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Sample records for reduce radiation-induced mucositis

  1. Radiation induced oral mucositis: a review of current literature on prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Supriya; Benson, Rony; Rath, G K

    2016-09-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a major limiting acute side effect of radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. The spectrum of problems associated with mucositis includes oral pain, odynophagia, reduced oral intake, and secondary infections. Incidence of mucositis is increased with addition of concurrent chemotherapy as well as altered fractionation schedules. This leads to treatment interruption and suboptimal disease control. Hence, prevention as well as timely management of OM is necessary for optimum tumor control. We reviewed the English literature with key words "Radiation induced mucositis, Mucositis, Oral Mucositis" to find relevant articles describing incidence, pathophysiology, prophylaxis, and treatment of oral mucositis. Prevention and treatment of OM is an active area of research. Maintenance of oral hygiene is an important part in prevention of OM. A battery of agents including normal saline and alkali (soda bicarbonate) mouth washes, low level laser therapy, and benzydamine (non-steroidal analgesic and anti-inflammatory) have effectiveness in the prevention and treatment of radiation induced oral mucositis. Chlorhexidine mouth gargles are recommended for prevention of chemotherapy induced oral mucositis but is not recommended for radiotherapy associated mucositis. Treatment of co-existing infection is also important and both topical (povidone iodine) and systemic anti fungals should be used judiciously. Radiation induced oral mucositis is a common problem limiting the efficacy of radiation by increasing treatment breaks. Adequate prophylaxis and treatment may limit the severity of radiation mucositis and improve compliance to radiation which may translate in better disease control and survival. PMID:26116012

  2. Chemotherapy or radiation-induced oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Lalla, Rajesh V; Saunders, Deborah P; Peterson, Douglas E

    2014-04-01

    Oral mucositis is a significant toxicity of systemic chemotherapy and of radiation therapy to the head and neck region. The morbidity of oral mucositis can include pain, nutritional compromise, impact on quality of life, alteration in cancer therapy, risk for infection, and economic costs. Management includes general symptomatic support and targeted therapeutic interventions for the prevention or treatment of oral mucositis. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines are available to guide clinicians in the selection of effective management strategies.

  3. Single-Dose Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Maria, Osama Muhammad; Syme, Alasdair; Eliopoulos, Nicoletta; Muanza, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The generation of a self-resolved radiation-induced oral mucositis (RIOM) mouse model using the highest possibly tolerable single ionizing radiation (RT) dose was needed in order to study RIOM management solutions. We used 10-week-old male BALB/c mice with average weight of 23 g for model production. Mice were treated with an orthovoltage X-ray irradiator to induce the RIOM ulceration at the intermolar eminence of the animal tongue. General anesthesia was injected intraperitoneally for proper animal immobilization during the procedure. Ten days after irradiation, a single RT dose of 10, 15, 18, 20, and 25 Gy generated a RIOM ulcer at the intermolar eminence (posterior upper tongue surface) with mean ulcer floor (posterior epithelium) heights of 190, 150, 25, 10, and 10 μm, respectively, compared to 200 μm in non-irradiated animals. The mean RIOM ulcer size % of the total epithelialized upper surface of the animal tongue was RT dose dependent. At day 10, the ulcer size % was 2, 5, 27, and 31% for 15, 18, 20, and 25 Gy RT, respectively. The mean relative surface area of the total epithelialized upper surface of the tongue was RT dose dependent, since it was significantly decreased to 97, 95, 88, and 38% with 15, 18, 20, and 25 Gy doses, respectively, at day 10 after RT. Subcutaneous injection of 1 mL of 0.9% saline/6 h for 24 h yielded a 100% survival only with 18 Gy self-resolved RIOM, which had 5.6 ± 0.3 days ulcer duration. In conclusion, we have generated a 100% survival self-resolved single-dose RIOM male mouse model with long enough duration for application in RIOM management research. Oral mucositis ulceration was radiation dose dependent. Sufficient hydration of animals after radiation exposure significantly improved their survival. PMID:27446800

  4. Protective Role of Rheum Tanguticum Polysaccharide 1 in Radiation- induced Intestinal Mucosal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lin-Na; Shi, Lei; Li, Shi-Cao; Zhang, Wen-Juan; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Zhi-Pei

    2015-01-01

    The protective effects of Rheum tanguticum polysaccharide 1 (RTP1), which is extracted from the Chinese traditional medicine Rheum tanguticum, on radiation-induced intestinal mucosal injury was investigated. Rat intestinal crypt epithelial cells (IEC-6 cells) and Sprague-Dawley rats were each divided into control, irradiated and RTP1-pretreated irradiated groups. After irradiation, cell survival was determined by MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide). assay, and the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was detected by fluorescent probe method. Apoptosis was observed by acridine orange staining, and cell cycle was analysed by flow cytometry. Histological analysis of the rat intestinal mucosa was conducted by haematoxylin and eosin staining. Irradiation at 8 Gy(Gray) decreased cell survival rate to only 54%, significantly increased intracellular ROS levels and induced apoptosis. RTP1 pretreatment significantly inhibited cell death, reduced the formation of intracellular ROS and partially inhibited apoptosis. Irradiation markedly reduced the height and quantity of rat intestinal villi, but it could be antagonised by RTP1 pretreatment. RTP1 can promote the recovery of intestinal mucosa damage, possibly by inhibiting radiation-induced intestinal epithelial apoptosis and intracellular ROS production. PMID:26330871

  5. Effect of topical honey on limitation of radiation-induced oral mucositis: an intervention study.

    PubMed

    Khanal, B; Baliga, M; Uppal, N

    2010-12-01

    Radiation therapy for oral carcinoma is therapeutically useful in dose of at least 6000 cGy but causes mucositis that severely interferes with oral function. The literature indicates that honey appears to promote wound healing, so the authors investigated whether its anti-inflammatory properties might limit the severity of radiation-induced oral mucositis. A single-blinded, randomized, controlled clinical trial was carried out to compare the mucositis-limiting qualities of honey with lignocaine. A visual assessment scale permitted scoring of degrees of mucositis and statistical evaluation of the results was performed using the χ(2) test. Only 1 of 20 patients in the honey group developed intolerable oral mucositis compared with the lignocaine group, indicating that honey is strongly protective (RR=0.067) against the development of mucositis. The proportion of patients with intolerable oral mucositis was lower in the honey group and this was statistically significant (p=0.000). Honey applied topically to the oral mucosa of patients undergoing radiation therapy appears to provide a distinct benefit by limiting the severity of mucositis. Honey is readily available, affordable and well accepted by patients making it useful for improving the quality of life in irradiated patients.

  6. A case of radiation-induced mucosal melanoma in an immunohistochemically S-100-negative patient.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Michael; Patil, Yash; Gupta, Arun

    2016-08-01

    We report a case of radiation-induced mucosal melanoma in a 41-year-old woman with a history of childhood rhabdomyosarcoma of the nasal cavity that had been treated with radiotherapy. During the workup for the melanoma, the patient was found to be negative for S-100 protein on immunostaining. While many melanotic markers for the histologic confirmation of melanoma exist, they can be negative in some cases, such as ours. To the best of our knowledge, only 1 case of radiation-induced melanoma has been previously reported in the English-language literature, and in that case the patient was S-100-positive. Although our case is rare, it suggests another possible long-term adverse effect of radiotherapy. We also describe the morphologies and histology associated with diagnosing melanoma in an S-100-negative patient. PMID:27551844

  7. Strategies for managing radiation-induced mucositis in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, David I; Trotti, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Radiation-induced mucositis (RIM) is a common toxicity for head and neck cancer (HNC) patients. The frequency has increased because of the use of more intensive altered radiation fractionation and concurrent chemotherapy regimens. The extent of the injury is directly related to the mucosal volume irradiated, anatomic subsite exposed, treatment intensity, and individual patient predisposition. The consequences of mucositis include pain, dysphagia including feeding tube dependency, dehydration, micronutrient deficiencies, weight loss, and potentially life-threatening aspiration. Currently, there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved cytoprotective agent that reliably prevents RIM for HNC, but several are under investigation. Strategies to limit the extent of mucositis and to manage its symptoms include basic oral care and supportive medications. Limiting the use of aggressive treatments to truly high-risk cancers and special attention to radiation therapy planning techniques can also help restrict the scope of the problem. This review focuses on mucositis recognition, patient treatment selection, and RIM symptom-management strategies. PMID:19028343

  8. The effect of clove-based herbal mouthwash on radiation-induced oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer: a single-blind randomized preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Moonkyoo; Hwang, Deok-Sang; Yoon, Seong Woo; Kim, Jinsung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of clove-based herbal mouthwash in ameliorating radiation-induced oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer. Methods Fourteen patients were prospectively enrolled in this study and randomized to either an experimental group or a control group. The patients of the experimental group swished their mouths with a clove-based herbal mouthwash during radiotherapy (RT), while the patients of the control group swished with clear water. The primary end point of this study was incidence of radiation-induced oral mucositis. The secondary end points were time to onset of radiation-induced oral mucositis, duration of radiation-induced oral mucositis, incidence of supplemental nutrition through feeding tube, maximum pain score, body weight loss, incidence of RT interruption, and duration of RT interruption. Results The use of clove-based herbal mouthwash shortened the duration of grade ≥2 mucositis (24.3 days vs 37.1 days, P=0.044) and reduced body weight loss during RT (3.1% vs 7.4%, P=0.023) compared with clear water. The use of clove-based herbal mouthwash also reduced the incidence of grade 3 mucositis (28.6% vs 57.1%), supplemental nutrition (0% vs 28.6%), and RT interruption (14.3% vs 28.6%), and reduced the duration of grade 3 mucositis (5.1 days vs 17.7 days) and RT interruption (1 days vs 8.5 days). In addition, clove-based herbal mouthwash delayed the time to onset of mucositis (26.6 days vs 24.5 days) and reduced the maximum pain score (4.1 vs 4.9). However, these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion Although we could not find significant differences in some end points, this single-blind randomized study showed that a clove-based herbal mouthwash can have a potentially beneficial effect on minimizing or preventing radiation-induced oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer. To confirm the results of our study, well-designed randomized studies with large

  9. Radiation-induced oral mucositis and periodontitis - proposal for an inter-relationship.

    PubMed

    Khaw, A; Logan, R; Keefe, D; Bartold, M

    2014-04-01

    Virtually all patients who receive head and neck radiotherapy develop some degree of oral mucositis. Severe oral mucositis may necessitate an interruption of the course of radiotherapy and thus can serve as a dose-limiting factor. Periodontitis is a host-driven inflammatory response to a pathogenic bacterial biofilm in the subgingival environment, resulting in the progressive destruction of the tissues that support the teeth, specifically the gingiva, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. This disease affects more than 50% of the population. Considering that radiation-induced oral mucositis and periodontitis are both linked with continuing presence of systemic inflammation, they may be associated through a primed inflammatory response as proposed by the 'two-hit' model. Alternatively, both conditions may be correlated as they represent a dysregulation of the inflammatory response. To date, no studies have looked into the association between these conditions. This review considers the current evidence that provides a rationale for proposing a link between periodontitis and oral mucositis. PMID:24147592

  10. Radiation-induced oral mucositis and periodontitis - proposal for an inter-relationship.

    PubMed

    Khaw, A; Logan, R; Keefe, D; Bartold, M

    2014-04-01

    Virtually all patients who receive head and neck radiotherapy develop some degree of oral mucositis. Severe oral mucositis may necessitate an interruption of the course of radiotherapy and thus can serve as a dose-limiting factor. Periodontitis is a host-driven inflammatory response to a pathogenic bacterial biofilm in the subgingival environment, resulting in the progressive destruction of the tissues that support the teeth, specifically the gingiva, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. This disease affects more than 50% of the population. Considering that radiation-induced oral mucositis and periodontitis are both linked with continuing presence of systemic inflammation, they may be associated through a primed inflammatory response as proposed by the 'two-hit' model. Alternatively, both conditions may be correlated as they represent a dysregulation of the inflammatory response. To date, no studies have looked into the association between these conditions. This review considers the current evidence that provides a rationale for proposing a link between periodontitis and oral mucositis.

  11. C-Reactive Protein Levels and Radiation-Induced Mucositis in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ki, Yongkan; Kim, Wontaek Nam, Jiho; Kim, Donghyun; Park, Dahl; Kim, Dongwon

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the relationship between C-reactive protein (CRP) levels or the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and the grade of acute radiation-induced mucositis in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: This study was performed in 40 patients who received intensity-modulated radiation therapy as a radical treatment of primary laryngo-pharyngeal cancer. Serum CRP level and ESR were initially checked on the day of radiotherapy simulation and were measured every week during the irradiation schedule and two times biweekly after radiotherapy. Mucosal reactions were evaluated by radiation oncologists on days of blood sampling. Results: The distribution of the most severe mucositis was Grade I mucositis in 10% of the patients, Grade II in 60% of the patients and Grade III in 30% of the patients. Statistical analysis indicated a significant rise in the CRP level (p < 0.001) according to radiation fraction number and grade of mucositis. A change of the mean CRP level was correlated with progression of mean grade of mucositis according to fraction number. The ESR did not show any statistically significant relationship with radiotherapy fraction number and grade of acute mucositis. Conclusions: There was a significant correlation between the presence of acute mucositis and CRP level in this study. The CRP level could be conveniently determined along with evaluation of mucosal reactions during or after radiotherapy to provide further information on radiation-induced mucositis.

  12. Risk, Outcomes, and Costs of Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis Among Patients With Head-and-Neck Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Elting, Linda S. . E-mail: lelting@mdanderson.org; Cooksley, Catherine D.; Chambers, Mark S.; Garden, Adam S.

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To study the risk, outcomes, and costs of radiation-induced oral mucositis (OM) among patients receiving radiotherapy (RT) to head and neck primary cancers. Methods and Materials: A retrospective cohort consisting of 204 consecutive head-and-neck cancer patients who received RT with or without chemotherapy during 2002 was formed; their records were reviewed for clinical and resource use information. Patients who had received prior therapy, had second primary cancers, or received palliative radiation therapy were excluded. The risk of OM was analyzed by multiple variable logistic regression. The cost of care was computed from the provider's perspective in 2006 U.S. dollars and compared among patients with and without OM. Results: Oral mucositis occurred in 91% of patients; in 66% it was severe (Grade 3-4). Oral mucositis was more common among patients with oral cavity or oropharynx primaries (odds ratio [OR], 44.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.2 to >100; p < 0.001), those who received chemotherapy (OR = 7.8; 95% CI, 1.5-41.6; p 0.02), and those who were treated with altered fractionation schedules (OR 6.3; 95% CI, 1.1-35.1; p = 0.03). Patients with OM were significantly more likely to have severe pain (54% vs. 6%; p < 0.001) and a weight loss of {>=}5% (60% vs. 17%; p < 0.001). Oral mucositis was associated with an incremental cost of $1700-$6000, depending on the grade. Conclusions: Head-and-neck RT causes OM in virtually all patients. Oral mucositis is associated with severe pain, significant weight loss, increased resource use, and excess cost. Preventive strategies are needed.

  13. Antioxidant capacity of calendula officinalis flowers extract and prevention of radiation induced oropharyngeal mucositis in patients with head and neck cancers: a randomized controlled clinical study.

    PubMed

    Babaee, Neda; Moslemi, Dariush; Khalilpour, Mohammad; Vejdani, Fatemeh; Moghadamnia, Yasaman; Bijani, Ali; Baradaran, Mahmoud; Kazemi, Mohammad Taghi; Khalilpour, Asieh; Pouramir, Mahdi; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effect of Calendula officinalis flowers extract mouthwash as oral gel on radiation-induced oropharyngeal mucositis (OM) in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Forty patients with neck and head cancers under radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy protocols were randomly assigned to receive either 2% calendula extract mouthwash or placebo (20 patients in each group). Patients were treated with telecobalt radiotherapy at conventional fractionation (200 cGy/fraction, five fractions weekly, 30-35 fractions within 4-7 weeks). The oropharyngeal mucositis was evaluated by two clinical investigators (a radiation oncologist and a dentist), using the oral mucositis assessment scale (OMAS). Trying to find out the possible mechanism of action of the treatment, total antioxidant, polyphenol and flavonoid contents, and quercetin concentration of the mouth wash were measured. Calendula mouthwash significantly decreased the intensity of OM compared to placebo at week 2 (score: 5.5 vs. 6.8, p = 0.019), week 3 (score: 8.25 vs. 10.95, p < 0.0001) and week 6 (score: 11.4 vs. 13.35, p = 0.031). Total antioxidant, polyphenol and flavonoid contents and quercetin concentration of the 2% extract were 2353.4 ± 56.5 μM, 313.40 ± 6.52 mg/g, 76.66 ± 23.24 mg/g, and 19.41 ± 4.34 mg/l, respectively. Calendula extract gel could be effective on decreasing the intensity of radiotherapy- induced OM during the treatment and antioxidant capacity may be partly responsible for the effect. PMID:23497687

  14. Antioxidant capacity of calendula officinalis flowers extract and prevention of radiation induced oropharyngeal mucositis in patients with head and neck cancers: a randomized controlled clinical study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effect of Calendula officinalis flowers extract mouthwash as oral gel on radiation-induced oropharyngeal mucositis (OM) in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Forty patients with neck and head cancers under radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy protocols were randomly assigned to receive either 2% calendula extract mouthwash or placebo (20 patients in each group). Patients were treated with telecobalt radiotherapy at conventional fractionation (200 cGy/fraction, five fractions weekly, 30–35 fractions within 4–7 weeks). The oropharyngeal mucositis was evaluated by two clinical investigators (a radiation oncologist and a dentist), using the oral mucositis assessment scale (OMAS). Trying to find out the possible mechanism of action of the treatment, total antioxidant, polyphenol and flavonoid contents, and quercetin concentration of the mouth wash were measured. Calendula mouthwash significantly decreased the intensity of OM compared to placebo at week 2 (score: 5.5 vs. 6.8, p = 0.019), week 3 (score: 8.25 vs. 10.95, p < 0.0001) and week 6 (score: 11.4 vs. 13.35, p = 0.031). Total antioxidant, polyphenol and flavonoid contents and quercetin concentration of the 2% extract were 2353.4 ± 56.5 μM, 313.40 ± 6.52 mg/g, 76.66 ± 23.24 mg/g, and 19.41 ± 4.34 mg/l, respectively. Calendula extract gel could be effective on decreasing the intensity of radiotherapy- induced OM during the treatment and antioxidant capacity may be partly responsible for the effect. PMID:23497687

  15. Antioxidant capacity of calendula officinalis flowers extract and prevention of radiation induced oropharyngeal mucositis in patients with head and neck cancers: a randomized controlled clinical study.

    PubMed

    Babaee, Neda; Moslemi, Dariush; Khalilpour, Mohammad; Vejdani, Fatemeh; Moghadamnia, Yasaman; Bijani, Ali; Baradaran, Mahmoud; Kazemi, Mohammad Taghi; Khalilpour, Asieh; Pouramir, Mahdi; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effect of Calendula officinalis flowers extract mouthwash as oral gel on radiation-induced oropharyngeal mucositis (OM) in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Forty patients with neck and head cancers under radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy protocols were randomly assigned to receive either 2% calendula extract mouthwash or placebo (20 patients in each group). Patients were treated with telecobalt radiotherapy at conventional fractionation (200 cGy/fraction, five fractions weekly, 30-35 fractions within 4-7 weeks). The oropharyngeal mucositis was evaluated by two clinical investigators (a radiation oncologist and a dentist), using the oral mucositis assessment scale (OMAS). Trying to find out the possible mechanism of action of the treatment, total antioxidant, polyphenol and flavonoid contents, and quercetin concentration of the mouth wash were measured. Calendula mouthwash significantly decreased the intensity of OM compared to placebo at week 2 (score: 5.5 vs. 6.8, p = 0.019), week 3 (score: 8.25 vs. 10.95, p < 0.0001) and week 6 (score: 11.4 vs. 13.35, p = 0.031). Total antioxidant, polyphenol and flavonoid contents and quercetin concentration of the 2% extract were 2353.4 ± 56.5 μM, 313.40 ± 6.52 mg/g, 76.66 ± 23.24 mg/g, and 19.41 ± 4.34 mg/l, respectively. Calendula extract gel could be effective on decreasing the intensity of radiotherapy- induced OM during the treatment and antioxidant capacity may be partly responsible for the effect.

  16. HGF Gene Modification in Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reduces Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury by Modulating Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Yang, Yue-Feng; Xiao, Feng-Jun; Zhang, Yi-Kun; Wang, Shao-Xia; Sun, Hui-Yan; Zhang, Qun-Wei; Wu, Chu-Tse; Wang, Li-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Background Effective therapeutic strategies to address intestinal complications after radiation exposure are currently lacking. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which display the ability to repair the injured intestine, have been considered as delivery vehicles for repair genes. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-gene-modified MSCs on radiation-induced intestinal injury (RIII). Methods Female 6- to 8-week-old mice were radiated locally at the abdomen with a single 13-Gy dose of radiation and then treated with saline control, Ad-HGF or Ad-Null-modified MSCs therapy. The transient engraftment of human MSCs was detected via real-time PCR and immunostaining. The therapeutic effects of non- and HGF-modified MSCs were evaluated via FACS to determine the lymphocyte immunophenotypes; via ELISA to measure cytokine expression; via immunostaining to determine tight junction protein expression; via PCNA staining to examine intestinal epithelial cell proliferation; and via TUNEL staining to detect intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis. Results The histopathological recovery of the radiation-injured intestine was significantly enhanced following non- or HGF-modified MSCs treatment. Importantly, the radiation-induced immunophenotypic disorders of the mesenteric lymph nodes and Peyer’s patches were attenuated in both MSCs-treated groups. Treatment with HGF-modified MSCs reduced the expression and secretion of inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), increased the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and the tight junction protein ZO-1, and promoted the proliferation and reduced the apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells. Conclusions Treatment of RIII with HGF-gene-modified MSCs reduces local inflammation and promotes the recovery of small intestinal histopathology in a mouse model. These findings might provide an effective therapeutic strategy for RIII

  17. Amifostine Reduces Radiation-Induced Complications in a Murine Model of Expander-Based Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Felice, Peter A.; Nelson, Noah S.; Page, Erin E.; Deshpande, Sagar S.; Donneys, Alexis; Rodriguez, José; Buchman, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Immediate expander-based breast reconstruction after mastectomy is a prevalent option for many women with breast cancer. When coupled with adjuvant radiation, however, radiation-induced skin and soft tissue injury diminish the success of this reconstructive technique. We hypothesize that prophylactic administration of the cytoprotectant Amifostine will reduce soft tissue complications from irradiation, aiding expander-based reconstruction for women battling this disease. Methods Sprague Dawley rats were divided into two experimental groups, Operative Expander Placement (Expander) and Operative Sham (Sham). Expander specimens received a sub-latissimus tissue expander with a 15cc fill volume; Shams underwent identical procedures without expander placement. Experimental groups were further divided into Control specimens receiving no further intervention, XRT specimens receiving human-equivalent radiation, and AMF-XRT specimens receiving both Amifostine and human-equivalent radiation. Animals underwent a 45-day recovery period and were evaluated grossly and via ImageJ analysis for skin and soft tissue complications. Results None of the Control, XRT, or AMF-XRT Sham specimens showed skin and soft tissue complications. For Expander animals, significantly fewer AMF-XRT specimens (4 of 13, 30%) demonstrated skin and soft tissue complications compared to XRT specimens (9 of 13, 69%; p = 0.041). ImageJ evaluation of Expander specimens demonstrated a significant increase in skin and soft tissue necrosis for XRT specimens (12.94%), compared with AMF-XRT animals (6.96%, p = 0.019). Conclusions Amifostine pre-treatment significantly reduced skin and soft-tissue complications in both gross inspection and ImageJ analysis. These findings demonstrate that Amifostine prophylaxis provides protection against radiation-induced skin and soft tissue injury in a murine model of expander-based breast reconstruction. Level of Evidence Animal study, not gradable for level of

  18. Fungal Aflatoxins Reduce Respiratory Mucosal Ciliary Function.

    PubMed

    Lee, Robert J; Workman, Alan D; Carey, Ryan M; Chen, Bei; Rosen, Phillip L; Doghramji, Laurel; Adappa, Nithin D; Palmer, James N; Kennedy, David W; Cohen, Noam A

    2016-01-01

    Aflatoxins are mycotoxins secreted by Aspergillus flavus, which can colonize the respiratory tract and cause fungal rhinosinusitis or bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. A. flavus is the second leading cause of invasive aspergillosis worldwide. Because many respiratory pathogens secrete toxins to impair mucociliary immunity, we examined the effects of acute exposure to aflatoxins on airway cell physiology. Using air-liquid interface cultures of primary human sinonasal and bronchial cells, we imaged ciliary beat frequency (CBF), intracellular calcium, and nitric oxide (NO). Exposure to aflatoxins (0.1 to 10 μM; 5 to 10 minutes) reduced baseline (~6-12%) and agonist-stimulated CBF. Conditioned media (CM) from A. fumigatus, A. niger, and A. flavus cultures also reduced CBF by ~10% after 60 min exposure, but effects were blocked by an anti-aflatoxin antibody only with A. flavus CM. CBF reduction required protein kinase C but was not associated with changes in calcium or NO. However, AFB2 reduced NO production by ~50% during stimulation of the ciliary-localized T2R38 receptor. Using a fluorescent reporter construct expressed in A549 cells, we directly observed activation of PKC activity by AFB2. Aflatoxins secreted by respiratory A. flavus may impair motile and chemosensory functions of airway cilia, contributing to pathogenesis of fungal airway diseases. PMID:27623953

  19. Fungal Aflatoxins Reduce Respiratory Mucosal Ciliary Function

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Robert J.; Workman, Alan D.; Carey, Ryan M.; Chen, Bei; Rosen, Phillip L.; Doghramji, Laurel; Adappa, Nithin D.; Palmer, James N.; Kennedy, David W.; Cohen, Noam A.

    2016-01-01

    Aflatoxins are mycotoxins secreted by Aspergillus flavus, which can colonize the respiratory tract and cause fungal rhinosinusitis or bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. A. flavus is the second leading cause of invasive aspergillosis worldwide. Because many respiratory pathogens secrete toxins to impair mucociliary immunity, we examined the effects of acute exposure to aflatoxins on airway cell physiology. Using air-liquid interface cultures of primary human sinonasal and bronchial cells, we imaged ciliary beat frequency (CBF), intracellular calcium, and nitric oxide (NO). Exposure to aflatoxins (0.1 to 10 μM; 5 to 10 minutes) reduced baseline (~6–12%) and agonist-stimulated CBF. Conditioned media (CM) from A. fumigatus, A. niger, and A. flavus cultures also reduced CBF by ~10% after 60 min exposure, but effects were blocked by an anti-aflatoxin antibody only with A. flavus CM. CBF reduction required protein kinase C but was not associated with changes in calcium or NO. However, AFB2 reduced NO production by ~50% during stimulation of the ciliary-localized T2R38 receptor. Using a fluorescent reporter construct expressed in A549 cells, we directly observed activation of PKC activity by AFB2. Aflatoxins secreted by respiratory A. flavus may impair motile and chemosensory functions of airway cilia, contributing to pathogenesis of fungal airway diseases. PMID:27623953

  20. Fungal Aflatoxins Reduce Respiratory Mucosal Ciliary Function.

    PubMed

    Lee, Robert J; Workman, Alan D; Carey, Ryan M; Chen, Bei; Rosen, Phillip L; Doghramji, Laurel; Adappa, Nithin D; Palmer, James N; Kennedy, David W; Cohen, Noam A

    2016-01-01

    Aflatoxins are mycotoxins secreted by Aspergillus flavus, which can colonize the respiratory tract and cause fungal rhinosinusitis or bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. A. flavus is the second leading cause of invasive aspergillosis worldwide. Because many respiratory pathogens secrete toxins to impair mucociliary immunity, we examined the effects of acute exposure to aflatoxins on airway cell physiology. Using air-liquid interface cultures of primary human sinonasal and bronchial cells, we imaged ciliary beat frequency (CBF), intracellular calcium, and nitric oxide (NO). Exposure to aflatoxins (0.1 to 10 μM; 5 to 10 minutes) reduced baseline (~6-12%) and agonist-stimulated CBF. Conditioned media (CM) from A. fumigatus, A. niger, and A. flavus cultures also reduced CBF by ~10% after 60 min exposure, but effects were blocked by an anti-aflatoxin antibody only with A. flavus CM. CBF reduction required protein kinase C but was not associated with changes in calcium or NO. However, AFB2 reduced NO production by ~50% during stimulation of the ciliary-localized T2R38 receptor. Using a fluorescent reporter construct expressed in A549 cells, we directly observed activation of PKC activity by AFB2. Aflatoxins secreted by respiratory A. flavus may impair motile and chemosensory functions of airway cilia, contributing to pathogenesis of fungal airway diseases.

  1. Photobiomodulation reduces oral mucositis by modulating NF-kB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curra, Marina; Pellicioli, Ana Carolina Amorim; Filho, Nélson Alexandre Kretzmann; Ochs, Gustavo; Matte, Úrsula; Filho, Manoel Sant'Ana; Martins, Marco Antonio Trevizani; Martins, Manoela Domingues

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate NF-kB during 5-fluorouracil (FU)-induced oral mucositis and ascertain whether photobiomodulation (PBM), as a preventive and/or therapeutic modality, influences this transcription factor. Ninety-six male golden Syrian hamsters were allocated into four groups: control (no treatment); PBM therapeutic, PBM preventive, and PBM combined. Animals received an injection of 5-FU on days 0 and 2. On days 3 and 4, the buccal mucosa was scratched. Irradiation was carried out using a 660-nm, 40-mW diode laser at 6 J/cm2 during 6 s/point, 0.24 J/point, for a total dose of 1.44 J/day of application. Animals were euthanized on days 0, 5, 10, and 15 (n=6). Buccal mucosa was removed for protein quantification by Western blot. Clinical analysis revealed that PBM groups exhibited less mucositis than controls on day 10. Control animals exhibited lower levels of NF-kB during mucositis development and healing. The preventive and combined protocols were associated with higher NF-kB levels at day 5; however, the therapeutic group had higher levels at days 10 and 15. These findings suggest that the preventive and/or therapeutic PBM protocols reduced the severity of oral mucositis by activating the NF-kB pathway.

  2. Hydrogen therapy may reduce the risks related to radiation-induced oxidative stress in space flight.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Michael P; Ansari, Rafat R; Zakrajsek, June F; Billiar, Timothy R; Toyoda, Yoshiya; Wink, David A; Nakao, Atsunori

    2011-01-01

    Cosmic radiation is known to induce DNA and lipid damage associated with increased oxidative stress and remains a major concern in space travel. Hydrogen, recently discovered as a novel therapeutic medical gas in a variety of biomedical fields, has potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. It is expected that space mission activities will increase in coming years both in numbers and duration. It is therefore important to estimate and prevent the risks encountered by astronauts due to oxidative stress prior to developing clinical symptoms of disease. We hypothesize that hydrogen administration to the astronauts by either inhalation or drinking hydrogen-rich water may potentially yield a novel and feasible preventative/therapeutic strategy to prevent radiation-induced adverse events.

  3. Hydrogen therapy may reduce the risks related to radiation-induced oxidative stress in space flight.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Michael P; Ansari, Rafat R; Zakrajsek, June F; Billiar, Timothy R; Toyoda, Yoshiya; Wink, David A; Nakao, Atsunori

    2011-01-01

    Cosmic radiation is known to induce DNA and lipid damage associated with increased oxidative stress and remains a major concern in space travel. Hydrogen, recently discovered as a novel therapeutic medical gas in a variety of biomedical fields, has potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. It is expected that space mission activities will increase in coming years both in numbers and duration. It is therefore important to estimate and prevent the risks encountered by astronauts due to oxidative stress prior to developing clinical symptoms of disease. We hypothesize that hydrogen administration to the astronauts by either inhalation or drinking hydrogen-rich water may potentially yield a novel and feasible preventative/therapeutic strategy to prevent radiation-induced adverse events. PMID:20851533

  4. Myocardial hydroxyproline reduced by early administration of methylprednisolone or ibuprofen to rabbits with radiation-induced heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, W.C.; Cunningham, D.; Schwiter, E.J.; Abt, A.; Skarlatos, S.; Wood, M.A.; Whitesell, L.

    1982-05-01

    The ability of methylprednisolone (MP) and ibuprofen (IB) to reduce the severity of the late state of radiation-induced heart disease was assessed in 57 New Zealand white rabbits. Before and shortly after cardiac irradiation, 15 rabbits received i.v. MP, 30 mg/kg twice daily for 3 days, and 15 others received IB, 12.5 mg/kg twice daily for 2 days. No drug was administered to 14 irradiated rabbits, and neither irradiation nor drugs were administered to 13 rabbits that served as controls, All 15 rabbits treated with MP and 13 of the 15 treated with IB lived for 100 days. Only seven of the untreated, irradiated rabbits lived that long. Longevity of each treated group of rabbits was better (p less than 0.01 and 0.05) than that of the untreated, irradiated rabbits. Surviving rabbits were killed 100 days after irradiation. Pericarditis (p less than 0.05) and pericardial effusion (p less than 0.01) were less frequent in the treated, irradiated groups than in the untreated, irradiated rabbits. At least some rabbits in each irradiated group had microscopic evidence of myocardial fibrosis. The fibrosis was quantitated by determination of myocardial hydroxyproline concentrations (MHP). MHP concentration in the untreated, irradiated rabbits was greater than in those treated with MP (p less than 0.05) or IB (p less than 0.01) and in the untreated, unirradiated rabbits (p less than 0.01). Early administration of MP or IB retarded the development of myocardial fibrosis, pericarditis and pericardial effusion, and improved survival in this experimental model of radiation-induced heart disease.

  5. Myocardial hydroxyproline reduced by early administration of methylprednisolone or ibuprofen to rabbits with radiation-induced heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, W.C.; Cunningham, D.; Schwiter, E.J.; Abt, A.; Skarlatos, S.; Wood, M.A.; Whitesell, L.

    1982-05-01

    The ability of methylprednisolone (MP) and ibuprofen (IB) to reduce the severity of the late state of radiation-induced heart disease was assessed in 57 New Zealand white rabbits. Before and shortly after cardiac irradiation, 15 rabbits received i.v. MP, 30 mg/kg twice daily for 3 days, and 15 others received IB, 12.5 mg/kg twice daily for 2 days. No drug administered to 14 irradiated rabbits, and neither irradiation nor drugs were administered to 13 rabbits that served as controls. All 15 rabbits treated with MP and 13 of the 15 treated with IB lived for 100 days. Only seven of the untreated, irradiated rabbits lived that long. Longevity of each treated group of rabbits was better (p < 0.01 and 0.05) than that of the untreated, irradiated rabbits. Surviving rabbits were killed 100 days after irradiation. Pericarditis (p < 0.05) and pericardial effusion (p < 0.01) were less frequent in the treated, irradiated groups than in the untreated, irradiated rabbits. At least some rabbits in each irradiated group had microscopic evidence of myocardial fibrosis. The fibrosis was quantitated by determination of myocardial hydroxyproline concentrations (MHP). MHP concentration in the untreated, irradiated rabbits was greater than in those treated with MP (p < 0.05) or IB (p < 0.01) and in the untreated, unirradiated rabbits (p < 0.01). Early administrative of MP or IB retarded the development of myocardial fibrosis, pericarditis and pericardial effusin, and improved survival in this experimental model of radiation-induced heart disease.

  6. Acemannan-containing wound dressing gel reduces radiation-induced skin reactions in C3H mice

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.B.; Travis, E.L.

    1995-07-15

    To determine (a) whether a wound dressing gel that contains acemannan extracted from aloe leaves affects the severity of radiation-induced acute skin reactions in C3H mice; (b) if so, whether other commercially available gels such as a personal lubricating jelly and a healing ointment have similar effects; and (c) when the wound dressing gel should be applied for maximum effect. Male C3H mice received graded single doses of gamma radiation ranging from 30 to 47.5 Gy to the right leg. In most experiments, the gel was applied daily beginning immediately after irradiation. Dose-response curves were obtained by plotting the percentage of mice that reached or exceeded a given peak skin reaction as a function of dose. Curves were fitted by logit analysis and ED{sub 50} values, and 95% confidence limits were obtained. The average peak skin reactions of the wound dressing gel-treated mice were lower than those of the untreated mice at all radiation doses tested. The ED{sub 50} values for skin reactions of 2.0-2.75 were approximately 7 Gy higher in the wound dressing gel-treated mice. The average peak skin reactions and the ED{sub 50} values for mice treated with personal lubricating jelly or healing ointment were similar to irradiated control values. Reduction in the percentage of mice with skin reactions of 2.5 or more was greatest in the groups that received wound dressing gel for at least 2 weeks beginning immediately after irradiation. There was no effect if gel was applied only before irradiation or beginning 1 week after irradiation. Wound dressing gel, but not personal lubricating jelly or healing ointment, reduces acute radiation-induced skin reactions in C3H mice if applied daily for at least 2 weeks beginning immediately after irradiation. 31 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Complementary and alternative medicine in reducing radiation-induced skin toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jennifer J; Cui, Tengjiao; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Allen, Glenn O; Li, Jie; Takita, Cristiane; Lally, Brian E

    2014-08-01

    Radiation therapy-induced acute and late effects, particularly skin toxicities, have significant impact on cancer patients' quality of life and long-term survival. To date, no effective topical agents have been routinely used in the clinical setting to prevent skin toxicity. Using SKH-hr1 hairless mice, we investigated two complementary and alternative medicine in their effects on inflammation and ionizing radiation (IR)-induced skin toxicity: Calendula officinalis (CO) and Ching Wan Hung (CWH). They were applied immediately following each IR dosing of 10 Gy/day for 4 days. Skin toxicity and inflammatory factors were evaluated at multiple time points up to 15 days post-radiation. Serum interleukin (IL)-1α, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP1), keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) were significantly induced by radiation. Both CO and CWH significantly inhibited IR-induced MCP1 (p < 0.01), KC (p < 0.05), and G-CSF (p < 0.001). IR-induced erythema and blood vessel dilation were significantly reduced by CWH (p < 0.001) but not by CO at day 10 post-IR. Both agents inhibited IR-induced IL-1α (p < 0.01), MCP1 (p < 0.05), and vascular endothelial growth factor (p < 0.05). There were continuous inhibitory effects of CWH on IR-induced skin toxicities and inflammation. In contrast, CO treatment resulted in skin reactions compared to IR alone. Our results suggest that both CO and CWH reduce IR-induced inflammation and CWH reduced IR-induced erythema. In summary, CWH showed promising effects in reducing IR-related inflammation and skin toxicities, and future proof-of-principal testing in humans will be critical in evaluating its potential application in preventing IR-induced skin toxicities.

  8. The impact of concurrent granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor on radiation-induced mucositis in head and neck cancer patients: A double-blind placebo-controlled prospective Phase III study by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9901

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Janice K. . E-mail: janice.ryu@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu; Swann, Suzanne; LeVeque, Francis; Johnson, Darlene J.; Chen, Allan; Fortin, Andre; Kim, Harold; Ang, Kian K.

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: Based on early clinical evidence of potential mucosal protection by granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized study to test the efficacy and safety of GM-CSF in reducing the severity and duration of mucosal injury and pain (mucositis) associated with curative radiotherapy (RT) in head-and-neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients included those with head-and-neck cancer with radiation ports encompassing >50% of oral cavity and/or oropharynx. Standard RT ports were used to cover the primary tumor and regional lymphatics at risk in standard fractionation to 60-70 Gy. Concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy was allowed. Patients were randomized to receive subcutaneous injection of GM-CSF 250 {mu}g/m{sup 2} or placebo 3 times a week. Mucosal reaction was assessed during the course of RT using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria and the protocol-specific scoring system. Results: Between October 2000 and September 2002, 130 patients from 36 institutions were accrued. Nine patients (7%) were excluded from the analysis, 3 as a result of drug unavailability. More than 80% of the patients participated in the quality-of-life endpoint of this study. The GM-CSF did not cause any increase in toxicity compared with placebo. There was no statistically significant difference in the average mean mucositis score in the GM-CSF and placebo arms by a t test (p = 0.4006). Conclusion: This placebo-controlled, randomized study demonstrated no significant effect of GM-CSF given concurrently compared with placebo in reducing the severity or duration of RT-induced mucositis in patients undergoing definitive RT for head-and-neck cancer.

  9. Amelioration of radiation-induced oral cavity mucositis and distant bone marrow suppression in fanconi anemia Fancd2-/- (FVB/N) mice by intraoral GS-nitroxide JP4-039.

    PubMed

    Berhane, Hebist; Shinde, Ashwin; Kalash, Ronny; Xu, Karen; Epperly, Michael W; Goff, Julie; Franicola, Darcy; Zhang, Xichen; Dixon, Tracy; Shields, Donna; Wang, Hong; Wipf, Peter; Li, Song; Gao, Xiang; Greenberger, Joel S

    2014-07-01

    The altered DNA damage response pathway in patients with Fanconi anemia (FA) may increase the toxicity of clinical radiotherapy. We quantitated oral cavity mucositis in irradiated Fanconi anemia Fancd2(-/-) mice, comparing this to Fancd2(+/-) and Fancd2(+/+) mice, and we measured distant bone marrow suppression and quantitated the effect of the intraoral radioprotector GS-nitroxide, JP4-039 in F15 emulsion. We found that FA mice were more susceptible to radiation injury and that protection from radiation injury by JP4-039/F15 was observed at all radiation doses. Adult 10-12-week-old mice, of FVB/N background Fancd2(-/-), Fancd2(+/-) and Fancd2(+/+) were head and neck irradiated with 24, 26, 28 or 30 Gy (large fraction sizes typical of stereotactic radiosurgery treatments) and subgroups received intraoral JP4-039 (0.4 mg/mouse in 100 μL F15 liposome emulsion) preirradiation. On day 2 or 5 postirradiation, mice were sacrificed, tongue tissue and femur marrow were excised for quantitation of radiation-induced stress response, inflammatory and antioxidant gene transcripts, histopathology and assay for femur marrow colony-forming hematopoietic progenitor cells. Fancd2(-/-) mice had a significantly higher percentage of oral mucosal ulceration at day 5 after 26 Gy irradiation (59.4 ± 8.2%) compared to control Fancd2(+/+) mice (21.7 ± 2.9%, P = 0.0063). After 24 Gy irradiation, Fancd2(-/-) mice had a higher oral cavity percentage of tongue ulceration compared to Fancd2(+/+) mice irradiated with higher doses of 26 Gy (P = 0.0123). Baseline and postirradiation oral cavity gene transcripts were altered in Fancd2(-/-) mice compared to Fancd2(+/+) controls. Fancd2(-/-) mice had decreased baseline femur marrow CFU-GM, BFUe and CFU-GEMM, which further decreased after 24 or 26 Gy head and neck irradiation. These changes were not seen in head- and neck-irradiated Fancd2(+/+) mice. In radiosensitive Fancd2(-/-) mice, biomarkers of both local oral cavity and distant marrow

  10. Syzygium cumini (Jamun) reduces the radiation-induced DNA damage in the cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Jagetia, Ganesh Chandra; Baliga, Manjeshwar Shrinath

    2002-06-01

    The effects of various concentrations (0.0, 1.56, 3.125, 6.25, 12.5, 25, 50 and 100 microg/ml) of the leaf extract of Syzygium cumini Linn. or Eugenia cumini (SC; black plum, Jamun, family Myrtaceae) was studied on the alteration in the radiation-induced micronuclei formation in the cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Treatment of lymphocytes to various concentrations of SC resulted in a dose dependent increase in the micronuclei-induction, especially after 25-100 microg/ml extract. The exposure of human lymphocytes to various concentrations of SC extract before 3 Gy gamma-irradiation resulted in a significant decline in the micronuclei-induction at all the drug doses when compared with the non-drug treated irradiated cultures. A nadir in MNBNC frequency was observed for 12.5 microg/ml drug concentration, where the MNBNC frequency was approximately fourfold lower than that of the non-drug treated irradiated cultures. Therefore, this dose may be considered as an optimum dose for radiation protection. Our study demonstrates that the leaf extract of S. cumini, a plant traditionally used to treat diabetic disorders protects against the radiation-induced DNA damage. PMID:12084616

  11. Oral supplementation of butyrate reduces mucositis and intestinal permeability associated with 5-Fluorouracil administration.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Talita Mayra; Leonel, Alda Jusceline; Melo, Marco Antônio; Santos, Rosana R G; Cara, Denise Carmona; Cardoso, Valbert N; Correia, Maria I T D; Alvarez-Leite, Jacqueline I

    2012-07-01

    Mucositis affects about 40 % of patients undergoing chemotherapy. Short chain fatty acids (SCFA), mainly butyrate, are claimed to improve mucosal integrity, reduce intestinal permeability and act as anti-inflammatory agents for the colon mucosa. We evaluated the effects of oral administration of SCFA or butyrate in the 5FU-induced mucositis. Mice received water, SCFA or butyrate during all experiment (10 days) and a single dose of 5FU (200 mg/kg) 3 days before euthanasia. We evaluated inflammatory and histological score by morphometry, and by activity of enzymes specific to neutrophil, eosinophil and macrophage and TLR-4, TNF-alpha and IL6 expressions. Intestinal permeability and tight junction protein ZO-1 expression were evaluated. Mice from the 5FU (5-Fluorouracil) group presented weight loss, ulcerations and inflammatory infiltration of neutrophils and eosinophils, increased expression of IL6 and TNF-alpha and increased intestinal permeability. SCFA minimized intestinal damage, reduced ulcerations without affecting intestinal permeability. Butyrate alone was more efficient at improving those parameters than in SCFA solution and also reduced intestinal permeability. The expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and ZO-1 tended to be higher in the SCFA supplemented but not in the butyrate supplemented group. We showed the beneficial effects of butyrate on intestinal mucositis and its promising function as an adjuvant in the treatment of diseases not only of the colon, but also of the small intestine.

  12. Chemical chaperones reduce ionizing radiation-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and cell death in IEC-6 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eun Sang; Lee, Hae-June; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Jeong, Jae-Hoon; Kang, Seongman; Lim, Young-Bin

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • UPR activation precedes caspase activation in irradiated IEC-6 cells. • Chemical ER stress inducers radiosensitize IEC-6 cells. • siRNAs that targeted ER stress responses ameliorate IR-induced cell death. • Chemical chaperons prevent cell death in irradiated IEC-6 cells. - Abstract: Radiotherapy, which is one of the most effective approaches to the treatment of various cancers, plays an important role in malignant cell eradication in the pelvic area and abdomen. However, it also generates some degree of intestinal injury. Apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is the primary pathological factor that initiates radiation-induced intestinal injury, but the mechanism by which ionizing radiation (IR) induces apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is not clearly understood. Recently, IR has been shown to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, thereby activating the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cells. However, the consequences of the IR-induced activation of the UPR signaling pathway on radiosensitivity in intestinal epithelial cells remain to be determined. In this study, we investigated the role of ER stress responses in IR-induced intestinal epithelial cell death. We show that chemical ER stress inducers, such as tunicamycin or thapsigargin, enhanced IR-induced caspase 3 activation and DNA fragmentation in intestinal epithelial cells. Knockdown of Xbp1 or Atf6 with small interfering RNA inhibited IR-induced caspase 3 activation. Treatment with chemical chaperones prevented ER stress and subsequent apoptosis in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Our results suggest a pro-apoptotic role of ER stress in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Furthermore, inhibiting ER stress may be an effective strategy to prevent IR-induced intestinal injury.

  13. Targeting α4β7 integrin reduces mucosal transmission of SIV and protects GALT from infection

    PubMed Central

    Byrareddy, Siddappa N.; Kallam, Brianne; Arthos, James; Cicala, Claudia; Nawaz, Fatima; Hiatt, Joseph; Kersh, Ellen N.; McNicholl, Janet M.; Hanson, Debra; Reimann, Keith A.; Brameier, Markus; Walter, Lutz; Rogers, Kenneth; Mayne, Ann E.; Dunbar, Paul; Villinger, Tara; Little, Dawn; Parslow, Tristram G.; Santangelo, Philip J.; Villinger, Francois; Fauci, Anthony S.; Ansari, Aftab A.

    2014-01-01

    α4β7 integrin expressing CD4+ T cells preferentially traffic to gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) and play a key role in HIV/SIV pathogenesis. The administration of an anti-α4β7 monoclonal antibody during acute infection protects macaques from transmission following repeated low-dose intra-vaginal challenges with SIVmac251. In treated animals that became infected the GALT was significantly protected and CD4+ T–cell numbers were maintained. Thus, targeting α4β7 reduces mucosal transmission of SIV in macaques. PMID:25419708

  14. Saccharomyces cerevisiae UFMG A-905 treatment reduces intestinal damage in a murine model of irinotecan-induced mucositis.

    PubMed

    Bastos, R W; Pedroso, S H S P; Vieira, A T; Moreira, L M C; França, C S; Cartelle, C T; Arantes, R M E; Generoso, S V; Cardoso, V N; Neves, M J; Nicoli, J R; Martins, F S

    2016-09-01

    Indigenous microbiota plays a crucial role in the development of several intestinal diseases, including mucositis. Gastrointestinal mucositis is a major and serious side effect of cancer therapy, and there is no effective therapy for this clinical condition. However, some probiotics have been shown to attenuate such conditions. To evaluate the effects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae UFMG A-905 (Sc-905), a potential probiotic yeast, we investigated whether pre- or post-treatment with viable or inactivated Sc-905 could prevent weight loss and intestinal lesions, and maintain integrity of the mucosal barrier in a mucositis model induced by irinotecan in mice. Only post-treatment with viable Sc-905 was able to protect mice against the damage caused by chemotherapy, reducing the weight loss, increase of intestinal permeability and jejunal lesions (villous shortening). Besides, this treatment reduced oxidative stress, prevented the decrease of goblet cells and stimulated the replication of cells in the intestinal crypts of mice with experimental mucositis. In conclusion, Sc-905 protects animals against irinotecan-induced mucositis when administered as a post-treatment with viable cells, and this effect seems to be related with the reduction of oxidative stress and preservation of intestinal mucosa. PMID:27133563

  15. Repeated autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell injections improve radiation-induced proctitis in pigs.

    PubMed

    Linard, Christine; Busson, Elodie; Holler, Valerie; Strup-Perrot, Carine; Lacave-Lapalun, Jean-Victor; Lhomme, Bruno; Prat, Marie; Devauchelle, Patrick; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Simon, Jean-Marc; Bonneau, Michel; Lataillade, Jean-Jacques; Benderitter, Marc

    2013-11-01

    The management of proctitis in patients who have undergone very-high-dose conformal radiotherapy is extremely challenging. The fibrosis-necrosis, fistulae, and hemorrhage induced by pelvic overirradiation have an impact on morbidity. Augmenting tissue repair by the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may be an important advance in treating radiation-induced toxicity. Using a preclinical pig model, we investigated the effect of autologous bone marrow-derived MSCs on high-dose radiation-induced proctitis. Irradiated pigs received repeated intravenous administrations of autologous bone marrow-derived MSCs. Immunostaining and real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis were used to assess the MSCs' effect on inflammation, extracellular matrix remodeling, and angiogenesis, in radiation-induced anorectal and colon damages. In humans, as in pigs, rectal overexposure induces mucosal damage (crypt depletion, macrophage infiltration, and fibrosis). In a pig model, repeated administrations of MSCs controlled systemic inflammation, reduced in situ both expression of inflammatory cytokines and macrophage recruitment, and augmented interleukin-10 expression in rectal mucosa. MSC injections limited radiation-induced fibrosis by reducing collagen deposition and expression of col1a2/col3a1 and transforming growth factor-β/connective tissue growth factor, and by modifying the matrix metalloproteinase/TIMP balance. In a pig model of proctitis, repeated injections of MSCs effectively reduced inflammation and fibrosis. This treatment represents a promising therapy for radiation-induced severe rectal damage. PMID:24068742

  16. Neurogenic differentiation factor NeuroD confers protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Du, Aonan; Xu, Jing; Ma, Yanchao; Cao, Han; Yang, Chao; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Xing, Chun-Gen; Chen, Ming; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Shuyu; Cao, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract, especially the small intestine, is particularly sensitive to radiation, and is prone to radiation-induced injury as a result. Neurogenic differentiation factor (NeuroD) is an evolutionarily-conserved basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor. NeuroD contains a protein transduction domain (PTD), which allows it to be exogenously delivered across the membrane of mammalian cells, whereupon its transcription activity can be unleashed. Whether NeuroD has therapeutic effects for radiation-induced injury remains unclear. In the present study, we prepared a NeuroD-EGFP recombinant protein, and explored its protective effects on the survival and intestinal damage induced by ionizing radiation. Our results showed that NeuroD-EGFP could be transduced into small intestine epithelial cells and tissues. NeuroD-EGFP administration significantly increased overall survival of mice exposed to lethal total body irradiation (TBI). This recombinant NeuroD also reduced radiation-induced intestinal mucosal injury and apoptosis, and improved crypt survival. Expression profiling of NeuroD-EGFP-treated mice revealed upregulation of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1), a known inhibitor of apoptosis in mammalian cells. In conclusion, NeuroD confers protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury, and provides a novel therapeutic clinical option for the prevention of intestinal side effects of radiotherapy and the treatment of victims of incidental exposure. PMID:27436572

  17. Radiation-induced pneumothorax

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, D.M.; Littman, P.; Gefter, W.B.; Miller, W.T.; Raney, R.B. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Pneumothorax is an uncommon complication of radiation therapy to the chest. The proposed pathogenesis is radiation-induced fibrosis promoting subpleural bleb formation that ruptures resulting in pneumothorax. We report on two young patients with primary sarcomas without pulmonary metastases who developed spontaneous pneumothorax after irradiation. Neither patient had antecedent radiographic evidence of pulmonary fibrosis.

  18. Highly specific blockade of CCR5 inhibits leukocyte trafficking and reduces mucosal inflammation in murine colitis

    PubMed Central

    Mencarelli, Andrea; Cipriani, Sabrina; Francisci, Daniela; Santucci, Luca; Baldelli, Franco; Distrutti, Eleonora; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Targeted disruption of leukocyte trafficking to the gut represents a promising approach for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). CCR5, the shared receptor for MIP1α and β and RANTES, is expressed by multiple leukocytes. Here, we aimed to determine the role of CCR5 in mediating leukocyte trafficking in models of colitis, and evaluate the therapeutic potential of maraviroc, an orally active CCR5 antagonist used in the treatment of CCR5-tropic HIV. Acute and chronic colitis were induced by administration of DSS or TNBS to wild-type and CCR5−/− mice or adoptive transfer of splenic naïve CD4+ T-cells from wild type or CCR5−/− mice into RAG-1−/−. CCR5 gene ablation reduced the mucosal recruitment and activation of CCR5-bearing CD4+ and CD11b+ leukocytes, resulting in profound attenuation of signs and symptoms of inflammation in the TNBS and transfer models of colitis. In the DSS/TNBS colitis and in the transfer model, maraviroc attenuated development of intestinal inflammation by selectively reducing the recruitment of CCR5 bearing leukocytes. In summary, CCR5 regulates recruitment of blood leukocytes into the colon indicating that targeting CCR5 may offer therapeutic options in IBDs. PMID:27492684

  19. Highly specific blockade of CCR5 inhibits leukocyte trafficking and reduces mucosal inflammation in murine colitis.

    PubMed

    Mencarelli, Andrea; Cipriani, Sabrina; Francisci, Daniela; Santucci, Luca; Baldelli, Franco; Distrutti, Eleonora; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2016-08-05

    Targeted disruption of leukocyte trafficking to the gut represents a promising approach for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). CCR5, the shared receptor for MIP1α and β and RANTES, is expressed by multiple leukocytes. Here, we aimed to determine the role of CCR5 in mediating leukocyte trafficking in models of colitis, and evaluate the therapeutic potential of maraviroc, an orally active CCR5 antagonist used in the treatment of CCR5-tropic HIV. Acute and chronic colitis were induced by administration of DSS or TNBS to wild-type and CCR5(-/-) mice or adoptive transfer of splenic naïve CD4(+) T-cells from wild type or CCR5(-/-) mice into RAG-1(-/-). CCR5 gene ablation reduced the mucosal recruitment and activation of CCR5-bearing CD4(+) and CD11b(+) leukocytes, resulting in profound attenuation of signs and symptoms of inflammation in the TNBS and transfer models of colitis. In the DSS/TNBS colitis and in the transfer model, maraviroc attenuated development of intestinal inflammation by selectively reducing the recruitment of CCR5 bearing leukocytes. In summary, CCR5 regulates recruitment of blood leukocytes into the colon indicating that targeting CCR5 may offer therapeutic options in IBDs.

  20. Emu Oil Combined with Lyprinol™ Reduces Small Intestinal Damage in a Rat Model of Chemotherapy-Induced Mucositis.

    PubMed

    Mashtoub, Suzanne; Lampton, Lorrinne S; Eden, Georgina L; Cheah, Ker Y; Lymn, Kerry A; Bajic, Juliana E; Howarth, Gordon S

    2016-10-01

    Chemotherapy-induced mucositis is characterized by inflammation and ulcerating lesions lining the alimentary tract. Emu Oil and Lyprinol™ have independently demonstrated their therapeutic potential in intestinal inflammatory disorders, including mucositis. We investigated Emu Oil and Lyprinol™ in combination for their further potential to alleviate chemotherapy-induced mucositis in rats. Rats were gavaged with (1 ml) water, Olive Oil, Emu Oil + Olive Oil, Lyprinol™ + Olive Oil or Emu Oil + Lyprinol™ from Days 0 to 7, injected with saline (control) or 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) on Day 5 and euthanized on Day 8. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity (indicative of acute inflammation), histological severity scores, and intestinal architecture were quantified. Myeloperoxidase activity was significantly increased in the jejunum and ileum following 5-FU, compared to saline controls. Both Olive Oil and Emu Oil + Lyprinol™ significantly reduced jejunal MPO levels (1.8-fold and 1.7-fold, respectively), whereas only Emu Oil + Lyprinol™ significantly decreased ileal MPO levels, relative to 5-FU controls. All oil treatments decreased histological severity scores in the jejunum and ileum, and normalized crypt depth in the mid small intestine, relative to 5-FU controls. Emu Oil combined with Lyprinol™ partially reduced acute small intestinal inflammation. Isolating bioactive constituents of these naturally sourced oils could provide a more targeted strategy to protect against intestinal mucositis. PMID:27618153

  1. Dietary L-arginine supplementation reduces Methotrexate-induced intestinal mucosal injury in rat

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Arginine (ARG) and nitric oxide maintain the mucosal integrity of the intestine in various intestinal disorders. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of oral ARG supplementation on intestinal structural changes, enterocyte proliferation and apoptosis following methotrexate (MTX)-induced intestinal damage in a rat. Methods Male rats were divided into four experimental groups: Control rats, CONTR-ARG rats, were treated with oral ARG given in drinking water 72 hours before and 72 hours following vehicle injection, MTX rats were treated with a single dose of methotrexate, and MTX-ARG rats were treated with oral ARG following injection of MTX. Intestinal mucosal damage, mucosal structural changes, enterocyte proliferation and enterocyte apoptosis were determined 72 hours following MTX injection. RT-PCR was used to determine bax and bcl-2 mRNA expression. Results MTX-ARG rats demonstrated greater jejunal and ileal bowel weight, greater ileal mucosal weight, greater ileal mucosal DNA and protein levels, greater villus height in jejunum and ileum and crypt depth in ileum, compared to MTX animals. A significant decrease in enterocyte apoptosis in the ileum of MTX-ARG rats (vs MTX) was accompanied by decreased bax mRNA and protein expression and increased bcl-2 protein levels. Conclusions Treatment with oral ARG prevents mucosal injury and improves intestinal recovery following MTX- injury in the rat. PMID:22545735

  2. REC-2006-A Fractionated Extract of Podophyllum hexandrum Protects Cellular DNA from Radiation-Induced Damage by Reducing the Initial Damage and Enhancing Its Repair In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Pankaj; Shukla, Sandeep Kumar; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Podophyllum hexandrum, a perennial herb commonly known as the Himalayan May Apple, is well known in Indian and Chinese traditional systems of medicine. P. hexandrum has been widely used for the treatment of venereal warts, skin infections, bacterial and viral infections, and different cancers of the brain, lung and bladder. This study aimed at elucidating the effect of REC-2006, a bioactive fractionated extract from the rhizome of P. hexandrum, on the kinetics of induction and repair of radiation-induced DNA damage in murine thymocytes in vivo. We evaluated its effect on non-specific radiation-induced DNA damage by the alkaline halo assay in terms of relative nuclear spreading factor (RNSF) and gene-specific radiation-induced DNA damage via semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Whole body exposure of animals with gamma rays (10 Gy) caused a significant amount of DNA damage in thymocytes (RNSF values 17.7 ± 0.47, 12.96 ± 1.64 and 3.3 ± 0.014) and a reduction in the amplification of β-globin gene to 0, 28 and 43% at 0, 15 and 60 min, respectively. Administrating REC-2006 at a radioprotective concentration (15 mg kg(-1) body weight) 1 h before irradiation resulted in time-dependent reduction of DNA damage evident as a decrease in RNSF values 6.156 ± 0.576, 1.647 ± 0.534 and 0.496 ± 0.012, and an increase in β-globin gene amplification 36, 95 and 99%, at 0, 15 and 60 min, respectively. REC-2006 scavenged radiation-induced hydroxyl radicals in a dose-dependent manner stabilized DPPH free radicals and also inhibited superoxide anions. Various polyphenols and flavonoides present in REC-2006 might contribute to scavenging of radiation-induced free radicals, thereby preventing DNA damage and stimulating its repair.

  3. Radiation-Induced Bioradicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahorte, Philippe; Mondelaers, Wim

    This chapter represents the second part of a review in which the production and application of radiation-induced radicals in biological matter are discussed. In part one the general aspects of the four stages (physical, physicochemical, chemical and biological) of interaction of radiation with matter in general and biological matter in particular, were discussed. Here an overview is presented of modem technologies and theoretical methods available for studying these radiation effects. The relevance is highlighted of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations with respect to obtaining structural information on bioradicals, and a survey is given of the research studies in this field. We also discuss some basic aspects of modem accelerator technologies which can be used for creating radicals and we conclude with an overview of applications of radiation processing in biology and related fields such as biomedical and environmental engineering, food technology, medicine and pharmacy.

  4. The effect of honey on mucositis induced by chemoradiation in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Pradip Kumar; Ray, Amitabh; Mitra, Tarak Nath; Jana, Utpal; Bhattacharya, Jibak; Ganguly, Subir

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pure natural honey on radiation-induced mucositis. Fifty-five patients diagnosed with head and neck cancer requiring radiation to the oropharyngeal mucosal area were divided into two groups (study arm-28 and control arm-27) to receive either chemoradiation or chemoradiation plus topical application of honey. Patients were treated using a telecobalt machine at 2 Gy per day, five times a week up to a total dose of 66 Gy. in the study arm, patients were advised to take 20 ml of honey 15 minutes before, 15 minutes after and similar amount at bed time. Patients were evaluated every week for the development of radiation mucositis using the WHO grading system. There was significant reduction in the symptomatic grades 3 and 4 mucositis in honey-treated patients compared to controls ie, 18% versus 41% for grade 3 and 4% versus 22% for grade 4 mucositis. Seventy-one per cent of patients treated with topical honey showed no change or a positive gain in body weight. In the control group also 22% had no weight loss, though none showed weight gain. Furthermore, it didn't affect blood sugar level when initial fasting blood sugar level was < 150 mg%. Honey is a cheap, simple, easily available and effective agent in reducing radiation-induced mucositis. Within the limits of this study the results showed the application of natural honey is effective in managing radiation induced mucositis, which warrants further multicentric randomised trials to validate the findings. PMID:23520669

  5. Radiation Induced Genomic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William F.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after irradiation of parental cells. The phenotype is well established both in vivo (Morgan 2003) and in vitro (Morgan 2003), and may be critical in radiation carcinogenesis (Little 2000, Huang et al. 2003). Instability can be induced by both the deposition of energy in irradiated cells as well as by signals transmitted by irradiated (targeted) cells to non-irradiated (non-targeted) cells (Kadhim et al. 1992, Lorimore et al. 1998). Thus both targeted and non-targeted cells can pass on the legacy of radiation to their progeny. However the radiation induced events and cellular processes that respond to both targeted and non-targeted radiation effects that lead to the unstable phenotype remain elusive. The cell system we have used to study radiation induced genomic instability utilizes human hamster GM10115 cells. These cells have a single copy of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes. Instability is evaluated in the clonal progeny of irradiated cells and a clone is considered unstable if it contains three or more metaphase sub-populations involving unique rearrangements of the human chromosome (Marder and Morgan 1993). Many of these unstable clones have been maintained in culture for many years and have been extensively characterized. As initially described by Clutton et al., (Clutton et al. 1996) many of our unstable clones exhibit persistently elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (Limoli et al. 2003), which appear to be due dysfunctional mitochondria (Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2006). Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, our unstable clones do not demonstrate a “mutator phenotype” (Limoli et al. 1997), but they do continue to rearrange their genomes for many years. The limiting factor with this system is the target – the human chromosome. While some clones demonstrate amplification of this chromosome and thus lend

  6. Quercetin inhibits radiation-induced skin fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Horton, Jason A; Li, Fei; Chung, Eun Joo; Hudak, Kathryn; White, Ayla; Krausz, Kristopher; Gonzalez, Frank; Citrin, Deborah

    2013-08-01

    Radiation induced fibrosis of the skin is a late toxicity that may result in loss of function due to reduced range of motion and pain. The current study sought to determine if oral delivery of quercetin mitigates radiation-induced cutaneous injury. Female C3H/HeN mice were fed control chow or quercetin-formulated chow (1% by weight). The right hind leg was exposed to 35 Gy of X rays and the mice were followed serially to assess acute toxicity and hind leg extension. Tissue samples were collected for assessment of soluble collagen and tissue cytokines. Human and murine fibroblasts were subjected to clonogenic assays to determine the effects of quercetin on radiation response. Contractility of fibroblasts was assessed with a collagen contraction assay in the presence or absence of quercetin and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Western blotting of proteins involved in fibroblast contractility and TGF-β signaling were performed. Quercetin treatment significantly reduced hind limb contracture, collagen accumulation and expression of TGF-β in irradiated skin. Quercetin had no effect on the radioresponse of fibroblasts or murine tumors, but was capable of reducing the contractility of fibroblasts in response to TGF-β, an effect that correlated with partial stabilization of phosphorylated cofilin. Quercetin is capable of mitigating radiation induced skin fibrosis and should be further explored as a therapy for radiation fibrosis.

  7. Quercetin Inhibits Radiation-Induced Skin Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Jason A.; Li, Fei; Chung, Eun Joo; Hudak, Kathryn; White, Ayla; Krausz, Kristopher; Gonzalez, Frank; Citrin, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Radiation induced fibrosis of the skin is a late toxicity that may result in loss of function due to reduced range of motion and pain. The current study sought to determine if oral delivery of quercetin mitigates radiation-induced cutaneous injury. Female C3H/HeN mice were fed control chow or quercetin-formulated chow (1% by weight). The right hind leg was exposed to 35 Gy of X rays and the mice were followed serially to assess acute toxicity and hind leg extension. Tissue samples were collected for assessment of soluble collagen and tissue cytokines. Human and murine fibroblasts were subjected to clonogenic assays to determine the effects of quercetin on radiation response. Contractility of fibroblasts was assessed with a collagen contraction assay in the presence or absence of quercetin and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Western blotting of proteins involved in fibroblast contractility and TGF-β signaling were performed. Quercetin treatment significantly reduced hind limb contracture, collagen accumulation and expression of TGF-β in irradiated skin. Quercetin had no effect on the radioresponse of fibroblasts or murine tumors, but was capable of reducing the contractility of fibroblasts in response to TGF-β, an effect that correlated with partial stabilization of phosphorylated cofilin. Quercetin is capable of mitigating radiation induced skin fibrosis and should be further explored as a therapy for radiation fibrosis. PMID:23819596

  8. [Symptoms and treatment of radiation-induced reactions].

    PubMed

    Brzozowska, Anna; Idziak, Magdalena; Burdan, Franciszek; Mazurkiewicz, Maria

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the main methods of cancer treatment alone or in combination with chemotherapy. It is applied in about 60% of oncological patients. However, in spite of its clinical usefulness, radiotherapy is associated with a high risk of radiation-induced side effects, including dermatitis, enteritis, cystitis, pericarditis, pneumonia or depression, sexual function disorders, cardiomiopathy, coronary heart disease, anomalies of heart valves and development of second malignant tumor. The early diagnosis and proper treatment of radiation-induced side effects have a major impact on patients` quality of life and future prognosis. Radiation reactions can be categorized as acute or late, occurring before and after six months after radiotherapy. Among the most common acute reactions there were observed: skin rash, mucositis, nausea, vomiting, fever and radiation pneumonitis. Within reference to the late complications, we distinguish for instance fibrosis of organs, a radiation necrosis of bone, ulcers, fistulas, sexual dysfunction and the development of second malignant carcinomas. PMID:26039025

  9. Higher levels of mucosal antibody to pneumococcal vaccine candidate proteins are associated with reduced acute otitis media caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae in young children.

    PubMed

    Xu, Q; Casey, J R; Pichichero, M E

    2015-09-01

    Mucosal immunity has a crucial role in controlling human respiratory tract infections. This study characterizes the naturally acquired mucosal antibody levels to three Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn) protein antigens, pneumococcal histidine triad protein D (PhtD), pneumococcal choline binding protein A (PcpA), and pneumolysin (Ply), and assesses the association of the mucosal antibody levels with occurrence of acute otitis media (AOM) caused by Spn. Both nasopharyngeal (NP) immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA levels to all three proteins slightly decreased in children from 6 to 9 months of age and then gradually increased through 24 months of age. Spn NP colonization was associated with higher mucosal antibody levels to all three proteins. However, children with Spn AOM had 5-8-fold lower IgG and 3-6-fold lower IgA levels to the three proteins than children without AOM but asymptomatically colonized with Spn. Antigen-specific antibody levels in the middle ear fluid (MEF) were correlated with antibody levels in the NP. Children with AOM caused by Spn had lower antibody levels in both the MEF and NP than children with AOM caused by other pathogens. These results indicate that higher naturally acquired mucosal antibody levels to PhtD, PcpA and Ply are associated with reduced AOM caused by Spn.

  10. Higher Levels of Mucosal Antibody to Pneumococcal Vaccine Candidate Proteins Are Associated with Reduced Acute Otitis Media Caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae in Young Children

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingfu; Casey, Janet R.; Pichichero, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Mucosal immunity plays a crucial role in controlling human respiratory tract infections. This study characterizes the naturally acquired mucosal antibody levels to three Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn) protein antigens, pneumococcal histidine triad protein D (PhtD), pneumococcal choline binding protein A (PcpA), and pneumolysin (Ply), and assesses the association of the mucosal antibody levels with occurrence of acute otitis media (AOM) caused by Spn. Both nasophargyeal (NP) IgG and IgA levels to all three proteins slightly decreased in children from 6 to 9 months of age and then gradually increased through 24 months of age. Spn NP colonization was associated with higher mucosal antibody levels to all three proteins. However, children with Spn AOM had 5-8 fold lower IgG and 3-6 fold lower IgA levels to the three proteins than children without AOM but asymptomatically colonized with Spn. Antigen-specific antibody levels in the middle ear fluid (MEF) were correlated with antibody levels in the NP. Children with AOM caused by Spn had lower antibody levels in both the MEF and NP than children with AOM caused by other pathogens. These results indicate that higher naturally acquired mucosal antibody levels to PhtD, PcpA and Ply are associated with reduced AOM caused by Spn. PMID:25648056

  11. Reduced expression of the ICE-related protease CPP32 is associated with radiation-induced cisplatin resistance in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Eichholtz-Wirth, H; Stoetzer, O; Marx, K

    1997-01-01

    Low-dose fractionated gamma-irradiation (three cycles of 5 x 2 Gy) induced cisplatin resistance in HeLa cells. The drug resistance was modest (Rf of about 2) and stable, similar to that found previously in murine cells after irradiation. In the drug-resistant HeLa-C3 cells, flow cytometric analysis revealed a decreased number of apoptotic cells compared with the parental cells. Drug resistance was associated with considerably enhanced expression of the p53 suppressor protein in HeLa-C3 cells after cisplatin exposure but seemed not to be regulated by the bcl-2-dependent pathway. Cisplatin resistance correlated with reduced expression of ICE-related proteases (interleukin-1beta-converting enzyme). Basal levels of the 45-kDa precursor ICE protein were reduced in HeLa-C3 cells, while those of the mature 60-kDa heterotetramer were similar. The CPP32 protease, a member of the ICE family with structural homology but different substrate specificity, was expressed at a lowered level. After drug exposure, there was a slight increase of CPP32 in HeLa-C3 cells, equivalent to about 45% of the level attained in the parental cells. This is in contrast to the CPP32 levels measured after irradiation, which were similar in sensitive and in resistant cells. As the radiosensitivity is unchanged in both cell lines, these results suggest that cisplatin resistance in HeLa-C3 cells is associated with alterations of a CPP32-linked apoptotic pathway, which is affected by the damage caused by cisplatin but not by irradiation. Whether these changes are dependent on the observed p53 modifications is now being studied in resistant clones.

  12. Reduced expression of the ICE-related protease CPP32 is associated with radiation-induced cisplatin resistance in HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Eichholtz-Wirth, H.; Stoetzer, O.; Marx, K.

    1997-01-01

    Low-dose fractionated gamma-irradiation (three cycles of 5 x 2 Gy) induced cisplatin resistance in HeLa cells. The drug resistance was modest (Rf of about 2) and stable, similar to that found previously in murine cells after irradiation. In the drug-resistant HeLa-C3 cells, flow cytometric analysis revealed a decreased number of apoptotic cells compared with the parental cells. Drug resistance was associated with considerably enhanced expression of the p53 suppressor protein in HeLa-C3 cells after cisplatin exposure but seemed not to be regulated by the bcl-2-dependent pathway. Cisplatin resistance correlated with reduced expression of ICE-related proteases (interleukin-1beta-converting enzyme). Basal levels of the 45-kDa precursor ICE protein were reduced in HeLa-C3 cells, while those of the mature 60-kDa heterotetramer were similar. The CPP32 protease, a member of the ICE family with structural homology but different substrate specificity, was expressed at a lowered level. After drug exposure, there was a slight increase of CPP32 in HeLa-C3 cells, equivalent to about 45% of the level attained in the parental cells. This is in contrast to the CPP32 levels measured after irradiation, which were similar in sensitive and in resistant cells. As the radiosensitivity is unchanged in both cell lines, these results suggest that cisplatin resistance in HeLa-C3 cells is associated with alterations of a CPP32-linked apoptotic pathway, which is affected by the damage caused by cisplatin but not by irradiation. Whether these changes are dependent on the observed p53 modifications is now being studied in resistant clones. PMID:9374378

  13. Comparison of mucosal competitive exclusion and competitive exclusion treatment to reduce Salmonella and Campylobacter spp. colonization in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Stern, N J; Cox, N A; Bailey, J S; Berrang, M E; Musgrove, M T

    2001-02-01

    Control of Salmonella spp. during the earliest phases of broiler production may provide the best opportunity to reduce human pathogens on processed broiler carcasses. Application of the "Nurmi concept" has been demonstrated to be an effective means in reducing Salmonella colonization among broiler chicks. In 1989, Aho et al. developed a competitive exclusion (CE) culture for control of Salmonella spp., whereas a mucosal competitive exclusion culture (MCE) developed in the United States was originally created to control Campylobacter colonization (Stern et al., 1995). The major differences in the two patents were the higher level of anaerobic culture required, the degree of epithelial scraping and washing of the ceca, media used for subculturing, and the culture incubation temperatures (35 C vs. 42 C). The CE and MCE were compared for efficacy in reducing Salmonella and Campylobacter colonization in broiler chicks. Nine adult birds (three for each of three replicates) were slaughtered, and each of a bird's paired ceca were used to produce corresponding antagonistic microflora, which were administered to day-of-hatch chicks. The chicks (a total of 210) were challenged 24 h later with Salmonella and Campylobacter and were killed 1 wk later, and levels of the pathogens were determined. Ninety CE-treated birds were significantly more colonized by Salmonella typhimurium than those 90 chicks treated with the MCE microflora (3.97 log 10 cfu/g cecal contents vs. 1.25 log 10 cfu/g cecal contents). Also, Campylobacter spp. colonization of these birds was significantly higher for CE-treated birds when compared with MCE-treated birds (6.96 log 10 cfu/g cecal contents vs. 5.03 log 10 cfu/g cecal contents). These results can be useful in developing intervention strategies to reduce chicken colonization by Salmonella and Campylobacter.

  14. Severity of pancreatitis-associated intestinal mucosal barrier injury is reduced following treatment with the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wenhong; Abliz, Ablikim; Xu, Sheng; Sun, Rongze; Guo, Wenyi; Shi, Qiao; Yu, Jia; Wang, Weixing

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that apocynin, a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase (NOX) inhibitor, significantly decreased acute pancreatitis-associated inflammatory and oxidative stress parameters. In addition, apocynin was able to reduce ischemic reperfusion injury-associated damage; however, the exact effects of apocynin on acute pancreatitis-associated intestinal mucosal injury have yet to be fully clarified. The present study aimed to investigate the protective effects of apocynin on intestinal mucosal injury in a rat model of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). A total of 60 male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups (n=15/group): Sham operation group (SO), SAP group, apocynin treatment (APO) group and drug control (APO-CON) group. SAP was induced by retrograde injection of 5% sodium taurocholate into the biliopancreatic duct. Apocynin was administered 30 min prior to SAP induction in the APO group. All rats were sacrificed 12 h after SAP induction. Intestinal integrity was assessed by measuring diamine oxidase (DAO) levels. Morphological alterations to intestinal tissue were determined under light and transmission electron microscopy. NOX2, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB expression levels were detected in the intestine by immunohistochemical staining. Oxidative stress was detected by measuring intestinal malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase content. In addition, blood inflammatory cytokines, and amylase (AMY) and lipase (LIP) levels were evaluated. The results demonstrated that apocynin attenuated the following: i) Serum AMY, LIP and DAO levels; ii) pancreatic and intestinal pathological injury; iii) intestinal MDA content; iv) intestinal ultrastructural alterations; v) serum interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels; and vi) NOX2, p38 MAPK and NF-κB expression in intestinal tissues. These results suggested that apocynin may attenuate

  15. Severity of pancreatitis‑associated intestinal mucosal barrier injury is reduced following treatment with the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wenhong; Abliz, Ablikim; Xu, Sheng; Sun, Rongze; Guo, Wenyi; Shi, Qiao; Yu, Jia; Wang, Weixing

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that apocynin, a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase (NOX) inhibitor, significantly decreased acute pancreatitis‑associated inflammatory and oxidative stress parameters. In addition, apocynin was able to reduce ischemic reperfusion injury‑associated damage; however, the exact effects of apocynin on acute pancreatitis‑associated intestinal mucosal injury have yet to be fully clarified. The present study aimed to investigate the protective effects of apocynin on intestinal mucosal injury in a rat model of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). A total of 60 male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups (n=15/group): Sham operation group (SO), SAP group, apocynin treatment (APO) group and drug control (APO‑CON) group. SAP was induced by retrograde injection of 5% sodium taurocholate into the biliopancreatic duct. Apocynin was administered 30 min prior to SAP induction in the APO group. All rats were sacrificed 12 h after SAP induction. Intestinal integrity was assessed by measuring diamine oxidase (DAO) levels. Morphological alterations to intestinal tissue were determined under light and transmission electron microscopy. NOX2, p38 mitogen‑activated protein kinases (MAPK) and nuclear factor (NF)‑κB expression levels were detected in the intestine by immunohistochemical staining. Oxidative stress was detected by measuring intestinal malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase content. In addition, blood inflammatory cytokines, and amylase (AMY) and lipase (LIP) levels were evaluated. The results demonstrated that apocynin attenuated the following: i) Serum AMY, LIP and DAO levels; ii) pancreatic and intestinal pathological injury; iii) intestinal MDA content; iv) intestinal ultrastructural alterations; v) serum interleukin (IL)‑1β, IL‑6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α levels; and vi) NOX2, p38 MAPK and NF‑κB expression in intestinal tissues. These results suggested

  16. Potential for reduced radiation-induced toxicity using intensity-modulated arc therapy for whole-brain radiotherapy with hippocampal sparing.

    PubMed

    Pokhrel, Damodar; Sood, Sumit; Lominska, Christopher; Kumar, Pravesh; Badkul, Rajeev; Jiang, Hongyu; Wang, Fen

    2015-01-01

    mean and maximum doses to hippocampus were 8.4 ± 0.3 Gy, 11.2 ± 0.3 Gy, and 15.6 ± 0.4 Gy, on average, respectively. The mean values of homogeneity index (HI) and conformity index (CI) were 0.23 ± 0.02 and 0.96 ± 0.02, respectively. The maximum point dose to WB-PTV was 35.3 Gy, well below the optic pathway tolerance of 37.5 Gy. In addition, compared to NC-WBRT, dose reduction of mean and maximum of parotid glands from IMAT were 65% and 50%, respectively. Ear canals mean and maximum doses were reduced by 26% and 12%, and mean and maximum scalp doses were reduced by 9 Gy (32%) and 2 Gy (6%), on average, respectively. The mean dose to skin was 9.7 Gy with IMAT plans compared to 16 Gy with conventional NC-WBRT, demonstrating that absolute reduction of skin dose by a factor of 2. The mean values of the total number of monitor units (MUs) and actual beam on time were 719 ± 44 and 2.34 ± 0.14 min, respectively. The accuracy of IMAT QA plan delivery was (98.1 ± 0.8) %, on average, with a 3%/3 mm gamma index passing rate criteria. All of these plans were considered clinically acceptable per RTOG 0933 criteria. IMAT planning provided highly conformal and homogenous plan with a fast and effective treatment option for WBRT patients, sparing not only hippocampi but also other OARs, which could potentially result in an additional improvement of the quality life (QoL). In the future, we plan to evaluate the clinical potential of IMAT planning and treatment option with hippocampal and other OARs avoidance in our patient's cohort and asses the QoL of the WBRT patients, as well as simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) for the brain metastases diseases. PMID:26699321

  17. Radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, A.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of the heritable somatic effects of ionizing radiation exposures has relied upon the assumption that radiation-induced lesions were 'fixed' in the DNA prior to the first postirradiation mitosis. Lesion conversion was thought to occur during the initial round of DNA replication or as a consequence of error-prone enzymatic processing of lesions. The standard experimental protocols for the assessment of a variety of radiation-induced endpoints (cell death, specific locus mutations, neoplastic transformation and chromosome aberrations) evaluate these various endpoints at a single snapshot in time. In contrast with the aforementioned approaches, some studies have specifically assessed radiation effects as a function of time following exposure. Evidence has accumulated in support of the hypothesis that radiation exposure induces a persistent destabilization of the genome. This instability has been observed as a delayed expression of lethal mutations, as an enhanced rate of accumulation of non-lethal heritable alterations, and as a progressive intraclonal chromosomal heterogeneity. The genetic controls and biochemical mechanisms underlying radiation-induced genomic instability have not yet been delineated. The aim is to integrate the accumulated evidence that suggests that radiation exposure has a persistent effect on the stability of the mammalian genome.

  18. Radiation-induced cardiovascular effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapio, Soile

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to ionising radiation enhances the risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in a moderate but significant manner. Our goal is to identify molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease using cellular and mouse models. Two radiation targets are studied in detail: the vascular endothelium that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiac function, and the myocardium, in particular damage to the cardiac mitochondria. Ionising radiation causes immediate and persistent alterations in several biological pathways in the endothelium in a dose- and dose-rate dependent manner. High acute and cumulative doses result in rapid, non-transient remodelling of the endothelial cytoskeleton, as well as increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation of the heart tissue, independent of whether exposure is local or total body. Proteomic and functional changes are observed in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, mitochondrial function (respiration, ROS production etc.), oxidative stress, cellular adhesion, and cellular structure. The transcriptional regulators Akt and PPAR alpha seem to play a central role in the radiation-response of the endothelium and myocardium, respectively. We have recently started co-operation with GSI in Darmstadt to study the effect of heavy ions on the endothelium. Our research will facilitate the identification of biomarkers associated with adverse cardiac effects of ionising radiation and may lead to the development of countermeasures against radiation-induced cardiac damage.

  19. Triptolide Mitigates Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shanmin; Zhang, Mei; Chen, Chun; Cao, Yongbin; Tian, Yeping; Guo, Yangsong; Zhang, Bingrong; Wang, Xiaohui; Yin, Liangjie; Zhang, Zhenhuan; O'Dell, Walter; Okunieff, Paul; Zhang, Lurong

    2015-11-01

    Triptolide (TPL) may mitigate radiation-induced late pulmonary side effects through its inhibition of global pro-inflammatory cytokines. In this study, we evaluated the effect of TPL in C57BL/6 mice, the animals were exposed to radiation with vehicle (15 Gy), radiation with TPL (0.25 mg/kg i.v., twice weekly for 1, 2 and 3 months), radiation and celecoxib (CLX) (30 mg/kg) and sham irradiation. Cultured supernatant of irradiated RAW 264.7 and MLE-15 cells and lung lysate in different groups were enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays at 33 h. Respiratory rate, pulmonary compliance and pulmonary density were measured at 5 months in all groups. The groups exposed to radiation with vehicle and radiation with TPL exhibited significant differences in respiratory rate and pulmonary compliance (480 ± 75/min vs. 378 ± 76/min; 0.6 ± 0.1 ml/cm H2O/p kg vs. 0.9 ± 0.2 ml/cm H2O/p kg). Seventeen cytokines were significantly reduced in the lung lysate of the radiation exposure with TPL group at 5 months compared to that of the radiation with vehicle group, including profibrotic cytokines implicated in pulmonary fibrosis, such as IL-1β, TGF- β1 and IL-13. The radiation exposure with TPL mice exhibited a 41% reduction of pulmonary density and a 25% reduction of hydroxyproline in the lung, compared to that of radiation with vehicle mice. The trichrome-stained area of fibrotic foci and pathological scaling in sections of the mice treated with radiation and TPL mice were significantly less than those of the radiation with vehicle-treated group. In addition, the radiation with TPL-treated mice exhibited a trend of improved survival rate compared to that of the radiation with vehicle-treated mice at 5 months (83% vs. 53%). Three radiation-induced profibrotic cytokines in the radiation with vehicle-treated group were significantly reduced by TPL treatment, and this partly contributed to the trend of improved survival rate and pulmonary density and function and the decreased severity of

  20. Radiation-induced valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Gujral, Dorothy M; Lloyd, Guy; Bhattacharyya, Sanjeev

    2016-02-15

    Radiation to the mediastinum is a key component of treatment with curative intent for a range of cancers including Hodgkin's lymphoma and breast cancer. Exposure to radiation is associated with a risk of radiation-induced heart valve damage characterised by valve fibrosis and calcification. There is a latent interval of 10-20 years between radiation exposure and development of clinically significant heart valve disease. Risk is related to radiation dose received, interval from exposure and use of concomitant chemotherapy. Long-term outlook and the risk of valve surgery are related to the effects of radiation on mediastinal structures including pulmonary fibrosis and pericardial constriction. Dose prediction models to predict the risk of heart valve disease in the future and newer radiation techniques to reduce the radiation dose to the heart are being developed. Surveillance strategies for this cohort of cancer survivors at risk of developing significant heart valve complications are required.

  1. A Novel Peptide for Simultaneously Enhanced Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer and Mitigation of Oral Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Peili; Mancini, Maria; Sonis, Stephen T.; Fernandez-Martinez, Juan; Liu, Jing; Cohen, Ezra E. W.; Toback, F. Gary

    2016-01-01

    We have characterized a novel 21 amino acid-peptide derived from Antrum Mucosal Protein (AMP)-18 that mediates growth promotion of cultured normal epithelial cells and mitigates radiation-induced oral mucositis in animal models, while suppressing in vitro function of cancer cells. The objective of this study was to evaluate these dual potential therapeutic effects of AMP peptide in a clinically relevant animal model of head and neck cancer (HNC) by simultaneously assessing its effect on tumor growth and radiation-induced oral mucositis in an orthotopic model of HNC. Bioluminescent SCC-25 HNC cells were injected into the anterior tongue and tumors that formed were then subjected to focal radiation treatment. Tumor size was assessed using an in vivo imaging system, and the extent of oral mucositis was compared between animals treated with AMP peptide or vehicle (controls). Synergism between AMP peptide and radiation therapy was suggested by the finding that tumors in the AMP peptide/radiation therapy cohort demonstrated inhibited growth vs. radiation therapy-only treated tumors, while AMP peptide-treatment delayed the onset and reduced the severity of radiation therapy-induced oral mucositis. A differential effect on apoptosis appears to be one mechanism by which AMP-18 can stimulate growth and repair of injured mucosal epithelial cells while inhibiting proliferation of HNC cells. RNA microarray analysis identified pathways that are differentially targeted by AMP-18 in HNC vs. nontransformed cells. These observations confirm the notion that normal cells and tumor cells may respond differently to common biological stimuli, and that leveraging this finding in the case of AMP-18 may provide a clinically relevant opportunity. PMID:27049860

  2. The effect of tianeptine in the prevention of radiation-induced neurocognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Akyurek, Serap; Senturk, Vesile; Oncu, Bedriye; Ozyigit, Gokhan; Yilmaz, Sercan; Gokce, Saban Cakir

    2008-12-01

    Radiation-induced neurocognitive impairment is an undesirable radiation-induced toxicity and a common health problem in patients with primary or metastatic brain tumor. It greatly impairs quality of life for long-term brain tumor survivors. Hippocampus is the most important brain structure for neurocognitive functions. It has been shown that radiation affects the hippocampal neurogenesis due to either induce the apoptosis or reduce the precursor cell proliferation in the hippocampus. Radiation-induced microglial inflammatory response is also negative regulator of neurogenesis. Tianeptine is a clinically effective antidepressant that induces neurogenesis. It has also been shown that tianeptine is able to reduce apoptosis and cytoprotective against the effects of proinflammatory cytokines in the hippocampus. Given the putative role of impaired hippocampal neurogenesis in radiation-induced neurocognitive impairment we think that tianeptine can be effective for preventing radiation-induced neurocognitive impairment by increasing hippocampal neurogenesis.

  3. Mucosal adjuvants: Opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lingbin

    2016-09-01

    Most pathogens access the body via mucosal surfaces. Mucosal vaccination is a highly effective and recommended method to prevent mucosally transmitted infections. Compared with immunization via intramuscular injection, mucosal immunization offers remarkable advantages, including non-invasiveness, low costs and reduced risk of transmission of blood-borne diseases, which make it more acceptable to human beings, especially to young children. However, only few mucosal vaccines are licensed for human, which is mainly due to the deficiency of safe and effective mucosal adjuvants. Adjuvants, as important components of most vaccines, are essential to enhance immunity and induce immune memory. The development of mucosal adjuvants, unfortunately, has been severely hampered by research strategies based on empiric trials and non-comprehensive methods for safety evaluation. Therefore, changing the research and development strategies of mucosal adjuvant field from empiricism based discovery to rational design based invention is highly demanded. The change of strategies mainly depends upon clarification of mechanism of mucosal adjuvant activity though a combination of life science, information science and materials science. PMID:27159278

  4. Radiation-induced moyamoya syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Snehal S.; Paulino, Arnold C. . E-mail: apaulino@tmh.tmc.edu; Mai, Wei Y.; Teh, Bin S.

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: The moyamoya syndrome is an uncommon late complication after radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A PubMed search of English-language articles, with radiation, radiotherapy, and moyamoya syndrome used as search key words, yielded 33 articles from 1967 to 2002. Results: The series included 54 patients with a median age at initial RT of 3.8 years (range, 0.4 to 47). Age at RT was less than 5 years in 56.3%, 5 to 10 years in 22.9%, 11 to 20 years in 8.3%, 21 to 30 years in 6.3%, 31 to 40 years in 2.1%, and 41 to 50 years in 4.2%. Fourteen of 54 patients (25.9%) were diagnosed with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1). The most common tumor treated with RT was low-grade glioma in 37 tumors (68.5%) of which 29 were optic-pathway glioma. The average RT dose was 46.5 Gy (range, 22-120 Gy). For NF-1-positive patients, the average RT dose was 46.5 Gy, and for NF-1-negative patients, it was 58.1 Gy. The median latent period for development of moyamoya syndrome was 40 months after RT (range, 4-240). Radiation-induced moyamoya syndrome occurred in 27.7% of patients by 2 years, 53.2% of patients by 4 years, 74.5% of patients by 6 years, and 95.7% of patients by 12 years after RT. Conclusions: Patients who received RT to the parasellar region at a young age (<5 years) are the most susceptible to moyamoya syndrome. The incidence for moyamoya syndrome continues to increase with time, with half of cases occurring within 4 years of RT and 95% of cases occurring within 12 years. Patients with NF-1 have a lower radiation-dose threshold for development of moyamoya syndrome.

  5. Selenomethionine in Reducing Mucositis in Patients With Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Who Are Receiving Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-08

    Chemotherapeutic Agent Toxicity; Mucositis; Radiation Toxicity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Xerostomia

  6. Reduced mucosal side-effects of acetylsalicylic acid after conjugation with tris-hydroxymethyl-aminomethane. Synthesis and biological evaluation of a new anti-inflammatory compound.

    PubMed

    Varga, Gabriella; Lajkó, Norbert; Ugocsai, Melinda; Érces, Dániel; Horváth, Gyöngyi; Tóth, Gábor; Boros, Mihály; Ghyczy, Miklós

    2016-06-15

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) causes adverse haemorrhagic reactions in the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract, and previous results have suggested that combination therapy with 2-amino-2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-propanediol (Tris) could provide protection in this scenario. Based on this hypothesis, our aim was to develop a new compound from ASA and Tris precursors and to characterize the biological effects of ASA-Tris and the derivatives ASA-bis- and mono-hydroxymethyl-aminomethane (ASA-Bis, ASA-Mono, respectively) using in vivo and in vitro test systems. ASA or ASA conjugates (0.55mmol/kg, each) were administered intragastrically to Sprague-Dawley rats. Changes in the mucosal structure and in the serosal microcirculation were detected by in vivo imaging techniques, the plasma TNF-alpha, tissue xanthine oxidoreductase and myeloperoxidase activities, and liver cytochrome c changes were also determined. In two separate series, platelet aggregation and carrageenan arthritis-induced inflammatory pain were measured in control, ASA and ASA-Tris-treated groups. Severe mucosal injury and a significant decrease in serosal red blood cell velocity developed in the ASA-treated group and an ~2-fold elevation in proinflammatory mediator levels evolved. ASA-Tris did not cause bleeding, microcirculatory dysfunction, mucosal injury or an elevation in proinflammatory markers. The ASA-Mono and ASA-Bis conjugates did not cause macroscopic bleeding, but the inflammatory activation was apparent. ASA-Tris did not influence the cyclooxygenase-induced platelet aggregation significantly, but the inflammatory pain was reduced as effectively as in the case of equimolar ASA doses. ASA-Tris conjugation is an effective approach through which the GI side-effects of ASA are controlled by decreasing the cytokine-mediated progression of pro-inflammatory events.

  7. Reduced mucosal side-effects of acetylsalicylic acid after conjugation with tris-hydroxymethyl-aminomethane. Synthesis and biological evaluation of a new anti-inflammatory compound.

    PubMed

    Varga, Gabriella; Lajkó, Norbert; Ugocsai, Melinda; Érces, Dániel; Horváth, Gyöngyi; Tóth, Gábor; Boros, Mihály; Ghyczy, Miklós

    2016-06-15

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) causes adverse haemorrhagic reactions in the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract, and previous results have suggested that combination therapy with 2-amino-2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-propanediol (Tris) could provide protection in this scenario. Based on this hypothesis, our aim was to develop a new compound from ASA and Tris precursors and to characterize the biological effects of ASA-Tris and the derivatives ASA-bis- and mono-hydroxymethyl-aminomethane (ASA-Bis, ASA-Mono, respectively) using in vivo and in vitro test systems. ASA or ASA conjugates (0.55mmol/kg, each) were administered intragastrically to Sprague-Dawley rats. Changes in the mucosal structure and in the serosal microcirculation were detected by in vivo imaging techniques, the plasma TNF-alpha, tissue xanthine oxidoreductase and myeloperoxidase activities, and liver cytochrome c changes were also determined. In two separate series, platelet aggregation and carrageenan arthritis-induced inflammatory pain were measured in control, ASA and ASA-Tris-treated groups. Severe mucosal injury and a significant decrease in serosal red blood cell velocity developed in the ASA-treated group and an ~2-fold elevation in proinflammatory mediator levels evolved. ASA-Tris did not cause bleeding, microcirculatory dysfunction, mucosal injury or an elevation in proinflammatory markers. The ASA-Mono and ASA-Bis conjugates did not cause macroscopic bleeding, but the inflammatory activation was apparent. ASA-Tris did not influence the cyclooxygenase-induced platelet aggregation significantly, but the inflammatory pain was reduced as effectively as in the case of equimolar ASA doses. ASA-Tris conjugation is an effective approach through which the GI side-effects of ASA are controlled by decreasing the cytokine-mediated progression of pro-inflammatory events. PMID:27079640

  8. Radiation-induced sarcoma of the thyroid

    SciTech Connect

    Griem, K.L.; Robb, P.K.; Caldarelli, D.D.; Templeton, A.C. )

    1989-08-01

    A 23-year-old white man presented with a thyroid mass 12 years after receiving high-dose radiotherapy for a T2 and N1 lymphoepithelioma of the nasopharynx. Following subtotal thyroidectomy, a histopathologic examination revealed liposarcoma of the thyroid gland. The relationship between sarcomas and irradiation is described and Cahan and colleagues' criteria for radiation-induced sarcomas are reviewed. To our knowledge, we are presenting the first such case of a radiation-induced sarcoma of the thyroid gland.

  9. Amifostine (ETHYOL) protects rats from mucositis resulting from fractionated or hyperfractionated radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Cassatt, David R.; McCarthy, Michael P. . E-mail: mccarthym@medimmune.com

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: The cytoprotective drug amifostine (Ethyol) protects rats from oral mucositis resulting from a single dose of {gamma}-irradiation. We expanded earlier studies to determine whether multiple doses of amifostine protect against fractionated or hyperfractionated radiation and whether the active metabolite of amifostine (WR-1065) accumulates in tissues upon repeated administration. Methods and materials: Rats received amifostine daily for 5 days in conjunction with a 1-week fractionated radiation schedule and were evaluated for oral mucositis. Rats also received amifostine before the am or pm exposure or b.i.d. in conjunction with hyperfractionated radiation. To determine the pharmacokinetics of WR-1065 after repeated dosing, amifostine was given 5 days a week for 1 or 3 weeks, and rat tissue and plasma were collected at intervals during and after treatment and analyzed for WR-1065. Results: Amifostine protected rats from mucositis resulting from fractionated or hyperfractionated radiation. When the number of days of amifostine administration was reduced, protection was diminished. A dose of 100 mg/kg given in the morning or 2 doses at 50 mg/kg provided the best protection against hyperfractionated radiation. WR-1065 did not accumulate in tissues or tumor upon repeated administration. Conclusions: Amifostine prevented radiation-induced mucositis in a rat model; protection was dose and schedule dependent.

  10. Mucosal immunology

    PubMed Central

    Bienenstock, J.; Befus, A. D.

    1980-01-01

    In this review, we shall highlight some recent advances in mucosal immunology and also those concepts which seem to us to merit more attention than they normally receive. Since we cannot hope to be all inclusive, we recommend the following articles and books to the reader (Tomasi & Bienenstock, 1968; Tomasi & Grey, 1972; Bienenstock, 1974; Heremans, 1974; Mestecky & Lawton, 1974; Lamm, 1976; Tomasi, 1976; Waksman & Ozer, 1976; Porter & Knight, 1977; McGhee, Mestecky & Babb, 1978; Ogra & Dayton, 1979; Befus & Bienenstock, 1980). PMID:7002769

  11. Repair of radiation induced genetic damage under microgravity.

    PubMed

    Pross, H D; Kost, M; Kiefer, J

    1994-10-01

    The influence of microgravity on the repair of radiation induced genetic damage in a temperature-conditional repair mutant of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (rad 54-3) was investigated onboard the IML-1 mission (January 22nd-30th 1992, STS-42). Cells were irradiated before the flight, incubated under microgravity at the permissive (22 degrees C) and restrictive (36 degrees C) temperature and afterwards tested for survival. The results suggest that repair may be reduced under microgravity.

  12. Cathodoluminescence of radiation-induced zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Y.; Nishido, H.; Kayama, M.; Noumi, Y.

    2013-12-01

    youngest formation ages of 1.93-1.20 Ma and 1.7-0.9 Ma, respectively (Harayama,1994; Harayama et al., 2010) in the world. In this case, it is hardly to detect yellow CL emissions derived from radiation-induced defect center, suggesting low radiation dose of alpha radiation from 238U and 232Th on them. CL spectra of MZ, TZ and KZ showed an increase in the intensities of yellow emissions with an increase in radiation dose of He+ ion implantation, though He+ ion implantation reduces the intensities of their impurity centers. CL intensity in the yellow region depends on radiation dose of He+ ion implantation. Therefore, if the component of yellow emission could be deconvoluted from the CL spectra in zircon, its intensity will be used for an indicator to evaluate total exposure doses on it during geological age.

  13. Azilsartan reduced TNF-α and IL-1β levels, increased IL-10 levels and upregulated VEGF, FGF, KGF, and TGF-α in an oral mucositis model.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Aurigena Antunes; Varela, Hugo; de Medeiros, Caroline Addison Carvalho Xavier; de Castro Brito, Gerly Anne; de Lima, Kênio Costa; de Moura, Ligia Moreno; de Araújo Júnior, Raimundo Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a common complication of treatments for head and neck cancer, particularly radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy. OM is characterised by oral erythema, ulceration, and pain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of azilsartan (AZT), an angiotensin II receptor antagonist, on 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced oral mucositis (OM) in Syrian hamsters. OM was induced by the intraperitoneal administration of 5-FU on experimental days 1 (60 mg/Kg) and 2 (40 mg/Kg). Animals were pretreated with oral AZT (1, 5, or 10 mg/kg) or vehicle 30 min before 5-FU injection and daily until day 10. Experimental treatment protocols were approved by the Animal Ethics Committee Use/CEUA (Number 28/2012) of the UFRN. Macroscopic analysis and cheek pouch samples were removed for histopathologic analysis. Myeloperoxidase (MPO), Malonyldialdehyde (MDA), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), interleukin-10 (IL-10), and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were analysed by Enzyme Linked Immuno Sorbent Assay (ELISA). Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF)-α were measured by immunohistochemistry. Analysis of variance followed by Bonferroni's test was used to calculate the means of intergroup differences (p ≤ 0.05). Treatment with 1 mg/kg AZT reduced levels MPO (p<0.01), MDA (p<0.5) and histological inflammatory cell infiltration, and increased the presence of granulation tissue. AZT treatment at 1 mg/kg reduced the TNF-α (p<0.05) and IL-1β (p<0.05) levels, increased the cheek pouch levels of IL-10 (p<0.01), and upregulated VEGF, FGF, KGF, and TGF-α. Administration of AZT at higher doses (5 and 10 mg/kg) did not significantly reverse the OM. AZT at a dose of 1 mg/kg prevented the mucosal damage and inflammation associated with 5-FU-induced OM, increasing granulation and tissue repair. PMID:25689279

  14. Radiation-induced Cochlea hair cell death: mechanisms and protection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Pei-Xin; Du, Sha-Sha; Ren, Chen; Yao, Qi-Wei; Yuan, Ya-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Cochlea hair cell death is regarded to be responsible for the radiation-induced sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), which is one of the principal complications of radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancers. In this mini- review, we focus on the current progresses trying to unravel mechanisms of radiation-induced hair cell death and find out possible protection. P53, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathways have been proposed as pivotal in the processes leading to radiation hair cell death. Potential protectants, such as amifostine, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and epicatechin (EC) , are claimed to be effective at reducing radiation- inducedhair cell death. The RT dosage, selection and application of concurrent chemotherapy should be pre- examined in order to minimize the damage to cochlea hair cells.

  15. Autophagy promotes radiation-induced senescence but inhibits bystander effects in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yao-Huei; Yang, Pei-Ming; Chuah, Qiu-Yu; Lee, Yi-Jang; Hsieh, Yi-Fen; Peng, Chih-Wen; Chiu, Shu-Jun

    2014-07-01

    Ionizing radiation induces cellular senescence to suppress cancer cell proliferation. However, it also induces deleterious bystander effects in the unirradiated neighboring cells through the release of senescence-associated secretory phenotypes (SASPs) that promote tumor progression. Although autophagy has been reported to promote senescence, its role is still unclear. We previously showed that radiation induces senescence in PTTG1-depleted cancer cells. In this study, we found that autophagy was required for the radiation-induced senescence in PTTG1-depleted breast cancer cells. Inhibition of autophagy caused the cells to switch from radiation-induced senescence to apoptosis. Senescent cancer cells exerted bystander effects by promoting the invasion and migration of unirradiated cells through the release of CSF2 and the subsequently activation of the JAK2-STAT3 and AKT pathways. However, the radiation-induced bystander effects were correlated with the inhibition of endogenous autophagy in bystander cells, which also resulted from the activation of the CSF2-JAK2 pathway. The induction of autophagy by rapamycin reduced the radiation-induced bystander effects. This study reveals, for the first time, the dual role of autophagy in radiation-induced senescence and bystander effects.

  16. Modulation of Radiation-Induced Apoptosis by Thiolamines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warters, R. L.; Roberts, J. C.; Wilmore, B. H.; Kelley, L. L.

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to the thiolamine radioprotector N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-propanediamine (WR-1065) induced apoptosis in the mouse TB8-3 hybridoma after 60-minute (LD(sub50) = 4.5mM) or during a 20-hour (LD(sub50) = 0.15 mM) exposure. In contrast, a 20-hour exposure to 17 mM L-cysteine or 10 mM cysteamine was required to induce 50 percent apoptosis within 20 hours. Apoptosis was not induced by either a 60-minute or 20-hour exposure to 10 mM of the thiazolidime prodrugs ribose-cysteine (RibCys) or ribose-cysteamine (RibCyst). Thiolamine-induced apoptosis appeared to be a p53-independent process since it was induced by WR-1065 exposure in human HL60 cells. Exposure to WR-1065 (4mM for 15 minutes) or cysteine (10mM for 60 minutes) before and during irradiation protected cells against the induction of both DNA double-strand breaks and apoptosis, while exposure to RibCys (10 mM for 3 hours) did not. Treatment with either WR-1065, cysteine, RibCys or RibCyst for 60 minutes beginning 60 minutes after irradiation did not affect the level of radiation-induced apoptosis. In contrast, treatment with either cysteine, cysteamine or RibCys for 20 hours beginning 60 minutes after irradiation enhanced radiation-induced apoptosis. Similar experiments could not be conducted with WR-1065 because of its extreme toxicity. Our results indicate that thiolamine enhancement of radiation-induced apoptosis is not involved in their previously reported capacity to reduce radiation-induced mutations.

  17. Acetylcysteine Rinse in Reducing Saliva Thickness and Mucositis in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer Undergoing Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-04

    Mucositis; Oral Complications; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage II Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage II Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Mucoepidermoid

  18. Radiation-induced leukemias in ankylosing spondylitis

    SciTech Connect

    Toolis, F.; Potter, B.; Allan, N.C.; Langlands, A.O.

    1981-10-01

    Three cases of leukemia occurred in patients with ankylosing spondylitis treated by radiotherapy. In each case, the leukemic process exhibited bizarre features suggesting that radiation is likely to induce atypical forms of leukemia possessing unusual attributes not shared by spontaneously developing leukemia. The likely distinctive aspects of radiation-induced leukemia are discussed.

  19. A Novel Peptide to Treat Oral Mucositis Blocks Endothelial and Epithelial Cell Apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Xiaoyan; Chen Peili; Sonis, Stephen T.; Lingen, Mark W.; Berger, Ann; Toback, F. Gary

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: No effective agents currently exist to treat oral mucositis (OM) in patients receiving chemoradiation for the treatment of head-and-neck cancer. We identified a novel 21-amino acid peptide derived from antrum mucosal protein-18 that is cytoprotective, mitogenic, and motogenic in tissue culture and animal models of gastrointestinal epithelial cell injury. We examined whether administration of antrum mucosal protein peptide (AMP-p) could protect against and/or speed recovery from OM. Methods and Materials: OM was induced in established hamster models by a single dose of radiation, fractionated radiation, or fractionated radiation together with cisplatin to simulate conventional treatments of head-and-neck cancer. Results: Daily subcutaneous administration of AMP-p reduced the occurrence of ulceration and accelerated mucosal recovery in all three models. A delay in the onset of erythema after irradiation was observed, suggesting that a protective effect exists even before injury to mucosal epithelial cells occurs. To test this hypothesis, the effects of AMP-p on tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}-induced apoptosis were studied in an endothelial cell line (human dermal microvascular endothelial cells) as well as an epithelial cell line (human adult low-calcium, high-temperature keratinocytes; HaCaT) used to model the oral mucosa. AMP-p treatment, either before or after cell monolayers were exposed to tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, protected against development of apoptosis in both cell types when assessed by annexin V and propidium iodide staining followed by flow cytometry or ligase-mediated polymerase chain reaction. Conclusions: These observations suggest that the ability of AMP-p to attenuate radiation-induced OM could be attributable, at least in part, to its antiapoptotic activity.

  20. White and dark kidney beans reduce colonic mucosal damage and inflammation in response to dextran sodium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Monk, Jennifer M; Zhang, Claire P; Wu, Wenqing; Zarepoor, Leila; Lu, Jenifer T; Liu, Ronghua; Pauls, K Peter; Wood, Geoffrey A; Tsao, Rong; Robinson, Lindsay E; Power, Krista A

    2015-07-01

    Common beans are a rich source of nondigestible fermentable components and phenolic compounds that have anti-inflammatory effects. We assessed the gut-health-promoting potential of kidney beans in healthy mice and their ability to attenuate colonic inflammation following dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) exposure (via drinking water, 2% DSS w/v, 7 days). C57BL/6 mice were fed one of three isocaloric diets: basal diet control (BD), or BD supplemented with 20% cooked white (WK) or dark red kidney (DK) bean flour for 3 weeks. In healthy mice, anti-inflammatory microbial-derived cecal short chain fatty acid (SCFA) levels (acetate, butyrate and propionate), colon crypt height and colonic Mucin 1 (MUC1) and Resistin-like Molecule beta (Relmβ) mRNA expression all increased in WK- and DK-fed mice compared to BD, indicative of enhanced microbial activity, gut barrier integrity and antimicrobial defense response. During colitis, both bean diets reduced (a) disease severity, (b) colonic histological damage and (c) increased mRNA expression of antimicrobial and barrier integrity-promoting genes (Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4), MUC1-3, Relmβ and Trefoil Factor 3 (TFF3)) and reduced proinflammatory mediator expression [interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, interferon (IFN)γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1], which correlated with reduced colon tissue protein levels. Further, bean diets exerted a systemic anti-inflammatory effect during colitis by reducing serum levels of IL-17A, IFNγ, TNFα, IL-1β and IL-6. In conclusion, both WK and DK bean-supplemented diets enhanced microbial-derived SCFA metabolite production, gut barrier integrity and the microbial defensive response in the healthy colon, which supported an anti-inflammatory phenotype during colitis. Collectively, these data demonstrate a beneficial colon-function priming effect of bean consumption that mitigates colitis severity.

  1. White and dark kidney beans reduce colonic mucosal damage and inflammation in response to dextran sodium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Monk, Jennifer M; Zhang, Claire P; Wu, Wenqing; Zarepoor, Leila; Lu, Jenifer T; Liu, Ronghua; Pauls, K Peter; Wood, Geoffrey A; Tsao, Rong; Robinson, Lindsay E; Power, Krista A

    2015-07-01

    Common beans are a rich source of nondigestible fermentable components and phenolic compounds that have anti-inflammatory effects. We assessed the gut-health-promoting potential of kidney beans in healthy mice and their ability to attenuate colonic inflammation following dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) exposure (via drinking water, 2% DSS w/v, 7 days). C57BL/6 mice were fed one of three isocaloric diets: basal diet control (BD), or BD supplemented with 20% cooked white (WK) or dark red kidney (DK) bean flour for 3 weeks. In healthy mice, anti-inflammatory microbial-derived cecal short chain fatty acid (SCFA) levels (acetate, butyrate and propionate), colon crypt height and colonic Mucin 1 (MUC1) and Resistin-like Molecule beta (Relmβ) mRNA expression all increased in WK- and DK-fed mice compared to BD, indicative of enhanced microbial activity, gut barrier integrity and antimicrobial defense response. During colitis, both bean diets reduced (a) disease severity, (b) colonic histological damage and (c) increased mRNA expression of antimicrobial and barrier integrity-promoting genes (Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4), MUC1-3, Relmβ and Trefoil Factor 3 (TFF3)) and reduced proinflammatory mediator expression [interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, interferon (IFN)γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1], which correlated with reduced colon tissue protein levels. Further, bean diets exerted a systemic anti-inflammatory effect during colitis by reducing serum levels of IL-17A, IFNγ, TNFα, IL-1β and IL-6. In conclusion, both WK and DK bean-supplemented diets enhanced microbial-derived SCFA metabolite production, gut barrier integrity and the microbial defensive response in the healthy colon, which supported an anti-inflammatory phenotype during colitis. Collectively, these data demonstrate a beneficial colon-function priming effect of bean consumption that mitigates colitis severity. PMID:25841250

  2. Radiation-induced brain injury: A review

    PubMed Central

    Greene-Schloesser, Dana; Robbins, Mike E.; Peiffer, Ann M.; Shaw, Edward G.; Wheeler, Kenneth T.; Chan, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 100,000 primary and metastatic brain tumor patients/year in the US survive long enough (>6 months) to experience radiation-induced brain injury. Prior to 1970, the human brain was thought to be highly radioresistant; the acute CNS syndrome occurs after single doses >30 Gy; white matter necrosis occurs at fractionated doses >60 Gy. Although white matter necrosis is uncommon with modern techniques, functional deficits, including progressive impairments in memory, attention, and executive function have become important, because they have profound effects on quality of life. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Given its central role in memory and neurogenesis, the majority of these studies have focused on the hippocampus. Irradiating pediatric and young adult rodent brains leads to several hippocampal changes including neuroinflammation and a marked reduction in neurogenesis. These data have been interpreted to suggest that shielding the hippocampus will prevent clinical radiation-induced cognitive impairment. However, this interpretation may be overly simplistic. Studies using older rodents, that more closely match the adult human brain tumor population, indicate that, unlike pediatric and young adult rats, older rats fail to show a radiation-induced decrease in neurogenesis or a loss of mature neurons. Nevertheless, older rats still exhibit cognitive impairment. This occurs in the absence of demyelination and/or white matter necrosis similar to what is observed clinically, suggesting that more subtle molecular, cellular and/or microanatomic modifications are involved in this radiation-induced brain injury. Given that radiation-induced cognitive impairment likely reflects damage to both hippocampal- and non-hippocampal-dependent domains, there is a critical need to investigate the microanatomic and functional effects of radiation in various brain regions as well as their

  3. Pyruvate metabolism: A therapeutic opportunity in radiation-induced skin injury

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Hyun; Kang, Jeong Wook; Lee, Dong Won; Oh, Sang Ho; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Eun-Jung; Cho, Jaeho

    2015-05-08

    Ionizing radiation is used to treat a range of cancers. Despite recent technological progress, radiation therapy can damage the skin at the administration site. The specific molecular mechanisms involved in this effect have not been fully characterized. In this study, the effects of pyruvate, on radiation-induced skin injury were investigated, including the role of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 (PDK2) signaling pathway. Next generation sequencing (NGS) identified a wide range of gene expression differences between the control and irradiated mice, including reduced expression of PDK2. This was confirmed using Q-PCR. Cell culture studies demonstrated that PDK2 overexpression and a high cellular pyruvate concentration inhibited radiation-induced cytokine expression. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated radiation-induced skin thickening and gene expression changes. Oral pyruvate treatment markedly downregulated radiation-induced changes in skin thickness and inflammatory cytokine expression. These findings indicated that regulation of the pyruvate metabolic pathway could provide an effective approach to the control of radiation-induced skin damage. - Highlights: • The effects of radiation on skin thickness in mice. • Next generation sequencing revealed that radiation inhibited pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 expression. • PDK2 inhibited irradiation-induced cytokine gene expression. • Oral pyruvate treatment markedly downregulated radiation-induced changes in skin thickness.

  4. Radiation-induced meningiomas in pediatric patients

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, S.D.; Rockswold, G.L.; Chou, S.N.; Yock, D.; Berger, M.S.

    1988-04-01

    Radiation-induced meningiomas rarely have latency periods short enough from the time of irradiation to the clinical presentation of the tumor to present in the pediatric patient. Three cases of radiation-induced intracranial meningiomas in pediatric patients are presented. The first involved a meningioma of the right frontal region in a 10-year-old boy 6 years after the resection and irradiation of a 4th ventricular medulloblastoma. Review of our pediatric tumor cases produced a second case of a left temporal fossa meningioma presenting in a 15-year-old boy with a history of irradiation for retinoblastoma at age 3 years and a third case of a right frontoparietal meningioma in a 15-year-old girl after irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Only three cases of meningiomas presenting in the pediatric age group after radiation therapy to the head were detected in our review of the literature.

  5. Study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chmura, A.

    1995-11-01

    The study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis has up to now based many of its results on the detection of genetic aberrations using the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. FISH is time consuming and this tends to hinder its use for looking at large numbers of samples. We are currently developing new technological advances which will increase the speed, clarity and functionality of the FISH technique. These advances include multi-labeled probes, amplification techniques, and separation techniques.

  6. Radiatively induced quark and lepton mass model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Takaaki; Okada, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    We propose a radiatively induced quark and lepton mass model in the first and second generation with extra U (1) gauge symmetry and vector-like fermions. Then we analyze the allowed regions which simultaneously satisfy the FCNCs for the quark sector, LFVs including μ- e conversion, the quark mass and mixing, and the lepton mass and mixing. Also we estimate the typical value for the (g - 2) μ in our model.

  7. Management of radiation-induced urethral strictures

    PubMed Central

    Hofer, Matthias D.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation as a treatment option for prostate cancer has been chosen by many patients. One of the side effects encountered are radiation-induced urethral strictures which occur in up to 11% of patients. Radiation damage has often left the irradiated field fibrotic and with poor vascularization which make these strictures a challenging entity to treat. The mainstay of urologic management remains an urethroplasty procedure for which several approaches exist with variable optimal indication. Excision and primary anastomoses are ideal for shorter bulbar strictures that comprise the majority of radiation-induced urethral strictures. One advantage of this technique is that it does not require tissue transfers and success rates of 70-95% have consistently been reported. Substitution urethroplasty using remote graft tissue such as buccal mucosa are indicated if the length of the stricture precludes a tension-free primary anastomosis. Despite the challenge of graft survival in radiation-damaged and poorly vascularized recipient tissue, up to 83% of patients have been treated successfully although the numbers described in the literature are small. The most extensive repairs involve the use of tissue flaps, for example gracilis muscle, which may be required if the involved periurethral tissue is unable to provide sufficient vascular support for a post-operative urethral healing process. In summary, radiation-induced urethral strictures are a challenging entity. Most strictures are amenable to excision and primary anastomosis (EPA) with encouraging success rates but substitution urethroplasty may be indicated when extensive repair is needed. PMID:26816812

  8. Dynamics of wound healing signaling as a potential therapeutic target for radiation-induced tissue damage.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yih-Lin; Pui, Newman N M

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized the histone deacetylase inhibitor phenylbutyrate (PB) has beneficial effects on radiation-induced injury by modulating the expression of DNA repair and wound healing genes. Hamsters received a radiosurgical dose of radiation (40 Gy) to the cheek and were treated with varying PB dosing regimens. Gross alteration of the irradiated cheeks, eating function, histological changes, and gene expression during the course of wound healing were compared between treatment groups. Pathological analysis showed decreased radiation-induced mucositis, facilitated epithelial cell growth, and preventing ulcerative wound formation, after short-term PB treatment, but not after vehicle or sustained PB. The radiation-induced wound healing gene expression profile exhibited a sequential transition from the inflammatory and DNA repair phases to the tissue remodeling phase in the vehicle group. Sustained PB treatment resulted in a prolonged wound healing gene expression profile and delayed the wound healing process. Short-term PB shortened the duration of inflammatory cytokine expression, triggered repeated pulsed expression of cell cycle and DNA repair-regulating genes, and promoted earlier oscillatory expression of tissue remodeling genes. Distinct gene expression patterns between sustained and short-term treatment suggest dynamic profiling of wound healing gene expression can be an important part of a biological therapeutic strategy to mitigate radiation-related tissue injury.

  9. The effect of probiotics for preventing radiation-induced morphological changes in intestinal mucosa of rats.

    PubMed

    Ki, Yongkan; Kim, Wontaek; Cho, Heunglae; Ahn, Kijung; Choi, Youngmin; Kim, Dongwon

    2014-10-01

    Radiation therapy is an important treatment modality for abdominal or pelvic cancer, but there is a common and serious complication such as radiation-induced enteritis. Probiotics is reported to have positive effects against radiation-induced enteropathy. In this study, morphological changes of bowel mucosa were analyzed in rats to presume the effect of probiotics on radiation-induced enteritis and its correlation with radiation dose. A total of 48 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to two groups and received a solution containing 1.0×10(8) colony-forming units of Lactiobacillus acidophilus or water once daily for 10 days. Each of two groups was divided into three subgroups and abdomino-pelvic area of each subgroup was irradiated with 10, 15, and 20 Gy, respectively on the seventh day of feeding the solutions. All rats were sacrificed 3 days after irradiation and the mucosal thickness and villus height of jejunum, ileum and colon were measured. The morphological parameters of the small intestine represented significant differences between two solution groups irradiated 10 or 15 Gy, except for villus height of jejunum in 15 Gy-subgroup (P=0.065). There was no significant morphometric difference between two groups irradiated with 20 Gy of radiation. Probiotics appear to be effective for the morphological shortening of small intestinal mucosa damaged by radiation less than or equal to 15 Gy. PMID:25368490

  10. Oral mucosal status and major salivary gland function

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, A.; Fox, P.C.; Ship, J.A.; Atkinson, J.C.; Macynski, A.A.; Baum, B.J. )

    1990-07-01

    Normal salivary function is considered to be critical for the maintenance of healthy oral mucosa. However, few studies have examined mucosal changes in patients with objectively documented salivary gland performance. In the present report, the mucosal status of 298 subjects being evaluated in a dry mouth clinic was assessed. A complete oral examination was performed and unstimulated and stimulated salivary samples were collected separately from the parotid and submandibular/sublingual glands. Data were analyzed according to diagnosis and salivary output after the assignment of an oral mucosal rating to each subject. In general, the mucosal surfaces were well preserved and infections were not seen. Patients evaluated for Sjoegren's syndrome and radiation-induced xerostomia had the lowest salivary gland performance but displayed a mucosal status similar to denture-wearing healthy subjects or patients with normal salivary flow who had idiopathic xerostomia. However, those patients with a total lack of salivary flow rarely had normal-appearing oral mucosa. These results confirm a role for saliva in oral mucosal preservation and also suggest that other factors may act to maintain oral mucosal integrity.

  11. Radiation-Induced Liver Damage: Correlation of Histopathology with Hepatobiliary Magnetic Resonance Imaging, a Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Seidensticker, Max; Burak, Miroslaw; Kalinski, Thomas; Garlipp, Benjamin; Koelble, Konrad; Wust, Peter; Antweiler, Kai; Seidensticker, Ricarda; Mohnike, Konrad; Pech, Maciej; Ricke, Jens

    2015-02-15

    PurposeRadiotherapy of liver malignancies shows promising results (radioembolization, stereotactic irradiation, interstitial brachytherapy). Regardless of the route of application, a certain amount of nontumorous liver parenchyma will be collaterally damaged by radiation. The functional reserve may be significantly reduced with an impact on further treatment planning. Monitoring of radiation-induced liver damage by imaging is neither established nor validated. We performed an analysis to correlate the histopathological presence of radiation-induced liver damage with functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) utilizing hepatobiliary contrast media (Gd-BOPTA).MethodsPatients undergoing local high-dose-rate brachytherapy for whom a follow-up hepatobiliary MRI within 120 days after radiotherapy as well as an evaluable liver biopsy from radiation-exposed liver tissue within 7 days before MRI were retrospectively identified. Planning computed tomography (CT)/dosimetry was merged to the CT-documentation of the liver biopsy and to the MRI. Presence/absence of radiation-induced liver damage (histopathology) and Gd-BOPTA uptake (MRI) as well as the dose applied during brachytherapy at the site of tissue sampling was determined.ResultsFourteen biopsies from eight patients were evaluated. In all cases with histopathological evidence of radiation-induced liver damage (n = 11), no uptake of Gd-BOPTA was seen. In the remaining three, cases no radiation-induced liver damage but Gd-BOPTA uptake was seen. Presence of radiation-induced liver damage and absence of Gd-BOPTA uptake was correlated with a former high-dose exposition.ConclusionsAbsence of hepatobiliary MRI contrast media uptake in radiation-exposed liver parenchyma may indicate radiation-induced liver damage. Confirmatory studies are warranted.

  12. Characterization of radiation-induced emesis in the ferret

    SciTech Connect

    King, G.L.

    1988-01-01

    Forty-eight ferrets (Mustela putorius furo) were individually head-shielded and radiated with bilateral cobalt 60 gamma radiation at 100 cGy min at doses ranging between 49 and 601 cGy. The emetic threshold was observed at 69 cGy, the ED 50 was calculated as 77 cGy, and 100% incidence of emesis occurred at 201 cGy. With increasing doses of radiation, the latency to first emesis after radiation decreased dramatically, whereas the duration of the prodromal period increased. Two other sets of experiments suggest that dopaminergic mechanisms play a minor role in radiation-induced emesis in the ferret. Twenty-two animals were injected either intravenously or subcutaneously with 30 to 300 micrograms /kg of apomorphine. Fewer than 50% of the animals vomited to 300 micrograms/kg apomorphine; central dopaminergic receptor activation was apparent at all doses. Another eight animals received 1 mg/kg domperidone prior to either 201 (n=4) or 401 (n=4) cGy radiation and their emetic responses were compared with NaCi-injected-irradiated controls (n=8). At 201 cGy, domperidone significantly reduced only the total time in emetic behavior. At 401 cGy, domperidone had no salutary effect on radiation-induced emesis. The emetic responses of the ferret to radiation and apomorphine are compared with these responses in other vomiting species.

  13. Vitamin D Deficiency Is Associated With the Severity of Radiation-Induced Proctitis in Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorbanzadeh-Moghaddam, Amir; Gholamrezaei, Ali; Hemati, Simin

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced injury to normal tissues is a common complication of radiation therapy in cancer patients. Considering the role of vitamin D in mucosal barrier hemostasis and inflammatory responses, we investigated whether vitamin D deficiency is associated with the severity of radiation-induced acute proctitis in cancer patients. Methods and Materials: This prospective observational study was conducted in cancer patients referred for pelvic radiation therapy. Serum concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D was measured before radiation therapy. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations of <35 nmol/L and <40 nmol/L in male and female patients, respectively, based on available normative data. Acute proctitis was assessed after 5 weeks of radiation therapy (total received radiation dose of 50 Gy) and graded from 0 to 4 using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria. Results: Ninety-eight patients (57.1% male) with a mean age of 62.8 ± 9.1 years were studied. Vitamin D deficiency was found in 57 patients (58.1%). Symptoms of acute proctitis occurred in 72 patients (73.4%) after radiation therapy. RTOG grade was significantly higher in patients with vitamin D deficiency than in normal cases (median [interquartile range] of 2 [0.5-3] vs 1 [0-2], P=.037). Vitamin D deficiency was associated with RTOG grade of ≥2, independent of possible confounding factors; odds ratio (95% confidence interval) = 3.07 (1.27-7.50), P=.013. Conclusions: Vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased severity of radiation-induced acute proctitis. Investigating the underlying mechanisms of this association and evaluating the effectiveness of vitamin D therapy in preventing radiation-induced acute proctitis is warranted.

  14. Radiation induced conductivity in space dielectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, R.; Paulmier, T. Belhaj, M.; Dirassen, B.; Molinie, P.; Payan, D.; Balcon, N.

    2014-01-21

    The radiation-induced conductivity of some polymers was described mainly in literature by a competition between ionization, trapping/detrapping, and recombination processes or by radiation assisted ageing mechanisms. Our aim is to revise the effect of the aforementioned mechanisms on the complex evolution of Teflon{sup ®} FEP under space representative ionizing radiation. Through the definition of a new experimental protocol, revealing the effect of radiation dose and relaxation time, we have been able to demonstrate that the trapping/recombination model devised in this study agrees correctly with the observed experimental phenomenology at qualitative level and allows describing very well the evolution of radiation induced conductivity with irradiation time (or received radiation dose). According to this model, the complex behavior observed on Teflon{sup ®} FEP may be basically ascribed to the competition between electron/hole pairs generation and recombination: electrons are deeply trapped and act as recombination centers for free holes. Relaxation effects have been characterized through successive irradiations steps and have been again well described with the defined model at qualitative level: recombination centers created by the irradiation induce long term alteration on the electric properties, especially the effective bulk conductivity. One-month relaxation does not allow a complete recovery of the material initial charging behavior.

  15. Mouse models for radiation-induced cancers.

    PubMed

    Rivina, Leena; Davoren, Michael J; Schiestl, Robert H

    2016-09-01

    Potential ionising radiation exposure scenarios are varied, but all bring risks beyond the simple issues of short-term survival. Whether accidentally exposed to a single, whole-body dose in an act of terrorism or purposefully exposed to fractionated doses as part of a therapeutic regimen, radiation exposure carries the consequence of elevated cancer risk. The long-term impact of both intentional and unintentional exposure could potentially be mitigated by treatments specifically developed to limit the mutations and precancerous replication that ensue in the wake of irradiation The development of such agents would undoubtedly require a substantial degree of in vitro testing, but in order to accurately recapitulate the complex process of radiation-induced carcinogenesis, well-understood animal models are necessary. Inbred strains of the laboratory mouse, Mus musculus, present the most logical choice due to the high number of molecular and physiological similarities they share with humans. Their small size, high rate of breeding and fully sequenced genome further increase its value for use in cancer research. This chapter will review relevant m. musculus inbred and F1 hybrid animals of radiation-induced myeloid leukemia, thymic lymphoma, breast and lung cancers. Method of cancer induction and associated molecular pathologies will also be described for each model. PMID:27209205

  16. Pyruvate metabolism: A therapeutic opportunity in radiation-induced skin injury.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hyun; Kang, Jeong Wook; Lee, Dong Won; Oh, Sang Ho; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Eun-Jung; Cho, Jaeho

    2015-05-01

    Ionizing radiation is used to treat a range of cancers. Despite recent technological progress, radiation therapy can damage the skin at the administration site. The specific molecular mechanisms involved in this effect have not been fully characterized. In this study, the effects of pyruvate, on radiation-induced skin injury were investigated, including the role of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 (PDK2) signaling pathway. Next generation sequencing (NGS) identified a wide range of gene expression differences between the control and irradiated mice, including reduced expression of PDK2. This was confirmed using Q-PCR. Cell culture studies demonstrated that PDK2 overexpression and a high cellular pyruvate concentration inhibited radiation-induced cytokine expression. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated radiation-induced skin thickening and gene expression changes. Oral pyruvate treatment markedly downregulated radiation-induced changes in skin thickness and inflammatory cytokine expression. These findings indicated that regulation of the pyruvate metabolic pathway could provide an effective approach to the control of radiation-induced skin damage. PMID:25797627

  17. Contribution of radiation-induced, nitric oxide-mediated bystander effect to radiation-induced adaptive response.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, H.; Ohnishi, T.

    There has been a recent upsurge of interest in radiation-induced adaptive response and bystander effect which are specific modes in stress response to low-dose low-dose rate radiation Recently we found that the accumulation of inducible nitric oxide NO synthase iNOS in wt p53 cells was induced by chronic irradiation with gamma rays followed by acute irradiation with X-rays but not by each one resulting in an increase in nitrite concentrations of medium It is suggested that the accumulation of iNOS may be due to the depression of acute irradiation-induced p53 functions by pre-chronic irradiation In addition we found that the radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells against acute irradiation with X-rays was reduced after chronic irradiation with gamma rays This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells was nearly completely suppressed by the addition of NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO to the medium This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells is just radiation-induced adaptive response suggesting that NO-mediated bystander effect may considerably contribute to adaptive response induced by radiation

  18. Modulation of radiation-induced apoptosis and G{sub 2}/M block in murine T-lymphoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Palayoor, S.T.; Macklis, R.M.; Bump, E.A.; Coleman, C.N.

    1995-03-01

    Radiation-induced apoptosis in lymphocyte-derived cell lines is characterized by endonucleolytic cleavage of cellular DNA within hours after radiation exposure. We have studied this phenomenon qualitatively (DNA gel electrophoresis) and quantitatively (diphenylamine reagent assay) in murine EL4 T-lymphoma cells exposed to {sup 137}Cs {gamma} irradiation. Fragmentation was discernible within 18-24 h after exposure. It increased with time and dose and reached a plateau after 8 Gy of {gamma} radiation. We studied the effect of several pharmacological agents on the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M block and DNA fragmentation. The agents which reduced the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M-phase arrest (caffeine, theobromine, theophylline and 2-aminopurine) enhanced the degree of DNA fragmentation at 24 h. In contrast, the agents which sustained the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M-phase arrest (TPA, DBcAMP, IBMX and 3-aminobenzamide) inhibited the DNA fragmentation at 24 h. These studies on EL4 lymphoma cells are consistent with the hypothesis that cells with radiation-induced genetic damage are eliminated by apoptosis subsequent to a G{sub 2}/M block. Furthermore, it may be possible to modulate the process of radiation-induced apoptosis in lymphoma cells with pharmacological agents that modify the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M block, and to use this effect in the treatment of patients with malignant disease. 59 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Amelioration of ionizing radiation induced lipid peroxidation in mouse liver by Moringa oleifera Lam. leaf extract.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Mahuya; Das, Dipesh Kr; Datta, Sanjukta; Ghosh, Santinath; Dey, Sanjit

    2012-03-01

    Protective effect of Moringa oleifera leaf extract (MoLE) against radiation-induced lipid peroxidation has been investigated. Swiss albino mice, selected from an inbred colony, were administered with MoLE (300 mg/kg body wt) for 15 days before exposing to a single dose of 5 Gy 60Co-gamma radiation. After treatments, animals were necropsied at different post irradiation intervals (days 1, 7 and 15) and hepatic lipid peroxidation and reduced glutathione (GSH) contents were estimated to observe the relative changes due to irradiation and its possible amelioration by MoLE. It was observed that, MoLE treatment restored GSH in liver and prevented radiation induced augmentation in hepatic lipid peroxidation. Phytochemical analysis showed that MoLE possess various phytochemicals such as ascorbic acid, phenolics (catechin, epicatechin, ferulic acid, ellagic acid, myricetin) etc., which may play the key role in prevention of hepatic lipid peroxidation by scavenging radiation induced free radicals. PMID:22439436

  20. Attenuation of a radiation-induced conditioned taste aversion after the development of ethanol tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, W.A.; Rabin, B.M.

    1988-01-01

    An attempt to reduce a radiation-induced conditioned taste aversion (CTA) was undertaken by rendering animals tolerant to ethanol. Ethanol tolerance, developed over 5 days, was sufficient to block a radiation-induced taste aversion, as well as an ethanol-induced CTA. Several intermittent doses of ethanol, which did not induce tolerance but removed the novelty of the conditioning stimulus, blocked an ethanol-induced CTA but not the radiation-induced CTA. A CTA induced by doses of radiation up to 500 rads was attenuated. These data suggest that radioprotection developing in association with ethanol tolerance is a result of a physiological response to the chronic presence of ethanol not to the ethanol itself.

  1. Radiation-Induced Breast Cancer Incidence and Mortality from Digital Mammography Screening: A Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Miglioretti, Diana L.; Lange, Jane; van den Broek, Jeroen J.; Lee, Christoph I.; van Ravesteyn, Nicolien T.; Ritley, Dominique; Kerlikowske, Karla; Fenton, Joshua J.; Melnikow, Joy; de Koning, Harry J.; Hubbard, Rebecca A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Estimates of radiation-induced breast cancer risk from mammography screening have not previously considered dose exposure variation or diagnostic work-up after abnormal screening. Objective To estimate distributions of radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality from digital mammography screening, considering exposure from screening and diagnostic mammography and dose variation across women. Design Two simulation-modeling approaches using common data on screening mammography from the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium and radiation dose from mammography from the Digital Mammographic Imaging Screening Trial. Setting U.S. population. Patients Women aged 40–74 years. Interventions Annual or biennial digital mammography screening from age 40, 45, or 50 until 74. Measurements Lifetime breast cancer deaths averted (benefits) and radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality per 100,000 women screened (harms). Results On average, annual screening of 100,000 women aged 40 to 74 years was projected to induce 125 breast cancers (95% confidence interval [CI]=88–178) leading to 16 deaths (95% CI=11–23) relative to 968 breast cancer deaths averted by early detection from screening. Women exposed at the 95th percentile were projected to develop 246 radiation-induced breast cancers leading to 32 deaths per 100,000 women. Women with large breasts requiring extra views for complete breast examination (8% of population) were projected to have higher radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality (266 cancers, 35 deaths per 100,000 women), compared to women with small or average breasts (113 cancers, 15 deaths per 100,000 women). Biennial screening starting at age 50 reduced risk of radiation-induced cancers 5-fold. Limitations We were unable to estimate years of life lost from radiation-induced breast cancer. Conclusions Radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality from digital mammography screening are impacted by dose

  2. Role of neurotensin in radiation-induced hypothermia in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kandasamy, S.B.; Hunt, W.A.; Harris, A.H. )

    1991-05-01

    The role of neurotensin in radiation-induced hypothermia was examined. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of neurotensin produced dose-dependent hypothermia. Histamine appears to mediate neurotensin-induced hypothermia because the mast cell stabilizer disodium cromoglycate and antihistamines blocked the hypothermic effects of neurotensin. An ICV pretreatment with neurotensin antibody attenuated neurotensin-induced hypothermia, but did not attenuate radiation-induced hypothermia, suggesting that radiation-induced hypothermia was not mediated by neurotensin.

  3. Radiation-induced mutation at minisatellite loci

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrova, Y.E. |; Nesterov, V.N.; Krouchinsky, N.G.

    1997-10-01

    We are studying the radiation-induced increase of mutation rate in minisatellite loci in mice and humans. Minisatellite mutations were scored by multilocus DNA fingerprint analysis in the progeny of {gamma}-irradiated and non-irradiated mice. The frequency of mutation in offspring of irradiated males was 1.7 higher that in the control group. Germline mutation at human minisatellite loci was studied among children born in heavily polluted areas of the Mogilev district of Belarus after the Chernobyl accident and in a control population. The frequency of mutation assayed both by DNA fingerprinting and by eight single locus probes was found to be two times higher in the exposed families than in the control group. Furthermore, mutation rate was correlated with the parental radiation dose for chronic exposure {sup 137}Cs, consistent with radiation-induction of germline mutation. The potential use of minisatellites in monitoring germline mutation in humans will be discussed.

  4. Radiation-induced mutations and plant breeding

    SciTech Connect

    Naqvi, S.H.M.

    1985-01-01

    Ionizing radiation could cause genetic changes in an organism and could modify gene linkages. The induction of mutation through radiation is random and the probability of getting the desired genetic change is low but can be increased by manipulating different parameters such as dose rate, physical conditions under which the material has been irradiated, etc. Induced mutations have been used as a supplement to conventional plant breeding, particularly for creating genetic variability for specific characters such as improved plant structure, pest and disease resistance, and desired changes in maturity period; more than 200 varieties of crop plants have been developed by this technique. The Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission has used this technique fruitfully to evolve better germplasm in cotton, rice, chickpea, wheat and mungbean; some of the mutants have become popular commercial varieties. This paper describes some uses of radiation induced mutations and the results achieved in Pakistan so far.

  5. Radiation induced carcinoma of the larynx

    SciTech Connect

    Amendola, B.E.; Amendola, M.A.; McClatchey, K.D.

    1985-07-01

    A squamous cell carcinoma presented in a 20 year old female nonsmoker three years after receiving a high dosage of radiation therapy to the base of the skull, face and entire neuroaxis and intense combination chemotherapy for a parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma of the paranasal sinuses is reported. The larynx received a dose of about 3,500 rads over an eight week period. This dosage in conjunction with the associated intense chemotherapy regimen given to the patient may explain the appearance of a radiation induced tumor in an unusually short latent period. This certainly represents a risk in young patients in whom an aggressive combined approach is taken and the physician should be aware of.

  6. Epithelial MUC1 promotes cell migration, reduces apoptosis and affects levels of mucosal modulators during acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin)-induced gastropathy.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Debashish; Fernandez, Harvey Robert; Patil, Pradeep Bhatu; Premaratne, Pushpa; Quiding-Järbrink, Marianne; Lindén, Sara Katarina

    2015-02-01

    MUC1 is a transmembrane mucin highly expressed in the stomach. Although extensive research has uncovered many of its roles in cancer, knowledge about the functions of MUC1 in normal tissues is limited. In the present study, we showed that acetylsalicylic acid (ASA; aspirin) up-regulated MUC1/Muc1 expression in the gastric mucosa of humans and wild-type (WT) mice. ASA induced mucosal injury in all mice to a similar extent; however, WT animals and those chimaeras with Muc1 on the epithelia recovered faster than Muc1-knockout (KO) mice and chimaeras carrying Muc1 on haemopoietic but not epithelial cells. MUC1 enhanced proliferation and migration of the human gastric cell line MKN-7 and increased resistance to apoptosis. The repeated treatment regime used caused a reduction in cyclo-oxygenase-1 (Cox-1) expression, though WT animals returned faster towards pre-treatment levels and had increased Cox-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor levels during recovery. Thus we found that epithelial Muc1 is more important for the healing process than haemopoietic Muc1 and Muc1/MUC1 facilitates wound healing by enhancing cell migration and proliferation, protecting against apoptosis and mediating expression of mucosal modulators. Thus MUC1 plays essential roles during wound healing and development of treatment modalities targeting enhanced expression of MUC1 may be beneficial to treat mucosal wounds.

  7. A model of radiation-induced myelopoiesis in space.

    PubMed

    Esposito, R D; Durante, M; Gialanella, G; Grossi, G; Pugliese, M; Scampoli, P; Jones, T D

    2001-01-01

    Astronauts' radiation exposure limits are based on experimental and epidemiological data obtained on Earth. It is assumed that radiation sensitivity remains the same in the extraterrestrial space. However, human radiosensitivity is dependent upon the response of the hematopoietic tissue to the radiation insult. It is well known that the immune system is affected by microgravity. We have developed a mathematical model of radiation-induced myelopoiesis which includes the effect of microgravity on bone marrow kinetics. It is assumed that cellular radiosensitivity is not modified by the space environment, but repopulation rates of stem and stromal cells are reduced as a function of time in weightlessness. A realistic model of the space radiation environment, including the HZE component, is used to simulate the radiation damage. A dedicated computer code was written and applied to solar particle events and to the mission to Mars. The results suggest that altered myelopoiesis and lymphopoiesis in microgravity might increase human radiosensitivity in space. PMID:11771552

  8. Role of Oxidative Damage in Radiation-Induced Bone Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Alwood, Joshua S.; Limoli, Charles L.; Globus, Ruth K.

    2014-01-01

    used an array of countermeasures (Antioxidant diets and injections) to prevent the radiation-induced bone loss, although these did not prevent bone loss, analysis is ongoing to determine if these countermeasure protected radiation-induced damage to other tissues.

  9. CDDO-Me protects against space radiation-induced transformation of human colon epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Eskiocak, Ugur; Kim, Sang Bum; Roig, Andres I; Kitten, Erin; Batten, Kimberly; Cornelius, Crystal; Zou, Ying S; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W

    2010-07-01

    Radiation-induced carcinogenesis is a major concern both for astronauts on long-term space missions and for cancer patients being treated with therapeutic radiation. Exposure to radiation induces oxidative stress and chronic inflammation, which are critical initiators and promoters of carcinogenesis. Many studies have demonstrated that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antioxidants can reduce the risk of radiation-induced cancer. In this study, we found that a synthetic triterpenoid, CDDO-Me (bardoxolone methyl), was able to protect human colon epithelial cells (HCECs) against radiation-induced transformation. HCECs that were immortalized by ectopic expression of hTERT and cdk4 and exhibit trisomy for chromosome 7 (a non-random chromosome change that occurs in 37% of premalignant colon adenomas) can be transformed experimentally with one combined exposure to 2 Gy of protons at 1 GeV/nucleon followed 24 h later by 50 cGy of (56)Fe ions at 1 GeV/nucleon. Transformed cells showed an increase in proliferation rate and in both anchorage-dependent and independent colony formation ability. A spectrum of chromosome aberrations was observed in transformed cells, with 40% showing loss of 17p (e.g. loss of one copy of p53). Pretreatment of cells with pharmacological doses of CDDO-Me, which has been shown to induce antioxidative as well as anti-inflammatory responses, prevented the heavy-ion-induced increase in proliferation rate and anchorage-dependent and independent colony formation efficiencies. Taken together, these results demonstrate that experimentally immortalized human colon epithelial cells with a non-random chromosome 7 trisomy are valuable premalignant cellular reagents that can be used to study radiation-induced colorectal carcinogenesis. The utility of premalignant HCECs to test novel compounds such as CDDO-Me that can be used to protect against radiation-induced neoplastic transformation is also demonstrated. PMID:20681796

  10. Theory Of Radiation-Induced Attenuation In Optical Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tsuen-Hsi; Johnston, Alan R.

    1996-01-01

    Improved theory of radiation-induced attenuation of light in optical fibers accounts for effects of dose rates. Based on kinetic aspects of fundamental physics of color centers induced in optical fibers by radiation. Induced attenuation is proportional to density of color centers, and part of this density decays by thermal-annealing/recombination process after irradiation.

  11. Radiation-induced osteosarcoma of the sphenoid bone

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, S.; Nishio, S.; Morioka, T.; Fukui, M.; Kitamura, K.; Hikita, K. )

    1989-10-01

    The case of a patient who developed osteosarcoma in the sphenoid bone 15 years after radiation therapy for a craniopharyngioma is reported. Radiation-induced osteosarcoma of the sphenoid bone has not been reported previously. Reported cases of radiation-induced osteosarcomas are reviewed.

  12. Oral mucositis - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer treatment - mucositis; Cancer treatment - mouth pain; Cancer treatment - mouth sores; Chemotherapy - mucositis; Chemotherapy - mouth pain; Chemotherapy - mouth sores; Radiation therapy - mucositis; Radiation therapy - mouth pain; Radiation therapy - mouth ...

  13. Why mucosal health?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aquaculture species depend more heavily on mucosal barriers than their terrestrial agricultural counterparts as they are continuously interacting with the aquatic microbiota. Unlike classical immune centers, such as the spleen and kidney, the accessibility of mucosal surfaces through immersion/dip t...

  14. Treatment of oral mucositis due to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bagán-Sebastián, José V

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The management of oral mucositis is a challenge, due to its complex biological nature. Over the last 10 years, different strategies have been developed for the management of oral mucositis caused by chemotherapy in cancer patients. Material and Methods An exhaustive search was made of the PubMed-Medline, Cochrane Library and Scopus databases, crossing the key words “oral mucositis”, “prevention” and “treatment” with the terms “chemotherapy” and “radiotherapy” by means of the boolean operators “AND” and “NOT”. A total of 268 articles were obtained, of which 96 met the inclusion criteria. Results Several interventions for the prevention of oral mucositis, such as oral hygiene protocols, amifostine, benzidamine, calcium phosphate, cryotherapy and iseganan, among others, were found to yield only limited benefits. Other studies have reported a decrease in the appearance and severity of mucositis with the use of cytoprotectors (sucralfate, oral glutamine, hyaluronic acid), growth factors, topical polyvinylpyrrolidone, and low power laser irradiation. Conclusions Very few interventions of confirmed efficacy are available for the management of oral mucositis due to chemotherapy. However, according to the reviewed literature, the use of palifermin, cryotherapy and low power laser offers benefits, reducing the incidence and severity of oral mucositis – though further studies are needed to confirm the results obtained. Key words:Chemotherapy-Induced Oral Mucositis Treatment. PMID:27034762

  15. Mucosal immunization and adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hideki; van Reit, Elly; Kida, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the influenza vaccine is to prevent influenza virus infection and control the yearly seasonal epidemic and pandemic. However, the presently available parenteral influenza vaccine induces only systemic humoral immunity, which does not prevent influenza virus infection on the mucosal surface. Secretary IGA antibodies play an important role in preventing natural infection. Moreover, the IgA antibody response mediates cross-protection against variant viruses in animal models. Thus, a mucosal influenza vaccine that induces mucosal immunity would be a powerful tool to protect individuals from the influenza virus. Although the function of the mucosal immune system, especially in the respiratory tract, is not completely understood, there are several studies underway to develop mucosal influenza vaccines. Here, we will review current knowledge concerning the induction of IgA, the role of B-cell production of influenza virus specific IgA antibodies in anti-influenza immunity, and the role of humoral memory responses induced upon vaccination.

  16. Evidence for Radiation-Induced Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation as a Major Cause of Radiation-Induced Death in Ferrets

    SciTech Connect

    Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Savage, Alexandria R.; Billings, Paul C.; Lin, Liyong; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The studies reported here were performed as part of a program in space radiation biology in which proton radiation like that present in solar particle events, as well as conventional gamma radiation, were being evaluated in terms of the ability to affect hemostasis. Methods and Materials: Ferrets were exposed to 0 to 2 Gy of whole-body proton or gamma radiation and monitored for 30 days. Blood was analyzed for blood cell counts, platelet clumping, thromboelastometry, and fibrin clot formation. Results: The lethal dose of radiation to 50% of the population (LD{sub 50}) of the ferrets was established at ∼1.5 Gy, with 100% mortality at 2 Gy. Hypocoagulability was present as early as day 7 postirradiation, with animals unable to generate a stable clot and exhibiting signs of platelet aggregation, thrombocytopenia, and fibrin clots in blood vessels of organs. Platelet counts were at normal levels during the early time points postirradiation when coagulopathies were present and becoming progressively more severe; platelet counts were greatly reduced at the time of the white blood cell nadir of 13 days. Conclusions: Data presented here provide evidence that death at the LD{sub 50} in ferrets is most likely due to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). These data question the current hypothesis that death at relatively low doses of radiation is due solely to the cell-killing effects of hematopoietic cells. The recognition that radiation-induced DIC is the most likely mechanism of death in ferrets raises the question of whether DIC is a contributing mechanism to radiation-induced death at relatively low doses in large mammals.

  17. Evidence for Radiation-Induced Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation as a Major Cause of Radiation-Induced Death in Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Savage, Alexandria R.; Billings, Paul C.; Lin, Liyong; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives(s) The studies reported here were performed as part of a program in space radiation biology in which proton radiation like that present in solar particle events (SPEs), as well as conventional gamma radiation, were being evaluated in terms of the ability to affect hemostasis. Methods and Materials Ferrets were exposed to 0 – 2 Gray (Gy) of whole body proton or gamma radiation and monitored for 30 days. Blood was analyzed for blood cell counts, platelet clumping, thromboelastometry, and fibrin clot formation. Results The lethal dose of radiation to 50% of the population, known as the LD50, of ferrets was established at ~ 1.5 Gy, with 100% mortality at 2 Gy. Hypocoagulability was present as early as day 7 post-irradiation, with animals unable to generate a stable clot and exhibiting signs of platelet aggregation, thrombocytopenia, and fibrin clots in blood vessels of organs. Platelet counts were at normal levels during the early times post-irradiation when coagulopathies were present and progressively becoming more severe; platelet counts were greatly reduced at the time of the white blood cell nadir of 13 days. Conclusions The data presented here provide evidence that death at the LD50 in ferrets is most likely due to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). These data question the current hypothesis that death at relatively low doses of radiation is solely due to the cell killing effects of hematopoietic cells. The recognition that radiation-induced DIC is the most likely mechanism of death in ferrets raises the question of whether DIC is a contributing mechanism to radiation induced death at relatively low doses in large mammals. PMID:24495588

  18. Ionizing Radiation-Induced Endothelial Cell Senescence and Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingying; Boerma, Marjan; Zhou, Daohong

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation induces not only apoptosis but also senescence. While the role of endothelial cell apoptosis in mediating radiation-induced acute tissue injury has been extensively studied, little is known about the role of endothelial cell senescence in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced late effects. Senescent endothelial cells exhibit decreased production of nitric oxide and expression of thrombomodulin, increased expression of adhesion molecules, elevated production of reactive oxygen species and inflammatory cytokines and an inability to proliferate and form capillary-like structures in vitro. These findings suggest that endothelial cell senescence can lead to endothelial dysfunction by dysregulation of vasodilation and hemostasis, induction of oxidative stress and inflammation and inhibition of angiogenesis, which can potentially contribute to radiation-induced late effects such as cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). In this article, we discuss the mechanisms by which radiation induces endothelial cell senescence, the roles of endothelial cell senescence in radiation-induced CVDs and potential strategies to prevent, mitigate and treat radiation-induced CVDs by targeting senescent endothelial cells. PMID:27387862

  19. Evolved Cellular Mechanisms to Respond to Genotoxic Insults: Implications for Radiation-Induced Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Fleenor, Courtney J.; Higa, Kelly; Weil, Michael M.; DeGregori, James

    2015-01-01

    Human exposure to ionizing radiation is highly associated with adverse health effects, including reduced hematopoietic cell function and increased risk of carcinogenesis. The hematopoietic deficits manifest across blood cell types and persist for years after radiation exposure, suggesting a long-lived and multi-potent cellular reservoir for radiation-induced effects. As such, research has focused on identifying both the immediate and latent hematopoietic stem cell responses to radiation exposure. Radiation-associated effects on hematopoietic function and malignancy development have generally been attributed to the direct induction of mutations resulting from radiation-induced DNA damage. Other studies have illuminated the role of cellular programs that both limit and enhance radiation-induced tissue phenotypes and carcinogenesis. In this review, distinct but collaborative cellular responses to genotoxic insults are highlighted, with an emphasis on how these programmed responses impact hematopoietic cellular fitness and competition. These radiation-induced cellular programs include apoptosis, senescence and impaired self-renewal within the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) pool. In the context of sporadic DNA damage to a cell, these cellular responses act in concert to restore tissue function and prevent selection for adaptive oncogenic mutations. But in the contexts of whole-tissue exposure or whole-body exposure to genotoxins, such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy, we propose that these programs can contribute to long-lasting tissue impairment and increased carcinogenesis. PMID:26414506

  20. A Prospective Cohort Study on Radiation-induced Hypothyroidism: Development of an NTCP Model

    SciTech Connect

    Boomsma, Marjolein J.; Bijl, Hendrik P.; Christianen, Miranda E.M.C.; Beetz, Ivo; Chouvalova, Olga; Steenbakkers, Roel J.H.M.; Laan, Bernard F.A.M. van der; Oosting, Sjoukje F.; Schilstra, Cornelis; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To establish a multivariate normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. Methods and Materials: The thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) level of 105 patients treated with (chemo-) radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer was prospectively measured during a median follow-up of 2.5 years. Hypothyroidism was defined as elevated serum TSH with decreased or normal free thyroxin (T4). A multivariate logistic regression model with bootstrapping was used to determine the most important prognostic variables for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. Results: Thirty-five patients (33%) developed primary hypothyroidism within 2 years after radiation therapy. An NTCP model based on 2 variables, including the mean thyroid gland dose and the thyroid gland volume, was most predictive for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. NTCP values increased with higher mean thyroid gland dose (odds ratio [OR]: 1.064/Gy) and decreased with higher thyroid gland volume (OR: 0.826/cm{sup 3}). Model performance was good with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.85. Conclusions: This is the first prospective study resulting in an NTCP model for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. The probability of hypothyroidism rises with increasing dose to the thyroid gland, whereas it reduces with increasing thyroid gland volume.

  1. Inactivation of Kupffer Cells by Gadolinium Chloride Protects Murine Liver From Radiation-Induced Apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Du Shisuo; Qiang Min; Zeng Zhaochong; Ke Aiwu; Ji Yuan; Zhang Zhengyu; Zeng Haiying; Liu Zhongshan

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To determine whether the inhibition of Kupffer cells before radiotherapy (RT) would protect hepatocytes from radiation-induced apoptosis. Materials and Methods: A single 30-Gy fraction was administered to the upper abdomen of Sprague-Dawley rats. The Kupffer cell inhibitor gadolinium chloride (GdCl3; 10 mg/kg body weight) was intravenously injected 24 h before RT. The rats were divided into four groups: group 1, sham RT plus saline (control group); group 2, sham RT plus GdCl3; group 3, RT plus saline; and group 4, RT plus GdCl3. Liver tissue was collected for measurement of apoptotic cytokine expression and evaluation of radiation-induced liver toxicity by analysis of liver enzyme activities, hepatocyte micronucleus formation, apoptosis, and histologic staining. Results: The expression of interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha was significantly attenuated in group 4 compared with group 3 at 2, 6, 24, and 48 h after injection (p <0.05). At early points after RT, the rats in group 4 exhibited significantly lower levels of liver enzyme activity, apoptotic response, and hepatocyte micronucleus formation compared with those in group 3. Conclusion: Selective inactivation of Kupffer cells with GdCl3 reduced radiation-induced cytokine production and protected the liver against acute radiation-induced damage.

  2. Evolved Cellular Mechanisms to Respond to Genotoxic Insults: Implications for Radiation-Induced Hematologic Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Fleenor, Courtney J; Higa, Kelly; Weil, Michael M; DeGregori, James

    2015-10-01

    Human exposure to ionizing radiation is highly associated with adverse health effects, including reduced hematopoietic cell function and increased risk of carcinogenesis. The hematopoietic deficits manifest across blood cell types and persist for years after radiation exposure, suggesting a long-lived and multi-potent cellular reservoir for radiation-induced effects. As such, research has focused on identifying both the immediate and latent hematopoietic stem cell responses to radiation exposure. Radiation-associated effects on hematopoietic function and malignancy development have generally been attributed to the direct induction of mutations resulting from radiation-induced DNA damage. Other studies have illuminated the role of cellular programs that both limit and enhance radiation-induced tissue phenotypes and carcinogenesis. In this review, distinct but collaborative cellular responses to genotoxic insults are highlighted, with an emphasis on how these programmed responses impact hematopoietic cellular fitness and competition. These radiation-induced cellular programs include apoptosis, senescence and impaired self-renewal within the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) pool. In the context of sporadic DNA damage to a cell, these cellular responses act in concert to restore tissue function and prevent selection for adaptive oncogenic mutations. But in the contexts of whole-tissue exposure or whole-body exposure to genotoxins, such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy, we propose that these programs can contribute to long-lasting tissue impairment and increased carcinogenesis. PMID:26414506

  3. Radiation-induced nausea and vomiting

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Mohsen; Namimoghadam, Amir; Korouni, Roghaye; Fashiri, Paria; Borzoueisileh, Sajad; Elahimanesh, Farideh; Amiri, Fatemeh; Moradi, Ghobad

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite the improvements in cancer screening and treatment, it still remains as one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide. Nausea and vomiting as the side effects of different cancer treatment modalities, such as radiotherapy, are multifactorial and could affect the treatment continuation and patient quality of life. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the possible linkage between ABO blood groups and radiation-induced nausea and vomiting (RINV), also its incidence and affecting factors. One hundred twenty-eight patients referring to Tohid hospital of Sanandaj, Iran, were selected and the patients and treatment-related factors were determined in a cross-sectional study. Patients’ nausea and vomiting were recorded from the onset of treatment until 1 week after treatment accomplishment. Also, previous possible nausea and vomiting were recorded. The frequencies of nausea and vomiting and their peak time were examined during the treatment period. The association between ABO blood group and the incidence of radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (RINV) were significant and it seems that A blood group patients are the most vulnerable individuals to these symptoms. The association between Rhesus antigen and the time of maximum severity of RINV may indicate that Rhesus antigen affects the time of maximum severity of RINV. The incidence of RINV was not affected by karnofsky performance status, but it was related to the severity of RINV. Furthermore, among the factors affecting the incidence of nausea and vomiting, nausea and vomiting during patient's previous chemotherapy, radiotherapy region, and background gastrointestinal disease were shown to be three important factors. In addition to familiar RINV-affecting factors, ABO blood group may play an important role and these results address the needs for further studies with larger sample size. PMID:27495037

  4. Delayed Radiation-Induced Vasculitic Leukoencephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, Philipp J.; Park, Henry S.; Knisely, Jonathan P.S.; Chiang, Veronica L.; Vortmeyer, Alexander O.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Recently, single-fraction, high-dosed focused radiation therapy such as that administered by Gamma Knife radiosurgery has been used increasingly for the treatment of metastatic brain cancer. Radiation therapy to the brain can cause delayed leukoencephalopathy, which carries its own significant morbidity and mortality. While radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy is known to be clinically different from that following fractionated radiation, pathological differences are not well characterized. In this study, we aimed to integrate novel radiographic and histopathologic observations to gain a conceptual understanding of radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy. Methods and Materials: We examined resected tissues of 10 patients treated at Yale New Haven Hospital between January 1, 2009, and June 30, 2010, for brain metastases that had been previously treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery, who subsequently required surgical management of a symptomatic regrowing lesion. None of the patients showed pathological evidence of tumor recurrence. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging data for each of the 10 patients were then studied retrospectively. Results: We provide evidence to show that radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy may present as an advancing process that extends beyond the original high-dose radiation field. Neuropathologic examination of the resected tissue revealed traditionally known leukoencephalopathic changes including demyelination, coagulation necrosis, and vascular sclerosis. Unexpectedly, small and medium-sized vessels revealed transmural T-cell infiltration indicative of active vasculitis. Conclusions: We propose that the presence of a vasculitic component in association with radiation-induced leukoencephalopathy may facilitate the progressive nature of the condition. It may also explain the resemblance of delayed leukoencephalopathy with recurring tumor on virtually all imaging modalities used for posttreatment follow-up.

  5. Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Malignancies and Acute Biological Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Ann

    The hypothesis being evaluated in this research program is that control of radiation induced oxidative stress will reduce the risk of radiation induced adverse biological effects occurring as a result of exposure to the types of radiation encountered during space travel. As part of this grant work, we have evaluated the protective effects of several antioxidants and dietary supplements and observed that a mixture of antioxidants (AOX), containing L-selenomethionine, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), ascorbic acid, vitamin E succinate, and alpha-lipoic acid, is highly effective at reducing space radiation induced oxidative stress in both in vivo and in vitro systems, space radiation induced cytotoxicity and malignant transformation in vitro [1-7]. In studies designed to determine whether the AOX formulation could affect radiation induced mortality [8], it was observed that the AOX dietary supplement increased the 30-day survival of ICR male mice following exposure to a potentially lethal dose (8 Gy) of X-rays when given prior to or after animal irradiation. Pretreatment of animals with antioxidants resulted in significantly higher total white blood cell and neutrophil counts in peripheral blood at 4 and 24 hours following exposure to doses of 1 Gy and 8 Gy. Antioxidant treatment also resulted in increased bone marrow cell counts following irradiation, and prevented peripheral lymphopenia following 1 Gy irradiation. Supplementation with antioxidants in irradiated animals resulted in several gene expression changes: the antioxidant treatment was associated with increased Bcl-2, and decreased Bax, caspase-9 and TGF-β1 mRNA expression in the bone marrow following irradiation. These results suggest that modulation of apoptosis may be mechanistically involved in hematopoietic system radioprotection by antioxidants. Maintenance of the antioxidant diet was associated with improved recovery of the bone marrow following sub-lethal or potentially lethal irradiation. Taken together

  6. Targeting Mucosal Healing in Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kakkar, Aarti; Wasan, Sharmeel K.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of medical treatment for Crohn's disease includes improving patients' quality of life while reducing the need for hospitalization and surgery. The current medical armamentarium includes 5-aminosalicylates, corticosteroids, immunomodulators, and biologic agents. In the past, response to treatment was measured by clinical improvement in symptoms; however, with the advent of disease-modifying medications, mucosal healing has emerged as an increasingly important goal of therapy. Mucosal healing, or endoscopic remission, is associated with increased rates of clinical remission, fewer hospitalizations, and fewer abdominal surgeries. Both the immunomodulator and biologic classes of medications are effective at inducing mucosal healing. Despite several limitations, mucosal healing has become a desirable and valid measure of disease activity. PMID:21869869

  7. Prophylaxis and management of acute radiation-induced skin reactions: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Salvo, N.; Barnes, E.; van Draanen, J.; Stacey, E.; Mitera, G.; Breen, D.; Giotis, A.; Czarnota, G.; Pang, J.; De Angelis, C.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a common treatment for cancer patients. One of the most common side effects of radiation is acute skin reaction (radiation dermatitis) that ranges from a mild rash to severe ulceration. Approximately 85% of patients treated with radiation therapy will experience a moderate-to-severe skin reaction. Acute radiation-induced skin reactions often lead to itching and pain, delays in treatment, and diminished aesthetic appearance—and subsequently to a decrease in quality of life. Surveys have demonstrated that a wide variety of topical, oral, and intravenous agents are used to prevent or to treat radiation-induced skin reactions. We conducted a literature review to identify trials that investigated products for the prophylaxis and management of acute radiation dermatitis. Thirty-nine studies met the pre-defined criteria, with thirty-three being categorized as prophylactic trials and six as management trials. For objective evaluation of skin reactions, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria and the U.S. National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria were the most commonly used tools (65% of the studies). Topical corticosteroid agents were found to significantly reduce the severity of skin reactions; however, the trials of corticosteroids evaluated various agents, and no clear indication about a preferred corticosteroid has emerged. Amifostine and oral enzymes were somewhat effective in preventing radiation-induced skin reactions in phase ii and phase iii trials respectively; further large randomized controlled trials should be undertaken to better investigate those products. Biafine cream (Ortho–McNeil Pharmaceuticals, Titusville, NJ, U.S.A.) was found not to be superior to standard regimes in the prevention of radiation-induced skin reactions (n = 6). In conclusion, the evidence is insufficient to support the use of a particular agent for the prevention and management of acute radiation-induced skin reactions. Future trials should focus

  8. Feasibility of OCT to detect radiation-induced esophageal damage in small animal models (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelvehgaran, Pouya; Alderliesten, Tanja; Salguero, Javier; Borst, Gerben; Song, Ji-Ying; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; de Boer, Johannes F.; de Bruin, Daniel M.; van Herk, Marcel B.

    2016-03-01

    Lung cancer survival is poor and radiotherapy patients often suffer serious treatment side effects. The esophagus is particularly sensitive leading to reduced food intake or even fistula formation. Only few direct techniques exist to measure radiation-induced esophageal damage, for which knowledge is needed to improve the balance between risk of tumor recurrence and complications. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a minimally-invasive imaging technique that obtains cross-sectional, high-resolution (1-10µm) images and is capable of scanning the esophageal wall up to 2-3mm depth. In this study we investigated the feasibility of OCT to detect esophageal radiation damage in mice. In total 30 mice were included in 4 study groups (1 main and 3 control groups). Mice underwent cone-beam CT imaging for initial setup assessment and dose planning followed by single-fraction dose delivery of 4, 10, 16, and 20Gy on 5mm spots, spaced 10mm apart. Mice were repeatedly imaged using OCT: pre-irradiation and up to 3 months post-irradiation. The control groups received either OCT only, irradiation only, or were sham-operated. We used histopathology as gold standard for radiation-induced damage diagnosis. The study showed edema in both the main and OCT-only groups. Furthermore, radiation-induced damage was primarily found in the highest dose region (distal esophagus). Based on the histopathology reports we were able to identify the radiation-induced damage in the OCT images as a change in tissue scattering related to the type of induced damage. This finding indicates the feasibility and thereby the potentially promising role of OCT in radiation-induced esophageal damage assessment.

  9. Early corticosteroid administration in experimental radiation-induced heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, W.C.; Stryker, J.A.; Abt, A.A.; Chung, C.K.; Whitesell, L.; Zelis, R.

    1980-02-01

    The ability of dexamethasone (DEX) to reduce the severity of the late stage of radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) was assessed in 25 New Zealand white rabbits. Ten rabbits served as unirradiated controls (CONT). In Group A, seven rabbits received intravenous DEX prior to irradiation and every 24 hours for three consecutive days. DEX was not administered to the eight rabbits in Group B. At 100 days postirradiation, the severity of the late state was determined by microscopic examination (MICRO) for myocardial fibrosis and determination of myocardial hydroxyproline content (MHP). Myocardial fibrosis was evident in groups A (40%) and B (80%) while none was present in CONT by MICRO. One rabbit in Group B with no fibrosis by MICRO had abnormally increased MHP. MHP was significantly increased in Groups A and B, as compared to CONT (p < 0.01). In addition to less fibrosis by MICRO, Group A demonstrated a significant reduction of MHP when compared to Group B (p < 0.05). Determination of MHP may be superior to MICRO in the detection of the late stage of RIHD. Also, early DEX administration appears to reduce myocardial collagen content (fibrosis) in this experimental model.

  10. Treatment of radiation-induced cystitis with hyperbaric oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, J.P.; Boland, F.P.; Mori, H.; Gallagher, M.; Brereton, H.; Preate, D.L.; Neville, E.C.

    1985-08-01

    The effects of hyperbaric oxygen on radiation cystitis have been documented in 3 patients with radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis refractory to conventional therapy. Cessation of gross hematuria and reversal of cystoscopic bladder changes were seen in response to a series of hyperbaric oxygen treatments of 2 atmosphere absolute pressure for 2 hours. To our knowledge this is the first report of cystoscopically documented healing of radiation-induced bladder injury.

  11. Nasal mucosal biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - nasal mucosa; Nose biopsy ... to fast for a few hours before the biopsy. ... Nasal mucosal biopsy is usually done when abnormal tissue is seen during examination of the nose. It may also be done ...

  12. Radiation-induced reactions in polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biscoglio, Michael Benedict

    Since the 1950's, there has been a considerable interest in the effects of ionizing radiation on the physical properties of polymer systems. Radiation induced chemical changes that were found to be helpful in producing specialty polymers, but also potentially harmful by degrading the physical performance of the material. Therefore, solute molecules, which act as excited state quenchers, and free radical scavengers, have been incorporated into the polymers in order to regulate the crosslinking, scission and desaturation reactions. This work is focused on using spectroscopic techniques to characterize the physical properties of polymeric media and the reactions occurring within them following pulsed radiolysis. This is done primarily by using arene doped polymer films which have highly absorbing excited states and radical ions that are easily monitored by transient studies. The probes are used to characterize the polymeric microenvironment, to monitor reaction rates, and to interfere in the radical reactions. Photophysical and photochemical characterization of partially crystalline polyethylene complements data previously obtained by conventional physical techniques for polymer characterization. Probe molecules are excluded from crystalline zones and distributed in a networked structure of amorphous zones. Upon high energy radiolysis, it is found that polyolefin systems efficiently donate all radical ions and excited states to the solute molecules, even when the energy is absorbed within the polymer crystalline zones. Studies of the subsequent reactions of the solute excited states and radical ions reveal information about their long term effectiveness as protectants. It is found that highly excited states formed by the recombination of solute radical ions are energetic enough to cause dissociation of halo-arenes. Also, arenes are found to become attached to the polymer chain through a polymer-aryl radical intermediate. These intermediates have been isolated and

  13. Loss of Matrix Metalloproteinase-13 Attenuates Murine Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Flechsig, Paul; Hartenstein, Bettina; Teurich, Sybille; Dadrich, Monika; Hauser, Kai; Abdollahi, Amir; Groene, Hermann-Josef; Angel, Peter; Huber, Peter E.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: Pulmonary fibrosis is a disorder of the lungs with limited treatment options. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) constitute a family of proteases that degrade extracellular matrix with roles in fibrosis. Here we studied the role of MMP13 in a radiation-induced lung fibrosis model using a MMP13 knockout mouse. Methods and Materials: We investigated the role of MMP13 in lung fibrosis by investigating the effects of MMP13 deficiency in C57Bl/6 mice after 20-Gy thoracic irradiation (6-MV Linac). The morphologic results in histology were correlated with qualitative and quantitative results of volume computed tomography (VCT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and clinical outcome. Results: We found that MMP13 deficient mice developed less pulmonary fibrosis than their wildtype counterparts, showed attenuated acute pulmonary inflammation (days after irradiation), and a reduction of inflammation during the later fibrogenic phase (5-6 months after irradiation). The reduced fibrosis in MMP13 deficient mice was evident in histology with reduced thickening of alveolar septi and reduced remodeling of the lung architecture in good correlation with reduced features of lung fibrosis in qualitative and quantitative VCT and MRI studies. The partial resistance of MMP13-deficient mice to fibrosis was associated with a tendency towards a prolonged mouse survival. Conclusions: Our data indicate that MMP13 has a role in the development of radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Further, our findings suggest that MMP13 constitutes a potential drug target to attenuate radiation-induced lung fibrosis.

  14. Podophyllum hexandrum prevents radiation-induced neuronal damage in postnatal rats exposed in utero.

    PubMed

    Sajikumar, S; Goel, H C

    2003-08-01

    Podophyllum hexandrum has been shown to mitigate radiation injuries and especially the haemopoietic syndrome in adult mice. To monitor the radiation-induced changes in the nervous system, the neurons of postnatal young mice and their modification by P. hexandrum, were studied histologically for differences in the apical and basal dendritic branching and intersections in the CA1 neurons of the hippocampal region of rats which were delivered a 2 Gy gamma dose while in utero (day 17 of gestation). Irradiation significantly reduced the dendritic branching and intersections but pre-irradiation administration of the extract of P. hexandrum (i.p. 200 mg/kg/b.w., 2 h) reduced the damage in postnatal young mice. These studies indicate that P. hexandrum provides protection to neurons against radiation-induced damage and the mechanism of neuronal damage and its repair need to be investigated further.

  15. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Radiation-Induced Cystitis and Proctitis

    SciTech Connect

    Oliai, Caspian; Fisher, Brandon; Jani, Ashish; Wong, Michael; Poli, Jaganmohan; Brady, Luther W.; Komarnicky, Lydia T.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To provide a retrospective analysis of the efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) for treating hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) and proctitis secondary to pelvic- and prostate-only radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients were treated with HBOT for radiation-induced HC and proctitis. The median age at treatment was 66 years (range, 15-84 years). The range of external-beam radiation delivered was 50.0-75.6 Gy. Bleeding must have been refractory to other therapies. Patients received 100% oxygen at 2.0 atmospheres absolute pressure for 90-120 min per treatment in a monoplace chamber. Symptoms were retrospectively scored according to the Late Effects of Normal Tissues-Subjective, Objective, Management, Analytic (LENT-SOMA) scale to evaluate short-term efficacy. Recurrence of hematuria/hematochezia was used to assess long-term efficacy. Results: Four of the 19 patients were lost to follow-up. Fifteen patients were evaluated and received a mean of 29.8 dives: 11 developed HC and 4 proctitis. All patients experienced a reduction in their LENT-SOMA score. After completion of HBOT, the mean LENT-SOMA score was reduced from 0.78 to 0.20 in patients with HC and from 0.66 to 0.26 in patients with proctitis. Median follow-up was 39 months (range, 7-70 months). No cases of hematuria were refractory to HBOT. Complete resolution of hematuria was seen in 81% (n = 9) and partial response in 18% (n = 2). Recurrence of hematuria occurred in 36% (n = 4) after a median of 10 months. Complete resolution of hematochezia was seen in 50% (n = 2), partial response in 25% (n = 1), and refractory bleeding in 25% (n = 1). Conclusions: Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is appropriate for radiation-induced HC once less time-consuming therapies have failed to resolve the bleeding. In these conditions, HBOT is efficacious in the short and long term, with minimal side effects.

  16. Radiation-Induced Notch Signaling in Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lagadec, Chann; Vlashi, Erina; Alhiyari, Yazeed; Phillips, Tiffany M.; Bochkur Dratver, Milana; Pajonk, Frank

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To explore patterns of Notch receptor and ligand expression in response to radiation that could be crucial in defining optimal dosing schemes for γ-secretase inhibitors if combined with radiation. Methods and Materials: Using MCF-7 and T47D breast cancer cell lines, we used real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction to study the Notch pathway in response to radiation. Results: We show that Notch receptor and ligand expression during the first 48 hours after irradiation followed a complex radiation dose–dependent pattern and was most pronounced in mammospheres, enriched for breast cancer stem cells. Additionally, radiation activated the Notch pathway. Treatment with a γ-secretase inhibitor prevented radiation-induced Notch family gene expression and led to a significant reduction in the size of the breast cancer stem cell pool. Conclusions: Our results indicate that, if combined with radiation, γ-secretase inhibitors may prevent up-regulation of Notch receptor and ligand family members and thus reduce the number of surviving breast cancer stem cells.

  17. Radiation-induced heart disease in lung cancer radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Xin; Feng, Yuanming; Yang, Chengwen; Wang, Wei; Wang, Ping; Deng, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD), which affects the patients’ prognosis with both acute and late side effects, has been published extensively in the radiotherapy of breast cancer, lymphoma and other benign diseases. Studies on RIHD in lung cancer radiotherapy, however, are less extensive and clear even though the patients with lung cancer are delivered with higher doses to the heart during radiation treatment. Methods: In this article, after extensive literature search and analysis, we reviewed the current evidence on RIHD in lung cancer patients after their radiation treatments and investigated the potential risk factors for RIHD as compared to other types of cancers. Result: Cardiac toxicity has been found highly relevant in lung cancer radiotherapy. So far, the crude incidence of cardiac complications in the lung cancer patients after radiotherapy has been up to 33%. Conclusion: The dose to the heart, the lobar location of tumor, the treatment modality, the history of heart and pulmonary disease and smoking were considered as potential risk factors for RIHD in lung cancer radiotherapy. As treatment techniques improve over the time with better prognosis for lung cancer survivors, an improved prediction model can be established to further reduce the cardiac toxicity in lung cancer radiotherapy. PMID:27741117

  18. Simvastatin attenuates radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction in mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liping; Yang, Xi; Chen, Jiayan; Ge, Xiaolin; Qin, Qin; Zhu, Hongcheng; Zhang, Chi; Sun, Xinchen

    2016-01-01

    Objective Statins are widely used lipid-lowering drugs, which have pleiotropic effects, such as anti-inflammation, and vascular protection. In our study, we investigated the radioprotective potential of simvastatin (SIM) in a murine model of radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction. Design Ninety-six Institute of Cancer Research mice were randomly divided into four groups: solvent + sham irradiation (IR) (Group I), SIM + sham IR (Group II), IR + solvent (Group III), and IR + SIM (Group IV). SIM (10 mg/kg body weight, three times per week) was administered intraperitoneally 1 week prior to IR through to the end of the experiment. Saliva and submandibular gland tissues were obtained for biochemical, morphological (hematoxylin and eosin staining and Masson’s trichrome), and Western blot analysis at 8 hours, 24 hours, and 4 weeks after head and neck IR. Results IR caused a significant reduction of salivary secretion and amylase activity but elevation of malondialdehyde. SIM remitted the reduction of saliva secretion and restored salivary amylase activity. The protective benefits of SIM may be attributed to scavenging malondialdehyde, remitting collagen deposition, and reducing and delaying the elevation of transforming growth factor β1 expression induced by radiation. Conclusion SIM may be clinically useful to alleviate side effects of radiotherapy on salivary gland. PMID:27471375

  19. Epigenetic regulation of diacylglycerol kinase alpha promotes radiation-induced fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Weigel, Christoph; Veldwijk, Marlon R.; Oakes, Christopher C.; Seibold, Petra; Slynko, Alla; Liesenfeld, David B.; Rabionet, Mariona; Hanke, Sabrina A.; Wenz, Frederik; Sperk, Elena; Benner, Axel; Rösli, Christoph; Sandhoff, Roger; Assenov, Yassen; Plass, Christoph; Herskind, Carsten; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Schmezer, Peter; Popanda, Odilia

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a fundamental part of cancer treatment but its use is limited by the onset of late adverse effects in the normal tissue, especially radiation-induced fibrosis. Since the molecular causes for fibrosis are largely unknown, we analyse if epigenetic regulation might explain inter-individual differences in fibrosis risk. DNA methylation profiling of dermal fibroblasts obtained from breast cancer patients prior to irradiation identifies differences associated with fibrosis. One region is characterized as a differentially methylated enhancer of diacylglycerol kinase alpha (DGKA). Decreased DNA methylation at this enhancer enables recruitment of the profibrotic transcription factor early growth response 1 (EGR1) and facilitates radiation-induced DGKA transcription in cells from patients later developing fibrosis. Conversely, inhibition of DGKA has pronounced effects on diacylglycerol-mediated lipid homeostasis and reduces profibrotic fibroblast activation. Collectively, DGKA is an epigenetically deregulated kinase involved in radiation response and may serve as a marker and therapeutic target for personalized radiotherapy. PMID:26964756

  20. Epigenetic regulation of diacylglycerol kinase alpha promotes radiation-induced fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Weigel, Christoph; Veldwijk, Marlon R; Oakes, Christopher C; Seibold, Petra; Slynko, Alla; Liesenfeld, David B; Rabionet, Mariona; Hanke, Sabrina A; Wenz, Frederik; Sperk, Elena; Benner, Axel; Rösli, Christoph; Sandhoff, Roger; Assenov, Yassen; Plass, Christoph; Herskind, Carsten; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Schmezer, Peter; Popanda, Odilia

    2016-03-11

    Radiotherapy is a fundamental part of cancer treatment but its use is limited by the onset of late adverse effects in the normal tissue, especially radiation-induced fibrosis. Since the molecular causes for fibrosis are largely unknown, we analyse if epigenetic regulation might explain inter-individual differences in fibrosis risk. DNA methylation profiling of dermal fibroblasts obtained from breast cancer patients prior to irradiation identifies differences associated with fibrosis. One region is characterized as a differentially methylated enhancer of diacylglycerol kinase alpha (DGKA). Decreased DNA methylation at this enhancer enables recruitment of the profibrotic transcription factor early growth response 1 (EGR1) and facilitates radiation-induced DGKA transcription in cells from patients later developing fibrosis. Conversely, inhibition of DGKA has pronounced effects on diacylglycerol-mediated lipid homeostasis and reduces profibrotic fibroblast activation. Collectively, DGKA is an epigenetically deregulated kinase involved in radiation response and may serve as a marker and therapeutic target for personalized radiotherapy.

  1. The suppression of radiation-induced NF-{kappa}B activity by dexamethasone correlates with increased cell death in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Seon Young; Chung, Hee-Yong . E-mail: hychung@hanyang.ac.kr

    2005-10-21

    In this study, we show that dexamethasone treatment increases ionizing radiation-induced cell death by inducing the inhibitory {kappa}B{alpha} (I{kappa}B{alpha}) pathway in mice. The effect of dexamethasone on radiation-induced cell death was assessed by changes in total spleen cellularity and bone marrow colony-forming unit-granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) contents after total body irradiation. While in vivo treatment of mice with dexamethasone alone (1 mg/kg/day, for 2 days) failed to elicit cell death in spleen cells, the combined treatment with dexamethasone (1 mg/kg/day, for 2 days) and {gamma}-rays (1 or 5 Gy) caused a 50-80% reduction in total cellularity in spleen and CFU-GM contents in bone marrow. These results demonstrate that dexamethasone has a synergistic effect on radiation-induced cellular damages in vivo. Immunoblot analysis showed that dexamethasone treatment significantly increases I{kappa}B{alpha} expression in the spleens of irradiated mice. In addition, the dexamethasone treatment significantly reduced radiation-induced nuclear translocation of the nucleus factor-{kappa}B in the spleens of irradiated mice. These results indicate that dexamethasone treatment in vivo may increase radiation-induced cell damages by increasing I{kappa}B{alpha} expression in hematopoietic organs such as spleen and bone marrow.

  2. Leaf extract of Moringa oleifera prevents ionizing radiation-induced oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Mahuya; Das, Dipesh K; Bhattacharjee, Surajit; Majumdar, Subrata; Dey, Sanjit

    2011-10-01

    The present study evaluated the hepatoprotective effect of aqueous ethanolic Moringa oleifera leaf extract (MoLE) against radiation-induced oxidative stress, which is assessed in terms of inflammation and lipid peroxidation. Swiss albino mice were administered MoLE (300 mg/kg of body weight) for 15 consecutive days before exposing them to a single dose of 5 Gy of ⁶⁰Co γ-irradiation. Mice were sacrificed at 4 hours after irradiation. Liver was collected for immunoblotting and biochemical tests for the detection of markers of hepatic oxidative stress. Nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and lipid peroxidation were augmented, whereas the superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), reduced glutathione (GSH), and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) values were decreased by radiation exposure. Translocation of NF-κB from cytoplasm to nucleus and lipid peroxidation were found to be inhibited, whereas increases in SOD, CAT, GSH, and FRAP were observed in the mice treated with MoLE prior to irradiation. Therefore pretreatment with MoLE protected against γ-radiation-induced liver damage. The protection may be attributed to the free radical scavenging activity of MoLE, through which it can ameliorate radiation-induced oxidative stress. PMID:21861723

  3. Leaf extract of Moringa oleifera prevents ionizing radiation-induced oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Mahuya; Das, Dipesh K; Bhattacharjee, Surajit; Majumdar, Subrata; Dey, Sanjit

    2011-10-01

    The present study evaluated the hepatoprotective effect of aqueous ethanolic Moringa oleifera leaf extract (MoLE) against radiation-induced oxidative stress, which is assessed in terms of inflammation and lipid peroxidation. Swiss albino mice were administered MoLE (300 mg/kg of body weight) for 15 consecutive days before exposing them to a single dose of 5 Gy of ⁶⁰Co γ-irradiation. Mice were sacrificed at 4 hours after irradiation. Liver was collected for immunoblotting and biochemical tests for the detection of markers of hepatic oxidative stress. Nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and lipid peroxidation were augmented, whereas the superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), reduced glutathione (GSH), and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) values were decreased by radiation exposure. Translocation of NF-κB from cytoplasm to nucleus and lipid peroxidation were found to be inhibited, whereas increases in SOD, CAT, GSH, and FRAP were observed in the mice treated with MoLE prior to irradiation. Therefore pretreatment with MoLE protected against γ-radiation-induced liver damage. The protection may be attributed to the free radical scavenging activity of MoLE, through which it can ameliorate radiation-induced oxidative stress.

  4. Effects of NOX1 on fibroblastic changes of endothelial cells in radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    CHOI, SEO-HYUN; KIM, MISEON; LEE, HAE-JUNE; KIM, EUN-HO; KIM, CHUN-HO; LEE, YOON-JIN

    2016-01-01

    Lung fibrosis is a major complication in radiation-induced lung damage following thoracic radiotherapy, while the underlying mechanism has remained to be elucidated. The present study performed immunofluorescence and immunoblot assays on irradiated human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs) with or without pre-treatment with VAS2870, a novel NADPH oxidase (NOX) inhibitor, or small hairpin (sh)RNA against NOX1, -2 or -4. VAS2870 reduced the cellular reactive oxygen species content induced by 5 Gy radiation in HPAECs and inhibited phenotypic changes in fibrotic cells, including increased alpha smooth muscle actin and vimentin, and decreased CD31 and vascular endothelial cadherin expression. These fibrotic changes were significantly inhibited by treatment with NOX1 shRNA, but not by NOX2 or NOX4 shRNA. Next, the role of NOX1 in pulmonary fibrosis development was assessed in the lung tissues of C57BL/6J mice following thoracic irradiation using trichrome staining. Administration of an NOX1-specific inhibitor suppressed radiation-induced collagen deposition and fibroblastic changes in the endothelial cells (ECs) of these mice. The results suggested that radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis may be efficiently reduced by specific inhibition of NOX1, an effect mediated by reduction of fibrotic changes of ECs. PMID:27053172

  5. Inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase ameliorates radiation-induced ototoxicity in zebrafish and cochlea-derived cell lines.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yoo Seob; Hwang, Hye Sook; Kang, Sung Un; Chang, Jae Won; Oh, Young-Taek; Kim, Chul-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Radiation is a widely used treatment for head and neck cancers, and one of its most severe side effects is ototoxicity. Radiation-induced ototoxicity has been demonstrated to be linked to the increased production of ROS and MAPK. We intended to investigate the effect of p38 inhibition on radiation-induced ototoxicity in cochlea-derived HEI-OC1 cells and in a zebrafish model. The otoprotective effect of p38 inhibition against radiation was tested in vitro in the organ of Corti-derived cell line, HEI-OC1, and in vivo in a zebrafish model. Radiation-induced apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, and an increase of intracellular NO generation were demonstrated in HEI-OC1 cells. The p38-specific inhibitor, SB203580, ameliorated radiation-induced apoptosis and mitochondrial injury in HEI-OC1 cells. p38 inhibition reduced radiation-induced activation of JNK, p38, cytochrome c, and cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP in HEI-OC1 cells. Scanning electron micrography showed that SB203580 prevented radiation-induced destruction of kinocilium and stereocilia in zebrafish neuromasts. The results of this study suggest that p38 plays an important role in mediating radiation-induced ototoxicity and inhibition of p38 could be a plausible option for preventing radiation ototoxicity. PMID:24374476

  6. Reduction of radiation-induced cell cycle blocks by caffeine does not necessarily lead to increased cell killing

    SciTech Connect

    Musk, S.R. )

    1991-03-01

    The effect of caffeine upon the radiosensitivities of three human tumor lines was examined and correlated with its action upon the radiation-induced S-phase and G2-phase blocks. Caffeine was found to reduce at least partially the S-phase and G2-phase blocks in all the cell lines examined but potentiated cytotoxicity in only one of the three tumor lines. That reductions have been demonstrated to occur in the absence of increased cell killing provides supporting evidence for the hypothesis that reductions may not be causal in those cases when potentiation of radiation-induced cytotoxicity is observed in the presence of caffeine.

  7. Panretinal photocoagulation for radiation-induced ocular ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Augsburger, J.J.; Roth, S.E.; Magargal, L.E.; Shields, J.A.

    1987-08-01

    We present preliminary findings on the effectiveness of panretinal photocoagulation in preventing neovascular glaucoma in eyes with radiation-induced ocular ischemia. Our study group consisted of 20 patients who developed radiation-induced ocular ischemia following cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy for a choroidal or ciliary body melanoma. Eleven of the 20 patients were treated by panretinal photocoagulation shortly after the diagnosis of ocular ischemia, but nine patients were left untreated. In this non-randomized study, the rate of development of neovascular glaucoma was significantly lower (p = 0.024) for the 11 photocoagulated patients than for the nine who were left untreated.

  8. [Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of radiation-induced enteritis].

    PubMed

    Sinkó, Dániel; Baranyai, Zsolt; Nemeskéri, Csaba; Teknos, Dániel; Jósa, Valéria; Hegedus, László; Mayer, Arpád

    2010-09-01

    The number of radiotherapy in the treatment of malignant diseases is increasing worldwide. During the radiotherapy of tumors in the minor pelvis and abdomen intestinal inflammation of different degree may occur even if special attention is paid. Irradiation to the minor pelvis causes in half of the cases radiation induced acute enteritis, whereas in 25% chronic enteritis and colitis will develop. Chronic enteritis following radiotherapy raises a number of diagnostic and therapeutic problems that can be solved only with cooperation of different specialties. Authors present a short review regarding therapeutical options of radiation induced enteritis.

  9. Hyperbaric oxygen: Primary treatment of radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, J.P.; Neville, E.C.

    1989-07-01

    Of 8 patients with symptoms of advanced cystitis due to pelvic radiation treated with hyperbaric oxygen 7 are persistently improved during followup. All 6 patients treated for gross hematuria requiring hospitalization have been free of symptoms for an average of 24 months (range 6 to 43 months). One patient treated for stress incontinence currently is dry despite little change in bladder capacity, implying salutary effect from hyperbaric oxygen on the sphincter mechanism. One patient with radiation-induced prostatitis failed to respond. This experience suggests that hyperbaric oxygen should be considered the primary treatment for patients with symptomatic radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis.

  10. Mechanisms of radiation-induced normal tissue toxicity and implications for future clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Jenrow, Kenneth A.; Brown, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    To summarize current knowledge regarding mechanisms of radiation-induced normal tissue injury and medical countermeasures available to reduce its severity. Advances in radiation delivery using megavoltage and intensity-modulated radiation therapy have permitted delivery of higher doses of radiation to well-defined tumor target tissues. Injury to critical normal tissues and organs, however, poses substantial risks in the curative treatment of cancers, especially when radiation is administered in combination with chemotherapy. The principal pathogenesis is initiated by depletion of tissue stem cells and progenitor cells and damage to vascular endothelial microvessels. Emerging concepts of radiation-induced normal tissue toxicity suggest that the recovery and repopulation of stromal stem cells remain chronically impaired by long-lived free radicals, reactive oxygen species, and pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines resulting in progressive damage after radiation exposure. Better understanding the mechanisms mediating interactions among excessive generation of reactive oxygen species, production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and activated macrophages, and role of bone marrow-derived progenitor and stem cells may provide novel insight on the pathogenesis of radiation-induced injury of tissues. Further understanding the molecular signaling pathways of cytokines and chemokines would reveal novel targets for protecting or mitigating radiation injury of tissues and organs. PMID:25324981

  11. Silymarin protects epidermal keratinocytes from ultraviolet radiation-induced apoptosis and DNA damage by nucleotide excision repair mechanism.

    PubMed

    Katiyar, Santosh K; Mantena, Sudheer K; Meeran, Syed M

    2011-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a well recognized epidemiologic risk factor for melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. This observation has been linked to the accumulation of UVB radiation-induced DNA lesions in cells, and that finally lead to the development of skin cancers. Earlier, we have shown that topical treatment of skin with silymarin, a plant flavanoid from milk thistle (Silybum marianum), inhibits photocarcinogenesis in mice; however it is less understood whether chemopreventive effect of silymarin is mediated through the repair of DNA lesions in skin cells and that protect the cells from apoptosis. Here, we show that treatment of normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) with silymarin blocks UVB-induced apoptosis of NHEK in vitro. Silymarin reduces the amount of UVB radiation-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by reduced amounts of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and as measured by comet assay, and that ultimately may lead to reduced apoptosis of NHEK. The reduction of UV radiation-induced DNA damage by silymarin appears to be related with induction of nucleotide excision repair (NER) genes, because UV radiation-induced apoptosis was not blocked by silymarin in NER-deficient human fibroblasts. Cytostaining and dot-blot analysis revealed that silymarin repaired UV-induced CPDs in NER-proficient fibroblasts from a healthy individual but did not repair UV-induced CPD-positive cells in NER-deficient fibroblasts from patients suffering from xeroderma pigmentosum complementation-A disease. Similarly, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that silymarin did not reduce the number of UVB-induced sunburn/apoptotic cells in the skin of NER-deficient mice, but reduced the number of sunburn cells in their wild-type counterparts. Together, these results suggest that silymarin exert the capacity to reduce UV radiation-induced DNA damage and, thus, prevent the harmful effects of UV radiation on the genomic stability of epidermal cells.

  12. Pharmacokinetics of Antiretrovirals in Mucosal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Cottrell, M.L.; Srinivas, N.; Kashuba, A.D.M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In the absence of an HIV vaccine or cure, antiretroviral (ARV) based prevention strategies are being investigated to reduce HIV incidence. These prevention strategies depend on achieving effective drug concentrations at the site HIV exposure which is most commonly the mucosal tissues of the lower gastrointestinal tract and the female genital tract. Areas covered This article collates all known data regarding drug exposure in these vulnerable mucosal tissues, and reviews important mechanisms of ARV drug distribution. Research papers and abstracts describing antiretroviral pharmacokinetics in the female genital tract and lower gastrointestinal mucosal tissues available in MEDLINE® or presented at scientific conferences prior to December 2014 are reviewed in detail. Important influences on ARV mucosal tissue distribution, including protein binding, active drug transport, and endogenous hormones, are also reviewed. Expert opinion ARVs exhibit highly variable pharmacokinetics in mucosal tissues. In general, antiretroviral exposure is higher in the lower gastrointestinal tract compared to the female genital tract, but concentrations required for protective efficacy are largely unknown. The expected site of HIV exposure represents an important consideration when designing and optimizing antiretroviral based prevention strategies. PMID:25797064

  13. A review on radiation-induced nucleation and growth of colloidal metallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Abedini, Alam; Daud, Abdul Razak; Abdul Hamid, Muhammad Azmi; Kamil Othman, Norinsan; Saion, Elias

    2013-01-01

    This review presents an introduction to the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles by radiation-induced method, especially gamma irradiation. This method offers some benefits over the conventional methods because it provides fully reduced and highly pure nanoparticles free from by-products or chemical reducing agents, and is capable of controlling the particle size and structure. The nucleation and growth mechanism of metallic nanoparticles are also discussed. The competition between nucleation and growth process in the formation of nanoparticles can determine the size of nanoparticles which is influenced by certain parameters such as the choice of solvents and stabilizer, the precursor to stabilizer ratio, pH during synthesis, and absorbed dose.

  14. SPHINX Measurements of Radiation Induced Conductivity of Foam

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, W.P.; Beutler, D.E.; Burt, M.; Dudley, K.J.; Stringer, T.A.

    1998-12-14

    Experiments on the SPHINX accelerator studying radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) in foam indicate that a field-exclusion boundary layer model better describes foam than a Maxwell-Garnett model that treats the conducting gas bubbles in the foam as modifying the dielectric constant. In both cases, wall attachment effects could be important but were neglected.

  15. Radiation-induced xerostomia: pathophysiology, clinical course and supportive treatment.

    PubMed

    Guchelaar, H J; Vermes, A; Meerwaldt, J H

    1997-07-01

    Xerostomia, or oral dryness, is one of the most common complaints experienced by patients who have had radiotherapy of the oral cavity and neck region. The hallmarks of radiation-induced damage are acinar atrophy and chronic inflammation of the salivary glands. The early response, resulting in atrophy of the secretory cells without inflammation might be due to radiation-induced apoptosis. In contrast, the late response with inflammation could be a result of radiation-induced necrosis. The subjective complaint of a dry mouth appears to be poorly correlated with objective findings of salivary gland dysfunction. Xerostomia, with secondary symptoms of increased dental caries, difficulty in chewing, swallowing and speaking, and an increased incidence of oral candidiasis, can have a significant effect on the quality of life. At present there is no causal treatment for radiation-induced xerostomia. Temporary symptomatic relief can be offered by moistening agents and saliva substitutes, and is the only option for patients without residual salivary function. In patients with residual salivary function, oral administration of pilocarpine 5-10 mg three times a day is effective in increasing salivary flow and improving the symptoms of xerostomia, and this therapy should be considered as the treatment of choice. Effectiveness of sialogogue treatment requires residual salivary function, which emphasizes the potential benefit from sparing normal tissue during irradiation. The hypothesis concerning the existence of early apoptotic and late necrotic effects of irradiation on the salivary glands theoretically offers a way of achieving this goal. PMID:9257424

  16. Radiation-induced segregation in alloy X-750

    SciTech Connect

    Kenik, E.A.

    1996-12-31

    Microstructural and microchemical evolution of an Alloy X-750 heat under neutron irradiation was studied in order to understand the origin of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking. Both clustering of point defects and radiation-induced segregation at interfaces were observed. Although no significant changes in the precipitate structure were observed, boundaries exhibited additional depletion of Cr and Fe and enrichment of Ni.

  17. Radiation-induced instability and its relation to radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ullrich, R. L.; Ponnaiya, B.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: A model that identifies radiation-induced genetic instability as the earliest cellular event in the multi-step sequence leading to radiation-induced cancer was previously proposed. In this paper ongoing experiments are discussed which are designed to test this model and its predictions in mouse mammary epithelial cells. RESULTS: Several lines of evidence are presented that appear to support this model: first, the development of delayed mutations in p53 following irradiation in altered growth variants; secondly, the high frequencies for the induction of both instability and transformation following irradiation in mammary epithelial cells; and finally, the demonstration that susceptibility to the induction of cytogenetic instability is a heritable trait that correlates with susceptibility to transformation and radiation-induced mammary cancer. Mice resistant to transformation and mammary cancer development are also resistant to the development of instability after irradiation. In contrast, mice sensitive to transformation and cancer are also sensitive to the development of cytogenetic instability. CONCLUSIONS: Data from this laboratory and from the studies cited above suggest a specific, and perhaps unique, role for radiation-induced instability as a critical early event associated with initiation of the carcinogenic process.

  18. Obstructive jaundice due to radiation-induced hepatic duct stricture

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekhara, K.L.; Iyer, S.K.

    1984-10-01

    A case of obstructive jaundice due to radiation-induced hepatic duct stricture is reported. The patient received postoperative radiation for left adrenal carcinoma, seven years prior to this admission. The sequelae of hepatobiliary radiation and their management are discussed briefly.

  19. Radiation-induced xerostomia: pathophysiology, clinical course and supportive treatment.

    PubMed

    Guchelaar, H J; Vermes, A; Meerwaldt, J H

    1997-07-01

    Xerostomia, or oral dryness, is one of the most common complaints experienced by patients who have had radiotherapy of the oral cavity and neck region. The hallmarks of radiation-induced damage are acinar atrophy and chronic inflammation of the salivary glands. The early response, resulting in atrophy of the secretory cells without inflammation might be due to radiation-induced apoptosis. In contrast, the late response with inflammation could be a result of radiation-induced necrosis. The subjective complaint of a dry mouth appears to be poorly correlated with objective findings of salivary gland dysfunction. Xerostomia, with secondary symptoms of increased dental caries, difficulty in chewing, swallowing and speaking, and an increased incidence of oral candidiasis, can have a significant effect on the quality of life. At present there is no causal treatment for radiation-induced xerostomia. Temporary symptomatic relief can be offered by moistening agents and saliva substitutes, and is the only option for patients without residual salivary function. In patients with residual salivary function, oral administration of pilocarpine 5-10 mg three times a day is effective in increasing salivary flow and improving the symptoms of xerostomia, and this therapy should be considered as the treatment of choice. Effectiveness of sialogogue treatment requires residual salivary function, which emphasizes the potential benefit from sparing normal tissue during irradiation. The hypothesis concerning the existence of early apoptotic and late necrotic effects of irradiation on the salivary glands theoretically offers a way of achieving this goal.

  20. Data acquisition system used in radiation induced electrical degradation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.P.

    1995-04-01

    Radiation induced electrical degradation (RIED) of ceramic materials has recently been reported and is the topic of much research at the present time. The object of this report is to describe the data acquisition system for an experiment designed to study RIED at the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  1. Radiation-induced inflammatory markers of brain injury are modulated by PPARdelta activation in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnegg, Caroline Isabel

    responses in microglia in vitro. To extend our in vitro findings in vivo, we investigated whether administration of the peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)ä agonist, GW0742, prevented radiation-induced brain injury in C57Bl/6 WT mice. Our data demonstrate that GW0742 prevented the radiation-induced increase in the number of activated microglia (CD68+ cells) in wild-type (WT) mice 1 week following 10 Gy WBI. Furthermore, GW0742 inhibited the WBI-induced increase in IL-1β message levels and ERK phosphorylation observed 3 h post-irradiation. In contrast, GW0742 administration failed to modulate the radiation-induced decrease in hippocampal neurogenesis (NeuN+/BrdU+ cells) determined 2 months after irradiation, or mitigate hippocampal-dependent spatial memory impairment observed 3 months post-irradiation using the Barnes Maze task. We used PPARō knockout (KO) mice to examine if the effects of GW0742 are PPARō-dependent. Unexpectedly, PPARō KO mice exhibited a differential response following WBI compared to WT mice; therefore, we were unable to make mechanistic conclusions about GW0742. KO mice do not exhibit a WBI-induced increase in activated microglia; however, they appeared to display a pronounced astrocytic response. In particular, PPARō KO but not WT mice displayed increased GFAP message levels 2 months after WBI. Additionally, the number of GFAP+ cells was reduced significantly in the WT mice 2 months after WBI, but it was not in the PPARō KO mice. These results demonstrate that: i) GW0742 prevents the radiation-induced increase in microglial activation and inflammatory markers, and ii) WT and PPARō KO mice have a differential response to WBI.

  2. Risk and survival outcomes of radiation-induced CNS tumors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jessica W; Wernicke, A Gabriella

    2016-08-01

    Patients treated with cranial radiation are at risk of developing secondary CNS tumors. Understanding the incidence, treatment, and long-term outcomes of radiation-induced CNS tumors plays a role in clinical decision-making and patient education. Additionally, as meningiomas and pituitary tumors have been detected at increasing rates across all ages and may potentially be treated with radiation, it is important to know and communicate the risk of secondary tumors in children and adults. After conducting an extensive literature search, we identified publications that report incidence and long-term outcomes of radiation-induced CNS tumors. We reviewed 14 studies in children, which reported that radiation confers a 7- to 10-fold increase in subsequent CNS tumors, with a 20-year cumulative incidence ranging from 1.03 to 28.9 %. The latency period for secondary tumors ranged from 5.5 to 30 years, with gliomas developing in 5-10 years and meningiomas developing around 15 years after radiation. We also reviewed seven studies in adults, where the two strongest studies showed no increased risk while the remaining studies found a higher risk compared to the general population. The latency period for secondary CNS tumors in adults ranged from 5 to 34 years. Treatment and long-term outcomes of radiation-induced CNS tumors have been documented in four case series, which did not conclusively demonstrate that secondary CNS tumors fared worse than primary CNS tumors. Radiation-induced CNS tumors remain a rare occurrence that should not by itself impede radiation treatment. Additional investigation is needed on the risk of radiation-induced tumors in adults and the long-term outcomes of these tumors. PMID:27209188

  3. Radiation induced cancer: risk assessment and prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    A number of factors have to be considered in defining the cancer risk from ionizing radiation. These include the radiation sensitivity of the target tissue(s), the temporal pattern of risk, the shape of the dose-incidence curve, the effects of low dose rates, host susceptibility factors, and synergism with other environmental exposures. For the population as a whole the largest sources of radiation exposure are natural background radiation and medical/dental radiation. Radiation exposures in the medical field make up the largest volume of occupational exposures as well. Although new technologies offer opportunities to lower exposures, worker training, careful exposure monitoring with remedial feedback, and monitoring to prevent unnecessary radiodiagnostic procedures may be even more important means of reducing radiation exposure. Screening of irradiated populations can serve a useful preventive function, but only for those who have received very high doses.

  4. Chemoprevention of Radiation Induced Rat Mammary Neoplasms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huso, David L.

    1999-01-01

    Radiations encountered in space include protons and heavy ions such as iron as well as their secondaries. The relative biological effect (RBE) of these ions is not known, particularly at the doses and dose-rates expected for planetary missions. Neutrons, are not particularly relevant to space travel, but have been found experimentally to have an increase in their RBE with decreasing dose. If a similar trend of increasing RBE with decreasing dose is present for heavy ions and protons during irradiation in space, the small doses received during space travel could potentially have substantial carcinogenic risk. Clearly more investigation of the effects of heavy ions and protons is needed before accurate risk assessment for prolonged travel in space can be done. One means to mitigate the increased risk of cancer due to radiation exposure in space is by developing effective countermeasures that can reduce the incidence of tumor development. Tamoxifen has recently been shown to be an effective chemopreventive agent in both animal models and humans for the prevention of mammary tumors. Tamoxifen is a unique drug, with a highly specific mechanism of action affecting a specific radiation-sensitive population of epithelial cells in the mammary gland. In human studies, the annual incidence of a primary tumor in the contralateral breast of women with previous breast cancer is about 8 per 1000, making them an exceedingly high-risk group for the development of breast cancer. In this high risk group, treated with tamoxifen, daily, for 2 years, the incidence of a new primary tumor in the contralateral breast was approximately one third of that noted in the non-tamoxifen treatment group. Tamoxifen antagonizes the action of estrogen by competing for the nuclear receptor complex thereby altering the association of the receptor complex and nuclear binding sites. Its effects in reducing the development of breast cancer could be accomplished by controlling clinically undetectable

  5. Radiation induced bystander effect by GAP junction channels in human fibroblast cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusawa, Y.; Shao, C.; Aoki, M.; Kobayashi, Y.; Funayama, T.; Ando, K.

    The chemical factor involved in bystander effect and its transfer pathway were investigated in a confluent human fibroblast cell (AG1522) population. Micronuclei (MN) and G1-phase arrest were detected in cells irradiated by carbon (~100 keV/μm) ions at HIMAC. A very low dose irradiation showed a high effectiveness in producing MN, suggesting a bystander effect. This effectiveness was enhanced by 8-Br-cAMP treatment that increases gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). On the other hand, the effect was reduced by 5% DMSO treatment, which reduce the reactive oxygen species (ROS), and suppressed by 100 μM lindane treatment, an inhibitor of GJIC. In addition, the radiation-induced G1-phase arrest was also enhanced by cAMP, and reduced or suppressed by DMSO or lindane. A microbeam device (JAERI) was also used for these studies. It was found that exposing one single cell in a confluent cell population to exactly one argon (~1260 keV/μm) or neon (~430 keV/ μm) ion, additional MN could be detected in many other unirradiated cells. The yield of MN increased with the number of irradiated cells. However, there was no significant difference in the MN induction when the cells were irradiated by increasing number of particles. MN induction by bystander effect was partly reduced by DMSO, and effectively suppressed by lindane. Our results obtained from both random irradiation and precise numbered irradiation indicate that both GJIC and ROS contributed to the radiation-induced bystander effect, but the cell gap junction channels likely play an essential role in the release and transfer of radiation-induced chemical factors.

  6. Mucosal immunology and probiotics.

    PubMed

    Dongarrà, Maria Luisa; Rizzello, Valeria; Muccio, Letizia; Fries, Walter; Cascio, Antonio; Bonaccorsi, Irene; Ferlazzo, Guido

    2013-02-01

    The cross-talk between the mucosa-associated immune system and microbiota is critical in mucosal tissue homeostasis as well as in protection against infectious and inflammatory diseases occurring at mucosal sites. This recent evidence has paved the way to therapeutic approaches aimed at modulating the mucosa-associated immune system using probiotics. Different strains of probiotics possess the ability to finely regulate dendritic cell (DC) activation, polarizing the subsequent T cell activity toward Th1 (e.g. Lactobacillus (Lb) acidophilus), Th2 (Lb.reuteri and Bifidobacterium bifidum) or, as more recently demonstrated, Th17 responses induced by specific strains such as Lb.rhamnosus GG and Lac23a, the latter isolated in our laboratory. Here, we review some recent advances in our understanding of probiotics effects on mucosal immunology, particularly on cells of the innate immunity such as DCs. We also highlight our own experiences in modulating DC functions by commensal bacteria and discuss the relevance of probiotics administration in the treatment of human immunopathologies.

  7. Novel submicronized rebamipide liquid with moderate viscosity: significant effects on oral mucositis in animal models.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Takako; Sako, Nobutomo; Matsuda, Takakuni; Uematsu, Naoya; Sakurai, Kazushi; Ishida, Tatsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at developing a novel rebamipide liquid for an effective treatment of oral mucositis. The healing effects of a variety of liquids comprising submicronized rebamipide crystals were investigated using a rat cauterization-induced oral ulcer model. Whereas 2% rebamipide liquid comprising micro-crystals did not exhibit significant curative effect, 2% rebamipide liquids comprising submicronized crystals with moderate viscosities exhibited healing effects following intra-oral administration. The 2% and 4% optimized rebamipide liquids showed significant healing effects in the rat oral ulcer model (p<0.01). In addition, in the rat radiation-induced glossitis model, whereby the injury was caused to the tongue by exposing only around the rat's snout to a 15 Gy of X-irradiation, the 2% optimized rebamipide liquid significantly reduced the percent area of ulcerated injury (p<0.05). In conclusion, the submicronized rebamipide liquid with moderate viscosity following intra-oral administration showed better both healing effect in the rat oral ulcer model and preventive effect in the rat irradiation-induced glossitis model.

  8. Radiation-induced electrical breakdown of helium in fusion reactor superconducting magnet systems

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, L.J.

    1983-12-02

    A comprehensive theoretical study has been performed on the reduction of the electrical breakdown potential of liquid and gaseous helium under neutron and gamma radiation. Extension of the conventional Townsend breakdown theory indicates that radiation fields at the superconducting magnets of a typical fusion reactor are potentially capable of significantly reducing currently established (i.e., unirradiated) helium breakdown voltages. Emphasis is given to the implications of these results including future deployment choices of magnet cryogenic methods (e.g., pool-boiling versus forced-flow), the possible impact on magnet shielding requirements and the analogous situation for radiation-induced electrical breakdown in fusion RF transmission systems.

  9. Relief of delayed oxidative stress by ascorbic acid can suppress radiation-induced cellular senescence in mammalian fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Kobashigawa, Shinko; Kashino, Genro; Mori, Hiromu; Watanabe, Masami

    2015-03-01

    Ionizing radiation-induced cellular senescence is thought to be caused by nuclear DNA damage that cannot be repaired. However, here we found that radiation induces delayed increase of intracellular oxidative stress after irradiation. We investigated whether the relief of delayed oxidative stress by ascorbic acid would suppress the radiation-induced cellular senescence in Syrian golden hamster embryo (SHE) cells. We observed that the level of oxidative stress was drastically increased soon after irradiation, then declined to the level in non-irradiated cells, and increased again with a peak on day 3 after irradiation. We found that the inductions of cellular senescence after X-irradiation were reduced along with suppression of the delayed induction of oxidative stress by treatment with ascorbic acid, but not when oxidative stress occurred immediately after irradiation. Moreover, treatment of ascorbic acid inhibited p53 accumulation at 3 days after irradiation. Our data suggested a delayed increase of intracellular oxidative stress levels plays an important role in the process of radiation-induced cellular senescence by p53 accumulation.

  10. Using Imaging Methods to Interrogate Radiation-Induced Cell Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Shankaran, Harish; Weber, Thomas J.; Freiin von Neubeck, Claere H.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2012-04-01

    There is increasing emphasis on the use of systems biology approaches to define radiation induced responses in cells and tissues. Such approaches frequently rely on global screening using various high throughput 'omics' platforms. Although these methods are ideal for obtaining an unbiased overview of cellular responses, they often cannot reflect the inherent heterogeneity of the system or provide detailed spatial information. Additionally, performing such studies with multiple sampling time points can be prohibitively expensive. Imaging provides a complementary method with high spatial and temporal resolution capable of following the dynamics of signaling processes. In this review, we utilize specific examples to illustrate how imaging approaches have furthered our understanding of radiation induced cellular signaling. Particular emphasis is placed on protein co-localization, and oscillatory and transient signaling dynamics.

  11. Radiation-induced lung injury: a hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, P.G.; Bryant, D.H.; Morgan, G.W.; Yeates, M.; Fernandez, V.; Penny, R.; Breit, S.N.

    1988-08-15

    Radiation pneumonitis occurs 6 to 12 weeks after thoracic irradiation, and is thought to be due to direct radiation-induced lung injury. Four patients who developed pneumonitis after unilateral thoracic irradiation for carcinoma of the breast were studied with bronchoalveolar lavage, gallium scan of the lung, and respiratory function tests. On the irradiated side of the chest, all four patients showed an increase in total cells recovered from the lavage fluid and a marked increase in the percentage of lymphocytes. When results for the unirradiated lung were compared with results for the irradiated lung, there was a comparable increase in total cells and percentage of lymphocytes. Gallium scans showed increases for both irradiated and unirradiated lungs. Prompt improvement was seen after corticosteroid therapy in all patients. The fact that abnormal findings occur equally in irradiated and unirradiated lung is inconsistent with simple direct radiation-induced injury and suggests an immunologically mediated mechanism such as a hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

  12. Ionizing Radiation Induces HMGB1 Cytoplasmic Translocation and Extracellular Release

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lili; He, Li; Bao, Guoqiang; He, Xin; Fan, Saijun; Wang, Haichao

    2016-01-01

    Objective A nucleosomal protein, HMGB1, can be secreted by activated immune cells or passively released by dying cells, thereby amplifying rigorous inflammatory responses. In this study we aimed to test the possibility that ionizing radiation similarly induces cytoplasmic HMGB1 translocation and extracellular release. Method Human skin fibroblast (GM0639) and bronchial epithelial (16HBE) cells and animals (rats) were exposed to X-ray radiation, and HMGB1 translocation and release were assessed by immunocytochemistry and immunoassay, respectively. Results At a wide dose range (4.0 – 12.0 Gy), X-ray radiation induced a dramatic cytoplasmic HMGB1 translocation, and triggered a time- and dose-dependent HMGB1 release both in vitro and in vivo. The radiation-mediated HMGB1 release was associated with noticeable chromosomal DNA damage and loss of cell viability. Conclusion radiation induces HMGB1 cytoplasmic translocation and extracellular release through active secretion and passive leakage processes. PMID:27331198

  13. Biological determinants of radiation-induced human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Feig, S.A.

    1980-01-01

    This is the second in a three part series on the hypothetical risk from x-ray mammography. It will review those aspects of breast anatomy, histology, physiology, and pathology which are pertinent to radiation carcinogenesis. Radiation-induced breast cancers are histologically identical to the naturally occurring type in that they arise from the ductal epithelium and consist of a similar proportion of infiltrating and intraductal lesions. Possible explanations for the increased resistance to radiation effect in women over 30 years of age at time of exposure include regression of the glandular target tissue, hormonal changes, and parity. Examples of age-related sensitivity and hormonal dependence in other radiation-induced human and animal tumors will be discussed.

  14. Radiation-induced decomposition of explosives under extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Giefers, Hubertus; Pravica, Michael; Yang, Wenge; Liermann, Peter

    2008-11-03

    We present high-pressure and high temperature studies of the synchrotron radiation-induced decomposition of powder secondary high explosives pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) and 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) using white beam synchrotron radiation at the 16 BM-B and 16 BM-D sectors of the HP-CAT beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. The radiation-induced decomposition rate TATB showed dramatic slowing with pressure up to 26.6 GPa (the highest pressure studied), implying a positive activation volume of the activated complex. The decomposition rate of PETN varied little with pressure up to 15.7 GPa (the highest pressure studied). Diffraction line intensities were measured as a function of time using energy-dispersive methods. By measuring the decomposition rate as a function of pressure and temperature, kinetic and other constants associated with the decomposition reactions were extracted.

  15. Caffeine Markedly Enhanced Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Erkang; Wu, Lijun

    2009-04-01

    In this paper it is shown that incubation with 2 mM caffeine enhanced significantly the MN (micronucleus) formation in both the 1 cGy α-particle irradiated and non-irradiated bystander regions. Moreover, caffeine treatment made the non-irradiated bystander cells more sensitive to damage signals. Treated by c-PTIO(2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-imidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide), a nitric oxide (NO) scavenger, the MN frequencies were effectively inhibited, showing that nitric oxide might be very important in mediating the enhanced damage. These results indicated that caffeine enhanced the low dose α-particle radiation-induced damage in irradiated and non-irradiated bystander regions, and therefore it is important to investigate the relationship between the radiosensitizer and radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE).

  16. Techniques for measuring radiation induced effects of acousto optic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, E.W.

    1995-08-01

    Innovative measurement techniques for determining radiation induced changes in acousto optic devices are briefly discussed. Measurements of acousto optic operational parameters such as signal transmission efficiency, diffraction efficiency, spatial intensity and bandwidth responses during electron irradiations are described. During exposure to pulsed electrons, only transient perturbations to the acousto optic operational parameters were experienced. Examples of new measurement procedures and typical data resulting from the measurements are presented.

  17. Heavy-ion radiation induced bystander effect in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shujian; Sun, Yeqing; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Wei; Cui, Changna

    2012-07-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect is defined as the induction of damage in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. Recently, Low dose of high LET radiation induced bystander effects in vivo have been reported more and more. It has been indicated that radiation induced bystander effect was localized not only in bystander tissues but also in distant organs. Genomic, epigenetic, metabolomics and proteomics play significant roles in regulating heavy-ion radiation stress responses in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male mice head were exposed to 2000mGy dose of 12C heavy-ion radiation and the distant organ liver was detected on 1h, 6h, 12h and 24h after radiation, respectively. MSAP was used to monitor the level of polymorphic DNA methylation changes. The results show that heavy-ion irradiate mouse head can induce liver DNA methylation changes significantly. The percent of DNA methylation changes are time-dependent and highest at 6h after radiation. We also prove that the hypo-methylation changes on 1h and 6h after irradiation. But the expression level of DNA methyltransferase DNMT3a is not changed. UPLC/Synapt HDMS G2 was employed to detect the proteomics of bystander liver 1h after irradiation. 64 proteins are found significantly different between treatment and control group. GO process show that six of 64 which were unique in irradiation group are associated with apoptosis and DNA damage response. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of radiation induced bystander effects in vivo.

  18. Protection from radiation-induced mitochondrial and genomic DNA damage by an extract of Hippophae rhamnoides.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Sandeep Kumar; Chaudhary, Pankaj; Kumar, Indracanti Prem; Samanta, Namita; Afrin, Farhat; Gupta, Manju Lata; Sharma, Upendra Kumar; Sinha, Arun Kumar; Sharma, Yogendra Kumar; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2006-12-01

    Hippophae rhamnoides or seabuckthorn is used extensively in Indian and Tibetan traditional medicine for the treatment of circulatory disorders, ischemic heart disease, hepatic injury, and neoplasia. In the present study, we have evaluated the radioprotective potential of REC-1001, a fraction isolated from the berries of H. rhamnoides. Chemical analysis of the extract indicated that REC-1001 was approximately 68% by weight polyphenols, and contained kaempferol, isorhamnetin, and quercetin. The effect of REC-1001 on modulating radiation-induced DNA damage was determined in murine thymocytes by measuring nonspecific nuclear DNA damage at the whole genome level using the alkaline halo assay and by measuring sequence/gene-specific DNA damage both in nuclear DNA (beta-globin gene) and in mitochondrial DNA using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Treatment with 10 Gy resulted in a significant amount of DNA damage in the halo assay and reductions in the amplification of both the beta-globin gene and mitochondrial DNA. REC-1001 dose-dependently reduced the amount of damage detected in each assay, with the maximum protective effects observed at the highest REC-1001 dose evaluated (250 micro g/ml). Studies measuring the nicking of naked plasmid DNA further established the radioprotective effect of REC-1001. To elucidate possible mechanisms of action, the antioxidant properties and the free-radical scavenging activities of REC-1001 were evaluated. REC-1001 dose-dependently scavenged radiation-induced hydroxyl radicals, chemically-generated superoxide anions, stabilized DPPH radicals, and reduced Fe(3+) to Fe(2+). The results of the study indicate that the REC-1001 extract of H. rhamnoides protects mitochondrial and genomic DNA from radiation-induced damage. The polyphenols/flavonoids present in the extract might be responsible for the free radical scavenging and DNA protection afforded by REC-1001. PMID:16948057

  19. Targeted Overexpression of Mitochondrial Catalase Prevents Radiation-Induced Cognitive Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Parihar, Vipan K.; Allen, Barrett D.; Tran, Katherine K.; Chmielewski, Nicole N.; Craver, Brianna M.; Martirosian, Vahan; Morganti, Josh M.; Rosi, Susanna; Vlkolinsky, Roman; Acharya, Munjal M.; Nelson, Gregory A.; Allen, Antiño R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Radiation-induced disruption of mitochondrial function can elevate oxidative stress and contribute to the metabolic perturbations believed to compromise the functionality of the central nervous system. To clarify the role of mitochondrial oxidative stress in mediating the adverse effects of radiation in the brain, we analyzed transgenic (mitochondrial catalase [MCAT]) mice that overexpress human catalase localized to the mitochondria. Results: Compared with wild-type (WT) controls, overexpression of the MCAT transgene significantly decreased cognitive dysfunction after proton irradiation. Significant improvements in behavioral performance found on novel object recognition and object recognition in place tasks were associated with a preservation of neuronal morphology. While the architecture of hippocampal CA1 neurons was significantly compromised in irradiated WT mice, the same neurons in MCAT mice did not exhibit extensive and significant radiation-induced reductions in dendritic complexity. Irradiated neurons from MCAT mice maintained dendritic branching and length compared with WT mice. Protected neuronal morphology in irradiated MCAT mice was also associated with a stabilization of radiation-induced variations in long-term potentiation. Stabilized synaptic activity in MCAT mice coincided with an altered composition of the synaptic AMPA receptor subunits GluR1/2. Innovation: Our findings provide the first evidence that neurocognitive sequelae associated with radiation exposure can be reduced by overexpression of MCAT, operating through a mechanism involving the preservation of neuronal morphology. Conclusion: Our article documents the neuroprotective properties of reducing mitochondrial reactive oxygen species through the targeted overexpression of catalase and how this ameliorates the adverse effects of proton irradiation in the brain. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 78–91. PMID:24949841

  20. Radiation-induced products of peptides and their enzymatic digestibility

    SciTech Connect

    Gajewski, E.

    1983-01-01

    Chemical characterization of radiation-induced products of peptides and proteins is essential for understanding the effect of ionizing radiation on peptides and proteins. Furthermore, peptides containing radiation-altered amino acid residues might not be completely digestible by proteolytic enzymes. In this work, small homopeptides of Ala, Phe and Met were chosen as model peptides. Lysozyme was used to investigate the effect of ionizing radiation on a small protein. All peptides and lysozyme were irradiated in diluted, oxygen free, N/sub 2/O-saturated aqueous solutions, using a /sup 60/Co-..gamma..-source. HPLC, capillary GC and GC-MS were applied to isolate and characterize the radiation-induced products. The enzymatic digestibility of the products was investigated using aminopeptidase M, leucine aminopeptidase, carboxypeptidase A and carboxypeptidase Y. It was found that irradiation of peptides examined in this work leads to racemization and alteration of amino acid residues and crosslinks between the peptide chains. In addition, it was established that exopeptidases act differently on radiation-induced dimers of peptides composed of aliphatic, aromatic and sulfur-containing amino acids.

  1. Blockade of TLR3 protects mice from lethal radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Takemura, Naoki; Kawasaki, Takumi; Kunisawa, Jun; Sato, Shintaro; Lamichhane, Aayam; Kobiyama, Kouji; Aoshi, Taiki; Ito, Junichi; Mizuguchi, Kenji; Karuppuchamy, Thangaraj; Matsunaga, Kouta; Miyatake, Shoichiro; Mori, Nobuko; Tsujimura, Tohru; Satoh, Takashi; Kumagai, Yutaro; Kawai, Taro; Standley, Daron M.; Ishii, Ken J.; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Akira, Shizuo; Uematsu, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    High-dose ionizing radiation induces severe DNA damage in the epithelial stem cells in small intestinal crypts and causes gastrointestinal syndrome (GIS). Although the tumour suppressor p53 is a primary factor inducing death of crypt cells with DNA damage, its essential role in maintaining genome stability means inhibiting p53 to prevent GIS is not a viable strategy. Here we show that the innate immune receptor Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) is critical for the pathogenesis of GIS. Tlr3−/− mice show substantial resistance to GIS owing to significantly reduced radiation-induced crypt cell death. Despite showing reduced crypt cell death, p53-dependent crypt cell death is not impaired in Tlr3−/− mice. p53-dependent crypt cell death causes leakage of cellular RNA, which induces extensive cell death via TLR3. An inhibitor of TLR3–RNA binding ameliorates GIS by reducing crypt cell death. Thus, we propose blocking TLR3 activation as a novel approach to treat GIS. PMID:24637670

  2. Protective effect of esculentoside A on radiation-induced dermatitis and fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Zhenyu; Su Ying; Yang Shanmin; Yin Liangjie; Wang Wei; Yi Yanghua; Fenton, Bruce M.; Zhang Lurong; Okunieff, Paul . E-mail: paul_okunieff@urmc.rochester.edu

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of esculentoside A (EsA) on radiation-induced cutaneous and fibrovascular toxicity and its possible molecular mechanisms, both in vivo and in vitro. Methods and Materials: Mice received drug intervention 18 hours before 30 Gy to the right hind leg. Alterations in several cytokines expressed in skin tissue 2 days after irradiation were determined by ELISA. Early skin toxicity was evaluated 3 to 4 weeks after irradiation by skin scoring, and both tissue contraction and expression of TGF-{beta}1 were determined for soft-tissue fibrosis 3 months after irradiation. In vitro, the effect of EsA on radiation-induced nitric oxide (NO) and cytokine production in different cell types was measured by application of 2, 4, and 8 Gy. Results: In vivo, EsA reduced levels of IL-1{alpha}, MCP-1, VEGF, and TGF-{beta}1 in cutaneous tissue and reduced soft-tissue toxicity. In vitro, EsA inhibited the IL-1{alpha} ordinarily produced after 4 Gy in A431 cells. In Raw264.7 cells, EsA reduced levels of IL-1{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, and NO production costimulated by radiation and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In L-929 cells, EsA inhibited VEGF, TNF, and MCP-1 production at 2, 4, and 8 Gy. Conclusions: Esculentoside A protects soft tissues against radiation toxicity through inhibiting the production of several proinflammatory cytokines and inflammatory mediators in epithelial cells, macrophages, fibroblasts, and skin tissue.

  3. Regulatory T Cells Promote β-Catenin–Mediated Epithelium-to-Mesenchyme Transition During Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Shanshan; Pan, Xiujie; Xu, Long; Yang, Zhihua; Guo, Renfeng; Gu, Yongqing; Li, Ruoxi; Wang, Qianjun; Xiao, Fengjun; Du, Li; Zhou, Pingkun; Zhu, Maoxiang

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis results from thoracic radiation therapy and severely limits radiation therapy approaches. CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}FoxP3{sup +} regulatory T cells (Tregs) as well as epithelium-to-mesenchyme transition (EMT) cells are involved in pulmonary fibrosis induced by multiple factors. However, the mechanisms of Tregs and EMT cells in irradiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the influence of Tregs on EMT in radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Methods and Materials: Mice thoraxes were irradiated (20 Gy), and Tregs were depleted by intraperitoneal injection of a monoclonal anti-CD25 antibody 2 hours after irradiation and every 7 days thereafter. Mice were treated on days 3, 7, and 14 and 1, 3, and 6 months post irradiation. The effectiveness of Treg depletion was assayed via flow cytometry. EMT and β-catenin in lung tissues were detected by immunohistochemistry. Tregs isolated from murine spleens were cultured with mouse lung epithelial (MLE) 12 cells, and short interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of β-catenin in MLE 12 cells was used to explore the effects of Tregs on EMT and β-catenin via flow cytometry and Western blotting. Results: Anti-CD25 antibody treatment depleted Tregs efficiently, attenuated the process of radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis, hindered EMT, and reduced β-catenin accumulation in lung epithelial cells in vivo. The coculture of Tregs with irradiated MLE 12 cells showed that Tregs could promote EMT in MLE 12 cells and that the effect of Tregs on EMT was partially abrogated by β-catenin knockdown in vitro. Conclusions: Tregs can promote EMT in accelerating radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. This process is partially mediated through β-catenin. Our study suggests a new mechanism for EMT, promoted by Tregs, that accelerates radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

  4. Protection against radiation-induced damage of 6-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU) in thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Perona, Marina; Dagrosa, María A; Pagotto, Romina; Casal, Mariana; Pignataro, Omar P; Pisarev, Mario A; Juvenal, Guillermo J

    2013-03-01

    Many epidemiologic studies have shown that the exposure to high external radiation doses increases thyroid neoplastic frequency, especially when given during childhood or adolescence. The use of radioprotective drugs may decrease the damage caused by radiation therapy and therefore could be useful to prevent the development of thyroid tumors. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible application of 6-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU) as a radioprotector in the thyroid gland. Rat thyroid epithelial cells (FRTL-5) were exposed to different doses of γ irradiation with or without the addition of PTU, methimazole (MMI), reduced glutathione (GSH) and perchlorate (KClO4). Radiation response was analyzed by clonogenic survival assay. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels were measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Apoptosis was quantified by nuclear cell morphology and caspase 3 activity assays. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were measured using the fluorescent dye 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate. Catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities were also determined. Pretreatment with PTU, MMI and GSH prior to irradiation significantly increased the surviving cell fraction (SF) at 2 Gy (P < 0.05), while no effect was observed with KClO4. An increase in extracellular levels of cAMP was found only in PTU treated cells in a dose and time-dependent manner. Cells incubated with agents that stimulate cAMP (forskolin and dibutyril cAMP) mimicked the effect of PTU on SF. Moreover, pretreatment with the inhibitor of protein kinase A, H-89, abolished the radioprotective effect of PTU. PTU treatment diminished radiation-induced apoptosis and protected cells against radiation-induced ROS elevation and suppression of the antioxidant enzyme's activity. PTU was found to radioprotect normal thyroid cells through cAMP elevation and reduction in both apoptosis and radiation-induced oxidative stress damage.

  5. Role of Ferulic Acid in the Amelioration of Ionizing Radiation Induced Inflammation: A Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Das, Ujjal; Manna, Krishnendu; Sinha, Mahuya; Datta, Sanjukta; Das, Dipesh Kr; Chakraborty, Anindita; Ghosh, Mahua; Saha, Krishna Das; Dey, Sanjit

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is responsible for oxidative stress by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), which alters the cellular redox potential. This change activates several redox sensitive enzymes which are crucial in activating signaling pathways at molecular level and can lead to oxidative stress induced inflammation. Therefore, the present study was intended to assess the anti-inflammatory role of ferulic acid (FA), a plant flavonoid, against radiation-induced oxidative stress with a novel mechanistic viewpoint. FA was administered (50 mg/kg body wt) to Swiss albino mice for five consecutive days prior to exposing them to a single dose of 10 Gy 60Co γ-irradiation. The dose of FA was optimized from the survival experiment and 50 mg/kg body wt dose showed optimum effect. FA significantly ameliorated the radiation induced inflammatory response such as phosphorylation of IKKα/β and IκBα and consequent nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB). FA also prevented the increase of cycloxygenase-2 (Cox-2) protein, inducible nitric oxide synthase-2 (iNOS-2) gene expression, lipid peroxidation in liver and the increase of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in serum. It was observed that exposure to radiation results in decreased activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and the pool of reduced glutathione (GSH) content. However, FA treatment prior to irradiation increased the activities of the same endogenous antioxidants. Thus, pretreatment with FA offers protection against gamma radiation induced inflammation. PMID:24854039

  6. Radiation-Induced Autophagy Contributes to Cell Death and Induces Apoptosis Partly in Malignant Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Guk Heui; Bögler, Oliver; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Yoo, Heon; Lee, Seung Hoon; Park, Jong Bae; Kim, Youn-Jae; Kim, Jong Heon; Gwak, Ho-Shin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Radiation-induced autophagy has been shown to play two different roles, in malignant glioma (MG) cells, cytocidal or cytoprotective. However, neither the role of radiation-induced autophagy for cell death nor the existence of autophagy-induced apoptosis, a well-known cell-death pathway after irradiation, has been verified yet. Materials and Methods We observed both temporal and dose-dependent response patterns of autophagy and apoptosis to radiation in MG cell lines. Additionally, we investigated the role of autophagy in apoptosis through knockdown of autophagy-related proteins. Results Autophagic activity measured by staining of acidic vesicle organelles and Western blotting of LC-3 protein increased in proportion to radiation dose from day 1 to 5 after irradiation. Apoptosis measured by annexin-V staining and Western blotting of cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase demonstrated relatively late appearance 3 days after irradiation that increased for up to 7 days. Blocking of pan-caspase (Z-VAD-FMK) did not affect apoptosis after irradiation, but silencing of Atg5 effectively reduced radiation-induced autophagy, which decreased apoptosis significantly. Inhibition of autophagy in Atg5 knockdown cells was shown to be beneficial for cell survival. Stable transfection of GFP-LC3 cells was observed after irradiation. Annexin-V was localized in cells bearing GFP-LC3 punctuated spots, indicating autophagy in immunofluorescence. Some of these punctuated GFP-LC3 bearing cells formed conglomerated spots and died in final phase. Conclusion These findings suggest that autophagy appears earlier than apoptosis after irradiation and that a portion of the apoptotic population that appears later is autophagy-dependent. Thus, autophagy is a pathway to cell death after irradiation of MG cells. PMID:25410762

  7. Hydrogen-rich saline protects immunocytes from radiation-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yanyong; Li, Bailong; Liu, Cong; Chuai, Yunhai; Lei, Jixiao; Gao, Fu; Cui, Jianguo; Sun, Ding; Cheng, Ying; Zhou, Chuanfeng; Cai, Jianming

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Radiation often causes depletion of immunocytes in tissues and blood, which results in immunosuppression. Molecular hydrogen (H2) has been shown in recent studies to have potential as a safe and effective radioprotective agent through scavenging free radicals. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that H2 could protect immunocytes from ionizing radiation (IR). Material/Methods H2 was dissolved in physiological saline or medium using an apparatus produced by our department. A 2-[6-(4′-hydroxy) phenoxy-3H-xanthen-3-on-9-yl] benzoate (HPF) probe was used to detect intracellular hydroxyl radicals (•OH). Cell apoptosis was evaluated by annexin V-FITC and Propidium iodide (PI) staining as well as the caspase 3 activity. Finally, we examined the hematological changes using an automatic Sysmex XE 2100 hematology analyzer. Results We demonstrated H2-rich medium pretreatment reduced •OH level in AHH-1 cells. We also showed H2 reduced radiation-induced apoptosis in thymocytes and splenocytes in living mice. Radiation-induced caspase 3 activation was also attenuated by H2 treatment. Finally, we found that H2 rescued the radiation-caused depletion of white blood cells (WBC) and platelets (PLT). Conclusions This study suggests that H2 protected the immune system and alleviated the hematological injury induced by IR. PMID:22460088

  8. The efficacy of sucralfate suspension in the prevention of oral mucositis due to radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, J.B.; Wong, F.L.W. )

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the value of sucralfate suspension in prevention of oral mucositis and for reduction of oral pain in patients who develop mucositis during radiation therapy. The study was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized prospective trial of a sucralfate suspension in the prevention and management of oral mucositis during radiation therapy. Oral mucositis was assessed using a quantitative scale and symptoms were assessed using visual analogue scales. The statistical model was developed to detect a 40% reduction in mucositis. No statistically significant reduction in mucositis was seen. Early during radiation therapy less oral pain was reported in the sucralfate group, but as treatment progressed all patients experienced pain. Patients in the sucralfate group were prescribed topical and systemic analgesics later in the course of radiation therapy. Prophylactic oral rinsing with sucralfate did not prevent oral ulcerative mucositis. Sucralfate may reduce the experience of pain during radiation therapy. 32 refs., 3 tabs.

  9. Role of sphingolipids in murine radiation-induced lung injury: protection by sphingosine 1-phosphate analogs

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Biji; Jacobson, Jeffrey R.; Berdyshev, Evgeny; Huang, Yong; Sun, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Yutong; Gerhold, Lynnette M.; Siegler, Jessica; Evenoski, Carrie; Wang, Ting; Zhou, Tong; Zaidi, Rafe; Moreno-Vinasco, Liliana; Bittman, Robert; Chen, Chin Tu; LaRiviere, Patrick J.; Sammani, Saad; Lussier, Yves A.; Dudek, Steven M.; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Garcia, Joe G. N.

    2011-01-01

    Clinically significant radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a common toxicity in patients administered thoracic radiotherapy. Although the molecular etiology is poorly understood, we previously characterized a murine model of RILI in which alterations in lung barrier integrity surfaced as a potentially important pathobiological event and genome-wide lung gene mRNA levels identified dysregulation of sphingolipid metabolic pathway genes. We hypothesized that sphingolipid signaling components serve as modulators and novel therapeutic targets of RILI. Sphingolipid involvement in murine RILI was confirmed by radiation-induced increases in lung expression of sphingosine kinase (SphK) isoforms 1 and 2 and increases in the ratio of ceramide to sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and dihydro-S1P (DHS1P) levels in plasma, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and lung tissue. Mice with a targeted deletion of SphK1 (SphK1−/−) or with reduced expression of S1P receptors (S1PR1+/−, S1PR2−/−, and S1PR3−/−) exhibited marked RILI susceptibility. Finally, studies of 3 potent vascular barrier-protective S1P analogs, FTY720, (S)-FTY720-phosphonate (fTyS), and SEW-2871, identified significant RILI attenuation and radiation-induced gene dysregulation by the phosphonate analog, fTyS (0.1 and 1 mg/kg i.p., 2×/wk) and to a lesser degree by SEW-2871 (1 mg/kg i.p., 2×/wk), compared with those in controls. These results support the targeting of S1P signaling as a novel therapeutic strategy in RILI.—Mathew, B., Jacobson, J. R., Berdyshev, E., Huang, Y., Sun, X., Zhao, Y., Gerhold, L. M., Siegler, J., Evenoski, C., Wang, T., Zhou, T., Zaidi, R., Moreno-Vinasco, L., Bittman, R., Chen, C. T., LaRiviere, P. J., Sammani, S., Lussier, Y. A., Dudek, S. M., Natarajan, V., Weichselbaum, R. R., Garcia, J. G. N. Role of sphingolipids in murine radiation-induced lung injury: protection by sphingosine 1-phosphate analogs. PMID:21712494

  10. Measurements of prompt radiation induced conductivity of Kapton.

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, Eric F.; Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Hartman, E. Frederick; Stringer, Thomas Arthur

    2010-10-01

    We performed measurements of the prompt radiation induced conductivity in thin samples of Kapton (polyimide) at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. Three mil samples were irradiated with a 0.5 {mu}s pulse of 20 MeV electrons, yielding dose rates of 1E9 to 1E10 rad/s. We applied variable potentials up to 2 kV across the samples and measured the prompt conduction current. Analysis rendered prompt conductivity coefficients between 6E-17 and 2E-16 mhos/m per rad/s, depending on the dose rate and the pulse width.

  11. Challenges and Opportunities in Radiation-induced Hemorrhagic Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Zwaans, Bernadette M.M.; Nicolai, Heinz G.; Chancellor, Michael B.; Lamb, Laura E.

    2016-01-01

    As diagnosis and treatment of cancer is improving, medical and social issues related to cancer survivorship are becoming more prevalent. Hemorrhagic cystitis (HC), a rare but serious disease that may affect patients after pelvic radiation or systemic chemotherapy, has significant unmet medical needs. Although no definitive treatment is currently available, various interventions are employed for HC. Effects of nonsurgical treatments for HC are of modest success and studies aiming to control radiation-induced bladder symptoms are lacking. In this review, we present current and advanced therapeutic strategies for HC to help cancer survivors deal with long-term urologic health issues.

  12. Facial reconstruction for radiation-induced skin cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Panje, W.R.; Dobleman, T.J. )

    1990-04-01

    Radiation-induced skin cancers can be difficult to diagnose and treat. Typically, a patient who has received orthovoltage radiotherapy for disorders such as acne, eczema, tinea capitis, skin tuberculosis, and skin cancer can expect that aggressive skin cancers and chronic radiodermatitis may develop subsequently. Cryptic facial cancers can lead to metastases and death. Prophylactic widefield excision of previously irradiated facial skin that has been subject to multiple recurrent skin cancers is suggested as a method of deterring future cutaneous malignancy and metastases. The use of tissue expanders and full-thickness skin grafts offers an expedient and successful method of subsequent reconstruction.

  13. Pathology and biology of radiation-induced cardiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Tapio, Soile

    2016-01-01

    Heart disease is the leading global cause of death. The risk for this disease is significantly increased in populations exposed to ionizing radiation, but the mechanisms are not fully elucidated yet. This review aims to gather and discuss the latest data about pathological and biological consequences in the radiation-exposed heart in a comprehensive manner. A better understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying radiation-induced damage in heart tissue and cardiac vasculature will provide novel targets for therapeutic interventions. These may be valuable for individuals clinically or occupationally exposed to varying doses of ionizing radiation. PMID:27422929

  14. Radiation-induced physical changes in UHMWPE implant components.

    PubMed

    Naidu, S H; Bixler, B L; Moulton, M J

    1997-02-01

    Post-irradiation aging of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is not well understood. Retrieval studies and in vitro aged specimens have shown oxidative changes along with increases in crystallinity. Critical analysis and review of the polymer science and polymer physics literature shows that while oxidation may be important during the first year post-irradiation, subsequent aging occurs because of initial gamma radiation-induced chain scission leading to eventual isothermal crystallization of polymer chains in the amorphous regions of the UHMWPE bulk. Mechanical properties of aged UHMWPE are not as yet clear and, until such data become available, gamma irradiation sterilization must be used with caution.

  15. Challenges and Opportunities in Radiation-induced Hemorrhagic Cystitis.

    PubMed

    Zwaans, Bernadette M M; Nicolai, Heinz G; Chancellor, Michael B; Lamb, Laura E

    2016-01-01

    As diagnosis and treatment of cancer is improving, medical and social issues related to cancer survivorship are becoming more prevalent. Hemorrhagic cystitis (HC), a rare but serious disease that may affect patients after pelvic radiation or systemic chemotherapy, has significant unmet medical needs. Although no definitive treatment is currently available, various interventions are employed for HC. Effects of nonsurgical treatments for HC are of modest success and studies aiming to control radiation-induced bladder symptoms are lacking. In this review, we present current and advanced therapeutic strategies for HC to help cancer survivors deal with long-term urologic health issues. PMID:27601964

  16. Radiation-Induced Premelting of Ice at Silica Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeder, S.; Reichert, H.; Schroeder, H.; Mezger, M.; Okasinski, J. S.; Dosch, H.; Honkimaeki, V.; Bilgram, J.

    2009-08-28

    The existence of surface and interfacial melting of ice below 0 deg. C has been confirmed by many different experimental techniques. Here we present a high-energy x-ray reflectivity study of the interfacial melting of ice as a function of both temperature and x-ray irradiation dose. We found a clear increase of the thickness of the quasiliquid layer with the irradiation dose. By a systematic x-ray study, we have been able to unambiguously disentangle thermal and radiation-induced premelting phenomena. We also confirm the previously announced very high water density (1.25 g/cm{sup 3}) within the emerging quasiliquid layer.

  17. Radiation-induced segregation in candidate fusion-reactor alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Brimhall, J.L.; Baer, D.R.; Jones, R.H.

    1981-07-01

    The effect of radiation on surface segregation of minor and impurity elements has been studied in four candidate fusion reactor alloys. Radiation induced surface segregation of phosphorus was found in both 316 type stainless steel and in Nimonic PE-16. Segregation and depletion of the other alloying elements in 316 stainless steel agreed with that reported by other investigators. Segregation of nitrogen in ferritic HT-9 was enhanced by radiation but no phosphorus segregation was detected. No significant radiation enhanced or induced segregation was observed in a Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The results indicate that radiaton enhanced grain boundary segregation could contribute to the embrittlement of 316 SS and PE-16.

  18. Measurements of prompt radiation induced conductivity in Teflon (PTFE).

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, E. Frederick; Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Preston, E.

    2013-05-01

    We performed measurements of the prompt radiation induced conductivity (RIC) in thin samples of Teflon (PTFE) at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. Three mil (76.2 microns) samples were irradiated with a 0.5 %CE%BCs pulse of 20 MeV electrons, yielding dose rates of 1E9 to 1E11 rad/s. We applied variable potentials up to 2 kV across the samples and measured the prompt conduction current. Details of the experimental apparatus and analysis are reported in this report on prompt RIC in Teflon.

  19. Challenges and Opportunities in Radiation-induced Hemorrhagic Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Zwaans, Bernadette M.M.; Nicolai, Heinz G.; Chancellor, Michael B.; Lamb, Laura E.

    2016-01-01

    As diagnosis and treatment of cancer is improving, medical and social issues related to cancer survivorship are becoming more prevalent. Hemorrhagic cystitis (HC), a rare but serious disease that may affect patients after pelvic radiation or systemic chemotherapy, has significant unmet medical needs. Although no definitive treatment is currently available, various interventions are employed for HC. Effects of nonsurgical treatments for HC are of modest success and studies aiming to control radiation-induced bladder symptoms are lacking. In this review, we present current and advanced therapeutic strategies for HC to help cancer survivors deal with long-term urologic health issues. PMID:27601964

  20. Radiation-induced malignant and atypical peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, K.M.; Woodruff, J.M.; Ellis, F.T.; Posner, J.B.

    1980-04-01

    The reported peripheral nerve complications of therapeutic irradiation in humans include brachial and lumbar plexus fibrosis and cranial and peripheral nerve atrophy. We have encountered 9 patients with malignant (7) and atypical (2) peripheral nerve tumors occurring in an irradiated site suggesting that such tumors represent another delayed effect of radiation treatment on peripheral nerve. In all instances the radio-theray was within an acceptable radiation dosage, yet 3 patients developed local radiation-induced skin and bony abnormalities. The malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors developed only in the radiation port. Animal studies support the clinical observation that malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors can occur as a delayed effect of irradiation.

  1. Radiation-induced apoptosis in the eye structures: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkacémi, Yazid; Huchet, Aymeri; Baudouin, Christophe; Lartigau, Éric

    2005-02-01

    Apoptosis plays a crucial role in tissue homeostasis and in the removal of damaged cells from tissues. Both increased and insufficient cell death can lead to human diseases. Apoptotic process is under the control of physiological metabolism as well as a panel of genes. After exposure to radiation, membrane damages induce the membrane pathway signal transduction for cell apoptosis. The importance of the radiation-induced apoptosis in the different ocular tissues and its relationship to the radiation parameters are reviewed in this article. This topic of ocular research has not been addressed in detail in the literature.

  2. Radiation-induced collisional pumping of molecules containing few atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Vasil'ev, G.K.; Chernyshev, Y.A.; Makarov, E.F.; Yakushev, V.G.

    1986-01-01

    The authors analyze the radiation-induced collisional pumping of few-atom molecules by laser emission taking into account both collisional and noncollisional processes of vibrational energy transfer in a molecule. For typical values of the parameters the vibrational energy of the molecules was found to depend on the laser emission intensity; regions of weak absorption, optimum absorption, and saturation appear as the pumping rate rises. Qualitative general conclusions are reached concerning the optimum conditions for the realization, in a medium absorbing laser emission, of either nonequilibrium dissociation or a chemical reaction involving vibrationally excited molecules.

  3. Radiation-induced salivary gland tumors: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Smith, S A

    1976-09-01

    I discuss radiation-induced salivary gland tumors, with special emphasis on those tumors thought to be secondary to childhood head and neck irradiation for benign diseases. I report such a case and review the literature. Statistically, 77.6% of irradiation-induced tumors occur in the parotid gland and 22.4% in the submaxillary and minor salivary glands. A greater proportion of malignant tumors are noted in the submaxillary and minor salivary glands. At present, there is no demonstrable relationship between tumor occurrence and the amount of radiation recieved. Young children are more susceptible to irradiation-induced salivary tumors than older individuals.

  4. Mucosal IgG Levels Correlate Better with Respiratory Syncytial Virus Load and Inflammation than Plasma IgG Levels

    PubMed Central

    Vissers, Marloes; Ahout, Inge M. L.; de Jonge, Marien I.

    2015-01-01

    Maternal vaccination is currently considered a strategy against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections. In RSV-infected infants, high mucosal IgG levels correlated better with reduced RSV load and lower mucosal CXCL10 levels than plasma IgG levels. For future vaccination strategies against RSV, more focus should be on the mucosal humoral immune response. PMID:26656116

  5. Geraniin down regulates gamma radiation-induced apoptosis by suppressing DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Bing, So Jin; Ha, Danbee; Kim, Min Ju; Park, Eunjin; Ahn, Ginnae; Kim, Dae Seung; Ko, Ryeo Kyeong; Park, Jae Woo; Lee, Nam Ho; Jee, Youngheun

    2013-07-01

    Gamma ray irradiation triggers DNA damage and apoptosis of proliferating stem cells and peripheral immune cells, resulting in the destruction of intestinal crypts and lymphoid system. Geraniin is a natural compound extracts from an aquatic plant Nymphaea tetragona and possesses good antioxidant property. In this study, we demonstrate that geraniin rescues radiosensitive splenocytes and jejunal crypt cells from radiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis. Isolated splenocytes from C57BL/6 mice treated with geraniin were protected against radiation injury of 2 Gy irradiation through the enhancement of the proliferation and attenuation of DNA damage. Also, geraniin inhibited apoptosis in radiosensitive splenocytes by reducing the expression level and immunoreactivity of proapoptotic p53 and Bax and increasing those of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. In mice exposed to radiation, geraniin treatment protected splenocytes and intestinal crypt cells from radiation-induced cell death. Our results suggest that geraniin presents radioprotective effects by regulating DNA damage on splenocytes, exerting immunostimulatory capacities and inhibiting apoptosis of radiosensitive immune cells and jejunal crypt cells. Therefore, geraniin can be a radioprotective agent against γ-irradiation exposure.

  6. The Role of Alveolar Epithelium in Radiation-Induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Celine; Nagarajan, Devipriya; Tian, Jian; Leal, Sofia Walder; Wheeler, Kenneth; Munley, Michael; Blackstock, William; Zhao, Weiling

    2013-01-01

    Pneumonitis and fibrosis are major lung complications of irradiating thoracic malignancies. In the current study, we determined the effect of thoracic irradiation on the lungs of FVB/N mice. Survival data showed a dose-dependent increase in morbidity following thoracic irradiation with single (11–13 Gy) and fractionated doses (24–36 Gy) of 137Cs γ-rays. Histological examination showed a thickening of vessel walls, accumulation of inflammatory cells, collagen deposition, and regional fibrosis in the lungs 14 weeks after a single 12 Gy dose and a fractionated 30 Gy dose; this damage was also seen 5 months after a fractionated 24 Gy dose. After both single and fractionated doses, i] aquaporin-5 was markedly decreased, ii] E-cadherin was reduced and iii] prosurfactant Protein C (pro-SP-c), the number of pro-SP-c+ cells and vimentin expression were increased in the lungs. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed co-localization of pro-SP-c and α-smooth muscle actin in the alveoli after a single dose of 12 Gy. These data suggest that, i] the FVB/N mouse strain is sensitive to thoracic radiation ii] aquaporin-5, E-cadherin, and pro-SP-c may serve as sensitive indicators of radiation-induced lung injury; and iii] the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition may play an important role in the development of radiation-induced lung fibrosis. PMID:23326473

  7. Geraniin down regulates gamma radiation-induced apoptosis by suppressing DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Bing, So Jin; Ha, Danbee; Kim, Min Ju; Park, Eunjin; Ahn, Ginnae; Kim, Dae Seung; Ko, Ryeo Kyeong; Park, Jae Woo; Lee, Nam Ho; Jee, Youngheun

    2013-07-01

    Gamma ray irradiation triggers DNA damage and apoptosis of proliferating stem cells and peripheral immune cells, resulting in the destruction of intestinal crypts and lymphoid system. Geraniin is a natural compound extracts from an aquatic plant Nymphaea tetragona and possesses good antioxidant property. In this study, we demonstrate that geraniin rescues radiosensitive splenocytes and jejunal crypt cells from radiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis. Isolated splenocytes from C57BL/6 mice treated with geraniin were protected against radiation injury of 2 Gy irradiation through the enhancement of the proliferation and attenuation of DNA damage. Also, geraniin inhibited apoptosis in radiosensitive splenocytes by reducing the expression level and immunoreactivity of proapoptotic p53 and Bax and increasing those of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. In mice exposed to radiation, geraniin treatment protected splenocytes and intestinal crypt cells from radiation-induced cell death. Our results suggest that geraniin presents radioprotective effects by regulating DNA damage on splenocytes, exerting immunostimulatory capacities and inhibiting apoptosis of radiosensitive immune cells and jejunal crypt cells. Therefore, geraniin can be a radioprotective agent against γ-irradiation exposure. PMID:23541438

  8. Induction of Excess Centrosomes in Neural Progenitor Cells during the Development of Radiation-Induced Microcephaly

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Mikio; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Kato, Akihiro; Kobayashi, Junya; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Komatsu, Kenshi

    2016-01-01

    The embryonic brain is one of the tissues most vulnerable to ionizing radiation. In this study, we showed that ionizing radiation induces apoptosis in the neural progenitors of the mouse cerebral cortex, and that the surviving progenitor cells subsequently develop a considerable amount of supernumerary centrosomes. When mouse embryos at Day 13.5 were exposed to γ-rays, brains sizes were reduced markedly in a dose-dependent manner, and these size reductions persisted until birth. Immunostaining with caspase-3 antibodies showed that apoptosis occurred in 35% and 40% of neural progenitor cells at 4 h after exposure to 1 and 2 Gy, respectively, and this was accompanied by a disruption of the apical layer in which mitotic spindles were positioned in unirradiated mice. At 24 h after 1 Gy irradiation, the apoptotic cells were completely eliminated and proliferation was restored to a level similar to that of unirradiated cells, but numerous spindles were localized outside the apical layer. Similarly, abnormal cytokinesis, which included multipolar division and centrosome clustering, was observed in 19% and 24% of the surviving neural progenitor cells at 48 h after irradiation with 1 and 2 Gy, respectively. Because these cytokinesis aberrations derived from excess centrosomes result in growth delay and mitotic catastrophe-mediated cell elimination, our findings suggest that, in addition to apoptosis at an early stage of radiation exposure, radiation-induced centrosome overduplication could contribute to the depletion of neural progenitors and thereby lead to microcephaly. PMID:27367050

  9. Punica granatum peel extract protects against ionizing radiation-induced enteritis and leukocyte apoptosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Toklu, Hale Z; Sehirli, Ozer; Ozyurt, Hazan; Mayadağli, A Alpaslan; Ekşioğlu-Demiralp, Emel; Cetinel, Sule; Sahin, Hülya; Yeğen, Berrak C; Ulusoylu Dumlu, Melek; Gökmen, Vural; Sener, Göksel

    2009-07-01

    Radiation-induced enteritis is a well-recognized sequel of therapeutic irradiation. Therefore we examined the radioprotective properties of Punica granatum peel extract (PPE) on the oxidative damage in the ileum. Rats were exposed to a single whole-body X-ray irradiation of 800 cGy. Irradiated rats were pretreated orally with saline or PPE (50 mg/kg/day) for 10 days before irradiation and the following 10 days, while control rats received saline or PPE but no irradiation. Then plasma and ileum samples were obtained. Irradiation caused a decrease in glutathione and total antioxidant capacity, which was accompanied by increases in malondialdehyde levels, myeloperoxidase activity, collagen content of the tissue with a concomitant increase 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (an index of oxidative DNA damage). Similarly, pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1beta and IL-6) and lactate dehydrogenase were elevated in irradiated groups as compared to control. PPE treatment reversed all these biochemical indices, as well as histopathological alterations induced by irradiation. Furthermore, flow cytometric measurements revealed that leukocyte apoptosis and cell death were increased in irradiated animals, while PPE reversed these effects. PPE supplementation reduced oxidative damage in the ileal tissues, probably by a mechanism that is associated with the decreased production of reactive oxygen metabolites and enhancement of antioxidant mechanisms. Adjuvant therapy of PPE may have a potential to support a successful radiotherapy by protecting against radiation-induced enteritis. PMID:19478462

  10. Induction of Excess Centrosomes in Neural Progenitor Cells during the Development of Radiation-Induced Microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Mikio; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Kato, Akihiro; Kobayashi, Junya; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Komatsu, Kenshi

    2016-01-01

    The embryonic brain is one of the tissues most vulnerable to ionizing radiation. In this study, we showed that ionizing radiation induces apoptosis in the neural progenitors of the mouse cerebral cortex, and that the surviving progenitor cells subsequently develop a considerable amount of supernumerary centrosomes. When mouse embryos at Day 13.5 were exposed to γ-rays, brains sizes were reduced markedly in a dose-dependent manner, and these size reductions persisted until birth. Immunostaining with caspase-3 antibodies showed that apoptosis occurred in 35% and 40% of neural progenitor cells at 4 h after exposure to 1 and 2 Gy, respectively, and this was accompanied by a disruption of the apical layer in which mitotic spindles were positioned in unirradiated mice. At 24 h after 1 Gy irradiation, the apoptotic cells were completely eliminated and proliferation was restored to a level similar to that of unirradiated cells, but numerous spindles were localized outside the apical layer. Similarly, abnormal cytokinesis, which included multipolar division and centrosome clustering, was observed in 19% and 24% of the surviving neural progenitor cells at 48 h after irradiation with 1 and 2 Gy, respectively. Because these cytokinesis aberrations derived from excess centrosomes result in growth delay and mitotic catastrophe-mediated cell elimination, our findings suggest that, in addition to apoptosis at an early stage of radiation exposure, radiation-induced centrosome overduplication could contribute to the depletion of neural progenitors and thereby lead to microcephaly. PMID:27367050

  11. Duodenal Chemosensing and Mucosal Defenses

    PubMed Central

    Akiba, Yasutada; Kaunitz, Jonathan D.

    2011-01-01

    The duodenal mucosa is exposed to endogenous and exogenous chemicals, including acid, CO2, bile acids and nutrients. Mucosal chemical sensors are necessary to exert physiological responses such as secretion, digestion, absorption, and motility. We propose a mucosal chemosensing system by which luminal chemicals are sensed via mucosal acid sensors and G-protein-coupled receptors. Luminal acid/CO2 sensing consists of ecto- and cytosolic carbonic anhydrases, epithelial ion transporters, and acid sensors expressed on the afferent nerves in the duodenum. Furthermore, a luminal L-glutamate signal is mediated via mucosal L-glutamate receptors, including metabotropic glutamate receptors and taste receptor 1 family heterodimers, with activation of afferent nerves and cyclooxygenase, whereas luminal Ca2+ is differently sensed via the calcium-sensing receptor in the duodenum. Recent studies also show the involvement of enteroendocrine G-protein-coupled receptors in bile acid and fatty acid sensing in the duodenum. These luminal chemosensors help activate mucosal defense mechanisms in or- der to maintain the mucosal integrity and physiological responses. Stimulation of luminal chemosensing in the duodenal mucosa may prevent mucosal injury, affect nutrient metabolism, and modulate sensory nerve activity. PMID:21389725

  12. Radiation-induced skin carcinomas of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Ron, E.; Modan, B.; Preston, D.; Alfandary, E.; Stovall, M.; Boice, J.D. Jr. )

    1991-03-01

    Radiation exposures to the scalp during childhood for tinea capitis were associated with a fourfold increase in skin cancer, primarily basal cell carcinomas, and a threefold increase in benign skin tumors. Malignant melanoma, however, was not significantly elevated. Overall, 80 neoplasms were identified from an extensive search of the pathology logs of all major hospitals in Israel and computer linkage with the national cancer registry. Radiation dose to the scalp was computed for over 10,000 persons irradiated for ringworm (mean 7 Gy), and incidence rates were contrasted with those observed in 16,000 matched comparison subjects. The relative risk of radiogenic skin cancer did not differ significantly between men or women or by time since exposure; however, risk was greatest following exposures in early childhood. After adjusting for sex, ethnic origin, and attained age, the estimated excess relative risk was 0.7 per Gy and the average excess risk over the current follow-up was 0.31/10(4) PY-Gy. The risk per Gy of radiation-induced skin cancer was intermediate between the high risk found among whites and no risk found among blacks in a similar study conducted in New York City. This finding suggests the role that subsequent exposure to uv radiation likely plays in the expression of a potential radiation-induced skin malignancy.

  13. Enhancement of radiation-induced apoptosis by Podophyllum hexandrum.

    PubMed

    Prem Kumar, I; Rana, S V S; Samanta, N; Goel, H C

    2003-09-01

    The aqueous extract of Podophyllum hexandrum (RP-1), which has been recently reported to manifest radioprotective and anti-tumour properties, has been investigated for its mode of action. RP-1, under in-vitro conditions dose-dependently chelated metal ions, inhibited radiation or metal ion-induced hydroxyl radicals and lipid peroxidation and scavenged superoxide anions. Intraperitoneal administration of RP-1 to mice pre-irradiation (10 Gy) induced more DNA fragmentation and lipid peroxidation in thymocytes maximally at 4 and 8 h, respectively, in comparison with RP-1 treatment or irradiation. Flow-cytometric quantification of sub-diploid peak, oligonucleosomal cleavage assay (ladder) and depletion of total thiols also corroborated the ability of RP-1 to enhance radiation-induced apoptosis. RP-1 in presence of 100 microM CuSO(4) induced strand breaks in plasmid DNA and addition of metal chelators (EDTA and deferoxamine) inhibited the strand scission. Treatment with a major constituent of RP-1, podophyllin, did not cause strand breaks, but isolated constituents of RP-1, quercetin or podophyllotoxin, induced strand breaks. Depending on its concentration in the milieu, RP-1 acted as a pro- or antioxidant modifying the radiation-induced apoptosis and therefore could be exploited for cancer management.

  14. Radiation-induced genomic instability in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Huumonen, Katriina; Immonen, Hanna-Kaisa; Baverstock, Keith; Hiltunen, Mikko; Korkalainen, Merja; Lahtinen, Tapani; Parviainen, Juha; Viluksela, Matti; Wong, Garry; Naarala, Jonne; Juutilainen, Jukka

    2012-10-01

    Radiation-induced genomic instability has been well documented, particularly in vitro. However, the understanding of its mechanisms and their consequences in vivo is still limited. In this study, Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans; strain CB665) nematodes were exposed to X-rays at doses of 0.1, 1, 3 or 10Gy. The endpoints were measured several generations after exposure and included mutations in the movement-related gene unc-58, alterations in gene expression analysed with oligoarrays containing the entire C. elegans genome, and micro-satellite mutations measured by capillary electrophoresis. The progeny of the irradiated nematodes showed an increased mutation frequency in the unc-58 gene, with a maximum response observed at 1Gy. Significant differences were also found in gene expression between the irradiated (1Gy) and non-irradiated nematode lines. Differences in gene expression did not show clear clustering into certain gene categories, suggesting that the instability might be a chaotic process rather than a result of changes in the function of few specific genes such as, e.g., those responsible for DNA repair. Increased heterogeneity in gene expression, which has previously been described in irradiated cultured human lymphocytes, was also observed in the present study in C. elegans, the coefficient of variation of gene expression being higher in the progeny of irradiated nematodes than in control nematodes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first publication reporting radiation-induced genomic instability in C. elegans.

  15. Nature of radiation-induced defects in quartz.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bu; Yu, Yingtian; Pignatelli, Isabella; Sant, Gaurav; Bauchy, Mathieu

    2015-07-14

    Although quartz (α-form) is a mineral used in numerous applications wherein radiation exposure is an issue, the nature of the atomistic defects formed during radiation-induced damage has not been fully clarified. Especially, the extent of oxygen vacancy formation is still debated, which is an issue of primary importance as optical techniques based on charged oxygen vacancies have been utilized to assess the level of radiation damage in quartz. In this paper, molecular dynamics simulations are applied to study the effects of ballistic impacts on the atomic network of quartz. We show that the defects that are formed mainly consist of over-coordinated Si and O, as well as Si-O connectivity defects, e.g., small Si-O rings and edge-sharing Si tetrahedra. Oxygen vacancies, on the contrary, are found in relatively low abundance, suggesting that characterizations based on E' centers do not adequately capture radiation-induced structural damage in quartz. Finally, we evaluate the dependence on the incident energy, of the amount of each type of the point defects formed, and quantify unambiguously the threshold displacement energies for both O and Si atoms. These results provide a comprehensive basis to assess the nature and extent of radiation damage in quartz. PMID:26178116

  16. Radiation-induced transmissable chromosomal instability in haemopoietic stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadhim, M. A.; Wright, E. G.

    Heritable radiation-induced genetic alterations have long been assumed to be ``fixed'' within the first cell division. However, there is a growing body of evidence that a considerable fraction of cells surviving radiation exposure appear normal, but a variety of mutational changes arise in their progeny due to a transmissible genomic instability. In our investigations of G-banded metaphases, non-clonal cytogenetic aberrations, predominantly chromatid-type aberrations, have been observed in the clonal descendants of murine and human haemopoietic stem cells surviving low doses (~1 track per cell) of alpha-particle irradiations. The data are consistent with a transmissible genetic instability induced in a stem cell resulting in a diversity of chromosomal aberrations in its clonal progeny many cell divisions later. Recent studies have demonstrated that the instability phenotype persists in vivo and that the expression of chromosomal instability has a strong dependence on the genetic characteristics of the irradiated cell. At the time when cytogenetic aberrations are detected, an increased incidence of hprt mutations and apoptotic cells have been observed in the clonal descendants of alpha-irradiated murine haemopoietic stem cells. Thus, delayed chromosomal abnormalities, delayed cell death by apoptosis and late-arising specific gene mutations may reflect diverse consequences of radiation-induced genomic instability. The relationship, if any, between these effects is not established. Current studies suggest that expression of these delayed heritable effects is determined by the type of radiation exposure, type of cell and a variety of genetic factors.

  17. Nature of radiation-induced defects in quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bu; Yu, Yingtian; Bauchy, Mathieu; Pignatelli, Isabella; Sant, Gaurav

    2015-07-14

    Although quartz (α-form) is a mineral used in numerous applications wherein radiation exposure is an issue, the nature of the atomistic defects formed during radiation-induced damage has not been fully clarified. Especially, the extent of oxygen vacancy formation is still debated, which is an issue of primary importance as optical techniques based on charged oxygen vacancies have been utilized to assess the level of radiation damage in quartz. In this paper, molecular dynamics simulations are applied to study the effects of ballistic impacts on the atomic network of quartz. We show that the defects that are formed mainly consist of over-coordinated Si and O, as well as Si–O connectivity defects, e.g., small Si–O rings and edge-sharing Si tetrahedra. Oxygen vacancies, on the contrary, are found in relatively low abundance, suggesting that characterizations based on E′ centers do not adequately capture radiation-induced structural damage in quartz. Finally, we evaluate the dependence on the incident energy, of the amount of each type of the point defects formed, and quantify unambiguously the threshold displacement energies for both O and Si atoms. These results provide a comprehensive basis to assess the nature and extent of radiation damage in quartz.

  18. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesismore » that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.« less

  19. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.

  20. The thermal stability of radiation-induced defects in illite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riegler, T.; Allard, T.; Beaufort, D.; Cantin, J.-L.; von Bardeleben, H. J.

    2016-01-01

    High-purity illite specimens from the Mesoproterozoic unconformity-related uranium deposits of Kiggavik, Thelon basin, Nunavut (Canada), and Shea Creek (Athabasca basin, Saskatchewan, Canada) have been studied using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to determine the thermal stability of the main radiation-induced defects and question the potential of using illite as a natural dosimeter. The observed spectra are complex as they can show in the same region several contributions: (1) an unstable native defect, (2) the main stable defect named Ai by reference to a previous study (Morichon et al. in Phys Chem Minerals 35:339-346, 2008), (3) a signal at g = 2.063 assigned to a new defect, not yet fully characterized, named Ai2 center and (4) impurities such as vanadyl complex or divalent manganese. Isochronal heating shows that the new signal corresponds to a stable species. Isothermal heating experiments at 400 and 450 °C provide values of half-life extrapolated at room temperature and activation energy of 1.9-29,109 years and 1.3-1.4 eV, respectively, corresponding to the Ai center. These parameters allow the use of stable radiation-induced defects as a record of radioactivity down to the Paleoproterozoic period.

  1. UV-radiation-induced degradation of fluorinated polyimide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Li-Hsin; Saha, Naresh C.

    1994-12-01

    Fully cured fluorinated polyimide (FPI) films with low dielectric constants ( less than or equal to 3.0) have been found to be chemically altered when exposed to UV radiation during a process integration study. This chemical modification is manifested in the loss of film thickness after it is subjected to UV radiation followed by photoresist stripping. The UV-radiation-induced surface modifications of the FPI film have been characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The XPS data show the presence of C=O and COO(-) sites in the FPI molecule following UV exposure. Under prolonged UV exposure in a stepper, the FPI film acts as a positive working photoresist. However, a 2 kA plasma enhanced chemically vapor-deposited oxide mask and/or a typical 12 kA photoresist mask effectively shields the FPI from UV-radiation-induced degradation. The effects of FPI on UV radiation present during other normal wafer processing steps such as plasma deposition and reactive ion-etching were also studied and found to be negligible.

  2. Radiation induced corrosion of copper for spent nuclear fuel storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björkbacka, Åsa; Hosseinpour, Saman; Johnson, Magnus; Leygraf, Christofer; Jonsson, Mats

    2013-11-01

    The long term safety of repositories for radioactive waste is one of the main concerns for countries utilizing nuclear power. The integrity of engineered and natural barriers in such repositories must be carefully evaluated in order to minimize the release of radionuclides to the biosphere. One of the most developed concepts of long term storage of spent nuclear fuel is the Swedish KBS-3 method. According to this method, the spent fuel will be sealed inside copper canisters surrounded by bentonite clay and placed 500 m down in stable bedrock. Despite the importance of the process of radiation induced corrosion of copper, relatively few studies have been reported. In this work the effect of the total gamma dose on radiation induced corrosion of copper in anoxic pure water has been studied experimentally. Copper samples submerged in water were exposed to a series of total doses using three different dose rates. Unirradiated samples were used as reference samples throughout. The copper surfaces were examined qualitatively using IRAS and XPS and quantitatively using cathodic reduction. The concentration of copper in solution after irradiation was measured using ICP-AES. The influence of aqueous radiation chemistry on the corrosion process was evaluated based on numerical simulations. The experiments show that the dissolution as well as the oxide layer thickness increase upon radiation. Interestingly, the evaluation using numerical simulations indicates that aqueous radiation chemistry is not the only process driving the corrosion of copper in these systems.

  3. Radiation-induced noncancer risks in interventional cardiology: optimisation of procedures and staff and patient dose reduction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhonghua; AbAziz, Aini; Yusof, Ahmad Khairuddin Md

    2013-01-01

    Concerns about ionizing radiation during interventional cardiology have been increased in recent years as a result of rapid growth in interventional procedure volumes and the high radiation doses associated with some procedures. Noncancer radiation risks to cardiologists and medical staff in terms of radiation-induced cataracts and skin injuries for patients appear clear potential consequences of interventional cardiology procedures, while radiation-induced potential risk of developing cardiovascular effects remains less clear. This paper provides an overview of the evidence-based reviews of concerns about noncancer risks of radiation exposure in interventional cardiology. Strategies commonly undertaken to reduce radiation doses to both medical staff and patients during interventional cardiology procedures are discussed; optimisation of interventional cardiology procedures is highlighted.

  4. Radiation-Induced Noncancer Risks in Interventional Cardiology: Optimisation of Procedures and Staff and Patient Dose Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Khairuddin Md Yusof, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Concerns about ionizing radiation during interventional cardiology have been increased in recent years as a result of rapid growth in interventional procedure volumes and the high radiation doses associated with some procedures. Noncancer radiation risks to cardiologists and medical staff in terms of radiation-induced cataracts and skin injuries for patients appear clear potential consequences of interventional cardiology procedures, while radiation-induced potential risk of developing cardiovascular effects remains less clear. This paper provides an overview of the evidence-based reviews of concerns about noncancer risks of radiation exposure in interventional cardiology. Strategies commonly undertaken to reduce radiation doses to both medical staff and patients during interventional cardiology procedures are discussed; optimisation of interventional cardiology procedures is highlighted. PMID:24027768

  5. Functional properties of nisin-carbohydrate conjugates formed by radiation induced Maillard reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muppalla, Shobita R.; Sonavale, Rahul; Chawla, Surinder P.; Sharma, Arun

    2012-12-01

    Nisin-carbohydrate conjugates were prepared by irradiating nisin either with glucose or dextran. Increase in browning and formation of intermediate products was observed with a concomitant decrease in free amino and reducing sugar groups indicating occurrence of the Maillard reaction catalyzed by irradiation. Nisin-carbohydrate conjugates showed a broad spectrum antibacterial activity against Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescence) as well as Gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus). Results of antioxidant assays, including that of DPPH radical-scavenging activity and reducing power, showed that the nisin-dextran conjugates possessed better antioxidant potential than nisin-glucose conjugate. These results suggested that it was possible to enhance the functional properties of nisin by preparing radiation induced conjugates suitable for application in food industry.

  6. A review on radiation-induced nucleation and growth of colloidal metallic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This review presents an introduction to the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles by radiation-induced method, especially gamma irradiation. This method offers some benefits over the conventional methods because it provides fully reduced and highly pure nanoparticles free from by-products or chemical reducing agents, and is capable of controlling the particle size and structure. The nucleation and growth mechanism of metallic nanoparticles are also discussed. The competition between nucleation and growth process in the formation of nanoparticles can determine the size of nanoparticles which is influenced by certain parameters such as the choice of solvents and stabilizer, the precursor to stabilizer ratio, pH during synthesis, and absorbed dose. PMID:24225302

  7. The correlation between swelling and radiation-induced segregation in iron-chromium-nickel alloys.

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T. R.; Busby, J. T.; Kenik, E. A.; Was, G. S.

    1998-03-05

    The magnitudes of both void swelling and radiation-induced segregation (RIS) in iron-chromium-nickel alloys are dependent on bulk alloy composition. Because the diffusivity of nickel via the vacancy flux is slow relative to chromium, nickel enriches and chromium depletes at void surfaces during irradiation. This local composition change reduces the subsequent vacancy flux to the void, thereby reducing void swelling. In this work, the resistance to swelling from major element segregation is estimated using diffusivities derived from grain boundary segregation measurements in irradiated iron-chromium-nickel alloys. The resistance to void swelling in iron- and nickel-base alloys correlates with the segregation and both are functions of bulk alloy composition. Alloys that display the greatest amount of nickel enrichment and chromium depletion are found to be most resistant to void swelling, as predicted. Additionally, swelling is shown to be greater in alloys in which the RIS profiles are slow to develop.

  8. Aminoguanidine Alleviates Radiation-Induced Small-Bowel Damage Through Its Antioxidant Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E.-Y.; Wang, F.-S.; Lin, I-H.; Yang, Kuender D.

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect and its mechanism of aminoguanidine (AG) on small-bowel protection after whole-abdominal irradiation (WAI) in rats. Methods and Materials: Male Sprague-Dawley rats (300-400 g) subjected to 12 Gy WAI were used for the study. Aminoguanidine at a dose of 50-800 mg/kg was administered by the gavage route 2 h before WAI. Mucosal damage of small bowel was evaluated by the grade of diarrhea and crypt survival; oxidative stress was determined by the level of 8-hydroxy 2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) with immunohistochemistry (IHC). Nitrosative stress was evaluated by the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) with IHC, and systemic and portal vein NOx (nitrite + nitrate) levels were measured and compared with and without AG treatment after WAI. Results: Aminoguanidine showed a dose-dependent effect against WAI-induced diarrhea. Aminoguanidine at a dose of 400 mg/kg had the best protective effect, from 92% to 17% (p = 0.002). Aminoguanidine increased crypt survival from 23% to 46% (p = 0.003). It also significantly attenuated 8-OHdG expression but not 3-NT and iNOS expression at both 4 and 8 h after 12-Gy WAI. Aminoguanidine did not alter the portal vein NOx levels 4 and 8 h after 12-Gy WAI. Conclusion: Aminoguanidine has a radioprotective effect against radiation-induced small-bowel damage due to its antioxidant effect but not inhibition of nitric oxide production. Dietary AG may have a potentially protective effect on the small intestine of patients subjected to pelvic and abdominal radiotherapies.

  9. Rhubarb extract partially improves mucosal integrity in chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Bajic, Juliana E; Eden, Georgina L; Lampton, Lorrinne S; Cheah, Ker Y; Lymn, Kerry A; Pei, Jinxin V; Yool, Andrea J; Howarth, Gordon S

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effects of orally gavaged aqueous rhubarb extract (RE) on 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced intestinal mucositis in rats. METHODS Female Dark Agouti rats (n = 8/group) were gavaged daily (1 mL) with water, high-dose RE (HDR; 200 mg/kg) or low-dose RE (LDR; 20mg/kg) for eight days. Intestinal mucositis was induced (day 5) with 5-FU (150 mg/kg) via intraperitoneal injection. Intestinal tissue samples were collected for myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and histological examination. Xenopus oocytes expressing aquaporin 4 water channels were prepared to examine the effect of aqueous RE on cell volume, indicating a potential mechanism responsible for modulating net fluid absorption and secretion in the gastrointestinal tract. Statistical significance was assumed at P < 0.05 by one-way ANOVA. RESULTS Bodyweight was significantly reduced in rats administered 5-FU compared to healthy controls (P < 0.01). Rats administered 5-FU significantly increased intestinal MPO levels (≥ 307%; P < 0.001), compared to healthy controls. However, LDR attenuated this effect in 5-FU treated rats, significantly decreasing ileal MPO activity (by 45%; P < 0.05), as compared to 5-FU controls. 5-FU significantly reduced intestinal mucosal thickness (by ≥ 29% P < 0.001) as compared to healthy controls. LDR significantly increased ileal mucosal thickness in 5-FU treated rats (19%; P < 0.05) relative to 5-FU controls. In xenopus oocytes expressing AQP4 water channels, RE selectively blocked water influx into the cell, induced by a decrease in external osmotic pressure. As water efflux was unaltered by the presence of extracellular RE, the directional flow of water across the epithelial barrier, in the presence of extracellular RE, indicated that RE may alleviate water loss across the epithelial barrier and promote intestinal health in chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis. CONCLUSION In summary, low dose RE improves selected parameters of mucosal integrity and reduces ileal

  10. Radioprotective effect of geraniin via the inhibition of apoptosis triggered by γ-radiation-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyoung Ah; Lee, In Kyung; Zhang, Rui; Piao, Mei Jing; Kim, Ki Cheon; Kim, Sang Young; Shin, Taekyun; Kim, Bum Joon; Lee, Nam Ho; Hyun, Jin Won

    2011-04-01

    The radioprotective effect of geraniin, a tannin compound isolated from Nymphaea tetragona Georgi var. (Nymphaeaceae), against γ-radiation-induced damage was investigated in Chinese hamster lung fibroblast (V79-4) cells. Geraniin recovered cell viability detected by MTT test and colony formation assay, which was compromised by γ-radiation, and reduced the γ-radiation-induced apoptosis by the inhibition of loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential. Geraniin protected cellular components (lipid membrane, cellular protein, and DNA) damaged by γ-radiation, which was detected by lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl formation, and comet assay. Geraniin significantly reduced the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species generated by γ-radiation, which was detected using spectrofluorometer, flow cytometer, and confocal microscope after 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate staining. Geraniin normalized the superoxide dismutase and catalase activities, which were decreased by γ-radiation. These results suggest that geraniin protects cells against radiation-induced oxidative stress via enhancing of antioxidant enzyme activities and attenuating of cellular damage.

  11. Radioprotective effect of geraniin via the inhibition of apoptosis triggered by γ-radiation-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyoung Ah; Lee, In Kyung; Zhang, Rui; Piao, Mei Jing; Kim, Ki Cheon; Kim, Sang Young; Shin, Taekyun; Kim, Bum Joon; Lee, Nam Ho; Hyun, Jin Won

    2011-04-01

    The radioprotective effect of geraniin, a tannin compound isolated from Nymphaea tetragona Georgi var. (Nymphaeaceae), against γ-radiation-induced damage was investigated in Chinese hamster lung fibroblast (V79-4) cells. Geraniin recovered cell viability detected by MTT test and colony formation assay, which was compromised by γ-radiation, and reduced the γ-radiation-induced apoptosis by the inhibition of loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential. Geraniin protected cellular components (lipid membrane, cellular protein, and DNA) damaged by γ-radiation, which was detected by lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl formation, and comet assay. Geraniin significantly reduced the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species generated by γ-radiation, which was detected using spectrofluorometer, flow cytometer, and confocal microscope after 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate staining. Geraniin normalized the superoxide dismutase and catalase activities, which were decreased by γ-radiation. These results suggest that geraniin protects cells against radiation-induced oxidative stress via enhancing of antioxidant enzyme activities and attenuating of cellular damage. PMID:20680428

  12. Treatment of radiation-induced acute intestinal injury with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHENG, KAI; WU, WEIZHEN; YANG, SHUNLIANG; HUANG, LIANGHU; CHEN, JIN; GONG, CHUNGUI; FU, ZHICHAO; LIN, RUOFEI; TAN, JIANMING

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the ability of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) to repair radiation-induced acute intestinal injury, and to elucidate the underlying repair mechanism. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to whole abdominal irradiation using a single medical linear accelerator (12 Gy) and randomly assigned to two groups. Rats in the BMSC-treated group were injected with 1 ml BMSC suspension (2×106 cells/ml) via the tail vein, while the control group rats were injected with normal saline. BMSCs were identified by detecting the expression of CD29, CD90, CD34 and CD45 using flow cytometry. The expression of the cytokines stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and interleukin (IL)-2 was detected using immunohistochemical techniques. Plasma citrulline concentrations were evaluated using an ELISA kit. Rat general conditions, including body weight, and changes in cellular morphology were also recorded. The results suggested that BMSCs exerted a protective effect on radiation-induced acute intestinal injury in rats. The histological damage was rapidly repaired in the BMSC-treated group. In addition, the BMSC-treated group showed significantly reduced radiation injury scores (P<0.01), mildly reduced body weight and plasma citrulline levels, significantly more rapid recovery (P<0.01), significantly reduced expression of the cytokines PGE2 and IL-2 (P<0.05) and significantly increased SDF-1 expression (P<0.01) compared with the control group. In summary, the present results indicate that BMSCs are able to effectively reduce inflammation and promote repair of the structure and function of intestinal tissues damaged by radiation exposure, suggesting that they may provide a promising therapeutic agent. PMID:27284330

  13. Controlled local delivery of tetracycline HCl in the treatment of periimplant mucosal hyperplasia and mucositis. A controlled case series.

    PubMed

    Schenk, G; Flemmig, T F; Betz, T; Reuther, J; Klaiber, B

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of this controlled case series was to assess the adjunctive efficacy of controlled topical tetracycline HCl application in the treatment of infection associated periimplant mucositis or mucosal hyperplasia. Eight patients with at least 2 endosseous implants showing clinical signs of periimplant mucosal hyperplasia or mucositis were enrolled. All implants received supra- and subgingival scaling, with half of the implants receiving adjunctive controlled local delivery of tetracycline HCl (test). Control implants did not receive any other therapy aside from scaling. Clinical parameters were assessed at baseline, 4, and 12 weeks. Scaling plus controlled local delivery of tetracycline HCl markedly reduced periimplant mucosal hyperplasia in 4 of 5 test implants and demonstrated a trend towards a reduction of bleeding on probing scores. Scaling alone had no effect on mucosal hyperplasia in the 2 control implants presenting with this condition nor bleeding on probing scores. In both groups, plaque index scores were slightly reduced at 4 weeks but returned to baseline values at 12 weeks, whereas pocket probing depths, clinical attachment levels, and probing bone levels remained unchanged during the course of the trial. The observed trends suggest that scaling plus controlled local delivery of tetracycline HCl may have beneficial effects. Randomized controlled trials employing a sample size high enough to reach sufficient statistical power are needed to definitively assess the efficacy of controlled local tetracycline HCl delivery on periimplant diseases.

  14. cAMP signaling inhibits radiation-induced ATM phosphorylation leading to the augmentation of apoptosis in human lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    radiation-induced ATM phosphorylation and increased apoptosis. Conclusions cAMP signaling inhibits radiation-induced ATM activation by PKA-dependent activation of PP2A, and this signaling mechanism augments radiation-induced apoptosis by reducing ATM-dependent activation of NF-κB in lung cancer cells. PMID:24568192

  15. Radiation induced genome instability: multiscale modelling and data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Sergey; Eidelman, Yuri

    2012-07-01

    Genome instability (GI) is thought to be an important step in cancer induction and progression. Radiation induced GI is usually defined as genome alterations in the progeny of irradiated cells. The aim of this report is to demonstrate an opportunity for integrative analysis of radiation induced GI on the basis of multiscale modelling. Integrative, systems level modelling is necessary to assess different pathways resulting in GI in which a variety of genetic and epigenetic processes are involved. The multilevel modelling includes the Monte Carlo based simulation of several key processes involved in GI: DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) generation in cells initially irradiated as well as in descendants of irradiated cells, damage transmission through mitosis. Taking the cell-cycle-dependent generation of DNA/chromosome breakage into account ensures an advantage in estimating the contribution of different DNA damage response pathways to GI, as to nonhomologous vs homologous recombination repair mechanisms, the role of DSBs at telomeres or interstitial chromosomal sites, etc. The preliminary estimates show that both telomeric and non-telomeric DSB interactions are involved in delayed effects of radiation although differentially for different cell types. The computational experiments provide the data on the wide spectrum of GI endpoints (dicentrics, micronuclei, nonclonal translocations, chromatid exchanges, chromosome fragments) similar to those obtained experimentally for various cell lines under various experimental conditions. The modelling based analysis of experimental data demonstrates that radiation induced GI may be viewed as processes of delayed DSB induction/interaction/transmission being a key for quantification of GI. On the other hand, this conclusion is not sufficient to understand GI as a whole because factors of DNA non-damaging origin can also induce GI. Additionally, new data on induced pluripotent stem cells reveal that GI is acquired in normal mature

  16. Hitting the mucosal road in tolerance induction.

    PubMed

    Wiedermann, Ursula

    2009-01-01

    Within the last decades a dramatic increase in allergic diseases has been recognized in the Westernized societies, leading to the fact that meanwhile 25-30% of the population is afflicted by allergic disorders. Besides a hereditary disposition, other factors, including a reduced microbial contact early in life or changes in nutrition, might also have influenced this epidemiological development. So far the only causative treatment against type-I allergies is specific immunotherapy. In young and monosensitized patients this treatment is highly efficacious, while there are clear limitations in older or multisensitized patients. Allergy research therefore aims at establishing new and more efficacious treatment strategies in prophylactic as well as therapeutic settings. Our research programs focus on the development of novel allergy vaccines based on the induction of mucosal tolerance. In different mouse models of respiratory allergy mucosal treatment with genetically engineered allergen constructs proved to prevent the development of allergic mono- and multisensitivities. The additional use of mucosal adjuvants seems particularly important to improve therapeutic treatment approaches. Recent studies on the inverse relation of certain parasite infections and the development of allergy prompted us to search for selected parasitic molecules with immunosuppressive properties as potential adjuvant systems for novel allergy vaccines. An overview of our recent studies will be given.

  17. A Mucosal Adjuvant for the Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Steil, Benjamin P.; Jorquera, Patricia; Westdijk, Janny; Bakker, Wilfried A.M.; Johnston, Robert E.; Barro, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The eradication of poliovirus from the majority of the world has been achieved through the use of two vaccines: the inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) and the live-attenuated oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). Both vaccines are effective at preventing paralytic poliomyelitis, however, they also have significant differences. Most importantly for this work is the risk of revertant virus from OPV, the greater cost of IPV, and the low mucosal immunity induced by IPV. We and others have previously described the use of an alphavirus-based adjuvant that can induce a mucosal immune response to a co-administered antigen even when delivered at a non-mucosal site. In this report, we describe the use of an alphavirus-based adjuvant (GVI3000) with IPV. The IPV-GVI3000 vaccine significantly increased systemic IgG, mucosal IgG and mucosal IgA antibody responses to all three poliovirus serotypes in mice even when administered intramuscularly. Furthermore, GVI3000 significantly increased the potency of IPV in rat potency tests as measured by poliovirus neutralizing antibodies in serum. Thus, an IPV-GVI3000 vaccine would reduce the dose of IPV needed and provide significantly improved mucosal immunity. This vaccine could be an effective tool to use in the poliovirus eradication campaign without risking the re-introduction of revertant poliovirus derived from OPV. PMID:24333345

  18. Alpha Lipoic Acid Attenuates Radiation-Induced Thyroid Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jung Hwa; Jung, Jaehoon; Kim, Soo Kyoung; Woo, Seung Hoon; Kang, Ki Mun; Jeong, Bae-Kwon; Jung, Myeong Hee; Kim, Jin Hyun; Hahm, Jong Ryeal

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of the thyroid to radiation during radiotherapy of the head and neck is often unavoidable. The present study aimed to investigate the protective effect of α-lipoic acid (ALA) on radiation-induced thyroid injury in rats. Rats were randomly assigned to four groups: healthy controls (CTL), irradiated (RT), received ALA before irradiation (ALA + RT), and received ALA only (ALA, 100 mg/kg, i.p.). ALA was treated at 24 h and 30 minutes prior to irradiation. The neck area including the thyroid gland was evenly irradiated with 2 Gy per minute (total dose of 18 Gy) using a photon 6-MV linear accelerator. Greater numbers of abnormal and unusually small follicles in the irradiated thyroid tissues were observed compared to the controls and the ALA group on days 4 and 7 after irradiation. However, all pathologies were decreased by ALA pretreatment. The quantity of small follicles in the irradiated rats was greater on day 7 than day 4 after irradiation. However, in the ALA-treated irradiated rats, the numbers of small and medium follicles were significantly decreased to a similar degree as in the control and ALA-only groups. The PAS-positive density of the colloid in RT group was decreased significantly compared with all other groups and reversed by ALA pretreatment. The high activity index in the irradiated rats was lowered by ALA treatment. TGF-ß1 immunoreactivity was enhanced in irradiated rats and was more severe on the day 7 after radiation exposure than on day 4. Expression of TGF-ß1 was reduced in the thyroid that had undergone ALA pretreatment. Levels of serum pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1ß and IL-6) did not differ significantly between the all groups. This study provides that pretreatment with ALA decreased the severity of radiation-induced thyroid injury by reducing inflammation and fibrotic infiltration and lowering the activity index. Thus, ALA could be used to ameliorate radiation-induced thyroid injury. PMID:25401725

  19. Probabilistic methodology for estimating radiation-induced cancer risk

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Leggett, R.W.; Williams, L.R.

    1981-01-01

    The RICRAC computer code was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide a versatile and convenient methodology for radiation risk assessment. The code allows as input essentially any dose pattern commonly encountered in risk assessments for either acute or chronic exposures, and it includes consideration of the age structure of the exposed population. Results produced by the analysis include the probability of one or more radiation-induced cancer deaths in a specified population, expected numbers of deaths, and expected years of life lost as a result of premature fatalities. These calculatons include consideration of competing risks of death from all other causes. The program also generates a probability frequency distribution of the expected number of cancers in any specified cohort resulting from a given radiation dose. The methods may be applied to any specified population and dose scenario.

  20. Solar radiation induced rotational bursting of interplanetary particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, J. G.

    1975-01-01

    It is suggested that the magnitudes of the two radiation-induced rotational bursting mechanisms (Radzieskii effect and windmill effect) have been overestimated and that they do not work significantly faster than the Poynting-Robertson effect in removing interplanetary particles. These two mechanisms are described, and serious doubts are raised regarding the derivation of their radiation pressure-torque proportionality constants, which are required for calculating their magnitudes. It is shown that both mechanisms will cause the alignment of elongated particles and, consequently, the polarization of zodiacal light. Since no positive polarization has been measured at the antisolar point, it is concluded that the magnitudes of the rotational bursting mechanisms are smaller than that of the Poynting-Robertson effect.

  1. Imaging for assessment of radiation-induced normal tissue effects

    PubMed Central

    Jeraj, Robert; Cao, Yue; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Hahn, Carol; Marks, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Imaging can provide quantitative assessment of radiation-induced normal tissue effects. Identifying an early sign of normal tissue damage with imaging would have the potential to predict organ dysfunction, thereby allowing re-optimization of treatment strategies based upon individual patients’ risks and benefits. Early detection with non-invasive imaging may enable interventions to mitigate therapy-associated injury prior to its clinical manifestation. Further, successive imaging may provide an objective assessment of the impact of such mitigation therapies. However, many problems make application of imaging to normal tissue assessment challenging, and further work is required to establish imaging biomarkers as surrogate endpoints of clinical outcome. The performance of clinical trials where normal tissue injury is a clearly defined endpoint would greatly aid in realization of these goals. PMID:20171509

  2. Radiation-induced polymerization for the immobilization of penicillin acylase

    SciTech Connect

    Boccu, E.; Carenza, M.; Lora, S.; Palma, G.; Veronese, F.M.

    1987-06-01

    The immobilization of Escherichia coli penicillin acylase was investigated by radiation-induced polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate at low temperature. A leak-proof composite that does not swell in water was obtained by adding the cross-linking agent trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate to the monomer-aqueous enzyme mixture. Penicillin acylase, which was immobilized with greater than 70% yield, possessed a higher Km value toward the substrate 6-nitro-3-phenylacetamidobenzoic acid than the free enzyme form (Km = 1.7 X 10(-5) and 1 X 10(-5) M, respectively). The structural stability of immobilized penicillin acylase, as assessed by heat, guanidinium chloride, and pH denaturation profiles, was very similar to that of the free-enzyme form, thus suggesting that penicillin acylase was entrapped in its native state into aqueous free spaces of the polymer matrix.

  3. Radiation induced crystallinity damage in poly( L-lactic acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantoǧlu, Ömer; Güven, Olgun

    2002-12-01

    The radiation-induced crystallinity damage in poly( L-lactic acid) (PLLA) in the presence of air and in vacuum, is studied. From the heat of fusion enthalpy values of gamma irradiated samples, some changes on the thermal properties were determined. To identify these changes, first the glass transition temperature ( Tg) of L-lactic acid polymers irradiated to various doses in air and vacuum have been investigated and it is found that it is independent of irradiation atmosphere and dose. The fraction of damaged units of PLLA per unit of absorbed energy has been measured. For this purpose, SAXS and differential scanning calorimetry methods were used, and the radiation yield of number of damaged units ( G(- u)) is found to be 0.74 and 0.58 for PLLA samples irradiated in vacuum and air, respectively.

  4. Measurements of prompt radiation induced conductivity of alumina and sapphire.

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, E. Frederick; Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Preston, Eric F.

    2011-04-01

    We performed measurements of the prompt radiation induced conductivity in thin samples of Alumina and Sapphire at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. Five mil thick samples were irradiated with pulses of 20 MeV electrons, yielding dose rates of 1E7 to 1E9 rad/s. We applied variable potentials up to 1 kV across the samples and measured the prompt conduction current. Analysis rendered prompt conductivity coefficients between 1E10 and 1E9 mho/m/(rad/s), depending on the dose rate and the pulse width for Alumina and 1E7 to 6E7 mho/m/(rad/s) for Sapphire.

  5. Radiatively induced breaking of conformal symmetry in a superpotential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbuzov, A. B.; Cirilo-Lombardo, D. J.

    2016-07-01

    Radiatively induced symmetry breaking is considered for a toy model with one scalar and one fermion field unified in a superfield. It is shown that the classical quartic self-interaction of the superfield possesses a quantum infrared singularity. Application of the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism for effective potential leads to the appearance of condensates and masses for both scalar and fermion components. That induces a spontaneous breaking of the initial classical symmetries: the supersymmetry and the conformal one. The energy scales for the scalar and fermion condensates appear to be of the same order, while the renormalization scale is many orders of magnitude higher. A possibility to relate the considered toy model to conformal symmetry breaking in the Standard Model is discussed.

  6. Factors that modify risks of radiation-induced cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1988-11-01

    The collective influence of biologic and physical factors that modify risks of radiation-induced cancer introduces uncertainties sufficient to deny precision of estimates of human cancer risk that can be calculated for low-dose radiation in exposed populations. The important biologic characteristics include the tissue sites and cell types, baseline cancer incidence, minimum latent period, time-to-tumor recognition, and the influence of individual host (age and sex) and competing etiologic influences. Physical factors include radiation dose, dose rate, and radiation quality. Statistical factors include time-response projection models, risk coefficients, and dose-response relationships. Other modifying factors include other carcinogens, and other biological sources (hormonal status, immune status, hereditary factors).

  7. Pulsed radiation-induced attenuation in certain optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, J.D. )

    1992-05-01

    Using the X-ray pulse from the HERMES II simulation machine at Sandia National Laboratories, the pulsed radiation-induced attenuation was measured in two optical fibers considered to be 'nonrad-hard': the 50-micron-core, graded-index fiber from Corning and the plastic (PMMA) fiber from the Mitsubishi Rayon Company. These fibers were exposed to radiation up to doses of 19.5 and 28 krad(Si), respectively. In addition, fits of their post-radiation recovery were made to the geminate recombination model, from which the recombination-rate and generation constants, characteristic of this theory, were determined. These parameters should be useful in determining the response of the fibers to radiation conditions other than those encountered here. 18 refs.

  8. [Radiation-induced and therapy-related AML/MDS].

    PubMed

    Inaba, Toshiya

    2009-10-01

    Radiation induced acute myeloid leukemia (AML) was recognized a century ago, soon after mankind found radiation. Atomic bomb survivors developed de novo AML with relatively short latency with very high frequency. By contrast, excess occurrence of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) as well as solid tumors was found decades late. This difference may be due to etiology that many de novo AML patients harbor chimeric leukemogenic genes caused by chromosomal translocations, while MDS patients rarely carry chimeras. In addition, epigenetic change would play important roles. Therapy related leukemia is mainly caused by topoisomerase II inhibitors that cause de novo AML with an 11q23 translocation or by alkyrating agents that induce MDS/AML with an AML1 point mutation and monosomy 7. PMID:19860183

  9. Claudin-3 expression in radiation-exposed rat models: A potential marker for radiation-induced intestinal barrier failure

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Sehwan; Lee, Jong-geol; Bae, Chang-hwan; Lee, Seung Bum; Jang, Won-Suk; Lee, Sun-Joo; Lee, Seung-Sook; Park, Sunhoo

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Irradiation increased intestinal bacterial translocation, accompanied by claudin protein expression in rats. • Neurotensin decreased the bacterial translocation and restored claudin-3 expression. • Claudin-3 can be used as a marker in evaluating radiation induced intestinal injury. - Abstract: The molecular events leading to radiation-induced intestinal barrier failure are not well known. The influence of the expression of claudin proteins in the presence and absence of neurotensin was investigated in radiation-exposed rat intestinal epithelium. Wistar rats were randomly divided into control, irradiation, and irradiation + neurotensin groups, and bacterial translocation to the mesenteric lymph node and expression of claudins were determined. Irradiation led to intestinal barrier failure as demonstrated by significant bacterial translocation. In irradiated terminal ilea, expression of claudin-3 and claudin-4 was significantly decreased, and claudin-2 expression was increased. Administration of neurotensin significantly reduced bacterial translocation and restored the structure of the villi as seen by histologic examination. Among the three subtype of claudins, only claudin-3 expression was restored. These results suggest that the therapeutic effect of neurotensin on the disruption of the intestinal barrier is associated with claudin-3 alteration and that claudin-3 could be used as a marker in evaluating radiation-induced intestinal injury.

  10. Protective effect of inhalation of hydrogen gas on radiation-induced dermatitis and skin injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Sadahiro; Fujita, Masanori; Ishihara, Masayuki; Tachibana, Shoichi; Yamamoto, Yoritsuna; Kaji, Tatsumi; Kawauchi, Toshio; Kanatani, Yasuhiro

    2014-11-01

    The effect of inhalation of hydrogen-containing gas (1.3% hydrogen + 20.8% oxygen + 77.9% nitrogen) (HCG) on radiation-induced dermatitis and on the healing of healing-impaired skin wounds in rats was examined using a rat model of radiation-induced skin injury. An X-ray dose of 20 Gy was irradiated onto the lower part of the back through two holes in a lead shield. Irradiation was performed before or after inhalation of HCG for 2 h. Inhalation of HCG significantly reduced the severity of radiodermatitis and accelerated healing-impaired wound repair. Staining with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) and 8-hydroxy-2(')-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) showed that the proportion of apoptotic keratinocytes and the level of staining in the X-irradiated skin of rats that pre-inhaled HCG were significantly lower than that of rats which did not pre-inhale HCG. Cutaneous full-thickness wounds were then created in the X-irradiated area to examine the time-course of wound healing. X-irradiation significantly increased the time required for wound healing, but the inhalation of HCG prior to the irradiation significantly decreased the delay in wound healing compared with the control and post-inhalation of HCG groups. Therefore, radiation-induced skin injury can potentially be alleviated by the pre-inhalation of HCG.

  11. UVA and UVB radiation-induced oxidation products of quercetin.

    PubMed

    Fahlman, Brian M; Krol, Ed S

    2009-12-01

    The flavonol quercetin is believed to provide protection against ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced damage in plants. As part of our investigations into the potential for quercetin to protect skin against UV radiation-induced damage we have investigated the products of quercetin exposed to UV radiation in vitro. UVA (740 microW cm(-2) at 365 nm) or UVB (1300 microW cm(-2) at 310 nm) irradiation of quercetin in methanol results in a small conversion (less than 20%) to C-ring breakdown products over 11 h. When the triplet sensitizer benzophenone is added, greater than 90% conversion by UVA or UVB occurs within 1h. The major photoproducts from either UVA or UVB radiation are 2,4,6-trihydroxybenzaldehyde (1), 2-(3',4'-dihydroxybenzoyloxy)-4,6-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethanol (3). Product 2 has previously been observed as a product of oxidative metabolism of quercetin, however products 1 and 3 appear to be the result of a unique UV-dependent pathway. In conclusion we have determined that quercetin undergoes slow decomposition to a mixture of C-ring-opened products, two of which to our knowledge have not been previously observed for quercetin decomposition, and that the presence of a triplet sensitizer greatly increases UV radiation-mediated quercetin decomposition. The presence of endogenous photosensitizers in the skin could potentially affect the UV stability of quercetin, suggesting that further study of quercetin for both its photoprotective properties and photostabilty in skin are warranted.

  12. Radiation-induced meningioma: a distinct molecular genetic pattern?

    PubMed

    Shoshan, Y; Chernova, O; Juen, S S; Somerville, R P; Israel, Z; Barnett, G H; Cowell, J K

    2000-07-01

    Radiation-induced meningiomas arise after low-dose irradiation treatment of certain medical conditions and are recognized as clinically separate from sporadic meningioma. These tumors are often aggressive or malignant, they are likely to be multiple, and they have a high recurrence rate following treatment compared with sporadic meningiomas. To understand the molecular mechanism by which radiation-induced meningioma (RIM) arise, we compared genetic changes in 7 RIM and 8 sporadic meningioma (SM) samples. The presence of mutations in the 17 exons of the neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) gene, which has been shown to be inactivated in sporadic meningiomas, was analyzed in RIM and SM using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and DNA sequencing. In contrast to SM, which showed NF2 mutations in 50% of specimens, no mutations were found in RIM. In addition, Western blot analysis of schwannomin/merlin protein, the NF2 gene product, demonstrated protein levels comparable to normal brain in 4/4 RIM tumor samples analyzed. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of genomic regions, which were reported for SM, was also analyzed in all cases of RIM using 22 polymorphic DNA markers. Allele losses were found on chromosomes 1p (4/7), 9p (2/7), 19q (2/7), 22q (2/7), and 18q (1/7). From these observations we conclude that unlike sporadic meningiomas, NF2 gene inactivation and chromosome 22q deletions are far less frequent in RIM, and their role in meningioma development following low dose irradiation is less significant. Other chromosomal lesions, especially loss of 1p, possibly induced by irradiation, may be more important in the development of these tumors. PMID:10901233

  13. Bystander effects in radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, William F.; Hartmann, Andreas; Limoli, Charles L.; Nagar, Shruti; Ponnaiya, Brian

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of GM10115 hamster-human hybrid cells to X-rays can result in the induction of chromosomal instability in the progeny of surviving cells. This instability manifests as the dynamic production of novel sub-populations of cells with unique cytogenetic rearrangements involving the "marker" human chromosome. We have used the comet assay to investigate whether there was an elevated level of endogenous DNA breaks in chromosomally unstable clones that could provide a source for the chromosomal rearrangements and thus account for the persistent instability observed. Our results indicate no significant difference in comet tail measurement between non-irradiated and radiation-induced chromosomally unstable clones. Using two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization we also investigated whether recombinational events involving the interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences in GM10115 cells were involved at frequencies higher than random processes would otherwise predict. Nine of 11 clones demonstrated a significantly higher than expected involvement of these interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences at the recombination junction between the human and hamster chromosomes. Since elevated levels of endogenous breaks were not detected in unstable clones we propose that epigenetic or bystander effects (BSEs) lead to the activation of recombinational pathways that perpetuate the unstable phenotype. Specifically, we expand upon the hypothesis that radiation induces conditions and/or factors that stimulate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These reactive intermediates then contribute to a chronic pro-oxidant environment that cycles over multiple generations, promoting chromosomal recombination and other phenotypes associated with genomic instability.

  14. Radiation-induced fibrosis: mechanisms and implications for therapy

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Jeffrey M.; New, Jacob; Hamilton, Chase D.; Lominska, Chris; Shnayder, Yelizaveta

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) is a long-term side effect of external beam radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer. It results in a multitude of symptoms that significantly impact quality of life. Understanding the mechanisms of RIF-induced changes is essential to developing effective strategies to prevent long-term disability and discomfort following radiation therapy. In this review, we describe the current understanding of the etiology, clinical presentation, pathogenesis, treatment, and directions of future therapy for this condition. Methods A literature review of publications describing mechanisms or treatments of RIF was performed. Specific databases utilized included PubMed and clinicaltrials.gov, using keywords “Radiation-Induced Fibrosis,” “Radiotherapy Complications,” “Fibrosis Therapy,” and other closely related terms. Results RIF is the result of a misguided wound healing response. In addition to causing direct DNA damage, ionizing radiation generates reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that lead to localized inflammation. This inflammatory process ultimately evolves into a fibrotic one characterized by increased collagen deposition, poor vascularity, and scarring. Tumor growth factor beta serves as the primary mediator in this response along with a host of other cytokines and growth factors. Current therapies have largely been directed toward these molecular targets and their associated signaling pathways. Conclusion Although RIF is widely prevalent among patients undergoing radiation therapy and significantly impacts quality of life, there is still much to learn about its pathogenesis and mechanisms. Current treatments have stemmed from this understanding, and it is anticipated that further elucidation will be essential for the development of more effective therapies. PMID:25910988

  15. Radiation-induced leukemia: Comparative studies in mouse and man

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, M.

    1991-01-01

    We now have a clear understanding of the mechanism by which radiation-induced (T-cell) leukemia occurs. In irradiated mice (radiation-induced thymic leukemia) and in man (acute lymphoblastic T-cell leukemia, T-ALL) the mechanism of leukemogenesis is surprisingly similar. Expressed in the most elementary terms, T-cell leukemia occurs when T-cell differentiation is inhibited by a mutation, and pre-T cells attempt but fail to differentiate in the thymus. Instead of leaving the thymus for the periphery as functional T-cells they continue to proliferate in the thymus. The proliferating pre- (pro-) T-cells constitute the (early) acute T-cell leukemia (A-TCL). This model for the mechanism of T-cell leukemogenesis accounts for all the properties of both murine and human A-TCL. Important support for the model has recently come from work by Ilan Kirsch and others, who have shown that mutations/deletions in the genes SCL (TAL), SIL, and LCK constitute primary events in the development of T-ALL, by inhibiting differentiation of thymic pre- (pro-) T-cells. This mechanism of T-cell leukemogenesis brings several specific questions into focus: How do early A-TCL cells progress to become potently tumorigenic and poorly treatable Is it feasible to genetically suppress early and/or progressed A-TCL cells What is the mechanism by which the differentiation-inhibited (leukemic) pre-T cells proliferate During the first grant year we have worked on aspects of all three questions.

  16. Ion beam induced luminescence: Relevance to radiation induced bystander effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, S. B.; McNeill, F. E.; Byun, S. H.; Prestwich, W. V.; Seymour, C.; Mothersill, C. E.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is quantify the light emitted as a result of charged particle interaction in materials which may be of relevance to radiation induced "bystander effects" studies. We have developed a system which employs single photon counting to measure the light emitted from samples irradiated under vacuum by a charged particle beam. The system uses a fast photomultiplier tube with a peak cathode response at 420 nm. It has been tested in a proof-of-principle experiment using polystyrene targets. Light output, as a result of irradiation, was measured. The luminescence yield appears to have a non-linear behavior with the incident ion fluence: it rises exponentially to an asymptotic value. The target was irradiated with beam energies varying from 1 to 2 MeV and showed saturation at or before an incident fluence rate of 3 × 1013 H+/cm2 s. The average saturation value for the photon output was found to be 40 × 106 cps. Some measurements were performed using filters to study the emission at specific wavelengths. In the case of filtered light measurements, the photon output was found to saturate at 28 × 103, 10 × 106, and 35 × 106 cps for wavelengths of 280 ± 5 nm, 320 ± 5 nm and 340 ± 5 nm respectively. The light output reaches a maximum value because of damage induced in the polymer. Our measurements indicate a "damage cross section" of the order of 10-14 cm2. The average radiant intensity was found to increase at wavelengths of 280 and 320 nm when the proton energy was increased. This was not found to occur at 340 nm. In conclusion, the light emission at specific wavelengths was found to depend upon the incident proton fluence and the proton energy. The wavelengths of the emitted light measured in this study have significance for the understanding of radiation induced bystander effects.

  17. Characterization of a Novel Radiation-Induced Sarcoma Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Lang, J.E.; Zhu, W.; Nokes, B.T.; Sheth, G.R.; Novak, P.; Fuchs, L.; Watts, G.S.; Futscher, B.W.; Mineyev, N.; Ring, A.; LeBeau, L.; Nagle, R.; Cranmer, L.D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Radiation-induced sarcoma (RIS) is a potential complication of cancer treatment. No widely available cell line models exist to facilitate studies of RIS. Methods We derived a spontaneously immortalized primary human cell line, UACC-SARC1, from a RIS. Results Short tandem repeat (STR) profiling of UACC-SARC1 was virtually identical to its parental tumor. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis of the tumor and immunocytochemistry (ICC) analysis of UACC-SARC1 revealed shared expression of vimentin, osteonectin, CD68, Ki67 and PTEN but tumor-restricted expression of the histiocyte markers α1-antitrypsin and α1-antichymotrypsin. Karyotyping of the tumor demonstrated aneuploidy. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) provided direct genetic comparison between the tumor and UACC-SARC1. Sequencing of 740 mutation hotspots revealed no mutations in UACC-SARC1 nor in the tumor. NOD/SCID gamma mouse xenografts demonstrated tumor formation and metastasis. Clonogenicity assays demonstrated that 90% of single cells produced viable colonies. NOD/SCID gamma mice produced useful patient-derived xenografts for orthotopic or metastatic models. Conclusion Our novel RIS strain constitutes a useful tool for pre-clinical studies of this rare, aggressive disease. UACC-SARC1 is an aneuploid cell line with complex genomics lacking common oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes as drivers of its biology. The UACC-SARC1 cell line will enable further studies of the drivers of RIS. Synopsis We derived a spontaneously immortalized primary human cell line, UACC-SARC1, from a radiation-induced sarcoma (RIS). Our novel RIS cell line constitutes a useful tool for pre-clinical studies of this rare, aggressive disease. PMID:25644184

  18. In vivo space radiation-induced non-targeted responses: late effects on molecular signaling in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jain, Mohit R; Li, Min; Chen, Wei; Liu, Tong; de Toledo, Sonia M; Pandey, Badri N; Li, Hong; Rabin, Bernard M; Azzam, Edouard I

    2011-06-01

    The lack of clear knowledge about space radiation-induced biological effects has been singled out as the most important factor limiting the prediction of radiation risk associated with human space exploration. The expression of space radiation-induced non-targeted effects is thought to impact our understanding of the health risks associated with exposure to low fluences of particulate radiation encountered by astronauts during prolonged space travel. Following a brief review of radiation-induced bystander effects and the growing literature for the involvement of oxidative metabolism in their expression, we show novel data on the induction of in vivo non-targeted effects following exposure to 1100 MeV/nucleon titanium ions. Analyses of proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis in non-targeted liver of cranially-irradiated Sprague Dawley rats revealed that the levels of key proteins involved in mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism are decreased. In contrast, those of proteins involved in various cellular defense mechanisms, including antioxidation, were increased. These data contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the biological responses to space radiation, and support the involvement of mitochondrial processes in the expression of radiation induced non-targeted effects. Significantly, they reveal the cross-talk between propagated stressful effects and induced adaptive responses. Together, with the accumulating data in the field, our results may help reduce the uncertainty in the assessment of the health risks to astronauts. They further demonstrate that 'network analyses' is an effective tool towards characterizing the signaling pathways that mediate the long-term biological effects of space radiation. PMID:21166651

  19. In vivo space radiation-induced non-targeted responses: late effects on molecular signaling in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jain, Mohit R; Li, Min; Chen, Wei; Liu, Tong; de Toledo, Sonia M; Pandey, Badri N; Li, Hong; Rabin, Bernard M; Azzam, Edouard I

    2011-06-01

    The lack of clear knowledge about space radiation-induced biological effects has been singled out as the most important factor limiting the prediction of radiation risk associated with human space exploration. The expression of space radiation-induced non-targeted effects is thought to impact our understanding of the health risks associated with exposure to low fluences of particulate radiation encountered by astronauts during prolonged space travel. Following a brief review of radiation-induced bystander effects and the growing literature for the involvement of oxidative metabolism in their expression, we show novel data on the induction of in vivo non-targeted effects following exposure to 1100 MeV/nucleon titanium ions. Analyses of proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis in non-targeted liver of cranially-irradiated Sprague Dawley rats revealed that the levels of key proteins involved in mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism are decreased. In contrast, those of proteins involved in various cellular defense mechanisms, including antioxidation, were increased. These data contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the biological responses to space radiation, and support the involvement of mitochondrial processes in the expression of radiation induced non-targeted effects. Significantly, they reveal the cross-talk between propagated stressful effects and induced adaptive responses. Together, with the accumulating data in the field, our results may help reduce the uncertainty in the assessment of the health risks to astronauts. They further demonstrate that 'network analyses' is an effective tool towards characterizing the signaling pathways that mediate the long-term biological effects of space radiation.

  20. Protection of the hemopoietic system by Podophyllum hexandrum against gamma radiation-induced damage.

    PubMed

    Sagar, Ravinder Kumar; Chawla, Raman; Arora, Rajesh; Singh, Shikha; Krishna, Bal; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar; Puri, Satish Chandra; Singh, Pankaj; Kumar, Raj; Sharma, Ashok Kumar; Singh, Surender; Prasad, Jagdish; Gupta, Vinay; Ahmed, Bilal; Dhar, Kanaya Lal; Khan, Haider Ali; Gupta, Manju Lata; Qazi, Ghulam Nabi

    2006-02-01

    A semi-purified extract of low-altitude Podophyllum hexandrum (REC-2001) containing a relatively low content of podophyllotoxin (3.25 %) exhibited potent antioxidant ability in lipid media (at 1000 microg/mLagainst 0.25 kGy) and significant (p < 0.05) hydroxyl ion scavenging potential (78.83 % at 500 microg/mL). In vitro investigations revealed the ability of REC-2001 to significantly (p < 0.05) reduce radiation-induced hemolysis (2 microg/mL; 46.184 %) and nitric oxide scavenging levels (IC (50): 792 +/- 1.25 microg/mL). Protection of the hemopoietic system of Strain 'A' mice administered 20 mg/kg BW REC-2001 30 min prior to lethal irradiation (10 Gy) was recorded and was mediated by free radical scavenging and lowering of lipid oxidation. Further studies investigating the effects of REC-2001 on stem cell modulation are warranted.

  1. New era of radiotherapy: an update in radiation-induced lung disease.

    PubMed

    Benveniste, M F K; Welsh, J; Godoy, M C B; Betancourt, S L; Mawlawi, O R; Munden, R F

    2013-06-01

    Over the last few decades, advances in radiotherapy (RT) technology have improved delivery of radiation therapy dramatically. Advances in treatment planning with the development of image-guided radiotherapy and in techniques such as proton therapy, allows the radiation therapist to direct high doses of radiation to the tumour. These advancements result in improved local regional control while reducing potentially damaging dosage to surrounding normal tissues. It is important for radiologists to be aware of the radiological findings from these advances in order to differentiate expected radiation-induced lung injury (RILD) from recurrence, infection, and other lung diseases. In order to understand these changes and correlate them with imaging, the radiologist should have access to the radiation therapy treatment plans. PMID:23473474

  2. Molecular mechanisms of radiation-induced genomic instability in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liber, Howard L.

    2003-02-13

    The overall strategy was to create a series of isogenic human cell lines that differ in key elements of cell cycle checkpoint, apoptosis, or DNA repair in response to radiation-induced damage. The goal then was to quantify the fractions of cells within a population that exhibit reduced telomere lengths and relate this to the genetic background of the cell, as well as to the response to ionizing radiation. Association between telomere length and degree of genomic instability in the population is being examined for seven closely related cell lines, that vary in p53 status, bcl-2 status, or ability to repair double strand breaks. Experiments utilize gamma rays at doses of 0, 10, and 200 cGy. During this time period the effort concentrated on generating data with two cell lines. Approximately one-third of the required clones were isolated, and analyses for mutagenesis and chromosome aberrations were undertaken.

  3. Marked reduction of radiation-induced micronuclei in human blood lymphocytes pretreated with melatonin

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayalaxmi; Reiter, R.J.; Leal, B.Z.

    1995-07-01

    Human peripheral blood lymphocytes which were pretreated in vitro with melatonin, and endogenously synthesized pineal hormone, for 20 min at 37 {plus_minus} 1{degrees}C exhibited a significant and concentration-dependent reduction in the frequency of {gamma}radiation-induced micronuclei compared with irradiated cells which did not receive the pretreatment. The extent of the reduction observed with 2.0 mM melatonin was similar to that found in lymphocytes pretreated for 20 min with 1.0 M dimethylsulfoxide, a known free radical scavenger. These observations indicate that melatonin may have an active role in protection of humans against genetic damage due to endogenously produced free radicals, and also may be of use in reducing damage due to exposure to physical and chemical mutagens and carcinogens which generate free radicals. 25 refs., 2 tabs.

  4. Involvement of prostaglandins and histamine in radiation-induced temperature responses in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kandasamy, S.B.; Hunt, W.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Exposure of rats to 1-15 Gy of gamma radiation induced hyperthermia, whereas exposure to 20-150 Gy produced hypothermia. Since radiation exposure induced the release of prostaglandins (PGs) and histamine, the role of PGs and histamine in radiation-induced temperature changes was examined. Radiation-induced hyper- and hypothermia were antagonized by pretreatment with indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor. Intracerebroventricular administration of PGE2 and PGD2 induced hyper- and hypothermia, respectively. Administration of SC-19220, a specific PGE2 antagonist, attenuated PGE2- and radiation-induced hyperthermia, but it did not antagonize PGD2- or radiation-induced hypothermia. Consistent with an apparent role of histamine in hypothermia, administration of disodium cromoglycate (a mast cell stabilizer), mepyramine (H1-receptor antagonist), or cimetidine (H2-receptor antagonist) attenuated PGD2- and radiation-induced hypothermia. These results suggest that radiation-induced hyperthermia is mediated via PGE2 and that radiation-induced hypothermia is mediated by another PG, possibly PGD2, via histamine.

  5. Benzydamine HCl, a new agent for the treatment of radiation mucositis of the oropharynx

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.H.; Chu, F.C.; Lakshmi, V.; Houde, R.

    1986-04-01

    Benzydamine HCl is a new nonsteroidal analgesic and anti-inflammatory compound which is not chemically related to local anesthetics such as procaine and xylocaine. A double-blind, randomized clinical investigation was carried out to determine the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effectiveness of benzydamine HCl in patients with radiation-induced mucositis of the oropharynx. Of the 67 patients in the study, 37 were on benzydamine and 30 on placebo. Patients developed radiation mucositis, hyperemia, and throat pain when the total radiation dose reached above 2000 rad over 2 weeks (200 rad per fraction, five treatments per week). Analysis of the data showed that benzydamine HCl used as a rinse/gargle provided a statistically significant and clinically meaningful alleviation of the symptoms of oropharyngeal mucositis. There was also significant improvement in terms of reduction in hyperemia and mucositis in benzydamine group. No systemic side effects associated with benzydamine medication were noted. In view of the relative ineffectiveness of systemic analgesics and topical anesthetics for these conditions, benzydamine HCl promises to be a useful addition to the therapeutic armamentarium.

  6. Using Drosophila Larval Imaginal Discs to Study Low-Dose Radiation-Induced Cell Cycle Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shian-Jang; Li, Willis X.

    2012-01-01

    Under genotoxic stress, activation of cell cycle checkpoint responses leads to cell cycle arrest, which allows cells to repair DNA damage before continuing to cycle. Drosophila larval epithelial sacs, called imaginal discs, are an excellent in vivo model system for studying radiation-induced cell cycle arrest. Larval imaginal discs go into cell cycle arrest after being subjected to low-dose irradiation, are subject to easy genetic manipulation, are not crucial for survival of the organism, and can be dissected easily for further molecular or cellular analysis. In this chapter, we describe methods for assessing low-dose irradiation-induced cell cycle arrest. Mitotic cells are identified by immunofluorescence staining for the mitotic marker phosphorylated histone H3 (phospho-histone H3 or pH3). When wandering third-instar control larvae, without transgene expression, are exposed to 500 rads of X-ray or γ-ray irradiation, the number of pH3-positive cells in wing imaginal discs is reduced from hundreds before irradiation to approximately 30 after irradiation, with an equal distribution between the anterior and posterior compartments (Yan et al., 2011, FASEB J). Using the GAL4/UAS system, RNAi, cDNA, or microRNA sponge transgenes can be expressed in the posterior compartment of the wing disc using drivers such as engrailed (en)-Gal4, while the anterior compartment serves as an internal control. This approach makes it possible to do genome-wide genetic screening for molecules involved in radiation-induced cell cycle arrest. PMID:21870287

  7. Protective effect of hydrogen-rich saline against radiation-induced immune dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Sanhu; Yang, Yanyong; Liu, Wen; Xuan, Zhiqiang; Wu, Shouming; Yu, Shunfei; Mei, Ke; Huang, Yijuan; Zhang, Pei; Cai, Jianming; Ni, Jin; Zhao, Yaoxian

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies showed that hydrogen can be used as an effective radioprotective agent through scavenging free radicals. This study was undertaken to evaluate the radioprotective effects of hydrogen on immune system in mice. H(2) was dissolved in physiological saline using an apparatus produced by our department. Spleen index and histological analysis were used to evaluate the splenic structural damage. Spleen superoxide dismutase, GSH, MDA were measured to appraise the antioxidant capacity and a DCF assay for the measurement of radical oxygen species. Cell apoptosis was evaluated by an Annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide staining method as well as the apoptotic proteins such as Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3 and c-caspase-3. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells subtypes were detected by flow cytometry with FITC-labelled antimouse CD4 and PE antimouse CD8 staining. Real-time PCR was utilized to determine the CD4+ T cell subtypes and related cytokines. Our study demonstrated that pre-treatment with H(2) could increase the spleen index and attenuate the radiation damage on splenic structure. Radical oxygen species level was also reduced by H(2) treatment. H(2) also inhibited radiation-induced apoptosis in splenocytes and down-regulated pro-apoptotic proteins in living mice. Radiation-induced imbalance of T cells was attenuated by H(2). Finally, we found that H(2) could regulate the polarization of CD4+ T cells and the level of related cytokines. This study suggests H(2) as an effective radioprotective agent on immune system by scavenging reactive oxygen species.

  8. Oxidative stress and gamma radiation-induced cancellous bone loss with musculoskeletal disuse

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Hisataka; Yumoto, Kenji; Alwood, Joshua S.; Mojarrab, Rose; Wang, Angela; Almeida, Eduardo A. C.; Searby, Nancy D.; Limoli, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure of astronauts in space to radiation during weightlessness may contribute to subsequent bone loss. Gamma irradiation of postpubertal mice rapidly increases the number of bone-resorbing osteoclasts and causes bone loss in cancellous tissue; similar changes occur in skeletal diseases associated with oxidative stress. Therefore, we hypothesized that increased oxidative stress mediates radiation-induced bone loss and that musculoskeletal disuse changes the sensitivity of cancellous tissue to radiation exposure. Musculoskeletal disuse by hindlimb unloading (1 or 2 wk) or total body gamma irradiation (1 or 2 Gy of 137Cs) of 4-mo-old, male C57BL/6 mice each decreased cancellous bone volume fraction in the proximal tibiae and lumbar vertebrae. The extent of radiation-induced acute cancellous bone loss in tibiae and lumbar vertebrae was similar in normally loaded and hindlimb-unloaded mice. Similarly, osteoclast surface in the tibiae increased 46% as a result of irradiation, 47% as a result of hindlimb unloading, and 64% as a result of irradiation + hindlimb unloading compared with normally loaded mice. Irradiation, but not hindlimb unloading, reduced viability and increased apoptosis of marrow cells and caused oxidative damage to lipids within mineralized tissue. Irradiation also stimulated generation of reactive oxygen species in marrow cells. Furthermore, injection of α-lipoic acid, an antioxidant, mitigated the acute bone loss caused by irradiation. Together, these results showed that disuse and gamma irradiation, alone or in combination, caused a similar degree of acute cancellous bone loss and shared a common cellular mechanism of increased bone resorption. Furthermore, irradiation, but not disuse, may increase the number of osteoclasts and the extent of acute bone loss via increased reactive oxygen species production and ensuing oxidative damage, implying different molecular mechanisms. The finding that α-lipoic acid protected cancellous tissue from the

  9. Protective effects of ulinastatin and methylprednisolone against radiation-induced lung injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yu; Du, Yu-Jun; Zhao, Hui; Zhang, Guo-Xing; Sun, Ni; Li, Xiu-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of ulinastatin and methylprednisolone in treating pathological changes in mice with radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) was evaluated. Forty C57BL/6 female mice received whole-chest radiation (1.5 Gy/min for 12 min) and were randomly allocated into Group R (single radiation, n = 10), Group U (ulinastatin treatment, n = 10), Group M (methylprednisolone treatment, n = 10), or Group UM (ulinastatin and methylprednisolone treatment, n = 10). Another 10 untreated mice served as controls (Group C). Pathological changes in lung tissue, pulmonary interstitial area density (PIAD) and expression levels of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) in lung tissue, serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were determined. Alleviation of pathological changes in lung tissue was observed in Groups U, M and UM. Treatment with ulinastatin, methylprednisolone or both effectively delayed the development of fibrosis at 12 weeks after radiation. Ulinastatin, methylprednisolone or both could alleviate the radiation-induced increase in the PIAD (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). Treatment with ulinastatin, methylprednisolone or both significantly reduced the expression of TNF-α, but not TGF-β1, at 9 weeks after radiation compared with Group R (P < 0.01). Ulinastatin and/or methylprednisolone effectively decreased the level of TNF-α in lung tissue after RILI and inhibited both the inflammatory response and the development of fibrosis. PMID:27342837

  10. 3D MR Sialography as a Tool to Investigate Radiation-Induced Xerostomia: Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Astreinidou, Eleftheria . E-mail: E.Astreinidou@umcutrecht.nl; Roesink, Judith M.; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J.; Bartels, Lambertus W.; Witkamp, Theo D.; Lagendijk, Jan J.W.; Terhaard, Chris H.J.

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether magnetic-resonance (MR) sialography can be used to investigate radiation-induced xerostomia. Preradiotherapy (pre-RT) and postradiotherapy (post-RT) MR sialographic images of the major salivary ducts (parotid and submandibular) were compared. Methods and Materials: Magnetic-resonance sialography was performed pre-RT, and 6 weeks and 6 months post-RT on 9 patients with T1-4N0-2M0 naso- or oropharyngeal tumors, on a 1.5-T MR scanner. Patients were positioned in the scanner, using a radiotherapy immobilization mask. Image registration of the MR sialograms pre- and post-RT with each other and with the CT and consequently the dose distribution was performed. A categorical scoring system was used to compare the visibility of ducts pre-RT and post-RT. Results: Good-quality MR sialographic images were obtained, and image registration was successful in all cases. The visibility score of the parotid ducts and submandibular ducts was reduced at 6 weeks post-RT, which means that the full trajectory of the salivary ducts, from the intraglandular space to the mouth cavity, was only partially visualized. For some of the parotid ducts, the visibility score improved at 6 months post-RT, but not for the submandibular ducts. The mean dose for the parotid glands was 35 Gy (1 standard deviation [SD] 3 Gy), and for the submandibular glands it was 62 Gy (SD, 8 Gy). Conclusion: Three-dimensional MR sialography is a promising approach for investigating xerostomia, because radiation-induced changes to the saliva content of the ducts can be visualized.

  11. Mucosal barrier injury, fever and infection in neutropenic patients with cancer: introducing the paradigm febrile mucositis.

    PubMed

    van der Velden, Walter J F M; Herbers, Alexandra H E; Netea, Mihai G; Blijlevens, Nicole M A

    2014-11-01

    Infection remains one of the most prominent complications after cytotoxic treatment for cancer. The connection between neutropenia and both infections and fever has long been designated as 'febrile neutropenia', but treatment with antimicrobial agents and haematopoietic growth factors has failed to significantly reduce its incidence. Moreover, emerging antimicrobial resistance is becoming a concern that necessitates the judicious use of available antimicrobial agents. In addition to neutropenia, patients who receive cytotoxic therapy experience mucosal barrier injury (MBI) or 'mucositis'. MBI creates a port-de-entrée for resident micro-organisms to cause blood stream infections and contributes directly to the occurrence of fever by disrupting the highly regulated host-microbe interactions, which, even in the absence of an infection, can result in strong inflammatory reactions. Indeed, MBI has been shown to be a pivotal factor in the occurrence of inflammatory complications after cytotoxic therapy. Hence, the concept 'febrile neutropenia' alone may no longer suffice and a new concept 'febrile mucositis' should be recognized as the two are at least complementary. This review we summarizes the existing evidence for both paradigms and proposes new therapeutic approaches to tackle the perturbed host-microbe interactions arising from cytotoxic therapy-induced tissue damage in order to reduce fever in neutropenic patients with cancer.

  12. Effect of epidermal growth factor against radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-wook; Jung, Kwon Il; Kim, Yeun Wha B.S.; Jung, Heun Don; Kim, Hyun Sook; Hong, Joon Pio . E-mail: joonphong@amc.seoul.kr

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: We tested the efficacy of oral recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) against radiation-induced oral mucositis in a rat model. Methods and Materials: Each of 35 Sprague-Dawley rats, 7 to 8 weeks of age and weighing 178 {+-} 5 grams, was irradiated once in the head region with 25 Gy, using a 4-MV therapeutic linear accelerator at a rate of 2 Gy/min. The irradiated rats were randomly divided into four groups: those receiving no treatment (Group 1), those treated with vehicle only three times per day (Group 2), and those treated with 50 {mu}g/mL (Group 3), or 100 {mu}g/mL (Group 4) rhEGF three times per day. Results: Rats were monitored for survival rate and daily activity, including hair loss, sensitivity, and anorexia. We found that survival rate and oral intake were significantly increased and histologic changes were significantly decreased in the rhEGF-treated rats. There was no difference, however, between rats treated with 50 {mu}g/mL or 100 {mu}g/mL rhEGF. Conclusion: These findings suggest that orally administered rhEGF decreased radiation-induced oral mucositis in rats.

  13. Outcome of Carotid Artery Stenting for Radiation-Induced Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Dorresteijn, Lucille; Vogels, Oscar; Leeuw, Frank-Erik de; Vos, Jan-Albert; Christiaans, Marleen H.; Ackerstaff, Rob; Kappelle, Arnoud C.

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Patients who have been irradiated at the neck have an increased risk of symptomatic stenosis of the carotid artery during follow-up. Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) can be a preferable alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy, which is associated with increased operative risks in these patients. Methods and Materials: We performed a prospective cohort study of 24 previously irradiated patients who underwent CAS for symptomatic carotid stenosis. We assessed periprocedural and nonprocedural events including transient ischemic attack (TIA), nondisabling stroke, disabling stoke, and death. Patency rates were evaluated on duplex ultrasound scans. Restenosis was defined as a stenosis of >50% at the stent location. Results: Periprocedural TIA rate was 8%, and periprocedural stroke (nondisabling) occurred in 4% of patients. After a mean follow-up of 3.3 years (range, 0.3-11.0 years), only one ipsilateral incident event (TIA) had occurred (4%). In 12% of patients, a contralateral incident event was present: one TIA (4%) and two strokes (12%, two disabling strokes). Restenosis was apparent in 17%, 33%, and 42% at 3, 12, and 24 months, respectively, although none of the patients with restenosed vessels became symptomatic. The length of the irradiation to CAS interval proved the only significant risk factor for restenosis. Conclusions: The results of CAS for radiation-induced carotid stenosis are favorable in terms of recurrence of cerebrovascular events at the CAS site.

  14. Interleukin-32 Positively Regulates Radiation-Induced Vascular Inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Hanako; Yazlovitskaya, Eugenia M.; Lin, P. Charles

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: To study the role of interleukin-32 (IL-32), a novel protein only detected in human tissues, in ionizing radiation (IR)-induced vascular inflammation. Methods and Materials: Irradiated (0-6 Gy) human umbilical vein endothelial cells treated with or without various agents-a cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) inhibitor, a cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) inhibitor, or lysophosphatidylcholines (LPCs)-were used to assess IL-32 expression by Northern blot analysis and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Expression of cell adhesion molecules and leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells using human acute monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1) cells was also analyzed. Results: Ionizing radiation dramatically increased IL-32 expression in vascular endothelial cells through multiple pathways. Ionizing radiation induced IL-32 expression through nuclear factor {kappa}B activation, through induction of cPLA2 and LPC, as well as induction of Cox-2 and subsequent conversion of arachidonic acid to prostacyclin. Conversely, blocking nuclear factor {kappa}B, cPLA2, and Cox-2 activity impaired IR-induced IL-32 expression. Importantly, IL-32 significantly enhanced IR-induced expression of vascular cell adhesion molecules and leukocyte adhesion on endothelial cells. Conclusion: This study identifies IL-32 as a positive regulator in IR-induced vascular inflammation, and neutralization of IL-32 may be beneficial in protecting from IR-induced inflammation.

  15. Gamma radiation induces hydrogen absorption by copper in water.

    PubMed

    Lousada, Cláudio M; Soroka, Inna L; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Tarakina, Nadezda V; Todoshchenko, Olga; Hänninen, Hannu; Korzhavyi, Pavel A; Jonsson, Mats

    2016-01-01

    One of the most intricate issues of nuclear power is the long-term safety of repositories for radioactive waste. These repositories can have an impact on future generations for a period of time orders of magnitude longer than any known civilization. Several countries have considered copper as an outer corrosion barrier for canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. Among the many processes that must be considered in the safety assessments, radiation induced processes constitute a key-component. Here we show that copper metal immersed in water uptakes considerable amounts of hydrogen when exposed to γ-radiation. Additionally we show that the amount of hydrogen absorbed by copper depends on the total dose of radiation. At a dose of 69 kGy the uptake of hydrogen by metallic copper is 7 orders of magnitude higher than when the absorption is driven by H2(g) at a pressure of 1 atm in a non-irradiated dry system. Moreover, irradiation of copper in water causes corrosion of the metal and the formation of a variety of surface cavities, nanoparticle deposits, and islands of needle-shaped crystals. Hence, radiation enhanced uptake of hydrogen by spent nuclear fuel encapsulating materials should be taken into account in the safety assessments of nuclear waste repositories. PMID:27086752

  16. Investigations of radiation-induced and carrier-enhanced conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meulenberg, A., Jr.; Parker, L. W.; Yadlowski, E. J.; Hazelton, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    A steady-state carrier computer code, PECK (Parker Enhanced Carrier Kinetics), that predicts the radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) produced in a dielectric by an electron beam was developed. The model, which assumes instantly-trapped holes, was then applied to experimental measurements on thin Kapton samples penetrated by an electron beam. Measurements at high bias were matched in the model by an appropriate choice for the trap-modulated electron mobility. A fractional split between front and rear currents measured at zone bias is explained on the basis of beam-scattering. The effects of carrier-enhanced conductivity (CEC) on data obtained for thick, free-surface Kapton samples is described by using an analytical model that incorporates field injection of carriers from the RIC region. The computer code, LWPCHARGE, modified for carrier transport, is also used to predict partial penetration effects associated with CEC in the unirradiated region. Experimental currents and surface voltages, when incorporated in the appropriate models, provide a value for the trap modulated mobility that is in essential agreement with the RIC results.

  17. Countermeasures for space radiation induced adverse biologic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, A. R.; Wan, X. S.

    2011-11-01

    Radiation exposure in space is expected to increase the risk of cancer and other adverse biological effects in astronauts. The types of space radiation of particular concern for astronaut health are protons and heavy ions known as high atomic number and high energy (HZE) particles. Recent studies have indicated that carcinogenesis induced by protons and HZE particles may be modifiable. We have been evaluating the effects of proton and HZE particle radiation in cultured human cells and animals for nearly a decade. Our results indicate that exposure to proton and HZE particle radiation increases oxidative stress, cytotoxicity, cataract development and malignant transformation in in vivo and/or in vitro experimental systems. We have also shown that these adverse biological effects can be prevented, at least partially, by treatment with antioxidants and some dietary supplements that are readily available and have favorable safety profiles. Some of the antioxidants and dietary supplements are effective in preventing radiation induced malignant transformation in vitro even when applied several days after the radiation exposure. Our recent progress is reviewed and discussed in the context of the relevant literature.

  18. Gamma radiation induced changes in nuclear waste glass containing Eu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, M.; Kadam, R. M.; Mishra, R. K.; Kaushik, C. P.; Tomar, B. S.; Godbole, S. V.

    2011-10-01

    Gamma radiation induced changes were investigated in sodium-barium borosilicate glasses containing Eu. The glass composition was similar to that of nuclear waste glasses used for vitrifying Trombay research reactor nuclear waste at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India. Photoluminescence (PL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques were used to study the speciation of the rare earth (RE) ion in the matrix before and after gamma irradiation. Judd-Ofelt ( J- O) analyses of the emission spectra were done before and after irradiation. The spin counting technique was employed to quantify the number of defect centres formed in the glass at the highest gamma dose studied. PL data suggested the stabilisation of the trivalent RE ion in the borosilicate glass matrix both before and after irradiation. It was also observed that, the RE ion distributes itself in two different environments in the irradiated glass. From the EPR data it was observed that, boron oxygen hole centre based radicals are the predominant defect centres produced in the glass after irradiation along with small amount of E’ centres. From the spin counting studies the concentration of defect centres in the glass was calculated to be 350 ppm at 900 kGy. This indicated the fact that bulk of the glass remained unaffected after gamma irradiation up to 900 kGy.

  19. Ionizing Radiation-Induced Cataract in Interventional Cardiology Staff

    PubMed Central

    Bitarafan Rajabi, Ahmad; Noohi, Feridoun; Hashemi, Hassan; Haghjoo, Majid; Miraftab, Mohammad; Yaghoobi, Nahid; Rastgou, Fereydon; Malek, Hadi; Faghihi, Hoshang; Firouzabadi, Hassan; Asgari, Soheila; Rezvan, Farhad; Khosravi, Hamidreza; Soroush, Sara; Khabazkhoob, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The use of ionizing radiation has led to advances in medical diagnosis and treatment. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the risk of radiation cataractogenesis in the interventionists and staff performing various procedures in different interventional laboratories. Patients and Methods: This cohort study included 81 interventional cardiology staff. According to the working site, they were classified into 5 groups. The control group comprised 14 professional nurses who did not work in the interventional sites. Participants were assigned for lens assessment by two independent trained ophthalmologists blinded to the study. Results: The electrophysiology laboratory staff received higher doses of ionizing radiation (17.2 ± 11.9 mSv; P < 0.001). There was a significant positive correlation between the years of working experience and effective dose in the lens (P < 0.001). In general, our findings showed that the incidence of lens opacity was 79% (95% CI, 69.9-88.1) in participants with exposure (the case group) and our findings showed that the incidence of lenses opacity was 7.1% (95% CI:2.3-22.6) with the relative risk (RR) of 11.06 (P < 0.001). Conclusions: We believe that the risk of radiation-induced cataract in cardiology interventionists and staff depends on their work site. As the radiation dose increases, the prevalence of posterior eye changes increases. PMID:25789258

  20. Gamma radiation induces hydrogen absorption by copper in water

    PubMed Central

    Lousada, Cláudio M.; Soroka, Inna L.; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Tarakina, Nadezda V.; Todoshchenko, Olga; Hänninen, Hannu; Korzhavyi, Pavel A.; Jonsson, Mats

    2016-01-01

    One of the most intricate issues of nuclear power is the long-term safety of repositories for radioactive waste. These repositories can have an impact on future generations for a period of time orders of magnitude longer than any known civilization. Several countries have considered copper as an outer corrosion barrier for canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. Among the many processes that must be considered in the safety assessments, radiation induced processes constitute a key-component. Here we show that copper metal immersed in water uptakes considerable amounts of hydrogen when exposed to γ-radiation. Additionally we show that the amount of hydrogen absorbed by copper depends on the total dose of radiation. At a dose of 69 kGy the uptake of hydrogen by metallic copper is 7 orders of magnitude higher than when the absorption is driven by H2(g) at a pressure of 1 atm in a non-irradiated dry system. Moreover, irradiation of copper in water causes corrosion of the metal and the formation of a variety of surface cavities, nanoparticle deposits, and islands of needle-shaped crystals. Hence, radiation enhanced uptake of hydrogen by spent nuclear fuel encapsulating materials should be taken into account in the safety assessments of nuclear waste repositories. PMID:27086752

  1. Gamma radiation induces hydrogen absorption by copper in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lousada, Cláudio M.; Soroka, Inna L.; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Tarakina, Nadezda V.; Todoshchenko, Olga; Hänninen, Hannu; Korzhavyi, Pavel A.; Jonsson, Mats

    2016-04-01

    One of the most intricate issues of nuclear power is the long-term safety of repositories for radioactive waste. These repositories can have an impact on future generations for a period of time orders of magnitude longer than any known civilization. Several countries have considered copper as an outer corrosion barrier for canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. Among the many processes that must be considered in the safety assessments, radiation induced processes constitute a key-component. Here we show that copper metal immersed in water uptakes considerable amounts of hydrogen when exposed to γ-radiation. Additionally we show that the amount of hydrogen absorbed by copper depends on the total dose of radiation. At a dose of 69 kGy the uptake of hydrogen by metallic copper is 7 orders of magnitude higher than when the absorption is driven by H2(g) at a pressure of 1 atm in a non-irradiated dry system. Moreover, irradiation of copper in water causes corrosion of the metal and the formation of a variety of surface cavities, nanoparticle deposits, and islands of needle-shaped crystals. Hence, radiation enhanced uptake of hydrogen by spent nuclear fuel encapsulating materials should be taken into account in the safety assessments of nuclear waste repositories.

  2. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability in human mammary epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, M.; Grossi, G. F.; Yang, T. C.

    Karyotypes of human cells surviving X- and alpha-irradiation have been studied. Human mammary epithelial cells of the immortal, non-tumorigenic cell line H184B5 F5-1 M/10 were irradiated and surviving clones isolated and expanded in culture. Cytogenetic analysis was performed using dedicated software with an image analyzer. We have found that both high- and low-LET radiation induced chromosomal instability in long-term cultures, but with different characteristics. Complex chromosomal rearrangements were observed after X-rays, while chromosome loss predominated after alpha-particles. Deletions were observed in both cases. In clones derived from cells exposed to alpha-particles, some cells showed extensive chromosome breaking and double minutes. Genomic instability was correlated to delayed reproductive death and neoplastic transformation. These results indicate that chromosomal instability is a radiation-quality-dependent effect which could determine late genetic effects, and should therefore be carefully considered in the evaluation of risk for space missions.

  3. Radiation-induced chromosome damage in astronauts' lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Testard, I; Ricoul, M; Hoffschir, F; Flury-Herard, A; Dutrillaux, B; Fedorenko, B; Gerasimenko, V; Sabatier, L

    1996-10-01

    The increased number of manned space missions has made it important to estimate the biological risks encountered by astronauts. As they are exposed to cosmic rays, especially ions with high linear energy transfer (LET), it is necessary to estimate the doses they receive. The most sensitive biological dosimetry used is based on the quantification of radiation-induced chromosome damage to human lymphocytes. After the space missions ANTARES (1992) and ALTAIR (1993), we performed cytogenetic analysis of blood samples from seven astronauts who had spent from 2 weeks to 6 months in space. After 2 or 3 weeks, the X-ray equivalent dose was found to be below the cytogenetic detection level of 20 mGy. After 6 months, the biological dose greatly varied among the astronauts, from 95 to 455 mGy equivalent dose. These doses are in the same range as those estimated by physical dosimetry (90 mGy absorbed dose and 180 mSv equivalent dose). Some blood cells exhibited the same cytogenetic pattern as the 'rogue cells' occasionally observed in controls, but with a higher frequency. We suggest that rogue cells might result from irradiation with high-LET particles of cosmic origin. However, the responsibility of such cells for the long-term effects of cosmic irradiation remains unknown and must be investigated. PMID:8862451

  4. Radiation-induced optic neuropathy: A magnetic resonance imaging study

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, J.; Mancuso, A.; Beck, R.; Moster, M.L.; Sedwick, L.A.; Quisling, R.G.; Rhoton, A.L. Jr.; Protzko, E.E.; Schiffman, J. )

    1991-03-01

    Optic neuropathy induced by radiation is an infrequent cause of delayed visual loss that may at times be difficult to differentiate from compression of the visual pathways by recurrent neoplasm. The authors describe six patients with this disorder who experienced loss of vision 6 to 36 months after neurological surgery and radiation therapy. Of the six patients in the series, two had a pituitary adenoma and one each had a metastatic melanoma, multiple myeloma, craniopharyngioma, and lymphoepithelioma. Visual acuity in the affected eyes ranged from 20/25 to no light perception. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed sellar and parasellar recurrence of both pituitary adenomas, but the intrinsic lesions of the optic nerves and optic chiasm induced by radiation were enhanced after gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid (DTPA) administration and were clearly distinguishable from the suprasellar compression of tumor. Repeated MR imaging showed spontaneous resolution of gadolinium-DTPA enhancement of the optic nerve in a patient who was initially suspected of harboring recurrence of a metastatic malignant melanoma as the cause of visual loss. The authors found the presumptive diagnosis of radiation-induced optic neuropathy facilitated by MR imaging with gadolinium-DTPA. This neuro-imaging procedure may help avert exploratory surgery in some patients with recurrent neoplasm in whom the etiology of visual loss is uncertain.

  5. Radiation-induced sarcomas of the chest wall

    SciTech Connect

    Souba, W.W.; McKenna, R.J. Jr.; Meis, J.; Benjamin, R.; Raymond, A.K.; Mountain, C.F.

    1986-02-01

    Sixteen patients are presented who had sarcomas of the chest wall at a site where a prior malignancy had been irradiated. The first malignancies included breast cancer (ten cases), Hodgkin's disease (four cases), and others (two cases). Radiation doses varied from 4200 to 5500 R (mean, 4900 R). The latency period ranged from 5 to 28 years (mean, 13 years). The histologic types of the radiation-induced sarcomas were as follows: malignant fibrous histiocytoma, nine cases; osteosarcoma, six cases; and malignant mesenchymoma, one case. The only long-term survivor is alive and well 12 years after resection of a clavicular chondroblastic osteosarcoma. Three cases were recently diagnosed. Despite aggressive multimodality treatment, the remaining 13 patients have all died from their sarcomas (mean survival, 13.5 months). All patients have apparently been cured of their first malignancies. Chemotherapy was ineffective. No treatment, including forequarter amputation, appeared to palliate the patients with supraclavicular soft tissue sarcomas. Major chest wall resection offered good palliation for seven of eight patients with sarcomas arising in the sternum or lateral chest wall. Close follow-up is needed to detect signs of these sarcomas in the ever-increasing number of patients receiving therapeutic irradiation.

  6. Mechanisms of radiation-induced neoplastic cell transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, T.C.H.; Tobias, C.A.

    1984-04-01

    Studies with cultured mammalian cells demonstrated clearly that radiation can transform cells directly and can enhance the cell transformation by oncogenic DNA viruses. In general, high-LET heavy-ion radiation can be more effective than X and gamma rays in inducing neoplastic cell transformation. Various experimental results indicate that radiation-induced DNA damage, most likely double-strand breaks, is important for both the initiation of cell transformation and for the enhancement of viral transformation. Some of the transformation and enhancement lesions can be repaired properly in the cell, and the amount of irrepairable lesions produced by a given dose depends on the quality of radiation. An inhibition of repair processes with chemical agents can increase the transformation frequency of cells exposed to radiation and/or oncogenic viruses, suggesting that repair mechanisms may play an important role in the radiation transformation. The progression of radiation-transformed cells appears to be a long and complicated process that can be modulated by some nonmutagenic chemical agents, e.g., DMSO. Normal cells can inhibit the expression of transforming properties of tumorigenic cells through an as yet unknown mechanism. The progression and expression of transformation may involve some epigenetic changes in the irradiated cells. 38 references, 15 figures, 1 table.

  7. Radiation induced destruction of thebaine, papaverine and noscapine in methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantoğlu, Ömer; Ergun, Ece

    2016-07-01

    The presence of methanol decreases the efficiency of radiation-induced decomposition of alkaloids in wastewater. Intermediate products were observed before the complete degradation of irradiated alkaloids. In order to identify the structure of the by-products and the formation pathway, thebaine, papaverine and noscapine solutions were prepared in pure methanol and irradiated using a 60Co gamma cell at absorbed doses of 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 30, 50 and 80 kGy. The dose-dependent alkaloid degradation and by-product formation were monitored by ESI mass spectrometer. Molecular structures of the by-products and reaction pathways were proposed. Oxygenated and methoxy group containing organic compounds was observed in the mass spectra of irradiated alkaloids. At initial dose values oxygenated by-products were formed due to the presence of dissolved oxygen in solutions. After the consumption of dissolved oxygen with radicals, the main mechanism was addition of solvent radicals to alkaloid structure. However, it was determined that alkaloids and by-products were completely degraded at doses higher than 50 kGy. The G-value and degradation efficiency of alkaloids were also evaluated.

  8. Radiation induced oxidative damage modification by cholesterol in liposomal membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, B. N.; Mishra, K. P.

    1999-05-01

    Ionizing radiation induced structural and chemical alterations in egg lecithin liposomal membrane have been studied by measurements of lipid peroxides, conjugated diene and fluorescence polarization. Predominantly unilamellar phospholipid vesicles prepared by sonication procedure were subjected to radiation doses of γ-rays from Co-60 in aerated, buffered aqueous suspensions. The oxidative damage in irradiated lipid molecules of liposomes has been determined spectrophotometrically by diene conjugate formation and thiobarbituric acid reactive (TBAR) method as a function of radiation dose. A correlation was found between the radiation dose applied (0.1-1 kGy) and the consequent lipid oxidation. The damage produced in irradiated liposomal membrane was measured by 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) fluorescence decay and polarization. The observed decrease in DPH fluorescence and increase in polarization was found dependent on the radiation dose suggesting alterations in rigidity or organizational order in phospholipid bilayer after irradiation. Furthermore, irradiated liposome vesicles composed of cholesterol showed marked reduction in observed radiation mediated peroxide formation and significantly affected the DPH fluorescence parameters. The magnitude of these modifying effects were found dependent on the mole fraction of cholesterol. It is concluded that modulation of structural order in unilamellar vesicle membrane by variations in basic molecular components controlled the magnitude of lipid peroxidation and diene conjugate formation. These observations contribute to our understanding of mechanism of radical reaction mediated damage caused by ionizing radiation in phospholipid membrane.

  9. Perinatal radiation-induced renal damage in the beagle

    SciTech Connect

    Jaenke, R.S.; Angleton, G.M. )

    1990-04-01

    The developing perinatal kidney is particularly sensitive to radiation. The pathogenesis of the radiation-induced lesion is related to the destruction of outer cortical developing nephrons and direct radiation injury with secondary hemodynamic alterations in remnant nephrons. In this study, which is part of a life span investigation of the effects of whole-body gamma radiation during prenatal and early postnatal life, dogs were given 0, 0.16, 0.83, or 1.25 Gy irradiation at either 55 days postcoitus or 2 days postpartum and were examined morphometrically and histopathologically at 70 days of age. Although irradiated dogs showed no reduction in the total number of nephrons per kidney, there was a significant increase in the total number and relative percentage of immature, dysplastic glomeruli. In addition, deeper cortical glomeruli of irradiated kidneys exhibited mesangial sclerosis similar to that associated with progressive renal failure in our previous studies. These findings are in accord with those reported at doses of 2.24 to 3.57 Gy and demonstrate that the perinatal kidney is affected by radiation doses much lower than previously demonstrated.

  10. Space-radiation-induced Photon Luminescence of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Thomas; Lee, Kerry

    2008-01-01

    We report on the results of a study of the photon luminescence of the Moon induced by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) and space radiation from the Sun, using the Monte Carlo program FLUKA. The model of the lunar surface is taken to be the chemical composition of soils found at various landing sites during the Apollo and Luna programs, averaged over all such sites to define a generic regolith for the present analysis. This then becomes the target that is bombarded by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) and Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) above 1 keV in FLUKA to determine the photon fluence albedo produced by the Moon's surface when there is no sunlight and Earthshine. This is to be distinguished from the gamma-ray spectrum produced by the radioactive decay of radiogenic constituents lying in the surface and interior of the Moon. From the photon fluence we derive the spectrum which can be utilized to examine existing lunar spectral data and to design orbiting instrumentation for measuring various components of the space-radiation-induced photon luminescence present on the Moon.

  11. Processability improvement of polyolefins through radiation-induced branching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Song; Phillips, Ed; Parks, Lewis

    2010-03-01

    Radiation-induced long-chain branching for the purpose of improving melt strength and hence the processability of polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene (PE) is reviewed. Long-chain branching without significant gel content can be created by low dose irradiation of PP or PE under different atmospheres, with or without multifunctional branching promoters. The creation of long-chain branching generally leads to improvement of melt strength, which in turn may be translated into processability improvement for specific applications in which melt strength plays an important role. In this paper, the changes of the melt flow rate and the melt strength of the irradiated polymer and the relationship between long-chain branching and melt strength are reviewed. The effects of the atmosphere and the branching promoter on long-chain branching vs. degradation are discussed. The benefits of improved melt strength on the processability, e.g., sag resistance and strain hardening, are illustrated. The implications on practical polymer processing applications such as foams and films are also discussed.

  12. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability in human mammary epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; Grossi, G. F.; Yang, T. C.

    1996-01-01

    Karyotypes of human cells surviving X- and alpha-irradiation have been studied. Human mammary epithelial cells of the immortal, non-tumorigenic cell line H184B5 F5-1 M/10 were irradiated and surviving clones isolated and expanded in culture. Cytogenetic analysis was performed using dedicated software with an image analyzer. We have found that both high- and low-LET radiation induced chromosomal instability in long-term cultures, but with different characteristics. Complex chromosomal rearrangements were observed after X-rays, while chromosome loss predominated after alpha-particles. Deletions were observed in both cases. In clones derived from cells exposed to alpha-particles, some cells showed extensive chromosome breaking and double minutes. Genomic instability was correlated to delayed reproductive death and neoplastic transformation. These results indicate that chromosomal instability is a radiation-quality-dependent effect which could determine late genetic effects, and should therefore be carefully considered in the evaluation of risk for space missions.

  13. Radiation induced thyroid neoplasms 1920 to 1987: A vanishing problem

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, M.P.; Goetowski, P.G.; Kinsella, T.J.

    1989-06-01

    Radiation for benign diseases has been implicated as an etiologic factor in thyroid cancer. From 1930-60, over 2 million children may have been exposed to therapeutic radiation and it is estimated that up to 7% may develop thyroid cancer after a 5-40 year latency. Thyroid stimulating hormone, secondary to radioinduced hypothyroidism, has been implicated as causative in animals. Such data has led to expensive screening programs in high risk patients. Because of a decline in irradiation for benign diseases in children over the last 2 decades, we questioned whether the incidence of radiation induced thyroid neoplasms (RITN) was also decreasing. Twenty-six of 227 patients (11%) with thyroid malignancies seen at our institution from 1974-87 had a history of previous head and neck irradiation. These included 13 papillary, 3 follicular, and 7 mixed carcinomas as well as 2 lymphomas and 1 synovial cell sarcoma. None of these 26 patients had abnormal thyroid function tests at presentation. Mean latency from irradiation to the diagnosis of thyroid cancer was 25.4 years (6-55 year range). Compared to the reported increasing incidence of RITN from 1940-70, there appears to be a significant decrease since 1970. Based on our analysis, the use of expensive screening programs in high risk populations may no longer be warranted. Additionally, the routine use of thyroid replacement in previously irradiated chemically hypothyroid patients is not recommended.30 references.

  14. Immunoglobulin Responses at the Mucosal Interface

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kang; Chorny, Alejo

    2011-01-01

    Mucosal surfaces are colonized by large communities of commensal bacteria and represent the primary site of entry for pathogenic agents. To prevent microbial intrusion, mucosal B cells release large amounts of immunoglobulin (Ig) molecules through multiple follicular and extrafollicular pathways. IgA is the most abundant antibody isotype in mucosal secretions and owes its success in frontline immunity to its ability to undergo transcytosis across epithelial cells. In addition to translocating IgA onto the mucosal surface, epithelial cells educate the mucosal immune system as to the composition of the local microbiota and instruct B cells to initiate IgA responses that generate immune protection while preserving immune homeostasis. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of the cellular interactions and signaling pathways governing IgA production at mucosal surfaces and discuss new findings on the regulation and function of mucosal IgD, the most enigmatic isotype of our mucosal antibody repertoire. PMID:21219173

  15. Toll-like Receptor 5 Agonist Protects Mice From Dermatitis and Oral Mucositis Caused by Local Radiation: Implications for Head-and-Neck Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Burdelya, Lyudmila G.; Gleiberman, Anatoli S.; Toshkov, Ilia; Aygun-Sunar, Semra; Bapardekar, Meghana; Manderscheid-Kern, Patricia; Bellnier, David; Krivokrysenko, Vadim I.; Feinstein, Elena; Gudkov, Andrei V.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Development of mucositis is a frequent side effect of radiotherapy of patients with head-and-neck cancer. We have recently reported that bacterial flagellin, an agonist of Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5), can protect rodents and primates from acute radiation syndrome caused by total body irradiation. Here we analyzed the radioprotective efficacy of TLR5 agonist under conditions of local, single dose or fractionated radiation treatment. Methods and Materials: Mice received either single-dose (10, 15, 20, or 25 Gy) or fractioned irradiation (cumulative dose up to 30 Gy) of the head-and-neck area with or without subcutaneous injection of pharmacologically optimized flagellin, CBLB502, 30 min before irradiation. Results: CBLB502 significantly reduced the severity of dermatitis and mucositis, accelerated tissue recovery, and reduced the extent of radiation induced weight loss in mice after a single dose of 15 or 20 Gy but not 25 Gy of radiation. CBLB502 was also protective from cumulative doses of 25 and 30 Gy delivered in two (10 + 15 Gy) or three (3 Multiplication-Sign 10 Gy) fractions, respectively. While providing protection to normal epithelia, CBLB502 did not affect the radiosensitivity of syngeneic squamous carcinoma SCCVII grown orthotopically in mice. Use of CBLB502 also elicited a radiation independent growth inhibitory effect upon TLR5-expressing tumors demonstrated in the mouse xenograft model of human lung adenocarcinoma A549. Conclusion: CBLB502 combines properties of supportive care (radiotherapy adjuvant) and anticancer agent, both mediated via activation of TLR5 signaling in the normal tissues or the tumor, respectively.

  16. Current Trends in the Management of Oral Mucositis Related to Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Biswal, Biswa Mohan

    2008-01-01

    Oral mucositis is one of the most common toxicities observed during radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment for cancers. Mucositis results in sore mouth, altered taste sensation, pain and dysphagia leading to malnutrition. Left untreated, oral mucositis leads to ulceration, orodental infection, bleeding and discontinuation of effective radiotherapy or chemotherapy. Frequent hospitalization, enteral or parenteral nutrition, increased demand for analgesics ultimately account for increased cost of healthcare. Quantification of oral mucositis using standardized grading system is important for appropriate evaluation, reporting and management. In the recent past there is a paradigm shift in the pathobiology of cancer therapy related mucositis. Clear understanding of its pathogenesis is essential for the formulation of effective mucositis care. Numerous drug therapies, radiation techniques and oral care protocols have been tried in the past to reduce oral mucositis, None have proven to be consistently effective. Current trends for the prevention and treatment of oral mucositis is multi-targeted treatment supplemented by aggressive oral hygiene, reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibitors, growth factors and use of specific topical agents to improve treatment of oral mucositis in future. PMID:22570584

  17. Immunology of Gut Mucosal Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Pasetti, Marcela F.; Simon, Jakub K.; Sztein, Marcelo B.; Levine, Myron M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Understanding the mechanisms underlying the induction of immunity in the gastrointestinal mucosa following oral immunization and the cross-talk between mucosal and systemic immunity should expedite the development of vaccines to diminish the global burden caused by enteric pathogens. Identifying an immunological correlate of protection in the course of field trials of efficacy, animal models (when available), or human challenge studies is also invaluable. In industrialized country populations, live attenuated vaccines (e.g. polio, typhoid, and rotavirus) mimic natural infection and generate robust protective immune responses. In contrast, a major challenge is to understand and overcome the barriers responsible for the diminished immunogenicity and efficacy of the same enteric vaccines in underprivileged populations in developing countries. Success in developing vaccines against some enteric pathogens has heretofore been elusive (e.g. Shigella). Different types of oral vaccines can selectively or inclusively elicit mucosal secretory immunoglobulin A and serum immunoglobulin G antibodies and a variety of cell-mediated immune responses. Areas of research that require acceleration include interaction between the gut innate immune system and the stimulation of adaptive immunity, development of safe yet effective mucosal adjuvants, better understanding of homing to the mucosa of immunologically relevant cells, and elicitation of mucosal immunologic memory. This review dissects the immune responses elicited in humans by enteric vaccines. PMID:21198669

  18. Management of a large mucosal defect after duodenal endoscopic resection

    PubMed Central

    Fujihara, Shintaro; Mori, Hirohito; Kobara, Hideki; Nishiyama, Noriko; Matsunaga, Tae; Ayaki, Maki; Yachida, Tatsuo; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Duodenal endoscopic resection is the most difficult type of endoscopic treatment in the gastrointestinal tract (GI) and is technically challenging because of anatomical specificities. In addition to these technical difficulties, this procedure is associated with a significantly higher rate of complication than endoscopic treatment in other parts of the GI tract. Postoperative delayed perforation and bleeding are hazardous complications, and emergency surgical intervention is sometimes required. Therefore, it is urgently necessary to establish a management protocol for preventing serious complications. For instance, the prophylactic closure of large mucosal defects after endoscopic resection may reduce the risk of hazardous complications. However, the size of mucosal defects after endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is relatively large compared with the size after endoscopic mucosal resection, making it impossible to achieve complete closure using only conventional clips. The over-the-scope clip and polyglycolic acid sheets with fibrin gel make it possible to close large mucosal defects after duodenal ESD. In addition to the combination of laparoscopic surgery and endoscopic resection, endoscopic full-thickness resection holds therapeutic potential for difficult duodenal lesions and may overcome the disadvantages of endoscopic resection in the near future. This review aims to summarize the complications and closure techniques of large mucosal defects and to highlight some directions for management after duodenal endoscopic treatment. PMID:27547003

  19. Potential Benefits of Oral Cryotherapy for Chemotherapy-Induced Mucositis.

    PubMed

    Wodzinski, Amelia

    2016-10-01

    Mucositis is a common side effect of cancer therapies that causes painful, erythematous lesions to develop in the gastrointestinal tract. These lesions can lead to malnutrition, increased risk for serious infection, prolonged hospital stays, and reduced quality of life. Oral cryotherapy, or the use of ice chips to cool the mucous membranes during bolus chemotherapy infusions (e.g., 5-fluorouracil [Adrucil®] and melphalan [Alkeran®]), is the most readily accessible and cost-effective intervention available. Although many factors may contribute to the development of mucositis during cancer treatment, studies have found a reduction in the incidence and the severity of mucositis with the use of oral cryotherapy.
. PMID:27668364

  20. Silencing Egr1 Attenuates Radiation-induced Apoptosis in Normal Tissues while Killing Cancer Cells and Delaying Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Diana Yi; Jacobs, Keith M; Hallahan, Dennis E; Thotala, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    Normal tissue toxicity reduces the therapeutic index of radiotherapy and decreases the quality of life for cancer survivors. Apoptosis is a key element of the radiation response in normal tissues like the hippocampus and small intestine, resulting in neurocognitive disorders and intestinal malabsorption. The Early Growth Response 1 (Egr1) transcription factor mediates radiation-induced apoptosis by activating the transcription of pro-apoptosis genes in response to ionizing radiation (IR). Therefore, we hypothesized that the genetic abrogation of Egr1 and the pharmacological inhibition of its transcriptional activity could attenuate radiation-induced apoptosis in normal tissues. We demonstrated that Egr1 null mice had less apoptosis in the hippocampus and intestine following irradiation as compared to their wild-type littermates. A similar result was achieved using Mithramycin A (MMA) to prevent binding of Egr1 to target promoters in the mouse intestine. Egr1 expression using shRNA dampened apoptosis and enhanced the clonogenic survival of irradiated HT22 hippocampal neuronal cells and IEC6 intestinal epithelial cells. Mechanistically, these events involved an abrogation of p53 induction by IR and an increase in the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax expression. In contrast, targeted silencing of Egr1 in two cancer cell lines (GL261 glioma cells, HCT116 colorectal cancer cells) was not radioprotective, since it reduced their growth while also sensitizing them to radiation-induced death. Further, Egr1 depletion delayed the growth of heterotopically implanted GL261 and HCT116 tumors. These results support the potential of silencing Egr1 in order to minimize the normal tissue complications associated with radiotherapy while enhancing tumor control. PMID:26206332

  1. Spectroscopic characterization of radiation-induced defects in gallium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qing

    Radiation damage studies of GaN provide insights into the fundamental properties of the material as well as the basic knowledge needed to predict degradation of GaN-based devices in space-based applications or other radiation environments. The main interests are in investigating the properties of radiation-induced defects at the microscopic level and providing data to evaluate the radiation hardness of the material. Selective damage of the N-sublattice is achieved with 0.42 MeV electron irradiation. Two new luminescence lines at 3.4732 eV and 3.4545 eV are detected by time-resolved photoluminescence after irradiation. The two lines are associated with the ground state bound exciton of a new donor B1 and its two-electron transition. The donor binding energy of B1 is determined as 24.9 +/- 0.4 meV, shallower than the impurity donors ON and Si Ga. Among the possible defects, the nitrogen vacancy (VN) is the best candidate for the new donor B1. In addition, a change under focused 267 nm laser beam is observed at cryogenic temperatures in the excitonic luminescence of the irradiated sample. The donor bound exciton intensity of ON and SiGa, the total band edge luminescence intensity, and the luminescence decay lifetime of free and bound excitons all increase with laser exposure time. In contrast, the relative intensity of the B 1 bound exciton emission decreases. The change is not observed with below bandgap illumination. We propose that the light-induced change reflects the illumination-assisted dissociation of non-radiative defect complexes O N-Ni and SiGa-Ni, and subsequently the migration of Ni and at least partial annihilation of N i at VN. The new donor B1 bound exciton emission and the light-induced change starts to disappear at annealing temperature around 300°C, indicating the annihilation of the irradiation-induced vacancy and interstitial defects. An activation energy of 1.5 eV is obtained, which is proposed to be the sum of the dissociation energy of the ON

  2. Radiation-Induced Phase Transformations in Ilmenite-Group Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J. N.

    1997-12-31

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a powerful tool for characterizing and understanding radiation-induced structural changes in materials. We have irradiated single crystals of ilmenite (FeTiO{sub 3}) and geikielite (MgTiO{sub 3}) using ions and electrons to better understand the response of complex oxides to radiation. Ion irradiation experiments of bulk single crystals at 100 K show that ilmenite amorphized at doses of less than 1x10(exp15) Ar(2+)/sq cm and at a damage level in the peak damage region of 1 displacement per atom (dpa). Transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction of a cross-sectioned portion of this crystal confirmed the formation of a 150 am thick amorphous layer. Geikielite proved to be more radiation resistant, requiring a flux of 2x10(exp 15) Xe(2+)/sq cm to induce amorphization at 100 K. This material did not amorphize at 470 K, despite a dose of 2.5 x10(exp 16) Xe(2+)/sq cm and a damage level as high as 25 dpa. Low temperature irradiations of electron- transparent crystals with 1 MeV Kr(+) also show that ilmenite amorphized after a damage level of 2.25 dpa at 175 K.Similar experiments on geikielite show that the microstructure is partially amorphous and partially crystalline after 10 dpa at 150 K. Concurrent ion and electron irradiation of both materials with 1 MeV Kr(+) and 0.9 MeV electrons produced dislocation loops in both materials, but no amorphous regions were formed. Differences in the radiation response of these isostructural oxides suggests that in systems with Mg-Fe solid solution, the Mg-rich compositions may be more resistant to structural changes.

  3. Radiation-induced grafting of acrylic acid onto polyethylene filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaji, K.; Okada, T.; Sakurada, I.

    Radiation-induced grafting of acrylic acid onto high density polyethylene (PE) filaments was carried out in order to raise softening temperature and impart flame retardance and hydrophilic properties. Mutual γ-irradiation method was employed for the grafting in a mixture of acrylic acid (AA), ethylene dichloride and water containing a small amount of ferrous ammonium sulfate. The rate of grafting was very low at room temperature. On the other hand, large percent grafts were obtained when the grafting was performed at an elevated temperature. Activation energy for the initial rate of grafting was found to be 17 {kcal}/{mol} between 20 and 60°C and 10 {kcal}/{mol} between 60 and 80°C. Original PE filament begins to shrink at 70°C, show maximum shrinkage of 50% at 130°C and then breaks off at 136°C. When a 34% AA graft is converted to metallic salt such as sodium and calcium, the graft filament retains its filament form even above 300°C and gives maximum shrinkage of 15%. Burning tests by a wire-netting basket method indicate that graft filaments and its metallic salts do not form melting drops upon burning and are self-extinguishing. Original PE filament shows no moisture absorption, however, that of AA-grafted PE increases with increasing graft percent. The sodium salt of 15% graft shows the same level of moisture regain as cotton. The AA-grafted PE filament and its metallic salts can be dyed with cationic dyes even at 1% graft. Tensile properties of PE filament is impaired neither by grafting nor by conversion to metallic salts.

  4. Role of PECAM-1 in radiation-induced liver inflammation.

    PubMed

    Malik, Ihtzaz Ahmed; Stange, Ina; Martius, Gesa; Cameron, Silke; Rave-Fränk, Margret; Hess, Clemens Friedrich; Ellenrieder, Volker; Wolff, Hendrik Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1, CD31) is known to play an important role in hepatic inflammation. Therefore, we investigated the role of PECAM-1 in wild-type (WT) and knock-out (KO)-mice after single-dose liver irradiation (25 Gy). Both, at mRNA and protein level, a time-dependent decrease in hepatic PECAM-1, corresponding to an increase in intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) (6 hrs) was detected in WT-mice after irradiation. Immunohistologically, an increased number of neutrophil granulocytes (NG) (but not of mononuclear phagocytes) was observed in the liver of WT and PECAM-1-KO mice at 6 hrs after irradiation. The number of recruited NG was higher and prolonged until 24 hrs in KO compared to WT-mice. Correspondingly, a significant induction of hepatic tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and CXC-chemokines (KC/CXCL1 interleukin-8/CXCL8) was detected together with an elevation of serum liver transaminases (6-24 hrs) in WT and KO-mice. Likewise, phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3) was observed in both animal groups after irradiation. The level of all investigated proteins as well as of the liver transaminases was significantly higher in KO than WT-mice. In the cell-line U937, irradiation led to a reduction in PECAM-1 in parallel to an increased ICAM-1 expression. TNF-α-blockage by anti-TNF-α prevented this change in both proteins in cell culture. Radiation-induced stress conditions induce a transient accumulation of granulocytes within the liver by down-regulation/absence of PECAM-1. It suggests that reduction/lack in PECAM-1 may lead to greater and prolonged inflammation which can be prevented by anti-TNFα. PMID:26177067

  5. Dosimetric Analysis of Radiation-Induced Gastric Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Mary; Normolle, Daniel; Pan, Charlie C.; Dawson, Laura A.; Amarnath, Sudha; Ensminger, William D.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Radiation-induced gastric bleeding has been poorly understood. In this study, we describe dosimetric predictors for gastric bleeding after fractionated radiotherapy and compare several predictive models. Materials & Methods The records of 139 sequential patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for intrahepatic malignancies between January 1999 and April 2002 were reviewed. Median follow-up was 7.4 months. Logistic regression and Lyman normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models for the occurrence of ≥ grade 3 gastric bleed were fit to the data. The principle of maximum likelihood was used to estimate parameters for all models. Results Sixteen of 116 evaluable patients (14%) developed gastric bleeds, at a median time of 4.0 months (mean 6.5 months, range 2.1–28.3 months) following completion of RT. The median and mean of the maximum doses to the stomach were 61 and 63 Gy (range 46 Gy–86 Gy), respectively, after bio-correction to equivalent 2 Gy daily fractions. The Lyman NTCP model with parameters adjusted for cirrhosis was most predictive of gastric bleed (AUROC=0.92). Best fit Lyman NTCP model parameters were n =0.10, and m =0.21, with TD50(normal) =56 Gy and TD50(cirrhosis) = 22 Gy. The low n value is consistent with the importance of maximum dose; a lower TD50 value for the cirrhosis patients points out their greater sensitivity. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the Lyman NTCP model has utility for predicting gastric bleeding, and that the presence of cirrhosis greatly increases this risk. These findings should facilitate the design of future clinical trials involving high-dose upper abdominal radiation. PMID:22541965

  6. Dosimetric Analysis of Radiation-induced Gastric Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Mary; Normolle, Daniel; Pan, Charlie C.; Dawson, Laura A.; Amarnath, Sudha; Ensminger, William D.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced gastric bleeding has been poorly understood. In this study, we described dosimetric predictors for gastric bleeding after fractionated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The records of 139 sequential patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for intrahepatic malignancies were reviewed. Median follow-up was 7.4 months. The parameters of a Lyman normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for the occurrence of {>=}grade 3 gastric bleed, adjusted for cirrhosis, were fitted to the data. The principle of maximum likelihood was used to estimate parameters for NTCP models. Results: Sixteen of 116 evaluable patients (14%) developed gastric bleeds at a median time of 4.0 months (mean, 6.5 months; range, 2.1-28.3 months) following completion of RT. The median and mean maximum doses to the stomach were 61 and 63 Gy (range, 46-86 Gy), respectively, after biocorrection of each part of the 3D dose distributions to equivalent 2-Gy daily fractions. The Lyman NTCP model with parameters adjusted for cirrhosis predicted gastric bleed. Best-fit Lyman NTCP model parameters were n=0.10 and m=0.21 and with TD{sub 50} (normal) = 56 Gy and TD{sub 50} (cirrhosis) = 22 Gy. The low n value is consistent with the importance of maximum dose; a lower TD{sub 50} value for the cirrhosis patients points out their greater sensitivity. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that the Lyman NTCP model has utility for predicting gastric bleeding and that the presence of cirrhosis greatly increases this risk. These findings should facilitate the design of future clinical trials involving high-dose upper abdominal radiation.

  7. Novel concepts in radiation-induced cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Cuomo, Jason R; Sharma, Gyanendra K; Conger, Preston D; Weintraub, Neal L

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced cardiovascular disease (RICVD) is the most common nonmalignant cause of morbidity and mortality among cancer survivors who have undergone mediastinal radiation therapy (RT). Cardiovascular complications include effusive or constrictive pericarditis, cardiomyopathy, valvular heart disease, and coronary/vascular disease. These are pathophysiologically distinct disease entities whose prevalence varies depending on the timing and extent of radiation exposure to the heart and great vessels. Although refinements in RT dosimetry and shielding will inevitably limit future cases of RICVD, the increasing number of long-term cancer survivors, including those treated with older higher-dose RT regimens, will ensure a steady flow of afflicted patients for the foreseeable future. Thus, there is a pressing need for enhanced understanding of the disease mechanisms, and improved detection methods and treatment strategies. Newly characterized mechanisms responsible for the establishment of chronic fibrosis, such as oxidative stress, inflammation and epigenetic modifications, are discussed and linked to potential treatments currently under study. Novel imaging modalities may serve as powerful screening tools in RICVD, and recent research and expert opinion advocating their use is introduced. Data arguing for the aggressive use of percutaneous interventions, such as transcutaneous valve replacement and drug-eluting stents, are examined and considered in the context of prior therapeutic approaches. RICVD and its treatment options are the subject of a rich and dynamic body of research, and patients who are at risk or suffering from this disease will benefit from the care of physicians with specialty expertise in the emerging field of cardio-oncology. PMID:27721934

  8. Mucosal healing in inflammatory bowel disease: treatment efficacy and predictive factors.

    PubMed

    Papi, Claudio; Fascì-Spurio, Federica; Rogai, Francesca; Settesoldi, Alessia; Margagnoni, Giovanna; Annese, Vito

    2013-12-01

    In recent years mucosal healing has emerged as an important therapeutic goal for patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Growing evidence suggests that achieving mucosal healing can improve patient outcomes and, potentially, alter the course of the disease. Drugs currently used in the management of inflammatory bowel disease are potentially able of inducing and maintaining mucosal healing, but the effect size is difficult to assess because of different definitions of mucosal healing, differences in study designs, and timing of endoscopic evaluation. Mucosal healing has been studied extensively in the biologic era. Data available from different sources, such as controlled trials and observational studies, show that anti-TNFα therapies can induce rapid and sustained mucosal healing in a variable percentage of patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colits. No controlled study has been designed to identify possible predictors of mucosal healing. Some clinical characteristics such as extensive disease, young age at diagnosis, and smoking status may be predictive of a more aggressive clinical course and, presumably, of a reduced clinical and endoscopic response to therapy. Changes and normalization of C-reactive protein and faecal calprotectin may be useful tools to predict outcomes, guide the timing for endoscopic evaluation and, possibly, reduce the need of endoscopic evaluation in assessing mucosal healing. PMID:24018244

  9. Primary mucosal melanomas: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Mihajlovic, Marija; Vlajkovic, Slobodan; Jovanovic, Predrag; Stefanovic, Vladisav

    2012-01-01

    Primary mucosal melanomas arise from melanocytes located in mucosal membranes lining respiratory, gastrointestinal and urogenital tract. Although a majority of mucosal melanomas originate from the mucosa of the nasal cavity and accessory sinuses, oral cavity, anorectum, vulva and vagina, they can arise in almost any part of mucosal membranes. Most of mucosal melanomas occur in occult sites, which together with the lack of early and specific signs contribute to late diagnosis, and poor prognosis. Because of their rareness the knowledge about their pathogenesis and risk factors is insufficient, and also there are not well established protocols for staging and treatment of mucosal melanomas. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment, with trends toward more conservative treatment since radical surgery did not show an advantage for survival. Radiotherapy can provide better local control in some locations, but did not show improvement in survival. There is no effective systemic therapy for these aggressive tumors. Compared with cutaneous and ocular melanoma, mucosal melanomas have lowest percent of five-year survival. Recently revealed molecular changes underlying mucosal melanomas offer new hope for development of more effective systemic therapy for mucosal melanomas. Herein we presented a comprehensive review of various locations of primary melanoma along mucosal membranes, their epidemiological and clinical features, and treatment options. We also gave a short comparison of some characteristics of cutaneous and mucosal melanomas. PMID:23071856

  10. The Mucosal Immune System of Teleost Fish

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Teleost fish possess an adaptive immune system associated with each of their mucosal body surfaces. Evidence obtained from mucosal vaccination and mucosal infection studies reveal that adaptive immune responses take place at the different mucosal surfaces of teleost. The main mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues (MALT) of teleosts are the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT), the gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT) and the recently discovered nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT). Teleost MALT includes diffuse B cells and T cells with specific phenotypes different from their systemic counterparts that have co-evolved to defend the microbe-rich mucosal environment. Both B and T cells respond to mucosal infection or vaccination. Specific antibody responses can be measured in the gills, gut and skin mucosal secretions of teleost fish following mucosal infection or vaccination. Rainbow trout studies have shown that IgT antibodies and IgT+ B cells are the predominant B cell subset in all MALT and respond in a compartmentalized manner to mucosal infection. Our current knowledge on adaptive immunity in teleosts is limited compared to the mammalian literature. New research tools and in vivo models are currently being developed in order to help reveal the great intricacy of teleost mucosal adaptive immunity and help improve mucosal vaccination protocols for use in aquaculture. PMID:26274978

  11. Preferential repair of ionizing radiation-induced damage in the transcribed strand of an active human gene is defective in Cockayne syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Leadon, S. A.; Cooper, P. K.

    1993-01-01

    Cells from patients with Cockayne syndrome (CS), which are sensitive to killing by UV although overall damage removal appears normal, are specifically defective in repair of UV damage in actively transcribed genes. Because several CS strains display cross-sensitivity to killing by ionizing radiation, we examined whether ionizing radiation-induced damage in active genes is preferentially repaired by normal cells and whether the radiosensitivity of CS cells can be explained by a defect in this process. We found that ionizing radiation-induced damage was repaired more rapidly in the transcriptionally active metallothionein IIA (MTIIA) gene than in the inactive MTIIB gene or in the genome overall in normal cells as a result of faster repair on the transcribed strand of MTIIA. Cells of the radiosensitive CS strain CS1AN are completely defective in this strand-selective repair of ionizing radiation-induced damage, although their overall repair rate appears normal. CS3BE cells, which are intermediate in radiosensitivity, do exhibit more rapid repair of the transcribed strand but at a reduced rate compared to normal cells. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A cells, which are hypersensitive to UV light because of a defect in the nucleotide excision repair pathway but do not show increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation, preferentially repair ionizing radiation-induced damage on the transcribed strand of MTIIA. Thus, the ability to rapidly repair ionizing radiation-induced damage in actively transcribing genes correlates with cell survival. Our results extend the generality of preferential repair in active genes to include damage other than bulky lesions. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8248136

  12. Potential Biomarkers for Radiation-Induced Renal Toxicity following 177Lu-Octreotate Administration in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schüler, Emil; Larsson, Maria; Parris, Toshima Z.; Johansson, Martin E.; Helou, Khalil; Forssell-Aronsson, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The kidneys are one of the main dose-limiting organs in peptide receptor radionuclide therapy and due to large inter-individual variations in renal toxicity, biomarkers are urgently needed in order to optimize therapy and reduce renal tissue damage. The aim of this study was to investigate the transcriptional, functional, and morphological effects on renal tissue after 177Lu-octreotate administration in normal mice, and to identify biomarkers for radiation induced renal toxicity. Methods C57BL/6N mice were i.v. injected with 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, or 150 MBq 177Lu-octreotate (0, 16, 29, 40, 48, and 54 Gy to the kidneys). At 4, 8, and 12 months after administration, radiation-induced effects were evaluated in relation to (a) global transcriptional variations in kidney tissues, (b) morphological changes in the kidneys, (c) changes in white and red blood cell count as well as blood levels of urea, and (d) changes in renal function using 99mTc-DTPA/99mTc-DMSA scintigraphy. Results In general, the highest number of differentially regulated transcripts was observed at 12 months after administration. The Cdkn1a, C3, Dbp, Lcn2, and Per2 genes displayed a distinct dose-dependent regulation, with increased expression level with increasing absorbed dose. Ifng, Tnf, and Il1B were identified as primary up-stream regulators of the recurrently regulated transcripts. Furthermore, previously proposed biomarkers for kidney injury and radiation damage were also observed. The functional investigation revealed reduced excretion of 99mTc-DTPA after 150 MBq, an increased uptake of 99mTc-DMSA at all dose levels compared with the controls, and markedly increased urea level in blood after 150 MBq at 12 months. Conclusion Distinct dose-response relationships were found for several of the regulated transcripts. The Cdkn1a, Dbp, Lcn2, and Per2 genes are proposed as biomarkers for 177Lu-octreotate exposure of kidney. Correlations to functional and morphological effects further confirm

  13. Involvement of ERK-Nrf-2 signaling in ionizing radiation induced cell death in normal and tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, Raghavendra S; Checker, Rahul; Sharma, Deepak; Sandur, Santosh K; Sainis, Krishna B

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged oxidative stress favors tumorigenic environment and inflammation. Oxidative stress may trigger redox adaptation mechanism(s) in tumor cells but not normal cells. This may increase levels of intracellular antioxidants and establish a new redox homeostasis. Nrf-2, a master regulator of battery of antioxidant genes is constitutively activated in many tumor cells. Here we show that, murine T cell lymphoma EL-4 cells show constitutive and inducible radioresistance via activation of Nrf-2/ERK pathway. EL-4 cells contained lower levels of ROS than their normal counterpart murine splenic lymphocytes. In response to radiation, the thiol redox circuits, GSH and thioredoxin were modified in EL-4 cells. Pharmacological inhibitors of ERK and Nrf-2 significantly enhanced radiosensitivity and reduced clonogenic potential of EL-4 cells. Unirradiated lymphoma cells showed nuclear accumulation of Nrf-2, upregulation of its dependent genes and protein levels. Interestingly, MEK inhibitor abrogated its nuclear translocation suggesting role of ERK in basal and radiation induced Nrf-2 activation in tumor cells. Double knockdown of ERK and Nrf-2 resulted in higher sensitivity to radiation induced cell death as compared to individual knockdown cells. Importantly, NF-kB which is reported to be constitutively active in many tumors was not present at basal levels in EL-4 cells and its inhibition did not influence radiosensitivity of EL-4 cells. Thus our results reveal that, tumor cells which are subjected to heightened oxidative stress employ master regulator cellular redox homeostasis Nrf-2 for prevention of radiation induced cell death. Our study reveals the molecular basis of tumor radioresistance and highlights role of Nrf-2 and ERK.

  14. Targets for, and consequences of, radiation-induced chromosomal instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Mark Isaac

    Chromosomal instability has been demonstrated in a human- hamster hybrid cell line, GM10115, after exposure to x- rays. Chromosomal instability in these cells is characterized by the appearance of novel chromosomal rearrangements multiple generations after exposure to ionizing radiation. To identify the cellular target(s) for radiation-induced chromosomal instability, cells were treated with 125I-labeled compounds. Labeling cells with 125I-iododeoxyuridine, which caused radiation damage to the DNA and associated nuclear structures, did induce chromosomal instability. While cell killing and first-division chromosomal rearrangements increased with increasing numbers of 125I decays, the frequency of chromosomal instability was independent of dose. Incorporation of an 125I-labeled protein, 125I-succinyl- concanavalin A, into either the plasma membrane or the cytoplasm, failed to elicit chromosomal instability. These results show that radiation damage to the nucleus, and not to extranuclear regions, contributes to the induction of chromosomal instability. To determine the role of DNA strand breaks as a molecular lesion responsible for initiating chromosomal instability, cells were treated with a variety of DNA strand breaking agents. Agents capable of producing complex DNA double strand breaks, including X-rays, Neocarzinostatin and bleomycin, were able to induce chromosomal instability. In contrast, double strand breaks produced by restriction endonucleases as well as DNA strand breaks produced by hydrogen peroxide failed to induce chromosomal instability. This demonstrates that the type of DNA breakage is important in the eventual manifestation of chromosomal instability. In order to understand the relationship between chromosomal instability and other end points of genomic instability, chromosomally stable and unstable clones were analyzed for sister chromatid exchange, delayed reproductive cell death, delayed mutation, mismatch repair and delayed gene amplification

  15. Radiation induced chemical activity at iron and copper oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiff, Sarah C.

    The radiolysis of three iron oxides, two copper oxides, and aluminum oxide with varying amounts of water were performed using gamma-rays and 5 MeV 4He ions. The adsorbed water on the surfaces was characterized using temperature programmed desorption and diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy, which indicated that all of the oxides had chemisorbed water on the surface. Physisorbed water was observed on the Fe2O 3 and Al2O3 surfaces as well. Molecular hydrogen was produced from adsorbed water only on Fe2O3 and Al 2O3, while the other compounds did not show any hydrogen production due to the low amounts of water on the surfaces. Slurries of varying amounts of water were also examined for hydrogen production, and they showed yields that were greater than the yield for bulk water. However, the yields of hydrogen from the copper compounds were much lower than those of the iron suggesting that the copper oxides are relatively inert to radiation induced damage to nearby water. X-ray diffraction measurements did not show any indication of changes to the bulk crystal structure due to radiolysis for any of the oxides. The surfaces of the oxides were analyzed using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). For the iron samples, FeO and Fe3O4, Raman spectroscopy revealed areas of Fe2O3 had formed following irradiation with He ions. XPS indicated the formation of a new oxygen species on the iron oxide surfaces. Raman spectroscopy of the copper oxides did not reveal any changes in the surface composition, however, XPS measurements showed a decrease in the amount of OH groups on the surface of Cu2O, while for the CuO samples the amount of OH groups were found to increase following radiolysis. Pristine Al2O3 showed the presence of a surface oxyhydroxide layer which was observed to decrease following radiolysis, consistent with the formation of molecular hydrogen.

  16. Radiation-induced osteosarcomas in the pediatric population

    SciTech Connect

    Koshy, Matthew; Paulino, Arnold C. . E-mail: apaulino@tmh.tmc.edu; Mai, Wei Y.; Teh, Bin S.

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: Radiation-induced osteosarcomas (R-OS) have historically been high-grade, locally invasive tumors with a poor prognosis. The purpose of this study was to perform a comprehensive literature review and analysis of reported cases dealing with R-OS in the pediatric population to identify the characteristics, prognostic factors, optimal treatment modalities, and overall survival of these patients. Methods and Materials: A MEDLINE/PubMed search of articles written in the English language dealing with OSs occurring after radiotherapy (RT) in the pediatric population yielded 30 studies from 1981 to 2004. Eligibility criteria included patients <21 years of age at the diagnosis of the primary cancer, cases satisfying the modified Cahan criteria, and information on treatment outcome. Factors analyzed included the type of primary cancer treated with RT, the radiation dose and beam energy, the latency period between RT and the development of R-OS, and the treatment, follow-up, and final outcome of R-OS. Results: The series included 109 patients with a median age at the diagnosis of primary cancer of 6 years (range, 0.08-21 years). The most common tumors treated with RT were Ewing's sarcoma (23.9%), rhabdomyosarcoma (17.4%), retinoblastoma (12.8%), Hodgkin's disease (9.2%), brain tumor (8.3%), and Wilms' tumor (6.4%). The median radiation dose was 47 Gy (range, 15-145 Gy). The median latency period from RT to the development of R-OS was 100 months (range, 36-636 months). The median follow-up after diagnosis of R-OS was 18 months (1-172 months). The 3- and 5-year cause-specific survival rate was 43.6% and 42.2%, respectively, and the 3- and 5-year overall survival rate was 41.7% and 40.2%, respectively. Variables, including age at RT, primary site, type of tumor treated with RT, total radiation dose, and latency period did not have a significant effect on survival. The 5-year cause-specific and overall survival rate for patients who received treatment for R-OS involving

  17. Radiation-Induced Topological Disorder in Irradiated Network Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, Linn W.

    2002-12-21

    This report summarizes results of a research program investigating the fundamental principles underlying the phenomenon of topological disordering in a radiation environment. This phenomenon is known popularly as amorphization, but is more formally described as a process of radiation-induced structural arrangement that leads in crystals to loss of long-range translational and orientational correlations and in glasses to analogous alteration of connectivity topologies. The program focus has been on a set compound ceramic solids with directed bonding exhibiting structures that can be described as networks. Such solids include SiO2, Si3N4, SiC, which are of interest to applications in fusion energy production, nuclear waste storage, and device manufacture involving ion implantation or use in radiation fields. The principal investigative tools comprise a combination of experimental diffraction-based techniques, topological modeling, and molecular-dynamics simulations that have proven a rich source of information in the preceding support period. The results from the present support period fall into three task areas. The first comprises enumeration of the rigidity constraints applying to (1) more complex ceramic structures (such as rutile, corundum, spinel and olivine structures) that exhibit multiply polytopic coordination units or multiple modes of connecting such units, (2) elemental solids (such as graphite, silicon and diamond) for which a correct choice of polytope is necessary to achieve correct representation of the constraints, and (3) compounds (such as spinel and silicon carbide) that exhibit chemical disorder on one or several sublattices. With correct identification of the topological constraints, a unique correlation is shown to exist between constraint and amorphizability which demonstrates that amorphization occurs at a critical constraint loss. The second task involves the application of molecular dynamics (MD) methods to topologically-generated models

  18. Mucosal Immunology of Food Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Berin, M. Cecilia; Sampson, Hugh A.

    2013-01-01

    Food allergies are increasing in prevalence at a higher rate than can be explained by genetic factors, suggesting a role for as yet unidentified environmental factors. In this review, we summarize the state of knowledge about the healthy immune response to antigens in the diet and the basis of immune deviation that results in IgE sensitization and allergic reactivity to foods. The intestinal epithelium forms the interface between the external environment and the mucosal immune system, and emerging data suggest that the interaction between intestinal epithelial cells and mucosal dendritic cells is of particular importance in determining the outcome of immune responses to dietary antigens. Exposure to food allergens through non-oral routes, in particular through the skin, is increasingly recognized as a potentially important factor in the increasing rate of food allergy. There are many open questions on the role of environmental factors such as dietary factors and microbiota in the development of food allergy, but data suggest that both have an important modulatory effect on the mucosal immune system. Finally, we discuss recent developments in our understanding of immune mechanisms of clinical manifestations of food allergy. New experimental tools, particularly in the field of genomics and microbiome, are likely to shed light on factors responsible for the growing clinical problem of food allergy. PMID:23660362

  19. Cryopreservation of Human Mucosal Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Zhiquan; Levy, Claire N.; Ferre, April L.; Hartig, Heather; Fang, Cifeng; Lentz, Gretchen; Fialkow, Michael; Kirby, Anna C.; Adams Waldorf, Kristina M.; Veazey, Ronald S.; Germann, Anja; von Briesen, Hagen; McElrath, M. Juliana; Dezzutti, Charlene S.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Baker, Chris A. R.; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Gao, Dayong; Hladik, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Background Understanding how leukocytes in the cervicovaginal and colorectal mucosae respond to pathogens, and how medical interventions affect these responses, is important for developing better tools to prevent HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. An effective cryopreservation protocol for these cells following their isolation will make studying them more feasible. Methods and Findings To find an optimal cryopreservation protocol for mucosal mononuclear leukocytes, we compared cryopreservation media and procedures using human vaginal leukocytes and confirmed our results with endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Specifically, we measured the recovery of viable vaginal T cells and macrophages after cryopreservation with different cryopreservation media and handling procedures. We found several cryopreservation media that led to recoveries above 75%. Limiting the number and volume of washes increased the fraction of cells recovered by 10–15%, possibly due to the small cell numbers in mucosal samples. We confirmed that our cryopreservation protocol also works well for both endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Cryopreserved leukocytes had slightly increased cytokine responses to antigenic stimulation relative to the same cells tested fresh. Additionally, we tested whether it is better to cryopreserve endocervical cells on the cytobrush or in suspension. Conclusions Leukocytes from cervicovaginal and colorectal tissues can be cryopreserved with good recovery of functional, viable cells using several different cryopreservation media. The number and volume of washes has an experimentally meaningful effect on the percentage of cells recovered. We provide a detailed, step-by-step protocol with best practices for cryopreservation of mucosal leukocytes. PMID:27232996

  20. Blunted inflammatory and mucosal IgA responses to pneumonia virus of mice in C57BL/6 neonates are correlated to reduced protective immunity upon re-infection as elderly mice.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Pratima; Atanley, Ethel; Sarkar, Indranil; Watkiss, Ellen; Gomis, Susantha; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia

    2015-11-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus is a major cause of bronchiolitis in infants and pneumonia virus of mice (PVM) causes similar disease in mice. The impact of PVM infection in BALB/c and C57BL/6 neonates, and upon re-infection as elderly mice, was compared. As previously shown for adult mice, PVM caused more disease in BALB/c than in C57BL/6 neonates. After PVM-15 infection BALB/c neonates showed higher production of inflammatory mediators, more influx of plasmacytoid dendritic cells and higher IFN-α expression, and more IgA in the lungs than C57BL/6 neonates. After re-infection as elderly, BALB/c mice developed virus neutralizing antibodies in serum and lung, and were protected from clinical disease, whereas C57BL/6 mice did not develop an anamnestic response and were not protected. These results suggest that an effective local innate response, as well as priming of mucosal adaptive responses in neonates after PVM-15 infection is correlated to decreased susceptibility and protection upon re-infection.

  1. Using dose-surface maps to predict radiation-induced rectal bleeding: a neural network approach.

    PubMed

    Buettner, Florian; Gulliford, Sarah L; Webb, Steve; Partridge, Mike

    2009-09-01

    The incidence of late-toxicities after radiotherapy can be modelled based on the dose delivered to the organ under consideration. Most predictive models reduce the dose distribution to a set of dose-volume parameters and do not take the spatial distribution of the dose into account. The aim of this study was to develop a classifier predicting radiation-induced rectal bleeding using all available information on the dose to the rectal wall. The dose was projected on a two-dimensional dose-surface map (DSM) by virtual rectum-unfolding. These DSMs were used as inputs for a classification method based on locally connected neural networks. In contrast to fully connected conventional neural nets, locally connected nets take the topology of the input into account. In order to train the nets, data from 329 patients from the RT01 trial (ISRCTN 47772397) were split into ten roughly equal parts. By using nine of these parts as a training set and the remaining part as an independent test set, a ten-fold cross-validation was performed. Ensemble learning was used and 250 nets were built from randomly selected patients from the training set. Out of these 250 nets, an ensemble of expert nets was chosen. The performances of the full ensemble and of the expert ensemble were quantified by using receiver-operator-characteristic (ROC) curves. In order to quantify the predictive power of the shape, ensembles of fully connected conventional neural nets based on dose-surface histograms (DSHs) were generated and their performances were quantified. The expert ensembles performed better than or equally as well as the full ensembles. The area under the ROC curve for the DSM-based expert ensemble was 0.64. The area under the ROC curve for the DSH-based expert ensemble equalled 0.59. This difference in performance indicates that not only volumetric, but also morphological aspects of the dose distribution are correlated to rectal bleeding after radiotherapy. Thus, the shape of the dose

  2. Using dose-surface maps to predict radiation-induced rectal bleeding: a neural network approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buettner, Florian; Gulliford, Sarah L.; Webb, Steve; Partridge, Mike

    2009-09-01

    The incidence of late-toxicities after radiotherapy can be modelled based on the dose delivered to the organ under consideration. Most predictive models reduce the dose distribution to a set of dose-volume parameters and do not take the spatial distribution of the dose into account. The aim of this study was to develop a classifier predicting radiation-induced rectal bleeding using all available information on the dose to the rectal wall. The dose was projected on a two-dimensional dose-surface map (DSM) by virtual rectum-unfolding. These DSMs were used as inputs for a classification method based on locally connected neural networks. In contrast to fully connected conventional neural nets, locally connected nets take the topology of the input into account. In order to train the nets, data from 329 patients from the RT01 trial (ISRCTN 47772397) were split into ten roughly equal parts. By using nine of these parts as a training set and the remaining part as an independent test set, a ten-fold cross-validation was performed. Ensemble learning was used and 250 nets were built from randomly selected patients from the training set. Out of these 250 nets, an ensemble of expert nets was chosen. The performances of the full ensemble and of the expert ensemble were quantified by using receiver-operator-characteristic (ROC) curves. In order to quantify the predictive power of the shape, ensembles of fully connected conventional neural nets based on dose-surface histograms (DSHs) were generated and their performances were quantified. The expert ensembles performed better than or equally as well as the full ensembles. The area under the ROC curve for the DSM-based expert ensemble was 0.64. The area under the ROC curve for the DSH-based expert ensemble equalled 0.59. This difference in performance indicates that not only volumetric, but also morphological aspects of the dose distribution are correlated to rectal bleeding after radiotherapy. Thus, the shape of the dose

  3. Simulating and Detecting Radiation-Induced Errors for Onboard Machine Learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.; Bornstein, Benjamin; Granat, Robert; Tang, Benyang; Turmon, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Spacecraft processors and memory are subjected to high radiation doses and therefore employ radiation-hardened components. However, these components are orders of magnitude more expensive than typical desktop components, and they lag years behind in terms of speed and size. We have integrated algorithm-based fault tolerance (ABFT) methods into onboard data analysis algorithms to detect radiation-induced errors, which ultimately may permit the use of spacecraft memory that need not be fully hardened, reducing cost and increasing capability at the same time. We have also developed a lightweight software radiation simulator, BITFLIPS, that permits evaluation of error detection strategies in a controlled fashion, including the specification of the radiation rate and selective exposure of individual data structures. Using BITFLIPS, we evaluated our error detection methods when using a support vector machine to analyze data collected by the Mars Odyssey spacecraft. We found ABFT error detection for matrix multiplication is very successful, while error detection for Gaussian kernel computation still has room for improvement.

  4. The Effects of Fenugreek on Radiation Induced Toxicity for Human Blood T-Cells in Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, Mohamed Bagher; Kiani, Ali; Roayaei, Mahnaz

    2015-01-01

    Many cellular damages either in normal or cancerous tissues are the outcome of molecular events affected by ionizing radiation. T-cells are the most important among immune system agents and are used for biological radiation dose measurement in recommended standard methods. The herbs with immune modulating properties may be useful to reduce the risk of the damages and subsequently the diseases. The T-cells as the most important immune cells being targeted for biological dosimetry of radiation. This study proposes a flowcytometric-method based on fluorescein isothiocyanate- and propidium iodide (PI)-labeled annexin-V to assess apoptosis in blood T-cells after irradiation in both presence and absence of fenugreek extract. T-cells peripheral blood lymphocyte isolated from blood samples of healthy individuals with no irradiated job background. The media of cultured cells was irradiated 1-h after the fenugreek extract was added. The number of apoptotic cells was assessed by annexin-V protocol and multicolor flowcytometry. An obvious variation in apoptotic cells number was observed in presence of fenugreek extract (>80%). The results suggest that fenugreek extract can potentiate the radiation induced apoptosis or radiation toxicity in blood T-cells (P < 0.05). PMID:26284174

  5. Effect of alpha-lipoic acid on radiation-induced small intestine injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Bae Kwon; Song, Jin Ho; Jeong, Hojin; Choi, Hoon Sik; Jung, Jung Hwa; Hahm, Jong Ryeal; Woo, Seung Hoon; Jung, Myeong Hee; Choi, Bong-Hoi; Kim, Jin Hyun; Kang, Ki Mun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Radiation therapy is a highly effective treatment for patients with solid tumors. However, it can cause damage and inflammation in normal tissues. Here, we investigated the effects of alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) as radioprotection agent for the small intestine in a mouse model. Materials and Methods Whole abdomen was evenly irradiated with total a dose of 15 Gy. Mice were treated with either ALA (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection [i.p.]) or saline (equal volume, i.p.) the prior to radiation as 100 mg/kg/day for 3 days. Body weight, food intake, histopathology, and biochemical parameters were evaluated. Results Significant differences in body weight and food intake were observed between the radiation (RT) and ALA + RT groups. Moreover, the number of crypt cells was higher in the ALA + RT group. Inflammation was decreased and recovery time was shortened in the ALA + RT group compared with the RT group. The levels of inflammation-related factors (i.e., phosphorylated nuclear factor kappa B and matrix metalloproteinase-9) and mitogen-activated protein kinases were significantly decreased in the ALA + RT group compared with those in the RT group. Conclusions ALA treatment prior to radiation decreases the severity and duration of radiation-induced enteritis by reducing inflammation, oxidative stress, and cell death. PMID:26943777

  6. Resistance of human erythrocytes containing elevated levels of vitamin E to radiation-induced hemolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.A.

    1983-08-01

    Human erythrocytes were isolated from the blood of healthy donors and then incubated in the presence of suspensions of alpha-tocopherol for 30 min at 37 degrees C. Unabsorbed tocopherol was removed by centrifugation using several washes of isotonic phosphate-buffered saline. Washed erythrocytes were resuspended to 0.05%. Hct and exposed to hemolyzing doses of /sup 60/Co gamma radiation, and hemolysis was monitored continuously by light scattering at 700 nm in a recording spectrophotometer. The extent of hemolysis with time was sigmoid and data analysis was carried out on the time taken for 50% hemolysis to occur (t50%). The vitamin E content of erythrocytes was significantly elevated by the incubation procedure and resulted in the cells exhibiting a significantly increased resistance to hemolysis as reflected by the extended t50% values. Oral supplementation of 500 IU of vitamin E per day to eight normal human subjects for a period of 16 days also resulted in their washed erythrocytes exhibiting a significant increase in resistance to radiation-induced hemolysis. When comparing vitamin E incubated cells with control cells, both the dose-reducing factor (DRF) and the time for 50% hemolysis quotient (Qt50%) were observed to increase with increasing radiation dose.

  7. Resistance of human erythrocytes containing elevated levels of vitamin E to radiation-induced hemolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.A.

    1983-08-01

    Human erythrocytes were isolated from the blood of healthy donors and then incubated in the presence of suspensions of ..cap alpha..-tocopherol for 30 min at 37/sup 0/C. Unabsorbed tocopherol was removed by centrifugation using several washes of isotonic phosphate-buffered saline. Washed erythrocytes were resuspended to 0.05% Hct and exposed to hemolyzing doses of /sup 60/Co gamma radiation, and hemolysis was monitored continuously by light scattering at 700 nm in a recording spectrophotometer. The extent of hemolysis with time was sigmoid and data analysis was carried out on the time taken for 50% hemolysis to occur (t/sub 50%/). The vitamin E content of erythrocytes was significantly elevated by the incubation procedure and resulted in the cells exhibiting a significantly increased resistance to hemolysis as reflected by the extended t/sub 50%/ values. Oral supplementation of 500 IU of vitamin E per day to eight normal human subjects for a period of 16 days also resulted in their washed erythrocytes exhibiting a significant increase in resistance to radiation-induced hemolysis. When comparing vitamin E incubated cells with control cells, both the dose-reducing factor (DRF) and the time for 50% hemolysis quotient (Qt/sub 50%/) were observed to increase with increasing radiation dose.

  8. The effect of environmental humidity on radiation-induced degradation of carrageenans.

    PubMed

    Sen, Murat; Toprak, Deniz; Güven, Olgun

    2014-12-19

    Better understanding of the chemistry of radiation-induced degradation is becoming of increasing importance on account of the utilization of polymeric materials in a variety of radiation environments as well as beneficial uses of degraded polymers. In this report the importance of environmental humidity on the degrading effect of radiation has been considered from the point of view of controlling the molecular weights of kappa- and iota-carrageenans. These two polysaccharides were irradiated in solid form under strictly controlled environmental humidity conditions by incubating and later irradiating the samples over saturated aqueous salt solutions of NaCl, NaNO3 and MgCl2. The degradation was followed in detail by a careful gel permeation chromatographic analysis of their respective molecular weights before and after irradiation. The chain scission yield values G(S) were found to decrease with the water adsorbed from environment at every absorbed dose in the range of 5-100 kGy. On the other hand at very high water uptakes the yield of chain scission again increases especially at low doses. The decrease in degradation yield was attributed to the plastifying effect of water trapped in between the polymer chains facilitating the macroradical recombinations thus reducing the extent of chain scission. This study showed that although carrageenans were irradiated in solid form, the difference in their water uptake from changing environmental humidity has a profound effect in controlling their molecular weights by irradiation with ionizing radiation.

  9. Effect of solvents on the radiation-induced polymerization of ethyl and isopropyl vinyl ethers

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, W.C.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of solvents on the radiation-induced cationic polymerization of ethyl and isopropyl vinyl ethers (EVE and IPVE, respectively) was investigated. EVE and IPVE polymerizations were carried out in bulk and in solution under superdry conditions in which polar impurities, especially water, have been reduced to negligible levels. This was accomplished by means of a sodium mirror technique using joint free baked out glass equipment and high vacuum. Plots of the monomer conversions and irradiation times were obtained for EVE and IPVE polymerizations in bulk and in benzene solution at constant monomer concentrations. The monomer concentration dependence of the polymerization rate was studied for EVE polymerization in bulk and in benzene, diethlyl ether, diglyme and methylene chloride, and for IPVE polymerization in bulk and in benzene. Solvent effect on the estimated propagating rate constants was examined for EVE and IPVE polymerization in bulk and in solution. The effect of temperature on the polymerization rate was also investigated for EVE polymerization in bulk ad in benzene, diethyl and diisopropyl ethers, methylene chloride and nitromethane, and for IPVE ploymerization in bulk and in benzene.

  10. Gamma Radiation-Induced Damage in the Zinc Finger of the Transcription Factor IIIA

    PubMed Central

    Miao, YuJi; Hu, XiaoDan; Min, Rui; Liu, PeiDang; Zhang, HaiQian

    2016-01-01

    A zinc finger motif is an element of proteins that can specifically recognize and bind to DNA. Because they contain multiple cysteine residues, zinc finger motifs possess redox properties. Ionizing radiation generates a variety of free radicals in organisms. Zinc finger motifs, therefore, may be a target of ionizing radiation. The effect of gamma radiation on the zinc finger motifs in transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA), a zinc finger protein, was investigated. TFIIIA was exposed to different gamma doses from 60Co sources. The dose rates were 0.20 Gy/min and 800 Gy/h, respectively. The binding capacity of zinc finger motifs in TFIIIA was determined using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. We found that 1000 Gy of gamma radiation impaired the function of the zinc finger motifs in TFIIIA. The sites of radiation-induced damage in the zinc finger were the thiol groups of cysteine residues and zinc (II) ions. The thiol groups were oxidized to form disulfide bonds and the zinc (II) ions were indicated to be reduced to zinc atoms. These results indicate that the zinc finger motif is a target domain for gamma radiation, which may decrease 5S rRNA expression via impairment of the zinc finger motifs in TFIIIA. PMID:27803644

  11. Radiation-induced cardiomyopathy as a function of radiation beam gating to the cardiac cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladstone, David J.; Flanagan, Michael F.; Southworth, Jean B.; Hadley, Vaughn; Thibualt, Melissa Wei; Hug, Eugen B.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2004-04-01

    Portions of the heart are often unavoidably included in the primary treatment volume during thoracic radiotherapy, and radiation-induced heart disease has been observed as a treatment-related complication. Such complications have been observed in humans following radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease and treatment of the left breast for carcinoma. Recent attempts have been made to prevent re-stenosis following angioplasty procedures using external beam irradiation. These attempts were not successful, however, due to the large volume of heart included in the treatment field and subsequent cardiac morbidity. We suggest a mechanism for sparing the heart from radiation damage by synchronizing the radiation beam with the cardiac cycle and delivering radiation only when the heart is in a relatively hypoxic state. We present data from a rat model testing this hypothesis and show that radiation damage to the heart can be altered by synchronizing the radiation beam with the cardiac cycle. This technique may be useful in reducing radiation damage to the heart secondary to treatment for diseases such as Hodgkin's disease and breast cancer.

  12. Advances and challenges in mucosal adjuvant technology.

    PubMed

    Newsted, Daniel; Fallahi, Firouzeh; Golshani, Ashkan; Azizi, Ali

    2015-05-15

    Adjuvants play attractive roles in enhancement of immune response during vaccination; however, due to several challenges, only a limited number of adjuvants are licensed by health authorities. The lack of an effective mucosal adjuvant is even more significant as none of the licensed adjuvants revealed a strong enhancement in immune system after mucosal administration. Over the past two decades, several mucosal adjuvants have been developed to deliver antigens to the target cells in the mucosal immune system and increase specific immune responses. However, the safety and efficacy of these adjuvants for testing in human trials is still an important issue, requiring further study. In this article, we briefly review the challenges associated with most common mucosal adjuvants and discuss potential strategies for targeting the mucosal immune system.

  13. Assessment of mucosal immunity to HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Jespers, Vicky; Harandi, Ali M; Hinkula, Jorma; Medaglini, Donata; Le Grand, Roger; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane; Bogers, Willy; El Habib, Raphaelle; Wegmann, Frank; Fraser, Carol; Cranage, Martin; Shattock, Robin J; Spetz, Anna-Lena

    2010-04-01

    A key gap in the development and evaluation of HIV-1 vaccines is insufficient knowledge with regard to sampling techniques and assessment of mucosal immune responses required for early prevention and inhibition of viral dissemination. In an attempt to start bridging this gap, the EUROPRISE network of scientists working on HIV-1 vaccine and microbicide research organized a workshop with the aim to review the types of mucosal responses/biomarkers currently measured in mucosal immunology and to define how the mucosal responses/biomarkers are measured and/or the assays and sampling methods used. The Workshop addressed two critical questions: first whether, with current knowledge, it would be possible to define a consensus set of mucosal sampling methods to facilitate cross-species comparisons and ensure standardized implementation in clinical trials; second to determine the remaining challenges (technical and logistical) and their possible solutions for assessing mucosal responses to HIV-1 vaccines. PMID:20370549

  14. Synchrotron-Radiation Induced X-Ray Emission (SRIXE)

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Keith W.

    1999-09-01

    and increase in scientific use can be maintained for the synchrotron x-ray source. A short summary of the present state of the synchrotron radiation-induced x-ray emission (SRIXE) method is presented here. Basically, SRIXE experiments can include any that depend on the detection. of characteristic x-rays produced by the incident x-ray beam born the synchrotron source as they interact with a sample. Thus, experiments done to measure elemental composition, chemical state, crystal, structure, and other sample parameters can be considered in a discussion of SRIXE. It is also clear that the experimentalist may well wish to use a variety of complementary techniques for study of a given sample. For this reason, discussion of computed microtomography (CMT) and x-ray diffraction is included here. It is hoped that this present discussion will serve as a succinct introduction to the basic ideas of SRIXE for those not working in the field and possibly help to stimulate new types of work by those starting in the field as well as by experienced practitioners of the art. The topics covered include short descriptions of (1) the properties of synchrotron radiation, (2) a description of facilities used for its production, (3) collimated microprobe, (4) focused microprobes, (5) continuum and monoenergetic excitation, (6) detection limits, (7) quantitation, (8) applications of SRIXE, (9) computed microtomography (CMT), and (10)chemical speciation using x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). An effort has been made to cite a wide variety of work from different laboratories to show the vital nature of the field.

  15. Image-based modeling of radiation-induced foci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costes, Sylvain; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ponomarev, Artem; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Chen, James; Chou, William; Gascard, Philippe

    Several proteins involved in the response to DNA double strand breaks (DSB) form microscopically visible nuclear domains, or foci, after exposure to ionizing radiation. Radiation-induced foci (RIF) are believed to be located where DNA damage occurs. To test this assumption, we used Monte Carlo simulations to predict the spatial distribution of DSB in human nuclei exposed to high or low-LET radiation. We then compared these predictions to the distribution patterns of three DNA damage sensing proteins, i.e. 53BP1, phosphorylated ATM and γH2AX in human mammary epithelial. The probability to induce DSB can be derived from DNA fragment data measured experimentally by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. We first used this probability in Monte Carlo simulations to predict DSB locations in synthetic nuclei geometrically described by a complete set of human chromosomes, taking into account microscope optics from real experiments. Simulations showed a very good agreement for high-LET, predicting 0.7 foci/µm along the path of a 1 GeV/amu Fe particle against measurement of 0.69 to 0.82 foci/µm for various RIF 5 min following exposure (LET 150 keV/µm). On the other hand, discrepancies were shown in foci frequency for low-LET, with measurements 20One drawback using a theoretical model for the nucleus is that it assumes a simplistic and static pattern for DNA densities. However DNA damage pattern is highly correlated to DNA density pattern (i.e. the more DNA, the more likely to have a break). Therefore, we generalized our Monte Carlo approach to real microscope images, assuming pixel intensity of DAPI in the nucleus was directly proportional to the amount of DNA in that pixel. With such approach we could predict DNA damage pattern in real images on a per nucleus basis. Since energy is randomly deposited along high-LET particle paths, RIF along these paths should also be randomly distributed. As expected, simulations produced DNA-weighted random (Poisson) distributions. In

  16. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Mitochondrial Proteins Reveals Pro-Survival Mechanisms in the Perpetuation of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Stefani N.; Waters, Katrina M.; Morgan, William F.; Yang, Austin; Baulch, Janet E.

    2012-07-26

    Radiation induced genomic instability is a well-studied phenomenon that is measured as mitotically heritable genetic alterations observed in the progeny of an irradiated cell. The mechanisms that perpetuate this instability are unclear, however, a role for chronic oxidative stress has consistently been demonstrated. In the chromosomally unstable LS12 cell line, oxidative stress and genomic instability were correlated with mitochondrial dysfunction. To clarify this mitochondrial dysfunction and gain insight into the mechanisms underlying radiation induced genomic instability we have evaluated the mitochondrial sub-proteome and performed quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of LS12 cells. Of 98 quantified mitochondrial proteins, 17 met criteria for fold changes and reproducibility; and 11 were statistically significant in comparison with the stable parental GM10115 cell line. Previous observations implicated defects in the electron transport chain (ETC) in the LS12 cell mitochondrial dysfunction. Proteomic analysis supports these observations, demonstrating significantly reduced levels of mitochondrial cytochrome c, the intermediary between complexes III and IV of the ETC. Results also suggest that LS12 cells compensate for ETC dysfunction and oxidative stress through increased levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes and up-regulation of proteins that protect against oxidative stress and apoptosis. More than one cellular defect is likely to contribute to the genomic instability phenotype. These data suggest that LS12 cells have adapted mechanisms that allow survival under sub-optimal conditions of oxidative stress and compromised mitochondrial function to perpetuate genomic instability.

  17. Amifostine, a radioprotectant agent, protects rat brain tissue lipids against ionizing radiation induced damage: An FTIR microspectroscopic imaging study

    SciTech Connect

    Cakmak G.; Miller L.; Zorlu, F.; Severcan, F.

    2012-03-03

    Amifostine is the only approved radioprotective agent by FDA for reducing the damaging effects of radiation on healthy tissues. In this study, the protective effect of amifostine against the damaging effects of ionizing radiation on the white matter (WM) and grey matter (GM) regions of the rat brain were investigated at molecular level. Sprague-Dawley rats, which were administered amifostine or not, were whole-body irradiated at a single dose of 800 cGy, decapitated after 24 h and the brain tissues of these rats were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM). The results revealed that the total lipid content and CH{sub 2} groups of lipids decreased significantly and the carbonyl esters, olefinic=CH and CH{sub 3} groups of lipids increased significantly in the WM and GM after exposure to ionizing radiation, which could be interpreted as a result of lipid peroxidation. These changes were more prominent in the WM of the brain. The administration of amifostine before ionizing radiation inhibited the radiation-induced lipid peroxidation in the brain. In addition, this study indicated that FTIRM provides a novel approach for monitoring ionizing radiation induced-lipid peroxidation and obtaining different molecular ratio images can be used as biomarkers to detect lipid peroxidation in biological systems.

  18. Profiling mitochondrial proteins in radiation-induced genome-unstable cell lines with persistent oxidative stress by mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, John H.; Jin, Shuangshuang; Morgan, William F.; Yang, Austin; Wan, Yunhu; Aypar, Umut; Peters, Jonathan S.; Springer, David L.

    2008-06-01

    Radiation-induced genome instability (RIGI) is a response to radiation exposure in which the progeny of surviving cells exhibit increased frequency of chromosomal changes many generations after the initial insult. Persistently elevated oxidative stress accompanying RIGI and the ability of free-radical scavengers, given before irradiation, to reduce the incidence of instability suggest that radiation induced alterations to mitochondrial function likely play a role in RIGI. To further elucidate this mechanism, we performed high-throughput quantitative mass spectrometry on samples enriched in mitochondrial proteins from three chromosomally-unstable GM10115 Chinese-hamster-ovary cell lines and their stable parental cell line. Out of several hundred identified proteins, sufficient data were collected on 74 mitochondrial proteins to test for statistically significant differences in their abundance between unstable and stable cell lines. Each of the unstable cell lines showed a distinct profile of statistically-significant differential abundant mitochondrial proteins. The LS-12 cell line was characterized by 8 downregulated proteins, whereas the CS-9 cell line exhibited 5 distinct up-regulated proteins. The unstable 115 cell line had two down-regulated proteins, one of which was also downregulated in LS-12, and one up-regulated protein relative to stable parental cells. The mitochondrial protein profiles for LS-12 and C-9 provide further evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in the genome instability of these cell lines.

  19. Radiation-Induced Microvascular Injury as a Mechanism of Salivary Gland Hypofunction and Potential Target for Radioprotectors.

    PubMed

    Mizrachi, Aviram; Cotrim, Ana P; Katabi, Nora; Mitchell, James B; Verheij, Marcel; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana

    2016-08-01

    Radiation therapy is commonly used to treat patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). One of the major side effects of radiotherapy is injury to the salivary glands (SG), which is thought to be mediated by microvascular dysfunction leading to permanent xerostomia. The goal of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of radiation-induced microvasculature damage and its impact on SG function. We measured bovine aortic endothelial cell (BAEC) apoptosis and ceramide production in response to 5 Gy irradiation, either alone or with reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers. We then investigated the effect of a single 15 Gy radiation dose on murine SG function. BAECs exposed to 5 Gy underwent apoptosis with increased ceramide production, both prevented by ROS scavengers. Among the 15 Gy irradiated mice, there was considerable weight loss, alopecia and SG hypofunction manifested by reduced saliva production and lower lysozyme levels. All of these effects, except for the lysozyme levels, were prevented by pretreatment with ROS scavengers. Microvessel density was significantly lower in the SG of irradiated mice compared to the control group, and this effect was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with Tempol. This study demonstrates that radiation-induced SG hypofunction is to a large extent mediated by microvascular dysfunction involving ceramide and ROS generation. These findings strongly suggest that ROS scavengers may serve as potential radioprotectors of SG function in patients undergoing radiotherapy for HNSCC. PMID:27459704

  20. The Therapeutic Effect of PLAG against Oral Mucositis in Hamster and Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ha-Reum; Yoo, Nina; Kim, Joo Heon; Sohn, Ki-Young; Kim, Heung-Jae; Kim, Myung-Hwan; Han, Mi Young; Yoon, Sun Young; Kim, Jae Wha

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced mucositis can limit the effectiveness of cancer therapy and increase the risk of infections. However, no specific therapy for protection against mucositis is currently available. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic effect of PLAG (1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl-3-acetyl-rac-glycerol, acetylated diglyceride) in 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced oral mucositis animal models. Hamsters were administered 5-FU (80 mg/kg) intraperitoneally on days 0, 6, and 9. The animals’ cheek pouches were then scratched equally with the tip of an 18-gage needle on days 1, 2, and 7. PLAG was administered daily at 250 mg/kg/day. PLAG administration significantly reduced 5-FU/scratching-induced mucositis. Dramatic reversal of weight loss in PLAG-treated hamsters with mucositis was observed. Histochemical staining data also revealed newly differentiated epidermis and blood vessels in the cheek pouches of PLAG-treated hamsters, indicative of recovery. Whole blood analyses indicated that PLAG prevents 5-FU-induced excessive neutrophil transmigration to the infection site and eventually stabilizes the number of circulating neutrophils. In a mouse mucositis model, mice with 5-FU-induced disease treated with PLAG exhibited resistance to body-weight loss compared with mice that received 5-FU or 5-FU/scratching alone. PLAG also dramatically reversed mucositis-associated weight loss and inhibited mucositis-induced inflammatory responses in the tongue and serum. These data suggest that PLAG enhances recovery from 5-FU-induced oral mucositis and may therefore be a useful therapeutic agent for treating side effects of chemotherapy, such as mucositis and cachexia. PMID:27800302

  1. Pharmacological Protection From Radiation {+-} Cisplatin-Induced Oral Mucositis

    SciTech Connect

    Cotrim, Ana P.; Yoshikawa, Masanobu; Sunshine, Abraham N.; Zheng Changyu; Sowers, Anastasia L.; Thetford, Angela D.; Cook, John A.; Mitchell, James B.; Baum, Bruce J.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate if two pharmacological agents, Tempol and D-methionine (D-met), are able to prevent oral mucositis in mice after exposure to ionizing radiation {+-} cisplatin. Methods and Materials: Female C3H mice, {approx}8 weeks old, were irradiated with five fractionated doses {+-} cisplatin to induce oral mucositis (lingual ulcers). Just before irradiation and chemotherapy, mice were treated, either alone or in combination, with different doses of Tempol (by intraperitoneal [ip] injection or topically, as an oral gel) and D-met (by gavage). Thereafter, mice were sacrificed and tongues were harvested and stained with a solution of Toluidine Blue. Ulcer size and tongue epithelial thickness were measured. Results: Significant lingual ulcers resulted from 5 Multiplication-Sign 8 Gy radiation fractions, which were enhanced with cisplatin treatment. D-met provided stereospecific partial protection from lingual ulceration after radiation. Tempol, via both routes of administration, provided nearly complete protection from lingual ulceration. D-met plus a suboptimal ip dose of Tempol also provided complete protection. Conclusions: Two fairly simple pharmacological treatments were able to markedly reduce chemoradiation-induced oral mucositis in mice. This proof of concept study suggests that Tempol, alone or in combination with D-met, may be a useful and convenient way to prevent the severe oral mucositis that results from head-and-neck cancer therapy.

  2. Mucosal vaccination by adenoviruses displaying reovirus sigma 1

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Eric A.; Camacho, Zenaido T.; Hillestad, Matthew L.; Crosby, Catherine M.; Turner, Mallory A.; Guenzel, Adam J.; Fadel, Hind J.; Mercier, George T.; Barry, Michael A.

    2015-08-15

    We developed adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors displaying the sigma 1 protein from reovirus as mucosal vaccines. Ad5-sigma retargets to JAM-1 and sialic acid, but has 40-fold reduced gene delivery when compared to Ad5. While weaker at transduction, Ad5-sigma generates stronger T cell responses than Ad5 when used for mucosal immunization. In this work, new Ad5-fiber-sigma vectors were generated by varying the number of fiber β-spiral shaft repeats (R) between the fiber tail and sigma. Increasing chimera length led to decreasing insertion of these proteinsAd5 virions. Ad-R3 and R14 vectors effectively targeted JAM-1 in vitro while R20 did not. When wereused to immunize mice by the intranasal route, Ad5-R3-sigma produced higher serum and vaginal antibody responses than Ad5. These data suggest optimized Ad-sigma vectors may be useful vectors for mucosal vaccination. - Highlights: • Constructed adenoviruses (Ads) displaying different reovirus sigma 1 fusion proteins. • Progressively longer chimeras were more poorly encapsidated onto Ad virions. • Ad5-R3-sigma mediated better systemic and mucosal immune responses than Ad5.

  3. Why Chitosan? From properties to perspective of mucosal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashwini; Vimal, Archana; Kumar, Awanish

    2016-10-01

    Non-parenteral drug delivery routes primarily remove the local pain at the injection site. The drugs administered through the oral route encounter the process of hepatic first pass metabolism. Among the alternative delivery routes, mucosal route is being investigated as the most preferred route. Different mucosal routes include the gastrointestinal tract (oral), vagina, buccal cavity and nasal cavity. Novel formulations are being developed using natural and synthetic polymers that could increase the residence time of the drug at mucosal surface in order to facilitate permeation and reduce (or bypass) the first pass metabolism. For recombinant drugs, the formulations are accompanied by enzyme inhibitors and penetration enhancers. Buccal cavity (buccal and sublingual mucosa) has smaller surface area than the gastrointestinal tract but the drugs can easily escape the first pass metabolism. Chitosan is the most applied natural polymer while synthetic polymers include Carbopol and Eudragit. Chitosan has inherent properties of mucoadhesion and penetration enhancement apart from biodegradability and efflux pump inhibition. This review hoards the important research purview of chitosan as a compatible drug carrier macromolecule for mucosal delivery on single platform.

  4. Voice Disorders in Mucosal Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Ruas, Ana Cristina Nunes; Lucena, Márcia Mendonça; da Costa, Ananda Dutra; Vieira, Jéssica Rafael; de Araújo-Melo, Maria Helena; Terceiro, Benivaldo Ramos Ferreira; de Sousa Torraca, Tania Salgado; de Oliveira Schubach, Armando; Valete-Rosalino, Claudia Maria

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Leishmaniasis is considered as one of the six most important infectious diseases because of its high detection coefficient and ability to produce deformities. In most cases, mucosal leishmaniasis (ML) occurs as a consequence of cutaneous leishmaniasis. If left untreated, mucosal lesions can leave sequelae, interfering in the swallowing, breathing, voice and speech processes and requiring rehabilitation. Objective To describe the anatomical characteristics and voice quality of ML patients. Materials and Methods A descriptive transversal study was conducted in a cohort of ML patients treated at the Laboratory for Leishmaniasis Surveillance of the Evandro Chagas National Institute of Infectious Diseases - Fiocruz, between 2010 and 2013. The patients were submitted to otorhinolaryngologic clinical examination by endoscopy of the upper airways and digestive tract and to speech-language assessment through directed anamnesis, auditory perception, phonation times and vocal acoustic analysis. The variables of interest were epidemiologic (sex and age) and clinic (lesion location, associated symptoms and voice quality. Results 26 patients under ML treatment and monitored by speech therapists were studied. 21 (81%) were male and five (19%) female, with ages ranging from 15 to 78 years (54.5+15.0 years). The lesions were distributed in the following structures 88.5% nasal, 38.5% oral, 34.6% pharyngeal and 19.2% laryngeal, with some patients presenting lesions in more than one anatomic site. The main complaint was nasal obstruction (73.1%), followed by dysphonia (38.5%), odynophagia (30.8%) and dysphagia (26.9%). 23 patients (84.6%) presented voice quality perturbations. Dysphonia was significantly associated to lesions in the larynx, pharynx and oral cavity. Conclusion We observed that vocal quality perturbations are frequent in patients with mucosal leishmaniasis, even without laryngeal lesions; they are probably associated to disorders of some resonance

  5. Podophyllum hexandrum modulates gamma radiation-induced immunosuppression in Balb/c mice: implications in radioprotection.

    PubMed

    Goel, H C; Prakash, H; Ali, A; Bala, M

    2007-01-01

    Aqueous extract of Podophyllum hexandrum (RP-1), which has been reported to render more than 82% survival against whole body lethal (10 Gy) gamma-irradiation in mice, was further investigated for its immunomodulatory potential. In this study, no significant change could be scored in peritoneal macrophages survival up to 8th day after whole body irradiation. RP-1 treatment (200 mg/kg body weight, i.p.) alone or 2 h before whole body irradiation enhanced macrophage survival significantly (p<0.05) as compared to irradiated control mice. In irradiated animals, there was significant (p<0.01) reduction in splenocyte survival and proliferation as revealed by 3H-TdR method. RP-1 treatment (200 mg/kg) alone or 2 h before irradiation countered the decrease in survival of splenocytes and proliferation significantly (p<0.05) as compared to irradiated control group. Whole body irradiation also significantly (p<0.05) reduced the population of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and bone marrow GM-CFU at 24 h and 72 h post-irradiation intervals, respectively, as compared to unirradiated control. RP-1 treatment 2 h before whole body irradiation countered the decrease in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells populations and CGM-CFU. Nitric oxide free radicals generation was enhanced significantly (p<0.05) in the supernatant of peritoneal macrophage cultures exposed to 2 Gy gamma radiation ex vivo in comparison to unirradiated control, which was reduced by pre-irradiation (-2 h) administration of RP-1. Whole body irradiation (10 Gy) also reduced the serum titres of IL-3, IL-1 and various IgG isotypes observed at different post-irradiation time interval. RP-1 treatment alone or before whole body irradiation countered radiation induced decrease in the titre of IL-1, IL-3 and IgG's in the serum of mice. These findings indicate immunostimulatory potential of RP-1.

  6. A New Model for Predicting Acute Mucosal Toxicity in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Radiotherapy With Altered Schedules

    SciTech Connect

    Strigari, Lidia; Pedicini, Piernicola; D'Andrea, Marco; Pinnaro, Paola; Marucci, Laura; Giordano, Carolina; Benassi, Marcello

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: One of the worst radiation-induced acute effects in treating head-and-neck (HN) cancer is grade 3 or higher acute (oral and pharyngeal) mucosal toxicity (AMT), caused by the killing/depletion of mucosa cells. Here we aim to testing a predictive model of the AMT in HN cancer patients receiving different radiotherapy schedules. Methods and Materials: Various radiotherapeutic schedules have been reviewed and classified as tolerable or intolerable based on AMT severity. A modified normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model has been investigated to describe AMT data in radiotherapy regimens, both conventional and altered in dose and overall treatment time (OTT). We tested the hypothesis that such a model could also be applied to identify intolerable treatment and to predict AMT. This AMT NTCP model has been compared with other published predictive models to identify schedules that are either tolerable or intolerable. The area under the curve (AUC) was calculated for all models, assuming treatment tolerance as the gold standard. The correlation between AMT and the predicted toxicity rate was assessed by a Pearson correlation test. Results: The AMT NTCP model was able to distinguish between acceptable and intolerable schedules among the data available for the study (AUC = 0.84, 95% confidence interval = 0.75-0.92). In the equivalent dose at 2 Gy/fraction (EQD2) vs OTT space, the proposed model shows a trend similar to that of models proposed by other authors, but was superior in detecting some intolerable schedules. Moreover, it was able to predict the incidence of {>=}G3 AMT. Conclusion: The proposed model is able to predict {>=}G3 AMT after HN cancer radiotherapy, and could be useful for designing altered/hypofractionated schedules to reduce the incidence of AMT.

  7. Antagonistic effects of black tea against gamma radiation-induced oxidative damage to normal lymphocytes in comparison with cancerous K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debjani; Dey, Subrata Kumar; Saha, Chabita

    2014-11-01

    The potential of naturally occurring antioxidants to reduce the cellular oxidative damage induced by ionizing radiation has been studied for more than a decade for their pharmacological application during cancer treatment. It is already known that radioprotective efficacy of phytochemicals might influence various end points of radiation damage. Flavonoids are well-known natural radioprotectors, and their biological effects depend upon their chemical structure. In the present study, radioprotective effect of black tea rich in flavonoids was evaluated against gamma radiation-induced oxidative damage on normal lymphocytes and compared with erythroleukemic K562 cells. Pre-treatment with black tea extract (BTE) significantly reduced radiation-induced loss of cell viability, generation of reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial dysfunction, activation of caspase-3 and apoptosis in normal lymphocytes compared to K562 cells. BTE also regulates the activity of endogenous antioxidant enzymes. The changes in the mRNA expression of bax, bcl2, p53 and Nrf2 were also followed to evaluate regulation of radiation-induced apoptosis by BTE. These findings suggest that black tea may have the potential of a natural radioprotective agent which can be used as adjunct with radiation during cancer treatment.

  8. Activating PTEN by COX-2 inhibitors antagonizes radiation-induced AKT activation contributing to radiosensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Zhen; Gan, Ye-Hua

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy is still one of the most effective nonsurgical treatments for many tumors. However, radioresistance remains a major impediment to radiotherapy. Although COX-2 inhibitors can induce radiosensitization, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we showed that COX-2 selective inhibitor celecoxib enhanced the radiation-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis in HeLa and SACC-83 cells. Treatment with celecoxib alone dephosphorylated phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN), promoted PTEN membrane translocation or activation, and correspondingly dephosphorylated or inactivated protein kinase B (AKT). By contrast, treatment with radiation alone increased PTEN phosphorylation, inhibited PTEN membrane translocation and correspondingly activated AKT in the two cell lines. However, treatment with celecoxib or another COX-2 selective inhibitor (valdecoxib) completely blocked radiation-induced increase of PTEN phosphorylation, rescued radiation-induced decrease in PTEN membrane translocation, and correspondingly inactivated AKT. Moreover, celecoxib could also upregulate PTEN protein expression by downregulating Sp1 expression, thereby leading to the activation of PTEN transcription. Our results suggested that COX-2 inhibitors could enhance radiosensitization at least partially by activating PTEN to antagonize radiation-induced AKT activation. - Highlights: • COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, could enhance radiosensitization. • Radiation induced PTEN inactivation (phosphorylation) and AKT activation. • COX-2 inhibitor induced PTEN expression and activation, and inactivated AKT. • COX-2 inhibitor enhanced radiosensitization through activating PTEN.

  9. Blueberry anthocyanins ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury through the protein kinase RNA-activated pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunen; Tan, Dehong; Tong, Changci; Zhang, Yubiao; Xu, Ying; Liu, Xinwei; Gao, Yan; Hou, Mingxiao

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of blueberry anthocyanins (BA) on radiation-induced lung injury and investigate the mechanism of action. Seven days after BA(20 and 80 mg/kg/d)administration, 6 weeks old male Sprague-Dawley rats rats were irradiated by LEKTA precise linear accelerator at a single dose of 20 Gy only once. and the rats were continuously treated with BA for 4 weeks. Moreover, human pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells (HPAEpiC) were transfected with either control-siRNA or siRNA targeting protein kinase R (PKR). Cells were then irradiated and treated with 75 μg/mL BA for 72 h. The results showed that BA significantly ameliorated radiation-induced lung inflammation, lung collagen deposition, apoptosis and PKR expression and activation. In vitro, BA significantly protected cells from radiation-induced cell death through modulating expression of Bcl-2, Bax and Caspase-3. Suppression of PKR by siRNA resulted in ablation of BA protection on radiation-induced cell death and modulation of anti-apoptotic and pro-apoptotic proteins, as well as Caspase-3 expression. These findings suggest that BA is effective in ameliorating radiation-induced lung injury, likely through the PKR signaling pathway. PMID:26551926

  10. Blueberry anthocyanins ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury through the protein kinase RNA-activated pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunen; Tan, Dehong; Tong, Changci; Zhang, Yubiao; Xu, Ying; Liu, Xinwei; Gao, Yan; Hou, Mingxiao

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of blueberry anthocyanins (BA) on radiation-induced lung injury and investigate the mechanism of action. Seven days after BA(20 and 80 mg/kg/d)administration, 6 weeks old male Sprague-Dawley rats rats were irradiated by LEKTA precise linear accelerator at a single dose of 20 Gy only once. and the rats were continuously treated with BA for 4 weeks. Moreover, human pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells (HPAEpiC) were transfected with either control-siRNA or siRNA targeting protein kinase R (PKR). Cells were then irradiated and treated with 75 μg/mL BA for 72 h. The results showed that BA significantly ameliorated radiation-induced lung inflammation, lung collagen deposition, apoptosis and PKR expression and activation. In vitro, BA significantly protected cells from radiation-induced cell death through modulating expression of Bcl-2, Bax and Caspase-3. Suppression of PKR by siRNA resulted in ablation of BA protection on radiation-induced cell death and modulation of anti-apoptotic and pro-apoptotic proteins, as well as Caspase-3 expression. These findings suggest that BA is effective in ameliorating radiation-induced lung injury, likely through the PKR signaling pathway.

  11. Mucosal Regulatory T Cells and T Helper 17 Cells in HIV-Associated Immune Activation

    PubMed Central

    Pandiyan, Pushpa; Younes, Souheil-Antoine; Ribeiro, Susan Pereira; Talla, Aarthi; McDonald, David; Bhaskaran, Natarajan; Levine, Alan D.; Weinberg, Aaron; Sekaly, Rafick P.

    2016-01-01

    Residual mucosal inflammation along with chronic systemic immune activation is an important feature in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and has been linked to a wide range of co-morbidities, including malignancy, opportunistic infections, immunopathology, and cardiovascular complications. Although combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) can reduce plasma viral loads to undetectable levels, reservoirs of virus persist, and increased mortality is associated with immune dysbiosis in mucosal lymphoid tissues. Immune-based therapies are pursued with the goal of improving CD4+ T-cell restoration, as well as reducing chronic immune activation in cART-treated patients. However, the majority of research on immune activation has been derived from analysis of circulating T cells. How immune cell alterations in mucosal tissues contribute to HIV immune dysregulation and the associated risk of non-infectious chronic complications is less studied. Given the significant differences between mucosal T cells and circulating T cells, and the immediate interactions of mucosal T cells with the microbiome, more attention should be devoted to mucosal immune cells and their contribution to systemic immune activation in HIV-infected individuals. Here, we will focus on mucosal immune cells with a specific emphasis on CD4+ T lymphocytes, such as T helper 17 cells and CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), which play crucial roles in maintaining mucosal barrier integrity and preventing inflammation, respectively. We hypothesize that pro-inflammatory milieu in cART-treated patients with immune activation significantly contributes to enhanced loss of Th17 cells and increased frequency of dysregulated Tregs in the mucosa, which in turn may exacerbate immune dysfunction in HIV-infected patients. We also present initial evidence to support this hypothesis. A better comprehension of how pro-inflammatory milieu impacts these two types of cells in the mucosa will shed light

  12. Topical and mucosal liposomes for vaccine delivery.

    PubMed

    Romero, Eder Lilia; Morilla, Maria Jose

    2011-01-01

    Mucosal (and in minor extent transcutanous) stimulation can induce local or distant mucosa secretory IgA. Liposomes and other vesicles as mucosal and transcutaneous adjuvants are attractive alternatives to parenteral vaccination. Liposomes can be massively produced under good manufacturing practices and stored for long periods, at high antigen/vesicle mass ratios. However, their uptake by antigen-presenting cells (APC) at the inductive sites remains as a major challenge. As neurotoxicity is a major concern in intranasal delivery, complexes between archaeosomes and calcium as well as cationic liposomes complexed with plasmids encoding for antigenic proteins could safely elicit secretory and systemic antigen-specific immune responses. Oral bilosomes generate intense immune responses that remain to be tested against challenge, but the admixing with toxins or derivatives is mandatory to reduce the amount of antigen. Most of the current experimental designs, however, underestimate the mucus blanket 100- to 1000-fold thicker than a 100-nm diameter liposome, which has first to be penetrated to access the underlying M cells. Overall, designing mucoadhesive chemoenzymatic resistant liposomes, or selectively targeted to M cells, has produced less relevant results than tailoring the liposomes to make them mucus penetrating. Opposing, the nearly 10 µm thickness stratum corneum interposed between liposomes and underlying APC can be surpassed by ultradeformable liposomes (UDL), with lipid matrices that penetrate up to the limit with the viable epidermis. UDL made of phospholipids and detergents, proved to be better transfection agents than conventional liposomes and niosomes, without the toxicity of ethosomes, in the absence of classical immunomodulators. PMID:21360692

  13. Mesenchymal stem cells stimulate intestinal stem cells to repair radiation-induced intestinal injury

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Wei; Guo, Mengzheng; Han, Zhibo; Wang, Yan; Yang, Ping; Xu, Chang; Wang, Qin; Du, Liqing; Li, Qian; Zhao, Hui; Fan, Feiyue; Liu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    The loss of stem cells residing in the base of the intestinal crypt has a key role in radiation-induced intestinal injury. In particular, Lgr5+ intestinal stem cells (ISCs) are indispensable for intestinal regeneration following exposure to radiation. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have previously been shown to improve intestinal epithelial repair in a mouse model of radiation injury, and, therefore, it was hypothesized that this protective effect is related to Lgr5+ ISCs. In this study, it was found that, following exposure to radiation, transplantation of MSCs improved the survival of the mice, ameliorated intestinal injury and increased the number of regenerating crypts. Furthermore, there was a significant increase in Lgr5+ ISCs and their daughter cells, including Ki67+ transient amplifying cells, Vil1+ enterocytes and lysozyme+ Paneth cells, in response to treatment with MSCs. Crypts isolated from mice treated with MSCs formed a higher number of and larger enteroids than those from the PBS group. MSC transplantation also reduced the number of apoptotic cells within the small intestine at 6 h post-radiation. Interestingly, Wnt3a and active β-catenin protein levels were increased in the small intestines of MSC-treated mice. In addition, intravenous delivery of recombinant mouse Wnt3a after radiation reduced damage in the small intestine and was radioprotective, although not to the same degree as MSC treatment. Our results show that MSCs support the growth of endogenous Lgr5+ ISCs, thus promoting repair of the small intestine following exposure to radiation. The molecular mechanism of action mediating this was found to be related to increased activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:27685631

  14. Radiation-induced undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma after radiation therapy for a desmoid tumour.

    PubMed

    Di Marco, J; Kaci, R; Orcel, P; Nizard, R; Laredo, J-D

    2016-02-01

    Radiation-induced sarcoma is a long-term complication of radiation therapy. The most common secondary neoplasia is the undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma, which is usually described in the deep soft tissue of the trunk or extremities. Radiation-induced sarcomas have a poor prognosis. An early diagnosis and management are needed to improve the survival rate of such patients. We presently report a case of a radiation-induced undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma of the left gluteus maximus muscle, which developed 25 years after an initial diagnosis of aggressive fibromatosis and 21 years after a tumour recurrence. This case study illustrates the risk of developing a sarcoma in a radiation field and the need for long-term follow-up after radiation therapy. Unnecessary radiation therapy, in particular in the case of benign conditions in young patients, should be avoided.

  15. Radiation-induced genomic instability and its implications for radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Lei; Snyder, Andrew R.; Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    Radiation-induced genomic instability is characterized by an increased rate of genetic alterations including cytogenetic rearrangements, mutations, gene amplifications, transformation and cell death in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after the initial insult. Chromosomal rearrangements are the best-characterized end point of radiation-induced genomic instability, and many of the rearrangements described are similar to those found in human cancers. Chromosome breakage syndromes are defined by chromosome instability, and individuals with these diseases are cancer prone. Consequently, chromosomal instability as a phenotype may underlie some fraction of those changes leading to cancer. Here we attempt to relate current knowledge regarding radiation-induced chromosome instability with the emerging molecular information on the chromosome breakage syndromes. The goal is to understand how genetic and epigenetic factors might influence the onset of chromosome instability and the role of chromosomal instability in carcinogenesis.

  16. Genetic background influences loss of heterozygosity patterns in radiation-induced mouse thymic lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Michael; Huang, Yurong; Snijders, Antoine M.; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have revealed that p53 heterozygous (p53+/−) mice are extremely susceptible to radiation-induced tumorigenesis. To investigate whether genetic background influences radiation induced tumor susceptibility, we crossed p53+/− 129/Sv mice with genetically diverse strains to generate p53+/− F1 hybrids. The results showed that genetic background had a profound impact on tumor latency after exposure to gamma radiation, while the tumor spectrum did not change. We further characterized the thymic lymphomas that arose in the p53+/− mice by genome-wide loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analyses and found that genetic background strongly influenced the frequency of LOH and the loss of which parental allele on different chromosomes. Further research is needed to identify which genetic variations control the LOH patterns in radiation-induced thymic lymphomas and to evaluate its relevance to human cancers. PMID:25932465

  17. Mucosal Wave Measurement and Visualization Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Krausert, Christopher R.; Olszewski, Aleksandra E.; Taylor, Lindsay N.; McMurray, James S.; Dailey, Seth H.; Jiang, Jack J.

    2010-01-01

    Organized vibration of the vocal folds is critical to high quality voice production. When the vocal folds oscillate, the superficial tissue of the vocal fold is displaced in a wave-like fashion, creating the so called “mucosal wave”. Because the mucosal wave is dependent on vocal fold structure, physical alterations of that structure cause mucosal wave abnormalities. Visualization and quantification of mucosal wave properties have become useful parameters in diagnosing and managing vocal fold pathology. Mucosal wave measurement provides information about vocal fold characteristics that cannot be determined with other assessment techniques. Here, we discuss the benefits, disadvantages, and clinical applicability of the different mucosal wave measurement techniques, such as electroglottography (EGG), photoglottography (PGG), and ultrasound and visualization techniques that include videokymography (VKG), stroboscopy, and high-speed digital imaging (HSDI). The various techniques and their specific uses are reviewed with the intention of helping researchers and clinicians choose a method for a given situation and understand its limitations as well as its potential applications. Recent applications of these techniques for quantitative assessment demonstrate that additional research must be conducted to realize the full potential of these tools. Evaluations of existing research and recommendations for future research are given to promote both the quantitative study of the mucosal wave through accurate and standardized measurement of mucosal wave parameters and the development of reliable methods with which physicians can diagnose vocal disorders. PMID:20471798

  18. Vagal nerve and the gastric mucosal defense.

    PubMed

    Mózsik, G; Karádi, O; Király, A; Matus, Z; Sütö, G; Tóth, G; Vincze, A

    1993-01-01

    An essential role for an intact vagal nerve has been proven in the development of gastric mucosal cyto- and general protection. On the other hand, chemically-induced (ethanol, HCl, indomethacin) gastric mucosal damage is enhanced after acute surgical vagotomy. The aims of this paper were to study the possible mechanisms of the vagal nerve in the development of gastric mucosal defense. The following questions were addressed: 1) effect of surgical vagotomy on the development of ethanol- (ETOH), HCl-, and indomethacin (IND)-induced gastric mucosal damage: 2) changes in the gastric mucosal defense by scavengers, prostacyclin and other compounds (small doses of atropine and cimetidine; 3) changes in the gastric mucosal vascular permeability due to chemicals; 4) effect of indomethacin in the ETOH and HCl models with and without surgical vagotomy; 5) changes in the gastric mucosal content of prostacyclin and PGE2 in the ETOH and HCl models after surgical vagotomy; and 6) changes in the role of SH-groups in gastric mucosal defense after surgical vagotomy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Biology and Mucosal Immunity to Myxozoans

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Daniela; Bartholomew, Jerri; Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2014-01-01

    Myxozoans are among the most abundant parasites in nature. Their life cycles involve two hosts: an invertebrate, usually an annelid, and a vertebrate, usually a fish. They affect fish species in their natural habitats but also constitute a menace for fish aquaculture. Using different strategies they are able to parasitize and cause damage in multiple organs, including mucosal tissues, which they use also as portals of entry. In fish, the main mucosal sites include the intestine, skin and gills. Recently the finding of a specific mucosal immunoglobulin in teleost (IgT), analogous to mammalian IgA, and the capacity of fish to develop a specific mucosal immune response against different pathogens, has highlighted the importance of studying immune responses at mucosal sites. In this review, we describe the major biological characteristics of myxozoan parasites and present the data available regarding immune responses for species that infect mucosal sites. As models for mucosal immunity we review the responses to Enteromyxum spp. and Ceratomyxa shasta, both of which parasitize the intestine. The immune response at the skin and gills is also described, as these mucosal tissues are used by myxozoans as attaching surfaces and portal of entry, and some species also parasitize these sites. Finally, the development of immunoprophylactic strategies is discussed. PMID:23994774

  20. Mucosal vaccines: a paradigm shift in the development of mucosal adjuvants and delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Atul; Gowda, Devegowda Vishakante; Madhunapantula, SubbaRao V; Shinde, Chetan G; Iyer, Meenakshi

    2015-04-01

    Mucosal immune responses are the first-line defensive mechanisms against a variety of infections. Therefore, immunizations of mucosal surfaces from which majority of infectious agents make their entry, helps to protect the body against infections. Hence, vaccinization of mucosal surfaces by using mucosal vaccines provides the basis for generating protective immunity both in the mucosal and systemic immune compartments. Mucosal vaccines offer several advantages over parenteral immunization. For example, (i) ease of administration; (ii) non-invasiveness; (iii) high-patient compliance; and (iv) suitability for mass vaccination. Despite these benefits, to date, only very few mucosal vaccines have been developed using whole microorganisms and approved for use in humans. This is due to various challenges associated with the development of an effective mucosal vaccine that can work against a variety of infections, and various problems concerned with the safe delivery of developed vaccine. For instance, protein antigen alone is not just sufficient enough for the optimal delivery of antigen(s) mucosally. Hence, efforts have been made to develop better prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines for improved mucosal Th1 and Th2 immune responses using an efficient and safe immunostimulatory molecule and novel delivery carriers. Therefore, in this review, we have made an attempt to cover the recent advancements in the development of adjuvants and delivery carriers for safe and effective mucosal vaccine production.

  1. Effect of carprofen and indomethacin on gastric function, mucosal integrity and generation of prostaglandins in men.

    PubMed

    Konturek, S J; Kwiecien, N; Obtulowicz, W; Kiec-Dembinska, A; Polanski, M; Kopp, B; Sito, E; Oleksy, J

    1982-12-01

    The effects of indomethacin and carprofen on gastric secretion, serum gastrin level, electropotential difference, gastric microbleeding, DNA loss, mucosal blood flow and the production of mucosal prostaglandins (PGs) were investigated in a double-blind cross-over study in 18 healthy volunteers after one week of treatment. We did not observe any significant changes in basal and pentagastrin-stimulated gastric secretory parameters, serum gastrin level and electro-potential difference before and after treatment with these drugs. Mucosal blood flow was significantly reduced following indomethacin treatment. The most pronounced differences were found in endoscopic score studies of gastric mucosa. After indomethacin all subjects developed multiple erosions, submucosal haemorrhages, and half of them showed diffuse antral erythema. These effects were accompanied by a significant increase in both gastric microbleeding and DNA loss, and significant decrease in the production of PGE2. We concluded that carprofen, in contrast to indomethacin, did not alter gastric mucosal integrity and production of PGE2. This study indicates that the gastric mucosal damage by non-steroid anti-inflammatory compounds (NOSAC) depends upon the suppression of PGE2 biosynthesis, and that endogenous PGE2 is involved in the control of mucosal blood flow and mucosal integrity.

  2. Chemotherapy-induced mucositis: the role of the gastrointestinal microbiome and toll-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Daniel W; Stringer, Andrea M; Gibson, Rachel J

    2013-01-01

    Alimentary mucositis is a major clinical problem. Patients with mucositis are at significantly increased risk of infection and are often hospitalized for prolonged periods. More importantly, these patients often have to undergo reductions in their cytotoxic therapy, which may lead to reduced survival. Unfortunately, there are very limited therapeutic options for mucositis and no effective prevention. The human gut microbiome is receiving increased attention as a key player in the pathogenesis of alimentary mucositis with recent literature suggesting that changes in bacteria lead to mucositis. The bacteria which are found throughout the gut are tightly regulated by the toll-like receptor (TLR) family which currently has 13 known members. TLRs play a critical role in gut homeostasis and bacterial regulation. Furthermore, TLRs play a critical role in the regulation of nuclear factor kappa B, a key regulator of alimentary mucositis. However to date, no research has clearly identified a link between TLRs and alimentary mucositis. This critical literature review seeks to correct this.

  3. Mucosal vaccines: novel strategies and applications for the control of pathogens and tumors at mucosal sites.

    PubMed

    Nizard, Mevyn; Diniz, Mariana O; Roussel, Helene; Tran, Thi; Ferreira, Luis Cs; Badoual, Cecile; Tartour, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system displays several adaptations reflecting the exposure to the external environment. The efficient induction of mucosal immune responses also requires specific approaches, such as the use of appropriate administration routes and specific adjuvants and/or delivery systems. In contrast to vaccines delivered via parenteral routes, experimental, and clinical evidences demonstrated that mucosal vaccines can efficiently induce local immune responses to pathogens or tumors located at mucosal sites as well as systemic response. At least in part, such features can be explained by the compartmentalization of mucosal B and T cell populations that play important roles in the modulation of local immune responses. In the present review, we discuss molecular and cellular features of the mucosal immune system as well as novel immunization approaches that may lead to the development of innovative and efficient vaccines targeting pathogens and tumors at different mucosal sites.

  4. Antimicrobial fabric adsorbed iodine produced by radiation-induced graft polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Shoji; Fujiwara, Kunio; Sugo, Takanobu; Suzuki, Koichi

    2013-03-01

    Antimicrobial fabric was synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of N-vinyl pyrrolidone onto polyolefine nonwoven fabric and subsequent adsorption of iodine. In response of the huge request for the antimicrobial material applied to face masks for swine flu in 2009, operation procedure of continuous radiation-induced graft polymerization apparatus was improved. The improved grafting production per week increased 3.8 times compared to the production by former operation procedure. Shipped antimicrobial fabric had reached 130,000 m2 from June until December, 2009.

  5. Gamma radiation-induced blue shift of resonance peaks of Bragg gratings in pure silica fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faustov, A. V.; Gusarov, A. I.; Mégret, P.; Wuilpart, M.; Kinet, D.; Zhukov, A. V.; Novikov, S. G.; Svetukhin, V. V.; Fotiadi, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    We report the first observation of a significant gamma radiation-induced blue shift of the reflection/transmission peak of fibre Bragg gratings inscribed into pure-silica core fibres via multiphoton absorption of femtosecond pulses. At a total dose of ~100 kGy, the shift is ~20 pm. The observed effect is attributable to the ionising radiation-induced decrease in the density of the silica glass when the rate of colour centre formation is slow. We present results of experimental measurements that provide the key parameters of the dynamics of the gratings for remote dosimetry and temperature sensing.

  6. [A case of prednisolone therapy for radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis].

    PubMed

    Yanagi, Masato; Nishimura, Taiji; Kurita, Susumu; Lee, Chorsu; Kondo, Yukihiro; Yamazaki, Keiichi

    2011-05-01

    Hemorrhagic cystitis resulting from radiation to pelvic visceral malignant lesions often might be incurable and there have been no established definitive treatment. We experienced a case with severe radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis refractory to conventional therapy. The treatment with oral administration of prednisolone was performed and obtained a successful result. Gross hematuria disappeared in 2 weeks in this case. This experience suggested that oral administration of prednisolone could be considered the treatment for patients with radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis when usual treatments including transurethral electro-coagulation are unsuccessful. PMID:21846069

  7. [A case of prednisolone therapy for radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis].

    PubMed

    Yanagi, Masato; Nishimura, Taiji; Kurita, Susumu; Lee, Chorsu; Kondo, Yukihiro; Yamazaki, Keiichi

    2011-05-01

    Hemorrhagic cystitis resulting from radiation to pelvic visceral malignant lesions often might be incurable and there have been no established definitive treatment. We experienced a case with severe radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis refractory to conventional therapy. The treatment with oral administration of prednisolone was performed and obtained a successful result. Gross hematuria disappeared in 2 weeks in this case. This experience suggested that oral administration of prednisolone could be considered the treatment for patients with radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis when usual treatments including transurethral electro-coagulation are unsuccessful.

  8. Pathophysiology of Radiation-Induced Dysphagia in Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    King, Suzanne N; Dunlap, Neal E; Tennant, Paul A; Pitts, Teresa

    2016-06-01

    Oncologic treatments, such as curative radiotherapy and chemoradiation, for head and neck cancer can cause long-term swallowing impairments (dysphagia) that negatively impact quality of life. Radiation-induced dysphagia comprised a broad spectrum of structural, mechanical, and neurologic deficits. An understanding of the biomolecular effects of radiation on the time course of wound healing and underlying morphological tissue responses that precede radiation damage will improve options available for dysphagia treatment. The goal of this review is to discuss the pathophysiology of radiation-induced injury and elucidate areas that need further exploration. PMID:27098922

  9. Dried Plum Protects From Radiation-Induced Bone Loss by Attenuating Pro-Osteoclastic and Oxidative Stress Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Future space explorations beyond the earths magnetosphere will increase human exposure to space radiation and associated risks to skeletal health. We hypothesize that oxidative stress resulting from radiation exposure plays a major role in progressive bone loss and dysfunction in associated tissue. In animal studies, increased free radical formation is associated with pathological changes in bone structure, enhanced bone resorption, reduced bone formation and decreased bone mineral density, which can lead to skeletal fragility. Our long-term goals are to define the mechanisms and risk of bone loss in the spaceflight environment and to facilitate the development of effective countermeasures. We had previously reported that exposure to low or high-LET radiation correlates with an acute increase in the expression of pro-osteoclastic and oxidative stress genes in bone during the early response to radiation followed by pathological changes in skeletal structure. We then conducted systematic screening for potential countermeasures against bone loss where we tested the ability of various antioxidants to mitigate the radiation-induced increase in expression of these markers. For the screen, 16-week old C57Bl6J mice were treated with a dietary antioxidant cocktail, injectable DHLA or a dried plum-enriched diet (DP). Mice were then exposed to 2Gy 137Cs radiation and one day later, marrow cells were collected and the relevant genes analyzed for expression levels. Among the candidate countermeasures tested, DP was most effective in reducing the expression of genes associated with bone loss. Furthermore, analysis of skeletal structure by microcomputed tomography (microCT) revealed that DP also prevents the radiation-induced deterioration in skeletal microarchitecture as indicated by parameters such as percent bone volume (BVTV), trabecular spacing and trabecular number. We also found that DP has similar protective effects on skeletal structure in a follow-up study using 1 Gy of

  10. Caspase-independent cell death mediated by apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) nuclear translocation is involved in ionizing radiation induced HepG2 cell death.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hengwen; Yang, Shana; Li, Jianhua; Zhang, Yajie; Gao, Dongsheng; Zhao, Shenting

    2016-03-25

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer in the world. The aim of radiotherapy is to eradicate cancer cells with ionizing radiation. Except for the caspase-dependent mechanism, several lines of evidence demonstrated that caspase-independent mechanism is directly involved in the cell death responding to irradiation. For this reason, defining the contribution of caspase-independent molecular mechanisms represents the main goal in radiotherapy. In this study, we focused on the role of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), the caspase-independent molecular, in ionizing radiation induced hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2) cell death. We found that ionizing radiation has no function on AIF expression in HepG2 cells, but could induce AIF release from the mitochondria and translocate into nuclei. Inhibition of AIF could reduce ionizing radiation induced HepG2 cell death. These studies strongly support a direct relationship between AIF nuclear translocation and radiation induced cell death. What's more, AIF nuclear translocation is caspase-independent manner, but not caspase-dependent manner, in this process. These new findings add a further attractive point of investigation to better define the complex interplay between caspase-independent cell death and radiation therapy. PMID:26920061

  11. The effect of 2-[(aminopropyl)amino] ethanethiol (WR-1065) on radiation induced DNA double strand damage and repair in V79 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sigdestad, C. P.; Treacy, S. H.; Knapp, L. A.; Grdina, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation induced DNA double strand breaks are believed to be important lesions involved in processes related to cell killing, induction of chromosome aberrations and carcinogenesis. This paper reports the effects of the radioprotector 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065) on radiation-induced DNA damage and repair in V79 cells using the neutral elution method performed at pH 7.2 or pH 9.6. WR-1065 (4 mM) was added to the culture medium either 30 minutes prior to and during irradiation with Cobalt-60 gamma rays (for dose response experiments) or during the repair times tested (for DNA rejoining experiments). The results indicate that WR-1065 is an effective protector against the formation of radiation-induced double-strand breaks in DNA as measured using a neutral elution technique at either pH. The protector reduced the strand scission factors by 1.44 and 1.77 in experiments run at pH 9.6 and pH 7.2, respectively. The kinetics of DNA double-strand rejoining were dependent upon the pH at which the neutral elution procedure was performed. Unlike the results obtained with alkaline elution, rejoining of DNA breaks was unaffected by the presence of WR-1065 at either pH. PMID:3606941

  12. Regulatory T Cells Contribute to the Inhibition of Radiation-Induced Acute Lung Inflammation via Bee Venom Phospholipase A2 in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dasom; Lee, Gihyun; Sohn, Sung-Hwa; Park, Soojin; Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Lee, Ji Min; Yang, Jieun; Cho, Jaeho; Bae, Hyunsu

    2016-01-01

    Bee venom has long been used to treat various inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Previously, we reported that bee venom phospholipase A2 (bvPLA2) has an anti-inflammatory effect through the induction of regulatory T cells. Radiotherapy is a common anti-cancer method, but often causes adverse effects, such as inflammation. This study was conducted to evaluate the protective effects of bvPLA2 in radiation-induced acute lung inflammation. Mice were focally irradiated with 75 Gy of X-rays in the lung and administered bvPLA2 six times after radiation. To evaluate the level of inflammation, the number of immune cells, mRNA level of inflammatory cytokine, and histological changes in the lung were measured. BvPLA2 treatment reduced the accumulation of immune cells, such as macrophages, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and eosinophils. In addition, bvPLA2 treatment decreased inflammasome-, chemokine-, cytokine- and fibrosis-related genes’ mRNA expression. The histological results also demonstrated the attenuating effect of bvPLA2 on radiation-induced lung inflammation. Furthermore, regulatory T cell depletion abolished the therapeutic effects of bvPLA2 in radiation-induced pneumonitis, implicating the anti-inflammatory effects of bvPLA2 are dependent upon regulatory T cells. These results support the therapeutic potential of bvPLA2 in radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis treatments. PMID:27144583

  13. Distinct Roles of Ape1 Protein, an Enzyme Involved in DNA Repair, in High or Low Linear Energy Transfer Ionizing Radiation-induced Cell Killing*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongyan; Wang, Xiang; Chen, Guangnan; Zhang, Xiangming; Tang, Xiaobing; Park, Dongkyoo; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Yu, David S.; Deng, Xingming; Dynan, William S.; Doetsch, Paul W.; Wang, Ya

    2014-01-01

    High linear energy transfer (LET) radiation from space heavy charged particles or a heavier ion radiotherapy machine kills more cells than low LET radiation, mainly because high LET radiation-induced DNA damage is more difficult to repair. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is the ratio of the effects generated by high LET radiation to low LET radiation. Previously, our group and others demonstrated that the cell-killing RBE is involved in the interference of high LET radiation with non-homologous end joining but not homologous recombination repair. This effect is attributable, in part, to the small DNA fragments (≤40 bp) directly produced by high LET radiation, the size of which prevents Ku protein from efficiently binding to the two ends of one fragment at the same time, thereby reducing non-homologous end joining efficiency. Here we demonstrate that Ape1, an enzyme required for processing apurinic/apyrimidinic (known as abasic) sites, is also involved in the generation of small DNA fragments during the repair of high LET radiation-induced base damage, which contributes to the higher RBE of high LET radiation-induced cell killing. This discovery opens a new direction to develop approaches for either protecting astronauts from exposure to space radiation or benefiting cancer patients by sensitizing tumor cells to high LET radiotherapy. PMID:25210033

  14. Administration of the peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} agonist pioglitazone during fractionated brain irradiation prevents radiation-induced cognitive impairment

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Weiling; Payne, Valerie; Tommasi, Ellen; Diz, Debra I.; Hsu, F.-C.; Robbins, Mike E. . E-mail: mrobbins@wfubmc.edu

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: We hypothesized that administration of the anti-inflammatory peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) agonist pioglitazone (Pio) to adult male rats would inhibit radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Methods and Materials: Young adult male F344 rats received one of the following: (1) fractionated whole brain irradiation (WBI); 40 or 45 Gy {gamma}-rays in 4 or 4.5 weeks, respectively, two fractions per week and normal diet; (2) sham-irradiation and normal diet; (3) WBI plus Pio (120 ppm) before, during, and for 4 or 54 weeks postirradiation; (4) sham-irradiation plus Pio; or (5) WBI plus Pio starting 24h after completion of WBI. Results: Administration of Pio before, during, and for 4 or 54 weeks after WBI prevented Radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Administration of Pio for 54 weeks starting after completion of fractionated WBI substantially but not significantly reduced Radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Conclusions: These findings offer the promise of improving the quality of life and increasing the therapeutic window for brain tumor patients.

  15. Influence of DL-alpha-tocopherol acetate on indomethacin-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Valcheva-Kuzmanova, S; Krasnaliev, I; Galunska, B; Belcheva, A

    2007-07-01

    1 There is an increasing body of evidence supporting the hypothesis that antioxidants are able to reduce gastric mucosal damage induced by stressors of different origin. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of dl-alpha-tocopherol acetate (TA) on indomethacin-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats and a possible role for an anti-oxidative mechanism in the response. 2 TA (25, 50 and 100 mg kg(-1)) was applied intraperitoneally as a pretreatment 1 h before the subcutaneous administration of indomethacin (30 mg kg(-1)). 3 TA reduced the area of indomethacin-induced gastric ulcers, the effect being significant (P < 0.05) at the highest dose of 100 mg kg(-1). 4 Histopathological examination of rat stomach samples demonstrated that TA caused an increase in gastric mucus production and a reduction of the severity of mucosal lesions. 5 The three doses of TA prevented indomethacin-induced elevation of plasma and mucosal malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, which in TA-pretreated rats were not significantly different from the control values. Neither indomethacin treatment nor TA pretreatment had a significant influence on the gastric mucosal levels of reduced glutathione or oxidized glutathione. 6 Our results suggest that the gastroprotective effect of TA is likely to be due to increased mucus production and interference with oxidative stress development as evidenced by the decreased plasma and gastric mucosal MDA.

  16. Protective role of 3-nitrotyrosine against gamma radiation-induced DNA strand breaks: A comparison study with tyrosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei-Qun; Ni, Mei-Nan; Kong, Fu-Quan; Sui, Li; Hu, Jia; Xu, Dian-Dou; Li, Yan-Mei

    2008-10-01

    3-Nitrotyrosine(3-NY) has been reported as a potential source of reactive oxygen species (ROSs). In this work, plasmid pBR322 DNA was irradiated by gamma rays in aqueous solution in presence and absence of 3-NY, DNA strand breaks were analyzed by neutral electrophoresis followed by quantification with image analysis software. It was found that the presence of 3-NY could effectively reduce radiation-induced DNA strand breaks. A side-by-side comparison was performed between 3-NY and tyrosine, the results showed that the protective role 3-NY was comparable with tyrosine, which might imply that protein tyrosine nitration might not significantly decrease its ability as a free radical scavenger.

  17. Prophylactic and Therapeutic Modulation of Innate and Adaptive Immunity Against Mucosal Infection of Herpes Simplex Virus

    PubMed Central

    Uyangaa, Erdenebileg; Patil, Ajit Mahadev

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) are the most common cause of genital ulceration in humans worldwide. Typically, HSV-1 and 2 infections via mucosal route result in a lifelong latent infection after peripheral replication in mucosal tissues, thereby providing potential transmission to neighbor hosts in response to reactivation. To break the transmission cycle, immunoprophylactics and therapeutic strategies must be focused on prevention of infection or reduction of infectivity at mucosal sites. Currently, our understanding of the immune responses against mucosal infection of HSV remains intricate and involves a balance between innate signaling pathways and the adaptive immune responses. Numerous studies have demonstrated that HSV mucosal infection induces type I interferons (IFN) via recognition of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and activates multiple immune cell populations, including NK cells, conventional dendritic cells (DCs), and plasmacytoid DCs. This innate immune response is required not only for the early control of viral replication at mucosal sites, but also for establishing adaptive immune responses against HSV antigens. Although the contribution of humoral immune response is controversial, CD4+ Th1 T cells producing IFN-γ are believed to play an important role in eradicating virus from the hosts. In addition, the recent experimental successes of immunoprophylactic and therapeutic compounds that enhance resistance and/or reduce viral burden at mucosal sites have accumulated. This review focuses on attempts to modulate innate and adaptive immunity against HSV mucosal infection for the development of prophylactic and therapeutic strategies. Notably, cells involved in innate immune regulations appear to shape adaptive immune responses. Thus, we summarized the current evidence of various immune mediators in response to mucosal HSV infection, focusing on the importance of innate immune responses. PMID:25177251

  18. Phytochemicals for prevention of solar ultraviolet radiation-induced damages.

    PubMed

    Adhami, Vaqar M; Syed, Deeba N; Khan, Naghma; Afaq, Farrukh

    2008-01-01

    While solar light is indispensable for sustenance of life, excessive exposure can cause several skin-related disorders. The UV part of solar radiation, in particular, is linked to disorders ranging from mild inflammatory effects of the skin to as serious as causing several different types of cancers. Changes in lifestyle together with depletion in the atmospheric ozone layer during the last few decades have led to an increase in the incidence of skin cancer. Skin cancers consisting of basal and squamous cell carcinomas are especially linked to the UVB part of solar radiation. Reducing excessive exposure to solar radiation is desirable; however, as this approach is unavoidable, it is suggested that other novel strategies be developed to reduce the effects of solar radiation to skin. One approach to reduce the harmful effects of solar radiation is through the use of phytochemicals, an approach that is popularly known as "Photochemoprotection." In recent years many phytochemicals with potential antioxidant properties have been identified and found to be photoprotective in nature. We describe here some of the most popular phytochemicals being studied that have the potential to reduce the harmful effects associated with solar UV radiation.

  19. Aloe vera for prevention of radiation-induced dermatitis: a self-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Haddad, P; Amouzgar-Hashemi, F; Samsami, S; Chinichian, S; Oghabian, M A

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate an Aloe vera lotion for prevention of radiation-induced dermatitis, all patients with a prescription of radiotherapy to a minimum dose of 40 Gy were eligible provided that their treatment area could be divided into two symmetrical halves. Patients were given a lotion of Aloe vera to use on one half of the irradiated area, with no medication to be used on the other half. The grade of dermatitis in each half was recorded weekly until 4 weeks after the end of radiotherapy. The trial enrolled 60 patients (mean age: 52 years; 67% women). Most patients had breast cancer (38%), followed by pelvic (32%), head-and-neck (22%), and other cancers (8%). Field size was 80-320 cm(2) (mean: 177 cm(2)), and the dose of radiotherapy was 40-70 Gy (mean: 54 Gy). Concurrent chemotherapy was administered in 20 patients. From week 4 to week 6 of radiotherapy and then at weeks 2 and 4 after radiotherapy, the mean grade of dermatitis with and without Aloe vera was 0.81 and 1.10 (p < 0.001), 0.96 and 1.28 (p < 0.001), 1.00 and 1.57 (p = 0.006), 0.59 and 0.79 (p = 0.003), and 0.05 and 0.21 (p = 0.002) respectively. Age and radiation field size had a significant effect on the grade of dermatitis. Based on these results, we conclude that the prophylactic use of Aloe vera reduces the intensity of radiationinduced dermatitis.

  20. Histamine prevents radiation-induced mesenchymal changes in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Galarza, Tamara E; Mohamad, Nora A; Táquez Delgado, Mónica A; Vedoya, Guadalupe M; Crescenti, Ernesto J; Bergoc, Rosa M; Martín, Gabriela A; Cricco, Graciela P

    2016-09-01

    Radiotherapy is a prime option for treatment of solid tumors including breast cancer though side effects are usually present. Experimental evidence shows an increase in invasiveness of several neoplastic cell types through conventional tumor irradiation. The induction of epithelial to mesenchymal transition is proposed as an underlying cause of metastasis triggered by gamma irradiation. Experiments were conducted to investigate the role of histamine on the ionizing radiation-induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition events in breast cancer cells with different invasive phenotype. We also evaluated the potential involvement of Src phosphorylation in the migratory capability of irradiated cells upon histamine treatment. MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 mammary tumor cells were exposed to a single dose of 2Gy of gamma radiation and five days after irradiation mesenchymal-like phenotypic changes were observed by optical microscope. The expression and subcellular localization of E-cadherin, β-catenin, vimentin and Slug were determined by immunoblot and indirect immunofluorescence. There was a decrease in the epithelial marker E-cadherin expression and an increase in the mesenchymal marker vimentin after irradiation. E-cadherin and β-catenin were mainly localized in cytoplasm. Slug positive nuclei, matrix metalloproteinase-2 activity and cell migration and invasion were significantly increased. In addition, a significant enhancement in Src phosphorylation/activation could be determined by immunoblot in irradiated cells. MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells also received 1 or 20μM histamine during 24h previous to be irradiated. Notably, pre-treatment of breast cancer cells with 20μM histamine prevented the mesenchymal changes induced by ionizing radiation and also reduced the migratory behavior of irradiated cells decreasing phospho-Src levels. Collectively, our results suggest that histamine may block events related to epithelial to mesenchymal transition in irradiated mammary cancer

  1. Recovery From Radiation-induced Bone Marrow Damage by HSP25 Through Tie2 Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hae-June; Kwon, Hee-Chung; Chung, Hee-Yong; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Whole-body radiation therapy can cause severe injury to the hematopoietic system, and therefore it is necessary to identify a novel strategy for overcoming this injury. Methods and Materials: Mice were irradiated with 4.5 Gy after heat shock protein 25 (HSP25) gene transfer using an adenoviral vector. Then, peripheral blood cell counts, histopathological analysis, and Western blotting on bone marrow (BM) cells were performed. The interaction of HSP25 with Tie2 was investigated with mouse OP9 and human BM-derived mesenchymal stem cells to determine the mechanism of HSP25 in the hematopoietic system. Results: HSP25 transfer increased BM regeneration and reduced apoptosis following whole-body exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). The decrease in Tie2 protein expression that followed irradiation of the BM was blocked by HSP25 transfer, and Tie2-positive cells were more abundant among the BM cells of HSP25-transferred mice, even after IR exposure. Following systemic RNA interference of Tie2 before IR, HSP25-mediated radioprotective effects were partially blocked in both mice and cell line systems. Stability of Tie2 was increased by HSP25, a response mediated by the interaction of HSP25 with Tie2. IR-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Tie2 was augmented by HSP25 overexpression; downstream events in the Tie2 signaling pathway, including phosphorylation of AKT and EKR1/2, were also activated. Conclusions: HSP25 protects against radiation-induced BM damage by interacting with and stabilizing Tie2. This may be a novel strategy for HSP25-mediated radioprotection in BM.

  2. The Effect of a Grape Seed Extract on Radiation-Induced DNA Damage in Human Lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicu, Tiberius; Postescu, Ion D.; Foriş, Vasile; Brie, Ioana; Fischer-Fodor, Eva; Cernea, Valentin; Moldovan, Mircea; Cosma, Constantin

    2009-05-01

    Plant-derived antioxidants due to their phenolic compounds content are reported as potential candidates for reducing the levels of oxidative stress in living organisms. Grape seed extracts are very potent antioxidants and exhibit numerous interesting pharmacologic activities. Hydroethanolic (50/50, v/v) standardized extract was obtained from red grape seed (Vitis vinifera, variety Burgund Mare—BM). The total polyphenols content was evaluated by Folin-Ciocalteu procedure and expressed as μEq Gallic Acid/ml. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential antioxidant effects of different concentrations of BM extract against 60Co γ-rays induced DNA damage in human lymphocytes. Samples of human lymphocytes were incubated with BM extract (12.5, 25.0 and 37.5 μEq GA/ml, respectively) administered at 30 minutes before in vitro irradiation with γ-rays (2 Gy). The DNA damage and repair in lymphocytes were evaluated using alkaline comet assay. Using the lesion score, the radiation-induced DNA damage was found to be significantly different (p<0.05) from control, both in the absence and presence of BM extract (except the lymphocytes treated with 37.5 μEq GA/ml BM extract). DNA repair analyzed by incubating the irradiated cells at 37° C and 5% CO2 atmosphere for 2 h, indicated a significant difference (p<0.05) in the lymphocytes group treated with 25.0 μEq GA/ml BM extract, immediately and two hours after irradiation. These results suggest radioprotective effects after treatment with BM extract in human lymphocytes.

  3. Thermal Injury Lowers the Threshold for Radiation-Induced Neuroinflammation and Cognitive Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Jonathan D.; Williams, Jacqueline P.; O’Banion, M. Kerry; Olschowka, John A.

    2013-01-01

    The consequences of radiation exposure alone are relatively well understood, but in the wake of events such as the World War II nuclear detonations and accidents such as Chernobyl, other critical factors have emerged that can substantially affect patient outcome. For example, ~70% of radiation victims from Hiroshima and Nagasaki received some sort of additional traumatic injury, the most common being thermal burn. Animal data has shown that the addition of thermal insult to radiation results in increased morbidity and mortality. To explore possible synergism between thermal injury and radiation on brain, C57BL/6J female mice were exposed to either 0 or 5 Gy whole-body gamma irradiation. Irradiation was immediately followed by a 10% total-body surface area full thickness thermal burn. Mice were sacrificed 6 h, 1 week or 6 month post-injury and brains and plasma were harvested for histology, mRNA analysis and cytokine ELISA. Plasma analysis revealed that combined injury synergistically upregulates IL-6 at acute time points. Additionally, at 6 h, combined injury resulted in a greater upregulation of the vascular marker, ICAM-1 and TNF-α mRNA. Enhanced activation of glial cells was also observed by CD68 and Iba1 immunohistochemistry at all time points. Additionally, doublecortin staining at 6 months showed reduced neurogenesis in all injury conditions. Finally, using a novel object recognition test, we observed that only mice with combined injury had significant learning and memory deficits. These results demonstrate that thermal injury lowers the threshold for radiation-induced neuroinflammation and long-term cognitive dysfunction. PMID:24059681

  4. Novel ion-exchange membranes for electrodialysis prepared by radiation-induced graft polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuneda, Satoshi; Saito, Kyoichi; Misuhara, Hisashi; Sugo, Takanobu

    1995-11-01

    Ion-exchange membranes have been used to concentrate seawater to produce salt as well as to desalinate brackish water to render it potable. Also, the interest in applications of ion-exchange membranes as separators for electrodialytic desalination of bioproducts and separators in hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells has been growing. Novel ion-exchange membranes containing sulfonic acid (SO{sub 3}H) and trimethyl ammonium [N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}] groups were prepared by a simple method of radiation-induced cografting of sodium styrene sulfonate (SSS) with acrylic acid (AAc) and vinyl benzyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (VBTAC) with 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), onto a polyethylene film with a thickness of 50 {micro}m. The high density graft chain was introduced throughout the polyethylene film. The maximum cation- and anion-exchange capacities of the resultant membranes were 2.5 and 1.3 mol/kg, receptively. These membranes exhibited an electrical resistance one order lower than commercially available ion-exchange membranes; for example, 12 h cografting provided cation- and anion-exchange membranes whose electrical resistances in a 0.5 M NaCl solution were 0.25 and 0.85 {Omega} cm{sup 2}, respectively. From the evaluation of electrodialytic desalination in a batch mode, using a pair of the graft-type ion-exchange membranes, the time required to achieve 99.5% desalination of the initial 0.5 M NaCl solutions was reduced to 85% comparing with that of the commercial ion-exchange membranes.

  5. CXC Receptor 1 and 2 and Neutrophil Elastase Inhibitors Alter Radiation-induced Lung Disease in the Mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Jessica; Haston, Christina K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We previously reported increased numbers of neutrophils to be associated with the development of the radiation-induced lung responses of alveolitis (pneumonitis) and fibrosis in mice. In the present study we investigated whether CXC receptor 1 and 2 antagonism with DF2156A, a small molecule inhibitor of neutrophil chemotaxis, or the neutrophil elastase inhibitor sivelestat decreases the lung response to irradiation. Methods and Materials: KK/HIJ mice received 14 Gy whole-thorax irradiation, and a subset of them received drug treatment 3 times per week from the day of irradiation until they were killed because of respiratory distress symptoms. Results: Irradiated mice receiving sivelestat survived 18% longer than did mice receiving radiation alone (73 vs 60 days for female mice, 91 vs 79 days for male mice), whereas postirradiation survival times did not differ between the group of mice receiving DF2156A and the radiation-only group. The numbers of neutrophils in lung tissue and in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid did not differ among groups of irradiated mice, but they significantly exceeded the levels in unirradiated control mice. The extent of alveolitis, assessed histologically, did not differ between irradiated mice treated with either drug and those receiving radiation alone, when assessed at the end of the experiment, but it was significantly reduced, as were the neutrophil measures, in sivelestat-treated mice at the common kill time of 60 days after irradiation. Mice treated with radiation and DF2156A developed significantly less fibrosis than did mice receiving radiation alone, and this difference was associated with decreased expression of interleukin-13 in lung tissue. Conclusions: We conclude that neutrophil elastase inhibition affects alveolitis and prolongs survival, whereas CXCR1/2 antagonism reduces radiation-induced fibrotic lung disease in mice without affecting the onset of distress.

  6. Mucosal acid causes gastric mucosal microcirculatory disturbance in nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Funatsu, Toshiyuki; Chono, Koji; Hirata, Takuya; Keto, Yoshihiro; Kimoto, Aishi; Sasamata, Masao

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism by which nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) suppress gastric mucosal blood flow is not fully understood, although the depletion of mucosal prostaglandin E2 has been proposed as one possible explanation. We investigated the role of gastric acid on gastric mucosal blood flow in NSAID-treated rats. A rat stomach was mounted in an ex vivo chamber, and gastric mucosal blood flow was measured sequentially in a 5-mm2 area of the gastric corpus using a scanning laser Doppler perfusion image system. Results showed that diclofenac (5 mg/kg s.c.) and indomethacin (10 mg/kg s.c.) did not affect gastric mucosal blood flow, although both strongly decreased mucosal prostaglandin E2 when saline was instilled into the gastric chamber. On replacement of the saline in the chamber with 100 mM hydrochloric acid, these drugs caused a decrease in gastric mucosal blood flow levels within 30 min. The specific cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors celecoxib (50 mg/kg s.c.) and rofecoxib (25 mg/kg s.c.) did not affect mucosal prostaglandin E2 level, nor did they decrease gastric mucosal blood flow, even when hydrochloric acid was added to the chamber. Furthermore, measurement of vasoconstrictive factors present in the mucosa showed that endothelin-1 levels increased after administration of diclofenac s.c. in the presence of intragastric hydrochloric acid. This indicates that the presence of mucosal hydrochloric acid plays an important role in the NSAID-induced decrease in gastric mucosal blood flow, while the COX-1-derived basal prostaglandin E2, which is unlikely to control gastric mucosal blood flow itself, protects microcirculatory systems from mucosal hydrochloric acid.

  7. Smad2/3-Regulated Expression of DLX2 Is Associated with Radiation-Induced Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Radioresistance of A549 and MDA-MB-231 Human Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yeo-Jin; Baek, Ga-Young; Park, Hae-Ran; Jo, Sung-Kee; Jung, Uhee

    2016-01-01

    The control of radioresistance and metastatic potential of surviving cancer cells is important for improving cancer eradication by radiotheraphy. The distal-less homeobox2 (DLX2) gene encodes for a homeobox transcription factor involved in morphogenesis and its deregulation was found in human solid tumors and hematologic malignancies. Here we investigated the role of DLX2 in association with radiation-induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and stem cell-like properties and its regulation by Smad2/3 signaling in irradiated A549 and MDA-MB-231 human cancer cell lines. In irradiated A549 and MDA-MB-231 cells, EMT was induced as demonstrated by EMT marker expression, phosphorylation of Smad2/3, and migratory and invasive ability. Also, irradiated A549 and MDA-MB-231 cells showed increased cancer stem cells (CSCs) marker. Interestingly, DLX2 was overexpressed upon irradiation. Therefore, we examined the role of DLX2 in radiation-induced EMT and radioresistance. The overexpression of DLX2 alone induced EMT, migration and invasion, and CSC marker expression. The reduced colony-forming ability in irradiated cells was partially restored by DLX2 overexpression. On the other hand, the depletion of DLX2 using si-RNA abolished radiation-induced EMT, CSC marker expression, and phosphorylation of Smad2/3 in irradiated A549 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Also, depletion of DLX2 increased the radiation sensitivity in both cell lines. Moreover, knockdown of Smad2/3, a key activator of TGF-β1 pathway, abrogated the radiation-induced DLX2 expression, indicating that radiation-induced DLX2 expression is dependent on Smad2/3 signaling. These results demonstrated that DLX2 plays a crucial role in radioresistance, radiation-induced EMT and CSC marker expression, and the expression of DLX2 is regulated by Smad2/3 signaling in A549 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines. PMID:26799321

  8. Smad2/3-Regulated Expression of DLX2 Is Associated with Radiation-Induced Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Radioresistance of A549 and MDA-MB-231 Human Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yeo-Jin; Baek, Ga-Young; Park, Hae-Ran; Jo, Sung-Kee; Jung, Uhee

    2016-01-01

    The control of radioresistance and metastatic potential of surviving cancer cells is important for improving cancer eradication by radiotheraphy. The distal-less homeobox2 (DLX2) gene encodes for a homeobox transcription factor involved in morphogenesis and its deregulation was found in human solid tumors and hematologic malignancies. Here we investigated the role of DLX2 in association with radiation-induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and stem cell-like properties and its regulation by Smad2/3 signaling in irradiated A549 and MDA-MB-231 human cancer cell lines. In irradiated A549 and MDA-MB-231 cells, EMT was induced as demonstrated by EMT marker expression, phosphorylation of Smad2/3, and migratory and invasive ability. Also, irradiated A549 and MDA-MB-231 cells showed increased cancer stem cells (CSCs) marker. Interestingly, DLX2 was overexpressed upon irradiation. Therefore, we examined the role of DLX2 in radiation-induced EMT and radioresistance. The overexpression of DLX2 alone induced EMT, migration and invasion, and CSC marker expression. The reduced colony-forming ability in irradiated cells was partially restored by DLX2 overexpression. On the other hand, the depletion of DLX2 using si-RNA abolished radiation-induced EMT, CSC marker expression, and phosphorylation of Smad2/3 in irradiated A549 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Also, depletion of DLX2 increased the radiation sensitivity in both cell lines. Moreover, knockdown of Smad2/3, a key activator of TGF-β1 pathway, abrogated the radiation-induced DLX2 expression, indicating that radiation-induced DLX2 expression is dependent on Smad2/3 signaling. These results demonstrated that DLX2 plays a crucial role in radioresistance, radiation-induced EMT and CSC marker expression, and the expression of DLX2 is regulated by Smad2/3 signaling in A549 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines. PMID:26799321

  9. [Mucosal healling: a realistic aim or marketing myth?].

    PubMed

    García-Sánchez, Valle; Iglesias-Flores, Eva

    2011-12-01

    The classical aim of the treatment of ulcerative colitis is to induce and maintain remission. However, this aim has not been shown to prevent long-term complications. Current treatment goals attempt to prevent complications. In some studies, healing of the intestinal mucosa has been shown to improve long-term outcomes. In ulcerative colitis, mucosal healing reduces recurrence, the risk of colorectal cancer and the need for surgery, and improves patients' quality of life. The drugs for which there is greatest evidence of their efficacy in inducing and maintaining mucosal healing are salicylates and biological agents. In the near future, endoscopic monitoring may be required to evaluate response to the treatment and decisions may have to be taken according to the persistence or disappearance of these lesions.

  10. DETECTION OF LOW DOSE RADIATION INDUCED DNA DAMAGE USING TEMPERATURE DIFFERENNTIAL FLUORESENCE ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. Changes in temperature-induced strand separation in both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from Escherichia coli) were measured after exposure to low doses of radiation. Exposures...

  11. DETECTION OF LOW DOSE RADIATION INDUCED DNA DAMAGE USING TEMPERATURE DIFFERENTIAL FLUORESCENCE ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. Changes in temperature-induced strand separation in both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from Escherichia coli) were measured after exposure to low doses of radiation. Exposur...

  12. Management of late radiation-induced rectal injury after treatment of carcinoma of the uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Allen-Mersh, T.G.; Wilson, E.J.; Hope-Stone, H.F.; Mann, C.V.

    1987-06-01

    Sixty-one of 1418 (4.3 per cent) patients treated with radiation for carcinoma of the uterus from 1963 to 1983 had significant radiation-induced complications of the intestine develop which required a surgical opinion considering further management. Ninety-three per cent of these complications involved the rectum. Florid proctitis resolved within two years of onset in 33 per cent of the patients who were managed conservatively while 22 per cent of the patients died of disseminated disease within the same time period. Surgical treatment was eventually necessary in 39 per cent of the patients who were initially treated conservatively for radiation induced proctitis. Rectal excision with coloanal sleeve anastomosis produced a satisfactory result in eight of 11 patients with severe radiation injury involving the rectum. The incidence of radiation-induced and malignant rectovaginal fistula were similar (1 per cent), but disease-induced symptoms tended to occur earlier after primary treatment (a median of eight months) compared with radiation-induced symptoms (a median of 16 months).

  13. Deep Friction Massage in Treatment of Radiation-induced Fibrosis: Rehabilitative Care for Breast Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Warpenburg, Mary J

    2014-10-01

    Treatment for invasive breast cancer usually involves some combination of surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and/or targeted therapy. For approximately 50% of patients, radiation therapy is a component of the therapies used. As a result, radiation-induced fibrosis is becoming a common and crippling side effect, leading to muscle imbalance with a lessened range of motion as well as pain and dysfunction of the vascular and lymphatic systems. No good estimates are available for how many patients experience complications from radiation. Radiation-induced fibrosis can affect the underlying fascia, muscles, organs, and bones within the primary target field and the larger secondary field that is caused by the scatter effect of radioactive elements. For breast cancer patients, the total radiation field may include the neck, shoulder, axillary, and thoracic muscles and the ribs for both the ipsilateral (cancer-affected) and contralateral sides. This case study indicates that therapy using deep friction massage can affect radiation-induced fibrosis beneficially, particularly in the thoracic muscles and the intercostals (ie, the muscles between the ribs). When delivered in intensive sessions using deep friction techniques, massage has the potential to break down fibrotic tissues, releasing the inflammation and free radicals that are caused by radiation therapy. In the course of the massage, painful and debilitating spasms resulting from fibrosis can be relieved and the progressive nature of the radiation-induced fibrosis interrupted. PMID:26770116

  14. 3D ultrasound Nakagami imaging for radiation-induced vaginal fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Rossi, Peter; Shelton, Joseph; Bruner, Debrorah; Tridandapani, Srini; Liu, Tian

    2014-03-01

    Radiation-induced vaginal fibrosis is a debilitating side-effect affecting up to 80% of women receiving radiotherapy for their gynecological (GYN) malignancies. Despite the significant incidence and severity, little research has been conducted to identify the pathophysiologic changes of vaginal toxicity. In a previous study, we have demonstrated that ultrasound Nakagami shape and PDF parameters can be used to quantify radiation-induced vaginal toxicity. These Nakagami parameters are derived from the statistics of ultrasound backscattered signals to capture the physical properties (e.g., arrangement and distribution) of the biological tissues. In this paper, we propose to expand this Nakagami imaging concept from 2D to 3D to fully characterize radiation-induced changes to the vaginal wall within the radiation treatment field. A pilot study with 5 post-radiotherapy GYN patients was conducted using a clinical ultrasound scanner (6 MHz) with a mechanical stepper. A serial of 2D ultrasound images, with radio-frequency (RF) signals, were acquired at 1 mm step size. The 2D Nakagami shape and PDF parameters were calculated from the RF signal envelope with a sliding window, and then 3D Nakagami parameter images were generated from the parallel 2D images. This imaging method may be useful as we try to monitor radiation-induced vaginal injury, and address vaginal toxicities and sexual dysfunction in women after radiotherapy for GYN malignancies.

  15. Use of iron colloid-enhanced MRI for study of acute radiation-induced hepatic injury

    SciTech Connect

    Suto, Yuji; Ametani, Masaki; Kato, Takashi; Hashimoto, Masayuki; Kamba, Masayuki; Sugihara, Syuji; Ohta, Yoshio

    1996-03-01

    We present a case with acute radiation-induced hepatic injury using chondroitin sulfate iron colloid (CSIC)-enhanced MRI. Uptake of CSIC was decreased in the irradiated portion of the liver. CSIC-enhanced MRI is useful for obtaining information on the function of the reticuloendothelial system and demarcates between irradiated and nonirradiated zones. 18 refs., 3 figs

  16. A Nonhuman Primate Model of Human Radiation-Induced Venocclusive Liver Disease and Hepatocyte Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Yannam, Govardhana Rao; Han, Bing; Setoyama, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Ito, Ryotaro; Brooks, Jenna M.; Guzman-Lepe, Jorge; Galambos, Csaba; Fong, Jason V.; Deutsch, Melvin; Quader, Mubina A.; Yamanouchi, Kosho; Kabarriti, Rafi; Mehta, Keyur; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; and others

    2014-02-01

    Background: Human liver has an unusual sensitivity to radiation that limits its use in cancer therapy or in preconditioning for hepatocyte transplantation. Because the characteristic veno-occlusive lesions of radiation-induced liver disease do not occur in rodents, there has been no experimental model to investigate the limits of safe radiation therapy or explore the pathogenesis of hepatic veno-occlusive disease. Methods and Materials: We performed a dose-escalation study in a primate, the cynomolgus monkey, using hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in 13 animals. Results: At doses ≥40 Gy, animals developed a systemic syndrome resembling human radiation-induced liver disease, consisting of decreased albumin, elevated alkaline phosphatase, loss of appetite, ascites, and normal bilirubin. Higher radiation doses were lethal, causing severe disease that required euthanasia approximately 10 weeks after radiation. Even at lower doses in which radiation-induced liver disease was mild or nonexistent, latent and significant injury to hepatocytes was demonstrated by asialoglycoprotein-mediated functional imaging. These monkeys developed hepatic failure with encephalopathy when they received parenteral nutrition containing high concentrations of glucose. Histologically, livers showed central obstruction via an unusual intimal swelling that progressed to central fibrosis. Conclusions: The cynomolgus monkey, as the first animal model of human veno-occlusive radiation-induced liver disease, provides a resource for characterizing the early changes and pathogenesis of venocclusion, for establishing nonlethal therapeutic dosages, and for examining experimental therapies to minimize radiation injury.

  17. Molecular, Cellular and Functional Effects of Radiation-Induced Brain Injury: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Balentova, Sona; Adamkov, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy is the most effective non-surgical treatment of primary brain tumors and metastases. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into pathogenesis of radiation-induced injury to the central nervous system. Radiation-induced brain injury can damage neuronal, glial and vascular compartments of the brain and may lead to molecular, cellular and functional changes. Given its central role in memory and adult neurogenesis, the majority of studies have focused on the hippocampus. These findings suggested that hippocampal avoidance in cranial radiotherapy prevents radiation-induced cognitive impairment of patients. However, multiple rodent studies have shown that this problem is more complex. As the radiation-induced cognitive impairment reflects hippocampal and non-hippocampal compartments, it is of critical importance to investigate molecular, cellular and functional modifications in various brain regions as well as their integration at clinically relevant doses and schedules. We here provide a literature overview, including our previously published results, in order to support the translation of preclinical findings to clinical practice, and improve the physical and mental status of patients with brain tumors. PMID:26610477

  18. The radiation-induced changes in rectal mucosa: Hyperfractionated vs. hypofractionated preoperative radiation for rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Starzewski, Jacek J.; Pajak, Jacek T.; Pawelczyk, Iwona; Lange, Dariusz; Golka, Dariusz . E-mail: dargolka@wp.pl; Brzeziska, Monika; Lorenc, Zbigniew

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was the qualitative and quantitative evaluation of acute radiation-induced rectal changes in patients who underwent preoperative radiotherapy according to two different irradiation protocols. Patients and Methods: Sixty-eight patients with rectal adenocarcinoma underwent preoperative radiotherapy; 44 and 24 patients underwent hyperfractionated and hypofractionated protocol, respectively. Fifteen patients treated with surgery alone served as a control group. Five basic histopathologic features (meganucleosis, inflammatory infiltrations, eosinophils, mucus secretion, and erosions) and two additional features (mitotic figures and architectural glandular abnormalities) of radiation-induced changes were qualified and quantified. Results: Acute radiation-induced reactions were found in 66 patients. The most common were eosinophilic and plasma-cell inflammatory infiltrations (65 patients), erosions, and decreased mucus secretion (54 patients). Meganucleosis and mitotic figures were more common in patients who underwent hyperfractionated radiotherapy. The least common were the glandular architectural distortions, especially in patients treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy. Statistically significant differences in morphologic parameters studied between groups treated with different irradiation protocols were found. Conclusion: The system of assessment is a valuable tool in the evaluation of radiation-induced changes in the rectal mucosa. A greater intensity of regenerative changes was found in patients treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy.

  19. Activating PTEN by COX-2 inhibitors antagonizes radiation-induced AKT activation contributing to radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhen; Gan, Ye-Hua

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy is still one of the most effective nonsurgical treatments for many tumors. However, radioresistance remains a major impediment to radiotherapy. Although COX-2 inhibitors can induce radiosensitization, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we showed that COX-2 selective inhibitor celecoxib enhanced the radiation-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis in HeLa and SACC-83 cells. Treatment with celecoxib alone dephosphorylated phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN), promoted PTEN membrane translocation or activation, and correspondingly dephosphorylated or inactivated protein kinase B (AKT). By contrast, treatment with radiation alone increased PTEN phosphorylation, inhibited PTEN membrane translocation and correspondingly activated AKT in the two cell lines. However, treatment with celecoxib or another COX-2 selective inhibitor (valdecoxib) completely blocked radiation-induced increase of PTEN phosphorylation, rescued radiation-induced decrease in PTEN membrane translocation, and correspondingly inactivated AKT. Moreover, celecoxib could also upregulate PTEN protein expression by downregulating Sp1 expression, thereby leading to the activation of PTEN transcription. Our results suggested that COX-2 inhibitors could enhance radiosensitization at least partially by activating PTEN to antagonize radiation-induced AKT activation.

  20. Effect of ozone oxidative preconditioning in preventing early radiation-induced lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Bakkal, B H; Gultekin, F A; Guven, B; Turkcu, U O; Bektas, S; Can, M

    2013-09-01

    Ionizing radiation causes its biological effects mainly through oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen species. Previous studies showed that ozone oxidative preconditioning attenuated pathophysiological events mediated by reactive oxygen species. As inhalation of ozone induces lung injury, the aim of this study was to examine whether ozone oxidative preconditioning potentiates or attenuates the effects of irradiation on the lung. Rats were subjected to total body irradiation, with or without treatment with ozone oxidative preconditioning (0.72 mg/kg). Serum proinflammatory cytokine levels, oxidative damage markers, and histopathological analysis were compared at 6 and 72 h after total body irradiation. Irradiation significantly increased lung malondialdehyde levels as an end-product of lipoperoxidation. Irradiation also significantly decreased lung superoxide dismutase activity, which is an indicator of the generation of oxidative stress and an early protective response to oxidative damage. Ozone oxidative preconditioning plus irradiation significantly decreased malondialdehyde levels and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase, which might indicate protection of the lung from radiation-induced lung injury. Serum tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta levels, which increased significantly following total body irradiation, were decreased with ozone oxidative preconditioning. Moreover, ozone oxidative preconditioning was able to ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury assessed by histopathological evaluation. In conclusion, ozone oxidative preconditioning, repeated low-dose intraperitoneal administration of ozone, did not exacerbate radiation-induced lung injury, and, on the contrary, it provided protection against radiation-induced lung damage.

  1. Radiation induces genomic instability and mammary ductal dysplasia in Atm heterozygous mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weil, M. M.; Kittrell, F. S.; Yu, Y.; McCarthy, M.; Zabriskie, R. C.; Ullrich, R. L.

    2001-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is a genetic syndrome resulting from the inheritance of two defective copies of the ATM gene that includes among its stigmata radiosensitivity and cancer susceptibility. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that although women with a single defective copy of ATM (AT heterozygotes) appear clinically normal, they may never the less have an increased relative risk of developing breast cancer. Whether they are at increased risk for radiation-induced breast cancer from medical exposures to ionizing radiation is unknown. We have used a murine model of AT to investigate the effect of a single defective Atm allele, the murine homologue of ATM, on the susceptibility of mammary epithelial cells to radiation-induced transformation. Here we report that mammary epithelial cells from irradiated mice with one copy of Atm truncated in the PI-3 kinase domain were susceptible to radiation-induced genomic instability and generated a 10% incidence of dysplastic mammary ducts when transplanted into syngenic recipients, whereas cells from Atm(+/+) mice were stable and formed only normal ducts. Since radiation-induced ductal dysplasia is a precursor to mammary cancer, the results indicate that AT heterozygosity increases susceptibility to radiogenic breast cancer in this murine model system.

  2. Brain neuropeptides in gastric mucosal protection.

    PubMed

    Gyires, Klára; Zádori, Zoltán S

    2014-12-01

    The centrally induced gastroprotective effect of neuropeptides has been intensively studied. Besides many similarities, however, differences can also be observed in their gastroprotective actions. The gastroprotective dose-response curve proved to be either sigmoid, or bell-shaped. Additional gastrointestinal effects of neuropeptides can contribute to their mucosal protective effect. Part of the neuropeptides induces gastroprotection by peripheral administration as well. Besides vagal nerve the sympathetic nervous system may also be involved in conveying the central effect to the periphery. Better understanding of the complex mechanism of the maintenance of gastric mucosal integrity may result in the development of new strategy to enhance gastric mucosal resistance against injury.

  3. Detecting Radiation-Induced Injury Using Rapid 3D Variogram Analysis of CT Images of Rat Lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, Rick E.; Murphy, Mark K.; Creim, Jeffrey A.; Carson, James P.

    2013-10-01

    A new heterogeneity analysis approach to discern radiation-induced lung damage was tested on CT images of irradiated rats. The method, combining octree decomposition with variogram analysis, demonstrated a significant correlation with radiation exposure levels, whereas conventional measurements and pulmonary function tests did not. The results suggest the new approach may be highly sensitive for assessing even subtle radiation-induced changes

  4. Adenosine Kinase Inhibition Protects against Cranial Radiation-Induced Cognitive Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Munjal M.; Baulch, Janet E.; Lusardi, Theresa A.; Allen, Barrett. D.; Chmielewski, Nicole N.; Baddour, Al Anoud D.; Limoli, Charles L.; Boison, Detlev

    2016-01-01

    Clinical radiation therapy for the treatment of CNS cancers leads to unintended and debilitating impairments in cognition. Radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction is long lasting; however, the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms are still not well established. Since ionizing radiation causes microglial and astroglial activation, we hypothesized that maladaptive changes in astrocyte function might be implicated in radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction. Among other gliotransmitters, astrocytes control the availability of adenosine, an endogenous neuroprotectant and modulator of cognition, via metabolic clearance through adenosine kinase (ADK). Adult rats exposed to cranial irradiation (10 Gy) showed significant declines in performance of hippocampal-dependent cognitive function tasks [novel place recognition, novel object recognition (NOR), and contextual fear conditioning (FC)] 1 month after exposure to ionizing radiation using a clinically relevant regimen. Irradiated rats spent less time exploring a novel place or object. Cranial irradiation also led to reduction in freezing behavior compared to controls in the FC task. Importantly, immunohistochemical analyses of irradiated brains showed significant elevation of ADK immunoreactivity in the hippocampus that was related to astrogliosis and increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Conversely, rats treated with the ADK inhibitor 5-iodotubercidin (5-ITU, 3.1 mg/kg, i.p., for 6 days) prior to cranial irradiation showed significantly improved behavioral performance in all cognitive tasks 1 month post exposure. Treatment with 5-ITU attenuated radiation-induced astrogliosis and elevated ADK immunoreactivity in the hippocampus. These results confirm an astrocyte-mediated mechanism where preservation of extracellular adenosine can exert neuroprotection against radiation-induced pathology. These innovative findings link radiation-induced changes in cognition and CNS functionality to altered

  5. On the mechanism of radiation-induced emesis: The role of serotonin

    SciTech Connect

    Scarantino, C.W.; Ornitz, R.D.; Hoffman, L.G.

    1994-11-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the mechanism of action of radiation-induced emesis by determining the incidence of radiation-induced emesis following hemibody irradiation; the effects of specific antiemetics especially ondansetron, a 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonist, and to determine the relationship between radiation-induced emesis and serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) through its active metabolite, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA). Forty-one patients received 53 hemibody treatments of 5-8 Gy following intravenous hydration. The patients were divided into three groups according to prehemibody irradiation treatment: Group A: no pretreatment antiemetics, 30 patients; Group B: nonondansetron antiemetics (metoclopramide, dexamethasone, prochlorperazine), ten patients; and Group C: ondansetron, 13 patient. The incidence of radiation-induced emesis was determined prehemibody irradiation or baseline and at 1 h posthemibody irradiation in 38 patients and the results expressed as the percent change in 5-HIAA (ng/ug creatinine). The incidence of radiation-induced emesis was 82% (14/17) following upper/mid hemibody irradiation and 15% (2/11) following lower hemibody irradiation in Group A; 50% (3/6) and 25% (1/4) following upper/mid and lower hemibody irradiation respectively, in Group B/; and 0% (p/13) after upper/mid hemibody irradiation in Group C. The incidence of emesis was significantly different (p<0.001) between the patients of Group A and C who received upper/mid hemibody irradiation. The percent change in 5-HIAA excretion following upper/mid hemibody irradiation were greatest in Group A and smallest in Group C (p<0.002). The degree of change following lower hemibody irradiation (15% incidence of emesis) in Group A was lower than upper/mid hemibody irradiation of the same group. 17 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Alteration of the Redox State with Reactive Oxygen Species for 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Oral Mucositis in Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Wada-Takahashi, Satoko; Takahashi, Shun-suke; Lee, Masaichi Chang-il

    2013-01-01

    Oral mucositis is often induced in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy treatment. It has been reported that oral mucositis can reduce quality of life, as well as increasing the incidence of mortality. The participation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the pathogenesis of oral mucositis is well known, but no report has actually demonstrated the presence of ROS. Thus, the purpose of this study was thus to demonstrate the involvement of ROS and the alteration of the redox state in oral mucositis using an in vivo L-band electron spin resonance (ESR) technique. An oral mucositis animal model induced by treatment of 5-fluorouracil with 10% acetic acid in hamster cheek pouch was used. Lipid peroxidation was measured as the level of malondialdehyde determined by the thiobarbituric acid reaction. The rate constants of the signal decay of nitroxyl compounds using in vivo L-band ESR were calculated from the signal decay curves. Firstly, we established the oral mucositis animal model induced by treatment of 5-fluorouracil with acetic acid in hamster cheek pouch. An increased level of lipid peroxidation in oral mucositis was found by measuring malondialdehyde using isolated hamster cheek pouch ulcer. In addition, as a result of in vivo L-band ESR measurements using our model animals, the decay rate constants of carbamoyl-PROXYL, which is a reagent for detecting the redox balance in tissue, were decreased. These results suggest that a redox imbalance might occur by excessive generation of ROS at an early stage of oral mucositis and the consumption of large quantities of antioxidants including glutathione in the locality of oral mucositis. These findings support the presence of ROS involved in the pathogenesis of oral mucositis with anti-cancer therapy, and is useful for the development of novel therapies drugs for oral mucositis. PMID:24376587

  7. Effect of radiation-induced segregation on void nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Si-Ahmed, A.; Wolfer, W.G.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of segregation on void nucleation is investigated utilizing previous results for the capture efficiency of coated void. First, it is shown that any segregation, whether or not it leads to actual precipitation, leads to a modification of the bias factors for any sink. Small increases of either the lattice parameters or the elastic moduli result in reduced interstitial bias factors. Second, segregations to void embryos not only changes their capture efficiencies but also the surface energy. The effect of these changes on the void nucleation rate is studied in quantitative terms. When the segregation to voids results in an increase of the local lattice parameters by 0.4% or an increase of the shear modulus by 3%, the ultimate void nucleation rate is reached. Further increases no longer enhance void nucleation. Void nucleation without segregation effects would only be possible if the dislocation bias exceeds 50%. With segregation, void nucleation is not strongly dependent on the dislocation bias.

  8. Effect of Prophylactic Low Level Laser Therapy on Oral Mucositis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Oberoi, Sapna; Zamperlini–Netto, Gabriele; Beyene, Joseph; Treister, Nathaniel S.; Sung, Lillian

    2014-01-01

    Background Objective was to determine whether prophylactic low level laser therapy (LLLT) reduces the risk of severe mucositis as compared to placebo or no therapy. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched until February 2014 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing prophylactic LLLT with placebo or no therapy in patients with cancer or undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). All analyses used random effects models. Results Eighteen RCTs (1144 patients) were included. Prophylactic LLLT reduced the overall risk of severe mucositis (risk ratio (RR) 0.37, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.20 to 0.67; P = 0.001). LLLT also reduced the following outcomes when compared to placebo/no therapy: severe mucositis at the time of anticipated maximal mucositis (RR 0.34, 95% CI 0.20 to 0.59), overall mean grade of mucositis (standardized mean difference −1.49, 95% CI −2.02 to −0.95), duration of severe mucositis (weighted mean difference −5.32, 95% CI −9.45 to −1.19) and incidence of severe pain (RR 0.26, 95% CI 0.18 to 0.37). Conclusion Prophylactic LLLT reduced severe mucositis and pain in patients with cancer and HSCT recipients. Future research should identify the optimal characteristics of LLLT and determine feasibility in the clinical setting. PMID:25198431

  9. Protective effect of an antithyroid compound against γ-radiation-induced damage in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Perona, Marina; Dagrosa, Maria A; Pagotto, Romina; Casal, Mariana; Pignataro, Omar; Pisarev, Mario A; Juvenal, Guillermo J

    2014-08-01

    We have previously reported the radioprotective effect of propylthiouracil (PTU) on thyroid cells. The aim of the present study was to analyze whether tumor cells and normal cells demonstrate the same response to PTU. Human colon carcinoma cells were irradiated with γ-irradiation with or without PTU. We evaluated the clonogenic survival, intracellular reactive oxygen species levels, catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities, and apoptosis by nuclear cell morphology and caspase-3 activity assays. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. PTU treatment increased surviving cell fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) from 56.9 ± 3.6 in controls to 75.0 ± 3.5 (p < 0.05) and diminished radiation-induced apoptosis. In addition, we observed that the level of antioxidant enzymes' activity was increased in cells treated with PTU. Moreover, pretreatment with PTU increased intracellular levels of cAMP. Forskolin (p < 0.01) and dibutyryl cAMP (p < 0.05) mimicked the effect of PTU on SF2. Co-treatment with H89, an inhibitor of protein kinase A, abolished the radioprotective effect of PTU. PTU reduces the toxicity of ionizing radiation by increasing cAMP levels and also possibly through a reduction in apoptosis levels and in radiation-induced oxidative stress damage. We therefore conclude that PTU protects both normal and cancer cells during exposure to radiation in conditions mimicking the radiotherapy.

  10. Radiation-Induced Damage to Microstructure of Parotid Gland: Evaluation Using High-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, Tomoko; Kodani, Kazuhiko; Michimoto, Koichi; Fujii, Shinya; Ogawa, Toshihide

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To elucidate the radiation-induced damage to the microstructure of the parotid gland using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. Methods and Materials: High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging of the parotid gland was performed before radiotherapy (RT) and during the RT period or {<=}3 weeks after RT completion for 12 head-and-neck cancer patients using a 1.5-T scanner with a microscopy coil. The maximal cross-sectional area of the gland was evaluated, and changes in the internal architecture of the gland were assessed both visually and quantitatively. Results: Magnetic resonance images were obtained at a median parotid gland dose of 36 Gy (range, 11-64). According to the quantitative analysis, the maximal cross-sectional area of the gland was reduced, the width of the main duct was narrowed, and the intensity ratio of the main duct lumen to background was significantly decreased after RT (p <.0001). According to the visual assessment, the width of the main duct tended to narrow and the contrast of the duct lumen tended to be decreased, but no significant differences were noted. The visibility of the duct branches was unclear in 10 patients (p = .039), and the septum became dense in 11 patients (p = .006) after RT. Conclusion: High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging is a noninvasive method of evaluating radiation-induced changes to the internal architecture of the parotid gland. Morphologic changes in the irradiated parotid gland were demonstrated during the RT course even when a relatively small dose was delivered to the gland.

  11. Targeting the renin-angiotensin system combined with an antioxidant is highly effective in mitigating radiation-induced lung damage

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Javed; Jelveh, Salomeh; Zaidi, Asif; Doctrow, Susan R.; Medhora, Meetha; Hill, Richard P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the outcome of suppression of renin angiotensin system (RAS) using Captopril combined with an antioxidant (EUKarion-207) for mitigation of radiation-induced lung damage in rats. Materials and Methods The thoracic cavity of female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats was irradiated with single dose of 11 Gy. Treatment with Captopril at a dose of 40 mg/kg/day in drinking water and EUK-207 given by subcutaneous injection (8 mg/kg daily) was started 1 week (wk) post-irradiation (PI) and continuing until 14 wks PI. Breathing rate was monitored until the rats were sacrificed at 32 wks PI when lung fibrosis was assessed by lung hydroxyproline content. Lung levels of the cytokine, Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-β1, and macrophage activation were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Oxidative DNA damage was assessed by 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels and lipid peroxidation was measured by a T-BARS assay. Results The increase in breathing rate in the irradiated rats was significantly reduced by the drug treatments. The drug treatment also significantly decreased the hydroxyproline content, 8-OHdG and malondialdehyde levels, and levels of activated macrophages and the cytokine TGF-β1 at 32 wks. Almost complete mitigation of these radiation effects was observed by combining Captopril and EUK-207. Conclusion Captopril and EUK-207 can provide mitigation of radiation-induced lung damage out to at least 32 wks PI following treatment given 1–14 wks PI. Overall the combination of Captopril and EUK-207 was more effective than the individual drugs used alone. PMID:24867538

  12. Targeting the Renin–Angiotensin System Combined With an Antioxidant Is Highly Effective in Mitigating Radiation-Induced Lung Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, Javed; Jelveh, Salomeh; Zaidi, Asif; Doctrow, Susan R.; Medhora, Meetha; Hill, Richard P.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the outcome of suppression of the renin angiotensin system using captopril combined with an antioxidant (Eukarion [EUK]-207) for mitigation of radiation-induced lung damage in rats. Methods and Materials: The thoracic cavity of female Sprague-Dawley rats was irradiated with a single dose of 11 Gy. Treatment with captopril at a dose of 40 mg/kg/d in drinking water and EUK-207 given by subcutaneous injection (8 mg/kg daily) was started 1 week after irradiation (PI) and continuing until 14 weeks PI. Breathing rate was monitored until the rats were killed at 32 weeks PI, when lung fibrosis was assessed by lung hydroxyproline content. Lung levels of the cytokine transforming growth factor-β1 and macrophage activation were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Oxidative DNA damage was assessed by 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine levels, and lipid peroxidation was measured by a T-BARS assay. Results: The increase in breathing rate in the irradiated rats was significantly reduced by the drug treatments. The drug treatment also significantly decreased the hydroxyproline content, 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine and malondialdehyde levels, and levels of activated macrophages and the cytokine transforming growth factor-β1 at 32 weeks. Almost complete mitigation of these radiation effects was observed by combining captopril and EUK-207. Conclusion: Captopril and EUK-207 can provide mitigation of radiation-induced lung damage out to at least 32 weeks PI after treatment given 1-14 weeks PI. Overall the combination of captopril and EUK-207 was more effective than the individual drugs used alone.

  13. Microbiota and Mucosal Immunity in Amphibians

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Bruno M.; Scalvenzi, Thibault; Benlamara, Sarah; Pollet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We know that animals live in a world dominated by bacteria. In the last 20 years, we have learned that microbes are essential regulators of mucosal immunity. Bacteria, archeas, and viruses influence different aspects of mucosal development and function. Yet, the literature mainly covers findings obtained in mammals. In this review, we focus on two major themes that emerge from the comparative analysis of mammals and amphibians. These themes concern: (i) the structure and functions of lymphoid organs and immune cells in amphibians, with a focus on the gut mucosal immune system; and (ii) the characteristics of the amphibian microbiota and its influence on mucosal immunity. Lastly, we propose to use Xenopus tadpoles as an alternative small-animal model to improve the fundamental knowledge on immunological functions of gut microbiota. PMID:25821449

  14. Microbiota and mucosal immunity in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Bruno M; Scalvenzi, Thibault; Benlamara, Sarah; Pollet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We know that animals live in a world dominated by bacteria. In the last 20 years, we have learned that microbes are essential regulators of mucosal immunity. Bacteria, archeas, and viruses influence different aspects of mucosal development and function. Yet, the literature mainly covers findings obtained in mammals. In this review, we focus on two major themes that emerge from the comparative analysis of mammals and amphibians. These themes concern: (i) the structure and functions of lymphoid organs and immune cells in amphibians, with a focus on the gut mucosal immune system; and (ii) the characteristics of the amphibian microbiota and its influence on mucosal immunity. Lastly, we propose to use Xenopus tadpoles as an alternative small-animal model to improve the fundamental knowledge on immunological functions of gut microbiota. PMID:25821449

  15. Transgenic killer commensal bacteria as mucosal protectants.

    PubMed

    Polonelli, L

    2001-05-01

    As first line of defense against the majority of infections and primary site for their transmission, mucosal surfaces of the oral cavity and genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and respiratory tracts represent the most suitable sites to deliver protective agents for the prevention of infectious diseases. Mucosal protection is important not only for life threatening diseases but also for opportunistic infections which currently represent a serious burden in terms of morbidity, mortality, and cost of cures. Candida albicans is among the most prevalent causes of mucosal infections not only in immuno-compromised patients, such as HIV-infected subjects who are frequently affected by oral and esophageal candidiasis, but also in otherwise healthy individuals, as in the case of acute vaginitis. Unfortunately, current strategies for mucosal protection against candidiasis are severely limited by the lack of effective vaccines and the relative paucity and toxicity of commercially available antifungal drugs.

  16. Nicotinamide prevents ultraviolet radiation-induced cellular energy loss.

    PubMed

    Park, Joohong; Halliday, Gary M; Surjana, Devita; Damian, Diona L

    2010-01-01

    UV radiation is carcinogenic by causing mutations in the skin and also by suppressing cutaneous antitumor immunity. We previously found nicotinamide (vitamin B3) to be highly effective at reducing UV-induced immunosuppression in human volunteers, with microarray studies on in vivo irradiated human skin suggesting that nicotinamide normalizes subsets of apoptosis, immune function and energy metabolism-related genes that are downregulated by UV exposure. Using human adult low calcium temperature keratinocytes, we further investigated nicotinamide's effects on cellular energy metabolism. We found that nicotinamide prevented UV-induced cellular ATP loss and protected against UV-induced glycolytic blockade. To determine whether nicotinamide alters the effects of UV-induced oxidative stress posttranslationally, we also measured UV-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS). Nicotinamide had no effect on ROS formation, and at the low UV doses used in these studies, equivalent to ambient daily sun exposure, there was no evidence of apoptosis. Hence, nicotinamide appears to exert its UV protective effects on the skin via its role in cellular energy pathways.

  17. Radiation-induced tumor neoantigens: imaging and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Corso, Christopher D; Ali, Arif N; Diaz, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Exposure of tumor cells to ionizing radiation (IR) is widely known to induce a number of cellular changes. One way that IR can affect tumor cells is through the development of neoantigens which are new molecules that tumor cells express at the cell membrane following some insult or change to the cell. There have been numerous reports in the literature of changes in both tumor and tumor vasculature cell surface molecule expression following treatment with IR. The usefulness of neoantigens for imaging and therapeutic applications lies in the fact that they are differentially expressed on the surface of irradiated tumor cells to a greater extent than on normal tissues. This differential expression provides a mechanism by which tumor cells can be “marked” by radiation for further targeting. Drug delivery vehicles or imaging agents conjugated to ligands that recognize and interact with the neoantigens can help to improve tumor-specific targeting and reduce systemic toxicity with cancer drugs. This article provides a review of the molecules that have been reported to be expressed on the surface of tumor cells in response to IR either in vivo or in vitro. Additionally, we provide a discussion of some of the methods used in the identification of these antigens and applications for their use in drug delivery and imaging. PMID:21969260

  18. Radiation induced decomposition of a refractory cefathiamidine intermediate.

    PubMed

    Bao, Qiburi; Chen, Lujun; Wang, Jianlong

    2014-12-01

    Diisopropylthiourea (DPT), an intermediate of a widely used cephalosporin, has been found to be one of the most refractory components in cephalosporin synthesis wastewater. This compound cannot be completely removed by conventional biological processes due to its antimicrobial property. Ionizing radiation has been applied in the decomposition of refractory pollutants in recent years and has proved effective. Therefore, the decomposition of DPT by γ-irradiation was studied. The compound was irradiated at the dose of 150-2000 Gy before a change of concentration and UV absorption of the solutions was detected. Furthermore, the decomposition kinetics and radiation yield (G-value) of DPT was investigated. The results of radiation experiments on DPT-containing aqueous showed that the DPT can be effectively degraded by γ-radiation. DPT concentration decreased with increasing absorbed doses. G-values of radiolytic decomposition for DPT (20 mg/L) were 1.04 and 0.47 for absorbed doses of 150 and 2000 Gy, respectively. The initial concentration and pH of the solutions affected the degradation. As the concentration of substrate increased, the decomposition was reduced. The decrease of removal rate and radiation efficacy under alkaline condition suggested that lower pH values benefit the γ-induced degradation. UV absorption from 190 to 250 nm decreased after radiation while that from 250 to 300 nm increased, indicating the formation of by-products.

  19. Silibinin attenuates ionizing radiation-induced pro-angiogenic response and EMT in prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nambiar, Dhanya K.; Rajamani, Paulraj; Singh, Rana P.

    2015-01-02

    Graphical abstract: Potential model showing mechanism of silibinin-mediated attenuation of IR-induced angiogenic phenotype and EMT in tumor cells. Silibinin counters radiation induced invasive and migratory phenotype of cancer cells by down-regulating mitogenic pathways activated by IR, leading to inhibition of molecules including VEGF, iNOS, MMPs and N-cadherin. Silibinin also reverses IR mediated E-cadherin down-regulation, inhibiting EMT in tumor cells. Silibinin also radiosensitizes endothelial cells, reduces capillary tube formation by targeting various pro-angiogenic molecules. Further, silibinin may inhibit autocrine and paracrine signaling between tumor and endothelial cells by decreasing the levels of VEGF and other signaling molecules activated in response to IR. - Highlights: • Silibinin radiosensitizes endothelial cells. • Silibinin targets ionization radiation (IR)-induced EMT in PCa cells. • Silibinin is in phase II clinical trial in PCa patients, hence clinically relevant. - Abstract: Radiotherapy of is well established and frequently utilized in prostate cancer (PCa) patients. However, recurrence following therapy and distant metastases are commonly encountered problems. Previous studies underline that, in addition to its therapeutic effects, ionizing radiation (IR) increases the vascularity and invasiveness of surviving radioresistant cancer cells. This invasive phenotype of radioresistant cells is an upshot of IR-induced pro-survival and mitogenic signaling in cancer as well as endothelial cells. Here, we demonstrate that a plant flavonoid, silibinin can radiosensitize endothelial cells by inhibiting expression of pro-angiogenic factors. Combining silibinin with IR not only strongly down-regulated endothelial cell proliferation, clonogenicity and tube formation ability rather it strongly (p < 0.001) reduced migratory and invasive properties of PCa cells which were otherwise marginally affected by IR treatment alone. Most of the pro

  20. Opportunities for nutritional amelioration of radiation-induced cellular damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Nancy D.; Braby, Leslie A.; Ford, John; Lupton, Joanne R.

    2002-01-01

    The closed environment and limited evasive capabilities inherent in space flight cause astronauts to be exposed to many potential harmful agents (chemical contaminants in the environment and cosmic radiation exposure). Current power systems used to achieve space flight are prohibitively expensive for supporting the weight requirements to fully shield astronauts from cosmic radiation. Therefore, radiation poses a major, currently unresolvable risk for astronauts, especially for long-duration space flights. The major detrimental radiation effects that are of primary concern for long-duration space flights are damage to the lens of the eye, damage to the immune system, damage to the central nervous system, and cancer. In addition to the direct damage to biological molecules in cells, radiation exposure induces oxidative damage. Many natural antioxidants, whether consumed before or after radiation exposure, are able to confer some level of radioprotection. In addition to achieving beneficial effects from long-known antioxidants such as vitamins E and C and folic acid, some protection is conferred by several recently discovered antioxidant molecules, such as flavonoids, epigallocatechin, and other polyphenols. Somewhat counterintuitive is the protection provided by diets containing elevated levels of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, considering they are thought to be prone to peroxidation. Even with the information we have at our disposal, it will be difficult to predict the types of dietary modifications that can best reduce the risk of radiation exposure to astronauts, those living on Earth, or those enduring diagnostic or therapeutic radiation exposure. Much more work must be done in humans, whether on Earth or, preferably, in space, before we are able to make concrete recommendations.

  1. Opportunities for nutritional amelioration of radiation-induced cellular damage.

    PubMed

    Turner, Nancy D; Braby, Leslie A; Ford, John; Lupton, Joanne R

    2002-10-01

    The closed environment and limited evasive capabilities inherent in space flight cause astronauts to be exposed to many potential harmful agents (chemical contaminants in the environment and cosmic radiation exposure). Current power systems used to achieve space flight are prohibitively expensive for supporting the weight requirements to fully shield astronauts from cosmic radiation. Therefore, radiation poses a major, currently unresolvable risk for astronauts, especially for long-duration space flights. The major detrimental radiation effects that are of primary concern for long-duration space flights are damage to the lens of the eye, damage to the immune system, damage to the central nervous system, and cancer. In addition to the direct damage to biological molecules in cells, radiation exposure induces oxidative damage. Many natural antioxidants, whether consumed before or after radiation exposure, are able to confer some level of radioprotection. In addition to achieving beneficial effects from long-known antioxidants such as vitamins E and C and folic acid, some protection is conferred by several recently discovered antioxidant molecules, such as flavonoids, epigallocatechin, and other polyphenols. Somewhat counterintuitive is the protection provided by diets containing elevated levels of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, considering they are thought to be prone to peroxidation. Even with the information we have at our disposal, it will be difficult to predict the types of dietary modifications that can best reduce the risk of radiation exposure to astronauts, those living on Earth, or those enduring diagnostic or therapeutic radiation exposure. Much more work must be done in humans, whether on Earth or, preferably, in space, before we are able to make concrete recommendations. PMID:12361786

  2. Chromatin structure and ionizing-radiation-induced chromosome aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Muehlmann-Diaz, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    The possible influence of chromatic structure or activity on chromosomal radiosensitivity was studied. A cell line was isolated which contained some 10[sup 5] copies of an amplified plasmid in a single large mosquito artificial chromosome (MAC). This chromosome was hypersensitive to DNase I. Its radiosensitivity was some three fold greater than normal mosquito chromosomes in the same cell. In cultured human cells irradiated during G[sub 0], the initial breakage frequency in chromosome 4, 19 and the euchromatic and heterochromatic portions of the Y chromosome were measured over a wide range of doses by inducing Premature Chromosome Condensation (PCC) immediately after irradiation with Cs-137 gamma rays. No evidence was seen that Y heterochromatin or large fragments of it remained unbroken. The only significant deviation from the expected initial breakage frequency per Gy per unit length of chromosome was that observed for the euchromatic portion of the Y chromosome, with breakage nearly twice that expected. The development of aberrations involving X and Y chromosomes at the first mitosis after irradation was also studied. Normal female cells sustained about twice the frequency of aberrations involving X chromosomes for a dose of 7.3 Gy than the corresponding male cells. Fibroblasts from individuals with supernumerary X chromosomes did not show any further increase in X aberrations for this dos. The frequency of aberrations involving the heterochromatic portion of the long arm of the Y chromosome was about what would be expected for a similar length of autosome, but the euchromatic portion of the Y was about 3 times more radiosensitive per unit length. 5-Azacytidine treatment of cultured human female fibroblasts or fibroblasts from a 49,XXXXY individual, reduced the methylation of cytosine residues in DNA, and resulted in an increased chromosomal radiosensitivity in general, but it did not increase the frequency of aberrations involving the X chromosomes.

  3. Polaprezinc prevents oral mucositis associated with radiochemotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tomoko; Ishihara, Masashi; Matsuura, Katsuhiko; Mizuta, Keisuke; Itoh, Yoshinori

    2010-10-15

    Oral mucositis is frequent but serious adverse event associated with radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy in head and neck cancer severely impairs health-related quality of life, leading to poor prognosis due to discontinuation of the therapy. Although a number of compounds have been tested for prophylaxis of oral mucositis, few of them are satisfactory. We investigated the effect of polaprezinc (zinc L-carnosine), a gastric mucosal protective drug, on radiochemotherapy-induced oral mucositis, pain, xerostomia and taste disturbance in patients with head and neck cancer. Patients were randomly assigned to receive polaprezinc (n = 16) or azulene oral rinse as the control (n = 15). The incidence rates of mucositis, pain, xerostomia and taste disturbance were all markedly lower in polaprezinc group than in control. Moreover, the use of analgesics was significantly (p = 0.003) less frequent and the amount of food intake was significantly (p = 0.002) higher in polaprezinc group than in control. On the other hand, tumor response rate in patients with neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy was not significantly affected by polaprezinc, in which the response rate (complete plus partial response) was 88% for polaprezinc and 92% for control (p = 1.000). Therefore, it is highly assumable that polaprezinc is potentially useful for prevention of oral mucositis and improvement of quality of life without reducing the tumor response.

  4. Protective effect of α-lipoic acid against radiation-induced fibrosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Seung-Hee; Park, Eun-Young; Kwak, Sungmin; Heo, Seung-Ho; Ryu, Je-Won; Park, Jin-hong

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) is one of the most common late complications of radiation therapy. We found that α-lipoic acid (α-LA) effectively prevents RIF. In RIF a mouse model, leg contracture assay was used to test the in vivo efficacy of α-LA. α-LA suppressed the expression of pro-fibrotic genes after irradiation, both in vivo and in vitro, and inhibited the up-regulation of TGF-β1-mediated p300/CBP activity. Thus, α-LA prevents radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) by inhibiting the transcriptional activity of NF-κB through inhibition of histone acetyltransferase activity. α-LA is a new therapeutic methods that can be used in the prevention-treatment of RIF. PMID:26799284

  5. Gamma radiation induced effects in floppy and rigid Ge-containing chalcogenide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Ailavajhala, Mahesh S.; Mitkova, Maria; Gonzalez-Velo, Yago; Barnaby, Hugh; Kozicki, Michael N.; Holbert, Keith; Poweleit, Christian; Butt, Darryl P.

    2014-01-28

    We explore the radiation induced effects in thin films from the Ge-Se to Ge-Te systems accompanied with silver radiation induced diffusion within these films, emphasizing two distinctive compositional representatives from both systems containing a high concentration of chalcogen or high concentration of Ge. The studies are conducted on blanket chalcogenide films or on device structures containing also a silver source. Data about the electrical conductivity as a function of the radiation dose were collected and discussed based on material characterization analysis. Raman Spectroscopy, X-ray Diffraction Spectroscopy, and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy provided us with data about the structure, structural changes occurring as a result of radiation, molecular formations after Ag diffusion into the chalcogenide films, Ag lateral diffusion as a function of radiation and the level of oxidation of the studied films. Analysis of the electrical testing suggests application possibilities of the studied devices for radiation sensing for various conditions.

  6. Radiation-induced leiomyosarcoma of the great vessels presenting as superior vena cava syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, K.S.; Zidar, B.L.; Wang, S.; Magovern, G.J. Sr.; Raju, R.N.; Lupetin, A.R.; Shackney, S.E.; Simon, S.R.; Singh, M.; Pugh, R.P.

    1987-09-15

    A patient with a pleomorphic intravascular leiomyosarcoma of the great vessels of the neck and mediastinum presented clinically with a superior vena cava syndrome. A latent period of 29 years elapsed between receiving orthovoltage radiation to the neck and right side of chest to treat recurrent ganglioneuroblastoma, and the appearance of a leiomyosarcoma and subsequent recurrences. The patient underwent partial resection of the tumor, received adjunct chemotherapy, and was shown to be free of disease by clinical tests and by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) 17 months after completion of chemotherapy. The criteria for the diagnosis of radiation-induced sarcomas are reviewed in relation to the present case. The critical role of magnetic resonance imaging in both the diagnosis and continued follow-up of the patient is described. This would appear to be the first reported case of radiation-induced intravascular leiomyosarcoma of the great vessels of the neck and mediastinum presenting as a superior vena cava syndrome.

  7. The effect of temperature on radiation-induced radicals in irradiated chicken drumstick bones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polat, M.; Korkmaz, M.; Korkmaz, Ö.

    1997-04-01

    The effect of temperature on the ESR spectra of well characterized unirradiated and irradiated samples of chicken drumstick bones under standardized experimental conditions has been investigated in detail over the temperature range 100-150 K. No significant changes in the linewidth and g factor of the endogenous signal were observed, but the signal intensity was found to decrease markedly in an irreversible way when the temperature was increased. The radiation-induced signal turned out to be the sum of a narrow and a broad line which were assigned to an inorganic and an organic radical, respectively. The thermal stability of the radiation-induced inorganic radical used in poultry irradiation dose determination and in dating was found to be much better than that of organic and endogenous radicals. The results of the present work highlight the need to define properly calibration factors which can be used in conjunction with pre- or post-irradiation thermal treatment of chicken drumstick bones.

  8. Anti-apoptotic peptides protect against radiation-induced cell death

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, Kevin W.; Muenzer, Jared T.; Chang, Kathy C.; Davis, Chris G.; McDunn, Jonathan E.; Coopersmith, Craig M.; Hilliard, Carolyn A.; Hotchkiss, Richard S.; Grigsby, Perry W.; Hunt, Clayton R. . E-mail: chunt@radonc.wustl.edu

    2007-04-06

    The risk of terrorist attacks utilizing either nuclear or radiological weapons has raised concerns about the current lack of effective radioprotectants. Here it is demonstrated that the BH4 peptide domain of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL can be delivered to cells by covalent attachment to the TAT peptide transduction domain (TAT-BH4) and provide protection in vitro and in vivo from radiation-induced apoptotic cell death. Isolated human lymphocytes treated with TAT-BH4 were protected against apoptosis following exposure to 15 Gy radiation. In mice exposed to 5 Gy radiation, TAT-BH4 treatment protected splenocytes and thymocytes from radiation-induced apoptotic cell death. Most importantly, in vivo radiation protection was observed in mice whether TAT-BH4 treatment was given prior to or after irradiation. Thus, by targeting steps within the apoptosis signaling pathway it is possible to develop post-exposure treatments to protect radio-sensitive tissues.

  9. Protective effect of α-lipoic acid against radiation-induced fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Seung-Hee; Park, Eun-Young; Kwak, Sungmin; Heo, Seung-Ho; Ryu, Je-Won; Park, Jin-Hong; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Lee, Sang-Wook

    2016-03-29

    Radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) is one of the most common late complications of radiation therapy. We found that α-lipoic acid (α-LA) effectively prevents RIF. In RIF a mouse model, leg contracture assay was used to test the in vivo efficacy of α-LA. α-LA suppressed the expression of pro-fibrotic genes after irradiation, both in vivo and in vitro, and inhibited the up-regulation of TGF-β1-mediated p300/CBP activity. Thus, α-LA prevents radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) by inhibiting the transcriptional activity of NF-κB through inhibition of histone acetyltransferase activity. α-LA is a new therapeutic methods that can be used in the prevention-treatment of RIF.

  10. Radiation-induced glioblastoma multiforme in a remitted acute lymphocytic leukemia patient.

    PubMed

    Joh, Daewon; Park, Bong Jin; Lim, Young Jin

    2011-09-01

    Radiation therapy has been widely applied for cancer treatment. Childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), characterized by frequent central nervous system involvement, is a well documented disease for the effect of prophylactic cranio-spinal irradiation. Irradiation, however, acts as an oncogenic factor as a delayed effect and it is rare that glioblastoma multiforme develops during the remission period of ALL. We experienced a pediatric radiation-induced GBM patient which developed during the remission period of ALL, who were primarily treated with chemotherapeutic agents and brain radiation therapy for the prevention of central nervous system (CNS) relapse. Additionally, we reviewed the related literature regarding on the effects of brain irradiation in childhood and on the prognosis of radiation induced GBM.

  11. [Radiation-Induced Radiculopathy with Paresis of the Neck and Autochthonous Back Muscles with Additional Myopathy].

    PubMed

    Ellrichmann, G; Lukas, C; Adamietz, I A; Grunwald, C; Schneider-Gold, C; Gold, R

    2016-06-01

    Radiation-induced tissue damage is caused by ionizing radiation mainly affecting the skin, vascular, neuronal or muscle tissue. Early damages occur within weeks and months while late damages may occur months or even decades after radiation.Radiation-induced paresis of the spine or the trunk muscles with camptocormia or dropped-head syndrome are rare but have already been described as long-term sequelae after treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma. The differential diagnosis includes limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, fascioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) or lysosomal storage diseases (e. g. Acid Maltase Deficiency). We present the case of a patient with long lasting diagnostics over many months due to different inconclusive results. PMID:27391986

  12. Radiation-induced segregation and precipitation behaviours around cascade clusters under electron irradiation.

    PubMed

    Sueishi, Yuichiro; Sakaguchi, Norihito; Shibayama, Tamaki; Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Heishichiro

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the formation of cascade clusters and structural changes in them by means of electron irradiation following ion irradiation in an austenitic stainless steel. Almost all of the cascade clusters, which were introduced by the ion irradiation, grew to form interstitial-type dislocation loops or vacancy-type stacking fault tetrahedra after electron irradiation at 623 K, whereas a few of the dot-type clusters remained in the matrix. It was possible to recognize the concentration of Ni and Si by radiation-induced segregation around the dot-type clusters. After electron irradiation at 773 K, we found that some cascade clusters became precipitates (delta-Ni2Si) due to radiation-induced precipitation. This suggests that the cascade clusters could directly become precipitation sites during irradiation.

  13. Hyperbaric oxygen in the treatment of radiation-induced optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, J.; Schatz, N.J.

    1986-08-01

    Four patients with radiation-induced optic neuropathies were treated with hyperbaric oxygen. They had received radiation therapy for treatment of pituitary tumors, reticulum cell sarcoma, and meningioma. Two presented with amaurosis fugax before the onset of unilateral visual loss and began hyperbaria within 72 hours after development of unilateral optic neuropathy. Both had return of visual function to baseline levels. The others initiated treatment two to six weeks after visual loss occurred in the second eye and had no significant improvement of vision. Treatment consisted of daily administration of 100% oxygen under 2.8 atmospheres of pressure for 14-28 days. There were no medical complications of hyperbaria. While hyperbaric oxygen is effective in the treatment of radiation-induced optic neuropathy, it must be instituted within several days of deterioration in vision for restoration of baseline function.

  14. The potential influence of radiation-induced microenvironments in neoplastic progression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a complete carcinogen, able both to initiate and promote neoplastic progression and is a known carcinogen of human and murine mammary gland. Tissue response to radiation is a composite of genetic damage, cell death and induction of new gene expression patterns. Although DNA damage is believed to initiate carcinogenesis, the contribution of these other aspects of radiation response are beginning to be explored. Our studies demonstrate that radiation elicits rapid and persistent global alterations in the mammary gland microenvironment. We postulate that radiation-induced microenvironments may affect epithelial cells neoplastic transformation by altering their number or susceptibility. Alternatively, radiation induced microenvironments may exert a selective force on initiated cells and/or be conducive to progression. A key impetus for these studies is the possibility that blocking these events could be a strategy to interrupt neoplastic progression.

  15. How Magnetotactic Bacteria Respond to Radiation Induced Stress and Damage: Comparative Genomics Evidences for Evolutionary Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Pan, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Solar radiation and galactic cosmic radiation is believed to be major restriction factors influencing survival and evolution of life. On planet earth, geomagnetic field along with atmosphere protect living beings from the harmful radiation. During a geomagnetic reversal or excursion, however, the efflux of charged particles on earth surface would increase as the shielding effect of magnetic field decrease. The stratospheric ozone can also be partially stripped away by solar wind when the strength of the field is weak, leading to an increasing ultraviolet radiation penetration to the earth surface. However, studies on the mechanism of radiation induced stress and damage are focused only on bacteria that have no response to magnetic field. This study was motivated by the need to fill the gap upon knowledge of that on magnetic field sensitive microorganism. Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are a group of microbes that are able to synthesis intracellular nano-sized magnetic particles (named magnetosomes). These chain-arranged magnetosomes help MTB sense and swim along the magnetic field to find their optimal living environment efficiently. In this paper, in silico prediction of stress and damage repair genes in response to different radiation were carried out on the complete genome of four nonmagnetotactic and four magnetotactic spirilla. In silico analyses of the genomes of magnetic field sensitive and non-sensitive spirilla revealed: 1) all strains contain genes for regulate responses superoxide and peroxide stress, DNA pyrimidine dimer and string breaks; 2) non-magnetotactic spirilla have more genes dealing with oxidative stress, while magnetotactic spirilla may benefit from magnetotaxis by swimming into oxic-anoxic zone away from oxidative stress and direct radiation damage; yet, the lipid hydroperoxide peroxidase gene in MTB may be responsible for possible ROS generated by the membrane enveloped magnetite magnetosome; 3) magnetotactic spirilla possess SOS rec

  16. Low intensity microwave radiation induced oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Megha, Kanu; Deshmukh, Pravin Suryakantrao; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Tripathi, Ashok Kumar; Ahmed, Rafat; Abegaonkar, Mahesh Pandurang

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade people have been constantly exposed to microwave radiation mainly from wireless communication devices used in day to day life. Therefore, the concerns over potential adverse effects of microwave radiation on human health are increasing. Until now no study has been proposed to investigate the underlying causes of genotoxic effects induced by low intensity microwave exposure. Thus, the present study was undertaken to determine the influence of low intensity microwave radiation on oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in rat brain. The study was carried out on 24 male Fischer 344 rats, randomly divided into four groups (n=6 in each group): group I consisted of sham exposed (control) rats, group II-IV consisted of rats exposed to microwave radiation at frequencies 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz, specific absorption rates (SARs) 0.59, 0.58 and 0.66 mW/kg, respectively in gigahertz transverse electromagnetic (GTEM) cell for 60 days (2h/day, 5 days/week). Rats were sacrificed and decapitated to isolate hippocampus at the end of the exposure duration. Low intensity microwave exposure resulted in a frequency dependent significant increase in oxidative stress markers viz. malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyl (PCO) and catalase (CAT) in microwave exposed groups in comparison to sham exposed group (p<0.05). Whereas, levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were found significantly decreased in microwave exposed groups (p<0.05). A significant increase in levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-2, IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ) was observed in microwave exposed animal (p<0.05). Furthermore, significant DNA damage was also observed in microwave exposed groups as compared to their corresponding values in sham exposed group (p<0.05). In conclusion, the present study suggests that low intensity microwave radiation induces oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in brain by exerting a frequency dependent effect

  17. Selenoprotein P Inhibits Radiation-Induced Late Reactive Oxygen Species Accumulation and Normal Cell Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Eckers, Jaimee C.; Kalen, Amanda L.; Xiao, Wusheng; Sarsour, Ehab H.; Goswami, Prabhat C.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Radiation is a common mode of cancer therapy whose outcome is often limited because of normal tissue toxicity. We have shown previously that the accumulation of radiation-induced late reactive oxygen species (ROS) precedes cell death, suggesting that metabolic oxidative stress could regulate cellular radiation response. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether selenoprotein P (SEPP1), a major supplier of selenium to tissues and an antioxidant, regulates late ROS accumulation and toxicity in irradiated normal human fibroblasts (NHFs). Methods and Materials: Flow cytometry analysis of cell viability, cell cycle phase distribution, and dihydroethidium oxidation, along with clonogenic assays, were used to measure oxidative stress and toxicity. Human antioxidant mechanisms array and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assays were used to measure gene expression during late ROS accumulation in irradiated NHFs. Sodium selenite addition and SEPP1 overexpression were used to determine the causality of SEPP1 regulating late ROS accumulation and toxicity in irradiated NHFs. Results: Irradiated NHFs showed late ROS accumulation (4.5-fold increase from control; P<.05) that occurs after activation of the cell cycle checkpoint pathways and precedes cell death. The mRNA levels of CuZn- and Mn-superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxiredoxin 3, and thioredoxin reductase 1 increased approximately 2- to 3-fold, whereas mRNA levels of cold shock domain containing E1 and SEPP1 increased more than 6-fold (P<.05). The addition of sodium selenite before the radiation treatment suppressed toxicity (45%; P<.05). SEPP1 overexpression suppressed radiation-induced late ROS accumulation (35%; P<.05) and protected NHFs from radiation-induced toxicity (58%; P<.05). Conclusion: SEPP1 mitigates radiation-induced late ROS accumulation and normal cell injury.

  18. Impact of p53 status on heavy-ion radiation-induced micronuclei in circulating erythrocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, P. Y.; Torous, D.; Lutze-Mann, L.; Winegar, R.

    2000-01-01

    Transgenic mice that differed in their p53 genetic status were exposed to an acute dose of highly charged and energetic (HZE) iron particle radiation. Micronuclei (MN) in two distinct populations of circulating peripheral blood erythrocytes, the immature reticulocytes (RETs) and the mature normochromatic erythrocytes (NCEs), were measured using a simple and efficient flow cytometric procedure. Our results show significant elevation in the frequency of micronucleated RETs (%MN-RETs) at 2 and 3 days post-radiation. At 3 days post-irradiation, the magnitude of the radiation-induced MN-RET was 2.3-fold higher in the irradiated p53 wild-type animals compared to the unirradiated controls, 2.5-fold higher in the p53 hemizygotes and 4.3-fold higher in the p53 nullizygotes. The persistence of this radiation-induced elevation of MN-RETs is dependent on the p53 genetic background of the animal. In the p53 wild-type and p53 hemizygotes, %MN-RETs returned to control levels by 9 days post-radiation. However, elevated levels of %MN-RETs in p53 nullizygous mice persisted beyond 56 days post-radiation. We also observed elevated MN-NCEs in the peripheral circulation after radiation, but the changes in radiation-induced levels of MN-NCEs appear dampened compared to those of the MN-RETs for all three strains of animals. These results suggest that the lack of p53 gene function may play a role in the iron particle radiation-induced genomic instability in stem cell populations in the hematopoietic system.

  19. Effects of subdiaphragmatic vagotomy on the acquisition of a radiation-induced conditioned taste aversion

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, W.A.; Rabin, B.M.; Lee, J.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of subdiaphragmatic vagotomy on the acquisition of a radiation-induced taste aversion was examined to assess the importance of the vagus nerve in transmitting information on the peripheral toxicity of radiation to the brain. Vagotomy had no effect on taste aversion learning, consistent with reports using other toxins. The data support the involvement of a blood-borne factor in the acquisition of taste aversion induced by ionizing radiation.

  20. Radiation-induced intermediates in irradiated glassy ionic liquids at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenko, Elizaveta V.; Lukianova, Mariia A.; Shiryaeva, Ekaterina S.; Takahashi, Kenji; Feldman, Vladimir I.

    2016-07-01

    The primary radiation-induced processes in irradiated low-temperature pyrrolidinium- and piperidinium-type ionic liquids were investigated by EPR and optical absorption spectroscopy. A narrow singlet signal in the EPR spectra of irradiated ionic liquids was attributed to the physically stabilized electron. Broad absorption band in visible region was ascribed to "hole" species. Aromatic scavengers react with "hole" species in glassy irradiated ionic liquids at 77 K.

  1. Energy Distribution of Electrons in Radiation Induced-Helium Plasmas. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    Energy distribution of high energy electrons as they slow down and thermalize in a gaseous medium is studied. The energy distribution in the entire energy range from source energies down is studied analytically. A helium medium in which primary electrons are created by the passage of heavy-charged particles from nuclear reactions is emphasized. A radiation-induced plasma is of interest in a variety of applications, such as radiation pumped lasers and gaseous core nuclear reactors.

  2. Argon plasma coagulation therapy for a hemorrhagic radiation-induced gastritis in patient with pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Shukuwa, Kazutaka; Kume, Keiichiro; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Yoshikawa, Ichiro; Otsuki, Makoto

    2007-01-01

    Radiation-induced gastritis is a serious complication of radiation therapy for pancreatic cancer which is difficult to manage. A 79-year-old man had been diagnosed as having inoperable pancreatic cancer (stage IVa). We encountered this patient with hemorrhagic gastritis induced by external radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer that was well-treated using argon plasma coagulation (APC). After endoscopic treatment using APC, anemia associated with hemorrhagic radiation gastritis improved and required no further blood transfusion. PMID:17603236

  3. Advances in dosimetry and biological predictors of radiation-induced esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Guan, Hui; Dong, Yuanli; Xing, Ligang; Li, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    Objective To summarize the research progress about the dosimetry and biological predictors of radiation-induced esophagitis. Methods We performed a systematic literature review addressing radiation esophagitis in the treatment of lung cancer published between January 2009 and May 2015 in the PubMed full-text database index systems. Results Twenty-eight eligible documents were included in the final analysis. Many clinical factors were related to the risk of radiation esophagitis, such as elder patients, concurrent chemoradiotherapy, and the intense radiotherapy regimen (hyperfractionated radiotherapy or stereotactic body radiotherapy). The parameters including Dmax, Dmean, V20, V30, V50, and V55 may be valuable in predicting the occurrence of radiation esophagitis in patients receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Genetic variants in inflammation-related genes are also associated with radiation-induced toxicity. Conclusion Dosimetry and biological factors of radiation-induced esophagitis provide clinical information to decrease its occurrence and grade during radiotherapy. More prospective studies are warranted to confirm their prediction efficacy. PMID:26869804

  4. Effect of top electrode material on radiation-induced degradation of ferroelectric thin film structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Steven J.; Deng, Carmen Z.; Callaway, Connor P.; Paul, McKinley K.; Fisher, Kenzie J.; Guerrier, Jonathon E.; Rudy, Ryan Q.; Polcawich, Ronald G.; Jones, Jacob L.; Glaser, Evan R.; Cress, Cory D.; Bassiri-Gharb, Nazanin

    2016-07-01

    The effects of gamma irradiation on the dielectric and piezoelectric responses of Pb[Zr0.52Ti0.48]O3 (PZT) thin film stacks were investigated for structures with conductive oxide (IrO2) and metallic (Pt) top electrodes. The samples showed, generally, degradation of various key dielectric, ferroelectric, and electromechanical responses when exposed to 2.5 Mrad (Si) 60Co gamma radiation. However, the low-field, relative dielectric permittivity, ɛr, remained largely unaffected by irradiation in samples with both types of electrodes. Samples with Pt top electrodes showed substantial degradation of the remanent polarization and overall piezoelectric response, as well as pinching of the polarization hysteresis curves and creation of multiple peaks in the permittivity-electric field curves post irradiation. The samples with oxide electrodes, however, were largely impervious to the same radiation dose, with less than 5% change in any of the functional characteristics. The results suggest a radiation-induced change in the defect population or defect energy in PZT with metallic top electrodes, which substantially affects motion of internal interfaces such as domain walls. Additionally, the differences observed for stacks with different electrode materials implicate the ferroelectric-electrode interface as either the predominant source of radiation-induced effects (Pt electrodes) or the site of healing for radiation-induced defects (IrO2 electrodes).

  5. Mint oil (Mentha spicata Linn.) offers behavioral radioprotection: a radiation-induced conditioned taste aversion study.

    PubMed

    Haksar, A; Sharma, A; Chawla, R; Kumar, Raj; Lahiri, S S; Islam, F; Arora, M P; Sharma, R K; Tripathi, R P; Arora, Rajesh

    2009-02-01

    Mentha spicata Linn. (mint), a herb well known for its gastroprotective properties in the traditional system of medicine has been shown to protect against radiation-induced lethality, and recently its constituents have been found to possess calcium channel antagonizing properties. The present study examined the behavioral radioprotective efficacy of mint oil (obtained from Mentha spicata), particularly in mitigating radiation-induced conditioned taste aversion (CTA), which has been proposed as a behavioral endpoint that is mediated by the toxic effects of gamma radiation on peripheral systems, primarily the gastrointestinal system in the Sprague-Dawley rat model. Intraperitoneal administration of Mentha spicata oil 10% (v/v), 1 h before 2 Gy gamma radiation, was found to render significant radioprotection against CTA (p < 0.05), by blocking the saccharin avoidance response within 5 post-treatment observational days, with the highest saccharin intake being observed on day 5. This finding clearly demonstrates that gastroprotective and calcium channel antagonizing properties of Mentha spicata can be effectively utilized in preventing radiation-induced behavioral changes.

  6. Altered gastric emptying and prevention of radiation-induced vomiting in dogs. [Cobalt 60 irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, A.; Jacobus, J.P.; Grissom, M.P.; Eng, R.R.; Conklin, J.J.

    1984-03-01

    The relation between radiation-induced vomiting and gastric emptying is unclear and the treatment of this condition is not established. We explored, therefore, (a) the effect of cobalt 60 irradiation on gastric emptying of solids and liquids and (b) the possibility of preventing radiation-induced vomiting with the dopamine antagonist, domperidone. Twenty dogs were studied on two separate days, blindly and in random order, after i.v. injection of either a placebo or 0.06 mg/kg domperidone. On a third day, they received 8 Gy (800 rads) whole body irradiation with cobalt 60 gamma-rays after either placebo (n . 10) or domperidone (n . 10). Before each study, each dog was fed chicken liver tagged in vivo with 99mTc-sulfur colloid (solid marker), and water containing 111In-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (liquid marker). Dogs were placed in a Pavlov stand for the subsequent 3 h and radionuclide imaging was performed at 10-min intervals. Irradiation produced vomiting in 9 of 10 dogs given placebo but only in 1 of 10 dogs pretreated with domperidone (p less than 0.01). Gastric emptying of liquids and solids was significantly suppressed by irradiation (p less than 0.01) after both placebo and domperidone. These results demonstrate that radiation-induced vomiting is accompanied by suppression of gastric emptying. Furthermore, domperidone prevents vomiting produced by ionizing radiation but does not alter the accompanying delay of gastric emptying.

  7. Role of the area postrema in radiation-induced taste aversion learning and emesis in cats

    SciTech Connect

    Rabin, B.M.; Hunt, W.A.; Chedester, A.L.; Lee, J.

    1986-01-01

    The role of the area postrema in radiation-induced emesis and taste aversion learning and the relationship between these behaviors were studied in cats. The potential involvement of neural factors which might be independent of the area postrema was minimized by using low levels of ionizing radiation (100 rads at a dose rate of 40 rads/min) to elicit a taste aversion, and by using body-only exposures (4500 and 6000 rads at 450 rads/min) to produce emesis. Lesions of the area postrema disrupted both taste aversion learning and emesis following irradiation. These results, which indicate that the area postrema is involved in the mediation of both radiation-induced emesis and taste aversion learning in cats under these experimental conditions, are interpreted as being consistent with the hypotheses that similar mechanisms mediate both responses to exposure to ionizing radiation, and that the taste aversion learning paradigm can therefore serve as a model system for studying radiation-induced emesis.

  8. Lessons learned using different mouse models during space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Farris, Alton B.; Wang, Ya

    2016-06-01

    Unlike terrestrial ionizing radiation, space radiation, especially galactic cosmic rays (GCR), contains high energy charged (HZE) particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). Due to a lack of epidemiologic data for high-LET radiation exposure, it is highly uncertain how high the carcinogenesis risk is for astronauts following exposure to space radiation during space missions. Therefore, using mouse models is necessary to evaluate the risk of space radiation-induced tumorigenesis; however, which mouse model is better for these studies remains uncertain. Since lung tumorigenesis is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and low-LET radiation exposure increases human lung carcinogenesis, evaluating space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis is critical to enable safe Mars missions. Here, by comparing lung tumorigenesis obtained from different mouse strains, as well as miR-21 in lung tissue/tumors and serum, we believe that wild type mice with a low spontaneous tumorigenesis background are ideal for evaluating the risk of space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis, and circulating miR-21 from such mice model might be used as a biomarker for predicting the risk.

  9. Lessons learned using different mouse models during space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis experiments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Farris, Alton B; Wang, Ya

    2016-06-01

    Unlike terrestrial ionizing radiation, space radiation, especially galactic cosmic rays (GCR), contains high energy charged (HZE) particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). Due to a lack of epidemiologic data for high-LET radiation exposure, it is highly uncertain how high the carcinogenesis risk is for astronauts following exposure to space radiation during space missions. Therefore, using mouse models is necessary to evaluate the risk of space radiation-induced tumorigenesis; however, which mouse model is better for these studies remains uncertain. Since lung tumorigenesis is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and low-LET radiation exposure increases human lung carcinogenesis, evaluating space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis is critical to enable safe Mars missions. Here, by comparing lung tumorigenesis obtained from different mouse strains, as well as miR-21 in lung tissue/tumors and serum, we believe that wild type mice with a low spontaneous tumorigenesis background are ideal for evaluating the risk of space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis, and circulating miR-21 from such mice model might be used as a biomarker for predicting the risk. PMID:27345200

  10. Lessons learned using different mouse models during space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis experiments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Farris, Alton B; Wang, Ya

    2016-06-01

    Unlike terrestrial ionizing radiation, space radiation, especially galactic cosmic rays (GCR), contains high energy charged (HZE) particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). Due to a lack of epidemiologic data for high-LET radiation exposure, it is highly uncertain how high the carcinogenesis risk is for astronauts following exposure to space radiation during space missions. Therefore, using mouse models is necessary to evaluate the risk of space radiation-induced tumorigenesis; however, which mouse model is better for these studies remains uncertain. Since lung tumorigenesis is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and low-LET radiation exposure increases human lung carcinogenesis, evaluating space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis is critical to enable safe Mars missions. Here, by comparing lung tumorigenesis obtained from different mouse strains, as well as miR-21 in lung tissue/tumors and serum, we believe that wild type mice with a low spontaneous tumorigenesis background are ideal for evaluating the risk of space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis, and circulating miR-21 from such mice model might be used as a biomarker for predicting the risk.

  11. The Efficacy of Nardostachys Jatamansi Against The Radiation Induced Haematological Damage In Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, Damodara K M; Shetty, Lathika; A P, Krishna; Kumari, Suchetha N; Sanjeev, Ganesh; P, Naveen

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Radiation is increasingly being used for medical purposes and it is an established weapon in the diagnosis and the therapy of cancer. An exposure to 1-2 Gys causes the NVD (Nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea) syndrome, whereas an exposure to 2-6 Gys causes the haematopoietic syndrome. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of the Nardostachys jatamansi root extract (NJE) on the radiation induced haematological damage in rats. Materials and Methods: EBR was performed at the Microtron Centre, Mangalore University, India. Rats were treated with NJE once daily for 15 days before and after the irradiation. After the irradiation, blood was collected for determining the peripheral blood counts (RBC and WBC), haemoglobin, the platelet count and the packed cell volume (PCV) at 6 hours, 12 hours, 24 hours, 48 hours and 5, 10 and 15 days post irradiation. The data was analyzed by one way ANOVA, followed by the Tukey’s test for multiple comparisons. Result: NJE provided protection against the radiation induced haematological disorders. The rats treated with NJE exhibited a time dependent significant elevation in all the haematological parameters which were studied and its modulation upto the near normal level was recorded. Conclusion: From this study, we concluded that, NJE provides protection by modulating the radiation induced damage on the haematopoietic system. PMID:23905085

  12. The role of secretory granules in radiation-induced dysfunction of rat salivary glands

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, B.; Van Waarde, M.A.W.H.; Konings, A.W.T.; Vissink, A. |; `s-Gravenmade, E.J.

    1995-02-01

    To investigate the possible role of secretory granules in radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction, rats were pretreated with isoproterenol (5 mg/kg intraperitoneally) to degranulate salivary gland acini. At maximal depletion, salivary glands were locally irradiated with a single dose of 15 Gy of X rays. Parotid and submandibular/sublingual saliva samples were collected before and 1-10 days after irradiation. The lag phase, flow rate, concentrations of potassium and sodium, and amylase secretion were determined. Sham-treated, isoproterenol-treated and irradiated animals provided reference data. In the parotid gland, but not in the submandibular gland, protection against radiation-induced changes in flow rate and composition of saliva occurred after pretreatment with isoproterenol. Combining morphological data from a previous study with data from the current study, it is suggested that improvement of parotid gland function is attributed predominantly to a proliferative stimulus on acinar cells by isoproterenol and not to its degranulation effect. After pretreatment with isoproterenol, an earlier expression of radiation-induced acinar cell damage leading to death was observed, followed by a faster tissue recovery. Thus the proliferative stimulus on acinar cells may accelerate the unmasking of latent lethal damage, resulting in the earlier replacement of dead cells by new, functionally intact cells. 33 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Protective Effect of Diphlorethohydroxycarmalol against Ultraviolet B Radiation-Induced DNA Damage by Inducing the Nucleotide Excision Repair System in HaCaT Human Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Piao, Mei Jing; Hewage, Susara Ruwan Kumara Madduma; Han, Xia; Kang, Kyoung Ah; Kang, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Nam Ho; Hyun, Jin Won

    2015-09-02

    We investigated the protective properties of diphlorethohydroxycarmalol (DPHC), a phlorotannin, against ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) in HaCaT human keratinocytes. The nucleotide excision repair (NER) system is the pathway by which cells identify and repair bulky, helix-distorting DNA lesions such as ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced CPDs and 6-4 photoproducts. CPDs levels were elevated in UVB-exposed cells; however, this increase was reduced by DPHC. Expression levels of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XPC) and excision repair cross-complementing 1 (ERCC1), which are essential components of the NER pathway, were induced in DPHC-treated cells. Expression of XPC and ERCC1 were reduced following UVB exposure, whereas DPHC treatment partially restored the levels of both proteins. DPHC also increased expression of transcription factor specificity protein 1 (SP1) and sirtuin 1, an up-regulator of XPC, in UVB-exposed cells. DPHC restored binding of the SP1 to the XPC promoter, which is reduced in UVB-exposed cells. These results indicate that DPHC can protect cells against UVB-induced DNA damage by inducing the NER system.

  14. Epigenetic Analysis of Heavy-ion Radiation Induced Bystander Effects in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Cui, Changna; Xue, Bei

    Abstract: Radiation-induced bystander effect was defined as the induction of damage in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. Recently, low dose of high LET radiation induced bystander effects in vivo have been reported more and more. It has been indicated that radiation induced bystander effect was localized not only in bystander tissues but also in distant organs. Genomic, epigenetic and proteomics plays significant roles in regulating heavy-ion radiation stress responses in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male Balb/c and C57BL mice were exposed head-only to 40, 200, 2000mGy dose of (12) C heavy-ion radiation, while the rest of the animal body was shielded. Directly radiation organ ear and the distant organ liver were detected on 1h, 6h, 12h and 24h after radiation, respectively. Methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP) was used to monitor the level of polymorphic genomic DNA methylation changed with dose and time effects. The results show that heavy-ion irradiated mouse head could induce genomic DNA methylation changes significantly in both the directly radiation organ ear and the distant organ liver. The percent of DNA methylation changes were time-dependent and tissue-specific. Demethylation polymorphism rate was highest separately at 1 h in 200 mGy and 6 h in 2000 mGy after irradiation. The global DNA methylation changes tended to occur in the CG sites. The results illustrated that genomic methylation changes of heavy ion radiation-induced bystander effect in liver could be obvious 1 h after radiation and achieved the maximum at 6 h, while the changes could recover gradually at 12 h. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in both directly radiation organ ear and distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of

  15. Combined inhibition of TGFβ and PDGF signaling attenuates radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Dadrich, Monika; Nicolay, Nils H; Flechsig, Paul; Bickelhaupt, Sebastian; Hoeltgen, Line; Roeder, Falk; Hauser, Kai; Tietz, Alexandra; Jenne, Jürgen; Lopez, Ramon; Roehrich, Manuel; Wirkner, Ute; Lahn, Michael; Huber, Peter E

    2016-05-01

    Background : Radiotherapy (RT) is a mainstay for the treatment of lung cancer, but the effective dose is often limited by the development of radiation-induced pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis. Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) play crucial roles in the development of these diseases, but the effects of dual growth factor inhibition on pulmonary fibrosis development remain unclear. Methods : C57BL/6 mice were treated with 20 Gy to the thorax to induce pulmonary fibrosis. PDGF receptor inhibitors SU9518 and SU14816 (imatinib) and TGFβ receptor inhibitor galunisertib were applied individually or in combinations after RT. Lung density and septal fibrosis were measured by high-resolution CT and MRI. Lung histology and gene expression analyses were performed and Osteopontin levels were studied. Results : Treatment with SU9518, SU14816 or galunisertib individually attenuated radiation-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis and decreased radiological and histological signs of lung damage. Combining PDGF and TGFβ inhibitors showed to be feasible and safe in a mouse model, and dual inhibition significantly attenuated radiation-induced lung damage and extended mouse survival compared to blockage of either pathway alone. Gene expression analysis of irradiated lung tissue showed upregulation of PDGF and TGFβ-dependent signaling components by thoracic irradiation, and upregulation patterns show crosstalk between downstream mediators of the PDGF and TGFβ pathways. Conclusion : Combined small-molecule inhibition of PDGF and TGFβ signaling is a safe and effective treatment for radiation-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis in mice and may offer a novel approach for treatment of fibrotic lung diseases in humans. Translational statement : RT is an effective treatment modality for cancer with limitations due to acute and chronic toxicities, where TGFβ and PDGF play a key role. Here, we show that a combined inhibition of

  16. Combined inhibition of TGFβ and PDGF signaling attenuates radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Dadrich, Monika; Nicolay, Nils H.; Flechsig, Paul; Bickelhaupt, Sebastian; Hoeltgen, Line; Roeder, Falk; Hauser, Kai; Tietz, Alexandra; Jenne, Jürgen; Lopez, Ramon; Roehrich, Manuel; Wirkner, Ute; Lahn, Michael; Huber, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Radiotherapy (RT) is a mainstay for the treatment of lung cancer, but the effective dose is often limited by the development of radiation-induced pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis. Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) play crucial roles in the development of these diseases, but the effects of dual growth factor inhibition on pulmonary fibrosis development remain unclear. Methods: C57BL/6 mice were treated with 20 Gy to the thorax to induce pulmonary fibrosis. PDGF receptor inhibitors SU9518 and SU14816 (imatinib) and TGFβ receptor inhibitor galunisertib were applied individually or in combinations after RT. Lung density and septal fibrosis were measured by high-resolution CT and MRI. Lung histology and gene expression analyses were performed and Osteopontin levels were studied. Results: Treatment with SU9518, SU14816 or galunisertib individually attenuated radiation-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis and decreased radiological and histological signs of lung damage. Combining PDGF and TGFβ inhibitors showed to be feasible and safe in a mouse model, and dual inhibition significantly attenuated radiation-induced lung damage and extended mouse survival compared to blockage of either pathway alone. Gene expression analysis of irradiated lung tissue showed upregulation of PDGF and TGFβ-dependent signaling components by thoracic irradiation, and upregulation patterns show crosstalk between downstream mediators of the PDGF and TGFβ pathways. Conclusion: Combined small-molecule inhibition of PDGF and TGFβ signaling is a safe and effective treatment for radiation-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis in mice and may offer a novel approach for treatment of fibrotic lung diseases in humans. Translational statement: RT is an effective treatment modality for cancer with limitations due to acute and chronic toxicities, where TGFβ and PDGF play a key role. Here, we show that a combined

  17. Protective effect of genistein on radiation-induced intestinal injury in tumor bearing mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Radiation therapy is the most widely used treatment for cancer, but it causes the side effect of mucositis due to intestinal damage. We examined the protective effect of genistein in tumor-bearing mice after abdominal irradiation by evaluation of apoptosis and intestinal morphological changes. Methods Mouse colon cancer CT26 cells were subcutaneously injected at the flank of BALB/c mice to generate tumors. The tumor-bearing mice were treated with abdominal radiation at 5 and 10 Gy, and with genistein at 200 mg/kg body weight per day for 1 d before radiation. The changes in intestinal histology were evaluated 12 h and 3.5 d after irradiation. To assess the effect of the combination treatment on the cancer growth, the tumor volume was determined at sacrifice before tumor overgrowth occurred. Results Genistein significantly decreased the number of apoptotic nuclei compared with that in the irradiation group 12 h after 5 Gy irradiation. Evaluation of histological changes showed that genistein ameliorated intestinal morphological changes such as decreased crypt survival, villus shortening, and increased length of the basal lamina 3.5 d after 10 Gy irradiation. Moreover, the genistein-treated group exhibited more Ki-67-positive proliferating cells in the jejunum than the irradiated control group, and crypt depths were greater in the genistein-treated group than in the irradiated control group. The mean weight of the CT26 tumors was reduced in the group treated with genistein and radiation compared with the control group. Conclusion Genistein had a protective effect on intestinal damage induced by irradiation and delayed tumor growth. These results suggest that genistein is a useful candidate for preventing radiotherapy-induced intestinal damage in cancer patients. PMID:23672582

  18. [Direct and indirect mucosal wave imaging techniques].

    PubMed

    Krasnodębska, Paulina; Szkiełkowska, Agata

    2016-04-01

    The vocal folds play a key role in the process of phonation. Cyclical movements of the vocal folds model a space called glottis, what leads to voice formation. The space contains surface between the vocal folds and the inner surface of the arytenoid cartilages. The best indicator of the vocal folds vibratory function is the mucosal wave. The presence and size of the mucosal wave is widely recognized as an indicator of tension and plasticity of vocal folds. It is also essential in the process of creating a proper, resonant voice. In the article, current knowledge of mucosal wave imaging techniques is given. Imaging can be carried out directly and indirectly. Among the direct methods, the following are distinguished: laryngostroboscopy, laryngovideostroboscopy, videokymography and high-speed digital imaging. Indirect methods include: electroglottography, photoglottography and ultrasonography. PMID:27137829

  19. Crosstalk between telomere maintenance and radiation effects: A key player in the process of radiation-induced carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Grace; Ricoul, Michelle; Hempel, William M.; Azzam, Edouard I.; Sabatier, Laure

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that ionizing radiation induces chromosomal damage, both following direct radiation exposure and via non-targeted (bystander) effects, activating DNA damage repair pathways, of which the proteins are closely linked to telomeric proteins and telomere maintenance. Long-term propagation of this radiation-induced chromosomal damage during cell proliferation results in chromosomal instability. Many studies have shown the link between radiation exposure and radiation-induced changes in oxidative stress and DNA damage repair in both targeted and non-targeted cells. However, the effect of these factors on telomeres, long established as guardians of the genome, still remains to be clarified. In this review, we will focus on what is known about how telomeres are affected by exposure to low- and high-LET ionizing radiation and during proliferation, and will discuss how telomeres may be a key player in the process of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:24486376

  20. Protection against radiation-induced oxidative stress in cultured human epithelial cells by treatment with antioxidant agents

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, X. Steven; Ware, Jeffrey H.; Zhou, Zhaozong; Donahue, Jeremiah J.; Guan, Jun; Kennedy, Ann R. . E-mail: akennedy@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the protective effects of antioxidant agents against space radiation-induced oxidative stress in cultured human epithelial cells. Methods and Materials: The effects of selected concentrations of N-acetylcysteine, ascorbic acid, sodium ascorbate, co-enzyme Q10, {alpha}-lipoic acid, L-selenomethionine, and vitamin E succinate on radiation-induced oxidative stress were evaluated in MCF10 human breast epithelial cells exposed to radiation with X-rays, {gamma}-rays, protons, or high mass, high atomic number, and high energy particles using a dichlorofluorescein assay. Results: The results demonstrated that these antioxidants are effective in protecting against radiation-induced oxidative stress and complete or nearly complete protection was achieved by treating the cells with a combination of these agents before and during the radiation exposure. Conclusion: The combination of antioxidants evaluated in this study is likely be a promising countermeasure for protection against space radiation-induced adverse biologic effects.

  1. Novel vaccine development strategies for inducing mucosal immunity

    PubMed Central

    Fujkuyama, Yoshiko; Tokuhara, Daisuke; Kataoka, Kosuke; Gilbert, Rebekah S; McGhee, Jerry R; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2012-01-01

    To develop protective immune responses against mucosal pathogens, the delivery route and adjuvants for vaccination are important. The host, however, strives to maintain mucosal homeostasis by responding to mucosal antigens with tolerance, instead of immune activation. Thus, induction of mucosal immunity through vaccination is a rather difficult task, and potent mucosal adjuvants, vectors or other special delivery systems are often used, especially in the elderly. By taking advantage of the common mucosal immune system, the targeting of mucosal dendritic cells and microfold epithelial cells may facilitate the induction of effective mucosal immunity. Thus, novel routes of immunization and antigen delivery systems also show great potential for the development of effective and safe mucosal vaccines against various pathogens. The purpose of this review is to introduce several recent approaches to induce mucosal immunity to vaccines, with an emphasis on mucosal tissue targeting, new immunization routes and delivery systems. Defining the mechanisms of mucosal vaccines is as important as their efficacy and safety, and in this article, examples of recent approaches, which will likely accelerate progress in mucosal vaccine development, are discussed. PMID:22380827

  2. Structural changes caused by radiation-induced reduction and radiolysis: the effect of X-ray absorbed dose in a fungal multicopper oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    De la Mora, Eugenio; Lovett, Janet E.; Blanford, Christopher F.; Garman, Elspeth F.; Valderrama, Brenda; Rudino-Pinera, Enrique

    2012-05-01

    Radiation-induced reduction, radiolysis of copper sites and the effect of pH value together with the concomitant geometrical distortions of the active centres were analysed in several fungal (C. gallica) laccase structures collected at cryotemperature. This study emphasizes the importance of careful interpretation when the crystallographic structure of a metalloprotein is described. X-ray radiation induces two main effects at metal centres contained in protein crystals: radiation-induced reduction and radiolysis and a resulting decrease in metal occupancy. In blue multicopper oxidases (BMCOs), the geometry of the active centres and the metal-to-ligand distances change depending on the oxidation states of the Cu atoms, suggesting that these alterations are catalytically relevant to the binding, activation and reduction of O{sub 2}. In this work, the X-ray-determined three-dimensional structure of laccase from the basidiomycete Coriolopsis gallica (Cg L), a high catalytic potential BMCO, is described. By combining spectroscopic techniques (UV–Vis, EPR and XAS) and X-ray crystallography, structural changes at and around the active copper centres were related to pH and absorbed X-ray dose (energy deposited per unit mass). Depletion of two of the four active Cu atoms as well as low occupancies of the remaining Cu atoms, together with different conformations of the metal centres, were observed at both acidic pH and high absorbed dose, correlating with more reduced states of the active coppers. These observations provide additional evidence to support the role of flexibility of copper sites during O{sub 2} reduction. This study supports previous observations indicating that interpretations regarding redox state and metal coordination need to take radiation effects explicitly into account.

  3. Differential Expression of Homer1a in the Hippocampus and Cortex Likely Plays a Role in Radiation-Induced Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Elizabeth D.; Kooshki, Mitra; Wheeler, Kenneth T.; Metheny-Barlow, Linda J.; Robbins, Mike E.

    2014-01-01

    Fractionated partial or whole-brain irradiation is the primary treatment for metastatic brain tumors. Despite reducing tumor burden and increasing lifespan, progressive, irreversible cognitive impairment occurs in >50% of the patients who survive >6 months after fractionated whole-brain irradiation. The exact mechanism(s) responsible for this radiation-induced brain injury are unknown; however, preclinical studies suggest that radiation modulates the extracellular receptor kinase signaling pathway, which is associated with cognitive impairment in many neurological diseases. In the study reported here, we demonstrated that the extracellular receptor kinase transcriptionally-regulated early response gene, Homer1a, was up-regulated transiently in the hippocampus and down-regulated in the cortex of young adult male Fischer 344 X Brown Norway rats at 48 h after 40 Gy of fractionated whole-brain irradiation. Two months after fractionated whole-brain irradiation, these changes in Homer1a expression correlated with a down-regulation of the hippocampal glutamate receptor 1 and protein kinase Cγ, and an up-regulation of cortical glutamate receptor 1 and protein kinase Cγ. Two drugs that prevent radiation-induced cognitive impairment in rats, the angiotensin type-1 receptor blocker, L-158,809, and the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, ramipril, reversed the fractionated whole-brain irradiation-induced Homer1a expression at 48 h in the hippocampus and cortex and restored glutamate receptor 1 and protein kinase Cγ to the levels in shamirradiated controls at 2 months after fractionated whole-brain irradiation. These data indicate that Homer1a is, (1) a brain region specific regulator of radiation-induced brain injury, including cognitive impairment and (2) potentially a druggable target for preventing it. PMID:24377717

  4. High-frequency detection of the formation and stabilization of a radiation-induced defect cluster in semiconductor structures

    SciTech Connect

    Puzanov, A. S.; Obolenskiy, S. V. Kozlov, V. A.; Volkova, E. V.; Paveliev, D. G.

    2015-12-15

    The processes of the formation and stabilization of a radiation-induced defect cluster upon the arrival of a fast neutron to the space-charge region of a semiconductor diode are analyzed. The current pulse formed by secondary electrons is calculated and the spectrum of the signal generated by the diode (detector) under the action of an instantaneous neutron flux of the fission spectrum is determined. The possibility of experimental detection of the picosecond radiation-induced transition processes is discussed.

  5. JAK-STAT and intestinal mucosal immunology

    PubMed Central

    Heneghan, Aaron F; Pierre, Joseph F; Kudsk, Kenneth A

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal mucosal immune system is challenged with bacteria, viruses, and parasites, in addition to food and environmental antigens, that require dynamic immune responsiveness for homeostasis. One central signaling pathway is JAK-STAT, which regulates the adaptive and innate immune arms of mucosal immunity as well as epithelial repair and regeneration. Adaptive immunity includes lymphocyte mediated secretion of specific antibodies, while innate immune respones include secretion of non-antigen specific compounds. This review examines effects of specialized nutrition support on JAK-STAT in innate immune function and in lymphocyte modulation and epithelial antibody transport in gut-associated lymphoid tissue. PMID:24416649

  6. The effect of thalidomide on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage in mice: involvement of inflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Amirshahrokhi, Keyvan; Khalili, Ali-Reza

    2015-01-01

    Excessive ethanol ingestion causes gastric mucosal damage through the inflammatory and oxidative processes. The present study was aimed to evaluate the protective effect of thalidomide on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage in mice. The animals were pretreated with vehicle or thalidomide (30 or 60 mg/kg, orally), and one hour later, the gastric mucosal injury was induced by oral administration of acidified ethanol. The animals were euthanized one hour after ethanol ingestion, and gastric tissues were collected to biochemical analyzes. The gastric mucosal lesions were assessed by macroscopic and histopathological examinations. The results showed that treatment of mice with thalidomide prior to the administration of ethanol dose-dependently reduced the gastric ulcer index. Thalidomide pretreatment significantly reduced the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines [tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6], malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. In addition, thalidomide significantly inhibited ethanol-induced nitric oxide (NO) overproduction in gastric tissue. Histological observations showed that ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage was attenuated by thalidomide pretreatment. It seems that thalidomide as an anti-inflammatory agent may have a protective effect against alcohol-induced mucosal damage by inhibition of neutrophil infiltration and reducing the production of nitric oxide and inflammatory cytokines in gastric tissue.

  7. Comparison of radiation exposure and associated radiation-induced cancer risks from mammography and molecular imaging of the breast

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, Michael K.; Li Hua; Rhodes, Deborah J.; Hruska, Carrie B.; Clancy, Conor B.; Vetter, Richard J.

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: Recent studies have raised concerns about exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation from medical imaging procedures. Little has been published regarding the relative exposure and risks associated with breast imaging techniques such as breast specific gamma imaging (BSGI), molecular breast imaging (MBI), or positron emission mammography (PEM). The purpose of this article was to estimate and compare the risks of radiation-induced cancer from mammography and techniques such as PEM, BSGI, and MBI in a screening environment. Methods: The authors used a common scheme for all estimates of cancer incidence and mortality based on the excess absolute risk model from the BEIR VII report. The lifetime attributable risk model was used to estimate the lifetime risk of radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality. All estimates of cancer incidence and mortality were based on a population of 100 000 females followed from birth to age 80 and adjusted for the fraction that survives to various ages between 0 and 80. Assuming annual screening from ages 40 to 80 and from ages 50 to 80, the cumulative cancer incidence and mortality attributed to digital mammography, screen-film mammography, MBI, BSGI, and PEM was calculated. The corresponding cancer incidence and mortality from natural background radiation was calculated as a useful reference. Assuming a 15%-32% reduction in mortality from screening, the benefit/risk ratio for the different imaging modalities was evaluated. Results: Using conventional doses of 925 MBq Tc-99m sestamibi for MBI and BSGI and 370 MBq F-18 FDG for PEM, the cumulative cancer incidence and mortality were found to be 15-30 times higher than digital mammography. The benefit/risk ratio for annual digital mammography was >50:1 for both the 40-80 and 50-80 screening groups, but dropped to 3:1 for the 40-49 age group. If the primary use of MBI, BSGI, and PEM is in women with dense breast tissue, then the administered doses need to be in the range

  8. Radiation-induced cell lethality of samonella typhimurium ATCC 14028: Cooperative effect of hydroxyl radical and oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.A.; Thayer, D.W.

    1995-10-01

    The lethality of {gamma}-radiation doses of 0.2 to 1.0 kGy for Salmonella typhimurium ATCC 14028 was measured in the presence of air, N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O and with the hydroxyl radical scavengers formate and polyethylene glycol (PEG), M{sub r} 8,000. Saturation of cell suspensions with either N{sub 2}O or N{sub 2}/N{sub 2}/N{sub 2}O (1:1, v/v) gas was expected to double the number of hydroxyl radicals (OH{center_dot}) and to produce an equivalent increase in lethality, but this did not occur. Adding 10% (v/v) O{sub 2} to either N{sub 2}/N{sub 2}O gas produced approximately the same {gamma}-irradiation lethality for S. typhimurium as did air. Addition of hydroxyl radical scavengers, 40 mM formate and 1.5% (w/v) PEG, significantly reduced the lethality of {gamma} radiation for S. typhimurium in the presence of air but not in the presence of N{sub 2} or N{sub 2}O gases. Membrane-permeable formate provided slightly better protection than nonpermeable PEG. Cells of S. typhimurium grown under anaerobic conditions were more sensitive to radiation, and were less protected by hydroxyl radical scavengers, especially formate, than when cells grown under aerobic conditions were irradiated in the presence of oxygen. Hydroxyl radical scavengers provided no further protection during irradiation in the absence of oxygen. These results indicated that the increased radiation sensitivity of cells grown under anaerobic conditions may be related to superoxide radicals which could increase intercellular damage during irradiation in the presence of oxygen. However, endogenous superoxide dismutase and catalase activities did not protect cells from the radiation-induced lethality of S. typhimurium. Cytoplasmic extracts protected bacterial DNA in vitro in either the presence of absence of oxygen, and no radiation-induced lipid peroxidation of the cellular components was identified by measuring the levels of 2-thiobarbituric acid. 38 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Radiation-induced brain injury: low-hanging fruit for neuroregeneration.

    PubMed

    Burns, Terry C; Awad, Ahmed J; Li, Matthew D; Grant, Gerald A

    2016-05-01

    Brain radiation is a fundamental tool in neurooncology to improve local tumor control, but it leads to profound and progressive impairments in cognitive function. Increased attention to quality of life in neurooncology has accelerated efforts to understand and ameliorate radiation-induced cognitive sequelae. Such progress has coincided with a new understanding of the role of CNS progenitor cell populations in normal cognition and in their potential utility for the treatment of neurological diseases. The irradiated brain exhibits a host of biochemical and cellular derangements, including loss of endogenous neurogenesis, demyelination, and ablation of endogenous oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. These changes, in combination with a state of chronic neuroinflammation, underlie impairments in memory, attention, executive function, and acquisition of motor and language skills. Animal models of radiation-induced brain injury have demonstrated a robust capacity of both neural stem cells and oligodendrocyte progenitor cells to restore cognitive function after brain irradiation, likely through a combination of cell replacement and trophic effects. Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells exhibit a remarkable capacity to migrate, integrate, and functionally remyelinate damaged white matter tracts in a variety of preclinical models. The authors here critically address the opportunities and challenges in translating regenerative cell therapies from rodents to humans. Although valiant attempts to translate neuroprotective therapies in recent decades have almost uniformly failed, the authors make the case that harnessing human radiation-induced brain injury as a scientific tool represents a unique opportunity to both successfully translate a neuroregenerative therapy and to acquire tools to facilitate future restorative therapies for human traumatic and degenerative diseases of the central nervous system. PMID:27132524

  10. Regulation of ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis by a manganese porphyrin complex

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jin Hyup; Lee, You Mie; Park, Jeen-Woo . E-mail: parkjw@knu.ac.kr

    2005-08-26

    Ionizing radiation induces the production of reactive oxygen species, which play an important causative role in apoptotic cell death. Therefore, compounds that scavenge reactive oxygen species may confer regulatory effects on apoptosis. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetics have been shown to be protective against cell injury caused by reactive oxygen species. We investigated the effects of the manganese (III) tetrakis(N-methyl-2-pyridyl)porphyrin (MnTMPyP), a cell-permeable SOD mimetic, on ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis. Upon exposure to 2 Gy of {gamma}-irradiation, there was a distinct difference between the control cells and the cells pre-treated with 5 {mu}M MnTMPyP for 2 h with regard to apoptotic parameters, cellular redox status, mitochondria function, and oxidative damage to cells. MnTMPyP effectively suppressed morphological evidence of apoptosis and DNA fragmentation in U937 cells exposed to ionizing radiation. The [GSSG]/[GSH + GSSG] ratio and the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species were higher and the [NADPH]/[NADP{sup +} + NADPH] ratio was lower in control cells compared to MnTMPyP-treated cells. The ionizing radiation-induced mitochondrial damage reflected by the altered mitochondrial permeability transition, the increase in the accumulation of reactive oxygen species, and the reduction of ATP production were significantly higher in control cells compared to MnTMPyP-treated cells. MnTMPyP pre-treated cells showed significant inhibition of apoptotic features such as activation of caspase-3, up-regulation of Bax and p53, and down-regulation of Bcl-2 compared to control cells upon exposure to ionizing radiation. This study indicates that MnTMPyP may play an important role in regulating the apoptosis induced by ionizing radiation presumably through scavenging of reactive oxygen species.

  11. Subcutaneous Administration of Bovine Superoxide Dismutase Protects Lungs from Radiation-Induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Isabel L.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of the present study was to determine whether single administration of the antioxidant enzyme bovine superoxide dismutase (bSOD) after radiation (RT) exposure mitigates development of pulmonary toxicity in rats. Methods Female F344 rats (n=60) were divided among six experimental groups: (1) RT, single dose of 21 Gy to the right hemithorax; (2) RT+5 mg/kg bSOD; (3) RT+15 mg/kg bSOD; (4) No RT; (5) sham RT+5mg/kg bSOD; and (6) sham RT+15mg/kg bSOD. A single subcutaneous injection of bSOD (5 or 15 mg/kg) was administered 24 hours postradiation. The effects of bSOD on radiation-induced lung injury were assessed by measurement of body weight, breathing frequency and histopathological changes. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate oxidative stress (8-OHdG+, NOX4+, nitrotyrosine+, 4HNE+ cells), macrophage activation (ED1+), and expression of profibrotic TGF-β in irradiated tissue. Results Radiation led to an increase in all evaluated parameters. Treatment with 15mg/kg bSOD significantly decreased levels of all evaluated parameters including tissue damage and breathing frequency starting 6 weeks post-radiation. Animals treated with 5 mg/kg bSOD trended toward a suppression of radiation-induced lung damage but did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions The single application of bSOD (15mg/kg) ameliorates radiation induced lung injury through suppression of ROS/RNS dependent tissue damage. PMID:26110460

  12. Protection of DNA From Ionizing Radiation-Induced Lesions by Asiaticoside.

    PubMed

    Joy, Jisha; Alarifi, Saud; Alsuhaibani, Entissar; Nair, Cherupally K Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate whether asiaticoside, a triterpene glycoside, can afford protection to DNA from alterations induced by gamma radiation under in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo conditions. In vitro studies were done on plasmid pBR322 DNA, ex vivo studies were done on cellular DNA of human peripheral blood leukocytes, and in vivo investigations were conducted on cellular DNA of spleen and bone marrow cells of mice exposed to whole-body gamma radiation. The supercoiled form of the plasmid pBR322 DNA upon exposure to the radiation was converted into relaxed open circular form due to induction of strand breaks. Presence of asiaticoside along with the DNA during irradiation prevented the relaxation of the supercoiled form to the open circular form. When human peripheral blood leukocytes were exposed to gamma radiation, the cellular DNA suffered strand breaks as evidenced by the increased comet parameters in an alkaline comet assay. Asiaticoside, when present along with blood during irradiation ex vivo, prevented the strand breaks and the comet parameters were closer to that of the controls. Whole-body exposure of mice to gamma radiation resulted in a significant increase in comet parameters of DNA of bone marrow and spleen cells of mice as a result of radiation-induced strand breaks in DNA. Administration of asiaticoside prior to whole-body radiation exposure of the mice prevented this increase in radiation-induced increase in comet parameters, which could be the result of protection to DNA under in vivo conditions of radiation exposure. Thus, it can be concluded from the results that asiaticoside can offer protection to DNA from radiation-induced alterations under in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo conditions.

  13. Administration of interleukin-6 stimulates multilineage hematopoiesis and accelerates recovery from radiation-induced hematopoietic depression

    SciTech Connect

    Patchen, M.L.; MacVittie, T.J.; Williams, J.L.; Schwartz, G.N.; Souza, L.M. )

    1991-02-01

    Hematopoietic depression and subsequent susceptibility to potentially lethal opportunistic infections are well-documented phenomena following radiotherapy. Methods to therapeutically mitigate radiation-induced myelosuppression could offer great clinical value. In vivo studies have demonstrated that interleukin-6 (IL-6) stimulates pluripotent hematopoietic stem cell (CFU-s), granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cell (GM-CFC), and erythroid progenitor cell (CFU-e) proliferation in normal mice. Based on these results, the ability of IL-6 to stimulate hematopoietic regeneration following radiation-induced hematopoietic injury was also evaluated. C3H/HeN female mice were exposed to 6.5 Gy 60Co radiation and subcutaneously administered either saline or IL-6 on days 1 through 3 or 1 through 6 postexposure. On days 7, 10, 14, 17, and 22, femoral and splenic CFU-s, GM-CFC, and CFU-e contents and peripheral blood white cell, red cell, and platelet counts were determined. Compared with saline treatment, both 3-day and 6-day IL-6 treatments accelerated hematopoietic recovery; 6-day treatment produced the greater effects. For example, compared with normal control values (N), femoral and splenic CFU-s numbers in IL-6-treated mice 17 days postirradiation were 27% N and 136% N versus 2% N and 10% N in saline-treated mice. At the same time, bone marrow and splenic GM-CFC values were 58% N and 473% N versus 6% N and 196% N in saline-treated mice; bone marrow and splenic CFU-e numbers were 91% N and 250% N versus 31% N and 130% N in saline-treated mice; and peripheral blood white cell, red cell, and platelet values were 210% N, 60% N, and 24% N versus 18% N, 39% N, and 7% N in saline-treated mice. These studies demonstrate that therapeutically administered IL-6 can effectively accelerate multilineage hematopoietic recovery following radiation-induced hematopoietic injury.

  14. Smad, but not MAPK, pathway mediates the expression of type I collagen in radiation induced fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Hiroyuki; Hamanaka, Ryoji; Nakamura, Miki; Sumiyoshi, Hideaki; Matsuo, Noritaka; Yoshioka, Hidekatsu

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine how radiation affects the expression level and signal pathway of collagen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta}1 mRNA is elevated earlier than those of collagen genes after irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Smad pathway mediates the expression of collagen in radiation induced fibrosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAPK pathways are not affected in the expression of collagen after irradiation. -- Abstract: Radiation induced fibrosis occurs following a therapeutic or accidental radiation exposure in normal tissues. Tissue fibrosis is the excessive accumulation of collagen and other extracellular matrix components. This study investigated how ionizing radiation affects the expression level and signal pathway of type I collagen. Real time RT-RCR showed that both {alpha}1and {alpha}2 chain of type I collagen mRNA were elevated from 48 h after irradiation with 10 Gy in NIH3T3 cells. The relative luciferase activities of both genes and type I collagen marker were elevated at 72 h. TGF-{beta}1 mRNA was elevated earlier than those of type I collagen genes. A Western blot analysis showed the elevation of Smad phosphorylation at 72 h. Conversely, treatment with TGF-{beta} receptor inhibitor inhibited the mRNA and relative luciferase activity of type I collagen. The phosphorylation of Smad was repressed with the inhibitor, and the luciferase activity was cancelled using a mutant construct of Smad binding site of {alpha}2(I) collagen gene. However, the MAPK pathways, p38, ERK1/2 and JNK, were not affected with specific inhibitors or siRNA. The data showed that the Smad pathway mediated the expression of type I collagen in radiation induced fibrosis.

  15. Effects of Berberine Against Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury in Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Li Guanghui; Zhang Yaping; Tang Jinliang; Chen Zhengtang; Hu Yide; Wei Hong; Li Dezhi; Hao Ping; Wang Donglin

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced intestinal injury is a significant clinical problem in patients undergoing abdominal radiotherapy (RT). Berberine has been used as an antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antimotility agent. The present study investigated the protective effect of berberine against radiation-induced intestinal injury. Methods and Materials: The mice were administrated berberine or distilled water. A total of 144 mice underwent 0, 3, 6, 12, or 16 Gy single session whole-abdominal RT and 16 mice underwent 3 Gy/fraction/d for four fractions of fractionated abdominal RT. Tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, interleukin-10, diamine oxidase, intestinal fatty acid-binding protein, malonaldehyde, and apoptosis were assayed in the mice after RT. The body weight and food intake of the mice receiving fractionated RT were recorded. Another 72 mice who had undergone 12, 16, or 20 Gy abdominal RT were monitored for mortality every 12 h. Results: The body weight and food intake of the mice administered with distilled water decreased significantly compared with before RT. After the same dose of abdominal RT, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, diamine oxidase, intestinal fatty acid-binding protein in plasma and malonalhehyde and apoptosis of the intestine were significantly greater in the control group than in the mice administered berberine (p < .05-.01). In contrast, interleukin-10 in the mice with berberine treatment was significantly greater than in the control group (p < .01). A similar result was found in the fractionated RT experiment and at different points after 16 Gy abdominal RT (p < .05-.01). Berberine treatment significantly delayed the point of death after 20 Gy, but not 16 Gy, abdominal RT (p < .01). Conclusion: Treatment with berberine can delay mortality and attenuated intestinal injury in mice undergoing whole abdominal RT. These findings could provide a useful therapeutic strategy for radiation-induced intestinal injury.

  16. Radiation-induced formation, annealing and ordering of voids in crystals: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinko, V. I.; Guglya, A. G.; Donnelly, S. E.

    2011-07-01

    Void ordering has been observed in very different radiation environments ranging from metals to ionic crystals bombarded with energetic particles. The void ordering is often accompanied by a saturation of the void swelling with increasing irradiation dose, which makes an understanding of the underlying mechanisms to be both of scientific significance and of practical importance for nuclear engineering. We show that both phenomena can be explained by the original mechanism based on the anisotropic energy transfer provided by self-focusing discrete breathers or quodons (energetic, mobile, highly localized lattice solitons that propagate great distances along close-packed crystal directions). The interaction of quodons with voids can result in radiation-induced “annealing” of selected voids, which results in the void ordering under special irradiation conditions. We observe experimentally radiation-induced void annealing by lowering the irradiation temperature of nickel and copper samples pre-irradiated to produce voids or gas bubbles. The bulk recombination of Frenkel pairs increases with decreasing temperature resulting in suppression of the production of freely migrating vacancies (the driving force of the void growth). On the other hand, the rate of radiation-induced vacancy emission from voids due to the void interaction with quodons remains essentially unchanged, which results in void dissolution. The experimental data on the void shrinkage and void lattice formation obtained for different metals and irradiating particles are explained by the present model assuming the quodon propagation length to be in the micron range, which is consistent with independent data on the irradiation-induced diffusion of interstitial ions in austenitic stainless steel.

  17. Stem Cell Therapies for the Treatment of Radiation-Induced Normal Tissue Side Effects

    PubMed Central

    Benderitter, Marc; Caviggioli, Fabio; Chapel, Alain; Coppes, Robert P.; Guha, Chandan; Klinger, Marco; Malard, Olivier; Stewart, Fiona; Tamarat, Radia; Luijk, Peter Van

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Targeted irradiation is an effective cancer therapy but damage inflicted to normal tissues surrounding the tumor may cause severe complications. While certain pharmacologic strategies can temper the adverse effects of irradiation, stem cell therapies provide unique opportunities for restoring functionality to the irradiated tissue bed. Recent Advances: Preclinical studies presented in this review provide encouraging proof of concept regarding the therapeutic potential of stem cells for treating the adverse side effects associated with radiotherapy in different organs. Early-stage clinical data for radiation-induced lung, bone, and skin complications are promising and highlight the importance of selecting the appropriate stem cell type to stimulate tissue regeneration. Critical Issues: While therapeutic efficacy has been demonstrated in a variety of animal models and human trials, a range of additional concerns regarding stem cell transplantation for ameliorating radiation-induced normal tissue sequelae remain. Safety issues regarding teratoma formation, disease progression, and genomic stability along with technical issues impacting disease targeting, immunorejection, and clinical scale-up are factors bearing on the eventual translation of stem cell therapies into routine clinical practice. Future Directions: Follow-up studies will need to identify the best possible stem cell types for the treatment of early and late radiation-induced normal tissue injury. Additional work should seek to optimize cellular dosing regimes, identify the best routes of administration, elucidate optimal transplantation windows for introducing cells into more receptive host tissues, and improve immune tolerance for longer-term engrafted cell survival into the irradiated microenvironment. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21: 338–355. PMID:24147585

  18. Protection of DNA From Ionizing Radiation-Induced Lesions by Asiaticoside.

    PubMed

    Joy, Jisha; Alarifi, Saud; Alsuhaibani, Entissar; Nair, Cherupally K Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate whether asiaticoside, a triterpene glycoside, can afford protection to DNA from alterations induced by gamma radiation under in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo conditions. In vitro studies were done on plasmid pBR322 DNA, ex vivo studies were done on cellular DNA of human peripheral blood leukocytes, and in vivo investigations were conducted on cellular DNA of spleen and bone marrow cells of mice exposed to whole-body gamma radiation. The supercoiled form of the plasmid pBR322 DNA upon exposure to the radiation was converted into relaxed open circular form due to induction of strand breaks. Presence of asiaticoside along with the DNA during irradiation prevented the relaxation of the supercoiled form to the open circular form. When human peripheral blood leukocytes were exposed to gamma radiation, the cellular DNA suffered strand breaks as evidenced by the increased comet parameters in an alkaline comet assay. Asiaticoside, when present along with blood during irradiation ex vivo, prevented the strand breaks and the comet parameters were closer to that of the controls. Whole-body exposure of mice to gamma radiation resulted in a significant increase in comet parameters of DNA of bone marrow and spleen cells of mice as a result of radiation-induced strand breaks in DNA. Administration of asiaticoside prior to whole-body radiation exposure of the mice prevented this increase in radiation-induced increase in comet parameters, which could be the result of protection to DNA under in vivo conditions of radiation exposure. Thus, it can be concluded from the results that asiaticoside can offer protection to DNA from radiation-induced alterations under in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo conditions. PMID:26756427

  19. RNA is an Adjuvanticity Mediator for the Lipid-Based Mucosal Adjuvant, Endocine.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masayuki; Aoshi, Taiki; Ozasa, Koji; Kusakabe, Takato; Momota, Masatoshi; Haseda, Yasunari; Kobari, Shingo; Kuroda, Etsushi; Kobiyama, Kouji; Coban, Cevayir; Ishii, Ken J

    2016-01-01

    Nasal vaccination has the potential to elicit systemic and mucosal immunity against pathogens. However, split and subunit vaccines lack potency at stimulating mucosal immunity, and an adjuvant is indispensable for eliciting potent mucosal immune response to nasal vaccines. Endocine, a lipid-based mucosal adjuvant, potentiates both systemic and mucosal immune responses. Although Endocine has shown efficacy and tolerability in animal and clinical studies, its mechanism of action remains unknown. It has been reported recently that endogenous danger signals are essential for the effects of some adjuvants such as alum or MF59. However, the contribution of danger signals to the adjuvanticity of Endocine has not been explored. Here, we show that RNA is likely to be an important mediator for the adjuvanticity of Endocine. Administration of Endocine generated nucleic acids release, and activated dendritic cells (DCs) in draining lymph nodes in vivo. These results suggest the possibility that Endocine indirectly activates DCs via damage-associated molecular patterns. Moreover, the adjuvanticity of Endocine disappeared in mice lacking TANK-binding kinase 1 (Tbk1), which is a downstream molecule of nucleic acid sensing signal pathway. Furthermore, co-administration of RNase A reduced the adjuvanticity of Endocine. These data suggest that RNA is important for the adjuvanticity of Endocine. PMID:27374884

  20. Mucosal and systemic immune responses induced by a single time vaccination strategy in mice.

    PubMed

    González Aznar, Elizabeth; Romeu, Belkis; Lastre, Miriam; Zayas, Caridad; Cuello, Maribel; Cabrera, Osmir; Valdez, Yolanda; Fariñas, Mildrey; Pérez, Oliver

    2015-08-01

    Vaccination is considered by the World Health Organization as the most cost-effective strategy for controlling infectious diseases. In spite of great successes with vaccines, many infectious diseases are still leading killers, because of the inadequate coverage of many vaccines. Several factors have been responsible: number of doses, high vaccine reactogenicity, vaccine costs, vaccination policy, among others. Contradictorily, few vaccines are of single dose and even less of mucosal administration. However, more common infections occur via mucosa, where secretory immunoglobulin A plays an essential role. As an alternative, we proposed a novel protocol of vaccination called Single Time Vaccination Strategy (SinTimVaS) by immunizing 2 priming doses at the same time: one by mucosal route and the other by parenteral route. Here, the mucosal and systemic responses induced by Finlay adjuvants (AF Proteoliposome 1 and AF Cochleate 1) implementing SinTimVaS in BALB/c mice were evaluated. One intranasal dose of AF Cochleate 1 and an intramuscular dose of AF Proteoliposome 1 adsorbed onto aluminum hydroxide, with bovine serum albumin or tetanus toxoid as model antigens, administrated at the same time, induced potent specific mucosal and systemic immune responses. Also, we demonstrated that SinTimVaS using other mucosal routes like oral and sublingual, in combination with the subcutaneous route elicits immune responses. SinTimVaS, as a new immunization strategy, could increase vaccination coverage and reduce time-cost vaccines campaigns, adding the benefits of immune response in mucosa.

  1. Oral mucositis due to cancer treatments. Orodental hygiene and ice cubes.

    PubMed

    2008-02-01

    (1) Oral mucositis is a frequent adverse effect of cancer chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Fluorouracil, radiotherapy and conditioning regimens for haematopoietic stem cell grafting often cause severe oral mucositis, preventing patients from drinking and eating normally. (2) A randomised trial suggests that this complication can be attenuated by timely orodental care such as extraction of damaged teeth, treatment of tooth decay, and care of trauma due to dentures. (3) In 3 randomised controlled trials involving about 200 patients at high risk of severe oral mucositis, sucking ice during chemotherapy reduced the incidence of severe oral mucositis, from 14-74% to 4-21%. (4) Other treatments are no more effective and carry a risk of known or poorly documented adverse effects. (5) Analgesics (especially morphine) should be used to treat intense pain. Local anaesthetics have not been tested in patients with damaged oral mucosa, but they can cause a burning sensation and carry a risk of swallowing disorders due to anaesthesia of the oropharyngeal junction. (6) In practice, prevention of oral mucositis due to cancer chemotherapy or radiotherapy is based on orodental care and ice rather than drugs. PMID:18383657

  2. RNA is an Adjuvanticity Mediator for the Lipid-Based Mucosal Adjuvant, Endocine

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Masayuki; Aoshi, Taiki; Ozasa, Koji; Kusakabe, Takato; Momota, Masatoshi; Haseda, Yasunari; Kobari, Shingo; Kuroda, Etsushi; Kobiyama, Kouji; Coban, Cevayir; Ishii, Ken J.

    2016-01-01

    Nasal vaccination has the potential to elicit systemic and mucosal immunity against pathogens. However, split and subunit vaccines lack potency at stimulating mucosal immunity, and an adjuvant is indispensable for eliciting potent mucosal immune response to nasal vaccines. Endocine, a lipid-based mucosal adjuvant, potentiates both systemic and mucosal immune responses. Although Endocine has shown efficacy and tolerability in animal and clinical studies, its mechanism of action remains unknown. It has been reported recently that endogenous danger signals are essential for the effects of some adjuvants such as alum or MF59. However, the contribution of danger signals to the adjuvanticity of Endocine has not been explored. Here, we show that RNA is likely to be an important mediator for the adjuvanticity of Endocine. Administration of Endocine generated nucleic acids release, and activated dendritic cells (DCs) in draining lymph nodes in vivo. These results suggest the possibility that Endocine indirectly activates DCs via damage-associated molecular patterns. Moreover, the adjuvanticity of Endocine disappeared in mice lacking TANK-binding kinase 1 (Tbk1), which is a downstream molecule of nucleic acid sensing signal pathway. Furthermore, co-administration of RNase A reduced the adjuvanticity of Endocine. These data suggest that RNA is important for the adjuvanticity of Endocine. PMID:27374884

  3. Oral mucositis due to cancer treatments. Orodental hygiene and ice cubes.

    PubMed

    2008-02-01

    (1) Oral mucositis is a frequent adverse effect of cancer chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Fluorouracil, radiotherapy and conditioning regimens for haematopoietic stem cell grafting often cause severe oral mucositis, preventing patients from drinking and eating normally. (2) A randomised trial suggests that this complication can be attenuated by timely orodental care such as extraction of damaged teeth, treatment of tooth decay, and care of trauma due to dentures. (3) In 3 randomised controlled trials involving about 200 patients at high risk of severe oral mucositis, sucking ice during chemotherapy reduced the incidence of severe oral mucositis, from 14-74% to 4-21%. (4) Other treatments are no more effective and carry a risk of known or poorly documented adverse effects. (5) Analgesics (especially morphine) should be used to treat intense pain. Local anaesthetics have not been tested in patients with damaged oral mucosa, but they can cause a burning sensation and carry a risk of swallowing disorders due to anaesthesia of the oropharyngeal junction. (6) In practice, prevention of oral mucositis due to cancer chemotherapy or radiotherapy is based on orodental care and ice rather than drugs.

  4. Systemic but not mucosal immunity induced by AVA prevents inhalational anthrax.

    PubMed

    Klinman, Dennis M; Currie, Debra; Lee, Gloria; Grippe, Vanessa; Merkel, Tod

    2007-10-01

    Improved vaccines and adjuvants are being developed to reduce the threat posed by a terrorist attack involving aerosolized anthrax spores. Nevertheless, uncertainty persists concerning the relative benefits of inducing mucosal vs systemic immunity to host survival following inhalational exposure to anthrax spores. This work examines the effect of delivering the licensed human vaccine (anthrax vaccine adsorbed, AVA) combined with a CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) adjuvant intraperitoneally or intranasally to A/J mice. Results indicate that protection from inhalational anthrax correlates with the induction of a strong systemic rather than mucosal immune response, and demonstrate that protection is significantly improved and accelerated by the addition of CpG ODN.

  5. Radiation-Induced Reduction of Ceria in Single and Polycrystalline Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Amit; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Shutthan