pesticides. PMID:19700503

  3. Study on the interaction of catalase with pesticides by flow injection chemiluminescence and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xijuan; Wang, Zhuming; Chen, Donghua; Luo, Kai; Xiong, Xunyu; Song, Zhenghua

    2014-08-01

    The interaction mechanisms of catalase (CAT) with pesticides (including organophosphates: disulfoton, isofenphos-methyl, malathion, isocarbophos, dimethoate, dipterex, methamidophos and acephate; carbamates: carbaryl and methomyl; pyrethroids: fenvalerate and deltamethrin) were first investigated by flow injection (FI) chemiluminescence (CL) analysis and molecular docking. By homemade FI-CL model of lg[(I0-I)/I]=lgK+nlg[D], it was found that the binding processes of pesticides to CAT were spontaneous with the apparent binding constants K of 10(3)-10(5) L mol(-1) and the numbers of binding sites about 1.0. The binding abilities of pesticides to CAT followed the order: fenvalerate>deltamethrin>disulfoton>isofenphos-methyl>carbaryl>malathion>isocarbophos>dimethoate>dipterex>acephate>methomyl>methamidophos, which was generally similar to the order of determination sensitivity of pesticides. The thermodynamic parameters revealed that CAT bound with hydrophobic pesticides by hydrophobic interaction force, and with hydrophilic pesticides by hydrogen bond and van der Waals force. The pesticides to CAT molecular docking study showed that pesticides could enter into the cavity locating among the four subdomains of CAT, giving the specific amino acid residues and hydrogen bonds involved in CAT-pesticides interaction. It was also found that the lgK values of pesticides to CAT increased regularly with increasing lgP, Mr, MR and MV, suggesting that the hydrophobicity and steric property of pesticide played essential roles in its binding to CAT.

  4. The legacy of pesticide pollution: An overlooked factor in current risk assessments of freshwater systems.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Jes J; Wiberg-Larsen, Peter; Baattrup-Pedersen, Annette; Cedergreen, Nina; McKnight, Ursula S; Kreuger, Jenny; Jacobsen, Dean; Kristensen, Esben A; Friberg, Nikolai

    2015-11-01

    We revealed a history of legacy pesticides in water and sediment samples from 19 small streams across an agricultural landscape. Dominant legacy compounds included organochlorine pesticides, such as DDT and lindane, the organophosphate chlorpyrifos and triazine herbicides such as terbutylazine and simazine which have long been banned in the EU. The highest concentrations of legacy pesticides were found in streams draining catchments with a large proportion of arable farmland suggesting that they originated from past agricultural applications. The sum of toxic units (SumTUD.magna) based on storm water samples from agriculturally impacted streams was significantly higher when legacy pesticides were included compared to when they were omitted. Legacy pesticides did not significantly change the predicted toxicity of water samples to algae or fish. However, pesticide concentrations in bed sediment and suspended sediment samples exceeded safety thresholds in 50% of the samples and the average contribution of legacy pesticides to the SumTUC.riparius was >90%. Our results suggest that legacy pesticides can be highly significant contributors to the current toxic exposure of stream biota, especially macroinvertebrate communities, and that those communities were primarily exposed to legacy pesticides via the sediment. Additionally, our results suggest that neglecting legacy pesticides in the risk assessment of pesticides in streams may severely underestimate the risk of ecological effects.

  5. Paraoxonase activity and genetic polymorphisms in greenhouse workers with long term pesticide exposure.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Antonio F; Mackness, Bharti; Rodrigo, Lourdes; López, Olga; Pla, Antonio; Gil, Fernando; Durrington, Paul N; Pena, Gloria; Parrón, Tesifón; Serrano, José L; Mackness, Michael I

    2003-11-01

    Serum paraoxonase (PON1) is a high-density lipoprotein (HDL) associated protein, which plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, although it was primarily associated with the hydrolysis of organophosphorus compounds. PON1 was initially thought to be independent from physiological or pathological states, although recently some environmental factors have been reported to modulate its activity. In this study, we have investigated the promoter (PON1 -108C/T and -909 C/G) and coding region (PON1 192Q/R and 55L/M) polymorphisms, as well as PON1 activity towards different substrates (paraoxon, phenylacetate and diazoxon) in 102 individuals with long term low dose exposure to pesticides in a plastic greenhouse setting (sprayers), who are probably the group of agricultural workers with the highest exposure to pesticides. PON1 activity towards paraoxon was nonsignificantly decreased (up to 53.5%) in the sprayers subgroup exposed to organophosphates (n = 41) compared with nonsprayers acting as controls (n = 39). None of the genotypes studied was associated significantly with the subgroup of individuals exposed to organophosphates, although differences between sprayers and nonsprayers were observed in the PON1 -909 G/C polymorphism. Among the environmental factors that significantly predicted lower rates of PON1 activity towards paraoxon are, interestingly, the exposure to organophosphates and current smoking. By contrast, the utilization of protective clothing while spraying pesticides inside the greenhouses was positively associated with PON1 activity, very likely by preventing the pesticides from being absorbed. This study suggests that chronic exposure to pesticides might decrease PON1 activity and pinpoints the potential usefulness of monitoring PON1 activity in occupational settings where exposure to organophosphates occurs. PMID:14686479

  6. Monitoring of pesticide residues in vegetarian diet.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Beena; Kathpal, T S

    2009-04-01

    Samples (28) of complete vegetarian diet consumed from morning till night i.e. tea, milk, breakfast, lunch, snacks, dinner, sweet dish etc. were collected from homes, hostels and hotels periodically from Hisar and analysed for detecting the residues of organochlorine, synthetic pyrethriod, organophosphate and carbamate insecticides. The estimation was carried out by using multi-residue analytical technique employing gas chromatograph (GC)-electron capture detector and GC-nitrogen phosphorous detector systems equipped with capillary columns. The whole diet sample was macerated in a mixer grinder and a representative sample in duplicate was analyzed for residues keeping the average daily diet of an adult to be 1,300 g. On comparing the data, it was found that actual daily intake (microgram/person/day) of lindane in two and endosulfan in four samples exceeded the acceptable daily intake. Residues of other pesticides in all the diet samples were lower than the acceptable daily intake (ADI) of the respective pesticides. The study concluded that although all the diet samples were found contaminated with one or the other pesticide, the actual daily intake of only a few pesticides was higher than their respective ADI. More extensive study covering other localities of Haryana has been suggested to know the overall scenario of contamination of vegetarian diet.

  7. Potential developmental neurotoxicity of pesticides used in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Bjørling-Poulsen, Marina; Andersen, Helle Raun; Grandjean, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Pesticides used in agriculture are designed to protect crops against unwanted species, such as weeds, insects, and fungus. Many compounds target the nervous system of insect pests. Because of the similarity in brain biochemistry, such pesticides may also be neurotoxic to humans. Concerns have been raised that the developing brain may be particularly vulnerable to adverse effects of neurotoxic pesticides. Current requirements for safety testing do not include developmental neurotoxicity. We therefore undertook a systematic evaluation of published evidence on neurotoxicity of pesticides in current use, with specific emphasis on risks during early development. Epidemiologic studies show associations with neurodevelopmental deficits, but mainly deal with mixed exposures to pesticides. Laboratory experimental studies using model compounds suggest that many pesticides currently used in Europe – including organophosphates, carbamates, pyrethroids, ethylenebisdithiocarbamates, and chlorophenoxy herbicides – can cause neurodevelopmental toxicity. Adverse effects on brain development can be severe and irreversible. Prevention should therefore be a public health priority. The occurrence of residues in food and other types of human exposures should be prevented with regard to the pesticide groups that are known to be neurotoxic. For other substances, given their widespread use and the unique vulnerability of the developing brain, the general lack of data on developmental neurotoxicity calls for investment in targeted research. While awaiting more definite evidence, existing uncertainties should be considered in light of the need for precautionary action to protect brain development. PMID:18945337

  8. Queens become workers: pesticides alter caste differentiation in bees.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Charles F; Acosta, André L; Dorneles, Andressa L; Dos Santos, Patrick D S; Blochtein, Betina

    2016-08-17

    Bees are important for the world biodiversity and economy because they provide key pollination services in forests and crops. However, pesticide use in crops has adversely affected (decreased) queen production because of increased mortality among larvae. Here, we demonstrated that in vitro-reared queens of a neotropical social bee species (Plebeia droryana) also showed high larval mortality after exposure to an organophosphate pesticide (chlorpyrifos) via larval food. Moreover, most of the surviving larvae that were destined to develop into queens became workers more likely because they ate less food than expected without pesticide skewing thus caste differentiation in this bee species. This adverse effect has not been previously reported for any other social insects, such as honeybees or bumblebees. Queens are essential for breeding and colony growth. Therefore, if our data are applicable to other pantropical social bee species across the globe, it is likely that these bees are at a serious risk of failure to form new colonies.

  9. Queens become workers: pesticides alter caste differentiation in bees

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Charles F.; Acosta, André L.; Dorneles, Andressa L.; dos Santos, Patrick D. S.; Blochtein, Betina

    2016-01-01

    Bees are important for the world biodiversity and economy because they provide key pollination services in forests and crops. However, pesticide use in crops has adversely affected (decreased) queen production because of increased mortality among larvae. Here, we demonstrated that in vitro-reared queens of a neotropical social bee species (Plebeia droryana) also showed high larval mortality after exposure to an organophosphate pesticide (chlorpyrifos) via larval food. Moreover, most of the surviving larvae that were destined to develop into queens became workers more likely because they ate less food than expected without pesticide skewing thus caste differentiation in this bee species. This adverse effect has not been previously reported for any other social insects, such as honeybees or bumblebees. Queens are essential for breeding and colony growth. Therefore, if our data are applicable to other pantropical social bee species across the globe, it is likely that these bees are at a serious risk of failure to form new colonies. PMID:27530246

  10. Queens become workers: pesticides alter caste differentiation in bees.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Charles F; Acosta, André L; Dorneles, Andressa L; Dos Santos, Patrick D S; Blochtein, Betina

    2016-01-01

    Bees are important for the world biodiversity and economy because they provide key pollination services in forests and crops. However, pesticide use in crops has adversely affected (decreased) queen production because of increased mortality among larvae. Here, we demonstrated that in vitro-reared queens of a neotropical social bee species (Plebeia droryana) also showed high larval mortality after exposure to an organophosphate pesticide (chlorpyrifos) via larval food. Moreover, most of the surviving larvae that were destined to develop into queens became workers more likely because they ate less food than expected without pesticide skewing thus caste differentiation in this bee species. This adverse effect has not been previously reported for any other social insects, such as honeybees or bumblebees. Queens are essential for breeding and colony growth. Therefore, if our data are applicable to other pantropical social bee species across the globe, it is likely that these bees are at a serious risk of failure to form new colonies. PMID:27530246

  11. Organophosphate inhibition of avian salt gland Na, K-ATPase activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eastin, W.C.; Fleming, W.J.; Murray, H.C.

    1982-01-01

    1. Adult black ducks (Anas rubripes) were given freshwater or saltwater (1.5% NaCl) for 11 days and half of each group was also given an organophosphate (17 p.p.m. fenthion) in the diet on days 6-11. 2. After 11 days, ducks drinking saltwater had lost more weight and had higher plasma Na and uric acid concentrations and osmolalities than birds drinking freshwater. 3. Saltwater treatment stimulated the salt gland to increased weight and Na, K-ATPase activity. 4. Fenthion generally reduced plasma and brain cholinesterase activity and depressed cholinesterase and Na, K-ATPase activities in salt glands of birds drinking saltwater.

  12. Pesticide use practices in rural Armenia.

    PubMed

    Tadevosyan, Artashes; Tadevosyan, Natalya; Kelly, Kevin; Gibbs, Shawn G; Rautiainen, Risto H

    2013-01-01

    Pesticide use can have adverse effects on both human health and the environment. Inappropriate use of pesticides increases the health risk to those who work with or live around pesticides. Educational programs for agricultural workers on the proper use of pesticides and personal protective equipment coupled with pesticide regulations are important tools to reduce the associated health risks. The authors conducted a survey (N = 2336) on pesticide use practices in the Ararat Valley of Armenia in 2000-2006. This study was a cross-sectional design. A multistage sampling method was implemented in the selection of the study population. The authors developed a questionnaire containing 173 questions to evaluate demographic characteristics, health conditions, and details of pesticides use practices. The intensity of pesticide use was high; 82.8% of respondents used them. More than 150 brand names of pesticides were in use. Unregistered, obsolete, expired, and banned compounds were found in active use. Poor compliance with the basic rules of pesticide safety was found throughout the study population, with 21.3% using gloves and only 11% using respirators. The agricultural workers' knowledge of the toxic properties of these pesticides as well as basic hygienic norms was very low. In some instances, the number of agrichemical applications to crops, particularly cucumbers and melons, reached 40 applications during the growing season. Better protection and training of pesticide users in Armenia is needed.

  13. Pesticides in the atmosphere across Canadian agricultural regions.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yuan; Harner, Tom; Blanchard, Pierrette; Tuduri, Ludovic; Waite, Don; Poissant, Laurier; Murphy, Clair; Belzer, Wayne; Aulagnier, Fabien; Sverko, Ed

    2008-08-15

    The Canadian Atmospheric Network for Currently Used Pesticides (CANCUP) was the first comprehensive, nationwide air surveillance study of pesticides in Canada. This paper presentsthe atmospheric occurrence and distribution of pesticides including organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), organophosphate pesticides (OPPs), acid herbicides (AHs), and neutral herbicides (NHs) during the spring to summer of 2004 and 2005 across agricultural regions in Canada. Atmospheric concentrations of pesticides varied within years and time periods, and regional characteristics were observed including the following: (i) highest air concentrations of several herbicides (e.g., mecoprop, triallate, and ethalfluralin) were found at Bratt's Lake, SK, a site in the Canadian Prairies; (ii) the west-coast site at Abbotsford, BC, had the maximum concentrations of diazinon; (iii) the fruit and vegetable growing region in Vineland, ON, showed highest levels for several insecticides including chlorpyrifos, endosulfan, and azinphos-methyl; (iv) high concentrations of atrazine and metolachlor were measured at St. Anicet, QC, a corn-growing region; (v) the Kensington site in PEI, Canada's largest potato-producing province, exhibited highest level of dimethoate. Analysis of particle- and gas-phase fractions of air samples revealed that most pesticides including OCPs, OPPs, and NHs exist mainly in the gas phase, while AHs exhibit more diversity in particle-gas partitioning behavior. This study also demonstrated that stirred up soil dust does not account for pesticides that are detected in the particle phase. The estimated dry and wet deposition fluxes indicate considerable atmospheric inputs for some current-use pesticides (CUPs). This data set represents the first measurements for many pesticides in the atmosphere, precipitation, and soil for given agricultural regions across Canada.

  14. Developmental exposure to organophosphate flame retardants elicits overt toxicity and alters behavior in early life stage zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Dishaw, Laura V; Hunter, Deborah L; Padnos, Beth; Padilla, Stephanie; Stapleton, Heather M

    2014-12-01

    Organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) are common replacements for the phased-out polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and have been detected at high concentrations in environmental samples. OPFRs are structurally similar to organophosphate pesticides and may adversely affect the developing nervous system. This study evaluated the overt toxicity, uptake, and neurobehavioral effects of tris (1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP), tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris (1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCPP), and tris (2,3-dibromopropyl) phosphate (TDBPP) in early life stage zebrafish. Chlorpyrifos was used as a positive control. For overt toxicity and neurobehavioral assessments, zebrafish were exposed from 0 to 5 days postfertilization (dpf). Hatching, death, or malformations were evaluated daily. Teratogenic effects were scored by visual examination on 6 dpf. To evaluate uptake and metabolism, zebrafish were exposed to 1 µM of each organophosphate (OP) flame retardant and collected on 1 and 5 dpf to monitor accumulation. Larval swimming activity was measured in 6 dpf larvae to evaluate neurobehavioral effects of exposures below the acute toxicity threshold. TDBPP elicited the greatest toxicity at >1 µM. TDCPP and chlorpyrifos were overtly toxic at concentrations ≥10 µM, TCEP, and TCPP were not overtly toxic at the doses tested. Tissue concentrations increased with increasing hydrophobicity of the parent chemical after 24 h exposures. TDCPP and TDBPP and their respective metabolites were detected in embryos on 5 dpf. For all chemicals tested, developmental exposures that were not overtly toxic significantly altered larval swimming activity. These data indicate that OPFRs adversely affect development of early life stage zebrafish.

  15. Developmental Exposure to Organophosphate Flame Retardants Elicits Overt Toxicity and Alters Behavior in Early Life Stage Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Dishaw, Laura V.; Hunter, Deborah L.; Padnos, Beth; Padilla, Stephanie; Stapleton, Heather M.

    2014-01-01

    Organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) are common replacements for the phased-out polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and have been detected at high concentrations in environmental samples. OPFRs are structurally similar to organophosphate pesticides and may adversely affect the developing nervous system. This study evaluated the overt toxicity, uptake, and neurobehavioral effects of tris (1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP), tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris (1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCPP), and tris (2,3-dibromopropyl) phosphate (TDBPP) in early life stage zebrafish. Chlorpyrifos was used as a positive control. For overt toxicity and neurobehavioral assessments, zebrafish were exposed from 0 to 5 days postfertilization (dpf). Hatching, death, or malformations were evaluated daily. Teratogenic effects were scored by visual examination on 6 dpf. To evaluate uptake and metabolism, zebrafish were exposed to 1 µM of each organophosphate (OP) flame retardant and collected on 1 and 5 dpf to monitor accumulation. Larval swimming activity was measured in 6 dpf larvae to evaluate neurobehavioral effects of exposures below the acute toxicity threshold. TDBPP elicited the greatest toxicity at >1 µM. TDCPP and chlorpyrifos were overtly toxic at concentrations ≥10 µM, TCEP, and TCPP were not overtly toxic at the doses tested. Tissue concentrations increased with increasing hydrophobicity of the parent chemical after 24 h exposures. TDCPP and TDBPP and their respective metabolites were detected in embryos on 5 dpf. For all chemicals tested, developmental exposures that were not overtly toxic significantly altered larval swimming activity. These data indicate that OPFRs adversely affect development of early life stage zebrafish. PMID:25239634

  16. Obsolete pesticides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Several hundred tons of obsolete pesticide stocks worldwide will pose a threat to humans and the environment until the year 2030 in some regions, unless funding for waste disposal is significantly increased, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) said in a message directed to donor governments and industry on May 24.“Deadly chemicals are contaminating the soils, groundwater, irrigation, and drinking water,” said Amemayehu Wodageneh, senior expert on obsolete pesticides for FAO. “These ‘forgotten’ stocks are a serious risk, [and] they could cause an environmental tragedy in rural areas and big cities. There is hardly any developing country that is not affected by the hazards of obsolete pesticides.”

  17. Organophosphate residues in grasshoppers from sprayed rangelands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stromborg, K.L.; McEwen, L.C.; Lamont, T.

    1984-01-01

    Grasshoppers (Orthoptera) were collected in pastures that had been sprayed with malathion and acephate to estimate the secondary exposure of insectivorous birds to these pesticides. Residues of malathion were below 3 ppm at 30 'and 54 hours after spraying and no malaoxon was detected. In contrast, acephate was found at 8 and 9 ppm 4 hours after spray; 3-5 ppm of the toxic metabolite methamidophos were also detected at that time. By 53 hours postspray, acephate levels declined to 2 ppm and methamidophos to less than 1 ppm. These results suggest that although malathion may not be a hazard to insectivorous species. acephate may be hazardous through metabolic transformation to methamidophos.

  18. Pesticides in Surface and Ground Water of the San Joaquin-Tulare Basins, California: Analysis of Available Data, 1966 Through 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Domagalski, Joseph L.

    1997-01-01

    Available pesticide data (1966-92) for surface and ground water were analyzed for the San Joaquin-Tulare Basins, California, one of 60 large hydrologic systems being studied as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program of the U.S. Geological Survey. Most of the pesticide data were for the San Joaquin Valley, one of the most intensively farmed and irrigated areas of the United States. Data were obtained from the Storage and Retrieval data base of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the water-quality data base of the U.S. Geological Survey, and from data files of State agencies. Pesticides detected in surface water include organochlorine pesticides, organophosphate pesticides, carbamate pesticides, and triazine herbicides. Pesticides detected in ground water include triazine and other organonitrogen herbicides and soil fumi gants. Surface-water data indicate seasonal patterns for the detection of organophosphate and carbamate pesticides, which are attributed to their use on almond orchards and alfafa fields. Organochlorine pesticides were detected primarily in river-bed sediments. Concentrations detected in bed sediments of the San Joaquin River near Vernalis are among the highest of any major river system in the United States. Patterns and timing of pesticide use indicate that pesticides might be present in surface-water systems during most months of a year. The most commonly detected pesticide in ground water is the soil fumigant, dibromochloropropane. Dibromochloropropane, used primarily on vineyards and orchards, was detected in ground water near the city of Fresno. Triazine and other organonitrogen herbicides were detected near vineyards and orchards in the same general locations as the detections of dibromochloropropane. Pesticides were detected in ground water of the east side of the valley floor, where the soils are sandy or coarsegrained, and water-soluble pesticides with long environmental half-lives were used. In contrast, fewer

  19. Detection of target site resistance to pyrethroids and organophosphates in the horn fly using multiplex polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Foil, L D; Guerrero, F D; Bendele, K G

    2010-09-01

    The horn fly, Haematobia irritans L., is an obligate blood-feeding fly and the primary insect pest parasitizing cattle in the United States. Pesticide resistance has become a substantial problem for cattle producers, and although several mechanisms of resistance are possible, target site resistance is the most important mechanism preventing control of this fly in the United States and possibly other countries. We developed a multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay to detect the known target site, pyrethroid resistance-associated mutation in the horn fly and a recently reported G262A mutation in the horn fly acetylcholinesterase, the target site for organophosphates. As expected, the pyrethroid resistance target site mutation was found in fly populations from Texas, Louisiana, Washington, Georgia, Mexico, and Brazil. This mutation was found to have a gender bias as it was more prevalent in females than males. The G262A acetylcholinesterase mutation was found in Texas, Louisiana, Washington, Georgia, and Mexico, but not Brazil. There was no gender bias in the occurrence of this mutation, and there was no correlation between the occurrence of the kdr and the G262A mutations. Unlike the case with the pyrethroid target site mutation, the presence of G262A did not appear to exclusively provide the level of resistance required to account for bioassay results. It is likely an additional mutation(s) occurs in the target site and/or a metabolic resistance mechanism exists in organophosphate-resistant horn fly populations.

  20. Pesticide personal protective clothing.

    PubMed

    Branson, D H; Sweeney, M

    1991-01-01

    A fairly large established data base provides information on clothing worn by U.S. and Canadian farmers to work with pesticides, their attitudes and beliefs about pesticide risk, and clothing as a dermal barrier. Very limited similar data are available for farmers in less developed countries. Clearly, farmers perceive the benefits of pesticides to far exceed any risks. While few report poisoning symptoms, most believe that their usual work clothing offers a sufficient pesticide barrier, and few wear special-purpose protective clothing. Gloves of various materials, including cotton and leather, appear to be the major protective clothing item. Although farmers feel that their usual work clothing provides excellent protection, fabric penetration research does not support this. Shirting-weight fabrics offer some limited protection against light spray of field-strenght pesticides. Heavier-weight fabrics, such as denim and twill, are better barriers. With a heavier spray or a spill, usual work clothing does not give sufficient protection. Greater protection can usually be achieved with the use of a fluorocarbon finished fabric, such as Scotchgard or Zepel. Scotchgard can readily be applied at home. A durable-press finish does not appear to improve fabric's pesticide-barrier resistance and some data suggest that it may decrease barrier properties. A second alternative for increased protection is the use of a special-purpose fabric, such as a coated nonwoven or possibly Gore-Tex. Numerous other new "waterproof breathable" fabrics have recently come to the market. Many of these are finished or coated fabrics and one would expect them to be at least somewhat resistant to pesticides. However, they have not been tested. Wearing an additional layer also appears to be another clothing strategy to minimize exposure. Fabric penetration research also shows that pesticide formulation, volume or spray regime, concentration, and active ingredients influence the barrier properties of

  1. Pesticide personal protective clothing.

    PubMed

    Branson, D H; Sweeney, M

    1991-01-01

    A fairly large established data base provides information on clothing worn by U.S. and Canadian farmers to work with pesticides, their attitudes and beliefs about pesticide risk, and clothing as a dermal barrier. Very limited similar data are available for farmers in less developed countries. Clearly, farmers perceive the benefits of pesticides to far exceed any risks. While few report poisoning symptoms, most believe that their usual work clothing offers a sufficient pesticide barrier, and few wear special-purpose protective clothing. Gloves of various materials, including cotton and leather, appear to be the major protective clothing item. Although farmers feel that their usual work clothing provides excellent protection, fabric penetration research does not support this. Shirting-weight fabrics offer some limited protection against light spray of field-strenght pesticides. Heavier-weight fabrics, such as denim and twill, are better barriers. With a heavier spray or a spill, usual work clothing does not give sufficient protection. Greater protection can usually be achieved with the use of a fluorocarbon finished fabric, such as Scotchgard or Zepel. Scotchgard can readily be applied at home. A durable-press finish does not appear to improve fabric's pesticide-barrier resistance and some data suggest that it may decrease barrier properties. A second alternative for increased protection is the use of a special-purpose fabric, such as a coated nonwoven or possibly Gore-Tex. Numerous other new "waterproof breathable" fabrics have recently come to the market. Many of these are finished or coated fabrics and one would expect them to be at least somewhat resistant to pesticides. However, they have not been tested. Wearing an additional layer also appears to be another clothing strategy to minimize exposure. Fabric penetration research also shows that pesticide formulation, volume or spray regime, concentration, and active ingredients influence the barrier properties of

  2. Biodegradation of the Organophosphate Trichlorfon and Its Major Degradation Products by a Novel Aspergillus sydowii PA F-2.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jiang; Dong, Qiaofeng; Yu, Chenlei; Zhao, Ruixue; Wang, Jing; Chen, Lanzhou

    2016-06-01

    Trichlorfon (TCF) is an important organophosphate pesticide in agriculture. However, limited information is known about the biodegradation behaviors and kinetics of this pesticide. In this study, a newly isolated fungus (PA F-2) from pesticide-polluted soils was identified as Aspergillus sydowii on the basis of the sequencing of internal transcribed spacer rDNA. This fungus degraded TCF as sole carbon, sole phosphorus, and sole carbon-phosphorus sources in a mineral salt medium (MSM). Optimal TCF degradation conditions were determined through response surface methodology, and results also revealed that 75.31% of 100 mg/L TCF was metabolized within 7 days. The degradation of TCF was accelerated, and the mycelial dry weight of PA F-2 was remarkably increased in MSM supplemented with exogenous sucrose and yeast extract. Five TCF metabolic products were identified through gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. TCF could be initially hydrolyzed to dichlorvos and then be degraded through the cleavage of the P-C bond to produce dimethyl hydrogen phosphate and chloral hydrate. These two compounds were subsequently deoxidized to produce dimethyl phosphite and trichloroethanal. These results demonstrate the biodegradation pathways of TCF and promote the potential use of PA F-2 to bioremediate TCF-contaminated environments. PMID:27161040

  3. An optical instrument to test pesticide residues in agricultural products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhengjun; Zheng, Wenzhong; Fang, Hui; He, Yong

    2005-10-01

    Pesticide is one of the indispensability materials in modern agricultural management, however the excessive use of pesticides has threatened the ecological environment and people's health. This paper introduced an optical instrument to test the pesticide residues in agricultural products based on the inhibition rate of organophosphates against acrtyl-cholinesterase (AchE). The instrument consists mainly of a solid light source with 410nm wavelength, a sampling container, an optical sensor, a temperature sensor, and a MCU based data acquisition board. The light illuminated through the liquid in the sampling container, and the absorptivity was determined by the amount of the pesticide residues in the liquid. This paper involves the design of optical testing system, the data acquisition and calibration of the optical sensor, the design of microcontroller-based electrical board. Tests were done to reveal the affection of temperature and reacting time on AchE, to establish the relationship between the amount of methamidophos and dichlorvos with AchE. The results showed that the absorption rate was related to the pesticide residues and it could be concluded that the pesticide residues exceeded the normal level when the inhibition rate was over 50 percent. The instrument has potential application in vegetable markets.

  4. The health significance of pesticide variability in individual commodity items.

    PubMed

    Marrs, T C

    2000-07-01

    The observed phenomenon of variability of residues in individual fruit and vegetables has a number of implications for risk assessment. The main implication is that the possibility of acute toxic effects in humans has to be considered, where items are commonly consumed unprocessed, are commonly consumed at a single sitting and the pesticide involved has substantial acute toxicity. The main groups of pesticides of concern are the anticholinesterase organophosphates and carbamates. The problem partly arises from the fact that, with some older pesticides, studies of the type most appropriate for setting acute reference doses (ARfDs) have not been carried out. As a result ARfDs are based on studies of length that is greater than ideal. While there is little evidence from the scientific or medical literature that food-borne pesticide poisoning is occurring on any major scale, the symptomatology of such poisoning would be non-specific and the pattern in the population, sporadic. Hence it is likely that pesticide-related illness, through food, would be missed. It is concluded that risk assessments should be improved, using refined safety factors, more appropriate studies and better intake data. The reasons for the variability could be sought and remedied or the application conditions of the pesticide modified.

  5. Metallic organophosphates as catalysts in asymmetric synthesis: a return journey.

    PubMed

    Parra, Alejandro; Reboredo, Silvia; Martín Castro, Ana M; Alemán, José

    2012-07-14

    This perspective article provides a general overview of the most relevant topics in the applications of chiral metallic organophosphates. A brief introduction along with a historic comparative profile of the BINOL and phosphoric acid analogues are given. Next, a selection of the most outstanding uses of the catalysts according to the employed metal is presented.

  6. MICROCHIP ENZYMATIC ASSAY OF ORGANOPHOSPHATE NERVE AGENTS. (R830900)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An on-chip enzymatic assay for screening organophosphate (OP) nerve agents, based on a pre-column reaction of organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH), electrophoretic separation of the phosphonic acid products, and their contactless-conductivity detection, is described. Factors affec...

  7. Pesticide mass budget in a stormwater wetland.

    PubMed

    Maillard, Elodie; Imfeld, Gwenaël

    2014-01-01

    Wetlands are reactive landscape zones that provide ecosystem services, including the improvement of water quality. Field studies distinguishing pesticide degradation from retention to evaluate the sink and source functions of wetlands are scarce. This study evaluated based on a complete mass budget the partitioning, retention, and degradation of 12 pesticides in water, suspended solids, sediments, and organisms in a wetland receiving contaminated runoff. The mass budget showed the following: (i) dissolved pesticides accounted for 95% of the total load entering the wetland and the pesticide partitioning between the dissolved phase and the suspended solids varied according to the molecules, (ii) pesticides accumulated primarily in the <250 μm bed sediments during spring and late summer, and (iii) the hydrological regime or the incoming pesticide loads did not influence the pesticide dissipation, which varied according to the molecules and the wetland biogeochemical conditions. The vegetation enhanced the pesticide degradation during the vegetative phase and the pesticides were released during plant senescence. The dithiocarbamates were degraded under oxic conditions in spring, whereas glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) degradation occurred under reducing conditions during the summer. The complete pesticide mass budget indicates the versatility of the pesticide sink and source functions of wetland systems.

  8. Pesticide mass budget in a stormwater wetland.

    PubMed

    Maillard, Elodie; Imfeld, Gwenaël

    2014-01-01

    Wetlands are reactive landscape zones that provide ecosystem services, including the improvement of water quality. Field studies distinguishing pesticide degradation from retention to evaluate the sink and source functions of wetlands are scarce. This study evaluated based on a complete mass budget the partitioning, retention, and degradation of 12 pesticides in water, suspended solids, sediments, and organisms in a wetland receiving contaminated runoff. The mass budget showed the following: (i) dissolved pesticides accounted for 95% of the total load entering the wetland and the pesticide partitioning between the dissolved phase and the suspended solids varied according to the molecules, (ii) pesticides accumulated primarily in the <250 μm bed sediments during spring and late summer, and (iii) the hydrological regime or the incoming pesticide loads did not influence the pesticide dissipation, which varied according to the molecules and the wetland biogeochemical conditions. The vegetation enhanced the pesticide degradation during the vegetative phase and the pesticides were released during plant senescence. The dithiocarbamates were degraded under oxic conditions in spring, whereas glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) degradation occurred under reducing conditions during the summer. The complete pesticide mass budget indicates the versatility of the pesticide sink and source functions of wetland systems. PMID:25003558

  9. Rhinitis associated with pesticide use among private pesticide applicators in the agricultural health study.

    PubMed

    Slager, Rebecca E; Simpson, Sean L; Levan, Tricia D; Poole, Jill A; Sandler, Dale P; Hoppin, Jane A

    2010-01-01

    Farmers commonly experience rhinitis but the risk factors are not well characterized. The aim of this study was to analyze cross-sectional data on rhinitis in the past year and pesticide use from 21,958 Iowa and North Carolina farmers in the Agricultural Health Study, enrolled 1993-1997, to evaluate pesticide predictors of rhinitis. Polytomous and logistic regression models were used to assess association between pesticide use and rhinitis while controlling for demographics and farm-related exposures. Sixty-seven percent of farmers reported current rhinitis and 39% reported 3 or more rhinitis episodes. The herbicides glyphosate [odds ratio (OR) = 1.09, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 1.05-1.13] and petroleum oil (OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.05-1.19) were associated with current rhinitis and increased rhinitis episodes. Of the insecticides, four organophosphates (chlorpyrifos, diazinon, dichlorvos, and malathion), carbaryl, and use of permethrin on animals were predictors of current rhinitis. Diazinon was significant in the overall polytomous model and was associated with an elevated OR of 13+ rhinitis episodes (13+ episodes OR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.09-1.38). The fungicide captan was also a significant predictor of rhinitis. Use of petroleum oil, use of malathion, use of permethrin, and use of the herbicide metolachlor were significant in exposure-response polytomous models. Specific pesticides may contribute to rhinitis in farmers; agricultural activities did not explain these findings.

  10. Environmental and occupational pesticide exposure and human sperm parameters: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Martenies, Sheena E; Perry, Melissa J

    2013-05-10

    Of continuing concern are the associations between environmental or occupational exposures to pesticides and semen quality parameters. Prior research has indicated that there may be associations between exposure to pesticides of a variety of classes and decreased sperm health. The intent of this review was to summarize the most recent evidence related to pesticide exposures and commonly used semen quality parameters, including concentration, motility and morphology. The recent literature was searched for studies published between January 2007 and August 2012 that focused on environmental or occupational pesticide exposures. Included in the review are 17 studies, 15 of which reported significant associations between exposure to pesticides and semen quality indicators. Two studies also investigated the roles genetic polymorphisms may play in the strength or directions of these associations. Specific pesticides targeted for study included dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), and abamectin. Pyrethroids and organophosphates were analyzed as classes of pesticides rather than as individual compounds, primarily due to the limitations of exposure assessment techniques. Overall, a majority of the studies reported significant associations between pesticide exposure and sperm parameters. A decrease in sperm concentration was the most commonly reported finding among all of the pesticide classes investigated. Decreased motility was also associated with exposures to each of the pesticide classes, although these findings were less frequent across studies. An association between pesticide exposure and sperm morphology was less clear, with only two studies reporting an association. The evidence presented in this review continues to support the hypothesis that exposures to pesticides at environmentally or occupationally relevant levels may be associated with decreased sperm health. Future work in this area should focus on associations between specific

  11. Efficacy of an organophosphate mixture against an organophosphate-resistant strain of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of an organophosphate (OP) mixture acaricide, Ravap®, was evaluated as a whole-body spray treatment applied at 0.15 and 0.3% active ingredient (AI) to cattle infested with all parasitic stages of a highly OP-resistant strain of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Canestrini). Laborator...

  12. AChE biosensor based on zinc oxide sol-gel for the detection of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Ravi; Ganesana, Mallikarjunarao; Andreescu, Silvana; Stanciu, Lia

    2010-02-28

    Zinc oxide has been used as a matrix for immobilization of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and detection of the pesticide paraoxon. The immobilized enzyme retained its enzymatic activity up to three months when stored in phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.4) at 4 degrees C. An amperometric biosensor for the detection of paraoxon was designed. The biosensor detected paraoxon in the range 0.035-1.38 ppm and can be used to detect other AChE inhibiting organophosphate pesticides. PMID:20113735

  13. Occurrence and distribution of pesticides in surface waters of the Hood River basin, Oregon, 1999-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Temple, Whitney B.; Johnson, Henry M.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey analyzed pesticide and trace-element concentration data from the Hood River basin collected by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ) from 1999 through 2009 to determine the distribution and concentrations of pesticides in the basin's surface waters. Instream concentrations were compared to (1) national and State water-quality standards established to protect aquatic organisms and (2) concentrations that cause sublethal or lethal effects in order to assess their potential to adversely affect the health of salmonids and their prey organisms. Three salmonid species native to the basin are listed as "threatened" under the U.S. Endangered Species Act: bull trout, steelhead, and Chinook salmon. A subset of 16 sites was sampled every year by the ODEQ for pesticides, with sample collection targeted to months of peak pesticide use in orchards (March-June and September). Ten pesticides and four pesticide degradation products were analyzed from 1999 through 2008; 100 were analyzed in 2009. Nineteen pesticides were detected: 11 insecticides, 6 herbicides, and 2 fungicides. Two of four insecticide degradation products were detected. All five detected organophosphate insecticides and the one detected organochlorine insecticide were present at concentrations exceeding water-quality standards, sublethal effects thresholds, or acute toxicity values in one or more samples. The frequency of organophosphate detection in the basin decreased during the period of record; however, changes in sampling schedule and laboratory reporting limits hindered clear analysis of detection frequency trends. Detected herbicide and fungicide concentrations were less than water-quality standards, sublethal effects thresholds, or acute toxicity values. Simazine, the most frequently detected pesticide, was the only herbicide detected at concentrations within an order of magnitude (factor of 10) of concentrations that impact salmonid olfaction. Some detected

  14. Comparative Dietary Toxicities of Pesticides to Birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heath, R.G.; Spann, J.W.; Hill, E.F.; Kreitzer, J.F.

    1972-01-01

    This report presents measurements of the lethal dietary toxicity of 89 pesticidal chemicals to young bowhites, Japanese quail, ring-necked pheasants, and mallards. Toxicity is expressed as the median lethal concentration (LC 50) of active chemical in a 5-day ad libitum diet. LC 50's and associated statistics are derived by methods of probit analysis. Endrin consistently was the most toxic chemical while aldrin and dieldrin were among the six most toxic chemicals of those tested on all species. In general, organophosphates were less toxic than aldrin or dieldrin and herbicides were of a low order of toxicity. There were obvious inconsistencies in the relative sensitivity of the four species to various chemicals.

  15. Residential Proximity to Agricultural Pesticide Applications and Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rull, Rudolph P.; Gunier, Robert; Von Behren, Julie; Hertz, Andrew; Crouse, Vonda; Buffler, Patricia A.; Reynolds, Peggy

    2009-01-01

    Ambient exposure from residential proximity to applications of agricultural pesticides may contribute to the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Using residential histories collected from the families of 213 ALL cases and 268 matched controls enrolled in the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study, the authors assessed residential proximity within a half-mile (804.5 meters) of pesticide applications by linking address histories with reports of agricultural pesticide use. Proximity was ascertained during different time windows of exposure, including the first year of life and the child’s lifetime through the date of diagnosis for cases or reference for controls. Agricultural pesticides were categorized a priori into groups based on similarities in toxicological effects, physicochemical properties, and target pests or uses. The effects of moderate and high exposure for each group of pesticides were estimated using conditional logistic regression. Elevated ALL risk was associated with lifetime moderate exposure, but not high exposure, to certain physicochemical categories of pesticides, including organophosphates, cholorinated phenols, and triazines, and with pesticides classified as insecticides or fumigants. A similar pattern was also observed for several toxicological groups of pesticides. These findings suggest future directions for the identification of specific pesticides that may play a role in the etiology of childhood leukemia. PMID:19700145

  16. The use and disposal of household pesticides.

    PubMed

    Grey, Charlotte N B; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J; Golding, Jean

    2005-01-01

    Most pesticides are synthetic chemicals manufactured specifically for their toxic properties to the target species, and widely used globally. Several epidemiological studies in the United States have suggested health concerns arising from the chronic exposure of young children to pesticides in the domestic environment. In the UK very little is currently known about how nonoccupational pesticides are being used or disposed of. Any use of pesticides is a potential risk factor for children's exposure, and any potential exposure is likely to be reduced by the parents' adopting precautionary behaviour when using these pesticide products. This was investigated using a sample of 147 parents from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children cohort in and around Bristol, through an in-depth interview between August and November 2001. The results of this study add to the understanding of the underlying behaviour of parents applying pesticide products in the home environment in the UK. Pesticides are readily available, and are normally purchased in do-it-yourself shops and supermarkets and mostly disposed of in domestic waste. Safety was stated by 45% of parents to be the most important factor to consider when buying a pesticide. When buying pesticide products, labels were stated to be the most important source of information about pesticides. However, a third of parents stated they would not follow the product label exactly when using a product, just under half felt labels were both inadequate and hard to understand, and about 10% of parents would not take notice of warnings on the pesticide label. Less than half of parents would use gloves when applying a pesticide, although the use of protective equipment such as gloves during the application of pesticides could greatly reduce the exposure. It is a public health concern that the instructions on the labels of products may not always be understood or followed, and further understanding of user behaviour is needed.

  17. Cytogenetic monitoring in a population occupationally exposed to pesticides in Ecuador.

    PubMed Central

    Paz-y-Miño, César; Bustamante, Gabriela; Sánchez, María Eugenia; Leone, Paola E

    2002-01-01

    We analyzed the incidence of structural and numerical chromosomal aberrations (CAs) in workers of a plantation of flowers located in Quito, Ecuador, in South America. This study included 41 individuals occupationally exposed to 27 pesticides, some of which are restricted in many countries and are classified as extremely toxic by the World Health Organization; among these are aldicarb and fenamiphos. The same number of individuals of the same age, sex, and geographic area were selected as controls. Workers exposed to these pesticides showed an increased frequency of CA compared with control group (20.59% vs. 2.73%; p < 0.001). We conclude that screening for CA is an adequate biomarker for evaluating and detecting genotoxicity resulting from exposure to pesticides. Levels of erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase were also determined as a complementary metabolic study. Levels below the optimal (> 28 U/mL blood) were found in 88% of exposed individuals; this clearly shows the effect of organophosphate pesticides. When comparing the levels of acetylcholinesterase and structural CA frequencies, there was a negative linear correlation (r = 0.416; p < 0.01). We conclude that by using both analyses it may be possible to estimate damage produced by exposure to organophosphate pesticides. PMID:12417477

  18. Microflow liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry--an approach to significantly increase sensitivity, decrease matrix effects, and reduce organic solvent usage in pesticide residue analysis.

    PubMed

    Uclés Moreno, Ana; Herrera López, Sonia; Reichert, Barbara; Lozano Fernández, Ana; Hernando Guil, María Dolores; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo Rodríguez

    2015-01-20

    This manuscript reports a new pesticide residue analysis method employing a microflow-liquid chromatography system coupled to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (microflow-LC-ESI-QqQ-MS). This uses an electrospray ionization source with a narrow tip emitter to generate smaller droplets. A validation study was undertaken to establish performance characteristics for this new approach on 90 pesticide residues, including their degradation products, in three commodities (tomato, pepper, and orange). The significant benefits of the microflow-LC-MS/MS-based method were a high sensitivity gain and a notable reduction in matrix effects delivered by a dilution of the sample (up to 30-fold); this is as a result of competition reduction between the matrix compounds and analytes for charge during ionization. Overall robustness and a capability to withstand long analytical runs using the microflow-LC-MS system have been demonstrated (for 100 consecutive injections without any maintenance being required). Quality controls based on the results of internal standards added at the samples' extraction, dilution, and injection steps were also satisfactory. The LOQ values were mostly 5 μg kg(-1) for almost all pesticide residues. Other benefits were a substantial reduction in solvent usage and waste disposal as well as a decrease in the run-time. The method was successfully applied in the routine analysis of 50 fruit and vegetable samples labeled as organically produced. PMID:25495653

  19. National Pesticide Information Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Safe Use Practices Food Safety Environment Air Water Soil Wildlife Plants Pest Control Identify Your Pest Learn About Your Pest Control Your Pest Integrated Pest Management Pesticide Products NPRO: Pesticide Product Search Pesticide Ingredients ...

  20. Dietary exposures to selected metals and pesticides.

    PubMed

    MacIntosh, D L; Spengler, J D; Ozkaynak, H; Tsai, L; Ryan, P B

    1996-02-01

    Average daily dietary exposures to 11 contaminants were estimated for approximately 120,000 U.S. adults by combining data on annual diet, as measured by a food frequency questionnaire, with contaminant residue data for table-ready foods that were collected as part of the annual U.S. Food and Drug Administration Total Diet Study. The contaminants included in the analysis were four heavy metals (arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury), three organophosphate pesticides (chlorpyrifos, diazinon, malathion), and four organochlorine pesticides (dieldrin, p,p'-DDE, lindane, heptachlor epoxide). Dietary exposures to these contaminants were highly variable among individuals, spanning two to three orders of magnitude. Intraindividual exposures to the metals, organophosphates, and organochlorines were estimated to be strongly correlated; Pearson's correlation coefficients ranged from 0.28 for lindane:dieldrin to 0.84 for lead:mercury. For some of the compounds (e.g., arsenic and dieldrin), a substantial fraction of the population was estimated to have dietary intakes in excess of health-based standards established by the EPA. Before use for risk assessment or epidemiologic purposes, however, the validity of the exposure estimates must be evaluated by comparison with biological indicators of chronic exposure. Because of their low detection rate in table-ready foods, the estimated distributions of exposures for dieldrin, p,p'-DDE, heptachlor epoxide, lindane, diazinon, and chlorpyrifos were found to be sensitive to assumed values for nondetect samples. Reliable estimates of the population distribution of dietary exposures to most other contaminants cannot be made currently, due to their low rate of detection in table-ready foods. Monitoring programs that use more sensitive study designs and population-based assessments for other subpopulations should be a priority for future research.

  1. Polymorphisms of pesticide-metabolizing genes in children living in intensive farming communities.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Martín, Antonio; Hernández, Antonio F; Martínez-González, Luis Javier; González-Alzaga, Beatriz; Rodríguez-Barranco, Miguel; López-Flores, Inmaculada; Aguilar-Garduno, Clemente; Lacasana, Marina

    2015-11-01

    Polymorphisms in genes encoding xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XME) are important parameters accounting for the wide inter-individual variability to environmental exposures. Paraoxonase-1 (PON1), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and Cytochrome-P450 constitute major classes of XME involved in the detoxification of pesticide chemicals, in particular organophosphates. This study explored the allelic frequency, linkage disequilibrium and haplotype analysis of ten common polymorphic variants of seven key genes involved in organophosphate metabolism (BCHE-K, BCHE-A, PON1 Q192R, PON1 L55M, PON1 -108C/T, CYP2C19 G681A, CYP2D6 G1846A, CYP3AP1 -44G/A, GSTM1∗0 and GSTT1∗0) in a children population living near an intensive agriculture area in Spain. It was hypothesized that individuals with unfavorable combinations of gene variants will be more susceptible to adverse effects from organophosphate exposure. Genomic DNA from 496 healthy children was isolated and amplified by PCR. Hydrolysis probes were used for the detection of eight specific SNPs and two copy number variants (CNVs) by using TaqMan® Assay-based real-time PCR. Frequencies of SNPs and CNVs in the target genes were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and broadly consistent with European populations. Linkage disequilibrium was found between the three PON1 genetic polymorphisms studied and between BCHE-K and BCHE-A. The adverse genotype combination (unusual BCHE variants, PON1 55MM/-108TT and null genotype for both GSTM1 and GSTT1) potentially conferring a greater genetic risk from exposure to organophosphates was observed in 0.2% of our study population. This information allows broadening our knowledge about differential susceptibility toward environmental toxicants and may be helpful for further research to understand the inter-individual toxicokinetic variability in response to organophosphate pesticides exposure.

  2. Sulfhydryl-specific PEGylation of phosphotriesterase cysteine mutants for organophosphate detoxification.

    PubMed

    Daffu, Gurdip K; Lopez, Patricia; Katz, Francine; Vinogradov, Michael; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Landry, Donald W; Macdonald, Joanne

    2015-11-01

    The catalytic bioscavenger phosphotriesterase (PTE) is experimentally an effective antidote for organophosphate poisoning. We are interested in the molecular engineering of this enzyme to confer additional functionality, such as improved in vivo longevity. To this aim, we developed PTE cysteine mutants with free sulfhydryls to allow macromolecular attachments to the protein. A library of PTE cysteine mutants were assessed for efficiency in hydrolysing the toxic pesticide metabolite paraoxon, and screened for attachment with a sulfhydryl-reactive small molecule, fluorescein 5-maleimide (F5M), to examine cysteine availability. We established that the newly incorporated cysteines were readily available for labelling, with R90C, E116C and S291C displaying the highest affinity for binding with F5M. Next, we screened for efficiency in attaching a large macromolecule, a 30 000 Da polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecule. Using a solid-phase PEGylation strategy, we found the E116C mutant to be the best single-mutant candidate for attachment with PEG30. Kinetic activity of PEGylated E116C, with paraoxon as substrate, displayed activity approaching that of the unPEGylated wild-type. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, an efficient cysteine mutation and subsequent method for sulfhydryl-specific macromolecule attachment to PTE.

  3. Increased Risk of Dementia in Patients With Acute Organophosphate and Carbamate Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jiun-Nong; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Ming-Chia; Lai, Chung-Hsu; Lin, Hsi-Hsun; Yang, Chih-Hui; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Organophosphate (OP) and carbamate (CM) are the most commonly used pesticides against insects. Little is known regarding the relationship between dementia and acute OP and CM poisoning. A nationwide population-based cohort study was conducted from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. The incidence and relative risk of dementia were assessed in patients hospitalized for acute OP and CM poisoning from 2000 to 2011. The comparison cohort was matched with the poisoned cohort at a 4:1 ratio based on age, sex, and the year of hospitalization. During the follow-up period, the incidence of dementia was 29.4 per 10,000 person-years in the poisoned group, and represented a 1.98-fold increased risk of dementia compared with the control cohort (95% confidence interval, 1.59–2.47). This study provides evidence on the association between dementia and acute OP and CM poisoning. Regular follow-up of poisoned patients for dementia is suggested. PMID:26200627

  4. Electronic and geometric structures of the organophosphate-degrading enzyme from Agrobacterium radiobacter (OpdA).

    PubMed

    Ely, Fernanda; Hadler, Kieran S; Mitić, Nataša; Gahan, Lawrence R; Ollis, David L; Plugis, Nicholas M; Russo, Marie T; Larrabee, James A; Schenk, Gerhard

    2011-06-01

    The organophosphate-degrading enzyme from Agrobacterium radiobacter (OpdA) is a highly efficient catalyst for the degradation of pesticides and some nerve agents such as sarin. OpdA requires two metal ions for catalytic activity, and hydrolysis is initiated by a nucleophilic hydroxide that is bound to one of these metal ions. The precise location of this nucleophile has been contentious, with both a terminal and a metal-ion-bridging hydroxide as likely candidates. Here, we employed magnetic circular dichroism to probe the electronic and geometric structures of the Co(II)-reconstituted dinuclear metal center in OpdA. In the resting state the metal ion in the more secluded α site is five-coordinate, whereas the Co(II) in the solvent-exposed β site is predominantly six-coordinate with two terminal water ligands. Addition of the slow substrate diethyl 4-methoxyphenyl phosphate does not affect the α site greatly but lowers the coordination number of the β site to five. A reduction in the exchange coupling constant indicates that substrate binding also triggers a shift of the μ-hydroxide into a pseudoterminal position in the coordination sphere of either the α or the β metal ion. Mechanistic implications of these observations are discussed.

  5. The organophosphate-degrading enzyme from Agrobacterium radiobacter displays mechanistic flexibility for catalysis.

    PubMed

    Ely, Fernanda; Hadler, Kieran S; Gahan, Lawrence R; Guddat, Luke W; Ollis, David L; Schenk, Gerhard

    2010-12-15

    The OP (organophosphate)-degrading enzyme from Agrobacterium radiobacter (OpdA) is a binuclear metallohydrolase able to degrade highly toxic OP pesticides and nerve agents into less or non-toxic compounds. In the present study, the effect of metal ion substitutions and site-directed mutations on the catalytic properties of OpdA are investigated. The study shows the importance of both the metal ion composition and a hydrogen-bond network that connects the metal ion centre with the substrate-binding pocket using residues Arg254 and Tyr257 in the mechanism and substrate specificity of this enzyme. For the Co(II) derivative of OpdA two protonation equilibria (pKa1 ~5; pKa2 ~10) have been identified as relevant for catalysis, and a terminal hydroxide acts as the likely hydrolysis-initiating nucleophile. In contrast, the Zn(II) and Cd(II) derivatives only have one relevant protonation equilibrium (pKa ~4-5), and the μOH is the proposed nucleophile. The observed mechanistic flexibility may reconcile contrasting reaction models that have been published previously and may be beneficial for the rapid adaptation of OP-degrading enzymes to changing environmental pressures.

  6. Assessing environmental contamination around obsolete pesticide stockpiles in West Africa: using the Nile monitor (Varanus niloticus) as a sentinel species.

    PubMed

    Ciliberti, Alexandre; Berny, Philippe; Vey, Danielle; de Buffrénil, Vivian

    2012-02-01

    Environmental contamination caused by obsolete pesticide stocks was assessed using the Nile monitor (Varanus niloticus) as a sentinel species. Organochlorines and organophosphates were quantified by gas chromatography in abdominal fat and the liver, respectively. Results were compared to those obtained from three other sites, characterized by different histories of contamination. None of the previously stocked pesticides were recovered. Low to moderate levels of 4,4'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (4,4'-DDE) were quantified in monitors from all sites. Malathion and 4,4'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (4,4'-DDD) also were detected sporadically. Interindividual variability was substantial. Correlations between pesticide loads and individual characteristics were considered. The nondetection of previously stocked pesticides in the monitors' tissues, their contamination by other pesticides, and the value of V. niloticus as a monitoring tool for environmental contamination are discussed. The results indicate a situation of low concern and draw attention to the importance of local conditions in determining environmental dangers associated with potential pollution sources.

  7. Exposures of 129 preschool children to organochlorines, organophosphates, pyrethroids, and acid herbicides at their homes and daycares in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Marsha K; Wilson, Nancy K; Chuang, Jane C

    2014-04-03

    Few data exist on the concurrent exposures of young children to past-use and current-use pesticides in their everyday environments. In this further analysis of study data, we quantified the potential exposures and intake doses of 129 preschool children, ages 20 to 66 months, to 16 pesticides (eight organochlorines, two organophosphates, three pyrethroids, and three acid herbicides). Environmental samples (soil, dust, outdoor air, and indoor air) and personal samples (hand wipes, solid food, and liquid food) were collected at 129 homes and 13 daycare centers in six counties in North Carolina between 2000 and 2001. α-Chlordane, γ-chlordane, heptachlor, chlorpyrifos, diazinon, cis-permethrin, trans-permethrin, and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) were detected ≥50% in two or more media in both settings. Of these pesticides, the children's estimated median potential intake doses through dietary ingestion, nondietary ingestion, and inhalation routes were the highest for 2,4-D and cis/trans-permethrin (both 4.84 ng/kg/day), cis/trans-permethrin (2.39 ng/kg/day), and heptachlor (1.71 ng/kg/day), respectively. The children's estimated median potential aggregate intake doses by all three routes were quantifiable for chlorpyrifos (4.6 ng/kg/day), cis/trans-permethrin (12.5 ng/kg/day), and 2,4-D (4.9 ng/kg/day). In conclusion, these children were likely exposed daily to several pesticides from several sources and routes at their homes and daycares.

  8. Exposures of 129 Preschool Children to Organochlorines, Organophosphates, Pyrethroids, and Acid Herbicides at Their Homes and Daycares in North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Marsha K.; Wilson, Nancy K.; Chuang, Jane C.

    2014-01-01

    Few data exist on the concurrent exposures of young children to past-use and current-use pesticides in their everyday environments. In this further analysis of study data, we quantified the potential exposures and intake doses of 129 preschool children, ages 20 to 66 months, to 16 pesticides (eight organochlorines, two organophosphates, three pyrethroids, and three acid herbicides). Environmental samples (soil, dust, outdoor air, and indoor air) and personal samples (hand wipes, solid food, and liquid food) were collected at 129 homes and 13 daycare centers in six counties in North Carolina between 2000 and 2001. α-Chlordane, γ-chlordane, heptachlor, chlorpyrifos, diazinon, cis-permethrin, trans-permethrin, and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) were detected ≥50% in two or more media in both settings. Of these pesticides, the children’s estimated median potential intake doses through dietary ingestion, nondietary ingestion, and inhalation routes were the highest for 2,4-D and cis/trans-permethrin (both 4.84 ng/kg/day), cis/trans-permethrin (2.39 ng/kg/day), and heptachlor (1.71 ng/kg/day), respectively. The children’s estimated median potential aggregate intake doses by all three routes were quantifiable for chlorpyrifos (4.6 ng/kg/day), cis/trans-permethrin (12.5 ng/kg/day), and 2,4-D (4.9 ng/kg/day). In conclusion, these children were likely exposed daily to several pesticides from several sources and routes at their homes and daycares. PMID:24705361

  9. Exposure to non-persistent pesticides and thyroid function: A systematic review of epidemiological evidence.

    PubMed

    Campos, Élida; Freire, Carmen

    2016-08-01

    Numerous pesticides are recognized for their endocrine-disrupting properties. Non-persistent pesticides such as organophosphates, dithiocarbamates and pyrethroids may interfere with thyroid function as suggested by animal studies. However, the influence of chronic exposure to these compounds on thyroidal functions in humans remains to be determined. The present study aimed to review epidemiological evidence for an association between exposure to non-persistent pesticides and circulating levels of thyroid hormones (thyroxin [T4] and triiodothyronine [T3]) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). A systematic review was conducted using MEDLINE, SCOPUS and Virtual Health Library (BVS) databases. Articles were limited to original studies and reports published in English, Portuguese or Spanish. Nineteen epidemiological studies were identified, 17 of which were cross-sectional, 14 were of occupationally exposed workers and 11 used exposure biomarkers. Fungicides and organophosphates (OP) insecticides were the most studied pesticides. Although methodological heterogeneity between studies was noted, particularly regarding study design, exposure assessment, and control of confounding, most of them showed associations with changes in T3 and T4, and/or TSH levels, while results from a few of these are consistent with experimental data supporting the findings that non-persistent pesticide exposure exerts hypothyroid-like effects. However, reporting quality was moderate to poor in 50% of the studies, particularly regarding method of selection of participants and discussion of external validity. Overall, current knowledge regarding the impact of non-persistent pesticides on human thyroid function is still limited. Given the widespread use of pesticides, future research should assess effects of exposure to currently-used pesticides in cohort studies combining comprehensive questionnaire-based assessment and biomarkers. Investigators need to pay particular attention to exposure

  10. Exposure to non-persistent pesticides and thyroid function: A systematic review of epidemiological evidence.

    PubMed

    Campos, Élida; Freire, Carmen

    2016-08-01

    Numerous pesticides are recognized for their endocrine-disrupting properties. Non-persistent pesticides such as organophosphates, dithiocarbamates and pyrethroids may interfere with thyroid function as suggested by animal studies. However, the influence of chronic exposure to these compounds on thyroidal functions in humans remains to be determined. The present study aimed to review epidemiological evidence for an association between exposure to non-persistent pesticides and circulating levels of thyroid hormones (thyroxin [T4] and triiodothyronine [T3]) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). A systematic review was conducted using MEDLINE, SCOPUS and Virtual Health Library (BVS) databases. Articles were limited to original studies and reports published in English, Portuguese or Spanish. Nineteen epidemiological studies were identified, 17 of which were cross-sectional, 14 were of occupationally exposed workers and 11 used exposure biomarkers. Fungicides and organophosphates (OP) insecticides were the most studied pesticides. Although methodological heterogeneity between studies was noted, particularly regarding study design, exposure assessment, and control of confounding, most of them showed associations with changes in T3 and T4, and/or TSH levels, while results from a few of these are consistent with experimental data supporting the findings that non-persistent pesticide exposure exerts hypothyroid-like effects. However, reporting quality was moderate to poor in 50% of the studies, particularly regarding method of selection of participants and discussion of external validity. Overall, current knowledge regarding the impact of non-persistent pesticides on human thyroid function is still limited. Given the widespread use of pesticides, future research should assess effects of exposure to currently-used pesticides in cohort studies combining comprehensive questionnaire-based assessment and biomarkers. Investigators need to pay particular attention to exposure

  11. Fate of pesticides during beer brewing.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Tomonori; Nagatomi, Yasushi; Suga, Keiko; Uyama, Atsuo; Mochizuki, Naoki

    2011-04-27

    The fates of more than 300 pesticide residues were investigated in the course of beer brewing. Ground malt artificially contaminated with pesticides was brewed via steps such as mashing, boiling, and fermentation. Analytical samples were taken from wort, spent grain, and beer produced at certain key points in the brewing process. The samples were extracted and purified with the QuEChERS (Quick Easy Cheap Effective Rugged and Safe) method and were then analyzed by LC-MS/MS using a multiresidue method. In the results, a majority of pesticides showed a reduction in the unhopped wort and were adsorbed onto the spent grain after mashing. In addition, some pesticides diminished during the boiling and fermentation. This suggests that the reduction was caused mainly by adsorption, pyrolysis, and hydrolysis. After the entire process of brewing, the risks of contaminating beer with pesticides were reduced remarkably, and only a few pesticides remained without being removed or resolved.

  12. Intensive care management of organophosphate insecticide poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Sungur, Murat; Güven, Muhammed

    2001-01-01

    Introduction Organophosphate (OP) insecticides inhibit both cholinesterase and pseudo-cholinesterase activities. The inhibition of acetylcholinesterase causes accumulation of acetylcholine at synapses, and overstimulation of neurotransmission occurs as a result of this accumulation. The mortality rate of OP poisoning is high. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment is often life saving. Treatment of OP poisoning consists of intravenous atropine and oximes. The clinical course of OP poisoning may be quite severe and may need intensive care management. We report our experience with the intensive care management of serious OP insecticide poisonings. Methods A retrospective study was performed on the patients with OP poisoning followed at our medical intensive care unit. Forty-seven patients were included. Diagnosis was performed from the history taken either from the patient or from the patient's relatives about the agent involved in the exposure. Diagnosis could not be confirmed with serum and red blood cell anticholinesterase levels because these are not performed at our institution. Intravenous atropine and pralidoxime was administered as soon as possible. Pralidoxime could not be given to 16 patients: 2 patients did not receive pralidoxime because they were late admissions and 14 did not receive pralidoxime because the Ministry of Health office was out of stock. Other measures for the treatment were gastric lavage and administration of activated charcoal via nasogastric tube, and cleansing the patient's body with soap and water. The patients were intubated and mechanically ventilated if the patients had respiratory failure, a depressed level of consciousness, which causes an inability to protect the airway, and hemodynamic instability. Mechanical ventilation was performed as synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation + pressure support mode, either as volume or pressure control. Positive end expiratory pressure was titrated to keep SaO2 above 94% with 40

  13. Pesticides' influence on wine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Caboni, Pierluigi; Cabras, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Wine quality strongly depends on the grape quality. To obtain high-quality wines, it is necessary to process healthy grapes at the correct ripeness stage and for this reason the farmer has to be especially careful in the prevention of parasite attacks on the grapevine. The most common fungal diseases affecting grape quality are downy and powdery mildew (Plasmopara viticola and Uncinula necator), and gray mold (Botrytis cinerea). On the other hand, the most dangerous insects are the grape moth (Lobesia botrana), vine mealybug (Planococcus ficus), and the citrus mealybug (Planococcus citri). Farmers fight grape diseases and insects applying pesticides that can be found at harvest time on grapes. The persistence of pesticides depends on the chemical characteristic of the active ingredients as well as on photodegradation, thermodegradation, codistillation, and enzymatic degradation. The pesticide residues on grapes can be transferred to the must and this can influence the selection and development of yeast strains. Moreover, yeasts can also influence the levels of the pesticides in the wine by reducing or adsorbing them on lees. During the fermentative process, yeasts can cause the disappearance of pesticide residues by degradation or absorption at the end of the fermentation when yeasts are deposited as lees. In this chapter, we reviewed the effect of commonly used herbicides, insecticides, and fungicides on yeasts. We also studied the effect of alcoholic and malolactic fermentation on pesticide residues. PMID:20610173

  14. Pesticides' influence on wine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Caboni, Pierluigi; Cabras, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Wine quality strongly depends on the grape quality. To obtain high-quality wines, it is necessary to process healthy grapes at the correct ripeness stage and for this reason the farmer has to be especially careful in the prevention of parasite attacks on the grapevine. The most common fungal diseases affecting grape quality are downy and powdery mildew (Plasmopara viticola and Uncinula necator), and gray mold (Botrytis cinerea). On the other hand, the most dangerous insects are the grape moth (Lobesia botrana), vine mealybug (Planococcus ficus), and the citrus mealybug (Planococcus citri). Farmers fight grape diseases and insects applying pesticides that can be found at harvest time on grapes. The persistence of pesticides depends on the chemical characteristic of the active ingredients as well as on photodegradation, thermodegradation, codistillation, and enzymatic degradation. The pesticide residues on grapes can be transferred to the must and this can influence the selection and development of yeast strains. Moreover, yeasts can also influence the levels of the pesticides in the wine by reducing or adsorbing them on lees. During the fermentative process, yeasts can cause the disappearance of pesticide residues by degradation or absorption at the end of the fermentation when yeasts are deposited as lees. In this chapter, we reviewed the effect of commonly used herbicides, insecticides, and fungicides on yeasts. We also studied the effect of alcoholic and malolactic fermentation on pesticide residues.

  15. Reducing the Use of Pesticides with Site-Specific Application: The Chemical Control of Rhizoctonia solani as a Case of Study for the Management of Soil-Borne Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Le Cointe, Ronan; Simon, Thomas E.; Delarue, Patrick; Hervé, Maxime; Leclerc, Melen; Poggi, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Reducing our reliance on pesticides is an essential step towards the sustainability of agricultural production. One approach involves the rational use of pesticides combined with innovative crop management. Most control strategies currently focus on the temporal aspect of epidemics, e.g. determining the optimal date for spraying, regardless of the spatial mechanics and ecology of disease spread. Designing innovative pest management strategies incorporating the spatial aspect of epidemics involves thorough knowledge on how disease control affects the life-history traits of the pathogen. In this study, using Rhizoctonia solani/Raphanus sativus as an example of a soil-borne pathosystem, we investigated the effects of a chemical control currently used by growers, Monceren® L, on key epidemiological components (saprotrophic spread and infectivity). We tested the potential “shield effect” of Monceren® L on pathogenic spread in a site-specific application context, i.e. the efficiency of this chemical to contain the spread of the fungus from an infected host when application is spatially localized, in our case, a strip placed between the infected host and a recipient bait. Our results showed that Monceren® L mainly inhibits the saprotrophic spread of the fungus in soil and may prevent the fungus from reaching its host plant. However, perhaps surprisingly we did not detect any significant effect of the fungicide on the pathogen infectivity. Finally, highly localized application of the fungicide—a narrow strip of soil (12.5 mm wide) sprayed with Monceren® L—significantly decreased local transmission of the pathogen, suggesting lowered risk of occurrence of invasive epidemics. Our results highlight that detailed knowledge on epidemiological processes could contribute to the design of innovative management strategies based on precision agriculture tools to improve the efficacy of disease control and reduce pesticide use. PMID:27668731

  16. Fluorescent Chemosensors for Toxic Organophosphorus Pesticides: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Obare, Sherine O.; De, Chandrima; Guo, Wen; Haywood, Tajay L.; Samuels, Tova A.; Adams, Clara P.; Masika, Noah O.; Murray, Desmond H.; Anderson, Ginger A.; Campbell, Keith; Fletcher, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Many organophosphorus (OP) based compounds are highly toxic and powerful inhibitors of cholinesterases that generate serious environmental and human health concerns. Organothiophosphates with a thiophosphoryl (P=S) functional group constitute a broad class of these widely used pesticides. They are related to the more reactive phosphoryl (P=O) organophosphates, which include very lethal nerve agents and chemical warfare agents, such as, VX, Soman and Sarin. Unfortunately, widespread and frequent commercial use of OP-based compounds in agricultural lands has resulted in their presence as residues in crops, livestock, and poultry products and also led to their migration into aquifers. Thus, the design of new sensors with improved analyte selectivity and sensitivity is of paramount importance in this area. Herein, we review recent advances in the development of fluorescent chemosensors for toxic OP pesticides and related compounds. We also discuss challenges and progress towards the design of future chemosensors with dual modes for signal transduction. PMID:22163587

  17. Organic chemicals in the environment: Pesticides in the San Joaquin River, California: Inputs from dormant sprayed orchards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Domagalski, J.L.; Dubrovsky, N.M.; Kratzer, C.R.

    1997-01-01

    Rainfall-induced runoff mobilized pesticides to the San Joaquin River and its tributaries during a 3.8-cm rainstorm beginning the evening of 7 February and lasting through the morning of 8 Feb. 1993. Two distinct peaks of organophosphate pesticide concentrations were measured at the mouth of the San Joaquin River. These two peaks were attributed to contrasts between the soil texture, basin size, pesticide-use patterns, and hydrology of the eastern and western San Joaquin Valley. The fine soil texture and small size of the western tributary basins contributed to rapid runoff. In western valley streams, diazinon concentrations peaked within hours of the rainfall's end and then decreased because of a combination of dilution with pesticide- free runoff from the nearby Coast Ranges and decreasing concentrations in the agricultural runoff. Peak concentrations for the Merced River, a large tributary of the eastern San Joaquin Valley, occurred at least a day later than those of the western tributary streams. That delay may be due to the presence of well-drained soils in the eastern San Joaquin Valley, the larger size of the Merced River drainage basin, and the management of surface-water drainage networks. A subsequent storm on 18 and 19 February resulted in much lower concentrations of most organophosphate pesticides suggesting that the first storm had mobilized most of the pesticides that were available for rainfall-induced transport.

  18. Organophosphates and their impact on the global environment.

    PubMed

    Satoh, T; Hosokawa, M

    2000-01-01

    Serious intoxications and incidences due to misuse of organophosphorus insecticides (OP) have been reported for over three decades. In this meeting I am talking about the following three topics. (1) Epidemiological studies on the use of OP in Japan, Taiwan and Thailand. The National Research Institute of Police Science (NRIPS) in Japan has published the annual report of the epidemiological studies on the criminal and suicide events. The numbers of the incidence of pesticides are approximately 22%-30% of the total incidences, during 1991 and 1996. The incidence of pesticides has been gradually reduced for past six years. This seems to be influenced by the decrease of the incidences of paraquat having extremely high toxicity. According to the epidemiological data in the National Poison Center in Taiwan, unlike the prevalence of drug poisoning exposures in most western countries, pesticides poisoning exposures are numerous in Taiwan. The number of pesticide intoxication cases is 6,872 out of 23,436 of total case numbers of various intoxications during the 1985 and 1997. The fatality rate is much higher in Taiwan than in most western countries, with 5.65% of all poisoning exposures resulted in death. Paraquot is the leading cause of death in Taiwan. The ratio of death to total OP intoxication cases is 11.5% including accidental exposure and suicide. According to the report of the Division of Epidemiology, Ministry of Public Health, Thailand during the 1990-1995, the overall morbidity due to poisoning was 30 per 100,000 population with 300 deaths per year. The morbidity rate of reported pesticide poisoning in the whole country was 10 per 100,000 population. (2) Sarin victims in Tokyo. On March 20, 1995, a terrorist attack using sarin (isopropylmethylphosphonofluoridate) occurred on the Tokyo subway. Many people inhaled the sarin gas and collapsed in the train. Eventually, 12 people died and over 5,000 were injured. The results of the forensic studies showed that

  19. Establishment of reentry intervals for organophosphate-treated cotton fields based on human data: III. 12 To 72 hours post-treatment exposure to monocrotophos, ethyl- and methyl parathion.

    PubMed

    Ware, G W; Morgan, D P; Estesen, B J; Cahill, W P

    1975-01-01

    Five human volunteers entered methyl parathion, ethyl parathion, or monocrotophos treated cotton fields for five-hr exposure periods when the residues of the respective pesticides had aged 12 hr, 24 and 48 hr and 72 hr. Foliage residues of methyl parathion disappeared fastest, those of monocrotophos slowest. Personal exposure to pesticide was evaluated from contamination of skin, clothing, and ambient air, while actual absorption of chemical was assessed from pesticide concentration in blood, urinary metabolite excretion, and effects on blood cholinesterase activities. There was good correspondence between magnitudes of foliar residue, estimates of personal contamination, and measures of chemical absorption. Field exposures caused no symptoms or clinical signs of organophosphate poisoning and depressed averaged blood cholinesterase activities by no more than 14% of pre-exposure levels.

  20. Action of organophosphates on the electroretinogram of rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Kreft, W D; Hoffert, J R; Fromm, P O

    1985-01-01

    Electroretinograms (ERGs) were recorded in vitro from eyes of rainbow trout that had received intraperitoneal injections of either TOCP (triorthocresyl phosphate) or DEF (S, S, S-tributyl phosphorotrithioate). Data obtained after 24 h indicated that these organophosphates caused alterations in four of five ERG parameters in the case of TOCP and all five parameters in the DEF treated specimens. These data were compared with data obtained from experiments with eserine and carbachol and led to the conclusion that the effects of the organophosphates on the retina were independent of any cholinesterase inhibitor activity of the compounds. These organophosphates affect (a) the non-cholinergic photoreceptor layer of the retina which produces the a-wave ERG component, and (b) the other neural layers of the retina known to be responsible for generation of the b-wave component. Based on data obtained 15 days after exposure there was no evidence that TOCP or DEF has any delayed neurotoxic effect on the retina of rainbow trout.

  1. Prevalence of tinnitus in workers exposed to noise and organophosphates

    PubMed Central

    Delecrode, Camila Ribas; de Freitas, Thais Domingues; Frizzo, Ana Claúdia Figueiredo; Cardoso, Ana Claúdia Vieira

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Research on the workplace has emphasized the effects of noise exposure on workers' hearing, but has not considered the effects of agrochemicals. Aim: To evaluate and correlate the hearing level and tinnitus of workers exposed simultaneously to noise and organophosphates in their workplace and to measure tinnitus distress on their quality of life. Method: A retrospective clinical study. We evaluated 82 organophosphate sprinklers from the São Paulo State Regional Superintendence who were active in the fight against dengue and who were exposed to noise and organophosphates. We performed pure tone audiometry and applied the translated THI (Tinnitus Handicap Inventory) questionnaire. Results: Of the sample, 28.05% reported current tinnitus or had presented tinnitus, and the workers with tinnitus had an increased incidence of abnormal audiometry. The average hearing threshold for the 4–8-kHz frequency range of the workers with current tinnitus was higher than that of the others, and was most affected at the 4-kHz frequency. The THI score ranged 0–84, with an average score of 13.1. Twelve (52.17%) workers had THI scores consistent with discrete handicap. Conclusion: There is an increased incidence of abnormal pure tone audiometry in workers with tinnitus, and its impact on the workers' quality of life was discrete. The correlation between average hearing threshold and tinnitus distress was weak. PMID:25991953

  2. Occupational pesticide intoxications among farmers in Bolivia: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Jørs, Erik; Morant, Rafael Cervantes; Aguilar, Guido Condarco; Huici, Omar; Lander, Flemming; Bælum, Jesper; Konradsen, Flemming

    2006-01-01

    Background Pesticide use and its consequences are of concern in Bolivia due to an intensive and increasing use. Methods To assess the magnitude and reasons for occupational pesticide intoxication, a cross-sectional study with interviews and blood-tests was performed among 201 volunteer farmers from 48 villages in the temperate and subtropical valleys in the eastern part of the Andes Mountains in Bolivia. Of these 171 male farmers using pesticides in their agricultural production were used in the statistical analysis, including linear- and logistic regression analysis. Results This study documented a frequent use of the most toxic pesticides among farmers who have had almost no instructions in how to use pesticides and protect themselves against the dangers of intoxication, reflected in the hazardous practices used when handling pesticides. Symptoms of intoxications were common in connection with spraying operations. The risk of experiencing symptoms and the serum cholinesterase activity were influenced by whether or not organophosphates were used and the number of times sprayed. The experience of symptoms was moreover influenced by the hygienic and personal protective measures taken during spraying operations while this had no influence on the serum cholinesterase level. Conclusion The study showed that occupational pesticide intoxications were common among farmers and did depend on multiple factors. Pesticide use is probably one of the largest toxicological problems in Bolivia, and a coordinated action by authorities, society and international bodies is needed to limit the number of intoxications and the environmental pollution. PMID:16630337

  3. Applications of phytochemical and in vitro techniques for reducing over-harvesting of medicinal and pesticidal plants and generating income for the rural poor.

    PubMed

    Sarasan, Viswambharan; Kite, Geoffrey C; Sileshi, Gudeta W; Stevenson, Philip C

    2011-07-01

    Plants provide medicine and pest control resources for millions of poor people world-wide. Widespread harvesting of medicinal and pesticidal plants puts pressure on natural populations, thus severely compromising their contribution to the income and well-being of traders and consumers. The development of in vitro propagation techniques appropriate for developing countries will provide a robust platform for effective propagation and cultivation of endangered plants. This review focuses on advances in the application of phytochemical and in vitro tools to identify and rapidly propagate medicinal and pesticidal plants. Problems of over-harvesting can be alleviated and ex situ cultivation in agroforestry systems can be facilitated through improving seed germination, in vitro cloning and the use of mycorrhizal fungi. We also present a case for effective use of phytochemical analyses for the accurate identification of elite materials from wild stands and validation of the desired quality in order to counter loss of efficacy in the long run through selection, propagation or ex situ management in agroforestry systems. Future prospects are discussed in the context of medicinal activity screening, sustainable propagation, on-farm planting, management and utilization.

  4. Biochemical effects of some pesticides on lipid peroxidation and free-radical scavengers.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, B D; Seth, V; Bhattacharya, A; Pasha, S T; Chakraborty, A K

    1999-06-30

    Oxidative stress was studied in blood samples obtained from lindane, malathion and propoxur poisoning cases admitted to the Guru Teg Bahadur Hospital, Delhi and evaluated for lipid peroxidation, oxygen free radical (OFR) scavenging enzymes, and glutathione (GSH) and related enzymes. Acetylcholine esterase (AChE), gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) and GSH level were also assayed in lymphocytes. The level of thiobarbituric acid reacting substances and activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase and GGT were increased and GSH level was decreased in pesticide poisoning. Apparently lindane (at the concentration examined) was more potent than malathion and propoxur in producing alteration in lipid peroxidation, GSH related parameters and OFR scavenging enzymes. However, AChE activity and GSH level in lymphocytes of malathion poisoning cases were reduced and GGT activity was enhanced in comparison to control subjects. The present results suggest that OFR scavenging enzymes were induced while combating oxidative stress in a differential manner in organochlorine, organophosphate and carbamate poisoning. Increased lipid peroxidation, coupled with altered levels of GSH and OFR scavenging enzymes in the blood are discussed in the light of oxidative stress.

  5. Scientists Probe Pesticide Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Summarizes discussions of a symposium on pesticide environmental dynamics with emphases upon pesticide transport processes, environmental reactions, and partitioning in air, soil, water and living organisms. Indicates that the goal is to attain knowledge enough to predict pesticide behavior and describe pesticide distribution with models and…

  6. Determinants of Butyrylcholinesterase Inhibition Among Agricultural Pesticide Handlers in Washington State: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Krenz, Jennifer E.; Hofmann, Jonathan N.; Smith, Theresa R.; Cunningham, Rad N.; Fenske, Richard A.; Simpson, Christopher D.; Keifer, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Organophosphate (OP) and N-methyl-carbamate (CB) insecticides are used widely in agriculture to manage insect pests of economic importance. Agricultural workers are more likely to suffer exposure because of the widespread use of OP/CBs in agriculture, and pesticide-related illnesses among handlers may be more severe when compared to other farm workers. The goal of this study was to identify occupational and personal characteristics associated with butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) inhibition in participants recruited from the Washington State Cholinesterase Monitoring Program from 2006 to 2011. Methods: We conducted a longitudinal study among agricultural pesticide handlers in Washington State during the OP/CB spray season (March–July) over a 6-year period (2006–2011). Linear mixed effects regression models were used to evaluate BuChE inhibition in relation to self-reported occupational and personal characteristics. Results: Relative to pre-season baseline levels, the mean decrease in BuChE activity during the OP/CB spray season over all years of the study period was 3.77% (P < 0.001). Greater BuChE inhibition was observed among handlers who reported using multiple OP/CBs (β = −2.70, P = 0.045), mixed or loaded OP/CBs (β = −3.97, P = 0.002), did not store personal protective equipment (PPE) in a locker at work (β = −3.4, P = 0.014), or did not wear chemical-resistant boots (β = −16.6, P < 0.001). Discussion and Conclusions: The Washington State Cholinesterase Monitoring Program has provided a valuable opportunity to evaluate potential sources of OP/CB exposure among agricultural pesticide handlers. Several previously reported associations were confirmed in the current analysis, which included a larger number of pesticide handlers enrolled over a longer time period. The use of multiple OP/CBs and mixing/loading activities were significant risk factors, and the use of chemical-resistant boots and lockers for PPE storage were protective factors

  7. Occupational Pesticide Exposures and Respiratory Health

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Ming; Beach, Jeremy; Martin, Jonathan W.; Senthilselvan, Ambikaipakan

    2013-01-01

    Pesticides have been widely used to control pest and pest-related diseases in agriculture, fishery, forestry and the food industry. In this review, we identify a number of respiratory symptoms and diseases that have been associated with occupational pesticide exposures. Impaired lung function has also been observed among people occupationally exposed to pesticides. There was strong evidence for an association between occupational pesticide exposure and asthma, especially in agricultural occupations. In addition, we found suggestive evidence for a link between occupational pesticide exposure and chronic bronchitis or COPD. There was inconclusive evidence for the association between occupational pesticide exposure and lung cancer. Better control of pesticide uses and enforcement of safety behaviors, such as using personal protection equipment (PPE) in the workplace, are critical for reducing the risk of developing pesticide-related symptoms and diseases. Educational training programs focusing on basic safety precautions and proper uses of personal protection equipment (PPE) are possible interventions that could be used to control the respiratory diseases associated with pesticide exposure in occupational setting. PMID:24287863

  8. INTERACTION OF ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDES AND RELATED COMPOUNDS WITH THE ANDROGEN RECEPTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification of several environmental chemicals capable of binding to the androgen receptor (AR) and interfering with its normal function has heightened concern for adverse effects across a broad spectrum of environmental chemicals. We previously demonstrated AR antagonist act...

  9. DISPARITIES IN CARDIOVASCULAR RISK FROM ORGANOPHOSPHATE-BASED PESTICIDE EXPOSURE IN SUSCEPTIBLE POPULATIONS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    High blood pressure (hypertension), the most common of all cardiovascular (CVD) diseases, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States, and a large percentage of the population manifests a genetic predisposition. Hypertension is polygenetically inherited, envi...

  10. Field methods to evaluate effects of pesticides on wildlife of the northwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henny, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    Field .methods used to evaluate the impact of organochlorine and organophosphate pesticides on wildlife populations in the Pacific Northwest are reviewed. Five field studies, presented in a CASE HISTORY format, illustrate study designs .and thetypes of information collected. The pesticides investigated included DDT, heptachlor, endr1n, and famphur, and the species studied included the American kestrel (Falco sparverius), Canada goose (Branta canadensis}, black--crowned night-heron (Nycticorax nycticorac), and black-billed magpie (Pica pica). Wildlife biologists conducting field studies of pesticides encounter a variety of design and logistics problems. However, a number of procedures are now available to the researcher for field evaluations. The three principa1 types of insecticides (organochlorines (OC's), organophosphates (OP's) and carbamates (CB's) require different field approaches. In this paper, five field studies, conducted by my colleagues and me between 1974 and 1982, in the northwestern portion of the United States (Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and northern Nevada), are reviewed to illustrate procedures for evaluating the effects of these insecticides.on wildlife populations. Althought most OC pesticides were banned in the United States during the 1970's (.for review, see F1eming et al. 1983), we studied several OC applications, including the last major DDT spray project in 1974. Use of OP's and CB's increased during the 1970's and 1980s as the OC's were phased out.

  11. Pesticide content in drinking water samples collected from orchard areas in central Poland.

    PubMed

    Badach, Hanna; Nazimek, Teresa; Kamińska, Iwona A

    2007-01-01

    Samples of drinking water collected in Warka-Grójec region of central Poland were tested for the presence of pesticides. Data obtained from analysis of water samples will be used for future epidemiological and environmental studies in the region. Samples were collected during spring and autumn of 2002-2003 from dug wells, deep wells and water mains in 81 randomly-selected rural households scattered throughout this region of extensive agriculture. The concentration of pesticides from four main chemical groups was determined by gas chromatography: organochlorines (lindane, DDT, methoxychlor), triazines (atrazine, simazine), organophosphates (acephate, diazinon, fenitrothion) and pyrethroids (alpha-cypermethrin, deltamethrin). Two-year monitoring of drinking water samples indicated the presence of DDT and methoxychlor contamination. Pyrethroids were generally not detected, with the exception of alpha-cypermethrin found in only a few samples. Triazines were also found in water samples collected in the course of the study with higher incidence during spring period. Organophosphates were by far the most common contaminants of drinking water in this region. Almost all samples were contaminated by significant amounts of fenitrothion. The present study reveals an urgent need for systematic monitoring of drinking water quality in regions of intensive agriculture, since they are highly vulnerable to pesticide contamination. Consumption of pesticide-contaminated water may have a negative impact on the population living in this area, which also requires scientific assessment.

  12. The effect of stress on the acute neurotoxicity of the organophosphate insecticide chlorpyrifos

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, Sandra; Ehrich, Marion; Hinckley, Jonathan; Pung, Thitiya; Jortner, Bernard S. . E-mail: bjortner@vt.edu

    2007-03-15

    A study was conducted to determine if multiple exposures to several stress paradigms might affect the anticholinesterase effect of subsequently administered organophosphate insecticide chlorpyrifos. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subject to daily periods of restraint, swimming, a combination of the two, or neither of the two (controls) (n = 8/group) for 5 days per week over a six-week period. The most profound stress, as measured by reduced body weight gain and elevated levels of plasma corticosterone, was swimming. On day 39 of the study, shortly after the daily stress episode, one half of the rats in each group was dosed with 60 mg/kg chlorpyrifos subcutaneously. This had no effect on subsequent levels of plasma corticosterone. There were no stress-related differences in the degree of chlorpyrifos-induced inhibition of brain acetylcholinesterase in animals sacrificed on day 43.

  13. Development and validation of a cellular biosensor detecting pesticide residues in tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Flampouri, Kelly; Mavrikou, Sophie; Kintzios, Spiridon; Miliadis, George; Aplada-Sarlis, Pipina

    2010-03-15

    Two of the most important categories of pesticides used in agricultural practice are organophosphates and dithiocarbamates. Their extensive and inappropriate use has rendered their reliable monitoring at trace levels more and more necessary. This study presents the construction of a rapid and sensitive cellular biosensor test based on the measurement of changes of the cell membrane potential of immobilized cells, according to the working principle of the Bioelectric Recognition Assay (BERA). The cells were immobilized by entrapment in a sodium alginate bead and directly applied in different pesticide dilutions and agricultural samples. The pesticides used were the organophosphate insecticide diazinon and the dithiocarbamate fungicide propineb. Two different cell types, N2a (neuroblastoma) and Vero (fibroblast) were used as the biosensory elements in order to investigate their differential response against the pesticides. In this way, we hoped to increase the selectivity of the assay. Based on the observed patterns of response, we demonstrate that the sensor can be used for the qualitative and, in some concentrations, quantitative detection of the pesticides with a high degree of reproducibility. The lowest detected concentration was 3nM. Finally, for the investigation of the effects of different pesticides on the accumulation of cytosolic Ca(2+), we conducted a fluorescent assay on N2a cells treated with tomato sample extracts, which were replicates of the E.U. proficiency test sample. The tomato samples were either organically grown or contained 14 different pesticides. The experimental results showed a higher increase of the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in cells treated with non-organic samples compared to the cells treated with organic samples.

  14. Pesticide Urinary Metabolite Levels of Children in Eastern North Carolina Farmworker Households

    PubMed Central

    Arcury, Thomas A.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Barr, Dana B.; Tapia, Janeth; Chen, Haiying; Quandt, Sara A.

    2007-01-01

    Background In this investigation we documented the pesticide urinary metabolite levels of farmworker children in North Carolina, determined the number of different metabolites detected for each child, and delineated risk factors associated with the number of metabolites. Methods Urine samples were collected from 60 Latino farmworker children 1–6 years of age (34 female, 26 male). Interviews were completed by their mothers in Spanish. We analyzed urine samples for 14 pesticide metabolites, including the organophosphate pesticides chlorpyrifos, coumaphos, diazinon, isazaphos, malathion, pirimiphos, and parathion and its methyl counterpart; a common metabolite of at least 18 pyrethroid insecticides; the repellent DEET; and the herbicides 2,4,5-trichlorphenoxyacetic acid, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, acetochlor, atrazine, and metolachlor. Predictors included measures of paraoccupational, residential, and environmental exposure, child characteristics, and mother characteristics. Results Thirteen metabolites were present in the urine samples. Organophosphate pesticide metabolites were detected in a substantial proportion of children, particularly metabolites of parathion/methyl parathion (90.0%; geometric mean 1.00 μg/L), chlorpyrifos/chlorpyrifos methyl (83.3%; geometric mean 1.92 μg/L), and diazinon (55.0%; geometric mean 10.56 μg/L). The number of metabolites detected ranged from 0 to 7, with a mode of 4 detected (28.3%). Boys, children living in rented housing, and children with mothers working part-time had more metabolites detected. Conclusions Children in farmworker homes experience multiple sources of pesticide exposure. Pesticides may remain in their environments for long periods. Environmental and occupational health changes are needed to address these exposures. Research is needed with more precise measures of exposure and on the health effects of concurrent exposure to multiple pesticides. PMID:17687456

  15. Development and validation of a cellular biosensor detecting pesticide residues in tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Flampouri, Kelly; Mavrikou, Sophie; Kintzios, Spiridon; Miliadis, George; Aplada-Sarlis, Pipina

    2010-03-15

    Two of the most important categories of pesticides used in agricultural practice are organophosphates and dithiocarbamates. Their extensive and inappropriate use has rendered their reliable monitoring at trace levels more and more necessary. This study presents the construction of a rapid and sensitive cellular biosensor test based on the measurement of changes of the cell membrane potential of immobilized cells, according to the working principle of the Bioelectric Recognition Assay (BERA). The cells were immobilized by entrapment in a sodium alginate bead and directly applied in different pesticide dilutions and agricultural samples. The pesticides used were the organophosphate insecticide diazinon and the dithiocarbamate fungicide propineb. Two different cell types, N2a (neuroblastoma) and Vero (fibroblast) were used as the biosensory elements in order to investigate their differential response against the pesticides. In this way, we hoped to increase the selectivity of the assay. Based on the observed patterns of response, we demonstrate that the sensor can be used for the qualitative and, in some concentrations, quantitative detection of the pesticides with a high degree of reproducibility. The lowest detected concentration was 3nM. Finally, for the investigation of the effects of different pesticides on the accumulation of cytosolic Ca(2+), we conducted a fluorescent assay on N2a cells treated with tomato sample extracts, which were replicates of the E.U. proficiency test sample. The tomato samples were either organically grown or contained 14 different pesticides. The experimental results showed a higher increase of the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in cells treated with non-organic samples compared to the cells treated with organic samples. PMID:20152413

  16. Effects of halving pesticide use on wheat production

    PubMed Central

    Hossard, L.; Philibert, A.; Bertrand, M.; Colnenne-David, C.; Debaeke, P.; Munier-Jolain, N.; Jeuffroy, M. H.; Richard, G.; Makowski, D.

    2014-01-01

    Pesticides pose serious threats to both human health and the environment. In Europe, farmers are encouraged to reduce their use, and in France a recent environmental policy fixed a target of halving the pesticide use by 2018. Organic and integrated cropping systems have been proposed as possible solutions for reducing pesticide use, but the effect of reducing pesticide use on crop yield remains unclear. Here we use a set of cropping system experiments to quantify the yield losses resulting from a reduction of pesticide use for winter wheat in France. Our estimated yield losses resulting from a 50% reduction in pesticide use ranged from 5 to 13% of the yield obtained with the current pesticide use. At the scale of the whole country, these losses would decrease the French wheat production by about 2 to 3 millions of tons, which represent about 15% of the French wheat export. PMID:24651597

  17. Effects of the organophosphate fenthion for control of the red-billed quelea Quelea quelea on cholinesterase and haemoglobin concentrations in the blood of target and non-target birds.

    PubMed

    Cheke, Robert A; McWilliam, Andrew N; Mbereki, Collen; van der Walt, Etienne; Mtobesya, Boaz; Magoma, Richard N; Young, Stephen; Eberly, J Patrick

    2012-10-01

    The red-billed quelea bird Quelea quelea is one of sub-Saharan Africa's most damaging pests, attacking small-grain crops throughout semi-arid zones. It is routinely controlled by spraying its breeding colonies and roosts with organophosphate pesticides, actions often associated with detrimental effects on non-target organisms. Attributions of mortality and morbidity of non-targets to the sprays are difficult to confirm unequivocally but can be achieved by assessing depressions in cholinesterase activities since these are reduced by exposure to organophosphates. Here we report on surveys of birds caught before and after sprays that were examined for their blood cholinesterase activities to assess the extent to which these became depressed. Blood samples from birds were taken before and after sprays with fenthion against red-billed quelea in colonies or roosts, and at other unsprayed sites, in Botswana and Tanzania and analysed for levels of haemoglobin (Hb) and activities of whole blood acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Background activities of AChE, BChE and Hb concentrations varied with bird species, subspecies, mass, age and gender. Contrary to expectation, since avian erythrocytes are often reported to lack cholinesterases, acetylcholinesterase activities in pre-spray samples of adult birds were positively correlated with Hb concentrations. When these factors were taken into account there were highly significant declines (P < 0.0001) in AChE and BChE and increases in Hb after contact with fenthion in both target and non-target birds. BChE generally declined further (up to 87 % depression) from baseline levels than AChE (up to 83 % depression) but did so at a slower rate in a sample of quelea nestlings. Baseline activities of AChE and BChE and levels of Hb were higher in the East African subspecies of the red-billed quelea Q. q. aethiopica than in the southern African subspecies Q. q. lathamii, with the exception of BChE activities for

  18. Pesticide Toxicity Index: a tool for assessing potential toxicity of pesticide mixtures to freshwater aquatic organisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nowell, Lisa H.; Norman, Julia E.; Moran, Patrick W.; Martin, Jeffrey D.; Stone, Wesley W.

    2014-01-01

    Pesticide mixtures are common in streams with agricultural or urban influence in the watershed. The Pesticide Toxicity Index (PTI) is a screening tool to assess potential aquatic toxicity of complex pesticide mixtures by combining measures of pesticide exposure and acute toxicity in an additive toxic-unit model. The PTI is determined separately for fish, cladocerans, and benthic invertebrates. This study expands the number of pesticides and degradates included in previous editions of the PTI from 124 to 492 pesticides and degradates, and includes two types of PTI for use in different applications, depending on study objectives. The Median-PTI was calculated from median toxicity values for individual pesticides, so is robust to outliers and is appropriate for comparing relative potential toxicity among samples, sites, or pesticides. The Sensitive-PTI uses the 5th percentile of available toxicity values, so is a more sensitive screening-level indicator of potential toxicity. PTI predictions of toxicity in environmental samples were tested using data aggregated from published field studies that measured pesticide concentrations and toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia in ambient stream water. C. dubia survival was reduced to ≤ 50% of controls in 44% of samples with Median-PTI values of 0.1–1, and to 0% in 96% of samples with Median-PTI values > 1. The PTI is a relative, but quantitative, indicator of potential toxicity that can be used to evaluate relationships between pesticide exposure and biological condition.

  19. Body mass index as a prognostic factor in organophosphate-poisoned patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Duk Hee; Jung, Koo Young; Choi, Yoon Hee; Cheon, Young Jin

    2014-07-01

    Organophosphate poisoning is a serious clinical entity and considerable morbidity and mortality. Several factors have been identified to predict outcomes of organophosphate poisoning. Organophosphates are lipophilic and therefore predicted to have a large volume of distribution and to rapidly distribute into tissue and fat. Thus, toxic effects of organophosphate would be expected to last longer in obese patients. We investigated the relationship between obesity and clinical course in 112 acute organophosphate-poisoned patients from an initial medical record review of 234 patients. One hundred twenty-two patients were excluded: 6 were children, 14 had an uncertain history of exposure and of uncertain agent, 10 were transferred to another hospital, 67 were discharged from the emergency department because their toxicity was mild, 21 had carbamate poisoning, and 4 did not have height or weight checked. Clinical features, body mass index, Glasgow Coma Scale, laboratory findings, serum cholinesterase activity, electrocardiogram finding, management, and outcomes were examined. The lipid solubility of the implicated organophosphate was characterized by its octanol/water coefficient. Forty of 112 patients were obese. Obese patients who were poisoned by high lipophilicity organophosphate compounds had a need for longer use of mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit care, and total length of admission. Body mass index can provide a guide to physicians in predicting clinical course and management in organophosphate-poisoned patients.

  20. Biodegradation of pesticide profenofos by the free and immobilized cells of Pseudoxanthomonas suwonensis strain HNM.

    PubMed

    Talwar, Manjunatha P; Ninnekar, Harichandra Z

    2015-09-01

    Profenofos is an organophosphate pesticide used extensively in agriculture to control pests. A bacterium capable of degrading profenofos was isolated from pesticide-contaminated soil samples and identified as Pseudoxanthomonas suwonensis strain HNM based on its morphological and biochemical characteristics and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences. 4-Bromo-2-chlorophenol was identified as a metabolite of profenofos degradation by HPLC and GC-MS analysis. The organism degraded profenofos by hydrolysis to yield 4-bromo-2-chlorophenol which was further utilized as carbon source for growth. The organism utilized various organophosphate pesticides such as temephos, quinalphos, and chloropyrifos as carbon sources. The optimum conditions for degradation of profenofos by P. suwonensis strain HMN were found to be at pH 7 and 30 °C. We have investigated the rate of degradation of profenofos by the free and immobilized cells of P. suwonensis strain HNM in various matrices such as sodium alginate (SA), sodium alginate-polyvinyl alcohol (SA-PVA), and SA-bentonite clay. The rate of degradation of 3 and 6 mM profenofos by the freely suspended cells were compared with that by immobilized cells in batches and semi-continuous with shaken cultures. The SA-bentonite clay-immobilized cells showed higher rate of degradation of 3 and 6 mM profenofos then freely suspended cells and cells immobilized in SA and SA-PVA. The SA-bentonite clay-immobilized cells of P. suwonensis strain HNM could be reused for more than 32 cycles without losing their degradation capacity. Thus, the immobilized cells are more efficient than freely suspended cells for the degradation of organophosphate pesticide contaminated water.

  1. Biodegradation of pesticide profenofos by the free and immobilized cells of Pseudoxanthomonas suwonensis strain HNM.

    PubMed

    Talwar, Manjunatha P; Ninnekar, Harichandra Z

    2015-09-01

    Profenofos is an organophosphate pesticide used extensively in agriculture to control pests. A bacterium capable of degrading profenofos was isolated from pesticide-contaminated soil samples and identified as Pseudoxanthomonas suwonensis strain HNM based on its morphological and biochemical characteristics and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences. 4-Bromo-2-chlorophenol was identified as a metabolite of profenofos degradation by HPLC and GC-MS analysis. The organism degraded profenofos by hydrolysis to yield 4-bromo-2-chlorophenol which was further utilized as carbon source for growth. The organism utilized various organophosphate pesticides such as temephos, quinalphos, and chloropyrifos as carbon sources. The optimum conditions for degradation of profenofos by P. suwonensis strain HMN were found to be at pH 7 and 30 °C. We have investigated the rate of degradation of profenofos by the free and immobilized cells of P. suwonensis strain HNM in various matrices such as sodium alginate (SA), sodium alginate-polyvinyl alcohol (SA-PVA), and SA-bentonite clay. The rate of degradation of 3 and 6 mM profenofos by the freely suspended cells were compared with that by immobilized cells in batches and semi-continuous with shaken cultures. The SA-bentonite clay-immobilized cells showed higher rate of degradation of 3 and 6 mM profenofos then freely suspended cells and cells immobilized in SA and SA-PVA. The SA-bentonite clay-immobilized cells of P. suwonensis strain HNM could be reused for more than 32 cycles without losing their degradation capacity. Thus, the immobilized cells are more efficient than freely suspended cells for the degradation of organophosphate pesticide contaminated water. PMID:25832924

  2. Mitigating pesticide pollution in China requires law enforcement, farmer training, and technological innovation.

    PubMed

    Li, Huizhen; Zeng, Eddy Y; You, Jing

    2014-05-01

    To feed an ever-growing population, it is necessary to take all measures to increase crop yields, including the use of pesticides. It has long been a difficult task to boost agricultural production and simultaneously minimize the impact of pesticide application on the environment, particularly in China, a developing country with more than 1.3 billion people. China has recently become the world's leading producer and consumer of pesticides, with production and consumption reaching 265 tons and 179 tons, respectively, in 2011, and a national average pesticide application dosage of more than 14 kg/ha. The large quantities of pesticides applied in agricultural fields have resulted in serious environmental deterioration. Organochlorine pesticides, such as dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane and hexachlorohexane, have become ubiquitous in the environment of China, with spatial distributions in soils and aquatic systems similar to their historic application patterns in different geographic regions: southeast > central > northwest. Pollution by current-use pesticides, for example, organophosphates and pyrethroids, has also been of great concern. To mitigate pesticide pollution in China, a significant reduction in pesticide inputs into the environment is mandatory. This can be accomplished only with joint efforts by the government, professionals, and citizens in combination with rigorous enforcement of laws and regulations, training of farmers in pesticide knowledge and environmental awareness, and technological innovation for producing low-risk pesticides and developing efficient application approaches. Restoring contaminated sites is also an urgent task. Finally, food security and environmental pollution are not problems for a sole country, and international cooperation and communication are necessary. PMID:24753037

  3. Mitigating pesticide pollution in China requires law enforcement, farmer training, and technological innovation.

    PubMed

    Li, Huizhen; Zeng, Eddy Y; You, Jing

    2014-05-01

    To feed an ever-growing population, it is necessary to take all measures to increase crop yields, including the use of pesticides. It has long been a difficult task to boost agricultural production and simultaneously minimize the impact of pesticide application on the environment, particularly in China, a developing country with more than 1.3 billion people. China has recently become the world's leading producer and consumer of pesticides, with production and consumption reaching 265 tons and 179 tons, respectively, in 2011, and a national average pesticide application dosage of more than 14 kg/ha. The large quantities of pesticides applied in agricultural fields have resulted in serious environmental deterioration. Organochlorine pesticides, such as dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane and hexachlorohexane, have become ubiquitous in the environment of China, with spatial distributions in soils and aquatic systems similar to their historic application patterns in different geographic regions: southeast > central > northwest. Pollution by current-use pesticides, for example, organophosphates and pyrethroids, has also been of great concern. To mitigate pesticide pollution in China, a significant reduction in pesticide inputs into the environment is mandatory. This can be accomplished only with joint efforts by the government, professionals, and citizens in combination with rigorous enforcement of laws and regulations, training of farmers in pesticide knowledge and environmental awareness, and technological innovation for producing low-risk pesticides and developing efficient application approaches. Restoring contaminated sites is also an urgent task. Finally, food security and environmental pollution are not problems for a sole country, and international cooperation and communication are necessary.

  4. Health risk for children and adults consuming apples with pesticide residue.

    PubMed

    Lozowicka, Bozena

    2015-01-01

    The presence of pesticide residues in apples raises serious health concerns, especially when the fresh fruits are consumed by children, particularly vulnerable to the pesticide hazards. This study demonstrates the results from nine years of investigation (2005-2013) of 696 samples of Polish apples for 182 pesticides using gas and liquid chromatography and spectrophotometric techniques. Only 33.5% of the samples did not contain residues above the limit of detection. In 66.5% of the samples, 34 pesticides were detected, of which maximum residue level (MRL) was exceeded in 3%. Multiple residues were present in 35% of the samples with two to six pesticides, and one sample contained seven compounds. A study of the health risk for children, adults and the general population consuming apples with these pesticides was performed. The pesticide residue data have been combined with the consumption of apples in the 97.5 percentile and the mean diet. A deterministic model was used to assess the chronic and acute exposures that are based on the average and high concentrations of residues. Additionally, the "worst-case scenario" and "optimistic case scenario" were used to assess the chronic risk. In certain cases, the total dietary pesticide intake calculated from the residue levels observed in apples exceeds the toxicological criteria. Children were the group most exposed to the pesticides, and the greatest short-term hazard stemmed from flusilazole at 624%, dimethoate at 312%, tebuconazole at 173%, and chlorpyrifos methyl and captan with 104% Acute Reference Dose (ARfD) each. In the cumulative chronic exposure, among the 17 groups of compounds studied, organophosphate insecticides constituted 99% acceptable daily intake (ADI). The results indicate that the occurrence of pesticide residues in apples could not be considered a serious public health problem. Nevertheless, an investigation into continuous monitoring and tighter regulation of pesticide residues is recommended.

  5. Organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning from a home-made shampoo.

    PubMed

    Sadaka, Yair; Broides, Arnon; Tzion, Raffi Lev; Lifshitz, Matitiahu

    2011-07-01

    Organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning is a major health problem in children. We report an unusual cause of organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning. Two children were admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit due to organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning after exposure from a home-made shampoo that was used for the treatment of head lice. Owing to no obvious source of poisoning, the diagnosis of organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning in one of these patients was delayed. Both patients had an uneventful recovery. Organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning from home-made shampoo is possible. In cases where the mode of poisoning is unclear, direct questioning about the use of home-made shampoo is warranted, in these cases the skin and particularly the scalp should be rinsed thoroughly as soon as possible.

  6. Organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning from a home-made shampoo

    PubMed Central

    Sadaka, Yair; Broides, Arnon; Tzion, Raffi Lev; Lifshitz, Matitiahu

    2011-01-01

    Organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning is a major health problem in children. We report an unusual cause of organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning. Two children were admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit due to organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning after exposure from a home-made shampoo that was used for the treatment of head lice. Owing to no obvious source of poisoning, the diagnosis of organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning in one of these patients was delayed. Both patients had an uneventful recovery. Organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning from home-made shampoo is possible. In cases where the mode of poisoning is unclear, direct questioning about the use of home-made shampoo is warranted, in these cases the skin and particularly the scalp should be rinsed thoroughly as soon as possible. PMID:21887044

  7. Chiral pesticides: Identification, description, and environmental implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ulrich, Elin M.; Morrison, Candice N.; Goldsmith, Michael R.; Foreman, William T.

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic chemicals, including pesticides, are a major source of contamination and pollution in the environment. Pesticides have many positive uses: increased food production, decreased damage to crops and structures, reduced disease vector populations, and more. Nevertheless, pesticide exposure can pose risks to humans and the environment, so various mitigation strategies are exercised to make them safer, minimize their use, and reduce their unintended environment effects. One strategy that may help achieve these goals relies on the unique properties of chirality or molecular asymmetry. Some common terms related to chirality are defined in Table 1.

  8. Comparison of pesticide residues in surface water and ground water of agriculture intensive areas

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The organochlorines (OClPs) and organophosphates (OPPs) pesticides in surface and ground water having intensive agriculture activity were investigated to evaluate their potential pollution and risks on human health. As per USEPA 8081 B method, liquid-liquid extraction followed by Gas-Chromatographic technique with electron capture detector and mass selective detector (GC-MS) were used for monitoring of pesticides. Among organochlorines, α,β,γ,δ HCH’s, aldrin, dicofol, DDT and its derivatives, α,β endosulphan’s and endosulphan-sulphate were analysed; dichlorovos, ethion, parathion-methyl, phorate, chlorpyrifos and profenofos were determined among organophosphates. As compared to ground water, higher concentrations of OClPs and OPPs were found in surface water. Throughout the monitoring study, α - HCH (0.39 μg/L in Amravati region),α - endosulphan (0.78 μg/L in Yavatmal region), chlorpyrifos (0.25 μg/L in Bhandara region) and parathion-methyl (0.09 μg/L in Amravati region) are frequently found pesticide in ground water, whereas α,β,γ-HCH (0.39 μg/L in Amravati region), α,β - endosulphan (0.42 μg/L in Amravati region), dichlorovos (0.25 μg/L in Yavatmal region), parathion-methyl (0.42 μg/L in Bhandara region), phorate (0.33 μg/L in Yavatmal region) were found in surface water. Surface water was found to be more contaminated than ground water with more number of and more concentrated pesticides. Among pesticides water samples are found to be more contaminated by organophosphate than organochlorine. Pesticides in the surface water samples from Bhandara and Yavatmal region exceeded the EU (European Union) limit of 1.0 μg/L (sum of pesticide levels in surface water) but were within the WHO guidelines for individual pesticides. PMID:24398360

  9. An electrophysiological study of the intermediate syndrome of organophosphate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Lorenzoni, Paulo José; Gasparetto, Juliano; Kay, Cláudia Suemi Kamoi; Scola, Rosana Herminia; Werneck, Lineu César

    2010-09-01

    Acute organophosphate (OP) poisoning is commonly seen in emergency medicine. Neurologists must be alert to detect neuromuscular transmission failure and other neurological complications that follow OP poisoning. We report a 37-year-old male with acute OP poisoning to emphasize the electrophysiological abnormalities during the intermediate syndrome (IMS). Motor nerve conduction studies revealed that a single nerve stimulation evoked a repetitive compound muscle action potential, whereas repetitive nerve stimulation resulted in a combination of a decrement-increment pattern and a repetitive fade response. Thus, electrophysiological studies can be used to monitor patients with IMS, and these test results correlate well with clinical findings in acute OP poisoning. PMID:20483619

  10. Comparative toxicity of two azadirachtin-based neem pesticides to Daphnia pulex.

    PubMed

    Goktepe, Ipek; Plhak, Leslie C

    2002-01-01

    Azadirachtin (AZA)-based pesticides (Neemix and Bioneem) demonstrated toxicity in 48-h nonrenewal toxicity assays using Daphnia pulex at levels that were comparable with several organophosphate pesticides. The median lethal concentration (LC50) values for the two neem pesticides were found to be 0.028 and 0.033 microl/ml, respectively. The LC50 value for nonformulated (95% pure) AZA was determined to be 0.382 microg AZA/ml. Neemix and Bioneem were exposed to air and northern sky daylight in a light box at 24 and 37 degrees C for 1, 3, 6, and 9 d. Standard 48-h acute toxicity tests were used to determine the effect of aging in these dry environmental conditions. Neemix and Bioneem were also fractionated into volatile and nonvolatile fractions, and the toxicity of each was tested. Compared with Neemix, Bioneem remained toxic longer when exposed to light and air at 37 degrees C, indicating that this pesticide may be less prone to environmental degradation. When fractionated, the nonvolatile fractions for both pesticides exhibited significantly lower LC50 values than the full formulations. These results suggest that, depending on the application rate and environmental fate, AZA-based pesticides may have direct adverse effects on aquatic organisms and that the toxicity and stability of formulated pesticides depend on factors other than only the AZA concentration. PMID:11804058

  11. Sediment-associated pesticides in an urban stream in Guangzhou, China: implication of a shift in pesticide use patterns.

    PubMed

    Li, Huizhen; Sun, Baoquan; Lydy, Michael J; You, Jing

    2013-04-01

    Pesticide use patterns in China have changed in recent years; however, the study of the environmental fate of current-use pesticides (CUPs) and their ecotoxicological significance in aquatic ecosystems is limited. In the present study, sediments were collected from an urban stream in the Chinese city of Guangzhou. Sediment-associated legacy organochlorine pesticides and CUPs-including organophosphates, pyrethroids, fipronil, and abamectin-were analyzed. Additionally, the relative toxicity of the sediments was evaluated with 10-d bioassays using Chironomus dilutus. Fifteen of 16 sediments collected from the stream were acutely toxic to C. dilutus, with 81% of the samples causing 100% mortality. Abamectin, fipronil, and pyrethroids (mainly cypermethrin) were identified as the principal contributors to the noted toxicity in the midges, with median predicted toxic units of 1.63, 1.63, and 1.03, respectively. Sediments taken from downstream sites, where residential and industrial regions were located, had elevated CUP concentrations and sediment toxicity compared with upstream sites. The present study is the first of its kind to link sediment CUPs, fipronil, and abamectin concentrations with toxicity in urban streams in China with a focus on shifting pesticide usage patterns.

  12. Poisoning of animals in the Los Angeles area with pesticides during 1977.

    PubMed

    Maddy, K T; Winter, J

    1980-12-01

    During 1977, there were 289 pesticide exposure incidents involving animals that were handled by the Thomas J. Fleming Memorial Poison Information Center in Los Angeles. Almost all of this service was provided to veterinarians and most of the incidents involved dogs. Cases handled by this center are considered typical for small animal practices in urban areas of California. Ingestion was the major route of exposure. As recently as 10 years ago, arsenic, strychnine, and phosphorus were major causes of such poisonings. During 1977, the n-methylcarbamates (27%), anticoagulants (19%), and organo-phosphates (15%) were the major pesticides involved in exposure incidents. Lesser percentages of cases attributed to a specific chemical included: Vacor (5%), metaldehyde (4%), chlorinated hydrocarbons (4%), and arsenicals (4%). A variety of other pesticides, classified as miscellaneous, were also involved in poisonings to a lesser extent.

  13. Pesticide residue screening using a novel artificial neural network combined with a bioelectric cellular biosensor.

    PubMed

    Ferentinos, Konstantinos P; Yialouris, Costas P; Blouchos, Petros; Moschopoulou, Georgia; Kintzios, Spyridon

    2013-01-01

    We developed a novel artificial neural network (ANN) system able to detect and classify pesticide residues. The novel ANN is coupled, in a customized way, to a cellular biosensor operation based on the bioelectric recognition assay (BERA) and able to simultaneously assay eight samples in three minutes. The novel system was developed using the data (time series) of the electrophysiological responses of three different cultured cell lines against three different pesticide groups (carbamates, pyrethroids, and organophosphates). Using the novel system, we were able to classify correctly the presence of the investigated pesticide groups with an overall success rate of 83.6%. Considering that only 70,000-80,000 samples are annually tested in Europe with current conventional technologies (an extremely minor fraction of the actual screening needs), the system reported in the present study could contribute to a screening system milestone for the future landscape in food safety control.

  14. Occurrence of biomarkers of pesticide exposure in non-invasive human specimens.

    PubMed

    Yusa, Vicent; Millet, Maurice; Coscolla, Clara; Pardo, Olga; Roca, Marta

    2015-11-01

    Biomonitoring has been used in many types of investigations, including national programmes and epidemiological studies, to explore the occurrence of biomarkers of pesticide exposure in the general population or relevant groups. This review discusses recent studies that measure levels of biomarkers of pesticide exposure in non-invasive human specimens such as urine, breast milk, meconium and hair. Specific and non-specific metabolites of organophosphate and pyrethroid insecticides have been widely investigated in urine, where some of the suitable biomarkers present rates of detection higher than 80%, which stand for an ongoing chronic exposure to traces of these chemicals. Hair is a promising emerging matrix, but some issues on its suitability and the biological relevance needs further research. Breast milk was used in research investigations focused mainly on legacy pesticides, which provide useful information about time trends. PMID:26070147

  15. Responses of the iguanid lizard Anolis carolinensis to four organophosphorus pesticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, R.J.; Clark, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    Dose related mortality and cholinesterase effects of parathion, methyl parathion, azinphos-methyl and malathion on Anolis carolinensis were investigated. The comparative effects of the four compounds on fish, birds and mammals are well known, but the effects of organophosphates on reptiles have not been studied critically. Sensitivity and patterns of mortality from exposure to the pesticides resemble those of birds and mammals rather than those of other poikilothermic vertebrates. Possible symptoms of epinephrine accumulation were observed in exposed animals; this side effect is consistent with the known mechanisms of the pesticides. Our findings indicate that brain cholinesterase activity is related to dose, that 50% inhibition of cholinesterase is associated with death and that 40% inhibition indicates sublethal exposure. Anolis lizards are frequently exposed to pesticides in the field and they may be useful in monitoring the hazards posed to a variety of wildlife species.

  16. Effect of pesticide use in fruit production orchards on shallow ground water.

    PubMed

    Loewy, R M; Carvajal, L G; Novelli, M; de D'Angelo, A M Pechen

    2003-05-01

    As a part of landscape-scale study, ground water samples were collected from 30 wells located in fruit production farms belonging to the valley of Neuquen river during the period 1995-1998 and analyzed for organophosphate pesticides. As a consequence of the leaching process, ground water from the Valley of Neuquen River frequently contained concentrations of organophosphorus pesticides that exceeded acute toxicity risk ratios established to protect aquatic life. It was found that some pesticides, as azinphos methyl, had a high detection frequency, 66% of the samples, with concentrations varying from no detection to 48.9 ppb. Dimethoate, metidathion and phosmet were also detected with frequencies of 14.1, 13.6 and 10.8% and with concentration ranks from no detection to a maximum value of 10.9, 2.0 and 15.5 ppb, respectively. Seasonal variations and temporal trends were found for these compounds in ground water.

  17. NMDA antagonists exert distinct effects in experimental organophosphate or carbamate poisoning in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Dekundy, Andrzej . E-mail: andrzej.dekundy@merz.de; Kaminski, Rafal M.; Zielinska, Elzbieta; Turski, Waldemar A.

    2007-03-15

    Organophosphate (OP) and carbamate acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors produce seizures and lethality in mammals. Anticonvulsant and neuroprotective properties of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists encourage the investigation of their effects in AChE inhibitor-induced poisonings. In the present study, the effects of dizocilpine (MK-801, 1 mg/kg) or 3-((RS)-2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)-propyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP, 10 mg/kg), alone or combined with muscarinic antagonist atropine (1.8 mg/kg), on convulsant and lethal properties of an OP pesticide dichlorvos or a carbamate drug physostigmine, were studied in mice. Both dichlorvos and physostigmine induced dose-dependent seizure activity and lethality. Atropine did not prevent the occurrence of convulsions but decreased the lethal effects of both dichlorvos and physostigmine. MK-801 or CPP blocked or attenuated, respectively, dichlorvos-induced convulsions. Contrariwise, NMDA antagonists had no effect in physostigmine-induced seizures or lethality produced by dichlorvos or physostigmine. Concurrent pretreatment with atropine and either MK-801 or CPP blocked or alleviated seizures produced by dichlorvos, but not by physostigmine. Both MK-801 and CPP co-administered with atropine enhanced its antilethal effects in both dichlorvos and physostigmine poisoning. In both saline- and AChE inhibitor-treated mice, no interaction of the investigated antidotes with brain cholinesterase was found. The data indicate that both muscarinic ACh and NMDA receptor-mediated mechanisms contribute to the acute toxicity of AChE inhibitors, and NMDA receptors seem critical to OP-induced seizures.

  18. Distribution and determinants of urinary biomarkers of exposure to organophosphate insecticides in Puerto Rican pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Ryan C.; Cantonwine, David E.; Anzalota Del Toro, Liza V.; Calafat, Antonia M.; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; Davis, Mark D.; Montesano, M. Angela; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.; Cordero, José F.

    2015-01-01

    Globally, human exposures to organophosphate (OP) insecticides may pose a significant burden to the health of mothers and their developing fetuses. Unfortunately, relevant data is limited in certain areas of the world concerning sources of exposure to OP insecticides in pregnant populations. To begin to address this gap in information for Puerto Rico, we studied repeated measures of urinary concentrations of 10 OP insecticide metabolites among 54 pregnant women from the northern karst region of the island. We also collected demographic data and self-reported information on the consumption of fruits, vegetables, and legumes in the past 48-hr before urine collection and home pest-related issues. We calculated the distributions of the urinary biomarkers and compared them to women of reproductive age from the general U.S. population. We also used statistical models accounting for correlated data to assess within-subject temporal variability of the urinary biomarkers and to identify predictors of exposure. We found that for all but two metabolites (para-nitrophenol [PNP], diethylthiophosphate [DETP]), 50th or 95th percentile urinary concentrations (the metric that was used for comparison was based on the biomarker’s detection frequency) of the other eight metabolites (3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol [TCPY], 2-isopropyl-4-methyl-6-hydroxy-pyrimidine, malathion dicarboxylic acid, diethylphosphate, diethyldithiophosphate, dimethylphosphate, dimethylthiophosphate [DMTP], dimethyldithiophosphate) were somewhat lower in our cohort compared with similarly aged women from the continental United States. TCPY, PNP, DETP, and DMTP, which were the only urinary metabolites detected in greater than 50% of the samples, had poor reproducibility (intraclass correlation coefficient range: 0.19–0.28) during pregnancy. Positive predictors of OP insecticide exposure included: age; marital or employment status; consumption of cherries, grape juice, peanuts, peanut butter, or raisins; and

  19. Distribution and determinants of urinary biomarkers of exposure to organophosphate insecticides in Puerto Rican pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Ryan C; Cantonwine, David E; Del Toro, Liza V Anzalota; Calafat, Antonia M; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; Davis, Mark D; Montesano, M Angela; Alshawabkeh, Akram N; Cordero, José F; Meeker, John D

    2015-04-15

    Globally, human exposures to organophosphate (OP) insecticides may pose a significant burden to the health of mothers and their developing fetuses. Unfortunately, relevant data is limited in certain areas of the world concerning sources of exposure to OP insecticides in pregnant populations. To begin to address this gap in information for Puerto Rico, we studied repeated measures of urinary concentrations of 10 OP insecticide metabolites among 54 pregnant women from the northern karst region of the island. We also collected demographic data and self-reported information on the consumption of fruits, vegetables, and legumes in the past 48 h before urine collection and home pest-related issues. We calculated the distributions of the urinary biomarkers and compared them to women of reproductive age from the general U.S. population. We also used statistical models accounting for correlated data to assess within-subject temporal variability of the urinary biomarkers and to identify predictors of exposure. We found that for all but two metabolites (para-nitrophenol [PNP], diethylthiophosphate [DETP]), 50th or 95th percentile urinary concentrations (the metric that was used for comparison was based on the biomarker's detection frequency) of the other eight metabolites (3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol [TCPY], 2-isopropyl-4-methyl-6-hydroxy-pyrimidine, malathion dicarboxylic acid, diethylphosphate, diethyldithiophosphate, dimethylphosphate, dimethylthiophosphate [DMTP], dimethyldithiophosphate) were somewhat lower in our cohort compared with similarly aged women from the continental United States. TCPY, PNP, DETP, and DMTP, which were the only urinary metabolites detected in greater than 50% of the samples, had poor reproducibility (intraclass correlation coefficient range: 0.19-0.28) during pregnancy. Positive predictors of OP insecticide exposure included: age; marital or employment status; consumption of cherries, grape juice, peanuts, peanut butter, or raisins; and

  20. Exposure of Preschool-Age Greek Children (RHEA Cohort) to Bisphenol A, Parabens, Phthalates, and Organophosphates.

    PubMed

    Myridakis, Antonis; Chalkiadaki, Georgia; Fotou, Marianna; Kogevinas, Manolis; Chatzi, Leda; Stephanou, Euripides G

    2016-01-19

    Phthalate esters (PEs), bisphenol A (BPA), and parabens (PBs), which are used in numerous consumer products, are known for their endocrine disrupting properties. Organophosphate chemicals (OPs), which form the basis of the majority of pesticides, are known for their neurotoxic activity in humans. All of these chemicals are associated with health problems to which children are more susceptible. Once they enter the human body, PEs, BPA, PBs, and OPs are metabolized and/or conjugated and finally excreted via urine. Hence, human exposure to these substances is examined through a determination of the urinary concentrations of their metabolites. This study assessed the exposure of Greek preschool-age children to PEs, BPA, PBs, and OPs by investigating the urinary levels of seven PEs metabolites, six PBs, BPA, and six dialkyl phosphate metabolites in five-hundred samples collected from 4-year-old children, subjects of the "RHEA" mother-child cohort in Crete, Greece. Daily intake of endocrine disruptors, calculated for 4 year old children, was lower than the corresponding daily intake for 2.5 year old children, which were determined in an earlier study of the same cohort. In some cases the daily intake levels exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI) values and the EFSA Reference Doses (RfD) (e.g., for di-2-ethyl-hexyl phthalate, 3.6% and 1% of the children exceeded RfD and TDi, respectively). Exposure was linked to three main sources: PEs-BPA to plastic, PBs-diethyl phthalate to personal hygiene products, and OPs to food. PMID:26654094

  1. NMDA antagonists exert distinct effects in experimental organophosphate or carbamate poisoning in mice.

    PubMed

    Dekundy, Andrzej; Kaminski, Rafal M; Zielinska, Elzbieta; Turski, Waldemar A

    2007-03-01

    Organophosphate (OP) and carbamate acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors produce seizures and lethality in mammals. Anticonvulsant and neuroprotective properties of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists encourage the investigation of their effects in AChE inhibitor-induced poisonings. In the present study, the effects of dizocilpine (MK-801, 1 mg/kg) or 3-((RS)-2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)-propyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP, 10 mg/kg), alone or combined with muscarinic antagonist atropine (1.8 mg/kg), on convulsant and lethal properties of an OP pesticide dichlorvos or a carbamate drug physostigmine, were studied in mice. Both dichlorvos and physostigmine induced dose-dependent seizure activity and lethality. Atropine did not prevent the occurrence of convulsions but decreased the lethal effects of both dichlorvos and physostigmine. MK-801 or CPP blocked or attenuated, respectively, dichlorvos-induced convulsions. Contrariwise, NMDA antagonists had no effect in physostigmine-induced seizures or lethality produced by dichlorvos or physostigmine. Concurrent pretreatment with atropine and either MK-801 or CPP blocked or alleviated seizures produced by dichlorvos, but not by physostigmine. Both MK-801 and CPP co-administered with atropine enhanced its antilethal effects in both dichlorvos and physostigmine poisoning. In both saline- and AChE inhibitor-treated mice, no interaction of the investigated antidotes with brain cholinesterase was found. The data indicate that both muscarinic ACh and NMDA receptor-mediated mechanisms contribute to the acute toxicity of AChE inhibitors, and NMDA receptors seem critical to OP-induced seizures.

  2. Exposure of Preschool-Age Greek Children (RHEA Cohort) to Bisphenol A, Parabens, Phthalates, and Organophosphates.

    PubMed

    Myridakis, Antonis; Chalkiadaki, Georgia; Fotou, Marianna; Kogevinas, Manolis; Chatzi, Leda; Stephanou, Euripides G

    2016-01-19

    Phthalate esters (PEs), bisphenol A (BPA), and parabens (PBs), which are used in numerous consumer products, are known for their endocrine disrupting properties. Organophosphate chemicals (OPs), which form the basis of the majority of pesticides, are known for their neurotoxic activity in humans. All of these chemicals are associated with health problems to which children are more susceptible. Once they enter the human body, PEs, BPA, PBs, and OPs are metabolized and/or conjugated and finally excreted via urine. Hence, human exposure to these substances is examined through a determination of the urinary concentrations of their metabolites. This study assessed the exposure of Greek preschool-age children to PEs, BPA, PBs, and OPs by investigating the urinary levels of seven PEs metabolites, six PBs, BPA, and six dialkyl phosphate metabolites in five-hundred samples collected from 4-year-old children, subjects of the "RHEA" mother-child cohort in Crete, Greece. Daily intake of endocrine disruptors, calculated for 4 year old children, was lower than the corresponding daily intake for 2.5 year old children, which were determined in an earlier study of the same cohort. In some cases the daily intake levels exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI) values and the EFSA Reference Doses (RfD) (e.g., for di-2-ethyl-hexyl phthalate, 3.6% and 1% of the children exceeded RfD and TDi, respectively). Exposure was linked to three main sources: PEs-BPA to plastic, PBs-diethyl phthalate to personal hygiene products, and OPs to food.

  3. Non-cancer health effects of pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Sanborn, M.; Kerr, K.J.; Sanin, L.H.; Cole, D.C.; Bassil, K.L.; Vakil, C.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate whether there are associations between exposure to pesticides and 4 chronic non-cancer health effects: dermatologic, neurologic, reproductive, and genotoxic effects. DATA SOURCES We searched PreMedline, MEDLINE, and LILACS using the key word pesticide combined with the term for the specific health effect being searched. Reviewers scanned the references of all articles for additional relevant studies. STUDY SELECTION Studies since 1992 were assessed using structured inclusion and quality-of-methods criteria. Studies scoring <4 on a 7-point global methodologic quality scale were excluded. In total, 124 studies were included. These studies had a mean quality score of 4.88 out of 7. SYNTHESIS Strong evidence of association with pesticide exposure was found for all neurologic outcomes, genotoxicity, and 4 of 6 reproductive effects: birth defects, fetal death, altered growth, and other outcomes. Exposure to pesticides generally doubled the level of genetic damage as measured by chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes. Only a few high-quality studies focused on the dermatologic effects of pesticides. In some of these studies, rates of dermatitis were higher among those who had had high exposure to pesticides on the job. CONCLUSION Evidence from research on humans consistently points to positive associations between pesticide exposure and 3 of the 4 non-cancer health outcomes studied. Physicians have a dual role in educating individual patients about the risks of exposure and in reducing exposure in the community by advocating for restrictions on use of pesticides. PMID:17934035

  4. Pesticides and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Pesticides and Pregnancy In every pregnancy, a woman starts out with a 3-5% chance of having ... risk. This sheet talks about whether exposure to pesticides may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  5. The Pesticide Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosch, Van Den Robert

    1979-01-01

    Contains a discussion of insects' ability to survive, of the development of pesticides and the introduction of DDT, of the problems of pesticide use and resistance to insecticides, and of the advantages of integrated pest control. (BB)

  6. Exploring Pesticide Pollution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillo, Thomas J.

    1974-01-01

    Examines environmental problems associated with the use of pesticides, and suggests thirty learning activities designed to give elementary school children a better understanding of the problem of pesticide pollution. (JR)

  7. Monte Carlo QSAR models for predicting organophosphate inhibition of acetycholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Veselinović, J B; Nikolić, G M; Trutić, N V; Živković, J V; Veselinović, A M

    2015-06-01

    A series of 278 organophosphate compounds acting as acetylcholinesterase inhibitors has been studied. The Monte Carlo method was used as a tool for building up one-variable quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models for acetylcholinesterase inhibition activity based on the principle that the target endpoint is treated as a random event. As an activity, bimolecular rate constants were used. The QSAR models were based on optimal descriptors obtained from Simplified Molecular Input-Line Entry System (SMILES) used for the representation of molecular structure. Two modelling approaches were examined: (1) 'classic' training-test system where the QSAR model was built with one random split into a training, test and validation set; and (2) the correlation balance based QSAR models were built with two random splits into a sub-training, calibration, test and validation set. The DModX method was used for defining the applicability domain. The obtained results suggest that studied activity can be determined with the application of QSAR models calculated with the Monte Carlo method since the statistical quality of all build models was very good. Finally, structural indicators for the increase and the decrease of the bimolecular rate constant are defined. The possibility of using these results for the computer-aided design of new organophosphate compounds is presented.

  8. Aquatic hazard assessment of the organophosphate insecticide fonofos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fairchild, James F.; Little, Edward E.; Huckins, James N.

    1992-01-01

    This study determined the acute and chronic toxicity of the organophosphate insecticide fonofos to standard freshwater aquatic organisms under laboratory conditions. Fonofos was acutely toxic to bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), Daphnia (D. magna), and midge (Chironomous riparius) at 5.3, 2.7, and 39 μg/L, respectively. Three fonofos formulations (technical, 94.8% A.I.; 20G, field granular 20% A.I.; and 4E, field liquid 4#/gal A.I.) exhibited similar acute toxicities to bluegill. Exposure to fonofos delayed reproduction and decreased the intrinsic rate of increase of Daphnia during 21-d chronic exposure at the lowest tested concentration (0.08 μg/L). The no observable effect concentration (NOEC) for Daphnia survival was 0.42 μg/L; 0% survival occurred at the lowest observable effect concentration (LOEC) of 1.45 μg/L. The NOEC for midge emergence was 3.42 μg/L; only 34% emergence occurred at the LOEC of 8.24 μg/L. Chronic 30-d exposure of juvenile bluegills decreased growth and survival at 5.65 μg/L (LOEC), but no effects occurred at 2.33 μg/L (NOEC). The relative hazard of fonofos to aquatic life is similar to other carbamate and organophosphate corn insecticides.

  9. Transient and reversible parkinsonism after acute organophosphate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Arima, Hajime; Sobue, Kazuya; So, MinHye; Morishima, Tetsuro; Ando, Hirkoshi; Katsuya, Hirotada

    2003-01-01

    Parkinsonism is a rare complication in patients with organophosphate poisoning. To date there have been two cases of transient parkinsonism after acute and severe cholinergic crisis, both of which were successfully treated using amantadine, an anti-parkinsonism drug. We report on an 81-year-old woman who was admitted for the treatment of acute severe organophosphate poisoning. Although acute cholinergic crisis was treated successfully with large doses of atropine and 2-pyridine aldoxime methiodide (PAM), extrapyramidal manifestations were noticed on hospital day 6. The neurological symptoms worsened, and the diagnosis of parkinsonism was made by a neurologist on hospital day 9. Immediately, biperiden (5mg), an anti-parkinsonism drug, was administered intravenously, and her symptoms markedly improved. From the following day, biperiden (5 mg/day) was given intramuscularly for eight days. Subsequently, neurological symptoms did not relapse, and no drugs were required. Our patient is the third case of parkinsonism developing after an acute severe cholinergic crisis and the first case successfully treated with biperiden. Patients should be carefully observed for the presence of neurological signs in this kind of poisoning. If present, an anti-parkinsonism drug should be considered.

  10. Mass Spectrometric Analyses of Organophosphate Insecticide Oxon Protein Adducts

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Charles M.; Prins, John M.; George, Kathleen M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Organophosphate (OP) insecticides continue to be used to control insect pests. Acute and chronic exposures to OP insecticides have been documented to cause adverse health effects, but few OP-adducted proteins have been correlated with these illnesses at the molecular level. Our aim was to review the literature covering the current state of the art in mass spectrometry (MS) used to identify OP protein biomarkers. Data sources and extraction We identified general and specific research reports related to OP insecticides, OP toxicity, OP structure, and protein MS by searching PubMed and Chemical Abstracts for articles published before December 2008. Data synthesis A number of OP-based insecticides share common structural elements that result in predictable OP–protein adducts. The resultant OP–protein adducts show an increase in molecular mass that can be identified by MS and correlated with the OP agent. Customized OP-containing probes have also been used to tag and identify protein targets that can be identified by MS. Conclusions MS is a useful and emerging tool for the identification of proteins that are modified by activated organophosphate insecticides. MS can characterize the structure of the OP adduct and also the specific amino acid residue that forms the key bond with the OP. Each protein that is modified in a unique way by an OP represents a unique molecular biomarker that with further research can lead to new correlations with exposure. PMID:20056576

  11. A multi-residue method for simultaneous determination of 74 pesticides in Chinese material medica using modified QuEChERS sample preparation procedure and gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-qin; Li, Yun-fei; Meng, Wen-ting; Li, Dong-xiang; Sun, Henry; Tong, Ling; Sun, Guo-xiang

    2016-03-15

    The present study is focused on the development of an analytical method for the simultaneous analysis of seventy-four pesticides belonging to different chemical classes (organochlorines, organophosphates, pyrethroids, dinitroanilines, dicarboximides, triazoles, etc.) in Chinese material medica. The samples were extracted according to the acetate QuEChERS protocol. To reduce the amount of co-extracted compounds, n-hexane instead of acetonitrile was employed as the extraction solvent. To improve the overall recoveries of problematic basic and base-sensitive compounds, sodium acetate was used to adjust the pH to a neutral condition, and florisil combined with octadecyl-modified silica (C18) were utilized in the cleanup step. The samples were analysed by GC-MS/MS, and quantified by matrix-matched calibration. The validation study was carried out on two representative herbs, Chuanxiong Rhizoma and Angelica Sinensis Radix. In two matrices, the linearity of the calibration was good between 5 and 250 ng/mL concentration ranges, and the limits of quantification (LOQs) less than 0.01 mg/kg for most pesticides. At the LOQs and ten times the LOQs, the mean recoveries of almost all pesticides were within 70-120%, with relative standard deviations (RSDs) lower than 10%. The method was applied on twenty real samples. Seven batches of Chuanxiong and five batches of Danggui were found to contain the residues. The combination of modified QuEChERS and GC-MS/MS offers low cost of analysis as well as excellent accuracy and sensitivity. This method could be especially useful for trace analysis of pesticide residues in complex matrices. PMID:26894850

  12. Pesticides and the Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neufeld, Gaylen

    1973-01-01

    Consideration of the dangers of pesticides to the world ecosystem as well as the economic necessity which an affluent society has created are the two sides of the pesticide problem discussed in this issue. An attempt is made to clarify the issue, to recognize the ways that pesticides exert their effects, and to relate what measures can be taken to…

  13. The Pesticide Scorecard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Jerome B.

    1977-01-01

    A scheme for comparing the relative toxicities and environmental safety of agricultural pesticides is presented. It is based on the sum of four key factors: (1) oral toxicity to rats, (2) oral toxicity to fish, (3) longevity, and (4) bioaccumulation. Thirty-one pesticides are ranked by these factors. The ranking indicates that new pesticides are…

  14. Assessing Children’s Dietary Pesticide Exposure: Direct Measurement of Pesticide Residues in 24-Hr Duplicate Food Samples

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chensheng; Schenck, Frank J.; Pearson, Melanie A.; Wong, Jon W.

    2010-01-01

    Background The data presented here are a response to calls for more direct measurements of pesticide residues in foods consumed by children and provide an opportunity to compare direct measures of pesticide residues in foods representing actual consumption with those reported by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Pesticide Data Program. Objective We measured pesticide residues in 24-hr duplicate food samples collected from a group of 46 young children participating in the Children’s Pesticide Exposure Study (CPES). Methods Parents were instructed to collect 24-hr duplicate food samples of all conventional fruits, vegetables, and fruit juices equal to the quantity consumed by their children, similarly prewashed/prepared, and from the same source or batch. Individual or composite food items were analyzed for organophosphate (OP) and pyrethroid insecticide residues. Results We collected a total of 239 24-hr duplicate food samples collected from the 46 CPES children. We found 14% or 5% of those food samples contained at least one OP or pyrethroid insecticide, respectively. We measured a total of 11 OP insecticides, at levels ranging from 1 to 387 ng/g, and three pyrethroid insecticides, at levels ranging from 2 to 1,133 ng/g, in children’s food samples. We found that many of the food items consumed by the CPES children were also on the list of the most contaminated food commodities reported by the Environmental Working Group. Conclusions The frequent consumption of food commodities with episodic presence of pesticide residues that are suspected to cause developmental and neurological effects in young children supports the need for further mitigation. PMID:20639183

  15. Analysis of Trends of the Types of Pesticide Used, Residues and Related Factors among Farmers in the Largest Vegetable Producing Area in the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jinky Leilanie

    2010-01-01

    The objective of study is to provide an analysis of data trends on the type of pesticide used, exposure factors, and the pesticide-related concerns among the farmers from 2005 to 2010 in one of the largest vegetable producing areas in the Philippines. This is to determine and analyze changes that have occurred for the last five years in order to provide necessary basis in promoting safe usage of pesticides. It is shown in the studies that the most commonly used type of pesticide was Tamaron (methamidophos) which is an organophosphate. The top five pesticide-related symptoms confirm findings in other studies. The risk factors to pesticide exposure were also identified in the reviewed studies such as improper mixing and loading of pesticides, and re-entering previously sprayed area. Pesticide residues were also found in vegetables, soil and water samples. This points to environmental contamination due to pesticide. It is suggested that government agencies implement programs on monitoring, surveillance, information dissemination, and training on proper use of pesticides, and seek alternative farming such as organically grown vegetables, or use of integrated pest management as well as good agricultural practices. PMID:25649105

  16. Surfactant effects on environmental behavior of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Katagi, Toshiyuki

    2008-01-01

    The potential effects of adjuvants, including surfactants used in pesticide formulation, have been extensively studied for many small organic chemicals, but similar investigation on pesticides is limited in most cases. Solubilizing effects leading to the apparently increased water solubility of a pesticide are commonly known through the preparation of formulations, but fundamental profiles, especially for a specific monodisperse surfactant, are not fully studied. Reduced volatilization of a pesticide from the formulation can be explained by analogy of a very simple organic chemical, but the actual mechanism for the pesticide is still obscure. In contrast, from the point of view of avoiding groundwater contamination with a pesticide, adsorption/desorption profiles in the presence of surfactants and adjuvants have been examined extensively as well as pesticide mobility in the soil column. The basic mechanism in micelle-catalyzed hydrolysis is well known, and theoretical approaches including the PPIE model have succeeded in explaining the observed effects of surfactants, but its application to pesticides is also limited. Photolysis, especially in an aqueous phase, is in the same situation. The dilution effect in the real environment would show these effects on hydrolysis and photolysis to be much less than expected from the laboratory basic studies, but more information is necessary to examine the practical extent of the effects in an early stage of applying a pesticide formulation to crops and soil. Many adjuvants, including surfactants, are biodegradable in the soil environment, and thus their effects on the biodegradation of a pesticide in soil and sediment may be limited, as demonstrated by field trials. Not only from the theoretical but also the practical aspect, the foliar uptake of pesticide in the presence of adjuvants has been investigated extensively and some prediction on the ease of foliar uptake can be realized in relation to the formulation technology

  17. Pesticides in surface water measured at select sites in the Sacramento River basin, California, 1996-1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Domagalski, Joseph L.

    2000-01-01

    Pesticides were measured in one urban stream, one agricultural stream, one site on the Sacramento River, and one large flood control channel over a period of 18 months during 1996-1998. All sites were located within the Sacramento River Basin of California. Measurements were made on 83 pesticides or pesticide transformation products by either gas chromatography/mass spectrometry or by high performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet light spectrometry. Some pesticides were detected frequently at the agricultural stream and downstream in the Sacramento River and at the flood control channel of the Sacramento River. These were pesticides related to rice farming (molinate, carbofuran, thiobencarb, and bentazon); herbicides used both agriculturally or for roadside maintenance (diuron, simazine, and metolachlor); or insecticides used on orchards and row corps (diazinon and chlorpyrifos). No pesticide concen-trations above enforceable water quality criteria were measured at either the agricultural site or the Sacramento River sites. In contrast to the agricul-tural site, insecticides used for household, lawn, or garden maintenance were the most frequently detected pesticides at the urban site. Diazinon, an organophosphate insecticide, exceeded recom-mended criteria for the protection of aquatic life, and the diazinon levels were frequently above known toxic levels for certain zooplankton species at the urban site. Because of the low discharge of the urban stream, pesticide concentrations were greatly diluted upon mixing with Sacramento River water.

  18. HYPOTHYROIDISM AND PESTICIDE USE AMONG MALE PRIVATE PESTICIDE APPLICATORS IN THE AGRICULTURAL HEALTH STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Goldner, Whitney S.; Sandler, Dale P.; Yu, Fang; Shostrom, Valerie; Hoppin, Jane A.; Kamel, Freya; LeVan, Tricia D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Evaluate the association between thyroid disease and use of insecticides, herbicides, fumigants/fungicides in male applicators in the Agricultural Health Study. Methods We examined the association between use of 50 specific pesticides and self-reported hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, and ‘other’ thyroid disease among 22,246 male pesticide applicators. Results There was increased odds of hypothyroidism with ever-use of the herbicides 2,4-D, 2,4,5-T, 2,4,5-TP, alachlor, dicamba, and petroleum oil. Hypothyroidism was also associated with ever-use of eight insecticides: organochlorines chlordane, DDT, heptachlor, lindane, and toxaphene; organophosphates diazinon and malathion; and the carbamate carbofuran. Exposure-response analysis showed increasing odds with increasing level of exposure for the herbicides alachlor and 2,4-D, and the insecticides aldrin, chlordane, DDT, lindane, and parathion. Conclusions There is an association between hypothyroidism and specific herbicides and insecticides in male applicators, similar to previous results for spouses. PMID:24064777

  19. Pesticide exposure, safety issues, and risk assessment indicators.

    PubMed

    Damalas, Christos A; Eleftherohorinos, Ilias G

    2011-05-01

    Pesticides are widely used in agricultural production to prevent or control pests, diseases, weeds, and other plant pathogens in an effort to reduce or eliminate yield losses and maintain high product quality. Although pesticides are developed through very strict regulation processes to function with reasonable certainty and minimal impact on human health and the environment, serious concerns have been raised about health risks resulting from occupational exposure and from residues in food and drinking water. Occupational exposure to pesticides often occurs in the case of agricultural workers in open fields and greenhouses, workers in the pesticide industry, and exterminators of house pests. Exposure of the general population to pesticides occurs primarily through eating food and drinking water contaminated with pesticide residues, whereas substantial exposure can also occur in or around the home. Regarding the adverse effects on the environment (water, soil and air contamination from leaching, runoff, and spray drift, as well as the detrimental effects on wildlife, fish, plants, and other non-target organisms), many of these effects depend on the toxicity of the pesticide, the measures taken during its application, the dosage applied, the adsorption on soil colloids, the weather conditions prevailing after application, and how long the pesticide persists in the environment. Therefore, the risk assessment of the impact of pesticides either on human health or on the environment is not an easy and particularly accurate process because of differences in the periods and levels of exposure, the types of pesticides used (regarding toxicity and persistence), and the environmental characteristics of the areas where pesticides are usually applied. Also, the number of the criteria used and the method of their implementation to assess the adverse effects of pesticides on human health could affect risk assessment and would possibly affect the characterization of the already

  20. Pesticide Exposure, Safety Issues, and Risk Assessment Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Damalas, Christos A.; Eleftherohorinos, Ilias G.

    2011-01-01

    Pesticides are widely used in agricultural production to prevent or control pests, diseases, weeds, and other plant pathogens in an effort to reduce or eliminate yield losses and maintain high product quality. Although pesticides are developed through very strict regulation processes to function with reasonable certainty and minimal impact on human health and the environment, serious concerns have been raised about health risks resulting from occupational exposure and from residues in food and drinking water. Occupational exposure to pesticides often occurs in the case of agricultural workers in open fields and greenhouses, workers in the pesticide industry, and exterminators of house pests. Exposure of the general population to pesticides occurs primarily through eating food and drinking water contaminated with pesticide residues, whereas substantial exposure can also occur in or around the home. Regarding the adverse effects on the environment (water, soil and air contamination from leaching, runoff, and spray drift, as well as the detrimental effects on wildlife, fish, plants, and other non-target organisms), many of these effects depend on the toxicity of the pesticide, the measures taken during its application, the dosage applied, the adsorption on soil colloids, the weather conditions prevailing after application, and how long the pesticide persists in the environment. Therefore, the risk assessment of the impact of pesticides either on human health or on the environment is not an easy and particularly accurate process because of differences in the periods and levels of exposure, the types of pesticides used (regarding toxicity and persistence), and the environmental characteristics of the areas where pesticides are usually applied. Also, the number of the criteria used and the method of their implementation to assess the adverse effects of pesticides on human health could affect risk assessment and would possibly affect the characterization of the already

  1. Environmental pesticide exposure in Honduras following hurricane Mitch.

    PubMed Central

    Balluz, L.; Moll, D.; Diaz Martinez, M. G.; Merida Colindres, J. E.; Malilay, J.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether environmental contamination occurred in the wake of hurricane Mitch (30-31 October 1998), we conducted a population-based cross-sectional household survey in the barrio of Istoca, Department of Choluteca, Honduras. The goals were to evaluate chemical contamination of potable water and the extent of human exposure to chemicals as a result of extensive flooding. METHODS: The survey consisted of an environmental exposure assessment, which included assaying water and soil samples for contaminants, and taking blood and urine samples from 45 adolescents aged 15-18 years. We also made a subjective questionnaire assessment of 155 households. FINDINGS: There was significant contamination of the soil in Istoca, but no water contamination in the aftermath of hurricane Mitch. The soil levels of chlopyrifos and parathion were 30- and 1000-times higher, respectively, than the Environmental Data Quality Level. However, the most striking finding was the detection of elevated levels of chlorinated and organophosphate pesticides in adolescents. Toxicological analyses of serum specimens showed that 51% of the samples had elevated levels of 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis-(p-chlorophenyl) ethylene (p,p-DDE) (range, 1.16-96.9 ng/ml) (US reference mean = 3.5 ng/ml) in adults). Dieldrin levels > 0.2 ng/ml were also present in 23% of the serum specimens (serum levels of this analyte in US adolescents are < 0.2 ng/ml). Of 43 urine samples analysed for organophosphate metabolites, 18.6% contained diethyl phosphate (DEP) at levels which were greater that the reference mean of 6.45 micrograms/g creatinine. We also detected elevated levels of p-nitrophenol (p-NP) and of 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (3,5,6-TCPY) in 91% and 42% of the samples, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The elevated levels of chlorinated pesticides were surprising, since although these substances were banned in Honduras 15 years ago it appears that they are still being used in the country. Moreover

  2. Influence of pesticide use in fruit orchards during blooming on honeybee mortality in 4 experimental apiaries.

    PubMed

    Calatayud-Vernich, Pau; Calatayud, Fernando; Simó, Enrique; Suarez-Varela, Maria Morales; Picó, Yolanda

    2016-01-15

    Samples of dead honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) were collected periodically from 4 different locations during citrus and stone fruit trees blooming season to evaluate the potential impact of agrochemicals on honey bee death rate. For the determination of mortality, dead honey bee traps were placed in front of the experimental hives entrance located in areas of intensive agriculture in Valencian Community (Spain). A total of 34 bee samples, obtained along the monitoring period, were analyzed by means of QuEChERS extraction method and screened for 58 pesticides or their degradation products by LC-MS/MS. An average of four pesticides per honey bee sample was detected. Coumaphos, an organophosphate acaricide used against varroosis in the experimental hives, was detected in 94% of the samples. However, this acaricide was unlikely to be responsible for honey bee mortality because its constantly low concentration during all the monitoring period, even before and after acute mortality episodes. The organophosphates chlorpyrifos and dimethoate, as well as the neonicotinoid imidacloprid, were the most frequently detected agrochemicals. Almost 80% of the samples had chlorpyrifos, 68% dimethoate, and 32% imidacloprid. Maximum concentrations for these three compounds were 751, 403, 223 ng/g respectively. Influence of these pesticides on acute honey bee mortality was demonstrated by comparing coincidence between death rate and concentrations of chlorpyrifos, dimethoate and imidacloprid. PMID:26398448

  3. Influence of pesticide use in fruit orchards during blooming on honeybee mortality in 4 experimental apiaries.

    PubMed

    Calatayud-Vernich, Pau; Calatayud, Fernando; Simó, Enrique; Suarez-Varela, Maria Morales; Picó, Yolanda

    2016-01-15

    Samples of dead honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) were collected periodically from 4 different locations during citrus and stone fruit trees blooming season to evaluate the potential impact of agrochemicals on honey bee death rate. For the determination of mortality, dead honey bee traps were placed in front of the experimental hives entrance located in areas of intensive agriculture in Valencian Community (Spain). A total of 34 bee samples, obtained along the monitoring period, were analyzed by means of QuEChERS extraction method and screened for 58 pesticides or their degradation products by LC-MS/MS. An average of four pesticides per honey bee sample was detected. Coumaphos, an organophosphate acaricide used against varroosis in the experimental hives, was detected in 94% of the samples. However, this acaricide was unlikely to be responsible for honey bee mortality because its constantly low concentration during all the monitoring period, even before and after acute mortality episodes. The organophosphates chlorpyrifos and dimethoate, as well as the neonicotinoid imidacloprid, were the most frequently detected agrochemicals. Almost 80% of the samples had chlorpyrifos, 68% dimethoate, and 32% imidacloprid. Maximum concentrations for these three compounds were 751, 403, 223 ng/g respectively. Influence of these pesticides on acute honey bee mortality was demonstrated by comparing coincidence between death rate and concentrations of chlorpyrifos, dimethoate and imidacloprid.

  4. Pesticide exposure and respiratory health of indigenous women in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Fieten, Karin B; Kromhout, Hans; Heederik, Dick; van Wendel de Joode, Berna

    2009-06-15

    A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2007 to evaluate the relation between pesticide exposure and respiratory health in a population of indigenous women in Costa Rica. Exposed women (n = 69) all worked at plantain plantations. Unexposed women (n = 58) worked at organic banana plantations or other locations without pesticide exposure. Study participants were interviewed using questionnaires to estimate exposure and presence of respiratory symptoms. Spirometry tests were conducted to obtain forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second. Among the exposed, prevalence of wheeze was 20% and of shortness of breath was 36% versus 9% and 26%, respectively, for the unexposed. Prevalence of chronic cough, asthma, and atopic symptoms was similar for exposed and unexposed women. Among nonsmokers (n = 105), reported exposures to the organophosphate insecticides chlorpyrifos (n = 25) and terbufos (n = 38) were strongly associated with wheeze (odd ratio = 6.7, 95% confidence interval: 1.6, 28.0; odds ratio = 5.9, 95% confidence interval: 1.4, 25.6, respectively). For both insecticides, a statistically significant exposure-effect association was found. Multiple organophosphate exposure was common; 81% of exposed women were exposed to both chlorpyrifos and terbufos. Consequently, their effects could not be separated. All findings were based on questionnaire data. No relation between pesticide exposure and ventilatory lung function was found. PMID:19372212

  5. Distributions of pesticides and organic contaminants between water and suspended sediment, San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Domagalski, J.L.; Kuivila, K.M.

    1993-01-01

    Suspended-sediment and water samples were collected from San Francisco Bay in 1991 during low river discharge and after spring rains. All samples were analyzed for organophosphate, carbamate, and organochlorine pesticides; petroleum hydrocarbons; biomarkers; and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. The objectives were to determine the concentrations of these contaminants in water and suspended sediment during two different hydrologic conditions and to determine partition coefficients of the contaminants between water and sediment. Concentrations of hydrophobic contaminants, such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, varied with location of sample collection, riverine discharge, and tidal cycle. Concentrations of hydrophobic contaminants in suspended sediments were highest during low river discharge but became diluted as agricultural soils entered the bay after spring rains. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons defined as dissolved in the water column were not detected. The concentrations sorbed on suspended sediments were variable and were dependent on sediment transport patterns in the bay. In contrast, the relatively hydrophilic organophosphate pesticides, such as chlorpyrifos and diazinon, has a more uniform concentration in suspended sediment. These pesticides were detected only after spring rains. Most of the measured diazinon, at least 98% for all samples, was in the dissolved phase. Measured partition coefficients for diazinon generally were uniform, which suggests that suspended-sediment concentrations were close to equilibrium with dissolved concentrations. The concentration of diazinon sorbed to suspended sediments, at any given sampling site, was driven primarily by the more abundant solution concentration. The concentrations of diazinon sorbed to suspended sediments, therefore, were independent of the patterns of sediment movement. ?? 1993 Estuarine Research Federation.

  6. Assessing pesticide exposure of the aquatic environment in tropical catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Frederik; Zurbrügg, Christian; Eggen, Rik; Castillo, Luisa; Ruepert, Clemens; Stamm, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Today, pesticides are intensively used in agriculture across the globe. Worldwide about 2.4×106 tons of pesticides are used annually on 1.6×109 ha of arable land. This yields a global average use of pesticides of 1.53 kg ha-1 year-1. Available data suggest that the use in the agricultural sector will continue to grow. Recently it was estimated that within the last decade, the world pesticide market increased by 93% and the Brazilian market alone by 190%. Though pesticides are intensively used in many low and middle income countries (LAMICs), scientifically sound data of amounts and types of pesticide use and the resulting impact on water quality are lacking in many of these countries. Therefore it is highly relevant to: i) identify risk areas where pesticides affect environmental health, ii) understand the environmental behavior of pesticides in vulnerable tropical ecosystems; and iii) develop possible mitigation options to reduce their exposure to ecosystems and humans. Here we present a project that will focus on assessing pesticide exposure of the aquatic environment and humans in tropical catchments of LAMICs. A catchment in the Zarcero province in Costa Rica will be the test case. Pesticide exposure will be assessed by passive sampling. In order to cover a broad range of compounds of possible use, two sampling devices will be used: SDB membranes for collecting polar compounds and silicon sheets for accumulating apolar pesticides. Extracts will be subsequently analysed by GC-MSMS and LC-HRMS.

  7. Organophosphate insecticide poisoning of Canada geese in the Texas panhandle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, D.H.; Mitchell, C.A.; Wynn, L.D.; Flickinger, Edward L.; Kolbe, E.J.

    1982-01-01

    Sixteen hundred waterfowl, mostly Canada Geese, died near Etter, Texas, in late January 1981 from anticholinesterase poisoning. Winter wheat in the area of the die-off had been treated with organophosphate insecticides to control greenbugs. Cholinesterase (ChE) levels in brains of a sample of geese found dead were 75% below normal, enough to account for death (Ludke et al. 1975). The gastrointestinal (G I) tracts of geese found dead were packed with winter wheat; gas chromatography techniques identified parathion and methyl parathion in the GI tract contents. Residues of both chemicals were confirmed by mass spectrometry. We recommend that less toxic materials, such as malathion, be used on grain crops when waterfowl are in the vicinity of treatment.

  8. Urbanisation shapes behavioural responses to a pesticide.

    PubMed

    Tüzün, Nedim; Debecker, Sara; Op de Beeck, Lin; Stoks, Robby

    2015-06-01

    The degree of urbanisation is rapidly increasing worldwide. Due to anthropogenic impact, urban populations are exposed to higher levels of contaminants and higher temperatures. Despite this, urbanisation is a largely overlooked spatial component in ecotoxicology. We tested in a common garden rearing experiment whether replicated urban and rural populations of the damselfly Coenagrion puella differ in their vulnerability to sublethal levels of a widespread pesticide, chlorpyrifos, in terms of ecologically relevant behaviours (exploration behaviour, activity, boldness and food intake), and to what extent these patterns are affected by temperature (20 and 24°C). Except boldness, all behaviours were affected by previous pesticide exposure. While the pesticide did not affect exploration behaviour at 20°C, it was associated with increased exploration at 24°C, which may reflect an increased toxicity of chlorpyrifos at higher temperatures. Importantly, rural and urban larvae showed consistently different, sometimes even opposite behavioural responses to pesticide exposure. When exposed to the pesticide, rural larvae decreased activity and food intake at both temperatures; urban larvae instead increased activity at both temperatures and only reduced food intake at the high temperature. This suggests that urban larvae were less affected by the pesticide, which would be consistent with a scenario of local adaptation to higher contaminant levels. Our results highlight that urbanisation may be an important factor to arrive at a spatially explicit ecological risk assessment, and may be an ignored reason why studies on the same species may generate widely different vulnerabilities to pesticides.

  9. Urbanisation shapes behavioural responses to a pesticide.

    PubMed

    Tüzün, Nedim; Debecker, Sara; Op de Beeck, Lin; Stoks, Robby

    2015-06-01

    The degree of urbanisation is rapidly increasing worldwide. Due to anthropogenic impact, urban populations are exposed to higher levels of contaminants and higher temperatures. Despite this, urbanisation is a largely overlooked spatial component in ecotoxicology. We tested in a common garden rearing experiment whether replicated urban and rural populations of the damselfly Coenagrion puella differ in their vulnerability to sublethal levels of a widespread pesticide, chlorpyrifos, in terms of ecologically relevant behaviours (exploration behaviour, activity, boldness and food intake), and to what extent these patterns are affected by temperature (20 and 24°C). Except boldness, all behaviours were affected by previous pesticide exposure. While the pesticide did not affect exploration behaviour at 20°C, it was associated with increased exploration at 24°C, which may reflect an increased toxicity of chlorpyrifos at higher temperatures. Importantly, rural and urban larvae showed consistently different, sometimes even opposite behavioural responses to pesticide exposure. When exposed to the pesticide, rural larvae decreased activity and food intake at both temperatures; urban larvae instead increased activity at both temperatures and only reduced food intake at the high temperature. This suggests that urban larvae were less affected by the pesticide, which would be consistent with a scenario of local adaptation to higher contaminant levels. Our results highlight that urbanisation may be an important factor to arrive at a spatially explicit ecological risk assessment, and may be an ignored reason why studies on the same species may generate widely different vulnerabilities to pesticides. PMID:25863029

  10. In vitro inhibition of acetylcholinesterase from four marine species by organophosphates and carbamates

    SciTech Connect

    Galgani, F.; Bocquene, G. )

    1990-08-01

    The literature on the biological, physical, and pharmaceutical chemistry of cholinesterase is considerable and includes data on activators and inhibitors. Most of the work on specific anticholinesterasic agents has been concerned with carbamates and organophosphates. Because of the sensitivity of acetylcholinesterase to carbamates and organophosphates, the enzyme has been used as a biochemical indicator of pollution by these agents. However, the chemical reactivity of such chemicals has not been correlated with their effect on Ache and it is impossible to accurately predict biological effects based only on structure. The objectives of this study were to investigate the sensitivity of various marine animals to both organo-phosphates and carbamates. The study was conducted by assessing the in vitro effect of five organophosphates and three carbamates on acetylcholinesterase activity from the muscle of the shrimp Palaemon serratus, the fishes Scomber and Pleuronectes platessa, and from the whole mussels Mytilus edulis. All these species could be used for the monitoring of effect of pollutants.

  11. REMOTE BIOSENSOR FOR IN SITU MONITORING OF ORGANOPHOSPHATE NERVE AGENTS. (R823663)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A remote electrochemical biosensor for field monitoring of organophosphate nerve agents is described. The new sensor relies on the coupling of the effective biocatalytic action of organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) with a submersible amperometric probe design. This combination resu...

  12. PHYSIOLOGICAL DYSFUNCTION IN ESTUARINE MYSIDS AND LARVAL DECAPODS WITH CHRONIC PESTICIDE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A variety of physiological functions was examined in an estuarine mysid (Mysidopsis bahia) during life-cycle exposures to four classes of pesticides. Pesticide exposure initially elevated respiration rates of juveniles. These increased metabolic requirements reduced the amount of...

  13. From Vegetated Ditches to Rice Fields: Thinking Outside the Box for Pesticide Mitigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Innovative mitigation strategies are necessary to address pesticide contamination of surface waters. Since 1998, extensive research has been conducted on the ability of vegetated agricultural drainage ditches to reduce pesticide transport to aquatic receiving systems. Recently, new research has pr...

  14. Comparative biology and pesticide susceptibility of Amblydromella caudiglans and Galendromus occidentalis as spider mite predators in apple orchards.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Jeffris, Rebecca A; Beers, Elizabeth H

    2015-09-01

    The successful integrated mite management program for Washington apples was based on conservation of the mite predator Galendromus occidentalis (Nesbitt). In the 1960s, this mite was assumed to be the only phytoseiid in Washington commercial apple orchards, due to its preference for the most common mite p