Science.gov

Sample records for reduced death toll

  1. Uncovering the 2010 Haiti earthquake death toll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniell, J. E.; Khazai, B.; Wenzel, F.

    2013-05-01

    Casualties are estimated for the 12 January 2010 earthquake in Haiti using various reports calibrated by observed building damage states from satellite imagery and reconnaissance reports on the ground. By investigating various damage reports, casualty estimates and burial figures, for a one year period from 12 January 2010 until 12 January 2011, there is also strong evidence that the official government figures of 316 000 total dead and missing, reported to have been caused by the earthquake, are significantly overestimated. The authors have examined damage and casualties report to arrive at their estimation that the median death toll is less than half of this value (±137 000). The authors show through a study of historical earthquake death tolls, that overestimates of earthquake death tolls occur in many cases, and is not unique to Haiti. As death toll is one of the key elements for determining the amount of aid and reconstruction funds that will be mobilized, scientific means to estimate death tolls should be applied. Studies of international aid in recent natural disasters reveal that large distributions of aid which do not match the respective needs may cause oversupply of help, aggravate corruption and social disruption rather than reduce them, and lead to distrust within the donor community.

  2. Eartkquake Death Tolls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knopoff, Leon; Sornette, Didier

    1995-12-01

    In the risk and insurance literature, the (one-point) distributions of losses in natural disasters have been proposed to be characterized by “fat tail” power laws, i.e. very large destruction may occur with a non-vanishing rate. A naive hypothesis of uncorrelated Poissonian occurrence would suggest that the losses are solely characterized by the properties of the underlying power law distributions, i.e. the longer we wait, the more dramatic will be the largest disaster, which could be as much as a finite fraction of the total population or the total wealth of a country. We find indeed that the numbers Z of deaths in the very largest earthquakes of this century can be described by a power law distribution P(Z)simeq Z^{-(1+δ)} with δ=1.0±0.3, implying an unbounded behavior for the most devastating earthquakes. However, the distribution of the number of deaths per capita in each country in this century has a well-defined maximum value, suggesting that the naive extrapolation of the power law distribution is incorrect and that the understanding of correlations is necessary to ascertain the level of risk from natural disasters. The one-point distributions only provide an upper bound of the expected risk. We propose a speculative model to explain the correlations between deaths in large earthquakes and their countries of occurrence: we suggest that large ancient civilizations that have matured into large present-day populations were the beneficiaries of isolation from marauders due to the relative geographic protection by tectonic processes largely of an orogenic nature.

  3. Mangroves protected villages and reduced death toll during Indian super cyclone.

    PubMed

    Das, Saudamini; Vincent, Jeffrey R

    2009-05-05

    Protection against coastal disasters has been identified as an important service of mangrove ecosystems. Empirical studies on this service have been criticized, however, for using small samples and inadequately controlling for confounding factors. We used data on several hundred villages to test the impact of mangroves on human deaths during a 1999 super cyclone that struck Orissa, India. We found that villages with wider mangroves between them and the coast experienced significantly fewer deaths than ones with narrower or no mangroves. This finding was robust to the inclusion of a wide range of other variables to our statistical model, including controls for the historical extent of mangroves. Although mangroves evidently saved fewer lives than an early warning issued by the government, the retention of remaining mangroves in Orissa is economically justified even without considering the many benefits they provide to human society besides storm-protection services.

  4. Mangroves protected villages and reduced death toll during Indian super cyclone

    PubMed Central

    Das, Saudamini; Vincent, Jeffrey R.

    2009-01-01

    Protection against coastal disasters has been identified as an important service of mangrove ecosystems. Empirical studies on this service have been criticized, however, for using small samples and inadequately controlling for confounding factors. We used data on several hundred villages to test the impact of mangroves on human deaths during a 1999 super cyclone that struck Orissa, India. We found that villages with wider mangroves between them and the coast experienced significantly fewer deaths than ones with narrower or no mangroves. This finding was robust to the inclusion of a wide range of other variables to our statistical model, including controls for the historical extent of mangroves. Although mangroves evidently saved fewer lives than an early warning issued by the government, the retention of remaining mangroves in Orissa is economically justified even without considering the many benefits they provide to human society besides storm-protection services. PMID:19380735

  5. Toll pathway modulates TNF-induced JNK-dependent cell death in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chenxi; Chen, Changyan; Dai, Jianli; Zhang, Fan; Chen, Yujun; Li, Wenzhe; Pastor-Pareja, José Carlos; Xue, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Signalling networks that control the life or death of a cell are of central interest in modern biology. While the defined roles of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway in regulating cell death have been well-established, additional factors that modulate JNK-mediated cell death have yet to be fully elucidated. To identify novel regulators of JNK-dependent cell death, we performed a dominant-modifier screen in Drosophila and found that the Toll pathway participates in JNK-mediated cell death. Loss of Toll signalling suppresses ectopically and physiologically activated JNK signalling-induced cell death. Our epistasis analysis suggests that the Toll pathway acts as a downstream modulator for JNK-dependent cell death. In addition, gain of JNK signalling results in Toll pathway activation, revealed by stimulated transcription of Drosomycin (Drs) and increased cytoplasm-to-nucleus translocation of Dorsal. Furthermore, the Spätzle (Spz) family ligands for the Toll receptor are transcriptionally upregulated by activated JNK signalling in a non-cell-autonomous manner, providing a molecular mechanism for JNK-induced Toll pathway activation. Finally, gain of Toll signalling exacerbates JNK-mediated cell death and promotes cell death independent of caspases. Thus, we have identified another important function for the evolutionarily conserved Toll pathway, in addition to its well-studied roles in embryonic dorso-ventral patterning and innate immunity. PMID:26202785

  6. Toll pathway modulates TNF-induced JNK-dependent cell death in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chenxi; Chen, Changyan; Dai, Jianli; Zhang, Fan; Chen, Yujun; Li, Wenzhe; Pastor-Pareja, José Carlos; Xue, Lei

    2015-07-01

    Signalling networks that control the life or death of a cell are of central interest in modern biology. While the defined roles of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway in regulating cell death have been well-established, additional factors that modulate JNK-mediated cell death have yet to be fully elucidated. To identify novel regulators of JNK-dependent cell death, we performed a dominant-modifier screen in Drosophila and found that the Toll pathway participates in JNK-mediated cell death. Loss of Toll signalling suppresses ectopically and physiologically activated JNK signalling-induced cell death. Our epistasis analysis suggests that the Toll pathway acts as a downstream modulator for JNK-dependent cell death. In addition, gain of JNK signalling results in Toll pathway activation, revealed by stimulated transcription of Drosomycin (Drs) and increased cytoplasm-to-nucleus translocation of Dorsal. Furthermore, the Spätzle (Spz) family ligands for the Toll receptor are transcriptionally upregulated by activated JNK signalling in a non-cell-autonomous manner, providing a molecular mechanism for JNK-induced Toll pathway activation. Finally, gain of Toll signalling exacerbates JNK-mediated cell death and promotes cell death independent of caspases. Thus, we have identified another important function for the evolutionarily conserved Toll pathway, in addition to its well-studied roles in embryonic dorso-ventral patterning and innate immunity.

  7. A Method for Estimation of Death Tolls in Disastrous Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, C.; Tien, Y.; Teng, T.

    2004-12-01

    Fatality tolls caused by the disastrous earthquake are the one of the most important items among the earthquake damage and losses. If we can precisely estimate the potential tolls and distribution of fatality in individual districts as soon as the earthquake occurrences, it not only make emergency programs and disaster management more effective but also supply critical information to plan and manage the disaster and the allotments of disaster rescue manpower and medicine resources in a timely manner. In this study, we intend to reach the estimation of death tolls caused by the Chi-Chi earthquake in individual districts based on the Attributive Database of Victims, population data, digital maps and Geographic Information Systems. In general, there were involved many factors including the characteristics of ground motions, geological conditions, types and usage habits of buildings, distribution of population and social-economic situations etc., all are related to the damage and losses induced by the disastrous earthquake. The density of seismic stations in Taiwan is the greatest in the world at present. In the meantime, it is easy to get complete seismic data by earthquake rapid-reporting systems from the Central Weather Bureau: mostly within about a minute or less after the earthquake happened. Therefore, it becomes possible to estimate death tolls caused by the earthquake in Taiwan based on the preliminary information. Firstly, we form the arithmetic mean of the three components of the Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) to give the PGA Index for each individual seismic station, according to the mainshock data of the Chi-Chi earthquake. To supply the distribution of Iso-seismic Intensity Contours in any districts and resolve the problems for which there are no seismic station within partial districts through the PGA Index and geographical coordinates in individual seismic station, the Kriging Interpolation Method and the GIS software, The population density depends on

  8. Combined Prediction Model of Death Toll for Road Traffic Accidents Based on Independent and Dependent Variables

    PubMed Central

    Zhong-xiang, Feng; Shi-sheng, Lu; Wei-hua, Zhang; Nan-nan, Zhang

    2014-01-01

    In order to build a combined model which can meet the variation rule of death toll data for road traffic accidents and can reflect the influence of multiple factors on traffic accidents and improve prediction accuracy for accidents, the Verhulst model was built based on the number of death tolls for road traffic accidents in China from 2002 to 2011; and car ownership, population, GDP, highway freight volume, highway passenger transportation volume, and highway mileage were chosen as the factors to build the death toll multivariate linear regression model. Then the two models were combined to be a combined prediction model which has weight coefficient. Shapley value method was applied to calculate the weight coefficient by assessing contributions. Finally, the combined model was used to recalculate the number of death tolls from 2002 to 2011, and the combined model was compared with the Verhulst and multivariate linear regression models. The results showed that the new model could not only characterize the death toll data characteristics but also quantify the degree of influence to the death toll by each influencing factor and had high accuracy as well as strong practicability. PMID:25610454

  9. Combined prediction model of death toll for road traffic accidents based on independent and dependent variables.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhong-xiang; Lu, Shi-sheng; Zhang, Wei-hua; Zhang, Nan-nan

    2014-01-01

    In order to build a combined model which can meet the variation rule of death toll data for road traffic accidents and can reflect the influence of multiple factors on traffic accidents and improve prediction accuracy for accidents, the Verhulst model was built based on the number of death tolls for road traffic accidents in China from 2002 to 2011; and car ownership, population, GDP, highway freight volume, highway passenger transportation volume, and highway mileage were chosen as the factors to build the death toll multivariate linear regression model. Then the two models were combined to be a combined prediction model which has weight coefficient. Shapley value method was applied to calculate the weight coefficient by assessing contributions. Finally, the combined model was used to recalculate the number of death tolls from 2002 to 2011, and the combined model was compared with the Verhulst and multivariate linear regression models. The results showed that the new model could not only characterize the death toll data characteristics but also quantify the degree of influence to the death toll by each influencing factor and had high accuracy as well as strong practicability.

  10. Air bags: reducing the toll of brain trauma.

    PubMed

    Jagger, J; Vernberg, K; Jane, J A

    1987-05-01

    Motor vehicle crashes account for approximately one-half of all hospitalized patients with brain injury. Therefore, measures to reduce the frequency and severity of injuries from motor vehicle crashes have the potential for making a substantial impact on the incidence and severity of brain trauma. Occupant restraints, including seat belts and air bags, have been proven highly effective in preventing injuries, yet the specific benefits for the brain, the face, and the cervical spine provided by air bags have not been widely publicized. Air bags prevent the violent whiplash motion of the head in a frontal crash, resulting in a more controlled deceleration of the brain. Wrenching forces exerted on the cervical spine are attenuated, and the face is protected from contact with hard or lacerating surfaces. Furthermore, compliance is not a problem with air bags. When a car is equipped with air bags, they are in effect 100% of the time, which is important for the protection of high risk groups, such a teenage boys, who tend to wear seat belts less often than other groups. It is estimated from national data and from epidemiological studies that air bags could have prevented or reduced brain injury for 25% of the hospitalized, brain-injured population. If provided as standard equipment on both the driver and the passenger side, air bags could do more to reduce the toll of brain trauma than any other available intervention. Air bags were ready for introduction into the marketplace 15 years ago. Since then, approximately 150,000 preventable deaths and more than 1,500,000 preventable brain injuries have occurred.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Toll-like receptor 2 ligands promote microglial cell death by inducing autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, Daniela S.; Soria, Javier A.; Gaviglio, Emilia A.; Garcia-Keller, Constanza; Cancela, Liliana M.; Rodriguez-Galan, Maria C.; Wang, Ji Ming; Iribarren, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Microglial cells are phagocytes in the central nervous system (CNS) and become activated in pathological conditions, resulting in microgliosis, manifested by increased cell numbers and inflammation in the affected regions. Thus, controlling microgliosis is important to prevent pathological damage to the brain. Here, we evaluated the contribution of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) to microglial survival. We observed that activation of microglial cells with peptidoglycan (PGN) from Staphylococcus aureus and other TLR2 ligands results in cell activation followed by the induction of autophagy and autophagy-dependent cell death. In C57BL/6J mice, intracerebral injection of PGN increased the autophagy of microglial cells and reduced the microglial/macrophage cell number in brain parenchyma. Our results demonstrate a novel role of TLRs in the regulation of microglial cell activation and survival, which are important for the control of microgliosis and associated inflammatory responses in the CNS.—Arroyo, D. S., Soria, J. A., Gaviglio, E. A., Garcia-Keller, C., Cancela, L. M., Rodriguez-Galan, M. C., Wang, J. M., Iribarren, P. Toll-like receptor 2 ligands promote microglial cell death by inducing autophagy. PMID:23073832

  12. Toll-like receptor 2 ligands promote microglial cell death by inducing autophagy.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Daniela S; Soria, Javier A; Gaviglio, Emilia A; Garcia-Keller, Constanza; Cancela, Liliana M; Rodriguez-Galan, Maria C; Wang, Ji Ming; Iribarren, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Microglial cells are phagocytes in the central nervous system (CNS) and become activated in pathological conditions, resulting in microgliosis, manifested by increased cell numbers and inflammation in the affected regions. Thus, controlling microgliosis is important to prevent pathological damage to the brain. Here, we evaluated the contribution of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) to microglial survival. We observed that activation of microglial cells with peptidoglycan (PGN) from Staphylococcus aureus and other TLR2 ligands results in cell activation followed by the induction of autophagy and autophagy-dependent cell death. In C57BL/6J mice, intracerebral injection of PGN increased the autophagy of microglial cells and reduced the microglial/macrophage cell number in brain parenchyma. Our results demonstrate a novel role of TLRs in the regulation of microglial cell activation and survival, which are important for the control of microgliosis and associated inflammatory responses in the CNS.

  13. [Application of artificial neural networks in forecasting the number of circulatory system diseases death toll].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Shao, Yi; Shang, Kezheng; Wang, Shigong; Wang, Jinyan

    2014-09-01

    Set up the model of forecasting the number of circulatorys death toll based on back-propagation (BP) artificial neural networks discuss the relationship between the circulatory system diseases death toll meteorological factors and ambient air pollution. The data of tem deaths, meteorological factors, and ambient air pollution within the m 2004 to 2009 in Nanjing were collected. On the basis of analyzing the ficient between CSDDT meteorological factors and ambient air pollution, leutral network model of CSDDT was built for 2004 - 2008 based on factors and ambient air pollution within the same time, and the data of 2009 est the predictive power of the model. There was a closely system diseases relationship between meteorological factors, ambient air pollution and the circulatory system diseases death toll. The ANN model structure was 17 -16 -1, 17 input notes, 16 hidden notes and 1 output note. The training precision was 0. 005 and the final error was 0. 004 999 42 after 487 training steps. The results of forecast show that predict accuracy over 78. 62%. This method is easy to be finished with smaller error, and higher ability on circulatory system death toll on independent prediction, which can provide a new method for forecasting medical-meteorological forecast and have the value of further research.

  14. The 2003 Iraq War and avoidable death toll.

    PubMed

    Rawaf, Salman

    2013-10-01

    Salman Rawaf discusses the implications of the most recent estimate of excess deaths associated with the Iraq war and subsequent occupation in the context of the current situation in Iraq. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  15. Theoretical Estimation of the Death Toll caused by collapsed buildings in different regions of Taiwan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, W. Y.; Chen, K. P.

    2016-12-01

    The main purpose of this study is to theoretically estimate the death toll caused by collapsed buildings in different regions of Taiwan from future earthquakes according to the empirical data of the 1999 7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake that occurred in Taiwan. The results are presented in a quadratic equation that relates collapsed buildings with Modified Mercalli Intensity (), then matching with a novel reliable function. It is found that two zones are subject to high collapsed building, one zone extends from Hsinchu southward to Taichung, Nantou, Chiayi, and Tainan in western Taiwan and the other extends from Ilan southward to Hualian and Taitung in eastern Taiwan. These zones are also characterized by low b values.We also present the expected probability of collapsed buildings as a function of waiting time in ten major metropolitan areas of Taiwan. The results exhibit relatively low expected probabilities in Tainan, Kaohsiung, and Hengchun; hence, the expected death toll due to collapsed buildings is very low (e.g., the expected death toll in Kaohsiung is zero). However, a relatively high number of collapsed buildings is found for most other areas. These results should be of use to government regulators and practicing engineers in enforcing appropriate building codes to effectively mitigate potential seismic hazards.

  16. The Boundaries of Genocide: Quantifying the Uncertainty of the Death Toll During the Pol Pot Regime (1975-1979)

    PubMed Central

    Heuveline, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Estimates of excess deaths under Pol Pot's rule of Cambodia (1975-79) range from under one million to over three million. The more plausible among those, methodologically, still vary from one to two million deaths, but this range of independent point estimates has no particular statistical meaning. Stochastically reconstructing population dynamics in Cambodia from extant historical and demographic data yields interpretable distributions of the death toll and other demographic indicators. The resulting 95-percent simulation interval (1.2 to 2.8 million excess deaths) demonstrates substantial uncertainty with regards to the exact scale of mortality, yet still excludes nearly half of the previous death-toll estimates. The 1.5 to 2.25 million interval contains 69 per cent of the simulations for the actual number of excess death, more than the wider (one to two million) range of previous plausible estimates. The median value of 1.9 million excess deaths represents 21 percent of the population at risk. PMID:26218856

  17. Effectiveness of a Death-Education Program in Reducing Death Anxiety of Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansson, Noreen; Lally, Terry

    1991-01-01

    Evaluated effectiveness of death education program in reducing death anxiety experienced by 22 junior and senior nursing students. Subjects were pre- and posttested with State Form of State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and viewed film of death experience. Posttest analysis indicated that death education program was effective in decreasing death anxiety…

  18. Toll-like Receptor 2: A Novel Therapeutic Target for Ischemic White Matter Injury and Oligodendrocyte Death.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun Young; Kim, Byung Gon

    2017-08-01

    Despite paramount clinical significance of white matter stroke, there is a paucity of researches on the pathomechanism of ischemic white matter damage and accompanying oligodendrocyte (OL) death. Therefore, a large gap exists between clinical needs and laboratory researches in this disease entity. Recent works have started to elucidate cellular and molecular basis of white matter injury under ischemic stress. In this paper, we briefly introduce white matter stroke from a clinical point of view and review pathophysiology of ischemic white matter injury characterized by OL death and demyelination. We present a series of evidence that Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), one of the membranous pattern recognition receptors, plays a cell-autonomous protective role in ischemic OL death and ensuing demyelination. Moreover, we also discuss our recent findings that its endogenous ligand, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), is released from dying OLs and exerts autocrine trophic effects on OLs and myelin sheath under ischemic condition. We propose that modulation of TLR2 and its endogenous ligand HMGB1 can be a novel therapeutic target for ischemic white matter disease.

  19. Reduced bioenergetics and toll-like receptor 1 function in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes in aging.

    PubMed

    Qian, Feng; Guo, Xiuyang; Wang, Xiaomei; Yuan, Xiaoling; Chen, Shu; Malawista, Stephen E; Bockenstedt, Linda K; Allore, Heather G; Montgomery, Ruth R

    2014-02-01

    Aging is associated with a progressive decline in immune function (immunosenescence) resulting in an increased susceptibility to viral and bacterial infections. Here we show reduced expression of Toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1) in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and an underlying age-dependent deficiency in PMN bioenergetics. In older (>65 years) adults, stimulation through TLR1 led to lower activation of integrins (CD11b and CD18), lower production of the chemokine IL-8, and lower levels of the phosphorylated signaling intermediate p38 MAP kinase than in PMN from younger donors (21-30 years). In addition, loss of CD62L, a marker of PMN activation, was reduced in PMN of older adults stimulated through multiple pathways. Rescue of PMN from apoptosis by stimulation with TLR1 was reduced in PMN from older adults. In seeking an explanation for effects of aging across multiple pathways, we examined PMN energy utilization and found that glucose uptake after stimulation through TLR1 was dramatically lower in PMN of older adults. Our results demonstrate a reduction in TLR1 expression and TLR1-mediated responses in PMN with aging, and reduced efficiency of bioenergetics in PMN. These changes likely contribute to reduced PMN efficiency in aging through multiple aspects of PMN function and suggest potential therapeutic opportunities.

  20. Thinking about Death Reduces Delay Discounting

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Nicholas J.; Schmeichel, Brandon J.

    2015-01-01

    The current study tested competing predictions regarding the effect of mortality salience on delay discounting. One prediction, based on evolutionary considerations, was that reminders of death increase the value of the present. Another prediction, based in part on construal level theory, was that reminders of death increase the value of the future. One-hundred eighteen participants thought about personal mortality or a control topic and then completed an inter-temporal choice task pitting the chance to gain $50 now against increasingly attractive rewards three months later. Consistent with the hypothesis inspired by construal theory, participants in the mortality salience condition traded $50 now for $66.67 in three months, whereas participants in the dental pain salience condition required $72.84 in three months in lieu of $50 now. Thus, participants in the mortality salience condition discounted future monetary gains less than other participants, suggesting that thoughts of death may increase the subjective value of the future. PMID:26630664

  1. Berberine reduces Toll-like receptor-mediated macrophage migration by suppression of Src enhancement.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei-Erh; Ying Chang, Miao; Wei, Jyun-Yan; Chen, Yen-Jen; Maa, Ming-Chei; Leu, Tzeng-Horng

    2015-06-15

    Berberine is an isoquinoline with anti-inflammatory activity. We previously demonstrated that there was a loop of signal amplification between nuclear factor kappa B and Src for macrophage mobility triggered by the engagement of Toll-like receptors (TLRs). The simultaneous suppression of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase 2, and cell mobility in berberine-treated macrophages suggested Src might be a target of berberine. Indeed, th reduced migration, greatly suppressed Src induction in both protein and RNA transcript by berberine were observed in macrophages exposed to LPS, peptidoglycan, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid, and CpG-oligodeoxynucleotides. In addition to Src induction, berberine also inhibited LPS-mediated Src activation in Src overexpressing macrophages and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (a nitric oxide donor) could partly restore it. Moreover, berberine suppressed Src activity in fibronectin-stimulated macrophages and in v-Src transformed cells. These results implied that by effectively reducing Src expression and activity, berberine inhibited TLR-mediated cell motility in macrophages.

  2. Reducing the Child Death Rate. KIDS COUNT Indicator Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Rima; Shore, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    In the 20th century's final decades, advances in the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases sharply reduced the child death rate. Despite this progress, the child death rate in the U.S. remains higher than in many other wealthy nations. The under-five mortality rate in the U.S. is almost three times higher than that of Iceland and Sweden…

  3. Toll-like receptor agonists induce inflammation and cell death in a model of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Rydberg, Camilla; Månsson, Anne; Uddman, Rolf; Riesbeck, Kristian; Cardell, Lars-Olaf

    2009-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are increasingly implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer. The present study describes TLR expression and function in healthy and malignant airway epithelial cells. The squamous cell carcinoma cell line Detroit-562 was compared with the healthy bronchial epithelial cell line NL-20 and primary human nasal epithelial cells (HNECs). TLR2, TLR3 and TLR5 were present in primary head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs). Consistent with this, Detroit-562 expressed TLR2, TLR3 and TLR5, whereas NL-20 expressed mainly TLR3 and HNECs expressed TLR2-5. In Detroit-562, Pam3CSK4, poly(I:C) and flagellin, ligands for TLR2, TLR3 and TLR5, respectively, induced an up-regulation of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), an increase in interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 secretion and a decrease in cell viability. Additionally, poly(I:C) affected IL-1β production and the migratory behaviour of Detroit-562. NL-20 responded with a slight increase in IL-8 secretion upon poly(I:C) stimulation. Poly(I:C) induced a small increase in IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 production in HNECs, while Pam3CSK4 increased viability. The TLR signalling was transcription-dependent, but the pathways involved differed among TLRs as well as cells. In Detroit-562, TLR2 and TLR5 activation was mediated via c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-, p38-, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)- and nuclear factor (NF)-κB-related pathways, while TLR3 was dependent on NF-κB. In NL-20, TLR3 signalled via p38, and in HNECs, NF-κB, JNK and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) appeared to be involved. We found that TLR agonists induced a robust response in HNSCCs, characterized by generation of inflammation and cell death. A similar response was not seen in normal epithelial cells. Thus, the TLR system should be considered an important target in future antitumour immunotherapy. PMID:19740321

  4. Toll-like receptor-5 agonist Entolimod broadens the therapeutic window of 5-fluorouracil by reducing its toxicity to normal tissues in mice.

    PubMed

    Kojouharov, Bojidar M; Brackett, Craig M; Veith, Jean M; Johnson, Christopher P; Gitlin, Ilya I; Toshkov, Ilia A; Gleiberman, Anatoli S; Gudkov, Andrei V; Burdelya, Lyudmila G

    2014-02-15

    Myelosuppression and gastrointestinal damage are common side effects of cancer treatment limiting efficacy of DNA-damaging chemotherapeutic drugs. The Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) agonist Entolimod has demonstrated efficacy in mitigating damage to hematopoietic and gastrointestinal tissues caused by radiation. Here, using 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) treated mice as a model of chemotherapy-induced side effects, we demonstrated significant reduction in the severity of 5-FU-induced morbidity and increased survival accompanied by the improved integrity of intestinal tissue and stimulated the restoration of hematopoiesis. Entolimod-stimulated IL-6 production was essential for Entolimod's ability to rescue mice from death caused by doses of 5-FU associated with hematopoietic failure. In contrast, IL-6 induction was not necessary for protection and restoration of drug-damaged gastrointestinal tissue by Entolimod. In a syngeneic mouse CT26 colon adenocarcinoma model, Entolimod reduced the systemic toxicity of 5-FU, but did not reduce its antitumor efficacy indicating that the protective effect of Entolimod was selective for normal, non-tumor, tissues. These results suggest that Entolimod has clinical potential to broaden the therapeutic window of genotoxic anticancer drugs by reducing their associated hematopoietic and gastrointestinal toxicities.

  5. Science and public health principles used to reduce road deaths.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Leon S

    2014-12-01

    An editorial in a previous issue of this journal falsely claims that the US government's efforts to reduce road fatalities are not based on science. It says that, as a result, the United States has fallen behind other countries in road death prevention. A large body of research and evaluation informed federal and state safety programs from the outset. Evans's comparisons of death trends among countries without adjustment for changes in relevant risk factors or specification of the injury reduction policies among the countries tell us nothing about the causes of the declines or the effects of specific ameliorative efforts.

  6. Science and Public Health Principles Used to Reduce Road Deaths

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    An editorial in a previous issue of this journal falsely claims that the US government’s efforts to reduce road fatalities are not based on science. It says that, as a result, the United States has fallen behind other countries in road death prevention. A large body of research and evaluation informed federal and state safety programs from the outset. Evans’s comparisons of death trends among countries without adjustment for changes in relevant risk factors or specification of the injury reduction policies among the countries tell us nothing about the causes of the declines or the effects of specific ameliorative efforts. PMID:25320900

  7. HIV and tuberculosis – science and implementation to turn the tide and reduce deaths

    PubMed Central

    Harries, Anthony D; Lawn, Stephen D; Getahun, Haileyesus; Zachariah, Rony; Havlir, Diane V

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Every year, HIV-associated tuberculosis (TB) deprives 350,000 mainly young people of productive and healthy lives. People die because TB is not diagnosed and treated in those with known HIV infection and HIV infection is not diagnosed in those with TB. Even in those in whom both HIV and TB are diagnosed and treated, this often happens far too late. These deficiencies can be addressed through the application of new scientific evidence and diagnostic tools. Discussion A strategy of starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) early in the course of HIV infection has the potential to considerably reduce both individual and community burden of TB and needs urgent evaluation for efficacy, feasibility and broader social and economic impact. Isoniazid preventive therapy can reduce the risk of TB and, if given strategically in addition to ART, provides synergistic benefit. Intensified TB screening as part of the “Three I's” strategy should be conducted at every clinic, home or community-based attendance using a symptoms-based algorithm, and new diagnostic tools should increasingly be used to confirm or refute TB diagnoses. Until such time when more sensitive and specific TB diagnostic assays are widely available, bolder approaches such as empirical anti-TB treatment need to be considered and evaluated. Patients with suspected or diagnosed TB must be screened for HIV and given cotrimoxazole preventive therapy and ART if HIV-positive. Three large randomized trials provide conclusive evidence that ART initiated within two to four weeks of start of anti-TB treatment saves lives, particularly in those with severe immunosuppression. The key to ensuring that these collaborative activities are delivered is the co-location and integration of TB and HIV services within the health system and the community. Conclusions Progress towards reducing HIV-associated TB deaths can be achieved through attention to simple and deliverable actions on the ground. John Donne, Meditation

  8. How Can the Science Community Support Reality Based Policies to Reducing the Escalating Toll of Natural Hazards?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    Worldwide, the toll of disaster damage caused by foreseeable natural hazards is growing, despite the fact that science is increasingly able to quantify the risk and foresee the likely location of natural events (NCDC 2012; NHC 2010). Those events can cause disastrous consequences if human built infrastructure is not properly designed for both the current state and future events (IBHS, 2012). Our existing approaches are not working at reducing the mounting toll of disasters which follow foreseeable natural events. Rather, even if the climate were not changing, current land use decisions coupled with development, engineering, design, and construction practices are significantly contributing to further increasing an unsustainable toll from disasters (Pielke, Gratz et al. 2007). Safe and proper construction practices developed to reduce flood losses (e.g. Design for Flooding, Watson, Adams et al., 2010) are all too often thought of as a zero sum situation where the community wins and the developer loses. In reality, the United States and the rest of the world often can find win-win solutions based on sound economics, law, ethics, and environmental sustainability that will benefit communities, developers, and natural hazard risk mitigation practitioners. While such solutions are being implemented in a fragmentary manner throughout the United States, communities implementing these solutions are increasingly working together in peer networks, such as the Natural Hazard Mitigation Association (NHMA)'s Resilient Neighbors Network. Examples include the Urban Drainage and Flood Control District that covers the metropolitan Denver area and recent work in Tulsa, Oklahoma. This presentation will set forth the scientific, ethical, and legal basis of higher development standards which, when combined with good negotiations techniques, can significantly decrease the terrible misery from wildfires, tornadoes, floods, and other natural disasters. Communities clearly have the legal

  9. Reduced cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in Toll-like receptor 4 deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Canxiang; Yang Qingwu . E-mail: yangqwmlys@hotmail.com; Lv Fenglin; Cui Jie; Fu Huabin; Wang Jingzhou

    2007-02-09

    Inflammatory reaction plays an important role in cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury, however, its mechanism is still unclear. Our study aims to explore the function of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the process of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion. We made middle cerebral artery ischemia-reperfusion model in mice with line embolism method. Compared with C3H/OuJ mice, scores of cerebral water content, cerebral infarct size and neurologic impairment in C3H/Hej mice were obviously lower after 6 h ischemia and 24 h reperfusion. Light microscopic and electron microscopic results showed that cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in C3H/Hej mice was less serious than that in C3H/OuJ mice. TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 contents in C3H/HeJ mice were obviously lower than that in C3H/OuJ mice with ELISA. The results showed that TLR4 participates in the process of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury probably through decrease of inflammatory cytokines. TLR4 may become a new target for prevention of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. Our study suggests that TLR4 is one of the mechanisms of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury besides its important role in innate immunity.

  10. Hawaii natural compounds are promising to reduce ovarian cancer deaths.

    PubMed

    Fei-Zhang, David J; Li, Chunshun; Cao, Shugeng

    2016-07-02

    The low survival rate of patients with ovarian cancer largely results from the advanced ovarian tumors as well as tumor resistance to chemotherapy, leading to metastasis and recurrence. However, it is missing as to an effective therapeutic approach that focuses on these aspects to prolong progression-free survival and to decrease mortality in ovarian cancer patients. Here, based on our cancer drug discovery studies, we provide prospective insights into the development of a future line of drugs to effectively reduce ovarian cancer deaths. Pathways that increase the probability of cancer, such as the defective Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway, may render cancer cells more sensitive to new drug targeting.

  11. Power and death: Mortality salience increases power seeking while feeling powerful reduces death anxiety.

    PubMed

    Belmi, Peter; Pfeffer, Jeffrey

    2016-05-01

    According to Terror Management Theory, people respond to reminders of mortality by seeking psychological security and bolstering their self-esteem. Because previous research suggests that having power can provide individuals a sense of security and self-worth, we hypothesize that mortality salience leads to an increased motivation to acquire power, especially among men. Study 1 found that men (but not women) who wrote about their death reported more interest in acquiring power. Study 2A and Study 2B demonstrated that when primed with reminders of death, men (but not women) reported behaving more dominantly during the subsequent week, while both men and women reported behaving more prosocially during that week. Thus, mortality salience prompts people to respond in ways that help them manage their death anxiety but in ways consistent with normative gender expectations. Furthermore, Studies 3-5 showed that feeling powerful reduces anxiety when mortality is salient. Specifically, we found that when primed to feel more powerful, both men and women experienced less mortality anxiety. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. A Century of Australian Natural Disasters and How to Reduce the Toll from Future Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAneney, J.

    2014-12-01

    This study reviews Australian experience of natural disasters over the last century and considers how to reduce this nation's vulnerability to such events in the future. In line with global experience, the cost of Australian weather-related natural disasters has been increasing, while loss of life has decreased, with extreme heat events responsible for more fatalities than all other natural perils combined, baring epidemics. However when disaster costs arising from historical events are normalised to current day exposure, no long-term trend emerges. Moreover the frequency of these losses shows no sign of increasing since 1950. In other words, the rising cost of natural disasters can be firmly sheeted home to the fact that there are now more of us living in vulnerable places with more to lose. In view of the above, emergency management and government risk management and strategic planning should focus on plausible large event scenarios, whatever their cause. If we wish to reduce disaster losses, land-use planning has to become risk-informed and building codes need to consider potential economic impacts, rather than just life safety. Insurers can play a role by pricing risk correctly and sending clear signals to homeowners (and governments) to stimulate risk-reducing behaviours. The tools to achieve fine-grained risk assessments are increasingly available. The success of the regulated use of the building code in tropical cyclone-prone regions in Australia and the performance of modern seismic building codes in New Zealand, shows what can be achieved when there is a demonstrated need and political will.

  13. Vaccination greatly reduces disease, disability, death and inequity worldwide.

    PubMed

    Andre, F E; Booy, R; Bock, H L; Clemens, J; Datta, S K; John, T J; Lee, B W; Lolekha, S; Peltola, H; Ruff, T A; Santosham, M; Schmitt, H J

    2008-02-01

    In low-income countries, infectious diseases still account for a large proportion of deaths, highlighting health inequities largely caused by economic differences. Vaccination can cut health-care costs and reduce these inequities. Disease control, elimination or eradication can save billions of US dollars for communities and countries. Vaccines have lowered the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma and will control cervical cancer. Travellers can be protected against "exotic" diseases by appropriate vaccination. Vaccines are considered indispensable against bioterrorism. They can combat resistance to antibiotics in some pathogens. Noncommunicable diseases, such as ischaemic heart disease, could also be reduced by influenza vaccination. Immunization programmes have improved the primary care infrastructure in developing countries, lowered mortality in childhood and empowered women to better plan their families, with consequent health, social and economic benefits. Vaccination helps economic growth everywhere, because of lower morbidity and mortality. The annual return on investment in vaccination has been calculated to be between 12% and 18%. Vaccination leads to increased life expectancy. Long healthy lives are now recognized as a prerequisite for wealth, and wealth promotes health. Vaccines are thus efficient tools to reduce disparities in wealth and inequities in health.

  14. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Deficiency Causes Reduced Exploratory Behavior in Mice Under Approach-Avoidance Conflict.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunlu; Yan, Yixiu; Cheng, Jingjing; Xiao, Gang; Gu, Jueqing; Zhang, Luqi; Yuan, Siyu; Wang, Junlu; Shen, Yi; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal approach-avoidance behavior has been linked to deficits in the mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system of the brain. Recently, increasing evidence has indicated that toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), an important pattern-recognition receptor in the innate immune system, can be directly activated by substances of abuse, resulting in an increase of the extracellular DA level in the nucleus accumbens. We thus hypothesized that TLR4-dependent signaling might regulate approach-avoidance behavior. To test this hypothesis, we compared the novelty-seeking and social interaction behaviors of TLR4-deficient (TLR4(-/-)) and wild-type (WT) mice in an approach-avoidance conflict situation in which the positive motivation to explore a novel object or interact with an unfamiliar mouse was counteracted by the negative motivation to hide in exposed, large spaces. We found that TLR4(-/-) mice exhibited reduced novelty-seeking and social interaction in the large open spaces. In less stressful test apparatuses similar in size to the mouse cage, however, TLR4(-/-) mice performed normally in both novelty-seeking and social interaction tests. The reduced exploratory behaviors under approach-avoidance conflict were not due to a high anxiety level or an enhanced fear response in the TLR4(-/-) mice, as these mice showed normal anxiety and fear responses in the open field and passive avoidance tests, respectively. Importantly, the novelty-seeking behavior in the large open field induced a higher level of c-Fos activation in the nucleus accumbens shell (NAcSh) in TLR4(-/-) mice than in WT mice. Partially inactivating the NAcSh via infusion of GABA receptor agonists restored the novelty-seeking behavior of TLR4(-/-) mice. These data suggested that TLR4 is crucial for positive motivational behavior under approach-avoidance conflict. TLR4-dependent activation of neurons in the NAcSh may contribute to this phenomenon.

  15. Reducing the Teen Death Rate. KIDS COUNT Indicator Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Rima; Shore, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Life continues to hold considerable risk for adolescents in the United States. In 2006, the teen death rate stood at 64 deaths per 100,000 teens (13,739 teens) (KIDS COUNT Data Center, 2009). Although it has declined by 4 percent since 2000, the rate of teen death in this country remains substantially higher than in many peer nations, based…

  16. Sudden Unexpected Infant Death and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome: Reducing the Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Learn about grief resources and about actions parents and caregivers can ... death syndrome (SIDS) and other sleep-related deaths. Grief Resources The following organizations offer support for people ...

  17. Reducing deaths from diarrhoea through oral rehydration therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Victora, C. G.; Bryce, J.; Fontaine, O.; Monasch, R.

    2000-01-01

    In 1980, diarrhoea was the leading cause of child mortality, accounting for 4.6 million deaths annually. Efforts to control diarrhoea over the past decade have been based on multiple, potentially powerful interventions implemented more or less simultaneously. Oral rehydration therapy (ORT) was introduced in 1979 and rapidly became the cornerstone of programmes for the control of diarrhoeal diseases. We report on the strategy for controlling diarrhoea through case management, with special reference to ORT, and on the relationship between its implementation and reduced mortality. Population-based data on the coverage and quality of facility-based use of ORT are scarce, despite its potential importance in reducing mortality, especially for severe cases. ORT use rates during the 1980s are available for only a few countries. An improvement in the availability of data occurred in the mid-1990s. The study of time trends is hampered by the use of several different definitions of ORT. Nevertheless, the data show positive trends in diarrhoea management in most parts of the world. ORT is now given to the majority of children with diarrhoea. The annual number of deaths attributable to diarrhoea among children aged under 5 years fell from the estimated 4.6 million in 1980 to about 1.5 million today. Case studies in Brazil, Egypt, Mexico, and the Philippines confirm increases in the use of ORT which are concomitant with marked falls in mortality. In some countries, possible alternative explanations for the observed decline in mortality have been fairly confidently ruled out. Experience with ORT can provide useful guidance for child survival programmes. With adequate political will and financial support, cost-effective interventions other than that of immunization can be successfully delivered by national programmes. Furthermore, there are important lessons for evaluators. The population-based data needed to establish trends in health service delivery, outcomes and impact are not

  18. Reducing deaths from diarrhoea through oral rehydration therapy.

    PubMed

    Victora, C G; Bryce, J; Fontaine, O; Monasch, R

    2000-01-01

    In 1980, diarrhoea was the leading cause of child mortality, accounting for 4.6 million deaths annually. Efforts to control diarrhoea over the past decade have been based on multiple, potentially powerful interventions implemented more or less simultaneously. Oral rehydration therapy (ORT) was introduced in 1979 and rapidly became the cornerstone of programmes for the control of diarrhoeal diseases. We report on the strategy for controlling diarrhoea through case management, with special reference to ORT, and on the relationship between its implementation and reduced mortality. Population-based data on the coverage and quality of facility-based use of ORT are scarce, despite its potential importance in reducing mortality, especially for severe cases. ORT use rates during the 1980s are available for only a few countries. An improvement in the availability of data occurred in the mid-1990s. The study of time trends is hampered by the use of several different definitions of ORT. Nevertheless, the data show positive trends in diarrhoea management in most parts of the world. ORT is now given to the majority of children with diarrhoea. The annual number of deaths attributable to diarrhoea among children aged under 5 years fell from the estimated 4.6 million in 1980 to about 1.5 million today. Case studies in Brazil, Egypt, Mexico, and the Philippines confirm increases in the use of ORT which are concomitant with marked falls in mortality. In some countries, possible alternative explanations for the observed decline in mortality have been fairly confidently ruled out. Experience with ORT can provide useful guidance for child survival programmes. With adequate political will and financial support, cost-effective interventions other than that of immunization can be successfully delivered by national programmes. Furthermore, there are important lessons for evaluators. The population-based data needed to establish trends in health service delivery, outcomes and impact are not

  19. Cause of Death in Patients with Reduced Kidney Function.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Stephanie; James, Matthew; Wiebe, Natasha; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Manns, Braden; Klarenbach, Scott; Tonelli, Marcello

    2015-10-01

    Information on common causes of death in people with CKD is limited. We hypothesized that, as eGFR declines, cardiovascular mortality and mortality from infection account for increasing proportions of deaths. We calculated eGFR using the CKD Epidemiology Collaboration equation for residents of Alberta, Canada who died between 2002 and 2009. We used multinomial logistic regression to estimate unadjusted and age- and sex-adjusted differences in the proportions of deaths from each cause according to the severity of CKD. Cause of death was classified as cardiovascular, infection, cancer, other, or not reported using International Classification of Diseases codes. Among 81,064 deaths, the most common cause was cancer (31.9%) followed by cardiovascular disease (30.2%). The most common cause of death for those with eGFR≥60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) and no proteinuria was cancer (38.1%); the most common cause of death for those with eGFR<60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) was cardiovascular disease. The unadjusted proportion of patients who died from cardiovascular disease increased as eGFR decreased (20.7%, 36.8%, 41.2%, and 43.7% of patients with eGFR≥60 [with proteinuria], 45-59.9, 30-44.9, and 15-29.9 ml/min per 1.73 m(2), respectively). The proportions of deaths from heart failure and valvular disease specifically increased with declining eGFR along with the proportions of deaths from infectious and other causes, whereas the proportion of deaths from cancer decreased. In conclusion, we found an inverse association between eGFR and specific causes of death, including specific types of cardiovascular disease, infection, and other causes, in this cohort. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  20. Reducing Potentially Excess Deaths from the Five Leading Causes of Death in the Rural United States

    PubMed

    Garcia, Macarena C; Faul, Mark; Massetti, Greta; Thomas, Cheryll C; Hong, Yuling; Bauer, Ursula E; Iademarco, Michael F

    2017-01-13

    In 2014, the all-cause age-adjusted death rate in the United States reached a historic low of 724.6 per 100,000 population (1). However, mortality in rural (nonmetropolitan) areas of the United States has decreased at a much slower pace, resulting in a widening gap between rural mortality rates (830.5) and urban mortality rates (704.3) (1). During 1999–2014, annual age-adjusted death rates for the five leading causes of death in the United States (heart disease, cancer, unintentional injury, chronic lower respiratory disease (CLRD), and stroke) were higher in rural areas than in urban (metropolitan) areas (Figure 1). In most public health regions (Figure 2), the proportion of deaths among persons aged <80 years (U.S. average life expectancy) (2) from the five leading causes that were potentially excess deaths was higher in rural areas compared with urban areas (Figure 3). Several factors probably influence the rural-urban gap in potentially excess deaths from the five leading causes, many of which are associated with sociodemographic differences between rural and urban areas. Residents of rural areas in the United States tend to be older, poorer, and sicker than their urban counterparts (3). A higher proportion of the rural U.S. population reports limited physical activity because of chronic conditions than urban populations (4). Moreover, social circumstances and behaviors have an impact on mortality and potentially contribute to approximately half of the determining causes of potentially excess deaths (5).

  1. Reducing maternal deaths in a low resource setting in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ezugwu, E C; Agu, P U; Nwoke, M O; Ezugwu, F O

    2014-01-01

    To assess the impact of the adoption of evidence based guidelines on maternal mortality reduction at Enugu State University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. A retrospective review of all maternal deaths between 1 st January, 2005 and 31 st December, 2010 was carried out. Evidence based management guidelines for eclampsia and post-partum hemorrhage were adopted. These interventions strategy were carried out from 1 st January, 2008-31 st December, 2010 and the result compared with that before the interventions (2005-2007). Maternal mortality ratio (MMR) and case fatality rates. There were 9150 live births and 59 maternal deaths during the study period, giving an MMR of 645/100 000 live births. Pregnant women who had no antenatal care had almost 10 times higher MMR. There was 43.5% reduction in the MMR with the interventions (488 vs. 864/100 000 live births P = 0.039, odds ratio = 1.77). There was also significant reduction in case fatality rate for both eclampsia (15.8% vs. 2.7%; P = 0.024, odds ratio = 5.84 and Post partum hemorrhage (PPH) (13.6% vs. 2.5% P value = 0.023, odds ratio = 5.5. Obstetric hemorrhage was the most common cause of death (23.73%), followed by the eclampsia. Administration of evidence based intervention is possible in low resource settings and could contribute to a significant reduction in the maternal deaths.

  2. Colonoscopy Reduces Risk of Death from Colorectal Cancer in High-Risk Patients

    Cancer.gov

    Long-term results from the National Polyp Study confirm that removing precancerous adenomas not only reduces the risk of colorectal cancer but also reduces the number of deaths from the disease by more than half.

  3. Government introduces action plan to reduce deaths from sepsis.

    PubMed

    Kleebauer, Alistair

    2015-01-20

    Tackling sepsis - the potentially fatal over-reaction of the immune system to infection - must be given the same priority as reducing Clostridium difficile and MRSA infections, the government has said.

  4. Absence of Toll-IL-1 receptor 8/single immunoglobulin IL-1 receptor-related molecule reduces house dust mite-induced allergic airway inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Barry, Jessica; Loh, Zhixuan; Collison, Adam; Mazzone, Stuart; Lalwani, Amit; Zhang, Vivian; Davidson, Sophia; Wybacz, Elisha; Garlanda, Cecilia; Mantovani, Alberto; Mattes, Joerg; Foster, Paul S; Phipps, Simon

    2013-09-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease predominately associated with the activation of CD4(+) T helper Type 2 (Th2) cells. Innate pattern recognition receptors are widely acknowledged to shape the adaptive immune response. For example, the activation of airway epithelial Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) is necessary for the generation of house dust mite (HDM)-specific Th2 responses and the development of asthma in mice. Here we sought to determine whether the absence of Toll-interleukin-1 receptor (TIR)-8, a negative regulator of TLR4 signaling that is highly expressed in airway epithelial cells, would exacerbate HDM-induced asthma in a murine model. We found that Th2 but not Th1 or Th17 cytokine expression was significantly reduced in the lung and draining lymph nodes in HDM-sensitized/challenged TIR8 gene-deleted mice. Mucus-producing goblet cells, HDM-specific IgG1, and airway hyperreactivity were also significantly reduced in HDM-exposed, TIR8-deficient mice. Consistent with the attenuated Th2 response, eotaxin-2/CCL24 expression and airway and peribronchial eosinophils were significantly reduced in the absence of TIR8. In contrast, IL-17A-responsive chemokines and neutrophil numbers were unaffected. Similar findings were obtained for cockroach allergen. HDM sensitization alone up-regulated the expression of IL-1F5, a putative TIR8 ligand and inducer of IL-4. Of note, innate IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and IL-33 cytokine expression was reduced during HDM sensitization in the absence of TIR8, as was the recruitment of conventional dendritic cells and basophils to the draining lymph nodes. Our findings suggest that TIR8 enhances the development of HDM-induced innate and adaptive Th2, but not Th1 or Th17 type immunity.

  5. Self-affirmation and mortality salience: affirming values reduces worldview defense and death-thought accessibility.

    PubMed

    Schmeichel, Brandon J; Martens, Andy

    2005-05-01

    To the extent that cultural worldviews provide meaning in the face of existential concerns, specifically the inevitability of death, affirming a valued aspect of one's worldview should render reminders of death less threatening. The authors report two studies in support of this view. In Study 1, mortality salience led to derogation of a worldview violator unless participants had first affirmed an important value. In Study 2, self-affirmation before a reminder of death was associated with reduced accessibility of death-related thoughts a short while thereafter. The authors propose that actively affirming one's worldview alters reactions to reminders of mortality by reducing the accessibility of death-related thoughts, not by boosting self-esteem. These studies attest to the flexible nature of psychological self-defense and to the central role of cultural worldviews in managing death-related concerns.

  6. Reducing Burnout in the Hospice and the Death Education Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaGrand, Louis E.

    1980-01-01

    Several possibilities are proposed for reducing stress: (1) cognitive modification; (2) exercise outlets; (3) relaxation techniques; and (4) stimulus control. Both awareness and social support among professionals are emphasized as resources to be utilized in designing individual stress-management programs. (Author)

  7. Toll-like receptor ligands sensitize B-cell receptor signalling by reducing actin-dependent spatial confinement of the receptor.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Spencer A; Jaumouillé, Valentin; Choi, Kate; Hsu, Brian E; Wong, Harikesh S; Abraham, Libin; Graves, Marcia L; Coombs, Daniel; Roskelley, Calvin D; Das, Raibatak; Grinstein, Sergio; Gold, Michael R

    2015-02-03

    Integrating signals from multiple receptors allows cells to interpret the physiological context in which a signal is received. Here we describe a mechanism for receptor crosstalk in which receptor-induced increases in actin dynamics lower the threshold for signalling by another receptor. We show that the Toll-like receptor ligands lipopolysaccharide and CpG DNA, which are conserved microbial molecules, enhance signalling by the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) by activating the actin-severing protein cofilin. Single-particle tracking reveals that increased severing of actin filaments reduces the spatial confinement of the BCR within the plasma membrane and increases BCR mobility. This allows more frequent collisions between BCRs and greater signalling in response to low densities of membrane-bound antigen. These findings implicate actin dynamics as a means of tuning receptor signalling and as a mechanism by which B cells distinguish inert antigens from those that are accompanied by indicators of microbial infection.

  8. Toll-like receptor ligands sensitize B-cell receptor signalling by reducing actin-dependent spatial confinement of the receptor

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Spencer A.; Jaumouillé, Valentin; Choi, Kate; Hsu, Brian E.; Wong, Harikesh S.; Abraham, Libin; Graves, Marcia L.; Coombs, Daniel; Roskelley, Calvin D.; Das, Raibatak; Grinstein, Sergio; Gold, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Integrating signals from multiple receptors allows cells to interpret the physiological context in which a signal is received. Here we describe a mechanism for receptor crosstalk in which receptor-induced increases in actin dynamics lower the threshold for signalling by another receptor. We show that the Toll-like receptor ligands lipopolysaccharide and CpG DNA, which are conserved microbial molecules, enhance signalling by the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) by activating the actin-severing protein cofilin. Single-particle tracking reveals that increased severing of actin filaments reduces the spatial confinement of the BCR within the plasma membrane and increases BCR mobility. This allows more frequent collisions between BCRs and greater signalling in response to low densities of membrane-bound antigen. These findings implicate actin dynamics as a means of tuning receptor signalling and as a mechanism by which B cells distinguish inert antigens from those that are accompanied by indicators of microbial infection. PMID:25644899

  9. Can the Americans With Disabilities Act Reduce the Death Toll From Police Encounters With Persons With Mental Illness?

    PubMed

    Appelbaum, Paul S

    2015-10-01

    A substantial proportion of people shot by police have mental disorders, and many of these killings appear to have been avoidable. One tool to encourage better police training and more cautious behavior is the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). However, police groups oppose application of the ADA to arrests, fearing limits on their discretion, and the U.S. Supreme Court appears to favor that view. When the Court declined a recent opportunity to decide the question, it left open a window of opportunity during which the ADA can be leveraged to improve how police officers deal with persons with mental illness.

  10. Reduced hepatic injury in Toll-like receptor 4-deficient mice following D-galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide-induced fulminant hepatic failure.

    PubMed

    Ben Ari, Ziv; Avlas, Orna; Pappo, Orit; Zilbermints, Veacheslav; Cheporko, Yelena; Bachmetov, Larissa; Zemel, Romy; Shainberg, Asher; Sharon, Eran; Grief, Franklin; Hochhauser, Edith

    2012-01-01

    Liver transplantation is the only therapy of proven benefit in fulminant hepatic failure (FHF). Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), D-galactosamine (GalN)-induced FHF is a well established model of liver injury in mice. Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4) has been identified as a receptor for LPS. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of TLR4 in FHF induced by D-GalN/LPS administration in mice. Wild type (WT) and TLR4 deficient (TLR4ko) mice were studied in vivo in a fulminant model induced by GalN/LPS. Hepatic TLR4 expression, serum liver enzymes, hepatic and serum TNF-α and interleukin-1β levels were determined. Apoptotic cells were identified by immunohistochemistry for caspase-3. Nuclear factor-kappaβ (NF-κ β) and phosphorylated c-Jun hepatic expression were studied using Western blot analysis. All WT mice died within 24 hours after administration of GalN/LPS while all TLR4ko mice survived. Serum liver enzymes, interleukin-1β, TNF-α level, TLR4 mRNA expression, hepatic injury and hepatocyte apoptosis all significantly decreased in TLR4ko mice compared with WT mice. A significant decrease in hepatic c-Jun and IκB signaling pathway was noted in TLR4ko mice compared with WT mice. In conclusion, following induction of FHF, the inflammatory response and the liver injury in TLR4ko mice was significantly attenuated through decreased hepatic c-Jun and NF-κB expression and thus decreased TNF-α level. Down-regulation of TLR4 expression plays a pivotal role in GalN/LPS induced FHF. These findings might have important implications for the use of the anti TLR4 protein signaling as a potential target for therapeutic intervention in FHF.

  11. Normothermic Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion in Brain-dead Donors Reduces Inflammatory Cytokines and Toll-like Receptor Expression.

    PubMed

    Shafaghi, Shadi; Mortaz, Esmaeil; Abbasi Dezfuli, Azizollah; Godarzi, Hoda; Sheikhy, Kambiz; Ansari Aval, Zahra; Farzanegan, Behrooz; Emami, Habib; Hosseini-Baharanchi, Fatemeh Sadat; Najafizadeh, Katayoun

    2016-10-01

    Inflammatory responses and innate immunologic reactions play an important role in the respiratory system. Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is considered a novel method in the evaluation and reconditioning of donor lungs prior to transplantation. However, EVLP's effect on inflammatory and metabolic markers of human lung tissue is unknown.  This study investigated how the performance of EVLP on brain-dead (BD) donor lungs affects the production and release of inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-a), inflammatory cells and toll-like receptors (TLR) -2, 4. This study was conducted with an animal subject for qualification of EVLP team and then EVLP was performed on 4 human cases referred to Masih Daneshvari Hospital (Tehran,Iran), from May 2013 to July 2015. Two of these cases, who had acceptable lung function parameters, were enrolled in this study for immunologic investigations. Bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) were taken before and after EVLP. Cytokines were quantitatively measured before lung retrieval, at the end of the lung removal, at the start of EVLP, and at the end of the each hour of EVLP. TLR expression was measured on the cells obtained by flow cytometry. TNF-a, IL-6 and IL-8 decreased in each stage of washing perfusate in both cases, and the level of cytokines in serum was in the normal range. Flow cytometry analysis revealed a decreasing expression of CD3, CD4/8, CD19, and CD16+56, as well as TLR-2 and TLR-4 in both cases. Intra-capillary pools of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-a) were determined to contribute to the lung injury during prolonged lung perfusion. This raises the possibility that EVLP donor lungs could be less immunogenic than standard lungs. However, to assess EVLP's effects on lung grafts and optimize recipient outcomes, further studies with a sufficient number of lungs are required.

  12. Mogroside IIIE, a Novel Anti-Fibrotic Compound, Reduces Pulmonary Fibrosis through Toll-Like Receptor 4 Pathways.

    PubMed

    Tao, Lijun; Yang, Jinyu; Cao, Fengyan; Xie, Haifeng; Zhang, Mian; Gong, Yanqing; Zhang, Chaofeng

    2017-05-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive fibrotic lung disease, and eventually most patients develop respiratory failure with a median survival rate of 2 to 3 years after diagnosis due to the lack of clinically effective therapies. Mogroside IIIE (MGIIIE), a cucurbitane-type compound, was isolated from Siraitia grosvenorii MGIIIE has shown the strongest inhibition of nitric oxide release, a crucial inflammatory factor, from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated RAW264.7 cells compared with other mogrosides. In the pulmonary fibrosis mouse model induced by bleomycin, MGIIIE treatment attenuated pulmonary fibrosis, indicated as a reduction in myeloperoxidase activity, collagen deposition, and pathologic score. MGIIIE also significantly suppressed expression of several important fibrotic markers, e.g., α-smooth muscle actin, collagen I, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signal, and metalloproteinases-9/tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1. Furthermore, MGIIIE blocked tansdifferentiation of lung resident fibroblasts into myofibroblast-like cells induced by TGF-β or LPS and subsequently inhibited collagen production in lung fibroblasts. These data indicate that MGIIIE is a potent inhibitor for pulmonary fibrosis. In vitro and in vivo mechanistic studies have shown that MGIIIE significantly decreased expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and its downstream signals of myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), an inflammatory signal essential for extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition in pulmonary fibroblasts. Taken together, these results demonstrate that MGIIIE significantly prevents pulmonary fibrosis by inhibiting pulmonary inflammation and ECM deposition through regulating TLR4/MyD88-MAPK signaling. Our study suggests that MGIIIE may have therapeutic potential for treating pulmonary fibrosis in clinical settings. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  13. Induced superficial chondrocyte death reduces catabolic cartilage damage in murine posttraumatic osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minjie; Mani, Sriniwasan B; He, Yao; Hall, Amber M; Xu, Lin; Li, Yefu; Zurakowski, David; Jay, Gregory D; Warman, Matthew L

    2016-08-01

    Joints that have degenerated as a result of aging or injury contain dead chondrocytes and damaged cartilage. Some studies have suggested that chondrocyte death precedes cartilage damage, but how the loss of chondrocytes affects cartilage integrity is not clear. In this study, we examined whether chondrocyte death undermines cartilage integrity in aging and injury using a rapid 3D confocal cartilage imaging technique coupled with standard histology. We induced autonomous expression of diphtheria toxin to kill articular surface chondrocytes in mice and determined that chondrocyte death did not lead to cartilage damage. Moreover, cartilage damage after surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus of the knee was increased in mice with intact chondrocytes compared with animals whose chondrocytes had been killed, suggesting that chondrocyte death does not drive cartilage damage in response to injury. These data imply that chondrocyte catabolism, not death, contributes to articular cartilage damage following injury. Therefore, therapies targeted at reducing the catabolic phenotype may protect against degenerative joint disease.

  14. Lack of Toll-like receptor 4 or myeloid differentiation factor 88 reduces atherosclerosis and alters plaque phenotype in mice deficient in apolipoprotein E.

    PubMed

    Michelsen, Kathrin S; Wong, Michelle H; Shah, Prediman K; Zhang, Wenxuan; Yano, Juliana; Doherty, Terence M; Akira, Shizuo; Rajavashisth, Tripathi B; Arditi, Moshe

    2004-07-20

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and the downstream adaptor molecule myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) play an essential role in the innate immune responses. Here, we demonstrate that genetic deficiency of TLR4 or MyD88 is associated with a significant reduction of aortic plaque areas in atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein E-deficient mice, despite persistent hypercholesterolemia, implying an important role for the innate immune system in atherogenesis. Apolipoprotein E-deficient mice that also lacked TLR4 or MyD88 demonstrated reduced aortic atherosclerosis that was associated with reductions in circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines IL-12 or monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, plaque lipid content, numbers of macrophage, and cyclooxygenase 2 immunoreactivity in their plaques. Endothelial-leukocyte adhesion in response to minimally modified low-density lipoprotein was reduced in aortic endothelial cells derived from MyD88-deficient mice. Taken together, our results suggest an important role for TLR4 and MyD88 signaling in atherosclerosis in a hypercholesterolemic mouse model, providing a pathophysiologic link between innate immunity, inflammation, and atherogenesis.

  15. Myeloid cell death associated with Toll-like receptor 7/8-mediated inflammatory response. Implication of ASK1, HIF-1 alpha, IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Sally A; Oniku, Abraham E; Sumbayev, Vadim V

    2010-01-01

    Programmed cell death or apoptosis is an important part of the host innate immune defence, especially against ssRNA viruses (influenza virus, HIV-1, ebola virus, hepatitis C virus and many others). Viral ssRNA is recognised by endosomal Toll-like receptors 7 and 8 (TLR7/8) which induce further stages of immune defence against these pathogens. Some of the immune cells die because of inflammatory stress allowing for the selection of those cells which are resistant to stress-induced apoptosis and which are used in further stages of the host immune response. On the other hand, apoptosis could be used as an instrument to suppress the function of activated inflammatory cells. However, the mechanisms underlying death of the inflammatory cells associated with stress induced by ligands of TLR7/8 remain unclear. In this study we have found that programmed death of human myeloid cells from different cell lines associated with ligand-induced TLR7/8-mediated inflammatory stress depends on activation of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1). This enzyme is, however, not required for the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines - TNF-α and IL-1β. We have found that released IL-1β and TNF-α are involved in apoptosis of myeloid cells associated with TLR7/8-mediated inflammatory stress. The pro-apoptotic effect of released TNF-α in this case is much lower compared to that of IL-1β.

  16. One-week high-fat diet leads to reduced toll-like receptor 2 expression and function in young healthy men.

    PubMed

    Wan, Zhongxiao; Durrer, Cody; Mah, Dorrian; Simtchouk, Svetlana; Little, Jonathan P

    2014-12-01

    Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) is implicated in inflammatory responses to high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity in rodents, but human HFD studies examining TLR2-mediated immune responses are lacking. Our aim was to determine whether HFD affected TLR2 function in humans. We hypothesized that a short-term HFD in humans would impair TLR2-mediated immune function. Fasting blood samples were obtained from healthy young men (N = 9) before and after a 7-day HFD. Toll-like receptor 2 function was assessed in ex vivo whole blood cultures stimulated with the TLR2 agonist N-palmitoyl-S-[2,3-bis[palmitoyloxy]-[2RS]-propyl]-[R]-cysteinyl-[S]-seryl-[S]-lysyl-[S]-lysyl-[S]-lysyl-[S]-lysine (Pam3-Cys-SK4). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated to examine TLR2, TLR4, and p47 subunit of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (p47(phox)) protein expression via Western blotting. Pam3-Cys-SK4-stimulated secretion of interleukin-1β (-35%, P = .005), interleukin-6 (-32%, P = .01), and tumor necrosis factor-α (-33%, P = .06) was reduced following the HFD. High-fat diet resulted in decreased TLR2 (P = .049) and p47(phox) (P = .037) protein expression from PBMCs. To mimic lipid overload ex vivo, follow-up experiments were performed in whole blood cultures exposed to a mixture of free fatty acids for 24 hours; and surface protein expression of TLR2 and TLR4 on CD14+ monocytes was measured by flow cytometry. Free fatty acid exposure for 24 hours ex vivo reduced monocyte TLR2 levels by about 20% (P = .028). A 7-day HFD in young healthy men resulted in impaired TLR2 function. Decreased TLR2 and p47(phox) protein expression in PBMCs, possibly due to excess free fatty acids, may mediate this response. Our current findings indicate that impaired TLR2 response after HFD might be partially responsible for increased risk of infection in diet-induced obesity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways are involved in Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-induced cell death in monocytic THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bei; Sun, Ruili; Luo, Hongbo; Liu, Xueting; Jiang, Manli; Yuan, Chuang; Yang, Li; Hu, Jinyue

    2017-02-01

    Our previous study showed that TLR3 induces apoptosis via both death receptors and mitochondial in human endothelial cells. We report here that the activation of TLR4 induced dose- and time-dependent cell death in moncytic THP-1 cells. LPS treatment of THP-1 cells induced the activation of both caspase 8 and 9, suggesting the involvement of intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis pathways. TNFα was induced by TLR4 activation at both mRNA and protein levels, but its neutralization did not down-regulated TLR4-induced cell death. TLR4 activation also induced the up-regulation of TRAIL and its receptors DR4 and DR5, and the neutralization of TRAIL ameliorated TLR4 induced apoptosis, suggesting the involvement of TRAIL and its receptors DR4 and DR5 in LPS-induced cell death. Meanwhile, LPS treatment down-regulated the expression of FLICE inhibitory protein (FLIP), a suppressor of death receptor-induced cell death. In addition, TLR4 activation down-regulated the anti-apoptotic protein bcl-2, and up-regulated the pro-apoptotic proteins Noxa and Puma, suggesting that mitochondrial apoptotic pathway was also involved in LPS-induced cell death. Furthermore, we found that TAP63α might confer to the activation of intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways. The treatment of THP-1 cells with LPS induced the translocation of TAP63α from cytoplasm to nucleus. Taken together, our study suggested that both death receptors and mitochondial were involved in TLR4-induced cell death, and TAP63α may be a target for the prevention of LPS-induced cell death.

  18. Gratitude orientation reduces death anxiety but not positive and negative affect.

    PubMed

    Lau, Rosanna W L; Cheng, Sheung-Tak

    This study aims at investigating whether a gratitude induction procedure can reduce death anxiety and promote emotional well-being. Ninety Chinese undergraduate students were randomly assigned into one of three experimental conditions: gratitude, hassle, and neutral. In each condition, participants were instructed to spend 15-20 minutes to reflect on past events and to write up to five events of the designated category. Subsequently, they responded to measures of death anxiety and affect. Results showed that those in the gratitude condition reported much lower death anxiety than those in the neutral or the hassle group. However, gratitude had no effect on positive or negative affect. The findings suggest that the effect of gratitude may be specific to death anxiety, which does not occur in the context of the enhancement of overall emotional well-being.

  19. Efficacy of side airbags in reducing driver deaths in driver-side car and SUV collisions.

    PubMed

    McCartt, Anne T; Kyrychenko, Sergey Y

    2007-06-01

    To estimate the efficacy of side airbags in preventing driver deaths in passenger vehicles struck on the driver side. Risk ratios for driver deaths per driver-side collision were computed for side airbag-equipped cars and SUVs, relative to vehicles without side airbags. Driver fatality ratios also were calculated for the same vehicles in front and rear impacts, and these were used to adjust the side crash risk ratios for differences in fatality risk unrelated to side airbags. Risk ratios were calculated separately for side airbags providing torso-only protection and side airbags with head protection; almost all head protecting airbags also had airbags protecting the torso. Car driver death risk in driver-side crashes was reduced by 37 percent for head protecting airbags and 26 percent for torso-only side airbags. Car driver death risk was reduced for older and younger drivers, males and females, and drivers of small and midsize cars, and when the striking vehicle was an SUV/pickup or a car/minivan. Death risk for drivers of SUVs was reduced by 52 percent with head protecting side airbags and by 30 percent with torso-only airbags. The effectiveness of side airbags could not be assessed for pickups and minivans due to the small number of these vehicles with airbags involved in crashes. Side airbags substantially reduce the risk of car and SUV driver death in driver-side collisions. Making side airbags with head protection available to drivers and right front passengers in all passenger vehicles could reduce the number of fatalities in motor vehicle crashes in the United States by about 2,000 each year.

  20. A Proinflammatory Function of Toll-Like Receptor 2 in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium as a Novel Target for Reducing Choroidal Neovascularization in Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Feng, Lili; Ju, Meihua; Lee, Kei Ying V; Mackey, Ashley; Evangelista, Mariasilvia; Iwata, Daiju; Adamson, Peter; Lashkari, Kameran; Foxton, Richard; Shima, David; Ng, Yin Shan

    2017-10-01

    Current treatments for choroidal neovascularization, a major cause of blindness for patients with age-related macular degeneration, treat symptoms but not the underlying causes of the disease. Inflammation has been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of choroidal neovascularization. We examined the inflammatory role of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) in age-related macular degeneration. TLR2 was robustly expressed by the retinal pigment epithelium in mouse and human eyes, both normal and with macular degeneration/choroidal neovascularization. Nuclear localization of NF-κB, a major downstream target of TLR2 signaling, was detected in the retinal pigment epithelium of human eyes, particularly in eyes with advanced stages of age-related macular degeneration. TLR2 antagonism effectively suppressed initiation and growth of spontaneous choroidal neovascularization in a mouse model, and the combination of anti-TLR2 and antivascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 yielded an additive therapeutic effect on both area and number of spontaneous choroidal neovascularization lesions. Finally, in primary human fetal retinal pigment epithelium cells, ligand binding to TLR2 induced robust expression of proinflammatory cytokines, and end products of lipid oxidation had a synergistic effect on TLR2 activation. Our data illustrate a functional role for TLR2 in the pathogenesis of choroidal neovascularization, likely by promoting inflammation of the retinal pigment epithelium, and validate TLR2 as a novel therapeutic target for reducing choroidal neovascularization. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Pu-erh Tea Reduces Nitric Oxide Levels in Rats by Inhibiting Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Expression through Toll-Like Receptor 4

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yang; Wang, Guan; Li, Chunjie; Zhang, Min; Zhao, Hang; Sheng, Jun; Shi, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Pu-erh tea undergoes a unique fermentation process and contains theabrownins, polysaccharides and caffeine; although it is unclear about which component is associated with the down regulation of nitric oxide levels or how this process is mediated. To address this question we examined the effects of pu-erh tea on nitric oxide synthase (NOS) genes. Cohorts of rats were separately given four-week treatments of water as control, pu-erh tea, or the tea components: theabrownins, caffeine or polysaccharides. Five experimental groups were injected with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) to induce nitric oxide (NO) production, while the corresponding five control groups were injected with saline as a negative control. The serum and liver NO concentrations were examined and the NOS expression of both mRNA and protein was measured in liver. The results showed that the rats which were fed pu-erh tea or polysaccharides had lower levels of NO which corresponded with the down-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. We further demonstrate that this effect is mediated through reduction of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling. Thus we find that the polysaccharide components in pu-erh tea reduce NO levels in an animal model by inhibiting the iNOS expression via signaling through TLR4. PMID:22837686

  2. Reducing intrapartum-related deaths and disability: can the health system deliver?

    PubMed

    Lawn, Joy E; Kinney, Mary; Lee, Anne C C; Chopra, Mickey; Donnay, France; Paul, Vinod K; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Bateman, Massee; Darmstadt, Gary L

    2009-10-01

    Each year 1.02 million intrapartum stillbirths and 904,000 intrapartum-related neonatal deaths (formerly called "birth asphyxia") occur, closely linked to 536,000 maternal deaths, an estimated 42% of which are intrapartum-related. To summarize the results of a systematic evidence review, and synthesize actions required to strengthen healthcare delivery systems and home care to reduce intrapartum-related deaths. For this series, systematic searches were undertaken, data synthesized, and meta-analyses carried out for various aspects of intrapartum care, including: obstetric care, neonatal resuscitation, strategies to link communities with facility-based care, care within communities for 60 million non-facility births, and perinatal audit. We used the Lives Saved Tool (LiST) to estimate neonatal deaths prevented with relevant interventions under 2 scenarios: (1) to address missed opportunities for facility and home births; and (2) assuming full coverage of comprehensive emergency obstetric care and emergency newborn care. Countries were first grouped into 5 Categories according to level of neonatal mortality rate and examined, and then priorities were suggested to reduce intrapartum-related deaths for each Category based on health performance and possible lives saved. There is moderate GRADE evidence of effectiveness for the reduction of intrapartum-related mortality through facility-based neonatal resuscitation, perinatal audit, integrated community health worker packages, and community mobilization. The quality of evidence for obstetric care is low, requiring further evaluation for effect on perinatal outcomes, but is expected to be high impact. Over three-quarters of intrapartum-related deaths occur in settings with weak health systems marked by low coverage of skilled birth attendance (<50%), low density of skilled human resources (<0.9 per 1000 population) and low per capita spending on health (

  3. Deferoxamine reduces intracerebral hematoma-induced iron accumulation and neuronal death in piglets

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yuxiang; Hua, Ya; Keep, Richard F.; Morgenstern, Lewis B.; Xi, Guohua

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose Our previous studies found that deferoxamine reduces intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH)-induced brain injury in rats. The current study examined whether deferoxamine reduces brain injury in a piglet ICH model. Methods Pigs received an injection of autologous blood into the right frontal lobe. Deferoxamine (50 mg/kg, IM) or vehicle was administered 2 hours after ICH and then every 12 hours up to 7 days. Animals were killed 3 or 7 days later to examine iron accumulation, white matter injury and neuronal death. Results ICH resulted in development of a reddish perihematomal zone, and iron accumulation, ferritin upregulation and neuronal death within that zone. Deferoxamine reduced the perihematomal reddish zone, white matter injury and the number of Perls’, ferritin and Fluoro-Jade C positive cells. Conclusions Iron accumulation occurs in the piglet brain after ICH. Deferoxamine reduces ICH-induced iron buildup and brain injury in piglets. PMID:19372448

  4. Will the light truck bumper height-matching standard reduce deaths in cars?

    PubMed

    Ossiander, Eric M; Koepsell, Thomas D; McKnight, Barbara

    2013-03-01

    In a collision between a car and a sport utility vehicle (SUV) or pickup truck, car occupants are more likely to be killed than if they crashed with another car. Some of the excess risk may be due to the propensity of SUVs and pickups with high bumpers to override the lower bumpers in cars. To reduce this incompatibility, particularly in head-on collisions, in 2003 automobile manufacturers voluntarily established a bumper height-matching standard for pickups and SUVs. To assess whether height-matching bumpers in pickups and SUVs were associated with the risk of death in either car occupants or pickup and SUV occupants. Case-control study of collisions between one car and one SUV or pickup in the US during 2000-2008, in which the SUV or pickup was model year 2000-2006. Cases were all decedents in fatal crashes; one control was selected from each crash in a national probability sample of crashes. Occupants of cars that crashed with SUVs or pickups with height-matching bumpers may be at slightly reduced risk of death compared to those that crashed with other SUVs or pickups (adjusted odds ratio: 0.83 (95% confidence interval 0.61-1.13)). There was no evidence of a reduction in risk in head-on crashes (1.09 (0.66-1.79)). In crashes in which the SUV or pickup struck the car on the side, height-matched bumpers were associated with a reduced risk of death (0.68 (0.48-0.97)). Occupants of SUVs and pickups with height-matching bumpers may also be at slightly reduced risk of death (0.91 (0.64-1.28)). Height-matching bumpers were associated with a reduced risk of death among car occupants in crashes in which SUVs or pickups struck cars in the side, but there was little evidence of an effect in head-on crashes. The new bumper height-matching standard may not achieve its primary goal of reducing deaths in head-on crashes, but may modestly reduce overall deaths in crashes between cars and SUVs or pickups because of unanticipated benefits to car occupants in side crashes, and a

  5. Is donation after cardiac death reducing the brain-dead donor pool in Australia?

    PubMed

    Sampson, Brett G; O'Callaghan, Gerry P; Russ, Graeme R

    2013-03-01

    Donation after cardiac death (DCD) has increased faster than donation after brain death (DBD) in Australia. However, DBD is the preferred pathway because it provides more organs per donor, the donation process is simpler and transplant outcomes are optimised. To determine if the increase in DCD has reduced the brain-dead donor pool in Australia. Retrospective analysis of records of organ donors (intended and actual) with brain injury as the cause of death from 2001 to 2011 in Australian intensive care units. Change in median ventilation period, over time, before brain-death determination in DBD donors (as DCD increased); a decreased median ventilation period in DBD donors being consistent with the conversion of DBD to DCD. As DCD (n = 311) increased, the median ventilation period in DBD donors (n = 2218) did not fall overall (P = 0.83), in all jurisdictions (P > 0.25) and for all causes of death (P > 0.3). The proportion of patients ventilated for less than 2 days was unchanged over time in both DBD (P = 1) and DCD (P = 0.99). The overall ventilation period in DCD donors (3.8 days; interquartile range [IQR], 2.1-6.3 days), exceeded the ventilation period in DBD donors (1.3 days; IQR, 1.0-2.4 days; P < 0.0001). DCD ventilation period was significantly longer in all jurisdictions, for all causes of death and annually (P < 0.05). In Australia, brain-injured donors appear to be ventilated long enough to allow progression to brain death before proceeding to DCD. Therefore, DCD is unlikely to have reduced the brain-dead donor pool.

  6. A minocycline derivative reduces nerve injury-induced allodynia, LPS-induced prostaglandin E2 microglial production and signaling via toll-like receptors 2 and 4.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Leandro F S; Godin, Adriana M; Zhang, Yingning; Jarussophon, Suwatchai; Ferreira, Bruno C S; Machado, Renes R; Maier, Steven F; Konishi, Yasuo; de Freitas, Rossimiriam P; Fiebich, Bernd L; Watkins, Linda R; Coelho, Márcio M; Moraes, Márcio F D

    2013-05-24

    Many studies have shown that minocycline, an antibacterial tetracycline, suppresses experimental pain. While minocycline's positive effects on pain resolution suggest that clinical use of such drugs may prove beneficial, minocycline's antibiotic actions and divalent cation (Ca(2+); Mg(2+)) chelating effects detract from its potential utility. Thus, we tested the antiallodynic effect induced by a non-antibacterial, non-chelating minocycline derivative in a model of neuropathic pain and performed an initial investigation of its anti-inflammatory effects in vitro. Intraperitoneal minocycline (100mg/kg) and 12S-hydroxy-1,12-pyrazolinominocycline (PMIN; 23.75 mg/kg, 47.50mg/kg or 95.00 mg/kg) reduce the mechanical allodynia induced by chronic constriction injury of mouse sciatic nerve. PMIN reduces the LPS-induced production of PGE2 by primary microglial cell cultures. Human embryonic kidney cells were transfected to express human toll-like receptors 2 and 4, and the signaling via both receptors stimulated with PAM3CSK4 or LPS (respectively) was affected either by minocycline or PMIN. Importantly, these treatments did not affect the cell viability, as assessed by MTT test. Altogether, these results reinforce the evidence that the anti-inflammatory and experimental pain suppressive effects induced by tetracyclines are neither necessarily linked to antibacterial nor to Ca(2+) chelating activities. This study supports the evaluation of the potential usefulness of PMIN in the management of neuropathic pain, as its lack of antibacterial and Ca(2+) chelating activities might confer greater safety over conventional tetracyclines.

  7. A minocycline derivative reduces nerve injury-induced allodynia, LPS-induced prostaglandin E2 microglial production and signaling via toll-like receptors 2 and 4

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Leandro F. S.; Godin, Adriana M.; Zhang, Yingning; Jarussophon, Suwatchai; Ferreira, Bruno C. S.; Machado, Renes R.; Maier, Steven F.; Konishi, Yasuo; de Freitas, Rossimiriam P.; Fiebich, Bernd L.; Watkins, Linda R.; Coelho, Márcio M.; Moraes, Márcio F. D.

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have shown that minocycline, an antibacterial tetracycline, suppresses experimental pain. While minocycline’s positive effects on pain resolution suggest that clinical use of such drugs may prove beneficial, minocycline’s antibiotic actions and divalent cation (Ca2+; Mg2+) chelating effects detract from its potential utility. Thus, we tested the antiallodynic effect induced by a non-antibacterial, non-chelating minocycline derivative in a model of neuropathic pain and performed an initial investigation of its anti-inflammatory effects in vitro. Intraperitoneal minocycline (100 mg/kg) and 12S-hydroxy-1,12-pyrazolinominocycline (PMIN; 23.75, 47.50 or 95.00 mg/kg) reduce the mechanical allodynia induced by chronic constriction injury of mouse sciatic nerve. PMIN reduces the LPS-induced production of PGE2 by primary microglial cell cultures. Human embryonic kidney cells were transfected to express human toll-like receptors 2 and 4, and the signaling via both receptors stimulated with PAM3CSK4 or LPS (respectively) was affected either by minocycline or PMIN. Importantly, these treatments did not affect the cell viability, as assessed by MTT test. Altogether, these results reinforce the evidence that the anti-inflammatory and experimental pain suppressive effects induced by tetracyclines are neither necessarily linked to antibacterial nor to Ca2+ chelating activities. This study supports the evaluation of the potential usefulness of PMIN in the management of neuropathic pain, as its lack of antibacterial and Ca2+ chelating activities might confer greater safety over conventional tetracyclines. PMID:23523650

  8. Gadolinium blocks membrane permeabilization induced by nanosecond electric pulses and reduces cell death

    PubMed Central

    André, Franck M.; Rassokhin, Mikhail A.; Bowman, Angela M.; Pakhomov, Andrei G.

    2009-01-01

    It has been widely accepted that nanosecond electric pulses (nsEP) are distinguished from micro-and millisecond duration pulses by their ability to cause intracellular effects and cell death with reduced effects on the cell plasma membrane. However, we found that nsEP-induced cell death is most likely mediated by the plasma membrane disruption. We showed that nsEP can cause long-lasting (minutes) increase in plasma membrane electrical conductance and disrupt electrolyte balance, followed by water uptake, cell swelling and blebbing. These effects of plasma membrane permeabilization could be blocked by Gd3+ in a dose-dependent manner, with a threshold at sub-micromolar concentrations. Consequently, Gd3+ protected cells from nsEP-induced cell death, thereby pointing to plasma membrane permeabilization as a likely primary mechanism of lethal cell damage. PMID:20097138

  9. Limiting Cumulative HIV Viremia Copy-Years by Early Treatment Reduces Risk of AIDS and Death

    PubMed Central

    Walker, A. Sarah; Suthar, Amitabh B.; Sabin, Caroline; Bucher, Heiner C.; Jarrin, Inma; Moreno, Santiago; Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Porter, Kholoud; Ford, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Background: Viremia copy-years (VCY), a time-updated measure of cumulative HIV exposure, predicts AIDS/death; although its utility in deciding when to start combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) remains unclear. We aimed to assess the impact of initiating versus deferring cART on risk of AIDS/death by levels of VCY both independent of and within CD4 cell count strata ≥500 cells per cubic millimeter. Methods: Using Concerted Action on Seroconversion to AIDS and Death in Europe (CASCADE) data, we created a series of nested “trials” corresponding to consecutive months for individuals ≥16 years at seroconversion after 1995 who were cART-naive and AIDS-free. Pooling across all trials, time to AIDS/death by CD4, and VCY strata was compared in those initiating vs. deferring cART using Cox models adjusted for: country, sex, risk group, seroconversion year, age, time since last HIV-RNA, and current CD4, VCY, HIV-RNA, and mean number of previous CD4/HIV-RNA measurements/year. Results: Of 9353 individuals, 5312 (57%) initiated cART and 486 (5%) acquired AIDS/died. Pooling CD4 strata, risk of AIDS/death associated with initiating vs. deferring cART reduced as VCY increased. In patients with high CD4 cell counts, ≥500 cells per cubic millimeter, there was a trend for a greater reduction for those initiating vs. deferring with increasing VCY (P = 0.09), with the largest benefit in the VCY ≥100,000 copy-years/mL group [hazard ratio (95% CI) = 0.41 (0.19 to 0.87)]. Conclusions: For individuals with CD4 ≥500 cells per cubic millimeter, limiting the cumulative HIV burden to <100,000 copy-years/mL through cART may reduce the risk of AIDS/death. PMID:27116045

  10. Efficacy of side air bags in reducing driver deaths in driver-side collisions.

    PubMed

    Braver, Elisa R; Kyrychenko, Sergey Y

    2004-03-15

    Side air bags, a relatively new technology designed to protect the head and/or torso in side-impact collisions, are becoming increasingly common in automobiles. Their efficacy in preventing US driver deaths among cars struck on the near (driver's) side was examined using data from the Fatality Analysis Reporting System and the General Estimates System. Risk ratios for driver death per nearside collision during 1999-2001 were computed for head/torso and torso-only side air bags in cars from model years 1997-2002, relative to cars without side air bags. Confounding was addressed by adjusting nearside risk ratios for front- and rear-impact mortality, which is unaffected by side air bags. Risk ratios were 0.55 (95% confidence interval: 0.43, 0.71) for head/torso air bags and 0.89 (95% confidence interval: 0.79, 1.01) for torso-only air bags. Risk was reduced when cars with head/torso air bags were struck by cars/minivans (significant) or pickup trucks/sport utility vehicles (nonsignificant). Risk was reduced in two-vehicle collisions and among male drivers and drivers aged 16-64 years. Protective effects associated with torso-only air bags were observed in single-vehicle crashes and among male and 16- to 64-year-old drivers. Head/torso side air bags appear to be very effective in reducing nearside driver deaths, whereas torso-only air bags appear less protective.

  11. Minimizing fungal disease deaths will allow the UNAIDS target of reducing annual AIDS deaths below 500 000 by 2020 to be realized.

    PubMed

    Denning, David W

    2016-12-05

    Deaths from AIDS (1 500 000 in 2013) have been falling more slowly than anticipated with improved access to antiretroviral therapy. Opportunistic infections account for most AIDS-related mortality, with a median age of death in the mid-30s. About 360 000 (24%) of AIDS deaths are attributed to tuberculosis. Fungal infections deaths in AIDS were estimated at more than 700 000 deaths (47%) annually. Rapid diagnostic tools and antifungal agents are available for these diseases and would likely have a major impact in reducing deaths. Scenarios for reduction of avoidable deaths were constructed based on published outcomes of the real-life impact of diagnostics and generic antifungal drugs to 2020. Annual deaths could fall for cryptococcal disease by 70 000, Pneumocystis pneumonia by 162 500, disseminated histoplasmosis by 48 000 and chronic pulmonary aspergillosis by 33 500, with approximately 60% coverage of diagnostics and antifungal agents; a total of >1 000 000 lives saved over 5 years. If factored in with the 90-90-90 campaign rollout and its effect, AIDS deaths could fall to 426 000 annually by 2020, with further reductions possible with increased coverage. Action could and should be taken by donors, national and international public health agencies, NGOs and governments to achieve the UNAIDS mortality reduction target, by scaling up capability to detect and treat fungal disease in AIDS.This article is part of the themed issue 'Tackling emerging fungal threats to animal health, food security and ecosystem resilience'.

  12. Minimizing fungal disease deaths will allow the UNAIDS target of reducing annual AIDS deaths below 500 000 by 2020 to be realized

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Deaths from AIDS (1 500 000 in 2013) have been falling more slowly than anticipated with improved access to antiretroviral therapy. Opportunistic infections account for most AIDS-related mortality, with a median age of death in the mid-30s. About 360 000 (24%) of AIDS deaths are attributed to tuberculosis. Fungal infections deaths in AIDS were estimated at more than 700 000 deaths (47%) annually. Rapid diagnostic tools and antifungal agents are available for these diseases and would likely have a major impact in reducing deaths. Scenarios for reduction of avoidable deaths were constructed based on published outcomes of the real-life impact of diagnostics and generic antifungal drugs to 2020. Annual deaths could fall for cryptococcal disease by 70 000, Pneumocystis pneumonia by 162 500, disseminated histoplasmosis by 48 000 and chronic pulmonary aspergillosis by 33 500, with approximately 60% coverage of diagnostics and antifungal agents; a total of >1 000 000 lives saved over 5 years. If factored in with the 90–90–90 campaign rollout and its effect, AIDS deaths could fall to 426 000 annually by 2020, with further reductions possible with increased coverage. Action could and should be taken by donors, national and international public health agencies, NGOs and governments to achieve the UNAIDS mortality reduction target, by scaling up capability to detect and treat fungal disease in AIDS. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Tackling emerging fungal threats to animal health, food security and ecosystem resilience’. PMID:28080991

  13. BDNF injected into the superior colliculus reduces developmental retinal ganglion cell death.

    PubMed

    Ma, Y T; Hsieh, T; Forbes, M E; Johnson, J E; Frost, D O

    1998-03-15

    The role of neurotrophins as survival factors for developing CNS neurons, including retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), is uncertain. Null mutations for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or neurotrophin 4 (NT4), individually or together, are without apparent effect on the number of RGCs that survive beyond the period of normal, developmental RGC death. This contrasts with the BDNF dependence of RGCs in vitro and the effectiveness of BDNF in reducing RGC loss after axotomy. To investigate the effect of target-derived neurotrophins on the survival of developing RGCs, we injected BDNF into the superior colliculus (SC) of neonatal hamsters. At the age when the rate of developmental RGC death is greatest, BDNF produces, 20 hr after injection, a 13-15-fold reduction in the rate of RGC pyknosis compared with the rates in vehicle-injected and untreated hamsters. There is no effect 8 hr after injection. Electrochemiluminescence immunoassay measurements of BDNF protein in the retinae and SC of normal and BDNF-treated hamsters demonstrate that the time course of BDNF transport to RGCs supports a role for target-derived BDNF in promoting RGC survival. The effectiveness of pharmacological doses of BDNF in reducing developmental RGC death may be useful in further studies of the mechanisms of stabilization and elimination of immature central neurons.

  14. Impact of a hospital-level intervention to reduce heart disease overreporting on leading causes of death.

    PubMed

    Al-Samarrai, Teeb; Madsen, Ann; Zimmerman, Regina; Maduro, Gil; Li, Wenhui; Greene, Carolyn; Begier, Elizabeth

    2013-05-16

    The quality of cause-of-death reporting on death certificates affects the usefulness of vital statistics for public health action. Heart disease deaths are overreported in the United States. We evaluated the impact of an intervention to reduce heart disease overreporting on other leading causes of death. A multicomponent intervention comprising training and communication with hospital staff was implemented during July through December 2009 at 8 New York City hospitals reporting excessive heart disease deaths. We compared crude, age-adjusted, and race/ethnicity-adjusted proportions of leading, underlying causes of death reported during death certification by intervention and nonintervention hospitals during preintervention (January-June 2009) and postintervention (January-June 2010) periods. We also examined trends in leading causes of death for 2000 through 2010. At intervention hospitals, heart disease deaths declined by 54% postintervention; other leading causes of death (ie, malignant neoplasms, influenza and pneumonia, cerebrovascular disease, and chronic lower respiratory diseases) increased by 48% to 232%. Leading causes of death at nonintervention hospitals changed by 6% or less. In the preintervention period, differences in leading causes of death between intervention and nonintervention hospitals persisted after controlling for race/ethnicity and age; in the postintervention period, age accounted for most differences observed between intervention and nonintervention hospitals. Postintervention, malignant neoplasms became the leading cause of premature death (ie, deaths among patients aged 35-74 y) at intervention hospitals. A hospital-level intervention to reduce heart disease overreporting led to substantial changes to other leading causes of death, changing the leading cause of premature death. Heart disease overreporting is likely obscuring the true levels of cause-specific mortality.

  15. Impact of a Hospital-Level Intervention to Reduce Heart Disease Overreporting on Leading Causes of Death

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Ann; Zimmerman, Regina; Maduro, Gil; Li, Wenhui; Greene, Carolyn; Begier, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The quality of cause-of-death reporting on death certificates affects the usefulness of vital statistics for public health action. Heart disease deaths are overreported in the United States. We evaluated the impact of an intervention to reduce heart disease overreporting on other leading causes of death. Methods A multicomponent intervention comprising training and communication with hospital staff was implemented during July through December 2009 at 8 New York City hospitals reporting excessive heart disease deaths. We compared crude, age-adjusted, and race/ethnicity-adjusted proportions of leading, underlying causes of death reported during death certification by intervention and nonintervention hospitals during preintervention (January–June 2009) and postintervention (January–June 2010) periods. We also examined trends in leading causes of death for 2000 through 2010. Results At intervention hospitals, heart disease deaths declined by 54% postintervention; other leading causes of death (ie, malignant neoplasms, influenza and pneumonia, cerebrovascular disease, and chronic lower respiratory diseases) increased by 48% to 232%. Leading causes of death at nonintervention hospitals changed by 6% or less. In the preintervention period, differences in leading causes of death between intervention and nonintervention hospitals persisted after controlling for race/ethnicity and age; in the postintervention period, age accounted for most differences observed between intervention and nonintervention hospitals. Postintervention, malignant neoplasms became the leading cause of premature death (ie, deaths among patients aged 35–74 y) at intervention hospitals. Conclusion A hospital-level intervention to reduce heart disease overreporting led to substantial changes to other leading causes of death, changing the leading cause of premature death. Heart disease overreporting is likely obscuring the true levels of cause-specific mortality. PMID:23680506

  16. Increased Rate of Adenoma Detection Associates With Reduced Risk of Colorectal Cancer and Death.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Michal F; Wieszczy, Paulina; Rupinski, Maciej; Wojciechowska, Urszula; Didkowska, Joanna; Kraszewska, Ewa; Kobiela, Jaroslaw; Franczyk, Robert; Rupinska, Maria; Kocot, Bartlomiej; Chaber-Ciopinska, Anna; Pachlewski, Jacek; Polkowski, Marcin; Regula, Jaroslaw

    2017-07-01

    The quality of endoscopists' colonoscopy performance is measured by adenoma detection rate (ADR). Although ADR is associated inversely with interval colorectal cancer and colorectal cancer death, the effects of an increasing ADR have not been shown. We investigated whether increasing ADRs from individual endoscopists is associated with reduced risks of interval colorectal cancer and subsequent death. We performed a prospective cohort study of individuals who underwent a screening colonoscopy within the National Colorectal Cancer Screening Program in Poland, from January 1, 2004, through December 31, 2008. We collected data from 146,860 colonoscopies performed by 294 endoscopists, with each endoscopist having participated at least twice in annual editions of primary colonoscopy screening. We used annual feedback and quality benchmark indicators to improve colonoscopy performance. We used ADR quintiles in the whole data set to categorize the annual ADRs for each endoscopist. An increased ADR was defined as an increase by at least 1 quintile category, or the maintenance of the highest category in subsequent screening years. Multivariate frailty models were used to evaluate the effects of increased ADR on the risk of interval colorectal cancer and death. Throughout the enrollment period, 219 endoscopists (74.5%) increased their annual ADR category. During 895,916 person-years of follow-up evaluation through the National Cancer Registry, we identified 168 interval colorectal cancers and 44 interval cancer deaths. An increased ADR was associated with an adjusted hazard ratio for interval colorectal cancer of 0.63 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.45-0.88; P = .006), and for cancer death of 0.50 (95% CI, 0.27-0.95; P = .035). Compared with no increase in ADR, reaching or maintaining the highest quintile ADR category (such as an ADR > 24.56%) decreased the adjusted hazard ratios for interval colorectal cancer to 0.27 (95% CI, 0.12-0.63; P = .003), and 0.18 (95% CI, 0

  17. Toll-Booth Purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    NASA's Technology Application Team at Stanford Research Institute searched available information and suggested a transfer of clean-room technology employing the use of the same laminar flow techniques found in environmental control systems of clean rooms used for contamination-free assembly of precision aerospace equipment. That information, from technology originally developed by NASA and the Energy Research & Development Administration was incorporated in the design of a prototype toll booth purifier. The draft-free design includes a "diffusor", which blows clean air out the toll booth doorway, thus retarding the infiltration of contaminated air. The net effect is a decrease in the toll collector's inhalation of exhaust fumes. The Washington Department of Highways installed the prototype system in a toll booth at the Evergreen Point Bridge near Seattle. After a successful two-year test, the department now has equipped all 10 of the bridge's toll booths with the air purifiers.

  18. Elevated CO2 Reduced Floret Death in Wheat Under Warmer Average Temperatures and Terminal Drought

    PubMed Central

    Dias de Oliveira, Eduardo; Palta, Jairo A.; Bramley, Helen; Stefanova, Katia; Siddique, Kadambot H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated CO2 often increases grain yield in wheat by enhancing grain number per ear, which can result from an increase in the potential number of florets or a reduction in the death of developed florets. The hypotheses that elevated CO2 reduces floret death rather than increases floret development, and that grain size in a genotype with more grains per unit area is limited by the rate of grain filling, were tested in a pair of sister lines contrasting in tillering capacity (restricted- vs. free-tillering). The hypotheses were tested under elevated CO2, combined with +3°C above ambient temperature and terminal drought, using specialized field tunnel houses. Elevated CO2 increased net leaf photosynthetic rates and likely the availability of carbon assimilates, which significantly reduced the rates of floret death and increased the potential number of grains at anthesis in both sister lines by an average of 42%. The restricted-tillering line had faster grain-filling rates than the free-tillering line because the free-tillering line had more grains to fill. Furthermore, grain-filling rates were faster under elevated CO2 and +3°C above ambient. Terminal drought reduced grain yield in both lines by 19%. Elevated CO2 alone increased the potential number of grains, but a trade-off in yield components limited grain yield in the free-tillering line. This emphasizes the need for breeding cultivars with a greater potential number of florets, since this was not affected by the predicted future climate variables. PMID:26635837

  19. Do pets reduce the likelihood of sudden unexplained death in epilepsy?

    PubMed

    Terra, Vera C; Sakamoto, Américo C; Machado, Hélio R; Martins, Luciana D; Cavalheiro, Esper A; Arida, Ricardo M; Stöllberger, Claudia; Finsterer, Josef; Scorza, Fulvio A

    2012-10-01

    To assess the relationship between the presence of pets in homes of epilepsy patients and the occurrence of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). Parents or relatives of SUDEP patients collected over a ten-year period (2000-2009) in a large epilepsy unit were asked if the patient lived together with any domestic pet at the time of death or not. Patients who did not experience SUDEP served as controls. Eleven out of the 1092 included patients (1%) experienced SUDEP, all with refractory symptomatic epilepsy, but none of them had pets in their homes at the time of death. In contrast, the frequency of pet-ownership in the control group (n=1081) was 61%. According to previous studies there are some indications that human health is directly related to companionship with animals in a way that domestic animals prevent illness and facilitate recovery of patients. Companion animals can buffer reactivity against acute stress, diminish stress perception and improve physical health. These factors may reduce cardiac arrhythmias and seizure frequency, factors related to SUDEP. Companion animals may have a positive effect on well-being, thus improving epilepsy outcome. Copyright © 2012 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Sudden cardiac death in hemodialysis patients: a comprehensive care approach to reduce risk.

    PubMed

    Pun, Patrick H; Middleton, John P

    2012-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death is a major problem in hemodialysis patients, and our understanding of this disease is underdeveloped. The lack of a precise definition tailored for use in the hemodialysis population limits the reliability of epidemiologic reports. Efforts should be directed toward an accurate classification of all deaths that occur in this vulnerable population. The traditional paradigm of disease pathophysiology based on known cardiac risk factors appears to be inadequate to explain the magnitude of sudden cardiac death risk in chronic kidney disease, and numerous unique cofactors and exposures appear to determine risk in this population. Well-designed cohort studies will be needed for a basic understanding of disease pathophysiology and risk factors, and randomized intervention trials will be needed before best management practices can be implemented. This review examines available data to describe the characteristics of the high-risk patient and suggests a comprehensive common sense approach to prevention using existing cardiovascular medications and reducing and monitoring potential dialysis-related arrhythmic triggers. Other unproven cardiovascular therapies such as implantable cardioverter defibrillators should be used on a case-by-case basis, with recognition of the associated hazards that these devices carry among hemodialysis patients.

  1. β-Blockers Reduce Breast Cancer Recurrence and Breast Cancer Death: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Childers, W Kurtis; Hollenbeak, Christopher S; Cheriyath, Pramil

    2015-12-01

    The normal physiologic stress mechanism, mediated by the sympathetic nervous system, causes a release of the neurotransmitters epinephrine and norepinephrine. Preclinical data have demonstrated an effect on tumor progression and metastasis via the sympathetic nervous system mediated primarily through the β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) pathway. In vitro data have shown an increase in tumor growth, migration, tumor angiogenesis, and metastatic spread in breast cancer through activation of the β-AR. Retrospective cohort studies on the clinical outcomes of β-blockers in breast cancer outcomes showed no clear consensus. The purpose of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of the effect of β-blockers on breast cancer outcomes. A systematic review was performed using the Cochrane library and PubMed. Publications between the dates of January 2010 and December 2013 were identified. Available hazard ratios (HRs) were extracted for breast cancer recurrence, breast cancer death, and all-cause mortality and pooled using a random effects meta-analysis. A total of 7 studies contained results for at least 1 of the outcomes of breast cancer recurrence, breast cancer death, or all-cause mortality in breast cancer patients receiving β-blockers. In the 5 studies that contained results for breast cancer recurrence, there was no statistically significant risk reduction (HR, 0.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.39-1.13). Breast cancer death results were contained in 4 studies, which also suggested a significant reduction in risk (HR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.32-0.80). Among the 4 studies that reported all-cause mortality, there was no significant effect of β-blockers on risk (HR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.75-1.37). Results of this systematic review and meta-analysis suggest that the use of β-blockers significantly reduced risk of breast cancer death among women with breast cancer.

  2. Reduced death rates from cyclones in Bangladesh: what more needs to be done?

    PubMed

    Haque, Ubydul; Hashizume, Masahiro; Kolivras, Korine N; Overgaard, Hans J; Das, Bivash; Yamamoto, Taro

    2012-02-01

    Tropical storms, such as cyclones, hurricanes and typhoons, present major threats to coastal communities. Around two million people worldwide have died and millions have been injured over the past two centuries as a result of tropical storms. Bangladesh is especially vulnerable to tropical cyclones, with around 718 000 deaths from them in the past 50 years. However, cyclone-related mortality in Bangladesh has declined by more than 100-fold over the past 40 years, from 500 000 deaths in 1970 to 4234 in 2007. The main factors responsible for these reduced fatalities and injuries are improved defensive measures, including early warning systems, cyclone shelters, evacuation plans, coastal embankments, reforestation schemes and increased awareness and communication. Although warning systems have been improved, evacuation before a cyclone remains a challenge, with major problems caused by illiteracy, lack of awareness and poor communication. Despite the potential risks of climate change and tropical storms, little empirical knowledge exists on how to develop effective strategies to reduce or mitigate the effects of cyclones. This paper summarizes the most recent data and outlines the strategy adopted in Bangladesh. It offers guidance on how similar strategies can be adopted by other countries vulnerable to tropical storms. Further research is needed to enable countries to limit the risks that cyclones present to public health.

  3. Reduced death rates from cyclones in Bangladesh: what more needs to be done?

    PubMed Central

    Hashizume, Masahiro; Kolivras, Korine N; Overgaard, Hans J; Das, Bivash; Yamamoto, Taro

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Tropical storms, such as cyclones, hurricanes and typhoons, present major threats to coastal communities. Around two million people worldwide have died and millions have been injured over the past two centuries as a result of tropical storms. Bangladesh is especially vulnerable to tropical cyclones, with around 718 000 deaths from them in the past 50 years. However, cyclone-related mortality in Bangladesh has declined by more than 100-fold over the past 40 years, from 500 000 deaths in 1970 to 4234 in 2007. The main factors responsible for these reduced fatalities and injuries are improved defensive measures, including early warning systems, cyclone shelters, evacuation plans, coastal embankments, reforestation schemes and increased awareness and communication. Although warning systems have been improved, evacuation before a cyclone remains a challenge, with major problems caused by illiteracy, lack of awareness and poor communication. Despite the potential risks of climate change and tropical storms, little empirical knowledge exists on how to develop effective strategies to reduce or mitigate the effects of cyclones. This paper summarizes the most recent data and outlines the strategy adopted in Bangladesh. It offers guidance on how similar strategies can be adopted by other countries vulnerable to tropical storms. Further research is needed to enable countries to limit the risks that cyclones present to public health. PMID:22423166

  4. Moraxella catarrhalis activates murine macrophages through multiple toll like receptors and has reduced clearance in lungs from TLR4 mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Ferdaus; Ren, Dabin; Zhang, Wenhong; Merkel, Tod J; Gu, Xin-Xing

    2012-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a gram negative bacterium and a leading causative agent of otitis media (OM) in children. Several recent reports have provided strong evidence for an association between toll like receptors and OM. It has been found that both Streptococcus pneumoniae and nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae activate host protective immune responses through toll like receptors (TLRs), however, the precise mechanism by which Moraxella catarrhalis initiates the host immune response is currently unknown. In this report, using murine macrophages generated from a series of knock-out mice, we have demonstrated that M. catarrhalis lipooligosaccharide (LOS) and either heat killed or live bacteria are recognized by one or more TLRs. LOS activates the host immune response through a membrane bound CD14-TLR4 complex, while both heat killed and live M.cat require recognition by multiple toll like receptors such as TLR2, TLR4 and TLR9 without the requirement of CD14. We have also shown that M.cat stimuli are capable of triggering the host innate immune response by both MyD88- and TRIF- dependent signaling pathways. We further showed that M.cat induced activation of mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) is essential in order to achieve optimal secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α. We finally showed that TLR4 mutant C3H/HeJ mice produce significantly lower levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 in vivo, An increased bacterial loads at 12 and 24 hours (P<0.001) in their lungs upon challenge with live M.cat in an aerosol chamber compared to wild-type (WT) control mice. These data suggest that TLRs are crucial for an effective innate immune response induced by M.cat. The results of these studies contribute to an increased understanding of molecular mechanism and possible novel treatment strategies for diseases caused by M.cat by specifically targeting TLRs and their signaling pathways.

  5. Cabergoline, dopamine D2 receptor agonist, prevents neuronal cell death under oxidative stress via reducing excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Odaka, Haruki; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Adachi, Naoki; Ooshima, Yoshiko; Nakajima, Shingo; Katanuma, Yusuke; Inoue, Takafumi; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Several lines of evidence demonstrate that oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease. Potent antioxidants may therefore be effective in the treatment of such diseases. Cabergoline, a dopamine D2 receptor agonist and antiparkinson drug, has been studied using several cell types including mesencephalic neurons, and is recognized as a potent radical scavenger. Here, we examined whether cabergoline exerts neuroprotective effects against oxidative stress through a receptor-mediated mechanism in cultured cortical neurons. We found that neuronal death induced by H₂O₂ exposure was inhibited by pretreatment with cabergoline, while this protective effect was eliminated in the presence of a dopamine D2 receptor inhibitor, spiperone. Activation of ERK1/2 by H₂O₂ was suppressed by cabergoline, and an ERK signaling pathway inhibitor, U0126, similarly protected cortical neurons from cell death. This suggested the ERK signaling pathway has a critical role in cabergoline-mediated neuroprotection. Furthermore, increased extracellular levels of glutamate induced by H₂O₂, which might contribute to ERK activation, were reduced by cabergoline, while inhibitors for NMDA receptor or L-type Ca²⁺ channel demonstrated a survival effect against H₂O₂. Interestingly, we found that cabergoline increased expression levels of glutamate transporters such as EAAC1. Taken together, these results suggest that cabergoline has a protective effect on cortical neurons via a receptor-mediated mechanism including repression of ERK1/2 activation and extracellular glutamate accumulation induced by H₂O₂.

  6. Improving patient safety to reduce preventable deaths: the case of a California safety net hospital.

    PubMed

    Leach, Linda Searle; Kagawa, Frank; Mayo, Ann; Pugh, Connie

    2012-01-01

    Preventable deaths occur when signs and symptoms of risk and decline are not detected yet are present many hours prior to a deteriorating course. Rapid responses teams (RRTs), also referred to as medical emergency teams (METs) were introduced to improve patient safety by preventing code arrests and death. This research using a case study methodology describes a nurse-led RRT, developed at a large, safety net, teaching hospital in California. Safety-net hospitals are challenged to deliver care and meet the complex needs of vulnerable patient populations. This hospital is a mission driven organization that is focused on the patient and the needs of underserved populations. To respond to the call for reform for patient safety and reduce adverse events, the organization adopted RRTs, early recognition rounds by RRT registered nurses (RNs) and the use of trigger alerts by nursing assistants (NAs) to expand the surveillance and identification of patients most at risk of clinical deterioration. Collaboration with interns and residents (house staff) facilitated their involvement and response to RRT calls. Using quality data from 2005 to 2010, findings from this patient safety innovation address RRT utilization, frequency of non-ICU code arrests, hospital mortality, and post-arrest survival outcomes.

  7. Nicotinamide reduces acute cortical neuronal death and edema in the traumatically injured brain.

    PubMed

    Hoane, Michael R; Gilbert, David R; Holland, Michael A; Pierce, Jeremy L

    2006-11-06

    Previous studies have shown that administration of nicotinamide (Vitamin B(3)) in animal models of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and ischemia significantly reduced the size of infarction or injury and improved functional recovery. The present study evaluated the ability of nicotinamide to provide acute neuroprotection and edema reduction following TBI. Groups of rats were assigned to nicotinamide (500mg/kg) or saline (1.0ml/kg) treatment conditions and received contusion injuries or sham surgeries. Drug treatment was administered 15min following injury. Brains were harvested 24h later and either processed for histology or water content. Frozen sections were stained with the degenerating neuron stain (Fluoro-Jade B) (FJ) and cell counts were performed at the site of injury. Additional brains were processed for water content (a measure of injury-induced edema). Results of this study showed that administration of nicotinamide following TBI significantly reduced the number of FJ(+) neurons in the injured cortex compared to saline-treated animals. Examination of the water content of the brains also revealed that administration of nicotinamide significantly attenuated the amount of water compared to saline-treated animals in the injured cortex. These results indicate that nicotinamide administration significantly reduced neuronal death and attenuated cerebral edema following injury. The current findings suggest that nicotinamide significantly modulates acute pathophysiological processes following injury and that this may account for its beneficial effects on recovery of function following injury.

  8. Ways To Reduce the Risk of SIDS and Other Sleep-Related Causes of Infant Death

    MedlinePlus

    ... SIDS and Other Sleep-Related Causes of Infant Death Page Content Research shows that there are several ... SIDS and other sleep-related causes of infant death: The actions listed here and in Safe to ...

  9. Management Strategies Aiming to Improve Horse Welfare Reduce Embryonic Death Rates in Mares.

    PubMed

    Malschitzky, E; Pimentel, A M; Garbade, P; Jobim, Mim; Gregory, R M; Mattos, R C

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate the effect of management strategies aiming to improve animal well-being on pregnancy and embryonic death (ED) rates. Breeding records of a cohort of 1206 Thoroughbred mares brought to a stallion station facility, to be bred with the stallions housed there, were evaluated during ten breeding seasons. Mares were blocked according to management strategies in two groups: Stress and Relax. Strategies used to improve animal well-being (Relax group) were as follows: stopping the teasing routine, reducing or eliminating stall confinement, reducing the number of mares per group and maintaining herd stability during the breeding season. In barren mares, the pregnancy rate was higher in the Relax group (91.8%) when compared to the observed in Stress group (84.7%). However, no difference in pregnancy rates were observed (Stress = 85.2% vs. Relax = 86.2) in foaling mares. ED rate was higher in barren and foaling mares of the Stress group mares (25.5% and 26.8%, respectively) compared with the Relax group (16.1% and 14.7%, respectively). No significant differences were observed on foal heat pregnancy rate between groups; yet, the embryo loss on foal heat was significant reduced in Relax mares (Relax = 8.7% vs Stress = 24.5%). In conclusion, management strategies aimed to reduce social stress can reduce early pregnancy losses and the average cycles per pregnancy, improving reproductive performance in mares.

  10. Teaching Child Care Providers to Reduce the Risk of SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byington, Teresa; Martin, Sally; Reilly, Jackie; Weigel, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Keeping children safe and healthy is one of the main concerns of parents and child care providers. SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome) is the leading cause of death in infants 1 month to 12 months of age. Over 2,000 infants die from SIDS every year in the United States, and almost 15% of these deaths occur in child care settings. A targeted…

  11. Teaching Child Care Providers to Reduce the Risk of SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byington, Teresa; Martin, Sally; Reilly, Jackie; Weigel, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Keeping children safe and healthy is one of the main concerns of parents and child care providers. SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome) is the leading cause of death in infants 1 month to 12 months of age. Over 2,000 infants die from SIDS every year in the United States, and almost 15% of these deaths occur in child care settings. A targeted…

  12. Adalimumab Reduces Photoreceptor Cell Death in A Mouse Model of Retinal Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Fernández de la Cámara, Cristina; Hernández-Pinto, Alberto M; Olivares-González, Lorena; Cuevas-Martín, Carmen; Sánchez-Aragó, María; Hervás, David; Salom, David; Cuezva, José M; de la Rosa, Enrique J; Millán, José M; Rodrigo, Regina

    2015-07-14

    Growing evidence suggests that inflammation is involved in the progression of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) both in patients and in animal models. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Adalimumab, a monoclonal anti-TNFα antibody, on retinal degeneration in a murine model of human autosomal recessive RP, the rd10 mice at postnatal day (P) 18. In our housing conditions, rd10 retinas were seriously damaged at P18. Adalimumab reduced photoreceptor cell death, as determined by scoring the number of TUNEL-positive cells. In addition, nuclear poly (ADP) ribose (PAR) content, an indirect measure of PAR polymerase (PARP) activity, was also reduced after treatment. The blockade of TNFα ameliorated reactive gliosis, as visualized by decreased GFAP and IBA1 immunolabelling (Müller cell and microglial markers, respectively) and decreased up-regulation of TNFα gene expression. Adalimumab also improved antioxidant response by restoring total antioxidant capacity and superoxide dismutase activity. Finally, we observed that Adalimumab normalized energetic and metabolic pattern in rd10 mouse retinas. Our study suggests that the TNFα blockade could be a successful therapeutic approach to increase photoreceptor survival during the progression of RP. Further studies are needed to characterize its effect along the progression of the disease.

  13. Adalimumab Reduces Photoreceptor Cell Death in A Mouse Model of Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Fernández de la Cámara, Cristina; Hernández-Pinto, Alberto M.; Olivares-González, Lorena; Cuevas-Martín, Carmen; Sánchez-Aragó, María; Hervás, David; Salom, David; Cuezva, José M.; de la Rosa, Enrique J.; Millán, José M; Rodrigo, Regina

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that inflammation is involved in the progression of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) both in patients and in animal models. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Adalimumab, a monoclonal anti-TNFα antibody, on retinal degeneration in a murine model of human autosomal recessive RP, the rd10 mice at postnatal day (P) 18. In our housing conditions, rd10 retinas were seriously damaged at P18. Adalimumab reduced photoreceptor cell death, as determined by scoring the number of TUNEL-positive cells. In addition, nuclear poly (ADP) ribose (PAR) content, an indirect measure of PAR polymerase (PARP) activity, was also reduced after treatment. The blockade of TNFα ameliorated reactive gliosis, as visualized by decreased GFAP and IBA1 immunolabelling (Müller cell and microglial markers, respectively) and decreased up-regulation of TNFα gene expression. Adalimumab also improved antioxidant response by restoring total antioxidant capacity and superoxide dismutase activity. Finally, we observed that Adalimumab normalized energetic and metabolic pattern in rd10 mouse retinas. Our study suggests that the TNFα blockade could be a successful therapeutic approach to increase photoreceptor survival during the progression of RP. Further studies are needed to characterize its effect along the progression of the disease. PMID:26170250

  14. Sigma-1 receptor deficiency reduces MPTP-induced parkinsonism and death of dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hong, J; Sha, S; Zhou, L; Wang, C; Yin, J; Chen, L

    2015-01-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (σ1R) has been reported to be decreased in nigrostriatal motor system of Parkinson's disease patients. Using heterozygous and homozygous σ1R knockout (σ1R+/− and σ1R−/−) mice, we investigated the influence of σ1R deficiency on 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-impaired nigrostriatal motor system. The injection of MPTP for 5 weeks in wild-type mice (MPTP-WT mice), but not in σ1R+/− or σ1R−/− mice (MPTP-σ1R+/− or MPTP-σ1R−/− mice), caused motor deficits and ~40% death of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta with an elevation of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) NR2B phosphorylation. The σ1R antagonist NE100 or the NR2B inhibitor Ro25-6981 could alleviate the motor deficits and the death of dopaminergic neurons in MPTP-WT mice. By contrast, MPTP-σ1R+/− mice treated with the σ1R agonist PRE084 or MPTP-σ1R−/− mice treated with the NMDAr agonist NMDA appeared to have similar motor deficits and loss of dopaminergic neurons as MPTP-WT mice. The pharmacological or genetic inactivation of σ1R suppressed the expression of dopamine transporter (DAT) in substantia nigra, which was corrected by NMDA. The activation of σ1R by PRE084 enhanced the DAT expression in WT mice or σ1R+/− mice. By contrast, the level of vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) in σ1R+/− mice or σ1R−/− mice had no difference from WT mice. Interestingly, MPTP-WT mice showed the reduction in the levels of DAT and VMAT2, but MPTP-σ1R−/− mice did not. The inactivation of σ1R by NE100 could prevent the reduction of VMAT2 in MPTP-WT mice. In addition, the activation of microglia cells in substantia nigra was equally enhanced in MPTP-WT mice and MPTP-σ1R−/− mice. The number of activated astrocytes in MPTP-σ1R−/− mice was less than that in MPTP-WT mice. The findings indicate that the σ1R deficiency through suppressing NMDAr function and DAT expression can reduce MPTP-induced death of

  15. Cabergoline, Dopamine D2 Receptor Agonist, Prevents Neuronal Cell Death under Oxidative Stress via Reducing Excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Odaka, Haruki; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Adachi, Naoki; Ooshima, Yoshiko; Nakajima, Shingo; Katanuma, Yusuke; Inoue, Takafumi; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Several lines of evidence demonstrate that oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease. Potent antioxidants may therefore be effective in the treatment of such diseases. Cabergoline, a dopamine D2 receptor agonist and antiparkinson drug, has been studied using several cell types including mesencephalic neurons, and is recognized as a potent radical scavenger. Here, we examined whether cabergoline exerts neuroprotective effects against oxidative stress through a receptor-mediated mechanism in cultured cortical neurons. We found that neuronal death induced by H2O2 exposure was inhibited by pretreatment with cabergoline, while this protective effect was eliminated in the presence of a dopamine D2 receptor inhibitor, spiperone. Activation of ERK1/2 by H2O2 was suppressed by cabergoline, and an ERK signaling pathway inhibitor, U0126, similarly protected cortical neurons from cell death. This suggested the ERK signaling pathway has a critical role in cabergoline-mediated neuroprotection. Furthermore, increased extracellular levels of glutamate induced by H2O2, which might contribute to ERK activation, were reduced by cabergoline, while inhibitors for NMDA receptor or L-type Ca2+ channel demonstrated a survival effect against H2O2. Interestingly, we found that cabergoline increased expression levels of glutamate transporters such as EAAC1. Taken together, these results suggest that cabergoline has a protective effect on cortical neurons via a receptor-mediated mechanism including repression of ERK1/2 activation and extracellular glutamate accumulation induced by H2O2. PMID:24914776

  16. Erythropoietin reduces neuronal cell death and hyperalgesia induced by peripheral inflammatory pain in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Mohamad, Osama; Chen, Dongdong; Zhang, Lingling; Hofmann, Cane; Wei, Ling; Yu, Shan Ping

    2011-07-21

    Painful stimuli during neonatal stage may affect brain development and contribute to abnormal behaviors in adulthood. Very few specific therapies are available for this developmental disorder. A better understanding of the mechanisms and consequences of painful stimuli during the neonatal period is essential for the development of effective therapies. In this study, we examined brain reactions in a neonatal rat model of peripheral inflammatory pain. We focused on the inflammatory insult-induced brain responses and delayed changes in behavior and pain sensation. Postnatal day 3 pups received formalin injections into the paws once a day for 3 days. The insult induced dysregulation of several inflammatory factors in the brain and caused selective neuronal cell death in the cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus. On postnatal day 21, rats that received the inflammatory nociceptive insult exhibited increased local cerebral blood flow in the somatosensory cortex, hyperalgesia, and decreased exploratory behaviors. Based on these observations, we tested recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) as a potential treatment to prevent the inflammatory pain-induced changes. rhEPO treatment (5,000 U/kg/day, i.p.), coupled to formalin injections, ameliorated neuronal cell death and normalized the inflammatory response. Rats that received formalin plus rhEPO exhibited normal levels of cerebral blood flow, pain sensitivity and exploratory behavior. Treatment with rhEPO also restored normal brain and body weights that were reduced in the formalin group. These data suggest that severe inflammatory pain has adverse effects on brain development and rhEPO may be a possible therapy for the prevention and treatment of this developmental disorder.

  17. Reducing Maternal Deaths in Ethiopia: Results of an Intervention Programme in Southwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Mitiku, Demissew; Zidda, Zillo; Yaya, Yaliso

    2017-01-01

    Background In a large population in Southwest Ethiopia (population 700,000), we carried out a complex set of interventions with the aim of reducing maternal mortality. This study evaluated the effects of several coordinated interventions to help improve effective coverage and reduce maternal deaths. Together with the Ministry of Health in Ethiopia, we designed a project to strengthen the health-care system. A particular emphasis was given to upgrade existing institutions so that they could carry out Basic (BEmOC) and Comprehensive Emergency Obstetric Care (CEmOC). Health institutions were upgraded by training non-clinical physicians and midwives by providing the institutions with essential and basic equipment, and by regular monitoring and supervision by staff competent in emergency obstetric work. Results In this implementation study, the maternal mortality ratio (MMR) was the primary outcome. The study was carried out from 2010 to 2013 in three districts, and we registered 38,312 births. The MMR declined by 64% during the intervention period from 477 to 219 deaths per 100,000 live births (OR 0.46; 95% CI 0.24–0.88). The decline in MMR was higher for the districts with CEmOC, while the mean number of antenatal visits for each woman was 2.6 (Inter Quartile Range 2–4). The percentage of pregnant women who attended four or more antenatal controls increased by 20%, with the number of women who delivered at home declining by 10.5% (P<0.001). Similarly, the number of deliveries at health posts, health centres and hospitals increased, and we observed a decline in the use of traditional birth attendants. Households living near to all-weather roads had lower maternal mortality rates (MMR 220) compared with households without roads (MMR 598; OR 2.72 (95% CI 1.61–4.61)). Conclusions Our results show that it is possible to achieve substantial reductions in maternal mortality rates over a short period of time if the effective coverage of well-known interventions is

  18. Performance-based regulation: enterprise responsibility for reducing death, injury, and disease caused by consumer products.

    PubMed

    Sugarman, Stephen D

    2009-12-01

    This article offers a bold new idea for confronting the staggering level of death, injury, and disease caused by five consumer products: cigarettes, alcohol, guns, junk food, and motor vehicles. Business leaders try to frame these negative outcomes as "collateral damage" that is someone else's problem. That framing not only is morally objectionable but also overlooks the possibility that, with proper prodding, industry could substantially lessen these public health disasters. I seek to reframe the public perception of who is responsible and propose to deploy a promising approach called "performance-based regulation" to combat the problem. Performance-based regulation would impose on manufacturers a legal obligation to reduce the negative social costs of their products. Rather than involving them in litigation or forcing them to operate differently (as "command-and-control" regimes do), performance-based regulation allows the firms to determine how best to decrease bad public health consequences. Like other public health strategies, performance-based regulation focuses on those who are far more likely than individual consumers to achieve real gains. Analogous to a tax on causing harm that exceeds a threshold level, performance-based regulation seeks to harness private initiative in pursuit of the public good.

  19. Uganda study found that death reduced HIV prevalence; did the public take home the wrong message?

    PubMed

    James, John S

    2005-02-25

    Uganda has had a remarkable decline in HIV prevalence, and the question of what caused this decline is controversial. An intensive study of the Rakai region of Uganda from 1994 - 2003 found that much of the decreased prevalence resulted from death of people with HIV. But the incidence of new HIV infections was low throughout this study and did not change greatly, suggesting that the real cause of the success was a large reduction in new infections before the study began. The early data presented at the February 2005 Retroviruses conference also showed increasing use of condoms, and some backsliding on reducing the number of sexual partners. But neither change was big enough to greatly affect the incidence of new infections, at least in the aggregate data across the 50 villages studied. In summary, the big reduction in HIV prevalence occurred because of changes that happened before this study, not those measured within it. Therefore the new information does not contradict reduction in the number of sexual partners as a major cause of Uganda's success.

  20. Reducing Avoidable Deaths Among Veterans: Directing Private-Sector Surgical Care to High-Performance Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, William B.; West, Alan N.; Wallace, Amy E.; Lee, Richard E.; Goodman, David C.; Dimick, Justin B.; Bagian, James P.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives. We quantified older (65 years and older) Veterans Health Administration (VHA) patients’ use of the private sector to obtain 14 surgical procedures and assessed the potential impact of directing that care to high-performance hospitals. Methods. Using a merged VHA–Medicare inpatient database for 2000 and 2001, we determined where older VHA enrollees obtained 6 cardiovascular surgeries and 8 cancer resections and whether private-sector care was obtained in high- or low-performance hospitals (based on historical performance and determined 2 years in advance of the service year). We then modeled the mortality and travel burden effect of directing private-sector care to high-performance hospitals. Results. Older veterans obtained most of their procedures in the private sector, but that care was equally distributed across high- and low-performance hospitals. Directing private-sector care to high-performance hospitals could have led to the avoidance of 376 to 584 deaths, most through improved cardiovascular care outcomes. Using historical mortality to define performance would produce better outcomes with lower travel time. Conclusions. Policy that directs older VHA enrollees’ private-sector care to high-performance hospitals promises to reduce mortality for VHA’s service population and warrants further exploration. PMID:17971543

  1. Erdosteine protects rat testis tissue from hypoxic injury by reducing apoptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Guven, A; Ickin, M; Uzun, O; Bakar, C; Balbay, E Gulec; Balbay, O

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of hypobaric hypoxia on testis morphology and the effects of erdosteine on testis tissue. Caspase-3 and hypoxia-inducible factor 1α expressions were detected by immunohistochemistry. Adult male Wistar rats were placed in a hypobaric hypoxic chamber. Rats in the erdosteine group were exposed to the same conditions and treated orally with erdosteine (20 mg kg(-1) daily) at the same time from the first day of hypoxic exposure for 2 weeks. The normoxia group was evaluated as the control. The hypoxia group showed decreased height of spermatogenic epithelium in some seminiferous tubules, vacuolisation in spermatogenic epithelial cells, deterioration and gaps in the basal membrane and an increase in blood vessels in the interstitial area. The erdosteine group showed amelioration of both epithelial cell vacuolisation and basal membrane deterioration. Numbers of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α-immunostained Sertoli and Leydig cells were significantly higher in the hypoxia group than in the erdosteine group. The number of seminiferous tubules with caspase-3-immunostained germ cells was highest in the hypoxia group and decreased in the erdosteine and normoxia groups respectively. Based on these observations, erdosteine protects testis tissue from hypoxic injury by reducing apoptotic cell death.

  2. Mandatory Provider Review And Pain Clinic Laws Reduce The Amounts Of Opioids Prescribed And Overdose Death Rates.

    PubMed

    Dowell, Deborah; Zhang, Kun; Noonan, Rita K; Hockenberry, Jason M

    2016-10-01

    To address the opioid overdose epidemic in the United States, states have implemented policies to reduce inappropriate opioid prescribing. These policies could affect the coincident heroin overdose epidemic by either driving the substitution of heroin for opioids or reducing simultaneous use of both substances. We used IMS Health's National Prescription Audit and government mortality data to examine the effect of these policies on opioid prescribing and on prescription opioid and heroin overdose death rates in the United States during 2006-13. The analysis revealed that combined implementation of mandated provider review of state-run prescription drug monitoring program data and pain clinic laws reduced opioid amounts prescribed by 8 percent and prescription opioid overdose death rates by 12 percent. We also observed relatively large but statistically insignificant reductions in heroin overdose death rates after implementation of these policies. This combination of policies was effective, but broader approaches to address these coincident epidemics are needed.

  3. Reducing deaths from tuberculosis in antiretroviral treatment programmes in sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Lawn, Stephen D.; Harries, Anthony D.; Meintjes, Graeme; Getahun, Haileyesus; Havlir, Diane V.; Wood, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Mortality rates are high in antiretroviral therapy (ART) programmes in sub-Saharan Africa, especially during the first few months of treatment. Tuberculosis (TB) has been identified as a major underlying cause. Under routine programme conditions, between 5% and 40% of adult patients enrolling in ART services have a baseline diagnosis of TB. There is also a high TB incidence during the first few months of ART (much of which is prevalent disease missed by baseline screening) and long-term rates remain several-fold higher than background. We identify three groups of patients entering ART programmes for which different interventions are required to reduce TB-related deaths. First, diagnostic screening is needed in patients who have undiagnosed active TB so that timely anti-tuberculosis treatment can be started. This may be greatly facilitated by new diagnostic assays such as the Xpert MTB/RIF assay. Second, patients with a diagnosis of active TB need optimised case management, which includes early initiation of ART (with timing now defined by randomised controlled trials), trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole prophylaxis and treatment of co-morbidity. Third, all remaining patients who are TB-free at enrolment have high ongoing risk of developing TB and require optimised immune recovery (with ART ideally started early in the course of HIV infection), isoniazid preventive therapy and infection control to reduce infection risk. Further specific measures are needed to address multi-drug resistant TB (MDR-TB). Finally, scale-up of all these interventions requires nationally and locally tailored models of care that are patient-centred and provide integrated health care delivery for TB, HIV and other co-morbidities. PMID:22695302

  4. Glutathione administration reduces mitochondrial damage and shifts cell death from necrosis to apoptosis in ageing diabetic mice hearts during exercise

    PubMed Central

    Golbidi, S; Botta, A; Gottfred, S; Nusrat, A; Laher, I; Ghosh, S

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The effect of antioxidants on ageing type 2 diabetic (T2D) hearts during exercise is unclear. We hypothesized that GSH therapy during exercise reduces mitochondrial oxidative stress (mOXS) and cell death in ageing db/db mice hearts. Experimental Approach The effect of GSH on cardiac mOXS and cell death was evaluated both in vivo and in vitro. Key Results During exercise, GSH treatment protected db/db hearts from exaggerated mOXS without reducing total cell death. Despite similar cell death, investigations on apoptosis-specific single-stranded DNA breaks and necrosis-specific damage provided the first in vivo evidence of a shift from necrosis to apoptosis, with reduced fibrosis following GSH administration in exercised db/db hearts. Further support for a GSH-regulated ‘switch’ in death phenotypes came from NIH-3T3 fibroblasts and H9c2 cardiomyocytes treated with H2O2, a reactive oxygen species (ROS). Similar to in vivo findings, augmenting GSH by overexpressing glutamyl cysteine ligase (GCLc) protected fibroblasts and cardiomyocytes from necrosis induced by H2O2, but elevated caspase-3 and apoptosis instead. Similar to in vivo findings, where GSH therapy in normoglycaemic mice suppressed endogenous antioxidants and augmented caspase-3 activity, GCLc overexpression during staurosporine-induced death, which was not characterized by ROS, increased GSH efflux and aggravated death in fibroblasts and cardiomyocytes, confirming that oxidative stress is required for GSH-mediated cytoprotection. Conclusions and Implications While GSH treatment is useful for reducing mOXS and attenuating necrosis and fibrosis in ageing T2D hearts during exercise, such antioxidant treatment could be counterproductive in the healthy heart during exercise. PMID:25039894

  5. [Sonographic screening of basilar arteries reduces the risk of sudden infant death].

    PubMed

    Deeg, K H; Reisig, A

    2013-09-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the most frequent cause of death in the first year of life. The causes of SIDS remain unclear although multiple theories have been published in recent decades. However, some important risk factors associated with SIDS, such as prone sleeping have been validated. Over 85% of all SIDS victims were found in a prone position but it is unclear why the prone sleeping position is more dangerous than the supine sleeping position. A possible cause of SIDS is hypoperfusion of the brain stem during head rotation. Some infants show compression of the vertebral arteries at the craniocervical junction during head rotation, especially in the prone position and this may lead to a subsequent decrease of brain stem perfusion. If compression lasts for a longer time hypoperfusion of the brainstem and central apnea and bradycardia result, which can lead to SIDS. The decrease in brainstem perfusion occurs more often and is more pronounced in the prone position as the head is more rotated in the prone than in the supine position. Doppler sonographic flow measurements of the flow in the basilar artery through the open fontanel, allow the detection of patients at risk of position-dependent hypoperfusion of the brain. Flow measurements are obtained in a neutral position (head in midline) and during head rotation. In the vast majority of infants (98.7%) the flow in the basilar artery is independent of head rotation and body position. In rare cases (1.3%) flow velocities drop to below 50% of the initial value during head rotation. A pathological biphasic or even retrograde flow can be found during head rotation in only 0.3% of infants and these infants may have an increased risk for SIDS. To prevent SIDS head rotation which leads to an abnormal or pathological flow decrease during head rotation should be avoided. Additionally these infants should be monitored until blood flow in the basilar artery has returned to normal, which usually occurs during the

  6. Toll Bar on Sea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Dave

    2008-01-01

    In the summer of 2007 the United Kingdom experienced some of the heaviest rainfall since records began. Toll Bar in South Yorkshire featured prominently in media coverage as the village and the homes surrounding it began to flood. Many people lost everything: their homes, their furniture, their possessions. In an effort to come to terms with what…

  7. Toll Bar on Sea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Dave

    2008-01-01

    In the summer of 2007 the United Kingdom experienced some of the heaviest rainfall since records began. Toll Bar in South Yorkshire featured prominently in media coverage as the village and the homes surrounding it began to flood. Many people lost everything: their homes, their furniture, their possessions. In an effort to come to terms with what…

  8. Mincle suppresses Toll-like receptor 4 activation.

    PubMed

    Greco, Stephanie H; Mahmood, Syed Kashif; Vahle, Anne-Kristin; Ochi, Atsuo; Batel, Jennifer; Deutsch, Michael; Barilla, Rocky; Seifert, Lena; Pachter, H Leon; Daley, Donnele; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu R; Miller, George

    2016-07-01

    Regulation of Toll-like receptor responses is critical for limiting tissue injury and autoimmunity in both sepsis and sterile inflammation. We found that Mincle, a C-type lectin receptor, regulates proinflammatory Toll-like receptor 4 signaling. Specifically, Mincle ligation diminishes Toll-like receptor 4-mediated inflammation, whereas Mincle deletion or knockdown results in marked hyperresponsiveness to lipopolysaccharide in vitro, as well as overwhelming lipopolysaccharide-mediated inflammation in vivo. Mechanistically, Mincle deletion does not up-regulate Toll-like receptor 4 expression or reduce interleukin 10 production after Toll-like receptor 4 ligation; however, Mincle deletion decreases production of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent inhibitory intermediate suppressor of cytokine signaling 1, A20, and ABIN3 and increases expression of the Toll-like receptor 4 coreceptor CD14. Blockade of CD14 mitigates the increased sensitivity of Mincle(-/-) leukocytes to Toll-like receptor 4 ligation. Collectively, we describe a major role for Mincle in suppressing Toll-like receptor 4 responses and implicate its importance in nonmycobacterial models of inflammation.

  9. Breastfeeding and reduced risk of sudden infant death syndrome: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Fern R; Thompson, John M D; Tanabe, Kawai O; Moon, Rachel Y; Vennemann, Mechtild M

    2011-07-01

    Benefits of breastfeeding include lower risk of postneonatal mortality. However, it is unclear whether breastfeeding specifically lowers sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) risk, because study results have been conflicting. To perform a meta-analysis to measure the association between breastfeeding and SIDS. We identified 288 studies with data on breastfeeding and SIDS through a Medline search (1966-2009), review articles, and meta-analyses. Twenty-four original case-control studies were identified that provided data on the relationship between breastfeeding and SIDS risk. Two teams of 2 reviewers evaluated study quality according to preset criteria; 6 studies were excluded, which resulted in 18 studies for analysis. Univariable and multivariable odds ratios were extracted. A summary odds ratio (SOR) was calculated for the odds ratios by using the fixed-effect and random-effect inverse-variance methods of meta-analysis. The Breslow-Day test for heterogeneity was performed. For infants who received any amount of breast milk for any duration, the univariable SOR was 0.40 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.35-0.44), and the multivariable SOR was 0.55 (95% CI: 0.44-0.69). For any breastfeeding at 2 months of age or older, the univariable SOR was 0.38 (95% CI: 0.27-0.54). The univariable SOR for exclusive breastfeeding of any duration was 0.27 (95% CI: 0.24-0.31). Breastfeeding is protective against SIDS, and this effect is stronger when breastfeeding is exclusive. The recommendation to breastfeed infants should be included with other SIDS risk-reduction messages to both reduce the risk of SIDS and promote breastfeeding for its many other infant and maternal health benefits. Copyright © 2011 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  10. Risk Factors, Protective Factors, and Current Recommendations to Reduce Sudden Infant Death Syndrome: A Review.

    PubMed

    Carlin, Rebecca F; Moon, Rachel Y

    2017-02-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome remains the leading cause of death in infants aged 1 month to 1 year in the United States. While its exact cause is unknown, sudden infant death syndrome is believed to be multifactorial, ie, occurs in infants with underlying biological vulnerability who experience an exogenous stressor, such as prone/side sleeping or soft bedding, during a critical developmental period. Much genetic and physiologic evidence points to impaired arousal responses to hypercarbia and hypoxia, which ultimately leads to asphyxia. Known risk factors for infants include prone and side sleeping, soft bedding, bed sharing, inappropriate sleep surfaces (including sofas), exposure to tobacco smoke, and prematurity; protective factors include breastfeeding, pacifier use, room sharing, and immunizations. Despite our improved understanding of the physiologic mechanisms that cause sudden infant death, the mainstay of risk reduction continues to be a safe sleep environment, as most infants who die suddenly and unexpectedly do so in unsafe sleep environments.

  11. Ovarian Cancer Screening Method Fails to Reduce Deaths from the Disease

    Cancer.gov

    New results from the NCI-sponsored PLCO Cancer Screening Trial show that screening for ovarian cancer with transvaginal ultrasound (TVU) and the CA-125 blood test did not result in fewer deaths from the disease compared with usual care.

  12. Potential Impact of Graphic Health Warnings on Cigarette Packages in Reducing Cigarette Demand and Smoking-Related Deaths in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Minh, Hoang Van; Chung, Le Hong; Giang, Kim Bao; Duc, Duong Minh; Hinh, Nguyen Duc; Mai, Vu Quynh; Cuong, Nguyen Manh; Manh, Pham Duc; Duc, Ha Anh; Yang, Jui-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Two years after implementation of the graphic health warning intervention in Vietnam, it is very important to evaluate the intervention's potential impact. The objective of this paper was to predict effects of graphic health warnings on cigarette packages, particularly in reducing cigarette demand and smoking-associated deaths in Vietnam. In this study, a discrete choice experiment (DCE) method was used to evaluate the potential impact of graphic tobacco health warnings on smoking demand. To predict the impact of GHWs on reducing premature deaths associated with smoking, we constructed different static models. We adapted the method developed by University of Toronto, Canada and found that GHWs had statistically significant impact on reducing cigarette demand (up to 10.1% through images of lung damage), resulting in an overall decrease of smoking prevalence in Vietnam. We also found that between 428,417- 646,098 premature deaths would be prevented as a result of the GHW intervention. The potential impact of the GHW labels on reducing premature smoking-associated deaths in Vietnam were shown to be stronger among lower socio-economic groups.

  13. miR-958 inhibits Toll signaling and Drosomycin expression via direct targeting of Toll and Dif in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Li, Shengjie; Li, Yao; Shen, Li; Jin, Ping; Chen, Liming; Ma, Fei

    2017-02-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is widely used as a model system to study innate immunity and signaling pathways related to innate immunity, including the Toll signaling pathway. Although this pathway is well studied, the precise mechanisms of posttranscriptional regulation of key components of the Toll signaling pathway by microRNAs (miRNAs) remain obscure. In this study, we used an in silico strategy in combination with the Gal80(ts)-Gal4 driver system to identify microRNA-958 (miR-958) as a candidate Toll pathway regulating miRNA in Drosophila We report that overexpression of miR-958 significantly reduces the expression of Drosomycin, a key antimicrobial peptide involved in Toll signaling and the innate immune response. We further demonstrate in vitro and in vivo that miR-958 targets the Toll and Dif genes, key components of the Toll signaling pathway, to negatively regulate Drosomycin expression. In addition, a miR-958 sponge rescued the expression of Toll and Dif, resulting in increased expression of Drosomycin. These results, not only revealed a novel function and modulation pattern of miR-958, but also provided a new insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms of Toll signaling in regulation of innate immunity. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Opioid substitution therapy as a strategy to reduce deaths in prison: retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Larney, Sarah; Gisev, Natasa; Farrell, Michael; Dobbins, Timothy; Burns, Lucinda; Gibson, Amy; Kimber, Jo; Degenhardt, Louisa

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To describe deaths in prison among opioid-dependent people, and examine associations between receipt of opioid substitution therapy (OST) and risk of death in prison. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Adult prisons in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Participants 16 715 opioid-dependent people who were received to prison between 2000 and 2012. Interventions Opioid substitution therapy. Primary outcome measures Natural and unnatural (suicide, drug-induced, violent and other injury) deaths in prison. Results Cohort members were in prison for 30 998 person-years (PY), during which time there were 51 deaths. The all-cause crude mortality rate (CMR) in prison was 1.6/1000 PY (95% CI 1.2 to 2.2/1000 PY), and the unnatural death CMR was 1.1/1000 PY (95% CI 0.8 to 1.6/1000 PY). Compared to time out of OST, the hazard of all-cause death was 74% lower while in OST (adjusted HR (AHR): 0.26; 95% CI 0.13 to 0.50), and the hazard of unnatural death was 87% lower while in OST (AHR: 0.13; 95% CI 0.05 to 0.35). The all-cause and unnatural death CMRs during the first 4 weeks of incarceration were 6.6/1000 PY (95% CI 3.8 to 10.6/1000 PY) and 5.5/1000 PY (95% CI 2.9 to 9.4/1000 PY), respectively. Compared to periods not in OST, the hazard of all-cause death during the first 4 weeks of incarceration was 94% lower while in OST (AHR: 0.06; 95% CI 0.01 to 0.48), and the hazard of unnatural death was 93% lower while in OST (AHR: 0.07; 95% CI 0.01 to 0.53). Conclusions Mortality of opioid-dependent prisoners was significantly lower while in receipt of OST. PMID:24694626

  15. Connexin43 mimetic peptide reduces vascular leak and retinal ganglion cell death following retinal ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Danesh-Meyer, Helen V; Kerr, Nathan M; Zhang, Jie; Eady, Elizabeth K; O'Carroll, Simon J; Nicholson, Louise F B; Johnson, Cameron S; Green, Colin R

    2012-02-01

    significantly reduced dye leak at 4 and 24 h. In vitro studies on endothelial cells demonstrate that endothelial cell death following hypoxia can be mediated directly by opening of connexin43 hemichannels in endothelial cells. Blocking connexin43 mediated vascular leakage using a connexin43 mimetic peptide led to increased retinal ganglion cell survival at 7 and 21 days to levels of uninjured retinas. Treatment with scrambled peptide did not result in retinal ganglion cell rescue. Pharmacological targeting of connexin43 gap junction protein by transiently blocking gap junction hemichannels following injury provides new opportunities for treatment of central nervous system ischaemia.

  16. [Modifiable risk factors of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). The current guidelines for reducing the risk of SIDS].

    PubMed

    Wasilewska, Jolanta; Kaczmarski, Maciej

    2009-01-01

    Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) is a subgroup of unexpected infant deaths that occur during the postneonatal period with relatively consistent clinical, epidemiological, and pathological features. SIDS remains the major cause of death in infants aged between 1 week and 1 year in western countries. While many SIDS risk factors have been and continue to be identified, the diagnosis remains one of exclusion--the definition of SIDS requires a negative history as well as a negative autopsy result. Epidemiological studies have led to the definition of populations with an increased risk for SIDS: prematurely born infants with perinatal risk factors, subsequent siblings of SIDS victims, ALTE infants (10%). Avoidable risk factors such as those associated with inappropriate infants' sleeping position, type of bedding used and sleeping arrangements strongly suggest a basis for further substantial reductions in SIDS incidence rates. The current guidelines for reducing the risk of SIDS are presented.

  17. Can addressing death anxiety reduce health care workers' burnout and improve patient care?

    PubMed

    Melo, Carol Gouveia; Oliver, David

    2011-01-01

    Death anxiety may interfere with health care workers' (HCWs) relationships with patients and patients' families and increase HCWs' levels of burnout. This study shows the impact of a six-day course for HCWs that provided training in communication, in offering emotional and spiritual support to patients, and in personal introspection on death anxiety. The HCWs were given questionnaires to evaluate their level of burnout, personal well-being, and death anxiety as well as the quality of their relationships with patients before the course and four months after it. There were 150 study participants, all HCWs involved in caring for dying patients (85 in palliative care units and 65 in other settings). There was a control group of 26 HCWs who cared for the dying in settings other than palliative care units. The results show that the course appeared to lead to a significant reduction in levels of burnout and death anxiety; they also indicated an increase in personal well-being and professional fulfillment, and participants perceived an improvement in the quality of their relationships with patients and patients' families.

  18. Ovarian Cancer Screening Method Fails to Reduce Deaths from the Disease | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    New results from the NCI-sponsored Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial show that screening for ovarian cancer with transvaginal ultrasound (TVU) and the CA-125 blood test did not result in fewer deaths from the disease compared with usual care. |

  19. Reduced heart rate volatility: an early predictor of death in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Grogan, Eric L; Morris, John A; Norris, Patrick R; France, Daniel J; Ozdas, Asli; Stiles, Renée A; Harris, Paul A; Dawant, Benoit M; Speroff, Theodore

    2004-09-01

    To determine if using dense data capture to measure heart rate volatility (standard deviation) measured in 5-minute intervals predicts death. Fundamental approaches to assessing vital signs in the critically ill have changed little since the early 1900s. Our prior work in this area has demonstrated the utility of densely sampled data and, in particular, heart rate volatility over the entire patient stay, for predicting death and prolonged ventilation. Approximately 120 million heart rate data points were prospectively collected and archived from 1316 trauma ICU patients over 30 months. Data were sampled every 1 to 4 seconds, stored in a relational database, linked to outcome data, and de-identified. HR standard deviation was continuously computed over 5-minute intervals (CVRD, cardiac volatility-related dysfunction). Logistic regression models incorporating age and injury severity score were developed on a test set of patients (N = 923), and prospectively analyzed in a distinct validation set (N = 393) for the first 24 hours of ICU data. Distribution of CVRD varied by survival in the test set. Prospective evaluation of the model in the validation set gave an area in the receiver operating curve of 0.81 with a sensitivity and specificity of 70.1 and 80.0, respectively. CVRD predict death as early as 24 hours in the validation set. CVRD identifies a subgroup of patients with a high probability of dying. Death is predicted within first 24 hours of stay. We hypothesize CVRD is a surrogate for autonomic nervous system dysfunction.

  20. Lung cancer deaths from indoor radon and the cost effectiveness and potential of policies to reduce them

    PubMed Central

    Read, Simon; McGale, Paul; Darby, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the number of deaths from lung cancer related to radon in the home and to explore the cost effectiveness of alternative policies to control indoor radon and their potential to reduce lung cancer mortality. Design Cost effectiveness analysis. Setting United Kingdom. Data sources Epidemiological data on risks from indoor radon and from smoking, vital statistics on deaths from lung cancer, survey information on effectiveness and costs of radon prevention and remediation. Main outcome measures Estimated number of deaths from lung cancer related to indoor radon, lifetime risks of death from lung cancer before and after various potential interventions to control radon, the cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained from different policies for control of radon, and the potential of those policies to reduce lung cancer mortality. Results The mean radon concentration in UK homes is 21 becquerels per cubic metre (Bq/m3). Each year around 1100 deaths from lung cancer (3.3% of all deaths from lung cancer) are related to radon in the home. Over 85% of these arise from radon concentrations below 100 Bq/m3 and most are caused jointly by radon and active smoking. Current policy requiring basic measures to prevent radon in new homes in selected areas is highly cost effective, and such measures would remain cost effective if extended to the entire UK, with a cost per QALY gained of £11 400 ( €12 200; $16 913). Current policy identifying and remediating existing homes with high radon levels is, however, neither cost effective (cost per QALY gained £36 800) nor effective in reducing lung cancer mortality. Conclusions Policies requiring basic preventive measures against radon in all new homes throughout the UK would be cost effective and could complement existing policies to reduce smoking. Policies involving remedial work on existing homes with high radon levels cannot prevent most radon related deaths, as these are caused by moderate exposure

  1. Toll road crashes of commercial and passenger motor vehicles.

    PubMed

    Braver, Elisa R; Solomon, Mark G; Preusser, David F

    2002-05-01

    Revenue-collection data from toll roads allow for accurate estimates of miles driven by vehicle type and, when combined with crash data, valid estimates of crash involvements per mile driven. Data on vehicle-miles traveled and collisions were obtained from toll road authorities in Florida. Kansas, and New York. In addition, state crash files and published vehicle-miles of travel were obtained for toll roads in Illinois. Indiana, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. Large commercial motor vehicles were significantly underinvolved in single-vehicle crashes on all state toll roads. In five states, commercial motor vehicles were significantly overinvolved in multiple-vehicle crashes relative to passenger vehicles; the exceptions were Kansas, where they had significantly lower multiple-vehicle involvement rates, and Indiana. where there were no significant differences in multiple-vehicle involvements by vehicle type. The risk of commercial motor vehicle involvement in multiple-vehicle crashes resulting in deaths or serious injuries was double that of passenger vehicles in the two states (Ohio and Pennsylvania) that identified serious injuries. Whether crash rates, on toll roads of commercial motor vehicles are higher or lower than those of passenger vehicles appears to depend on the type of crash, specific toll road. and traffic density.

  2. Can art therapy reduce death anxiety and burnout in end-of-life care workers? a quasi-experimental study.

    PubMed

    S Potash, Jordan; Hy Ho, Andy; Chan, Faye; Lu Wang, Xiao; Cheng, Carol

    2014-05-01

    The need for empathy and the difficulties of coping with mortality when caring for the dying and the bereaved can cause psychological, emotional, and spiritual strain. The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of art-therapy-based supervision in reducing burnout and death anxiety among end-of-life care workers in Hong Kong. Through a quasi-experimental design, 69 participants enrolled in a 6-week, 18-hour art-therapy-based supervision group, and another 63 enrolled in a 3-day, 18-hour standard skills-based supervision group (n=132). Pre- and post-intervention assessments were carried out with three outcome measures: the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey, the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire, and the Death Attitude Profile-Revised. The data was analysed using paired sample t-tests. Significant reductions in exhaustion and death anxiety and significant increases in emotional awareness were observed for participants in the art-therapy-based supervision group. This study provides preliminary evidence that art-therapy-based supervision for end-of-life care workers can reduce burnout by enhancing emotional awareness and regulation, fostering meaning-making, and promoting reflection on death.

  3. The Sudden Death in the Young Case Registry: Collaborating to Understand and Reduce Mortality.

    PubMed

    Burns, Kristin M; Bienemann, Lauren; Camperlengo, Lena; Cottengim, Carri; Covington, Theresa M; Dykstra, Heather; Faulkner, Meghan; Kobau, Rosemarie; Erck Lambert, Alexa B; MacLeod, Heather; Parks, Sharyn E; Rosenberg, Ellen; Russell, Mark W; Shapiro-Mendoza, Carrie K; Shaw, Esther; Tian, Niu; Whittemore, Vicky; Kaltman, Jonathan R

    2017-03-01

    Knowledge gaps persist about the incidence of and risk factors for sudden death in the young (SDY). The SDY Case Registry is a collaborative effort between the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Michigan Public Health Institute. Its goals are to: (1) describe the incidence of SDY in the United States by using population-based surveillance; (2) compile data from SDY cases to create a resource of information and DNA samples for research; (3) encourage standardized approaches to investigation, autopsy, and categorization of SDY cases; (4) develop partnerships between local, state, and federal stakeholders toward a common goal of understanding and preventing SDY; and (5) support families who have lost loved ones to SDY by providing resources on bereavement and medical evaluation of surviving family members. Built on existing Child Death Review programs and as an expansion of the Sudden Unexpected Infant Death Case Registry, the SDY Case Registry achieves its goals by identifying SDY cases, providing guidance to medical examiners/coroners in conducting comprehensive autopsies, evaluating cases through child death review and an advanced review by clinical specialists, and classifying cases according to a standardized algorithm. The SDY Case Registry also includes a process to obtain informed consent from next-of-kin to save DNA for research, banking, and, in some cases, diagnostic genetic testing. The SDY Case Registry will provide valuable incidence data and will enhance understanding of the characteristics of SDY cases to inform the development of targeted prevention efforts. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  4. Reducing Defensive Responses to Thoughts of Death: Meditation, Mindfulness, and Buddhism.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Chin; Pyszczynski, Tom

    2017-08-24

    Three studies investigated the effects of meditation on responses to reminders of death. Study 1 took a quasi-experimental approach, comparing defensive responses to mortality salience (MS) of South Korean participants with varying levels of experience with Buddhism and meditation. Whereas non-Buddhists without meditation showed the typical increase in worldview defense after mortality salience (MS), this effect was not found among non-Buddhists immediately after an initial meditation experience, nor among lay Buddhists who meditated regularly or Buddhist monks with intensive meditation experience. Study 2, a fully randomized experiment, showed that MS increased worldview defense among South Koreans at a meditation training who were assessed before meditating but not among participants assessed after their first meditation experience. Study 3 showed that whereas American students without prior meditation experience showed increased worldview defense and suppression of death-related thoughts after MS, these effects were eliminated immediately after an initial meditation experience. Death thought accessibility mediated the effect of MS on worldview defense without meditation, but meditation eliminated this mediation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. RAGE on the Toll Road?

    PubMed

    Lin, Li

    2006-10-01

    Mammalian Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are cellular pattern-recognizing receptors (PRRs) that recognize the molecular patterns of pathogens. After engaging the pathogenic patterned ligands, the cytosolic portion of the TLRs in monocytes and macrophages, recruits adaptor proteins, via a receptor-driven signaling cascade, activates the transcription factor NF-kappaB, leading to the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, which trigger inflammation. Such rapid, innate cellular responses serve as the first line of host defense against infection by pathogens, and also stimulate the adaptive immune system to clear the invading microbes. Increasing evidence suggests that TLRs also recognize host-derived ligands, linking this group of PRRs to diseases that may not have an etiology that is associated directly with infections. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are nonenzymatically glycated or oxidated proteins, lipids and nucleic acids that are formed in the environment of oxidant stress and hyperglycemia. Binding of AGEs to their receptor RAGE initiates cellular signals that activate NF-kappaB, which results in transcription of proinflammatory factors. RAGE can also interact with other endogenous ligands generated by cell death and tissue injuries. RAGE has been implicated in chronic diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, neurodisorders, cancers, as well as aging. This review discusses the possible role of RAGE as a PRR that may use signaling mechanisms parallel to TLRs', to solicit inflammatory reactions. Thus, in this scenario, RAGE may play a prominent role in the regulation of cellular homeostasis in the context of complex disease progression.

  6. A Virtual Out-of-Body Experience Reduces Fear of Death.

    PubMed

    Bourdin, Pierre; Barberia, Itxaso; Oliva, Ramon; Slater, Mel

    2017-01-01

    Immersive virtual reality can be used to visually substitute a person's real body by a life-sized virtual body (VB) that is seen from first person perspective. Using real-time motion capture the VB can be programmed to move synchronously with the real body (visuomotor synchrony), and also virtual objects seen to strike the VB can be felt through corresponding vibrotactile stimulation on the actual body (visuotactile synchrony). This setup typically gives rise to a strong perceptual illusion of ownership over the VB. When the viewpoint is lifted up and out of the VB so that it is seen below this may result in an out-of-body experience (OBE). In a two-factor between-groups experiment with 16 female participants per group we tested how fear of death might be influenced by two different methods for producing an OBE. In an initial embodiment phase where both groups experienced the same multisensory stimuli there was a strong feeling of body ownership. Then the viewpoint was lifted up and behind the VB. In the experimental group once the viewpoint was out of the VB there was no further connection with it (no visuomotor or visuotactile synchrony). In a control condition, although the viewpoint was in the identical place as in the experimental group, visuomotor and visuotactile synchrony continued. While both groups reported high scores on a question about their OBE illusion, the experimental group had a greater feeling of disownership towards the VB below compared to the control group, in line with previous findings. Fear of death in the experimental group was found to be lower than in the control group. This is in line with previous reports that naturally occurring OBEs are often associated with enhanced belief in life after death.

  7. An Evidence-Based Infant Safe Sleep Program to Reduce Sudden Unexplained Infant Deaths.

    PubMed

    Zachritz, Whitney; Fulmer, Megan; Chaney, Nicole

    2016-11-01

    : Objective: The purpose of this project was to design, implement, and evaluate a safe sleep program for expectant mothers and the families of infants discharged from our hospital's neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). It was prompted by the sleep-related deaths of two infants in the community, both of whom had been discharged from our NICU. A six-member interdisciplinary team comprising nurses, a physician, an occupational therapist, and a respiratory therapist developed a safe sleep program in an effort to identify and implement evidence-based safe sleep practices for infants in the NICU. The team examined the literature on sleep-related death and safe sleep practices, consulted with colleagues in NICUs at nearby hospitals and clinics, and conducted an audit of practices related to putting infants to sleep in the NICU. The initiative included the use of infant sleep sacks, the development of a clinical practice guideline to promote safe sleep, and the delivery of standardized discharge education for caregivers in the NICU and safe sleep classes for expectant mothers and caregivers in the community. The team educated NICU staff on the new practice guideline in November and December 2014, and implemented the clinical intervention in January 2015. Random unit audits showed that prior to implementation of the safe sleep program, NICU nurses had followed safe sleep practices only 20% of the time; after implementation, however, safe sleep practices were followed an average of about 90% of the time. In-hospital and community-oriented evidence-based teaching on safe sleep practices and environments was associated with no sleep-related infant deaths after discharge from our NICU in calendar year 2015. A multifaceted safe sleep program offers many benefits to both the NICU and its patients. The implementation of a standardized safe sleep program provides an enormous opportunity to improve the health and well-being of the community. All hospitals that care for mothers and

  8. A Virtual Out-of-Body Experience Reduces Fear of Death

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Immersive virtual reality can be used to visually substitute a person’s real body by a life-sized virtual body (VB) that is seen from first person perspective. Using real-time motion capture the VB can be programmed to move synchronously with the real body (visuomotor synchrony), and also virtual objects seen to strike the VB can be felt through corresponding vibrotactile stimulation on the actual body (visuotactile synchrony). This setup typically gives rise to a strong perceptual illusion of ownership over the VB. When the viewpoint is lifted up and out of the VB so that it is seen below this may result in an out-of-body experience (OBE). In a two-factor between-groups experiment with 16 female participants per group we tested how fear of death might be influenced by two different methods for producing an OBE. In an initial embodiment phase where both groups experienced the same multisensory stimuli there was a strong feeling of body ownership. Then the viewpoint was lifted up and behind the VB. In the experimental group once the viewpoint was out of the VB there was no further connection with it (no visuomotor or visuotactile synchrony). In a control condition, although the viewpoint was in the identical place as in the experimental group, visuomotor and visuotactile synchrony continued. While both groups reported high scores on a question about their OBE illusion, the experimental group had a greater feeling of disownership towards the VB below compared to the control group, in line with previous findings. Fear of death in the experimental group was found to be lower than in the control group. This is in line with previous reports that naturally occurring OBEs are often associated with enhanced belief in life after death. PMID:28068368

  9. Genetic Inhibition of Receptor Interacting Protein Kinase-1 Reduces Cell Death and Improves Functional Outcome After Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lule, Sevda; Wu, Limin; McAllister, Lauren M; Edmiston, William J; Chung, Joon Yong; Levy, Emily; Zheng, Yi; Gough, Peter J; Bertin, John; Degterev, Alexei; Lo, Eng H; Whalen, Michael J

    2017-09-01

    Recent studies using cultured cells and rodent intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) models have implicated RIPK1 (receptor interacting protein kinase-1) as a driver of programmed necrosis and secondary injury based on use of chemical inhibitors. However, these inhibitors have off-target effects and cannot be used alone to prove a role for RIPK1. The aim of the current study was to examine the effect of genetic inhibition of the kinase domain of RIPK1 in a mouse ICH model. We subjected 2 lines of mice with RIPK1 point mutations of the kinase domain (K45A and D138N), rendering them kinase inactive, to autologous blood ICH and measured acute cell death and functional outcome. Compared with wild-type controls, RIPK1(K45A/K45A) and RIPK1(D138N/D138N) had significantly less cells with plasmalemma permeability, less acute neuronal cell death, less weight loss and more rapid weight gain to baseline, and improved performance in a Morris water maze paradigm after autologous blood ICH. In addition, mice systemically administered GSK'963, a potent, specific, brain penetrant small molecule RIPK1 inhibitor, had reduced acute neuronal death at 24 hours after ICH. The data show that the kinase domain of RIPK1 is a disease driver of ICH, mediating both acute cell death and functional outcome, and support development of RIPK1 inhibitors as therapeutic agents for human ICH. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Obesity-related endometrial cancer: an update on survivorship approaches to reducing cardiovascular death.

    PubMed

    Laskey, R A; McCarroll, M L; von Gruenigen, V E

    2016-01-01

    As the rate of obesity increases worldwide, so will the number of women diagnosed with obesity-related malignancy. The strongest correlation between obesity and cancer is endometrial cancer (EC). Obesity is the most significant modifiable risk factor for development of EC and also contributes to the most common cause of death in EC survivors-cardiovascular disease (CVD). Most cancer survivors after diagnosis do not implement lifestyle changes aimed at weight-loss and CVD risk reduction. This selective review highlights recent novel and unique approaches for managing CVD co-morbidities in EC survivorship. © 2015 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  11. Cathelicidin Antimicrobial Peptides with Reduced Activation of Toll-Like Receptor Signaling Have Potent Bactericidal Activity against Colistin-Resistant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiaoyan; Yi, Guanghui; Zhang, Yunliang; Rowe-Magnus, Dean A.; Bush, Karen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The world is at the precipice of a postantibiotic era in which medical procedures and minor injuries can result in bacterial infections that are no longer effectively treated by antibiotics. Cathelicidins are peptides produced by animals to combat bacterial infections and to regulate innate immune responses. However, cathelicidins are potent activators of the inflammatory response. Cathelicidins with reduced proinflammatory activity and potent bactericidal activity in the low micromolar range against Gram-negative bacteria have been identified. Motifs in cathelicidins that impact bactericidal activity and cytotoxicity to human cells have been elucidated and used to generate peptides that have reduced activation of proinflammatory cytokine production and reduced cytotoxicity to human cells. The resultant peptides have bactericidal activities comparable to that of colistin and can kill colistin-resistant bacteria. PMID:27651360

  12. Using Item Response Theory (IRT) to Reduce Patient Burden When Assessing Desire for Hastened Death.

    PubMed

    Kolva, Elissa; Rosenfeld, Barry; Liu, Ying; Pessin, Hayley; Breitbart, William

    2016-06-09

    Desire for hastened death (DHD) represents a wish to die sooner than might occur by natural disease progression. Efficient and accurate assessment of DHD is vital for clinicians providing care to terminally ill patients. The Schedule of Attitudes Toward Hastened Death (SAHD) is a commonly used self-report measure of DHD. The goal of this study was to use methods grounded in item response theory (IRT) to analyze the psychometric properties of the SAHD and identify an abbreviated version of the scale. Data were drawn from 4 studies of psychological distress at the end of life. Participants were 1,076 patients diagnosed with either advanced cancer or AIDS. The sample was divided into 2 subsamples for scale analysis and development of the shortened form. IRT was used to estimate item parameters. A 6-item version of the SAHD (SAHD-A) was identified through examination of item parameter estimations. The SAHD-A demonstrated adequate convergent validity. Receiver operating characteristic analyses indicated comparable cut scores to identify patients with high levels of DHD. These analyses support the utility of the SAHD-A, which can be more easily integrated into research studies and clinical assessments of DHD. (PsycINFO Database Record

  13. Photobiomodulation reduces photoreceptor death and regulates cytoprotection in early states of P23H retinal dystrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Diana K.; Gopalakrishnan, Sandeep; Schmitt, Heather; Abroe, Betsy; Stoehr, Michele; Dubis, Adam; Carroll, Joseph; Stone, Jonathan; Valter, Krisztina; Eells, Janis

    2013-03-01

    Irradiation by light in the far-red to near-infrared (NIR) region of the spectrum (photobiomodulation, PBM) has been demonstrated to attenuate the severity of neurodegenerative disease in experimental and clinical studies. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that 670 nm PBM would protect against the loss of retinal function and improve photoreceptor survival in a rodent model of retinitis pigmentosa, the P23H transgenic rat. P23H rat pups were treated once per day with a 670 nm LED array (180 sec treatments at 50 mW/cm2; fluence 9 joules/cm2) (Quantum Devices Inc., Barneveld WI) from postnatal day (p) 16-20 or from p10-20. Sham-treated rats were restrained, but not exposed to NIR light. The status of the retina was determined at p22 by assessment of mitochondrial function, oxidative stress and cell death. In a second series of studies, retinal status was assessed at p30 by measuring photoreceptor function by ERG and retinal morphology by Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT). 670 nm PBM increased retinal mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase activity and upregulated the retina's production of the key mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme, MnSOD. PBM also attenuated photoreceptor cell loss and improved photoreceptor function. PBM protects photoreceptors in the developing P23H retina, by augmenting mitochondrial function and stimulating antioxidant protective pathways. Photobiomodulation may have therapeutic potential, where mitochondrial damage is a step in the death of photoreceptors.

  14. Radiation takes its Toll

    PubMed Central

    Ratikan, Josephine A.; Micewicz, Ewa D.; Xie, Michael W.; Schaue, Dörthe

    2015-01-01

    The ability to recognize and respond to universal molecular patterns on invading microorganisms allows our immune system to stay on high alert, sensing danger to our self-integrity. Our own damaged cells and tissues in pathological situations activate similar warning systems as microbes. In this way, the body is able to mount a response that is appropriate to the danger. Toll-like receptors are at the heart of this pattern recognition system that initiates innate pro-oxidant, pro-inflammatory signaling cascades and ultimately bridges recognition of danger to adaptive immunity. The acute inflammatory lesions that are formed segue into resolution of inflammation, repair and healing or, more dysfunctionally, into chronic inflammation, autoimmunity, excessive tissue damage and carcinogenesis. Redox is at the nexus of this decision making process and is the point at which ionizing radiation initially intercepts to trigger similar responses to self-damage. In this review we discuss our current understanding of how radiation-damaged cells interact with Toll-like receptors and how the immune systems interprets these radiation-induced danger signals in the context of whole-body exposures and during local tumor irradiation. PMID:25819030

  15. Radiation takes its Toll.

    PubMed

    Ratikan, Josephine A; Micewicz, Ewa D; Xie, Michael W; Schaue, Dörthe

    2015-11-28

    The ability to recognize and respond to universal molecular patterns on invading microorganisms allows our immune system to stay on high alert, sensing danger to our self-integrity. Our own damaged cells and tissues in pathological situations activate similar warning systems as microbes. In this way, the body is able to mount a response that is appropriate to the danger. Toll-like receptors are at the heart of this pattern recognition system that initiates innate pro-oxidant, pro-inflammatory signaling cascades and ultimately bridges recognition of danger to adaptive immunity. The acute inflammatory lesions that are formed segue into resolution of inflammation, repair and healing or, more dysfunctionally, into chronic inflammation, autoimmunity, excessive tissue damage and carcinogenesis. Redox is at the nexus of this decision making process and is the point at which ionizing radiation initially intercepts to trigger similar responses to self-damage. In this review we discuss our current understanding of how radiation-damaged cells interact with Toll-like receptors and how the immune systems interprets these radiation-induced danger signals in the context of whole-body exposures and during local tumor irradiation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Inclusion into a heart failure critical pathway reduces the risk of death or readmission after hospital discharge.

    PubMed

    Garin, Nicolas; Carballo, Sebastian; Gerstel, Eric; Lerch, René; Meyer, Philippe; Zare, Maryam; Zawodnik, Alexis; Perrier, Arnaud

    2012-12-01

    Evidence-based therapies can lower the risk of death or hospital admission in heart failure (HF) patients, but are underprescribed. Critical pathways are one means of supporting systematic use of evidence-based recommendations. Patients admitted for HF in one hospital in 2009 and included in a critical pathway were compared with a control group of patients admitted in 2007. The primary endpoint was the risk of death or readmission within 90 days after discharge. The hazard ratio of death or readmission was evaluated in a multivariate Cox proportional hazard model adjusting for age, sex, co-morbidities, and length of stay. Three hundred and sixty-three patients were evaluated (151 in the critical pathway and 212 in the control group). Adjusted hazard ratio for death or readmission at 90 days was 0.72 (95 CI 0.51-1.00, p=0.049). Adhesion to guidelines was significantly better for patients included in the critical pathway (p=0.004), with more frequent prescription of beta-blockers (70.9% (95% CI 62.9-78.0) vs. 56.6% (95% CI 49.6-63.4), p=0.006), and evaluation of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, 73.5% (95% CI 65.7-80.3) vs. 57.5% (95% CI 50.6-64.3), p=0.002). Patients with reduced LVEF seem to have benefited the most from the inclusion in the critical pathway. Implementation of a critical pathway for patients hospitalized for HF was associated with a 28% reduction of the relative risk of death or readmission and improved adhesion to guidelines. Copyright © 2012 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. An analysis of stratagems to reduce drowning deaths of young children in private swimming pools and spas in Victoria, Australia.

    PubMed

    Bugeja, Lyndal; Franklin, Richard C

    2013-01-01

    This population-based retrospective case series study examined the frequency and distribution of protective stratagems (legislatively compliant safety barrier, adequate caregiver supervision, water familiarisation and early administration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation [CPR]) amongst drowning deaths of young children (0-4 years) in private swimming pools or spas in Victoria, Australia. In 65.0% (52/80) of deaths, none of the four protective stratagems were known to be present and there was only one case where all four were known to be present. This indicates that if the presence of all four stratagems is increased, this may reduce drowning in this age group and setting. While these results are positive, further examination of the presence and interaction of these stratagems for effectiveness is required. Further research is also warranted to explore the impact of enforcement of pool fencing legislation and potential associations between water familiarisation and drowning risk. In addition, a consensus on the definition of adequate supervision in needed.

  18. bcl-2 Overexpression Reduces Apoptotic Photoreceptor Cell Death in Three Different Retinal Degenerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jeannie; Flannery, John G.; Lavail, Matthew M.; Steinberg, Roy H.; Xu, Jun; Simon, Melvin I.

    1996-07-01

    Apoptosis of photoreceptors occurs infrequently in adult retina but can be triggered in inherited and environmentally induced retinal degenerations. The protooncogene bcl-2 is known to be a potent regulator of cell survival in neurons. We created lines of transgenic mice overexpressing bcl-2 to test for its ability to increase photoreceptor survival. Bcl-2 increased photoreceptor survival in mice with retinal degeneration caused by a defective opsin or cGMP phosphodiesterase. Overexpression of Bcl-2 in normal photoreceptors also decreased the damaging effects of constant light exposure. Apoptosis was induced in normal photoreceptors by very high levels of bcl-2. We conclude that bcl-2 is an important regulator of photoreceptor cell death in retinal degenerations.

  19. The common pain of surrealism and death: acetaminophen reduces compensatory affirmation following meaning threats.

    PubMed

    Randles, Daniel; Heine, Steven J; Santos, Nathan

    2013-06-01

    The meaning-maintenance model posits that any violation of expectations leads to an affective experience that motivates compensatory affirmation. We explore whether the neural mechanism that responds to meaning threats can be inhibited by acetaminophen, in the same way that acetaminophen inhibits physical pain or the distress caused by social rejection. In two studies, participants received either acetaminophen or a placebo and were provided with either an unsettling experience or a control experience. In Study 1, participants wrote about either their death or a control topic. In Study 2, participants watched either a surrealist film clip or a control film clip. In both studies, participants in the meaning-threat condition who had taken a placebo showed typical compensatory affirmations by becoming more punitive toward lawbreakers, whereas those who had taken acetaminophen, and those in the control conditions, did not.

  20. Nutritional Deficiencies and Sarcopenia in Heart Failure: A Therapeutic Opportunity to Reduce Hospitalization and Death.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Peter A; Fallahzadeh, Mohammad Kazem; Hegazi, Refaat M

    2016-01-01

    There is an expanding prevalence pool of heart failure (HF) due to the increasing prevalence of survivors of myocardial infarction, diabetes, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, and obesity. There is increasing interest in the role of nutrition in all forms of HF, given observations concerning micro- and macronutrient deficiencies, loss of lean body mass or sarcopenia, and their relationships with hospitalization and death. This review examines the relationships among loss of lean body mass, macro- and micronutrient intake, and the natural history of HF, particularly in the elderly, in whom the risks for all-cause rehospitalization, infection, falls, and mortality are increased. These risks are potentially modifiable through strategies that improve nutrition in this vulnerable population.

  1. [Being in motion reduces the risk of disease and premature death].

    PubMed

    Henriksson, Jan; Sundberg, Carl Johan

    2015-11-17

    Regular physical activity affects most organs and tissues through a large number of mechanisms which in various ways contribute to improved function and health. Regular physical activity improves quality of life, cognitive functions, mood state and physical capacity, and lowers the risk of many diseases and premature death. Physical activity affects proteins and gene expression through signalling mechanisms, e.g. epigenetic changes. The biological response to physical activity can be markedly different between individuals, to a large degree due to genetic mechanisms. Regular aerobic physical activity (endurance training) improves cardiac function, partly due to an increased stroke volume, and lowers blood pressure due to e.g. improved vasodilation, lower arterial stiffness and increased capillarisation. Regular physical activity helps to maintain muscle mass and function and can improve brain health and function, e.g. executive and memory functions.

  2. Fetal death and reduced birth rates associated with exposure to lead-contaminated drinking water.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Marc

    2014-01-01

    This ecologic study notes that fetal death rates (FDR) during the Washington DC drinking water "lead crisis" (2000-2004) peaked in 2001 when water lead levels (WLLs) were highest, and were minimized in 2004 after public health interventions were implemented to protect pregnant women. Changes in the DC FDR vs neighboring Baltimore City were correlated to DC WLL (R(2) = 0.72). Birth rates in DC also increased versus Baltimore City and versus the United States in 2004-2006, when consumers were protected from high WLLs. The increased births in DC neighborhoods comparing 2004 versus 2001 was correlated to the incidence of lead pipes (R(2) = 0.60). DC birth rates from 1999 to 2007 correlated with proxies for maternal blood lead including the geometric mean blood lead in DC children (R(2) = 0.68) and the incidence of lead poisoning in children under age 1.3 years (R(2) = 0.64). After public health protections were removed in 2006, DC FDR spiked in 2007-2009 versus 2004-2006 (p < 0.05), in a manner consistent with high WLL health risks to consumers arising from partial lead service line replacements, and DC FDR dropped to historically low levels in 2010-2011 after consumers were protected and the PSLR program was terminated. Re-evaluation of a historic construction-related miscarriage cluster in the USA Today Building (1987-1988), demonstrates that high WLLs from disturbed plumbing were a possible cause. Overall results are consistent with prior research linking increased lead exposure to higher incidence of miscarriages and fetal death, even at blood lead elevations (≈5 μg/dL) once considered relatively low.

  3. Interleukin-21 receptor deficiency increases the initial toll-like receptor 2 response but protects against joint pathology by reducing Th1 and Th17 cells during streptococcal cell wall arthritis.

    PubMed

    Marijnissen, Renoud J; Roeleveld, Debbie M; Young, Deborah; Nickerson-Nutter, Cheryl; Abdollahi-Roodsaz, Shahla; Garcia de Aquino, Sabrina; van de Loo, Fons A J; van Spriel, Annemiek B; Boots, Annemieke M H; van den Berg, Wim B; Koenders, Marije I

    2014-04-01

    The cytokine interleukin-21 (IL-21) can have both proinflammatory and immunosuppressive effects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential dual role of IL-21 in experimental arthritis in relation to Th17 cells. Antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) and chronic streptococcal cell wall (SCW) arthritis were induced in IL-21 receptor-deficient (IL-21R(-/-) ) and wild-type mice. Knee joints, synovial tissue, and serum were analyzed for arthritis pathology and inflammatory markers. During AIA and chronic SCW arthritis, IL-21R deficiency protected against severe inflammation and joint destruction. This was accompanied by suppressed serum IgG1 levels and antigen-specific T cell responses. Levels of IL-17 were reduced during AIA, and synovial lymphocytes isolated during SCW arthritis for flow cytometry demonstrated that mainly IL-17+ interferon-γ (IFNγ)-positive T cells were reduced in IL-21R(-/-) mice. However, during the acute phases of SCW arthritis, significantly higher joint swelling scores were observed, consistent with enhanced tumor necrosis factor and IL-6 expression. Interestingly, IL-21R(-/-) mice were significantly less capable of up-regulating suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS-1) and SOCS-3 messenger RNA. IL-21 stimulation also affected the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2)/caspase recruitment domain 15 response to SCW fragments in vitro, indicating that impaired SOCS regulation in the absence of IL-21 signaling might contribute to the increased local activation during SCW arthritis. In contrast to the proinflammatory role of IL-21 in adaptive immunity, which drives IL-17+IFN+ cells and joint pathology during chronic experimental arthritis, IL-21 also has an important immunosuppressive role, presumably by inhibiting TLR signaling via SOCS-1 and SOCS-3. If this dual role of IL-21 in various immune processes is present in human disease, it could make IL-21 a difficult therapeutic target in rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2014 by the American

  4. Para-Phenylenediamine Induces Apoptotic Death of Melanoma Cells and Reduces Melanoma Tumour Growth in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bhowmick, Debajit; Bhar, Kaushik; Mallick, Sanjaya K.; Das, Subhadip; Chatterjee, Nabanita; Sarkar, Tuhin Subhra; Chakrabarti, Rajarshi; Das Saha, Krishna; Siddhanta, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the most aggressive forms of cancer, usually resistant to standard chemotherapeutics. Despite a huge number of clinical trials, any success to find a chemotherapeutic agent that can effectively destroy melanoma is yet to be achieved. Para-phenylenediamine (p-PD) in the hair dyes is reported to purely serve as an external dyeing agent. Very little is known about whether p-PD has any effect on the melanin producing cells. We have demonstrated p-PD mediated apoptotic death of both human and mouse melanoma cells in vitro. Mouse melanoma tumour growth was also arrested by the apoptotic activity of intraperitoneal administration of p-PD with almost no side effects. This apoptosis is shown to occur primarily via loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and caspase 8 activation. p-PD mediated apoptosis was also confirmed by the increase in sub-G0/G1 cell number. Thus, our experimental observation suggests that p-PD can be a potential less expensive candidate to be developed as a chemotherapeutic agent for melanoma. PMID:27293892

  5. Sustained Toll-Like Receptor 9 Activation Promotes Systemic and Cardiac Inflammation, and Aggravates Diastolic Heart Failure in SERCA2a KO Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dhondup, Yangchen; Sjaastad, Ivar; Scott, Helge; Sandanger, Øystein; Zhang, Lili; Haugstad, Solveig Bjærum; Aronsen, Jan Magnus; Ranheim, Trine; Holmen, Sigve Dhondup; Alfsnes, Katrine; Ahmed, Muhammad Shakil; Attramadal, Håvard; Gullestad, Lars; Aukrust, Pål; Christensen, Geir; Yndestad, Arne; Vinge, Leif Erik

    2015-01-01

    Aim Cardiac inflammation is important in the pathogenesis of heart failure. However, the consequence of systemic inflammation on concomitant established heart failure, and in particular diastolic heart failure, is less explored. Here we investigated the impact of systemic inflammation, caused by sustained Toll-like receptor 9 activation, on established diastolic heart failure. Methods and Results Diastolic heart failure was established in 8–10 week old cardiomyocyte specific, inducible SERCA2a knock out (i.e., SERCA2a KO) C57Bl/6J mice. Four weeks after conditional KO, mice were randomized to receive Toll-like receptor 9 agonist (CpG B; 2μg/g body weight) or PBS every third day. After additional four weeks, echocardiography, phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging, histology, flow cytometry, and cardiac RNA analyses were performed. A subgroup was followed, registering morbidity and death. Non-heart failure control groups treated with CpG B or PBS served as controls. Our main findings were: (i) Toll-like receptor 9 activation (CpG B) reduced life expectancy in SERCA2a KO mice compared to PBS treated SERCA2a KO mice. (ii) Diastolic function was lower in SERCA2a KO mice with Toll-like receptor 9 activation. (iii) Toll-like receptor 9 stimulated SERCA2a KO mice also had increased cardiac and systemic inflammation. Conclusion Sustained activation of Toll-like receptor 9 causes cardiac and systemic inflammation, and deterioration of SERCA2a depletion-mediated diastolic heart failure. PMID:26461521

  6. Annual Screening with Chest X-Ray Does Not Reduce Lung Cancer Deaths

    Cancer.gov

    Annual screening for lung cancer using a standard chest x-ray does not reduce the risk of dying from lung cancer when compared with no annual screening, according to findings from the NCI-led Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) screening trial.

  7. Reduced Ca2+ entry and suicidal death of erythrocytes in PDK1 hypomorphic mice.

    PubMed

    Föller, Michael; Mahmud, Hasan; Koka, Saisudha; Lang, Florian

    2008-02-01

    The phosphoinositide-dependent kinase PDK1 is a key element in the phosphoinositol-3-kinase signalling pathway, which is involved in the regulation of ion channels, transporters, cell volume and cell survival. Eryptosis, the suicidal death of erythrocytes, is characterized by decrease in cell volume, cell membrane blebbing and phospholipids scrambling with phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface. Oxidative stress, osmotic shock or Cl- removal trigger eryptosis by activation of Ca2+-permeable cation channels and subsequent increase in cytosolic Ca2+ activity. To explore the impact of PDK1 for erythrocyte survival, eryptosis was analysed in hypomorphic mice (pdk1hm) expressing only some 25% of PDK1 and in their wild-type littermates (pdk1wt). Cell volume was estimated from forward scatter and phosphatidylserine exposure from annexin-V binding in fluorescence activated cell sorter analysis. Forward scatter was smaller in pdk1hm than in pdk1wt erythrocytes. Oxidative stress (100 microM tert-butylhydroperoxide), osmotic shock (+300 mM sucrose) and Cl- removal (replacement of Cl- with gluconate) all decreased forward scatter and increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding erythrocytes from both pdk1hm and pdk1wt mice. After treatment, the forward scatter was similar in both genotypes, but the percentage of annexin-V binding was significantly smaller in pdk1hm than in pdk1wt erythrocytes. According to Fluo-3 fluorescence, cytosolic Ca2+ activity was significantly smaller in pdk1hm than in pdk1wt erythrocytes. Treatment with Ca2+-ionophore ionomycin (1 microM) was followed by an increase in annexin-V binding to similar levels in pdk1hm and pdk1wt erythrocytes. The experiments reveal that PDK1 deficiency is associated with decreased Ca2+ entry into erythrocytes and thus with blunted eryptotic effects of oxidative stress, osmotic shock and Cl- removal.

  8. Reduced Frequency of a CD14+ CD16+ Monocyte Subset with High Toll-Like Receptor 4 Expression in Cord Blood Compared to Adult Blood Contributes to Lipopolysaccharide Hyporesponsiveness in Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Pedraza-Sánchez, Sigifredo; Hise, Amy G.; Ramachandra, Lakshmi; Arechavaleta-Velasco, Fabian

    2013-01-01

    The human innate immune response to pathogens is not fully effective and mature until well into childhood, as exemplified by various responses to Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists in newborns compared to adults. To better understand the mechanistic basis for this age-related difference in innate immunity, we compared tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) production by monocytes from cord blood (CB) and adult blood (AB) in response to LAM (lipoarabinomannan from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a TLR2 ligand) and LPS (lipopolysaccharide from Escherichia coli, a TLR4 ligand). LPS or LAM-induced TNF-α production was 5 to 18 times higher in AB than in CB monocytes, whereas interleukin-1α (IL-1α) stimulated similar levels of TNF-α in both groups, suggesting that decreased responses to LPS or LAM in CB are unlikely to be due to differences in the MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. This impaired signaling was attributable, in part, to lower functional TLR4 expression, especially on CD14+ CD16+ monocytes, which are the primary cell subset for LPS-induced TNF-α production. Importantly, the frequency of CD14+ CD16+ monocytes in CB was 2.5-fold lower than in AB (P < 0.01). CB from Kenyan newborns sensitized to parasite antigens in utero had more CD14+ CD16+ monocytes (P = 0.02) and produced higher levels of TNF-α in response to LPS (P = 0.004) than CB from unsensitized Kenyan or North American newborns. Thus, a reduced CD14+ CD16+ activated/differentiated monocyte subset and a correspondingly lower level of functional TLR4 on monocytes contributes to the relatively low TNF-α response to LPS observed in immunologically naive newborns compared to the response in adults. PMID:23595503

  9. Metallothionein treatment reduces proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-alpha and apoptotic cell death during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE).

    PubMed

    Penkowa, M; Hidalgo, J

    2001-07-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an animal model for the human autoimmune disease multiple sclerosis (MS). Proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) are considered important for induction and pathogenesis of EAE/MS disease, which is characterized by significant inflammation and neuroglial damage. We have recently shown that the exogenous administration of the antioxidant protein zinc-metallothionein-II (Zn-MT-II) significantly decreased the clinical symptoms, mortality, and leukocyte infiltration of the CNS during EAE. However, it is not known how EAE progression is regulated nor how cytokine production and cell death can be reduced. We herewith demonstrate that treatment with Zn-MT-II significantly decreased the CNS expression of IL-6 and TNF-alpha during EAE. Zn-MT-II treatment could also significantly reduce apoptotic cell death of neurons and oligodendrocytes during EAE, as judged by using TUNEL and immunoreactivity for cytochrome c and caspases 1 and 3. In contrast, the number of apoptotic lymphocytes and macrophages was less affected by Zn-MT-II treatment. The Zn-MT-II-induced decrease in proinflammatory cytokines and apoptosis during EAE could contribute to the reported diminution of clinical symptoms and mortality in EAE-immunized rats receiving Zn-MT-II treatment. Our results demonstrate that MT-II reduces the CNS expression of proinflammatory cytokines and the number of apoptotic neurons during EAE in vivo and that MT-II might be a potentially useful factor for treatment of EAE/MS.

  10. Davunetide (NAP) protects the retina against early diabetic injury by reducing apoptotic death.

    PubMed

    Scuderi, Soraya; D'Amico, Agata Grazia; Castorina, Alessandro; Federico, Concetta; Marrazzo, Giuseppina; Drago, Filippo; Bucolo, Claudio; D'Agata, Velia

    2014-11-01

    Davunetide (NAP) is an eight amino acid peptide that has been shown to provide potent neuroprotection. In the present study, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of NAP in diabetic retinopathy using an in vivo streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic model. A single intraocular injection of NAP (100 μg/mL) or vehicle was administered 1 week after STZ injection. Three weeks after diabetes induction, we assessed the retinal expression and distribution of apoptosis markers, cleaved caspase-3, and Bcl2, by Western blot and immunofluorescent analysis. Furthermore, we evaluated the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (MAPK/ERK) and/or phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/Akt pathways by measuring the protein levels of p-ERK and p-AKT with or without NAP treatment. Results demonstrated that NAP treatment reduced apoptotic event in diabetic retina, and it restored cleaved caspase-3 expression levels in the retina of STZ-injected rats as well as the decreased Bcl2. NAP treatment improved cellular survival through the activation of the MAPK/ERK pathway. Taken together, these findings suggested that NAP might be useful to treat retinal degenerative diseases.

  11. Axin expression reduces staurosporine-induced mitochondria-mediated cell death in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jee-Hye; Kim, Hyun-wook; Rhyu, Im Joo; Song, Ki-Joon; Kee, Sun-Ho

    2012-10-01

    Cytoplasmic axin expression frequently produces punctuate structures in cells, but the nature of axin puncta has not been fully elucidated. In an effort to analyze cytoplasmic axin puncta, we established HeLa cells expressing axin in a doxycycline-inducible manner (HeLa-Axin). We observed that axin accumulated in an aggregate-like pattern in perinuclear areas and appeared to be associated with mitochondria, Golgi apparatus, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but not lysosomes. Further biochemical analysis suggested that some part of the cytoplasmic axin pool was associated with mitochondria. In addition, mitochondrial proteins [i.e., cytochrome oxidase IV (CoxIV) and cytochrome c] were slightly higher in HeLa-Axin cells than in HeLa-EV cells, suggesting altered mitochondrial degradation. HeLa-Axin cells were then treated with staurosporine (STS) to determine if the mitochondria-induced apoptosis pathway was altered. Compared to STS-treated control cells (HeLa-EV), HeLa-Axin cells had less STS-induced cytotoxicity and reduced caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage. Given that mitochondria outer membrane potential was unchanged, HeLa-Axin cells might be relatively resistant to STS-mediated mitochondrial damage. Mitochondria associated with axin aggregates were resistant to detergent-mediated permeabilization. These results suggest that axin forms aggregate-like structures in association with mitochondria, which render mitochondria resistant to STS-induced membrane damage and cytotoxicity.

  12. Effect of Statin Therapy in Reducing the Risk of Serious Non-AIDS-Defining Events and Nonaccidental Death

    PubMed Central

    Overton, E. T.; Kitch, D.; Benson, C. A.; Hunt, P. W.; Stein, J. H.; Smurzynski, M.; Ribaudo, H. J.; Tebas, P.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Excessive inflammation persists despite antiretroviral treatment. Statins decrease cardiovascular (CV) disease risk by reducing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and inflammation. We performed an exploratory analysis to evaluate whether statin therapy decreased risk of non-AIDS-defining events and nonaccidental death. Methods. A total of 3601 subjects not on a statin from the AIDS Clinical Trials Group Longitudinal Linked Randomized Trials cohort were included. Outcome was time to first clinical event (CV event, renal or hepatic disease, incident diabetes, thrombotic/embolic event, nontraumatic fracture, non-AIDS-defining malignancy, serious bacterial infection, or nonaccidental death); event categories were also analyzed separately. Inverse probability of treatment and censoring weighted Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess the causal statin effect. Differential statin effects by baseline covariates were evaluated. Results. Over 15 135 person-years (PY) of follow-up, 484 subjects initiated statins; 616 experienced an event (crude event rate, 4.4/100 PY on a statin and 4.1/100 PY not on a statin); the unadjusted hazard ratio (HR) was 1.17 (95% confidence interval [CI], .91–1.50). In a final weighted model, the adjusted HR (AHR) was 0.81 (95% CI, .53– 1.24). Results for other clinical events were similar, except for malignancies (AHR, 0.43 [95% CI, .19–.94]) and bacterial infections (AHR, 1.30 [95% CI, .64–2.65]). No differential statin effects by baseline covariates were detected. Conclusions. Although statin therapy was not associated with a reduction in time to all non-AIDS-defining event or nonaccidental death, it was associated with a statistically significant 57% reduction in non-AIDS-defining malignancies. Confirmatory studies are needed to evaluate statin-associated reduction in risk of cancer and non-AIDS-associated morbidities. PMID:23386631

  13. Electrocardiographic Screening for Prolonged QT Interval to Reduce Sudden Cardiac Death in Psychiatric Patients: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    PubMed

    Poncet, Antoine; Gencer, Baris; Blondon, Marc; Gex-Fabry, Marianne; Combescure, Christophe; Shah, Dipen; Schwartz, Peter J; Besson, Marie; Girardin, François R

    2015-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death is a leading cause of mortality in psychiatric patients. Long QT (LQT) is common in this population and predisposes to Torsades-de-Pointes (TdP) and subsequent mortality. To estimate the cost-effectiveness of electrocardiographic screening to detect LQT in psychiatric inpatients. We built a decision analytic model based on a decision tree to evaluate the cost-effectiveness and utility of LQT screening from a health care perspective. LQT proportion parameters were derived from an in-hospital cross-sectional study. We performed experts' elicitation to estimate the risk of TdP, given extent of QT prolongation. A TdP reduction of 65% after LQT detection was based on positive drug dechallenge rate and through adequate treatment and electrolyte adjustments. The base-case model uncertainty was assessed with one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Finally, the TdP related mortality and TdP avoidance parameters were varied in a two-way sensitivity analysis to assess their effect on the Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Ratio (ICER). Costs, Quality Ajusted Life Year (QALY), ICER, and probability of cost effectiveness thresholds ($ 10,000, $25,000, and $50,000 per QALY). In the base-case scenario, the numbers of patients needed to screen were 1128 and 2817 to avoid one TdP and one death, respectively. The ICER of systematic ECG screening was $8644 (95%CI, 3144-82 498) per QALY. The probability of cost-effectiveness was 96% at a willingness-to-pay of $50,000 for one QALY. In sensitivity analyses, results were sensitive to the case-fatality of TdP episodes and to the TdP reduction following the diagnosis of LQT. In psychiatric hospitals, performing systematic ECG screening at admission help reduce the number of sudden cardiac deaths in a cost-effective fashion.

  14. Early generation of nitric oxide contributes to copper tolerance through reducing oxidative stress and cell death in hulless barley roots.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanfeng

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the specific role of nitric oxide (NO) in the early response of hulless barley roots to copper (Cu) stress. We used the fluorescent probe diaminofluorescein-FM diacetate to establish NO localization, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-special labeling and histochemical procedures for the detection of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the root apex. An early production of NO was observed in Cu-treated root tips of hulless barley, but the detection of NO levels was decreased by supplementation with a NO scavenger, 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (c-PTIO). Application of sodium nitroprusside (a NO donor) relieved Cu-induced root inhibition, ROS accumulation and oxidative damage, while c-PTIO treatment had a synergistic effect with Cu and further enhanced ROS levels and oxidative stress. In addition, the Cu-dependent increase in activities of superoxide dismutase, peroxidase and ascorbate peroxidase were further enhanced by exogenous NO, but application of c-PTIO decreased the activities of catalase and ascorbate peroxidase in Cu-treated roots. Subsequently, cell death was observed in root tips and was identified as a type of programed cell death (PCD) by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay. The addition of NO prevented the increase of cell death in root tips, whereas inhibiting NO accumulation further increased the number of cells undergoing PCD. These results revealed that NO production is an early response of hulless barley roots to Cu stress and that NO contributes to Cu tolerance in hulless barley possibly by modulating antioxidant defense, subsequently reducing oxidative stress and PCD in root tips.

  15. Inverse Susceptibility to Oxidative Death of Lymphocytes Obtained From Alzheimer's Patients and Skin Cancer Survivors: Increased Apoptosis in Alzheimer's and Reduced Necrosis in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Monica; Salech, Felipe; Ponce, Daniela P.; Merino, Daniela; Sinning, Mariana; Xiong, Chengjie; Roe, Catherine M.; Quest, Andrew F. G.

    2012-01-01

    A paucity of cancer in individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and low rates of AD in cancer survivors has been reported in epidemiological studies. Deregulation in opposite directions of biological mechanisms, such as susceptibility to cell death, might be shared in the two disorders. We analyzed lymphocytes from AD and skin cancer patients as well as healthy controls and found significantly increased vulnerability of AD lymphocytes to H2O2-induced apoptotic death and higher resistance to death of skin cancer lymphocytes, due to reduced necrosis, as compared with healthy controls by pairwise comparisons adjusted for age and sex. H2O2-induced death in lymphocytes was caspase independent and significantly reduced by PARP-1 inhibition in all three groups. These differences in the susceptibility to cell death observed for lymphocytes from AD and skin cancer patients may be one of the mechanisms that help explain the inverse correlation detected between these diseases in epidemiological studies. PMID:22367434

  16. Coffee reduces the risk of death after acute myocardial infarction: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Oliver I; Allgar, Victoria; Wong, Kenneth Y-K

    2016-11-01

    Habitual coffee consumption is protective against coronary heart disease in women; however, it is not clear whether such cardioprotection is conferred on those who have already experienced an acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Our aim was to investigate whether coffee consumption affected mortality after AMI. We carried out a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies that examined the relationship between coffee intake and mortality after an AMI. Using a defined-search strategy, electronic databases (MEDLINE and Embase) were searched for papers published between 1946 and 2015. Two eligible studies investigating post-AMI mortality risk against coffee consumption were identified and assessed using set criteria. Combined, these studies recruited a total of 3271 patients and 604 died. The hazard ratios for the following experimental groups were defined: light coffee drinkers (1-2 cups/day) versus noncoffee drinkers, heavy coffee drinkers (>2 cups/day) versus noncoffee drinkers and heavy coffee drinkers versus light coffee drinkers. A statistically significant inverse correlation was observed between coffee drinking and mortality; all three groups showed a significant reduction in risk ratio. Light coffee drinkers versus noncoffee drinkers were associated with a risk ratio of 0.79 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.66-0.94, P=0.008]; heavy coffee drinkers versus noncoffee drinkers were associated with a risk ratio of 0.54 (95% CI: 0.45-0.65, P<0.00001); and heavy coffee drinkers versus light coffee drinkers were associated with a risk ratio of 0.69 (95% CI: 0.58-0.83, P<0.0001). Drinking coffee habitually following AMI was associated with a reduced risk of mortality.

  17. Hif-1α Knockdown Reduces Glycolytic Metabolism and Induces Cell Death of Human Synovial Fibroblasts Under Normoxic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Del Rey, Manuel J; Valín, Álvaro; Usategui, Alicia; García-Herrero, Carmen M; Sánchez-Aragó, María; Cuezva, José M; Galindo, María; Bravo, Beatriz; Cañete, Juan D; Blanco, Francisco J; Criado, Gabriel; Pablos, José L

    2017-06-16

    Increased glycolysis and HIF-1α activity are characteristics of cells under hypoxic or inflammatory conditions. Besides, in normal O2 environments, elevated rates of glycolysis support critical cellular mechanisms such as cell survival. The purpose of this study was to analyze the contribution of HIF-1α to the energy metabolism and survival of human synovial fibroblasts (SF) under normoxic conditions. HIF-1α was silenced using lentiviral vectors or small-interfering RNA (siRNA) duplexes. Expression analysis by qRT-PCR and western blot of known HIF-1α target genes in hypoxia demonstrated the presence of functional HIF-1α in normoxic SF and confirmed the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as a HIF-1α target even in normoxia. HIF-1α silencing induced apoptotic cell death in cultured SF and, similarly, treatment with glycolytic, but not with OXPHOS inhibitors, induced SF death. Finally, in vivo HIF-1α targeting by siRNA showed a significant reduction in the viability of human SF engrafted into a murine air pouch. Our results demonstrate that SF are highly dependent on glycolytic metabolism and that HIF-1α plays a regulatory role in glycolysis even under aerobic conditions. Local targeting of HIF-1α provides a feasible strategy to reduce SF hyperplasia in chronic arthritic diseases.

  18. Lithium carbonate and coenzyme Q10 reduce cell death in a cell model of Machado-Joseph disease

    PubMed Central

    Lopes-Ramos, C.M.; Pereira, T.C.; Dogini, D.B.; Gilioli, R.; Lopes-Cendes, I.

    2016-01-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) or spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by expansion of the polyglutamine domain of the ataxin-3 (ATX3) protein. MJD/SCA3 is the most frequent autosomal dominant ataxia in many countries. The mechanism underlying MJD/SCA3 is thought to be mainly related to protein misfolding and aggregation leading to neuronal dysfunction followed by cell death. Currently, there are no effective treatments for patients with MJD/SCA3. Here, we report on the potential use of lithium carbonate and coenzyme Q10 to reduce cell death caused by the expanded ATX3 in cell culture. Cell viability and apoptosis were evaluated by MTT assay and by flow cytometry after staining with annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide. Treatment with lithium carbonate and coenzyme Q10 led to a significant increase in viability of cells expressing expanded ATX3 (Q84). In addition, we found that the increase in cell viability resulted from a significant reduction in the proportion of apoptotic cells. Furthermore, there was a significant change in the expanded ATX3 monomer/aggregate ratio after lithium carbonate and coenzyme Q10 treatment, with an increase in the monomer fraction and decrease in aggregates. The safety and tolerance of both drugs are well established; thus, our results indicate that lithium carbonate and coenzyme Q10 are good candidates for further in vivo therapeutic trials. PMID:27878228

  19. Reduced scytonemin isolated from Nostoc commune induces autophagic cell death in human T-lymphoid cell line Jurkat cells.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Tomohiro; Tsuzuki, Ryosuke; Tanaka, Toshiomi; Ninomiya, Masayuki; Yamaguchi, Yuji; Takenaka, Hiroyuki; Ando, Masashi; Tsukamasa, Yasuyuki; Koketsu, Mamoru

    2013-10-01

    Nostoc commune is a terrestrial benthic blue-green alga that often forms an extended mucilaginous layer on the soil, accumulates on stones and mud in aquatic environments. Reduced-scytonemin (R-scy), isolated from N. commune Vaucher, has been shown to suppress the human T-lymphoid Jurkat cell growth. To reveal the mechanisms underlying the R-scy-mediated inhibition of Jurkat cell growth, we examined cell morphology, DNA fragmentation, and microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) modification in these cells. We observed multiple vacuoles as well as the conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II in R-scy-treated cells. These results suggest that the R-scy induced Jurkat cell growth inhibition is attributable to the induction of type II programmed cell death (PCD II; autophagic cell death or autophagy). We further examined the mechanisms underlying R-scy-induced PCDII. The cells treated with R-scy produced large amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to the induction of mitochondrial dysfunction. However, the elimination of R-scy-induced ROS by treatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) markedly opposed R-scy-induced PCDII. Based on these results, we conclude that ROS formation plays a critical role in R-scy-induced PCDII. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Lithium carbonate and coenzyme Q10 reduce cell death in a cell model of Machado-Joseph disease.

    PubMed

    Lopes-Ramos, C M; Pereira, T C; Dogini, D B; Gilioli, R; Lopes-Cendes, I

    2016-11-21

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) or spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by expansion of the polyglutamine domain of the ataxin-3 (ATX3) protein. MJD/SCA3 is the most frequent autosomal dominant ataxia in many countries. The mechanism underlying MJD/SCA3 is thought to be mainly related to protein misfolding and aggregation leading to neuronal dysfunction followed by cell death. Currently, there are no effective treatments for patients with MJD/SCA3. Here, we report on the potential use of lithium carbonate and coenzyme Q10 to reduce cell death caused by the expanded ATX3 in cell culture. Cell viability and apoptosis were evaluated by MTT assay and by flow cytometry after staining with annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide. Treatment with lithium carbonate and coenzyme Q10 led to a significant increase in viability of cells expressing expanded ATX3 (Q84). In addition, we found that the increase in cell viability resulted from a significant reduction in the proportion of apoptotic cells. Furthermore, there was a significant change in the expanded ATX3 monomer/aggregate ratio after lithium carbonate and coenzyme Q10 treatment, with an increase in the monomer fraction and decrease in aggregates. The safety and tolerance of both drugs are well established; thus, our results indicate that lithium carbonate and coenzyme Q10 are good candidates for further in vivo therapeutic trials.

  1. Bacterial and yeast chaperones reduce both aggregate formation and cell death in mammalian cell models of Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, Jenny; Chatellier, Jean; Woolfson, Adrian; Milstein, César; Fersht, Alan R.; Rubinsztein, David C.

    2000-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative condition caused by expansions of more than 35 uninterrupted CAG repeats in exon 1 of the huntingtin gene. The CAG repeats in HD and the other seven known diseases caused by CAG codon expansions are translated into long polyglutamine tracts that confer a deleterious gain of function on the mutant proteins. Intraneuronal inclusions comprising aggregates of the relevant mutant proteins are found in the brains of patients with HD and related diseases. It is crucial to determine whether the formation of inclusions is directly pathogenic, because a number of studies have suggested that aggregates may be epiphenomena or even protective. Here, we show that fragments of the bacterial chaperone GroEL and the full-length yeast heat shock protein Hsp104 reduce both aggregate formation and cell death in mammalian cell models of HD, consistent with a causal link between aggregation and pathology. PMID:10920207

  2. How can we reduce hepatic veno-occlusive disease-related deaths after allogeneic stem cell transplantation?

    PubMed

    Johnson, Douglas B; Savani, Bipin N

    2012-07-01

    Hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD) is a common and potentially devastating complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Confirmative diagnosis of this disorder can prove difficult early post hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, as a broad differential diagnosis exists and no definitive diagnostic test is available. Incidence of VOD has decreased in recent years, with especially dramatic declines in severe and fatal VOD. This improvement is attributed to less toxic and reduced-intensity conditioning regimens, and more appropriate patient selection. When severe VOD does occur, current treatments have been largely ineffective. Prevention remains the primary tool in the clinician's arsenal for managing VOD. Our institution pursues aggressive preventative measures for VOD, including appropriate conditioning regimen selection, avoiding hepatotoxic drugs, early prophylactic use of ursodiol, and aggressive fluid management. With appropriate management steps, we believe the incidence of VOD and related deaths can be further decreased.

  3. Beacon of Hope? Lessons Learned from Efforts to Reduce Civilian Deaths from Police Shootings in an Australian State.

    PubMed

    Saligari, Jessica; Evans, Richard

    2016-04-01

    In the 1990s, the police service in Victoria, Australia, faced a crisis of community confidence due to a spate of civilian deaths from police shootings. In that decade, twice as many civilians died at the hands of the police in Victoria than in every other Australian state combined. Most of those killed were mentally ill and affected by drugs and alcohol, and were rarely a serious threat except to themselves. The problem was also almost entirely an urban phenomenon. Shootings in rural communities, where mentally ill people were more likely to be personally known to local police, were (and remain) almost unknown. The large number of fatalities was recognised as a serious threat to public confidence, and Victoria Police introduced a ground-breaking training programme, Operation Beacon. Operating procedures and weapons training were fundamentally changed, to focus on de-escalation of conflict and avoiding or minimising police use of force. In the short term, Operation Beacon was successful. Shooting incidents were dramatically reduced. However, during the first decade of the new century, the number of civilians being killed again increased. This article examines Operation Beacon, both as a successful model for reducing civilian deaths at the hand of police and as a cautionary tale for police reform. We argue that the lessons of Operation Beacon have been gradually forgotten and that old habits and attitudes resurfaced. Fatal shootings of mentally ill civilians can be prevented, but if success is to be other than temporary, the Beacon philosophy must be continually reemphasised by police management.

  4. Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide fluorescence lifetime detected poly(adenosine-5'-diphosphate-ribose) polymerase-1-mediated cell death and therapeutic effect of pyruvate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Han-Wen; Wei, Yau-Huei; Wang, Hsing-Wen

    2011-06-01

    Noninvasive detection of cell death has the potential for definitive diagnosis and monitoring treatment outcomes in real time. Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence intensity has long been used as a noninvasive optical probe of metabolic states. NADH fluorescence lifetime has recently been studied for its potential as an alternative optical probe of cellular metabolic states and cell death. In this study, we investigated the potential using NADH fluorescence intensity and/or lifetime to detect poly(adenosine-5'-diphosphate-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1)-mediated cell death in HeLa cells. We also examined if NADH signals respond to treatment by pyruvate. The mechanism of PARP-1-mediated cell death has been well studied that extensive PARP-1 activation leads to cytosolic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide depletion resulting in glycolytic inhibition, mitochondrial failure, and death. Pyruvate could restore electron transport chain to prevent energy failure and death. Our results show that NADH fluorescence lifetime, not intensity, responded to PARP-1-mediated cell death and the rescue effect of pyruvate. This lifetime change of NADH fluorescence happened before the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial uncoupling. Together with our previous findings in staurosporine-induced cell death, we suggest that NADH fluorescence lifetime increase during cell death is mainly due to increased protein-protein interactions but not the intracellular NADH content.

  5. Disseminated cysticercosis: clinical spectrum, Toll-like receptor-4 gene polymorphisms and role of albendazole

    PubMed Central

    Qavi, Abdul; Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Jain, Amita; Kumar, Neeraj; Malhotra, Kiran Preet; Srivastava, Pradeep Kumar; Verma, Rajesh; Sharma, Praveen Kumar

    2016-01-01

    27 patients. Of the 4 deaths recorded, 3 had a heavy parasitic load and died after praziquantel therapy. Toll-like receptor-4 gene polymorphisms are associated with an increased susceptibility to disseminated cysticercosis, in the Indian population. Albendazole treatment seems to reduce the lesion load and improve symptoms. PMID:27684822

  6. Prolyl-4-Hydroxylases Inhibitor Stabilizes HIF-1α and Increases Mitophagy to Reduce Cell Death After Experimental Retinal Detachment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiyang; Zhu, Hong; Li, Tong; Zhang, Pengfei; Wang, Ning; Sun, Xiaodong

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the neuroprotective effect against photoreceptor cell death using prolyl-4-hydroxylases inhibitor (PHI), an HIF-1α stabilizer, in experimental retinal detachment (RD). RD was created in Brown Norway rats by subretinal injection of 1% sodium hyaluronate. FG-4592 (a PHI, 25 mg/kg) or a vehicle was administered every 2 days with retro-orbital injection. Photoreceptor death was evaluated by TdT-dUTP terminal nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay 3 days after RD and by the thickness of the outer nuclear layer 7 days after RD. The mitophagy-related markers Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1α (HIF-1α), BCL2/adenovirus E1B 19 kDa protein-interacting protein 3 (BNIP3), autophagy-related gene 5 (Atg5), microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 beta (LC3B), and FUN14 domain containing 1 (FUNDC1) were detected by Western blot and immunofluorescence. Transmission electron microscopy was used to observe ultramicro-morphological changes. Mitochondrial damage was evaluated by the measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by in situ ROS detection with dihydroethidium. The accumulation of HIF-1α and BNIP3 significantly increased after PHI treatment (P < 0.05), the pattern of Atg5 and LC3 changed, and FUNDC1 and LC3 were colocated. More autophagic vacuoles engulfing mitochondria were observed in transmission electron microscopy sections after PHI treatment when compared with the control. ROS significantly decreased in the PHI-treatment group (P < 0.05). This resulted in reduced TUNEL-positive photoreceptors 3 days after RD and an increased thickness of the outer nuclear layer 7 days after RD (P < 0.05). HIF-1α stabilization as a result of PHI treatment, along with the enhancement of mitophagy, could provide protection against photoreceptor injury following RD, which might be mediated by excessive ROS generation.

  7. Traffic-related air quality assessment for open road tolling highway facility.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jie; Yu, Dan

    2008-09-01

    Open road tolling (ORT) design has been considered as an effective means of smoothing highway traffic and reducing travel delay on toll highways. In this paper it is demonstrated that ORT can also achieve significant air quality benefits over the conventional toll plaza design. The near roadside carbon monoxide (CO) concentration levels can be reduced by up to 37%, and diesel particulate matter (DPM) emissions can decrease by as much as 58%. These large expected air quality benefits have great implications to the regional efforts of reducing mobile source air pollution toward achieving attainment status and healthier living environment.

  8. 33 CFR 402.4 - Tolls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tolls. 402.4 Section 402.4 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TARIFF OF TOLLS § 402.4 Tolls. (a) Every vessel entering, passing through or leaving the Seaway shall pay...

  9. Melatonin reduces ischemia/reperfusion-induced superoxide generation in arterial wall and cell death in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei Z; Fang, Xin-Hua; Stephenson, Linda L; Khiabani, Kayvan T; Zamboni, William A

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of melatonin on superoxide generation in arterial wall at an early phase of reperfusion and on endothelial dysfunction of microvasculature and cell viability of cremaster muscle at late phase of reperfusion (24 hr) after prolonged ischemia. Bilateral vascular pedicles which supply blood flow to the cremaster muscle were exposed. After surgical preparation, microvascular clamps were applied on the right iliac, femoral and spermatic arteries to create 4 hr of ischemia in both feeding vessels and the unexposed cremaster muscle. The vascular clamping was omitted on the left iliac, femoral and spermatic arteries and served as an internal control. Melatonin or Vehicle was via by intravenous injection at 10 min prior to reperfusion and 10 min after reperfusion. In the first experiment, the vascular pedicle was harvested after reperfusion to measure superoxide generation in real time by lucigenin-derived chemiluminescence. In the second experiment, endothelial-dependent and -independent vasodilatation was examined in the terminal arteriole of cremaster muscle which was then harvested to examine cell viability by WST-1 assay on day 2. Superoxide generation in arterial wall peaked at first 5-min of reperfusion and declined to near baseline after 60 min of reperfusion. Melatonin treatment significantly reduced superoxide generation in arterial walls and improved cell viability in cremaster muscles. Melatonin treatment also significantly reduced microvascular endothelial dysfunction which was still observable in the microcirculation of cremaster muscle after 24 hr of reperfusion. Melatonin reduces superoxide generation in the early phase of reperfusion resulting in attenuating endothelial dysfunction and muscle cell death in the late phase of reperfusion.

  10. Consumer Experiences Calling Toll-Free Corporate Hotlines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Charles L.; Smart, Denise T.

    1994-01-01

    Finds that dimensions that contribute to caller satisfaction (of toll-free corporate hotlines) included operator characteristics such as knowledge, courtesy, and interest; specific behaviors such as apologizing for a problem, thanking the consumer for calling, and encouraging them to call again; and reducing time placed on "hold." (SR)

  11. System dynamics modeling as a potentially useful tool in analyzing mitigation strategies to reduce overdose deaths associated with pharmaceutical opioid treatment of chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Wakeland, Wayne; Schmidt, Teresa; Gilson, Aaron M; Haddox, J David; Webster, Lynn R

    2011-06-01

    To illustrate a system-level, simulation-based approach for evaluating mitigation strategies to address the dramatic rise in abuse, addiction, and overdose deaths associated with the use of pharmaceutical opioid analgesics to treat chronic pain. SIMULATED INTERVENTIONS: Making available drug formulations with increased tamper-resistance, prescriber education programs, and programs that reduce rates of medical user-related abuse and addiction. SIMULATED OUTCOME MEASURE: Number of overdose deaths of medical users of pharmaceutical opioid analgesics, including those who abuse or have become addicted. A demonstration system dynamics model is developed, tested, and used to evaluate the impact of candidate mitigation strategies on the outcome measures. Tamper-resistant drug products will likely reduce overdose death rates but may not reduce overall deaths if there is increased prescribing. Prescriber education would likely reduce deaths through a reduction in patient access to pharmaceutical opioid analgesics. The system dynamics approach may have potential for opioid-related policy evaluation. However, metrics must be carefully selected, and trade-offs may be involved. For example, it may be difficult to limit negative outcomes associated with pharmaceutical opioids without adversely affecting chronic pain patients' access to pharmaceutical treatment. Ultimately, a combination of metrics and value judgments will be needed to properly evaluate mitigation strategies. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. What you count is what you target: the implications of maternal death classification for tracking progress towards reducing maternal mortality in developing countries

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Jacqueline S; Graham, Wendy J

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The first target of the fifth United Nations Millennium Development Goal is to reduce maternal mortality by 75% between 1990 and 2015. This target is critically off track. Despite difficulties inherent in measuring maternal mortality, interventions aimed at reducing it must be monitored and evaluated to determine the most effective strategies in different contexts. In some contexts, the direct causes of maternal death, such as haemorrhage and sepsis, predominate and can be tackled effectively through providing access to skilled birth attendance and emergency obstetric care. In others, indirect causes of maternal death, such as HIV/AIDS and malaria, make a significant contribution and require alternative interventions. Methods of planning and evaluating maternal health interventions that do not differentiate between direct and indirect maternal deaths may lead to unrealistic expectations of effectiveness or mask progress in tackling specific causes. Furthermore, the need for additional or alternative interventions to tackle the causes of indirect maternal death may not be recognized if all-cause maternal death is used as the sole outcome indicator. This article illustrates the importance of differentiating between direct and indirect maternal deaths by analysing historical data from England and Wales and contemporary data from Ghana, Rwanda and South Africa. The principal aim of the paper is to highlight the need to differentiate deaths in this way when evaluating maternal mortality, particularly when judging progress towards the fifth Millennium Development Goal. It is recommended that the potential effect of maternity services failing to take indirect maternal deaths into account should be modelled. PMID:20428372

  13. Spiritual Well-being May Reduce the Negative Impacts of Cancer Symptoms on the Quality of Life and the Desire for Hastened Death in Terminally Ill Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yin-Chih; Lin, Chia-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Spirituality is a central component of the well-being of terminally ill cancer patients. The aim of this study was to examine the mediating or moderating role of spiritual well-being in reducing the impact of cancer-related symptoms on quality of life and the desire for hastened death in terminally ill cancer patients. Eighty-five terminally ill cancer patients were assessed using the Taiwanese version of the M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General, the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-being, the Beck Hopelessness Scale, and the Schedule of Attitudes Toward Hastened Death. Spiritual well-being was significantly negatively correlated with symptom severity (r = -0.46, P < .01). Symptom severity negatively correlated with quality of life (r = -0.54) and positively correlated with hopelessness (r = 0.51, P < .01) and the desire for hastened death (r = 0.61, P < .01). Spiritual well-being was a partial mediator and moderator between symptom severity and quality of life. Spiritual well-being was a partial mediator between symptom severity and the desire for hastened death. The meaning subscale of spiritual well-being was a more significant predictor of the desire for hastened death and quality of life than the faith subscale was. Spiritual well-being may reduce the negative impacts of cancer on quality of life and the desire for hastened death. Appropriate spiritual care may reduce the negative impact of severe cancer symptoms on quality of life and the desire for hastened death in terminally ill cancer patients.

  14. Acute Kidney Outreach to Reduce Deterioration and Death (AKORDD) trial: the protocol for a large pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Abdelaziz, Tarek Samy; Lindenmeyer, Antje; Baharani, Jyoti; Mistry, Hema; Sitch, Alice; Temple, R Mark; Perkins, Gavin; Thomas, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Acute kidney injury (AKI) contributes to morbidity and mortality, and its care is often suboptimal and/or delayed. The Acute Kidney Outreach to Reduce Deterioration and Death (AKORDD) study is a large pilot testing provision of early specialist advice, to improve outcomes for patients with AKI. Methods and analysis This before and after study will test an Outreach service for adult patients with AKI, identified using the national algorithm. During the 2-month before phase, AKI outcomes (30-day mortality, need for dialysis or AKI stage deterioration) will be observed in the intervention and control hospitals and their respective community areas; no interventions will be delivered. Patients will receive good standard care. During the 5-month after phase, the intervention will be delivered to patients with AKI in the intervention hospital and its area. Patients with AKI in the control hospital and its area will continue to have good standard care only. Patients already on dialysis and at end of life will be excluded. The interventions will be initially delivered via a phone call, with or without a visit to the primary clinician, aiming at rapidly establishing the aetiology, correcting reversible causes and conducting further appropriate investigation. Surviving stage 3 patients will be followed-up in an AKI clinic. We will conduct qualitative research using focus group-based discussions with primary and secondary care clinicians during the early and late phases of the trial. This will help break down potential barriers and improve care delivery. Ethics and dissemination Patients will be contacted about the study allowing them to ‘opt out’. The work of an Outreach team, guided by AKI alerts and delivering timely advice to clinicians, may improve outcomes. If the results suggest that benefits are delivered by an AKI Outreach team, this study will lead to a full cluster randomised trial. Trial registration number NCT02398682: Pre-results. PMID:27543592

  15. Dual inhibition of cathepsin G and chymase reduces myocyte death and improves cardiac remodeling after myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Hooshdaran, Bahman; Kolpakov, Mikhail A; Guo, Xinji; Miller, Sonni A; Wang, Tao; Tilley, Douglas G; Rafiq, Khadija; Sabri, Abdelkarim

    2017-09-14

    Early reperfusion of ischemic cardiac tissue increases inflammatory cell infiltration which contributes to cardiomyocyte death and loss of cardiac function, referred to as ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury. Neutrophil- and mast cell-derived proteases, cathepsin G (Cat.G) and chymase, are released early after IR, but their function is complicated by potentially redundant actions and targets. This study investigated whether a dual inhibition of Cat.G and chymase influences cardiomyocyte injury and wound healing after experimental IR in mice. Treatment with a dual Cat.G and chymase inhibitor (DCCI) immediately after reperfusion blocked cardiac Cat.G and chymase activity induced after IR, which resulted in decreased immune response in the infarcted heart. Mice treated with DCCI had less myocardial collagen deposition and showed preserved ventricular function at 1 and 7 days post-IR compared with vehicle-treated mice. DCCI treatment also significantly attenuated focal adhesion (FA) complex disruption and myocyte degeneration after IR. Treatment of isolated cardiomyocytes with Cat.G or chymase significantly promoted FA signaling downregulation, myofibril degeneration and myocyte apoptosis. Conversely, treatment of cardiac fibroblasts with Cat.G or chymase induced FA signaling activation and increased their migration and differentiation to myofibroblasts. These opposite responses in cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts were blocked by treatment with DCCI. These findings show that Cat.G and chymase are key mediators of myocyte apoptosis and fibroblast migration and differentiation that play a role in adverse cardiac remodeling and function post-IR. Thus, dual targeting of neutrophil- and mast cell-derived proteases could be used as a novel therapeutic strategy to reduce post-IR inflammation and improve cardiac remodeling.

  16. Growth Retardation, Reduced Invasiveness, and Impaired Colistin-Mediated Cell Death Associated with Colistin Resistance Development in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Poulou, Aggeliki; Dafopoulou, Konstantina; Chabane, Yassine Nait; Kristo, Ioulia; Makris, Demosthenes; Hardouin, Julie; Cosette, Pascal; Tsakris, Athanassios; Dé, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    Two colistin-susceptible/colistin-resistant (Cols/Colr) pairs of Acinetobacter baumannii strains assigned to international clone 2, which is prevalent worldwide, were sequentially recovered from two patients after prolonged colistin administration. Compared with the respective Cols isolates (Ab248 and Ab299, both having a colistin MIC of 0.5 μg/ml), both Colr isolates (Ab249 and Ab347, with colistin MICs of 128 and 32 μg/ml, respectively) significantly overexpressed pmrCAB genes, had single-amino-acid shifts in the PmrB protein, and exhibited significantly slower growth. The Colr isolate Ab347, tested by proteomic analysis in comparison with its Cols counterpart Ab299, underexpressed the proteins CsuA/B and C from the csu operon (which is necessary for biofilm formation). This isolate also underexpressed aconitase B and different enzymes involved in the oxidative stress response (KatE catalase, superoxide dismutase, and alkyl hydroperoxide reductase), suggesting a reduced response to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and, consequently, impaired colistin-mediated cell death through hydroxyl radical production. Cols isolates that were indistinguishable by macrorestriction analysis from Ab299 caused six sequential bloodstream infections, and isolates indistinguishable from Ab248 caused severe soft tissue infection, while Colr isolates indistinguishable from Ab347 and Ab249 were mainly colonizers. In particular, a Cols isolate identical to Ab299 was still invading the bloodstream 90 days after the colonization of this patient by Colr isolates. These observations indicate considerably lower invasiveness of A. baumannii clinical isolates following the development of colistin resistance. PMID:24247145

  17. The MOC31PE immunotoxin reduces cell migration and induces gene expression and cell death in ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The standard treatment of ovarian cancer with chemotherapy often leads to drug resistance and relapse of the disease, and the need for development of novel therapy alternatives is obvious. The MOC31PE immunotoxin binds to the cell surface antigen EpCAM, which is expressed by the majority of epithelial cancers including ovarian carcinomas, and we studied the cytotoxic effects of MOC31PE in ovarian cancer cells. Methods Investigation of the effects of MOC31PE treatment on protein synthesis, cell viability, proliferation and gene expression of the ovarian cancer cell lines B76 and HOC7. Results MOC31PE treatment for 24 h caused a dose-dependent reduction of protein synthesis with ID50 values of less than 10 ng/ml, followed by reduced cell viability. In a gene expression array monitoring the expression of 84 key genes in cancer pathways, 13 of the genes were differentially expressed by MOC31PE treatment in comparison to untreated cells. By combining MOC31PE and the immune suppressor cyclosporin A (CsA) the MOC31PE effect on protein synthesis inhibition and cell viability increased tenfold. Cell migration was also reduced, both in the individual MOC31PE and CsA treatment, but even more when combining MOC31PE and CsA. In tumor metastasis PCR arrays, 23 of 84 genes were differentially expressed comparing CsA versus MOC31PE + CsA treatment. Increased expression of the tumor suppressor KISS1 and the nuclear receptor NR4A3 was observed, and the differential candidate gene expression was confirmed in complementary qPCR analyses. For NR4A3 this was not accompanied by increased protein expression. However, a subcellular fractionation assay revealed increased mitochondrial NR4A3 in MOC31PE treated cells, suggesting a role for this protein in MOC31PE-induced apoptotic cell death. Conclusion The present study demonstrates that MOC31PE may become a new targeted therapy for ovarian cancer and that the MOC31PE anti-cancer effect is potentiated by CsA. PMID:24528603

  18. Back to Sleep: Reduce the Risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) [and] Questions and Answers for Professionals on Infant Sleeping Position and SIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Resources and Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Washington, DC. Maternal and Child Health Bureau.

    The "Back to Sleep" public health campaign, which recommends that infants be placed on their backs for sleeping help reduce the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), was initiated in 1994. The campaign was led by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and co-sponsored by the U.S. Public Health Service, the…

  19. Toll-Like Receptors in Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Nicotra, Lauren; Loram, Lisa C; Watkins, Linda R; Hutchinson, Mark R

    2011-01-01

    Proinflammatory central immune signaling contributes significantly to the initiation and maintenance of heightened pain states. Recent discoveries have implicated the innate immune system, pattern recognition Toll-like receptors in triggering these proinflammatory central immune signaling events. These exciting developments have been complemented by the discovery of neuronal expression of Toll-like receptors, suggesting pain pathways can be activated directly by the detection of pathogen associated molecular patterns or danger associated molecular patterns. This review will examine the evidence to date implicating Toll-like receptors and their associated signaling components in heightened pain states. In addition, insights into the impact Toll-like receptors have on priming central immune signaling systems for heightened pain states will be discussed. The influence possible sex differences in Toll-like receptor signaling have for female pain and the recognition of small molecule xenobiotics by Toll-like receptors will also be reviewed. PMID:22001158

  20. Subnormothermic ex vivo liver perfusion reduces endothelial cell and bile duct injury after donation after cardiac death pig liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Knaak, Jan M; Spetzler, Vinzent N; Goldaracena, Nicolas; Boehnert, Markus U; Bazerbachi, Fateh; Louis, Kristine S; Adeyi, Oyedele A; Minkovich, Leonid; Yip, Paul M; Keshavjee, Shaf; Levy, Gary A; Grant, David R; Selzner, Nazia; Selzner, Markus

    2014-11-01

    An ischemic-type biliary stricture (ITBS) is a common feature after liver transplantation using donation after cardiac death (DCD) grafts. We compared sequential subnormothermic ex vivo liver perfusion (SNEVLP; 33°C) with cold storage (CS) for the prevention of ITBS in DCD liver grafts in pig liver transplantation (n = 5 for each group). Liver grafts were stored for 10 hours at 4°C (CS) or preserved with combined 7-hour CS and 3-hour SNEVLP. Parameters of hepatocyte [aspartate aminotransferase (AST), international normalized ratio (INR), factor V, and caspase 3 immunohistochemistry], endothelial cell (EC; CD31 immunohistochemistry and hyaluronic acid), and biliary injury and function [alkaline phosphatase (ALP), total bilirubin, and bile lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)] were determined. Long-term survival (7 days) after transplantation was similar between the SNEVLP and CS groups (60% versus 40%, P = 0.13). No difference was observed between SNEVLP- and CS-treated animals with respect to the peak of serum INR, factor V, or AST levels within 24 hours. CD31 staining 8 hours after transplantation demonstrated intact EC lining in SNEVLP-treated livers (7.3 × 10(-4) ± 2.6 × 10(-4) cells/μm(2)) but not in CS-treated livers (3.7 × 10(-4) ± 1.3 × 10(-4) cells/μm(2) , P = 0.03). Posttransplant SNEVLP animals had decreased serum ALP and serum bilirubin levels in comparison with CS animals. In addition, LDH in bile fluid was lower in SNEVLP pigs versus CS pigs (14 ± 10 versus 60 ± 18 μmol/L, P = 0.02). Bile duct histology revealed severe bile duct necrosis in 3 of 5 animals in the CS group but none in the SNEVLP group (P = 0.03). Sequential SNEVLP preservation of DCD grafts reduces bile duct and EC injury after liver transplantation. © 2014 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  1. Aged red garlic extract reduces cigarette smoke extract-induced cell death in human bronchial smooth muscle cells by increasing intracellular glutathione levels.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yi-Yeong; Park, Hye-Jin; Cho, Young-Woo; Kim, Eun-Jin; Kim, Gyu-Tae; Mun, Yun-Ja; Lee, Jong Deog; Shin, Jung-Hye; Sung, Nak-Ju; Kang, Dawon; Han, Jaehee

    2012-01-01

    Increasing antioxidant capacity has been proposed as a promising strategy to prevent cigarette smoke-induced lung diseases. This study tested whether garlic extracts prevented cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-induced cell death in human bronchial smooth muscle cells (HBSMCs). Garlic extracts were prepared from fresh raw garlic (FRG), aged black garlic (ABG) and aged red garlic (ARG). Treatment of HBSMCs with 10% CSE induced cell death accompanied by activation of caspase. Of the garlic extracts, treatment with ARG extract reduced CSE-induced cell death. The combination of ARG extract with CSE attenuated the CSE-induced reduction in glutathione (GSH) content, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induction of heme oxygenase-1 expression compared with CSE treatment without ARG extract. Furthermore, the combination of L-BSO, a GSH synthesis inhibitor, with ARG and CSE extracts failed to increase the intracellular GSH content and cell viability. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ARG extract reduces CSE-induced cell death by increasing GSH content and reducing ROS generation in HBSMCs. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. The design of a toll plaza

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Haibin

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, a model is established to find the optimal shape, size and merging pattern of the toll plaza. The main work is how to take the aspects such as the accident prevention, throughput and cost into consideration to make the model of the toll plaza optimal. By analyzing the match of the number of tollbooths (B) and travel lanes (L) considering safety and cost, the optimal toll plaza model is established when the traffic flow is given.

  3. Cyanide-induced death of dopaminergic cells is mediated by uncoupling protein-2 up-regulation and reduced Bcl-2 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Li, L.; Zhang, L.; Borowitz, J.L.; Isom, G.E.

    2009-07-01

    Cyanide is a potent inhibitor of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism and produces mitochondria-mediated death of dopaminergic neurons and sublethal intoxications that are associated with a Parkinson-like syndrome. Cyanide toxicity is enhanced when mitochondrial uncoupling is stimulated following up-regulation of uncoupling protein-2 (UCP-2). In this study, the role of a pro-survival protein, Bcl-2, in cyanide-mediated cell death was determined in a rat dopaminergic immortalized mesencephalic cell line (N27 cells). Following pharmacological up-regulation of UCP-2 by treatment with Wy14,643, cyanide reduced cellular Bcl-2 expression by increasing proteasomal degradation of the protein. The increased turnover of Bcl-2 was mediated by an increase of oxidative stress following UCP-2 up-regulation. The oxidative stress involved depletion of mitochondrial glutathione (mtGSH) and increased H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generation. Repletion of mtGSH by loading cells with glutathione ethyl ester reduced H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generation and in turn blocked the cyanide-induced decrease of Bcl-2. To determine if UCP-2 mediated the response, RNAi knock down was conducted. The RNAi decreased cyanide-induced depletion of mtGSH, reduced H{sub 2}O{sub 2} accumulation, and inhibited down-regulation of Bcl-2, thus blocking cell death. To confirm the role of Bcl-2 down-regulation in the cell death, it was shown that over-expression of Bcl-2 by cDNA transfection attenuated the enhancement of cyanide toxicity after UCP-2 up-regulation. It was concluded that UCP-2 up-regulation sensitizes cells to cyanide by increasing cellular oxidative stress, leading to an increase of Bcl-2 degradation. Then the reduced Bcl-2 levels sensitize the cells to cyanide-mediated cell death.

  4. Cyanide-induced death of dopaminergic cells is mediated by uncoupling protein-2 up-regulation and reduced Bcl-2 expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Li, L; Zhang, L; Borowitz, J L; Isom, G E

    2009-07-01

    Cyanide is a potent inhibitor of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism and produces mitochondria-mediated death of dopaminergic neurons and sublethal intoxications that are associated with a Parkinson-like syndrome. Cyanide toxicity is enhanced when mitochondrial uncoupling is stimulated following up-regulation of uncoupling protein-2 (UCP-2). In this study, the role of a pro-survival protein, Bcl-2, in cyanide-mediated cell death was determined in a rat dopaminergic immortalized mesencephalic cell line (N27 cells). Following pharmacological up-regulation of UCP-2 by treatment with Wy14,643, cyanide reduced cellular Bcl-2 expression by increasing proteasomal degradation of the protein. The increased turnover of Bcl-2 was mediated by an increase of oxidative stress following UCP-2 up-regulation. The oxidative stress involved depletion of mitochondrial glutathione (mtGSH) and increased H2O2 generation. Repletion of mtGSH by loading cells with glutathione ethyl ester reduced H2O2 generation and in turn blocked the cyanide-induced decrease of Bcl-2. To determine if UCP-2 mediated the response, RNAi knock down was conducted. The RNAi decreased cyanide-induced depletion of mtGSH, reduced H2O2 accumulation, and inhibited down-regulation of Bcl-2, thus blocking cell death. To confirm the role of Bcl-2 down-regulation in the cell death, it was shown that over-expression of Bcl-2 by cDNA transfection attenuated the enhancement of cyanide toxicity after UCP-2 up-regulation. It was concluded that UCP-2 up-regulation sensitizes cells to cyanide by increasing cellular oxidative stress, leading to an increase of Bcl-2 degradation. Then the reduced Bcl-2 levels sensitize the cells to cyanide-mediated cell death.

  5. Cyanide-induced Death of Dopaminergic Cells is Mediated by Uncoupling Protein-2 Up-regulation and Reduced Bcl-2 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, X.; Li, L.; Zhang, L.; Borowitz, J.L.; Isom, G.E.

    2009-01-01

    Cyanide is a potent inhibitor of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism and produces mitochondria-mediated death of dopaminergic neurons and sublethal intoxications are associated with a Parkinson-like syndrome. Cyanide toxicity is enhanced when mitochondrial uncoupling is stimulated following up-regulation of uncoupling protein-2 (UCP-2). In this study, the role of a pro-survival protein, Bcl-2, in cyanide-mediated cell death was determined in a rat dopaminergic immortalized mesencephalic cell line (N27 cells). Following pharmacological up-regulation of UCP-2 by treatment with Wy14,643, cyanide reduced cellular Bcl-2 expression by increasing proteasomal degradation of the protein. The increased turnover of Bcl-2 was mediated by an increase of oxidative stress following UCP-2 up-regulation. The oxidative stress involved depletion of mitochondrial glutathione (mtGSH) and increased H2O2 generation. Repletion of mtGSH by loading cells with glutathione ethyl ester reduced H2O2 generation and in turn blocked the cyanide-induced decrease of Bcl-2. To determine if UCP-2 mediated the response, RNAi knock down was conducted. The RNAi decreased cyanide-induced depletion of mtGSH, reduced H2O2 accumulation, and inhibited down-regulation of Bcl-2, thus blocking cell death. To confirm the role of Bcl-2 down-regulation in the cell death, it was shown that overexpression of Bcl-2 by cDNA transfection attenuated the enhancement of cyanide toxicity after UCP-2 up-regulation. It was concluded that UCP-2 up-regulation sensitizes cells to cyanide by increasing cellular oxidative stress, leading to an increase of Bcl-2 degradation. Then the reduced Bcl-2 levels sensitize the cells to cyanide-mediated cell death. PMID:19361538

  6. Death Education and Death Fear Reduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Mary Louise

    1976-01-01

    The study examined the possibility of reducing the fear of death in early adolescents through a 12-lesson unit designed to assist the student to achieve an attitude of integration toward life and death. (NQ)

  7. Annual Report of the Perinatology Committee, Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2015: Proposal of urgent measures to reduce maternal deaths.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Satoru; Takeda, Jun; Murakami, Keisuke; Kubo, Takahiko; Hamada, Hiromi; Murakami, Maki; Makino, Shintaro; Itoh, Hiroaki; Ohba, Takashi; Naruse, Katsuhiko; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Kanayama, Naohiro; Matsubara, Shigeki; Sameshima, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Tomoaki

    2017-01-01

    Perinatal care in Japan has progressed rapidly in recent decades, remarkably reducing maternal, perinatal and neonatal mortality rates. This is attributable not only to the sustained efforts and dedication of past obstetricians and midwives, but also to the collective results achieved by the Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology and healthcare administration, including research on advanced medical care, education, medical care improvements and establishing perinatal care centers. Although the maternal mortality rate was in steady decline until 2007 (3.1/100 000 births), it repeatedly fluctuated thereafter, plateauing at 3.4 per 100 000 births in 2013 and 2.7 per 100 000 births in 2014. Thus, the Perinatology Committee has analyzed the current situation of maternal deaths and has proposed countermeasures to reduce such death. The items deliberated upon by related subcommittees in 2015 are presented herein. The addition of indications for 'fibrinogen concentrate', 'eptacog alfa' and approval of the PGE2 vaginal tablet for cervical ripening were discussed in the subcommittee for unapproved drug review. Thus, a request for approval for health insurance coverage was submitted to the 'Evaluation committee on unapproved or off-label drugs with high medical needs' of the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. Maternal and late-maternal deaths from suicide during the 10 years from 2005 to 2014 in Tokyo's 23 wards were jointly examined with the Tokyo Medical Examiner's Office. The suicide rate in the 23 wards is very high, at 8.7 per 100 000 births. Thus, the subcommittee for the reduction of maternal death discussed countermeasures for the eradication of maternal death and maternal suicide and the revision of death certificates. © 2017 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  8. 11. MECHANICAL ROOM BELOW GARAGE LEVEL OF TOLL PLAZA, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. MECHANICAL ROOM BELOW GARAGE LEVEL OF TOLL PLAZA, LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING AURORA PUMPS AND BELL & GOSSETT HEATERS FOR ABANDONED SNOW-MELT SYSTEM. - Chicago Skyway Toll Bridge, Toll Plaza & Service Building, 8801 South Anthony Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  9. Hypoxia reduces ER-to-Golgi protein trafficking and increases cell death by inhibiting the adaptive unfolded protein response in mouse beta cells.

    PubMed

    Bensellam, Mohammed; Maxwell, Emma L; Chan, Jeng Yie; Luzuriaga, Jude; West, Phillip K; Jonas, Jean-Christophe; Gunton, Jenny E; Laybutt, D Ross

    2016-07-01

    Hypoxia may contribute to beta cell failure in type 2 diabetes and islet transplantation. The adaptive unfolded protein response (UPR) is required for endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis. Here we investigated whether or not hypoxia regulates the UPR in beta cells and the role the adaptive UPR plays during hypoxic stress. Mouse islets and MIN6 cells were exposed to various oxygen (O2) tensions. DNA-damage inducible transcript 3 (DDIT3), hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF)1α and HSPA5 were knocked down using small interfering (si)RNA; Hspa5 was also overexpressed. db/db mice were used. Hypoxia-response genes were upregulated in vivo in the islets of diabetic, but not prediabetic, db/db mice. In isolated mouse islets and MIN6 cells, O2 deprivation (1-5% vs 20%; 4-24 h) markedly reduced the expression of adaptive UPR genes, including Hspa5, Hsp90b1, Fkbp11 and spliced Xbp1. Coatomer protein complex genes (Copa, Cope, Copg [also known as Copg1], Copz1 and Copz2) and ER-to-Golgi protein trafficking were also reduced, whereas apoptotic genes (Ddit3, Atf3 and Trb3 [also known as Trib3]), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation and cell death were increased. Inhibition of JNK, but not HIF1α, restored adaptive UPR gene expression and ER-to-Golgi protein trafficking while protecting against apoptotic genes and cell death following hypoxia. DDIT3 knockdown delayed the loss of the adaptive UPR and partially protected against hypoxia-induced cell death. The latter response was prevented by HSPA5 knockdown. Finally, Hspa5 overexpression significantly protected against hypoxia-induced cell death. Hypoxia inhibits the adaptive UPR in beta cells via JNK and DDIT3 activation, but independently of HIF1α. Downregulation of the adaptive UPR contributes to reduced ER-to-Golgi protein trafficking and increased beta cell death during hypoxic stress.

  10. Implementation and Operational Research: Cost-Effectiveness of Antiretroviral Therapy and Isoniazid Prophylaxis to Reduce Tuberculosis and Death in People Living With HIV in Botswana.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tyler; Samandari, Taraz; Abimbola, Taiwo; Marston, Barbara; Sangrujee, Nalinee

    2015-11-01

    In Botswana, a 36-month course of isoniazid treatment of latent tuberculosis (TB) infection [isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT)] was superior to 6-month IPT in reducing TB and death in persons living with HIV (PLHIV), having positive tuberculin skin tests (TSTs) but not in those with negative TST. We examined the cost-effectiveness of IPT in Botswana, where antiretroviral therapy (ART) is widely available. Using a decision-analytic model, we determined the incremental cost-effectiveness of strategies for reducing TB and death in 10,000 PLHIV over 36 months. IPT for 6 months and provision of ART if CD4 lymphocyte count <250 cells per microliter (2011 Botswana policy) was compared with 6 alternative strategies that varied the use of IPT, TST, and ART for CD4 count thresholds, including CD4 <350 and <500 cells per microliter. Botswana policy, 2011 was dominated by most other strategies. IPT of 36 months for TST-positive PLHIV with ART for CD4 <250 cells per microliter resulted in 120 fewer TB cases for an additional cost of $1612 per case averted and resulted in 80 fewer deaths for an additional $2418 per death averted compared with provision of 6-month IPT to TST-positive PLHIV who received ART for CD4 <250 cells per microliter, the next most effective strategy. Alternative strategies offered lower incremental effectiveness at higher cost. These findings remained consistent in sensitivity analyses. A strategy of treating PLHIV who have positive TST with 36-month IPT is more cost effective for reducing both TB and death compared with providing IPT without a TST, providing only 6-month IPT, or expanding ART eligibility without IPT.

  11. GAPDH-knockdown reduce rotenone-induced H9C2 cells death via autophagy and anti-oxidative stress pathway.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shao; Figtree, Gemma; Aiqun, Ma; Ping, Zhang

    2015-05-05

    GAPDH, well known for its house-keeping functions, has also been shown to be involved in cell injury, apoptosis and death under conditions of stress such as starvation, chemical injury and oxidative stress. This study examines the effect of GAPDH knockdown on cell injury in response to Rotenone. GAPDH was knocked down in H9C2 cardiomyoblasts using siRNA prior to exposure to rotenone (0 nM, 20 nM, 40 nM and 80 nM). Autophagy was detected by western blot for autophagy proteins (Beclin-1, Atg5, LC-3A/B and p62) and MDC staining for acidic substances. Pro-apoptosis protein and flow cytometry were used to assess cell apoptosis and death and intracellular ATP relative concentration was measured. Oxidant stress was assessed by measuring DCFH-DA, TBARS, GSH and SOD. In this study, GAPDH-knockdown enhanced autophagy in rotenone-induced H9C2 cells, decreased oxidant stress and increased antioxidant pathways; and reduced cell apoptosis and death. Furthermore, GAPDH-knockdown preserved cell energy. siRNA-mediated GAPDH knockdown reduced rotenone-induced H9C2 cell death occurring via autophagy and anti-oxidative stress pathway. This study enriches the understanding of GAPDH pathophysiology role, and provides potential new therapeutic targets for cardiac disease states characterized by oxidative stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Interleukin-6 reduces NMDAR-mediated cytosolic Ca²⁺ overload and neuronal death via JAK/CaN signaling.

    PubMed

    Ma, Song-Hua; Zhuang, Qian-Xing; Shen, Wei-Xing; Peng, Yu-Ping; Qiu, Yi-Hua

    2015-09-01

    Cytosolic Ca(2+) overload induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) is one of the major causes for neuronal cell death during cerebral ischemic insult and neurodegenerative disorders. Previously, we have reported that the cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) reduces NMDA-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) overload by inhibiting both L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (L-VGCC) activity and intracellular Ca(2+) store release in cultured cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). Here we aimed to show that NMDA-gated receptor channels (i.e., NMDA receptors, NMDARs) are an inhibitory target of IL-6 via a mediation of calcineurin (CaN) signaling. As expected, IL-6 decreased NMDAR-mediated cytosolic Ca(2+) overload and inward current in cultured CGNs. The NMDAR subunits, NR1, NR2A, NR2B and NR2C, were expressed in CGNs. Blocking either of NR2A, NR2B and NR2C with respective antagonist reduced NMDA-induced extracellular Ca(2+) influx and neuronal death. Importantly, the reduced percentages in extracellular Ca(2+) influx and neuronal death by either NR2B or NR2C antagonist were weaker in the presence of IL-6 than in the absence of IL-6, while the reduced percentage by NR2A antagonist was not significantly different between the presence and the absence of IL-6. AG490, an inhibitor of Janus kinase (JAK), abolished IL-6 protection against extracellular Ca(2+) influx, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, neuronal death, and CaN activity impairment induced by NMDA. The CaN inhibitor FK506 reduced these IL-6 neuroprotective properties. Collectively, these results suggest that IL-6 exerts neuroprotection by inhibiting activities of the NMDAR subunits NR2B and NR2C (but not NR2A) via the intermediation of JAK/CaN signaling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Pelle Modulates dFoxO-Mediated Cell Death in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Changyan; Zhang, Shiping; Li, Chaojie; Li, Wenzhe; Wu, Shian; Xue, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinases (IRAKs) are crucial mediators of the IL-1R/TLR signaling pathways that regulate the immune and inflammation response in mammals. Recent studies also suggest a critical role of IRAKs in tumor development, though the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Pelle is the sole Drosophila IRAK homolog implicated in the conserved Toll pathway that regulates Dorsal/Ventral patterning, innate immune response, muscle development and axon guidance. Here we report a novel function of pll in modulating apoptotic cell death, which is independent of the Toll pathway. We found that loss of pll results in reduced size in wing tissue, which is caused by a reduction in cell number but not cell size. Depletion of pll up-regulates the transcription of pro-apoptotic genes, and triggers caspase activation and cell death. The transcription factor dFoxO is required for loss-of-pll induced cell death. Furthermore, loss of pll activates dFoxO, promotes its translocation from cytoplasm to nucleus, and up-regulates the transcription of its target gene Thor/4E-BP. Finally, Pll physically interacts with dFoxO and phosphorylates dFoxO directly. This study not only identifies a previously unknown physiological function of pll in cell death, but also shed light on the mechanism of IRAKs in cell survival/death during tumorigenesis. PMID:26474173

  14. Road traffic casualties: understanding the night‐time death toll

    PubMed Central

    Plainis, S; Murray, I J; Pallikaris, I G

    2006-01-01

    A disproportionate number of fatal injuries occur after dark. The paper presents some statistics of road traffic injuries in a novel way which suggests that low luminance plays a major role in this effect. A sound physiological explanation for this is advanced based on the poor temporal characteristics of rod photoreceptors. It is argued that processing information based on low luminance, low contrast targets is much slower than that for high contrast bright targets. To test the idea, simple visual reaction times were measured under typical low visibility conditions encountered on non‐lit roads and were found to be substantially longer than under optimal conditions. It is shown that longer reaction times translate into significantly increased stopping distances. This important point has received insufficient attention in the road safety literature, by the Highways Agency, the police, injury prevention officials, and the UK Highway Code. PMID:16595429

  15. Annual Death Toll from Alzheimer's Nearly Doubles in 15 Years

    MedlinePlus

    ... report their health has worsened since assuming caregiver duties, compared with 19 percent of caregivers for older ... what to expect." SOURCES: Keith Fargo, Ph.D., director, scientific programs and outreach, Alzheimer's Association, New York ...

  16. [Innate immunity, Toll receptor and sepsis].

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Esper, Raúl

    2003-01-01

    The innate immune response is the first line of defense against infection. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize bacterial lipopolysaccharide and other pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Intracellular signals initiated by interaction between Toll receptors and specific PAMPs results in inflammatory response. Sepsis and septic shock are the result of an exaggerated inflammatory systemic response induced by innate immune dysregulation.

  17. 17beta-estradiol pretreatment reduces CA1 sector cell death and the spontaneous hyperthermia that follows forebrain ischemia in the gerbil.

    PubMed

    Plahta, W C; Clark, D L; Colbourne, F

    2004-01-01

    Pretreatment with 17beta-estradiol attenuates ischemia-induced hippocampal cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) neuronal death. We assessed whether this is mediated through prevention of hyperthermia that normally follows ischemia in gerbils. Male gerbils were given sustained-released 17beta-estradiol pellets or sham operation. Later, a guide cannula was implanted for brain temperature measurement and some were implanted with core temperature telemetry probes. Gerbils were subjected to either 5 min bilateral carotid artery occlusion or sham procedures 2 weeks after pellet surgery. Brain temperature was normothermic during surgery in all cases. In experiment 1, only core temperature was measured afterward in untreated and estrogen-treated gerbils. In experiment 2, postischemic core temperature was measured in untreated and two estrogen-treated ischemic groups, one of which had their postischemic temperature increased, via infrared lamp, to mimic the untreated group. Habituation was assessed on days 5 and 6. Hyperthermia, like that which occurs spontaneously, was forced on untreated and estrogen-treated ischemic animals in the third experiment, where brain temperature was measured. CA1 cell counts were assessed after a 7-day survival. A fourth experiment measured brain and core temperature simultaneously in normal gerbils during heating with an infrared lamp. Estrogen did not affect core temperature of non-ischemic gerbils whereas spontaneous postischemic hyperthermia was blocked. Estrogen reduced cell death and provided behavioral protection when gerbils regulated their own core temperature, but not when core hyperthermia was enforced. Conversely, estrogen reduced cell death in gerbils that had their brain temperature elevated. Experiment 4 showed that the brain becomes overheated (by approximately 1 degree C) when core temperature is elevated. Accordingly, estrogen likely failed to reduce CA1 injury in experiment 2, when core hyperthermia was enforced, because of overheating the

  18. [Zoledronic acid reduces risk of any new clinical fracture and risk of death after surgical repair of a low-trauma hip fracture].

    PubMed

    Leszczyński, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    The most common treatment option for postmenopausal osteoporosis are the bisphosphonates which inhibit osteoclast function. Bisphosphonates interfere with cellular metabolism and in large clinical trials reduce risk of vertebral and non-vertebral fractures. Zoledronic acid is a potent bisphosphonate also approved for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. In addition zoledronic acid reduce relative risk of any new clinical fracture after surgical repair of low-trauma hip fracture. Also the reduction in the relative risk of death was observed after repeated once-yearly intravenous infusion. In conclusion, this is another interesting option for the treatment of the patients affected with osteoporosis and previous hip fractures.

  19. Chemical chaperones reduce ionizing radiation-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and cell death in IEC-6 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eun Sang; Lee, Hae-June; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Jeong, Jae-Hoon; Kang, Seongman; Lim, Young-Bin

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • UPR activation precedes caspase activation in irradiated IEC-6 cells. • Chemical ER stress inducers radiosensitize IEC-6 cells. • siRNAs that targeted ER stress responses ameliorate IR-induced cell death. • Chemical chaperons prevent cell death in irradiated IEC-6 cells. - Abstract: Radiotherapy, which is one of the most effective approaches to the treatment of various cancers, plays an important role in malignant cell eradication in the pelvic area and abdomen. However, it also generates some degree of intestinal injury. Apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is the primary pathological factor that initiates radiation-induced intestinal injury, but the mechanism by which ionizing radiation (IR) induces apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is not clearly understood. Recently, IR has been shown to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, thereby activating the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cells. However, the consequences of the IR-induced activation of the UPR signaling pathway on radiosensitivity in intestinal epithelial cells remain to be determined. In this study, we investigated the role of ER stress responses in IR-induced intestinal epithelial cell death. We show that chemical ER stress inducers, such as tunicamycin or thapsigargin, enhanced IR-induced caspase 3 activation and DNA fragmentation in intestinal epithelial cells. Knockdown of Xbp1 or Atf6 with small interfering RNA inhibited IR-induced caspase 3 activation. Treatment with chemical chaperones prevented ER stress and subsequent apoptosis in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Our results suggest a pro-apoptotic role of ER stress in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Furthermore, inhibiting ER stress may be an effective strategy to prevent IR-induced intestinal injury.

  20. Cholinergic-receptor-independent dysfunction of mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes, reduced mitochondrial transmembrane potential and ATP depletion underlie necrotic cell death induced by the organophosphate poison mevinphos.

    PubMed

    Chan, J Y H; Chan, S H H; Dai, K Y; Cheng, H L; Chou, J L J; Chang, A Y W

    2006-12-01

    Our current understanding of the nature of cell death that is associated with fatal organophosphate poisoning and the underlying cellular mechanisms is surprisingly limited. Taking advantage of the absence in an in vitro system of acetylcholinesterase, the pharmacological target of organophosphate compounds, the present study evaluated the hypothesis that the repertoire of cholinergic receptor-independent cellular events that underlie fatal organophosphate poisoning entails induction of mitochondrial dysfunction, followed by bioenergetic failure that leads to necrotic cell death because of ATP depletion. Pheochromocytoma PC12 cells incubated with the organophosphate pesticide mevinphos (0.4 or 4mumol) for 1 or 3h underwent a dose-related and time-dependent loss of cell viability that was not reversed by muscarinic (atropine) or nicotinic (mecamylamine) blockade. This was accompanied by depressed NADH cytochrome c reductase, succinate cytochrome c reductase or cytochrome c oxidase activity in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, reduced mitochondrial transmembrane potential, decreased ATP concentration, elevated ADP/ATP ratio, increased lactate dehydrogenase release and necrotic cell death. We conclude that Mev induces cholinergic receptor-independent necrotic cell death by depressing the activity of Complexes I to IV in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, eliciting reduction in mitochondrial transmembrane potential, depleting intracellular ATP contents and damaging cell membrane integrity.

  1. Inhibition of programmed cell death impairs in vitro vascular-like structure formation and reduces in vivo angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Segura, Inmaculada; Serrano, Antonio; De Buitrago, Gonzalo González; González, Manuel A; Abad, Jose Luis; Clavería, Cristina; Gómez, Lucio; Bernad, Antonio; Martínez-A, Carlos; Riese, Hans H

    2002-06-01

    Tissue remodeling during embryonic development and in the adult organism relies on a subtle balance between cell growth and apoptosis. As angiogenesis involves restructuring of preexisting endothelium, we examined the role of apoptosis in new vessel formation. We show that apoptosis occurs before capillary formation but not after vessels have assembled. Using the human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) in vitro Matrigel angiogenesis model, we show that vascular-like structure formation requires apoptotic cell death through activation of a caspase-dependent mechanism and mitochondrial cytochrome c release. Vascular-like structure formation was further blocked by caspase inhibitors such as z-VAD or Ac-DEVD-CHO, using HUVEC and human lung microvascular endothelial cells. Overexpression of anti-apoptotic human Bcl-2 or baculovirus p35 genes in HUVEC altered endothelial cell rearrangement during in vitro angiogenesis, causing impaired vessel-like structure formation. Caspase inhibitors blocked VEGF- or bFGF-induced HUVEC angiogenesis on 2- or 3-D collagen gels, respectively, confirming that apoptosis was not the result of nonspecific cell death after seeding on the matrix. In an in vivo angiogenesis assay, caspase inhibitors blocked VEGF-dependent vascular formation at the alignment step, as demonstrated histologically. This evidence indicates that endothelial cell apoptosis may be relevant for precise vascular tissue rearrangement in in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis.

  2. Novel Toll-like receptor-4 antagonist (+)-naloxone protects mice from inflammation-induced preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Chin, Peck Yin; Dorian, Camilla L; Hutchinson, Mark R; Olson, David M; Rice, Kenner C; Moldenhauer, Lachlan M; Robertson, Sarah A

    2016-11-07

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation by bacterial infection, or by sterile inflammatory insult is a primary trigger of spontaneous preterm birth. Here we utilize mouse models to investigate the efficacy of a novel small molecule TLR4 antagonist, (+)-naloxone, the non-opioid isomer of the opioid receptor antagonist (-)-naloxone, in infection-associated preterm birth. Treatment with (+)-naloxone prevented preterm delivery and alleviated fetal demise in utero elicited by i.p. LPS administration in late gestation. A similar effect with protection from preterm birth and perinatal death, and partial correction of reduced birth weight and postnatal mortality, was conferred by (+)-naloxone administration after intrauterine administration of heat-killed E. coli. Local induction by E. coli of inflammatory cytokine genes Il1b, Il6, Tnf and Il10 in fetal membranes was suppressed by (+)-naloxone, and cytokine expression in the placenta, and uterine myometrium and decidua, was also attenuated. These data demonstrate that inhibition of TLR4 signaling with the novel TLR4 antagonist (+)-naloxone can suppress the inflammatory cascade of preterm parturition, to prevent preterm birth and perinatal death. Further studies are warranted to investigate the utility of small molecule inhibition of TLR-driven inflammation as a component of strategies for fetal protection and delaying preterm birth in the clinical setting.

  3. Novel Toll-like receptor-4 antagonist (+)-naloxone protects mice from inflammation-induced preterm birth

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Peck Yin; Dorian, Camilla L.; Hutchinson, Mark R.; Olson, David M.; Rice, Kenner C.; Moldenhauer, Lachlan M.; Robertson, Sarah A.

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation by bacterial infection, or by sterile inflammatory insult is a primary trigger of spontaneous preterm birth. Here we utilize mouse models to investigate the efficacy of a novel small molecule TLR4 antagonist, (+)-naloxone, the non-opioid isomer of the opioid receptor antagonist (−)-naloxone, in infection-associated preterm birth. Treatment with (+)-naloxone prevented preterm delivery and alleviated fetal demise in utero elicited by i.p. LPS administration in late gestation. A similar effect with protection from preterm birth and perinatal death, and partial correction of reduced birth weight and postnatal mortality, was conferred by (+)-naloxone administration after intrauterine administration of heat-killed E. coli. Local induction by E. coli of inflammatory cytokine genes Il1b, Il6, Tnf and Il10 in fetal membranes was suppressed by (+)-naloxone, and cytokine expression in the placenta, and uterine myometrium and decidua, was also attenuated. These data demonstrate that inhibition of TLR4 signaling with the novel TLR4 antagonist (+)-naloxone can suppress the inflammatory cascade of preterm parturition, to prevent preterm birth and perinatal death. Further studies are warranted to investigate the utility of small molecule inhibition of TLR-driven inflammation as a component of strategies for fetal protection and delaying preterm birth in the clinical setting. PMID:27819333

  4. Occupational Noise Exposure among Toll Tellers at Toll Plaza in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azmi, Sharifah Nadya Syed; Dawal, Siti Zawiah Md; Ya, Tuan Mohammad Yusoff Shah Tuan; Saidin, Hamidi

    2010-10-01

    Toll tellers working at toll plaza have potential of exposure to high noise from the vehicles especially for the peak level of sound emitted by the heavy vehicles. However, occupational exposures in this workplace have not been adequately characterized and identified. Occupational noise exposure among toll tellers at toll plaza was assessed using Sound Level Meter, Noise Dosimeter and through questionnaire survey. These data were combined to estimate the work shift exposure level and health impacts to the toll tellers by using statistical analysis. Noise Dosimeter microphone was located at the hearing zone of the toll teller which working inside the toll booth and full-period measurements were collected for each work shift. The measurements were taken at 20 toll booths from 6.00 am to 2.00 pm for 5 days. 71 respondents participated in the survey to identify the symptoms of noise induced hearing loss and other health related problems among toll tellers. Results of this study indicated that occupational noise exposure among toll tellers for Mean Continuous Equivalent Level, Leq was 79.2±1.4 dB(A), Mean Maximum Level, Lmax was 107.8±3.6 dB(A) and Mean Peak Level, Lpeak was 136.6±9.9 dB. The Peak Level reported statistically significantly at 140 dB, the level of TLV recommended by ACGIH. The research findings indicated that the primary risk exposure to toll tellers comes from noise that emitted from heavy vehicles. Most of the toll tellers show symptoms of noise induced hearing loss and annoyed by the sources of noise at the toll plaza.

  5. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells reduce neuronal death after transient global cerebral ischemia through prevention of blood-brain barrier disruption and endothelial damage.

    PubMed

    Chung, Tae Nyoung; Kim, Jin Hee; Choi, Bo Young; Chung, Sung Phil; Kwon, Sung Won; Suh, Sang Won

    2015-02-01

    Global cerebral ischemia (GCI) is the leading cause of a poor prognosis even after successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest. Therapeutic induction of hypothermia (TH) is the only proven therapy-and current standard care-for GCI after cardiac arrest; however, its application has been significantly limited owing to technical difficulties. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known to suppress neuronal death after cerebral ischemia. The prevention of blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption has not been suggested as a mechanism of MSC treatment but has for TH. We evaluated the therapeutic effect of MSC administration on BBB disruption and neutrophil infiltration after GCI. To evaluate the therapeutic effects of MSC treatment, rats were subjected to 7 minutes of transient GCI and treated with MSCs immediately after reperfusion. Hippocampal neuronal death was evaluated at 7 days after ischemia using Fluoro-Jade B (FJB). BBB disruption, endothelial damage, and neutrophil infiltration were evaluated at 7 days after ischemia by immunostaining for IgG leakage, Rat endothelial antigen-1, and myeloperoxidase (MPO). Rats treated with MSCs showed a significantly reduced FJB+ neuron count compared with the control group. They also showed reduced IgG leakage, endothelial damage, and MPO+ cell counts. The present study demonstrated that administration of MSCs after transient GCI provides a dramatic protective effect against hippocampal neuronal death. We hypothesized that the neuroprotective effects of MSC treatment might be associated with the prevention of BBB disruption and endothelial damage and a decrease in neutrophil infiltration. ©AlphaMed Press.

  6. Deletion Of XIAP reduces the severity of acute pancreatitis via regulation of cell death and nuclear factor-κB activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Yu, Jiang; Chi, Jun-Lin; Long, Fei-Wu; Yang, Hong-Wei; Chen, Ke-Ling; Lv, Zhao-Ying; Zhou, Bin; Peng, Zhi-Hai; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Li, Yuan; Zhou, Zong-Guang

    2017-03-16

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) still remains a clinical challenge, not only for its high mortality but the uncontrolled inflammatory progression from acute pancreatitis (AP) to SAP. Cell death, including apoptosis and necrosis are critical pathology of AP, since the severity of pancreatitis correlates directly with necrosis and inversely with apoptosis Therefore, regulation of cell death from necrosis to apoptosis may have practicably therapeutic value. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) is the best characterized member of the inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAP) family, but its function in AP remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the potential role of XIAP in regulation of cell death and inflammation during acute pancreatitis. The in vivo pancreatitis model was induced by the administration of cerulein with or without lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or by the administration of l-arginine in wild-type or XIAP-deficient mice, and ex vivo model was induced by the administration of cerulein+LPS in AR42J cell line following XIAP inhibition. The severity of acute pancreatitis was determined by serum amylase activity and histological grading. XIAP deletion on cell apoptosis, necrosis and inflammatory response were examined. Caspases activities, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation and receptor-interacting protein kinase1 (RIP1) degradation were assessed by western blot. Deletion of XIAP resulted in the reduction of amylase activity, decrease of NF-κB activation and less release of TNF-α and IL-6, together with increased caspases activities and RIP1 degradation, leading to enhanced apoptosis and reduced necrosis in pancreatic acinar cells and ameliorated the severity of acute pancreatitis. Our results indicate that deletion of XIAP switches cell death away from necrosis to apoptosis and decreases the inflammatory response, effectively attenuating the severity of AP/SAP. The critical role of XIAP in cell death and inflammation suggests that

  7. Deaths From Secondhand Smoke Exposure in the United States: Economic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Hai-Yen; Shi, Yanling

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We estimated the number of deaths attributable to secondhand smoke (SHS), years of potential life lost (YPLL), and value of lost productivity for different US racial/ethnic groups in 2006. Methods. We determined the number of SHS–related deaths among nonsmokers from 2 adult and 4 infant conditions using an epidemiological approach. We estimated adult SHS exposure using detectable serum cotinine. For each death, we determined the YPLL and the value of lost productivity. Results. SHS exposure resulted in more than 42 000 deaths: more than 41 000 adults and nearly 900 infants. Blacks accounted for 13% of all deaths but 24% to 36% of infant deaths. SHS–attributable deaths resulted in a loss of nearly 600 000 YPLL and $6.6 billion of lost productivity, or $158 000 per death. The value of lost productivity per death was highest among Blacks ($238 000) and Hispanics ($193 000). Conclusions. The economic toll of SHS exposure is substantial, with communities of color having the greatest losses. Interventions need to be designed to reduce the health and economic burden of smoking on smokers and nonsmokers alike and on particularly vulnerable groups. PMID:22994180

  8. 47 CFR 52.111 - Toll free number assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Toll free number assignment. 52.111 Section 52.111 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) NUMBERING Toll Free Numbers § 52.111 Toll free number assignment. Toll free numbers shall be made available...

  9. 47 CFR 52.111 - Toll free number assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Toll free number assignment. 52.111 Section 52.111 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) NUMBERING Toll Free Numbers § 52.111 Toll free number assignment. Toll free numbers shall be made available...

  10. 47 CFR 52.111 - Toll free number assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Toll free number assignment. 52.111 Section 52.111 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) NUMBERING Toll Free Numbers § 52.111 Toll free number assignment. Toll free numbers shall be made available...

  11. 47 CFR 52.111 - Toll free number assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Toll free number assignment. 52.111 Section 52.111 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) NUMBERING Toll Free Numbers § 52.111 Toll free number assignment. Toll free numbers shall be made available...

  12. 47 CFR 52.111 - Toll free number assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Toll free number assignment. 52.111 Section 52.111 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) NUMBERING Toll Free Numbers § 52.111 Toll free number assignment. Toll free numbers shall be made available...

  13. Social group memberships in retirement are associated with reduced risk of premature death: evidence from a longitudinal cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Steffens, Niklas K; Cruwys, Tegan; Haslam, Catherine; Jetten, Jolanda; Haslam, S Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Retirement constitutes a major life transition that poses significant challenges to health, with many retirees experiencing a precipitous decline in health status following retirement. We examine the extent to which membership in social groups following retirement determines quality of life and mortality. Design The longitudinal impact of the number of social group memberships before and after the transition to retirement was assessed on retirees’ quality of life and risk of death 6 years later. Setting Nationally representative cohort study of older adults living in England. Participants Adults who underwent the transition to retirement (N=424). A matched control group (N=424) of participants who had comparable demographic and health characteristics at baseline but did not undergo the transition to retirement were also examined. Outcome measures Analyses examined participants’ quality of life and mortality during a period of 6 years. Results Retirees who had two group memberships prior to retirement had a 2% risk of death in the first 6 years of retirement if they maintained membership in two groups, a 5% risk if they lost one group and a 12% risk if they lost both groups. Furthermore, for every group membership that participants lost in the year following retirement, their experienced quality of life 6 years later was approximately 10% lower. These relationships are robust when controlling for key sociodemographic variables (age, gender, relationship status and socioeconomic status prior to retirement). A comparison with a matched control group confirmed that these effects were specific to those undergoing the transition to retirement. The effect of social group memberships on mortality was comparable to that of physical exercise. Conclusions Theoretical implications for our understanding of the determinants of retiree quality of life and health, and practical implications for the support of people transitioning from a life of work to

  14. Reducing diarrhoea deaths in South Africa: costs and effects of scaling up essential interventions to prevent and treat diarrhoea in under-five children.

    PubMed

    Chola, Lumbwe; Michalow, Julia; Tugendhaft, Aviva; Hofman, Karen

    2015-04-17

    Diarrhoea is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in South African children, accounting for approximately 20% of under-five deaths. Though progress has been made in scaling up multiple interventions to reduce diarrhoea in the last decade, challenges still remain. In this paper, we model the cost and impact of scaling up 13 interventions to prevent and treat childhood diarrhoea in South Africa. Modelling was done using the Lives Saved Tool (LiST). Using 2014 as the baseline, intervention coverage was increased from 2015 until 2030. Three scale up scenarios were compared: by 2030, 1) coverage of all interventions increased by ten percentage points; 2) intervention coverage increased by 20 percentage points; 3) and intervention coverage increased to 99%. The model estimates 13 million diarrhoea cases at baseline. Scaling up intervention coverage averted between 3 million and 5.3 million diarrhoea cases. In 2030, diarrhoeal deaths are expected to reduce from an estimated 5,500 in 2014 to 2,800 in scenario one, 1,400 in scenario two and 100 in scenario three. The additional cost of implementing all 13 interventions will range from US$510 million (US$9 per capita) to US$960 million (US$18 per capita), of which the health system costs range between US$40 million (less than US$1 per capita) and US$170 million (US$3 per capita). Scaling up 13 essential interventions could have a substantial impact on reducing diarrhoeal deaths in South African children, which would contribute toward reducing child mortality in the post-MDG era. Preventive measures are key and the government should focus on improving water, sanitation and hygiene. The investments required to achieve these results seem feasible considering current health expenditure.

  15. Test Procedures for Toll Call Certification Alternatives.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-07

    REPORT 4 PERIOD COVERED (U) Test Procedures for Toll CallFia Se86-Ar7 Certification AlternativesFiaSe86-Ar7 6. PERFORMING ORG . REPORT NUMBER 1. AUTHOR(e...toll call sampling is to use the toll call 21 a a C3a En L~a cmaL-a Lna ac C3 a cc u _3 to a- aa aL 4r C14 I Lo a_ V ’ Iara a D r- w U 4 c * a I’ aDUJ

  16. MK2 balances inflammation and cell death.

    PubMed

    Oberst, Andrew

    2017-09-29

    The cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and the toll-like receptors (TLRs) coordinate immune responses by activating inflammatory transcriptional programs, but these signals can also trigger cell death. Recent studies identify the MAP kinase substrate MK2 as a key player in determining whether cells live or die in response to TNF and TLR signalling.

  17. Alcohol resistance in Drosophila is modulated by the Toll innate immune pathway.

    PubMed

    Troutwine, B R; Ghezzi, A; Pietrzykowski, A Z; Atkinson, N S

    2016-04-01

    A growing body of evidence has shown that alcohol alters the activity of the innate immune system and that changes in innate immune system activity can influence alcohol-related behaviors. Here, we show that the Toll innate immune signaling pathway modulates the level of alcohol resistance in Drosophila. In humans, a low level of response to alcohol is correlated with increased risk of developing an alcohol use disorder. The Toll signaling pathway was originally discovered in, and has been extensively studied in Drosophila. The Toll pathway is a major regulator of innate immunity in Drosophila, and mammalian Toll-like receptor signaling has been implicated in alcohol responses. Here, we use Drosophila-specific genetic tools to test eight genes in the Toll signaling pathway for effects on the level of response to ethanol. We show that increasing the activity of the pathway increases ethanol resistance whereas decreasing the pathway activity reduces ethanol resistance. Furthermore, we show that gene products known to be outputs of innate immune signaling are rapidly induced following ethanol exposure. The interaction between the Toll signaling pathway and ethanol is rooted in the natural history of Drosophila melanogaster.

  18. Alcohol resistance in Drosophila is modulated by the Toll innate immune pathway

    PubMed Central

    Troutwine, Benjamin R.; Ghezzi, Alfredo; Pietrzykowski, Andrzej Z.; Atkinson, Nigel S.

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence has shown that alcohol alters the activity of the innate immune system and that changes in innate immune system activity can influence alcohol-related behaviors (Cui et al., 2014; Vetreno & Crews, 2014). Here we show that the Toll innate immune signaling pathway modulates the level of alcohol resistance in Drosophila. In humans, a low level of response to alcohol is correlated with increased risk of developing an alcohol use disorder (Schuckit, 1994). The Toll signaling pathway was originally discovered in, and has been extensively studied in Drosophila. The Toll pathway is a major regulator of innate immunity in Drosophila, and mammalian Toll-like receptor signaling has been implicated in alcohol responses. Here, we use Drosophila-specific genetic tools to test eight genes in the Toll signaling pathway for effects on the level of response to ethanol. We show that increasing the activity of the pathway increases ethanol resistance while decreasing pathway activity reduces ethanol resistance. Furthermore, we show that gene products known to be outputs of innate immune signaling are rapidly induced following ethanol exposure. The interaction between the Toll signaling pathway and ethanol is rooted in the natural history of Drosophila melanogaster. PMID:26916032

  19. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus microRNAs target IRAK1 and MYD88, two components of the toll-like receptor/interleukin-1R signaling cascade, to reduce inflammatory-cytokine expression.

    PubMed

    Abend, Johanna R; Ramalingam, Dhivya; Kieffer-Kwon, Philippe; Uldrick, Thomas S; Yarchoan, Robert; Ziegelbauer, Joseph M

    2012-11-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent of KS, an important AIDS-associated malignancy. KSHV expresses at least 18 different mature microRNAs (miRNAs). We identified interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R)-associated kinase 1 (IRAK1) as a potential target of miR-K12-9 (miR-K9) in an array data set examining changes in cellular gene expression levels in the presence of KSHV miRNAs. Using 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) luciferase reporter assays, we confirmed that miR-K9 and other miRNAs inhibit IRAK1 expression. In addition, IRAK1 expression is downregulated in cells transfected with miR-K9 and during de novo KSHV infection. IRAK1 is an important component of the Toll-like receptor (TLR)/IL-1R signaling cascade. The downregulation of IRAK1 by miR-K9 resulted in the decreased stimulation of NF-κB activity in endothelial cells treated with IL-1α and in B cells treated with a TLR7/8 agonist. Interestingly, miR-K9 had a greater effect on NF-κB activity than did a small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting IRAK1 despite the more efficient downregulation of IRAK1 expression with the siRNA. We hypothesized that KSHV miRNAs may also be regulating a second component of the TLR/IL-1R signaling cascade, resulting in a stronger phenotype. Reanalysis of the array data set identified myeloid differentiation primary response protein 88 (MYD88) as an additional potential target. 3'UTR luciferase reporter assays and Western blot analysis confirmed the targeting of MYD88 by miR-K5. The presence of miR-K9 and miR-K5 inhibited the production of IL-6 and IL-8 upon the IL-1α stimulation of endothelial cells. These results demonstrate KSHV-encoded miRNAs regulating the TLR/IL-1R signaling cascade at two distinct points and suggest the importance of these pathways during viral infection.

  20. Association of TrkA and APP Is Promoted by NGF and Reduced by Cell Death-Promoting Agents.

    PubMed

    Canu, Nadia; Pagano, Ilaria; La Rosa, Luca Rosario; Pellegrino, Marsha; Ciotti, Maria Teresa; Mercanti, Delio; Moretti, Fabiola; Sposato, Valentina; Triaca, Viviana; Petrella, Carla; Maruyama, Ichiro N; Levi, Andrea; Calissano, Pietro

    2017-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) interacts with the tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA) in normal rat, mouse, and human brain tissue but not in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain tissue. However, it has not been reported whether the two proteins interact directly, and if so, which domains are involved. Clarifying these points will increase our understanding of the role and regulation of the TrkA/APP interaction in normal brain functioning as well as in AD. Here we addressed these questions using bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) and the proximity ligation assay (PLA). We demonstrated that exogenously expressed APP and TrkA associate through their juxtamembrane/transmembrane domains, to form a complex that localizes mainly to the plasma membrane, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi. Formation of the complex was inhibited by p75NTR, ShcC and Mint-2. Importantly, we demonstrated that the association between endogenous APP and TrkA in primary septal neurons were modified by NGF, or by drugs that either inhibit ER-to-Golgi transport or perturb microtubules and microfilaments. Interestingly, several agents that induce cell death [amyloid β (Aβ)-peptide, staurosporine and rapamycin], albeit via different mechanisms, all caused dissociation of APP/TrkA complexes and increased production of C-terminal fragment (β-CTF) APP fragment. These findings open new perspectives for investigating the interplay between these proteins during neurodegeneration and AD.

  1. Chemical chaperones reduce ionizing radiation-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and cell death in IEC-6 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Sang; Lee, Hae-June; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Jeong, Jae-Hoon; Kang, Seongman; Lim, Young-Bin

    2014-07-25

    Radiotherapy, which is one of the most effective approaches to the treatment of various cancers, plays an important role in malignant cell eradication in the pelvic area and abdomen. However, it also generates some degree of intestinal injury. Apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is the primary pathological factor that initiates radiation-induced intestinal injury, but the mechanism by which ionizing radiation (IR) induces apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is not clearly understood. Recently, IR has been shown to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, thereby activating the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cells. However, the consequences of the IR-induced activation of the UPR signaling pathway on radiosensitivity in intestinal epithelial cells remain to be determined. In this study, we investigated the role of ER stress responses in IR-induced intestinal epithelial cell death. We show that chemical ER stress inducers, such as tunicamycin or thapsigargin, enhanced IR-induced caspase 3 activation and DNA fragmentation in intestinal epithelial cells. Knockdown of Xbp1 or Atf6 with small interfering RNA inhibited IR-induced caspase 3 activation. Treatment with chemical chaperones prevented ER stress and subsequent apoptosis in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Our results suggest a pro-apoptotic role of ER stress in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Furthermore, inhibiting ER stress may be an effective strategy to prevent IR-induced intestinal injury.

  2. Bone marrow transplantation in hindlimb muscles of motoneuron degenerative mice reduces neuronal death and improves motor function.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Diego; Viso-León, Mari Carmen; Botella-López, Arancha; Jaramillo-Merchan, Jesus; Moraleda, Jose M; Jones, Jonathan; Martínez, Salvador

    2013-06-01

    Bone marrow has proved to be an adequate source of stem cells for the treatment of numerous disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Bone marrow can be easily and relatively painlessly extracted from a patient or allogenic donor and then transplanted into the degenerative area. Here, the grafted cells will activate a number of mechanisms in order to protect, repair, and/or regenerate the damaged tissue. These properties make the bone marrow a feasible source for cell therapy. In this work, we transplanted bone marrow cells into a mouse model of motoneuron degeneration, with the particularity of placing the cells in the hindlimb muscles rather than in the spinal cord where neuronal degeneration occurs. To this end, we analyze the possibility for the transplanted cells to increase the survival rate of the spinal cord motoneurons by axonal-guided retrograde neurotrophism. As a result, the mice significantly improved their motor functions. This coincided with an increased number of motoneurons innervating the treated muscle compared with the neurons innervating the non-treated contralateral symmetric muscle. In addition, we detected an increase in glial-derived neurotrophic factor in the spinal cord, a neurotrophic factor known to be involved in the rescue of degenerating motoneurons, exerting a neuroprotective effect. Thus, we have proved that bone marrow injected into the muscles is capable of rescuing these motoneurons from death, which may be a possible therapeutic approach for spinal cord motoneuron degenerative diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  3. Improvements In US Diet Helped Reduce Disease Burden And Lower Premature Deaths, 1999-2012; Overall Diet Remains Poor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong D; Li, Yanping; Chiuve, Stephanie E; Hu, Frank B; Willett, Walter C

    2015-11-01

    Evaluation of time trends in dietary quality and their relation to disease burden provides essential feedback for policy making. We used an index titled the Alternate Healthy Eating Index 2010 to evaluate trends in dietary quality among 33,885 US adults. From 1999 to 2012 the index increased from 39.9 to 48.2 (perfect score = 110). Gaps in performance on the index across socioeconomic groups persisted or widened. Using data relating index scores to health outcomes in two large cohorts, we estimated that the improvements in dietary quality from 1999 to 2012 prevented 1.1 million premature deaths. Also, this improvement in diet quality resulted in 8.6 percent fewer cardiovascular disease cases, 1.3 percent fewer cancer cases, and 12.6 percent fewer type 2 diabetes cases. Although the steady improvement in dietary quality likely accounted for substantial reductions in disease burden from 1999 to 2012, overall dietary quality in the United States remains poor. Policy initiatives are needed to ensure further improvements. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  4. Association of TrkA and APP Is Promoted by NGF and Reduced by Cell Death-Promoting Agents

    PubMed Central

    Canu, Nadia; Pagano, Ilaria; La Rosa, Luca Rosario; Pellegrino, Marsha; Ciotti, Maria Teresa; Mercanti, Delio; Moretti, Fabiola; Sposato, Valentina; Triaca, Viviana; Petrella, Carla; Maruyama, Ichiro N.; Levi, Andrea; Calissano, Pietro

    2017-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) interacts with the tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA) in normal rat, mouse, and human brain tissue but not in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brain tissue. However, it has not been reported whether the two proteins interact directly, and if so, which domains are involved. Clarifying these points will increase our understanding of the role and regulation of the TrkA/APP interaction in normal brain functioning as well as in AD. Here we addressed these questions using bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) and the proximity ligation assay (PLA). We demonstrated that exogenously expressed APP and TrkA associate through their juxtamembrane/transmembrane domains, to form a complex that localizes mainly to the plasma membrane, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi. Formation of the complex was inhibited by p75NTR, ShcC and Mint-2. Importantly, we demonstrated that the association between endogenous APP and TrkA in primary septal neurons were modified by NGF, or by drugs that either inhibit ER-to-Golgi transport or perturb microtubules and microfilaments. Interestingly, several agents that induce cell death [amyloid β (Aβ)-peptide, staurosporine and rapamycin], albeit via different mechanisms, all caused dissociation of APP/TrkA complexes and increased production of C-terminal fragment (β-CTF) APP fragment. These findings open new perspectives for investigating the interplay between these proteins during neurodegeneration and AD. PMID:28197073

  5. Inhibition of diacylglycerol kinase alpha restores restimulation-induced cell death and reduces immunopathology in XLP-1

    PubMed Central

    Ruffo, Elisa; Malacarne, Valeria; Larsen, Sasha E.; Das, Rupali; Patrussi, Laura; Wülfing, Christoph; Biskup, Christoph; Kapnick, Senta M.; Verbist, Katherine; Tedrick, Paige; Schwartzberg, Pamela L.; Baldari, Cosima T.; Rubio, Ignacio; Nichols, Kim E.; Snow, Andrew L.; Baldanzi, Gianluca; Graziani, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP-1) is an often-fatal primary immunodeficiency associated with the exuberant expansion of activated CD8+ T cells following Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. XLP-1 is caused by defects in SAP, an adaptor protein that modulates T cell receptor (TCR)-induced signaling. SAP-deficient T cells exhibit impaired TCR restimulation-induced cell death (RICD) and diminished TCR-induced inhibition of diacylglycerol kinase alpha (DGKα), leading to increased diacylglycerol metabolism and decreased signaling through Ras and PKCθ. Here, we show that down-regulation of DGKα activity in SAP-deficient T cells restores diacylglycerol signaling at the immune synapse and rescues RICD via induction of the pro-apoptotic proteins NUR77 and NOR1. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of DGKα prevents the excessive CD8+ T cell expansion and IFNγ production that occur in Sap-deficient mice following Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus infection without impairing lytic activity. Collectively, these data highlight DGKα as a viable therapeutic target to reverse the life-threatening EBV-associated immunopathology that occurs in XLP-1 patients. PMID:26764158

  6. Inhibition of diacylglycerol kinase α restores restimulation-induced cell death and reduces immunopathology in XLP-1.

    PubMed

    Ruffo, Elisa; Malacarne, Valeria; Larsen, Sasha E; Das, Rupali; Patrussi, Laura; Wülfing, Christoph; Biskup, Christoph; Kapnick, Senta M; Verbist, Katherine; Tedrick, Paige; Schwartzberg, Pamela L; Baldari, Cosima T; Rubio, Ignacio; Nichols, Kim E; Snow, Andrew L; Baldanzi, Gianluca; Graziani, Andrea

    2016-01-13

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP-1) is an often-fatal primary immunodeficiency associated with the exuberant expansion of activated CD8(+) T cells after Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. XLP-1 is caused by defects in signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP), an adaptor protein that modulates T cell receptor (TCR)-induced signaling. SAP-deficient T cells exhibit impaired TCR restimulation-induced cell death (RICD) and diminished TCR-induced inhibition of diacylglycerol kinase α (DGKα), leading to increased diacylglycerol metabolism and decreased signaling through Ras and PKCθ (protein kinase Cθ). We show that down-regulation of DGKα activity in SAP-deficient T cells restores diacylglycerol signaling at the immune synapse and rescues RICD via induction of the proapoptotic proteins NUR77 and NOR1. Pharmacological inhibition of DGKα prevents the excessive CD8(+) T cell expansion and interferon-γ production that occur in SAP-deficient mice after lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection without impairing lytic activity. Collectively, these data highlight DGKα as a viable therapeutic target to reverse the life-threatening EBV-associated immunopathology that occurs in XLP-1 patients.

  7. Bone Marrow Transplantation in Hindlimb Muscles of Motoneuron Degenerative Mice Reduces Neuronal Death and Improves Motor Function

    PubMed Central

    Viso-León, Mari Carmen; Botella-López, Arancha; Jaramillo-Merchan, Jesus; Moraleda, Jose M.; Jones, Jonathan; Martínez, Salvador

    2013-01-01

    Bone marrow has proved to be an adequate source of stem cells for the treatment of numerous disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Bone marrow can be easily and relatively painlessly extracted from a patient or allogenic donor and then transplanted into the degenerative area. Here, the grafted cells will activate a number of mechanisms in order to protect, repair, and/or regenerate the damaged tissue. These properties make the bone marrow a feasible source for cell therapy. In this work, we transplanted bone marrow cells into a mouse model of motoneuron degeneration, with the particularity of placing the cells in the hindlimb muscles rather than in the spinal cord where neuronal degeneration occurs. To this end, we analyze the possibility for the transplanted cells to increase the survival rate of the spinal cord motoneurons by axonal-guided retrograde neurotrophism. As a result, the mice significantly improved their motor functions. This coincided with an increased number of motoneurons innervating the treated muscle compared with the neurons innervating the non-treated contralateral symmetric muscle. In addition, we detected an increase in glial-derived neurotrophic factor in the spinal cord, a neurotrophic factor known to be involved in the rescue of degenerating motoneurons, exerting a neuroprotective effect. Thus, we have proved that bone marrow injected into the muscles is capable of rescuing these motoneurons from death, which may be a possible therapeutic approach for spinal cord motoneuron degenerative diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PMID:23282201

  8. Safe Sleep for Your Baby: Reduce the Risk of SIDS and Other Sleep-Related Causes of Infant Death

    MedlinePlus

    ... 6 months of age. If your baby rolls over on his or her own during sleep, you do not need to turn the baby over onto his or her back. The important thing is that the baby start off every sleep time on his or her back to reduce ...

  9. Annual Screening with Chest X-Ray Does Not Reduce Lung Cancer Deaths | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Annual screening for lung cancer using a standard chest x-ray does not reduce the risk of dying from lung cancer when compared with no annual screening, according to findings from the NCI-led Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) screening trial. |

  10. Toll-like receptor 7 mediates pruritus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tong; Xu, Zhen-Zhong; Park, Chul-Kyu; Berta, Temugin; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2010-12-01

    Toll-like receptors are typically expressed in immune cells to regulate innate immunity. We found that functional Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) was expressed in C-fiber primary sensory neurons and was important for inducing itch (pruritus), but was not necessary for eliciting mechanical, thermal, inflammatory and neuropathic pain in mice. Our results indicate that TLR7 mediates itching and is a potential therapeutic target for anti-itch treatment in skin disease conditions.

  11. (+)-Pentazocine Reduces NMDA-Induced Murine Retinal Ganglion Cell Death Through a σR1-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Mysona, Barbara A.; Qureshi, Azam; Kim, Lily; Fields, Taylor; Gonsalvez, Graydon B.; Smith, Sylvia B.; Bollinger, Kathryn E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate, in vivo, the effects of the sigma-1 receptor (σR1) agonist, (+)-pentazocine, on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-mediated retinal excitotoxicity. Methods Intravitreal NMDA injections were performed in C57BL/6J mice (wild type [WT]) and σR1−/− (σR1 knockout [KO]) mice. Fellow eyes were injected with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). An experimental cohort of WT and σR1 KO mice was administered (+)-pentazocine by intraperitoneal injection, and untreated animals served as controls. Retinas derived from mice were flat-mounted and labeled for retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The number of RGCs was compared between NMDA and PBS-injected eyes for all groups. Apoptosis was assessed using TUNEL assay. Levels of extracellular-signal–regulated kinases (ERK1/2) were analyzed by Western blot. Results N-methyl-D-aspartate induced a significant increase in TUNEL-positive nuclei and a dose-dependent loss of RGCs. Mice deficient in σR1 showed greater RGC loss (≈80%) than WT animals (≈50%). (+)-Pentazocine treatment promoted neuronal survival, and this effect was prevented by deletion of σR1. (+)-Pentazocine treatment resulted in enhanced activation of ERK at the 6-hour time point following NMDA injection. The (+)-pentazocine–induced ERK activation was diminished in σR1 KO mice. Conclusions Targeting σR1 activation prevented RGC death while enhancing activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), ERK1/2. Sigma-1 receptor is a promising therapeutic target for retinal neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26868747

  12. No benefits of statins for sudden cardiac death prevention in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Al-Gobari, Muaamar; Le, Hai-Ha; Fall, Mor; Gueyffier, François; Burnand, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Statins showed mixed results in heart failure (HF) patients. The benefits in major HF outcomes, including all-cause mortality and sudden cardiac death (SCD), have always been discordant across systematic reviews and meta-analyses. We intended to systematically identify and appraise the available evidence that evaluated the effectiveness of statins in clinical outcomes for HF patients. Systematic review and meta-analysis. We searched, until April 28, 2016: Medline, Embase, ISI Web of Science and EBM reviews (Cochrane DSR, ACP journal club, DARE, CCTR, CMR, HTA, and NHSEED), checked clinicaltrials.gov for ongoing trials and manually searched references of included studies. We identified 24 randomized clinical trials that evaluated the efficacy of statins for HF patients. All randomized clinical trials were assessed for risk of bias and pooled together in a meta-analysis. Pre-specified outcomes were sudden cardiac death, all-cause mortality, and hospitalization for worsening heart failure. Statins did not reduce sudden cardiac death (SCD) events in HF patients [relative risk (RR) 0.92, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.70 to 1.21], all-cause mortality [RR 0.88, 95% CI 0.75 to 1.02] but significantly reduced hospitalization for worsening heart failure (HWHF) although modestly [RR 0.79, 95% CI 0.66 to 0.94]. Nevertheless, estimated predictive intervals were insignificant in SCD, all-cause mortality and HWHF [RR, 0.54 to 1.63, 0.64 to 1.19, and 0.54 to 1.15], respectively. An important finding was the possible presence of publication bias, small-study effects and heterogeneity of the trials conducted in HF patients. Statins do not reduce sudden cardiac death, all-cause mortality, but may slightly decrease hospitalization for worsening heart failure in HF patients. The evaluation of the risk of biases suggested moderate quality of the published results. Until new evidence is available, this study supports the 2013 ACCF/AHA guidelines to not systematically prescribe statins

  13. No benefits of statins for sudden cardiac death prevention in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Le, Hai-Ha; Fall, Mor; Gueyffier, François; Burnand, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Background and objectives Statins showed mixed results in heart failure (HF) patients. The benefits in major HF outcomes, including all-cause mortality and sudden cardiac death (SCD), have always been discordant across systematic reviews and meta-analyses. We intended to systematically identify and appraise the available evidence that evaluated the effectiveness of statins in clinical outcomes for HF patients. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis Data sources We searched, until April 28, 2016: Medline, Embase, ISI Web of Science and EBM reviews (Cochrane DSR, ACP journal club, DARE, CCTR, CMR, HTA, and NHSEED), checked clinicaltrials.gov for ongoing trials and manually searched references of included studies. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies We identified 24 randomized clinical trials that evaluated the efficacy of statins for HF patients. All randomized clinical trials were assessed for risk of bias and pooled together in a meta-analysis. Pre-specified outcomes were sudden cardiac death, all-cause mortality, and hospitalization for worsening heart failure. Results Statins did not reduce sudden cardiac death (SCD) events in HF patients [relative risk (RR) 0.92, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.70 to 1.21], all-cause mortality [RR 0.88, 95% CI 0.75 to 1.02] but significantly reduced hospitalization for worsening heart failure (HWHF) although modestly [RR 0.79, 95% CI 0.66 to 0.94]. Nevertheless, estimated predictive intervals were insignificant in SCD, all-cause mortality and HWHF [RR, 0.54 to 1.63, 0.64 to 1.19, and 0.54 to 1.15], respectively. An important finding was the possible presence of publication bias, small-study effects and heterogeneity of the trials conducted in HF patients. Conclusions Statins do not reduce sudden cardiac death, all-cause mortality, but may slightly decrease hospitalization for worsening heart failure in HF patients. The evaluation of the risk of biases suggested moderate quality of the published results. Until new

  14. Death Imagery and Death Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Rita T.; Hilgendorf, William A.

    1986-01-01

    Investigated the relationship between death imagery and death anxiety among 179 undergraduate students. Results reveal subjects with low death anxiety scores had more positive death images. Subjects who imagined death to be young had a more positive image of death. Death was seen as male by majority of respondents. (Author/BL)

  15. Role of omega-3 ethyl ester concentrate in reducing sudden cardiac death following myocardial infarction and in management of hypertriglyceridemia: An Indian consensus statement

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, J.J.; Kasliwal, R.R.; Dutta, A.L.; Sawhney, J.P.S.; Iyengar, S.S.; Dani, S.; Desai, N.; Sathyamurthy, I.; Rao, D.; Menon, A.; Dasbiswas, A.; Wander, G.S.; Chadha, M.; Hiremath, M.S.; Roy, D.G.; Gupta, V.; Shivakadaksham, N.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is the most lethal manifestation of heart disease. In an Indian study the SCDs contribute about 10% of the total mortality and SCD post ST elevation myocardial infarction (MI) constitutes for about half of total deaths. Objective Given the limitations of existing therapy there is a need for an effective, easy to use, broadly applicable and affordable intervention to prevent SCD post MI. Leading cardiologists from all over India came together to discuss the potential role of n-3 acid ethyl esters (90%) of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) 460 mg & docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) 380 mg in the management of post MI patients and those with hypertriglyceridemia. Recommendations Highly purified & concentrated omega-3 ethyl esters (90%) of EPA (460 mg) & DHA (380 mg) has clinically proven benefits in improving post MI outcomes (significant 15% risk reduction for all-cause mortality, 20% risk reduction for CVD and 45% risk reduction in SCD in GISSI-Prevenzione trial) and in reducing hypertriglyceridemia, and hence, represent an interesting option adding to the treatment armamentarium in the secondary prevention after MI based on its anti-arrhythmogenic effects and also in reducing hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:23102390

  16. The role of tobacco control policies in reducing smoking and deaths caused by smoking in an Eastern European nation: results from the Albania SimSmoke simulation model.

    PubMed

    Levy, David T; Ross, Hana; Zaloshnja, Eduard; Shuperka, Roland; Rusta, Meriglena

    2008-12-01

    The Albania SimSmoke simulation model is used to examine the effects of tobacco control policies. The model is used to consider the projected trends in smoking prevalence and associated smoking-attributable deaths in the absence of new policies, and then to examine the effect of new policies that are consistent with the Framework Convention for Tobacco Control (FCTC) on these outcomes. The model shows that significant inroads to reducing smoking prevalence and premature mortality can be achieved through tax increases. Acomprehensive strategy to further reduce smoking rates should include a media campaign complete with programs to publicize and enforce clean air laws, a comprehensive cessation treatment program, strong health warnings, advertising bans, and youth access laws. Besides presenting the benefits of a comprehensive tobacco control strategy, the model helps to identify important information needed for both modeling and policymaking. The effectiveness of future tobacco control policy will require proper surveillance and evaluation schemes for Albania.

  17. The complement system and toll-like receptors as integrated players in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hovland, Anders; Jonasson, Lena; Garred, Peter; Yndestad, Arne; Aukrust, Pål; Lappegård, Knut T; Espevik, Terje; Mollnes, Tom E

    2015-08-01

    Despite recent medical advances, atherosclerosis is a global burden accounting for numerous deaths and hospital admissions. Immune-mediated inflammation is a major component of the atherosclerotic process, but earlier research focus on adaptive immunity has gradually switched towards the role of innate immunity. The complement system and toll-like receptors (TLRs), and the crosstalk between them, may be of particular interest both with respect to pathogenesis and as therapeutic targets in atherosclerosis. Animal studies indicate that inhibition of C3a and C5a reduces atherosclerosis. In humans modified LDL-cholesterol activate complement and TLRs leading to downstream inflammation, and histopathological studies indicate that the innate immune system is present in atherosclerotic lesions. Moreover, clinical studies have demonstrated that both complement and TLRs are upregulated in atherosclerotic diseases, although interventional trials have this far been disappointing. However, based on recent research showing an intimate interplay between complement and TLRs we propose a model in which combined inhibition of both complement and TLRs may represent a potent anti-inflammatory therapeutic approach to reduce atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Toll-Like Receptor 9-Activation during Onset of Myocardial Ischemia Does Not Influence Infarct Extension

    PubMed Central

    Ohm, Ingrid Kristine; Gao, Erhe; Belland Olsen, Maria; Alfsnes, Katrine; Bliksøen, Marte; Øgaard, Jonas; Ranheim, Trine; Nymo, Ståle Haugset; Holmen, Yangchen Dhondup; Aukrust, Pål; Yndestad, Arne; Vinge, Leif Erik

    2014-01-01

    Aim Myocardial infarction (MI) remains a major cause of death and disability worldwide, despite available reperfusion therapies. Inflammatory signaling is considered nodal in defining final infarct size. Activation of the innate immune receptor toll-like receptors (TLR) 9 prior to ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) reduces infarct size, but the consequence of TLR9 activation timed to the onset of ischemia is not known. Methods and Results The TLR9-agonist; CpG B was injected i.p. in C57BL/6 mice immediately after induction of ischemia (30 minutes). Final infarct size, as well as area-at-risk, was measured after 24 hours of reperfusion. CpG B injection resulted in a significant increase in circulating granulocytes and monocytes both in sham and I/R mice. Paradoxically, clear evidence of reduced cardiac infiltration of both monocytes and granulocytes could be demonstrated in I/R mice treated with CpG B (immunocytochemistry, myeloperoxidase activity and mRNA expression patterns). In addition, systemic TLR9 activation elicited significant alterations of cardiac inflammatory genes. Despite these biochemical and cellular changes, there was no difference in infarct size between vehicle and CpG B treated I/R mice. Conclusion Systemic TLR9-stimulation upon onset of ischemia and subsequent reperfusion does not alter final infarct size despite causing clear alterations of both systemic and cardiac inflammatory parameters. Our results question the clinical usefulness of TLR9 activation during cardiac I/R. PMID:25126943

  19. Toll-like receptor 9-activation during onset of myocardial ischemia does not influence infarct extension.

    PubMed

    Ohm, Ingrid Kristine; Gao, Erhe; Belland Olsen, Maria; Alfsnes, Katrine; Bliksøen, Marte; Øgaard, Jonas; Ranheim, Trine; Nymo, Ståle Haugset; Holmen, Yangchen Dhondup; Aukrust, Pål; Yndestad, Arne; Vinge, Leif Erik

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) remains a major cause of death and disability worldwide, despite available reperfusion therapies. Inflammatory signaling is considered nodal in defining final infarct size. Activation of the innate immune receptor toll-like receptors (TLR) 9 prior to ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) reduces infarct size, but the consequence of TLR9 activation timed to the onset of ischemia is not known. The TLR9-agonist; CpG B was injected i.p. in C57BL/6 mice immediately after induction of ischemia (30 minutes). Final infarct size, as well as area-at-risk, was measured after 24 hours of reperfusion. CpG B injection resulted in a significant increase in circulating granulocytes and monocytes both in sham and I/R mice. Paradoxically, clear evidence of reduced cardiac infiltration of both monocytes and granulocytes could be demonstrated in I/R mice treated with CpG B (immunocytochemistry, myeloperoxidase activity and mRNA expression patterns). In addition, systemic TLR9 activation elicited significant alterations of cardiac inflammatory genes. Despite these biochemical and cellular changes, there was no difference in infarct size between vehicle and CpG B treated I/R mice. Systemic TLR9-stimulation upon onset of ischemia and subsequent reperfusion does not alter final infarct size despite causing clear alterations of both systemic and cardiac inflammatory parameters. Our results question the clinical usefulness of TLR9 activation during cardiac I/R.

  20. Suitable Concentrations of Uric Acid Can Reduce Cell Death in Models of OGD and Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Yang, Ning; Lin, Shao-Peng; Zhang, Feng

    2017-07-01

    Cerebral infarction (CI) is a common clinical cerebrovascular disease, and to explore the pathophysiological mechanisms and seek effective treatment means are the hotspot and difficult point in medical research nowadays. Numerous studies have confirmed that uric acid plays an important role in CI, but the mechanism has not yet been clarified. When treating HT22 and BV-2 cells with different concentrations of uric acid, uric acid below 450 μM does not have significant effect on cell viability, but uric acid more than 500 μM can significantly inhibit cell viability. After establishing models of OGD (oxygen-glucose deprivation) with HT22 and BV-2 cells, uric acid at a low concentration (50 μM) cannot improve cell viability and apoptosis, and Reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels during OGD/reoxygenation; a suitable concentration (300 μM) of uric acid can significantly improve cell viability and apoptosis, and reduce ROS production during OGD/reoxygenation; but a high concentration (1000 μM) of uric acid can further reduce cell viability and enhance ROS production. After establishing middle cerebral artery occlusion of male rats with suture method, damage and increase of ROS production in brain tissue could be seen, and after adding suitable concentration of uric acid, the degree of brain damage and ROS production was reduced. Therefore, different concentrations of uric acid should have different effect, and suitable concentrations of uric acid have neuroprotective effect, and this finding may provide guidance for study on the clinical curative effect of uric acid.

  1. Reduced calcium binding protein immunoreactivity induced by electroconvulsive shock indicates neuronal hyperactivity, not neuronal death or deactivation.

    PubMed

    Kim, J-E; Kwak, S-E; Kim, D-S; Won, M H; Kwon, O-S; Choi, S-Y; Kang, T-C

    2006-01-01

    Calcium-binding proteins (CBPs), such as parvalbumin and calbindin D-28k, are useful markers of specific neuronal types in the CNS. In recent studies, expression of CBPs may be indicative of a deactivated neuronal state, particularly epilepsy. However, it is controversial whether altered expression of CBPs in the hippocampus practically indicate neuronal activity. Therefore, the present study was performed to investigate the extent of profiles of expression of CBPs in the rat hippocampus affected by several episodes induced by electroconvulsive shock. In the present study, following electroconvulsive shock expression of CBPs were reduced in the hippocampus in a stimulus-dependent manner, and recovered to the control level at 6 h after electroconvulsive shock. However, paired-pulse responses of the dentate gyrus were transiently impaired by electroconvulsive shock, and immediately normalized to baseline value. In addition, effects of electroconvulsive shock on expression of CBPs and paired-pulse responses were prevented by pretreatment of vigabatrin. These findings suggest that reduced expression of CBPs induced by seizure activity may be indicative of hyperactivity of CBP positive neurons, which is a practical consequence of the abnormal discharge, and that they may play an important role in regulating seizure activity.

  2. Peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligand PK11195 reduces microglial activation and neuronal death in quinolinic acid-injected rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jae K; Choi, Hyun B; McLarnon, James G

    2005-11-01

    The effects of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) ligand, PK11195, were investigated in the rat striatum following the administration of quinolinic acid (QUIN). Intrastriatal QUIN injection caused an increase of PBR expression in the lesioned striatum as demonstrated by immunohistochemical analysis. Double immunofluorescent staining indicated PBR was primarily expressed in ED1-immunoreactive microglia but not in GFAP-immunoreactive astrocytes or NeuN-immunoreactive neurons. PK11195 treatment significantly reduced the level of microglial activation and the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and iNOS in QUIN-injected striatum. Oxidative-mediated striatal QUIN damage, characterized by increased expression of markers for lipid peroxidation (4-HNE) and oxidative DNA damage (8-OHdG), was significantly diminished by PK11195 administration. Furthermore, intrastriatal injection of PK11195 with QUIN significantly reduced striatal lesions induced by the excitatory amino acid and diminished QUIN-mediated caspase-3 activation in striatal neurons. These results suggest that inflammatory responses from activated microglia are damaging to striatal neurons and pharmacological targeting of PBR in microglia may be an effective strategy in protecting neurons in neurological disorders such as Huntington's disease.

  3. Spn1 Regulates the GNBP3-Dependent Toll Signaling Pathway in Drosophila melanogaster▿

    PubMed Central

    Fullaondo, Ane; García-Sánchez, Susana; Sanz-Parra, Arantza; Recio, Emma; Lee, So Young; Gubb, David

    2011-01-01

    The Drosophila genome encodes 29 serpins, most of unknown function. We show here that Spn1 is an active protease inhibitor of the serpin superfamily. Spn1 inhibits trypsin in vitro and regulates the Toll-mediated immune response in vivo. Expression of the Toll-dependent transcripts Drosomycin and IM1 is increased in Spn1 null mutants. Overexpression of Spn1 reduces the induction of Drosomycin upon immune challenge with fungi but not Gram-positive bacteria. Similar reductions in Drosomycin levels are observed in the psh, spz, and grass mutants of the Toll signaling pathway. These results support a role of Spn1 as a repressor of Toll activation upon fungal infection. Epistatic analysis places Spn1 upstream of Spätzle processing enzyme and Grass, in the fungal cell wall-activated side branch of the pathway. Overexpression of the pattern recognition receptor GNBP3 activates the β-1,3-glucan-sensitive side branch of the Toll pathway. The resultant increased Drosomycin level is reduced by concomitant overexpression of Spn1, confirming that Spn1 regulates the fungal cell wall side branch. Spn1 null mutants show altered susceptibility to fungal infection compared to the wild type, demonstrating a requirement for Spn1 in the fine regulation of the immune response. PMID:21576362

  4. Association of coffee intake with reduced incidence of liver cancer and death from chronic liver disease in the US multiethnic cohort.

    PubMed

    Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Wilkens, Lynne R; Lu, Shelly C; Hernandez, Brenda Y; Le Marchand, Loïc; Henderson, Brian E

    2015-01-01

    Coffee consumption has been proposed to reduce risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and chronic liver disease (CLD), but few data are available from prospective, US multiethnic populations. We evaluated the association of coffee intake with HCC and CLD in 162,022 African Americans, Native Hawaiians, Japanese Americans, Latinos, and whites in the US Multiethnic Cohort (MEC). We collected data from the MEC, a population-based prospective cohort study of >215,000 men and women from Hawaii and California, assembled in 1993-1996. Participants reported coffee consumption and other dietary and lifestyle factors when they joined the study. During an 18-year follow-up period, there were 451 incident cases of HCC and 654 deaths from CLD. Hazard rate ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using Cox regression, adjusting for known HCC risk factors. High levels of coffee consumption were associated with reduced risk of incident HCC and CLD mortality (Ptrend ≤ .0002). Compared with non-coffee drinkers, those who drank 2-3 cups per day had a 38% reduction in risk for HCC (RR = 0.62; 95% CI: 0.46-0.84); those who drank ≥4 cups per day had a 41% reduction in HCC risk (RR = 0.59; 95% CI: 0.35-0.99). Compared with non-coffee drinkers, participants who consumed 2-3 cups coffee per day had a 46% reduction in risk of death from CLD (RR = 0.54; 95% CI: 0.42-0.69) and those who drank ≥4 cups per day had a 71% reduction (RR = 0.29; 95% CI: 0.17-0.50). The inverse associations were similar regardless of the participants' ethnicity, sex, body mass index, smoking status, alcohol intake, or diabetes status. Increased coffee consumption reduces the risk of HCC and CLD in multiethnic US populations. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Long-term bioavailability of redox nanoparticles effectively reduces organ dysfunctions and death in whole-body irradiated mice.

    PubMed

    Feliciano, Chitho P; Tsuboi, Koji; Suzuki, Kenshi; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2017-06-01

    Radioprotective agents have been developed to protect patients against the damaging and lethal effects of ionizing radiation. However, in addition to the intrinsic ability to target reactive oxygen species (ROS), the ability to retain a significant level of bioavailability is desirable in radioprotective agents because that would increase and prolong their radioprotective efficacy and improve its safety. Here, we report the development of a novel nanoparticle-based radioprotective agent with improved bioavailability, which suppressed the adverse effects typically associated with low-molecular-weight (LMW) antioxidants. We developed biocompatible and colloidally stable nanoparticles in which nitroxide radicals that were covalently conjugated (redox nanoparticles, RNP(N)) effectively scavenged radiation-induced ROS with a characteristically prolonged bioavailability and tissue-residence time compared with that of conventional LMW antioxidants. The confinement of the nitroxide radicals in the RNP(N) core prevented its rapid metabolism and excretion out of the body. The nano-sized formulation prevented internalization of RNP(N) in healthy cells, thereby preserving the normal function of the redox reactions in the cell. This improved pharmacological performance dramatically reduced the radiation-induced organ dysfunctions and increased the survival time of the lethally irradiated mice when the nanoparticles were administered 3-24 h before whole-body irradiation.

  6. Cotton GhMKK5 affects disease resistance, induces HR-like cell death, and reduces the tolerance to salt and drought stress in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Li, Yuzhen; Lu, Wenjing; Meng, Fei; Wu, Chang-ai; Guo, Xingqi

    2012-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are involved in various processes from plant growth and development to biotic and abiotic stress responses. MAPK kinases (MAPKKs), which link MAPKs and MAPKK kinases (MAPKKKs), play crucial roles in MAPK cascades to mediate a variety of stress responses in plants. However, few MAPKKs have been functionally characterized in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). In this study, a novel gene, GhMKK5, from cotton belonging to the group C MAPKKs was isolated and characterized. The expression of GhMKK5 can be induced by pathogen infection, abiotic stresses, and multiple defence-related signal molecules. The overexpression of GhMKK5 in Nicotiana benthamiana enhanced the plants’ resistance to the bacterial pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum by elevating the expression of pathogen resistance (PR) genes, including PR1a, PR2, PR4, PR5, and NPR1, but increased the plants’ sensitivity to the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora parasitica var. nicotianae Tucker. Importantly, GhMKK5-overexpressing plants displayed markedly elevated expression of reactive oxygen species-related and cell death marker genes, such as NtRbohA and NtCDM, and resulted in hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death characterized by the accumulation of H2O2. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that GhMKK5 overexpression in plants reduced their tolerance to salt and drought stresses, as determined by statistical analysis of seed germination, root length, leaf water loss, and survival rate. Drought obviously accelerated the cell death phenomenon in GhMKK5-overexpressing plants. These results suggest that GhMKK5 may play an important role in pathogen infection and the regulation of the salt and drought stress responses in plants. PMID:22442420

  7. CD147 is increased in HCC cells under starvation and reduces cell death through upregulating p-mTOR in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gou, Xingchun; Tang, Xu; Kong, Derek Kai; He, Xinying; Gao, Xingchun; Guo, Na; Hu, Zhifang; Zhao, Zhaohua; Chen, Yanke

    2016-01-01

    Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is the standard of care for treatment of intermediate hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), however, key molecules involved in HCC cell survival and tumor metastasis post-TACE remain unclear. CD147 is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily that is overexpressed on the surface of HCC cells and is associated with malignant potential and poor prognosis in HCC patients. In this study, using an Earle's Balanced Salt Solution medium culture model that mimics nutrient deprivation induced by TACE, we investigated the regulation of CD147 expression on HCC cells under starvation conditions and its functional effects on HCC cell death. During early stages of starvation, the expression of CD147 was considerably upregulated in SMMC7721, HepG2 and HCC9204 hepatoma cell lines at the protein levels. Downregulation of CD147 by specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly promoted starvation-induced cell death. In addition, CD147 siRNA-transfected SMMC7721 cells demonstrated significantly increased levels of both apoptosis and autophagy as compared to cells transfected with control siRNA under starvation conditions, whereas no difference was observed between the two treatment groups under normal culture conditions. Furthermore, silencing of CD147 resulted in a remarkable downregulation of phosphorylated mammalian target of rapamycin (p-mTOR) in starved SMMC7721 cells. Finally, the combined treatment of starvation and anti-CD147 monoclonal antibody exhibited a synergistic HCC cell killing effect. Our study suggests that upregulation of CD147 under starvation may reduce hepatoma cell death by modulating both apoptosis and autophagy through mTOR signaling, and that CD147 may be a novel potential molecular target to improve the efficacy of TACE.

  8. Potential gains in life expectancy from reducing heart disease, cancer, Alzheimer's disease, kidney disease or HIV/AIDS as major causes of death in the USA.

    PubMed

    Wang, G D; Lai, D J; Burau, K D; Du, X L

    2013-04-01

    Potential gains in life expectancy (PGLEs) that give proper consideration to competing risks are an effective indicator for measuring the impact of multiple causes of death on a defined population. This study aimed to assess PGLE by hypothetically reducing the major causes of death in the USA from 2001 to 2008. PGLEs due to the reduction and elimination of heart disease, cancer, Alzheimer's disease, kidney disease or human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) were calculated by age, gender and race. Age-specific mortality rates for the above diseases from the National Center for Health Statistics were used, and multiple decremental life tables were constructed to compute the corresponding PGLEs. PGLEs due to the elimination of heart disease, cancer or HIV/AIDS decreased from 2001 to 2008, but PGLEs due to the elimination of Alzheimer's disease or kidney disease increased over time. For heart disease, PGLE in 2001-2008 for all races was 2.78-2.15 for females vs 2.41-2.06 for males. For cancer, PGLE in 2001-2008 for all races was 2.97-2.81 for females vs 3.02-2.85 for males. HIV/AIDS has a greater impact on people of working age, whereas Alzheimer's disease has a greater impact on the elderly population. To compare the impacts of these diseases on life expectancy, partial multiple decremental life tables were constructed, and PGLEs were computed by a partial reduction or complete elimination of various causes of death for the entire life span as well as for certain working ages. This study outlined a picture of how each category of diseases could affect life expectancy in the US population by age, race or sex. The findings may assist in evaluating current public health improvements, and also provide useful information for directing future research and disease control programmes. Copyright © 2013 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The role of the African-American physician in reducing traffic-related injury and death among African Americans: consensus report of the National Medical Association.

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Fernando; Moore, Wayne; Conti, Christopher; Norville Perez, Lucille C.; Gaines, Beverly M.; Hood, Rodney G.; Swain, Ian J. J.; Williams, Rudolph; Burgess, Chaka T.

    2002-01-01

    ISSUE: Traffic-related injuries and fatalities disproportionately affect the African American community. These high rates of traffic-related death and injury among African Americans manifest in multiple areas of traffic safety, including: Failure to use seat belts and child restraints. High incidence of alcohol-impaired driving. Failure to follow child passenger and seat belt safety laws and recommendations. High rates of pedestrian accidents, ofen brought on by impairments of drivers and/or pedestrians. Research indicates that national public information campaigns, with general messages only slightly modified for African American audiences, have not been culturally appropriate or effective in changing traffic safety behavior. In addition, traditional distribution mechanisms for these messages have not effectively reached the target population. Evidence suggests that in the African American community, there is a pervasive lack of knowledge of the devastating impact of traffic-related accidents on the overall health status of the community. This lack of information has resulted in a tragic cycle, in which parents fail to model safe operation of motor vehicles, and generation after generation copy this behavior, increasing the community's vulnerability to serious injuries and untimely deaths. This trend toward improper traffic safety habits among African Americans persists despite federal, state and local laws to enforce and promote sound traffic safety practices. OBJECTIVE: To study the existence of disparities in traffic-related injury and death among African Americans and to determine what kinds of traffic safety messages and campaigns will be effective in encouraging African Americans to respond to safety laws in sufficient numbers to reduce the disproportionately high rate of injury and death. Traffic safety issues were examined to effectively recommend policy, address barriers, best practices, and intervention strategies for the National Medical Association

  10. Prenatal diagnosis of critical congenital heart disease reduces risk of death from cardiovascular compromise prior to planned neonatal cardiac surgery: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Holland, B J; Myers, J A; Woods, C R

    2015-06-01

    To determine if prenatal diagnosis improves the chance that a newborn with critical congenital heart disease will survive to undergo planned cardiac surgery. A systematic review of the medical literature identified eight studies which met the following criteria: compared outcomes between newborns with prenatal and those with postnatal diagnosis of critical congenital heart disease; compared groups of patients with the same anatomical diagnosis; provided detailed information on cardiac anatomy; included detailed information on preoperative cause of death. A meta-analysis was performed to assess differences in preoperative mortality rates between newborns with prenatal diagnosis and those with postnatal diagnosis. Patients with established risk factors for increased mortality (high risk) and those whose families chose comfort care rather than cardiac surgery were excluded. In patients with comparable anatomy, standard risk, a parental desire to treat and optimal care, newborns with a prenatal diagnosis of critical congenital heart disease were significantly less likely to die prior to planned cardiac surgery than were those with a comparable postnatal diagnosis (pooled odds ratio, 0.26; 95% CI, 0.08-0.84). For newborns most likely to benefit from treatment for their critical congenital heart disease, because they did not have additional risk factors and their families pursued treatment, prenatal diagnosis reduced the risk of death prior to planned cardiac surgery relative to patients with a comparable postnatal diagnosis. Further study and efforts to improve prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart disease should therefore be considered. Copyright © 2015 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. 60 Million non-facility births: who can deliver in community settings to reduce intrapartum-related deaths?

    PubMed

    Darmstadt, Gary L; Lee, Anne C C; Cousens, Simon; Sibley, Lynn; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Donnay, France; Osrin, Dave; Bang, Abhay; Kumar, Vishwajeet; Wall, Steven N; Baqui, Abdullah; Lawn, Joy E

    2009-10-01

    For the world's 60 million non-facility births, addressing who is currently attending these births and what effect they have on birth outcomes is a key starting point toward improving care during childbirth. We present a systematic review of evidence for the effect of community-based cadres-community-based skilled birth attendants (SBAs), trained traditional birth attendants (TBAs), and community health workers (CHWs)-in improving perinatal and intrapartum-related outcomes. The evidence for providing skilled birth attendance in the community is low quality, consisting of primarily before-and-after and quasi-experimental studies, with a pooled 12% reduction in all cause perinatal mortality (PMR) and a 22%-47% reduction in intrapartum-related neonatal mortality (IPR-NMR). Low/moderate quality evidence suggests that TBA training may improve linkages with facilities and improve perinatal outcomes. A randomized controlled trial (RCT) of TBA training showed a 30% reduction in PMR, and a meta-analysis demonstrated an 11% reduction in IPR-NMR. There is moderate evidence that CHWs have a positive impact on perinatal-neonatal outcomes. Meta-analysis of CHW packages (2 cluster randomized controlled trials, 2 quasi-experimental studies) showed a 28% reduction in PMR and a 36% reduction in early neonatal mortality rate; one quasi-experimental study showed a 42% reduction in IPR-NMR. Skilled childbirth care is recommended for all pregnant women, and community strategies need to be linked to prompt, high-quality emergency obstetric care. CHWs may play a promising role in providing pregnancy and childbirth care, mobilizing communities, and improving perinatal outcomes in low-income settings. While the role of the TBA is still controversial, strategies emphasizing partnerships with the health system should be further considered. Innovative community-based strategies combined with health systems strengthening may improve childbirth care for the rural poor, help reduce gross

  12. 60 million non-facility births: Who can deliver in community settings to reduce intrapartum-related deaths?

    PubMed Central

    Darmstadt, Gary L.; Lee, Anne CC; Cousens, Simon; Sibley, Lynn; Bhutta, Zulqar A.; Donnay, France; Osrin, Dave; Bang, Abhay; Kumar, Vishwajeet; Wall, Steve N.; Baqui, Abdullah; Lawn, Joy E.

    2012-01-01

    care for the rural poor, help reduce gross inequities in maternal and newborn survival and stillbirth rates, and provide an effective transition to higher coverage for facility births. PMID:19815200

  13. Patient barriers to implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation for the primary prevention of sudden cardiac death in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Laura Lihua; Lim, Choon Pin; Aung, Soe Tin; Quetua, Paul; Ho, Kah Leng; Chong, Daniel; Teo, Wee Siong; Sim, David; Ching, Chi Keong

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Device therapy is efficacious in preventing sudden cardiac death (SCD) in patients with reduced ejection fraction. However, few who need the device eventually opt to undergo implantation and even fewer reconsider their decisions after deliberation. This is due to many factors, including unresolved patient barriers. This study identified the factors that influenced patients’ decision to decline implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation, and those that influenced patients who initially declined an implant to reconsider having one. METHODS A single-centre survey was conducted among 240 patients who had heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and met the ICD implantation criteria, but had declined ICD implantation. RESULTS Participants who refused ICD implantation were mostly male (84%), Chinese (71%), married (72%), currently employed (54%), and had up to primary or secondary education (78%) and monthly income of < SGD 3,000 (51%). Those who were more likely to reconsider their decision were aware that SCD was a consequence of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, knowledgeable of the preventive role of ICDs, currently employed and aware that their doctor strongly recommended the implant. Based on multivariate analysis, knowledge of the role of ICDs for primary prophylaxis was the most important factor influencing patient decision. CONCLUSION This study identified the demographic and social factors of patients who refused ICD therapy. Knowledge of the role of ICDs in preventing SCD was found to be the strongest marker for reconsidering ICD implantation. Measures to address this information gap may lead to higher rates of ICD implantation. PMID:27075476

  14. Effectiveness of Scotland's National Naloxone Programme for reducing opioid‐related deaths: a before (2006–10) versus after (2011–13) comparison

    PubMed Central

    McAuley, Andrew; Perry, Samantha; Hunter, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims To assess the effectiveness for Scotland's National Naloxone Programme (NNP) by comparison between 2006–10 (before) and 2011–13 (after NNP started in January 2011) and to assess cost‐effectiveness. Design This was a pre–post evaluation of a national policy. Cost‐effectiveness was assessed by prescription costs against life‐years gained per opioid‐related death (ORD) averted. Setting Scotland, in community settings and all prisons. Intervention Brief training and standardized naloxone supply became available to individuals at risk of opioid overdose. Measurements ORDs as identified by National Records of Scotland. Look‐back determined the proportion of ORDs who, in the 4 weeks before ORD, had been (i) released from prison (primary outcome) and (ii) released from prison or discharged from hospital (secondary). We report 95% confidence intervals for effectiveness in reducing the primary (and secondary) outcome in 2011–13 versus 2006–10. Prescription costs were assessed against 1 or 10 life‐years gained per averted ORD. Findings In 2006–10, 9.8% of ORDs (193 of 1970) were in people released from prison within 4 weeks of death, whereas only 6.3% of ORDs in 2011–13 followed prison release (76 of 1212, P < 0.001; this represented a difference of 3.5% [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.6–5.4%)]. This reduction in the proportion of prison release ORDs translates into 42 fewer prison release ORDs (95% CI = 19–65) during 2011–13, when 12 000 naloxone kits were issued at current prescription cost of £225 000. Scotland's secondary outcome reduced from 19.0 to 14.9%, a difference of 4.1% (95% CI = 1.4–6.7%). Conclusions Scotland's National Naloxone Programme, which started in 2011, was associated with a 36% reduction in the proportion of opioid‐related deaths that occurred in the 4 weeks following release from prison. PMID:26642424

  15. Effectiveness of Scotland's National Naloxone Programme for reducing opioid-related deaths: a before (2006-10) versus after (2011-13) comparison.

    PubMed

    Bird, Sheila M; McAuley, Andrew; Perry, Samantha; Hunter, Carole

    2016-05-01

    To assess the effectiveness for Scotland's National Naloxone Programme (NNP) by comparison between 2006-10 (before) and 2011-13 (after NNP started in January 2011) and to assess cost-effectiveness. This was a pre-post evaluation of a national policy. Cost-effectiveness was assessed by prescription costs against life-years gained per opioid-related death (ORD) averted. Scotland, in community settings and all prisons. Brief training and standardized naloxone supply became available to individuals at risk of opioid overdose. ORDs as identified by National Records of Scotland. Look-back determined the proportion of ORDs who, in the 4 weeks before ORD, had been (i) released from prison (primary outcome) and (ii) released from prison or discharged from hospital (secondary). We report 95% confidence intervals for effectiveness in reducing the primary (and secondary) outcome in 2011-13 versus 2006-10. Prescription costs were assessed against 1 or 10 life-years gained per averted ORD. In 2006-10, 9.8% of ORDs (193 of 1970) were in people released from prison within 4 weeks of death, whereas only 6.3% of ORDs in 2011-13 followed prison release (76 of 1212, P < 0.001; this represented a difference of 3.5% [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.6-5.4%)]. This reduction in the proportion of prison release ORDs translates into 42 fewer prison release ORDs (95% CI = 19-65) during 2011-13, when 12,000 naloxone kits were issued at current prescription cost of £225,000. Scotland's secondary outcome reduced from 19.0 to 14.9%, a difference of 4.1% (95% CI = 1.4-6.7%). Scotland's National Naloxone Programme, which started in 2011, was associated with a 36% reduction in the proportion of opioid-related deaths that occurred in the 4 weeks following release from prison. © 2015 The Authors. Addiction published by JohnWiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society for the Study of Addiction.

  16. GSK-3β inhibition attenuates LPS-induced death but aggravates radiation-induced death via down-regulation of IL-6.

    PubMed

    Li, Bailong; Zhang, Chaoxiong; He, Feng; Liu, Wen; Yang, Yanyong; Liu, Hu; Liu, Xin; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Lin; Deng, Bo; Gao, Fu; Cui, Jianguo; Liu, Cong; Cai, Jianming

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of high dose ionizing radiation is lethal. Signal pathways involved in radiation biology reaction still remain illdefined. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS), the ligands of Toll-like receptor 4(TLR4), could elicit strong immune responses. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β(GSK-3β) promotes the production of inflammatory molecules and cell migration. Inhibition of GSK-3β provides protection against inflammation in animal models. The aim of the study was to investigate role of GSK-3β in LPS shock and ionizing radiation. WT or IL-6(-/-)mice or cells were pretreated with SB216763, a GSK-3β inhibitor, and survival of the mice was determined. Cell viability was assayed by Cell Counting Kit. Apoptosis was assayed by Annexin V-PI double staining. Serum concentrations of IL-6 and TNF-α were determined by ELISA. SB216763 attenuated LPS induced mice or cell death but aggravated radiation induced mice or cell death. SB216763 reduced IL-6, but not TNF-α levels in vivo. IL-6(-/-) mice were more resistant to LPS-induced death but less resistant to radiation-induced death than wild type mice. Inhibition of GSK-3β conferred resistance to LPS shock but fostered death induced by ionizing radiation. Inhibition of GSK-3β was effective by reducing IL-6.

  17. 47 CFR 63.65 - Closure of public toll station where another toll station of applicant in the community will...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... toll station to be retained; (2) Description of service area affected, including approximate population and character of the business of the community; (3) Average number of toll telephone messages...

  18. 40 CFR 52.111 - Toll free number assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Toll free number assignment. 52.111... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Arizona § 52.111 Toll free number assignment. Toll free numbers shall be made available on a first-come, first-served basis unless otherwise directed...

  19. 40 CFR 52.111 - Toll free number assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Toll free number assignment. 52.111... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Arizona § 52.111 Toll free number assignment. Toll free numbers shall be made available on a first-come, first-served basis unless otherwise directed...

  20. 40 CFR 52.111 - Toll free number assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Toll free number assignment. 52.111... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Arizona § 52.111 Toll free number assignment. Toll free numbers shall be made available on a first-come, first-served basis unless otherwise directed...

  1. 40 CFR 52.111 - Toll free number assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Toll free number assignment. 52.111... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Arizona § 52.111 Toll free number assignment. Toll free numbers shall be made available on a first-come, first-served basis unless otherwise directed...

  2. 40 CFR 52.111 - Toll free number assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Toll free number assignment. 52.111... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Arizona § 52.111 Toll free number assignment. Toll free numbers shall be made available on a first-come, first-served basis unless otherwise directed...

  3. 47 CFR 51.209 - Toll dialing parity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Toll dialing parity. 51.209 Section 51.209... Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.209 Toll dialing parity. (a) A LEC shall implement throughout each state in which it offers telephone exchange service intraLATA and interLATA toll dialing...

  4. 47 CFR 51.209 - Toll dialing parity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Toll dialing parity. 51.209 Section 51.209... Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.209 Toll dialing parity. (a) A LEC shall implement throughout each state in which it offers telephone exchange service intraLATA and interLATA toll dialing...

  5. 47 CFR 51.209 - Toll dialing parity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Toll dialing parity. 51.209 Section 51.209... Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.209 Toll dialing parity. (a) A LEC shall implement throughout each state in which it offers telephone exchange service intraLATA and interLATA toll dialing...

  6. 47 CFR 51.209 - Toll dialing parity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Toll dialing parity. 51.209 Section 51.209... Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.209 Toll dialing parity. (a) A LEC shall implement throughout each state in which it offers telephone exchange service intraLATA and interLATA toll dialing...

  7. 47 CFR 51.209 - Toll dialing parity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Toll dialing parity. 51.209 Section 51.209... Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.209 Toll dialing parity. (a) A LEC shall implement throughout each state in which it offers telephone exchange service intraLATA and interLATA toll dialing...

  8. Metallic gold slows disease progression, reduces cell death and induces astrogliosis while simultaneously increasing stem cell responses in an EAE rat model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Dan Sonne; Fredericia, Pil Møntegaard; Pedersen, Mie Ostergaard; Stoltenberg, Meredin; Penkowa, Milena; Danscher, Gorm; Rungby, Jørgen; Larsen, Agnete

    2012-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common neurodegenerative disease in the Western world affecting younger, otherwise healthy individuals. Today no curative treatment exists. Patients suffer from recurring attacks caused by demyelination and underlying neuroinflammation, ultimately leading to loss of neurons. Recent research shows that bio-liberation of gold ions from metallic gold implants can ameliorate inflammation, reduce apoptosis and promote proliferation of neuronal stem cells (NSCs) in a mouse model of focal brain injury. Based on these findings, the present study investigates whether metallic gold implants affect the clinical signs of disease progression and the pathological findings in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a rodent model of MS. Gold particles 20-45 μm suspended in hyaluronic acid were bilaterally injected into the lateral ventricles (LV) of young Lewis rats prior to EAE induction. Comparing gold-treated animals to untreated and vehicle-treated ones, a statistically significant slowing of disease progression in terms of reduced weight loss was seen. Despite massive inflammatory infiltration, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling staining revealed reduced apoptotic cell death in disease foci in the brain stem of gold-treated animals, alongside an up-regulation of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive reactive astrocytes near the LV and in the brain stem. Cell counting of frizzled-9 and nestin-stained cells showed statistically significant up-regulation of NSCs migrating from the subventricular zone. Additionally, the neuroprotective proteins Metallothionein-1 and -2 were up-regulated in the corpus callosum. In conclusion, this study is the first to show that the presence of small gold implants affect disease progression in a rat model of MS, increasing the neurogenic response and reducing the loss of cells in disease foci. Gold implants might thus improve clinical outcome for MS patients and further

  9. Association of Coffee Intake with Reduced Incidence of Liver Cancer and Death from Chronic Liver Disease in the US Multiethnic Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Lu, Shelly C.; Hernandez, Brenda Y.; Le Marchand, Loïc; Henderson, Brian E.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Coffee consumption has been proposed to reduce risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and chronic liver disease (CLD), but few data are available from prospective, US, multi-ethnic populations. We evaluated the association of coffee intake with HCC and CLD in 162,022 African Americans, Native Hawaiians, Japanese Americans, Latinos, and whites in the US Multiethnic Cohort (MEC). Methods We collected data from the MEC, a population-based prospective cohort study of more than 215,000 men and women from Hawaii and California, assembled 1993−1996. Participants reported coffee consumption and other dietary and lifestyle factors when they joined the study. During an 18-year follow up period, there were 451 incident cases of HCC and 654 deaths from CLD. Hazard rate ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using Cox regression, adjusting for known HCC risk factors. Results High levels of coffee consumption were associated with reduced risk of incident HCC and CLD mortality (Ptrend ≤.0002). Compared to non-coffee drinkers, those who drank 2–3 cups/day had a 38% reduction in risk for HCC (RR=0.62; 95% CI, 0.46−0.84); those who drank ≥4 cups per day had a 41% reduction in HCC risk (RR=0.59; 95% CI, 0.35–0.99). Compared to non-coffee drinkers, participants who consumed 2−3 cups coffee/day had a 46% reduction in risk of death from CLD (RR=0.54; 95% CI, 0.42–0.69) and those who drank ≥4 cups/day had a 71% reduction (RR=0.29; 95% CI, 0.17−0.50). The inverse associations were similar regardless of the participants’ ethnicity, sex, body mass index, smoking status, alcohol intake, or diabetes status. Conclusions Increased coffee consumption reduces the risk of HCC and CLD in multi-ethnic US populations. PMID:25305507

  10. The role of tobacco control policies in reducing smoking and deaths in a middle income nation: results from the Thailand SimSmoke simulation model.

    PubMed

    Levy, D T; Benjakul, S; Ross, H; Ritthiphakdee, B

    2008-02-01

    With the male smoking prevalence near 60% in 1991, Thailand was one of the first Asian nations to implement strict tobacco control policies. However, the success of their efforts has not been well documented. The role of tobacco control policies are examined using the "SimSmoke" tobacco control model. We first validated the model against survey data on smoking prevalence. We then distinguished the effect of policies implemented between 1991 and 2006 from long-term trends in smoking rates. We also estimated smoking attributable deaths and lives saved as a result of the policies. The model validates well against survey data. The model shows that by the year 2006, policies implemented between 1991 and 2006 had already decreased smoking prevalence by 25% compared to what it would have been in the absence of the policies. Tax increases on cigarettes and advertising bans had the largest impact, followed by media anti-smoking campaigns, clean air laws and health warnings. The model estimates that the policies saved 31 867 lives by 2006 and will have saved 319,456 lives by 2026. The results document the success of Thailand in reducing smoking prevalence and reducing the number of lives lost to smoking, thereby showing the potential of tobacco control policies specifically in a middle-income country. Additional improvements can be realised through higher taxes, stronger clean air policies, comprehensive cessation treatment policies, and targeted media campaigns.

  11. End-ischemic machine perfusion reduces bile duct injury in donation after circulatory death rat donor livers independent of the machine perfusion temperature.

    PubMed

    Westerkamp, Andrie C; Mahboub, Paria; Meyer, Sophie L; Hottenrott, Maximilia; Ottens, Petra J; Wiersema-Buist, Janneke; Gouw, Annette S H; Lisman, Ton; Leuvenink, Henri G D; Porte, Robert J

    2015-10-01

    A short period of oxygenated machine perfusion (MP) after static cold storage (SCS) may reduce biliary injury in donation after cardiac death (DCD) donor livers. However, the ideal perfusion temperature for protection of the bile ducts is unknown. In this study, the optimal perfusion temperature for protection of the bile ducts was assessed. DCD rat livers were preserved by SCS for 6 hours. Thereafter, 1 hour of oxygenated MP was performed using either hypothermic machine perfusion, subnormothermic machine perfusion, or with controlled oxygenated rewarming (COR) conditions. Subsequently, graft and bile duct viability were assessed during 2 hours of normothermic ex situ reperfusion. In the MP study groups, lower levels of transaminases, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances were measured compared to SCS. In parallel, mitochondrial oxygen consumption and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production were significantly higher in the MP groups. Biomarkers of biliary function, including bile production, biliary bicarbonate concentration, and pH, were significantly higher in the MP groups, whereas biomarkers of biliary epithelial injury (biliary gamma-glutamyltransferase [GGT] and LDH), were significantly lower in MP preserved livers. Histological analysis revealed less injury of large bile duct epithelium in the MP groups compared to SCS. In conclusion, compared to SCS, end-ischemic oxygenated MP of DCD livers provides better preservation of biliary epithelial function and morphology, independent of the temperature at which MP is performed. End-ischemic oxygenated MP could reduce biliary injury after DCD liver transplantation. © 2015 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  12. Death Cafe.

    PubMed

    Miles, Lizzy; Corr, Charles A

    2017-06-01

    This article explains the meaning of the phrase Death Cafe and describes what typically occurs at a Death Cafe gathering. The article traces the history of the Death Cafe movement, explores some reasons why people take part in a Death Cafe gathering, and gives examples of what individuals think they might derive from their participation. In addition, this article notes similarities between the Death Cafe movement and three other developments in the field of death, dying, and bereavement. Finally, this article identifies two provisional lessons that can be drawn from Death Cafe gatherings and the Death Cafe movement itself.

  13. Toll Like Receptor 3 Plays a Critical Role in the Progression and Severity of Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Cavassani, Karen A.; Moreira, Ana Paula; Habiel, David; Ito, Toshihiro; Coelho, Ana Lucia; Allen, Ron M.; Hu, Bin; Raphelson, Janna; Carson, William F.; Schaller, Matthew A.; Lukacs, Nicholas W.; Omary, M. Bishr; Hogaboam, Cory M.; Kunkel, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation has been implicated in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity. Herein, we hypothesize that TLR3 activation significantly contributed to APAP-induced liver injury. In fasted wildtype (WT) mice, APAP caused significant cellular necrosis, edema, and inflammation in the liver, and the de novo expression and activation of TLR3 was found to be necessary for APAP-induced liver failure. Specifically, liver tissues from similarly fasted TLR3-deficient (tlr3−/−) mice exhibited significantly less histological and biochemical evidence of injury after APAP challenge. Similar protective effects were observed in WT mice in which TLR3 was targeted through immunoneutralization at 3 h post-APAP challenge. Among three important death ligands (i.e. TNFα, TRAIL, and FASL) known to promote hepatocyte death after APAP challenge, TNFα was the only ligand that was significantly reduced in APAP-challenged tlr3−/− mice compared with APAP-challenged WT controls. In vivo studies demonstrated that TLR3 activation contributed to TNFα production in the liver presumably via F4/80+ and CD11c+ immune cells. In vitro studies indicated that there was cooperation between TNFα and TLR3 in the activation of JNK signaling in isolated and cultured liver epithelial cells (i.e. nMuLi). Moreover, TLR3 activation enhanced the expression of phosphorylated JNK in APAP injured livers. Thus, the current study demonstrates that TLR3 activation contributes to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:23762449

  14. Adolescent Death Anxiety: The Effect of Death Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Nina Ribak

    1980-01-01

    An 18-week course on death and dying designed specifically for high school students significantly reduced participants' level of death anxiety. These results conflict with previous research on adolescents in which either increased anxiety or no significant differences in death anxiety were reported as a result of death education. (CM)

  15. Voodoo death.

    PubMed

    Lester, David

    2009-01-01

    Scholarly writing on voodoo death is reviewed. Criticisms that voodoo deaths in indigenous societies have never been well documented are refuted with cases medically documented in developed nations. The work of Cannon and Richter on sudden death in animals is reviewed and dismissed as irrelevant for understanding voodoo death. The role of starvation and dehydration is discussed, and it is suggested that the given-up/giving-up hypothesis best fits the phenomenon of voodoo death. Hypotheses for future research are suggested.

  16. Toll-like receptor 8: augmentation of innate immunity in platinum resistant ovarian carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Brueseke, Taylor J; Tewari, Krishnansu S

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most deadly gynecologic cancer, with 15,000 anticipated deaths within the United States alone in 2012, and new treatment strategies are needed. Ovarian cancer tumors are known to host an immunosuppressive microenvironment. This suppression may be reversible via activation of the innate immune response. Toll-like receptor 8 activates innate immunity while simultaneously inhibiting the effects of regulatory T cells within the ovarian cancer tumors. VTX-2337 is a novel small molecule ligand of Toll-like receptor 8 and is currently the subject of a Phase II randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG)-3003 for patients with recurrent platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. We look forward to the results of this trial as support for the paradigm of process therapy in the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:23723721

  17. Ectoine alters subcellular localization of inclusions and reduces apoptotic cell death induced by the truncated Machado-Joseph disease gene product with an expanded polyglutamine stretch.

    PubMed

    Furusho, Kentaro; Yoshizawa, Toshihiro; Shoji, Shinichi

    2005-10-01

    Protein misfolding is considered a key event in the pathogenesis of polyglutamine disease such as Machado-Joseph disease (MJD). Overexpression of chaperone proteins and the application of chemical chaperones are reported to suppress polyglutamine induced cytotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. The effects of compatible solutes, which are osmoprotectants in bacteria and possess the action in stabilizing proteins under stress, have not, to our knowledge, been studied. We explored the protective effects of the compatible solutes ectoine, hydroxyectoine, and betaine on apoptotic cell death produced by the truncated MJD gene product with an expanded polyglutamine tract in cultured neuro2a cells. Ectoine, but not hydroxyectoine or betaine, decreased large cytoplasmic inclusions and increased the frequency of nuclear inclusions. Immunoblot analysis showed that ectoine reduced the total amount of aggregates. Despite the presence of nuclear inclusions, apoptotic features were less frequently observed after ectoine application. Our findings suggest that ectoine, a natural osmoprotectant in bacteria, may function as a novel molecule protecting cells from polyglutamine-induced toxicity.

  18. Hydrogen-rich saline reduces cell death through inhibition of DNA oxidative stress and overactivation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 in retinal ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    LIU, HONGWEI; HUA, NING; XIE, KELIANG; ZHAO, TINGTING; YU, YONGHAO

    2015-01-01

    Overactivation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), as a result of sustained DNA oxidation in ischemia-reperfusion injury, triggers programmed cell necrosis and apoptosis. The present study was conducted to demonstrate whether hydrogen-rich saline (HRS) has a neuroprotective effect on retinal ischemia reperfusion (RIR) injury through inhibition of PARP-1 activation. RIR was induced by transient elevation of intraocular pressure in rats. HRS (5 ml/kg) was administered peritoneally every day from the beginning of reperfusion in RIR rats until the rats were sacrificed. Retinal damage and cell death was determined using hematoxylin and eosin and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling staining. DNA oxidative stress was evaluated by immunofluorescence staining of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine. In addition, the expression of PARP-1 and caspase-3 was investigated by western blot analysis and/or immunohistochemical staining. The results demonstrated that HRS administration improved morphological alterations and reduced apoptosis following RIR injury. Furthermore, the present study found that HRS alleviated DNA oxidation and PARP-1 overactivation in RIR rats. HRS can protect RIR injury by inhibition of PARP-1, which may be involved in DNA oxidative stress and caspase-3-mediated apoptosis. PMID:25954991

  19. Reducing drug related deaths: a pre-implementation assessment of knowledge,barriers and enablers for naloxone distribution through general practice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Scottish Naloxone Programme aims to reduce Scotland’s high number of drug-related deaths (DRDs) caused by opiate overdose. It is currently implemented through specialist drug services but General Practitioners (GPs) are likely to have contact with drug using patients and their families and are therefore in an ideal position to direct them to naloxone schemes, or provide it themselves. This research gathered baseline data on GP’s knowledge of and willingness to be involved in DRD prevention, including naloxone administration, prior to the implementation of primary care based delivery. Methods Mixed methods were used comprising a quantitative, postal survey and qualitative telephone interviews. A questionnaire was sent to 500 GPs across Scotland. An initial mailing was followed by a reminder. A shortened questionnaire containing seven key questions was posted as a final reminder. Telephone interviews were conducted with 17 GPs covering a range of demographic characteristics and drug user experience. Results A response rate of 55% (240/439) was achieved. There was some awareness of the naloxone programme but little involvement (3.3%), 9% currently provided routine overdose prevention, there was little involvement in displaying overdose prevention information (<20%). Knowledge of DRD risk was mixed. There was tentative willingness to be involved in naloxone prescribing with half of respondents willing to provide this to drug users or friends/family. However half were uncertain GP based naloxone provision was essential to reduce DRDs. Factors enabling naloxone distribution were: evidence of effectiveness, appropriate training, and adding to the local formulary. Interviewees had limited awareness of what naloxone distribution in primary care may involve and considered naloxone supply as a specialist service rather than a core GP role. Wider attitudinal barriers to involvement with this group were expressed. Conclusions There was poor awareness of the

  20. Double-Stranded RNA Interacts With Toll-Like Receptor 3 in Driving the Acute Inflammatory Response Following Lung Contusion.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Madathilparambil V; Thomas, Bivin; Machado-Aranda, David; Dolgachev, Vladislov A; Kumar Ramakrishnan, Sadeesh; Talarico, Nicholas; Cavassani, Karen; Sherman, Matthew A; Hemmila, Mark R; Kunkel, Steven L; Walter, Nils G; Hogaboam, Cory M; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2016-11-01

    Lung contusion is a major risk factor for the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome. We set to determine the role of toll-like receptor 3 and the binding of double-stranded RNA in the pathogenesis of sterile injury following lung contusion. Toll-like receptor 3 expression was analyzed in postmortem lung samples from patients with lung contusion. Unilateral lung contusion was induced in toll-like receptor 3 (-/-), TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (-/-), and wild-type mice. Subsequently, lung injury and inflammation were evaluated. Apoptotic indices, phagocytic activity, and phenotypic characterization of the macrophages were determined. Double-stranded RNA in bronchoalveolar lavage and serum samples following lung contusion was measured. A toll-like receptor 3/double-stranded RNA ligand inhibitor was injected into wild-type mice prior to lung contusion. Toll-like receptor 3 expression was higher in patients and wild-type mice with lung contusion. The degree of lung injury, inflammation, and macrophage apoptosis was reduced in toll-like receptor 3 (-/-), TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (-/-), and wild-type mice with toll-like receptor 3 antibody neutralization. Alveolar macrophages from toll-like receptor 3 (-/-) mice had a lower early apoptotic index, a predominant M2 phenotype and increased surface translocation of toll-like receptor 3 from the endosome to the surface. When compared with viral activation pathways, lung injury in lung contusion demonstrated increased p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation with inflammasome activation without a corresponding increase in nuclear factor-κB or type-1 interferon production. Additionally, pretreatment with toll-like receptor 3/double-stranded RNA ligand inhibitor led to a reduction in injury, inflammation, and macrophage apoptosis. We conclude that the interaction of double-stranded RNA from injured cells with

  1. Enhanced antimicrobial peptide-induced activity in the mollusc Toll-2 family through evolution via tandem Toll/interleukin-1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jun; Chen, Yihong; Jin, Min; Ren, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Toll receptors play an important role in the innate immunity of invertebrates. All reported Tolls have only one Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain at the C-terminal. In this study, numerous Tolls with tandem TIRs at the C-terminal were found in molluscs. Such Tolls presented an extra TIR (TIR-1) compared with Toll-I. Thus, Toll-I might be the ancestor of tandem TIRs containing Toll. To test this hypothesis, 83 Toll-I and Toll-2 (most have two TIRs, but others seem to be the evolutionary intermediates) genes from 29 shellfish species were identified. These Tolls were divided into nine groups based on phylogenetic analyses. A strong correlation between phylogeny and motif composition was found. All Toll proteins contained the TIR-2 domain, whereas the TIR-1 domain only existed in some Toll-2 protein, suggesting that TIR-1 domain insertion may play an important role in Toll protein evolution. Further analyses of functional divergence and adaptive evolution showed that some of the critical sites responsible for functional divergence may have been under positive selection. An additional intragenic recombination played an important role in the evolution of the Toll-I and Toll-2 genes. To investigate the functional difference of Toll-I and Toll-2, over expression of Hcu_Toll-I or Hcu_Toll-2-2 in Drosophila S2 cells was performed. Results showed that Hcu_Toll-2-2 had stronger antimicrobial peptide (AMP) activity than Hcu_Toll-I. Therefore, enhanced AMP-induced activity resulted from tandem TIRs in Toll-2s of molluscs during evolution history. PMID:27429771

  2. Clean birth and postnatal care practices to reduce neonatal deaths from sepsis and tetanus: a systematic review and Delphi estimation of mortality effect

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Annually over 520,000 newborns die from neonatal sepsis, and 60,000 more from tetanus. Estimates of the effect of clean birth and postnatal care practices are required for evidence-based program planning. Objective To review the evidence for clean birth and postnatal care practices and estimate the effect on neonatal mortality from sepsis and tetanus for the Lives Saved Tool (LiST). Methods We conducted a systematic review of multiple databases. Data were abstracted into standard tables and assessed by GRADE criteria. Where appropriate, meta-analyses were undertaken. For interventions with low quality evidence but a strong GRADE recommendation, a Delphi process was conducted. Results Low quality evidence supports a reduction in all-cause neonatal mortality (19% (95% c.i. 1–34%)), cord infection (30% (95% c.i. 20–39%)) and neonatal tetanus (49% (95% c.i. 35–62%)) with birth attendant handwashing. Very low quality evidence supports a reduction in neonatal tetanus mortality with a clean birth surface (93% (95% c.i. 77-100%)) and no relationship between a clean perineum and tetanus. Low quality evidence supports a reduction of neonatal tetanus with facility birth (68% (95% c.i. 47-88%). No relationship was found between birth place and cord infections or sepsis mortality. For postnatal clean practices, all-cause mortality is reduced with chlorhexidine cord applications in the first 24 hours of life (34% (95% c.i. 5–54%, moderate quality evidence) and antimicrobial cord applications (63% (95% c.i. 41–86%, low quality evidence). One study of postnatal maternal handwashing reported reductions in all-cause mortality (44% (95% c.i. 18–62%)) and cord infection ((24% (95% c.i. 5-40%)). Given the low quality of evidence, a Delphi expert opinion process was undertaken. Thirty experts reached consensus regarding reduction of neonatal sepsis deaths by clean birth practices at home (15% (IQR 10–20)) or in a facility (27% IQR 24–36)), and by clean

  3. Toll-like Receptor-7 Mediates Pruritus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tong; Xu, Zhen-Zhong; Park, Chul-Kyu; Berta, Temugin; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2010-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are typically expressed in immune cells to regulate innate immunity. Here we report that functional TLR7 is expressed in C-fiber primary sensory neurons and important for inducing itch (pruritis) but not necessary for eliciting mechanical, thermal, inflammatory and neuropathic pain in mice. Thus, we have uncovered TLR7 as a novel itch mediator and a potential therapeutic target for anti-itch treatment in skin disease conditions. PMID:21037581

  4. 23 CFR 950.5 - Requirement to use electronic toll collection technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Requirement to use electronic toll collection technology... technology. (a) Any toll agency operating a toll facility pursuant to authority under a 1604 toll program... agency using electronic toll collection technology must develop and implement reasonable methods...

  5. 23 CFR 950.5 - Requirement to use electronic toll collection technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Requirement to use electronic toll collection technology... technology. (a) Any toll agency operating a toll facility pursuant to authority under a 1604 toll program... agency using electronic toll collection technology must develop and implement reasonable methods to...

  6. 23 CFR 950.5 - Requirement to use electronic toll collection technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Requirement to use electronic toll collection technology... technology. (a) Any toll agency operating a toll facility pursuant to authority under a 1604 toll program... agency using electronic toll collection technology must develop and implement reasonable methods to...

  7. 23 CFR 950.5 - Requirement to use electronic toll collection technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Requirement to use electronic toll collection technology... technology. (a) Any toll agency operating a toll facility pursuant to authority under a 1604 toll program... agency using electronic toll collection technology must develop and implement reasonable methods...

  8. Cot Deaths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyrrell, Shelagh

    1985-01-01

    Addresses the tragedy of crib deaths, giving particular attention to causes, prevention, and medical research on Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Gives anecdotal accounts of coping strategies used by parents and families of SIDS infants. (DT)

  9. Cot Deaths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyrrell, Shelagh

    1985-01-01

    Addresses the tragedy of crib deaths, giving particular attention to causes, prevention, and medical research on Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Gives anecdotal accounts of coping strategies used by parents and families of SIDS infants. (DT)

  10. A Water-Ethanol Extract from the Willow Bracket Mushroom, Phellinus igniarius (Higher Basidiomycetes), Reduces Transient Cerebral Ischemia-Induced Neuronal Death.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hee; Choi, Bo Young; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, In Yeol; Lee, Bo Eun; Sohn, Min; Park, Hyoung Jin; Suh, Sang Won

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the potential neuroprotective effect of a mushroom extract from Phellinus igniarius (Piwep) after transient cerebral ischemia. Ph. Igniarius, which has a history of traditional medicinal use, contains immunomodulatory compounds that have been described to have effects on the human immune system. Using a model of transient cerebral ischemia induced by both common carotid artery occlusion and hypovolemia, a water-ethanol extract precipitate of Ph. Igniarius (Piwep) was delivered intraperitoneally immediately after the insult and was injected subsequently every other day for the experimental course. Neuronal death was examined by Fluoro-Jade B staining 1 week after the insult. Piwep injection lead to decreased hippocampal neuronal death, suppression of oxidative injury, activation of microglia, and disruption of the blood-brain barrier. We conclude that Piwep potently inhibits hippocampal neuronal death following ischemia and may have a high therapeutic potential for ameliorating stroke-induced neuron death in the clinical setting.

  11. Exposure to electromagnetic field attenuates oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced microglial cell death by reducing intracellular Ca(2+) and ROS.

    PubMed

    Duong, Cao Nguyen; Kim, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this research was to demonstrate the protective effects of electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure on the human microglial cell line, HMO6, against ischemic cell death induced by in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). Materials and methods HMO6 cells were cultured for 4 h under OGD with or without exposure to EMF with different combinations of frequencies and intensities (10, 50, or 100 Hz/1 mT and 50 Hz/0.01, 0.1, or 1 mT). Cell survival, intracellular calcium and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were measured. Results OGD caused significant HMO6 cell death as well as elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) and ROS levels. Among different combinations of EMF frequencies and intensities, 50 Hz/1 mT EMF was the most potent to attenuate OGD-induced cell death and intracellular Ca(2+) and ROS levels. A significant but less potent protective effect was also found at 10 Hz/1 mT, whereas no protective effect was found at other combinations of EMF. A xanthine oxidase inhibitor reversed OGD-induced ROS production and cell death, while NADPH oxidase and mitochondrial respiration chain complex II inhibitors did not affect cell death. Conclusions 50 Hz/1 mT EMF protects human microglial cells from OGD-induced cell death by interfering with OGD-induced elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) and ROS levels, and xanthine oxidase is one of the main mediators involved in OGD-induced HMO6 cell death. Non-invasive treatment of EMF radiation may be clinically useful to attenuate hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

  12. Historic American Buildings Survey, A.S. Burns, Photographer December, 1933 TOLL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Historic American Buildings Survey, A.S. Burns, Photographer December, 1933 TOLL HOUSE (DETAIL OF PLAQUE SHOWING TOLL RATES) - Structures on Old National Trail, Toll House, U.S. Route 40, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  13. 23 CFR 950.5 - Requirement to use electronic toll collection technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... location and use of such methods do not create unsafe operating conditions on the toll facility. (b) A toll... electronic toll collection technology must develop, implement, and make publicly available privacy...

  14. Inhibition of never in mitosis A (NIMA)-related kinase-4 reduces survivin expression and sensitizes cancer cells to TRAIL-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Park, So Jung; Jo, Doo Sin; Jo, Se-Young; Shin, Dong Woon; Shim, Sangmi; Jo, Yoon Kyung; Shin, Ji Hyun; Ha, Ye Jin; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Hwang, Jung Jin; Kim, Young Sam; Suh, Young-Ah; Chang, Jong Wook; Kim, Jin Cheon; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2016-10-04

    The tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) preferentially induces apoptosis in cancer cells. However, many tumors are resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis, and resistance mechanisms are not fully understood. To identify novel regulatory molecules of TRAIL resistance, we screened a siRNA library targeting the human kinome, and NEK4 (NIMA-related kinase-4) was identified. Knockdown of NEK4 sensitized TRAIL-resistant cancer cells and in vivo xenografts to cell death. In contrast, over expression of NEK4 suppressed TRAIL-induced cell death in TRAIL-sensitive cancer cells. In addition, loss of NEK4 resulted in decrease of the anti-apoptotic protein survivin, but an increase in apoptotic cell death. Interestingly, NEK4 was highly upregulated in tumor tissues derived from patients with lung cancer and colon cancer. These results suggest that inhibition of NEK4 sensitizes cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis by regulation of survivin expression.

  15. Inhibition of never in mitosis A (NIMA)-related kinase-4 reduces survivin expression and sensitizes cancer cells to TRAIL-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Park, So Jung; Jo, Doo Sin; Jo, Se-Young; Shin, Dong Woon; Shim, Sangmi; Jo, Yoon Kyung; Shin, Ji Hyun; Ha, Ye Jin; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Hwang, Jung Jin; Kim, Young Sam; Suh, Young-Ah; Chang, Jong Wook; Kim, Jin Cheon; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) preferentially induces apoptosis in cancer cells. However, many tumors are resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis, and resistance mechanisms are not fully understood. To identify novel regulatory molecules of TRAIL resistance, we screened a siRNA library targeting the human kinome, and NEK4 (NIMA-related kinase-4) was identified. Knockdown of NEK4 sensitized TRAIL-resistant cancer cells and in vivo xenografts to cell death. In contrast, over expression of NEK4 suppressed TRAIL-induced cell death in TRAIL-sensitive cancer cells. In addition, loss of NEK4 resulted in decrease of the anti-apoptotic protein survivin, but an increase in apoptotic cell death. Interestingly, NEK4 was highly upregulated in tumor tissues derived from patients with lung cancer and colon cancer. These results suggest that inhibition of NEK4 sensitizes cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis by regulation of survivin expression. PMID:27602754

  16. Wnt3a mitigates acute lung injury by reducing P2X7 receptor-mediated alveolar epithelial type I cell death

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Y; Mishra, A; Weng, T; Chintagari, N R; Wang, Y; Zhao, C; Huang, C; Liu, L

    2014-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is characterized by pulmonary endothelial and epithelial cell damage, and loss of the alveolar–capillary barrier. We have previously shown that P2X7 receptor (P2X7R), a cell death receptor, is specifically expressed in alveolar epithelial type I cells (AEC I). In this study, we hypothesized that P2X7R-mediated purinergic signaling and its interaction with Wnt/β-catenin signaling contributes to AEC I death. We examined the effect of P2X7R agonist 2′-3′-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl)-ATP (BzATP) and Wnt agonist Wnt3a on AEC I death in vitro and in vivo. We also assessed the therapeutic potential of Wnt3a in a clinically relevant ALI model of intratracheal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure in ventilated mice. We found that the activation of P2X7R by BzATP caused the death of AEC I by suppressing Wnt/β-catenin signaling through stimulating glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and proteasome. On the other hand, the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling by Wnt3a, GSK-3β inhibitor, or proteasome inhibitor blocked the P2X7R-mediated cell death. More importantly, Wnt3a attenuated the AEC I damage caused by intratracheal instillation of BzATP in rats or LPS in ventilated mice. Our results suggest that Wnt3a overrides the effect of P2X7R on the Wnt/β-catenin signaling to prevent the AEC I death and restrict the severity of ALI. PMID:24922070

  17. Disseminated cysticercosis: clinical spectrum, Toll-like receptor-4 gene polymorphisms and role of albendazole: A prospective follow-up of 60 cases with a review of 56 published cases.

    PubMed

    Qavi, Abdul; Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Jain, Amita; Kumar, Neeraj; Malhotra, Kiran Preet; Srivastava, Pradeep Kumar; Verma, Rajesh; Sharma, Praveen Kumar

    2016-09-01

    . Of the 4 deaths recorded, 3 had a heavy parasitic load and died after praziquantel therapy.Toll-like receptor-4 gene polymorphisms are associated with an increased susceptibility to disseminated cysticercosis, in the Indian population. Albendazole treatment seems to reduce the lesion load and improve symptoms.

  18. Increases in fines and driver licence withdrawal have effectively reduced immediate deaths from trauma on Brazilian roads: first-year report on the new traffic code.

    PubMed

    Poli de Figueiredo, L F; Rasslan, S; Bruscagin, V; Cruz, R; Rocha e Silva, M

    2001-03-01

    Road accidents are a major cause of death in Brazil, with rates increasing steadily for years. Our objective here is to report the impact of the new Brazilian Traffic Code, introduced in 1998. Its main new features include a large increase in fines and a rigid penalty scoring system that leads to driver license withdrawal. Speed limits have actually been raised on many roads, but adherence to the rules has been monitored more closely. We compare the incidence of injured patients and immediate deaths in road accidents and emergency room admissions to a level I trauma centre in downtown São Paulo between January and December 1998 with corresponding data from between January and December 1997. There was an overall 21.3% reduction in the number of accidents and a 24.7% reduction in immediate deaths, saving 5962 lives on Brazilian highways. Tickets issued fell by 49.5% (601977 during 1997 to 304785 during 1998). Motor vehicle accident-related emergency room admissions decreased by 33.2%. We conclude that very costly tickets and threatened driver licences have proved very effective in decreasing immediate deaths from trauma. Further advances in educational programmes associated with road and vehicle safety measures are likely to provide the much needed further reduction in the still high trauma mortality on Brazilian roads and streets.

  19. Dietary blueberry attenuates whole-body insulin resistance in high fat-fed mice by reducing adipocyte death and its inflammatory sequelae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Adipose tissue (AT) inflammation promotes insulin resistance (IR) and other obesity complications. AT inflammation and IR are associated with oxidative stress, adipocyte death, and the scavenging of dead adipocytes by proinflammatory CD11c+ AT macrophages (ATMF). We tested the hypothesis that supple...

  20. Mycobacterium avium MAV2052 protein induces apoptosis in murine macrophage cells through Toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang-In; Choi, Han-Gyu; Son, Yeo-Jin; Whang, Jake; Kim, Kwangwook; Jeon, Heat Sal; Park, Hye-Soo; Back, Yong Woo; Choi, Seunga; Kim, Seong-Woo; Choi, Chul Hee; Kim, Hwa-Jung

    2016-04-01

    Mycobacterium avium and its sonic extracts induce apoptosis in macrophages. However, little is known about the M. avium components regulating macrophage apoptosis. In this study, using multidimensional fractionation, we identified MAV2052 protein, which induced macrophage apoptosis in M. avium culture filtrates. The recombinant MAV2052 induced macrophage apoptosis in a caspase-dependent manner. The loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm), mitochondrial translocation of Bax, and release of cytochrome c from mitochondria were observed in macrophages treated with MAV2052. Further, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was required for the apoptosis induced by MAV2052. In addition, ROS and mitogen-activated protein kinases were involved in MAV2052-mediated TNF-α and IL-6 production. ROS-mediated activation of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1)-JNK pathway was a major signaling pathway for MAV2052-induced apoptosis. Moreover, MAV2052 bound to Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 molecule and MAV2052-induced ROS production, ΔΨm loss, and apoptosis were all significantly reduced in TLR4(-/-) macrophages. Altogether, our results suggest that MAV2052 induces apoptotic cell death through TLR4 dependent ROS production and JNK pathway in murine macrophages.

  1. A Toll-like receptor in horseshoe crabs.

    PubMed

    Inamori, Kei-ichiro; Ariki, Shigeru; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro

    2004-04-01

    Non-self-recognition of invading microbes relies on the pattern-recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) derived from microbial cell-wall components. Insects and mammals conserve a signaling pathway of the innate immune system through cell-surface receptors called Tolls and Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) are an important trigger of the horseshoe crab's innate immunity to infectious microorganisms. Horseshoe crabs' granular hemocytes respond specifically to LPS stimulation, inducing the secretion of various defense molecules from the granular hemocytes. Here, we show a cDNA which we named tToll, coding for a TLR identified from hemocytes of the horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus. tToll is most closely related to Drosophila Toll in both domain architecture and overall length. Human TLRs have been suggested to contain numerous PAMP-binding insertions located in the leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) of their ectodomains. However, the LRRs of tToll contained no obvious PAMP-binding insertions. Furthermore, tToll was non-specifically expressed in horseshoe crab tissues. These observations suggest that tToll does not function as an LPS receptor on granular hemocytes.

  2. 47 CFR 51.213 - Toll dialing parity implementation plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Toll dialing parity implementation plans. 51... parity implementation plans. (a) A LEC must file a plan for providing intraLATA toll dialing parity... dialing parity within a state until the implementation plan has been approved by the appropriate...

  3. 47 CFR 51.213 - Toll dialing parity implementation plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Toll dialing parity implementation plans. 51... parity implementation plans. (a) A LEC must file a plan for providing intraLATA toll dialing parity... dialing parity within a state until the implementation plan has been approved by the appropriate...

  4. 47 CFR 51.213 - Toll dialing parity implementation plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Toll dialing parity implementation plans. 51... parity implementation plans. (a) A LEC must file a plan for providing intraLATA toll dialing parity... dialing parity within a state until the implementation plan has been approved by the appropriate...

  5. 47 CFR 51.213 - Toll dialing parity implementation plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Toll dialing parity implementation plans. 51... parity implementation plans. (a) A LEC must file a plan for providing intraLATA toll dialing parity... dialing parity within a state until the implementation plan has been approved by the appropriate...

  6. 47 CFR 51.213 - Toll dialing parity implementation plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Toll dialing parity implementation plans. 51... parity implementation plans. (a) A LEC must file a plan for providing intraLATA toll dialing parity... dialing parity within a state until the implementation plan has been approved by the appropriate...

  7. 33 CFR 401.26 - Security for tolls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 401.26 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT... applies, security for the payment of tolls in accordance with the “St. Lawrence Seaway Tariff of Tolls” as... sufficient to cover the tolls established in the “St. Lawrence Seaway Tariff of Tolls” for the gross...

  8. The Drosophila melanogaster Toll Pathway Participates in Resistance to Infection by the Gram-Negative Human Pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Gee W.; Goumnerov, Boyan C.; Walendziewicz, Cynthia L.; Hewitson, Jennifer; Xiao, Wenzhong; Mahajan-Miklos, Shalina; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Perkins, Lizabeth A.; Rahme, Laurence G.

    2003-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram-negative pathogen that infects immunocompromised and cystic fibrosis patients. The molecular basis of the host-P. aeruginosa interaction and the effect of specific P. aeruginosa virulence factors on various components of the innate immunity pathways are largely unknown. We examine interactions between P. aeruginosa virulence factors and components of innate immunity response in the Drosophila melanogaster model system to reveal the importance of the Toll signaling pathway in resistance to infection by the P. aeruginosa human isolate PA14. Using the two PA14-isogenic mutants plcS and dsbA, we show that Drosophila loss-of-function mutants of Spatzle, the extracellular ligand of Toll, and Dorsal and Dif, two NF-κB-like transcription factors, allow increased P. aeruginosa infectivity within fly tissues. In contrast, a constitutively active Toll mutant and a loss-of-function mutant of Cactus, an IκB-like factor that inhibits the Toll signaling, reduce infectivity. Our finding that Dorsal activity is required to restrict P. aeruginosa infectivity in Drosophila provides direct in vivo evidence for Dorsal function in adult fly immunity. Additionally, our results provide the basis for future studies into interactions between P. aeruginosa virulence factors and components of the Toll signaling pathway, which is functionally conserved between flies and humans. PMID:12819096

  9. Conventional and Non-Conventional Drosophila Toll Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Scott A.; Wasserman, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of Toll in Drosophila and of the remarkable conservation in pathway composition and organization catalyzed a transformation in our understanding of innate immune recognition and response. At the center of that picture is a cascade of interactions in which specific microbial cues activate Toll receptors, which then transmit signals driving transcription factor nuclear localization and activity. Experiments gave substance to the vision of pattern recognition receptors, linked phenomena in development, gene regulation, and immunity into a coherent whole, and revealed a rich set of variations for identifying non-self and responding effectively. More recently, research in Drosophila has illuminated the positive and negative regulation of Toll activation, the organization of signaling events at and beneath membranes, the sorting of information flow, and the existence of non-conventional signaling via Toll-related receptors. Here, we provide an overview of the Toll pathway of flies and highlight these ongoing realms of research. PMID:23632253

  10. Natural death.

    PubMed

    Oehmichen, M; Meissner, C

    2000-01-01

    The increasing age of every human being is the beginning of the end of life, an obviously natural process, but any attempt to define the term 'natural death' soon encounters difficulties in defining what is meant by 'natural'. In the industrialized countries of the West, for example 'natural death' is thought of as the opposite of non-natural types of death such as accidental death, suicide, and homicide. The aim of our present survey is to discuss the meaning of the term 'natural death' under a clinical, a forensic and a scientific point of view with regard to recent developments especially in molecular biology. If there are 'external' physical influences, a medical-technical manipulation, a therapeutic or molecular biological intervention cannot be definitely ruled out as the cause of death, then use of the term 'natural death' in general is open to question. It will only remain meaningful if it can be applied with a specific meaning in definite practical situations. Current research and medical technology, however, do not allow use of the term 'natural death' in its conventional sense: it can thus be stricken from the medical vocabulary. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

  11. Invariant death.

    PubMed

    Frank, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    In nematodes, environmental or physiological perturbations alter death's scaling of time. In human cancer, genetic perturbations alter death's curvature of time. Those changes in scale and curvature follow the constraining contours of death's invariant geometry. I show that the constraints arise from a fundamental extension to the theories of randomness, invariance and scale. A generalized Gompertz law follows. The constraints imposed by the invariant Gompertz geometry explain the tendency of perturbations to stretch or bend death's scaling of time. Variability in death rate arises from a combination of constraining universal laws and particular biological processes.

  12. Can plant oncogenes inhibit programmed cell death? The rolB oncogene reduces apoptosis-like symptoms in transformed plant cells.

    PubMed

    Gorpenchenko, Tatiana Y; Aminin, Dmitry L; Vereshchagina, Yuliya V; Shkryl, Yuri N; Veremeichik, Galina N; Tchernoded, Galina K; Bulgakov, Victor P

    2012-09-01

    The rolB oncogene was previously identified as an important player in ROS metabolism in transformed plant cells. Numerous reports indicate a crucial role for animal oncogenes in apoptotic cell death. Whether plant oncogenes such as rolB can induce programmed cell death (PCD) in transformed plant cells is of particular importance. In this investigation, we used a single-cell assay based on confocal microscopy and fluorescent dyes capable of discriminating between apoptotic and necrotic cells. Our results indicate that the expression of rolB in plant cells was sufficient to decrease the proportion of apoptotic cells in steady-state conditions and diminish the rate of apoptotic cells during induced PCD. These data suggest that plant oncogenes, like animal oncogenes, may be involved in the processes mediating PCD.

  13. Severe hypertriglyceridemia, reduced high density lipoprotein, and neonatal death in lipoprotein lipase knockout mice. Mild hypertriglyceridemia with impaired very low density lipoprotein clearance in heterozygotes.

    PubMed Central

    Weinstock, P H; Bisgaier, C L; Aalto-Setälä, K; Radner, H; Ramakrishnan, R; Levak-Frank, S; Essenburg, A D; Zechner, R; Breslow, J L

    1995-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL)-deficient mice have been created by gene targeting in embryonic stem cells. At birth, homozygous knockout pups have threefold higher triglycerides and sevenfold higher VLDL cholesterol levels than controls. When permitted to suckle, LPL-deficient mice become pale, then cyanotic, and finally die at approximately 18 h of age. Before death, triglyceride levels are severely elevated (15,087 +/- 3,805 vs 188 +/- 71 mg/dl in controls). Capillaries in tissues of homozygous knockout mice are engorged with chylomicrons. This is especially significant in the lung where marginated chylomicrons prevent red cell contact with the endothelium, a phenomenon which is presumably the cause of cyanosis and death in these mice. Homozygous knockout mice also have diminished adipose tissue stores as well as decreased intracellular fat droplets. By crossbreeding with transgenic mice expressing human LPL driven by a muscle-specific promoter, mouse lines were generated that express LPL exclusively in muscle but not in any other tissue. This tissue-specific LPL expression rescued the LPL knockout mice and normalized their lipoprotein pattern. This supports the contention that hypertriglyceridemia caused the death of these mice and that LPL expression in a single tissue was sufficient for rescue. Heterozygous LPL knockout mice survive to adulthood and have mild hypertriglyceridemia, with 1.5-2-fold elevated triglyceride levels compared with controls in both the fed and fasted states on chow, Western-type, or 10% sucrose diets. In vivo turnover studies revealed that heterozygous knockout mice had impaired VLDL clearance (fractional catabolic rate) but no increase in transport rate. In summary, total LPL deficiency in the mouse prevents triglyceride removal from plasma, causing death in the neonatal period, and expression of LPL in a single tissue alleviates this problem. Furthermore, half-normal levels of LPL cause a decrease in VLDL fractional catabolic rate and mild

  14. A Good Death

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine defines a good death a “one that is free from avoidable death and suffering for patients, families and caregivers in general accordance with the patients’ and families’ wishes.”. The current system creates barriers to reducing the stress and suffering that accompany a patient’s end of life. Data and eHealth technology, if it were more accessible, could help patients, families, and caregivers to cope with end of life issues. PMID:17478415

  15. SIGIRR, a negative regulator of Toll-like receptor-interleukin 1 receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Wald, David; Qin, Jinzhong; Zhao, Zhendong; Qian, Youcun; Naramura, Mayumi; Tian, Liping; Towne, Jennifer; Sims, John E; Stark, George R; Li, Xiaoxia

    2003-09-01

    The Toll-like receptor-interleukin 1 receptor signaling (TLR-IL-1R) receptor superfamily is important in differentially recognizing pathogen products and eliciting appropriate immune responses. These receptors alter gene expression, mainly through the activation of nuclear factor-kappaB and activating protein 1. SIGIRR (single immunoglobulin IL-1R-related molecule), a member of this family that does not activate these factors, instead negatively modulates immune responses. Inflammation is enhanced in SIGIRR-deficient mice, as shown by their enhanced chemokine induction after IL-1 injection and reduced threshold for lethal endotoxin challenge. Cells from SIGIRR-deficient mice showed enhanced activation in response to either IL-1 or certain Toll ligands. Finally, biochemical analysis indicated that SIGIRR binds to the TLR-IL-1R signaling components in a ligand-dependent way. Our data show that SIGIRR functions as a biologically important modulator of TLR-IL-1R signaling.

  16. [Smoking-attributable deaths in Spain, 2006].

    PubMed

    Banegas, José R; Díez-Gañán, Lucía; Bañuelos-Marco, Beatriz; González-Enríquez, Jesús; Villar-Álvarez, Fernando; Martín-Moreno, José M; Córdoba-García, Rodrigo; Pérez-Trullén, Alfonso; Jiménez-Ruiz, Carlos

    2011-02-12

    This study estimates smoking-attributable mortality in Spain in 2006. Source data included 1) smoking prevalence in Spain; 2) deaths occurred in Spain; and 3) relative risks of mortality by tobacco-caused diseases drawn from the Cancer Prevention Study II. All data corresponded to individuals aged 35 years and older. In 2006, 53,155 smoking-attributable deaths were estimated (14.7% of all deaths occurred in individuals≥35 years; 25.1% in men and 3.4% in women). Almost 90% (47,174) of these attributable deaths corresponded to men, and 11.3% (5,981) to women. The most frequent attributable deaths were: cancer (24,058), specially lung cancer (16,482), cardiovascular disease (17,560), specially ischemic heart disease (6,263) and stroke (4,283), and respiratory disease (11,537), specially chronic obstructive lung disease (9,886). Since 2001, a decrease in smoking-attributable mortality was observed in men and an increase in women. About one out of 7 deaths occurring annually in individuals≥35 years in Spain is attributable to smoking (one in 4 in men and one in 29 in women). Despite a decreasing trend in the number of smoking-attributable deaths over time (except in women, where they increase), the toll of estimated attributable deaths is still very high. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Espana.

  17. Concentrations of ultrafine particles at a highway toll collection booth and exposure implications for toll collectors.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Hsiang; Huang, Cheng-Hsiung; Huang, Hsiao-Lin; Tsai, Chuen-Jinn

    2010-12-15

    Research regarding the magnitude of ultrafine particle levels at highway toll stations is limited. This study measured ambient concentrations of ultrafine particles at a highway toll station from October 30 to November 1 and November 5 to November 6, 2008. A scanning mobility particle sizer was used to measure ultrafine particle concentrations at a ticket/cash tollbooth. Levels of hourly average ultrafine particles at the tollbooth were about 3-6 times higher than those in urban backgrounds, indicating that a considerable amount of ultrafine particles are exhausted from passing vehicles. A bi-modal size distribution pattern with a dominant mode at about <6 nm and a minor mode at about 40 nm was observed at the tollbooth. The high amounts of nanoparticles in this study can be attributed to gas-to-particle reactions in fresh fumes emitted directly from vehicles. The influences of traffic volume, wind speed, and relative humidity on ultrafine particle concentrations were also determined. High ambient concentrations of ultrafine particles existed under low wind speed, low relative humidity, and high traffic volume. Although different factors account for high ambient concentrations of ultrafine particles at the tollbooth, measurements indicate that toll collectors who work close to traffic emission sources have a high exposure risk. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Toll-Like Receptors in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Falck-Hansen, Mika; Kassiteridi, Christina; Monaco, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the leading cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD), is driven by inflammation. Increasing evidence suggests that toll-like receptors (TLRs) are key orchestrators of the atherosclerotic disease process. Interestingly, a distinct picture is being revealed for individual receptors in atherosclerosis. TLRs exhibit a complex nature enabling the detection of multiple motifs named danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Activation of these receptors triggers an intracellular signalling cascade mediated through MyD88 or TRIF, leading to the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. In this review we explore key novel findings pertaining to TLR signalling in atherosclerosis, including recently described endosomal TLRs and future directions in TLR research. PMID:23880853

  19. Toll-like receptor signaling in transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Alegre, Maria-Luisa; Goldstein, Daniel R.; Chong, Anita S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose of the review This review summarizes recent advances on the role of endogenous and exogenous Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands in the activation and inhibition of immune responses in transplantation. Recent findings During an alloresponse, TLRs can be engaged by both damage-induced endogenous ligands or microbial-associated molecular patterns. The damage-induced molecule high mobility group box 1 protein (HGMB1) and its binding to TLR4 have been identified as major initiators of anti-tumor and anti-transplant immune responses. Type I interferon (IFN) signaling plays an important role in the pro-rejection effect mediated by TLR agonists and some bacteria. However, similar pathways in neonates can result in inhibition rather than activation of alloimmune responses. Summary The consequences of TLR engagement by endogenous and exogenous ligands in transplantation may depend on the relative induction of inflammatory and regulatory pathways and the stage of development of the immune system. PMID:18685330

  20. Toll-like receptors and liver disease.

    PubMed

    Kesar, Vivek; Odin, Joseph A

    2014-02-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pattern recognition receptors that play an important role in host defence by recognizing pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMP). Recent studies indicate that TLR signalling plays an important role in progression of chronic liver diseases. Ongoing clinical trials suggest that therapeutic manipulation of TLR pathways may offer novel means of reversing chronic liver diseases. Upon activation by their respective ligands, TLRs initiate an intracellular pro-inflammatory/anti-inflammatory signalling cascade via recruitment of various adaptor proteins. TLR associated signalling pathways are tightly regulated to keep a check on inappropriate production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and interferons thereby preventing various autoimmune and inflammatory processes. Herein, we review the current state of knowledge of hepatic distribution, signalling pathways and therapeutic modulation of TLRs in chronic liver diseases. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Toll-like receptors and airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Gon, Yasuhiro

    2008-03-01

    The respiratory tract opens to the external environment at the oral side edge, and the other edge of the respiratory tract connects to the closed space (alveoli), and so to preserve the sterility in the terminal respiratory tract is critical for protection against pathogens. The recognition machinery for the invasion of microbes is indispensable for the preservation of the sterility in the lungs. Our general understanding of how microbes are recognized by the innate immune system has increased considerably over the past several years, and the contribution of Toll-Like Receptors (TLRs) to innate immunity is now well documented. In the meantime, it has come to understand that many inflammatory processes may depend on TLR signaling, it has been considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of airway inflammatory diseases such as airway infections, bronchial asthma, and occupational airway diseases. In this review, we focus on physiological roles of TLRs in defense mechanisms of the airways, and pathophysiological roles on airway diseases.

  2. Mycobacterial signaling through toll-like receptors

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Joyoti; Shin, Dong-Min; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2012-01-01

    Studies over the past decade have helped to decipher molecular networks dependent on Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, in mycobacteria-infected macrophages. Stimulation of TLRs by mycobacteria and their antigenic components rapidly induces intracellular signaling cascades involved in the activation of nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, which play important roles in orchestrating proinflammatory responses and innate defense through generation of a variety of antimicrobial effector molecules. Recent studies have provided evidence that mycobacterial TLR-signaling cross talks with other intracellular antimicrobial innate pathways, the autophagy process and functional vitamin D receptor (VDR) signaling. In this article we describe recent advances in the recognition, responses, and regulation of mycobacterial signaling through TLRs. PMID:23189273

  3. Toll gates: An emerging therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Maheaswari, Rajendran; Sivasankar, Kiruthika; Subbarayan, Sathya

    2014-01-01

    Innate immune system forms the first line of defense against microbial infections, as it exerts an immediate response. Innate immunity works through Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which functions as primary sensors of pathogens. TLR activates multiple signaling cascades leading to the induction of genes responsible for the release of inflammatory cytokines and type I interferon. Thus, they induce antimicrobial responses and also have an instructive role in adaptive immunity. However, TLR-mediated inflammation is said to be responsible for many of the destructive host responses in inflammatory diseases like periodontitis. Hence, therapeutics targeting TLRs are being used to treat disease such as HIV, Hepatitis B, asthma etc. Recently, synthetic TLR agonists are tried as novel vaccine adjuvant in treating periodontal diseases. This paper reviews the scope of TLR-based therapeutics in treating periodontitis. PMID:25624622

  4. Inherent low Erk and p38 activity reduce Fas Ligand expression and degranulation in T helper 17 cells leading to activation induced cell death resistance

    PubMed Central

    Peroumal, Doureradjou; Abimannan, Thiruvaimozhi; Tagirasa, Ravichandra; Parida, Jyothi Ranjan; Singh, Santosh Kumar; Padhan, Prasantha; Devadas, Satish

    2016-01-01

    Activation Induced Cell Death of T helper cells is central to maintaining immune homeostasis and a perturbation often manifests in aberrant T helper cells that is associated with immunopathologies. Significant presence of T cells positive for IL-17A (Th17) and dual positive for IFN-γ/IL-17A (Th1/Th17) in both effector (CD45RA+RO+) and memory (CD45RA−RO+) compartments with differential FasL protein in RA peripheral blood suggested their differential TCR AICD sensitivity. Lowered active caspase-3 in Th17 and Th1/Th17 over Th1 cells confirmed their capability to resist AICD and pointed to early upstream events. Differential MAPK activities, FasL protein and downstream caspase-3 activities in murine Th1 and Th17 cells established distinct TCR mediated signaling pathways and suggested low Erk and p38 activity as pivotal for AICD sensitivity. We extrapolated our mouse and human data and report that Fas-FasL is the preferred death pathway for both Th1 and Th17 and that inherently low Erk2 activity protected Th17 cells from TCR AICD. The presence of significantly higher numbers of aberrant T helper cells in RA also suggest an inflammatory cytokine milieu and AICD insensitive T cell link to sustained inflammation. Re sensitization to apoptosis by targeting MAPK activity especially Erk2 in RA might be of therapeutic value. PMID:27486885

  5. A flavivirus protein M-derived peptide directly permeabilizes mitochondrial membranes, triggers cell death and reduces human tumor growth in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Brabant, Magali; Baux, Ludwig; Casimir, Richard; Briand, Jean Paul; Chaloin, Olivier; Porceddu, Mathieu; Buron, Nelly; Chauvier, David; Lassalle, Myriam; Lecoeur, Hervé; Langonné, Alain; Dupont, Sylvie; Déas, Olivier; Brenner, Catherine; Rebouillat, Dominique; Muller, Sylviane; Borgne-Sanchez, Annie; Jacotot, Etienne

    2009-10-01

    Dengue viruses belong to the Flavivirus family and are responsible for hemorrhagic fever in Human. Dengue virus infection triggers apoptosis especially through the expression of the small membrane (M) protein. Using isolated mitochondria, we found that synthetic peptides containing the C-terminus part of the M ectodomain caused apoptosis-related mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (MMP) events. These events include matrix swelling and the dissipation of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)). Protein M Flavivirus sequence alignments and helical wheel projections reveal a conserved distribution of charged residues. Moreover, when combined to the cell penetrating HIV-1 Tat peptide transduction domain (Tat-PTD), this sequence triggers a caspase-dependent cell death associated with DeltaPsi(m) loss and cytochrome c release. Mutational approaches coupled to functional screening on isolated mitochondria resulted in the selection of a protein M derived sequence containing nine residues with potent MMP-inducing properties on isolated mitochondria. A chimeric peptide composed of a Tat-PTD linked to the 9-mer entity triggers MMP and cell death. Finally, local administration of this chimeric peptide induces growth inhibition of xenograft prostate PC3 tumors in immuno-compromised mice, and significantly enhances animal survival. Together, these findings support the notion of using viral genomes as valuable sources to discover mitochondria-targeted sequences that may lead to the development of new anticancer compounds.

  6. T-cell death following immune activation is mediated by mitochondria-localized SARM.

    PubMed

    Panneerselvam, P; Singh, L P; Selvarajan, V; Chng, W J; Ng, S B; Tan, N S; Ho, B; Chen, J; Ding, J L

    2013-03-01

    Following acute-phase infection, activated T cells are terminated to achieve immune homeostasis, failure of which results in lymphoproliferative and autoimmune diseases. We report that sterile α- and heat armadillo-motif-containing protein (SARM), the most conserved Toll-like receptors adaptor, is proapoptotic during T-cell immune response. SARM expression is significantly reduced in natural killer (NK)/T lymphoma patients compared with healthy individuals, suggesting that decreased SARM supports NK/T-cell proliferation. T cells knocked down of SARM survived and proliferated more significantly compared with wild-type T cells following influenza infection in vivo. During activation of cytotoxic T cells, the SARM level fell before rising, correlating inversely with cell proliferation and subsequent T-cell clearance. SARM knockdown rescued T cells from both activation- and neglect-induced cell deaths. The mitochondria-localized SARM triggers intrinsic apoptosis by generating reactive oxygen species and depolarizing the mitochondrial potential. The proapoptotic function is attributable to the C-terminal sterile alpha motif and Toll/interleukin-1 receptor domains. Mechanistically, SARM mediates intrinsic apoptosis via B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) family members. SARM suppresses B cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xL) and downregulates extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation, which are cell survival effectors. Overexpression of Bcl-xL and double knockout of Bcl-2 associated X protein and Bcl-2 homologous antagonist killer substantially reduced SARM-induced apoptosis. Collectively, we have shown how T-cell death following infection is mediated by SARM-induced intrinsic apoptosis, which is crucial for T-cell homeostasis.

  7. A novel Toll like receptor with two TIR domains (HcToll-2) is involved in regulation of antimicrobial peptide gene expression of Hyriopsis cumingii.

    PubMed

    Ren, Qian; Lan, Jiang-Feng; Zhong, Xue; Song, Xiao-Jun; Ma, Fei; Hui, Kai-Min; Wang, Wen; Yu, Xiao-Qiang; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2014-07-01

    Animal Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are involved in innate immunity. Toll proteins are generally transmembrane proteins. In this study, an atypical Toll-like receptor (HcToll-2) was identified from the triangle-shell pearl mussel Hyriopsis cumingii, which belongs to phylum Mollusca. Unlike the typical Toll like receptors with extracellular leucine-rich repeats (LRRs), transmembrane, and intracellular Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domains, HcToll-2 has two homologous TIR domains located at the C-terminal (designated as HcTIR1 and HcTIR2) and lacks a transmembrane domain. Phylogenetic analysis showed that HcTIR1 was clustered with TIR of sea anemone Toll, and HcTIR2 was clustered with TIR of Drosophila Toll. HcToll-2 mRNA could be detected in the hepatopancreas and was upregulated after challenge with Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Recombinant HcLRR protein with GST tag could bind to bacteria and also to LPS and PGN. Over-expression of both HcTIR1 and HcTIR2 induced drosomycin genes in Drosophila S2 cells. RNAi analysis showed that HcToll-2 was required for the expression of theromacin, which is a cysteine-rich antimicrobial peptide (AMP) gene. This research is the first report of an atypical Toll-like receptor HcToll-2 involved in antibacterial immunity through induction of AMP expression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Reducing the risk of sudden infant death syndrome in child care and changing provider practices: lessons learned from a demonstration project.

    PubMed

    Moon, Rachel Y; Calabrese, Trisha; Aird, Laura

    2008-10-01

    The goal was to evaluate, through an American Academy of Pediatrics demonstration project, the effectiveness of a curriculum and train-the-trainer model in changing child care providers' behaviors regarding safe infant sleep practices. Participating licensed child care centers and family child care homes were assigned randomly to intervention and control groups. Observers performed an initial unannounced visit to each site, to watch infants being placed for sleep, to inventory sleep policies, and to administer questionnaires to center staff members. Trainers then used the American Academy of Pediatrics curriculum in educational sessions at intervention sites. Three months later, observers conducted a follow-up observation at each site, and staff members completed a questionnaire about logistic barriers encountered in implementation of safe sleep recommendations. A total of 264 programs and 1212 providers completed the study; the care of 1993 infants was observed. Provider awareness of the American Academy of Pediatrics infant supine sleep position recommendation increased from 59.7% (both groups) to 64.8% (control) and 80.5% (intervention). Exclusive use of the supine position in programs increased from 65.0% to 70.4% (control) and 87.8% (intervention). Observed supine placement increased from 51.0% to 57.1% (control) and 62.1% (intervention). A sudden infant death syndrome risk reduction curriculum using a train-the-trainer model is effective in improving the knowledge and practices of child care providers. Perceived parental objections, provider skepticism about the benefits of supine positioning, and lack of program policies and training opportunities are important barriers to implementation of safe sleep policies. Continued education of parents, expanded training efforts, and statewide regulations, mandates, and monitoring are critical to ongoing efforts to decrease further the risk of sudden infant death syndrome in child care.

  9. Treatment with gemcitabine and TRA-8 anti-death receptor-5 mAb reduces pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell viability in vitro and growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    DeRosier, Leo Christopher; Huang, Zhi-Qiang; Sellers, Jeffrey C; Buchsbaum, Donald J; Vickers, Selwyn M

    2006-11-01

    Gemcitabine is a first line agent for pancreatic cancer, but yields minimal survival benefit. This study evaluated in vitro and in vivo effects of a monoclonal antibody (TRA-8) to human death receptor 5, combined with gemcitabine, using two human pancreatic cancer cell lines, S2VP10 and MIA PaCa-2. A subcutaneous model of pancreatic cancer was employed to test in vivo efficacy. S2VP10 and MIA PaCa-2 cells were treated with varying doses of gemcitabine and TRA-8. Cell viability and apoptosis were determined with an adenosine triphosphate assay and annexin V staining, respectively. Mitochondrial membrane destabilization was evaluated with fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis of JC-1 stained cells. Caspase activation was evaluated by Western blot analysis. MIA PaCa-2 subcutaneous xenografts in athymic nude mice were evaluated for response to treatment with 200 mug of TRA-8 (intraperitoneal on days 9, 13, 16, 20, 23, and 27 postimplant) and 120 mg/kg gemcitabine (I.P. on days 10, 17, and 24). Tumor growth was measured with calipers. MIA PaCa-2 and S2VP10 cells receiving combination treatment with TRA-8 and gemcitabine demonstrated enhanced cytotoxicity, annexin V staining, and mitochondrial destabilization compared to either agent alone. Combination treatment produced enhanced caspase-3 and -8 activation in both cell lines compared with either agent alone. In vivo studies demonstrated mean subcutaneous tumor surface area (produce of two largest diameters) doubling times of 38 days untreated, 32 days gemcitabine, 49 days TRA-8, and 64 days combination treatment. TRA-8 is an apoptosis-inducing agonistic monoclonal antibody that produced synergistic cytotoxicity in combination with gemcitabine in vitro through enhanced caspase activation. These findings, with substantial inhibition of tumor growth in a mouse pancreatic cancer xenograft model receiving combination therapy, are encouraging for anti-death receptor therapy in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  10. Molecular cloning and expression of a Toll receptor in the giant tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon.

    PubMed

    Arts, Joop A J; Cornelissen, Ferry H J; Cijsouw, Tony; Hermsen, Trudi; Savelkoul, Huub F J; Stet, René J M

    2007-09-01

    Invertebrates rely completely for their protection against pathogens on the innate immune system. This non-self-recognition is activated by microbial cell wall components with unique conserved molecular patterns. Pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) are recognised by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). Toll and its mammalian homologs Toll-like receptors are cell-surface receptors acting as PRRs and involved in the signalling pathway implicated in their immune response. Here we describe a novel partial Toll receptor gene cloned from a gill library of the giant tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon, using primers based on the highly conserved Toll/IL-1R (TIR) domain. The deduced amino acid sequence of the P. monodon Toll (PmToll) shows 59% similarity to a Toll-related protein of Apis mellifera. Analysis of the LRRs of shrimp Toll contained no obvious PAMP-binding insertions. Phylogenetic analysis with the insect Toll family shows clustering with Toll1 and Toll5 gene products, and it is less related to Toll3 and Toll4. Furthermore, RT-qPCR shows that PmToll is constitutively expressed in gut, gill and hepatopancreas. Challenge with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) shows equal levels of expression in these organs. A role in the defence mechanism is discussed. In conclusion, shrimp possess at least one Toll receptor that might be involved in immune defence.

  11. TSCA Chemical Data Reporting Fact Sheet: Toll Manufacturing

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This fact sheet provides information on existing Chemical Data Reporting (CDR) regulations to persons who are involved in toll manufacturing of chemical substances which may be subject to the CDR rule.

  12. Delivering Career Information on a Toll-Free Hotline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snipes, Juanita K.; McDaniels, Carl

    1982-01-01

    Reviews some of the uses of the phone in crisis situations and describes a popular toll-free career information hotline in Virginia. Provides a profile of the mostly adult users along with a user evaluation of the service. (Author)

  13. 26 CFR 49.4252-2 - Toll telephone service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... subscriber for toll telephone service furnished to the hotel or its guests, but no tax attaches to any charge made by the hotel for service rendered in placing the calls for its guests. (c) Cross reference....

  14. 26 CFR 49.4252-2 - Toll telephone service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... subscriber for toll telephone service furnished to the hotel or its guests, but no tax attaches to any charge made by the hotel for service rendered in placing the calls for its guests. (c) Cross reference....

  15. 26 CFR 49.4252-2 - Toll telephone service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... subscriber for toll telephone service furnished to the hotel or its guests, but no tax attaches to any charge made by the hotel for service rendered in placing the calls for its guests. (c) Cross reference....

  16. 26 CFR 49.4252-2 - Toll telephone service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... subscriber for toll telephone service furnished to the hotel or its guests, but no tax attaches to any charge made by the hotel for service rendered in placing the calls for its guests. (c) Cross reference....

  17. A role for the adaptor proteins TRAM and TRIF in toll-like receptor 2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Nadra J; Vladimer, Gregory I; Stenvik, Jørgen; Orning, M Pontus A; Zeid-Kilani, Maria V; Bugge, Marit; Bergstroem, Bjarte; Conlon, Joseph; Husebye, Harald; Hise, Amy G; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Espevik, Terje; Lien, Egil

    2015-02-06

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are involved in sensing invading microbes by host innate immunity. TLR2 recognizes bacterial lipoproteins/lipopeptides, and lipopolysaccharide activates TLR4. TLR2 and TLR4 signal via the Toll/interleukin-1 receptor adaptors MyD88 and MAL, leading to NF-κB activation. TLR4 also utilizes the adaptors TRAM and TRIF, resulting in activation of interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3. Here, we report a new role for TRAM and TRIF in TLR2 regulation and signaling. Interestingly, we observed that TLR2-mediated induction of the chemokine Ccl5 was impaired in TRAM or TRIF deficient macrophages. Inhibition of endocytosis reduced Ccl5 release, and the data also suggested that TRAM and TLR2 co-localize in early endosomes, supporting the hypothesis that signaling may occur from an intracellular compartment. Ccl5 release following lipoprotein challenge additionally involved the kinase Tbk-1 and Irf3, as well as MyD88 and Irf1. Induction of Interferon-β and Ccl4 by lipoproteins was also partially impaired in cells lacking TRIF cells. Our results show a novel function of TRAM and TRIF in TLR2-mediated signal transduction, and the findings broaden our understanding of how Toll/interleukin-1 receptor adaptor proteins may participate in signaling downstream from TLR2.

  18. Death foretold.

    PubMed

    Biderman, A; Herman, J

    2000-01-01

    We briefly trace the history of a belief in the possibility that a person in apparent good health may accurately predict his or her own demise. The phenomenon is referred to as death foretold and we present presumed examples of it from the Bible, world literature, medical writings and newspaper reports without pretending to completeness. In two widely quoted scientific papers, death foretold is subsumed under the wider heading of decease due to psychic stress. We speculate on a possible link between the two, taking into consideration the fact that most people who prophesy their end are of an advanced age.

  19. Sleep deprivation and divergent toll-like receptor-4 activation of cellular inflammation in aging.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Judith E; Carrillo, Carmen; Olmstead, Richard; Witarama, Tuff; Breen, Elizabeth C; Yokomizo, Megumi; Seeman, Teresa; Irwin, Michael R

    2015-02-01

    Sleep disturbance and aging are associated with increases in inflammation, as well as increased risk of infectious disease. However, there is limited understanding of the role of sleep loss on age-related differences in immune responses. This study examines the effects of sleep deprivation on toll-like receptor activation of monocytic inflammation in younger compared to older adults. Community-dwelling adults (n = 70) who were categorized as younger (25-39 y old, n = 21) and older (60-84 y old, n = 49) participants, underwent a sleep laboratory-based experimental partial sleep deprivation (PSD) protocol including adaptation, an uninterrupted night of sleep, sleep deprivation (sleep restricted to 03:00-07:00), and recovery. Blood samples were obtained each morning to measure toll-like receptor-4 activation of monocyte intracellular production of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Partial sleep deprivation induced a significant increase in the production of IL-6 and/or TNF-α that persisted after a night of recovery sleep (F(2,121.2) = 3.8, P < 0.05). Age moderated the effects of sleep loss, such that younger adults had an increase in inflammatory cytokine production that was not present in older adults (F(2,121.2) = 4.0, P < 0.05). Older adults exhibit reduced toll-like receptor 4 stimulated cellular inflammation that, unlike in younger adults, is not activated after a night of partial sleep loss. Whereas sleep loss increases cellular inflammation in younger adults and may contribute to inflammatory disorders, blunted toll-like receptor activation in older adults may increase the risk of infectious disease seen with aging. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  20. 33 CFR 402.10 - Schedule of tolls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Column 2 Column 3 1. Subject to item 3, for complete transit of the Seaway, a composite toll, comprising... manifest or other document, as follows: (a) bulk cargo 1.0012 0.6834. (b) general cargo 2.4124 1.0936. (c... of the U.S. portion of tolls for commercial vessels is waived by law (33 U.S.C. 998a(a)). 3...

  1. Impaired toll like receptor-7 and 9 induced immune activation in chronic spinal cord injured patients contributes to immune dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Gungor, Bilgi; Kahraman, Tamer; Gursel, Mayda; Yilmaz, Bilge

    2017-01-01

    Reduced immune activation or immunosuppression is seen in patients withneurological diseases. Urinary and respiratory infections mainly manifested as septicemia and pneumonia are the most frequent complications following spinal cord injuries and they account for the majority of deaths. The underlying reason of these losses is believed to arise due to impaired immune responses to pathogens. Here, we hypothesized that susceptibility to infections of chronic spinal cord injured (SCI) patients might be due to impairment in recognition of pathogen associated molecular patterns and subsequently declining innate and adaptive immune responses that lead to immune dysfunction. We tested our hypothesis on healthy and chronic SCI patients with a level of injury above T-6. Donor PBMCs were isolated and stimulated with different toll like receptor ligands and T-cell inducers aiming to investigate whether chronic SCI patients display differential immune activation to multiple innate and adaptive immune cell stimulants. We demonstrate that SCI patients' B-cell and plasmacytoid dendritic cells retain their functionality in response to TLR7 and TLR9 ligand stimulation as they secreted similar levels of IL6 and IFNα. The immune dysfunction is not probably due to impaired T-cell function, since neither CD4+ T-cell dependent IFNγ producing cell number nor IL10 producing regulatory T-cells resulted different outcomes in response to PMA-Ionomycin and PHA-LPS stimulation, respectively. We showed that TLR7 dependent IFNγ and IP10 levels and TLR9 mediated APC function reduced substantially in SCI patients compared to healthy subjects. More importantly, IP10 producing monocytes were significantly fewer compared to healthy subjects in response to TLR7 and TLR9 stimulation of SCI PBMCs. When taken together this work implicated that these defects could contribute to persistent complications due to increased susceptibility to infections of chronic SCI patients. PMID:28170444

  2. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate alleviates paraquat-induced acute lung injury and inhibits upregulation of toll-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Shen, Haitao; Wu, Na; Liu, Zhenning; Zhao, Hongyu; Zhao, Min

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the detoxifying effect of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on paraquat (PQ)-induced acute lung injury in mice, and to explore the action mechanisms. Following administration of PQ, the mice received a low, a medium or a high dose of EGCG daily for three days. Histopathology of the lungs were examined by H&E staining. The levels of inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6, in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Activation of NF-κB was assessed by Western blot and electrophoretic mobility gel shift assay. The expression of toll-like receptor (TLR)-2, 4, 9 and TLR adaptors (MyD88 and TRAF6) was detected by Western blot and immunohistochemical staining. The protective effect of EGCG against PQ toxicity was validated in vitro using A549 lung cancer cell line. Treatment with EGCG dose-dependently attenuated PQ-induced acute lung injury in mice by reducing alveolar edema, hemorrhage, inflammatory cell infiltration and production of inflammatory cytokines. EGCG inhibited the activation of NF-κB and the upregulation of TLR 2, 4 and 9 as well as their adaptors MyD88 and TRAF6 in the lungs following PQ challenge. In addition, EGCG significantly reduced PQ-induced cell death, cytokine production, activation of NF-κB, and upregulation of TLRs and adaptors in A549 cells. Our data suggest that TLR-mediated activation of NF-κB in the non-immune pulmonary cells could be involved in PQ-induced acute lung injury, and it may serve as a target of EGCG against PQ pulmonary toxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Tobacco control and the reduction in smoking-related premature deaths in the United States, 1964-2012.

    PubMed

    Holford, Theodore R; Meza, Rafael; Warner, Kenneth E; Meernik, Clare; Jeon, Jihyoun; Moolgavkar, Suresh H; Levy, David T

    2014-01-08

    January 2014 marks the 50th anniversary of the first surgeon general's report on smoking and health. This seminal document inspired efforts by governments, nongovernmental organizations, and the private sector to reduce the toll of cigarette smoking through reduced initiation and increased cessation. To model reductions in smoking-related mortality associated with implementation of tobacco control since 1964. Smoking histories for individual birth cohorts that actually occurred and under likely scenarios had tobacco control never emerged were estimated. National mortality rates and mortality rate ratio estimates from analytical studies of the effect of smoking on mortality yielded death rates by smoking status. Actual smoking-related mortality from 1964 through 2012 was compared with estimated mortality under no tobacco control that included a likely scenario (primary counterfactual) and upper and lower bounds that would capture plausible alternatives. National Health Interview Surveys yielded cigarette smoking histories for the US adult population in 1964-2012. Number of premature deaths avoided and years of life saved were primary outcomes. Change in life expectancy at age 40 years associated with change in cigarette smoking exposure constituted another measure of overall health outcomes. In 1964-2012, an estimated 17.7 million deaths were related to smoking, an estimated 8.0 million (credible range [CR], 7.4-8.3 million, for the lower and upper tobacco control counterfactuals, respectively) fewer premature smoking-related deaths than what would have occurred under the alternatives and thus associated with tobacco control (5.3 million [CR, 4.8-5.5 million] men and 2.7 million [CR, 2.5-2.7 million] women). This resulted in an estimated 157 million years (CR, 139-165 million) of life saved, a mean of 19.6 years for each beneficiary (111 million [CR, 97-117 million] for men, 46 million [CR, 42-48 million] for women). During this time, estimated life expectancy at

  4. The Heart of 25 by 25: Achieving the Goal of Reducing Global and Regional Premature Deaths From Cardiovascular Diseases and Stroke: A Modeling Study From the American Heart Association and World Heart Federation.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Ralph L; Roth, Gregory A; Reddy, K Srinath; Arnett, Donna K; Bonita, Ruth; Gaziano, Thomas A; Heidenreich, Paul A; Huffman, Mark D; Mayosi, Bongani M; Mendis, Shanthi; Murray, Christopher J L; Perel, Pablo; Piñeiro, Daniel J; Smith, Sidney C; Taubert, Kathryn A; Wood, David A; Zhao, Dong; Zoghbi, William A

    2016-06-07

    In 2011, the United Nations set key targets to reach by 2025 to reduce the risk of premature noncommunicable disease death by 25% by 2025. With cardiovascular disease being the largest contributor to global mortality, accounting for nearly half of the 36 million annual noncommunicable disease deaths, achieving the 2025 goal requires that cardiovascular disease and its risk factors be aggressively addressed. The Global Cardiovascular Disease Taskforce, comprising the World Heart Federation, American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology Foundation, European Heart Network, and European Society of Cardiology, with expanded representation from Asia, Africa, and Latin America, along with global cardiovascular disease experts, disseminates information and approaches to reach the United Nations 2025 targets. The writing committee, which reflects Global Cardiovascular Disease Taskforce membership, engaged the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington, to develop region-specific estimates of premature cardiovascular mortality in 2025 based on various scenarios. Results show that >5 million premature CVD deaths among men and 2.8 million among women are projected worldwide by 2025, which can be reduced to 3.5 million and 2.2 million, respectively, if risk factor targets for blood pressure, tobacco use, diabetes mellitus, and obesity are achieved. However, global risk factor targets have various effects, depending on region. For most regions, United Nations targets for reducing systolic blood pressure and tobacco use have more substantial effects on future scenarios compared with maintaining current levels of body mass index and fasting plasma glucose. However, preventing increases in body mass index has the largest effect in some high-income countries. An approach achieving reductions in multiple risk factors has the largest impact for almost all regions. Achieving these goals can be accomplished only if countries set priorities

  5. Inactivation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis mannosyltransferase pimB reduces the cell wall lipoarabinomannan and lipomannan content and increases the rate of bacterial-induced human macrophage cell death

    PubMed Central

    Torrelles, Jordi B; DesJardin, Lucy E; MacNeil, Jessica; Kaufman, Thomas M; Kutzbach, Beth; Knaup, Rose; McCarthy, Travis R; Gurcha, Sudagar S; Besra, Gurdyal S; Clegg, Steven; Schlesinger, Larry S

    2009-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) cell wall contains an important group of structurally related mannosylated lipoglycans called phosphatidyl-myo-inositol mannosides (PIMs), lipomannan (LM), and mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM), where the terminal α-[1→2] mannosyl structures on higher order PIMs and ManLAM have been shown to engage C-type lectins such as the macrophage mannose receptor directing M.tb phagosome maturation arrest. An important gene described in the biosynthesis of these molecules is the mannosyltransferase pimB (Rv0557). Here, we disrupted pimB in a virulent strain of M.tb. We demonstrate that the inactivation of pimB in M.tb does not abolish the production of any of its cell wall mannosylated lipoglycans; however, it results in a quantitative decrease in the ManLAM and LM content without affecting higher order PIMs. This finding indicates gene redundancy or the possibility of an alternative biosynthetic pathway that may compensate for the PimB deficiency. Furthermore, infection of human macrophages by the pimB mutant leads to an alteration in macrophage phenotype concomitant with a significant increase in the rate of macrophage death. PMID:19318518

  6. Death of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 in real mayonnaise and reduced-calorie mayonnaise dressing as influenced by initial population and storage temperature.

    PubMed Central

    Hathcox, A K; Beuchat, L R; Doyle, M P

    1995-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the survivability of low-density populations (10(0) and 10(2) CFU/g) of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 inoculated into real mayonnaise and reduced-calorie mayonnaise dressing and stored at 20 and 30 degrees C, temperatures within the range used for normal commercial mayonnaise distribution and storage. Inactivation patterns at 5 degrees C and inactivation of high-inoculum populations (10(6) CFU/g) were also determined. The pathogen did not grow in either mayonnaise formulation, regardless of the inoculum level or storage temperature. Increases in storage temperature from 5 to 20 degrees C and from 20 to 30 degrees C resulted in dramatic increases in the rate of inactivation. Populations of E. coli O157:H7 in the reduced-calorie and real formulations inoculated with a population of 0.23 to 0.29 log10 CFU/g and held at 30 degrees C were reduced to undetectable levels within 1 and 2 days, respectively; viable cells were not detected after 1 day at 20 degrees C. In mayonnaise containing an initial population of 2.23 log10 CFU/g, viable cells were not detected after 4 days at 30 degrees C or 7 days at 20 degrees C; tolerance was greater in real mayonnaise than in reduced-calorie mayonnaise dressing stored at 5 degrees C. The tolerance of E. coli O157:H7 inoculated at the highest population density (6.23 log 10 CFU/g) was less in reduced-calorie mayonnaise dressing than in real mayonnaise at all storage temperatures. In reduced-calorie mayonnaise dressing and real mayonnaise initially containing 2.23 log10 CFU/g, levels were undetectable after 28 and 58 days at 5 degrees C, respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8534084

  7. Death of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 in real mayonnaise and reduced-calorie mayonnaise dressing as influenced by initial population and storage temperature.

    PubMed

    Hathcox, A K; Beuchat, L R; Doyle, M P

    1995-12-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the survivability of low-density populations (10(0) and 10(2) CFU/g) of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 inoculated into real mayonnaise and reduced-calorie mayonnaise dressing and stored at 20 and 30 degrees C, temperatures within the range used for normal commercial mayonnaise distribution and storage. Inactivation patterns at 5 degrees C and inactivation of high-inoculum populations (10(6) CFU/g) were also determined. The pathogen did not grow in either mayonnaise formulation, regardless of the inoculum level or storage temperature. Increases in storage temperature from 5 to 20 degrees C and from 20 to 30 degrees C resulted in dramatic increases in the rate of inactivation. Populations of E. coli O157:H7 in the reduced-calorie and real formulations inoculated with a population of 0.23 to 0.29 log10 CFU/g and held at 30 degrees C were reduced to undetectable levels within 1 and 2 days, respectively; viable cells were not detected after 1 day at 20 degrees C. In mayonnaise containing an initial population of 2.23 log10 CFU/g, viable cells were not detected after 4 days at 30 degrees C or 7 days at 20 degrees C; tolerance was greater in real mayonnaise than in reduced-calorie mayonnaise dressing stored at 5 degrees C. The tolerance of E. coli O157:H7 inoculated at the highest population density (6.23 log 10 CFU/g) was less in reduced-calorie mayonnaise dressing than in real mayonnaise at all storage temperatures. In reduced-calorie mayonnaise dressing and real mayonnaise initially containing 2.23 log10 CFU/g, levels were undetectable after 28 and 58 days at 5 degrees C, respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Artesunate ameliorates severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) in rats by inhibiting expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and Toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Cen, Yanyan; Liu, Chao; Li, Xiaoli; Yan, Zifei; Kuang, Mei; Su, Yujie; Pan, Xichun; Qin, Rongxin; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Jiang; Zhou, Hong

    2016-09-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is a severe clinical condition with significant morbidity and mortality. Multiple organs dysfunction (MOD) is the leading cause of SAP-related death. The over-release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α is the underlying mechanism of MOD; however, there is no effective agent against the inflammation. Herein, artesunate (AS) was found to increase the survival of SAP rats significantly when injected with 3.5% sodium taurocholate into the biliopancreatic duct in a retrograde direction, improving their pancreatic pathology and decreasing serum amylase and pancreatic lipase activities along with substantially reduced pancreatic IL-1β and IL-6 release. In vitro, AS-pretreatment strongly inhibited IL-1β and IL-6 release and their mRNA expressions in the pancreatic acinar cells treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but exerted little effect on TNF-α release. Additionally, AS reduced the mRNA expressions of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 as well as their protein expressions in the pancreatic acinar cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that AS could significantly protect SAP rats, and this protection was related to the reduction of digestive enzyme activities and pro-inflammatory cytokine expressions via inhibition of TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway. Therefore, AS may be considered as a potential therapeutic agent against SAP.

  9. Toll-like receptors as targets for allergen immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Aryan, Zahra; Rezaei, Nima

    2015-12-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are novel and promising targets for allergen immunotherapy. Bench studies suggest that TLR agonists reduce Th2 responses and ameliorate airway hyper-responsiveness. In addition, clinical trials are at initial phases to evaluate the safety and efficacy of TLR agonists for the allergen immunotherapy of patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma. (Figure is included in full-text article.) To date, two allergy vaccine-containing TLR agonists have been investigated in clinical trials; Pollinex Quattro and AIC. The former contains monophosphoryl lipid, a TLR4 agonist and the latter contains, CpG motifs activating the TLR9 cascade. Preseasonal subcutaneous injection of both of these allergy vaccines has been safe and efficacious in control of nasal symptoms of patients with allergic rhinitis. CRX-675 (a TLR4 agonist), AZD8848 (a TLR7 agonist), VTX-1463 (a TLR8 agonist) and 1018 ISS and QbG10 (TLR9 agonists) are currently in clinical development for allergic rhinitis and asthma. TLR agonists herald promising results for allergen immunotherapy of patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma. Future research should be directed at utilizing these agents for immunotherapy of food allergy (for instance, peanut allergy) as well.

  10. Toll receptor response to white spot syndrome virus challenge in giant freshwater prawns (Macrobrachium rosenbergii).

    PubMed

    Feng, Jinling; Zhao, Lingling; Jin, Min; Li, Tingting; Wu, Lei; Chen, Yihong; Ren, Qian

    2016-10-01

    Toll receptors are evolutionary ancient families of pattern recognition receptors with crucial roles in invertebrate innate immune response. In this study, we identified a Toll receptor (MrToll) from giant freshwater prawns (Macrobrachium rosenbergii). The full-length cDNA of MrToll is 4257 bp, which encodes a putative protein of 1367 amino acids. MrToll contains 17 LRR domains, a transmembrane domain, and a TIR domain. Phylogenetic analysis showed that MrToll was grouped with Drosophila Toll7 and other arthropod Tolls. The transcripts of MrToll are mainly distributed in the heart, hepatopancreas, gills, stomach, and intestine. A low level of MrToll expression can be detected in hemocytes and the lymphoid organ. MrToll expression in gills was gradually upregulated to the highest level from 24 h to 48 h during the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge. The expression levels of the crustin (Cru) genes Cru3 and Cru7 in gills were relatively lower than those of Cru2 and Cru4. The expression levels of Cru3 and Cru7 were inhibited after the RNA interference of MrToll in gills during the WSSV challenge. The anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF) genes ALF2, ALF3, ALF4, and ALF5 were also regulated by MrToll in gills during the virus challenge. These findings suggest that MrToll may contribute to the innate immune defense of M. rosenbergii against WSSV.

  11. Galileo or for whom the bell tolls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legat, K.; Hofmann-Wellenhof, B.

    2000-10-01

    Satellite-based navigation rapidly evolved into an efficient tool extensively used in a wide variety of civilian applications covering numerous modes of transportation, communication, administration, geodesy, agriculture, and many others. The current systems globally available are the US Global Positioning System (GPS) and the conceptually very similar Russian Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS). Considering the worldwide applications, GPS clearly predominates over GLONASS. However, GPS and GLONASS are mainly under military control of single nations and, also critical, do not fulfill certain performance requirements of the civil users, especially in terms of safety-critical applications. Thus, augmentations to the current systems and even completely new systems are under investigation. These are usually summarized under the abbreviation Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs). The various types of GNSS are described where emphasis is put on the future US and European contributions to the second-generation GNSS, i.e., the modernized GPS and the definition of the new European Galileo system. These two systems may be characterized as "compatible competitors"—thus, one might ask for whom the bell tolls.

  12. Toll-like receptors and cutaneous melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Coati, Ilaria; Miotto, Serena; Zanetti, Irene; Alaibac, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Innate immune cells recognize highly conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) via pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). Previous studies have demonstrated that PRRs also recognize endogenous molecules, termed damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) that are derived from damaged cells. PRRs include Toll-like receptors (TLRs), scavenger receptors, C-type lectin receptors and nucleotide oligomerization domain-like receptors. To date, 10 TLRs have been identified in humans and each receptor responds to a different ligand. The recognition of PAMPS or DAMPs by TLRs leads to the activation of signaling pathways and cellular responses with subsequent pro-inflammatory cytokine release, phagocytosis and antigen presentation. In the human skin, TLRs are expressed by keratinocytes and melanocytes: The main cells from which skin cancers arise. TLRs 1–6 and 9 are expressed in keratinocytes, while TLRs 2–5, 7, 9 and 10 have been identified in melanocytes. It is hypothesized that TLRs may present a target for melanoma therapies. In this review, the involvement of TLRs in the pathogenesis and treatment of melanoma was discussed. PMID:27900049

  13. Toll-Like Receptors of Deuterostome Invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Satake, Honoo; Sekiguchi, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    Defensive systems against pathogens are responsible not only for survival or lifetime of an individual but also for the evolution of a species. Innate immunity is expected to be more important for invertebrates than mammals, given that adaptive immunity has not been acquired in the former. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been shown to play a crucial role in host defense of pathogenic microbes in innate immunity of mammals. Recent genome-wide analyses have suggested that TLR or their related genes are conserved in invertebrates. In particular, numerous TLR-related gene candidates were detected in deuterostome invertebrates, including a sea urchin (222 TLR-related gene candidates) and amphioxus (72 TLR-related gene candidates). Molecular phylogenetic analysis verified that most of sea urchin or amphioxus TLR candidates are paralogous, suggesting that these organisms expanded TLR-related genes in a species-specific manner. In contrast, another deuterostome invertebrate, the ascidian Ciona intestinalis, was found to possess only two TLR genes. Moreover, Ciona TLRs, Ci-TLR1 and Ci-TLR2, were shown to possess “hybrid” functionality of mammalian TLRs. Such functionality of Ci-TLRs could not be predicted by sequence comparison with vertebrate TLRs, indicating confounding evolutionary lineages of deuterostome invertebrate TLRs or their candidates. In this review article, we present recent advances in studies of TLRs or their candidates among deuterostome invertebrates, and provide insight into an evolutionary process of TLRs. PMID:22566918

  14. Adaptive responses induced by 24S-hydroxycholesterol through liver X receptor pathway reduce 7-ketocholesterol-caused neuronal cell death.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Akishi; Urano, Yasuomi; Itoh, Sayoko; Suda, Naoto; Kotani, Rina; Nishimura, Yuki; Saito, Yoshiro; Noguchi, Noriko

    2013-01-01

    Lipid peroxidation products have been known to induce cellular adaptive responses and enhance tolerance against subsequent oxidative stress through up-regulation of antioxidant compounds and enzymes. 24S-hydroxycholesterol (24SOHC) which is endogenously produced oxysterol in the brain plays an important role in maintaining brain cholesterol homeostasis. In this study, we evaluated adaptive responses induced by brain-specific oxysterol 24SOHC in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Cells treated with 24SOHC at sub-lethal concentrations showed significant reduction in cell death induced by subsequent treatment with 7-ketocholesterol (7KC) in both undifferentiated and retinoic acid-differentiated SH-SY5Y cells. These adaptive responses were also induced by other oxysterols such as 25-hydroxycholesterol and 27-hydroxycholesterol which are known to be ligands of liver X receptor (LXR). Co-treatment of 24SOHC with 9-cis retinoic acid, a retinoid X receptor ligand, enhanced the adaptive responses. Knockdown of LXRβ by siRNA diminished the adaptive responses induced by 24SOHC almost completely. The treatment with 24SOHC induced the expression of LXR target genes, such as ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and G1 (ABCG1). The 24SOHC-induced adaptive responses were significantly attenuated by siRNA for ABCG1 but not by siRNA for ABCA1. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that 24SOHC at sub-lethal concentrations induces adaptive responses via transcriptional activation of LXR signaling pathway, thereby protecting neuronal cells from subsequent 7KC-induced cytotoxicity.

  15. Reduced cellular redox status induces 4-hydroxynonenal-mediated caspase 3 activation leading to erythrocyte death during chronic arsenic exposure in rats.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Debabrata; Sen, Gargi; Biswas, Tuli

    2010-05-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic in rats led to gradual accumulation of the toxicant in erythrocytes causing oxidative stress in these cells. 4-Hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), a major aldehyde product of lipid peroxidation, contributed significantly to the cytopathological events observed during oxidative stress in the erythrocytes of exposed rats. 4-HNE triggered death signal cascade that was initiated with the formation of HNE-protein adducts in cytosol. HNE-protein adduct formation resulted in depletion of cytosolic antioxidants followed by increased generation of ROS. Results showed accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) from the early stages of arsenic exposure, while superoxide (O(2)(*-)) and hydroxyl radical ((*)OH) also contributed to the oxidative stress during longer period of exposure. Suppression of antioxidant system coupled with increased generation of ROS eventually led to activation of caspase 3 during arsenic exposure. Attenuation of HNE-mediated activation of caspase 3 in presence of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) indicated the involvement of GSH in the process. Prevention of HNE-mediated degradation of membrane proteins in presence of Z-DEVD-FMK identified caspase 3 as the principal mediator of HNE-induced cellular damage during arsenic exposure. Degradation of band 3 followed by its aggregation on the red cell surface promoted immunologic recognition of redistributed band 3 by autologous IgG with subsequent attachment of C3b. Finally, the formation of C3b-IgG-band 3 immune complex accelerated the elimination of affected cells from circulation and led to the decline of erythrocyte life span during chronic arsenic toxicity. Copyright 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of Bedtime Basics for Babies: A National Crib Distribution Program to Reduce the Risk of Sleep-Related Sudden Infant Deaths

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Kawai O.; McMurry, Timothy; Moon, Rachel Y.

    2015-01-01

    Rates of sleep-related infant deaths have remained stagnant in recent years. Although most parents are aware of safe sleep recommendations, barriers to adherence, including lack of access to a safe crib, remain. The objective of this study was to describe parental knowledge and practices regarding infant sleep position, bedsharing, pacifier use, and feeding practices before and after receipt of a free crib and safe sleep education. Bedtime Basics for Babies (BBB) enrolled high-risk families in Washington, Indiana, and Washington, DC and provided them with cribs and safe sleep education. Parents completed surveys before (“prenatal” and “postnatal”) and 1–3 months after crib receipt (“follow-up”). Descriptive and bivariate analyses were completed. 3,303 prenatal, 1,483 postnatal, and 1,729 follow-up surveys were collected. Parental knowledge of recommended infant sleep position improved from 76 % (prenatal) and 77 % (postnatal) to 94 % after crib receipt (p < 0.001). Intended use of supine positioning increased from 84 % (prenatal) and 80 % (postnatal) to 87 % after the intervention (p < 0.001). Although only 8 % of parents intended to bedshare when asked prenatally, 38 % of parents receiving the crib after the infant’s birth reported that they had bedshared the night before. This decreased to 16 % after the intervention. Ninety percent reported that the baby slept in a crib after the intervention, compared with 51 % postnatally (p < 0.01). BBB was successful in changing knowledge and practices in the majority of high-risk participants with regards to placing the infant supine in a crib for sleep. Crib distribution and safe sleep education positively influence knowledge and practices about safe sleep. PMID:25331608

  17. Reduced cellular redox status induces 4-hydroxynonenal-mediated caspase 3 activation leading to erythrocyte death during chronic arsenic exposure in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Debabrata; Sen, Gargi; Biswas, Tuli

    2010-05-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic in rats led to gradual accumulation of the toxicant in erythrocytes causing oxidative stress in these cells. 4-Hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), a major aldehyde product of lipid peroxidation, contributed significantly to the cytopathological events observed during oxidative stress in the erythrocytes of exposed rats. 4-HNE triggered death signal cascade that was initiated with the formation of HNE-protein adducts in cytosol. HNE-protein adduct formation resulted in depletion of cytosolic antioxidants followed by increased generation of ROS. Results showed accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) from the early stages of arsenic exposure, while superoxide (O{sub 2}{sup c}entre dot{sup -}) and hydroxyl radical ({sup c}entre dotOH) also contributed to the oxidative stress during longer period of exposure. Suppression of antioxidant system coupled with increased generation of ROS eventually led to activation of caspase 3 during arsenic exposure. Attenuation of HNE-mediated activation of caspase 3 in presence of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) indicated the involvement of GSH in the process. Prevention of HNE-mediated degradation of membrane proteins in presence of Z-DEVD-FMK identified caspase 3 as the principal mediator of HNE-induced cellular damage during arsenic exposure. Degradation of band 3 followed by its aggregation on the red cell surface promoted immunologic recognition of redistributed band 3 by autologous IgG with subsequent attachment of C3b. Finally, the formation of C3b-IgG-band 3 immune complex accelerated the elimination of affected cells from circulation and led to the decline of erythrocyte life span during chronic arsenic toxicity.

  18. Evaluation of bedtime basics for babies: a national crib distribution program to reduce the risk of sleep-related sudden infant deaths.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Fern R; Tanabe, Kawai O; McMurry, Timothy; Moon, Rachel Y

    2015-06-01

    Rates of sleep-related infant deaths have remained stagnant in recent years. Although most parents are aware of safe sleep recommendations, barriers to adherence, including lack of access to a safe crib, remain. The objective of this study was to describe parental knowledge and practices regarding infant sleep position, bedsharing, pacifier use, and feeding practices before and after receipt of a free crib and safe sleep education. Bedtime Basics for Babies (BBB) enrolled high-risk families in Washington, Indiana, and Washington, DC and provided them with cribs and safe sleep education. Parents completed surveys before ("prenatal" and "postnatal") and 1-3 months after crib receipt ("follow-up"). Descriptive and bivariate analyses were completed. 3,303 prenatal, 1,483 postnatal, and 1,729 follow-up surveys were collected. Parental knowledge of recommended infant sleep position improved from 76% (prenatal) and 77% (postnatal) to 94% after crib receipt (p < 0.001). Intended use of supine positioning increased from 84% (prenatal) and 80% (postnatal) to 87% after the intervention (p < 0.001). Although only 8% of parents intended to bedshare when asked prenatally, 38% of parents receiving the crib after the infant's birth reported that they had bedshared the night before. This decreased to 16% after the intervention. Ninety percent reported that the baby slept in a crib after the intervention, compared with 51% postnatally (p < 0.01). BBB was successful in changing knowledge and practices in the majority of high-risk participants with regards to placing the infant supine in a crib for sleep. Crib distribution and safe sleep education positively influence knowledge and practices about safe sleep.

  19. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory terpenoids of Amentotaxus formosana protect cisplatin-induced cell death by reducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) in normal human urothelial and bladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Nan; Huang, A-Mei; Lin, Kai-Wei; Hour, Tzyh-Chyuan; Ko, Horng-Huey; Yang, Shyh-Chyun; Pu, Yeong-Shiau

    2010-12-01

    The diterpenoids (+)-ferruginol (1), ent-kaur-16-en-15-one (2), ent-8(14),15-sandaracopimaradiene-2α,18-diol (3), 8(14),15-sandaracopimaradiene-2α,18,19-triol (4), and (+)-sugiol (5) and the triterpenoids 3β-methoxycycloartan-24(24(1))-ene (6), 3β,23β-dimethoxycycloartan-24(24(1))-ene (7), 3β,23β-dimethoxy-5α-lanosta-24(24(1))-ene (8), and 23(S)-23-methoxy-24-methylenelanosta-8-en-3-one (9), isolated from Amentotaxus formosana, showed inhibitory effects on xanthine oxidase (XO). Of the compounds tested, compound 5 was a potent inhibitor of XO activity, with an IC(50) value of 6.8±0.4 μM, while displaying weak ABTS radical cation scavenging activity. Treatment of the bladder cancer cell line, NTUB1, with 3-10 μM of compound 5 and 10 μM cisplatin, and immortalized normal human urothelial cell line, SV-HUC1, with 0.3-1 μM and 10-50 μM of compound 5 and 10 μM cisplatin, respectively, resulted in increased viability of cells compared with cytotoxicity induced by cisplatin. Treatment of NTUB1 with 20 μM cisplatin and 10 or 30 μM of compound 5 resulted in decreased ROS production compared with ROS production induced by cisplatin. These results indicate that 10 or 30 μM of compound 5 in NTUB1 cells may mediate through the suppression of XO activity and reduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by compound 5 cotreated with 20 μM cisplatin and protection of subsequent cell death. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Post-irradiation hypoxic incubation of X-irradiated MOLT-4 cells reduces apoptotic cell death by changing the intracellular redox state and modulating SAPK/JNK pathways.

    PubMed

    Hamasu, T; Inanami, O; Tsujitani, M; Yokoyama, K; Takahashi, E; Kashiwakura, I; Kuwabara, M

    2005-05-01

    To elucidate radiobiological effects of hypoxia on X-ray-induced apoptosis, MOLT-4 cells were treated under four set of conditions: (1) both X irradiation and incubation under normoxia, (2) X irradiation under hypoxia and subsequent incubation under normoxia, (3) X irradiation under normoxia and subsequent incubation under hypoxia, and (4) both X irradiation and incubation under hypoxia, and the induction of apoptosis was examined by fluorescence microscopy. About 28-33% apoptosis was observed in cells treated under conditions 1 and 2, but this value was significantly reduced to around 18-20% in cells treated under conditions 3 and 4, suggesting that post-irradiation hypoxic incubation rather than hypoxic irradiation mainly caused the reduction of apoptosis. The activation and expression of apoptosis signal-related molecules SAPK/JNK, Fas and caspase-3 were also suppressed by hypoxic incubation. Effects of hypoxic incubation were canceled when cells were treated under conditions 3 and 4 with an oxygen-mimicking hypoxic cell radiosensitizer, whereas the addition of N-acetyl-L-cysteine again reduced the induction of apoptosis. From these results it was concluded that hypoxia reduced the induction of apoptosis by changing the intracellular redox state, followed by the regulation of apoptotic signals in X-irradiated MOLT-4 cells.

  1. Brain death.

    PubMed

    Wijdicks, Eelco F M

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of brain death should be based on a simple premise. If every possible confounder has been excluded and all possible treatments have been tried or considered, irreversible loss of brain function is clinically recognized as the absence of brainstem reflexes, verified apnea, loss of vascular tone, invariant heart rate, and, eventually, cardiac standstill. This condition cannot be reversed - not even partly - by medical or surgical intervention, and thus is final. Many countries in the world have introduced laws that acknowledge that a patient can be declared brain-dead by neurologic standards. The U.S. law differs substantially from all other brain death legislation in the world because the U.S. law does not spell out details of the neurologic examination. Evidence-based practice guidelines serve as a standard. In this chapter, I discuss the history of development of the criteria, the current clinical examination, and some of the ethical and legal issues that have emerged. Generally, the concept of brain death has been accepted by all major religions. But patients' families may have different ideas and are mostly influenced by cultural attitudes, traditional customs, and personal beliefs. Suggestions are offered to support these families.

  2. Enhanced UV-B radiation during pupal stage reduce body mass and fat content, while increasing deformities, mortality and cell death in female adults of solitary bee Osmia bicornis.

    PubMed

    Wasielewski, Oskar; Wojciechowicz, Tatiana; Giejdasz, Karol; Krishnan, Natraj

    2015-08-01

    The effects of enhanced UV-B radiation on the oogenesis and morpho-anatomical characteristics of the European solitary red mason bee Osmia bicornis L. (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) were tested under laboratory conditions. Cocooned females in the pupal stage were exposed directly to different doses (0, 9.24, 12.32, and 24.64 kJ/m(2) /d) of artificial UV-B. Our experiments revealed that enhanced UV-B radiation can reduce body mass and fat body content, cause deformities and increase mortality. Following UV exposure at all 3 different doses, the body mass of bees was all significantly reduced compared to the control, with the highest UV dose causing the largest reduction. Similarly, following UV-B radiation, in treated groups the fat body index decreased and the fat body index was the lowest in the group receiving the highest dose of UV radiation. Mortality and morphological deformities, between untreated and exposed females varied considerably and increased with the dose of UV-B radiation. Morphological deformities were mainly manifested in the wings and mouthparts, and occurred more frequently with an increased dose of UV. Cell death was quantified by the Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay (DNA fragmentation) during early stages of oogenesis of O. bicornis females. The bees, after UV-B exposure exhibited more germarium cells with fragmented DNA. The TUNEL test indicated that in germarium, low doses of UV-B poorly induced the cell death during early development. However, exposure to moderate UV-B dose increased programmed cell death. In females treated with the highest dose of UV-B the vast majority of germarium cells were TUNEL-positive.

  3. Activation of the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas pathway reduces oxygen-glucose deprivation induced tissue swelling, ROS production, and cell death in mouse brain with angiotensin II overproduction

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jiaolin; Li, Guangze; Chen, Shuzhen; Chen, Ji; Buck, Joshua; Zhu, Yulan; Xia, Huijing; Lazartigues, Eric; Chen, Yanfang; Olson, James E.

    2014-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that mice which overexpress human renin and angiotensinogen (R+A+) show enhanced cerebral damage in both in vivo and in vitro experimental ischemia models. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) counteracts the effects of angiotensin (Ang-II) by transforming it into Ang-(1-7), thus reducing the ligand for the AT1 receptor and increasing stimulation of the Mas receptor. Triple transgenic mice, SARA, which specifically overexpress ACE2 in neurons of R+A+ mice were used to study the role of ACE2 in ischemic stroke using oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) of brain slices as an in vitro model. We examined tissue swelling, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cell death in cerebral cortex (CX) and the hippocampal CA1 region during OGD. Expression levels of NADPH oxidase isoforms, Nox2 and Nox4 were measured using western blots. Results show that SARA mice and R+A+ mice treated with the Mas receptor agonist Ang-(1-7) had less swelling, cell death, and ROS production in CX and CA1 areas compared to those in R+A+ animals. Treatment of slices from SARA mice with the Mas antagonist A779 eliminated this protection. Finally, western blots revealed less Nox2 and Nox4 expression in SARA mice compared with R+A+ mice both before and after OGD. We suggest that reduced brain swelling and cell death observed in SARA animals exposed to OGD results from diminished ROS production coupled with lower expression of NADPH oxidases. Thus, the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas receptor pathway plays a protective role in brain ischemic damage by counteracting the detrimental effects of Ang-II-induced ROS production. PMID:24814023

  4. Laminin and collagen IV inclusion in immuening inflammation by modnoisolating microcapsules reduces cytokine-mediated cell death in human pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Llacua, L Alberto; de Haan, Bart J; de Vos, Paul

    2017-05-16

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules have several functions in pancreatic islets, including provision of mechanical support and prevention of cytotoxicity during inflammation. During islet isolation, ECM connections are damaged, and are not restored after encapsulation and transplantation. Inclusion of specific combinations of collagen type IV and laminins in immunoisolating capsules can enhance survival of pancreatic islets. Here we investigated whether ECM can also enhance survival and lower susceptibility of human islets to cytokine-mediated cytotoxicity. To this end, human islets were encapsulated in alginate with collagen IV and either RGD, LRE or PDSGR, i.e. laminin sequences. Islets in capsules without ECM served as control. The encapsulated islets were exposed to IL-1β, IFN-γ and TNF-α for 24 and 72 h. All combinations of ECM improved the islet cell survival, and reduced necrosis and apoptosis after cytokine exposure (P < 0.01). Collagen IV-RGD and collagen IV-LRE reduced danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) release from islets (P < 0.05). Moreover, collagen IV-RGD and collagen IV-PDSGR, but not collagen IV-LRE, reduced NO release from encapsulated human islets (P < 0.05). This reduction correlated with a higher oxygen consumption rate (OCR) of islets in capsules containing collagen IV-RGD and collagen IV-PDSGR. Islets in capsules with collagen IV-LRE showed more dysfunction, and OCR was not different from islets in control capsules without ECM. Our study demonstrates that incorporation of specific ECM molecules such as collagen type IV with the laminin sequences RGD and PDSGR in immunoisolated islets can protect against cytokine toxicity. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Deaths in natural hazards in the solomon islands.

    PubMed

    Blong, R J; Radford, D A

    1993-03-01

    Archival and library search techniques have been used to establish extensive databases on deaths and damage resulting from natural hazards in the Solomon Islands. Although the records of fatalities are certainly incomplete, volcanic eruptions, tropical cyclones, landslides, tsunami and earthquakes appear to have been the most important. Only 22 per cent of the recorded deaths have resulted from meteorological hazards but a single event could change this proportion significantly. Five events in the fatality database account for 88 per cent of the recorded deaths. Future death tolls are also likely to be dominated by a small number of events. While the expected number of deaths in a given period is dependent upon the length of record considered, it is clear that a disaster which kills one hundred or more people in the Solomons can be expected more frequently than once in a hundred years.

  6. Sleep Deprivation and Divergent Toll-like Receptor-4 Activation of Cellular Inflammation in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Judith E.; Carrillo, Carmen; Olmstead, Richard; Witarama, Tuff; Breen, Elizabeth C.; Yokomizo, Megumi; Seeman, Teresa E.; Irwin, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Sleep disturbance and aging are associated with increases in inflammation, as well as increased risk of infectious disease. However, there is limited understanding of the role of sleep loss on age-related differences in immune responses. This study examines the effects of sleep deprivation on toll-like receptor activation of monocytic inflammation in younger compared to older adults. Design, Setting, and Participants: Community-dwelling adults (n = 70) who were categorized as younger (25–39 y old, n = 21) and older (60–84 y old, n = 49) participants, underwent a sleep laboratory-based experimental partial sleep deprivation (PSD) protocol including adaptation, an uninterrupted night of sleep, sleep deprivation (sleep restricted to 03:00–07:00), and recovery. Measurement and Results: Blood samples were obtained each morning to measure toll-like receptor-4 activation of monocyte intracellular production of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Partial sleep deprivation induced a significant increase in the production of IL-6 and/or TNF-α that persisted after a night of recovery sleep (F(2,121.2) = 3.8, P < 0.05). Age moderated the effects of sleep loss, such that younger adults had an increase in inflammatory cytokine production that was not present in older adults (F(2,121.2) = 4.0, P < 0.05). Conclusion: Older adults exhibit reduced toll-like receptor 4 stimulated cellular inflammation that, unlike in younger adults, is not activated after a night of partial sleep loss. Whereas sleep loss increases cellular inflammation in younger adults and may contribute to inflammatory disorders, blunted toll-like receptor activation in older adults may increase the risk of infectious disease seen with aging. Citation: Carroll JE, Carrillo C, Olmstead R, Witarama T, Breen EC, Yokomizo M, Seeman TE, Irwin MR. Sleep deprivation and divergent toll-like receptor-4 activation of cellular inflammation in aging. SLEEP

  7. The toll of traffic-related fatalities in a metropolitan Italian area through the experience of the Department of Legal Medicine.

    PubMed

    Amadasi, Alberto; Cerutti, Elisa; Spagnoli, Laura; Blandino, Alberto; Rancati, Alessandra; Gallo, Carlotta; Mancini, Elisabetta; Rizzi, Vittorio; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Despite the introduction of new traffic laws in Italy, traffic-related deaths are still a huge burden. The study presents data and medico-legal issues behind traffic deaths in Milan between 2001 and 2012 (1506 traffic-related deaths). Data were collected from the database of the Department of Legal Medicine: 79.4% males and 20.6% females (mean age 44.14). The target group concerned traumatic deaths as a consequence of the accident as well as deaths not directly related to an accident. Although 6.1% were non-traumatic deaths (cause of death unconnected to the accident, i.e. because of a heart attack, or when death occurred after survival and cause of death was not related certainly to the accident), multiple skeletal/visceral injuries were the main cause of death (57.9%), occurring in motorcyclists the most (63.7%). Injuries to the skull and brain were the second cause of death (25.9%). Victims were mostly males (79.4%) and drivers (77.6%). Fifty-five per cent were deaths on-scene, while 45% survived. Other variables were also considered: medications, medical history, and drugs/alcohol/smoke. A downward trend in traffic-related fatalities was evident, but the toll is still high. This study should be a glimpse at the actual situation, since it is indicative of a metropolitan area where autopsies are systematically performed.

  8. Licofelone (ML-3000), a dual inhibitor of 5-lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase, reduces the level of cartilage chondrocyte death in vivo in experimental dog osteoarthritis: inhibition of pro-apoptotic factors.

    PubMed

    Boileau, Christelle; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Jouzeau, Jean-Yves; Netter, Patrick; Moldovan, Florina; Laufer, Stefan; Tries, Susanne; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre

    2002-07-01

    To evaluate in vivo therapeutic efficacy of licofelone, a novel competitive dual inhibitor of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and cyclooxygenase (COX) in chondrocyte death in the canine ligament transection model of osteoarthritis (OA), and to explore its effect on factors involved in the apoptotic phenomenon, i.e., caspase-3, COX-2, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Cartilage specimens were obtained from 3 experimental groups of dogs: Group 1, dogs subjected to sectioning of the anterior cruciate ligament of the right knee and given placebo treatment; Groups 2 and 3, operated dogs that received oral treatment with licofelone (2.5 or 5.0 mg/kg/day, respectively) for 8 weeks starting immediately after surgery. All dogs were killed 8 weeks postsurgery. The cartilage level of chondrocyte death was detected by TUNEL reaction. Cartilage distribution of caspase-3, COX-2, and iNOS was documented by immunohistochemistry using specific antibodies, and other levels were quantified by morphometric analysis. In cartilage specimens from placebo treated dogs a large number of chondrocytes in the superficial layers stained positive for TUNEL reaction. Treatment with therapeutic concentrations of licofelone (2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg/day) markedly reduced the level of chondrocyte apoptosis to the same extent in both therapeutic groups (p < 0.0001, p < 0.002, respectively). In these groups, the levels of caspase-3, COX-2, and iNOS in cartilage from both condyles and plateaus were also significantly decreased (p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001, p < 0.0002, respectively) compared to the control (placebo) group. Licofelone is an effective treatment in vivo, capable of reducing the level of OA chondrocyte death. This effect is likely mediated by a decrease in the level of caspase-3 activity, which may be related to the reduced production of 2 major factors involved in chondrocyte apoptosis, NO and prostaglandin E2. These findings may explain some of the mechanisms by which licofelone reduces the

  9. Amyloid-β reduces the expression of neuronal FAIM-L, thereby shifting the inflammatory response mediated by TNFα from neuronal protection to death

    PubMed Central

    Carriba, P; Jimenez, S; Navarro, V; Moreno-Gonzalez, I; Barneda-Zahonero, B; Moubarak, R S; Lopez-Soriano, J; Gutierrez, A; Vitorica, J; Comella, J X

    2015-01-01

    The brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) present elevated levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), a cytokine that has a dual function in neuronal cells. On one hand, TNFα can activate neuronal apoptosis, and on the other hand, it can protect these cells against amyloid-β (Aβ) toxicity. Given the dual behavior of this molecule, there is some controversy regarding its contribution to the pathogenesis of AD. Here we examined the relevance of the long form of Fas apoptotic inhibitory molecule (FAIM) protein, FAIM-L, in regulating the dual function of TNFα. We detected that FAIM-L was reduced in the hippocampi of patients with AD. We also observed that the entorhinal and hippocampal cortex of a mouse model of AD (PS1M146LxAPP751sl) showed a reduction in this protein before the onset of neurodegeneration. Notably, cultured neurons treated with the cortical soluble fractions of these animals showed a decrease in endogenous FAIM-L, an effect that is mimicked by the treatment with Aβ-derived diffusible ligands (ADDLs). The reduction in the expression of FAIM-L is associated with the progression of the neurodegeneration by changing the inflammatory response mediated by TNFα in neurons. In this sense, we also demonstrate that the protection afforded by TNFα against Aβ toxicity ceases when endogenous FAIM-L is reduced by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) or by treatment with ADDLs. All together, these results support the notion that levels of FAIM-L contribute to determine the protective or deleterious effect of TNFα in neuronal cells. PMID:25675299

  10. Low expression of Toll-like receptors in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Cuaxospa, María; Contreras-Ramos, Alejandra; Pérez-Figueroa, Erandi; Medina-Sansón, Aurora; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Torres-Nava, José R; Rojas-Castillo, Emilio; Maldonado-Bernal, Carmen

    2016-08-01

    Cancer is the second most common cause of death among children aged 1-14 years. Leukemia accounts for one-third of all childhood cancers, 78% of which is acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The development of cancer has been associated with malignant cells that express low levels of immunogenic molecules, which facilitates their escape from the antineoplastic immune response. It is thought that it may be possible to rescue the antineoplastic immune response through the activation of recognition receptors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which activate the innate immune system. TLRs are type I membrane glycoproteins expressed mainly in immune system cells such as monocytes, neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells, T, B and natural killer cells. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression of TLR1, TLR3, TLR4, TLR7 and TLR9 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in patients with ALL and prior to any treatment. PBMCs were obtained from 50 pediatric patients diagnosed with ALL and from 20 children attending the ophthalmology and orthopedics services. The mean fluorescence intensity was obtained by analysis of immunofluorescence. We found lower expression levels of TLR1, TLR3, TLR4, TLR7 and TLR9 in PBMCs from patients with ALL compared with those from control patients. We also observed that the PBMCs from patients with Pre-B and B ALL had lower TLR4 expression than controls and patients with Pro-B, Pre-B, B and T ALL had lower TLR7 expression than controls. The present study is the first to demonstrate reduced expression of TLRs in PBMCs from pediatric patients with ALL. This finding is of great relevance and may partly explain the reduction in the antineoplastic immune response in patients with ALL.

  11. Toll-like receptor activation by helminths or helminth products to alleviate inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Sun, ShuMin; Wang, XueLin; Wu, XiuPing; Zhao, Ying; Wang, Feng; Liu, XiaoLei; Song, Yanxia; Wu, ZhiLiang; Liu, MingYuan

    2011-09-27

    Helminth infection may modulate the expression of Toll like receptors (TLR) in dendritic cells (DCs) and modify the responsiveness of DCs to TLR ligands. This may regulate aberrant intestinal inflammation in humans with helminthes and may thus help alleviate inflammation associated with human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Epidemiological and experimental data provide further evidence that reducing helminth infections increases the incidence rate of such autoimmune diseases. Fine control of inflammation in the TLR pathway is highly desirable for effective host defense. Thus, the use of antagonists of TLR-signaling and agonists of their negative regulators from helminths or helminth products should be considered for the treatment of IBD.

  12. Toll-like receptor activation by helminths or helminth products to alleviate inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Helminth infection may modulate the expression of Toll like receptors (TLR) in dendritic cells (DCs) and modify the responsiveness of DCs to TLR ligands. This may regulate aberrant intestinal inflammation in humans with helminthes and may thus help alleviate inflammation associated with human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Epidemiological and experimental data provide further evidence that reducing helminth infections increases the incidence rate of such autoimmune diseases. Fine control of inflammation in the TLR pathway is highly desirable for effective host defense. Thus, the use of antagonists of TLR-signaling and agonists of their negative regulators from helminths or helminth products should be considered for the treatment of IBD. PMID:21943110

  13. Pediatric brain death determination.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Mudit; Ashwal, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    Clinical guidelines for the determination of brain death in children were first published in 1987. These guidelines were revised in 2011 under the auspices of the Society of Critical Care Medicine, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the Child Neurology Society, and provide the minimum standards that must be satisfied before brain death can be declared in infants and children. After achieving physiologic stability and exclusion of confounders, two examinations including apnea testing separated by an observation period (24 hours for term newborns up to 30 days of age, and 12 hours for infants and children from 31 days up to 18 years) are required to establish brain death. Apnea testing should demonstrate a final arterial PaCO2 20 mm Hg above the baseline and ≥ 60 mm Hg with no respiratory effort during the testing period. Ancillary studies (electroencephalogram and radionuclide cerebral blood flow) are not required to establish brain death and are not a substitute for the neurologic examination. The committee concluded that ancillary studies may be used (1) when components of the examination or apnea testing cannot be completed, (2) if uncertainty about components of the neurologic examination exists, (3) if a medication effect may be present, or (4) to reduce the interexamination observation period. When ancillary studies are used, a second clinical examination and apnea test should still be performed and components that can be completed must remain consistent with brain death.

  14. Genetic Screen in Drosophila Larvae Links ird1 Function to Toll Signaling in the Fat Body and Hemocyte Motility

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Martin R.; Anderl, Ines; Vo, Hoa T. M.; Valanne, Susanna; Yang, Hairu; Kronhamn, Jesper; Rämet, Mika; Rusten, Tor Erik

    2016-01-01

    To understand how Toll signaling controls the activation of a cellular immune response in Drosophila blood cells (hemocytes), we carried out a genetic modifier screen, looking for deletions that suppress or enhance the mobilization of sessile hemocytes by the gain-of-function mutation Toll10b (Tl10b). Here we describe the results from chromosome arm 3R, where five regions strongly suppressed this phenotype. We identified the specific genes immune response deficient 1 (ird1), headcase (hdc) and possibly Rab23 as suppressors, and we studied the role of ird1 in more detail. An ird1 null mutant and a mutant that truncates the N-terminal kinase domain of the encoded Ird1 protein affected the Tl10b phenotype, unlike mutations that affect the C-terminal part of the protein. The ird1 null mutant suppressed mobilization of sessile hemocytes, but enhanced other Tl10b hemocyte phenotypes, like the formation of melanotic nodules and the increased number of circulating hemocytes. ird1 mutants also had blood cell phenotypes on their own. They lacked crystal cells and showed aberrant formation of lamellocytes. ird1 mutant plasmatocytes had a reduced ability to spread on an artificial substrate by forming protrusions, which may explain why they did not go into circulation in response to Toll signaling. The effect of the ird1 mutation depended mainly on ird1 expression in hemocytes, but ird1-dependent effects in other tissues may contribute. Specifically, the Toll receptor was translocated from the cell membrane to intracellular vesicles in the fat body of the ird1 mutant, and Toll signaling was activated in that tissue, partially explaining the Tl10b-like phenotype. As ird1 is otherwise known to control vesicular transport, we conclude that the vesicular transport system may be of particular importance during an immune response. PMID:27467079

  15. Sudden cardiac death and obesity.

    PubMed

    Plourde, Benoit; Sarrazin, Jean-François; Nault, Isabelle; Poirier, Paul

    2014-09-01

    For individuals and the society as a whole, the increased risk of sudden cardiac death in obese patients is becoming a major challenge, especially since obesity prevalence has been increasing steadily around the globe. Traditional risk factors and obesity often coexist. Hypertension, diabetes, obstructive sleep apnea and metabolic syndrome are well-known risk factors for CV disease and are often present in the obese patient. Although the bulk of evidence is circumstantial, sudden cardiac death and obesity share common traditional CV risk factors. Structural, functional and metabolic factors modulate and influence the risk of sudden cardiac death in the obese population. Other risk factors such as left ventricular hypertrophy, increased number of premature ventricular complexes, altered QT interval and reduced heart rate variability are all documented in both obese and sudden cardiac death populations. The present review focuses on out-of-hospital sudden cardiac death and potential mechanisms leading to sudden cardiac death in this population.

  16. [Accompany death].

    PubMed

    Salvador Borrell, Montserrat

    2010-11-01

    One of the roles of nursing is to take care of the patients in terminal situation. The time, the experience, the formation, and the personal and professional attitudes that the nurse has will propitiate that taking care of moribund patients might turn into one of the more rewarding human experiences in life. There for, it is indispensable that nurses assume death as a natural and inevitable reality to achieve. The principal aim of the study is to evaluate the competence of confrontation and the autoefficiency of the welfare among nurses who work with adult patients at the end of the life. Descriptive study realized in the units of Oncology, Hametology and Palliative Care of the following centers: La Fe, Clínico, Dr. Peset, H. General, Arnau de Vilanova and Dr. Moliner de Portacoelli in Valencia (Spain). The following instruments were used: the Bugen Scale of confrontation of the Death (1980-1981) and the Robbins Scale of Autoefficiency (1992). Data suggests that major coping gives major autoeffciency and vice versa. The realized study opens numerous questions, specially related with training and the burden of preparation along the whole professional career, in order to achieve competence for coping and autoefficiency.

  17. Fucoidan induces Toll-like receptor 4-regulated reactive oxygen species and promotes endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsien-Yeh; Lin, Tung-Yi; Lu, Mei-Kuang; Leng, Pei-Ju; Tsao, Shu-Ming; Wu, Yu-Chung

    2017-03-23

    Fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide extracted from brown algae, exhibits anti-cancer activity. However, the effects and mechanism of fucoidan-induced apoptosis via endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that fucoidan prevents tumorigenesis and reduces tumor size in LLC1-xenograft male C57BL/6 mice. Fucoidan induces an ER stress response by activating the PERK-ATF4-CHOP pathway, resulting in apoptotic cell death in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, ATF4 knockdown abolishes fucoidan-induced CHOP expression and rescues cell viability. Specifically, fucoidan increases intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), which increase ATF4 and CHOP in lung cancer cells. Using the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), we found that ROS generation is involved in fucoidan-induced ER stress-mediated apoptosis. Moreover, via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) knockdown, we demonstrated that fucoidan-induced ROS and CHOP expression were attenuated. Our study is the first to identify a novel mechanism for the antitumor activity of fucoidan. We showed that fucoidan inhibits tumor viability by activating the TLR4/ROS/ER stress axis and the downstream PERK-ATF4-CHOP pathway, leading to apoptosis and suppression of lung cancer cell progression. Together, these results indicate that fucoidan is a potential preventive and therapeutic agent for lung cancer that acts via activation of ROS-dependent ER stress pathways.

  18. Fucoidan induces Toll-like receptor 4-regulated reactive oxygen species and promotes endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hsien-Yeh; Lin, Tung-Yi; Lu, Mei-Kuang; Leng, Pei-Ju; Tsao, Shu-Ming; Wu, Yu-Chung

    2017-01-01

    Fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide extracted from brown algae, exhibits anti-cancer activity. However, the effects and mechanism of fucoidan-induced apoptosis via endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that fucoidan prevents tumorigenesis and reduces tumor size in LLC1-xenograft male C57BL/6 mice. Fucoidan induces an ER stress response by activating the PERK-ATF4-CHOP pathway, resulting in apoptotic cell death in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, ATF4 knockdown abolishes fucoidan-induced CHOP expression and rescues cell viability. Specifically, fucoidan increases intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), which increase ATF4 and CHOP in lung cancer cells. Using the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), we found that ROS generation is involved in fucoidan-induced ER stress-mediated apoptosis. Moreover, via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) knockdown, we demonstrated that fucoidan-induced ROS and CHOP expression were attenuated. Our study is the first to identify a novel mechanism for the antitumor activity of fucoidan. We showed that fucoidan inhibits tumor viability by activating the TLR4/ROS/ER stress axis and the downstream PERK-ATF4-CHOP pathway, leading to apoptosis and suppression of lung cancer cell progression. Together, these results indicate that fucoidan is a potential preventive and therapeutic agent for lung cancer that acts via activation of ROS-dependent ER stress pathways. PMID:28332554

  19. [Hugo Toll - physician, author, and health debater with firm views].

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Peter M

    2004-01-01

    The Swedish physician Hugo Toll (1858-1943) was brought up as the son of a farmer in mid-Sweden. He was a talented young medical student at the University of Uppsala. After finishing his studies Hugo Toll spent some years as a surgeon in the US, working in Minnesota. Before settling down again in Sweden Toll toured many European countries to increase his knowledge in medical matters and public health issues. In his laborous years of work he spent time in Stockholm, running a private practice, and later on as a headmaster at Ersta School of Nursing, outside Stockholm. Through many years Hugo Toll devoted much time and efforts to writing and lecturing on public health, healthy lifestyle matters, and other topics related to medicine. As many other authors of this time, he also included views based on racial biology and the positive health selection of future parents. At this time some Swedish physicians were more or less openly committed to Nazi ideology, such as Ake Berglund, Herman Lundborg and Gösta Häggqvist. Other physicians were never members of any Nazi party, or did not see themselves as believers in any similar ideology. However, in their lectures and writings, a mixture of ideas upon public health were revealed, some of them also related to Nazi ideology. My impression is that Hugo Toll, although an elderly man and almost blind in the 1930's, was one of many Swedish physicians and debaters with ideas that other, more ideologically determined physicians with strong political views could make use of. Therefore, in current times we can learn from the experience of Hugo Toll that physicians with strong beliefs in public health and a healthy lifestyle can provide arguments that others can use in a different context for darker purposes.

  20. Modulation of Toll-interleukin 1 receptor mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoxia; Qin, Jinzhong

    2005-04-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) belong to the Toll-interleukin 1 receptor superfamily, which is defined by a common intracellular Toll-IL-1 receptor (TIR) domain. A group of TIR domain containing adaptors (MyD88, TIRAP, TRIF and TRAM), are differentially recruited to the Toll-IL-1 receptors, contributing to the specificity of signaling. The IL-1 mediated signaling pathway serves as a "prototype" for other family members. Genetic and biochemical studies reveal that IL-1R uses adaptor molecule MyD88 to mediate a very complex pathway, involving a cascade of kinases organized by multiple adapter molecules into signaling complexes, leading to activation of the transcription factor NFkappaB. Several Toll-like receptors utilize variations of the "prototype" pathway by employing different adaptor molecules. Double-stranded RNA triggered, TLR3-mediated signaling is independent of MyD88, IRAK4, and IRAK. The adapter molecule TRIF is utilized by TLR3 to mediate the activation of NFkappaB and IRF3. LPS-induced, TLR4-mediated signaling employs multiple TIR-domain containing adaptors, MyD88/TIRAP to mediate NFkappaB activation, TRIF/TRAM for IRF3 activation. Recent studies have also begun to unravel how these pathways are negatively regulated. SIGIRR (also known as TIR8), a member of TIR superfamily that does not activate the transcription factors NFkappaB and IRF3, instead negatively modulates responses. Cells from SIGIRR-null mice show enhanced activation in response to either IL-1 or certain Toll ligands. In addition to SIGIRR, several other negative regulators have been shown to inhibit the TIR signaling, including ST2, IRAKM, MyD88s, SOCS1, and Triad3A. The coordinated positive and negative regulation of the TIR signaling ensures the appropriate modulation of the innate and inflammatory responses.

  1. Saturated fatty acids activate microglia via Toll-like receptor 4/NF-κB signalling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Liu, Dexiang; Wang, Fuwu; Liu, Shangming; Zhao, Shidou; Ling, Eng-Ang; Hao, Aijun

    2012-01-01

    Diets rich in SFA have been implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD). There is strong evidence to suggest that microglial activation augments the progression of AD. However, it remains uncertain whether SFA can initiate microglial activation and whether this response can cause neuronal death. Using the BV-2 microglial cell line and primary microglial culture, we showed that palmitic acid (PA) and stearic acid (SA) could activate microglia, as assessed by reactive morphological changes and significantly increased secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, NO and reactive oxygen species, which trigger primary neuronal death. In addition, the mRNA level of these pro-inflammatory mediators determined by RT-PCR was also increased by PA and SA. We further investigated the intracellular signalling mechanism underlying the release of pro-inflammatory mediators from PA-activated microglial cells. The present results showed that PA activated the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit of NF-κB. Furthermore, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, a NF-κB inhibitor, attenuated the production of pro-inflammatory mediators except for IL-6 in PA-stimulated microglia. Administration of anti-Toll-like receptor (TLR)4-neutralising antibody repressed PA-induced NF-κB activation and pro-inflammatory mediator production. In conclusion, the present in vitro study demonstrates that SFA could activate microglia and stimulate the TLR4/NF-κB pathway to trigger the production of pro-inflammatory mediators, which may contribute to neuronal death.

  2. Toll-like receptor agonists in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Sylvia

    2010-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pattern-recognition receptors related to the Drosophila Toll protein. TLR activation alerts the immune system to microbial products and initiates innate and adaptive immune responses. The naturally powerful immunostimulatory property of TLR agonists can be exploited for active immunotherapy against cancer. Antitumor activity has been demonstrated in several cancers, and TLR agonists are now undergoing extensive clinical investigation. This review discusses recent advances in the field and highlights potential opportunities for the clinical development of TLR agonists as single agent immunomodulators, vaccine adjuvants and in combination with conventional cancer therapies. PMID:20563267

  3. Invariant death

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    In nematodes, environmental or physiological perturbations alter death’s scaling of time. In human cancer, genetic perturbations alter death’s curvature of time. Those changes in scale and curvature follow the constraining contours of death’s invariant geometry. I show that the constraints arise from a fundamental extension to the theories of randomness, invariance and scale. A generalized Gompertz law follows. The constraints imposed by the invariant Gompertz geometry explain the tendency of perturbations to stretch or bend death’s scaling of time. Variability in death rate arises from a combination of constraining universal laws and particular biological processes. PMID:27785361

  4. The Toll pathway is required in the epidermis for muscle development in the Drosophila embryo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halfon, M. S.; Keshishian, H.

    1998-01-01

    The Toll signaling pathway functions in several Drosophila processes, including dorsal-ventral pattern formation and the immune response. Here, we demonstrate that this pathway is required in the epidermis for proper muscle development. Previously, we showed that the zygotic Toll protein is necessary for normal muscle development; in the absence of zygotic Toll, close to 50% of hemisegments have muscle patterning defects consisting of missing, duplicated and misinserted muscle fibers (Halfon, M.S., Hashimoto, C., and Keshishian, H., Dev. Biol. 169, 151-167, 1995). We have now also analyzed the requirements for easter, spatzle, tube, and pelle, all of which function in the Toll-mediated dorsal-ventral patterning pathway. We find that spatzle, tube, and pelle, but not easter, are necessary for muscle development. Mutations in these genes give a phenotype identical to that seen in Toll mutants, suggesting that elements of the same pathway used for Toll signaling in dorsal-ventral development are used during muscle development. By expressing the Toll cDNA under the control of distinct Toll enhancer elements in Toll mutant flies, we have examined the spatial requirements for Toll expression during muscle development. Expression of Toll in a subset of epidermal cells that includes the epidermal muscle attachment cells, but not Toll expression in the musculature, is necessary for proper muscle development. Our results suggest that signals received by the epidermis early during muscle development are an important part of the muscle patterning process.

  5. Microbiota regulates type 1 diabetes through Toll-like receptors

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, Michael P.; Volchkov, Pavel; Kobayashi, Koichi S.; Chervonsky, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    Deletion of the innate immune adaptor myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of type 1 diabetes (T1D) results in microbiota-dependent protection from the disease: MyD88-negative mice in germ-free (GF), but not in specific pathogen-free conditions develop the disease. These results could be explained by expansion of particular protective bacteria (“specific lineage hypothesis”) or by dominance of negative (tolerizing) signaling over proinflammatory signaling (“balanced signal hypothesis”) in mutant mice. Here we found that colonization of GF mice with a variety of intestinal bacteria was capable of reducing T1D in MyD88-negative (but not wild-type NOD mice), favoring the balanced signal hypothesis. However, the receptors and signaling pathways involved in prevention or facilitation of the disease remained unknown. The protective signals triggered by the microbiota were revealed by testing NOD mice lacking MyD88 in combination with knockouts of several critical components of innate immune sensing for development of T1D. Only MyD88- and TIR-domain containing adapter inducing IFN β (TRIF) double deficient NOD mice developed the disease. Thus, TRIF signaling (likely downstream of Toll-like receptor 4, TLR4) serves as one of the microbiota-induced tolerizing pathways. At the same time another TLR (TLR2) provided prodiabetic signaling by controlling the microbiota, as reduction in T1D incidence caused by TLR2 deletion was reversed in GF TLR2-negative mice. Our results support the balanced signal hypothesis, in which microbes provide signals that both promote and inhibit autoimmunity by signaling through different receptors, including receptors of the TLR family. PMID:26216961

  6. Asparagine reduces the mRNA expression of muscle atrophy markers via regulating protein kinase B (Akt), AMP-activated protein kinase α, toll-like receptor 4 and nucleotide-binding oligomerisation domain protein signalling in weaning piglets after lipopolysaccharide challenge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuying; Liu, Yulan; Wang, Shuhui; Pi, Dingan; Leng, Weibo; Zhu, Huiling; Zhang, Jing; Shi, Haifeng; Li, Shuang; Lin, Xi; Odle, Jack

    2016-10-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines are critical in mechanisms of muscle atrophy. In addition, asparagine (Asn) is necessary for protein synthesis in mammalian cells. We hypothesised that Asn could attenuate lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced muscle atrophy in a piglet model. Piglets were allotted to four treatments (non-challenged control, LPS-challenged control, LPS+0·5 % Asn and LPS+1·0 % Asn). On day 21, the piglets were injected with LPS or saline. At 4 h post injection, piglet blood and muscle samples were collected. Asn increased protein and RNA content in muscles, and decreased mRNA expression of muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx) and muscle RING finger 1 (MuRF1). However, Asn had no effect on the protein abundance of MAFbx and MuRF1. In addition, Asn decreased muscle AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) α phosphorylation, but increased muscle protein kinase B (Akt) and Forkhead Box O (FOXO) 1 phosphorylation. Moreover, Asn decreased the concentrations of TNF-α, cortisol and glucagon in plasma, and TNF-α mRNA expression in muscles. Finally, Asn decreased mRNA abundance of muscle toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and nucleotide-binding oligomerisation domain protein (NOD) signalling-related genes, and regulated their negative regulators. The beneficial effects of Asn on muscle atrophy may be associated with the following: (1) inhibiting muscle protein degradation via activating Akt and inactivating AMPKα and FOXO1; and (2) decreasing the expression of muscle pro-inflammatory cytokines via inhibiting TLR4 and NOD signalling pathways by modulation of their negative regulators.

  7. Encountering Death: Structured Activities for Death Awareness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Ira David; And Others

    This book is intended to be used as a supplement to standard textbooks on death and dying for college students. Chapter 1 "Encountering Death in the Self" builds the foundation for increased self-awareness for the study of death and dying. Chapter 2 "Encountering Death in the Family" provides activities which are appropriate for a wide variety of…

  8. [The role of maternal care in reducing perinatal and neonatal mortality in developing countries].

    PubMed

    Nicolau, S; Teodoru, G; Popa, I; Nicolescu, S; Feldioreanu, E

    1989-01-01

    -30/1000 live births and the total annual toll reaches 750,000 to 1 million globally mostly because of nonsterile instruments. 90% of tetanus incidence in Romania was eradicated by vaccination. Preventive measures can reduce mortality: education of women on health and hygiene, avoidance of heavy labor during pregnancy, family planning services, aseptic techniques, vaccination against tetanus and other infectious diseases, chemical prophylaxis against malaria, improved obstetrical care, consolidated support system, and community participation.

  9. Drosophila Dicer-2 has an RNA interference–independent function that modulates Toll immune signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaowei; Wu, Di; Liu, Yongxiang; Xia, Xiaoling; Gong, Wanyun; Qiu, Yang; Yang, Jie; Zheng, Ya; Li, Jingjing; Wang, Yu-Feng; Xiang, Ye; Hu, Yuanyang; Zhou, Xi

    2015-01-01

    Dicer-2 is the central player for small interfering RNA biogenesis in the Drosophila RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. Intriguingly, we found that Dicer-2 has an unconventional RNAi-independent function that positively modulates Toll immune signaling, which defends against Gram-positive bacteria, fungi, and some viruses, in both cells and adult flies. The loss of Dicer-2 expression makes fruit flies more susceptible to fungal infection. We further revealed that Dicer-2 posttranscriptionally modulates Toll signaling because Dicer-2 is required for the proper expression of Toll protein but not for Toll protein stability or Toll mRNA transcription. Moreover, Dicer-2 directly binds to the 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) of Toll mRNA via its PAZ (Piwi/Argonaute/Zwille) domain and is required for protein translation mediated by Toll 3′UTR. The loss of Toll 3′UTR binding activity makes Dicer-2 incapable of promoting Toll signaling. These data indicate that the interaction between Dicer-2 and Toll mRNA plays a pivotal role in Toll immune signaling. In addition, we found that Dicer-2 is also required for the Toll signaling induced by two different RNA viruses in Drosophila cells. Consequently, our findings uncover a novel RNAi-independent function of Dicer-2 in the posttranscriptional regulation of Toll protein expression and signaling, indicate an unexpected intersection of the RNAi pathway and the Toll pathway, and provide new insights into Toll immune signaling, Drosophila Dicer-2, and probably Dicer and Dicer-related proteins in other organisms. PMID:26601278

  10. Henry Hudson Bridge toll plaza, upper level, looking west. Pipe ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Henry Hudson Bridge toll plaza, upper level, looking west. Pipe railing parapets and pedestrian walkway on left. Inwood Hill Park in background. - Henry Hudson Parkway, Extending 11.2 miles from West 72nd Street to Bronx-Westchester border, New York County, NY

  11. 33 CFR 401.75 - Payment of tolls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Payment of tolls. 401.75 Section 401.75 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF..., established by agreement between Canada and the United States, and known as the St. Lawrence Seaway Schedule...

  12. For Whom Does Language Death Toll? Cautionary Notes from the Basque Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Echeverria, Begona

    2010-01-01

    In this article, I show that despite a seemingly inclusive, language-based identity promoted in schools and pedagogical materials, Basque identity and language are embedded with social histories that exclude large swaths of the would-be Basque nation: women and second language learners of Basque. To the extent that these processes continue to…

  13. The influence of economic incentives linked to road safety indicators on accidents: the case of toll concessions in Spain.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Thais; Vassallo, José Manuel; Herraiz, Israel

    2013-10-01

    The goal of this paper is to evaluate whether the incentives incorporated in toll highway concession contracts in order to encourage private operators to adopt measures to reduce accidents are actually effective at improving safety. To this end, we implemented negative binomial regression models using information about highway characteristics and accident data from toll highway concessions in Spain from 2007 to 2009. Our results show that even though road safety is highly influenced by variables that are not managed by the contractor, such as the annual average daily traffic (AADT), the percentage of heavy vehicles on the highway, number of lanes, number of intersections and average speed; the implementation of these incentives has a positive influence on the reduction of accidents and injuries. Consequently, this measure seems to be an effective way of improving safety performance in road networks.

  14. Role of Toll-Like Receptors in Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Biyikli, Oguz Oben; Baysak, Aysegul; Ece, Gulfem; Oz, Adnan Tolga; Ozhan, Mustafa Hikmet; Berdeli, Afig

    2016-01-01

    Background One-third of the world’s population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Investigation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) has revealed new information regarding the immunopathogenesis of this disease. Toll-like receptors can recognize various ligands with a lipoprotein structure in the bacilli. Toll-like receptor 2 and TLR-4 have been identified in association with tuberculosis infection. Objectives The aim of our study was to investigate the relationship between TLR polymorphism and infection progress. Methods Twenty-nine patients with a radiologically, microbiologically, and clinically proven active tuberculosis diagnosis were included in this 25-month study. Toll-like receptor 2 and TLR-4 polymorphisms and allele distributions were compared between these 29 patients and 100 healthy control subjects. Peripheral blood samples were taken from all patients. Genotyping of TLR-2, TLR-4, and macrophage migration inhibitory factor was performed. The extraction step was completed with a Qiagen mini blood purification system kit (Qiagen, Ontario, Canada) using a peripheral blood sample. The genotyping was performed using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Results In total, 19 of the 29 patients with tuberculosis infection had a TLR-2 polymorphism, and 20 of the 100 healthy subjects had a TLR-2 polymorphism (P < 0.001). The TLR-4 polymorphism and interferon-γ allele distributions were not statistically correlated. Conclusions Toll-like receptor 2 polymorphism is a risk factor for tuberculosis infection. The limiting factor in this study was the lack of investigation of the interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α levels, which are important in the development of infection. Detection of lower levels of these cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage specimens, especially among patients with TLR-2 defects, will provide new data that may support the results of this study. PMID:27942355

  15. Crude Extracts, Flavokawain B and Alpinetin Compounds from the Rhizome of Alpinia mutica Induce Cell Death via UCK2 Enzyme Inhibition and in Turn Reduce 18S rRNA Biosynthesis in HT-29 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Rasedee; Kassim, Nur Kartinee Bt; Rosli, Rozita; Yeap, Swee Keong; Waziri, Peter; Etti, Imaobong Christopher; Bello, Muhammad Bashir

    2017-01-01

    Uridine-cytidine kinase 2 is an enzyme that is overexpressed in abnormal cell growth and its implication is considered a hallmark of cancer. Due to the selective expression of UCK2 in cancer cells, a selective inhibition of this key enzyme necessitates the discovery of its potential inhibitors for cancer chemotherapy. The present study was carried out to demonstrate the potentials of natural phytochemicals from the rhizome of Alpinia mutica to inhibit UCK2 useful for colorectal cancer. Here, we employed the used of in vitro to investigate the effectiveness of natural UCK2 inhibitors to cause HT-29 cell death. Extracts, flavokawain B, and alpinetin compound from the rhizome of Alpinia mutica was used in the study. The study demonstrated that the expression of UCK2 mRNA were substantially reduced in treated HT-29 cells. In addition, downregulation in expression of 18S ribosomal RNA was also observed in all treated HT-29 cells. This was confirmed by fluorescence imaging to measure the level of expression of 18S ribosomal RNA in live cell images. The study suggests the possibility of MDM2 protein was downregulated and its suppression subsequently activates the expression of p53 during inhibition of UCK2 enzyme. The expression of p53 is directly linked to a blockage of cell cycle progression at G0/G1 phase and upregulates Bax, cytochrome c, and caspase 3 while Bcl2 was deregulated. In this respect, apoptosis induction and DNA fragmentation were observed in treated HT-29 cells. Initial results from in vitro studies have shown the ability of the bioactive compounds of flavokawain B and alpinetin to target UCK2 enzyme specifically, inducing cell cycle arrest and subsequently leading to cancer cell death, possibly through interfering the MDM2-p53 signalling pathway. These phenomena have proven that the bioactive compounds could be useful for future therapeutic use in colon cancer. PMID:28103302

  16. Crude Extracts, Flavokawain B and Alpinetin Compounds from the Rhizome of Alpinia mutica Induce Cell Death via UCK2 Enzyme Inhibition and in Turn Reduce 18S rRNA Biosynthesis in HT-29 Cells.

    PubMed

    Malami, Ibrahim; Abdul, Ahmad Bustamam; Abdullah, Rasedee; Kassim, Nur Kartinee Bt; Rosli, Rozita; Yeap, Swee Keong; Waziri, Peter; Etti, Imaobong Christopher; Bello, Muhammad Bashir

    2017-01-01

    Uridine-cytidine kinase 2 is an enzyme that is overexpressed in abnormal cell growth and its implication is considered a hallmark of cancer. Due to the selective expression of UCK2 in cancer cells, a selective inhibition of this key enzyme necessitates the discovery of its potential inhibitors for cancer chemotherapy. The present study was carried out to demonstrate the potentials of natural phytochemicals from the rhizome of Alpinia mutica to inhibit UCK2 useful for colorectal cancer. Here, we employed the used of in vitro to investigate the effectiveness of natural UCK2 inhibitors to cause HT-29 cell death. Extracts, flavokawain B, and alpinetin compound from the rhizome of Alpinia mutica was used in the study. The study demonstrated that the expression of UCK2 mRNA were substantially reduced in treated HT-29 cells. In addition, downregulation in expression of 18S ribosomal RNA was also observed in all treated HT-29 cells. This was confirmed by fluorescence imaging to measure the level of expression of 18S ribosomal RNA in live cell images. The study suggests the possibility of MDM2 protein was downregulated and its suppression subsequently activates the expression of p53 during inhibition of UCK2 enzyme. The expression of p53 is directly linked to a blockage of cell cycle progression at G0/G1 phase and upregulates Bax, cytochrome c, and caspase 3 while Bcl2 was deregulated. In this respect, apoptosis induction and DNA fragmentation were observed in treated HT-29 cells. Initial results from in vitro studies have shown the ability of the bioactive compounds of flavokawain B and alpinetin to target UCK2 enzyme specifically, inducing cell cycle arrest and subsequently leading to cancer cell death, possibly through interfering the MDM2-p53 signalling pathway. These phenomena have proven that the bioactive compounds could be useful for future therapeutic use in colon cancer.

  17. Recognition of lipopeptide patterns by Toll-like receptor 2-Toll-like receptor 6 heterodimer.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jin Young; Nan, Xuehua; Jin, Mi Sun; Youn, Suk-Jun; Ryu, Young Hee; Mah, Shinjee; Han, Seung Hyun; Lee, Hayyoung; Paik, Sang-Gi; Lee, Jie-Oh

    2009-12-18

    Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) initiates potent immune responses by recognizing diacylated and triacylated lipopeptides. Its ligand specificity is controlled by whether it heterodimerizes with TLR1 or TLR6. We have determined the crystal structures of TLR2-TLR6-diacylated lipopeptide, TLR2-lipoteichoic acid, and TLR2-PE-DTPA complexes. PE-DTPA, 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid, is a synthetic phospholipid derivative. Two major factors contribute to the ligand specificity of TLR2-TLR1 or TLR2-TLR6 heterodimers. First, the lipid channel of TLR6 is blocked by two phenylalanines. Simultaneous mutation of these phenylalanines made TLR2-TLR6 fully responsive not only to diacylated but also to triacylated lipopeptides. Second, the hydrophobic dimerization interface of TLR2-TLR6 is increased by 80%, which compensates for the lack of amide lipid interaction between the lipopeptide and TLR2-TLR6. The structures of the TLR2-lipoteichoic acid and the TLR2-PE-DTPA complexes demonstrate that a precise interaction pattern of the head group is essential for a robust immune response by TLR2 heterodimers.

  18. Targeting the Toll of Drug Abuse: The Translational Potential of Toll-Like Receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Bachtell, Ryan; Hutchinson, Mark R; Wang, Xiaohui; Rice, Kenner C; Maier, Steven F; Watkins, Linda R

    2015-01-01

    There is growing recognition that glial proinflammatory activation importantly contributes to the rewarding and reinforcing effects of a variety of drugs of abuse, including cocaine, methamphetamine, opioids, and alcohol. It has recently been proposed that glia are recognizing, and becoming activated by, such drugs as a CNS immunological response to these agents being xenobiotics; that is, substances foreign to the brain. Activation of glia, primarily microglia, by various drugs of abuse occurs via toll like receptor 4 (TLR4). The detection of such xenobiotics by TLR4 results in the release of glial neuroexcitatory and neurotoxic substances. These glial products of TLR4 activation enhance neuronal excitability within brain reward circuitry, thereby enhancing their rewarding and reinforcing effects. Indeed, selective pharmacological blockade of TLR4 activation, such as with the non-opioid TLR4 antagonist (+)-naltrexone, suppresses a number of indices of drug reward/reinforcement. These include: conditioned place preference, self-administration, drugprimed reinstatement, incubation of craving, and elevations of nucleus accumbens shell dopamine. Notably, TLR4 blockade fails to alter self-administration of food, indicative of a selective effect on drugs of abuse. Genetic disruption of TLR4 signaling recapitulates the effects of pharmacological TLR4 blockade, providing converging lines of evidence of a central importance of TLR4. Taken together, multiple lines of evidence converge to raise TLR4 as a promising therapeutic target for drug abuse.

  19. Targeting the Toll of Drug Abuse: The Translational Potential of Toll-Like Receptor 4

    PubMed Central

    Bachtell, Ryan; Hutchinson, Mark R.; Wang, Xiaohui; Rice, Kenner C.; Maier, Steven F; Watkins, Linda R.

    2017-01-01

    There is growing recognition that glial proinflammatory activation importantly contributes to the rewarding and reinforcing effects of a variety of drugs of abuse, including cocaine, methamphetamine, opioids, and alcohol. It has recently been proposed that glia are recognizing, and becoming activated by, such drugs as a CNS immunological response to these agents being xenobiotics; that is, substances foreign to the brain. Activation of glia, primarily microglia, by various drugs of abuse occurs via toll like receptor 4 (TLR4). The detection of such xenobiotics by TLR4 results in the release of glial neuroexcitatory and neurotoxic substances. These glial products of TLR4 activation enhance neuronal excitability within brain reward circuitry, thereby enhancing their rewarding and reinforcing effects. Indeed, selective pharmacological blockade of TLR4 activation, such as with the non-opioid TLR4 antagonist (+)-naltrexone, suppresses a number of indices of drug reward/reinforcement. These include: conditioned place preference, self-administration, drug-primed reinstatement, incubation of craving, and elevations of nucleus accumbens shell dopamine. Notably, TLR4 blockade fails to alter self-administration of food, indicative of a selective effect on drugs of abuse. Genetic disruption of TLR4 signaling recapitulates the effects of pharmacological TLR4 blockade, providing converging lines of evidence of a central importance of TLR4. Taken together, multiple lines of evidence converge to raise TLR4 as a promising therapeutic target for drug abuse. PMID:26022268

  20. Wealth transfer through voluntary death.

    PubMed

    Fung, K K

    1993-01-01

    Today, the hopelessly ill who are insured must choose between futile treatment and prolonged morbidity. Legalizing physician-assisted death for the hopelessly ill would broaden patient choice and conserve scarce resources. To ensure that the saved resources will not be re-channeled to more futile treatments for other hopelessly ill patients, those who choose dignified passage should be allowed to determine how the saving from their refusal to a prolonged death is to be re-deployed. Converting projected entitlements into death benefits at a discount would not only reduce health-care and retirements costs but improve allocation of scarce resources.

  1. Toll Like Receptor 4 Affects the Cerebral Biochemical Changes Induced by MPTP Treatment.

    PubMed

    Conte, Carmela; Roscini, Luca; Sardella, Roccaldo; Mariucci, Giuseppina; Scorzoni, Stefania; Beccari, Tommaso; Corte, Laura

    2017-02-01

    The etiology and pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) are still unclear. However, multiple lines of evidence suggest a critical role of the toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) in inflammatory response and neuronal death. Neuroinflammation may be associated with the misfolding and aggregation of proteins accompanied by a change in their secondary structure. Recent findings also suggest that biochemical perturbations in cerebral lipid content could contribute to the pathogenesis of central nervous system (CNS) disorders, including PD. Thus, it is of great importance to determine the biochemical changes that occur in PD. In this respect, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy represents a useful tool to detect molecular alterations in biological systems in response to stress stimuli. By relying upon FTIR approach, this study was designed to elucidate the potential role of TLR4 in biochemical changes induced by methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) neurotoxin in a mouse model of PD. The analysis of the FTIR spectra was performed in different brain regions of both wild type (WT) and toll like receptor 4-deficient (TLR4(-/-)) mice. It revealed that each brain region exhibited a characteristic molecular fingerprint at baseline, with no significant differences between genotypes. Conversely, WT and TLR4(-/-) mice showed differential biochemical response to MPTP toxicity, principally related to lipid and protein composition. These differences appeared to be characteristic for each brain area. Furthermore, the present study showed that WT mice resulted more vulnerable than TLR4(-/-) animals to striatal dopamine (DA) depletion following MPTP treatment. These results support the hypothesis of a possible involvement of TLR4 in biochemical changes occurring in neurodegeneration.

  2. Toll-Like Signaling and the Cytokine IL-6 Regulate Histone Deacetylase Dependent Neuronal Survival

    PubMed Central

    Forgione, Nicole; Tropepe, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) proteins have a role in promoting neuronal survival in vitro, but the mechanism underlying this function has not been identified. Here we provide evidence that components of the neuronal microenvironment, including non-neuronal cells and defined culture media, can mitigate midbrain neuronal cell death induced by HDAC inhibitor treatment. Using microarrays we further identified gene expression changes taking place in non-neuronal cells as a result of HDAC inhibition. This analysis demonstrated that HDAC inhibitor treatment results in the down-regulation of immunity related signaling factors, in particular the Toll-like receptors (TLR). TLR signaling is active in cultured midbrain cells, yet blocking TLR receptors is not sufficient to cause neuronal cell death. In contrast, selective activation of this pathway using TLR ligands can modestly block the effects of HDAC inhibition. Furthermore, we observed that the negative effects of HDAC inhibitor treatment on neuronal survival could be more substantially blocked by the cytokine Interleukin-6 (IL-6), which is a major downstream target of TLR signaling. These data suggest that HDACs function to promote neuronal survival by activating a TLR and IL-6 dependent pathway. PMID:22848425

  3. Lifestyle and host defense mechanisms of the dung beetle, Euoniticellus intermedius: the toll signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Hull, Rodney; Alaouna, Mohamed; Khanyile, Lucky; Byrne, Marcus; Ntwasa, Monde

    2013-01-01

    The dung beetle, Euoniticellus intermedius (Reiche) (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) is an important ecological and agricultural agent. Their main activity, the burying of dung, improves quality of the soil and reduces pests that could cause illness in animals. E. intermedius are therefore important for agriculture and for good maintenance of the environment, and are regarded as effective biological control agents for parasites of the gastrointestinal tract in livestock. The ability of E. intermedius to co-exist comfortably with many microorganisms, some of which are important human pathogens, stimulated our interest in its host defense strategies. The aim of this study was to investigate the Toll signaling pathway, which is strongly activated by fungi. Gene expression associated with fungal infection was analyzed by using 2-D gel electrophoresis and mass spectroscopy. Furthermore, the partial adult transcriptome was investigated for the presence of known immune response genes by using high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics. The results presented here suggest that E. intermedius responds to fungal challenge via the Toll signaling pathway.

  4. Characteristics of run-off quality and pollution loading from a highway toll-gate.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju Young

    2012-01-01

    The Ministry of Environment of the Republic of Korea has been seriously considering implementing a TMDL (Total Maximum Daily Load) as a mandatory requirement on watersheds because of the potential water pollution from highway toll-gates. The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics of run-off quality and pollution loading during rainfall events at a highway toll-gate. Samples were analysed for run-off quantity and quality parameters such as COD(cr), TSS, total petroleum hydrocarbons, nutrients (TKN, NO3, TP and PO4) and several heavy metals (As, Cu, Cd, Ni, Pb and Zn). Based on a hydrograph and pollutant graph analysis, the pollutant concentration peak occurred in the run-off 10 minutes after the onset of rainfall. The typical first flush effect on the concentration depended on the rainfall intensity and the number of antecedent dry days. The relationships between the run-off and the event mean concentrations of the pollutants (e.g. TSS and COD) were described by general nonlinear equations. For governmental implementation of TMDL policies, the estimation of the cumulative TSS load was 1032 kg/(ha x yr) in 2007, 963.44 kg/(ha x yr) in 2008 and 847.21 kg/(ha x yr) in 2009. This information can lead to improved practical water quality management practices and reduced costs of improving water quality.

  5. Lifestyle and Host Defense Mechanisms of the Dung Beetle, Euoniticellus intermedius: The Toll Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Rodney; Alaouna, Mohamed; Khanyile, Lucky; Byrne, Marcus; Ntwasa, Monde

    2013-01-01

    The dung beetle, Euoniticellus intermedius (Reiche) (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) is an important ecological and agricultural agent. Their main activity, the burying of dung, improves quality of the soil and reduces pests that could cause illness in animals. E. intermedius are therefore important for agriculture and for good maintenance of the environment, and are regarded as effective biological control agents for parasites of the gastrointestinal tract in livestock. The ability of E. intermedius to co-exist comfortably with many microorganisms, some of which are important human pathogens, stimulated our interest in its host defense strategies. The aim of this study was to investigate the Toll signaling pathway, which is strongly activated by fungi. Gene expression associated with fungal infection was analyzed by using 2-D gel electrophoresis and mass spectroscopy. Furthermore, the partial adult transcriptome was investigated for the presence of known immune response genes by using high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics. The results presented here suggest that E. intermedius responds to fungal challenge via the Toll signaling pathway. PMID:24735102

  6. Patents for Toll-like receptor ligands as radiation countermeasures for acute radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay K; Pollard, Harvey B

    2015-01-01

    Acute radiation exposure induces apoptosis of tissues in the hematopoietic, digestive, cutaneous, cardiovascular and nervous systems; extensive apoptosis of these tissues ultimately leads to acute radiation syndrome. A novel strategy for developing radiation countermeasures has been to imitate the genetic mechanisms acquired by radiation-resistant tumors. Two mechanisms that underlie this ability of tumor cells are the p53 and NF-κB pathways. The loss of p53 function results in the inactivation of pro-apoptotic control mechanisms, while constitutive activation of NF-κB results in the up-regulation of anti-apoptotic genes. Various Toll-like receptor ligands are capable of up regulating the NF-κB pathway, which increases radio-resistance and reduces radiation-induced apoptosis in various tissues. Several Toll-like receptor ligands have been patented and are currently under development as radiation countermeasures for acute radiation syndrome. Ongoing studies suggest that a few of these attractive agents are progressing well along the US FDA approval pathway to become radiation countermeasures.

  7. Patents for Toll-like receptor ligands as radiation countermeasures for acute radiation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vijay K; Pollard, Harvey B

    2015-01-01

    Acute radiation exposure induces apoptosis of tissues in the hematopoietic, digestive, cutaneous, cardiovascular and nervous systems; extensive apoptosis of these tissues ultimately leads to acute radiation syndrome. A novel strategy for developing radiation countermeasures has been to imitate the genetic mechanisms acquired by radiation-resistant tumors. Two mechanisms that underlie this ability of tumor cells are the p53 and NF-κB pathways. The loss of p53 function results in the inactivation of pro-apoptotic control mechanisms, while constitutive activation of NF-κB results in the up-regulation of anti-apoptotic genes. Various Toll-like receptor ligands are capable of up regulating the NF-κB pathway, which increases radio-resistance and reduces radiation-induced apoptosis in various tissues. Several Toll-like receptor ligands have been patented and are currently under development as radiation countermeasures for acute radiation syndrome. Ongoing studies suggest that a few of these attractive agents are progressing well along the US FDA approval pathway to become radiation countermeasures. PMID:26135043

  8. Aging and Death Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinder, Margaret M.; Hayslip, Bert, Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The elderly death rate is somewhat higher than the death rate in general. Numbers of schools with gerontological curricula and frequency of death education courses are positively related to elderly death rates. The contention that elderly deaths have less social impact is not supported. (JAC)

  9. Sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moon, Rachel Y; Horne, Rosemary S C; Hauck, Fern R

    2007-11-03

    Despite declines in prevalence during the past two decades, sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) continues to be the leading cause of death for infants aged between 1 month and 1 year in developed countries. Behavioural risk factors identified in epidemiological studies include prone and side positions for infant sleep, smoke exposure, soft bedding and sleep surfaces, and overheating. Evidence also suggests that pacifier use at sleep time and room sharing without bed sharing are associated with decreased risk of SIDS. Although the cause of SIDS is unknown, immature cardiorespiratory autonomic control and failure of arousal responsiveness from sleep are important factors. Gene polymorphisms relating to serotonin transport and autonomic nervous system development might make affected infants more vulnerable to SIDS. Campaigns for risk reduction have helped to reduce SIDS incidence by 50-90%. However, to reduce the incidence even further, greater strides must be made in reducing prenatal smoke exposure and implementing other recommended infant care practices. Continued research is needed to identify the pathophysiological basis of SIDS.

  10. Commentary: Pursuing justice in death penalty trials.

    PubMed

    Watson, Clarence; Eth, Spencer; Leong, Gregory B

    2012-01-01

    The capital trial, by its nature, is fraught with emotionally disturbing elements that jurors must face when deciding the ultimate fate of a guilty defendant. A confluence of mitigating and aggravating factors influences a capital jury's decision to impose a sentence of death. The presence or absence of defendant remorse in these cases may make all the difference in whether a capital defendant's life is spared. This commentary examines the onerous emotional toll encountered by capital jurors in light of the findings of Corwin and colleagues regarding defendant remorse and juror's need for affect. The commentary also presents practical and ethics-related considerations that should be kept in mind when reflecting on their study.

  11. Environmental lead exposure to toll booth workers in Hong Kong

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, T.C.; Wong, L.T.L.; Lam, C.W.K.

    1988-01-01

    A survey of workers in the Lion Rock Tunnel toll booths was conducted, as they were regarded as a high risk group in lead exposure due to high density of vehicular traffic. The exposure of the workers to lead was determined by continuous sapling of air around the breathing zone of workers inside the booths. Blood lead concentration of 50 workers showed a mean of 0.65 {mu}mol/L and the mean urine lead concentration was 0.14 {mu}mol/L. Other tests, such as urinary amino-levulinic acid (ALA), erythrocyte zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) and hemoglobin concentration (Hb), were also preformed. The blood lead concentrations and other biological parameters of the toll-booth workers were acceptable and may be attributed to the recent legislation to lower the lead content in petrol and to the good preventive measures taken by the management.

  12. Standardization and Interoperability Problems of European Electronic Tolling Service (EETS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowacki, Gabriel; Mitraszewska, Izabella; Kamiński, Tomasz; Potapczuk, Włodzimierz; Kallweit, Thomas

    The paper refers to some standardization and interoperability problems of the European Electronic Toll Service (EETS) implementation in European Union. The existing EETS systems in the European Union member states are not interoperable due to many differences among them. European Commission has taken bold steps to address that issue. The first one was the 2004/52/EC Directive on the interoperability in the Community. The second one was the decision to launch Europe's own Galileo system. The third was the EC decision from 6th October 2009, based on Research Charging Interoperability (RCI) and the Common Electronic Fee Collection System for a Road Tolling European Service(CESARE) projects. Furthermore, the Motor Transport Institute researches, concerning the mentioned matters have been presented too.

  13. Determination of death: Metaphysical and biomedical discourse.

    PubMed

    Jakušovaitė, Irayda; Luneckaitė, Žydrunė; Peičius, Eimantas; Bagdonaitė, Živilė; Riklikienė, Olga; Stankevičius, Edgaras

    2016-01-01

    The prominence of biomedical criteria relying on brain death reduces the impact of metaphysical, anthropological, psychosocial, cultural, religious, and legal aspects disclosing the real value and essence of human life. The aim of this literature review is to discuss metaphysical and biomedical approaches toward death and their complimentary relationship in the determination of death. A critical appraisal of theoretical and scientific evidence and legal documents supported analytical discourse. In the metaphysical discourse of death, two main questions about what human death is and how to determine the fact of death clearly separate the ontological and epistemological aspects of death. During the 20th century, various understandings of human death distinguished two different approaches toward the human: the human is a subject of activities or a subject of the human being. Extinction of the difference between the entities and the being, emphasized as rational-logical instrumentation, is not sufficient to understand death thoroughly. Biological criteria of death are associated with biological features and irreversible loss of certain cognitive capabilities. Debating on the question "Does a brain death mean death of a human being?" two approaches are considering: the body-centrist and the mind-centrist. By bridging those two alternatives human death appears not only as biomedical, but also as metaphysical phenomenon. It was summarized that a predominance of clinical criteria for determination of death in practice leads to medicalization of death and limits the holistic perspective toward individual's death. Therefore, the balance of metaphysical and biomedical approaches toward death and its determination would decrease the medicalization of the concept of death.

  14. Death: 'nothing' gives insight.

    PubMed

    Ettema, Eric J

    2013-08-01

    According to a widely accepted belief, we cannot know our own death--death means 'nothing' to us. At first sight, the meaning of 'nothing' just implies the negation or absence of 'something'. Death then simply refers to the negation or absence of life. As a consequence, however, death has no meaning of itself. This leads to an ontological paradox in which death is both acknowledged and denied: death is … nothing. In this article, I investigate whether insight into the ontological paradox of the nothingness of death can contribute to a good end-of-life. By analysing Aquinas', Heidegger's and Derrida's understanding of death as nothingness, I explore how giving meaning to death on different ontological levels connects to, and at the same time provides resistance against, the harsh reality of death. By doing so, I intend to demonstrate that insight into the nothingness of death can count as a framework for a meaningful dealing with death.

  15. 1. AERIAL VIEW, LOOKING SE. CHICAGO SKYWAY TOLL BRIDGE (HAER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. AERIAL VIEW, LOOKING SE. CHICAGO SKYWAY TOLL BRIDGE (HAER No. IL-145) IS TOWARD RIGHT OF FRAME; PITTSBURGH, FORT WAYNE & CHICAGO RAILWAY BRIDGE IS JUST LEFT OF GRAIN ELEVATOR; PAIR OF LAKE SHORE & MICHIGAN SOUTHERN RAILWAY BRIDGES (HAER No. IL-161) ARE TOWARD LEFT OF FRAME. - Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne & Chicago Railway, Calumet River Bridge, Spanning Calumet River, east of Chicago Skyway (I-90), Chicago, Cook County, IL

  16. Specific calcineurin isoforms are involved in Drosophila toll immune signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-Xian; Dijkers, Pascale F

    2015-01-01

    Because excessive or inadequate responses can be detrimental, immune responses to infection require appropriate regulation. Networks of signaling pathways establish versatility of immune responses. Drosophila melanogaster is a powerful model organism for dissecting conserved innate immune responses to infection. For example, the Toll pathway, which promotes activation of NF-κB transcription factors Dorsal/Dorsal-related immune factor (Dif), was first identified in Drosophila. Together with the IMD pathway, acting upstream of NF-κB transcription factor Relish, these pathways constitute a central immune signaling network. Inputs in these pathways contribute to specific and appropriate responses to microbial insults. Relish activity during infection is modulated by Ca(2+)-dependent serine/threonine phosphatase calcineurin, an important target of immunosuppressants in transplantation biology. Only one of the three Drosophila calcineurin isoforms, calcineurin A1, acts on Relish during infection. However, it is not known whether there is a role for calcineurin in Dorsal/Dif immune signaling. In this article, we demonstrate involvement of specific calcineurin isoforms, protein phosphatase at 14D (Pp2B-14D)/calcineurin A at 14F (CanA-14F), in Toll-mediated immune signaling. These isoforms do not affect IMD signaling. In cell culture, pharmacological inhibition of calcineurin or RNA interference against homologous calcineurin isoforms Pp2B-14D/CanA-14F, but not against isoform calcineurin A1, decreased Toll-dependent Dorsal/Dif activity. A Pp2B-14D gain-of-function transgene promoted Dorsal nuclear translocation and Dorsal/Dif activity. In vivo, Pp2B-14D/CanA-14F RNA interference attenuated the Dorsal/Dif-dependent response to infection without affecting the Relish-dependent response. Altogether, these data identify a novel input, calcineurin, in Toll immune signaling and demonstrate involvement of specific calcineurin isoforms in Drosophila NF-κB signaling. Copyright

  17. [Unobserved death of an infant: cot death?].

    PubMed

    van Wouwe, J P; Dandachli, T H; Huber, J

    1999-10-02

    Three children, two girls aged 8 and 12 months and one boy aged 7 weeks, were found dead unexpectedly. Autopsy revealed pneumonia in two children, following which the diagnosis of 'natural, explained death' was made; one child showed no abnormalities and the diagnosis read 'natural, unexplained death' (cot death). Autopsy may currently only be performed with parental permission or, in case of doubt about unnatural cause of death, by order of the public prosecutor. The authors propose routine performance of a protocolled autopsy by GP, pediatrician, pathologist and medical examiner in order to avoid subsequent and possibly incorrect doubt about the cause of death.

  18. Alternate transcription of the Toll-like receptor signaling cascade

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Christine A; Chalk, Alistair M; Forrest, Alistair; Taylor, Darrin; Waddell, Nic; Schroder, Kate; Himes, S Roy; Faulkner, Geoffrey; Lo, Sandra; Kasukawa, Takeya; Kawaji, Hideya; Kai, Chikatoshi; Kawai, Jun; Katayama, Shintaro; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Hume, David A; Grimmond, Sean M

    2006-01-01

    Background Alternate splicing of key signaling molecules in the Toll-like receptor (Tlr) cascade has been shown to dramatically alter the signaling capacity of inflammatory cells, but it is not known how common this mechanism is. We provide transcriptional evidence of widespread alternate splicing in the Toll-like receptor signaling pathway, derived from a systematic analysis of the FANTOM3 mouse data set. Functional annotation of variant proteins was assessed in light of inflammatory signaling in mouse primary macrophages, and the expression of each variant transcript was assessed by splicing arrays. Results A total of 256 variant transcripts were identified, including novel variants of Tlr4, Ticam1, Tollip, Rac1, Irak1, 2 and 4, Mapk14/p38, Atf2 and Stat1. The expression of variant transcripts was assessed using custom-designed splicing arrays. We functionally tested the expression of Tlr4 transcripts under a range of cytokine conditions via northern and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The effects of variant Mapk14/p38 protein expression on macrophage survival were demonstrated. Conclusion Members of the Toll-like receptor signaling pathway are highly alternatively spliced, producing a large number of novel proteins with the potential to functionally alter inflammatory outcomes. These variants are expressed in primary mouse macrophages in response to inflammatory mediators such as interferon-γ and lipopolysaccharide. Our data suggest a surprisingly common role for variant proteins in diversification/repression of inflammatory signaling. PMID:16507160

  19. Sigma-1 (σ₁) receptor deficiency reduces β-amyloid(25-35)-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death and cognitive deficits through suppressing phosphorylation of the NMDA receptor NR2B.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Sha, Sha; Chen, Tingting; Wang, Conghui; Hong, Juan; Jie, Pinghui; Zhou, Rong; Li, Lin; Sokabe, Masahiro; Chen, Ling

    2015-02-01

    In early Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain, reduction of sigma-1 receptors (σ1R) is detected. In this study, we employed male heterozygous σ1R knockout (σ1R(+/-)) mice showing normal cognitive performance to investigate association of σ1R deficiency with AD risk. Herein we report that a single injection (i.c.v.) of Aβ(25-35) impaired spatial memory with approximately 25% death of pyramidal cells in the hippocampal CA1 region of WT mice (Aβ(25-35)-WT mice), whereas it did not cause such impairments in σ1R(+/-) mice (Aβ(25-35)-σ1R(+/-) mice). Compared with WT mice, Aβ(25-35)-WT mice showed increased levels of NMDA-activated currents (INMDA) and NR2B phosphorylation (phospho-NR2B) in the hippocampal CA1 region at 48 h after Aβ25-35-injection (post-Aβ(25-35)) followed by approximately 40% decline at 72 h post-Aβ(25-35) of their respective control levels, which was inhibited by the σ1R antagonist NE100. In Aβ(25-35)-WT mice, the administration of NR2B inhibitor Ro25-6981 or NE100 on day 1-4 post-Aβ(25-35) attenuated the memory deficits and loss of pyramidal cells. By contrast, Aβ(25-35)-σ1R(+/-) mice showed a slight increase in the INMDA density and the phospho-NR2B at 48 h or 72 h post-Aβ25-35 compared to σ1R(+/-) mice. Treatment with σ1R agonist PRE084 in Aβ(25-35)-σ1R(+/-) mice caused the same changes in the INMDA density and the phospho-NR2B as those in Aβ(25-35)-WT mice. Furthermore, Aβ(25-35)-σ1R(+/-) mice treated with the NMDA receptor agonist NMDA or PRE084 on day 1-4 post-Aβ(25-35) showed a loss of neuronal cells and memory impairment. These results indicate that the σ1R deficiency can reduce Aβ(25-35)-induced neuronal cell death and cognitive deficits through suppressing Aβ(25-35)-enhanced NR2B phosphorylation.

  20. Radiofrequency Ablation to Prevent Sudden Cardiac Death.

    PubMed

    Atoui, Moustapha; Gunda, Sampath; Lakkireddy, Dhanunjaya; Mahapatra, Srijoy

    2015-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation may prevent or treat atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. Since some of these arrhythmias are associated with sudden cardiac death, it has been hypothesized that ablation may prevent sudden death in certain cases. We performed a literature search to better understand under which circumstances ablation may prevent sudden death and found little randomized data demonstrating the long-term effects of ablation. Current literature shows that ablation clearly prevents symptoms of arrhythmia and may reduce the incidence of sudden cardiac death in select patients, although data does not indicate improved mortality. Ongoing clinical trials are needed to better define the role of ablation in preventing sudden cardiac death.

  1. Study on effect of toll station on the traffic flow on three-line road

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guang-yu; Li, Wen-bo; Feng, Yu-jie

    2013-03-01

    Based on the NaSch Model, a new three-line cellular automata model emphasizing toll station on the high ways is built to discuss the impact of different amount of toll stations on the traffic flow. The models are as follows: Firstly, the process of cars driving is simulated. Secondly, the process of pulling station is simulated. In this part, two Cellular Automata Models are built separately for two cases, three tollbooths in the toll station and four tollbooths. The result shows that when the density of cars is on medium level, comparing with the toll station with three tollbooths, the toll station with four tollbooths can remit the traffic congestion effectively, but when the density of cars is too high or too low, the toll station with three tollbooths can do better.

  2. Deaths from heart failure: using coarsened exact matching to correct cause-of-death statistics

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Incomplete information on death certificates makes recorded cause-of-death data less useful for public health monitoring and planning. Certifying physicians sometimes list only the mode of death without indicating the underlying disease or diseases that led to the death. Inconsistent cause-of-death assignment among cardiovascular causes of death is of particular concern. This can prevent valid epidemiologic comparisons across countries and over time. Methods We propose that coarsened exact matching be used to infer the underlying causes of death where only the mode of death is known. We focus on the case of heart failure in US, Mexican, and Brazilian death records. Results Redistribution algorithms derived using this method assign the largest proportion of heart failure deaths to ischemic heart disease in all three countries (53%, 26%, and 22% respectively), with larger proportions assigned to hypertensive heart disease and diabetes in Mexico and Brazil (16% and 23% vs. 7% for hypertensive heart disease, and 13% and 9% vs. 6% for diabetes). Reassigning these heart failure deaths increases the US ischemic heart disease mortality rate by 6%. Conclusions The frequency with which physicians list heart failure in the causal chain for various underlying causes of death allows for inference about how physicians use heart failure on the death certificate in different settings. This easy-to-use method has the potential to reduce bias and increase comparability in cause-of-death data, thereby improving the public health utility of death records. PMID:20388206

  3. Nanotechnology Tolls the Bell for Plastic Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Salehahmadi, Zeinab; Hajiliasgari, Fatemeh

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology is an emerging discipline, having power to revolutionarize every scientific field to a very deep level which previously thought to be a science fiction. Having a great potential to beneficially change the way a disease is diagnosed, treated and prevented, nanotechnology practically impacts on state of the art healthcare technologies and plays a crucial role in changing the field of surgery. Surgeons are constantly looking for minimally invasive ways to treat their patients, as recovery is faster when a lesser trauma is inflicted upon a patient, scarring is lessened and there are usually fewer complications in the aftermath of the operation. Through nanotechnology, tiny biosensors could be constructed which could take these factors into account, thus shortening the patient recovery period and saving hospitals money, reducing infection rates within the hospital, reducing the waiting lists for operation and allowing doctors to treat more patients in the same period of time. This review employs a thematic analysis of online series of academic papers focuses on the potentials of nanotechnology in surgery, especially in plastic surgery and addresses the possible future prospects of nanotechnology in this field. PMID:25489508

  4. Racial bias in federal nutrition policy, Part II: Weak guidelines take a disproportionate toll.

    PubMed Central

    Bertron, P.; Barnard, N. D.; Mills, M.

    1999-01-01

    Many diet-related chronic diseases take a disproportionate toll among members of racial minorities. Research shows the prevalence of diabetes, hypertension, cancer, and heart disease is higher among various ethnic groups compared with whites. The Guidelines and the Food Guide Pyramid, however, promote the use of multiple servings of meats and dairy products each day and do not encourage replacing these foods with vegetables, legumes, fruits, and grains. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans encourage a 30% caloric reduction in fat intake and make no provision for further reductions for those who wish to minimize health risks. Abundant evidence has shown that regular exercise combined with diets lower in fat and richer in plant products than is encouraged by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans are associated with reduced risk of these chronic conditions. While ineffective Dietary Guidelines potentially put all Americans at unnecessary risk, this is particularly true for those groups hardest hit by chronic disease. PMID:10333669

  5. Children and Death.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Andrew J. J.

    Health professionals and educators should develop their abilities to educate about death and to comfort the bereaved. Due to lower death rates, the lack of philosophical religious views, and distorted perceptions of death contributed by television, death has become a mystery instead of a segment of the common experience. Particularly when a child…

  6. Brain Death Determination.

    PubMed

    Spinello, Irene M

    2015-09-01

    In the United States, each year 1% to 2% of deaths are brain deaths. Considerable variation in the practice of determining brain death still remains, despite the publication of practice parameters in 1995 and an evidence-based guideline update in 2010. This review is intended to give bedside clinicians an overview of definition, the causes and pitfalls of misdiagnosing brain death, and a focus on the specifics of the brain death determination process.

  7. The Unique Impact of Abolition of Jim Crow Laws on Reducing Inequities in Infant Death Rates and Implications for Choice of Comparison Groups in Analyzing Societal Determinants of Health

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jarvis T.; Coull, Brent; Waterman, Pamela D.; Beckfield, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We explored associations between the abolition of Jim Crow laws (i.e., state laws legalizing racial discrimination overturned by the 1964 US Civil Rights Act) and birth cohort trends in infant death rates. Methods. We analyzed 1959 to 2006 US Black and White infant death rates within and across sets of states (polities) with and without Jim Crow laws. Results. Between 1965 and 1969, a unique convergence of Black infant death rates occurred across polities; in 1960 to 1964, the Black infant death rate was 1.19 times higher (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.18, 1.20) in the Jim Crow polity than in the non–Jim Crow polity, whereas in 1970 to 1974 the rate ratio shrank to and remained at approximately 1 (with the 95% CI including 1) until 2000, when it rose to 1.10 (95% CI = 1.08, 1.12). No such convergence occurred for Black–White differences in infant death rates or for White infants. Conclusions. Our results suggest that abolition of Jim Crow laws affected US Black infant death rates and that valid analysis of societal determinants of health requires appropriate comparison groups. PMID:24134378

  8. Confidential inquiry into malaria deaths.

    PubMed Central

    Dürrheim, D. N.; Frieremans, S.; Kruger, P.; Mabuza, A.; de Bruyn, J. C.

    1999-01-01

    The results of a confidential inquiry into mortality attributed to malaria in South Africa's Mpumalanga Province are being used to guide the design of strategies for improving the management of cases and reducing the probability of deaths from the disease. PMID:10212518

  9. Hypoxia preconditioning increases survival and decreases expression of Toll-like receptor 4 in pulmonary artery endothelial cells exposed to lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Ali, Irshad; Nanchal, Rahul; Husnain, Fouad; Audi, Said; Konduri, G Ganesh; Densmore, John C; Medhora, Meetha; Jacobs, Elizabeth R

    2013-09-01

    Abstract Pulmonary or systemic infections and hypoxemic respiratory failure are among the leading causes of admission to intensive care units, and these conditions frequently exist in sequence or in tandem. Inflammatory responses to infections are reproduced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) engaging Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Apoptosis is a hallmark of lung injury in sepsis. This study was conducted to determine whether preexposure to LPS or hypoxia modulated the survival of pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs). We also investigated the role TLR4 receptor expression plays in apoptosis due to these conditions. Bovine PAECs were cultured in hypoxic or normoxic environments and treated with LPS. TLR4 antagonist TAK-242 was used to probe the role played by TLR4 receptors in cell survival. Cell apoptosis and survival were measured by caspase 3 activity and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) incorporation. TLR4 expression and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) production were also determined. LPS increased caspase 3 activity in a TAK-242-sensitive manner and decreased MTT incorporation. Apoptosis was decreased in PAECs preconditioned with hypoxia prior to LPS exposure. LPS increased TNF-α production, and hypoxic preconditioning blunted it. Hypoxic preconditioning reduced LPS-induced TLR4 messenger RNA and TLR4 protein. TAK-242 decreased to baseline the LPS-stimulated expression of TLR4 messenger RNA regardless of environmental conditions. In contrast, LPS followed by hypoxia substantially increased apoptosis and cell death. In conclusion, protection from LPS-stimulated PAEC apoptosis by hypoxic preconditioning is attributable in part to reduction in TLR4 expression. If these signaling pathways apply to septic patients, they may account for differing sensitivities of individuals to acute lung injury depending on oxygen tensions in PAECs in vivo.

  10. Hypoxia preconditioning increases survival and decreases expression of Toll-like receptor 4 in pulmonary artery endothelial cells exposed to lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Nanchal, Rahul; Audi, Said; Konduri, G. Ganesh; Medhora, Meetha

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary or systemic infections and hypoxemic respiratory failure are among the leading causes of admission to intensive care units, and these conditions frequently exist in sequence or in tandem. Inflammatory responses to infections are reproduced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) engaging Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Apoptosis is a hallmark of lung injury in sepsis. This study was conducted to determine whether preexposure to LPS or hypoxia modulated the survival of pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs). We also investigated the role TLR4 receptor expression plays in apoptosis due to these conditions. Bovine PAECs were cultured in hypoxic or normoxic environments and treated with LPS. TLR4 antagonist TAK-242 was used to probe the role played by TLR4 receptors in cell survival. Cell apoptosis and survival were measured by caspase 3 activity and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) incorporation. TLR4 expression and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) production were also determined. LPS increased caspase 3 activity in a TAK-242-sensitive manner and decreased MTT incorporation. Apoptosis was decreased in PAECs preconditioned with hypoxia prior to LPS exposure. LPS increased TNF-α production, and hypoxic preconditioning blunted it. Hypoxic preconditioning reduced LPS-induced TLR4 messenger RNA and TLR4 protein. TAK-242 decreased to baseline the LPS-stimulated expression of TLR4 messenger RNA regardless of environmental conditions. In contrast, LPS followed by hypoxia substantially increased apoptosis and cell death. In conclusion, protection from LPS-stimulated PAEC apoptosis by hypoxic preconditioning is attributable in part to reduction in TLR4 expression. If these signaling pathways apply to septic patients, they may account for differing sensitivities of individuals to acute lung injury depending on oxygen tensions in PAECs in vivo. PMID:24618542

  11. Toll-like receptor 4 signaling contributes to Paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Zhang, Haijun; Zhang, Hongmei; Kosturakis, Alyssa K; Jawad, Abdul Basit; Dougherty, Patrick M

    2014-07-01

    This paper tests the contribution of the toll-like receptors, TLR4 in particular, in the initiation and maintenance of paclitaxel-related chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. TLR4 and its immediate downstream signaling molecules-myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) and toll/interleukin 1 receptor domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF)-were found to be increased in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) using Western blot by day 7 of paclitaxel treatment. The behavioral phenotype, the increase of both TLR4 and MyD88, was blocked by cotreatment with the TLR4 antagonist lipopolysaccharide-Rhodobacter sphaeroides during chemotherapy. A similar, but less robust, behavioral effect was observed using intrathecal treatment of MyD88 homodimerization inhibitory peptide. DRG levels of TLR4 and MyD88 reduced over the next 2 weeks, whereas these levels remained increased in spinal cord through day 21 following chemotherapy. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed TLR4 expression in both calcitonin gene-related peptide-positive and isolectin B4-positive small DRG neurons. MyD88 was only found in calcitonin gene-related peptide-positive neurons, and TRIF was found in both calcitonin gene-related peptide-positive and isolectin B4-positive small DRG neurons as well as in medium- and large-size DRG neurons. In the spinal cord, TLR4 was only found colocalized to astrocytes but not with either microglia or neurons. Intrathecal treatment with the TLR4 antagonist lipopolysaccharide-R. sphaeroides transiently reversed preestablished chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy mechanical hypersensitivity. These results strongly implicate TLR4 signaling in the DRG and the spinal cord in the induction and maintenance of paclitaxel-related chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. The toll-like receptor TLR4 and MyD88 signaling pathway could be a new potential therapeutic target in paclitaxel-induced painful neuropathy. Copyright © 2014 American Pain

  12. Toll-Like Receptor–2/6 and Toll-Like Receptor–9 Agonists Suppress Viral Replication but Not Airway Hyperreactivity in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Scott E.; Dickey, Burton F.; Fryer, Allison D.; Jacoby, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory virus infections cause airway hyperreactivity (AHR). Preventative strategies for virus-induced AHR remain limited. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been suggested as a therapeutic target because of their central role in triggering antiviral immune responses. Previous studies showed that concurrent treatment with TLR2/6 and TLR9 agonists reduced lethality and the microbial burden in murine models of bacterial and viral pneumonia. This study investigated the effects of TLR2/6 and TLR9 agonist pretreatment on parainfluenza virus pneumonia and virus-induced AHR in guinea pigs in vivo. Synthetic TLR2/6 lipopeptide agonist Pam2CSK4 and Class C oligodeoxynucleotide TLR9 agonist ODN2395, administered in combination 24 hours before virus infection, significantly reduced viral replication in the lung. Despite a fivefold reduction in viral titers, concurrent TLR2/6 and TLR9 agonist pretreatment did not prevent virus-induced AHR or virus-induced inhibitory M2 muscarinic receptor dysfunction. Interestingly, the TLR agonists independently caused non–M2-dependent AHR. These data confirm the therapeutic antiviral potential of TLR agonists, while suggesting that virus inhibition may be insufficient to prevent virus-induced airway pathophysiology. Furthermore, TLR agonists independently cause AHR, albeit through a distinctly different mechanism from that of parainfluenza virus. PMID:23449736

  13. Death Education and Death-Related Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoelter, Jon W.; Epley, Rita J.

    1979-01-01

    Assessed the impact of a death and dying course. Results showed no significant pre-test/post-test differences for the experimental or the control group, but indicated initial differences between the two groups, suggesting that students enrolling in a death and dying course have more favorable attitudes toward both suicide and abortion. (Author)

  14. Whither brain death?

    PubMed

    Bernat, James L

    2014-01-01

    The publicity surrounding the recent McMath and Muñoz cases has rekindled public interest in brain death: the familiar term for human death determination by showing the irreversible cessation of clinical brain functions. The concept of brain death was developed decades ago to permit withdrawal of therapy in hopeless cases and to permit organ donation. It has become widely established medical practice, and laws permit it in all U.S. jurisdictions. Brain death has a biophilosophical justification as a standard for determining human death but remains poorly understood by the public and by health professionals. The current controversies over brain death are largely restricted to the academy, but some practitioners express ambivalence over whether brain death is equivalent to human death. Brain death remains an accepted and sound concept, but more work is necessary to establish its biophilosophical justification and to educate health professionals and the public.

  15. Sudden infant death syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Carl E.; Hauck, Fern R.

    2006-01-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) continues to be the most common cause of postneonatal infant death. SIDS is a complex, multifactorial disorder, the cause of which is still not fully understood. However, much is known now about environmental risk factors, some of which are modifiable. These include maternal and antenatal risk factors such as smoking during pregnancy, as well as infant-related risk factors such as non-supine sleeping position and soft bedding. Emerging evidence also substantiates an expanding number of genetic risk factors. Interactions between environmental and genetic risk factors may be of critical importance in determining an infant's actual risk of SIDS. Although no practical way exists to identify which infants will die of SIDS, nor is there a safe and proven prevention strategy even if identification were feasible, reducing exposure to modifiable risk factors has helped to lower the incidence of SIDS. Current challenges include wider dissemination of guidelines to all people who care for infants, dissemination of guidelines in culturally appropriate ways, and surveillance of SIDS trends and other outcomes associated with implementation of these guidelines. PMID:16785462

  16. Sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Adams, Stephen M; Ward, Chad E; Garcia, Karla L

    2015-06-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the sudden unexpected death of a child younger than one year during sleep that cannot be explained after a postmortem evaluation including autopsy, a thorough history, and scene evaluation. The incidence of SIDS has decreased more than 50% in the past 20 years, largely as a result of the Back to Sleep campaign. The most important risk factors relate to the sleep environment. Prone and side sleeping positions are significantly more dangerous than the supine position. Bed sharing with a parent is strongly correlated with an increased risk of SIDS, especially in infants younger than 12 weeks. Apparent life-threatening events are not a risk factor for SIDS. Parents should place infants on their backs to sleep, should not share a bed, and should avoid exposing the infant to tobacco smoke. Other risk-reducing measures include using a firm crib mattress, breastfeeding, keeping vaccinations up to date, avoiding overheating due to overbundling, avoiding soft bedding, and considering the use of a pacifier during sleep once breastfeeding is established. One consequence of the Back to Sleep campaign is a significant increase in the incidence of occipital flattening. Infants who develop a flat spot should be placed with the head facing alternating directions each time he or she is put to bed. Supervised prone positioning while the infant is awake, avoiding excessive use of carriers, and upright positioning while awake are also recommended.

  17. Toll-like receptor sensing of human herpesvirus infection

    PubMed Central

    West, John A.; Gregory, Sean M.; Damania, Blossom

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are evolutionarily conserved pathogen sensors that constitute the first line of defense in the human immune system. Herpesviruses are prevalent throughout the world and cause significant disease in the human population. Sensing of herpesviruses via TLRs has only been documented in the last 10 years and our understanding of the relationship between these sentinels of the immune system and herpesvirus infection has already provided great insight into how the host cell responds to viral infection. This report will summarize the activation and modulation of TLR signaling in the context of human herpesvirus infections. PMID:23061052

  18. Roles of Toll-like receptors in innate immune responses.

    PubMed

    Takeda, K; Akira, S

    2001-09-01

    Innate immunity recognizes invading micro-organisms and triggers a host defence response. However, the molecular mechanism for innate immune recognition was unclear. Recently, a family of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) was identified, and crucial roles for these receptors in the recognition of microbial components have been elucidated. The TLR family consists of 10 members and will be expanding. Each TLR distinguishes between specific patterns of microbial components to provoke innate immune responses. The activation of innate immunity then leads to the development of antigen-specific adaptive immunity. Thus, TLRs control both innate and adaptive immune responses.

  19. Posttranslational Modification of HOIP Blocks Toll-Like Receptor 4-Mediated Linear-Ubiquitin-Chain Formation

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, James; Rodgers, Mary A.; Shi, Mude; Amatya, Rina; Hostager, Bruce; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Linear ubiquitination is an atypical posttranslational modification catalyzed by the linear-ubiquitin-chain assembly complex (LUBAC), containing HOIP, HOIL-1L, and Sharpin. LUBAC facilitates NF-κB activation and inflammation upon receptor stimulation by ligating linear ubiquitin chains to critical signaling molecules. Indeed, linear-ubiquitination-dependent signaling is essential to prevent pyogenic bacterial infections that can lead to death. While linear ubiquitination is essential for intracellular receptor signaling upon microbial infection, this response must be measured and stopped to avoid tissue damage and autoimmunity. While LUBAC is activated upon bacterial stimulation, the mechanisms regulating LUBAC activity in response to bacterial stimuli have remained elusive. We demonstrate that LUBAC activity itself is downregulated through ubiquitination, specifically, ubiquitination of the catalytic subunit HOIP at the carboxyl-terminal lysine 1056. Ubiquitination of Lys1056 dynamically altered HOIP conformation, resulting in the suppression of its catalytic activity. Consequently, HOIP Lys1056-to-Arg mutation led not only to persistent LUBAC activity but also to prolonged NF-κB activation induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide-mediated Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) stimulation, whereas it showed no effect on NF-κB activation induced by CD40 stimulation. This study describes a novel posttranslational regulation of LUBAC-mediated linear ubiquitination that is critical for specifically directing TLR4-mediated NF-κB activation. PMID:26578682

  20. Toll-Like Receptor Signalling and the Control of Intestinal Barrier Function.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Daniel G W; Corr, Sinéad C

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial barrier function and innate immunity are fundamental to the pathogenesis of inflammatory and infectious disease. Along with plasma membranes, epithelial cells are the primary cellular determinant of epithelial barrier function. The mechanism by which polarized epithelia form a permeability barrier is of fundamental importance to the prevention of many infectious and inflammatory diseases. Moreover, epithelial cells express Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which upon recognition of conserved microbial factors such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induce epithelial responses including epithelial cell proliferation, secretion of secretory IgA into the lumen and production mucins and antimicrobial peptides, thereby promoting intestinal barrier function. Understanding gut barrier integrity and regulation of permeability is crucial to increase our understanding of the pathogenesis of intestinal disease. A variety of tests have been developed to assess this barrier, including assessing intestinal epithelial cell proliferation or death, intestinal tight junction status and the consequence of intestinal barrier integrity loss such as increased intestinal permeability and susceptibility to bacterial infection. Using a mouse model, this chapter describes some of the methods to assess the functional integrity of this epithelial barrier and the part played by a TLR signalling pathway.

  1. Divergent functions of Toll-like receptors during bacterial lung infections.

    PubMed

    Baral, Pankaj; Batra, Sanjay; Zemans, Rachel L; Downey, Gregory P; Jeyaseelan, Samithamby

    2014-10-01

    Lower respiratory tract infections caused by bacteria are a major cause of death in humans irrespective of sex, race, or geography. Indeed, accumulated data indicate greater mortality and morbidity due to these infections than cancer, malaria, or HIV infection. Successful recognition of, followed by an appropriate response to, bacterial pathogens in the lungs is crucial for effective pulmonary host defense. Although the early recruitment and activation of neutrophils in the lungs is key in the response against invading microbial pathogens, other sentinels, such as alveolar macrophages, epithelial cells, dendritic cells, and CD4(+) T cells, also contribute to the elimination of the bacterial burden. Pattern recognition receptors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors, are important for recognizing and responding to microbes during pulmonary infections. However, bacterial pathogens have acquired crafty evasive strategies to circumvent the pattern recognition receptor response and thus establish infection. Increased understanding of the function of TLRs and evasive mechanisms used by pathogens during pulmonary infection will deepen our knowledge of immunopathogenesis and is crucial for developing effective therapeutic and/or prophylactic measures. This review summarizes current knowledge of the multiple roles of TLRs in bacterial lung infections and highlights the mechanisms used by pathogens to modulate or interfere with TLR signaling in the lungs.

  2. Toll-like receptor 4-dependent contribution of the immune system to anticancer chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Apetoh, Lionel; Ghiringhelli, François; Tesniere, Antoine; Obeid, Michel; Ortiz, Carla; Criollo, Alfredo; Mignot, Grégoire; Maiuri, M Chiara; Ullrich, Evelyn; Saulnier, Patrick; Yang, Huan; Amigorena, Sebastian; Ryffel, Bernard; Barrat, Franck J; Saftig, Paul; Levi, Francis; Lidereau, Rosette; Nogues, Catherine; Mira, Jean-Paul; Chompret, Agnès; Joulin, Virginie; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Bourhis, Jean; André, Fabrice; Delaloge, Suzette; Tursz, Thomas; Kroemer, Guido; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2007-09-01

    Conventional cancer treatments rely on radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Such treatments supposedly mediate their effects via the direct elimination of tumor cells. Here we show that the success of some protocols for anticancer therapy depends on innate and adaptive antitumor immune responses. We describe in both mice and humans a previously unrecognized pathway for the activation of tumor antigen-specific T-cell immunity that involves secretion of the high-mobility-group box 1 (HMGB1) alarmin protein by dying tumor cells and the action of HMGB1 on Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expressed by dendritic cells (DCs). During chemotherapy or radiotherapy, DCs require signaling through TLR4 and its adaptor MyD88 for efficient processing and cross-presentation of antigen from dying tumor cells. Patients with breast cancer who carry a TLR4 loss-of-function allele relapse more quickly after radiotherapy and chemotherapy than those carrying the normal TLR4 allele. These results delineate a clinically relevant immunoadjuvant pathway triggered by tumor cell death.

  3. Energetics of Endotoxin Recognition in the Toll-Like Receptor 4 Innate Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Paramo, Teresa; Tomasio, Susana M; Irvine, Kate L; Bryant, Clare E; Bond, Peter J

    2015-12-09

    Bacterial outer membrane lipopolysaccharide (LPS) potently stimulates the mammalian innate immune system, and can lead to sepsis, the primary cause of death from infections. LPS is sensed by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in complex with its lipid-binding coreceptor MD-2, but subtle structural variations in LPS can profoundly modulate the response. To better understand the mechanism of LPS-induced stimulation and bacterial evasion, we have calculated the binding affinity to MD-2 of agonistic and antagonistic LPS variants including lipid A, lipid IVa, and synthetic antagonist Eritoran, and provide evidence that the coreceptor is a molecular switch that undergoes ligand-induced conformational changes to appropriately activate or inhibit the receptor complex. The plasticity of the coreceptor binding cavity is shown to be essential for distinguishing between ligands, whilst similar calculations for a model bacterial LPS bilayer reveal the "membrane-like" nature of the protein cavity. The ability to predict the activity of LPS variants should facilitate the rational design of TLR4 therapeutics.

  4. Energetics of Endotoxin Recognition in the Toll-Like Receptor 4 Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Paramo, Teresa; Tomasio, Susana M.; Irvine, Kate L.; Bryant, Clare E.; Bond, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial outer membrane lipopolysaccharide (LPS) potently stimulates the mammalian innate immune system, and can lead to sepsis, the primary cause of death from infections. LPS is sensed by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in complex with its lipid-binding coreceptor MD-2, but subtle structural variations in LPS can profoundly modulate the response. To better understand the mechanism of LPS-induced stimulation and bacterial evasion, we have calculated the binding affinity to MD-2 of agonistic and antagonistic LPS variants including lipid A, lipid IVa, and synthetic antagonist Eritoran, and provide evidence that the coreceptor is a molecular switch that undergoes ligand-induced conformational changes to appropriately activate or inhibit the receptor complex. The plasticity of the coreceptor binding cavity is shown to be essential for distinguishing between ligands, whilst similar calculations for a model bacterial LPS bilayer reveal the “membrane-like” nature of the protein cavity. The ability to predict the activity of LPS variants should facilitate the rational design of TLR4 therapeutics. PMID:26647780

  5. Toll-like Receptors in the Vascular System: Sensing the Dangers Within

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Cameron G.; Webb, R. Clinton

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are components of the innate immune system that respond to exogenous infectious ligands (pathogen-associated molecular patterns, PAMPs) and endogenous molecules that are released during host tissue injury/death (damage-associated molecular patterns, DAMPs). Interaction of TLRs with their ligands leads to activation of downstream signaling pathways that induce an immune response by producing inflammatory cytokines, type I interferons (IFN), and other inflammatory mediators. TLR activation affects vascular function and remodeling, and these molecular events prime antigen-specific adaptive immune responses. Despite the presence of TLRs in vascular cells, the exact mechanisms whereby TLR signaling affects the function of vascular tissues are largely unknown. Cardiovascular diseases are considered chronic inflammatory conditions, and accumulating data show that TLRs and the innate immune system play a determinant role in the initiation and development of cardiovascular diseases. This evidence unfolds a possibility that targeting TLRs and the innate immune system may be a novel therapeutic goal for these conditions. TLR inhibitors and agonists are already in clinical trials for inflammatory conditions such as asthma, cancer, and autoimmune diseases, but their study in the context of cardiovascular diseases is in its infancy. In this article, we review the current knowledge of TLR signaling in the cardiovascular system with an emphasis on atherosclerosis, hypertension, and cerebrovascular injury. Furthermore, we address the therapeutic potential of TLR as pharmacological targets in cardiovascular disease and consider intriguing research questions for future study. PMID:26721702

  6. Divergent Functions of Toll-like Receptors during Bacterial Lung Infections

    PubMed Central

    Baral, Pankaj; Batra, Sanjay; Zemans, Rachel L.; Downey, Gregory P.

    2014-01-01

    Lower respiratory tract infections caused by bacteria are a major cause of death in humans irrespective of sex, race, or geography. Indeed, accumulated data indicate greater mortality and morbidity due to these infections than cancer, malaria, or HIV infection. Successful recognition of, followed by an appropriate response to, bacterial pathogens in the lungs is crucial for effective pulmonary host defense. Although the early recruitment and activation of neutrophils in the lungs is key in the response against invading microbial pathogens, other sentinels, such as alveolar macrophages, epithelial cells, dendritic cells, and CD4+ T cells, also contribute to the elimination of the bacterial burden. Pattern recognition receptors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain–like receptors, are important for recognizing and responding to microbes during pulmonary infections. However, bacterial pathogens have acquired crafty evasive strategies to circumvent the pattern recognition receptor response and thus establish infection. Increased understanding of the function of TLRs and evasive mechanisms used by pathogens during pulmonary infection will deepen our knowledge of immunopathogenesis and is crucial for developing effective therapeutic and/or prophylactic measures. This review summarizes current knowledge of the multiple roles of TLRs in bacterial lung infections and highlights the mechanisms used by pathogens to modulate or interfere with TLR signaling in the lungs. PMID:25033332

  7. NOD2 and Toll-Like Receptors Are Nonredundant Recognition Systems of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Recognition of M. tuberculosis by pattern recognition receptors is crucial for activation of both innate and adaptive immune responses. In the present study, we demonstrate that nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2) and Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are two nonredundant recognition mechanisms of M. tuberculosis. CHO cell lines transfected with human TLR2 or TLR4 were responsive to M. tuberculosis. TLR2 knock-out mice displayed more than 50% defective cytokine production after stimulation with mycobacteria, whereas TLR4-defective mice also released 30% less cytokines compared to controls. Similarly, HEK293T cells transfected with NOD2 responded to stimulation with M. tuberculosis. The important role of NOD2 for the recognition of M. tuberculosis was demonstrated in mononuclear cells of individuals homozygous for the 3020insC NOD2 mutation, who showed an 80% defective cytokine response after stimulation with M. tuberculosis. Finally, the mycobacterial TLR2 ligand 19-kDa lipoprotein and the NOD2 ligand muramyl dipeptide synergized for the induction of cytokines, and this synergism was lost in cells defective in either TLR2 or NOD2. Together, these results demonstrate that NOD2 and TLR pathways are nonredundant recognition mechanisms of M. tuberculosis that synergize for the induction of proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:16322770

  8. 77 FR 19010 - Zone J Tolling Co., LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-29

    ...-000] Zone J Tolling Co., LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market- Based Rate Filing Includes... proceeding of Zone J Tolling Co., LLC's application for market-based rate authority, with an...

  9. Death by fraternity hazing.

    PubMed

    Boglioli, L R; Taff, M L

    1995-03-01

    Fraternity hazing can cause a variety of injuries and deaths. We recently had the opportunity to investigate a heat-related death that occurred during a college fraternity event. The original death investigation did not consider the circumstances of death, environmental conditions, or the subtle autopsy findings related to heat stroke. This case is intended to alert health care professionals that deaths on college campuses may be related to fraternity hazing and may require in-depth investigations. An analysis of the death and a discussion of heat-related injuries are presented.

  10. Methods for determining time of death.

    PubMed

    Madea, Burkhard

    2016-12-01

    Medicolegal death time estimation must estimate the time since death reliably. Reliability can only be provided empirically by statistical analysis of errors in field studies. Determining the time since death requires the calculation of measurable data along a time-dependent curve back to the starting point. Various methods are used to estimate the time since death. The current gold standard for death time estimation is a previously established nomogram method based on the two-exponential model of body cooling. Great experimental and practical achievements have been realized using this nomogram method. To reduce the margin of error of the nomogram method, a compound method was developed based on electrical and mechanical excitability of skeletal muscle, pharmacological excitability of the iris, rigor mortis, and postmortem lividity. Further increasing the accuracy of death time estimation involves the development of conditional probability distributions for death time estimation based on the compound method. Although many studies have evaluated chemical methods of death time estimation, such methods play a marginal role in daily forensic practice. However, increased precision of death time estimation has recently been achieved by considering various influencing factors (i.e., preexisting diseases, duration of terminal episode, and ambient temperature). Putrefactive changes may be used for death time estimation in water-immersed bodies. Furthermore, recently developed technologies, such as H magnetic resonance spectroscopy, can be used to quantitatively study decompositional changes. This review addresses the gold standard method of death time estimation in forensic practice and promising technological and scientific developments in the field.

  11. Disruption of IP₃R2-mediated Ca²⁺ signaling pathway in astrocytes ameliorates neuronal death and brain damage while reducing behavioral deficits after focal ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Li, Hailong; Xie, Yicheng; Zhang, Nannan; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Qiao; Ding, Shinghua

    2015-12-01

    Inositol trisphosphate receptor (IP3R)-mediated intracellular Ca(2+) increase is the major Ca(2+) signaling pathway in astrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS). Ca(2+) increases in astrocytes have been found to modulate neuronal function through gliotransmitter release. We previously demonstrated that astrocytes exhibit enhanced Ca(2+) signaling in vivo after photothrombosis (PT)-induced ischemia, which is largely due to the activation of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). The aim of this study is to investigate the role of astrocytic IP3R-mediated Ca(2+) signaling in neuronal death, brain damage and behavior outcomes after PT. For this purpose, we conducted experiments using homozygous type 2 IP3R (IP3R2) knockout (KO) mice. Histological and immunostaining studies showed that IP3R2 KO mice were indeed deficient in IP3R2 in astrocytes and exhibited normal brain cytoarchitecture. IP3R2 KO mice also had the same densities of S100β+ astrocytes and NeuN+ neurons in the cortices, and exhibited the same glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and glial glutamate transporter (GLT-1) levels in the cortices and hippocampi as compared with wild type (WT) mice. Two-photon (2-P) imaging showed that IP3R2 KO mice did not exhibit ATP-induced Ca(2+) waves in vivo in the astrocytic network, which verified the disruption of IP3R-mediated Ca(2+) signaling in astrocytes of these mice. When subject to PT, IP3R2 KO mice had smaller infarction than WT mice in acute and chronic phases of ischemia. IP3R2 KO mice also exhibited less neuronal apoptosis, reactive astrogliosis, and tissue loss than WT mice. Behavioral tests, including cylinder, hanging wire, pole and adhesive tests, showed that IP3R2 KO mice exhibited reduced functional deficits after PT. Collectively, our study demonstrates that disruption of astrocytic Ca(2+) signaling by deleting IP3R2s has beneficial effects on neuronal and brain protection and functional deficits after stroke. These findings reveal a novel non

  12. 77 FR 47165 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-07

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Project Committee AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is...

  13. The Toll-Dorsal Pathway Is Required for Resistance to Viral Oral Infection in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Álvaro Gil; Naylor, Huw; Esteves, Sara Santana; Pais, Inês Silva; Martins, Nelson Eduardo; Teixeira, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Pathogen entry route can have a strong impact on the result of microbial infections in different hosts, including insects. Drosophila melanogaster has been a successful model system to study the immune response to systemic viral infection. Here we investigate the role of the Toll pathway in resistance to oral viral infection in D. melanogaster. We show that several Toll pathway components, including Spätzle, Toll, Pelle and the NF-kB-like transcription factor Dorsal, are required to resist oral infection with Drosophila C virus. Furthermore, in the fat body Dorsal is translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and a Toll pathway target gene reporter is upregulated in response to Drosophila C Virus infection. This pathway also mediates resistance to several other RNA viruses (Cricket paralysis virus, Flock House virus, and Nora virus). Compared with control, viral titres are highly increased in Toll pathway mutants. The role of the Toll pathway in resistance to viruses in D. melanogaster is restricted to oral infection since we do not observe a phenotype associated with systemic infection. We also show that Wolbachia and other Drosophila-associated microbiota do not interact with the Toll pathway-mediated resistance to oral infection. We therefore identify the Toll pathway as a new general inducible pathway that mediates strong resistance to viruses with a route-specific role. These results contribute to a better understanding of viral oral infection resistance in insects, which is particularly relevant in the context of transmission of arboviruses by insect vectors. PMID:25473839

  14. 37 CFR 41.40 - Tolling of time period to file a reply brief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tolling of time period to... TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE PRACTICE BEFORE THE PATENT TRIAL AND APPEAL BOARD Ex Parte Appeals § 41.40 Tolling of time period to file a reply brief. (a) Timing. Any request to seek review of the...

  15. Expression of a Toll Signaling Regulator Serpin in a Mycoinsecticide for Increased Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Linzhi; Keyhani, Nemat O.; Tang, Guirong; Tian, Chuang; Lu, Ruipeng; Wang, Xin; Pei, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Serpins are ubiquitously distributed serine protease inhibitors that covalently bind to target proteases to exert their activities. Serpins regulate a wide range of activities, particularly those in which protease-mediated cascades are active. The Drosophila melanogaster serpin Spn43Ac negatively controls the Toll pathway that is activated in response to fungal infection. The entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana offers an environmentally friendly alternative to chemical pesticides for insect control. However, the use of mycoinsecticides remains limited in part due to issues of efficacy (low virulence) and the recalcitrance of the targets (due to strong immune responses). Since Spn43Ac acts to inhibit Toll-mediated activation of defense responses, we explored the feasibility of a new strategy to engineer entomopathogenic fungi with increased virulence by expression of Spn43Ac in the fungus. Compared to the 50% lethal dose (LD50) for the wild-type parent, the LD50 of B. bassiana expressing Spn43Ac (strain Bb::S43Ac-1) was reduced ∼3-fold, and the median lethal time against the greater wax moth (Galleria mellonella) was decreased by ∼24%, with the more rapid proliferation of hyphal bodies being seen in the host hemolymph. In vitro and in vivo assays showed inhibition of phenoloxidase (PO) activation in the presence of Spn43Ac, with Spn43Ac-mediated suppression of activation by chymotrypsin, trypsin, laminarin, and lipopolysaccharide occurring in the following order: chymotrypsin and trypsin > laminarin > lipopolysaccharide. Expression of Spn43Ac had no effect on the activity of the endogenous B. bassiana-derived cuticle-degrading protease (CDEP-1). These results expand our understanding of Spn43Ac function and confirm that suppression of insect immune system defenses represents a feasible approach to engineering entomopathogenic fungi for greater efficacy. PMID:24837378

  16. Intragraft Toll-like receptor profiling in acute renal allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Dessing, Mark C; Bemelman, Frederike J; Claessen, Nike; Ten Berge, Ineke J M; Florquin, Sandrine; Leemans, Jaklien C

    2010-12-01

    Experimental studies have shown potential for Toll-like receptor (TLR) profiling in renal allograft in predicting renal outcome after transplantation. Our goal was to determine if profiling of TLR1-10 and TLR-related genes could be used as a prognostic value for renal function and late clinical outcome after transplantation. TLR1-10, CD14, MD-2 and negative regulators Toll-interacting protein (TOLLIP) and single immunoglobulin domain IL-1R-related receptor were analysed in 36 biopsies from renal transplant recipients with acute rejection (AR) and in 14 biopsies from renal transplant recipients without rejection (NR). Analysis was performed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. TLR (-related) genes were correlated to Banff'07 classification, cellular influx, response to conventional anti-rejection therapy, renal function 12 and 24 months after rejection and graft loss. mRNA levels of most TLRs were significantly higher in acute rejection while TOLLIP mRNA level was decreased. mRNA levels of TLR1/2/4/7/8 were highly accurate in distinguishing AR from NR. TLR mRNA levels correlated to inflammatory parameters according to the Banff'07 classification and to cellular influx. Elevated mRNA level of TLR3 in acute rejection was independent from infiltrating leukocytes. TLR (-related) genes were not correlated with response to conventional anti-rejection therapy. Splice variant TLR4r3 was associated with poor renal function 24 months after transplantation, and TLR1 appeared to be associated with graft loss. The elevated mRNA levels of several TLRs in association with reduced mRNA levels of TOLLIP in renal transplant biopsies of patients with acute rejection indicate a pro-inflammatory state, which may contribute to uncontrolled inflammation.

  17. Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom: exploring wartime death and bereavement.

    PubMed

    Harrington Lamorie, Jill

    2011-01-01

    Military deaths are often sudden, unanticipated, traumatic, and/or violent in nature and involve the death of a young adult. More than 5,500 service members have died as a result of their service in the wars in Afghanistan (2001) and Iraq (2003) in combat- or non-combat- related incidences. As the death toll continues to rise, service members and their families struggle with the visible and invisible wounds of war. This article explores wartime death, trauma, and bereavement experienced by those survivors affected by service members who have died as a result of their military service in Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF). It recognizes the circumstantial and cultural factors of the death as well as the grief and trauma experiences of survivors. Resources and suggested interventions of support are highlighted.

  18. Toll-like Receptor 1 Polymorphisms Affect Innate Immune Responses and Outcomes in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Wurfel, Mark M.; Gordon, Anthony C.; Holden, Tarah D.; Radella, Frank; Strout, Jeanna; Kajikawa, Osamu; Ruzinski, John T.; Rona, Gail; Black, R. Anthony; Stratton, Seth; Jarvik, Gail P.; Hajjar, Adeline M.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Rieder, Mark; Sevransky, Jonathan; Maloney, James P.; Moss, Marc; Martin, Greg; Shanholtz, Carl; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Gao, Li; Brower, Roy; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Walley, Keith R.; Russell, James A.; Martin, Thomas R.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale: Polymorphisms affecting Toll-like receptor (TLR)–mediated responses could predispose to excessive inflammation during an infection and contribute to an increased risk for poor outcomes in patients with sepsis. Objectives: To identify hypermorphic polymorphisms causing elevated TLR-mediated innate immune cytokine and chemokine responses and to test whether these polymorphisms are associated with increased susceptibility to death, organ dysfunction, and infections in patients with sepsis. Methods: We screened single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 43 TLR-related genes to identify variants affecting TLR-mediated inflammatory responses in blood from healthy volunteers ex vivo. The SNP associated most strongly with hypermorphic responses was tested for associations with death, organ dysfunction, and type of infection in two studies: a nested case–control study in a cohort of intensive care unit patients with sepsis, and a case–control study using patients with sepsis, patients with sepsis-related acute lung injury, and healthy control subjects. Measurements and Main Results: The SNP demonstrating the most hypermorphic effect was the G allele of TLR1−7202A/G (rs5743551), which associated with elevated TLR1-mediated cytokine production (P < 2 × 10−20). TLR1−7202G marked a coding SNP that causes higher TLR1-induced NF-κB activation and higher cell surface TLR1 expression. In the cohort of patients with sepsis TLR1−7202G predicted worse organ dysfunction and death (odds ratio, 1.82; 95% confidence interval, 1.07–3.09). In the case-control study TLR1−7202G was associated with sepsis-related acute lung injury (odds ratio, 3.40; 95% confidence interval, 1.59–7.27). TLR1−7202G also associated with a higher prevalence of gram-positive cultures in both clinical studies. Conclusions: Hypermorphic genetic variation in TLR1 is associated with increased susceptibility to organ dysfunction, death, and gram-positive infection in sepsis. PMID

  19. Maternal deaths in the Nordic countries.

    PubMed

    Vangen, Siri; Bødker, Birgit; Ellingsen, Liv; Saltvedt, Sissel; Gissler, Mika; Geirsson, Reynir T; Nyfløt, Lill T

    2017-09-01

    Despite the seriousness of the event, maternal deaths are substantially underreported. There is often a missed opportunity to learn from such tragedies. The aim of the study was to identify maternal deaths in the five Nordic countries, to classify causes of death based on internationally acknowledged criteria, and to identify areas that would benefit from further teaching, training or research to possibly reduce the number of maternal deaths. We present data for the years 2005-2013. National audit groups collected data by linkage of registers and direct reporting from hospitals. Each case was then assessed to determine the cause of death, and level of care provided. Potential improvements to care were evaluated. We registered 168 maternal deaths, 90 direct and 78 indirect cases. The maternal mortality ratio was 7.2/100 000 live births ranging from 6.8 to 8.1 between the countries. Cardiac disease (n = 29) was the most frequent cause of death, followed by preeclampsia (n = 24), thromboembolism (n = 20) and suicide (n = 20). Improvements to care which could potentially have made a difference to the outcome were identified in one-third of the deaths, i.e. in as many as 60% of preeclamptic, 45% of thromboembolic, and 32% of the deaths from cardiac disease. Direct deaths exceeded indirect maternal deaths in the Nordic countries. To reduce maternal deaths, increased efforts to better implement existing clinical guidelines seem warranted, particularly for preeclampsia, thromboembolism and cardiac disease. More knowledge is also needed about what contributes to suicidal maternal deaths. © 2017 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  20. Toll-like receptor signalling and their therapeutic targeting in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Moossavi, Shirin; Rezaei, Nima

    2013-06-01

    Intestinal homeostasis is dependent on the proper host/microbiota interaction via pattern recognition receptors. Toll-like receptors are a specialised group of membrane receptors which detect pathogen-associated conserved structures. They are present in the intestinal tract and are required for intestinal homeostasis. Dysregulation in the Toll-like receptor signalling can conceivably result in a dysregulated immune response which could contribute to major intestinal pathologies including colorectal cancer. Evidence for the role of microbiota and toll-like receptors in colorectal cancer is emerging. In this report the evidence for the contribution of toll-like receptors to the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer; potential mechanisms affecting toll-like receptor signalling; and their therapeutic targeting in colorectal cancer are reviewed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The human adaptor SARM negatively regulates adaptor protein TRIF-dependent Toll-like receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Carty, Michael; Goodbody, Rory; Schröder, Martina; Stack, Julianne; Moynagh, Paul N; Bowie, Andrew G

    2006-10-01

    Toll-like receptors discriminate between different pathogen-associated molecules and activate signaling cascades that lead to immune responses. The specificity of Toll-like receptor signaling occurs by means of adaptor proteins containing Toll-interleukin 1 receptor (TIR) domains. Activating functions have been assigned to four TIR adaptors: MyD88, Mal, TRIF and TRAM. Here we characterize a fifth TIR adaptor, SARM, as a negative regulator of TRIF-dependent Toll-like receptor signaling. Expression of SARM blocked gene induction 'downstream' of TRIF but not of MyD88. SARM associated with TRIF, and 'knockdown' of endogenous SARM expression by interfering RNA led to enhanced TRIF-dependent cytokine and chemokine induction. Thus, the fifth mammalian TIR adaptor SARM is a negative regulator of Toll-like receptor signaling.

  2. Dynamic BMP signaling polarized by Toll patterns the dorsoventral axis in a hemimetabolous insect

    PubMed Central

    Sachs, Lena; Chen, Yen-Ta; Drechsler, Axel; Lynch, Jeremy A; Panfilio, Kristen A; Lässig, Michael; Berg, Johannes; Roth, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    Toll-dependent patterning of the dorsoventral axis in Drosophila represents one of the best understood gene regulatory networks. However, its evolutionary origin has remained elusive. Outside the insects Toll is not known for a patterning function, but rather for a role in pathogen defense. Here, we show that in the milkweed bug Oncopeltus fasciatus, whose lineage split from Drosophila's more than 350 million years ago, Toll is only required to polarize a dynamic BMP signaling network. A theoretical model reveals that this network has self-regulatory properties and that shallow Toll signaling gradients are sufficient to initiate axis formation. Such gradients can account for the experimentally observed twinning of insect embryos upon egg fragmentation and might have evolved from a state of uniform Toll activity associated with protecting insect eggs against pathogens. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05502.001 PMID:25962855

  3. Death and Grief

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Death and Grief KidsHealth > For Teens > Death and Grief Print A ... Yourself en español Muerte y duelo What Is Grief? Grief is the reaction we have in response ...

  4. [Innate immunity: cutaneous expression of Toll-like receptors].

    PubMed

    Musette, Philippe; Auquit Auckbur, Isabelle; Begon, Edouard

    2006-02-01

    Toll receptors were first identified as an essential molecule for embryonic patterning in Drosophila and were subsequently shown to be a key in antibacterial and antifungal immunity in adult flies. Toll receptors have been conserved throughout evolution. In mammals, TLRs have been implicated in both inflammatory responses and innate host defense to pathogens. The 11 different TLRs recognize conserved molecular patterns of microbial pathogens termed pathogen-specific molecular patterns (PAMPs), that permit to confer responsiveness to a wide variety of pathogens. Endogenous ligands are also able to activate TLRs. All adult tissue is capable to express at least one of member of TLR family, but a largest repertoire of TLRs is found in tissues exposed to the external environment. The TLR activation induce the NF-kappaB translocation to the nucleus and cytokine secretion. Since the primary function of skin is to provide an effective barrier against outside agression, it is likely that keratinocytes may play a role in a rapid and efficient host defence system, and the fact that keratinocytes are capable of expressing a wide variety of TLRs is subsequently not surprising.

  5. 78 FR 69939 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-21

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer...) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be...

  6. 78 FR 11277 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee

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    2013-02-15

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  7. 78 FR 56269 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee

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  8. 78 FR 64063 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee

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  9. 77 FR 67735 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee

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  10. 78 FR 36304 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee

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  11. 78 FR 3500 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee.

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  12. 78 FR 41193 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee

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  13. 78 FR 22947 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee

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  14. 78 FR 15126 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee

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    2013-03-08

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer... open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be held...

  15. 77 FR 74920 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-18

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer.... (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee...

  16. 78 FR 78517 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer...) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be...

  17. 78 FR 29207 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-17

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer... open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be held...

  18. 25 CFR 170.130 - How can tribes use Federal highway funds for toll and ferry facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How can tribes use Federal highway funds for toll and... Toll, Ferry and Airport Facilities § 170.130 How can tribes use Federal highway funds for toll and ferry facilities? (a) A tribe can use Federal-aid highway funds, including IRR Program funds, to study...

  19. 25 CFR 170.130 - How can tribes use Federal highway funds for toll and ferry facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How can tribes use Federal highway funds for toll and... Toll, Ferry and Airport Facilities § 170.130 How can tribes use Federal highway funds for toll and ferry facilities? (a) A tribe can use Federal-aid highway funds, including IRR Program funds, to study...

  20. 25 CFR 170.130 - How can tribes use Federal highway funds for toll and ferry facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true How can tribes use Federal highway funds for toll and... Toll, Ferry and Airport Facilities § 170.130 How can tribes use Federal highway funds for toll and ferry facilities? (a) A tribe can use Federal-aid highway funds, including IRR Program funds, to study...

  1. 25 CFR 170.131 - How can a tribe find out more about designing and operating a toll facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How can a tribe find out more about designing and... Eligibility Toll, Ferry and Airport Facilities § 170.131 How can a tribe find out more about designing and operating a toll facility? Information on designing and operating a toll highway, bridge or tunnel is...

  2. 25 CFR 170.131 - How can a tribe find out more about designing and operating a toll facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How can a tribe find out more about designing and... Eligibility Toll, Ferry and Airport Facilities § 170.131 How can a tribe find out more about designing and operating a toll facility? Information on designing and operating a toll highway, bridge or tunnel is...

  3. Children's Experience with Death.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeligs, Rose

    Children's concepts of death grow with their age and development The three-year-old begins to notice that living things move and make sounds. The five-year-old thinks that life and death are reversable, but the six-year-old knows that death is final and brings sorrow. Children from eight through ten are interested in the causes of death and what…

  4. Are Death Anxiety and Death Depression Distinct Entities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarado, Katherine A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Administered Death Anxiety Scale and Death Depression Scale to 200 individuals. Two scales correlated 0.55. Factor analysis of combined 32 items revealed factors: "death anxiety" having highest factor loadings with Death Anxiety Scale, "death depression" having highest factor loadings with Death Depression Scale, "death of…

  5. Are Death Anxiety and Death Depression Distinct Entities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarado, Katherine A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Administered Death Anxiety Scale and Death Depression Scale to 200 individuals. Two scales correlated 0.55. Factor analysis of combined 32 items revealed factors: "death anxiety" having highest factor loadings with Death Anxiety Scale, "death depression" having highest factor loadings with Death Depression Scale, "death of…

  6. Identity and Death Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterling, Christopher M.; Van Horn, K. Roger

    1989-01-01

    Examined relationships between death anxiety and Erikson's concept of ego identity in White male undergraduates (N=63). Found involvement in identity crisis or decision-making period appeared to have increased death anxiety. Recommends further research between death anxiety and ego identity development. (Author/ABL)

  7. Death Anxiety and Politics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Steven A.

    1986-01-01

    Explores the relationship between death anxiety and sociopolitical attitudes and political behavior. Data from a sample of 209 undergraduate students indicate that death anxiety is modestly related to attitudes reflecting a turning away from the social and political world. Death anxiety does not seem related to political behavior. (Author)

  8. Separation, Part I: Death.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Anne Devereaux

    1997-01-01

    Contends literature is the one place where death still abides, where grief is felt and consolation can be sought. States that young readers can gain a recognition in books that death is natural. Discusses death in folk and fairy tales, in 17th-century didactic children's books and in modern and contemporary literature. Outlines characteristics of…

  9. CDC Vital Signs: Motor Vehicle Crash Deaths

    MedlinePlus

    ... more progress in reducing crash deaths. Drivers and passengers can: Use a seat belt in every seat, ... federal partners. www.cdc.gov/motorvehiclesafety/ Drivers and passengers can Use a seat belt in every seat, ...

  10. Meaning and death-thought accessibility.

    PubMed

    Van Tongeren, Daryl R; Green, Jeffrey D

    2017-08-01

    Meaning is a central feature in human life, but death can disrupt a sense of meaning. Two experiments tested the hypothesis that meaning in life and meaning in death are distinct types of meaning when mortality is salient and differentially affect death-thought accessibility (DTA). In Experiment 1, imagining a specific scenario in which meaning is preserved beyond death reduced DTA relative to a standard mortality salience prime; moreover, these effects were not due to changes in self-esteem. In Experiment 2, imagining a meaningful life when mortality is salient elicited greater DTA, whereas imagining meaning in death elicited less DTA. Imbuing death with meaning attenuates DTA, whereas meaning in life increases DTA. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  11. Obstetric deaths in Bangladesh, 1996-1997.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M H; Akhter, H H; Khan Chowdhury, M-E-E; Yusuf, H R; Rochat, R W

    2002-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure and to describe obstetric deaths in Bangladesh. We reviewed hospital records and interviewed health workers in clinic sites and field workers who cared for pregnant women. We obtained case reports of 28998 deaths of women aged 10-50, of which 8562 (29.5%) were maternal deaths. Most (7086, 82.8%) of these deaths were due to obstetric causes. The most common causes of direct obstetric death were eclampsia (34.3%), hemorrhage (27.9%), and obstructed and/or prolonged labor (11.3%). National direct obstetric death rate was estimated to be 16.9 per 100,000 women. Efforts to reduce fertility in Bangladesh have led to an estimated 49% reduction in the maternal mortality rate per 1000 women during the past 18 years. Variations in maternal mortality suggest the need to develop local strategies to improve obstetric care.

  12. Infant death scene investigation.

    PubMed

    Tabor, Pamela D; Ragan, Krista

    2015-01-01

    The sudden unexpected death of an infant is a tragedy to the family, a concern to the community, and an indicator of national health. To accurately determine the cause and manner of the infant's death, a thorough and accurate death scene investigation by properly trained personnel is key. Funding and resources are directed based on autopsy reports, which are only as accurate as the scene investigation. The investigation should include a standardized format, body diagrams, and a photographed or videotaped scene recreation utilizing doll reenactment. Forensic nurses, with their basic nursing knowledge and additional forensic skills and abilities, are optimally suited to conduct infant death scene investigations as well as train others to properly conduct death scene investigations. Currently, 49 states have child death review teams, which is an idea avenue for a forensic nurse to become involved in death scene investigations.

  13. Potentially Preventable Deaths Among the Five Leading Causes of Death - United States, 2010 and 2014.

    PubMed

    García, Macarena C; Bastian, Brigham; Rossen, Lauren M; Anderson, Robert; Miniño, Arialdi; Yoon, Paula W; Faul, Mark; Massetti, Greta; Thomas, Cheryll C; Hong, Yuling; Iademarco, Michael F

    2016-11-18

    Death rates by specific causes vary across the 50 states and the District of Columbia.* Information on differences in rates for the leading causes of death among states might help state health officials determine prevention goals, priorities, and strategies. CDC analyzed National Vital Statistics System data to provide national and state-specific estimates of potentially preventable deaths among the five leading causes of death in 2014 and compared these estimates with estimates previously published for 2010. Compared with 2010, the estimated number of potentially preventable deaths changed (supplemental material at https://stacks.cdc.gov/view/cdc/42472); cancer deaths decreased 25% (from 84,443 to 63,209), stroke deaths decreased 11% (from 16,973 to 15,175), heart disease deaths decreased 4% (from 91,757 to 87,950), chronic lower respiratory disease (CLRD) (e.g., asthma, bronchitis, and emphysema) deaths increased 1% (from 28,831 to 29,232), and deaths from unintentional injuries increased 23% (from 36,836 to 45,331). A better understanding of progress made in reducing potentially preventable deaths in the United States might inform state and regional efforts targeting the prevention of premature deaths from the five leading causes in the United States.

  14. Application potential of toll-like receptors in cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ming; Chen, Xi; Ye, Kangruo; Yao, Yuanfei; Li, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Toll-like receptors (TLRs), as the most important pattern recognition receptors in innate immunity, play a pivotal role in inducing immune response through recognition of microbial invaders or specific agonists. Recent studies have suggested that TLRs could serve as important regulators in the development of a variety of cancer. However, increasing evidences have shown that TLRs may display quite opposite outcomes in cancer development. Although several potential therapeutic Toll-like receptor ligands have been found, the mechanism and therapy prospect of TLRs in cancer development has to be further elucidated to accelerate the clinical application. By performing a systematic review of the present findings on TLRs in cancer immunology, we attempted to evaluate the therapeutic potential of TLRs in cancer therapy and elucidate the potential mechanism of cancer progress regulated by TLR signaling and the reported targets on TLRs for clinical application. An electronic databases search was conducted in PubMed, Chinese Scientific Journal Database, and Chinese Biomedical Literature Database from their inception to February 1, 2016. The following keywords were used to search the databases: Toll-like receptors, cancer therapy, therapeutic target, innate immunity. Of 244 studies that were identified, 97 nonrelevant studies were excluded. In total, 147 full-text articles were assessed, and from these, 54 were excluded as they did not provide complete key information. Thus, 93 studies were considered eligible and included in the analysis. According to the data from the included trials, 14 TLR ligands (77.8%) from 82 studies have been demonstrated to display antitumor property in various cancers, whereas 4 ligands (22.2%) from 11 studies promote tumors. Among them, only 3 TLR ligands have been approved for cancer therapy, and 9 ligands were in clinical trials. In addition, the potential mechanism of recently reported targets on TLRs for clinical application was also

  15. Toll ligand Spätzle3 controls melanization in the stripe pattern formation in caterpillars.

    PubMed

    KonDo, Yûsuke; Yoda, Shinichi; Mizoguchi, Takayuki; Ando, Toshiya; Yamaguchi, Junichi; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Banno, Yutaka; Fujiwara, Haruhiko

    2017-08-01

    A stripe pattern is an aposematic or camouflage coloration often observed among various caterpillars. However, how this ecologically important pattern is formed is largely unknown. The silkworm dominant mutant Zebra (Ze) has a black stripe in the anterior margin of each dorsal segment. Here, fine linkage mapping of 3,135 larvae revealed a 63-kbp region responsible for the Ze locus, which contained three candidate genes, including the Toll ligand gene spätzle3 (spz-3). Both electroporation-mediated ectopic expression and RNAi analyses showed that, among candidate genes, only processed spz-3 induced melanin pigmentation and that Toll-8 was the candidate receptor gene of spz-3 This Toll ligand/receptor set is also involved in melanization of other mutant Striped (p(S) ), which has broader stripes. Additional knockdown of 5 other spz family and 10 Toll-related genes caused no drastic change in the pigmentation of either mutant, suggesting that only spz-3/Toll-8 is mainly involved in the melanization process rather than pattern formation. The downstream pigmentation gene yellow was specifically up-regulated in the striped region of the Ze mutant, but spz-3 showed no such region-specific expression. Toll signaling pathways are known to be involved in innate immunity, dorsoventral axis formation, and neurotrophic functions. This study provides direct evidence that a Toll signaling pathway is co-opted to control the melanization process and adaptive striped pattern formation in caterpillars.

  16. Newly identified PcToll4 regulates antimicrobial peptide expression in intestine of red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Li, Tingting; Jin, Min; Yin, Shaowu; Hui, Kai-Min; Ren, Qian

    2017-02-14

    Tolls or Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have an essential role in initiating innate immune responses against pathogens. In this study, a novel Toll gene, PcToll4, was first identified from the intestinal transcriptome of the freshwater crayfish, Procambarus clarkii. The PcToll4 cDNA is 4849bp long with a 3036bp open reading frame that encodes a 1011-amino acid protein. PcToll4 contains a signal peptide, 13 LRR domains, 3 LRR TYP domains, 2 LRR CT domains, an LRR NT domain, a transmembrane region, and a TIR domain. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that PcToll4 mRNA was detected in all tested tissues, and the expression of PcToll4 in the intestine was significantly upregulated after white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge. Overexpression of PcToll4 in Drosophila Schneider 2 (S2) cells activates the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) of Drosophila, including metchnikowin, drosomycin, attacin A, and shrimp Penaeidin-4. Results of RNA interference by siRNA also showed that PcToll4 regulates the expressions of 5 anti-lipopolysaccharide factors (ALFs) in the intestine of crayfish. Our findings suggest that PcToll4 is important for the innate immune responses of P. clarkii because this gene regulates the expressions of AMPs against WSSV.

  17. [The diagnosis of death].

    PubMed

    Echeverría, Carlos; Goic, Alejandro; Lavados, Manuel; Quintana, Carlos; Rojas, Alberto; Serani, Alejandro; Vacarezza, Ricardo

    2004-01-01

    This paper undertakes an analysis of the scientific criteria used in the diagnosis of death and underscores the importance of intellectual rigor in the definition of medical concepts, particularly regarding such a critical issue as the diagnosis of death. Under the cardiore