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Sample records for reduce postoperative pain

  1. Reducing Postoperative Pain from Tonsillectomy Using Monopolar Electrocautery by Cooling the Oropharynx

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Lucas; Nissen, Leonardo; Sela, Gustavo; Amara, Yara; Fonseca, Vinicius

    2014-01-01

    Objective Evaluate intraoperative cooling of the oropharynx to reduce postoperative pain in tonsillectomy using monopolar electrocautery. Methods Sixty-six patients, age 1 to 12 years, were selected for the study, 33 in the control group and 33 in the experimental group. After randomization, patients underwent subcapsular dissection and hemostasis with monopolar electrocautery. Patients in the experimental group had the oropharynx cooled after tonsil dissection and hemostasis for 10 minutes. The procedure was done through the oral cavity by irrigation with 500 mL of 0.9% saline, in temperatures between 5°C and 10°C, for 5 minutes. The evaluation of postoperative pain was made with the pain visual analog scale (VAS) for 10 days. As complementary data on the evaluation of pain, we recorded daily use of ketoprofen for pain relief. Results Pain after tonsillectomy assessed by VAS was significantly lower in the experimental group at days 0, 5, and 6 (p < 0.05). There were no differences in the use of ketoprofen between the groups. Conclusion Cooling of the oropharynx after tonsillectomy promotes clinically significant reduction in postoperative pain, without additional complications. PMID:25992083

  2. [Postoperative pain in craniotomy].

    PubMed

    Peón, Andréa Ungaro; Diccini, Solange

    2005-01-01

    In the postoperative period, 47% to 75% of the patients report some degree of pain. This study aimed to evaluate pain in the pre and postoperative period of patients submitted to craniotomy. This prospective research was carried out at the neurosurgery unit of a large Brazilian hospital. For a quantitative evaluation of pain, the verbal numeric 0-10 rating scale was used. Forty patients with a mean age of 36 years were evaluated. In the preoperative period, 34 (85%) patients indicated headache as the main cause of pain. In the postoperative period, 37 (93%) patients complained of pain while three (7%) reported absence of pain. Pain peaks were observed on the 2nd postoperative day, when 12 (32%) of the patients reported severe pain and 10 (27%) moderate pain. Absence of severe pain occurred after the 8th postoperative day. It was concluded that protocols of analgesia in craniotomy are needed, such as training nurses to better evaluate and handle pain.

  3. Preoperative pregabalin prolongs duration of spinal anesthesia and reduces early postoperative pain

    PubMed Central

    Park, MiHye; Jeon, Younghoon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The administration of oral pregabalin preoperatively has been reported to reduce acute postoperative pain. However, no clinical study to date has yet fully investigated whether or not pregabalin premedication affects sensory and motor blocks using spinal anesthesia and its effect upon early postoperative pain management. This prospective, randomized, and double-blind clinical study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of a single dose of pregabalin in terms of spinal blockade duration and its potential opioid-sparing effect during the first 24 hours subsequent to urogenital surgery. Methods: Forty-four patients scheduled for urogenital surgery under spinal anesthesia were randomly allocated to 2 groups: group C (no premedication; orally administered placebo 2 hours before surgery) and group P (orally administered 150 mg pregabalin 2 hours before surgery). Results: The duration of sensory and motor blockade was significantly prolonged in group P patients when compared with that in group C patients, and the pain scores at postoperative 6 and 24 hours were significantly lower in group P patients. Requests for analgesics during the first postoperative 24 hours were lower among group P patients. Conclusion: Premedication with a single dose of 150 mg pregabalin before surgery promoted the efficacy of intrathecal bupivacaine and improved postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing urogenital surgery under spinal anesthesia. PMID:27603398

  4. [Chronic postoperative pain].

    PubMed

    Cachemaille, Matthieu; Blanc, Catherine

    2016-06-22

    Chronic postoperative pain remains a frequent pathology whose global impact approximates 20 and 30% and accounts for 20% of the consultations in a pain center. Risk factors consider firstly each patient's feature and comorbidity and also different surgical procedures with their technical approach. Neuropathic pain compared to nociceptive pain is a great component in the postoperative period and needs to be recognized by specific tests (DN4). Pain prevention involves risk factors' detection, appropriate anesthetic support and effective postoperative pain management. Treatment is based on the type of pain and includes a multimodal analgesia with interventional pain therapy.

  5. Preoperative education and use of analgesic before onset of pain routinely for post-thoracotomy pain control can reduce pain effect and total amount of analgesics administered postoperatively.

    PubMed

    Kol, Emine; Alpar, Sule Ecevit; Erdoğan, Abdullah

    2014-03-01

    homogeneous distribution in both patient groups. The rate of pain, which was defined as sharp, stabbing, and exhausting, was higher in the control group than in the study group, and the difference between the two groups was statistically significant (p < .05). As the doses of analgesics used for pain management in both groups were compared, it was determined that analgesic consumption was lower in the study group than in the control group, and the difference was statistically significant (p < .05). As a result, it was determined that preoperative thoracic pain management education and analgesics administered postoperatively, before the onset of pain, reduced the amount of analgesics used in the first postoperative 48 hours.

  6. Intra-articular bupivacaine reduces postoperative pain and meperidine use after total hip arthroplasty: a randomized, double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dave W; Hu, Chih-Chien; Chang, Yu-Han; Lee, Mel S; Chang, Chee-Jen; Hsieh, Pang-Hsin

    2014-12-01

    One hundred patients receiving unilateral total hip arthroplasty (THA) were randomized to receive an intra-articular injection of 300mg bupivacaine or normal saline after completion of surgery. Pain scores of the bupivacaine group were significantly lower than those of the control group the first 12hours postoperatively (all, P<0.001). A significantly lower dose of meperidine was used in the study group than in the control group the first 24hours postoperatively (median, 25 vs. 45mg, P<0.001). Nineteen patients in the study group required meperidine the first day after surgery, as compared to 45 patients in the control group. We conclude that intra-articular injection of bupivacaine after THA reduces pain and meperidine use in the first 12hours after surgery.

  7. Deep Neuromuscular Block Improves Surgical Conditions during Bariatric Surgery and Reduces Postoperative Pain: A Randomized Double Blind Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Torensma, Bart; Martini, Chris H.; Boon, Martijn; Olofsen, Erik; in ‘t Veld, Bas; Liem, Ronald S. L.; Knook, Mireille T. T.; Swank, Dingeman J.; Dahan, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Background It remains unknown whether the administration of a deep neuromuscular block (NMB) during bariatric surgery improves surgical conditions and patient outcome. The authors studied the effect of deep versus moderate NMB in laparoscopic bariatric surgery on surgical conditions and postoperative pain. Methods and Results One hundred patients scheduled to undergo elective bariatric surgery were randomized to a deep NMB (post-tetanic-count 2–3) or a moderate NMB (train-of-four 1–2). The quality of the surgical field was scored using the Leiden-Surgical Rating Scale (L-SRS), a 5-point scale ranging from 1 (extremely poor conditions) to 5 (optimal conditions). Three surgeons scored the L-SRS at 10-min intervals during surgery; postoperative pain scores were obtained in the postanesthesia-care-unit (PACU) and on the ward. Mean (95% confidence interval) L-SRS scores in moderate NMB 4.2 (4.0–4.4) versus 4.8 (4.7–4.9) in deep NMB (p < 0.001). Moderate NMB resulted in 17% of scores at L-SRS scores of 1–3, while deep NMB resulted in 100% scores at the high end of the L-SRS (4–5). Deep NMB led to improved pain scores in the PACU (4.6 (4.2–4.9) versus 3.9 (3.6–4.4), p = 0.03) and reduced shoulder pain on the ward (1.8 (1.5–2.1) versus 1.3 (1.1–1.5), p = 0.03). A composite score of pain and opioid use in the PACU favoured deep NMB (p = 0.001). Conclusions In bariatric surgery, deep relaxation has advantages for surgeon and patient. Compared to moderate NMB, deep NMB produced stable and improved surgical conditions with less postoperative pain. PMID:27936214

  8. Role of intercostal nerve block in reducing postoperative pain following video-assisted thoracoscopy: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Zulfiqar; Samad, Khalid; Ullah, Hameed

    2017-01-01

    Background: The main advantages of video assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) include less post-operative pain, rapid recovery, less postoperative complications, shorter hospital stay and early discharge. Although pain intensity is less as compared to conventional thoracotomy but still patients experience upto moderate pain postoperatively. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy and morphine sparing effect of intercostal nerve block in alleviating immediate post-operative pain in patients undergoing VATS. Materials and Methods: Sixty ASA I-III patients, aged between 16 to 60 years, undergoing mediastinal lymph node biopsy through VATS under general anaesthesia were randomly divided into two groups. The intercostal nerve block (ICNB group) received the block along with patient control intravenous analgesia (PCIA) with morphine, while control group received only PCIA with morphine for post-operative analgesia. Patients were followed for twenty four hours post operatively for intervention of post-operative pain in the recovery room and ward. Results: The pain was assessed using visual analogue scale (VAS) at 1, 6, 12 and 24 hours. There was a significant decrease in pain score and morphine consumption in ICNB group as compared to control group in first 6 hours postoperatively. There was no significant difference in pain scores and morphine consumption between the two groups after 6 hours. Conclusion: Patients receiving intercostal nerve block have better pain control and less morphine consumption as compared to those patients who did not receive intercostal nerve block in early (6 hours) post-operative period. PMID:28217054

  9. Postoperative pain assessment after septorhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Wittekindt, D; Wittekindt, C; Schneider, G; Meissner, W; Guntinas-Lichius, O

    2012-06-01

    Postoperative pain after septorhinoplasty and its optimal management has not been described in detail. Fifty-two adult septorhinoplasty patients were included in a prospective cohort single center study. Patients' and surgical characteristics were evaluated. Outcome and process parameters were analyzed using the questionnaires of the German-wide project Quality Improvement in Postoperative Pain Management (QUIPS) on the first postoperative day. Pain during the first operative day after septorhinoplasty was moderate. Pain management predominately consisted of remifentanil intraoperatively, metamizole in the recovery room, in combination with piritramide in one-third of the patients, and metamizole on ward. Patients younger than 31 years were less satisfied with pain management (P = 0.018). Open rhinoplasty was associated with less satisfaction with pain management (P = 0.007). Use of rib grafts led to more mobility, breathing, sleeping and mood disturbances (P = 0.003, 0.047; 0.047; 0.022, respectively). Preoperative pain counseling was followed by higher satisfaction, less breathing and mood disturbances after surgery (P = 0.021; 0.004; 0.046, respectively). Opioids in the recovery room in addition to non-opioids and treatment with non-opioids on ward led to less maximal pain (P = 0.027 and 0.040, respectively). We conclude that QUIPS is an easy tool to evaluate the quality of postoperative pain management following rhinoplasty. Preoperative pain counseling, specific care for patients with rib grafts, consequent use of opioids in the recovery room in addition to non-opioids, and use of non-opioids on ward seem to be effective to improve pain management after septorhinoplasty.

  10. Moderate evidence to recommend submucosal injection of dexamethasone in reducing post-operative oedema and pain after third molar extraction.

    PubMed

    Freda, Nicolas M; Keenan, Analia Veitz

    2016-06-01

    of -1.79 (95% CI -3.28 to -0.30) and showed a statistically significant difference favouring dexamethasone.ConclusionsThe review found moderate quality evidence that submucosal injections of dexamethasone reduced post-operative oedema and pain compared to a placebo following impacted third molar surgery. There was no significant difference, in regards to trismus, between placebo and dexamethasone.

  11. Post-operative pain behavior in rats is reduced after single high-concentration capsaicin application.

    PubMed

    Pospisilova, Eva; Palecek, Jiri

    2006-12-05

    Surgical procedures associated with tissue injury are often followed by increased sensitivity to innocuous and noxious stimuli in the vicinity of the surgical wound. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptor (TRPV1) containing nociceptors in this process, by their functional inactivation using a high-concentration intradermal injection of capsaicin in a rat plantar incision model. Paw withdrawal responses to mechanical stimuli (von Frey filaments 10-367mN) and to radiant heat applied on plantar skin were tested in animals treated with capsaicin or the vehicle 6 days and 24h before or 2h after the incision was made. In the vehicle-treated animals, mechanical and thermal sensitivity increased significantly 1-96h following the incision. Capsaicin applied 24h before the surgery was most effective and significantly diminished the development of post-incisional mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia. Thermal hypoalgesia was present in the incised paw after the capsaicin treatment. Capsaicin application 6 days before the incision induced thermal hypoalgesia before the incision but did not prevent completely the thermal hyperalgesia after the incision, while there was also a reduction of mechanical hypersensitivity. Application of the capsaicin injection after the incision showed its first effect at 2h after the injection and at 24h the effect was comparable with the 6 days pretreatment. Our results show an important role of TRPV1-containing nociceptors in the development of post-surgical hypersensitivity and suggest that local, high-concentration capsaicin treatment could be used to reduce it.

  12. Pathogenesis of postoperative oral surgical pain.

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Cliff K. S.; Seymour, R. A.

    2003-01-01

    Pain is a major postoperative symptom in many oral surgical procedures. It is a complex and variable phenomenon that can be influenced by many factors. Good management of oral surgical pain requires a detailed understanding of the pathogenesis of surgical pain. This article aims at reviewing postoperative pain from a broad perspective by looking into the nociception, neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and neuropharmacology of pain. Therapeutic recommendations are made after reviewing the evidence from the literature for maximizing the efficacy of pain management techniques for oral surgical pain. PMID:12722900

  13. Combination of general anesthesia and peripheral nerve block with low-dose ropivacaine reduces postoperative pain for several days after outpatient arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Büttner, Benedikt; Mansur, Ashham; Hinz, José; Erlenwein, Joachim; Bauer, Martin; Bergmann, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Effective methods for postoperative pain relief are an important concern in outpatient surgery. For arthroscopies we combine a single-shot peripheral nerve block using low-volume, low-concentration ropivacaine with general anesthesia. We hypothesized that the patients would have less postoperative pain and be more rapidly home ready than after general anesthesia alone. Methods: Patients (American Society of Anesthesiologists I–III, 18–80 years old) scheduled for outpatient arthroscopy on the upper or lower extremity were randomized to have either a combination of peripheral nerve block and general anesthesia (NB + GA, study group) or general anesthesia alone (GA, control group). The relevant nerve was localized by ultrasound and 10 mL ropivacaine 0.2% was injected. General anesthesia was with propofol and remifentanil. Numeric rating scales were used to assess pain and patient satisfaction in the recovery room, on the evening of surgery, and on the following 2 days. Results: A total of 120 patients participated in the study (NB + GA: 61; GA: 59). The percentage of patients reporting relevant pain in the recovery room were 0% versus 44% (P < 0.001), on the evening after surgery 3% versus 80% (P < 0.001), and on days 1 and 2 postsurgery 12% versus 73% and 12% versus 64% (NB + GA vs GA, respectively). Median time to home discharge was NB + GA 34.5 min (range 15–90) versus GA 55 min (20–115) (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The combination of a peripheral nerve block with low-dose ropivacaine and general anesthesia reduced postoperative pain compared with general anesthesia alone for several days after outpatient arthroscopy. It also shortened the time to home discharge. PMID:28178149

  14. Chlorhexidine gel and less difficult surgeries might reduce post-operative pain, controlling for dry socket, infection and analgesic consumption: a split-mouth controlled randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Haraji, A; Rakhshan, V

    2015-03-01

    Reports on post-surgical pain are a few, controversial and flawed (by statistics and analgesic consumption). Besides, it is not known if chlorhexidine can reduce post-extraction pain adjusting for its effect on prevention of infection and dry socket (DS). We assessed these. A total of 90 impacted mandibular third molars of 45 patients were extracted. Intra-alveolar 0·2% chlorhexidine gel was applied in a split-mouth randomised design to one-half of the sockets. None of the included patients took antibiotics or analgesics afterwards. In the first and third post-operative days, DS formation and pain levels were recorded. Predictive roles of the risk factors were analysed using fixed-effects (classic) and multilevel (mixed-model) multiple linear regressions (α = 0·05, β≤0·1). In the first day, pain levels were 5·56 ± 1·53 and 4·78 ± 1·43 (out of 10), respectively. These reduced to 3·22 ± 1·41 and 2·16 ± 1·40. Pain was more intense on the control sides [both P values = 0·000 (paired t-test)]. Chlorhexidine had a significant pain-alleviating effect (P = 0·0001), excluding its effect on DS and infection. More difficult surgeries (P = 0·0201) and dry sockets were more painful (P = 0·0000). Age had a marginally significant negative role (P = 0·0994). Gender and smoking had no significant impact [P ≥ 0·7 (regression)]. The pattern of pain reduction differed between dry sockets and healthy sockets [P = 0·0102 (anova)]. Chlorhexidine can reduce pain, regardless of its infection-/DS-preventive effects. Simpler surgeries and sockets not affected by alveolar osteitis are less painful. Smoking and gender less likely affect pain. The role of age was not conclusive and needs future studies.

  15. Foot and hand massage as an intervention for postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsiao-Lan; Keck, Juanita F

    2004-06-01

    Physiological responses to pain create harmful effects that prolong the body's recovery after surgery. Patients routinely report mild to moderate pain even though pain medications have been administered. Complementary strategies based on sound research findings are needed to supplement postoperative pain relief using pharmacologic management. Foot and hand massage has the potential to assist in pain relief. Massaging the feet and hands stimulates the mechanoreceptors that activate the "nonpainful" nerve fibers, preventing pain transmission from reaching consciousness. The purpose of this pretest-posttest design study was to investigate whether a 20-minute foot and hand massage (5 minutes to each extremity), which was provided 1 to 4 hours after a dose of pain medication, would reduce pain perception and sympathetic responses among postoperative patients. A convenience sample of 18 patients rated pain intensity and pain distress using a 0 to 10 numeric rating scale. They reported decreases in pain intensity from 4.65 to 2.35 (t = 8.154, p <.001) and in pain distress from 4.00 to 1.88 (t = 5.683, p <.001). Statistically significant decreases in sympathetic responses to pain (i.e., heart rate and respiratory rate) were observed although blood pressure remained unchanged. The changes in heart rate and respiratory rate were not clinically significant. The patients experienced moderate pain after they received pain medications. This pain was reduced by the intervention, thus supporting the effectiveness of massage in postoperative pain management. Foot and hand massage appears to be an effective, inexpensive, low-risk, flexible, and easily applied strategy for postoperative pain management.

  16. [Post-operative pain therapy of a chronic pain patient].

    PubMed

    Pawlik, Michael T; Ittner, Karl Peter

    2006-11-01

    Post-operative pain therapy of chronic pain patients poses a challenge. Here we report the perioperative management of a 39-year-old male under chronic therapy with oxycodon, gabapentin and tolperison. Particular the pharmacointeractions regarding premedication and postoperative dose finding of opioids with intravenous PCIA are discussed.

  17. Nursing documentation of postoperative pain management.

    PubMed

    Idvall, Ewa; Ehrenberg, Anna

    2002-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that nursing documentation is often deficient in its recording of pain assessment and treatment. In Sweden, documentation of the care process, including assessment, is a legal obligation. The aim of this study was to describe nursing documentation of postoperative pain management and nurses' perceptions of the records in relation to current regulations and guidelines. The sample included nursing records of postoperative care on the second postoperative day from 172 patients and 63 Registered Nurses from surgical wards in a central county hospital in Sweden. The records were reviewed for content and comprehensiveness based on regulations and guidelines for postoperative pain management. Three different auditing instruments were used. The nurses were asked if the documentation concurred with current regulations and guidelines. The result showed that pain assessment was based mainly on patients' self-report, but less than 10% of the records contained notes on systematic assessment with a pain assessment instrument. Pain location was documented in 50% of the records and pain character in 12%. About 73% of the nurses reported that the documentation concurred with current regulations and guidelines. The findings indicate that significant flaws existed in nurses' recording of postoperative pain management, of which the nurses were not aware.

  18. The Postoperative Pain Assessment Skills pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    McGillion, Michael; Dubrowski, Adam; Stremler, Robyn; Watt-Watson, Judy; Campbell, Fiona; McCartney, Colin; Victor, J Charles; Wiseman, Jeffrey; Snell, Linda; Costello, Judy; Robb, Anja; Nelson, Sioban; Stinson, Jennifer; Hunter, Judith; Dao, Thuan; Promislow, Sara; McNaughton, Nancy; White, Scott; Shobbrook, Cindy; Jeffs, Lianne; Mauch, Kianda; Leegaard, Marit; Beattie, W Scott; Schreiber, Martin; Silver, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Pain-related misbeliefs among health care professionals (HCPs) are common and contribute to ineffective postoperative pain assessment. While standardized patients (SPs) have been effectively used to improve HCPs’ assessment skills, not all centres have SP programs. The present equivalence randomized controlled pilot trial examined the efficacy of an alternative simulation method – deteriorating patient-based simulation (DPS) – versus SPs for improving HCPs’ pain knowledge and assessment skills. METHODS: Seventy-two HCPs were randomly assigned to a 3 h SP or DPS simulation intervention. Measures were recorded at baseline, immediate postintervention and two months postintervention. The primary outcome was HCPs’ pain assessment performance as measured by the postoperative Pain Assessment Skills Tool (PAST). Secondary outcomes included HCPs knowledge of pain-related misbeliefs, and perceived satisfaction and quality of the simulation. These outcomes were measured by the Pain Beliefs Scale (PBS), the Satisfaction with Simulated Learning Scale (SSLS) and the Simulation Design Scale (SDS), respectively. Student’s t tests were used to test for overall group differences in postintervention PAST, SSLS and SDS scores. One-way analysis of covariance tested for overall group differences in PBS scores. RESULTS: DPS and SP groups did not differ on post-test PAST, SSLS or SDS scores. Knowledge of pain-related misbeliefs was also similar between groups. CONCLUSIONS: These pilot data suggest that DPS is an effective simulation alternative for HCPs’ education on postoperative pain assessment, with improvements in performance and knowledge comparable with SP-based simulation. An equivalence trial to examine the effectiveness of deteriorating patient-based simulation versus standardized patients is warranted. PMID:22184553

  19. Topical lidocaine patch 5% for acute postoperative pain control.

    PubMed

    Gilhooly, D; McGarvey, B; O'Mahony, H; O'Connor, T C

    2011-02-08

    A 39-year-old para 3 woman presented for elective caesarean section (lower segment caesarean section (LSCS)) for breech presentation. The patient had a strong history of atopy and anaphylaxis to paracetamol, codeine, penicillin and latex. The patient was asthmatic, triggered by aspirin. Epidural anaesthesia was unsuccessful and LSCS was carried out under spinal anaesthesia. Postoperatively the patient was unwilling to take analgesic medication due to fear of an allergic reaction. Three 5% lidocaine patches were applied to the wound for postoperative analgesia. This reduced the patient's visual analogue scale pain score from 10/10 to 5/10 at rest and 10/10 to 7/10 with movement. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation was added and this improved associated back pain, reducing the pain further to 2/10. This is the first description of lignocaine patch 5% for postoperative LSCS pain. It is suggested that this method of delivery of local anaesthetic, which is easy to apply and has minimal side effects, should be considered not as a sole agent but as part of a multimodal technique to address postoperative LSCS pain.

  20. Single dose dipyrone for acute postoperative pain

    PubMed Central

    Derry, Sheena; Faura, Clara; Edwards, Jayne; McQuay, Henry J; Moore, R Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Dipyrone (metamizole) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug used in some countries to treat pain (postoperative, colic, cancer, and migraine); it is banned in others because of an association with life-threatening blood agranulocytosis. This review updates a 2001 Cochrane review, and no relevant new studies were identified, but additional outcomes were sought. Objectives To assess the efficacy and adverse events of single dose dipyrone in acute postoperative pain. Search methods The earlier review searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS and the Oxford Pain Relief Database to December 1999. For the update we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE,EMBASE and LILACS to February 2010. Selection criteria Single dose, randomised, double-blind, placebo or active controlled trials of dipyrone for relief of established moderate to severe postoperative pain in adults. We included oral, rectal, intramuscular or intravenous administration of study drugs. Data collection and analysis Studies were assessed for methodological quality and data extracted by two review authors independently. Summed total pain relief over six hours (TOTPAR) was used to calculate the number of participants achieving at least 50% pain relief. Derived results were used to calculate, with 95% confidence intervals, relative benefit compared to placebo, and the number needed to treat (NNT) for one participant to experience at least 50% pain relief over six hours. Use and time to use of rescue medication were additional measures of efficacy. Information on adverse events and withdrawals was collected. Main results Fifteen studies tested mainly 500 mg oral dipyrone (173 participants), 2.5 g intravenous dipyrone (101), 2.5 g intramuscular dipyrone (99); fewer than 60 participants received any other dose. All studies used active controls (ibuprofen, paracetamol, aspirin, flurbiprofen, ketoprofen, dexketoprofen, ketorolac, pethidine, tramadol, suprofen); eight used placebo controls. Over 70% of participants

  1. Postoperative pelvic pain: An imaging approach.

    PubMed

    Farah, H; Laurent, N; Phalippou, J; Bazot, M; Giraudet, G; Serb, T; Poncelet, E

    2015-10-01

    Postoperative pelvic pain after gynecological surgery is a readily detected but unspecific sign of complication. Imaging as a complement to physical examination helps establish the etiological diagnosis. In the context of emergency surgery, vascular, urinary and digestive injuries constitute the most frequent intraoperative complications. During the follow-up of patients who had undergone pelvic surgery, imaging should be performed to detect recurrent disease, postoperative fibrosis, adhesions and more specific complications related to prosthetic material. Current guidelines recommend using pelvic ultrasonography as the first line imaging modality whereas the use of pelvic computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging should be restricted to specific situations, depending on local availability of equipment and suspected disease.

  2. The Effect of Diclofenac Mouthwash on Periodontal Postoperative Pain

    PubMed Central

    Yaghini, Jaber; Abed, Ahmad Moghareh; Mostafavi, Seyed Abolfazl; Roshanzamir, Najmeh

    2011-01-01

    Background: The need to relieve pain and inflammation after periodontal surgery and the side effects of systemic drugs and advantages of topical drugs, made us to evaluate the effect of Diclofenac mouthwash on periodontal postoperative pain. Methods: In this double-blind, randomized clinical trial study 20 quadrants of 10 patients(n = 20) aged between 22-54 who also acted as their own controls, were treated using Modified Widman Flap procedure in two quadrants of the same jaw with one month interval between the operations. After the operation in addition to ibuprofen 400 mg, one quadrant randomly received Diclofenac mouthwash (0/01%) for 30 seconds, 4 times a day (for a week) and for the contrary quadrant, ibuprofen and placebo mouthwash was given to be used in the same manner. The patients scored the number of ibuprofen consumption and their pain intensity based on VAS index in a questionnaire in days 1, 2, 3 and the first week after operation. The findings were analysed using two-way ANOVA, t-test and Wilcoxon. P-value less than 0.05 considered to be significant. Results: There was a significant difference between the mean values of pain intensity of two quadrants in four periods (P = 0.031). But, there was no significant difference between the average ibuprofen consumption in two groups (P = 0.51). Postoperative satisfaction was not significantly different in two quadrants (P = 0.059). 60% of patients preferred Diclofenac mouthwash. Conclusion: Diclofenac mouthwash was effective in reducing postoperative periodontal pain but it seems that it isn’t enough to control postoperative pain on its own. PMID:22013478

  3. The effects of Western music on postoperative pain in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Good, M; Chin, C C

    1998-02-01

    Music is a method nurses can use to help relieve pain, however little is known about its effectiveness across cultures. In this study, Western music was tested for its effectiveness in reducing postoperative pain in 38 Taiwanese patients, and its acceptability was explored. A pretest and post-test experimental design was used with visual analogue scales to measure sensation and distress of pain. Before surgery, subjects were randomly assigned to receive tape recorded music or the usual care. Those who were assigned to the music group chose among 5 types of sedative music. On postoperative Day 1 and Day 2, the effectiveness of the tape-recorded music was investigated during 15 minutes of rest in bed. Patients were interviewed on Day 3 to determine their liking for the music, its calming effects, and the helpfulness of the music. Repeated measures analysis of variance showed a significant interaction between time and group in the distress of pain on Day 1, but not on Day 2, and in pain sensation on Day 2, but not Day 1. Subjects from Taiwan were similar to subjects in a previous study in the United States in their liking for the music, and in reports of the helpfulness of the music for pain sensation and distress, but fewer Taiwanese found the music calming, and they had different choices: more chose harp music and fewer chose jazz than subjects in the U.S. study, and some would prefer Buddhist hymns or popular songs heard in Taiwan. Findings support the use of culturally acceptable music in addition to analgesic medication for the sensation and distress of postoperative pain.

  4. Efficacy and safety of post-cesarean section incisional infiltration with lidocaine and epinephrine versus lidocaine alone in reducing postoperative pain: A randomized controlled double-blinded clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Tharwat, Ahmed A.; Yehia, Amr H.; Wahba, Karim A.; Ali, Abd-Elrhman G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Aim was to assess the efficacy and safety of incisional infiltration of lidocaine and epinephrine vs. lidocaine only to reduce postcesarean section (C/S) pain. Material and Methods It was a prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blinded clinical trial that was conducted in two tertiary hospitals in Egypt and included 153 women undergoing C/S under general anesthesia. They were randomly divided into the following two groups: Group I (control group, number=78), in which the wound was infiltrated before skin closure with 20 mL of 2% lidocaine, and Group II (study group, number=75), in which the wound was infiltrated before skin closure with 20 mL of 2% lidocaine and epinephrine. The primary outcomes were the time to first analgesic (TFA) request (minutes) and the postoperative pain scores that were measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS). The secondary outcomes included the duration of C/S, onset of mobilization, onset of breastfeeding, duration of hospital stay, local or systemic side effects of lidocaine and epinephrine, postoperative pyrexia, and postoperative wound infection. Results The pain score determined using VAS after 1 and 2 h was significantly decreased in Group II than in Group I. However, at 4.8 and 16 h, these results were significantly reversed in Group II than in Group I. The cumulative postoperative opioid consumption was significantly less in Group II than in Group I (50 vs. 90 mg). The onset of mobilization, onset of breastfeeding, and duration of hospital stay was significantly shorter in Group II than in Group I, whereas the TFA request was significantly longer in Group II. Conclusion Administering epinephrine with 2% lidocaine prolongs the anesthetic effect and reduces the opioid analgesic dose postoperatively required, thereby enhancing patient recovery. PMID:27026771

  5. (S)-lacosamide inhibition of CRMP2 phosphorylation reduces postoperative and neuropathic pain behaviors through distinct classes of sensory neurons identified by constellation pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Moutal, Aubin; Chew, Lindsey A; Yang, Xiaofang; Wang, Yue; Yeon, Seul Ki; Telemi, Edwin; Meroueh, Seeneen; Park, Ki Duk; Shrinivasan, Raghuraman; Gilbraith, Kerry B; Qu, Chaoling; Xie, Jennifer Y; Patwardhan, Amol; Vanderah, Todd W; Khanna, May; Porreca, Frank; Khanna, Rajesh

    2016-07-01

    Chronic pain affects the life of millions of people. Current treatments have deleterious side effects. We have advanced a strategy for targeting protein interactions which regulate the N-type voltage-gated calcium (CaV2.2) channel as an alternative to direct channel block. Peptides uncoupling CaV2.2 interactions with the axonal collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2) were antinociceptive without effects on memory, depression, and reward/addiction. A search for small molecules that could recapitulate uncoupling of the CaV2.2-CRMP2 interaction identified (S)-lacosamide [(S)-LCM], the inactive enantiomer of the Food and Drug Administration-approved antiepileptic drug (R)-lacosamide [(R)-LCM, Vimpat]. We show that (S)-LCM, but not (R)-LCM, inhibits CRMP2 phosphorylation by cyclin dependent kinase 5, a step necessary for driving CaV2.2 activity, in sensory neurons. (S)-lacosamide inhibited depolarization-induced Ca influx with a low micromolar IC50. Voltage-clamp electrophysiology experiments demonstrated a commensurate reduction in Ca currents in sensory neurons after an acute application of (S)-LCM. Using constellation pharmacology, a recently described high content phenotypic screening platform for functional fingerprinting of neurons that uses subtype-selective pharmacological agents to elucidate cell-specific combinations (constellations) of key signaling proteins that define specific cell types, we investigated if (S)-LCM preferentially acts on certain types of neurons. (S)-lacosamide decreased the dorsal root ganglion neurons responding to mustard oil, and increased the number of cells responding to menthol. Finally, (S)-LCM reversed thermal hypersensitivity and mechanical allodynia in a model of postoperative pain, and 2 models of neuropathic pain. Thus, using (S)-LCM to inhibit CRMP2 phosphorylation is a novel and efficient strategy to treat pain, which works by targeting specific sensory neuron populations.

  6. Effect of Music Therapy on Postoperative Pain Management in Gynecological Patients: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Sin, Wai Man; Chow, Ka Ming

    2015-12-01

    Unrelieved postoperative pain may have a negative impact on the physiological and psychological well-being of patients. Pharmacological methods are currently used to relieve such pain in gynecological patients; however, inadequate pain control is still reported, and the use of nonpharmacological pain-relieving methods is increasingly being advocated, one of which is music therapy. The purpose of this literature review was to identify, summarize, and critically appraise current evidence on music therapy and postoperative pain management among gynecological patients. A systematic search of MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, British Nursing Index, and Allied and Complementary Medicine was conducted using the search terms music, gynecological, pain, surgery, operative, and post-operative to identify relevant articles in English from 1995 to the present. All identified articles were assessed independently for inclusion into review. A total of 7 articles were included after removal of duplicates and exclusion of irrelevant studies. All the included studies assessed the effects of music therapy on postoperative pain intensity, and three of them measured pain-related physiological symptoms. The findings indicated that music therapy, in general, was effective in reducing pain intensity, fatigue, anxiety, and analgesic consumption in gynecological patients during the postoperative period. It is recommended as an adjunct to pharmacological pain-relieving methods in reducing postoperative pain. Future researches on music therapy to identify the most effective application and evaluate its effect by qualitative study are recommended.

  7. Perspectives of Swedish patients on postoperative pain management.

    PubMed

    Idvall, Ewa; Bergqvist, Anna; Silverhjelm, Jenny; Unosson, Mitra

    2008-06-01

    This study aimed to describe the perspectives of surgical patients towards postoperative pain management during their hospital stay. Thirty strategically chosen postoperative inpatients from different surgical wards in a university hospital in Sweden participated. A qualitative, descriptive approach using individual interviews was chosen. These were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed according to a qualitative content analysis. The patients' descriptions of postoperative pain management indicated that pain was a symptom that was always in focus, either because it was constantly present or because pain could appear abruptly during different activities and movements. Although the focus was on pain and an awareness that it should be relieved or avoided, the solutions were often routine, short-term, and involved the regular intake of drugs, plus additional medication if needed for an acute pain episode. From the patients' descriptions of their experience with postoperative pain management, we distinguished three categories: "patients' pain knowledge", "patients' pain management approaches", and "patients' views of health-care professionals". The findings from this study highlight important aspects of nursing care that should receive greater attention in postoperative pain management. The patients' narratives could be a valuable asset in the quality improvement of postoperative pain management as these narratives highlight episodes difficult to elicit in other ways.

  8. [Postoperative pain management. Aims and organization of a strategy for postoperative acute pain therapy].

    PubMed

    Nolli, M; Nicosia, F

    2000-09-01

    The Health Services, not only the Italian one, is under pressure because of request for improving treatment quality and the financial need for reorganization and cost-saving. It's required a rationalization of intervention, together with a careful choice of the best and cheapest techniques and the demonstration of their efficacy. The anaesthesia service activity, in a period of cost rationalization and funds restriction should be aimed to appropriate outcome measures corrected by both patient's risk factors and surgical-anaesthesiological case-mix. The development of a complete strategy for surgical pain management might run into two phases. The first phase, internal and mono-specialistic, should develop like the creation of an Acute Pain Team. The main processes are: focusing the problem (charge of the care), training, information, teaching methodology (timing, methods, drugs, techniques, etc.) and the audit (before and after changes). The main aims are the evaluation of the level of analgesia and pain relief or patient's satisfaction which are partial endpoints useful to demonstrate the improvement and the efficacy of the new pain management strategies. The second phase, multidisciplinary, is directed toward the creation of a Postoperative Evaluation Team. The main objective is to set up a collaborative clinical group able to identify the criteria for quality, efficacy and safety. The major purpose is the evaluation of major outcome measures: surgical outcome, morbidity, mortality and length of hospitalization. The improvement in the quality of postoperative pain treatment goes through a better organization and a progressive increase of the already available therapy. The achievement of the result and the quality projects depend on the interaction among staff members with different behaviours and settings. Internal teaching and training, continuous education for doctors and nurses, and external information, marketing and improvement of attractive capability of

  9. A prospective study on postoperative pain after cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Porela-Tiihonen, Susanna; Kaarniranta, Kai; Kokki, Merja; Purhonen, Sinikka; Kokki, Hannu

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate postoperative pain and early recovery in cataract patients. Patients and methods A total of 201 patients who underwent elective first eye cataract extraction surgery were enrolled, and 196 were included in the final analysis. The study design was a single-center, prospective, follow-up study in a tertiary hospital in eastern Finland. Postoperative pain was evaluated with the Brief Pain Inventory at four time points: at baseline, and at 24 hours, 1 week, and 6 weeks postsurgery. Results Postoperative pain was relatively common during the first hours after surgery, as it was reported by 67 (34%) patients. After hospital discharge, the prevalence decreased; at 24 hours, 1 week, and 6 weeks, 18 (10%), 15 (9%) and 12 (7%) patients reported having ocular pain, respectively. Most patients with eye pain reported significant pain, with a score of ≥4 on a pain scale of 0–10, but few had taken analgesics for eye pain. Those who had used analgesics rated the analgesic efficacy of paracetamol and ibuprofen as good or excellent. Other ocular irritation symptoms were common after surgery; as a new postoperative symptom, foreign-body sensation was reported by 40 patients (22%), light sensitivity by 29 (16%), burning by 15 (8%), and itching by 15 (8%). Conclusion Moderate or severe postoperative pain was relatively common after cataract surgery. Thus, all patients undergoing cataract surgery should be provided appropriate counseling on pain and pain management after surgery. PMID:23885165

  10. Postoperative Pain in Children After Dentistry Under General Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Michelle; Copp, Peter E.; Haas, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence, severity, and duration of postoperative pain in children undergoing general anesthesia for dentistry. This prospective cross-sectional study included 33 American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) Class I and II children 4–6 years old requiring multiple dental procedures, including at least 1 extraction, and/or pulpectomy, and/or pulpotomy of the primary dentition. Exclusion criteria were children who were developmentally delayed, cognitively impaired, born prematurely, taking psychotropic medications, or recorded baseline pain or analgesic use. The primary outcome of pain was measured by parents using the validated Faces Pain Scale-Revised (FPS-R) and Parents' Postoperative Pain Measure (PPPM) during the first 72 hours at home. The results showed that moderate-to-severe postoperative pain, defined as FPS-R ≥ 6, was reported in 48.5% of children. The prevalence of moderate-to-severe pain was 29.0% by FPS-R and 40.0% by PPPM at 2 hours after discharge. Pain subsided over 3 days. Postoperative pain scores increased significantly from baseline (P < .001, Wilcoxon matched pairs signed rank test). Moderately good correlation between the 2 pain measures existed 2 and 12 hours from discharge (Spearman rhos correlation coefficients of 0.604 and 0.603, P < .005). In conclusion, children do experience moderate-to-severe pain postoperatively. Although parents successfully used pain scales, they infrequently administered analgesics. PMID:26650492

  11. Nurses' strategies for managing pain in the postoperative setting.

    PubMed

    Manias, Elizabeth; Bucknall, Tracey; Botti, Mari

    2005-03-01

    Acute pain is a significant problem in the postoperative setting. Patients report a lack of information about pain-control measures and ineffective pain control. Nurses continue to rely on pharmacologic measures and tend to under-administer analgesics. The purpose of this study was to determine the strategies nurses used to manage patients' pain in the postoperative setting. It also sought to examine the effect of context, including organization of care, nurses' prioritization of work activities, and pressures during a working shift, on their pain-management strategies. An observational design was used in two surgical units of a metropolitan teaching hospital in Melbourne, Australia. Six fixed observation times were identified as key periods for pain activities, each comprising a 2-hour duration. An observation period was examined at least 12 times, resulting in the completion of 74 observations and the identification of 316 pain cases. Fifty-two nurses were observed during their normal day's work with postoperative patients. Six themes were identified: managing pain effectively; prioritizing pain experiences for pain management; missing pain cues for pain management; regulators and enforcers of pain management; preventing pain; and reactive management of pain. The findings highlighted the critical nature of communication between clinicians and patients and among clinicians. It also demonstrated the influence of time on management strategies and the relative importance that nurses place on nonpharmacologic measures in actual practice. This research, which portrays what happens in actual clinical practice, has facilitated the identification of new data that were not evident from other research studies.

  12. The effect of music on postoperative pain and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Allred, Kelly D; Byers, Jacqueline F; Sole, Mary Lou

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if listening to music or having a quiet rest period just before and just after the first ambulation on postoperative day 1 can reduce pain and/or anxiety or affect mean arterial pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, and/or oxygen saturation in patients who underwent a total knee arthroplasty. Fifty-six patients having a total knee arthroplasty were randomly assigned to either a music intervention group or a quiet rest group. A visual analog scale was used to measure pain and anxiety. Physiologic measures, including blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen saturation, and respiratory rate, were also obtained. Statistical findings between groups indicated that the music group's decrease in pain and anxiety was not significantly different from the comparison rest group's decrease in pain (F = 1.120; p = .337) or anxiety (F = 1.566; p = .206) at any measurement point. However, statistical findings within groups indicated that the sample had a statistically significant decrease in pain (F = 6.699; p = .001) and anxiety (F = 4.08; p = .013) over time. Results of this research provide evidence to support the use of music and/or a quiet rest period to decrease pain and anxiety. The interventions pose no risks and have the benefits of improved pain reports and decreased anxiety. It potentially could be opioid sparing in some individuals, limiting the negative effects from opioids. Nurses can offer music as an intervention to decrease pain and anxiety in this patient population with confidence, knowing there is evidence to support its efficacy.

  13. Evaluation of aromatherapy in treating postoperative pain: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung T; Wajda, Michael; Cuff, Germaine; Serota, David; Schlame, Michael; Axelrod, Deborah M; Guth, Amber A; Bekker, Alex Y

    2006-12-01

    This study compared the analgesic efficacy of postoperative lavender oil aromatherapy in 50 patients undergoing breast biopsy surgery. Twenty-five patients received supplemental oxygen through a face mask with two drops of 2% lavender oil postoperatively. The remainder of the patients received supplemental oxygen through a face mask with no lavender oil. Outcome variables included pain scores (a numeric rating scale from 0 to 10) at 5, 30, and 60 minutes postoperatively, narcotic requirements in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU), patient satisfaction with pain control, as well as time to discharge from the PACU. There were no significant differences in narcotic requirements and recovery room discharge times between the two groups. Postoperative lavender oil aromatherapy did not significantly affect pain scores. However, patients in the lavender group reported a higher satisfaction rate with pain control than patients in the control group (P = 0.0001).

  14. Aqueous acupuncture for postoperative pain--a matched controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Chen, S C; Lu, S N; Lai, C T; Jean, J Y; Hsiao, C L; Hsu, P T

    1991-09-01

    The analgesic effects of acupuncture are well-documented. Aqueous acupuncture, or point injection, is a conveniently modified modern acupuncture method. This matched controlled trial was carried out to evaluate the effects of aqueous acupuncture in postoperative pain control. A total of 12 patients were selected as age-, sex- and operative-style-matched controls. In treating group, 2 to 5 ml of 20% glucose solution was injected into Ho-Ku (LI 4) and Yang-Ling-Chuan (GB 34) when patients had regained conciousness from operation anesthesia. The pain intensity were recorded as score system included verbal, sleep disturbance and use of narcotics. In comparisons with the control group, the intensity of postoperative pain, and the amounts and frequency of narcotics used were significantly lower in the study group, especially for the first 12 postoperative hours. Aqueous acupuncture is a convenient and effective procedure in postoperative pain control.

  15. Investigation of Central Pain Processing in Post-Operative Shoulder Pain and Disability

    PubMed Central

    Valencia, Carolina; Fillingim, Roger B.; Bishop, Mark; Wu, Samuel S.; Wright, Thomas W.; Moser, Michael; Farmer, Kevin; George, Steven Z.

    2014-01-01

    Measures of central pain processing like conditioned pain modulation (CPM), and suprathreshold heat pain response (SHPR) have been described to assess different components of central pain modulatory mechanisms. Central pain processing potentially play a role in the development of postsurgical pain, however, the role of CPM and SHPR in explaining postoperative clinical pain and disability is still unclear. Seventy eight patients with clinical shoulder pain were included in this study. Patients were examined before shoulder surgery, at 3 months, and 6 months after surgery. The primary outcome measures were pain intensity and upper extremity disability. Analyses revealed that the change score (baseline – 3 months) of 5th pain rating of SHPR accounted for a significant amount of variance in 6 month postsurgical clinical pain intensity and disability after age, sex, preoperative pain intensity, and relevant psychological factors were considered. The present study suggests that baseline measures of central pain processing were not predictive of 6 month postoperative pain outcome. Instead, the 3 month change in SHPR might be a relevant factor in the transition to elevated 6-month postoperative pain and disability outcomes. In patients with shoulder pain, the 3 month change in a measure of central pain processing might be a relevant factor in the transition to elevated 6-month postoperative pain and disability scores. PMID:24042347

  16. [Postoperative pain therapy in urology. A prospective study].

    PubMed

    Gronau, E; Pannek, J; Benninghoff, A; Seibold, W; Senge, T

    2002-05-01

    A sufficient analgesic treatment in the early postoperative period is important for the patients comfort level. Moreover, physical therapy for prophylaxis of pneumonia and thrombosis is better tolerated. In a prospective study, we compared two postoperative pain management regimens to establish a sufficient pain management without the need of additional costs or manpower. Of 215 patients undergoing major urologic surgery, 111 patients received on demand medication exclusively (group 1), whereas 104 patients were treated with basic analgesics combined with on demand medication (group 2). Pain intensity, side effects and subjective well being were evaluated with a visual analogue scale and a standardised interview. Pain intensity and side effects were significantly lower in group 2. Thus, with combined analgesic treatment, postoperative pain relieve can be achieved safely and without additional costs.

  17. Best evidence in multimodal pain management in spine surgery and means of assessing postoperative pain and functional outcomes.

    PubMed

    Devin, Clinton J; McGirt, Matthew J

    2015-06-01

    Multimodal approaches to pain management have arisen with the goal of improving postoperative pain and reducing opioid analgesic use. We performed a comprehensive literature review to determine grades of recommendation for commonly used agents in multimodal pain management and provide a best practice guideline. To evaluate common drugs used in multimodal treatment of pain, a search was performed on English language publications on Medline (PubMed; National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD, USA). Manuscripts were rated as Level I-V according to the North American Spine Society's (NASS) standardized levels of evidence tables. Grades of recommendation were assigned for each drug based on the NASS Clinical Guidelines for Multidisciplinary Spine Care. There is good (Grade A) evidence gabapentinoids, acetaminophen, neuraxial blockade and extended-release local anesthetics reduce postoperative pain and narcotic requirements. There is fair (Grade B) evidence that preemptive analgesia and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) result in reduced postoperative pain. There is insufficient and/or conflicting (Grade I) evidence that muscle relaxants and ketamine provide a significant reduction in postoperative pain or narcotic usage. There is fair (Grade B) evidence that short-term use of NSAID result in no long-term reduction in bone healing or fusion rates. Comprehensive assessment of the effectiveness of perioperative pain control can be accomplished through the use of validated measures. Multimodal pain management protocols have consistently been demonstrated to allow for improved pain control with less reliance on opioids. There is good quality evidence that supports many of the common agents utilized in multimodal therapy, however, there is a lack of evidence regarding optimal postoperative protocols or pathways.

  18. Determining the effect of intraperitoneal pethidine on postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Jahromi, S Abbas Hosseini; Valami, S Massumeh Hosseini; Yaghoubi, Siamak

    2011-02-01

    The main problem in the postoperative period is pain relief. Adequate postoperative analgesia not only leads to patient's comfort but also decreases morbidity, nursing care and time of hospitalization. Determination of the effect of intraperitoneal pethidine on postoperative pain in women scheduled for elective tubal ligation was undertaken. In a double blind clinical trial study of 60 women, ASA I, 25-45 years old, were enrolled for elective tubal ligation in Kosar hospital in Qazvin, IRAN. Patients were randomly divided in two equal groups (30 each).One group received pethidine intraperitoneally and the other group received equal amount of placebo in the same region. The intensity of postoperative pain was evaluated by visual analogue scale (VAS) for about 8 hours. Incidence of nausea was also evaluated. Data was transformed to SPSS software. Then data analysis was performed by U-test. There was no significant statistical difference with regard to age, weight, and time of operation between the two groups. The mean score of pain was significantly lower in intraperitoneal pethidine group than placebo group but the incidence of nausea in the intraperitoneal pethidine group was more than in placebo group (P < 0.05). Thus, intraperitoneal pethidine decreases postoperative pain but increases postoperative nausea.

  19. [Smoking cigarettes and pain--implications for the postoperative period].

    PubMed

    Billert, Hanna; Gaca, Michał; Adamski, Dariusz

    2007-01-01

    Smoking cigarettes poses a number of relevant medical and social problems. Impact of smoking on pain threshold and tolerance may be of significance for surgical patients, who are prompted to abstain from cigarettes before operation. Association between smoking and pain perception is complex. Experimental data bring evidence for analgesic action of nicotine and tobacco smoke acting via nicotinic acetylochline receptors (nAChR). However, clinical studies are unequivocal. Smoking is connected with some pain syndromes. Smokers take much more analgesics than non-smokers and probability of developing opioid dependence is increased in this group of patients. Smokers also present with altered mechanism of stress-induced analgesia and both gender and pain modalities influence their pain perception. Some studies demonstrate increased requirements for postoperative opioid analgesia in smoking patients. Strategies for postoperative pain treatment in smokers should involve regional techniques and clonidine.

  20. Markov Chain evaluation of acute postoperative pain transition states

    PubMed Central

    Tighe, Patrick J.; Bzdega, Matthew; Fillingim, Roger B.; Rashidi, Parisa; Aytug, Haldun

    2016-01-01

    Prior investigations on acute postoperative pain dynamicity have focused on daily pain assessments, and so were unable to examine intra-day variations in acute pain intensity. We analyzed 476,108 postoperative acute pain intensity ratings clinically documented on postoperative days 1 to 7 from 8,346 surgical patients using Markov Chain modeling to describe how patients are likely to transition from one pain state to another in a probabilistic fashion. The Markov Chain was found to be irreducible and positive recurrent, with no absorbing states. Transition probabilities ranged from 0.0031 for the transition from state 10 to state 1, to 0.69 for the transition from state zero to state zero. The greatest density of transitions was noted in the diagonal region of the transition matrix, suggesting that patients were generally most likely to transition to the same pain state as their current state. There were also slightly increased probability densities in transitioning to a state of asleep or zero from the current state. Examination of the number of steps required to traverse from a particular first pain score to a target state suggested that overall, fewer steps were required to reach a state of zero (range 6.1–8.8 steps) or asleep (range 9.1–11) than were required to reach a mild pain intensity state. Our results suggest that Markov Chains are a feasible method for describing probabilistic postoperative pain trajectories, pointing toward the possibility of using Markov decision processes to model sequential interactions between pain intensity ratings and postoperative analgesic interventions. PMID:26588689

  1. A Neurofeedback-Based Intervention to Reduce Post-Operative Pain in Lung Cancer Patients: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Marzorati, Chiara; Casiraghi, Monica; Spaggiari, Lorenzo; Pravettoni, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Background Thoracic surgery appears to be the treatment of choice for many lung cancers. Nevertheless, depending on the type of surgery, the chest area may be painful for several weeks to months after surgery. This painful state has multiple physical and psychological implications, including respiratory failure, inability to clear secretions by coughing, and even anxiety and depression that have negative effects on recovery. Objective The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of a neurofeedback-based intervention on controlling acute post-surgery pain and improving long-term recovery in patients who undergo thoracotomy for lung resection for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) at an academic oncologic hospital. Methods This study will be based on a 2-parallel group randomized controlled trial design, intervention versus usual care, with multiple in-hospital assessments and 2 clinical, radiological, and quality of life follow-ups. Participants will be randomized to either the intervention group receiving a neurofeedback-based relaxation training and usual care, or to a control group receiving only usual care. Pain intensity is the primary outcome and will be assessed using the Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NRS) in the days following the operation. Secondary outcomes will include the effect of the intervention on hospital utilization for pain crisis, daily opioid consumption, anxiety, patient engagement, blood test and chest x-ray results, and long-term clinical, radiological, and quality of life evaluations. Outcome measures will be repeatedly taken during hospitalization, while follow-up assessments will coincide with the follow-up visits. Pain intensity will be assessed by mixed model repeated analysis. Effect sizes will be calculated as mean group differences with standard deviations. Results We expect to have results for this study before the end of 2016. Conclusions The proposed innovative, neurofeedback- and relaxation-based approach to support post

  2. Post-operative pain after knee arthroscopy and related factors.

    PubMed

    Drosos, G I; Stavropoulos, N I; Katsis, A; Kesidis, K; Kazakos, K; Verettas, D-A

    2008-06-13

    The aim of this study was to explore the intensity of post-arthroscopy knee pain during the first 24 hours, and to study the influence of pre-operative pain, tourniquet time and amount of surgical trauma on post-arthroscopy pain. In 78 male patients that underwent elective arthroscopic menisectomy or diagnostic arthroscopy of the knee, preoperative and post-operative pain were registered using the Visual Analogue Scale. Variance for repeated measures and for independent observations was analysed. Supplementary analgesia was required for 23% of the patients, more often in the recovery room and between 2 and 8 hours postoperatively. Of all factors analyzed, only time was statistically significant in determining the level of post-operative pain. Supplementary analgesia was required only in patients that underwent operative arthroscopy, and more often in patients with tourniquet time of more than 40 minutes. In conclusions, post-operative time is the most significant factor related to the post-arthroscopy knee pain.

  3. Acid-sensing ion channels in postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Deval, Emmanuel; Noël, Jacques; Gasull, Xavier; Delaunay, Anne; Alloui, Abdelkrim; Friend, Valérie; Eschalier, Alain; Lazdunski, Michel; Lingueglia, Eric

    2011-04-20

    Iatrogenic pain consecutive to a large number of surgical procedures has become a growing health concern. The etiology and pathophysiology of postoperative pain are still poorly understood, but hydrogen ions appear to be important in this process. We have investigated the role of peripheral acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), which form depolarizing channels activated by extracellular protons, in a rat model of postoperative pain (i.e., hindpaw skin/muscle incision). We report high levels of ASIC-type currents (∼ 77%) in sensory neurons innervating the hindpaw muscles, with a prevalence of ASIC3-like currents. The ASIC3 protein is largely expressed in lumbar DRG neurons innervating the plantar muscle, and its mRNA and protein levels are increased by plantar incision 24 h after surgery. Pharmacological inhibition of ASIC3 channels with the specific toxin APETx2 or in vivo knockdown of ASIC3 subunit by small interfering RNA led to a significant reduction of postoperative spontaneous, thermal, and postural pain behaviors (spontaneous flinching, heat hyperalgesia, and weight bearing). ASIC3 appears to have an important role in deep tissue but also affects prolonged pain evoked by skin incision alone. The specific homomeric ASIC1a blocker PcTx1 has no effect on spontaneous flinching, when applied peripherally. Together, these data demonstrate a significant role for peripheral ASIC3-containing channels in postoperative pain.

  4. Factors Associated with Postoperative Pain in Endodontic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sadaf, Durre; Ahmad, Muhammad Zubair

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess postoperative pain in endodontic therapy and its association with clinical factors such as gender, age, tooth type, pulpal diagnosis, and preoperative pain, length of obturation and sealer extrusion. Study Design: Cross-Sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Dental section of the Aga khan university hospital, Karachi, Pakistan from January to December 2009. Methodology: One hundred and forty patients (140) requiring endodontic therapy for molar and premolar teeth were included in this study. Local Anesthesia (2% Lidocain with 1:80,000 Epinephrine) was administered. The tooth was isolated with rubber dam. Access cavity was prepared with the help of round carbide No. 2 bur. Canal preparation was completed using crown-down technique. Access was sealed with sterile dry cotton pallet and restored temporarily with double layer of Glass ionomer cement and Cavit. After one week patients were recalled and access was re-opened, obturation was done using cold lateral condensation technique. Ca(OH)2 based sealer was used. Postoperative radiographs were taken. Patients were recalled after 24 hours and postobturation pain was recorded using Visual analogue scale (VAS).Data was obtained on a structured Performa. χ2 test was used for statistical analysis. Results: Pain was present in 42.9% of patients. Females more frequently experienced pain (65%) than males (35%). Preoperative pain was found to be significantly associated with postoperative pain (p value < 0.001). Obturation length was not found to be significantly associated with postoperative pain (p value 1.0). Sealer extrusion was not found to be significantly associated with postoperative (P value 0.547). PMID:25598754

  5. Pain Management: Part 1: Managing Acute and Postoperative Dental Pain

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Daniel E.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Safe and effective management of acute dental pain can be accomplished with nonopioid and opioid analgesics. To formulate regimens properly, it is essential to appreciate basic pharmacological principles and appropriate dosage strategies for each of the available analgesic classes. This article will review the basic pharmacology of analgesic drug classes, including their relative efficacy for dental pain, and will suggest appropriate regimens based on pain intensity. Management of chronic pain will be addressed in the second part of this series. PMID:20553137

  6. Effective postoperative pain prevention through administration of bupivacaine and diclofenac.

    PubMed Central

    Hyrkäs, T.; Ylipaavalniemi, P.; Oikarinen, V. J.; Paakkari, I.

    1994-01-01

    The efficacies of bupivacaine and lidocaine together with a preoperatively administered single-dose oral combination of normal- and sustained-release preparations of diclofenac in preventing postoperative pain after third molar removal were compared in a double-blind crossover study. Bilaterally impacted lower third molars were removed in two sessions. Each patient was given one type of local anesthetic on one session and the other in the second. Pain was recorded using a visual analog scale. When the diclofenac combination (150 mg) was given before the operation, postoperative analgesia was better with bupivacaine plus diclofenac than with lidocaine plus diclofenac. Twenty-five out of 40 patients preferred bupivacaine to lidocaine for local anesthesia. It is possible to achieve effective postoperative pain prevention by combining bupivacaine and preoperative normal- and sustained-release preparations of diclofenac. PMID:8629744

  7. Vocal and verbal expression of postoperative pain in preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Amandine; Bringuier, Sophie; Capdevilla, Xavier; Pry, René

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the development and construction of vocal and verbal expression of postoperative pain in young children with limited linguistic abilities. The main objective was to highlight specific pain vocalizations, which may lead to easy and quick detection and assessment of postoperative pain relative to the age of the suffering child. Forty-seven children aged 1 to 6 years were observed during two periods of surgical hospitalization: a preoperative and a postoperative period. The results showed that there was a significant relation between their age and the types of vocalization they expressed during the postoperative period. Regarding the development in relation to certain contexts, a minor modification seems to be concerned not with the type but with the frequency of the items of vocalizations. The study confirms earlier observations and clinical experience that an efficient and reliable assessment of pain in infants and young children necessitates taking several factors into account, such as the developmental age of the children, and especially a consideration of the whole spectrum of pain markers present in the child's behavior and captured by the assessment tools.

  8. Transdermal Buprenorphine Patches for Postoperative Pain Control in Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santosh; Singh, Prithvi Kumar; Verma, Reetu; Chandra, Girish; Bhatia, Vinod Kumar; Singh, Dinesh; Bogra, Jaishri

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Buprenorphine is a semi-synthetic derivative of thebaine; its low concentration is sufficient to provide effective pain relief. Aim To evaluate the efficacy of transdermal buprenorphine patch in postoperative pain management. Materials and Methods After ethical approval and taking informed consent from the patients, they were randomized into three groups (n=30 in each group) using a computer generated random number table. Group A: placebo patch; Group B: buprenorphine (10mg) patch and Group C: buprenorphine (20mg) patch. Haemodynamic and analgesic effects were compared by using analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Turkey’s post hoc test. The proportion of side effects was compared using the Chi-square test. Results Haemodynamic changes were not statistically different in all the three groups A, B and C, whereas at the end of surgery VAS score of Group A subjects was significantly higher (4.93±0.98) as compared to Group B (1.73±0.64) and Group C (1.40±0.50). On 2nd postoperative day, no pain was reported by the Group C patients and on 4th day after surgery, no pain was reported by Group B patients. Conclusion The transdermal buprenorphine patch (20mg) was effective in attenuating postoperative pain, maintaining haemodynamic stability requiring no rescue analgesia, with fewer postoperative rescue analgesic requirements in low dose of buprenorphine patch (10mg) group. PMID:27504383

  9. [Analysis of regional anesthetic efficacy in pediatric postop pain].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Tellería, A; Cano Serrano, M E; Martínez-Tellería, M J; Castejón Casado, J

    1997-01-01

    A randomized, double blind study was carried out in 76 paediatric surgical patients scheduled for herniography or circumcision. Patients were randomly assigned to receive ilioinguinal and iliohipogastric nerve block (group A), penile block (group B), caudal block (group C) or metamizol intravenously (group D). Postoperative pain was evaluated by Objective pain scale at the end of surgical process and at 15, 30, 60 minutes and 6 hours after surgery. Pain free time was also recorded. There was no difference between groups regarding demographic data. We find a significatively less pain scores in the children who received regional anaesthesia. In those groups the administration of any analgesic were not necessary. No side effects were recorded. We conclude that locorregional anaesthesia techniques are safe and effective for minor surgery in children, because they are easy to carry out, comfortable for the patient, and provide a good postoperative analgesia.

  10. Perioperative intravenous lidocaine infusion on postoperative pain relief in patients undergoing upper abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Baral, B K; Bhattarai, B K; Rahman, T R; Singh, S N; Regmi, R

    2010-12-01

    Due to unpleasant nature and physiological consequences of postoperative pain, search of safe and effective modalities for its management has remained a subject of interest to clinical researchers. Analgesic action of lidocaine infusion in patients with chronic neuropathic pain is well known but its place in relieving postoperative pain is yet to be established. The study aimed to assess the effectiveness of perioperative intravenous lidocaine infusion on postoperative pain intensity and analgesic requirement. Sixty patients undergoing major upper abdominal surgery were recruited in this randomized double blinded study. Thirty patients received lidocaine 2.0% (intravenous bolus 1.5 mg/kg followed by an infusion of 1.5 mg/kg/h), and 30 patients received normal saline according to randomization. The infusion started 30 min before skin incision and stopped 1 h after the end of surgery. Postoperative pain intensity and analgesic (diclofenac) requirement were assessed at the interval 15 minutes for 1 hour then 4 hourly up to 24 hours. The pain intensity at rest and movement as well as the total postoperative analgesic (diclofenac) requirement were significantly lower (142.50 +/- 37.80 mg vs.185.00 +/- 41.31 mg, P<0.001) in lidocaine group. The extubation time was significantly longer in lidocaine group (14.43 +/- 3.50 minutes vs. 6.73 +/- 1.76 minutes, P<0.001). The time for the first dose of analgesic requirement was longer in lidocaine group (60.97 +/- 18.05 minutes vs.15.73 +/- 7.46 minutes, P<0.001). It can be concluded that perioperative infusion of low dose of lidocaine decreases the intensity of postoperative pain, reduces the postoperative analgesic consumption, without causing significant adverse effects in patients undergoing upper abdominal surgery.

  11. Postoperative pain relief following hysterectomy: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Raghvendra, K. P.; Thapa, Deepak; Mitra, Sukanya; Ahuja, Vanita; Gombar, Satinder; Huria, Anju

    2016-01-01

    Background: Women experience moderate to severe postoperative pain following total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH). The transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is a new modality for providing postoperative pain relief in these patients. Materials and Methods: The present study was a single center, prospective randomized trial. After the Institutional Ethics Committee approval and informed consent, patients were randomized to either epidural group: Epidural block placement + general anesthesia (GA) or TAP group: Single shot TAP block + GA. Patients in both the groups received standard general anesthetic technique and intravenous tramadol patient-controlled analgesia in the postoperative period. Patients were monitored for tramadol consumption, visual analog scale (VAS) both at rest and on coughing, hemodynamics, and side effects at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, and 24 h postoperatively. Results: The total consumption of tramadol in 24 h was greater in TAP group as compared to epidural group (68.8 [25.5] vs. 5.3 [11.6] mg, P < 0.001). The VAS scores at rest and on coughing were higher in TAP group as compared to the epidural group at 6, 8, 12, and 24 h postoperatively (P < 0.05). None of the patients in either group had any adverse effects. Conclusion: Epidural analgesia provided greater tramadol-sparing effect with superior analgesia postoperatively as compared to TAP block in patients up to 24 h following TAH. PMID:27499592

  12. Single dose oral ibuprofen for acute postoperative pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Derry, Christopher J; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background This review updates a 1999 Cochrane review showing that ibuprofen at various doses was effective in postoperative pain in single dose studies designed to demonstrate analgesic efficacy. New studies have since been published. Ibuprofen is one of the most widely used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) analgesics both by prescription and as an over-the-counter medicine. Ibuprofen is used for acute and chronic painful conditions. Objectives To assess analgesic efficacy of ibuprofen in single oral doses for moderate and severe postoperative pain in adults. Search methods We searched Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Oxford Pain Relief Database for studies to May 2009. Selection criteria Randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled trials of single dose orally administered ibuprofen (any formulation) in adults with moderate to severe acute postoperative pain. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Pain relief or pain intensity data were extracted and converted into the dichotomous outcome of number of participants with at least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours, from which relative risk and number-needed-to-treat-to-benefit (NNT) were calculated. Numbers of participants using rescue medication over specified time periods, and time to use of rescue medication, were sought as additional measures of efficacy. Information on adverse events and withdrawals were collected. Main results Seventy-two studies compared ibuprofen and placebo (9186 participants). Studies were predominantly of high reporting quality, and the bulk of the information concerned ibuprofen 200 mg and 400 mg. For at least 50% pain relief compared with placebo the NNT for ibuprofen 200 mg (2690 participants) was 2.7 (2.5 to 3.0) and for ibuprofen 400 mg (6475 participants) it was 2.5 (2.4 to 2.6). The proportion with at least 50% pain relief was 46% with 200 mg and 54% with 400 mg. Remedication within 6 hours was less

  13. Single dose oral tenoxicam for acute postoperative pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Owen A; McIntyre, Mairead; Moore, R Andrew; Derry, Sheena; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background Tenoxicam is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) licensed for use in rheumatic disease and other musculoskeletal disorders in the UK, and is widely available in other countries worldwide. This review sought to evaluate the efficacy and safety of oral tenoxicam in acute postoperative pain, using clinical studies of patients with established pain, and with outcomes measured primarily over 6 hours using standard methods. This type of study has been used for many decades to establish that drugs have analgesic properties. Objectives To assess the efficacy of single dose oral tenoxicam in acute postoperative pain, and any associated adverse events. Search methods We searched The Cochrane Library (Issue 1, 2009), MEDLINE (March 2009); EMBASE via Ovid (March 2009); the Oxford Pain Relief Database. Selection criteria Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials of oral tenoxicam for relief of acute postoperative pain in adults. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. The area under the “pain relief versus time” curve was used to derive the proportion of participants with tenoxicam experiencing least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours, using validated equations. The number needed to treat to benefit (NNT) was calculated using 95% confidence intervals (CI). The proportion of participants using rescue analgesia over a specified time period, and time to use of rescue analgesia, were sought as additional measures of efficacy. Information on adverse events and withdrawals was also collected. Main results Not one of sixteen studies identified by the searches and examined in detail studied oral tenoxicam in patients with established postoperative pain and therefore no results are available. Authors’ conclusions In the absence of evidence of efficacy for oral tenoxicam in acute postoperative pain, its use in this indication is not justified at present. Because trials clearly

  14. Effectiveness of Submucosal Dexamethasone to Control Postoperative Pain & Swelling in Apicectomy of Maxillary Anterior Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shahzad Ali; Khan, Irfanullah; Shah, Humera Shahzad

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of submucosal dexamethasone injection to control postoperative pain and swelling in apicectomy of maxillary anterior teeth. Methods A randomized, controlled trial comprising 60 adult patients (68.3% male, 31.7% female) with no local or systemic problems was conducted. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: Group A was given 4mg dexamethasone injection perioperatively. Group B (control group) was treated conventionally without any steroid injection. Postoperative pain and swelling was evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS). Objective measurements of facial pain and swelling were performed daily up to six days postoperatively. Results Dexamethasone group showed significant reduction in pain and swelling postoperatively compared with the control. Conclusion Submucosal dexamethasone 4mg injection is an effective therapeutic strategy for swift and comfortable improvement after surgical procedure and has a significant effect on reducing postoperative pain and swelling. The treatment offers a simple, safe, painless, noninvasive and cost effective therapeutic option for moderate and severe cases. PMID:23267293

  15. Reducing Cancer Patients' Painful Treatment

    NASA Video Gallery

    A NASA light technology originally developed to aid plant growth experiments in space has proved to reduce the painful side effects resulting from chemotherapy and radiation treatment in bone marro...

  16. The direct perfusion of surgical wounds with local anaesthetic solution: an approach to postoperative pain?

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, D. F.; Lambert, W. G.; Williams, K. L.

    1983-01-01

    A simple technique of wound perfusion with bupivacaine (Marcain) which provides sustained postoperative analgesia is described. No complications nor side effects related to toxicity, hypersensitivity, infection, or impaired wound healing were encountered. Postoperative pain was reduced and analgesic requirements were significantly lower in patients undergoing both intermittent (P less than 0.01) and continuous (P = 0.1) wound perfusion (Student t test). Perfusion with isotonic saline was also found to be effective. This may represent a true therapeutic effect attributable to the removal or dilution of pain mediating substances in the wound. PMID:6347012

  17. Comparing Postoperative Pain Experiences of the Adolescent and Adult Athlete After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Stanish, William D.; Reardon, Gerald; Coady, Catherine; Sullivan, Michael J. L.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To examine age-related differences in pain, catastrophizing, and affective distress (depression and anxiety) after athletic injury and knee surgery. Design and Setting: Participants were assessed with measures of pain intensity, pain-related catastrophizing, depression, and anxiety symptoms at 24 hours after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery. Subjects: Twenty patients (10 adolescents, 10 adults) with an acute complete tear of the ACL. Measurements: Pain was assessed by Visual Analog Scale (VAS), catastrophizing with the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS), depressive symptoms with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and anxiety with the state form of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S). Results: At 24 hours postsurgery, adolescents reported greater pain, catastrophizing, and anxiety than adults. Ancillary analyses showed that helplessness and rumination were significant contributors to the differences in catastrophizing. Further, an analysis of covariance showed that controlling for the effects of catastrophizing, the adolescent and adult differences in pain scores were reduced to a null effect. Conclusions: After ACL surgery, athletic adolescents and adults differed significantly in pain, catastrophizing, and anxiety. Catastrophizing seemed to be a particularly strong factor in postoperative pain differences between adolescents and adults, with clinical-management implications. These data indicate the need for continued research into specific pain- and age-related factors during the acute postoperative period for athletes undergoing ACL surgery. PMID:12937527

  18. Foot massage: effectiveness on postoperative pain in breast surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Ucuzal, Meral; Kanan, Nevin

    2014-06-01

    effective in postoperative pain management.

  19. Predictive Factors of Postoperative Pain and Postoperative Anxiety in Children Undergoing Elective Circumcision: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Tsamoudaki, Stella; Ntomi, Vasileia; Yiannopoulos, Ioannis; Christianakis, Efstratios; Pikoulis, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Background Although circumcision for phimosis in children is a minor surgical procedure, it is followed by pain and carries the risk of increased postoperative anxiety. This study examined predictive factors of postoperative pain and anxiety in children undergoing circumcision. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of children scheduled for elective circumcision. Circumcision was performed applying one of the following surgical techniques: sutureless prepuceplasty (SP), preputial plasty technique (PP), and conventional circumcision (CC). Demographics and base-line clinical characteristics were collected, and assessment of the level of preoperative anxiety was performed. Subsequently, a statistical model was designed in order to examine predictive factors of postoperative pain and postoperative anxiety. Assessment of postoperative pain was performed using the Faces Pain Scale (FPS). The Post Hospitalization Behavior Questionnaire study was used to assess negative behavioral manifestations. Results A total of 301 children with a mean age of 7.56 ± 2.61 years were included in the study. Predictive factors of postoperative pain measured with the FPS included a) the type of surgical technique, b) the absence of siblings, and c) the presence of postoperative complications. Predictive factors of postoperative anxiety included a) the type of surgical technique, b) the level of education of mothers, c) the presence of preoperative anxiety, and d) a history of previous surgery. Conclusions Although our study was not without its limitations, it expands current knowledge by adding new predictive factors of postoperative pain and postoperative anxiety. Clearly, further randomized controlled studies are needed to confirm its results. PMID:26495079

  20. The importance of communication in the management of postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Sugai, Daniel Y; Deptula, Peter L; Parsa, Alan A; Don Parsa, Fereydoun

    2013-06-01

    This study investigates the importance of communication in surgery and how delivering preoperative patient education can lead to better health outcomes postoperatively, via promoting tolerable pain scores and minimizing the use of narcotics after surgery. Patients who underwent outpatient surgery were randomly divided into groups to compare the pain scores of those who received preoperative patient education, the experimental group, and those who did not receive any form of patient education, the control group. Two weeks before surgery, the experimental group subjects received oral and written forms of patient education consisting of how the body responds to pain, and how endorphins cause natural analgesia. Moreover, patients were educated on the negative effects narcotics have on endorphin production and activity, as well as mechanisms of non-opioid analgesics. Of the 69 patients in the experimental group, 90% declined a prescription for hydrocodone after receiving preoperative education two weeks prior to surgery. The control group consisted of 66 patients who did not receive preoperative patient education and 100% filled their hydrocodone prescriptions. Patients in both groups were offered and received gabapentin and celecoxib preoperatively for prophylaxis of postoperative pain unless they declined. The control groups were found to have average pain scores significantly greater (P <.05) than the experimental groups and also a significantly longer (P <.005) duration of pain. This study illustrates the power of patient education via oral, written and visual communication, which can serve as an effective means to minimize narcotic analgesia after surgery.

  1. Single dose oral dihydrocodeine for acute postoperative pain

    PubMed Central

    Moore, R Andrew; Edwards, Jayne; Derry, Sheena; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 2, 2000. Dihydrocodeine is a synthetic opioid analgesic developed in the early 1900s. Its structure and pharmacokinetics are similar to that of codeine and it is used for the treatment of postoperative pain or as an antitussive. It is becoming increasingly important to assess the relative efficacy and harm caused by different treatments. Relative efficacy can be determined when an analgesic is compared with control under similar clinical circumstances. Objectives To quantitatively assess the analgesic efficacy and adverse effects of single-dose dihydrocodeine compared with placebo in randomised trials in moderate to severe postoperative pain. Search methods Published reports were identified from electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, the Oxford Pain Relief Database in December 2007, the original search was conducted in October 1999). Additional studies were identified from the reference lists of retrieved reports. Selection criteria Inclusion criteria: full journal publication, clinical trial, random allocation of participants to treatment groups, double blind design, adult participants, baseline pain of moderate to severe intensity, postoperative administration of study drugs, treatment arms which included dihydrocodeine and placebo and either oral or injected (intramuscular or intravenous) administration of study drugs. Data collection and analysis Data collection and analysis: summed pain intensity and pain relief data over four to six hours were extracted and converted into dichotomous information to yield the number of participants obtaining at least 50% pain relief. This was used to calculate relative benefit and number-needed-to-treat-to-benefit (NNT) for one participant to obtain at least 50% pain relief. Single-dose adverse effect data were collected and used to calculate relative risk and number-needed-to-treat-to-harm (NNH). Main results Fifty-two reports

  2. Multilevel lumbar fusion and postoperative physiotherapy rehabilitation in a patient with persistent pain.

    PubMed

    Pons, Tracey; Shipton, Edward A

    2011-04-01

    There are no comparative randomised controlled trials of physiotherapy modalities for chronic low back and radicular pain associated with multilevel fusion. Physiotherapy-based rehabilitation to control pain and improve activation levels for persistent pain following multilevel fusion can be challenging. This is a case report of a 68-year-old man who was referred for physiotherapy intervention 10 months after a multilevel spinal fusion for spinal stenosis. He reported high levels of persistent postoperative pain with minimal activity as a consequence of his pain following the surgery. The physiotherapy interventions consisted of three phases of rehabilitation starting with pool exercise that progressed to land-based walking. These were all combined with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) that was used consistently for up to 8 hours per day. As outcome measures, daily pain levels and walking distances were charted once the pool programme was completed (in the third phase). Phase progression was determined by shuttle test results. The pain level was correlated with the distance walked using linear regression over a 5-day average. Over a 5-day moving average, the pain level reduced and walking distance increased. The chart of recorded pain level and walking distance showed a trend toward decreased pain with the increased distance walked. In a patient undergoing multilevel lumbar fusion, the combined use of TENS and a progressive walking programme (from pool to land) reduced pain and increased walking distance. This improvement was despite poor medication compliance and a reported high level of postsurgical pain.

  3. Effects of preoperative local ropivacaine infiltration on postoperative pain scores in infants and small children undergoing elective cleft palate repair.

    PubMed

    Coban, Yusuf Kenan; Senoglu, Nimet; Oksuz, Hafize

    2008-09-01

    Previous data have shown that preoperative analgesia may reduce postoperative analgesic demands. The aim of the current study was to determine if preincisional ropivacaine infiltration may reduce postoperative oral pain in infants and small children undergoing elective cleft palate patients.Twenty nonsyndromic cleft palate patients were randomly divided into 2 groups. Injection with ropivacaine hydrochloride, at dose of 0.2 mg/kg, was performed by submucous infiltration of the proposed incisional site groups of patients. In control group, no medication was given before cleft palate repair under general anesthesia. Postoperative pain scores were measured according to Children and Infants Postoperative Pain Scale. Heart rate recordings and noninvasive blood pressure measurements were also done in all the patients.Measurements of Children and Infants Postoperative Pain Scale scores at all the observational postoperative periods showed significantly favorable values in ropivacaine group than in control group (P < 0.05). Six patients in the control group required rescue analgesia, whereas 2 patients required analgesic therapy in the treatment group.Preemptive analgesia using ropivacaine may enhance early postoperative comfort by reducing early postoperative pain in primary cleft repair.

  4. Present-day challenges and future solutions in postoperative pain management: results from PainForum 2014

    PubMed Central

    Kuusniemi, Kristiina; Pöyhiä, Reino

    2016-01-01

    This paper is a summary of presentations on postoperative pain control by the authors at the 2014 PainForum meeting in People’s Republic of China. Postoperative pain is often untreated or undertreated and may lead to subsequent chronic pain syndromes. As more procedures migrate to the outpatient setting, postoperative pain control will become increasingly more challenging. Evidence-based guidelines for postoperative pain control recommend pain assessment using validated tools on a consistent basis. In this regard, consistency may be more important than the specific tool selected. Many hospitals have introduced a multidisciplinary acute pain service (APS), which has been associated with improved patient satisfaction and fewer adverse events. Patient education is an important component of postoperative pain control, which may be most effective when clinicians chose a multimodal approach, such as paracetamol (acetaminophen) and opioids. Opioids are a mainstay of postoperative pain control but require careful monitoring and management of side effects, such as nausea, vomiting, dizziness, and somnolence. Opioids may be administered using patient-controlled analgesia systems. Protocols for postoperative pain control can be very helpful to establish benchmarks for pain management and assure that clinicians adhere to evidence-based standards. The future of postoperative pain control around the world will likely involve more and better established APSs and greater communication between patients and clinicians about postoperative pain. The changes necessary to implement and move forward with APSs is not a single step but rather one of continuous improvement and ongoing change. PMID:26893579

  5. POSTOPERATIVE PAIN: MANAGEMENT AND DOCUMENTATION BY IRANIAN NURSES

    PubMed Central

    Rafati, Foozieh; Soltaninejad, Maryam; Aflatoonian, Mohamad Reza; Mashayekhi, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pain is one of the most common symptoms experienced by patients after surgeries. Inadequate postoperative pain management is an international problem and the need to improve its management is well documented. The aim of the study was to assess nursing reports related to the patients’ pain intensity and quality, concomitant symptoms, use of scales in pain assessment, and compliance with the national guideline after surgery. Methods: This study was a retrospective cohort; samples were nurse records of patients who had elective surgery. Result: Only 6% of the patients’ pain records included pain intensity which was not measured with standard scales. More than half of all injections were opioid analgesic which is in contrast to the guidelines of the Iranian Ministry of Health. Pain assessment was higher in women and by nurses with more than 15 years of working experience. Conclusion: to conclude, the patients’ pain was not assessed properly in terms of intensity, quality, and associated symptoms. Therefore, training and motivating nurses is very important in this context and should be incorporated in nurses’ academic and continuous educational courses. PMID:27047265

  6. [New trends in the treatment of post-operative pain in general and gastrointestinal surgery].

    PubMed

    Santeularia Vergés, María Teresa; Català Puigbò, Elena; Genové Cortada, Mercè; Revuelta Rizo, Miren; Moral García, María Victoria

    2009-08-01

    The correct application of multimodal analgesia appropriate to the pain intensity, the characteristics of the surgery and the hospitalisation scheme provide the key to improving the management of postoperative pain, which is currently still under treated. In highly complex surgeries the best benefit is obtained by combining systemic analgesic drugs with regional analgesia techniques. Epidural analgesia, not only provides an excellent quality of analgesia, but can prevent complications and reduce postoperative morbidity. Recently, peripheral blocks and parietal infiltration techniques, with or without catheter, have gained prominence in the postoperative analgesia of haemorrhoids and hernia repair. All these analgesic techniques are integrated into the concept of early postoperative rehabilitation and pursue the objective of minimising the side effects associated with the treatment and facilitate the functional recovery of the patient. In addition, proper postoperative pain management, not only increases the quality of in-patient care but is also a factor to consider in the development of chronic post-surgical pain, where the impact is significant and impairs the quality of life of the patients.

  7. Comparison of intravenous acetylsalicylic acid and dipyrone in postoperative pain

    PubMed Central

    Blendinger, I.; Eberlein, H. J.

    1980-01-01

    1 In 17 gynaecological patients with postoperative pain the analgesic efficacy of intravenous lysine salicylate 1.8 g (corresponding to acetylsalicyclic acid (ASA) 1.0 g) and dipyrone 1.0 g were compared in a double-blind randomized study. 2 In the ASA group, mean pain relief and pain intensity difference scores reached a maximum 30 min after drug administration and remained at this level for the next 90 minutes. 3 In the dipyrone group, these scores reached their peak 60 min after drug administration and seemed to fall off during the next hour. 4 The mean pain relief and intensity difference scores were greater following aspirin than dipyrone. However, firm conclusions cannot be drawn from the results of this small study. PMID:7437274

  8. Relative analgesic potencies of morphine and hydromorphone in postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Mahler, D L; Forrest, W H

    1975-05-01

    Because of discrepancies in the estimates of the relative analgesic potencies of hydromorphone and morphine, the drugs were compared in two four-point, double-blind bioassays. In the first study, hydromorphone, 1 and 2 mg, was compared with morphine, 5 and 10 mg, in 31 postoperative patients; in the second, hydromorphone, 0.5 and 1 mg, was compared with morphine, 5 and 10 mg, in 112 postoperative patients. Subjective responses to nurse-observer questions were used to quantitate analgesia for postoperative pain. Hydromorphone is more potent than commonly believed: approximately 0.9 to 1.2 mg is equianalgesic with 10 mg of morphine, with a similar incidence of side effects.

  9. Effects of Perioperative Low Dose Ketamine Infusion on Postoperative Pain Perception in Males and Females Undergoing Laparoscopic Surgery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    Fifty to 75% of patients report that postoperative pain management is grossly inadequate. A contributing factor to this analgesic deficit may be...produces hyperalgesia. Ketamine, an NMDA receptor antagonist, administered preemptively may inhibit central sensitization and thereby reduce postoperative ...2 factorial, double blind, placebo- controlled study, 37 female and 18 male (N =55) ASA 1-3 participants who underwent elective laparoscopic surgery

  10. Gabapentin as an adjuvant for postoperative pain management in dogs undergoing mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    CROCIOLLI, Giulianne Carla; CASSU, Renata Navarro; BARBERO, Rafael Cabral; ROCHA, Thalita Leone A; GOMES, Denis Robson; NICÁCIO, Gabriel Montoro

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the analgesic efficacy of gabapentin as an adjuvant for postoperative pain management in dogs. Twenty dogs undergoing mastectomy were randomized to receive perioperative oral placebo or gabapentin (10 mg/kg). All dogs were premedicated with intramuscular acepromazine (0.03 mg/kg) and morphine (0.3 mg/ kg). Anesthesia was induced with propofol (4 mg/kg) intravenously and maintained with isoflurane. Intravenous meloxicam (0.2 mg/kg) was administered preoperatively. Postoperative analgesia was evaluated for 72 hr. Rescue analgesia was provided with intramuscular morphine (0.5 mg/kg). Dogs in the Placebo group received significantly more morphine doses than the Gabapentin group (P=0.021), despite no significant differences in pain scores. Perioperative gabapentin reduced the postoperative morphine requirements in dogs after mastectomy. PMID:25816802

  11. Post Tonsillectomy Pain: Can Honey Reduce the Analgesic Requirements?

    PubMed Central

    Boroumand, Peyman; Zamani, Mohammad Mahdi; Saeedi, Masoumeh; Rouhbakhshfar, Omid; Hosseini Motlagh, Seyed Reza; Aarabi Moghaddam, Fatemeh

    2013-01-01

    Background Tonsillectomy with or without adenoidectomy is one of the most common surgical procedures performed worldwide, especially for children. Oral honey administration following tonsillectomy in pediatric cases may reduce the need for analgesics via relieving postoperative pain. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of honey on the incidence and severity of postoperative pain in patients undergoing tonsillectomy. Patients and Methods A randomized, double blind, placebo controlled study was performed. One hundred and four patients, who were older than eight, and were scheduled for tonsillectomy, were divided into two equal groups, honey and placebo. Standardized general anesthesia, and postoperative usual analgesic, and antibiotic regimen were administrated for all patients. Acetaminophen plus honey for the honey group, and acetaminophen plus placebo for the placebo group were given daily. They began to receive honey or placebo when the patients established oral intake. Results The difference between acetaminophen and acetaminophen plus honey groups was statistically significant both for visual analogue scale (VAS), and number of painkillers taken within the first three postoperative days. The consumption of painkillers differed significantly in every five postoperative days. No significant difference was found between groups regarding the number of awaking at night. Conclusions Postoperative honey administration reduces postoperative pain and analgesic requirements in patients after tonsillectomy. As the side effects of honey appear to be negligible, consideration of its routine usage seems to be beneficial along with routine analgesics. PMID:24223362

  12. Single dose oral paracetamol (acetaminophen) for postoperative pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Toms, Laurence; McQuay, Henry J; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 1, 2004 - this original review had been split from a previous title on ‘Single dose paracetamol (acetaminophen) with and without codeine for postoperative pain’. The last version of this review concluded that paracetamol is an effective analgesic for postoperative pain, but additional trials have since been published. This review sought to evaluate the efficacy and safety of paracetamol using current data, and to compare the findings with other analgesics evaluated in the same way. Objectives To assess the efficacy of single dose oral paracetamol for the treatment of acute postoperative pain. Search methods We searched The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Oxford Pain Relief Database and reference lists of articles to update an existing version of the review in July 2008. Selection criteria Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials of paracetamol for acute postoperative pain in adults. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Area under the “pain relief versus time” curve was used to derive the proportion of participants with paracetamol or placebo experiencing at least 50% pain relief over four to six hours, using validated equations. Number-needed-to-treat-to-benefit (NNT) was calculated, with 95% confidence intervals (CI). The proportion of participants using rescue analgesia over a specified time period, and time to use, were sought as measures of duration of analgesia. Information on adverse events and withdrawals was also collected. Main results Fifty-one studies, with 5762 participants, were included: 3277 participants were treated with a single oral dose of paracetamol and 2425 with placebo. About half of participants treated with paracetamol at standard doses achieved at least 50% pain relief over four to six hours, compared with about 20% treated with placebo. NNTs for at

  13. Efficacy of Bilateral Mental Nerve Block with Bupivacaine for Postoperative Pain Control in Mandibular Parasymphysis Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Mesgarzadeh, Ali Hossein; Afsari, Hosein; Pourkhamne, Sohrab; Shahamfar, Mohamadreza

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Postoperative pain control is extremely important for both patients and surgeons; in this context, long-acting local anesthesia can play an important role after open reduction of maxillofacial fractures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of bilateral mental nerve block with bupivacaine on postoperative pain control in mandibular symphyseal fractures. Materials and methods. Fifty patients with pure mandibular symphyseal fractures were studied in two control and study groups. In contrast to the control group, the study group received bilateral mental nerve block with bupivacaine postoperatively. Patients were examined in relation to pain severity and opioid analgesic drug need sequences. Results. The study group needed significantly less opioid than the control group (P<0.01, U=141). The control and study groups were different in first opioid administration time. The control and study groups received first opioid dose in 0-2 and 2-4 hours, respectively. Conclusion. Bilateral mental nerve blocks with bupivacaine can reduce opioid analgesic need and it has a positive effect on postoperative pain control in mandibular symphyseal fractures. PMID:25346837

  14. Institutionalizing pain management: the Post-Operative Pain Management Quality Improvement Project.

    PubMed

    Dahl, June L; Gordon, Deb; Ward, Sandra; Skemp, Marty; Wochos, Sarah; Schurr, Michael

    2003-09-01

    Clinical practice and quality improvement (QI) guidelines for acute postoperative pain management have been developed to address the well-documented problem of undertreatment of postoperative pain. The Post-Operative Pain Management Quality Improvement Project (the POP Project) was initiated to determine whether an intervention designed to support hospitals in the development of QI efforts would lead to improvements in structures, processes, and outcomes consistent with recommended guidelines. A nationwide sample of 233 hospitals joined the project. The intervention consisted of written resource materials accompanied by support services that included an e-mail list server, a resource Web page, and assistance from POP Project staff via telephone. Data regarding critical structures, processes (practice patterns), and patient outcomes were collected at baseline before the intervention began and at follow-up 12 to 18 months later. Results showed a statistically significant increase from baseline (45%) to follow-up (72%) in the presence of structural elements that are critical to improving pain management. There were statistically significant improvements in practices including documented use of pain rating scales, decreased use of intramuscular opioids, and increased use of nonpharmacologic strategies. Patient survey data showed no change in pain outcomes. Evaluation data showed that 70% of hospitals were very or extremely satisfied with their participation in the POP Project and 90% of them planned to continue efforts to improve pain management after the POP Project ended. Further research is needed to determine how to translate the excellent results obtained for structure and process into meaningful outcomes for patients.

  15. What's new in... the management of post-operative pain in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Taneja, Pankaj; Pattni, Amit; Pearson, David

    2015-01-01

    Post-operative pain is a common occurrence within dentistry. The causative factors are not solely dependent on the procedure but a part is also played by the patient's ability to self-cope as well as their level of anxiety. This article discusses the effectiveness of analgesia available for prescription by general dental practitioners based on systematic reviews in the literature, with particular reference to third molar removal. In addition, other methods that can help reduce pain in the post-operative period are addressed, including the types of local anaesthetic used for the procedure and psychological aspects of patient care. The main aim is to update and aid dentists' decision making processes in choosing ways to lessen the pain experienced by patients following dental procedures.

  16. Effects on postoperative salivary cortisol of relaxation/music and patient teaching about pain management.

    PubMed

    Good, Marion; Albert, Jeffrey M; Arafah, Baha; Anderson, Gene Cranston; Wotman, Stephen; Cong, Xiaomei; Lane, Deforia; Ahn, Sukhee

    2013-07-01

    The physiological and psychological stress of surgery and postoperative pain can leave patients more susceptible to infection and complications. The present study was designed to determine whether two interventions, patient teaching (PT) for pain management and relaxation/music (RM), reduced cortisol levels, an indicator of stress, following abdominal surgery. Patients (18-75 years) were randomly assigned to receive PT, RM, a combination of the two, or usual care; the 205 patients with both pre- and posttest cortisol values were analyzed. A 2 × 2 factorial design was used to compare groups for PT effects and RM effects. Stress was measured by salivary cortisol before and after 20-min tests of the interventions in the morning and afternoon of postoperative Day 2. Saliva was stimulated with lemon juice and analyzed with high-sensitivity salivary cortisol enzyme immunoassay. Comparisons using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), controlling for baseline levels, showed no PT effect or RM effect on cortisol in the morning or afternoon. Post hoc ANCOVA showed no significant effects when intervention groups were compared to the control group. Although in previous studies, RM reduced pain and music reduced cortisol on Day 1, in the present study the cortisol response to surgery was not attenuated by PT or RM on Day 2. The RM intervention can be used for pain but needs to be further tested for effects on plasma cortisol in abdominal surgery patients on their first postoperative day.

  17. Effect of Premedication with Indomethacin and Ibuprofen on Postoperative Endodontic Pain: A Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mokhtari, Fatemeh; Yazdi, Kamal; Mahabadi, Amir Mohammad; Modaresi, Seyed Jalil; Hamzeheil, Zeinab

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Post-endodontic pain is one of the main problems for both patients and dentists. The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of premedication with indomethacin and ibuprofen for management of postoperative endodontic pain. Methods and Materials: In this clinical trial, mandibular molars with irreversible pulpitis were endodontically treated in 66 patients. The medicines were prepared similarly in the form of capsules containing 400 mg ibuprofen (group A), 25 mg indomethacin (group B) and placebo (group C). The patients were given one capsule 1 h before the start of treatment. Patients recorded their pain measured by a visual analogue scale (VAS) at medication time, during treatment and 8, 12 and 24 h after treatment. The data were analyzed using the chi-square, repeated measures ANOVA, paired t-test, Tamhane and Pearson correlation coefficient. Results: Ibuprofen and indomethacin significantly reduced the postoperative pain in comparison with placebo during treatment and 8 h after treatment; however, there were no significant differences between them 12 and 24 h after treatment. Conclusion: Premedication with ibuprofen and indomethacin can effectively control short term post-operative pain; the lower incidence of side effects and greater analgesic power of ibuprofen make it a superior choice. PMID:26843879

  18. Effect of Music on Postoperative Pain in Patients Under Open Heart Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mirbagher Ajorpaz, Neda; Mohammadi, Abouzar; Najaran, Hamed; Khazaei, Shala

    2014-01-01

    Background: Music, as a non-pharmacological and inexpensive nursing intervention, can be used easily as a complementary technique in reducing pain along with other methods. While some studies have demonstrated pain to decrease after music, others found music to be ineffective on pain. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of music on postoperative pain in patients under open heart surgery. Patients and Methods: A quasi-experimental study was performed on 60 patients under open heart surgery referred to ICU of Shahid Beheshti hospital in Kashan city. Patients were randomly divided into two groups including experimental and control groups. Patients in music group listened to nonverbal music for 30 minutes after surgery by headphones. The control group did not receive any intervention other than routine care. Before and after intervention, pain intensity was measured and recorded by visual analog scale in two groups. Data was analyzed using Chi-Square and t-tests. Results: Before intervention, the mean of pain intensity was 6.32 ± 0.21 and 6.10 ± 0.21 for experimental and control groups, respectively; and the difference was not significant (P = 0.21). After intervention, the mean of pain intensity was 3.11 ± 0.12 and 5.81 ± 0.38 for experimental and control groups, respectively; and the difference was significant (P = 0.04). Conclusions: Listening to the relaxant music can reduce postoperative pain. It is suggested that relaxant music be used as a complementary method in patients in order to reduce prospective pain. PMID:25699280

  19. Postoperative pain assessment in the neonatal intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    McNair, C; Ballantyne, M; Dionne, K; Stephens, D; Stevens, B

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the convergent validity of two measures of pain (premature infant pain profile (PIPP) and crying, requires oxygen, increased vital signs, expression, and sleepless (CRIES)) in real life postoperative pain assessment in infants. Methods: This study was a prospective, repeated measures, correlational design. Two staff nurses were randomly assigned either the PIPP or CRIES measure. An expert rater assessed each infant after surgery, and once a day using the visual analogue scale (VAS). Setting: A level III neonatal intensive care unit in a metropolitan university affiliated paediatric hospital. Results: Pain was assessed in 51 neonates (28–42 weeks of gestational age) after surgery. There was no significant difference in the rates of change between the pain assessment measures across time using repeated measures analysis of variance (F50,2  =  0.62, p  =  0.540), indicating correlation between the measures. Convergent validity analysis using intraclass correlation showed correlation, most evident in the first 24 hours (immediately, 4, 8, 20, and 24 hours after the operation). Correlations were more divergent at 40 and 72 hours after surgery. No significant interactions were found between gestational age and measure (F304,4  =  0.75, p  =  0.563) and surgical group and measure (F304,2  =  0.39, p  =  0.680). Conclusions: PIPP and CRIES are valid measures that correlate with pain for the first 72 hours after surgery in term and preterm infants. Both measures would provide healthcare professionals with an objective measure of a neonatal patient's pain. PMID:15499150

  20. Post-operative pain management in head and neck cancer patients: predictive factors and efficacy of therapy.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, C; Malagò, M; Crema, L; Aimoni, C; Matarazzo, T; Bortolazzi, S; Ciorba, A; Pelucchi, S; Pastore, A

    2016-04-01

    There is increasing interest about all aspects of pain sensation for patients undergoing head and neck surgery, and efforts have been made to better assess, monitor and reduce the occurrence of pain. The aetiology of pain is considered to be "multifactorial", as it is defined by several features such as personal experience, quality perception, location, intensity and emotional impact. The aim of this paper is: (i) to evaluate the efficacy of analgesic treatment in patients with head and neck cancer treated by surgery, and (ii) to study the variables and predictive factors that can influence the occurrence of pain. A total of 164 patients, affected by head and neck cancer and surgically treated, between December 2009 and December 2013, were included in this study. Data collected include age, gender, assessment of anaesthetic risk, tumour localisation, pathological cancer stage, TNM stage, type of surgery performed, complexity and duration of surgery, post-operative complications, postoperative days of hospital stay and pain evaluation on days 0, 1, 3 and 5 post-surgery. We studied the appropriateness of analgesic therapy in terms of incidence and prevalence of post-operative pain; we also related pain to patient characteristics, disease and surgical treatment to determine possible predictive factors. The population studied received adequate pain control through analgesic therapy immediately post-surgery and in the following days. No associations between gender, age and post-operative pain were found, whereas pathological cancer stage, complexity of surgery and tumour site were significantly associated with the risk of post-operative pain. Adequate pain control is essential in oncological patients, and particularly in head and neck cancer patients as the prevalence of pain in this localisation is reported to be higher than in other anatomical sites. Improved comprehension of the biological and psychological factors that characterise pain perception will help to

  1. Use of preoperative gabapentin significantly reduces postoperative opioid consumption: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Arumugam, Sudha; Lau, Christine SM; Chamberlain, Ronald S

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Effective postoperative pain management is crucial in the care of surgical patients. Opioids, which are commonly used in managing postoperative pain, have a potential for tolerance and addiction, along with sedating side effects. Gabapentin’s use as a multimodal analgesic regimen to treat neuropathic pain has been documented as having favorable side effects. This meta-analysis examined the use of preoperative gabapentin and its impact on postoperative opioid consumption. Materials and methods A comprehensive literature search was conducted to identify randomized control trials that evaluated preoperative gabapentin on postoperative opioid consumption. The outcomes of interest were cumulative opioid consumption following the surgery and the incidence of vomiting, somnolence, and nausea. Results A total of 1,793 patients involved in 17 randomized control trials formed the final analysis for this study. Postoperative opioid consumption was reduced when using gabapentin within the initial 24 hours following surgery (standard mean difference −1.35, 95% confidence interval [CI]: −1.96 to −0.73; P<0.001). There was a significant reduction in morphine, fentanyl, and tramadol consumption (P<0.05). While a significant increase in postoperative somnolence incidence was observed (relative risk 1.30, 95% CI: 1.10–1.54, P<0.05), there were no significant effects on postoperative vomiting and nausea. Conclusion The administration of preoperative gabapentin reduced the consumption of opioids during the initial 24 hours following surgery. The reduction in postoperative opioids with preoperative gabapentin increased postoperative somnolence, but no significant differences were observed in nausea and vomiting incidences. The results from this study demonstrate that gabapentin is more beneficial in mastectomy and spinal, abdominal, and thyroid surgeries. Gabapentin is an effective analgesic adjunct, and clinicians should consider its use in multimodal treatment

  2. Comparison of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation and Parasternal Block for Postoperative Pain Management after Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Nilgun Kavrut; Baki, Elif Dogan; Kavakli, Ali Sait; Sahin, Ayca Sultan; Ayoglu, Raif Umut; Karaveli, Arzu; Emmiler, Mustafa; Inanoglu, Kerem; Karsli, Bilge

    2016-01-01

    Background. Parasternal block and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) have been demonstrated to produce effective analgesia and reduce postoperative opioid requirements in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Objectives. To compare the effectiveness of TENS and parasternal block on early postoperative pain after cardiac surgery. Methods. One hundred twenty patients undergoing cardiac surgery were enrolled in the present randomized, controlled prospective study. Patients were assigned to three treatment groups: parasternal block, intermittent TENS application, or a control group. Results. Pain scores recorded 4 h, 5 h, 6 h, 7 h, and 8 h postoperatively were lower in the parasternal block group than in the TENS and control groups. Total morphine consumption was also lower in the parasternal block group than in the TENS and control groups. It was also significantly lower in the TENS group than in the control group. There were no statistical differences among the groups regarding the extubation time, rescue analgesic medication, length of intensive care unit stay, or length of hospital stay. Conclusions. Parasternal block was more effective than TENS in the management of early postoperative pain and the reduction of opioid requirements in patients who underwent cardiac surgery through median sternotomy. This trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov number NCT02725229.

  3. The Efficacy of Acupuncture in Post-Operative Pain Management: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ming-Shun; Chen, Kee-Hsin; Chen, I-Fan; Huang, Shihping Kevin; Tzeng, Pei-Chuan; Yeh, Mei-Ling; Lee, Fei-Peng; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chen, Chiehfeng

    2016-01-01

    Background Postoperative pain resulting from surgical trauma is a significant challenge for healthcare providers. Opioid analgesics are commonly used to treat postoperative pain; however, these drugs are associated with a number of undesirable side effects. Objective This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluated the effectiveness of acupuncture and acupuncture-related techniques in treating postoperative pain. Data Source MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and EMBASE databases were searched until Sep 30, 2014. Study Eligibility Criteria Randomized controlled trials of adult subjects (≥ 18 years) who had undergone surgery and who had received acupuncture, electroacupuncture, or acupoint electrical stimulation for managing acute post-operative pain were included. Results We found that patients treated with acupuncture or related techniques had less pain and used less opioid analgesics on Day 1 after surgery compared with those treated with control (P < 0.001). Sensitivity analysis using the leave-one-out approach indicated the findings are reliable and are not dependent on any one study. In addition, no publication bias was detected. Subgroup analysis indicated that conventional acupuncture and transcutaneous electric acupoint stimulation (TEAS) were associated with less postoperative pain one day following surgery than control treatment, while electroacupuncture was similar to control (P = 0.116). TEAS was associated with significantly greater reduction in opioid analgesic use on Day 1 post surgery than control (P < 0.001); however conventional acupuncture and electroacupuncture showed no benefit in reducing opioid analgesic use compared with control (P ≥ 0.142). Conclusion Our findings indicate that certain modes of acupuncture improved postoperative pain on the first day after surgery and reduced opioid use. Our findings support the use of acupuncture as adjuvant therapy in treating postoperative pain. PMID:26959661

  4. Predictors for Moderate to Severe Acute Postoperative Pain after Cesarean Section.

    PubMed

    Borges, Natalia de Carvalho; Pereira, Lilian Varanda; de Moura, Louise Amália; Silva, Thuany Cavalcante; Pedroso, Charlise Fortunato

    2016-01-01

    Background. Moderate to severe postoperative pain affects performance of daily activities and it contributes to persistent postoperative pain. In patients submitted to cesarean section, this pain can also interfere with women's ability to care for their babies, to effectively breastfeed, and to satisfactorily interact with their children. Factors influencing the pain perception during the immediate postoperative period have not been widely pursued. Objective. To investigate the incidence and predicting factors of postoperative pain after cesarean section. Methods. A prospective longitudinal study with 1,062 women submitted to cesarean section. We collected sociodemographic, clinical, surgical, and health behavior data. We used the 11-point Numerical Pain and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales. We performed logistic analysis to identify predictors of moderate to severe postoperative pain. Results. The incidence of moderate-severe postoperative pain was 78.4% (CI: 95%: 75.9%-80.8%). The preoperative anxiety (OR = 1.60; CI 95%: 1.22-2.30) and intrathecal morphine with fentanyl (OR = 0,23; CI 95%: 0.08-0.66) were significantly associated with moderate-severe postoperative pain report. Conclusion. The preoperative anxiety increases the risk of moderate-severe postoperative pain in women submitted to cesarean section. The intrathecal morphine with fentanyl added to bupivacaine was a protective factor against this pain.

  5. Predictors for Moderate to Severe Acute Postoperative Pain after Cesarean Section

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Thuany Cavalcante; Pedroso, Charlise Fortunato

    2016-01-01

    Background. Moderate to severe postoperative pain affects performance of daily activities and it contributes to persistent postoperative pain. In patients submitted to cesarean section, this pain can also interfere with women's ability to care for their babies, to effectively breastfeed, and to satisfactorily interact with their children. Factors influencing the pain perception during the immediate postoperative period have not been widely pursued. Objective. To investigate the incidence and predicting factors of postoperative pain after cesarean section. Methods. A prospective longitudinal study with 1,062 women submitted to cesarean section. We collected sociodemographic, clinical, surgical, and health behavior data. We used the 11-point Numerical Pain and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales. We performed logistic analysis to identify predictors of moderate to severe postoperative pain. Results. The incidence of moderate-severe postoperative pain was 78.4% (CI: 95%: 75.9%–80.8%). The preoperative anxiety (OR = 1.60; CI 95%: 1.22–2.30) and intrathecal morphine with fentanyl (OR = 0,23; CI 95%: 0.08–0.66) were significantly associated with moderate-severe postoperative pain report. Conclusion. The preoperative anxiety increases the risk of moderate-severe postoperative pain in women submitted to cesarean section. The intrathecal morphine with fentanyl added to bupivacaine was a protective factor against this pain. PMID:27956847

  6. The Effect of Inhalation of Aromatherapy Blend containing Lavender Essential Oil on Cesarean Postoperative Pain

    PubMed Central

    Olapour, Alireza; Behaeen, Kaveh; Akhondzadeh, Reza; Soltani, Farhad; al Sadat Razavi, Forough; Bekhradi, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background Pain is a major problem in patients after cesarean and medication such as aromatherapy which is a complementary therapy, in which the essences of the plants oils are used to reduce such undesirable conditions. Objectives In this study, the effect of aromatherapy using Lavender (Lavandula) essential oil on cesarean postoperative pain was assessed. Materials and Methods In a triple blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial study, 60 pregnant women who were admitted to a general hospital for cesarean section, were divided randomly into two groups. After cesarean, the Lavender group inhaled about 3 drops of 10% Lavender oil essence and the placebo group inhaled 3 drops of placebo after the start of postoperative pain, four, eight and 12 hours later, for 5 minutes from the 10 cm distance. Patient's pain was measured by the VAS (Visual Analog Scale) score before and after each intervention, and vital sign, complications and level of satisfaction of every patient were recorded before and after aromatherapy. Results There was no statistically significant difference between groups in age, height, weight, and time to the first analgesic requirement. Patients in the Lavender group had less postoperative pain in four (P = 0.008), eight (P = 0.024) and 12 (P = 0.011) hours after first medication than the placebo group. The decreased heart rate and patients' level of satisfaction with analgesia were significantly higher in the Lavender group (P = 0.001). In the placebo group, the use of diclofenac suppositories for complete analgesia was also significantly higher than the Lavender group (P = 0.008). Conclusions The inhaled Lavender essence may be used as a part of the multidisciplinary treatment of pain after cesarean section, but it is not recommended as the sole pain management. PMID:24223363

  7. Movement, Function, Pain, and Postoperative Edema in Axillary Web Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Blaes, Anne H.; Haddad, Tuffia C.; Hunter, David W.; Hirsch, Alan T.; Ludewig, Paula M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Axillary web syndrome (AWS) is a condition that may develop following breast cancer surgery and that presents as a palpable axillary cord of tissue. Objective The purposes of this study were: (1) to determine the clinical characteristics of AWS related to movement, function, pain, and postoperative edema and (2) to define the incidence of and risk factors for AWS within the first 3 months following breast cancer surgery. Design This was a prospective cohort study with a repeated-measures design. Methods Women who underwent breast cancer surgery with sentinel node biopsy or axillary lymph node dissection (N=36) were assessed for AWS, shoulder range of motion, function, pain, and postoperative edema (using girth measurements, bioimpedance, and tissue dielectric constant) at 2, 4, and 12 weeks. Demographic characteristics were used for risk analysis. Results Seventeen women (47.2%) developed AWS, and AWS persisted in 10 participants (27.8%) at 12 weeks. Abduction range of motion was significantly lower in the AWS group compared with the non-AWS group at 2 and 4 weeks. There were no differences between groups in measurements of function, pain, or edema at any time point. Trunk edema measured by dielectric constant was present in both groups, with an incidence of 55%. Multivariate analysis determined lower body mass index as being significantly associated with AWS (odds ratio=0.86; 95% confidence interval=0.74, 1.00). Limitations Limitations included a short follow-up time and a small sample size. Conclusion Axillary web syndrome is prevalent following breast/axilla surgery for early-stage breast cancer and may persist beyond 12 weeks. The early consequences include movement restriction, but the long-term effects of persistent AWS cords are yet unknown. Low body mass index is considered a risk factor for AWS. PMID:25977305

  8. Relative frequency of chronic postoperative pain in patients operated for chronic otitis media.

    PubMed

    Nemati, Shadman; Okhovvat, S Ahmadreza; Naghavi, S Ebrahim; Shakiba, Maryam; Mikaeeli, Saman

    2014-08-01

    Chronic postoperative pain may lead to physical disability and psychosocial distress. In this longitudinal observational study, for the first time we evaluated the relative frequency of chronic postoperative pain in patients operated for chronic otitis media (COM) at two university hospitals. Patients were questioned about pain at the site of the surgical incision 3-6 months after the operation, and again 3 months after the first visit. Pain intensity was quantified by visual analogue scale (VAS). T test, Chi-square test, and logistic regression were used for analyzing data and multivariate analysis. In 155 patients (42 male, 113 female, mean age: 38.57 ± 10.66 years), chronic postoperative pain was observed in 50 cases (32.3 %). A significant decrease in the average score of VAS was observed from 5.18 to 2.64 within 3 months (P = 0.0001). Statistically significant correlation was observed between chronic postoperative pain and age, sex, acute postoperative pain and history of Irritable Bowel Syndrome or migraine, but after multivariate analysis, only the age group and severe acute post-operation pain were effective on incidence of chronic post-operative pain. In conclusion, surgery for COM is followed by chronic pain in about 32 % of patients, and some risk factors for the development of chronic postoperative pain after this surgery exist, including age and severe acute post-operation pain.

  9. Gender differences in post-operative pain and patient controlled analgesia use among adolescent surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Logan, Deirdre E; Rose, John B

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore gender differences in anticipatory emotional distress, coping strategies, post-operative pain perception, and patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) use among adolescent surgical patients. One hundred and two 12-18-year-old adolescents undergoing surgeries with overnight hospital stay were recruited. Participants completed pre-operative measures of anxiety and anticipated pain. Post-operatively, they reported on coping skills, post-operative anxiety, and pain. Data on PCA use were recorded from medical records. Girls reported higher levels of pre-operative state anxiety and anticipated more pain. After surgery, girls and boys differed on their lowest daily pain ratings and average daily pain ratings, with girls reporting more pain in both cases. Reports of highest daily pain were similar across genders. Gender was found to moderate the relationship between anticipatory distress and post-operative pain, such that higher anticipatory distress before surgery predicted more post-operative pain for girls, but not for boys. Patterns of PCA use did not vary by gender on post-operative days 0 or 1. Findings suggest that adolescent boys' and girls' pain experiences are different in several important respects, although somewhat less divergent than has been reported in samples of adult males and females. Results have implications for the development of targeted intervention strategies to help adolescents cope effectively with acute post-operative pain.

  10. [Peri- and postoperative pain therapy with mechanical patient-controlled disposable analgesia pumps in general surgery. Report of initial trial].

    PubMed

    Fieseler, H G; Vogt, B; Menges, H W

    1996-01-01

    The patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) or "ondemand analgesia" is a pain-relieving therapy, which is regulated and monitored by the patient himself. Postoperative pain therapy is the main approach for PCA, which facilitates a long-term, individually controlled pain relief. In certain situations we use mechanical PCA-pumps filled with piritramid (Dipidolor) as an opioid-analgetic for reducing postoperative pain. This kind of therapy needs the acceptance and understanding of the patient as a main condition for the success. Beside an increase of patients' comfort and patients' independence of analgetic demand from the medical staff a reduction in postoperative complications can be expected, the time of hospitalisation might be decreased.

  11. Assessment of pain during rest and during activities in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    de Mello, Larissa Coelho; Rosatti, Silvio Fernando Castro; Hortense, Priscilla

    2014-01-01

    Objective to assess the intensity and site of pain after Cardiac Surgery through sternotomy during rest and while performing five activities. Method descriptive study with a prospective cohort design. A total of 48 individuals participated in the study. A Multidimensional Scale for Pain Assessment was used. Results postoperative pain from cardiac surgery was moderate during rest and decreased over time. Pain was also moderate during activities performed on the 1st and 2nd postoperative days and decreased from the 3rd postoperative day, with the exception of coughing, which diminished only on the 6th postoperative day. Coughing, turning over, deep breathing and rest are presented in decreased order of intensity. The region of the sternum was the most frequently reported site of pain. Conclusion the assessment of pain in the individuals who underwent cardiac surgery during rest and during activities is extremely important to adapt management and avoid postoperative complications and delayed surgical recovery. PMID:24553714

  12. Perioperative Dextromethorphan as an Adjunct for Postoperative Pain: a Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    King, Michael R.; Ladha, Karim S.; Gelineau, Amanda M.; Anderson, T. Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Background N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists have been shown to reduce perioperative pain and opioid use. We performed a meta-analysis to determine whether the use of perioperative dextromethorphan lowers opioid consumption or pain scores. Methods PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, pubget, and Embase were searched. Studies were included if they were randomized, double-blinded, placebo controlled trials written in English, performed on patients ≥12 years. For comparison of opioid use, included studies tracked total consumption of intravenous or intramuscular opioids over 24 to 48 hours. Pain score comparisons were performed at 1 hour, 4 to 6 hours, and 24 hours postoperatively. Difference in means (MD) was used for effect size. Results Forty studies were identified and 21 were eligible for one or more comparisons. In 848 patients from 14 trials, opioid consumption favored dextromethorphan (MD -10.51 mg intravenous morphine equivalents; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -16.48 mg to -4.53 mg; p = 0.0006). In 884 patients from 13 trials, pain at 1 hour favored dextromethorphan (MD -1.60; 95% CI: -1.89 to -1.31; p < 0.00001). In 950 patients from 13 trials, pain at 4-6 hours favored dextromethorphan (MD -0.89; 95% CI: -1.11 to -0.66; p < 0.00001). In 797 patients from 12 trials, pain at 24 hours favored dextromethorphan (MD -0.92; 95% CI: -1.24 to -0.60; p < 0.00001). Conclusions This meta-analysis suggests dextromethorphan use perioperatively reduces postoperative opioid consumption at 24-48 hours and pain scores at 1, 4-6, and 24 hours. PMID:26587683

  13. The role of the nurse anesthetist in the planning of postoperative pain management.

    PubMed

    Stomberg, Margareta Warrén; Sjöström, Björn; Haljamäe, Hengo

    2003-06-01

    Adequate pain relief after surgery is essential for avoiding pain-associated stress and patient comfort in the postoperative period. The Swedish nurse anesthetist has an important role in the intraoperative management of the surgical patient by assessing and moderating individual physiological response evoked by surgical stimuli during general anesthesia. The extent to which knowledge of specific individual response patterns are used to plan postoperative pain management is unknown. The aim of the present study was to assess the role of the nurse anesthetist in planning early postoperative pain management for surgical patients. Nurse anesthetists (N = 101) at 4 academic hospitals in Sweden responded to a questionnaire focusing, in addition to demographic data, on intraoperative routines for postoperative pain management, perceived clinical relevance of used routines, personal involvement (in addition to existing routines) in postoperative pain management, factors influencing pain alleviation requirements, and the potential role of the nurse anesthetist for improved postoperative pain management. We found that type of anesthesia and type of surgical procedure were both factors considered important for postoperative pain management. A majority of the participants believed that pain management approaches were not appropriately individualized to the patient.

  14. Postoperative infusional continuous regional analgesia. A technique for relief of postoperative pain following major extremity surgery.

    PubMed

    Malawer, M M; Buch, R; Khurana, J S; Garvey, T; Rice, L

    1991-05-01

    A new technique using postoperative infusional continuous regional analgesia (PICRA) for postoperative pain relief was investigated in 23 surgical patients treated by amputation (12 patients) or by limb-salvage resection operations (11 patients). Bupivacaine was delivered into peripheral nerve sheaths via catheters placed therein at the time of surgery. Only patients in whom the nerves were easily accessible were treated. Catheters were placed in the axillary sheath, the lumbosacral trunk, and the femoral nerve sheaths of patients treated with shoulder girdle and pelvic procedures (resections and amputations), and within the sciatic nerve sheath of those treated with lower extremity procedures. The anesthetic agent was delivered at controllable rates. Regional analgesia was obtained in the operative site with minimal motor or sensory decrease. To assess the efficacy of this technique, the results of this study group were compared with those of a matched group of 11 patients treated with similar surgical procedures but who received epidural morphine. Eleven of the 23 patients on PICRA required no supplemental narcotic agents. The mean level of the narcotic agents required by the remaining 13 PICRA patients was approximately one third of that required by the matched group of 11 patients receiving epidural morphine. Overall, the patients on PICRA had an 80% reduction of narcotic requirements when compared to the historical controls. The technique is reliable and can be performed by the surgeon, requiring about a ten-minute increase in operating time. It has potentially wide application in orthopedics in procedures in which the major nerves are easily accessible (e.g., pelvic fractures and revision hip surgery) and for patients with intractable pain of the extremities.

  15. Randomized Trial of Immediate Postoperative Pain Following Single-incision Versus Traditional Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; Liu, Yang; Han, Wei; Liu, Jun; Jin, Lan; Li, Jian-She; Zhang, Zhong-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Background: We undertook a randomized controlled trial to ascertain if single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy (SILC) was more beneficial for reducing postoperative pain than traditional laparoscopic cholecystectomy (TLC). Moreover, the influencing factors of SILC were analyzed. Methods: A total of 552 patients with symptomatic gallstones or polyps were allocated randomly to undergo SILC (n = 138) or TLC (n = 414). Data on postoperative pain score, operative time, complications, procedure conversion, and hospital costs were collected. After a 6-month follow-up, all data were analyzed using the intention-to-treat principle. Results: Among SILC group, 4 (2.9%) cases required conversion to TLC. Mean operative time of SILC was significantly longer than that of TLC (58.97 ± 21.56 vs. 43.38 ± 19.02 min, P < 0.001). The two groups showed no significant differences in analgesic dose, duration of hospital stay, or cost. Median pain scores were similar between the two groups 7 days after surgery, but SILC-treated patients had a significantly lower median pain score 6 h after surgery (10-point scale: 3 [2, 4] vs. 4 [3, 5], P = 0.009). Importantly, subgroup analyses of operative time for SILC showed that a longer operative time was associated with greater prevalence of pain score >5 (≥100 min: 5/7 patients vs. <40 min, 3/16 patients, P = 0.015). Conclusions: The primary benefit of SILC appears to be slightly less pain immediately after surgery. Surgeon training seems to be important because the shorter operative time for SILC may elicit less pain immediately after surgery. PMID:26668145

  16. The effect of oral tizanidine on postoperative pain relief after elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Talakoub, Reihanak; Abbasi, Saeed; Maghami, Elham; Zavareh, Sayyed Morteza Heidari Tabaei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cholecystectomy is considered as the most important and relatively common postoperative pain control often begins in recovery room by using systemic narcotics that may have some side effects. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of premedication with oral tizanidine on pain relief after elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Materials and Methods: In this double-blinded clinical trial, 70 adults of American Society of Anesthesiologist physiologic state 1 and 2 scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anesthesia were studied and randomly divided in two study and control groups. Ninety minutes before the induction of anesthesia, patients received either 4 mg tizanidine (study group) orally in 50cc or the same volume of plain water as a placebo (control group). Then, the vital signs, pain intensity, duration of stay in recovery, and the analgesic consumption were measured and then compared in both groups during 24 h postoperatively. Results: There was no significant difference in patient characteristics, with respect to age, weight, gender, and duration of anesthesia and surgery between the groups (P > 0.05). The pain intensity, need for analgesic drugs (34.57 ± 8.88 mg vs. 101.86 ± 5.08 mg), and the duration of stay in recovery room (67.43 ± 1.59 min vs. 79.57 ± 5.48 min) were significantly lower in tizanidine group than that of the control group. Conclusion: Oral administration of 4 mg tizanidine before laparoscopic cholecystectomy reduces postoperative pain, opioid consumption, and consequence of the duration of stay in recovery room without any complication. PMID:26962521

  17. Comparison of Bupivacaine and Lidocaine Use for Postoperative Pain Control in Endodontics

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Saeed; Naghavi, Neda

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Many patients suffer from mild, moderate or severe pain during or after root canal therapy. Theoretically, post-operative pain control can be achieved by using long-acting local anesthetics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a long acting anesthesia, bupivacaine, on preventing post-operative pain associated with endodontic treatment, and to compare it with lidocaine. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study was a double blind and randomized clinical trial on 30 patients' anterior maxillary teeth. The patients were divided into two groups of fifteen. One group was administered lidocanine (2% with 1:100000 epinephrine) local anesthesia and the other group was given bupivacaine (0.5% without epinephrine). The pain in patients were compared using the visual analogue scale (VAS) at definite times i.e. before treatment, during treatment and 2,4,6,8,10,12,24,36 and 48 hours after operation. Data were analyzed using One-way ANOVA tests. RESULTS: Bupivacaine significantly decreased postoperative pain compared to lidocaine. Postoperative pain was directly related to preoperative pain. Women reported more pain, though significant difference in postoperative pain report was not found between different ages. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, a single dose of bupivacaine 0.5% used in infiltration anesthesia could be more effective in reduction or prevention of post-operative endodontic pain compared with lidocaine. PMID:24778680

  18. Management of acute postoperative pain with continuous intercostal nerve block after single port video-assisted thoracoscopic anatomic resection

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Wang, Kuo-Cheng; Liu, Hung-Pin; Gonzalez-Rivas, Diego; Wu, Ching-Yang; Liu, Yun-Hen; Wu, Yi-Cheng; Chao, Yin-Kai

    2016-01-01

    Background Effective postoperative pain control for thoracic surgery is very important, not only because it reduces pulmonary complications but also because it accelerates the pace of recovery. Moreover, it increases patients’ satisfaction with the surgery. In this study, we present a simple approach involving the safe placement of intercostal catheter (ICC) after single port video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) anatomic resection and we evaluate postoperative analgesic function with and without it. Methods We identified patients who underwent single port anatomic resection with ICC placed intraoperatively as a route for continuous postoperative levobupivacaine (0.5%) administration and retrospectively compared them with a group of single port anatomic resection patients without ICC. The operation time, postoperative day 0, 1, 2, 3 and discharge day pain score, triflow numbers, narcotic requirements, drainage duration and post-operative hospital stay were compared. Results In total, 78 patients were enrolled in the final analysis (39 patients with ICC and 39 without). We found patients with ICC had less pain sensation numerical rating scale (NRS) on postoperative day 0, 1 (P=0.023, <0.001) and better triflow performance on postoperative day 1 and 2 (P=0.015, 0.032). In addition, lower IV form morphine usage frequency and dosage (P=0.009, 0.017), shorter chest tube drainage duration (P=0.001) and postoperative stay (P=0.005) were observed in the ICC group. Conclusions Continuous intercostal nerve blockade by placing an ICC intraoperatively provides effective analgesia for patients undergoing single port VATS anatomic resection. This may be considered a viable alternative for postoperative pain management. PMID:28149550

  19. Auricular Acupressure for Managing Postoperative Pain and Knee Motion in Patients with Total Knee Replacement: A Randomized Sham Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ling-hua; Hsu, Chung-Hua; Jong, Gwo-Ping; Ho, Shungtai; Tsay, Shiow-luan; Lin, Kuan-Chia

    2012-01-01

    Background. Postoperative pain management remains a significant challenge for all healthcare providers. A randomized controlled trial was conducted to examine the adjuvant effects of auricular acupressure on relieving postoperative pain and improving the passive range of motion in patients with total knee replacement (TKR). Method. Sixty-two patients who had undergone a TKR were randomly assigned to the acupressure group and the sham control group. The intervention was delivered three times a day for 3 days. A visual analog scale (VAS) and the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire were used to assess pain intensity. Pain medication consumption was recorded, and the knee motion was measured using a goniometer. Results. The patients experienced a moderately severe level of pain postoperatively (VAS 58.66 ± 20.35) while being on the routine PCA. No differences were found in pain scores between the groups at all points. However, analgesic drug usage in the acupressure group patients was significantly lower than in the sham control group (P < 0.05), controlling for BMI, age, and pain score. On the 3rd day after surgery, the passive knee motion in the acupressure group patients was significantly better than in the sham control group patients (P < 0.05), controlling for BMI. Conclusion. The application of auricular acupressure at specific therapeutic points significantly reduces the opioid analgesia requirement and improves the knee motion in patients with TKR. PMID:22844334

  20. Challenges in the optimisation of post-operative pain management with opioids in obese patients: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Lloret-Linares, C; Lopes, A; Declèves, X; Serrie, A; Mouly, S; Bergmann, J-F; Perrot, S

    2013-09-01

    An increasing number of obese patients are undergoing surgery, particularly bariatric and orthopaedic surgery. The physiological differences between obese and normal-weight subjects may modify not only anaesthetic requirements during surgery but also post-operative analgesic management, raising a number of challenges in a critical period. In this review, we analyse studies of post-operative pain management with opioids in obese subjects. We discuss the genetic factors common to pain and obesity and the factors potentially modifying opioid pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in obese patients, and we analyse the overall efficacy and safety of opioids for pain management during the post-operative period in obese patients. Both modifications to surgical methods and additional analgesic treatments to decrease the requirement for opioids may improve early rehabilitation and quality of care and reduce adverse effects in obese patients.

  1. Hepatic resection is associated with reduced postoperative opioid requirement

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Caitlyn Rose; Caldwell, Julia Christine; Afilaka, Babatunde; Iskandarani, Khaled; Chinchilli, Vernon Michael; McQuillan, Patrick; Cooper, Amanda Beth; Gusani, Niraj; Bezinover, Dmitri

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Postoperative pain can significantly affect surgical outcomes. As opioid metabolism is liver-dependent, any reduction in hepatic volume can lead to increased opioid concentrations in the blood. The hypothesis of this retrospective study was that patients undergoing open hepatic resection would require less opioid for pain management than those undergoing open pancreaticoduodenectomy. Material and Methods: Data from 79 adult patients who underwent open liver resection and eighty patients who underwent open pancreaticoduodenectomy at our medical center between January 01, 2010 and June 30, 2013 were analyzed. All patients received both general and neuraxial anesthesia. Postoperatively, patients were managed with a combination of epidural and patient-controlled analgesia. Pain scores and amount of opioids administered (morphine equivalents) were compared. A multivariate lineal regression was performed to determine predictors of opioid requirement. Results: No significant differences in pain scores were found at any time point between groups. Significantly more opioid was administered to patients having pancreaticoduodenectomy than those having a hepatic resection at time points: Intraoperative (P = 0.006), first 48 h postoperatively (P = 0.001), and the entire length of stay (LOS) (P = 0.002). Statistical significance was confirmed after controlling for age, sex, body mass index, and American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status classification (adjusted P = 0.006). Total hospital LOS was significantly longer after pancreaticoduodenectomy (P = 0.03). A multivariate lineal regression demonstrated a lower opioid consumption in the hepatic resection group (P = 0.03), but there was no difference in opioid use based on the type of hepatic resection. Conclusion: Patients undergoing open hepatic resection had a significantly lower opioid requirement in comparison with patients undergoing open pancreaticoduodenectomy. A multicenter prospective

  2. The interaction of tilidine and pethidine in postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Tammisto, T; Tigerstedt, I

    1975-01-01

    The mode of interaction between the new, non-narcotic analgesic tilidine and pethidine was studied in the treatment of postoperative pain. The potency ratio 3:1 (pethidine:tilidine) found previously was used in the comparison. Thus 0.25 mg/kg of pethidine with 0.75 mg/kg of tilidine and 0.5 mg/kg of pethidine with 1.5 mg/kg of tilidine were compared with 0.5 mg/kg and with 1.0 mg/kg of pethidine. These drug combinations proved to be equipotent with the pethidine dosages used. Consequently the mode of interaction seemed to be additive synergism. The onset of action was slightly faster with pethidine, but the duration of action was longer with pethidine-tilidine combinations. Respiratory depression and sedation were less evident after pethidine-tilidine combinations than after equianalgesic doses of pethidine. Circulatory effects were similar in all groups. No statistical difference in other side effects could be demonstrated between the groups.

  3. Influence of kinesiologic tape on postoperative swelling, pain and trismus after zygomatico-orbital fractures.

    PubMed

    Ristow, Oliver; Pautke, Christoph; Victoria Kehl; Koerdt, Steffen; Schwärzler, Katharina; Hahnefeld, Lilian; Hohlweg-Majert, Bettina

    2014-07-01

    Surgical treatment of zygomatico-orbital (ZO) fractures is a common procedure in maxillofacial surgery. Often accompanied by pain, trismus and swelling, postoperative morbidity is a major disadvantage, affecting patients' quality of life. The appliance of kinesiologic tape (KT) improves the blood and lymph flow, removing congestions of lymphatic fluid and haemorrhages. The aim of this study was to find out if the application of kinesiologic tape prevents or improves swelling, pain and trismus after zygomatico-orbital fracture surgery, improving patients' postoperative quality of life. A total of 30 patients were assigned for treatment of zygomatico-orbital fractures and were randomly divided into treatment either with or without kinesiologic tape. Tape was applied directly after surgery and maintained for at least 5 days postoperatively. Facial swelling was quantified using a five-line measurement at six specific time points. Pain and degree of mouth opening was measured. Patient's subjective feeling and satisfaction was queried. The results of this study show that application of kinesiologic tape after zygomatico-orbital surgery significantly reduced the incidence of swelling with an earlier swelling maximum, and decreased the maximum turgidity for more than 60% during the first 2 days after surgery. Although, kinesiologic tape has no significant influence on pain control and trismus, mouth opening increased earlier after operation in the kinesiologic tape group compared to the no-kinesiologic tape group. Furthermore, patients with kinesiologic tape felt significantly lower morbidity than those without kinesiologic tape. Therefore kinesiologic tape is a promising, simple, less traumatic, economical approach, which is free from adverse reaction and improves patients' quality of life.

  4. Laparoscopic Surgery Can Reduce Postoperative Edema Compared with Open Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong; Gong, Jianfeng; Cao, Lei; Wei, Yao; Guo, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The study aimed to investigate the impact of laparoscopic surgery and open surgery on postoperative edema in Crohn's disease. Methods. Patients who required enterectomy were divided into open group (Group O) and laparoscopic group (Group L). Edema was measured using bioelectrical impedance analysis preoperatively (PRE) and on postoperative day 3 (POD3) and postoperative day 5 (POD5). The postoperative edema was divided into slight edema and edema by an edema index, defined as the ratio of total extracellular water to total body water. Results. Patients who underwent laparoscopic surgery had better clinical outcomes and lower levels of inflammatory and stress markers. A total of 31 patients (26.05%) developed slight edema and 53 patients (44.54%) developed edema on POD3. More patients developed postoperative edema in Group O than in Group L on POD3 (p = 0.006). The value of the edema index of Group O was higher than that of Group L on POD3 and POD5 (0.402 ± 0.010 versus 0.397 ± 0.008, p = 0.001; 0.401 ± 0.009 versus 0.395 ± 0.007, p = 0.039, resp.). Conclusions. Compared with open surgery, laparoscopic surgery can reduce postoperative edema, which may contribute to the better outcomes of laparoscopic surgery over open surgery. PMID:27777583

  5. Management of Postoperative Pain in Medical Institutions in Shandong Province in China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Donghua; Ma, Jianzhong; Zhang, Zongwang; Yu, Ailan; Chen, Xueli; Feng, Cuicui; Lei, Weifu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to investigate current situation of postoperative pain management in medical institutions in Shandong Province.A questionnaire was developed on the basis of guidelines of acute pain and pain quality assessment scale. The questionnaire was used to obtain information regarding the nature and scale of the medical institution, structure of pain management organization, implementation of pain assessment, and analgesic techniques and processes used in clinical practice. A multistage stratified and cluster sampling method was employed to investigate the current situation of postoperative pain management in 168 medical institutions in Shandong Province. For acute pain service (APS), 32% of the hospitals established postoperative pain management organizations similar to APS. For pain evaluation, 57.1% of the hospitals evaluated pain as the fifth vital sign, and 47.0% of the hospitals evaluated pain at rest and during activity. Furthermore, 43.0% of the surveyed hospitals employed patient-controlled analgesia mode, of which hospitals employing brachial plexus block, lumbar plexus block, and femoral nerve block analgesia accounted for 5.0%, 1.0%, and 4.0%, respectively. The survey revealed that 51.0% of the hospitals educated patients about pain and pain management, of which patients were postoperatively educated by ward nurses in 5.0% and patients were educated by APS during ward rounds in 2.0%. There is a lack of standardized postoperative pain management, the involvement of nurses in pain management is scarce, and the pain assessment and education and application of advanced analgesic management techniques were found to be inadequate in medical institutions in Shandong Province. PMID:26871800

  6. Use of three evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices by registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Cathy L

    2009-12-01

    To provide optimal postoperative pain relief, nursing practice should be based on the best evidence available. For over 20 years, results of studies regarding nurses' use of evidence-based practices, including postoperative pain assessment practices, have shown that nurses use the practices inconsistently. The present cross-sectional survey study was conducted to: 1) determine the extent to which registered nurses caring for postoperative patients experiencing pain used three evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices; and 2) identify relationships among the level of adoption of evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices and selected characteristics of registered nurses. Data were collected from a convenience sample of all nurses caring for adult postoperative patients in two Midwestern hospitals where 443 surveys (46.9%) were returned. Respondents were aware of, but not using, three evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices consistently. Registered nurses who used multiple sources to identify solutions to clinical practice problems or read one or two professional journals regularly were more likely to have adopted the three evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices. Registered nurses need to be encouraged to use multiple sources to identify solutions to clinical practice problems, including professional nursing journals. Innovative approaches to promote the application of research to education and practice settings are needed. It is important to identify opinion leaders, because opinion leaders are an important resource in overcoming the barriers so that adoption of pain of evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices can proceed. Additional research is needed to identify what variables effect the adoption of evidence-based practices and identify interventions to improve the level of adoption.

  7. The surgery and early postoperative radicular pain in cases with multifocal lumbar disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Ulutaş, Murat; Çınar, Kadir; Seçer, Mehmet

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Persistence of postoperative radicular pain after surgery for multifocal disc herniation (MFDH) is a clinical problem. This study aims to evaluate the effects of a combined treatment approach compared with unilateral stabilization on early postoperative radicular pain in patients with MFDH. Age, sex, level of operation, clinical findings, and radicular pain visual analogue scale (VAS) scores before surgery in the early postoperative period and at 3 months after surgery were retrospectively reviewed for 20 cases of multifocal lumbar disc herniation. The combined approach (translaminar and far lateral) was used for 13 cases. Seven cases underwent transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) and unilateral transpedicular stabilization following total facetectomy. The mean age of the sample was 49.4 ± 10.1 years and the female-to-male ratio was 8:12. The mean VAS scores for radicular pain in cases treated with the combined approach were 8.2, 4.07, and 2.3 in the preoperative and early postoperative periods and 3 months after surgery, respectively. The mean score for radicular pain improved by 50.4% in the early postoperative period and by 72% in the late postoperative period. The mean VAS scores for radicular pain in cases who underwent TLIF and unilateral stabilization after facetectomy were 8.4, 2.1, and 1.4 in the preoperative and early postoperative periods and 3 months after surgery, respectively. The mean VAS score for radicular pain improved by 75% in the early postoperative period and by 83.3% in the late postoperative period. The combined approach is an effective alternative in cases with MFDH. TLIF and unilateral segmental stabilization provide substantial decompression and eliminate mechanical compression by conserving the height of the intervertebral foramen in the event that sufficient decompression is unable to obtain. We suggest that elimination of chemical mediators, particularly those causing pain in the dorsal ganglion, contributes to

  8. The surgery and early postoperative radicular pain in cases with multifocal lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Ulutaş, Murat; Çınar, Kadir; Seçer, Mehmet

    2017-03-01

    Persistence of postoperative radicular pain after surgery for multifocal disc herniation (MFDH) is a clinical problem. This study aims to evaluate the effects of a combined treatment approach compared with unilateral stabilization on early postoperative radicular pain in patients with MFDH.Age, sex, level of operation, clinical findings, and radicular pain visual analogue scale (VAS) scores before surgery in the early postoperative period and at 3 months after surgery were retrospectively reviewed for 20 cases of multifocal lumbar disc herniation. The combined approach (translaminar and far lateral) was used for 13 cases. Seven cases underwent transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) and unilateral transpedicular stabilization following total facetectomy.The mean age of the sample was 49.4 ± 10.1 years and the female-to-male ratio was 8:12. The mean VAS scores for radicular pain in cases treated with the combined approach were 8.2, 4.07, and 2.3 in the preoperative and early postoperative periods and 3 months after surgery, respectively. The mean score for radicular pain improved by 50.4% in the early postoperative period and by 72% in the late postoperative period. The mean VAS scores for radicular pain in cases who underwent TLIF and unilateral stabilization after facetectomy were 8.4, 2.1, and 1.4 in the preoperative and early postoperative periods and 3 months after surgery, respectively. The mean VAS score for radicular pain improved by 75% in the early postoperative period and by 83.3% in the late postoperative period.The combined approach is an effective alternative in cases with MFDH. TLIF and unilateral segmental stabilization provide substantial decompression and eliminate mechanical compression by conserving the height of the intervertebral foramen in the event that sufficient decompression is unable to obtain. We suggest that elimination of chemical mediators, particularly those causing pain in the dorsal ganglion, contributes to the absence

  9. Nurses' assessment of postoperative pain: can it be an alternative to patients' self-reports?

    PubMed Central

    Chung, I. S.; Sim, W. S.; Kim, G. S.; Park, S. H.; Park, Y. S.; Cha, K. J.; Park, Y. S.; Lim, Y. J.; Lee, S. C.; Kim, Y. C.

    2001-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate whether the nurses' assessment of postoperative pain can be an alternative to patients' self-reporting. We examined 187 patients receiving postoperative intravenous patient-controlled analgesia. The nurses assessed the patients' pain with three pain indices (therapeutic efficacy, pain intensity, and facial pain expression) 8 hr after operation. The patients recorded their resting and movement pain using 100-mm visual analog scales immediately following the nurses' assessment. There was an acceptable correlation between overall pain measurement assessed by patients and that assessed by nurses (canonical correlation coefficient=0.72, p=0.0001). The resting pain was more reliably reflected than the movement pain in overall measurement assessed both by nurses and by patients. Among the three pain indices assessed by nurses, the pain intensity most reliably reflected the patients' self-reports. The pain intensity assessed with a simple verbal descriptor scale therefore is believed to be an effective alternative to the patients' self-reports of postoperative pain at rest. However, it mirrored the patients' self-reports during movement less reliably. Therapeutic efficacy and facial pain expression indices were not effective alternatives to patients' self-reporting. PMID:11748363

  10. Postoperative Pain and Intravenous Patient-Controlled Analgesia-Related Adverse Effects in Young and Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Jae Chul; Lee, Jinae; Kim, So Yeon; Choi, Sumin; Han, Dong Woo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In this retrospective analysis of 10,575 patients who used fentanyl-based intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) after surgery, we evaluated difference between young and elderly patients on their characteristic of adverse effects. We reviewed the data collected from the patients who were provided IV-PCA for pain control following elective surgery under either general or spinal anesthesia between September 2010 and March 2014. Postoperative pain, incidence of PCA-related adverse effects, and risk factors for the need of rescue analgesics and antiemetics for postoperative 48 hours were analyzed. Pain intensity (numerical rating scale [NRS]) at postoperative 6 to 12 hours (4.68 vs 4.58, P < 0.01) and incidence of nausea or vomiting (23.8% vs 20.6%, P < 0.001) were higher in young patients, while incidence of PCA discontinuation (9.9% vs 11.5%, P < 0.01) and sedation (0.1% vs 0.7%, P < 0.001) was higher in elderly patients. Despite larger fentanyl dose used, a greater proportion of young patients required rescue analgesics (53.8% vs 47.9%, P < 0.001) while addition of ketorolac was effective in reducing postoperative pain. Despite lower incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), a larger proportion of elderly patients required rescue antiemetics (10.1% vs 12.2%, P < 0.001) while addition of ramosetron was effective in reducing PONV. In conclusion, when fentanyl-based IV-PCA is used for postoperative pain control, a larger proportion of young patients may require rescue analgesics while elderly patients may require more rescue antiemetics. The addition of ketorolac or ramosetron to the PCA of young and elderly patients can be effective to prevent rescue analgesics or antiemetics use. PMID:26559296

  11. Postoperative Pain Management in Latino Families: Parent Beliefs about Analgesics Predict Analgesic Doses Provided to Children

    PubMed Central

    Rosales, Alvina; Fortier, Michelle A.; Campos, Belinda; Kain, Zeev N.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives The present study examined whether parental perceptions of children’s pain impacted home-based pain management following outpatient surgery in a sample of Latino families from low socioeconomic backgrounds. Methods Latino parents of children (n = 161) who underwent outpatient surgery were recruited for this study and completed measures assessing attitudes on pain and analgesic use (Parental Pain Expression Perceptions and Medication Attitudes Questionnaire) before their child’s surgery. Parents also rated their child’s pain after their child’s surgery using the Parent Postoperative Pain Measure and collected data on the amount of analgesics they gave to their child on the first postoperative day. Hierarchical regression analyses examined whether parental attitudes predicted pain assessment and management at home. Results A majority of parents reported multiple misconceptions regarding children’s pain and fears of side effects as well as avoidance of analgesic use. For example, over 80% reported believing that a child always tells their parents when they are in pain. Hierarchical regression analyses found that more fear and avoidance regarding analgesic use for children’s pain predicted parents’ providing fewer doses of analgesic to their children on the first postoperative day (β = −0.21, p = 0.028). Conclusions Preoperative parents’ beliefs regarding analgesics for treatment of children’s pain may adversely impact parent postoperative analgesic administration at home in Latino families. PMID:26792407

  12. Ketamine in outpatient arthroscopic shoulder surgery: Effects on postoperative pain, hemodynamic stability and process times

    PubMed Central

    Schotola, Hanna; Kirsch, Karl-Christian; Höcker, Jan; Egan, Michael; Büttner, Benedikt; Wiese, Christoph; Mansur, Ashham; Hinz, José Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background Pain after arthroscopic shoulder surgery is often severe, and establishing a pain treatment regimen that does not delay discharge can be challenging. The reported ability of ketamine to prevent opioid-induced hyperalgesia has not been investigated in this particular setting. Methods 300 adult patients scheduled for shoulder arthroscopy under general anesthesia were recruited for this observational clinical trial and were allotted to either receive 1mg/kg IV bolus of ketamine before surgery (ketamine group, KG) or to a control group (CG) without ketamine. NRS pain scores were obtained on the operative day and on postoperative days 1 and 2 and compared between groups. Secondary variables were blood pressure, heart rate, process times, satisfaction with the anesthetic and unwanted effects. Results Pain severity did not differ significantly between the groups at any time. Propofol injection rate and cumulative dose were higher in the KG. Heart rates and blood pressures were similar. Time to emergence and time in PACU were longer and vomiting was more frequent in patients given ketamine. Conclusion Preoperative low-dose ketamine added to a general anesthetic does not reduce perioperative pain after outpatient shoulder arthroscopy. It increases procedural times and the incidence of PONV.

  13. Initial evaluation of a canine stifle arthrotomy post-operative pain model.

    PubMed

    Tomas, A; Bledsoe, D; Wall, S; Davidson, G; Lascelles, B D X

    2015-06-01

    Most models of acute post-operative orthopedic pain involve the injection of a clinically irrelevant pro-inflammatory agent. The ideal model should, however, be clinically relevant and allow full functional recovery of enrolled animals after research is completed. This study explored the validity of a model employing arthrotomy and objectively measured limb use. Six purpose-bred Beagles underwent arthrotomies on each stifle with a washout period in between. Using a randomized crossover design, each dog received placebo and an extended-release buprenorphine (ER-Bup) preparation. Static and dynamic ground reaction forces (GRFs) were measured prior to and for 72 h following surgery using a pressure sensitive walkway (PSW). GRFs for each hind limb were compared using difference (delta), and symmetry indices (SI). The effects of surgery and of treatment were analyzed using repeated measures ANCOVA. The results indicated significantly decreased limb use compared to baseline for placebo, and significantly increased limb use in the ER-Bup group over placebo at all times for % bodyweight distribution (%BWdistrib), peak vertical force (PVF) and vertical impulse (VI). There was a significant treatment by time interaction for velocity (P = 0.03) and %BWdistrib (P = 0.01, 0.003). Overall, the data show that reduced limb use was present for at least 72 h following arthrotomy. In addition, the use of the ER-Bup analgesic decreased lameness, confirming the validity of this approach as a model of post-operative pain. Subjective assessments did not detect the pain-inducing effects of arthrotomy or pain-alleviating effects of treatment, and subjective measures of procedural pain in research dogs need to be developed.

  14. Role of Ketamine in Acute Postoperative Pain Management: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Radvansky, Brian M.; Shah, Khushbu; Parikh, Anant; Sifonios, Anthony N.; Le, Vanny; Eloy, Jean D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The objective of this narrative review was to examine the usage of ketamine as a postoperative analgesic agent across a wide variety of surgeries. Design. A literature search was performed using the phrases “ketamine” and “postoperative pain.” The authors analyzed the studies that involved testing ketamine's effectiveness at controlling postoperative pain. Effectiveness was assessed through various outcomes such as the amount of opiate consumption, visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores, and persistent postoperative pain at long-term follow-up. Results. While many different administration protocols were evaluated, delivering ketamine both as a pre- or perioperative bolus and postoperative infusion for up to 48 hours appeared to be the most effective. These effects are dose-dependent. However, a number of studies analyzed showed no benefit in using ketamine versus placebo for controlling postoperative pain. While ketamine is a safe and well-tolerated drug, it does have adverse effects, and there are concerns for possible neurotoxicity and effects on memory. Conclusions. In a number of limited situations, ketamine has shown some efficacy in controlling postoperative pain and decreasing opioid consumption. More randomized controlled trials are necessary to determine the surgical procedures and administrations (i.e., intravenous, epidural) that ketamine is best suited for. PMID:26495312

  15. Prior conditions influencing nurses' decisions to adopt evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Cathy L

    2010-12-01

    Over the past 30 years, postoperative pain relief has been shown to be inadequate. To provide optimal postoperative pain relief, it is imperative for nurses to use evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices. This correlational descriptive study was conducted to identify factors, termed prior conditions, that influenced nurses' decisions to adopt three evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices. A convenience sample of nurses who cared for adult postoperative patients in two Midwestern hospitals were surveyed, and 443 (46.9%) nurses responded. The previous practice and innovativeness of nurses were supportive of adoption of the three practices. Nurses felt that patients received adequate pain relief, which is unsupportive of adoption of the three practices because there is no impetus to change. Nurses who perceived the prior conditions as being supportive of adoption of pain management practices used multiple sources to identify solutions to clinical practice problems, and those who read professional nursing journals were more likely to have adopted the three practices and were more innovative. The number of sources used to identify solutions to clinical practice problems, previous practices, and innovativeness were predictive of nurses' adoption of the three evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices. Nurses need to be encouraged to use multiple sources, including professional nursing journals, to identify solutions to clinical practice problems. Innovative nurses may be considered to be opinion leaders and need to be identified to promote the adoption of evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices. Further exploration of the large unexplained variance in adoption of evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices is needed.

  16. Preoperative concentration of beta-lipotropin immunoreactive material in cerebrospinal fluid: a predictor of postoperative pain?

    PubMed

    Matejec, Reginald; Schulz, Axel; Mühling, Jörg; Uhlich, Holger; Bödeker, Rolf-Hasso; Hempelmann, Gunter; Teschemacher, Hansjörg

    2006-02-01

    Levels of beta-endorphin immunoreactive material (IRM) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) have been reported to correlate inversely with postoperative morphine requirement. Considering proopiomelanocortin (POMC) derivatives as predictors for sensitivity to postoperative pain, we determined authentic beta-endorphin (beta-endorphin(1-31)), beta-lipotropin IRM, N-acetyl-beta-endorphin IRM and ACTH in CSF of 17 patients undergoing hip or knee arthroplasty, before surgery (t(A)), immediately after termination of propofol infusion and still under spinal anesthesia (t(B)), under postoperative pain (t(C)) and one day after surgery (t(D)); patients rated their severity of pain on a visual analogue scale (VAS) at those four times. In all patients CSF concentrations of N-acetyl-beta-endorphin IRM and beta-lipotropin IRM were found to be increased after terminating the propofol infusion with spinal anesthesia still effective at t(B). Patients did not feel pain at times t(A), t(B) or t(D); however, they reported moderate to considerable pain at t(C). There were no correlations of postoperative pain severity at t(C) with ACTH, beta-endorphin(1-31) or N-acetyl-beta-endorphin IRM concentrations in CSF. In contrast, we observed significant inverse correlations (Spearman's rank correlation coefficients between -0.83 and -0.85, p<0.01) for postoperative pain severity with beta-lipotropin IRM concentrations in CSF at t(C), and, in addition, at t(A), t(B) and t(D); thus, postoperative pain severity appeared to be dependent on a central system controlling sensitivity to pain, linked to a POMC system releasing beta-lipotropin IRM into CSF and already active at times t(A) and t(B). We conclude that beta-lipotropin IRM in CSF might be considered to serve as a predictor of sensitivity to postoperative pain.

  17. Assessment of post-operative pain and its management among patients undergoing craniotomy.

    PubMed

    Saramma, P P; Mathew, Rikku

    2013-01-01

    Pain assessment and its management in patients undergoing craniotomy, especially those with communication barriers, continue to present challenges to nurses. The present study was undertaken to assess the level of post-operative pain suffered by patients after craniotomy, to identify the activities that increase/relieve pain and to find out association between pain score of patients and selected variables. A self-prepared validated questionnaire and Wong Bakers Faces pain scale were used as the tools. The post-operative pain was mild to moderate and decreased from first to third postoperative day. Pain relief was adequate with the combination therapy of non-narcotic analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The study revealed that there was no significant difference between the pain perception and age or gender of the patient. The activities that increased pain were surgical dressing removal and position changing. Nursing staff should focus on assessing and managing post-operative pain to improve quality of nursing care in order to improve the comfort of craniotomy patients.

  18. Music May Soothe the 'Savage Beast' of Post-Op Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164526.html Music May Soothe the 'Savage Beast' of Post-Op ... pain and anxiety, but new research shows that music therapy may help ease their discomfort. Medication is ...

  19. Correlates of satisfaction with pain treatment in the acute postoperative period: results from the international PAIN OUT registry.

    PubMed

    Schwenkglenks, Matthias; Gerbershagen, Hans J; Taylor, Rod S; Pogatzki-Zahn, Esther; Komann, Marcus; Rothaug, Judith; Volk, Thomas; Yahiaoui-Doktor, Maryam; Zaslansky, Ruth; Brill, Silviu; Ullrich, Kristin; Gordon, Debra B; Meissner, Winfried

    2014-07-01

    Patient ratings of satisfaction with their postoperative pain treatment tend to be high even in those with substantial pain. Determinants are poorly understood and have not previously been studied in large-scale, international datasets. PAIN OUT, a European Union-funded acute pain registry and research project, collects patient-reported outcome data on postoperative day 1 using the self-reported International Pain Outcome Questionnaire (IPO), and patient, clinical, and treatment characteristics. We investigated correlates of satisfaction and consistency of effects across centres and countries using multilevel regression modelling. Our sample comprised 16,868 patients (median age 55 years; 55% female) from 42 centres in 11 European countries plus Israel, USA, and Malaysia, who underwent a wide range of surgical procedures, for example, joint, limb, and digestive tract surgeries. Median satisfaction was 9 (interquartile range 7-10) on a 0-10 scale. Three IPO items showed strong associations and explained 35% of the variability present in the satisfaction variable: more pain relief received, higher allowed participation in pain treatment decisions, and no desire to have received more pain treatment. Patient factors and additional IPO items reflecting pain experience (eg, worst pain intensity), pain-related impairment, and information on pain treatment added little explanatory value, partially due to covariate correlations. Effects were highly consistent across centres and countries. We conclude that satisfaction with postoperative pain treatment is associated with the patients' actual pain experience, but more strongly with impressions of improvement and appropriateness of care. To the degree they desire, patients should be provided with information and involved in pain treatment decisions.

  20. Comparison of effects of intraoperative nefopam and ketamine infusion on managing postoperative pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy administered remifentanil

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sung Kwan; Choi, Jung Il; Kim, Woong Mo; Heo, Bong Ha; Park, Keun Seok; Song, Ji A

    2016-01-01

    Background Although intraoperative opioids provide more comfortable anesthesia and reduce the use of postoperative analgesics, it may cause opioid induced hyperalgesia (OIH). OIH is an increased pain response to opioids and it may be associated with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. This study aimed to determine whether intraoperative nefopam or ketamine, known being related on NMDA receptor, affects postoperative pain and OIH after continuous infusion of intraoperative remifentanil. Methods Fifty-four patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomized into three groups. In the nefopam group (N group), patients received nefopam 0.3 mg/kg at the induction of anesthesia followed by a continuous infusion of 0.065 mg/kg/h. In the ketamine group (K group), patients received ketamine 0.3 mg/kg at the induction of anesthesia followed by a continuous infusion of 3 µg/kg/min. The control group did not received any other agents except for the standard anesthetic regimen. Postoperative pain score, first time and number of demanding rescue analgesia, OIH and degrees of drowsiness/sedation scale were examined. Results Co-administrated nefopam or ketamine significantly reduced the total amount of intraoperative remifentanil and postoperative supplemental morphine. Nefopam group showed superior property over control and ketamine group in the postoperative VAS score and recovery index (alertness and respiratory drive), respectively. Nefopam group showed lower morphine consumption than ketamine group, but not significant. Conclusions Both nefopam and ketamine infusion may be useful in managing in postoperative pain control under concomitant infusion of remifentanil. However, nefopam may be preferred to ketamine in terms of sedation. PMID:27703629

  1. Negative oncologic impact of poor postoperative pain control in left-sided pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Min, Eun-Ki; Chong, Jae Uk; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Pae, Sang Joon; Kang, Chang Moo; Lee, Woo Jung

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the association between postoperative pain control and oncologic outcomes in resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). METHODS From January 2009 to December 2014, 221 patients were diagnosed with PDAC and underwent resection with curative intent. Retrospective review of the patients was performed based on electronic medical records system. One patient without records of numerical rating scale (NRS) pain intensity scores was excluded and eight patients who underwent total pancreatectomy were also excluded. NRS scores during 7 postoperative days following resection of PDAC were reviewed along with clinicopathologic characteristics. Patients were stratified into a good pain control group and a poor pain control group according to the difference in average pain intensity between the early (POD 1, 2, 3) and late (POD 5, 7) postoperative periods. Cox-proportional hazards multivariate analysis was performed to determine association between postoperative pain control and oncologic outcomes. RESULTS A total of 212 patients were dichotomized into good pain control group (n = 162) and poor pain control group (n = 66). Median follow-up period was 17 mo. A negative impact of poor postoperative pain control on overall survival (OS) was observed in the group of patients receiving distal pancreatectomy (DP group; 42.0 mo vs 5.0 mo, P = 0.001). Poor postoperative pain control was also associated with poor disease-free survival (DFS) in the DP group (18.0 mo vs 8.0 mo, P = 0.001). Patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy or pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD group) did not show associations between postoperative pain control and oncologic outcomes. Poor patients’ perceived pain control was revealed as an independent risk factor of both DFS (HR = 4.157; 95%CI: 1.938-8.915; P < 0.001) and OS (HR = 4.741; 95%CI: 2.214-10.153; P < 0.001) in resected left-sided pancreatic cancer. CONCLUSION Adequate postoperative pain relief during the early

  2. The Influence of Genotype Polymorphism on Morphine Analgesic Effect for Postoperative Pain in Children

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi Geum; Kim, Hyun Jung; Lee, Keun Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Background Although opioids are the most commonly used medications to control postoperative pain in children, the analgesic effects could have a large inter-individual variability according to genotypes. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms and the analgesic effect of morphine for postoperative pain in children. Methods A prospective study was conducted in 88 healthy children undergoing tonsillectomy, who received morphine during the operation. The postoperative pain score, frequency of rescue analgesics, and side effects of morphine were assessed in the post-anesthesia care unit. The children were genotyped for OPRM1 A118G, ABCB1 C3435T, and COMT Val158Met. Results Children with at least one G allele for OPRM1 (AG/GG) had higher postoperative pain scores compared with those with the AA genotype at the time of discharge from the post-anesthesia care unit (P = 0.025). Other recovery profiles were not significantly different between the two groups. There was no significant relationship between genotypes and postoperative pain scores in analysis of ABCB1 and COMT polymorphisms. Conclusions Genetic polymorphism at OPRM1 A118G, but not at ABCB1 C3435T and COMT Val158Met, influences the analgesic effect of morphine for immediate acute postoperative pain in children. PMID:26839669

  3. Influence of preoperative emotional state on postoperative pain following orthopedic and trauma surgery

    PubMed Central

    Robleda, Gemma; Sillero-Sillero, Amalia; Puig, Teresa; Gich, Ignasi; Baños, Josep-E

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to analyze the relationship between preoperative emotional state and the prevalence and intensity of postoperative pain and to explore predictors of postoperative pain. METHOD: observational retrospective study undertaken among 127 adult patients of orthopedic and trauma surgery. Postoperative pain was assessed with the verbal numeric scale and with five variables of emotional state: anxiety, sweating, stress, fear, and crying. The Chi-squared test, Student's t test or ANOVA and a multivariate logistic regression analysis were used for the statistical analysis. RESULTS: the prevalence of immediate postoperative pain was 28%. Anxiety was the most common emotional factor (72%) and a predictive risk factor for moderate to severe postoperative pain (OR: 4.60, 95% CI 1.38 to 15.3, p<0.05, AUC: 0.72, 95% CI: 0.62 to 0.83). Age exerted a protective effect (OR 0.96, 95% CI: 0.94-0.99, p<0.01). CONCLUSION: preoperative anxiety and age are predictors of postoperative pain in patients undergoing orthopedic and trauma surgery. PMID:25493674

  4. The Effect of Premenstrual Syndrome and Menstrual Phase on Postoperative Pain

    PubMed Central

    Arab, Maliheh; Mirkheshti, Alireza; Noghabaei, Giti; Ashori, Adeleh; Ghasemi, Tahereh; Hosseini-Zijoud, Seyed Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is a common finding in luteal phase of menstrual cycle resulting in several changes in woman life including pain sensation. Objectives: This study evaluated the alterations of postoperative pain sensation in those with and without a history of PMS. Patients and Methods: A total of 140 women in in postoperative period were assigned to four groups regarding luteal or follicular phase of menstrual cycle and the history of PMS and were evaluated regarding scale of pain sensation and morphine demand in recovery room. To evaluate the difference among the groups, Mann Whitney U, Kruskal-Wallis, and Bonferroni tests were used. Results: Patients with PMS presented higher pain sensation and analgesia request (P = 0.003). Patients in luteal phase showed less pain and analgesia request in two out of five studied outcomes (P = 0.075). Conclusions: The most comfortable postoperative women were those in luteal phase without history of PMS group. PMID:25893183

  5. Effect of endocannabinoid degradation on pain: role of FAAH polymorphisms in experimental and postoperative pain in women treated for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cajanus, Kristiina; Holmström, Emil J; Wessman, Maija; Anttila, Verneri; Kaunisto, Mari A; Kalso, Eija

    2016-02-01

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) metabolizes the endocannabinoid anandamide, which has an important role in nociception. We investigated the role of common FAAH single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in experimentally induced and postoperative pain. One thousand women undergoing surgery for breast cancer participated in the study. They were tested for cold (n = 900) and heat pain (n = 1000) sensitivity. After surgery, their pain intensities and analgesic consumption were carefully registered. FAAH genotyping was performed using MassARRAY platform and genome-wide chip (n = 926). Association between 8 FAAH SNPs and 9 pain phenotypes was analyzed using linear regression models. The results showed that carrying 2 copies of a missense variant converting proline at position 129 to threonine (rs324420) resulted in significantly lower cold pain sensitivity and less need for postoperative analgesia. More specifically, rs324420 and another highly correlated SNP, rs1571138, associated significantly with cold pain intensity (corrected P value, 0.0014; recessive model). Patients homozygous for the minor allele (AA genotype) were less sensitive to cold pain (β = -1.48; 95% CI, -2.14 to -0.8). Two other SNPs (rs3766246 and rs4660928) showed nominal association with cold pain, and SNPs rs4141964, rs3766246, rs324420, and rs1571138 nominal association with oxycodone consumption. In conclusion, FAAH gene variation was shown to associate with cold pain sensitivity with P129T/rs324420 being the most likely causal variant as it is known to reduce the FAAH enzyme activity. The same variant showed nominal association with postoperative oxycodone consumption. Our conclusions are, however, limited by the lack of replication and the results should be replicated in an independent cohort.

  6. Acupuncture and related techniques for postoperative pain: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y; Gan, T J; Dubose, J W; Habib, A S

    2008-08-01

    Postoperative pain management remains a significant challenge for all healthcare providers. The objective of this systematic review was to quantitatively evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture and related techniques as adjunct analgesics for acute postoperative pain management. We searched the databases of Medline (1966-2007), CINAHL, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (2006), and Scopus for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) using acupuncture for postoperative pain management. We extracted data about postoperative opioid consumption, postoperative pain intensity, and opioid-related side-effects. Combined data were analysed using a random effects model. Fifteen RCTs comparing acupuncture with sham control in the management of acute postoperative pain were included. Weighted mean difference for cumulative opioid analgesic consumption was -3.14 mg (95% confidence interval, CI: -5.15, -1.14), -8.33 mg (95% CI: -11.06, -5.61), and -9.14 mg (95% CI: -16.07, -2.22) at 8, 24, and 72 h, respectively. Postoperative pain intensity (visual analogue scale, 0-100 mm) was also significantly decreased in the acupuncture group at 8 and 72 h compared with the control group. The acupuncture treatment group was associated with a lower incidence of opioid-related side-effects such as nausea (relative risk, RR: 0.67; 95% CI: 0.53, 0.86), dizziness (RR: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.52, 0.81), sedation (RR: 0.78; 95% CI: 0.61, 0.99), pruritus (RR: 0.75; 95% CI: 0.59, 0.96), and urinary retention (RR: 0.29; 95% CI: 0.12, 0.74). Perioperative acupuncture may be a useful adjunct for acute postoperative pain management.

  7. The effect of complementary therapies on post-operative pain control in ambulatory knee surgery: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Timothy; Downham, Christopher; Barlow, David

    2013-10-01

    Ambulatory knee surgery is a common procedure with over 100,000 knee arthroscopies performed in the U.K. in 2010-2011. Pain after surgery can decrease patient satisfaction, delay discharge, and decrease cost effectiveness. Multi-modal therapies, including complementary therapies, to improve pain control after surgery have been recommended. However, a comprehensive review of the literature regarding the use of complementary therapies to enhance pain control after ambulatory knee surgery is lacking, and this article aims to address this deficit. CINHAL, EMBASE, MEDLINE, AMED and CENTRAL databases were searched. Only Randomised Controlled Trials were included. All eligible papers were quality assessed using the Jadad system, and data was extracted using piloted forms. Two independent reviewers performed each stage of the review. Full details of the study methodology can be found on Prospero, a systematic review register. Five studies satisfied our eligibility criteria: three reporting on acupuncture, one on homeopathy, and one on acupoints. Acupoint pressure was the only study that demonstrated reduced pain compared with placebo. This study was the least methodologically robust. Arnica, although demonstrating a significant reduction in swelling, did not affect post-operative pain. Acupuncture did not affect post-operative pain; however, a reduction in ibuprofen use was demonstrated in two studies. Before recommending complementary therapy for routine use in ambulatory knee surgery, further work is required. Two areas of future research likely to bear fruit are demonstrating robust evidence for the effect of acupoint pressure on post-operative pain, and quantifying the positive effect of homeopathic arnica on post-operative swelling.

  8. A Model-Based Approach for Joint Analysis of Pain Intensity and Opioid Consumption in Postoperative Pain.

    PubMed

    Juul, Rasmus V; Knøsgaard, Katrine R; Olesen, Anne E; Pedersen, Katja V; Kreilgaard, Mads; Christrup, Lona L; Osther, Palle J; Drewes, Asbjørn M; Lund, Trine M

    2016-07-01

    Joint analysis of pain intensity and opioid consumption is encouraged in trials of postoperative pain. However, previous approaches have not appropriately addressed the complexity of their interrelation in time. In this study, we applied a non-linear mixed effects model to simultaneously study pain intensity and opioid consumption in a 4-h postoperative period for 44 patients undergoing percutaneous kidney stone surgery. Analysis was based on 748 Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) scores of pain intensity and 51 observed morphine and oxycodone dosing events. A joint model was developed to describe the recurrent pattern of four key phases determining the development of pain intensity and opioid consumption in time; (A) Distribution of pain intensity scores which followed a truncated Poisson distribution with time-dependent mean score ranging from 0.93 to 2.45; (B) Probability of transition to threshold pain levels (NRS ≥ 3) which was strongly dependent on previous pain levels ranging from 2.8-15.2% after NRS of 0-2; (C) Probability of requesting opioid when allowed (NRS ≥ 3) which was strongly correlated with the number of previous doses, ranging from 89.8% for requesting the first dose to 26.1% after three previous doses; (D) Reduction in pain scores after opioid dosing which was significantly related to the pain intensity at time of opioid request (P < 0.001). This study highlights the importance of analyzing pain intensity and opioid consumption in an integrated manner. Non-linear mixed effects modeling proved a valuable tool for analysis of interventions that affect pain intensity, probability of rescue dosing or the effect of opioids in the postoperative pain period.

  9. Management of postoperative pain: experience of the Niamey National Hospital, Niger

    PubMed Central

    Chaibou, Maman Sani; Sanoussi, Samuila; Sani, Rachid; Toudou, Nouhou A; Daddy, Hadjara; Madougou, Moussa; Abdou, Idrissa; Abarchi, Habibou; Chobli, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the management of postoperative pain at the Niamey National Hospital. Methods A prospective study was conducted in the Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care at the Niamey National Hospital from March to June, 2009. Data collected included age, sex, literacy, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status classification, type of anesthesia, type of surgery, postoperative analgesics used, and the cost of analgesics. Three types of pain assessment scale were used depending on the patient’s ability to describe his or her pain: the verbal rating scale (VRS), the numerical rating scale (NRS), or the visual analog scale (VAS). Patients were evaluated during the first 48 hours following surgery. Results The sample included 553 patients. The VRS was used for the evaluation of 72% of patients, the NRS for 14.4%, and the VAS for 13.6%. Of the VRS group, 33.9%, 8.3%, and 2.1% rated their pain as 3 or 4 out of 4 at 12, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively, respectively. For the NRS group, 33.8%, 8.8%, and 2.5% rated their pain as greater than 7 out of 10 at 12, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively, respectively. For the VAS group, 29.3%, 5.4%, and 0% rated their pain as greater than 7 out of 10 at 12, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively, respectively. Conclusion Postoperative pain assessment and management in developing countries has not been well described. Poverty, illiteracy, and inadequate training of physicians and other health personnel contribute to the underutilization of postoperative analgesia. Analysis of the results gathered at the Niamey National Hospital gives baseline data that can be the impetus to increase training in pain management and to establish standardized protocols. PMID:23271923

  10. Barriers to postoperative pain management in hip fracture patients with dementia as evaluated by nursing staff.

    PubMed

    Rantala, Maija; Kankkunen, Päivi; Kvist, Tarja; Hartikainen, Sirpa

    2014-03-01

    This paper reports a study of the perceptions of nursing staff regarding barriers to postoperative pain management in hip fracture patients with dementia, their expectations, and facilitators offered by their employers to overcome these barriers. Patients with dementia are at high risk for insufficient postoperative pain treatment, mainly owing to inability to articulate or convey their pain experience. Nursing staff have an essential role in the treatment and care of patients who are vulnerable, and therefore unable to advocate for their own pain treatment. Questionnaires with both structured and open-ended questions were used to collect data from nursing staff members in seven university hospitals and ten city-center hospitals from March to May 2011. The response rate was 52% (n = 331). According to nursing staff, the biggest barrier in pain management was the difficulty in assessing pain owing to a patient's cognitive impairment (86%). Resisting care and restlessness among patients with dementia can lead to use of restraints, although these kinds of behavioral changes can point to the occurrence of pain. There were statistically significant differences between the sufficiency of pain management and barriers. Those who expected pain management to be insufficient identified more barriers than those who expected pain management to be sufficient (p < .001). Further updating education for nursing staff in pain detection and management is needed so that nursing staff are also able to recognize behavioral symptoms as potential signs of pain and provide appropriate pain management.

  11. Effect of Intravenous High Dose Vitamin C on Postoperative Pain and Morphine Use after Laparoscopic Colectomy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Younghoon; Park, Jun Seok; Moon, Suyoung

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective. Vitamin C has antioxidant, neuroprotective, and neuromodulating effects. Recently, it showed antinociceptive effect as a result of the antioxidant properties. Therefore, we designed this study to assess the effect of intravenous vitamin C on opiate consumption and pain in patients undergoing laparoscopic colectomy. Methods. A total of 100 patients were enrolled and allocated to receive 50 mg/kg vitamin C or placebo by intravenous infusion immediately after induction of anesthesia. Morphine consumption and scores of pain were assessed at 2, 6, and 24 h after completion of surgery. Results. There were 97 patients included in the analysis. Patients who received vitamin C had higher plasma concentrations of vitamin C at the end of surgery, significantly lower morphine consumption at the 2 h after end of surgery, and significantly lower pain scores at rest during first 24 h postoperatively. There was no significant difference between groups in side effects, fatigue score, or pain score during cough. Conclusion. This study shows high dose vitamin C infusion decreased postoperative pain during the first 24 h and reduced morphine consumption in the early postoperative period. Additional research needed to examine whether higher doses of vitamin C and longer infusion times can amplify these effects. PMID:27872555

  12. Influence of ethnicity on the perception and treatment of early post-operative pain

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Simon; Griffin-Teall, Nicola; Thompson, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous studies indicated that patients from Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) groups tend to receive less analgesics compared to Caucasian (White) patients after similar surgical procedures. Most such data originated from North America and suggested that health-care professionals may perceive the expression of excessive pain by BAME patient groups as an exaggerated response to pain, rather than sub-optimal treatment. There are limited data comparing acute pain management between South Asian and White British patients. Objective: We aimed to investigate correlation between patients’ ethnicity and disparities of early post-operative pain perception/management, in an ethnically diverse population. Methods: We conducted a retrospective case note review of acute post-operative pain after total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH) in 60 South Asian and 60 age-matched White British females. Data for 140 variables (pre-, intra- and post-operative) for each patient were recorded. We used propensity score matching to produce 30 closely matched patients in each group minimizing effects of recorded co-variates. Data were analysed with and without propensity score matching. Results: There were no significant differences in acute post-operative pain scores, morphine requirements, pain management, adverse effects or duration of post-operative care unit stay between South Asian and White British patients. The median duration of hospital stay of South Asian patients was longer (4.5 days versus 3.0 days, p < 0.001). Conclusion: We conclude that in an institution where both patients and health-care professionals are from an ethnically diverse population, neither post-operative pain nor pain management are influenced significantly by South Asian ethnicity. PMID:26516573

  13. Postoperative pain intensity after using different instrumentation techniques: a randomized clinical study

    PubMed Central

    ÇIÇEK, Ersan; KOÇAK, Mustafa Murat; KOÇAK, Sibel; SAĞLAM, Baran Can; TÜRKER, Sevinç Aktemur

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Postoperative pain is a frequent complication associated with root canal treatment, especially during apical instrumentation of tooth with preexisting periradicular inflammation Objectives The aim of this clinical study was to evaluate the influence of the instrumentation techniques on the incidence and intensity of postoperative pain in single-visit root canal treatment. Material and Methods Ninety patients with single root/canal and non-vital pulps were included. The patients were assigned into 3 groups according to root canal instrumentation technique used; modified step-back, reciprocal, and rotational techniques. Root canal treatment was carried out in a single visit and the severity of postoperative pain was assessed via 4-point pain intensity scale. All the participants were called through the phone at 12, 24 and 48 h to obtain the pain scores. Data were analyzed through the Kruskal–Wallis test. Results There was significant difference between all groups (p<0.05). The modified step-back technique produced postoperative pain significantly lower than the rotational (p=0.018) and reciprocal (p=0.020) techniques. No difference was found between the reciprocal and rotational techniques (p=0.868). Postoperative pain in the first 12 h period (p=0.763) and in the 24 h period (p=0.147) was not significantly different between the groups. However, the difference in the 48 h period was statistically different between the groups (p=0.040). Conclusion All instrumentation techniques caused postoperative pain. The modified step-back technique produced less pain compared to the rotational and reciprocal techniques. PMID:28198972

  14. Analgesic Effect of Indian Gooseberry (Emblica officinalis Fruit) Extracts on Postoperative and Neuropathic Pain in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Dong Wook; Kim, Jae Goo; Kim, Yun Tai

    2016-01-01

    Indian gooseberry (Emblica officinalis fruit), also known as “Amla” is one of the oldest edible fruits known in India. It has also traditionally been used to treat inflammation, and as an analgesic to treat wounds. However, experimental evidence for the analgesic effects of E. officinalis has been lacking. The present study investigated whether E. officinalis extracts exhibit analgesic effects in the plantar incision (PI) and spared nerve injury (SNI) pain-model rats. We evaluated the mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT) using von Frey filaments, and pain-related behavior was determined after surgery based on ultrasonic vocalization (USV). The group treated with E. officinalis extracts at 300 mg/kg had significantly increased MWT values at 6 h and 24 h after the PI, and had a significantly reduced number of 22–27-kHz USVs at 6 h and 24 h after PI. Moreover, after 15 days of continuous treatment with E. officinalis extracts, the treated group showed significantly alleviated SNI-induced hypersensitivity and reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine levels. Thus, E. officinalis extracts have potential analgesic effects in both postoperative and neuropathic pain models in vivo. PMID:27898027

  15. Micro opioid receptor A118G polymorphism and post-operative pain: opioids' effects on heterozygous patients.

    PubMed

    De Capraris, A; Cinnella, G; Marolla, A; Salatto, P; Da Lima, S; Vetuschi, P; Consoletti, L; Gesualdo, L; Dambrosio, M

    2011-01-01

    The single-nucleotide-polymorphism (SNP) 118A>G in the micro-1 opioid receptor gene (OPRM1) is associated with a decrease in the analgesic effects of opioids. The aim of this study is to assess whether 118A >G polymorphism could influence the analgesic response to opioid-based postoperative pain (POP) therapy. The study consisted of two parts: section alpha, observational, included 199 subjects undergoing scheduled surgical procedures with pain management standardized on surgery invasiveness and on expected level of postoperative pain; section beta, randomized, included 41 women undergoing scheduled caesarean delivery with continuous intra-operative epidural anesthesia and post-operative analgesia (CEA). In both sections, POP was measured over 48 h (T6h-T24h-T48h) by the visual analogue scale (VAS). In section beta we also tested the responsiveness of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) expressed by cortisol levels. In section alpha, with cluster analysis, subjects were analyzed according to their genotype: a group (no. 1) of 34 patients reporting VAS score >3 at every time lapse was identified and included only A118G carriers, while wild-type (A118A - absence of 118A>G polymorphism) patients were unevenly distributed between those with cluster no. 2 (VAS score <3 at every study steps) and those with cluster no. 3 (VAS score progressively reducing from T6h). In section beta, A118G carriers receiving epidural sufentanil had the lowest VAS scores at T24h; also in these patients, cortisol levels remained more stable, with a mild decrease at T6h. This study shows that the OPRM1 118A>G polymorphism affects postoperative pain response in heterozygous patients: they have a different postoperative pain response than patients with wild-type genes, which may affect the efficacy of the analgesic therapy.

  16. The Complement System in Neuropathic and Postoperative Pain

    PubMed Central

    Fritzinger, David C.; Benjamin, Daniel E.

    2017-01-01

    Certain types of pain are major unmet medical needs that affect more than 8 percent of the population. Neuropathic pain can be caused by many pathogenic processes including injury, autoimmune disease, neurological disease, endocrine dysfunction, infection, toxin exposure, and substance abuse and is frequently resistant to available pain therapies. The same can be said of postsurgical pain, which can arise from uncontrolled inflammation around the wound site. The complement system is part of the innate immune system and can both initiate and sustain acute and chronic inflammatory pain. Here we review the complement system and original investigations that identify potential drug targets within this system. Drugs that act to inhibit the complement system could fill major gaps in our current standard of care for neuropathic pain states. PMID:28154610

  17. [Evaluation of pain intensity and vital signs in the cardiac surgery postoperative period].

    PubMed

    Miranda, Adriana de Fátima Alencar; da Silva, Lúcia de Fátima; Caetano, Joselany Áfio; de Sousa, Ana Cláudia; Almeida, Paulo César

    2011-04-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the changes in vital signs of postoperative cardiac surgery patients, according to the referred pain intensity. This descriptive-exploratory study was performed using quantitative analysis to investigate 38 patients submitted to a first dressing change. The analysis of the data, measured before and after performing the nursing procedure, indicated that the manifestation of pain occurred at different levels. The main changes in vital signs referred to blood pressure. In conclusion, there is a relationship between pain intensity and vital signs, and the care that is delivered is indispensible to reestablishing the health state of the postoperative patient.

  18. Can chronic neuropathic pain following thoracic surgery be predicted during the postoperative period?

    PubMed

    Searle, Robert D; Simpson, Matthew P; Simpson, Karen H; Milton, Richard; Bennett, Michael I

    2009-12-01

    Chronic pain following thoracic surgery is common and associated with neuropathic symptoms, however, the proportion of patients with neuropathic pain in the immediate postoperative period is unknown. We aimed to determine the proportion of patients who have neuropathic symptoms and signs immediately after, and at three months following thoracic surgery. The study was designed as a prospective observational cohort study. We identified patients with pain of predominantly neuropathic origin using the Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (LANSS) score in the immediate postoperative period and the self-report LANSS (S-LANSS) version three months after surgery. One hundred patients undergoing video assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) or thoracotomy completed LANSS scores preoperatively and in the immediate postoperative period. Eighty-seven percent completed three months S-LANSS follow-up scores. Eight percent of patients had positive LANSS scores in the immediate postoperative period; 22% of patients had positive S-LANSS scores three months following surgery. There was a significant association between positive scores in the acute and chronic periods (relative risk (RR) 3.5, [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7-7.2]). Identifying pain of predominantly neuropathic origin in the postoperative period with a simple pain score can help identify those at risk of developing chronic pain with these features following thoracic surgery.

  19. [Managing postoperative pain in pediatric nursing: searching for subsides to improve nursing care].

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Fernanda Cristina; Nascimento, Lucila Castanheira; Leite, Adriana Moraes; Flória-Santos, Milena; de Lima, Regina Aparecida Garcia; Scochi, Carmen Gracinda Silvan

    2007-01-01

    This study reports on a literature review about child postoperative pain management by nursing professionals, in the period from 1993 to 2005. Three themes were identified: factors influencing nurses' management of child pain, interventions to relieve child pain, and nurses' assessment and response to children's pain experience. Child pain management is a complex act that involves elements of the dimensions related to the children themselves, health professionals and family members. The lack of studies in this area reveals the need for research, with a view to (re)considering pediatric nursing care.

  20. Post-Operative Pain Management Practices in Patients with Dementia - The Current Situation in Finland

    PubMed Central

    Rantala, Maija; Kankkunen, Päivi; Kvist, Tarja; Hartikainen, Sirpa

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe current post-operative pain management practices for patients with dementia and hip fracture in Finland. Older adults with hip fracture are at high risk of under treatment for pain, especially if they also have a cognitive disorder at the stage of dementia. Previous studies have provided limited information about the quality of acute pain treatment for persons with dementia. In this study data concerning current pain management practices was collected by questionnaire from 333 nursing staff. They worked in surgical wards of seven universities and ten city-centre hospitals. The response rate to the questionnaire was 53%. The data was analysed using factor analysis and parametric methods. Half the respondents (53%) considered that post-operative pain management was sufficient for patients with dementia. Less than one third of respondent nurses reported that pain scales were in use on their unit: the most commonly used scale was VAS. The use of pain scales was significantly related to the respondents’ opinion of the sufficiency of post-operative pain management in this patient group (p<0.001). The findings can be utilised in nursing practice and research when planning suitable complementary educational interventions for nursing staff of surgical wards. Further research is needed to explain the current situation of pain management practices from the viewpoint of patients with dementia. PMID:22723810

  1. Post-operative pain management practices in patients with dementia - the current situation in Finland.

    PubMed

    Rantala, Maija; Kankkunen, Päivi; Kvist, Tarja; Hartikainen, Sirpa

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe current post-operative pain management practices for patients with dementia and hip fracture in Finland. Older adults with hip fracture are at high risk of under treatment for pain, especially if they also have a cognitive disorder at the stage of dementia. Previous studies have provided limited information about the quality of acute pain treatment for persons with dementia. In this study data concerning current pain management practices was collected by questionnaire from 333 nursing staff. They worked in surgical wards of seven universities and ten city-centre hospitals. The response rate to the questionnaire was 53%. The data was analysed using factor analysis and parametric methods. Half the respondents (53%) considered that post-operative pain management was sufficient for patients with dementia. Less than one third of respondent nurses reported that pain scales were in use on their unit: the most commonly used scale was VAS. The use of pain scales was significantly related to the respondents' opinion of the sufficiency of post-operative pain management in this patient group (p<0.001). The findings can be utilised in nursing practice and research when planning suitable complementary educational interventions for nursing staff of surgical wards. Further research is needed to explain the current situation of pain management practices from the viewpoint of patients with dementia.

  2. Effect of Intravenous Ketorolac on Postoperative Pain in Mandibular Fracture Surgery; A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Eftekharian, Hamid Reza; Ilkhani pak, Homa

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of intravenous ketorolac on early postoperative pain in patients with mandibular fractures, who underwent surgical repair. Methods: This prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted in Shahid Rajaei Hospital, affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences during a 1-year period from 2015 to 2016. We included a total number of 50 patients with traumatic mandibular fractures who underwent surgical repair. Patients with obvious contraindications to ketorolac such as asthma, renal dysfunction, peptic ulceration, bleeding disorders, cardiovascular disease, mental retardation, or allergy to ketorolac or NSAIDS, were excluded. The patients were randomly assigned to receive intravenous ketorolac (30 mg) at the end of operation in post anesthesia care unit immediately upon the onset of pain (n=25), or intravenous distilled water as placebo (n=25). Postoperative monitoring included non-invasive arterial blood pressure, ECG, and peripheral oxygen saturation. The postoperative pain was evaluated by a nurse using visual analog scale (VAS) (0–100 mm) pain score 4 hours after surgery and was compared between the two study groups. Results: Overall we included 50 patients (25 per group) in the current study. The baseline characteristics including age, gender, weight, operation duration, anesthesia duration and type of surgical procedure were comparable between two study groups. Those who received placebo had significantly higher requirements for analgesic use compared to ketorolac group (72% vs. 28%; p=0.002). Ketorolac significantly reduced the pain intensity 30-min after the operation (p<0.001). There were no significant side effects associated with ketorolac. Conclusion: Intravenous single-dose ketorolac is a safe and effective analgesic agent for the short-term management of mild to moderate acute postoperative pain in mandibular fracture surgery and can be used as an alternative to opioids. PMID:28246618

  3. The effect of various kinematics on postoperative pain after instrumentation: a prospective, randomized clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Hakan; Khalilov, Ruslan; Doğanay, Ezgi; Karatas, Ertugrul

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate various kinematic movements on postoperative pain using a Reciproc system. Material and Methods: Fifty-six molar teeth were divided into four groups according to kinematics as follows: continuous rotation, 360° CCW – 30° CW, 270° CCW – 30° CW, and 150° CCW – 30° CW. Preoperative and postoperative pain levels using visual analogue scale (VAS), percussion pain, and analgesic intake were recorded for each subject. Postoperative pain levels at 1, 3, 5, and 7 d were evaluated. Data were analyzed statistically using the Kruskal-Walis, Mann-Whitney-U, one-way analysis of variance, and chi-square tests (p=0.05). Results: Continuous rotation resulted in more pain at Day 1 when compared with the reciprocating groups (360° CCW – 30° CW and 270° CCW – 30° C) (p<0.05). Conclusions: Continuous rotation resulted in more postoperative pain at Day 1 than in reciprocating groups, and thereafter no significant pain was found among the groups. PMID:27812621

  4. Single dose oral indometacin for the treatment of acute postoperative pain

    PubMed Central

    Moore, R Andrew; Derry, Sheena; Mason, Lorna; McQuay, Henry J; Edwards, Jayne

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 4, 2004. Indometacin is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used most commonly for the treatment of inflammation and pain resulting from rheumatic disease (arthritis), and less commonly in postoperative pain management. When taken for chronic pain conditions, indometacin has been associated with a high incidence of adverse events. The benefits and harms of orally-administered indometacin for postoperative pain are not clear. Objectives To determine the efficacy of a single dose of oral indometacin compared with placebo in treating acute postoperative pain in adults, and to analyse information relating to adverse events. Search methods We searched the Cochrane CENTRAL Register of Controlled Trials in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Oxford Pain Relief Database for relevant studies in January 2002 and for the updated search in December 2007. Additional studies were sought from the reference lists of retrieved studies. Selection criteria Studies were included in the review if they were randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials using a single oral dose of indometacin in adults with acute postoperative pain. Data collection and analysis Studies were assessed independently by two review authors. Pain relief or pain intensity data were extracted and converted into dichotomous information to give the number of participants with at least 50% pain relief over four to six hours. The relative benefit for at least 50% pain relief was calculated. Main results In the original review one study of 59 women with post-episiotomy pain met the inclusion criteria. The dose of indometacin assessed against placebo was 50 mg, and the results concluded that indometacin was not significantly better than placebo for relieving postoperative pain at four to six hours. There was insufficient information to conduct further efficacy analyses or assess adverse events

  5. To predict sufentanil requirement for postoperative pain control using a real-time method

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuhao; Duan, Guangyou; Guo, Shanna; Ying, Ying; Huang, Penghao; Zhang, Mi; Li, Ningbo; Zhang, Xianwei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Preoperative identification of individual sensitivity to opioid analgesics could improve the quality of postoperative analgesia. We explored the feasibility and utility of a real-time assessment of sufentanil sensitivity in predicting postoperative analgesic requirement. Our primary study included 111 patients who underwent measurements of pressure and quantitative pricking pain thresholds before and 5 minutes after sufentanil infusion. Pain intensity was assessed during the first 24-hour postsurgery, and patients who reported inadequate levels of analgesia were excluded from the study. The sufentanil requirement for patient-controlled analgesia was recorded, and a subsequent exploratory study of 20 patients facilitated the interpretation of the primary study results. In the primary study, experimental pain thresholds increased (P < 0.001) 5 minutes after sufentanil infusion, and the percent change in pricking pain threshold was positively associated with sufentanil requirement at 12 and 24 hours after surgery (β = 0.318, P = 0.001; and β = 0.335, P = 0.001). A receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis showed that patients with a change in pricking pain threshold >188% were >50% likely to require more sufentanil for postoperative pain control. In the exploratory study, experimental pain thresholds significantly decreased after the operation (P < 0.001), and we observed a positive correlation (P < 0.001) between the percent change in pricking pain threshold before and after surgery. Preoperative detection of individual sensitivity to sufentanil via the above described real-time method was effective in predicting postoperative sufentanil requirement. Thus, percent change in pricking pain threshold might be a feasible predictive marker of postoperative analgesia requirement. PMID:27336880

  6. Antinociceptive effects of vitexin in a mouse model of postoperative pain

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qing; Mao, Li-Na; Liu, Cheng-Peng; Sun, Yue-Hua; Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Wei; Li, Jun-Xu

    2016-01-01

    Vitexin, a C-glycosylated flavone present in several medicinal herbs, has showed various pharmacological activities including antinociception. The present study investigated the antinociceptive effects of vitexin in a mouse model of postoperative pain. This model was prepared by making a surgical incision on the right hindpaw and von Frey filament test was used to assess mechanical hyperalgesia. Isobolographical analysis method was used to examine the interaction between vitexin and acetaminophen. A reliable mechanical hyperalgesia was observed at 2 h post-surgery and lasted for 4 days. Acute vitexin administration (3–10 mg/kg, i.p.) dose-dependently relieved this hyperalgesia, which was also observed from 1 to 3 days post-surgery during repeated daily treatment. However, repeated vitexin administration prior to surgery had no preventive value. The 10 mg/kg vitexin-induced antinociception was blocked by the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone or the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline. The doses of vitexin used did not significantly suppress the locomotor activity. In addition, the combination of vitexin and acetaminophen produced an infra-additive effect in postoperative pain. Together, though vitexin-acetaminophen combination may not be useful for treating postoperative pain, vitexin exerts behaviorally-specific antinociception against postoperative pain mediated through opioid receptors and GABAA receptors, suggesting that vitexin may be useful for the control of postoperative pain. PMID:26763934

  7. Postoperative Pain, an Unmet Problem in Day or Overnight Italian Surgery Patients: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Campagna, Sara; Antonielli D'Oulx, Maria Delfina; Paradiso, Rosetta; Perretta, Laura; Re Viglietti, Silvia; Berchialla, Paola; Dimonte, Valerio

    2016-01-01

    Background. Because of economic reasons, day surgery rates have steadily increased in many countries and the trend is to perform around 70% of all surgical procedures as day surgery. Literature shows that postoperative pain treatment remains unfulfilled in several fields such as orthopedic and general surgery patients. In Italy, the day surgery program is not yet under governmental authority and is managed regionally by local practices. Aim. To investigate the trends in pain intensity and its relation to type of surgeries and pain therapy protocols, in postoperative patients, discharged from three different Ambulatory Surgeries located in North West Italy (Piedmont region). Method. The present study enrolled 276 patients who undergone different surgical procedures in ambulatory regimen. Patients recorded postoperative pain score twice a day, compliance with prescribed drugs, and pain related reasons for contacting the hospital. Monitoring lasted for 7 days. Results. At discharge, 72% of patients were under weak opioids, 12% interrupted the treatment due to side effects, 17% of patients required extra drugs, and 15% contacted the hospital reporting pain problems. About 50% of patients experienced moderate pain during the first day after surgery. Results from our study show that most of the patients experienced avoidable pain after discharge.

  8. Postoperative Pain, an Unmet Problem in Day or Overnight Italian Surgery Patients: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Antonielli D'Oulx, Maria Delfina; Paradiso, Rosetta; Perretta, Laura; Dimonte, Valerio

    2016-01-01

    Background. Because of economic reasons, day surgery rates have steadily increased in many countries and the trend is to perform around 70% of all surgical procedures as day surgery. Literature shows that postoperative pain treatment remains unfulfilled in several fields such as orthopedic and general surgery patients. In Italy, the day surgery program is not yet under governmental authority and is managed regionally by local practices. Aim. To investigate the trends in pain intensity and its relation to type of surgeries and pain therapy protocols, in postoperative patients, discharged from three different Ambulatory Surgeries located in North West Italy (Piedmont region). Method. The present study enrolled 276 patients who undergone different surgical procedures in ambulatory regimen. Patients recorded postoperative pain score twice a day, compliance with prescribed drugs, and pain related reasons for contacting the hospital. Monitoring lasted for 7 days. Results. At discharge, 72% of patients were under weak opioids, 12% interrupted the treatment due to side effects, 17% of patients required extra drugs, and 15% contacted the hospital reporting pain problems. About 50% of patients experienced moderate pain during the first day after surgery. Results from our study show that most of the patients experienced avoidable pain after discharge. PMID:28115878

  9. Manual lymph drainage efficiently reduces postoperative facial swelling and discomfort after removal of impacted third molars.

    PubMed

    Szolnoky, G; Szendi-Horváth, K; Seres, L; Boda, K; Kemény, L

    2007-09-01

    The removal of wisdom teeth is often associated with severe postoperative edema and pain, and operation on the third molar can cause local inflammation that impairs lymph transport. The objective of the study was to assess the efficacy of manual lymph drainage (MLD) in reducing swelling following bilateral wisdom tooth removal. Ten consecutive patients with bilateral impacted wisdom teeth that required surgical removal were enrolled in the study. Each patient was postoperatively treated with MLD (after Vodder's method) on one side of the neck region with the untreated contralateral side as a control. Swelling was evaluated using a tape-measure placed in contact with the skin. The six landmarks of measurement included tragus-lip junction, tragus-pogonion, mandibular angle-external corner of eye, mandibular angle-ala nasi, mandibular angle-lip junction, and mandibular angle-median point of chin. Subjective assessment of MLD was conducted with self-evaluation using a visual analogue bar scale (VAS, range 0-100 mm). Of the 6 linear measurements, 4 lines (2, 4, 5, 6) showed a significant reduction of swelling on the side of MLD compared to the untreated side. Mean score of VAS of pretreatment condition was 35.5 +/- 20.60 mm that decreased to 22 +/- 19.32 mm measured after MLD (p=0.0295). This initial study demonstrates that MLD may promote an improvement of lymph circulation and work in an adjunctive role for reduction of postoperative swelling and pain following removal of impacted third molars.

  10. Inter-Hospital Variability of Postoperative Pain after Tonsillectomy: Prospective Registry-Based Multicentre Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; Geißler, Katharina; Komann, Marcus; Schlattmann, Peter; Meissner, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Although tonsillectomy is one of the most frequent and painful surgeries, the association between baseline and process parameters and postoperative pain are not fully understood. Methods A multicentre prospective cohort study using a web-based registry enrolled 1,527 women and 1,008 men aged 4 to 85 years from 52 German hospitals between 2006 and 2015. Maximal pain (MP) score the first day after surgery on a numeric rating scale (NRS) from 0 (no pain) to 10 (MP) was the main outcome parameter. Results The mean maximal pain score was 5.8±2.2 (median 6). Multivariable analysis revealed that female gender (Odds ratio [OR] = 1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.12 to 1.56; p = 0.001), age <20 years (OR = 1.56; CI = 1.27 to 1.91; p<0.0001), no pain counselling (OR = 1.78; CI = 1.370 to 2.316; p<0.001), chronic pain (OR = 1.34; CI = 1.107 to 1.64; p = 0.004), and receiving opioids in recovery room (OR = 1.89; CI = 1.55 to 2.325; p<0.001) or on ward (OR = 1.79; CI = 1.42 to 2.27; p<0.001) were independently associated with higher experienced maximal postoperative pain (greater the median of 6). The effect of age on pain was not linear. Maximal pain increased in underage patients to a peak at the age of 18 to 20 years. From the age of ≥20 years on, maximal pain after tonsillectomy continuously decreased. Even after adjustment to all statistically important baseline and process parameters, there was substantial variability of maximal pain between hospitals with a heterogeneity variance of 0.31. Conclusion Many patients seem to receive insufficient or ineffective analgesia after tonsillectomy. Further research should address if populations at risk of higher postoperative pain such as females, younger patients or those with preexisting pain might profit from a special pain management protocol. Beyond classical demographical and process parameters the large variability between different hospitals is striking and indicates the existence of other unknown factors

  11. Clinically derived early postoperative pain trajectories differ by age, sex, and type of surgery.

    PubMed

    Tighe, Patrick J; Le-Wendling, Linda T; Patel, Ameet; Zou, Baiming; Fillingim, Roger B

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of age, sex, and type of surgery on postoperative pain trajectories derived in a clinical setting from pain assessments in the first 24 hours after surgery. This study is a retrospective cohort study using a large electronic medical records system to collect and analyze surgical case data. The sample population included adult patients undergoing nonambulatory nonobstetric surgery in a single institution over a 1-year period. Analyses of postoperative pain trajectories were performed using a linear mixed-effects model. Pain score observations (91,708) from 7293 patients were included in the statistical analysis. On average, the pain score decreased about 0.042 (95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.044 to -0.040) points on the numerical rating scale (NRS) per hour after surgery for the first 24 postoperative hours. The pain score reported by male patients was approximately 0.27 (95% CI: -0.380 to -0.168) NRS points lower than that reported by females. Pain scores significantly decreased over time in all age groups, with a slightly more rapid decrease for younger patients. Pain trajectories differed by anatomic location of surgery, ranging from -0.054 (95% CI: -0.062 to -0.046) NRS units per hour for integumentary and nervous surgery to -0.104 (95% CI: -0.110 to -0.098) NRS units per hour for digestive surgery, and a positive trajectory (0.02 [95% CI: 0.016 to 0.024] NRS units per hour) for musculoskeletal surgery. Our data support the important role of time after surgery in considering the influence of biopsychosocial and clinical factors on acute postoperative pain.

  12. Neurolysis using a carbohydrate polymer gel for the treatment of postoperative neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Daniel P; Kalbermatten, Daniel F; Egloff, Daniel V; Raffoul, Wassim

    2010-02-01

    Perineural and intraneural fibrosis is thought to be the main cause of failure of the many surgical treatments of neuropathic pain. We have used Adcon-T/N carbohydrate polymer gel for prevention of perineural fibrosis in several parts of the body. In this retrospective study, 54 patients who presented with postoperative neuropathic pain had microsurgical epineural neurolysis and relocation of a terminal neuroma. In 19 of them, the carbohydrate gel was applied at the same time. The mean follow-up was four years and the nerve distribution varied. Postoperative improvement in pain scores (visual analogue scale (VAS) and neuropathic pain scale inventory (NPSI)), sensitivity, overall improvement and satisfaction were equivalent in the two groups, with pain relief in about 80% of the patients. There was no significant beneficial effect in the carbohydrate gel group. Patients treated with this device had a higher infection rate (21 compared with 0, p = 0.01) and delayed wound healing (31.6 compared with 11.8, p = 0.2). We conclude that good long-term pain relief is obtained postoperatively independently of the addition of carbohydrate gel. There was a slight but not significant trend towards profound pain relief with the gel.

  13. Glyceryl Trinitrate Ointment Did Not Reduce Pain After Stapled Hemorrhoidectomy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Trent; Bartlett, Lynne; Mushaya, Chrispen; Ashour, Mohamed; Ho, Yik-Hong

    2012-01-01

    Medications, including topical 0.2% glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), can reduce anal spasm and pain after excisional hemorrhoidectomy. GTN after stapled hemorrhoidopexy was compared with routine postoperative management. Patients with symptomatic grade 3/4 hemorrhoids were recruited. After stapled hemorrhoidopexy, residual perianal skin tags were excised as appropriate. Those requiring double purse-string mucosectomy were excluded. Postoperative pain, pain duration, and complications were assessed. One hundred ten patients (74 men; mean age 50.6 years) were enrolled in the control group and 100 patients (57 men; mean age 49.8 years) in the GTN group. Maximum pain was higher in the GTN group (P  =  0.015). There were no differences between the two groups in residual perianal skin tags requiring excision, postoperative complications, recurrence rates, follow-up period, average pain, duration of pain, or satisfaction scores. Sixteen GTN patients were noncompliant due to side effects. None had persistent perianal skin tags. GTN did not reduce postoperative pain after stapled hemorrhoidectomy. PMID:23102076

  14. Efficacy of Tramadol as a Sole Analgesic for Postoperative Pain in Male and Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, A Marissa; Kennedy, Lucy H; Na, Jane J; Nemzek-Hamlin, Jean A

    2015-07-01

    Tramadol is a centrally acting weak μ opioid agonist that has few of the adverse side effects common to other opioids. Little work has been done to establish an effective analgesic dose of tramadol specific for surgical laparotomy and visceral manipulation in mice. We used general appearance parameters to score positive indicators of pain including posture, coat condition, activity, breathing, and interactions with other mice, activity events (that is, the number of times each mouse stretched up in a 3-min period) used as an indicator of decreased pain, von Frey fibers, and plasma levels of corticosterone to determine whether tramadol at 20, 40, or 80 mg/kg prevented postoperative pain in male and female C57BL/6 mice. A ventral midline laparotomy with typhlectomy was used as a model of postoperative pain. In male mice, none of the markers differed between groups that received tramadol (regardless of dose) and the saline-treated controls. However, general appearance scores and plasma corticosterone levels were lower in female mice that received 80 mg/kg tramadol compared with saline. In summary, for severe postoperative pain after laparotomy and aseptic typhlectomy, tramadol was ineffective in male C57BL/6 mice at all doses tested. Although 80 mg/kg ameliorated postoperative pain in female C57BL/6 mice, this dose is very close to the threshold reported to cause toxic side effects, such as tremors and seizures. Therefore, we do not recommend the use of tramadol as a sole analgesic in this mouse model of postoperative pain.

  15. Efficacy of Tramadol as a Sole Analgesic for Postoperative Pain in Male and Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, A Marissa; Kennedy, Lucy H; Na, Jane J; Nemzek-Hamlin, Jean A

    2015-01-01

    Tramadol is a centrally acting weak μ opioid agonist that has few of the adverse side effects common to other opioids. Little work has been done to establish an effective analgesic dose of tramadol specific for surgical laparotomy and visceral manipulation in mice. We used general appearance parameters to score positive indicators of pain including posture, coat condition, activity, breathing, and interactions with other mice, activity events (that is, the number of times each mouse stretched up in a 3-min period) used as an indicator of decreased pain, von Frey fibers, and plasma levels of corticosterone to determine whether tramadol at 20, 40, or 80 mg/kg prevented postoperative pain in male and female C57BL/6 mice. A ventral midline laparotomy with typhlectomy was used as a model of postoperative pain. In male mice, none of the markers differed between groups that received tramadol (regardless of dose) and the saline-treated controls. However, general appearance scores and plasma corticosterone levels were lower in female mice that received 80 mg/kg tramadol compared with saline. In summary, for severe postoperative pain after laparotomy and aseptic typhlectomy, tramadol was ineffective in male C57BL/6 mice at all doses tested. Although 80 mg/kg ameliorated postoperative pain in female C57BL/6 mice, this dose is very close to the threshold reported to cause toxic side effects, such as tremors and seizures. Therefore, we do not recommend the use of tramadol as a sole analgesic in this mouse model of postoperative pain. PMID:26224442

  16. Evidence-based postoperative pain management in nursing: is a randomized-controlled trial the most appropriate design?

    PubMed

    Seers, K; Crichton, N; Carroll, D; Richards, S; Saunders, T

    2004-05-01

    There is an increasing drive to make nursing care evidence-based. High quality evidence from systematic reviews relevant to postoperative pain relief exists, yet pain after surgery remains poorly controlled for many patients. This study aimed to assess whether implementing evidence-based pain management improved postoperative pain outcomes. Pain on a 0-10 scale was the primary outcome and analgesic consumption a secondary outcome. A baseline audit was undertaken on four surgical wards to establish whether there was a need for the study. A randomized-controlled trial was then designed to assess the effects of implementing an evidence-based approach to postoperative pain management. The four wards were randomized to receive the intervention or act as a control. Outcomes were assessed 3 months after the intervention on both intervention and control wards. The intervention (implementation of an oral analgesic algorithm derived from systematic reviews) was then implemented on the control wards and outcomes reassessed after 3 months on the control wards. The intervention was designed using an evidence-based approach to effective implementation. Four interactive sessions covered: (1) detailed feedback of baseline data and discussion (utilizing audit and feedback), (2) why systematic reviews, analgesic league tables and choice of drugs to develop an analgesic algorithm (see Figure 1), (3) principles of evidence based health care (EBHC), including critical appraisal and (4) facilitation and change workshop. The findings revealed no significant differences in pain level or drug use between the intervention and control wards. However, the control wards also changed during the control period. Possible explanations for this are discussed. When looking at changes compared with baseline, both intervention and control wards increased their use of algorithm drugs and reduced use of non-algorithm drugs during the study. No effects were found on pain in the intervention wards. Pain

  17. Comparison between two thoracotomy closure techniques: postoperative pain and pulmonary function*

    PubMed Central

    Leandro, Juliana Duarte; Rodrigues, Olavo Ribeiro; Slaets, Annie France Frere; Schmidt, Aurelino F.; Yaekashi, Milton L.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare two thoracotomy closure techniques (pericostal and transcostal suture) in terms of postoperative pain and pulmonary function. METHODS: This was a prospective, randomized, double-blind study carried out in the Department of Thoracic Surgery of the Luzia de Pinho Melo Hospital das Clínicas and at the University of Mogi das Cruzes, both located in the city of Mogi das Cruzes, Brazil. We included 30 patients (18-75 years of age) undergoing posterolateral or anterolateral thoracotomy. The patients were randomized into two groups by the type of thoracotomy closure: pericostal suture (PS; n = 16) and transcostal suture (TS; n = 14). Pain intensity during the immediate and late postoperative periods was assessed by a visual analogic scale and the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Spirometry variables (FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC ratio, and PEF) were determined in the preoperative period and on postoperative days 21 and 60. RESULTS: Pain intensity was significantly greater in the PS group than in the TS group. Between the preoperative and postoperative periods, there were decreases in the spirometry variables studied. Those decreases were significant in the PS group but not in the TS group. CONCLUSIONS: The patients in the TS group experienced less immediate and late post-thoracotomy pain than did those in the PS group, as well as showing smaller reductions in the spirometry parameters. Therefore, transcostal suture is recommended over pericostal suture as the thoracotomy closure technique of choice. PMID:25210961

  18. Effect of single dose pretreatment analgesia with three different analgesics on postoperative endodontic pain: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Priyank; Agarwal, Manish; Chourasia, Hemant Ramesh; Singh, Mahesh Pratap

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: One of the aims of root canal treatment is to prevent or eliminate pain. Postoperative endodontic pain control continues to be a significant challenge. Aim: To compare and evaluate the effect of single oral dose of 100 mg of tapentadol, 400 mg of etodolac, or 10 mg of ketorolac as a pretreatment analgesic for the prevention and control of postoperative endodontic pain in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. The incidence of side effects was recorded as secondary outcome. Materials and Methods: Sixty emergency patients with moderate to severe pain, diagnosed with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis were randomly allocated (1:1:1) to any of the three groups; tapentadol, etodolac, or ketorolac. Medications were administered 30 min before beginning of the endodontic treatment. Patients recorded pain intensity on 10 cm visual analog scale (VAS) after treatment, for upto 24 h. Results: At 24 h, mean ±standard deviation (SD) of VAS scores (in cm) for tapentadol, etodolac, and ketorolac were 0.89 ± 0.83, 2.68 ± 2.29, and 0.42 ± 0.69, respectively. Kruskal-Wallis (K-W) test showed significant difference among the three groups (P = 0.001). Mann-Whitney test showed significantly lower VAS scores in tapentadol and ketorolac than etodolac group (P = 0.013 and 0.001, respectively). Conclusions: Single oral dose of 10 mg of ketorolac and 100mg of tapentadol as a pretreatment analgesic significantly reduced postoperative endodontic pain in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis when compared to 400 mg of etodolac. PMID:25506136

  19. Single dose oral mefenamic acid for acute postoperative pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Moll, Rachel; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background Mefenamic acid is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). It is most often used for treating pain of dysmenorrhoea in the short term (seven days or less), as well as mild to moderate pain including headache, dental pain, postoperative and postpartum pain. It is widely available in many countries worldwide. Objectives To assess the efficacy of single dose oral mefenamic acid in acute postoperative pain, and any associated adverse events. Search methods We searched Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Oxford Pain Relief Database for studies to December 2010. Selection criteria Single oral dose, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of mefenamic acid for relief of established moderate to severe postoperative pain in adults. Data collection and analysis Studies were assessed for methodological quality and the data extracted by two review authors independently. Summed total pain relief (TOTPAR) or pain intensity difference (SPID) over 4 to 6 hours was used to calculate the number of participants achieving at least 50% pain relief. These derived results were used to calculate, with 95% confidence intervals, the relative benefit compared to placebo, and the number needed to treat (NNT) for one participant to experience at least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours. Numbers of participants using rescue medication over specified time periods, and time to use of rescue medication, were sought as additional measures of efficacy. Information on adverse events and withdrawals was collected. Main results Four studies with 842 participants met the inclusion criteria; 126 participants were treated with mefenamic acid 500 mg, 67 with mefenamic acid 250 mg, 197 with placebo, and 452 with lignocaine, aspirin, zomepirac or nimesulide. Participants had pain following third molar extraction, episiotomy and orthopaedic surgery. The NNT for at least 50% pain relief over 6 hours with a single dose of mefenamic acid 500 mg compared to placebo was 4.0 (2

  20. Avoiding Opioids and Their Harmful Side Effects in the Postoperative Patient: Exogenous Opioids, Endogenous Endorphins, Wellness, Mood, and Their Relation to Postoperative Pain.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Bradley C; Parsa, Fereydoun D

    2016-03-01

    Prescribed opioids are routinely used for many postoperative patients. However, these medications have daunting adverse effects on the body's innate pain management system--the action of the beta-endorphins. The prescribed opioids not only severely impair the function of the mu-opioid receptors, but also inhibit the release of beta-endorphin. This is unfortunate, because beta-endorphin appears to be a much more potent agonist of the mu-opioid receptor than opioids. In addition, beta-endorphin indirectly elevates dopamine, a neurotransmitter related to feelings of euphoria. Therefore, by prescribing opioids, practitioners may inadvertently prolong and increase the overall intensity of the postoperative patients' pain as well as herald anhedonia. This article highlights the relationships between prescribed (exogenous) opioids, beta-endorphins, mu-opioid receptors, wellness, mood, and postoperative pain. The role of patient education, opioid alternatives, and additional recommendations regarding pain control in the postoperative patient are also discussed.

  1. Antinociceptive effects of curcumin in a rat model of postoperative pain

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qing; Sun, Yuehua; Yun, Xiaodi; Ou, Yuntao; Zhang, Wei; Li, Jun-Xu

    2014-01-01

    Curcumin is a principal ingredient of traditional Chinese medicine, Curcuma Longa, which possesses a variety of pharmacological activities including pain relief. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that curcumin has antinociceptive effects for inflammatory and neuropathic pain. This study examined the effects of curcumin in a rat model of postoperative pain. A surgical incision on the right hind paw induced a sustained mechanical hyperalgesia that lasted for 5 days. Acute curcumin treatment (10–40 mg/kg, p.o) significantly and dose dependently reversed mechanical hyperalgesia. In addition, repeated curcumin treatment significantly facilitated the recovery from surgery. In contrast, repeated treatment with curcumin before surgery did not impact the postoperative pain threshold and recovery rate. All the doses of curcumin did not significantly alter the spontaneous locomotor activity. Combined, these results suggested that curcumin could alleviate postoperative pain and promote recovery from the surgery, although there was no significant preventive value. This study extends previous findings and supports the application of curcumin alone or as an adjunct therapy for the management of peri-operative pain. PMID:24816565

  2. Music benefits on postoperative distress and pain in pediatric day care surgery.

    PubMed

    Calcaterra, Valeria; Ostuni, Selene; Bonomelli, Irene; Mencherini, Simonetta; Brunero, Marco; Zambaiti, Elisa; Mannarino, Savina; Larizza, Daniela; Albertini, Riccardo; Tinelli, Carmine; Pelizzo, Gloria

    2014-08-12

    Postoperative effect of music listening has not been established in pediatric age. Response on postoperative distress and pain in pediatric day care surgery has been evaluated. Forty-two children were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to the music-group (music intervention during awakening period) or the non-music group (standard postoperative care). Slow and fast classical music and pauses were recorded and played via ambient speakers. Heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, glucose and cortisol levels, faces pain scale and Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC) Pain Scale were considered as indicators of response to stress and pain experience. Music during awakening induced lower increase of systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels. The non-music group showed progressive increasing values of glycemia; in music-group the curve of glycemia presented a plateau pattern (P<0.001). Positive impact on reactions to pain was noted using the FLACC scale. Music improves cardiovascular parameters, stress-induced hyperglycemia. Amelioration on pain perception is more evident in older children. Positive effects seems to be achieved by the alternation of fast, slow rhythms and pauses even in pediatric age.

  3. Evaluating Persistent Postoperative Pain in One Tertiary Hospital: Incidence, Quality of Life, Associated Factors, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Guimaraes-Pereira, Luis; Valdoleiros, Ines; Reis, Pedro; Abelha, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Background Persistent postoperative pain (PPP) is defined as persistent pain after surgery of greater than three months’ duration. Objectives Identify the incidence of PPP in our hospital and its associated factors; evaluate quality of life (QoL) and treatment of patients. Patients and Methods We conducted an observational prospective study in adults proposed to various types of surgery using the brief pain inventory short form preoperatively (T0), one day after surgery, and three months later (T3). If the patient had pain at T3 and other causes of pain were excluded, they were considered to have PPP, and the McGill Pain Questionnaire Short Form was applied. QoL was measured with the EuroQol 5-dimension questionnaire (EQ-5D). Results One hundred seventy-five patients completed the study. The incidence of PPP was 28%, and the affected patients presented lower QoL. The majority referred to a moderate to severe level of interference in their general activity. Cholecystectomies were less associated with PPP, and total knee/hip replacements were more associated with it. Preoperative pain, preoperative benzodiazepines or antidepressants, and more severe acute postoperative pain were associated with the development of PPP. Half of the patients with PPP were under treatment, and they refer a mean symptomatic relief of 69%. Conclusions This study, apart from attempting to better characterize the problem of PPP, emphasizes the lack of its treatment. PMID:27252908

  4. [The effect of corticosteroids in children and adolescents after tonsillectomy in the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting, pain and bleeding].

    PubMed

    Ploner, Sandra; Gruber, Elisabeth; Mantovan, Franco

    2014-05-01

    Tonsillectomy and adenotomy are the most common pediatric surgical procedures, with approximately five millions performed each year worldwide (O'Mathúna, Wiffen & Conlon, 2010). However, this procedure is accompanied by significant postoperative morbidity, which may include postoperative pain, postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), poor oral intake with consequent dehydration and postoperative bleeding (Hanasono et al., 2004). If pain is not treated effectively, it can cause avoidance behaviors related to further healthcare. Inadequate pain management has been found to increase morbidity and mortality rates in postoperative patients of all ages (O'Mathúna, Wiffen & Conlon, 2010). In addition, there is an increase in the incidence of PONV: 40% in children with pain compared to 16% in children without pain. PONV also disturbs significantly the wellbeing and patient satisfaction, it can lead to a substantial prolongation of time in the recovery room with increased costs of personal care. In pediatric patients PONV is the most common cause of the approximately 1% to 2% of unplanned hospitalizations following outpatient surgery (Rüsch et al., 2010). The incidence of bleeding after tonsillectomy is approximately 0.5-10%, with deaths occurring in 1 in 20,000 patients (Kim et al., 2011). In recent years, several scientists have explored the effect ofcorticosteroids in the reduction of morbidity after tonsillectomy. In this publication, the question is addressed to what extent perioperatively administered corticosteroids can reduce pain, PONV and postoperative bleeding in the context of tonsillectomy in children and adolescents. For this purpose, a narrative literature analysis of the electronic databases and journals was conducted. There is evidence that corticosteroids can reduce postoperative morbidity. However, no evident and clear recommendation can be drawn from the advices of the various studies.

  5. Prospective, randomized, and controlled trial on ketamine infusion during bilateral axillo-breast approach (BABA) robotic or endoscopic thyroidectomy: Effects on postoperative pain and recovery profiles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Ho; Choi, June Young; Kim, Byoung-Gook; Hwang, Jin-Young; Park, Seong-Joo; Oh, Ah-Young; Jeon, Young-Tae; Ryu, Jung-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Robotic or endoscopic thyroidectomy using bilateral axillo-breast approach (BABA) is frequently performed for excellent cosmesis. However, postoperative pain is remained as concerns due to the extent tissue dissection and tension during the operation. Ketamine is a noncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist that reduces acute postoperative pain. We evaluated the effects of intraoperative ketamine infusion on postoperative pain control and recovery profiles following BABA robotic or endoscopic thyroidectomy. Methods: Fifty-eight adult patients scheduled for BABA robotic or endoscopic thyroidectomy were randomized into a control group (n = 29) and ketamine group (n = 29). Following induction of anesthesia, patients in each group were infused with the same volume of saline or ketamine solution (1 mg/kg bolus, 60 μg/kg/h continuous infusion). Total intravenous anesthesia with propofol and remifentanil was used to induce and maintain anesthesia. Pain scores (101-point numerical rating scale, 0 = no pain, 100 = the worst imaginable pain), the consumption of rescue analgesics, and other postoperative adverse effects were assessed at 1, 6, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively. Results: Patients in the ketamine group reported lower pain scores than those in the control group at 6 hours (30 [30] vs 50 [30]; P = 0.017), 24 hours (20 [10] vs 30 [20]; P < 0.001), and 48 hours (10 [10] vs 20 [15]; P < 0.001) in neck area. No statistically significant differences were found between the 2 groups in terms of the requirements for rescue analgesics or the occurrence of adverse events. Conclusion: Intravenous ketamine infusion during anesthesia resulted in lower postoperative pain scores following BABA robotic or endoscopic thyroidectomy, with no increase in adverse events. PMID:27930531

  6. Postoperative Pain after Endodontic Treatment of Asymptomatic Teeth Using Rotary Instruments: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Shahriar; Asghari, Vahideh; Rahimi, Saeed; Lotfi, Mehrdad; Samiei, Mohammad; Yavari, Hamidreza; Shakouie, Sahar; Nezafati, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of the present study was to compare the effect of two different rotary instruments on postoperative pain in teeth with asymptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Methods and Materials: A total of 78 mandibular first and second molars were divided into two groups (n=39) and their root canal preparation was carried out with either RaCe or ProTaper rotary instruments. All the subjects underwent one-visit root canal treatment and the severity of postoperative pain was evaluated using visual analog scale (VAS) at 4-, 12-, 24-, 48- and 72-h and 1-week intervals. In addition, the need for taking analgesics was recorded. Data were analyzed with the repeated-measures ANOVA and the Mann-Whitney U test was used for two-by-two comparison. Statistical significance was set at 0.05. Results: Comparison of mean pain severity between the two groups at various postoperative intervals did not reveal any significant differences (P=0.10). The difference in amount of analgesics taken by each groups was not statistically significant (P=0.25). Conclusion: There were no significant differences in the postoperative pain reported between the two groups; which indicates the clinical acceptability of both systems. PMID:26843876

  7. Does body mass index and position of impacted lower third molar affect the postoperative pain intensity?

    PubMed

    Matijević, Marko; Uzarević, Zvonimir; Gvozdić, Vlatka; Leović, Dinko; Ivanisević, Zrinka; Matijević-Mikelić, Valentina; Bogut, Irella; Vcev, Aleksandar; Macan, Darko

    2012-12-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine to which extent body mass index and position of impacted lower third molar was affecting the pain intensity in the first seven postoperative days. The study was conducted following the extraction of the lower third molar in 108 patients. Depending on the type of information given to each particular patient, the patients were divided in two groups: the test group where patients were given detailed standard written and verbal instructions and the control group which received only standard written instructions about treatment after surgery. Using canonical discriminant analysis we investigated the influence of body mass index and the position of impacted lower third molar on postoperative pain intensity in two groups of patients. Results of this study showed that the body mass index or the tooth position did not have influence on intensity of postoperative pain. The body mass index and the position of impacted lower third molar do not affect the postoperative pain intensity.

  8. The effect of complementary music therapy on the patient's postoperative state anxiety, pain control, and environmental noise satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Comeaux, Tressa; Comeaux, Tressa

    2013-01-01

    Postoperative pain is difficult to manage with analgesia alone. Complementary interventions such as music therapy provide a level of distraction, thus promoting comfort. In this study, decreased pain and environmental noise were demonstrated, without diminishing state anxiety, in a group of postoperative patients.

  9. Postoperative pain treatment after total knee arthroplasty: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Wetterslev, Mik; Hansen, Signe Elisa; Hansen, Morten Sejer; Mathiesen, Ole; Dahl, Jørgen B.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this systematic review was to document efficacy, safety and quality of evidence of analgesic interventions after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods This PRISMA-compliant and PROSPERO-registered review includes all-language randomized controlled trials of medication-based analgesic interventions after TKA. Bias was evaluated according to Cochrane methodology. Outcomes were opioid consumption (primary), pain scores at rest and during mobilization, adverse events, and length of stay. Interventions investigated in three or more trials were meta-analysed. Outcomes were evaluated using forest plots, Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE), L’Abbe Plots and trial sequential analysis. Results The included 113 trials, investigating 37 different analgesic interventions, were characterized by unclear/high risk of bias, low assay sensitivity and considerable differences in pain assessment tools, basic analgesic regimens, and reporting of adverse events. In meta-analyses single and continuous femoral nerve block (FNB), intrathecal morphine, local infiltration analgesia, intraarticular injection of local anaesthetics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and gabapentinoids demonstrated significant analgesic effects. The 24-hour morphine-sparing effects ranged from 4.2 mg (CI: 1.3, 7.2; intraarticular local anaesthetics), to 16.6 mg (CI: 11.2, 22; single FNB). Pain relieving effects at rest at 6 hours ranged from 4 mm (CI: -10, 2; gabapentinoids), to 19 mm (CI: 8, 31; single FNB), and at 24 hours from 3 mm (CI: -2, 8; gabapentinoids), to 16 mm (CI: 8, 23; continuous FNB). GRADE-rated quality of evidence was generally low. Conclusion A low quality of evidence, small sample sizes and heterogeneity of trial designs prohibit designation of an optimal procedure-specific analgesic regimen after TKA. PMID:28273133

  10. Single dose oral tiaprofenic acid for acute postoperative pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Moore, R Andrew; Derry, Sheena; Moore, Maura; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background Tiaprofenic acid is a a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). It is widely available around the world, with indications for osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, periarticular disorders, and strains and sprains. This review sought to evaluate the efficacy and safety of oral tiaprofenic acid in acute postoperative pain, using clinical studies of patients with established pain, and with outcomes measured primarily over 6 hours using standard methods. This type of study has been used for many decades to establish that drugs have analgesic properties. Objectives To assess the efficacy of single dose oral tiaprofenic acid in acute postoperative pain, and any associated adverse events. Search methods We searched Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Oxford Pain Relief Database for studies to June 2009. Selection criteria Randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled trials of single dose orally administered tiaprofenic acid in adults with moderate to severe acute postoperative pain. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We planned to use area under the “pain relief versus time” curve to derive the proportion of participants with tiaprofenic acid experiencing at least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours, using validated equations; to use number needed to treat to benefit (NNT); the proportion of participants using rescue analgesia over a specified time period; time to use of rescue analgesia; information on adverse events and withdrawals. Main results Not one of eleven studies identified by the searches and examined in detail studied oral tiaprofenic acid against placebo in patients with established postoperative pain and therefore no results are available. Authors’ conclusions In the absence of evidence of efficacy for oral tiaprofenic acid in acute postoperative pain, its use in this indication is not justified at present. Because trials clearly

  11. Effects of remifentanil versus nitrous oxide on postoperative nausea, vomiting, and pain in patients receiving thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Kyoung; Yi, Myung Sub; Kang, Hyun; Choi, Geun-Joo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Remifentanil and nitrous oxide (N2O) are 2 commonly used anesthetic agents. Both these agents are known risk factors for postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). However, remifentanil and N2O have not been directly compared in a published study. Remifentanil can induce acute tolerance or hyperalgesia, thus affecting postoperative pain. The objective of this retrospective study is to compare the effects of remifentanil and N2O on PONV and pain in patients receiving intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) after thyroidectomy. We analyzed the electronic medical records of 992 patients receiving fentanyl-based IV-PCA after thyroidectomy at Chung-Ang University Hospital from January 1, 2010 to April 30, 2016. We categorized the patients according to anesthetic agents used: group N2O (n = 745) and group remifentanil (n = 247). The propensity score matching method was used to match patients in the 2 groups based on their covariates. Finally, 128 matched subjects were selected from each group. There were no differences between groups for all covariates after propensity score matching. The numeric rating scale for nausea (0.55 ± 0.88 vs 0.27 ± 0.76, P = 0.01) was higher and complete response (88 [68.8%] vs 106 [82.8%], P = 0.001) was lower in group N2O compared with group remifentanil on postoperative day 0. However, the visual analog scale score for pain (3.47 ± 2.02 vs 3.97 ± 1.48, P = 0.025) was higher in group remifentanil than group N2O on postoperative day 0. In patients receiving IV-PCA after thyroidectomy, postoperative nausea was lower but postoperative pain was higher in group remifentanil. PMID:27741140

  12. Efficacy of Continuous S(+)-Ketamine Infusion for Postoperative Pain Control: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Miziara, Luiz Eduardo de Paula Gomes; Simoni, Ricardo Francisco; Esteves, Luís Otávio; Cangiani, Luis Henrique; Grillo-Filho, Gil Fernando Ribeiro; Paula, Anderson Garcia Lima E

    2016-01-01

    Aim. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial was designed to evaluate the efficacy of continuous intraoperative infusion of S(+)-ketamine under intravenous anesthesia with target-controlled infusion of remifentanil and propofol for postoperative pain control. Methods. Forty-eight patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were assigned to receive continuous S(+)-ketamine infusion at a rate of 0.3 mg·kg(-1)·h(-1) (n = 24, intervention group) or an equivalent volume of saline at the same rate (n = 24, placebo group). The same target-controlled intravenous anesthesia was induced in both groups. Pain was assessed using a 0 to 10 verbal numeric rating scale during the first 12 postoperative hours. Pain scores and morphine consumption were recorded in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) and at 4 and 12 hours after surgery. Results. Pain scores were lower in the intervention group at all time points. Morphine consumption did not differ significantly between groups during PACU stay, but it was significantly lower in the intervention group at each time point after PACU discharge (P = 0.0061). At 12 hours after surgery, cumulative morphine consumption was also lower in the intervention group (5.200 ± 2.707) than in the placebo group (7.525 ± 1.872). Conclusions. Continuous S(+)-ketamine infusion during laparoscopic cholecystectomy under target-controlled intravenous anesthesia provided better postoperative pain control than placebo, reducing morphine requirement. Trial Registration. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02421913.

  13. A unilateral open door laminoplasty technique: prospective analysis of the relationship between midline extensor muscle preservation and postoperative neck pain.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Hoon; Jeong, Eui-Kyun; Lee, Moon Kyu; Chul Rhim, Seung; Roh, Sung Woo; Kim, Jeoung Hee; Jeon, Sang Ryong

    2015-02-01

    Since laminoplasty was first introduced, several techniques have been developed to reduce postoperative neck pain and progressive kyphosis following this procedure. We describe the importance of deep muscle preservation to prevent postoperative neck pain following cervical posterior surgery, using the inter-muscular plane. We performed cervical laminoplasty on 10 patients from March to July 2012. The mean follow-up duration was 14.6 (range 12-18) months, and the mean age was 58.8 (48-68) years. There were eight men and two women in the study cohort, which consisted of eight cases of cervical spondylotic myelopathy and two cases of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score and neck disability index (NDI) score were assessed before and at 6 and 12 months after surgery. The numeric rating scale (NRS) for neck pain was evaluated at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery. CT scan was performed immediately after the operation, and a radiograph was performed preoperatively and during the follow-up evaluation at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery. The preoperative JOA and NDI scores improved in all patients. Although there were two patients who complained of moderate postoperative neck pain (NRS 4 and 5), their condition gradually improved. Seven patients had mild or no neck pain (below NRS 3) at the 12 month follow-up. In addition, the cervical alignment was well maintained in all but one patient. Although larger prospective cohorts, longer follow-up periods, and comparative analyses are still needed, the clinical and radiological outcomes observed in the short 12 month period in this small cohort are promising.

  14. Avoiding aortic clamping during CABG reduces postoperative stroke

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Emmanuel; Puskas, John D; Thourani, Vinod H; Kilgo, Patrick; Chen, Edward P; Leshnower, Bradley G; Lattouf, Omar M; Guyton, Robert A.; Glas, Kathryn E; Halkos, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine whether the incidence of postoperative stroke (PS) could be reduced by eliminating aortic clamping during CABG. Methods From 2002–2013, 12,079 patients underwent primary, isolated CABG at a single US academic institution. Aortic manipulation was completely avoided by using in-situ internal mammary arteries for inflow in 1,552 (12.9%) patients (no-touch), a clampless facilitating device (CFD) was used for proximal anastomoses in 1,548 (12.8%) patients, and aortic clamping was used in 8,979 (74.3%) patients. These strategies were assessed in a logistic regression model controlling for relevant variables. Results The overall incidence of PS was 1.4% (n=165), with an unadjusted incidence of 0.6% (n=10) in the no-touch group, 1.2% (n=18) in the CFD group, and 1.5% (n=137) in the clamp group (p<0.01 for no-touch vs clamp). The ratio of observed to expected stroke rate increased as the degree of aortic manipulation increased, from 0.48 in the no-touch group, to 0.61 in the CFD group, and 0.95 in the clamp group. Aortic clamping was independently associated with an increase in PS compared to a no-touch technique (AOR 2.50, p<0.01). When separated by CPB utilization, both the off-pump partial clamp and on-pump cross-clamp techniques increased the risk of PS compared to no-touch (AOR 2.52, p<0.01 and AOR 4.25, p<0.001, respectively). Conclusion A no-aortic touch technique has the lowest risk for postoperative stroke for patients undergoing CABG. Clamping the aorta during CABG increases the risk of PS, regardless of the severity of aortic disease. PMID:25293356

  15. The Effect of Paracetamol versus Meperidine on Postoperative Pain of Cesarean Section

    PubMed Central

    Jarineshin, Hashem; Fekrat, Fereydoon; Kashani, Saeed

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aim: Meperidine and paracetamol are frequently used in postoperative pain control. We evaluated the effect of paracetamol versus meperidine on postoperative pain control of elective cesarean section in patients under general anesthesia. Materials and Methods: In this randomized double-blind study, seventy mothers’ candidate for cesarean section under general anesthesia were randomized in paracetamol group (n = 35), received 1 g paracetamol in 100 ml normal saline, and meperidine group (n = 35), received 25 mg meperidine in 100 ml normal saline and then compared regarding the pain and vomiting severity based on visual analog scale (VAS). Results: Two groups did not show significant difference regarding pain score based on VAS during 30 min after surgery in the recovery room, however, the pain score after 30 min in paracetamol group was significantly more than meperidine group. The difference between two groups regarding pain score in surgery ward at 0, 2, 4, 6 h, were not significant, however, pain score after 6 h in meperidine group was significantly lower than paracetamol group. The score of vomiting based on VAS in the recovery room in meperidine group was marginally more than paracetamol group (P > 0.05). The score of vomiting, based on VAS in meperidine group was significantly more than paracetamol group during the 24 h in the surgery ward. The analgesic consumption in meperidine group during 24 h after surgery was significantly lower than paracetamol group. Conclusion: We indicated that the meperidine decreased postoperative pain score and analgesic consumption more than paracetamol, but increased the vomiting score. PMID:28298778

  16. A Prospective Multicentre Study to Improve Postoperative Pain: Identification of Potentialities and Problems

    PubMed Central

    Pogatzki-Zahn, Esther; Kutschar, Patrick; Nestler, Nadja; Osterbrink, Juergen

    2015-01-01

    Many studies still indicate insufficient pain management after surgery, e.g., in patients after small- or medium-size operations. Yet it is still uncertain if postoperative pain based on patient-related outcomes can be improved by implementing guideline-related programmes in a multicentre approach. Adult patients in six hospitals in one German city were included in this prospective study. Data collection took place twice in each hospital, once before and once after implementation of concepts and in-house training. Pain and pain-related aspects were assessed one day after surgery and compared between the pre- and post-test group including subgroup analysis of certain surgical procedures by using Student’s t-tests, Mann-Whitney U tests and chi-square tests (alphatwo-tailed = 0.05). Overall, pain at rest and during movement was slightly lower after the intervention. Significant changes were observed after thoracic surgery, small joint surgery and other minor surgical procedures. The rather moderate decrease in pain likely relates to a reasonable pre-existing pain management and to detached improvements in certain patient subgroups. Interestingly, specific analyses revealed significantly lower post-test pain as compared to pre-test pain only in patients without pre-existing chronic pain. Side effects related to pain medication were significantly lower after intervention. Our data show, for the first time, benefits of a perioperative teaching programme in a multicentre approach. Pain ratings improved mainly in specific subgroups of patients, e.g., small surgical procedures and patients without preoperative pain. Thus, general improvement is possible but special attention should be paid to the group of patients with preoperative pain. PMID:26600464

  17. [Pain scale: implementation for patients in the immediate postoperative period of cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Keller, Clarissa; Paixão, Adriana; Moraes, Maria Antonieta; Rabelo, Eneida Rejane; Goldmeier, Silvia

    2013-06-01

    A clinical intervention study was developed in a hospital specialized in cardiology in Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil, with the objective of evaluating the implementation of the pain scale in post-operative cardiac surgery patients. It was developed in four steps: pre-test on pain, training lecture for nursing staff, and, reapplication of the pre-test at 30 and 60 days. The test consisted of ten questions weighing one point each. Scores > or =7 were determined to represent satisfactory knowledge in using the pain scale. The sample consisted of 57 nursing professionals. The scores ranged from 6.12 +/- 1.65 in the pre-test to 7.73 +/- 1.05 and 8.18 +/- 0.99 after 30 and 60 days, respectively (p<0.005). Pain intensity was correlated to medication standardized by protocol. The training improved the knowledge of the team and the type of analgesia administered in relation to pain intensity.

  18. Current concepts and practice in postoperative pain management: need for a change?

    PubMed

    Filos, K S; Lehmann, K A

    1999-01-01

    Despite a growing trend in acute pain management, many deficiencies still account for the high incidence of moderate to severe postoperative pain to date. Patients nowadays continue to receive inadequate doses of analgesics, but additionally the identification and treatment of those patients with pain still remains a significant health care problem. Advanced techniques are available including epidural or intrathecal administration of local anaesthetics and opioids, various opioid administration techniques such as patient-controlled analgesia and infusions via sublingual, oral-transmucosal, nasal, intra-articular and rectal routes. Nonopioid analgesics such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and newer nonopioid drugs such as alpha2-adrenergic agonists, calcium channel antagonists and various combinations of the above are possible. However, the solution to the problem of inadequate pain relief lies not so much in the development of new drugs and new techniques, but in the effective strategy of delivering these to patients through the introduction of acute pain management services on surgical wards.

  19. Prophylactic effect of dexamethasone in reducing postoperative sore throat

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sun-young; Lee, Ae-ri; Cho, Sung-Hwan; Chae, Won Seok; Jin, Hee Cheol; Lee, Jeong Seok; Kim, Yong Ik

    2010-01-01

    Background This study was performed to compare the effectiveness of prophylactic dexamethasone and postintubation dexamethasone in reducing the incidence and severity of postoperative sore throat (POST). Methods This was a prospective, randomized, double-blind clinical trial. The study population consisted of 70 patients between 20 and 60 years old who were classified as American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II and were scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The patients were divided randomly into two groups. Patients in the prophylactic and postintubation groups received intravenous injection of 10 mg of dexamethasone 30 min before or after tracheal intubation, respectively. The patients were interviewed 1, 6, and 24 h after the operation. The incidence and severity of POST were recorded. Results The severity scores of POST at 1 and 6 h after the operation were significantly lower in the prophylactic group than in the postintubation group. There were no significant differences in the incidence of POST during the 24 h after the operation between the two groups (22/32 in the prophylactic group vs. 27/34 in the postintubation group, P = 0.403). Conclusions Intravenous injection of 10 mg of dexamethasone was more effective in reducing the severity of POST when administered before tracheal intubation compared with after tracheal intubation. PMID:20498806

  20. Adhesion barrier reduces postoperative adhesions after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yukihiro; Hirata, Yasutaka; Achiwa, Ikuya; Morishita, Hiroyuki; Soto, Hajime; Kobayahsi, Jotaro

    2012-06-01

    Reoperation in cardiac surgery is associated with increased risk due to surgical adhesions. Application of a bioresorbable material could theoretically reduce adhesions and allow later development of a free dissection plane for cardiac reoperation. Twenty-one patients in whom a bioresorbable hyaluronic acid-carboxymethylcellulose adhesion barrier had been applied in a preceding surgery underwent reoperations, while 23 patients underwent reoperations during the same period without a prior adhesion barrier. Blinded observers graded the tenacity of the adhesions from surgical video recordings of the reoperations. No excessive bleeding requiring wound reexploration, mediastinal infection, or other complication attributable to the adhesion barrier occurred. Multiple regression analysis showed that shorter duration of the preceding surgery, non-use of cardiopulmonary bypass in the preceding surgery, and use of the adhesion barrier were significantly associated with less tenacious surgical adhesions. The use of a bioresorbable material in cardiac surgery reduced postoperative adhesions, facilitated reoperation, and did not promote complications. The use of adhesion barrier is recommended in planned staged procedures and those in which future reoperation is likely.

  1. Comparison of Intravenous Morphine with Sublingual Buprenorphine in Management of Postoperative Pain after Closed Reduction Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Ghasem; Khorsand, Mahmood; Shamloo, Alireza Sepehri; Jarahi, Lida; Zirak, Nahid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative pain is a common side effect following surgery that can significantly reduce surgical quality and patient’s satisfaction. Treatment options are morphine and buprenorphine. We aimed to compare the efficacy of a single dose of intravenous morphine with sublingual buprenorphine in postoperative pain control following closed reduction surgery. Methods: This triple blind clinical trial was conducted on 90 patients referred for closed reduction orthopedic surgery. They were older than 18 years and in classes I and II of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) with an operation time of 30-90 minutes. Patients were divided into two groups of buprenorphine (4.5µg/kg sublingually) and morphine (0.2mg/kg intravenously). Baseline characteristics, vital signs, pain score, level of sedation and pharmacological side effects were recorded in the recovery room (at 0 and 30 minutes), and in the ward (at 3, 6 and 12 hours). SPSS version 19 software was used for data analysis and the significance level was set at P<0.05. Results: Ninety patients were studied, 60 males and 30 females with a mean age of 37.7±16.2 years. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of baseline characteristics. Pain score in the morphine group was significantly higher than the buprenorphine group with an average score of 2.5 (P<0.001). Postoperative mean heart rate in the buprenorphine group was four beats lower than the morphine group (P<0.001). Also, in the buprenorphine 48.6% and in the morphine group 86.7% of cases were conscious in recovery (P=0.001) with a higher rate of pruritus in the latter group (P=0.001). Conclusion: Sublingual buprenorphine administration before anesthesia induction in closed reduction surgery can lead to better postoperative pain control in comparison to intravenous morphine. Due to simple usage and longer postoperative sedation, sublingual buprenorphine is recommended as a suitable drug in closed reduction surgery

  2. Evaluation of Pain Preoperatively and Postoperatively in Patients with Chronic Pancreatitis Undergoing Longitudinal Pancreaticojejunostomy.

    PubMed

    Bhat, K R Seetharam; Khajanchi, Monty; Prajapati, Ram; Satoskar, R R

    2015-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a fairly common condition with pain being the major symptom, and longitudinal pancreaticojejunostomy (LPJ) is performed for symptomatic relief. The aim of the study is to assess relief of pain post-LPJ for chronic pancreatitis and to evaluate the factors influencing relief of symptoms. A prospective observational non-interventional study enrolling 28 patients. This study involved a questionnaire studying various risk factors and pain related to chronic pancreatitis, pancreaticojejunostomy, and postoperative assessment of pain relief at 1 and 6 months from surgery. Pain was assessed using Visual analogue scale (VAS). In chronic pancreatitis, there is a significant relief in symptoms of pain post-LPJ; the degree of relief was less in the alcoholics vs non-alcoholics (p = 0.09) and smokers. There was also reduction in analgesic requirement and frequency of acute attacks of pain. Fifty-seven percent of patients had a complete remission of their pain after LPJ for CP. In chronic pancreatitis, there is a significant relief in symptoms of pain post-LPJ, although the degree of relief is less in the alcoholics and smokers.

  3. Ibuprofen given pre- and post-operatively for the relief of pain.

    PubMed

    Hill, C M; Carroll, M J; Giles, A D; Pickvance, N

    1987-08-01

    155 patients undergoing surgical removal of lower third molars took part in a parallel group, randomised double-blind study to assess the analgesic effect of single pre-operative doses of ibuprofen (400 mg), codeine phosphate (30 mg), a combination of ibuprofen/codeine (400 mg/30 mg), placebo and post-operative single doses of the same combination or diflunisal (250 mg). Patients receiving the combination or ibuprofen pre-operatively took significantly longer between surgery completion and needing the post-operative study treatment than patients receiving codeine phosphate or placebo. At 1 1/2-2 h after post-operative administration, patients receiving the combination post-operatively reported significantly greater decreases in pain severity than those receiving diflunisal. Patients taking the combination post-operatively experienced significantly better pain relief than patients taking diflunisal at 1 and 2 h, but the reverse was true at 5 h. Side-effects reported were mild with no significant differences between the different treatment groups.

  4. The Ghanaian surgical nurse and postoperative pain management: a clinical ethnographic insight.

    PubMed

    Aziato, Lydia; Adejumo, Oluyinka

    2014-03-01

    Nurses form an indispensable part of the clinical team that manages postoperative pain (POP). Within a particular clinical context, nurses perceive and respond to pain based on specific factors. This study aimed at illuminating the perceptions and responses of Ghanaian surgical nurses regarding their patients' POP. It also identified the factors that influenced nurses' pain responses. A focused ethnography was used, and data were collected through individual interviews. Sampling was performed purposively to include junior, senior, day, and night nurses who cared for surgical patients. Concurrent data analysis was performed and data were saturated with 12 individual interviews. The findings indicated that nurses perceived POP as an individual phenomenon, and nurses responded to patients' pain by administering analgesics and by using nonpharmacologic measures. Factors that influenced the nurses' response were individual factors, such as commitment, discretion, fear of addiction, and organizational factors, such as organizational laxity and challenges of teamwork. The study recommended that nurses should be educated, supported, and encouraged to ensure pain relief after surgery and that they should see pain relief as a priority postoperative care to avert the negative repercussions of poorly managed POP.

  5. Prediction of postoperative facial swelling, pain and trismus following third molar surgery based on preoperative variables

    PubMed Central

    de Souza-Santos, Jadson A.; Martins-Filho, Paulo R.; da Silva, Luiz C.; de Oliveira e Silva, Emanuel D.; Gomes, Ana C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This paper investigates the relationship between preoperative findings and short-term outcome in third molar surgery. Study design: A prospective study was carried out involving 80 patients who required 160 surgical extractions of impacted mandibular third molars between January 2009 and December 2010. All extractions were performed under local anesthesia by the same dental surgeon. Swelling and maximal inter-incisor distance were measured at 48 h and on the 7th day postoperatively. Mean visual analogue pain scores were determined at four different time periods. Results: One-hundred eight (67.5%) of the 160 extractions were performed on male subjects and 52 (32.5%) were performed on female subjects. Median age was 22.46 years. The amount of facial swelling varied depending on gender and operating time. Trismus varied depending on gender, operating time and tooth sectioning. The influence of age, gender and operating time varied depending on the pain evaluation period (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Short-term outcomes of third molar operations (swelling, trismus and pain) differ depending on the patients’ characteristics (age, gender and body mass index). Moreover, surgery characteristics such as operating time and tooth sectioning were also associated with postoperative variables. Key words:Third molar extraction, pain, swelling, trismus, postoperative findings, prediction. PMID:23229245

  6. Bayesian inference for causal mechanisms with application to a randomized study for postoperative pain control.

    PubMed

    Baccini, Michela; Mattei, Alessandra; Mealli, Fabrizia

    2017-03-15

    We conduct principal stratification and mediation analysis to investigate to what extent the positive overall effect of treatment on postoperative pain control is mediated by postoperative self administration of intra-venous analgesia by patients in a prospective, randomized, double-blind study. Using the Bayesian approach for inference, we estimate both associative and dissociative principal strata effects arising in principal stratification, as well as natural effects from mediation analysis. We highlight that principal stratification and mediation analysis focus on different causal estimands, answer different causal questions, and involve different sets of structural assumptions.

  7. Bupivacaine application reduces post thyroidectomy pain: Cerrahpasa experience

    PubMed Central

    Teksoz, Serkan; Soylu, Selen; Erbabacan, Safak Emre; Ozcan, Murat; Bukey, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    Background We aimed to evaluate the impact of bupivacaine administration into the surgical field after total thyroidectomy on post-operative pain and analgesic requirement with a double-blind, prospective, clinical and randomized study. Methods The study was performed between 2010 and 2011. Pain assessment was performed with the visual analog score (VAS). Patients were pre-operatively, randomly divided into two groups to receive either bupivacaine or saline. One group received a 10-mL of bupivacaine solution while the other group was treated with the same volume of 0.9% NaCl through the drain after completion of total thyroidectomy procedure. All patients were anesthetized and operated with the same anesthesia and surgical team. Results Ninety-one patients (20 males) were included in the study. No patient dropped out of the study during the procedures. No mortality was seen. The VAS scores were significantly lower in the bupivacaine administered group at post-operative minute 30 (3.7±3.2 vs. 5±2.9; P=0.03), hour one (3.04±2.4 vs. 4.2±2.8; P=0.04), and hour eight (1.8±2.04 vs. 3.2±2.1; P=0.005). Thirteen patients required analgesia during their hospital stay in the bupivacaine group while this number was twenty-two in the saline group (P=0.005). Conclusions Local bupivacaine administration into the surgical field after total thyroidectomy reduces pain and analgesic requirement during the hospital stay. PMID:28149801

  8. Microcurrent skin patches for postoperative pain control in total knee arthroplasty: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    El-Husseini, T; El-Kawy, S; Shalaby, H; El-Sebai, M

    2007-04-01

    Pain control following painful orthopaedic procedures such as total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is an ongoing challenge, as current pain management techniques often result in under-medication and/or complications. In a study designed to test the effect of the micro-current skin patch (MCT) on pain relief in patients following TKA, we followed 24 patients, randomly divided into two groups, one group receiving MCT plus tramadol hydrochloride (tramadol) for pain relief and a control group receiving only tramadol, for 10 days postoperatively. Tramadol was given intramuscularly in increment doses of 100 mg, as needed, for the duration of the study period. Pain was assessed daily using a visual analogue score (VAS). Other parameters, including the effect of MCT on the dose of tramadol needed for pain relief, the degree of wound healing measured at the end of the follow-up period, category of the wound 10 days postoperatively (1, 2 or 3) and total drain fluid volume, were also assessed. During the 10-day postoperative period there was a progressive decrease in pain in patients of both groups, however the patients of the MCT group showed a consistently lower VAS throughout the observation period, most markedly on those follow-up days with the highest pain scores in patients of the control group. This effect was monitored on the basis of the average dose of tramadol administered per day: 200.0+/-7.0 mg/day in the control group and 63.3+/-15.8 mg/day in the MCT group. Wound healing was better with the application of the MCT patch: grade 1 wounds were observed in 50% of the patients of the MCT group as compared to 8.3% in control group. The total drain volume was lower in patients of the MCT group compared to the controls (1020.8+/-211.6 and 1170.8+/-243.5 ml, respectively). None of the patients indicated that they wished to discontinue MCT therapy. This pilot study shows that MCT therapy led to better pain control with a markedly lower need for tramadol as compared to the

  9. Continuous Quadratus Lumborum Block for Postoperative Pain in Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hockett, Margaret M; Hembrador, Sheena; Lee, Alex

    2016-09-15

    A 69-year-old man with a history of chronic pain and opioid use presented for total hip arthroplasty. In the interests of ensuring early mobilization and pain control, we chose a continuous quadratus lumborum block technique, a novel ultrasound-guided block that has not yet been described for total hip arthroplasty, hypothesizing that it would be motor-sparing. While the perineural catheter was infused, the patient required no IV opioids. He was able to ambulate on the first postoperative day, reporting pain scores between 0 and 3/10. The quadratus lumborum block is a promising technique that, in our patient, was motor-sparing and provided excellent pain control.

  10. Validation of the English version of the UNESP-Botucatu multidimensional composite pain scale for assessing postoperative pain in cats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A scale validated in one language is not automatically valid in another language or culture. The purpose of this study was to validate the English version of the UNESP-Botucatu multidimensional composite pain scale (MCPS) to assess postoperative pain in cats. The English version was developed using translation, back-translation, and review by individuals with expertise in feline pain management. In sequence, validity and reliability tests were performed. Results Of the three domains identified by factor analysis, the internal consistency was excellent for ‘pain expression’ and ‘psychomotor change’ (0.86 and 0.87) but not for ‘physiological variables’ (0.28). Relevant changes in pain scores at clinically distinct time points (e.g., post-surgery, post-analgesic therapy), confirmed the construct validity and responsiveness (Wilcoxon test, p < 0.001). Favorable correlation with the IVAS scores (p < 0.001) and moderate to very good agreement between blinded observers and ‘gold standard’ evaluations, supported criterion validity. The cut-off point for rescue analgesia was > 7 (range 0–30 points) with 96.5% sensitivity and 99.5% specificity. Conclusions The English version of the UNESP-Botucatu-MCPS is a valid, reliable and responsive instrument for assessing acute pain in cats undergoing ovariohysterectomy, when used by anesthesiologists or anesthesia technicians. The cut-off point for rescue analgesia provides an additional tool for guiding analgesic therapy. PMID:23867090

  11. A Clinical Experimental Model to Evaluate Analgesic Effect of Remote Ischemic Preconditioning in Acute Postoperative Pain

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Francisco Elano Carvalho; Mello, Irene Lopes; Pimenta, Fernando Heladio de Oliveira Medeiros; Costa, Debora Maia; Wong, Deysi Viviana Tenazoa; Fernandes, Claudia Regina; Lima Junior, Roberto César; Gomes, Josenília M. Alves

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the viability of a clinical model of remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) and its analgesic effects. It is a prospective study with twenty (20) patients randomly divided into two groups: control group and RIPC group. The opioid analgesics consumption in the postoperative period, the presence of secondary mechanical hyperalgesia, the scores of postoperative pain by visual analog scale, and the plasma levels interleukins (IL-6) were evaluated. The tourniquet applying after spinal anesthetic block was safe, producing no pain for all patients in the tourniquet group. The total dose of morphine consumption in 24 hours was significantly lower in RIPC group than in the control group (p = 0.0156). The intensity analysis of rest pain, pain during coughing and pain in deep breathing, showed that visual analogue scale (VAS) scores were significantly lower in RIPC group compared to the control group: p = 0.0087, 0.0119, and 0.0015, respectively. There were no differences between groups in the analysis of presence or absence of mechanical hyperalgesia (p = 0.0704) and in the serum levels of IL-6 dosage over time (p < 0.0001). This clinical model of remote ischemic preconditioning promoted satisfactory analgesia in patients undergoing conventional cholecystectomy, without changing serum levels of IL-6. PMID:27446611

  12. Post-operative pain therapy: prescription patterns in two Nigerian teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    Faponle, A F; Soyannwo, O A

    2002-01-01

    In order to evaluate doctors prescriptions in post-operative pain management, a precoded, structured and pretested questionnaire was administered to resident doctors working in the department of surgery in two teaching hospitals in Nigeria. The questionnaires were completed voluntarily by all the doctors involved. Fifty-five completed questionnaires were analysed. Fifty-three per cent of the doctors aimed at relieving just enough pain for the patient to be comfortable. The others aimed at complete pain relief. Drug availability was the most important factor determining what the doctors prescribed. Anaesthetists had little or no influence on their choice of drugs. Forty-five per cent of the doctors thought that they had been adequately educated in pain control. However, the level of training did not influence the response (p > 0.05). Intramuscular opioid, 6-8 hourly, was the most preferred route of drug administration. It was concluded that prescribing patterns for post-operative pain therapy in Nigeria has changed little in the last decade. The new treatment modalities, which are being utilized in developed countries, are still not being used in this country.

  13. A comparison of tilidine hydrochloride and morphine in the treatment of postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Leary, W P; Asmal, A C; Bees, L

    1976-05-22

    Intramuscular injections of 10 mg morphine or 100 mg tilidine hydrochloride were administered in a double-blind fashion and in random order to 40 patients after minor surgical operations. The therapeutic effect of each analgesic was assessed by comparing the severity of pain immediately postoperatively with that 1, 2, 3 and 4 hours after injection of the relevant analgesic. Tilidine and morphine relieved pain to a similar degree. Within the limits of the protocol followed, morphine appeared superior to tilidine in some tests. No major side-effects occurred.

  14. A randomized crossover trial of tenoxicam compared with rofecoxib for postoperative dental pain control.

    PubMed

    Zacharias, M; De Silva, R K; Herbison, P; Templer, P

    2004-12-01

    Two non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, tenoxicam and rofecoxib, were compared for the control of postoperative pain following surgical extraction of bilaterally and symmetrically impacted wisdom teeth performed under intravenous sedation and local anaesthesia. Thirty-five young fit adult patients received each analgesic treatment for four days in a randomized, crossover design. The results suggest statistically better pain relief for the selective COX-2 inhibitor rofecoxib compared to tenoxicam, a traditional NSAID. There were side-effects with both treatments. Abdominal discomfort was significantly more common following rofecoxib compared to tenoxicam. Both analgesics were acceptable to most participants in the trial.

  15. Comparison of Efficacy and Safety of Intramuscular Piroxicam and Tramadol for Post-operative Pain in Patients Undergoing Caesarean Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Thippeswamy, Tejashree; Bengalorkar, Girish M; Mariyappa, Narayanaswamy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Post-caesarean section pain can be both stressful and unfavourable. Effective and rapid reduction of pain facilitates early ambulation and care of the new born. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) and opioids are used for pain relief but they are associated with adverse effects both in the mother and the child. Aim To evaluate efficacy and safety of piroxicam and tramadol in post-caesarean section pain. Materials and Methods Primigravidae who underwent elective caesarean section received either piroxicam 20mg or tramadol 100mg intra-muscularly, following recovery from anaesthesia. Severity of pain was assessed using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and side-effects to study drugs were noted. Rescue analgesic butorphanol 2mg was administered if VAS score was more than four. Patient’s satisfaction score was assessed at 12 hours post-operatively. Results Mean age in piroxicam and tramadol groups were 23.32±3.43 and 22.03±2.0 years respectively. Significant reduction in pain was observed at 2, 4, 8, 12 and 24 hours in both groups (p<0.001). Pain relief was significant at 2, 4 and 8 hours in piroxicam group compared to tramadol. Twenty-one and 12 patients in tramadol and piroxicam groups received rescue analgesic respectively. Sedation and nausea was significantly higher in tramadol group (p<0.001), 46.66% of patients graded their satisfaction score as good and 15% as excellent in piroxicam group. Conclusion Intra-muscular piroxicam was effective in reducing post-caesarean section pain for 24 hours with minimal side-effects compared to tramadol. PMID:28050391

  16. Mothers' view on late postoperative pain management by the nursing team in children after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Lucila Castanheira; Strabelli, Brisa Soldatelli; de Almeida, Fernanda Cristina Queiroz Gomes; Rossato, Lisabelle Mariano; Leite, Adriana Moraes; de Lima, Regina Aparecida Garcia

    2010-01-01

    Postoperative pain management in children is a complex, multidimensional and subjective phenomenon. It represents a challenge for children, parents and health professionals. This study aimed to understand how mothers assess their children's pain management by the nursing team in the late postoperative phase of cardiac surgery. Empirical data collection was carried out through semistructured interviews with 17 mothers who accompanied their children. Data were subject to qualitative analysis, revealing that, for the mothers, taking good care results from the confidence they vest in the nursing team and from the observation of the medication interventions this team performs. Not taking good care of their children is a consequence of lack of information or inadequate communication between the team and the mothers. The results of this study permit identifying aspects that strengthen and weaken nursing care for these clients, contributing to the improvement of the delivered care.

  17. Intravenous Ibuprofen for Treatment of Post-Operative Pain: A Multicenter, Double Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Escontrela Rodriguez, Blanca; Planas Roca, Antonio; Martínez Ruiz, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Background Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are often used as components of multimodal therapy for postoperative pain management, but their use is currently limited by its side effects. The specific objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a new formulation of intravenous (IV) ibuprofen for the management of postoperative pain in a European population. Methods and Findings A total of 206 patients from both abdominal and orthopedic surgery, were randomly assigned in 1:1 ratio to receive 800 mg IV-ibuprofen or placebo every 6 hours; all patients had morphine access through a patient controlled analgesia pump. The primary outcome measure was median morphine consumption within the first 24 hours following surgery. The mean±SEM of morphine requirements was reduced from 29,8±5,25 mg to 14,22±3,23 mg (p = 0,015) and resulted in a decrease in pain at rest (p = 0,02) measured by Visual Analog Scale (VAS) from mean±SEM 3.34±0,35 to 0.86±0.24, and also in pain during movement (p = 0,02) from 4.32±0,36 to 1.90±0,30 in the ibuprofen treatment arm; while in the placebo group VAS score at rest ranged from 4.68±0,40 to 2.12±0,42 and during movement from 5.66±0,42 to 3.38±0,44. Similar treatment-emergent adverse events occurred across both study groups and there was no difference in the overall incidence of these events. Conclusions Perioperative administration of IV-Ibuprofen 800 mg every 6 hours in abdominal surgery patient’s decreases morphine requirements and pain score. Furthermore IV-Ibuprofen was safe and well tolerate. Consequently we consider appropriate that protocols for management of postoperative pain include IV-Ibuprofen 800 mg every 6 hours as an option to offer patients an analgesic benefit while reducing the potentially risks associated with morphine consumption. Trial Registration EU Clinical Trials Register 2011-005007-33 PMID:27152748

  18. Preventive Gabapentin versus Pregabalin to Decrease Postoperative Pain after Lumbar Microdiscectomy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Qadeer, Mohsin; Waqas, Muhammad; Rashid, Muhammad Jawad; Enam, Syed Ather; Sharif, Salman

    2017-01-01

    Study Design Randomized controlled trial. Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare pregabalin and gabapentin for mean postoperative visual analog score (VAS) for pain in patients undergoing single-level lumbar microdiscectomy for intervertebral disc prolapse at a tertiary care hospital. Overview of Literature Pregabalin has a superior pharmacokinetic profile and analgesic effect at lower doses than gabapentin; however, analgesic efficacy must be established during the perioperative period after lumbar spine surgery. Methods This randomized controlled trial was carried out at our institute from February to October 2011 on 78 patients, with 39 participants in each study group. Patients undergoing lumbar microdiscectomy were randomized to group A (gabapentin) or group B (pregabalin) and started on trial medicines one week before surgery. The VAS for pain was recorded at 24 hours and one week postoperatively. Results Both groups had similar baseline variables, with mean ages of 42 and 39 years in groups A and B, respectively, and a majority of male patients in each group. The mean VAS values for pain at 24 hours for gabapentin vs. pregabalin were comparable (1.97±0.84 vs. 1.6±0.87, respectively; p=0.087) as were the results at one week after surgery (0.27±0.45 vs. 0.3±0.46, respectively; p=0.79). None of the patients required additional analgesia postoperatively. After adjusting for age and sex, the VAS value for group B patients was 0.028 points lower than for group A patients, but this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.817, R2=0.018). Conclusions Pregabalin is equivalent to gabapentin for the relief of postoperative pain at a lower dose in patients undergoing lumbar microdiscectomy. Therefore, other factors, such as dose, frequency, cost, pharmacokinetics, and side effects of these medicines, should be taken into account whenever it is prescribed. PMID:28243376

  19. Gelatin matrix use reduces postoperative bleeding after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Velyvis, John H

    2015-02-01

    Bleeding after total knee arthroplasty can result in significant morbidity and increases the need for blood transfusion. The proper use of intraoperative adjunctive topical hemostatic agents can enhance hemostasis perioperatively, potentially reducing blood transfusions. In this prospective study, 157 consecutive patients undergoing primary total knee arthroplasty received FLOSEAL (FLOSEAL Hemostatic Matrix; Baxter Healthcare Corporation, Hayward, California), a gelatin thrombin hemostatic matrix, 5 mL (74 patients) or 10 mL (83 patients). All patients received warfarin as thromboprophylaxis starting the day after surgery. Data were extracted via hospital chart review from 100 consecutive patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty and immediately preceded the FLOSEAL groups and did not receive FLOSEAL (control group). Postoperative drainage was significantly lower in the FLOSEAL 5 mL (236.9 mL) and 10 mL (120.5 mL) groups compared with the control group (430.8 mL; P<.0001 for both). The FLOSEAL 10 mL group had significantly less drainage than the FLOSEAL 5 mL group (P<.0001). The predicted probability of transfusion in the FLOSEAL 5 mL group was not significantly different compared with the control group (6.0% vs 7.6%, P=.650). The predicted probability of transfusion was lower in the FLOSEAL 10 mL group compared with the control group (0.5% vs 5.5%; P=.004). Within the FLOSEAL 10 mL group, application of FLOSEAL either before or after tourniquet release had a similarly significant effect on drainage volume and predicted probability of blood transfusion. No differences in outcomes were observed by type of anesthesia used. No adverse events occurred related to FLOSEAL use.

  20. The Transition of Acute Postoperative Pain to Chronic Pain: An Integrative Overview of Research on Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Chapman, C Richard; Vierck, Charles J

    2017-04-01

    The nature of the transition from acute to chronic pain still eludes explanation, but chronic pain resulting from surgery provides a natural experiment that invites clinical epidemiological investigation and basic scientific inquiry into the mechanisms of this transition. The primary purpose of this article is to review current knowledge and hypotheses on the transition from acute to persistent postsurgical pain, summarizing literature on clinical epidemiological studies of persistent postsurgical pain development, as well as basic neurophysiological studies targeting mechanisms in the periphery, spinal cord, and brain. The second purpose of this article is to integrate theory, information, and causal reasoning in these areas. Conceptual mapping reveals 5 classes of hypotheses pertaining to pain. These propose that chronic pain results from: 1) persistent noxious signaling in the periphery; 2) enduring maladaptive neuroplastic changes at the spinal dorsal horn and/or higher central nervous system structures reflecting a multiplicity of factors, including peripherally released neurotrophic factors and interactions between neurons and microglia; 3) compromised inhibitory modulation of noxious signaling in medullary-spinal pathways; 4) descending facilitatory modulation; and 5) maladaptive brain remodeling in function, structure, and connectivity. The third purpose of this article is to identify barriers to progress and review opportunities for advancing the field. This review reveals a need for a concerted, strategic effort toward integrating clinical epidemiology, basic science research, and current theory about pain mechanisms to hasten progress toward understanding, managing, and preventing persistent postsurgical pain.

  1. Intravenous non-opioid analgesia for peri- and postoperative pain management: a scientific review of intravenous acetaminophen and ibuprofen

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Wonuk; Nguyen, Kimngan Pham

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a predictable consequence following operations, but the management of postoperative pain is another challenge for anesthesiologists and inappropriately controlled pain may lead to unwanted outcomes in the postoperative period. Opioids are indeed still at the mainstream of postoperative pain control, but solely using only opioids for postoperative pain management may be connected with risks of complications and adverse effects. As a consequence, the concept of multimodal analgesia has been proposed and is recommended whenever possible. Acetaminophen is one of the most commonly used analgesic and antipyretic drug for its good tolerance and high safety profiles. The introduction of intravenous form of acetaminophen has led to a wider flexibility of its use during peri- and postoperative periods, allowing the early initiation of multimodal analgesia. Many studies have revealed the efficacy, safety and opioid sparing effects of intravenous acetaminophen. Intravenous ibuprofen has also shown to be well tolerated and demonstrated to have significant opioid sparing effects during the postoperative period. However, the number of randomized controlled trials confirming the efficacy and safety is small and should be used in caution in certain group of patients. Intravenous acetaminophen and ibuprofen are important options for multimodal postoperative analgesia, improving pain and patient satisfaction. PMID:25664148

  2. Management of postoperative pain in abdominal surgery in Spain. A multicentre drug utilization study

    PubMed Central

    Vallano, Antonio; Aguilera, Cristina; Arnau, Josep Maria; Baños, Josep-Eladi; Laporte, Joan-Ramon

    1999-01-01

    Participating centres: Hospital Universitario San Juan, Alicante: Maria Jesús Olaso, Javier Agulló, Clara Faura. Hospital Torrecárdenas, Almería: Carmen Fernández Sánchez, Miguel Lorenzo Campos, Juan Manuel Rodríguez Alonso. Hospital Quirúrgic Adriano, Barcelona: Carmen Alerany Pardo, Paquita Alvarez González, Teresa Martín Benito. Hospital Universitari del Mar-IMIM, Barcelona: Magí Farré, Maite Terán. Corporació Sanitària Parc Taulí, Sabadell: Montserrat Cañellas, Sergio Zavala, Josep Planell. Hospital Universitari de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau: Gonzalo Calvo, Rosa Morros, Silvia Mateo. Hospital General Vall d’Hebron, Barcelona: Carmen Bosch, María José Martínez. Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Victoria, Málaga: Maribel Lucena, José Antonio González, Gabriel Carranque. Hospital Clínico Universitario San Carlos, Madrid: Emilio Vargas, Amparo Gil López-Oliva, Míriam García Mateos. Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander: Mario González, Antonio Cuadrado. Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Macarena, Sevilla: Juan Antonio Durán, Pilar Máyquez, María Isabel Serrano. Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío, Sevilla: Jaume Torelló, Juan Ramón Castillo, María de las Nieves Merino. Aims Postoperative pain is common in hospital-admitted patients. Its management is determined by different therapeutic traditions and by the attitudes of health professionals in each hospital. The aim of this study was to describe the patterns of prescription and administration of analgesic drugs used for postoperative pain after abdominal surgery in Spanish hospitals, to know the prevalence and the severity of postoperative pain, and to determine the extent of variability in the management of postoperative pain among the participating centres. Methods The study was a multicentre descriptive cross-sectional drug utilization study in 12 Spanish hospitals. The subjects were an unselected sample of consecutive patients undergoing abdominal

  3. Perioperative intravenous glucocorticoids can decrease postoperative nausea and vomiting and pain in total joint arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ping; Li, Xiwen; Sang, Lili; Huang, Jiangfa

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: This meta-analysis aimed to demonstrate the efficacy and safety of intravenous glucocorticoids for reducing pain intensity and postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) in patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Methods: PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Web of Science, and Google databases were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing intravenous glucocorticoids versus no intravenous glucocorticoids or sham for patients undergoing TJA. Outcomes included visual analogue scale (VAS) pain at 12, 24, and 48 hours; the occurrence of PONV; length of hospital stay; the occurrence of infection; and blood glucose levels after surgery. We calculated risk ratios (RR) with a 95% confidence interval (CI) for dichotomous outcomes and the weighted mean difference (WMD) with a 95% CI for continuous outcomes. Trial sequential analysis was also used to verify the pooled results. Results: Thirteen clinical trials involving 821 patients were ultimately included in this meta-analysis. The pooled results indicated that intravenous steroids can decrease VAS at 12 hours (WMD = −8.54, 95% CI −11.55 to −5.53, P = 0.000; I2 = 35.1%), 24 hours (WMD = −7.48, 95% CI −13.38 to −1.59, P = 0.013; I2 = 91.8%), and 48 hours (WMD = −1.90, 95% CI −3.75 to −0.05, P = 0.044; I2 = 84.5%). Intravenous steroids can decrease the occurrence of PONV (RR = 0.56, 95% CI 0.44–0.73, P = 0.000; I2 = 33.1%). There was no significant difference in the length of hospital stay, occurrence of infection, and blood glucose levels after surgery. Conclusion: Intravenous glucocorticoids not only alleviate early pain intensity but also decrease PONV after TJA. More high-quality RCTs are required to determine the safety of glucocorticoids before making final recommendations. PMID:28353565

  4. Reducing the Risk of Postoperative Genital Complications in Male Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dossanova, ?ssem; Lozovoy, Vasiliy; Wood, Dan; ??nekenova, ?enzhekyz; Botabayeva, ?igul; Dossanov, Bolatbek; Lozovaya, Yelena; ?marov, ?algat

    2016-01-01

    The reproductive system of adolescents is exposed to a high risk of anomalies. In spite of the successes of surgical correction, the percentage of postoperative complications remains high. Special attention should be paid to circumcision, which is regarded as a religious tradition in many countries and carried out with sanitary violations. This…

  5. Off-pump grafting does not reduce postoperative pulmonary dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Izzat, Mohammad Bashar; Almohammad, Farouk; Raslan, Ahmad Fahed

    2017-02-01

    Objectives Pulmonary dysfunction is a recognized postoperative complication that may be linked to use of cardiopulmonary bypass. The off-pump technique of coronary artery bypass aims to avoid some of the complications that may be related to cardiopulmonary bypass. In this study, we compared the influence of on-pump or off-pump coronary artery bypass on pulmonary gas exchange following routine surgery. Methods Fifty patients (mean age 60.4 ± 8.4 years) with no preexisting lung disease and good left ventricular function undergoing primary coronary artery bypass grafting were prospectively randomized to undergo surgery with or without cardiopulmonary bypass. Alveolar/arterial oxygen pressure gradients were calculated prior to induction of anesthesia while the patients were breathing room air, and repeated postoperatively during mechanical ventilation and after extubation while inspiring 3 specific fractions of oxygen. Results Baseline preoperative arterial blood gases and alveolar/arterial oxygen pressure gradients were similar in both groups. At both postoperative stages, the partial pressure of arterial oxygen and alveolar/arterial oxygen pressure gradients increased with increasing fraction of inspired oxygen, but there were no statistically significant differences between patients who underwent surgery with or without cardiopulmonary bypass, either during ventilation or after extubation. Conclusions Off-pump surgery is not associated with superior pulmonary gas exchange in the early postoperative period following routine coronary artery bypass grafting in patients with good left ventricular function and no preexisting lung disease.

  6. Acupuncture-Point Stimulation for Postoperative Pain Control: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xian-Liang; Tan, Jing-Yu; Molassiotis, Alex; Suen, Lorna K. P.; Shi, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Acupuncture-point stimulation (APS) in postoperative pain control compared with sham/placebo acupuncture or standard treatments (usual care or no treatment). Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included. Meta-analysis results indicated that APS interventions improved VAS scores significantly and also reduced total morphine consumption. No serious APS-related adverse effects (AEs) were reported. There is Level I evidence for the effectiveness of body points plaster therapy and Level II evidence for body points electroacupuncture (EA), body points acupressure, body points APS for abdominal surgery patients, auricular points seed embedding, manual auricular acupuncture, and auricular EA. We obtained Level III evidence for body points APS in patients who underwent cardiac surgery and cesarean section and for auricular-point stimulation in patients who underwent abdominal surgery. There is insufficient evidence to conclude that APS is an effective postoperative pain therapy in surgical patients, although the evidence does support the conclusion that APS can reduce analgesic requirements without AEs. The best level of evidence was not adequate in most subgroups. Some limitations of this study may have affected the results, possibly leading to an overestimation of APS effects. PMID:26568767

  7. [The influence of nursing measures on incision pain and the use of opioids in the postoperative period].

    PubMed

    Osterbrink, J; Evers, G C

    2000-10-01

    This experimental study was designed to investigate the influence of a cognitive behavioural technique on elective abdominal-surgical and orthopaedic patients at seven different time points within the first 72 postoperative hours. It examines the effect of deep breathing relaxation on the anxiety, distress, and incisional pain levels of postoperative surgical patients. The results show that the cognitive behavioural technique positively affects postoperative perception of pain, energy level, relaxed state and strain within the experimental group. The technique did not influence the patients' postoperative state-anxiety and agitation. Postoperatively, patients from the experimental group in both surgical areas used more opioids than patients from the control group. Preoperatively assessed personality factors did not differ between both groups. Overall the findings suggest that the implementation of a deep breathing relaxation technique positively influences the postoperative course of elective abdominal-surgical and orthopaedic patients.

  8. Effectiveness of green tea mouthwash in postoperative pain control following surgical removal of impacted third molars: double blind randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pain following surgical removal of impacted molars has remained an important concern among practitioners. Various protocols have been proposed to reduce postoperative pain. However, each one has special side effects and limitations. As green tea possesses anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties, the aim of the current study was to evaluate the effectiveness of green tea mouthwash in controlling postoperative pain. Materials and methods In a study with split-mouth and double blind design, 44 patients in need of bilateral removal of impacted third molars underwent randomized surgical extraction; following one surgery patients rinsed with a green tea mouthwash from the first to seventh postoperative day and after other extraction rinsed with placebo mouthwash in the same duration. Both patients and surgeon were blinded to the type of mouthwash. The predictor variable was type of mouthwash and primary outcome variable was postoperative pain measured by visual analogue scale (VAS) during first week after surgery. In addition, number of analgesics patients used after surgery recorded. To measure the effect of green tea mouthwash, repeated measures test with confidence interval of 95% was performed. Results Total of 43 patients with mean age of 24 years underwent total of 86 surgeries. VAS value had no statistically difference prior rinsing among groups (P-value > 0.05). However, the mean value of VAS following rinsing with green tea was statistically lower than placebo in postoperative days of 3–7 (P-value < 0.05). In addition, while rinsing with green tea, patients took significantly lower number of analgesics after surgery (P-value < 0.05). No side effects reported. Conclusion Green tea mouthwash could be an appropriate and safe choice to control postoperative pain after third molar surgery. PMID:23866761

  9. Postoperative Pain following Pulpotomy of Primary Molars with Two Biomaterials: A Randomized Split Mouth Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shafie, Leili; Barghi, Hamide; Parirokh, Masoud; Ebrahimnejad, Hamed; Nakhae, Nozar; Esmaili, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this randomized clinical trial split-mouth study was to compare the postoperative pain following use of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement as pulpotomy agents in carious primary molars. Methods and Materials: Forty-seven children aged between 6-10 years old were enrolled in this study. Each child had two cariously involved primary molar in need of pulpotomy. After caries removal and preparing access cavity in one of the carious teeth, either MTA or CEM cement was randomly used as the pulpotomy agent, while the other cariously involved primary molar tooth was capped with the other material in a separate visit. After covering the radicular pulp with one of the capping materials the teeth were permanently restored with stainless steel crown (SSC). Postoperative pain was recorded by using Wong-Baker faces pain rating scale (Wong-Baker FPRS) up to seven days following the treatment. Data was analyzed using the Wilcoxon, McNemar, and chi square tests. Results: Forty-five patients fulfilled the treatment procedure and returned the Wong-Baker FPRS forms. Overall 65.6% of the patients reported pain irrespective of the pulpotomy agents used. There was no significant difference in postoperative pain between the teeth that received either MTA or CEM cement as pulpotomy agents in the first, second and the third day (P=0.805, P=0.942, P=0.705, respectively) following the procedure. The trend of the pain scores showed decreasing manner during the study period for the teeth in either groups of MTA or CEM cement. There was no significant difference between the two groups in the number of analgesics used following the treatment (P>0.05). Conclusion: The findings of the present study showed that a majority of the children felt pain following pulpotomy and SSC placement; however, there was no significant difference in pain reported when either MTA or CEM cement was used as pulpotomy agents. PMID:28179916

  10. Pain management strategies used by patients with breast and gynecologic cancer with postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Kwekkeboom, K L

    2001-10-01

    Many people with cancer will experience pain when they are outside of structured care settings. Patients must provide their own self-care, drawing on instructions from healthcare providers and on independently developed plans for pain management. With growing interest in complementary therapies, the scope of nonpharmacologic interventions used by patients with cancer to manage pain may be very different than 10-15 years ago. The purpose of this study was to describe steps taken by patients with breast and gynecologic cancer to manage pain after discharge from a surgical hospitalization. A secondary analysis was completed using data from 34 women who participated in a randomized trial of guided imagery. Techniques used included positioning, distraction, relaxation, heat, and eating/drinking. Compared to results of previous studies, increased use of relaxation strategies (breathing, imagery, music, meditation) was noted in the current study. The majority of participants used nonpharmacologic strategies in addition to analgesic medications. Pain-related outcomes were similar among persons who used analgesic medications alone and those who used a combination of analgesics and nonpharmacologic strategies. Nurses may benefit from knowing which pain management strategies patients find helpful so that they can encourage their use and teach similar strategies to the patients who find them useful.

  11. Korean and American music reduces pain in Korean women after gynecologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Good, Marion; Ahn, Sukhee

    2008-09-01

    American music has been found to relieve pain in adults in several countries but has not been tested in Korea. Korean women have reported that they would like American music as well as Korean folk songs and religious music sung in Korean. The study purpose was to pilot-test the effects of music on pain after gynecologic surgery in Korean women and to compare pain relief between those who chose American or Korean music. Using a quasiexperimental pretest-posttest design, 73 South Korean women on a preoperative unit were assigned by day of the week to receive music (n = 34; 47%) or no music (n = 39; 53%). The music group chose among Korean (ballads and religious and popular songs) and American (soft slow piano and orchestra) music and heard it for 15 minutes at four time points (postoperatively), whereas the controls rested in bed. They marked VAS Sensation and Distress of Pain scales before and after each test. The two groups were similar on pretest pain. When controlling for pretest pain, MANCOVA indicated that there was significantly less posttest pain in those with music plus analgesics than those with analgesics alone at three of the four tests: p = .04 to .001. Two-thirds in the music group (n = 21; 62%) chose Korean music and one-third (n = 13; 38%) chose American, with no difference in pain: both were effective. In addition to analgesics, music can be used to reduce postoperative pain in Korean women. Patients selected music that was appealing to them. Nurses in many countries can consider music of the country and seek individual preferences to use in addition to analgesics for postoperative pain.

  12. Postoperative interstitial hernia as a cause of obscure incisional wound site pain.

    PubMed

    Modrzejewski, Andrzej; Smietański, Maciej

    2012-03-01

    An interstitial hernia is one in which the hernia sac is located between the layers of the abdominal wall. The analysis of contemporary literature shows that interstitial hernias are most often seen in children as a type of inguinal hernia and often accompany undescended testis. The hernia sac is usually located between the external-oblique and internal-oblique muscles in a lateral-cephalic direction. The authors present 3 cases of interstitial hernia found during laparoscopic exploration of the front abdominal wall done due to incisional wound site pain. No previous diagnosis of hernia was considered in all the cases. Hernias were found as complications of appendectomy and wound healing after radiotherapy of uterine and cervical cancer. In conclusion, in obscure wound site pain, the presence of an interstitial postoperative hernia should be considered as a possible reason for the complaint. Laparoscopic examination of the anterior abdominal wall during adhesiolysis in patients with abdominal pain enables proper diagnosis and treatment.

  13. OPRM1 and ABCB1 polymorphisms and their effect on postoperative pain relief with piritramide.

    PubMed

    Bartošová, O; Polanecký, O; Perlík, F; Adámek, S; Slanař, O

    2015-01-01

    Genetic factors may contribute to the differential response to opioids. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between polymorphisms of µ1-opioid receptor gene OPRM1 (rs1799971), and P-glycoprotein transporter gene ABCB1 (rs1045642, rs2032582), and piritramide efficacy under postoperative patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). In 51 patients, OPRM1 variant was associated with decreased efficacy in early postoperative period evidenced by sum of pain intensity difference in the 0-6 h postoperative period (SPID(0-6)), (F=3.27, p=0.029). Mean (SD) SPID(0-6) was observed in the 118AA genotype 22.9 (6.1) mm, which was significantly higher from the 118GG genotype 10.0 (4.4) mm, p=0.006. The lowest cumulative dose was recorded in 118AA genotype 19.1 (9.8) mg, which was significantly less than in the 118GG genotype group 36.6 (6.1) mg, p=0.017. Opioid-induced adverse effects were observed in 11, 30, and 100 % of patients in 118AA, 118AG, and 118GG genotype groups, respectively (p<0.05). Piritramide efficacy and safety was not significantly affected by ABCB1 (rs1045642, rs2032582) polymorphisms. Variant OPRM1 118G allele is associated with decreased acute postoperative pain relief after piritramide. Decreased efficacy leads to higher drug consumption under PCA settings, which however, does not fully compensate insufficient pain relief, but increases incidence of adverse effects.

  14. Electro-acupuncture decreases postoperative pain and improves recovery in patients undergoing a supratentorial craniotomy.

    PubMed

    An, Li-Xin; Chen, Xue; Ren, Xiu-Jun; Wu, Hai-Feng

    2014-01-01

    We performed this study to examine the effect of electro-acupuncture (EA) on postoperative pain, postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) and recovery in patients after a supratentorial tumor resection. Eighty-eight patients requiring a supratentorial tumor resection were anesthetized with sevoflurane and randomly allocated to a no treatment group (Group C) or an EA group (Group A). After anesthesia induction, the patients in Group A received EA at LI4 and SJ5, at BL63 and LR3 and at ST36 and GB40 on the same side as the craniotomy. The stimulation was continued until the end of the operation. Patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (PCIA) was used for the postoperative analgesia. The postoperative pain scores, PONV, the degree of dizziness and appetite were recorded. In the first 6 hours after the operation, the mean total bolus, the effective times of PCIA bolus administrations and the VAS scores were much lower in the EA group (p < 0.05). In the EA group, the incidence of PONV and degree of dizziness and feeling of fullness in the head within the first 24 hours after the operation was much lower than in the control group (p < 0.05). In the EA group, more patients had a better appetite than did the patients in group C (51.2% vs. 27.5%) (p < 0.05). The use of EA in neurosurgery patients improves the quality of postoperative analgesia, promotes appetite recovery and decreases some uncomfortable sensations, such as dizziness and feeling of fullness in the head.

  15. The efficacy of periarticular drug infiltration for postoperative pain after total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanyang; Gao, Fuqiang; Sun, Wei; Wang, Bailiang; Guo, Wanshou; Li, Zirong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: The ability of intraoperative periarticular drug infiltration (PDI) to control pain after total hip arthroplasty (THA) has been studied for many times, but it still remains controversial. Therefore, we undertook a meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy and safety of PDI on postoperative pain after THA. Methods: Databases, including Pubmed, Medline, Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane library, were searched to identify randomized controlled trials concerning PDI for pain management in patients undergoing THA. The primary outcomes included pain score with rest or activity and opioid consumption. Secondary outcomes were length of hospital stay and complications (nausea or vomiting). Results: A total of 666 THA patients from 8 randomized controlled trials were subjected to meta-analysis. The results showed that the PDI group had better pain relief, less opioid consumption, and less length of hospital, when compared with the placebo group (P < 0.05). No significant differences were observed in regard to visual analog score with activity and complications between the 2 groups. Conclusion: PDI may be recommended for the pain management after THA. However, due to the variations in the included studies, additional studies are still needed to validate these conclusions. PMID:28328836

  16. The effect of spinal versus general anesthesia on postoperative pain and analgesic requirements in patients undergoing peripheral vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Nesek-Adam, Visnja; Rasić, Zarko; Schwarz, Dragan; Grizelj-Stojcić, Elvira; Rasić, Domagoj; Krstonijević, Zoran; Markić, Ana; Kovacević, Marko

    2012-12-01

    The optimal anesthetic technique for peripheral vascular surgery remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of spinal versus general anesthesia on postoperative pain, analgesic requirements and postoperative comfort in patients undergoing peripheral vascular surgery. A total of 40 patients scheduled for peripheral vascular surgery were randomly assigned to two groups of 20 patients each to receive general anesthesia (GA) or spinal anesthesia (SA). In GA group, anesthesia was induced using thiopental and fentanyl. Vecuronium was used for muscle relaxation. Anaesthesia was maintained with isoflurane and nitrous oxide. In the SA group, hyperbaric 0.5% bupivacaine was injected into the subarachnoid space. Postoperative pain was assessed for 24 hours by a visual analog scale during three assessment periods: 0-4, 4-12 and 12-24 h as well as analgesic requirements. Patients were also asked to assess their postoperative state as satisfactory or unsatisfactory with regard to the pain, side effects and postoperative nausea and vomiting. Visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score was significantly lower in the group SA compared with group GA. This effect was mainly due to the lower pain score during the first study period. The patients received general anesthesia also reported a significantly higher rate of unsatisfactory postoperative comfort than those receiving spinal anesthesia. We conclude that spinal anesthesia is superior to general anesthesia when considering patients' satisfaction, side effects and early postoperative analgesic management.

  17. [How can leg ulcer pain be reduced?].

    PubMed

    Stansal, A; Lazareth, I; D'Ussel, M; Priollet, P

    2016-09-01

    Chronic vascular wounds are often painful. Pain can develop whatever the cause of the ulceration. It is well known during wound care but can occur at any time. The pain is often a complex phenomenon involving nociceptive pain, neuropathic pain, anxiety and emotional suffering, all directly related to the chronic disease. Care for the patient suffering from pain must take into consideration all of these aspects of the disease. The therapeutic strategy should rely on the use of different pharmacological agents, well-adapted local care using the different available analgesic tools and include psycho-affective care.

  18. Gargling with sodium azulene sulfonate reduces the postoperative sore throat after intubation of the trachea.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Junchi; Minami, Kouichiro; Horishita, Takafumi; Shiraishi, Munehiro; Okamoto, Takashi; Terada, Tadanori; Sata, Takeyoshi

    2005-07-01

    Postoperative sore throat (POST) is a complication that remains to be resolved in patients undergoing endotracheal intubation. In this study, we investigated whether preoperative gargling with sodium 1,4-dimethyl-7-isopropylazulene-3-sulfonate monohydrate (sodium azulene sulfonate, Azunol) reduces POST after endotracheal intubation. Forty patients scheduled for elective surgery under general anesthesia were randomized into Azunol and control groups. In the Azunol group, patients gargled with 4 mg Azunol diluted with 100 mL tap water (40 microg/mL). In the control group, patients gargled with 100 mL of tap water. After emergence from general anesthesia, the patients with POST were counted and POST was evaluated using a verbal analog pain scale. There were no significant differences between the two groups by age, height, body weight, gender distribution, or duration of anesthesia and surgery. In the control group, 13 patients (65%) complained of POST, which remained 24 h later in nine patients (45%). In the Azunol group, five patients (25%) also complained of POST, which completely disappeared by 24 h later. The incidence of POST and verbal analog pain scale scores in the Azunol group decreased significantly compared with the control group. We demonstrated that gargling with Azunol effectively attenuated POST with no adverse reactions.

  19. Postoperative Pain Management in Children, Parental English Proficiency, and Access to Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Nathalia; Jackson, Douglass L.; Zhou, Chuan; Ayala, Nelly C.; Ebel, Beth E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE Patients with limited English proficiency (LEP) are at risk for undertreated pain. The goal of this study was to examine the association between parental language proficiency, interpreted care, and postsurgical pediatric pain management. METHODS This was a retrospective matched cohort study among children <18 years of age. Children of LEP and English-proficient (EP) parents were matched according to age group, surgical procedure, and admission date. Mean number of daily pain assessments and mean daily pain scores were compared between language groups. We also compared the association between pain scores and type of medication given (opioid versus nonopioid). Within the LEP group, similar analyses compared pain assessment and treatment of children whose families received ≥2 professional interpretations per day versus those who received lower rates of interpretation. RESULTS A total of 474 children (237 LEP and 237 EP) were included in the study. Children of LEP parents had fewer pain assessments (mean: 7 [95% confidence interval: 2–13] vs 9 [95% confidence interval: 4–15]; P = .012), and higher levels of pain recorded before receiving opioid analgesics, compared with children of EP parents (P = .003). Within the LEP group, children with ≥2 interpretations per day had lower pain scores after medication administration (P < .05) and were more likely to receive opioids at pain levels similar to those of EP families. CONCLUSIONS Children of LEP parents received fewer pain assessments and were less likely to receive opioid analgesics for similar levels of pain compared with children of EP parents. More frequent use of professional interpreters when assessing pain may aid in reducing the gap in pain management between LEP and EP pediatric patients. PMID:24435597

  20. Comparison of oral versus sublingual piroxicam during postoperative pain management after lower third molar extraction.

    PubMed

    Trindade, P A K; Giglio, F P M; Colombini-Ishikiriama, B L; Calvo, A M; Modena, K C S; Ribeiro, D A; Dionísio, T J; Brozoski, D T; Lauris, J R P; Faria, F A C; Santos, C F

    2011-03-01

    In this study, 53 patients received piroxicam, administered orally or sublingually, after undergoing removal of symmetrically positioned lower third molars, during two separate appointments. This study used a randomized, blind, cross-over protocol. Objective and subjective parameters were recorded for comparison of postoperative results for 7 days after surgery. Patients treated with oral or sublingual piroxicam reported low postoperative pain scores. The patients who received piroxicam orally took a similar average amount of analgesic rescue medication compared with patients who received piroxicam sublingually (p>0.05). Patients exhibited similar values for mouth opening measured just before surgery and immediately following suture removal 7 days later (p>0.05), and showed no significant differences between routes of piroxicam administration for swelling control during the second or seventh postoperative days (p>0.05). In summary, pain, trismus and swelling after lower third molar extraction, independent of surgical difficulty, could be controlled by piroxicam 20mg administered orally or sublingually and no significant differences were observed between the route of delivery used in this study.

  1. Increased Risk of Postthoracotomy Pain Syndrome in Patients with Prolonged Hospitalization and Increased Postoperative Opioid Use

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Adam K.; Passe, Melissa A.; Mantilla, Carlos B.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Postthoracotomy pain syndrome (PTPS) is unfortunately very common following thoracotomy and results in decreased quality of life. The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine perioperative patient, surgical, and analgesic characteristics associated with the development of PTPS. Methods. Sixty-six patients who presented to the Mayo Clinic Rochester Pain Clinic were diagnosed with PTPS 2 months or more after thoracotomy with postoperative epidural analgesia. These patients were matched with sixty-six control patients who underwent thoracotomy with postoperative epidural analgesia and were never diagnosed with PTPS. Results. Median (IQR) hospital stay was significantly different between control patients (5 days (4, 6)) compared with PTPS patients (6 days (5, 8)), P < 0.02. The total opioid equivalent utilized in oral morphine equivalents in milligrams for the first three days postoperatively was significantly different between control patients and PTPS patients. The median (IQR) total opioid equivalent utilized was 237 (73, 508) for controls and 366 (116, 874) for PTPS patients (P < 0.005). Conclusion. Patients with a prolonged hospital stay after thoracotomy were at an increased risk of developing PTPS, and this is a novel finding. Patients who utilize higher oral morphine equivalents for the first 3 days were also at increased risk for PTPS. PMID:27340565

  2. Alternative Approach to the Management of Postoperative Pain after Pediatric Surgical Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Juliana; Santos-Pinto, Lourdes; Pansani, Cyneu

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: This paper reports two clinical cases in which the application of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) enhanced the postoperative symptoms after pediatric surgical procedures. Background: The uses of novel technologies allow more comfort to the patients and ensure a rapid procedure, and LLLT application has shown a positive effect in the prevention of discomfort after invasive procedures. Case description: Low-level laser therapy protocol was applied after surgical removal of supernumerary tooth and frenectomy resulting in less swallow and pain with no need of medication intake. Conclusion: The laser application was well accepted by both children and parents and showed a clinical efficiency in the follow-up examinations beyond the satisfactory quality of wound healing. Clinical significance: The LLLT approach is an excellent adjuvant therapy resource for delivery an optimal postoperative after surgical procedures in children. How to cite this article: Paschoal M, Souza J, Santos-Pinto L, Pansani C. Alternative Approach to the Management of Postoperative Pain after Pediatric Surgical Procedures. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(2):125-129. PMID:25356012

  3. Knowledge of and Attitudes Regarding Postoperative Pain among the Pediatric Cardiac Nursing Staff: An Indian Experience.

    PubMed

    Dongara, Ashish R; Shah, Shail N; Nimbalkar, Somashekhar M; Phatak, Ajay G; Nimbalkar, Archana S

    2015-06-01

    Pain following cardiac intervention in children is a common, but complex phenomenon. Identifying and reporting pain is the responsibility of the nursing staff, who are the primary caregivers and spend the most time with the patients. Inadequately managed pain in children may lead to multiple short- and long-term adverse effects. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the knowledge and attitudes regarding postoperative pain in children among the nursing staff at B.M. Patel Cardiac Center, Karamsad, Anand, Gujarat, India. The study included 42 of the 45 nurses employed in the cardiac center. The nurses participating in the study were responsible for the care of the pediatric patients. A modified Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain and a sociodemographic questionnaire were administered after obtaining written informed consent. The study was approved by the institutional Human Research Ethics Committee. Mean (SD) experience in years of the nursing staff was 2.32 (1.69) years (range 1 month to 5 years). Of the nurses, 67% were posted in the cardiac surgical intensive care unit (ICU). The mean (SD) score for true/false questions was 11.48 (2.95; range 7,19). The average correct response rate of the true/false questions was 45.9%. Knowledge about pain was only affected by the ward in which the nurse was posted. In first (asymptomatic) and second (symptomatic) case scenarios, 78.6% and 59.5% underestimated pain, respectively. Knowledge and attitudes regarding pain and its management is poor among nurses. Targeted training sessions and repeated reinforcement sessions are essential for holistic patient care.

  4. Common risk factors for postoperative pain following the extraction of wisdom teeth

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The extraction of third molars is a common task carried out at dental/surgery clinics. Postoperative pain is one of the two most common complications of this surgery, along with dry socket. Knowledge of the frequent risk factors of this complication is useful in determining high-risk patients, planning treatment, and preparing the patients mentally. Since the risk factors for postoperative pain have never been summarized before while the risk factors for dry socket have been highly debated, this report summarizes the literature regarding the common predictors of postextraction pain. Except for surgical difficulty and the surgeon's experience, the influences of other risk factors (age, gender and oral contraceptive use) were rather inconclusive. The case of a female gender or oral contraceptive effect might mainly be associated with estrogen levels (when it comes to dry socket), which can differ considerably from case to case. Improvement in and unification of statistical and diagnostic methods seem necessary. In addition, each risk factor was actually a combination of various independent variables, which should instead be targeted in more comprehensive studies. PMID:25922816

  5. A clinical approach to neuraxial morphine for the treatment of postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Mugabure Bujedo, Borja

    2012-01-01

    Opioids are considered a "gold standard" in clinical practice for the treatment of postoperative pain. The spinal administration of an opioid drug does not guarantee selective action and segmental analgesia in the spine. Evidence from experimental studies in animals indicates that bioavailability in the spinal cord biophase is negatively correlated with liposolubility, and is higher for hydrophilic opioids, such as morphine, than lipophilic opioids, such as fentanyl, sufentanil and alfentanil. Epidural morphine sulphate has proven analgesic efficacy and superiority over systemically administered morphine for improving postoperative pain. However, pain relief after a single epidural injection of morphine could last less than 24 hours. Techniques used to administered and prolong opioid epidural analgesia, can be costly and inconvenient. Moreover, complications can arise from indwelling epidural catheterization, particularly in patients receiving anticoagulants. Clinical trials have shown that epidural morphine in the form of extended-release liposome injections (EREM) gives good analgesia for a period of 48 hours, with no need for epidural catheterisation. Intrathecal morphine produces intense analgesia for up to 24 hours with a single shot, and clinical recommendation is to choose the minimum effective dose and do not exceed 300 μg to prevent the delay respiratory depression.

  6. Analgesic properties of calcium phosphate apatite loaded with bupivacaine on postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Verron, Elise; Gauthier, Olivier; Janvier, Pascal; Le Guen, Herve; Holopherne, Delphine; Cavagna, Remi; Bouler, Jean-Michel

    2010-07-01

    Synthetic calcium-deficient apatites (CDA) are structurally similar to biological apatites and are well known as chemical precursors of biphasic calcium phosphates (BCP). BCP are mixtures of hydroxyapatite and beta-tricalcium phosphate and are widely used as bone substitutes in human surgery. Bupivacaine, a local anesthetic, has been loaded onto CDA using isostatic compaction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the in vivo performance of such a local release on pain after having previously defined the in vitro release profile of bupivacaine. CDA was loaded with 1%, 4%, and 16% of bupivacaine using an isostatic compaction process. In vitro release profile assays performed indicated the complete release of bupivacaine after 24 h. Wistar male rats received 50 mg implants of CDA associated, respectively, with 0, 1%, 4%, and 16% of bupivacaine into the distal femur. Analgesia was measured using the electronic version of the Von Frey monofilament test, assessing the inflammatory response and a neurological score. During the first postoperative days, a dose-dependent analgesic effect was observed with the bupivacaine adsorbed on the resorbable implant. This combined device system thus appears to release local anesthetic in a manner that prevents or limits postoperative pain following bone surgery. This innovative approach could be integrated into a global pain management program, for example, in the context of bone harvesting where bone reconstruction is required.

  7. Analgesic drug consumption increases after knee arthroplasty: a pharmacoepidemiological study investigating postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Fuzier, Régis; Serres, Isabelle; Bourrel, Robert; Palmaro, Aurore; Montastruc, Jean-Louis; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse

    2014-07-01

    Knee arthroplasty remains the gold standard in the treatment of severe osteoarthritis. Chronic postoperative pain has been reported with a prevalence ranging from 15% to 47%. The aim of this study was to compare analgesic drug consumption before and after surgery as an indicator of pain after knee surgery. A pharmacoepidemiological method comparing analgesics and antineuropathic issues 1 year before and 1 year after surgery was used. All patients who underwent knee arthroplasty in the Midi-Pyrenees region (2.5 million inhabitants) were identified through the Health Insurance System Database. Increase of drug issues (all analgesics, antineuropathic drugs, strong opioids) was calculated and compared between several periods surrounding the surgery (12 months, 2 months, and 10 months before and after the knee arthroplasty). A multivariate logistic regression model was used to identify factors associated with chronic postoperative pain. The study included 1939 patients. An increase in analgesic, antineuropathic, and opioid drug consumption was observed the year after the surgery in 47.3%, 8.6%, and 5.6% of patients, respectively. Multivariate analysis found a significant association between type of surgery (total knee vs unicompartmental arthroplasty) and analgesic consumption 1 year after surgery, and between preoperative pain and psychiatric vulnerability and increase in neuropathic drug dispensing. Conversely, older age was considered as a protective factor. This study revealed that an increase in the issue of different analgesic drugs is present in half of patients 1 year after knee arthroplasty. Several associated factors of drug consumption (preoperative pain, type of surgery, and psychiatric disorder) were identified.

  8. The Effectiveness of Ropivacaine and Mepivacaine in the Postoperative Pain after Third Lower Molar Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Crincoli, Vito; Favia, Gianfranco; LImongelli, Luisa; Tempesta, Angela; Brienza, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To compare the efficacy of 0.75% ropivacaine with 3% mepivacaine for pain control in the first 24 hours after surgical removal of lower third molars, using a quantitative measurement such as VAS. The secondary objective involved rescue analgesia. Methods: Forty-five patients, 21 females and 24 males, mean age 23,2 ± 3 years, underwent surgical removal of third molars in two separate sessions. A split-mouth design was chosen, so each patient underwent both the first and second surgeries, having for each extraction a different anesthetic. The second extraction was carried out 1 month later. Parameters evaluated were: onset of anesthesia, duration of surgery, lip numbness, timing of pain appearance and first analgesic intake. Results: No significant differences about onset of anesthesia, duration of surgical procedures, and timing of first analgesic intake were found. Lower lip numbness, on the other hand, was more prolonged after using ropivacaine (p < 0.0001) and the onset of postoperative pain was more delayed after anesthesia with ropivacaine (p=0.0048). Pain scores at 1 and 2 hours after surgery were 3.5 ± 2.0 and 4.1 ±1.3 after injection of mepivacaine, and 2.7 ±2.2 and 2.9 ±2.4 after ropivacaine (p value =0.006 for both time points). No significant differences in pain score were recorded between the two anesthetics at 12 and 24 hours post surgery. Conclusions: With the use of ropivacaine, the discomfort caused by prolonged lip numbness is counterbalanced by less postoperative discomfort after surgery. In addition, when compared with other long-acting anesthetics, ropivacaine ensures a safer anesthetic profile for medically complex patients. PMID:26640405

  9. The Impact of Demographic, Clinical, Symptom and Psychological Characteristics on the Trajectories of Acute Postoperative Pain After Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Miaskowski, Christine; Rustøen, Tone; Rosseland, Leiv Arne; Paul, Steven M.; Cooper, Bruce A.; Lerdal, Anners

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Total knee arthroplasty is a painful procedure. No studies have evaluated modifiable predictors of acute postoperative pain trajectories during hospitalization. Methods. Consecutive patients (N = 188) were enrolled in a longitudinal cohort study and completed a demographic questionnaire, as well as the Brief Pain Inventory, Hospital Depression and Anxiety Scale, Lee Fatigue Scale, Fatigue Severity Scale, and Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire on the day before surgery. Clinical data were extracted from medical records. Setting and Patients. Each patient completed a pain diary that assessed pain at rest and with activity, and hours per day in pain every evening from day of surgery until postoperative day 3. Using hierarchical linear modeling, we investigated which demographic, clinical, symptom, and psychological characteristics predicted initial levels as well as the trajectories of acute pain at rest and with activity, and hours per day in pain. Results. Higher levels of all three acute pain characteristics on the day of surgery resulted in worse trajectories. Higher pain scores with rest and with activity on the day of surgery were associated with more days with femoral block, higher average dose of opioids, and higher emotional response to osteoarthritis. Higher number of comorbidities, higher average dose of opioids, and lower perceived control predicted more hours per day in pain on the day of surgery. Conclusions. This study identified several potentially modifiable predictors of worsening pain trajectories following total knee arthroplasty. Optimal pain management warrants identification of these high-risk patients and treatment of modifiable risk factors. PMID:27165969

  10. The effect of a preoperative educational film on patients' postoperative pain in relation to their request for opioids.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Jacqueline F M; van Wijck, Albert J M; Kappen, Teus H; Peelen, Linda M; Kalkman, Cor J; Schuurmans, Marieke J

    2015-04-01

    Guidelines for postoperative pain treatment are based on patients' pain scores. Patients with an intermediate Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) score of 5 or 6 may consider their pain as either bearable or unbearable, which makes it difficult to decide on pain treatment because guidelines advise professionals to treat pain at NRS > 4. Educating patients in using an NRS score for pain might improve adequate pain treatment. A quasi-randomized controlled trial was conducted in which 194 preoperative patients watched the educational film and 183 the control film. Pain scores were considered discordant when patients reported an NRS ≤ 4 and wanted additional opioids or when patients reported an NRS > 4 and did not want additional opioids. Beliefs, fear, and knowledge of pain; pain assessment; and pain treatment were measured by questionnaires. No significant differences in discordant pain scores between the groups were found: relative risk (RR) 0.73, confidence interval (CI) 0.47-1.15 at rest and RR 0.96, CI 0.72-1.28 at movement. Patients in the intervention group had lower NRS pain scores than patients in the control group. In the intervention group, patients had significantly more knowledge and lower barriers to pain management compared with the control group. We did not find a statistically significant reduction in discordant pain scores when comparing the intervention group with the control group. However, patients in the intervention group had significantly lower pain scores, lower barriers, and more knowledge of pain treatment than patients in the control group.

  11. Piloting tailored teaching on nonpharmacologic enhancements for postoperative pain management in older adults.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Susanne M

    2010-09-01

    Despite many advances in the pharmacologic treatment of pain, the issue of unresolved postoperative pain continues to plague patients and health care professionals. Little seems to be known about the reasons why nonpharmacologic methods are not more widely used, particularly as they are commonly low in cost, easy to use, and largely free of adverse side effects. A central question has to do with what patients are taught about nonpharmacologic methods and how a novel mode of teaching can be embedded in practice. A seven-step pre-posttest teaching intervention pilot study was deployed with older joint replacement patients within the context of a translational research model. Results of the teaching pilot showed significant post-teaching changes in subjects' knowledge and attitudes about nonpharmacologic methods for pain management, high satisfaction with the nonpharmacologic methods they chose, and incrementally greater use of the nonpharmacologic methods over the course of the hospital stay. A randomized controlled trial of the study is now in the early planning stages in an effort to obtain generalizable results that will help solidify evidence of the impact of music, imagery, and slow-stroke massage on pain management and confirm the value of patient teaching as an important means of offering patients more options for managing their own pain.

  12. State anxiety and depression as factors modulating and influencing postoperative pain in dental implant surgery. A prospective clinical survey

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-de Diego, Rafael; Cutando-Soriano, Antonio; Montero-Martín, Javier; Prados-Frutos, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    Objetives: To determine whether preoperative state anxiety and depression modulate or influence objective and subjective postoperative pain following dental implant insertion. Study Design: Prospective, clinical study with 7-day follow-up of a sample of 105 subjects who preoperatively completed the state anxiety questionnaire (STAI-E) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and postoperatively, at 2 and 7 days, recorded objective pain with the Semmes-Weinstein mechanical esthesiometer (SW test) and subjective pain with the Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Results: 85.6% and 81.5% of patients, respectively, recorded no signs of state anxiety or depression. The correlation between anxiety and depression for both maxillary bones was the lower (P=0.02). The correlation between subjective and objective pain at 2 and 7 days, and the anatomic regions intervened, was statistically significant in the mandible at day 7 (P<0.01), and highly significant (P<0.001) for the other variables. The correlation between state anxiety and objective pain at day 7 was nearly statistically significant (P=0.07). Conclusions: The correlation between state anxiety and depression, and objective and subjective pain at day 7 was not statistically significant. A strong correlation was found between objective and subjective pain in the immediate postoperative period. Key words:Anxiety, depression, postoperative pain, dental implants. PMID:24880447

  13. The effect of music therapy on postoperative pain, heart rate, systolic blood pressures and analgesic use following nasal surgery.

    PubMed

    Tse, Mimi M Y; Chan, M F; Benzie, Iris F F

    2005-01-01

    The prevalence of unrelieved postoperative pain is high and may lead to adverse effects including prolonged hospitalization and delayed recovery. Distraction may be an effective pain-relieving strategy, and can be implemented by several means including affective imaging, games, and possibly music. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of music therapy on postoperative pain. Fifty-seven patients (24 females, 33 males; mean +/- SD age 39.9 +/- 14.35 years [range 15 to 69 years] were matched for age and sex and then nonselectively assigned to either an experimental (n = 27) or a control (n = 30) group. Music was played intermittently to members of the experimental group during the first 24 hour postoperative period. Pain intensity was measured using the Pain Verbal Rating Scales (VRS). Significant decreases in pain intensity over time were found in the experimental group compared to the control group (p < 0.0001). In addition, the experimental group had a lower systolic blood pressure and heart rate, and took fewer oral analgesics for pain. These findings suggest that music therapy is an effective nonpharmacologic approach for postoperative pain management.

  14. Single dose oral codeine, as a single agent, for acute postoperative pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background Codeine is an opioid metabolised to active analgesic compounds, including morphine. It is widely available by prescription, and combination drugs including low doses of codeine are commonly available without prescription. Objectives To assess the efficacy, the time to onset of analgesia, the time to use of rescue medication and any associated adverse events of single dose oral codeine in acute postoperative pain. Search methods We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and PubMed to November 2009. Selection criteria Single oral dose, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of codeine for relief of established moderate to severe postoperative pain in adults. Data collection and analysis Studies were assessed for methodological quality and data independently extracted by two review authors. Summed total pain relief (TOTPAR) or pain intensity difference (SPID) over 4 to 6 hours were used to calculate the number of participants achieving at least 50% pain relief, which were used to calculate, with 95% confidence intervals, the relative benefit compared to placebo, and the number needed to treat (NNT) for one participant to experience at least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours. Numbers using rescue medication over specified time periods, and time to use of rescue medication, were sought as additional measures of efficacy. Data on adverse events and withdrawals were collected. Main results Thirty-five studies were included (1223 participants received codeine 60 mg, 27 codeine 90 mg, and 1252 placebo). Combining all types of surgery (33 studies, 2411 participants), codeine 60 mg had an NNT of at least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours of 12 (8.4 to 18) compared with placebo. At least 50% pain relief was achieved by 26% on codeine 60 mg and 17% on placebo. Following dental surgery the NNT was 21 (12 to 96) (15 studies, 1146 participants), and following other types of surgery the NNT was 6.8 (4.6 to 13) (18 studies, 1265 participants). The NNT to prevent

  15. Local Infiltration Analgesia reduces pain and hospital stay after primary TKA: randomized controlled double blind trial.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Wani, Ajaz Majeed; Vijay, Vipul

    2015-12-01

    Postoperative analgesia following Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) with the use of parenteral opioids or epidural analgesia can be associated with important side effects. Good perioperative analgesia facilitates faster rehabilitation, improves patient satisfaction, and may reduce the hospital stay. We investigated the analgesic effect of a locally injected mixture of drugs, in a double blinded RCT in 80 primary TKA. They were randomized either to receive a periarticular mixture of drugs containing bupivacaine, ketorolac, morphine, and adrenalline or to receive normal saline. Visual analog scores (VAS) for pain (at rest and during activity) and for patient satisfaction and range of motion were recorded postoperatively. The patients who had received the periarticular injection used significantly less the Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA) after the surgery as compared to the control group. In addition, they had lower VAS for pain during rest and activity and higher visual analog scores for patient satisfaction 72 hours postoperatively. No major complication related to the drugs was observed. Intraoperative periarticular injection with multimodal drugs following TKA can significantly reduce the postoperative pain and hence the requirements for PCA and hospital stay, with no apparent risks.

  16. Comparison of Pain Scores in Postoperative Patients: Intravenous Morphine Patient-Controlled Analgesia vs Iontophoretic Transdermal Fentanyl

    PubMed Central

    Caram, Anthony M; Patel, Nirav; Sandler, Hayden M

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative management of pain has traditionally utilized intravenous (IV) morphine for pain control. An alternative approach to the invasive patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) system is the administration of transdermal analgesics, such as fentanyl. In 2006 the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the fentanyl hydrochloride (fentanyl HCl) iontophoretic transdermal system (ITS), which utilizes iontophoretic technology to produce a controlled electrical current that propels ionized fentanyl molecules into the systemic vasculature. Transdermal fentanyl has been shown to be equivalent or superior to IV morphine PCA in a variety of postoperative settings with patients experiencing decreased pain scores and a favorable side effect profile. PMID:27688989

  17. [Postoperative pain therapy with hydromorphone and metamizole. A prospective randomized study in intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA)].

    PubMed

    Lehmann, K A; Paral, F; Sabatowski, R

    2001-10-01

    Most potent opioid analgesics available in Germany have been investigated for use in postoperative patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). To conclude an older comparative series, it was the aim of the present study to define analgesic potency, side effects and patient acceptance of hydromorphone and its interaction with the non-opioid analgesic metamizole. A total of 120 patients recovering from elective abdominal or orthopaedic surgery, performed under standardised general anaesthesia, were randomised into 3 double-blind treatment groups to receive intravenous PCA demand doses of hydromorphone 283 micrograms (low dose, LD), 566 micrograms (high dose, HD) or a combination of hydromorphone 283 micrograms and metamizole 50 mg (low dose hydromorphone + metamizole, LM). Demand-independent low-dose background infusions were added to deliver hydromorphone at 67.9 micrograms/h in all groups, with additional metamizole at 12 mg/h in group LM. Lockout times were set to 2 min. After an average observation time of 24.5 +/- 2.6 h (mean, SD) since start of PCA, cumulative PCA hydromorphone doses in groups LD, HD and LM were 7.8 +/- 3.3, 12.1 +/- 4.8 and 7.5 +/- 2.0 mg, respectively, with the well known large inter-individual variability in all groups. Although hydromorphone consumption was significantly higher in group HD, self-reported pain intensities (VAS, retrospective pain scores) were quite comparable between the groups. Low dose, PCA bolus-linked metamizole did not significantly reduce hydromorphone consumption nor improve patient acceptance. Side-effects were typical for potent postoperative opioids, but never required special treatment; haemodynamic or respiratory complications were not observed in any patient. It can be concluded by comparison with other PCA opioid investigations performed under the same study protocol that hydromorphone is about 3-4 times as potent an analgesic as morphine under the conditions of intravenous postoperative PCA. Due to a favourable

  18. Postoperative seroma formation after abdominoplasty with placement of continuous infusion local anesthetic pain pump

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Melissa M; Lin, Michael P; Hovsepian, Raffi V; Wood, David; Nguyen, Trung; Evans, Gregory RD; Wirth, Garrett A

    2009-01-01

    The most common complication after abdominoplasty is seroma formation. The incidence of seroma formation in abdominal procedures as a whole, including abdominoplasty, panniculectomy and transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap abdominal donor sites, ranges from 1% to 38%. A recent concern among surgeons is the possibility of a causal relationship between the use of continuous infusion devices such as local anesthetic pain pumps and the development of seromas. A case of postoperative, persistent, recurrent seroma formation after abdominoplasty with the use of continuous infusion local anesthetic pain pump is presented. After several attempts at aspiration and drain catheter placement, only open surgical excision of the seroma cavity was found to be definitively effective in treating the development of seroma. PMID:21119843

  19. Double blind study with nefopam, tilidine and placebo, for postoperative pain suppression.

    PubMed

    Abeloos, J; Rolly, G; Uten, M

    1983-12-01

    A double-blind study involving 101 patients was done to assess the efficacy of parenteral nefopam (0.66 mg/kg) for postoperative pain suppression, in comparison to tilidine (1.67 mg/kg) or placebo. The difference in painfree duration for both active drugs compared to placebo is significant, but no significant difference was present between them; although tilidine was a little longer acting. At no moment a significant difference was present in the pain score of the patients receiving one of both active drugs. Only minor changes of blood pressure, heart rate and respiratory frequency were seen and marked side effects were not present in any of the patients.

  20. Postoperative oxycodone toxicity in a patient with chronic pain and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Tran, Bryant W; Kohan, Lynn R; Vorenkamp, Kevin E

    2015-02-15

    We present this case to review the metabolism of oxycodone and the effects of end-stage renal disease on the elimination of oxycodone and its metabolites. A 42-year-old female with end-stage renal disease who was dependent on hemodialysis presented for left hamstring posterior capsule release. She had been receiving methadone for 2 years for chronic leg pain. On postoperative day 1, the patient's medication was changed from IV hydromorphone to oral oxycodone to treat breakthrough pain. By the next day, the patient was unarousable with notable respiratory depression. She did not fully recover after urgent hemodialysis but did have full recovery after receiving an IV naloxone infusion for 22 hours. Further study of the safety of oxycodone in hemodialysis patients is warranted.

  1. Prevalence of acute post-operative pain in patients in adult age-group undergoing inpatient abdominal surgery and correlation of intensity of pain and satisfaction with analgesic management: A cross-sectional single institute-based study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prashant Kumar; Saikia, Priyam; Lahakar, Mangala

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Considering the paucity of regional data, this study was designed to investigate the prevalence of post-operative pain and determine if there exists any correlation between the intensity of post-operative pain and patient's level of satisfaction with their pain management after inpatient abdominal surgery at an academic tertiary care government centre. Methods: Pain intensity was measured in 120 patients with numeric rating scale at the fifth post-operative hour, second and third post-operative day. A questionnaire was used to measure the level of satisfaction with nurse's and doctor's response to their pain and overall pain management. Results: The prevalence of post-operative pain was 84.17%, 92.5% and 96.66% at the fifth post-operative hour, second and third post-operative day, respectively. Less number of patients experienced severe intensity pain on the third post-operative day (P = 0.00046), whereas the number of patients experiencing mild pain increased (P < 0.000) compared to the fifth post-operative hour. The number of patients with complete analgesia decreased on the third post-operative day (P = 0.001 compared to fifth post-operative day). The Spearman correlation coefficient between pain score on the third post-operative day and level of satisfaction with nurse's response, doctor's response to pain and the overall pain management was − 0.0218 (P = 0.8107), 0.1307 (P = 0.1553) and 0.0743 (P = 0.4195), respectively. Conclusion: There is a high prevalence of acute post-operative pain in patients undergoing inpatient abdominal surgery at our institute. There is a weak correlation between the intensity of pain and level of satisfaction with pain management. PMID:27761037

  2. Validation study of the strategic and clinical quality indicators in postoperative pain management questionnaire in Turkish surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Vatansever, Nursel Aydın; Akansel, Neriman

    2014-12-01

    Determining patient satisfaction with postoperative pain management is an important intervention to improve strategies for effective pain control. The aim of this study was to validate an English version of the 14-item Strategic and Clinical Quality Indicators in Postoperative Pain Management questionnaire in Turkish language. The study included 113 patients who underwent elective surgeries at a university hospital in Bursa, Turkey. The data were collected after translation procedures and final adjustments were done on the original instrument. For the total scale, Cronbach's coefficient α was 0.81 and the main score obtained from the scale was 45.8 ± 10.8. Included were three subscales: nursing interventions, pain management, and environments. Of the patients, 40.7% reported more pain than expected in the postoperative period and their satisfaction with pain relief was 7.4 ± 2.5. This instrument is a reliable and valid instrument in Turkish language and can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of postoperative pain management.

  3. Postoperative Pain Control with the Fentanyl Patch and Continuous Paravertebral Anesthetic Infusion after Posterior Occipitocervical Junction Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sivakumar, Walavan; Karsy, Michael; Brock, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative pain is a significant concern for patients who undergo surgery via a midline posterior approach to the occipitocervical junction and spinal axis. The development of the disposable, ambulatory pain pump presents a novel alternative for treatment of postoperative pain. The authors describe a multimodal treatment algorithm for postoperative pain after posterior occipitocervical junction surgery that uses the On-Q pain catheter system (I-Flow Corp., Lake Forest, CA) and a fentanyl patch. The On-Q PainBuster catheter system is a disposable, ambulatory device that allows for continuous anesthetic delivery directly into or adjacent to the wound. On-Q catheters are placed in the nuchal musculature for continuous infusion of 0.5% bupivacaine. The On-Q catheter infusion is continued for three days, and the catheters are then withdrawn. Patients are also provided with a transdermal fentanyl patch at the start of surgery. In regards to complications at our facility, there have been no cases of respiratory depression or arrest postoperatively and no wound infections, but one case of inadvertent subdural placement. The technique described for the use of the fentanyl patch and a continuous anesthetic delivery device in surgery of the occipitocervical junction presents a novel alternative to the current standard of care in pain control after suboccipital decompression. PMID:27433423

  4. Acute psychosocial stress reduces pain modulation capabilities in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Geva, Nirit; Pruessner, Jens; Defrin, Ruth

    2014-11-01

    Anecdotes on the ability of individuals to continue to function under stressful conditions despite injuries causing excruciating pain suggest that acute stress may induce analgesia. However, studies exploring the effect of acute experimental stress on pain perception show inconsistent results, possibly due to methodological differences. Our aim was to systematically study the effect of acute stress on pain perception using static and dynamic, state-of-the-art pain measurements. Participants were 29 healthy men who underwent the measurement of heat-pain threshold, heat-pain intolerance, temporal summation of pain, and conditioned pain modulation (CPM). Testing was conducted before and during exposure to the Montreal Imaging Stress Task (MIST), inducing acute psychosocial stress. Stress levels were evaluated using perceived ratings of stress and anxiety, autonomic variables, and salivary cortisol. The MIST induced a significant stress reaction. Although pain threshold and pain intolerance were unaffected by stress, an increase in temporal summation of pain and a decrease in CPM were observed. These changes were significantly more robust among individuals with stronger reaction to stress ("high responders"), with a significant correlation between the perception of stress and the performance in the pain measurements. We conclude that acute psychosocial stress seems not to affect the sensitivity to pain, however, it significantly reduces the ability to modulate pain in a dose-response manner. Considering the diverse effects of stress in this and other studies, it appears that the type of stress and the magnitude of its appraisal determine its interactions with the pain system.

  5. Comparative study of ultrasound-guided abdominal field blocks versus port infiltration in laparoscopic cholecystectomies for post-operative pain relief

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Ruchi; Joshi, Saurabh; Srivastava, Kuldeep; Tiwari, Shashank; Sharma, Nitin; Valecha, Umesh K

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Post-operative pain is a major concern for day care surgeries like laparoscopic cholecystectomy. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of ultrasound guided abdominal field blocks (USAFB) with port site infiltrations for post-operative analgesia in terms of quality of pain relief, opioid consumption and patient satisfaction for day care surgeries Methods: Eighty patients presenting for laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomly allocated to two groups either to receive port-site infiltration of local anaesthetic (n = 40, Group A) or USAFB (n = 40, Group B group). Numeric rating scores (NRS) were measured postoperatively to primarily assess the pain severity and opioid requirements. Data were analysed using Chi-Square test/Fisher's exact test for categorical data and Mann–Whitney test/unpaired t-test for quantitative data. Results: The study group (Group B) had significantly reduced NRS and opioid consumption over 24 h. The overall fentanyl consumption in patients receiving port infiltrations was approximately twice (200 ΁ 100 μg) as compared to patients in USAFB group (120 ΁ 74 μg) (P < 0.0001). Maximum fentanyl consumption was 400 μg (Group A) and 262 μg (Group B) over 24 h and the minimum requirement was 50 μg and zero, respectively. Conclusion: Superior post-operative analgesia was observed with USAFB which may help in minimising opioid-related adverse effects and facilitating faster recovery. PMID:27601741

  6. Exposure to violence reduces empathetic responses to other's pain.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiuyan; Zheng, Li; Wang, Hongyi; Zhu, Lei; Li, Jianqi; Wang, Qianfeng; Dienes, Zoltan; Yang, Zhiliang

    2013-07-01

    Past researches showed that empathy for pain not only triggers a resonance mechanism between other and self, but also is modulated by contextual factors. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, the present study demonstrated that short-term media violence exposure reduced both pain ratings and also the activation of anterior insula and anterior mid-cingulate cortex to other's pain. Thus, violence exposure modulated empathic responses to other's pain based on a physiological desensitization.

  7. A comparison of ketorolac with flunixin, butorphanol, and oxymorphone in controlling postoperative pain in dogs.

    PubMed

    Mathews, K A; Paley, D M; Foster, R A; Valliant, A E; Young, S S

    1996-09-01

    Ketorolac tromethamine, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory analgesic, was compared with flunixin and butorphanol for its analgesic efficacy and potential side effects after laparotomy or shoulder arthrotomy in dogs. Sixty-four dogs were randomly assigned to receive butorphanol 0.4 mg/kg body weight (BW) (n = 21), flunixin 1.0 mg/kg BW (n = 21), or ketorolac 0.5 mg/kg BW (n = 22), in a double blind fashion. The analgesic efficacy was rated from 1 to 4 (1 = inadequate, 4 = excellent) for each dog. The average scores after laparotomy were ketorolac, 3.4; flunixin, 2.7; and butorphanol, 1.6. After shoulder arthrotomy, the average scores were ketorolac, 3.5; flunixin, 3.0; and butorphanol, 1.4 (5/11 dogs). As butorphanol was unable to control pain after shoulder arthrotomy, oxymorphone, 0.05 mg/kg BW, replaced butorphanol in a subsequent group of dogs and had a score of 2.0 (6/11 dogs). Serum alanine aminotransferase and creatinine were significantly elevated above baseline at 24 hours postoperatively in dogs receiving flunixin. One dog in each group developed melena or hematochezia. One dog receiving ketorolac had histological evidence of gastric ulceration. We concluded that ketorolac is a good analgesic for postoperative pain in dogs.

  8. Co-administration of morphine and gabapentin leads to dose dependent synergistic effects in a rat model of postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Papathanasiou, Theodoros; Juul, Rasmus Vestergaard; Heegaard, Anne-Marie; Kreilgaard, Mads; Lund, Trine Meldgaard

    2016-01-20

    Despite much evidence that combination of morphine and gabapentin can be beneficial for managing postoperative pain, the nature of the pharmacological interaction of the two drugs remains unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the interaction of morphine and gabapentin in range of different dose combinations and investigate whether co-administration leads to synergistic effects in a preclinical model of postoperative pain. The pharmacodynamic effects of morphine (1, 3 and 7mg/kg), gabapentin (10, 30 and 100mg/kg) or their combination (9 combinations in total) were evaluated in the rat plantar incision model using an electronic von Frey device. The percentage of maximum possible effect (%MPE) and the area under the response curve (AUC) were used for evaluation of the antihyperalgesic effects of the drugs. Identification of synergistic interactions was based on Loewe additivity response surface analyses. The combination of morphine and gabapentin resulted in synergistic antihyperalgesic effects in a preclinical model of postoperative pain. The synergistic interactions were found to be dose dependent and the increase in observed response compared to the theoretical additive response ranged between 26 and 58% for the synergistic doses. The finding of dose-dependent synergistic effects highlights that choosing the right dose-dose combination is of importance in postoperative pain therapy. Our results indicate benefit of high doses of gabapentin as adjuvant to morphine. If these findings translate to humans, they might have important implications for the treatment of pain in postoperative patients.

  9. Improved pain management in pediatric postoperative liver transplant patients using parental education and non-pharmacologic interventions.

    PubMed

    Sharek, Paul J; Wayman, Karen; Lin, Eugenia; Strichartz, Debra; Sentivany-Collins, Sandy; Good, Julie; Esquivel, Carlos; Brown, Michelle; Cox, Kenneth

    2006-03-01

    A pain management intervention, consisting of pretransplant parental education and support, pre- and postoperative behavioral pediatrics consultation, postoperative physical and occupational therapy consultation, and implementation of non-pharmacologic pain management strategies, was introduced to all pediatrics patients receiving liver transplants at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital beginning August 2001. Children receiving transplants pre-intervention (May, 2000 to February, 2001) and post-intervention (August, 2001 to March, 2002) were compared using pain scores, parent perception of pain ratings, length of stay, ventilator days, total cost, and opioid use. A total of 27 children were evaluated (13 historical control, 14 intervention). The two populations did not differ on age at transplant (mean age 53.8 vs. 63.6 months), sex (46.1% vs. 50% male), ethnicity (53.8% vs. 57.1% white, non-Hispanic) weight at transplant (17.5 vs. 24.7 kg), percent with biliary atresia as the primary reason for transplant (42.9% vs. 69.2%), percent with status 1 transplant listing score (38.5% vs. 50.0%), or public insurance status (30.8 vs. 57.2% with Medicaid). No differences were found in mean pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) postoperative length of stay (6.7 vs. 5.3 days), total postoperative length of stay (17.5 vs. 17.5 days), total inpatient length of stay (27.0 vs. 24.4 days), time to extubation (30 vs. 24.3 h), total cost (dollar 147,983 vs. dollar 157,882) or opioid use through postoperative day (POD) 6 (0.24 vs. 0.25 mg/kg/day morphine equivalent). A decrease in mean pain score between POD 0 and 6 (2.82 vs. 2.12; p = 0.047), a decrease in mean parental pain perception score (3.1 vs. 2.1; p = 0.001), and an increase in number of pain assessments per 12 h shift (3.43 vs. 6.79; p < 0.005) were seen. A comprehensive non-pharmacologic postoperative pain management program in children receiving a liver transplant was associated with decreased pain scores, improved parent

  10. [Rett syndrome: double epidural catheter for the control of postoperative pain after scoliosis surgery. A literature review].

    PubMed

    Freire Vila, E; de la Iglesia López, A; Juncal Díaz, J L

    2013-03-01

    Rett syndrome is a severe and incapacitating neurological disease caused by a structural defect in the short arm of the X chromosome (Xq28). It affects females and consists of multiple and progressive neurological impairments that start from a young age, leading to lifelong disability and dependency. Scoliosis appears in more than 50% of patients and requires surgical correction in cases where the curvature is severe. Pre-anaesthetic assessment is essential in order to identify the risk factors and thus reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with the surgical procedure. We present the case of a patient affected by this syndrome and scoliosis, who was scheduled to have an instrumented thoracolumbar spine arthrodesis with general anaesthesia, which passed without incident. We evaluate the specific details of this syndrome, its potential complications, and its management from an anaesthetic point of view, emphasising the control of postoperative pain using a double epidural catheter with an infusion of local anaesthetics and fentanyl.

  11. Validation of the scale on Satisfaction of Adolescents with Postoperative pain management – idiopathic Scoliosis (SAP-S)

    PubMed Central

    Khadra, Christelle; Le May, Sylvie; Ballard, Ariane; Théroux, Jean; Charette, Sylvie; Villeneuve, Edith; Parent, Stefan; Tsimicalis, Argerie; MacLaren Chorney, Jill

    2017-01-01

    Background Spinal fusion is a common orthopedic surgery in children and adolescents and is associated with high pain levels postoperatively. If the pain is not well managed, negative outcomes may ensue. To our knowledge, there is no measure in English that assesses patient’s satisfaction with postoperative pain management following idiopathic scoliosis surgery. The aim of the present study was to assess the psychometric properties of the satisfaction subscale of the English version of the Satisfaction of Adolescents with Postoperative pain management – idiopathic Scoliosis (SAP-S) scale. Methods Eighty-two participants aged 10–18 years, who had undergone spinal fusion surgery, fully completed the SAP-S scale at 10–14 days postdischarge. Construct validity was assessed through a principal component analysis using varimax rotation. Results Principal component analysis indicated a three-factor structure of the 13-item satisfaction subscale of the SAP-S scale. Factors referred to satisfaction regarding current medication received (Factor 1), actions taken by nurses and doctors to manage pain (Factor 2) and information received after surgery (Factor 3). Cronbach’s alpha was 0.91, showing very good internal consistency. Data on satisfaction and clinical outcomes were also reported. Conclusion The SAP-S is a valid and reliable measure of satisfaction with postoperative pain management that can be used in both research and clinical settings to improve pain management practices. Although it was developed and validated with adolescents who had undergone spinal fusion surgery, it can be used, with further validation, to assess adolescents’ satisfaction with pain management in other postoperative contexts. PMID:28138264

  12. What is the impact of theoretical knowledge on children's nurses' post-operative pain management practices? An exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Twycross, Alison

    2007-10-01

    Despite the availability of the evidence to guide pain management practices, practices are often sub-optimal with children experiencing moderate to severe pain post-operatively. Limited theoretical knowledge about managing pain has been suggested as one reason for this. Several studies have identified gaps in nurses' theoretical knowledge. However, the affect of theoretical knowledge on pain management practices has not been explored. This explored whether there is a relationship between nurses' theoretical knowledge and the quality of their practices. Nurses (n=13) on one children's surgical ward were shadowed for a five-hour period during two-four shifts. Data about post-operative pain management practices were collected using a pain management checklist and field notes. Nurses (n=12) also completed the revised pain management knowledge test. Questionnaire scores were compared to the observational data. No positive relationship was found between nurses' level of theoretical knowledge and how well they actually managed pain. Nurses did not appear to routinely apply theoretical knowledge in practice. This may explain, at least in part, why pain management practices remain poor despite the evidence to guide practice being readily available. The hypothesis, put forward in other studies, that increasing nurses' theoretical knowledge about pain will improve practices may be overly simplistic.

  13. Validation of a Behavioral Ethogram for Assessing Postoperative Pain in Guinea Pigs (Cavia porcellus)

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar, Misha L; David, Emily M; Aline, Marian R; Lofgren, Jennifer L

    2016-01-01

    Although guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus) have been used in research for more than a century and remain the most prevalent USDA-covered species, little has been elucidated regarding the recognition of clinical pain or analgesic efficacy in this species. We sought to assess pain in guinea pigs by using newer, clinically relevant methods that have been validated in other rodent species: the behavioral ethogram and cageside proxy indicator. In this study, 10 male guinea pigs underwent electronic von Frey testing of nociception, remote videorecording of behavior, and cageside assessment by using time-to-consumption (TTC) of a preferred treat test. These assessments were performed across 2 conditions (anesthesia only and castration surgery under anesthesia) at 3 time points (2, 8, and 24 h after the event). The anesthesia only condition served to control for the nonpainful but potentially distressing components of the surgical experience. Compared with those after anesthesia only conditions, subtle body movements were increased and nociceptive thresholds were decreased at 2 and 8 h after surgery. At 24 h, neither subtle body movement behaviors nor nociceptive thresholds differed between the 2 conditions. In contrast, TTC scores did not differ between the anesthesia only and surgery conditions at any time point, underscoring the challenge of identifying pain in this species through cageside evaluation. By comparing ethogram scores with measures of nociception, we validated select behaviors as pain-specific. Therefore, our novel ethogram allowed us to assess postoperative pain and may further serve as a platform for future analgesia efficacy studies in guinea pigs. PMID:26817977

  14. Validation of a Behavioral Ethogram for Assessing Postoperative Pain in Guinea Pigs (Cavia porcellus).

    PubMed

    Dunbar, Misha L; David, Emily M; Aline, Marian R; Lofgren, Jennifer L

    2016-01-01

    Although guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus) have been used in research for more than a century and remain the most prevalent USDA-covered species, little has been elucidated regarding the recognition of clinical pain or analgesic efficacy in this species. We sought to assess pain in guinea pigs by using newer, clinically relevant methods that have been validated in other rodent species: the behavioral ethogram and cageside proxy indicator. In this study, 10 male guinea pigs underwent electronic von Frey testing of nociception, remote videorecording of behavior, and cageside assessment by using time-to-consumption (TTC) of a preferred treat test. These assessments were performed across 2 conditions (anesthesia only and castration surgery under anesthesia) at 3 time points (2, 8, and 24 h after the event). The anesthesia only condition served to control for the nonpainful but potentially distressing components of the surgical experience. Compared with those after anesthesia only conditions, subtle body movements were increased and nociceptive thresholds were decreased at 2 and 8 h after surgery. At 24 h, neither subtle body movement behaviors nor nociceptive thresholds differed between the 2 conditions. In contrast, TTC scores did not differ between the anesthesia only and surgery conditions at any time point, underscoring the challenge of identifying pain in this species through cageside evaluation. By comparing ethogram scores with measures of nociception, we validated select behaviors as pain-specific. Therefore, our novel ethogram allowed us to assess postoperative pain and may further serve as a platform for future analgesia efficacy studies in guinea pigs.

  15. The effect of sutureless wound closure on postoperative pain and swelling after impacted mandibular third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Hamid Mahmood; Beshkar, Majid; Aghajani, Reihaneh

    2012-04-01

    Our aim was to assess the influence of sutureless and multiple-suture closure of wounds on postoperative complications after extraction of bilateral, impacted, mandibular third molars in 30 patients in a split mouth study. After the teeth had been removed, on one side the flap was replaced but with no suture to hold it in place (study side), and on the other side the wound was closed primarily with three sutures (control side). Recorded complications included pain, swelling, bleeding, and formation of periodontal pockets. The results showed that patients had significantly less postoperative pain and swelling when no sutures were used (p=0.005). There were no signs of excessive bleeding or oozing postoperatively on either side. Six months postoperatively there was no significant difference in the depth of the periodontal pocket around the second molar.

  16. Hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning improves postoperative cognitive dysfunction by reducing oxidant stress and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhi-xin; Rao, Jin; Li, Yuan-hai

    2017-01-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction is a crucial public health issue that has been increasingly studied in efforts to reduce symptoms or prevent its occurrence. However, effective advances remain lacking. Hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning has proved to protect vital organs, such as the heart, liver, and brain. Recently, it has been introduced and widely studied in the prevention of postoperative cognitive dysfunction, with promising results. However, the neuroprotective mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain controversial. This review summarizes and highlights the definition and application of hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning, the perniciousness and pathogenetic mechanism underlying postoperative cognitive dysfunction, and the effects that hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning has on postoperative cognitive dysfunction. Finally, we conclude that hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning is an effective and feasible method to prevent, alleviate, and improve postoperative cognitive dysfunction, and that its mechanism of action is very complex, involving the stimulation of endogenous antioxidant and anti-inflammation defense systems.

  17. Hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning improves postoperative cognitive dysfunction by reducing oxidant stress and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhi-Xin; Rao, Jin; Li, Yuan-Hai

    2017-02-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction is a crucial public health issue that has been increasingly studied in efforts to reduce symptoms or prevent its occurrence. However, effective advances remain lacking. Hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning has proved to protect vital organs, such as the heart, liver, and brain. Recently, it has been introduced and widely studied in the prevention of postoperative cognitive dysfunction, with promising results. However, the neuroprotective mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain controversial. This review summarizes and highlights the definition and application of hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning, the perniciousness and pathogenetic mechanism underlying postoperative cognitive dysfunction, and the effects that hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning has on postoperative cognitive dysfunction. Finally, we conclude that hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning is an effective and feasible method to prevent, alleviate, and improve postoperative cognitive dysfunction, and that its mechanism of action is very complex, involving the stimulation of endogenous antioxidant and anti-inflammation defense systems.

  18. Reiki therapy for postoperative oral pain in pediatric patients: Pilot data from a double-blind, randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Anjana; Lin, Yuting; Oron, Assaf P.; Doorenbos, Ardith Z.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine the effects of Reiki as an adjuvant therapy to opioid therapy for postoperative pain control in pediatric patients. Methods This was a double-blind, randomized controlled study of children undergoing dental procedures. Participants were randomly assigned to receive either Reiki therapy or the control therapy (sham Reiki) preoperatively. Postoperative pain scores, opioid requirements, and side effects were assessed. Family members were also asked about perioperative care satisfaction. Multiple linear regressions were used for analysis. Results Thirty-eight children participated. The blinding procedure was successful. No statistically significant difference was observed between groups on all outcome measures. Implications Our study provides a successful example of a blinding procedure for Reiki therapy among children in the perioperative period. This study does not support the effectiveness of Reiki as an adjuvant therapy to opioid therapy for postoperative pain control in pediatric patients. PMID:24439640

  19. Impact of iliac crest bone graft harvesting on fusion rates and postoperative pain during instrumented posterolateral lumbar fusion

    PubMed Central

    Triantafyllopoulos, Dimitrios; Kosmopoulos, Victor; Stafylas, Kosmas

    2007-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the influence of bone harvesting on postoperative pain and fusion rates. Group 1 patients received iliac crest bone graft (ICBG) either alone or augmented with local bone. Group 2 received only local bone. No statistical significance was found in radiological union or in the Oswestry Disability Index scores. Visual Analogue Scale scores showed less pain in group 2. Logistic regression showed no correlation between residual pain and occurrence of fusion. Harvesting ICBG did not appear to increase fusion rates and no relation was found between radiological non-union and pain. PMID:17724591

  20. Ear Acupuncture for Post-Operative Pain Associated with Ambulatory Arthroscopic Knee Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-14

    E7(/(3+21(180%(5 ,QFOXGHDUHDFRGH 14 Jan 2014 Final Report Ear acupuncture for post-operative pain associated with ambulatory arthroscopic...DISTRIBUTION A. Approved for public release: distribution unlimited. The purpose of this study is to compare ear acupuncture plus standard therapy versus...3298 Ear Acupuncture for Post-operative Pa111 Assoc1ated With Ambulatory Arthroscopic Knee Surgery A Randomized Controlled Trial ’• V ’’ ’-’ I

  1. Intrathecal hydromorphone for cesarean delivery: in search of improved postoperative pain management: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Erik

    2011-10-01

    Currently, morphine and fentanyl are the most commonly used intrathecal opioids for the postoperative pain management of patients who underwent cesarean delivery. Unfortunately, the analgesic benefits of these 2 drugs tend to fall into different extremes based on lipid solubility. Intrathecal hydromorphone may provide more consistent analgesia because its lipid solubility falls between that of the other 2 opioids. A 22-year-old woman with a 39-week intrauterine pregnancy, gravida 2, para 1, came in for a scheduled second-time cesarean delivery. Her preoperative history included a morphine allergy discovered when administered intrathecally during her first cesarean delivery. Thus, in this case, preservative-free hydromorphone, 100 microg, was administered intrathecally as the opioid replacement for the spinal anesthetic. Intrathecal hydromorphone was found to have provided superior pain relief with fewer side effects in this patient, who received intrathecal morphine for the same surgery 2 years earlier. This case report supports an emerging hypothesis that intrathecal hydromorphone is not only safe but possibly more effective than other intrathecal opioids for pain management after cesarean delivery. The purpose of this case report is to encourage the development of more research regarding this use of intrathecal hydromorphone.

  2. Evaluation of the effect of aromatherapy with Rosa damascena Mill. on postoperative pain intensity in hospitalized children in selected hospitals affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2013: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Marofi, Maryam; Sirousfard, Motahareh; Moeini, Mahin; Ghanadi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pain is the common complication after a surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of aromatherapy with Rosa damascena Mill. on the postoperative pain in children. Materials and Methods: In a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial, we selected 64 children of 3–6 years of age through convenient sampling and divided them randomly into two groups. Patients in group A were given inhalation aromatherapy with R. damascena Mill., and in group B, the patients were given almond oil as a placebo. Inhalation aromatherapy was used at the first time of subjects’ arrival to the ward and then at 3, 6, 9, and 12 h afterward. Common palliative treatments to relieve pain were used in both groups. Thirty minutes after aromatherapy, the postoperative pain in children was evaluated with the Toddler Preschooler Postoperative Pain Scale (TPPPS). Data were statistically analyzed using Chi-square test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and repeated measures ANOVA. Results: There was no significant difference in pain scores at the first time of subjects’ arrival to the ward (before receiving any aromatherapy or palliative care) between the two groups. After each time of aromatherapy and at the end of treatment, the pain score was significantly reduced in the aromatherapy group with R. damascena Mill. compared to the placebo group. Conclusions: According to our results, aromatherapy with R. damascena Mill. can be used in postoperative pain in children, together with other common treatments without any significant side effects. PMID:25878704

  3. The Evaluation of Undergraduate Nursing Students' Knowledge of Post-op Pain Management after Participation in Simulation.

    PubMed

    Evans, Cecile B; Mixon, Diana K

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this paper was to assess undergraduate nursing students' pain knowledge after participation in a simulation scenario. The Knowledge and Attitudes of Survey Regarding Pain (KASRP) was used to assess pain knowledge. In addition, reflective questions related to the simulation were examined. Student preferences for education method and reactions to the simulation (SIM) were described. Undergraduate nursing students' knowledge of pain management is reported as inadequate. An emerging pedagogy used to educate undergraduate nurses in a safe, controlled environment is simulation. Literature reports of simulation to educate students' about pain management are limited. As part of the undergraduate nursing student clinical coursework, a post-operative pain management simulation, the SIM was developed. Students were required to assess pain levels and then manage the pain for a late adolescent male whose mother's fear of addiction was a barrier to pain management. The students completed an anonymous written survey that included selected questions from the KASRP and an evaluation of the SIM experience. The students' mean KASRP percent correct was 70.4% ± 8.6%. Students scored the best on items specific to pain assessment and worst on items specific to opiate equivalents and decisions on PRN orders. The students' overall KASRP score post simulation was slightly better than previous studies of nursing students. These results suggest that educators should consider simulations to educate about pain assessment and patient/family education. Future pain simulations should include more opportunities for students to choose appropriate pain medications when provided PRN orders.

  4. Can consistent benchmarking within a standardized pain management concept decrease postoperative pain after total hip arthroplasty? A prospective cohort study including 367 patients

    PubMed Central

    Benditz, Achim; Greimel, Felix; Auer, Patrick; Zeman, Florian; Göttermann, Antje; Grifka, Joachim; Meissner, Winfried; von Kunow, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    Background The number of total hip replacement surgeries has steadily increased over recent years. Reduction in postoperative pain increases patient satisfaction and enables better mobilization. Thus, pain management needs to be continuously improved. Problems are often caused not only by medical issues but also by organization and hospital structure. The present study shows how the quality of pain management can be increased by implementing a standardized pain concept and simple, consistent, benchmarking. Methods All patients included in the study had undergone total hip arthroplasty (THA). Outcome parameters were analyzed 24 hours after surgery by means of the questionnaires from the German-wide project “Quality Improvement in Postoperative Pain Management” (QUIPS). A pain nurse interviewed patients and continuously assessed outcome quality parameters. A multidisciplinary team of anesthetists, orthopedic surgeons, and nurses implemented a regular procedure of data analysis and internal benchmarking. The health care team was informed of any results, and suggested improvements. Every staff member involved in pain management participated in educational lessons, and a special pain nurse was trained in each ward. Results From 2014 to 2015, 367 patients were included. The mean maximal pain score 24 hours after surgery was 4.0 (±3.0) on an 11-point numeric rating scale, and patient satisfaction was 9.0 (±1.2). Over time, the maximum pain score decreased (mean 3.0, ±2.0), whereas patient satisfaction significantly increased (mean 9.8, ±0.4; p<0.05). Among 49 anonymized hospitals, our clinic stayed on first rank in terms of lowest maximum pain and patient satisfaction over the period. Conclusion Results were already acceptable at the beginning of benchmarking a standardized pain management concept. But regular benchmarking, implementation of feedback mechanisms, and staff education made the pain management concept even more successful. Multidisciplinary teamwork

  5. Reduced acute nociception and chronic pain in Shank2-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Ko, Hyoung-Gon; Oh, Seog-Bae; Zhuo, Min; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder is a debilitating mental illness and social issue. Autism spectrum disorder patients suffer from social isolation, cognitive deficits, compulsive behavior, and sensory deficits, including hyposensitivity to pain. However, recent studies argued that autism spectrum disorder patients show physiological pain response and, in some cases, even extremely intense pain response to harmless stimulation. Recently, Shank gene family was reported as one of the genetic risk factors of autism spectrum disorder. Thus, in this study, we used Shank2(-) (/) (-) (Shank2 knock-out, KO) mice to investigate the controversial pain sensitivity issue and found that Shank2 KO mice showed reduced tactile perception and analgesia to chronic pain.

  6. Effective postoperative pain management in children after ambulatory surgery, with a focus on tonsillectomy: barriers and possible solutions.

    PubMed

    Dorkham, Mariana C; Chalkiadis, George A; von Ungern Sternberg, Britta S; Davidson, Andrew J

    2014-03-01

    Pain following ambulatory surgery is often poorly managed at home. Certain procedures, such as tonsillectomy, cause high levels of pain for at least 1 week postoperatively. This impacts significantly on recovery and postoperative morbidity with regards to oral intake, sleep, and behavior. Barriers to effective postoperative pain management at home following discharge have been investigated and incorporate: parental factors, such as the ability to recognize and assess their child's pain, and misconceptions about analgesics; child factors, such as refusal to take medication; medication factors, such as ineffective medication or inadequate formulation or dose of analgesics; and system factors, such as poor discharge instructions, difficulty in obtaining medication and lack of information provision. A number of interventions have been suggested and trialled in an effort to address these barriers, which encompass educational strategies, improved information provision, improved medication regimens, and the provision of tools to aid parents in the pain management of their children. All in all, improvements in pain outcomes have been minor, and a more holistic approach, that appreciates the complex and multifaceted nature of pain management at home, is required.

  7. Clonidine for treatment of postoperative pain: a dose-finding study.

    PubMed

    Marinangeli, Franco; Ciccozzi, Alessandra; Donatelli, Francesco; Di Pietro, Alcide; Iovinelli, Giorgio; Rawal, Narinder; Paladini, Antonella; Varrassi, Giustino

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this double-blind randomized study was to evaluate the optimal intravenous dose of clonidine administrated during the peri-operative period, after lumbar hemilaminectomy for herniated disk repair. The "optimal intravenous dose" was defined as that providing minimal analgesic request, stable haemodynamic profile and a minimal sedation score during 12h after extubation. Eighty adult patients, ASA physical status I-II, undergoing lumbar hemilaminectomy for herniated disk (L(4)-L(5), L(5)-S(1)) were included in the study. All the patients were randomly assigned to one of four study groups (A, B, C, D), 20 patients each. The same standardized general anaesthesia was performed for each group. Thirty minutes before the end of surgery, group A, B and C patients received three different loading doses of intravenous clonidine (5 microg/kg, 3 microg/kg, 2 microg/kg respectively), followed by the same infusion of intravenous clonidine (0.3 microg/kg per hour). Group D patients received a bolus dose and a continuous infusion of NaCl 0.9%. In the recovery unit, postoperative pain was treated by a patient-controlled analgesia device, containing morphine. Pain relief was evaluated by the total morphine requirement during the postoperative period. Systolic blood pressure (SBP), heart rate and sedation were also noted during the first 12h postoperatively. Intravenous clonidine decreased morphine requirements in a dose-dependent manner. Group A, B, C and D patients requested 5 +/- 2, 11 +/- 3, 19 +/- 4 and 29 +/- 8 doses of morphine respectively. Clonidine also affected SBP in a dose-related manner. Group A, B and C patients had an SBP decrease respectively of 26 +/- 3%, 7 +/- 4% and 2 +/- 2% compared with basic values while, at the same time, in group D patients no SBP variation was registered. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that, when sedation and analgesic effect of clonidine is required, 3 microg/kg bolus dose followed by a continuous infusion of 0.3 microg

  8. Maximizing the safety of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use for postoperative dental pain: an evidence-based approach.

    PubMed Central

    Ong, K. S.; Seymour, R. A.

    2003-01-01

    This article reviews the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for postoperative dental pain. An evidence-based approach is used to evaluate the clinical studies to date on the safe use of these drugs in dental patients. No drugs are without adverse effects or are perfectly safe, but their safe use in clinical practice would entail maximizing the therapeutic efficacy and minimizing the adverse effects. Therapeutic recommendations are made after reviewing the evidence for the safe use of NSAIDs in postoperative dental pain. PMID:12866802

  9. Analysis of Postoperative Pain at the Anterior Iliac Crest Harvest Site: A Prospective Study of the Intraoperative Local Administration of Ropivacaine

    PubMed Central

    Hitzl, Wolfgang; Mayer, Michael; Koller, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    harvest site, and all patients underwent successful 3-level and 4-level ACDFP. Statistical analysis showed significant differences for VAS on postoperative day 1 (p=0.004) and day 2 (p=0.005). Conclusions VAS assessment showed overall moderate perioperative morbidity in terms of donor site-related pain, which was reduced by administering ropivacaine. PMID:25705333

  10. Retracted: Postoperative pain after irrigation with Vibringe versus a conventional needle: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bilgili, D; Yilmaz, S; Dumani, A; Yoldas, O

    2016-08-01

    The following article from International Endodontic Journal, 'Postoperative pain after irrigation with Vibringe versus a conventional needle: a randomized controlled trial' by D. Bilgili, S. Yilmaz, A. Dumani & O. Yoldas, published online on 29 February 2016 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the Journal Editor in Chief, Prof. Paul Dummer, and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. The retraction has been agreed because the corresponding author did not contact the first author who carried out the work before alterations to the article were made prior to submission. This damages the integrity of the work and there are additional concerns over the number of patients and the accuracy of the results and conclusions.

  11. Peripheral and spinal activation of cannabinoid receptors by joint mobilization alleviates postoperative pain in mice.

    PubMed

    Martins, D F; Mazzardo-Martins, L; Cidral-Filho, F J; Gadotti, V M; Santos, A R S

    2013-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the relative contribution of cannabinoid receptors (CBRs) subtypes and to analyze cannabimimetic mechanisms involved in the inhibition of anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol degradation on the antihyperalgesic effect of ankle joint mobilization (AJM). Mice (25-35g) were subjected to plantar incision (PI) and 24h after surgery animals received the following treatments, AJM for 9min, AEA (10mg/kg, intraperitoneal [i.p.]), WIN 55,212-2 (1.5mg/kg, i.p.), URB937 (0.01-1mg/kg, i.p.; a fatty acid amide hydrolase [FAAH] inhibitor) or JZL184 (0.016-16mg/kg, i.p.; a monoacylglycerol lipase [MAGL] inhibitor). Withdrawal frequency to mechanical stimuli was assessed 24h after PI and at different time intervals after treatments. Receptor specificity was investigated using selective CB1R (AM281) and CB2R (AM630) antagonists. In addition, the effect of the FAAH and MAGL inhibitors on the antihyperalgesic action of AJM was investigated. AJM, AEA, WIN 55,212-2, URB937 and JZL184 decreased mechanical hyperalgesia induced by PI. The antihyperalgesic effect of AJM was reversed by pretreatment with AM281 given by intraperitoneal and intrathecal routes, but not intraplantarly. Additionally, intraperitoneal and intraplantar, but not intrathecal administration of AM630 blocked AJM-induced antihyperalgesia. Interestingly, in mice pretreated with FAAH or the MAGL inhibitor the antihyperalgesic effect of AJM was significantly longer. This article presents data addressing the CBR mechanisms underlying the antihyperalgesic activity of joint mobilization as well as of the endocannabinoid catabolic enzyme inhibitors in the mouse postoperative pain model. Joint mobilization and these enzymes offer potential targets to treat postoperative pain.

  12. The associations between OPRM 1 and COMT genotypes and postoperative pain, opioid use, and opioid-induced sedation.

    PubMed

    Henker, Richard A; Lewis, Allison; Dai, Feng; Lariviere, William R; Meng, Li; Gruen, Gary S; Sereika, Susan M; Pape, Hans; Tarkin, Ivan S; Gowda, Indira; Conley, Yvette P

    2013-07-01

    Previous studies have associated mu-opioid receptor (OPRM1) genotype with pain and analgesia responses in postoperative and patient populations. This study investigates the role of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and OPRM1 genotypes in acute postoperative pain scores, opioid use, and opioid-induced sedation after surgical procedures for orthopedic trauma in an otherwise healthy patient population. Verbal pain/sedation scores, opioid use, and physiologic responses in the immediate postoperative period were examined for association with genetic variants in Caucasians genotyped for OPRM1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) A118G and C17T and COMT SNPs. The OPRM1 A118G genotype was associated with patients' postoperative Numerical Pain scale (NPS) ratings at 15 min in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) (p = .01) and patients' sedation scores at 15 min in the PACU (p = .02). COMT genotype (rs4818) was associated with opioid consumption in the first 45 min in the PACU (p = .04). NPS ratings at 45 min were also higher in the group of patients with A/A genotype of rs4680 than in patients with the other two genotypes at this SNP (p = .03). Our haplotype trend analysis identified a COMT haplotype "GCGG" significantly associated with NPS at 15 min (p = .0013), amount of opioids consumed in the first 45 min (p = .0024), and heart rate at 45 min in the PACU (p = .017). The results indicate that genetic variations in COMT contribute to the acute postoperative pain and analgesia responses and physiologic responses in this group of otherwise healthy postoperative orthopedic trauma patients.

  13. Electronically monitored single-use patient-controlled analgesia pumps in postoperative pain control.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Michael; Friedrich, Karin; Kirchner, Rolf

    2005-01-01

    The present study was performed to establish whether analgesic consumption in the first four postoperative hours is a suitable basis for selecting the demand dose and predicting the likely analgesic requirement over the next 20 hours with single-use patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) pumps, and to establish whether this method provides effective pain control. Forty-two patients who had undergone a laparotic gynecological procedure (hysterectomy) were given an electronic PCA pump (Abbott Lifecare, Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL) for four hours (phase I) with a demand dose of 1 mg piritramide and a lockout period of five minutes for dose titration. Piritramide's potency is comparable with that of morphine. The patients then received single-use PCA pumps (Baxter Infusor/Watch, Baxter, Deerfield, IL) for the next 20 hours (phase II) with a demand dose of 0.75 mg in Group A and 1.5 mg in Group B, depending on whether more or less than 10 mg pritramide had been consumed in phase I. A specially designed electronic recorder was used to measure the exact amount consumed and number of demands. Patients experiencing pain were free to receive additional piritramide at any time as rescue medication; however, these patients were withdrawn from the study. Ninety percent of the patients in group A said they were satisfied with or undecided as to the level of analgesia. The corresponding figure in group B was 95 percent. Piritramide consumption was significantly higher in group B than in group A. There were no significant differences between the groups regarding demographic data or duration of surgery, nor did either of these two parameters affect postoperative piritramide consumption. Significant alleviation of pain and improvement in visual analog scale scores from phase I [group A, 4.7 (range, 2.0 to 6.8); group B, 4.6 (range, 3.0 to 8.3)] to phase II [group A, 3.1 (range, 0.4 to 5.2); group B, 3.2 (range, 0.4 to 6.0)] was achieved in both groups. A significant difference

  14. Acupuncture for Acute Postoperative Pain after Back Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young-Hun; Kim, Chang-Kyu; Heo, Kwang-Ho; Lee, Myeong Soo; Ha, In-Hyuk; Son, Dong Wuk; Choi, Byung Kwan; Song, Geun-Sung; Shin, Byung-Cheul

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Acupuncture is commonly used as a complimentary treatment for pain management. However, there has been no systematic review summarizing the current evidence concerning the effectiveness of acupuncture for acute postoperative pain after back surgery. This systematic review aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of acupuncture treatment for acute postoperative pain (≤1 week) after back surgery. Methods We searched 15 electronic databases without language restrictions. Two reviewers independently assessed studies for eligibility and extracted data, outcomes, and risk of bias. Random effect meta-analyses and subgroup analyses were performed. Results Five trials, including 3 of high quality, met our inclusion criteria. The meta-analysis showed positive results for acupuncture treatment of pain after surgery in terms of the visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain intensity 24 hours after surgery, when compared to sham acupuncture (standard mean difference −0.67 (−1.04 to −0.31), P = 0.0003), whereas the other meta-analysis did not show a positive effect of acupuncture on 24-hour opiate demands when compared to sham acupuncture (standard mean difference −0.23 (−0.58 to 0.13), P = 0.21). Conclusion Our systematic review finds encouraging but limited evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture treatment for acute postoperative pain after back surgery. Further rigorously designed clinical trials are required. PMID:24766648

  15. Effect of adding intrathecal morphine to a multimodal analgesic regimen for postoperative pain management after laparoscopic bariatric surgery: a prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    El Sherif, Fatma Adel; Othman, Ahmed Hassan; Abd El-Rahman, Ahmad Mohammad; Taha, Osama

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pain control after bariatric surgery is a major challenge. Our objective was to study the efficacy and safety of intrathecal (IT) morphine 0.3 mg added to bupivacaine 0.5% for postoperative pain after laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Methods: After local ethics committee approval, 100 morbidly obese patients scheduled for laparoscopic bariatric surgery were enrolled in this study. Patients were randomly assigned into two groups: Group I received IT 0.3 mg morphine (0.3 mL) added to 1.2 mL of bupivacaine 0.5%; Group II received IT 0.3 mL saline added to 1.2 mL of bupivacaine 0.5%, immediately before induction of general anaesthesia. For both groups, 60 mg ketorolac and 1000 mg paracetamol were infused 30 minutes before the end of surgery. After wound closure, 20 mL bupivacaine 0.25% was infiltrated at wound edges. Results: Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score was significantly lower in group I immediately, 30 minutes and 1 hour postoperatively. Time to first ambulation, return of intestinal sounds and hospital stay were shorter in group I than group II (p < 0.05); total morphine consumption was significantly lower in group I than group II (p < 0.05). Sedation score was significantly higher in group I immediately postoperatively, while at 30 minutes, 1, 2 and 6 hours postoperatively sedation scores were significantly higher in group II. Itching was significantly higher in group I. Conclusion: The addition of IT morphine to a multimodal analgesic regimen after laparoscopic bariatric surgery was an effective and safe method that markedly reduced postoperative pain, systemic opioid consumption and length of hospital stay. PMID:27867510

  16. Self-Managing Postoperative Pain with the Use of a Novel, Interactive Device: A Proof of Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    Mordecai, Luke; Leung, Frances H. L.; Carvalho, Clarissa Y. M.; Reddi, Danielle; Lees, Martin; Cone, Stephen; Fox, Zoe; Williams, Amanda C. de C.; Brandner, Brigitta

    2016-01-01

    Background. Pain is commonly experienced following surgical procedures. Suboptimal management is multifactorial. Objectives. The primary objective was to assess whether patients used a device (Navimed) to self-report pain over and above a normal baseline of observations. Secondary outcome measures included comparison of pain scores and patient use of and feedback on the device. Methods. In a prospective randomized controlled trial, elective gynaecological surgery patients received standard postoperative pain care or standard care plus the Navimed, which allowed them to self-report pain and offered interactive self-help options. Results. 52 female patients, 26 in each of device and standard groups, did not differ in the frequency of nurse-documented pain scores or mean pain scores provided to nurses. The device group additionally reported pain on the device (means 18.50 versus 11.90 pain ratings per day, t(32) = 2.75, p < 0.001) that was significantly worse than reported to nurses but retrospectively rated significantly less anxiety. 80% of patients found the device useful. Discussion and Conclusion. This study demonstrates that patients used the Navimed to report pain and to help manage it. Further work is required to investigate the difference in pain scores reported and to develop more sophisticated software. PMID:27445635

  17. Local infiltration analgesia is not improved by postoperative intra-articular bolus injections for pain after total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Karen V; Nikolajsen, Lone; Daugaard, Henrik; Andersen, Niels T; Haraldsted, Viggo; Søballe, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose — The effect of postoperative intra-articular bolus injections after total hip arthroplasty (THA) remains unclear. We tested the hypothesis that intra-articular bolus injections administered every 6 hours after surgery during the first 24 hours would significantly improve analgesia after THA. Patients and methods — 80 patients undergoing THA received high-volume local infiltration analgesia (LIA; 200 mg ropivacaine and 30 mg ketorolac) followed by 4 intra-articular injections with either ropivacaine (100 mg) and ketorolac (15 mg) (the treatment group) or saline (the control group). The intra-articular injections were combined with 4 intravenous injections of either saline (treatment group) or 15 mg ketorolac (control group). All patients received morphine as patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). The primary outcome was consumption of intravenous morphine PCA and secondary outcomes were consumption of oral morphine, pain intensity, side effects, readiness for hospital discharge, length of hospital stay, and postoperative consumption of analgesics at 3, 6, and 12 weeks after surgery. Results — There were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups regarding postoperative consumption of intravenous morphine PCA. Postoperative pain scores during walking were higher in the treatment group from 24–72 hours after surgery, but other pain scores were similar between groups. Time to readiness for hospital discharge was longer in the treatment group. Other secondary outcomes were similar between groups. Interpretation — Postoperative intra-articular bolus injections of ropivacaine and ketorolac cannot be recommended as analgesic method after THA. PMID:26312445

  18. Effect of intraoperative intravenous lidocaine on postoperative pain and return of bowel function after laparoscopic abdominal gynecologic procedures.

    PubMed

    Grady, Philip; Clark, Nathaniel; Lenahan, John; Oudekerk, Christopher; Hawkins, Robert; Nezat, Greg; Pellegrini, Joseph E

    2012-08-01

    Abdominal surgery has a high incidence of postoperative pain and dysfunctional gastrointestinal motility. This study investigated the effect of a continuous intraoperative infusion of lidocaine on patients undergoing laparoscopic gynecologic surgery. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled investigation, 50 subjects were randomly assigned to control and experimental groups. Both groups received an intravenous lidocaine bolus of 1 mg/kg on induction. The experimental group received a continuous lidocaine infusion of 2 mg/kg/h, initiated following induction and discontinued 15 to 30 minutes before skin closure. Controls received a placebo infusion. Patients in the experimental group had lower postoperative day 3 pain scores using a verbal analog scale (P = .02). Morphine equivalent dose at second request for pain treatment in the postoperative anesthesia care unit was lower in the experimental group (P = .02). There was a statistically significant difference in time interval from surgical start to return of first flatus between the groups (P = .02). Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. A P value less than .05 was considered significant. These study results are consistent with previous research suggesting that intraoperative lidocaine infusion may improve postoperative pain levels and may shorten the time to return of bowel function.

  19. Effect of analgesic standards on persistent postoperative pain evoked by skin/muscle incision and retraction (SMIR).

    PubMed

    Flatters, Sarah J L

    2010-06-14

    Various common surgeries such as thoracotomy and inguinal hernia repair involve essential prolonged tissue retraction, often causing persistent postoperative pain. A new model was developed to mimic this clinical scenario, whereby skin/muscle incision and retraction (SMIR) in the medial thigh evoked persistent postoperative pain (Flatters (2008) [Pain 135:119-130]). This study examines the response of SMIR-evoked mechanical hypersensitivity to analgesic standards commonly used as positive controls in behavioural pain studies. Rats were anaesthetised, the skin and superficial muscle of the medial thigh was then incised and retracted for 1h. In separate experiments, morphine, gabapentin and MK-801 were intraperitoneally administered to SMIR-operated rats, at maximally tolerated doses, on postoperative day 9-13. Mechanical hypersensitivity was measured by withdrawal responses to von Frey stimulation of the plantar hindpaws. Morphine (6mg/kg) and gabapentin (100mg/kg) elicited an almost complete reversal of SMIR-evoked mechanical hypersensitivity. In contrast, MK-801 (0.1mg/kg) did not affect SMIR-evoked mechanical hypersensitivity. Contralateral hindpaw responses to von Frey stimulation were unaffected by SMIR surgery or any drug treatment. In conclusion, the SMIR model displays persistent mechanical hypersensitivity that is reversible by morphine or gabapentin treatment. As previously demonstrated, SMIR-evoked pain is not driven by neuronal damage and these data show that NMDA receptor activation does not play a role in the maintenance of SMIR-evoked pain. This study further demonstrates the value of the SMIR model as a tool to understand persistent postoperative/postsurgical pain mechanisms and evaluate potential treatments.

  20. Oxytocin reduces neural activity in the pain circuitry when seeing pain in others

    PubMed Central

    Hermans, Erno J.; Keysers, Christian; van Honk, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Our empathetic abilities allow us to feel the pain of others. This phenomenon of vicarious feeling arises because the neural circuitry of feeling pain and seeing pain in others is shared. The neuropeptide oxytocin (OXT) is considered a robust facilitator of empathy, as intranasal OXT studies have repeatedly been shown to improve cognitive empathy (e.g. mind reading and emotion recognition). However, OXT has not yet been shown to increase neural empathic responses to pain in others, a core aspect of affective empathy. Effects of OXT on empathy for pain are difficult to predict, because OXT evidently has pain-reducing properties. Accordingly, OXT might paradoxically decrease empathy for pain. Here, using functional neuroimaging we show robust activation in the neural circuitry of pain (insula and sensorimotor regions) when subjects observe pain in others. Crucially, this empathy-related activation in the neural circuitry of pain is strongly reduced after intranasal OXT, specifically in the left insula. OXT on the basis of our neuroimaging data thus remarkably decreases empathy for pain, but further research including behavioral measures are necessary to draw definite conclusions. PMID:25818690

  1. A multicentre survey of the current acute post-operative pain management practices in tertiary care teaching hospitals in Maharashtra

    PubMed Central

    Khatib, Samina Khaliloddin; Razvi, Syed Shamim; Kulkarni, Sadhana Sudhir; Parab, Swapnil

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: Undertreated pain can have negative consequences on patients' health as well as the health-care system. The present study was aimed at identifying the current trends in post-operative pain management and availability of acute pain services (APS). In addition, it is also an attempt to assess the availability of analgesia for non-surgical cases, and the attitudes, beliefs, and perceptions of clinicians regarding acute pain management in the tertiary hospitals in the state of Maharashtra (India). Methods: This was a cross-sectional, multicentre questionnaire survey involving the anaesthesiologists and surgeons. Percentages, median, interquartile ranges were calculated and compared by employing a Wilcoxon sign rank test. Results: Data from thirty centres revealed that the surgeons played a major role in treating pain, while most of the anaesthesiologists treated pain primarily in the operation theatre and recovery room. An APS was operational in seven hospitals. The most frequently employed techniques to achieve analgesia were the administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, opioids and epidural analgesia. The majority of the centres had no written protocol and dedicated staff for pain management, pain assessment was not adequately stressed, and only five out of the thirty centres included in the study provided ongoing pain education to health professionals even when the hospitals claimed to provide APS. The major hurdles in providing optimal analgesia and implementing APS were a lack of pain education, equipment and administrative problems. Conclusion: Thus, the tertiary centres in Maharashtra fall short of providing optimal acute post-operative pain management.

  2. Preemptive Analgesic Effects of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) on Postoperative Pain: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Eidy, Mohammad; Fazel, Mohammad Reza; Janzamini, Monir; Haji Rezaei, Mostafa; Moravveji, Ali Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a non-pharmacological analgesic method used to control different types of pain. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of preoperative TENS on post inguinal hernia repair pain. Patients and Methods This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was performed on 66 male patients with unilateral inguinal hernias who were admitted to the Shahid Beheshti hospital in Kashan, Iran, from April to October 2014. Participants were selected using a convenience sampling method and were assigned to intervention (n = 33) and control (n = 33) groups using permuted-block randomization. Patients in the intervention group were treated with TENS 1 hour before surgery, while the placebo was administered to patients in the control group. All of the patients underwent inguinal hernia repair by the Lichtenstein method, and pain intensity was evaluated at 2, 4, 6, and 12 hours after surgery using a visual analogue scale. Additionally, the amounts of analgesic administered by pump were calculated and compared between the two groups. Results The mean estimated postoperative pain intensity was 6.21 ± 1.63 in the intervention group and 5.45 ± 1.82 in the control group (P = 0.08). In the intervention group pain intensity at 2 and 4 hours after surgery were 3.54 ± 1.48 and 5.12 ± 1.41 (P < 0.001), respectively. In the control group these values were 4.0±1.5 and 4.76 ± 1.39 (P = 0.04), respectively. No significant differences were observed in mean pain intensities at 6 and 12 hours. Conclusions TENS can reduce postoperative pain in the early hours after inguinal hernia repair surgery. PMID:27275401

  3. Implementing a benchmarking and feedback concept decreases postoperative pain after total knee arthroplasty: A prospective study including 256 patients

    PubMed Central

    Benditz, A.; Drescher, J.; Greimel, F.; Zeman, F.; Grifka, J.; Meißner, W.; Völlner, F.

    2016-01-01

    Perioperative pain reduction, particularly during the first two days, is highly important for patients after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Problems are not only caused by medical issues but by organization and hospital structure. The present study shows how the quality of pain management can be increased by implementing a standardized pain concept and simple, consistent benchmarking. All patients included into the study had undergone total knee arthroplasty. Outcome parameters were analyzed by means of a questionnaire on the first postoperative day. A multidisciplinary team implemented a regular procedure of data analyzes and external benchmarking by participating in a nationwide quality improvement project. At the beginning of the study, our hospital ranked 16th in terms of activity-related pain and 9th in patient satisfaction among 47 anonymized hospitals participating in the benchmarking project. At the end of the study, we had improved to 1st activity-related pain and to 2nd in patient satisfaction. Although benchmarking started and finished with the same standardized pain management concept, results were initially pure. Beside pharmacological treatment, interdisciplinary teamwork and benchmarking with direct feedback mechanisms are also very important for decreasing postoperative pain and for increasing patient satisfaction after TKA. PMID:27917911

  4. Comparison of Manual and Rotary Instrumentation on Postoperative Pain in Teeth with Asymptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Talebzadeh, Bita; Nezafati, Saeed; Rahimi, Saeed; Shahi, Shahriar; Lotfi, Mehrdad; Ghasemi, Negin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: One of the most common complications of root canal treatment is postoperative pain. The aim of the present clinical trial was to compare the severity of postoperative pain after root canal preparation with RaCe rotary system and hand K-Flexofile. Methods and Materials: A total of 96 mandibular first and second molars were divided into two groups (n=48) based on root canal preparation technique. The teeth in both groups underwent one-session root canal treatment and the severity of postoperative pain was evaluated using visual analog scale (VAS) at 4-, 8-, 12-, 24- and 48-h and 1-week intervals. In addition, the type and dosage of analgesics were recorded. Data were analyzed with repeated-measures ANOVA. Statistical significance was set at 0.05. Results: The difference between the two groups during this period and at subsequent intervals were not significant (P>0.05). There were no significant differences between the two groups in type and the number of analgesics in pain-free subjects (P=0.12 and P=0.61, respectively). Conclusion: There were no statistically significant differences in pain severity between the two groups at any intervals. PMID:27790255

  5. Drug Reduces Cancer Treatment-Related Joint Pain

    Cancer.gov

    A Cancer Currents blog post about a clinical trial demonstrating that duloxetine (Cymbalta®) may reduce joint pain caused by aromatase inhibitors in women being treated for early-stage breast cancer.

  6. Editorial Commentary: Knee Hyaluronic Acid Viscosupplementation Reduces Osteoarthritis Pain.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H

    2015-10-01

    In contrast to the AAOS knee osteoarthritis guidelines, systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses shows that viscosupplementation with intra-articular hyaluronic acid injection reduces knee osteoarthritis pain and improves function according to the highest level of evidence.

  7. Comparison of the effect of pre- and post-operative physical therapy versus post-operative physical therapy alone on pain and recovery of function after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Alghadir, Ahmad; Iqbal, Zaheen Ahmed; Anwer, Shahnawaz

    2016-10-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to compare the effect of pre-operative and post-operative physical therapy versus post-operative physical therapy alone on pain and recovery of function after total knee arthroplasty. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty patients (18 males and 32 females) ranging in age from 48 to 80 years (mean 63.28, SD 9.44) participated in a 6-week two-arm randomized rater-blinded trial. One group received pre- and post-operative physical therapy whereas the other group received only post-operative physical therapy. Pain and function were measured with a visual analogue scale and a lower extremity functional scale at baseline (pre-operative) as well as week 3 and week 6 post-operative. [Results] The differences in pain intensity and functional score at week 3 and week 6 post-operative remained statistically insignificant between the two groups. [Conclusion] The reduction of pain and recovery of function was similar in subjects who received pre- and post-operative physical therapy and those who received only post-operative physical therapy after total knee arthroplasty. Additional pre-operative physical therapy did not bring about any further improvement in pain intensity or recovery of function after total knee arthroplasty.

  8. The optimal dose of dexmedetomidine added to an sufentanil-based analgesic regimen for postoperative pain control in spine surgery

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chun-Shan; Lu, Yao; Zhang, Jun; Sun, Peng; Yu, Jun-Ma; Wu, Chao; Lu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Postoperative spinal patients remain a challenge for provision of postoperative analgesia. Patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (PCIA) is a major method in reducing the severe pain after the surgery in our institution, but some adverse effects prevent the use of adequate dosage opioids. This study was determined using the probit analysis to investigate the optimal dose of dexmedetomidine (DEX) infusion for postoperative analgesia combined with sufentanil (SUF) in spine surgery. The dose of DEX needed to produce satisfactory analgesia conditions following combination of 3.0 μg/kg SUF in PCIA pump, which was diluted to 250 mL with a 4 mL/h as background infusion. Patients were recruited with age 35 to 65 years. The satisfactory criteria of postoperative analgesia were determined with a average satisfaction level of pain control, sedation, self-satisfaction, and adverse effects, among others. The dose of DEX was determined using the modified Dixon's up-and-down method (0.5 μg/kg as a step size). The first patient was test at 3.0 μg/kg DEX. The patient was assessed at 6, 12, 36 hours, and termination of PCIA following the continuous infusion of DEX-SUF mixture in PCIA after surgery. Twenty-five patients were enrolled by predetermined criteria. The optimal dose of DEX required for satisfactory analgesic was 4.33 (SD, 0.38) μg/kg combined with 3.0 μg/kg SUF via a PCIA volume of 250 mL by background infusion of 4 mL/h. Using probit analysis, the ED50 of DEX was 4.12 μg/kg (95% confidence limits 3.74–4.52 μg/kg) for satisfactory postoperative analgesic in spine surgery, the ED95 of DEX was 4.85 μg/kg (95% confidence limits 4.48–7.13 μg/kg). There was no report of somnolence or respiratory depression, relevant bradycardia or hypotension, or over sedation in this study. The optimal dose of DEX was 4.33 (0.38) μg/kg−1 combined with 3.0 μg/kg−1 SUF diluted to 250 mL with a background infusion of 4 mL/h for

  9. [Reducing postoperative morbidity and mortality with preoperative risk evaluation and with refined perioperative medical care].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Kanji

    2012-05-01

    Reducing postoperative morbidity and mortality is important not only for patients' outcome but for reduction of financial burden on society. Precise and accurate preoperative evaluation of surgical risk factors is crucial to plan appropriate postoperative allocation of medical resources. American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status is a traditional measure to describe preoperative risk of patients undergoing surgery. In the last decade, several scoring systems with better sensitivity and specificity were reported and validated. Charlson Age-comorbidity Index, Physiological and Operative Severity Score for the Enumeration of Mortality and Morbidity (POSSUM) are frequently used scoring systems. Several lines of evidence indicate that negligence of medical caregivers cause substantial numbers of errors to patients and often leads to severe complications or deaths. Full compliances to surgical checklists and implementation of medical team will help reduce these errors and lead to better patients' postoperative outcomes.

  10. Preoperative physical therapy treatment did not influence postoperative pain and disability outcomes in patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Valencia, Carolina; Coronado, Rogelio A; Simon, Corey B; Wright, Thomas W; Moser, Michael W; Farmer, Kevin W; George, Steven Z

    2016-01-01

    Background There is limited literature investigating preoperative physical therapy (pre-op PT) treatment on pain intensity and disability after musculoskeletal surgery. The purposes of the present cohort study were to describe patient characteristics for those who had and did not have pre-op PT treatment and determine whether pre-op PT influenced the length of postoperative physical therapy (post-op PT) treatment (number of sessions) and 3-month and 6-month postsurgical outcomes, such as pain intensity and disability. Patients and methods A total of 124 patients (mean age =43 years, 81 males) with shoulder pain were observed before and after shoulder arthroscopic surgery. Demographic data, medical history, and validated self-report questionnaires were collected preoperatively and at 3 months and 6 months after surgery. Analysis of variance models were performed to identify differences across measures for patients who had pre-op PT treatment and those who did not and to examine outcome differences at 3 months and 6 months. Alpha was set at the 0.05 level for statistical significance. Results Males had less participation in pre-op PT than females (P=0.01). In contrast, age, pain intensity, disability, and pain-associated psychological factors did not differ between pre-op PT treatment groups (P>0.05). Subacromial bursectomies were more commonly performed in patients having pre-op PT treatment (P<0.05). Pre-op PT treatment did not influence length of post-op PT treatment and did not affect 3-month and 6-month pain intensity and disability outcomes. Differences in distribution of pre-op PT for males and females and subacromial bursectomy did not influence 3-month or 6-month postsurgical outcomes. Conclusion Receiving pre-op PT treatment did not influence post-op PT treatment or pain and disability outcomes at 3 months and 6 months. This prospective cohort study provides no evidence of benefit for pre-op PT on post-op PT treatment or postsurgical outcomes. Females or

  11. Effects of Postoperative Pain Management on Immune Function After Laparoscopic Resection of Colorectal Cancer: A Randomized Study.

    PubMed

    Kim, So Yeon; Kim, Nam Kyu; Baik, Seung Hyuk; Min, Byung Soh; Hur, Hyuk; Lee, Jinae; Noh, Hyun-Young; Lee, Jong Ho; Koo, Bon-Neyo

    2016-05-01

    There has been a rising interest in the possible association between perioperative opioid use and postoperative outcomes in cancer patients. Continuous surgical wound infiltration with local anesthetics is a nonopioid analgesic technique that can be used as a postoperative pain management alternative to opioid-based intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV PCA). The aim of this study was to compare the effects of an opioid-based analgesic regimen versus a local anesthetic wound infiltration-based analgesic regimen on immune modulation and short-term cancer recurrence or metastasis in patients undergoing laparoscopic resection of colorectal cancer.Sixty patients undergoing laparoscopic resection of colorectal cancer were randomly assigned to either the opioid group or the ON-Q group. For postoperative analgesia during the first 48 hours, the opioid group (n = 30) received fentanyl via IV PCA, whereas the ON-Q group (n = 30) received continuous wound infiltration of 0.5% ropivacaine with an ON-Q pump and tramadol via IV PCA. Pethidine for the opioid group and ketorolac or propacetamol for the ON-Q group were used as rescue analgesics. Anesthesia was induced and maintained with propofol and remifentanil. The primary outcome was postoperative immune function assessed by natural killer cell cytotoxicity (NKCC) and interleukin-2. Secondary outcomes were postoperative complications, cancer recurrence, or metastasis within 1 year after surgery, and postoperative inflammatory responses measured by white blood cell count, neutrophil percentage, and C-reactive protein. Immune function and inflammatory responses were measured before surgery and 24 and 48 hours after surgery.Fifty-nine patients completed the study. In the circumstance of similar pain control efficacy between the opioid group and the ON-Q group, postoperative NKCC and interleukin-2 levels did not differ between the 2 groups. The incidence of postoperative complications and recurrence or

  12. Amantadine sulfate reduces experimental sensitization and pain in chronic back pain patients.

    PubMed

    Kleinböhl, Dieter; Görtelmeyer, Roman; Bender, Hans-Joachim; Hölzl, Rupert

    2006-03-01

    We investigated if established psychophysical measures of enhanced experimental sensitization in chronic musculoskeletal pain can be reduced by adjuvant treatment with a N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist, amantadine sulfate, and whether a reduction in sensitization might be accompanied by a concurrent improvement in clinical pain. Sensitization was evaluated by an experimental tonic heat model of short-term sensitization with concurrent subjective and behavioral psychophysical scaling. Twenty-six patients with chronic back pain were included in the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study and received daily dosages of either placebo or 100 mg of amantadine sulfate during a 1-wk treatment. Participants completed quantitative sensory testing of pain thresholds and experimental sensitization before and after treatment and clinical pain ratings before, during, and after treatment. Experimental sensitization and clinical pain were reduced in patients receiving verum. Initially, experimental sensitization was enhanced in patients, with early sensitization at nonpainful intensities of contact heat and enhanced sensitization at painful intensities, as shown previously. After 1 wk of treatment, experimental sensitization was reduced with amantadine sulfate but not with placebo. We conclude that adjuvant chronic pain treatment with N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonists might be beneficial for chronic pain if enhanced sensitization is involved and that the quantitative sensory test of temporal summation may be used to verify this.

  13. Does changing pain-related knowledge reduce pain and improve function through changes in catastrophizing?

    PubMed

    Lee, Hopin; McAuley, James H; Hübscher, Markus; Kamper, Steven J; Traeger, Adrian C; Moseley, G Lorimer

    2016-04-01

    Evidence from randomized controlled studies shows that reconceptualizing pain improves patients' knowledge of pain biology, reduces catastrophizing thoughts, and improves pain and function. However, causal relationships between these variables remain untested. It is hypothesized that reductions in catastrophizing could mediate the relationship between improvements in pain knowledge and improvements in pain and function. To test this causal mechanism, we conducted longitudinal mediation analyses on a cohort of 799 patients who were exposed to a pain education intervention. Patients provided responses to the neurophysiology of pain questionnaire, catastrophic thoughts about pain scale, visual analogue pain scale, and the patient specific functional scale, at baseline, 1-month, 6-month, and 12-month follow-up. With adjustment for potential confounding variables, an improvement in pain biology knowledge was significantly associated with a reduction in pain intensity (total effect = -2.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] = -2.96 to -1.44). However, this effect was not mediated by a reduction in catastrophizing (indirect effect = -0.16, 95% CI = -0.36 to 0.02). This might be due to a weak, nonsignificant relationship between changes in catastrophizing and pain intensity (path b = 0.19, 95% CI = -0.03 to 0.41). Similar trends were found in models with function as the outcome. Our findings indicate that change in catastrophizing did not mediate the effect of pain knowledge acquisition on change in pain or function. The strength of this conclusion is moderated, however, if patient-clinician relational factors are conceptualized as a consequence of catastrophizing, rather than a cause.

  14. Perioperative lung-protective ventilation strategy reduces postoperative pulmonary complications in patients undergoing thoracic and major abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of postoperative pulmonary complications is strongly associated with increased hospital mortality and prolonged postoperative hospital stays. Although protective lung ventilation is commonly used in the intensive care unit, low tidal volume ventilation in the operating room is not a routine strategy. Low tidal volume ventilation, moderate positive end-expiratory pressure, and repeated recruitment maneuvers, particularly for high-risk patients undergoing major abdominal surgery, can reduce postoperative pulmonary complications. Facilitating perioperative bundle care by combining prophylactic and postoperative positive-pressure ventilation with intraoperative lung-protective ventilation may be helpful to reduce postoperative pulmonary complications. PMID:26885294

  15. Effect of Pre-Designed Instructions for Mothers of Children with Hypospadias on Reducing Postoperative Complications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohamed, Sanaa A.

    2015-01-01

    Hypospadias is a common congenital anomaly with a prevalence estimated to be as high as 1 in 125 live male births. Complications after surgical procedures are possible. The incidence of complications can be reduced by meticulous preoperative planning, and judicious postoperative care. So the aim of the study was to investigate the effect of…

  16. Impact of Nursing Educational Program on Reducing or Preventing Postoperative Complications for Patients after Intracranial Surgery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmowla, Rasha Ali Ahmed Abd; El-Lateef, Zienab Abd; El-khayat, Roshdy

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial surgery means any surgery performed inside the skull to treat problems in the brain and surrounding structures. Aim: Evaluate the impact of nursing educational program on reducing or preventing postoperative complications for patients after intracranial surgery. Subjects and methods: Sixty adult patients had intracranial surgery (burr…

  17. The Effectiveness of Aromatherapy in Reducing Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sheafer, Heather; Tepper, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Background. Aromatherapy refers to the medicinal or therapeutic use of essential oils absorbed through the skin or olfactory system. Recent literature has examined the effectiveness of aromatherapy in treating pain. Methods. 12 studies examining the use of aromatherapy for pain management were identified through an electronic database search. A meta-analysis was performed to determine the effects of aromatherapy on pain. Results. There is a significant positive effect of aromatherapy (compared to placebo or treatments as usual controls) in reducing pain reported on a visual analog scale (SMD = −1.18, 95% CI: −1.33, −1.03; p < 0.0001). Secondary analyses found that aromatherapy is more consistent for treating nociceptive (SMD = −1.57, 95% CI: −1.76, −1.39, p < 0.0001) and acute pain (SMD = −1.58, 95% CI: −1.75, −1.40, p < 0.0001) than inflammatory (SMD = −0.53, 95% CI: −0.77, −0.29, p < 0.0001) and chronic pain (SMD = −0.22, 95% CI: −0.49, 0.05, p = 0.001), respectively. Based on the available research, aromatherapy is most effective in treating postoperative pain (SMD = −1.79, 95% CI: −2.08, −1.51, p < 0.0001) and obstetrical and gynecological pain (SMD = −1.14, 95% CI: −2.10, −0.19, p < 0.0001). Conclusion. The findings of this study indicate that aromatherapy can successfully treat pain when combined with conventional treatments. PMID:28070420

  18. Bunion: Strengthening Foot Muscles to Reduce Pain and Improve Mobility.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    Foot pain discourages physical activity, and less activity harms overall health. Bunion, extra bone and tissue at the base of the big toe, is a frequent cause of foot pain. More than 64 million Americans have bunions that can lead to painful walking. Bunions affect some 35% of women over the age of 65. Bunions can be removed by surgery, which can reduce pain and improve your ability to walk and exercise, but up to 15% of bunions return. Weak muscles may play a role in bunion-related pain and movement problems. In a review of prior research and commentary on this topic published in the July 2016 issue of JOSPT, the author identifies muscle-strengthening exercises that may help people with bunions. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(7):606. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0504.

  19. A comparative study of postoperative pain for open thyroidectomy versus bilateral axillo-breast approach robotic thyroidectomy using a self-reporting application for iPad

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Young Jun; Song, Junho; Kang, Jiyoung; Woo, Jung-Woo; Song, Ra-Yeong; Kwon, Hyungju; Kim, Su-Jin; Choi, June Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Postoperative pain for robotic thyroid surgeries including bilateral axillo-breast approach (BABA) has not been well studied. In this study, we have developed a self-reporting application (SRA) for iPad and prospectively collected pain scores from open thyroidectomy (OT) and BABA robotic thyroidectomy (RT) patients. Methods Female patients who underwent total thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid carcinoma were included. Patients recorded pain scores for throat, anterior neck, posterior neck, chest, and back on postoperative days 1, 2, and 3. Once discharged, on postoperative day 14, a survey was also conducted on satisfaction of SRA and cosmesis. Results A total of 54 patients were enrolled (27 BABA RT and 27 OT). There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in clinicopathological characteristics and postoperative complication rates. Postoperative pain scores at days 1, 2, 3, and 14 were not significantly different between the groups for throat, anterior neck, posterior neck, or back. Postoperative analgesic requirements were similar between the 2 groups. Wound satisfaction scores were significantly higher in the BABA RT group (BABA RT 7.4 vs. OT 5.7; P = 0.016). Satisfaction scores for the usefulness of SRA were above 7.2 for all four questionnaire items on the 10-point scale. Conclusion Postoperative pain for BABA RT is equivalent to OT but offers greater cosmetic satisfaction for patients. A mobile device application such as SRA may facilitate proper assessment and management of pain in postoperative patients. PMID:27186567

  20. Effects of Anesthetic Management on Early Postoperative Recovery, Hemodynamics and Pain After Supratentorial Craniotomy

    PubMed Central

    Ayrian, Eugenia; Kaye, Alan David; Varner, Chelsia L.; Guerra, Carolina; Vadivelu, Nalini; Urman, Richard D.; Zelman, Vladimir; Lumb, Philip D.; Rosa, Giovanni; Bilotta, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Various clinical trials have assessed how intraoperative anesthetics can affect early recovery, hemodynamics and nociception after supratentorial craniotomy. Whether or not the difference in recovery pattern differs in a meaningful way with anesthetic choice is controversial. This review examines and compares different anesthetics with respect to wake-up time, hemodynamics, respiration, cognitive recovery, pain, nausea and vomiting, and shivering. When comparing inhalational anesthetics to intravenous anesthetics, either regimen produces similar recovery results. Newer shorter acting agents accelerate the process of emergence and extubation. A balanced inhalational/intravenous anesthetic could be desirable for patients with normal intracranial pressure, while total intravenous anesthesia could be beneficial for patients with elevated intracranial pressure. Comparison of inhalational anesthetics shows all appropriate for rapid emergence, decreasing time to extubation, and cognitive recovery. Comparison of opioids demonstrates similar awakening and extubation time if the infusion of longer acting opioids was ended at the appropriate time. Administration of local anesthetics into the skin, and addition of corticosteroids, NSAIDs, COX-2 inhibitors, and PCA therapy postoperatively provided superior analgesia. It is also important to emphasize the possibility of long-term effects of anesthetics on cognitive function. More research is warranted to develop best practices strategies for the future that are evidence-based. PMID:26345202

  1. Comparison of epidural morphine, hydromorphone and fentanyl for postoperative pain control in children undergoing orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Goodarzi, M

    1999-01-01

    The safety and side-effects profile of epidural administration of a hydrophilic (morphine), highly lipophilic (fentanyl) and a drug with intermediate hydrophilic and lipophilic activity (hydromorphone) were compared in 90 children undergoing orthopaedic procedures. Ninety patients were randomly assigned (30 in each group) to receive epidural morphine, hydromorphone, or fentanyl for postoperative analgesia. Respiratory effects, nausea, somnolence, urinary retention, pruritus and visual pain scales were evaluated and compared during a 30-h period following surgery. In the morphine group, 25% showed respiratory depression with oxygen saturation below 90% but there was no incidence of respiratory depression in the fentanyl or hydromorphone groups. Somnolence was prominent in some of the patients in all the groups, but was more prolonged in the morphine group. Statistically, there was no significant difference in nausea between the groups, but pruritus was more severe and frequent in the morphine group. The incidence of urinary retention in the morphine group was higher compared with the fentanyl and hydromorphone groups. In conclusion, epidural hydromorphone, demonstrating less side-effects, is preferable to morphine and fentanyl for epidural analgesia in children.

  2. Effects of Anesthetic Management on Early Postoperative Recovery, Hemodynamics and Pain After Supratentorial Craniotomy.

    PubMed

    Ayrian, Eugenia; Kaye, Alan David; Varner, Chelsia L; Guerra, Carolina; Vadivelu, Nalini; Urman, Richard D; Zelman, Vladimir; Lumb, Philip D; Rosa, Giovanni; Bilotta, Federico

    2015-10-01

    Various clinical trials have assessed how intraoperative anesthetics can affect early recovery, hemodynamics and nociception after supratentorial craniotomy. Whether or not the difference in recovery pattern differs in a meaningful way with anesthetic choice is controversial. This review examines and compares different anesthetics with respect to wake-up time, hemodynamics, respiration, cognitive recovery, pain, nausea and vomiting, and shivering. When comparing inhalational anesthetics to intravenous anesthetics, either regimen produces similar recovery results. Newer shorter acting agents accelerate the process of emergence and extubation. A balanced inhalational/intravenous anesthetic could be desirable for patients with normal intracranial pressure, while total intravenous anesthesia could be beneficial for patients with elevated intracranial pressure. Comparison of inhalational anesthetics shows all appropriate for rapid emergence, decreasing time to extubation, and cognitive recovery. Comparison of opioids demonstrates similar awakening and extubation time if the infusion of longer acting opioids was ended at the appropriate time. Administration of local anesthetics into the skin, and addition of corticosteroids, NSAIDs, COX-2 inhibitors, and PCA therapy postoperatively provided superior analgesia. It is also important to emphasize the possibility of long-term effects of anesthetics on cognitive function. More research is warranted to develop best practices strategies for the future that are evidence-based.

  3. Effect of the suture technique on postoperative pain, swelling and trismus after removal of lower third molars: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Santos, Laila; Sánchez-Torres, Alba; Herráez-Vilas, José-María

    2015-01-01

    Background To evaluate the intensity of pain, swelling and trismus after the removal of impacted lower third molars comparing two different suture techniques of the triangular flap: the complete suture of the distal incision and relieving incision and the partial suture with only one suture knot for closure of the corner of the flap and the closure of the distal incision, without suturing the relieving incision. Material and Methods A prospective, randomized, crossover clinical trial was conducted in 40 patients aged from 18 to 45 years who underwent surgical extraction of impacted lower third molars at the Department of Oral Surgery in the Odontological Hospital of the University of Barcelona during the year 2011. Patients were randomly divided in 2 groups. Two different techniques (hermetical closure and partial closure of the wound) were performed separated by a one month washout period in each patient. Postoperative pain, swelling and trismus were evaluated prior to the surgical procedure and also at 2 and 7 days post operatively. Results No statistically significant differences were observed for pain (p<0.06), trismus (p<0.71) and swelling (p<0.05) between the test and the control group. However, the values of the three parameters related to the test group were lower than those for the control group. Conclusions Partial closure of the flap without suturing the relieving incision after surgical extraction of lower third molars reduces operating time and it does not produce any postoperative complications compared with complete closure of the wound. Key words: Third molar, surgical flaps, suture techniques, postoperative pain, swelling, trismus. PMID:25662551

  4. Xiaozhi decoction reduced posthemorrhoidectomy pain and analgesic medication consumption: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jianbin; Luo, Xiagang; Zhou, Xiao; Tang, Chengwu; Ju, Huanyu; Xu, Yongqiang; Qin, Lianjin

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Xiaozhi decoction (XZD) on posthemorrhoidectomy pain and analgesic medication consumption. Methods From May 2013 to March 2015, 315 patients who underwent open hemorrhoidectomy in our hospital were enrolled in this study, of whom, 160 patients were randomly assigned to accept sitz bath with warm water after hemorrhoidectomy (control group) and 155 patients were randomly assigned to accept sitz bath with XZD (XZD group) after hemorrhoidectomy. Postoperative pain at 12 hours after surgery and on postoperative days (PODs) 1, 2, 7, 14 and 28 was evaluated by Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Pain on defecation on PODs 1, 2, 7, 14 and 28 was also recorded using the VAS. The consumption of analgesics was also analyzed. Results No significant difference was found in baseline characteristics between the two groups. Postoperative pain score of the XZD group was significantly lower on POD 2 (6.04±1.11 vs 6.33±1.14, P=0.0229), POD 7 (3.35±0.75 vs 4.22±0.87, P=0.0000) and POD 14 (2.87±0.64 vs 3.64±0.77, P=0.0000) than that of the control group. Similarly, patients in the XZD group experienced significantly less pain on defecation on POD 2 (5.02±1.34 vs 5.43±1.56, P=0.0130), POD 7 (3.08±1.17 vs 3.52±1.29, P=0.0017) and POD 14 (2.31±0.85 vs 2.68±0.99, P=0.0004). Patients in the XZD group consumed significantly less analgesic medication on POD 2 (P=0.0136), POD 7 (P=0.0074) and POD 14 (P=0.0046) than the control group. Conclusion XZD could effectively relieve postoperative pain and reduce analgesic medication consumption after hemorrhoidectomy. PMID:28176917

  5. Music reduces pain and increases functional mobility in fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Garza-Villarreal, Eduardo A.; Wilson, Andrew D.; Vase, Lene; Brattico, Elvira; Barrios, Fernando A.; Jensen, Troels S.; Romero-Romo, Juan I.; Vuust, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The pain in Fibromyalgia (FM) is difficult to treat and functional mobility seems to be an important comorbidity in these patients that could evolve into a disability. In this study we wanted to investigate the analgesic effects of music in FM pain. Twenty-two FM patients were passively exposed to (1) self-chosen, relaxing, pleasant music, and to (2) a control auditory condition (pink noise). They rated pain and performed the “timed-up & go task (TUG)” to measure functional mobility after each auditory condition. Listening to relaxing, pleasant, self-chosen music reduced pain and increased functional mobility significantly in our FM patients. The music-induced analgesia was significantly correlated with the TUG scores; thereby suggesting that the reduction in pain unpleasantness increased functional mobility. Notably, this mobility improvement was obtained with music played prior to the motor task (not during), therefore the effect cannot be explained merely by motor entrainment to a fast rhythm. Cognitive and emotional mechanisms seem to be central to music-induced analgesia. Our findings encourage the use of music as a treatment adjuvant to reduce chronic pain in FM and increase functional mobility thereby reducing the risk of disability. PMID:24575066

  6. Music reduces pain and increases functional mobility in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Garza-Villarreal, Eduardo A; Wilson, Andrew D; Vase, Lene; Brattico, Elvira; Barrios, Fernando A; Jensen, Troels S; Romero-Romo, Juan I; Vuust, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The pain in Fibromyalgia (FM) is difficult to treat and functional mobility seems to be an important comorbidity in these patients that could evolve into a disability. In this study we wanted to investigate the analgesic effects of music in FM pain. Twenty-two FM patients were passively exposed to (1) self-chosen, relaxing, pleasant music, and to (2) a control auditory condition (pink noise). They rated pain and performed the "timed-up & go task (TUG)" to measure functional mobility after each auditory condition. Listening to relaxing, pleasant, self-chosen music reduced pain and increased functional mobility significantly in our FM patients. The music-induced analgesia was significantly correlated with the TUG scores; thereby suggesting that the reduction in pain unpleasantness increased functional mobility. Notably, this mobility improvement was obtained with music played prior to the motor task (not during), therefore the effect cannot be explained merely by motor entrainment to a fast rhythm. Cognitive and emotional mechanisms seem to be central to music-induced analgesia. Our findings encourage the use of music as a treatment adjuvant to reduce chronic pain in FM and increase functional mobility thereby reducing the risk of disability.

  7. Effect of continuous psoas compartment block and intravenous patient controlled analgesia on postoperative pain control after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Jin; Lee, Mi Kyoung; Lim, Byung Gun; Hur, Wonseok

    2012-01-01

    Background Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) generates severe postoperative pain in 60% of patients and moderate pain in 30% of patients. Because inadequate postoperative pain control can hinder early physiotherapy and rehabilitation, it is the most influential factor dictating a good outcome. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of continuous psoas compartment block (PCB) in comparison to intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IVPCA) in TKA patients. Methods 40 TKA patients were randomly divided into 2 groups. Group IVPCA (n = 20) received intravenous patient controlled analgesia (IVPCA) for 48 hours. Group PCB (n = 20) received continuous PCB for 48 hours at the fourth intertransverse process of the lumbar using the C-arm. Pain scores, side effects, satisfaction, the length of hospital stay, rescue antiemetics, and analgesics were recorded. Results Pain scores (VNRS 0-100) were higher in Group IVPCA than in Group PCB. Nausea and sedation occurred more frequently in Group IVPCA than in Group PCB. There were no differences between the groups in the length of the hospital stay, satisfaction scores, and the use of rescue antiemetics and analgesics. Conclusions Continuous PCB seemed to be an appropriate and reliable technique for TKA patients, because it provided better analgesia and fewer side effects such as nausea and sedation when compared to IVPCA. PMID:22323954

  8. Thoracic epidural catheter for postoperative pain control following an ineffective transversus abdominis plane block using liposome bupivacaine

    PubMed Central

    Terrien, Brian D; Espinoza, David; Stehman, Charles C; Rodriguez, Gabriel A; Connolly, Nicholas C

    2017-01-01

    A 24-year-old female with a history of ulcerative colitis underwent colectomy. The patient received an ineffective transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block with liposome bupivacaine (Exparel) intraoperatively and was started on a hydromorphone patient-controlled analgesia 5 hours after the TAP block, which did not relieve her pain. A continuous thoracic epidural (CTE) was then placed after blood levels of bupivacaine were drawn, and the patient immediately experienced significant pain relief. The combined use of liposome bupivacaine and bupivacaine CTE infusion in the postoperative management of this patient demonstrated no safety concerns, provided excellent analgesia and plasma concentrations of bupivacaine remained far below toxic levels. PMID:28144162

  9. Bilateral Continuous Quadratus Lumborum Block for Acute Postoperative Abdominal Pain as a Rescue After Opioid-Induced Respiratory Depression.

    PubMed

    Shaaban, Mohamed; Esa, Wael Ali Sakr; Maheshwari, Kamal; Elsharkawy, Hesham; Soliman, Loran Mounir

    2015-10-01

    We present a case of acute postoperative abdominal pain after proctosigmoidectomy and colorectal anastomosis that was treated by bilateral continuous quadratus lumborum block. The block was performed in the lateral position under ultrasound guidance with a 15-mL bolus of 0.5% bupivacaine injected anterior to the quadratus lumborum muscle followed by bilateral catheter placement. Each catheter received a continuous infusion of 0.1% bupivacaine at 8 mL/h and an on-demand bolus 5 mL every 30 minutes. Sensory level was confirmed by insensitivity to cold from T7 through T12. The block was devoid of hemodynamic side effects or motor weakness. This case demonstrates that bilateral continuous quadratus lumborum catheters can provide extended postoperative pain control.

  10. Preoperative oral health care reduces postoperative inflammation and complications in oral cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Shigeishi, Hideo; Ohta, Kouji; Fujimoto, Shinichi; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Mizuta, Kuniko; Ono, Shigehiro; Shimasue, Hiroshi; Ninomiya, Yoshiaki; Higashikawa, Koichiro; Tada, Misato; Ishida, Fumi; Okui, Gaku; Okumura, Toshiya; Fukui, Akiko; Kubozono, Kazumi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Ishida, Yoko; Seino, Sayaka; Hashikata, Miho; Sasaki, Kazuki; Naruse, Takako; Rahman, Mohammad Zeshaan; Uetsuki, Ryo; Nimiya, Akiko; Takamoto, Megumi; Dainobu, Kana; Tokikazu, Tomoko; Nishi, Hiromi; Sugiyama, Masaru; Takechi, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    The records of 70 patients with oral cancer who were treated at a single institution between 2008 and 2014 were reviewed. The body temperature, white blood cell count, and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were compared between those who had received preoperative oral care (oral care group) and those who had not received any (non-oral care group). When the patients were divided into those who underwent minimally invasive surgery and those who underwent severely invasive surgery, the mean CRP level in the early postoperative period was lower in the oral care group as compared with the non-oral care group in those who underwent minimally invasive surgery as well as those who underwent severely invasive surgery. However, the mean CRP level was most evidently reduced in the severely invasive group on days 1 and 3–5. However, no significant differences were observed with regard to the percentage of postoperative infectious complications (for example, surgical site infection, anastomotic leak and pneumonia) between the oral care (13.6%) and non-oral care (20.8%) groups, though a reduced prevalence of postoperative complications following preoperative oral care was noted. The results of the present study suggest that preoperative oral care can decrease inflammation during the early postoperative stage in patients with oral cancer who undergo severely invasive surgery. PMID:27588111

  11. The use of Targeted MicroCurrent Therapy in postoperative pain management.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Allen; Sobota, Rachel; Gialich, Shelby; Maxwell, G Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Effective postoperative analgesia is a prerequisite to enhance the recovery process and reduce morbidity. The use of local anesthetic techniques is well documented to be effective, but single-dose techniques (infiltration, peripheral blocks, neuraxial blocks) have been of limited value in major operations because of their short duration of analgesia. Recent advances in technology have led to the development of a noninvasive device, targeted MicroCurrent Therapy, which enhances postsurgical recovery by stimulating the body's natural healing process. This therapy transmits gentle, short bursts of electrical current targeted to the tissue cells at the surgical site. This article reviews recent clinical experience and evidence of this device in plastic and reconstructive surgery.

  12. Mediastinal micro-vessels clipping during lymph node dissection may contribute to reduce postoperative pleural drainage

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shi; Wang, Xing; Lv, Chao; Phan, Kevin; Wang, Yuzhao; Wang, Jia; Yang, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Background Postoperative pleural drainage markedly influences the length of postoperative stay and financial costs of medical care. The aim of this study is to retrospectively investigate potentially predisposing factors related to pleural drainage after curative thoracic surgery and to explore the impact of mediastinal micro-vessels clipping on pleural drainage control after lymph node dissection. Methods From February 2012 to November 2013, 322 consecutive cases of operable non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) undergoing lobectomy and mediastinal lymph node dissection with or without application of clipping were collected. Total and daily postoperative pleural drainage were recorded. Propensity score matching (1:2) was applied to balance variables potentially impacting pleural drainage between group clip and group control. Analyses were performed to compare drainage volume, duration of chest tube and postoperative hospital stay between the two groups. Variables linked with pleural drainage in whole cohort were assessed using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results Propensity score matching resulted in 197 patients (matched cohort). Baseline patient characteristics were matched between two groups. Group clip showed less cumulative drainage volume (P=0.020), shorter duration of chest tube (P=0.031) and postoperative hospital stay (P=0.022) compared with group control. Risk factors significantly associated with high-output drainage in multivariable logistic regression analysis were being male, age >60 years, bilobectomy/sleeve lobectomy, pleural adhesion, the application of clip applier, duration of operation ≥220 minutes and chylothorax (P<0.05). Conclusions This study suggests that mediastinal micro-vessels clipping during lymph node dissection may reduce postoperative pleural drainage and thus shorten hospital stay. PMID:27076936

  13. Quercetin Reduces Ehrlich Tumor-Induced Cancer Pain in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Calixto-Campos, Cassia; Corrêa, Mab P.; Carvalho, Thacyana T.; Zarpelon, Ana C.; Hohmann, Miriam S. N.; Rossaneis, Ana C.; Coelho-Silva, Leticia; Pavanelli, Wander R.; Pinge-Filho, Phileno; Crespigio, Jefferson; Bernardy, Catia C. F.; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer pain directly affects the patient's quality of life. We have previously demonstrated that the subcutaneous administration of the mammary adenocarcinoma known as Ehrlich tumor induces pain in mice. Several studies have shown that the flavonoid quercetin presents important biological effects, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, analgesic, and antitumor activity. Therefore, the analgesic effect and mechanisms of quercetin were evaluated in Ehrlich tumor-induced cancer pain in mice. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) treatments with quercetin reduced Ehrlich tumor-induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia, but not paw thickness or histological alterations, indicating an analgesic effect without affecting tumor growth. Regarding the analgesic mechanisms of quercetin, it inhibited the production of hyperalgesic cytokines IL-1β and TNFα and decreased neutrophil recruitment (myeloperoxidase activity) and oxidative stress. Naloxone (opioid receptor antagonist) inhibited quercetin analgesia without interfering with neutrophil recruitment, cytokine production, and oxidative stress. Importantly, cotreatment with morphine and quercetin at doses that were ineffective as single treatment reduced the nociceptive responses. Concluding, quercetin reduces the Ehrlich tumor-induced cancer pain by reducing the production of hyperalgesic cytokines, neutrophil recruitment, and oxidative stress as well as by activating an opioid-dependent analgesic pathway and potentiation of morphine analgesia. Thus, quercetin treatment seems a suitable therapeutic approach for cancer pain that merits further investigation. PMID:26351625

  14. Evaluation of Oral Robenacoxib for the Treatment of Postoperative Pain and Inflammation in Cats: Results of a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    King, Stephen; Roberts, Elizabeth S.; Roycroft, Linda M.; King, Jonathan N.

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of robenacoxib were assessed for the control of postoperative pain and inflammation in cats. The study was a multicenter, prospective, randomized, blinded, and parallel group clinical trial. A total of 249 client-owned cats scheduled for forelimb onychectomy plus either ovariohysterectomy or castration surgeries were included. All cats received butorphanol prior to anesthesia and forelimb four-point regional nerve blocks with bupivacaine after induction of general anesthesia. Cats were randomized to receive daily oral tablet robenacoxib, at a mean (range) dosage of 1.84 (1.03–2.40) mg/kg (n = 167), or placebo (n = 82), once prior to surgery and for two days postoperatively. Significantly (P < 0.05) fewer robenacoxib cats received additional analgesia rescue therapy (16.5%) than placebo cats (46.3%). Pain elicited on palpation of the soft tissue incision site, behavior following social interaction, and posture assessed during the first 8 hours after extubation were significantly (P < 0.05) improved in cats receiving robenacoxib. Frequency of reported adverse clinical signs, hematology, serum chemistry and urinalysis variables, and body weight changes weresimilar between groups. In conclusion, robenacoxib was effective and well tolerated in the control of postoperative pain and inflammation in cats undergoing onychectomy with ovariohysterectomy or castration. PMID:23738129

  15. Single dose oral analgesics for postoperative pain have few adverse events.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yin J

    2016-09-01

    Data sourcesThe Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews on the Cochrane Library.Study selectionAll Cochrane reviews of RCTs between 1999 to 2015, conducted in adults examining the adverse events associated with single dose oral analgesics used for acute post-operative pain were considered.Data extraction and synthesisStudies were searched, reviewed and assessed independently by two reviewers and standard data items extracted. Methodological quality was assessed using criteria adapted from AMSTAR (Assessing the Methodological Quality of Systematic Reviews).ResultsData from 39 Cochrane reviews of 41 different analgesics or analgesic combinations involving a total of 350 studies involving 35,000 adults were included. Most analgesics were tested in a narrow dose range. For most NSAIDs, paracetamol (acetaminophen), and combinations not containing opioids, the rates of adverse events were similar to that of placebos (NSAID 3% - 44% vs 4 - 46%; paracetamol 7-18% vs 6-16%; combination 11-30% vs 6-48%). However, for higher dosages, like 1000 mg aspirin, 1000 mg diflunisal, and opioids or drug combinations containing opioids, there was a statistically significant difference in the incidence of adverse events reported (NNH 7.7(95%CI; 4.8 - 20) for 1000 mg aspirin; 7.5(95%CI; 4.8-17) for 1000 mg diflunisal; 3.5-8.6 for opioids and combinations). Serious adverse events were rare, occurring at about 1 in 3,200.ConclusionsDespite ongoing problems with the measurement, recording and reporting of adverse events in clinical trials and in systematic reviews, the large amount of information available for single oral doses of analgesics provides evidence that adverse events rates are generally similar with active drug and placebo in these circumstances, except at higher doses of some drugs, and in combinations including opioids.

  16. Counseling, quality of life, and acute postoperative pain in elderly patients with hip fracture

    PubMed Central

    Gambatesa, Maria; D’Ambrosio, Alessandro; D’Antini, Davide; Mirabella, Lucia; De Capraris, Antonella; Iuso, Salvatore; Bellomo, Antonello; Macchiarola, Antonio; Dambrosio, Michele; Cinnella, Gilda

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Hip fractures represent one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in elderly people. Anxiety and depression affect their quality of life and increase pain severity, and have adverse effects on functional recovery. Recent World Health Organization guidelines emphasize that therapeutic regimes need to be individualized and combined with psychological support. This study was launched with the primary endpoint of assessing if and to what extent client-centered therapy affects the perception of pain, reduces anxiety and depression, and increases the quality of life of elderly patients with hip fracture. Materials and methods Forty patients were admitted to the Orthopedic and Trauma Surgery ward for hip fracture. Patients were randomly divided into two subgroups: (1) case (group C), had to receive patient-centered counseling throughout the hospitalization; and (2) control (group NC), receiving the analgesic treatment without receiving counseling. Short Form-36-item Health Survey Questionnaire, State–Trait Anxiety Inventory, and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression scores were recorded before any treatment, at discharge, and after 30 days. Pain levels were evaluated by means of Visual Analog Scale every 12 hours during the hospitalization from the day of surgery until day 5. Results The hierarchical clustering analysis identified before any treatment were two clusters based on different physical functioning perceptions and role limitations, which were due to physical and emotional problems. Counseling did have a positive impact on quality of life on all patients, but in a more relevant way if patients were low functioning upon admittance to the ward. Anxiety and depression decreased in patients undergoing counseling, and their pain levels were lower than among patients not receiving it. Conclusion This study reveals that hip fracture patients can be clustered on the basis of Short Form-36 baseline scores. Counseling affects the evolution

  17. Epigenetic regulation of spinal cord gene expression contributes to enhanced postoperative pain and analgesic tolerance subsequent to continuous opioid exposure

    PubMed Central

    Liang, De-Yong; Shi, Xiao-You; Sun, Yuan; Clark, J David

    2016-01-01

    Background Opioids have become the mainstay for treatment of moderate to severe pain and are commonly used to treat surgical pain. While opioid administration has been shown to cause opioid-induced hyperalgesia and tolerance, interactions between opioid administration and surgery with respect to these problematic adaptations have scarcely been addressed. Accumulating evidence suggests opioids and nociceptive signaling may converge on epigenetic mechanisms in spinal cord to enhance or prolong neuroplastic changes. Epigenetic regulation of Bdnf (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) and Pdyn (prodynorphin) genes may be involved. Results Four days of ascending doses of morphine treatment caused opioid-induced hyperalgesia and reduced opioid analgesic efficacy in mice. Both opioid-induced hyperalgesia and the reduced opioid analgesic efficacy were enhanced in mice that received hindpaw incisions. The expression of Bdnf and Pdyn (qPCR) was increased after morphine treatment and incision. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that the Pdyn and Bdnf promoters were more strongly associated with acetylated H3K9 after morphine plus incision than in the morphine or incision alone groups. Selective tropomyosin-related kinase B (ANA-12) and κ-opioid receptor (nor-binaltorphimine) antagonists were administered intrathecally, both reduced hyperalgesia one or three days after surgery. Administration of ANA-12 or nor-binaltorphimine attenuated the decreased morphine analgesic efficacy on day 1, but only nor-binaltorphimine was effective on day 3 after incision in opioid-exposed group. Coadministration of histone acetyltransferase inhibitor anacardic acid daily with morphine blocked the development of opioid-induced hyperalgesia and attenuated incision-enhanced hyperalgesia in morphine-treated mice. Anacardic acid had similar effects on analgesic tolerance, showing the involvement of histone acetylation in the interactions detected. Conclusions Spinal epigenetic changes

  18. The influence of surgical experience, type of instructions given to patients and patient sex on postoperative pain intensity following lower wisdom tooth surgery.

    PubMed

    Matijević, Marko; Uzarević, Zvonimir; Gvozdić, Vlatka; Mikelić, Valentina Matijević; Leović, Dinko; Macan, Darko

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the extent to which the intensity of postoperative pain in the first seven days after lower wisdom tooth extraction is affected by operator experience, patient level of information and patient sex. Postoperative pain intensity after lower wisdom tooth extraction was assessed in 108 patients. Depending on the type of information given to each patient individually, the patients were divided into two groups: test group in which patients were provided with detailed standard written and verbal instructions and control group where patients only received detailed standard written instructions about treatment after surgery. Each of these two groups was divided into three subgroups depending on operator experience. Results of this study showed that the type of information irrespective of being given verbally or not had no effects on postoperative pain intensity, whereas operator experience and patient sex influenced postoperative pain intensity.

  19. Application of lidocaine jelly on chest tubes to reduce pain caused by drainage catheter after coronary artery bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun; Chung, Yoon Sang; Choe, Ju Won; Woo, Young Cheol; Kim, Sang Wook; Park, Soon J; Hong, Joonhwa

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effect of lidocaine jelly application to chest tubes on the intensity and duration of overall pain, chest tube site pain and the required analgesics for postoperative pain relief in coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) patients. For patients in group L, we applied sterile 2% lidocaine jelly on the chest tubes just before insertion, and for patients in group C, we applied normal saline. Overall visual analogue scale (VAS), maximal pain area with their VAS were documented postoperatively, and the frequency that button of patient-controlled analgesia was pressed (FPB) and total fentanyl consumption were assessed. The number of patients who complained that tube site was the most painful site was significantly higher in group C than in group L (85% vs. 30% at extubation, P<0.001). The overall VAS score was significantly higher in group C than in group L (39.14±12.49 vs. 27.74±13.76 at extubation, P=0.006). After all of the tubes were removed, the VAS score decreased more in group C (5.74±4.77, P<0.001) than in group L (3.05±2.48, P<0.001). FPB and total fentanyl consumption were significantly higher in group C than in group L (73.00, 59.00-78.00 vs. 34.00, 31.00-39.25, P<0.001; 2,214.65±37.01 vs. 1,720.19±361.63, P<0.001, respectively). Lidocaine jelly application is a very simple way to reduce postoperative pain by reducing chest tube site pain after CABG. (Clinical Trials Registry No. ACTRN 12611001215910).

  20. A comparison of ibuprofen and ibuprofen-codeine combination in the relief of post-operative oral surgery pain.

    PubMed

    Walton, G M; Rood, J P

    1990-10-20

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory analgesics are commonly prescribed to out-patients who have undergone oral surgical procedures, since they are said to provide excellent pain relief for mild to moderate pain, allied with minimal side-effects. One hundred patients were entered into a randomised clinical trial to compare the efficacy of a simple non-steroidal analgesic with that of a combination analgesic compound following the removal of lower third molars under local anaesthesia. Pain scores were measured for patients post-operatively by means of a verbal rating scale for 3 days and data were analysed using the Mann-Whitney U-test. Results suggest that this combination product offers no advantages (but shows definite disadvantages) when compared to an effective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory product.

  1. A Comparison of the Effects of Preemptive Oral Dextromethorphan on Perceived Postoperative Pain in Male and Female Patients Undergoing Arthroscopic Knee surgery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    subjects were randomly assigned to either a treatment group receiving . lmg/kg ketimine or a control group receiving a placebo of .9% saline. The study... Postoperative pain leads to increased morbidity, length of stay, and health care costs. Several studies have shown that preemptively administered N...methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists, such as ketimine, are effective in decreasing perception of postoperative pain. To date, there have not been any

  2. Gabapentin Does Not Appear to Improve Postoperative Pain and Sleep Patterns in Patients Who Concomitantly Receive Regional Anesthesia for Lower Extremity Orthopedic Surgery: A Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Shawn; Reilly, Mark C.; Shulman, Steven

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, gabapentin has gained popularity as an adjuvant therapy for the treatment of postoperative pain. Numerous studies have shown a decrease in pain score, even with immediate postoperative activity, which is significant for early post-op ambulation and regaining functionality sooner. However, studies have been in conclusive in patients undergoing lower extremity orthopedic surgery. For this reason, we hoped to study the effect of gabapentin on postoperative pain in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty, total hip arthroplasty, or a hip fracture repair. This was done in the setting of ensuring adequate postoperative analgesia with regional blocks and opioid PCA, as is protocol at our institution. Given the sedative effects of gabapentin and the potential for improving postoperative sleep patterns, we also studied the drug's effect on this aspect of our patient's postoperative course. We utilized the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index and Visual Analog Scale for pain to obtain a more objective standardized score amongst our study population. Our results indicate that gabapentin does not offer any additional relief in pain or improve sleep habits in patients who have received either a femoral or lumbar plexus block for lower extremity orthopedic surgery. This trial is registered with NCT01546857. PMID:28348503

  3. Effects of systemic lidocaine versus magnesium administration on postoperative functional recovery and chronic pain in patients undergoing breast cancer surgery: A prospective, randomized, double-blind, comparative clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myoung Hwa; Lee, Ki Young; Park, Seho; Kim, Seung Il; Park, Hyung Seok

    2017-01-01

    Introduction We aimed to compare the effects of intraoperative lidocaine and magnesium on postoperative functional recovery and chronic pain after mastectomy due to breast cancer. Systemic lidocaine and magnesium reduce pain hypersensitivity to surgical stimuli; however, their effects after mastectomy have not been evaluated clearly. Methods In this prospective, double-blind, clinical trial, 126 female patients undergoing mastectomy were randomly assigned to lidocaine (L), magnesium (M), and control (C) groups. Lidocaine and magnesium were administered at 2 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg for 15 minutes immediately after induction, followed by infusions of 2 mg/kg/h and 20 mg/kg/h, respectively. The control group received the same volume of saline. Patient characteristics, perioperative parameters, and postoperative recovery profiles, including the Quality of Recovery 40 (QoR-40) survey, pain scales, length of hospital stay, and the short-form McGill pain questionnaire (SF-MPQ) at postoperative 1 month and 3 months were evaluated. Results The global QoR-40 scores on postoperative day 1 were significantly higher in group L than in group C (P = 0.003). Moreover, in sub-scores of the QoR-40 dimensions, emotional state and pain scores were significantly higher in group L than those in groups M and C (P = 0.027 and 0.023, respectively). At postoperative 3 months, SF-MPQ and SF-MPQ-sensitive scores were significantly lower in group L than in group C (P = 0.046 and 0.036, respectively). Conclusions Intraoperative infusion of lidocaine improved the quality of recovery and attenuated the intensity of chronic pain in patients undergoing breast cancer surgery. PMID:28253307

  4. Comparison of Postoperative Pain after Root Canal Preparation with Two Reciprocating and Rotary Single-File Systems: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mollashahi, Narges Farhad; Saberi, Eshagh Ali; Havaei, Seyed Rohollah; Sabeti, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Root canal preparation techniques may cause postoperative pain. The aim of the present study was to compare the intensity of postoperative pain after endodontic treatment using hand files, single file rotary (OneShape), and single file reciprocating (Reciproc) systems. Methods and Materials: In this single-blind, parallel-grouped randomized clinical trial a total of 150 healthy patients aged between 20 to 50 years old were diagnosed with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis of one maxillary or mandibular molars. The teeth were randomly assigned to three groups according to the root canal instrumentation technique: hand files (control), OneShape and Reciproc. Treatment was performed in a single visit by an endodontist. The severity of the postoperative pain was assessed by the visual analogue scale (VAS) after 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h. Data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Results: The patients in control group reported significantly higher mean postoperative pain intensity at 12, 24, 48, and 72 h compared to the patients in the two other groups (P<0.05). There was no significant difference in mean intensity of postoperative pain between Reciproc and OneShape at 5 time points (P>0.05). Conclusion: The instrumentation kinematics (single-file reciprocating or single-file rotary) had no impact on intensity of postoperative pain. PMID:28179917

  5. A comparison of postoperative pain after conventional open thyroidectomy and single-incision, gasless, endoscopic transaxillary thyroidectomy: a single institute prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jung Bong; Kim, Eun Young; Park, Yong Lai; Park, Chan Heun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to compare postoperative pain between single-incision, gasless, endoscopic transaxillary thyroidectomy (SET), and conventional open thyroidectomy. Methods From March to December 2015, patients with thyroid disease underwent total thyroidectomy or lobectomy. Patient's clinical and pathological characteristics, postoperative pain score using visual analog scale (VAS) were compared between the 2 groups. The primary endpoint was postoperative pain evaluated by VAS score and postoperative analgesic use. Operation time and length of postoperative hospital stay were secondary outcome measures. Results Conventional, open cervical surgery was performed on 30 patients (group O) and SET was performed on 27 patients (group E). Pain scores in shoulder area, which is the ipsilateral side of the tumor location at 1 hour and 24 hours after surgery, were higher in group E patients (P < 0.05). Pain scores 7 days after surgery did not differ between the 2 groups according to the locations (P < 0.05). Conclusion In conclusion, endocrine surgeons should be concerned about immediate higher postoperative pain scores in patients who undergo SET. PMID:28090500

  6. Treatment of Necrotic Teeth Using Two Engine-Driven Systems and Patient’s Postoperative Pain: A Double-Blind Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Zand, Vahid; Milani, Amin Salem; Hassani Dehkharghani, Ayla; Rahbar, Mahdi; Tehranchi, Pardis

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: One of the most important reasons for postoperative pain is the extrusion of debris from the apical foramen during preparation and shaping of root canals. The aim of this clinical trial was to evaluate the severity of postoperative pain with the use of two different engine-driven NiTi systems. Methods and Materials: Ninety mandibular molars were randomly divided into two groups (n=45), and root canal cleaning and shaping was done using either RaCe or Reciproc instruments. The severity of postoperative pain was determined with visual analogue scale (VAS) at 4-, 12-, 24-, 48- and 72 h and 1-week intervals and postoperative pain was compared between the two groups. The chi-squared test and repeated-measures analysis were used to compare the data between the two groups. Results: Based on the results of the statistical analyses, the two groups were matched regarding the age and gender, with no significant differences. In addition, except for 4- and 24-h and 1-week intervals, postoperative pain was significantly less in the RaCe group compared to the Reciproc group (P<0.001). Conclusion: Based on the results of the present study, use of RaCe files for cleaning and shaping of root canals in necrotic mandibular molars resulted in less severe postoperative pain compared to Reciproc files. PMID:27790254

  7. Local analgesic effect of tramadol is mediated by opioid receptors in late postoperative pain after plantar incision in rats

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Junior, José Oswaldo; de Freitas, Milena Fernandes; Bullara de Andrade, Carolina; Chacur, Marucia; Ashmawi, Hazem Adel

    2016-01-01

    Tramadol is a drug used to treat moderate to severe pain. It is known to present a peripheral effect, but the local mechanisms underlying its actions remain unclear. The role of peripheral opioid receptors in postoperative pain is not well understood. In the present study, we examined the peripheral opioid receptors to determine the local effect of tramadol in a plantar incision pain model. Rats were subjected to plantar incision and divided into four groups on postoperative day (POD) 1: SF_SF, 0.9% NaCl injected into the right hindpaw; SF_TraI, 0.9% NaCl and tramadol injected into the right hindpaw; SF_TraC, 0.9% NaCl and tramadol injected into the contralateral hindpaw; and Nal_Tra, naloxone and tramadol injected into the ipsilateral hindpaw. To determine the animals’ nociceptive threshold, mechanical hyperalgesia was measured before incision, on POD1 before treatment and at 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes after the incision. The same procedure was repeated on the POD2. The expression levels of μ-opioid receptor (MOR) and δ-opioid receptor (DOR) were obtained through immunoblotting assays in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia (L3–L6) in naïve rats and 1, 2, 3, and 7 days after the incision. Our results showed that the plantar incision was able to cause an increase in mechanical hyperalgesia and that tramadol reversed this hyperalgesia on POD1 and POD2. Tramadol injections in the contralateral paw did not affect the animals’ nociceptive threshold. Naloxone was able to antagonize the tramadol effect partially on POD1 and completely on POD2. The DOR expression increased on POD2, POD3, and POD7, whereas the MOR expression did not change. Together, our results show that tramadol promoted a local analgesic effect in the postoperative pain model that was antagonized by naloxone in POD2, alongside the increase of DOR expression. PMID:27799813

  8. Comparative Study of the Effect of Intravenous Paracetamol and Tramadol in Relieving of Postoperative Pain after General Anesthesia in Nephrectomy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Manne, Venkata Sesha Sai Krishna; Gondi, Srinivasa Rao

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the effect of intravenous paracetamol and tramadol in relieving of postoperative pain after general anesthesia for nephrectomy in prospective donor patients for kidney transplantation. Materials and Methods: A randomized study was conducted on 100 adult patients scheduled for nephrectomy aged from 35 to 55 years of both sexes and divided into two groups and were administered intravenous paracetamol and tramadol for postoperative pain relief and assessed with visual analog scale score and variations in vital parameters to assess extent of pain relief. Results: After statistical interpretation of collected data, the observations were extrapolated. There was a statistically significant difference in the pain intensity scores obtained between the paracetamol and tramadol groups. Conclusion: On the basis of the present study, it is concluded that tramadol due to its lesser onset of action time was superior to paracetamol in providing acute postoperative pain relief. PMID:28298768

  9. Efficacy of low-level laser therapy in the management of pain, facial swelling, and postoperative trismus after a lower third molar extraction. A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    López-Ramírez, Marta; Vílchez-Pérez, Miguel Angel; Gargallo-Albiol, Jordi; Arnabat-Domínguez, Josep; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2012-05-01

    Pain, swelling, and trismus are the most common complications after surgical removal of impacted lower third molars. The aim of this study was to evaluate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of a low-level laser therapy (Laser Smile™, Biolase®, San Clemente, USA) applied to the wound appeared after the surgical removal of impacted lower third molars. A prospective, randomized, and double-blind study was undertaken in 20 healthy patients with two symmetrically impacted lower third molars. The application of a low-level laser was made randomly on one of the two sides after surgery. The experimental side received 5 J/cm(2) of energy density, a wavelength of 810 nm, and an output power of 0.5 W. On the control side, a handpiece was applied intraorally, but the laser was not activated. Evaluations of postoperative pain, trismus, and swelling were made. The sample consisted of 11 women and nine men, and mean age was 23.35 years (18-37). The pain level in the first hours after surgery was lower in the experimental side than in the placebo side, although without statistically significant differences (p = 0.258). Swelling and trismus at the 2nd and 7th postoperative days were slightly higher in the control side, although not statistically significant differences were detected (p > 0.05). The application of a low-level laser with the parameters used in this study did not show beneficial affects in reducing pain, swelling, and trismus after removal of impacted lower third molars.

  10. Evaluation of a post-operative pain-like state on motivated behavior in rats: Effects of plantar incision on progressive-ratio food-maintained responding

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Emily; Krivitsky, Rebecca; Cone, Katherine; Atherton, Phillip; Pitre, Travis; Lanpher, Janell; Giuvelis, Denise; Bergquist, Ivy; King, Tamara; Bilsky, Edward J.; Stevenson, Glenn W.

    2015-01-01

    There has been recent interest in characterizing the effects of pain-like states on motivated behaviors in order to quantify how pain modulates goal-directed behavior and the persistence of that behavior. The current set of experiments assessed the effects of an incisional post-operative pain manipulation on food-maintained responding under a progressive-ratio (PR) operant schedule. Independent variables included injury state (plantar incision or anesthesia control) and reinforcer type (grain pellet or sugar pellet); dependent variables were tactile sensory thresholds and response breakpoint. Once responding stabilized on the PR schedule, separate groups of rats received a single ventral hind paw incision or anesthesia (control condition). Incision significantly reduced breakpoints in rats responding for grain, but not sugar. In rats responding for sugar, tactile hypersensitivity recovered within 24 hrs, indicating a faster recovery of incision-induced tactile hypersensitivity compared to rats responding for grain, which demonstrated recovery at PD2. The NSAID analgesic, diclofenac (5.6 mg/kg) completely restored incision-depressed PR operant responding and tactile sensitivity at 3 hr following incision. The PR schedule differentiated between sucrose and grain, suggesting that relative reinforcing efficacy may be an important determinant in detecting pain-induced changes in motivated behavior. PMID:26494422

  11. Evaluation of a Postoperative Pain-Like State on Motivated Behavior in Rats: Effects of Plantar Incision on Progressive-Ratio Food-Maintained Responding.

    PubMed

    Warner, Emily; Krivitsky, Rebecca; Cone, Katherine; Atherton, Phillip; Pitre, Travis; Lanpher, Janell; Giuvelis, Denise; Bergquist, Ivy; King, Tamara; Bilsky, Edward J; Stevenson, Glenn W

    2015-12-01

    There has been recent interest in characterizing the effects of pain-like states on motivated behaviors in order to quantify how pain modulates goal-directed behavior and the persistence of that behavior. The current set of experiments assessed the effects of an incisional postoperative pain manipulation on food-maintained responding under a progressive-ratio (PR) operant schedule. Independent variables included injury state (plantar incision or anesthesia control) and reinforcer type (grain pellet or sugar pellet); dependent variables were tactile sensory thresholds and response breakpoint. Once responding stabilized on the PR schedule, separate groups of rats received a single ventral hind paw incision or anesthesia (control condition). Incision significantly reduced breakpoints in rats responding for grain, but not sugar. In rats responding for sugar, tactile hypersensitivity recovered within 24 hr, indicating a faster recovery of incision-induced tactile hypersensitivity compared to rats responding for grain, which demonstrated recovery at PD2. The NSAID analgesic, diclofenac (5.6 mg/kg) completely restored incision-depressed PR operant responding and tactile sensitivity at 3 hr following incision. The PR schedule differentiated between sucrose and grain, suggesting that relative reinforcing efficacy may be an important determinant in detecting pain-induced changes in motivated behavior.

  12. Efficacy of Postoperative Pain Management Using Continuous Local Anesthetic Infusion at the Iliac Crest Bone Graft Site in Patients with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: A Parallel, Double-Blinded, Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial.

    PubMed

    Samartzis, Dino; Bow, Cora; Cheung, Jason Pui Yin; Sham, Phoebe; Mak, Kin-Cheung; Cheung, Wai-Yuen; Wong, Yat-Wa; Luk, Keith D K; Cheung, Kenneth M C; Lawmin, Jean-Claude

    2016-05-01

    regarding age, weight, height, arm span, sex, curve type, instrumented and fused levels, length of hospitalization, and pain scores between groups. Postoperatively, no difference was noted in surgical site pain between groups (p > 0.05). However, decreased ICBG and contralateral ICBG pain decreased twofold in group B patients in comparison with group A. Similarly, group B subjects had notably decreased postoperative overall pain scores (group A, mean 15.3; group B, mean 3.8). No significant differences were noted for the pain scores due to the small sample size. Conclusions This study is the first with a robust level I study design to assess the efficacy of continuous infusion of analgesia into the ICBG site in young patients with AIS. This pilot study noted a trend that continuous anesthetic infusion reduces pain at the ICBG site and may further decrease overall physical bodily pain. This study further established a sample size calculation to facilitate large-scale studies addressing these parameters. This study provides further support of postoperative pain management options for children with spinal deformities.

  13. Efficacy of Magnesium Sulphate as an Adjunct to Ropivacaine in Local Infiltration for Postoperative Pain Following Lower Segment Caesarean Section

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rupinder M; Singh, Gaganpreet; Singh, Tania; Jarewal, Vikrant; Katyal, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intravenous and peri-articular magnesium has been shown to reduce perioperative analgesic consumption. With this background, subcutaneous infiltration was hypothesized to potentiate the subcutaneous infiltration of local anaesthetic agent. Aim To comparatively evaluate the efficacy of magnesium sulphate as an adjunct to ropivacaine in local infiltration for postoperative pain following lower segment cesarean section. Materials and Methods Sixty parturients undergoing cesarean delivery were randomized to either group A or B in a double blinded manner. After uterine and muscle closure but before skin closure, Group A was administered local subcutaneous wound infiltration of Injection (Inj) ropivacaine 0.75% 150 milligram (mg) or 20 millilitres(ml) whereas, group B patients were given a local subcutaneous wound infiltration of Inj magnesium sulphate 750 mg (1.5 ml of Inj 50% Magnesium sulphate) added to Inj ropivacaine 0.75% (18.5 ml) making a total volume of 20 ml. In postoperative period, Heart rate (HR), Mean Arterial Pressure (MAP), Visual Analogue Score (VAS), supplemental analgesic consumption and timing of each subsequent analgesic was noted for the initial 24 hours. Results There was no difference in the timings for the requirement of first Intravenous (IV) rescue analgesic among both the groups (p=0.279). However, the need for 2nd and 3rd doses of rescue analgesics was significantly later in group B and the difference was statistically significant with p-value of 0.034 and 0.031 respectively. The number of patients who were administered 2nd, 3rd and 4th doses of rescue analgesics was significantly greater in group A as compared to group B. None of the patients in group B needed more than 4 doses of rescue analgesia while in group A, 5 patients were administered a rescue analgesic for 5th time. The cumulative analgesic requirement in the initial 24 hours was also greater in group A as compared to group B and the difference was statistically

  14. Transcutaneous electric acupoint stimulation at Jiaji points reduce abdominal pain after colonoscopy: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yanqing; Wu, Weilan; Yao, Yusheng; Yang, Yang; Zhao, Qiuyan; Qiu, Liangcheng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Transcutaneous electric acupoint stimulation (TEAS) at Jiaji acupuncture points has therapeutic potential for relieving viscera pain and opioid-related side effects. This prospective, randomized, triple-blinded, placebo-controlled trial was to investigate the efficacy of TEAS on abdominal pain after colonoscopy. Methods: Consecutive outpatients with American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status I or II underwent selective colonoscopy were randomly assigned into two groups for either TEAS or sham pretreatment. The primary outcomes were the incidence of abdominal pain after colonoscopy. The secondary outcomes included the incidence of abdominal distension, postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), duration of PACU stay, and patient’s satisfaction and acceptance. Results: Among the 229 patients analyzed, fewer occurrence of post-procedural abdominal pain (11.4% vs 25.2%, P = 0.007) and distension (1.8% vs 7.8%, P = 0.032) were observed in TEAS group, when compared with the sham group. The duration of PACU stay was significant shortened in TEAS group (P < 0.001). Meanwhile, patients’ satisfaction score to medical service was higher (P < 0.001), and their acceptance to colonoscopy was improved (P = 0.011). Conclusion: Pretreatment with TEAS can reduce post-procedural discomfort, provide more efficient medical resources utilization, and improved patient’s satisfaction and colonoscopy acceptance. PMID:26131193

  15. Long-term effect of ropivacaine nanoparticles for sciatic nerve block on postoperative pain in rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zi; Huang, Haizhen; Yang, Shaozhong; Huang, Shanshan; Guo, Jingxuan; Tang, Qi; Qi, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The analgesic effect of ropivacaine (Rop) for nerve block lasts only ~3–6 hours for single use. The aim of this study was to develop long-acting regional anesthetic Rop nanoparticles and investigate the effects of sciatic nerve block on postoperative pain in rats. Materials and methods Rop nanoparticles were developed using polyethylene glycol-co-polylactic acid (PELA). One hundred and twenty adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups (n=30, each): Con (control group; 0.9% saline, 200 µL), PELA (PELA group; 10 mg), Rop (Rop group; 0.5%, 200 µL), and Rop-PELA (Rop-PELA group; 10%, 10 mg). Another 12 rats were used for the detection of Rop concentration in plasma. The mechanical withdrawal threshold and thermal withdrawal latency were measured at 2 hours, 4 hours, 8 hours, 1 day, 2 days, 3 days, 5 days, and 7 days after incision. The expression of c-FOS was determined by immunohistochemistry at 2 hours, 8 hours, 48 hours, and 7 days. Nerve and organ toxicities were also evaluated at 7 days. Results The duration of Rop absorption in the plasma of the Rop-PELA group was longer (>8 hours) than that of the Rop group (4 hours). Mechanical withdrawal threshold and thermal withdrawal latency in the Rop-PELA group were higher than that in other groups (4 hours–3 days). c-FOS expression in the Rop-PELA group was lower than that in the control group at 2 hours, 8 hours, and 48 hours and lower than that in the Rop group at 8 hours and 48 hours after paw incision. Slight foreign body reactions were observed surrounding the sciatic nerve at 7 days. No obvious pathophysiological change was found in the major organs after Rop-PELA administration at 7 days. Conclusion Rop-PELA provides an effective analgesia for nerve block over 3 days after single administration, and the analgesic mechanism might be mediated by the regulation of spinal c-FOS expression. However, its potential long-term tissue toxicity needs to be further investigated. PMID:27274236

  16. Evaluation of Using Behavioural Changes to Assess Post-Operative Pain in the Guinea Pig (Cavia porcellus)

    PubMed Central

    Ellen, Yvette; Flecknell, Paul; Leach, Matt

    2016-01-01

    To manage pain effectively in people and animals, it is essential to recognise when pain is present and to assess its intensity. Currently there is very little information regarding the signs of post-surgical pain or its management in guinea pigs. Studies from other rodent species indicate that behaviour-based scoring systems can be used successfully to detect pain and evaluate analgesic efficacy. This preliminary study aimed to establish whether behaviour-based scoring systems could be developed to assess post-surgical pain in guinea pigs. This prospective, randomised, placebo-controlled study used 16 guinea pigs, and evaluated changes in behaviour following either anaesthesia alone or anaesthesia and orchiectomy. Behaviour was assessed using a combination of manual and automated scoring of remotely obtained video footage. A small number of behaviours were identified that appeared to have high specificity for pain caused by orchiectomy. However, the behaviours were displayed infrequently. The most common was a change in posture from standing to recumbency, sometimes with one hind leg extended either to the side or behind the body. A composite behaviour score incorporating these abnormal behaviours differentiated between the effects of surgery and anaesthesia alone (p<0.0001), and between animals that received analgesia post-operatively compared to an untreated group (p<0.0001). Although behavioural changes occurred in these guinea pigs after orchiectomy, the changes were relatively subtle and the individual specific pain-related behaviours occurred infrequently. However, it may prove possible to develop a behaviour-based scoring system for routine use in this species using a combination of pain-related behaviours. PMID:27583446

  17. Neuropathic Pain After Lung Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-08

    Chronic Neuropathic Pain, Postoperative; Chronic Pain, Postoperative; Chronic Chemotherapy-induced Neuropathic Pain; Chronic Chemotherapy-induced Pain; Chronic Chemotherapy-induced Peripheral Neuropathy

  18. Increase in volume of lignocaine/adrenaline-containing local anaesthetic solution causes increase in acute postoperative pain after gingivectomy.

    PubMed

    Jorkjend, L; Skoglund, L A

    2000-06-01

    A randomized, single-blind, within-patient, crossover study was done in 44 patients (27 women and 17 men mean age 47 years, range 29-63) who had bilateral 'identical' gingivectomies. On one occasion a standard volume of local anaesthetic containing lignocaine 2% and adrenaline (1/80 000) was infiltrated into the mucosal tissue before operation. On the other occasion double the standard volume was infiltrated. The intensity of pain postoperatively was recorded by the patients on 100 mm visual analogue scale every hour for an 11-hour observation period. The intensity of pain when double volume had been given was significantly higher than that after the standard volume from 2 to 8 hours postoperatively (P < 0.04), the median (range) being 52.0 mm (0.0-434.0) compared with 30.5 mm (0.0-359.0) after the standard volume (P < 0.005). Doubling the volume of local anaesthetic containing adrenaline that was infiltrated increased the intensity of acute pain after gingivectomy.

  19. The efficacy of multimodal high-volume wound infiltration in primary total knee replacement in facilitating immediate post-operative pain relief and attainment of early rehabilitation milestones.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Purnajyoti

    2014-05-01

    Inadequate pain relief after lower limb joint replacement surgery has been a well-recognised limiting factor affecting post-operative mobilisation and length of hospital stay. Multimodal local wound infiltration with local anaesthetics, adrenaline and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents can lower the opiate intake, reduce the length of stay and enhance early mobilisation in knee replacement patients. A retrospective review of 64 patients undergoing primary total knee replacement was undertaken. Thirty-two patients (cases) had their wounds infiltrated with ropivacaine, adrenaline and ketorolac by the operating surgeon, intraoperatively. Subsequently, a 19G wound catheter placed into the knee joint. They received two further top-up doses of the same combination at 10 and 20 h post-operatively. This group was compared with a control group of 32 patients who did not receive any local infiltration. Both groups were comparable in terms of BMI and age. Post-operative opiate drug consumption in first 48 h after surgery, length of hospital stays and time taken to mobilise after surgery were recorded. There was significant reduction in opiate consumption in the treatment group with an average consumption of 49.35 mg of morphine compared to 71.48 mg in the control group (p = 0.004). The median length of hospital stay was significantly reduced from 5 days in the control group to 4 days in the treatment group (p = 0.03). The patients in the treatment group mobilised around 19 h earlier (p = 0.001). No major post-operative complications were encountered in either group. Wound infiltration is an effective and safe technique that promotes early rehabilitation and discharge of patients following primary total knee replacement.

  20. Sufentanil infusion before extubation suppresses coughing on emergence without delaying extubation time and reduces postoperative analgesic requirement without increasing nausea and vomiting after desflurane anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jea Yeun; Lim, Byung Gun; Park, Hye Yoon

    2012-01-01

    Background Coughing, hypertension, tachycardia, and even laryngospasm can occur due to airway irritation during emergence from anesthesia. We investigated the effect of maintaining a sufentanil infusion during emergence from anesthesia by evaluating the incidence of cough and recovery profiles at extubation. Methods In total, eighty-four patients undergoing an elective laparoscopic hysterectomy were randomly divided into two sufentanil groups and a control group. During emergence, sufentanil was administered in the sufentanil groups at a rate of 0.2 µg/kg/hr (Group S1) or 0.3 µg/kg/hr (Group S2), and saline was administered to the control group. Cough score, hemodynamic changes, and recovery profiles, such as duration from skin closure to a bispectral index of 80, to eye opening at verbal command, to tracheal extubation and the total duration of study solution infusion, were recorded. The pain score, the total volume of administered patient-controlled analgesia (PCA), and the postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) score were evaluated 1, 6, and 24 hours after surgery. Results Groups S1 and S2 showed significantly lower cough scores and smaller hemodynamic changes on extubation compared to Group C. Recovery profiles showed no significant differences among the three groups. Pain score, PONV at 1 hour postoperatively, and the total volume of PCA administered at all evaluation times were significantly lower in Groups S1 and S2 than in the control group. However, pain score, and PONV at 6 hours and 24 hours postoperatively showed no significant differences. Conclusions A sufentanil infusion (0.2-0.3 µg/kg/hr) during emergence from desflurane anesthesia may suppress coughing on extubation in patients with body mass indexes (BMI) of 21-26 without delaying extubation time. It may also reduce the postoperative analgesic requirement without increasing PONV. PMID:22778885

  1. Reducing smoking. The effect of suggestion during general anaesthesia on postoperative smoking habits.

    PubMed

    Hughes, J A; Sanders, L D; Dunne, J A; Tarpey, J; Vickers, M D

    1994-02-01

    In a double-blind randomised trial, 122 female smokers undergoing elective surgery were allocated to receive one of two prerecorded messages while fully anaesthetised. The active message was designed to encourage them to give up smoking whilst the control message was the same voice counting numbers. No patient could recall hearing the tape. Patients were asked about their postoperative smoking behaviour one month later. Significantly more of those who had received the active tape had stopped or reduced their smoking (p < 0.01). This would suggest a level of preconscious processing of information.

  2. Evaluation of piroxicam-beta-cyclodextrin, piroxicam, paracetamol and placebo in post-operative oral surgery pain.

    PubMed

    Dolci, G; Ripari, M; Pacifici, L; Umile, A

    1994-01-01

    Two hundred ninety-eight patients with post-operative pain after the surgical removal of an impacted third molar were randomly assigned, on a double-blind basis, to receive a single oral dose of piroxicam 20 mg, or piroxicam-beta-cyclodextrin equivalent to 20 mg piroxicam, or paracetamol 500 mg, or placebo. Using a semi-quantitative self-rating scale, patients rated their pain and its relief at 30-min intervals for the first 2 h, and then hourly for 4 h after treatment administration. All active medications were reported to be significantly superior to placebo. The three active drugs were comparable for the degree of analgesia up to the third hour, after which the effect of paracetamol decreased significantly as compared to piroxicam-beta-cyclodextrin and piroxicam. Piroxicam-beta-cyclodextrin and paracetamol were more rapid than piroxicam in inducing analgesia. The tolerability for the active drugs was comparable to that for placebo.

  3. Experimentally induced pain perception is acutely reduced by aerobic exercise in people with chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Martin D; Shepanski, Melissa A; Mackenzie, Sean P; Clifford, Philip S

    2005-01-01

    This study examined whether subjects with chronic low back pain demonstrate exercise-induced analgesia to experimentally induced pressure pain. We employed a repeated measures design to study eight subjects with chronic low back pain (mean +/- standard deviation age = 40 +/- 10, duration of pain = 7 +/- 4 years). Pain ratings were measured immediately before and 2 minutes and 32 minutes after 25 minutes of cycle ergometry (5 minutes at 50% peak oxygen uptake, then 20 minutes at 70% peak oxygen uptake). We based the pain ratings on subject input on a visual analog scale at 10-second intervals during the 2-minute pressure pain stimulus to the nondominant index finger. Compared with preexercise values, pain ratings were significantly (p < 0.05) decreased after exercise at both 2 and 32 minutes postexercise. We conclude that pressure pain perception can be reduced for more than 30 minutes following aerobic exercise from leg cycling among people with chronic low back pain.

  4. Safety and efficacy of transdermal buprenorphine versus oral tramadol for the treatment of post-operative pain following surgery for fracture neck of femur: A prospective, randomised clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Sameer N; Badiger, Santhoshi V; Tokur, Shreesha B; Naik, Prashanth A

    2017-01-01

    Background: Transdermal buprenorphine, which is used in chronic pain management, has rarely been studied for use in acute pain management. The aim of this study was to compare the safety and efficacy of transdermal buprenorphine patch to oral tramadol for post-operative analgesia, following proximal femur surgeries. Methodology: Fifty adult patients undergoing surgery for hip fracture under spinal anaesthesia were included in this study. One group (Group TDB) received transdermal buprenorphine 10 mcg/h patch applied a day before the surgery and other group received oral tramadol 50 mg three times a day for analgesia (Group OT). They were allowed to take diclofenac and paracetamol tablets for rescue analgesia. Pain scores at rest, on movement, rescue analgesic requirement and side effects were compared between the groups over 7 days. Chi-square and independent sample t-test were used for categorical and continuous variables, respectively. Results: Resting pain scores and pain on movement were significantly lower in TDB Group on all 7 days starting from 24 h post-operatively. Rescue analgesic requirement was significantly lower in TDB Group compared to OT Group. All the patients needed rescue analgesic in OT Group whereas 68% of the patients needed the same in TDB Group. Incidence of vomiting was less and satisfaction scores were much higher in TDB Group as compared to OT Group (79% vs. 66%, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Transdermal buprenorphine can be safely used for post-operative analgesia and is more efficacious in reducing post-operative pain after 24 hours, with fewer side effects when compared to oral tramadol.

  5. Use of indocyanine green videoangiography during intracranial aneurysm surgery reduces the incidence of postoperative ischaemic complications.

    PubMed

    Lai, Leon Tat; Morgan, Michael Kerin

    2014-01-01

    Microscope-integrated near-infrared indocyanine green videoangiography (ICGVA) has been shown to be a useful adjunct for intracranial aneurysm surgery. That the routine application of this technique reduces the risk of postoperative ischaemic complication, however, has not been reported. We present a retrospective matched-pair comparison of ICGVA guided aneurysm surgery versus historic control surgical cohort treated by the same author. Index patients and controls were matched for aneurysm size, location, patient demographics, risk factors, comorbidities, and surgical treatments. Ninety-one eligible patients with 100 intracranial aneurysms were treated using ICGVA assistance. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in terms of patient age, sex, risk factors, comorbidities and aneurysm characteristics. Of the 100 aneurysms in the ICGVA group, 107 investigations of ICGVA were performed. In 79 aneurysms (79.0%), ICGVA was considered useful but did not affect surgical management. In six patients (6.0%), ICGVA led to a crucial change of intraoperative strategies. In nine patients (9.0%), it was considered critical in assuring patency of small perforators. ICGVA was of no benefit in four patients (4.0%) and was misleading in two (2.0%). Postoperative ischaemic complications occurred in three patients (3.3%) in the ICGVA group compared with seven patients (7.7%) in the control group (p<0.001). Our study supports the use of ICGVA in aneurysm surgery as a safe and effective modality of intraoperative blood flow assessment. With all limitations of a retrospective matched-pair comparison, the use of ICGVA during routine aneurysm surgery reduces the incidence of postoperative ischaemic complications.

  6. [Pain management after third molar extraction. Observations of the use of mefenamic acid and rofecoxib in the treatment of postoperative pain in the dental office].

    PubMed

    Pajarola, Gion; Riva, Chantal; Good, Meinrad; Grätz, Klaus W

    2003-01-01

    Pain monitoring is often inadequate in the ambulant field to assure therapy results. Today NSAID take the centre in acute pain and inflammation control in dental interventions. Compared to conventional non-selective NSAID modern selective Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors (COX-2) provide the potential for improved compatibility and simplified medication with heightened effectiveness in acute postoperative toothaches. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of selective COX-2 inhibitors with NSAID after operative wisdom tooth extraction in 30 ambulant patients. The pain curve under mefenamine acid showed a significant increase during the first 48 hours after extraction. With rofecoxib a continuous pain decrease with the lowest stand 48 hours after intervention was registered. One week after extraction the patient's satisfaction was in favour of rofecoxib, which showed a clearly prolonged analgetic effect over 24 hours. Additionally rofecoxib as a COX-2 selective inhibitor doesn't bear the risk for severe non-anticipatable gastrointestinal side effects or prolonged bleeding after surgical intervention.

  7. Implementation of the quality management system improves postoperative pain treatment: a prospective pre-/post-interventional questionnaire study

    PubMed Central

    Usichenko, T. I.; Röttenbacher, I.; Kohlmann, T.; Jülich, A.; Lange, J.; Mustea, A.; Engel, G.; Wendt, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background An organizational approach is proposed as an immediate solution for improving postoperative pain (POP) management. The aim was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of a quality management system (QMS), based on procedure-specific, multimodal analgesic protocols, modified to meet the individual patients’ requirements. Methods Patients from the orthopaedic, gynaecological, visceral, and trauma surgery departments of the university hospital were involved in two prospective surveys. Survey 1 was performed at baseline and survey 2 was performed after the implementation of QMS within an interval of 1 year. The patients were asked to report pain intensity on the visual rating scale, incidence of analgesia-related side-effects, and incidence of pain interference with the items of life quality and their satisfaction with the treatment of POP. Results Patients from Survey 2 (n=251) reported 25–30% less pain than those from Survey 1 (n=269) (P<0.0001). Nausea was reported by 40% of the patients from Survey 1 vs 17% from Survey 2, vomiting by 25 vs 11% and fatigue by 76% in Survey 1 vs 30% in Survey 2 (P<0.0001). Life quality and patients’ satisfaction improved in Survey 2 vs Survey 1 (P<0.001). Conclusions The implementation of QMS allowed the reduction in POP intensity with a simultaneous decrease in analgesia-related side-effects. This has led to an increased quality of life and patient satisfaction. PMID:23048069

  8. Risk Factors for Postoperative Pain Intensity in Patients Undergoing Lumbar Disc Surgery: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Löbner, Margrit; Stein, Janine; Konnopka, Alexander; Meisel, Hans J.; Günther, Lutz; Meixensberger, Jürgen; Stengler, Katarina; König, Hans-Helmut; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Pain relief has been shown to be the most frequently reported goal by patients undergoing lumbar disc surgery. There is a lack of systematic research investigating the course of postsurgical pain intensity and factors associated with postsurgical pain. This systematic review focuses on pain, the most prevalent symptom of a herniated disc as the primary outcome parameter. The aims of this review were (1) to examine how pain intensity changes over time in patients undergoing surgery for a lumbar herniated disc and (2) to identify socio-demographic, medical, occupational and psychological factors associated with pain intensity. Methods Selection criteria were developed and search terms defined. The initial literature search was conducted in April 2015 and involved the following databases: Web of Science, Pubmed, PsycInfo and Pubpsych. The course of pain intensity and associated factors were analysed over the short-term (≤ 3 months after surgery), medium-term (> 3 months and < 12 months after surgery) and long-term (≥ 12 months after surgery). Results From 371 abstracts, 85 full-text articles were reviewed, of which 21 studies were included. Visual analogue scales indicated that surgery helped the majority of patients experience significantly less pain. Recovery from disc surgery mainly occurred within the short-term period and later changes of pain intensity were minor. Postsurgical back and leg pain was predominantly associated with depression and disability. Preliminary positive evidence was found for somatization and mental well-being. Conclusions Patients scheduled for lumbar disc surgery should be selected carefully and need to be treated in a multimodal setting including psychological support. PMID:28107402

  9. The Impact of Evidence-Based Practices on Postoperative Pain in Patients undergoing Gastrointestinal Surgery in Amiralmomenin Hospital in Zabol During 2014-2015

    PubMed Central

    Haghighi, Maryam Jahantigh; Moghadam, Mahdieh Poodineh; Balouchi, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Evidence-Based Practices (EBP), have gained considerable ground in treatment and care, increases the quality of nurses’ clinical care. Yet EBP is less frequently employed despite its efficiency and importance. Pain management is an important component of nursing care and sufficient pain control has still remained as a challenge despite routine nursing practices that are already provided. Aim The present study intended to define the impact of evidence-based nursing practices on postoperative pain in patients undergoing gastrointestinal surgery. Materials and Methods The present study was a single group quasi-experimental study with before/after design. The study was conducted in the General Surgery Departments of the Amiralmomenin Hospital in Zabol during 2014-2015. A purposive sampling method was used to study 55 patients undergoing abdominal surgery. The data collection tool was a questionnaire. The patients pain severity was defined before and after implementing evidence-based practices. The collected data were analysed in SPSS using descriptive statistics and inferential statistics. Results The results showed that 61.8% of patients experienced severe postoperative pain. The mean perceived pain ratings in women and men were 7.88±1.78 and 9.42±0.81, respectively. The mean pain intensity was 8.48±1.66 before the intervention and reached 7.16±1.71 after the intervention, which was significant based on Kruskal-Wallis test (p=0.003). The mean postoperative pain experienced by the patients (p<0.01) and pain-relief following the intervention (p=0.002) was significant for gender. Conclusion This study suggests that a high percentage of patients experienced acute postoperative pain despite routine nursing care, while evidence-based nursing practices could significantly alleviate pain. PMID:27630865

  10. Comparison between paracetamol, piroxicam, their combination, and placebo in postoperative pain management of upper limb orthopedic surgery (a randomized double blind clinical trial)

    PubMed Central

    Khalili, Gholamreza; Salimianfard, Marzieh; Zarehzadeh, Abolghasem

    2016-01-01

    Background: Therapeutic superiority of a combination of Paracetamol and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) over either drug alone remains controversial. We evaluated the efficiency of a combination of Paracetamol and Piroxicam versus each drug alone and also placebo in the management of postoperative pain, in patients who had undergone elective upper limb orthopedic surgery under general anesthesia. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 patients were randomly divided into four groups to receive either intravenous (IV) infusion of Paracetamol, 15 mg/kg., intramuscular (IM) injection of Piroxicam 0.4 mg/kg., their combination or placebo. The pain scores were recorded at the first; second, fourth, sixth, twelfth, and 24 hours after Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) admission. After the operation 0.1 mg/kg of morphine was administered, if the patient needed. Result: The means of the pain scores were 5.26 ± 1.53, 4.09 ± 0.88, 4.36 ± 1.48, and 4.11 ± 1.29, in groups A, B, C, and D, respectively, (Group A: received placebo; Group B: received both Paracetamol and Piroxicam; Group C received Piroxicam; Group D received Paracetamol). Except for differences between the mean pain scores in Groups B and D, the other differences were statistically significant (P value < 0.05). No adverse effect was reported in the four groups. Conclusion: IV infusion of 15 mg/kg Paracetamol used as a preventive may provide effective analgesia in comparison with IM 0.4 mg/kg Piroxicam or placebo. Addition of Piroxicam to Paracetamol has not much more benefit than Paracetamol alone, in reducing pain after upper limb orthopedic surgery. PMID:27403409

  11. Effect of Catechol-O-methyltransferase-gene (COMT) Variants on Experimental and Acute Postoperative Pain in 1,000 Women undergoing Surgery for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kambur, Oleg; Kaunisto, Mari A.; Tikkanen, Emmi; Leal, Suzanne M.; Ripatti, Samuli; Kalso, Eija A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) metabolizes catecholamines in different tissues. Polymorphisms in COMT gene can attenuate COMT activity and increase sensitivity to pain. Human studies exploring the effect of COMT polymorphisms on pain sensitivity have mostly included small, heterogeneous samples and have ignored several important single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). This study examines the effect of COMT polymorphisms on experimental and postoperative pain phenotypes in a large ethnically homogeneous female patient cohort. Methods Intensity of cold (+2–4°C) and heat (+48°C) pain and tolerance to cold pain were assessed in 1,000 patients scheduled for breast cancer surgery. Acute postoperative pain and oxycodone requirements were recorded. Twenty-two COMT SNPs were genotyped and their association with six pain phenotypes analyzed with linear regression. Results There was no association between any of the tested pain phenotypes and SNP rs4680. The strongest association signals were seen between rs165774 and heat pain intensity as well as rs887200 and cold pain intensity. In both cases, minor allele carriers reported less pain. Neither of these results remained significant after strict multiple testing corrections. When analyzed further, the effect of rs887200 was, however, shown to be significant and consistent throughout the cold pressure test. No evidence of association between the SNPs and postoperative oxycodone consumption was found. Conclusions SNPs rs887200 and rs165774 located in the untranslated regions of the gene had the strongest effects on pain sensitivity. Their effect on pain is described here for the first time. These results should be confirmed in further studies and the potential functional mechanisms of the variants studied. PMID:24343288

  12. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-3 (MKP-3) in the surgical wound is necessary for the resolution of postoperative pain in mice

    PubMed Central

    Skopelja-Gardner, Sladjana; Saha, Madhurima; Alvarado-Vazquez, Perla Abigail; Liponis, Brenna S; Martinez, Elena; Romero-Sandoval, E Alfonso

    2017-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatase-3 (MKP-3) and its substrates (extracellular signal-regulated kinase [ERK] and p38) play an important role in pathophysiological mechanisms of acute postoperative and chronic neuropathic pain in the spinal cord. This study aimed to understand the role of MKP-3 and its target MAPKs at the site of surgical incision in nociceptive behavior. Wild-type (WT) and MKP-3 knockout (KO) mice underwent unilateral plantar hind paw incision. Mechanical allodynia was assessed by using von Frey filaments. Peripheral ERK-1/2 and p38 phosphorylation were measured by Western blot. Cell infiltration was determined using hematoxylin and eosin histological staining. Peripheral phosphorylated ERK-1/2 (p-ERK-1/2) inhibition was performed in MKP-3 KO mice. In WT mice, mechanical hypersensitivity was observed on postoperative day 1 (0.69±0.17 g baseline vs 0.13±0.08 g day 1), which resolved normally by postoperative day 12 (0.46±0.08 g, N=6). In MKP-3 KO mice, this hypersensitivity persisted at least 12 days after surgery (0.19±0.06 g; N=6). KO mice displayed higher numbers of infiltrating cells (51.4±6 cells/0.1 mm2) than WT mice (8.7±1.2 cells/0.1 mm2) on postoperative day 1 (vs 5–6 cells/0.1 mm2 at baseline) that returned to baseline 12 days after surgery (10–12 cells/0.1 mm2). In WT mice, peripheral p-p38 and p-ERK-1/2 expression increased (5- and 3-fold, respectively) on postoperative days 1 and 5, and returned to basal levels 7–12 days after surgery (N=3 per group). Peripheral p-p38 levels in MKP-3 KO mice followed a similar expression pattern as WT mice. Peripheral p-ERK-1/2 levels in MKP-3 KO mice remained elevated 12 days after surgery (2.5-fold, N=3 per group). Administration of PD98059 (MEK inhibitor, N=8, vehicle N=9) reduced p-ERK-1/2 expression in the incised tissue and blocked hypersensitivity in MKP-3 KO mice (N=6). The findings of this study suggest that MKP-3 is pivotal for normal resolution of acute

  13. The efficacy of low-level laser treatment in reducing pain and swelling after endodontic surgery: a systematic review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshari, Amirabbas; Vatanpour, Mehdi; Zakershahrak, Mehrsa

    2016-03-01

    Introduction: LLLT in oral cavity believed to reduce pain after endodontic surgery and wisdom tooth removal, to accelerate wound healing and to have an anti-inflammatory and regenerative effect. The aim of this systematic review therefore was to assess the proof available for the efficacy of low-level laser treatment in reducing pain and swelling after endodontic surgery. Methods: The PubMed service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine was searched with applicable search strategies. No language restriction was applied. The last electronic search was accomplished on August 31, 2015. All randomized clinical trials on the efficiency of low-level laser treatment in reducing pain and swelling after endodontic surgery was considered for the Meta-analysis. Quality consideration of the included randomized clinical trials was appraised according to CONSORT guidelines. Results: Only two randomized clinical trials were attained. These studies clarified that laser treatment could reduce pain and swelling, but the results were not significant. Conclusions: Low-level laser therapy can be advantageous for the reduction of postoperative pain but there is no strong confirmation for its efficiency. Its clinical utility and applicability relating to endodontic surgery, Along with the optimal energy dosage and the number of laser treatments needed after surgery, still, demand further research and experiment.

  14. Intrathecal morphine in younger patients for postoperative pain following spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Blackman, R G; Reynolds, J; Shively, J

    1991-09-01

    Intrathecal morphine in an average dose of 0.01 mg/kg was given to 33 patients between ages 11 and 16 years who had spinal arthrodesis for idiopathic scoliosis. The morphine was administered intrathecally as a 10 cc bolus at the conclusion of the arthrodesis, but before closure. The goal was to study safety in terms of respiratory depression and pain relief. Respirations occurred spontaneously in 30 of the 33 patients within 15 minutes of cessation of anesthesia. Respiratory depression occurred in five patients, four of whom had arterial blood pCO2 levels greater than 60 mm Hg. Thirty-one patients had relief of pain for 8 to greater than 40 hours, averaging 18 hours. Two patients had no noticeable pain relief. There appeared to be no relation between dose and pain relief in this limited dose range. We were unable to duplicate the long duration of pain relief reported elsewhere. We also were unable to decrease the side effects of respiratory depression and nausea to a level reported by others. It may be that the 10 cc bolus injected intrathecally circulates to the brain and ventricles faster than desired, or that factors relating to type of anesthesia or dose need to be considered. Low-dose intrathecal morphine does provide noticeable pain relief in younger patients undergoing spinal fusion. The side effects of nausea and respiratory depression can be managed safely with medication.

  15. Spinal anesthesia reduces postoperative delirium in opium dependent patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaie, O; Matin, N; Heidari, A; Tabatabaie, A; Hadaegh, A; Yazdanynejad, S; Tabatabaie, K

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of high spinal anesthesia on postoperative delirium in opium dependent patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). The study was conducted in a tertiary referral university hospital on a population of 60 opium dependent patients undergoing CABG surgery. Patients were divided into two groups based on anesthesia protocol. One group were given general anesthesia (GA Group), the other group additionally received intrathecal morphine and bupivacaine (SGA Group). Postoperative delirium (POD) was defined as the main outcome of interest. Incidence of POD was significantly higher in patients of GA Group as compared with those in SGA Group (47% and 17% for GA and SGA respectively; P-value = 0.01). Time to extubation was on average 2.2 h shorter in SGA than in GA (7.1 h and 9.3 h respectively, P-value < 0.001). Intrathecal morphine and bupivacaine reduced the risk of POD after CABG in a population of opium dependent patients.

  16. Pain fiber anesthetic reduces brainstem Fos after tooth extraction.

    PubMed

    Badral, B; Davies, A J; Kim, Y H; Ahn, J S; Hong, S D; Chung, G; Kim, J S; Oh, S B

    2013-11-01

    We recently demonstrated that pain-sensing neurons in the trigeminal system can be selectively anesthetized by co-application of QX-314 with the TRPV1 receptor agonist, capsaicin (QX cocktail). Here we examined whether this new anesthetic strategy can block the neuronal changes in the brainstem following molar tooth extraction in the rat. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received infiltration injection of anesthetic 10 min prior to lower molar tooth extraction. Neuronal activation was determined by immunohistochemistry for the proto-oncogene protein c-Fos in transverse sections of the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Sp5C). After tooth extraction, c-Fos-like immunoreactivity (Fos-LI) detected in the dorsomedial region of bilateral Sp5C was highest at 2 hrs (p < .01 vs. naïve ipsilateral) and declined to pre-injury levels by 8 hrs. Pre-administration of the QX cocktail significantly reduced to sham levels Fos-LI examined 2 hrs after tooth extraction; reduced Fos-LI was also observed with the conventional local anesthetic lidocaine. Pulpal anesthesia by infiltration injection was confirmed by inhibition of the jaw-opening reflex in response to electrical tooth pulp stimulation. Our results suggest that the QX cocktail anesthetic is effective in reducing neuronal activation following tooth extraction. Thus, a selective pain fiber 'nociceptive anesthetic' strategy may provide an effective local anesthetic option for dental patients in the clinic.

  17. The analgesic efficacy of ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block on postoperative pain and morphine consumption in varicocelectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ömür, Dilek; Oğuzalp, Hüseyin; Kiraz, Hasan A.; Ekin, Serpil; Alan, Cabir; Ersay, Ahmet R.; Hancı, Volkan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the analgesic effect of transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block administered before varicocele surgery. Methods: This study was completed at the Faculty of Medicine, Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University, Çanakkale, Turkey, between January 2011 and April 2013. In a prospective, double blind, randomized, placebo controlled clinical study, 40 male patients scheduled for elective varicocele operations were randomized to group T (treatment group) or group C (controls). After receiving general anesthesia, group T received a TAP block using 20 mL 0.25% bupivacaine on the operation side, whereas group C received a control block using 20 mL 0.9% Sodium chloride. During the first 24 hours after surgery, the patient pain was evaluated using the visual analogue scale (VAS) at rest and while coughing. Postoperative patient controlled analgesia morphine consumption, VAS scores, and side effects were recorded. Results: Of 34 patients, Group T (n=18) had significantly lower VAS pain scores than Group C (n=16) both at rest and while coughing. The total morphine consumed was lower (7.7 ± 4.0) versus 21.6 ± 12.4 mg, p<0.001) in the 24 hours after surgery. Conclusion: As part of a multimodal analgesic regime after varicocelectomy surgery, morphine consumption and VAS pain scores were significantly lower among those receiving 20 mL 0.25% bupivacaine administered for a TAP block than among controls. PMID:27279511

  18. A clinical comparison of tilidine hydrochloride and pentazocine, given orally for the treatment of postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Kay, B

    1977-03-01

    A controlled, double-blind study involving 250 women was carried out ot assess the efficacy of oral tilidine 25, 50 and 100 mg in treating postepisiotomy pain, and to offer a comparison with oral pentazocine 50 mg. All the analgesics produced significant pain relief. At peak effect tilidine 50 mg produced very similar results to pentazocine 50 mg with tilidine 25 mg producing less, and tilidine 100 mg more pain relief. These results were not, however, statistically significant. In these postdelivery ambulant patients pentazocine 50 mg and tilidine 100 mg produced at 25% incidence of side-effects, mainly dizziness and drowsiness, but tilidine 25 mg produced significant analgesia with virtually no side-effects.

  19. Infiltrated lidocaine 2% with epinephrine 1:80,000 causes more postoperative pain than lidocaine 2% after oral soft tissue surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Jorkjend, L.; Skoglund, L. A.

    1999-01-01

    A controlled, randomized, double-blind, within-patient, crossover study was made with 50 patients (28 women and 22 men) of mean age 47 years (range, 32-69 years) who were subjected to identical bilateral gingivectomies. On one occasion, lidocaine 2% was infiltrated as the local anesthetic. On the other occasion, lidocaine 2% with epinephrine 1:80,000 was given. Postoperative pain intensity was recorded by the patients on a 100-mm visual analogue scale every hour during an 11-hour observation period. The mean pain intensity was numerically higher after lidocaine 2% at 0 hours and 1 hour postoperatively. Then the mean pain intensity after lidocaine 2% was lower than that after lidocaine 2% with epinephrine 1:80,000 throughout the remaining observation period. The difference in pain intensity was statistically significant (P < .05) at 2, 4, 5, 6, and 7 hours after surgery. Mean sum (SEM) pain intensity over the 11-hour observation period was lower (P = .03) after lidocaine 2%, 66.5 (13.4) mm than after lidocaine 2% with epinephrine 1:80,000, 92.6 (15.4) mm. The study shows that high epinephrine concentration (1:80,000) increases the postoperative pain after dental soft tissue surgery with mild pain. PMID:10853568

  20. Post-operative stress fractures complicating surgery for painful forefoot conditions.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Max R; Jack, Christopher; Jones, Gareth G; Singh, Samrendu K

    2010-01-01

    A stress fracture is caused by repetitive or unusual loading of a bone leading to mechanical failure. Fatigue type stress fractures occur in normal bone exposed to abnormally high repetitive loads, whereas insufficiency type stress fractures occur in abnormal bone exposed to normal loads. We describe three cases of insufficiency stress fractures that have complicated surgery for painful forefoot conditions. The diagnosis and management of these cases are discussed. Stress fractures should be included in the differential diagnosis of any patient who continues or develops pain after surgery to the forefoot.

  1. [Evaluation of the therapeutic efficacy and tolerance of a new thiamine compound (benzoyloxymethylthiamine) in the treatment of postoperative pain symptomatology in odontostomatological surgery].

    PubMed

    Sammartino, G; Nicolò, M; Battagliese, G; Amato, M

    1989-11-01

    The therapeutic effectiveness of benzoyloxymethyl-thiamin in controlling post-operative pain in odontostomatological surgery has been examined. The double blind study used a placebo and concerned 100 patients subjected to avulsion of the third molar in dysodontiasis on an out-patient basis. The results point to the effectiveness of benzoyloxymethyl-thiamin in the symptomatic treatment of post-operative pain symptomatology both as regards its duration and intensity; the drug also proved to be very well tolerated and its administration was not accompanied by any unwanted side-effects.

  2. Cortisol reduces recall of explicit contextual pain memory in healthy young men.

    PubMed

    Schwegler, Kyrill; Ettlin, Dominik; Buser, Iris; Klaghofer, Richard; Goetzmann, Lutz; Buddeberg, Claus; Alon, Eli; Brügger, Mike; de Quervain, Dominique J-F

    2010-09-01

    Remembering painful incidents has important adaptive value but may also contribute to clinical symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder and chronic pain states. Because glucocorticoids are known to impair memory retrieval processes, we investigated whether cortisol affects recall of previously experienced pain in healthy young men. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study, 20 male participants were presented pictures, half of them combined with a heat-pain stimulus. The next day, the same pictures were shown in the absence of pain. Cortisol (20 mg) administered 1h before retention testing reduced recall of explicit contextual pain memory, whereas it did not affect pain threshold or pain tolerance.

  3. The association between component malalignment and post-operative pain following navigation-assisted total knee arthroplasty: results of a cohort/nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Czurda, Thomas; Fennema, Peter; Baumgartner, Martin; Ritschl, Peter

    2010-07-01

    Previous studies have noted an adverse relationship between implant malalignment during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and post-operative pain. Although some evidence exists indicating that computer-assisted surgical navigation for TKA can improve the accuracy of component alignment, its impact on clinical outcomes is currently unknown. The dual goals of the present cohort/nested case-control study were to (1) compare self-reported responses to the Western Ontario-McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) questionnaire between computer-assisted TKA (123 patients) using the imageless PiGalileo navigation system and conventional TKA (207 patients) [cohort analysis], and (2) to investigate a potential association between malalignment and post-operative pain in 19 painful knees and 19 asymptomatic knees obtained from the cohort analysis using matched sampling [nested case-control study]. In the cohort analysis, a relevant but non-significant (P = 0.06) difference in the occurrence of chronic pain was observed between the navigated (12%) and conventional arms (20%). Median post-operative WOMAC pain score was 100 (range, 50-100) in the conventional group and 100 (range, 65-100) in the navigated group. However, the Mann-Whitney test revealed a significant difference in favor of the navigated group (P = 0.01). In the nested case-control analysis, radiological outcomes and computer tomography (CT) measurements of femoral rotation were compared between the groups. The CT rotation measurements yielded evidence of a relationship between post-operative pain and incorrect rotational alignment of the femoral component of more than 3 degrees (OR: 7; 95% CI: 1.2-42; P = .033). In conclusion, there was no clinical benefit to computer-assisted navigation; however, a statistically significant relationship was observed between incorrect rotational alignment of the femoral component and symptoms of post-operative pain following TKA.

  4. Complications related to the use of spinal cord stimulation for managing persistent postoperative neuropathic pain after lumbar spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Shamji, Mohammed F; Westwick, Harrison J; Heary, Robert F

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT Structural spinal surgery yields improvement in pain and disability for selected patients with spinal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, or a herniated intervertebral disc. A significant fraction of patients exhibit persistent postoperative neuropathic pain (PPNP) despite technically appropriate intervention, and such patients can benefit from spinal cord stimulation (SCS) to alleviate suffering. The complication profile of this therapy has not been systematically assessed and, thus, was the goal of this review. METHODS A comprehensive literature search was performed to identify prospective cohorts of patients who had PPNP following structurally corrective lumbar spinal surgery and who underwent SCS device implantation. Data about study design, technique of SCS lead introduction, and complications encountered were collected and analyzed. Comparisons of complication incidence were performed between percutaneously and surgically implanted systems, with the level of significance set at 0.05. RESULTS Review of 11 studies involving 542 patients formed the basis of this work: 2 randomized controlled trials and 9 prospective cohorts. Percutaneous implants were used in 4 studies and surgical implants were used in 4 studies; in the remainder, the types were undefined. Lead migration occurred in 12% of cases, pain at the site of the implantable pulse generator occurred in 9% of cases, and wound-related complications occurred in 5% of cases; the latter 2 occurred more frequently among surgically implanted devices. CONCLUSIONS Spinal cord stimulation can provide for improved pain and suffering and for decreased narcotic medication use among patients with PPNP after lumbar spinal surgery. This study reviewed the prospective studies forming the evidence base for this therapy, to summarize the complications encountered and, thus, best inform patients and clinicians considering its use. There is a significant rate of minor complications, many of which require further surgical

  5. Incidence of Postoperative Pain after Single Visit and Two Visit Root Canal Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Sonal B.; Bhagwat, S.V; Patil, Sanjana A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Root Canal Treatment (RCT) has become a mainstream procedure in dentistry. A successful RCT is presented by absence of clinical signs and symptoms in teeth without any radiographic evidence of periodontal involvement. Completing this procedure in one visit or multiple visits has long been a topic of discussion. Aim To evaluate the incidence of postoperative pain after root canal therapy performed in single visit and two visits. Material and Methods An unblinded/ open label randomized controlled trial was carried out in the endodontic department of the Dental Institute, where 78 patients were recruited from the regular pool of patients. A total of 66 maxillary central incisors requiring root canal therapy fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Using simple randomization by biased coin randomization method, the selected patients were assigned into two groups: group A (n=33) and group B (n=33). Single visit root canal treatment was performed for group A and two visit root canal treatment for group B. Independent sample t-test was used for statistical analysis. Results Thirty three patients were allotted to group A where endodontic treatment was completed in single visit while 33 patients were allotted to group B where endodontic treatment was completed in two visits. One patient dropped-out from Group A. Hence in Group A, 32 patients were analysed while in Group B, 33 patients were analysed. After 6 hours, 12 hours and 24 hours of obturation, pain was significantly higher in Group B as compared to Group A. However, there was no significant difference in the pain experienced by the patients 48 hours after treatment in both the groups. Conclusion Incidence of pain after endodontic treatment being performed in one-visit or two-visits is not significantly different. PMID:27437339

  6. Modifying Post-Operative Medical Care after EBV Implant May Reduce Pneumothorax Incidence

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Dominik; Poellinger, Alexander; Doellinger, Felix; Schuermann, Dirk; Temmesfeld-Wollbrueck, Bettina; Froeling, Vera; Schreiter, Nils F.; Neumann, Konrad; Hippenstiel, Stefan; Suttorp, Norbert; Hubner, Ralf-Harto

    2015-01-01

    Objective Endoscopic lung volume reduction (ELVR) with valves has been shown to improve COPD patients with severe emphysema. However, a major complication is pneumothoraces, occurring typically soon after valve implantation, with severe consequences if not managed promptly. Based on the knowledge that strain activity is related to a higher risk of pneumothoraces, we asked whether modifying post-operative medical care with the inclusion of strict short-term limitation of strain activity is associated with a lower incidence of pneumothorax. Methods Seventy-two (72) emphysematous patients without collateral ventilation were treated with bronchial valves and included in the study. Thirty-two (32) patients received standard post-implantation medical management (Standard Medical Care (SMC)), and 40 patients received a modified medical care that included an additional bed rest for 48 hours and cough suppression, as needed (Modified Medical Care (MMC)). Results The baseline characteristics were similar for the two groups, except there were more males in the SMC cohort. Overall, ten pneumothoraces occurred up to four days after ELVR, eight pneumothoraces in the SMC, and only two in the MMC cohorts (p=0.02). Complicated pneumothoraces and pneumothoraces after upper lobe treatment were significantly lower in MMC (p=0.02). Major clinical outcomes showed no significant differences between the two cohorts. Conclusions In conclusion, modifying post-operative medical care to include bed rest for 48 hours after ELVR and cough suppression, if needed, might reduce the incidence of pneumothoraces. Prospective randomized studies with larger numbers of well-matched patients are needed to confirm the data. PMID:26010886

  7. A comparison of the analgesic effect of intramuscular nalbuphine and morphine in patients with postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Beaver, W T; Feise, G A

    1978-02-01

    In a double-study, using patients' subjective reports as indices of analgesia, the relative analgesic potency of intramuscular nalbuphine and morphine was determined in 56 postoperative patients. A total of 28 crossover comparisons (utilizing the twin passover, balanced four-point incomplete block design) were performed in two sequentially related experiments, each assay comparing 4 and 8 mg of morphine with either 3 and 6 or 6 and 12 mg of nalbuphine. When both intensity and duration of analgesia are considered (i.e., total analgesic effect), nalbuphine was 0.8 to 0.9 times as potent as morphine. In terms of peak analgesic effect, nalbuphine was 0.7 to 0.8 times as potent. Both the time-effect curves and the relative potency estimates suggest that nalbuphine has a slightly longer duration of action than morphine at doses that are equianalgesic in terms of peak effect. Side effects of the type usually noted after the administration of potent injectable analgesics to postoperative patients were observed after both morphine and nalbuphine. Although nalbuphine is a potent narcotic antagonist, no psychotomimetic reactions were observed.

  8. Management of acute and post-operative pain in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Parmar, Malvinder S

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is common and patients with many co-morbid conditions frequently have to undergo surgical procedures and, therefore, require effective pain management. The pharmacokinetics of various analgesic agents are not well studied in patients with chronic kidney disease and the risk of accumulation of the main drug or their metabolites, resulting in serious adverse events, is a common scenario on medical and surgical wards. It is common for these patients to be cared for by 'non-nephrologists' who often prescribe the standard dose of the commonly used analgesics, without taking into consideration the patient's kidney function. It is important to recognize the problems and complications associated with the use of standard doses of analgesics, and highlight the importance of adjusting analgesic dosage based on kidney function to avoid complications while still providing adequate pain relief. PMID:24358847

  9. Active Coping Reduces Reports of Pain from Childbirth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leventhal, Elaine A.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examined pain and negative moods during labor in relation to instructions to monitor labor contractions and LaMaze class attendance. In Study 1, pain and negative moods showed sharp decline at Stage 2 (active labor) for women who monitored and LaMaze participants; in Study 2, LaMaze participants reported decline in pain during active labor and…

  10. Effect of preoperative administration of intravenous paracetamol during cesarean surgery on hemodynamic variables relative to intubation, postoperative pain and neonatal apgar.

    PubMed

    Ayatollahi, Vida; Faghihi, Safa; Behdad, Shokoufeh; Heiranizadeh, Najmeh; Baghianimoghadam, Behnam

    2014-09-01

    Selection of anesthetic drugs for cesarean section requires many considerations. Anesthetic drugs for this purpose must prevent hemodynamic stress due to tracheal intubation, while inducing neonatal complications. This study was conducted to determine the effects of paracetamol given before induction of anesthesia on cardiovascular responses to tracheal intubation and postoperative pain in the mother, and on neonatal Apgar score. This double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial included 60 women in ASA I, without underlying diseases and fetal distress, who were candidates for elective cesarean section under general anesthesia. Patients were divided into two groups of 30 patients. Patients in the paracetamol group received 1 g intravenous (IV) paracetamol 20 min before the operation, while those in the placebo group received 1 cc normal saline at the same time. In both groups, anesthesia was induced by sodium thiopental and succinylcholine. Maternal systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were measured before and immediately upon induction of anesthesia, and at first and fifth minute after tracheal intubation. Neonatal effects were assessed by Apgar score. Postoperative pain was assessed by use of the visual analog scale (VAS). The dose of analgesic used and the time of the first analgesic request by patients postoperatively were recorded. The SBP, DBP, MAP and HR were controlled significantly better in paracetamol group than in placebo group (P < 0.05). The mean 1-min and 5-min Apgar scores of neonates did not differ between the groups. The VAS pain score was significantly lower in paracetamol group than in placebo group at all measuring times (P < 0.05). Also, paracetamol caused later first analgesic request and lower dose of analgesic needed to control pain postoperatively (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the results of our study suggested IV paracetamol to be an efficacious agent to decrease

  11. Comparison of local infiltration and epidural analgesia for postoperative pain control in total knee arthroplasty and total hip arthroplasty: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Huan; Cang, Jing; Xue, Zhanggang; Lu, Jianfeng; Wang, Hao

    2016-11-10

    Pain management after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and total hip arthroplasty should permit early mobilization with minimal pain. Local infiltration analgesia (LIA) is a new popular method for decreasing postoperative pain. The goal of this meta-analysis is to evaluate the efficacy of LIA in comparison with epidural analgesia. A literature search was performed in PubMed, EMBASE, the OVID database, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library databases. The risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane collaboration tool. Outcomes of interest included visual analog scale score, range of flexion, length of stay, and complications. Nine trials involving 537 patients met the inclusion criteria. LIA provides better pain relief and larger range of motion in TKA patients compared to epidural analgesia at the late postoperative period. No significant difference was observed in regard to the length of stay and complications. The current evidence shows that the use of local infiltration is effective for postoperative pain management in TKA patients. More high-quality randomized controlled trials with long-term follow-up are required for examining the long-term efficacy and safety of local infiltration.

  12. Effect of Karamardādi Yoga versus diclofenac sodium in post-operative pain management: A randomized comparative clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Hegana, Rahul; Toshikhane, Hemant Devaraj; Toshikhane, Sangeeta; Amin, Hetal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Post-operative pain is Nociceptive i.e., anticipated unavoidable physiological pain which is caused due to tissue trauma. Drugs such as NSAIDs (Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs) and Opioids are used for post-operative pain management but are associated with their own drawbacks. Karamardādi Yoga has been in use in Ayurvedic practice for analgesia. It is known to relieve pain and can be used to supplement anaesthesia and also get rid of adverse effect of modern analgesic drugs. Aims and Objective: To study the comparative effect of Karamardādi Yoga and Diclofenac sodium in post-operative pain management. Materials and Methods: Randomized clinical trial with Group A (Control Group: Tab Diclofenac sodium 50 mg as a single dose) and Group B (Trial Group: Cap Karamardādi Yoga 500 mg as a single dose). Those who had undergone haemorrhoidectomy operation under local anaesthesia were selected as per inclusion criteria. Vitals, desirable effect and undesirable effect, total surgical time, requirement of 1st dose of analgesic, requirement of rescue analgesic and pain determined by VAS (Visual Analog Scale) were the assessment criteria and were observed and recorded. Results: Karamardādi Yoga does not show any undesirable or serious ill effects and altered values of vitals as per statistical analysis. As per VAS scale, pain felt by Trial group was earlier than control group. Conclusions: Karamardādi Yoga has analgesic property but its analgesic property and pain threshold capacity is lesser than those of Diclofenac sodium. PMID:27621519

  13. Efficacy of Opioid-free Anesthesia in Reducing Postoperative Respiratory Depression in Children Undergoing Tonsillectomy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-08

    Anesthesia; General Anesthesia; Analgesics, Opioid; Postoperative Complications; Pathologic Processes; Physiologic Effects of Drugs; Narcotics; Analgesics; Sleep Disordered Breathing; Obstructive Sleep Apnea of Child; Tonsillectomy; Respiratory Depression; Dexmedetomidine; Ketamine; Lidocaine; Gabapentin; Pulse Oximetry

  14. Reducing Unnecessary Postoperative Complete Blood Count Testing in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Dewan, Maya; Galvez, Jorge; Polsky, Tracey; Kreher, Genna; Kraus, Blair; Ahumada, Luis; McCloskey, John; Wolfe, Heather

    2017-01-01

    Context: Complete blood count (CBC) testing commonly occurs to determine the need for blood transfusions after surgical procedures. Many clinicians believe postoperative CBCs are “routine.” Objective: To decrease unnecessary routine CBC testing in a low-risk cohort of postoperative patients in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia by 50% in 6 months. Design: Quality-improvement study. Data from our institution regarding frequency of ordering laboratory studies and transfusion requirements were collected for prior quality-improvement work demonstrating the safety and feasibility of avoiding routine postoperative CBCs in this cohort. Baseline survey data were gathered from key stakeholders on attitudes about and utilization of routine postoperative laboratory testing. Patient and clinician data were shared with all PICU clinicians. Simple Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles involving education, audit, and feedback were put into place. Main Outcome Measures: Percentage of postoperative patients receiving CBCs within 48 hours of PICU admission. Balancing measures were hemoglobin level below 8 g/dL in patients for whom CBCs were sent and blood transfusions up to 7 days postoperatively for any patients in this cohort. Results: Sustained decreases below our 50% goal were seen after our interventions. There were no hemoglobin results below 8 g/dL or surgery-related blood transfusions in this cohort within 7 days of surgery. Estimated hospital charges related to routine postoperative CBCs decreased by 87% during 6 postintervention months. Conclusion: A simple approach to a systemic problem in the PICU of unnecessary laboratory testing is feasible and effective. By using local historical data, we were able to identify a cohort of patients for whom routine postoperative CBC testing is unnecessary. PMID:28241909

  15. Reduced Cold Pain Tolerance in Chronic Pain Patients Following Opioid Detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Younger, Jarred; Barelka, Peter; Carroll, Ian; Kaplan, Kim; Chu, Larry; Prasad, Ravi; Gaeta, Ray; Mackey, Sean

    2009-01-01

    Objective One potential consequence of chronic opioid analgesic administration is a paradoxical increase of pain sensitivity over time. Little scientific attention has been given to how cessation of opioid medication affects the hyperalgesic state. In this study, we examined the effects of opioid tapering on pain sensitivity in chronic pain patients. Design Twelve chronic pain patients on long-term opioid analgesic treatment were observed in a 7- to 14-day inpatient pain rehabilitation program, with cold pain tolerance assessed at admission and discharge. The majority of participants were completely withdrawn from their opioids during their stay. Outcome Measures We hypothesized that those patients with the greatest reduction in daily opioid use would show the greatest increases in pain tolerance, as assessed by a cold pressor task. Results A linear regression revealed that the amount of opioid medication withdrawn was a significant predictor of pain tolerance changes, but not in the direction hypothesized. Greater opioid reduction was associated with decreased pain tolerance. This reduction of pain tolerance was not associated with opioid withdrawal symptoms or changes in general pain. Conclusions These findings suggest that the withdrawal of opioids in a chronic pain sample leads to an acute increase in pain sensitivity. PMID:18564998

  16. The effect of pulpotomy using a calcium-enriched mixture cement versus one-visit root canal therapy on postoperative pain relief in irreversible pulpitis: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Asgary, Saeed; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this noninferiority trial was to compare postoperative pain relief after one-visit root canal therapy (ORCT) with a pulpotomy performed with a new endodontic calcium-enriched mixture cement (PCEM) in human permanent molars with irreversible pulpitis. A total of 407 selected patients were randomly allocated into the ORCT group (n = 202) or the PCEM group (n = 205). Numerical Rating Scale questionnaires were used to record pain intensity (PI) by the patients during the first 7 days after treatment. While there was no statistically significant difference in the mean PI at baseline between the two study groups (P = 0.45), changes in mean PI were significantly different between them (P < 0.001). In the ORCT group, pain relief was achieved after 36 h [95% confidence interval (CI), 27.00-45.00], compared to 18 h in the PCEM group (95% CI, 15.00-21.00), a significant difference (P < 0.01). Comparison of the mean PI sum recorded over 7 days showed that patients in the ORCT group experienced significantly more pain than those in the PCEM group (P < 0.001); a similar difference was observed for pain in response to percussion tests (P < 0.001). Treatment with PCEM thus had the better pain-reducing effects than ORCT in irreversible pulpitis cases.

  17. Registered Nurses' Knowledge about Adverse Effects of Analgesics when Treating Postoperative Pain in Patients with Dementia.

    PubMed

    Rantala, Maija; Hartikainen, Sirpa; Kvist, Tarja; Kankkunen, Päivi

    2015-08-01

    Registered nurses (RNs) play a pivotal role in treating pain and preventing and recognizing the adverse effects (AEs) of analgesics in patients with dementia. The purpose of this study was to determine RNs' knowledge of potentially clinically relevant AEs of analgesics. A descriptive, cross-sectional study design was used. In all, 267 RNs treating orthopedic patients, including patients with dementia, in 7 university hospitals and 10 central hospitals in Finland, completed a questionnaire. Analgesics were defined according to the Anatomic Therapeutic Classification as strong opioids, weak opioids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory analgesics (NSAIDs), and paracetamol. Definitions of AEs were based on the literature. Logistic regression analysis was applied to analyze which variables predicted nurses' knowledge. The RNs had a clear understanding of the AEs of paracetamol and strong opioids. However, the AEs of NSAIDs, especially renal and cardiovascular AEs, were less well known. The median percentage of correct answers was 87% when asked about strong opioids, 73% for weak opioids, and 60% for NSAIDs. Younger RNs had better knowledge of opioid-related AEs (odds ratio [OR] per 1-year increase, 0.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.94-1.00) and weak opioids (OR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.93-0.99). This study provides evidence of a deficiency in RNs' knowledge, especially regarding the adverse renal and cardiovascular effects of NSAIDs. Such lack of knowledge indicates that hospitals may need to update the knowledge of older RNs, especially those who treat vulnerable patients with dementia.

  18. Oral fluoropyrimidines may not reduce the risk of postoperative recurrence in colorectal cancer associated with mesenteric lymph node metastasis.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Yutaka; Torigoe, Shojiro; Matono, Keiko; Sasatomi, Teruo; Ishibashi, Nobuya; Shida, Seiichiro; Ohkita, Akira; Fukumitu, Takamasa; Mizobe, Tomoaki; Ikeda, Satoru; Ogo, Shujiro; Ozasa, Hiroyuki; Shirouzu, Kazuo

    2007-01-01

    To clarify the efficacy and problems of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy using oral fluoropyrimidines, the clinicopathological data of 307 colorectal cancer patients treated with or without postoperative chemotherapy were analyzed retrospectively. Patients in the chemotherapy group (n=188) who underwent curative resection were followed by administration of oral fluoropyrimidine. The other 119 patients underwent surgery alone. The disease-free survival rates were compared between the two groups. The disease-free survival rate in the chemotherapy group was significantly higher than that in the surgery alone. However, no significant difference in disease-free survival rate was found for those with tumors that were associated with mesenteric lymph node involvement and tumors with a high grade of lymphatic invasion or high grade of venous invasion. Postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy using oral fluoropyrimidines such as UFT (litegafur +4:uracil) and 5'-DFUR (doxifluridine) might not reduce the risk of recurrence in colorectal cancer with mesenteric lymph nodes involvement.

  19. The safety and effectiveness of a long-acting transdermal fentanyl solution compared with oxymorphone for the control of postoperative pain in dogs: a randomized, multicentered clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, S A; Wilson, M G; Linton, D D; Newbound, G C; Freise, K J; Lin, T-L; Clark, T P

    2014-01-01

    A prospective, double-blinded, positive-controlled, multicenter, noninferiority study was conducted to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of transdermal fentanyl solution (TFS) compared with oxymorphone for the control of postoperative pain in dogs. Five hundred and two (502) client-owned dogs were assigned to a single dose of TFS (2.7 mg/kg) applied 2–4 h prior to surgery or oxymorphone hydrochloride (0.22 mg/kg) administered subcutaneously 2–4 h prior to surgery and q6h through 90 h. Pain was evaluated over 4 days by blinded observers using a modified Glasgow composite pain scale, and the a priori criteria for treatment failure was a pain score ≥8 or adverse event necessitating withdrawal. Four TFS- and eight oxymorphone-treated dogs were withdrawn due to lack of pain control. Eighteen oxymorphone-treated, but no TFS-treated dogs were withdrawn due to severe adverse events. The one-sided upper 95% confidence interval of the difference between TFS and oxymorphone treatment failure rates was −5.3%. Adverse events associated with oxymorphone were greater in number and severity compared with TFS. It was concluded that a single administration of TFS was safe and noninferior to repeated injections of oxymorphone for the control of postoperative pain over 4 days at the dose rates of both formulations used in this study. PMID:24344787

  20. The effect of a single intravenous dose of metamizol 2 g, ketorolac 30 mg and propacetamol 1 g on haemodynamic parameters and postoperative pain after heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Avellaneda, C; Gómez, A; Martos, F; Rubio, M; Sarmiento, J; de la Cuesta, F S

    2000-02-01

    Although nonopiate analgesics may be particularly useful in the immediate postoperative period after major surgery, their use has been associated with haemodynamic adverse effects during postoperative pain treatment and in critically ill patients in intensive care. The effect of a single intravenous dose of metamizol (dipyrone) 2 g, ketorolac 30 mg and propacetamol 1 g on haemodynamic variables and pain control in the immediate postoperative period after heart surgery is compared. Seventy-two patients undergoing elective coronary and/or heart valve surgery, were included in a cohort study of 1-years duration (1998). After weaning from mechanical ventilation and extubation, haemodynamic variables and a 4-point verbal rating pain scale were asseseed at base-line and 60 min after the administration of a single doses of metamizol, ketorolac or propacetamol. The Student's t-test for paired samples was used to compare changes produced by the study medications. A significant, but small, decrease in radial artery blood pressure was observed in all treatment groups which had little clinical relevance; no vasodilator effects were observed and ventricular function showed only minor changes: propacetamol decreased cardiac index by 10% and a 15% decrease in right ventricular work was also observed. Metamizol and ketorolac produced a 10% decrease in the left ventricular work index. Pain scores showed a statistically significant decrease in all treatment groups. The analgesic effects of metamizol, ketorolac and propacetamol were not associated with a clinically significant impairment in haemodynamic function when administered to haemodynamically stable patients.

  1. The effect of dexmedetomidine added to preemptive (2% lignocaine with adrenaline) infiltration on intraoperative hemodynamics and postoperative pain after ambulatory maxillofacial surgeries under general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Debabrata; Das, Anjan; Chhaule, Subinay; Halder, Partha Sarathi; Paul, Joydip; RoyBasunia, Sandip; Chattopadhyay, Surajit; Mandal, Subrata Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lignocaine + adrenaline; a local anesthetic agent; frequently used for perilesional infiltration, maintains the stable hemodynamics and decreases the postoperative pain after maxillofacial surgery. α2 agonists have peripheral analgesic effects. This prospective study was to evaluate the effectiveness of perilesional dexmedetomidine administered preincisionally in addition to conventional lignocaine adrenaline combinations for reconstructive maxillofacial surgery in an ambulatory care setting. Materials and Methods: 76, American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II patients scheduled for unilateral traumatic maxillofacial surgeries were randomly allocated into group DL (n = 38) receiving 15 cc of 2% lignocaine + adrenaline (1:200,000) mixed with 1 μg/kg dexmedetomidine and group PL receiving 15 cc of 2% lignocaine + adrenaline with normal saline (placebo) via local wound infiltration 5 min prior to skin incision. Perioperative hemodynamics, time to first analgesic use, total analgesic need, bleeding, and side effects were recorded for each patient. Results: Dosage of supplemental propofol; total perioperative, postoperative, and postanesthesia care unit (PACU) fentanyl consumption was significantly lower (P = 0.0001, P= 0.0001, P= 0.0001, P= 0.004, respectively) in dexmedetomine treated group than placebo. Rescue analgesic requirement was significantly earlier in group PL than group DL. Group DL patients suffered from significantly less (P = 0.02) bleeding and surgeon's satisfaction score was also high in this group. Discharge from PACU was significantly earlier in group DL. Intraoperative hemodynamic parameters were significantly lower in group DL (P < 0.05) without any appreciable side effects. Conclusion: Thus, prior dexmedetomidine local infiltration at the site of maxillofacial trauma has significantly reduced bleeding from wound site; perioperative fentanyl, propofol consumption, and subsequently ensured earlier discharge from PACU, better surgeon

  2. Use of Fentanyl Iontophoretic Transdermal System (ITS) (IONSYS(®)) in the Management of Patients with Acute Postoperative Pain: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Poplawski, Steven; Johnson, Matthew; Philips, Philip; Eberhart, Leopold H J; Koch, Tilo; Itri, Loretta M

    2016-12-01

    Fentanyl iontophoretic transdermal system (ITS) [IONSYS(®), The Medicines Company, Parsippany, NJ, USA] is a needle-free, patient-controlled, postoperative opioid pain management treatment. It is indicated for the short-term management of acute postoperative pain in adults requiring opioid analgesia in the hospital. The safety and effectiveness of fentanyl ITS for acute postoperative pain management has been demonstrated in a range of surgery and patient types studied in seven phase 3 trials (three placebo-controlled trials and four active-comparator trials). The majority of the patients in the phase 3 trials had undergone either abdominal/pelvic, orthopedic, or thoracic surgery. Consistent with the prescribing information, physicians in clinical practice may treat patients with this system following any type of surgery including those that may not have been included in the phase 3 trials. The purpose of this case series is to illustrate how fentanyl ITS is being utilized for postoperative pain management in real-world clinical practice following a variety of surgeries and in current pain management protocols that may have evolved since the completion of the phase 3 program. There are seven cases from three clinical centers described within this case series, each using fentanyl ITS according to the prescribing information. The surgery types included are bariatric (N = 3), prostate (N = 2), colorectal (N = 1), and perirectal abscess drainage (N = 1). A systematic review of each patient chart was conducted via a standardized retrospective assessment by the clinicians who managed each patient. Additionally, each healthcare professional was interviewed regarding their overall experience and key learnings using fentanyl ITS. Overall, fentanyl ITS was effective and well tolerated in these case reports in current-day clinical practice settings. These case studies are informative about fentanyl ITS use shortly after product approval and set the stage for

  3. Dry Needling Alters Trigger Points in the Upper Trapezius Muscle and Reduces Pain in Subjects with Chronic Myofascial Pain

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Lynn H.; Shah, Jay; Rosenberger, William; Armstrong, Kathryn; Turo, Diego; Otto, Paul; Heimur, Juliana; Thaker, Nikki; Sikdar, Siddhartha

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether dry needling of an active myofascial trigger point (MTrP) reduces pain and alters the status of the trigger point to either a non-spontaneously tender nodule or its resolution. Design A prospective, non-randomized, controlled interventional clinical study Setting University campus Participants Fifty-six subjects with neck or shoulder girdle pain > 3 months duration and active MTrPs were recruited from a campus-wide, volunteer sample. Fifty-two completed the study (23 male/33 female) with mean age of 35.8 years. Interventions Three weekly dry needling treatments of a single active MTrP Main Outcome Measures Primary Outcomes: Baseline and post treatment evaluations of pain using the verbal analogue scale, the Brief Pain Inventory and the status of the MTrP as determined by digital palpation. Trigger points were rated: active (spontaneously painful), latent (requiring palpation to reproduce the characteristic pain) and resolved (no palpable nodule). Secondary Outcomes: Profile of Mood States, Oswestry Disability Index, Short Form 36, Cervical Range of Motion. Results Primary outcomes: 41 subjects had a change in trigger point status from active to latent or resolved; and 11 had no change (p < .001). Reduction in all pain scores was significant (p<.001). Secondary outcomes: significant improvement in post-treatment cervical rotational asymmetry in subjects with unilateral/bilateral MTrPs (p=.001, p=21, respectively); in pain pressure threshold in subjects with unilateral/bilateral MTrPs, (p=.006, p=.012), respectively; improvement in the SF-36 mental health and physical functioning subscales (p=.019, p=.03) respectively; decrease in the Oswestry disability scale (p=.003). Conclusions Dry needling reduces pain and changes MTrP status. Change in trigger point status is associated with a statistically and clinically significant reduction in pain. Reduction in pain is associated with improved mood, function and level of disability. PMID

  4. Stability of morphine sulfate in polypropylene infusion bags for use in patient-controlled analgesia pumps for postoperative pain management.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Xuan, Tho; Griffiths, William; Kern, Christian; Gessel, Elisabeth Van; Bonnabry, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a stable intravenous solution of 1-mg/mL morphine sulfate in polypropylene bags for use in patient-controlled analgesia pumps for postoperative pain management. Three large-scale batches of 1-mg/mL morphine sulfate solution filled into polypropylene bags and terminally sterilized at 120 deg C for 20 minutes were used in this study. The stability of the drug was monitored at 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 months after preparation in a long-term study (25 deg C) and after 3 and 6 months in accelerated studies (30 and 40 deg C) using a stability-indicating high-performance liquid chromatography assay. The levels of degradation products (morphine-N-oxide and pseudomorphine) were determined. Measures of physical stability included pH values, presence of subvisible particles, and weight loss. Microbiological stability was tested by performing sterility test. There was practically no loss of morphine, and impurity contents were very low. Subvisible particles were below pharmacopeial specifications. No significant change in pH was observed and water losses were minimal. The sterility of the bags was demonstrated throughout the study. In conclusion, terminally sterilized 1-mg/mL morphine sulfate solution packed in polypropylene bags is stable for at least 3 years when stored at 25 deg C.

  5. Cement technique for reducing post-operative bursitis after trochanteric fixation.

    PubMed

    Derman, Peter B; Horneff, John G; Kamath, Atul F; Garino, Jonathan

    2013-02-01

    Post-operative trochanteric bursitis is a known complication secondary to the surgical approach in total hip arthroplasty. This phenomenon may be partially attributable to repetitive microtrauma generated when soft tissues rub against implanted hardware. Significant rates of post-operative trochanteric bursitis have been observed following procedures in which a trochanteric fixation device, such as a bolt-washer mechanism or a cable-grip/claw system, is used to secure the trochanteric fragment after trochanteric osteotomy. We present a simple technique for use with a bolt-washer system or grip plate in which trochanteric components are covered in bone wax followed by a layer of cement to decrease friction and to diminish the risk of post-operative bursitis.

  6. Preoperative Preparation for Cardiac Surgery Facilitates Recovery, Reduces Psychological Distress, and Reduces the Incidence of Acute Postoperative Hypertension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Erling A.

    1987-01-01

    Cardiac surgery patients were assigned to information-only, information-plus-coping, or control preoperative preparation groups. Preoperatively, both experimental groups were significantly less anxious than were controls. Both experimental groups increased patients' belief in control over recovery. Postoperatively, experimental patients were less…

  7. The Efficacy and Clinical Safety of Various Analgesic Combinations for Post-Operative Pain after Third Molar Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Au, Alvin Ho Yeung; Choi, Siu Wai; Cheung, Chi Wai; Leung, Yiu Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To run a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials aiming to answer the clinical question “which analgesic combination and dosage is potentially the most effective and safe for acute post-operative pain control after third molar surgery?”. Materials and Methods A systematic search of computer databases and journals was performed. The search and the evaluations of articles were performed by 2 independent reviewers in 3 rounds. Randomized clinical trials related to analgesic combinations for acute post-operative pain control after lower third molar surgery that matched the selection criteria were evaluated to enter in the final review. Results Fourteen studies with 3521 subjects, with 10 groups (17 dosages) of analgesic combinations were included in the final review. The analgesic efficacy were presented by the objective pain measurements including sum of pain intensity at 6 hours (SPID6) and total pain relief at 6 hours (TOTPAR6). The SPID6 scores and TOTPAR6 scores of the reported analgesic combinations were ranged from 1.46 to 6.44 and 3.24 – 10.3, respectively. Ibuprofen 400mg with oxycodone HCL 5mg had superior efficacy (SPID6: 6.44, TOTPAR6: 9.31). Nausea was the most common adverse effect, with prevalence ranging from 0-55%. Ibuprofen 200mg with caffeine 100mg or 200mg had a reasonable analgesic effect with fewer side effects. Conclusion This systematic review and meta-analysis may help clinicians in their choices of prescribing an analgesic combination for acute post-operative pain control after lower third molar surgery. It was found in this systematic review Ibuprofen 400mg combined with oxycodone HCL 5mg has superior analgesic efficacy when compared to the other analgesic combinations included in this study. PMID:26053953

  8. Yoga and other meditative movement therapies to reduce chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Achilefu, Allison; Joshi, Kunal; Meier, Megan; McCarthy, Laine H.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical Question In adults with chronic pain, do yoga and other meditative movement therapies to improvement in chronic pain symptoms? Answer Yes. However, in each of the studies reviewed, yoga classes were included as part of the pain management regime, sometimes alone and sometimes in tandem with DVDs or audiotapes. We feel that no exercise therapy program should be undertaken without professional coaching from certified, registered and qualified instructors. Date Answer was Determined August 2014, June, 2015, August 2015. Level of Evidence for the Answer A Search Terms chronic pain, yoga, exercise therapy, meditative movement therapy Inclusion criteria Adults; meta-analyses; systematic reviews; cohort studies; randomized controlled trials; practice guidelines; articles from 2010 to present. Exclusion criteria Children younger than 18 years of age, Pilates. PMID:28190896

  9. Music reduces sensation and distress of labor pain.

    PubMed

    Phumdoung, Sasitorn; Good, Marion

    2003-06-01

    Labor pain is often severe, and analgesic medication may not be indicated. In this randomized controlled trial we examined the effects of music on sensation and distress of pain in Thai primiparous women during the active phase of labor. The gate control theory of pain was the theoretical framework for this study. Randomization with a computerized minimization program was used to assign women to a music group (n = 55) or a control group (n = 55). Women in the intervention group listened to soft music without lyrics for 3 hours starting early in the active phase of labor. Dual visual analog scales were used to measure sensation and distress of pain before starting the study and at three hourly posttests. While controlling for pretest scores, one-way repeated measures analysis of covariance indicated that those in the music group had significantly less sensation and distress of pain than did the control group (F (1, 107) = 18.69, p <.001, effect size =.15, and F (1, 107) = 14.87, p <.001, effect size =.12), respectively. Sensation and distress significantly increased across the 3 hours in both groups (p <.001), except for distress in the music group during the first hour. Distress was significantly lower than sensation in both groups (p <.05). In this controlled study, music--a mild to moderate strength intervention--consistently provided significant relief of severe pain across 3 hours of labor and delayed the increase of affective pain for 1 hour. Nurses can provide soft music to laboring women for greater pain relief during the active phase when contractions are strong and women suffer.

  10. Caloric Vestibular Stimulation Reduces Pain and Somatoparaphrenia in a Severe Chronic Central Post-Stroke Pain Patient: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Central post-stroke pain is a neuropathic syndrome characterized by intolerable contralesional pain and, in rare cases, somatic delusions. To date, there is limited evidence for the effective treatments of this disease. Here we used caloric vestibular stimulation to reduce pain and somatoparaphrenia in a 57-year-old woman suffering from central post-stroke pain. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess the neurological effects of this treatment. Following vestibular stimulation we observed impressive improvements in motor skills, pain, and somatic delusions. In the functional connectivity study before the vestibular stimulation, we observed differences in the patient’s left thalamus functional connectivity, with respect to the thalamus connectivity of a control group (N = 20), in the bilateral cingulate cortex and left insula. After the caloric stimulation, the left thalamus functional connectivity with these regions, which are known to be involved in the cortical response to pain, disappeared as in the control group. The beneficial use of vestibular stimulation in the reduction of pain and somatic delusion in a CPSP patient is now documented by behavioral and imaging data. This evidence can be applied to theoretical models of pain and body delusions. PMID:27028404

  11. Caloric Vestibular Stimulation Reduces Pain and Somatoparaphrenia in a Severe Chronic Central Post-Stroke Pain Patient: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Spitoni, Grazia Fernanda; Pireddu, Giorgio; Galati, Gaspare; Sulpizio, Valentina; Paolucci, Stefano; Pizzamiglio, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Central post-stroke pain is a neuropathic syndrome characterized by intolerable contralesional pain and, in rare cases, somatic delusions. To date, there is limited evidence for the effective treatments of this disease. Here we used caloric vestibular stimulation to reduce pain and somatoparaphrenia in a 57-year-old woman suffering from central post-stroke pain. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess the neurological effects of this treatment. Following vestibular stimulation we observed impressive improvements in motor skills, pain, and somatic delusions. In the functional connectivity study before the vestibular stimulation, we observed differences in the patient's left thalamus functional connectivity, with respect to the thalamus connectivity of a control group (N = 20), in the bilateral cingulate cortex and left insula. After the caloric stimulation, the left thalamus functional connectivity with these regions, which are known to be involved in the cortical response to pain, disappeared as in the control group. The beneficial use of vestibular stimulation in the reduction of pain and somatic delusion in a CPSP patient is now documented by behavioral and imaging data. This evidence can be applied to theoretical models of pain and body delusions.

  12. Postoperative Analgesia Due to Sustained-Release Buprenorphine, Sustained-Release Meloxicam, and Carprofen Gel in a Model of Incisional Pain in Rats (Rattus norvegicus)

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Travis L; Adams, Sean C; Felt, Stephen A; Jampachaisri, Katechan; Yeomans, David C; Pacharinsak, Cholawat

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative analgesia in laboratory rats is complicated by the frequent handling associated with common analgesic dosing requirements. Here, we evaluated sustained-release buprenorphine (Bup-SR), sustained-release meloxicam (Melox-SR), and carprofen gel (CG) as refinements for postoperative analgesia. The aim of this study was to investigate whether postoperative administration of Bup-SR, Melox-SR, or CG effectively controls behavioral mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in a rat model of incisional pain. Rats were randomly assigned to 1 of 5 treatment groups: saline, 1 mL/kg SC BID; buprenorphine HCl (Bup HCl), 0.05 mg/kg SC BID; Bup-SR, 1.2 mg/kg SC once; Melox-SR, 4 mg/kg SC once; and CG, 2 oz PO daily. Mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity were tested daily from day–1 through 4. Bup HCl and Bup-SR attenuated mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity on days 1 through 4. Melox-SR and CG attenuated mechanical hypersensitivity–but not thermal hypersensitivity–on days 1 through 4. Plasma concentrations, measured by using UPLC with mass spectrometry, were consistent between both buprenorphine formulations. Gross pathologic examination revealed no signs of toxicity in any group. These findings suggest that postoperative administration of Bup HCl and Bup-SR—but not Melox-SR or CG—effectively attenuates mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in a rat model of incisional pain. PMID:27177563

  13. An observer-blind randomised parallel group study comparing the efficacy and tolerability of tenoxicam and piroxicam in the treatment of post-operative pain after oral surgery.

    PubMed

    Roelofse, J A; Swart, L C; Stander, I A

    1996-11-01

    Tenoxicam and piroxicam were compared for analgesic efficacy in 58 patients undergoing removal of bilateral impacted third molar teeth, under general anaesthesia. Pain intensity was assessed over a 7 day period by the patient using verbal and visual analogue scales. The patients received one hour pre-operatively dormicum 7.5 mg orally and either tenoxicam 40 mg or piroxicam 40 mg rectally. This was followed by tenoxicam 20 mg daily in effervescent form, or piroxicam 20 mg daily in despersible tablet form for 7 days. Surgical and anaesthetic techniques were standardized for all patients. Therapeutic gain was assessed by comparing hourly pain levels 4 hours post-operatively and then twice daily for 7 days. Trismus was evaluated pre-operatively, at one hour, 24 hours and 7 days post-operatively. Analysis of the results showed a statistical significant difference between the treatment groups only 4 hours post-operatively, patients in the tenoxicam group experiencing less pain than those in the piroxicam group (p = < 0.05).

  14. SOULAGE-TAVIE: development and validation of a virtual nursing intervention to promote self-management of postoperative pain after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Martorella, Géraldine; Côté, José; Choinière, Manon

    2013-04-01

    This article is the report of the development and validation of a tailored Web-based intervention for postoperative pain self-management in adults who underwent cardiac surgery. The development of SOULAGE-TAVIE included four main phases: (1) identification of a clinical problem, (2) outline design, (3) clinical operationalization, and (4) production. The validation of the intervention's feasibility and acceptability was made through pilot testing with 30 patients expecting cardiac surgery over 4 months in 2010. SOULAGE-TAVIE consists of a 30-minute computer-tailored preoperative educational session about postoperative pain management. Activities and information were tailored according to a predetermined profile. Two short reinforcements were provided in person postoperatively. Ninety-six percent of participants agreed that the strategies proposed responded to their needs. An iterative process among various sources of knowledge gave place to an innovative approach to preoperative education. Pilot testing provided preliminary support for the acceptability and feasibility of a tailored Web-based intervention. Patient empowerment is complementary yet crucial in the current context of care and may contribute to improved pain relief. The use of information technologies can increase personalization and accessibility to health education in a complex environment of care.

  15. From painkiller to empathy killer: acetaminophen (paracetamol) reduces empathy for pain.

    PubMed

    Mischkowski, Dominik; Crocker, Jennifer; Way, Baldwin M

    2016-09-01

    Simulation theories of empathy hypothesize that empathizing with others' pain shares some common psychological computations with the processing of one's own pain. Support for this perspective has largely relied on functional neuroimaging evidence of an overlap between activations during the experience of physical pain and empathy for other people's pain. Here, we extend the functional overlap perspective to the neurochemical level and test whether a common physical painkiller, acetaminophen (paracetamol), can reduce empathy for another's pain. In two double-blind placebo-controlled experiments, participants rated perceived pain, personal distress and empathic concern in response to reading scenarios about another's physical or social pain, witnessing ostracism in the lab, or visualizing another study participant receiving painful noise blasts. As hypothesized, acetaminophen reduced empathy in response to others' pain. Acetaminophen also reduced the unpleasantness of noise blasts delivered to the participant, which mediated acetaminophen's effects on empathy. Together, these findings suggest that the physical painkiller acetaminophen reduces empathy for pain and provide a new perspective on the neurochemical bases of empathy. Because empathy regulates prosocial and antisocial behavior, these drug-induced reductions in empathy raise concerns about the broader social side effects of acetaminophen, which is taken by almost a quarter of adults in the United States each week.

  16. Do the pharmacodynamics of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs suggest a role in the management of postoperative pain?

    PubMed

    Mather, L E

    1992-01-01

    Until recently, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were regarded as weak analgesic agents with a potent antiplatelet effect that severely limited their perioperative usefulness. However, the recent development of injectable NSAIDs has stimulated a re-evaluation of the potential role of this class of drugs in postoperative pain management. In general surgery, NSAIDs have been shown to be effective analgesics when administered after surgery, as judged by either a reduction in pain scores and/or by an opioid sparing effect. Parenteral NSAIDs alone, notably ketorolac and diclofenac, may be adequate or even preferred analgesic agents after minor surgery. In dental surgery, NSAIDs produce greater initial analgesia than steroids, although the latter produce greater suppression of swelling and less functional loss. NSAID pretreatment results in only modest suppression of swelling compared with placebo. These data suggest that the acute analgesic effects of NSAIDs in oral surgery and probably other models result from suppression of a nociceptive process, rather than a generalised anti-inflammatory effect. This view challenges the traditional association between inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis and the therapeutic effects of these drugs. The variety of NSAIDs leads to a range in half-lives from short, e.g. diclofenac (1 h), intermediate, e.g. ketorolac (5h), to long, e.g. tenoxicam (60h), which has implications for both convenience of the dosage regimen and drug accumulation. For some racemic NSAIDs (e.g. ibuprofen), metabolic 'activation' of the inactive R-enantiomer to the active S-enantiomer occurs. Renal dysfunction may increase both the plasma concentration and body residence time of NSAIDs, thereby increasing the risk of adverse effects. The concomitant effects of anaesthesia have not yet been studied. The principal concern regarding the use of perioperative NSAIDs is the risk of decreased haemostasis and wound healing. Although it has been found that

  17. Randomised, double-blind, parallel group, placebo-controlled study to evaluate the analgesic efficacy and safety of VVZ-149 injections for postoperative pain following laparoscopic colorectal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nedeljkovic, Srdjan S; Correll, Darin J; Bao, Xiaodong; Zamor, Natacha; Zeballos, Jose L; Zhang, Yi; Young, Mark J; Ledley, Johanna; Sorace, Jessica; Eng, Kristen; Hamsher, Carlyle P; Maniam, Rajivan; Chin, Jonathan W; Tsui, Becky; Cho, Sunyoung; Lee, Doo H

    2017-01-01

    Introduction In spite of advances in understanding and technology, postoperative pain remains poorly treated for a significant number of patients. In colorectal surgery, the need for developing novel analgesics is especially important. Patients after bowel surgery are assessed for rapid return of bowel function and opioids worsen ileus, nausea and constipation. We describe a prospective, double-blind, parallel group, placebo-controlled randomised controlled trial testing the hypothesis that a novel analgesic drug, VVZ -149, is safe and effective in improving pain compared with providing opioid analgesia alone among adults undergoing laparoscopic colorectal surgery. Methods and analysis Based on sample size calculations for primary outcome, we plan to enrol 120 participants. Adult patients without significant medical comorbidities or ongoing opioid use and who are undergoing laparoscopic colorectal surgery will be enrolled. Participants are randomly assigned to receive either VVZ-149 with intravenous (IV) hydromorphone patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) or the control intervention (IV PCA alone) in the postoperative period. The primary outcome is the Sum of Pain Intensity Difference over 8 hours (SPID-8 postdose). Participants receive VVZ-149 for 8 hours postoperatively to the primary study end point, after which they continue to be assessed for up to 24 hours. We measure opioid consumption, record pain intensity and pain relief, and evaluate the number of rescue doses and requests for opioid. To assess safety, we record sedation, nausea and vomiting, respiratory depression, laboratory tests and ECG readings after study drug administration. We evaluate for possible confounders of analgesic response, such as anxiety, depression and catastrophising behaviours. The study will also collect blood sample data and evaluate for pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic relationships. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval of the study protocol has been obtained from

  18. A prospective randomised comparison of the LMA ProSeal™ versus endotracheal tube on the severity of postoperative pain following gynaecological laparoscopy.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, J D; Nguyen, M; Lau, H; Grant, S; Williams, D I

    2013-01-01

    Pain and postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) are common problems after gynaecologic laparoscopy. Two recent studies have shown that morphine requirements and PONV are lower when an LMA ProSeal™ is used, rather than an endotracheal tube (ETT), for female patients undergoing breast and gynaecological surgery. We conducted a patient and observer-blinded randomised controlled trial, recruiting non-obese women without gastro-oesophageal reflux undergoing laparoscopic gynaecological surgery. Patients received a standardised relaxant general anaesthetic and then were randomised to receive either an LMA ProSeal or an endotracheal tube. Patients were assessed at two and 24 hours post-anaesthesia. The primary outcome was postoperative pain score and secondary endpoints included morphine consumption, postoperative emesis and adverse upper airway symptoms. We recruited 116 patients to the study, 57 patients in the ETT group and 59 patients in the LMA ProSeal group. The patients were similar in demographic and surgical characteristics. At two hours, the ETT group was similar to the LMA ProSeal group in regards to pain scores (Visual Analogue Scale 3.0 vs 3.5, P=0.86), morphine consumption (7.2 vs 7.4 mg, P=0.56) and PONV (47.4 vs 47.5%, P=0.99). After 24 hours, pain scores and PONV rates were also similar. No significant difference in rates of sore throat or dysphagia was observed between the ETT and LMA ProSeal groups. No significant complications were attributable to either airway device. The LMA ProSeal did not decrease pain or PONV in patients undergoing gynaecological laparoscopy when compared to endotracheal intubation.

  19. Reduced expression of pain mediators and pain sensitivity in amyloid precursor protein over-expressing CRND8 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Shukla, M; Quirion, R; Ma, W

    2013-10-10

    β-Amyloid (Aβ) peptides are derived from the sequential cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). They are enriched in plaques present in Alzheimer's brains and thus play important roles in the pathogenesis of this disease. APP is also known to be expressed in the neurons of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and contributes to neuronal survival and axonal growth during development. However, whether APP and Aβ peptides are involved in nociception and pathological pain states is mostly unknown. In the present study, we have used behavioral, biochemical and morphological approaches to address this issue in both adult rats and APP over-expressing CRND8 transgenic mice. We observed that the Aβ peptide (17-24) was predominantly expressed in small-sized DRG neurons of rats. Following intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of complete Freud's adjuvant (CFA), the levels of APP and Aβ peptides were significantly reduced in the ipsilateral lumbar 4-6 rat DRG. In 3-, 12- and 24-month-old CRND8 mice, pain sensitivity in response to heat and mechanical stimulation was significantly dampened compared to their age-matched wild-type littermates. In parallel with reduced pain sensitivity, the expression of pain mediators such as substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide and transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 was significantly reduced in L4-6 DRG of CRND8 mice. Although i.pl. injection of CFA induced a rather similar pattern of inflammatory pain in 3-month-old CRND8 mice and their wild-type littermates, recovery from inflammatory pain seemed faster in 12-month-old CRND8 mice than wild-type mice. These findings suggest that APP and Aβ peptides suppress both nociception and inflammatory pain and are likely involved in blunt pain perception of Alzheimer's patients in clinical settings.

  20. Immediate Postoperative Intraocular Pressure Adjustment Reduces Risk of Cystoid Macular Edema after Uncomplicated Micro Incision Coaxial Phacoemulsification Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jarstad, Allison R.; Chung, Gary W.; Tester, Robert A.; Day, Linda E.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To determine the accuracy of visual estimation of immediate postoperative intraocular pressure (IOP) following microincision cataract surgery (MICS) and the effect of immediate postoperative IOP adjustment on prevention of cystoid macular edema (CME). Setting Ambulatory surgical center. Methods Prospective, randomized analysis of 170 eyes in 135 patients with MICS, performed in a Medicare approved outpatient ambulatory surgery center. Surgical parameters included a keratome incision of 1.5 mm to 2.8 mm, topical anesthetic, case completion IOP estimation by palpation and patient visualization of light, and IOP adjustment before exiting the operating theater. IOPs were classified into three groups: low (<16 mmHg), normal (16 to 21 mmHg), and elevated (>21 to 30 mmHg). IOP measurements were repeated 1 day after surgery. Optical coherence tomography (Stratus OCT, Zeiss) was measured at 2 weeks. An increase in foveal thickness greater than 15 µm was used to indicate CME. Statistical analysis was performed using one- and two-tailed Student's t-tests. Results Mean minimal foveal thickness averaged 207.15 µm in the low pressure group, 205.14 µm in the normal IOP group, and 210.48 µm in the elevated IOP group 2 weeks following surgery. CME occurred in 14 of 170 eyes (8.2%) at 2 weeks (low IOP, 35.7%; normal IOP, 14.2%; elevated IOP, 50.0%). Change in IOP from the operating theater to 1 day after surgery was within +/−5 mmHg in 54 eyes (31.7%), elevated by 6 to 15 mmHg in 22 eyes (12.9%), and elevated more than 15 mmHg in four eyes (2.3%). IOP was reduced by 6 mmHg to 15 mmHg in 39 eyes (22.9%) and reduced by more than 15 mmHg in nine eyes (5.3%). Conclusions Immediate postoperative adjustment of IOP may prevent CME in MICS. Physicians can improve their ability to estimate postoperative IOP with experience in tonometry to verify immediate postoperative IOP. There are patient safety and economic benefits to immediate IOP adjustment in the operating theater

  1. Administration of Tranexamic Acid Reduces Postoperative Blood Loss in Calcaneal Fractures: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bing; Tian, Jing; Zhou, Da-peng

    2015-01-01

    The present randomized controlled trial was undertaken to evaluate the effect of tranexamic acid (TXA) on reducing postoperative blood loss in calcaneal fractures. A total of 90 patients with a unilateral closed calcaneal fracture were randomized to the TXA (n = 45) and control (n = 45) groups. The corresponding groups received 15 mg/kg body weight of TXA or placebo (0.9% sodium chloride solution) intravenously before the skin incision was made. Open reduction and internal fixation was performed for all patients and selective bone grafting was performed. The patients were examined 3 months after surgery. The intraoperative and postoperative blood loss, blood test results, and wound complications were compared between the 2 groups. The complications of TXA were also investigated. No statistically significant differences were found in the baseline characteristics between the TXA and control groups. Also, no significant difference was noted in the intraoperative blood loss between the 2 groups. However, in the TXA group, the postoperative blood loss during the first 24 hours was significantly lower than that in the control group (110.0 ± 160.0 mL versus 320.0 ± 360.0 mL; p < .001). The incidence of wound complications was also reduced compared with that in the control group (7.3% versus 23.8%; p = .036). No significant difference was found in the incidence of thromboembolic events or adverse drug reactions between the 2 groups. We concluded that preoperative single-dose TXA can effectively reduce postoperative blood loss and wound complications in patients with calcaneal fractures and that no significant side effects developed compared with the control group.

  2. Management of post-operative pain by placement of an intraoperative intercostal catheter after single port video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery: a propensity-score matched study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ching-Feng; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Liu, Hung-Pin; Gonzalez-Rivas, Diego; Liu, Yun-Hen; Wu, Yi-Cheng; Chao, Yin-Kai

    2016-01-01

    Background The establishment of a golden standard for post-operative analgesia after thoracic surgery remains an unresolved issue. Benefiting from the rapid development of single port video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS), a good candidate for the alleviation of patients’ pain is the placement of an intercostal catheter (ICC) safely after uniport VATS. We hypothesized that continual infusion through ICC could provide effective analgesia for patients with only one wound and we evaluate its postoperative analgesic function in uniport VATS patients with or without intercostal nerve blockade. Methods Since March 2014, 235 patients received various kinds of single port VATS. We identified 50 patients who received single port VATS with intercostal nerve blockade and retrospectively compared them with a group of patients who had received single port VATS without intercostal nerve blockade. The operative time, post operation day 0, 1, 2, 3 and discharge day pain score, narcotic requirements, drainage duration and post-operative hospital stay were collected. In order to establish a well-balanced cohort study, we also used propensity scores matching (1:1) to compare the short term clinical outcome in two groups. Results No operative deaths occurred in this study. The uniport VATS with intercostal nerve blockade group was associated with less post operation day 0 and day 1 pain score, and narcotic requirements in our cohort study (P<0.001, <0.001, and 0.003). After propensity scores matching, there were 50 patients in each group. Mean day 0 and day 1, day 2, day 3 pain score, drainage duration, post-operative hospital stay, and narcotic requirements were smaller in uniport VATS with intercostal nerve blockade (P<0.001, <0.001, 0.038, 0.007, 0.02, 0.042, and 0.003). Conclusions In conclusion, in patients post single port VATS, continual intercostal nerve block with levobupivacaine infusion appears to be a safe, effective and promising technique in our study, associated

  3. Multicentric evaluation by Verbal Rate Scale and EuroQoL-5D of early and late post-operative pain after TAPP and TEP procedures with mechanical fixation for bilateral inguinal hernias.

    PubMed

    Zanghì, Antonio; Di Vita, Maria; Lo Menzo, Emanuele; Castorina, Sergio; Cavallaro, Andrea Sebastiano; Piccolo, Gaetano; Grosso, Giuseppe; Cappellani, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    Aimed to evaluate the postoperative pain and other complications among two cohorts of patients undergone transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) and totally extraperitoneal (TEP) laparoscopic hernia repairs with mechanical fixation, the chart of 305 TAPP and 134 TEP for bilateral not recurrent inguinal hernias were reviewed. The postoperative pain was assessed by using the Verbal Rating Scale (VRS) at one week, one month, 3 months ad six months postoperatively. A subgroup of 60 patients was also administered the QoL EQ-5D questionnaire and follow up for at least 6 months. We found a statistically significant difference in the first day (p = 0.001), in the 7th day (p = 0.002), 30th, and 90th day (p = 0.008) between patients perception of pain in TAPP group and TEP group, but after the 180th day there was not any considerable distinction. On the short term the postoperative pain seems slightly lesser in TEP group.

  4. Efficacy of a Topical Gelatin-Thrombin Matrix Sealant in Reducing Postoperative Drainage Following Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Li, Quan You; Lee, Osung; Han, Ho Sung; Kim, Gang-Un; Lee, Chee Kean; Kang, Sung Shik; Lee, Myung Ho; Cho, Hyeon Guk; Kim, Ho-Joong

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective fusion level(s)-, age-, and gender-matched analysis. Purpose To determine whether the application of a topical gelatin-thrombin matrix sealant (Floseal) at the end of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) can reduce the amount of postoperative hemorrhage. Overview of Literature The effect of the matrix sealant in decreasing postoperative hemorrhage following ACDF has not been reported. Methods Matrix sealant was (n=116, study group) or was not applied (n=58, control group) at the end of ACDF. Patients were selected by 1:2 matching criteria of fusion level(s), age, and gender. Seven parameters described below were compared between the two groups. Results The total drain amount for the first 24 hours (8±9 versus 27±22 mL), total drain amount until the 8-hour drainage decreased to ≤10 mL (8±10 versus 33±26 mL), and the total drain amount until 6 AM on the first postoperative day (7±8 versus 24±20 mL) were significantly lower in the study group than the control group (all p<0.001). The time for the 8-hour drainage to decrease to ≤10 mL was significantly lower in the study group (10±5 versus 26±14 hours, p<0.001). The 8-hour drainage decreased to ≤10 mL on the operation day in most patients (88%) in the study group versus mostly on the first (48%) or second (33%) postoperative day in the control group (p<0.001). The total drain amount until 6 AM on the first postoperative day was 0 mL in 43% of patients in the study group and in 7% in the control group (p<0.001). No patient in either group required hematoma evacuation. Conclusions Application of the topical matrix sealant at the end of ACDF can significantly reduce the amount of postoperative hemorrhage. PMID:26713124

  5. Increase in volume of dental local anaesthetic solution while maintaining the tissue lidocaine and adrenaline concentration does not increase acute postoperative pain after gingivectomy.

    PubMed

    Hanvold, K I; Vigen, E C; Jorkjend, L; Aass, A M; Skoglund, L A

    2008-04-01

    A randomised, single-blind, within-patient, crossover study was done in 45 patients (29 women and 16 men, mean age 49 years, range 37-71) who had bilateral "identical" gingivectomies. On one occasion a standard volume of local anaesthetic containing 2% lidocaine and 1/80,000 adrenaline was infiltrated into the mucosal tissue before operation. On the other, double the standard volume with 1% lidocaine and 1/160,000 adrenaline was infiltrated. The intensity of postoperative pain was recorded by the patients on a 100 mm visual analogue scale every hour for an 11-hour observation period. The time courses and the sum of pain intensity after injection of the double and standard volumes did not differ significantly. Doubling the volume of local anaesthetic while maintaining the total lidocaine and adrenaline concentration that was infiltrated does not influence the intensity of acute pain after gingivectomy.

  6. A Randomized Double Blinded Comparison of Epidural Infusion of Bupivacaine, Ropivacaine, Bupivacaine-Fentanyl, Ropivacaine-Fentanyl for Postoperative Pain Relief in Lower Limb Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Sawhney, Krishan Yogesh; Grewal, Anju; Katyal, Sunil; Singh, Gurdeep; Kaur, Ananjit

    2015-01-01

    Background Continuous epidural infusion of Bupivacaine and Ropivacaine with or without the addition of Fentanyl has been evaluated by various researchers for effective postoperative pain relief. Studies however, depict significant variability in their results with regard to analgesic efficacy and adverse effects like hypotension, motor blockade etc. Aim To comparatively evaluate postoperative analgesic efficacy, motor sparing effect, postoperative haemodynamic variations and total postoperative analgesic consumption in first 24 hours. Materials and Methods A randomised double blind study was conducted on 100 adult, ASA grade I and II patients, of either sex who had undergone elective lower limb surgery under spinal anaesthesia. According to the group allocated, patients were started on epidural infusion after completion of surgery. Group I (0.2% Ropivacaine), Group II (0.1% Ropivacaine + 2μg/ml Fentanyl), Group III (0.2% Bupivacaine), Group IV (0.1% Bupivacaine + 2μg/ml Fentanyl) at the rate of 6 ml/hour. VAS scores, epidural consumption, supplemental epidural boluses, rescue analgesics, haemodynamics, motor block, sensory block regression, sedation, nausea and pruritis were recorded by a blinded observer for 24 hours. Results The haemodynamic parameters were stable in all the groups. Side effects including the motor block were negligible and comparable in all groups. Group I patients had significantly lower VAS scores, mean total epidural consumption, supplemental epidural bolus requirement and rescue analgesic requirement among all groups. Conclusion It can be concluded that epidural analgesia using Ropivacaine 0.2% infusion is more effective than other study groups when used for postoperative pain relief in lower limb surgeries. PMID:26500984

  7. Colchicine to Reduce Atrial Fibrillation in the Postoperative Period of Myocardial Revascularization

    PubMed Central

    Zarpelon, Camila Stuchi; Netto, Miguel Chomiski; Jorge, José Carlos Moura; Fabris, Cátia Carolina; Desengrini, Dieli; Jardim, Mariana da Silva; da Silva, Diego Guedes

    2016-01-01

    Background The high prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF) in the postoperative period of myocardial revascularization surgery increases morbidity and mortality. Objective To assess the efficacy of colchicine to prevent AF in the postoperative period of myocardial revascularization surgery, the impact of AF on hospital length of stay and death, and to identify its risk factors. Methods Between May 2012 and November 2013, 140 patients submitted to myocardial revascularization surgery were randomized, 69 to the control group and 71 to the colchicine group. Colchicine was used at the dose of 1 mg orally, twice daily, preoperatively, and of 0.5 mg, twice daily, until hospital discharge. A single dose of 1 mg was administered to those admitted 12 hours or less before surgery. Results The primary endpoint was AF rate in the postoperative period of myocardial revascularization surgery. Colchicine group patients showed no reduction in AF incidence as compared to control group patients (7.04% versus 13.04%, respectively; p = 0.271). There was no statistically significant difference between the groups regarding death from any cause rate (5.6% versus 10.1%; p = 0,363) and hospital length of stay (14.5 ± 11.5 versus 13.3 ± 9.4 days; p = 0.490). However, colchicine group patients had a higher infection rate (26.8% versus 8.7%; p = 0.007). Conclusion The use of colchicine to prevent AF after myocardial revascularization surgery was not effective in the present study. Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials number RBR-556dhr. PMID:27223641

  8. Postoperative pain management of liver transplantation in cystic fibrosis: Is it time to start US-guided neuraxial blocks?

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, M; Martucci, G; Arcadipane, A

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common life-limiting genetic disease in Caucasians. Declining lung function is the principal cause of death, but liver involvement can lead to the need for liver transplantation. General anesthesia has detrimental effects on pulmonary function, increasing perioperative morbidity and mortality in CF patients. Regional anesthetic techniques improve outcomes by reducing anesthetic drugs and administration of opioids, and hastening extubation, awakening, and restarting respiratory of physiotherapy. There is a growing evidence that thoracic epidural anesthesia is feasible in pediatric patients. Concerns about coagulopathy and immunosuppression have limited its use in liver transplantation. Ultrasonography is becoming an adjunct tool in neuraxial blocks, allowing faster and easier recognition of the epidural space, and reducing vertebral touch and number of attempts. In pediatric patients, it is still debated whether anesthesia has detrimental effects on cognitive development. Efforts to make regional techniques easier and safer by ultrasonography are ongoing. We report the first case of continuous thoracic epidural analgesia after pediatric liver transplantation in a 10-year-old boy affected with CF with macronodular cirrhosis. Despite a challenging coagulation profile, the echo-assisted procedure was safely performed and allowed extubation in the odds ratio, postoperative awakening and comfort, and quick resumption of respiratory physiotherapy. PMID:27833495

  9. Evaluation of the preliminary effectiveness of hand massage therapy on postoperative pain of adults in the intensive care unit after cardiac surgery: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Boitor, Mădălina; Martorella, Géraldine; Arbour, Caroline; Michaud, Cécile; Gélinas, Céline

    2015-06-01

    Although many intensive care unit patients experience significant pain, very few studies explored massage to maximize their pain relief. This study aimed to evaluate the preliminary effects of hand massage on pain after cardiac surgery in the adult intensive care unit. A pilot randomized controlled trial was used for this study. The study was conducted in a Canadian medical-surgical intensive care unit. Forty adults who were admitted to the intensive care unit after undergoing elective cardiac surgery in the previous 24 hours participated in the study. They were randomly assigned to the experimental (n = 21) or control (n = 19) group. The experimental group received a 15-minute hand massage, and the control group received a 15-minute hand-holding without massage. In both groups the intervention was followed by a 30-minute rest period. The interventions were offered on 2-3 occasions within 24 hours after surgery. Pain, muscle tension, and vital signs were assessed. Pain intensity and behavioral scores were decreased for the experimental group. Although hand massage decreased muscle tension, fluctuations in vital signs were not significant. This study supports potential benefits of hand massage for intensive care unit postoperative pain management. Although larger randomized controlled trials are necessary, this low-cost nonpharmacologic intervention can be safely administered.

  10. Reduced Maximal Force during Acute Anterior Knee Pain Is Associated with Deficits in Voluntary Muscle Activation

    PubMed Central

    Salomoni, Sauro; Tucker, Kylie; Hug, François; McPhee, Megan; Hodges, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Although maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force is reduced during pain, studies using interpolated twitch show no consistent reduction of voluntary muscle drive. The present study aimed to test if the reduction in MVC force during acute experimental pain could be explained by increased activation of antagonist muscles, weak voluntary activation at baseline, or changes in force direction. Twenty-two healthy volunteers performed maximal voluntary isometric knee extensions before, during, and after the effects of hypertonic (pain) and isotonic (control) saline injections into the infrapatellar fat pad. The MVC force, voluntary activation, electromyographic (EMG) activity of agonist, antagonist, and auxiliary (hip) muscles, and pain cognition and anxiety scores were recorded. MVC force was 9.3% lower during pain than baseline (p < 0.001), but there was no systematic change in voluntary activation. Reduced MVC force during pain was variable between participants (SD: 14%), and was correlated with reduced voluntary activation (r = 0.90), baseline voluntary activation (r = − 0.62), and reduced EMG amplitude of agonist and antagonist muscles (all r > 0.52), but not with changes in force direction, pain or anxiety scores. Hence, reduced MVC force during acute pain was mainly explained by deficits in maximal voluntary drive. PMID:27559737

  11. [Methods for reducing dacarbazine photodegradation and its accompanying venous pain].

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Takumi; Ohtsubo, Tatsuya; Umeyama, Takayo; Sudou, Miho; Komesu, Kana; Matsumoto, Minako; Yoshida, Yuya; Banno, Rie; Mikami, Tadashi; Kohno, Takeyuki

    2014-01-01

    The anticancer drug dacarbazine (DTIC) is photosensitive, and the photodegradation product 5-diazoimidazole-4-carboxamide (diazo-IC) induces adverse reactions including local venous pain during intravenous injection. In this study we evaluated the effectiveness of colored shields (orange and red) to protect against photodegradation of DTIC as determined by ascertaining the concentration of diazo-IC. Samples were prepared and stored under four conditions: (1) no shield; (2) covered with an aluminum (opaque) shield; (3) covered with an orange shield; and (4) covered with a red shield. The samples were exposed to natural light for a specified time (0, 30, 60, 120, and 180 min) prior to measuring the concentration of diazo-IC by HPLC. We found that after 180 min, the diazo-IC concentration was 5.7±0.6 (S.D.) μg/mL with no shield and 1.9±0.2 μg/mL in both colored shield conditions. This production of diazo-IC under the colored shields was suppressed to a level similar to that under the aluminum shield (1.7±0.2 μg/mL). We also evaluated the effectiveness of NSAIDs (zaltoprofen, loxoprofen sodium, and diclofenac sodium) administered to mice prior to DTIC treatment on venous pain by counting their stretching and writhing reactions. Premedication with zaltoprofen significantly decreased expression of pain behavior in the DTIC-treated mice. These results suggest that storing DTIC under the protection of an orange or red shield is clinically beneficial because the shield prevents DTIC photodegradation, and that NSAIDs such as zaltoprofen are a promising premedication candidate for pain.

  12. Horizontal Body Position Reduces Cortical Pain-Related Processing: Evidence from Late ERPs

    PubMed Central

    Fardo, Francesca; Spironelli, Chiara; Angrilli, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the influence of short-term horizontal body position on pain-related somatosensory processing, by measuring subjective and cortical responses to electrical pain stimulation. Twenty-eight healthy women were randomly assigned to either the experimental horizontal group (Bed Rest, BR) or to the sitting control group (Sitting Control, SC). After 90 minutes in either horizontal or sitting position, the individual pain thresholds were assessed and EEG/self-evaluations recorded during the administration of 180 stimuli delivered to the left forearm. Electrical pain stimuli, calibrated to subjects’ individual pain thresholds, consisted of two different intensity levels: no pain (40% below pain threshold) and pain (40% above pain threshold). Compared with control, BR condition significantly inhibited subjective sensitivity to painless stimuli, whereas electrophysiological results pointed to a reduced slow cortical wave (interval: 300-600 ms) at all stimulus intensities, and smaller amplitude in BR’s right vs. left prefrontal sites. sLORETA analysis revealed that cortical responses were associated with a decreased activation of superior frontal gyrus and anterior cingulate cortex (BA 6/24). Interestingly, BR group only showed significant negative correlations between self-evaluation of painful intensities and frontal cortical negativity, revealing increasingly differentiated responses in bed rest: indeed those BR participants who reported lower pain ratings, displayed reduced negativity within anterior regions. Taken together, results indicate that short-term horizontal position is able to inhibit a fronto-parietal pain network, particularly at the level of central prefrontal regions typically involved in cognitive, affective and motor aspects of pain processing. PMID:24278467

  13. The quality of reporting of RCTs used within a postoperative pain management meta-analysis, using the CONSORT statement

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are routinely used in systematic reviews and meta-analyses that help inform healthcare and policy decision making. The proper reporting of RCTs is important because it acts as a proxy for health care providers and researchers to appraise the quality of the methodology, conduct and analysis of an RCT. The aims of this study are to analyse the overall quality of reporting in 23 RCTs that were used in a meta-analysis by assessing 3 key methodological items, and to determine factors associated with high quality of reporting. It is hypothesized that studies with larger sample sizes, that have funding reported, that are published in journals with a higher impact factor and that are in journals that have adopted or endorsed the CONSORT statement will be associated with better overall quality of reporting and reporting of key methodological items. Methods We systematically reviewed RCTs used within an anesthesiology related post-operative pain management meta-analysis. We included all of the 23 RCTs used, all of which were parallel design that addressed the use of femoral nerve block in improving outcomes after total knee arthroplasty. Data abstraction was done independently by two reviewers. The two main outcomes were: 1) 15 point overall quality of reporting score (OQRS) based on the Consolidated Standards for Reporting Trials (CONSORT) and 2) 3 point key methodological item score (KMIS) based on allocation concealment, blinding and intention-to-treat analysis. Results Twenty-three RCTs were included. The median OQRS was 9.0 (Interquartile Range = 3). A multivariable regression analysis did not show any significant association between OQRS or KMIS and our four predictor variables hypothesized to improve reporting. The direction and magnitude of our results when compared to similar studies suggest that the sample size and impact factor are associated with improved key methodological item reporting. Conclusions The quality

  14. Clinical Use of Virtual Reality Distraction System to Reduce Anxiety and Pain in Dental Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Kenneth; Wiederhold, Brenda K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Virtual reality (VR) has been used by clinicians to manage pain in clinical populations. This study examines the use of VR as a form of distraction for dental patients using both subjective and objective measures to determine how a VR system affects patients' reported anxiety level, pain level, and physiological factors. As predicted, results of self-evaluation questionnaires showed that patients experienced less anxiety and pain after undergoing VR treatment. Physiological data reported similar trends in decreased anxiety. Overall, the favorable subjective and objective responses suggest that VR distraction systems can reduce discomfort and pain for patients with mild to moderate fear and anxiety. PMID:24892198

  15. Clinical use of virtual reality distraction system to reduce anxiety and pain in dental procedures.

    PubMed

    Wiederhold, Mark D; Gao, Kenneth; Wiederhold, Brenda K

    2014-06-01

    Virtual reality (VR) has been used by clinicians to manage pain in clinical populations. This study examines the use of VR as a form of distraction for dental patients using both subjective and objective measures to determine how a VR system affects patients' reported anxiety level, pain level, and physiological factors. As predicted, results of self-evaluation questionnaires showed that patients experienced less anxiety and pain after undergoing VR treatment. Physiological data reported similar trends in decreased anxiety. Overall, the favorable subjective and objective responses suggest that VR distraction systems can reduce discomfort and pain for patients with mild to moderate fear and anxiety.

  16. Analgesic efficacy of a single dose of lumiracoxib compared with rofecoxib, celecoxib and placebo in the treatment of post-operative dental pain.

    PubMed

    Kellstein, D; Ott, D; Jayawardene, S; Fricke, J

    2004-03-01

    This randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study compared the efficacy and tolerability of lumiracoxib (a novel COX-2 selective inhibitor) with rofecoxib, celecoxib and placebo in patients with moderate-to-severe post-operative dental pain. Following third molar extraction, patients received single oral doses of lumiracoxib 400 mg, rofecoxib 50 mg, celecoxib 200 mg or placebo (n = 355). Additional patients from a similar study, assigned to lumiracoxib, rofecoxib or placebo (n = 155), were included for analysis of the primary variable, Summed Pain Intensity Difference over the first 8 h post dose (SPID-8). For SPID-8, lumiracoxib was superior to rofecoxib (p < 0.05), celecoxib (p < 0.001) and placebo (p < 0.001). Lumiracoxib demonstrated the fastest onset of analgesia and the longest time to rescue medication use. Patient global evaluation of lumiracoxib was comparable to rofecoxib and superior to celecoxib and placebo. All treatments were well tolerated. Lumiracoxib 400 mg provides rapid, effective and sustained relief of post-operative dental pain, comparable or superior to rofecoxib.

  17. Pain and affective distress before and after ACL surgery: a comparison of amateur and professional male soccer players in the early postoperative period.

    PubMed

    Oztekin, Haluk H; Boya, Hakan; Ozcan, Ozal; Zeren, Bulent; Pinar, Pelin

    2008-10-01

    Pain thresholds and levels of distress before and in the early postoperative period after anterior cruciate ligament surgery were measured in professional and amateur male soccer players and compared. Between June 2005 and March 2007, 30 soccer players (10 amateur, 20 professional) with acute or chronic tears of the anterior cruciate ligament who were scheduled for a bone-tendon-bone ACL reconstruction procedure were enrolled in the study. Measures of pain intensity, depression and anxiety were assessed 1 day pre-operation and 1 week and 3 weeks post-operation (T1 T2 and T3). Pain was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS), depression with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and anxiety with both the state and trait forms of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Scores on the VAS, BDI, and STAI in both groups were analyzed. The mean VAS scores at T1 and T2 in professional players were not significantly higher than those in amateur players (P>0.05). Professionals had significantly higher BDI scores at T1 and T2 (P<0.05), but this difference was not significant at T3 (P=0.12). High depression scores did not correlate with high pain scores. Pain scores between professional and amateur soccer players with ACL injuries were not significantly different pre-op or in the early post-op period. Depression was more common in professionals before and after their ACL surgery, but anxiety levels were not significantly different between the two groups.

  18. Adjunct High Frequency Transcutaneous Electric Stimulation (TENS) for Postoperative Pain Management during Weaning from Epidural Analgesia Following Colon Surgery: Results from a Controlled Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Bjerså, Kristofer; Jildenstaal, Pether; Jakobsson, Jan; Egardt, Madelene; Fagevik Olsén, Monika

    2015-12-01

    The potential benefit of nonpharmacological adjunctive therapy is not well-studied following major abdominal surgery. The aim of the present study was to investigate transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) as a complementary nonpharmacological analgesia intervention during weaning from epidural analgesia (EDA) after open lower abdominal surgery. Patients were randomized to TENS and sham TENS during weaning from EDA. The effects on pain at rest, following short walk, and after deep breath were assessed by visual analog scale (VAS) grading. Number of patients assessed was lower than calculated because of change in clinical routine. Pain scores overall were low. A trend of lower pain scores was observed in the active TENS group of patients; a statistical significance between the groups was found for the pain lying prone in bed (p < .05). This controlled pilot study indicates benefits of TENS use in postoperative pain management during weaning from EDA after open colon surgery. Further studies are warranted in order to verify the potential beneficial effects from TENS during weaning from EDA after open, lower abdominal surgery.

  19. Duloxetine in OsteoArthritis (DOA) study: study protocol of a pragmatic open-label randomised controlled trial assessing the effect of preoperative pain treatment on postoperative outcome after total hip or knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Blikman, T; Rienstra, W; van Raaij, T M; ten Hagen, A J; Dijkstra, B; Zijlstra, W P; Bulstra, S K; van den Akker-Scheek, I; Stevens, M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Residual pain is a major factor in patient dissatisfaction following total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty (THA/TKA). The proportion of patients with unfavourable long-term residual pain is high, ranging from 7% to 34%. There are studies indicating that a preoperative degree of central sensitisation (CS) is associated with poorer postoperative outcomes and residual pain. It is thus hypothesised that preoperative treatment of CS could enhance postoperative outcomes. Duloxetine has been shown to be effective for several chronic pain syndromes, including knee osteoarthritis (OA), in which CS is most likely one of the underlying pain mechanisms. This study aims to evaluate the postoperative effects of preoperative screening and targeted duloxetine treatment of CS on residual pain compared with care-as-usual. Methods and analysis This multicentre, pragmatic, prospective, open-label, randomised controlled trial includes patients with idiopathic hip/knee OA who are on a waiting list for primary THA/TKA. Patients at risk for CS will be randomly allocated to the preoperative duloxetine treatment programme group or the care-as-usual control group. The primary end point is the degree of postoperative pain 6 months after THA/TKA. Secondary end points at multiple time points up to 12 months postoperatively are: pain, neuropathic pain-like symptoms, (pain) sensitisation, pain catastrophising, joint-associated problems, physical activity, health-related quality of life, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and perceived improvement. Data will be analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. Ethics and dissemination The study is approved by the local Medical Ethics Committee (METc 2014/087) and will be conducted according to the principles of the Declaration of Helsinki (64th, 2013) and the Good Clinical Practice standard (GCP), and in compliance with the Medical Research Involving Human Subjects Act (WMO). Trial registration number 2013-004313-41; Pre