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Sample records for reduce radiation-induced mucositis

  1. Radiation Induced Oral Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    PS, Satheesh Kumar; Balan, Anita; Sankar, Arun; Bose, Tinky

    2009-01-01

    Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i) With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii) who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii) who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv) who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene PMID:20668585

  2. Potential prevention: Aloe vera mouthwash may reduce radiation-induced oral mucositis in head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Amirhossein

    2012-08-01

    In recent years, more head and neck cancer patients have been treated with radiotherapy. Radiation-induced mucositis is a common and dose limiting toxicity of radiotherapy among patients with head and neck cancers. Patients undergoing radiation therapy for head and neck cancer are also at increased risk of developing oral candidiasis. A number of new agents applied locally or systemically to prevent or treat radiation-induced mucositis have been investigated, but there is no widely accepted prophylactic or effective treatment for mucositis. Topical Aloe vera is widely used for mild sunburn, frostbites, and scalding burns. Studies have reported the beneficial effects of Aloe gel for wound healing, mucous membrane protection, and treatment of oral ulcers, in addition to antiinflammatory, immunomudulation, antifungal, scavenging free radicals, increasing collagen formation and inhibiting collagenase. Herein the author postulates that oral Aloe vera mouthwash may not only prevent radiation-induced mucositis by its wound healing and antiinflammatory mechanism, but also may reduce oral candidiasis of patients undergoing head and neck radiotherapy due to its antifungal and immunomodulatory properties. Hence, Aloe vera mouthwash may provide an alternative agent for treating radiation-induced oral mucositis and candidiasis in patients with head and neck cancers.

  3. Ghrelin may reduce radiation-induced mucositis and anorexia in head-neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Guney, Yildiz; Ozel Turkcu, Ummuhani; Hicsonmez, Ayse; Nalca Andrieu, Meltem; Kurtman, Cengiz

    2007-01-01

    Body weight loss is common in cancer patients, and is often associated with poor prognosis, it greatly impairs quality of life (QOL). Radiation therapy (RT) is used in head and neck cancers (HNC) either as a primary treatment or as an adjuvant therapy to surgery. Patients with HNC are most susceptible to malnutrition especially due to anorexia, which is aggravated by RT. Multiple pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), interferon (IFN)-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha(TNF-alpha), have been all associated with the development of both anorexia and oral mucositis. Radiation-induced mucositis occurs in almost all patients, who are treated for HNC, it could also cause weight loss. Ghrelin is a novel 28-amino acid peptide, which up-regulates body weight through appetite control, increase food intake, down-regulate energy expenditure and induces adiposity. Furthermore, ghrelin inhibits pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, TNF-alpha which may cause oral mucositis and aneroxia, which are the results of weight loss. Thus weight loss during RT is an early indicator of nutritional decline, we propose that recombinant ghrelin used prophylactically could be useful as an appetite stimulant; and preventive of mucositis because of its anti-inflammatory effect, it might help patients maintain weight over the course of curative RT of the HNC and can improve specific aspects of QOL. This issue warrants further studies.

  4. Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Maria, Osama Muhammad; Eliopoulos, Nicoletta; Muanza, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced oral mucositis (RIOM) is a major dose-limiting toxicity in head and neck cancer patients. It is a normal tissue injury caused by radiation/radiotherapy (RT), which has marked adverse effects on patient quality of life and cancer therapy continuity. It is a challenge for radiation oncologists since it leads to cancer therapy interruption, poor local tumor control, and changes in dose fractionation. RIOM occurs in 100% of altered fractionation radiotherapy head and neck cancer patients. In the United Sates, its economic cost was estimated to reach 17,000.00 USD per patient with head and neck cancers. This review will discuss RIOM definition, epidemiology, impact and side effects, pathogenesis, scoring scales, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. PMID:28589080

  5. Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis.

    PubMed

    Maria, Osama Muhammad; Eliopoulos, Nicoletta; Muanza, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced oral mucositis (RIOM) is a major dose-limiting toxicity in head and neck cancer patients. It is a normal tissue injury caused by radiation/radiotherapy (RT), which has marked adverse effects on patient quality of life and cancer therapy continuity. It is a challenge for radiation oncologists since it leads to cancer therapy interruption, poor local tumor control, and changes in dose fractionation. RIOM occurs in 100% of altered fractionation radiotherapy head and neck cancer patients. In the United Sates, its economic cost was estimated to reach 17,000.00 USD per patient with head and neck cancers. This review will discuss RIOM definition, epidemiology, impact and side effects, pathogenesis, scoring scales, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, prevention, and treatment.

  6. Nocifensive Behaviors in Mice with Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Michael W; Long, C Tyler; Marcus, Karen L; Sarmadi, Shayan; Roback, Donald M; Fukuyama, Tomoki; Baeumer, Wolfgang; Lascelles, B Duncan X

    2017-02-10

    Oral mucositis can result in significant dysphagia, and is the most common dose-limiting acute toxicity in head and neck cancer patients receiving chemoradiotherapy. There is a critical need to determine the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie radiotherapy-associated discomfort in patients with mucositis. The objective was to induce oral mucositis in mice, using a clinical linear accelerator, and to quantify resultant discomfort, and characterize peripheral sensitization. A clinical linear accelerator was used to deliver ionizing radiation to the oral cavity of mice. Mucositis severity scoring, and various behavioral assays were performed to quantify bouts of orofacial wiping and scratching, bite force, gnawing behavior and burrowing activity. Calcium imaging was performed on neurons of the trigeminal ganglia. Glossitis was induced with a single fraction of at least 27 Gy. Body weight decreased and subsequently returned to baseline, in concert with development and resolution of mucositis, which was worst at day 10 and 11 postirradiation, however was resolved within another 10 days. Neither bite force, nor gnawing behavior were measurably affected. However, burrowing activity was decreased, and both facial wiping and scratching were increased while mice had visible mucositis lesions. Sensory nerves of irradiated mice were more responsive to histamine, tumor necrosis factor alpha and capsaicin. Radiation-induced glossitis is associated with hyper-reactivity of sensory neurons in the trigeminal ganglia of mice, and is accompanied by several behaviors indicative of both itch and pain. These data validate an appropriate model for cancer treatment related discomfort in humans.

  7. Effectiveness of triclosan in the management of radiation-induced oral mucositis: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Satheeshkumar, P S; Chamba, Moideen Sha; Balan, Anita; Sreelatha, K T; Bhatathiri, V N; Bose, Tinky

    2010-01-01

    Oral care in cancer patients is an important aspect in the quality of life of patients undergoing cancer therapy. Mucositis, trismus, salivary gland dysfunction are the main complications of the cancer therapy, which lead to long-term complications such as radiation caries, poor oral hygiene and osteoradionecrosis. A timely oral evaluation and intervention in these patients can reduce the severity of the potential complications. Triclosan is an antibacterial agent widely used in periodontal therapy, the effectiveness of triclosan in the management of radiation induced oral mucositis is evaluated here. 1) To determine the effectiveness of triclosan in the management of radiation-induced oral mucositis. 2) To compare the effectiveness of triclosan mouth rinse with conventional sodium bicarbonate mouth rinse. Twenty-four patients who underwent radiation therapy for oral cancer and subsequently developed oral mucositis were included in the study. They were randomly allocated into two groups on noticing grade I mucositis (erythema). The study group was advised to use triclosan mouthwash containing triclosan 0.03% W/V and sodium bicarbonate 2 mg mouth wash for the control group. A weekly follow-up evaluation of body weight, food intake, pain and grading of mucositis were made during the radiation treatment period and post radiation treatment period. Both the groups were statistically identical. All the 24 patients in both the groups passed through grade 3 mucositis on the last day of radiotherapy. However, 10 patients in the control group and only one patient in the study group entered to grade 4 mucositis. A definite change was noticed in the severity of the mucositis, food intake and weight loss. The control group took more than 45 days to resolve while the study group took only less than 28 days. The results of the study were evaluated and tried to formulate a hypothesis so as to explain the less severity and early resolution of mucositis in the study group. Triclosan

  8. Protective effects of Nigella sativa on gamma radiation-induced jejunal mucosal damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Orhon, Zeynep Nur; Uzal, Cem; Kanter, Mehmet; Erboga, Mustafa; Demiroglu, Murat

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of Nigella sativa in protection of jejunal mucosa against harmful effects of gamma radiation. Radiotherapy group received abdominal gamma radiation of 15Gy in addition to physiological saline. Radiotherapy+Nigella sativa treatment group received abdominal gamma radiation of 15Gy in addition to Nigella sativa treatment in the amount of 400mg/kg. Radiotherapy and treatment groups were sacrificed 3 days after the exposure to irradiation. Then, jejunum samples were harvested for biochemical and histological assessment of mucosal injury. Nigella sativa treatment was found to significantly lower elevated tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and, to raise reduced glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in intestinal tissues samples. Single dose 15Gy gamma-irradiation was noted to result in a marked jejunal mucosal injury. Three days after exposure to irradiation, the villi and Lieberkühn crypts were observed as denuded, and villous height diminished. Concomitantly with inflammatory cell invasion, capillary congestion and ulceration were observed in the atrophic mucosa. Nigella sativa treatment significantly attenuated the radiation induced morphological changes in the irradiated rat jejunal mucosa. Nigella sativa has protective effects against radiation-induced damage, suggesting that clinical transfer is feasible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Prevention and management of radiation-induced dermatitis, mucositis, and xerostomia.

    PubMed

    Radvansky, Lauren J; Pace, Makala B; Siddiqui, Asif

    2013-06-15

    Current strategies for preventing and managing radiation-induced dermatitis, mucositis, and xerostomia are reviewed, with an emphasis on pharmacologic interventions. Nearly two thirds of all patients with cancer receive radiation therapy during the course of treatment, frequently resulting in acute skin and mucosal toxicities. The severity of radiotherapy-associated toxicities varies according to multiple treatment- and patient-related factors (e.g., total radiation dose and dose fractionation schedule, volume of organ or tissue irradiated, use of concurrent versus sequential chemotherapy, comorbid conditions, functional performance status). Three major radiation toxicities encountered in clinical practice are (1) radiation dermatitis, typically managed with a variety of topical agents such as water-based moisturizing creams or lotions, topical steroids, antiinflammatory emulsions, and wound dressings, (2) radiation-induced oral mucositis, which can be managed through proper basic oral care practices, appropriate pain management, and the use of medicated mouthwashes and oral rinses and gels, and (3) radiation-induced xerostomia, which can be alleviated with saliva substitutes, moistening agents, and sialagogues. Pharmacists involved in the care of patients receiving radiotherapy can play an important role in optimizing symptom control, educating patients on self-care strategies, and adverse effect monitoring and reporting. Radiation-induced dermatitis, mucositis, and xerostomia can cause significant morbidity and diminished quality of life. Pharmacologic interventions for the prevention and treatment of these toxicities include topical agents for dermatitis; oral products, analgesics, and palifermin for mucositis; and amifostine, saliva substitutes, and pilocarpine for xerostomia.

  10. Impact of dose and volume on radiation-induced mucositis.

    PubMed

    Mantini, Giovanna; Manfrida, Stefania; Cellini, Francesco; Giammarino, Daniela; Petrone, Adelina; Vitucci, Pasquale; Cellini, Numa

    2005-01-01

    There is a relationship between a given radiation dose and the resulting biological effect in the management of head and neck cancer. Radiation mucositis represents a frequent complication in cancer chemoradiation. Its prevention and treatment are major goals in radiation therapy schedules. Critical tissues can be spared using high conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) based on consensus guidelines for target volume. Current approaches to radiation mucositis with respect to the dose and volume impact are illustrated. The monitoring system of late toxicity used by the authors is presented.

  11. Mucoadhesive propolis gel for prevention of radiation-induced oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Noronha, Vladimir R A S; Araujo, Gustavo S; Gomes, Rafael T; Iwanaga, Samara H; Barbosa, Maralice C; Abdo, Evandro N; Ferreira e Ferreira, Efigenia; Viana Campos, Ana C; Souza, Alexandre A; Abreu, Sheila R L; Santos, Vagner R

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this phase II study was to determine the effectiveness of a mucoadhesive propolis gel in the prevention of radiation-induced oral mucositis. Twenty-four patients who were selected to undergo radiation therapy for oral cancer were included in this open-label trial. They were advised to use a mucoadhesive gel containing propolis 5,0% w/v three times a day starting one day before the course of radiation therapy and concluding after 2 weeks of radiation therapy. A weekly follow-up for evaluation of food intake, pain and grading of mucositis was performed. In order to confirm the absence of Candida-related mucositis in patients who developed mucositis, it was performed exfoliative cytology of buccal mucosa, palate and tongue and the material for Candifast(®) Candida species identification. At the end of the study was made the compliance of patients, quality, appreciation and acceptance of product evaluation. Twenty patients did not develop mucositis, two patients developed grade 1 mucositis and two patients developed grade 2 mucositis. None of the patients discontinued food intake and no pain was observed during the study. Candidosis was not detected in any patient. Mucoadhesive propolis gel could be considered as a potential topical medication for preventing radiation-induced oral mucositis. However, comparative phase III study with larger number of patients should be done for confirmation of the efficacy of the product.

  12. The effect of clove-based herbal mouthwash on radiation-induced oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer: a single-blind randomized preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Moonkyoo; Hwang, Deok-Sang; Yoon, Seong Woo; Kim, Jinsung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of clove-based herbal mouthwash in ameliorating radiation-induced oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer. Methods Fourteen patients were prospectively enrolled in this study and randomized to either an experimental group or a control group. The patients of the experimental group swished their mouths with a clove-based herbal mouthwash during radiotherapy (RT), while the patients of the control group swished with clear water. The primary end point of this study was incidence of radiation-induced oral mucositis. The secondary end points were time to onset of radiation-induced oral mucositis, duration of radiation-induced oral mucositis, incidence of supplemental nutrition through feeding tube, maximum pain score, body weight loss, incidence of RT interruption, and duration of RT interruption. Results The use of clove-based herbal mouthwash shortened the duration of grade ≥2 mucositis (24.3 days vs 37.1 days, P=0.044) and reduced body weight loss during RT (3.1% vs 7.4%, P=0.023) compared with clear water. The use of clove-based herbal mouthwash also reduced the incidence of grade 3 mucositis (28.6% vs 57.1%), supplemental nutrition (0% vs 28.6%), and RT interruption (14.3% vs 28.6%), and reduced the duration of grade 3 mucositis (5.1 days vs 17.7 days) and RT interruption (1 days vs 8.5 days). In addition, clove-based herbal mouthwash delayed the time to onset of mucositis (26.6 days vs 24.5 days) and reduced the maximum pain score (4.1 vs 4.9). However, these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion Although we could not find significant differences in some end points, this single-blind randomized study showed that a clove-based herbal mouthwash can have a potentially beneficial effect on minimizing or preventing radiation-induced oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer. To confirm the results of our study, well-designed randomized studies with large

  13. Radiation-induced oral mucositis and periodontitis - proposal for an inter-relationship.

    PubMed

    Khaw, A; Logan, R; Keefe, D; Bartold, M

    2014-04-01

    Virtually all patients who receive head and neck radiotherapy develop some degree of oral mucositis. Severe oral mucositis may necessitate an interruption of the course of radiotherapy and thus can serve as a dose-limiting factor. Periodontitis is a host-driven inflammatory response to a pathogenic bacterial biofilm in the subgingival environment, resulting in the progressive destruction of the tissues that support the teeth, specifically the gingiva, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. This disease affects more than 50% of the population. Considering that radiation-induced oral mucositis and periodontitis are both linked with continuing presence of systemic inflammation, they may be associated through a primed inflammatory response as proposed by the 'two-hit' model. Alternatively, both conditions may be correlated as they represent a dysregulation of the inflammatory response. To date, no studies have looked into the association between these conditions. This review considers the current evidence that provides a rationale for proposing a link between periodontitis and oral mucositis.

  14. Successful treatment of radiation-induced mucositis with proton pump inhibitor administration: A report of two laryngeal cancer cases.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Kohtaro; Suzuki, Masami; Ida, Shota; Kudo, Shigehiro; Ando, Ken; Ebara, Takeshi; Higuchi, Keiko

    2017-02-01

    Presently, the relationship between laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) and radiation-induced mucositis has not been fully explored. In the present study, we report 2 cases of laryngeal cancer in which radiation-induced mucositis ameliorated after proton pump inhibitor (PPI) administration. Case 1 was diagnosed with T1aN0M0 right glottis carcinoma and was treated with radiation therapy. Grade 3 mucositis occurred after administration of 46Gy irradiation. PPI was administered and mucositis ameliorated quickly without cessation of radiation therapy. Case 2 was diagnosed with T2N0M0 supraglottic cancer and was treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Grade 3 mucositis occurred after administration of 44Gy irradiation. PPI was administered and mucositis ameliorated quickly without cessation of chemoradiation therapy. In both cases, a remarkable therapeutic effect of PPI was observed in the perilaryngeal areas including the epiglottic vallecula, arytenoid, and postcricoid area. In both cases, LPR involvement was suspected before the onset of radiation therapy. The two cases presented here, indicated a causal relationship between LPR and radiation-induced mucositis. In cases of severe mucositis in the perilaryngeal area in patients with LPR prior to radiation therapy, PPI administration may be an effective therapeutic option.

  15. The potential clinical impact of probiotic treatment for the prevention and/or anti-inflammatory therapeutic effect against radiation induced intestinal mucositis. A review.

    PubMed

    Maria-Aggeliki, Kalogeridi S; Nikolaos, Kelekis L; Kyrias, George M; Vassilis, Kouloulias E

    2009-11-01

    Although pelvic radiotherapy, either alone or combined with chemotherapy, has proved to be successful in the treatment of patients with rectal, gynecological and urologic cancer, it is not devoid of side effects. Among patients receiving pelvic radiotherapy more than 70% develop acute inflammatory changes causing gastrointestinal symptoms during treatment. The most frequently reported symptom related to radiation-induced intestinal mucositis is diarrhea. Among nutritional interventions used to manage radiation-induced diarrhoea, probiotics has gained popularity. This term describes organisms and substances that improve microbial balance in the intestines. Although encouraging results have been obtained in clinical trials, the potential of oral probiotics to manage gastrointestinal symptoms needs further research. The article also outlines recent patents related to probiotics therapy to reduce radiation induced mocositis.

  16. A rat model against chemotherapy plus radiation-induced oral mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Alkesh; Rajesh, S.; Chandrashekhar, V.M.; Rathnam, Shivprakash; Shah, Karishma; Mallikarjuna Rao, C.; Nandakumar, K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Present study was aimed at developing an experimental model of oral mucositis in rats using a combination of chemotherapeutic agent and radiation. Study design Female Wistar rats (150–200 g) were divided into 3 groups (n = 6). Rats in group 1 (normal control) and group 2 (mucositis control) were treated with vehicle. Rats in group 3 were treated with l-glutamine (1 g/kg, p.o.; 15 days) before and after mucositis induction. Oral mucositis was induced by busulfan (6 mg/kg, p.o.; 4 days) and the tongue exposed to infrared (IR) radiation of intensity 40 mV/cm2 for 5 s on the 1st, 4th and 10th days of challenge using a tail flick apparatus. Parameters monitored were body weight, food intake, blood count and survival. Oral mucositis score (OMS) was recorded daily. Histological changes of the irradiated tongue were assessed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Results Busulfan and IR radiation significantly reduced body weight and food intake of the mucositis control group as compared to normal control. Clear ulceration of the tongue reflected in the OMS. Histopathology of the tongue revealed intense lymphocytic infiltration, decreased thickness of squamous epithelial cell layer, decrease in number of blood vessels, and necrosis of cells along with pseudo-membrane formation in the mucositis control group. These findings suggested that oral mucositis was successfully induced and treatment with l-glutamine partially reversed these conditions. Conclusion Oral mucositis was established successfully in rats by the combination of chemotherapeutic agent and IR radiation. This may be a useful model for screening drugs in the treatment of oral mucositis. PMID:24227960

  17. The effect of a calcium phosphate mouth rinse on (chemo) radiation induced oral mucositis in head and neck cancer patients: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Stokman, M A; Burlage, F R; Spijkervet, F K L

    2012-08-01

    Promising results of a calcium phosphate (CP) mouth rinse on reduced severity of oral mucositis have been reported. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a CP mouth rinse on the frequency, duration and severity of (chemo) radiation induced oral mucositis in patients with head-neck cancer. patients with oral malignancies, treated with (chemo) radiotherapy, were included. Patients rinsed four times a day with a CP mouth rinse. Patients not willing to rinse with the CP mouth rinse served as control. Mucositis was scored according to the WHO score at baseline and twice a week during the full course of (chemo) radiotherapy. Patient's self-reported mouth-throat soreness (MTS) was evaluated at the same time interval using a diary in the CP mouth rinse group. The outcomes on MTS were compared with a historical control group. Fifty-two patients were analysed: 25 CP mouth rinse group, 11 control group and 16 historical group. There was no significant difference between the CP group and control group on development and severity of oral mucositis. No significant difference was found for subjective outcomes on MTS between the CP group and the historical group. The CP mouth rinse seems to have no influence on the frequency, duration and severity of oral mucositis during (chemo) radiation in patients with head and neck cancer. A trend to develop less MTS for drinking and eating was found when applying the CP mouth rinse. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. Antioxidant agents: a future alternative approach in the prevention and treatment of radiation-induced oral mucositis?

    PubMed

    de Freitas Cuba, Letícia; Salum, Fernanda Gonçalves; Cherubini, Karen; de Figueiredo, Maria Antonia Zancanaro

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a therapeutic modality frequently employed for patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). It destroys tumor cells, but it is not selective, also affecting healthy tissues and producing adverse effects. One that stands out is oral mucositis because of the morbidity that it is capable of causing. This lesion is characterized by the presence of erythema, ulcerations, pain, opportunistic infections, and weight loss. These side effects can lead to serious situations that require the interruption of the antineoplastic treatment and can result in hospitalization and even death. The complex mechanisms linked to the pathogenesis of oral mucositis were recently established, and since then, the control of oxidative stress (OS) has been tied to the prevention and management of this disease. The authors have carried out a review of the literature about the use of antioxidant agents in the prevention and treatment of radiation-induced oral mucositis, using the PubMed database. This review has shown that the research on use of antioxidants (AOX) has proved insufficient to justify suggesting the products in treatment protocols. Results are promising, however, and AOX may represent a future alternative in the prevention and treatment of oral mucositis.

  19. Comparative Efficacy of Aloe vera and Benzydamine Mouthwashes on Radiation-induced Oral Mucositis: A Triple-blind, Randomised, Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Sahebjamee, Mahnaz; Mansourian, Arash; Hajimirzamohammad, Mohammad; Mohammad, Haji Mirza Mohammad; Zadeh, Mohsen Taghi; Bekhradi, Reza; Kazemian, Ali; Manifar, Soheila; Ashnagar, Sajjad; Doroudgar, Kiavash

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of an Aloe vera mouthwash with a benzydamine mouthwash in the alleviation of radiation- induced mucositis in head and neck cancer patients using a triple-blind, randomised controlled trial. Twenty-six eligible head and neck cancer patients who were to receive conventional radiation therapy at the radiation oncology department were randomised to receive an Aloe vera mouthwash or a benzydamine mouthwash. Mucositis severity was assessed during the course of radiation therapy using the WHO grading system. At baseline, there was no difference in the distribution of mucositis severity between the two groups. The mean interval between radiation therapy and onset of mucositis was similar for both groups (Aloe vera 15.69±7.77 days, benzydamine 15.85±12.96 days). The mean interval between the start of radiation therapy and the maximum severity of mucositis were was also similar in both the Aloe vera and benzydamine groups (Aloe vera 23.38±10.75 days, benzydamine 23.54±15.45 days). Mean changes of mucositis severity over time in both groups were statistically similar and the effect of both treatments did not change signficantly with time (p=0.09). Aloe vera mouthwash was as beneficial as benzydamine mouthwash in alleviating the severity of radiation-induced mucositis and showed no side effects. The Aloe vera mouthwash could be an alternative agent in the treatment of radiation-induced mucositis in patients with head and neck cancers.

  20. Risk, Outcomes, and Costs of Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis Among Patients With Head-and-Neck Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Elting, Linda S. . E-mail: lelting@mdanderson.org; Cooksley, Catherine D.; Chambers, Mark S.; Garden, Adam S.

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To study the risk, outcomes, and costs of radiation-induced oral mucositis (OM) among patients receiving radiotherapy (RT) to head and neck primary cancers. Methods and Materials: A retrospective cohort consisting of 204 consecutive head-and-neck cancer patients who received RT with or without chemotherapy during 2002 was formed; their records were reviewed for clinical and resource use information. Patients who had received prior therapy, had second primary cancers, or received palliative radiation therapy were excluded. The risk of OM was analyzed by multiple variable logistic regression. The cost of care was computed from the provider's perspective in 2006 U.S. dollars and compared among patients with and without OM. Results: Oral mucositis occurred in 91% of patients; in 66% it was severe (Grade 3-4). Oral mucositis was more common among patients with oral cavity or oropharynx primaries (odds ratio [OR], 44.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.2 to >100; p < 0.001), those who received chemotherapy (OR = 7.8; 95% CI, 1.5-41.6; p 0.02), and those who were treated with altered fractionation schedules (OR 6.3; 95% CI, 1.1-35.1; p = 0.03). Patients with OM were significantly more likely to have severe pain (54% vs. 6%; p < 0.001) and a weight loss of {>=}5% (60% vs. 17%; p < 0.001). Oral mucositis was associated with an incremental cost of $1700-$6000, depending on the grade. Conclusions: Head-and-neck RT causes OM in virtually all patients. Oral mucositis is associated with severe pain, significant weight loss, increased resource use, and excess cost. Preventive strategies are needed.

  1. Melatonin blunts the mitochondrial/NLRP3 connection and protects against radiation-induced oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Francisco; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío; Doerrier, Carolina; Dayoub, José C; López, Luis C; Venegas, Carmen; García, José A; López, Ana; Volt, Huayqui; Luna-Sánchez, Marta; Escames, Germaine

    2015-01-01

    Mucositis is a common and distressing side effect of chemotherapy or radiotherapy that has potentially severe consequences, and no treatment is available. The purpose of this study was to analyze the molecular pathways involved in the development of oral mucositis and to evaluate whether melatonin can prevent this pathology. The tongue of male Wistar rats was subjected to irradiation (X-ray YXLON Y.Tu 320-D03 irradiator; the animals received a dose of 7.5 Gy/day for 5 days). Rats were treated with 45 mg/day melatonin or vehicle for 21 days postirradiation, either by local application into their mouths (melatonin gel) or by subcutaneous injection. A connection between reactive oxygen species, generating mitochondria and the NLRP3 (NLR-related protein 3 nucleotide-binding domain leucine-rich repeat containing receptor-related protein 3) inflammasome, has been reported in mucositis. Here, we show that mitochondrial oxidative stress, bioenergetic impairment and subsequent NLRP3 inflammasome activation are involved in the development of oral mucositis after irradiation and that melatonin synthesized in the rat tongue is depleted after irradiation. The application of melatonin gel restores physiological melatonin levels in the tongue and prevents mucosal disruption and ulcer formation. Melatonin gel protects the mitochondria from radiation damage and blunts the NF-κB/NLRP3 inflammasome signaling activation in the tongue. Our results suggest new molecular pathways involved in radiotherapy-induced mucositis that are inhibited by topical melatonin application, suggesting a potential preventive therapy for mucositis in patients with cancer.

  2. Low-level laser therapy in chemo- and radiation-induced mucositis: results of multicenter phase III studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensadoun, Rene-Jean

    2001-04-01

    Low of middle energy irradiation with helium-neon laser (LLLT) appears to be a simple atraumatic technique for the prevention and treatment of mucositis of various origins. Preliminary findings obtained by Ciais et al prompted randomized multi-center, double-blind trials to evaluate LLLT for the prevention of a acute chemo- and radiation- induced stomatitis. Irradiation by LLLT corresponds to local application of a high photon density monochromatic light source. Activation of epithelial healing on LLL-treated surfaces, the most commonly recognized effect, has been confirmed by numerous in vitro studies, and is a function of cell type, wavelength, and energy dose. The mechanism of action at a molecular and enzymatic level is currently being studied (detoxification of free-radicals).

  3. Radiation-induced mucositis: a randomized clinical trial of micronized sucralfate versus salt & soda mouthwashes.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Marylin J; Miaskowski, Christine; Greenspan, Deborah; MacPhail, Laurie; Shih, Ai-Shan; Shiba, Gayle; Facione, Noreen; Paul, Steven M

    2003-01-01

    Oral mucositis is one of the major toxicities caused by radiation therapy (RT) treatments to the head and neck. The clinical efficacy of sucralfate (Carafate R) mouthwash for head and neck cancer patients (HNC) is not consistent across studies. In this study, it was hypothesized that if the particles in the original sucralfate suspension were micronized (i.e., < or = 25 microns) then the coating action of the mouthwash in the oral cavity would be enhanced. The purpose of this pilot study was to compare the efficacy of micronized sucralfate (Carafate R) mouthwash and salt & soda mouthwash in terms of the severity of the mucositis, the severity of mucositis-related pain, and the time required to heal RT-induced mucositis in patients with HNC. Severe mucositis and related pain can interfere with the ingestion of food and fluids, so patients' body weights were measured as well. All patients in this randomized clinical trial carried out a systematic oral hygiene protocol called the PRO-SELF: Mouth Aware (PSMA) Program. Patients who developed RT-induced mucositis anytime during their course of RT were randomized to one of the two mouthwashes and followed to the completion of RT and at one month following RT. Two referral sites were used for the study. Repeated measures occurred with the following instruments/variables: MacDibbs Mouth Assessment and weight. Demographic, disease, and cancer treatment information was also obtained. Thirty patients successfully completed the study. The typical participant was male (70%), married/partnered (70%), White (63%), not working or retired (73%), and had an average of 14.5 years of education (SD = 3.7). T-tests and Chi-square analyses with an alpha set at 0.05 were used to compare differences between the two mouthwashes. No significant differences were found in the number of days to onset of mucositis (i.e., 16 +/- 8.4 days). When patients had their worst MacDibbs score, (i.e., the most severe mucositis), there were no significant

  4. The effect of synbiotics on acute radiation-induced diarrhea and its association with mucosal inflammatory and adaptive responses in rats.

    PubMed

    Spyropoulos, Basileios G; Theodoropoulos, George; Misiakos, Evangelos P; Stoidis, Christos N; Zapatis, Haralambos; Diamantopoulou, Kalliopi; Gialeli, Chrisostomi; Karamanos, Nikos K; Karatzas, Gabriel; Machairas, Anastasios; Fotiadis, Constantinos; Zografos, George C; Kelekis, Nikolaos; Kouloulias, Vasileios

    2013-09-01

    Previous clinical studies advocated that probiotics beneficially affect acute radiation-induced diarrhea. These encouraging results were attributed to the restoration of the intestinal flora; however, there is lack of evidence if and how probiotics influence the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. The present study was conducted to investigate the potential supporting role of a synbiotic preparation (combination of pro- and pre-biotics) on experimentally-induced acute radiation diarrhea from the perspective of mucosal inflammation and histological injury. Ninety adult Wistar rats were randomly assigned into six groups. Group A (non-irradiated), group B (non-irradiated/synbiotic supplemented), group C (irradiated), and group D (irradiated/synbiotic supplemented) were followed up to a week after the beginning of the experiment. Group E (irradiated) and group F (irradiated/synbiotic supplemented) were followed up for four days. On the last day of the experiments tissues were harvested for structural and molecular assessments. Synbiotic administration could not avert the occurrence of diarrhea, but significantly attenuated its severity. This effect was associated with the significant downregulation of neutrophil accumulation and lipid peroxidation during the acute phase. During the subacute phase, synbiotic treatment significantly improved both the histological profile and radiation mucositis. These mechanisms significantly contributed to the rehabilitation of the intestinal absorptive function as further indicated from the significantly reduced weight loss. Given the optimization of the intestinal flora exerted by synbiotics, the resolution of diarrhea relies on the suppression of the "reactive" and the augmentation of "regenerative" components of acute radiation-induced intestinal response.

  5. Efficacy of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Treatment and Prophylaxis of Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis in Patients Receiving Radiotherapy: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong; Wang, Peiguo; Ouyang, Huaqiang; Wang, Jing; Sun, Lining; Li, Yanwei; Liu, Dongying; Jiang, Zhansheng; Wang, Bin; Pan, Zhanyu

    2017-09-01

    To estimate the efficacy of traditional Chinese medicine (Chining decoction, CHIN) for radiation-induced oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer. From May 2014 to December 2015, 70 consecutive patients were randomly assigned to receive CHIN (treatment group) or recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) spray (control group) at a 1:1 ratio. CHIN was administered to treatment group from the first day of radiotherapy until the completion of radiotherapy. Simultaneously, the rhEGF spray was administered to control group on the oral mucosa of irradiated area. The clinical benefit was determined by gradation of mucositis (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.0), oral pain, and xerostomia (visual analysis scale) for each week during radiotherapy. Body mass index was evaluated before and after radiotherapy. Patients in the treatment group had prominent remission of oral pain and grade of mucositis on each observing point compared with those in control group ( P < .01). Xerostomia was decreased notably in treatment group compared with control group ( P < .01). Body mass index in the treatment group exhibited advantage over control group after radiotherapy, but there was no statistical significance (19.8 ± 3.26 vs 18.8 ± 2.5 kg/m(2), P = .153, >.05). CHIN presented an obvious advantage in preventing radiation-induced oral mucositis compared with rhEGF spray.

  6. The M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory-Head and Neck Module, a Patient-Reported Outcome Instrument, Accurately Predicts the Severity of Radiation-Induced Mucositis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, David I. Mendoza, Tito R.; Chambers, Mark; Burkett, V. Shannon; Garden, Adam S.; Hessell, Amy C.; Lewin, Jan S.; Ang, K. Kian; Kies, Merrill S.

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To compare the M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory-Head and Neck (MDASI-HN) module, a symptom burden instrument, with the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Head and Neck (FACT-HN) module, a quality-of-life instrument, for the assessment of mucositis in patients with head-and-neck cancer treated with radiotherapy and to identify the most distressing symptoms from the patient's perspective. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients with head-and-neck cancer (n = 134) completed the MDASI-HN and FACT-HN before radiotherapy (time 1) and after 6 weeks of radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy (time 2). The mean global and subscale scores for each instrument were compared with the objective mucositis scores determined from the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. Results: The global and subscale scores for each instrument showed highly significant changes from time 1 to time 2 and a significant correlation with the objective mucositis scores at time 2. Only the MDASI scores, however, were significant predictors of objective Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events mucositis scores on multivariate regression analysis (standardized regression coefficient, 0.355 for the global score and 0.310 for the head-and-neck cancer-specific score). Most of the moderate and severe symptoms associated with mucositis as identified on the MDASI-HN are not present on the FACT-HN. Conclusion: Both the MDASI-HN and FACT-HN modules can predict the mucositis scores. However, the MDASI-HN, a symptom burden instrument, was more closely associated with the severity of radiation-induced mucositis than the FACT-HN on multivariate regression analysis. This greater association was most likely related to the inclusion of a greater number of face-valid mucositis-related items in the MDASI-HN compared with the FACT-HN.

  7. A randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of zinc sulfate supplementation for alleviation of radiation-induced oral mucositis and pharyngitis in head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Sangthawan, Duangjai; Phungrassami, Temsak; Sinkitjarurnchai, Wattana

    2013-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of zinc sulfate supplementation in reducing ofradiation-induced oral mucositis and pharyngitis in head and neck cancer patients. One hundred forty four head and neck patients were enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Patients who received radiation therapy alone or postoperative radiation therapy were eligible. Radiation therapy used conventional fractionation with 1.8 to 2.0 Gy perfraction, to total doses of 50 to 70 Gy over five to seven weeks. Drug and identically appearing placebo were self-administered 50 mg (10 cc) per meal, three times a day at mealtime. The zinc sulfate and placebo were administered beginning on the first day of radiation, and continued daily including weekends until radiation was completed Patients were evaluated before radiation, weekly during radiation and at the first month after completion of radiation. The baseline characteristics of patients, tumor, and treatment were not significantly different between the two groups. There were no statistically significant differences between the two treatment groups in frequency of patients experiencing greater than or equal to grade 2 oral mucositis andpharyngitis at each week during radiation and at the first month after completion of radiation. Six patients (17%) in the zinc sulfate and ten patients (23%) in placebo group developed grade 3 oral mucositis, which was not significantly different. Twenty-two patients (32%) in the zinc sulfate and nineteen patients (27%) in the placebo group developed grade 3 pharyngitis, which was not signifiibantly different. However there was no observation of grade 4 oral mucositis and pharyngitis in either group. Nausea and vomiting were mostly of mild degree. Adverse events were not statistically significant different between the two groups. It was concluded that zinc sulfate administered during head and neck radiation therapy produced no significant benefit in relieving radiation-induced oral mucositis

  8. Endoglin haploinsufficiency reduces radiation-induced fibrosis and telangiectasia formation in mouse kidneys.

    PubMed

    Scharpfenecker, Marion; Floot, Ben; Russell, Nicola S; Ten Dijke, Peter; Stewart, Fiona A

    2009-09-01

    Endoglin is a transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) co-receptor mainly expressed in dividing endothelial cells. It regulates cell proliferation and survival and is upregulated at sites of vessel repair. Mutations in endoglin have been linked to the vascular disease hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). HHT patients display dilated capillaries (telangiectasia) that are prone to rupture. Cancer patients receiving radiotherapy develop similar vascular damage in normal tissues lying in the irradiation field. If located in the mucosa, irradiation-induced telangiectasia can lead to severe bleeding. Therefore, this study was aimed at investigating the role of endoglin in radiation-induced telangiectasia formation. Kidneys of endoglin heterozygous (Eng(+/-)) or wild type mice were irradiated with 16 Gy. Mice were sacrificed after 20 weeks and changes in gene expression and protein levels were analysed. Expression of TGF-beta target genes involved in radiation-induced fibrosis and fibrosis development in the kidney decreased in Eng(+/-) compared to wild type mice. Unexpectedly, Eng(+/-) mice also displayed reduced telangiectasia formation in the irradiated kidney. Endoglin plays an important role in the development of irradiation-induced normal tissue damage. Future studies will show whether interfering with endoglin functions protects tissues from late radiation toxicity.

  9. HGF Gene Modification in Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reduces Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury by Modulating Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Yang, Yue-Feng; Xiao, Feng-Jun; Zhang, Yi-Kun; Wang, Shao-Xia; Sun, Hui-Yan; Zhang, Qun-Wei; Wu, Chu-Tse; Wang, Li-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Background Effective therapeutic strategies to address intestinal complications after radiation exposure are currently lacking. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which display the ability to repair the injured intestine, have been considered as delivery vehicles for repair genes. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-gene-modified MSCs on radiation-induced intestinal injury (RIII). Methods Female 6- to 8-week-old mice were radiated locally at the abdomen with a single 13-Gy dose of radiation and then treated with saline control, Ad-HGF or Ad-Null-modified MSCs therapy. The transient engraftment of human MSCs was detected via real-time PCR and immunostaining. The therapeutic effects of non- and HGF-modified MSCs were evaluated via FACS to determine the lymphocyte immunophenotypes; via ELISA to measure cytokine expression; via immunostaining to determine tight junction protein expression; via PCNA staining to examine intestinal epithelial cell proliferation; and via TUNEL staining to detect intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis. Results The histopathological recovery of the radiation-injured intestine was significantly enhanced following non- or HGF-modified MSCs treatment. Importantly, the radiation-induced immunophenotypic disorders of the mesenteric lymph nodes and Peyer’s patches were attenuated in both MSCs-treated groups. Treatment with HGF-modified MSCs reduced the expression and secretion of inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), increased the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and the tight junction protein ZO-1, and promoted the proliferation and reduced the apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells. Conclusions Treatment of RIII with HGF-gene-modified MSCs reduces local inflammation and promotes the recovery of small intestinal histopathology in a mouse model. These findings might provide an effective therapeutic strategy for RIII

  10. HGF Gene Modification in Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reduces Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury by Modulating Immunity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Sun, Rui-Ting; Li, Yang; Yang, Yue-Feng; Xiao, Feng-Jun; Zhang, Yi-Kun; Wang, Shao-Xia; Sun, Hui-Yan; Zhang, Qun-Wei; Wu, Chu-Tse; Wang, Li-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Effective therapeutic strategies to address intestinal complications after radiation exposure are currently lacking. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which display the ability to repair the injured intestine, have been considered as delivery vehicles for repair genes. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-gene-modified MSCs on radiation-induced intestinal injury (RIII). Female 6- to 8-week-old mice were radiated locally at the abdomen with a single 13-Gy dose of radiation and then treated with saline control, Ad-HGF or Ad-Null-modified MSCs therapy. The transient engraftment of human MSCs was detected via real-time PCR and immunostaining. The therapeutic effects of non- and HGF-modified MSCs were evaluated via FACS to determine the lymphocyte immunophenotypes; via ELISA to measure cytokine expression; via immunostaining to determine tight junction protein expression; via PCNA staining to examine intestinal epithelial cell proliferation; and via TUNEL staining to detect intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis. The histopathological recovery of the radiation-injured intestine was significantly enhanced following non- or HGF-modified MSCs treatment. Importantly, the radiation-induced immunophenotypic disorders of the mesenteric lymph nodes and Peyer's patches were attenuated in both MSCs-treated groups. Treatment with HGF-modified MSCs reduced the expression and secretion of inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), increased the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and the tight junction protein ZO-1, and promoted the proliferation and reduced the apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells. Treatment of RIII with HGF-gene-modified MSCs reduces local inflammation and promotes the recovery of small intestinal histopathology in a mouse model. These findings might provide an effective therapeutic strategy for RIII.

  11. Amifostine Reduces Radiation-Induced Complications in a Murine Model of Expander-Based Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Felice, Peter A.; Nelson, Noah S.; Page, Erin E.; Deshpande, Sagar S.; Donneys, Alexis; Rodriguez, José; Buchman, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Immediate expander-based breast reconstruction after mastectomy is a prevalent option for many women with breast cancer. When coupled with adjuvant radiation, however, radiation-induced skin and soft tissue injury diminish the success of this reconstructive technique. We hypothesize that prophylactic administration of the cytoprotectant Amifostine will reduce soft tissue complications from irradiation, aiding expander-based reconstruction for women battling this disease. Methods Sprague Dawley rats were divided into two experimental groups, Operative Expander Placement (Expander) and Operative Sham (Sham). Expander specimens received a sub-latissimus tissue expander with a 15cc fill volume; Shams underwent identical procedures without expander placement. Experimental groups were further divided into Control specimens receiving no further intervention, XRT specimens receiving human-equivalent radiation, and AMF-XRT specimens receiving both Amifostine and human-equivalent radiation. Animals underwent a 45-day recovery period and were evaluated grossly and via ImageJ analysis for skin and soft tissue complications. Results None of the Control, XRT, or AMF-XRT Sham specimens showed skin and soft tissue complications. For Expander animals, significantly fewer AMF-XRT specimens (4 of 13, 30%) demonstrated skin and soft tissue complications compared to XRT specimens (9 of 13, 69%; p = 0.041). ImageJ evaluation of Expander specimens demonstrated a significant increase in skin and soft tissue necrosis for XRT specimens (12.94%), compared with AMF-XRT animals (6.96%, p = 0.019). Conclusions Amifostine pre-treatment significantly reduced skin and soft-tissue complications in both gross inspection and ImageJ analysis. These findings demonstrate that Amifostine prophylaxis provides protection against radiation-induced skin and soft tissue injury in a murine model of expander-based breast reconstruction. Level of Evidence Animal study, not gradable for level of

  12. Antioxidant capacity of calendula officinalis flowers extract and prevention of radiation induced oropharyngeal mucositis in patients with head and neck cancers: a randomized controlled clinical study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effect of Calendula officinalis flowers extract mouthwash as oral gel on radiation-induced oropharyngeal mucositis (OM) in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Forty patients with neck and head cancers under radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy protocols were randomly assigned to receive either 2% calendula extract mouthwash or placebo (20 patients in each group). Patients were treated with telecobalt radiotherapy at conventional fractionation (200 cGy/fraction, five fractions weekly, 30–35 fractions within 4–7 weeks). The oropharyngeal mucositis was evaluated by two clinical investigators (a radiation oncologist and a dentist), using the oral mucositis assessment scale (OMAS). Trying to find out the possible mechanism of action of the treatment, total antioxidant, polyphenol and flavonoid contents, and quercetin concentration of the mouth wash were measured. Calendula mouthwash significantly decreased the intensity of OM compared to placebo at week 2 (score: 5.5 vs. 6.8, p = 0.019), week 3 (score: 8.25 vs. 10.95, p < 0.0001) and week 6 (score: 11.4 vs. 13.35, p = 0.031). Total antioxidant, polyphenol and flavonoid contents and quercetin concentration of the 2% extract were 2353.4 ± 56.5 μM, 313.40 ± 6.52 mg/g, 76.66 ± 23.24 mg/g, and 19.41 ± 4.34 mg/l, respectively. Calendula extract gel could be effective on decreasing the intensity of radiotherapy- induced OM during the treatment and antioxidant capacity may be partly responsible for the effect. PMID:23497687

  13. Antioxidant capacity of calendula officinalis flowers extract and prevention of radiation induced oropharyngeal mucositis in patients with head and neck cancers: a randomized controlled clinical study.

    PubMed

    Babaee, Neda; Moslemi, Dariush; Khalilpour, Mohammad; Vejdani, Fatemeh; Moghadamnia, Yasaman; Bijani, Ali; Baradaran, Mahmoud; Kazemi, Mohammad Taghi; Khalilpour, Asieh; Pouramir, Mahdi; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar

    2013-03-07

    This study was designed to determine the effect of Calendula officinalis flowers extract mouthwash as oral gel on radiation-induced oropharyngeal mucositis (OM) in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Forty patients with neck and head cancers under radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy protocols were randomly assigned to receive either 2% calendula extract mouthwash or placebo (20 patients in each group). Patients were treated with telecobalt radiotherapy at conventional fractionation (200 cGy/fraction, five fractions weekly, 30-35 fractions within 4-7 weeks). The oropharyngeal mucositis was evaluated by two clinical investigators (a radiation oncologist and a dentist), using the oral mucositis assessment scale (OMAS). Trying to find out the possible mechanism of action of the treatment, total antioxidant, polyphenol and flavonoid contents, and quercetin concentration of the mouth wash were measured. Calendula mouthwash significantly decreased the intensity of OM compared to placebo at week 2 (score: 5.5 vs. 6.8, p = 0.019), week 3 (score: 8.25 vs. 10.95, p < 0.0001) and week 6 (score: 11.4 vs. 13.35, p = 0.031). Total antioxidant, polyphenol and flavonoid contents and quercetin concentration of the 2% extract were 2353.4 ± 56.5 μM, 313.40 ± 6.52 mg/g, 76.66 ± 23.24 mg/g, and 19.41 ± 4.34 mg/l, respectively. Calendula extract gel could be effective on decreasing the intensity of radiotherapy- induced OM during the treatment and antioxidant capacity may be partly responsible for the effect.

  14. Therapy with Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Protects Lungs from Radiation-Induced Injury and Reduces the Risk of Lung Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Klein, Diana; Schmetter, Alexandra; Imsak, Roze; Wirsdörfer, Florian; Unger, Kristian; Jastrow, Holger; Stuschke, Martin; Jendrossek, Verena

    2016-01-10

    Previous thorax irradiation promotes metastatic spread of tumor cells to the lung. We hypothesized that vascular damage facilitates lung metastasis after thorax irradiation and that therapeutically applied multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) with reported repair activity may prevent these adverse effects of ionizing radiation by protecting lung endothelia from radiation-induced damage. Previous whole-thorax irradiation (WTI) with 15 Gy significantly enhanced seeding and metastatic growth of tumor cells in the lung. WTI was further associated with endothelial cell damage, senescence of lung epithelial cells, and upregulation of invasion- and inflammation-promoting soluble factors, for example, endothelial matrix metalloproteinase 2 (Mmp2), its activator Mmp14, the cofactor tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 2 (Timp2), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (Ccl2), and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (Plau/uPA), and recruitment of CD11b+CD11c- myelomonocytic cells. Inhibition of Mmp2 counteracted radiation-induced vascular dysfunction without preventing increased metastasis. In contrast, therapy with bone marrow or aorta-derived MSCs within 2 weeks postirradiation antagonized radiation-induced damage to resident cells as well as the resulting secretome changes and abrogated the metastasis-promoting effects of WTI. Therapy with MSCs protects lungs from radiation-induced injury and reduces the risk of lung metastasis. MSC-mediated inhibition of Mmp2 mediates their protective effects at the vasculature. Furthermore, local and systemic effects such as inhibition of radiation-induced senescence of bronchial epithelial cells and associated secretion of immunomodulatory factors may participate in the inhibitory effect of MSCs on lung metastasis. MSC therapy is a promising strategy to prevent radiation-induced lung injury and the resulting increased risk of metastasis.

  15. Cost-effectiveness of imaging strategies to reduce radiation-induced cancer risk in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Cipriano, Lauren E; Levesque, Barrett G; Zaric, Gregory S; Loftus, Edward V; Sandborn, William J

    2012-07-01

    The aim was to examine the cost-effectiveness of magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) compared with computed tomography enterography (CTE) for routine imaging of small bowel Crohn's disease (CD) patients to reduce patients' life-time radiation-induced cancer risk. We developed a Markov model to compare the lifetime costs, benefits (measured in quality-adjusted life-years [QALYs] of survival and cancers averted) and cost-effectiveness of using MRE rather than CTE for routine disease monitoring in hypothetical cohorts of 100,000 20-year-old patients with CD. We assumed each CT radiation exposure conferred an incremental annual risk of developing cancer using the linear, no-threshold model. In the base case of 16 mSv per CTE, we estimated that radiation from CTE resulted in 1,206 to 20,146 additional cancers depending on the frequency of patient monitoring. Compared to using CTE only, using MRE until age 30 and CTE thereafter resulted in incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) between $37,538 and $41,031 per life-year (LY) gained and between $52,969 and $57,772 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained. Using MRE until age 50 resulted in ICERs between $58,022 and $62,648 per LY gained and between $84,250 and $90,982 per QALY gained. In a threshold analysis, any use of MRE had an ICER of greater than $100,000 per QALY gained when CT radiation doses are less than 6.0 mSv per CTE exam. MRE is likely cost-effective compared to CTE in patients younger than age 50. Low-dose CTE may be an alternative cost-effective choice in the future. Copyright © 2011 Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America, Inc.

  16. Berberine Reduces Uremia-Associated Intestinal Mucosal Barrier Damage.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chao; Tan, Shanjun; Zhou, Chunyu; Zhu, Cuilin; Kang, Xin; Liu, Shuai; Zhao, Shuang; Fan, Shulin; Yu, Zhen; Peng, Ai; Wang, Zhen

    2016-11-01

    Berberine is one of the main active constituents of Rhizoma coptidis, a traditional Chinese medicine, and has long been used for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of berberine on the intestinal mucosal barrier damage in a rat uremia model induced by the 5/6 kidney resection. Beginning at postoperative week 4, the uremia rats were treated with daily 150 mg/kg berberine by oral gavage for 6 weeks. To assess the intestinal mucosal barrier changes, blood samples were collected for measuring the serum D-lactate level, and terminal ileum tissue samples were used for analyses of intestinal permeability, myeloperoxidase activity, histopathology, malondialdehyde (MDA) level, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. Berberine treatment resulted in significant decreases in the serum D-lactate level, intestinal permeability, intestinal myeloperoxidase activity, and intestinal mucosal and submucosal edema and inflammation, and the Chiu's scores assessed for intestinal mucosal injury. The intestinal MDA level was reduced and the intestinal SOD activity was increased following berberine treatment. In conclusion, berberine reduces intestinal mucosal barrier damage induced by uremia, which is most likely due to its anti-oxidative activity. It may be developed as a potential treatment for preserving intestinal mucosal barrier function in patients with uremia.

  17. Oral cryotherapy reduced oral mucositis in patients having cancer treatments.

    PubMed

    Spivakovsky, Sylvia

    2016-09-01

    Data sourcesCochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Medline, Embase, CANCERLIT, CINAHL, the US National Institutes of Health Trials Registry and the WHO Clinical Trials Registry Platform.Study selectionRandomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of oral cryotherapy in patients with cancer receiving treatment compared to usual care, no treatment or other interventions to prevent mucositis. The primary outcome was incidence of mucositis and its severity.Data extraction and synthesisTwo reviewers carried out study assessment and data extraction independently. Treatment effect for continuous data was calculated using mean values and standard deviations and expressed as mean difference (MD) and 95% confidence interval. Risk ratio (RR) was calculated for dichotomous data. Meta-analysis was performed.ResultsFourteen studies with 1280 participants were included. Subgroup analysis was undertaken according to the main cancer treatment type. Cryotherapy reduced the risk of developing mucositis by 39% (RR = 0.61; 95%CI, 0.52 to 0.72) on patients treated with fluorouracil (5FU). For melphalan-based treatment the risk of developing mucositis was reduced by 41% (RR =0.59; 95%CI, 0.35 to 1.01). Oral cryotherapy was shown to be safe, with very low rates of minor adverse effects, such as headaches, chills, numbness/taste disturbance and tooth pain. This appears to contribute to the high rates of compliance seen in the included studies.ConclusionsThere is confidence that oral cryotherapy leads to a large reduction in oral mucositis in adults treated with 5FU. Although there is less certainty on the size of the reduction on patients treated with melphalan, it is certain there is reduction of severe mucositis.

  18. Fungal Aflatoxins Reduce Respiratory Mucosal Ciliary Function

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Robert J.; Workman, Alan D.; Carey, Ryan M.; Chen, Bei; Rosen, Phillip L.; Doghramji, Laurel; Adappa, Nithin D.; Palmer, James N.; Kennedy, David W.; Cohen, Noam A.

    2016-01-01

    Aflatoxins are mycotoxins secreted by Aspergillus flavus, which can colonize the respiratory tract and cause fungal rhinosinusitis or bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. A. flavus is the second leading cause of invasive aspergillosis worldwide. Because many respiratory pathogens secrete toxins to impair mucociliary immunity, we examined the effects of acute exposure to aflatoxins on airway cell physiology. Using air-liquid interface cultures of primary human sinonasal and bronchial cells, we imaged ciliary beat frequency (CBF), intracellular calcium, and nitric oxide (NO). Exposure to aflatoxins (0.1 to 10 μM; 5 to 10 minutes) reduced baseline (~6–12%) and agonist-stimulated CBF. Conditioned media (CM) from A. fumigatus, A. niger, and A. flavus cultures also reduced CBF by ~10% after 60 min exposure, but effects were blocked by an anti-aflatoxin antibody only with A. flavus CM. CBF reduction required protein kinase C but was not associated with changes in calcium or NO. However, AFB2 reduced NO production by ~50% during stimulation of the ciliary-localized T2R38 receptor. Using a fluorescent reporter construct expressed in A549 cells, we directly observed activation of PKC activity by AFB2. Aflatoxins secreted by respiratory A. flavus may impair motile and chemosensory functions of airway cilia, contributing to pathogenesis of fungal airway diseases. PMID:27623953

  19. Hydrogen therapy may reduce the risks related to radiation-induced oxidative stress in space flight.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Michael P; Ansari, Rafat R; Zakrajsek, June F; Billiar, Timothy R; Toyoda, Yoshiya; Wink, David A; Nakao, Atsunori

    2011-01-01

    Cosmic radiation is known to induce DNA and lipid damage associated with increased oxidative stress and remains a major concern in space travel. Hydrogen, recently discovered as a novel therapeutic medical gas in a variety of biomedical fields, has potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. It is expected that space mission activities will increase in coming years both in numbers and duration. It is therefore important to estimate and prevent the risks encountered by astronauts due to oxidative stress prior to developing clinical symptoms of disease. We hypothesize that hydrogen administration to the astronauts by either inhalation or drinking hydrogen-rich water may potentially yield a novel and feasible preventative/therapeutic strategy to prevent radiation-induced adverse events. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Photobiomodulation reduces oral mucositis by modulating NF-kB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curra, Marina; Pellicioli, Ana Carolina Amorim; Filho, Nélson Alexandre Kretzmann; Ochs, Gustavo; Matte, Úrsula; Filho, Manoel Sant'Ana; Martins, Marco Antonio Trevizani; Martins, Manoela Domingues

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate NF-kB during 5-fluorouracil (FU)-induced oral mucositis and ascertain whether photobiomodulation (PBM), as a preventive and/or therapeutic modality, influences this transcription factor. Ninety-six male golden Syrian hamsters were allocated into four groups: control (no treatment); PBM therapeutic, PBM preventive, and PBM combined. Animals received an injection of 5-FU on days 0 and 2. On days 3 and 4, the buccal mucosa was scratched. Irradiation was carried out using a 660-nm, 40-mW diode laser at 6 J/cm2 during 6 s/point, 0.24 J/point, for a total dose of 1.44 J/day of application. Animals were euthanized on days 0, 5, 10, and 15 (n=6). Buccal mucosa was removed for protein quantification by Western blot. Clinical analysis revealed that PBM groups exhibited less mucositis than controls on day 10. Control animals exhibited lower levels of NF-kB during mucositis development and healing. The preventive and combined protocols were associated with higher NF-kB levels at day 5; however, the therapeutic group had higher levels at days 10 and 15. These findings suggest that the preventive and/or therapeutic PBM protocols reduced the severity of oral mucositis by activating the NF-kB pathway.

  1. Photobiomodulation reduces oral mucositis by modulating NF-kB.

    PubMed

    Curra, Marina; Pellicioli, Ana Carolina Amorim; Filho, Nélson Alexandre Kretzmann; Ochs, Gustavo; Matte, Úrsula; Filho, Manoel Sant'Ana; Martins, Marco Antonio Trevizani; Martins, Manoela Domingues

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate NF-kB during 5-fluorouracil (FU)-induced oral mucositis and ascertain whether photobiomodulation (PBM), as a preventive and/or therapeutic modality, influences this transcription factor. Ninety-six male golden Syrian hamsters were allocated into four groups: control (no treatment); PBM therapeutic, PBM preventive, and PBM combined. Animals received an injection of 5-FU on days 0 and 2. On days 3 and 4, the buccal mucosa was scratched. Irradiation was carried out using a 660-nm, 40-mW diode laser at 6  J/cm(2) during 6  s/point, 0.24  J/point, for a total dose of 1.44  J/day of application. Animals were euthanized on days 0, 5, 10, and 15 (n=6). Buccal mucosa was removed for protein quantification by Western blot. Clinical analysis revealed that PBM groups exhibited less mucositis than controls on day 10. Control animals exhibited lower levels of NF-kB during mucositis development and healing. The preventive and combined protocols were associated with higher NF-kB levels at day 5; however, the therapeutic group had higher levels at days 10 and 15. These findings suggest that the preventive and/or therapeutic PBM protocols reduced the severity of oral mucositis by activating the NF-kB pathway.

  2. Systematic review: the role of the gut microbiota in chemotherapy- or radiation-induced gastrointestinal mucositis - current evidence and potential clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Touchefeu, Y; Montassier, E; Nieman, K; Gastinne, T; Potel, G; Bruley des Varannes, S; Le Vacon, F; de La Cochetière, M F

    2014-09-01

    Gastrointestinal mucositis is defined as inflammation and/or ulcers of the gastrointestinal tract occurring as a complication of chemotherapy and radiation therapy, and affects about 50% of all cancer patients. To assess the role of gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal mucositis and the potential for manipulations of the microbiota to prevent and to treat mucositis. Search of the literature published in English using Medline, Scopus and the Cochrane Library, with main search terms 'intestinal microbiota', 'bacteremia', 'mucositis', 'chemotherapy-induced diarrhoea', 'chemotherapy-induced mucositis', 'radiotherapy-induced mucositis'. The gut microbiota plays a major role in the maintenance of intestinal homoeostasis and integrity. Patients receiving cytotoxic and radiation therapy exhibit marked changes in intestinal microbiota, with most frequently, decrease in Bifidobacterium, Clostridium cluster XIVa, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, and increase in Enterobacteriaceae and Bacteroides. These modifications may contribute to the development of mucositis, particularly diarrhoea and bacteraemia. The prevention of cancer therapy-induced mucositis by probiotics has been investigated in randomised clinical trials with some promising results. Three of six trials reported a significantly decreased incidence of diarrhoea. One trial reported a decrease in infectious complications. The gut microbiota may play a major role in the pathogenesis of mucositis through the modification of intestinal barrier function, innate immunity and intestinal repair mechanisms. Better knowledge of these effects may lead to new therapeutic approaches and to the identification of predictive markers of mucositis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Protein energy malnutrition alters mucosal IgA responses and reduces mucosal vaccine efficacy in mice.

    PubMed

    Rho, Semi; Kim, Heejoo; Shim, Seung Hyun; Lee, Seung Young; Kim, Min Jung; Yang, Bo-Gie; Jang, Myoung Ho; Han, Byung Woo; Song, Man Ki; Czerkinsky, Cecil; Kim, Jae-Ouk

    2017-08-30

    Oral vaccine responsiveness is often lower in children from less developed countries. Childhood malnutrition may be associated with poor immune response to oral vaccines. The present study was designed to investigate whether protein energy malnutrition (PEM) impairs B cell immunity and ultimately reduces oral vaccine efficacy in a mouse model. Purified isocaloric diets containing low protein (1/10 the protein of the control diet) were used to determine the effect of PEM. PEM increased both nonspecific total IgA and oral antigen-specific IgA in serum without alteration of gut permeability. However, PEM decreased oral antigen-specific IgA in feces, which is consistent with decreased expression of polymeric Immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) in the small intestine. Of note, polymeric IgA was predominant in serum under PEM. In addition, PEM altered B cell development status in the bone marrow and increased the frequency of IgA-secreting B cells, as well as IgA secretion by long-lived plasma cells in the small intestinal lamina propria. Moreover, PEM reduced the protective efficacy of the mucosally administered cholera vaccine and recombinant attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine in a mouse model. Our results suggest that PEM can impair mucosal immunity where IgA plays an important role in host protection and may partly explain the reduced efficacy of oral vaccines in malnourished subjects. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Prostaglandin E2 reduces radiation-induced epithelial apoptosis through a mechanism involving AKT activation and bax translocation.

    PubMed

    Tessner, Teresa G; Muhale, Filipe; Riehl, Terrence E; Anant, Shrikant; Stenson, William F

    2004-12-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis modulates the response to radiation injury in the mouse intestinal epithelium through effects on crypt survival and apoptosis; however, the downstream signaling events have not been elucidated. WT mice receiving 16,16-dimethyl PGE2 (dmPGE2) had fewer apoptotic cells per crypt than untreated mice. Apoptosis in Bax(-/-) mice receiving 12 Gy was approximately 50% less than in WT mice, and the ability of dmPGE2 to attenuate apoptosis was lost in Bax(-/-) mice. Positional analysis revealed that apoptosis in the Bax(-/-) mice was diminished only in the bax-expressing cells of the lower crypts and that in WT mice, dmPGE2 decreased apoptosis only in the bax-expressing cells. The HCT-116 intestinal cell line and Bax(-/-) HCT-116 recapitulated the apoptotic response of the mouse small intestine with regard to irradiation and dmPGE2. Irradiation of HCT-116 cells resulted in phosphorylation of AKT that was enhanced by dmPGE2 through transactivation of the EGFR. Inhibition of AKT phosphorylation prevented the reduction of apoptosis by dmPGE2 following radiation. Transfection of HCT-116 cells with a constitutively active AKT reduced apoptosis in irradiated cells to the same extent as in nontransfected cells treated with dmPGE2. Treatment with dmPGE2 did not alter bax or bcl-x expression but suppressed bax translocation to the mitochondrial membrane. Our in vivo studies indicate that there are bax-dependent and bax-independent radiation-induced apoptosis in the intestine but that only the bax-dependent apoptosis is reduced by dmPGE2. The in vitro studies indicate that dmPGE2, most likely by signaling through the E prostaglandin receptor EP2, reduces radiation-induced apoptosis through transactivation of the EGFR and enhanced activation of AKT and that this results in reduced bax translocation to the mitochondria.

  5. Acemannan-containing wound dressing gel reduces radiation-induced skin reactions in C3H mice

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.B.; Travis, E.L.

    1995-07-15

    To determine (a) whether a wound dressing gel that contains acemannan extracted from aloe leaves affects the severity of radiation-induced acute skin reactions in C3H mice; (b) if so, whether other commercially available gels such as a personal lubricating jelly and a healing ointment have similar effects; and (c) when the wound dressing gel should be applied for maximum effect. Male C3H mice received graded single doses of gamma radiation ranging from 30 to 47.5 Gy to the right leg. In most experiments, the gel was applied daily beginning immediately after irradiation. Dose-response curves were obtained by plotting the percentage of mice that reached or exceeded a given peak skin reaction as a function of dose. Curves were fitted by logit analysis and ED{sub 50} values, and 95% confidence limits were obtained. The average peak skin reactions of the wound dressing gel-treated mice were lower than those of the untreated mice at all radiation doses tested. The ED{sub 50} values for skin reactions of 2.0-2.75 were approximately 7 Gy higher in the wound dressing gel-treated mice. The average peak skin reactions and the ED{sub 50} values for mice treated with personal lubricating jelly or healing ointment were similar to irradiated control values. Reduction in the percentage of mice with skin reactions of 2.5 or more was greatest in the groups that received wound dressing gel for at least 2 weeks beginning immediately after irradiation. There was no effect if gel was applied only before irradiation or beginning 1 week after irradiation. Wound dressing gel, but not personal lubricating jelly or healing ointment, reduces acute radiation-induced skin reactions in C3H mice if applied daily for at least 2 weeks beginning immediately after irradiation. 31 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Myocardial hydroxyproline reduced by early administration of methylprednisolone or ibuprofen to rabbits with radiation-induced heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, W.C.; Cunningham, D.; Schwiter, E.J.; Abt, A.; Skarlatos, S.; Wood, M.A.; Whitesell, L.

    1982-05-01

    The ability of methylprednisolone (MP) and ibuprofen (IB) to reduce the severity of the late state of radiation-induced heart disease was assessed in 57 New Zealand white rabbits. Before and shortly after cardiac irradiation, 15 rabbits received i.v. MP, 30 mg/kg twice daily for 3 days, and 15 others received IB, 12.5 mg/kg twice daily for 2 days. No drug administered to 14 irradiated rabbits, and neither irradiation nor drugs were administered to 13 rabbits that served as controls. All 15 rabbits treated with MP and 13 of the 15 treated with IB lived for 100 days. Only seven of the untreated, irradiated rabbits lived that long. Longevity of each treated group of rabbits was better (p < 0.01 and 0.05) than that of the untreated, irradiated rabbits. Surviving rabbits were killed 100 days after irradiation. Pericarditis (p < 0.05) and pericardial effusion (p < 0.01) were less frequent in the treated, irradiated groups than in the untreated, irradiated rabbits. At least some rabbits in each irradiated group had microscopic evidence of myocardial fibrosis. The fibrosis was quantitated by determination of myocardial hydroxyproline concentrations (MHP). MHP concentration in the untreated, irradiated rabbits was greater than in those treated with MP (p < 0.05) or IB (p < 0.01) and in the untreated, unirradiated rabbits (p < 0.01). Early administrative of MP or IB retarded the development of myocardial fibrosis, pericarditis and pericardial effusin, and improved survival in this experimental model of radiation-induced heart disease.

  7. Myocardial hydroxyproline reduced by early administration of methylprednisolone or ibuprofen to rabbits with radiation-induced heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, W.C.; Cunningham, D.; Schwiter, E.J.; Abt, A.; Skarlatos, S.; Wood, M.A.; Whitesell, L.

    1982-05-01

    The ability of methylprednisolone (MP) and ibuprofen (IB) to reduce the severity of the late state of radiation-induced heart disease was assessed in 57 New Zealand white rabbits. Before and shortly after cardiac irradiation, 15 rabbits received i.v. MP, 30 mg/kg twice daily for 3 days, and 15 others received IB, 12.5 mg/kg twice daily for 2 days. No drug was administered to 14 irradiated rabbits, and neither irradiation nor drugs were administered to 13 rabbits that served as controls, All 15 rabbits treated with MP and 13 of the 15 treated with IB lived for 100 days. Only seven of the untreated, irradiated rabbits lived that long. Longevity of each treated group of rabbits was better (p less than 0.01 and 0.05) than that of the untreated, irradiated rabbits. Surviving rabbits were killed 100 days after irradiation. Pericarditis (p less than 0.05) and pericardial effusion (p less than 0.01) were less frequent in the treated, irradiated groups than in the untreated, irradiated rabbits. At least some rabbits in each irradiated group had microscopic evidence of myocardial fibrosis. The fibrosis was quantitated by determination of myocardial hydroxyproline concentrations (MHP). MHP concentration in the untreated, irradiated rabbits was greater than in those treated with MP (p less than 0.05) or IB (p less than 0.01) and in the untreated, unirradiated rabbits (p less than 0.01). Early administration of MP or IB retarded the development of myocardial fibrosis, pericarditis and pericardial effusion, and improved survival in this experimental model of radiation-induced heart disease.

  8. Rad1, rad10 and rad52 mutations reduce the increase of microhomology length during radiation-induced microhomology-mediated illegitimate recombination in saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chan, Cecilia Y; Schiestl, Robert H

    2009-08-01

    Abstract Illegitimate recombination can repair DNA double-strand breaks in one of two ways, either without sequence homology or by using a few base pairs of homology at the junctions. The second process is known as microhomology-mediated recombination. Previous studies showed that ionizing radiation and restriction enzymes increase the frequency of microhomology-mediated recombination in trans during rejoining of unirradiated plasmids or during integration of plasmids into the genome. Here we show that radiation-induced microhomology-mediated recombination is reduced by deletion of RAD52, RAD1 and RAD10 but is not affected by deletion of RAD51 and RAD2. The rad52 mutant did not change the frequency of radiation-induced microhomology-mediated recombination but rather reduced the length of microhomology required to undergo repair during radiation-induced recombination. The rad1 and rad10 mutants exhibited a smaller increase in the frequency of radiation-induced microhomology-mediated recombination, and the radiation-induced integration junctions from these mutants did not show more than 4 bp of microhomology. These results suggest that Rad52 facilitates annealing of short homologous sequences during integration and that Rad1/Rad10 endonuclease mediates removal of the displaced 3' single-stranded DNA ends after base-pairing of microhomology sequences, when more than 4 bp of microhomology are used. Taken together, these results suggest that radiation-induced microhomology-mediated recombination is under the same genetic control as the single-strand annealing apparatus that requires the RAD52, RAD1 and RAD10 genes.

  9. Acemannan-containing wound dressing gel reduces radiation-induced skin reactions in C3H mice.

    PubMed

    Roberts, D B; Travis, E L

    1995-07-15

    To determine (a) whether a wound dressing gel that contains acemannan extracted from aloe leaves affects the severity of radiation-induced acute skin reactions in C3H mice; (b) if so, whether other commercially available gels such as a personal lubricating jelly and a healing ointment have similar effects; and (c) when the wound dressing gel should be applied for maximum effect. Male C3H mice received graded single doses of gamma radiation ranging from 30 to 47.5 Gy to the right leg. In most experiments, the gel was applied daily beginning immediately after irradiation. To determine timing of application for best effect, gel was applied beginning on day -7, 0, or +7 relative to the day of irradiation (day 0) and continuing for 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 weeks. The right inner thigh of each mouse was scored on a scale of 0 to 3.5 for severity of radiation reaction from the seventh to the 35th day after irradiation. Dose-response curves were obtained by plotting the percentage of mice that reached or exceeded a given peak skin reaction as a function of dose. Curves were fitted by logit analysis and ED50 values, and 95% confidence limits were obtained. The average peak skin reactions of the wound dressing gel-treated mice were lower than those of the untreated mice at all radiation doses tested. The ED50 values for skin reactions of 2.0-2.75 were approximately 7 Gy higher in the wound dressing gel-treated mice. The average peak skin reactions and the ED50 values for mice treated with personal lubricating jelly or healing ointment were similar to irradiated control values. Reduction in the percentage of mice with skin reactions of 2.5 or more was greatest in the groups that received wound dressing gel for at least 2 weeks beginning immediately after irradiation. There was no effect if gel was applied only before irradiation or beginning 1 week after irradiation. Wound dressing gel, but not personal lubricating jelly or healing ointment, reduces acute radiation-induced skin

  10. The impact of concurrent granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor on radiation-induced mucositis in head and neck cancer patients: A double-blind placebo-controlled prospective Phase III study by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9901

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Janice K. . E-mail: janice.ryu@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu; Swann, Suzanne; LeVeque, Francis; Johnson, Darlene J.; Chen, Allan; Fortin, Andre; Kim, Harold; Ang, Kian K.

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: Based on early clinical evidence of potential mucosal protection by granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized study to test the efficacy and safety of GM-CSF in reducing the severity and duration of mucosal injury and pain (mucositis) associated with curative radiotherapy (RT) in head-and-neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients included those with head-and-neck cancer with radiation ports encompassing >50% of oral cavity and/or oropharynx. Standard RT ports were used to cover the primary tumor and regional lymphatics at risk in standard fractionation to 60-70 Gy. Concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy was allowed. Patients were randomized to receive subcutaneous injection of GM-CSF 250 {mu}g/m{sup 2} or placebo 3 times a week. Mucosal reaction was assessed during the course of RT using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria and the protocol-specific scoring system. Results: Between October 2000 and September 2002, 130 patients from 36 institutions were accrued. Nine patients (7%) were excluded from the analysis, 3 as a result of drug unavailability. More than 80% of the patients participated in the quality-of-life endpoint of this study. The GM-CSF did not cause any increase in toxicity compared with placebo. There was no statistically significant difference in the average mean mucositis score in the GM-CSF and placebo arms by a t test (p = 0.4006). Conclusion: This placebo-controlled, randomized study demonstrated no significant effect of GM-CSF given concurrently compared with placebo in reducing the severity or duration of RT-induced mucositis in patients undergoing definitive RT for head-and-neck cancer.

  11. Syzygium cumini (Jamun) reduces the radiation-induced DNA damage in the cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Jagetia, Ganesh Chandra; Baliga, Manjeshwar Shrinath

    2002-06-07

    The effects of various concentrations (0.0, 1.56, 3.125, 6.25, 12.5, 25, 50 and 100 microg/ml) of the leaf extract of Syzygium cumini Linn. or Eugenia cumini (SC; black plum, Jamun, family Myrtaceae) was studied on the alteration in the radiation-induced micronuclei formation in the cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Treatment of lymphocytes to various concentrations of SC resulted in a dose dependent increase in the micronuclei-induction, especially after 25-100 microg/ml extract. The exposure of human lymphocytes to various concentrations of SC extract before 3 Gy gamma-irradiation resulted in a significant decline in the micronuclei-induction at all the drug doses when compared with the non-drug treated irradiated cultures. A nadir in MNBNC frequency was observed for 12.5 microg/ml drug concentration, where the MNBNC frequency was approximately fourfold lower than that of the non-drug treated irradiated cultures. Therefore, this dose may be considered as an optimum dose for radiation protection. Our study demonstrates that the leaf extract of S. cumini, a plant traditionally used to treat diabetic disorders protects against the radiation-induced DNA damage.

  12. Amelioration of radiation-induced oral cavity mucositis and distant bone marrow suppression in fanconi anemia Fancd2-/- (FVB/N) mice by intraoral GS-nitroxide JP4-039.

    PubMed

    Berhane, Hebist; Shinde, Ashwin; Kalash, Ronny; Xu, Karen; Epperly, Michael W; Goff, Julie; Franicola, Darcy; Zhang, Xichen; Dixon, Tracy; Shields, Donna; Wang, Hong; Wipf, Peter; Li, Song; Gao, Xiang; Greenberger, Joel S

    2014-07-01

    The altered DNA damage response pathway in patients with Fanconi anemia (FA) may increase the toxicity of clinical radiotherapy. We quantitated oral cavity mucositis in irradiated Fanconi anemia Fancd2(-/-) mice, comparing this to Fancd2(+/-) and Fancd2(+/+) mice, and we measured distant bone marrow suppression and quantitated the effect of the intraoral radioprotector GS-nitroxide, JP4-039 in F15 emulsion. We found that FA mice were more susceptible to radiation injury and that protection from radiation injury by JP4-039/F15 was observed at all radiation doses. Adult 10-12-week-old mice, of FVB/N background Fancd2(-/-), Fancd2(+/-) and Fancd2(+/+) were head and neck irradiated with 24, 26, 28 or 30 Gy (large fraction sizes typical of stereotactic radiosurgery treatments) and subgroups received intraoral JP4-039 (0.4 mg/mouse in 100 μL F15 liposome emulsion) preirradiation. On day 2 or 5 postirradiation, mice were sacrificed, tongue tissue and femur marrow were excised for quantitation of radiation-induced stress response, inflammatory and antioxidant gene transcripts, histopathology and assay for femur marrow colony-forming hematopoietic progenitor cells. Fancd2(-/-) mice had a significantly higher percentage of oral mucosal ulceration at day 5 after 26 Gy irradiation (59.4 ± 8.2%) compared to control Fancd2(+/+) mice (21.7 ± 2.9%, P = 0.0063). After 24 Gy irradiation, Fancd2(-/-) mice had a higher oral cavity percentage of tongue ulceration compared to Fancd2(+/+) mice irradiated with higher doses of 26 Gy (P = 0.0123). Baseline and postirradiation oral cavity gene transcripts were altered in Fancd2(-/-) mice compared to Fancd2(+/+) controls. Fancd2(-/-) mice had decreased baseline femur marrow CFU-GM, BFUe and CFU-GEMM, which further decreased after 24 or 26 Gy head and neck irradiation. These changes were not seen in head- and neck-irradiated Fancd2(+/+) mice. In radiosensitive Fancd2(-/-) mice, biomarkers of both local oral cavity and distant marrow

  13. Amelioration of Radiation-Induced Oral Cavity Mucositis and Distant Bone Marrow Suppression in Fanconi Anemia Fancd2−/− (FVB/N) Mice by Intraoral GS-Nitroxide JP4-039

    PubMed Central

    Berhane, Hebist; Shinde, Ashwin; Kalash, Ronny; Xu, Karen; Epperly, Michael W.; Goff, Julie; Franicola, Darcy; Zhang, Xichen; Dixon, Tracy; Shields, Donna; Wang, Hong; Wipf, Peter; Li, Song; Gao, Xiang; Greenberger, Joel S.

    2014-01-01

    The altered DNA damage response pathway in patients with Fanconi anemia (FA) may increase the toxicity of clinical radiotherapy. We quantitated oral cavity mucositis in irradiated Fanconi anemia Fancd2−/− mice, comparing this to Fancd2+/− and Fancd2+/+ mice, and we measured distant bone marrow suppression and quantitated the effect of the intraoral radioprotector GS-nitroxide, JP4-039 in F15 emulsion. We found that FA mice were more susceptible to radiation injury and that protection from radiation injury by JP4-039/F15 was observed at all radiation doses. Adult 10–12-week-old mice, of FVB/N background Fancd2−/−, Fancd2+/− and Fancd2+/+ were head and neck irradiated with 24, 26, 28 or 30 Gy (large fraction sizes typical of stereotactic radiosurgery treatments) and subgroups received intraoral JP4-039 (0.4 mg/mouse in 100 μL F15 liposome emulsion) preirradiation. On day 2 or 5 postirradiation, mice were sacrificed, tongue tissue and femur marrow were excised for quantitation of radiation-induced stress response, inflammatory and antioxidant gene transcripts, histopathology and assay for femur marrow colony-forming hematopoietic progenitor cells. Fancd2−/− mice had a significantly higher percentage of oral mucosal ulceration at day 5 after 26 Gy irradiation (59.4 ± 8.2%) compared to control Fancd2+/+ mice (21.7 ± 2.9%, P = 0.0063). After 24 Gy irradiation, Fancd2−/− mice had a higher oral cavity percentage of tongue ulceration compared to Fancd2+/+ mice irradiated with higher doses of 26 Gy (P = 0.0123). Baseline and postirradiation oral cavity gene transcripts were altered in Fancd2−/− mice compared to Fancd2+/+ controls. Fancd2−/− mice had decreased baseline femur marrow CFU-GM, BFUe and CFU-GEMM, which further decreased after 24 or 26 Gy head and neck irradiation. These changes were not seen in head- and neck-irradiated Fancd2+/+ mice. In radiosensitive Fancd2−/− mice, biomarkers of both local oral cavity and distant marrow

  14. Oral Administration of Escin Inhibits Acute Inflammation and Reduces Intestinal Mucosal Injury in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Li, Minmin; Lu, Chengwen; Zhang, Leiming; Zhang, Jianqiao; Du, Yuan; Duan, Sijin; Fu, Fenghua

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of oral administration of escin on acute inflammation and intestinal mucosal injury in animal models. The effects of escin on carrageenan-induced paw edema in a rat model of acute inflammation, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) induced intestinal mucosal injury in a mouse model, were observed. It was shown that oral administration of escin inhibits carrageenan-induced paw edema and decreases the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2. In CLP model, low dose of escin ameliorates endotoxin induced liver injury and intestinal mucosal injury and increases the expression of tight junction protein claudin-5 in mice. These findings suggest that escin effectively inhibits acute inflammation and reduces intestinal mucosal injury in animal models. PMID:26199634

  15. Oral Administration of Escin Inhibits Acute Inflammation and Reduces Intestinal Mucosal Injury in Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Li, Minmin; Lu, Chengwen; Zhang, Leiming; Zhang, Jianqiao; Du, Yuan; Duan, Sijin; Wang, Tian; Fu, Fenghua

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of oral administration of escin on acute inflammation and intestinal mucosal injury in animal models. The effects of escin on carrageenan-induced paw edema in a rat model of acute inflammation, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) induced intestinal mucosal injury in a mouse model, were observed. It was shown that oral administration of escin inhibits carrageenan-induced paw edema and decreases the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2. In CLP model, low dose of escin ameliorates endotoxin induced liver injury and intestinal mucosal injury and increases the expression of tight junction protein claudin-5 in mice. These findings suggest that escin effectively inhibits acute inflammation and reduces intestinal mucosal injury in animal models.

  16. Nintedanib reduces radiation-induced microscopic lung fibrosis but this cannot be monitored by CT imaging: A preclinical study with a high precision image-guided irradiator.

    PubMed

    De Ruysscher, Dirk; Granton, Patrick Vincent; Lieuwes, Natasja Gaby; van Hoof, Stefan; Wollin, Lutz; Weynand, Birgit; Dingemans, Anne-Marie; Verhaegen, Frank; Dubois, Ludwig

    2017-09-01

    Nintedanib has anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory activity and is approved for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. The aim of this study was to noninvasively assess the efficacy of nintedanib in a mouse model of partial lung irradiation to prevent radiation-induced lung damage (RILD). 266 C57BL/6 adult male mice were irradiated with a single radiation dose (0, 4, 8, 12, 16 or 20Gy) using parallel-opposed fields targeting the upper right lung using a precision image-guided small animal irradiator sparing heart and spine based on micro-CT images. One week post irradiation, mice were randomized across nintedanib daily oral gavage treatment (0, 30 or 60mg/kg). CT density analysis of the lungs was performed on monthly acquired micro-CT images. After 39weeks, lungs were processed to evaluate the fibrotic phenotype. Although the CT density increase correlated with the radiation dose, nintedanib did not influence this relationship. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the ability of nintedanib to reduce the microscopic fibrotic phenotype, in particular interstitial edema, interstitial and perivascular fibrosis and inflammation, and vasculitis. Nintedanib reduces radiation-induced lung fibrosis after partial lung irradiation without adverse effects, however, noninvasive CT imaging measuring electron density cannot be applied for monitoring its effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Chemical chaperones reduce ionizing radiation-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and cell death in IEC-6 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Sang; Lee, Hae-June; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Jeong, Jae-Hoon; Kang, Seongman; Lim, Young-Bin

    2014-07-25

    Radiotherapy, which is one of the most effective approaches to the treatment of various cancers, plays an important role in malignant cell eradication in the pelvic area and abdomen. However, it also generates some degree of intestinal injury. Apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is the primary pathological factor that initiates radiation-induced intestinal injury, but the mechanism by which ionizing radiation (IR) induces apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is not clearly understood. Recently, IR has been shown to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, thereby activating the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cells. However, the consequences of the IR-induced activation of the UPR signaling pathway on radiosensitivity in intestinal epithelial cells remain to be determined. In this study, we investigated the role of ER stress responses in IR-induced intestinal epithelial cell death. We show that chemical ER stress inducers, such as tunicamycin or thapsigargin, enhanced IR-induced caspase 3 activation and DNA fragmentation in intestinal epithelial cells. Knockdown of Xbp1 or Atf6 with small interfering RNA inhibited IR-induced caspase 3 activation. Treatment with chemical chaperones prevented ER stress and subsequent apoptosis in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Our results suggest a pro-apoptotic role of ER stress in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Furthermore, inhibiting ER stress may be an effective strategy to prevent IR-induced intestinal injury.

  18. Chemical chaperones reduce ionizing radiation-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and cell death in IEC-6 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eun Sang; Lee, Hae-June; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Jeong, Jae-Hoon; Kang, Seongman; Lim, Young-Bin

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • UPR activation precedes caspase activation in irradiated IEC-6 cells. • Chemical ER stress inducers radiosensitize IEC-6 cells. • siRNAs that targeted ER stress responses ameliorate IR-induced cell death. • Chemical chaperons prevent cell death in irradiated IEC-6 cells. - Abstract: Radiotherapy, which is one of the most effective approaches to the treatment of various cancers, plays an important role in malignant cell eradication in the pelvic area and abdomen. However, it also generates some degree of intestinal injury. Apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is the primary pathological factor that initiates radiation-induced intestinal injury, but the mechanism by which ionizing radiation (IR) induces apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is not clearly understood. Recently, IR has been shown to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, thereby activating the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cells. However, the consequences of the IR-induced activation of the UPR signaling pathway on radiosensitivity in intestinal epithelial cells remain to be determined. In this study, we investigated the role of ER stress responses in IR-induced intestinal epithelial cell death. We show that chemical ER stress inducers, such as tunicamycin or thapsigargin, enhanced IR-induced caspase 3 activation and DNA fragmentation in intestinal epithelial cells. Knockdown of Xbp1 or Atf6 with small interfering RNA inhibited IR-induced caspase 3 activation. Treatment with chemical chaperones prevented ER stress and subsequent apoptosis in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Our results suggest a pro-apoptotic role of ER stress in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Furthermore, inhibiting ER stress may be an effective strategy to prevent IR-induced intestinal injury.

  19. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy reduces radiation-induced trismus in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a prospective study with >5 years of follow-up.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Chong; Wang, Jin; Ma, Hong-Lian; Lai, Shu-Zheng; Liu, Yuan; Han, Fei; Lu, Li-Xia; Bao, Yong; Chen, Ming

    2011-07-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) provides better temporomandibular joint (TMJ) sparing and, thus, may reduce the incidence of radiation-induced trismus after radiotherapy. The objectives of this study were to evaluate radiation-induced trismus in patients with NPC who had received IMRT and to assess the pretreatment factors, relevant treatment factors, and dosimetry parameters associated with trismus. A prospective, single-arm measurement study with more than 5 years of follow-up was designed. Patients with newly diagnosed stage I through IVB NPC who received treatment with IMRT were eligible. Patients received 66 to 70 grays (Gy) to the gross tumor volume. The maximal interincisal distance (MID) was measured at baseline and 6 months, 1 year, 2 years, 3 years, 4 years, and 5 years after they completed IMRT. The trial enrolled 211 consecutive patients from 2001 to 2004. The mean dose to the TMJ ranged from 6.18 Gy to 51.36 Gy (median dose, 29.88 Gy). Compared with baseline MID levels, normalized MID levels at 6 months, 1 year, 2 years, 3 years, 4 years, and 5 years after IMRT were 94.6% ± 9.9%, 92.5% ± 10.5%, 92% ± 10.6%, 92.2% ± 10.5%, 92.1% ± 10.2%, and 90.3% ± 11.4%, respectively (P < .001). According to a revised subjective-objective management-analytical (SOMA) scale, grade 1/2 trismus was identified in 12 of 211 patients (5.7%), and no grade 3/4 trismus was observed. There was an increasing risk of trismus after IMRT when the MID was <40.5 mm at baseline compared with an MID >40.5 mm (P = .007). No dosimetric parameter was associated with trismus. IMRT was able to reduce the radiation dose to the TMJ and likely reduced the incidence and severity of radiation-induced trismus after radiotherapy. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  20. L-arginine pretreatment reduces intestinal mucositis as induced by 5-FU in mice.

    PubMed

    Leocádio, Paola C L; Antunes, Maísa M; Teixeira, Lílian G; Leonel, Alda J; Alvarez-Leite, Jacqueline I; Machado, Denise C C; Generoso, Simone V; Cardoso, Valbert N; Correia, Maria Isabel T D

    2015-01-01

    Beneficial effects of L-arginine on immune responses and bowel function have been reported. Mucositis is a side effect of chemotherapy treatment that affects approximately 40% of patients. This complication is characterized by inflammation that affects the gastrointestinal tract, increasing permeability and causing abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, which worsen the patient's nutritional status and increases morbimortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pretreating with 2% L-arginine supplementation in water on mucositis as induced by 5-fluorouracil (5-FU; a single dose of 200 mg/kg body weight) in Swiss male mice. The effect of L-arginine on weight, intestinal permeability, morphology, and the histopathological score of the small intestine (from 0 to 12), oxidative stress, myeloperoxidase (MPO), and N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAG) activities were evaluated. Intestinal length improvement was observed, in addition to the partial recovery of the mucosal architecture. L-arginine attenuated the histopathological score and MPO activity. There was also an improvement in intestinal permeability, despite weight loss after 5-FU administration. In conclusion, L-arginine can positively impact intestinal mucositis by promoting partial mucosal recovery, reducing inflammation and improving intestinal permeability.

  1. Radiation-induced gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Gautam; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced gliomas represent a relatively rare but well-characterized entity in the neuro-oncologic literature. Extensive retrospective cohort data in pediatric populations after therapeutic intracranial radiation show a clearly increased risk in glioma incidence that is both patient age- and radiation dose/volume-dependent. Data in adults are more limited but show heightened risk in certain groups exposed to radiation. In both populations, there is no evidence linking increased risk associated with routine exposure to diagnostic radiation. At the molecular level, recent studies have found distinct genetic differences between radiation-induced gliomas and their spontaneously-occurring counterparts. Clinically, there is understandable reluctance on the part of clinicians to re-treat patients due to concern for cumulative neurotoxicity. However, available data suggest that aggressive intervention can lead to improved outcomes in patients with radiation-induced gliomas. PMID:19831840

  2. CXCR4 increases in-vivo glioma perivascular invasion, and reduces radiation induced apoptosis: A genetic knockdown study

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Viveka Nand; Zamler, Daniel; Baker, Gregory J.; Kadiyala, Padma; Erdreich-Epstein, Anat; DeCarvalho, Ana C.; Mikkelsen, Tom; Castro, Maria G.; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a highly invasive brain tumor. Perivascular invasion, autovascularization and vascular co-option occur throughout the disease and lead to tumor invasion and progression. The molecular basis for perivascular invasion, i.e., the interaction of glioma tumor cells with endothelial cells is not well characterized. Recent studies indicate that glioma cells have increased expression of CXCR4. We investigated the in-vivo role of CXCR4 in perivascular invasion of glioma cells using shRNA-mediated knock down of CXCR4. We show that primary cultures of human glioma stem cells HF2303 and mouse glioma GL26-Cit cells exhibit significant migration towards human (HBMVE) and mouse (MBVE) brain microvascular endothelial cells. Blocking CXCR4 on tumor cells with AMD3100 in-vitro, inhibits migration of GL26-Cit and HF2303 toward MBVE and HBMVE cells. Additionally, genetic down regulation of CXCR4 in mouse glioma GL26-Cit cells inhibits their in-vitro migration towards MBVE cells; in an in-vivo intracranial mouse model, these cells display reduced tumor growth and perivascular invasion, leading to increased survival. Quantitative analysis of brain sections showed that CXCR4 knockdown tumors are less invasive. Lastly, we tested the effects of radiation on CXCR4 knock down GL26-Cit cells in an orthotopic brain tumor model. Radiation treatment increased apoptosis of CXCR4 downregulated tumor cells and prolonged median survival. In summary, our data suggest that CXCR4 signaling is critical for perivascular invasion of GBM cells and targeting this receptor makes tumors less invasive and more sensitive to radiation therapy. Combination of CXCR4 knock down and radiation treatment might improve the efficacy of GBM therapy. PMID:27863376

  3. CXCR4 increases in-vivo glioma perivascular invasion, and reduces radiation induced apoptosis: A genetic knockdown study.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Viveka Nand; Zamler, Daniel; Baker, Gregory J; Kadiyala, Padma; Erdreich-Epstein, Anat; DeCarvalho, Ana C; Mikkelsen, Tom; Castro, Maria G; Lowenstein, Pedro R

    2016-12-13

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a highly invasive brain tumor. Perivascular invasion, autovascularization and vascular co-option occur throughout the disease and lead to tumor invasion and progression. The molecular basis for perivascular invasion, i.e., the interaction of glioma tumor cells with endothelial cells is not well characterized. Recent studies indicate that glioma cells have increased expression of CXCR4. We investigated the in-vivo role of CXCR4 in perivascular invasion of glioma cells using shRNA-mediated knock down of CXCR4. We show that primary cultures of human glioma stem cells HF2303 and mouse glioma GL26-Cit cells exhibit significant migration towards human (HBMVE) and mouse (MBVE) brain microvascular endothelial cells. Blocking CXCR4 on tumor cells with AMD3100 in-vitro, inhibits migration of GL26-Cit and HF2303 toward MBVE and HBMVE cells. Additionally, genetic down regulation of CXCR4 in mouse glioma GL26-Cit cells inhibits their in-vitro migration towards MBVE cells; in an in-vivo intracranial mouse model, these cells display reduced tumor growth and perivascular invasion, leading to increased survival. Quantitative analysis of brain sections showed that CXCR4 knockdown tumors are less invasive. Lastly, we tested the effects of radiation on CXCR4 knock down GL26-Cit cells in an orthotopic brain tumor model. Radiation treatment increased apoptosis of CXCR4 downregulated tumor cells and prolonged median survival. In summary, our data suggest that CXCR4 signaling is critical for perivascular invasion of GBM cells and targeting this receptor makes tumors less invasive and more sensitive to radiation therapy. Combination of CXCR4 knock down and radiation treatment might improve the efficacy of GBM therapy.

  4. Repeated Autologous Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Injections Improve Radiation-Induced Proctitis in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Busson, Elodie; Holler, Valerie; Strup-Perrot, Carine; Lacave-Lapalun, Jean-Victor; Lhomme, Bruno; Prat, Marie; Devauchelle, Patrick; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Simon, Jean-Marc; Bonneau, Michel; Lataillade, Jean-Jacques; Benderitter, Marc

    2013-01-01

    The management of proctitis in patients who have undergone very-high-dose conformal radiotherapy is extremely challenging. The fibrosis-necrosis, fistulae, and hemorrhage induced by pelvic overirradiation have an impact on morbidity. Augmenting tissue repair by the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may be an important advance in treating radiation-induced toxicity. Using a preclinical pig model, we investigated the effect of autologous bone marrow-derived MSCs on high-dose radiation-induced proctitis. Irradiated pigs received repeated intravenous administrations of autologous bone marrow-derived MSCs. Immunostaining and real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis were used to assess the MSCs' effect on inflammation, extracellular matrix remodeling, and angiogenesis, in radiation-induced anorectal and colon damages. In humans, as in pigs, rectal overexposure induces mucosal damage (crypt depletion, macrophage infiltration, and fibrosis). In a pig model, repeated administrations of MSCs controlled systemic inflammation, reduced in situ both expression of inflammatory cytokines and macrophage recruitment, and augmented interleukin-10 expression in rectal mucosa. MSC injections limited radiation-induced fibrosis by reducing collagen deposition and expression of col1a2/col3a1 and transforming growth factor-β/connective tissue growth factor, and by modifying the matrix metalloproteinase/TIMP balance. In a pig model of proctitis, repeated injections of MSCs effectively reduced inflammation and fibrosis. This treatment represents a promising therapy for radiation-induced severe rectal damage. PMID:24068742

  5. Repeated autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell injections improve radiation-induced proctitis in pigs.

    PubMed

    Linard, Christine; Busson, Elodie; Holler, Valerie; Strup-Perrot, Carine; Lacave-Lapalun, Jean-Victor; Lhomme, Bruno; Prat, Marie; Devauchelle, Patrick; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Simon, Jean-Marc; Bonneau, Michel; Lataillade, Jean-Jacques; Benderitter, Marc

    2013-11-01

    The management of proctitis in patients who have undergone very-high-dose conformal radiotherapy is extremely challenging. The fibrosis-necrosis, fistulae, and hemorrhage induced by pelvic overirradiation have an impact on morbidity. Augmenting tissue repair by the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may be an important advance in treating radiation-induced toxicity. Using a preclinical pig model, we investigated the effect of autologous bone marrow-derived MSCs on high-dose radiation-induced proctitis. Irradiated pigs received repeated intravenous administrations of autologous bone marrow-derived MSCs. Immunostaining and real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis were used to assess the MSCs' effect on inflammation, extracellular matrix remodeling, and angiogenesis, in radiation-induced anorectal and colon damages. In humans, as in pigs, rectal overexposure induces mucosal damage (crypt depletion, macrophage infiltration, and fibrosis). In a pig model, repeated administrations of MSCs controlled systemic inflammation, reduced in situ both expression of inflammatory cytokines and macrophage recruitment, and augmented interleukin-10 expression in rectal mucosa. MSC injections limited radiation-induced fibrosis by reducing collagen deposition and expression of col1a2/col3a1 and transforming growth factor-β/connective tissue growth factor, and by modifying the matrix metalloproteinase/TIMP balance. In a pig model of proctitis, repeated injections of MSCs effectively reduced inflammation and fibrosis. This treatment represents a promising therapy for radiation-induced severe rectal damage.

  6. Rebamipide ameliorates radiation-induced intestinal injury in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Shim, Sehwan; Jang, Hyo-Sun; Myung, Hyun-Wook; Myung, Jae Kyung; Kang, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Min-Jung; Lee, Seung Bum; Jang, Won-Suk; Lee, Sun-Joo; Jin, Young-Woo; Lee, Seung-Sook; Park, Sunhoo

    2017-08-15

    Radiation-induced enteritis is a major side effect in cancer patients undergoing abdominopelvic radiotherapy. Radiation exposure produces an uncontrolled inflammatory cascade and epithelial cell loss leading to impaired epithelial barrier function. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of rebamipide on regeneration of the intestinal epithelia after radiation injury. The abdomens of C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 13Gy of irradiation (IR) and then the mice were treated with rebamipide. Upon IR, intestinal epithelia were destroyed structurally at the microscopic level and bacterial translocation was increased. The intestinal damage reached a maximum level on day 6 post-IR and intestinal regeneration occurred thereafter. We found that rebamipide significantly ameliorated radiation-induced intestinal injury. In mice treated with rebamipide after IR, intestinal barrier function recovered and expression of the tight junction components of the intestinal barrier were upregulated. Rebamipide administration reduced radiation-induced intestinal mucosal injury. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9) were significantly reduced upon rebamipide administration. Intestinal cell proliferation and β-catenin expression also increased upon rebamipide administration. These data demonstrate that rebamipide reverses impairment of the intestinal barrier by increasing intestinal cell proliferation and attenuating the inflammatory response by inhibiting MMP9 and proinflammatory cytokine expression in a murine model of radiation-induced enteritis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Radiation-induced pneumothorax

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, D.M.; Littman, P.; Gefter, W.B.; Miller, W.T.; Raney, R.B. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Pneumothorax is an uncommon complication of radiation therapy to the chest. The proposed pathogenesis is radiation-induced fibrosis promoting subpleural bleb formation that ruptures resulting in pneumothorax. We report on two young patients with primary sarcomas without pulmonary metastases who developed spontaneous pneumothorax after irradiation. Neither patient had antecedent radiographic evidence of pulmonary fibrosis.

  8. Radiation-Induced Bioradicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondelaers, Win; Lahorte, Philippe

    This chapter is part one of a review in which the production and application of radiation-induced bioradicals is discussed. Bioradicals play a pivotal role in the complex chain of processes starting with the absorption of radiation in biological materials and ending with the radiation-induced biological after-effects. The general aspects of the four consecutive stages (physical, physicochemical, chemical and biological) are discussed from an interdisciplinary point of view. The close relationship between radiation dose and track structure, induced DNA damage and cell survival or killing is treated in detail. The repair mechanisms that cells employ, to insure DNA stability following irradiation, are described. Because of their great biomedical importance tumour suppressor genes involved in radiation-induced DNA repair and in checkpoint activation will be treated briefly, together with the molecular genetics of radiosensitivity. Part two of this review will deal with modern theoretical methods and experimental instrumentation for quantitative studies in this research field. Also an extensive overview of the applications of radiation-induced bioradicals will be given. A comprehensive list of references allows further exploration of this research field, characterised in the last decade by a substantial advance, both in fundamental knowledge and in range of applications.

  9. Reducing the probability of radiation-induced hepatic toxicity by changing the treatment modality from helical tomotherapy to fixed-beam intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jin Ho; Son, Seok Hyun; Kay, Chul Seung; Jang, Hong Seok

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To estimate and compare the risk of radiation-induced hepatic toxicity (RIHT) in helical tomotherapy and fixed-beam intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Materials and Methods Twenty patients with unresectable HCC treated with tomotherapy were selected. We performed tomotherapy re-planning to reduce the non-target normal liver volume receiving a dose of more than 15 Gy (NTNL-V15Gy), and we created a fixed-beam IMRT plan (FB-P). We compared the dosimetric results as well as the estimated probability of RIHT among the tomotherapy initial plan (T-IP), the tomotherapy re-plan (T-RP), and the FB-P. Results Comparing the T-RP and FB-P, the homogeneity index was 0.11 better with the T-RP. However, the mean NTNL-V15Gy was 6.3% lower with the FB-P. These differences result in a decline in the probability of RIHT from 0.216 in the T-RP to 0.115 in the FB-P. In patients whose NTNL-V15Gy was higher than 43.2% with the T-RP, the probability of RIHT markedly reduced from 0.533 to 0.274. Conclusions By changing the treatment modality from tomotherapy to fixed-beam IMRT, we could reduce the liver dose and the probability of RIHT without scarifying the target coverage, especially in patients whose liver dose is high. PMID:26376679

  10. High-fat enteral nutrition reduces intestinal mucosal barrier damage after peritoneal air exposure.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shan-Jun; Yu, Chao; Yu, Zhen; Lin, Zhi-Liang; Wu, Guo-Hao; Yu, Wen-Kui; Li, Jie-Shou; Li, Ning

    2016-05-01

    Peritoneal air exposure is needed in open abdominal surgery, but long-time exposure could induce intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction followed by many postoperative complications. High-fat enteral nutrition can ameliorate intestinal injury and improve intestinal function in many gastrointestinal diseases. In the present study, we investigated the effect of high-fat enteral nutrition on intestinal mucosal barrier after peritoneal air exposure and the underlying mechanism. Male adult rats were administrated saline, low-fat or high-fat enteral nutrition via gavage before and after peritoneal air exposure for 3 h. Rats undergoing anesthesia without laparotomy received saline as control. Twenty four hours after surgery, samples were collected to assess intestinal mucosal barrier changes in serum D-lactate levels, intestinal permeability, intestinal tight junction protein ZO-1 and occludin levels, and intestinal histopathology. The levels of malondialdehyde and the activity of superoxide dismutase in the ileum tissue were also measured to assess the status of intestinal oxidative stress. High-fat enteral nutrition significantly decreased the serum D-lactate level and increased the intestinal tight junction protein ZO-1 level when compared to the group treated with low-fat enteral nutrition (P < 0.05). Meanwhile, histopathologic findings showed that the intestinal mucosal injury assessed by the Chiu's score and the intestinal epithelial tight junction were also improved much more in the high-fat enteral nutrition-treated group (P < 0.05). In addition, the intestinal malondialdehyde level was lower, and the intestinal superoxide dismutase activity was higher in the high-fat enteral nutrition-treated group than that in the low-fat enteral nutrition-treated group (P < 0.05). These results suggest that high-fat enteral nutrition could reduce intestinal mucosal barrier damage after peritoneal air exposure, and the underlying mechanism may be associated with its antioxidative

  11. Failure of ethamsylate to reduce aspirin-induced gastric mucosal bleeding in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Daneshmend, T K; Stein, A G; Bhaskar, N K; Hawkey, C J

    1989-01-01

    1. We investigated the effect of the haemostatic agent ethamsylate on aspirin-induced gastric mucosal bleeding. 2. Eighteen healthy subjects were studied three times: at the end of 48 h periods of treatment with (a) placebo, (b) aspirin 600 mg four times daily, (9 doses) and (c) aspirin 600 mg four times daily with each dose preceded by ethamsylate 500 mg. 3. At the end of each treatment period gastric mucosal bleeding into timed gastric washings was quantified using the orthotolidine reaction. 4. Aspirin increased bleeding from a rate on placebo of 1.2 microliters 10 min-1 geometric mean (95% confidence limits) (0.7-1.8) microliters 10 min-1 to 20.0 (11.6-34.2) microliters 10 min-1, (P less than 0.01). The rate of bleeding after aspirin preceded by ethamsylate [14.1 (8.5-23.4) microliters 10 min-1] was not significantly different from that after aspirin alone. 5. We conclude that ethamsylate does not reduce acute aspirin-induced gastric mucosal bleeding in healthy humans. PMID:2789070

  12. Neurogenic differentiation factor NeuroD confers protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Du, Aonan; Xu, Jing; Ma, Yanchao; Cao, Han; Yang, Chao; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Xing, Chun-Gen; Chen, Ming; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Shuyu; Cao, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract, especially the small intestine, is particularly sensitive to radiation, and is prone to radiation-induced injury as a result. Neurogenic differentiation factor (NeuroD) is an evolutionarily-conserved basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor. NeuroD contains a protein transduction domain (PTD), which allows it to be exogenously delivered across the membrane of mammalian cells, whereupon its transcription activity can be unleashed. Whether NeuroD has therapeutic effects for radiation-induced injury remains unclear. In the present study, we prepared a NeuroD-EGFP recombinant protein, and explored its protective effects on the survival and intestinal damage induced by ionizing radiation. Our results showed that NeuroD-EGFP could be transduced into small intestine epithelial cells and tissues. NeuroD-EGFP administration significantly increased overall survival of mice exposed to lethal total body irradiation (TBI). This recombinant NeuroD also reduced radiation-induced intestinal mucosal injury and apoptosis, and improved crypt survival. Expression profiling of NeuroD-EGFP-treated mice revealed upregulation of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1), a known inhibitor of apoptosis in mammalian cells. In conclusion, NeuroD confers protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury, and provides a novel therapeutic clinical option for the prevention of intestinal side effects of radiotherapy and the treatment of victims of incidental exposure. PMID:27436572

  13. Photoprotective Potential of Glycolic Acid by Reducing NLRC4 and AIM2 Inflammasome Complex Proteins in UVB Radiation-Induced Normal Human Epidermal Keratinocytes and Mice.

    PubMed

    Hung, Sung-Jen; Tang, Sheau-Chung; Liao, Pei-Yun; Ge, Jheng-Siang; Hsiao, Yu-Ping; Yang, Jen-Hung

    2017-02-01

    Exposure to UVB radiation induces inflammation and free radical-mediated oxidative stress through reactive oxygen species (ROS) that play a crucial role in the induction of skin cancer. Glycolic acid (GA) is frequently used in cosmetics and dermatology. The aim of the study was to analyze the photoprotective mechanisms through which GA retards UVB-induced ROS accumulation and inflammation in normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) and mice skin, respectively. NHEK cell line and C57BL/6J mice were treated with GA (0.1 or 5 mM) for 24 h followed by UVB irradiation. ROS accumulation, DNA damage, and expression of inflammasome complexes (NLRP3, NLRC4, ASC, and AIM2) were measured in vitro. Epidermal thickness and inflammasome complex proteins were analyzed in vivo. GA significantly prevented UVB-induced loss of skin cell viability, ROS formation, and DNA damage (single and double strands DNA break). GA suppressed the mRNA expression levels of NLRC4 and AIM2 among the inflammasome complexes. GA also blocked interleukin (IL)-1β by reducing the activity of caspase-1 in the NHEKs. Treatment with GA (2%) inhibited UVB-induced inflammation marker NLRC4 protein levels in mouse dorsal skin. The photoprotective activity of GA was ascribed to the inhibition of ROS formation and DNA damage, as well as a reduction in the activities of inflammasome complexes and IL-1β. We propose that GA has anti-inflammatory and photoprotective effects against UVB irradiation. GA is potentially beneficial to the protection of human skin from UV damage.

  14. Radiation-induced injury of the esophagus

    SciTech Connect

    Lepke, R.A.; Libshitz, H.I.

    1983-08-01

    Forty patients with functional or morphologic esophageal abnormalities following radiotherapy were identified. Abnormalities included abnormal motility with and without mucosal edema, stricture, ulceration and pseudodiverticulum, and fistula. Abnormal motility occurred 4 to 12 weeks following radiotherapy alone and as early as 1 week after therapy when concomitant chemotherapy had been given. Strictures developed 4 to 8 months following completion of radiotherapy. Ulceration, pseudodiverticulum, and fistula formation did not develop in a uniform time frame. Radiation-induced esophageal injury is more frequent when radiotherapy and chemotherapy are combined than it is with radiotherapy alone.

  15. Oral Platelet Gel Supernatant Plus Supportive Medical Treatment Versus Supportive Medical Treatment in the Management of Radiation-induced Oral Mucositis: A Matched Explorative Active Control Trial by Propensity Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bonfili, Pierluigi; Gravina, Giovanni L; Marampon, Francesco; Rughetti, Anna; Di Staso, Mario; Dell'Orso, Luigi; Vittorini, Francesca; Moro, Roberto; La Verghetta, Maria E; Parente, Silvia; Reale, Marilisa; Ruggieri, Valeria; Franzese, Pietro; Tombolini, Vincenzo; Masciocchi, Carlo; Di Cesare, Ernesto

    2017-08-01

    In this active control trial, the rate of radio-induced WHO grade 3/4 oral mucositis and the change in quality of life, assessed by OMWQ-HN, were measured in subjects with head and neck cancer treated by platelet gel supernatant (PGS) and supportive medical treatment versus subjects treated by supportive medical treatment alone. Eighty patients with nonmetastatic head and neck cancer underwent curative or adjuvant radiotherapy. All patients underwent supportive medical treatment and/or PGS at the beginning and during radiotherapy. Sixteen patients received PGS in association with supportive medical treatment. To obtain 2 groups virtually randomized for important clinical characteristics subjects were matched, by propensity analysis, with a group of subjects (64 patients) treated with supportive medical treatment alone. Subjects treated with standard supportive treatment experienced significant higher WHO grade 3/4 toxicity (55%; 35/64) than subjects treated by PGS (13%; 3/16). The reduced toxicity found in PGS group paralleled with the evidence that they developed later symptoms with respect to controls. The Cox proportional hazard model indicated that patients treated with standard supportive medical treatment experienced 2.7-fold increase (hazard ratio=2.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-5.7) in the occurrence of WHO grade 3/4 toxicity. PGS group significantly experienced higher quality of life than control groups as measured by OMWQ-HN. A significant decrease in the opioid analgesics usage was found in the PGS group. These preliminary data should be interpreted with caution and could serve as a framework around which to design future trials.

  16. Dietary soy protein is associated with reduced intestinal mucosal polyamine concentration in male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Higuchi, C M

    2000-07-01

    Quantitation of polyamine levels has been correlated with biomarkers of proliferation in the colon mucosa where dysregulated epithelial hyperproliferation is associated with colorectal cancer risk. This study was performed to assess the response of polyamine measurements to dietary factors in an animal model. Male Wistar rats were fed purified diet or diets substituted by 20% lard fat, 20% beet fiber and 20% soy protein. After 2 wk, mucosal polyamines were measured along intestinal tracts by HPLC. In rats fed the control diet (n = 10), mucosal polyamines were found at high levels in the duodenum, jejunum and ileum but at low levels in the cecum, colon and rectum. Compared with rats fed the control diet, those fed the 20% lard diet showed greater polyamine levels in the large intestine (P < 0.05, n = 10), but those fed the 20% fiber diet exhibited lower polyamine levels in the small intestine (P < 0.05, n = 9). However, rats fed the 20% soy protein diet had lower polyamine levels in both small and large intestines (P < 0.05, n = 15). Significant linear correlations were observed between rectal polyamine levels and the dietary energy intakes in these four diet groups (r = 0.972-0.991, P < 0.001). Supplementation of 0.1% soy isoflavones to the basal diet or 0.3% DL-methionine to the 20% soy protein diet for 4 wk did not affect polyamine levels. The results indicate that soy protein reduced mucosal polyamine levels, at least in part, through reduction of energy intakes. Further studies are warranted to verify that polyamine levels in intestinal mucosa are useful as an intermediate endpoint of the dietary risk factors.

  17. Probiotic therapy reduces inflammation and improves intestinal morphology in rats with induced oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Gerhard, Dayana; Sousa, Frederico José da Silva Simão de; Andraus, Rodrigo Antonio Carvalho; Pardo, Paulo Eduardo; Nai, Gisele Alborguetti; Neto, Hermann Bremer; Messora, Michel Reis; Maia, Luciana Prado

    2017-07-03

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of systemic administration of probiotics (PROB) on the progression of experimentally induced oral and intestinal mucositis in rats immunosuppressed by chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil: 5-FU). Twenty-four rats were divided into the following groups (n=6): GC (control), GPROB, G5FU and G5-FU/PROB. Groups GPROB and G5-FU/PROB received 1 g of probiotic incorporated into each 100 g of feed (Bacillus subtilis, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Enterococcus faecium and Lactobacilllus acidophilus), beginning 30 days before oral mucositis induction. Groups G5FU and G5-FU/PROB received 60 mg/kg of 5-FU on days 0 and 2. The left oral mucosa of each animal was irritated by mechanical trauma (days 1 and 2). On days 3 and 7, three animals from each group were sacrificed, and their oral mucosa and small intestine were biopsied and processed for histopathological analysis. Groups G5-FU and G5-FU/PROB showed ulcerated oral lesions at day 3, with progression in group G5-FU and regression in group G5-FU/PROB at day 7. Histologically, less severe signs of inflammation in the oral mucosa were observed in group G5-FU/PROB than in group G5-FU. Regarding the intestine, villus-related defects of lesser magnitude were observed in group G5-FU/PROB, compared with group G5-FU. Group GPROB showed greater villus height than group GC. It can be concluded that probiotic supplementation reduced oral and intestinal inflammation in immunosuppressed rats with experimentally induced mucositis, and may protect the intestine from changes induced by chemotherapy, thus contributing to overall health.

  18. Saccharomyces cerevisiae UFMG A-905 treatment reduces intestinal damage in a murine model of irinotecan-induced mucositis.

    PubMed

    Bastos, R W; Pedroso, S H S P; Vieira, A T; Moreira, L M C; França, C S; Cartelle, C T; Arantes, R M E; Generoso, S V; Cardoso, V N; Neves, M J; Nicoli, J R; Martins, F S

    2016-09-01

    Indigenous microbiota plays a crucial role in the development of several intestinal diseases, including mucositis. Gastrointestinal mucositis is a major and serious side effect of cancer therapy, and there is no effective therapy for this clinical condition. However, some probiotics have been shown to attenuate such conditions. To evaluate the effects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae UFMG A-905 (Sc-905), a potential probiotic yeast, we investigated whether pre- or post-treatment with viable or inactivated Sc-905 could prevent weight loss and intestinal lesions, and maintain integrity of the mucosal barrier in a mucositis model induced by irinotecan in mice. Only post-treatment with viable Sc-905 was able to protect mice against the damage caused by chemotherapy, reducing the weight loss, increase of intestinal permeability and jejunal lesions (villous shortening). Besides, this treatment reduced oxidative stress, prevented the decrease of goblet cells and stimulated the replication of cells in the intestinal crypts of mice with experimental mucositis. In conclusion, Sc-905 protects animals against irinotecan-induced mucositis when administered as a post-treatment with viable cells, and this effect seems to be related with the reduction of oxidative stress and preservation of intestinal mucosa.

  19. REC-2006-A Fractionated Extract of Podophyllum hexandrum Protects Cellular DNA from Radiation-Induced Damage by Reducing the Initial Damage and Enhancing Its Repair In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Pankaj; Shukla, Sandeep Kumar; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Podophyllum hexandrum, a perennial herb commonly known as the Himalayan May Apple, is well known in Indian and Chinese traditional systems of medicine. P. hexandrum has been widely used for the treatment of venereal warts, skin infections, bacterial and viral infections, and different cancers of the brain, lung and bladder. This study aimed at elucidating the effect of REC-2006, a bioactive fractionated extract from the rhizome of P. hexandrum, on the kinetics of induction and repair of radiation-induced DNA damage in murine thymocytes in vivo. We evaluated its effect on non-specific radiation-induced DNA damage by the alkaline halo assay in terms of relative nuclear spreading factor (RNSF) and gene-specific radiation-induced DNA damage via semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Whole body exposure of animals with gamma rays (10 Gy) caused a significant amount of DNA damage in thymocytes (RNSF values 17.7 ± 0.47, 12.96 ± 1.64 and 3.3 ± 0.014) and a reduction in the amplification of β-globin gene to 0, 28 and 43% at 0, 15 and 60 min, respectively. Administrating REC-2006 at a radioprotective concentration (15 mg kg(-1) body weight) 1 h before irradiation resulted in time-dependent reduction of DNA damage evident as a decrease in RNSF values 6.156 ± 0.576, 1.647 ± 0.534 and 0.496 ± 0.012, and an increase in β-globin gene amplification 36, 95 and 99%, at 0, 15 and 60 min, respectively. REC-2006 scavenged radiation-induced hydroxyl radicals in a dose-dependent manner stabilized DPPH free radicals and also inhibited superoxide anions. Various polyphenols and flavonoides present in REC-2006 might contribute to scavenging of radiation-induced free radicals, thereby preventing DNA damage and stimulating its repair.

  20. Radiation-Induced Bioradicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahorte, Philippe; Mondelaers, Wim

    This chapter represents the second part of a review in which the production and application of radiation-induced radicals in biological matter are discussed. In part one the general aspects of the four stages (physical, physicochemical, chemical and biological) of interaction of radiation with matter in general and biological matter in particular, were discussed. Here an overview is presented of modem technologies and theoretical methods available for studying these radiation effects. The relevance is highlighted of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations with respect to obtaining structural information on bioradicals, and a survey is given of the research studies in this field. We also discuss some basic aspects of modem accelerator technologies which can be used for creating radicals and we conclude with an overview of applications of radiation processing in biology and related fields such as biomedical and environmental engineering, food technology, medicine and pharmacy.

  1. Reduced late rectal mucosal changes after prostate three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with endorectal balloon as observed in repeated endoscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Emile van . E-mail: E.vanLin@rther.umcn.nl; Kristinsson, Jon; Philippens, Marielle E.P.; Jong, Dirk J. de; Vight, Lisette P. van der; Kaanders, Johannes; Leer, Jan Willem; Visser, Andries G.

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate prospectively the rectal wall (Rwall) spatial dose distribution, toxicity, and mucosal changes after prostate cancer radiotherapy with or without an endorectal balloon (ERB). Methods and Materials: A total of 24 patients with ERB and 24 without ERB (No-ERB) were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) to a dose of 67.5 Gy. The Rwall was divided into 16 mucosal areas and Rwall dose surface maps were constructed. After 3 months, 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years a rectosigmoidoscopy was performed, and each mucosal area was scored on telangiectasia, congestion, ulceration, stricture, and necrosis. Late rectal toxicity was correlated with the endoscopic findings. Results: The ERB significantly reduced the Rwall volume exposed to doses >40 Gy. Late rectal toxicity (grade {>=}1, including excess of bowel movements and slight rectal discharge) was reduced significantly in the ERB group. A total of 146 endoscopies and 2,336 mucosal areas were analyzed. Telangiectases were most frequently seen and appeared after 6 months. At 1 and 2 years, significantly less high-grade telangiectasia (T 2-3) was observed in the ERB group at the lateral and posterior part of the Rwall. In mucosal areas exposed to doses >40 Gy, less high-grade telangiectases (T 2-3) were seen in the ERB group compared with the No-ERB group. Conclusions: An ERB reduced the Rwall volume exposed to doses >40 Gy, resulting in reduction of late rectal mucosal changes and reduced late rectal toxicity. Although further analysis is needed, these data suggest an ERB-induced increased tolerance for late Rwall damage.

  2. Radiation Induced Genomic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William F.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after irradiation of parental cells. The phenotype is well established both in vivo (Morgan 2003) and in vitro (Morgan 2003), and may be critical in radiation carcinogenesis (Little 2000, Huang et al. 2003). Instability can be induced by both the deposition of energy in irradiated cells as well as by signals transmitted by irradiated (targeted) cells to non-irradiated (non-targeted) cells (Kadhim et al. 1992, Lorimore et al. 1998). Thus both targeted and non-targeted cells can pass on the legacy of radiation to their progeny. However the radiation induced events and cellular processes that respond to both targeted and non-targeted radiation effects that lead to the unstable phenotype remain elusive. The cell system we have used to study radiation induced genomic instability utilizes human hamster GM10115 cells. These cells have a single copy of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes. Instability is evaluated in the clonal progeny of irradiated cells and a clone is considered unstable if it contains three or more metaphase sub-populations involving unique rearrangements of the human chromosome (Marder and Morgan 1993). Many of these unstable clones have been maintained in culture for many years and have been extensively characterized. As initially described by Clutton et al., (Clutton et al. 1996) many of our unstable clones exhibit persistently elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (Limoli et al. 2003), which appear to be due dysfunctional mitochondria (Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2006). Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, our unstable clones do not demonstrate a “mutator phenotype” (Limoli et al. 1997), but they do continue to rearrange their genomes for many years. The limiting factor with this system is the target – the human chromosome. While some clones demonstrate amplification of this chromosome and thus lend

  3. Altered Biomarkers of Mucosal Immunity and Reduced Vaginal Lactobacillus Concentrations in Sexually Active Female Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Rebecca Pellett; Carpenter, Colleen; Fiedler, Tina; Kalyoussef, Sabah; McAndrew, Thomas C.; Viswanathan, Shankar; Kim, Mimi; Keller, Marla J.; Fredricks, David N.; Herold, Betsy C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Genital secretions collected from adult women exhibit in vitro activity against herpes simplex virus (HSV) and Escherichia coli (E. coli), but prior studies have not investigated this endogenous antimicrobial activity or its mediators in adolescent females. Methodology/Principal Findings Anti-HSV and anti-E.coli activity were quantified from cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) specimens collected from 20 sexually active adolescent females (15–18 years). Soluble immune mediators that may influence this activity were measured in CVL, and concentrations of Lactobacillus jensenii and crispatus were quantified by PCR from vaginal swabs. Results for adolescents were compared to those obtained from 54 healthy, premenopausal adult women. Relative to specimens collected from adults, CVL collected from adolescent subjects had significantly reduced activity against E. coli and diminished concentrations of protein, IgG, and IgA but significantly increased anti-HSV activity and concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-6 and IL-1 receptor antagonist. Vaginal swabs collected from adolescent subjects had comparable concentrations of L. crispatus but significantly reduced concentrations of L. jensenii, relative to adult swabs. Conclusions/Significance Biomarkers of genital mucosal innate immunity may differ substantially between sexually active adolescents and adult women. These findings warrant further study and may have significant implications for prevention of sexually transmitted infections in adolescent females. PMID:22808157

  4. Highly specific blockade of CCR5 inhibits leukocyte trafficking and reduces mucosal inflammation in murine colitis.

    PubMed

    Mencarelli, Andrea; Cipriani, Sabrina; Francisci, Daniela; Santucci, Luca; Baldelli, Franco; Distrutti, Eleonora; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2016-08-05

    Targeted disruption of leukocyte trafficking to the gut represents a promising approach for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). CCR5, the shared receptor for MIP1α and β and RANTES, is expressed by multiple leukocytes. Here, we aimed to determine the role of CCR5 in mediating leukocyte trafficking in models of colitis, and evaluate the therapeutic potential of maraviroc, an orally active CCR5 antagonist used in the treatment of CCR5-tropic HIV. Acute and chronic colitis were induced by administration of DSS or TNBS to wild-type and CCR5(-/-) mice or adoptive transfer of splenic naïve CD4(+) T-cells from wild type or CCR5(-/-) mice into RAG-1(-/-). CCR5 gene ablation reduced the mucosal recruitment and activation of CCR5-bearing CD4(+) and CD11b(+) leukocytes, resulting in profound attenuation of signs and symptoms of inflammation in the TNBS and transfer models of colitis. In the DSS/TNBS colitis and in the transfer model, maraviroc attenuated development of intestinal inflammation by selectively reducing the recruitment of CCR5 bearing leukocytes. In summary, CCR5 regulates recruitment of blood leukocytes into the colon indicating that targeting CCR5 may offer therapeutic options in IBDs.

  5. Highly specific blockade of CCR5 inhibits leukocyte trafficking and reduces mucosal inflammation in murine colitis

    PubMed Central

    Mencarelli, Andrea; Cipriani, Sabrina; Francisci, Daniela; Santucci, Luca; Baldelli, Franco; Distrutti, Eleonora; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Targeted disruption of leukocyte trafficking to the gut represents a promising approach for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). CCR5, the shared receptor for MIP1α and β and RANTES, is expressed by multiple leukocytes. Here, we aimed to determine the role of CCR5 in mediating leukocyte trafficking in models of colitis, and evaluate the therapeutic potential of maraviroc, an orally active CCR5 antagonist used in the treatment of CCR5-tropic HIV. Acute and chronic colitis were induced by administration of DSS or TNBS to wild-type and CCR5−/− mice or adoptive transfer of splenic naïve CD4+ T-cells from wild type or CCR5−/− mice into RAG-1−/−. CCR5 gene ablation reduced the mucosal recruitment and activation of CCR5-bearing CD4+ and CD11b+ leukocytes, resulting in profound attenuation of signs and symptoms of inflammation in the TNBS and transfer models of colitis. In the DSS/TNBS colitis and in the transfer model, maraviroc attenuated development of intestinal inflammation by selectively reducing the recruitment of CCR5 bearing leukocytes. In summary, CCR5 regulates recruitment of blood leukocytes into the colon indicating that targeting CCR5 may offer therapeutic options in IBDs. PMID:27492684

  6. Prosthodontic management of radiation induced xerostomic patient using flexible dentures

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Varsha; V, Yuvraj; Nair, Preeti P; Thomas, Shaji

    2012-01-01

    Xerostomia causes discomfort for complete denture wearers as the tissues become dry and friable due to lack of lubricating properties of saliva. Common problems faced by such patients are glossitis, mucositis, angular chelitis, dysgeusia and difficulty in chewing and swallowing. This case report describes a new method in addressing such issues by using flexible complete denture construction in radiation induced xerostomic patient with minimal tissue damage during and after denture construction procedures. PMID:22605708

  7. Quercetin inhibits radiation-induced skin fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Horton, Jason A; Li, Fei; Chung, Eun Joo; Hudak, Kathryn; White, Ayla; Krausz, Kristopher; Gonzalez, Frank; Citrin, Deborah

    2013-08-01

    Radiation induced fibrosis of the skin is a late toxicity that may result in loss of function due to reduced range of motion and pain. The current study sought to determine if oral delivery of quercetin mitigates radiation-induced cutaneous injury. Female C3H/HeN mice were fed control chow or quercetin-formulated chow (1% by weight). The right hind leg was exposed to 35 Gy of X rays and the mice were followed serially to assess acute toxicity and hind leg extension. Tissue samples were collected for assessment of soluble collagen and tissue cytokines. Human and murine fibroblasts were subjected to clonogenic assays to determine the effects of quercetin on radiation response. Contractility of fibroblasts was assessed with a collagen contraction assay in the presence or absence of quercetin and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Western blotting of proteins involved in fibroblast contractility and TGF-β signaling were performed. Quercetin treatment significantly reduced hind limb contracture, collagen accumulation and expression of TGF-β in irradiated skin. Quercetin had no effect on the radioresponse of fibroblasts or murine tumors, but was capable of reducing the contractility of fibroblasts in response to TGF-β, an effect that correlated with partial stabilization of phosphorylated cofilin. Quercetin is capable of mitigating radiation induced skin fibrosis and should be further explored as a therapy for radiation fibrosis.

  8. Quercetin Inhibits Radiation-Induced Skin Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Jason A.; Li, Fei; Chung, Eun Joo; Hudak, Kathryn; White, Ayla; Krausz, Kristopher; Gonzalez, Frank; Citrin, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Radiation induced fibrosis of the skin is a late toxicity that may result in loss of function due to reduced range of motion and pain. The current study sought to determine if oral delivery of quercetin mitigates radiation-induced cutaneous injury. Female C3H/HeN mice were fed control chow or quercetin-formulated chow (1% by weight). The right hind leg was exposed to 35 Gy of X rays and the mice were followed serially to assess acute toxicity and hind leg extension. Tissue samples were collected for assessment of soluble collagen and tissue cytokines. Human and murine fibroblasts were subjected to clonogenic assays to determine the effects of quercetin on radiation response. Contractility of fibroblasts was assessed with a collagen contraction assay in the presence or absence of quercetin and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Western blotting of proteins involved in fibroblast contractility and TGF-β signaling were performed. Quercetin treatment significantly reduced hind limb contracture, collagen accumulation and expression of TGF-β in irradiated skin. Quercetin had no effect on the radioresponse of fibroblasts or murine tumors, but was capable of reducing the contractility of fibroblasts in response to TGF-β, an effect that correlated with partial stabilization of phosphorylated cofilin. Quercetin is capable of mitigating radiation induced skin fibrosis and should be further explored as a therapy for radiation fibrosis. PMID:23819596

  9. Dragon's blood extracts reduce radiation-induced peripheral blood injury and protects human megakaryocyte cells from GM-CSF withdraw-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ran, Yuanyuan; Xu, Bing; Wang, Ran; Gao, Qian; Jia, Qiutian; Hasan, Murtaza; Shan, Shuangquan; Ma, Hong; Dai, Rongji; Deng, Yulin; Qing, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Dragon's blood (DB), a Chinese traditional herb, was shown to have certain protective effects on radiation-induced bone marrow injury due to the presence of several phenolic compounds. The 50% ethanol extracts (DBE) were separated from DB by the methods of alcohol extracting-water precipitating. The protective effects of DBE on hematopoiesis were studied, particularly on megakaryocytes. In this study, we investigated the in vivo radioprotective effects of DBE on hematopoiesis and pathological changes using an irradiated-mouse model. Moreover, the protective effects and potential molecular mechanisms of DBE on megakaryocytopoiesis in vitro were explored in GM-CSF depletion-induced Mo7e cell model. DBE significantly promoted the recovery of peripheral blood cells in irradiated mice. Histology bone marrow confirmed the protective effect of DBE, as shown by an increased number of hematopoietic cells and a reduction of apoptosis. In a megakaryocytic apoptotic model, DBE (50 µg/mL) markedly alleviated GM-CSF withdrawal-induced apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest of Mo7e cells. DBE (50 µg/mL) also significantly decreased the ratio of Bax to Bcl-2 expression, inhibited the active caspase-3 expression. In addition, DBE could induce ERK1/2 phosphorylation in GM-CSF-depleted Mo7e cell, but not Akt. Our data demonstrated that DBE could effectively accelerate the recovery of peripheral blood cells, especially platelet. DBE attenuated cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest through the decrease of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and the reduction of active caspase-3 expression. The effect of DBE on Mo7e cells survival and proliferation is likely associated with the activation of ERK, but not Akt. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Vaccine-Elicited Mucosal and Systemic Antibody Responses Are Associated with Reduced Simian Immunodeficiency Viremia in Infant Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kara; Nabi, Rafiq; Van Rompay, Koen K. A.; Robichaux, Spencer; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Piatak, Michael; Jacobs, William R.; Fennelly, Glenn; Canfield, Don; Mollan, Katie R.; Hudgens, Michael G.; Larsen, Michelle H.; Amedee, Angela M.; Kozlowski, Pamela A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite significant progress in reducing peripartum mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) with antiretroviral therapy (ART), continued access to ART throughout the breastfeeding period is still a limiting factor, and breast milk exposure to HIV accounts for up to 44% of MTCT. As abstinence from breastfeeding is not recommended, alternative means are needed to prevent MTCT of HIV. We have previously shown that oral vaccination at birth with live attenuated Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains expressing simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) genes safely induces persistent SIV-specific cellular and humoral immune responses both systemically and at the oral and intestinal mucosa. Here, we tested the ability of oral M. tuberculosis vaccine strains expressing SIV Env and Gag proteins, followed by systemic heterologous (MVA-SIV Env/Gag/Pol) boosting, to protect neonatal macaques against oral SIV challenge. While vaccination did not protect infant macaques against oral SIV acquisition, a subset of immunized animals had significantly lower peak viremia which inversely correlated with prechallenge SIV Env-specific salivary and intestinal IgA responses and higher-avidity SIV Env-specific IgG in plasma. These controller animals also maintained CD4+ T cell populations better and showed reduced tissue pathology compared to noncontroller animals. We show that infants vaccinated at birth can develop vaccine-induced SIV-specific IgA and IgG antibodies and cellular immune responses within weeks of life. Our data further suggest that affinity maturation of vaccine-induced plasma antibodies and induction of mucosal IgA responses at potential SIV entry sites are associated with better control of viral replication, thereby likely reducing SIV morbidity. IMPORTANCE Despite significant progress in reducing peripartum MTCT of HIV with ART, continued access to ART throughout the breastfeeding period is still a limiting factor. Breast milk exposure

  11. Antibiotics Suppress Activation of Intestinal Mucosal Mast Cells and Reduce Dietary Lipid Absorption in Sprague-Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hirokazu; Zhang, Linda S; Martinez, Kristina; Chang, Eugene B; Yang, Qing; Wang, Fei; Howles, Philip N; Hokari, Ryota; Miura, Soichiro; Tso, Patrick

    2016-11-01

    The gut microbiota affects intestinal permeability and mucosal mast cells (MMCs) responses. Activation of MMCs has been associated with absorption of dietary fat. We investigated whether the gut microbiota contributes to the fat-induced activation of MMCs in rats, and how antibiotics might affect this process. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were given streptomycin and penicillin for 4 days (n = 6-8) to reduce the abundance of their gut flora, or normal drinking water (controls, n = 6-8). They underwent lymph fistula surgery and after an overnight recovery were given an intraduodenal bolus of intralipid. We collected intestinal tissues and lymph fluid and assessed activation of MMCs, intestinal permeability, and fat transport parameters. Compared with controls, intestinal lymph from rats given antibiotics had reduced levels of mucosal mast cell protease II (produced by MMCs) and decreased activity of diamine oxidase (produced by enterocytes) (P < .05). Rats given antibiotics had reduced intestinal permeability in response to dietary lipid compared with controls (P < .01). Unexpectedly, antibiotics also reduced lymphatic transport of triacylglycerol and phospholipid (P < .01), concomitant with decreased levels of mucosal apolipoproteins B, A-I, and A-IV (P < .01). No differences were found in intestinal motility or luminal pancreatic lipase activity between rats given antibiotics and controls. These effects were not seen with an acute dose of antibiotics or 4 weeks after the antibiotic regimen ended. The intestinal microbiota appears to activate MMCs after the ingestion of fat in rats; this contributes to fat-induced intestinal permeability. We found that the gut microbiome promotes absorption of lipid, probably by intestinal production of apolipoproteins and secretion of chylomicrons. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Lactobacillus fermentum BR11 and fructo-oligosaccharide partially reduce jejunal inflammation in a model of intestinal mucositis in rats.

    PubMed

    Smith, Cassie L; Geier, Mark S; Yazbeck, Roger; Torres, Diana M; Butler, Ross N; Howarth, Gordon S

    2008-01-01

    Although probiotics are beginning to enter mainstream medicine for disorders of the colon, their effects on the small bowel remain largely unexplored. We investigated the recently identified probiotic, Lactobacillus fermentum (L. fermentum) BR11 (BR11) and the prebiotic, fructo-oligosaccharide (FOS), both individually and in synbiotic combination, for their potential to alleviate intestinal mucositis. From Days 0-9, rats consumed skim milk (SM; saline + SM), low dose (LD-BR11; 1 x 10(6)cfu/ml), high dose (HD-BR11; 1 x 10(9)cfu/ml), LD-FOS (3%), HD-FOS (6%), or synbiotic (HD-BR11/FOS). On Day 7, rats were injected with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU; 150 mg/kg). All rats were sacrificed on Day 10. Intestinal tissues were collected for quantitative histology, sucrase, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) determinations. 5-FU decreased sucrase activity, villus height, crypt depth, and crypt cell proliferation compared to controls. Compared to 5-FU + SM, histological damage severity scores were increased for all treatments, although all were effective at reducing jejunal inflammation, indicated by reduced MPO activity (P < 0.05). The combination of BR11 and FOS did not provide additional protection. Moreover, HD-FOS and the synbiotic actually increased clinical mucositis severity (P < 0.05). We conclude that L. fermentum BR11 has the potential to reduce inflammation of the upper small intestine. However, its combination with FOS does not appear to confer any further therapeutic benefit for the alleviation of mucositis.

  13. Radiation-induced esophagitis in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Sarah; Fairchild, Alysa

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced esophagitis is the most common local acute toxicity of radiotherapy (RT) delivered for the curative or palliative intent treatment of lung cancer. Although concurrent chemotherapy and higher RT dose are associated with increased esophagitis risk, advancements in RT techniques as well as adherence to esophageal dosimetric constraints may reduce the incidence and severity. Mild acute esophagitis symptoms are generally self-limited, and supportive management options include analgesics, acid suppression, diet modification, treatment for candidiasis, and maintenance of adequate nutrition. Esophageal stricture is the most common late sequela from esophageal irradiation and can be addressed with endoscopic dilatation. Approaches to prevent or mitigate these toxicities are also discussed. PMID:28210168

  14. VSL#3 probiotic modifies mucosal microbial composition but does not reduce colitis-associated colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Janelle C.; Gharaibeh, Raad Z.; Uronis, Joshua M.; Perez-Chanona, Ernesto; Sha, Wei; Tomkovich, Sarah; Mühlbauer, Marcus; Fodor, Anthony A.; Jobin, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Although probiotics have shown success in preventing the development of experimental colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CRC), beneficial effects of interventional treatment are relatively unknown. Here we show that interventional treatment with VSL#3 probiotic alters the luminal and mucosally-adherent microbiota, but does not protect against inflammation or tumorigenesis in the azoxymethane (AOM)/Il10−/− mouse model of colitis-associated CRC. VSL#3 (109 CFU/animal/day) significantly enhanced tumor penetrance, multiplicity, histologic dysplasia scores, and adenocarcinoma invasion relative to VSL#3-untreated mice. Illumina 16S sequencing demonstrated that VSL#3 significantly decreased (16-fold) the abundance of a bacterial taxon assigned to genus Clostridium in the mucosally-adherent microbiota. Mediation analysis by linear models suggested that this taxon was a contributing factor to increased tumorigenesis in VSL#3-fed mice. We conclude that VSL#3 interventional therapy can alter microbial community composition and enhance tumorigenesis in the AOM/Il10−/− model. PMID:24100376

  15. Radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, A.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of the heritable somatic effects of ionizing radiation exposures has relied upon the assumption that radiation-induced lesions were 'fixed' in the DNA prior to the first postirradiation mitosis. Lesion conversion was thought to occur during the initial round of DNA replication or as a consequence of error-prone enzymatic processing of lesions. The standard experimental protocols for the assessment of a variety of radiation-induced endpoints (cell death, specific locus mutations, neoplastic transformation and chromosome aberrations) evaluate these various endpoints at a single snapshot in time. In contrast with the aforementioned approaches, some studies have specifically assessed radiation effects as a function of time following exposure. Evidence has accumulated in support of the hypothesis that radiation exposure induces a persistent destabilization of the genome. This instability has been observed as a delayed expression of lethal mutations, as an enhanced rate of accumulation of non-lethal heritable alterations, and as a progressive intraclonal chromosomal heterogeneity. The genetic controls and biochemical mechanisms underlying radiation-induced genomic instability have not yet been delineated. The aim is to integrate the accumulated evidence that suggests that radiation exposure has a persistent effect on the stability of the mammalian genome.

  16. Radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, A.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of the heritable somatic effects of ionizing radiation exposures has relied upon the assumption that radiation-induced lesions were 'fixed' in the DNA prior to the first postirradiation mitosis. Lesion conversion was thought to occur during the initial round of DNA replication or as a consequence of error-prone enzymatic processing of lesions. The standard experimental protocols for the assessment of a variety of radiation-induced endpoints (cell death, specific locus mutations, neoplastic transformation and chromosome aberrations) evaluate these various endpoints at a single snapshot in time. In contrast with the aforementioned approaches, some studies have specifically assessed radiation effects as a function of time following exposure. Evidence has accumulated in support of the hypothesis that radiation exposure induces a persistent destabilization of the genome. This instability has been observed as a delayed expression of lethal mutations, as an enhanced rate of accumulation of non-lethal heritable alterations, and as a progressive intraclonal chromosomal heterogeneity. The genetic controls and biochemical mechanisms underlying radiation-induced genomic instability have not yet been delineated. The aim is to integrate the accumulated evidence that suggests that radiation exposure has a persistent effect on the stability of the mammalian genome.

  17. SU-E-T-625: Potential for Reduced Radiation Induced Toxicity for the Treatment of Inoperable Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Using RapidArc Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Pokhrel, D; Sood, S; Badkul, R; Jiang, H; Saleh, H; Wang, F

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using RapidArc (RA) treatment planning to reduce irradiation volume of normal lung and other organs at risk (OARs) in the treatment of inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods: A retrospective treatment planning and delivery study was performed to compare target coverage and the volumes of the normal lung, spinal cord, heart and esophagus on 4D-CT scan above their dose tolerances delivered by RA vs. IMRT for ten inoperable NSCLC patients (Stage I-IIIB). RA plans consisted of either one-full or two-partial co-planar arcs used to treat 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) with 6MV beam to a prescription of 66Gy in 33 fractions. IMRT plans were generated using 5–7 co-planar fields with 6MV beam. PTV coverage, dose-volume histograms, homogeneity/conformity indices (CI), total number of monitor units(MUs), beam-on time and delivery accuracy were compared between the two treatment plans. Results: Similar target coverage was obtained between the two techniques. RA (CI=1.02) provided more conformal plans without loss of homogeneity compared to IMRT plans (CI=1.12). Compared to IMRT, RA achieved a significant median dose reduction in V10 (3%), V20 (8%), and mean lung dose (3%) on average, respectively. On average, V5 was comparable between the two treatment plans. RA reduced mean esophagus (6%), mean heart (18%), and maximum spinal cord dose (7%), on average, respectively. Total number of MUs and beam-on time were each reduced almost by a factor of 2 when compared to IMRT-patient comfort, reduced intra-fraction-motion and leakage dose. The average IMRT and RA QA pass rate was about 98% for both types of plans for 3%/3mm criterion. Conclusion: Compared to IMRT plans, RA provided not only comparable target coverage, but also improved conformity, treatment time, and significant reduction in irradiation of OARs. This may potentially allow for target dose escalation without increase in normal tissue toxicity.

  18. Vaccine-Elicited Mucosal and Systemic Antibody Responses Are Associated with Reduced Simian Immunodeficiency Viremia in Infant Rhesus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kara; Nabi, Rafiq; Van Rompay, Koen K A; Robichaux, Spencer; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Piatak, Michael; Jacobs, William R; Fennelly, Glenn; Canfield, Don; Mollan, Katie R; Hudgens, Michael G; Larsen, Michelle H; Amedee, Angela M; Kozlowski, Pamela A; De Paris, Kristina

    2016-08-15

    Despite significant progress in reducing peripartum mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) with antiretroviral therapy (ART), continued access to ART throughout the breastfeeding period is still a limiting factor, and breast milk exposure to HIV accounts for up to 44% of MTCT. As abstinence from breastfeeding is not recommended, alternative means are needed to prevent MTCT of HIV. We have previously shown that oral vaccination at birth with live attenuated Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains expressing simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) genes safely induces persistent SIV-specific cellular and humoral immune responses both systemically and at the oral and intestinal mucosa. Here, we tested the ability of oral M. tuberculosis vaccine strains expressing SIV Env and Gag proteins, followed by systemic heterologous (MVA-SIV Env/Gag/Pol) boosting, to protect neonatal macaques against oral SIV challenge. While vaccination did not protect infant macaques against oral SIV acquisition, a subset of immunized animals had significantly lower peak viremia which inversely correlated with prechallenge SIV Env-specific salivary and intestinal IgA responses and higher-avidity SIV Env-specific IgG in plasma. These controller animals also maintained CD4(+) T cell populations better and showed reduced tissue pathology compared to noncontroller animals. We show that infants vaccinated at birth can develop vaccine-induced SIV-specific IgA and IgG antibodies and cellular immune responses within weeks of life. Our data further suggest that affinity maturation of vaccine-induced plasma antibodies and induction of mucosal IgA responses at potential SIV entry sites are associated with better control of viral replication, thereby likely reducing SIV morbidity. Despite significant progress in reducing peripartum MTCT of HIV with ART, continued access to ART throughout the breastfeeding period is still a limiting factor. Breast milk exposure to HIV accounts for

  19. Potential for reduced radiation-induced toxicity using intensity-modulated arc therapy for whole-brain radiotherapy with hippocampal sparing.

    PubMed

    Pokhrel, Damodar; Sood, Sumit; Lominska, Christopher; Kumar, Parvesh; Badkul, Rajeev; Jiang, Hongyu; Wang, Fen

    2015-09-01

    and maximum doses to hippocampus were 8.4±0.3 Gy,11.2±0.3 Gy, and 15.6±0.4 Gy, on average, respectively. The mean values of homogeneity index (HI) and conformity index (CI) were 0.23×0.02 and 0.96×0.02, respectively. The maximum point dose to WB-PTV was 35.3 Gy, well below the optic pathway tolerance of 37.5 Gy. In addition, compared to NC-WBRT, dose reduction of mean and maximum of parotid glands from IMAT were 65% and 50%, respectively. Ear canals mean and maximum doses were reduced by 26% and 12%, and mean and maximum scalp doses were reduced by 9 Gy (32%) and 2 Gy (6%), on average, respectively. The mean dose to skin was 9.7 Gy with IMAT plans compared to 16 Gy with conventional NC-WBRT, demonstrating that absolute reduction of skin dose by a factor of 2. The mean values of the total number of monitor units (MUs) and actual beam on time were 719×44 and 2.34×0.14 min, respectively. The accuracy of IMAT QA plan delivery was (98.1±0.8) %, on average, with a 3%/3 mm gamma index passing rate criteria. All of these plans were considered clinically acceptable per RTOG 0933 criteria. IMAT planning provided highly conformal and homogenous plan with a fast and effective treatment option for WBRT patients, sparing not only hippocampi but also other OARs, which could potentially result in an additional improvement of the quality life (QoL). In the future, we plan to evaluate the clinical potential of IMAT planning and treatment option with hippocampal and other OARs avoidance in our patient's cohort and asses the QoL of the WBRT patients, as well as simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) for the brain metastases diseases. PACS number: 87.

  20. Potential for reduced radiation-induced toxicity using intensity-modulated arc therapy for whole-brain radiotherapy with hippocampal sparing.

    PubMed

    Pokhrel, Damodar; Sood, Sumit; Lominska, Christopher; Kumar, Pravesh; Badkul, Rajeev; Jiang, Hongyu; Wang, Fen

    2015-09-08

    mean and maximum doses to hippocampus were 8.4 ± 0.3 Gy, 11.2 ± 0.3 Gy, and 15.6 ± 0.4 Gy, on average, respectively. The mean values of homogeneity index (HI) and conformity index (CI) were 0.23 ± 0.02 and 0.96 ± 0.02, respectively. The maximum point dose to WB-PTV was 35.3 Gy, well below the optic pathway tolerance of 37.5 Gy. In addition, compared to NC-WBRT, dose reduction of mean and maximum of parotid glands from IMAT were 65% and 50%, respectively. Ear canals mean and maximum doses were reduced by 26% and 12%, and mean and maximum scalp doses were reduced by 9 Gy (32%) and 2 Gy (6%), on average, respectively. The mean dose to skin was 9.7 Gy with IMAT plans compared to 16 Gy with conventional NC-WBRT, demonstrating that absolute reduction of skin dose by a factor of 2. The mean values of the total number of monitor units (MUs) and actual beam on time were 719 ± 44 and 2.34 ± 0.14 min, respectively. The accuracy of IMAT QA plan delivery was (98.1 ± 0.8) %, on average, with a 3%/3 mm gamma index passing rate criteria. All of these plans were considered clinically acceptable per RTOG 0933 criteria. IMAT planning provided highly conformal and homogenous plan with a fast and effective treatment option for WBRT patients, sparing not only hippocampi but also other OARs, which could potentially result in an additional improvement of the quality life (QoL). In the future, we plan to evaluate the clinical potential of IMAT planning and treatment option with hippocampal and other OARs avoidance in our patient's cohort and asses the QoL of the WBRT patients, as well as simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) for the brain metastases diseases.

  1. Long-term oral melatonin administration reduces ethanol-induced increases in duodenal mucosal permeability and motility in rats.

    PubMed

    Sommansson, A; Yamskova, O; Schiöth, H B; Nylander, O; Sjöblom, M

    2014-10-01

    Increased intestinal epithelial permeability is associated with intestinal inflammation and dysfunction. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of long-term oral melatonin administration on ethanol-induced increases in duodenal mucosal permeability and hypermotility. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered melatonin in their tap water (0.1 mg mL(-1) or 0.5 mg mL(-1) ) for 2 or 4 weeks. After the treatment period, the rats were anaesthetized with Inactin(®) , and a 30-mm duodenal segment was perfused in situ. The effects on duodenal mucosal paracellular permeability, bicarbonate secretion, fluid flux and motor activity were studied. The expression levels of the tight junction components, zona occludens (ZO)-1, ZO-2, and ZO-3, claudin-2, claudin-3, claudin-4, occludin, and myosin light chain kinase and of the melatonin receptors MT1 and MT2 were assessed using qRT-PCR. Melatonin administration for 2 weeks significantly reduced the basal paracellular permeability, an effect that was absent after 4 weeks. Perfusing the duodenal segment with 15% ethanol induced marked increases in duodenal paracellular permeability, bicarbonate secretion and motor activity. Melatonin for 2 weeks dose-dependently reduced ethanol-induced increases in permeability and motor activity. Four weeks of melatonin administration reduced the ethanol-induced increases in duodenal motility and bicarbonate secretion but had no effect on the increases in permeability. Two weeks of melatonin administration upregulated the expression of MT1 and MT2 , although both were downregulated after 4 weeks. Melatonin downregulated the expression of ZO-3 and upregulated the expression of claudin-2, even as all other mRNA-levels investigated were unaffected. Although further studies are needed, our data demonstrate that melatonin administration markedly improves duodenal barrier functions, suggesting its utility in clinical applications when intestinal barrier functions are compromised.

  2. Radiation-induced cardiovascular effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapio, Soile

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to ionising radiation enhances the risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in a moderate but significant manner. Our goal is to identify molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease using cellular and mouse models. Two radiation targets are studied in detail: the vascular endothelium that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiac function, and the myocardium, in particular damage to the cardiac mitochondria. Ionising radiation causes immediate and persistent alterations in several biological pathways in the endothelium in a dose- and dose-rate dependent manner. High acute and cumulative doses result in rapid, non-transient remodelling of the endothelial cytoskeleton, as well as increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation of the heart tissue, independent of whether exposure is local or total body. Proteomic and functional changes are observed in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, mitochondrial function (respiration, ROS production etc.), oxidative stress, cellular adhesion, and cellular structure. The transcriptional regulators Akt and PPAR alpha seem to play a central role in the radiation-response of the endothelium and myocardium, respectively. We have recently started co-operation with GSI in Darmstadt to study the effect of heavy ions on the endothelium. Our research will facilitate the identification of biomarkers associated with adverse cardiac effects of ionising radiation and may lead to the development of countermeasures against radiation-induced cardiac damage.

  3. Saireito (TJ-114), a Japanese traditional herbal medicine, reduces 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal mucositis in mice by inhibiting cytokine-mediated apoptosis in intestinal crypt cells.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shinichi; Hayashi, Shusaku; Kitahara, Yumeno; Nagasawa, Koyo; Aono, Hitomi; Shibata, Junichiro; Utsumi, Daichi; Amagase, Kikuko; Kadowaki, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Clinical chemotherapy frequently causes intestinal mucositis as a side effect, which is accompanied by severe diarrhea. We recently showed that the cytokine-mediated apoptotic pathway might be important for the development of intestinal mucositis induced by 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Saireito, the traditional Japanese herbal (Kampo) medicine, is widely used to treat diarrhea and various inflammatory diseases in Japan. In the present study, we investigated the effect of saireito on 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis in mice, especially in relation to apoptosis in the intestinal crypt. Male C57BL/6 mice were given 5-FU (50 mg/kg), i.p. once daily for 6 days. Intestinal mucositis was evaluated histochemically. Saireito (100-1000 mg/kg) was administered p.o. twice daily for 6 days. Repeated 5-FU treatment caused severe intestinal mucositis including morphological damage, which was accompanied by body weight loss and diarrhea. Daily administration of saireito reduced the severity of intestinal mucositis in a dose-dependent manner. Body weight loss and diarrhea during 5-FU treatment were also significantly attenuated by saireito administration. The number of apoptotic and caspase-3-activated cells in the intestinal crypt was increased, and was accompanied by up-regulated tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β mRNA within 24 h of the first 5-FU injection. However, all of these measures were significantly lower after saireito administration. These results suggest that saireito attenuates 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis. This action may come from the reduction of apoptosis in the intestinal crypt via suppression of the up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines. Therefore, saireito may be clinically useful for the prevention of intestinal mucositis during cancer chemotherapy.

  4. Protection of radiation-induced damage to the hematopoietic system, small intestine and salivary glands in rats by JNJ7777120 compound, a histamine H4 ligand.

    PubMed

    Martinel Lamas, Diego J; Carabajal, Eliana; Prestifilippo, Juan P; Rossi, Luis; Elverdin, Juan C; Merani, Susana; Bergoc, Rosa M; Rivera, Elena S; Medina, Vanina A

    2013-01-01

    Based on previous data on the histamine radioprotective effect on highly radiosensitive tissues, in the present work we aimed at investigating the radioprotective potential of the H4R ligand, JNJ7777120, on ionizing radiation-induced injury and genotoxic damage in small intestine, salivary glands and hematopoietic tissue. For that purpose, rats were divided into 4 groups. JNJ7777120 and JNJ7777120-irradiated groups received a daily subcutaneous JNJ7777120 injection (10 mg/kg) starting 24 h before irradiation. Irradiated groups received a single dose of 5 Gy on whole-body using Cesium-137 source and were sacrificed 3 or 30 days after irradiation. Tissues were removed, fixed, stained with hematoxylin and eosin or PAS staining and histological characteristics were evaluated. Proliferative and apoptotic markers were studied by immunohistochemistry, while micronucleus assay was performed to evaluate DNA damage. Submandibular gland (SMG) function was evaluated by methacholine-induced salivation. Results indicate that JNJ7777120 treatment diminished mucosal atrophy and preserved villi and the number of crypts after radiation exposure (240±8 vs. 165±10, P<0.01). This effect was associated to a reduced apoptosis and DNA damage in intestinal crypts. JNJ7777120 reduced radiation-induced aplasia, preserving medullar components and reducing formation of micronucleus and also it accelerated bone marrow repopulation. Furthermore, it reduced micronucleus frequency in peripheral blood (27±8 vs. 149±22, in 1,000 erythrocytes, P<0.01). JNJ7777120 completely reversed radiation-induced reduced salivation, conserving glandular mass with normal histological appearance and reducing apoptosis and atrophy of SMG. JNJ7777120 exhibits radioprotective effects against radiation-induced cytotoxic and genotoxic damages in small intestine, SMG and hematopoietic tissues and, thus, could be of clinical value for patients undergoing radiotherapy.

  5. Radiation-induced bladder carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Uyama, T.; Nakamura, S.; Moriwaki, S.

    1981-01-01

    Two cases are presented of radiation-induced bladder carcinoma which followed prior irradiation for cervical carcinoma of the uterus. One was a sixty-eight-year-old woman with bladder carcinoma fourteen years after irradiation (total dose of 4,500 rad) for cervical carcinoma of the uterus. The other was a sixty-four-year-old woman with bladder carcinoma twenty-five years after irradiation with 150-K volt apparatus for cervical carcinoma of the uterus. From the late radiation change of the skin, it was estimated that the total dose of prior radiation might be 4,000 rad or more. Both had high-grade, high-stage transitional cell bladder carcinoma, and the former was with marked mucus-forming adenomatous metaplasia.

  6. 5-AED enhances survival of irradiated mice in a G-CSF-dependent manner, stimulates innate immune cell function, reduces radiation-induced DNA damage and induces genes that modulate cell cycle progression and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Marcy B.; Singh, Vijay K.; Rhee, Juong G.; Jackson, William E.; Kao, Tzu-Cheg; Whitnall, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    The steroid androst-5-ene-3ß,17ß-diol (5-androstenediol, 5-AED) elevates circulating granulocytes and platelets in animals and humans, and enhances survival during the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) in mice and non-human primates. 5-AED promotes survival of irradiated human hematopoietic progenitors in vitro through induction of Nuclear Factor-κB (NFκB)-dependent Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) expression, and causes elevations of circulating G-CSF and interleukin-6 (IL-6). However, the in vivo cellular and molecular effects of 5-AED are not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of action of 5-AED administered subcutaneously (s.c.) to mice 24 h before total body γ- or X-irradiation (TBI). We used neutralizing antibodies, flow cytometric functional assays of circulating innate immune cells, analysis of expression of genes related to cell cycle progression, DNA repair and apoptosis, and assessment of DNA strand breaks with halo-comet assays. Neutralization experiments indicated endogenous G-CSF but not IL-6 was involved in survival enhancement by 5-AED. In keeping with known effects of G-CSF on the innate immune system, s.c. 5-AED stimulated phagocytosis in circulating granulocytes and oxidative burst in monocytes. 5-AED induced expression of both bax and bcl-2 in irradiated animals. Cdkn1a and ddb1, but not gadd45a expression, were upregulated by 5-AED in irradiated mice. S.c. 5-AED administration caused decreased DNA strand breaks in splenocytes from irradiated mice. Our results suggest 5-AED survival enhancement is G-CSF-dependent, and that it stimulates innate immune cell function and reduces radiation-induced DNA damage via induction of genes that modulate cell cycle progression and apoptosis. PMID:22843381

  7. 5-AED enhances survival of irradiated mice in a G-CSF-dependent manner, stimulates innate immune cell function, reduces radiation-induced DNA damage and induces genes that modulate cell cycle progression and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Grace, Marcy B; Singh, Vijay K; Rhee, Juong G; Jackson, William E; Kao, Tzu-Cheg; Whitnall, Mark H

    2012-11-01

    The steroid androst-5-ene-3ß,17ß-diol (5-androstenediol, 5-AED) elevates circulating granulocytes and platelets in animals and humans, and enhances survival during the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) in mice and non-human primates. 5-AED promotes survival of irradiated human hematopoietic progenitors in vitro through induction of Nuclear Factor-κB (NFκB)-dependent Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) expression, and causes elevations of circulating G-CSF and interleukin-6 (IL-6). However, the in vivo cellular and molecular effects of 5-AED are not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of action of 5-AED administered subcutaneously (s.c.) to mice 24 h before total body γ- or X-irradiation (TBI). We used neutralizing antibodies, flow cytometric functional assays of circulating innate immune cells, analysis of expression of genes related to cell cycle progression, DNA repair and apoptosis, and assessment of DNA strand breaks with halo-comet assays. Neutralization experiments indicated endogenous G-CSF but not IL-6 was involved in survival enhancement by 5-AED. In keeping with known effects of G-CSF on the innate immune system, s.c. 5-AED stimulated phagocytosis in circulating granulocytes and oxidative burst in monocytes. 5-AED induced expression of both bax and bcl-2 in irradiated animals. Cdkn1a and ddb1, but not gadd45a expression, were upregulated by 5-AED in irradiated mice. S.c. 5-AED administration caused decreased DNA strand breaks in splenocytes from irradiated mice. Our results suggest 5-AED survival enhancement is G-CSF-dependent, and that it stimulates innate immune cell function and reduces radiation-induced DNA damage via induction of genes that modulate cell cycle progression and apoptosis.

  8. Prevention of Radiation-Induced Breast Cancer by Amifostine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    acetylcysteine and captopril . 4 Task 2. To determine if post-irradiation amifostine treatment can reduce the frequency of radiation-induced ductal...similar to amifostine but more suited to oral administration such as WR- 3689, WR151327, N-acetylcysteine and captopril . The first task is to

  9. Prevention of Radiation-Induced Breast Cancer by Amifostine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    acetylcysteine and captopril . 4 Task 2. To determine if post-irradiation amifostine treatment can reduce the frequency of radiation-induced ductal...similar to amifostine but more suited to oral administration such as WR- 3689, WR151327, N-acetylcysteine and captopril . The first task is to

  10. Prevention of Radiation-Induced Breast Cancer by Amifostine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    and captopril . 4 Task 2. To determine if post-irradiation amifostine treatment can reduce the frequency of radiation-induced ductal dysplasia...amifostine but more suited to oral administration such as WR- 3689, WR151327, N-acetylcysteine and captopril . The first task is to determine if

  11. Triptolide Mitigates Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shanmin; Zhang, Mei; Chen, Chun; Cao, Yongbin; Tian, Yeping; Guo, Yangsong; Zhang, Bingrong; Wang, Xiaohui; Yin, Liangjie; Zhang, Zhenhuan; O'Dell, Walter; Okunieff, Paul; Zhang, Lurong

    2015-11-01

    Triptolide (TPL) may mitigate radiation-induced late pulmonary side effects through its inhibition of global pro-inflammatory cytokines. In this study, we evaluated the effect of TPL in C57BL/6 mice, the animals were exposed to radiation with vehicle (15 Gy), radiation with TPL (0.25 mg/kg i.v., twice weekly for 1, 2 and 3 months), radiation and celecoxib (CLX) (30 mg/kg) and sham irradiation. Cultured supernatant of irradiated RAW 264.7 and MLE-15 cells and lung lysate in different groups were enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays at 33 h. Respiratory rate, pulmonary compliance and pulmonary density were measured at 5 months in all groups. The groups exposed to radiation with vehicle and radiation with TPL exhibited significant differences in respiratory rate and pulmonary compliance (480 ± 75/min vs. 378 ± 76/min; 0.6 ± 0.1 ml/cm H2O/p kg vs. 0.9 ± 0.2 ml/cm H2O/p kg). Seventeen cytokines were significantly reduced in the lung lysate of the radiation exposure with TPL group at 5 months compared to that of the radiation with vehicle group, including profibrotic cytokines implicated in pulmonary fibrosis, such as IL-1β, TGF- β1 and IL-13. The radiation exposure with TPL mice exhibited a 41% reduction of pulmonary density and a 25% reduction of hydroxyproline in the lung, compared to that of radiation with vehicle mice. The trichrome-stained area of fibrotic foci and pathological scaling in sections of the mice treated with radiation and TPL mice were significantly less than those of the radiation with vehicle-treated group. In addition, the radiation with TPL-treated mice exhibited a trend of improved survival rate compared to that of the radiation with vehicle-treated mice at 5 months (83% vs. 53%). Three radiation-induced profibrotic cytokines in the radiation with vehicle-treated group were significantly reduced by TPL treatment, and this partly contributed to the trend of improved survival rate and pulmonary density and function and the decreased severity of

  12. PAI-1-Dependent Endothelial Cell Death Determines Severity of Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Abderrahmani, Rym; François, Agnes; Buard, Valerie; Tarlet, Georges; Blirando, Karl; Hneino, Mohammad; Vaurijoux, Aurelie; Benderitter, Marc; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Milliat, Fabien

    2012-01-01

    Normal tissue toxicity still remains a dose-limiting factor in clinical radiation therapy. Recently, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (SERPINE1/PAI-1) was reported as an essential mediator of late radiation-induced intestinal injury. However, it is not clear whether PAI-1 plays a role in acute radiation-induced intestinal damage and we hypothesized that PAI-1 may play a role in the endothelium radiosensitivity. In vivo, in a model of radiation enteropathy in PAI-1 −/− mice, apoptosis of radiosensitive compartments, epithelial and microvascular endothelium was quantified. In vitro, the role of PAI-1 in the radiation-induced endothelial cells (ECs) death was investigated. The level of apoptotic ECs is lower in PAI-1 −/− compared with Wt mice after irradiation. This is associated with a conserved microvascular density and consequently with a better mucosal integrity in PAI-1 −/− mice. In vitro, irradiation rapidly stimulates PAI-1 expression in ECs and radiation sensitivity is increased in ECs that stably overexpress PAI-1, whereas PAI-1 knockdown increases EC survival after irradiation. Moreover, ECs prepared from PAI-1 −/− mice are more resistant to radiation-induced cell death than Wt ECs and this is associated with activation of the Akt pathway. This study demonstrates that PAI-1 plays a key role in radiation-induced EC death in the intestine and suggests that this contributes strongly to the progression of radiation-induced intestinal injury. PMID:22563394

  13. In a methotrexate-induced model of intestinal mucositis, olmesartan reduced inflammation and induced enteropathy characterized by severe diarrhea, weight loss, and reduced sucrose activity.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Aurigena Antunes; Borba, Pedro Brito; de Souza, Fernando Henrique Destefani; Nogueira, Anália Cristina; Saldanha, Taís Suassuna; Araújo, Thayse Emanuele Franklin; da Silva, Aldemara Ingrid; de Araújo Júnior, Raimundo Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of olmesartan (OLME), an angiotensin II receptor antagonist, on an intestinal mucositis model. Briefly, daily intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of methotrexate (MTX) 7 mg/kg were administered to rats on 3 consecutive days. A subset of these rats was also pretreated with oral administration of OLME (0.5, 1.0, or 5.0 mg/kg) or vehicle as a control 30 min prior to MTX injection. Body weight, feces scoring, and death were recorded daily. On day 4, the rats were killed, and intestinal tissues were assayed for levels of interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, myeloperoxidase and sucrose activity, and histopathological findings. A significant reduction in body weight was observed in the MTX+1.0 mg/kg OLME group (p<0.01). The feces scores for the MTX+0.5 mg/kg OLME and MTX+5.0 mg/kg OLME groups were also significantly higher (p<0.001). Sucrose activity was reduced in all groups treated with OLME (p<0.05). Treatment with MTX+OLM at all doses resulted in reduced inflammatory infiltration, ulcerations, vasodilation, and hemorrhagic areas (p<0.05), as well as reduced concentrations of myeloperoxidase (p<0.001). The IL-1β and TNF-α levels were decreased in the MTX+OLME 5.0 mg/kg (p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively) compared with the MTX-alone group. Overall, antiinflammatory activity was observed in rats with MTX-induced intestinal mucositis that were administered OLME. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the adverse effects of OLME.

  14. Mucosal Immunization with a Candidate Universal Influenza Vaccine Reduces Virus Transmission in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Chia-Yun; Misplon, Julia A.; Epstein, Suzanne L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pandemic influenza is a major public health concern, but conventional strain-matched vaccines are unavailable early in a pandemic. Candidate “universal” vaccines targeting the viral antigens nucleoprotein (NP) and matrix 2 (M2), which are conserved among all influenza A virus strains and subtypes, could be manufactured in advance for use at the onset of a pandemic. These vaccines do not prevent infection but can reduce disease severity, deaths, and virus titers in the respiratory tract. We hypothesized that such immunization may reduce virus transmission from vaccinated, infected animals. To investigate this hypothesis, we studied mouse models for direct-contact and airborne transmission of H1N1 and H3N2 influenza viruses. We established conditions under which virus transmission occurs and showed that transmission efficiency is determined in part at the level of host susceptibility to infection. Our findings indicate that virus transmission between mice has both airborne and direct-contact components. Finally, we demonstrated that immunization with recombinant adenovirus vectors expressing NP and M2 significantly reduced the transmission of virus to cohoused, unimmunized mice in comparison to controls. These findings have broad implications for the impact of conserved-antigen vaccines, not only in protecting the vaccinated individual but also in protecting others by limiting influenza virus transmission and potentially reducing the size of epidemics. IMPORTANCE Using a mouse model of influenza A virus transmission, we demonstrate that a candidate “universal” influenza vaccine both protects vaccinated animals from lethal infection and reduces the transmission of virus from vaccinated to nonvaccinated mice. This vaccine induces immunity against proteins conserved among all known influenza A virus strains and subtypes, so it could be used early in a pandemic before conventional strain-matched vaccines are available and could potentially reduce the

  15. The effect of tianeptine in the prevention of radiation-induced neurocognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Akyurek, Serap; Senturk, Vesile; Oncu, Bedriye; Ozyigit, Gokhan; Yilmaz, Sercan; Gokce, Saban Cakir

    2008-12-01

    Radiation-induced neurocognitive impairment is an undesirable radiation-induced toxicity and a common health problem in patients with primary or metastatic brain tumor. It greatly impairs quality of life for long-term brain tumor survivors. Hippocampus is the most important brain structure for neurocognitive functions. It has been shown that radiation affects the hippocampal neurogenesis due to either induce the apoptosis or reduce the precursor cell proliferation in the hippocampus. Radiation-induced microglial inflammatory response is also negative regulator of neurogenesis. Tianeptine is a clinically effective antidepressant that induces neurogenesis. It has also been shown that tianeptine is able to reduce apoptosis and cytoprotective against the effects of proinflammatory cytokines in the hippocampus. Given the putative role of impaired hippocampal neurogenesis in radiation-induced neurocognitive impairment we think that tianeptine can be effective for preventing radiation-induced neurocognitive impairment by increasing hippocampal neurogenesis.

  16. Banhasasim-Tang Treatment Reduces the Severity of Esophageal Mucosal Ulcer on Chronic Acid Reflux Esophagitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity of Banhasasim-tang (BHSST) on chronic acid reflux esophagitis (CRE) model. Rat CRE model was established operatively and then treated with BHSST (1 g/kg body weight per day) for 15 days Esophageal pathological changes were analyzed using macroscopic examination and hematoxylin/eosin staining. The antioxidant and inflammatory protein levels were determined using Western blotting. The administration of BHSST significantly reduced both the overexpression of serum reactive oxygen species (ROS) and an excessive formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) in esophagus tissue. Thus, the severity of esophageal ulcer was lower in BHSST treated rats than control rats on the gross and histological evaluation. Nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) led to the upregulation of antioxidant enzyme including SOD, GPx-1/2, and HO-1 by binding to antioxidant response element (ARE). Moreover, BHSST administration markedly reduced the expression of inflammatory proteins through mitogen-activated protein kinase- (MAPK-) related signaling pathways and decreased significantly the protein expressions of inflammatory mediators and cytokines by inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation. Taken together, these results support the fact that BHSST administration can suppress the development of esophageal mucosal ulcer via regulating inflammation through the activation of the antioxidant pathway. PMID:28349065

  17. Mucosal vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Nizard, Mevyn; Diniz, Mariana O; Roussel, Helene; Tran, Thi; Ferreira, Luis CS; Badoual, Cecile; Tartour, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system displays several adaptations reflecting the exposure to the external environment. The efficient induction of mucosal immune responses also requires specific approaches, such as the use of appropriate administration routes and specific adjuvants and/or delivery systems. In contrast to vaccines delivered via parenteral routes, experimental, and clinical evidences demonstrated that mucosal vaccines can efficiently induce local immune responses to pathogens or tumors located at mucosal sites as well as systemic response. At least in part, such features can be explained by the compartmentalization of mucosal B and T cell populations that play important roles in the modulation of local immune responses. In the present review, we discuss molecular and cellular features of the mucosal immune system as well as novel immunization approaches that may lead to the development of innovative and efficient vaccines targeting pathogens and tumors at different mucosal sites. PMID:25424921

  18. Reduced peripheral and mucosal Tropheryma whipplei-specific Th1 response in patients with Whipple's disease.

    PubMed

    Moos, Verena; Kunkel, Désirée; Marth, Thomas; Feurle, Gerhard E; LaScola, Bernard; Ignatius, Ralf; Zeitz, Martin; Schneider, Thomas

    2006-08-01

    Whipple's disease is a rare infectious disorder caused by Tropheryma whipplei. Major symptoms are arthropathy, weight loss, and diarrhea, but the CNS and other organs may be affected, too. The incidence of Whipple's disease is very low despite the ubiquitous presence of T. whipplei in the environment. Therefore, it has been suggested that host factors indicated by immune deficiencies are responsible for the development of Whipple's disease. However, T. whipplei-specific T cell responses could not be studied until now, because cultivation of the bacteria was established only recently. Thus, the availability of T. whipplei Twist-Marseille(T) has enabled the first analysis of T. whipplei-specific reactivity of CD4(+) T cells. A robust T. whipplei-specific CD4(+) Th1 reactivity and activation (expression of CD154) was detected in peripheral and duodenal lymphocytes of all healthy (16 young, 27 age-matched, 11 triathletes) and disease controls (17 patients with tuberculosis) tested. However, 32 Whipple's disease patients showed reduced or absent T. whipplei-specific Th1 responses, whereas their capacity to react to other common Ags like tetanus toxoid, tuberculin, actinomycetes, Giardia lamblia, or CMV was not reduced compared with controls. Hence, we conclude that an insufficient T. whipplei-specific Th1 response may be responsible for an impaired immunological clearance of T. whipplei in Whipple's disease patients and may contribute to the fatal natural course of the disease.

  19. Severity of pancreatitis-associated intestinal mucosal barrier injury is reduced following treatment with the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wenhong; Abliz, Ablikim; Xu, Sheng; Sun, Rongze; Guo, Wenyi; Shi, Qiao; Yu, Jia; Wang, Weixing

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that apocynin, a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase (NOX) inhibitor, significantly decreased acute pancreatitis-associated inflammatory and oxidative stress parameters. In addition, apocynin was able to reduce ischemic reperfusion injury-associated damage; however, the exact effects of apocynin on acute pancreatitis-associated intestinal mucosal injury have yet to be fully clarified. The present study aimed to investigate the protective effects of apocynin on intestinal mucosal injury in a rat model of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). A total of 60 male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups (n=15/group): Sham operation group (SO), SAP group, apocynin treatment (APO) group and drug control (APO-CON) group. SAP was induced by retrograde injection of 5% sodium taurocholate into the biliopancreatic duct. Apocynin was administered 30 min prior to SAP induction in the APO group. All rats were sacrificed 12 h after SAP induction. Intestinal integrity was assessed by measuring diamine oxidase (DAO) levels. Morphological alterations to intestinal tissue were determined under light and transmission electron microscopy. NOX2, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB expression levels were detected in the intestine by immunohistochemical staining. Oxidative stress was detected by measuring intestinal malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase content. In addition, blood inflammatory cytokines, and amylase (AMY) and lipase (LIP) levels were evaluated. The results demonstrated that apocynin attenuated the following: i) Serum AMY, LIP and DAO levels; ii) pancreatic and intestinal pathological injury; iii) intestinal MDA content; iv) intestinal ultrastructural alterations; v) serum interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels; and vi) NOX2, p38 MAPK and NF-κB expression in intestinal tissues. These results suggested that apocynin may attenuate

  20. Radiation induces senescence and a bystander effect through metabolic alterations.

    PubMed

    Liao, E-C; Hsu, Y-T; Chuah, Q-Y; Lee, Y-J; Hu, J-Y; Huang, T-C; Yang, P-M; Chiu, S-J

    2014-05-22

    Cellular senescence is a state of irreversible growth arrest; however, the metabolic processes of senescent cells remain active. Our previous studies have shown that radiation induces senescence of human breast cancer cells that display low expression of securin, a protein involved in control of the metaphase-anaphase transition and anaphase onset. In this study, the protein expression profile of senescent cells was resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to investigate associated metabolic alterations. We found that radiation induced the expression and activation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase that has an important role in glycolysis. The activity of lactate dehydrogenase A, which is involved in the conversion of pyruvate to lactate, the release of lactate and the acidification of the extracellular environment, was also induced. Inhibition of glycolysis by dichloroacetate attenuated radiation-induced senescence. In addition, radiation also induced activation of the 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathways to promote senescence. We also found that radiation increased the expression of monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) that facilitates the export of lactate into the extracellular environment. Inhibition of glycolysis or the AMPK/NF-κB signalling pathways reduced MCT1 expression and rescued the acidification of the extracellular environment. Interestingly, these metabolic-altering signalling pathways were also involved in radiation-induced invasion of the surrounding, non-irradiated breast cancer and normal endothelial cells. Taken together, radiation can induce the senescence of human breast cancer cells through metabolic alterations.

  1. Sage tea-thyme-peppermint hydrosol oral rinse reduces chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis: A randomized controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Mutluay Yayla, Ezgi; Izgu, Nur; Ozdemir, Leyla; Aslan Erdem, Sinem; Kartal, Murat

    2016-08-01

    This pilot study aimed to investigate the preventive effect of sage tea-thyme-peppermint hydrosol oral rinse used in conjunction with basic oral care on chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis. An open-label randomized controlled study. Two oncology hospitals in Ankara, Turkey. Patients receiving 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy regimens were divided into the intervention group (N=30) and control group (N=30). Basic oral care was prescribed to the control group, while the intervention group was prescribed sage tea-thyme-peppermint hydrosol in addition to basic oral care. All patients were called to assess their compliance with the study instructions on day 5 and 14. Oral mucositis was evaluated using an inspection method or by assessing oral cavity photos based on the World Health Organization oral toxicity scale on day 5 and 14. Most of the patients in the intervention group did not develop oral mucositis on day 5. In addition, the incidence of grade 1 oral mucositis was statistically lower in the intervention group (10%) than the control group (53.3%) on day 5. By day 14, the majority of patients in both the groups had grade 0 oral mucositis. Sage tea-thyme-peppermint hydrosol oral rinse has promising results in alleviating oral mucositis. This hydrosol can be recommended for clinical use as it is well tolerated and cost-effective. However, further randomized controlled trials are needed to support the study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Treatment of Radiation-Induced Urethral Strictures.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Matthias D; Liu, Joceline S; Morey, Allen F

    2017-02-01

    Radiation therapy may result in urethral strictures from vascular damage. Most radiation-induced urethral strictures occur in the bulbomembranous junction, and urinary incontinence may result as a consequence of treatment. Radiation therapy may compromise reconstruction due to poor tissue healing and radionecrosis. Excision and primary anastomosis is the preferred urethroplasty technique for radiation-induced urethral stricture. Principles of posterior urethroplasty for trauma may be applied to the treatment of radiation-induced urethral strictures. Chronic management with suprapubic tube is an option based on patient comorbidities and preference.

  3. Experimental Colitis Is Attenuated by Cardioprotective Diet Supplementation That Reduces Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Mucosal Damage.

    PubMed

    Vargas Robles, Hilda; Citalán Madrid, Alí Francisco; García Ponce, Alexander; Silva Olivares, Angelica; Shibayama, Mineko; Betanzos, Abigail; Del Valle Mondragón, Leonardo; Nava, Porfirio; Schnoor, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) are multifactorial, relapsing disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. However, the etiology is still poorly understood but involves altered immune responses, epithelial dysfunction, environmental factors, and nutrition. Recently, we have shown that the diet supplement corabion has cardioprotective effects due to reduction of oxidative stress and inflammation. Since oxidative stress and inflammation are also prominent risk factors in IBD, we speculated that corabion also has beneficial effects on experimental colitis. Colitis was induced in male mice by administration of 3.5% (w/v) dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in drinking water for a period of 3 or 7 days with or without daily gavage feeding of corabion consisting of vitamin C, vitamin E, L-arginine, and eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid. We found that corabion administration attenuated DSS-induced colon shortening, tissue damage, and disease activity index during the onset of colitis. Mechanistically, these effects could be explained by reduced neutrophil recruitment, oxidative stress, production of proinflammatory cytokines, and internalization of the junctional proteins ZO-1 and E-cadherin leading to less edema formation. Thus, corabion may be a useful diet supplement for the management of chronic inflammatory intestinal disorders such as IBD.

  4. Experimental Colitis Is Attenuated by Cardioprotective Diet Supplementation That Reduces Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Mucosal Damage

    PubMed Central

    Vargas Robles, Hilda; Citalán Madrid, Alí Francisco; García Ponce, Alexander; Silva Olivares, Angelica; Shibayama, Mineko; Betanzos, Abigail; Del Valle Mondragón, Leonardo; Nava, Porfirio; Schnoor, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) are multifactorial, relapsing disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. However, the etiology is still poorly understood but involves altered immune responses, epithelial dysfunction, environmental factors, and nutrition. Recently, we have shown that the diet supplement corabion has cardioprotective effects due to reduction of oxidative stress and inflammation. Since oxidative stress and inflammation are also prominent risk factors in IBD, we speculated that corabion also has beneficial effects on experimental colitis. Colitis was induced in male mice by administration of 3.5% (w/v) dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in drinking water for a period of 3 or 7 days with or without daily gavage feeding of corabion consisting of vitamin C, vitamin E, L-arginine, and eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid. We found that corabion administration attenuated DSS-induced colon shortening, tissue damage, and disease activity index during the onset of colitis. Mechanistically, these effects could be explained by reduced neutrophil recruitment, oxidative stress, production of proinflammatory cytokines, and internalization of the junctional proteins ZO-1 and E-cadherin leading to less edema formation. Thus, corabion may be a useful diet supplement for the management of chronic inflammatory intestinal disorders such as IBD. PMID:26881044

  5. Radiation-induced moyamoya syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Snehal S.; Paulino, Arnold C. . E-mail: apaulino@tmh.tmc.edu; Mai, Wei Y.; Teh, Bin S.

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: The moyamoya syndrome is an uncommon late complication after radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A PubMed search of English-language articles, with radiation, radiotherapy, and moyamoya syndrome used as search key words, yielded 33 articles from 1967 to 2002. Results: The series included 54 patients with a median age at initial RT of 3.8 years (range, 0.4 to 47). Age at RT was less than 5 years in 56.3%, 5 to 10 years in 22.9%, 11 to 20 years in 8.3%, 21 to 30 years in 6.3%, 31 to 40 years in 2.1%, and 41 to 50 years in 4.2%. Fourteen of 54 patients (25.9%) were diagnosed with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1). The most common tumor treated with RT was low-grade glioma in 37 tumors (68.5%) of which 29 were optic-pathway glioma. The average RT dose was 46.5 Gy (range, 22-120 Gy). For NF-1-positive patients, the average RT dose was 46.5 Gy, and for NF-1-negative patients, it was 58.1 Gy. The median latent period for development of moyamoya syndrome was 40 months after RT (range, 4-240). Radiation-induced moyamoya syndrome occurred in 27.7% of patients by 2 years, 53.2% of patients by 4 years, 74.5% of patients by 6 years, and 95.7% of patients by 12 years after RT. Conclusions: Patients who received RT to the parasellar region at a young age (<5 years) are the most susceptible to moyamoya syndrome. The incidence for moyamoya syndrome continues to increase with time, with half of cases occurring within 4 years of RT and 95% of cases occurring within 12 years. Patients with NF-1 have a lower radiation-dose threshold for development of moyamoya syndrome.

  6. Topical hemostatic powder promotes reepithelialization and reduces scar formation after extensive esophageal mucosal resection.

    PubMed

    Beye, B; Barret, M; Alatawi, A; Beuvon, F; Nicco, C; Pratico, C A; Chereau, C; Chaussade, S; Batteux, F; Prat, F

    2016-08-01

    The development of techniques for endoscopic resection has provided new strategies for radical conservative treatment of superficial esophageal neoplasms, even those that are circumferential, such as Barrett's neoplasia. However, it is necessary to prevent the formation of scar tissue that can be responsible for esophageal strictures following circumferential resection. Preliminary data have suggested the possible efficacy of a hemostatic powder in the promotion of wound healing. The study aims to assess the effectiveness of Hemospray (Cook Medical) in a swine model of post-endoscopic esophageal stricture. Our prospective controlled study included 21 pigs. A 6-cm circumferential submucosal dissection of the esophagus (CESD) was performed in each pig. Group 1 (n = 11) only underwent CESD and Group 2 (n = 10) had repeated Hemospray applications after CESD. Clinical, endoscopic, and radiological monitoring were performed, blood levels of four inflammatory or pro-fibrotic cytokines were assessed, and histological analysis was performed. Median esophageal diameter was greater in the group treated with Hemospray (2 mm [1-3] vs. 3 mm [2-4], P = 0.01), and the rate of symptomatic esophageal stricture was 100% and 60% in Groups 1 and 2, respectively (P = 0.09). The thicknesses of esophageal fibrosis and inflammatory cell infiltrate were significantly lower in Group 2 than in Group 1 (P = 0.002 and 0.0003, respectively). The length of the neoepithelium was greater in Group 2 than in Group 1 (P = 0.0004). Transforming growth factor-β levels were significantly lower in Group 2 than in Group 1 (P = 0.01). The application of Hemospray after esophageal CESD reduces scar tissue formation and promotes reepithelialization, and therefore is a promising therapeutic approach in the prevention of post-endoscopic esophageal stricture.

  7. Radiation-induced accelerated coronary arteriosclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, B.; Deutsch, M.; Thompson, M.; Dameshek, H.L.

    1986-07-01

    There is a paucity of information on radiation-induced coronary heart disease. A young patient with myocardial infarction following mediastinal irradiation is described. The role of radiotherapy and chemotherapy on the subsequent development of coronary heart disease is discussed.

  8. Radiation-induced sarcoma of the thyroid

    SciTech Connect

    Griem, K.L.; Robb, P.K.; Caldarelli, D.D.; Templeton, A.C. )

    1989-08-01

    A 23-year-old white man presented with a thyroid mass 12 years after receiving high-dose radiotherapy for a T2 and N1 lymphoepithelioma of the nasopharynx. Following subtotal thyroidectomy, a histopathologic examination revealed liposarcoma of the thyroid gland. The relationship between sarcomas and irradiation is described and Cahan and colleagues' criteria for radiation-induced sarcomas are reviewed. To our knowledge, we are presenting the first such case of a radiation-induced sarcoma of the thyroid gland.

  9. Effective vitamin B12 treatment can reduce serum antigastric parietal cell antibody titer in patients with oral mucosal disease.

    PubMed

    Sun, Andy; Chang, Julia Yu-Fong; Wang, Yi-Ping; Cheng, Shih-Jung; Chen, Hsin-Ming; Chiang, Chun-Pin

    2016-10-01

    Patients with serum antigastric parietal cell antibody (GPCA) positivity may have vitamin B12 deficiency and some oral symptoms. This study assessed the changes of serum GPCA titer in GPCA-positive patients after effective vitamin B12 treatment. Two hundred and ten GPCA-positive oral mucosal disease patients became oral symptom free (complete response) after 1.0-67.1 months of treatment with regular and continuous intramuscular injection of vitamin B12 once per week. The changes of serum GPCA titers after treatment were evaluated in these 210 patients. We found a significant drop of the GPCA positive rate from 100% to 42.9% in our 210 complete response patients after effective vitamin B12 treatment (p < 0.001). When 210 patients were further divided into seven subgroups according to the low to high serum GPCA titers, we noted that the higher serum GPCA titers decreased to significantly lower levels after treatment in all seven subgroups (all p < 0.001). However, serum GPCA titers increased to significantly higher levels in 46 GPCA-positive control patients receiving only oral administration of two vitamin BC capsules (containing 10 μg of vitamin B12) plus deficient hematinic supplements per day after a follow-up period of 2.7-27 months. A maintenance vitamin B12 treatment once a month could retain the GPCA-negative status in 87% of treated-to GPCA-negative patients compared with those (10%) without further maintenance vitamin B12 treatment. Regular and continuous effective vitamin B12 treatment can reduce the relatively higher serum GPCA titers to significantly lower or undetectable levels in GPCA-positive patients. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Radiation-induced valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Gujral, Dorothy M; Lloyd, Guy; Bhattacharyya, Sanjeev

    2016-02-15

    Radiation to the mediastinum is a key component of treatment with curative intent for a range of cancers including Hodgkin's lymphoma and breast cancer. Exposure to radiation is associated with a risk of radiation-induced heart valve damage characterised by valve fibrosis and calcification. There is a latent interval of 10-20 years between radiation exposure and development of clinically significant heart valve disease. Risk is related to radiation dose received, interval from exposure and use of concomitant chemotherapy. Long-term outlook and the risk of valve surgery are related to the effects of radiation on mediastinal structures including pulmonary fibrosis and pericardial constriction. Dose prediction models to predict the risk of heart valve disease in the future and newer radiation techniques to reduce the radiation dose to the heart are being developed. Surveillance strategies for this cohort of cancer survivors at risk of developing significant heart valve complications are required. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. [Prevention and treatment of mucositis in children with oral cancers: Practical recommendations].

    PubMed

    El Bousaadani, A; Eljahd, L; Abada, R; Rouadi, S; Roubal, M; Mahtar, M

    2016-05-01

    Oral mucositis is an inflammation of the mucosa of the oral cavity of various etiologies. This is a common and debilitating complication in children treated with chemoradiotherapy for cancer. Its management remains a major concern both for the doctor than the patient. It affects the quality of life of patients and families. It may initiate the functional and vital prognosis because of the judgment of cancer treatment. Several treatment options are available, but there is no clear consensus therapeutic especially for the pediatric population. We have identified, through a comprehensive literature search indexed publications on this subject in order to review the pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches that have been used to prevent and treat oral mucositis. Thus, current recommendations for the management of oral mucositis are very limited, and therefore the standard of care for this complication was palliative. In recent years several studies have revealed that the use of low-energy laser was particularly interesting in the prevention and treatment of radiation-induced or chemically induced mucositis. It significantly reduces the pain, the severity and duration of the ulcer by promoting wound healing. Randomized controlled trials with a large number of patients are expected to establish preventive and therapeutic protocols. Treatment with low power laser, known devoid of side effects, is a very promising oncology care to support radio-induced mucositis and chemotherapy.

  12. A nontoxic chimeric enterotoxin adjuvant induces protective immunity in both mucosal and systemic compartments with reduced IgE antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kweon, Mi-Na; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Watanabe, Fumiko; Tamura, Shinichi; Van Ginkel, Frederik W; Miyauchi, Akira; Takagi, Hiroaki; Takeda, Yoshifumi; Hamabata, Takashi; Fujihashi, Kohtaro; McGhee, Jerry R; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2002-11-01

    A novel nontoxic form of chimeric mucosal adjuvant that combines the A subunit of mutant cholera toxin E112K with the pentameric B subunit of heat-labile enterotoxin from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli was constructed by use of the Brevibacillus choshinensis expression system (mCTA/LTB). Nasal immunization of mice with tetanus toxoid (TT) plus mCTA/LTB elicited significant TT-specific immunoglobulin A responses in mucosal compartments and induced high serum immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin A anti-TT antibody responses. Although TT plus native CT induced high total and TT-specific immunoglobulin E responses, use of the chimera molecule as mucosal adjuvant did not. Furthermore, all mice immunized with TT plus mCTA/LTB were protected from lethal systemic challenge with tetanus toxin. Importantly, the mice were completely protected from influenza virus infection after nasal immunization with inactivated influenza vaccine together with mCTA/LTB. These results show that B. choshinensis-derived mCTA/LTB is an effective and safe mucosal adjuvant for the induction of protective immunity against potent bacterial exotoxin and influenza virus infection.

  13. Carvacrol reduces irinotecan-induced intestinal mucositis through inhibition of inflammation and oxidative damage via TRPA1 receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Alvarenga, Elenice M; Souza, Luan K M; Araújo, Thiago S L; Nogueira, Kerolayne M; Sousa, Francisca Beatriz M; Araújo, Alyne R; Martins, Conceição S; Pacífico, Dvison M; de C Brito, Gerly Anne; Souza, Emmanuel P; Sousa, Damião P; Medeiros, Jand Venes R

    2016-12-25

    Intestinal mucositis is an inflammatory process occurring in the intestinal mucosa and is a common side effect of irinotecan hydrochloride (CPT-11) based anticancer regimens. The transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily A, member 1 (TRPA1) receptor is highly expressed in the intestinal mucosa and has the ability to identify cell damage signaling indicates its possible association with intestinal mucositis. Carvacrol is an agonist of the TRPA1 receptor and has anti-inflammatory properties. Thus, the aim of the present study was to verify the supposed anti-inflammatory and protective action of carvacrol via TRPA1 activation against intestinal mucositis induced by CPT-11 in mice. Briefly, mice were treated with either DMSO 2% or CPT-11 (75 mg/kg, per 4 days, i.p.) or the carvacrol (25, 75 or 150 mg/kg, per 8 days, i.p.) before CPT-11. In other group, the animals were pretreated with HC-030031, a TRPA1 antagonist, 30 min before treatment with carvacrol. On day 7, animal survival and bacteremia were assessed, and following euthanasia, samples of the jejunum were obtained for morphometric analysis and measurement of antioxidant and pro-inflammatory markers. Carvacrol was found to exert an anti-inflammatory action against CPT-11-induced intestinal mucositis through strong interactions with TRPA1 receptors; reduction in the production or release or both of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and KC); and decrease in other indicators of inflammation (MPO, NF-κB, COX-2) and oxidative stress (GSH, MDA, and NOx levels). It also contributed to the restoration of the tissue architecture of the villi and crypts in the small intestine, and improved clinical parameters such as survival, body mass variation, leukogram, and blood bacterial count. Thus, TRPA1 could be a target for future therapeutic approaches in the treatment of intestinal mucositis.

  14. Mucoadhesive formulation of Bidens pilosa L. (Asteraceae) reduces intestinal injury from 5-fluorouracil-induced mucositis in mice.

    PubMed

    de Ávila, Paulo Henrique Marcelino; de Ávila, Renato Ivan; Dos Santos Filho, Edvande Xavier; Cunha Bastos, Carla Caroline; Batista, Aline Carvalho; Mendonça, Elismauro Francisco; Serpa, Raphael Caixeta; Marreto, Ricardo Neves; da Cruz, Andrezza Furquim; Lima, Eliana Martins; Valadares, Marize Campos

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal mucositis induced during cancer treatment is considered a serious dose-limiting side effect of chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Frequently, interruption of the cancer treatment due to this pathology leads to a reduction in cure rates, increase of treatment costs and decrease life quality of the patient. Natural products such as Bidens pilosa L. (Asteraceae), represent a potential alternative for the treatment of mucositis given its anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, B. pilosa glycolic extract was formulated (BPF) with poloxamer, a mucoadhesive copolymer, was used for treatment of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced mucositis in mice. As expected, animals only treated with 5-FU (200 mg/kg) presented marked weight loss, reduction of intestinal villi, crypts and muscular layer, which was associated with severe disruption of crypts, edema, inflammatory infiltrate and vacuolization in the intestinal tissue, as compared to the control group and healthy animals only treated with BPF. On the other hand, the treatment of intestinal mucositis-bearing mice with BPF (75, 100 or 125 mg/kg) managed to mitigate clinical and pathologic changes, noticeably at 100 mg/kg. This dose led to the restoration of intestinal proliferative activity through increasing Ki-67 levels; modulated the expression of Bax, Bcl2 and p53 apoptotic markers protecting intestinal cells from cell death. Moreover, this treatment regulated lipid peroxidation and inflammatory infiltration. No acute toxic effects were observed with this formulation. This work demonstrated that BPF was safe and effective against 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis in mice. Additional studies are already in progress to further characterize the mechanisms involved in the protective effects of this technological formulation toward the development of a new medicine for the prevention and treatment of intestinal injury in patients undergoing chemotherapy/radiotherapy.

  15. A Novel Peptide for Simultaneously Enhanced Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer and Mitigation of Oral Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Peili; Mancini, Maria; Sonis, Stephen T.; Fernandez-Martinez, Juan; Liu, Jing; Cohen, Ezra E. W.; Toback, F. Gary

    2016-01-01

    We have characterized a novel 21 amino acid-peptide derived from Antrum Mucosal Protein (AMP)-18 that mediates growth promotion of cultured normal epithelial cells and mitigates radiation-induced oral mucositis in animal models, while suppressing in vitro function of cancer cells. The objective of this study was to evaluate these dual potential therapeutic effects of AMP peptide in a clinically relevant animal model of head and neck cancer (HNC) by simultaneously assessing its effect on tumor growth and radiation-induced oral mucositis in an orthotopic model of HNC. Bioluminescent SCC-25 HNC cells were injected into the anterior tongue and tumors that formed were then subjected to focal radiation treatment. Tumor size was assessed using an in vivo imaging system, and the extent of oral mucositis was compared between animals treated with AMP peptide or vehicle (controls). Synergism between AMP peptide and radiation therapy was suggested by the finding that tumors in the AMP peptide/radiation therapy cohort demonstrated inhibited growth vs. radiation therapy-only treated tumors, while AMP peptide-treatment delayed the onset and reduced the severity of radiation therapy-induced oral mucositis. A differential effect on apoptosis appears to be one mechanism by which AMP-18 can stimulate growth and repair of injured mucosal epithelial cells while inhibiting proliferation of HNC cells. RNA microarray analysis identified pathways that are differentially targeted by AMP-18 in HNC vs. nontransformed cells. These observations confirm the notion that normal cells and tumor cells may respond differently to common biological stimuli, and that leveraging this finding in the case of AMP-18 may provide a clinically relevant opportunity. PMID:27049860

  16. Autophagy promotes radiation-induced senescence but inhibits bystander effects in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yao-Huei; Yang, Pei-Ming; Chuah, Qiu-Yu; Lee, Yi-Jang; Hsieh, Yi-Fen; Peng, Chih-Wen; Chiu, Shu-Jun

    2014-07-01

    Ionizing radiation induces cellular senescence to suppress cancer cell proliferation. However, it also induces deleterious bystander effects in the unirradiated neighboring cells through the release of senescence-associated secretory phenotypes (SASPs) that promote tumor progression. Although autophagy has been reported to promote senescence, its role is still unclear. We previously showed that radiation induces senescence in PTTG1-depleted cancer cells. In this study, we found that autophagy was required for the radiation-induced senescence in PTTG1-depleted breast cancer cells. Inhibition of autophagy caused the cells to switch from radiation-induced senescence to apoptosis. Senescent cancer cells exerted bystander effects by promoting the invasion and migration of unirradiated cells through the release of CSF2 and the subsequently activation of the JAK2-STAT3 and AKT pathways. However, the radiation-induced bystander effects were correlated with the inhibition of endogenous autophagy in bystander cells, which also resulted from the activation of the CSF2-JAK2 pathway. The induction of autophagy by rapamycin reduced the radiation-induced bystander effects. This study reveals, for the first time, the dual role of autophagy in radiation-induced senescence and bystander effects.

  17. Torin2 Suppresses Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage Repair.

    PubMed

    Udayakumar, Durga; Pandita, Raj K; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Liu, Yan; Liu, Qingsong; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Hunt, Clayton R; Gray, Nathanael S; Minna, John D; Pandita, Tej K; Westover, Kenneth D

    2016-05-01

    Several classes of inhibitors of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) have been developed based on its central role in sensing growth factor and nutrient levels to regulate cellular metabolism. However, its ATP-binding site closely resembles other phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinase (PIKK) family members, resulting in reactivity with these targets that may also be therapeutically useful. The ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitor, Torin2, shows biochemical activity against the DNA repair-associated proteins ATM, ATR and DNA-PK, which raises the possibility that Torin2 and related compounds might radiosensitize cancerous tumors. In this study Torin2 was also found to enhance ionizing radiation-induced cell killing in conditions where ATM was dispensable, confirming the requirement for multiple PIKK targets. Moreover, Torin2 did not influence the initial appearance of γ-H2AX foci after irradiation but significantly delayed the disappearance of radiation-induced γ-H2AX foci, indicating a DNA repair defect. Torin2 increased the number of radiation-induced S-phase specific chromosome aberrations and reduced the frequency of radiation-induced CtIP and Rad51 foci formation, suggesting that Torin2 works by blocking homologous recombination (HR)-mediated DNA repair resulting in an S-phase specific DNA repair defect. Accordingly, Torin2 reduced HR-mediated repair of I-Sce1-induced DNA damage and contributed to replication fork stalling. We conclude that radiosensitization of tumor cells by Torin2 is associated with disrupting ATR- and ATM-dependent DNA damage responses. Our findings support the concept of developing combination cancer therapies that incorporate ionizing radiation therapy and Torin2 or compounds with similar properties.

  18. Radiation-Induced Breast Cancer Incidence and Mortality From Digital Mammography Screening: A Modeling Study.

    PubMed

    Miglioretti, Diana L; Lange, Jane; van den Broek, Jeroen J; Lee, Christoph I; van Ravesteyn, Nicolien T; Ritley, Dominique; Kerlikowske, Karla; Fenton, Joshua J; Melnikow, Joy; de Koning, Harry J; Hubbard, Rebecca A

    2016-02-16

    Estimates of risk for radiation-induced breast cancer from mammography screening have not considered variation in dose exposure or diagnostic work-up after abnormal screening results. To estimate distributions of radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality from digital mammography screening while considering exposure from screening and diagnostic mammography and dose variation among women. 2 simulation-modeling approaches. U.S. population. Women aged 40 to 74 years. Annual or biennial digital mammography screening from age 40, 45, or 50 years until age 74 years. Lifetime breast cancer deaths averted (benefits) and radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality (harms) per 100,000 women screened. Annual screening of 100,000 women aged 40 to 74 years was projected to induce 125 breast cancer cases (95% CI, 88 to 178) leading to 16 deaths (CI, 11 to 23), relative to 968 breast cancer deaths averted by early detection from screening. Women exposed at the 95th percentile were projected to develop 246 cases of radiation-induced breast cancer leading to 32 deaths per 100,000 women. Women with large breasts requiring extra views for complete examination (8% of population) were projected to have greater radiation-induced breast cancer risk (266 cancer cases and 35 deaths per 100,000 women) than other women (113 cancer cases and 15 deaths per 100,000 women). Biennial screening starting at age 50 years reduced risk for radiation-induced cancer 5-fold. Life-years lost from radiation-induced breast cancer could not be estimated. Radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality from digital mammography screening are affected by dose variability from screening, resultant diagnostic work-up, initiation age, and screening frequency. Women with large breasts may have a greater risk for radiation-induced breast cancer. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, National Cancer Institute.

  19. Radiation-induced vaginal stenosis: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Lucinda; Do, Viet; Chard, Jennifer; Brand, Alison H

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of gynecological cancer commonly involves pelvic radiation therapy (RT) and/or brachytherapy. A commonly observed side effect of such treatment is radiation-induced vaginal stenosis (VS). This review analyzed the incidence, pathogenesis, clinical manifestation(s) and assessment and grading of radiation-induced VS. In addition, risk factors, prevention and treatment options and follow-up schedules are also discussed. The limited available literature on many of these aspects suggests that additional studies are required to more precisely determine the best management strategy of this prevalent group after RT. PMID:28496367

  20. Radiation-induced amorphization of intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, N. Q.; Sabochick, M. J.; Okamoto, P. R.

    1994-06-01

    In the present paper, important results of our recent computer simulation of radiation-induced amorphization in the ordered compounds CuTi and Cu4Ti3 are summarized. The energetic, structural, thermodynamic and mechanical responses of these intermetallics during chemical disordering, point-defect production and heating were simulated, using molecular dynamics and embedded-atom potentials. From the atomistic details obtained, the critical role of radiation-induced structural disorder in driving the crystalline-to-amorphous phase transformation is discussed.

  1. Clarithromycin Attenuates Radiation-Induced Lung Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Jun; Yi, Chin-ok; Heo, Rok Won; Song, Dae Hyun; Cho, Yu Ji; Jeong, Yi Yeong; Kang, Ki Mun; Roh, Gu Seob; Lee, Jong Deog

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a common and unavoidable complication of thoracic radiotherapy. The current study was conducted to evaluate the ability of clarithromycin (CLA) to prevent radiation-induced pneumonitis, oxidative stress, and lung fibrosis in an animal model. C57BL/6J mice were assigned to control, irradiation only, irradiation plus CLA, and CLA only groups. Test mice received single thoracic exposures to radiation and/or oral CLA (100 mg/kg/day). Histopathologic findings and markers of inflammation, fibrosis, and oxidative stress were compared by group. On a microscopic level, CLA inhibited macrophage influx, alveolar fibrosis, parenchymal collapse, consolidation, and epithelial cell changes. The concentration of collagen in lung tissue was lower in irradiation plus CLA mice. Radiation-induced expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, TNF receptor 1, acetylated nuclear factor kappa B, cyclooxygenase 2, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and matrix metallopeptidase 9 were also attenuated by CLA. Expression levels of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 and heme oxygenase 1, transforming growth factor-β1, connective tissue growth factor, and type I collagen in radiation-treated lungs were also attenuated by CLA. These findings indicate that CLA ameliorates the deleterious effects of thoracic irradiation in mice by reducing pulmonary inflammation, oxidative damage, and fibrosis.

  2. Clarithromycin Attenuates Radiation-Induced Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Jun; Yi, Chin-ok; Heo, Rok Won; Song, Dae Hyun; Cho, Yu Ji; Jeong, Yi Yeong; Kang, Ki Mun; Roh, Gu Seob; Lee, Jong Deog

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a common and unavoidable complication of thoracic radiotherapy. The current study was conducted to evaluate the ability of clarithromycin (CLA) to prevent radiation-induced pneumonitis, oxidative stress, and lung fibrosis in an animal model. C57BL/6J mice were assigned to control, irradiation only, irradiation plus CLA, and CLA only groups. Test mice received single thoracic exposures to radiation and/or oral CLA (100 mg/kg/day). Histopathologic findings and markers of inflammation, fibrosis, and oxidative stress were compared by group. On a microscopic level, CLA inhibited macrophage influx, alveolar fibrosis, parenchymal collapse, consolidation, and epithelial cell changes. The concentration of collagen in lung tissue was lower in irradiation plus CLA mice. Radiation-induced expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, TNF receptor 1, acetylated nuclear factor kappa B, cyclooxygenase 2, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and matrix metallopeptidase 9 were also attenuated by CLA. Expression levels of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 and heme oxygenase 1, transforming growth factor-β1, connective tissue growth factor, and type I collagen in radiation-treated lungs were also attenuated by CLA. These findings indicate that CLA ameliorates the deleterious effects of thoracic irradiation in mice by reducing pulmonary inflammation, oxidative damage, and fibrosis. PMID:26114656

  3. Modulation of Radiation-Induced Apoptosis by Thiolamines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warters, R. L.; Roberts, J. C.; Wilmore, B. H.; Kelley, L. L.

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to the thiolamine radioprotector N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-propanediamine (WR-1065) induced apoptosis in the mouse TB8-3 hybridoma after 60-minute (LD(sub50) = 4.5mM) or during a 20-hour (LD(sub50) = 0.15 mM) exposure. In contrast, a 20-hour exposure to 17 mM L-cysteine or 10 mM cysteamine was required to induce 50 percent apoptosis within 20 hours. Apoptosis was not induced by either a 60-minute or 20-hour exposure to 10 mM of the thiazolidime prodrugs ribose-cysteine (RibCys) or ribose-cysteamine (RibCyst). Thiolamine-induced apoptosis appeared to be a p53-independent process since it was induced by WR-1065 exposure in human HL60 cells. Exposure to WR-1065 (4mM for 15 minutes) or cysteine (10mM for 60 minutes) before and during irradiation protected cells against the induction of both DNA double-strand breaks and apoptosis, while exposure to RibCys (10 mM for 3 hours) did not. Treatment with either WR-1065, cysteine, RibCys or RibCyst for 60 minutes beginning 60 minutes after irradiation did not affect the level of radiation-induced apoptosis. In contrast, treatment with either cysteine, cysteamine or RibCys for 20 hours beginning 60 minutes after irradiation enhanced radiation-induced apoptosis. Similar experiments could not be conducted with WR-1065 because of its extreme toxicity. Our results indicate that thiolamine enhancement of radiation-induced apoptosis is not involved in their previously reported capacity to reduce radiation-induced mutations.

  4. Modulation of Radiation-Induced Apoptosis by Thiolamines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warters, R. L.; Roberts, J. C.; Wilmore, B. H.; Kelley, L. L.

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to the thiolamine radioprotector N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-propanediamine (WR-1065) induced apoptosis in the mouse TB8-3 hybridoma after 60-minute (LD(sub50) = 4.5mM) or during a 20-hour (LD(sub50) = 0.15 mM) exposure. In contrast, a 20-hour exposure to 17 mM L-cysteine or 10 mM cysteamine was required to induce 50 percent apoptosis within 20 hours. Apoptosis was not induced by either a 60-minute or 20-hour exposure to 10 mM of the thiazolidime prodrugs ribose-cysteine (RibCys) or ribose-cysteamine (RibCyst). Thiolamine-induced apoptosis appeared to be a p53-independent process since it was induced by WR-1065 exposure in human HL60 cells. Exposure to WR-1065 (4mM for 15 minutes) or cysteine (10mM for 60 minutes) before and during irradiation protected cells against the induction of both DNA double-strand breaks and apoptosis, while exposure to RibCys (10 mM for 3 hours) did not. Treatment with either WR-1065, cysteine, RibCys or RibCyst for 60 minutes beginning 60 minutes after irradiation did not affect the level of radiation-induced apoptosis. In contrast, treatment with either cysteine, cysteamine or RibCys for 20 hours beginning 60 minutes after irradiation enhanced radiation-induced apoptosis. Similar experiments could not be conducted with WR-1065 because of its extreme toxicity. Our results indicate that thiolamine enhancement of radiation-induced apoptosis is not involved in their previously reported capacity to reduce radiation-induced mutations.

  5. Follistatin attenuates radiation-induced fibrosis in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Forrester, Helen B.; de Kretser, David M.; Leong, Trevor; Hagekyriakou, Jim; Sprung, Carl N.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Fibrosis can be a disabling, severe side effect of radiotherapy that can occur in patients, and for which there is currently no effective treatment. The activins, proteins which are members of the TGFβ superfamily, have a major role in stimulating the inflammatory response and subsequent fibrosis. Follistatin is an endogenous protein that binds the activins virtually irreversibly and inhibits their actions. These studies test if follistatin can attenuate the fibrotic response using a murine model of radiation-induced fibrosis. Experimental design C57BL/6 mice were subcutaneously injected with follistatin 24 hours prior to irradiation. Mice were irradiated in a 10 x 10 mm square area of the right hind leg with 35 Gy and were given follistatin 24 hours before radiation and three times a week for six months following. Leg extension was measured, and tissue was collected for histological and molecular analysis to evaluate the progression of the radiation-induced fibrosis. Results Leg extension was improved in follistatin treated mice compared to vehicle treated mice at six months after irradiation. Also, epidermal thickness and cell nucleus area of keratinocytes were decreased by the follistatin treatment compared to the cells in irradiated skin of control mice. Finally, the gene expression of transforming growth factor β1 (Tgfb1), and smooth muscle actin (Acta2) were decreased in the irradiated skin and Acta2 and inhibin βA subunit (Inhba) were decreased in the irradiated muscle of the follistatin treated mice. Conclusions Follistatin attenuated the radiation-induced fibrotic response in irradiated mice. These studies provide the data to support further investigation of the use of follistatin to reduce radiation-induced fibrosis in patients undergoing radiotherapy for cancer. PMID:28301516

  6. Follistatin attenuates radiation-induced fibrosis in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Helen B; de Kretser, David M; Leong, Trevor; Hagekyriakou, Jim; Sprung, Carl N

    2017-01-01

    Fibrosis can be a disabling, severe side effect of radiotherapy that can occur in patients, and for which there is currently no effective treatment. The activins, proteins which are members of the TGFβ superfamily, have a major role in stimulating the inflammatory response and subsequent fibrosis. Follistatin is an endogenous protein that binds the activins virtually irreversibly and inhibits their actions. These studies test if follistatin can attenuate the fibrotic response using a murine model of radiation-induced fibrosis. C57BL/6 mice were subcutaneously injected with follistatin 24 hours prior to irradiation. Mice were irradiated in a 10 x 10 mm square area of the right hind leg with 35 Gy and were given follistatin 24 hours before radiation and three times a week for six months following. Leg extension was measured, and tissue was collected for histological and molecular analysis to evaluate the progression of the radiation-induced fibrosis. Leg extension was improved in follistatin treated mice compared to vehicle treated mice at six months after irradiation. Also, epidermal thickness and cell nucleus area of keratinocytes were decreased by the follistatin treatment compared to the cells in irradiated skin of control mice. Finally, the gene expression of transforming growth factor β1 (Tgfb1), and smooth muscle actin (Acta2) were decreased in the irradiated skin and Acta2 and inhibin βA subunit (Inhba) were decreased in the irradiated muscle of the follistatin treated mice. Follistatin attenuated the radiation-induced fibrotic response in irradiated mice. These studies provide the data to support further investigation of the use of follistatin to reduce radiation-induced fibrosis in patients undergoing radiotherapy for cancer.

  7. Mouse models of radiation-induced cancers.

    PubMed

    Rivina, Leena; Schiestl, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced (RI) secondary cancers were not a major clinical concern even as little as 15 years ago. However, advances in cancer diagnostics, therapy, and supportive care have saved numerous lives and many former cancer patients are now living for 5, 10, 20, and more years beyond their initial diagnosis. The majority of these patients have received radiotherapy as a part of their treatment regimen and are now beginning to develop secondary cancers arising from normal tissue exposure to damaging effects of ionizing radiation. Because historically patients rarely survived past the extended latency periods inherent to these RI cancers, very little effort was channeled towards the research leading to the development of therapeutic agents intended to prevent or ameliorate oncogenic effects of normal tissue exposure to radiation. The number of RI cancers is expected to increase very rapidly in the near future, but the field of cancer biology might not be prepared to address important issues related to this phenomena. One such issue is the ability to accurately differentiate between primary tumors and de novo arising secondary tumors in the same patient. Another issue is the lack of therapeutic agents intended to reduce such cancers in the future. To address these issues, large-scale epidemiological studies must be supplemented with appropriate animal modeling studies. This work reviews relevant mouse (Mus musculus) models of inbred and F1 animals and methodologies of induction of most relevant radiation-associated cancers: leukemia, lymphoma, and lung and breast cancers. Where available, underlying molecular pathologies are included. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Factors that modify radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Ann R

    2009-11-01

    It is known that numerous factors can influence radiation carcinogenesis in animals; these factors include the specific characteristics of the radiation (radiation type and dose, dose-rate, dose-fractionation, dose distribution, etc.) as well as many other contributing elements that are not specific to the radiation exposure, such as animal genetic characteristics and age, the environment of the animal, dietary factors and whether specific modifying agents for radiation carcinogenesis have been utilized in the studies. This overview focuses on the modifying factors for radiation carcinogenesis, in both in vivo and in vitro systems, and includes a discussion of agents that enhance (e.g., promoting agents) or suppress (e.g., cancer preventive agents) radiation-induced carcinogenesis. The agents that enhance or suppress radiation carcinogenesis in experimental model systems have been shown to lead to effects equally as large as other known modifying factors for radiation-induced carcinogenesis (e.g., dose-rate, dose-fractionation, linear energy transfer). It is known that dietary factors play an important role in determining the yields of radiation-induced cancers in animal model systems, and it is likely that they also influence radiation-induced cancer risks in human populations.

  9. Molecular pathways: radiation-induced cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Greene-Schloesser, Dana; Moore, Elizabeth; Robbins, Mike E

    2013-05-01

    Each year, approximately 200,000 patients in the United States will receive partial- or whole-brain irradiation for the treatment of primary or metastatic brain cancer. Early and delayed radiation effects are transient and reversible with modern therapeutic standards; yet, late radiation effects (≥6 months postirradiation) remain a significant risk, resulting in progressive cognitive impairment. These risks include functional deficits in memory, attention, and executive function that severely affect the patient's quality of life. The mechanisms underlying radiation-induced cognitive impairment remain ill defined. Classically, radiation-induced alterations in vascular and neuroinflammatory glial cell clonogenic populations were hypothesized to be responsible for radiation-induced brain injury. Recently, preclinical studies have focused on the hippocampus, one of two sites of adult neurogenesis within the brain, which plays an important role in learning and memory. Radiation ablates hippocampal neurogenesis, alters neuronal function, and induces neuroinflammation. Neuronal stem cells implanted into the hippocampus prevent the decrease in neurogenesis and improve cognition after irradiation. Clinically prescribed drugs, including PPARα and PPARγ agonists, as well as RAS blockers, prevent radiation-induced neuroinflammation and cognitive impairment independent of improved neurogenesis. Translating these exciting findings to the clinic offers the promise of improving the quality of life of brain tumor patients who receive radiotherapy. ©2013 AACR.

  10. [Quantification of radiation-induced genetic risk].

    PubMed

    Ehling, U H

    1987-05-01

    Associated with technical advances of our civilization is a radiation- and chemically-induced increase in the germ cell mutation rate in man. This would result in an increase in the frequency of genetic diseases and would be detrimental to future generations. It is the duty of our generation to keep this risk as low as possible. The estimation of the radiation-induced genetic risk of human populations is based on the extrapolation of results from animal experiments. Radiation-induced mutations are stochastic events. The probability of the event depends on the dose; the degree of the damage does not. The different methods to estimate the radiation-induced genetic risk will be discussed. The accuracy of the predicted results will be evaluated by a comparison with the observed incidence of dominant mutations in offspring born to radiation exposed survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings. These methods will be used to predict the genetic damage from the fallout of the reactor accident at Chernobyl. For the exposure dose we used the upper limits of the mean effective life time equivalent dose from the fallout values in the Munich region. According to the direct method for the risk estimation we will expect for each 100 to 500 spontaneous dominant mutations one radiation-induced mutation in the first generation. With the indirect method we estimate a ratio of 100 dominant spontaneous mutations to one radiation-induced dominant mutation. The possibilities and the limitations of the different methods to estimate the genetic risk will be discussed. The discrepancy between the high safety standards for radiation protection and the low level of knowledge for the toxicological evaluation of chemical mutagens will be emphasized.

  11. Radiation-induced brain injury: A review

    PubMed Central

    Greene-Schloesser, Dana; Robbins, Mike E.; Peiffer, Ann M.; Shaw, Edward G.; Wheeler, Kenneth T.; Chan, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 100,000 primary and metastatic brain tumor patients/year in the US survive long enough (>6 months) to experience radiation-induced brain injury. Prior to 1970, the human brain was thought to be highly radioresistant; the acute CNS syndrome occurs after single doses >30 Gy; white matter necrosis occurs at fractionated doses >60 Gy. Although white matter necrosis is uncommon with modern techniques, functional deficits, including progressive impairments in memory, attention, and executive function have become important, because they have profound effects on quality of life. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Given its central role in memory and neurogenesis, the majority of these studies have focused on the hippocampus. Irradiating pediatric and young adult rodent brains leads to several hippocampal changes including neuroinflammation and a marked reduction in neurogenesis. These data have been interpreted to suggest that shielding the hippocampus will prevent clinical radiation-induced cognitive impairment. However, this interpretation may be overly simplistic. Studies using older rodents, that more closely match the adult human brain tumor population, indicate that, unlike pediatric and young adult rats, older rats fail to show a radiation-induced decrease in neurogenesis or a loss of mature neurons. Nevertheless, older rats still exhibit cognitive impairment. This occurs in the absence of demyelination and/or white matter necrosis similar to what is observed clinically, suggesting that more subtle molecular, cellular and/or microanatomic modifications are involved in this radiation-induced brain injury. Given that radiation-induced cognitive impairment likely reflects damage to both hippocampal- and non-hippocampal-dependent domains, there is a critical need to investigate the microanatomic and functional effects of radiation in various brain regions as well as their

  12. Inflammation and chronic oxidative stress in radiation-induced late normal tissue injury: therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weiling; Robbins, Mike E C

    2009-01-01

    The threat of radiation-induced late normal tissue injury limits the dose of radiation that can be delivered safely to cancer patients presenting with solid tumors. Tissue dysfunction and failure, associated with atrophy, fibrosis and/or necrosis, as well as vascular injury, have been reported in late responding normal tissues, including the central nervous system, gut, kidney, liver, lung, and skin. The precise mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced late normal tissue injury have not been fully elucidated. It has been proposed recently that the radiation-induced late effects are caused, in part, by chronic oxidative stress and inflammation. Increased production of reactive oxygen species, which leads to lipid peroxidation, oxidation of DNA and proteins, as well as activation of pro-inflammatory factors has been observed in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we will present direct and indirect evidence to support this hypothesis. To improve the long-term survival and quality of life for radiotherapy patients, new approaches have been examined in preclinical models for their efficacy in preventing or mitigating the radiation-induced chronic normal tissue injury. We and others have tested drugs that can either attenuate inflammation or reduce chronic oxidative stress in animal models of late radiation-induced normal tissue injury. The effectiveness of renin-angiotensin system blockers, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma agonists, and antioxidants/antioxidant enzymes in preventing or mitigating the severity of radiation-induced late effects indicates that radiation-induced chronic injury can be prevented and/or treated. This provides a rationale for the design and development of anti-inflammatory-based interventional approaches for the treatment of radiation-induced late normal tissue injury.

  13. Inhibition of radiation-induced skin fibrosis with imatinib.

    PubMed

    Horton, Jason A; Chung, Eun Joo; Hudak, Kathryn E; Sowers, Anastasia; Thetford, Angela; White, Ayla O; Mitchell, James B; Citrin, Deborah E

    2013-03-01

    Dermal fibrosis is a disabling late toxicity of radiotherapy. Several lines of evidence suggest that overactive signaling via the Platelet-derived growth factor receptor-beta (PDGFR-β) and V-abl Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1 (cAbl) may be etiologic factors in the development of radiation-induced fibrosis. We tested the hypothesis that imatinib, a clinically available inhibitor of PDGFR-β, Mast/stem cell growth factor receptor (c-kit) and cAbl, would reduce the severity of dermal fibrosis in a murine model. The right hind legs of female C3H/HeN mice were exposed to 35 Gy of X-rays. Cohorts of mice were maintained on chow formulated with imatinib 0.5 mg/g or control chow for the duration of the experiment. Bilateral hind limb extension was measured serially to assess fibrotic contracture. Immunohistochemistry and biochemical assays were used to evaluate the levels of collagen and cytokines implicated in radiation-induced fibrosis. Imatinib treatment significantly reduced hind limb contracture and dermal thickness after irradiation. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated a substantial reduction in PDGFR-β phosphorylation. We also observed reduced Transforming Growth factor-β (TGF-β) and collagen expression in irradiated skin of imatinib-treated mice, suggesting that imatinib may suppress the fibrotic process by interrupting cross-talk between these pathways. Taken together, these results support that imatinib may be a useful agent in the prevention and treatment of radiation-induced dermal fibrosis.

  14. Pyruvate metabolism: A therapeutic opportunity in radiation-induced skin injury

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Hyun; Kang, Jeong Wook; Lee, Dong Won; Oh, Sang Ho; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Eun-Jung; Cho, Jaeho

    2015-05-08

    Ionizing radiation is used to treat a range of cancers. Despite recent technological progress, radiation therapy can damage the skin at the administration site. The specific molecular mechanisms involved in this effect have not been fully characterized. In this study, the effects of pyruvate, on radiation-induced skin injury were investigated, including the role of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 (PDK2) signaling pathway. Next generation sequencing (NGS) identified a wide range of gene expression differences between the control and irradiated mice, including reduced expression of PDK2. This was confirmed using Q-PCR. Cell culture studies demonstrated that PDK2 overexpression and a high cellular pyruvate concentration inhibited radiation-induced cytokine expression. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated radiation-induced skin thickening and gene expression changes. Oral pyruvate treatment markedly downregulated radiation-induced changes in skin thickness and inflammatory cytokine expression. These findings indicated that regulation of the pyruvate metabolic pathway could provide an effective approach to the control of radiation-induced skin damage. - Highlights: • The effects of radiation on skin thickness in mice. • Next generation sequencing revealed that radiation inhibited pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 expression. • PDK2 inhibited irradiation-induced cytokine gene expression. • Oral pyruvate treatment markedly downregulated radiation-induced changes in skin thickness.

  15. Radiation-induced meningiomas in pediatric patients

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, S.D.; Rockswold, G.L.; Chou, S.N.; Yock, D.; Berger, M.S.

    1988-04-01

    Radiation-induced meningiomas rarely have latency periods short enough from the time of irradiation to the clinical presentation of the tumor to present in the pediatric patient. Three cases of radiation-induced intracranial meningiomas in pediatric patients are presented. The first involved a meningioma of the right frontal region in a 10-year-old boy 6 years after the resection and irradiation of a 4th ventricular medulloblastoma. Review of our pediatric tumor cases produced a second case of a left temporal fossa meningioma presenting in a 15-year-old boy with a history of irradiation for retinoblastoma at age 3 years and a third case of a right frontoparietal meningioma in a 15-year-old girl after irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Only three cases of meningiomas presenting in the pediatric age group after radiation therapy to the head were detected in our review of the literature.

  16. Bile acids in radiation-induced diarrhea

    SciTech Connect

    Arlow, F.L.; Dekovich, A.A.; Priest, R.J.; Beher, W.T.

    1987-10-01

    Radiation-induced bowel disease manifested by debilitating diarrhea is an unfortunate consequence of therapeutic irradiation for pelvic malignancies. Although the mechanism for this diarrhea is not well understood, many believe it is the result of damage to small bowel mucosa and subsequent bile acid malabsorption. Excess amounts of bile acids, especially the dihydroxy components, are known to induce water and electrolyte secretion and increase bowel motility. We have directly measured individual and total bile acids in the stool samples of 11 patients with radiation-induced diarrhea and have found bile acids elevated two to six times normal in eight of them. Our patients with diarrhea and increased bile acids in their stools had prompt improvement when given cholestyramine. They had fewer stools and returned to a more normal life-style.

  17. Radiation-induced meningiomas in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Moss, S D; Rockswold, G L; Chou, S N; Yock, D; Berger, M S

    1988-04-01

    Radiation-induced meningiomas rarely have latency periods short enough from the time of irradiation to the clinical presentation of the tumor to present in the pediatric patient. Three cases of radiation-induced intracranial meningiomas in pediatric patients are presented. The first involved a meningioma of the right frontal region in a 10-year-old boy 6 years after the resection and irradiation of a 4th ventricular medulloblastoma. Review of our pediatric tumor cases produced a second case of a left temporal fossa meningioma presenting in a 15-year-old boy with a history of irradiation for retinoblastoma at age 3 years and a third case of a right frontoparietal meningioma in a 15-year-old girl after irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Only three cases of meningiomas presenting in the pediatric age group after radiation therapy to the head were detected in our review of the literature.

  18. Study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chmura, A.

    1995-11-01

    The study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis has up to now based many of its results on the detection of genetic aberrations using the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. FISH is time consuming and this tends to hinder its use for looking at large numbers of samples. We are currently developing new technological advances which will increase the speed, clarity and functionality of the FISH technique. These advances include multi-labeled probes, amplification techniques, and separation techniques.

  19. Radiation-induced heart disease in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lauk, S.; Kiszel, Z.; Buschmann, J.; Trott, K.R.

    1985-04-01

    After local irradiation of the rat heart with X ray doses of over 10 Gy (single dose), animals developed symptoms of radiation-induced heart disease, which at higher doses would lead to fatal cardiac failure. The LD 50 at 1 year was between 15 Gy and 20 Gy. The pericardium and epicardium responded to irradiation with exudative pericarditis after 4 months. Focal myocardial damage was secondary to progressive capillary damage.

  20. Radiation induced fracture of the scapula

    SciTech Connect

    Riggs, J.H. III; Schultz, G.D.; Hanes, S.A. )

    1990-10-01

    A case of radiation induced osteonecrosis resulting in a fracture of the scapula in a 76-yr-old female patient with a history of breast carcinoma is presented. Diagnostic imaging, laboratory recommendations and clinical findings are discussed along with an algorithm for the safe management of patients with a history of cancer and musculoskeletal complaints. This case demonstrates the necessity of a thorough investigation of musculoskeletal complaints in patients with previous bone-seeking carcinomas.

  1. Selenomethionine in Reducing Mucositis in Patients With Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Who Are Receiving Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-08

    Chemotherapeutic Agent Toxicity; Mucositis; Radiation Toxicity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Xerostomia

  2. Imaging radiation-induced normal tissue injury.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Mike E; Brunso-Bechtold, Judy K; Peiffer, Ann M; Tsien, Christina I; Bailey, Janet E; Marks, Lawrence B

    2012-04-01

    Technological developments in radiation therapy and other cancer therapies have led to a progressive increase in five-year survival rates over the last few decades. Although acute effects have been largely minimized by both technical advances and medical interventions, late effects remain a concern. Indeed, the need to identify those individuals who will develop radiation-induced late effects, and to develop interventions to prevent or ameliorate these late effects is a critical area of radiobiology research. In the last two decades, preclinical studies have clearly established that late radiation injury can be prevented/ameliorated by pharmacological therapies aimed at modulating the cascade of events leading to the clinical expression of radiation-induced late effects. These insights have been accompanied by significant technological advances in imaging that are moving radiation oncology and normal tissue radiobiology from disciplines driven by anatomy and macrostructure to ones in which important quantitative functional, microstructural, and metabolic data can be noninvasively and serially determined. In the current article, we review use of positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR spectroscopy to generate pathophysiological and functional data in the central nervous system, lung, and heart that offer the promise of, (1) identifying individuals who are at risk of developing radiation-induced late effects, and (2) monitoring the efficacy of interventions to prevent/ameliorate them.

  3. High pneumococcal density correlates with more mucosal inflammation and reduced respiratory syncytial virus disease severity in infants.

    PubMed

    Vissers, Marloes; Ahout, Inge M; van den Kieboom, Corné H; van der Gaast-de Jongh, Christa E; Groh, Laszlo; Cremers, Amelieke J; de Groot, Ronald; de Jonge, Marien I; Ferwerda, Gerben

    2016-03-17

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants. A small percentage of the infected infants develops a severe infection, while most of these severely ill patients were previously healthy. It remains unclear why these children develop severe RSV infections. In this study, we investigate whether pneumococcal nasopharyngeal carriage patterns correlate with mucosal inflammation and severity of disease. In total, 105 infants hospitalized with RSV infection were included and recovery samples were taken from 42 patients. The presence and density of Streptococcus pneumoniae was determined by RT qPCR to study its relation to viral load, inflammation (MMP-9 and IL-6) and severity of RSV disease. We show that pneumococcal presence or absence in the nasopharynx does not correlate with viral load, inflammation or severity of disease. However, when pneumococcus is present in patients, a higher nasopharyngeal pneumococcal density was correlated with a higher RSV load, higher MMP-9 levels and a less severe course of disease. Our results show correlations between S. pneumoniae density and viral load, inflammation and disease severity, suggesting that pneumococcal density may be an indicator for severity in paediatric RSV disease.

  4. Atorvastatin Ameliorates Radiation-Induced Cardiac Fibrosis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, KunYi; He, XuYu; Zhou, Yingling; Gao, Lijuan; Qi, Zhengyu; Chen, Jiyan; Gao, Xiuren

    2015-12-01

    Radiation-induced heart injury is one of the major side effects of radiotherapy for thoracic malignancies. Previous studies have shown that radiotherapy induced myocardial fibrosis and intensified myocardial remodeling. In this study, we investigated whether atorvastatin could inhibit radiation-induced heart fibrosis in Sprague-Dawley rats, which were randomly divided into six groups: control; radiation only; and four treatment groups receiving atorvastatin plus radiation (E1, E2, E3 and E4). All rats, except the control group, received local heart irradiation in 7 daily fractions of 3 Gy for a total of 21 Gy. Rats in groups E1 (10 mg/kg/day) and E2 (20 mg/kg/day) received atorvastatin and radiation treatment until week 12 after exposure. Rats in groups E3 (10 mg/kg/day) and E4 (20 mg/kg/day) received atorvastatin treatment from 3 months before irradiation to week 12 after irradiation. The expressions of TGF-β1, Smad2, Smad3, fibronectin, ROCK I and p-Akt in heart tissues were evaluated using real-time PCR or Western blot analyses. Atorvastatin significantly reduced the expression of TGF-β1, Smad3/P-Smad3, ROCK I and p-Akt in rats of the E1-E4 groups and in a dose-dependent manner. Fibronectin exhibited a similar pattern of expression changes. In addition, echocardiography showed that atorvastatin treatment can inhibit the increase of left ventricular end-diastolic dimension, left ventricular end-systolic diameter and left ventricular posterior wall thickness, and prevent the decrease of ejection fraction and fraction shortening in E1-E4 groups compared with the radiation only group. This study demonstrated that radiation exposure increased the expression of fibronectin in cardiac fibroblasts and induced cardiac fibrosis through activation of the TGF-β1/Smad3, RhoA/ROCK, and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. Statins ameliorated radiation-induced cardiac fibrosis in Sprague-Dawley rats. Our results suggest that atorvastatin is effective for the treatment of radiation-induced

  5. Treatment with Saccharomyces boulardii reduces the inflammation and dysfunction of the gastrointestinal tract in 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal mucositis in mice.

    PubMed

    Justino, Priscilla F C; Melo, Luis F M; Nogueira, Andre F; Costa, Jose V G; Silva, Luara M N; Santos, Cecila M; Mendes, Walber O; Costa, Marina R; Franco, Alvaro X; Lima, Aldo A; Ribeiro, Ronaldo A; Souza, Marcellus H L P; Soares, Pedro M G

    2014-05-01

    Intestinal mucositis is an important toxic side effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment. Saccharomyces boulardii is known to protect from intestinal injury via an effect on the gastrointestinal microbiota. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of S. boulardii on intestinal mucositis induced by 5-FU in a murine model. Mice were divided into saline, saline (control)+5-FU or 5-FU+S. boulardii (16 × 10⁹ colony-forming units/kg) treatment groups, and the jejunum and ileum were removed after killing of mice for the evaluation of histopathology, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and non-protein sulfhydryl group (mainly reduced glutathione; GSH), nitrite and cytokine concentrations. To determine gastric emptying, phenol red was administered orally, mice were killed 20 min after administration, and the absorbance of samples collected from the mice was measured by spectrophotometry. Intestinal permeability was measured by the urinary excretion rate of lactulose and mannitol following oral administration. S. boulardii significantly reversed the histopathological changes in intestinal mucositis induced by 5-FU and reduced the inflammatory parameters: neutrophil infiltration (control 1·73 (SEM 0·37) ultrastructural MPO (UMPO)/mg, 5-FU 7·37 (SEM 1·77) UMPO/mg and 5-FU+S. boulardii 4·15 (SEM 0·73) UMPO/mg); nitrite concentration (control 37·00 (SEM 2·39) μm, 5-FU 59·04 (SEM 11·41) μm and 5-FU+S. boulardii 37·90 (SEM 5·78) μm); GSH concentration (control 477·60 (SEM 25·25) μg/mg, 5-FU 270·90 (SEM 38·50) μg/mg and 5-FU+S. boulardii 514·00 (SEM 38·64) μg/mg). Treatment with S. Boulardii significantly reduced the concentrations of TNF-α and IL-1β by 48·92 and 32·21 % in the jejunum and 38·92 and 61·79 % in the ileum. In addition, S. boulardii decreased the concentrations of chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 by 5-fold in the jejunum and 3-fold in the ileum. Interestingly, S. boulardii reduced the delay in gastric emptying

  6. Effects of CTGF Blockade on Attenuation and Reversal of Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bickelhaupt, Sebastian; Erbel, Christian; Timke, Carmen; Wirkner, Ute; Dadrich, Monika; Flechsig, Paul; Tietz, Alexandra; Pföhler, Johanna; Gross, Wolfgang; Peschke, Peter; Hoeltgen, Line; Katus, Hugo A; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Nicolay, Nils H; Saffrich, Rainer; Debus, Jürgen; Sternlicht, Mark D; Seeley, Todd W; Lipson, Kenneth E; Huber, Peter E

    2017-08-01

    Radiotherapy is a mainstay for the treatment of lung cancer that can induce pneumonitis or pulmonary fibrosis. The matricellular protein connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a central mediator of tissue remodeling. A radiation-induced mouse model of pulmonary fibrosis was used to determine if transient administration of a human antibody to CTGF (FG-3019) started at different times before or after 20 Gy thoracic irradiation reduced acute and chronic radiation toxicity. Mice (25 mice/group; 10 mice/group in a confirmation study) were examined by computed tomography, histology, gene expression changes, and for survival. In vitro experiments were performed to directly study the interaction of CTGF blockade and radiation. All statistical tests were two-sided. Administration of FG-3019 prevented (∼50%-80%) or reversed (∼50%) lung remodeling, improved lung function, improved mouse health, and rescued mice from lethal irradiation ( P < .01). Importantly, when antibody treatment was initiated at 16 weeks after thoracic irradiation, FG-3019 reversed established lung remodeling and restored lung function. CTGF blockade abrogated M2 polarized macrophage influx, normalized radiation-induced gene expression changes, and reduced myofibroblast abundance and Osteopontin expression. These results indicate that blocking CTGF attenuates radiation-induced pulmonary remodeling and can reverse the process after initiation. CTGF has a central role in radiation-induced fibrogenesis, and FG-3019 may benefit patients with radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis or patients with other forms or origin of chronic fibrotic diseases.

  7. Radiation-Induced Liver Damage: Correlation of Histopathology with Hepatobiliary Magnetic Resonance Imaging, a Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Seidensticker, Max; Burak, Miroslaw; Kalinski, Thomas; Garlipp, Benjamin; Koelble, Konrad; Wust, Peter; Antweiler, Kai; Seidensticker, Ricarda; Mohnike, Konrad; Pech, Maciej; Ricke, Jens

    2015-02-15

    PurposeRadiotherapy of liver malignancies shows promising results (radioembolization, stereotactic irradiation, interstitial brachytherapy). Regardless of the route of application, a certain amount of nontumorous liver parenchyma will be collaterally damaged by radiation. The functional reserve may be significantly reduced with an impact on further treatment planning. Monitoring of radiation-induced liver damage by imaging is neither established nor validated. We performed an analysis to correlate the histopathological presence of radiation-induced liver damage with functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) utilizing hepatobiliary contrast media (Gd-BOPTA).MethodsPatients undergoing local high-dose-rate brachytherapy for whom a follow-up hepatobiliary MRI within 120 days after radiotherapy as well as an evaluable liver biopsy from radiation-exposed liver tissue within 7 days before MRI were retrospectively identified. Planning computed tomography (CT)/dosimetry was merged to the CT-documentation of the liver biopsy and to the MRI. Presence/absence of radiation-induced liver damage (histopathology) and Gd-BOPTA uptake (MRI) as well as the dose applied during brachytherapy at the site of tissue sampling was determined.ResultsFourteen biopsies from eight patients were evaluated. In all cases with histopathological evidence of radiation-induced liver damage (n = 11), no uptake of Gd-BOPTA was seen. In the remaining three, cases no radiation-induced liver damage but Gd-BOPTA uptake was seen. Presence of radiation-induced liver damage and absence of Gd-BOPTA uptake was correlated with a former high-dose exposition.ConclusionsAbsence of hepatobiliary MRI contrast media uptake in radiation-exposed liver parenchyma may indicate radiation-induced liver damage. Confirmatory studies are warranted.

  8. Radiation induced detwinning in nanotwinned Cu

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Youxing; Wang, Haiyan; Kirk, Mark A.; Li, Meimei; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xinghang

    2016-11-15

    Superior radiation tolerance has been experimentally examined in nanotwinned metals. The stability of nanotwinned structure under radiation is the key factor for advancing the application of nanotwinned metals for nuclear reactors. We thus performed in situ radiation tests for nanotwinned Cu with various twin thicknesses inside a transmission electron microscope. We found that there is a critical twin thickness (10 nm), below which, radiation induced detwinning is primarily accomplished through migration of incoherent twin boundaries. Lastly, detwinning is faster for thinner twins in this range, while thicker twins are more stable.

  9. A report on radiation-induced gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Salvati, M.; Artico, M.; Caruso, R.; Rocchi, G.; Orlando, E.R.; Nucci, F. )

    1991-01-15

    Radiation-induced gliomas are uncommon, with only 73 cases on record to date. The disease that most frequently occasioned radiation therapy has been acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Three more cases are added here, two after irradiation for ALL and one after irradiation for tinea capitis. In a review of the relevant literature, the authors stress the possibility that the ALL-glioma and the retinoblastoma-glioma links point to syndromes in their own right that may occur without radiation therapy.56 references.

  10. Dynamics of wound healing signaling as a potential therapeutic target for radiation-induced tissue damage.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yih-Lin; Pui, Newman N M

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized the histone deacetylase inhibitor phenylbutyrate (PB) has beneficial effects on radiation-induced injury by modulating the expression of DNA repair and wound healing genes. Hamsters received a radiosurgical dose of radiation (40 Gy) to the cheek and were treated with varying PB dosing regimens. Gross alteration of the irradiated cheeks, eating function, histological changes, and gene expression during the course of wound healing were compared between treatment groups. Pathological analysis showed decreased radiation-induced mucositis, facilitated epithelial cell growth, and preventing ulcerative wound formation, after short-term PB treatment, but not after vehicle or sustained PB. The radiation-induced wound healing gene expression profile exhibited a sequential transition from the inflammatory and DNA repair phases to the tissue remodeling phase in the vehicle group. Sustained PB treatment resulted in a prolonged wound healing gene expression profile and delayed the wound healing process. Short-term PB shortened the duration of inflammatory cytokine expression, triggered repeated pulsed expression of cell cycle and DNA repair-regulating genes, and promoted earlier oscillatory expression of tissue remodeling genes. Distinct gene expression patterns between sustained and short-term treatment suggest dynamic profiling of wound healing gene expression can be an important part of a biological therapeutic strategy to mitigate radiation-related tissue injury. © 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  11. Azilsartan Reduced TNF-α and IL-1β Levels, Increased IL-10 Levels and Upregulated VEGF, FGF, KGF, and TGF-α in an Oral Mucositis Model

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo, Aurigena Antunes; Varela, Hugo; de Medeiros, Caroline Addison Carvalho Xavier; de Castro Brito, Gerly Anne; de Lima, Kênio Costa; de Moura, Ligia Moreno; de Araújo, Raimundo Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a common complication of treatments for head and neck cancer, particularly radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy. OM is characterised by oral erythema, ulceration, and pain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of azilsartan (AZT), an angiotensin II receptor antagonist, on 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced oral mucositis (OM) in Syrian hamsters. OM was induced by the intraperitoneal administration of 5-FU on experimental days 1 (60mg/Kg) and 2 (40mg/Kg). Animals were pretreated with oral AZT (1, 5, or 10 mg/kg) or vehicle 30 min before 5-FU injection and daily until day 10. Experimental treatment protocols were approved by the Animal Ethics Committee Use/CEUA (Number 28/2012) of the UFRN. Macroscopic analysis and cheek pouch samples were removed for histopathologic analysis. Myeloperoxidase (MPO), Malonyldialdehyde (MDA), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), interleukin-10 (IL-10), and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were analysed by Enzyme Linked Immuno Sorbent Assay (ELISA). Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF)-α were measured by immunohistochemistry. Analysis of variance followed by Bonferroni’s test was used to calculate the means of intergroup differences (p ≤ 0.05). Treatment with 1 mg/kg AZT reduced levels MPO (p<0.01), MDA (p<0.5) and histological inflammatory cell infiltration, and increased the presence of granulation tissue. AZT treatment at 1 mg/kg reduced the TNF-α (p<0.05) and IL-1β (p<0.05) levels, increased the cheek pouch levels of IL-10 (p<0.01), and upregulated VEGF, FGF, KGF, and TGF-α. Administration of AZT at higher doses (5 and 10 mg/kg) did not significantly reverse the OM. AZT at a dose of 1 mg/kg prevented the mucosal damage and inflammation associated with 5-FU-induced OM, increasing granulation and tissue repair. PMID:25689279

  12. Azilsartan reduced TNF-α and IL-1β levels, increased IL-10 levels and upregulated VEGF, FGF, KGF, and TGF-α in an oral mucositis model.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Aurigena Antunes; Varela, Hugo; de Medeiros, Caroline Addison Carvalho Xavier; de Castro Brito, Gerly Anne; de Lima, Kênio Costa; de Moura, Ligia Moreno; de Araújo Júnior, Raimundo Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a common complication of treatments for head and neck cancer, particularly radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy. OM is characterised by oral erythema, ulceration, and pain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of azilsartan (AZT), an angiotensin II receptor antagonist, on 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced oral mucositis (OM) in Syrian hamsters. OM was induced by the intraperitoneal administration of 5-FU on experimental days 1 (60 mg/Kg) and 2 (40 mg/Kg). Animals were pretreated with oral AZT (1, 5, or 10 mg/kg) or vehicle 30 min before 5-FU injection and daily until day 10. Experimental treatment protocols were approved by the Animal Ethics Committee Use/CEUA (Number 28/2012) of the UFRN. Macroscopic analysis and cheek pouch samples were removed for histopathologic analysis. Myeloperoxidase (MPO), Malonyldialdehyde (MDA), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), interleukin-10 (IL-10), and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were analysed by Enzyme Linked Immuno Sorbent Assay (ELISA). Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF)-α were measured by immunohistochemistry. Analysis of variance followed by Bonferroni's test was used to calculate the means of intergroup differences (p ≤ 0.05). Treatment with 1 mg/kg AZT reduced levels MPO (p<0.01), MDA (p<0.5) and histological inflammatory cell infiltration, and increased the presence of granulation tissue. AZT treatment at 1 mg/kg reduced the TNF-α (p<0.05) and IL-1β (p<0.05) levels, increased the cheek pouch levels of IL-10 (p<0.01), and upregulated VEGF, FGF, KGF, and TGF-α. Administration of AZT at higher doses (5 and 10 mg/kg) did not significantly reverse the OM. AZT at a dose of 1 mg/kg prevented the mucosal damage and inflammation associated with 5-FU-induced OM, increasing granulation and tissue repair.

  13. Novel Radiomitigator for Radiation-Induced Bone Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreurs, A-S; Shirazi-fard, Y.; Terada, M.; Alwood, J. S.; Steczina, S.; Medina, C.; Tahimic, C. G. T.; Globus, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced bone loss can occur with radiotherapy patients, accidental radiation exposure and during long-term spaceflight. Bone loss due to radiation is due to an early increase in oxidative stress, inflammation and bone resorption, resulting in an imbalance in bone remodeling. Furthermore, exposure to high-Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiation will impair the bone forming progenitors and reduce bone formation. Radiation can be classified as high-LET or low-LET based on the amount of energy released. Dried Plum (DP) diet prevents bone loss in mice exposed to total body irradiation with both low-LET and high-LET radiation. DP prevents the early radiation-induced bone resorption, but furthermore, we show that DP protects the bone forming osteoblast progenitors from high-LET radiation. These results provide insight that DP re-balances the bone remodeling by preventing resorption and protecting the bone formation capacity. This data is important considering that most of the current osteoporosis treatments only block the bone resorption but do not protect bone formation. In addition, DP seems to act on both the oxidative stress and inflammation pathways. Finally, we have preliminary data showing the potential of DP to be radio-protective at a systemic effect and could possible protect other tissues at risk of total body-irradiation such as skin, brain and heart.

  14. Sestrin2 protects the myocardium against radiation-induced damage.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yue-Can; Chi, Feng; Xing, Rui; Zeng, Jing; Gao, Song; Chen, Jia-Jia; Wang, Hong-Mei; Duan, Qiong-Yu; Sun, Yu-Nan; Niu, Nan; Tang, Mei-Yue; Wu, Rong

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of Sestrin2 in response to radiation-induced injury to the heart and on the cardiomyopathy development in the mouse. Mice with genetic deletion of the Sestrin2 (Sestrin2 knockout mice [Sestrin2 KO]) and treatment with irradiation (22 or 15 Gy) were used as independent approaches to determine the role of Sestrin2. Echocardiography (before and after isoproterenol challenge) and left ventricular (LV) catheterization were performed to evaluate changes in LV dimensions and function. Masson's trichrome was used to assess myocardial fibrosis. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot were used to detect the capillary density. After 22 or 15 Gy irradiation, the LV ejection fraction (EF) was impaired in wt mice at 1 week and 4 months after irradiation when compared with sham irradiation. Compared to wt mice, Sestrin2 KO mice had significant reduction in reduced LVEF at 1 week and 4 months after irradiation. A significant increase in LV end-diastolic pressure and myocardial fibrosis and a significant decrease in capillary density were observed in irradiation-wt mice, as well as in irradiation-Sestrin2 KO mice. Sestrin2 involved in the regulation of cardiomyopathy (such as myocardial fibrosis) after irradiation. Overexpression of Sestrin2 might be useful in limiting radiation-induced myocardial injury.

  15. Inhibition of radiation-induced polyuria by histamine receptor antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Donlon, M.A.; Melia, J.A.; Helgeson, E.A.; Wolfe, W.W.

    1986-03-01

    In previous studies the authors have demonstrated that gamma radiation results in polyuria, which is preceded by polydypsia. This suggests that the increased thirst elicited by radiation causes increased urinary volume (UV). Histamine, which is released following radiation exposure, also elicits drinking by nonirradiated rats when administered exogenously. In this study the authors have investigated both the role of water deprivation and the effect of histamine receptor antagonists (HRA) on radiation-induced polyuria. Sprague-Dawley rats were housed individually in metabolic cages. Water was allowed ad libitum except in deprivation experiments where water was removed for 24 hr immediately following radiation. Cimetidine (CIM), an H2 HRA, and dexbromopheniramine (DXB), an H1 HRA, were administered i.p. (16 and 1 mg/kg, respectively) 30 min prior to irradiation (950 rads from a cobalt source). UV was determined at 24-hr intervals for 3 days preceding irradiation and 24 hr postirradiation. UV in DXB treated rats was significantly reduced 24 hr postirradiation (CON = 427 +/- 54%; DXB = 247 +/- 39% of preirradiated CON) compared to postirradiation control values. CIM did not affect postirradiation UV. These data suggest that radiation-induced polyuria is caused by polydypsia which is, in part, mediated by histamine induced by an H1 receptor.

  16. Characterization of radiation-induced emesis in the ferret

    SciTech Connect

    King, G.L.

    1988-01-01

    Forty-eight ferrets (Mustela putorius furo) were individually head-shielded and radiated with bilateral cobalt 60 gamma radiation at 100 cGy min at doses ranging between 49 and 601 cGy. The emetic threshold was observed at 69 cGy, the ED 50 was calculated as 77 cGy, and 100% incidence of emesis occurred at 201 cGy. With increasing doses of radiation, the latency to first emesis after radiation decreased dramatically, whereas the duration of the prodromal period increased. Two other sets of experiments suggest that dopaminergic mechanisms play a minor role in radiation-induced emesis in the ferret. Twenty-two animals were injected either intravenously or subcutaneously with 30 to 300 micrograms /kg of apomorphine. Fewer than 50% of the animals vomited to 300 micrograms/kg apomorphine; central dopaminergic receptor activation was apparent at all doses. Another eight animals received 1 mg/kg domperidone prior to either 201 (n=4) or 401 (n=4) cGy radiation and their emetic responses were compared with NaCi-injected-irradiated controls (n=8). At 201 cGy, domperidone significantly reduced only the total time in emetic behavior. At 401 cGy, domperidone had no salutary effect on radiation-induced emesis. The emetic responses of the ferret to radiation and apomorphine are compared with these responses in other vomiting species.

  17. Characterization of radiation-induced emesis in the ferret

    SciTech Connect

    King, G.L.

    1988-06-01

    Forty-eight ferrets (Mustela putorius furo) were individually head-shielded and radiated with bilateral /sup 60/Co gamma radiation at 100 cGy min-1 at doses ranging between 49 and 601 cGy. The emetic threshold was observed at 69 cGy, the ED50 was calculated at 77 cGy, and 100% incidence of emesis occurred at 201 cGy. With increasing doses of radiation, the latency to first emesis after radiation decreased dramatically, whereas the duration of the prodromal period increased. Two other sets of experiments suggest that dopaminergic mechanisms play a minor role in radiation-induced emesis in the ferret. Twenty-two animals were injected either intravenously or subcutaneously with 30 to 300 micrograms/kg of apomorphine. Fewer than 50% of the animals vomited to 300 micrograms/kg apomorphine; central dopaminergic receptor activation was apparent at all doses. Another eight animals received 1 mg/kg domperidone prior to either 201 (n = 4) or 401 (n = 4) cGy radiation and their emetic responses were compared with NaCl-injected-irradiated controls (n = 8). At 201 cGy, domperidone significantly reduced only the total time in emetic behavior. At 401 cGy, domperidone had no salutary effect on radiation-induced emesis. The emetic responses of the ferret to radiation and apomorphine are compared with these responses in other vomiting species.

  18. Development of a new minipig model to study radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome and its application in clinical research.

    PubMed

    Shim, Sehwan; Jang, Won-Suk; Lee, Sun-Joo; Jin, Sungho; Kim, Jin; Lee, Seung-Sook; Bang, Ho Yoon; Jeon, Byung Suk; Park, Sunhoo

    2014-04-01

    Because of insufficient clinical data regarding acute radiation damage after single high-dose radiation exposure, acute radiation-induced gastrointestinal (GI) syndrome remains difficult to treat. The goal of this study was to establish an appropriate and efficient minipig model to study high-dose radiation-induced GI syndrome after radiation exposure. For endoscopic access to the ileum, ileocutaneous anastomosis was performed 3 weeks before irradiation in six male Göttingen minipigs. Minipigs were locally irradiated at the abdominal area using a gamma source as follows: 1,000 cGy (n = 3) and 1,500 cGy (n = 3). Endoscopic evaluation for the terminal ileum was periodically performed via the ileocutaneous anastomosis tract. Pieces of tissue were serially taken for histological examination. The irradiated intestine presented characteristic morphological changes over time. The most obvious changes in the ileum were mucosal atrophy and telangiectasia from day 1 to day 17 after abdominal irradiation. Microscopic findings were characterized as architectural disorganization, loss of villi and chronic active inflammation. Increase in cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression was closely correlated with severity of tissue damage and inflammation. Particularly, the plasma citrulline level (PCL), a potential marker for radiation-induced intestinal damage, was significantly decreased the day after irradiation and recovered when irradiated mucosa was normalized. Our results also showed that PCL changes were positively correlated with microscopic changes and the endoscopic score in radiation-induced mucosal damage. In conclusion, the ileocutaneous anastomosis model using the minipig mimics human GI syndrome and allows the study of sequential changes in the ileum, the main target tissue of abdominal irradiation. In addition, PCL could be a simple biomarker for radiation-induced intestinal damage.

  19. Evaluating the effects of the essential oils Leptospermum scoparium (manuka) and Kunzea ericoides (kanuka) on radiotherapy induced mucositis: a randomized, placebo controlled feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Maddocks-Jennings, Wendy; Wilkinson, Jenny M; Cavanagh, Heather M; Shillington, David

    2009-04-01

    This study evaluated the effects of an essential oil mouthwash on radiation induced mucositis of the oropharyngeal area during treatment for head and neck cancers. Nineteen adult patients completed the randomized placebo controlled trial which involved the use of a gargle containing 2 drops of a 1:1 mix of the essential oils of manuka (Leptospermum scoparium) and kanuka (Kunzea ericoides) in water. Those in the essential oil gargle group were observed to have a delayed onset of mucositis and reduced pain and oral symptoms relative to placebo (gargling with water) and the control ('usual care') groups. In addition those in the essential oil group were seen to have less weight loss (1% loss) than the other two groups (control 2.5%, placebo 4.5%). However a significant limitation in this study was the small sample size. Although the results from this feasibility study support the hypothesis that very small volumes of manuka and kanuka used in a gargle can provide a positive effect on the development of radiation induced mucositis, further research is required to confirm this finding. Randomization was applied according to the timing of the patient's entering the trial as well as their physical ability to gargle. Confirmation of these findings would pave the way for introduction of a simple, yet effective treatment for a condition which causes considerable discomfort and for which there is currently no definitive treatment.

  20. Epigenetics in radiation-induced fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Weigel, C; Schmezer, P; Plass, C; Popanda, O

    2015-04-23

    Radiotherapy is a major cancer treatment option but dose-limiting side effects such as late-onset fibrosis in the irradiated tissue severely impair quality of life in cancer survivors. Efforts to explain radiation-induced fibrosis, for example, by genetic variation remained largely inconclusive. Recently published molecular analyses on radiation response and fibrogenesis showed a prominent role of epigenetic gene regulation. This review summarizes the current knowledge on epigenetic modifications in fibrotic disease and radiation response, and it points out the important role for epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, microRNAs and histone modifications in the development of this disease. The synopsis illustrates the complexity of radiation-induced fibrosis and reveals the need for investigations to further unravel its molecular mechanisms. Importantly, epigenetic changes are long-term determinants of gene expression and can therefore support those mechanisms that induce and perpetuate fibrogenesis even in the absence of the initial damaging stimulus. Future work must comprise the interconnection of acute radiation response and long-lasting epigenetic effects in order to assess their role in late-onset radiation fibrosis. An improved understanding of the underlying biology is fundamental to better comprehend the origin of this disease and to improve both preventive and therapeutic strategies.

  1. Radiation induced conductivity in space dielectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, R.; Paulmier, T. Belhaj, M.; Dirassen, B.; Molinie, P.; Payan, D.; Balcon, N.

    2014-01-21

    The radiation-induced conductivity of some polymers was described mainly in literature by a competition between ionization, trapping/detrapping, and recombination processes or by radiation assisted ageing mechanisms. Our aim is to revise the effect of the aforementioned mechanisms on the complex evolution of Teflon{sup ®} FEP under space representative ionizing radiation. Through the definition of a new experimental protocol, revealing the effect of radiation dose and relaxation time, we have been able to demonstrate that the trapping/recombination model devised in this study agrees correctly with the observed experimental phenomenology at qualitative level and allows describing very well the evolution of radiation induced conductivity with irradiation time (or received radiation dose). According to this model, the complex behavior observed on Teflon{sup ®} FEP may be basically ascribed to the competition between electron/hole pairs generation and recombination: electrons are deeply trapped and act as recombination centers for free holes. Relaxation effects have been characterized through successive irradiations steps and have been again well described with the defined model at qualitative level: recombination centers created by the irradiation induce long term alteration on the electric properties, especially the effective bulk conductivity. One-month relaxation does not allow a complete recovery of the material initial charging behavior.

  2. Radiation induced conductivity in space dielectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, R.; Paulmier, T.; Molinie, P.; Belhaj, M.; Dirassen, B.; Payan, D.; Balcon, N.

    2014-01-01

    The radiation-induced conductivity of some polymers was described mainly in literature by a competition between ionization, trapping/detrapping, and recombination processes or by radiation assisted ageing mechanisms. Our aim is to revise the effect of the aforementioned mechanisms on the complex evolution of Teflon® FEP under space representative ionizing radiation. Through the definition of a new experimental protocol, revealing the effect of radiation dose and relaxation time, we have been able to demonstrate that the trapping/recombination model devised in this study agrees correctly with the observed experimental phenomenology at qualitative level and allows describing very well the evolution of radiation induced conductivity with irradiation time (or received radiation dose). According to this model, the complex behavior observed on Teflon® FEP may be basically ascribed to the competition between electron/hole pairs generation and recombination: electrons are deeply trapped and act as recombination centers for free holes. Relaxation effects have been characterized through successive irradiations steps and have been again well described with the defined model at qualitative level: recombination centers created by the irradiation induce long term alteration on the electric properties, especially the effective bulk conductivity. One-month relaxation does not allow a complete recovery of the material initial charging behavior.

  3. Mouse models for radiation-induced cancers.

    PubMed

    Rivina, Leena; Davoren, Michael J; Schiestl, Robert H

    2016-09-01

    Potential ionising radiation exposure scenarios are varied, but all bring risks beyond the simple issues of short-term survival. Whether accidentally exposed to a single, whole-body dose in an act of terrorism or purposefully exposed to fractionated doses as part of a therapeutic regimen, radiation exposure carries the consequence of elevated cancer risk. The long-term impact of both intentional and unintentional exposure could potentially be mitigated by treatments specifically developed to limit the mutations and precancerous replication that ensue in the wake of irradiation The development of such agents would undoubtedly require a substantial degree of in vitro testing, but in order to accurately recapitulate the complex process of radiation-induced carcinogenesis, well-understood animal models are necessary. Inbred strains of the laboratory mouse, Mus musculus, present the most logical choice due to the high number of molecular and physiological similarities they share with humans. Their small size, high rate of breeding and fully sequenced genome further increase its value for use in cancer research. This chapter will review relevant m. musculus inbred and F1 hybrid animals of radiation-induced myeloid leukemia, thymic lymphoma, breast and lung cancers. Method of cancer induction and associated molecular pathologies will also be described for each model. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the UK Environmental Mutagen Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. GUCY2C Signaling Opposes the Acute Radiation-Induced GI Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Wuthrick, Evan; Rappaport, Jeff A; Kraft, Crystal; Lin, Jieru E; Marszalowicz, Glen; Snook, Adam E; Zhan, Tingting; Hyslop, Terry M; Waldman, Scott A

    2017-09-15

    High doses of ionizing radiation induce acute damage to epithelial cells of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, mediating toxicities restricting the therapeutic efficacy of radiation in cancer and morbidity and mortality in nuclear disasters. No approved prophylaxis or therapy exists for these toxicities, in part reflecting an incomplete understanding of mechanisms contributing to the acute radiation-induced GI syndrome (RIGS). Guanylate cyclase C (GUCY2C) and its hormones guanylin and uroguanylin have recently emerged as one paracrine axis defending intestinal mucosal integrity against mutational, chemical, and inflammatory injury. Here, we reveal a role for the GUCY2C paracrine axis in compensatory mechanisms opposing RIGS. Eliminating GUCY2C signaling exacerbated RIGS, amplifying radiation-induced mortality, weight loss, mucosal bleeding, debilitation, and intestinal dysfunction. Durable expression of GUCY2C, guanylin, and uroguanylin mRNA and protein by intestinal epithelial cells was preserved following lethal irradiation inducing RIGS. Oral delivery of the heat-stable enterotoxin (ST), an exogenous GUCY2C ligand, opposed RIGS, a process requiring p53 activation mediated by dissociation from MDM2. In turn, p53 activation prevented cell death by selectively limiting mitotic catastrophe, but not apoptosis. These studies reveal a role for the GUCY2C paracrine hormone axis as a novel compensatory mechanism opposing RIGS, and they highlight the potential of oral GUCY2C agonists (Linzess; Trulance) to prevent and treat RIGS in cancer therapy and nuclear disasters. Cancer Res; 77(18); 5095-106. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Sodium tanshinone IIA sulfonate attenuates radiation-induced fibrosis damage in cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jing; Li, Hai-Long; Wu, Hong-Yan; Gu, Mei; Li, Ying-Dong; Wang, Xiao-Gang; Ming, Hai-Xia; Dong, Xiao-Li; Liu, Kai

    2014-01-01

    The main pathological change in radiation-induced heart disease is fibrosis. Emerging evidence has indicated that sodium tanshinone IIA sulfonate (STS) was used for treating fibrosis diseases. The present study was undertaken to characterize the effect of STS on radiation-induced cardiac fibrosis (RICF) on cultured cardiac fibroblasts (CFs). CFs were irradiated with 1 or 2 Gy X-rays, and the expression of TGF-β1 and collagen I (Col-1) increased, indicating that low-dose X-rays promoted fibrosis damage effect. The fibrosis damage was accompanied by morphologic changes in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), as well as an increase in the expression of the ER stress-related molecules, GRP78 and CHOP. Administration of STS reduced ROS production and decreased the expression of Col-1, TGF-β1, p-Smad2/3, GRP78, and CHOP in irradiated CFs, thus weakening the radiation-induced fibrosis damage and ER stress. Radiation-induced fibrosis damage was observed on a cellular level. The involvement of ER stress in radiation-induced fibrosis damage was demonstrated for the first time. STS attenuated the fibrosis damage effect in CFs and this effect may be related to its antioxidant action, and also related to its inhibition of ER stress and TGF-β1-Smad pathway. These results suggest that STS shows a good prospect in clinical prevention and treatment of RICF.

  6. Late radiation-induced heart disease after radiotherapy. Clinical importance, radiobiological mechanisms and strategies of prevention.

    PubMed

    Andratschke, Nicolaus; Maurer, Jean; Molls, Michael; Trott, Klaus-Rüdiger

    2011-08-01

    The clinical importance of radiation-induced heart disease, in particular in post-operative radiotherapy of breast cancer patients, has been recognised only recently. There is general agreement, that a co-ordinated research effort would be needed to explore all the potential strategies of how to reduce the late risk of radiation-induced heart disease in radiotherapy. This approach would be based, on one hand, on a comprehensive understanding of the radiobiological mechanisms of radiation-induced heart disease after radiotherapy which would require large-scale long-term animal experiments with high precision local heart irradiation. On the other hand - in close co-operation with mechanistic in vivo research studies - clinical studies in patients need to determine the influence of dose distribution in the heart on the risk of radiation-induced heart disease. The aim of these clinical studies would be to identify the critical structures within the organ which need to be spared and their radiation sensitivity as well as a potential volume and dose effect. The results of the mechanistic studies might also provide concepts of how to modify the gradual progression of radiation damage in the heart by drugs or biological molecules. The results of the studies in patients would need to also incorporate detailed dosimetric and imaging studies in order to develop early indicators of impending radiation-induced heart disease which would be a pre-condition to develop sound criteria for treatment plan optimisation. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. The Lactate Dehydrogenase Inhibitor Gossypol Inhibits Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Judge, Jennifer L; Lacy, Shannon H; Ku, Wei-Yao; Owens, Kristina M; Hernady, Eric; Thatcher, Thomas H; Williams, Jacqueline P; Phipps, Richard P; Sime, Patricia J; Kottmann, R Matthew

    2017-07-01

    Exposure of the lung to ionizing radiation that occurs in radiotherapy, as well as after accidental or intentional mass casualty incident can result in pulmonary fibrosis, which has few treatment options. Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by an accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins that create scar tissue. Although the mechanisms leading to radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis remain poorly understood, one frequent observation is the activation of the profibrotic cytokine transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β). Our laboratory has shown that the metabolite lactate activates latent TGF-β by a reduction in extracellular pH. We recently demonstrated that lactate dehydrogenase-A (LDHA), the enzyme that produces lactate, is upregulated in patients with radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Furthermore, genetic silencing of LDHA or pharmacologic inhibition using the LDHA inhibitor gossypol prevented radiation-induced extracellular matrix secretion in vitro through inhibition of TGF-β activation. In the current study, we hypothesized that LDHA inhibition in vivo prevents radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. To test this hypothesis, C57BL/6 mice received 5 Gy total-body irradiation plus 10 Gy thoracic irradiation from a (137)Cs source to induce pulmonary fibrosis. Starting at 4 weeks postirradiation, mice were treated with 5 mg/kg of the LDHA inhibitor gossypol or vehicle daily until sacrifice at 26 weeks postirradiation. Exposure to radiation resulted in pulmonary fibrosis, characterized by an increase in collagen content, fibrosis area, extracellular matrix gene expression and TGF-β activation. Irradiated mice treated with gossypol had significantly reduced fibrosis outcomes, including reduced collagen content in the lungs, reduced expression of active TGF-β, LDHA and the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). These findings suggest that inhibition of LDHA protects against radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis, and may be a novel

  8. Contribution of radiation-induced, nitric oxide-mediated bystander effect to radiation-induced adaptive response.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, H.; Ohnishi, T.

    There has been a recent upsurge of interest in radiation-induced adaptive response and bystander effect which are specific modes in stress response to low-dose low-dose rate radiation Recently we found that the accumulation of inducible nitric oxide NO synthase iNOS in wt p53 cells was induced by chronic irradiation with gamma rays followed by acute irradiation with X-rays but not by each one resulting in an increase in nitrite concentrations of medium It is suggested that the accumulation of iNOS may be due to the depression of acute irradiation-induced p53 functions by pre-chronic irradiation In addition we found that the radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells against acute irradiation with X-rays was reduced after chronic irradiation with gamma rays This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells was nearly completely suppressed by the addition of NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO to the medium This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells is just radiation-induced adaptive response suggesting that NO-mediated bystander effect may considerably contribute to adaptive response induced by radiation

  9. Modulation of radiation-induced apoptosis and G{sub 2}/M block in murine T-lymphoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Palayoor, S.T.; Macklis, R.M.; Bump, E.A.; Coleman, C.N.

    1995-03-01

    Radiation-induced apoptosis in lymphocyte-derived cell lines is characterized by endonucleolytic cleavage of cellular DNA within hours after radiation exposure. We have studied this phenomenon qualitatively (DNA gel electrophoresis) and quantitatively (diphenylamine reagent assay) in murine EL4 T-lymphoma cells exposed to {sup 137}Cs {gamma} irradiation. Fragmentation was discernible within 18-24 h after exposure. It increased with time and dose and reached a plateau after 8 Gy of {gamma} radiation. We studied the effect of several pharmacological agents on the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M block and DNA fragmentation. The agents which reduced the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M-phase arrest (caffeine, theobromine, theophylline and 2-aminopurine) enhanced the degree of DNA fragmentation at 24 h. In contrast, the agents which sustained the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M-phase arrest (TPA, DBcAMP, IBMX and 3-aminobenzamide) inhibited the DNA fragmentation at 24 h. These studies on EL4 lymphoma cells are consistent with the hypothesis that cells with radiation-induced genetic damage are eliminated by apoptosis subsequent to a G{sub 2}/M block. Furthermore, it may be possible to modulate the process of radiation-induced apoptosis in lymphoma cells with pharmacological agents that modify the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M block, and to use this effect in the treatment of patients with malignant disease. 59 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Vitamin D Deficiency Is Associated With the Severity of Radiation-Induced Proctitis in Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorbanzadeh-Moghaddam, Amir; Gholamrezaei, Ali; Hemati, Simin

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced injury to normal tissues is a common complication of radiation therapy in cancer patients. Considering the role of vitamin D in mucosal barrier hemostasis and inflammatory responses, we investigated whether vitamin D deficiency is associated with the severity of radiation-induced acute proctitis in cancer patients. Methods and Materials: This prospective observational study was conducted in cancer patients referred for pelvic radiation therapy. Serum concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D was measured before radiation therapy. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations of <35 nmol/L and <40 nmol/L in male and female patients, respectively, based on available normative data. Acute proctitis was assessed after 5 weeks of radiation therapy (total received radiation dose of 50 Gy) and graded from 0 to 4 using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria. Results: Ninety-eight patients (57.1% male) with a mean age of 62.8 ± 9.1 years were studied. Vitamin D deficiency was found in 57 patients (58.1%). Symptoms of acute proctitis occurred in 72 patients (73.4%) after radiation therapy. RTOG grade was significantly higher in patients with vitamin D deficiency than in normal cases (median [interquartile range] of 2 [0.5-3] vs 1 [0-2], P=.037). Vitamin D deficiency was associated with RTOG grade of ≥2, independent of possible confounding factors; odds ratio (95% confidence interval) = 3.07 (1.27-7.50), P=.013. Conclusions: Vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased severity of radiation-induced acute proctitis. Investigating the underlying mechanisms of this association and evaluating the effectiveness of vitamin D therapy in preventing radiation-induced acute proctitis is warranted.

  11. Radiation-Induced Breast Cancer Incidence and Mortality from Digital Mammography Screening: A Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Miglioretti, Diana L.; Lange, Jane; van den Broek, Jeroen J.; Lee, Christoph I.; van Ravesteyn, Nicolien T.; Ritley, Dominique; Kerlikowske, Karla; Fenton, Joshua J.; Melnikow, Joy; de Koning, Harry J.; Hubbard, Rebecca A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Estimates of radiation-induced breast cancer risk from mammography screening have not previously considered dose exposure variation or diagnostic work-up after abnormal screening. Objective To estimate distributions of radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality from digital mammography screening, considering exposure from screening and diagnostic mammography and dose variation across women. Design Two simulation-modeling approaches using common data on screening mammography from the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium and radiation dose from mammography from the Digital Mammographic Imaging Screening Trial. Setting U.S. population. Patients Women aged 40–74 years. Interventions Annual or biennial digital mammography screening from age 40, 45, or 50 until 74. Measurements Lifetime breast cancer deaths averted (benefits) and radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality per 100,000 women screened (harms). Results On average, annual screening of 100,000 women aged 40 to 74 years was projected to induce 125 breast cancers (95% confidence interval [CI]=88–178) leading to 16 deaths (95% CI=11–23) relative to 968 breast cancer deaths averted by early detection from screening. Women exposed at the 95th percentile were projected to develop 246 radiation-induced breast cancers leading to 32 deaths per 100,000 women. Women with large breasts requiring extra views for complete breast examination (8% of population) were projected to have higher radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality (266 cancers, 35 deaths per 100,000 women), compared to women with small or average breasts (113 cancers, 15 deaths per 100,000 women). Biennial screening starting at age 50 reduced risk of radiation-induced cancers 5-fold. Limitations We were unable to estimate years of life lost from radiation-induced breast cancer. Conclusions Radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality from digital mammography screening are impacted by dose

  12. Protective effect of prostaglandin E₁ on radiation-induced proliferative inhibition and apoptosis in keratinocytes and healing of radiation-induced skin injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Takikawa, Megumi; Sumi, Yuki; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Nambu, Masaki; Doumoto, Takashi; Yanagibayashi, Satoshi; Azuma, Ryuichi; Yamamoto, Naoto; Kishimoto, Satoko; Ishihara, Masayuki; Kiyosawa, Tomoharu

    2012-01-01

    We examined the effects of prostaglandin E₁ (PGE₁) on radiation-induced proliferation inhibition and apoptosis in keratinocytes and healing of radiation-induced skin injury in a rat model. PGE₁ had a protective effect on radiation-induced growth inhibition in keratinocytes in vitro, but not in fibroblasts. Varying concentrations of PGE₁ were subcutaneously administered into the posterior neck region. X-irradiation at a dose of 20 Gy was administrated to the lower part of the back using a lead sheet with two holes 30 min to 1 h before or after the administration of PGE₁. Although X-irradiation induced epilation, minor erosions, or skin ulcers in almost all rats, PGE₁ administration prior to irradiation reduced these irradiation injuries. Staining with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling showed that proportions of apoptotic keratinocytes in the X-irradiated skin of PGE₁-administered rats were significantly lower than for those in the skin of rats which did not receive PGE₁. Cutaneous full-thickness defective wounds were then formed in X-irradiated areas to examine the time course of wound healing. Wound healing was significantly delayed because of X-irradiation, but PGE₁ administration prior to irradiation led to a significantly shorter delay in wound healing compared with controls. Decreasing delay in wound healing was correlated with concentration of PGE₁ administrated. Thus, PGE₁-administration may potentially alleviate the radiation-induced skin injury.

  13. A molecular dynamics study of radiation induced diffusion in uranium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, G.; Maillard, S.; Brutzel, L. Van; Garcia, P.; Dorado, B.; Valot, C.

    2009-03-01

    The nuclear oxide fuels are submitted 'in-pile' to strong structural and chemical modifications due to the fissions and temperature. The diffusion of species is notably the result of a thermal activation and of radiation induced diffusion. This study proposes to estimate to what extent the radiation induced diffusion contributes to the diffusion of lattice atoms in UO2. Irradiations are simulated using molecular dynamics simulation by displacement cascades induced by uranium primary knock-on atoms between 1 and 80 keV. As atoms are easier to displace when their vibration amplitude increases, the temperature range which have been investigated is 300-1400 K. Cascade overlaps were also simulated. The material is shown to melt at the end of cascades, yielding a reduced threshold energy displacement. The nuclear contribution to the radiation induced diffusion is compared to thermally activated diffusion under in-reactor and long-term storage conditions.

  14. Attenuation of a radiation-induced conditioned taste aversion after the development of ethanol tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, W.A.; Rabin, B.M.

    1988-01-01

    An attempt to reduce a radiation-induced conditioned taste aversion (CTA) was undertaken by rendering animals tolerant to ethanol. Ethanol tolerance, developed over 5 days, was sufficient to block a radiation-induced taste aversion, as well as an ethanol-induced CTA. Several intermittent doses of ethanol, which did not induce tolerance but removed the novelty of the conditioning stimulus, blocked an ethanol-induced CTA but not the radiation-induced CTA. A CTA induced by doses of radiation up to 500 rads was attenuated. These data suggest that radioprotection developing in association with ethanol tolerance is a result of a physiological response to the chronic presence of ethanol not to the ethanol itself.

  15. Role of neurotensin in radiation-induced hypothermia in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kandasamy, S.B.; Hunt, W.A.; Harris, A.H. )

    1991-05-01

    The role of neurotensin in radiation-induced hypothermia was examined. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of neurotensin produced dose-dependent hypothermia. Histamine appears to mediate neurotensin-induced hypothermia because the mast cell stabilizer disodium cromoglycate and antihistamines blocked the hypothermic effects of neurotensin. An ICV pretreatment with neurotensin antibody attenuated neurotensin-induced hypothermia, but did not attenuate radiation-induced hypothermia, suggesting that radiation-induced hypothermia was not mediated by neurotensin.

  16. Acetylcysteine Rinse in Reducing Saliva Thickness and Mucositis in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer Undergoing Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-21

    Mucositis; Oral Complications; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage II Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage II Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Mucoepidermoid

  17. A Novel Peptide to Treat Oral Mucositis Blocks Endothelial and Epithelial Cell Apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Xiaoyan; Chen Peili; Sonis, Stephen T.; Lingen, Mark W.; Berger, Ann; Toback, F. Gary

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: No effective agents currently exist to treat oral mucositis (OM) in patients receiving chemoradiation for the treatment of head-and-neck cancer. We identified a novel 21-amino acid peptide derived from antrum mucosal protein-18 that is cytoprotective, mitogenic, and motogenic in tissue culture and animal models of gastrointestinal epithelial cell injury. We examined whether administration of antrum mucosal protein peptide (AMP-p) could protect against and/or speed recovery from OM. Methods and Materials: OM was induced in established hamster models by a single dose of radiation, fractionated radiation, or fractionated radiation together with cisplatin to simulate conventional treatments of head-and-neck cancer. Results: Daily subcutaneous administration of AMP-p reduced the occurrence of ulceration and accelerated mucosal recovery in all three models. A delay in the onset of erythema after irradiation was observed, suggesting that a protective effect exists even before injury to mucosal epithelial cells occurs. To test this hypothesis, the effects of AMP-p on tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}-induced apoptosis were studied in an endothelial cell line (human dermal microvascular endothelial cells) as well as an epithelial cell line (human adult low-calcium, high-temperature keratinocytes; HaCaT) used to model the oral mucosa. AMP-p treatment, either before or after cell monolayers were exposed to tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, protected against development of apoptosis in both cell types when assessed by annexin V and propidium iodide staining followed by flow cytometry or ligase-mediated polymerase chain reaction. Conclusions: These observations suggest that the ability of AMP-p to attenuate radiation-induced OM could be attributable, at least in part, to its antiapoptotic activity.

  18. Radiation-induced mutation at minisatellite loci

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrova, Y.E. |; Nesterov, V.N.; Krouchinsky, N.G.

    1997-10-01

    We are studying the radiation-induced increase of mutation rate in minisatellite loci in mice and humans. Minisatellite mutations were scored by multilocus DNA fingerprint analysis in the progeny of {gamma}-irradiated and non-irradiated mice. The frequency of mutation in offspring of irradiated males was 1.7 higher that in the control group. Germline mutation at human minisatellite loci was studied among children born in heavily polluted areas of the Mogilev district of Belarus after the Chernobyl accident and in a control population. The frequency of mutation assayed both by DNA fingerprinting and by eight single locus probes was found to be two times higher in the exposed families than in the control group. Furthermore, mutation rate was correlated with the parental radiation dose for chronic exposure {sup 137}Cs, consistent with radiation-induction of germline mutation. The potential use of minisatellites in monitoring germline mutation in humans will be discussed.

  19. Radiation-induced mutations and plant breeding

    SciTech Connect

    Naqvi, S.H.M.

    1985-01-01

    Ionizing radiation could cause genetic changes in an organism and could modify gene linkages. The induction of mutation through radiation is random and the probability of getting the desired genetic change is low but can be increased by manipulating different parameters such as dose rate, physical conditions under which the material has been irradiated, etc. Induced mutations have been used as a supplement to conventional plant breeding, particularly for creating genetic variability for specific characters such as improved plant structure, pest and disease resistance, and desired changes in maturity period; more than 200 varieties of crop plants have been developed by this technique. The Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission has used this technique fruitfully to evolve better germplasm in cotton, rice, chickpea, wheat and mungbean; some of the mutants have become popular commercial varieties. This paper describes some uses of radiation induced mutations and the results achieved in Pakistan so far.

  20. Transesophageal Echocardiography and Radiation-induced Damages

    PubMed Central

    Cottini, Marzia; Polizzi, Vincenzo; Pino, Paolo Giuseppe; Buffa, Vitaliano; Musumeci, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The long-term sequelae of mantle therapy include, especially lung and cardiac disease but also involve the vessels and the organs in the neck and thorax (such as thyroid, aorta, and esophagus). We presented the case of 66-year-old female admitted for congestive heart failure in radiation-induced heart disease. The patient had undergone to massive radiotherapy 42 years ago for Hodgkin's disease (type 1A). Transesophageal echocardiography was performed unsuccessfully with difficulty because of the rigidity and impedance of esophageal walls. Our case is an extraordinary report of radiotherapy's latency effect as a result of dramatic changes in the structure of mediastinum, in particular in the esophagus, causing unavailability of a transesophageal echocardiogram. PMID:27867461

  1. Radiation induced carcinoma of the larynx

    SciTech Connect

    Amendola, B.E.; Amendola, M.A.; McClatchey, K.D.

    1985-07-01

    A squamous cell carcinoma presented in a 20 year old female nonsmoker three years after receiving a high dosage of radiation therapy to the base of the skull, face and entire neuroaxis and intense combination chemotherapy for a parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma of the paranasal sinuses is reported. The larynx received a dose of about 3,500 rads over an eight week period. This dosage in conjunction with the associated intense chemotherapy regimen given to the patient may explain the appearance of a radiation induced tumor in an unusually short latent period. This certainly represents a risk in young patients in whom an aggressive combined approach is taken and the physician should be aware of.

  2. Management of radiation-induced rectal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Laterza, Liboria; Cecinato, Paolo; Guido, Alessandra; Mussetto, Alessandro; Fuccio, Lorenzo

    2013-11-01

    Pelvic radiation disease is one of the major complication after radiotherapy for pelvic cancers. The most commonly reported symptom is rectal bleeding which affects patients' quality of life. Therapeutic strategies for rectal bleeding are generally ignored and include medical, endoscopic, and hyperbaric oxygen treatments. Most cases of radiation-induced bleeding are mild and self-limiting, and treatment is normally not indicated. In cases of clinically significant bleeding (i.e. anaemia), medical therapies, including stool softeners, sucralfate enemas, and metronidazole, should be considered as first-line treatment options. In cases of failure, endoscopic therapy, mainly represented by argon plasma coagulation and hyperbaric oxygen treatments, are valid and complementary second-line treatment strategies. Although current treatment options are not always supported by high-quality studies, patients should be reassured that treatment options exist and success is achieved in most cases if the patient is referred to a dedicated centre.

  3. Radioprotectors and Mitigators of Radiation-Induced Normal Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cotrim, Ana P.; Hyodo, Fuminori; Baum, Bruce J.; Krishna, Murali C.; Mitchell, James B.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation is used in the treatment of a broad range of malignancies. Exposure of normal tissue to radiation may result in both acute and chronic toxicities that can result in an inability to deliver the intended therapy, a range of symptoms, and a decrease in quality of life. Radioprotectors are compounds that are designed to reduce the damage in normal tissues caused by radiation. These compounds are often antioxidants and must be present before or at the time of radiation for effectiveness. Other agents, termed mitigators, may be used to minimize toxicity even after radiation has been delivered. Herein, we review agents in clinical use or in development as radioprotectors and mitigators of radiation-induced normal tissue injury. Few agents are approved for clinical use, but many new compounds show promising results in preclinical testing. PMID:20413641

  4. The Dose Window for Radiation-Induced Protective Adaptive Responses

    PubMed Central

    Mitchel, Ronald E. J.

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive responses to low doses of low LET radiation occur in all organisms thus far examined, from single cell lower eukaryotes to mammals. These responses reduce the deleterious consequences of DNA damaging events, including radiation-induced or spontaneous cancer and non-cancer diseases in mice. The adaptive response in mammalian cells and mammals operates within a certain window that can be defined by upper and lower dose thresholds, typically between about 1 and 100 mGy for a single low dose rate exposure. However, these thresholds for protection are not a fixed function of total dose, but also vary with dose rate, additional radiation or non-radiation stressors, tissue type and p53 functional status. Exposures above the upper threshold are generally detrimental, while exposures below the lower threshold may or may not increase either cancer or non-cancer disease risk. PMID:20585438

  5. Study of radiation induced cancers in a breast screening programme.

    PubMed

    León, A; Verdú, G; Cuevas, M D; Salas, M D; Villaescusa, J I; Bueno, F

    2001-01-01

    It is demonstrated that screening mammography programmes reduce breast cancer mortality considerably. Nevertheless, radiology techniques have an intrinsic risk, the most important being the late somatic effect of the induction of cancer. This study was carried out in order to evaluate the risk to the population produced by the Comunidad Valenciana Breast Screening Programme. All the calculations are carried out for two risk models, UNSCEAR 94 and NRPB 93. On the one hand, screening series detriments are investigated as a function of doses delivered and other parameters related to population structure and X ray equipment. On the other hand the radiation induced cancer probability for a woman who starts at 45 years and remains in the programme until 65 years old is calculated as a function of mammography units' doses and average compression breast thickness. Finally, risk comparison between a screening programme starting at 45 years old and another one starting at 50 years old is made.

  6. 5-AED Enhances Survival of Irradiated Mice in a G-CSF-Dependent Manner, Stimulates Innate Immune Cell Function, Reduces Radiation-induced DNA Damage and Induces Genes that Modulate Cell Cycle Progression and Apoptosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    pre-irradiation) radio- protectants and (post-irradiation) therapeutics, as recognized by civilian and military government agencies [2– 4 ]. 5-AED is...2012 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5-AED Enhances Survival of Irradiated Mice in a G-CSF-Dependent Manner, Stimulates Innate Immune Cell Function, Reduces...control after 4 days, but not 8 days. The time course of plasma 5-AED after buccal de- livery (60 mg/kg) was similar, but levels were significantly lower

  7. Role of Oxidative Damage in Radiation-Induced Bone Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Alwood, Joshua S.; Limoli, Charles L.; Globus, Ruth K.

    2014-01-01

    used an array of countermeasures (Antioxidant diets and injections) to prevent the radiation-induced bone loss, although these did not prevent bone loss, analysis is ongoing to determine if these countermeasure protected radiation-induced damage to other tissues.

  8. Oral green tea catechin metabolites are incorporated into human skin and protect against UV radiation-induced cutaneous inflammation in association with reduced production of pro-inflammatory eicosanoid 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Lesley E; Darby, Gemma; Massey, Karen A; Clarke, Kayleigh A; Dew, Tristan P; Farrar, Mark D; Bennett, Susan; Watson, Rachel E B; Williamson, Gary; Nicolaou, Anna

    2013-09-14

    Green tea catechins (GTC) reduce UV radiation (UVR)-induced inflammation in experimental models, but human studies are scarce and their cutaneous bioavailability and mechanism of photoprotection are unknown. We aimed to examine oral GTC cutaneous uptake, ability to protect human skin against erythema induced by a UVR dose range and impact on potent cyclo-oxygenase- and lipoxygenase-produced mediators of UVR inflammation, PGE2 and 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE), respectively. In an open oral intervention study, sixteen healthy human subjects (phototype I/II) were given low-dose GTC (540 mg) with vitamin C (50 mg) daily for 12 weeks. Pre- and post-supplementation, the buttock skin was exposed to UVR and the resultant erythema quantified. Skin blister fluid and biopsies were taken from the unexposed and the UVR-exposed skin 24 h after a pro-inflammatory UVR challenge (three minimal erythema doses). Urine, skin tissue and fluid were analysed for catechin content and skin fluid for PGE2 and 12-HETE by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem MS. A total of fourteen completing subjects were supplement compliant (twelve female, median 42.5 years, range 29-59 years). Benzoic acid levels were increased in skin fluid post-supplementation (P= 0.03), and methylated gallic acid and several intact catechins and hydroxyphenyl-valerolactones were detected in the skin tissue and fluid. AUC analysis for UVR erythema revealed reduced response post-GTC (P= 0.037). Pre-supplementation, PGE2 and 12-HETE were UVR induced (P= 0.003, 0.0001). After GTC, UVR-induced 12-HETE reduced from mean 64 (sd 42) to 41 (sd 32) pg/μl (P= 0.01), while PGE2 was unaltered. Thus, GTC intake results in the incorporation of catechin metabolites into human skin associated with abrogated UVR-induced 12-HETE; this may contribute to protection against sunburn inflammation and potentially longer-term UVR-mediated damage.

  9. Radiation induces autophagic cell death via the p53/DRAM signaling pathway in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Li; Song, Zhiheng; Liang, Bing; Jia, Lili; Ma, Shumei; Liu, Xiaodong

    2016-06-01

    Autophagy is known to play a role in the response of breast cancer cells to radiation therapy. However, the mechanisms that mediate the process of autophagy and contribute to radiation-induced cell death and cell survival remain to be fully characterized. Therefore, in this study, the functional role of autophagy in radiation-induced cytotoxicity in breast cancer cells was investigated. After MCF-7 cells were exposed to various doses of radiation, increased monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining and a greater deposition of LC3-positive puncta were observed. Expression of the autophagy-related proteins, Beclin 1 and LC3-II, were also found to be upregulated. Radiation-induced autophagic cell death was partially abrogated following the administration of 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and in knockdown experiments of Atg5 and Beclin 1. In the gene microarray analysis performed after irradiation, a number of differentially expressed genes were identified. In particular, upregulation of both the mRNA and protein levels of the autophagy-related genes, DRAM and TIGAR, were detected. However, inhibition of autophagy by 3-MA reduced the radiation-induced upregulation of LC3-II and DRAM. Conversely, silencing of p53 downregulated the expression of LC3-II and DRAM following radiation. Silencing of DRAM reversed the upregulation of LC3-II and DRAM following radiation, partially blocked radiation-induced cell death, and no significant change in p53 expression was detected. Based on these results, the p53/DRAM signaling pathway appears to contribute to radiation-induced autophagic cell death in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

  10. White and dark kidney beans reduce colonic mucosal damage and inflammation in response to dextran sodium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Monk, Jennifer M; Zhang, Claire P; Wu, Wenqing; Zarepoor, Leila; Lu, Jenifer T; Liu, Ronghua; Pauls, K Peter; Wood, Geoffrey A; Tsao, Rong; Robinson, Lindsay E; Power, Krista A

    2015-07-01

    Common beans are a rich source of nondigestible fermentable components and phenolic compounds that have anti-inflammatory effects. We assessed the gut-health-promoting potential of kidney beans in healthy mice and their ability to attenuate colonic inflammation following dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) exposure (via drinking water, 2% DSS w/v, 7 days). C57BL/6 mice were fed one of three isocaloric diets: basal diet control (BD), or BD supplemented with 20% cooked white (WK) or dark red kidney (DK) bean flour for 3 weeks. In healthy mice, anti-inflammatory microbial-derived cecal short chain fatty acid (SCFA) levels (acetate, butyrate and propionate), colon crypt height and colonic Mucin 1 (MUC1) and Resistin-like Molecule beta (Relmβ) mRNA expression all increased in WK- and DK-fed mice compared to BD, indicative of enhanced microbial activity, gut barrier integrity and antimicrobial defense response. During colitis, both bean diets reduced (a) disease severity, (b) colonic histological damage and (c) increased mRNA expression of antimicrobial and barrier integrity-promoting genes (Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4), MUC1-3, Relmβ and Trefoil Factor 3 (TFF3)) and reduced proinflammatory mediator expression [interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, interferon (IFN)γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1], which correlated with reduced colon tissue protein levels. Further, bean diets exerted a systemic anti-inflammatory effect during colitis by reducing serum levels of IL-17A, IFNγ, TNFα, IL-1β and IL-6. In conclusion, both WK and DK bean-supplemented diets enhanced microbial-derived SCFA metabolite production, gut barrier integrity and the microbial defensive response in the healthy colon, which supported an anti-inflammatory phenotype during colitis. Collectively, these data demonstrate a beneficial colon-function priming effect of bean consumption that mitigates colitis severity.

  11. [Medical prevention and treatment of radiation-induced pulmonary complications].

    PubMed

    Vallard, A; Rancoule, C; Le Floch, H; Guy, J-B; Espenel, S; Le Péchoux, C; Deutsch, É; Magné, N; Chargari, C

    2017-08-01

    Radiation-induced lung injuries mainly include the (acute or sub-acute) radiation pneumonitis, the lung fibrosis and the bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP). The present review aims at describing the diagnostic process, the current physiopathological knowledge, and the available (non dosimetric) preventive and curative treatments. Radiation-induced lung injury is a diagnosis of exclusion, since clinical, radiological, or biological pathognomonic evidences do not exist. Investigations should necessarily include a thoracic high resolution CT-scan and lung function tests with a diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide. No treatment ever really showed efficacy to prevent acute radiation-induced lung injury, or to treat radiation-induced lung fibrosis. The most promising drugs in order to prevent radiation-induced lung injury are amifostine, angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors and pentoxifylline. Inhibitors of collagen synthesis are currently tested at a pre-clinical stage to limit the radiation-induced lung fibrosis. Regarding available treatments of radiation-induced pneumonitis, corticoids can be considered the cornerstone. However, no standardized program or guidelines concerning the initial dose and the gradual tapering have been scientifically established. Alternative treatments can be prescribed, based on clinical cases reporting on the efficacy of immunosuppressive drugs. Such data highlight the major role of the lung dosimetric protection in order to efficiently prevent radiation-induced lung injury. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Radiation-induced osteosarcoma of the sphenoid bone

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, S.; Nishio, S.; Morioka, T.; Fukui, M.; Kitamura, K.; Hikita, K. )

    1989-10-01

    The case of a patient who developed osteosarcoma in the sphenoid bone 15 years after radiation therapy for a craniopharyngioma is reported. Radiation-induced osteosarcoma of the sphenoid bone has not been reported previously. Reported cases of radiation-induced osteosarcomas are reviewed.

  13. [Radiation-induced cancers: state of the art in 1997].

    PubMed

    Cosset, J M

    1997-01-01

    Scientists now have available a large amount of data dealing with radiation-induced neoplasms. These data went back to anecdotal observations which were made in the very first years of utilization of X-rays and radioactive elements. In fact, it is essentially the strict follow-up of the Japanese populations irradiated by the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombing which allowed a more precise evaluation of the carcinogenicity of ionizing radiations. Further refinements came from therapeutical irradiations: it is now possible to study large cohorts of patients given well-known doses in well-defined volumes and followed for more than 20 years. Last but not least, a significant increase in the incidence and mortality of thyroid cancer has been detected in children contaminated by iodine radioisotopes after the Tchernobyl accident. Recently, some data suggested the emergence of "clusters" of leukemias close to some nuclear facilities, but this question remains highly polemical, both in France and in the UK. Other questions are still waiting for a precise answer; of course, the extrapolation of our available data to very low doses delivered at very low dose rates, but also the carcinogenic risk at high doses. For these "high" doses (about 30 to 70 Gy), a competition between mutagenesis and cell killing was expected, so that these dose levels were expected to be less carcinogenic than lower (a few sieverts) doses. Actually, recent data suggest that the carcinogenic risk goes on increasing up to relatively important doses. In addition, carcinogenic factors, such as tabacco, anticancer chemotherapy and individual susceptibility, are found more and more to be closely intricated with ionizing radiation in the genesis of a given cancer. Even if a number of questions are still pending, the already available data allow specialists, both in medicine and radioprotection, to edict strict rules which can be reasonably expected to have significantly reduced the risk of radiation-induced

  14. In vivo evidence for an endothelium-dependent mechanism in radiation-induced normal tissue injury

    PubMed Central

    Rannou, Emilie; François, Agnès; Toullec, Aurore; Guipaud, Olivier; Buard, Valérie; Tarlet, Georges; Mintet, Elodie; Jaillet, Cyprien; Iruela-Arispe, Maria Luisa; Benderitter, Marc; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Milliat, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiological mechanism involved in side effects of radiation therapy, and especially the role of the endothelium remains unclear. Previous results showed that plasminogen activator inhibitor-type 1 (PAI-1) contributes to radiation-induced intestinal injury and suggested that this role could be driven by an endothelium-dependent mechanism. We investigated whether endothelial-specific PAI-1 deletion could affect radiation-induced intestinal injury. We created a mouse model with a specific deletion of PAI-1 in the endothelium (PAI-1KOendo) by a Cre-LoxP system. In a model of radiation enteropathy, survival and intestinal radiation injury were followed as well as intestinal gene transcriptional profile and inflammatory cells intestinal infiltration. Irradiated PAI-1KOendo mice exhibited increased survival, reduced acute enteritis severity and attenuated late fibrosis compared with irradiated PAI-1flx/flx mice. Double E-cadherin/TUNEL labeling confirmed a reduced epithelial cell apoptosis in irradiated PAI-1KOendo. High-throughput gene expression combined with bioinformatic analyses revealed a putative involvement of macrophages. We observed a decrease in CD68+cells in irradiated intestinal tissues from PAI-1KOendo mice as well as modifications associated with M1/M2 polarization. This work shows that PAI-1 plays a role in radiation-induced intestinal injury by an endothelium-dependent mechanism and demonstrates in vivo that the endothelium is directly involved in the progression of radiation-induced enteritis. PMID:26510580

  15. Radiation-induced degradation of aqueous fluoranthene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Petar; Getoff, Nikola

    2005-01-01

    The radiation-induced degradation of fluoranthene (FA) in slightly alkaline aqueous solution was investigated in the presence of air as well as of N 2O. Depending on the starting FA-concentration the determined Gi(-FA) was 0.34 for 1×10 -5 mol/l FA upto 0.67 for 4.6×10 -5 mol/l FA. As major radiolytic products found by HPLC-analysis were: 9-fluorene carboxylic acid ( Gi =0.006), 9-fluorenone ( Gi=0.004) and fluorene ( Gi=0.002) in addition to a mixture of carboxylic acids and aldehydes. In the presence of N 2O (90% OH, 10% H) practically the same products were observed, however in this case the yield of the carboxylic acids was about 2-times higher than in solutions saturated with air, but 4-times less aldehydes, resp. For illustration of the rather complicated degradation process a probable reaction mechanism is presented.

  16. Radiation-induced segregation, hardening, and IASCC

    SciTech Connect

    Eason, E.D.; Nelson, E.E.

    1995-12-31

    Intergranular cracking has been discovered after extended radiation exposure in several boiling water reactor (BWR) internal components made of austenitic stainless steel and nickel-based alloys. There are fewer field observations of intergranular cracking in pressurized water reactors (PWR), but failures have occurred in bolts, springs, and fuel cladding. There is concern for other PWR components, some of which will receive greater radiation doses than BWR components during the plant lifetime. This paper presents the results of an investigation on the connection between radiation induced segregation, hardening and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). A data base was developed containing the available data on austenitic stainless steel where the grain boundary composition was measured by Field Emission Gun-Scanning Transmission Election Microscopy (FEG-STEM), the stress corrosion susceptibility was measured by constant extension rate tests (CERT) in light water reactor environments, some estimate of irradiated strength was available and the irradiation was conducted in a power reactor. The data base was analyzed using advanced data analysis techniques, including tree-structured pattern recognition and transformation analysis codes. The most sensitive variables and optimal modeling forms were identified using these techniques, then preliminary models were calibrated using nonlinear least squares. The results suggest that more than one mechanism causes IASCC.

  17. Evidence for Radiation-Induced Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation as a Major Cause of Radiation-Induced Death in Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Savage, Alexandria R.; Billings, Paul C.; Lin, Liyong; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives(s) The studies reported here were performed as part of a program in space radiation biology in which proton radiation like that present in solar particle events (SPEs), as well as conventional gamma radiation, were being evaluated in terms of the ability to affect hemostasis. Methods and Materials Ferrets were exposed to 0 – 2 Gray (Gy) of whole body proton or gamma radiation and monitored for 30 days. Blood was analyzed for blood cell counts, platelet clumping, thromboelastometry, and fibrin clot formation. Results The lethal dose of radiation to 50% of the population, known as the LD50, of ferrets was established at ~ 1.5 Gy, with 100% mortality at 2 Gy. Hypocoagulability was present as early as day 7 post-irradiation, with animals unable to generate a stable clot and exhibiting signs of platelet aggregation, thrombocytopenia, and fibrin clots in blood vessels of organs. Platelet counts were at normal levels during the early times post-irradiation when coagulopathies were present and progressively becoming more severe; platelet counts were greatly reduced at the time of the white blood cell nadir of 13 days. Conclusions The data presented here provide evidence that death at the LD50 in ferrets is most likely due to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). These data question the current hypothesis that death at relatively low doses of radiation is solely due to the cell killing effects of hematopoietic cells. The recognition that radiation-induced DIC is the most likely mechanism of death in ferrets raises the question of whether DIC is a contributing mechanism to radiation induced death at relatively low doses in large mammals. PMID:24495588

  18. Evidence for radiation-induced disseminated intravascular coagulation as a major cause of radiation-induced death in ferrets.

    PubMed

    Krigsfeld, Gabriel S; Savage, Alexandria R; Billings, Paul C; Lin, Liyong; Kennedy, Ann R

    2014-03-15

    The studies reported here were performed as part of a program in space radiation biology in which proton radiation like that present in solar particle events, as well as conventional gamma radiation, were being evaluated in terms of the ability to affect hemostasis. Ferrets were exposed to 0 to 2 Gy of whole-body proton or gamma radiation and monitored for 30 days. Blood was analyzed for blood cell counts, platelet clumping, thromboelastometry, and fibrin clot formation. The lethal dose of radiation to 50% of the population (LD50) of the ferrets was established at ∼ 1.5 Gy, with 100% mortality at 2 Gy. Hypocoagulability was present as early as day 7 postirradiation, with animals unable to generate a stable clot and exhibiting signs of platelet aggregation, thrombocytopenia, and fibrin clots in blood vessels of organs. Platelet counts were at normal levels during the early time points postirradiation when coagulopathies were present and becoming progressively more severe; platelet counts were greatly reduced at the time of the white blood cell nadir of 13 days. Data presented here provide evidence that death at the LD50 in ferrets is most likely due to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). These data question the current hypothesis that death at relatively low doses of radiation is due solely to the cell-killing effects of hematopoietic cells. The recognition that radiation-induced DIC is the most likely mechanism of death in ferrets raises the question of whether DIC is a contributing mechanism to radiation-induced death at relatively low doses in large mammals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Evidence for Radiation-Induced Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation as a Major Cause of Radiation-Induced Death in Ferrets

    SciTech Connect

    Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Savage, Alexandria R.; Billings, Paul C.; Lin, Liyong; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The studies reported here were performed as part of a program in space radiation biology in which proton radiation like that present in solar particle events, as well as conventional gamma radiation, were being evaluated in terms of the ability to affect hemostasis. Methods and Materials: Ferrets were exposed to 0 to 2 Gy of whole-body proton or gamma radiation and monitored for 30 days. Blood was analyzed for blood cell counts, platelet clumping, thromboelastometry, and fibrin clot formation. Results: The lethal dose of radiation to 50% of the population (LD{sub 50}) of the ferrets was established at ∼1.5 Gy, with 100% mortality at 2 Gy. Hypocoagulability was present as early as day 7 postirradiation, with animals unable to generate a stable clot and exhibiting signs of platelet aggregation, thrombocytopenia, and fibrin clots in blood vessels of organs. Platelet counts were at normal levels during the early time points postirradiation when coagulopathies were present and becoming progressively more severe; platelet counts were greatly reduced at the time of the white blood cell nadir of 13 days. Conclusions: Data presented here provide evidence that death at the LD{sub 50} in ferrets is most likely due to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). These data question the current hypothesis that death at relatively low doses of radiation is due solely to the cell-killing effects of hematopoietic cells. The recognition that radiation-induced DIC is the most likely mechanism of death in ferrets raises the question of whether DIC is a contributing mechanism to radiation-induced death at relatively low doses in large mammals.

  20. [Mucosal immune system and mucosal vaccine].

    PubMed

    Yanagita, M; Hiroi, T; Kiyono, H

    1997-02-01

    In the recent years, mucosal immune system is recognized as the new world in the area of immunology. The host is continuously exposed to the numerous numbers of environmental antigens via the mucosa and the skin. A total surface area of the mucosa is approximately 200 times larger than that of the skin, and the former surface area contains a large numbers of lymphoid cells (> 10(11)). In order to provide an effective defence for the host by vaccine, it is logical to consider the mucosal immune system. According to the new informations obtained by the modern cellular and molecular immunobiological knowledges and approaches, the concept of the mucosal immune system has been rapidly proceeded to apply for the development of mucosal vaccine. In this report, we have reviewed and discussed the recent progress in the characterization of mucosal immune system and the development of mucosal vaccine.

  1. Ionizing Radiation-Induced Endothelial Cell Senescence and Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingying; Boerma, Marjan; Zhou, Daohong

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation induces not only apoptosis but also senescence. While the role of endothelial cell apoptosis in mediating radiation-induced acute tissue injury has been extensively studied, little is known about the role of endothelial cell senescence in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced late effects. Senescent endothelial cells exhibit decreased production of nitric oxide and expression of thrombomodulin, increased expression of adhesion molecules, elevated production of reactive oxygen species and inflammatory cytokines and an inability to proliferate and form capillary-like structures in vitro. These findings suggest that endothelial cell senescence can lead to endothelial dysfunction by dysregulation of vasodilation and hemostasis, induction of oxidative stress and inflammation and inhibition of angiogenesis, which can potentially contribute to radiation-induced late effects such as cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). In this article, we discuss the mechanisms by which radiation induces endothelial cell senescence, the roles of endothelial cell senescence in radiation-induced CVDs and potential strategies to prevent, mitigate and treat radiation-induced CVDs by targeting senescent endothelial cells. PMID:27387862

  2. Extracellular Adenosine Production by ecto-5'-Nucleotidase (CD73) Enhances Radiation-Induced Lung Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Wirsdörfer, Florian; de Leve, Simone; Cappuccini, Federica; Eldh, Therese; Meyer, Alina V; Gau, Eva; Thompson, Linda F; Chen, Ning-Yuan; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Fischer, Ute; Kasper, Michael; Klein, Diana; Ritchey, Jerry W; Blackburn, Michael R; Westendorf, Astrid M; Stuschke, Martin; Jendrossek, Verena

    2016-05-15

    Radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis is a severe side effect of thoracic irradiation, but its pathogenesis remains poorly understood and no effective treatment is available. In this study, we investigated the role of the extracellular adenosine as generated by the ecto-5'-nucleotidase CD73 in fibrosis development after thoracic irradiation. Exposure of wild-type C57BL/6 mice to a single dose (15 Gray) of whole thorax irradiation triggered a progressive increase in CD73 activity in the lung between 3 and 30 weeks postirradiation. In parallel, adenosine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were increased by approximately 3-fold. Histologic evidence of lung fibrosis was observed by 25 weeks after irradiation. Conversely, CD73-deficient mice failed to accumulate adenosine in BALF and exhibited significantly less radiation-induced lung fibrosis (P < 0.010). Furthermore, treatment of wild-type mice with pegylated adenosine deaminase or CD73 antibodies also significantly reduced radiation-induced lung fibrosis. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that CD73 potentiates radiation-induced lung fibrosis, suggesting that existing pharmacologic strategies for modulating adenosine may be effective in limiting lung toxicities associated with the treatment of thoracic malignancies. Cancer Res; 76(10); 3045-56. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Evolved Cellular Mechanisms to Respond to Genotoxic Insults: Implications for Radiation-Induced Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Fleenor, Courtney J.; Higa, Kelly; Weil, Michael M.; DeGregori, James

    2015-01-01

    Human exposure to ionizing radiation is highly associated with adverse health effects, including reduced hematopoietic cell function and increased risk of carcinogenesis. The hematopoietic deficits manifest across blood cell types and persist for years after radiation exposure, suggesting a long-lived and multi-potent cellular reservoir for radiation-induced effects. As such, research has focused on identifying both the immediate and latent hematopoietic stem cell responses to radiation exposure. Radiation-associated effects on hematopoietic function and malignancy development have generally been attributed to the direct induction of mutations resulting from radiation-induced DNA damage. Other studies have illuminated the role of cellular programs that both limit and enhance radiation-induced tissue phenotypes and carcinogenesis. In this review, distinct but collaborative cellular responses to genotoxic insults are highlighted, with an emphasis on how these programmed responses impact hematopoietic cellular fitness and competition. These radiation-induced cellular programs include apoptosis, senescence and impaired self-renewal within the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) pool. In the context of sporadic DNA damage to a cell, these cellular responses act in concert to restore tissue function and prevent selection for adaptive oncogenic mutations. But in the contexts of whole-tissue exposure or whole-body exposure to genotoxins, such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy, we propose that these programs can contribute to long-lasting tissue impairment and increased carcinogenesis. PMID:26414506

  4. Inactivation of Kupffer Cells by Gadolinium Chloride Protects Murine Liver From Radiation-Induced Apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Du Shisuo; Qiang Min; Zeng Zhaochong; Ke Aiwu; Ji Yuan; Zhang Zhengyu; Zeng Haiying; Liu Zhongshan

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To determine whether the inhibition of Kupffer cells before radiotherapy (RT) would protect hepatocytes from radiation-induced apoptosis. Materials and Methods: A single 30-Gy fraction was administered to the upper abdomen of Sprague-Dawley rats. The Kupffer cell inhibitor gadolinium chloride (GdCl3; 10 mg/kg body weight) was intravenously injected 24 h before RT. The rats were divided into four groups: group 1, sham RT plus saline (control group); group 2, sham RT plus GdCl3; group 3, RT plus saline; and group 4, RT plus GdCl3. Liver tissue was collected for measurement of apoptotic cytokine expression and evaluation of radiation-induced liver toxicity by analysis of liver enzyme activities, hepatocyte micronucleus formation, apoptosis, and histologic staining. Results: The expression of interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha was significantly attenuated in group 4 compared with group 3 at 2, 6, 24, and 48 h after injection (p <0.05). At early points after RT, the rats in group 4 exhibited significantly lower levels of liver enzyme activity, apoptotic response, and hepatocyte micronucleus formation compared with those in group 3. Conclusion: Selective inactivation of Kupffer cells with GdCl3 reduced radiation-induced cytokine production and protected the liver against acute radiation-induced damage.

  5. A Prospective Cohort Study on Radiation-induced Hypothyroidism: Development of an NTCP Model

    SciTech Connect

    Boomsma, Marjolein J.; Bijl, Hendrik P.; Christianen, Miranda E.M.C.; Beetz, Ivo; Chouvalova, Olga; Steenbakkers, Roel J.H.M.; Laan, Bernard F.A.M. van der; Oosting, Sjoukje F.; Schilstra, Cornelis; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To establish a multivariate normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. Methods and Materials: The thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) level of 105 patients treated with (chemo-) radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer was prospectively measured during a median follow-up of 2.5 years. Hypothyroidism was defined as elevated serum TSH with decreased or normal free thyroxin (T4). A multivariate logistic regression model with bootstrapping was used to determine the most important prognostic variables for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. Results: Thirty-five patients (33%) developed primary hypothyroidism within 2 years after radiation therapy. An NTCP model based on 2 variables, including the mean thyroid gland dose and the thyroid gland volume, was most predictive for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. NTCP values increased with higher mean thyroid gland dose (odds ratio [OR]: 1.064/Gy) and decreased with higher thyroid gland volume (OR: 0.826/cm{sup 3}). Model performance was good with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.85. Conclusions: This is the first prospective study resulting in an NTCP model for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. The probability of hypothyroidism rises with increasing dose to the thyroid gland, whereas it reduces with increasing thyroid gland volume.

  6. A Combination of Podophyllotoxin and Rutin Attenuates Radiation Induced Gastrointestinal Injury by Negatively Regulating NF-κB/p53 Signaling in Lethally Irradiated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kalita, Bhargab; Ranjan, Rajiv; Singh, Abhinav; Yashavarddhan, M. H.; Bajaj, Sania; Gupta, Manju Lata

    2016-01-01

    Development of an effective radio protector to minimise radiation-inflicted damages have largely failed owing to inherent toxicity of most of the agents examined so far. This study is centred towards delivering protection to lethally irradiated mice by pre-administration of a safe formulation G-003M (combination of podophyllotoxin and rutin) majorly through regulation of inflammatory and cell death pathways in mice. Single intramuscular dose of G-003M injected 60 min prior to 9 Gy exposure rescued 89% of whole body lethally irradiated C57BL/6J mice. Studies have revealed reduction in radiation induced reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO) generation, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels and intestinal apoptosis in G-003M pre-treated mice intestine. Restricted nuclear translocation of redox-sensitive Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and subsequent downregulation of cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS; EC 1.14.13.39) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) levels demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effect that G-003M exerts. Support to early hematopoietic recovery was exhibited through G-003M mediated induction of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and interleukin (IL-6) levels in lethally irradiated mice. Considerable attenuation in radiation induced morphological damage to the intestinal villi, crypts and mucosal layers was observed in G-003M pre-treated mice. Additionally, our formulation did not reduce the sensitivity of tumor tissue to radiation. Altogether, these results suggest that G-003M ameliorates the deleterious effects of radiation exposure by minimising ROS and NO generation and effectively regulating inflammatory and cell death pathways. Mechanism of protection elucidated in the current study demonstrates that G-003M can be used as a safe and effective radio protective agent in radiotherapy for human application. PMID:28036347

  7. A Combination of Podophyllotoxin and Rutin Attenuates Radiation Induced Gastrointestinal Injury by Negatively Regulating NF-κB/p53 Signaling in Lethally Irradiated Mice.

    PubMed

    Kalita, Bhargab; Ranjan, Rajiv; Singh, Abhinav; Yashavarddhan, M H; Bajaj, Sania; Gupta, Manju Lata

    2016-01-01

    Development of an effective radio protector to minimise radiation-inflicted damages have largely failed owing to inherent toxicity of most of the agents examined so far. This study is centred towards delivering protection to lethally irradiated mice by pre-administration of a safe formulation G-003M (combination of podophyllotoxin and rutin) majorly through regulation of inflammatory and cell death pathways in mice. Single intramuscular dose of G-003M injected 60 min prior to 9 Gy exposure rescued 89% of whole body lethally irradiated C57BL/6J mice. Studies have revealed reduction in radiation induced reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO) generation, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels and intestinal apoptosis in G-003M pre-treated mice intestine. Restricted nuclear translocation of redox-sensitive Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and subsequent downregulation of cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS; EC 1.14.13.39) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) levels demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effect that G-003M exerts. Support to early hematopoietic recovery was exhibited through G-003M mediated induction of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and interleukin (IL-6) levels in lethally irradiated mice. Considerable attenuation in radiation induced morphological damage to the intestinal villi, crypts and mucosal layers was observed in G-003M pre-treated mice. Additionally, our formulation did not reduce the sensitivity of tumor tissue to radiation. Altogether, these results suggest that G-003M ameliorates the deleterious effects of radiation exposure by minimising ROS and NO generation and effectively regulating inflammatory and cell death pathways. Mechanism of protection elucidated in the current study demonstrates that G-003M can be used as a safe and effective radio protective agent in radiotherapy for human application.

  8. The effects of sucralfate suspension and diphenhydramine syrup plus kaolin-pectin on radiotherapy-induced mucositis

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, G.; Loftus, L.; Cuddy, P.; Barker, B. )

    1991-03-01

    A prospective, double-blind study compared the effectiveness of sucralfate suspension with diphenhydramine syrup plus kaolin-pectin in reducing severity and pain of radiation-induced oropharyngeal mucositis. Fourteen patients who received at least 4600 cGy to the oral cavity used one of the mouth rinses four times a day, beginning at 1600 cGy. Data were collected on daily perceived pain and helpfulness of mouth rinse, weekly mucositis grade, weight change, and interruption of therapy. Analysis of data revealed no statistically significant differences between the two groups in any parameter. A retrospective review of 15 patients who had received at least 4600 cGy radiation to the oropharynx but had not used a daily mouth-coating rinse, was compared with the study group. Comparison of the two groups suggested that consistent daily oral hygiene and use of a mouth-coating agent will result in less pain and may reduce weight loss and interruption of radiation because of severe mucositis.

  9. Radiation-Induced Alopecia after Endovascular Embolization under Fluoroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ounsakul, Vipawee; Iamsumang, Wimolsiri

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced alopecia after fluoroscopically guided procedures is becoming more common due to an increasing use of endovascular procedures. It is characterized by geometric shapes of nonscarring alopecia related to the area of radiation. We report a case of a 46-year-old man presenting with asymptomatic, sharply demarcated rectangular, nonscarring alopecic patch on the occipital scalp following cerebral angiography with fistula embolization under fluoroscopy. His presentations were compatible with radiation-induced alopecia. Herein, we also report a novel scalp dermoscopic finding of blue-grey dots in a target pattern around yellow dots and follicles, which we detected in the lesion of radiation-induced alopecia. PMID:28074164

  10. Combined treatment with dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) inhibitor sitagliptin and elemental diets reduced indomethacin-induced intestinal injury in rats via the increase of mucosal glucagon-like peptide-2 concentration

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Kaori; Inoue, Takuya; Yorifuji, Naoki; Iguchi, Munetaka; Sakanaka, Taisuke; Narabayashi, Ken; Kakimoto, Kazuki; Nouda, Sadaharu; Okada, Toshihiko; Ishida, Kumi; Abe, Yosuke; Masuda, Daisuke; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Fukunishi, Shinya; Umegaki, Eiji; Akiba, Yasutada; Kaunitz, Jonathan D.; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2015-01-01

    The gut incretin glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and the intestinotropic hormone GLP-2 are released from enteroendocrine L cells in response to ingested nutrients. Treatment with an exogenous GLP-2 analogue increases intestinal villous mass and prevents intestinal injury. Since GLP-2 is rapidly degraded by dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4), DPP4 inhibition may be an effective treatment for intestinal ulcers. We measured mRNA expression and DPP enzymatic activity in intestinal segments. Mucosal DPP activity and GLP concentrations were measured after administration of the DPP4 inhibitor sitagliptin (STG). Small intestinal ulcers were induced by indomethacin (IM) injection. STG was given before IM treatment, or orally administered after IM treatment with or without an elemental diet (ED). DPP4 mRNA expression and enzymatic activity were high in the jejunum and ileum. STG dose-dependently suppressed ileal mucosal enzyme activity. Treatment with STG prior to IM reduced small intestinal ulcer scores. Combined treatment with STG and ED accelerated intestinal ulcer healing, accompanied by increased mucosal GLP-2 concentrations. The reduction of ulcers by ED and STG was reversed by co-administration of the GLP-2 receptor antagonist. DPP4 inhibition combined with luminal nutrients, which up-regulate mucosal concentrations of GLP-2, may be an effective therapy for the treatment of small intestinal ulcers. PMID:25759522

  11. Lipotransfer for radiation-induced skin fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R; Griffin, M; Adigbli, G; Kalavrezos, N; Butler, P E M

    2016-07-01

    Radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) is a late complication of radiotherapy that results in progressive functional and cosmetic impairment. Autologous fat has emerged as an option for soft tissue reconstruction. There are also sporadic reports suggesting regression of fibrosis following regional lipotransfer. This systematic review aimed to identify cellular mechanisms driving RIF, and the potential role of lipotransfer in attenuating these processes. PubMed, OVID and Google Scholar databases were searched to identify all original articles regarding lipotransfer for RIF. All articles describing irradiated fibroblast or myofibroblast behaviour were included. Data elucidating the mechanisms of RIF, role of lipotransfer in RIF and methods to quantify fibrosis were extracted. Ninety-eight studies met the inclusion criteria. A single, definitive model of RIF is yet to be established, but four cellular mechanisms were identified through in vitro studies. Twenty-one studies identified connective tissue growth factor and transforming growth factor β1 cytokines as drivers of fibrotic cascades. Hypoxia was demonstrated to propagate fibrogenesis in three studies. Oxidative stress from the release of reactive oxygen species and free radicals was also linked to RIF in 11 studies. Purified autologous fat grafts contain cellular and non-cellular properties that potentially interact with these processes. Six methods for quantifying fibrotic changes were evaluated including durometry, ultrasound shear wave elastography, thermography, dark field imaging, and laser Doppler and laser speckle flowmetry. Understanding how lipotransfer causes regression of RIF remains unclear; there are a number of new hypotheses for future research. © 2016 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Delayed Radiation-Induced Vasculitic Leukoencephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, Philipp J.; Park, Henry S.; Knisely, Jonathan P.S.; Chiang, Veronica L.; Vortmeyer, Alexander O.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Recently, single-fraction, high-dosed focused radiation therapy such as that administered by Gamma Knife radiosurgery has been used increasingly for the treatment of metastatic brain cancer. Radiation therapy to the brain can cause delayed leukoencephalopathy, which carries its own significant morbidity and mortality. While radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy is known to be clinically different from that following fractionated radiation, pathological differences are not well characterized. In this study, we aimed to integrate novel radiographic and histopathologic observations to gain a conceptual understanding of radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy. Methods and Materials: We examined resected tissues of 10 patients treated at Yale New Haven Hospital between January 1, 2009, and June 30, 2010, for brain metastases that had been previously treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery, who subsequently required surgical management of a symptomatic regrowing lesion. None of the patients showed pathological evidence of tumor recurrence. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging data for each of the 10 patients were then studied retrospectively. Results: We provide evidence to show that radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy may present as an advancing process that extends beyond the original high-dose radiation field. Neuropathologic examination of the resected tissue revealed traditionally known leukoencephalopathic changes including demyelination, coagulation necrosis, and vascular sclerosis. Unexpectedly, small and medium-sized vessels revealed transmural T-cell infiltration indicative of active vasculitis. Conclusions: We propose that the presence of a vasculitic component in association with radiation-induced leukoencephalopathy may facilitate the progressive nature of the condition. It may also explain the resemblance of delayed leukoencephalopathy with recurring tumor on virtually all imaging modalities used for posttreatment follow-up.

  13. Oral mucosal status and major salivary gland function

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, A.; Fox, P.C.; Ship, J.A.; Atkinson, J.C.; Macynski, A.A.; Baum, B.J. )

    1990-07-01

    Normal salivary function is considered to be critical for the maintenance of healthy oral mucosa. However, few studies have examined mucosal changes in patients with objectively documented salivary gland performance. In the present report, the mucosal status of 298 subjects being evaluated in a dry mouth clinic was assessed. A complete oral examination was performed and unstimulated and stimulated salivary samples were collected separately from the parotid and submandibular/sublingual glands. Data were analyzed according to diagnosis and salivary output after the assignment of an oral mucosal rating to each subject. In general, the mucosal surfaces were well preserved and infections were not seen. Patients evaluated for Sjoegren's syndrome and radiation-induced xerostomia had the lowest salivary gland performance but displayed a mucosal status similar to denture-wearing healthy subjects or patients with normal salivary flow who had idiopathic xerostomia. However, those patients with a total lack of salivary flow rarely had normal-appearing oral mucosa. These results confirm a role for saliva in oral mucosal preservation and also suggest that other factors may act to maintain oral mucosal integrity.

  14. Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Malignancies and Acute Biological Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Ann

    The hypothesis being evaluated in this research program is that control of radiation induced oxidative stress will reduce the risk of radiation induced adverse biological effects occurring as a result of exposure to the types of radiation encountered during space travel. As part of this grant work, we have evaluated the protective effects of several antioxidants and dietary supplements and observed that a mixture of antioxidants (AOX), containing L-selenomethionine, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), ascorbic acid, vitamin E succinate, and alpha-lipoic acid, is highly effective at reducing space radiation induced oxidative stress in both in vivo and in vitro systems, space radiation induced cytotoxicity and malignant transformation in vitro [1-7]. In studies designed to determine whether the AOX formulation could affect radiation induced mortality [8], it was observed that the AOX dietary supplement increased the 30-day survival of ICR male mice following exposure to a potentially lethal dose (8 Gy) of X-rays when given prior to or after animal irradiation. Pretreatment of animals with antioxidants resulted in significantly higher total white blood cell and neutrophil counts in peripheral blood at 4 and 24 hours following exposure to doses of 1 Gy and 8 Gy. Antioxidant treatment also resulted in increased bone marrow cell counts following irradiation, and prevented peripheral lymphopenia following 1 Gy irradiation. Supplementation with antioxidants in irradiated animals resulted in several gene expression changes: the antioxidant treatment was associated with increased Bcl-2, and decreased Bax, caspase-9 and TGF-β1 mRNA expression in the bone marrow following irradiation. These results suggest that modulation of apoptosis may be mechanistically involved in hematopoietic system radioprotection by antioxidants. Maintenance of the antioxidant diet was associated with improved recovery of the bone marrow following sub-lethal or potentially lethal irradiation. Taken together

  15. Lactobacillus casei DG and its postbiotic reduce the inflammatory mucosal response: an ex-vivo organ culture model of post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Compare, Debora; Rocco, Alba; Coccoli, Pietro; Angrisani, Debora; Sgamato, Costantino; Iovine, Barbara; Salvatore, Umberto; Nardone, Gerardo

    2017-04-14

    The evidence on the role of gut microbiota in post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS) is convincing. Lactobacillus spp. positively affect IBS symptoms, although the mechanisms through which probiotics exert their beneficial effects are largely unknown. The aim of the study is to evaluate the role of Lactobacillus casei DG (LC-DG) and its postbiotic (PB) in modulating the inflammatory/immune-response in PI-IBS in an ex-vivo organ culture model. Ex vivo cultures of ileal and colonic mucosa from 10 PI-IBS, diarrhea predominant subtype (D) patients, and 10 healthy controls (HC) were treated with LPS, LC-DG and PB. Interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 mRNA levels were assessed by real-time PCR and Toll like receptor 4 (TLR-4) protein expression by Western blotting. At baseline, IL-1α, IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA levels as well as TLR-4 protein expression were significantly higher while IL-10 mRNA levels were lower in PI-IBS D than in HC in both ileum and colon. LC-DG and PB significantly reduced the mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and TLR-4 while increased that of IL-10 after LPS stimulation. The protective effect was more pronounced for PB than LC-DG treatment. LC-DG and its PB attenuate the inflammatory mucosal response in an ex-vivo organ culture model of PI-IBS D.

  16. Prophylaxis and management of acute radiation-induced skin reactions: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Salvo, N.; Barnes, E.; van Draanen, J.; Stacey, E.; Mitera, G.; Breen, D.; Giotis, A.; Czarnota, G.; Pang, J.; De Angelis, C.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a common treatment for cancer patients. One of the most common side effects of radiation is acute skin reaction (radiation dermatitis) that ranges from a mild rash to severe ulceration. Approximately 85% of patients treated with radiation therapy will experience a moderate-to-severe skin reaction. Acute radiation-induced skin reactions often lead to itching and pain, delays in treatment, and diminished aesthetic appearance—and subsequently to a decrease in quality of life. Surveys have demonstrated that a wide variety of topical, oral, and intravenous agents are used to prevent or to treat radiation-induced skin reactions. We conducted a literature review to identify trials that investigated products for the prophylaxis and management of acute radiation dermatitis. Thirty-nine studies met the pre-defined criteria, with thirty-three being categorized as prophylactic trials and six as management trials. For objective evaluation of skin reactions, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria and the U.S. National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria were the most commonly used tools (65% of the studies). Topical corticosteroid agents were found to significantly reduce the severity of skin reactions; however, the trials of corticosteroids evaluated various agents, and no clear indication about a preferred corticosteroid has emerged. Amifostine and oral enzymes were somewhat effective in preventing radiation-induced skin reactions in phase ii and phase iii trials respectively; further large randomized controlled trials should be undertaken to better investigate those products. Biafine cream (Ortho–McNeil Pharmaceuticals, Titusville, NJ, U.S.A.) was found not to be superior to standard regimes in the prevention of radiation-induced skin reactions (n = 6). In conclusion, the evidence is insufficient to support the use of a particular agent for the prevention and management of acute radiation-induced skin reactions. Future trials should focus

  17. Pathogenesis and Prevention of Radiation-induced Myocardial Fibrosis

    PubMed

    Liu, Li Kun; Ouyang, Weiwei; Zhao, Xing; Su, Sheng Fa; Yang, Yan; Ding, Wen Jin; Luo, Da Xian; He, Zhi Xu; Lu, Bing

    2017-03-01

    Radiation therapy is one of the most important methods for the treatment of malignant tumors. However, in radiotherapy for thoracic tumors such as breast cancer, lung cancer, esophageal cancer, and mediastinal lymphoma, the heart, located in the mediastinum, is inevitably affected by the irradiation, leading to pericardial disease, myocardial fibrosis, coronary artery disease, valvular lesions, and cardiac conduction system injury, which are considered radiation-induced heart diseases. Delayed cardiac injury especially myocardial fibrosis is more prominent, and its incidence is as high as 20–80%. Myocardial fibrosis is the final stage of radiation-induced heart diseases, and it increases the stiffness of the myocardium and decreases myocardial systolic and diastolic function, resulting in myocardial electrical physiological disorder, arrhythmia, incomplete heart function, or even sudden death. This article reviews the pathogenesis and prevention of radiation-induced myocardial fibrosis for providing references for the prevention and treatment of radiation-induced myocardial fibrosis. Creative Commons Attribution License

  18. Radiation-induced charge trapping in bipolar base oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Fleetwood, D.M.; Riewe, L.C.; Witczak, Schrimpf, R.D.

    1996-03-01

    Capacitance-voltage and thermally stimulated current methods are used to investigate radiation induced charge trapping in bipolar base oxides. Results are compared with models of oxide and interface trap charge buildup at low electric fields.

  19. Feasibility of OCT to detect radiation-induced esophageal damage in small animal models (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelvehgaran, Pouya; Alderliesten, Tanja; Salguero, Javier; Borst, Gerben; Song, Ji-Ying; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; de Boer, Johannes F.; de Bruin, Daniel M.; van Herk, Marcel B.

    2016-03-01

    Lung cancer survival is poor and radiotherapy patients often suffer serious treatment side effects. The esophagus is particularly sensitive leading to reduced food intake or even fistula formation. Only few direct techniques exist to measure radiation-induced esophageal damage, for which knowledge is needed to improve the balance between risk of tumor recurrence and complications. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a minimally-invasive imaging technique that obtains cross-sectional, high-resolution (1-10µm) images and is capable of scanning the esophageal wall up to 2-3mm depth. In this study we investigated the feasibility of OCT to detect esophageal radiation damage in mice. In total 30 mice were included in 4 study groups (1 main and 3 control groups). Mice underwent cone-beam CT imaging for initial setup assessment and dose planning followed by single-fraction dose delivery of 4, 10, 16, and 20Gy on 5mm spots, spaced 10mm apart. Mice were repeatedly imaged using OCT: pre-irradiation and up to 3 months post-irradiation. The control groups received either OCT only, irradiation only, or were sham-operated. We used histopathology as gold standard for radiation-induced damage diagnosis. The study showed edema in both the main and OCT-only groups. Furthermore, radiation-induced damage was primarily found in the highest dose region (distal esophagus). Based on the histopathology reports we were able to identify the radiation-induced damage in the OCT images as a change in tissue scattering related to the type of induced damage. This finding indicates the feasibility and thereby the potentially promising role of OCT in radiation-induced esophageal damage assessment.

  20. Radar detection of radiation-induced ionization in air

    DOEpatents

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Heifetz, Alexander; Chien, Hual-Te; Liao, Shaolin; Koehl, Eugene R.; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    2015-07-21

    A millimeter wave measurement system has been developed for remote detection of airborne nuclear radiation, based on electromagnetic scattering from radiation-induced ionization in air. Specifically, methods of monitoring radiation-induced ionization of air have been investigated, and the ionized air has been identified as a source of millimeter wave radar reflection, which can be utilized to determine the size and strength of a radiation source.

  1. Early corticosteroid administration in experimental radiation-induced heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, W.C.; Stryker, J.A.; Abt, A.A.; Chung, C.K.; Whitesell, L.; Zelis, R.

    1980-02-01

    The ability of dexamethasone (DEX) to reduce the severity of the late stage of radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) was assessed in 25 New Zealand white rabbits. Ten rabbits served as unirradiated controls (CONT). In Group A, seven rabbits received intravenous DEX prior to irradiation and every 24 hours for three consecutive days. DEX was not administered to the eight rabbits in Group B. At 100 days postirradiation, the severity of the late state was determined by microscopic examination (MICRO) for myocardial fibrosis and determination of myocardial hydroxyproline content (MHP). Myocardial fibrosis was evident in groups A (40%) and B (80%) while none was present in CONT by MICRO. One rabbit in Group B with no fibrosis by MICRO had abnormally increased MHP. MHP was significantly increased in Groups A and B, as compared to CONT (p < 0.01). In addition to less fibrosis by MICRO, Group A demonstrated a significant reduction of MHP when compared to Group B (p < 0.05). Determination of MHP may be superior to MICRO in the detection of the late stage of RIHD. Also, early DEX administration appears to reduce myocardial collagen content (fibrosis) in this experimental model.

  2. Radiation-Induced Second Cancer Risk Estimates From Radionuclide Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednarz, Bryan; Besemer, Abigail

    2017-09-01

    The use of radionuclide therapy in the clinical setting is expected to increase significantly over the next decade. There is an important need to understand the radiation-induced second cancer risk associated with these procedures. In this study the radiation-induced cancer risk in five radionuclide therapy patients was investigated. These patients underwent serial SPECT imaging scans following injection as part of a clinical trial testing the efficacy of a 131Iodine-labeled radiopharmaceutical. Using these datasets the committed absorbed doses to multiple sensitive structures were calculated using RAPID, which is a novel Monte Carlo-based 3D dosimetry platform developed for personalized dosimetry. The excess relative risk (ERR) for radiation-induced cancer in these structures was then derived from these dose estimates following the recommendations set forth in the BEIR VII report. The radiation-induced leukemia ERR was highest among all sites considered reaching a maximum value of approximately 4.5. The radiation-induced cancer risk in the kidneys, liver and spleen ranged between 0.3 and 1.3. The lifetime attributable risks (LARs) were also calculated, which ranged from 30 to 1700 cancers per 100,000 persons and were highest for leukemia and the liver for both males and females followed by radiation-induced spleen and kidney cancer. The risks associated with radionuclide therapy are similar to the risk associated with external beam radiation therapy.

  3. [Update in radiation-induced neoplasms: genetic studies].

    PubMed

    Chauveinc, Laurent; Lefevre, Sandrine; Malfoy, Bernard; Dutrillaux, Bernard

    2002-02-01

    Radiation induced tumors are a possible (very) late complications of radiotherapy. The evaluation of the risks of radiation-induced tumors has been presented in different epidemiological studies, with the evaluation of the relative risk for different tissues. But, the genetic studies are rare, and no global theory exists. Two cytogenetic profiles are described, one with translocations and one with genetic material losses, evoking two different genetic evolutions. Two questions are stated. What are the radiation-induced genetic mechanisms? Is it possible to differentiate the radiation-induced and spontaneous tumors with genetic approaches? With 37 cytogenetic cases, 12 analyzed in our laboratory, the radiation-induced tumors were characterized by genetic material losses. An anti-oncogenic evolution is probable. A new molecularly study confirm these results. Only thyroid tumors do not have this evolution. For tumors with simple karyotype, like meningioma, radiation-induced tumors seem to be more complex than spontaneous tumors. But for the others, the differentiation is impossible to be done with cytogenetic. The mechanism of the chromosomic material losses in unknown, but some hypothesis are discussed.

  4. Loss of Matrix Metalloproteinase-13 Attenuates Murine Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Flechsig, Paul; Hartenstein, Bettina; Teurich, Sybille; Dadrich, Monika; Hauser, Kai; Abdollahi, Amir; Groene, Hermann-Josef; Angel, Peter; Huber, Peter E.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: Pulmonary fibrosis is a disorder of the lungs with limited treatment options. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) constitute a family of proteases that degrade extracellular matrix with roles in fibrosis. Here we studied the role of MMP13 in a radiation-induced lung fibrosis model using a MMP13 knockout mouse. Methods and Materials: We investigated the role of MMP13 in lung fibrosis by investigating the effects of MMP13 deficiency in C57Bl/6 mice after 20-Gy thoracic irradiation (6-MV Linac). The morphologic results in histology were correlated with qualitative and quantitative results of volume computed tomography (VCT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and clinical outcome. Results: We found that MMP13 deficient mice developed less pulmonary fibrosis than their wildtype counterparts, showed attenuated acute pulmonary inflammation (days after irradiation), and a reduction of inflammation during the later fibrogenic phase (5-6 months after irradiation). The reduced fibrosis in MMP13 deficient mice was evident in histology with reduced thickening of alveolar septi and reduced remodeling of the lung architecture in good correlation with reduced features of lung fibrosis in qualitative and quantitative VCT and MRI studies. The partial resistance of MMP13-deficient mice to fibrosis was associated with a tendency towards a prolonged mouse survival. Conclusions: Our data indicate that MMP13 has a role in the development of radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Further, our findings suggest that MMP13 constitutes a potential drug target to attenuate radiation-induced lung fibrosis.

  5. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Radiation-Induced Cystitis and Proctitis

    SciTech Connect

    Oliai, Caspian; Fisher, Brandon; Jani, Ashish; Wong, Michael; Poli, Jaganmohan; Brady, Luther W.; Komarnicky, Lydia T.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To provide a retrospective analysis of the efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) for treating hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) and proctitis secondary to pelvic- and prostate-only radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients were treated with HBOT for radiation-induced HC and proctitis. The median age at treatment was 66 years (range, 15-84 years). The range of external-beam radiation delivered was 50.0-75.6 Gy. Bleeding must have been refractory to other therapies. Patients received 100% oxygen at 2.0 atmospheres absolute pressure for 90-120 min per treatment in a monoplace chamber. Symptoms were retrospectively scored according to the Late Effects of Normal Tissues-Subjective, Objective, Management, Analytic (LENT-SOMA) scale to evaluate short-term efficacy. Recurrence of hematuria/hematochezia was used to assess long-term efficacy. Results: Four of the 19 patients were lost to follow-up. Fifteen patients were evaluated and received a mean of 29.8 dives: 11 developed HC and 4 proctitis. All patients experienced a reduction in their LENT-SOMA score. After completion of HBOT, the mean LENT-SOMA score was reduced from 0.78 to 0.20 in patients with HC and from 0.66 to 0.26 in patients with proctitis. Median follow-up was 39 months (range, 7-70 months). No cases of hematuria were refractory to HBOT. Complete resolution of hematuria was seen in 81% (n = 9) and partial response in 18% (n = 2). Recurrence of hematuria occurred in 36% (n = 4) after a median of 10 months. Complete resolution of hematochezia was seen in 50% (n = 2), partial response in 25% (n = 1), and refractory bleeding in 25% (n = 1). Conclusions: Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is appropriate for radiation-induced HC once less time-consuming therapies have failed to resolve the bleeding. In these conditions, HBOT is efficacious in the short and long term, with minimal side effects.

  6. Effect of sodium meclofenamate on radiation-induced esophagitis and cystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrus, J.L.; Ambrus, C.M.; Lillie, D.B.; Johnson, R.J.; Gastpar, H.; Kishel, S.

    1984-01-01

    Stumptailed monkeys (Macaca arctoides) received 2000 rad irradiation to the upper half of the esophagus and to the bladder by a 6-MeV linear accelerator. Endoscopy and biopsy was obtained from these organs weekly for 3 weeks. At the end of this period, the animals were autopsied and histopathologic examination undertaken. Sodium meclofenamate in doses of 5-20 mg/kg/day p.os was found effective in reducing or preventing radiation-induced esophagitis and cystitis.

  7. Clinical and dosimetric factors of radiation-induced esophageal injury: Radiation-induced esophageal toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Wen-Bo; Zhao, Yan-Hui; Zhao, Yan-Bin; Wang, Rui-Zhi

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the clinical and dosimetric predictive factors for radiation-induced esophageal injury in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 208 consecutive patients (146 men and 62 women) with NSCLC treated with 3D-CRT. The median age of the patients was 64 years (range 35-87 years). The clinical and treatment parameters including gender, age, performance status, sequential chemotherapy, concurrent chemotherapy, presence of carinal or subcarinal lymph nodes, pretreatment weight loss, mean dose to the entire esophagus, maximal point dose to the esophagus, and percentage of volume of esophagus receiving >55 Gy were studied. Clinical and dosimetric factors for radiation-induced acute and late grade 3-5 esophageal injury were analyzed according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria. RESULTS: Twenty-five (12%) of the two hundred and eight patients developed acute or late grade 3-5 esophageal injury. Among them, nine patients had both acute and late grade 3-5 esophageal injury, two died of late esophageal perforation. Concurrent chemotherapy and maximal point dose to the esophagus ≥60 Gy were significantly associated with the risk of grade 3-5 esophageal injury. Fifty-four (26%) of the two hundred and eight patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Among them, 25 (46%) developed grade 3-5 esophageal injury (P = 0.0001<0.01). However, no grade 3-5 esophageal injury occurred in patients who received a maximal point dose to the esophagus <60 Gy (P = 0.0001<0.01). CONCLUSION: Concurrent chemotherapy and the maximal esophageal point dose ≥60 Gy are significantly associated with the risk of grade 3-5 esophageal injury in patients with NSCLC treated with 3D-CRT. PMID:15849822

  8. Keratinocyte growth factor protects mice from chemotherapy and radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury and mortality.

    PubMed

    Farrell, C L; Bready, J V; Rex, K L; Chen, J N; DiPalma, C R; Whitcomb, K L; Yin, S; Hill, D C; Wiemann, B; Starnes, C O; Havill, A M; Lu, Z N; Aukerman, S L; Pierce, G F; Thomason, A; Potten, C S; Ulich, T R; Lacey, D L

    1998-03-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) stimulates the proliferation and differentiation of epithelial cells including those of the gastrointestinal tract. Although chemotherapeutics and radiation exposure kill rapidly proliferating tumor cells, rapidly dividing normal cells of the host's gastrointestinal tract are also frequently damaged, leading to the clinical condition broadly termed "mucositis." In this report, recombinant human KGF used as a pretreatment in several mouse models of chemotherapy and/or radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury significantly improved mouse survival. Using multiple-dose 5-fluorouracil, methotrexate, and radiation in combination and total body radiation alone models, KGF increased survival by 55% or greater. In the models that used chemotherapy with or without radiation, KGF significantly ameliorated weight loss after injury and accelerated weight gain during recovery. The basis of these systemic benefits appears to be due in part to the trophic effects of the growth factor on the intestinal epithelium because KGF pretreatment caused an increase in measures of mucosal thickness (villus height and crypt depth) that persisted during the course of 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. Treatment with KGF also afforded a 3.5-fold improvement in crypt survival in the small intestine, suggesting that KGF also has a direct effect on the crypt stem cells. These data indicate that KGF may be therapeutically useful to lessen the intestinal side effects of current cancer therapy regimens.

  9. Radiation-induced heart disease in lung cancer radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Xin; Feng, Yuanming; Yang, Chengwen; Wang, Wei; Wang, Ping; Deng, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD), which affects the patients’ prognosis with both acute and late side effects, has been published extensively in the radiotherapy of breast cancer, lymphoma and other benign diseases. Studies on RIHD in lung cancer radiotherapy, however, are less extensive and clear even though the patients with lung cancer are delivered with higher doses to the heart during radiation treatment. Methods: In this article, after extensive literature search and analysis, we reviewed the current evidence on RIHD in lung cancer patients after their radiation treatments and investigated the potential risk factors for RIHD as compared to other types of cancers. Result: Cardiac toxicity has been found highly relevant in lung cancer radiotherapy. So far, the crude incidence of cardiac complications in the lung cancer patients after radiotherapy has been up to 33%. Conclusion: The dose to the heart, the lobar location of tumor, the treatment modality, the history of heart and pulmonary disease and smoking were considered as potential risk factors for RIHD in lung cancer radiotherapy. As treatment techniques improve over the time with better prognosis for lung cancer survivors, an improved prediction model can be established to further reduce the cardiac toxicity in lung cancer radiotherapy. PMID:27741117

  10. Radiation-Induced Notch Signaling in Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lagadec, Chann; Vlashi, Erina; Alhiyari, Yazeed; Phillips, Tiffany M.; Bochkur Dratver, Milana; Pajonk, Frank

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To explore patterns of Notch receptor and ligand expression in response to radiation that could be crucial in defining optimal dosing schemes for γ-secretase inhibitors if combined with radiation. Methods and Materials: Using MCF-7 and T47D breast cancer cell lines, we used real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction to study the Notch pathway in response to radiation. Results: We show that Notch receptor and ligand expression during the first 48 hours after irradiation followed a complex radiation dose–dependent pattern and was most pronounced in mammospheres, enriched for breast cancer stem cells. Additionally, radiation activated the Notch pathway. Treatment with a γ-secretase inhibitor prevented radiation-induced Notch family gene expression and led to a significant reduction in the size of the breast cancer stem cell pool. Conclusions: Our results indicate that, if combined with radiation, γ-secretase inhibitors may prevent up-regulation of Notch receptor and ligand family members and thus reduce the number of surviving breast cancer stem cells.

  11. Radiation induced oxidation of liquid alkanes as a polymer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soebianto, Yanti S.; Katsumura, Yosuke; Ishigure, Kenkichi; Kubo, Junichi; Hamakawa, Satoshi; Kudoh, Hisaaki; Seguchi, Tadao

    1996-10-01

    Radiation induced oxidation of liquid n-hexadecane ( n-C 16H 34) and squalene (C 30H 62) as a polymer model has been investigated by the measurements of the gas evolution and O 2 uptake, and analyses of the oxidation products. Low O 2 uptake [G(-O 2 ≈ 6.0] in liquid alkanes, indicates in solid oxidation reaction does not exhibit chain kinetics, which is a big contrast to the process observed in solid, G(-O 2) ≫ 10. H 2 is the main gas product. More than 90% of the consumed O 2 are converted into the oxidation products in liquid phase, mainly carboxylic acids, which is also a big contrast to the results of the radiolysis of liquid cyclohexane in the presence of O 2 and thermal oxidation of hexadecene at elevated temperatures, where ketones and alcohols are major products at the initial stage. In the presence of aromatic additives, energy and charge transfer to the additives taking place despite the presence of O 2 reduce the H 2 evolution and the acid formation in parallel. Although hydroaromatic compounds act as an energy and charge scavenger, the are selectively oxidized through the donation of hydrogen in cyclic alkyl part attached to the phenyl ring, leading to large O 2 uptake and corresponding ketone formation. From the comparison of the G-values of the O 2 uptake, it was found that the oxidation reactions of liquid alkanes reflect well the oxidation of amorphous part in polymers.

  12. Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Ameliorates Endothelial Dysfunction in Radiation-Induced Bladder Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shiwei; Qiu, Xuefeng; Zhang, Yanting; Fu, Kai; Zhao, Xiaozhi; Wu, Jinhui; Hu, Yiqiao; Zhu, Weiming; Guo, Hongqian

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to explore the effect of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on radiation-induced endothelial dysfunction and histological changes in the urinary bladder. bFGF was administrated to human umbilical vein cells (HUVEC) or urinary bladder immediately after radiation. Reduced expression of thrombomodulin (TM) was indicated in the HUVEC and urinary bladder after treatment with radiation. Decreased apoptosis was observed in HUVEC treated with bFGF. Administration of bFGF increased the expression of TM in HUVEC medium, as well as in the urinary bladder at the early and delayed phases of radiation-induced bladder injury (RIBI). At the early phase, injection of bFGF increased the thickness of urothelium and reduced inflammation within the urinary bladder. At the delayed phase, bFGF was effective in reducing fibrosis within the urinary bladder. Our results indicate that endothelial dysfunction is a prominent feature of RIBI. Administration of bFGF can ameliorate radiation-induced endothelial dysfunction in urinary bladder and preserve bladder histology at early and delayed phases of RIBI. PMID:26351640

  13. The suppression of radiation-induced NF-{kappa}B activity by dexamethasone correlates with increased cell death in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Seon Young; Chung, Hee-Yong . E-mail: hychung@hanyang.ac.kr

    2005-10-21

    In this study, we show that dexamethasone treatment increases ionizing radiation-induced cell death by inducing the inhibitory {kappa}B{alpha} (I{kappa}B{alpha}) pathway in mice. The effect of dexamethasone on radiation-induced cell death was assessed by changes in total spleen cellularity and bone marrow colony-forming unit-granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) contents after total body irradiation. While in vivo treatment of mice with dexamethasone alone (1 mg/kg/day, for 2 days) failed to elicit cell death in spleen cells, the combined treatment with dexamethasone (1 mg/kg/day, for 2 days) and {gamma}-rays (1 or 5 Gy) caused a 50-80% reduction in total cellularity in spleen and CFU-GM contents in bone marrow. These results demonstrate that dexamethasone has a synergistic effect on radiation-induced cellular damages in vivo. Immunoblot analysis showed that dexamethasone treatment significantly increases I{kappa}B{alpha} expression in the spleens of irradiated mice. In addition, the dexamethasone treatment significantly reduced radiation-induced nuclear translocation of the nucleus factor-{kappa}B in the spleens of irradiated mice. These results indicate that dexamethasone treatment in vivo may increase radiation-induced cell damages by increasing I{kappa}B{alpha} expression in hematopoietic organs such as spleen and bone marrow.

  14. Epigenetic regulation of diacylglycerol kinase alpha promotes radiation-induced fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Weigel, Christoph; Veldwijk, Marlon R; Oakes, Christopher C; Seibold, Petra; Slynko, Alla; Liesenfeld, David B; Rabionet, Mariona; Hanke, Sabrina A; Wenz, Frederik; Sperk, Elena; Benner, Axel; Rösli, Christoph; Sandhoff, Roger; Assenov, Yassen; Plass, Christoph; Herskind, Carsten; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Schmezer, Peter; Popanda, Odilia

    2016-03-11

    Radiotherapy is a fundamental part of cancer treatment but its use is limited by the onset of late adverse effects in the normal tissue, especially radiation-induced fibrosis. Since the molecular causes for fibrosis are largely unknown, we analyse if epigenetic regulation might explain inter-individual differences in fibrosis risk. DNA methylation profiling of dermal fibroblasts obtained from breast cancer patients prior to irradiation identifies differences associated with fibrosis. One region is characterized as a differentially methylated enhancer of diacylglycerol kinase alpha (DGKA). Decreased DNA methylation at this enhancer enables recruitment of the profibrotic transcription factor early growth response 1 (EGR1) and facilitates radiation-induced DGKA transcription in cells from patients later developing fibrosis. Conversely, inhibition of DGKA has pronounced effects on diacylglycerol-mediated lipid homeostasis and reduces profibrotic fibroblast activation. Collectively, DGKA is an epigenetically deregulated kinase involved in radiation response and may serve as a marker and therapeutic target for personalized radiotherapy.

  15. Epigenetic regulation of diacylglycerol kinase alpha promotes radiation-induced fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Weigel, Christoph; Veldwijk, Marlon R.; Oakes, Christopher C.; Seibold, Petra; Slynko, Alla; Liesenfeld, David B.; Rabionet, Mariona; Hanke, Sabrina A.; Wenz, Frederik; Sperk, Elena; Benner, Axel; Rösli, Christoph; Sandhoff, Roger; Assenov, Yassen; Plass, Christoph; Herskind, Carsten; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Schmezer, Peter; Popanda, Odilia

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a fundamental part of cancer treatment but its use is limited by the onset of late adverse effects in the normal tissue, especially radiation-induced fibrosis. Since the molecular causes for fibrosis are largely unknown, we analyse if epigenetic regulation might explain inter-individual differences in fibrosis risk. DNA methylation profiling of dermal fibroblasts obtained from breast cancer patients prior to irradiation identifies differences associated with fibrosis. One region is characterized as a differentially methylated enhancer of diacylglycerol kinase alpha (DGKA). Decreased DNA methylation at this enhancer enables recruitment of the profibrotic transcription factor early growth response 1 (EGR1) and facilitates radiation-induced DGKA transcription in cells from patients later developing fibrosis. Conversely, inhibition of DGKA has pronounced effects on diacylglycerol-mediated lipid homeostasis and reduces profibrotic fibroblast activation. Collectively, DGKA is an epigenetically deregulated kinase involved in radiation response and may serve as a marker and therapeutic target for personalized radiotherapy. PMID:26964756

  16. Radiation-induced myeloid leukemia in murine models

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The use of radiation therapy is a cornerstone of modern cancer treatment. The number of patients that undergo radiation as a part of their therapy regimen is only increasing every year, but this does not come without cost. As this number increases, so too does the incidence of secondary, radiation-induced neoplasias, creating a need for therapeutic agents targeted specifically towards incidence reduction and treatment of these cancers. Development and efficacy testing of these agents requires not only extensive in vitro testing but also a set of reliable animal models to accurately recreate the complex situations of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. As radiation-induced leukemic progression often involves genomic changes such as rearrangements, deletions, and changes in methylation, the laboratory mouse Mus musculus, with its fully sequenced genome, is a powerful tool in cancer research. This fact, combined with the molecular and physiological similarities it shares with man and its small size and high rate of breeding in captivity, makes it the most relevant model to use in radiation-induced leukemia research. In this work, we review relevant M. musculus inbred and F1 hybrid animal models, as well as methods of induction of radiation-induced myeloid leukemia. Associated molecular pathologies are also included. PMID:25062865

  17. Radiation-induced myeloid leukemia in murine models.

    PubMed

    Rivina, Leena; Davoren, Michael; Schiestl, Robert H

    2014-07-25

    The use of radiation therapy is a cornerstone of modern cancer treatment. The number of patients that undergo radiation as a part of their therapy regimen is only increasing every year, but this does not come without cost. As this number increases, so too does the incidence of secondary, radiation-induced neoplasias, creating a need for therapeutic agents targeted specifically towards incidence reduction and treatment of these cancers. Development and efficacy testing of these agents requires not only extensive in vitro testing but also a set of reliable animal models to accurately recreate the complex situations of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. As radiation-induced leukemic progression often involves genomic changes such as rearrangements, deletions, and changes in methylation, the laboratory mouse Mus musculus, with its fully sequenced genome, is a powerful tool in cancer research. This fact, combined with the molecular and physiological similarities it shares with man and its small size and high rate of breeding in captivity, makes it the most relevant model to use in radiation-induced leukemia research. In this work, we review relevant M. musculus inbred and F1 hybrid animal models, as well as methods of induction of radiation-induced myeloid leukemia. Associated molecular pathologies are also included.

  18. Mucosal Immunosenescence In The Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Shintaro; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that pathogen-specific secretory IgA (SIgA) antibody (Ab) is the major player at mucosal surfaces for host defense. However, alterations in the mucosal immune system occur in advanced aging which results in a failure of induction of SIgA Abs for protection from infectious diseases. Signs of mucosal senescence first appear in the gut immune system. Further, changes in the intestinal microbiota most likely influence mucosal immunity. To overcome the immunological aging decline in mucosal immunity, several adjuvant systems including mucosal dendritic cell (DC) targeting have been shown to be attractive and effective immunological strategies. Similarly, antigen (Ag) uptake-M cells are ideal targets for facilitating Ag-specific mucosal immune responses. However, the numbers of M cells are reduced in aged mice. In this regard, Spi-B, an essential transcription factor for the functional and structural differentiation of M cells could be a potent strategy for the induction of effective mucosal immunity in aging. PMID:25531743

  19. Effects of NOX1 on fibroblastic changes of endothelial cells in radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    CHOI, SEO-HYUN; KIM, MISEON; LEE, HAE-JUNE; KIM, EUN-HO; KIM, CHUN-HO; LEE, YOON-JIN

    2016-01-01

    Lung fibrosis is a major complication in radiation-induced lung damage following thoracic radiotherapy, while the underlying mechanism has remained to be elucidated. The present study performed immunofluorescence and immunoblot assays on irradiated human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs) with or without pre-treatment with VAS2870, a novel NADPH oxidase (NOX) inhibitor, or small hairpin (sh)RNA against NOX1, -2 or -4. VAS2870 reduced the cellular reactive oxygen species content induced by 5 Gy radiation in HPAECs and inhibited phenotypic changes in fibrotic cells, including increased alpha smooth muscle actin and vimentin, and decreased CD31 and vascular endothelial cadherin expression. These fibrotic changes were significantly inhibited by treatment with NOX1 shRNA, but not by NOX2 or NOX4 shRNA. Next, the role of NOX1 in pulmonary fibrosis development was assessed in the lung tissues of C57BL/6J mice following thoracic irradiation using trichrome staining. Administration of an NOX1-specific inhibitor suppressed radiation-induced collagen deposition and fibroblastic changes in the endothelial cells (ECs) of these mice. The results suggested that radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis may be efficiently reduced by specific inhibition of NOX1, an effect mediated by reduction of fibrotic changes of ECs. PMID:27053172

  20. Leaf extract of Moringa oleifera prevents ionizing radiation-induced oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Mahuya; Das, Dipesh K; Bhattacharjee, Surajit; Majumdar, Subrata; Dey, Sanjit

    2011-10-01

    The present study evaluated the hepatoprotective effect of aqueous ethanolic Moringa oleifera leaf extract (MoLE) against radiation-induced oxidative stress, which is assessed in terms of inflammation and lipid peroxidation. Swiss albino mice were administered MoLE (300 mg/kg of body weight) for 15 consecutive days before exposing them to a single dose of 5 Gy of ⁶⁰Co γ-irradiation. Mice were sacrificed at 4 hours after irradiation. Liver was collected for immunoblotting and biochemical tests for the detection of markers of hepatic oxidative stress. Nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and lipid peroxidation were augmented, whereas the superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), reduced glutathione (GSH), and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) values were decreased by radiation exposure. Translocation of NF-κB from cytoplasm to nucleus and lipid peroxidation were found to be inhibited, whereas increases in SOD, CAT, GSH, and FRAP were observed in the mice treated with MoLE prior to irradiation. Therefore pretreatment with MoLE protected against γ-radiation-induced liver damage. The protection may be attributed to the free radical scavenging activity of MoLE, through which it can ameliorate radiation-induced oxidative stress.

  1. Epithelial MUC1 promotes cell migration, reduces apoptosis and affects levels of mucosal modulators during acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin)-induced gastropathy.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Debashish; Fernandez, Harvey Robert; Patil, Pradeep Bhatu; Premaratne, Pushpa; Quiding-Järbrink, Marianne; Lindén, Sara Katarina

    2015-02-01

    MUC1 is a transmembrane mucin highly expressed in the stomach. Although extensive research has uncovered many of its roles in cancer, knowledge about the functions of MUC1 in normal tissues is limited. In the present study, we showed that acetylsalicylic acid (ASA; aspirin) up-regulated MUC1/Muc1 expression in the gastric mucosa of humans and wild-type (WT) mice. ASA induced mucosal injury in all mice to a similar extent; however, WT animals and those chimaeras with Muc1 on the epithelia recovered faster than Muc1-knockout (KO) mice and chimaeras carrying Muc1 on haemopoietic but not epithelial cells. MUC1 enhanced proliferation and migration of the human gastric cell line MKN-7 and increased resistance to apoptosis. The repeated treatment regime used caused a reduction in cyclo-oxygenase-1 (Cox-1) expression, though WT animals returned faster towards pre-treatment levels and had increased Cox-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor levels during recovery. Thus we found that epithelial Muc1 is more important for the healing process than haemopoietic Muc1 and Muc1/MUC1 facilitates wound healing by enhancing cell migration and proliferation, protecting against apoptosis and mediating expression of mucosal modulators. Thus MUC1 plays essential roles during wound healing and development of treatment modalities targeting enhanced expression of MUC1 may be beneficial to treat mucosal wounds.

  2. Inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase ameliorates radiation-induced ototoxicity in zebrafish and cochlea-derived cell lines.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yoo Seob; Hwang, Hye Sook; Kang, Sung Un; Chang, Jae Won; Oh, Young-Taek; Kim, Chul-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Radiation is a widely used treatment for head and neck cancers, and one of its most severe side effects is ototoxicity. Radiation-induced ototoxicity has been demonstrated to be linked to the increased production of ROS and MAPK. We intended to investigate the effect of p38 inhibition on radiation-induced ototoxicity in cochlea-derived HEI-OC1 cells and in a zebrafish model. The otoprotective effect of p38 inhibition against radiation was tested in vitro in the organ of Corti-derived cell line, HEI-OC1, and in vivo in a zebrafish model. Radiation-induced apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, and an increase of intracellular NO generation were demonstrated in HEI-OC1 cells. The p38-specific inhibitor, SB203580, ameliorated radiation-induced apoptosis and mitochondrial injury in HEI-OC1 cells. p38 inhibition reduced radiation-induced activation of JNK, p38, cytochrome c, and cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP in HEI-OC1 cells. Scanning electron micrography showed that SB203580 prevented radiation-induced destruction of kinocilium and stereocilia in zebrafish neuromasts. The results of this study suggest that p38 plays an important role in mediating radiation-induced ototoxicity and inhibition of p38 could be a plausible option for preventing radiation ototoxicity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Prophylactic effect of flaxseed oil against radiation-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, A L; Sharma, Avadhesh; Patni, Shikha; Sharma, Antim Lata

    2007-09-01

    Flaxseed (linseed, Linum usitatissimum, Linaceae) is widely used for its edible oil in many parts of the world. The present study investigates the radioprotective and antioxidative potential of flaxseed oil (FO). Swiss albino mice were administered FO orally once daily for 15 consecutive days, then exposed to a single dose of 5 Gy of gamma radiation. Lipid peroxide, reduced glutathione and total protein were estimated in the liver. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), acid and alkaline phosphatase estimations in serum were also carried out. Radiation-induced increases in the levels of lipid peroxidation (LPO), AST, ALT and acid phosphatase were significantly ameliorated by flaxseed oil pretreatment, and radiation-induced depletion in the level of glutathione (GSH) and alkaline phosphatase activities was significantly inhibited by flaxseed oil administration. The lifespan was increased in the flaxseed oil treated irradiated mice in comparison with their respective control mice, with survival data showing an LD(50/30) (lethal dose for 50% of animals after 30 days) of 7.1 and 10 Gy for control and FO treated irradiated mice, respectively, and produced a dose reduction factor for flaxseed oil (DRF) of 1.40. Radiation-induced deficits in body and organ weight were significantly reduced or prevented in flaxseed oil pretreated mice. The protection afforded by flaxseed oil may be attributed to the constituents of the oil, which include omega-3 essential fatty acids and phytoestrogenic lignans, which appear to play an important role in free radical scavenging and singlet oxygen quenching. The study does not rule out the possibility of a prophylactic potential of flaxseed oil against radiation-induced degenerative changes in liver.

  4. Protective effects of selenocystine against γ-radiation-induced genotoxicity in Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Kunwar, Amit; Jayakumar, S; Bhilwade, H N; Bag, P P; Bhatt, H; Chaubey, R C; Priyadarsini, K I

    2011-05-01

    Selenocystine (CysSeSeCys), a diselenide aminoacid exhibiting glutathione peroxidase-like activity and selective antitumor effects, was examined for in vivo antigenotoxic and antioxidant activity in Swiss albino mice after exposure to a sublethal dose (5 Gy) of γ-radiation. For this, CysSeSeCys was administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) to mice at a dosage of 0.5 mg/kg body weight for 5 consecutive days prior to whole-body γ-irradiation. When examined in the hepatic tissue, CysSeSeCys administration reduced the DNA damage at 30 min after radiation exposure by increasing the rate of DNA repair. Since antigenotoxic agents could alter the expression of genes involved in cell cycle arrest and DNA repair, the transcriptional changes in p53, p21 and GADD45α were monitored in the hepatic tissue by real-time PCR. The results show that CysSeSeCys alone causes moderate induction of these three genes. However, CysSeSeCys pretreatment resulted in a suppression of radiation-induced enhancement of p21 and GADD45α expression, but did not affect p53 expression. Further analysis of radiation-induced oxidative stress markers in the same tissue indicated that CysSeSeCys significantly inhibits lipid peroxidation and prevents the depletion of antioxidant enzymes and glutathione (GSH) levels. Additionally, it also prevents radiation-induced DNA damage in other radiation sensitive cellular systems like peripheral leukocytes and bone marrow, which was evident by a decrease in comet parameters and micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (mn-PCEs) frequency, respectively. Based on these observations, it is concluded that CysSeSeCys exhibits antigenotoxic effects, reduces radiation-induced oxidative stress, and is a promising candidate for future exploration as a radioprotector.

  5. Amelioration of radiation-induced hematopoietic and gastrointestinal damage by Ex-RAD(R) in mice.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sanchita P; Kulkarni, Shilpa; Perkins, Michael W; Hieber, Kevin; Pessu, Roli L; Gambles, Kristen; Maniar, Manoj; Kao, Tzu-Cheg; Seed, Thomas M; Kumar, K Sree

    2012-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess recovery from hematopoietic and gastrointestinal damage by Ex-RAD(®), also known as ON01210.Na (4-carboxystyryl-4-chlorobenzylsulfone, sodium salt), after total body radiation. In our previous study, we reported that Ex-RAD, a small-molecule radioprotectant, enhances survival of mice exposed to gamma radiation, and prevents radiation-induced apoptosis as measured by the inhibition of radiation-induced protein 53 (p53) expression in cultured cells. We have expanded this study to determine best effective dose, dose-reduction factor (DRF), hematological and gastrointestinal protection, and in vivo inhibition of p53 signaling. A total of 500 mg/kg of Ex-RAD administered at 24 h and 15 min before radiation resulted in a DRF of 1.16. Ex-RAD ameliorated radiation-induced hematopoietic damage as monitored by the accelerated recovery of peripheral blood cells, and protection of granulocyte macrophage colony-forming units (GM-CFU) in bone marrow. Western blot analysis on spleen indicated that Ex-RAD treatment inhibited p53 phosphorylation. Ex-RAD treatment reduces terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay (TUNEL)-positive cells in jejunum compared with vehicle-treated mice after radiation injury. Finally, Ex-RAD preserved intestinal crypt cells compared with the vehicle control at 13 and 14 Gy. The results demonstrated that Ex-RAD ameliorates radiation-induced peripheral blood cell depletion, promotes bone marrow recovery, reduces p53 signaling in spleen and protects intestine from radiation injury.

  6. A selenocysteine derivative therapy affects radiation-induced pneumonitis in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Kunwar, Amit; Jain, V K; Priyadarsini, K I; Haston, Christina K

    2013-10-01

    The mechanism leading to the radiation-induced lung response of pneumonitis is largely unknown. Here we investigated whether treatment with 3,3'-diselenodipropionic acid (DSePA), which reduces radiation-induced oxidative stress in acute response models, decreases the lung response to irradiation. Mice of the C3H/HeJ (alveolitis/pneumonitis-responding) strain received 18 Gy whole-thorax irradiation, and a subset of these mice was treated with DSePA (2 mg/kg) three times per week, beginning at 2 hours after radiation treatment, and continuing in the postirradiation period until death because of respiratory distress symptoms. DSePA treatment increased the postirradiation survival time of mice by an average of 32 days (P = 0.0002). Radiation-treated and DSePA-treated mice presented lower levels of lipid peroxidation and augmented glutathione peroxidase in the lungs, compared with those levels measured in mice receiving radiation only, when mice receiving radiation only were killed because of distress symptoms, whereas catalase and superoxide dismutase levels did not show consistent differences among treatment groups. DSePA treatment decreased pneumonitis and the numbers of mast cells, neutrophils, and lymphocytes in the lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage, respectively, of irradiated mice relative to mice exposed to radiation alone. DSePA treatment also decreased the radiation-induced increase in granulocyte colony-stimulating factor levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage and lung-tissue expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and E-selectin, while increasing the expression of glutathione peroxidase-4. We conclude that DSePA treatment reduces radiation-induced pneumonitis in mice by delaying oxidative damage and the inflammatory cell influx.

  7. Anti-inflammatory effects of the selective phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitor, cilostazol, and antioxidants, enzymatically-modified isoquercitrin and α-lipoic acid, reduce dextran sulphate sodium-induced colorectal mucosal injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Kangawa, Yumi; Yoshida, Toshinori; Abe, Hajime; Seto, Yoshiki; Miyashita, Taishi; Nakamura, Michi; Kihara, Tohru; Hayashi, Shim-Mo; Shibutani, Makoto

    2017-04-04

    Developing effective treatments and preventing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are urgent challenges in improving patients' health. It has been suggested that platelet activation and reactive oxidative species generation are involved in the pathogenesis of IBD. We examined the inhibitory effects of a selective phosphodiesterase-3 inhibitor, cilostazol (CZ), and two antioxidants, enzymatically modified isoquercitrin (EMIQ) and α-lipoic acid (ALA), against dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. BALB/c mice were treated with 0.3% CZ, 1.5% EMIQ, and 0.2% ALA in their feed. Colitis was induced by administering 5% DSS in drinking water for 8days. The inhibitory effects of these substances were evaluated by measuring relevant clinical symptoms (faecal blood, diarrhoea, and body weight loss), colon length, plasma cytokine and chemokine levels, whole genome gene expression, and histopathology. Diarrhoea was suppressed by each treatment, while CZ prevented shortening of the colon length. All treatment groups exhibited decreased plasma levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α compared with the DSS group. Microarray analysis showed that cell adhesion, cytoskeleton regulation, cell proliferation, and apoptosis, which might be related to inflammatory cell infiltration and mucosal healing, were affected in all the groups. DSS-induced mucosal injuries such as mucosal loss, submucosal oedema, and inflammatory cell infiltration in the distal colon were prevented by CZ or antioxidant treatment. These results suggest that anti-inflammatory effects of these agents reduced DSS-induced mucosal injuries in mice and, therefore, may provide therapeutic benefits in IBD.

  8. Reduction of radiation-induced cell cycle blocks by caffeine does not necessarily lead to increased cell killing

    SciTech Connect

    Musk, S.R. )

    1991-03-01

    The effect of caffeine upon the radiosensitivities of three human tumor lines was examined and correlated with its action upon the radiation-induced S-phase and G2-phase blocks. Caffeine was found to reduce at least partially the S-phase and G2-phase blocks in all the cell lines examined but potentiated cytotoxicity in only one of the three tumor lines. That reductions have been demonstrated to occur in the absence of increased cell killing provides supporting evidence for the hypothesis that reductions may not be causal in those cases when potentiation of radiation-induced cytotoxicity is observed in the presence of caffeine.

  9. Hypopharyngeal carcinoma after radiation for tuberculosis: radiation-induced carcinoma.

    PubMed

    van der Putten, Lisa; de Bree, Remco; Kuik, Dirk J; Rietveld, Derek H F; Langendijk, Johannes A; Leemans, C René

    2010-09-01

    Radiation may cause radiation-induced cancers after a long latency period. In a group of 111 patients surgically treated for hypopharyngeal carcinoma, patients previously treated with radiotherapy for tuberculosis in the neck were compared to patients without previous radiotherapy. Seven patients (7.4%) underwent radiotherapy (median age 15 years) and developed a hypopharyngeal carcinoma (median age 70 years, median latency period 54.4 year). Considering this long latency period and the localisation in the previous radiation field these tumours can be classified as potentially radiation-induced carcinomas. Patients with potentially radiation-induced carcinomas were significantly older when the hypopharyngeal carcinoma was diagnosed (p=0.048), were more frequently females (p=0.05) and had a worse 5-year regional control rate (p=0.048). When radiotherapy is considered in young patients the risk of induction of tumours has to be kept in mind. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Panretinal photocoagulation for radiation-induced ocular ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Augsburger, J.J.; Roth, S.E.; Magargal, L.E.; Shields, J.A.

    1987-08-01

    We present preliminary findings on the effectiveness of panretinal photocoagulation in preventing neovascular glaucoma in eyes with radiation-induced ocular ischemia. Our study group consisted of 20 patients who developed radiation-induced ocular ischemia following cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy for a choroidal or ciliary body melanoma. Eleven of the 20 patients were treated by panretinal photocoagulation shortly after the diagnosis of ocular ischemia, but nine patients were left untreated. In this non-randomized study, the rate of development of neovascular glaucoma was significantly lower (p = 0.024) for the 11 photocoagulated patients than for the nine who were left untreated.

  11. The Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, M; Fardid, R; Hadadi, Gh; Fardid, M

    2014-01-01

    The radiation-induced bystander effect is the phenomenon which non-irradiated cells exhibit effects along with their different levels as a result of signals received from nearby irradiated cells. Responses of non-irradiated cells may include changes in process of translation, gene expression, cell proliferation, apoptosis and cells death. These changes are confirmed by results of some In-Vivo studies. Most well-known important factors affecting radiation-induced bystander effect include free radicals, immune system factors, expression changes of some genes involved in inflammation pathway and epigenetic factors. PMID:25599062

  12. [Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of radiation-induced enteritis].

    PubMed

    Sinkó, Dániel; Baranyai, Zsolt; Nemeskéri, Csaba; Teknos, Dániel; Jósa, Valéria; Hegedus, László; Mayer, Arpád

    2010-09-05

    The number of radiotherapy in the treatment of malignant diseases is increasing worldwide. During the radiotherapy of tumors in the minor pelvis and abdomen intestinal inflammation of different degree may occur even if special attention is paid. Irradiation to the minor pelvis causes in half of the cases radiation induced acute enteritis, whereas in 25% chronic enteritis and colitis will develop. Chronic enteritis following radiotherapy raises a number of diagnostic and therapeutic problems that can be solved only with cooperation of different specialties. Authors present a short review regarding therapeutical options of radiation induced enteritis.

  13. Intraperitoneal administration of chitosan/DsiRNA nanoparticles targeting TNFα prevents radiation-induced fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nawroth, Isabel; Alsner, Jan; Behlke, Mark A; Besenbacher, Flemming; Overgaard, Jens; Howard, Kenneth A; Kjems, Jørgen

    2010-10-01

    One of the most common and dose-limiting long-term adverse effects of radiation therapy is radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF), which is characterized by restricted tissue flexibility, reduced compliance or strictures, pain and in severe cases, ulceration and necrosis. Several strategies have been proposed to ameliorate RIF but presently no effective one is available. Recent studies have reported that tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) plays a role in fibrogenesis. Male CDF1 mice were radiated with a single dose of 45 Gy. Chitosan/DsiRNA nanoparticles targeting TNFα were intraperitoneal injected and late radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) was assessed using a modification of the leg contracture model. Additionally, the effect of these nanoparticles on tumor growth and tumor control probability in the absence of radiation was examined in a C3H mammary carcinoma model. We show in this work, that targeting TNFα in macrophages by intraperitoneal administration of chitosan/DsiRNA nanoparticles completely prevented radiation-induced fibrosis in CDF1 mice without revealing any cytotoxic side-effects after a long-term administration. Furthermore, such TNFα targeting was selective without any significant influence on tumor growth or irradiation-related tumor control probability. This nanoparticle-based RNAi approach represents a novel approach to prevent RIF with potential application to improve clinical radiation therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Mitigation of whole-body gamma radiation-induced damages by Clerodendron infortunatum in mammalian organisms.

    PubMed

    Chacko, Tiju; Menon, Aditya; Majeed, Teeju; Nair, Sivaprabha V; John, Nithu Sara; Nair, Cherupally Krishnan Krishnan

    2016-11-17

    Several phytoceuticals and extracts of medicinal plants are reported to mitigate deleterious effects of ionizing radiation. The potential of hydro-alcoholic extract of Clerodendron infortunatum (CIE) for providing protection to mice exposed to gamma radiation was investigated. Oral administration of CIE bestowed a survival advantage to mice exposed to lethal doses of gamma radiation. Radiation-induced depletion of the total blood count and bone marrow cellularity were prevented by treatment with CIE. Damage to the cellular DNA (as was evident from the comet assay and the micronucleus index) was also found to be decreased upon CIE administration. Radiation-induced damages to intestinal crypt cells was also reduced by CIE. Studies on gene expression in intestinal cells revealed that there was a marked increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in mice exposed to whole-body 4 Gy gamma radiation, and that administration of CIE resulted in significant lowering of this ratio, suggestive of reduction of radiation-induced apoptosis. Also, in the intestinal tissue of irradiated animals, following CIE treatment, levels of expression of the DNA repair gene Atm were found to be elevated, and there was reduction in the expression of the inflammatory Cox-2 gene. Thus, our results suggest a beneficial use of Clerodendron infortunatum for mitigating radiation toxicity.

  15. Modulation of radiation-induced alteration in the antioxidant status of mice by naringin.

    PubMed

    Jagetia, Ganesh Chandra; Reddy, Tiyyagura Koti

    2005-07-01

    The alteration in the antioxidant status and lipid peroxidation was investigated in Swiss albino mice treated with 2 mg/kg b.wt. naringin, a citrus flavoglycoside, before exposure to 0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 4 Gy gamma radiation. Lipid peroxidation, glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, catalase and superoxide dismutase were determined in the liver and small intestine of mice treated or not with naringin at 0.5, 1, 2, 4 and 8 h post-irradiation. Whole-body irradiation of mice caused a dose-dependent elevation in the lipid peroxidation while a dose-dependent depletion was observed for glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase in both liver as well as small intestine. Treatment of mice with 2 mg/kg b. wt. naringin inhibited the radiation-induced elevation in the lipid peroxidation as well as depletion of glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase in liver and small intestine. Radiation-induced lipid peroxidation increased with time, which was greatest at 2 h post-irradiation and declined thereafter in the liver and small intestine. Similarly, a maximum decline in the glutathione glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase was observed at 1 h, while catalase showed a maximum decline at 2 h post-irradiation. Our study demonstrates that naringin protects mouse liver and intestine against the radiation-induced damage by elevating the antioxidant status and reducing the lipid peroxidation.

  16. Proteasome inhibitor bortezomib is a novel therapeutic agent for focal radiation-induced osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Abhishek; Wang, Luqiang; Young, Tiffany; Zhong, Leilei; Tseng, Wei-Ju; Levine, Michael A; Cengel, Keith; Liu, X Sherry; Zhang, Yejia; Pignolo, Robert J; Qin, Ling

    2017-08-31

    Bone atrophy and its related fragility fractures are frequent, late side effects of radiotherapy in cancer survivors and have a detrimental impact on their quality of life. In another study, we showed that parathyroid hormone 1-34 and anti-sclerostin antibody attenuates radiation-induced bone damage by accelerating DNA repair in osteoblasts. DNA damage responses are partially regulated by the ubiquitin proteasome pathway. In the current study, we examined whether proteasome inhibitors have similar bone-protective effects against radiation damage. MG132 treatment greatly reduced radiation-induced apoptosis in cultured osteoblastic cells. This survival effect was owing to accelerated DNA repair as revealed by γH2AX foci and comet assays and to the up-regulation of Ku70 and DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit, essential DNA repair proteins in the nonhomologous end-joining pathway. Administration of bortezomib (Bzb) reversed the loss of trabecular bone structure and strength in mice at 4 wk after focal radiation. Histomorphometry revealed that Bzb significantly increased the number of osteoblasts and activity in the irradiated area and suppressed the number and activity of osteoclasts, regardless of irradiation. Two weeks of Bzb treatment accelerated DNA repair in bone-lining osteoblasts and thus promoted their survival. Meanwhile, it also inhibited bone marrow adiposity. Taken together, we demonstrate a novel role of proteasome inhibitors in treating radiation-induced osteoporosis.-Chandra, A., Wang, L., Young, T., Zhong, L., Tseng, W.-J., Levine, M. A., Cengel, K., Liu, X. S., Zhang, Y., Pignolo, R. J., Qin, L. Proteasome inhibitor bortezomib is a novel therapeutic agent for focal radiation-induced osteoporosis. © FASEB.

  17. Silymarin Protects Epidermal Keratinocytes from Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Apoptosis and DNA Damage by Nucleotide Excision Repair Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Katiyar, Santosh K.; Mantena, Sudheer K.; Meeran, Syed M.

    2011-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a well recognized epidemiologic risk factor for melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. This observation has been linked to the accumulation of UVB radiation-induced DNA lesions in cells, and that finally lead to the development of skin cancers. Earlier, we have shown that topical treatment of skin with silymarin, a plant flavanoid from milk thistle (Silybum marianum), inhibits photocarcinogenesis in mice; however it is less understood whether chemopreventive effect of silymarin is mediated through the repair of DNA lesions in skin cells and that protect the cells from apoptosis. Here, we show that treatment of normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) with silymarin blocks UVB-induced apoptosis of NHEK in vitro. Silymarin reduces the amount of UVB radiation-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by reduced amounts of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and as measured by comet assay, and that ultimately may lead to reduced apoptosis of NHEK. The reduction of UV radiation-induced DNA damage by silymarin appears to be related with induction of nucleotide excision repair (NER) genes, because UV radiation-induced apoptosis was not blocked by silymarin in NER-deficient human fibroblasts. Cytostaining and dot-blot analysis revealed that silymarin repaired UV-induced CPDs in NER-proficient fibroblasts from a healthy individual but did not repair UV-induced CPD-positive cells in NER-deficient fibroblasts from patients suffering from xeroderma pigmentosum complementation-A disease. Similarly, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that silymarin did not reduce the number of UVB-induced sunburn/apoptotic cells in the skin of NER-deficient mice, but reduced the number of sunburn cells in their wild-type counterparts. Together, these results suggest that silymarin exert the capacity to reduce UV radiation-induced DNA damage and, thus, prevent the harmful effects of UV radiation on the genomic stability of epidermal cells. PMID:21731736

  18. Silymarin protects epidermal keratinocytes from ultraviolet radiation-induced apoptosis and DNA damage by nucleotide excision repair mechanism.

    PubMed

    Katiyar, Santosh K; Mantena, Sudheer K; Meeran, Syed M

    2011-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a well recognized epidemiologic risk factor for melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. This observation has been linked to the accumulation of UVB radiation-induced DNA lesions in cells, and that finally lead to the development of skin cancers. Earlier, we have shown that topical treatment of skin with silymarin, a plant flavanoid from milk thistle (Silybum marianum), inhibits photocarcinogenesis in mice; however it is less understood whether chemopreventive effect of silymarin is mediated through the repair of DNA lesions in skin cells and that protect the cells from apoptosis. Here, we show that treatment of normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) with silymarin blocks UVB-induced apoptosis of NHEK in vitro. Silymarin reduces the amount of UVB radiation-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by reduced amounts of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and as measured by comet assay, and that ultimately may lead to reduced apoptosis of NHEK. The reduction of UV radiation-induced DNA damage by silymarin appears to be related with induction of nucleotide excision repair (NER) genes, because UV radiation-induced apoptosis was not blocked by silymarin in NER-deficient human fibroblasts. Cytostaining and dot-blot analysis revealed that silymarin repaired UV-induced CPDs in NER-proficient fibroblasts from a healthy individual but did not repair UV-induced CPD-positive cells in NER-deficient fibroblasts from patients suffering from xeroderma pigmentosum complementation-A disease. Similarly, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that silymarin did not reduce the number of UVB-induced sunburn/apoptotic cells in the skin of NER-deficient mice, but reduced the number of sunburn cells in their wild-type counterparts. Together, these results suggest that silymarin exert the capacity to reduce UV radiation-induced DNA damage and, thus, prevent the harmful effects of UV radiation on the genomic stability of epidermal cells.

  19. Poor outcome in radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis

    SciTech Connect

    Karram, T.; Rinkevitch, D.; Markiewicz, W. )

    1993-01-15

    The purpose was to compare the outcome of patients with radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis versus patients with constiction due to another etiology. Twenty patients with constrictive pericarditis were seen during 1975-1986 at a single medical center. Six had radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis (Group A). The etiology was idiopathic in ten subjects and secondary to carcinomatous encasement, chronic renal failure, purulent infection and tuberculosis in one patient each (Group B, N = 14). Meang age was 53.4 [+-] 15.5 years. Extensive pericardiectomy was performed in 3/6 Group A and 13/14 Group B patients. All Group A patients died, 4 weeks - 11 years post-diagnosis (median = 10 months). Two Group A patients died suddenly, one died post-operatively of respiratory failure, another of pneumonia and two of recurrent carcinoma. Thirteen Group B patients are alive (median follow-up = 72 months). The only death in this group was due to metastatic cancer. The poor outcome with radiation-induced constriction is probably multi-factorial. Poor surgical outcome is to be expected in patients with evidence of recurrent tumor, high-dose irradiation, pulmonary fibrosis or associated radiation-induced myocardinal, valvular or coronary damage.

  20. Radiation-induced instability and its relation to radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ullrich, R. L.; Ponnaiya, B.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: A model that identifies radiation-induced genetic instability as the earliest cellular event in the multi-step sequence leading to radiation-induced cancer was previously proposed. In this paper ongoing experiments are discussed which are designed to test this model and its predictions in mouse mammary epithelial cells. RESULTS: Several lines of evidence are presented that appear to support this model: first, the development of delayed mutations in p53 following irradiation in altered growth variants; secondly, the high frequencies for the induction of both instability and transformation following irradiation in mammary epithelial cells; and finally, the demonstration that susceptibility to the induction of cytogenetic instability is a heritable trait that correlates with susceptibility to transformation and radiation-induced mammary cancer. Mice resistant to transformation and mammary cancer development are also resistant to the development of instability after irradiation. In contrast, mice sensitive to transformation and cancer are also sensitive to the development of cytogenetic instability. CONCLUSIONS: Data from this laboratory and from the studies cited above suggest a specific, and perhaps unique, role for radiation-induced instability as a critical early event associated with initiation of the carcinogenic process.

  1. Radiation-induced instability and its relation to radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ullrich, R. L.; Ponnaiya, B.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: A model that identifies radiation-induced genetic instability as the earliest cellular event in the multi-step sequence leading to radiation-induced cancer was previously proposed. In this paper ongoing experiments are discussed which are designed to test this model and its predictions in mouse mammary epithelial cells. RESULTS: Several lines of evidence are presented that appear to support this model: first, the development of delayed mutations in p53 following irradiation in altered growth variants; secondly, the high frequencies for the induction of both instability and transformation following irradiation in mammary epithelial cells; and finally, the demonstration that susceptibility to the induction of cytogenetic instability is a heritable trait that correlates with susceptibility to transformation and radiation-induced mammary cancer. Mice resistant to transformation and mammary cancer development are also resistant to the development of instability after irradiation. In contrast, mice sensitive to transformation and cancer are also sensitive to the development of cytogenetic instability. CONCLUSIONS: Data from this laboratory and from the studies cited above suggest a specific, and perhaps unique, role for radiation-induced instability as a critical early event associated with initiation of the carcinogenic process.

  2. Radiation-induced augmentation of the immune response

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.E.; Lefkovits, I.; Troup, G.M.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation-induced augmentation of the immune response has been shown to occur both in vivo and in vitro. Evidence is presented to implicate injury to an extremely radiosensitive T cell in the expression of this phenomenon. Experiments are outlined which could be employed to support or reflect this hypothesis.

  3. Use of probiotics for prevention of radiation-induced diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Delia, P; Sansotta, G; Donato, V; Frosina, P; Messina, G; De Renzis, C; Famularo, G

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the efficacy of a high-potency probiotic preparation on prevention of radiation-induced diarrhea in cancer patients. METHODS: This was a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Four hundred and ninety patients who underwent adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy after surgery for sigmoid, rectal, or cervical cancer were assigned to either the high-potency probiotic preparation VSL#3 (one sachet t.i.d.,) or placebo starting from the first day of radiation therapy. Efficacy endpoints were incidence and severity of radiation-induced diarrhea, daily number of bowel movements, and the time from the start of the study to the use of loperamide as rescue medication. RESULTS: More placebo patients had radiation-induced diarrhea than VSL#3 patients (124 of 239 patients, 51.8%, and 77 of 243 patients, 31.6%; P < 0.001) and more patients given placebo suffered grade 3 or 4 diarrhea compared with VSL#3 recipients (55.4% and 1.4%, P < 0.001). Daily bowel movements were 14.7 ± 6 and 5.1 ± 3 among placebo and VSL#3 recipients (P < 0.05), and the mean time to the use of loperamide was 86 ± 6 h for placebo patients and 122 ± 8 h for VSL#3 patients (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Probiotic lactic acid-producing bacteria are an easy, safe, and feasible approach to protect cancer patients against the risk of radiation-induced diarrhea. PMID:17352022

  4. Radiation-induced cognitive impairment-from bench to bedside

    PubMed Central

    Greene-Schloesser, Dana; Robbins, Mike E.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 100 000 patients per year in the United States with primary and metastatic brain tumor survive long enough (>6 months) to develop radiation-induced brain injury. Before 1970, the human brain was thought to be radioresistant; the acute central nervous system (CNS) syndrome occurs after single doses of ≥30 Gy, and white matter necrosis can occur at fractionated doses of ≥60 Gy. Although white matter necrosis is uncommon with modern radiation therapy techniques, functional deficits, including progressive impairments in memory, attention, and executive function have become increasingly important, having profound effects on quality of life. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into the pathogenic mechanisms involved in radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Although reductions in hippocampal neurogenesis and hippocampal-dependent cognitive function have been observed in rodent models, it is important to recognize that other brain regions are affected; non–hippocampal-dependent reductions in cognitive function occur. Neuroinflammation is viewed as playing a major role in radiation-induced cognitive impairment. During the past 5 years, several preclinical studies have demonstrated that interventional therapies aimed at modulating neuroinflammation can prevent/ameliorate radiation-induced cognitive impairment independent of changes in neurogenesis. Translating these exciting preclinical findings to the clinic offers the promise of improving the quality of life in patients with brain tumors who receive radiation therapy. PMID:23095829

  5. Radiation-induced xerostomia: pathophysiology, clinical course and supportive treatment.

    PubMed

    Guchelaar, H J; Vermes, A; Meerwaldt, J H

    1997-07-01

    Xerostomia, or oral dryness, is one of the most common complaints experienced by patients who have had radiotherapy of the oral cavity and neck region. The hallmarks of radiation-induced damage are acinar atrophy and chronic inflammation of the salivary glands. The early response, resulting in atrophy of the secretory cells without inflammation might be due to radiation-induced apoptosis. In contrast, the late response with inflammation could be a result of radiation-induced necrosis. The subjective complaint of a dry mouth appears to be poorly correlated with objective findings of salivary gland dysfunction. Xerostomia, with secondary symptoms of increased dental caries, difficulty in chewing, swallowing and speaking, and an increased incidence of oral candidiasis, can have a significant effect on the quality of life. At present there is no causal treatment for radiation-induced xerostomia. Temporary symptomatic relief can be offered by moistening agents and saliva substitutes, and is the only option for patients without residual salivary function. In patients with residual salivary function, oral administration of pilocarpine 5-10 mg three times a day is effective in increasing salivary flow and improving the symptoms of xerostomia, and this therapy should be considered as the treatment of choice. Effectiveness of sialogogue treatment requires residual salivary function, which emphasizes the potential benefit from sparing normal tissue during irradiation. The hypothesis concerning the existence of early apoptotic and late necrotic effects of irradiation on the salivary glands theoretically offers a way of achieving this goal.

  6. SPHINX Measurements of Radiation Induced Conductivity of Foam

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, W.P.; Beutler, D.E.; Burt, M.; Dudley, K.J.; Stringer, T.A.

    1998-12-14

    Experiments on the SPHINX accelerator studying radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) in foam indicate that a field-exclusion boundary layer model better describes foam than a Maxwell-Garnett model that treats the conducting gas bubbles in the foam as modifying the dielectric constant. In both cases, wall attachment effects could be important but were neglected.

  7. Obstructive jaundice due to radiation-induced hepatic duct stricture

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekhara, K.L.; Iyer, S.K.

    1984-10-01

    A case of obstructive jaundice due to radiation-induced hepatic duct stricture is reported. The patient received postoperative radiation for left adrenal carcinoma, seven years prior to this admission. The sequelae of hepatobiliary radiation and their management are discussed briefly.

  8. Radiation-Induced Immune Modulation in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    postulate that radiation-induced TNFR I probably acts as a “ brake ” on immunity. Because of the high risk of the proposed experiment and high...the rest of body shielded. Tumor diameters were measured in three mutually orthogonal dimensions at 2–3 day intervals with a vernier caliper and the

  9. Radiation-induced nonlinear optical response of quartz fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaksin, O. A.

    2006-10-01

    The intensity of radiation-induced luminescence and transient optical losses in KU-1 (Russia) and K-3 (Japan) quartz glass optical tibers irradiated in a fast pulsed fission reactor (a pulse duration of 80 μs and a neutron flux up to 7 × 1016 cm 2 s 2) has been measured in the visible range. The intensity of the fast luminescence component nonlinearly depends on the neutron flux. The luminescence intensity and the transient optical losses depend on the probe light intensity. Suppression of radiation-induced luminescence is observed at wavelengths that are longer or shorter than the probe light wavelength. Light probing leads to an increase in transient optical losses and a more rapid recovery of transparency. A model of two photon fluxes is proposed to analyze the relationship of the effects of suppression of radiation-induced luminescence and the increase in optical losses upon light probing. The effect of suppression of radiation-induced luminescence can be used to control the optical properties of fibers in radiation fields.

  10. Data acquisition system used in radiation induced electrical degradation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.P.

    1995-04-01

    Radiation induced electrical degradation (RIED) of ceramic materials has recently been reported and is the topic of much research at the present time. The object of this report is to describe the data acquisition system for an experiment designed to study RIED at the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  11. Why mucosal health?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aquaculture species depend more heavily on mucosal barriers than their terrestrial agricultural counterparts as they are continuously interacting with the aquatic microbiota. Unlike classical immune centers, such as the spleen and kidney, the accessibility of mucosal surfaces through immersion/dip t...

  12. Radiation-induced inflammatory markers of brain injury are modulated by PPARdelta activation in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnegg, Caroline Isabel

    responses in microglia in vitro. To extend our in vitro findings in vivo, we investigated whether administration of the peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)ä agonist, GW0742, prevented radiation-induced brain injury in C57Bl/6 WT mice. Our data demonstrate that GW0742 prevented the radiation-induced increase in the number of activated microglia (CD68+ cells) in wild-type (WT) mice 1 week following 10 Gy WBI. Furthermore, GW0742 inhibited the WBI-induced increase in IL-1β message levels and ERK phosphorylation observed 3 h post-irradiation. In contrast, GW0742 administration failed to modulate the radiation-induced decrease in hippocampal neurogenesis (NeuN+/BrdU+ cells) determined 2 months after irradiation, or mitigate hippocampal-dependent spatial memory impairment observed 3 months post-irradiation using the Barnes Maze task. We used PPARō knockout (KO) mice to examine if the effects of GW0742 are PPARō-dependent. Unexpectedly, PPARō KO mice exhibited a differential response following WBI compared to WT mice; therefore, we were unable to make mechanistic conclusions about GW0742. KO mice do not exhibit a WBI-induced increase in activated microglia; however, they appeared to display a pronounced astrocytic response. In particular, PPARō KO but not WT mice displayed increased GFAP message levels 2 months after WBI. Additionally, the number of GFAP+ cells was reduced significantly in the WT mice 2 months after WBI, but it was not in the PPARō KO mice. These results demonstrate that: i) GW0742 prevents the radiation-induced increase in microglial activation and inflammatory markers, and ii) WT and PPARō KO mice have a differential response to WBI.

  13. Treatment of oral mucositis due to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bagán-Sebastián, José V

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The management of oral mucositis is a challenge, due to its complex biological nature. Over the last 10 years, different strategies have been developed for the management of oral mucositis caused by chemotherapy in cancer patients. Material and Methods An exhaustive search was made of the PubMed-Medline, Cochrane Library and Scopus databases, crossing the key words “oral mucositis”, “prevention” and “treatment” with the terms “chemotherapy” and “radiotherapy” by means of the boolean operators “AND” and “NOT”. A total of 268 articles were obtained, of which 96 met the inclusion criteria. Results Several interventions for the prevention of oral mucositis, such as oral hygiene protocols, amifostine, benzidamine, calcium phosphate, cryotherapy and iseganan, among others, were found to yield only limited benefits. Other studies have reported a decrease in the appearance and severity of mucositis with the use of cytoprotectors (sucralfate, oral glutamine, hyaluronic acid), growth factors, topical polyvinylpyrrolidone, and low power laser irradiation. Conclusions Very few interventions of confirmed efficacy are available for the management of oral mucositis due to chemotherapy. However, according to the reviewed literature, the use of palifermin, cryotherapy and low power laser offers benefits, reducing the incidence and severity of oral mucositis – though further studies are needed to confirm the results obtained. Key words:Chemotherapy-Induced Oral Mucositis Treatment. PMID:27034762

  14. Quercetin liposomes protect against radiation-induced pulmonary injury in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    LIU, HAO; XUE, JIAN-XING; LI, XING; AO, RUI; LU, YOU

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the hypothesis that quercetin liposomes are able to effectively protect against radiation-induced pulmonary injury in a murine model was tested. C57BL/6J mice receiving whole-thorax radiotherapy (16 Gy) were randomly divided into three groups: control, radiation therapy plus saline (RT+NS) and RT plus quercetin (RT+QU). At 1, 4, 8 and 24 weeks post-irradiation, lung injury was assessed by measuring oxidative damage and the extent of acute pneumonitis and late fibrosis. In the lung tissues from the RT+NS group, the malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were significantly elevated and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) activities were significantly reduced; the total cell counts and inflammatory cell proportions in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), plasma tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 concentrations and the hydroxyproline (HP) content were significantly increased. Quercetin liposome administration significantly reduced the MDA content and increased SOD and GSH-PX activities in the lung tissues, and reduced the total cell counts and inflammatory cell proportions in the BALF, plasma TNF-α and TGF-β1 concentrations and the HP content in the lung tissues. A histological examination revealed suppression of the inflammatory response and reduced TGF-β1 expression and fibrosis scores. Radiation-induced oxidative damage ranged from pneumonitis to lung fibrosis. Quercetin liposomes were shown to protect against radiation-induced acute pneumonitis and late fibrosis, potentially by reducing oxidative damage. PMID:24137346

  15. Quercetin liposomes protect against radiation-induced pulmonary injury in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Xue, Jian-Xing; Li, Xing; Ao, Rui; Lu, You

    2013-08-01

    In the present study, the hypothesis that quercetin liposomes are able to effectively protect against radiation-induced pulmonary injury in a murine model was tested. C57BL/6J mice receiving whole-thorax radiotherapy (16 Gy) were randomly divided into three groups: control, radiation therapy plus saline (RT+NS) and RT plus quercetin (RT+QU). At 1, 4, 8 and 24 weeks post-irradiation, lung injury was assessed by measuring oxidative damage and the extent of acute pneumonitis and late fibrosis. In the lung tissues from the RT+NS group, the malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were significantly elevated and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) activities were significantly reduced; the total cell counts and inflammatory cell proportions in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), plasma tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 concentrations and the hydroxyproline (HP) content were significantly increased. Quercetin liposome administration significantly reduced the MDA content and increased SOD and GSH-PX activities in the lung tissues, and reduced the total cell counts and inflammatory cell proportions in the BALF, plasma TNF-α and TGF-β1 concentrations and the HP content in the lung tissues. A histological examination revealed suppression of the inflammatory response and reduced TGF-β1 expression and fibrosis scores. Radiation-induced oxidative damage ranged from pneumonitis to lung fibrosis. Quercetin liposomes were shown to protect against radiation-induced acute pneumonitis and late fibrosis, potentially by reducing oxidative damage.

  16. Herbs in Oral Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Baharvand, Maryam; Jafari, Soudeh

    2017-01-01

    Oral mucositis is an inflammatory mucosal destruction as a result of chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy, which in severe cases can impair patients’ quality of life. Moreover, mucosal infection and/or systemic involvement due to compromised immunity leads to delay or discontinuation of the treatment. Many strategies and agents have been suggested for the management of this condition. Because of their lower side effects compared to chemical drugs, general interest in evaluating therapeutic effects of herbs has been increased intensively. Herbal plants apply their effect through different mechanisms of action: antioxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antifungal, antiseptic, and anticarcinogenic activity. Recently, various natural agents in plants have been noticed in mucositis, which may improve the symptoms through different interventions. The purpose of this review is to focus on the preventive or therapeutic use of herbal medicine to alleviate oral mucositis. PMID:28511530

  17. Risk and survival outcomes of radiation-induced CNS tumors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jessica W; Wernicke, A Gabriella

    2016-08-01

    Patients treated with cranial radiation are at risk of developing secondary CNS tumors. Understanding the incidence, treatment, and long-term outcomes of radiation-induced CNS tumors plays a role in clinical decision-making and patient education. Additionally, as meningiomas and pituitary tumors have been detected at increasing rates across all ages and may potentially be treated with radiation, it is important to know and communicate the risk of secondary tumors in children and adults. After conducting an extensive literature search, we identified publications that report incidence and long-term outcomes of radiation-induced CNS tumors. We reviewed 14 studies in children, which reported that radiation confers a 7- to 10-fold increase in subsequent CNS tumors, with a 20-year cumulative incidence ranging from 1.03 to 28.9 %. The latency period for secondary tumors ranged from 5.5 to 30 years, with gliomas developing in 5-10 years and meningiomas developing around 15 years after radiation. We also reviewed seven studies in adults, where the two strongest studies showed no increased risk while the remaining studies found a higher risk compared to the general population. The latency period for secondary CNS tumors in adults ranged from 5 to 34 years. Treatment and long-term outcomes of radiation-induced CNS tumors have been documented in four case series, which did not conclusively demonstrate that secondary CNS tumors fared worse than primary CNS tumors. Radiation-induced CNS tumors remain a rare occurrence that should not by itself impede radiation treatment. Additional investigation is needed on the risk of radiation-induced tumors in adults and the long-term outcomes of these tumors.

  18. Chemoprevention of Radiation Induced Rat Mammary Neoplasms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huso, David L.

    1999-01-01

    Radiations encountered in space include protons and heavy ions such as iron as well as their secondaries. The relative biological effect (RBE) of these ions is not known, particularly at the doses and dose-rates expected for planetary missions. Neutrons, are not particularly relevant to space travel, but have been found experimentally to have an increase in their RBE with decreasing dose. If a similar trend of increasing RBE with decreasing dose is present for heavy ions and protons during irradiation in space, the small doses received during space travel could potentially have substantial carcinogenic risk. Clearly more investigation of the effects of heavy ions and protons is needed before accurate risk assessment for prolonged travel in space can be done. One means to mitigate the increased risk of cancer due to radiation exposure in space is by developing effective countermeasures that can reduce the incidence of tumor development. Tamoxifen has recently been shown to be an effective chemopreventive agent in both animal models and humans for the prevention of mammary tumors. Tamoxifen is a unique drug, with a highly specific mechanism of action affecting a specific radiation-sensitive population of epithelial cells in the mammary gland. In human studies, the annual incidence of a primary tumor in the contralateral breast of women with previous breast cancer is about 8 per 1000, making them an exceedingly high-risk group for the development of breast cancer. In this high risk group, treated with tamoxifen, daily, for 2 years, the incidence of a new primary tumor in the contralateral breast was approximately one third of that noted in the non-tamoxifen treatment group. Tamoxifen antagonizes the action of estrogen by competing for the nuclear receptor complex thereby altering the association of the receptor complex and nuclear binding sites. Its effects in reducing the development of breast cancer could be accomplished by controlling clinically undetectable

  19. Chemoprevention of Radiation Induced Rat Mammary Neoplasms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huso, David L.

    1999-01-01

    Radiations encountered in space include protons and heavy ions such as iron as well as their secondaries. The relative biological effect (RBE) of these ions is not known, particularly at the doses and dose-rates expected for planetary missions. Neutrons, are not particularly relevant to space travel, but have been found experimentally to have an increase in their RBE with decreasing dose. If a similar trend of increasing RBE with decreasing dose is present for heavy ions and protons during irradiation in space, the small doses received during space travel could potentially have substantial carcinogenic risk. Clearly more investigation of the effects of heavy ions and protons is needed before accurate risk assessment for prolonged travel in space can be done. One means to mitigate the increased risk of cancer due to radiation exposure in space is by developing effective countermeasures that can reduce the incidence of tumor development. Tamoxifen has recently been shown to be an effective chemopreventive agent in both animal models and humans for the prevention of mammary tumors. Tamoxifen is a unique drug, with a highly specific mechanism of action affecting a specific radiation-sensitive population of epithelial cells in the mammary gland. In human studies, the annual incidence of a primary tumor in the contralateral breast of women with previous breast cancer is about 8 per 1000, making them an exceedingly high-risk group for the development of breast cancer. In this high risk group, treated with tamoxifen, daily, for 2 years, the incidence of a new primary tumor in the contralateral breast was approximately one third of that noted in the non-tamoxifen treatment group. Tamoxifen antagonizes the action of estrogen by competing for the nuclear receptor complex thereby altering the association of the receptor complex and nuclear binding sites. Its effects in reducing the development of breast cancer could be accomplished by controlling clinically undetectable

  20. Radiation induced bystander effect by GAP junction channels in human fibroblast cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusawa, Y.; Shao, C.; Aoki, M.; Kobayashi, Y.; Funayama, T.; Ando, K.

    The chemical factor involved in bystander effect and its transfer pathway were investigated in a confluent human fibroblast cell (AG1522) population. Micronuclei (MN) and G1-phase arrest were detected in cells irradiated by carbon (~100 keV/μm) ions at HIMAC. A very low dose irradiation showed a high effectiveness in producing MN, suggesting a bystander effect. This effectiveness was enhanced by 8-Br-cAMP treatment that increases gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). On the other hand, the effect was reduced by 5% DMSO treatment, which reduce the reactive oxygen species (ROS), and suppressed by 100 μM lindane treatment, an inhibitor of GJIC. In addition, the radiation-induced G1-phase arrest was also enhanced by cAMP, and reduced or suppressed by DMSO or lindane. A microbeam device (JAERI) was also used for these studies. It was found that exposing one single cell in a confluent cell population to exactly one argon (~1260 keV/μm) or neon (~430 keV/ μm) ion, additional MN could be detected in many other unirradiated cells. The yield of MN increased with the number of irradiated cells. However, there was no significant difference in the MN induction when the cells were irradiated by increasing number of particles. MN induction by bystander effect was partly reduced by DMSO, and effectively suppressed by lindane. Our results obtained from both random irradiation and precise numbered irradiation indicate that both GJIC and ROS contributed to the radiation-induced bystander effect, but the cell gap junction channels likely play an essential role in the release and transfer of radiation-induced chemical factors.

  1. The mucosal immune system for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Lamichhane, Aayam; Azegamia, Tatsuhiko; Kiyonoa, Hiroshi

    2014-11-20

    Mucosal surfaces are continuously exposed to the external environment and therefore represent the largest lymphoid organ of the body. In the mucosal immune system, gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALTs), including Peyer's patches and isolated lymphoid follicles, play an important role in the induction of antigen-specific immune responses in the gut. GALTs have unique organogenesis characteristics and interact with the network of dendritic cells and T cells for the simultaneous induction and regulation of IgA responses and oral tolerance. In these lymphoid tissues, antigens are up taken by M cells in the epithelial layer, and antigen-specific immune responses are subsequently initiated by GALT cells. Nasopharynx- and tear-duct-associated lymphoid tissues (NALTs and TALTs) are key organized lymphoid structures in the respiratory tract and ocular cavities, respectively, and have been shown to interact with each other. Mucosal surfaces are also characterized by host-microbe interactions that affect the genesis and maturation of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues and the induction and regulation of innate and acquired mucosal immune responses. Because most harmful pathogens enter the body through mucosal surfaces by ingestion, inhalation, or sexual contact, the mucosa is a candidate site for vaccination. Mucosal vaccination has some physiological and practical advantages, such as decreased costs and reduced risk of needle-stick injuries and transmission of bloodborne diseases, and it is painless. Recently, the application of modern bioengineering and biochemical engineering technologies, including gene transformation and manipulation systems, resulted in the development of systems to express vaccine antigens in transgenic plants and nanogels, which will usher in a new era of delivery systems for mucosal vaccine antigens. In this review, based on some of our research group's thirty seven years of progress and effort, we highlight the unique features of mucosal immune

  2. Reduced numbers of mucosal DR(int) macrophages and increased numbers of CD103(+) dendritic cells during anti-TNF-α treatment in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Dige, Anders; Magnusson, Maria K; Öhman, Lena; Hvas, Christian Lodberg; Kelsen, Jens; Wick, Mary Jo; Agnholt, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Anti-TNF-α treatment constitutes a mainstay in the treatment of Crohn's disease (CD), but its mechanisms of action are not fully understood. We aimed to investigate the effects of adalimumab, a human monoclonal TNF-α antibody, on macrophage (MQ) and dendritic cell (DC) subsets in mucosal biopsies and peripheral blood. Intestinal biopsies and blood samples were obtained from 12 different CD patients both before and 4 weeks after the initiation of the induction of adalimumab treatment. Endoscopic disease activity was estimated by the Simple Endoscopic Score for Crohn's Disease. Biopsies were obtained from inflamed and non-inflamed areas. The numbers of lamina propria CD14 (+) DR(int) and CD14 (+) DR(hi) MQs, CD141(+), CD141(-) and CD103(+) DCs subsets, and circulating monocytes and DCs were analyzed using flow cytometry. At baseline, we observed higher numbers of DR(int) MQs and lower numbers of CD103(+) DCs in inflamed versus non-inflamed mucosa [843 vs. 391/10(5) lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMCs) (p < 0.05) and 9 vs. 19 × 10(5) LPMCs (p = 0.01), respectively]. After four weeks of adalimumab treatment, the numbers of DR(int) MQs decreased [843 to 379/10(5) LPMCs (p = 0.03)], whereas the numbers of CD103(+) DCs increased [9-20 × 10(5) LPMCs (p = 0.003)] compared with baseline. In peripheral blood, no alterations were observed in monocyte or DC numbers between baseline and week 4. In CD, mucosal inflammation is associated with high numbers of DR(int) MQs and low numbers of CD103(+) DCs. This composition of intestinal myeloid subsets is reversed by anti-TNF-α treatment. These results suggest that DR(int) MQs play a pivotal role in CD inflammation.

  3. Targeting Mucosal Healing in Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kakkar, Aarti; Wasan, Sharmeel K.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of medical treatment for Crohn's disease includes improving patients' quality of life while reducing the need for hospitalization and surgery. The current medical armamentarium includes 5-aminosalicylates, corticosteroids, immunomodulators, and biologic agents. In the past, response to treatment was measured by clinical improvement in symptoms; however, with the advent of disease-modifying medications, mucosal healing has emerged as an increasingly important goal of therapy. Mucosal healing, or endoscopic remission, is associated with increased rates of clinical remission, fewer hospitalizations, and fewer abdominal surgeries. Both the immunomodulator and biologic classes of medications are effective at inducing mucosal healing. Despite several limitations, mucosal healing has become a desirable and valid measure of disease activity. PMID:21869869

  4. Mucosal Vaccination against Tuberculosis Using Inert Bioparticles

    PubMed Central

    Reljic, Rajko; Sibley, Laura; Huang, Jen-Min; Pepponi, Ilaria; Hoppe, Andreas; Hong, Huynh A.

    2013-01-01

    Needle-free, mucosal immunization is a highly desirable strategy for vaccination against many pathogens, especially those entering through the respiratory mucosa, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Unfortunately, mucosal vaccination against tuberculosis (TB) is impeded by a lack of suitable adjuvants and/or delivery platforms that could induce a protective immune response in humans. Here, we report on a novel biotechnological approach for mucosal vaccination against TB that overcomes some of the current limitations. This is achieved by coating protective TB antigens onto the surface of inert bacterial spores, which are then delivered to the respiratory tract. Our data showed that mice immunized nasally with coated spores developed humoral and cellular immune responses and multifunctional T cells and, most importantly, presented significantly reduced bacterial loads in their lungs and spleens following pathogenic challenge. We conclude that this new vaccine delivery platform merits further development as a mucosal vaccine for TB and possibly also other respiratory pathogens. PMID:23959722

  5. Protein and miRNA profiling of radiation-induced skin injury in rats: the protective role of peroxiredoxin-6 against ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuyu; Wang, Wenjie; Gu, Qing; Xue, Jiao; Cao, Han; Tang, Yiting; Xu, Xiaohui; Cao, Jianping; Zhou, Jundong; Wu, Jinchang; Ding, Wei-Qun

    2014-04-01

    Radiation-induced skin injury is a serious concern during radiotherapy. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of radiation-induced skin injury has not been extensively reported. Most biological functions are performed and regulated by proteins and noncoding RNAs, including microRNAs (miRNAs). The interplay between mRNA and miRNA has been implicated in disease initiation and progression. Technical advances in genomics and proteomics have enabled the exploration of the etiology of diseases and have the potential to broaden our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of radiation-induced skin injury. In this study, we compared the protein and miRNA expression in rat skin irradiated with a 45-Gy electron beam with expression from adjacent normal tissues. We found 24 preferentially expressed proteins and 12 dysregulated miRNAs in irradiated skin. By analyzing the protein and miRNA profiles using bioinformatics tools, we identified a possible interaction between miR-214 and peroxiredoxin-6 (PRDX-6). Next, we investigated the expression of PRDX-6 and the consequences of its dysregulation. PRDX-6 is suppressed by radiation-inducible miR-214 and is involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced skin injury. Overexpression of PRDX-6 conferred radioresistance on cells, decreased cell apoptosis, and preserved mitochondrial integrity after radiation exposure. In addition, in vivo transfection with PRDX-6 reduced radiation-induced reactive oxygen species and the malondialdehyde concentration and ameliorated radiation-induced skin damage in rats. Our present findings illustrate the molecular changes during radiation-induced skin injury and the important role of PRDX-6 in ameliorating this damage in rats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Fatal hepatic and renal toxicity as a complication of trabectedin therapy for radiation-induced sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Pick, Amy M; Nystrom, Kelly K

    2010-12-01

    Trabectedin therapy was prescribed for a patient with radiation-induced sarcoma. Two doses of trabectedin were given before therapy was discontinued with the patient experiencing renal and liver failure. Despite discontinuing trabectedin the patient continued to experience increases in liver transaminases, bilirubin, blood urea nitrogen, and serum creatinine. Hemodialysis was initiated with no improvement. With all other causes being ruled out, trabectedin likely caused hepatic and renal failure leading to death in this patient. Recent literature suggests that patients may benefit from prophylactic dexamethasone as a means of reducing hepatic toxicity.

  7. Radiation-induced cholecystitis after hepatic radioembolization: do we need to take precautionary measures?

    PubMed

    Prince, Jip F; van den Hoven, Andor F; van den Bosch, Maurice A A J; Elschot, Mattijs; de Jong, Hugo W A M; Lam, Marnix G E H

    2014-11-01

    Controversy exists over the need to take precautionary measures during hepatic radioembolization to minimize the risk of radiation-induced cholecystitis. Strategies for a variety of clinical scenarios are discussed on the basis of a literature review. Precautionary measures are unnecessary in the majority of patients and should be taken only when single photon-emission computed tomography (CT; SPECT)/CT shows a significant concentration of technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin in the gallbladder wall. In this case report with quantitative SPECT analysis, it is illustrated how an adjustment of the catheter position can effectively reduce the absorbed dose of radiation delivered to the gallbladder wall by more than 90%.

  8. Oligomer formation in the radiation-induced polymerization of styrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harayma, Hiroshi; Al-Sheikhly, Mohamad; Silverman, Joseph

    2003-12-01

    Analyses of the oligomers formed in radiation-induced polymerization of purified styrene were performed. The principal dimeric products were cis- and trans-diphenyl-cyclobutane with a relatively small amount of 1-phenyltetralin; the trimeric products were the optical isomers of 1-phenyl-4-[1'-phenylethyl-(1')]-tetralin in gamma-ray and 60 MeV proton irradiation. Oligomer formation increased with increasing dose, but more gradually than the linear formation of high polymer with dose. The yield was 0.25-3.1 μmol/J at low doses and decreased to an asymptotic value of 0.15 at higher doses. It appears that oligomers act as chain transfer agents during the polymerization reaction which would account for the observed decrease in molecular weight of the high polymer with increase in dose. Although the thermal and radiation-induced polymerization of styrene have different initiation steps, the oligomers produced by both reactions are similar in composition.

  9. Faecal microbiota transplantation protects against radiation-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ming; Xiao, Huiwen; Li, Yuan; Zhou, Lixin; Zhao, Shuyi; Luo, Dan; Zheng, Qisheng; Dong, Jiali; Zhao, Yu; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Junling; Lu, Lu; Wang, Haichao; Fan, Saijun

    2017-04-01

    Severe radiation exposure may cause acute radiation syndrome, a possibly fatal condition requiring effective therapy. Gut microbiota can be manipulated to fight against many diseases. We explored whether intestinal microbe transplantation could alleviate radiation-induced toxicity. High-throughput sequencing showed that gastrointestinal bacterial community composition differed between male and female mice and was associated with susceptibility to radiation toxicity. Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) increased the survival rate of irradiated animals, elevated peripheral white blood cell counts and improved gastrointestinal tract function and intestinal epithelial integrity in irradiated male and female mice. FMT preserved the intestinal bacterial composition and retained mRNA and long non-coding RNA expression profiles of host small intestines in a sex-specific fashion. Despite promoting angiogenesis, sex-matched FMT did not accelerate the proliferation of cancer cells in vivo FMT might serve as a therapeutic to mitigate radiation-induced toxicity and improve the prognosis of tumour patients after radiotherapy.

  10. Radiation-induced decomposition of explosives under extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Giefers, Hubertus; Pravica, Michael; Yang, Wenge; Liermann, Peter

    2008-11-03

    We present high-pressure and high temperature studies of the synchrotron radiation-induced decomposition of powder secondary high explosives pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) and 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) using white beam synchrotron radiation at the 16 BM-B and 16 BM-D sectors of the HP-CAT beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. The radiation-induced decomposition rate TATB showed dramatic slowing with pressure up to 26.6 GPa (the highest pressure studied), implying a positive activation volume of the activated complex. The decomposition rate of PETN varied little with pressure up to 15.7 GPa (the highest pressure studied). Diffraction line intensities were measured as a function of time using energy-dispersive methods. By measuring the decomposition rate as a function of pressure and temperature, kinetic and other constants associated with the decomposition reactions were extracted.

  11. Caffeine Markedly Enhanced Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Erkang; Wu, Lijun

    2009-04-01

    In this paper it is shown that incubation with 2 mM caffeine enhanced significantly the MN (micronucleus) formation in both the 1 cGy α-particle irradiated and non-irradiated bystander regions. Moreover, caffeine treatment made the non-irradiated bystander cells more sensitive to damage signals. Treated by c-PTIO(2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-imidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide), a nitric oxide (NO) scavenger, the MN frequencies were effectively inhibited, showing that nitric oxide might be very important in mediating the enhanced damage. These results indicated that caffeine enhanced the low dose α-particle radiation-induced damage in irradiated and non-irradiated bystander regions, and therefore it is important to investigate the relationship between the radiosensitizer and radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE).

  12. Radioadaptive response for protection against radiation-induced teratogenesis.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Ryuji; Ootsuyama, Akira; Norimura, Toshiyuki

    2005-03-01

    To clarify the characteristics of the radioadaptive response in mice, we compared the incidence of radiation-induced malformations in ICR mice. Pregnant ICR mice were exposed to a priming dose of 2 cGy (667 muGy/min) on day 9.5 of gestation and to a challenging dose of 2 Gy (1.04 Gy/min) 4 h later and were killed on day 18.5 of gestation. The incidence of malformations and prenatal death and fetal body weights were studied. The incidence of external malformations was significantly lower (by approximately 10%) in the primed (2 cGy + 2 Gy) mice compared to the unprimed (2 Gy alone) mice. However, there were no differences in the incidence of prenatal death or the skeletal malformations or the body weights between primed and unprimed mice. These results suggest that primary conditioning with low doses of radiation suppresses radiation-induced teratogenesis.

  13. Radiation induced viscous flow in amorphous thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayr, S. G.; Ashkenazy, Y.; Averback, R. S.

    2003-03-01

    We investigate surface roughness and stress relaxation in amorphous thin films during ion beam irradiation by a combination of experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. These experiments show, that smoothing occurs by a viscous mechanism. With computer simulations we investigate the model system CuTi, and find that radiation induced viscous flow is independent of the recoil energy between 100 and 15keV, when compared on the basis of defect production. Additionally we can identify a threshold recoil energy for flow of approximately 10eV. We show, that point defects can mediate the flow, by injection of interstitial and vacancy-like defects, which induce the same amount of flow as recoil events. The results are compared with the thermal spike model of radiation induced viscous flow.

  14. Dose and volume impact on radiation-induced xerostomia.

    PubMed

    Marmiroli, Luca; Salvi, Giovanna; Caiazza, Adolfo; Di Rienzo, Luigi; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Murino, Paola; Macchia, Gabriella

    2005-01-01

    Radiation-induced xerostomia consists in the chronic dryness of the mouth caused by parotid gland irradiation. Parotid glands produce approximately 60% of saliva while the rest is secreted by submandibular and accessory salivary glands. Methods of measuring the salivary output are essentially represented by 99mTc-pertechnate scintigraphy or simpler albeit less accurate methods in stimulated or unstimulated saliva. There are subjective and objective criteria of classification and grading of the secretion of saliva. Radiation-induced xerostomia, namely the residual salivary gland function is evidently associated with the mean dose absorbed. The salivary output tends to decrease after the end of radiotherapy. The partial dose-volume is substantially correlated with the mean dose to the whole gland. As for ipsilateral irradiation for head and neck cancer, conformal RT or IMRT allow to spare the contralateral parotid gland without increasing the risk of contralateral nodal recurrences. The monitoring system of late toxicity used by the authors is presented.

  15. Radiation-induced transient darkening of optically transparent polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Downey, S.W.; Builta, L.A.; Carlson, R.L.; Czuchlewski, S.J.; Moir, D.C.

    1986-11-15

    Results are presented for the radiation-induced transient darkening of thin organic polymer films normally used as Cerenkov light emissions sources. The radiation source is a 27-MeV, 10-..mu..C, 200-ns electron beam generated by the PHERMEX accelerator. The typical dose for a single pulse is 5 Mrad. At this dose, the broadband time-resolved percent transmission above 520 nm was measured for four common polymers: polyimide (Kapton-H), polyethylene terephthalate (Mylar), cellulose acetate, and high-density polyethylene. Kapton was found to darken the most and polyethylene darkened the least. The recovery time to normal transmission for Kapton was found to be greater than 10--20 ..mu..s. The radiation-induced attenuation coefficient is shown to depend on electronic band energy separation. The results show that Kapton is not the material of choice for a Cerenkov light source.

  16. Mitigation of radiation-induced hematopoietic injury by the polyphenolic acetate 7, 8-diacetoxy-4-methylthiocoumarin in mice.

    PubMed

    Venkateswaran, Kavya; Shrivastava, Anju; Agrawala, Paban K; Prasad, Ashok; Kalra, Namita; Pandey, Parvat R; Manda, Kailash; Raj, Hanumantharao G; Parmar, Virinder S; Dwarakanath, Bilikere S

    2016-11-16

    Protection of the hematopoietic system from radiation damage, and/or mitigation of hematopoietic injury are the two major strategies for developing medical countermeasure agents (MCM) to combat radiation-induced lethality. In the present study, we investigated the potential of 7, 8-diacetoxy-4-methylthiocoumarin (DAMTC) to ameliorate radiation-induced hematopoietic damage and the associated mortality following total body irradiation (TBI) in C57BL/6 mice. Administration of DAMTC 24 hours post TBI alleviated TBI-induced myelo-suppression and pancytopenia, by augmenting lymphocytes and WBCs in the peripheral blood of mice, while bone marrow (BM) cellularity was restored through enhanced proliferation of the stem cells. It stimulated multi-lineage expansion and differentiation of myeloid progenitors in the BM and induced proliferation of splenic progenitors thereby, facilitating hematopoietic re-population. DAMTC reduced the radiation-induced apoptotic and mitotic death in the hematopoietic compartment. Recruitment of pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages in spleen contributed to the immune-protection linked to the mitigation of hematopoietic injury. Recovery of the hematopoietic compartment correlated well with mitigation of mortality at a lethal dose of 9 Gy, leading to 80% animal survival. Present study establishes the potential of DAMTC to mitigate radiation-induced injury to the hematopoietic system by stimulating the re-population of stem cells from multiple lineages.

  17. Nimotuzumab Enhances the Radiosensitivity of Cancer Cells In Vitro by Inhibiting Radiation-Induced DNA Damage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yuan-yuan; Hu, Song-liu; Xu, Xiang-ying; Wang, Rui-zhi; Yu, Hong-yang; Xu, Jian-yu; Chen, Lin; Dong, Guang-lu

    2013-01-01

    Background Nimotuzumab is a humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody specifically targeting EGFR. In this study, we aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms of nimotuzumab in its effects of enhancing cancer cell radiosensitivity. Principal Finding Lung cancer A549 cells and breast cancer MCF-7 cells were pretreated with or without nimotuzumab for 24 h before radiation to perform the clonogenic survival assay and to analyze the cell apoptosis by flow ctyometry. γ-H2AX foci were detected by confocal microscopy to assess the effect of nimotuzumab on radiation induced DNA repair. EGFR activation was examined and the levels of DNA damage repair related proteins in A549 cells at different time point and at varying doses exposure after nimotuzumab and radiation treatment were examined by Western blot. Pretreatment with nimotuzumab reduced clonogenic survival after radiation, inhibited radiation-induced EGFR activation and increased the radiation-induced apoptosis in both A549 cells and MCF-7 cells. The foci of γ-H2AX 24 h after radiation significantly increased in nimotuzumab pretreated cells with different doses. The phosphorylation of AKT and DNA-PKcs were remarkably inhibited in the combination group at each dose point as well as time point. Conclusions Our results revealed that the possible mechanism of nimotuzumab enhancing the cancer radiosensitivity is that nimotuzumab inhibited the radiation-induced activation of DNA-PKcs through blocking the PI3K/AKT pathway, which ultimately affected the DNA DSBs repair. PMID:23976954

  18. Nimotuzumab enhances the radiosensitivity of cancer cells in vitro by inhibiting radiation-induced DNA damage repair.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yuan-yuan; Hu, Song-liu; Xu, Xiang-ying; Wang, Rui-zhi; Yu, Hong-yang; Xu, Jian-yu; Chen, Lin; Dong, Guang-lu

    2013-01-01

    Nimotuzumab is a humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody specifically targeting EGFR. In this study, we aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms of nimotuzumab in its effects of enhancing cancer cell radiosensitivity. Lung cancer A549 cells and breast cancer MCF-7 cells were pretreated with or without nimotuzumab for 24 h before radiation to perform the clonogenic survival assay and to analyze the cell apoptosis by flow ctyometry. γ-H2AX foci were detected by confocal microscopy to assess the effect of nimotuzumab on radiation induced DNA repair. EGFR activation was examined and the levels of DNA damage repair related proteins in A549 cells at different time point and at varying doses exposure after nimotuzumab and radiation treatment were examined by Western blot. Pretreatment with nimotuzumab reduced clonogenic survival after radiation, inhibited radiation-induced EGFR activation and increased the radiation-induced apoptosis in both A549 cells and MCF-7 cells. The foci of γ-H2AX 24 h after radiation significantly increased in nimotuzumab pretreated cells with different doses. The phosphorylation of AKT and DNA-PKcs were remarkably inhibited in the combination group at each dose point as well as time point. Our results revealed that the possible mechanism of nimotuzumab enhancing the cancer radiosensitivity is that nimotuzumab inhibited the radiation-induced activation of DNA-PKcs through blocking the PI3K/AKT pathway, which ultimately affected the DNA DSBs repair.

  19. Mitigation of radiation-induced hematopoietic injury by the polyphenolic acetate 7, 8-diacetoxy-4-methylthiocoumarin in mice

    PubMed Central

    Venkateswaran, Kavya; Shrivastava, Anju; Agrawala, Paban K.; Prasad, Ashok; Kalra, Namita; Pandey, Parvat R.; Manda, Kailash; Raj, Hanumantharao G.; Parmar, Virinder S.; Dwarakanath, Bilikere S.

    2016-01-01

    Protection of the hematopoietic system from radiation damage, and/or mitigation of hematopoietic injury are the two major strategies for developing medical countermeasure agents (MCM) to combat radiation-induced lethality. In the present study, we investigated the potential of 7, 8-diacetoxy-4-methylthiocoumarin (DAMTC) to ameliorate radiation-induced hematopoietic damage and the associated mortality following total body irradiation (TBI) in C57BL/6 mice. Administration of DAMTC 24 hours post TBI alleviated TBI-induced myelo-suppression and pancytopenia, by augmenting lymphocytes and WBCs in the peripheral blood of mice, while bone marrow (BM) cellularity was restored through enhanced proliferation of the stem cells. It stimulated multi-lineage expansion and differentiation of myeloid progenitors in the BM and induced proliferation of splenic progenitors thereby, facilitating hematopoietic re-population. DAMTC reduced the radiation-induced apoptotic and mitotic death in the hematopoietic compartment. Recruitment of pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages in spleen contributed to the immune-protection linked to the mitigation of hematopoietic injury. Recovery of the hematopoietic compartment correlated well with mitigation of mortality at a lethal dose of 9 Gy, leading to 80% animal survival. Present study establishes the potential of DAMTC to mitigate radiation-induced injury to the hematopoietic system by stimulating the re-population of stem cells from multiple lineages. PMID:27849061

  20. Relief of delayed oxidative stress by ascorbic acid can suppress radiation-induced cellular senescence in mammalian fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Kobashigawa, Shinko; Kashino, Genro; Mori, Hiromu; Watanabe, Masami

    2015-03-01

    Ionizing radiation-induced cellular senescence is thought to be caused by nuclear DNA damage that cannot be repaired. However, here we found that radiation induces delayed increase of intracellular oxidative stress after irradiation. We investigated whether the relief of delayed oxidative stress by ascorbic acid would suppress the radiation-induced cellular senescence in Syrian golden hamster embryo (SHE) cells. We observed that the level of oxidative stress was drastically increased soon after irradiation, then declined to the level in non-irradiated cells, and increased again with a peak on day 3 after irradiation. We found that the inductions of cellular senescence after X-irradiation were reduced along with suppression of the delayed induction of oxidative stress by treatment with ascorbic acid, but not when oxidative stress occurred immediately after irradiation. Moreover, treatment of ascorbic acid inhibited p53 accumulation at 3 days after irradiation. Our data suggested a delayed increase of intracellular oxidative stress levels plays an important role in the process of radiation-induced cellular senescence by p53 accumulation.

  1. Extracellular adenosine production by ecto-5′-nucleotidase (CD73) enhances radiation-induced lung fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wirsdörfer, Florian; de Leve, Simone; Cappuccini, Federica; Eldh, Therese; Meyer, Alina V.; Gau, Eva; Thompson, Linda F.; Chen, Ning-Yuan; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Fischer, Ute; Kasper, Michael; Klein, Diana; Ritchey, Jerry W.; Blackburn, Michael R.; Westendorf, Astrid M.; Stuschke, Martin; Jendrossek, Verena

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis is a severe side effect of thoracic irradiation, but its pathogenesis remains poorly understood and no effective treatment is available. In this study, we investigated the role of the extracellular adenosine as generated by the ecto-5'-nucleotidase CD73 in fibrosis development after thoracic irradiation. Exposure of wild-type C57BL/6 mice to a single dose (15 Gray) of whole thorax irradiation triggered a progressive increase in CD73 activity in the lung between 3 and 30 weeks post-irradiation. In parallel, adenosine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were increased by approximately three-fold. Histological evidence of lung fibrosis was observed by 25 weeks after irradiation. Conversely, CD73-deficient mice failed to accumulate adenosine in BALF and exhibited significantly less radiation-induced lung fibrosis (P<0.010). Furthermore, treatment of wild-type mice with pegylated adenosine deaminase (PEG-ADA) or CD73 antibodies also significantly reduced radiation-induced lung fibrosis. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that CD73 potentiates radiation-induced lung fibrosis, suggesting that existing pharmacological strategies for modulating adenosine may be effective in limiting lung toxicities associated with the treatment of thoracic malignancies. PMID:26921334

  2. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate ameliorates radiation-induced acute skin damage in breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wanqi; Jia, Li; Chen, Guanxuan; Zhao, Hanxi; Sun, Xiaorong; Meng, Xiangjiao; Zhao, Xianguang; Xing, Ligang; Yu, Jinming; Zheng, Meizhu

    2016-01-01

    There are few effective treatment options for radiation-induced dermatitis in breast cancer patients. We conducted a single-arm trial to tested the hypothesis that topical epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is effective against radiation-induced dermatitis in breast cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Forty-nine patients participated in this study. The patients underwent mastectomy followed by adjuvant radiotherapy. Topical EGCG was applied daily, starting when grade I dermatitis appeared and ending two weeks after radiotherapy. The maximum dermatitis observed during the EGCG treatment was as follows: Grade 1 toxicity, 71.4% (35 patients); grade 2 toxicity, 28.6% (14 patients); there were no patients with grade 3 or 4 toxicity. The majority of the radiation-induced dermatitis was observed 1 week after the end of radiotherapy. EGCG reduced the pain in 85.7% of patients, burning-feeling in 89.8%, itching in 87.8%, pulling in 71.4%, and tenderness in 79.6%. These findings suggest topical EGCG may be an effective treatment for radiation-induced dermatitis and has acceptable toxicity. PMID:27224910

  3. Heavy-ion radiation induced bystander effect in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shujian; Sun, Yeqing; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Wei; Cui, Changna

    2012-07-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect is defined as the induction of damage in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. Recently, Low dose of high LET radiation induced bystander effects in vivo have been reported more and more. It has been indicated that radiation induced bystander effect was localized not only in bystander tissues but also in distant organs. Genomic, epigenetic, metabolomics and proteomics play significant roles in regulating heavy-ion radiation stress responses in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male mice head were exposed to 2000mGy dose of 12C heavy-ion radiation and the distant organ liver was detected on 1h, 6h, 12h and 24h after radiation, respectively. MSAP was used to monitor the level of polymorphic DNA methylation changes. The results show that heavy-ion irradiate mouse head can induce liver DNA methylation changes significantly. The percent of DNA methylation changes are time-dependent and highest at 6h after radiation. We also prove that the hypo-methylation changes on 1h and 6h after irradiation. But the expression level of DNA methyltransferase DNMT3a is not changed. UPLC/Synapt HDMS G2 was employed to detect the proteomics of bystander liver 1h after irradiation. 64 proteins are found significantly different between treatment and control group. GO process show that six of 64 which were unique in irradiation group are associated with apoptosis and DNA damage response. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of radiation induced bystander effects in vivo.

  4. Thermodynamic models of radiation-induced processes in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurov, V. M.; Eremin, E. N.; Kasymov, S. S.; Laurinas, V. CH; Chernyavskii, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    A thermodynamic model is proposed to qualitatively describe the radiation-induced processes in solids: temperature dependence of the X-ray radio luminescence output, dependence of these processes on the excitation density, energy accumulating in a solid under exposure to ionizing radiation and its temperature dependence. The proposed model and the formula derived can be used to develop radiation-resistant and radiation-sensitive materials.

  5. Process and Radiation Induced Defects in Electronic Materials and Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washington, Kenneth; Fogarty, T. N.

    1997-01-01

    Process and radiation induced defects are characterized by a variety of electrical techniques, including capacitance-voltage measurements and charge pumping. Separation of defect type into stacking faults, displacement damage, oxide traps, interface states, etc. and their related causes are discussed. The defects are then related to effects on device parameters. Silicon MOS technology is emphasized. Several reviews of radiation effects and silicon processing exist.

  6. Dynamics of radiation-induced amorphization in intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.; Okamoto, P.R. ); Devanathan, R. Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Meshii, M. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1992-06-01

    Recent progress in molecular-dynamics simulations of radiation-induced crystalline-to-amorphous transition in intermetallic compounds and the relationship between amorphization and melting are discussed. By focusing on the mean-square static displacement, which provides a generic measure of energy stored in the lattice in the forms of chemical and topological disorder, a unified description of solid-state amorphization as a disorder-induced, isothermal melting process can be developed within the framework of a generalized Lindemann criterion.

  7. Process and Radiation Induced Defects in Electronic Materials and Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washington, Kenneth; Fogarty, T. N.

    1997-01-01

    Process and radiation induced defects are characterized by a variety of electrical techniques, including capacitance-voltage measurements and charge pumping. Separation of defect type into stacking faults, displacement damage, oxide traps, interface states, etc. and their related causes are discussed. The defects are then related to effects on device parameters. Silicon MOS technology is emphasized. Several reviews of radiation effects and silicon processing exist.

  8. Mucosal Health in Aquaculture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Abstract The mucosal surfaces (skin, gill, and intestine) constitute the first line of defense against pathogen invasion while simultaneously carrying out a diverse array of other critical physiological processes, including nutrient absorption, osmoregulation, and waste excretion. Aquaculture specie...

  9. Modeling radiation induced segregation in Iron-Chromium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Senninger, Oriane; Soisson, Frederic; Martinez Saez, Enrique; Nastar, Maylise; Fu, Chu-Chun; Brechet, Yves

    2015-10-16

    Radiation induced segregation in ferritic Fe-Cr alloys is studied by Atomistic Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations that include di usion of chemical species by vacancy and interstitial migration, recombination, and elimination at sinks. The parameters of the di usion model are tted to DFT calculations. Transport coe cients that control the coupling between di usion of defects and chemical species are measured in dilute and concentrated alloys. Radiation induced segregation near grain boundaries is directly simulated with this model. We nd that the di usion of vacancies toward sinks leads to a Cr depletion. Meanwhile, the di usion of self-interstitials causes an enrichment of Cr in the vicinity of sinks. For concentrations lower than 15%Cr, we predict that sinks will be enriched with Cr for temperatures lower than a threshold. When the temperature is above this threshold value, the sinks will be depleted in Cr. These results are compared to previous experimental studies and models. Cases of radiation induced precipitation and radiation accelerated precipitation are considered.

  10. Modeling radiation induced segregation in Iron-Chromium alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Senninger, Oriane; Soisson, Frederic; Martinez Saez, Enrique; ...

    2015-10-16

    Radiation induced segregation in ferritic Fe-Cr alloys is studied by Atomistic Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations that include di usion of chemical species by vacancy and interstitial migration, recombination, and elimination at sinks. The parameters of the di usion model are tted to DFT calculations. Transport coe cients that control the coupling between di usion of defects and chemical species are measured in dilute and concentrated alloys. Radiation induced segregation near grain boundaries is directly simulated with this model. We nd that the di usion of vacancies toward sinks leads to a Cr depletion. Meanwhile, the di usion of self-interstitials causesmore » an enrichment of Cr in the vicinity of sinks. For concentrations lower than 15%Cr, we predict that sinks will be enriched with Cr for temperatures lower than a threshold. When the temperature is above this threshold value, the sinks will be depleted in Cr. These results are compared to previous experimental studies and models. Cases of radiation induced precipitation and radiation accelerated precipitation are considered.« less

  11. Radiation-induced cataract in astronauts and cosmonauts.

    PubMed

    Rastegar, Noushin; Eckart, Peter; Mertz, Manfred

    2002-07-01

    Opacification of the ocular lens is an important effect of exposure to ionizing radiation. Astronauts and cosmonauts are exposed to relatively high doses of all types of radiation in space, including high-energy particle radiation. A study was initiated to examine the lenses of the eyes of astronauts/cosmonauts to detect signs of radiation-induced cataracts. The aim of this study was to take a first step towards gaining improved, quantitative insight into the risk of radiation-induced cataract associated with long space missions. The lenses of 21 former astronauts and cosmonauts were examined, using an upgraded Topcon SL-45 B Scheimpflug camera system. The degrees of opacification in this group of astronauts and cosmonauts were compared with the measurements in a reference group. This reference group was established by examining a cohort of 395 persons using the same Scheimpflug system. Initial results indicated that opacity values in most of the astronauts and cosmonauts were slightly to strongly increased in regions IV (posterior cortex) and V (posterior capsule), compared with the average opacity values for the respective age-group of the reference cohort. The aim of this study - to conduct first examinations of astronauts' and cosmonauts' ocular lenses with regard to signs of radiation-induced cataract - was successfully achieved in a total of 21 astronauts and cosmonauts using a Scheimpflug camera system. It is planned to examine a larger group of astronauts and cosmonauts in the future.

  12. Radiation-induced grain boundary segregation in austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Bruemmer, S.M.; Charlot, L.A.; Vetrano, J.S.; Simonen, E.P.

    1994-11-01

    Radiation-induced segregation (RIS) to grain boundaries in Fe-Ni-Cr-Si stainless alloys has been measured as a function of irradiation temperature and dose. Heavy-ion irradiation was used to produce damage levels from 1 to 20 displacements per atom (dpa) at temperatures from 175 to 550{degrees}C. Measured Fe, Ni, and Cr segregation increased sharply with irradiation dose (from G to 5 dpa) and temperature (from 175 to about 350{degrees}C). However, grain boundary concentrations did not change significantly as dose or temperatures were further increased. Although interfacial compositions were similar, the width of radiation-induced enrichment or depletion profiles increased consistently with increasing dose or temperature. Impurity segregation (Si and P) was also measured, but only Si enrichment appeared to be radiation-induced. Grain boundary Si peaked at levels approaching 10 at% after irradiation doses to 10 dpa at an intermediate temperature of 325{degrees}C. No evidence of grain boundary silicide precipitation was detected after irradiation at any temperature. Equilibrium segregation of P was measured in the high-P alloys, but interfacial concentration did not increase with irradiation exposure. Comparisons to reported RIS in neutron-irradiated stainless steels revealed similar grain boundary compositional changes for both major alloying and impurity elements.

  13. Targeted overexpression of mitochondrial catalase prevents radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Parihar, Vipan K; Allen, Barrett D; Tran, Katherine K; Chmielewski, Nicole N; Craver, Brianna M; Martirosian, Vahan; Morganti, Josh M; Rosi, Susanna; Vlkolinsky, Roman; Acharya, Munjal M; Nelson, Gregory A; Allen, Antiño R; Limoli, Charles L

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced disruption of mitochondrial function can elevate oxidative stress and contribute to the metabolic perturbations believed to compromise the functionality of the central nervous system. To clarify the role of mitochondrial oxidative stress in mediating the adverse effects of radiation in the brain, we analyzed transgenic (mitochondrial catalase [MCAT]) mice that overexpress human catalase localized to the mitochondria. Compared with wild-type (WT) controls, overexpression of the MCAT transgene significantly decreased cognitive dysfunction after proton irradiation. Significant improvements in behavioral performance found on novel object recognition and object recognition in place tasks were associated with a preservation of neuronal morphology. While the architecture of hippocampal CA1 neurons was significantly compromised in irradiated WT mice, the same neurons in MCAT mice did not exhibit extensive and significant radiation-induced reductions in dendritic complexity. Irradiated neurons from MCAT mice maintained dendritic branching and length compared with WT mice. Protected neuronal morphology in irradiated MCAT mice was also associated with a stabilization of radiation-induced variations in long-term potentiation. Stabilized synaptic activity in MCAT mice coincided with an altered composition of the synaptic AMPA receptor subunits GluR1/2. Our findings provide the first evidence that neurocognitive sequelae associated with radiation exposure can be reduced by overexpression of MCAT, operating through a mechanism involving the preservation of neuronal morphology. Our article documents the neuroprotective properties of reducing mitochondrial reactive oxygen species through the targeted overexpression of catalase and how this ameliorates the adverse effects of proton irradiation in the brain.

  14. Targeted Overexpression of Mitochondrial Catalase Prevents Radiation-Induced Cognitive Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Parihar, Vipan K.; Allen, Barrett D.; Tran, Katherine K.; Chmielewski, Nicole N.; Craver, Brianna M.; Martirosian, Vahan; Morganti, Josh M.; Rosi, Susanna; Vlkolinsky, Roman; Acharya, Munjal M.; Nelson, Gregory A.; Allen, Antiño R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Radiation-induced disruption of mitochondrial function can elevate oxidative stress and contribute to the metabolic perturbations believed to compromise the functionality of the central nervous system. To clarify the role of mitochondrial oxidative stress in mediating the adverse effects of radiation in the brain, we analyzed transgenic (mitochondrial catalase [MCAT]) mice that overexpress human catalase localized to the mitochondria. Results: Compared with wild-type (WT) controls, overexpression of the MCAT transgene significantly decreased cognitive dysfunction after proton irradiation. Significant improvements in behavioral performance found on novel object recognition and object recognition in place tasks were associated with a preservation of neuronal morphology. While the architecture of hippocampal CA1 neurons was significantly compromised in irradiated WT mice, the same neurons in MCAT mice did not exhibit extensive and significant radiation-induced reductions in dendritic complexity. Irradiated neurons from MCAT mice maintained dendritic branching and length compared with WT mice. Protected neuronal morphology in irradiated MCAT mice was also associated with a stabilization of radiation-induced variations in long-term potentiation. Stabilized synaptic activity in MCAT mice coincided with an altered composition of the synaptic AMPA receptor subunits GluR1/2. Innovation: Our findings provide the first evidence that neurocognitive sequelae associated with radiation exposure can be reduced by overexpression of MCAT, operating through a mechanism involving the preservation of neuronal morphology. Conclusion: Our article documents the neuroprotective properties of reducing mitochondrial reactive oxygen species through the targeted overexpression of catalase and how this ameliorates the adverse effects of proton irradiation in the brain. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 78–91. PMID:24949841

  15. Gastroduodenal Mucosal Defense Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Said, Hyder; Kaji, Izumi; Kaunitz, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review To highlight recent developments in the field of gastroduodenal mucosal defense with emphasis on lumen-gut interactions. Recent Findings There has been a growing interest in the physiological functions of luminal chemosensors present from tongue to colon that detect organic molecules in the luminal content associated with nutrient ingestion, usually associated with specialized cells, in particular the enteroendocrine cells. These receptors transduce the release of peptide hormones, in particular proglucagon-derived products such as the glucagon-like-peptides (GLPs), which have profound effects on gut function and on metabolism. Luminal chemosensors transduce GLP release in response to changes in the cellular environment, as part of the mechanism of nutrient chemosensing. GLP-2 has important trophic effects on the intestinal mucosa, including increasing the proliferation rate of stem cells and reducing transmucosal permeability to ions and small molecules, in addition to increasing the rate of duodenal bicarbonate secretion. GLP-1, although traditionally considered an incretin that enhances the effect of insulin on peripheral tissues, also has trophic effects on the intestinal epithelium. Summary A better understanding of the mechanisms that mediate GLP release can further illuminate the importance of nutrient chemosensing as an important component of the mechanism that mediates the trophic effects of luminal nutrients. GLP-1 and -2 are already in clinical use for the treatment of diabetes and intestinal failure. Improved understanding of the control of their release and their end-organ effects will identify new clinical indications and interventions that enhance their release. PMID:26376476

  16. Blockade of TLR3 protects mice from lethal radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Takemura, Naoki; Kawasaki, Takumi; Kunisawa, Jun; Sato, Shintaro; Lamichhane, Aayam; Kobiyama, Kouji; Aoshi, Taiki; Ito, Junichi; Mizuguchi, Kenji; Karuppuchamy, Thangaraj; Matsunaga, Kouta; Miyatake, Shoichiro; Mori, Nobuko; Tsujimura, Tohru; Satoh, Takashi; Kumagai, Yutaro; Kawai, Taro; Standley, Daron M.; Ishii, Ken J.; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Akira, Shizuo; Uematsu, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    High-dose ionizing radiation induces severe DNA damage in the epithelial stem cells in small intestinal crypts and causes gastrointestinal syndrome (GIS). Although the tumour suppressor p53 is a primary factor inducing death of crypt cells with DNA damage, its essential role in maintaining genome stability means inhibiting p53 to prevent GIS is not a viable strategy. Here we show that the innate immune receptor Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) is critical for the pathogenesis of GIS. Tlr3−/− mice show substantial resistance to GIS owing to significantly reduced radiation-induced crypt cell death. Despite showing reduced crypt cell death, p53-dependent crypt cell death is not impaired in Tlr3−/− mice. p53-dependent crypt cell death causes leakage of cellular RNA, which induces extensive cell death via TLR3. An inhibitor of TLR3–RNA binding ameliorates GIS by reducing crypt cell death. Thus, we propose blocking TLR3 activation as a novel approach to treat GIS. PMID:24637670

  17. Molecular hydrogen attenuates radiation-induced nucleobase damage to DNA in aerated aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Abou-Hamdan, Mhamad; Gardette, Bernard; Cadet, Jean; Gharib, Bouchra; De Reggi, Max; Douki, Thierry; Triantaphylides, Christian

    2016-09-01

    The main aim of the present study is to gain mechanistic insights into the modulating effect of molecular hydrogen on the γ-radiation-induced alteration pathways of DNA nucleobases. Aerated aqueous solutions of calf thymus DNA were exposed to a (60)Co source at doses ranging from 0 to 55 Gy under normoxic conditions, in the presence or not of 0.7 MPa hydrogen or helium. The measurement of several modified bases was performed using HPLC associated with electrospray ionization tandem pass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS). Bleaching of aqueous solutions of p-nitrosodimethylaniline (p-NDA) solutions was also used to allow the quantification of hydroxyl radical (•OH) formation. pNDA bleaching was significantly reduced in the presence of hyperbaric hydrogen. This is undoubtedly due to (•)OH scavenging by H2 since, under the same conditions, He had no effect. Similarly, base alterations were significantly reduced in the presence of hydrogen, as compared to controls under normal atmosphere or in the presence of helium. The relative proportions of modified nucleobases were not changed, showing that the only effect of H2 is to scavenge (•)OH without exhibiting reducing properties. Our findings demonstrate that H2 exerts a significant protection against radiation-induced DNA base damage in aqueous solutions, (•)OH scavenging being the only mechanism involved.

  18. Protective effect of esculentoside A on radiation-induced dermatitis and fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Zhenyu; Su Ying; Yang Shanmin; Yin Liangjie; Wang Wei; Yi Yanghua; Fenton, Bruce M.; Zhang Lurong; Okunieff, Paul . E-mail: paul_okunieff@urmc.rochester.edu

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of esculentoside A (EsA) on radiation-induced cutaneous and fibrovascular toxicity and its possible molecular mechanisms, both in vivo and in vitro. Methods and Materials: Mice received drug intervention 18 hours before 30 Gy to the right hind leg. Alterations in several cytokines expressed in skin tissue 2 days after irradiation were determined by ELISA. Early skin toxicity was evaluated 3 to 4 weeks after irradiation by skin scoring, and both tissue contraction and expression of TGF-{beta}1 were determined for soft-tissue fibrosis 3 months after irradiation. In vitro, the effect of EsA on radiation-induced nitric oxide (NO) and cytokine production in different cell types was measured by application of 2, 4, and 8 Gy. Results: In vivo, EsA reduced levels of IL-1{alpha}, MCP-1, VEGF, and TGF-{beta}1 in cutaneous tissue and reduced soft-tissue toxicity. In vitro, EsA inhibited the IL-1{alpha} ordinarily produced after 4 Gy in A431 cells. In Raw264.7 cells, EsA reduced levels of IL-1{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, and NO production costimulated by radiation and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In L-929 cells, EsA inhibited VEGF, TNF, and MCP-1 production at 2, 4, and 8 Gy. Conclusions: Esculentoside A protects soft tissues against radiation toxicity through inhibiting the production of several proinflammatory cytokines and inflammatory mediators in epithelial cells, macrophages, fibroblasts, and skin tissue.

  19. Regulatory T Cells Promote β-Catenin–Mediated Epithelium-to-Mesenchyme Transition During Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Shanshan; Pan, Xiujie; Xu, Long; Yang, Zhihua; Guo, Renfeng; Gu, Yongqing; Li, Ruoxi; Wang, Qianjun; Xiao, Fengjun; Du, Li; Zhou, Pingkun; Zhu, Maoxiang

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis results from thoracic radiation therapy and severely limits radiation therapy approaches. CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}FoxP3{sup +} regulatory T cells (Tregs) as well as epithelium-to-mesenchyme transition (EMT) cells are involved in pulmonary fibrosis induced by multiple factors. However, the mechanisms of Tregs and EMT cells in irradiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the influence of Tregs on EMT in radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Methods and Materials: Mice thoraxes were irradiated (20 Gy), and Tregs were depleted by intraperitoneal injection of a monoclonal anti-CD25 antibody 2 hours after irradiation and every 7 days thereafter. Mice were treated on days 3, 7, and 14 and 1, 3, and 6 months post irradiation. The effectiveness of Treg depletion was assayed via flow cytometry. EMT and β-catenin in lung tissues were detected by immunohistochemistry. Tregs isolated from murine spleens were cultured with mouse lung epithelial (MLE) 12 cells, and short interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of β-catenin in MLE 12 cells was used to explore the effects of Tregs on EMT and β-catenin via flow cytometry and Western blotting. Results: Anti-CD25 antibody treatment depleted Tregs efficiently, attenuated the process of radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis, hindered EMT, and reduced β-catenin accumulation in lung epithelial cells in vivo. The coculture of Tregs with irradiated MLE 12 cells showed that Tregs could promote EMT in MLE 12 cells and that the effect of Tregs on EMT was partially abrogated by β-catenin knockdown in vitro. Conclusions: Tregs can promote EMT in accelerating radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. This process is partially mediated through β-catenin. Our study suggests a new mechanism for EMT, promoted by Tregs, that accelerates radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

  20. Regulatory T Cells Promote β-Catenin--Mediated Epithelium-to-Mesenchyme Transition During Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Shanshan; Pan, Xiujie; Xu, Long; Yang, Zhihua; Guo, Renfeng; Gu, Yongqing; Li, Ruoxi; Wang, Qianjun; Xiao, Fengjun; Du, Li; Zhou, Pingkun; Zhu, Maoxiang

    2015-10-01

    Radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis results from thoracic radiation therapy and severely limits radiation therapy approaches. CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) as well as epithelium-to-mesenchyme transition (EMT) cells are involved in pulmonary fibrosis induced by multiple factors. However, the mechanisms of Tregs and EMT cells in irradiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the influence of Tregs on EMT in radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Mice thoraxes were irradiated (20 Gy), and Tregs were depleted by intraperitoneal injection of a monoclonal anti-CD25 antibody 2 hours after irradiation and every 7 days thereafter. Mice were treated on days 3, 7, and 14 and 1, 3, and 6 months post irradiation. The effectiveness of Treg depletion was assayed via flow cytometry. EMT and β-catenin in lung tissues were detected by immunohistochemistry. Tregs isolated from murine spleens were cultured with mouse lung epithelial (MLE) 12 cells, and short interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of β-catenin in MLE 12 cells was used to explore the effects of Tregs on EMT and β-catenin via flow cytometry and Western blotting. Anti-CD25 antibody treatment depleted Tregs efficiently, attenuated the process of radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis, hindered EMT, and reduced β-catenin accumulation in lung epithelial cells in vivo. The coculture of Tregs with irradiated MLE 12 cells showed that Tregs could promote EMT in MLE 12 cells and that the effect of Tregs on EMT was partially abrogated by β-catenin knockdown in vitro. Tregs can promote EMT in accelerating radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. This process is partially mediated through β-catenin. Our study suggests a new mechanism for EMT, promoted by Tregs, that accelerates radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Detection and early phase assessment of radiation-induced lung injury in mice using micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shigeyoshi; Murase, Kenya

    2012-01-01

    Radiation therapy is an important therapeutic modality for thoracic malignancies. However, radiation-induced pulmonary injuries such as radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis are major dose-limiting factors. Previous research shows that micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) can detect radiation-induced lung injuries a few months following irradiation, but studies to assess the early response of lung tissue are lacking. The aim of this study was to determine if micro-CT could be used to detect and assess early-phase radiation-induced lung injury in mice. Twenty-one animals were divided into three groups: normal (n = 7), one day after x-ray exposure (n = 7), and at four days after x-ray exposure (n = 7). The x-ray-exposed groups received a single dose of 20 Gy, to the whole lung. Histology showed enlargements of the air space (Lm: mean chord length) following irradiation. 40.5 ± 3.8 µm and 60.0 ± 6.9 µm were observed after one and four days, respectively, compared to 26.5 ± 3.1 µm in normal mice. Three-dimensional micro-CT images were constructed and histograms of radiodensity - Hounsfield Units (HU) - were used to assess changes in mouse lungs. Radiation-induced lung injury was observed in irradiated mice, by the use of two parameters which were defined as shifts in peak HU between -200 to -800 HU (Peak(HU)) and increase in the number of pixels at -1000 HU (Number(-1000)). These parameters were correlated with histological changes. The results demonstrate that micro-CT can be used for the early detection and assessment of structural and histopathological changes resulting from radiation-induced lung injury in mice. Micro-CT has the advantage, over traditional histological techniques, of allowing longitudinal studies of lung disease progression and assessment of the entire lung, while reducing the number of animals required for such studies.

  2. Involvement of intracellular expression of FGF12 in radiation-induced apoptosis in mast cells.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Fumiaki; Müller, Kerstin; Hagiwara, Akiko; Ridi, Roland; Akashi, Makoto; Meineke, Viktor

    2008-09-01

    Several fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are able to reduce and improve radiation-induced tissue damage through the activation of surface fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs). In contrast, some FGFs lack classical signal sequences, which play roles in the release of FGFs, and the intracellular function of these FGFs is not well clarified. In this study, we evaluated the transcript levels of 22 FGFs in a human mast cell line, HMC-1, using quantitative RT-PCR and found that FGF2 and FGF12 were expressed in HMC-1 cells. FGF12 not only lacks classical signal sequences but also fails to activate FGFRs. HMC-1 cells were transfected with an expression vector of FGF12 to clarify the intracellular function of FGF12 after irradiation. The overexpression of FGF12 in HMC-1 cells decreased ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis, and siRNA-mediated repression of FGF12 expression augmented apoptosis in HMC-1 cells. The overexpression of FGF12 strongly suppressed the marked augmentation of apoptosis induced by inhibition of the MEK/ERK pathway with PD98059. In contrast, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) scaffold protein islet brain 2 (IB2), which was reported to bind to FGF12, did not interfere with the anti-apoptotic effect of FGF12. The expression of FGF12 transcripts was also detected in murine cultured mast cells derived from bone marrow or fetal skin. These findings suggest that FGF12 intracellularly suppresses radiation-induced apoptosis in mast cells independently of IB2.

  3. Clemens von Sonntag and the early history of radiation-induced sugar damage in DNA.

    PubMed

    Dizdaroglu, Miral

    2014-06-01

    This article reviews the early history of ionizing radiation-induced sugar damage in DNA in dedication to Prof. Clemens von Sonntag, who recently passed away. It covers the time between 1968 and 1978, during which most of the work on the ionizing radiation-induced damage to polyalcohols, carbohydrates and the 2'-deoxyribose moiety in DNA was performed. Methodologies using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were developed to identify and quantify the radiation-induced products that had previously remained elusive. Products were identified by GC-MS either directly or after reduction of samples with NaBH(4) or NaBD(4). Incorporation of deuterium atoms by NaBD(4)-reduction facilitated the identification of aldehyde, keto, carboxyl and deoxy groups in the molecules. Numerous products of a polyalcohol and carbohydrates were identified and quantified. Mechanisms of product formation were proposed. Several products of the 2'-deoxyribose moiety in DNA were identified, indicating that they were released from DNA strand, not bound to it. Alkali labile sites and products still remaining within DNA or bound to DNA as end groups were also elucidated by first reducing irradiated samples with NaBD(4) followed by alkali treatment and GC-MS analysis. The knowledge of the products of the 2'-deoxyribose moiety in DNA led to the first mechanistic understanding of various pathways of hydroxyl radical-induced DNA strand breakage. To this date, some of these mechanisms still remain the most-widely studied mechanisms of DNA damage. Prof. von Sonntag's contributions to the understanding of the radiation chemistry of carbohydrates and DNA helped shape this field of science for years to come.

  4. Accelerated senescence in skin in a murine model of radiation-induced multi-organ injury.

    PubMed

    McCart, Elizabeth A; Thangapazham, Rajesh L; Lombardini, Eric D; Mog, Steven R; Panganiban, Ronald Allan M; Dickson, Kelley M; Mansur, Rihab A; Nagy, Vitaly; Kim, Sung-Yop; Selwyn, Reed; Landauer, Michael R; Darling, Thomas N; Day, Regina M

    2017-03-18

    Accidental high-dose radiation exposures can lead to multi-organ injuries, including radiation dermatitis. The types of cellular damage leading to radiation dermatitis are not completely understood. To identify the cellular mechanisms that underlie radiation-induced skin injury in vivo, we evaluated the time-course of cellular effects of radiation (14, 16 or 17 Gy X-rays; 0.5 Gy/min) in the skin of C57BL/6 mice. Irradiation of 14 Gy induced mild inflammation, observed histologically, but no visible hair loss or erythema. However, 16 or 17 Gy radiation induced dry desquamation, erythema and mild ulceration, detectable within 14 days post-irradiation. Histological evaluation revealed inflammation with mast cell infiltration within 14 days. Fibrosis occurred 80 days following 17 Gy irradiation, with collagen deposition, admixed with neutrophilic dermatitis, and necrotic debris. We found that in cultures of normal human keratinocytes, exposure to 17.9 Gy irradiation caused the upregulation of p21/waf1, a marker of senescence. Using western blot analysis of 17.9 Gy-irradiated mice skin samples, we also detected a marker of accelerated senescence (p21/waf1) 7 days post-irradiation, and a marker of cellular apoptosis (activated caspase-3) at 30 days, both preceding histological evidence of inflammatory infiltrates. Immunohistochemistry revealed reduced epithelial stem cells from hair follicles 14-30 days post-irradiation. Furthermore, p21/waf1 expression was increased in the region of the hair follicle stem cells at 14 days post 17 Gy irradiation. These data indicate that radiation induces accelerated cellular senescence in the region of the stem cell population of the skin.

  5. Role of Ferulic Acid in the Amelioration of Ionizing Radiation Induced Inflammation: A Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Das, Ujjal; Manna, Krishnendu; Sinha, Mahuya; Datta, Sanjukta; Das, Dipesh Kr; Chakraborty, Anindita; Ghosh, Mahua; Saha, Krishna Das; Dey, Sanjit

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is responsible for oxidative stress by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), which alters the cellular redox potential. This change activates several redox sensitive enzymes which are crucial in activating signaling pathways at molecular level and can lead to oxidative stress induced inflammation. Therefore, the present study was intended to assess the anti-inflammatory role of ferulic acid (FA), a plant flavonoid, against radiation-induced oxidative stress with a novel mechanistic viewpoint. FA was administered (50 mg/kg body wt) to Swiss albino mice for five consecutive days prior to exposing them to a single dose of 10 Gy 60Co γ-irradiation. The dose of FA was optimized from the survival experiment and 50 mg/kg body wt dose showed optimum effect. FA significantly ameliorated the radiation induced inflammatory response such as phosphorylation of IKKα/β and IκBα and consequent nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB). FA also prevented the increase of cycloxygenase-2 (Cox-2) protein, inducible nitric oxide synthase-2 (iNOS-2) gene expression, lipid peroxidation in liver and the increase of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in serum. It was observed that exposure to radiation results in decreased activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and the pool of reduced glutathione (GSH) content. However, FA treatment prior to irradiation increased the activities of the same endogenous antioxidants. Thus, pretreatment with FA offers protection against gamma radiation induced inflammation. PMID:24854039

  6. Metformin Attenuates Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in a Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Wang, Ye; Han, Jun; Mei, Hong; Yu, Dandan; Ding, Qian; Zhang, Tao; Wu, Gang; Peng, Gang; Lin, Zhenyu

    2017-07-01

    While radiotherapy continues to be a major cancer treatment option, its dose-limiting side effects, such as pulmonary fibrosis, severely impair the quality of life in these patients. In this study, we evaluated the radioprotective effects of metformin, a commonly used biguanide antidiabetic medication, in a murine model of pulmonary damage. Sprague Dawley(®) rats received whole lung 20 Gy irradiation with or without metformin treatment. Computed tomography (CT) was performed and Hounsfield units (HU) were determined during the observation period. Histological analysis and evaluation of fibrosis/inflammatory markers by Western blot were performed at 12 weeks postirradiation. CCK-8 and colony formation assays were used to explore the effects of metformin on non-small cell lung cancer cells A549 and H460. Results of this study showed that metformin reduced radiological and histological signs of fibrosis, inflammatory infiltration, alterations to alveolar structures and radiation-induced HU lung density. In addition, metformin was found to significantly decrease collagen 1a and TGF-β expression and inhibit p-Smad2 and p-Smad3 expression compared to that of the irradiated group alone. Moreover, metformin reduced A549 and H460 cell growth and clonogenic survival. In conclusion, metformin exerted a protective effect on normal tissues from radiation-induced pulmonary injury, and shows promise as a radioprotective agent in the treatment of lung cancer.

  7. PHD Inhibition Mitigates and Protects Against Radiation-Induced Gastrointestinal Toxicity via HIF2

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Cullen M.; Miao, Yu Rebecca; Diep, Anh N.; Wu, Colleen; Rankin, Erinn B.; Atwood, Todd F.; Xing, Lei; Giaccia, Amato J.

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity can be a major source of morbidity and mortality after radiation exposure. There is an unmet need for effective preventative or mitigative treatments against the potentially fatal diarrhea and water loss induced by radiation damage to the GI tract. We report that prolyl hydroxylase inhibition by genetic knockout or pharmacologic inhibition of all PHD isoforms by the small molecule dimethyloxyallylglycine (DMOG) increases HIF expression, improves epithelial integrity, reduces apoptosis, and increases intestinal angiogenesis, all of which are essential for radioprotection. HIF2, but not HIF1, is both necessary and sufficient to prevent radiation-induced GI toxicity and death. Increased VEGF expression contributes to the protective effects of HIF2, since inhibition of VEGF function reversed the radioprotection and radiomitigation afforded by DMOG. Additionally, mortality is reduced from abdominal or total body irradiation even when DMOG is given 24 hours after exposure. Thus, prolyl hydroxylase inhibition represents a new treatment strategy to protect against and mitigate GI toxicity from both therapeutic radiation and potentially lethal radiation exposures. PMID:24828078

  8. PHD inhibition mitigates and protects against radiation-induced gastrointestinal toxicity via HIF2.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Cullen M; Miao, Yu Rebecca; Diep, Anh N; Wu, Colleen; Rankin, Erinn B; Atwood, Todd F; Xing, Lei; Giaccia, Amato J

    2014-05-14

    Radiation-induced gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity can be a major source of morbidity and mortality after radiation exposure. There is an unmet need for effective preventative or mitigative treatments against the potentially fatal diarrhea and water loss induced by radiation damage to the GI tract. We report that prolyl hydroxylase inhibition by genetic knockout or pharmacologic inhibition of all PHD (prolyl hydroxylase domain) isoforms by the small-molecule dimethyloxallyl glycine (DMOG) increases hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) expression, improves epithelial integrity, reduces apoptosis, and increases intestinal angiogenesis, all of which are essential for radioprotection. HIF2, but not HIF1, is both necessary and sufficient to prevent radiation-induced GI toxicity and death. Increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression contributes to the protective effects of HIF2, because inhibition of VEGF function reversed the radioprotection and radiomitigation afforded by DMOG. Additionally, mortality from abdominal or total body irradiation was reduced even when DMOG was given 24 hours after exposure. Thus, prolyl hydroxylase inhibition represents a treatment strategy to protect against and mitigate GI toxicity from both therapeutic radiation and potentially lethal radiation exposures.

  9. Combined CXCR1/CXCR2 antagonism decreases radiation-induced alveolitis in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Fox, Jessica; Gordon, John R; Haston, Christina K

    2011-05-01

    The mechanisms leading to the radiation-induced lung responses of alveolitis and fibrosis are largely unknown. Herein we investigated whether CXC receptor 1 and 2 antagonism with CXCL8((3-72))K11R/G31P (G31P), a protein that reduces neutrophil chemotaxis in acute inflammatory response models, decreases the lung response to radiation. Mice of the AKR/J (alveolitis/pneumonitis responding) and KK/HIJ (fibrosis) strains received 18 Gy whole-thorax irradiation and a subset of these mice were treated with G31P (500 µg/kg) three times per week from the day of irradiation until euthanasia due to respiratory distress symptoms or 20 weeks after radiation treatment. Irradiated mice of both strains receiving G31P survived longer than mice receiving radiation alone. Radiation- and G31P-treated AKR/J mice surviving to the end of the experiment developed significantly less alveolitis, as measured histologically, than mice receiving radiation alone, but this difference was not evident in KK/HIJ mice. Using immunohistochemistry, G31P treatment was shown to increase the numbers of Gr-1-positive cells (neutrophils) in the lungs of unirradiated mice relative to control mice injected with saline, but the antagonist did not alter the numbers of Gr-1-positive cells in the lungs of radiation-treated mice. We conclude that G31P treatment reduces radiation-induced alveolitis but not fibrosis in mice.

  10. Tetrahydrobiopterin Protects against Radiation-induced Growth Inhibition in H9c2 Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zheng-Yi; Li, Yi; Li, Rui; Zhang, An-An; Shang, Bo; Yu, Jing; Xie, Xiao-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an essential cofactor of nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) for the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO). BH4 therapy can reverse the disease-related redox disequilibrium observed with BH4 deficiency. However, whether BH4 exerts a protective effect against radiation-induced damage to cardiomyocytes remains unknown. Methods: Clonogenic assays were performed to determine the effects of X-ray on H9c2 cells with or without BH4 treatment. The contents of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and malondialdehyde (MDA) in H9c2 cells were measured to investigate oxidative stress levels. The cell cycle undergoing radiation with or without BH4 treatment was detected using flow cytometry. The expression levels of proteins in the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT)/P53 signaling pathway, inducible NOS (iNOS), and endothelial NOS (eNOS) were examined using Western blotting. Results: X-ray radiation significantly inhibited the growth of H9c2 cells in a dose-dependent manner, whereas BH4 treatment significantly reduced the X-ray radiation-induced growth inhibition (control group vs. X-ray groups, respectively, P < 0.01). X-ray radiation induced LDH release, apoptosis, and G0/G1 peak accumulation, significantly increasing the level of MDA and the production of NO, and decreased the level of SOD (control group vs. X-ray groups, respectively, P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). By contrast, BH4 treatment can significantly reverse these processes (BH4 treatment groups vs. X-ray groups, P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). BH4 reversed the X-ray radiation-induced expression alterations of apoptosis-related molecules, including B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2), Bcl-2 associated X protein, and caspase-3, and molecules of the PI3K/Akt/P53 signaling pathway. BH4 enhanced the production of NO in 2 Gy and 4 Gy radiated groups by upregulating eNOS protein expression and downregulating iNOS protein expression. Conclusions: BH4 treatment can protect

  11. Measurements of prompt radiation induced conductivity of Kapton.

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, Eric F.; Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Hartman, E. Frederick; Stringer, Thomas Arthur

    2010-10-01

    We performed measurements of the prompt radiation induced conductivity in thin samples of Kapton (polyimide) at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. Three mil samples were irradiated with a 0.5 {mu}s pulse of 20 MeV electrons, yielding dose rates of 1E9 to 1E10 rad/s. We applied variable potentials up to 2 kV across the samples and measured the prompt conduction current. Analysis rendered prompt conductivity coefficients between 6E-17 and 2E-16 mhos/m per rad/s, depending on the dose rate and the pulse width.

  12. Radiation-Induced Premelting of Ice at Silica Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeder, S.; Reichert, H.; Schroeder, H.; Mezger, M.; Okasinski, J. S.; Dosch, H.; Honkimaeki, V.; Bilgram, J.

    2009-08-28

    The existence of surface and interfacial melting of ice below 0 deg. C has been confirmed by many different experimental techniques. Here we present a high-energy x-ray reflectivity study of the interfacial melting of ice as a function of both temperature and x-ray irradiation dose. We found a clear increase of the thickness of the quasiliquid layer with the irradiation dose. By a systematic x-ray study, we have been able to unambiguously disentangle thermal and radiation-induced premelting phenomena. We also confirm the previously announced very high water density (1.25 g/cm{sup 3}) within the emerging quasiliquid layer.

  13. A model of radiatively induced quark and lepton mass model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Takaaki

    2017-07-01

    We discuss a radiatively induced quark and lepton mass model in the rst and second generation introducing extra U(1) gauge symmetry, discrete Z 2 symmetry, vector-like fermions and exotic scalar elds. Then we analyze the allowed parameter regions which simultaneously satisfy the constraints of FCNCs for the quark sector and of LFVs including μ - e conversion, observed quark mass and mixing, and the lepton mass and mixing. In addition, the typical value for the (g - 2) μ in our model is presented. We also show extension of the model in which Majorana type neutrino masses are generated at the two loop level.

  14. Mechanisms of Radiation Induced Effects in Carbon Nanotubes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    kilogram ( C kg –1 ) rad [absorbed dose] 1 × 10 –2 joule per kilogram (J kg –1 ) [gray (Gy)] rem [equivalent and effective dose] 1 × 10–2 joule per...8725 John J. Kingman Road, MS 6201 Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-6201 T E C H N IC A L R E P O R T DTRA-TR-17-5 Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced...CLASSIFICATION OF: a. REPORT b. ABSTRACT c . THIS PAGE 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 00-10-2016 Final Oct 5, 2010 - Dec 31, 2015 Mechanisms of

  15. Radiation-induced malignant and atypical peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, K.M.; Woodruff, J.M.; Ellis, F.T.; Posner, J.B.

    1980-04-01

    The reported peripheral nerve complications of therapeutic irradiation in humans include brachial and lumbar plexus fibrosis and cranial and peripheral nerve atrophy. We have encountered 9 patients with malignant (7) and atypical (2) peripheral nerve tumors occurring in an irradiated site suggesting that such tumors represent another delayed effect of radiation treatment on peripheral nerve. In all instances the radio-theray was within an acceptable radiation dosage, yet 3 patients developed local radiation-induced skin and bony abnormalities. The malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors developed only in the radiation port. Animal studies support the clinical observation that malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors can occur as a delayed effect of irradiation.

  16. Measurements of prompt radiation induced conductivity in Teflon (PTFE).

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, E. Frederick; Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Preston, E.

    2013-05-01

    We performed measurements of the prompt radiation induced conductivity (RIC) in thin samples of Teflon (PTFE) at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. Three mil (76.2 microns) samples were irradiated with a 0.5 %CE%BCs pulse of 20 MeV electrons, yielding dose rates of 1E9 to 1E11 rad/s. We applied variable potentials up to 2 kV across the samples and measured the prompt conduction current. Details of the experimental apparatus and analysis are reported in this report on prompt RIC in Teflon.

  17. Skeletal Scintigraphy in Radiation-Induced Fibrosis With Lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jieqi; Iranmanesh, Arya M; Oates, M Elizabeth

    2017-03-01

    Despite increasing reliance on CT, MRI, and FDG PET/CT for oncological imaging, whole-body skeletal scintigraphy remains a frontline modality for staging and surveillance of osseous metastatic disease. We present a 54-year-old woman with metastatic breast cancer who received palliative external-beam radiation to the left ilium. Serial follow-up Tc-MDP bone scans demonstrated progressive soft-tissue uptake in her left lower extremity, extending from thigh to leg, with associated enlargement and skin thickening, consistent with lymphedema related to radiation-induced fibrosis. Correlative abdominopelvic CT scans confirmed fibrotic changes in the left thigh.

  18. Exaggerated radiation-induced fibrosis in patients with systemic sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Varga, J.; Haustein, U.F.; Creech, R.H.; Dwyer, J.P.; Jimenez, S.A. )

    1991-06-26

    Four patients with stable systemic sclerosis and limited skin involvement received radiation for the treatment of solid malignant neoplasms. Following localized irradiation, each patient developed an exaggerated cutaneous and internal fibrotic reaction in the irradiated areas. The surface area of fibrosis extended beyond the radiation portals employed, and the fibrotic process was poorly responsive to antifibrotic therapy. Three of the patients died of complications caused by fibrous encasement of internal organs. The extent and severity of postradiation fibrosis in these patients was distinctly unusual. These observations suggest that patients with systemic sclerosis are particularly susceptible to developing excessive radiation-induced fibrosis.

  19. Radiation-Induced Premelting of Ice at Silica Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöder, S.; Reichert, H.; Schröder, H.; Mezger, M.; Okasinski, J. S.; Honkimäki, V.; Bilgram, J.; Dosch, H.

    2009-08-01

    The existence of surface and interfacial melting of ice below 0°C has been confirmed by many different experimental techniques. Here we present a high-energy x-ray reflectivity study of the interfacial melting of ice as a function of both temperature and x-ray irradiation dose. We found a clear increase of the thickness of the quasiliquid layer with the irradiation dose. By a systematic x-ray study, we have been able to unambiguously disentangle thermal and radiation-induced premelting phenomena. We also confirm the previously announced very high water density (1.25g/cm3) within the emerging quasiliquid layer.

  20. Facial reconstruction for radiation-induced skin cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Panje, W.R.; Dobleman, T.J. )

    1990-04-01

    Radiation-induced skin cancers can be difficult to diagnose and treat. Typically, a patient who has received orthovoltage radiotherapy for disorders such as acne, eczema, tinea capitis, skin tuberculosis, and skin cancer can expect that aggressive skin cancers and chronic radiodermatitis may develop subsequently. Cryptic facial cancers can lead to metastases and death. Prophylactic widefield excision of previously irradiated facial skin that has been subject to multiple recurrent skin cancers is suggested as a method of deterring future cutaneous malignancy and metastases. The use of tissue expanders and full-thickness skin grafts offers an expedient and successful method of subsequent reconstruction.

  1. Challenges and Opportunities in Radiation-induced Hemorrhagic Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Zwaans, Bernadette M.M.; Nicolai, Heinz G.; Chancellor, Michael B.; Lamb, Laura E.

    2016-01-01

    As diagnosis and treatment of cancer is improving, medical and social issues related to cancer survivorship are becoming more prevalent. Hemorrhagic cystitis (HC), a rare but serious disease that may affect patients after pelvic radiation or systemic chemotherapy, has significant unmet medical needs. Although no definitive treatment is currently available, various interventions are employed for HC. Effects of nonsurgical treatments for HC are of modest success and studies aiming to control radiation-induced bladder symptoms are lacking. In this review, we present current and advanced therapeutic strategies for HC to help cancer survivors deal with long-term urologic health issues. PMID:27601964

  2. Radiation-Induced Intraspinal Chondrosarcoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Obid, Peter; Vierbuchen, Mathias; Wolf, Eduard; Reichl, Michael; Niemeyer, Thomas; Übeyli, Hüseyin; Richter, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case report and review of the literature. Objective To report a unique case of an intraspinal chondrosarcoma that was diagnosed 18 years after radiotherapy for a cervical carcinoma and its remarkably unusual clinical presentation. Methods A retrospective case description of an intraspinal mass lesion that occurred 6 weeks after previous spinal surgery. Results Within ∼9 weeks, the tumor had infiltrated the peritoneal cavity and reached the lumbar subcutaneous tissue. Conclusion Radiation-induced sarcomas are rare, are highly aggressive, and may be difficult to diagnose. Furthermore, the only means of achieving long-term survival is through early and extensive surgery. PMID:26430606

  3. Pathology and biology of radiation-induced cardiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Tapio, Soile

    2016-01-01

    Heart disease is the leading global cause of death. The risk for this disease is significantly increased in populations exposed to ionizing radiation, but the mechanisms are not fully elucidated yet. This review aims to gather and discuss the latest data about pathological and biological consequences in the radiation-exposed heart in a comprehensive manner. A better understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying radiation-induced damage in heart tissue and cardiac vasculature will provide novel targets for therapeutic interventions. These may be valuable for individuals clinically or occupationally exposed to varying doses of ionizing radiation. PMID:27422929

  4. Radiation-induced breast angiosarcoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Tato-Varela, Sara; Albalat-Fernández, Rosa; Pabón-Fernández, Sara; Núñez-García, Diego; Calle-Marcos, Manolo La

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced breast angiosarcoma is a severe but rare late complication in the breast-preserving management of breast cancer through surgery and radiotherapy [1]. Often the initial diagnosis of this entity is complex given its relatively anodyne nature and usually being present in the form of typically multifocal reddish-purple papular skin lesions [2]. Because of the low incidence of this tumour, there is a limited number of studies regarding its optimal therapeutic management [3]. The preferred treatment is aggressive surgical removal and the prognosis is poor with an overall survival rate of 12–20% at five years [4]. PMID:28101140

  5. Suppression of radiation-induced migration of non-small cell lung cancer through inhibition of Nrf2-Notch Axis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiuyue; Mao, Aihong; Guo, Ruoshui; Zhang, Liping; Yan, Jiawei; Sun, Chao; Tang, Jinzhou; Ye, Yancheng; Zhang, Yanshan; Zhang, Hong

    2017-03-28

    Nuclear factor E2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that is associated with tumor growth and resistance to radiation. The canonical Notch signaling pathway is also crucial for maintaining non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Aberrant Nrf2 and Notch signaling has repeatedly been showed to facilitate metastasis of NSCLC. Here, we show that radiation induce Nrf2 and Notch1 expression in NSCLC. Knockdown of Nrf2 enhanced radiosensitivity of NSCLC and reduced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Importantly, we found that knockdown of Nrf2 dramatically decreased radiation-induced NSCLC invasion and significantly increased E-cadherin, but reduced N-cadherin and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2/9 expression. We found that Notch1 knockdown also upregulated E-cadherin and suppressed N-cadherin expression. Nrf2 contributes to NSCLC cell metastatic properties and this inhibition correlated with reduced Notch1 expression. These results establish that Nrf2 and Notch1 downregulation synergistically inhibit radiation-induced migratory and invasive properties of NSCLC cells.

  6. Induction of Excess Centrosomes in Neural Progenitor Cells during the Development of Radiation-Induced Microcephaly

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Mikio; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Kato, Akihiro; Kobayashi, Junya; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Komatsu, Kenshi

    2016-01-01

    The embryonic brain is one of the tissues most vulnerable to ionizing radiation. In this study, we showed that ionizing radiation induces apoptosis in the neural progenitors of the mouse cerebral cortex, and that the surviving progenitor cells subsequently develop a considerable amount of supernumerary centrosomes. When mouse embryos at Day 13.5 were exposed to γ-rays, brains sizes were reduced markedly in a dose-dependent manner, and these size reductions persisted until birth. Immunostaining with caspase-3 antibodies showed that apoptosis occurred in 35% and 40% of neural progenitor cells at 4 h after exposure to 1 and 2 Gy, respectively, and this was accompanied by a disruption of the apical layer in which mitotic spindles were positioned in unirradiated mice. At 24 h after 1 Gy irradiation, the apoptotic cells were completely eliminated and proliferation was restored to a level similar to that of unirradiated cells, but numerous spindles were localized outside the apical layer. Similarly, abnormal cytokinesis, which included multipolar division and centrosome clustering, was observed in 19% and 24% of the surviving neural progenitor cells at 48 h after irradiation with 1 and 2 Gy, respectively. Because these cytokinesis aberrations derived from excess centrosomes result in growth delay and mitotic catastrophe-mediated cell elimination, our findings suggest that, in addition to apoptosis at an early stage of radiation exposure, radiation-induced centrosome overduplication could contribute to the depletion of neural progenitors and thereby lead to microcephaly. PMID:27367050

  7. Does altered fractionation influence the risk of radiation-induced optic neuropathy?

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandare, Niranjan; Monroe, Alan T.; Morris, Christopher G.; Bhatti, M. Tariq; Mendenhall, William M. . E-mail: mendewil@shands.ufl.edu

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze the parameters that influence the risk of radiation-induced optic neuropathy (RION) after radiotherapy for head-and-neck tumors. Methods and Materials: Between 1964 and 2000, 273 patients with tumors of the nasopharynx, paranasal sinuses, nasal cavity, and hard palate adenoid cystic carcinomas were treated with curative intent and had radiation fields that included the optic nerves and/or chiasm. Patients were followed for at least 1 year after radiotherapy. Results: Radiation-induced optic neuropathy developed in 32 eyes of 24 patients (9%). The 5-year rates of freedom from RION according to the total dose and once- vs. twice-daily fractionation were as follows: {<=}63 Gy once daily, 95%; {<=}63 Gy twice daily, 98%; >63 Gy once daily, 78%; and >63 Gy twice daily, 91%. Multivariate analysis revealed that the total dose affected the risk of RION (p = 0.0047), with patient age (p = 0.0909), once-daily vs. twice-daily fractionation (p = 0.0684), and overall treatment time (p = 0.0972) were marginally significant. The use of adjuvant chemotherapy did not significantly influence the likelihood of developing RION. Conclusion: The likelihood of developing RION is primarily influenced by the total dose. Hyperfractionation may reduce the risk of experiencing this complication.

  8. The role of alveolar epithelium in radiation-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Celine; Nagarajan, Devipriya; Tian, Jian; Leal, Sofia Walder; Wheeler, Kenneth; Munley, Michael; Blackstock, William; Zhao, Weiling

    2013-01-01

    Pneumonitis and fibrosis are major lung complications of irradiating thoracic malignancies. In the current study, we determined the effect of thoracic irradiation on the lungs of FVB/N mice. Survival data showed a dose-dependent increase in morbidity following thoracic irradiation with single (11-13 Gy) and fractionated doses (24-36 Gy) of (137)Cs γ-rays. Histological examination showed a thickening of vessel walls, accumulation of inflammatory cells, collagen deposition, and regional fibrosis in the lungs 14 weeks after a single 12 Gy dose and a fractionated 30 Gy dose; this damage was also seen 5 months after a fractionated 24 Gy dose. After both single and fractionated doses, i] aquaporin-5 was markedly decreased, ii] E-cadherin was reduced and iii] prosurfactant Protein C (pro-SP-c), the number of pro-SP-c(+) cells and vimentin expression were increased in the lungs. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed co-localization of pro-SP-c and α-smooth muscle actin in the alveoli after a single dose of 12 Gy. These data suggest that, i] the FVB/N mouse strain is sensitive to thoracic radiation ii] aquaporin-5, E-cadherin, and pro-SP-c may serve as sensitive indicators of radiation-induced lung injury; and iii] the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition may play an important role in the development of radiation-induced lung fibrosis.

  9. Sorafenib Enhances Radiation-Induced Apoptosis in Hepatocellular Carcinoma by Inhibiting STAT3

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chao-Yuan; Lin, Chen-Si; Tai, Wei-Tien; Hsieh, Chi-Ying; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Cheng, Ann-Lii; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common and lethal human malignancies. Lack of efficient therapy for advanced HCC is a pressing problem worldwide. This study aimed to determine the efficacy and mechanism of combined sorafenib and radiation therapy treatment for HCC. Methods and Materials: HCC cell lines (PLC5, Huh-7, Sk-Hep1, and Hep3B) were treated with sorafenib, radiation, or both, and apoptosis and signal transduction were analyzed. Results: All 4 HCC cell lines showed resistance to radiation-induced apoptosis; however, this resistance could be reversed in the presence of sorafenib. Inhibition of phospho-STAT3 was found in cells treated with sorafenib or sorafenib plus radiation and subsequently reduced the expression levels of STAT3-related proteins, Mcl-1, cyclin D1, and survivin. Silencing STAT3 by RNA interference overcame apoptotic resistance to radiation in HCC cells, and the ectopic expression of STAT3 in HCC cells abolished the radiosensitizing effect of sorafenib. Moreover, sorafenib plus radiation significantly suppressed PLC5 xenograft tumor growth. Conclusions: These results indicate that sorafenib sensitizes resistant HCC cells to radiation-induced apoptosis via downregulating phosphorylation of STAT3 in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Radiation-induced transmissable chromosomal instability in haemopoietic stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadhim, M. A.; Wright, E. G.

    Heritable radiation-induced genetic alterations have long been assumed to be ``fixed'' within the first cell division. However, there is a growing body of evidence that a considerable fraction of cells surviving radiation exposure appear normal, but a variety of mutational changes arise in their progeny due to a transmissible genomic instability. In our investigations of G-banded metaphases, non-clonal cytogenetic aberrations, predominantly chromatid-type aberrations, have been observed in the clonal descendants of murine and human haemopoietic stem cells surviving low doses (~1 track per cell) of alpha-particle irradiations. The data are consistent with a transmissible genetic instability induced in a stem cell resulting in a diversity of chromosomal aberrations in its clonal progeny many cell divisions later. Recent studies have demonstrated that the instability phenotype persists in vivo and that the expression of chromosomal instability has a strong dependence on the genetic characteristics of the irradiated cell. At the time when cytogenetic aberrations are detected, an increased incidence of hprt mutations and apoptotic cells have been observed in the clonal descendants of alpha-irradiated murine haemopoietic stem cells. Thus, delayed chromosomal abnormalities, delayed cell death by apoptosis and late-arising specific gene mutations may reflect diverse consequences of radiation-induced genomic instability. The relationship, if any, between these effects is not established. Current studies suggest that expression of these delayed heritable effects is determined by the type of radiation exposure, type of cell and a variety of genetic factors.

  11. Radiation-induced dural fibrosarcoma with unusually short latent period

    SciTech Connect

    Ghatak, N.R.; Aydin, F.; Leshner, R.T. Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA )

    1993-05-01

    Although rare, the occurrence of radiation-induced intracranial neoplasms of various types is well known. Among these tumors, fibrosarcomas, especially in the region of seila turcica, seem to be the most common type. These tumors characteristically occur after a long latent period, usually several years, following radiation therapy. The authors now report a case of apparently radiation-induced fibrosarcoma with some unusual features in a 10-year-old boy who was treated with radiation for medulloblastoma. He received a total dose of 53.2 Gy radiation delivered at 1.8 per fraction with 6 MV acceleration using the standard craniospinal technique. An MRI at 15 months after the completion of radiotherapy showed a mass over the cerebral convexity, which increased two-fold in size within a period of 4 months. A well circumscribed tumor was removed from the fronto-parietal convexity. The tumor measured 5x4.5x1.5 cm and was attached to the dura with invasion of the overlying bone. Histologically, it displayed the characteristic features of a low-grade fibrosarcoma. The patient remains free of tumor 18 months after the surgery. This case emphasizes the potential risk for the development of a second neoplasm following therapeutic radiation and also documents, to the authors' knowledge, the shortest latent period reported so far between administration of radiotherapy and development of an intracranial tumor.

  12. Radiation-induced recurrent intestinal pseudo-obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Conklin, J.L.; Anuras, S.

    1981-06-01

    The syndrome of intestinal pseudo-obstruction is a complex of signs and symptoms of intestinal obstruction without evidence of mechanical obstruction of the intestinal lumen. A patient with radiation-induced intestinal pseudoobstruction is described. The patient is a 74-year old woman with a history of chronic diarrhea, recurrent episodes of crampy abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting since receiving a 13,000 rad radiation dose to the pelvis in 1954. She has been hospitalized on many occasions for symptoms and signs of bowel obstruction. Upper gastrointestinal contrast roentgenograms with small bowel follow-through done during these episodes revealed multiple dilated loops of small bowel with no obstructing lesion. Barium enemas revealed no obstructing lesion. Each episode resolved with conservative therapy. Other secondary causes for intestinal pseudo-obstruction were ruled out in our patient. She gave no history of familial gastrointestinal disorders. Although postirradiation motility abnormalities have been demonstrated experimentally this is the first report of radiation induced intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

  13. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.

  14. Genetic variation in radiation-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Denis A; Brady, Lauren; Halasa, Krzysztof; Morley, Michael; Solomon, Sonia; Cheung, Vivian G

    2012-02-01

    Radiation exposure through environmental, medical, and occupational settings is increasingly common. While radiation has harmful effects, it has utility in many applications such as radiotherapy for cancer. To increase the efficacy of radiation treatment and minimize its risks, a better understanding of the individual differences in radiosensitivity and the molecular basis of radiation response is needed. Here, we integrated human genetic and functional genomic approaches to study the response of human cells to radiation. We measured radiation-induced changes in gene expression and cell death in B cells from normal individuals. We found extensive individual variation in gene expression and cellular responses. To understand the genetic basis of this variation, we mapped the DNA sequence variants that influence expression response to radiation. We also identified radiation-responsive genes that regulate cell death; silencing of these genes by small interfering RNA led to an increase in radiation-induced cell death in human B cells, colorectal and prostate cancer cells. Together these results uncovered DNA variants that contribute to radiosensitivity and identified genes that can be targeted to increase the sensitivity of tumors to radiation.

  15. Sensitivity to Radiation-Induced Cancer in Hemochromatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bull. Richard J.; Anderson, Larry E.

    2000-06-01

    The objectives of this pilot project using HFE-knockout homozygotes and heterozygotes are to (1) determine whether the knock-out mice have greater sensitivity to radiation-induced cancer of the colon, liver and breast, (2) establish the dependence of this sensitivity on the accumulation of iron, (3) determine the extent to which cell replication and apoptosis occur in these target tissues with varying iron load, and (4) correlate the increases in sensitivity with changes in insulin-related signaling in tumors and normal tissue from each target organ. Three experimental designs will be used in the pilot project. The sequence of experiments is designed to first explore the influence of iron load on the response and demonstrate that HFE knockout mice are more sensitive than the wild type to radiation-induced cancer in one or more of three target tissues (liver, colon and breast). The dose response relationships with a broader set of radiation doses will be explored in the second experiment. The final experiment is designed to explore the extent to which heterozygotes display the increased susceptibility to cancer induction and to independently assess the importance of iron load to the initiation versus promotion of tumors.

  16. Radiation-induced genomic instability in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Huumonen, Katriina; Immonen, Hanna-Kaisa; Baverstock, Keith; Hiltunen, Mikko; Korkalainen, Merja; Lahtinen, Tapani; Parviainen, Juha; Viluksela, Matti; Wong, Garry; Naarala, Jonne; Juutilainen, Jukka

    2012-10-09

    Radiation-induced genomic instability has been well documented, particularly in vitro. However, the understanding of its mechanisms and their consequences in vivo is still limited. In this study, Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans; strain CB665) nematodes were exposed to X-rays at doses of 0.1, 1, 3 or 10Gy. The endpoints were measured several generations after exposure and included mutations in the movement-related gene unc-58, alterations in gene expression analysed with oligoarrays containing the entire C. elegans genome, and micro-satellite mutations measured by capillary electrophoresis. The progeny of the irradiated nematodes showed an increased mutation frequency in the unc-58 gene, with a maximum response observed at 1Gy. Significant differences were also found in gene expression between the irradiated (1Gy) and non-irradiated nematode lines. Differences in gene expression did not show clear clustering into certain gene categories, suggesting that the instability might be a chaotic process rather than a result of changes in the function of few specific genes such as, e.g., those responsible for DNA repair. Increased heterogeneity in gene expression, which has previously been described in irradiated cultured human lymphocytes, was also observed in the present study in C. elegans, the coefficient of variation of gene expression being higher in the progeny of irradiated nematodes than in control nematodes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first publication reporting radiation-induced genomic instability in C. elegans.

  17. Nature of radiation-induced defects in quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bu; Yu, Yingtian; Bauchy, Mathieu; Pignatelli, Isabella; Sant, Gaurav

    2015-07-14

    Although quartz (α-form) is a mineral used in numerous applications wherein radiation exposure is an issue, the nature of the atomistic defects formed during radiation-induced damage has not been fully clarified. Especially, the extent of oxygen vacancy formation is still debated, which is an issue of primary importance as optical techniques based on charged oxygen vacancies have been utilized to assess the level of radiation damage in quartz. In this paper, molecular dynamics simulations are applied to study the effects of ballistic impacts on the atomic network of quartz. We show that the defects that are formed mainly consist of over-coordinated Si and O, as well as Si–O connectivity defects, e.g., small Si–O rings and edge-sharing Si tetrahedra. Oxygen vacancies, on the contrary, are found in relatively low abundance, suggesting that characterizations based on E′ centers do not adequately capture radiation-induced structural damage in quartz. Finally, we evaluate the dependence on the incident energy, of the amount of each type of the point defects formed, and quantify unambiguously the threshold displacement energies for both O and Si atoms. These results provide a comprehensive basis to assess the nature and extent of radiation damage in quartz.

  18. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    DOE PAGES

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesismore » that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.« less

  19. Radiation-induced skin carcinomas of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Ron, E.; Modan, B.; Preston, D.; Alfandary, E.; Stovall, M.; Boice, J.D. Jr. )

    1991-03-01

    Radiation exposures to the scalp during childhood for tinea capitis were associated with a fourfold increase in skin cancer, primarily basal cell carcinomas, and a threefold increase in benign skin tumors. Malignant melanoma, however, was not significantly elevated. Overall, 80 neoplasms were identified from an extensive search of the pathology logs of all major hospitals in Israel and computer linkage with the national cancer registry. Radiation dose to the scalp was computed for over 10,000 persons irradiated for ringworm (mean 7 Gy), and incidence rates were contrasted with those observed in 16,000 matched comparison subjects. The relative risk of radiogenic skin cancer did not differ significantly between men or women or by time since exposure; however, risk was greatest following exposures in early childhood. After adjusting for sex, ethnic origin, and attained age, the estimated excess relative risk was 0.7 per Gy and the average excess risk over the current follow-up was 0.31/10(4) PY-Gy. The risk per Gy of radiation-induced skin cancer was intermediate between the high risk found among whites and no risk found among blacks in a similar study conducted in New York City. This finding suggests the role that subsequent exposure to uv radiation likely plays in the expression of a potential radiation-induced skin malignancy.

  20. The thermal stability of radiation-induced defects in illite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riegler, T.; Allard, T.; Beaufort, D.; Cantin, J.-L.; von Bardeleben, H. J.

    2016-01-01

    High-purity illite specimens from the Mesoproterozoic unconformity-related uranium deposits of Kiggavik, Thelon basin, Nunavut (Canada), and Shea Creek (Athabasca basin, Saskatchewan, Canada) have been studied using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to determine the thermal stability of the main radiation-induced defects and question the potential of using illite as a natural dosimeter. The observed spectra are complex as they can show in the same region several contributions: (1) an unstable native defect, (2) the main stable defect named Ai by reference to a previous study (Morichon et al. in Phys Chem Minerals 35:339-346, 2008), (3) a signal at g = 2.063 assigned to a new defect, not yet fully characterized, named Ai2 center and (4) impurities such as vanadyl complex or divalent manganese. Isochronal heating shows that the new signal corresponds to a stable species. Isothermal heating experiments at 400 and 450 °C provide values of half-life extrapolated at room temperature and activation energy of 1.9-29,109 years and 1.3-1.4 eV, respectively, corresponding to the Ai center. These parameters allow the use of stable radiation-induced defects as a record of radioactivity down to the Paleoproterozoic period.

  1. [Radiation-induced genomic instability: phenomenon, molecular mechanisms, pathogenetic significance].

    PubMed

    Mazurik, V K; Mikhaĭlov, V F

    2001-01-01

    The recent data on the radiation-induced genome instability as a special state of progeny of cells irradiated in vitro as well as after a whole body exposure to ionizing radiation, that make these cells considerably different from normal, unirradiated cells, were considered. This state presents a number of cytogenetical, molecular-biological, cytological and biochemical manifestations untypical for normal cells. The state is controlled by the mechanisms of regulation of checkpoints of cell cycle, and apoptosis, that is under gene p53 control. The proof has been found that this state transfers from irradiated maternal cells to their surviving progeny by the epigenetical mechanisms and would exist until the cells restore the original state of response on the DNA damage. From the point of view of the genome instability conception, that considers the chromatine rearrangement as the adaptive-evolution mechanism of adaptation of the species to changeable environmental conditions, the radiation-induced genome instability may be considered as transition of irradiated progeny to the state of read these to adaptation changes with two alternative pathways. The first leads to adaptation to enviromental conditions and restoring of normal cell functions. The second presents the cell transition into the transformed state with remain genome instability and with increase of tumour growth probability.

  2. Radiation Induced DNA Double-Strand Breaks in Radiology.

    PubMed

    Kuefner, M A; Brand, M; Engert, C; Schwab, S A; Uder, M

    2015-10-01

    Shortly after the discovery of X-rays, their damaging effect on biological tissues was observed. The determination of radiation exposure in diagnostic and interventional radiology is usually based on physical measurements or mathematical algorithms with standardized dose simulations. γ-H2AX immunofluorescence microscopy is a reliable and sensitive method for the quantification of radiation induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in blood lymphocytes. The detectable amount of these DNA damages correlates well with the dose received. However, the biological radiation damage depends not only on dose but also on other individual factors like radiation sensitivity and DNA repair capacity. Iodinated contrast agents can enhance the x-ray induced DNA damage level. After their induction DSB are quickly repaired. A protective effect of antioxidants has been postulated in experimental studies. This review explains the prinicple of the γ-H2AX technique and provides an overview on studies evaluating DSB in radiologic examinations. Radiologic examinations including CT and angiography induce DNA double-strand breaks. Even after mammography a slight but significant increase is detectable in peripheral blood lymphocytes. The number of radiation induced double-strand breaks correlates well with the radiation dose. Individual factors including radiation sensitivity, DNA repair capacity and the application of iodinated contrast media has an influence on the DNA damage level. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Cytokines and mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Bamias, Giorgos; Arseneau, Kristen O; Cominelli, Fabio

    2014-11-01

    Cytokines are integral mediators for maintaining intestinal mucosal homeostasis, as well as prominent effector molecules during chronic gut inflammatory diseases. This review focuses on recent studies of the role of specific cytokines in mucosal immunity. Dichotomous, or even opposing, functions have been described for several cytokines involved in intestinal innate immunity (most notably for members of the interleukin-1 family), which depend on the specific inflammatory conditions within the intestinal mucosa. For example, both interleukin-1α and interleukin-33 exhibit 'alarmin'-type properties that can signal tissue or cell damage, which further add to their well described proinflammatory roles. Costimulatory molecules of the tumor necrosis factor/tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, such as TNF-like cytokine 1A and LIGHT, are actively involved in mucosal proinflammatory pathways, but also may exert protection against infectious agents to facilitate recovery from acute inflammation. Finally, innate lymphoid cells are increasingly recognized as important cellular sources of pivotal mucosal cytokines, including the interleukin-23/T helper 17 cytokine, interleukin-22. Elucidating the complexity of cytokine signaling within the normal mucosa and during acute and chronic inflammation will be a pivotal step toward understanding the pathogenesis of immune-mediated gut diseases and developing effective therapies to treat them.

  4. Caspase-independent cell death mediated by apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) nuclear translocation is involved in ionizing radiation induced HepG2 cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Hengwen; Yang, Shana; Li, Jianhua; Zhang, Yajie; Gao, Dongsheng; Zhao, Shenting

    2016-03-25

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer in the world. The aim of radiotherapy is to eradicate cancer cells with ionizing radiation. Except for the caspase-dependent mechanism, several lines of evidence demonstrated that caspase-independent mechanism is directly involved in the cell death responding to irradiation. For this reason, defining the contribution of caspase-independent molecular mechanisms represents the main goal in radiotherapy. In this study, we focused on the role of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), the caspase-independent molecular, in ionizing radiation induced hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2) cell death. We found that ionizing radiation has no function on AIF expression in HepG2 cells, but could induce AIF release from the mitochondria and translocate into nuclei. Inhibition of AIF could reduce ionizing radiation induced HepG2 cell death. These studies strongly support a direct relationship between AIF nuclear translocation and radiation induced cell death. What's more, AIF nuclear translocation is caspase-independent manner, but not caspase-dependent manner, in this process. These new findings add a further attractive point of investigation to better define the complex interplay between caspase-independent cell death and radiation therapy. - Highlights: • AIF nuclear translocation is involved in ionizing radiation induced hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2 cell death. • AIF mediated cell death induced by ionizing radiation is caspase-independent. • Caspase-independent pathway is involved in ionzing radiation induced HepG2 cell death.

  5. Radiation-Induced Noncancer Risks in Interventional Cardiology: Optimisation of Procedures and Staff and Patient Dose Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Khairuddin Md Yusof, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Concerns about ionizing radiation during interventional cardiology have been increased in recent years as a result of rapid growth in interventional procedure volumes and the high radiation doses associated with some procedures. Noncancer radiation risks to cardiologists and medical staff in terms of radiation-induced cataracts and skin injuries for patients appear clear potential consequences of interventional cardiology procedures, while radiation-induced potential risk of developing cardiovascular effects remains less clear. This paper provides an overview of the evidence-based reviews of concerns about noncancer risks of radiation exposure in interventional cardiology. Strategies commonly undertaken to reduce radiation doses to both medical staff and patients during interventional cardiology procedures are discussed; optimisation of interventional cardiology procedures is highlighted. PMID:24027768

  6. A review on radiation-induced nucleation and growth of colloidal metallic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This review presents an introduction to the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles by radiation-induced method, especially gamma irradiation. This method offers some benefits over the conventional methods because it provides fully reduced and highly pure nanoparticles free from by-products or chemical reducing agents, and is capable of controlling the particle size and structure. The nucleation and growth mechanism of metallic nanoparticles are also discussed. The competition between nucleation and growth process in the formation of nanoparticles can determine the size of nanoparticles which is influenced by certain parameters such as the choice of solvents and stabilizer, the precursor to stabilizer ratio, pH during synthesis, and absorbed dose. PMID:24225302

  7. Baicalein protects mice against radiation-induced DNA damages and genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Nitin Motilal

    2013-07-01

    Baicalein is the major flavonoid extracted from the root of Scutellaria baicaleins. This flavonoid is used extensively in Chinese herbal medicine. In the present study baicalein is evaluated for its radioprotective properties. Human blood cells when exposed to the γ-radiation ex vivo in presence of baicalein underwent the reduced DNA damage compared to the control. Baicalein administration prior to the whole-body γ-radiation (4 Gy) exposure of mice resulted in protecting the damage to the DNA as measured in their blood cells by alkaline comet assay. Mice when exposed to the radiation (whole body; 1.7 Gy) resulted in damage to the bone marrow as measured by micronucleated reticulocyte (MNRET) formation. Baicalein pre-treatment reduces the radiation induced damage to the bone marrow cells, as there was decrease in the percentage MNRET formation. These findings indicate radio-protecting ability of baicalein.

  8. Functional properties of nisin-carbohydrate conjugates formed by radiation induced Maillard reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muppalla, Shobita R.; Sonavale, Rahul; Chawla, Surinder P.; Sharma, Arun

    2012-12-01

    Nisin-carbohydrate conjugates were prepared by irradiating nisin either with glucose or dextran. Increase in browning and formation of intermediate products was observed with a concomitant decrease in free amino and reducing sugar groups indicating occurrence of the Maillard reaction catalyzed by irradiation. Nisin-carbohydrate conjugates showed a broad spectrum antibacterial activity against Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescence) as well as Gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus). Results of antioxidant assays, including that of DPPH radical-scavenging activity and reducing power, showed that the nisin-dextran conjugates possessed better antioxidant potential than nisin-glucose conjugate. These results suggested that it was possible to enhance the functional properties of nisin by preparing radiation induced conjugates suitable for application in food industry.

  9. Radioprotective effect of geraniin via the inhibition of apoptosis triggered by γ-radiation-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyoung Ah; Lee, In Kyung; Zhang, Rui; Piao, Mei Jing; Kim, Ki Cheon; Kim, Sang Young; Shin, Taekyun; Kim, Bum Joon; Lee, Nam Ho; Hyun, Jin Won

    2011-04-01

    The radioprotective effect of geraniin, a tannin compound isolated from Nymphaea tetragona Georgi var. (Nymphaeaceae), against γ-radiation-induced damage was investigated in Chinese hamster lung fibroblast (V79-4) cells. Geraniin recovered cell viability detected by MTT test and colony formation assay, which was compromised by γ-radiation, and reduced the γ-radiation-induced apoptosis by the inhibition of loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential. Geraniin protected cellular components (lipid membrane, cellular protein, and DNA) damaged by γ-radiation, which was detected by lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl formation, and comet assay. Geraniin significantly reduced the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species generated by γ-radiation, which was detected using spectrofluorometer, flow cytometer, and confocal microscope after 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate staining. Geraniin normalized the superoxide dismutase and catalase activities, which were decreased by γ-radiation. These results suggest that geraniin protects cells against radiation-induced oxidative stress via enhancing of antioxidant enzyme activities and attenuating of cellular damage.

  10. Novel submicronized rebamipide liquid with moderate viscosity: significant effects on oral mucositis in animal models.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Takako; Sako, Nobutomo; Matsuda, Takakuni; Uematsu, Naoya; Sakurai, Kazushi; Ishida, Tatsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at developing a novel rebamipide liquid for an effective treatment of oral mucositis. The healing effects of a variety of liquids comprising submicronized rebamipide crystals were investigated using a rat cauterization-induced oral ulcer model. Whereas 2% rebamipide liquid comprising micro-crystals did not exhibit significant curative effect, 2% rebamipide liquids comprising submicronized crystals with moderate viscosities exhibited healing effects following intra-oral administration. The 2% and 4% optimized rebamipide liquids showed significant healing effects in the rat oral ulcer model (p<0.01). In addition, in the rat radiation-induced glossitis model, whereby the injury was caused to the tongue by exposing only around the rat's snout to a 15 Gy of X-irradiation, the 2% optimized rebamipide liquid significantly reduced the percent area of ulcerated injury (p<0.05). In conclusion, the submicronized rebamipide liquid with moderate viscosity following intra-oral administration showed better both healing effect in the rat oral ulcer model and preventive effect in the rat irradiation-induced glossitis model.

  11. Modulation of ionizing radiation induced oxidative imbalance by semi-fractionated extract of Piper betle

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Savita; Dutta, Ajaswrata; Sankhwar, Sanghmitra; Shukla, Sandeep Kumar

    2010-01-01

    The study was planned to evaluate modulatory effect of aqueous extract of Piper betle leaf (PBL) on ionizing radiation mediated oxidative stress leading to normal tissues damage during radiotherapy and other radiation exposures. The total polyphenols and flavonoids known as free radical scavenger (chelators) were measured in the extract. To ascertain antioxidant potential of PBL extract, we studied free radical scavenging, metal chelation, reducing power, lipid peroxidation inhibition and ferric reducing antioxidant properties (FRAP ) using in vitro assays. Mice were exposed to varied radiation doses administered with the same extract prior to irradiation to confirm its oxidative stress minimizing efficacy by evaluating ferric reducing ability of plasma, reduced glutathione, lipid peroxidation and micro-nuclei frequency. PBL extract was effective in scavenging DPPH (up to 92% at 100 µg/ml) and superoxide radicals (up to 95% at 80 µg/ml), chelated metal ions (up to 83% at 50 µg/ml) and inhibited lipid peroxidation (up to 45.65% at 500 µg/ml) in a dose dependant manner using in vitro model. Oral administration of PBL extract (225 mg/kg body weight) 1 hr before irradiation in mice significantly enhanced (p < 0.01) radiation abated antioxidant potential of plasma and GSH level in all the observed organs. The treatment with extract effectively lowered the radiation induced lipid peroxidation at 24 hrs in all the selected organs with maximum inhibition in thymus (p < 0.01). After 48 hrs, lipid peroxidation was maximally inhibited in the group treated with the extract. Frequency of radiation induced micronucleated cells declined significantly (34.78%, p < 0.01) at 24 hrs post-irradiation interval by PBL extract administration. The results suggest that PBL extract has high antioxidant potential and relatively non-toxic and thus could be assertively used to mitigate radiotherapy inflicted normal tissues damage and also injuries caused by moderate doses of radiation

  12. cAMP signaling inhibits radiation-induced ATM phosphorylation leading to the augmentation of apoptosis in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eun-Ah; Kim, Eui-Jun; Kwak, Sahng-June; Juhnn, Yong-Sung

    2014-02-24

    phosphorylation and increased apoptosis. cAMP signaling inhibits radiation-induced ATM activation by PKA-dependent activation of PP2A, and this signaling mechanism augments radiation-induced apoptosis by reducing ATM-dependent activation of NF-κB in lung cancer cells.

  13. ATM Mutations and the Development of Severe Radiation-Induced Morbidity Following Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    repair of radiation-induced damage. Furthermore, cells possessing a mutated copy of this gene are more radiosensitive than cells from individuals with...AD Award Number: DAMD17-02-1-0503 TITLE: ATM Mutations and the Development of Severe Radiation-Induced Morbidity Following Radiotherapy for Breast...2005 Annual 1 Jul 2004 - 30 Jun 2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER ATM Mutations and the Development of Severe Radiation-Induced Morbidity

  14. Hydrogen Protects Mice from Radiation Induced Thymic Lymphoma in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Luqian; Zhou, Chuanfeng; Zhang, Jian; Gao, Fu; Li, Bailong; Chuai, Yunhai; Liu, Cong; Cai, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a well-known carcinogen, however the mechanism of radiation induced thymic lymphoma is not well known. Moreover, an easy and effective method to protect mice from radiation induced thymic lymphoma is still unknown. Hydrogen, or H2, is seldom regarded as an important agent in medical usage, especially as a therapeutic gas. Here in this study, we found that H2 protects mice from radiation induced thymic lymphoma in BALB/c mice. PMID:21448340

  15. Aminoguanidine Alleviates Radiation-Induced Small-Bowel Damage Through Its Antioxidant Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E.-Y.; Wang, F.-S.; Lin, I-H.; Yang, Kuender D.

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect and its mechanism of aminoguanidine (AG) on small-bowel protection after whole-abdominal irradiation (WAI) in rats. Methods and Materials: Male Sprague-Dawley rats (300-400 g) subjected to 12 Gy WAI were used for the study. Aminoguanidine at a dose of 50-800 mg/kg was administered by the gavage route 2 h before WAI. Mucosal damage of small bowel was evaluated by the grade of diarrhea and crypt survival; oxidative stress was determined by the level of 8-hydroxy 2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) with immunohistochemistry (IHC). Nitrosative stress was evaluated by the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) with IHC, and systemic and portal vein NOx (nitrite + nitrate) levels were measured and compared with and without AG treatment after WAI. Results: Aminoguanidine showed a dose-dependent effect against WAI-induced diarrhea. Aminoguanidine at a dose of 400 mg/kg had the best protective effect, from 92% to 17% (p = 0.002). Aminoguanidine increased crypt survival from 23% to 46% (p = 0.003). It also significantly attenuated 8-OHdG expression but not 3-NT and iNOS expression at both 4 and 8 h after 12-Gy WAI. Aminoguanidine did not alter the portal vein NOx levels 4 and 8 h after 12-Gy WAI. Conclusion: Aminoguanidine has a radioprotective effect against radiation-induced small-bowel damage due to its antioxidant effect but not inhibition of nitric oxide production. Dietary AG may have a potentially protective effect on the small intestine of patients subjected to pelvic and abdominal radiotherapies.

  16. Radiation induced genome instability: multiscale modelling and data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Sergey; Eidelman, Yuri

    2012-07-01

    Genome instability (GI) is thought to be an important step in cancer induction and progression. Radiation induced GI is usually defined as genome alterations in the progeny of irradiated cells. The aim of this report is to demonstrate an opportunity for integrative analysis of radiation induced GI on the basis of multiscale modelling. Integrative, systems level modelling is necessary to assess different pathways resulting in GI in which a variety of genetic and epigenetic processes are involved. The multilevel modelling includes the Monte Carlo based simulation of several key processes involved in GI: DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) generation in cells initially irradiated as well as in descendants of irradiated cells, damage transmission through mitosis. Taking the cell-cycle-dependent generation of DNA/chromosome breakage into account ensures an advantage in estimating the contribution of different DNA damage response pathways to GI, as to nonhomologous vs homologous recombination repair mechanisms, the role of DSBs at telomeres or interstitial chromosomal sites, etc. The preliminary estimates show that both telomeric and non-telomeric DSB interactions are involved in delayed effects of radiation although differentially for different cell types. The computational experiments provide the data on the wide spectrum of GI endpoints (dicentrics, micronuclei, nonclonal translocations, chromatid exchanges, chromosome fragments) similar to those obtained experimentally for various cell lines under various experimental conditions. The modelling based analysis of experimental data demonstrates that radiation induced GI may be viewed as processes of delayed DSB induction/interaction/transmission being a key for quantification of GI. On the other hand, this conclusion is not sufficient to understand GI as a whole because factors of DNA non-damaging origin can also induce GI. Additionally, new data on induced pluripotent stem cells reveal that GI is acquired in normal mature

  17. Radiation-induced lichen sclerosus of the vulva : First report in the medical literature.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Lisa R; Privette, Emily D; Patterson, James W; Tchernev, Georgi; Chokoeva, Anastasiya Atanasova; Wollina, Uwe; Lotti, Torello; Wilson, Barbara B

    2017-03-01

    A 67-year-old woman presented with a firm plaque in the perineal region, 16 months after diagnosis of a high-grade basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the vagina and treatment by external beam radiation therapy and vaginal cuff brachytherapy. The differential diagnosis included radiation-induced morphea, radiation dermatitis, or, possibly, radiation-induced lichen sclerosus. Biopsy findings, including special staining, confirmed the diagnosis of radiation-induced lichen sclerosus. To our knowledge, this is the first report of radiation-induced lichen sclerosus of the vulvar region.

  18. Protective effects of seabuckthorn pulp and seed oils against radiation-induced acute intestinal injury

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jing; Wang, Lan; Lu, Yan; Ji, Yue; Wang, Yaqing; Dong, Ke; Kong, Xiangqing; Sun, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome, including nausea, diarrhea and dehydration, contributes to morbidity and mortality after medical or industrial radiation exposure. No safe and effective radiation countermeasure has been approved for clinical therapy. In this study, we aimed to investigate the potential protective effects of seabuckthorn pulp and seed oils against radiation-induced acute intestinal injury. C57/BL6 mice were orally administered seabuckthorn pulp oil, seed oil and control olive oil once per day for 7 days before exposure to total-body X-ray irradiation of 7.5 Gy. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were used for the measurement of apoptotic cells and proteins, inflammation factors and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases. Seabuckthorn oil pretreatment increased the post-radiation survival rate and reduced the damage area of the small intestine villi. Both the pulp and seed oil treatment significantly decreased the apoptotic cell numbers and cleaved caspase 3 expression. Seabuckthorn oil downregulated the mRNA level of inflammatory factors, including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-8. Both the pulp and seed oils elevated the level of phosphorylated extracellular-signal-regulated kinase and reduced the levels of phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38. Palmitoleic acid (PLA) and alpha linolenic acid (ALA) are the predominant components of pulp oil and seed oil, respectively. Pretreatment with PLA and ALA increased the post-radiation survival time. In conclusion, seabuckthorn pulp and seed oils protect against mouse intestinal injury from high-dose radiation by reducing cell apoptosis and inflammation. ALA and PLA are promising natural radiation countermeasure candidates. PMID:27422938

  19. A PPAR-gamma agonist protects from radiation-induced intestinal toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Sottili, Mariangela; Gerini, Chiara; Desideri, Isacco; Bastida, Cinzia; Pallotta, Stefania; Castiglione, Francesca; Bonomo, Pierluigi; Meattini, Icro; Greto, Daniela; Cappelli, Sabrina; Di Brina, Lucia; Loi, Mauro; Biti, Giampaolo; Livi, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Because of its anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrotic, anti-apoptotic and anti-neoplastic properties, the PPAR-γ agonist rosiglitazone is an interesting drug for investigating for use in the prevention and treatment of radiation-induced intestinal damage. We aimed to evaluate the radioprotective effect of rosiglitazone in a murine model of acute intestinal damage, assessing whether radioprotection is selective for normal tissues or also occurs in tumour cells. Methods Mice were total-body irradiated (12 Gy), with or without rosiglitazone (5 mg/kg/day). After 24 and 72 hours, mice were sacrificed and the jejunum was collected. HT-29 human colon cancer cells were irradiated with a single dose of 2 (1000 cells), 4 (1500 cells) or 6 (2000 cells) Gy, with or without adding rosiglitazone (20 µM) 1 hour before irradiation. HT-29-xenografted CD1 mice were irradiated (16 Gy) with or without rosiglitazone; tumour volumes were measured for 33 days. Results Rosiglitazone markedly reduced histological signs of altered bowel structures, that is, villi shortening, submucosal thickening, necrotic changes in crypts, oedema, apoptosis, and inflammatory infiltrate induced by irradiation. Rosiglitazone significantly decreased p-NF-kB p65 phosphorylation and TGFβ protein expression at 24 and 72 hours post-irradiation and significantly decreased gene expression of Collagen1, Mmp13, Tnfα and Bax at 24 hours and p53 at 72 hours post-irradiation. Rosiglitazone reduced HT-29 clonogenic survival, but only produced a slight reduction of xenograft tumour growth. Conclusion Rosiglitazone exerts a protective effect on normal tissues and reduces alterations in bowel structures and inflammation in a radiation-induced bowel toxicity model, without interfering with the radiation effect on HT-29 cancer cells. PPAR-γ agonists should be further investigated for their application in abdominal and pelvic irradiation. PMID:28344789

  20. Protective effects of seabuckthorn pulp and seed oils against radiation-induced acute intestinal injury.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jing; Wang, Lan; Lu, Yan; Ji, Yue; Wang, Yaqing; Dong, Ke; Kong, Xiangqing; Sun, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome, including nausea, diarrhea and dehydration, contributes to morbidity and mortality after medical or industrial radiation exposure. No safe and effective radiation countermeasure has been approved for clinical therapy. In this study, we aimed to investigate the potential protective effects of seabuckthorn pulp and seed oils against radiation-induced acute intestinal injury. C57/BL6 mice were orally administered seabuckthorn pulp oil, seed oil and control olive oil once per day for 7 days before exposure to total-body X-ray irradiation of 7.5 Gy. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were used for the measurement of apoptotic cells and proteins, inflammation factors and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases. Seabuckthorn oil pretreatment increased the post-radiation survival rate and reduced the damage area of the small intestine villi. Both the pulp and seed oil treatment significantly decreased the apoptotic cell numbers and cleaved caspase 3 expression. Seabuckthorn oil downregulated the mRNA level of inflammatory factors, including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-8. Both the pulp and seed oils elevated the level of phosphorylated extracellular-signal-regulated kinase and reduced the levels of phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38. Palmitoleic acid (PLA) and alpha linolenic acid (ALA) are the predominant components of pulp oil and seed oil, respectively. Pretreatment with PLA and ALA increased the post-radiation survival time. In conclusion, seabuckthorn pulp and seed oils protect against mouse intestinal injury from high-dose radiation by reducing cell apoptosis and inflammation. ALA and PLA are promising natural radiation countermeasure candidates. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation

  1. Calculation of radiation-induced creep and stress relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagakawa, Johsei

    1995-08-01

    Numerical calculation based on a computer simulation of point defect kinetics under stress was performed to predict radiation-induced deformation in an Inconel X-750 bolt in a LWR core and for a 316 stainless steel blanket in experimental fusion reactors with the water-coolant scenario. Although the displacement rate is rather low, modest irradiation creep with nearly linear stress dependence was predicted below 200 MPa at 300°C in the LWR core. This low stress dependence causes significant stress relaxation, which coincides with the experimental data to 2 dpa. An almost equal amount of enhanced irradiation creep strain was predicted at 60°C in both solution annealed and cold worker 316 stainless steel in the water-cooled blanket. The stress relaxation is practically not expected without irradiation in both the cases, but the calculation predicts that it is definitely expected under irradiation.

  2. Factors that modify risks of radiation-induced cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1988-11-01

    The collective influence of biologic and physical factors that modify risks of radiation-induced cancer introduces uncertainties sufficient to deny precision of estimates of human cancer risk that can be calculated for low-dose radiation in exposed populations. The important biologic characteristics include the tissue sites and cell types, baseline cancer incidence, minimum latent period, time-to-tumor recognition, and the influence of individual host (age and sex) and competing etiologic influences. Physical factors include radiation dose, dose rate, and radiation quality. Statistical factors include time-response projection models, risk coefficients, and dose-response relationships. Other modifying factors include other carcinogens, and other biological sources (hormonal status, immune status, hereditary factors).

  3. Measurements of prompt radiation induced conductivity of alumina and sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, E. Frederick; Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Preston, Eric F.

    2011-04-01

    We performed measurements of the prompt radiation induced conductivity in thin samples of Alumina and Sapphire at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. Five mil thick samples were irradiated with pulses of 20 MeV electrons, yielding dose rates of 1E7 to 1E9 rad/s. We applied variable potentials up to 1 kV across the samples and measured the prompt conduction current. Analysis rendered prompt conductivity coefficients between 1E10 and 1E9 mho/m/(rad/s), depending on the dose rate and the pulse width for Alumina and 1E7 to 6E7 mho/m/(rad/s) for Sapphire.

  4. Radiation Induced Cystitis and Proctitis - Prediction, Assessment and Management.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Supriya; Madan, Renu; Julka, Pramod K; Rath, Goura K

    2015-01-01

    Cystitis and proctitis are defined as inflammation of bladder and rectum respectively. Haemorrhagic cystitis is the most severe clinical manifestation of radiation and chemical cystitis. Radiation proctitis and cystitis are major complications following radiotherapy. Prevention of radiation-induced haemorrhagic cystitis has been investigated using various oral agents with minimal benefit. Bladder irrigation remains the most frequently adopted modality followed by intra-vesical instillation of alum or formalin. In intractable cases, surgical intervention is required in the form of diversion ureterostomy or cystectomy. Proctitis is more common in even low dose ranges but is self-limiting and improves on treatment interruption. However, treatment of radiation proctitis is broadly non-invasive or invasive. Non-invasive treatment consists of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), anti-oxidants, sucralfate, short chain fatty acids and hyperbaric oxygen. Invasive treatment consists of ablative procedures like formalin application, endoscopic YAG laser coagulation or argon plasma coagulation and surgery as a last resort.

  5. Radiatively induced breaking of conformal symmetry in a superpotential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbuzov, A. B.; Cirilo-Lombardo, D. J.

    2016-07-01

    Radiatively induced symmetry breaking is considered for a toy model with one scalar and one fermion field unified in a superfield. It is shown that the classical quartic self-interaction of the superfield possesses a quantum infrared singularity. Application of the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism for effective potential leads to the appearance of condensates and masses for both scalar and fermion components. That induces a spontaneous breaking of the initial classical symmetries: the supersymmetry and the conformal one. The energy scales for the scalar and fermion condensates appear to be of the same order, while the renormalization scale is many orders of magnitude higher. A possibility to relate the considered toy model to conformal symmetry breaking in the Standard Model is discussed.

  6. Dose-dependent radiation-induced hypotension in the canine

    SciTech Connect

    Cockerham, L.G.; Hampton, J.D.; Doyle, T.F.

    1986-01-01

    Radiation-induced early transient incapacitation (ETI) is often accompanied by severe systemic hypotension. However, postradiation hypotension does not occur with equal frequency in all species and is not reported with consistency in the canine. In an attempt to clarify the differences in reported canine post-radiation blood pressures, canine systemic blood pressures were determined both before and after exposure to gamma radiation of either 80 or 100 Gy. Data obtained from six sham-radiated beagles and 12 radiated beagles indicated that 100-Gy, whole-body, gamma radiation produced a decrease in systemic mean blood pressure while 80-Gy, whole-body, gamma radiation did not. Analysis of this data could be consistent with a quantal response to a gamma radiation dose between 80 Gy and 100 Gy.

  7. Radiation-induced cerebral meningioma: a recognizable entity.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, A B; Shalit, M N; Cohen, M L; Zandbank, U; Reichenthal, E

    1984-11-01

    The authors retrospectively analyzed the clinical and histopathological findings in 201 patients with intracranial meningiomas operated on in the period 1978 to 1982. Forty-three of the patients (21.4%) had at some previous time received radiation treatment to their scalp, the majority for tinea capitis. The findings in these 43 irradiated patients were compared with those in the 158 non-irradiated patients. Several distinctive clinical and histological features were identified in the irradiated group, which suggest that radiation-induced meningiomas can be defined as a separate nosological subgroup. The use of irradiation in large numbers of children with tinea capitis in the era prior to the availability of griseofulvin may be responsible for a significantly increased incidence of intracranial meningiomas.

  8. [Radiation-induced and therapy-related AML/MDS].

    PubMed

    Inaba, Toshiya

    2009-10-01

    Radiation induced acute myeloid leukemia (AML) was recognized a century ago, soon after mankind found radiation. Atomic bomb survivors developed de novo AML with relatively short latency with very high frequency. By contrast, excess occurrence of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) as well as solid tumors was found decades late. This difference may be due to etiology that many de novo AML patients harbor chimeric leukemogenic genes caused by chromosomal translocations, while MDS patients rarely carry chimeras. In addition, epigenetic change would play important roles. Therapy related leukemia is mainly caused by topoisomerase II inhibitors that cause de novo AML with an 11q23 translocation or by alkyrating agents that induce MDS/AML with an AML1 point mutation and monosomy 7.

  9. Modification of microcrystalline cellulose by gamma radiation-induced grafting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madrid, Jordan F.; Abad, Lucille V.

    2015-10-01

    Modified microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) was prepared through gamma radiation-induced graft polymerization of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA). Simultaneous grafting was employed wherein MCC with GMA in methanol was irradiated with gamma radiation in nitrogen atmosphere. The effects of different experimental factors such as monomer concentration, type of solvent and absorbed dose on the degree of grafting, Dg, were studied. The amount of grafted GMA, expressed as Dg, was determined gravimetrically. Information from grafted samples subjected to Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) in attenuated total reflectance (ATR) mode showed peaks corresponding to GMA which indicates successful grafting. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis revealed that the crystalline region of MCC was not adversely affected after grafting with GMA. The thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) data showed that the decomposition of grafted MCC occurred at higher temperature compared to the base MCC polymer.

  10. Radiation-induced polymerization for the immobilization of penicillin acylase

    SciTech Connect

    Boccu, E.; Carenza, M.; Lora, S.; Palma, G.; Veronese, F.M.

    1987-06-01

    The immobilization of Escherichia coli penicillin acylase was investigated by radiation-induced polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate at low temperature. A leak-proof composite that does not swell in water was obtained by adding the cross-linking agent trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate to the monomer-aqueous enzyme mixture. Penicillin acylase, which was immobilized with greater than 70% yield, possessed a higher Km value toward the substrate 6-nitro-3-phenylacetamidobenzoic acid than the free enzyme form (Km = 1.7 X 10(-5) and 1 X 10(-5) M, respectively). The structural stability of immobilized penicillin acylase, as assessed by heat, guanidinium chloride, and pH denaturation profiles, was very similar to that of the free-enzyme form, thus suggesting that penicillin acylase was entrapped in its native state into aqueous free spaces of the polymer matrix.

  11. Invertase immobilization onto radiation-induced graft copolymerized polyethylene pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Queiroz, Alvaro Antonio Alencar; Vitolo, Michele; de Oliveira, Rômulo Cesar; Higa, Olga Zazuco

    1996-06-01

    The graft copolymer poly(ethylene-g-acrylic acid) (LDPE-g-AA) was prepared by radiation-induced graft copolymerization of acrylic acid onto low density polyethylene (LDPE) pellets, and characterized by infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The presence of the grafted poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) was established. Invertase was immobilized onto the graft polymer and the thermodynamic parameters of the soluble and immobilized enzyme were determined. The Michaelis constant, Km, and the maximum reaction velocity, Vmax, were determined for the free and the immobilized invertase. The Michaelis constant, Km was larger for the immobilized invertase than for the free enzyme, whereas Vmax was smaller for the immobilized invertase. The thermal stability of the immobilized invertase was higher than that of the free enzyme.

  12. Pulsed radiation-induced attenuation in certain optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, J.D. )

    1992-05-01

    Using the X-ray pulse from the HERMES II simulation machine at Sandia National Laboratories, the pulsed radiation-induced attenuation was measured in two optical fibers considered to be 'nonrad-hard': the 50-micron-core, graded-index fiber from Corning and the plastic (PMMA) fiber from the Mitsubishi Rayon Company. These fibers were exposed to radiation up to doses of 19.5 and 28 krad(Si), respectively. In addition, fits of their post-radiation recovery were made to the geminate recombination model, from which the recombination-rate and generation constants, characteristic of this theory, were determined. These parameters should be useful in determining the response of the fibers to radiation conditions other than those encountered here. 18 refs.

  13. Potential targets for intervention in radiation-induced heart disease.

    PubMed

    Boerma, M; Hauer-Jensen, M

    2010-11-01

    Radiotherapy of thoracic and chest wall tumors, if all or part of the heart was included in the radiation field, can lead to radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD), a late and potentially severe side effect. RIHD presents clinically several years after irradiation and manifestations include accelerated atherosclerosis, pericardial and myocardial fibrosis, conduction abnormalities, and injury to cardiac valves. The pathogenesis of RIHD is largely unknown, and a treatment is not available. Hence, ongoing pre-clinical studies aim to elucidate molecular and cellular mechanisms of RIHD. Here, an overview of recent pre-clinical studies is given, and based on the results of these studies, potential targets for intervention in RIHD are discussed.

  14. Radiation-induced degradation of 4-chloroaniline in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, M.; Wolfger, H.; Getoff, N.

    2002-12-01

    The radiation-induced decomposition of 4-chloroaniline (4-ClA) was studied under steady-state conditions using aqueous solutions saturated with air, pure oxygen, N 2O, argon and argon in the presence of t-Butanol. Using HPLC-method, the initial G-values of the substrate degradation as well as of a number of radiolytic products were determined. The formation of aminophenols, chlorophenols, aniline and phenol in addition to chloride, ammonia, formaldehyde and mixture of aldehydes as well as carboxylic acids was studied as a function of absorbed dose. Based on the experimental data, probable reaction mechanisms for the degradation of 4-ClA by γ-rays and the formation of the identified products are presented.

  15. Modulation of radiation-induced hemopoietic suppression by acute thrombocytopenia

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbe, S.; Phalen, E.; Threatte, G.; Londe, H.

    1985-01-01

    Modifications of radiation-induced hemopoietic suppression by acute thrombocytopenia were evaluated. Immediately before or after exposure to sublethal irradiation, mice were given a single injection of anti-mouse platelet serum (APS), normal heterologous serum, neuraminidase (N'ase), or saline, or no further treatment was provided. Hemopoiesis was evaluated by blood cell counts, hematocrits, and incorporation of (75Se)selenomethionine into platelets. APS and N'ase induced an acute thrombocytopenia from which there was partial recovery before the platelet count started to fall from the radiation. During the second post-treatment week, both thrombocytopoiesis and erythropoiesis were greater in mice that received APS or N'ase in addition to radiation than in control irradiated mice. Differences in leukopoiesis were not apparent. Therefore, both thrombocytopoiesis and erythropoiesis appeared to be responsive to a stimulus generated by acute thrombocytopenia in sublethally irradiated mice.

  16. Probabilistic methodology for estimating radiation-induced cancer risk

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Leggett, R.W.; Williams, L.R.

    1981-01-01

    The RICRAC computer code was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide a versatile and convenient methodology for radiation risk assessment. The code allows as input essentially any dose pattern commonly encountered in risk assessments for either acute or chronic exposures, and it includes consideration of the age structure of the exposed population. Results produced by the analysis include the probability of one or more radiation-induced cancer deaths in a specified population, expected numbers of deaths, and expected years of life lost as a result of premature fatalities. These calculatons include consideration of competing risks of death from all other causes. The program also generates a probability frequency distribution of the expected number of cancers in any specified cohort resulting from a given radiation dose. The methods may be applied to any specified population and dose scenario.

  17. [Nonsurgical treatment of chronic radiation-induced hemorrhagic proctitis].

    PubMed

    de Parades, Vincent; Bauer, Pierre; Marteau, Philippe; Chauveinc, Laurent; Bouillet, Thierry; Atienza, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of radiation-induced chronic hemorrhagic proctitis is less than 10 to 20%. The onset of this proctitis is delayed relative to the radiation therapy and generally develops from 6 to 24 months later. There are numerous predisposing factors, the most important of which is the radiation therapy dose: risk increases exponentially above 40-45 Gy. Its pathophysiology involves progressive obliterating endarteritis and transmural interstitial fibrosis, which induce chronic ischemia that is irreversible and progressive during the years after radiation therapy. Its diagnosis depends most often on the combination of clinical history and typical endoscopic appearance (congestive mucosa and/or telangiectases). Topical administrative of sucralfate or corticosteroids as well as argon plasma coagulation, with formalin treatment if necessary, provides relief for most patients.

  18. Radiation-induced cationic polymerization of. beta. -pinene

    SciTech Connect

    Adur, A.M.; Williams, F.

    1981-03-01

    The radiation-induced polymerization of ..beta..-pinene carried out in bulk at ca.25/sup 0/ has been studied for different methods of monomer drying. It has been confirmed that the polymerization is sensitive to adventitious moisture and that substantial polymer yields (ca. 10% conversion per Mrad) can only be obtained under extremely dry conditions. Complete inhibition of the reaction by added tripropylamine corroborates the view that the polymerization is cationic. About half of the polymer formed is insoluble in the monomer. The number-average molecular weights for the soluble poly(..beta..-pinene) fraction have been measured by vapor pressure osmometry and are in the narrow range from 1700 to 2400 with little or no dependence on the degree of monomer conversion to polymer, at least up to 80%. The results are compared with literature reports on the polymerization of ..beta..-pinene by catalytic initiators.

  19. Alpha Lipoic Acid Attenuates Radiation-Induced Thyroid Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jung Hwa; Jung, Jaehoon; Kim, Soo Kyoung; Woo, Seung Hoon; Kang, Ki Mun; Jeong, Bae-Kwon; Jung, Myeong Hee; Kim, Jin Hyun; Hahm, Jong Ryeal

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of the thyroid to radiation during radiotherapy of the head and neck is often unavoidable. The present study aimed to investigate the protective effect of α-lipoic acid (ALA) on radiation-induced thyroid injury in rats. Rats were randomly assigned to four groups: healthy controls (CTL), irradiated (RT), received ALA before irradiation (ALA + RT), and received ALA only (ALA, 100 mg/kg, i.p.). ALA was treated at 24 h and 30 minutes prior to irradiation. The neck area including the thyroid gland was evenly irradiated with 2 Gy per minute (total dose of 18 Gy) using a photon 6-MV linear accelerator. Greater numbers of abnormal and unusually small follicles in the irradiated thyroid tissues were observed compared to the controls and the ALA group on days 4 and 7 after irradiation. However, all pathologies were decreased by ALA pretreatment. The quantity of small follicles in the irradiated rats was greater on day 7 than day 4 after irradiation. However, in the ALA-treated irradiated rats, the numbers of small and medium follicles were significantly decreased to a similar degree as in the control and ALA-only groups. The PAS-positive density of the colloid in RT group was decreased significantly compared with all other groups and reversed by ALA pretreatment. The high activity index in the irradiated rats was lowered by ALA treatment. TGF-ß1 immunoreactivity was enhanced in irradiated rats and was more severe on the day 7 after radiation exposure than on day 4. Expression of TGF-ß1 was reduced in the thyroid that had undergone ALA pretreatment. Levels of serum pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1ß and IL-6) did not differ significantly between the all groups. This study provides that pretreatment with ALA decreased the severity of radiation-induced thyroid injury by reducing inflammation and fibrotic infiltration and lowering the activity index. Thus, ALA could be used to ameliorate radiation-induced thyroid injury. PMID:25401725

  20. Bystander effects in radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, William F.; Hartmann, Andreas; Limoli, Charles L.; Nagar, Shruti; Ponnaiya, Brian

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of GM10115 hamster-human hybrid cells to X-rays can result in the induction of chromosomal instability in the progeny of surviving cells. This instability manifests as the dynamic production of novel sub-populations of cells with unique cytogenetic rearrangements involving the "marker" human chromosome. We have used the comet assay to investigate whether there was an elevated level of endogenous DNA breaks in chromosomally unstable clones that could provide a source for the chromosomal rearrangements and thus account for the persistent instability observed. Our results indicate no significant difference in comet tail measurement between non-irradiated and radiation-induced chromosomally unstable clones. Using two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization we also investigated whether recombinational events involving the interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences in GM10115 cells were involved at frequencies higher than random processes would otherwise predict. Nine of 11 clones demonstrated a significantly higher than expected involvement of these interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences at the recombination junction between the human and hamster chromosomes. Since elevated levels of endogenous breaks were not detected in unstable clones we propose that epigenetic or bystander effects (BSEs) lead to the activation of recombinational pathways that perpetuate the unstable phenotype. Specifically, we expand upon the hypothesis that radiation induces conditions and/or factors that stimulate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These reactive intermediates then contribute to a chronic pro-oxidant environment that cycles over multiple generations, promoting chromosomal recombination and other phenotypes associated with genomic instability.

  1. Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 Knockout Abrogates Radiation Induced Pulmonary Inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallahan, Dennis E.; Virudachalam, Subbulakshmi

    1997-06-01

    Increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1; CD54) is induced by exposure to ionizing radiation. The lung was used as a model to study the role of ICAM-1 in the pathogenesis of the radiation-induced inflammation-like response. ICAM-1 expression increased in the pulmonary microvascular endothelium and not in the endothelium of larger pulmonary vessels following treatment of mice with thoracic irradiation. To quantify radiation-induced ICAM-1 expression, we utilized fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis of anti-ICAM-1 antibody labeling of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells from human cadaver donors (HMVEC-L cells). Fluorochrome conjugates and UV microscopy were used to quantify the fluorescence intensity of ICAM in the irradiated lung. These studies showed a dose- and time-dependent increase in ICAM-1 expression in the pulmonary microvascular endothelium. Peak expression occurred at 24 h, while threshold dose was as low as 2 Gy. To determine whether ICAM-1 is required for inflammatory cell infiltration into the irradiated lung, the anti-ICAM-1 blocking antibody was administered by tail vein injection to mice following thoracic irradiation. Inflammatory cells were quantified by immunofluorescence for leukocyte common antigen (CD45). Mice treated with the anti-ICAM-1 blocking antibody showed attenuation of inflammatory cell infiltration into the lung in response to ionizing radiation exposure. To verify the requirement of ICAM-1 in the inflammation-like radiation response, we utilized the ICAM-1 knockout mouse. ICAM-1 was not expressed in the lungs of ICAM-1-deficient mice following treatment with thoracic irradiation. ICAM-1 knockout mice had no increase in the inflammatory cell infiltration into the lung in response to thoracic irradiation. These studies demonstrate a radiation dose-dependent increase in ICAM-1 expression in the pulmonary microvascular endothelium, and show that ICAM-1 is required for inflammatory cell infiltration

  2. Radiation-induced leukemia: Comparative studies in mouse and man

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, M.

    1991-01-01

    We now have a clear understanding of the mechanism by which radiation-induced (T-cell) leukemia occurs. In irradiated mice (radiation-induced thymic leukemia) and in man (acute lymphoblastic T-cell leukemia, T-ALL) the mechanism of leukemogenesis is surprisingly similar. Expressed in the most elementary terms, T-cell leukemia occurs when T-cell differentiation is inhibited by a mutation, and pre-T cells attempt but fail to differentiate in the thymus. Instead of leaving the thymus for the periphery as functional T-cells they continue to proliferate in the thymus. The proliferating pre- (pro-) T-cells constitute the (early) acute T-cell leukemia (A-TCL). This model for the mechanism of T-cell leukemogenesis accounts for all the properties of both murine and human A-TCL. Important support for the model has recently come from work by Ilan Kirsch and others, who have shown that mutations/deletions in the genes SCL (TAL), SIL, and LCK constitute primary events in the development of T-ALL, by inhibiting differentiation of thymic pre- (pro-) T-cells. This mechanism of T-cell leukemogenesis brings several specific questions into focus: How do early A-TCL cells progress to become potently tumorigenic and poorly treatable Is it feasible to genetically suppress early and/or progressed A-TCL cells What is the mechanism by which the differentiation-inhibited (leukemic) pre-T cells proliferate During the first grant year we have worked on aspects of all three questions.

  3. Radiation-induced fibrosis: mechanisms and implications for therapy

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Jeffrey M.; New, Jacob; Hamilton, Chase D.; Lominska, Chris; Shnayder, Yelizaveta

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) is a long-term side effect of external beam radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer. It results in a multitude of symptoms that significantly impact quality of life. Understanding the mechanisms of RIF-induced changes is essential to developing effective strategies to prevent long-term disability and discomfort following radiation therapy. In this review, we describe the current understanding of the etiology, clinical presentation, pathogenesis, treatment, and directions of future therapy for this condition. Methods A literature review of publications describing mechanisms or treatments of RIF was performed. Specific databases utilized included PubMed and clinicaltrials.gov, using keywords “Radiation-Induced Fibrosis,” “Radiotherapy Complications,” “Fibrosis Therapy,” and other closely related terms. Results RIF is the result of a misguided wound healing response. In addition to causing direct DNA damage, ionizing radiation generates reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that lead to localized inflammation. This inflammatory process ultimately evolves into a fibrotic one characterized by increased collagen deposition, poor vascularity, and scarring. Tumor growth factor beta serves as the primary mediator in this response along with a host of other cytokines and growth factors. Current therapies have largely been directed toward these molecular targets and their associated signaling pathways. Conclusion Although RIF is widely prevalent among patients undergoing radiation therapy and significantly impacts quality of life, there is still much to learn about its pathogenesis and mechanisms. Current treatments have stemmed from this understanding, and it is anticipated that further elucidation will be essential for the development of more effective therapies. PMID:25910988

  4. Bystander effects in radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, William F.; Hartmann, Andreas; Limoli, Charles L.; Nagar, Shruti; Ponnaiya, Brian

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of GM10115 hamster-human hybrid cells to X-rays can result in the induction of chromosomal instability in the progeny of surviving cells. This instability manifests as the dynamic production of novel sub-populations of cells with unique cytogenetic rearrangements involving the "marker" human chromosome. We have used the comet assay to investigate whether there was an elevated level of endogenous DNA breaks in chromosomally unstable clones that could provide a source for the chromosomal rearrangements and thus account for the persistent instability observed. Our results indicate no significant difference in comet tail measurement between non-irradiated and radiation-induced chromosomally unstable clones. Using two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization we also investigated whether recombinational events involving the interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences in GM10115 cells were involved at frequencies higher than random processes would otherwise predict. Nine of 11 clones demonstrated a significantly higher than expected involvement of these interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences at the recombination junction between the human and hamster chromosomes. Since elevated levels of endogenous breaks were not detected in unstable clones we propose that epigenetic or bystander effects (BSEs) lead to the activation of recombinational pathways that perpetuate the unstable phenotype. Specifically, we expand upon the hypothesis that radiation induces conditions and/or factors that stimulate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These reactive intermediates then contribute to a chronic pro-oxidant environment that cycles over multiple generations, promoting chromosomal recombination and other phenotypes associated with genomic instability.

  5. Radiation-induced fibrosis: mechanisms and implications for therapy.

    PubMed

    Straub, Jeffrey M; New, Jacob; Hamilton, Chase D; Lominska, Chris; Shnayder, Yelizaveta; Thomas, Sufi M

    2015-11-01

    Radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) is a long-term side effect of external beam radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer. It results in a multitude of symptoms that significantly impact quality of life. Understanding the mechanisms of RIF-induced changes is essential to developing effective strategies to prevent long-term disability and discomfort following radiation therapy. In this review, we describe the current understanding of the etiology, clinical presentation, pathogenesis, treatment, and directions of future therapy for this condition. A literature review of publications describing mechanisms or treatments of RIF was performed. Specific databases utilized included PubMed and clinicaltrials.gov, using keywords "Radiation-Induced Fibrosis," "Radiotherapy Complications," "Fibrosis Therapy," and other closely related terms. RIF is the result of a misguided wound healing response. In addition to causing direct DNA damage, ionizing radiation generates reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that lead to localized inflammation. This inflammatory process ultimately evolves into a fibrotic one characterized by increased collagen deposition, poor vascularity, and scarring. Tumor growth factor beta serves as the primary mediator in this response along with a host of other cytokines and growth factors. Current therapies have largely been directed toward these molecular targets and their associated signaling pathways. Although RIF is widely prevalent among patients undergoing radiation therapy and significantly impacts quality of life, there is still much to learn about its pathogenesis and mechanisms. Current treatments have stemmed from this understanding, and it is anticipated that further elucidation will be essential for the development of more effective therapies.

  6. Ion beam induced luminescence: Relevance to radiation induced bystander effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, S. B.; McNeill, F. E.; Byun, S. H.; Prestwich, W. V.; Seymour, C.; Mothersill, C. E.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is quantify the light emitted as a result of charged particle interaction in materials which may be of relevance to radiation induced "bystander effects" studies. We have developed a system which employs single photon counting to measure the light emitted from samples irradiated under vacuum by a charged particle beam. The system uses a fast photomultiplier tube with a peak cathode response at 420 nm. It has been tested in a proof-of-principle experiment using polystyrene targets. Light output, as a result of irradiation, was measured. The luminescence yield appears to have a non-linear behavior with the incident ion fluence: it rises exponentially to an asymptotic value. The target was irradiated with beam energies varying from 1 to 2 MeV and showed saturation at or before an incident fluence rate of 3 × 1013 H+/cm2 s. The average saturation value for the photon output was found to be 40 × 106 cps. Some measurements were performed using filters to study the emission at specific wavelengths. In the case of filtered light measurements, the photon output was found to saturate at 28 × 103, 10 × 106, and 35 × 106 cps for wavelengths of 280 ± 5 nm, 320 ± 5 nm and 340 ± 5 nm respectively. The light output reaches a maximum value because of damage induced in the polymer. Our measurements indicate a "damage cross section" of the order of 10-14 cm2. The average radiant intensity was found to increase at wavelengths of 280 and 320 nm when the proton energy was increased. This was not found to occur at 340 nm. In conclusion, the light emission at specific wavelengths was found to depend upon the incident proton fluence and the proton energy. The wavelengths of the emitted light measured in this study have significance for the understanding of radiation induced bystander effects.

  7. Barriers to Radiation-Induced In Situ Tumor Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Wennerberg, Erik; Lhuillier, Claire; Vanpouille-Box, Claire; Pilones, Karsten A.; García-Martínez, Elena; Rudqvist, Nils-Petter; Formenti, Silvia C.; Demaria, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    The immunostimulatory properties of radiation therapy (RT) have recently generated widespread interest due to preclinical and clinical evidence that tumor-localized RT can sometimes induce antitumor immune responses mediating regression of non-irradiated metastases (abscopal effect). The ability of RT to activate antitumor T cells explains the synergy of RT with immune checkpoint inhibitors, which has been well documented in mouse tumor models and is supported by observations of more frequent abscopal responses in patients refractory to immunotherapy who receive RT during immunotherapy. However, abscopal responses following RT remain relatively rare in the clinic, and antitumor immune responses are not effectively induced by RT against poorly immunogenic mouse tumors. This suggests that in order to improve the pro-immunogenic effects of RT, it is necessary to identify and overcome the barriers that pre-exist and/or are induced by RT in the tumor microenvironment. On the one hand, RT induces an immunogenic death of cancer cells associated with release of powerful danger signals that are essential to recruit and activate dendritic cells (DCs) and initiate antitumor immune responses. On the other hand, RT can promote the generation of immunosuppressive mediators that hinder DCs activation and impair the function of effector T cells. In this review, we discuss current evidence that several inhibitory pathways are induced and modulated in irradiated tumors. In particular, we will focus on factors that regulate and limit radiation-induced immunogenicity and emphasize current research on actionable targets that could increase the effectiveness of radiation-induced in situ tumor vaccination. PMID:28348554

  8. Simulating Space Radiation-Induced Breast Tumor Incidence Using Automata.

    PubMed

    Heuskin, A C; Osseiran, A I; Tang, J; Costes, S V

    2016-07-01

    Estimating cancer risk from space radiation has been an ongoing challenge for decades primarily because most of the reported epidemiological data on radiation-induced risks are derived from studies of atomic bomb survivors who were exposed to an acute dose of gamma rays instead of chronic high-LET cosmic radiation. In this study, we introduce a formalism using cellular automata to model the long-term effects of ionizing radiation in human breast for different radiation qualities. We first validated and tuned parameters for an automata-based two-stage clonal expansion model simulating the age dependence of spontaneous breast cancer incidence in an unexposed U.S. We then tested the impact of radiation perturbation in the model by modifying parameters to reflect both targeted and nontargeted radiation effects. Targeted effects (TE) reflect the immediate impact of radiation on a cell's DNA with classic end points being gene mutations and cell death. They are well known and are directly derived from experimental data. In contrast, nontargeted effects (NTE) are persistent and affect both damaged and undamaged cells, are nonlinear with dose and are not well characterized in the literature. In this study, we introduced TE in our model and compared predictions against epidemiologic data of the atomic bomb survivor cohort. TE alone are not sufficient for inducing enough cancer. NTE independent of dose and lasting ∼100 days postirradiation need to be added to accurately predict dose dependence of breast cancer induced by gamma rays. Finally, by integrating experimental relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for TE and keeping NTE (i.e., radiation-induced genomic instability) constant with dose and LET, the model predicts that RBE for breast cancer induced by cosmic radiation would be maximum at 220 keV/μm. This approach lays the groundwork for further investigation into the impact of chronic low-dose exposure, inter-individual variation and more complex space radiation

  9. Radiation-induced sarcomas of bone: factors that affect outcome.

    PubMed

    Kalra, S; Grimer, R J; Spooner, D; Carter, S R; Tillman, R M; Abudu, A

    2007-06-01

    We identified 42 patients who presented to our unit over a 27-year period with a secondary radiation-induced sarcoma of bone. We reviewed patient, tumour and treatment factors to identify those that affected outcome. The mean age of the patients at presentation was 45.6 years (10 to 84) and the mean latent interval between radiotherapy and diagnosis of the sarcoma was 17 years (4 to 50). The median dose of radiotherapy given was estimated at 50 Gy (mean 49; 20 to 66). There was no correlation between radiation dose and the time to development of a sarcoma. The pelvis was the most commonly affected site (14 patients (33%)). Breast cancer was the most common primary tumour (eight patients; 19%). Metastases were present at diagnosis of the sarcoma in nine patients (21.4%). Osteosarcoma was the most common diagnosis and occurred in 30 cases (71.4%). Treatment was by surgery and chemotherapy when indicated: 30 patients (71.4%) were treated with the intention to cure. The survival rate was 41% at five years for those treated with the intention to cure but in those treated palliatively the mean survival was only 8.8 months (2 to 22), and all had died by two years. The only factor found to be significant for survival was the ability to completely resect the tumour. Limb sarcomas had a better prognosis (66% survival at five years) than central ones (12% survival at five years) (p = 0.009). Radiation-induced sarcoma is a rare complication of radiotherapy. Both surgical and oncological treatment is likely to be compromised by the treatment received previously by the patient.

  10. Mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned medium prevents radiation-induced liver injury by inhibiting inflammation and protecting sinusoidal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Xing; Zeng, Zhao-Chong; Sun, Jing; Zeng, Hai-Ying; Huang, Yan-; Zhang, Zhen-Yu

    2015-07-01

    Current management of radiation-induced liver injury is limited. Sinusoidal endothelial cell (SEC) apoptosis and inflammation are considered to be initiating events in hepatic damage. We hypothesized that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory actions during hepatic irradiation, acting via paracrine mechanisms. This study aims to examine whether MSC-derived bioactive components are protective against radiation-induced liver injury in rats. MSC-conditioned medium (MSC-CM) was generated from rat bone marrow-derived MSCs. The effect of MSC-CM on the viability of irradiated SECs was examined by flow cytometric analysis. Activation of the Akt and ERK pathways was analyzed by western blot. MSC-CM was also delivered to Sprague-Dawley rats immediately before receiving liver irradiation, followed by testing for pathological features, changes in serum hyaluronic acid, ALT, and inflammatory cytokine levels, and liver cell apoptosis. MSC-CM enhanced the viability of irradiated SECs in vitro and induced Akt and ERK phosphorylation in these cells. Infusion of MSC-CM immediately before liver irradiation provided a significant anti-apoptotic effect on SECs and improved the histopathological features of injury in the irradiated liver. MSC-CM also reduced the secretion and expression of inflammatory cytokines and increased the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines. MSC-derived bioactive components could be a novel therapeutic approach for treating radiation-induced liver injury.

  11. Claudin-3 expression in radiation-exposed rat models: A potential marker for radiation-induced intestinal barrier failure

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Sehwan; Lee, Jong-geol; Bae, Chang-hwan; Lee, Seung Bum; Jang, Won-Suk; Lee, Sun-Joo; Lee, Seung-Sook; Park, Sunhoo

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Irradiation increased intestinal bacterial translocation, accompanied by claudin protein expression in rats. • Neurotensin decreased the bacterial translocation and restored claudin-3 expression. • Claudin-3 can be used as a marker in evaluating radiation induced intestinal injury. - Abstract: The molecular events leading to radiation-induced intestinal barrier failure are not well known. The influence of the expression of claudin proteins in the presence and absence of neurotensin was investigated in radiation-exposed rat intestinal epithelium. Wistar rats were randomly divided into control, irradiation, and irradiation + neurotensin groups, and bacterial translocation to the mesenteric lymph node and expression of claudins were determined. Irradiation led to intestinal barrier failure as demonstrated by significant bacterial translocation. In irradiated terminal ilea, expression of claudin-3 and claudin-4 was significantly decreased, and claudin-2 expression was increased. Administration of neurotensin significantly reduced bacterial translocation and restored the structure of the villi as seen by histologic examination. Among the three subtype of claudins, only claudin-3 expression was restored. These results suggest that the therapeutic effect of neurotensin on the disruption of the intestinal barrier is associated with claudin-3 alteration and that claudin-3 could be used as a marker in evaluating radiation-induced intestinal injury.

  12. Radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction and cerebellar oxidative stress in mice: protective effect of alpha-lipoic acid.

    PubMed

    Manda, Kailash; Ueno, Megumi; Moritake, Takashi; Anzai, Kazunori

    2007-02-12

    Reactive oxygen species are implicated in neurodegeneration and cognitive disorders due to higher vulnerability of neuronal tissues. The cerebellum is recently reported to be involved in cognitive function. Therefore, present study aimed at investigating the role alpha-lipoic acid against radiation-induced oxidative stress and antioxidant status in cerebellum and its correlation with cognitive dysfunction. We observed spontaneous motor activities and spatial memory task of mice using pyroelectric infrared sensor and programmed video tracking system, respectively. Whole body X-irradiation (6 Gy) of mice substantially impaired the reference memory and motor activities of mice. However, acute intraperitoneal treatment of mice with alpha-lipoic acid prior to irradiation significantly attenuated such cognitive dysfunction. Alpha-lipoic acid pretreatment exerted a very high magnitude of protection against radiation-induced augmentation of protein carbonyls and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) in mice cerebellum. Further, radiation-induced deficit of total, nonprotein and protein-bound sulfhydryl (T-SH, NP-SH, PB-SH) contents of cerebellum and plasma ferric reducing power (FRAP) was also inhibited by alpha-lipoic acid pre-treatment. Moreover, alpha-lipoic acid treated mice showed an intact cytoarchitecture of cerebellum, higher counts of intact Purkinje cells and granular cells in comparison to untreated irradiated mice. Results clearly indicate that alpha-lipoic acid is potent neuroprotective antioxidant.

  13. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation improves radiation-induced heart injury through DNA damage repair in rat model.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Zhao, Zhiying; Wu, Rong; Zeng, Yuecan; Zhang, Zhenyong; Miao, Jianing; Yuan, Zhengwei

    2017-03-01

    Radiotherapy is an effective form of therapy for most thoracic malignant tumors. However, myocardial injury resulting from the high doses of radiation is a severe complication. Here we aimed to study the possibility of reducing radiation-induced myocardial injury with mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation. We used MSCs extracted from bone marrow (BMSCs) to transplant via the tail vein into a radiation-induced heart injury (RIHI) rat model. The rats were divided into six groups: a Sham group, an IRR (irradiation) group, and four IRR + BMSCs transplantation groups obtained at different time points. After irradiation, BMSC transplantation significantly enhanced the cardiac function in rats. By analyzing the expression of PPAR-α, PPAR-γ, TGF-β, IL-6, and IL-8, we found that BMSC transplantation alleviated radiation-induced myocardial fibrosis and decreased the inflammatory reaction. Furthermore, we found that expression of γ-H2AX, XRCC4, DNA ligase4, and TP53BP1, which are associated with DNA repair, was up-regulated, along with increased secretion of growth factors SDF-1, CXCR4, VEGF, and IGF in rat myocardium in the IRR + BMSCs transplantation groups compared with the IRR group. Thus, BMSC transplantation has the potential to improve RIHI via DNA repair and be a new therapeutic approach for patients with myocardial injury.

  14. In vivo space radiation-induced non-targeted responses: late effects on molecular signaling in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jain, Mohit R; Li, Min; Chen, Wei; Liu, Tong; de Toledo, Sonia M; Pandey, Badri N; Li, Hong; Rabin, Bernard M; Azzam, Edouard I

    2011-06-01

    The lack of clear knowledge about space radiation-induced biological effects has been singled out as the most important factor limiting the prediction of radiation risk associated with human space exploration. The expression of space radiation-induced non-targeted effects is thought to impact our understanding of the health risks associated with exposure to low fluences of particulate radiation encountered by astronauts during prolonged space travel. Following a brief review of radiation-induced bystander effects and the growing literature for the involvement of oxidative metabolism in their expression, we show novel data on the induction of in vivo non-targeted effects following exposure to 1100 MeV/nucleon titanium ions. Analyses of proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis in non-targeted liver of cranially-irradiated Sprague Dawley rats revealed that the levels of key proteins involved in mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism are decreased. In contrast, those of proteins involved in various cellular defense mechanisms, including antioxidation, were increased. These data contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the biological responses to space radiation, and support the involvement of mitochondrial processes in the expression of radiation induced non-targeted effects. Significantly, they reveal the cross-talk between propagated stressful effects and induced adaptive responses. Together, with the accumulating data in the field, our results may help reduce the uncertainty in the assessment of the health risks to astronauts. They further demonstrate that 'network analyses' is an effective tool towards characterizing the signaling pathways that mediate the long-term biological effects of space radiation.

  15. In Vivo Space Radiation-Induced Non-Targeted Responses: Late Effects On Molecular Signaling In Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Mohit R.; Li, Min; Chen, Wei; Liu, Tong; de Toledo, Sonia M.; Pandey, Badri N.; Li, Hong; Rabin, Bernard M.; Azzam, Edouard I.

    2012-01-01

    The lack of clear knowledge about space radiation-induced biological effects has been singled out as the most important factor limiting the prediction of radiation risk associated with human space exploration. The expression of space radiation-induced non-targeted effects is thought to impact our understanding of the health risks associated with exposure to low fluences of particulate radiation encountered by astronauts during prolonged space travel. Following a brief review of radiation-induced bystander effects and the growing literature for the involvement of oxidative metabolism in their expression, we show novel data on the induction of in vivo non-targeted effects following exposure to 1100 MeV/nucleon titanium ions. Analyses of proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis in non-targeted liver of cranially-irradiated Sprague Dawley rats revealed that the levels of key proteins involved in mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism are decreased. In contrast, those of proteins involved in various cellular defense mechanisms, including antioxidation, were increased. These data contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the biological responses to space radiation, and support the involvement of mitochondrial processes in the expression of radiation induced non-targeted effects. Significantly, they reveal the cross-talk between propagated stressful effects and induced adaptive responses. Together, with the accumulating data in the field, our results may help reduce the uncertainty in the assessment of the health risks to astronauts. They further demonstrate that ‘network analyses’ is an effective tool towards characterizing the signaling pathways that mediate the long-term biological effects of space radiation. PMID:21166651

  16. Mucosal melanoma: an update.

    PubMed

    Ballester Sánchez, R; de Unamuno Bustos, B; Navarro Mira, M; Botella Estrada, R

    2015-03-01

    Mucosal melanoma is a rare melanoma subtype that differs from the cutaneous form of the tumor in its biology, clinical manifestations, and management. Diagnosis is usually late due to a lack of early or specific signs and the location of lesions in areas that are difficult to access on physical examination. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice for localized disease. The value of sentinel lymph node biopsy and lymphadenectomy is still unclear. Radiotherapy can be used as adjuvant therapy for the control of local disease. c-KIT mutations are more common than in other types of melanoma and this has led to significant advances in the use of imatinib for the treatment of metastatic mucosal melanoma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  17. Oral Mucositis: Melatonin Gel an Effective New Treatment.

    PubMed

    Abdel Moneim, Ahmed Esmat; Guerra-Librero, Ana; Florido, Javier; Shen, Ying-Qiang; Fernández-Gil, Beatriz; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío; Escames, Germaine

    2017-05-07

    The current treatment for cervico-facial cancer involves radio and/or chemotherapy. Unfortunately, cancer therapies can lead to local and systemic complications such as mucositis, which is the most common dose-dependent complication in the oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract. Mucositis can cause a considerably reduced quality of life in cancer patients already suffering from physical and psychological exhaustion. However, the role of melatonin in the treatment of mucositis has recently been investigated, and offers an effective alternative therapy in the prevention and/or management of radio and/or chemotherapy-induced mucositis. This review focuses on the pathobiology and management of mucositis in order to improve the quality of cancer patients' lives.

  18. Oral Mucositis: Melatonin Gel an Effective New Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Abdel Moneim, Ahmed Esmat; Guerra-Librero, Ana; Florido, Javier; Shen, Ying-Qiang; Fernández-Gil, Beatriz; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío; Escames, Germaine

    2017-01-01

    The current treatment for cervico-facial cancer involves radio and/or chemotherapy. Unfortunately, cancer therapies can lead to local and systemic complications such as mucositis, which is the most common dose-dependent complication in the oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract. Mucositis can cause a considerably reduced quality of life in cancer patients already suffering from physical and psychological exhaustion. However, the role of melatonin in the treatment of mucositis has recently been investigated, and offers an effective alternative therapy in the prevention and/or management of radio and/or chemotherapy-induced mucositis. This review focuses on the pathobiology and management of mucositis in order to improve the quality of cancer patients’ lives. PMID:28481279

  19. New era of radiotherapy: an update in radiation-induced lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Benveniste, M. F. K.; Welsh, J.; Godoy, M. C. B.; Betancourt, S. L.; Mawlawi, O. R; Munden, R. F.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few decades, advances in radiotherapy (RT) technology have improved delivery of radiation therapy dramatically. Advances in treatment planning with the development of image-guided radiotherapy and in techniques such as proton therapy, allows the radiation therapist to direct high doses of radiation to the tumour. These advancements result in improved local regional control while reducing potentially damaging dosage to surrounding normal tissues. It is important for radiologists to be aware of the radiological findings from these advances in order to differentiate expected radiation-induced lung injury (RILD) from recurrence, infection, and other lung diseases. In order to understand these changes and correlate them with imaging, the radiologist should have access to the radiation therapy treatment plans. PMID:23473474

  20. Molecular mechanisms of radiation-induced genomic instability in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liber, Howard L.

    2003-02-13

    The overall strategy was to create a series of isogenic human cell lines that differ in key elements of cell cycle checkpoint, apoptosis, or DNA repair in response to radiation-induced damage. The goal then was to quantify the fractions of cells within a population that exhibit reduced telomere lengths and relate this to the genetic background of the cell, as well as to the response to ionizing radiation. Association between telomere length and degree of genomic instability in the population is being examined for seven closely related cell lines, that vary in p53 status, bcl-2 status, or ability to repair double strand breaks. Experiments utilize gamma rays at doses of 0, 10, and 200 cGy. During this time period the effort concentrated on generating data with two cell lines. Approximately one-third of the required clones were isolated, and analyses for mutagenesis and chromosome aberrations were undertaken.

  1. CDK1 Enhances Mitochondrial Bioenergetics for Radiation-Induced DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Lili; Fan, Ming; Candas, Demet; Jiang, Guochun; Papadopoulos, Stelios; Tian, Lin; Woloschak, Gayle; Grdina, David J.; Li, Jian Jian

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Nuclear DNA repair capacity is a critical determinant of cell fate under genotoxic stress conditions. DNA repair is a well-defined energy consuming process; however, it is unclear how DNA repair is fueled and whether mitochondrial energy production contributes to nuclear DNA repair. Here, we report a dynamic enhancement of oxygen consumption and mitochondrial ATP generation in irradiated normal cells, paralleled with increased mitochondrial relocation of cell cycle kinase CDK1 and nuclear DNA repair. The basal and radiation-induced mitochondrial ATP generation is significantly reduced in cells harboring CDK1 phosphorylation deficient mutant complex I subunits. Similarly, mitochondrial ATP generation and nuclear DNA repair are also severely compromised in cells harboring mitochondrial-targeted kinase deficient CDK1. These results demonstrate a mechanism governing the communication between mitochondria and nucleus, by which CDK1 boosts mitochondrial bioenergetics to meet the increased cellular fuel demand for DNA repair and cell survival under genotoxic stress. PMID:26670043

  2. Radiation-induced pulmonary arterial perfusion defects: modification by D-penicillamine. [Rats; /sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, W.F.

    1981-04-01

    D-penicillamine, previously shown to have a beneficial effect on radiation-induced pulmonary histopathology, was tested to determine its effect on function in the irradiated lung. Male rats were irradiated with /sup 60/Co gamma rays; half then received 10 mg D-penicillamine per day, and half received no further treatment. One to nine months after irradiation, animals were subjected to lung perfusion scans. Untreated irradiated rats exhibited hyperemia, hypoperfusion, and perfusion defects of the irradiated lung. In penicillamine-treated rats, the appearance of perfusion defects was delayed, the peak incidence and severity of the defects was reduced, and recovery from pulmonary hypoperfusion was accelerated. Thus, using functional criteria, penicillamine appears to improve arterial perfusion and to ameliorate radiation injury in the rat lung.

  3. Marked reduction of radiation-induced micronuclei in human blood lymphocytes pretreated with melatonin

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayalaxmi; Reiter, R.J.; Leal, B.Z.

    1995-07-01

    Human peripheral blood lymphocytes which were pretreated in vitro with melatonin, and endogenously synthesized pineal hormone, for 20 min at 37 {plus_minus} 1{degrees}C exhibited a significant and concentration-dependent reduction in the frequency of {gamma}radiation-induced micronuclei compared with irradiated cells which did not receive the pretreatment. The extent of the reduction observed with 2.0 mM melatonin was similar to that found in lymphocytes pretreated for 20 min with 1.0 M dimethylsulfoxide, a known free radical scavenger. These observations indicate that melatonin may have an active role in protection of humans against genetic damage due to endogenously produced free radicals, and also may be of use in reducing damage due to exposure to physical and chemical mutagens and carcinogens which generate free radicals. 25 refs., 2 tabs.

  4. Radioprotective Effect of Melatonin on Radiation-Induced Lung Injury and Lipid Peroxidation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tahamtan, Raziyeh; Shabestani Monfared, Ali; Tahamtani, Yasser; Tavassoli, Alireza; Akmali, Maasoomeh; Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Naghizadeh, Mohammad Mehdi; Ghasemi, Danial; Keshavarz, Mojtaba; Haddadi, Gholam Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Free radicals generated by ionizing radiation attack various cellular components such as lipids. The lung is a very radiosensitive organ and its damage is a doselimiting factor in radiotherapy treatments. Melatonin (MLT), the major product of the pineal gland acts as a radioprotective agent. This study aims to investigate the radioprotective effects of MLT on malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and histopathological changes in irradiated lungs. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, a total of 62 rats were divided into five groups. Group 1 received no MLT and radiation (unT), group 2 received oral MLT (oM), group 3 received oral MLT and their thoracic areas were irradiated with 18 Gy (oMR), group 4 received MLT by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection and their thoracic areas were irradiated with 18 Gy (ipM-R), group 5 received only 18 Gy radiation in the thoracic area (R). Following radiotherapy, half of the animals in each group were sacrificed at 48 hours for evaluation of lipid peroxidation and early phase lung injuries. Other animals were sacrificed in the eighth week of the experiment for evaluation of the presence of late phase radiation induced lung injuries. Results Pre-treatment of rats with either i.p injection (p<0.05) and oral administration of MLT (p<0.001) significantly reduced MDA levels in red blood cell (RBC) samples compared to the R group. Furthermore, i.p. injection of MLT decreased MDA levels in plasma and tissue (p<0.05). In the early phase of lung injury, both administration of MLT significantly increased lymphocyte (p<0.05) and macrophage frequency (p<0.001). MLT reduced the lung injury index in the lungs compared to the R group (p<0.05). Conclusion The result of this study confirms the radioprotective effect of MLT on lipid peroxidation, and in both early and late phases of radiation induced lung injuries in an animal model. PMID:25870840

  5. Mitigation and Treatment of Radiation-Induced Thoracic Injury With a Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitor, Celecoxib

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Nancy R.; Valdecanas, David; Liao Zhongxing; Milas, Luka; Thames, Howard D.; Mason, Kathy A.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To test whether a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor (celecoxib) could reduce mortality resulting from radiation-induced pneumonitis. Methods and Materials: Celecoxib was given to mice twice daily for 40 consecutive days starting on the day of local thoracic irradiation (LTI) or 40 or 80 days later. C3Hf/KamLaw mice were observed for morbidity, and time to death was determined. Results were analyzed using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Timing of celecoxib relative to LTI determined efficacy. A significant reduction in time to death was achieved only when celecoxib was started 80 days after LTI, corresponding to the time when pneumonitis is expressed. For these mice the reduction in mortality was quantified as a hazard ratio for mortality of treated vs untreated of 0.36 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.24-0.53), thus significantly less than 1.0. Correspondingly, the median lethal dose for treated mice (12.9 Gy; 95% CI 12.55-13.25 Gy) was significantly (P=.026) higher than for untreated mice (12.4 Gy; 95% CI 12.2-12.65 Gy). Conclusions: Celecoxib significantly reduced lung toxicity when administered months after LTI when the deleterious effects of radiation were expressed. The schedule-dependent reduction in fatal pneumonitis suggests that celecoxib could be clinically useful by reintroduction of treatment months after completion of radiation therapy. These findings may be important for designing clinical trials using cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors to treat radiation-induced lung toxicity as a complement to concurrent radiation therapy of lung cancers.

  6. Extracellular Vesicles Mediate Radiation-Induced Systemic Bystander Signals in the Bone Marrow and Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Szatmári, Tünde; Kis, Dávid; Bogdándi, Enikő Noémi; Benedek, Anett; Bright, Scott; Bowler, Deborah; Persa, Eszter; Kis, Enikő; Balogh, Andrea; Naszályi, Lívia N.; Kadhim, Munira; Sáfrány, Géza; Lumniczky, Katalin

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects refer to the induction of biological changes in cells not directly hit by radiation implying that the number of cells affected by radiation is larger than the actual number of irradiated cells. Recent in vitro studies suggest the role of extracellular vesicles (EVs) in mediating radiation-induced bystander signals, but in vivo investigations are still lacking. Here, we report an in vivo study investigating the role of EVs in mediating radiation effects. C57BL/6 mice were total-body irradiated with X-rays (0.1, 0.25, 2 Gy), and 24 h later, EVs were isolated from the bone marrow (BM) and were intravenously injected into unirradiated (so-called bystander) animals. EV-induced systemic effects were compared to radiation effects in the directly irradiated animals. Similar to direct radiation, EVs from irradiated mice induced complex DNA damage in EV-recipient animals, manifested in an increased level of chromosomal aberrations and the activation of the DNA damage response. However, while DNA damage after direct irradiation increased with the dose, EV-induced effects peaked at lower doses. A significantly reduced hematopoietic stem cell pool in the BM as well as CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocyte pool in the spleen was detected in mice injected with EVs isolated from animals irradiated with 2 Gy. These EV-induced alterations were comparable to changes present in the directly irradiated mice. The pool of TLR4-expressing dendritic cells was different in the directly irradiated mice, where it increased after 2 Gy and in the EV-recipient animals, where it strongly decreased in a dose-independent manner. A panel of eight differentially expressed microRNAs (miRNA) was identified in the EVs originating from both low- and high-dose-irradiated mice, with a predicted involvement in pathways related to DNA damage repair, hematopoietic, and immune system regulation, suggesting a direct involvement of these pathways in mediating radiation-induced

  7. The flavonolignan-silymarin protects enzymatic, hematological, and immune system against γ-radiation-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Manish; Arora, Rajesh

    2016-06-01

    The main focus of this study is evaluation of radioprotective efficacy of silymarin, a flavonolignan, against γ-radiation-induced damage to hematological, vital organs (liver and intestine), and immune system. Survival studies revealed that silymarin (administered orally for 3 days) provided maximum protection (67%) at 70 mg/kg body weight (b.wt.) against lethal 9 Gy γ-irradiation (dose reduction factor = 1.27). The study revealed significant (p < 0.05) changes in levels of catalase (12.57 ± 2.58 to 30.24 ± 4.89 units), glutathione peroxidase (6.23 ± 2.95 to 13.26 ± 1.36 µg of reduced glutathione consumed/min/mg protein), glutathione reductase (0.25 ± 5.6 to 11.65 ± 2.83 pM NADPH consumed/min/mg protein), and superoxide dismutase (11.74 ± 0.2 to 16.09 ± 3.47 SOD U/mg of protein) activity at 30th day. Silymarin pretreated irradiated group exhibited increased proliferation in erythrocyte count (1.76 ± 0.41 × 10(6) to 9.25 ± 0.24 × 10(6) ), hemoglobin (2.15 ± 0.48g/dL to 14.77 ± 0.25g/dL), hematocrit (4.55 ± 0.24% to 37.22 ± 0.21%), and total leucocyte count (1.4 ± 0.15 × 10(6) to 8.31 ± 0.47 × 10(6) ) as compared with radiation control group on 15th day. An increase in CD4:CD8 ratio was witnessed (0.2-1%) at 30th day time interval using flow cytometry. Silymarin also countered radiation-induced decrease (p < 0.05) in regulatory T-cells (Tregs ) (11.23% in radiation group at 7th day versus 0.1% in pretreated silymarin irradiated group at 15th day). The results of this study indicate that flavonolignan-silymarin protects enzymatic, hematological, and immune system against γ-radiation-induced toxicity and might prove useful in management of nuclear and radiological emergencies. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 641-654, 2016.

  8. Involvement of prostaglandins and histamine in radiation-induced temperature responses in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kandasamy, S.B.; Hunt, W.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Exposure of rats to 1-15 Gy of gamma radiation induced hyperthermia, whereas exposure to 20-150 Gy produced hypothermia. Since radiation exposure induced the release of prostaglandins (PGs) and histamine, the role of PGs and histamine in radiation-induced temperature changes was examined. Radiation-induced hyper- and hypothermia were antagonized by pretreatment with indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor. Intracerebroventricular administration of PGE2 and PGD2 induced hyper- and hypothermia, respectively. Administration of SC-19220, a specific PGE2 antagonist, attenuated PGE2- and radiation-induced hyperthermia, but it did not antagonize PGD2- or radiation-induced hypothermia. Consistent with an apparent role of histamine in hypothermia, administration of disodium cromoglycate (a mast cell stabilizer), mepyramine (H1-receptor antagonist), or cimetidine (H2-receptor antagonist) attenuated PGD2- and radiation-induced hypothermia. These results suggest that radiation-induced hyperthermia is mediated via PGE2 and that radiation-induced hypothermia is mediated by another PG, possibly PGD2, via histamine.

  9. Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects in Cultured Human Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sokolov, Mykyta V.; Neumann, Ronald D.

    2010-01-01

    Background The radiation-induced “bystander effect” (RIBE) was shown to occur in a number of experimental systems both in vitro and in vivo as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). RIBE manifests itself by intercellular communication from irradiated cells to non-irradiated cells which may cause DNA damage and eventual death in these bystander cells. It is known that human stem cells (hSC) are ultimately involved in numerous crucial biological processes such as embryologic development; maintenance of normal homeostasis; aging; and aging-related pathologies such as cancerogenesis and other diseases. However, very little is known about radiation-induced bystander effect in hSC. To mechanistically interrogate RIBE responses and to gain novel insights into RIBE specifically in hSC compartment, both medium transfer and cell co-culture bystander protocols were employed. Methodology/Principal Findings Human bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) and embryonic stem cells (hESC) were irradiated with doses 0.2 Gy, 2 Gy and 10 Gy of X-rays, allowed to recover either for 1 hr or 24 hr. Then conditioned medium was collected and transferred to non-irradiated hSC for time course studies. In addition, irradiated hMSC were labeled with a vital CMRA dye and co-cultured with non-irradiated bystander hMSC. The medium transfer data showed no evidence for RIBE either in hMSC and hESC by the criteria of induction of DNA damage and for apoptotic cell death compared to non-irradiated cells (p>0.05). A lack of robust RIBE was also demonstrated in hMSC co-cultured with irradiated cells (p>0.05). Conclusions/Significance These data indicate that hSC might not be susceptible to damaging effects of RIBE signaling compared to differentiated adult human somatic cells as shown previously. This finding could have profound implications in a field of radiation biology/oncology, in evaluating radiation risk of IR exposures, and for the safety and efficacy of hSC regenerative

  10. Oxidative stress and gamma radiation-induced cancellous bone loss with musculoskeletal disuse

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Hisataka; Yumoto, Kenji; Alwood, Joshua S.; Mojarrab, Rose; Wang, Angela; Almeida, Eduardo A. C.; Searby, Nancy D.; Limoli, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure of astronauts in space to radiation during weightlessness may contribute to subsequent bone loss. Gamma irradiation of postpubertal mice rapidly increases the number of bone-resorbing osteoclasts and causes bone loss in cancellous tissue; similar changes occur in skeletal diseases associated with oxidative stress. Therefore, we hypothesized that increased oxidative stress mediates radiation-induced bone loss and that musculoskeletal disuse changes the sensitivity of cancellous tissue to radiation exposure. Musculoskeletal disuse by hindlimb unloading (1 or 2 wk) or total body gamma irradiation (1 or 2 Gy of 137Cs) of 4-mo-old, male C57BL/6 mice each decreased cancellous bone volume fraction in the proximal tibiae and lumbar vertebrae. The extent of radiation-induced acute cancellous bone loss in tibiae and lumbar vertebrae was similar in normally loaded and hindlimb-unloaded mice. Similarly, osteoclast surface in the tibiae increased 46% as a result of irradiation, 47% as a result of hindlimb unloading, and 64% as a result of irradiation + hindlimb unloading compared with normally loaded mice. Irradiation, but not hindlimb unloading, reduced viability and increased apoptosis of marrow cells and caused oxidative damage to lipids within mineralized tissue. Irradiation also stimulated generation of reactive oxygen species in marrow cells. Furthermore, injection of α-lipoic acid, an antioxidant, mitigated the acute bone loss caused by irradiation. Together, these results showed that disuse and gamma irradiation, alone or in combination, caused a similar degree of acute cancellous bone loss and shared a common cellular mechanism of increased bone resorption. Furthermore, irradiation, but not disuse, may increase the number of osteoclasts and the extent of acute bone loss via increased reactive oxygen species production and ensuing oxidative damage, implying different molecular mechanisms. The finding that α-lipoic acid protected cancellous tissue from the

  11. Protective effect of N-acetylcysteine against radiation induced DNA damage and hepatic toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Heba H; Hafez, Hafez F; Fahmy, Nadia M; Hanafi, Nemat

    2008-02-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the radioprotective effect of N- acetylcysteine (NAC) on gamma-radiation induced toxicity in hepatic tissue in rat. The cellular changes were estimated using malondialdehyde (MDA, an index of lipid peroxidation), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx), reduced glutathione (GSH), and total nitrate/nitrite (NO(x)) as markers of hepatic oxidative stress in rats following gamma-irradiation. The DNA damage was determined by agarose gel electrophoresis. To achieve the ultimate goal of this study, 40 adult rats were randomly divided into 4 groups of 10 animals each. Group I was injected intraperitoneally with saline solution for 7 consecutive days and served as control group. Group II was irradiated with a single dose of 6Gy gamma-radiation. Group III was daily injected with NAC (1g/kg, i.p.) for 7 consecutive days. Group IV received a daily i.p. injection of NAC (1g/kg, i.p.) for 7 consecutive days and 1h after the last dose, rats were irradiated with a single dose (6Gy) gamma-radiation. The animals were sacrificed after 24h. DNA damage was observed in tissue after total body irradiation with a single dose of 6Gy. Malondialdehyde and total nitrate/nitrite were increased significantly whereas the levels of GSH and antioxidant enzymes were significantly decreased in gamma-irradiated group. Pretreatment with NAC showed a significant decrease in the levels of MDA, NO(x) and DNA damage. The antioxidant enzymes increased significantly along with the levels of GSH. Moreover, histopathological examination of liver tissues confirmed the biochemical data. Thus, our results show that pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine offers protection against gamma-radiation induced cellular damage.

  12. Acute adaptive immune response correlates with late radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Paun, Alexandra; Kunwar, Amit; Haston, Christina K

    2015-02-20

    The lung response to radiation exposure can involve an immediate or early reaction to the radiation challenge, including cell death and an initial immune reaction, and can be followed by a tissue injury response, of pneumonitis or fibrosis, to this acute reaction. Herein, we aimed to determine whether markers of the initial immune response, measured within days of radiation exposure, are correlated with the lung tissue injury responses occurring weeks later. Inbred strains of mice known to be susceptible (KK/HIJ, C57BL/6J, 129S1/SvImJ) or resistant (C3H/HeJ, A/J, AKR/J) to radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis and to vary in time to onset of respiratory distress post thoracic irradiation (from 10-23 weeks) were studied. Mice were untreated (controls) or received 18 Gy whole thorax irradiation and were euthanized at 6 h, 1d or 7 d after radiation treatment. Pulmonary CD4+ lymphocytes, bronchoalveolar cell profile & cytokine level, and serum cytokine levels were assayed. Thoracic irradiation and inbred strain background significantly affected the numbers of CD4+ cells in the lungs and the bronchoalveolar lavage cell differential of exposed mice. At the 7 day timepoint greater numbers of pulmonary Th1 and Th17 lymphocytes and reduced lavage interleukin17 and interferonγ levels were significant predictors of late stage fibrosis. Lavage levels of interleukin-10, measured at the 7 day timepoint, were inversely correlated with fibrosis score (R=-0.80, p=0.05), while serum levels of interleukin-17 in control mice significantly correlated with post irradiation survival time (R=0.81, p=0.04). Lavage macrophage, lymphocyte or neutrophil counts were not significantly correlated with either of fibrosis score or time to respiratory distress in the six mouse strains. Specific cytokine and lymphocyte levels, but not strain dependent lavage cell profiles, were predictive of later radiation-induced lung injury in this panel of inbred strains.

  13. Soluble Dietary Fiber Ameliorates Radiation-Induced Intestinal Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition and Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianbo; Ding, Chao; Dai, Xujie; Lv, Tengfei; Xie, Tingbing; Zhang, Tenghui; Gao, Wen; Gong, Jianfeng; Zhu, Weiming; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2016-09-22

    Intestinal fibrosis is a late complication of pelvic radiotherapy. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays an important role in tissue fibrosis. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of soluble dietary fiber on radiation-induced intestinal EMT and fibrosis in a mouse model. Apple pectin (4% wt/wt in drinking water) was administered to wild-type and pVillin-Cre-EGFP transgenic mice with intestinal fibrosis induced by a single dose of abdominal irradiation of 10 Gy. The effects of pectin on intestinal EMT and fibrosis, gut microbiota, and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentration were evaluated. Intestinal fibrosis in late radiation enteropathy showed increased submucosal thickness and subepithelial collagen deposition. Enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)(+)/vimentin(+) and EGFP(+)/α-smooth muscle actin (SMA)(+) coexpressing cells were most clearly observed at 2 weeks after irradiation and gradually decreased at 4 and 12 weeks. Pectin significantly attenuated the thickness of submucosa and collagen deposition at 12 weeks (24.3 vs 27.6 µm in the pectin + radiation-treated group compared with radiation-alone group, respectively, P < .05; 69.0% vs 57.1%, P < .001) and ameliorated EMT at 2 and 4 weeks. Pectin also modulated the intestinal microbiota composition and increased the luminal SCFA concentration. The soluble dietary fiber pectin protected the terminal ileum against radiation-induced fibrosis. This effect might be mediated by altered SCFA concentration in the intestinal lumen and reduced EMT in the ileal epithelium. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  14. Protective effect of hydrogen-rich saline against radiation-induced immune dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Sanhu; Yang, Yanyong; Liu, Wen; Xuan, Zhiqiang; Wu, Shouming; Yu, Shunfei; Mei, Ke; Huang, Yijuan; Zhang, Pei; Cai, Jianming; Ni, Jin; Zhao, Yaoxian

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies showed that hydrogen can be used as an effective radioprotective agent through scavenging free radicals. This study was undertaken to evaluate the radioprotective effects of hydrogen on immune system in mice. H(2) was dissolved in physiological saline using an apparatus produced by our department. Spleen index and histological analysis were used to evaluate the splenic structural damage. Spleen superoxide dismutase, GSH, MDA were measured to appraise the antioxidant capacity and a DCF assay for the measurement of radical oxygen species. Cell apoptosis was evaluated by an Annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide staining method as well as the apoptotic proteins such as Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3 and c-caspase-3. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells subtypes were detected by flow cytometry with FITC-labelled antimouse CD4 and PE antimouse CD8 staining. Real-time PCR was utilized to determine the CD4+ T cell subtypes and related cytokines. Our study demonstrated that pre-treatment with H(2) could increase the spleen index and attenuate the radiation damage on splenic structure. Radical oxygen species level was also reduced by H(2) treatment. H(2) also inhibited radiation-induced apoptosis in splenocytes and down-regulated pro-apoptotic proteins in living mice. Radiation-induced imbalance of T cells was attenuated by H(2). Finally, we found that H(2) could regulate the polarization of CD4+ T cells and the level of related cytokines. This study suggests H(2) as an effective radioprotective agent on immune system by scavenging reactive oxygen species.

  15. Dragon's blood may have radioprotective effects in radiation-induced rat brain injury.

    PubMed

    Xin, Nian; Li, Yu-Juan; Li, Xu; Wang, Xiao; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiao; Dai, Rong-Ji; Meng, Wei-Wei; Wang, Hai-Long; Ma, Hong; Schläppi, Michael; Deng, Yu-Lin

    2012-07-01

    Dragon's blood is a bright red resin obtained from Dracaena cochinchinensis. It is a traditional medicinal that is used for wound healing and to stop bleeding. Its main biological activity appears to be from phenolic compounds found in Dragon's blood. In this study, the radioprotective effects of Dragon's blood were examined after whole brain irradiation of rats with either 100 MeV/u Carbon (12)C(6+) heavy ions or (60)Co γ-rays. The amounts of radiation-induced oxidative stress, inflammatory cytokines and apoptosis in irradiated rat brains were compared with and without Dragon's blood treatment. Compared to the "irradiation only" control group, the Dragon's blood treatment group significantly decreased malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide levels, and increased superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione levels induced by oxidative stress in radiation exposed rats (P < 0.05). Dragon's blood also significantly reduced radiation-induced inflammatory cytokines of tumor necrosis factor-α, interferon-γ and interleukin-6 levels (P < 0.05) and inhibited hippocampal neuronal apoptosis in (60)Co γ-ray irradiated rats. Furthermore, Dragon's blood significantly increased expression of brain-derived neurophic factor and inhibited the expression of pro-apoptotic caspase 3 (P < 0.05-0.01). Finally, Dragon's blood significantly inhibited expression of the AP-1 transcription factor family members c-fos and c-jun proteins (P < 0.05-0.01). The results obtained here suggest that Dragon's blood has radioprotective properties in rat brains after both heavy ions and (60)Co γ-ray exposure.

  16. Dietary inhibition of xanthine oxidase attenuates radiation-induced endothelial dysfunction in rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Soucy, Kevin G; Lim, Hyun Kyo; Attarzadeh, David O; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Kim, Jae Hyung; Bhunia, Anil K; Sevinc, Baris; Ryoo, Sungwoo; Vazquez, Marcelo E; Nyhan, Daniel; Shoukas, Artin A; Berkowitz, Dan E

    2010-05-01

    Radiation exposure is associated with the development of various cardiovascular diseases. Although irradiation is known to cause elevated oxidant stress and chronic inflammation, both of which are detrimental to vascular function, the molecular mechanisms remain incompletely understood. We previously demonstrated that radiation causes endothelial dysfunction and increased vascular stiffness by xanthine oxidase (XO) activation. In this study, we investigated whether dietary inhibition of XO protects against radiation-induced vascular injury. We exposed 4-mo-old rats to a single dose of 0 or 5 Gy gamma radiation. These rats received normal drinking water or water containing 1 mM oxypurinol, an XO inhibitor. We measured XO activity and superoxide production in rat aorta and demonstrated that both were significantly elevated 2 wk after radiation exposure. However, oxypurinol treatment in irradiated rats prevented aortic XO activation and superoxide elevation. We next investigated endothelial function through fluorescent measurement of nitric oxide (NO) and vascular tension dose responses. Radiation reduced endothelium-dependent NO production in rat aorta. Similarly, endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in the aorta of irradiated rats was significantly attenuated compared with the control group. Dietary XO inhibition maintained NO production at control levels and prevented the development of endothelial dysfunction. Furthermore, pulse wave velocity, a measure of vascular stiffness, increased by 1 day postirradiation and remained elevated 2 wk after irradiation, despite unchanged blood pressures. In oxypurinol-treated rats, pulse wave velocities remained unchanged from baseline throughout the experiment, signifying preserved vascular health. These findings demonstrate that XO inhibition can offer protection from radiation-induced endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular complications.

  17. Biological consequences of radiation-induced DNA damage: relevance to radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lomax, M E; Folkes, L K; O'Neill, P

    2013-10-01

    DNA damage of exposed tumour tissue leading to cell death is one of the detrimental effects of ionising radiation that is exploited, with beneficial consequences, for radiotherapy. The pattern of the discrete energy depositions during passage of the ionising track of radiation defines the spatial distribution of lesions induced in DNA with a fraction of the DNA damage sites containing clusters of lesions, formed over a few nanometres, against a background of endogenously induced individual lesions. These clustered DNA damage sites, which may be considered as a signature of ionising radiation, underlie the deleterious biological consequences of ionising radiation. The concepts developed rely in part on the fact that ionising radiation creates significant levels of clustered DNA damage, including complex double-strand breaks (DSB), to kill tumour cells as clustered damage sites are difficult to repair. This reduced repairability of clustered DNA damage using specific repair pathways is exploitable in radiotherapy for the treatment of cancer. We discuss some potential strategies to enhance radiosensitivity by targeting the repair pathways of radiation-induced clustered damage and complex DNA DSB, through inhibition of specific proteins that are not required in the repair pathways for endogenous damage. The variety and severity of DNA damage from ionising radiation is also influenced by the tumour microenvironment, being especially sensitive to the oxygen status of the cells. For instance, nitric oxide is known to influence the types of damage induced by radiation under hypoxic conditions. A potential strategy based on bioreductive activation of pro-drugs to release nitric oxide is discussed as an approach to deliver nitric oxide to hypoxic tumours during radiotherapy. The ultimate aim of this review is to stimulate thinking on how knowledge of the complexity of radiation-induced DNA damage may contribute to the development of adjuncts to radiotherapy. Copyright

  18. Protective effect of hydrogen-rich saline against radiation-induced immune dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Sanhu; Yang, Yanyong; Liu, Wen; Xuan, Zhiqiang; Wu, Shouming; Yu, Shunfei; Mei, Ke; Huang, Yijuan; Zhang, Pei; Cai, Jianming; Ni, Jin; Zhao, Yaoxian

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies showed that hydrogen can be used as an effective radioprotective agent through scavenging free radicals. This study was undertaken to evaluate the radioprotective effects of hydrogen on immune system in mice. H2 was dissolved in physiological saline using an apparatus produced by our department. Spleen index and histological analysis were used to evaluate the splenic structural damage. Spleen superoxide dismutase, GSH, MDA were measured to appraise the antioxidant capacity and a DCF assay for the measurement of radical oxygen species. Cell apoptosis was evaluated by an Annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide staining method as well as the apoptotic proteins such as Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3 and c-caspase-3. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells subtypes were detected by flow cytometry with FITC-labelled antimouse CD4 and PE antimouse CD8 staining. Real-time PCR was utilized to determine the CD4+ T cell subtypes and related cytokines. Our study demonstrated that pre-treatment with H2 could increase the spleen index and attenuate the radiation damage on splenic structure. Radical oxygen species level was also reduced by H2 treatment. H2 also inhibited radiation-induced apoptosis in splenocytes and down-regulated pro-apoptotic proteins in living mice. Radiation-induced imbalance of T cells was attenuated by H2. Finally, we found that H2 could regulate the polarization of CD4+ T cells and the level of related cytokines. This study suggests H2 as an effective radioprotective agent on immune system by scavenging reactive oxygen species. PMID:24618260

  19. 3D MR Sialography as a Tool to Investigate Radiation-Induced Xerostomia: Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Astreinidou, Eleftheria . E-mail: E.Astreinidou@umcutrecht.nl; Roesink, Judith M.; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J.; Bartels, Lambertus W.; Witkamp, Theo D.; Lagendijk, Jan J.W.; Terhaard, Chris H.J.

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether magnetic-resonance (MR) sialography can be used to investigate radiation-induced xerostomia. Preradiotherapy (pre-RT) and postradiotherapy (post-RT) MR sialographic images of the major salivary ducts (parotid and submandibular) were compared. Methods and Materials: Magnetic-resonance sialography was performed pre-RT, and 6 weeks and 6 months post-RT on 9 patients with T1-4N0-2M0 naso- or oropharyngeal tumors, on a 1.5-T MR scanner. Patients were positioned in the scanner, using a radiotherapy immobilization mask. Image registration of the MR sialograms pre- and post-RT with each other and with the CT and consequently the dose distribution was performed. A categorical scoring system was used to compare the visibility of ducts pre-RT and post-RT. Results: Good-quality MR sialographic images were obtained, and image registration was successful in all cases. The visibility score of the parotid ducts and submandibular ducts was reduced at 6 weeks post-RT, which means that the full trajectory of the salivary ducts, from the intraglandular space to the mouth cavity, was only partially visualized. For some of the parotid ducts, the visibility score improved at 6 months post-RT, but not for the submandibular ducts. The mean dose for the parotid glands was 35 Gy (1 standard deviation [SD] 3 Gy), and for the submandibular glands it was 62 Gy (SD, 8 Gy). Conclusion: Three-dimensional MR sialography is a promising approach for investigating xerostomia, because radiation-induced changes to the saliva content of the ducts can be visualized.

  20. α3β1 integrin promotes radiation-induced migration of meningioma cells.

    PubMed

    Gogineni, Venkateswara Rao; Nalla, Arun Kumar; Gupta, Reshu; Gujrati, Meena; Klopfenstein, Jeffrey D; Mohanam, Sanjeeva; Rao, Jasti S

    2011-06-01

    Cell motility is influenced by the microenvironment, signal transduction and cytoskeleton rearrangement. Cancer cells become resistant to these control mechanisms and gain the ability to move throughout the body and invade healthy tissues, which leads to metastatic disease. Integrins respond to context-dependent cues and promote cell migration and survival in can