Science.gov

Sample records for reduced dimensionality models

  1. A dimensionality reducing model for distributed filtering.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angel, E.; Jain, A. K.

    1973-01-01

    An approach is made to filtering of two-dimensional steady-state problems based on the notion of nearest neighbor interaction, i.e., at a given point in the spatial grid, the value at the variable of interest can be assumed to depend only on the values at adjacent grid points. It is shown that for linear steady-state problems significant dimensionality reductions can be accomplished. It was possible to achieve the desired results using a small amount of computer time and without getting into stability difficulties.

  2. Rigorous joining of advanced reduced-dimensional beam models to three-dimensional finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Huimin

    In the aerospace and automotive industries, many finite element analyses use lower-dimensional finite elements such as beams, plates and shells, to simplify the modeling. These simplified models can greatly reduce the computation time and cost; however, reduced-dimensional models may introduce inaccuracies, particularly near boundaries and near portions of the structure where reduced-dimensional models may not apply. Another factor in creation of such models is that beam-like structures frequently have complex geometry, boundaries and loading conditions, which may make them unsuitable for modeling with single type of element. The goal of this dissertation is to develop a method that can accurately and efficiently capture the response of a structure by rigorous combination of a reduced-dimensional beam finite element model with a model based on full two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) finite elements. The first chapter of the thesis gives the background of the present work and some related previous work. The second chapter is focused on formulating a system of equations that govern the joining of a 2D model with a beam model for planar deformation. The essential aspect of this formulation is to find the transformation matrices to achieve deflection and load continuity on the interface. Three approaches are provided to obtain the transformation matrices. An example based on joining a beam to a 2D finite element model is examined, and the accuracy of the analysis is studied by comparing joint results with the full 2D analysis. The third chapter is focused on formulating the system of equations for joining a beam to a 3D finite element model for static and free-vibration problems. The transition between the 3D elements and beam elements is achieved by use of the stress recovery technique of the variational-asymptotic method as implemented in VABS (the Variational Asymptotic Beam Section analysis). The formulations for an interface transformation matrix and

  3. Variational asymptotic modeling of composite dimensionally reducible structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wenbin

    A general framework to construct accurate reduced models for composite dimensionally reducible structures (beams, plates and shells) was formulated based on two theoretical foundations: decomposition of the rotation tensor and the variational asymptotic method. Two engineering software systems, Variational Asymptotic Beam Sectional Analysis (VABS, new version) and Variational Asymptotic Plate and Shell Analysis (VAPAS), were developed. Several restrictions found in previous work on beam modeling were removed in the present effort. A general formulation of Timoshenko-like cross-sectional analysis was developed, through which the shear center coordinates and a consistent Vlasov model can be obtained. Recovery relations are given to recover the asymptotic approximations for the three-dimensional field variables. A new version of VABS has been developed, which is a much improved program in comparison to the old one. Numerous examples are given for validation. A Reissner-like model being as asymptotically correct as possible was obtained for composite plates and shells. After formulating the three-dimensional elasticity problem in intrinsic form, the variational asymptotic method was used to systematically reduce the dimensionality of the problem by taking advantage of the smallness of the thickness. The through-the-thickness analysis is solved by a one-dimensional finite element method to provide the stiffnesses as input for the two-dimensional nonlinear plate or shell analysis as well as recovery relations to approximately express the three-dimensional results. The known fact that there exists more than one theory that is asymptotically correct to a given order is adopted to cast the refined energy into a Reissner-like form. A two-dimensional nonlinear shell theory consistent with the present modeling process was developed. The engineering computer code VAPAS was developed and inserted into DYMORE to provide an efficient and accurate analysis of composite plates and

  4. A Reduced Order, One Dimensional Model of Joint Response

    SciTech Connect

    DOHNER,JEFFREY L.

    2000-11-06

    As a joint is loaded, the tangent stiffness of the joint reduces due to slip at interfaces. This stiffness reduction continues until the direction of the applied load is reversed or the total interface slips. Total interface slippage in joints is called macro-slip. For joints not undergoing macro-slip, when load reversal occurs the tangent stiffness immediately rebounds to its maximum value. This occurs due to stiction effects at the interface. Thus, for periodic loads, a softening and rebound hardening cycle is produced which defines a hysteretic, energy absorbing trajectory. For many jointed sub-structures, this hysteretic trajectory can be approximated using simple polynomial representations. This allows for complex joint substructures to be represented using simple non-linear models. In this paper a simple one dimensional model is discussed.

  5. Reduced nonlinear prognostic model construction from high-dimensional data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, Andrey; Mukhin, Dmitry; Loskutov, Evgeny; Feigin, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Construction of a data-driven model of evolution operator using universal approximating functions can only be statistically justified when the dimension of its phase space is small enough, especially in the case of short time series. At the same time in many applications real-measured data is high-dimensional, e.g. it is space-distributed and multivariate in climate science. Therefore it is necessary to use efficient dimensionality reduction methods which are also able to capture key dynamical properties of the system from observed data. To address this problem we present a Bayesian approach to an evolution operator construction which incorporates two key reduction steps. First, the data is decomposed into a set of certain empirical modes, such as standard empirical orthogonal functions or recently suggested nonlinear dynamical modes (NDMs) [1], and the reduced space of corresponding principal components (PCs) is obtained. Then, the model of evolution operator for PCs is constructed which maps a number of states in the past to the current state. The second step is to reduce this time-extended space in the past using appropriate decomposition methods. Such a reduction allows us to capture only the most significant spatio-temporal couplings. The functional form of the evolution operator includes separately linear, nonlinear (based on artificial neural networks) and stochastic terms. Explicit separation of the linear term from the nonlinear one allows us to more easily interpret degree of nonlinearity as well as to deal better with smooth PCs which can naturally occur in the decompositions like NDM, as they provide a time scale separation. Results of application of the proposed method to climate data are demonstrated and discussed. The study is supported by Government of Russian Federation (agreement #14.Z50.31.0033 with the Institute of Applied Physics of RAS). 1. Mukhin, D., Gavrilov, A., Feigin, A., Loskutov, E., & Kurths, J. (2015). Principal nonlinear dynamical

  6. SCALING ANALYSIS OF REPOSITORY HEAT LOAD FOR REDUCED DIMENSIONALITY MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    MICHAEL T. ITAMUA AND CLIFFORD K. HO

    1998-06-04

    The thermal energy released from the waste packages emplaced in the potential Yucca Mountain repository is expected to result in changes in the repository temperature, relative humidity, air mass fraction, gas flow rates, and other parameters that are important input into the models used to calculate the performance of the engineered system components. In particular, the waste package degradation models require input from thermal-hydrologic models that have higher resolution than those currently used to simulate the T/H responses at the mountain-scale. Therefore, a combination of mountain- and drift-scale T/H models is being used to generate the drift thermal-hydrologic environment.

  7. Is a 3-Dimensional Stress Balance Ice-Stream Model Really Better Than a 2-Dimensional "Reduced Order" Ice-Stream Model?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergienko, O.; Macayeal, D. R.

    2007-12-01

    With growing observational awareness of numerous ice-stream processes occurring on short time and spatial scales, e.g., sub-ice-stream lake volume changes and grounding-line sediment wedge build-up, the question of how well models based on "reduced-order" dynamics can simulate ice-stream behavior becomes paramount. Reduced-order models of ice-streams are typically 2-dimensional, and capture only the largest-magnitude terms in the stress tensor (with other terms being constrained by various assumptions). In predicting the overall magnitude and large-scale pattern of ice-stream flow, the reduced-order models appear to be adequate. Efforts underway in the Glaciological Community to create 3-dimensional models of the "full" ice-stream stress balance, which relax the assumptions associated with reduced-order models, suggest that a cost/benefit analysis should be done to determine how likely these efforts will be fruitful. To assess the overall benefits of full 3-dimensional models in relation to the simpler 2-dimensional counterparts, we present model solutions of the full Stokes equations for ice-stream flow over a variety of basal perturbations (e.g., a sticky spot, a subglacial lake, a grounding line). We also present the solutions derived from reduced 2-dimensional models, and compare the two solutions to estimate effects of simplifications and neglected terms, as well as to advise on what circumstances 3-dimensional models are preferable to 2-dimensional models.

  8. A Reduced Three Dimensional Model for SAW Sensors Using Finite Element Analysis.

    PubMed

    El Gowini, Mohamed M; Moussa, Walied A

    2009-01-01

    A major problem that often arises in modeling Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) such as Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors using Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is the extensive computational capacity required. In this study a new approach is adopted to significantly reduce the computational capacity needed for analyzing the response of a SAW sensor using the finite element (FE) method. The approach is based on the plane wave solution where the properties of the wave vary in two dimensions and are uniform along the thickness of the device. The plane wave solution therefore allows the thickness of the SAW device model to be minimized; the model is referred to as a Reduced 3D Model (R3D). Various configurations of this novel R3D model are developed and compared with theoretical and experimental frequency data and the results show very good agreement. In addition, two-dimensional (2D) models with similar configurations to the R3D are developed for comparison since the 2D approach is widely adopted in the literature as a computationally inexpensive approach to model SAW sensors using the FE method. Results illustrate that the R3D model is capable of capturing the SAW response more accurately than the 2D model; this is demonstrated by comparison of centre frequency and insertion loss values. These results are very encouraging and indicate that the R3D model is capable of capturing the MEMS-based SAW sensor response without being computationally expensive.

  9. Low-dimensional manifolds and reduced chemical models for tropospheric chemistry simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Richard; Tomlin, Alison

    The chemical component of a reactive pollution dispersion model often consumes much of the total computational effort involved. If savings can be made in the calculation of the chemical sub-model without significant loss of accuracy then higher resolution can be afforded in the spatial domain leading to better overall solution accuracy. The usual approach to reducing chemical models is by combining species with similar reactivities into single variables. Compact representations of atmospheric chemical mechanisms can be found of the order of 30-100 species. Dynamical systems analysis however shows that the long-term behaviour of chemical systems is usually restricted to much lower-dimensional manifolds in the total species space, due to many of the fast time-scales quickly reaching local equilibrium. This suggests that if appropriate representations can be found, further reductions can be made in the number of variables required to represent tropospheric chemistry. This paper will demonstrate using time-scale analysis that the intrinsic dimension of a typical tropospheric chemical model is low (varying between 2 and 9) and therefore by using a lower-dimensional representation of the chemistry, savings can be made in terms of the number of equations which need to be solved in the chemical sub-model of a dispersion code. An alternative method for chemical modelling will be described which uses simple difference equations rather than the solution of differential rate equations; a technique called repro-modelling. This technique defines difference equations representing species concentrations as functions of concentrations at previous time-points and important parameters, by fitting orthonormal polynomial functions to large data sets. The use of such fitted algebraic representations makes the repeated chemical kinetic simulations used in reactive dispersion codes more efficient. The paper will present a dimensional analysis of a reduced version of the Carbon-Bond scheme

  10. A reduced-order model from high-dimensional frictional hysteresis

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Saurabh; Chatterjee, Anindya

    2014-01-01

    Hysteresis in material behaviour includes both signum nonlinearities as well as high dimensionality. Available models for component-level hysteretic behaviour are empirical. Here, we derive a low-order model for rate-independent hysteresis from a high-dimensional massless frictional system. The original system, being given in terms of signs of velocities, is first solved incrementally using a linear complementarity problem formulation. From this numerical solution, to develop a reduced-order model, basis vectors are chosen using the singular value decomposition. The slip direction in generalized coordinates is identified as the minimizer of a dissipation-related function. That function includes terms for frictional dissipation through signum nonlinearities at many friction sites. Luckily, it allows a convenient analytical approximation. Upon solution of the approximated minimization problem, the slip direction is found. A final evolution equation for a few states is then obtained that gives a good match with the full solution. The model obtained here may lead to new insights into hysteresis as well as better empirical modelling thereof. PMID:24910522

  11. A reduced-order model from high-dimensional frictional hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Saurabh; Chatterjee, Anindya

    2014-06-08

    Hysteresis in material behaviour includes both signum nonlinearities as well as high dimensionality. Available models for component-level hysteretic behaviour are empirical. Here, we derive a low-order model for rate-independent hysteresis from a high-dimensional massless frictional system. The original system, being given in terms of signs of velocities, is first solved incrementally using a linear complementarity problem formulation. From this numerical solution, to develop a reduced-order model, basis vectors are chosen using the singular value decomposition. The slip direction in generalized coordinates is identified as the minimizer of a dissipation-related function. That function includes terms for frictional dissipation through signum nonlinearities at many friction sites. Luckily, it allows a convenient analytical approximation. Upon solution of the approximated minimization problem, the slip direction is found. A final evolution equation for a few states is then obtained that gives a good match with the full solution. The model obtained here may lead to new insights into hysteresis as well as better empirical modelling thereof.

  12. Forward Modeling of Reduced Power Spectra from Three-dimensional k-space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Papen, Michael; Saur, Joachim

    2015-06-01

    We present results from a numerical forward model to evaluate one-dimensional reduced power spectral densities (PSDs) from arbitrary energy distributions in {\\boldsymbol{k}} -space. In this model, we can separately calculate the diagonal elements of the spectral tensor for incompressible axisymmetric turbulence with vanishing helicity. Given a critically balanced turbulent cascade with {{k}\\parallel }∼ k\\bot α and α \\lt 1, we explore the implications on the reduced PSD as a function of frequency. The spectra are obtained under the assumption of Taylor’s hypothesis. We further investigate the functional dependence of the spectral index κ on the field-to-flow angle θ between plasma flow and background magnetic field from MHD to electron kinetic scales. We show that critically balanced turbulence asymptotically develops toward θ-independent spectra with a slope corresponding to the perpendicular cascade. This occurs at a transition frequency {{f}2D}(L,α ,θ ), which is analytically estimated and depends on outer scale L, critical balance exponent α, and field-to-flow angle θ. We discuss anisotropic damping terms acting on the {\\boldsymbol{k}} -space distribution of energy and their effects on the PSD. Further, we show that the spectral anisotropies κ (θ ) as found by Horbury et al. and Chen et al. in the solar wind are in accordance with a damped critically balanced cascade of kinetic Alfvén waves. We also model power spectra obtained by Papen et al. in Saturn’s plasma sheet and find that the change of spectral indices inside 9 {{R}s} can be explained by damping on electron scales.

  13. Experimental validation of a three-dimensional reduced-order continuum model of phonation

    PubMed Central

    Farahani, Mehrdad H.; Zhang, Zhaoyan

    2016-01-01

    Due to the complex nature of the phonation process, a one-dimensional (1D) glottal flow description is often used in current phonation models. Although widely used in voice research, these 1D flow-based phonation models have not been rigorously validated against experiments. In this study, a 1D glottal flow model is coupled with a three-dimensional nonlinear continuum model of the vocal fold and its predictions are compared to physical model experiments. The results show that the 1D flow-based model is able to predict the phonation threshold pressure and onset frequency within reasonable accuracy and to reproduce major vibratory features observed in the experiments. PMID:27586776

  14. Reduced-order modeling for rotating rotor-bearing systems with cracked impellers using three-dimensional finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuai; Wang, Yu; Zi, Yanyang; Li, Bing; He, Zhengjia

    2015-10-01

    A novel reduced-order modeling method is presented in this paper for dynamics analysis of rotating impeller-shaft-bearing assembly with cracked impellers. Based on three-dimensional finite element model, the complex component mode synthesis (CMS) method is employed to generate an efficient reduced-order model (ROM) for studying the effects of crack on the global vibration of the rotating assembly. First, a modeling framework for impeller-shaft-bearing systems in rotating frame is presented. Rotational effects, including Coriolis matrix and centrifugal softening, have been taken into account. Then, the governing equation of motion of the damped gyroscopic system is reduced by the complex CMS method. Finally, the obtained ROM is employed to study the effects of crack on assembly's vibration. During the steady-state response analysis, external excitations on the impeller due to rotor-stator interactions have been taken into account, which was however neglected in previous investigations on rotordynamics. Numerical results show that the lower-order eigenvalues and the unbalance response of the assembly are not sensitive to the local crack on impeller. Nevertheless, the flexible coupling between impeller and shaft becomes more complex when the air flow-induced excitations are considered. Under EO1 traveling wave excitations, a crack leads to slight changes in the assembly's response. In contrast, the effect of crack becomes significant when the assembly is excited by EO2 and higher EO excitations. Moreover, the nonlinear crack breathing effects affect the assembly's response obviously. Finally, a potential technique for detecting the crack on impeller during operation is discussed.

  15. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURAL, MECHANICAL, AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: Reduced Fidelity Susceptibility in One-Dimensional Transverse Field Ising Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jian; Xu, Lei; Wang, Xiao-Guang

    2010-01-01

    We study critical behaviors of the reduced fidelity susceptibility for two neighboring sites in the one-dimensional transverse field Ising model. It is found that the divergent behaviors of the susceptibility take the form of square of logarithm, in contrast with the global ground-state fidelity susceptibility which is power divergence. In order to perform a scaling analysis, we take the square root of the susceptibility and determine the scaling exponent analytically and the result is further confirmed by numerical calculations.

  16. Low-dimensional reduced-order models for statistical response and uncertainty quantification: Barotropic turbulence with topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Di; Majda, Andrew J.

    2017-03-01

    A low-dimensional reduced-order statistical closure model is developed for quantifying the uncertainty to changes in forcing in a barotropic turbulent system with topography involving interactions between small-scale motions and a large-scale mean flow. Imperfect model sensitivity is improved through a recent mathematical strategy for calibrating model errors in a training phase, where information theory and linear statistical response theory are combined in a systematic fashion to achieve the optimal model parameters. Statistical theories about a Gaussian invariant measure and the exact statistical energy equations are also developed for the truncated barotropic equations that can be used to improve the imperfect model prediction skill. A stringent paradigm model of 57 degrees of freedom is used to display the feasibility of the reduced-order methods. This simple model creates large-scale zonal mean flow shifting directions from westward to eastward jets with an abrupt change in amplitude when perturbations are applied, and prototype blocked and unblocked patterns can be generated in this simple model similar to the real natural system. Principal statistical responses in mean and variance can be captured by the reduced-order models with desirable accuracy and efficiency with only 3 resolved modes. An even more challenging regime with non-Gaussian equilibrium statistics using the fluctuation equations is also tested in the reduced-order models with accurate prediction using the first 5 resolved modes. These reduced-order models also show potential for uncertainty quantification and prediction in more complex realistic geophysical turbulent dynamical systems.

  17. Three dimensional simulations of plasma filaments in the scrape off layer: A comparison with models of reduced dimensionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easy, L.; Militello, F.; Omotani, J.; Dudson, B.; Havlíčková, E.; Tamain, P.; Naulin, V.; Nielsen, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents simulations of isolated 3D filaments in a slab geometry obtained using a newly developed 3D reduced fluid code, written using the BOUT++ framework. First, systematic scans were performed to investigate how the dynamics of a filament are affected by its amplitude, perpendicular size, and parallel extent. The perpendicular size of the filament was found to have a strong influence on its motions, as it determined the relative importance of parallel currents to polarization and viscous currents, whilst drift-wave instabilities were observed if the initial amplitude of the blob was increased sufficiently. Next, the 3D simulations were compared to 2D simulations using different parallel closures; namely, the sheath dissipation closure, which neglects parallel gradients, and the vorticity advection closure, which neglects the influence of parallel currents. The vorticity advection closure was found to not replicate the 3D perpendicular dynamics and overestimated the initial radial acceleration of all the filaments studied. In contrast, a more satisfactory comparison with the sheath dissipation closure was obtained, even in the presence of significant parallel gradients, where the closure is no longer valid. Specifically, it captured the contrasting dynamics of filaments with different perpendicular sizes that were observed in the 3D simulations which the vorticity advection closure failed to replicate. However, neither closure successfully replicated the Boltzmann spinning effects nor the associated poloidal drift of the blob that was observed in the 3D simulations. Although the sheath dissipation closure was concluded to be more successful in replicating the 3D dynamics, it is emphasized that the vorticity advection closure may still be relevant for situations where the parallel current is inhibited from closing through the sheath due to effects such as strong magnetic shear around X points or increased resistivity near the targets.

  18. Neurobiological Models of Two-Choice Decision Making Can Be Reduced to a One-Dimensional Nonlinear Diffusion Equation

    PubMed Central

    Roxin, Alex; Ledberg, Anders

    2008-01-01

    The response behaviors in many two-alternative choice tasks are well described by so-called sequential sampling models. In these models, the evidence for each one of the two alternatives accumulates over time until it reaches a threshold, at which point a response is made. At the neurophysiological level, single neuron data recorded while monkeys are engaged in two-alternative choice tasks are well described by winner-take-all network models in which the two choices are represented in the firing rates of separate populations of neurons. Here, we show that such nonlinear network models can generally be reduced to a one-dimensional nonlinear diffusion equation, which bears functional resemblance to standard sequential sampling models of behavior. This reduction gives the functional dependence of performance and reaction-times on external inputs in the original system, irrespective of the system details. What is more, the nonlinear diffusion equation can provide excellent fits to behavioral data from two-choice decision making tasks by varying these external inputs. This suggests that changes in behavior under various experimental conditions, e.g. changes in stimulus coherence or response deadline, are driven by internal modulation of afferent inputs to putative decision making circuits in the brain. For certain model systems one can analytically derive the nonlinear diffusion equation, thereby mapping the original system parameters onto the diffusion equation coefficients. Here, we illustrate this with three model systems including coupled rate equations and a network of spiking neurons. PMID:18369436

  19. Coupled and reduced dimensional modeling of respiratory mechanics during spontaneous breathing.

    PubMed

    Ismail, M; Comerford, A; Wall, W A

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we develop a total lung model based on a tree of 0D airway and acinar models for studying respiratory mechanics during spontaneous breathing. This model utilizes both computer tomography-based geometries and artificially generated lobe-filling airway trees to model the entire conducting region of the lung. Beyond the conducting airways, we develop an acinar model, which takes into account the alveolar tissue resistance, compliance, and the intrapleural pressure. With this methodology, we compare four different 0D models of airway mechanics and determine the best model based on a comparison with a 3D-0D coupled model of the conducting airways; this methodology is possible because the majority of airway resistance is confined to the lower generations, that is, the trachea and the first few bronchial generations. As an example application of the model, we simulate the flow and pressure dynamics under spontaneous breathing conditions, that is, at flow conditions driven purely by pleural space pressure. The results show good agreement, both qualitatively and quantitatively, with reported physiological values. One of the key advantages of this model is the ability to provide insight into lung ventilation in the peripheral regions. This is often crucial because this is where information, specifically for studying diseases and gas exchange, is needed. Thus, the model can be used as a tool for better understanding local peripheral lung mechanics without excluding the upper portions of the lung. This tool will be also useful for in vitro investigations of lung mechanics in both health and disease. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Assessment of reduced-order unscented Kalman filter for parameter identification in 1-dimensional blood flow models using experimental data.

    PubMed

    Caiazzo, A; Caforio, Federica; Montecinos, Gino; Muller, Lucas O; Blanco, Pablo J; Toro, Eluterio F

    2016-10-25

    This work presents a detailed investigation of a parameter estimation approach on the basis of the reduced-order unscented Kalman filter (ROUKF) in the context of 1-dimensional blood flow models. In particular, the main aims of this study are (1) to investigate the effects of using real measurements versus synthetic data for the estimation procedure (i.e., numerical results of the same in silico model, perturbed with noise) and (2) to identify potential difficulties and limitations of the approach in clinically realistic applications to assess the applicability of the filter to such setups. For these purposes, the present numerical study is based on a recently published in vitro model of the arterial network, for which experimental flow and pressure measurements are available at few selected locations. To mimic clinically relevant situations, we focus on the estimation of terminal resistances and arterial wall parameters related to vessel mechanics (Young's modulus and wall thickness) using few experimental observations (at most a single pressure or flow measurement per vessel). In all cases, we first perform a theoretical identifiability analysis on the basis of the generalized sensitivity function, comparing then the results owith the ROUKF, using either synthetic or experimental data, to results obtained using reference parameters and to available measurements.

  1. Testing the Palma-Clary Reduced Dimensionality Model Using Classical Mechanics on the CH4 + H → CH3 + H2 Reaction.

    PubMed

    Vikár, Anna; Nagy, Tibor; Lendvay, György

    2016-07-14

    Application of exact quantum scattering methods in theoretical reaction dynamics of bimolecular reactions is limited by the complexity of the equations of nuclear motion to be solved. Simplification is often achieved by reducing the number of degrees of freedom to be explicitly handled by freezing the less important spectator modes. The reaction cross sections obtained in reduced-dimensionality (RD) quantum scattering methods can be used in the calculation of rate coefficients, but their physical meaning is limited. The accurate test of the performance of a reduced-dimensionality method would be a comparison of the RD cross sections with those obtained in accurate full-dimensional (FD) calculations, which is not feasible because of the lack of complete full-dimensional results. However, classical mechanics allows one to perform reaction dynamics calculations using both the RD and the FD model. In this paper, an RD versus FD comparison is made for the 8-dimensional Palma-Clary model on the example of four isotopologs of the CH4 + H → CH3 + H2 reaction, which has 12 internal dimensions. In the Palma-Clary model, the only restriction is that the methyl group is confined to maintain C3v symmetry. Both RD and FD opacity and excitation functions as well as differential cross sections were calculated using the quasiclassical trajectory method. The initial reactant separation has been handled according to our one-period averaging method [ Nagy et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2016, 144, 014104 ]. The RD and FD excitation functions were found to be close to each other for some isotopologs, but in general, the RD reactivity parameters are lower than the FD reactivity parameters beyond statistical error, and for one of the isotopologs, the deviation is significant. This indicates that the goodness of RD cross sections cannot be taken for granted.

  2. Emergent reduced dimensionality by vertex frustration in artificial spin ice

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Ian; Lao, Yuyang; Carrasquillo, Isaac; O’Brien, Liam; Watts, Justin D.; Manno, Michael; Leighton, Chris; Scholl, Andreas; Nisoli, Cristiano; Schiffer, Peter

    2015-10-26

    Reducing the dimensionality of a physical system can have a profound effect on its properties, as in the ordering of low-dimensional magnetic materials, phonon dispersion in mercury chain salts, sliding phases, and the electronic states of graphene. Here we explore the emergence of quasi-one-dimensional behaviour in two-dimensional artificial spin ice, a class of lithographically fabricated nanomagnet arrays used to study geometrical frustration. We extend the implementation of artificial spin ice by fabricating a new array geometry, the so-called tetris lattice. We demonstrate that the ground state of the tetris lattice consists of alternating ordered and disordered bands of nanomagnetic moments. The disordered bands can be mapped onto an emergent thermal one-dimensional Ising model. Furthermore, we show that the level of degeneracy associated with these bands dictates the susceptibility of island moments to thermally induced reversals, thus establishing that vertex frustration can reduce the relevant dimensionality of physical behaviour in a magnetic system.

  3. Emergent reduced dimensionality by vertex frustration in artificial spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Ian; Lao, Yuyang; Carrasquillo, Isaac; O'Brien, Liam; Watts, Justin D.; Manno, Michael; Leighton, Chris; Scholl, Andreas; Nisoli, Cristiano; Schiffer, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Reducing the dimensionality of a physical system can have a profound effect on its properties, as in the ordering of low-dimensional magnetic materials, phonon dispersion in mercury chain salts, sliding phases, and the electronic states of graphene. Here we explore the emergence of quasi-one-dimensional behaviour in two-dimensional artificial spin ice, a class of lithographically fabricated nanomagnet arrays used to study geometrical frustration. We extend the implementation of artificial spin ice by fabricating a new array geometry, the so-called tetris lattice. We demonstrate that the ground state of the tetris lattice consists of alternating ordered and disordered bands of nanomagnetic moments. The disordered bands can be mapped onto an emergent thermal one-dimensional Ising model. Furthermore, we show that the level of degeneracy associated with these bands dictates the susceptibility of island moments to thermally induced reversals, thus establishing that vertex frustration can reduce the relevant dimensionality of physical behaviour in a magnetic system.

  4. Bright solitons in a quasi-one-dimensional reduced model of a dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate with repulsive short-range interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiquillo, Emerson

    2014-08-01

    We study the formation and dynamics of bright solitons in a quasi-one-dimensional reduced mean-field Gross-Pitaevskii equation of a dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate with repulsive short-range interactions. The study is carried out using a variational approximation and a numerical solution. Plots of chemical potential and root mean square (rms) size of solitons are obtained for the quasi-one-dimensional model of three different dipolar condensates of 52Cr, 168Er and 164Dy atoms. The results achieved are in good agreement with those produced by the full three-dimensional mean-field model of the condensate. We also study the dynamics of the collision of a train of two solitons in the quasi-one-dimensional model of every condensate above. At small velocities (zero or close to zero) the dynamics is attractive for a phase difference δ = 0, the solitons coalesce and these oscillate, forming a bound soliton molecule. For a phase difference δ = π the effect is repulsive. At large velocities the collision is independent of the initial phase difference δ. This is quasi-elastic and the result is two quasi-solitons.

  5. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome alters nuclear shape and reduces cell motility in three dimensional model substrates.

    PubMed

    Booth-Gauthier, Elizabeth A; Du, Vicard; Ghibaudo, Marion; Rape, Andrew D; Dahl, Kris Noel; Ladoux, Benoit

    2013-03-01

    Cell migration through tight interstitial spaces in three dimensional (3D) environments impacts development, wound healing and cancer metastasis and is altered by the aging process. The stiffness of the extracellular matrix (ECM) increases with aging and affects the cells and cytoskeletal processes involved in cell migration. However, the nucleus, which is the largest and densest organelle, has not been widely studied during cell migration through the ECM. Additionally, the nucleus is stiffened during the aging process through the accumulation of a mutant nucleoskeleton protein lamin A, progerin. By using microfabricated substrates to mimic the confined environment of surrounding tissues, we characterized nuclear movements and deformation during cell migration into micropillars where interspacing can be tuned to vary nuclear confinement. Cell motility decreased with decreased micropillar (μP) spacing and correlated with increased dysmorphic shapes of nuclei. We examined the effects of increased nuclear stiffness which correlates with cellular aging by studying Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome cells which are known to accumulate progerin. With the expression of progerin, cells showed a threshold response to decreased μP spacing. Cells became trapped in the close spacing, possibly from visible micro-defects in the nucleoskeleton induced by cell crawling through the μP and from reduced force generation, measured independently. We suggest that ECM changes during aging could be compounded by the increasing stiffness of the nucleus and thus changes in cell migration through 3D tissues.

  6. Ligand-Stabilized Reduced-Dimensionality Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Quan, Li Na; Yuan, Mingjian; Comin, Riccardo; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Beauregard, Eric M; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Buin, Andrei; Kirmani, Ahmad R; Zhao, Kui; Amassian, Aram; Kim, Dong Ha; Sargent, Edward H

    2016-03-02

    Metal halide perovskites have rapidly advanced thin-film photovoltaic performance; as a result, the materials' observed instabilities urgently require a solution. Using density functional theory (DFT), we show that a low energy of formation, exacerbated in the presence of humidity, explains the propensity of perovskites to decompose back into their precursors. We find, also using DFT, that intercalation of phenylethylammonium between perovskite layers introduces quantitatively appreciable van der Waals interactions. These drive an increased formation energy and should therefore improve material stability. Here we report reduced-dimensionality (quasi-2D) perovskite films that exhibit improved stability while retaining the high performance of conventional three-dimensional perovskites. Continuous tuning of the dimensionality, as assessed using photophysical studies, is achieved by the choice of stoichiometry in materials synthesis. We achieve the first certified hysteresis-free solar power conversion in a planar perovskite solar cell, obtaining a 15.3% certified PCE, and observe greatly improved performance longevity.

  7. Empirical extensions of the lasso penalty to reduce the false discovery rate in high-dimensional Cox regression models.

    PubMed

    Ternès, Nils; Rotolo, Federico; Michiels, Stefan

    2016-07-10

    Correct selection of prognostic biomarkers among multiple candidates is becoming increasingly challenging as the dimensionality of biological data becomes higher. Therefore, minimizing the false discovery rate (FDR) is of primary importance, while a low false negative rate (FNR) is a complementary measure. The lasso is a popular selection method in Cox regression, but its results depend heavily on the penalty parameter λ. Usually, λ is chosen using maximum cross-validated log-likelihood (max-cvl). However, this method has often a very high FDR. We review methods for a more conservative choice of λ. We propose an empirical extension of the cvl by adding a penalization term, which trades off between the goodness-of-fit and the parsimony of the model, leading to the selection of fewer biomarkers and, as we show, to the reduction of the FDR without large increase in FNR. We conducted a simulation study considering null and moderately sparse alternative scenarios and compared our approach with the standard lasso and 10 other competitors: Akaike information criterion (AIC), corrected AIC, Bayesian information criterion (BIC), extended BIC, Hannan and Quinn information criterion (HQIC), risk information criterion (RIC), one-standard-error rule, adaptive lasso, stability selection, and percentile lasso. Our extension achieved the best compromise across all the scenarios between a reduction of the FDR and a limited raise of the FNR, followed by the AIC, the RIC, and the adaptive lasso, which performed well in some settings. We illustrate the methods using gene expression data of 523 breast cancer patients. In conclusion, we propose to apply our extension to the lasso whenever a stringent FDR with a limited FNR is targeted. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Stimuli Reduce the Dimensionality of Cortical Activity.

    PubMed

    Mazzucato, Luca; Fontanini, Alfredo; La Camera, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    The activity of ensembles of simultaneously recorded neurons can be represented as a set of points in the space of firing rates. Even though the dimension of this space is equal to the ensemble size, neural activity can be effectively localized on smaller subspaces. The dimensionality of the neural space is an important determinant of the computational tasks supported by the neural activity. Here, we investigate the dimensionality of neural ensembles from the sensory cortex of alert rats during periods of ongoing (inter-trial) and stimulus-evoked activity. We find that dimensionality grows linearly with ensemble size, and grows significantly faster during ongoing activity compared to evoked activity. We explain these results using a spiking network model based on a clustered architecture. The model captures the difference in growth rate between ongoing and evoked activity and predicts a characteristic scaling with ensemble size that could be tested in high-density multi-electrode recordings. Moreover, we present a simple theory that predicts the existence of an upper bound on dimensionality. This upper bound is inversely proportional to the amount of pair-wise correlations and, compared to a homogeneous network without clusters, it is larger by a factor equal to the number of clusters. The empirical estimation of such bounds depends on the number and duration of trials and is well predicted by the theory. Together, these results provide a framework to analyze neural dimensionality in alert animals, its behavior under stimulus presentation, and its theoretical dependence on ensemble size, number of clusters, and correlations in spiking network models.

  9. Stimuli Reduce the Dimensionality of Cortical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mazzucato, Luca; Fontanini, Alfredo; La Camera, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    The activity of ensembles of simultaneously recorded neurons can be represented as a set of points in the space of firing rates. Even though the dimension of this space is equal to the ensemble size, neural activity can be effectively localized on smaller subspaces. The dimensionality of the neural space is an important determinant of the computational tasks supported by the neural activity. Here, we investigate the dimensionality of neural ensembles from the sensory cortex of alert rats during periods of ongoing (inter-trial) and stimulus-evoked activity. We find that dimensionality grows linearly with ensemble size, and grows significantly faster during ongoing activity compared to evoked activity. We explain these results using a spiking network model based on a clustered architecture. The model captures the difference in growth rate between ongoing and evoked activity and predicts a characteristic scaling with ensemble size that could be tested in high-density multi-electrode recordings. Moreover, we present a simple theory that predicts the existence of an upper bound on dimensionality. This upper bound is inversely proportional to the amount of pair-wise correlations and, compared to a homogeneous network without clusters, it is larger by a factor equal to the number of clusters. The empirical estimation of such bounds depends on the number and duration of trials and is well predicted by the theory. Together, these results provide a framework to analyze neural dimensionality in alert animals, its behavior under stimulus presentation, and its theoretical dependence on ensemble size, number of clusters, and correlations in spiking network models. PMID:26924968

  10. Emergent reduced dimensionality by vertex frustration in artificial spin ice

    DOE PAGES

    Gilbert, Ian; Lao, Yuyang; Carrasquillo, Isaac; ...

    2015-10-26

    Reducing the dimensionality of a physical system can have a profound effect on its properties, as in the ordering of low-dimensional magnetic materials, phonon dispersion in mercury chain salts, sliding phases, and the electronic states of graphene. Here we explore the emergence of quasi-one-dimensional behaviour in two-dimensional artificial spin ice, a class of lithographically fabricated nanomagnet arrays used to study geometrical frustration. We extend the implementation of artificial spin ice by fabricating a new array geometry, the so-called tetris lattice. We demonstrate that the ground state of the tetris lattice consists of alternating ordered and disordered bands of nanomagnetic moments.more » The disordered bands can be mapped onto an emergent thermal one-dimensional Ising model. Furthermore, we show that the level of degeneracy associated with these bands dictates the susceptibility of island moments to thermally induced reversals, thus establishing that vertex frustration can reduce the relevant dimensionality of physical behaviour in a magnetic system.« less

  11. Accelerating global left-ventricular function assessment in mice using reduced slice acquisition and three-dimensional guide-point modelling

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To investigate the utility of three-dimensional guide-point modeling (GPM) to reduce the time required for CMR evaluation of global cardiac function in mice, by reducing the number of image slices required for accurate quantification of left-ventricular (LV) mass and volumes. Methods Five female C57Bl/6 mice 8 weeks post myocardial infarction induced by permanent occlusion of the left coronary artery, and six male control (un-operated) C57Bl/6 mice, were subject to CMR examination under isoflurane anaesthesia. Contiguous short axis (SAX) slices (1 mm thick 7-9 slices) were obtained together with two long axis (LAX) slices in two chamber and four chamber orientations. Using a mathematical model of the heart to interpolate information between the available slices, GPM LV mass and volumes were determined using full slice (all SAX and two LAX), six slice (four SAX and two LAX) and four slice (two SAX and two LAX) analysis protocols. All results were compared with standard manual volumetric analysis using all SAX slices. Results Infarct size was 39.1 ± 5.1% of LV myocardium. No significant differences were found in left ventricular mass and volumes between the standard and GPM full and six slice protocols in infarcted mice (113 ± 10, 116 ± 11, and 117 ± 11 mg respectively for mass), or between the standard and GPM full, six and four slice protocols in control mice, (105 ± 14, 106 ± 10, 104 ± 12, and 105 ± 7 mg respectively for mass). Significant differences were found in LV mass (135 ± 18 mg) and EF using the GPM four slice protocol in infarcted mice (p < 0.05). Conclusion GPM enables accurate analysis of LV function in mice with relatively large infarcts using a reduced six slice acquisition protocol, and in mice with normal/symmetrical left-ventricular topology using a four slice protocol. PMID:21917165

  12. Accelerating global left-ventricular function assessment in mice using reduced slice acquisition and three-dimensional guide-point modelling.

    PubMed

    Young, Alistair A; Medway, Debra J; Lygate, Craig A; Neubauer, Stefan; Schneider, Jürgen E

    2011-09-14

    To investigate the utility of three-dimensional guide-point modeling (GPM) to reduce the time required for CMR evaluation of global cardiac function in mice, by reducing the number of image slices required for accurate quantification of left-ventricular (LV) mass and volumes. Five female C57Bl/6 mice 8 weeks post myocardial infarction induced by permanent occlusion of the left coronary artery, and six male control (un-operated) C57Bl/6 mice, were subject to CMR examination under isoflurane anaesthesia. Contiguous short axis (SAX) slices (1 mm thick 7-9 slices) were obtained together with two long axis (LAX) slices in two chamber and four chamber orientations. Using a mathematical model of the heart to interpolate information between the available slices, GPM LV mass and volumes were determined using full slice (all SAX and two LAX), six slice (four SAX and two LAX) and four slice (two SAX and two LAX) analysis protocols. All results were compared with standard manual volumetric analysis using all SAX slices. Infarct size was 39.1±5.1% of LV myocardium. No significant differences were found in left ventricular mass and volumes between the standard and GPM full and six slice protocols in infarcted mice (113±10, 116±11, and 117±11 mg respectively for mass), or between the standard and GPM full, six and four slice protocols in control mice, (105±14, 106±10, 104±12, and 105±7 mg respectively for mass). Significant differences were found in LV mass (135±18 mg) and EF using the GPM four slice protocol in infarcted mice (p<0.05). GPM enables accurate analysis of LV function in mice with relatively large infarcts using a reduced six slice acquisition protocol, and in mice with normal/symmetrical left-ventricular topology using a four slice protocol.

  13. Reduced Vector Preisach Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Umesh D.; Torre, Edward Della; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A new vector Preisach model, called the Reduced Vector Preisach model (RVPM), was developed for fast computations. This model, derived from the Simplified Vector Preisach model (SVPM), has individual components that like the SVPM are calculated independently using coupled selection rules for the state vector computation. However, the RVPM does not require the rotational correction. Therefore, it provides a practical alternative for computing the magnetic susceptibility using a differential approach. A vector version, using the framework of the DOK model, is implemented. Simulation results for the reduced vector Preisach model are also presented.

  14. Do muscle synergies reduce the dimensionality of behavior?

    PubMed

    Kuppuswamy, Naveen; Harris, Christopher M

    2014-01-01

    The muscle synergy hypothesis is an archetype of the notion of Dimensionality Reduction (DR) occurring in the central nervous system due to modular organization. Toward validating this hypothesis, it is important to understand if muscle synergies can reduce the state-space dimensionality while maintaining task control. In this paper we present a scheme for investigating this reduction utilizing the temporal muscle synergy formulation. Our approach is based on the observation that constraining the control input to a weighted combination of temporal muscle synergies also constrains the dynamic behavior of a system in a trajectory-specific manner. We compute this constrained reformulation of system dynamics and then use the method of system balancing for quantifying the DR; we term this approach as Trajectory Specific Dimensionality Analysis (TSDA). We then investigate the consequence of minimization of the dimensionality for a given task. These methods are tested in simulations on a linear (tethered mass) and a non-linear (compliant kinematic chain) system. Dimensionality of various reaching trajectories is compared when using idealized temporal synergies. We show that as a consequence of this Minimum Dimensional Control (MDC) model, smooth straight-line Cartesian trajectories with bell-shaped velocity profiles emerged as the optima for the reaching task. We also investigated the effect on dimensionality due to adding via-points to a trajectory. The results indicate that a trajectory and synergy basis specific DR of behavior results from muscle synergy control. The implications of these results for the synergy hypothesis, optimal motor control, motor development, and robotics are discussed.

  15. Do muscle synergies reduce the dimensionality of behavior?

    PubMed Central

    Kuppuswamy, Naveen; Harris, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    The muscle synergy hypothesis is an archetype of the notion of Dimensionality Reduction (DR) occurring in the central nervous system due to modular organization. Toward validating this hypothesis, it is important to understand if muscle synergies can reduce the state-space dimensionality while maintaining task control. In this paper we present a scheme for investigating this reduction utilizing the temporal muscle synergy formulation. Our approach is based on the observation that constraining the control input to a weighted combination of temporal muscle synergies also constrains the dynamic behavior of a system in a trajectory-specific manner. We compute this constrained reformulation of system dynamics and then use the method of system balancing for quantifying the DR; we term this approach as Trajectory Specific Dimensionality Analysis (TSDA). We then investigate the consequence of minimization of the dimensionality for a given task. These methods are tested in simulations on a linear (tethered mass) and a non-linear (compliant kinematic chain) system. Dimensionality of various reaching trajectories is compared when using idealized temporal synergies. We show that as a consequence of this Minimum Dimensional Control (MDC) model, smooth straight-line Cartesian trajectories with bell-shaped velocity profiles emerged as the optima for the reaching task. We also investigated the effect on dimensionality due to adding via-points to a trajectory. The results indicate that a trajectory and synergy basis specific DR of behavior results from muscle synergy control. The implications of these results for the synergy hypothesis, optimal motor control, motor development, and robotics are discussed. PMID:25002844

  16. Evaluation of Floodplain Modifications to Reduce the Effect of Floods Using a Two-Dimensional Hydrodynamic Model of the Flint River at Albany, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Musser, Jonathan W.

    2008-01-01

    Potential flow characteristics of future flooding along a 4.8-mile reach of the Flint River in Albany, Georgia, were simulated using recent digital-elevation-model data and the U.S. Geological Survey finite-element surface-water modeling system for two-dimensional flow in the horizontal plane (FESWMS-2DH). The model was run at four water-surface altitudes at the Flint River at Albany streamgage (02352500): 181.5-foot (ft) altitude with a flow of 61,100 cubic feet per second (ft3/s), 184.5-ft altitude with a flow of 75,400 ft3/s, 187.5-ft altitude with a flow of 91,700 ft3/s, and 192.5-ft altitude with a flow of 123,000 ft3/s. The model was run to measure changes in inundated areas and water-surface altitudes for eight scenarios of possible modifications to the 4.8-mile reach on the Flint River. The eight scenarios include removing a human-made peninsula located downstream from Oglethorpe Boulevard, increasing the opening under the Oakridge Drive bridge, adding culverts to the east Oakridge Drive bridge approach, adding culverts to the east and west Oakridge Drive bridge approaches, adding an overflow across the oxbow north of Oakridge Drive, making the overflow into a channel, removing the Oakridge Drive bridge, and adding a combination of an oxbow overflow and culverts on both Oakridge Drive bridge approaches. The modeled inundation and water-surface altitude changes were mapped for use in evaluating the river modifications. The most effective scenario at reducing inundated area was the combination scenario. At the 187.5-ft altitude, the inundated area decreased from 4.24 square miles to 4.00 square miles. The remove-peninsula scenario was the least effective with a reduction in inundated area of less than 0.01 square miles. In all scenarios, the inundated area reduction increased with water-surface altitude, peaking at the 187.5-ft altitude. The inundated area reduction then decreased at the gage altitude of 192.5 ft.

  17. Electronic states in systems of reduced dimensionality

    SciTech Connect

    Ulloa, S.E.

    1992-04-15

    This report briefly discusses the following research: magnetically modulated systems, inelastic magnetotunneling, ballistic transport review, screening in reduced dimensions, raman and electron energy loss spectroscopy; and ballistic quantum interference effects. (LSP).

  18. Reduced Order Podolsky Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibes, Ronaldo

    2017-02-01

    We perform the canonical and path integral quantizations of a lower-order derivatives model describing Podolsky's generalized electrodynamics. The physical content of the model shows an auxiliary massive vector field coupled to the usual electromagnetic field. The equivalence with Podolsky's original model is studied at classical and quantum levels. Concerning the dynamical time evolution, we obtain a theory with two first-class and two second-class constraints in phase space. We calculate explicitly the corresponding Dirac brackets involving both vector fields. We use the Senjanovic procedure to implement the second-class constraints and the Batalin-Fradkin-Vilkovisky path integral quantization scheme to deal with the symmetries generated by the first-class constraints. The physical interpretation of the results turns out to be simpler due to the reduced derivatives order permeating the equations of motion, Dirac brackets and effective action.

  19. Fast two-dimensional model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Douglass, Anne R.; Stolarski, Richard S.; Guthrie, Paul D.; Thompson, A. M.

    1990-01-01

    A two dimensional (altitude and latitude) model of the atmosphere is used to investigate problems relating to the variability of the dynamics and temperature of the atmosphere on the ozone distribution, solar cycle variations of atmospheric constituents, the sensitivity of model results to tropospheric trace gas sources, and assessment computations of changes in ozone related to manmade influences. In a comparison between two dimensional model results in which the odd nitrogen family was transported together and model results in which the odd nitrogen species was transported separately, it was found that the family approximations are adequate for perturbation scenario calculations.

  20. Reducing dimensionality in remote homology detection using predicted contact maps.

    PubMed

    Bedoya, Oscar; Tischer, Irene

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a new method for remote protein homology detection is presented. Most discriminative methods concatenate the values extracted from physicochemical properties to build a model that separates homolog and non-homolog examples. Each discriminative method uses a specific strategy to represent the information extracted from the protein sequence and a different number of indices. After the vector representation is achieved, support vector machines (SVM) are usually used. Most classification techniques are not suitable in remote homology detection because they do not address high dimensional datasets. In this paper, we propose a method that reduces the high dimensionality of the vector representation using models that are defined at the 3D level. Next, the models are mapped from the protein primary sequence. The new method, called remote-C3D, is presented and tested on the SCOP 1.53 and SCOP 1.55 datasets. The remote-C3D method achieves a higher accuracy than the composition-based methods and a comparable performance with profile-based methods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Dimensionality reduction in epidemic spreading models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frasca, M.; Rizzo, A.; Gallo, L.; Fortuna, L.; Porfiri, M.

    2015-09-01

    Complex dynamical systems often exhibit collective dynamics that are well described by a reduced set of key variables in a low-dimensional space. Such a low-dimensional description offers a privileged perspective to understand the system behavior across temporal and spatial scales. In this work, we propose a data-driven approach to establish low-dimensional representations of large epidemic datasets by using a dimensionality reduction algorithm based on isometric features mapping (ISOMAP). We demonstrate our approach on synthetic data for epidemic spreading in a population of mobile individuals. We find that ISOMAP is successful in embedding high-dimensional data into a low-dimensional manifold, whose topological features are associated with the epidemic outbreak. Across a range of simulation parameters and model instances, we observe that epidemic outbreaks are embedded into a family of closed curves in a three-dimensional space, in which neighboring points pertain to instants that are close in time. The orientation of each curve is unique to a specific outbreak, and the coordinates correlate with the number of infected individuals. A low-dimensional description of epidemic spreading is expected to improve our understanding of the role of individual response on the outbreak dynamics, inform the selection of meaningful global observables, and, possibly, aid in the design of control and quarantine procedures.

  2. Reduced basis ANOVA methods for partial differential equations with high-dimensional random inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Qifeng; Lin, Guang

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we present a reduced basis ANOVA approach for partial deferential equations (PDEs) with random inputs. The ANOVA method combined with stochastic collocation methods provides model reduction in high-dimensional parameter space through decomposing high-dimensional inputs into unions of low-dimensional inputs. In this work, to further reduce the computational cost, we investigate spatial low-rank structures in the ANOVA-collocation method, and develop efficient spatial model reduction techniques using hierarchically generated reduced bases. We present a general mathematical framework of the methodology, validate its accuracy and demonstrate its efficiency with numerical experiments.

  3. Reduced basis ANOVA methods for partial differential equations with high-dimensional random inputs

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Qifeng; Lin, Guang

    2016-07-15

    In this paper we present a reduced basis ANOVA approach for partial deferential equations (PDEs) with random inputs. The ANOVA method combined with stochastic collocation methods provides model reduction in high-dimensional parameter space through decomposing high-dimensional inputs into unions of low-dimensional inputs. In this work, to further reduce the computational cost, we investigate spatial low-rank structures in the ANOVA-collocation method, and develop efficient spatial model reduction techniques using hierarchically generated reduced bases. We present a general mathematical framework of the methodology, validate its accuracy and demonstrate its efficiency with numerical experiments.

  4. System for generating two-dimensional masks from a three-dimensional model using topological analysis

    DOEpatents

    Schiek, Richard

    2006-06-20

    A method of generating two-dimensional masks from a three-dimensional model comprises providing a three-dimensional model representing a micro-electro-mechanical structure for manufacture and a description of process mask requirements, reducing the three-dimensional model to a topological description of unique cross sections, and selecting candidate masks from the unique cross sections and the cross section topology. The method further can comprise reconciling the candidate masks based on the process mask requirements description to produce two-dimensional process masks.

  5. A three-dimensional ground-water-flow model modified to reduce computer-memory requirements and better simulate confining-bed and aquifer pinchouts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leahy, P.P.

    1982-01-01

    The Trescott computer program for modeling groundwater flow in three dimensions has been modified to (1) treat aquifer and confining bed pinchouts more realistically and (2) reduce the computer memory requirements needed for the input data. Using the original program, simulation of aquifer systems with nonrectangular external boundaries may result in a large number of nodes that are not involved in the numerical solution of the problem, but require computer storage. (USGS)

  6. The nitric oxide donor S-nitrosoglutathione reduces apoptotic primary liver cell loss in a three-dimensional perfusion bioreactor culture model developed for liver support.

    PubMed

    Prince, Jose M; Vodovotz, Yoram; Baun, Matthew J; Monga, Satdarshan Pal; Billiar, Timothy R; Gerlach, Jörg C

    2010-03-01

    24 and 72 h in the bioreactor groups treated with either 200 or 500 microM GSNO compared with the control groups. Addition of an NO donor reduces adult rat liver cell apoptosis during the initial 24 h after cell inoculation within a three-dimensional perfusion bioreactor system for liver support and promotes liver cell aggregation and spontaneous restructuring of the cells at 24 and 72 h. GSNO-treated bioreactors remain metabolically active and show significantly lower levels of cellular injury as compared with controls. Further studies will be required to evaluate the impact of NO treatment of liver support bioreactors for clinical studies.

  7. Electronic, Optical, and Thermal Properties of Reduced-Dimensional Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shouting

    Reduced-dimensional materials have attracted tremendous attention because of their new physics and exotic properties, which are of great interests for fundamental science. More importantly, the manipulation and engineering of matter on an atomic scale yield promising applications for many fields including nanoelectronics, nanobiotechnology, environments, and renewable energy. Because of the unusual quantum confinement and enhanced surface effect of reduced-dimensional materials, traditional empirical models suffer from necessary but unreliable parameters extracted from previously-studied bulk materials. In this sense, quantitative, parameter-free approaches are highly useful for understanding properties of reduced-dimensional materials and, furthermore, predicting their novel applications. The first-principles density functional theory (DFT) is proven to be a reliable and convenient tool. In particular, recent progress in many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) makes it possible to calculate excited-state properties, e.g., quasiparticle (QP) band gap and optical excitations, by the first-principles approach based on DFT. Therefore, during my PhD study, I employed first-principles calculations based on DFT and MBPT to systematically study fundamental properties of typical reduced-dimensional semiconductors, i.e., the electronic structure, phonons, and optical excitations of core-shell nanowires (NWs) and graphene-like two-dimensional (2D) structures of current interests. First, I present first-principles studies on how to engineer band alignments of nano-sized radial heterojunctions, Si/Ge core-shell NWs. Our calculation reveals that band offsets in these one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures can be tailored by applying axial strain or varying core-shell sizes. In particular, the valence band offset can be efficiently tuned across a wide range and even be diminished via applied strain. Two mechanisms contribute to this tuning of band offsets. Furthermore, varying the

  8. The Nitric Oxide Donor S-Nitrosoglutathione Reduces Apoptotic Primary Liver Cell Loss in a Three-Dimensional Perfusion Bioreactor Culture Model Developed for Liver Support

    PubMed Central

    Prince, Jose M.; Vodovotz, Yoram; Baun, Matthew J.; Monga, Satdarshan Pal; Billiar, Timothy R.

    2010-01-01

    superior spontaneous restructuring of the cells were seen at 24 and 72 h in the bioreactor groups treated with either 200 or 500 μM GSNO compared with the control groups. Conclusion Addition of an NO donor reduces adult rat liver cell apoptosis during the initial 24 h after cell inoculation within a three-dimensional perfusion bioreactor system for liver support and promotes liver cell aggregation and spontaneous restructuring of the cells at 24 and 72 h. GSNO-treated bioreactors remain metabolically active and show significantly lower levels of cellular injury as compared with controls. Further studies will be required to evaluate the impact of NO treatment of liver support bioreactors for clinical studies. PMID:19814591

  9. Sensory stimuli reduce the dimensionality of cortical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzucato, Luca; Fontanini, Alfredo; La Camera, Giancarlo

    Neural ensembles in alert animals generate complex patterns of activity. Although cortical activity unfolds in a space whose dimension is equal to the number of neurons, it is often restricted to a lower dimensional subspace. Dimensionality is the minimal number of dimensions that accurately capture neural dynamics, and may be related to the computational tasks supported by the neural circuit. Here, we investigate the dimensionality of neural ensembles from the insular cortex of alert rats during periods of `ongoing' (spontaneous) and stimulus-evoked activity. We find that the dimensionality grows with ensemble size, and does so significantly faster during ongoing compared to evoked activity. We explain both results using a recurrent spiking network with clustered architecture, and obtain analytical results on the dependence of dimensionality on ensemble size, number of clusters, and pair-wise noise correlations. The theory predicts a characteristic scaling with ensemble size and the existence of an upper bound on dimensionality, which grows with the number of clusters and decreases with the amount of noise correlations. To our knowledge, this is the first mechanistic model of neural dimensionality in cortex during both spontaneous and evoked activity.

  10. Modelling reduced sparse data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozera, Ryszard; Noakes, Lyle

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we discuss the problem of fitting to an ordered collection of points in arbitary Euclidean space called reduced data. We are not given here the corresponding interpolation knots. Instead, these are estimated by new knots upon minimizing a relevant highly nonlinear optimization scheme based on natural spline interpolation. The existence of a global minimizer (i.e. the collection of interpolation knots in ascending order) is also addressed in this paper. Finally, Leap-Frog optimization tool is used to compute these knots approximating the unknown interpolation knots. This numerical scheme is subsequently compared with the Secant Method. Two illustrative examples are given.

  11. Determining Reduced Order Models for Optimal Stochastic Reduced Order Models

    SciTech Connect

    Bonney, Matthew S.; Brake, Matthew R.W.

    2015-08-01

    The use of parameterized reduced order models(PROMs) within the stochastic reduced order model (SROM) framework is a logical progression for both methods. In this report, five different parameterized reduced order models are selected and critiqued against the other models along with truth model for the example of the Brake-Reuss beam. The models are: a Taylor series using finite difference, a proper orthogonal decomposition of the the output, a Craig-Bampton representation of the model, a method that uses Hyper-Dual numbers to determine the sensitivities, and a Meta-Model method that uses the Hyper-Dual results and constructs a polynomial curve to better represent the output data. The methods are compared against a parameter sweep and a distribution propagation where the first four statistical moments are used as a comparison. Each method produces very accurate results with the Craig-Bampton reduction having the least accurate results. The models are also compared based on time requirements for the evaluation of each model where the Meta- Model requires the least amount of time for computation by a significant amount. Each of the five models provided accurate results in a reasonable time frame. The determination of which model to use is dependent on the availability of the high-fidelity model and how many evaluations can be performed. Analysis of the output distribution is examined by using a large Monte-Carlo simulation along with a reduced simulation using Latin Hypercube and the stochastic reduced order model sampling technique. Both techniques produced accurate results. The stochastic reduced order modeling technique produced less error when compared to an exhaustive sampling for the majority of methods.

  12. Extra-dimensional models on the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Knechtli, Francesco; Rinaldi, Enrico

    2016-08-05

    In this paper we summarize the ongoing effort to study extra-dimensional gauge theories with lattice simulations. In these models the Higgs field is identified with extra-dimensional components of the gauge field. The Higgs potential is generated by quantum corrections and is protected from divergences by the higher dimensional gauge symmetry. Dimensional reduction to four dimensions can occur through compactification or localization. Gauge-Higgs unification models are often studied using perturbation theory. Numerical lattice simulations are used to go beyond these perturbative expectations and to include nonperturbative effects. We describe the known perturbative predictions and their fate in the strongly-coupled regime for various extra-dimensional models.

  13. Extra-dimensional models on the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Knechtli, Francesco; Rinaldi, Enrico

    2016-08-05

    In this paper we summarize the ongoing effort to study extra-dimensional gauge theories with lattice simulations. In these models the Higgs field is identified with extra-dimensional components of the gauge field. The Higgs potential is generated by quantum corrections and is protected from divergences by the higher dimensional gauge symmetry. Dimensional reduction to four dimensions can occur through compactification or localization. Gauge-Higgs unification models are often studied using perturbation theory. Numerical lattice simulations are used to go beyond these perturbative expectations and to include nonperturbative effects. We describe the known perturbative predictions and their fate in the strongly-coupled regime for various extra-dimensional models.

  14. Reduced dimensionality diatom--diatom reactive scattering: Application to a model H sub 2 +A sub 2 r arrow H+HA sub 2 reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Q.; Bowman, J.M. )

    1990-01-15

    We apply a recently formulated quantum theory of diatom--diatom reactions (Q. Sun and J. M. Bowman, Int. J. Quant. Chem., Quant. Chem. Symp. {bold 23}, 9 (1989)) to a model collinear H{sub 2}+A{sub 2}{r arrow}H+HA{sub 2} reaction, where A has the mass of a hydrogen atom. The theory assumes one diatom bond is nonreactive, and the reactive scattering Hamiltonian is written in terms of hyperspherical and cylindrical coordinates. The potential-energy surface used is the PK2 H+H{sub 2} surface augmented by a harmonic degree of freedom describing the nonreactive A{sub 2}. Details of the formulation and solution of the coupled-channel equations are given, along with convergence tests, and a discussion of the new state-to-state transition probabilities. In particular, the partial quenching of the well-known collinear H+H{sub 2} resonances is noted.

  15. Sparse High Dimensional Models in Economics

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jianqing; Lv, Jinchi; Qi, Lei

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on sparse high dimensional models and discusses some applications in economics and finance. Recent developments of theory, methods, and implementations in penalized least squares and penalized likelihood methods are highlighted. These variable selection methods are proved to be effective in high dimensional sparse modeling. The limits of dimensionality that regularization methods can handle, the role of penalty functions, and their statistical properties are detailed. Some recent advances in ultra-high dimensional sparse modeling are also briefly discussed. PMID:22022635

  16. Physical model of dimensional regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schonfeld, Jonathan F.

    2016-12-01

    We explicitly construct fractals of dimension 4{-}ɛ on which dimensional regularization approximates scalar-field-only quantum-field theory amplitudes. The construction does not require fractals to be Lorentz-invariant in any sense, and we argue that there probably is no Lorentz-invariant fractal of dimension greater than 2. We derive dimensional regularization's power-law screening first for fractals obtained by removing voids from 3-dimensional Euclidean space. The derivation applies techniques from elementary dielectric theory. Surprisingly, fractal geometry by itself does not guarantee the appropriate power-law behavior; boundary conditions at fractal voids also play an important role. We then extend the derivation to 4-dimensional Minkowski space. We comment on generalization to non-scalar fields, and speculate about implications for quantum gravity.

  17. Improving the text classification using clustering and a novel HMM to reduce the dimensionality.

    PubMed

    Seara Vieira, A; Borrajo, L; Iglesias, E L

    2016-11-01

    In text classification problems, the representation of a document has a strong impact on the performance of learning systems. The high dimensionality of the classical structured representations can lead to burdensome computations due to the great size of real-world data. Consequently, there is a need for reducing the quantity of handled information to improve the classification process. In this paper, we propose a method to reduce the dimensionality of a classical text representation based on a clustering technique to group documents, and a previously developed Hidden Markov Model to represent them. We have applied tests with the k-NN and SVM classifiers on the OHSUMED and TREC benchmark text corpora using the proposed dimensionality reduction technique. The experimental results obtained are very satisfactory compared to commonly used techniques like InfoGain and the statistical tests performed demonstrate the suitability of the proposed technique for the preprocessing step in a text classification task.

  18. Model diagnostics in reduced-rank estimation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Reduced-rank methods are very popular in high-dimensional multivariate analysis for conducting simultaneous dimension reduction and model estimation. However, the commonly-used reduced-rank methods are not robust, as the underlying reduced-rank structure can be easily distorted by only a few data outliers. Anomalies are bound to exist in big data problems, and in some applications they themselves could be of the primary interest. While naive residual analysis is often inadequate for outlier detection due to potential masking and swamping, robust reduced-rank estimation approaches could be computationally demanding. Under Stein's unbiased risk estimation framework, we propose a set of tools, including leverage score and generalized information score, to perform model diagnostics and outlier detection in large-scale reduced-rank estimation. The leverage scores give an exact decomposition of the so-called model degrees of freedom to the observation level, which lead to exact decomposition of many commonly-used information criteria; the resulting quantities are thus named information scores of the observations. The proposed information score approach provides a principled way of combining the residuals and leverage scores for anomaly detection. Simulation studies confirm that the proposed diagnostic tools work well. A pattern recognition example with hand-writing digital images and a time series analysis example with monthly U.S. macroeconomic data further demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed approaches. PMID:28003860

  19. Extra-dimensional models on the lattice

    DOE PAGES

    Knechtli, Francesco; Rinaldi, Enrico

    2016-08-05

    In this paper we summarize the ongoing effort to study extra-dimensional gauge theories with lattice simulations. In these models the Higgs field is identified with extra-dimensional components of the gauge field. The Higgs potential is generated by quantum corrections and is protected from divergences by the higher dimensional gauge symmetry. Dimensional reduction to four dimensions can occur through compactification or localization. Gauge-Higgs unification models are often studied using perturbation theory. Numerical lattice simulations are used to go beyond these perturbative expectations and to include nonperturbative effects. We describe the known perturbative predictions and their fate in the strongly-coupled regime formore » various extra-dimensional models.« less

  20. POD/DEIM reduced-order strategies for efficient four dimensional variational data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ştefănescu, R.; Sandu, A.; Navon, I. M.

    2015-08-01

    This work studies reduced order modeling (ROM) approaches to speed up the solution of variational data assimilation problems with large scale nonlinear dynamical models. It is shown that a key requirement for a successful reduced order solution is that reduced order Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions accurately represent their full order counterparts. In particular, accurate reduced order approximations are needed for the forward and adjoint dynamical models, as well as for the reduced gradient. New strategies to construct reduced order based are developed for proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) ROM data assimilation using both Galerkin and Petrov-Galerkin projections. For the first time POD, tensorial POD, and discrete empirical interpolation method (DEIM) are employed to develop reduced data assimilation systems for a geophysical flow model, namely, the two dimensional shallow water equations. Numerical experiments confirm the theoretical framework for Galerkin projection. In the case of Petrov-Galerkin projection, stabilization strategies must be considered for the reduced order models. The new reduced order shallow water data assimilation system provides analyses similar to those produced by the full resolution data assimilation system in one tenth of the computational time.

  1. POD/DEIM reduced-order strategies for efficient four dimensional variational data assimilation

    SciTech Connect

    Ştefănescu, R.; Sandu, A.; Navon, I.M.

    2015-08-15

    This work studies reduced order modeling (ROM) approaches to speed up the solution of variational data assimilation problems with large scale nonlinear dynamical models. It is shown that a key requirement for a successful reduced order solution is that reduced order Karush–Kuhn–Tucker conditions accurately represent their full order counterparts. In particular, accurate reduced order approximations are needed for the forward and adjoint dynamical models, as well as for the reduced gradient. New strategies to construct reduced order based are developed for proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) ROM data assimilation using both Galerkin and Petrov–Galerkin projections. For the first time POD, tensorial POD, and discrete empirical interpolation method (DEIM) are employed to develop reduced data assimilation systems for a geophysical flow model, namely, the two dimensional shallow water equations. Numerical experiments confirm the theoretical framework for Galerkin projection. In the case of Petrov–Galerkin projection, stabilization strategies must be considered for the reduced order models. The new reduced order shallow water data assimilation system provides analyses similar to those produced by the full resolution data assimilation system in one tenth of the computational time.

  2. Random projections in reducing the dimensionality of climate simulation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitola, Teija; Mikkola, Visa; Silen, Johan; Järvinen, Heikki

    2014-05-01

    Climate simulation data is often high dimensional with several variables and thousands of time steps and grid points. High dimensionality presents a problem by making I/O and post-processing expensive and time consuming. It also excludes use of some analysis methods. Random projection (RP) is a dimensionality reduction method that has been earlier applied to high dimensional data sets, for instance, in image processing. Here we introduce random projection as a dimensionality reduction method applied on simulated global surface temperature data (so called Millennium simulation data of MPI-M) and show how the projected data preserves the essential structure of the original data. We apply Principal component analysis (PCA) on original and randomly projected lower dimensional data to analyze how RP preserves structures when original data is compressed down to 10% or 1% of the original volume. We also demonstrate the application of the RP method on very high dimensional data of the atmospheric temperature in three-dimensions. Our experiments show that information is naturally lost in RP but the main spatial patterns (the principal components) and temporal signatures (spectra of time-dependent coefficients) can still be recovered from the randomly projected low-dimensional subspaces. Our results imply that RP could be used as a pre-processing step before analyzing the structure of large data sets. This might allow investigating the dynamics of truly high dimensional climate data sets of several state variables, time steps and spatial locations.

  3. Bayesian Methods for High Dimensional Linear Models

    PubMed Central

    Mallick, Himel; Yi, Nengjun

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we present a selective overview of some recent developments in Bayesian model and variable selection methods for high dimensional linear models. While most of the reviews in literature are based on conventional methods, we focus on recently developed methods, which have proven to be successful in dealing with high dimensional variable selection. First, we give a brief overview of the traditional model selection methods (viz. Mallow’s Cp, AIC, BIC, DIC), followed by a discussion on some recently developed methods (viz. EBIC, regularization), which have occupied the minds of many statisticians. Then, we review high dimensional Bayesian methods with a particular emphasis on Bayesian regularization methods, which have been used extensively in recent years. We conclude by briefly addressing the asymptotic behaviors of Bayesian variable selection methods for high dimensional linear models under different regularity conditions. PMID:24511433

  4. Toward black-box-type full- and reduced-dimensional variational (ro)vibrational computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mátyus, Edit; Czakó, Gábor; Császár, Attila G.

    2009-04-01

    A black-box-type algorithm is presented for the variational computation of energy levels and wave functions using a (ro)vibrational Hamiltonian expressed in an arbitrarily chosen body-fixed frame and in any set of internal coordinates of full or reduced vibrational dimensionality. To make the required numerical work feasible, matrix representation of the operators is constructed using a discrete variable representation (DVR). The favorable properties of DVR are exploited in the straightforward and numerically exact inclusion of any representation of the potential and the kinetic energy including the G matrix and the extrapotential term. In this algorithm there is no need for an a priori analytic derivation of the kinetic energy operator, as all of its matrix elements at each grid point are computed numerically either in a full- or a reduced-dimensional model. Due to the simple and straightforward definition of reduced-dimensional models within this approach, a fully anharmonic variational treatment of large, otherwise intractable molecular systems becomes available. In the computer code based on the above algorithm, there is no inherent limitation for the maximally coupled number of vibrational degrees of freedom. However, in practice current personal computers allow the treatment of about nine fully coupled vibrational dimensions. Computation of vibrational band origins of full and reduced dimensions showing the advantages and limitations of the algorithm and the related computer code are presented for the water, ammonia, and methane molecules.

  5. Toward black-box-type full- and reduced-dimensional variational (ro)vibrational computations.

    PubMed

    Mátyus, Edit; Czakó, Gábor; Császár, Attila G

    2009-04-07

    A black-box-type algorithm is presented for the variational computation of energy levels and wave functions using a (ro)vibrational Hamiltonian expressed in an arbitrarily chosen body-fixed frame and in any set of internal coordinates of full or reduced vibrational dimensionality. To make the required numerical work feasible, matrix representation of the operators is constructed using a discrete variable representation (DVR). The favorable properties of DVR are exploited in the straightforward and numerically exact inclusion of any representation of the potential and the kinetic energy including the G matrix and the extrapotential term. In this algorithm there is no need for an a priori analytic derivation of the kinetic energy operator, as all of its matrix elements at each grid point are computed numerically either in a full- or a reduced-dimensional model. Due to the simple and straightforward definition of reduced-dimensional models within this approach, a fully anharmonic variational treatment of large, otherwise intractable molecular systems becomes available. In the computer code based on the above algorithm, there is no inherent limitation for the maximally coupled number of vibrational degrees of freedom. However, in practice current personal computers allow the treatment of about nine fully coupled vibrational dimensions. Computation of vibrational band origins of full and reduced dimensions showing the advantages and limitations of the algorithm and the related computer code are presented for the water, ammonia, and methane molecules.

  6. Developments in two-dimensional regenerator modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gedeon, David

    The development status of the manifold-estimate, or 'MANIFEST', computer code for two-dimensional modeling of Stirling cycle engines' regenerator-element flow. MANIFEST can model oscillating compressible fluid internal flows in arbitrarily shaped two-dimensional regions, irrespective of whether these are filled with porous materials or empty. An interactive examination of the solution output can be conducted graphically, for ease of boundary condition specification and viewing of flow velocity, temperature, and pressure plots at various locations.

  7. Hybrid reduced order modeling for assembly calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, Youngsuk; Abdel-Khalik, Hany S.; Jessee, Matthew A.; Mertyurek, Ugur

    2015-08-14

    While the accuracy of assembly calculations has greatly improved due to the increase in computer power enabling more refined description of the phase space and use of more sophisticated numerical algorithms, the computational cost continues to increase which limits the full utilization of their effectiveness for routine engineering analysis. Reduced order modeling is a mathematical vehicle that scales down the dimensionality of large-scale numerical problems to enable their repeated executions on small computing environment, often available to end users. This is done by capturing the most dominant underlying relationships between the model's inputs and outputs. Previous works demonstrated the use of the reduced order modeling for a single physics code, such as a radiation transport calculation. This paper extends those works to coupled code systems as currently employed in assembly calculations. Finally, numerical tests are conducted using realistic SCALE assembly models with resonance self-shielding, neutron transport, and nuclides transmutation/depletion models representing the components of the coupled code system.

  8. Hybrid reduced order modeling for assembly calculations

    DOE PAGES

    Bang, Youngsuk; Abdel-Khalik, Hany S.; Jessee, Matthew A.; ...

    2015-08-14

    While the accuracy of assembly calculations has greatly improved due to the increase in computer power enabling more refined description of the phase space and use of more sophisticated numerical algorithms, the computational cost continues to increase which limits the full utilization of their effectiveness for routine engineering analysis. Reduced order modeling is a mathematical vehicle that scales down the dimensionality of large-scale numerical problems to enable their repeated executions on small computing environment, often available to end users. This is done by capturing the most dominant underlying relationships between the model's inputs and outputs. Previous works demonstrated the usemore » of the reduced order modeling for a single physics code, such as a radiation transport calculation. This paper extends those works to coupled code systems as currently employed in assembly calculations. Finally, numerical tests are conducted using realistic SCALE assembly models with resonance self-shielding, neutron transport, and nuclides transmutation/depletion models representing the components of the coupled code system.« less

  9. [Dimensional modeling analysis for outpatient payments].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yi-zhong; Guo, Yi-min

    2008-09-01

    This paper introduces a data warehouse model for outpatient payments, which is designed according to the requirements of the hospital financial management while dimensional modeling technique is combined with the analysis on the requirements. This data warehouse model can not only improve the accuracy of financial management requirements, but also greatly increase the efficiency and quality of the hospital management.

  10. Reduced Dimensionality Effects in Gd-based Magnetocaloric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belliveau, Hillary

    Magnetic refrigeration based on the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) is a promising alternative to conventional gas compression based cooling techniques. Understanding impacts of reduced dimensionality on the magnetocaloric response of a material such as Gadolinium (Gd) or its alloys is essential in optimizing the performance of cooling devices, which is also the overall goal of this thesis. We have determined, in the first part of the thesis, that laminate structures of pure Gd produced by magnetron sputtering have several disadvantages. The target material (pure Gd), ultra-high vacuum components, and the electrical energy it takes to run the manufacturing process are all very costly. To produce quality films requires a time and energy consuming chamber preparation (gettering) to produce films with a relative cooling power (RCP) of an order of magnitude smaller (˜70 J/kg) than can be obtained with Gd-alloy microwires (˜800 J/kg). The increased surface area for an array of wires as compared to a laminate structure allows for more efficient heat transfer. For all of these reasons, we turned the focus onto Gd-alloy microwires. In the latter part of this thesis, we have discussed the Gd-alloy microwires as a function of magnetocaloric parameters of magnetic entropy change, adiabatic temperature change, and refrigerant capacity ( RC). We have demonstrated two effective methods for improving the RC of the microwires through creating novel biphase nanocrystalline/amorphous structures via thermal annealing and directly from adjusted melt-extraction. Through studying the effects of chemical doping, as well as studying arrays of microwires with a range of Curie temperature (TC) values, we have designed a new magnetic bed structure that has potential applications as a cooling device for micro-electro-mechanical systems and energy-conversion devices.

  11. Two-dimensional lattice liquid models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimoto, Yukitaka; Murashima, Takahiro; Taniguchi, Takashi; Yamamoto, Ryoichi

    2012-09-01

    A family of models of liquid on a two-dimensional lattice (2D lattice liquid models) have been proposed as primitive models of soft-material membrane. As a first step, we have formulated them as single-component, single-layered, classical particle systems on a two-dimensional surface with no explicit viscosity. Among the family of the models, we have shown and constructed two stochastic models, a vicious walk model and a flow model, on an isotropic regular lattice and on some honeycomb lattices of various sizes. In both cases, the dynamics is governed by the nature of the frustration of the particle movements. By simulations, we have found the approximate functional form of the frustration probability and peculiar anomalous diffusions in their time-averaged mean-square displacements in the flow model. The relations to other existing statistical models and possible extensions of the models are also discussed.

  12. Reduced dimensionality and spatial entanglement in highly anisotropic Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacla, Alexandre B.; Caves, Carlton M.

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the reduced dimensionality of highly anisotropic Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) in connection with the entanglement between the spatial degrees of freedom. We argue that the reduced dimensionality of the BEC is physically meaningful in a regime where spatial correlations are negligible. We handle the problem analytically within the mean-field approximation for general quasi-one-dimensional and quasi-two-dimensional geometries and obtain the optimal reduced-dimension, pure-state description of the condensate mean field. We give explicit solutions for the case of harmonic potentials, which we compare against exact numerical integration of the three-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation.

  13. 3-Dimensional Topographic Models for the Classroom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, J. W.; Roark, J. H.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Stockman, S.; Frey, H. V.

    2003-01-01

    We have recently undertaken a program to develop educational tools using 3-dimensional solid models of digital elevation data acquired by the Mars Orbital Laser Altimeter (MOLA) for Mars as well as a variety of sources for elevation data of the Earth. This work is made possible by the use of rapid prototyping technology to construct solid 3-Dimensional models of science data. We recently acquired rapid prototyping machine that builds 3-dimensional models in extruded plastic. While the machine was acquired to assist in the design and development of scientific instruments and hardware, it is also fully capable of producing models of spacecraft remote sensing data. We have demonstrated this by using Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) topographic data and Earth based topographic data to produce extruded plastic topographic models which are visually appealing and instantly engage those who handle them.

  14. 3-Dimensional Topographic Models for the Classroom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, J. W.; Roark, J. H.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Stockman, S.; Frey, H. V.

    2003-01-01

    We have recently undertaken a program to develop educational tools using 3-dimensional solid models of digital elevation data acquired by the Mars Orbital Laser Altimeter (MOLA) for Mars as well as a variety of sources for elevation data of the Earth. This work is made possible by the use of rapid prototyping technology to construct solid 3-Dimensional models of science data. We recently acquired rapid prototyping machine that builds 3-dimensional models in extruded plastic. While the machine was acquired to assist in the design and development of scientific instruments and hardware, it is also fully capable of producing models of spacecraft remote sensing data. We have demonstrated this by using Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) topographic data and Earth based topographic data to produce extruded plastic topographic models which are visually appealing and instantly engage those who handle them.

  15. One-dimensional model update

    SciTech Connect

    Wuebbles, D.J.; Penner, J.E.; Tarp, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    Changes were made in the reaction kinetics constants for the atmospheric chemistry model. The CH/sub 3/CCl/sub 3/ emission rate was changed to 10/sup 9/ lb/y. Values for the solar flux vs wavelength were updated. Solar variability is discussed. Effects of clouds on photolysis rates are considered. (DLC)

  16. Three-dimensional shape modeler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Naonori; Yamada, Toshio; Usui, Masakazu; Niwa, Yoshinori

    1997-01-01

    Computerization has come to our society rapidly in recent years. In particular, most processes of production are now automated in industrial fields. Owing to this computerization, even in fields of design which require imaginary processes, it is also being done. Thus, may professional designers are forced to design new products in restricted environments such as CAD systems. Today, many designers generate prototype shapes of products with actual objects like clay. It is the best method to design a product full of originality. However, it is difficult to convert the actual model to CAD data using even the latest tools and CAD systems. Our team has developed 3D shape modeler (3DSM). The 3DSM can generate the lost entities from measured data of an actual model. This system provides an interactive interface to generate the geometry of lines, planes and filet entities. ALso, as this systems is equipped with a stereoscopic display and a 3D mouse, it provides users with 3D environments. Thus, users can get a sense of the designed shape in the display.

  17. Reduced-order modelling numerical homogenization.

    PubMed

    Abdulle, A; Bai, Y

    2014-08-06

    A general framework to combine numerical homogenization and reduced-order modelling techniques for partial differential equations (PDEs) with multiple scales is described. Numerical homogenization methods are usually efficient to approximate the effective solution of PDEs with multiple scales. However, classical numerical homogenization techniques require the numerical solution of a large number of so-called microproblems to approximate the effective data at selected grid points of the computational domain. Such computations become particularly expensive for high-dimensional, time-dependent or nonlinear problems. In this paper, we explain how numerical homogenization method can benefit from reduced-order modelling techniques that allow one to identify offline and online computational procedures. The effective data are only computed accurately at a carefully selected number of grid points (offline stage) appropriately 'interpolated' in the online stage resulting in an online cost comparable to that of a single-scale solver. The methodology is presented for a class of PDEs with multiple scales, including elliptic, parabolic, wave and nonlinear problems. Numerical examples, including wave propagation in inhomogeneous media and solute transport in unsaturated porous media, illustrate the proposed method.

  18. Feature Selection for Varying Coefficient Models With Ultrahigh Dimensional Covariates

    PubMed Central

    Li, Runze; Wu, Rongling

    2014-01-01

    This paper is concerned with feature screening and variable selection for varying coefficient models with ultrahigh dimensional covariates. We propose a new feature screening procedure for these models based on conditional correlation coefficient. We systematically study the theoretical properties of the proposed procedure, and establish their sure screening property and the ranking consistency. To enhance the finite sample performance of the proposed procedure, we further develop an iterative feature screening procedure. Monte Carlo simulation studies were conducted to examine the performance of the proposed procedures. In practice, we advocate a two-stage approach for varying coefficient models. The two stage approach consists of (a) reducing the ultrahigh dimensionality by using the proposed procedure and (b) applying regularization methods for dimension-reduced varying coefficient models to make statistical inferences on the coefficient functions. We illustrate the proposed two-stage approach by a real data example. PMID:24678135

  19. Feature Selection for Varying Coefficient Models With Ultrahigh Dimensional Covariates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingyuan; Li, Runze; Wu, Rongling

    2014-01-01

    This paper is concerned with feature screening and variable selection for varying coefficient models with ultrahigh dimensional covariates. We propose a new feature screening procedure for these models based on conditional correlation coefficient. We systematically study the theoretical properties of the proposed procedure, and establish their sure screening property and the ranking consistency. To enhance the finite sample performance of the proposed procedure, we further develop an iterative feature screening procedure. Monte Carlo simulation studies were conducted to examine the performance of the proposed procedures. In practice, we advocate a two-stage approach for varying coefficient models. The two stage approach consists of (a) reducing the ultrahigh dimensionality by using the proposed procedure and (b) applying regularization methods for dimension-reduced varying coefficient models to make statistical inferences on the coefficient functions. We illustrate the proposed two-stage approach by a real data example.

  20. EXAFS Model of 2-Dimensional Platinum Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, S. D.; Charochak, M. E.; Blackwell, N.; Bare, S. R.

    2013-04-01

    Highly dispersed supported platinum clusters have been extensively studied because of their many uses as the active metallic component in heterogeneous catalysts, including catalytic reforming. EXAFS modelling has been used to determine the average coordination number for the first through fifth Pt shells and thereby determine the average cluster size and shape. Several studies have shown that Pt clusters on γ-Al2O3 are truncated to form plate-like clusters in the hexagonal (111) plane as evidenced by an overly reduced second shell coordination number, which would be zero for a truly 2-dimensional cluster. In our system of Pt on γ-Al2O3 the average Pt morphology is determined, on the average, to be small ~13 atom clusters that are 2-diminsional in the hexagonal (111) plane morphology as determined by first and, nearly zero, second nearest neighbour coordination numbers of 4.4 ± 0.6 and 0.5 ± 0.3, respectively.

  1. Finding four dimensional symplectic maps with reduced chaos: Preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Weishi Wan; Cary, J.R.; Shasharina, S.G.

    1998-06-01

    A method for finding integrable four-dimensional symplectic maps is outlined. The method relies on solving for parameter values at which the linear stability factors of the fixed points of the map have the values corresponding to integrability. This method is applied to accelerator lattices in order to increase dynamic aperture. Results show a increase of the dynamic aperture after correction, which implies the validity of the method.

  2. Modeling the three-dimensional river antidunes using a depth-integrated hydrodynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, T.; Inoue, T.; Yabe, H.

    2016-12-01

    Dynamics of bedforms in rivers have been extensively studied in the last decades, however, the three-dimensionality of the river bedforms have been poorly understood because of the lack of experimental, theoretical and numerical works. Understanding the three-dimensional river bedorms is therefore one of challenging research topic in the engineering and the geomorphological research communities. Here, we propose a modeling of the three-dimensional river antidunes using a reduced horizontal two-dimensional morphodynamic model, which consists of a horizontal two-dimensional depth-integrated hydrodynamic model and a non-equilibrium bedload transport model. We use a simple submodel, which describes a phase lag of bed shear stress, into a depth-integrated shallow water flow model. First, a linear stability analysis is performed to understand the linear response of the morphodynamic model to a three-dimensional wavy bed perturbation. The analysis shows that the model could explain both the three-dimensional antidune instability and free bar instability. The dominant streamwise wavelength and spanwise mode of the antidunes obtained by the linear analysis are consistent with the results of experimental flumes. We then carried out numerical simulations to replicate the nonlinear dynamics of the three-dimensional antidunes and associated water surface deformation in straight channels. The numerical simulations show that the model is able to capture the formation and development of upstream-migrating antidunes and a co-evolution of the antidunes and alternate bars.

  3. Reduced Order Modeling in General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiglio, Manuel

    2014-03-01

    Reduced Order Modeling is an emerging yet fast developing filed in gravitational wave physics. The main goals are to enable fast modeling and parameter estimation of any detected signal, along with rapid matched filtering detecting. I will focus on the first two. Some accomplishments include being able to replace, with essentially no lost of physical accuracy, the original models with surrogate ones (which are not effective ones, that is, they do not simplify the physics but go on a very different track, exploiting the particulars of the waveform family under consideration and state of the art dimensional reduction techniques) which are very fast to evaluate. For example, for EOB models they are at least around 3 orders of magnitude faster than solving the original equations, with physically equivalent results. For numerical simulations the speedup is at least 11 orders of magnitude. For parameter estimation our current numbers are about bringing ~100 days for a single SPA inspiral binary neutron star Bayesian parameter estimation analysis to under a day. More recently, it has been shown that the full precessing problem for, say, 200 cycles, can be represented, through some new ideas, by a remarkably compact set of carefully chosen reduced basis waveforms (~10-100, depending on the accuracy requirements). I will highlight what I personally believe are the challenges to face next in this subarea of GW physics and where efforts should be directed. This talk will summarize work in collaboration with: Harbir Antil (GMU), Jonathan Blackman (Caltech), Priscila Canizares (IoA, Cambridge, UK), Sarah Caudill (UWM), Jonathan Gair (IoA. Cambridge. UK), Scott Field (UMD), Chad R. Galley (Caltech), Frank Herrmann (Germany), Han Hestahven (EPFL, Switzerland), Jason Kaye (Brown, Stanford & Courant). Evan Ochsner (UWM), Ricardo Nochetto (UMD), Vivien Raymond (LIGO, Caltech), Rory Smith (LIGO, Caltech) Bela Ssilagyi (Caltech) and MT (UMD & Caltech).

  4. Reduced-Order Modeling: New Approaches for Computational Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beran, Philip S.; Silva, Walter A.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we review the development of new reduced-order modeling techniques and discuss their applicability to various problems in computational physics. Emphasis is given to methods ba'sed on Volterra series representations and the proper orthogonal decomposition. Results are reported for different nonlinear systems to provide clear examples of the construction and use of reduced-order models, particularly in the multi-disciplinary field of computational aeroelasticity. Unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic behaviors of two- dimensional and three-dimensional geometries are described. Large increases in computational efficiency are obtained through the use of reduced-order models, thereby justifying the initial computational expense of constructing these models and inotivatim,- their use for multi-disciplinary design analysis.

  5. A reduced-order optimization strategy for four dimensional variational data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoteit, I.; Khol, A.; Stammer, D.; Heimbach, P.

    2003-04-01

    Four dimensional variational data assimilation methods remain expensive for operational oceanography. Every optimization step requires actually one forward and one backward integration of the numerical model, and the huge dimension of the system control vector makes the convergence of the optimization procedure very slow. In this study, an order reduction is applied to the control vector in order to speed up the convergence of the optimization. The reduction is based on an Empirical Orthogonal Functions (EOF) analysis. Some important features however can not be represented in the reduced space. We therefore propose to start the optimization in the reduced space and than continue in the full control space. The effectiveness of this strategy is demonstrated using a simple configuration of the MIT model over the North Atlantic ocean.

  6. Three-dimensional trabecular alignment model.

    PubMed

    Bono, Eric S; Smolinski, Patrick; Casagranda, Al; Xu, Junde

    2003-04-01

    Trabecular alignment theory has been used to quantify Wolff's Law of bone remodeling. A three-dimensional finite element scheme was developed to analyze the bone remodeling phenomenon. The mathematical model proposed by Mullender et al. and later modified by Smith et al. was adopted to simulate the surface-based trabecular resorption and formation processes. Enhancements incorporated into the previous model include: mapping into three-dimensions, controlling the remodeling signal's passage through marrow, controlling the finite distance the signal may pass through the bone matrix, and including non-bone material in the finite element model. After the model is explained and thoroughly studied, three-dimensional implant surface geometries are simulated.

  7. A reduced-order approach to four-dimensional variational data assimilation using proper orthogonal decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yanhua; Zhu, Jiang; Navon, I. M.; Luo, Zhendong

    2007-04-01

    Four-dimensional variational data assimilation (4DVAR) is a powerful tool for data assimilation in meteorology and oceanography. However, a major hurdle in use of 4DVAR for realistic general circulation models is the dimension of the control space (generally equal to the size of the model state variable and typically of order 107-108) and the high computational cost in computing the cost function and its gradient that require integration model and its adjoint model.In this paper, we propose a 4DVAR approach based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). POD is an efficient way to carry out reduced order modelling by identifying the few most energetic modes in a sequence of snapshots from a time-dependent system, and providing a means of obtaining a low-dimensional description of the system's dynamics. The POD-based 4DVAR not only reduces the dimension of control space, but also reduces the size of dynamical model, both in dramatic ways. The novelty of our approach also consists in the inclusion of adaptability, applied when in the process of iterative control the new control variables depart significantly from the ones on which the POD model was based upon. In addition, these approaches also allow to conveniently constructing the adjoint model.The proposed POD-based 4DVAR methods are tested and demonstrated using a reduced gravity wave ocean model in Pacific domain in the context of identical twin data assimilation experiments. A comparison with data assimilation experiments in the full model space shows that with an appropriate selection of the basis functions the optimization in the POD space is able to provide accurate results at a reduced computational cost. The POD-based 4DVAR methods have the potential to approximate the performance of full order 4DVAR with less than 1/100 computer time of the full order 4DVAR. The HFTN (Hessian-free truncated-Newton)algorithm benefits most from the order reduction (see (Int. J. Numer. Meth. Fluids, in press)) since

  8. Anisotropic 2-dimensional Robin Hood model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buldyrev, Sergey; Cwilich, Gabriel; Zypman, Fredy

    2009-03-01

    We have considered the Robin Hood model introduced by Zaitsev[1] to discuss flux creep and depinning of interfaces in a two dimensional system. Although the model has been studied extensively analytically in 1-d [2], its scaling laws have been verified numerically only in that case. Recent work suggest that its properties might be important to understand surface friction[3], where its 2-dimensional properties are important. We show that in the 2-dimensional case scaling laws can be found provided one considers carefully the anisotropy of the model, and different ways of introducing that anisotropy lead to different exponents and scaling laws, in analogy with directed percolation, with which this model is closely related[4]. We show that breaking the rotational symmetry between the x and y axes does not change the scaling properties of the model, but the introduction of a preferential direction of accretion (``robbing'' in the language of the model) leads to new scaling exponents. [1] S.I.Zaitsev, Physica A189, 411 (1992) [2] M. Pacuzki, S. Maslov and P.Bak, Phys Rev. E53, 414 (1996) [3] S. Buldyrev, J. Ferrante and F. Zypman Phys. Rev E64, 066110 (2006) [4] G. Odor, Rev. Mod. Phys. 76, 663 (2004) .

  9. Reduced MHD in Astrophysical Applications: Two-dimensional or Three-dimensional?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oughton, S.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Dmitruk, P.

    2017-04-01

    Originally proposed as an efficient approach to computation of nonlinear dynamics in tokamak fusion research devices, reduced magnetohydrodynamics (RMHD) has subsequently found application in studies of coronal heating, flux tube dynamics, charged particle transport, and, in general, as an approximation to describe plasma turbulence in space physics and astrophysics. Given the diverse set of derivations available in the literature, there has emerged some level of discussion and a lack of consensus regarding the completeness of RMHD as a turbulence model, and its applicability in contexts such as the solar wind. Some of the key issues in this discussion are examined here, emphasizing that RMHD is properly neither 2D nor fully 3D, being rather an incomplete representation that enforces at least one family of extraneous conservation laws.

  10. Two dimensional thick center vortex model

    SciTech Connect

    Rafibakhsh, Shahnoosh; Ahmadi, Alireza

    2016-01-22

    The potential between static color source is calculated in the SU (3) gauge group by introducing a two dimensional vortex flux. To generalize the model, the length of the Wilson loop is equal to R oriented along the x axis, and the vortex flux is considered as a function of x and y. The comparison between the generalized model and the original one shows that the intermediate linear regime is increased significantly and better agreement with Casimir scaling is achieved. Furthermore, the model is applied to calculate the potential between baryons.

  11. Bootstrapping the Three Dimensional Supersymmetric Ising Model.

    PubMed

    Bobev, Nikolay; El-Showk, Sheer; Mazáč, Dalimil; Paulos, Miguel F

    2015-07-31

    We implement the conformal bootstrap program for three dimensional conformal field theories with N=2 supersymmetry and find universal constraints on the spectrum of operator dimensions in these theories. By studying the bounds on the dimension of the first scalar appearing in the operator product expansion of a chiral and an antichiral primary, we find a kink at the expected location of the critical three dimensional N=2 Wess-Zumino model, which can be thought of as a supersymmetric analog of the critical Ising model. Focusing on this kink, we determine, to high accuracy, the low-lying spectrum of operator dimensions of the theory, as well as the stress-tensor two-point function. We find that the latter is in an excellent agreement with an exact computation.

  12. Semi-Empirical Modeling of Two-Dimensional and Three-Dimensional Dynamic Stall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modarres, Ramin

    Helicopters are generally limited in their performance by the phenomenon of dynamic stall. The purpose of this work is to develop a method for modeling dynamic stall that is appropriate to preliminary design and flight simulator applications. Unlike other semi-empirical dynamic stall models, the model developed in this thesis, not only counts for the well-known, three-dimensional flow effects on the stalled loads but also captures the secondary vortex-shedding phenomenon that has been seen in experiments. The fundamental physics that modify dynamic-stall behavior and that have been extended from two-dimensional to three-dimensional flow are, namely: 1.) yawed flow, 2.) time-varying velocity, 3.) the rotational environment and 4.) the radial blade coupling. For the reduced-order modeling, extra nonlinear states have been added to the dynamic stall model in order to simulate the double-dynamic-stall phenomenon. The results of this study will have practical applications to aerospace systems, such as compliant or morphing surfaces in rotary-wing systems that encounter transient or periodic separation and reattachment during phenomena such as dynamic stall.

  13. Rank-Based Similarity Search: Reducing the Dimensional Dependence.

    PubMed

    Houle, Michael E; Nett, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a data structure for k-NN search, the Rank Cover Tree (RCT), whose pruning tests rely solely on the comparison of similarity values; other properties of the underlying space, such as the triangle inequality, are not employed. Objects are selected according to their ranks with respect to the query object, allowing much tighter control on the overall execution costs. A formal theoretical analysis shows that with very high probability, the RCT returns a correct query result in time that depends very competitively on a measure of the intrinsic dimensionality of the data set. The experimental results for the RCT show that non-metric pruning strategies for similarity search can be practical even when the representational dimension of the data is extremely high. They also show that the RCT is capable of meeting or exceeding the level of performance of state-of-the-art methods that make use of metric pruning or other selection tests involving numerical constraints on distance values.

  14. Three-Dimensional Ocean Noise Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    particular attention paid to the case of Gaussian canyon . The solution to the three-dimensional wave equation in Cartesian co-ordinates can be written...in terms of a modal decomposition, carried out in the vertical and across- canyon horizontal directions. Work Completed 1. Nx2D and 3D Noise PE...azimuth in the Hudson Canyon [Figure 2). Additionally, the PE-reciprocity noise model was used to estimate the size, speed and distance from the

  15. Pattern recognition in volcano seismology - Reducing spectral dimensionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unglert, K.; Radic, V.; Jellinek, M.

    2015-12-01

    Variations in the spectral content of volcano seismicity can relate to changes in volcanic activity. Low-frequency seismic signals often precede or accompany volcanic eruptions. However, they are commonly manually identified in spectra or spectrograms, and their definition in spectral space differs from one volcanic setting to the next. Increasingly long time series of monitoring data at volcano observatories require automated tools to facilitate rapid processing and aid with pattern identification related to impending eruptions. Furthermore, knowledge transfer between volcanic settings is difficult if the methods to identify and analyze the characteristics of seismic signals differ. To address these challenges we evaluate whether a machine learning technique called Self-Organizing Maps (SOMs) can be used to characterize the dominant spectral components of volcano seismicity without the need for any a priori knowledge of different signal classes. This could reduce the dimensions of the spectral space typically analyzed by orders of magnitude, and enable rapid processing and visualization. Preliminary results suggest that the temporal evolution of volcano seismicity at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i, can be reduced to as few as 2 spectral components by using a combination of SOMs and cluster analysis. We will further refine our methodology with several datasets from Hawai`i and Alaska, among others, and compare it to other techniques.

  16. Dimensional Reduction for the General Markov Model on Phylogenetic Trees.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Jeremy G

    2017-03-01

    We present a method of dimensional reduction for the general Markov model of sequence evolution on a phylogenetic tree. We show that taking certain linear combinations of the associated random variables (site pattern counts) reduces the dimensionality of the model from exponential in the number of extant taxa, to quadratic in the number of taxa, while retaining the ability to statistically identify phylogenetic divergence events. A key feature is the identification of an invariant subspace which depends only bilinearly on the model parameters, in contrast to the usual multi-linear dependence in the full space. We discuss potential applications including the computation of split (edge) weights on phylogenetic trees from observed sequence data.

  17. A Fourier dimensionality reduction model for big data interferometric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijay Kartik, S.; Carrillo, Rafael E.; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Wiaux, Yves

    2017-06-01

    Data dimensionality reduction in radio interferometry can provide savings of computational resources for image reconstruction through reduced memory footprints and lighter computations per iteration, which is important for the scalability of imaging methods to the big data setting of the next-generation telescopes. This article sheds new light on dimensionality reduction from the perspective of the compressed sensing theory and studies its interplay with imaging algorithms designed in the context of convex optimization. We propose a post-gridding linear data embedding to the space spanned by the left singular vectors of the measurement operator, providing a dimensionality reduction below image size. This embedding preserves the null space of the measurement operator and hence its sampling properties are also preserved in light of the compressed sensing theory. We show that this can be approximated by first computing the dirty image and then applying a weighted subsampled discrete Fourier transform to obtain the final reduced data vector. This Fourier dimensionality reduction model ensures a fast implementation of the full measurement operator, essential for any iterative image reconstruction method. The proposed reduction also preserves the independent and identically distributed Gaussian properties of the original measurement noise. For convex optimization-based imaging algorithms, this is key to justify the use of the standard ℓ2-norm as the data fidelity term. Our simulations confirm that this dimensionality reduction approach can be leveraged by convex optimization algorithms with no loss in imaging quality relative to reconstructing the image from the complete visibility data set. Reconstruction results in simulation settings with no direction dependent effects or calibration errors show promising performance of the proposed dimensionality reduction. Further tests on real data are planned as an extension of the current work. matlab code implementing the

  18. Escherichia coli growth under modeled reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Paul W.; Meyer, Michelle L.; Leff, Laura G.

    2004-01-01

    Bacteria exhibit varying responses to modeled reduced gravity that can be simulated by clino-rotation. When Escherichia coli was subjected to different rotation speeds during clino-rotation, significant differences between modeled reduced gravity and normal gravity controls were observed only at higher speeds (30-50 rpm). There was no apparent affect of removing samples on the results obtained. When E. coli was grown in minimal medium (at 40 rpm), cell size was not affected by modeled reduced gravity and there were few differences in cell numbers. However, in higher nutrient conditions (i.e., dilute nutrient broth), total cell numbers were higher and cells were smaller under reduced gravity compared to normal gravity controls. Overall, the responses to modeled reduced gravity varied with nutrient conditions; larger surface to volume ratios may help compensate for the zone of nutrient depletion around the cells under modeled reduced gravity.

  19. Escherichia coli growth under modeled reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Paul W.; Meyer, Michelle L.; Leff, Laura G.

    2004-01-01

    Bacteria exhibit varying responses to modeled reduced gravity that can be simulated by clino-rotation. When Escherichia coli was subjected to different rotation speeds during clino-rotation, significant differences between modeled reduced gravity and normal gravity controls were observed only at higher speeds (30-50 rpm). There was no apparent affect of removing samples on the results obtained. When E. coli was grown in minimal medium (at 40 rpm), cell size was not affected by modeled reduced gravity and there were few differences in cell numbers. However, in higher nutrient conditions (i.e., dilute nutrient broth), total cell numbers were higher and cells were smaller under reduced gravity compared to normal gravity controls. Overall, the responses to modeled reduced gravity varied with nutrient conditions; larger surface to volume ratios may help compensate for the zone of nutrient depletion around the cells under modeled reduced gravity.

  20. Low dimensional modeling of wall turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubry, Nadine

    2015-11-01

    In this talk we will review the original low dimensional dynamical model of the wall region of a turbulent boundary layer [Aubry, Holmes, Lumley and Stone, Journal of Fluid Dynamics 192, 1988] and discuss its impact on the field of fluid dynamics. We will also invite a few researchers who would like to make brief comments on the influence Lumley had on their research paths. In collaboration with Philip Holmes, Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics and Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ.

  1. Three-dimensional ring current decay model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Moore, Thomas E.; Kozyra, Janet U.; Ho, George C.; Hamilton, Douglas C.

    1995-01-01

    This work is an extension of a previous ring current decay model. In the previous work, a two-dimensional kinetic model was constructed to study the temporal variations of the equatorially mirroring ring current ions, considering charge exchange and Coulomb drag losses along drift paths in a magnetic dipole field. In this work, particles with arbitrary pitch angle are considered. By bounce averaging the kinetic equation of the phase space density, information along magnetic field lines can be inferred from the equator. The three-dimensional model is used to simulate the recovery phase of a model great magnetic storm, similar to that which occurred in early February 1986. The initial distribution of ring current ions (at the minimum Dst) is extrapolated to all local times from AMPTE/CCE spacecraft observations on the dawnside and duskside of the inner magnetosphere spanning the L value range L = 2.25 to 6.75. Observations by AMPTE/CCE of ring current distributions over subsequent orbits during the storm recovery phase are compared to model outputs. In general, the calculated ion fluxes are consistent with observations, except for H(+) fluxes at tens of keV, which are always overestimated. A newly invented visualization idea, designated as a chromogram, is used to display the spatial and energy dependence of the ring current ion differential flux. Important features of storm time ring current, such as day-night asymmetry during injection and drift hole on the dayside at low energies (less than 10 keV), are manifested in the chromogram representation. The pitch angle distribution is well fit by the function, J(sub o)(1 + Ay(sup n)), where y is sine of the equatorial pitch angle. The evolution of the index n is a combined effect of charge exchange loss and particle drift. At low energies (less than 30 keV), both drift dispersion and charge exchange are important in determining n.

  2. Three-dimensional visualization for large models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Michael W.

    2001-09-01

    High-resolution (0.3-1 m) digital-elevation data is widely available from commercial sources. Whereas the production of two-dimensional (2D) mapping products from such data is standard practice, the visualization of such three-dimensional (3D) data has been problematic. The basis for this problem is the same as that for the large-model problem in computer graphics-- large amounts of geometry are difficult for current rendering algorithms and hardware. This paper describes a cost-effective solution to this problem that has two parts. First is the employment of the latest in cost-effective 3D chips and video boards that have recently emerged. The second part is the employment of quad-tree data structures for efficient data storage and retrieval during rendering. The result is the capability for real-time display of large (over tens of millions of samples) digital elevation models on modest PC-based systems. This paper shows several demonstrations of this approach using airborne lidar data. The implication of this work is a paradigm shift for geo-spatial information systems--3D data can now be as easy to use as 2D data.

  3. Higher dimensional generalizations of the SYK model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkooz, Micha; Narayan, Prithvi; Rozali, Moshe; Simón, Joan

    2017-01-01

    We discuss a 1+1 dimensional generalization of the Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev model. The model contains N Majorana fermions at each lattice site with a nearest-neighbour hopping term. The SYK random interaction is restricted to low momentum fermions of definite chirality within each lattice site. This gives rise to an ordinary 1+1 field theory above some energy scale and a low energy SYK-like behavior. We exhibit a class of low-pass filters which give rise to a rich variety of hyperscaling behaviour in the IR. We also discuss another set of generalizations which describes probing an SYK system with an external fermion, together with the new scaling behavior they exhibit in the IR.

  4. Vlasov multi-dimensional model dispersion relation

    SciTech Connect

    Lushnikov, Pavel M.; Rose, Harvey A.; Silantyev, Denis A.; Vladimirova, Natalia

    2014-07-15

    A hybrid model of the Vlasov equation in multiple spatial dimension D > 1 [H. A. Rose and W. Daughton, Phys. Plasmas 18, 122109 (2011)], the Vlasov multi dimensional model (VMD), consists of standard Vlasov dynamics along a preferred direction, the z direction, and N flows. At each z, these flows are in the plane perpendicular to the z axis. They satisfy Eulerian-type hydrodynamics with coupling by self-consistent electric and magnetic fields. Every solution of the VMD is an exact solution of the original Vlasov equation. We show approximate convergence of the VMD Langmuir wave dispersion relation in thermal plasma to that of Vlasov-Landau as N increases. Departure from strict rotational invariance about the z axis for small perpendicular wavenumber Langmuir fluctuations in 3D goes to zero like θ{sup N}, where θ is the polar angle and flows are arranged uniformly over the azimuthal angle.

  5. Reduced-order modeling for hyperthermia control.

    PubMed

    Potocki, J K; Tharp, H S

    1992-12-01

    This paper analyzes the feasibility of using reduced-order modeling techniques in the design of multiple-input, multiple-output (MIMO) hyperthermia temperature controllers. State space thermal models are created based upon a finite difference expansion of the bioheat transfer equation model of a scanned focused ultrasound system (SFUS). These thermal state space models are reduced using the balanced realization technique, and an order reduction criterion is tabulated. Results show that a drastic reduction in model dimension can be achieved using the balanced realization. The reduced-order model is then used to design a reduced-order optimal servomechanism controller for a two-scan input, two thermocouple output tissue model. In addition, a full-order optimal servomechanism controller is designed for comparison and validation purposes. These two controllers are applied to a variety of perturbed tissue thermal models to test the robust nature of the reduced-order controller. A comparison of the two controllers validates the use of open-loop balanced reduced-order models in the design of MIMO hyperthermia controllers.

  6. Solution of three-dimensional afterbody flow using reduced Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almahroos, H. M. H.; Khosla, P. K.; Rubin, S. G.

    1991-01-01

    The flow over afterbody geometries was investigated using the reduced Navier-Stokes (RNS) approximation. Both pressure velocity flux-split and composites velocity primitive variable formulations were considered. Pressure or pseudopotential relaxation procedures are combined with sparse matrix or coupled strongly implicit algorithms to form a three-dimensional solver for general non-orthogonal coordinates. Three-dimensional subsonic and transonic viscous/inviscid interacting flows were evaluated. Solutions with and without regions of recirculation were obtained.

  7. Incorporating 3-dimensional models in online articles.

    PubMed

    Cevidanes, Lucia H S; Ruellas, Antonio C O; Jomier, Julien; Nguyen, Tung; Pieper, Steve; Budin, Francois; Styner, Martin; Paniagua, Beatriz

    2015-05-01

    The aims of this article are to introduce the capability to view and interact with 3-dimensional (3D) surface models in online publications, and to describe how to prepare surface models for such online 3D visualizations. Three-dimensional image analysis methods include image acquisition, construction of surface models, registration in a common coordinate system, visualization of overlays, and quantification of changes. Cone-beam computed tomography scans were acquired as volumetric images that can be visualized as 3D projected images or used to construct polygonal meshes or surfaces of specific anatomic structures of interest. The anatomic structures of interest in the scans can be labeled with color (3D volumetric label maps), and then the scans are registered in a common coordinate system using a target region as the reference. The registered 3D volumetric label maps can be saved in .obj, .ply, .stl, or .vtk file formats and used for overlays, quantification of differences in each of the 3 planes of space, or color-coded graphic displays of 3D surface distances. All registered 3D surface models in this study were saved in .vtk file format and loaded in the Elsevier 3D viewer. In this study, we describe possible ways to visualize the surface models constructed from cone-beam computed tomography images using 2D and 3D figures. The 3D surface models are available in the article's online version for viewing and downloading using the reader's software of choice. These 3D graphic displays are represented in the print version as 2D snapshots. Overlays and color-coded distance maps can be displayed using the reader's software of choice, allowing graphic assessment of the location and direction of changes or morphologic differences relative to the structure of reference. The interpretation of 3D overlays and quantitative color-coded maps requires basic knowledge of 3D image analysis. When submitting manuscripts, authors can now upload 3D models that will allow readers to

  8. Incorporating 3-dimensional models in online articles

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia H. S.; Ruellasa, Antonio C. O.; Jomier, Julien; Nguyen, Tung; Pieper, Steve; Budin, Francois; Styner, Martin; Paniagua, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aims of this article were to introduce the capability to view and interact with 3-dimensional (3D) surface models in online publications, and to describe how to prepare surface models for such online 3D visualizations. Methods Three-dimensional image analysis methods include image acquisition, construction of surface models, registration in a common coordinate system, visualization of overlays, and quantification of changes. Cone-beam computed tomography scans were acquired as volumetric images that can be visualized as 3D projected images or used to construct polygonal meshes or surfaces of specific anatomic structures of interest. The anatomic structures of interest in the scans can be labeled with color (3D volumetric label maps), and then the scans are registered in a common coordinate system using a target region as the reference. The registered 3D volumetric label maps can be saved in .obj, .ply, .stl, or .vtk file formats and used for overlays, quantification of differences in each of the 3 planes of space, or color-coded graphic displays of 3D surface distances. Results All registered 3D surface models in this study were saved in .vtk file format and loaded in the Elsevier 3D viewer. In this study, we describe possible ways to visualize the surface models constructed from cone-beam computed tomography images using 2D and 3D figures. The 3D surface models are available in the article’s online version for viewing and downloading using the reader’s software of choice. These 3D graphic displays are represented in the print version as 2D snapshots. Overlays and color-coded distance maps can be displayed using the reader’s software of choice, allowing graphic assessment of the location and direction of changes or morphologic differences relative to the structure of reference. The interpretation of 3D overlays and quantitative color-coded maps requires basic knowledge of 3D image analysis. Conclusions When submitting manuscripts, authors can

  9. Describing high-dimensional dynamics with low-dimensional piecewise affine models: applications to renewable energy.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Yoshito; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2012-06-01

    We introduce a low-dimensional description for a high-dimensional system, which is a piecewise affine model whose state space is divided by permutations. We show that the proposed model tends to predict wind speeds and photovoltaic outputs for the time scales from seconds to 100 s better than by global affine models. In addition, computations using the piecewise affine model are much faster than those of usual nonlinear models such as radial basis function models.

  10. High dimensional decision dilemmas in climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracco, A.; Neelin, J. D.; Luo, H.; McWilliams, J. C.; Meyerson, J. E.

    2013-10-01

    An important source of uncertainty in climate models is linked to the calibration of model parameters. Interest in systematic and automated parameter optimization procedures stems from the desire to improve the model climatology and to quantify the average sensitivity associated with potential changes in the climate system. Building upon on the smoothness of the response of an atmospheric circulation model (AGCM) to changes of four adjustable parameters, Neelin et al. (2010) used a quadratic metamodel to objectively calibrate the AGCM. The metamodel accurately estimates global spatial averages of common fields of climatic interest, from precipitation, to low and high level winds, from temperature at various levels to sea level pressure and geopotential height, while providing a computationally cheap strategy to explore the influence of parameter settings. Here, guided by the metamodel, the ambiguities or dilemmas related to the decision making process in relation to model sensitivity and optimization are examined. Simulations of current climate are subject to considerable regional-scale biases. Those biases may vary substantially depending on the climate variable considered, and/or on the performance metric adopted. Common dilemmas are associated with model revisions yielding improvement in one field or regional pattern or season, but degradation in another, or improvement in the model climatology but degradation in the interannual variability representation. Challenges are posed to the modeler by the high dimensionality of the model output fields and by the large number of adjustable parameters. The use of the metamodel in the optimization strategy helps visualize trade-offs at a regional level, e.g., how mismatches between sensitivity and error spatial fields yield regional errors under minimization of global objective functions.

  11. A three-dimensional human walking model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q. S.; Qin, J. W.; Law, S. S.

    2015-11-01

    A three-dimensional human bipedal walking model with compliant legs is presented in this paper. The legs are modeled with time-variant dampers, and the model is able to characterize the gait pattern of an individual using a minimal set of parameters. Feedback control, for both the forward and lateral movements, is implemented to regulate the walking performance of the pedestrian. The model provides an improvement over classic invert pendulum models. Numerical studies were undertaken to investigate the effects of leg stiffness and attack angle. Simulation results show that when walking at a given speed, increasing the leg stiffness with a constant attack angle results in a longer step length, a higher step frequency, a faster walking speed and an increase in both the peak vertical and lateral ground reaction forces. Increasing the attack angle with a constant leg stiffness results in a higher step frequency, a decrease in the step length, an increase in the total energy of the system and a decrease in both the peak vertical and lateral ground reaction forces.

  12. A Standardized Generalized Dimensionality Discrepancy Measure and a Standardized Model-Based Covariance for Dimensionality Assessment for Multidimensional Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Roy; Xu, Yuning; Yel, Nedim; Svetina, Dubravka

    2015-01-01

    The standardized generalized dimensionality discrepancy measure and the standardized model-based covariance are introduced as tools to critique dimensionality assumptions in multidimensional item response models. These tools are grounded in a covariance theory perspective and associated connections between dimensionality and local independence.…

  13. Symmetries of self-dual Yang-Mills equations dimensionally reduced from (2, 2) space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, Paul; Wardlow, Adam

    2011-01-01

    We construct infinite-dimensional symmetries of the two dimensional equation which results from the dimensional reduction of the self-duality condition in (2, 2) signature space-time. These are symmetries of the dimensionally reduced Chalmers-Siegel action and so hold off-shell.

  14. Two-Dimensional Computational Model for Wave Rotor Flow Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.

    1996-01-01

    A two-dimensional (theta,z) Navier-Stokes solver for multi-port wave rotor flow simulation is described. The finite-volume form of the unsteady thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations are integrated in time on multi-block grids that represent the stationary inlet and outlet ports and the moving rotor passages of the wave rotor. Computed results are compared with three-port wave rotor experimental data. The model is applied to predict the performance of a planned four-port wave rotor experiment. Two-dimensional flow features that reduce machine performance and influence rotor blade and duct wall thermal loads are identified. The performance impact of rounding the inlet port wall, to inhibit separation during passage gradual opening, is assessed.

  15. Three-dimensional modelling of Venus photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolzenbach, Aurélien; Lefèvre, Franck; Lebonnois, Sébastien; Määttänen, Anni; Bekki, Slimane

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a new code of the Venus atmospheric chemistry based on our photochemical model already in use for Mars (e.g., Lefèvre et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2004). For Venus, the code also includes a parameterized treatment of cloud microphysics that computes the composition of sulphuric acid droplets and their number density based on a given droplet size distribution in altitude. We coupled this photochemical-microphysical package to the LMD general circulation model of Venus (Lebonnois et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2010) with a sedimentation module recently added. We will describe preliminary results obtained with this first three-dimensional model of the Venus photochemistry. The space and time distribution of key chemical species as well as the modelled clouds characteristics will be detailed and compared to observations performed from Venus Express and from the Earth (e.g. Knollenberg and Hunten, J. Geophys. Res., 1980 ; Wilquet et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2009 ; Sandor et al., Icarus, 2012).

  16. Three-Dimensional Modelling of Venus Photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolzenbach, A.; Lefèvre, F.; Lebonnois, S.; Maattanen, A. E.; Bekki, S.

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a new code of the Venus atmospheric chemistry based on our photochemical model already in use for Mars (e.g., Lefèvre et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2004). For Venus, the code also includes a parameterized treatment of cloud microphysics that computes the composition of sulphuric acid droplets and their number density based on a given droplet size distribution in altitude and latitude. We coupled this photochemical-microphysical package to the LMD general circulation model of Venus (Lebonnois et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2010) with a sedimentation module that takes into account the parametrized droplet size distribution. We will describe the results obtained with this first three-dimensional model of the Venus photochemistry. The space and time distribution of key chemical species as well as the modelled clouds characteristics will be detailed and compared to observations performed from Venus Express and from the Earth (e.g. Knollenberg and Hunten, J. Geophys. Res., 1980 ; Wilquet et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2009 ; Sandor et al., Icarus, 2012 ; Mahieux et al., PSS, 2014 ; Marcq et al., 2015, PSS).

  17. Multiscale modeling of three-dimensional genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Wolynes, Peter

    The genome, the blueprint of life, contains nearly all the information needed to build and maintain an entire organism. A comprehensive understanding of the genome is of paramount interest to human health and will advance progress in many areas, including life sciences, medicine, and biotechnology. The overarching goal of my research is to understand the structure-dynamics-function relationships of the human genome. In this talk, I will be presenting our efforts in moving towards that goal, with a particular emphasis on studying the three-dimensional organization, the structure of the genome with multi-scale approaches. Specifically, I will discuss the reconstruction of genome structures at both interphase and metaphase by making use of data from chromosome conformation capture experiments. Computationally modeling of chromatin fiber at atomistic level from first principles will also be presented as our effort for studying the genome structure from bottom up.

  18. New two-dimensional quantum models with shape invariance

    SciTech Connect

    Cannata, F.; Ioffe, M. V.; Nishnianidze, D. N.

    2011-02-15

    Two-dimensional quantum models which obey the property of shape invariance are built in the framework of polynomial two-dimensional supersymmetric quantum mechanics. They are obtained using the expressions for known one-dimensional shape invariant potentials. The constructed Hamiltonians are integrable with symmetry operators of fourth order in momenta, and they are not amenable to the conventional separation of variables.

  19. Three-dimensional model of electron beam generated plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, Shahid; Balakrishna, Ajit; Agarwal, Ankur; Dorf, Leonid; Collins, Kenneth; Boris, David R.; Walton, Scott G.

    2017-06-01

    A three-dimensional model for magnetized electron beam generated plasma is described, which includes a coupled fluid simulation of the bulk plasma and a Monte Carlo model for beam electrons. A modified form of the classical expressions for magnetized-plasma electron transport coefficients is used in the fluid plasma model. The plasma model is calibrated and validated using Langmuir probe measurements in a cylindrical electron beam generated plasma, where the beam is launched parallel to the magnetic field. The electron density (n e ) and temperature (T e ) are measured along and across the beam for several gas pressures and magnetic fields in Ar. The validated plasma model is then used to examine a three-dimensional electron beam generated plasma system. Generally, plasma densities are on the order of 1016 m-3 and, since there is no externally applied electric field in the plasma region, T e is below 1.25 eV in Ar. The chamber in the simulation is slightly asymmetric perpendicular to the axis of the electron beam and the magnetic field. This asymmetry combined with the E × B drift produce non-uniformities in the plasma even if the magnetic field is spatially uniform in the chamber. However, the cross-field plasma uniformity can be controlled by tailoring the magnetic field profile to enhance or reduce plasma production near the periphery of the chamber.

  20. Three-dimensional modeling of tsunami waves

    SciTech Connect

    Mader, C.L.

    1985-01-01

    Two- and three-dimensional, time-dependent, nonlinear, incompressible, viscous flow calculations of realistic models of tsunami wave formation and run up have been performed using the Los Alamos-developed SOLA-3D code. The results of the SOLA calculations are compared with shallow-water, long-wave calculations for the same problems using the SWAN code. Tsunami wave formation by a continental slope subsidence has been examined using the two numerical models. The SOLA waves were slower than the SWAN waves and the interaction with the shoreline was more complicated for the SOLA waves. In the SOLA calculation, the first wave was generated by the cavity being filled along the shoreline close to the source of motion. The second wave was generated by the cavity being filled from the deep water end. The two waves interacted along the shoreline resulting in the second wave being the largest wave with a velocity greater than the first wave. The second wave overtook the first wave at later times and greater distances from the source. In the SWAN calculation, the second wave was smaller than the first wave. 6 refs.

  1. Reducing the invasiveness of modelling frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donchyts, G.; Baart, F.

    2010-12-01

    There are several modelling frameworks available that allow for environmental models to exchange data with other models. Many efforts have been made in the past years promoting solutions aimed at integrating different numerical models with each other as well as at simplifying the way to set them up, entering the data, and running them. Meanwhile the development of many modeling frameworks concentrated on the interoperability of different model engines, several standards were introduced such as ESMF, OMS and OpenMI. One of the issues with applying modelling frameworks is the invasessness, the more the model has to know about the framework, the more intrussive it is. Another issue when applying modelling frameworks are that a lot of environmental models are written in procedural and in FORTRAN, which is one of the few languages that doesn't have a proper interface with other programming languages. Most modelling frameworks are written in object oriented languages like java/c# and the modelling framework in FORTRAN ESMF is also objected oriented. In this research we show how the application of domain driven, object oriented development techniques to environmental models can reduce the invasiveness of modelling frameworks. Our approach is based on four different steps: 1) application of OO techniques and reflection to the existing model to allow introspection. 2) programming language interoperability, between model written in a procedural programming language and modeling framework written in an object oriented programming language. 3) Domain mapping between data types used by model and other components being integrated 4) Connecting models using framework (wrapper) We compare coupling of an existing model as it was to the same model adapted using the four step approach. We connect both versions of the models using two different integrated modelling frameworks. As an example of a model we use the coastal morphological model XBeach. By adapting this model it allows for

  2. Inversion of infrared imaging bolometer based on one-dimensional and three-dimensional modeling in HL-2A

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, J. M. Liu, Y.; Li, W.; Cui, Z. Y.; Dong, Y. B.; Lu, J.; Xia, Z. W.; Yi, P.; Yang, Q. W.

    2014-04-15

    Linear regularization has been applied to the HL-2A infrared imaging bolometer to reconstruct local plasma emission with one-dimensional (1D) and three-dimensional (3D) modeling under the assumption of toroidal symmetry. In the 3D modeling, a new method to calculate the detector point response function is introduced. This method can be adapted to an arbitrarily shaped pinhole. With the full 3D treatment of the detector geometry, up to 50% of the mean-squared error is reduced compared with the 1D modeling. This is attributed to the effects of finite detector size being taken into account in the 3D modeling. Meanwhile, the number of the bolometer pixels has been optimized to 20 × 20 by making a trade-off between the number of bolometer pixels and the sensitivity of the system. The plasma radiated power density distributions have been calculated as a demonstration using 1D modeling and 3D modeling, respectively.

  3. Simple Two-Dimensional Corrections for One-Dimensional Pulse Tube Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. M.; Kittel, P.; Timmerhaus, K. D.; Radebaugh, R.

    2004-01-01

    One-dimensional oscillating flow models are very useful for designing pulse tubes. They are simple to use, not computationally intensive, and the physical relationship between temperature, pressure and mass flow are easy to understand when used in conjunction with phasor diagrams. They do not possess, however, the ability to directly calculate thermal and momentum diffusion in the direction transverse to the oscillating flow. To account for transverse effects, lumped parameter corrections, which are obtained though experiment, must be used. Or two-dimensional solutions of the differential fluid equations must be obtained. A linear two-dimensional solution to the fluid equations has been obtained. The solution provides lumped parameter corrections for one-dimensional models. The model accounts for heat transfer and shear flow between the gas and the tube. The complex Nusselt number and complex shear wall are useful in describing these corrections, with phase relations and amplitudes scaled with the Prandtl and Valensi numbers. The calculated ratio, a, between a two-dimensional solution of the oscillating temperature and velocity and a one-dimensional solution for the same shows a scales linearly with Va for Va less than 30. In this region alpha less than 0.5, that is, the enthalpy flow calculated with a two-dimensional model is 50% of a calculation using a one-dimensional model. For Va greater than 250, alpha = 0.8, showing that diffusion is still important even when it is confined to a thing layer near the tube wall.

  4. Reducing the two-loop large-scale structure power spectrum to low-dimensional, radial integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittfull, Marcel; Vlah, Zvonimir

    2016-11-01

    Modeling the large-scale structure of the universe on nonlinear scales has the potential to substantially increase the science return of upcoming surveys by increasing the number of modes available for model comparisons. One way to achieve this is to model nonlinear scales perturbatively. Unfortunately, this involves high-dimensional loop integrals that are cumbersome to evaluate. Trying to simplify this, we show how two-loop (next-to-next-to-leading order) corrections to the density power spectrum can be reduced to low-dimensional, radial integrals. Many of those can be evaluated with a one-dimensional fast Fourier transform, which is significantly faster than the five-dimensional Monte-Carlo integrals that are needed otherwise. The general idea of this fast fourier transform perturbation theory method is to switch between Fourier and position space to avoid convolutions and integrate over orientations, leaving only radial integrals. This reformulation is independent of the underlying shape of the initial linear density power spectrum and should easily accommodate features such as those from baryonic acoustic oscillations. We also discuss how to account for halo bias and redshift space distortions.

  5. Reducing the two-loop large-scale structure power spectrum to low-dimensional, radial integrals

    SciTech Connect

    Schmittfull, Marcel; Vlah, Zvonimir

    2016-11-28

    Modeling the large-scale structure of the universe on nonlinear scales has the potential to substantially increase the science return of upcoming surveys by increasing the number of modes available for model comparisons. One way to achieve this is to model nonlinear scales perturbatively. Unfortunately, this involves high-dimensional loop integrals that are cumbersome to evaluate. Here, trying to simplify this, we show how two-loop (next-to-next-to-leading order) corrections to the density power spectrum can be reduced to low-dimensional, radial integrals. Many of those can be evaluated with a one-dimensional fast Fourier transform, which is significantly faster than the five-dimensional Monte-Carlo integrals that are needed otherwise. The general idea of this fast fourier transform perturbation theory method is to switch between Fourier and position space to avoid convolutions and integrate over orientations, leaving only radial integrals. This reformulation is independent of the underlying shape of the initial linear density power spectrum and should easily accommodate features such as those from baryonic acoustic oscillations. We also discuss how to account for halo bias and redshift space distortions.

  6. Reducing the two-loop large-scale structure power spectrum to low-dimensional, radial integrals

    DOE PAGES

    Schmittfull, Marcel; Vlah, Zvonimir

    2016-11-28

    Modeling the large-scale structure of the universe on nonlinear scales has the potential to substantially increase the science return of upcoming surveys by increasing the number of modes available for model comparisons. One way to achieve this is to model nonlinear scales perturbatively. Unfortunately, this involves high-dimensional loop integrals that are cumbersome to evaluate. Here, trying to simplify this, we show how two-loop (next-to-next-to-leading order) corrections to the density power spectrum can be reduced to low-dimensional, radial integrals. Many of those can be evaluated with a one-dimensional fast Fourier transform, which is significantly faster than the five-dimensional Monte-Carlo integrals thatmore » are needed otherwise. The general idea of this fast fourier transform perturbation theory method is to switch between Fourier and position space to avoid convolutions and integrate over orientations, leaving only radial integrals. This reformulation is independent of the underlying shape of the initial linear density power spectrum and should easily accommodate features such as those from baryonic acoustic oscillations. We also discuss how to account for halo bias and redshift space distortions.« less

  7. Three-dimensional percolation modeling of self-healing composites.

    PubMed

    Dementsov, Alexander; Privman, Vladimir

    2008-08-01

    We study the self-healing process of materials with embedded "glue"-carrying cells, in the regime of the onset of the initial fatigue. Three-dimensional numerical simulations within the percolation-model approach are reported. The main numerical challenge taken up in the present work has been to extend the calculation of the conductance to three-dimensional lattices. Our results confirm the general features of the process: The onset of material fatigue is delayed, by development of a plateaulike time dependence of the material quality. We demonstrate that, in this low-damage regime, the changes in the conductance and thus in similar transport and response properties of the material can be used as measures of the material quality degradation. A new feature found for three dimensions, where it is much more profound than in earlier-studied two-dimensional systems, is the competition between the healing cells. Even for low initial densities of the healing cells, they interfere with each other and reduce each other's effective healing efficiency.

  8. TRANSMISSION SPECTRA OF THREE-DIMENSIONAL HOT JUPITER MODEL ATMOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Fortney, J. J.; Shabram, M.; Showman, A. P.; Lian, Y.; Lewis, N. K.; Freedman, R. S.; Marley, M. S.

    2010-02-01

    We compute models of the transmission spectra of planets HD 209458b, HD 189733b, and generic hot Jupiters. We examine the effects of temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity for the generic planets as a guide to understanding transmission spectra in general. We find that carbon dioxide absorption at 4.4 and 15 mum is prominent at high metallicity, and is a clear metallicity indicator. For HD 209458b and HD 189733b, we compute spectra for both one-dimensional and three-dimensional model atmospheres and examine the differences between them. The differences are usually small, but can be large if atmospheric temperatures are near important chemical abundance boundaries. The calculations for the three-dimensional atmospheres, and their comparison with data, serve as constraints on these dynamical models that complement the secondary eclipse and light curve data sets. For HD 209458b, even if TiO and VO gases are abundant on the dayside, their abundances can be considerably reduced on the cooler planetary limb. However, given the predicted limb temperatures and TiO abundances, the model's optical opacity is too high. For HD 189733b we find a good match with some infrared data sets and constrain the altitude of a postulated haze layer. For this planet, substantial differences can exist between the transmission spectra of the leading and trailing hemispheres, which are an excellent probe of carbon chemistry. In thermochemical equilibrium, the cooler leading hemisphere is methane-dominated, and the hotter trailing hemisphere is CO-dominated, but these differences may be eliminated by non-equilibrium chemistry due to vertical mixing. It may be possible to constrain the carbon chemistry of this planet, and its spatial variation, with James Webb Space Telescope.

  9. Development and Validation of a 3-Dimensional CFB Furnace Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vepsäläinen, Arl; Myöhänen, Karl; Hyppäneni, Timo; Leino, Timo; Tourunen, Antti

    At Foster Wheeler, a three-dimensional CFB furnace model is essential part of knowledge development of CFB furnace process regarding solid mixing, combustion, emission formation and heat transfer. Results of laboratory and pilot scale phenomenon research are utilized in development of sub-models. Analyses of field-test results in industrial-scale CFB boilers including furnace profile measurements are simultaneously carried out with development of 3-dimensional process modeling, which provides a chain of knowledge that is utilized as feedback for phenomenon research. Knowledge gathered by model validation studies and up-to-date parameter databases are utilized in performance prediction and design development of CFB boiler furnaces. This paper reports recent development steps related to modeling of combustion and formation of char and volatiles of various fuel types in CFB conditions. Also a new model for predicting the formation of nitrogen oxides is presented. Validation of mixing and combustion parameters for solids and gases are based on test balances at several large-scale CFB boilers combusting coal, peat and bio-fuels. Field-tests including lateral and vertical furnace profile measurements and characterization of solid materials provides a window for characterization of fuel specific mixing and combustion behavior in CFB furnace at different loads and operation conditions. Measured horizontal gas profiles are projection of balance between fuel mixing and reactions at lower part of furnace and are used together with both lateral temperature profiles at bed and upper parts of furnace for determination of solid mixing and combustion model parameters. Modeling of char and volatile based formation of NO profiles is followed by analysis of oxidizing and reducing regions formed due lower furnace design and mixing characteristics of fuel and combustion airs effecting to formation ofNO furnace profile by reduction and volatile-nitrogen reactions. This paper presents

  10. A Dimensionally Reduced Clustering Methodology for Heterogeneous Occupational Medicine Data Mining.

    PubMed

    Saâdaoui, Foued; Bertrand, Pierre R; Boudet, Gil; Rouffiac, Karine; Dutheil, Frédéric; Chamoux, Alain

    2015-10-01

    Clustering is a set of techniques of the statistical learning aimed at finding structures of heterogeneous partitions grouping homogenous data called clusters. There are several fields in which clustering was successfully applied, such as medicine, biology, finance, economics, etc. In this paper, we introduce the notion of clustering in multifactorial data analysis problems. A case study is conducted for an occupational medicine problem with the purpose of analyzing patterns in a population of 813 individuals. To reduce the data set dimensionality, we base our approach on the Principal Component Analysis (PCA), which is the statistical tool most commonly used in factorial analysis. However, the problems in nature, especially in medicine, are often based on heterogeneous-type qualitative-quantitative measurements, whereas PCA only processes quantitative ones. Besides, qualitative data are originally unobservable quantitative responses that are usually binary-coded. Hence, we propose a new set of strategies allowing to simultaneously handle quantitative and qualitative data. The principle of this approach is to perform a projection of the qualitative variables on the subspaces spanned by quantitative ones. Subsequently, an optimal model is allocated to the resulting PCA-regressed subspaces.

  11. Evaluation of reduced power spectra from three-dimensional k-space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Papen, Michael; Saur, Joachim

    2014-05-01

    We present a new tool to evaluate one dimensional reduced power spectral densities (PSD) from arbitrary energy distributions in k-space. This enables us to calculate the power spectra as they are measured in spacecraft frame for any given measurement geometry assuming Taylor's frozen-in approximation. It is possible to seperately calculate the diagonal elements of the spectral tensor and also to insert additional, non-turbulent energy in k-space (e.g. mirror mode waves). Given a critically balanced turbulent cascade with k∥~ k⊥α, we explore the implications on the spectral form of the PSD and the functional dependence of the spectral index κ on the field-to-flow angle θ between plasma flow and background magnetic field. We show that critically balanced turbulence develops a θ-independent cascade with the spectral slope of the perpendicular cascade κ(θ=90°). This happens at frequencies f > fmax, where fmax(L,α,θ) is a function of outer scale L, critical balance exponent α and field-to-flow angle θ. The resulting spectra resemble the θ-independent spectral form reported by Grappin & Müller (2010). We also discuss potential damping terms acting on the k-space distribution of energy and their effect on the PSD. Further, we show that the functional dependence κ(θ) as found by Horbury et al. (2008) can be explained with a critically balanced turbulence model.

  12. One-dimensional transport equation models for sound energy propagation in long spaces: theory.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yun; Larsen, Edward W; Xiang, Ning

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, a three-dimensional transport equation model is developed to describe the sound energy propagation in a long space. Then this model is reduced to a one-dimensional model by approximating the solution using the method of weighted residuals. The one-dimensional transport equation model directly describes the sound energy propagation in the "long" dimension and deals with the sound energy in the "short" dimensions by prescribed functions. Also, the one-dimensional model consists of a coupled set of N transport equations. Only N=1 and N=2 are discussed in this paper. For larger N, although the accuracy could be improved, the calculation time is expected to significantly increase, which diminishes the advantage of the model in terms of its computational efficiency.

  13. Lattice model of reduced jamming by a barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirillo, Emilio N. M.; Krehel, Oleh; Muntean, Adrian; van Santen, Rutger

    2016-10-01

    We study an asymmetric simple exclusion process in a strip in the presence of a solid impenetrable barrier. We focus on the effect of the barrier on the residence time of the particles, namely, the typical time needed by the particles to cross the whole strip. We explore the conditions for reduced jamming when varying the environment (different drifts, reservoir densities, horizontal diffusion walks, etc.). In particular, we discover an interesting nonmonotonic behavior of the residence time as a function of the barrier length. Besides recovering by means of both the lattice dynamics and the mean-field model well-known aspects like the faster-is-slower effect and the intermittence of the flow, we propose also a birth-and-death process and a reduced one-dimensional (1D) model with variable barrier permeability to capture the behavior of the residence time with respect to the parameters.

  14. A three-dimensional model of vasculogenesis.

    PubMed

    Valarmathi, Mani T; Davis, Jeffrey M; Yost, Michael J; Goodwin, Richard L; Potts, Jay D

    2009-02-01

    Postnatal bone marrow contains various subpopulations of resident and circulating stem cells (HSCs, BMSCs/MSCs) and progenitor cells (MAPCs, EPCs) that are capable of differentiating into one or more of the cellular components of the vascular bed in vitro as well as contribute to postnatal neo-vascularization in vivo. When rat BMSCs were seeded onto a three-dimensional (3-D) tubular scaffold engineered from topographically aligned type I collagen fibers and cultured either in vasculogenic or non-vasculogenic media for 7, 14, 21 or 28 days, the maturation and co-differentiation into endothelial and/or smooth muscle cell lineages were observed. Phenotypic induction of these substrate-grown cells was assayed at transcript level by real-time PCR and at protein level by confocal microscopy. In the present study, the observed upregulation of transcripts coding for vascular phenotypic markers is reminiscent of an in vivo expression pattern. Immunolocalization of vasculogenic lineage-associated markers revealed typical expression patterns of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells. These endothelial cells exhibited high metabolism of acetylated low-density lipoprotein. In addition to the induced monolayers of endothelial cells, the presence of numerous microvascular capillary-like structures was observed throughout the construct. At the level of scanning electron microscopy, smooth-walled cylindrical tube-like structures with smooth muscle cells and/or pericytes attached to its surface were elucidated. Our 3-D culture system not only induces the maturation and differentiation of BMSCs into vascular cell lineages but also supports microvessel morphogenesis. Thus, this unique in vitro model provides an excellent platform to study the temporal and spatial regulation of postnatal de novo vasculogenesis, as well as attack the lingering limit in developing engineered tissues, that is perfusion.

  15. Two-dimensional disordered Ising model within nonextensive statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodikhin, V. N.

    2017-06-01

    In this work, the two-dimensional disordered Ising model with nonextensive Tsallis statistics has been studied for the first time. The critical temperatures and critical indices have been determined for both disordered and uniform models. A new type of critical behavior has been revealed for the disordered model with nonextensive statistics. It has been shown that, within the nonextensive statistics of the two-dimensional Ising model, the Harris criterion is also valid.

  16. Dimensionality reduction for uncertainty quantification of nuclear engineering models.

    SciTech Connect

    Roderick, O.; Wang, Z.; Anitescu, M.

    2011-01-01

    The task of uncertainty quantification consists of relating the available information on uncertainties in the model setup to the resulting variation in the outputs of the model. Uncertainty quantification plays an important role in complex simulation models of nuclear engineering, where better understanding of uncertainty results in greater confidence in the model and in the improved safety and efficiency of engineering projects. In our previous work, we have shown that the effect of uncertainty can be approximated by polynomial regression with derivatives (PRD): a hybrid regression method that uses first-order derivatives of the model output as additional fitting conditions for a polynomial expansion. Numerical experiments have demonstrated the advantage of this approach over classical methods of uncertainty analysis: in precision, computational efficiency, or both. To obtain derivatives, we used automatic differentiation (AD) on the simulation code; hand-coded derivatives are acceptable for simpler models. We now present improvements on the method. We use a tuned version of the method of snapshots, a technique based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), to set up the reduced order representation of essential information on uncertainty in the model inputs. The automatically obtained sensitivity information is required to set up the method. Dimensionality reduction in combination with PRD allows analysis on a larger dimension of the uncertainty space (>100), at modest computational cost.

  17. Inverse regression-based uncertainty quantification algorithms for high-dimensional models: Theory and practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weixuan; Lin, Guang; Li, Bing

    2016-09-01

    Many uncertainty quantification (UQ) approaches suffer from the curse of dimensionality, that is, their computational costs become intractable for problems involving a large number of uncertainty parameters. In these situations, the classic Monte Carlo often remains the preferred method of choice because its convergence rate O (n - 1 / 2), where n is the required number of model simulations, does not depend on the dimension of the problem. However, many high-dimensional UQ problems are intrinsically low-dimensional, because the variation of the quantity of interest (QoI) is often caused by only a few latent parameters varying within a low-dimensional subspace, known as the sufficient dimension reduction (SDR) subspace in the statistics literature. Motivated by this observation, we propose two inverse regression-based UQ algorithms (IRUQ) for high-dimensional problems. Both algorithms use inverse regression to convert the original high-dimensional problem to a low-dimensional one, which is then efficiently solved by building a response surface for the reduced model, for example via the polynomial chaos expansion. The first algorithm, which is for the situations where an exact SDR subspace exists, is proved to converge at rate O (n-1), hence much faster than MC. The second algorithm, which doesn't require an exact SDR, employs the reduced model as a control variate to reduce the error of the MC estimate. The accuracy gain could still be significant, depending on how well the reduced model approximates the original high-dimensional one. IRUQ also provides several additional practical advantages: it is non-intrusive; it does not require computing the high-dimensional gradient of the QoI; and it reports an error bar so the user knows how reliable the result is.

  18. Reduced order modeling of fluid/structure interaction.

    SciTech Connect

    Barone, Matthew Franklin; Kalashnikova, Irina; Segalman, Daniel Joseph; Brake, Matthew Robert

    2009-11-01

    This report describes work performed from October 2007 through September 2009 under the Sandia Laboratory Directed Research and Development project titled 'Reduced Order Modeling of Fluid/Structure Interaction.' This project addresses fundamental aspects of techniques for construction of predictive Reduced Order Models (ROMs). A ROM is defined as a model, derived from a sequence of high-fidelity simulations, that preserves the essential physics and predictive capability of the original simulations but at a much lower computational cost. Techniques are developed for construction of provably stable linear Galerkin projection ROMs for compressible fluid flow, including a method for enforcing boundary conditions that preserves numerical stability. A convergence proof and error estimates are given for this class of ROM, and the method is demonstrated on a series of model problems. A reduced order method, based on the method of quadratic components, for solving the von Karman nonlinear plate equations is developed and tested. This method is applied to the problem of nonlinear limit cycle oscillations encountered when the plate interacts with an adjacent supersonic flow. A stability-preserving method for coupling the linear fluid ROM with the structural dynamics model for the elastic plate is constructed and tested. Methods for constructing efficient ROMs for nonlinear fluid equations are developed and tested on a one-dimensional convection-diffusion-reaction equation. These methods are combined with a symmetrization approach to construct a ROM technique for application to the compressible Navier-Stokes equations.

  19. Reduced models of extratropical low-frequency variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strounine, Kirill

    Low-frequency variability (LFV) of the atmosphere refers to its behavior on time scales of 10-100 days, longer than the life cycle of a mid-latitude cyclone but shorter than a season. This behavior is still poorly understood and hard to predict. It has been helpful in gaining understanding that might improve prediction to use various simplified models. The present study compares and contrasts various mode reduction strategies that help derive systematically such simplified models of LFV. Three major strategies have been applied to reduce a fairly realistic, high-dimensional, quasi-geostrophic, 3-level (QG3) atmospheric model to lower dimensions: (i) a purely empirical, multi-level regression procedure, which specifies the functional form of the reduced model and finds the model coefficients by multiple polynomial regression; (ii) an empirical-dynamical method, which retains only a few components in the projection of the full QG3 model equations onto a specified basis (the so-called bare truncation), and finds the linear deterministic and additive stochastic corrections empirically; and (iii) a dynamics-based technique, employing the stochastic mode reduction strategy of Majda et al. (2001; MTV). Subject to the assumption of significant time-scale separation in the physical system under consideration, MTV derives the form of the reduced model and finds its coefficients with minimal statistical fitting. The empirical-dynamical and dynamical reduced models were further improved by sequential parameter estimation and benchmarked against multi-level regression models; the extended Kalman filter (EKF) was used for the parameter estimation. In constructing the reduced models, the choice of basis functions is also important. We considered as basis functions a set of empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). These EOFs were computed using (a) an energy norm; and (b) a potential-enstrophy norm. We also devised a method, using singular value decomposition of the full-model

  20. Three-dimensional effects for radio frequency antenna modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, M.D.; Batchelor, D.B.; Stallings, D.C. )

    1994-10-15

    Electromagnetic field calculations for radio frequency (rf) antennas in two dimensions (2-D) neglect finite antenna length effects as well as the feeders leading to the main current strap. The 2-D calculations predict that the return currents in the sidewalls of the antenna structure depend strongly on the plasma parameters, but this prediction is suspect because of experimental evidence. To study the validity of the 2-D approximation, the Multiple Antenna Implementation System (MAntIS) has been used to perform three-dimensional (3-D) modeling of the power spectrum, plasma loading, and inductance for a relevant loop antenna design. Effects on antenna performance caused by feeders to the main current strap and conducting sidewalls are considered. The modeling shows that the feeders affect the launched power spectrum in an indirect way by forcing the driven rf current to return in the antenna structure rather than the plasma, as in the 2-D model. It has also been found that poloidal dependencies in the plasma impedance matrix can reduce the loading predicted from that predicted in the 2-D model. For some plasma parameters, the combined 3-D effects can lead to a reduction in the predicted loading by as much as a factor of 2 from that given by the 2-D model, even with end-effect corrections for the 2-D model.

  1. Three-dimensional effects for radio frequency antenna modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, M. D.; Batchelor, D. B.; Stallings, D. C.

    Electromagnetic field calculations for radio frequency (RF) antennas in two dimensions (2-D) neglect finite antenna length effects as well as the feeders leading to the main current strap. The 2-D calculations predict that the return currents in the sidewalls of the antenna structure depend strongly on the plasma parameters, but this prediction is suspect because of experimental evidence. To study the validity of the 2-D approximation, the Multiple Antenna Implementation System (MAntIS) has been used to perform three-dimensional (3-D) modeling of the power spectrum, plasma loading, and inductance for a relevant loop antenna design. Effects on antenna performance caused by feeders to the main current strap and conducting sidewalls are considered. The modeling shows that the feeders affect the launched power spectrum in an indirect way by forcing the driven RF current to return in the antenna structure rather than the plasma, as in the 2-D model. It has also been found that poloidal dependencies in the plasma impedance matrix can reduce the loading predicted from that predicted in the 2-D model. For some plasma parameters, the combined 3-D effects can lead to a reduction in the predicted loading by as much as a factor of 2 from that given by the 2-D model, even with end-effect corrections for the 2-D model.

  2. Three-dimensional effects for radio frequency antenna modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, M. D.; Batchelor, D. B.; Stallings, D. C.

    1994-10-01

    Electromagnetic field calculations for radio frequency (rf) antennas in two dimensions (2-D) neglect finite antenna length effects as well as the feeders leading to the main current strap. The 2-D calculations predict that the return currents in the sidewalls of the antenna structure depend strongly on the plasma parameters, but this prediction is suspect because of experimental evidence. To study the validity of the 2-D approximation, the Multiple Antenna Implementation System (MAntIS) has been used to perform three-dimensional (3-D) modeling of the power spectrum, plasma loading, and inductance for a relevant loop antenna design. Effects on antenna performance caused by feeders to the main current strap and conducting sidewalls are considered. The modeling shows that the feeders affect the launched power spectrum in an indirect way by forcing the driven rf current to return in the antenna structure rather than the plasma, as in the 2-D model. It has also been found that poloidal dependencies in the plasma impedance matrix can reduce the loading predicted from that predicted in the 2-D model. For some plasma parameters, the combined 3-D effects can lead to a reduction in the predicted loading by as much as a factor of 2 from that given by the 2-D model, even with end-effect corrections for the 2-D model.

  3. Low-Dimensional Dynamical Models of Thermal Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liakopoulos, Anthony

    1996-01-01

    A low-dimensional dynamic model for transitional buoyancy-driven flow in a differentially heated tall enclosure is presented. The full governing partial differential equations with the associated boundary conditions are solved by a spectral element method for a cavity of aspect ratio A=20. Proper orthogonal decomposition is applied to the oscillatory solution at Prandtl number Pr=P tau (omega) = 0.71 and Grashof number G tau (omega) = 3.2 x 10 (exp 4) to construct empirical eigenfunctions. Using the four most energetic empirical eigenfunctions for the velocity and temperature as basis functions and applying Galerkin's method, a reduced model consisting of eight nonlinear ordinary differential equations is obtained. Close to the 'design' conditions (P tau(omega) G tau(omega)), the low-order model (LOM) predictions are in excellent agreement with the predictions of the full model. In particular, the critical Grashof number at the onset of the first temporal flow instability (Hopf bifurcation) was well as the frequency and amplitude of oscillations at supercritical conditions are in excellent agreement with the predictions of the full model. Far from the 'design' conditions, the LOM predicts the existence of multiple stable steady solutions at large values of G tau, and a unique stable steady solution at small values of G tau, and exhibits hysteretic behavior that is qualitatively similar to that observed in direct numerical simulations based on the full model.

  4. A New Method for Reducing Dimensional Variability of Extruded Hollow Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baringbing, Henry Ako; Welo, Torgeir; Søvik, Odd Perry

    2007-05-01

    Crash boxes are one recent application example of aluminum extrusions in the automotive industry. A crash box is typically made by welding an extruded tube (tower) to a foot plate at one end, providing the mounting features towards the rail tip of the vehicle. When using fully automated welding processes, the exterior dimensions of the tower have to be within a tolerance of typically +/- 0.25 mm in order to provide consistent weld properties. However, the extrusion process commonly introduces dimensional variations exceeding those required for good weld quality. In order to avoid costly hydro-forming processes, a new mechanical calibration process has been developed. This method represents a means to achieve sufficient dimensional accuracy of the crash box tower prior to welding. A prototype die was made to validate the calibration process using alloy AA6063 T4 extrusions. Tensile tests were performed in order to determine material parameters. The geometry of each tower was carefully measured before and after forming to determine the dimensional capability of the calibration process. Statistical methods were combined with FEA simulations and analytical methods to establish surrogate models and response surfaces. The results show that the calibration process is an effective method for improving the dimensional accuracy of crash box profiles, providing significant improvements in dimensional capability. It is concluded that the methodology has a high industrial potential.

  5. A nonlinear manifold-based reduced order model for multiscale analysis of heterogeneous hyperelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Satyaki; Matouš, Karel

    2016-05-01

    A new manifold-based reduced order model for nonlinear problems in multiscale modeling of heterogeneous hyperelastic materials is presented. The model relies on a global geometric framework for nonlinear dimensionality reduction (Isomap), and the macroscopic loading parameters are linked to the reduced space using a Neural Network. The proposed model provides both homogenization and localization of the multiscale solution in the context of computational homogenization. To construct the manifold, we perform a number of large three-dimensional simulations of a statistically representative unit cell using a parallel finite strain finite element solver. The manifold-based reduced order model is verified using common principles from the machine-learning community. Both homogenization and localization of the multiscale solution are demonstrated on a large three-dimensional example and the local microscopic fields as well as the homogenized macroscopic potential are obtained with acceptable engineering accuracy.

  6. A Five Dimensional Model for Educating the Net Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyers, Ronald Noel

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes a multi-dimensional concept model of an ICT enabled classroom to highlight potential similarities and differences between where teachers perceive themselves relative to their learners. Some teachers and learners may be at the two dimensional text-book level, while others are operating in at a globalization level. Being armed…

  7. Reducing Spatial Data Complexity for Classification Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruta, Dymitr; Gabrys, Bogdan

    2007-11-01

    Intelligent data analytics gradually becomes a day-to-day reality of today's businesses. However, despite rapidly increasing storage and computational power current state-of-the-art predictive models still can not handle massive and noisy corporate data warehouses. What is more adaptive and real-time operational environment requires multiple models to be frequently retrained which further hinders their use. Various data reduction techniques ranging from data sampling up to density retention models attempt to address this challenge by capturing a summarised data structure, yet they either do not account for labelled data or degrade the classification performance of the model trained on the condensed dataset. Our response is a proposition of a new general framework for reducing the complexity of labelled data by means of controlled spatial redistribution of class densities in the input space. On the example of Parzen Labelled Data Compressor (PLDC) we demonstrate a simulatory data condensation process directly inspired by the electrostatic field interaction where the data are moved and merged following the attracting and repelling interactions with the other labelled data. The process is controlled by the class density function built on the original data that acts as a class-sensitive potential field ensuring preservation of the original class density distributions, yet allowing data to rearrange and merge joining together their soft class partitions. As a result we achieved a model that reduces the labelled datasets much further than any competitive approaches yet with the maximum retention of the original class densities and hence the classification performance. PLDC leaves the reduced dataset with the soft accumulative class weights allowing for efficient online updates and as shown in a series of experiments if coupled with Parzen Density Classifier (PDC) significantly outperforms competitive data condensation methods in terms of classification performance at the

  8. Reducing Spatial Data Complexity for Classification Models

    SciTech Connect

    Ruta, Dymitr; Gabrys, Bogdan

    2007-11-29

    Intelligent data analytics gradually becomes a day-to-day reality of today's businesses. However, despite rapidly increasing storage and computational power current state-of-the-art predictive models still can not handle massive and noisy corporate data warehouses. What is more adaptive and real-time operational environment requires multiple models to be frequently retrained which further hinders their use. Various data reduction techniques ranging from data sampling up to density retention models attempt to address this challenge by capturing a summarised data structure, yet they either do not account for labelled data or degrade the classification performance of the model trained on the condensed dataset. Our response is a proposition of a new general framework for reducing the complexity of labelled data by means of controlled spatial redistribution of class densities in the input space. On the example of Parzen Labelled Data Compressor (PLDC) we demonstrate a simulatory data condensation process directly inspired by the electrostatic field interaction where the data are moved and merged following the attracting and repelling interactions with the other labelled data. The process is controlled by the class density function built on the original data that acts as a class-sensitive potential field ensuring preservation of the original class density distributions, yet allowing data to rearrange and merge joining together their soft class partitions. As a result we achieved a model that reduces the labelled datasets much further than any competitive approaches yet with the maximum retention of the original class densities and hence the classification performance. PLDC leaves the reduced dataset with the soft accumulative class weights allowing for efficient online updates and as shown in a series of experiments if coupled with Parzen Density Classifier (PDC) significantly outperforms competitive data condensation methods in terms of classification performance at the

  9. Reduced Dynamic Models in Epithelial Transport

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Julio A.

    2013-01-01

    Most models developed to represent transport across epithelia assume that the cell interior constitutes a homogeneous compartment, characterized by a single concentration value of the transported species. This conception differs significantly from the current view, in which the cellular compartment is regarded as a highly crowded media of marked structural heterogeneity. Can the finding of relatively simple dynamic properties of transport processes in epithelia be compatible with this complex structural conception of the cell interior? The purpose of this work is to contribute with one simple theoretical approach to answer this question. For this, the techniques of model reduction are utilized to obtain a two-state reduced model from more complex linear models of transcellular transport with a larger number of intermediate states. In these complex models, each state corresponds to the solute concentration in an intermediate intracellular compartment. In addition, the numerical studies reveal that it is possible to approximate a general two-state model under conditions where strict reduction of the complex models cannot be performed. These results contribute with arguments to reconcile the current conception of the cell interior as a highly complex medium with the finding of relatively simple dynamic properties of transport across epithelial cells. PMID:23533397

  10. Shape memory polymers: three-dimensional isotropic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogun, Olaniyi; Mo, Changki

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive three-dimensional isotropic numerical simulation for a thermo-mechanical constitutive model of shape memory polymers (SMPs). In order to predict the thermo-mechanical behavior of SMPs, a one-dimensional rheological thermo-mechanical constitutive model is adopted, translated into a three-dimensional form and a time discrete form of the three-dimensional model is then presented. Numerical simulation of this model was developed using the UMAT subroutine capabilities of the finite element software ABAQUS. Evolution of the analysis was conducted by making use of the backward difference scheme, which was applied to all quantities within the model, including the material properties. A comparison of the numerical simulation results was carried out with the available experimental data. Numerical simulation results clearly exhibit the thermo-mechanical properties of the material which include shape fixity, shape recovery, and recovery stress. Finally, a prediction for the transverse and shear directions of the material is presented.

  11. Three-dimensional model for subsurface transport and biodegradation

    SciTech Connect

    Waddill, D.W.; Widdowson, M.A.

    1998-04-01

    This paper describes and demonstrates a numerical model for subsurface solute transport with aerobic and sequential anaerobic biodegradation. The model can depict multiple constituents in a three-dimensional (3D), anisotropic, heterogeneous domain. Hydrocarbon contaminants are simulated as electron donors for microbial growth, and available electron acceptors (EAs) may be utilized simultaneously or in the following sequence: O{sub 2}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, Mn(IV), Fe(III), SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, and CO{sub 2}. The model can account for Mn(II), Fe(II), H{sub w}S, CH{sub 4}, and a user-defined nitrogenous compound as products of biodegradation. Biodegradation of each hydrocarbon substrate follows Monod kinetics, modified to include the effects of EA and nutrient availability. Inhibition functions allow any EA to inhibit the utilization of all other EAs that provide less energy to the microbes. Microbial biomass is conceptualized as scattered microcolonies attached to the porous medium. The model assumes that interphase diffusion limitations to microbial growth are negligible and no geometrical parameters are assigned to the colonies. The behavior of the model was demonstrated using simple, hypothetical test cases. Transport of a biodegradable hydrocarbon was compared to a nonbiodegradable tracer in a 3D, hypothetical domain. Anaerobic biodecay significantly reduced predicted contaminant concentrations and travel distance. Biodegradation of the total contaminant mass depends on EA availability and did not follow first-order kinetics.

  12. Three dimensional water quality modeling of a shallow subtropical estuary.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yongshan; Ji, Zhen-Gang; Shen, Jian; Hu, Guangdou; Sun, Detong

    2012-12-01

    Knowledge of estuarine hydrodynamics and water quality comes mostly from studies of large estuarine systems. The processes affecting algae, nutrients, and dissolved oxygen (DO) in small and shallow subtropical estuaries are relatively less studied. This paper documents the development, calibration, and verification of a three dimensional (3D) water quality model for the St. Lucie Estuary (SLE), a small and shallow estuary located on the east coast of south Florida. The water quality model is calibrated and verified using two years of measured data. Statistical analyses indicate that the model is capable of reproducing key water quality characteristics of the estuary within an acceptable range of accuracy. The calibrated model is further applied to study hydrodynamic and eutrophication processes in the estuary. Modeling results reveal that high algae concentrations in the estuary are likely caused by excessive nutrient and algae supplies in freshwater inflows. While algal blooms may lead to reduced DO concentrations near the bottom of the waterbody, this study indicates that stratification and circulation induced by freshwater inflows may also contribute significantly to bottom water hypoxia in the estuary. It is also found that high freshwater inflows from one of the tributaries can change the circulation pattern and nutrient loading, thereby impacting water quality conditions of the entire estuary. Restoration plans for the SLE ecosystem need to consider both a reduction of nutrient loading and regulation of the freshwater discharge pattern. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Evaluation of Reduced Power Spectra from Three-Dimensional k-Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saur, J.; von Papen, M.

    2014-12-01

    We present a new tool to evaluate one dimensional reduced power spectral densities (PSD) from arbitrary energy distributions in kk-space. This enables us to calculate the power spectra as they are measured in spacecraft frame for any given measurement geometry assuming Taylor's frozen-in approximation. It is possible to seperately calculate the diagonal elements of the spectral tensor and also to insert additional, non-turbulent energy in kk-space (e.g. mirror mode waves). Given a critically balanced turbulent cascade with k∥˜kα⊥k_\\|sim k_perp^alpha, we explore the implications on the spectral form of the PSD and the functional dependence of the spectral index κkappa on the field-to-flow angle θtheta between plasma flow and background magnetic field. We show that critically balanced turbulence develops a θtheta-independent cascade with the spectral slope of the perpendicular cascade κ(θ=90∘)kappa(theta{=}90^circ). This happens at frequencies f>fmaxf>f_mathrm{max}, where fmax(L,α,θ)f_mathrm{max}(L,alpha,theta) is a function of outer scale LL, critical balance exponent αalpha and field-to-flow angle θtheta. We also discuss potential damping terms acting on the kk-space distribution of energy and their effect on the PSD. Further, we show that the functional dependence κ(θ)kappa(theta) as found by textit{Horbury et al.} (2008) and textit{Chen et al.} (2010) can be explained with a damped critically balanced turbulence model.

  14. Exact solution of three-dimensional transport problems using one-dimensional models. [in semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misiakos, K.; Lindholm, F. A.

    1986-01-01

    Several parameters of certain three-dimensional semiconductor devices including diodes, transistors, and solar cells can be determined without solving the actual boundary-value problem. The recombination current, transit time, and open-circuit voltage of planar diodes are emphasized here. The resulting analytical expressions enable determination of the surface recombination velocity of shallow planar diodes. The method involves introducing corresponding one-dimensional models having the same values of these parameters.

  15. A Probabilistic Model for Reducing Medication Errors

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Phung Anh; Syed-Abdul, Shabbir; Iqbal, Usman; Hsu, Min-Huei; Huang, Chen-Ling; Li, Hsien-Chang; Clinciu, Daniel Livius; Jian, Wen-Shan; Li, Yu-Chuan Jack

    2013-01-01

    Background Medication errors are common, life threatening, costly but preventable. Information technology and automated systems are highly efficient for preventing medication errors and therefore widely employed in hospital settings. The aim of this study was to construct a probabilistic model that can reduce medication errors by identifying uncommon or rare associations between medications and diseases. Methods and Finding(s) Association rules of mining techniques are utilized for 103.5 million prescriptions from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance database. The dataset included 204.5 million diagnoses with ICD9-CM codes and 347.7 million medications by using ATC codes. Disease-Medication (DM) and Medication-Medication (MM) associations were computed by their co-occurrence and associations’ strength were measured by the interestingness or lift values which were being referred as Q values. The DMQs and MMQs were used to develop the AOP model to predict the appropriateness of a given prescription. Validation of this model was done by comparing the results of evaluation performed by the AOP model and verified by human experts. The results showed 96% accuracy for appropriate and 45% accuracy for inappropriate prescriptions, with a sensitivity and specificity of 75.9% and 89.5%, respectively. Conclusions We successfully developed the AOP model as an efficient tool for automatic identification of uncommon or rare associations between disease-medication and medication-medication in prescriptions. The AOP model helps to reduce medication errors by alerting physicians, improving the patients’ safety and the overall quality of care. PMID:24312659

  16. A condensed global photochemical mechanism for two-dimensional atmospheric models

    SciTech Connect

    Tamaresis, J.; Kinnison, D.E.; Wuebbles, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    A condensed chemical mechanism that represents the reactions of organic compounds in the atmosphere is developed and tested using a one-dimensional model. Due to the differences between the full and condensed mechanisms, the reduced version cannot be considered an accurate predictor of globally important trace species concentrations. The condensed mechanism must be improved before it can be used with confidence in two-dimensional models. Appendix contains both full and reduced mechanisms of photolysis and thermal reactions as well as species profile comparisons. 3 refs., 8 figs.

  17. Model of a Negatively Curved Two-Dimensional Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckroth, Charles A.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the construction of models of two-dimensional surfaces with negative curvature that are used to illustrate differences in the triangle sum rule for the various Big Bang Theories of the universe. (JRH)

  18. Model of a Negatively Curved Two-Dimensional Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckroth, Charles A.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the construction of models of two-dimensional surfaces with negative curvature that are used to illustrate differences in the triangle sum rule for the various Big Bang Theories of the universe. (JRH)

  19. Reduced order models for nonlinear aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahajan, Aparajit J.; Dowell, Earl H.; Bliss, Donald B.

    1988-01-01

    Reduced order models are needed for reliable, efficient and accurate prediction of aerodynamic forces to analyze fluid structure interaction problems in turbomachinery, including propfans. Here, a finite difference, time marching Navier-Stokes code is validated for unsteady airfoil motion by comparing results with those from classical potential flow. The Navier-Stokes code is then analyzed for calculation of primitive and exact estimates of eigenvalues and eigenvectors associated with fluid-airfoil interaction. A variational formulation for the Euler equations and Navier-Stokes equations will be the basis for reduction of order through an eigenvector transformation.

  20. A latent factor linear mixed model for high-dimensional longitudinal data analysis.

    PubMed

    An, Xinming; Yang, Qing; Bentler, Peter M

    2013-10-30

    High-dimensional longitudinal data involving latent variables such as depression and anxiety that cannot be quantified directly are often encountered in biomedical and social sciences. Multiple responses are used to characterize these latent quantities, and repeated measures are collected to capture their trends over time. Furthermore, substantive research questions may concern issues such as interrelated trends among latent variables that can only be addressed by modeling them jointly. Although statistical analysis of univariate longitudinal data has been well developed, methods for modeling multivariate high-dimensional longitudinal data are still under development. In this paper, we propose a latent factor linear mixed model (LFLMM) for analyzing this type of data. This model is a combination of the factor analysis and multivariate linear mixed models. Under this modeling framework, we reduced the high-dimensional responses to low-dimensional latent factors by the factor analysis model, and then we used the multivariate linear mixed model to study the longitudinal trends of these latent factors. We developed an expectation-maximization algorithm to estimate the model. We used simulation studies to investigate the computational properties of the expectation-maximization algorithm and compare the LFLMM model with other approaches for high-dimensional longitudinal data analysis. We used a real data example to illustrate the practical usefulness of the model. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Traveling waves in a one-dimensional model of hemodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlukova, A. M.; Cherevko, A. A.; Chupakhin, A. P.

    2014-11-01

    We consider a one-dimensional model of hemodynamics—blood flow in the blood vessels—which is based on the Navier-Stokes equations averaged over the cross section of the vessel, and conjugate with a linear or nonlinear model for the elastic wall of the vessel. The objective is to study traveling wave solutions using this model. For such solutions, the system of partial differential equations reduces to an ordinary differential equation of the fourth order. The only singular point of the corresponding system of differential equations is found. It is established that at the singular point, the linearization matrix of the system has real or complex roots for different values of the parameters of the problem. With a special choice of the parameters, it has four complex conjugate roots with a nonzero real part or purely imaginary roots. For this case, the effect of the model parameter corresponding to the viscoelastic response of the vessel wall on the solution is investigated. Numerical experiments are performed to verify and analyze the results, and various modes of blood movement are discussed.

  2. Spectral analysis of two-dimensional Bose-Hubbard models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, David; Hoffmann, Darius; Wimberger, Sandro

    2016-04-01

    One-dimensional Bose-Hubbard models are well known to obey a transition from regular to quantum-chaotic spectral statistics. We are extending this concept to relatively simple two-dimensional many-body models. Also in two dimensions a transition from regular to chaotic spectral statistics is found and discussed. In particular, we analyze the dependence of the spectral properties on the bond number of the two-dimensional lattices and the applied boundary conditions. For maximal connectivity, the systems behave most regularly in agreement with the applicability of mean-field approaches in the limit of many nearest-neighbor couplings at each site.

  3. Adaptive h -refinement for reduced-order models: ADAPTIVE h -refinement for reduced-order models

    DOE PAGES

    Carlberg, Kevin T.

    2014-11-05

    Our work presents a method to adaptively refine reduced-order models a posteriori without requiring additional full-order-model solves. The technique is analogous to mesh-adaptive h-refinement: it enriches the reduced-basis space online by ‘splitting’ a given basis vector into several vectors with disjoint support. The splitting scheme is defined by a tree structure constructed offline via recursive k-means clustering of the state variables using snapshot data. This method identifies the vectors to split online using a dual-weighted-residual approach that aims to reduce error in an output quantity of interest. The resulting method generates a hierarchy of subspaces online without requiring large-scale operationsmore » or full-order-model solves. Furthermore, it enables the reduced-order model to satisfy any prescribed error tolerance regardless of its original fidelity, as a completely refined reduced-order model is mathematically equivalent to the original full-order model. Experiments on a parameterized inviscid Burgers equation highlight the ability of the method to capture phenomena (e.g., moving shocks) not contained in the span of the original reduced basis.« less

  4. Two-Dimensional Intercomparison of Stratospheric Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H. (Editor); Seals, Robert K., Jr. (Editor); Prather, Michael J. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    A detailed record is provided for the examination of fundamental differences in photochemistry and transport among atmospheric models. The results of 16 different modeling groups are presented for several model experiments.

  5. Applications of three-dimensionally scanned models in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Cha, B K; Choi, J I; Jost-Brinkmann, P G; Jeong, Y M

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical applications of the three-dimensional reverse engineering technologies for the analysis of orthodontic models. The measuring accuracy and the process of the 3D model scanning technique were evaluated with respect to linear, surface and volumetric parameters. Orthodontically induced dentoalveolar changes, which have been traditionally evaluated by cephalometric analysis, were assessed by the registration function of Rapidform 2002, a 3D-reverse modeling software in scanned maxillary casts. Three-dimensional digital models are valuable alternatives to conventional casts for model analysis and also yield information which could previously be gathered only by cephalometric superimposition.

  6. A three dimensional model of the Venusian thermosphere with superrotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens-Rayburn, D. R.; Mayr, H. G.; Harris, I.

    1986-01-01

    An improved three dimensional spectral model of the thermosphere of Venus is described. The model solves the Navier-Stokes equations and includes nonlinear effects for an arbitrary number of atmospheric species. A two dimensional axisymmetric model of the superrotation of the thermosphere is also presented. This model addresses the Pioneer-Venus mission finding, which suggested the thermospheric rotation rate to be much higher than that of the planet as seen from the asymmetric distribution of hydrogen and helium. Both models include the effects of an anisotropic eddy diffusion that is consistent with atmospheric mixing length theory.

  7. Reduced-order model based feedback control of the modified Hasegawa-Wakatani model

    SciTech Connect

    Goumiri, I. R.; Rowley, C. W.; Ma, Z.; Gates, D. A.; Krommes, J. A.; Parker, J. B.

    2013-04-15

    In this work, the development of model-based feedback control that stabilizes an unstable equilibrium is obtained for the Modified Hasegawa-Wakatani (MHW) equations, a classic model in plasma turbulence. First, a balanced truncation (a model reduction technique that has proven successful in flow control design problems) is applied to obtain a low dimensional model of the linearized MHW equation. Then, a model-based feedback controller is designed for the reduced order model using linear quadratic regulators. Finally, a linear quadratic Gaussian controller which is more resistant to disturbances is deduced. The controller is applied on the non-reduced, nonlinear MHW equations to stabilize the equilibrium and suppress the transition to drift-wave induced turbulence.

  8. Error-Correcting 6/8 Modulation Code for Reducing Two-Dimensional Intersymbol Interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jinyoung; Lee, Jaejin

    2011-09-01

    We introduce error-correcting 6/8 modulation codes for reducing two-dimensional intersymbol interference in holographic data storage. The proposed modulation codes have a trellis-like structure in which the data is encoded, enabling their error-correcting capability, and are more complex than previous error-correcting 4/6 modulation codes because of increasing number of symbols and states compared to the conventional 6/8 modulation codes. The bit error rate (BER) performances are improved for the proposed modulation codes compared with those for 4/6 modulation codes, moreover the proposed codes make 12.5% times more efficient.

  9. Computation of pair distribution functions and three-dimensional densities with a reduced variance principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgis, Daniel; Assaraf, Roland; Rotenberg, Benjamin; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe

    2013-12-01

    No fancy statistical objects here, we go back to the computation of one of the most basic and fundamental quantities in the statistical mechanics of fluids, namely the pair distribution functions. Those functions are usually computed in molecular simulations by using histogram techniques. We show here that they can be estimated using a global information on the instantaneous forces acting on the particles, and that this leads to a reduced variance compared to the standard histogram estimators. The technique is extended successfully to the computation of three-dimensional solvent densities around tagged molecular solutes, quantities that are noisy and very long to converge, using histograms.

  10. A Reduced Model for the Magnetorotational Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamroz, Ben; Julien, Keith; Knobloch, Edgar

    2008-11-01

    The magnetorotational instability is investigated within the shearing box approximation in the large Elsasser number regime. In this regime, which is of fundamental importance to astrophysical accretion disk theory, shear is the dominant source of energy, but the instability itself requires the presence of a weaker vertical magnetic field. Dissipative effects are weaker still. However, they are sufficiently large to permit a nonlinear feedback mechanism whereby the turbulent stresses generated by the MRI act on and modify the local background shear in the angular velocity profile. To date this response has been omitted in shearing box simulations and is captured by a reduced pde model derived here from the global MHD fluid equations using multiscale asymptotic perturbation theory. Results from numerical simulations of the reduced pde model indicate a linear phase of exponential growth followed by a nonlinear adjustment to algebraic growth and decay in the fluctuating quantities. Remarkably, the velocity and magnetic field correlations associated with these algebraic growth and decay laws conspire to achieve saturation of the angular momentum transport. The inclusion of subdominant ohmic dissipation arrests the algebraic growth of the fluctuations on a longer, dissipative time scale.

  11. Supersymmetric models with higher dimensional operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniadis, I.; Dudas, E.; Ghilencea, D. M.

    2008-03-01

    In 4D renormalisable theories, integrating out massive states generates in the low energy effective action higher dimensional operators (derivative or otherwise). Using a superfield language it is shown that a 4D N=1 supersymmetric theory with higher derivative operators in either the Kahler or the superpotential part of the Lagrangian and with an otherwise arbitrary superpotential, is equivalent to a 4D N=1 theory of second order (i.e. without higher derivatives) with additional superfields and renormalised interactions. We provide examples where a free theory with trivial supersymmetry breaking provided by a linear superpotential becomes, in the presence of higher derivatives terms and in the second order version, a non-trivial interactive one with spontaneous supersymmetry breaking. The couplings of the equivalent theory acquire a threshold correction through their dependence on the scale of the higher dimensional operator(s). The scalar potential in the second order theory is not necessarily positive definite, and one can in principle have a vanishing potential with broken supersymmetry. We provide an application to MSSM and argue that at tree-level and for a mass scale associated to a higher derivative term in the TeV range, the Higgs mass can be lifted above the current experimental limits.

  12. Three Dimensional Vapor Intrusion Modeling: Model Validation and Uncertainty Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbariyeh, S.; Patterson, B.; Rakoczy, A.; Li, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Volatile organic chemicals (VOCs), such as chlorinated solvents and petroleum hydrocarbons, are prevalent groundwater contaminants due to their improper disposal and accidental spillage. In addition to contaminating groundwater, VOCs may partition into the overlying vadose zone and enter buildings through gaps and cracks in foundation slabs or basement walls, a process termed vapor intrusion. Vapor intrusion of VOCs has been recognized as a detrimental source for human exposures to potential carcinogenic or toxic compounds. The simulation of vapor intrusion from a subsurface source has been the focus of many studies to better understand the process and guide field investigation. While multiple analytical and numerical models were developed to simulate the vapor intrusion process, detailed validation of these models against well controlled experiments is still lacking, due to the complexity and uncertainties associated with site characterization and soil gas flux and indoor air concentration measurement. In this work, we present an effort to validate a three-dimensional vapor intrusion model based on a well-controlled experimental quantification of the vapor intrusion pathways into a slab-on-ground building under varying environmental conditions. Finally, a probabilistic approach based on Monte Carlo simulations is implemented to determine the probability distribution of indoor air concentration based on the most uncertain input parameters.

  13. An Extensible Reduced Order Model Builder for Simulation and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    2012-09-28

    REVEAL is a software framework for building reduced order models (surrogate models) for high fidelity complex scientific simulations. REVEAL is designed to do reduced order modeling and sensitivity analysis for scientific simulations. REVEAL incorporates a range of sampling and regression methods. It provides complete user environment and is adaptable to new simulators, runs jobs on any computing platform of choice, automatically post processes simulation results and provides a range of data analysis tools. The software is generic and can easily be extended to incorporate new methods, simulators.

  14. The Long Decay Model of One-Dimensional Projectile Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lattery, Mark Joseph

    2008-01-01

    This article introduces a research study on student model formation and development in introductory mechanics. As a point of entry, I present a detailed analysis of the Long Decay Model of one-dimensional projectile motion. This model has been articulated by Galileo ("in De Motu") and by contemporary students. Implications for instruction are…

  15. One-Dimensional Ising Model with "k"-Spin Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, Yale

    2011-01-01

    We examine a generalization of the one-dimensional Ising model involving interactions among neighbourhoods of "k" adjacent spins. The model is solved by exploiting a connection to an interesting computational problem that we call ""k"-SAT on a ring", and is shown to be equivalent to the nearest-neighbour Ising model in the absence of an external…

  16. The Long Decay Model of One-Dimensional Projectile Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lattery, Mark Joseph

    2008-01-01

    This article introduces a research study on student model formation and development in introductory mechanics. As a point of entry, I present a detailed analysis of the Long Decay Model of one-dimensional projectile motion. This model has been articulated by Galileo ("in De Motu") and by contemporary students. Implications for instruction are…

  17. One-Dimensional Ising Model with "k"-Spin Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, Yale

    2011-01-01

    We examine a generalization of the one-dimensional Ising model involving interactions among neighbourhoods of "k" adjacent spins. The model is solved by exploiting a connection to an interesting computational problem that we call ""k"-SAT on a ring", and is shown to be equivalent to the nearest-neighbour Ising model in the absence of an external…

  18. A one-dimensional model of subsurface hillslope flow

    Treesearch

    Jason C. Fisher

    1997-01-01

    Abstract - A one-dimensional, finite difference model of saturated subsurface flow within a hillslope was developed. The model uses rainfall, elevation data, a hydraulic conductivity, and a storage coefficient to predict the saturated thickness in time and space. The model was tested against piezometric data collected in a swale located in the headwaters of the North...

  19. Two-dimensional Chebyshev pseudospectral modelling of cardiac propagation.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Z; Ng, K T

    2000-05-01

    Bidomain or monodomain modelling has been used widely to study various issues related to action potential propagation in cardiac tissue. In most of these previous studies, the finite difference method is used to solve the partial differential equations associated with the model. Though the finite difference approach has provided useful insight in many cases, adequate discretisation of cardiac tissue with realistic dimensions often requires a large number of nodes, making the numerical solution process difficult or impossible with available computer resources. Here, a Chebyshev pseudospectral method is presented that allows a significant reduction in the number of nodes required for a given solution accuracy. The new method is used to solve the governing nonlinear partial differential equation for the monodomain model representing a two-dimensional homogeneous sheet of cardiac tissue. The unknown transmembrane potential is expanded in terms of Chebyshev polynomial trial functions and the equation is enforced at the Gauss-Lobatto grid points. Spatial derivatives are obtained using the fast Fourier transform and the solution is advanced in time using an explicit technique. Numerical results indicate that the pseudospectral approach allows the number of nodes to be reduced by a factor of sixteen, while still maintaining the same error performance. This makes it possible to perform simulations with the same accuracy using about twelve times less CPU time and memory.

  20. Model-based image reconstruction for four-dimensional PET

    SciTech Connect

    Li Tianfang; Thorndyke, Brian; Schreibmann, Eduard; Yang Yong; Xing Lei

    2006-05-15

    Positron emission tonography (PET) is useful in diagnosis and radiation treatment planning for a variety of cancers. For patients with cancers in thoracic or upper abdominal region, the respiratory motion produces large distortions in the tumor shape and size, affecting the accuracy in both diagnosis and treatment. Four-dimensional (4D) (gated) PET aims to reduce the motion artifacts and to provide accurate measurement of the tumor volume and the tracer concentration. A major issue in 4D PET is the lack of statistics. Since the collected photons are divided into several frames in the 4D PET scan, the quality of each reconstructed frame degrades as the number of frames increases. The increased noise in each frame heavily degrades the quantitative accuracy of the PET imaging. In this work, we propose a method to enhance the performance of 4D PET by developing a new technique of 4D PET reconstruction with incorporation of an organ motion model derived from 4D-CT images. The method is based on the well-known maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization (ML-EM) algorithm. During the processes of forward- and backward-projection in the ML-EM iterations, all projection data acquired at different phases are combined together to update the emission map with the aid of deformable model, the statistics is therefore greatly improved. The proposed algorithm was first evaluated with computer simulations using a mathematical dynamic phantom. Experiment with a moving physical phantom was then carried out to demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed method and the increase of signal-to-noise ratio over three-dimensional PET. Finally, the 4D PET reconstruction was applied to a patient case.

  1. (N+1)-dimensional fractional reduced differential transform method for fractional order partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshad, Muhammad; Lu, Dianchen; Wang, Jun

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we pursue the general form of the fractional reduced differential transform method (DTM) to (N+1)-dimensional case, so that fractional order partial differential equations (PDEs) can be resolved effectively. The most distinct aspect of this method is that no prescribed assumptions are required, and the huge computational exertion is reduced and round-off errors are also evaded. We utilize the proposed scheme on some initial value problems and approximate numerical solutions of linear and nonlinear time fractional PDEs are obtained, which shows that the method is highly accurate and simple to apply. The proposed technique is thus an influential technique for solving the fractional PDEs and fractional order problems occurring in the field of engineering, physics etc. Numerical results are obtained for verification and demonstration purpose by using Mathematica software.

  2. Reduced-Order Model Based Feedback Control For Modified Hasegawa-Wakatani Model

    SciTech Connect

    Goumiri, I. R.; Rowley, C. W.; Ma, Z.; Gates, D. A.; Krommes, J. A.; Parker, J. B.

    2013-01-28

    In this work, the development of model-based feedback control that stabilizes an unstable equilibrium is obtained for the Modi ed Hasegawa-Wakatani (MHW) equations, a classic model in plasma turbulence. First, a balanced truncation (a model reduction technique that has proven successful in ow control design problems) is applied to obtain a low dimensional model of the linearized MHW equation. Then a modelbased feedback controller is designed for the reduced order model using linear quadratic regulators (LQR). Finally, a linear quadratic gaussian (LQG) controller, which is more resistant to disturbances is deduced. The controller is applied on the non-reduced, nonlinear MHW equations to stabilize the equilibrium and suppress the transition to drift-wave induced turbulence.

  3. A constrained reduced-dimensionality search algorithm to follow chemical reactions on potential energy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lankau, Timm; Yu, Chin-Hui

    2013-06-01

    A constrained reduced-dimensionality algorithm can be used to efficiently locate transition states and products in reactions involving conformational changes. The search path (SP) is constructed stepwise from linear combinations of a small set of manually chosen internal coordinates, namely the predictors. The majority of the internal coordinates, the correctors, are optimized at every step of the SP to minimize the total energy of the system so that the path becomes a minimum energy path connecting products and transition states with the reactants. Problems arise when the set of predictors needs to include weak coordinates, for example, dihedral angles, as well as strong ones such as bond distances. Two principal constraining methods for the weak coordinates are proposed to mend this situation: static and dynamic constraints. Dynamic constraints are automatically activated and revoked depending on the state of the weak coordinates among the predictors, while static ones require preset control factors and act permanently. All these methods enable the successful application (4 reactions are presented involving cyclohexane, alanine dipeptide, trimethylsulfonium chloride, and azafulvene) of the reduced dimensionality method to reactions where the reaction path covers large conformational changes in addition to the formation/breaking of chemical bonds. Dynamic constraints are found to be the most efficient method as they require neither additional information about the geometry of the transition state nor fine tuning of control parameters.

  4. Boundary Critical Behaviour of Two-Dimensional Layered Ising Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelizzola, Alessandro

    Layered models are models in which the coupling constants depend in an arbitrary way on one spatial coordinate, usually the distance from a free surface or boundary. Here the theory of the boundary critical behaviour of two-dimensional layered Ising models, including the Hilhorst-van Leeuwen model and models for aperiodic systems, is reviewed, with a particular attention to exact results for the critical behaviour and the boundary order parameter.

  5. Chiral anomalies in the reduced model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikukawa, Yoshio; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2002-09-01

    On the basis of an observation due to Kiskis, Narayanan and Neuberger, we show that there is a remnant of chiral anomalies in the reduced model when a Dirac operator which obeys the Ginsparg-Wilson relation is employed for the fermion sector. We consider fermions belonging to the fundamental representation of the gauge group U(N) or SU(N). For vector-like theories, we determine a general form of the axial anomaly or the topological charge within a framework of a U(1) embedding. For chiral gauge theories with the gauge group U(N), a remnant of gauge anomaly emerges as an obstruction to a smooth fermion integration measure. The pure gauge action of gauge-field configurations which cause these non-trivial phenomena always diverges in the 't Hooft N→∞ limit when d > 2.

  6. Reduced-Order Aerodynamic Model and Its Application to a Nonlinear Aeroelastic System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Deman; Conner, Mark D.; Dowell, Earl H.

    1998-01-01

    Starting from a finite state model for a two-dimensional aerodynamic flow over an airfoil, the eigenmodes of the aerodynamic flow are determined. Using a small number of these aerodynamic eigenmodes, ie., a reduced-order model, the aeroelastic model is formed by coupling them to a typical section structural model with a trailing-edge flap. A free-play nonlinearity is modeled. Results are shown from the finite state model, the reduced-order model, and previous theoretical and experimental work. All results are in good agreement.

  7. Numerical Modeling of Three-Dimensional Confined Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greywall, M. S.

    1981-01-01

    A three dimensional confined flow model is presented. The flow field is computed by calculating velocity and enthalpy along a set of streamlines. The finite difference equations are obtained by applying conservation principles to streamtubes constructed around the chosen streamlines. With appropriate substitutions for the body force terms, the approach computes three dimensional magnetohydrodynamic channel flows. A listing of a computer code, based on this approach is presented in FORTRAN IV language. The code computes three dimensional compressible viscous flow through a rectangular duct, with the duct cross section specified along the axis.

  8. The problem of dimensional instability in airfoil models for cryogenic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wigley, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of dimensional instability in airfoil models for cryogenic wind tunnels is discussed in terms of the various mechanisms that can be responsible. The interrelationship between metallurgical structure and possible dimensional instability in cryogenic usage is discussed for those steel alloys of most interest for wind tunnel model construction at this time. Other basic mechanisms responsible for setting up residual stress systems are discussed, together with ways in which their magnitude may be reduced by various elevated or low temperature thermal cycles. A standard specimen configuration is proposed for use in experimental investigations into the effects of machining, heat treatment, and other variables that influence the dimensional stability of the materials of interest. A brief classification of various materials in terms of their metallurgical structure and susceptability to dimensional instability is presented.

  9. Numerical modeling of two-dimensional confined flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greywall, M. S.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical model of two-dimensional confined flows is presented. The flow in the duct is partitioned into finite streams. The difference equations are then obtained by applying conservation principles directly to the individual streams. A listing of a computer code based on this approach in FORTRAN 4 language is presented. The code computes two dimensional compressible turbulent flows in ducts when the duct area along the flow is specified and the pressure gradient is unknown.

  10. A new algorithm for high-dimensional uncertainty quantification based on dimension-adaptive sparse grid approximation and reduced basis methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Quarteroni, Alfio

    2015-10-01

    In this work we develop an adaptive and reduced computational algorithm based on dimension-adaptive sparse grid approximation and reduced basis methods for solving high-dimensional uncertainty quantification (UQ) problems. In order to tackle the computational challenge of "curse of dimensionality" commonly faced by these problems, we employ a dimension-adaptive tensor-product algorithm [16] and propose a verified version to enable effective removal of the stagnation phenomenon besides automatically detecting the importance and interaction of different dimensions. To reduce the heavy computational cost of UQ problems modelled by partial differential equations (PDE), we adopt a weighted reduced basis method [7] and develop an adaptive greedy algorithm in combination with the previous verified algorithm for efficient construction of an accurate reduced basis approximation. The efficiency and accuracy of the proposed algorithm are demonstrated by several numerical experiments.

  11. A two-dimensional dam-break flood plain model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hromadka, T.V.; Berenbrock, C.E.; Freckleton, J.R.; Guymon, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    A simple two-dimensional dam-break model is developed for flood plain study purposes. Both a finite difference grid and an irregular triangle element integrated finite difference formulation are presented. The governing flow equations are approximately solved as a diffusion model coupled to the equation of continuity. Application of the model to a hypothetical dam-break study indicates that the approach can be used to predict a two-dimensional dam-break flood plain over a broad, flat plain more accurately than a one-dimensional model, especially when the flow can break-out of the main channel and then return to the channel at other downstream reaches. ?? 1985.

  12. One-dimensional hydrodynamic model generating a turbulent cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Takeshi; Sakajo, Takashi

    2016-05-01

    As a minimal mathematical model generating cascade analogous to that of the Navier-Stokes turbulence in the inertial range, we propose a one-dimensional partial-differential-equation model that conserves the integral of the squared vorticity analog (enstrophy) in the inviscid case. With a large-scale random forcing and small viscosity, we find numerically that the model exhibits the enstrophy cascade, the broad energy spectrum with a sizable correction to the dimensional-analysis prediction, peculiar intermittency, and self-similarity in the dynamical system structure.

  13. Bootstrapping Critical Ising Model on Three Dimensional Real Projective Space.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Yu

    2016-04-08

    Given conformal data on a flat Euclidean space, we use crosscap conformal bootstrap equations to numerically solve the Lee-Yang model as well as the critical Ising model on a three dimensional real projective space. We check the rapid convergence of our bootstrap program in two dimensions from the exact solutions available. Based on the comparison, we estimate that our systematic error on the numerically solved one-point functions of the critical Ising model on a three dimensional real projective space is less than 1%. Our method opens up a novel way to solve conformal field theories on nontrivial geometries.

  14. Generalized Reduced Order Modeling of Aeroservoelastic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gariffo, James Michael

    Transonic aeroelastic and aeroservoelastic (ASE) modeling presents a significant technical and computational challenge. Flow fields with a mixture of subsonic and supersonic flow, as well as moving shock waves, can only be captured through high-fidelity CFD analysis. With modern computing power, it is realtively straightforward to determine the flutter boundary for a single structural configuration at a single flight condition, but problems of larger scope remain quite costly. Some such problems include characterizing a vehicle's flutter boundary over its full flight envelope, optimizing its structural weight subject to aeroelastic constraints, and designing control laws for flutter suppression. For all of these applications, reduced-order models (ROMs) offer substantial computational savings. ROM techniques in general have existed for decades, and the methodology presented in this dissertation builds on successful previous techniques to create a powerful new scheme for modeling aeroelastic systems, and predicting and interpolating their transonic flutter boundaries. In this method, linear ASE state-space models are constructed from modal structural and actuator models coupled to state-space models of the linearized aerodynamic forces through feedback loops. Flutter predictions can be made from these models through simple eigenvalue analysis of their state-transition matrices for an appropriate set of dynamic pressures. Moreover, this analysis returns the frequency and damping trend of every aeroelastic branch. In contrast, determining the critical dynamic pressure by direct time-marching CFD requires a separate run for every dynamic pressure being analyzed simply to obtain the trend for the critical branch. The present ROM methodology also includes a new model interpolation technique that greatly enhances the benefits of these ROMs. This enables predictions of the dynamic behavior of the system for flight conditions where CFD analysis has not been explicitly

  15. Dimensional reduction of the master equation for stochastic chemical networks: The reduced-multiplane method.

    PubMed

    Barzel, Baruch; Biham, Ofer; Kupferman, Raz; Lipshtat, Azi; Zait, Amir

    2010-08-01

    Chemical reaction networks which exhibit strong fluctuations are common in microscopic systems in which reactants appear in low copy numbers. The analysis of these networks requires stochastic methods, which come in two forms: direct integration of the master equation and Monte Carlo simulations. The master equation becomes infeasible for large networks because the number of equations increases exponentially with the number of reactive species. Monte Carlo methods, which are more efficient in integrating over the exponentially large phase space, also become impractical due to the large amounts of noisy data that need to be stored and analyzed. The recently introduced multiplane method [A. Lipshtat and O. Biham, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 170601 (2004)] is an efficient framework for the stochastic analysis of large reaction networks. It is a dimensional reduction method, based on the master equation, which provides a dramatic reduction in the number of equations without compromising the accuracy of the results. The reduction is achieved by breaking the network into a set of maximal fully connected subnetworks (maximal cliques). A separate master equation is written for the reduced probability distribution associated with each clique, with suitable coupling terms between them. This method is highly efficient in the case of sparse networks, in which the maximal cliques tend to be small. However, in dense networks some of the cliques may be rather large and the dimensional reduction is not as effective. Furthermore, the derivation of the multiplane equations from the master equation is tedious and difficult. Here we present the reduced-multiplane method in which the maximal cliques are broken down to the fundamental two-vertex cliques. The number of equations is further reduced, making the method highly efficient even for dense networks. Moreover, the equations take a simpler form, which can be easily constructed using a diagrammatic procedure, for any desired network

  16. Recent developments in three-dimensional numerical estuarine models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, Ralph T.; Smith, Peter E.; Casulli, Vincenzo

    1993-01-01

    For a fixed cost, computing power increases 5 to 10 times every five years. The readily available computing resources have inspired new modal formulations and innovative model applications. Significant progress has been advanced in three-dimensional numerical estuarine modeling within the past three or four years. This paper attempts to review and summarize properties of new 3-D estuarine hydrodynamic models. The emphasis of the review is placed on the formulation, numerical methods. The emphasis of the review is placed on the formulation, numerical methods, spatial and temporal resolution, computational efficiency, and turbulence closure of new models. Recent research has provided guidelines for the proper use of 3-D models involving in the σ-transformation. Other models resort to a fixed level discretization in the vertical. The semi-implicit treatment in time-stepping models appears to have gained momentum. Future research in three-dimensional numerical modeling remains to be on computational efficiency and turbulent closure.

  17. Creating physically-based three-dimensional microstructures: Bridging phase-field and crystal plasticity models.

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Hojun; Owen, Steven J.; Abdeljawad, Fadi F.; Hanks, Byron; Battaile, Corbett Chandler

    2015-09-01

    In order to better incorporate microstructures in continuum scale models, we use a novel finite element (FE) meshing technique to generate three-dimensional polycrystalline aggregates from a phase field grain growth model of grain microstructures. The proposed meshing technique creates hexahedral FE meshes that capture smooth interfaces between adjacent grains. Three dimensional realizations of grain microstructures from the phase field model are used in crystal plasticity-finite element (CP-FE) simulations of polycrystalline a -iron. We show that the interface conformal meshes significantly reduce artificial stress localizations in voxelated meshes that exhibit the so-called "wedding cake" interfaces. This framework provides a direct link between two mesoscale models - phase field and crystal plasticity - and for the first time allows mechanics simulations of polycrystalline materials using three-dimensional hexahedral finite element meshes with realistic topological features.

  18. [Research on monitoring mechanical wear state based on oil spectrum multi-dimensional time series model].

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Zhang, Pei-lin; Ren, Guo-quan; Li, Bing; Yang, Ning

    2010-11-01

    A new method using oil atomic spectrometric analysis technology to monitor the mechanical wear state was proposed. Multi-dimensional time series model of oil atomic spectrometric data of running-in period was treated as the standard model. Residues remained after new data were processed by the standard model. The residues variance matrix was selected as the features of the corresponding wear state. Then, high dimensional feature vectors were reduced through the principal component analysis and the first three principal components were extracted to represent the wear state. Euclidean distance was computed for feature vectors to classify the testing samples. Thus, the mechanical wear state was identified correctly. The wear state of a specified track vehicle engine was effectively identified, which verified the validity of the proposed method. Experimental results showed that introducing the multi-dimensional time series model to oil spectrometric analysis can fuse the spectrum data and improve the accuracy of monitoring mechanical wear state.

  19. Three-dimensional canine heart model for cardiac elastography

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hao; Varghese, Tomy

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: A three-dimensional finite element analysis based canine heart model is introduced that would enable the assessment of cardiac function. Methods: The three-dimensional canine heart model is based on the cardiac deformation and motion model obtained from the Cardiac Mechanics Research Group at UCSD. The canine heart model is incorporated into ultrasound simulation programs previously developed in the laboratory, enabling the generation of simulated ultrasound radiofrequency data to evaluate algorithms for cardiac elastography. The authors utilize a two-dimensional multilevel hybrid method to estimate local displacements and strain from the simulated cardiac radiofrequency data. Results: Tissue displacements and strains estimated along both the axial and lateral directions (with respect to the ultrasound scan plane) are compared to the actual scatterer movement obtained using the canine heart model. Simulation and strain estimation algorithms combined with the three-dimensional canine heart model provide high resolution displacement and strain curves for improved analysis of cardiac function. The use of principal component analysis along parasternal cardiac short axis views is also presented. Conclusions: A 3D cardiac deformation model is proposed for evaluating displacement tracking and strain estimation algorithms for cardiac strain imaging. Validation of the model is shown using ultrasound simulations to generate axial and lateral displacement and strain curves that are similar to the actual axial and lateral displacement and strain curves. PMID:21158300

  20. Spatial and Temporal Low-Dimensional Models for Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalb, Virginia

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses work that obtains a low-dimensional model that captures both temporal and spatial flow by constructing spatial and temporal four-mode models for two classic flow problems. The models are based on the proper orthogonal decomposition at two reference Reynolds numbers. Model predictions are made at an intermediate Reynolds number and compared with direct numerical simulation results at the new Reynolds number.

  1. Large field inflation models from higher-dimensional gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuuchi, Kazuyuki; Koyama, Yoji

    2015-02-01

    Motivated by the recent detection of B-mode polarization of CMB by BICEP2 which is possibly of primordial origin, we study large field inflation models which can be obtained from higher-dimensional gauge theories. The constraints from CMB observations on the gauge theory parameters are given, and their naturalness are discussed. Among the models analyzed, Dante's Inferno model turns out to be the most preferred model in this framework.

  2. Large field inflation models from higher-dimensional gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Furuuchi, Kazuyuki; Koyama, Yoji

    2015-02-23

    Motivated by the recent detection of B-mode polarization of CMB by BICEP2 which is possibly of primordial origin, we study large field inflation models which can be obtained from higher-dimensional gauge theories. The constraints from CMB observations on the gauge theory parameters are given, and their naturalness are discussed. Among the models analyzed, Dante’s Inferno model turns out to be the most preferred model in this framework.

  3. Improving a regional model using reduced complexity and parameter estimation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelson, Victor A.; Hunt, Randall J.; Haitjema, Henk M.

    2002-01-01

    The availability of powerful desktop computers and graphical user interfaces for ground water flow models makes possible the construction of ever more complex models. A proposed copper-zinc sulfide mine in northern Wisconsin offers a unique case in which the same hydrologic system has been modeled using a variety of techniques covering a wide range of sophistication and complexity. Early in the permitting process, simple numerical models were used to evaluate the necessary amount of water to be pumped from the mine, reductions in streamflow, and the drawdowns in the regional aquifer. More complex models have subsequently been used in an attempt to refine the predictions. Even after so much modeling effort, questions regarding the accuracy and reliability of the predictions remain. We have performed a new analysis of the proposed mine using the two-dimensional analytic element code GFLOW coupled with the nonlinear parameter estimation code UCODE. The new model is parsimonious, containing fewer than 10 parameters, and covers a region several times larger in areal extent than any of the previous models. The model demonstrates the suitability of analytic element codes for use with parameter estimation codes. The simplified model results are similar to the more complex models; predicted mine inflows and UCODE-derived 95% confidence intervals are consistent with the previous predictions. More important, the large areal extent of the model allowed us to examine hydrological features not included in the previous models, resulting in new insights about the effects that far-field boundary conditions can have on near-field model calibration and parameterization. In this case, the addition of surface water runoff into a lake in the headwaters of a stream while holding recharge constant moved a regional ground watershed divide and resulted in some of the added water being captured by the adjoining basin. Finally, a simple analytical solution was used to clarify the GFLOW model

  4. Accelerated Gravitational Wave Parameter Estimation with Reduced Order Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canizares, Priscilla; Field, Scott E.; Gair, Jonathan; Raymond, Vivien; Smith, Rory; Tiglio, Manuel

    2015-02-01

    Inferring the astrophysical parameters of coalescing compact binaries is a key science goal of the upcoming advanced LIGO-Virgo gravitational-wave detector network and, more generally, gravitational-wave astronomy. However, current approaches to parameter estimation for these detectors require computationally expensive algorithms. Therefore, there is a pressing need for new, fast, and accurate Bayesian inference techniques. In this Letter, we demonstrate that a reduced order modeling approach enables rapid parameter estimation to be performed. By implementing a reduced order quadrature scheme within the LIGO Algorithm Library, we show that Bayesian inference on the 9-dimensional parameter space of nonspinning binary neutron star inspirals can be sped up by a factor of ˜30 for the early advanced detectors' configurations (with sensitivities down to around 40 Hz) and ˜70 for sensitivities down to around 20 Hz. This speedup will increase to about 150 as the detectors improve their low-frequency limit to 10 Hz, reducing to hours analyses which could otherwise take months to complete. Although these results focus on interferometric gravitational wave detectors, the techniques are broadly applicable to any experiment where fast Bayesian analysis is desirable.

  5. Accelerated gravitational wave parameter estimation with reduced order modeling.

    PubMed

    Canizares, Priscilla; Field, Scott E; Gair, Jonathan; Raymond, Vivien; Smith, Rory; Tiglio, Manuel

    2015-02-20

    Inferring the astrophysical parameters of coalescing compact binaries is a key science goal of the upcoming advanced LIGO-Virgo gravitational-wave detector network and, more generally, gravitational-wave astronomy. However, current approaches to parameter estimation for these detectors require computationally expensive algorithms. Therefore, there is a pressing need for new, fast, and accurate Bayesian inference techniques. In this Letter, we demonstrate that a reduced order modeling approach enables rapid parameter estimation to be performed. By implementing a reduced order quadrature scheme within the LIGO Algorithm Library, we show that Bayesian inference on the 9-dimensional parameter space of nonspinning binary neutron star inspirals can be sped up by a factor of ∼30 for the early advanced detectors' configurations (with sensitivities down to around 40 Hz) and ∼70 for sensitivities down to around 20 Hz. This speedup will increase to about 150 as the detectors improve their low-frequency limit to 10 Hz, reducing to hours analyses which could otherwise take months to complete. Although these results focus on interferometric gravitational wave detectors, the techniques are broadly applicable to any experiment where fast Bayesian analysis is desirable.

  6. Use of high dimensional model representation in dimensionality reduction: application to hyperspectral image classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taşkin, Gülşen

    2016-05-01

    Recently, information extraction from hyperspectral images (HI) has become an attractive research area for many practical applications in earth observation due to the fact that HI provides valuable information with a huge number of spectral bands. In order to process such a huge amount of data in an effective way, traditional methods may not fully provide a satisfactory performance because they do not mostly consider high dimensionality of the data which causes curse of dimensionality also known as Hughes phenomena. In case of supervised classification, a poor generalization performance is achieved as a consequence resulting in availability of limited training samples. Therefore, advance methods accounting for the high dimensionality need to be developed in order to get a good generalization capability. In this work, a method of High Dimensional Model Representation (HDMR) was utilized for dimensionality reduction, and a novel feature selection method was introduced based on global sensitivity analysis. Several implementations were conducted with hyperspectral images in comparison to state-of-art feature selection algorithms in terms of classification accuracy, and the results showed that the proposed method outperforms the other feature selection methods even with all considered classifiers, that are support vector machines, Bayes, and decision tree j48.

  7. Three-dimensional laser radar modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinvall, Ove K.; Carlsson, Tomas

    2001-09-01

    Laser radars have the unique capability to give intensity and full 3-D images of an object. Doppler lidars can give velocity and vibration characteristics of an objects. These systems have many civilian and military applications such as terrain modelling, depth sounding, object detection and classification as well as object positioning. In order to derive the signal waveform from the object one has to account for the laser pulse time characteristics, media effects such as the atmospheric attenuation and turbulence effects or scattering properties, the target shape and reflection (BRDF), speckle noise together with the receiver and background noise. Finally the type of waveform processing (peak detection, leading edge etc.) is needed to model the sensor output to be compared with observations. We have developed a computer model which models performance of a 3-D laser radar. We will give examples of signal waveforms generated from model different targets calculated by integrating the laser beam profile in space and time over the target including reflection characteristics during different speckle and turbulence conditions. The result will be of help when designing and using new laser radar systems. The importance of different type of signal processing of the waveform in order to fulfil performance goals will be shown.

  8. Underwater striling engine design with modified one-dimensional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Daijin; Qin, Kan; Luo, Kai

    2015-05-01

    Stirling engines are regarded as an efficient and promising power system for underwater devices. Currently, many researches on one-dimensional model is used to evaluate thermodynamic performance of Stirling engine, but in which there are still some aspects which cannot be modeled with proper mathematical models such as mechanical loss or auxiliary power. In this paper, a four-cylinder double-acting Stirling engine for Unmanned Underwater Vehicles (UUVs) is discussed. And a one-dimensional model incorporated with empirical equations of mechanical loss and auxiliary power obtained from experiments is derived while referring to the Stirling engine computer model of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The P-40 Stirling engine with sufficient testing results from NASA is utilized to validate the accuracy of this one-dimensional model. It shows that the maximum error of output power of theoretical analysis results is less than 18% over testing results, and the maximum error of input power is no more than 9%. Finally, a Stirling engine for UUVs is designed with Schmidt analysis method and the modified one-dimensional model, and the results indicate this designed engine is capable of showing desired output power.

  9. Underwater striling engine design with modified one-dimensional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Daijin; Qin, Kan; Luo, Kai

    2015-09-01

    Stirling engines are regarded as an efficient and promising power system for underwater devices. Currently, many researches on one-dimensional model is used to evaluate thermodynamic performance of Stirling engine, but in which there are still some aspects which cannot be modeled with proper mathematical models such as mechanical loss or auxiliary power. In this paper, a four-cylinder double-acting Stirling engine for Unmanned Underwater Vehicles (UUVs) is discussed. And a one-dimensional model incorporated with empirical equations of mechanical loss and auxiliary power obtained from experiments is derived while referring to the Stirling engine computer model of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The P-40 Stirling engine with sufficient testing results from NASA is utilized to validate the accuracy of this one-dimensional model. It shows that the maximum error of output power of theoretical analysis results is less than 18% over testing results, and the maximum error of input power is no more than 9%. Finally, a Stirling engine for UUVs is designed with Schmidt analysis method and the modified one-dimensional model, and the results indicate this designed engine is capable of showing desired output power.

  10. Application of N-Doped Three-Dimensional Reduced Graphene Oxide Aerogel to Thin Film Loudspeaker.

    PubMed

    Kim, Choong Sun; Lee, Kyung Eun; Lee, Jung-Min; Kim, Sang Ouk; Cho, Byung Jin; Choi, Jung-Woo

    2016-08-31

    We built a thermoacoustic loudspeaker employing N-doped three-dimensional reduced graphene oxide aerogel (N-rGOA) based on a simple template-free fabrication method. A two-step fabrication process, which includes freeze-drying and reduction/doping, was used to realize a three-dimensional, freestanding, and porous graphene-based loudspeaker, whose macroscopic structure can be easily modulated. The simplified fabrication process also allows the control of structural properties of the N-rGOAs, including density and area. Taking advantage of the facile fabrication process, we fabricated and analyzed thermoacoustic loudspeakers with different structural properties. The anlayses showed that a N-rGOA with lower density and larger area can produce a higher sound pressure level (SPL). Furthermore, the resistance of the proposed loudspeaker can be easily controlled through heteroatom doping, thereby helping to generate higher SPL per unit driving voltage. Our success in constructing an array of optimized N-rGOAs able to withstand input power as high as 40 W demonstrates that a practical thermoacoustic loudspeaker can be fabricated using the proposed mass-producible solution-based process.

  11. Reducing artifacts in one-dimensional Fourier velocity encoding for fast and pulsatile flow.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daeho; Santos, Juan M; Hu, Bob S; Pauly, John M; Kerr, Adam B

    2012-12-01

    When evaluating the severity of valvular stenosis, the peak velocity of the blood flow is routinely used to estimate the transvalvular pressure gradient. One-dimensional Fourier velocity encoding effectively detects the peak velocity with an ungated time series of spatially resolved velocity spectra in real time. However, measurement accuracy can be degraded by the pulsatile and turbulent nature of stenotic flow and the existence of spatially varying off-resonance. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of improving the peak velocity detection capability of one-dimensional Fourier velocity encoding for stenotic flow using a novel echo-shifted interleaved readout combined with a variable-density circular k-space trajectory. The shorter echo and readout times of the echo-shifted interleaved acquisitions are designed to reduce sensitivity to off-resonance. Preliminary results from limited phantom and in vivo results also indicate that some artifacts from pulsatile flow appear to be suppressed when using this trajectory compared to conventional single-shot readouts, suggesting that peak velocity detection may be improved. The efficiency of the new trajectory improves the temporal and spatial resolutions. To realize the proposed readout, a novel multipoint-traversing algorithm is introduced for flexible and automated gradient-waveform design.

  12. An Effective Parameter Screening Strategy for High Dimensional Watershed Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, Y. P.; Martinez, C. J.; Munoz-Carpena, R.

    2014-12-01

    Watershed simulation models can assess the impacts of natural and anthropogenic disturbances on natural systems. These models have become important tools for tackling a range of water resources problems through their implementation in the formulation and evaluation of Best Management Practices, Total Maximum Daily Loads, and Basin Management Action Plans. For accurate applications of watershed models they need to be thoroughly evaluated through global uncertainty and sensitivity analyses (UA/SA). However, due to the high dimensionality of these models such evaluation becomes extremely time- and resource-consuming. Parameter screening, the qualitative separation of important parameters, has been suggested as an essential step before applying rigorous evaluation techniques such as the Sobol' and Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test (FAST) methods in the UA/SA framework. The method of elementary effects (EE) (Morris, 1991) is one of the most widely used screening methodologies. Some of the common parameter sampling strategies for EE, e.g. Optimized Trajectories [OT] (Campolongo et al., 2007) and Modified Optimized Trajectories [MOT] (Ruano et al., 2012), suffer from inconsistencies in the generated parameter distributions, infeasible sample generation time, etc. In this work, we have formulated a new parameter sampling strategy - Sampling for Uniformity (SU) - for parameter screening which is based on the principles of the uniformity of the generated parameter distributions and the spread of the parameter sample. A rigorous multi-criteria evaluation (time, distribution, spread and screening efficiency) of OT, MOT, and SU indicated that SU is superior to other sampling strategies. Comparison of the EE-based parameter importance rankings with those of Sobol' helped to quantify the qualitativeness of the EE parameter screening approach, reinforcing the fact that one should use EE only to reduce the resource burden required by FAST/Sobol' analyses but not to replace it.

  13. Modeling of Low-Dimensional Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünlü, Hilmi; Gürel, H. Hakan; Akıncı, Özden; Karim, Mohamed Rezaul

    In this chapter, we discuss the general methodology to carry out qualitatively reliable and quantitatively precise calculations of electronic band structure of heterostructures that are essential in the realistic modeling and prediction of device performance in technologically important semiconductor devices, which can proceed relatively independently of experiment.

  14. A numerical method for reducing the random noise in a two-dimensional waveform

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, A.J.

    1991-01-23

    This invention is comprised of a method for reducing random noise in a two-dimensional waveform having an irregular curvature includes the steps of selecting a plurality of points initially positioned at preselected locations on the waveform. For each point selected, the straight line is found which connects it to the midpoint between its neighboring points. A new location for the point is calculated to lie on the straight line a fraction of the distance between the initial location of the point and the midpoint. This process is repeated for each point positioned on the waveform. After a single iteration of the method is completed, the entire process is repeated a predetermined number of times to identify final calculated locations for the plurality of points selected. The final calculated locations of the points are then connected to form a relatively random noise-free waveform having a substantially smooth curvature.

  15. Reduced dimensionality 3D HNCAN for unambiguous HN, CA and N assignment in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rout, Manoj Kumar; Mishra, Pushpa; Atreya, Hanudatta S.; Hosur, Ramakrishna V.

    2012-03-01

    We present here an improvisation of HNN (Panchal, Bhavesh et al., 2001) called RD 3D HNCAN for backbone (HN, CA and 15N) assignment in both folded and unfolded proteins. This is a reduced dimensionality experiment which employs CA chemical shifts to improve dispersion. Distinct positive and negative peak patterns of various triplet segments along the polypeptide chain observed in HNN are retained and these provide start and check points for the sequential walk. Because of co-incrementing of CA and 15N, peaks along one of the dimensions appear at sums and differences of the CA and 15N chemical shifts. This changes the backbone assignment protocol slightly and we present this in explicit detail. The performance of the experiment has been demonstrated using Ubiquitin and Plasmodium falciparum P2 proteins. The experiment is particularly valuable when two neighboring amino acid residues have nearly identical backbone 15N chemical shifts.

  16. Reduced and exact quantum dynamics of the vibrational relaxation of a molecular system interacting with a finite-dimensional bath.

    PubMed

    Bouakline, Foudhil; Lüder, Franziska; Martinazzo, Rocco; Saalfrank, Peter

    2012-11-26

    We investigate the vibrational relaxation of a Morse oscillator, nonlinearly coupled to a finite-dimensional bath of harmonic oscillators at zero temperature, using two different approaches: Reduced dynamics with the help of the Lindblad formalism of reduced density matrix theory in combination with Fermi's Golden Rule, and exact dynamics (within the chosen model) with the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) method. Two different models have been constructed, the situation where the bath spectrum is exactly resonant with the anharmonic oscillator transition frequencies, and the case for which the subsystem is slightly off-resonant with the environment. At short times, reduced dynamics calculations describe the relaxation process qualitatively well but fail to reproduce recurrences observed with MCTDH for longer times. Lifetimes of all the vibrational levels of the Morse oscillator have been calculated, and both Lindblad and MCTDH results show the same dependence of the lifetimes on the initial vibrational state quantum number. A prediction, which should be generic for adsorbate systems is a striking, sharp increase of lifetimes of the subsystem vibrational levels close to the dissociation limit. This is contradictory with harmonic/linear extrapolation laws, which predict a monotonic decrease of the lifetime with initial vibrational quantum number.

  17. Recent Progress in GW-based Methods for Excited-State Calculations of Reduced Dimensional Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Jornada, Felipe H.

    2015-03-01

    Ab initio calculations of excited-state phenomena within the GW and GW-Bethe-Salpeter equation (GW-BSE) approaches allow one to accurately study the electronic and optical properties of various materials, including systems with reduced dimensionality. However, several challenges arise when dealing with complicated nanostructures where the electronic screening is strongly spatially and directionally dependent. In this talk, we discuss some recent developments to address these issues. First, we turn to the slow convergence of quasiparticle energies and exciton binding energies with respect to k-point sampling. This is very effectively dealt with using a new hybrid sampling scheme, which results in savings of several orders of magnitude in computation time. A new ab initio method is also developed to incorporate substrate screening into GW and GW-BSE calculations. These two methods have been applied to mono- and few-layer MoSe2, and yielded strong environmental dependent behaviors in good agreement with experiment. Other issues that arise in confined systems and materials with reduced dimensionality, such as the effect of the Tamm-Dancoff approximation to GW-BSE, and the calculation of non-radiative exciton lifetime, are also addressed. These developments have been efficiently implemented and successfully applied to real systems in an ab initio framework using the BerkeleyGW package. I would like to acknowledge collaborations with Diana Y. Qiu, Steven G. Louie, Meiyue Shao, Chao Yang, and the experimental groups of M. Crommie and F. Wang. This work was supported by Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231 and by National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR10-1006184.

  18. Effects of confinement and external fields on structure and transport in colloidal dispersions in reduced dimensionality.

    PubMed

    Wilms, D; Deutschländer, S; Siems, U; Franzrahe, K; Henseler, P; Keim, P; Schwierz, N; Virnau, P; Binder, K; Maret, G; Nielaba, P

    2012-11-21

    In this work, we focus on low-dimensional colloidal model systems, via simulation studies and also some complementary experiments, in order to elucidate the interplay between phase behavior, geometric structures and transport properties. In particular, we try to investigate the (nonlinear!) response of these very soft colloidal systems to various perturbations: uniform and uniaxial pressure, laser fields, shear due to moving boundaries and randomly quenched disorder. We study ordering phenomena on surfaces or in monolayers by Monte Carlo computer simulations of binary hard-disk mixtures, the influence of a substrate being modeled by an external potential. Weak external fields allow a controlled tuning of the miscibility of the mixture. We discuss the laser induced de-mixing for the three different possible couplings to the external potential. The structural behavior of hard spheres interacting with repulsive screened Coulomb or dipolar interaction in 2D and 3D narrow constrictions is investigated using Brownian dynamics simulations. Due to misfits between multiples of the lattice parameter and the channel widths, a variety of ordered and disordered lattice structures have been observed. The resulting local lattice structures and defect probabilities are studied for various cross sections. The influence of a self-organized order within the system is reflected in the velocity of the particles and their diffusive behavior. Additionally, in an experimental system of dipolar colloidal particles confined by gravity on a solid substrate we investigate the effect of pinning on the dynamics of a two-dimensional colloidal liquid. This work contains sections reviewing previous work by the authors as well as new, unpublished results. Among the latter are detailed studies of the phase boundaries of the de-mixing regime in binary systems in external light fields, configurations for shear induced effects at structured walls, studies on the effect of confinement on the structures

  19. Elastic models of defects in two-dimensional crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikova, A. L.; Orlova, T. S.; Hussainova, I.; Romanov, A. E.

    2014-12-01

    Elastic models of defects in two-dimensional (2D) crystals are presented in terms of continuum mechanics. The models are based on the classification of defects, which is founded on the dimensionality of the specification region of their self-distortions, i.e., lattice distortions associated with the formation of defects. The elastic field of an infinitesimal dislocation loop in a film is calculated for the first time. The fields of the center of dilatation, dislocation, disclination, and circular inclusion in planar 2D elastic media, namely, nanofilms and graphenes, are considered. Elastic fields of defects in 2D and 3D crystals are compared.

  20. Bacteriophage Infection of Model Metal Reducing Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, K. A.; Bender, K. S.; Gandhi, K.; Coates, J. D.

    2008-12-01

    filtered through a 0.22 μ m sterile nylon filter, stained with phosphotungstic acid (PTA), and examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM revealed the presence of viral like particles in the culture exposed to mytomycin C. Together these results suggest an active infection with a lysogenic bacteriophage in the model metal reducing bacteria, Geobacter spp., which could affect metabolic physiology and subsequently metal reduction in environmental systems.

  1. Three-dimensional cell culture models for investigating human viruses.

    PubMed

    He, Bing; Chen, Guomin; Zeng, Yi

    2016-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture models are physiologically relevant, as they provide reproducible results, experimental flexibility and can be adapted for high-throughput experiments. Moreover, these models bridge the gap between traditional two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures and animal models. 3D culture systems have significantly advanced basic cell science and tissue engineering, especially in the fields of cell biology and physiology, stem cell research, regenerative medicine, cancer research, drug discovery, and gene and protein expression studies. In addition, 3D models can provide unique insight into bacteriology, virology, parasitology and host-pathogen interactions. This review summarizes and analyzes recent progress in human virological research with 3D cell culture models. We discuss viral growth, replication, proliferation, infection, virus-host interactions and antiviral drugs in 3D culture models.

  2. Dimensional reduction of Markov state models from renormalization group theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orioli, S.; Faccioli, P.

    2016-09-01

    Renormalization Group (RG) theory provides the theoretical framework to define rigorous effective theories, i.e., systematic low-resolution approximations of arbitrary microscopic models. Markov state models are shown to be rigorous effective theories for Molecular Dynamics (MD). Based on this fact, we use real space RG to vary the resolution of the stochastic model and define an algorithm for clustering microstates into macrostates. The result is a lower dimensional stochastic model which, by construction, provides the optimal coarse-grained Markovian representation of the system's relaxation kinetics. To illustrate and validate our theory, we analyze a number of test systems of increasing complexity, ranging from synthetic toy models to two realistic applications, built form all-atom MD simulations. The computational cost of computing the low-dimensional model remains affordable on a desktop computer even for thousands of microstates.

  3. Dimensional reduction of Markov state models from renormalization group theory.

    PubMed

    Orioli, S; Faccioli, P

    2016-09-28

    Renormalization Group (RG) theory provides the theoretical framework to define rigorous effective theories, i.e., systematic low-resolution approximations of arbitrary microscopic models. Markov state models are shown to be rigorous effective theories for Molecular Dynamics (MD). Based on this fact, we use real space RG to vary the resolution of the stochastic model and define an algorithm for clustering microstates into macrostates. The result is a lower dimensional stochastic model which, by construction, provides the optimal coarse-grained Markovian representation of the system's relaxation kinetics. To illustrate and validate our theory, we analyze a number of test systems of increasing complexity, ranging from synthetic toy models to two realistic applications, built form all-atom MD simulations. The computational cost of computing the low-dimensional model remains affordable on a desktop computer even for thousands of microstates.

  4. Fermions in five-dimensional brane world models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolyakov, Mikhail N.

    2016-06-01

    In the present paper the fermion fields, living in the background of five-dimensional warped brane world models with compact extra dimension, are thoroughly examined. The Kaluza-Klein decomposition and isolation of the physical degrees of freedom is performed for those five-dimensional fermion field Lagrangians, which admit such a decomposition to be performed in a mathematically consistent way and provide a physically reasonable four-dimensional effective theory. It is also shown that for the majority of five-dimensional fermion field Lagrangians there are no (at least rather obvious) ways to perform the Kaluza-Klein decomposition consistently. Moreover, in these cases one may expect the appearance of various pathologies in the four-dimensional effective theory. Among the cases, for which the Kaluza-Klein decomposition can be performed in a mathematically consistent way, the case, which reproduces the Standard Model by the zero Kaluza-Klein modes most closely regardless of the size of the extra dimension, is examined in detail in the background of the Randall-Sundrum model.

  5. On numerical modeling of one-dimensional geothermal histories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haugerud, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Numerical models of one-dimensional geothermal histories are one way of understanding the relations between tectonics and transient thermal structure in the crust. Such models can be powerful tools for interpreting geochronologic and thermobarometric data. A flexible program to calculate these models on a microcomputer is available and examples of its use are presented. Potential problems with this approach include the simplifying assumptions that are made, limitations of the numerical techniques, and the neglect of convective heat transfer. ?? 1989.

  6. Three-dimensional models. [For orbital celestial mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, C. )

    1990-06-01

    The Schwarzschild (1979) approach to the analysis of three-dimensional galactic models is reviewed. An analysis of triaxial Staeckel models is discussed which shows that such models have a wide variety of possible distribution functions. The uniqueness that Schwarzschild first encountered in his discrete formulation of the problem of finding a three-integral distribution function for a triaxial density is real and not an artifact of the finite cell approximation. 27 refs.

  7. Are the bipolar disorders best modelled categorically or dimensionally?

    PubMed

    Parker, G B; Graham, R K; Hadzi-Pavlovic, D

    2016-08-01

    Considerable debate exists as to whether the bipolar disorders are best classified according to a categorical or dimensional model. This study explored whether there is evidence for a single or multiple subpopulations and the degree to which differing diagnostic criteria correspond to bipolar subpopulations. A mixture analysis was performed on 1081 clinically diagnosed (and a reduced sample of 497 DSM-IV diagnosed) bipolar I and II disorder patients, using scores on hypomanic severity (as measured by the Mood Swings Questionnaire). Mixture analyses were conducted using two differing diagnostic criteria and two DSM markers to ascertain the most differentiating and their associated clinical features. The two subpopulation solution was most supported although the entropy statistic indicated limited separation and there was no distinctive point of rarity. Quantification by the odds ratio statistic indicated that the clinical diagnosis (respecting DSM-IV criteria, but ignoring 'high' duration) was somewhat superior to DSM-IV diagnosis in allocating patients to the putative mixture analysis groups. The most differentiating correlate was the presence or absence of psychotic features. Findings favour the categorical distinction of bipolar I and II disorders and argue for the centrality of the presence or absence of psychotic features to subgroup differentiation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Emergent friction in two-dimensional Frenkel-Kontorova models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norell, Jesper; Fasolino, Annalisa; de Wijn, Astrid S.

    2016-08-01

    Simple models for friction are typically one-dimensional, but real interfaces are two-dimensional. We investigate the effects of the second dimension on static and dynamic friction by using the Frenkel-Kontorova (FK) model. We study the two most straightforward extensions of the FK model to two dimensions and simulate both the static and dynamic properties. We show that the behavior of the static friction is robust and remains similar in two dimensions for physically reasonable parameter values. The dynamic friction, however, is strongly influenced by the second dimension and the accompanying additional dynamics and parameters introduced into the models. We discuss our results in terms of the thermal equilibration and phonon dispersion relations of the lattices, establishing a physically realistic and suitable two-dimensional extension of the FK model. We find that the presence of additional dissipation channels can increase the friction and produces significantly different temperature dependence when compared to the one-dimensional case. We also briefly study the anisotropy of the dynamic friction and show highly nontrivial effects, including that the friction anisotropy can lead to motion in different directions depending on the value of the initial velocity.

  9. One-dimensional and three-dimensional models of cerebrovascular flow.

    PubMed

    Moore, S M; Moorhead, K T; Chase, J G; David, T; Fink, J

    2005-06-01

    The Circle of Willis is a ring-like structure of blood vessels found beneath the hypothalamus at the base of the brain. Its main function is to distribute oxygen-rich arterial blood to the cerebral mass. One-dimensional (1D) and three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of the Circle of Willis have been created to provide a simulation tool which can potentially be used to identify at-risk cerebral arterial geometries and conditions and replicate clinical scenarios, such as occlusions in afferent arteries and absent circulus vessels. Both models capture cerebral haemodynamic autoregulation using a proportional-integral (PI) controller to modify efferent artery resistances to maintain optimal efferent flow rates for a given circle geometry and afferent blood pressure. The models can be used to identify at-risk cerebral arterial geometries and conditions prior to surgery or other clinical procedures. The 1D model is particularly relevant in this instance, with its fast solution time suitable for real-time clinical decisions. Results show the excellent correlation between models for the transient efferent flux profile. The assumption of strictly Poiseuille flow in the 1D model allows more flow through the geometrically extreme communicating arteries than the 3D model. This discrepancy was overcome by increasing the resistance to flow in the anterior communicating artery in the 1D model to better match the resistance seen in the 3D results.

  10. FEEDBACK FROM CENTRAL BLACK HOLES IN ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES: TWO-DIMENSIONAL MODELS COMPARED TO ONE-DIMENSIONAL MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Novak, Gregory S.; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Ciotti, Luca

    2011-08-10

    We extend the black hole (BH) feedback models of Ciotti, Ostriker, and Proga to two dimensions. In this paper, we focus on identifying the differences between the one-dimensional and two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations. We examine a normal, isolated L{sub *} galaxy subject to the cooling flow instability of gas in the inner regions. Allowance is made for subsequent star formation, Type Ia and Type II supernovae, radiation pressure, and inflow to the central BH from mildly rotating galactic gas which is being replenished as a normal consequence of stellar evolution. The central BH accretes some of the infalling gas and expels a conical wind with mass, momentum, and energy flux derived from both observational and theoretical studies. The galaxy is assumed to have low specific angular momentum in analogy with the existing one-dimensional case in order to isolate the effect of dimensionality. The code then tracks the interaction of the outflowing radiation and winds with the galactic gas and their effects on regulating the accretion. After matching physical modeling to the extent possible between the one-dimensional and two-dimensional treatments, we find essentially similar results in terms of BH growth and duty cycle (fraction of the time above a given fraction of the Eddington luminosity). In the two-dimensional calculations, the cool shells forming at 0.1-1 kpc from the center are Rayleigh-Taylor unstable to fragmentation, leading to a somewhat higher accretion rate, less effective feedback, and a more irregular pattern of bursting compared with the one-dimensional case.

  11. Stochastic reduced order models for inverse problems under uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Warner, James E; Aquino, Wilkins; Grigoriu, Mircea D

    2015-03-01

    This work presents a novel methodology for solving inverse problems under uncertainty using stochastic reduced order models (SROMs). Given statistical information about an observed state variable in a system, unknown parameters are estimated probabilistically through the solution of a model-constrained, stochastic optimization problem. The point of departure and crux of the proposed framework is the representation of a random quantity using a SROM - a low dimensional, discrete approximation to a continuous random element that permits e cient and non-intrusive stochastic computations. Characterizing the uncertainties with SROMs transforms the stochastic optimization problem into a deterministic one. The non-intrusive nature of SROMs facilitates e cient gradient computations for random vector unknowns and relies entirely on calls to existing deterministic solvers. Furthermore, the method is naturally extended to handle multiple sources of uncertainty in cases where state variable data, system parameters, and boundary conditions are all considered random. The new and widely-applicable SROM framework is formulated for a general stochastic optimization problem in terms of an abstract objective function and constraining model. For demonstration purposes, however, we study its performance in the specific case of inverse identification of random material parameters in elastodynamics. We demonstrate the ability to efficiently recover random shear moduli given material displacement statistics as input data. We also show that the approach remains effective for the case where the loading in the problem is random as well.

  12. Stochastic reduced order models for inverse problems under uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Warner, James E.; Aquino, Wilkins; Grigoriu, Mircea D.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a novel methodology for solving inverse problems under uncertainty using stochastic reduced order models (SROMs). Given statistical information about an observed state variable in a system, unknown parameters are estimated probabilistically through the solution of a model-constrained, stochastic optimization problem. The point of departure and crux of the proposed framework is the representation of a random quantity using a SROM - a low dimensional, discrete approximation to a continuous random element that permits e cient and non-intrusive stochastic computations. Characterizing the uncertainties with SROMs transforms the stochastic optimization problem into a deterministic one. The non-intrusive nature of SROMs facilitates e cient gradient computations for random vector unknowns and relies entirely on calls to existing deterministic solvers. Furthermore, the method is naturally extended to handle multiple sources of uncertainty in cases where state variable data, system parameters, and boundary conditions are all considered random. The new and widely-applicable SROM framework is formulated for a general stochastic optimization problem in terms of an abstract objective function and constraining model. For demonstration purposes, however, we study its performance in the specific case of inverse identification of random material parameters in elastodynamics. We demonstrate the ability to efficiently recover random shear moduli given material displacement statistics as input data. We also show that the approach remains effective for the case where the loading in the problem is random as well. PMID:25558115

  13. Micropolar continuum modelling of bi-dimensional tetrachiral lattices

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y.; Liu, X. N.; Hu, G. K.; Sun, Q. P.; Zheng, Q. S.

    2014-01-01

    The in-plane behaviour of tetrachiral lattices should be characterized by bi-dimensional orthotropic material owing to the existence of two orthogonal axes of rotational symmetry. Moreover, the constitutive model must also represent the chirality inherent in the lattices. To this end, a bi-dimensional orthotropic chiral micropolar model is developed based on the theory of irreducible orthogonal tensor decomposition. The obtained constitutive tensors display a hierarchy structure depending on the symmetry of the underlying microstructure. Eight additional material constants, in addition to five for the hemitropic case, are introduced to characterize the anisotropy under Z2 invariance. The developed continuum model is then applied to a tetrachiral lattice, and the material constants of the continuum model are analytically derived by a homogenization process. By comparing with numerical simulations for the discrete lattice, it is found that the proposed continuum model can correctly characterize the static and wave properties of the tetrachiral lattice. PMID:24808754

  14. Blood flow in compliant arteries: an effective viscoelastic reduced model, numerics, and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Canić, Suncica; Hartley, Craig J; Rosenstrauch, Doreen; Tambaca, Josip; Guidoboni, Giovanna; Mikelić, Andro

    2006-04-01

    The focus of this work is on modeling blood flow in medium-to-large systemic arteries assuming cylindrical geometry, axially symmetric flow, and viscoelasticity of arterial walls. The aim was to develop a reduced model that would capture certain physical phenomena that have been neglected in the derivation of the standard axially symmetric one-dimensional models, while at the same time keeping the numerical simulations fast and simple, utilizing one-dimensional algorithms. The viscous Navier-Stokes equations were used to describe the flow and the linearly viscoelastic membrane equations to model the mechanical properties of arterial walls. Using asymptotic and homogenization theory, a novel closed, "one-and-a-half dimensional" model was obtained. In contrast with the standard one-dimensional model, the new model captures: (1) the viscous dissipation of the fluid, (2) the viscoelastic nature of the blood flow - vessel wall interaction, (3) the hysteresis loop in the viscoelastic arterial walls dynamics, and (4) two-dimensional flow effects to the leading-order accuracy. A numerical solver based on the 1D-Finite Element Method was developed and the numerical simulations were compared with the ultrasound imaging and Doppler flow loop measurements. Less than 3% of difference in the velocity and less than 1% of difference in the maximum diameter was detected, showing excellent agreement between the model and the experiment.

  15. Zero-Dimensional Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Halide Perovskite Modeling: Insights from First Principles.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, Giacomo; Yamashita, Koichi

    2016-03-03

    We discuss the properties of zero dimensional (cluster) hybrid organic-inorganic halide perovskite in view of their possible applicability in photovoltaics, light-emitting, and lasing devices. To support the need of theoretical investigations of such systems and pave the way for future investigations of clusters with different orientations, terminations, and compositions, we have assembled and characterized some zero dimensional models of methylammonium lead iodide, MAPbI3, by "cutting" its bulk. Interesting properties of such clusters that have been here theoretically investigated include their charge distribution, bandgap, wave function localization, and reduced effective mass. The surface orientation/termination and the organic/inorganic cation ratios have been discussed together with the roles they play in determining the electronic properties of such clusters. Also in agreement with experiments, it emerges that surface termination is crucial in determining the structural and optoelectronic properties of this largely overlooked, dimensionally reduced class of materials. Analogies and differences between clusters and bulk are discussed.

  16. Dimensional reduction of the master equation for stochastic chemical networks: The reduced-multiplane method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzel, Baruch; Biham, Ofer; Kupferman, Raz; Lipshtat, Azi; Zait, Amir

    2010-08-01

    Chemical reaction networks which exhibit strong fluctuations are common in microscopic systems in which reactants appear in low copy numbers. The analysis of these networks requires stochastic methods, which come in two forms: direct integration of the master equation and Monte Carlo simulations. The master equation becomes infeasible for large networks because the number of equations increases exponentially with the number of reactive species. Monte Carlo methods, which are more efficient in integrating over the exponentially large phase space, also become impractical due to the large amounts of noisy data that need to be stored and analyzed. The recently introduced multiplane method [A. Lipshtat and O. Biham, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 170601 (2004)10.1103/PhysRevLett.93.170601] is an efficient framework for the stochastic analysis of large reaction networks. It is a dimensional reduction method, based on the master equation, which provides a dramatic reduction in the number of equations without compromising the accuracy of the results. The reduction is achieved by breaking the network into a set of maximal fully connected subnetworks (maximal cliques). A separate master equation is written for the reduced probability distribution associated with each clique, with suitable coupling terms between them. This method is highly efficient in the case of sparse networks, in which the maximal cliques tend to be small. However, in dense networks some of the cliques may be rather large and the dimensional reduction is not as effective. Furthermore, the derivation of the multiplane equations from the master equation is tedious and difficult. Here we present the reduced-multiplane method in which the maximal cliques are broken down to the fundamental two-vertex cliques. The number of equations is further reduced, making the method highly efficient even for dense networks. Moreover, the equations take a simpler form, which can be easily constructed using a diagrammatic procedure

  17. Reducing variation in decomposition odour profiling using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Perrault, Katelynn A; Stefanuto, Pierre-Hugues; Stuart, Barbara H; Rai, Tapan; Focant, Jean-François; Forbes, Shari L

    2015-01-01

    Challenges in decomposition odour profiling have led to variation in the documented odour profile by different research groups worldwide. Background subtraction and use of controls are important considerations given the variation introduced by decomposition studies conducted in different geographical environments. The collection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from soil beneath decomposing remains is challenging due to the high levels of inherent soil VOCs, further confounded by the use of highly sensitive instrumentation. This study presents a method that provides suitable chromatographic resolution for profiling decomposition odour in soil by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry using appropriate controls and field blanks. Logarithmic transformation and t-testing of compounds permitted the generation of a compound list of decomposition VOCs in soil. Principal component analysis demonstrated the improved discrimination between experimental and control soil, verifying the value of the data handling method. Data handling procedures have not been well documented in this field and standardisation would thereby reduce misidentification of VOCs present in the surrounding environment as decomposition byproducts. Uniformity of data handling and instrumental procedures will reduce analytical variation, increasing confidence in the future when investigating the effect of taphonomic variables on the decomposition VOC profile.

  18. Existence of global weak solution for a reduced gravity two and a half layer model

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Zhenhua Li, Zilai Yao, Lei

    2013-12-15

    We investigate the existence of global weak solution to a reduced gravity two and a half layer model in one-dimensional bounded spatial domain or periodic domain. Also, we show that any possible vacuum state has to vanish within finite time, then the weak solution becomes a unique strong one.

  19. Three dimensional modelling of ICRF launchers for fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, M. D.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Ryan, P. M.; Hanson, G. R.; Stallings, D. C.; Batchelor, D. B.; Bigelow, T. S.; England, A. C.; Hoffman, D. J.; Murakami, M.; Wang, C. Y.; Wilgen, J. B.; Rogers, J. H.; Wilson, J. R.; Majeski, R.; Schilling, G.

    1996-02-01

    The three dimensional (3-D) nature of antennas for fusion applications in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) requires accurate modelling to design and analyse new antennas. In this article, analysis and design tools for radiofrequency (RF) antennas are successfully benchmarked with experiment, and the 3-D physics of the launched waves is explored. The systematic analysis combines measured density profiles from a reflectometer system, transmission line circuit modelling, detailed 3-D magnetostatics modelling and a new 3-D electromagnetic antenna model including plasma. This analysis gives very good agreement with measured loading data from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Bay-M antenna, thus demonstrating the validity of the analysis for the design of new RF antennas. The 3-D modelling is contrasted with 2-D models, and significant deficiencies are found in the latter. The 2-D models are in error by as much as a factor of 2 in real and reactive loading, even after they are corrected for the most obvious 3-D effects. Three dimensional effects play the most significant role at low parallel wavenumbers, where the launched power spectrum can be quite different from the predictions of 2-D models. Three dimensional effects should not be ignored for many RF designs, especially those intended for fast wave current drive

  20. Reducing radiation losses of one-dimensional photonic-crystal mirrors in a silica waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Wei; Liu, Rong-juan; Li, Zhi-yuan

    2012-11-01

    One-dimensional PhC mirrors are constructed in a single-mode silica slab waveguide with a row of elliptical holes. The photonic band gap (PBG) of the PhC structure is attained by fast eigen-mode calculations. Being aware that component radiated waves of the PhC mirror are generated at interfaces between different waveguide sections, when propagating guided waves impinge on these interfaces, we point out that the total radiation loss of the PhC mirror is consequence of interferometric interplays of component radiated waves. We visualize this radiation generation process with intuitive pictures. We also estimate total radiation losses of PhC mirrors by using an analytical model. For uniform PhC mirrors, our model explains the oscillations of the total radiation loss with the increase of the period number. The calculated results agree well with the numerical simulations in terms of the oscillation period, the damping speed, the initial phase, and the relative intensity. For non-uniform PhC mirrors, our model finds that the progressively tapered transition from the feeding waveguide to the PhC mirror does not yield the lowest radiation loss. This finding is against to the well known "impedance-matching" picture. The matching of our model with the simulated results certifies the interferometric nature of the radiation generation process in a PhC mirror especially when a low-index waveguide is considered.

  1. Conceptual Change and Chemistry Achievement: A Two-Dimensional Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suits, Jerry P.

    The results of this study are consistent with a two-stage model of learning chemistry, a multi-dimensional subject, in which students accumulate knowledge in stage one, and then restructure their knowledge in stage two. When cognitive, metacognitive and achievement variables were subjected to a predictive discriminant analysis (PDA) procedure,…

  2. A two-dimensional analytical model of petroleum vapor intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yijun; Verginelli, Iason; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2016-02-01

    In this study we present an analytical solution of a two-dimensional petroleum vapor intrusion model, which incorporates a steady-state diffusion-dominated vapor transport in a homogeneous soil and piecewise first-order aerobic biodegradation limited by oxygen availability. This new model can help practitioners to easily generate two-dimensional soil gas concentration profiles for both hydrocarbons and oxygen and estimate hydrocarbon indoor air concentrations as a function of site-specific conditions such as source strength and depth, reaction rate constant, soil characteristics and building features. The soil gas concentration profiles generated by this new model are shown in good agreement with three-dimensional numerical simulations and two-dimensional measured soil gas data from a field study. This implies that for cases involving diffusion dominated soil gas transport, steady state conditions and homogenous source and soil, this analytical model can be used as a fast and easy-to-use risk screening tool by replicating the results of 3-D numerical simulations but with much less computational effort.

  3. Three dimensional geometric modeling of processing-tomatoes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Characterizing tomato geometries with different shapes and sizes would facilitate the design of tomato processing equipments and promote computer-based engineering simulations. This research sought to develop a three-dimensional geometric model that can describe the morphological attributes of proce...

  4. A two-dimensional analytical model of petroleum vapor intrusion

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yijun; Verginelli, Iason; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2017-01-01

    In this study we present an analytical solution of a two-dimensional petroleum vapor intrusion model, which incorporates a steady-state diffusion-dominated vapor transport in a homogeneous soil and piecewise first-order aerobic biodegradation limited by oxygen availability. This new model can help practitioners to easily generate two-dimensional soil gas concentration profiles for both hydrocarbons and oxygen and estimate hydrocarbon indoor air concentrations as a function of site-specific conditions such as source strength and depth, reaction rate constant, soil characteristics and building features. The soil gas concentration profiles generated by this new model are shown in good agreement with three-dimensional numerical simulations and two-dimensional measured soil gas data from a field study. This implies that for cases involving diffusion dominated soil gas transport, steady state conditions and homogenous source and soil, this analytical model can be used as a fast and easy-to-use risk screening tool by replicating the results of 3-D numerical simulations but with much less computational effort. PMID:28255184

  5. Judgment Research and the Dimensional Model of Personality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garb, Howard N.

    2008-01-01

    Comments on the original article "Plate tectonics in the classification of personality disorder: Shifting to a dimensional model," by T. A. Widiger and T. J. Trull. The purpose of this comment is to address (a) whether psychologists know how personality traits are currently assessed by clinicians and (b) the reliability and validity of those…

  6. THREE-DIMENSIONAL NAPL FATE AND TRANSPORT MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have added several new and significant capabilities to UTCHEM to make it into a general-purpose NAPL simulator. The simulator is now capable of modeling transient and steady-state three-dimensional flow and mass transport in the groundwater (saturated) and vadose (unsaturated...

  7. THREE-DIMENSIONAL NAPL FATE AND TRANSPORT MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have added several new and significant capabilities to UTCHEM to make it into a general-purpose NAPL simulator. The simulator is now capable of modeling transient and steady-state three-dimensional flow and mass transport in the groundwater (saturated) and vadose (unsaturated...

  8. Interactive Multimedia and Concrete Three-Dimensional Modelling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, J. H.; Preece, Peter F. W.

    1999-01-01

    Compares a multimedia package for teaching about the phases of the moon to grade 8 (12-year-old) students with a conventional three-dimensional modeling approach. Results show both methods were equally effective in terms of student learning, for male and female students, and prior computer experience was not a factor in multimedia use. (Author/LRW)

  9. Judgment Research and the Dimensional Model of Personality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garb, Howard N.

    2008-01-01

    Comments on the original article "Plate tectonics in the classification of personality disorder: Shifting to a dimensional model," by T. A. Widiger and T. J. Trull. The purpose of this comment is to address (a) whether psychologists know how personality traits are currently assessed by clinicians and (b) the reliability and validity of those…

  10. A Framework for Dimensionality Assessment for Multidimensional Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svetina, Dubravka; Levy, Roy

    2014-01-01

    A framework is introduced for considering dimensionality assessment procedures for multidimensional item response models. The framework characterizes procedures in terms of their confirmatory or exploratory approach, parametric or nonparametric assumptions, and applicability to dichotomous, polytomous, and missing data. Popular and emerging…

  11. A Framework for Dimensionality Assessment for Multidimensional Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svetina, Dubravka; Levy, Roy

    2014-01-01

    A framework is introduced for considering dimensionality assessment procedures for multidimensional item response models. The framework characterizes procedures in terms of their confirmatory or exploratory approach, parametric or nonparametric assumptions, and applicability to dichotomous, polytomous, and missing data. Popular and emerging…

  12. Three dimensional global modeling of atmospheric CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, I.; Hansen, J.; Rind, D.

    1983-01-01

    A model was developed to study the prospects of extracting information on carbon dioxide sources and sinks from observed CO2 variations. The approach uses a three dimensional global transport model, based on winds from a 3-D general circulation model (GCM), to advect CO2 noninteractively, i.e., as a tracer, with specified sources and sinks of CO2 at the surface. The 3-D model employed is identified and biosphere, ocean and fossil fuel sources and sinks are discussed. Some preliminary model results are presented.

  13. Recurrence relations in one-dimensional Ising models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Conceição, C. M. Silva; Maia, R. N. P.

    2017-09-01

    The exact finite-size partition function for the nonhomogeneous one-dimensional (1D) Ising model is found through an approach using algebra operators. Specifically, in this paper we show that the partition function can be computed through a trace from a linear second-order recurrence relation with nonconstant coefficients in matrix form. A relation between the finite-size partition function and the generalized Lucas polynomials is found for the simple homogeneous model, thus establishing a recursive formula for the partition function. This is an important property and it might indicate the possible existence of recurrence relations in higher-dimensional Ising models. Moreover, assuming quenched disorder for the interactions within the model, the quenched averaged magnetic susceptibility displays a nontrivial behavior due to changes in the ferromagnetic concentration probability.

  14. Star-triangle relation for a three-dimensional model

    SciTech Connect

    Bazhanov, V.V. Institute for High Eenrgy Physics, Protvino, Moscow Region ); Baxter, R.J. Australian National Univ., Canberra )

    1993-06-01

    The solvable sl(n)-chiral Potts model can be interpreted as a three-dimensional lattice model with local interactions. To within a minor modification of the boundary conditions it is an Ising-type model on the body-centered cubic lattice with two- and three-spin interactions. The corresponding local Boltzmann weights obey a number of simple relations, including a restricted star-triangle relation, which is a modified version of the well-known star-triangle relation appearing in two-dimensional models. It is shown that these relations lead to remarkable symmetry properties of the Boltzmann weight function of an elementary cube of the lattice, related to the spatial symmetry group of the cubic lattice. These symmetry properties allow one to prove the commutativity of the row-to-row transfer matrices, bypassing the tetrahedron relation. The partition function per site for the infinite lattice is calculated exactly. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Coupled-channel scattering in 1 + 1 dimensional lattice model

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Peng

    2013-07-01

    Based on the Lippmann-Schwinger equation approach, a generalized Lüscher’s formula in 1+1 dimensions for two particles scattering in both the elastic and coupled-channel cases in moving frames is derived. A two-dimensional coupled-channel scattering lattice model is presented, which represents a two-coupled-channel resonant scattering scalars system. The Monte Carlo simulation is performed on finite lattices and in various moving frames. The two-dimensional generalized Lüscher’s formula is used to extract the scattering amplitudes for the coupled-channel system from the discrete finite-volume spectrum.

  16. Integrable cosmological models from higher dimensional Einstein equations

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, Masakazu; Suzuki, Hisao

    2007-09-15

    We consider the cosmological models for the higher dimensional space-time which includes the curvatures of our space as well as the curvatures of the internal space. We find that the condition for the integrability of the cosmological equations is that the total space-time dimensions are D=10 or D=11 which is exactly the conditions for superstrings or M theory. We obtain analytic solutions with generic initial conditions in the four-dimensional Einstein frame and study the accelerating universe when both our space and the internal space have negative curvatures.

  17. Covariant 4-dimensional fuzzy spheres, matrix models and higher spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperling, Marcus; Steinacker, Harold C.

    2017-09-01

    We study in detail generalized 4-dimensional fuzzy spheres with twisted extra dimensions. These spheres can be viewed as SO(5) -equivariant projections of quantized coadjoint orbits of SO(6) . We show that they arise as solutions in Yang-Mills matrix models, which naturally leads to higher-spin gauge theories on S 4. Several types of embeddings in matrix models are found, including one with self-intersecting fuzzy extra dimensions \

  18. Three-dimensional control-volume distributed multi-point flux approximation coupled with a lower-dimensional surface fracture model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Raheel; Edwards, Michael G.; Lamine, Sadok; Huisman, Bastiaan A. H.; Pal, Mayur

    2015-12-01

    A novel cell-centred control-volume distributed multi-point flux approximation (CVD-MPFA) finite-volume formulation is presented for discrete fracture-matrix simulations on unstructured grids in three-dimensions (3D). The grid is aligned with fractures and barriers which are then modelled as lower-dimensional surface interfaces located between the matrix cells in the physical domain. The three-dimensional pressure equation is solved in the matrix domain coupled with a two-dimensional (2D) surface pressure equation solved over fracture networks via a novel surface CVD-MPFA formulation. The CVD-MPFA formulation naturally handles fractures with anisotropic permeabilities on unstructured grids. Matrix-fracture fluxes are expressed in terms of matrix and fracture pressures and define the transfer function, which is added to the lower-dimensional flow equation and couples the three-dimensional and surface systems. An additional transmission condition is used between matrix cells adjacent to low permeable fractures to couple the velocity and pressure jump across the fractures. Convergence and accuracy of the lower-dimensional fracture model is assessed for highly anisotropic fractures having a range of apertures and permeability tensors. A transport equation for tracer flow is coupled via the Darcy flux for single and intersecting fractures. The lower-dimensional approximation for intersecting fractures avoids the more restrictive CFL condition corresponding to the equi-dimensional approximation with explicit time discretisation. Lower-dimensional fracture model results are compared with equi-dimensional model results. Fractures and barriers are efficiently modelled by lower-dimensional interfaces which yield comparable results to those of the equi-dimensional model. Pressure continuity is built into the model across highly conductive fractures, leading to reduced local degrees of freedom in the CVD-MPFA approximation. The formulation is applied to geologically complex

  19. Ultraefficient reduced model for countercurrent two-layer flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavalle, Gianluca; Vila, Jean-Paul; Lucquiaud, Mathieu; Valluri, Prashant

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of two superposed layers with density contrast flowing countercurrent inside a channel, when the lower layer is much thinner than the wavelength of interfacial waves. We apply a low-dimensional film model to the bottom (heavier) layer and introduce a fast and efficient method to predict the onset of flow reversal in this phase. We study three vertical scenarios with different applied pressure gradients and compare the temporal growth rates of linear and weakly nonlinear waves to the Orr-Sommerfeld problem and to the weakly nonlinear theory, respectively. At the loading point, i.e., when a large wave hump stands at the interface, our spatiotemporal analysis shows that the system is absolutely unstable. We then present profiles of nonlinear saturated waves, pressure field, and streamline distribution in agreement with direct numerical simulation. The reduced model presented here allows us to explore the effect of the upper-layer speed on the wave pattern, showing that the wave profile is very sensitive when the mean film thickness, rather than the liquid flow rate, is maintained constant in the simulation. In addition, we show the strong effect of surface tension on both the maximum wave hump and the crest steepness before the loading point. Finally, we reveal how the nonlinear wave speed affects the vortex distribution within the lower layer by analyzing the stream function under different scenarios.

  20. A proposed Fast algorithm to construct the system matrices for a reduced-order groundwater model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushijima, Timothy T.; Yeh, William W.-G.

    2017-04-01

    Past research has demonstrated that a reduced-order model (ROM) can be two-to-three orders of magnitude smaller than the original model and run considerably faster with acceptable error. A standard method to construct the system matrices for a ROM is Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD), which projects the system matrices from the full model space onto a subspace whose range spans the full model space but has a much smaller dimension than the full model space. This projection can be prohibitively expensive to compute if it must be done repeatedly, as with a Monte Carlo simulation. We propose a Fast Algorithm to reduce the computational burden of constructing the system matrices for a parameterized, reduced-order groundwater model (i.e. one whose parameters are represented by zones or interpolation functions). The proposed algorithm decomposes the expensive system matrix projection into a set of simple scalar-matrix multiplications. This allows the algorithm to efficiently construct the system matrices of a POD reduced-order model at a significantly reduced computational cost compared with the standard projection-based method. The developed algorithm is applied to three test cases for demonstration purposes. The first test case is a small, two-dimensional, zoned-parameter, finite-difference model; the second test case is a small, two-dimensional, interpolated-parameter, finite-difference model; and the third test case is a realistically-scaled, two-dimensional, zoned-parameter, finite-element model. In each case, the algorithm is able to accurately and efficiently construct the system matrices of the reduced-order model.

  1. A multiphase model for three-dimensional tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciumè, G.; Shelton, S.; Gray, W. G.; Miller, C. T.; Hussain, F.; Ferrari, M.; Decuzzi, P.; Schrefler, B. A.

    2013-01-01

    Several mathematical formulations have analyzed the time-dependent behavior of a tumor mass. However, most of these propose simplifications that compromise the physical soundness of the model. Here, multiphase porous media mechanics is extended to model tumor evolution, using governing equations obtained via the thermodynamically constrained averaging theory. A tumor mass is treated as a multiphase medium composed of an extracellular matrix (ECM); tumor cells (TCs), which may become necrotic depending on the nutrient concentration and tumor phase pressure; healthy cells (HCs); and an interstitial fluid for the transport of nutrients. The equations are solved by a finite element method to predict the growth rate of the tumor mass as a function of the initial tumor-to-healthy cell density ratio, nutrient concentration, mechanical strain, cell adhesion and geometry. Results are shown for three cases of practical biological interest such as multicellular tumor spheroids (MTSs) and tumor cords. First, the model is validated by experimental data for time-dependent growth of an MTS in a culture medium. The tumor growth pattern follows a biphasic behavior: initially, the rapidly growing TCs tend to saturate the volume available without any significant increase in overall tumor size; then, a classical Gompertzian pattern is observed for the MTS radius variation with time. A core with necrotic cells appears for tumor sizes larger than 150 μm, surrounded by a shell of viable TCs whose thickness stays almost constant with time. A formula to estimate the size of the necrotic core is proposed. In the second case, the MTS is confined within a healthy tissue. The growth rate is reduced, as compared to the first case—mostly due to the relative adhesion of the TCs and HCs to the ECM, and the less favorable transport of nutrients. In particular, for HCs adhering less avidly to the ECM, the healthy tissue is progressively displaced as the malignant mass grows, whereas TC

  2. A refined one-dimensional rotordynamics model with three-dimensional capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, E.; Filippi, M.

    2016-03-01

    This paper evaluates the vibration characteristics of various rotating structures. The present methodology exploits the one-dimensional Carrera Unified Formulation (1D CUF), which enables one to go beyond the kinematic assumptions of classical beam theories. According to the component-wise (CW) approach, Lagrange-like polynomial expansions (LE) are here adopted to develop the refined displacement theories. The LE elements make it possible to model each structural component of the rotor with an arbitrary degree of accuracy using either different displacement theories or localized mesh refinements. Hamilton's Principle is used to derive the governing equations, which are solved by the Finite Element Method. The CUF one-dimensional theory includes all the effects due to rotation, namely the Coriolis term, spin softening and geometrical stiffening. The numerical simulations have been performed considering a thin ring, discs and bladed-deformable shafts. The effects of the number and the position of the blades on the dynamic stability of the rotor have been evaluated. The results have been compared, when possible, with the 2D and 3D solutions that are available in the literature. CUF models appear very practical to investigate the dynamics of complex rotating structures since they provide 2D and quasi-3D results, while preserving the computational effectiveness of one-dimensional solutions.

  3. Analytical two-dimensional model of solar cell current-voltage characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldararu, F.; Caldararu, M.; Nan, S.; Nicolaescu, D.; Vasile, S.

    1991-06-01

    This paper describes an analytical two-dimensional model for pn junction solar cell I-V characteristic. In order to solve the two-dimensional equations for the minority carrier concentration the Laplace transformation method is used. The model eliminates Hovel's assumptions concerning a one-dimensional model and provides an I-V characteristic that is simpler than those derived from the one-dimensional model. The method can be extended to any other device with two-dimensional symmetry.

  4. TWO-DIMENSIONAL CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA MODELS WITH MULTI-DIMENSIONAL TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Dolence, Joshua C.; Burrows, Adam; Zhang, Weiqun E-mail: burrows@astro.princeton.edu

    2015-02-10

    We present new two-dimensional (2D) axisymmetric neutrino radiation/hydrodynamic models of core-collapse supernova (CCSN) cores. We use the CASTRO code, which incorporates truly multi-dimensional, multi-group, flux-limited diffusion (MGFLD) neutrino transport, including all relevant O(v/c) terms. Our main motivation for carrying out this study is to compare with recent 2D models produced by other groups who have obtained explosions for some progenitor stars and with recent 2D VULCAN results that did not incorporate O(v/c) terms. We follow the evolution of 12, 15, 20, and 25 solar-mass progenitors to approximately 600 ms after bounce and do not obtain an explosion in any of these models. Though the reason for the qualitative disagreement among the groups engaged in CCSN modeling remains unclear, we speculate that the simplifying ''ray-by-ray'' approach employed by all other groups may be compromising their results. We show that ''ray-by-ray'' calculations greatly exaggerate the angular and temporal variations of the neutrino fluxes, which we argue are better captured by our multi-dimensional MGFLD approach. On the other hand, our 2D models also make approximations, making it difficult to draw definitive conclusions concerning the root of the differences between groups. We discuss some of the diagnostics often employed in the analyses of CCSN simulations and highlight the intimate relationship between the various explosion conditions that have been proposed. Finally, we explore the ingredients that may be missing in current calculations that may be important in reproducing the properties of the average CCSNe, should the delayed neutrino-heating mechanism be the correct mechanism of explosion.

  5. Two-dimensional Core-collapse Supernova Models with Multi-dimensional Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolence, Joshua C.; Burrows, Adam; Zhang, Weiqun

    2015-02-01

    We present new two-dimensional (2D) axisymmetric neutrino radiation/hydrodynamic models of core-collapse supernova (CCSN) cores. We use the CASTRO code, which incorporates truly multi-dimensional, multi-group, flux-limited diffusion (MGFLD) neutrino transport, including all relevant {O}(v/c) terms. Our main motivation for carrying out this study is to compare with recent 2D models produced by other groups who have obtained explosions for some progenitor stars and with recent 2D VULCAN results that did not incorporate {O}(v/c) terms. We follow the evolution of 12, 15, 20, and 25 solar-mass progenitors to approximately 600 ms after bounce and do not obtain an explosion in any of these models. Though the reason for the qualitative disagreement among the groups engaged in CCSN modeling remains unclear, we speculate that the simplifying "ray-by-ray" approach employed by all other groups may be compromising their results. We show that "ray-by-ray" calculations greatly exaggerate the angular and temporal variations of the neutrino fluxes, which we argue are better captured by our multi-dimensional MGFLD approach. On the other hand, our 2D models also make approximations, making it difficult to draw definitive conclusions concerning the root of the differences between groups. We discuss some of the diagnostics often employed in the analyses of CCSN simulations and highlight the intimate relationship between the various explosion conditions that have been proposed. Finally, we explore the ingredients that may be missing in current calculations that may be important in reproducing the properties of the average CCSNe, should the delayed neutrino-heating mechanism be the correct mechanism of explosion.

  6. Three-dimensional finite deformation viscoelastic model accounting for damage effects

    SciTech Connect

    Simo, J.C.; Taylor, R.L.

    1985-03-01

    In this paper, a fully three-dimensional finite deformation isotropic viscoelastic model is developed with the following characteristics: (a) Uncoupled bulk response over any range of deformations; (b) Generalization of the classical standard solid of the linearized theory; and (c) Both for relaxation times either extremely small or very large, the model exactly reduces to the classical Mooney-Rivlin model of rubber elasticity. In addition, a damage mechanism is incorporated into the model of the type previously developed by the authors in the context of the linearized theory. This is a three-dimensional isotropic damage mechanism based on the maximum value attained by a scalar function of certain deviatoric Lagrangian strain measure. The resulting 5-parameter finite deformation damage model has been implemented in the finite element computer program FEAP. The coding architecture also is compatible with the NIKE2D codes currently in use at LLNL.

  7. SOLVING THE TWO-DIMENSIONAL DIFFUSION FLOW MODEL.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hromadka, T.V.; Lai, Chintu

    1985-01-01

    A simplification of the two-dimensional (2-D) continuity and momentum equations is the diffusion equation. To investigate its capability, the numerical model using the diffusion approach is applied to a hypothetical failure problem of a regional water reservoir. The model is based on an explicit, integrated finite-difference scheme, and the floodplain is simulated by a popular home computer which supports 64K FORTRAN. Though simple, the 2-D model can simulate some interesting flooding effects that a 1-D full dynamic model cannot.

  8. Digital three-dimensional models of Drosophila development.

    PubMed

    Pereanu, Wayne; Hartenstein, Volker

    2004-08-01

    Digital models of organs, cells and subcellular structures have become important tools in biological and medical research. Reaching far beyond their traditional widespread use as didactic tools, computer-generated models serve as electronic atlases to identify specific elements in complex patterns, and as analytical tools that reveal relationships between such pattern elements that would remain obscure in two-dimensional sections. Digital models also offer the unique opportunity to store and display gene-expression patterns, and pilot studies have been made in several genetic model organisms, including mouse, Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans, to construct digital graphic databases intended as repositories for gene-expression data.

  9. On a Three Dimensional Vision Based Collision Avoidance Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parzani, Céline; Filbet, Francis

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents a three dimensional collision avoidance approach for aerial vehicles inspired by coordinated behaviors in biological groups. The proposed strategy aims to enable a group of vehicles to converge to a common destination point avoiding collisions with each other and with moving obstacles in their environment. The interaction rules lead the agents to adapt their velocity vectors through a modification of the relative bearing angle and the relative elevation. Moreover the model satisfies the limited field of view constraints resulting from individual perception sensitivity. From the proposed individual based model, a mean-field kinetic model is derived. Simulations are performed to show the effectiveness of the proposed model.

  10. The XY model coupled to two-dimensional quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baillie, C. F.; Johnston, D. A.

    1992-09-01

    We perform Monte Carlo simulations using the Wolff cluster algorithm of the XY model on both fixed and dynamical phi-cubed graphs (i.e. without and with coupling to two-dimensional quantum gravity). We compare the numerical results with the theoretical expectation that the phase transition remains of KT type when the XY model is coupled to gravity. We also examine whether the universality we discovered in our earlier work on various Potts models with the same value of the central charge, c, carries over to the XY model, which has c=1.

  11. Assessing and reducing hydrogeologic model uncertainty

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    NRC is sponsoring research that couples model abstraction techniques with model uncertainty assessment methods. Insights and information from this program will be useful in decision making by NRC staff, licensees and stakeholders in their assessment of subsurface radionuclide transport. All analytic...

  12. Three Dimensional Thermal Abuse Reaction Model for Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    and Ahmad Pesaran, Gi-Heon Kim

    2006-06-29

    Three dimensional computer models for simulating thermal runaway of lithium ion battery was developed. The three-dimensional model captures the shapes and dimensions of cell components and the spatial distributions of materials and temperatures, so we could consider the geometrical features, which are critical especially in large cells. An array of possible exothermic reactions, such as solid-electrolyte-interface (SEI) layer decomposition, negative active/electrolyte reaction, and positive active/electrolyte reaction, were considered and formulated to fit experimental data from accelerating rate calorimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. User subroutine code was written to implement NREL developed approach and to utilize a commercially available solver. The model is proposed to use for simulation a variety of lithium-ion battery safety events including thermal heating and short circuit.

  13. Equation of State of the Two-Dimensional Hubbard Model.

    PubMed

    Cocchi, Eugenio; Miller, Luke A; Drewes, Jan H; Koschorreck, Marco; Pertot, Daniel; Brennecke, Ferdinand; Köhl, Michael

    2016-04-29

    The subtle interplay between kinetic energy, interactions, and dimensionality challenges our comprehension of strongly correlated physics observed, for example, in the solid state. In this quest, the Hubbard model has emerged as a conceptually simple, yet rich model describing such physics. Here we present an experimental determination of the equation of state of the repulsive two-dimensional Hubbard model over a broad range of interactions 0≲U/t≲20 and temperatures, down to k_{B}T/t=0.63(2) using high-resolution imaging of ultracold fermionic atoms in optical lattices. We show density profiles, compressibilities, and double occupancies over the whole doping range, and, hence, our results constitute benchmarks for state-of-the-art theoretical approaches.

  14. Equation of State of the Two-Dimensional Hubbard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocchi, Eugenio; Miller, Luke A.; Drewes, Jan H.; Koschorreck, Marco; Pertot, Daniel; Brennecke, Ferdinand; Köhl, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The subtle interplay between kinetic energy, interactions, and dimensionality challenges our comprehension of strongly correlated physics observed, for example, in the solid state. In this quest, the Hubbard model has emerged as a conceptually simple, yet rich model describing such physics. Here we present an experimental determination of the equation of state of the repulsive two-dimensional Hubbard model over a broad range of interactions 0 ≲U /t ≲20 and temperatures, down to kBT /t =0.63 (2 ) using high-resolution imaging of ultracold fermionic atoms in optical lattices. We show density profiles, compressibilities, and double occupancies over the whole doping range, and, hence, our results constitute benchmarks for state-of-the-art theoretical approaches.

  15. A three-dimensional model of Tangential YORP

    SciTech Connect

    Golubov, O.; Scheeres, D. J.; Krugly, Yu. N.

    2014-10-10

    Tangential YORP, or TYORP, has recently been demonstrated to be an important factor in the evolution of an asteroid's rotation state. It is complementary to normal YORP, or NYORP, which used to be considered previously. While NYORP is produced by non-symmetry in the large-scale geometry of an asteroid, TYORP is due to heat conductivity in stones on the surface of the asteroid. To date, TYORP has been studied only in a simplified one-dimensional model, substituting stones with high long walls. This article for the first time considers TYORP in a realistic three-dimensional model, also including shadowing and self-illumination effects via ray tracing. TYORP is simulated for spherical stones lying on regolith. The model includes only five free parameters and the dependence of the TYORP on each of them is studied. The TYORP torque appears to be smaller than previous estimates from the one-dimensional model, but is still comparable to the NYORP torques. These results can be used to estimate TYORP of different asteroids and also as a basis for more sophisticated models of TYORP.

  16. A Three-dimensional Model of Tangential YORP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubov, O.; Scheeres, D. J.; Krugly, Yu. N.

    2014-10-01

    Tangential YORP, or TYORP, has recently been demonstrated to be an important factor in the evolution of an asteroid's rotation state. It is complementary to normal YORP, or NYORP, which used to be considered previously. While NYORP is produced by non-symmetry in the large-scale geometry of an asteroid, TYORP is due to heat conductivity in stones on the surface of the asteroid. To date, TYORP has been studied only in a simplified one-dimensional model, substituting stones with high long walls. This article for the first time considers TYORP in a realistic three-dimensional model, also including shadowing and self-illumination effects via ray tracing. TYORP is simulated for spherical stones lying on regolith. The model includes only five free parameters and the dependence of the TYORP on each of them is studied. The TYORP torque appears to be smaller than previous estimates from the one-dimensional model, but is still comparable to the NYORP torques. These results can be used to estimate TYORP of different asteroids and also as a basis for more sophisticated models of TYORP.

  17. Highly efficient supercapacitor electrode with two-dimensional tungsten disulfide and reduced graphene oxide hybrid nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Chao-Chi; Lin, Lu-Yin; Xiao, Bing-Chang; Chen, Yu-Shiang

    2016-07-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) nanostructures with their high surface area and large in-plane conductivity have been regarded as promising materials for supercapacitors (SCs). Tungsten disulfide (WS2) is highly suitable for charge accumulation with its abundant active sites in the interspacing between the 2D structures and the intraspacing of each atomic layer, as well as on the tungsten centers with the charges generated by the Faradaic reactions. This study proposes the preparation of well-constructed WS2/reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanosheets using a simple molten salt process as the electroactive material for SCs, which presents a high specific capacitance (CF) of 2508.07 F g-1 at the scan rate of 1 mV s-1, because of the synergic effect of WS2 with its large charge-accumulating sites on the 2D planes and RGO with its highly enhanced conductivity and improved connections in the WS2 networks. The excellent cycling stability of 98.6% retention after 5000 cycles charge/discharge process and the Coulombic efficiency close to 100% for the entire measurement are also achieved for the WS2/RGO-based SC electrode. The results suggest the potential for the combination of the 2D metal sulfide and carbon materials as the charge storage material to solve the energy problems and attain a sustainable society.

  18. Reduced-order prediction of rogue waves in two-dimensional deep-water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farazmand, Mohammad; Sapsis, Themistoklis P.

    2017-07-01

    We consider the problem of large wave prediction in two-dimensional water waves. Such waves form due to the synergistic effect of dispersive mixing of smaller wave groups and the action of localized nonlinear wave interactions that leads to focusing. Instead of a direct simulation approach, we rely on the decomposition of the wave field into a discrete set of localized wave groups with optimal length scales and amplitudes. Due to the short-term character of the prediction, these wave groups do not interact and therefore their dynamics can be characterized individually. Using direct numerical simulations of the governing envelope equations we precompute the expected maximum elevation for each of those wave groups. The combination of the wave field decomposition algorithm, which provides information about the statistics of the system, and the precomputed map for the expected wave group elevation, which encodes dynamical information, allows (i) for understanding of how the probability of occurrence of rogue waves changes as the spectrum parameters vary, (ii) the computation of a critical length scale characterizing wave groups with high probability of evolving to rogue waves, and (iii) the formulation of a robust and parsimonious reduced-order prediction scheme for large waves. We assess the validity of this scheme in several cases of ocean wave spectra.

  19. Discrete elastic model for two-dimensional melting.

    PubMed

    Lansac, Yves; Glaser, Matthew A; Clark, Noel A

    2006-04-01

    We present a network model for the study of melting and liquid structure in two dimensions, the first in which the presence and energy of topological defects (dislocations and disclinations) and of geometrical defects (elemental voids) can be independently controlled. Interparticle interaction is via harmonic springs and control is achieved by Monte Carlo moves which springs can either be orientationally "flipped" between particles to generate topological defects, or can be "popped" in force-free shape, to generate geometrical defects. With the geometrical defects suppressed the transition to the liquid phase occurs via disclination unbinding, as described by the Kosterlitz-Thouless-Halperin-Nelson-Young model and found in soft potential two-dimensional (2D) systems, such as the dipole-dipole potential [H. H. von Grünberg, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 255703 (2004)]. By contrast, with topological defects suppressed, a disordering transition, the Glaser-Clark condensation of geometrical defects [M. A. Glaser and N. A. Clark, Adv. Chem. Phys. 83, 543 (1993); M. A. Glaser, (Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1990), Vol. 52, p. 141], produces a state that accurately characterizes the local liquid structure and first-order melting observed in hard-potential 2D systems, such as hard disk and the Weeks-Chandler-Andersen (WCA) potentials (M. A. Glaser and co-workers, see above). Thus both the geometrical and topological defect systems play a role in melting. The present work introduces a system in which the relative roles of topological and geometrical defects and their interactions can be explored. We perform Monte Carlo simulations of this model in the isobaric-isothermal ensemble, and present the phase diagram as well as various thermodynamic, statistical, and structural quantities as a function of the relative populations of geometrical and topological defects. The model exhibits a rich phase behavior including hexagonal and square crystals, expanded crystal, dodecagonal quasicrystal

  20. Reducing RANS Model Error Using Random Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-Xun; Wu, Jin-Long; Xiao, Heng; Ling, Julia

    2016-11-01

    Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models are still the work-horse tools in the turbulence modeling of industrial flows. However, the model discrepancy due to the inadequacy of modeled Reynolds stresses largely diminishes the reliability of simulation results. In this work we use a physics-informed machine learning approach to improve the RANS modeled Reynolds stresses and propagate them to obtain the mean velocity field. Specifically, the functional forms of Reynolds stress discrepancies with respect to mean flow features are trained based on an offline database of flows with similar characteristics. The random forest model is used to predict Reynolds stress discrepancies in new flows. Then the improved Reynolds stresses are propagated to the velocity field via RANS equations. The effects of expanding the feature space through the use of a complete basis of Galilean tensor invariants are also studied. The flow in a square duct, which is challenging for standard RANS models, is investigated to demonstrate the merit of the proposed approach. The results show that both the Reynolds stresses and the propagated velocity field are improved over the baseline RANS predictions. SAND Number: SAND2016-7437 A

  1. A three-dimensional spin-diffusion model for micromagnetics

    PubMed Central

    Abert, Claas; Ruggeri, Michele; Bruckner, Florian; Vogler, Christoph; Hrkac, Gino; Praetorius, Dirk; Suess, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    We solve a time-dependent three-dimensional spin-diffusion model coupled to the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation numerically. The presented model is validated by comparison to two established spin-torque models: The model of Slonzewski that describes spin-torque in multi-layer structures in the presence of a fixed layer and the model of Zhang and Li that describes current driven domain-wall motion. It is shown that both models are incorporated by the spin-diffusion description, i.e., the nonlocal effects of the Slonzewski model are captured as well as the spin-accumulation due to magnetization gradients as described by the model of Zhang and Li. Moreover, the presented method is able to resolve the time dependency of the spin-accumulation. PMID:26442796

  2. A three-dimensional spin-diffusion model for micromagnetics.

    PubMed

    Abert, Claas; Ruggeri, Michele; Bruckner, Florian; Vogler, Christoph; Hrkac, Gino; Praetorius, Dirk; Suess, Dieter

    2015-10-07

    We solve a time-dependent three-dimensional spin-diffusion model coupled to the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation numerically. The presented model is validated by comparison to two established spin-torque models: The model of Slonzewski that describes spin-torque in multi-layer structures in the presence of a fixed layer and the model of Zhang and Li that describes current driven domain-wall motion. It is shown that both models are incorporated by the spin-diffusion description, i.e., the nonlocal effects of the Slonzewski model are captured as well as the spin-accumulation due to magnetization gradients as described by the model of Zhang and Li. Moreover, the presented method is able to resolve the time dependency of the spin-accumulation.

  3. Analysis of necking based on a one-dimensional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audoly, Basile; Hutchinson, John W.

    2016-12-01

    Dimensional reduction is applied to derive a one-dimensional energy functional governing tensile necking localization in a family of initially uniform prismatic solids, including as particular cases rectilinear blocks in plane strain and cylindrical bars undergoing axisymmetric deformations. The energy functional depends on both the axial stretch and its gradient. The coefficient of the gradient term is derived in an exact and general form. The one-dimensional model is used to analyze necking localization for nonlinear elastic materials that experience a maximum load under tensile loading, and for a class of nonlinear materials that mimic elastic-plastic materials by displaying a linear incremental response when stretch switches from increasing to decreasing. Bifurcation predictions for the onset of necking from the simplified theory compared with exact results suggest the approach is highly accurate at least when the departures from uniformity are not too large. Post-bifurcation behavior is analyzed to the point where the neck is fully developed and localized to a region on the order of the thickness of the block or bar. Applications to the nonlinear elastic and elastic-plastic materials reveal the highly unstable nature of necking for the former and the stable behavior for the latter, except for geometries where the length of the block or bar is very large compared to its thickness. A formula for the effective stress reduction at the center of a neck is established based on the one-dimensional model, which is similar to that suggested by Bridgman (1952).

  4. Two dimensional hydrodynamic modeling of a high latitude braided river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphries, E.; Pavelsky, T.; Bates, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    Rivers are a fundamental resource to physical, ecologic and human systems, yet quantification of river flow in high-latitude environments remains limited due to the prevalence of complex morphologies, remote locations and sparse in situ monitoring equipment. Advances in hydrodynamic modeling and remote sensing technology allow us to address questions such as: How well can two-dimensional models simulate a flood wave in a highly 3-dimensional braided river environment, and how does the structure of such a flood wave differ from flow down a similar-sized single-channel river? Here, we use the raster-based hydrodynamic model LISFLOOD-FP to simulate flood waves, discharge, water surface height, and velocity measurements over a ~70 km reach of the Tanana River in Alaska. In order to use LISFLOOD-FP a digital elevation model (DEM) fused with detailed bathymetric data is required. During summer 2013, we surveyed 220,000 bathymetric points along the study reach using an echo sounder system connected to a high-precision GPS unit. The measurements are interpolated to a smooth bathymetric surface, using Topo to Raster interpolation, and combined with an existing five meter DEM (Alaska IfSAR) to create a seamless river terrain model. Flood waves are simulated using varying complexities in model solvers, then compared to gauge records and water logger data to assess major sources of model uncertainty. Velocity and flow direction maps are also assessed and quantified for detailed analysis of braided channel flow. The most accurate model output occurs with using the full two-dimensional model structure, and major inaccuracies appear to be related to DEM quality and roughness values. Future work will intercompare model outputs with extensive ground measurements and new data from AirSWOT, an airborne analog for the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission, which aims to provide high-resolution measurements of terrestrial and ocean water surface elevations globally.

  5. On the Two-Dimensional Simplification of Three-Dimensional Cementless Hip Stem Numerical Models.

    PubMed

    Quevedo González, Fernando J; Reimeringer, Michael; Nuño, Natalia

    2017-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) models are commonly used to analyze the mechanical behavior of the bone under different conditions (i.e., before and after arthroplasty). They can provide detailed information but they are numerically expensive and this limits their use in cases where large or numerous simulations are required. On the other hand, 2D models show less computational cost, but the precision of results depends on the approach used for the simplification. Two main questions arise: Are the 3D results adequately represented by a 2D section of the model? Which approach should be used to build a 2D model that provides reliable results compared to the 3D model? In this paper, we first evaluate if the stem symmetry plane used for generating the 2D models of bone-implant systems adequately represents the results of the full 3D model for stair climbing activity. Then, we explore three different approaches that have been used in the past for creating 2D models: (1) without side-plate (WOSP), (2) with variable thickness side-plate and constant cortical thickness (SPCT), and (3) with variable thickness side-plate and variable cortical thickness (SPVT). From the different approaches investigated, a 2D model including a side-plate best represents the results obtained with the full 3D model with much less computational cost. The side-plate needs to have variable thickness, while the cortical bone thickness can be kept constant.

  6. Macroinvertebrate response to flow changes in a subalpine stream: predictions from two-dimensional hydrodynamic models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waddle, T.J.; Holmquist, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional hydrodynamic models are being used increasingly as alternatives to traditional one-dimensional instream flow methodologies for assessing adequacy of flow and associated faunal habitat. Two-dimensional modelling of habitat has focused primarily on fishes, but fish-based assessments may not model benthic macroinvertebrate habitat effectively. We extend two-dimensional techniques to a macroinvertebrate assemblage in a high-elevation stream in the Sierra Nevada (Dana Fork of the Tuolumne River, Yosemite National Park, CA, USA). This stream frequently flows at less than 0.03?m3?s?1 in late summer and is representative of a common water abstraction scenario: maximum water abstraction coinciding with seasonally low flows. We used two-dimensional modelling to predict invertebrate responses to reduced flows that might result from increased abstraction. We collected site-specific field data on the macroinvertebrate assemblage, bed topography and flow conditions and then coupled a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model with macroinvertebrate indices to evaluate habitat across a range of low flows. Macroinvertebrate indices were calculated for the wetted area at each flow. A surrogate flow record based on an adjacent watershed was used to evaluate frequency and duration of low flow events. Using surrogate historical records, we estimated that flow should fall below 0.071?m3?s?1 at least 1?day in 82 of 95?years and below 0.028?m3?s?1 in 48 of 95?years. Invertebrate metric means indicated minor losses in response to modelled discharge reductions, but wetted area decreased substantially. Responses of invertebrates to water abstraction will likely be a function of changing habitat quantity rather than quality.

  7. Performance of a reduced-order FSI model for flow-induced vocal fold vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Siyuan; Luo, Haoxiang; Luo's lab Team

    2016-11-01

    Vocal fold vibration during speech production involves a three-dimensional unsteady glottal jet flow and three-dimensional nonlinear tissue mechanics. A full 3D fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model is computationally expensive even though it provides most accurate information about the system. On the other hand, an efficient reduced-order FSI model is useful for fast simulation and analysis of the vocal fold dynamics, which is often needed in procedures such as optimization and parameter estimation. In this work, we study the performance of a reduced-order model as compared with the corresponding full 3D model in terms of its accuracy in predicting the vibration frequency and deformation mode. In the reduced-order model, we use a 1D flow model coupled with a 3D tissue model. Two different hyperelastic tissue behaviors are assumed. In addition, the vocal fold thickness and subglottal pressure are varied for systematic comparison. The result shows that the reduced-order model provides consistent predictions as the full 3D model across different tissue material assumptions and subglottal pressures. However, the vocal fold thickness has most effect on the model accuracy, especially when the vocal fold is thin. Supported by the NSF.

  8. Dimensional reduction of the Standard Model coupled to a new singlet scalar field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauner, Tomáš; Tenkanen, Tuomas V. I.; Tranberg, Anders; Vuorinen, Aleksi; Weir, David J.

    2017-03-01

    We derive an effective dimensionally reduced theory for the Standard Model augmented by a real singlet scalar. We treat the singlet as a superheavy field and integrate it out, leaving an effective theory involving only the Higgs and SU(2) L × U(1) Y gauge fields, identical to the one studied previously for the Standard Model. This opens up the possibility of efficiently computing the order and strength of the electroweak phase transition, numerically and nonperturbatively, in this extension of the Standard Model. Understanding the phase diagram is crucial for models of electroweak baryogenesis and for studying the production of gravitational waves at thermal phase transitions.

  9. Fermion masses and mixing in general warped extra dimensional models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Mariana; Hamzaoui, Cherif; Pourtolami, Nima; Toharia, Manuel

    2015-06-01

    We analyze fermion masses and mixing in a general warped extra dimensional model, where all the Standard Model (SM) fields, including the Higgs, are allowed to propagate in the bulk. In this context, a slightly broken flavor symmetry imposed universally on all fermion fields, without distinction, can generate the full flavor structure of the SM, including quarks, charged leptons and neutrinos. For quarks and charged leptons, the exponential sensitivity of their wave functions to small flavor breaking effects yield hierarchical masses and mixing as it is usual in warped models with fermions in the bulk. In the neutrino sector, the exponential wave-function factors can be flavor blind and thus insensitive to the small flavor symmetry breaking effects, directly linking their masses and mixing angles to the flavor symmetric structure of the five-dimensional neutrino Yukawa couplings. The Higgs must be localized in the bulk and the model is more successful in generalized warped scenarios where the metric background solution is different than five-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS5 ). We study these features in two simple frameworks, flavor complimentarity and flavor democracy, which provide specific predictions and correlations between quarks and leptons, testable as more precise data in the neutrino sector becomes available.

  10. [3-Dimensional model reconstruction of penis and surrounding tissue].

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Heng; Cao, Chuan; Mei, Wen-Ming; Wang, Wen-Xian; Tan, Li-Wen; Li, Shi-Rong

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of 3-Dimensional (3-D) model reconstruction of penis and surrounding structures based on magnetic resonance images, which may provide the model building method for modeling surgery of individual penoplasty. Magnetic resonance (MR) images of penis with different imaging parameters were evaluated. With the surface rendering construction, the 3D virtual model was established by Amira software. The anatomical details imaging is better in T2-weighted fast spin-echo images with 3.0 mm slice thickness. The established model based on the MR images can show the soft-tissue, suspensory ligament of the penis. The suspensory ligament stretches between the pubic symphysis and the corpora cavernosa. The penile roots attach to inferior ramus of pubis. MR imaging provides enough anatomical information for modeling. It can be used for the development of model surgery system of individual penoplasty.

  11. Three-dimensional graphene foams loaded with bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells promote skin wound healing with reduced scarring.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhonghua; Wang, Haiqin; Yang, Bo; Sun, Yukai; Huo, Ran

    2015-12-01

    The regeneration of functional skin remains elusive, due to poor engraftment, deficient vascularization, and excessive scar formation. Aiming to overcome these issues, the present study proposed the combination of a three-dimensional graphene foam (GF) scaffold loaded with bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to improve skin wound healing. The GFs demonstrated good biocompatibility and promoted the growth and proliferation of MSCs. Meanwhile, the GFs loaded with MSCs obviously facilitated wound closure in animal model. The dermis formed in the presence of the GF structure loaded with MSCs was thicker and possessed a more complex structure at day 14 post-surgery. The transplanted MSCs correlated with upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), which may lead to neo-vascularization. Additionally, an anti-scarring effect was observed in the presence of the 3D-GF scaffold and MSCs, as evidenced by a downregulation of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) and alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) together with an increase of TGF-β3. Altogether, the GF scaffold could guide the wound healing process with reduced scarring, and the MSCs were crucial to enhance vascularization and provided a better quality neo-skin. The GF scaffold loaded with MSCs possesses necessary bioactive cues to improve wound healing with reduced scarring, which may be of great clinical significance for skin wound healing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Numerical solutions of the three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic alpha model.

    PubMed

    Mininni, Pablo D; Montgomery, David C; Pouquet, Annick

    2005-04-01

    We present direct numerical simulations and alpha -model simulations of four familiar three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence effects: selective decay, dynamic alignment, inverse cascade of magnetic helicity, and the helical dynamo effect. The MHD alpha model is shown to capture the long-wavelength spectra in all these problems, allowing for a significant reduction of computer time and memory at the same kinetic and magnetic Reynolds numbers. In the helical dynamo, not only does the alpha model correctly reproduce the growth rate of magnetic energy during the kinematic regime, it also captures the nonlinear saturation level and the late generation of a large scale magnetic field by the helical turbulence.

  13. A Three-dimensional Topological Model of Ternary Phase Diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Yingxue; Bao, Hong

    2017-01-01

    In order to obtain a visualization of the complex internal structure of ternary phase diagram, the paper realized a three-dimensional topology model of ternary phase diagram with the designed data structure and improved algorithm, under the guidance of relevant theories of computer graphics. The purpose of the model is mainly to analyze the relationship between each phase region of a ternary phase diagram. The model not only obtain isothermal section graph at any temperature, but also extract a particular phase region in which users are interested.

  14. Three-dimensional modeling of propagating precipitation waves.

    PubMed

    Tinsley, Mark R; Collison, Darrell; Showalter, Kenneth

    2015-06-01

    A general three-dimensional model for propagating precipitation waves is presented. Structural features identified in experimental studies of propagating waves in the AlCl3/NaOH and NaAl(OH)4/HCl systems are described by the 3D model. Two forms of precipitate with different physical properties play key mechanistic roles in the wave propagation. Experimentally observed circular and spiral waves are simulated by the 3D model, as well as wave annihilation on the collision of two waves.

  15. A Three-dimensional Babcock-Leighton Solar Dynamo Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miesch, Mark S.; Dikpati, Mausumi

    2014-04-01

    We present a three-dimensional (3D) kinematic solar dynamo model in which poloidal field is generated by the emergence and dispersal of tilted sunspot pairs (more generally bipolar magnetic regions, or BMRs). The axisymmetric component of this model functions similarly to previous 2.5 dimensional (2.5D, axisymmetric) Babcock-Leighton (BL) dynamo models that employ a double-ring prescription for poloidal field generation but we generalize this prescription into a 3D flux emergence algorithm that places BMRs on the surface in response to the dynamo-generated toroidal field. In this way, the model can be regarded as a unification of BL dynamo models (2.5D in radius/latitude) and surface flux transport models (2.5D in latitude/longitude) into a more self-consistent framework that builds on the successes of each while capturing the full 3D structure of the evolving magnetic field. The model reproduces some basic features of the solar cycle including an 11 yr periodicity, equatorward migration of toroidal flux in the deep convection zone, and poleward propagation of poloidal flux at the surface. The poleward-propagating surface flux originates as trailing flux in BMRs, migrates poleward in multiple non-axisymmetric streams (made axisymmetric by differential rotation and turbulent diffusion), and eventually reverses the polar field, thus sustaining the dynamo. In this Letter we briefly describe the model, initial results, and future plans.

  16. Modelling Three-Dimensional Sound Propagation in Wedge Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Melanie Elizabeth

    Ocean environments with sloped seafloors can give rise to sound paths that do not remain in a constant plane of propagation. Numerical modelling of sound fields in such environments requires the use of computer models that fully account for out-of-plane sound propagation effects. The inclusion of these three-dimensional effects can be computationally intensive and the effects are often neglected in computer sound propagation codes. The current state-of-the art in sound propagation modelling has seen the development of models that can fully account for out-of-plane sound propagation. Such a model has been implemented in this research to provide acoustic consultants JASCO Applied Sciences with an important tool for environmental noise impact assessment in complicated marine environments. The model is described and validation results are shown for benchmark test cases. The model is also applied to study three-dimensional propagation effects in measured data from a realistic ocean environment. Particular analysis techniques assist in the interpretation of the modelled sound field for this physical test environment providing new insight into the characteristics of the test environment.

  17. New data assimilation system DNDAS for high-dimensional models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qun-bo, Huang; Xiao-qun, Cao; Meng-bin, Zhu; Wei-min, Zhang; Bai-nian, Liu

    2016-05-01

    The tangent linear (TL) models and adjoint (AD) models have brought great difficulties for the development of variational data assimilation system. It might be impossible to develop them perfectly without great efforts, either by hand, or by automatic differentiation tools. In order to break these limitations, a new data assimilation system, dual-number data assimilation system (DNDAS), is designed based on the dual-number automatic differentiation principles. We investigate the performance of DNDAS with two different optimization schemes and subsequently give a discussion on whether DNDAS is appropriate for high-dimensional forecast models. The new data assimilation system can avoid the complicated reverse integration of the adjoint model, and it only needs the forward integration in the dual-number space to obtain the cost function and its gradient vector concurrently. To verify the correctness and effectiveness of DNDAS, we implemented DNDAS on a simple ordinary differential model and the Lorenz-63 model with different optimization methods. We then concentrate on the adaptability of DNDAS to the Lorenz-96 model with high-dimensional state variables. The results indicate that whether the system is simple or nonlinear, DNDAS can accurately reconstruct the initial condition for the forecast model and has a strong anti-noise characteristic. Given adequate computing resource, the quasi-Newton optimization method performs better than the conjugate gradient method in DNDAS. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 41475094 and 41375113).

  18. A THREE-DIMENSIONAL BABCOCK-LEIGHTON SOLAR DYNAMO MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Miesch, Mark S.; Dikpati, Mausumi

    2014-04-10

    We present a three-dimensional (3D) kinematic solar dynamo model in which poloidal field is generated by the emergence and dispersal of tilted sunspot pairs (more generally bipolar magnetic regions, or BMRs). The axisymmetric component of this model functions similarly to previous 2.5 dimensional (2.5D, axisymmetric) Babcock-Leighton (BL) dynamo models that employ a double-ring prescription for poloidal field generation but we generalize this prescription into a 3D flux emergence algorithm that places BMRs on the surface in response to the dynamo-generated toroidal field. In this way, the model can be regarded as a unification of BL dynamo models (2.5D in radius/latitude) and surface flux transport models (2.5D in latitude/longitude) into a more self-consistent framework that builds on the successes of each while capturing the full 3D structure of the evolving magnetic field. The model reproduces some basic features of the solar cycle including an 11 yr periodicity, equatorward migration of toroidal flux in the deep convection zone, and poleward propagation of poloidal flux at the surface. The poleward-propagating surface flux originates as trailing flux in BMRs, migrates poleward in multiple non-axisymmetric streams (made axisymmetric by differential rotation and turbulent diffusion), and eventually reverses the polar field, thus sustaining the dynamo. In this Letter we briefly describe the model, initial results, and future plans.

  19. Reduced Order Modeling of Bubble Cloud Dynamics in a Focused Ultrasound Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Kazuki; Colonius, Tim

    2016-11-01

    In order to characterize the cloud cavitation in burst wave lithotripsy, reduced order modeling of the dynamics of a spherical bubble cloud of a radius O (1) mm interacting with traveling ultrasound waves of an amplitude O(1) MPa in water is presented. Bubbles are treated as spherical, radially oscillating cavities dispersed in continuous liquid phase. The volume of Lagrangian point bubbles is mapped with a regularization kernel as void fraction onto three-dimensional Cartesian grids that define the Eulerian liquid phase. The flow field is solved using a WENO-based compressible flow solver. The initial size and number density of the bubbles are critical for their coherent dynamics in the cloud, yet three-dimensional simulations of clouds with various parameters are computationally demanding. For further reduced-order modeling, a new kernel is introduce into the model to regularize bubbles onto two-dimensional, axisymmetric grids. The evolution of the void fraction and the maximum pressure in the cloud simulated using the model agree with results of three-dimensional simulations, while the reduction in computational cost is a factor of O (100) . Finally, the model is applied to a parametric study of the coherent dynamics of bubbles.

  20. Quasi-One-Dimensional Modeling of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Christopher I.

    2002-01-01

    Pulsed detonation rocket engines (PDREs) have generated considerable research interest in recent years as a chemical propulsion system potentially offering improved performance and reduced complexity compared to conventional rocket engines. The detonative mode of combustion employed by these devices offers a thermodynamic advantage over the constant-pressure deflagrative combustion mode used in conventional rocket engines and gas turbines. However, while this theoretical advantage has spurred a great deal of interest in building PDRE devices, the unsteady blowdown process intrinsic to the PDRE has made realistic estimates of the actual propulsive performance problematic. The recent review article by Kailasanath highlights some of the difficulties in comparing the available experimental measurements with numerical models. In a previous paper by the author, parametric studies of the performance of a single, straight-tube PDRE were reported. A 1-D, unsteady method of characteristics code, employing a constant-gamma assumption behind the detonation front, was developed for that study. Models of this type are computationally inexpensive, and are particularly useful for parametric performance comparisons. For example, a plot showing the specific impulse of various PDRE and steady-state rocket engine (SSRE) configurations as a function of blowdown pressure ratio. The performance curves clearly indicate that a straight-tube PDRE is superior in specific impulse to a SSRE with a sonic nozzle over the entire range of pressure ratios. Note, however, that a straight-tube PDRE in general does not compare favorably to a SSRE fitted with an optimized de Laval supersonic nozzle, particularly at the high pressure ratios typical for boost or in-space rocket applications. However, the calculations also show that if a dynamically optimized, supersonic de Laval nozzle could be could be fitted to a PDRE, then the specific impulse of the device would exceed that of a comparable SSRE

  1. Optimization Model for Reducing Emissions of Greenhouse ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA Vehicle Greenhouse Gas (VGHG) model is used to apply various technologies to a defined set of vehicles in order to meet a specified GHG emission target, and to then calculate the costs and benefits of doing so. To facilitate its analysis of the costs and benefits of the control of GHG emissions from cars and trucks.

  2. Modeling and experiments for heat transfer process in pulverized coal-firing furnace with two-dimensional radiation characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, J.; Zhang, M.C.

    2009-07-01

    A dimension-reducing method for calculating the radiant heat transfer with two-dimensional characteristics is introduced in this article. Using this dimension-reducing method, the two-dimensional discrete transfer method (DTM) was applied to a cylindrical enclosure where the medium was absorptive and emissive. The two-dimensional DTM was proved to produce equivalent prediction results as the three-dimensional radiation computation. Then the two-dimensional DTM was incorporated into a general pulverized coal combustion model to estimate radiant heat transfer. The temperature distribution and the net heat flux distribution of an axisymmetric pilot furnace, in which three kinds of lignite were burned, respectively, were calculated using the comprehensive model. The prediction using this model has been found to have a high agreement with the measured data, that the temperature errors was at 5% and the net heat flux error was at about 15%. The results have demonstrated the feasibility and potential of using the two-dimensional DTM for radiation modeling in pulverized coal flame, and confirmed that the dimension-reducing method and the overall model will be simple and convenient for engineers to use.

  3. HIGH DIMENSIONAL COVARIANCE MATRIX ESTIMATION IN APPROXIMATE FACTOR MODELS

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jianqing; Liao, Yuan; Mincheva, Martina

    2012-01-01

    The variance covariance matrix plays a central role in the inferential theories of high dimensional factor models in finance and economics. Popular regularization methods of directly exploiting sparsity are not directly applicable to many financial problems. Classical methods of estimating the covariance matrices are based on the strict factor models, assuming independent idiosyncratic components. This assumption, however, is restrictive in practical applications. By assuming sparse error covariance matrix, we allow the presence of the cross-sectional correlation even after taking out common factors, and it enables us to combine the merits of both methods. We estimate the sparse covariance using the adaptive thresholding technique as in Cai and Liu (2011), taking into account the fact that direct observations of the idiosyncratic components are unavailable. The impact of high dimensionality on the covariance matrix estimation based on the factor structure is then studied. PMID:22661790

  4. HIGH DIMENSIONAL COVARIANCE MATRIX ESTIMATION IN APPROXIMATE FACTOR MODELS.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jianqing; Liao, Yuan; Mincheva, Martina

    2011-01-01

    The variance covariance matrix plays a central role in the inferential theories of high dimensional factor models in finance and economics. Popular regularization methods of directly exploiting sparsity are not directly applicable to many financial problems. Classical methods of estimating the covariance matrices are based on the strict factor models, assuming independent idiosyncratic components. This assumption, however, is restrictive in practical applications. By assuming sparse error covariance matrix, we allow the presence of the cross-sectional correlation even after taking out common factors, and it enables us to combine the merits of both methods. We estimate the sparse covariance using the adaptive thresholding technique as in Cai and Liu (2011), taking into account the fact that direct observations of the idiosyncratic components are unavailable. The impact of high dimensionality on the covariance matrix estimation based on the factor structure is then studied.

  5. Three-dimensional radiation transfer modeling in a dicotyledon leaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govaerts, Yves M.; Jacquemoud, Stéphane; Verstraete, Michel M.; Ustin, Susan L.

    1996-11-01

    The propagation of light in a typical dicotyledon leaf is investigated with a new Monte Carlo ray-tracing model. The three-dimensional internal cellular structure of the various leaf tissues, including the epidermis, the palisade parenchyma, and the spongy mesophyll, is explicitly described. Cells of different tissues are assigned appropriate morphologies and contain realistic amounts of water and chlorophyll. Each cell constituent is characterized by an index of refraction and an absorption coefficient. The objective of this study is to investigate how the internal three-dimensional structure of the tissues and the optical properties of cell constituents control the reflectance and transmittance of the leaf. Model results compare favorably with laboratory observations. The influence of the roughness of the epidermis on the reflection and absorption of light is investigated, and simulation results confirm that convex cells in the epidermis focus light on the palisade parenchyma and increase the absorption of radiation.

  6. A Three Dimensional Non-Singular Modelling of Rigid Manipulators.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    511111 OTC FILE COPY (1) ’ NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL 0 ’ Monterey, California IDTIC I{ IELECTE S MAR 08 8 f 0? THESIS A THREE DIMENSIONAL NON-SINGULAR...MODELLING OF RIGID MANIPULATORS by Sadrettin Altinok December 1987 Thesis Advisor D.L. Smith Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 88...MASTERS THESIS FROM _ TO 1987 DECEMBER iC 6 16 SUPPLEMENTARY NOTATION 17 COSA T i CODES 18 SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on reverse f necessary and identify by

  7. Multiple Potts models coupled to two-dimensional quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baillie, C. F.; Johnston, D. A.

    1992-07-01

    We perform Monte Carlo simulations using the Wolff cluster algorithm of multiple q=2, 3, 4 state Potts models on dynamical phi-cubed graphs of spherical topology in order to investigate the c>1 region of two-dimensional quantum gravity. Contrary to naive expectation we find no obvious signs of pathological behaviour for c>1. We discuss the results in the light of suggestions that have been made for a modified DDK ansatz for c>1.

  8. Tipping Points in 1-Dimensional Schelling Models with Switching Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmpalias, George; Elwes, Richard; Lewis-Pye, Andy

    2015-02-01

    Schelling's spacial proximity model was an early agent-based model, illustrating how ethnic segregation can emerge, unwanted, from the actions of citizens acting according to individual local preferences. Here a 1-dimensional unperturbed variant is studied under switching agent dynamics, interpretable as being open in that agents may enter and exit the model. Following the authors' work (Barmpalias et al., FOCS, 2014) and that of Brandt et al. (Proceedings of the 44th ACM Symposium on Theory of Computing (STOC 2012), 2012), rigorous asymptotic results are established. The dynamic allows either type to take over almost everywhere. Tipping points are identified between the regions of takeover and staticity. In a generalization of the models considered in [1] and [3], the model's parameters comprise the initial proportions of the two types, along with independent values of the tolerance for each type. This model comprises a 1-dimensional spin-1 model with spin dependent external field, as well as providing an example of cascading behaviour within a network.

  9. An algebraic turbulence model for three-dimensional viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, R. V.; Giel, P. W.; Boyle, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    An algebraic turbulence model is proposed for use with three-dimensional Navier-Stokes analyses. It incorporates features of both the Baldwin-Lomax and Cebeci-Smith models. The Baldwin-Lomax model uses the maximum of a function f(y) to determine length and velocity scales. An analysis of the Baldwin-Lomax model shows that f(y) can have a spurious maximum close to the wall, causing numerical problems and non-physical results. The proposed model uses integral relations to determine delta(*) u(sub e) and delta used in the Cebeci-Smith mode. It eliminates a constant in the Baldwin-Lomax model and determines the two remaining constants by comparison to the Cebeci-Smith formulation. Pressure gradient effects, a new wake model, and the implementation of these features in a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code are also described. Results are shown for a flat plate boundary layer, an annular turbine cascade, and endwall heat transfer in a linear turbine cascade. The heat transfer results agree well with experimental data which shows large variations in endwall Stanton number contours with Reynolds number.

  10. Two-dimensional XXZ-Ising model with quartic interactions.

    PubMed

    Valverde, J S

    2012-05-01

    In this work we study a two-dimensional XXZ-Ising spin-1/2 model with quartic interactions. The model is composed of a two-dimensional lattice of edge-sharing unitary cells, where each cell consists of two triangular prisms, converging in a basal plane with four Ising spin-1/2 (open circles); the apical positions are also occupied by four Heisenberg spin-1/2 (solid circles). Interaction of the base plane containing the multispin Ising interaction has the parameter J_{4}, and the other pairwise interactions have parameter J. For the proposed model we construct the phase diagram at zero temperature and give all possible spin configurations. In addition, we investigate two regions where the model can be solved exactly, the free fermion condition (FFC) and the symmetrical eight-vertex condition (SEVC). For this purpose we perform a straightforward mapping for a zero-field eight-vertex model. The necessary conditions for the equivalence are analyzed for all ranges of the interaction parameters. Unfortunately, the present model does not satisfy the FFC unless the trivial case; however, it was possible to give a region where the model can be solved approximately. We study the SEVC and verify that this condition is always satisfied. We also explore and discuss the critical conditions giving the region where these critical points are relevant.

  11. An introduction to three-dimensional climate modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washington, W. M.; Parkinson, C. L.

    1986-01-01

    The development and use of three-dimensional computer models of the earth's climate are discussed. The processes and interactions of the atmosphere, oceans, and sea ice are examined. The basic theory of climate simulation which includes the fundamental equations, models, and numerical techniques for simulating the atmosphere, oceans, and sea ice is described. Simulated wind, temperature, precipitation, ocean current, and sea ice distribution data are presented and compared to observational data. The responses of the climate to various environmental changes, such as variations in solar output or increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide, are modeled. Future developments in climate modeling are considered. Information is also provided on the derivation of the energy equation, the finite difference barotropic forecast model, the spectral transform technique, and the finite difference shallow water waved equation model.

  12. Digital vision system for three-dimensional model acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ta; Lin, Huei-Yung; Qin, Xiangdong; Subbarao, Murali

    2000-10-01

    A digital vision system and the computational algorithms used by the system for three-dimensional (3D) model acquisition are described. The system is named Stonybrook VIsion System (SVIS). The system can acquire the 3D model (which includes the 3D shape and the corresponding image texture) of a simple object within a 300 mm X 300 mm X 300 mm volume placed about 600 mm from the system. SVIS integrates Image Focus Analysis (IFA) and Stereo Image Analysis (SIA) techniques for 3D shape and image texture recovery. First, 4 to 8 partial 3D models of the object are obtained from 4 to 8 views of the object. The partial models are then integrated to obtain a complete model of the object. The complete model is displayed using a 3D graphics rendering software (Apple's QuickDraw). Experimental results on several objects are presented.

  13. [Sutural physical model building in the three-dimensional finite-element model of maxillofacial bones].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Zhu, Xian-chun; Zhang, Xing; Tai, Yin-xia; Yan, Sen

    2011-02-01

    To build the physical model of four suturae which are related to the growth of maxilla in the three-dimensional finite-element model of maxillofacial bones. A 16 years old volunteer with individual normal occlusion, good periodontium health condition and without diseases of temporomandibular joint was chosen to be the material of modeling. The three-dimensional finite-element model of the volunteer's maxillofacial bones was built using the CT scan and the finite-element modeling method. Finally we built the physical model of four suturae which were related to the growth of maxilla in the model of maxillofacial bones. The model of maxillofacial bones with 86,575 nodes and 485,915 elements was generated. This model contained four suturae including sutura frontomaxillaris, sutura zygomaticomaxillaris, sutura temporozygomatica and sutura pterygopalatine. A three-dimensional finite-element model of maxillofacial bones with good biological similarity was developed.

  14. One-dimensional GIS-based model compared with a two-dimensional model in urban floods simulation.

    PubMed

    Lhomme, J; Bouvier, C; Mignot, E; Paquier, A

    2006-01-01

    A GIS-based one-dimensional flood simulation model is presented and applied to the centre of the city of Nîmes (Gard, France), for mapping flow depths or velocities in the streets network. The geometry of the one-dimensional elements is derived from the Digital Elevation Model (DEM). The flow is routed from one element to the next using the kinematic wave approximation. At the crossroads, the flows in the downstream branches are computed using a conceptual scheme. This scheme was previously designed to fit Y-shaped pipes junctions, and has been modified here to fit X-shaped crossroads. The results were compared with the results of a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model based on the full shallow water equations. The comparison shows that good agreements can be found in the steepest streets of the study zone, but differences may be important in the other streets. Some reasons that can explain the differences between the two models are given and some research possibilities are proposed.

  15. Concentration data and dimensionality in groundwater models: evaluation using inverse modelling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barlebo, H.C.; Hill, M.C.; Rosbjerg, D.; Jensen, K.H.

    1998-01-01

    A three-dimensional inverse groundwater flow and transport model that fits hydraulic-head and concentration data simultaneously using nonlinear regression is presented and applied to a layered sand and silt groundwater system beneath the Grindsted Landfill in Denmark. The aquifer is composed of rather homogeneous hydrogeologic layers. Two issues common to groundwater flow and transport modelling are investigated: 1) The accuracy of simulated concentrations in the case of calibration with head data alone; and 2) The advantages and disadvantages of using a two-dimensional cross-sectional model instead of a three-dimensional model to simulate contaminant transport when the source is at the land surface. Results show that using only hydraulic heads in the nonlinear regression produces a simulated plume that is profoundly different from what is obtained in a calibration using both hydraulic-head and concentration data. The present study provides a well-documented example of the differences that can occur. Representing the system as a two-dimensional cross-section obviously omits some of the system dynamics. It was, however, possible to obtain a simulated plume cross-section that matched the actual plume cross-section well. The two-dimensional model execution times were about a seventh of those for the three-dimensional model, but some difficulties were encountered in representing the spatially variable source concentrations and less precise simulated concentrations were calculated by the two-dimensional model compared to the three-dimensional model. Summed up, the present study indicates that three dimensional modelling using both hydraulic heads and concentrations in the calibration should be preferred in the considered type of transport studies.

  16. How to Reduce Computational Time in Distributed Hydrological Modeling?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, U.; Tuteja, N. K.; Ajami, H.; Sharma, A.

    2012-12-01

    One of the key limitations of distributed hydrologic modeling for large scale simulations of soil moisture and land surface fluxes is the computational time spent in simulating hydrological processes. It is for this reason that applications involving assessment of model uncertainty, or simulating multiple input realizations as often needed to assess climate change impacts on a catchment, are not attempted, and models applied to understand hydrological processes in small sized, experimental catchments. The questions asked in this presentation are (a) whether one can simulate the catchment hydrology by simulating across multiple cross sections in a hillslope ; and (b) can one improve these simulations further by simulating on a single (or selected few) "Equivalent" cross-sections in the catchment. This new concept of an Equivalent Cross-section informed by the catchment landform is developed for upland catchments, to reduce computational time while maintaining the same order of accuracy in simulating hydrologic fluxes. The Unsaturated Soil Moisture Movement model (U3M-2d), based on a 2-dimensional solution of the Richards' equation, is used to simulate hydrologic fluxes. In this method, simulations with U3M-2d are first done for a number of uniformly spaced cross-sections in each Strahler's first order sub-basin and the total fluxes are estimated (reference case). Single or multiple Equivalent Cross-sections are then derived for each Strahler's first order sub-basin and results are compared against the reference case. To formulate the Equivalent Cross-section, the catchment is divided into four major landforms using the methodology developed by Khan et al. [2009] and then a range of weighting schemes for topographic variables and soil types are investigated. The Equivalent Cross-section approach is investigated for seven first order sub-basins of McLaughlin catchment of Snowy River and Wagga Wagga experimental catchment of NSW, Australia. Simulated fluxes by the

  17. POD-Galerkin reduced-order modeling with adaptive finite element snapshots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, Sebastian; Rotkvic, Marko; Lang, Jens

    2016-11-01

    We consider model order reduction by proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) for parametrized partial differential equations, where the underlying snapshots are computed with adaptive finite elements. We address computational and theoretical issues arising from the fact that the snapshots are members of different finite element spaces. We propose a method to create a POD-Galerkin model without interpolating the snapshots onto their common finite element mesh. The error of the reduced-order solution is not necessarily Galerkin orthogonal to the reduced space created from space-adapted snapshot. We analyze how this influences the error assessment for POD-Galerkin models of linear elliptic boundary value problems. As a numerical example we consider a two-dimensional convection-diffusion equation with a parametrized convective direction. To illustrate the applicability of our techniques to non-linear time-dependent problems, we present a test case of a two-dimensional viscous Burgers equation with parametrized initial data.

  18. Three-dimensional Model of Tissue and Heavy Ions Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, Artem L.; Sundaresan, Alamelu; Huff, Janice L.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional tissue model was incorporated into a new Monte Carlo algorithm that simulates passage of heavy ions in a tissue box . The tissue box was given as a realistic model of tissue based on confocal microscopy images. The action of heavy ions on the cellular matrix for 2- or 3-dimensional cases was simulated. Cells were modeled as a cell culture monolayer in one example, where the data were taken directly from microscopy (2-d cell matrix), and as a multi-layer obtained from confocal microscopy (3-d case). Image segmentation was used to identify cells with precise areas/volumes in an irradiated cell culture monolayer, and slices of tissue with many cell layers. The cells were then inserted into the model box of the simulated physical space pixel by pixel. In the case of modeled tissues (3-d), the tissue box had periodic boundary conditions imposed, which extrapolates the technique to macroscopic volumes of tissue. For the real tissue (3-d), specific spatial patterns for cell apoptosis and necrosis are expected. The cell patterns were modeled based on action cross sections for apoptosis and necrosis estimated from current experimental data. A spatial correlation function indicating a higher spatial concentration of damaged cells from heavy ions relative to the low-LET radiation cell damage pattern is presented. The spatial correlation effects among necrotic cells can help studying microlesions in organs, and probable effects of directionality of heavy ion radiation on epithelium and endothelium.

  19. Three-dimensional Model of Tissue and Heavy Ions Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, Artem L.; Sundaresan, Alamelu; Huff, Janice L.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional tissue model was incorporated into a new Monte Carlo algorithm that simulates passage of heavy ions in a tissue box . The tissue box was given as a realistic model of tissue based on confocal microscopy images. The action of heavy ions on the cellular matrix for 2- or 3-dimensional cases was simulated. Cells were modeled as a cell culture monolayer in one example, where the data were taken directly from microscopy (2-d cell matrix), and as a multi-layer obtained from confocal microscopy (3-d case). Image segmentation was used to identify cells with precise areas/volumes in an irradiated cell culture monolayer, and slices of tissue with many cell layers. The cells were then inserted into the model box of the simulated physical space pixel by pixel. In the case of modeled tissues (3-d), the tissue box had periodic boundary conditions imposed, which extrapolates the technique to macroscopic volumes of tissue. For the real tissue (3-d), specific spatial patterns for cell apoptosis and necrosis are expected. The cell patterns were modeled based on action cross sections for apoptosis and necrosis estimated from current experimental data. A spatial correlation function indicating a higher spatial concentration of damaged cells from heavy ions relative to the low-LET radiation cell damage pattern is presented. The spatial correlation effects among necrotic cells can help studying microlesions in organs, and probable effects of directionality of heavy ion radiation on epithelium and endothelium.

  20. Signatures from an extra-dimensional seesaw model

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, Mattias; Melbeus, Henrik; Ohlsson, Tommy; Zhang He

    2010-08-15

    We study the generation of small neutrino masses in an extra-dimensional model, where singlet fermions are allowed to propagate in the extra dimension, while the standard model particles are confined to a brane. Motivated by the fact that extra-dimensional models are nonrenormalizable, we truncate the Kaluza-Klein towers at a maximal Kaluza-Klein number. This truncation, together with the structure of the bulk Majorana mass term, motivated by the Sherk-Schwarz mechanism, implies that the Kaluza-Klein modes of the singlet fermions pair to form Dirac fermions, except for a number of unpaired Majorana fermions at the top of each tower. These heavy Majorana fermions are the only sources of lepton number breaking in the model, and similarly to the type-I seesaw mechanism, they naturally generate small masses for the left-handed neutrinos. The lower Kaluza-Klein modes mix with the light neutrinos, and the mixing effects are not suppressed with respect to the light-neutrino masses. Compared to conventional fermionic seesaw models, such mixing can be more significant. We study the signals of this model at the Large Hadron Collider, and find that the current low-energy bounds on the nonunitarity of the leptonic mixing matrix are strong enough to exclude an observation.

  1. Reduced Quasilinear Models for Energetic Particles Interaction with Alfvenic Eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect

    Ghantous, Katy

    2013-11-01

    The Line Broadened Quasilinear (LBQ) and the 1.5D reduced models are able to predict the effect of Alfvenic eigenmodes' interaction with energetic particles in burning plasmas. This interaction can result in energetic-particle losses that can damage the first wall, deteriorate the plasma performance, and even prevent ignition. The 1.5D model assumes a broad spectrum of overlapping modes and, based on analytic expressions for the growth and damping rates, calculates the pressure profiles that the energetic particles relax to upon interacting with the modes. 1.5D is validated with DIII-D experiments and predicted neutron losses consistent with observation. The model is employed to predict alpha-particle fusion-product losses in a large-scale operational parameter-space for burning plasmas. \\par The LBQ model captures the interaction both in the regime of isolated modes as well as in the conventional regime of overlapping modes. Rules were established that allow quasilinear equations to replicate the expected steady-state saturation levels of isolated modes. The fitting formula is improved and the model is benchmarked with a Vlasov code, BOT. The saturation levels are accurately predicted and the mode evolution is well-replicated in the case of steady-state evolution where the collisions are high enough that coherent structures do not form. When the collisionality is low, oscillatory behavior can occur. LBQ can also exhibit non-steady behavior, but the onset of oscillations occurs for much higher collisional rates in BOT than in LBQ. For certain parameters of low collisionality, hole-clump creation and frequency chirping can occur which are not captured by the LBQ model. Also, there are cases of non-steady evolution without chirping which is possible for LBQ to study. However the results are inconclusive since the periods and amplitudes of the oscillations in the mode evolution are not well-replicated. If multiple modes exist, they can grow to the point of overlap

  2. Reduced quasilinear models for energetic particles interaction with Alfvenic eigenmodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghantous, Katy

    The Line Broadened Quasilinear (LBQ) and the 1.5D reduced models are able to predict the effect of Alfvenic eigenmodes' interaction with energetic particles in burning plasmas. This interaction can result in energetic-particle losses that can damage the first wall, deteriorate the plasma performance, and even prevent ignition. The 1.5D model assumes a broad spectrum of overlapping modes and, based on analytic expressions for the growth and damping rates, calculates the pressure profiles that the energetic particles relax to upon interacting with the modes. 1.5D is validated with DIII-D experiments and predicted neutron losses consistent with observation. The model is employed to predict alpha-particle fusion-product losses in a large-scale operational parameter-space for burning plasmas. The LBQ model captures the interaction both in the regime of isolated modes as well as in the conventional regime of overlapping modes. Rules were established that allow quasilinear equations to replicate the expected steady-state saturation levels of isolated modes. The fitting formula is improved and the model is benchmarked with a Vlasov code, BOT. The saturation levels are accurately predicted and the mode evolution is well-replicated in the case of steady-state evolution where the collisions are high enough that coherent structures do not form. When the collisionality is low, oscillatory behavior can occur. LBQ can also exhibit non-steady behavior, but the onset of oscillations occurs for much higher collisional rates in BOT than in LBQ. For certain parameters of low collisionality, hole-clump creation and frequency chirping can occur which are not captured by the LBQ model. Also, there are cases of non-steady evolution without chirping which is possible for LBQ to study. However the results are inconclusive since the periods and amplitudes of the oscillations in the mode evolution are not well-replicated. If multiple modes exist, they can grow to the point of overlap which

  3. The Dimensional Nature of Externalizing Behaviors in Adolescence: Evidence from a Direct Comparison of Categorical, Dimensional, and Hybrid Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Kate E.; Ormel, Johan; Krueger, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    Researchers have recognized the importance of developing an accurate classification system for externalizing disorders, though much of this work has been framed by a priori preferences for categorical vs. dimensional constructs. Newer statistical technologies now allow categorical and dimensional models of psychopathology to be compared…

  4. The Dimensional Nature of Externalizing Behaviors in Adolescence: Evidence from a Direct Comparison of Categorical, Dimensional, and Hybrid Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Kate E.; Ormel, Johan; Krueger, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    Researchers have recognized the importance of developing an accurate classification system for externalizing disorders, though much of this work has been framed by a priori preferences for categorical vs. dimensional constructs. Newer statistical technologies now allow categorical and dimensional models of psychopathology to be compared…

  5. One-dimensional nonlinear elastodynamic models and their local conservation laws with applications to biological membranes.

    PubMed

    Cheviakov, A F; Ganghoffer, J-F

    2016-05-01

    The framework of incompressible nonlinear hyperelasticity and viscoelasticity is applied to the derivation of one-dimensional models of nonlinear wave propagation in fiber-reinforced elastic solids. Equivalence transformations are used to simplify the resulting wave equations and to reduce the number of parameters. Local conservation laws and global conserved quantities of the models are systematically computed and discussed, along with other related mathematical properties. Sample numerical solutions are presented. The models considered in the paper are appropriate for the mathematical description of certain aspects of the behavior of biological membranes and similar structures.

  6. A six-dimensional Jordan model for electroweak interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez Merino, Aldo; Obregon, Octavio

    2014-03-01

    We present a model for the electroweak interactions based on the commutative but non-associative exceptional Jordan algebra of Hermitian matrices valued on the octonions. By this means, we propose a construction of a gauge theory which take values in this algebra. Following closely the six-dimensional model proposed by D. Fairlie years ago and using a supergroup, we found a natural structure that provides the weak interaction action with some additional terms; we will briefly comment on their possible meaning. Postdoctoral Fellow at Universidad de Guanajuato.

  7. Three-dimensional nanojunction device models for photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wangperawong, Artit; Bent, Stacey F.

    2011-06-01

    A model is developed to describe the behavior of three-dimensionally nanostructured photovoltaic devices, distinguishing between isolated radial pn junctions and interdigitated pn junctions. We examine two specific interdigitated architectures, the point-contact nanojunction and the extended nanojunction, which are most relevant to experimental devices reported to date but have yet to be distinguished in the field. The model is also applied to polycrystalline CdTe devices with inverted grain boundaries. We demonstrate that for CdTe/CdS solar cells using low-quality materials, the efficiency of the extended nanojunction geometry is superior to other designs considered.

  8. Edge formation in low-dimensional models of shear transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebovitz, Norman

    2010-11-01

    Low dimensional models are used to illustrate the nature of an edge state. In these models the edge is the stable manifold of a lower-branch equilibrium point. It comes into existence in connection with the birth of a periodic orbit via a homoclinic bifurcation as a parameter (the Reynolds number) increases beyond a critical value. Even for values of the Reynolds number less than this critical value, the structure of the basin boundary is such that edge-like behavior occurs in parts of phase space. It is possible to manufacture dynamical systems for which the edge state disappears for sufficiently large parameter values.

  9. Corner wetting transition in the two-dimensional Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipowski, Adam

    1998-07-01

    We study the interfacial behavior of the two-dimensional Ising model at the corner of weakened bonds. Monte Carlo simulations results show that the interface is pinned to the corner at a lower temperature than a certain temperature Tcw at which it undergoes a corner wetting transition. The temperature Tcw is substantially lower than the temperature of the ordinary wetting transition with a line of weakened bonds. A solid-on-solid-like model is proposed, which provides a supplementary description of the corner wetting transition.

  10. Three Dimensional Modeling of an MRI Actuated Steerable Catheter System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Taoming; Cavuşoğlu, M Cenk

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the three dimensional kinematic modeling of a novel steerable robotic ablation catheter system. The catheter, embedded with a set of current-carrying micro-coils, is actuated by the magnetic forces generated by the magnetic field of the MRI scanner. This paper develops a 3D model of the MRI actuated steerable catheter system by using finite differences approach. For each finite segment, a quasi-static torque-deflection equilibrium equation is calculated using beam theory. By using the deflection displacements and torsion angles, the kinematic modeling of the catheter system is derived. The proposed models are evaluated by comparing the simulation results of the proposed model with the experimental results of a proof-of-concept prototype.

  11. Three Dimensional Modeling of an MRI Actuated Steerable Catheter System

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Taoming; Çavuşoğlu, M. Cenk

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the three dimensional kinematic modeling of a novel steerable robotic ablation catheter system. The catheter, embedded with a set of current-carrying micro-coils, is actuated by the magnetic forces generated by the magnetic field of the MRI scanner. This paper develops a 3D model of the MRI actuated steerable catheter system by using finite differences approach. For each finite segment, a quasi-static torque-deflection equilibrium equation is calculated using beam theory. By using the deflection displacements and torsion angles, the kinematic modeling of the catheter system is derived. The proposed models are evaluated by comparing the simulation results of the proposed model with the experimental results of a proof-of-concept prototype. PMID:25328804

  12. Statistical validation of high-dimensional models of growing networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medo, Matúš

    2014-03-01

    The abundance of models of complex networks and the current insufficient validation standards make it difficult to judge which models are strongly supported by data and which are not. We focus here on likelihood maximization methods for models of growing networks with many parameters and compare their performance on artificial and real datasets. While high dimensionality of the parameter space harms the performance of direct likelihood maximization on artificial data, this can be improved by introducing a suitable penalization term. Likelihood maximization on real data shows that the presented approach is able to discriminate among available network models. To make large-scale datasets accessible to this kind of analysis, we propose a subset sampling technique and show that it yields substantial model evidence in a fraction of time necessary for the analysis of the complete data.

  13. Two-Dimensional Quantum Model of a Nanotransistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Govindan, T. R.; Biegel, B.; Svizhenko, A.; Anantram, M. P.

    2009-01-01

    A mathematical model, and software to implement the model, have been devised to enable numerical simulation of the transport of electric charge in, and the resulting electrical performance characteristics of, a nanotransistor [in particular, a metal oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) having a channel length of the order of tens of nanometers] in which the overall device geometry, including the doping profiles and the injection of charge from the source, gate, and drain contacts, are approximated as being two-dimensional. The model and software constitute a computational framework for quantitatively exploring such device-physics issues as those of source-drain and gate leakage currents, drain-induced barrier lowering, and threshold voltage shift due to quantization. The model and software can also be used as means of studying the accuracy of quantum corrections to other semiclassical models.

  14. A Multi-Dimensional Classification Model for Scientific Workflow Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Ramakrishnan, Lavanya; Plale, Beth

    2010-04-05

    Workflows have been used to model repeatable tasks or operations in manufacturing, business process, and software. In recent years, workflows are increasingly used for orchestration of science discovery tasks that use distributed resources and web services environments through resource models such as grid and cloud computing. Workflows have disparate re uirements and constraints that affects how they might be managed in distributed environments. In this paper, we present a multi-dimensional classification model illustrated by workflow examples obtained through a survey of scientists from different domains including bioinformatics and biomedical, weather and ocean modeling, astronomy detailing their data and computational requirements. The survey results and classification model contribute to the high level understandingof scientific workflows.

  15. Automated photogrammetry for three-dimensional models of urban spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leberl, Franz; Meixner, Philipp; Wendel, Andreas; Irschara, Arnold

    2012-02-01

    The location-aware Internet is inspiring intensive work addressing the automated assembly of three-dimensional models of urban spaces with their buildings, circulation spaces, vegetation, signs, even their above-ground and underground utility lines. Two-dimensional geographic information systems (GISs) and municipal utility information exist and can serve to guide the creation of models being built with aerial, sometimes satellite imagery, streetside images, indoor imaging, and alternatively with light detection and ranging systems (LiDARs) carried on airplanes, cars, or mounted on tripods. We review the results of current research to automate the information extraction from sensor data. We show that aerial photography at ground sampling distances (GSD) of 1 to 10 cm is well suited to provide geometry data about building facades and roofs, that streetside imagery at 0.5 to 2 cm is particularly interesting when it is collected within community photo collections (CPCs) by the general public, and that the transition to digital imaging has opened the no-cost option of highly overlapping images in support of a more complete and thus more economical automation. LiDAR-systems are a widely used source of three-dimensional data, but they deliver information not really superior to digital photography.

  16. Three-dimensional face model reproduction method using multiview images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagashima, Yoshio; Agawa, Hiroshi; Kishino, Fumio

    1991-11-01

    This paper describes a method of reproducing three-dimensional face models using multi-view images for a virtual space teleconferencing system that achieves a realistic visual presence for teleconferencing. The goal of this research, as an integral component of a virtual space teleconferencing system, is to generate a three-dimensional face model from facial images, synthesize images of the model virtually viewed from different angles, and with natural shadow to suit the lighting conditions of the virtual space. The proposed method is as follows: first, front and side view images of the human face are taken by TV cameras. The 3D data of facial feature points are obtained from front- and side-views by an image processing technique based on the color, shape, and correlation of face components. Using these 3D data, the prepared base face models, representing typical Japanese male and female faces, are modified to approximate the input facial image. The personal face model, representing the individual character, is then reproduced. Next, an oblique view image is taken by TV camera. The feature points of the oblique view image are extracted using the same image processing technique. A more precise personal model is reproduced by fitting the boundary of the personal face model to the boundary of the oblique view image. The modified boundary of the personal face model is determined by using face direction, namely rotation angle, which is detected based on the extracted feature points. After the 3D model is established, the new images are synthesized by mapping facial texture onto the model.

  17. A hybrid model for reducing ecological bias.

    PubMed

    Salway, Ruth; Wakefield, Jon

    2008-01-01

    A major drawback of epidemiological ecological studies, in which the association between area-level summaries of risk and exposure is used to make inference about individual risk, is the difficulty in characterizing within-area variability in exposure and confounder variables. To avoid ecological bias, samples of individual exposure/confounder data within each area are required. Unfortunately, these may be difficult or expensive to obtain, particularly if large samples are required. In this paper, we propose a new approach suitable for use with small samples. We combine a Bayesian nonparametric Dirichlet process prior with an estimating functions' approach and show that this model gives a compromise between 2 previously described methods. The method is investigated using simulated data, and a practical illustration is provided through an analysis of lung cancer mortality and residential radon exposure in counties of Minnesota. We conclude that we require good quality prior information about the exposure/confounder distributions and a large between- to within-area variability ratio for an ecological study to be feasible using only small samples of individual data.

  18. Experimental and theoretical models for three-dimensional laser shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satasook, Witawats

    This research demonstrates, for the first time, the application of a polygonal scanner to machine three-dimensional shapes of graphite, a model material, and an advanced structural ceramic, silicon nitride (Si3N 4). Laser machining strategies proposed by Copley, Bass, and Hsu have been investigated by systematic experiments and the validity and limitations of their approaches have been assessed. Machining parameters including the orientation of the incident laser beam relative to the surface, orientation of the linearly polarized laser beam's electric vector, incident power, laser scan speed, beam feed (f) to single groove width (a) ratio f/a, and focal plane position were investigated, and optimized parameters for high material removal rates and low surface roughnesses were identified. Perpendicular walls (oriented 90° with respect to the initial specimen surface), blind comers and quadrant hemispherical caps (complex three-dimensional shape) of graphite (Poco, graphite grade SK-6) and silicon nitride (Si 3N4 GS-44) were successfully machined.

  19. Coherent two-dimensional spectroscopy of a Fano model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelstein-Shapiro, Daniel; Poulsen, Felipe; Pullerits, Tõnu; Hansen, Thorsten

    2016-11-01

    The Fano line shape arises from the interference of two excitation pathways to reach a continuum. Its generality has resulted in a tremendous success in explaining the line shapes of many one-dimensional spectroscopies—absorption, emission, scattering, conductance, photofragmentation—applied to very varied systems—atoms, molecules, semiconductors, and metals. Unraveling a spectroscopy into a second dimension reveals the relationship between states in addition to decongesting the spectra. Femtosecond-resolved two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES) is a four-wave mixing technique that measures the time evolution of the populations and coherences of excited states. It has been applied extensively to the dynamics of photosynthetic units, and more recently to materials with extended band structures. In this paper, we solve the full time-dependent third-order response, measured in 2DES, of a Fano model and give the system parameters that become accessible.

  20. Goldilocks models of higher-dimensional inflation (including modulus stabilization)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, C. P.; Enns, Jared J. H.; Hayman, Peter; Patil, Subodh P.

    2016-08-01

    We explore the mechanics of inflation within simplified extra-dimensional models involving an inflaton interacting with the Einstein-Maxwell system in two extra dimensions. The models are Goldilocks-like inasmuch as they are just complicated enough to include a mechanism to stabilize the extra-dimensional size (or modulus), yet simple enough to solve explicitly the full extra-dimensional field equations using only simple tools. The solutions are not restricted to the effective 4D regime with H ll mKK (the latter referring to the characteristic mass splitting of the Kaluza-Klein excitations) because the full extra-dimensional Einstein equations are solved. This allows an exploration of inflationary physics in a controlled calculational regime away from the usual four-dimensional lamp-post. The inclusion of modulus stabilization is important because experience with string models teaches that this is usually what makes models fail: stabilization energies easily dominate the shallow potentials required by slow roll and so open up directions to evolve that are steeper than those of the putative inflationary direction. We explore (numerically and analytically) three representative kinds of inflationary scenarios within this simple setup. In one the radion is trapped in an inflaton-dependent local minimum whose non-zero energy drives inflation. Inflation ends as this energy relaxes to zero when the inflaton finds its own minimum. The other two involve power-law scaling solutions during inflation. One of these is a dynamical attractor whose features are relatively insensitive to initial conditions but whose slow-roll parameters cannot be arbitrarily small; the other is not an attractor but can roll much more slowly, until eventually transitioning to the attractor. The scaling solutions can satisfy H > mKK, but when they do standard 4D fluctuation calculations need not apply. When in a 4D regime the solutions predict η simeq 0 and so r simeq 0.11 when ns simeq 0.96 and so

  1. The innovative concept of three-dimensional hybrid receptor modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojić, A.; Stanišić Stojić, S.

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to improve the current understanding of air pollution transport processes at regional and long-range scale. For this purpose, three-dimensional (3D) potential source contribution function and concentration weighted trajectory models, as well as new hybrid receptor model, concentration weighted boundary layer (CWBL), which uses a two-dimensional grid and a planetary boundary layer height as a frame of reference, are presented. The refined approach to hybrid receptor modeling has two advantages. At first, it considers whether each trajectory endpoint meets the inclusion criteria based on planetary boundary layer height, which is expected to provide a more realistic representation of the spatial distribution of emission sources and pollutant transport pathways. Secondly, it includes pollutant time series preprocessing to make hybrid receptor models more applicable for suburban and urban locations. The 3D hybrid receptor models presented herein are designed to identify altitude distribution of potential sources, whereas CWBL can be used for analyzing the vertical distribution of pollutant concentrations along the transport pathway.

  2. Mandibular reconstruction using stereolithographic 3-dimensional printing modeling technology.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Adir; Laviv, Amir; Berman, Phillip; Nashef, Rizan; Abu-Tair, Jawad

    2009-11-01

    Mandibular reconstruction can be challenging for the surgeon wishing to restore its unique geometry. Reconstruction can be achieved with titanium bone plates followed by autogenous bone grafting. Incorporation of the bone graft into the mandible provides continuity and strength required for proper esthetics and function and permitting dental implant rehabilitation at a later stage. Precious time in the operating room is invested in plate contouring to reconstruct the mandible. Rapid prototyping technologies can construct physical models from computer-aided design via 3-dimensional (3D) printers. A prefabricated 3D model is achieved, which assists in accurate contouring of plates and/or planning of bone graft harvest geometry before surgery. The 2 most commonly used rapid prototyping technologies are stereolithography and 3D printing (3DP). Three-dimensional printing is advantageous to stereolithography for better accuracy, quicker printing time, and lower cost. We present 3 clinical cases based on 3DP modeling technology. Models were fabricated before the resection of mandibular ameloblastoma and were used to prepare bridging plates before the first stage of reconstruction. In 1 case, another model was fabricated and used as a template for iliac crest bone graft in the second stage of reconstruction. The 3DP technology provided a precise, fast, and cheap mandibular reconstruction, which aids in shortened operation time (and therefore decreased exposure time to general anesthesia, decreased blood loss, and shorter wound exposure time) and easier surgical procedure.

  3. Modeling of three-dimensional mixing and reacting ducted flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelazny, S. W.; Baker, A. J.; Rushmore, W. L.

    1976-01-01

    A computer code, based upon a finite element solution algorithm, was developed to solve the governing equations for three-dimensional, reacting boundary region, and constant area ducted flow fields. Effective diffusion coefficients are employed to allow analyses of turbulent, transitional or laminar flows. The code was used to investigate mixing and reacting hydrogen jets injected from multiple orifices, transverse and parallel to a supersonic air stream. Computational results provide a three-dimensional description of velocity, temperature, and species-concentration fields downstream of injection. Experimental data for eight cases covering different injection conditions and geometries were modeled using mixing length theory (MLT). These results were used as a baseline for examining the relative merits of other mixing models. Calculations were made using a two-equation turbulence model (k+d) and comparisons were made between experiment and mixing length theory predictions. The k+d model shows only a slight improvement in predictive capability over MLT. Results of an examination of the effect of tensorial transport coefficients on mass and momentum field distribution are also presented. Solutions demonstrating the ability of the code to model ducted flows and parallel strut injection are presented and discussed.

  4. Exact solution of the one-dimensional J sup 2 model of superconducting networks in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, R.B. Service de Physique Theorique, Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette ); Floria, L.M. )

    1992-05-01

    A simplified one-dimensional model of certain nonperiodic networks of superconducting wires in a magnetic field, introduced by Grest, Chaikin, and Levine, is solved exactly by reducing it to a mathematical problem involving Fourier transforms of one-dimensional sequences. Explicit results are obtained for some particular cases including that of the Fibonacci sequence'' considered by them. Inflation symmetry appears to play no significant role; the crucial question is the existence and structure of a discrete spectrum in the Fourier transform.

  5. Reduced Shell Model Calculations of 106Sb and 108Sb

    SciTech Connect

    Dikmen, Erdal

    2007-04-23

    The reduced shell model calculations have been done for the odd-odd 106Sb and 108Sb isotopes. The model space has been chosen as 1d5/2, 0g7/2, 1d3/2, 2s1/2 for the reduced calculations and included 0h11/2 for the full calculations. The reduced shell model calculations of 108Sb isotope are presented for the first time. The calculated energy spectra are compared to the experimental results to understand which model space is the best for the shell model calculations around N = Z = 50 region of the periodic table. This is the extention of the study that whether the reduced shell model calculations are capable of reproducing the experimental results for the nuclei whose shell model calculations can be carried out in the full model space.

  6. Numerical simulations of a reduced model for blood coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, Jevgenija; Fasano, Antonio; Sequeira, Adélia

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the three-dimensional numerical resolution of a complex mathematical model for the blood coagulation process is presented. The model was illustrated in Fasano et al. (Clin Hemorheol Microcirc 51:1-14, 2012), Pavlova et al. (Theor Biol 380:367-379, 2015). It incorporates the action of the biochemical and cellular components of blood as well as the effects of the flow. The model is characterized by a reduction in the biochemical network and considers the impact of the blood slip at the vessel wall. Numerical results showing the capacity of the model to predict different perturbations in the hemostatic system are discussed.

  7. Recursive three-dimensional model reconstruction based on Kalman filtering.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ying Kin; Wong, Kin Hong; Chang, Michael Ming Yuen

    2005-06-01

    A recursive two-step method to recover structure and motion from image sequences based on Kalman filtering is described in this paper. The algorithm consists of two major steps. The first step is an extended Kalman filter (EKF) for the estimation of the object's pose. The second step is a set of EKFs, one for each model point, for the refinement of the positions of the model features in the three-dimensional (3-D) space. These two steps alternate from frame to frame. The initial model converges to the final structure as the image sequence is scanned sequentially. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated with both synthetic data and real-world objects. Analytical and empirical comparisons are made among our approach, the interleaved bundle adjustment method, and the Kalman filtering-based recursive algorithm by Azarbayejani and Pentland. Our approach outperformed the other two algorithms in terms of computation speed without loss in the quality of model reconstruction.

  8. A three dimensional heart model based on anatomically aligned trusses.

    PubMed

    Witman, S; Gefen, A; Barnea, O

    2007-01-01

    A new approach for modeling and simulating the contraction of the heart is presented. The model is based on anatomical images and accounts for cardiac muscle fibers and their orientation. The heart is modeled as a structure built of trusses, each representing a group of myofibers with calculated deformations using matrix structural analysis. Three elements are represented; these are the contractile cardiac muscle, the elastic passive collagen, and intracardiac blood interacting with the heart's preload and afterload. Incompressibility of each element is preserved. The conduction system is simulated in the model by transferring the activating signal from one element to another or by Purkinje fibers activation. The method was demonstrated using a three-dimensional one-layer geometrical ventricle with orthogonal fibers and with anatomically oriented fibers.

  9. Development of an interactive anatomical three-dimensional eye model.

    PubMed

    Allen, Lauren K; Bhattacharyya, Siddhartha; Wilson, Timothy D

    2015-01-01

    The discrete anatomy of the eye's intricate oculomotor system is conceptually difficult for novice students to grasp. This is problematic given that this group of muscles represents one of the most common sites of clinical intervention in the treatment of ocular motility disorders and other eye disorders. This project was designed to develop a digital, interactive, three-dimensional (3D) model of the muscles and cranial nerves of the oculomotor system. Development of the 3D model utilized data from the Visible Human Project (VHP) dataset that was refined using multiple forms of 3D software. The model was then paired with a virtual user interface in order to create a novel 3D learning tool for the human oculomotor system. Development of the virtual eye model was done while attempting to adhere to the principles of cognitive load theory (CLT) and the reduction of extraneous load in particular. The detailed approach, digital tools employed, and the CLT guidelines are described herein.

  10. Assessing Predicted Contacts for Building Protein Three-Dimensional Models.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Badri; Bhattacharya, Debswapna; Cao, Renzhi; Cheng, Jianlin

    2017-01-01

    Recent successes of contact-guided protein structure prediction methods have revived interest in solving the long-standing problem of ab initio protein structure prediction. With homology modeling failing for many protein sequences that do not have templates, contact-guided structure prediction has shown promise, and consequently, contact prediction has gained a lot of interest recently. Although a few dozen contact prediction tools are already currently available as web servers and downloadables, not enough research has been done towards using existing measures like precision and recall to evaluate these contacts with the goal of building three-dimensional models. Moreover, when we do not have a native structure for a set of predicted contacts, the only analysis we can perform is a simple contact map visualization of the predicted contacts. A wider and more rigorous assessment of the predicted contacts is needed, in order to build tertiary structure models. This chapter discusses instructions and protocols for using tools and applying techniques in order to assess predicted contacts for building three-dimensional models.

  11. Up and down cascades: three-dimensional magnetic field model.

    PubMed

    Blanter, E M; Shnirman, M G; Le Mouël, J L

    2002-06-01

    In our previous works we already have proposed a two-dimensional model of geodynamo. Now we use the same approach to build a three-dimensional self-excited geodynamo model that generates a large scale magnetic field from whatever small initial field, using the up and down cascade effects of a multiscale turbulent system of cyclones. The multiscale system of turbulent cyclones evolves in six domains of an equatorial cylindrical layer of the core. The appearance of new cyclones is realized by two cascades: a turbulent direct cascade and an inverse cascade of coupling of similar cyclones. The interaction between the different domains is effected through a direct cascade parameter which is essential for the statistics of the long-life symmetry breaking. Generation of the secondary magnetic field results from the interaction of the components of the primary magnetic field with the turbulent cyclones. The amplification of the magnetic field is due to the transfer of energy from the turbulent helical motion to the generated magnetic field. The model demonstrates a phase transition through the parameter characterizing this energy transfer. In the supercritical domain we obtain long-term intervals of constant polarity (chrons) and quick reversals; relevant time constants agree with paleomagnetic observations. Possible application of the model to the study of the geometrical structure of the geomagnetic field (and briefly other planetary fields) is discussed.

  12. Spatial modes in one-dimensional models for capillary jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, J.; González, H.; García, F. J.

    2016-03-01

    One-dimensional (1D) models are widely employed to simplify the analysis of axisymmetric capillary jets. These models postulate that, for slender deformations of the free surface, the radial profile of the axial velocity can be approximated as uniform (viscous slice, averaged, and Cosserat models) or parabolic (parabolic model). In classical works on spatial stability analysis with 1D models, considerable misinterpretation was generated about the modes yielded by each model. The already existing physical analysis of three-dimensional (3D) axisymmetric spatial modes enables us to relate these 1D spatial modes to the exact 3D counterparts. To do so, we address the surface stimulation problem, which can be treated as linear, by considering the effect of normal and tangential stresses to perturb the jet. A Green's function for a spatially local stimulation having a harmonic time dependence provides the general formalism to describe any time-periodic stimulation. The Green's function of this signaling problem is known to be a superposition of the spatial modes, but in fact these modes are of fundamental nature, i.e., not restricted to the surface stimulation problem. The smallness of the wave number associated with each mode is the criterion to validate or invalidate the 1D approaches. The proposed axial-velocity profiles (planar or parabolic) also have a remarkable influence on the outcomes of each 1D model. We also compare with the classical 3D results for (i) conditions for absolute instability, and (ii) the amplitude of the unstable mode resulting from both normal and tangential surface stress stimulation. Incidentally, as a previous task, we need to re-deduce 1D models in order to include eventual stresses of various possible origins (electrohydrodynamic, thermocapillary, etc.) applied on the free surface, which were not considered in the previous general formulations.

  13. Three-dimensional Myoblast Aggregates--Effects of Modeled Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byerly, Diane; Sognier, M. A.; Marquette, M. L.

    2006-01-01

    The overall objective of these studies is to elucidate the molecular and cellular alterations that contribute to muscle atrophy in astronauts caused by exposure to microgravity conditions in space. To accomplish this, a three-dimensional model test system was developed using mouse myoblast cells (C2C12). Myoblast cells were grown as three-dimensional aggregates (without scaffolding or other solid support structures) in both modeled microgravity (Rotary Cell Culture System, Synthecon, Inc.) and at unit gravity in coated Petri dishes. Evaluation of H&E stained thin sections of the aggregates revealed the absence of any necrosis. Confocal microscopy evaluations of cells stained with the Live/Dead assay (Molecular Probes) confirmed that viable cells were present throughout the aggregates with an average of only three dead cells observed per aggregate. Preliminary results from gene array analysis (Affymetrix chip U74Av2) showed that approximately 14% of the genes were down regulated (decreased more than 3 fold) and 4% were upregulated in cells exposed to modeled microgravity for 12 hours compared to unit gravity controls. Additional studies using fluorescent phallacidin revealed a decrease in F-actin in the cells exposed to modeled microgravity compared to unit gravity. Myoblast cells grown as aggregates in modeled microgravity exhibited spontaneous differentiation into syncitia while no differentiation was seen in the unit gravity controls. These studies show that 1)the model test system developed is suitable for assessing cellular and molecular alterations in myoblasts; 2) gene expression alterations occur rapidly (within 12 hours) following exposure to modeled microgravity; and 3) modeled microgravity conditions stimulated myoblast cell differentiation. Achieving a greater understanding of the molecular alterations leading to muscle atrophy will eventually enable the development of cell-based countermeasures, which may be valuable for treatment of muscle diseases on

  14. Stochastic Modeling of Multi-Dimensional Precipitation Fields.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Chulsang

    1995-01-01

    A new multi-dimensional stochastic precipitation model is proposed with major emphasis on its spectral structure. As a hyperbolic type of stochastic partial differential equation, this model is characterized by having a small set of parameters, which could be easily estimated. These characteristics are similar to those of the noise forced diffusive precipitation model, but representation of the physics and statistical features of the precipitation field is better as in the WGR precipitation model. The model derivation was based on the AR (Auto Regressive) process considering advection and diffusion, the dominant statistical and physical characteristics of the precipitation field propagation. The model spectrum showed a good match for the GATE spectrum developed by Nakamoto et al. (1990). This model was also compared with the WGR model and the noise forced diffusive precipitation model analytically and through applications such as the sampling error estimation from space-borne sensors and raingages, and the ground-truth problem. The sampling error from space-borne sensors based on the proposed model was similar to that of the noise forced diffusive precipitation model but much smaller than that of the WGR model. Similar result was also obtained in the estimation of the sampling error from raingages. The dimensionless root mean square error of the proposed model in the ground-truth problem was in between those of the WGR model and the noise forced diffusive precipitation model, even though the difference was very small. Simulation study of the realistic precipitation field showed the effect of the variance of the noise forcing term on the life time of a storm event.

  15. Computational Model Builder for Multi-Dimensional Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-12

    Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per...Model Builder (CMB) and includes applications for processing LiDAR (PointsBuilder), creating appropriate geometric scenes (SceneBuilder), creating...various scanned based data such as LiDAR  SceneBuilder – provides the ability of creating geometric scenes of the domain being modeled  GeologyBuilder

  16. A comparison of two- and three-dimensional stochastic models of regional solute movement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shapiro, A.M.; Cvetkovic, V.D.

    1990-01-01

    Recent models of solute movement in porous media that are based on a stochastic description of the porous medium properties have been dedicated primarily to a three-dimensional interpretation of solute movement. In many practical problems, however, it is more convenient and consistent with measuring techniques to consider flow and solute transport as an areal, two-dimensional phenomenon. The physics of solute movement, however, is dependent on the three-dimensional heterogeneity in the formation. A comparison of two- and three-dimensional stochastic interpretations of solute movement in a porous medium having a statistically isotropic hydraulic conductivity field is investigated. To provide an equitable comparison between the two- and three-dimensional analyses, the stochastic properties of the transmissivity are defined in terms of the stochastic properties of the hydraulic conductivity. The variance of the transmissivity is shown to be significantly reduced in comparison to that of the hydraulic conductivity, and the transmissivity is spatially correlated over larger distances. These factors influence the two-dimensional interpretations of solute movement by underestimating the longitudinal and transverse growth of the solute plume in comparison to its description as a three-dimensional phenomenon. Although this analysis is based on small perturbation approximations and the special case of a statistically isotropic hydraulic conductivity field, it casts doubt on the use of a stochastic interpretation of the transmissivity in describing regional scale movement. However, by assuming the transmissivity to be the vertical integration of the hydraulic conductivity field at a given position, the stochastic properties of the hydraulic conductivity can be estimated from the stochastic properties of the transmissivity and applied to obtain a more accurate interpretation of solute movement. ?? 1990 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  17. Generation of animation sequences of three dimensional models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poi, Sharon (Inventor); Bell, Brad N. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The invention is directed toward a method and apparatus for generating an animated sequence through the movement of three-dimensional graphical models. A plurality of pre-defined graphical models are stored and manipulated in response to interactive commands or by means of a pre-defined command file. The models may be combined as part of a hierarchical structure to represent physical systems without need to create a separate model which represents the combined system. System motion is simulated through the introduction of translation, rotation and scaling parameters upon a model within the system. The motion is then transmitted down through the system hierarchy of models in accordance with hierarchical definitions and joint movement limitations. The present invention also calls for a method of editing hierarchical structure in response to interactive commands or a command file such that a model may be included, deleted, copied or moved within multiple system model hierarchies. The present invention also calls for the definition of multiple viewpoints or cameras which may exist as part of a system hierarchy or as an independent camera. The simulated movement of the models and systems is graphically displayed on a monitor and a frame is recorded by means of a video controller. Multiple movement and hierarchy manipulations are then recorded as a sequence of frames which may be played back as an animation sequence on a video cassette recorder.

  18. Digital Moon: A three-dimensional framework for lunar modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paige, D. A.; Elphic, R. C.; Foote, E. J.; Meeker, S. R.; Siegler, M. A.; Vasavada, A. R.

    2009-12-01

    The Moon has a complex three-dimensional shape with significant large-scale and small-scale topographic relief. The Moon’s topography largely controls the distribution of incident solar radiation, as well as the scattered solar and infrared radiation fields. Topography also affects the Moon’s interaction with the space environment, its magnetic field, and the propagation of seismic waves. As more extensive and detailed lunar datasets become available, there is an increasing need to interpret and compare them with the results of physical models in a fully three-dimensional context. We have developed a three-dimensional framework for lunar modeling we call the Digital Moon. The goal of this work is to enable high fidelity physical modeling and visualization of the Moon in a parallel computing environment. The surface of the Moon is described by a continuous triangular mesh of arbitrary shape and spatial scale. For regions of limited geographic extent, it is convenient to employ meshes on a rectilinear grid. However for global-scale modeling, we employ a continuous geodesic gridding scheme (Teanby, 2008). Each element in the mesh surface is allowed to have a unique set of physical properties. Photon and particle interactions between mesh elements are modeled using efficient ray tracing algorithms. Heat, mass, photon and particle transfer within each mesh element are modeled in one dimension. Each compute node is assigned a portion of the mesh and collective interactions between elements are handled through network interfaces. We have used the model to calculate lunar surface and subsurface temperatures that can be compared directly with radiometric temperatures measured by the Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. The model includes realistic surface photometric functions based on goniometric measurements of lunar soil samples (Foote and Paige, 2009), and one-dimensional thermal models based on lunar remote sensing and Apollo

  19. Investigation on the Practicality of Developing Reduced Thermal Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lombardi, Giancarlo; Yang, Kan

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the spacecraft design and development process, detailed instrument thermal models are created to simulate their on-orbit behavior and to ensure that they do not exceed any thermal limits. These detailed models, while generating highly accurate predictions, can sometimes lead to long simulation run times, especially when integrated with a spacecraft observatory model. Therefore, reduced models containing less detail are typically produced in tandem with the detailed models so that results may be more readily available, albeit less accurate. In the current study, both reduced and detailed instrument models are integrated with their associated spacecraft bus models to examine the impact of instrument model reduction on run time and accuracy. Preexisting instrument bus thermal model pairs from several projects were used to determine trends between detailed and reduced thermal models; namely, the Mirror Optical Bench (MOB) on the Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer (GEMS) spacecraft, Advanced Topography Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) on the Ice, Cloud, and Elevation Satellite 2 (ICESat-2), and the Neutral Mass Spectrometer (NMS) on the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE). Hot and cold cases were run for each model to capture the behavior of the models at both thermal extremes. It was found that, though decreasing the number of nodes from a detailed to reduced model brought about a reduction in the run-time, a large time savings was not observed, nor was it a linear relationship between the percentage of nodes reduced and time saved. However, significant losses in accuracy were observed with greater model reduction. It was found that while reduced models are useful in decreasing run time, there exists a threshold of reduction where, once exceeded, the loss in accuracy outweighs the benefit from reduced model runtime.

  20. Modeling direct interband tunneling. II. Lower-dimensional structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Andrew; Chui, Chi On

    2014-08-07

    We investigate the applicability of the two-band Hamiltonian and the widely used Kane analytical formula to interband tunneling along unconfined directions in nanostructures. Through comparisons with k·p and tight-binding calculations and quantum transport simulations, we find that the primary correction is the change in effective band gap. For both constant fields and realistic tunnel field-effect transistors, dimensionally consistent band gap scaling of the Kane formula allows analytical and numerical device simulations to approximate non-equilibrium Green's function current characteristics without arbitrary fitting. This allows efficient first-order calibration of semiclassical models for interband tunneling in nanodevices.

  1. Two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence - Cylindrical, non-dissipative model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D.; Vahala, G.

    1979-01-01

    Incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is treated in the presence of cylindrical boundaries which are perfectly conducting and rigidly smooth. The model treated is non-dissipative and two-dimensional, the variation of all quantities in the axial direction being ignored. Equilibrium Gibbs ensemble predictions are explored assuming the constraint of constant axial current (appropriate to tokamak operation). No small-amplitude approximations are made. The expectation value of the turbulent kinetic energy is found to approach zero for the state of maximum mean-square vector potential to energy ratio. These are the only states for which large velocity fluctuations are not expected.

  2. Two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence - Cylindrical, non-dissipative model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D.; Vahala, G.

    1979-01-01

    Incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is treated in the presence of cylindrical boundaries which are perfectly conducting and rigidly smooth. The model treated is non-dissipative and two-dimensional, the variation of all quantities in the axial direction being ignored. Equilibrium Gibbs ensemble predictions are explored assuming the constraint of constant axial current (appropriate to tokamak operation). No small-amplitude approximations are made. The expectation value of the turbulent kinetic energy is found to approach zero for the state of maximum mean-square vector potential to energy ratio. These are the only states for which large velocity fluctuations are not expected.

  3. Moduli inflation in five-dimensional supergravity models

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, Hiroyuki; Otsuka, Hajime E-mail: hajime.13.gologo@akane.waseda.jp

    2014-11-01

    We propose a simple but effective mechanism to realize an inflationary early universe consistent with the observed WMAP, Planck and/or BICEP2 data, which would be incorporated in various supersymmetric models of elementary particles constructed in the (effective) five-dimensional spacetime. In our scenario, the inflaton field is identified with one of the moduli appearing when the fifth direction is compactified, and a successful cosmological inflation without the so-called η problem can be achieved by a very simple moduli stabilization potential. We also discuss the related particle cosmology during and (just) after the inflation, such as the (no) cosmological moduli problem.

  4. Three Dimensional Visualization of a Coastal Mesoscale Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    thankful to Karen, my wife, who managed to keep the faith as well as grow a beautiful daughter, Danielle Tayler Sampson -- our first. Danielle, I ...No I I TITLE (include secutray class•ncarronii Three Dimensional Visualization of a Coastal Mesoscale Model 12 PERSONAl. AUTHOR(S) Sampson, R. Mark 1...3a TYPE OF REPORT 13b TIME COVERED 114 DATE OF REPORT (year, monA daiv; I PAGE COUN.NT Master’s Thesis Fr To 93 December 70 16 SUPPLEMENTARY NOTATION

  5. Superconductivity in the two-dimensional generalized Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, L. S.

    2016-08-01

    We have used the Green's functions method at finite temperature and the Kubo's formalism, to calculate the electron conductivity σ(ω) in the generalized two-dimensional Hubbard model. We have obtained a behavior superconductor for the system to T > T0. The AC conductivity falls to zero in ω =ω0 , where ω0 depends on Δ, which is the gap of the system. The behavior gotten is according of with the behavior of the superconductors of high Tc where there is a changes abruptly from a Mott's insulator state to superconductor.

  6. High dimensional model representation (HDMR) with clustering for image retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karcılı, Ayşegül; Tunga, Burcu

    2017-01-01

    Image retrieval continues to hold an important place in today's extremely fast growing technology. In this field, the accurate image retrieval with high speed is critical. In this study, to achieve this important issue we developed a novel method with the help of High Dimensional Model Representation (HDMR) philosophy. HDMR is a decomposition method used to solve different scientific problems. To test the performance of the new method we used Columbia Object Image Library (COIL100) and obtained the encouraging results. These results are given in the findings section.

  7. Complete wetting in the three-dimensional transverse Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, A. B.; Micheletti, C.; Yeomans, J. M.

    1996-08-01

    We consider a three-dimensional Ising model in a transverse magnetic field h and a bulk field H. An interface is introduced by an appropriate choice of boundary conditions. At the point ( H=0, h=0) spin configurations corresponding to different positions of the interface are degenerate. By studying the phase diagram near this multiphase point using quantum mechanical perturbation theory, we show that the quantum fluctuations, controlled by h, split the multiphase degeneracy giving rise to an infinite sequence of layering transitions.

  8. Modeling of Unsteady Three-dimensional Flows in Multistage Machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Kenneth C.; Pratt, Edmund T., Jr.; Kurkov, Anatole (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Despite many years of development, the accurate and reliable prediction of unsteady aerodynamic forces acting on turbomachinery blades remains less than satisfactory, especially when viewed next to the great success investigators have had in predicting steady flows. Hall and Silkowski (1997) have proposed that one of the main reasons for the discrepancy between theory and experiment and/or industrial experience is that many of the current unsteady aerodynamic theories model a single blade row in an infinitely long duct, ignoring potentially important multistage effects. However, unsteady flows are made up of acoustic, vortical, and entropic waves. These waves provide a mechanism for the rotors and stators of multistage machines to communicate with one another. In other words, wave behavior makes unsteady flows fundamentally a multistage (and three-dimensional) phenomenon. In this research program, we have has as goals (1) the development of computationally efficient computer models of the unsteady aerodynamic response of blade rows embedded in a multistage machine (these models will ultimately be capable of analyzing three-dimensional viscous transonic flows), and (2) the use of these computer codes to study a number of important multistage phenomena.

  9. Two-dimensional modeling of magnetically imploded liners

    SciTech Connect

    Atchison, W.L.; Bowers, R.L.; Brownell, J.H.; Lee, H.

    1996-11-01

    Magnetically imploded massive cylindrical liner drivers have been studied in two-dimensions for low, intermediate and high energy pulsed power systems. The simulations have been carried out using a resistive Eulerian magnetohydrodynamics computational model which includes material strength, and models the interactions between the imploding liner and the electrode walls. The computations simulate the generation of perturbations and their subsequent growth during the implosion. At low energies a solid liner remains in the plastic regime, reaching an inner cylindrical target with velocities of a few mm per {mu}s. At higher energies (where one-dimensional models predict implosion velocities of order 1 cm/{mu}s or more) resistive heating of the liner results in melting, and the effects of magnetically driven instabilities become important. We discuss the two-dimensional issues which arise in these systems. These include: the onset of perturbations associated with the motion of the liner along the electrodes; the growth of instabilities in liquid layers; and the suppression of instability growth during the implosion by maintaining a solid inner layer. Studies have been made of liners designed for the Pegasus capacitor bank facility (currents in the 5 - 12 MA regime), and for the Procyon high explosive system (currents in the 20 MA regime). This work focus on the design and performance of the first Pegasus composite megabar liner experiment.

  10. Infinite dimensional variational inequalities and dynamic network disequilibrium modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Friesz, T.; Bernstein, D.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper we explain the importance of modeling disequilibrium flow patterns occurring on networks, with special emphasis on automobile networks and the role of information technology. We show how elementary notions of disequilibrium, whether abstract, physical or economic in nature, give rise to an adjustment process expressible as a dynamical system. We comment that when such a system is autonomous its steady states can be given the traditional finite dimensional variational inequality/fixed point representations common to static network equilibria. Beyond this, and unique to our work, we show that if the disequilibrium dynamical system is nonautonomous it may tend toward moving or dynamic (instead of static) network equilibria expressible as infinite dimensional variational inequalities. Using concepts of fast and slow dynamic systems, we show how day-to-day and within-day aspects of automobile travel decision making can be combined to yield a nonautonomous dynamical system with the mathematical properties reviewed previously. We introduce axioms for a proper predictive model of urban network flows which integrates both day-to-day and within-day considerations and postulate one such model for further study.

  11. Emergent O(n ) symmetry in a series of three-dimensional Potts models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Chengxiang; Blöte, Henk W. J.; Deng, Youjin

    2016-09-01

    We study the q -state Potts model on a simple cubic lattice with ferromagnetic interactions in one lattice direction, and antiferromagnetic interactions in the other two directions. As the temperature T decreases, the system undergoes a second-order phase transition that fits in the universality class of the three-dimensional O (n ) model with n =q -1 . This conclusion is based on the estimated critical exponents, and histograms of the order parameter. At even smaller T we find, for q =4 and 5, a first-order transition to a phase with a different type of long-range order. This long-range order dissolves at T =0 , and the system effectively reduces to a disordered two-dimensional Potts antiferromagnet. These results are obtained by means of Monte Carlo simulations and finite-size scaling.

  12. Finite volume model for two-dimensional shallow environmental flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simoes, F.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a two-dimensional, depth integrated, unsteady, free-surface model based on the shallow water equations. The development was motivated by the desire of balancing computational efficiency and accuracy by selective and conjunctive use of different numerical techniques. The base framework of the discrete model uses Godunov methods on unstructured triangular grids, but the solution technique emphasizes the use of a high-resolution Riemann solver where needed, switching to a simpler and computationally more efficient upwind finite volume technique in the smooth regions of the flow. Explicit time marching is accomplished with strong stability preserving Runge-Kutta methods, with additional acceleration techniques for steady-state computations. A simplified mass-preserving algorithm is used to deal with wet/dry fronts. Application of the model is made to several benchmark cases that show the interplay of the diverse solution techniques.

  13. Users manual for a one-dimensional Lagrangian transport model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoellhamer, D.H.; Jobson, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    A Users Manual for the Lagrangian Transport Model (LTM) is presented. The LTM uses Lagrangian calculations that are based on a reference frame moving with the river flow. The Lagrangian reference frame eliminates the need to numerically solve the convective term of the convection-diffusion equation and provides significant numerical advantages over the more commonly used Eulerian reference frame. When properly applied, the LTM can simulate riverine transport and decay processes within the accuracy required by most water quality studies. The LTM is applicable to steady or unsteady one-dimensional unidirectional flows in fixed channels with tributary and lateral inflows. Application of the LTM is relatively simple and optional capabilities improve the model 's convenience. Appendices give file formats and three example LTM applications that include the incorporation of the QUAL II water quality model 's reaction kinetics into the LTM. (Author 's abstract)

  14. Modeling for Process Control: High-Dimensional Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lev S. Tsimring

    2008-09-15

    Most of other technologically important systems (among them, powders and other granular systems) are intrinsically nonlinear. This project is focused on building the dynamical models for granular systems as a prototype for nonlinear high-dimensional systems exhibiting complex non-equilibrium phenomena. Granular materials present a unique opportunity to study these issues in a technologically important and yet fundamentally interesting setting. Granular systems exhibit a rich variety of regimes from gas-like to solid-like depending on the external excitation. Based the combination of the rigorous asymptotic analysis, available experimental data and nonlinear signal processing tools, we developed a multi-scale approach to the modeling of granular systems from detailed description of grain-grain interaction on a micro-scale to continuous modeling of large-scale granular flows with important geophysical applications.

  15. Three-dimensional temporomandibular joint modeling and animation.

    PubMed

    Cascone, Piero; Rinaldi, Fabrizio; Pagnoni, Mario; Marianetti, Tito Matteo; Tedaldi, Massimiliano

    2008-11-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) temporomandibular joint (TMJ) model derives from a study of the cranium by 3D virtual reality and mandibular function animation. The starting point of the project is high-fidelity digital acquisition of a human dry skull. The cooperation between the maxillofacial surgeon and the cartoonist enables the reconstruction of the fibroconnective components of the TMJ that are the keystone for comprehension of the anatomic and functional features of the mandible. The skeletal model is customized with the apposition of the temporomandibular ligament, the articular disk, the retrodiskal tissue, and the medial and the lateral ligament of the disk. The simulation of TMJ movement is the result of the integration of up-to-date data on the biomechanical restrictions. The 3D TMJ model is an easy-to-use application that may be run on a personal computer for the study of the TMJ and its biomechanics.

  16. Medical image denoising using one-dimensional singularity function model.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jianhua; Zhu, Yuemin; Hiba, Bassem

    2010-03-01

    A novel denoising approach is proposed that is based on a spectral data substitution mechanism through using a mathematical model of one-dimensional singularity function analysis (1-D SFA). The method consists in dividing the complete spectral domain of the noisy signal into two subsets: the preserved set where the spectral data are kept unchanged, and the substitution set where the original spectral data having lower signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) are replaced by those reconstructed using the 1-D SFA model. The preserved set containing original spectral data is determined according to the SNR of the spectrum. The singular points and singularity degrees in the 1-D SFA model are obtained through calculating finite difference of the noisy signal. The theoretical formulation and experimental results demonstrated that the proposed method allows more efficient denoising while introducing less distortion, and presents significant improvement over conventional denoising methods.

  17. Three-dimensional vertex model for simulating multicellular morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Satoru; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Adachi, Taiji

    2015-01-01

    During morphogenesis, various cellular activities are spatiotemporally coordinated on the protein regulatory background to construct the complicated, three-dimensional (3D) structures of organs. Computational simulations using 3D vertex models have been the focus of efforts to approach the mechanisms underlying 3D multicellular constructions, such as dynamics of the 3D monolayer or multilayer cell sheet like epithelia as well as the 3D compacted cell aggregate, including dynamic changes in layer structures. 3D vertex models enable the quantitative simulation of multicellular morphogenesis on the basis of single-cell mechanics, with complete control of various cellular activities such as cell contraction, growth, rearrangement, division, and death. This review describes the general use of the 3D vertex model, along with its applications to several simplified problems of developmental phenomena. PMID:27493850

  18. The DSM-5 dimensional trait model and five-factor models of general personality.

    PubMed

    Gore, Whitney L; Widiger, Thomas A

    2013-08-01

    The current study tests empirically the relationship of the dimensional trait model proposed for the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) with five-factor models of general personality. The DSM-5 maladaptive trait dimensional model proposal included 25 traits organized within five broad domains (i.e., negative affectivity, detachment, antagonism, disinhibition, and psychoticism). Consistent with the authors of the proposal, it was predicted that negative affectivity would align with five-factor model (FFM) neuroticism, detachment with FFM introversion, antagonism with FFM antagonism, disinhibition with low FFM conscientiousness and, contrary to the proposal; psychoticism would align with FFM openness. Three measures of alternative five-factor models of general personality were administered to 445 undergraduates along with the Personality Inventory for DSM-5. The results provided support for the hypothesis that all five domains of the DSM-5 dimensional trait model are maladaptive variants of general personality structure, including the domain of psychoticism.

  19. Three-Dimensional Modeling of Air-Sea Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regis, J. L.; Slinn, D. N.

    2004-12-01

    Deep-water wave breaking is crucial in the transfer of heat, gases, and momentum between the ocean and the atmosphere. Observations of these events have provided qualitative support to this end, and yet accurate quantification of momentum transfer for strong winds and nonlinear waves has remained a challenge. In recent years, advances have been made in the development of numerous algorithms to capture and describe air-sea interaction. Most, however, are idealized and only capable of modeling fluid flow within the two-dimensional approximation. Thus, many important characteristics of the flow composition and breaking process are ignored, oversimplified, or remain unknown. We employ a three-dimensional, time-dependent, finite difference, volume of fluid model, including both the flow of air and water, entitled TRUCHAS, to address the issue of deep-water breaking waves. Our model utilizes the multidimensional piecewise linear interface calculation method to assess the volume fraction of each fluid material in every mesh cell. The model solves conservation equations for mass and momentum for multiple fluids within the domain and tracks the interfaces between them. A great many details of the flow development are available for analysis from the model output. These include wind and water velocities, pressure gradients in both the air and sea around a breaking wave, the development and evolution of wind-generated waves, and the corresponding transfer of momentum from the atmosphere to the ocean. Our results are correlated with laboratory experiments conducted at the University of Miami's Air-Sea Interaction Salt-water Tank that possesses both wind and wave generating capabilities. Preliminary model results show good qualitative agreement to laboratory data.

  20. Reduced-order model of fish-like swimming due to shedding of unsteady point vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallapragada, Phanindra

    2013-11-01

    Reduced order models of biomimetic swimming in an ideal fluid, relying on the shedding of point vortices at short intervals of time, are useful to illuminate the essential underlying dynamics of locomotion in fluids. However these reduced order models still possess a state space that is very high dimensional, thus presenting challenges to develop control algorithms. A two-dimensional model that fully couples the motion of the solid boundary and the fluid containing singular distributions of vorticity is presented. The model relies on the shedding of unsteady point vortices, from the tip of a fish-like hydrofoil, in place of many steady point vortices. The subsequent reduction in the dimension of the state space makes the model more amenable to control algorithms. A simple case of the heading-angle control of a fish-like body will be illustrated. The model also has the advantage of being computationally significantly less demanding. More interestingly from a theoretical point of view, the reduced order model illustrates the connection between vortex shedding and velocity constraints encountered in rigid body mechanics.

  1. Model-based labeling, analysis, and three-dimensional visualization from two-dimensional medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arata, Louis K.; Dhawan, Atam P.; Thomas, Stephen R.

    1991-07-01

    The computerized analysis and interpretation of three-dimensional medical images is of significant interest for diagnosis as well as for studying pathological processes. Knowledge-based image analysis and interpretation of radiological images can provide a tool for identifying and labeling each part of the image. The authors have developed a knowledge-based biomedical image analysis system for interpreting medical images using an anatomical knowledge base of the appropriate organs. In this paper, the structure of the biomedical image analysis system, along with results from the analysis of images of the human chest cavity, are presented. This approach utilizes an image analysis system with the capability of analyzing the data in both bottom-up (or data driven) and top-down (or model driven) modes to improve the recognition process. After an initial identification is achieved, segmented regions are aggregated and features for these aggregates are recomputed and matched to the model. This process continues until a 'best' match is found for the subject model region. Initial results are encouraging; however, much work remains to be done.

  2. Lower-order effects adjustment in quantitative traits model-based multifactor dimensionality reduction.

    PubMed

    Mahachie John, Jestinah M; Cattaert, Tom; Lishout, François Van; Gusareva, Elena S; Steen, Kristel Van

    2012-01-01

    Identifying gene-gene interactions or gene-environment interactions in studies of human complex diseases remains a big challenge in genetic epidemiology. An additional challenge, often forgotten, is to account for important lower-order genetic effects. These may hamper the identification of genuine epistasis. If lower-order genetic effects contribute to the genetic variance of a trait, identified statistical interactions may simply be due to a signal boost of these effects. In this study, we restrict attention to quantitative traits and bi-allelic SNPs as genetic markers. Moreover, our interaction study focuses on 2-way SNP-SNP interactions. Via simulations, we assess the performance of different corrective measures for lower-order genetic effects in Model-Based Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction epistasis detection, using additive and co-dominant coding schemes. Performance is evaluated in terms of power and familywise error rate. Our simulations indicate that empirical power estimates are reduced with correction of lower-order effects, likewise familywise error rates. Easy-to-use automatic SNP selection procedures, SNP selection based on "top" findings, or SNP selection based on p-value criterion for interesting main effects result in reduced power but also almost zero false positive rates. Always accounting for main effects in the SNP-SNP pair under investigation during Model-Based Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction analysis adequately controls false positive epistasis findings. This is particularly true when adopting a co-dominant corrective coding scheme. In conclusion, automatic search procedures to identify lower-order effects to correct for during epistasis screening should be avoided. The same is true for procedures that adjust for lower-order effects prior to Model-Based Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction and involve using residuals as the new trait. We advocate using "on-the-fly" lower-order effects adjusting when screening for SNP-SNP interactions

  3. Numerical study on a canonized Hamiltonian system representing reduced magnetohydrodynamics and its comparison with two-dimensional Euler system

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, Yuta; Yoshida, Zensho

    2014-03-15

    Introducing a Clebsch-like parameterization, we have formulated a canonical Hamiltonian system on a symplectic leaf of reduced magnetohydrodynamics. An interesting structure of the equations is in that the Lorentz-force, which is a quadratic nonlinear term in the conventional formulation, appears as a linear term −ΔQ, just representing the current density (Q is a Clebsch variable, and Δ is the two-dimensional Laplacian); omitting this term reduces the system into the two-dimensional Euler vorticity equation of a neutral fluid. A heuristic estimate shows that current sheets grow exponentially (even in a fully nonlinear regime) together with the action variable P that is conjugate to Q. By numerical simulation, the predicted behavior of the canonical variables, yielding exponential growth of current sheets, has been demonstrated.

  4. A reduced-dynamics variational approach for the assimilation of altimeter data into eddy-resolving ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Peng; Morey, Steven L.; O'Brien, James J.

    A new method of assimilating sea surface height (SSH) data into ocean models is introduced and tested. Many features observable by satellite altimetry are approximated by the first baroclinic mode over much of the ocean, especially in the lower (but non-equatorial) and mid latitude regions. Based on this dynamical trait, a reduced-dynamics adjoint technique is developed and implemented with a three-dimensional model using vertical normal mode decomposition. To reduce the complexity of the variational data assimilation problem, the adjoint equations are based on a one-active-layer reduced-gravity model, which approximates the first baroclinic mode, as opposed to the full three-dimensional model equations. The reduced dimensionality of the adjoint model leads to lower computational cost than a traditional variational data assimilation algorithm. The technique is applicable to regions of the ocean where the SSH variability is dominated by the first baroclinic mode. The adjustment of the first baroclinic mode model fields dynamically transfers the SSH information to the deep ocean layers. The technique is developed in a modular fashion that can be readily implemented with many three-dimensional ocean models. For this study, the method is tested with the Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM) configured to simulate the Gulf of Mexico.

  5. Reduced order modelling of an unstructured mesh air pollution model and application in 2D/3D urban street canyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, F.; Zhang, T.; Pavlidis, D.; Pain, C. C.; Buchan, A. G.; Navon, I. M.

    2014-10-01

    A novel reduced order model (ROM) based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) has been developed for a finite-element (FE) adaptive mesh air pollution model. A quadratic expansion of the non-linear terms is employed to ensure the method remained efficient. This is the first time such an approach has been applied to air pollution LES turbulent simulation through three dimensional landscapes. The novelty of this work also includes POD's application within a FE-LES turbulence model that uses adaptive resolution. The accuracy of the reduced order model is assessed and validated for a range of 2D and 3D urban street canyon flow problems. By comparing the POD solutions against the fine detail solutions obtained from the full FE model it is shown that the accuracy is maintained, where fine details of the air flows are captured, whilst the computational requirements are reduced. In the examples presented below the size of the reduced order models is reduced by factors up to 2400 in comparison to the full FE model while the CPU time is reduced by up to 98% of that required by the full model.

  6. Dimensional models of personality: the five-factor model and the DSM-5

    PubMed Central

    Trull, Timothy J.; Widiger, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    It is evident that the classification of personality disorder is shifting toward a dimensional trait model and, more specifically, the five-factor model (FFM). The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the FFM of personality disorder. It will begin with a description of this dimensional model of normal and abnormal personality functioning, followed by a comparison with a proposal for future revisions to DSM-5 and a discussion of its potential advantages as an integrative hierarchical model of normal and abnormal personality structure. PMID:24174888

  7. Dimensional models of personality: the five-factor model and the DSM-5.

    PubMed

    Trull, Timothy J; Widiger, Thomas A

    2013-06-01

    It is evident that the classification of personality disorder is shifting toward a dimensional trait model and, more specifically, the five-factor model (FFM). The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the FFM of personality disorder. It will begin with a description of this dimensional model of normal and abnormal personality functioning, followed by a comparison with a proposal for future revisions to DSM-5 and a discussion of its potential advantages as an integrative hierarchical model of normal and abnormal personality structure.

  8. Mathematical modeling of the neuron morphology using two dimensional images.

    PubMed

    Rajković, Katarina; Marić, Dušica L; Milošević, Nebojša T; Jeremic, Sanja; Arsenijević, Valentina Arsić; Rajković, Nemanja

    2016-02-07

    In this study mathematical analyses such as the analysis of area and length, fractal analysis and modified Sholl analysis were applied on two dimensional (2D) images of neurons from adult human dentate nucleus (DN). Using mathematical analyses main morphological properties were obtained including the size of neuron and soma, the length of all dendrites, the density of dendritic arborization, the position of the maximum density and the irregularity of dendrites. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used for modeling the size of neurons and the length of all dendrites. However, the RSM model based on the second-order polynomial equation was only possible to apply to correlate changes in the size of the neuron with other properties of its morphology. Modeling data provided evidence that the size of DN neurons statistically depended on the size of the soma, the density of dendritic arborization and the irregularity of dendrites. The low value of mean relative percent deviation (MRPD) between the experimental data and the predicted neuron size obtained by RSM model showed that model was suitable for modeling the size of DN neurons. Therefore, RSM can be generally used for modeling neuron size from 2D images.

  9. Multi-Dimensional Calibration of Impact Dynamic Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Reaves, Mercedes C.; Annett, Martin S.; Jackson, Karen E.

    2011-01-01

    NASA Langley, under the Subsonic Rotary Wing Program, recently completed two helicopter tests in support of an in-house effort to study crashworthiness. As part of this effort, work is on-going to investigate model calibration approaches and calibration metrics for impact dynamics models. Model calibration of impact dynamics problems has traditionally assessed model adequacy by comparing time histories from analytical predictions to test at only a few critical locations. Although this approach provides for a direct measure of the model predictive capability, overall system behavior is only qualitatively assessed using full vehicle animations. In order to understand the spatial and temporal relationships of impact loads as they migrate throughout the structure, a more quantitative approach is needed. In this work impact shapes derived from simulated time history data are used to recommend sensor placement and to assess model adequacy using time based metrics and orthogonality multi-dimensional metrics. An approach for model calibration is presented that includes metric definitions, uncertainty bounds, parameter sensitivity, and numerical optimization to estimate parameters to reconcile test with analysis. The process is illustrated using simulated experiment data.

  10. One-dimensional biomass fast pyrolysis model with reaction kinetics integrated in an Aspen Plus Biorefinery Process Model

    DOE PAGES

    Humbird, David; Trendewicz, Anna; Braun, Robert; ...

    2017-01-12

    A biomass fast pyrolysis reactor model with detailed reaction kinetics and one-dimensional fluid dynamics was implemented in an equation-oriented modeling environment (Aspen Custom Modeler). Portions of this work were detailed in previous publications; further modifications have been made here to improve stability and reduce execution time of the model to make it compatible for use in large process flowsheets. The detailed reactor model was integrated into a larger process simulation in Aspen Plus and was stable for different feedstocks over a range of reactor temperatures. Sample results are presented that indicate general agreement with experimental results, but with higher gasmore » losses caused by stripping of the bio-oil by the fluidizing gas in the simulated absorber/condenser. Lastly, this integrated modeling approach can be extended to other well-defined, predictive reactor models for fast pyrolysis, catalytic fast pyrolysis, as well as other processes.« less

  11. Reduced-order modelling of parameter-dependent, linear and nonlinear dynamic partial differential equation models.

    PubMed

    Shah, A A; Xing, W W; Triantafyllidis, V

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we develop reduced-order models for dynamic, parameter-dependent, linear and nonlinear partial differential equations using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). The main challenges are to accurately and efficiently approximate the POD bases for new parameter values and, in the case of nonlinear problems, to efficiently handle the nonlinear terms. We use a Bayesian nonlinear regression approach to learn the snapshots of the solutions and the nonlinearities for new parameter values. Computational efficiency is ensured by using manifold learning to perform the emulation in a low-dimensional space. The accuracy of the method is demonstrated on a linear and a nonlinear example, with comparisons with a global basis approach.

  12. Two-Dimensional Numerical Modeling of Anthropogenic Beach Berm Erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeri Majd, M.; Schubert, J.; Gallien, T.; Sanders, B. F.

    2014-12-01

    Anthropogenic beach berms (sometimes called artificial berms or artificial dunes) temporarily enhance the ability of beaches to withstand overtopping and thus guard against coastal flooding. However, the combination of a rising tide, storm surge, and/or waves may erode anthropogenic berms in a matter of hours or less and cause flooding [1]. Accurate forecasts of coastal flooding therefore demand the ability to predict where and when berms fail and the volume of water that overtops into defended coastal lowlands. Here, a two-dimensional numerical model of swash zone waves and erosion is examined as a tool for predicting the erosion of anthropogenic beach berms. The 2D model is known as a Debris Flow Model (DFM) because it tightly couples flow and sediment transport within an approximate Riemann solver and is able to resolve shocks in fluid/sediment interface [2]. The DFM also includes a two dimensional avalanching scheme to account for gravity-driven slumping of steep slopes. The performance of the DFM is examined with field-scale anthropogenic berm erosion data collected at Newport Beach, California. Results show that the DFM can be applied in the swash zone to resolve wave-by-wave flow and sediment transport. Results also show that it is possible to calibrate the model for a particular event, and then predict erosion for another event, but predictions are sensitive to model parameters, such as erosion and avalanching. References: [1] Jochen E. Schubert, Timu W. Gallien, Morteza Shakeri Majd, and Brett F. Sanders. Terrestrial laser scanning of anthropogenic beach berm erosion and overtopping. Journal of Coastal Research In-Press, 2014. [2] Morteza Shakeri Majd and Brett F. Sanders. The LHLLC scheme for Two-Layer and Two-Phase transcritical flows over a mobile bed with avalanching, wetting and drying. Advances in Water Resources, 64, 16-31, 2014.

  13. One-dimensional cloud fluid model for propagating star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titus, Timothy N.; Struck-Marcell, Curtis

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this project was to study the propagation of star formation (SF) with a self-consistent deterministic model for the interstellar gas. The questions of under what conditions does star formation propagate in this model and what are the mechanisms of the propagation are explored. Here, researchers used the deterministic Oort-type cloud fluid model of Scalo and Struck-Marcell (1984, also see the review of Struck-Marcell, Scalo and Appleton 1987). This cloud fluid approach includes simple models for the effects of cloud collisional coalescence or disruption, collisional energy dissipation, and cloud disruption and acceleration as the result of young star winds, HII regions and supernovae. An extensive one-zone parameter study is presented in Struck-Marcell and Scalo (1987). To answer the questions above, researchers carried out one-dimensional calculations for an annulus within a galactic disk, like the so-called solar neighborhood of the galactic chemical evolution. In the calculations the left-hand boundary is set equal to the right hand boundary. The calculation is obviously idealized; however, it is computationally convenient to study the first order effects of propagating star formation. The annulus was treated as if it were at rest, i.e., in the local rotating frame. This assumption may remove some interesting effects of a supersonic gas flow, but was necessary to maintain a numerical stability in the annulus. The results on the one-dimensional propagation of SF in the Oort cloud fluid model follow: (1) SF is propagated by means of hydrodynamic waves, which can be generated by external forces or by the pressure generated by local bursts. SF is not effectively propagated via diffusion or variation in cloud interaction rates without corresponding density and velocity changes. (2) The propagation and long-range effects of SF depend on how close the gas density is to the critical threshold value, i.e., on the susceptibility of the medium.

  14. A three-dimensional ring current decay model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Moore, Thomas E.; Kozyra, Janet U.; Ho, George C.; Hamilton, Douglas C.

    1994-01-01

    This work is an extension of a previous ring current decay model. In the previous work, a two-dimensional kinetic model was constructed to study the temporal variations of the equatorially mirroring ring current ions, considering charge exchange and Coulomb drag losses along drift paths in a magnetic dipole field. In this work, particles with arbitrary pitch angle are considered. By bounce averaging the kinetic equation of the phase space density, information along magnetic field lines can be inferred from the equator. The three-dimensional model is used to simulate the recovery phase of a model great magnetic storm, similar to that which occurred in early February 1986. The initial distribution of ring current ions (at the minimum Dst) is extrapolated to all local times from AMPTE/CCE spacecraft observations on the dawn and dusk sides of the inner magnetosphere spanning the L value range L = 2.25 to 6.75. Observations by AMPTE/CCE of ring current distributions over subsequent orbits during the storm recovery phase are compared to model outputs. In general, the calculated ion fluxes are consistent with observations, except for H+ fluxes at tens of keV, which are always over-estimated. A newly-invented visualization idea, designated as a chromogram, is used to display the spatial and energy dependence of the ring current ion differential flux. Important features of storm-time ring current, such as day-night asymmetry during injection and drift hole on the dayside at low energies (less than 10 keV), are manifested in the chromogram representation. The pitch angle distribution is well fit by the function, j(sub o)(1+Ay(exp n)), where y is sine of the equatorial pitch angle. The evolution of the index n is a combined effect of charge exchange loss and particle drift. At low energies (less than 30 keV), both drift dispersion and charge exchange are important in determining n.

  15. Modeling Esophagitis Using Human Three-Dimensional Organotypic Culture System.

    PubMed

    Laczkó, Dorottya; Wang, Fang; Johnson, F Bradley; Jhala, Nirag; Rosztóczy, András; Ginsberg, Gregory G; Falk, Gary W; Rustgi, Anil K; Lynch, John P

    2017-08-01

    Esophagitis, whether caused by acid reflux, allergic responses, graft-versus-host disease, drugs, or infections, is a common condition of the gastrointestinal tract affecting nearly 20% of the US population. The instigating agent typically triggers an inflammatory response. The resulting inflammation is a risk factor for the development of esophageal strictures, Barrett esophagus, and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Research into the pathophysiology of these conditions has been limited by the availability of animal and human model systems. Three-dimensional organotypic tissue culture (OTC) is an innovative three-dimensional multicellular in vitro platform that recapitulates normal esophageal epithelial stratification and differentiation. We hypothesized that this platform can be used to model esophagitis to better understand the interactions between immune cells and the esophageal epithelium. We found that human immune cells remain viable and respond to cytokines when cultured under OTC conditions. The acute inflammatory environment induced in the OTC significantly affected the overlying epithelium, inducing a regenerative response marked by increased cell proliferation and epithelial hyperplasia. Moreover, oxidative stress from the acute inflammation induced DNA damage and strand breaks in epithelial cells, which could be reversed by antioxidant treatment. These findings support the importance of immune cell-mediated esophageal injury in esophagitis and confirms the utility of the OTC platform to characterize the underlying molecular events in esophagitis. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. One-dimensional bubble model of pulsed discharge in water

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Xinpei

    2007-09-15

    In this paper, a one-dimensional bubble model of pulsed discharge in water is presented. With a total input energy of 0.63 J, the simulation results show that when the bubble collapses at the center of the bubble, the plasma pressure oscillates strongly. It oscillates between 800 and 1150 atm with an oscillation frequency of about 6.9 MHz, while at r=R/2 (R: bubble radius), the gas velocity oscillates intensely at the same frequency. It oscillates between -235 and 229 m/s when the bubble radius reaches its minimum. But it does not oscillate at r=R because of the inertia of the surrounding water. The bubble collapses and reexpands with almost the same speed as that of the zero-dimensional (0D) model. This further confirms why the shock wave pressure from the 0D mode has a good agreement with the experimental results since the shock wave pressure is only determined by the bubble wall velocity v(R)

  17. ODTLES : a model for 3D turbulent flow based on one-dimensional turbulence modeling concepts.

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, Randy; Kerstein, Alan R.; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon

    2005-01-01

    This report describes an approach for extending the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model of Kerstein [6] to treat turbulent flow in three-dimensional (3D) domains. This model, here called ODTLES, can also be viewed as a new LES model. In ODTLES, 3D aspects of the flow are captured by embedding three, mutually orthogonal, one-dimensional ODT domain arrays within a coarser 3D mesh. The ODTLES model is obtained by developing a consistent approach for dynamically coupling the different ODT line sets to each other and to the large scale processes that are resolved on the 3D mesh. The model is implemented computationally and its performance is tested and evaluated by performing simulations of decaying isotropic turbulence, a standard turbulent flow benchmarking problem.

  18. Reducing the Dimensionality of Data: Locally Linear Embedding of Sloan Galaxy Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderplas, Jake; Connolly, Andrew

    2009-11-01

    We introduce locally linear embedding (LLE) to the astronomical community as a new classification technique, using Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra as an example data set. LLE is a nonlinear dimensionality reduction technique that has been studied in the context of computer perception. We compare the performance of LLE to well-known spectral classification techniques, e.g., principal component analysis and line-ratio diagnostics. We find that LLE combines the strengths of both methods in a single, coherent technique, and leads to improved classification of emission-line spectra at a relatively small computational cost. We also present a data subsampling technique that preserves local information content, and proves effective for creating small, efficient training samples from large, high-dimensional data sets. Software used in this LLE-based classification is made available.

  19. REDUCING THE DIMENSIONALITY OF DATA: LOCALLY LINEAR EMBEDDING OF SLOAN GALAXY SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderplas, Jake; Connolly, Andrew

    2009-11-15

    We introduce locally linear embedding (LLE) to the astronomical community as a new classification technique, using Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra as an example data set. LLE is a nonlinear dimensionality reduction technique that has been studied in the context of computer perception. We compare the performance of LLE to well-known spectral classification techniques, e.g., principal component analysis and line-ratio diagnostics. We find that LLE combines the strengths of both methods in a single, coherent technique, and leads to improved classification of emission-line spectra at a relatively small computational cost. We also present a data subsampling technique that preserves local information content, and proves effective for creating small, efficient training samples from large, high-dimensional data sets. Software used in this LLE-based classification is made available.

  20. Error Estimation for Reduced Order Models of Dynamical Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Homescu, C; Petzold, L; Serban, R

    2004-01-22

    The use of reduced order models to describe a dynamical system is pervasive in science and engineering. Often these models are used without an estimate of their error or range of validity. In this paper we consider dynamical systems and reduced models built using proper orthogonal decomposition. We show how to compute estimates and bounds for these errors, by a combination of small sample statistical condition estimation and error estimation using the adjoint method. Most importantly, the proposed approach allows the assessment of regions of validity for reduced models, i.e., ranges of perturbations in the original system over which the reduced model is still appropriate. Numerical examples validate our approach: the error norm estimates approximate well the forward error while the derived bounds are within an order of magnitude.

  1. Three-dimensional chemotaxis model for a crawling neutrophil.

    PubMed

    Song, Jihwan; Kim, Dongchoul

    2010-11-01

    Chemotactic cell migration is a fundamental phenomenon in complex biological processes. A rigorous understanding of the chemotactic mechanism of crawling cells has important implications for various medical and biological applications. In this paper, we propose a three-dimensional model of a single crawling cell to study its chemotaxis. A single-cell study of chemotaxis has an advantage over studies of a population of cells in that it provides a clearer observation of cell migration, which leads to more accurate assessments of chemotaxis. The model incorporates the surface energy of the cell and the interfacial interaction between the cell and substrate. The semi-implicit Fourier spectral method is applied to achieve high efficiency and numerical stability. The simulation results provide the kinetic and morphological traits of a crawling cell during chemotaxis.

  2. The cleft ion fountain - A two-dimensional kinetic model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, J. L.; Lockwood, M.

    1985-01-01

    The transport of ionospheric ions from a source in the polar cleft ionosphere through the polar magnetosphere is investigated using a two-dimensional, kinetic, trajectory-based code. The transport model includes the effects of gravitation, longitudinal magnetic gradient force, convection electric fields, and parallel electric fields. Individual ion trajectories as well as distribution functions and resulting bulk parameters of density, parallel average energy, and parallel flux for a presumed cleft ionosphere source distribution are presented for various conditions to illustrate parametrically the dependences on source energies, convection electric field strengths, ion masses, and parallel electric field strengths. The essential features of the model are consistent with the concept of a cleft-based ion fountain supplying ionospheric ions to the polar magnetosphere, and the resulting plasma distributions and parameters are in general agreement with recent low-energy ion measurements from the DE 1 satellite.

  3. Two-dimensional electron beam charging model for polymer films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, R. D.; Balmain, K. G.

    1981-01-01

    A two-dimensional model is developed to describe the charging of strips of thin polymer films above a grounded substrate exposed to a uniform mono-energetic electron beam. The study is motivated by the observed anomalous behavior of geosynchronous satellites, which has been attributed to differential charging of the satellite surfaces exposed to magnetospheric electrons. Surface and bulk electric fields are calcuated at steady state in order to identify regions of high electrical stress, with emphasis on behavior near the material's edge. The model is used to study the effects of some of the experimental parameters, notably beam energy, beam angle of incidence, beam current density, material thickness and material width. Also examined are the consequences of a central gap in the material and a discontinuity in the material thickness.

  4. Two-dimensional MHD generator model. [GEN code

    SciTech Connect

    Geyer, H. K.; Ahluwalia, R. K.; Doss, E. D.

    1980-09-01

    A steady state, two-dimensional MHD generator code, GEN, is presented. The code solves the equations of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy, using a Von Mises transformation and a local linearization of the equations. By splitting the source terms into a part proportional to the axial pressure gradient and a part independent of the gradient, the pressure distribution along the channel is easily obtained to satisfy various criteria. Thus, the code can run effectively in both design modes, where the channel geometry is determined, and analysis modes, where the geometry is previously known. The code also employs a mixing length concept for turbulent flows, Cebeci and Chang's wall roughness model, and an extension of that model to the effective thermal diffusities. Results on code validation, as well as comparisons of skin friction and Stanton number calculations with experimental results, are presented.

  5. Quantum quench dynamics in analytically solvable one-dimensional models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iucci, Anibal; Cazalilla, Miguel A.; Giamarchi, Thierry

    2008-03-01

    In connection with experiments in cold atomic systems, we consider the non-equilibrium dynamics of some analytically solvable one-dimensional systems which undergo a quantum quench. In this quench one or several of the parameters of the Hamiltonian of an interacting quantum system are changed over a very short time scale. In particular, we concentrate on the Luttinger model and the sine-Gordon model in the Luther-Emery point. For the latter, we show that the order parameter and the two-point correlation function relax in the long time limit to the values determined by a generalized Gibbs ensemble first discussed by J. T. Jaynes [Phys. Rev. 106, 620 (1957); 108, 171 (1957)], and recently conjectured by M. Rigol et.al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 050405 (2007)] to apply to the non-equilibrium dynamics of integrable systems.

  6. Heat string model of bi-dimensional dc Glidarc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellerin, S.; Richard, F.; Chapelle, J.; Cormier, J.-M.; Musiol, K.

    2000-10-01

    The gliding arc discharge (`Glidarc') is the subject of renewed interest in application to a variety of chemical reactions. The gliding arc creates a weakly ionized gas `string' between two horn-shaped electrodes. In this paper, we present a simple model for a bi-dimensional dc Glidarc working in air, in which the conducting zone of the discharge that is heated by the Joule effect is considered as a hot wire cooled by an air flow. Inside this wire, the heat transfer results from thermal conduction. The exchange of heat between the hot wire and the air flow is assured by convection and depends on the wire radius and the relative velocity of the arc with respect to the gas flow. The model correctly describes experimental results and allows us to predict the working parameters of the Glidarc in different experimental situations.

  7. Two-Dimensional Massless Light Front Fields and Solvable Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinovic̆, L'ubomír; Grangé, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    Quantum field theory formulated in terms of light front (LF) variables has a few attractive as well as some puzzling features. The latter hindered a wider acceptance of LF methods. In two space-time dimensions, it has been a long-standing puzzle how to correctly quantize massless fields, in particular fermions. Here we show that two-dimensional massless LF fields (scalar and fermion) can be recovered in a simple way as limits of the corresponding massive fields and thereby quantized without any loss of physical information. Bosonization of the fermion field then follows in a straightforward manner and the solvable models can be studied directly in the LF theory. We sketch the LF operator solution of the Thirring-Wess model and also point out the closeness of the massless LF fields to those of conformal field theory.

  8. One dimensional modeling of blood flow in large networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaofei; Lagree, Pierre-Yves; Fullana, Jose-Maria; Lorthois, Sylvie; Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    A fast and valid simulation of blood flow in large networks of vessels can be achieved with a one-dimensional viscoelastic model. In this paper, we developed a parallel code with this model and computed several networks: a circle of arteries, a human systemic network with 55 arteries and a vascular network of mouse kidney with more than one thousand segments. The numerical results were verified and the speedup of parallel computing was tested on multi-core computers. The evolution of pressure distributions in all the networks were visualized and we can see clearly the propagation patterns of the waves. This provides us a convenient tool to simulate blood flow in networks.

  9. Three-Dimensional Numerical Modeling of Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, M. W.; Hawk, C. W.; Litchford, R. J.

    2009-01-01

    Over the past several years, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has engaged in the design and development of an experimental research facility to investigate the use of diagonalized crossed-field magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accelerators as a possible thrust augmentation device for thermal propulsion systems. In support of this effort, a three-dimensional numerical MHD model has been developed for the purpose of analyzing and optimizing accelerator performance and to aid in understanding critical underlying physical processes and nonideal effects. This Technical Memorandum fully summarizes model development efforts and presents the results of pretest performance optimization analyses. These results indicate that the MHD accelerator should utilize a 45deg diagonalization angle with the applied current evenly distributed over the first five inlet electrode pairs. When powered at 100 A, this configuration is expected to yield a 50% global efficiency with an 80% increase in axial velocity and a 50% increase in centerline total pressure.

  10. Reduced three-dimensional airway volume is a function of skeletal dysmorphology in Treacher Collins syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoyang; Forte, Antonio J; Persing, John A; Alonso, Nivaldo; Berlin, Nicholas L; Steinbacher, Derek M

    2015-02-01

    Children with Treacher Collins syndrome frequently present with obstructive sleep apnea and respiratory insufficiency. The purpose of this study was to three-dimensionally calculate upper airway volume in these patients. The authors also assessed the correlation between bony craniofacial morphology and spatial position with airway volume. Thirty Treacher Collins syndrome patients who have not been operated on were compared with a sample of 35 age- and sex-matched unaffected controls. Upper airway volume was stratified into retropalatal and retroglossal aspects. Three-dimensional craniometric findings were compared between patients and controls. Among Treacher Collins syndrome patients, the authors assessed the relationship of craniofacial morphology and spatial positioning to airway volume. Statistical analyses included independent sample t tests and Pearson correlation coefficient analyses. Decreased total upper airway volume (p = 0.034) was found in the Treacher Collins syndrome group, attributable primarily to a decrease in retroglossal airway volume (p = 0.009). Regarding three-dimensional craniometric variables, maxillary and mandibular length (r = 0.76, p < 0.001; and r = 0.68, p < 0.001), and the anterior and posterior cranial base (r = 0.61, p < 0.001; and r = 0.77, p < 0.001) were positively correlated with airway volume in Treacher Collins syndrome patients. Transverse internal diameters of the upper airway were also positively correlated with airway volume (r = 0.635, p = 0.001; and r = 0.511, p = 0.006); however, no correlation was shown for the anteroposterior airway diameters. Three-dimensional analysis revealed diminished upper airway volume in Treacher Collins syndrome, with the retroglossal region being the most severely constricted. Maxillomandibular dysmorphologies, and their relationship to the cranial base, correlated significantly with airway findings.

  11. Constrained reduced-order models based on proper orthogonal decomposition

    DOE PAGES

    Reddy, Sohail R.; Freno, Brian Andrew; Cizmas, Paul G. A.; ...

    2017-04-09

    A novel approach is presented to constrain reduced-order models (ROM) based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). The Karush–Kuhn–Tucker (KKT) conditions were applied to the traditional reduced-order model to constrain the solution to user-defined bounds. The constrained reduced-order model (C-ROM) was applied and validated against the analytical solution to the first-order wave equation. C-ROM was also applied to the analysis of fluidized beds. Lastly, it was shown that the ROM and C-ROM produced accurate results and that C-ROM was less sensitive to error propagation through time than the ROM.

  12. Linking a one-dimensional pesticide fate model to a three-dimensional groundwater model to simulate pollution risks of shallow and deep groundwater underlying fractured till

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenemo, Fredrik; Jørgensen, Peter R.; Jarvis, Nicholas

    2005-09-01

    The one-dimensional pesticide fate model MACRO was loose-linked to the three-dimensional discrete fracture/matrix diffusion model FRAC3DVS to describe transport of the pesticide mecoprop in a fractured moraine till and local sand aquifer (5-5.5 m depth) overlying a regional limestone aquifer (16 m depth) at Havdrup, Denmark. Alternative approaches to describe the upper boundary in the groundwater model were examined. Field-scale simulations were run to compare a uniform upper boundary condition with a spatially variable upper boundary derived from Monte-Carlo simulations with MACRO. Plot-scale simulations were run to investigate the influence of the temporal resolution of the upper boundary conditions for fluxes in the groundwater model and the effects of different assumptions concerning the macropore/fracture connectivity between the two models. The influence of within-field variability of leaching on simulated mecoprop concentrations in the local aquifer was relatively small. A fully transient simulation with FRAC3DVS gave 20 times larger leaching to the regional aquifer compared to the case with steady-state water flow, assuming full connectivity with respect to macropores/fractures across the boundary between the two models. For fully transient simulations 'disconnecting' the macropores/fractures at the interface between the two models reduced leaching by a factor 24. A fully connected, transient simulation with FRAC3DVS, with spatially uniform upper boundary fluxes derived from a MACRO simulation with 'effective' parameters is therefore recommended for assessing leaching risks to the regional aquifer, at this, and similar sites.

  13. Three-dimensional modeling of blue jets and blue starters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasko, V. P.; George, J. J.

    2001-12-01

    Blue jets are narrow cones of blue light propagating upward from the apparent cloud tops at speeds of the order of 100 km/s to a terminal altitude of about 40 km [Wescott et al., GRL, 22, 1209, 1995]. Blue starters are distinguished from blue jets by a much lower terminal altitude. They protrude upward from the cloud top (17-18 km) to a maximum 25.5 km in altitude [Wescott et al., GRL, 23, 2153, 1996]. It has recently been suggested that blue jets correspond qualitatively to the development of the streamer zone of a positive leader and therefore should be filled with a branching structure of streamer channels [Petrov and Petrova, Tech. Phys., 44, 472, 1999]. In our talk we will discuss the physical concept proposed by Petrov and Petrova [1999] as well as will demonstrate a role of blue jets and blue starters in the large-scale atmospheric electric circuit. We will also discuss specific physical reasons and required circumstances for occurrence of blue jets and starters above thundercloud tops and will support our arguments with results from a new three-dimensional model. The model simulates the propagation of branching streamer channels constituting blue jets and starters as a three dimensional growth of fractal trees in a self-consistent electric field created by thundercloud charges. The model is based on a phenomenological probabilistic approach proposed in [Niemeyer et al., IEEE Trans. Electr. Insul., 24, 309, 1989] and is a straightforward expansion of the previously developed two-dimensional version [Pasko et al., GRL, 27, 497, 2000]. The model results indicate that blue jets and starters can be formed by a fast ( ~1 sec) accumulation of 110-150 C of positive thundercloud charge distributed in a volume with effective radius 3 km near the cloud top at 15 km. The obtained results closely resemble characteristics of blue jets and blue starters observed by Wescott et al. [1995; 1996] in terms of their altitude extents, transverse dimensions and conical structure

  14. Block-structured adaptive meshes and reduced grids for atmospheric general circulation models.

    PubMed

    Jablonowski, Christiane; Oehmke, Robert C; Stout, Quentin F

    2009-11-28

    Adaptive mesh refinement techniques offer a flexible framework for future variable-resolution climate and weather models since they can focus their computational mesh on certain geographical areas or atmospheric events. Adaptive meshes can also be used to coarsen a latitude-longitude grid in polar regions. This allows for the so-called reduced grid setups. A spherical, block-structured adaptive grid technique is applied to the Lin-Rood finite-volume dynamical core for weather and climate research. This hydrostatic dynamics package is based on a conservative and monotonic finite-volume discretization in flux form with vertically floating Lagrangian layers. The adaptive dynamical core is built upon a flexible latitude-longitude computational grid and tested in two- and three-dimensional model configurations. The discussion is focused on static mesh adaptations and reduced grids. The two-dimensional shallow water setup serves as an ideal testbed and allows the use of shallow water test cases like the advection of a cosine bell, moving vortices, a steady-state flow, the Rossby-Haurwitz wave or cross-polar flows. It is shown that reduced grid configurations are viable candidates for pure advection applications but should be used moderately in nonlinear simulations. In addition, static grid adaptations can be successfully used to resolve three-dimensional baroclinic waves in the storm-track region.

  15. THREE-DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF HOT JUPITER ATMOSPHERIC FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Rauscher, Emily; Menou, Kristen

    2010-05-10

    We present a three-dimensional hot Jupiter model, extending from 200 bar to 1 mbar, using the Intermediate General Circulation Model from the University of Reading. Our horizontal spectral resolution is T31 (equivalent to a grid of 48 x 96), with 33 logarithmically spaced vertical levels. A simplified (Newtonian) scheme is employed for the radiative forcing. We adopt a physical setup nearly identical to the model of HD 209458b by Cooper and Showman to facilitate a direct model inter-comparison. Our results are broadly consistent with theirs but significant differences also emerge. The atmospheric flow is characterized by a super-rotating equatorial jet, transonic wind speeds, and eastward advection of heat away from the dayside. We identify a dynamically induced temperature inversion ('stratosphere') on the planetary dayside and find that temperatures at the planetary limb differ systematically from local radiative equilibrium values, a potential source of bias for transit spectroscopic interpretations. While our model atmosphere is quasi-identical to that of Cooper and Showman and we solve the same meteorological equations, we use different algorithmic methods, spectral-implicit versus grid-explicit, which are known to yield fully consistent results in the Earth modeling context. The model discrepancies identified here indicate that one or both numerical methods do not faithfully capture all of the atmospheric dynamics at work in the hot Jupiter context. We highlight the emergence of a shock-like feature in our model, much like that reported recently by Showman et al., and suggest that improved representations of energy conservation may be needed in hot Jupiter atmospheric models, as emphasized by Goodman.

  16. Turbulence modeling in three-dimensional stenosed arterial bifurcations.

    PubMed

    Banks, J; Bressloff, N W

    2007-02-01

    Under normal healthy conditions, blood flow in the carotid artery bifurcation is laminar. However, in the presence of a stenosis, the flow can become turbulent at the higher Reynolds numbers during systole. There is growing consensus that the transitional k-omega model is the best suited Reynolds averaged turbulence model for such flows. Further confirmation of this opinion is presented here by a comparison with the RNG k-epsilon model for the flow through a straight, nonbifurcating tube. Unlike similar validation studies elsewhere, no assumptions are made about the inlet profile since the full length of the experimental tube is simulated. Additionally, variations in the inflow turbulence quantities are shown to have no noticeable affect on downstream turbulence intensity, turbulent viscosity, or velocity in the k-epsilon model, whereas the velocity profiles in the transitional k-omega model show some differences due to large variations in the downstream turbulence quantities. Following this validation study, the transitional k-omega model is applied in a three-dimensional parametrically defined computer model of the carotid artery bifurcation in which the sinus bulb is manipulated to produce mild, moderate, and severe stenosis. The parametric geometry definition facilitates a powerful means for investigating the effect of local shape variation while keeping the global shape fixed. While turbulence levels are generally low in all cases considered, the mild stenosis model produces higher levels of turbulent viscosity and this is linked to relatively high values of turbulent kinetic energy and low values of the specific dissipation rate. The severe stenosis model displays stronger recirculation in the flow field with higher values of vorticity, helicity, and negative wall shear stress. The mild and moderate stenosis configurations produce similar lower levels of vorticity and helicity.

  17. Error Estimation for Reduced Order Models of Dynamical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Homescu, C; Petzold, L R; Serban, R

    2003-12-16

    The use of reduced order models to describe a dynamical system is pervasive in science and engineering. Often these models are used without an estimate of their error or range of validity. In this paper we consider dynamical systems and reduced models built using proper orthogonal decomposition. We show how to compute estimates and bounds for these errors, by a combination of the small sample statistical condition estimation method and of error estimation using the adjoint method. More importantly, the proposed approach allows the assessment of so-called regions of validity for reduced models, i.e., ranges of perturbations in the original system over which the reduced model is still appropriate. This question is particularly important for applications in which reduced models are used not just to approximate the solution to the system that provided the data used in constructing the reduced model, but rather to approximate the solution of systems perturbed from the original one. Numerical examples validate our approach: the error norm estimates approximate well the forward error while the derived bounds are within an order of magnitude.

  18. Three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann model for magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza, M.; Munoz, J. D.

    2008-02-15

    We develop a three-dimensional (3D) lattice Boltzmann model that recovers in the continuous limit the two-fluids theory for plasmas, and consequently includes the generalized Ohm's law. The model reproduces the magnetic reconnection process just by giving the right initial equilibrium conditions in the magnetotail, without any assumption on the resistivity in the diffusive region. In this model, the plasma is handled similar to two fluids with an interaction term, each one with distribution functions associated to a cubic lattice with 19 velocities (D3Q19). The electromagnetic fields are considered as a third fluid with an external force on a cubic lattice with 13 velocities (D3Q13). The model can simulate either viscous fluids in the incompressible limit or nonviscous compressible fluids, and successfully reproduces both the Hartmann flow and the magnetic reconnection in the magnetotail. The reconnection rate in the magnetotail obtained with this model lies between R=0.062 and R=0.073, in good agreement with the observations.

  19. A three-dimensional computational model of collagen network mechanics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byoungkoo; Zhou, Xin; Riching, Kristin; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Keely, Patricia J; Guelcher, Scott A; Weaver, Alissa M; Jiang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) strongly influences cellular behaviors, including cell proliferation, adhesion, and particularly migration. In cancer, the rigidity of the stromal collagen environment is thought to control tumor aggressiveness, and collagen alignment has been linked to tumor cell invasion. While the mechanical properties of collagen at both the single fiber scale and the bulk gel scale are quite well studied, how the fiber network responds to local stress or deformation, both structurally and mechanically, is poorly understood. This intermediate scale knowledge is important to understanding cell-ECM interactions and is the focus of this study. We have developed a three-dimensional elastic collagen fiber network model (bead-and-spring model) and studied fiber network behaviors for various biophysical conditions: collagen density, crosslinker strength, crosslinker density, and fiber orientation (random vs. prealigned). We found the best-fit crosslinker parameter values using shear simulation tests in a small strain region. Using this calibrated collagen model, we simulated both shear and tensile tests in a large linear strain region for different network geometry conditions. The results suggest that network geometry is a key determinant of the mechanical properties of the fiber network. We further demonstrated how the fiber network structure and mechanics evolves with a local formation, mimicking the effect of pulling by a pseudopod during cell migration. Our computational fiber network model is a step toward a full biomechanical model of cellular behaviors in various ECM conditions.

  20. A Three-Dimensional Computational Model of Collagen Network Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byoungkoo; Zhou, Xin; Riching, Kristin; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Keely, Patricia J.; Guelcher, Scott A.; Weaver, Alissa M.; Jiang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) strongly influences cellular behaviors, including cell proliferation, adhesion, and particularly migration. In cancer, the rigidity of the stromal collagen environment is thought to control tumor aggressiveness, and collagen alignment has been linked to tumor cell invasion. While the mechanical properties of collagen at both the single fiber scale and the bulk gel scale are quite well studied, how the fiber network responds to local stress or deformation, both structurally and mechanically, is poorly understood. This intermediate scale knowledge is important to understanding cell-ECM interactions and is the focus of this study. We have developed a three-dimensional elastic collagen fiber network model (bead-and-spring model) and studied fiber network behaviors for various biophysical conditions: collagen density, crosslinker strength, crosslinker density, and fiber orientation (random vs. prealigned). We found the best-fit crosslinker parameter values using shear simulation tests in a small strain region. Using this calibrated collagen model, we simulated both shear and tensile tests in a large linear strain region for different network geometry conditions. The results suggest that network geometry is a key determinant of the mechanical properties of the fiber network. We further demonstrated how the fiber network structure and mechanics evolves with a local formation, mimicking the effect of pulling by a pseudopod during cell migration. Our computational fiber network model is a step toward a full biomechanical model of cellular behaviors in various ECM conditions. PMID:25386649

  1. Preliminary results of a three-dimensional radiative transfer model

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hirok, W.

    1995-09-01

    Clouds act as the primary modulator of the Earth`s radiation at the top of the atmosphere, within the atmospheric column, and at the Earth`s surface. They interact with both shortwave and longwave radiation, but it is primarily in the case of shortwave where most of the uncertainty lies because of the difficulties in treating scattered solar radiation. To understand cloud-radiative interactions, radiative transfer models portray clouds as plane-parallel homogeneous entities to ease the computational physics. Unfortunately, clouds are far from being homogeneous, and large differences between measurement and theory point to a stronger need to understand and model cloud macrophysical properties. In an attempt to better comprehend the role of cloud morphology on the 3-dimensional radiation field, a Monte Carlo model has been developed. This model can simulate broadband shortwave radiation fluxes while incorporating all of the major atmospheric constituents. The model is used to investigate the cloud absorption anomaly where cloud absorption measurements exceed theoretical estimates and to examine the efficacy of ERBE measurements and cloud field experiments. 3 figs.

  2. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional digital flow models of the Salinas Valley ground-water basin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durbin, T.J.; Kapple, G.W.; Freckleton, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    The Salinas Valley ground-water basin is in central coastal California. The ground-water basin extends from Monterey Bay southeastward along the Salinas River to San Ardo, a distance of about 70 miles, and has a maximum thickness of about 2,000 feet. Annual recharge to the ground-water basin, which is derived mostly from the Salinas River, is about 290,000 acre-feet. Annual discharge, which is mostly from pumpage but also includes the consumptive use of ground water by riparian vegetation along the Salinas River, is about 507,000 acre-feet. About 45 percent of the pumpage, or about 217,000 acre-feet of water annually, returns to the ground-water system. A system of interacting hydrologic models was developed for the Salinas Valley. These models include the small-stream model, river model, two-dimensional ground-water model, and three-dimensional ground-water model. The small-stream model simulates ground-water recharge from small streams that are tributary to the Salinas River. The river model simulates ground-water recharge from the surface-water discharge in the Salinas River. The two-dimensional and three-dimensional ground-water models simulate hydraulic head in the ground-water basin. (Woodard-USGS)

  3. Large-Scale Sediment Routing: Development of a One-Dimensional Model Incorporating Sand Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiele, S. M.; Wilcock, P. R.; Grams, P. E.

    2005-12-01

    Routing sediment through long reaches and networks requires a balance between model efficiency, data availability, and accurate representation of sediment flux and storage. The first two often constrain the appropriate model to one dimension, but such models are unable to capture changes in sediment storage in side-channel environments, which are typically driven by two-dimensional transport fields. Side-channel environments are especially important in canyon channels. Routing of sand in canyon channels can be further complicated by transport of sand over a cobble or boulder bed and by remote locations, which can hinder measurement of channel shape. We have produced a one-dimensional model that routes water and sand through the Colorado River below Glen Canyon Dam in Arizona. Our model differs from conventional one-dimensional models in several significant ways: (1) exchange of sand between the main downstream current and eddies, which cannot be directly represented by a one-dimensional model, is included by parameterizing predictions over a wide range of conditions from a multidimensional model; (2) suspended-sand transport over an extremely rough and sparsely sand-covered bed, which is not accurately represented in conventional sand-transport relations or boundary conditions, is calculated in our model with newly developed algorithms (see Grams and others, this meeting); (3) the channel is represented by reach-averaged properties, thereby reducing data requirements and increasing model efficiency; and (4) the model is coupled with an unsteady-flow model, thereby accounting for frequent changes in discharge produced by variations in releases in this power-producing regulated river. Numerical models can contribute to the explanation of observed changes in sand storage, extrapolate field observations to unobserved flows, and evaluate alternative dam-operation strategies for preserving the sand resource. Model applications can address several significant management

  4. Application of Two-Dimensional AWE Algorithm in Training Multi-Dimensional Neural Network Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-07-01

    with the optimization one. Various well-known two-dimensional AWE is applied to accelerate the optimization techniques, such as genetic process of...1 output ayer Relue ay Reitv e Frequtency Dmnino Position of’ee Lene lfine fixed fixed Two-Dimensional AWE Algorith ~m tcrllnwf cei Output Vriables

  5. Semiautomated four-dimensional computed tomography segmentation using deformable models

    SciTech Connect

    Ragan, Dustin; Starkschall, George; McNutt, Todd; Kaus, Michael; Guerrero, Thomas; Stevens, Craig W.

    2005-07-15

    The purpose of this work is to demonstrate a proof of feasibility of the application of a commercial prototype deformable model algorithm to the problem of delineation of anatomic structures on four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) image data sets. We acquired a 4D CT image data set of a patient's thorax that consisted of three-dimensional (3D) image data sets from eight phases in the respiratory cycle. The contours of the right and left lungs, cord, heart, and esophagus were manually delineated on the end inspiration data set. An interactive deformable model algorithm, originally intended for deforming an atlas-based model surface to a 3D CT image data set, was applied in an automated fashion. Triangulations based on the contours generated on each phase were deformed to the CT data set on the succeeding phase to generate the contours on that phase. Deformation was propagated through the eight phases, and the contours obtained on the end inspiration data set were compared with the original manually delineated contours. Structures defined by high-density gradients, such as lungs, cord, and heart, were accurately reproduced, except in regions where other gradient boundaries may have confused the algorithm, such as near bronchi. The algorithm failed to accurately contour the esophagus, a soft-tissue structure completely surrounded by tissue of similar density, without manual interaction. This technique has the potential to facilitate contour delineation in 4D CT image data sets; and future evolution of the software is expected to improve the process.

  6. Proton environment of reduced Rieske iron-sulfur cluster probed by two-dimensional ESEEM spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kolling, Derrick R J; Samoilova, Rimma I; Shubin, Alexander A; Crofts, Antony R; Dikanov, Sergei A

    2009-01-29

    The proton environment of the reduced [2Fe-2S] cluster in the water-soluble head domain of the Rieske iron-sulfur protein (ISF) from the cytochrome bc(1) complex of Rhodobacter sphaeroides has been studied by orientation-selected X-band 2D ESEEM. The 2D spectra show multiple cross-peaks from protons, with considerable overlap. Samples in which (1)H(2)O water was replaced by (2)H(2)O were used to determine which of the observed peaks belong to exchangeable protons, likely involved in hydrogen bonds in the neighborhood of the cluster. By correlating the cross-peaks from 2D spectra recorded at different parts of the EPR spectrum, lines from nine distinct proton signals were identified. Assignment of the proton signals was based on a point-dipole model for interaction with electrons of Fe(III) and Fe(II) ions, using the high-resolution structure of ISF from Rb. sphaeroides. Analysis of experimental and calculated tensors has led us to conclude that even 2D spectra do not completely resolve all contributions from nearby protons. Particularly, the seven resolved signals from nonexchangeable protons could be produced by at least 13 protons. The contributions from exchangeable protons were resolved by difference spectra ((1)H(2)O minus (2)H(2)O), and assigned to two groups of protons with distinct anisotropic hyperfine values. The largest measured coupling exceeded any calculated value. This discrepancy could result from limitations of the point dipole approximation in dealing with the distribution of spin density over the sulfur atoms of the cluster and the cysteine ligands, or from differences between the structure in solution and the crystallographic structure. The approach demonstrated here provides a paradigm for a wide range of studies in which hydrogen-bonding interactions with metallic centers has a crucial role in understanding the function.

  7. Finite-dimensional attractors for the Kirchhoff models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhijian, Yang

    2010-09-01

    The paper studies the existence of the finite-dimensional global attractor and exponential attractor for the dynamical system associated with the Kirchhoff models arising in elasto-plastic flow utt-div{|∇u|m -1∇u}-Δut+Δ2u+h(ut)+g(u)=f(x). By using the method of ℓ-trajectories and the operator technique, it proves that under subcritical case, 1≤mdimensional (weak) global attractor and a weak exponential attractor, respectively. For application, the fact shows that for the concerned elasto-plastic flow the permanent regime (global attractor) can be observed when the excitation starts from any bounded set in phase space, and the fractal dimension of the attractor, that is, the number of degree of freedom of the turbulent phenomenon and thus the level of complexity concerning the flow, is finite.

  8. Reducing Fear of the Laboratory Rat: A Participant Modeling Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barber, Nigel

    1994-01-01

    Reports on the use of participant modeling in a study of 56 college-level students to reduce fear of laboratory rats. Discovers that even mild exposure reduced fear significantly. Finds that women were more fearful initially but that their fear reduction was equal to that of men. (CFR)

  9. A 3-dimensional model for teaching local flaps using porcine skin.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Zahid; Hogg, Fiona; Graham, Ken

    2014-10-01

    The European Working Time Directive and streamlined training has led to reduced training time. Surgery, as an experience-dependent craft specialty is affected more than other medical specialties. Trainees want to maximize all training opportunities in the clinical setting, and having predeveloped basic skills acquired on a simulated model can facilitate this.Here we describe the use of a novel model to design and raise local flaps in the face and scalp regions. The model consists of mannequin heads draped with porcine skin which is skewered with pins at strategic points to give a 3-dimensional model which closely resembles a cadaveric head.The advantages of this model are that it is life size and incorporates all the relevant anatomical features, which can be drawn on if required.This model was used on a recent course, Intermediate Skills in Plastic Surgery: Flaps Around the Face, at the Royal College of Surgeons England. The trainees found that practicing on the porcine skin gave them an opportunity to master the basics of flap design and implementation.In summary, this innovative 3-dimensional training model has received high levels of satisfaction and is currently as close as we can get to cadaveric dissection without the constraints and cost of using human tissue.

  10. Phase transitions in two-dimensional model systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schief, William R., Jr.

    Lipid and protein monolayers at the air/water interface are well suited for the study of two-dimensional phase transitions as their thermodynamic parameters may be tightly controlled, and they are amendable to in situ, non-perturbative, surface-analytical techniques. In this dissertation, quantitative light microscopy techniques are developed and expanded to study transitions in lipid and protein monolayers at the air/water interface. In the simplest model system studied, pure phospholipid monolayers, the introduction of light scattering microscopy reveals previously undetected, nanoscale topographic transitions in a microscopic pattern throughout the condensed phase. The findings demonstrate that condensed phospholipid phases are not flat as conventionally thought, and indicate that a patterned distribution of packing defects is imprinted on the monolayer during the first order liquid-to-condensed transition. As the monolayer is compressed, the pattern of defects persists in the pure condensed phase, giving rise to first a corrugation transition and later a budding transition. Finally, the pattern of defects controls the morphology of the monolayer collapse phase transition. The findings show the high sensitivity of light scattering microscopy to surface deformations on the angstrom to nanoscale and demonstrate the promise of this technique for future discoveries in a range of systems at fluid interfaces. In binary mixed monolayers of phospholipids and dihydrocholesterol and highly complex natural lung surfactant monolayers, quantitative Brewster angle microscopy leads to the discovery of a first order, two- to three-dimensional phase transition from monolayer to monolayer plus overlying bilayer discs. This phase transition occurs within the lower end of the physiological range of surface pressure, so the discovery raises new questions concerning the structure/function relationship of pulmonary surfactant and specifically points to a powerful structural impact by

  11. The dimensional nature of eating pathology: Evidence from a direct comparison of categorical, dimensional, and hybrid models.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaochen; Donnellan, M Brent; Burt, S Alexandra; Klump, Kelly L

    2016-07-01

    Eating disorders are conceptualized as categorical rather than dimensional in the current major diagnostic system (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders; 5th ed.; American Psychiatric Association, 2013) and in many previous studies. However, previous research has not critically evaluated this assumption or tested hybrid models (e.g., modeling latent variables with both dimensional and categorical features). Accordingly, the current study directly compared categorical, dimensional, and hybrid models for eating pathology in a large, population-based sample. Participants included 3,032 female and male twins (ages 9-30 years) from the Michigan State University Twin Registry. The Minnesota Eating Behaviors Survey was used to assess disordered eating symptoms including body dissatisfaction, weight preoccupation, binge eating, and compensatory behaviors. Results showed that dimensional models best fit the data in the overall sample as well as across subgroups divided by sex and pubertal status (e.g., prepubertal vs. postpubertal). It is interesting to note that the results favored more categorical models when using a case-control subset of our sample with participants who either endorsed substantial eating pathology or no/little eating pathology. Overall, findings provide support for a dimensional conceptualization of eating pathology and underscore the importance of using community samples to capture the full range of severity of eating pathology when investigating questions about taxonomy. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Three Dimensional TEM Forward Modeling Using FDTD Accelerated by GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Huang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Three dimensional inversion of transient electromagnetic (TEM) data is still challenging. The inversion speed mostly depends on the forward modeling. Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is one of the popular forward modeling scheme. In an explicit type, which is based on the Du Fort-Frankel scheme, the time step is under the constraint of quasi-static approximation. Often an upward-continuation boundary condition (UCBC) is applied on the earth-air surface to avoid time stepping in the model air. However, UCBC is not suitable for models with topography and has a low parallel efficiency. Modeling without UCBC may cause a much smaller time step because of the resistive attribute of the air and the quasi-static constraint, which may also low the efficiency greatly. Our recent research shows that the time step in the model air is not needed to be constrained by the quasi-static approximation, which can let the time step without UCBC much closer to that with UCBC. The parallel performance of FDTD is then largely released. On a computer with a 4-core CPU, this newly developed method is obviously faster than the method using UCBC. Besides, without UCBC, this method can be easily accelerated by Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). On a computer with a CPU of 4790k@4.4GHz and a GPU of GTX 970, the speed accelerated by CUDA is almost 10 times of that using CPU only. For a model with a grid size of 140×140×130, if the conductivity of the model earth is 0.02S/m, and the minimal space interval is 15m, it takes only 80 seconds to evolve the field from excitation to 0.032s.

  13. Adaptive tracking for complex systems using reduced-order models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnigan, Craig R.

    1990-01-01

    Reduced-order models are considered in the context of parameter adaptive controllers for tracking workspace trajectories. A dual-arm manipulation task is used to illustrate the methodology and provide simulation results. A parameter adaptive controller is designed to track a payload trajectory using a four-parameter model instead of the full-order, nine-parameter model. Several simulations with different payload-to-arm mass ratios are used to illustrate the capabilities of the reduced-order model in tracking the desired trajectory.

  14. Adaptive tracking for complex systems using reduced-order models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carignan, Craig R.

    1990-01-01

    Reduced-order models are considered in the context of parameter adaptive controllers for tracking workspace trajectories. A dual-arm manipulation task is used to illustrate the methodology and provide simulation results. A parameter adaptive controller is designed to track the desired position trajectory of a payload using a four-parameter model instead of a full-order, nine-parameter model. Several simulations with different payload-to-arm mass ratios are used to illustrate the capabilities of the reduced-order model in tracking the desired trajectory.

  15. Three-dimensional pseudospectral modelling of cardiac propagation in an inhomogeneous anisotropic tissue.

    PubMed

    Ng, K T; Yan, R

    2003-11-01

    Various investigators have used the monodomain model to study cardiac propagation behaviour. In many cases, the governing non-linear parabolic equation is solved using the finite-difference method. An adequate discretisation of cardiac tissue with realistic dimensions, however, often leads to a large model size that is computationally demanding. Recently, it has been demonstrated, for a two-dimensional homogeneous monodomain, that the Chebyshev pseudospectral method can offer higher computational efficiency than the finite-difference technique. Here, an extension of the pseudospectral approach to a three-dimensional inhomogeneous case with fibre rotation is presented. The unknown transmembrane potential is expanded in terms of Chebyshev polynomial trial functions, and the monodomain equation is enforced at the Gauss-Lobatto node points. The forward Euler technique is used to advance the solution in time. Numerical results are presented that demonstrate that the Chebyshev pseudospectral method offered an even larger improvement in computational performance over the finite-difference method in the three-dimensional case. Specifically, the pseudospectral method allowed the number of nodes to be reduced by approximately 85 times, while the same solution accuracy was maintained. Depending on the model size, simulations were performed with approximately 18-41 times less memory and approximately 99-169 times less CPU time.

  16. High performance computing for three-dimensional agent-based molecular models.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Rodríguez, G; Pérez-Pérez, M; Fdez-Riverola, F; Lourenço, A

    2016-07-01

    Agent-based simulations are increasingly popular in exploring and understanding cellular systems, but the natural complexity of these systems and the desire to grasp different modelling levels demand cost-effective simulation strategies and tools. In this context, the present paper introduces novel sequential and distributed approaches for the three-dimensional agent-based simulation of individual molecules in cellular events. These approaches are able to describe the dimensions and position of the molecules with high accuracy and thus, study the critical effect of spatial distribution on cellular events. Moreover, two of the approaches allow multi-thread high performance simulations, distributing the three-dimensional model in a platform independent and computationally efficient way. Evaluation addressed the reproduction of molecular scenarios and different scalability aspects of agent creation and agent interaction. The three approaches simulate common biophysical and biochemical laws faithfully. The distributed approaches show improved performance when dealing with large agent populations while the sequential approach is better suited for small to medium size agent populations. Overall, the main new contribution of the approaches is the ability to simulate three-dimensional agent-based models at the molecular level with reduced implementation effort and moderate-level computational capacity. Since these approaches have a generic design, they have the major potential of being used in any event-driven agent-based tool. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Using three-dimensional protein structure to model protein aggregation: Collagen fibrillogenesis in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Darren; Graovac, Ivan; Rainey, Jan; Goh, M. Cynthia

    2004-03-01

    Collagen is the most prevalent protein in mammals. In vitro, it self-assembles into a variety of fibrillar constructs which depend on solution conditions. These assembly processes are still not understood in a thorough manner, in part because of the lack of a three-dimensional structure of the rather large monomer ( 3000 amino acids). Using a statistically-based reduced-rotamer representation alongside a triple-helical backbone parameterization, we have created a 3-D collagen model, and examined the location of charges as a function of pH. Using this representation, we propose a mechanism of assembly that accounts for the morphology (observed using atomic force microscopy) of the most common fibrillar construct. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the experimentally observed effects of pH and ionic strength on the assembly process can be related to the three-dimensional structure of the monomer.

  18. A Novel Deployment Scheme Based on Three-Dimensional Coverage Model for Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Fu; Yang, Yang; Wang, Ruchuan; Sun, Lijuan

    2014-01-01

    Coverage pattern and deployment strategy are directly related to the optimum allocation of limited resources for wireless sensor networks, such as energy of nodes, communication bandwidth, and computing power, and quality improvement is largely determined by these for wireless sensor networks. A three-dimensional coverage pattern and deployment scheme are proposed in this paper. Firstly, by analyzing the regular polyhedron models in three-dimensional scene, a coverage pattern based on cuboids is proposed, and then relationship between coverage and sensor nodes' radius is deduced; also the minimum number of sensor nodes to maintain network area's full coverage is calculated. At last, sensor nodes are deployed according to the coverage pattern after the monitor area is subdivided into finite 3D grid. Experimental results show that, compared with traditional random method, sensor nodes number is reduced effectively while coverage rate of monitor area is ensured using our coverage pattern and deterministic deployment scheme. PMID:25045747

  19. A zero dimensional model of lithium-sulfur batteries during charge and discharge.

    PubMed

    Marinescu, Monica; Zhang, Teng; Offer, Gregory J

    2016-01-07

    Lithium-sulfur cells present an attractive alternative to Li-ion batteries due to their large energy density, safety, and possible low cost. Their successful commercialisation is dependent on improving their performance, but also on acquiring sufficient understanding of the underlying mechanisms to allow for the development of predictive models for operational cells. To address the latter, we present a zero dimensional model that predicts many of the features observed in the behaviour of a lithium-sulfur cell during charge and discharge. The model accounts for two electrochemical reactions via the Nernst formulation, power limitations through Butler-Volmer kinetics, and precipitation/dissolution of one species, including nucleation. It is shown that the flat shape of the low voltage plateau typical of the lithium-sulfur cell discharge is caused by precipitation. During charge, it is predicted that the dissolution can act as a bottleneck, because for large enough currents the amount that dissolves becomes limited. This results in reduced charge capacity and an earlier onset of the high plateau reaction, such that the two voltage plateaus merge. By including these effects, the model improves on the existing zero dimensional models, while requiring considerably fewer input parameters and computational resources than one dimensional models. The model also predicts that, due to precipitation, the customary way of experimentally obtaining the open circuit voltage from a low rate discharge might not be suitable for lithium-sulfur. This model can provide the basis for mechanistic studies, identification of dominant effects in a real cell, predictions of operational behaviour under realistic loads, and control algorithms for applications.

  20. Correlation driven dimensional reduction in a two orbital Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Anamitra; Patel, Niravkumar D.; Moreo, Adrianna; Dagotto, Elbio

    We apply a recently developed many-body technique that allows for the incorporation of thermal effects, to a two orbital Hubbard model of relevance for the pnictides. In this `Mean Field-Monte Carlo' (MF-MC) approach, we first perform a mean field (MF) decomposition of the Hubbard model and then treat the mean field parameters via the standard finite-temperature classical Monte Carlo (MC). We have earlier established that for the one orbital Hubbard model, this MF-MC approach provides remarkable improvement over simple finite-temperature mean field methods and is in good agreement with Determinantal Quantum Monte Carlo results. In this talk we will discuss our MC-MF results applied to the two orbital Hubbard model with degenerate dxz and dyz orbitals for the undoped pnictides. The onsite repulsion strength U vs. temperature phase diagram is rich and has a narrow window of nematicity above the N'eel temperature. Our main result is the discovery of a novel intermediate coupling regime characterized by an unexpected spontaneous dimensional reduction that renders one direction insulating and the other metallic.

  1. Three-dimensional modeling of hearing in Delphinus delphis.

    PubMed

    Aroyan, J L

    2001-12-01

    Physical modeling is a fertile approach to investigating sound emission and reception (hearing) in marine mammals. A method for simulation of hearing was developed combining three-dimensional acoustic propagation and extrapolation techniques with a novel approach to modeling the acoustic parameters of mammalian tissues. Models of the forehead and lower jaw tissues of the common dolphin, Delphinus delphis, were created in order to simulate the biosonar emission and hearing processes. This paper outlines the methods used in the hearing simulations and offers observations concerning the mechanisms of acoustic reception in this dolphin based on model results. These results include: (1) The left and right mandibular fat bodies were found to channel sound incident from forward directions to the left and right tympanic bulla and to create sharp maxima against the lateral surfaces of each respective bulla; (2) The soft tissues of the lower jaw improved the forward directivity of the simulated receptivity patterns; (3) A focal property of the lower-jaw pan bones appeared to contribute to the creation of distinct forward receptivity peaks for each ear; (4) The reception patterns contained features that may correspond to lateral hearing pathways. A "fast" lens mechanism is proposed to explain the focal contribution of the pan bones in this dolphin. Similar techniques may be used to study hearing in other marine mammals.

  2. Persistence in a Two-Dimensional Moving-Habitat Model.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Austin; Kot, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Environmental changes are forcing many species to track suitable conditions or face extinction. In this study, we use a two-dimensional integrodifference equation to analyze whether a population can track a habitat that is moving due to climate change. We model habitat as a simple rectangle. Our model quickly leads to an eigenvalue problem that determines whether the population persists or declines. After surveying techniques to solve the eigenvalue problem, we highlight three findings that impact conservation efforts such as reserve design and species risk assessment. First, while other models focus on habitat length (parallel to the direction of habitat movement), we show that ignoring habitat width (perpendicular to habitat movement) can lead to overestimates of persistence. Dispersal barriers and hostile landscapes that constrain habitat width greatly decrease the population's ability to track its habitat. Second, for some long-distance dispersal kernels, increasing habitat length improves persistence without limit; for other kernels, increasing length is of limited help and has diminishing returns. Third, it is not always best to orient the long side of the habitat in the direction of climate change. Evidence suggests that the kurtosis of the dispersal kernel determines whether it is best to have a long, wide, or square habitat. In particular, populations with platykurtic dispersal benefit more from a wide habitat, while those with leptokurtic dispersal benefit more from a long habitat. We apply our model to the Rocky Mountain Apollo butterfly (Parnassius smintheus).

  3. Supervised Bayesian latent class models for high-dimensional data

    PubMed Central

    Desantis, Stacia M.; Houseman, E. Andrés; Coull, Brent A.; Nutt, Catherine L.; Betensky, Rebecca A.

    2013-01-01

    High-grade gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors in adults and are typically diagnosed using histopathology. However, these diagnostic categories are highly heterogeneous and do not always correlate well with survival. In an attempt to refine these diagnoses, we make several immunohistochemical measurements of YKL-40, a gene previously shown to be differentially expressed between diagnostic groups. We propose two latent class models for classification and variable selection in the presence of high-dimensional binary data, fit by using Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques. Penalization and model selection are incorporated in this setting via prior distributions on the unknown parameters. The methods provide valid parameter estimates under conditions in which standard supervised latent class models do not, and outperform two-stage approaches to variable selection and parameter estimation in a variety of settings. We study the properties of these methods in simulations, and apply these methodologies to the glioma study for which identifiable three-class parameter estimates cannot be obtained without penalization. With penalization, the resulting latent classes correlate well with clinical tumor grade and offer additional information on survival prognosis that is not captured by clinical diagnosis alone. The inclusion of YKL-40 features also increases the precision of survival estimates. Fitting models with and without YKL-40 highlights a subgroup of patients who have glioblastoma (GBM) diagnosis but appear to have better prognosis than the typical GBM patient. PMID:22495652

  4. Three-dimensional antiferromagnetic CP(N-1) models.

    PubMed

    Delfino, Francesco; Pelissetto, Andrea; Vicari, Ettore

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the critical behavior of three-dimensional antiferromagnetic CP(N-1) (ACP(N-1)) models in cubic lattices, which are characterized by a global U(N) symmetry and a local U(1) gauge symmetry. Assuming that critical fluctuations are associated with a staggered gauge-invariant (Hermitian traceless matrix) order parameter, we determine the corresponding Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson (LGW) model. For N=3 this mapping allows us to conclude that the three-component ACP(2) model undergoes a continuous transition that belongs to the O(8) vector universality class, with an effective enlargement of the symmetry at the critical point. This prediction is confirmed by numerical analyses of the finite-size scaling behaviors of the ACP(2) and the O(8) vector models, which show the same universal features at their transitions. We also present a renormalization-group (RG) analysis of the LGW theories for N≥4. We compute perturbative series in two different renormalization schemes and analyze the corresponding RG flow. We do not find stable fixed points that can be associated with continuous transitions.

  5. Principal Angle Enrichment Analysis (PAEA): Dimensionally Reduced Multivariate Gene Set Enrichment Analysis Tool.

    PubMed

    Clark, Neil R; Szymkiewicz, Maciej; Wang, Zichen; Monteiro, Caroline D; Jones, Matthew R; Ma'ayan, Avi

    2015-11-01

    Gene set analysis of differential expression, which identifies collectively differentially expressed gene sets, has become an important tool for biology. The power of this approach lies in its reduction of the dimensionality of the statistical problem and its incorporation of biological interpretation by construction. Many approaches to gene set analysis have been proposed, but benchmarking their performance in the setting of real biological data is difficult due to the lack of a gold standard. In a previously published work we proposed a geometrical approach to differential expression which performed highly in benchmarking tests and compared well to the most popular methods of differential gene expression. As reported, this approach has a natural extension to gene set analysis which we call Principal Angle Enrichment Analysis (PAEA). PAEA employs dimensionality reduction and a multivariate approach for gene set enrichment analysis. However, the performance of this method has not been assessed nor its implementation as a web-based tool. Here we describe new benchmarking protocols for gene set analysis methods and find that PAEA performs highly. The PAEA method is implemented as a user-friendly web-based tool, which contains 70 gene set libraries and is freely available to the community.

  6. A two-dimensional hydrodynamic model of a tidal estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, Roy A.; Cheng, Ralph T.

    1979-01-01

    A finite element model is described which is used in the computation of tidal currents in an estuary. This numerical model is patterned after an existing algorithm and has been carefully tested in rectangular and curve-sided channels with constant and variable depth. One of the common uncertainties in this class of two-dimensional hydrodynamic models is the treatment of the lateral boundary conditions. Special attention is paid specifically to addressing this problem. To maintain continuity within the domain of interest, ‘smooth’ curve-sided elements must be used at all shoreline boundaries. The present model uses triangular, isoparametric elements with quadratic basis functions for the two velocity components and a linear basis function for water surface elevation. An implicit time integration is used and the model is unconditionally stable. The resultant governing equations are nonlinear owing to the advective and the bottom friction terms and are solved iteratively at each time step by the Newton-Raphson method. Model test runs have been made in the southern portion of San Francisco Bay, California (South Bay) as well as in the Bay west of Carquinez Strait. Owing to the complex bathymetry, the hydrodynamic characteristics of the Bay system are dictated by the generally shallow basins which contain deep, relict river channels. Great care must be exercised to ensure that the conservation equations remain locally as well as globally accurate. Simulations have been made over several representative tidal cycles using this finite element model, and the results compare favourably with existing data. In particular, the standing wave in South Bay and the progressive wave in the northern reach are well represented.

  7. Current status of one- and two-dimensional numerical models: Successes and limitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, R. J.; Gray, J. L.; Lundstrom, M. S.

    1985-01-01

    The capabilities of one and two-dimensional numerical solar cell modeling programs (SCAP1D and SCAP2D) are described. The occasions when a two-dimensional model is required are discussed. The application of the models to design, analysis, and prediction are presented along with a discussion of problem areas for solar cell modeling.

  8. Quantum fluctuations in a disordered two-dimensional spin model

    SciTech Connect

    Gawiec, P.; Grempel, D.R.

    1996-08-01

    We study the effect of quantum fluctuations on the spin stiffness of a disordered two-dimensional anisotropic spin model within an 1/{ital S} expansion. We find that these fluctuations, very weak in the pure system, may be quite strong in the presence of bond disorder provided the latter introduces frustration in the system. As a consequence of the disorder-induced increase in the amplitude of zero-point fluctuations, the spin stiffness constant of the system vanishes in certain regions of parameter space, leading to the appearance of a spin-liquid phase in parts of the phase diagram where a spin-glass phase would be expected classically. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  9. Three dimensional CAD model of the Ignitor machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlandi, S.; Zanaboni, P.; Macco, A.; Sioli, V.; Risso, E.

    1998-11-01

    defind The final, global product of all the structural and thermomechanical design activities is a complete three dimensional CAD (AutoCAD and Intergraph Design Review) model of the IGNITOR machine. With this powerful tool, any interface, modification, or upgrading of the machine design is managed as an integrated part of the general effort aimed at the construction of the Ignitor facility. ind The activities that are underway, to complete the design of the core of the experiment and that will be described, concern the following: ind - the cryogenic cooling system, ind - the radial press, the center post, the mechanical supports (legs) of the entire machine, ind - the inner mechanical supports of major components such as the plasma chamber and the outer poloidal field coils.

  10. Computational Model of Three Dimensional Elastic Wing Driven by Muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. Jane; Cowen, Nathaniel; Peskin, Charles S.; Childress, Stephen W.

    2003-11-01

    The flapping wing motion observed in nature results from couplings of muscles, flexible wing structures, and unsteady flows. Previously we have studied the unsteady flows and forces of a rigid two dimensional wing undergoing prescribed motion similar to kinematics observed in insects, as a means of understanding basic unsteady aerodynamic mechanisms. In this talk, we describe our recent progress in constructing a more realistic model insect, which consists of a pair of elastic wings immersed in fluids, and is driven by periodically contracting 'muscles'. A natural computational framework for such a system is the immersed boundary method, which is used here. We present simulations of flapping flight at Reynolds number 10^2, in the same range as that of fruitflies and butterflies.

  11. Charge diffusion in the one-dimensional Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinigeweg, R.; Jin, F.; De Raedt, H.; Michielsen, K.; Gemmer, J.

    2017-08-01

    We study the real-time and real-space dynamics of charge in the one-dimensional Hubbard model in the limit of high temperatures. To this end, we prepare pure initial states with sharply peaked density profiles and calculate the time evolution of these nonequilibrium states, by using numerical forward-propagation approaches to chains as long as 20 sites. For a class of typical states, we find excellent agreement with linear-response theory and unveil the existence of remarkably clean charge diffusion in the regime of strong particle-particle interactions. We additionally demonstrate that, in the half-filling sector, this diffusive behavior does not depend on certain details of our initial conditions, i.e., it occurs for five different realizations with random and nonrandom internal degrees of freedom, single and double occupation of the central site, and displacement of spin-up and spin-down particles.

  12. Current fluctuations in a two dimensional model of heat conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Espigares, Carlos; Garrido, Pedro L.; Hurtado, Pablo I.

    2011-03-01

    In this work we study numerically and analytically current fluctuations in the two-dimensional Kipnis-Marchioro-Presutti (KMP) model of heat conduction. For that purpose, we use a recently introduced algorithm which allows the direct evaluation of large deviations functions. We compare our results with predictions based on the Hydrodynamic Fluctuation Theory (HFT) of Bertini and coworkers, finding very good agreement in a wide interval of current fluctuations. We also verify the existence of a well-defined temperature profile associated to a given current fluctuation which depends exclusively on the magnitude of the current vector, not on its orientation. This confirms the recently introduced Isometric Fluctuation Relation (IFR), which results from the time-reversibility of the dynamics, and includes as a particular instance the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem in this context but adds a completely new perspective on the high level of symmetry imposed by timereversibility on the statistics of nonequilibrium fluctuations.

  13. Quasi-one-dimensional model of pretransitional soft mode behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendelson, S.

    1988-04-01

    Pretransitional effects at displacive phase transitions are temperature dependent responses to fluctuations of the order parameter; these give rise to 1-D correlations in martensitic transformations when lattice dynamical constraints divide the “hard mode” 3-D correlation of the Bain distortion in order to maintain the mean field on a macroscopic scale. The quasi-one-dimensional (QOD) soft mode model of the latttice-variant-shear-theory (LVST) is described and its relevance to pretransitional nucleation and soft mode behavior, discussed. The 1-D correlations give rise to localized soft modes above T m , which nucleate microdomains of an intermediate phase at dissociated dislocations; these grow with second order kinetics and maintain the mean field when microdomains of opposite displacement vector cancel each other. Pretransitional behavior, predicted by LVST, are compared with experimental data in a wide range of materials and show why materials with different order parameters show similar transformation behavior.

  14. Three-dimensional antenna models for fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, M. D.; Wang, C. Y.; Hogan, J. T.; Harris, J. H.; Hoffman, D. J.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Ryan, P. M.; Stallings, D. S.; Batchelor, D. B.; Beaumont, B.; Hutter, T.; Saoutic, B.

    1996-02-01

    The development of the RANT3D code has permitted the systematic study of the effect of three-dimensional structures on the launched power spectrum for antennas in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. The code allows the septa between current straps to be modeled with arbitrary heights and permits the antenna to interact with other structures in the tokamak. In this paper we present comparisons of calculated loading with the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and Tore Supra experiments, demonstrate the effects on loading caused by positioning uncertainties for an antenna in Tore Supra, and show electric field patterns near the Tore Supra antenna. A poloidal component in the static magnetic field for the plasma response is included in the near-field calculations using the warm plasma code, GLOSI. Preliminary estimates for the heat flux on the bumper limiters during typical operation in Tore Supra are also presented.

  15. 3-dimensional current collection model. [of Tethered Satellite System 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Kai-Shen; Shiah, A.; Wu, S. T.; Stone, N.

    1992-01-01

    A three-dimensional, time dependent current collection model of a satellite has been developed for the TSS-1 system. The system has been simulated particularly for the Research of Plasma Electrodynamics (ROPE) experiment. The Maxwellian distributed particles with the geomagnetic field effects are applied in this numerical simulation. The preliminary results indicate that a ring current is observed surrounding the satellite in the equatorial plane. This ring current is found between the plasma sheath and the satellite surface and is oscillating with a time scale of approximately 1 microsec. This is equivalent to the electron plasma frequency. An hour glass shape of electron distribution was observed when the viewing direction is perpendicular to the equatorial plane. This result is consistent with previous findings from Linson (1969) and Antoniades et al. (1990). Electrons that are absorbed by the satellite are limited from the background ionosphere as indicated by Parker and Murphy (1967).

  16. Downhole-electrode resistivity interpretation with three-dimensional models

    SciTech Connect

    Newkirk, D.J.

    1982-06-01

    Using an integral equation numerical solution, the theoretical results for (1) the potential, (2) the apparent resistivity calculated from the total horizontal electric field, (3) the apparent resistivity calculated from the potential due to different three-dimensional bodies in plan and cross-section views have been computed. The transmitter consists of a remote electrode and a dowhole electrode embedded in the body or located near the body. For hole-to-surface work, the potential offers little information about the parameters of a deep body. The apparent resistivity from the total electric field, with its distinctive patterns, best resolves the width, length, and dip of the model, while the apparent resistivity from the potential is more difficult to interpret. The cross-section views, for analysis of hole-to-hole surveys, theoretically define the body for the potential and the apparent resistivity derived from the potential, but their use in practice is limited.

  17. Insight into the numerical challenges of implementing 2-dimensional SOA models in atmospheric chemical transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napier, W. J.; Ensberg, J. J.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2014-10-01

    The new generation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) models that represent gas- and particle-phase chemistry and thermodynamic partitioning using discrete two-dimensional grids (e.g. SOM, 2D-VBS) cannot be efficiently implemented into three-dimensional atmospheric chemical transport models (CTMs) due to the large number of bins (tracers) required. In this study, we introduce a novel mathematical framework, termed the Oxidation State/Volatility Moment Method, that is designed to address these computational burdens so as to allow the new generation of SOA models to be implemented into CTMs. This is accomplished by mapping the two-dimensional grids onto probability distributions that conserve carbon and oxygen mass. Assessment of the Moment Method strengths (speed, carbon and oxygen conservation) and weaknesses (numerical drift) provide valuable insight that can guide future development of SOA modules for atmospheric CTMs.

  18. Projection-Based Reduced Order Modeling for Spacecraft Thermal Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qian, Jing; Wang, Yi; Song, Hongjun; Pant, Kapil; Peabody, Hume; Ku, Jentung; Butler, Charles D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematically rigorous, subspace projection-based reduced order modeling (ROM) methodology and an integrated framework to automatically generate reduced order models for spacecraft thermal analysis. Two key steps in the reduced order modeling procedure are described: (1) the acquisition of a full-scale spacecraft model in the ordinary differential equation (ODE) and differential algebraic equation (DAE) form to resolve its dynamic thermal behavior; and (2) the ROM to markedly reduce the dimension of the full-scale model. Specifically, proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) in conjunction with discrete empirical interpolation method (DEIM) and trajectory piece-wise linear (TPWL) methods are developed to address the strong nonlinear thermal effects due to coupled conductive and radiative heat transfer in the spacecraft environment. Case studies using NASA-relevant satellite models are undertaken to verify the capability and to assess the computational performance of the ROM technique in terms of speed-up and error relative to the full-scale model. ROM exhibits excellent agreement in spatiotemporal thermal profiles (<0.5% relative error in pertinent time scales) along with salient computational acceleration (up to two orders of magnitude speed-up) over the full-scale analysis. These findings establish the feasibility of ROM to perform rational and computationally affordable thermal analysis, develop reliable thermal control strategies for spacecraft, and greatly reduce the development cycle times and costs.

  19. A reduced-grid method for a parallel global ocean general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickett, Michael Everett

    A limitation of many explicit finite-difference global climate models is the timestep restriction caused by the decrease in cell size associated with the convergence of meridians near the poles. A computational grid in which the number of cells in the longitudinal direction is reduced toward high- latitudes, keeping the longitudinal width of the resulting cells as uniform as possible and increasing the allowable timestep, is applied to a three- dimensional primitive equation ocean-climate model. This ``reduced'' grid consists of subgrids which interact at interfaces along their northern and southern boundaries, where the resolution changes by a factor of three. Algorithms are developed to extend the finite difference techniques to this interface, focusing on the conservation required to perform long time integrations, while preserving the staggered spatial arrangement of variables and the numerics used on subgrids. The reduced grid eliminates the common alternative of filtering high- frequency modes from the solution at high-latitudes to allow a larger timestep and reduces execution time per model step by roughly 20 percent. The reduced grid model is implemented for parallel computer architectures with two-dimensional domain decomposition and message passing, with speedup results comparable to those of the original model. Both idealized and realistic model runs are presented to show the effect of the interface numerics on the model solution. First, a rectangular, mid-latitude, flat-bottomed basin with vertical walls at the boundaries is driven only by surface wind stress to compare three resolutions of the standard grid to reduced grid cases which use various interface conditions. Next, a similar basin with wind stress, heat, and fresh water forcing is used to compare the results of a reduced grid with those of a standard grid result while exercising the full set of model equations. Finally, global model runs, with topography, forcing, and physical parameters

  20. A Reduced Grid Method for a Parallel Global Ocean General Circulation Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wickett, Michael Everett

    1999-12-01

    A limitation of many explicit finite-difference global climate models is the timestep restriction caused by the decrease in cell size associated with the convergence of meridians near the poles. A computational grid in which the number of cells in the longitudinal direction is reduced toward high-latitudes, keeping the longitudinal width of the resulting cells as uniform as possible and increasing the allowable timestep, is applied to a three-dimensional primitive equation ocean-climate model. This ''reduced'' grid consists of subgrids which interact at interfaces along their northern and southern boundaries, where the resolution changes by a factor of three. Algorithms are developed to extend the finite difference techniques to this interface, focusing on the conservation required to perform long time integrations, while preserving the staggered spatial arrangement of variables and the numerics used on subgrids. The reduced grid eliminates the common alternative of filtering high-frequency modes from the solution at high-latitudes to allow a larger timestep and reduces execution time per model step by roughly 20 percent. The reduced grid model is implemented for parallel computer architectures with two-dimensional domain decomposition and message passing, with speedup results comparable to those of the original model. Both idealized and realistic model runs are presented to show the effect of the interface numerics on the model solution. First, a rectangular, mid-latitude, at-bottomed basin with vertical walls at the boundaries is driven only by surface wind stress to compare three resolutions of the standard grid to reduced grid cases which use various interface conditions. Next, a similar basin with wind stress, heat, and fresh water forcing is used to compare the results of a reduced grid with those of a standard grid result while exercising the full set of model equations. Finally, global model runs, with topography, forcing, and physical parameters similar to

  1. Development of Unsteady Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic Reduced-Order Models Using the FUN3D Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Vatsa, Veer N.; Biedron, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    Recent significant improvements to the development of CFD-based unsteady aerodynamic reduced-order models (ROMs) are implemented into the FUN3D unstructured flow solver. These improvements include the simultaneous excitation of the structural modes of the CFD-based unsteady aerodynamic system via a single CFD solution, minimization of the error between the full CFD and the ROM unsteady aero- dynamic solution, and computation of a root locus plot of the aeroelastic ROM. Results are presented for a viscous version of the two-dimensional Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) model and an inviscid version of the AGARD 445.6 aeroelastic wing using the FUN3D code.

  2. A Novel Medical Freehand Sketch 3D Model Retrieval Method by Dimensionality Reduction and Feature Vector Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Zhang; Sheng, Kang Bao

    2016-01-01

    To assist physicians to quickly find the required 3D model from the mass medical model, we propose a novel retrieval method, called DRFVT, which combines the characteristics of dimensionality reduction (DR) and feature vector transformation (FVT) method. The DR method reduces the dimensionality of feature vector; only the top M low frequency Discrete Fourier Transform coefficients are retained. The FVT method does the transformation of the original feature vector and generates a new feature vector to solve the problem of noise sensitivity. The experiment results demonstrate that the DRFVT method achieves more effective and efficient retrieval results than other proposed methods. PMID:27293478

  3. A Novel Medical Freehand Sketch 3D Model Retrieval Method by Dimensionality Reduction and Feature Vector Transformation.

    PubMed

    Jing, Zhang; Sheng, Kang Bao

    2015-01-01

    To assist physicians to quickly find the required 3D model from the mass medical model, we propose a novel retrieval method, called DRFVT, which combines the characteristics of dimensionality reduction (DR) and feature vector transformation (FVT) method. The DR method reduces the dimensionality of feature vector; only the top M low frequency Discrete Fourier Transform coefficients are retained. The FVT method does the transformation of the original feature vector and generates a new feature vector to solve the problem of noise sensitivity. The experiment results demonstrate that the DRFVT method achieves more effective and efficient retrieval results than other proposed methods.

  4. Meta-modelling, visualization and emulation of multi-dimensional data for virtual production intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Wolfgang; Hermanns, Torsten; Al Khawli, Toufik

    2017-07-01

    Decision making for competitive production in high-wage countries is a daily challenge where rational and irrational methods are used. The design of decision making processes is an intriguing, discipline spanning science. However, there are gaps in understanding the impact of the known mathematical and procedural methods on the usage of rational choice theory. Following Benjamin Franklin's rule for decision making formulated in London 1772, he called "Prudential Algebra" with the meaning of prudential reasons, one of the major ingredients of Meta-Modelling can be identified finally leading to one algebraic value labelling the results (criteria settings) of alternative decisions (parameter settings). This work describes the advances in Meta-Modelling techniques applied to multi-dimensional and multi-criterial optimization by identifying the persistence level of the corresponding Morse-Smale Complex. Implementations for laser cutting and laser drilling are presented, including the generation of fast and frugal Meta-Models with controlled error based on mathematical model reduction Reduced Models are derived to avoid any unnecessary complexity. Both, model reduction and analysis of multi-dimensional parameter space are used to enable interactive communication between Discovery Finders and Invention Makers. Emulators and visualizations of a metamodel are introduced as components of Virtual Production Intelligence making applicable the methods of Scientific Design Thinking and getting the developer as well as the operator more skilled.

  5. Electronic states in systems of reduced dimensionality. Progress report, September 15, 1991--September 14, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Ulloa, S.E.

    1992-04-15

    This report briefly discusses the following research: magnetically modulated systems, inelastic magnetotunneling, ballistic transport review, screening in reduced dimensions, raman and electron energy loss spectroscopy; and ballistic quantum interference effects. (LSP).

  6. Demonstration of reduced-order urban scale building energy models

    DOE PAGES

    Heidarinejad, Mohammad; Mattise, Nicholas; Dahlhausen, Matthew; ...

    2017-09-08

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate a developed framework to rapidly create urban scale reduced-order building energy models using a systematic summary of the simplifications required for the representation of building exterior and thermal zones. These urban scale reduced-order models rely on the contribution of influential variables to the internal, external, and system thermal loads. OpenStudio Application Programming Interface (API) serves as a tool to automate the process of model creation and demonstrate the developed framework. The results of this study show that the accuracy of the developed reduced-order building energy models varies only up to 10% withmore » the selection of different thermal zones. In addition, to assess complexity of the developed reduced-order building energy models, this study develops a novel framework to quantify complexity of the building energy models. Consequently, this study empowers the building energy modelers to quantify their building energy model systematically in order to report the model complexity alongside the building energy model accuracy. An exhaustive analysis on four university campuses suggests that the urban neighborhood buildings lend themselves to simplified typical shapes. Specifically, building energy modelers can utilize the developed typical shapes to represent more than 80% of the U.S. buildings documented in the CBECS database. One main benefits of this developed framework is the opportunity for different models including airflow and solar radiation models to share the same exterior representation, allowing a unifying exchange data. Altogether, the results of this study have implications for a large-scale modeling of buildings in support of urban energy consumption analyses or assessment of a large number of alternative solutions in support of retrofit decision-making in the building industry.« less

  7. Controller design via structural reduced modeling by FETM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yousuff, Ajmal

    1987-01-01

    The Finite Element-Transfer Matrix (FETM) method has been developed to reduce the computations involved in analysis of structures. This widely accepted method, however, has certain limitations, and does not address the issues of control design. To overcome these, a modification of the FETM method has been developed. The new method easily produces reduced models tailored toward subsequent control design. Other features of this method are its ability to: (1) extract open loop frequencies and mode shapes with less computations, (2) overcome limitations of the original FETM method, and (3) simplify the design procedures for output feedback, constrained compensation, and decentralized control. This report presents the development of the new method, generation of reduced models by this method, their properties, and the role of these reduced models in control design. Examples are included to illustrate the methodology.

  8. Reduced order modeling of some fluid flows of industrial interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, D.; Terragni, F.; Velazquez, A.; Vega, J. M.

    2012-06-01

    Some basic ideas are presented for the construction of robust, computationally efficient reduced order models amenable to be used in industrial environments, combined with somewhat rough computational fluid dynamics solvers. These ideas result from a critical review of the basic principles of proper orthogonal decomposition-based reduced order modeling of both steady and unsteady fluid flows. In particular, the extent to which some artifacts of the computational fluid dynamics solvers can be ignored is addressed, which opens up the possibility of obtaining quite flexible reduced order models. The methods are illustrated with the steady aerodynamic flow around a horizontal tail plane of a commercial aircraft in transonic conditions, and the unsteady lid-driven cavity problem. In both cases, the approximations are fairly good, thus reducing the computational cost by a significant factor.

  9. A Reduced-Order Model of Transport Phenomena for Power Plant Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Cizmas; Brian Richardson; Thomas Brenner; Raymond Fontenot

    2009-09-30

    A reduced-order model based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) has been developed to simulate transient two- and three-dimensional isothermal and non-isothermal flows in a fluidized bed. Reduced-order models of void fraction, gas and solids temperatures, granular energy, and z-direction gas and solids velocity have been added to the previous version of the code. These algorithms are presented and their implementation is discussed. Verification studies are presented for each algorithm. A number of methods to accelerate the computations performed by the reduced-order model are presented. The errors associated with each acceleration method are computed and discussed. Using a combination of acceleration methods, a two-dimensional isothermal simulation using the reduced-order model is shown to be 114 times faster than using the full-order model. In the pursue of achieving the objectives of the project and completing the tasks planned for this program, several unplanned and unforeseen results, methods and studies have been generated. These additional accomplishments are also presented and they include: (1) a study of the effect of snapshot sampling time on the computation of the POD basis functions, (2) an investigation of different strategies for generating the autocorrelation matrix used to find the POD basis functions, (3) the development and implementation of a bubble detection and tracking algorithm based on mathematical morphology, (4) a method for augmenting the proper orthogonal decomposition to better capture flows with discontinuities, such as bubbles, and (5) a mixed reduced-order/full-order model, called point-mode proper orthogonal decomposition, designed to avoid unphysical due to approximation errors. The limitations of the proper orthogonal decomposition method in simulating transient flows with moving discontinuities, such as bubbling flows, are discussed and several methods are proposed to adapt the method for future use.

  10. Three dimensional numerical modeling of land subsidence in Shanghai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, S.; Luo, Y.; Wu, J.; Teatini, P.; Wang, H.; Jiao, X.

    2015-11-01

    Shanghai city has been suffering land subsidence caused by overly exploitation of ground water since 1921, which is a serious problem for this coastal city with altitude of 2.2-4.8 m above mean sea level. The largest cumulative land subsidence amounted to 2.6 m in the downtown area. Measures to decrease the ground water exploitation, change the pumping aquifers, and increase aquifer artificial recharge have been used to mitigate land subsidence since 1961. It is necessary to develop a proper numerical model to simulate and predict land subsidence. In this study, a decoupled three-dimensional (3-D) finite element land subsidence model including a 3-D ground water flow model and a 3-D geo-mechanical model was developed to simulate the 3-D deformation of the aquifer systems in the center area of Shanghai. The area of downtown Shanghai is 660 km2, with 10 million inhabitants, dense high buildings, and 11 metro lines. The simulation spans the period from 1979 to 1995. Two different assumptions have been tested on the side boundary, i.e., precluding the three components of the displacement, or assuming a free-displacement condition. The distribution of calculated land subsidence and horizontal displacements in different aquifers was analyzed. The computed vertical displacement fitted well with the available observations. It has been verified that the two different assumptions on the lateral boundaries in the geo-mechanical model caused different results just limited on nodes close to boundary. The developed 3-D land subsidence model is reasonable and can be used to simulate and predict 3-D movement of aquifer systems in the center area of Shanghai, which could provide scientific support to local government in controlling land subsidence and differential movements of the land surface.

  11. A three-dimensional model of sand bank formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besio, G.; Blondeaux, P.; Vittori, G.

    2005-12-01

    The results of a fully three-dimensional model for the generation of tidal sand banks are discussed. The model is based on the linear stability analysis of the flat sea bed configuration subject to oscillatory tidal currents. The flow regime is assumed to be turbulent and a Boussinesq’s approach is adopted to model Reynolds stresses. The eddy viscosity depends on the distance from the bed and an accurate description of the flow close to the sea bed, where sediment motion is mainly confined, is obtained. Sediment transport is modelled in terms of both suspended and bed loads. As discussed in Besio et al. (2005), where model predictions are compared with field data, the model can reliably predict the conditions leading to the appearance of tidal sand banks. Presently, attention is focussed on the prediction of the geometrical characteristics of sand banks. While previous works on the subject always predict sand banks with crests counter-clockwise rotated with respect to the direction of the main tidal current, the present results show that sand bank crests are rotated clockwise/anti-clockwise depending on the anti-clockwise/clockwise rotation of the velocity vector induced by the tide. Only when the tidal current tends to be unidirectional, sand banks are always characterized by crests which are anti-clockwise rotated with respect to the direction of the tidal current. Moreover, no preferred direction is selected by the analysis when the tide tends to be circular. The geometrical characteristics of sand banks (wavelength and angle of rotation) are computed as the function of the ratio between the minor and major axes of the tidal ellipse for both clockwise and counter-clockwise rotating tidal velocity vectors.

  12. Reducing Redundancies in Reconfigurable Antenna Structures Using Graph Models

    SciTech Connect

    Costantine, Joseph; al-Saffar, Sinan; Christodoulou, Christos G.; Abdallah, Chaouki T.

    2010-04-23

    Many reconfigurable antennas have redundant components in their structures. In this paper we present an approach for reducing redundancies in reconfigurable antenna structures using graph models. We study reconfigurable antennas, which are grouped, categorized and modeled according to a set of proposed graph rules. Several examples are presented and discussed to demonstrate the validity of this new technique.

  13. Interactive Exploration of Microarray Gene Expression Patterns in a Reduced Dimensional Space

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Jatin; Schmitt, William; Hwang, Daehee; Hsiao, Li-Li; Gullans, Steve; Stephanopoulos, George; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2002-01-01

    The very high dimensional space of gene expression measurements obtained by DNA microarrays impedes the detection of underlying patterns in gene expression data and the identification of discriminatory genes. In this paper we show the use of projection methods such as principal components analysis (PCA) to obtain a direct link between patterns in the genes and patterns in samples. This feature is useful in the initial interactive pattern exploration of gene expression data and data-driven learning of the nature and types of samples. Using oligonucleotide microarray measurements of 40 samples from different normal human tissues, we show that distinct patterns are obtained when the genes are projected on a two-dimensional plane spanned by the loadings of the two major principal components. These patterns define the particular genes associated with a sample class (i.e., tissue). When used separately from the other genes, these class-specific (i.e., tissue-specific) genes in turn define distinct tissue patterns in the projection space spanned by the scores of the two major principal components. In this study, PCA projection facilitated discriminatory gene selection for different tissues and identified tissue-specific gene expression signatures for liver, skeletal muscle, and brain samples. Furthermore, it allowed the classification of nine new samples belonging to these three types using the linear combination of the expression levels of the tissue-specific genes determined from the first set of samples. The application of the technique to other published data sets is also discussed. [Online supplementary material available at www.genome.org.] PMID:12097349

  14. Reducing Outpatient Waiting Time: A Simulation Modeling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Aeenparast, Afsoon; Tabibi, Seyed Jamaleddin; Shahanaghi, Kamran; Aryanejhad, Mir Bahador

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to provide a model for reducing outpatient waiting time by using simulation. Materials and Methods A simulation model was constructed by using the data of arrival time, service time and flow of 357 patients referred to orthopedic clinic of a general teaching hospital in Tehran. The simulation model was validated before constructing different scenarios. Results In this study 10 scenarios were presented for reducing outpatient waiting time. Patients waiting time was divided into three levels regarding their physicians. These waiting times for all scenarios were computed by simulation model. According to the final scores the 9th scenario was selected as the best way for reducing outpatient's waiting time. Conclusions Using the simulation as a decision making tool helps us to decide how we can reduce outpatient's waiting time. Comparison of outputs of this scenario and the based- case scenario in simulation model shows that combining physician's work time changing with patient's admission time changing (scenario 9) would reduce patient waiting time about 73.09%. Due to dynamic and complex nature of healthcare systems, the application of simulation for the planning, modeling and analysis of these systems has lagged behind traditional manufacturing practices. Rapid growth in health care system expenditures, technology and competition has increased the complexity of health care systems. Simulation is a useful tool for decision making in complex and probable systems. PMID:24616801

  15. Reducing outpatient waiting time: a simulation modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Aeenparast, Afsoon; Tabibi, Seyed Jamaleddin; Shahanaghi, Kamran; Aryanejhad, Mir Bahador

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to provide a model for reducing outpatient waiting time by using simulation. A simulation model was constructed by using the data of arrival time, service time and flow of 357 patients referred to orthopedic clinic of a general teaching hospital in Tehran. The simulation model was validated before constructing different scenarios. In this study 10 scenarios were presented for reducing outpatient waiting time. Patients waiting time was divided into three levels regarding their physicians. These waiting times for all scenarios were computed by simulation model. According to the final scores the 9th scenario was selected as the best way for reducing outpatient's waiting time. Using the simulation as a decision making tool helps us to decide how we can reduce outpatient's waiting time. Comparison of outputs of this scenario and the based- case scenario in simulation model shows that combining physician's work time changing with patient's admission time changing (scenario 9) would reduce patient waiting time about 73.09%. Due to dynamic and complex nature of healthcare systems, the application of simulation for the planning, modeling and analysis of these systems has lagged behind traditional manufacturing practices. Rapid growth in health care system expenditures, technology and competition has increased the complexity of health care systems. Simulation is a useful tool for decision making in complex and probable systems.

  16. Three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann model for electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, M; Muñoz, J D

    2010-11-01

    In this paper we introduce a three-dimensional Lattice-Boltzmann model that recovers in the continuous limit the Maxwell equations in materials. In order to build conservation equations with antisymmetric tensors, like the Faraday law, the model assigns four auxiliary vectors to each velocity vector. These auxiliary vectors, when combined with the distribution functions, give the electromagnetic fields. The evolution is driven by the usual Bhatnager-Gross-Krook (BGK) collision rule, but with a different form for the equilibrium distribution functions. This lattice Bhatnager-Gross-Krook (LBGK) model allows us to consider for both dielectrics and conductors with realistic parameters, and therefore it is adequate to simulate the most diverse electromagnetic problems, like the propagation of electromagnetic waves (both in dielectric media and in waveguides), the skin effect, the radiation pattern of a small dipole antenna and the natural frequencies of a resonant cavity, all with 2% accuracy. Actually, it shows to be one order of magnitude faster than the original Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) formulation by Yee to reach the same accuracy. It is, therefore, a valuable alternative to simulate electromagnetic fields and opens lattice Boltzmann for a broad spectrum of new applications in electrodynamics.

  17. One-dimensional cold cap model for melters with bubblers

    DOE PAGES

    Pokorny, Richard; Hilliard, Zachary J.; Dixon, Derek R.; ...

    2015-07-28

    The rate of glass production during vitrification in an all-electrical melter greatly impacts the cost and schedule of nuclear waste treatment and immobilization. The feed is charged to the melter on the top of the molten glass, where it forms a layer of reacting and melting material, called the cold cap. During the final stages of the batch-to-glass conversion process, gases evolved from reactions produce primary foam, the growth and collapse of which controls the glass production rate. The mathematical model of the cold cap was revised to include functional representation of primary foam behavior and to account for themore » dry cold cap surface. The melting rate is computed as a response to the dependence of the primary foam collapse temperature on the heating rate and melter operating conditions, including the effect of bubbling on the cold cap bottom and top surface temperatures. The simulation results are in good agreement with experimental data from laboratory-scale and pilot-scale melter studies. Lastly, the cold cap model will become part of the full three-dimensional mathematical model of the waste glass melter.« less

  18. Theme section: Multi-dimensional modelling, analysis and visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilbert, Éric; Çöltekin, Arzu; Castro, Francesc Antón; Pettit, Chris

    2016-07-01

    Spatial data are now collected and processed in larger amounts, and used by larger populations than ever before. While most geospatial data have traditionally been recorded as two-dimensional data, the evolution of data collection methods and user demands have led to data beyond the two dimensions describing complex multidimensional phenomena. An example of the relevance of multidimensional modelling is seen with the development of urban modelling where several dimensions have been added to the traditional 2D map representation (Sester et al., 2011). These include obviously the third spatial dimension (Biljecki et al., 2015) as well as the temporal, but also the scale dimension (Van Oosterom and Stoter, 2010) or, as mentioned by (Lu et al., 2016), multi-spectral and multi-sensor data. Such a view provides an organisation of multidimensional data around these different axes and it is time to explore each axis as the availability of unprecedented amounts of new data demands new solutions. The availability of such large amounts of data induces an acute need for developing new approaches to assist with their dissemination, visualisation, and analysis by end users. Several issues need to be considered in order to provide a meaningful representation and assist in data visualisation and mining, modelling and analysis; such as data structures allowing representation at different scales or in different contexts of thematic information.

  19. Modeling three-dimensional propagation in a continental shelf environment.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Megan S

    2012-03-01

    An acoustic propagation model is applied to predict measurements of three-dimensional (3-D) effects recorded off the southeast coast of Florida. The measured signal is produced by a low frequency source that is towed north parallel to the shelf from a fixed receiving array. The acoustic data show the direct path arrival at the bearing of the tow ship and a second refracted path arrival as much as 30° inshore of the direct arrival. Notably, the refracted arrival has a received level more than 25 dB greater than that of the direct arrival. A geoacoustic model of the environment is created to explain the data. It is shown that the topography of the seafloor plays the largest role in controlling horizontal refraction effects, whereas the range-dependent sediment properties have the most influence on the received level. The modeling approach is based on a 3-D adiabatic mode technique in which the horizontal refraction equation is solved using a parabolic equation in Cartesian coordinates. A modal decomposition of the field provides insight into the variability in the arrival angle and received level of the measured signal.

  20. Two-dimensional CFD modeling of wave rotor flow dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.; Chima, Rodrick V.

    1994-01-01

    A two-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver developed for detailed study of wave rotor flow dynamics is described. The CFD model is helping characterize important loss mechanisms within the wave rotor. The wave rotor stationary ports and the moving rotor passages are resolved on multiple computational grid blocks. The finite-volume form of the thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations with laminar viscosity are integrated in time using a four-stage Runge-Kutta scheme. Roe's approximate Riemann solution scheme or the computationally less expensive advection upstream splitting method (AUSM) flux-splitting scheme is used to effect upwind-differencing of the inviscid flux terms, using cell interface primitive variables set by MUSCL-type interpolation. The diffusion terms are central-differenced. The solver is validated using a steady shock/laminar boundary layer interaction problem and an unsteady, inviscid wave rotor passage gradual opening problem. A model inlet port/passage charging problem is simulated and key features of the unsteady wave rotor flow field are identified. Lastly, the medium pressure inlet port and high pressure outlet port portion of the NASA Lewis Research Center experimental divider cycle is simulated and computed results are compared with experimental measurements. The model accurately predicts the wave timing within the rotor passages and the distribution of flow variables in the stationary inlet port region.

  1. Spatially clustered zealots in a two-dimensional voter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Thomas; Ludden, Matthew; McKay, Susan

    The voter model, solvable in all dimensions in its standard form, has been extensively used to study behavior dynamics by using the tools of statistical mechanics. Recently, much work has been focused on determining the effects of zealots in the voter model, where a zealot is an agent that maintains its opinion (akin to an Ising spin variable) no matter the local environment. Here we investigate the effects of spatially clustered zealots in the standard voter model on a two-dimensional square lattice. The clustering of zealots is quantified by the conditional probability that a zealot of the +1 state appears on an adjacent site to a randomly chosen zealot. (All zealots are of the +1 state.) We determine the functional forms of the system consensus time with respect to system size, clustering, and zealot density, and compare these findings to previous results that do not include clustering. We also discuss an interesting random walk problem that arises when one attempts to calculate how clustering affects the consensus time for fixed zealot density and system size.

  2. Three-dimensional transient electromagnetic modeling in the Laplace Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Mizunaga, H.; Lee, Ki Ha; Kim, H.J.

    1998-09-01

    In modeling electromagnetic responses, Maxwell's equations in the frequency domain are popular and have been widely used (Nabighian, 1994; Newman and Alumbaugh, 1995; Smith, 1996, to list a few). Recently, electromagnetic modeling in the time domain using the finite difference (FDTD) method (Wang and Hohmann, 1993) has also been used to study transient electromagnetic interactions in the conductive medium. This paper presents a new technique to compute the electromagnetic response of three-dimensional (3-D) structures. The proposed new method is based on transforming Maxwell's equations to the Laplace domain. For each discrete Laplace variable, Maxwell's equations are discretized in 3-D using the staggered grid and the finite difference method (FDM). The resulting system of equations is then solved for the fields using the incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient (ICCG) method. The new method is particularly effective in saving computer memory since all the operations are carried out in real numbers. For the same reason, the computing speed is faster than frequency domain modeling. The proposed approach can be an extremely useful tool in developing an inversion algorithm using the time domain data.

  3. Spatiotemporal evolution in a (2+1)-dimensional chemotaxis model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Santo; Misra, Amar P.; Rondoni, L.

    2012-01-01

    Simulations are performed to investigate the nonlinear dynamics of a (2+1)-dimensional chemotaxis model of Keller-Segel (KS) type, with a logistic growth term. Because of its ability to display auto-aggregation, the KS model has been widely used to simulate self-organization in many biological systems. We show that the corresponding dynamics may lead to steady-states, to divergencies in a finite time as well as to the formation of spatiotemporal irregular patterns. The latter, in particular, appears to be chaotic in part of the range of bounded solutions, as demonstrated by the analysis of wavelet power spectra. Steady-states are achieved with sufficiently large values of the chemotactic coefficient (χ) and/or with growth rates r below a critical value rc. For r>rc, the solutions of the differential equations of the model diverge in a finite time. We also report on the pattern formation regime, for different values of χ, r and of the diffusion coefficient D.

  4. Three-Dimensional Oil Dispersion Model in Campos basin, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Bernardo Lopes Almeida de; Netto, Theodoro Antoun; Assad, Luiz Paulo de Freitas

    2017-02-22

    This paper presents the physical and mathematical formulation of a three-dimensional oil dispersion model that calculates the trajectory from the seafloor to the sea surface, its assumptions and constraints. It was developed by researchers that are familiar with oil spill dispersion and mathematical analysis. Oil dispersion is calculated through two computational routines. The first calculates the vertical dispersion along the water column and resamples the droplets when the oil reaches the surface. The second calculates the surface displacement of the spill. This model is based on the Eulerian Approach, and it uses numerical solution schemes in time and in space to solve the equation for advective-diffusive transport. A case study based on an actual accident that happened in the Campos Basin, in Rio de Janeiro State, considering the instant spill of 1.000 m(3) was used to evaluate the proposed model. After calculating the vertical transport, it was estimated that the area covered by the oil spill on the surface was about 35.685 m². After calculating the dispersion at the surface, the plume area was estimated as 20% of the initial area, resulting in a final area of 28.548 m².

  5. One-dimensional cold cap model for melters with bubblers

    SciTech Connect

    Pokorny, Richard; Hilliard, Zachary J.; Dixon, Derek R.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Guillen, Donna P.; Kruger, Albert A.; Hrma, Pavel

    2015-07-28

    The rate of glass production during vitrification in an all-electrical melter greatly impacts the cost and schedule of nuclear waste treatment and immobilization. The feed is charged to the melter on the top of the molten glass, where it forms a layer of reacting and melting material, called the cold cap. During the final stages of the batch-to-glass conversion process, gases evolved from reactions produce primary foam, the growth and collapse of which controls the glass production rate. The mathematical model of the cold cap was revised to include functional representation of primary foam behavior and to account for the dry cold cap surface. The melting rate is computed as a response to the dependence of the primary foam collapse temperature on the heating rate and melter operating conditions, including the effect of bubbling on the cold cap bottom and top surface temperatures. The simulation results are in good agreement with experimental data from laboratory-scale and pilot-scale melter studies. Lastly, the cold cap model will become part of the full three-dimensional mathematical model of the waste glass melter.

  6. Verification and transfer of thermal pollution model. Volume 5: Verification of 2-dimensional numerical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. S.; Sengupta, S.; Nwadike, E. V.

    1982-01-01

    The six-volume report: describes the theory of a three dimensional (3-D) mathematical thermal discharge model and a related one dimensional (1-D) model, includes model verification at two sites, and provides a separate user's manual for each model. The 3-D model has two forms: free surface and rigid lid. The former, verified at Anclote Anchorate (FL), allows a free air/water interface and is suited for significant surface wave heights compared to mean water depth; e.g., estuaries and coastal regions. The latter, verified at Lake Keowee (SC), is suited for small surface wave heights compared to depth (e.g., natural or man-made inland lakes) because surface elevation has been removed as a parameter. These models allow computation of time dependent velocity and temperature fields for given initial conditions and time-varying boundary conditions.

  7. Transonic limit cycle oscillation analysis using reduced order aerodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowell, E. H.; Thomas, J. P.; Hall, K. C.

    2004-01-01

    Limit cycle oscillations have been observed in flight operations of modern aircraft, wind tunnel experiments and mathematical models. Both fluid and structural nonlinearities are thought to contribute to these phenomena. With recent advances in reduced order aerodynamic modeling, it is now feasible to analyze limit cycle oscillations that may occur in transonic flow including the effects of structural and fluid nonlinearities. In this paper an airfoil with control surface freeplay (a common structural nonlinearity) is used to investigate transonic flutter and limit cycle oscillations. The reduced order aerodynamic model used in this paper assumes the shock motion is small and in proportion to the structural motions.

  8. Reduced-order-model based feedback control of the Modified Hasegawa-Wakatani equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goumiri, Imene; Rowley, Clarence; Ma, Zhanhua; Gates, David; Parker, Jeffrey; Krommes, John

    2012-10-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the development of model-based feedback control for stabilization of an unstable equilibrium obtained in the Modified Hasegawa-Wakatani (MHW) equations, a classic model in plasma turbulence. First, a balanced truncation is applied; a model reduction technique that has been proved successful in flow control design problems, to obtain a low dimensional model of the linearized MHW equation. A model-based feedback controller is then designed for the reduced order model using linear quadratic regulators (LQR) then a linear quadratic gaussian (LQG) control. The controllers are then applied on the original linearized and nonlinear MHW equations to stabilize the equilibrium and suppress the transition to drift-wave induced turbulences.

  9. Validating two-dimensional leadership models on three-dimensionally structured fish schools.

    PubMed

    Watts, Isobel; Nagy, Máté; Holbrook, Robert I; Biro, Dora; Burt de Perera, Theresa

    2017-01-01

    Identifying leader-follower interactions is crucial for understanding how a group decides where or when to move, and how this information is transferred between members. Although many animal groups have a three-dimensional structure, previous studies investigating leader-follower interactions have often ignored vertical information. This raises the question of whether commonly used two-dimensional leader-follower analyses can be used justifiably on groups that interact in three dimensions. To address this, we quantified the individual movements of banded tetra fish (Astyanax mexicanus) within shoals by computing the three-dimensional trajectories of all individuals using a stereo-camera technique. We used these data firstly to identify and compare leader-follower interactions in two and three dimensions, and secondly to analyse leadership with respect to an individual's spatial position in three dimensions. We show that for 95% of all pairwise interactions leadership identified through two-dimensional analysis matches that identified through three-dimensional analysis, and we reveal that fish attend to the same shoalmates for vertical information as they do for horizontal information. Our results therefore highlight that three-dimensional analyses are not always required to identify leader-follower relationships in species that move freely in three dimensions. We discuss our results in terms of the importance of taking species' sensory capacities into account when studying interaction networks within groups.

  10. Validating two-dimensional leadership models on three-dimensionally structured fish schools

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Máté; Holbrook, Robert I.; Biro, Dora; Burt de Perera, Theresa

    2017-01-01

    Identifying leader–follower interactions is crucial for understanding how a group decides where or when to move, and how this information is transferred between members. Although many animal groups have a three-dimensional structure, previous studies investigating leader–follower interactions have often ignored vertical information. This raises the question of whether commonly used two-dimensional leader–follower analyses can be used justifiably on groups that interact in three dimensions. To address this, we quantified the individual movements of banded tetra fish (Astyanax mexicanus) within shoals by computing the three-dimensional trajectories of all individuals using a stereo-camera technique. We used these data firstly to identify and compare leader–follower interactions in two and three dimensions, and secondly to analyse leadership with respect to an individual's spatial position in three dimensions. We show that for 95% of all pairwise interactions leadership identified through two-dimensional analysis matches that identified through three-dimensional analysis, and we reveal that fish attend to the same shoalmates for vertical information as they do for horizontal information. Our results therefore highlight that three-dimensional analyses are not always required to identify leader–follower relationships in species that move freely in three dimensions. We discuss our results in terms of the importance of taking species' sensory capacities into account when studying interaction networks within groups. PMID:28280582

  11. Three-dimensional modeling of ozone and particulate matter: Model improvement and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ping

    Accuracy and computationally-efficiency in representing secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is essential in an air quality model because SOA constitutes a sizeable fraction of fine particulate mater (PM2.5), which impacts human health, visibility, and climate. Two aerosol modules: Model of Aerosol Dynamics, Reaction, Ionization, and Dissolution 1 and 2 (MADRID 1 and 2) have been incorporated into EPA's Models-3 Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system to simulate SOA. MADRID 2 represents a detailed treatment for SOA formation, but it is computationally more expensive than MADRID 1. In this thesis work, a zero-dimensional CMAQ with MADRID 2 (CMAQ-MADRID 2) is applied to explore various methods for improving the computational efficiency of the SOA module. A combination of several speed-up methods used in MADRID 2_FAST can significantly reduce the CPU cost by 61 to 97% (speedup by factors of 2.5-30) with percentage deviations within +/-15% from the benchmark under four representative ambient conditions and conditions with typical ranges of temperatures and relative humidities. CMAQ-MADRID 2 and CMAQ-MADRID 2_FAST are evaluated along with CMAQ and CMAQ-MADRID 1 using the June 12-28, 1999 episode. CMAQ shows a generally good performance in simulating ozone (O3) and PM2.5. The O3-NOx-VOC chemical regimes are identified using the integrated reaction rates (IRRs) analysis. The integrated process rates (IPRs) analysis and correlation analysis show that, aerosol processes, cloud processes, dry deposition, and emissions are correlated or large contributors to the model biases for PM2.5 and its components. These results are used to guide the design of sensitivity simulations, focusing on uncertainties in the dry deposition velocities of particulate matter (PM) species and precursors, the emissions of PM precursors, and the cloud processes and gas-phase chemistry of sulfate (SO42-) formation. Adjusting the most influential processes/factors (i.e., emissions of

  12. Neurobiological dimensional models of personality: a review of the models of Cloninger, Depue, and Siever.

    PubMed

    Paris, Joel

    2005-04-01

    Neurobiological dimensional models of personality aim to account for the structure of personality traits and disorders through links to neurotransmitter systems. Three such models are reviewed: those of Cloninger, Depue, and Siever. While these proposals have heuristic value, none of them has obtained strong empirical support. Our current understanding of neurobiology is insufficient to develop a model of personality on this basis. At this point, dimensions of personality should be derived from factor analysis rather than from neurobiological theories.

  13. Simulational Studies of a 2-DIMENSIONAL Burridge - Model for Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, John Bernard

    1993-01-01

    A two-dimensional cellular automaton version of the Burridge-Knopoff (BK) model for earthquakes is studied. The model consists of a lattice of blocks connected by springs, subject to static friction and driven at a rate v by an externally applied force. A block ruptures provided that its total stress matches or exceeds static friction. The distance it moves is proportional to the total stress, alpha of which it releases to each of its neighbors and 1 - qalpha<=aves the system, where q is the number of neighbors. The BK model with nearest neighbor (q = 4) and long range (q = 24) interactions is simulated for spatially uniform and random static friction on lattices with periodic, open, closed, and fixed boundary conditions. In the nearest neighbor model, the system appears to have a spinodal critical point at v = v_{c} in all cases except for closed boundaries and uniform thresholds, where the system appears to be self-organized critical. The dynamics of the model is always periodic or quasiperiodic for non-closed boundaries and uniform thresholds. The stress is "quantized" in multiples of the loader force in this case. A mean field theory is presented from which v _{c} and the dominant period of oscillation is derived, which agree well with the data. v_{c} varies inversely with the number of neighbors to which each blocks is attached and, as a result, goes to zero as the range of the springs goes to infinity. This is consistent with the behavior of a spinodal critical point as the range of interactions goes to infinity. The quasistatic limit of tectonic loading is thus recovered.

  14. A regional adaptive and assimilative three-dimensional ionospheric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbagh, Dario; Scotto, Carlo; Sgrigna, Vittorio

    2016-03-01

    A regional adaptive and assimilative three-dimensional (3D) ionospheric model is proposed. It is able to ingest real-time data from different ionosondes, providing the ionospheric bottomside plasma frequency fp over the Italian area. The model is constructed on the basis of empirical values for a set of ionospheric parameters Pi[base] over the considered region, some of which have an assigned variation ΔPi. The values for the ionospheric parameters actually observed at a given time at a given site will thus be Pi = Pi[base] + ΔPi. These Pi values are used as input for an electron density N(h) profiler. The latter is derived from the Advanced Ionospheric Profiler (AIP), which is software used by Autoscala as part of the process of automatic inversion of ionogram traces. The 3D model ingests ionosonde data by minimizing the root-mean-square deviation between the observed and modeled values of fp(h) profiles obtained from the associated N(h) values at the points where observations are available. The ΔPi values are obtained from this minimization procedure. The 3D model is tested using data collected at the ionospheric stations of Rome (41.8N, 12.5E) and Gibilmanna (37.9N, 14.0E), and then comparing the results against data from the ionospheric station of San Vito dei Normanni (40.6N, 18.0E). The software developed is able to produce maps of the critical frequencies foF2 and foF1, and of fp at a fixed altitude, with transverse and longitudinal cross-sections of the bottomside ionosphere in a color scale. fp(h) and associated simulated ordinary ionogram traces can easily be produced for any geographic location within the Italian region. fp values within the volume in question can also be provided.

  15. Two-dimensional Rayleigh model of vapor bubble evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Amendt, P; Friedman, M; Glinsky, M; Gurewitz, E; London, R A; Strauss, M

    1999-01-14

    The understanding of vapor bubble generation in an aqueous tissue near a fiber tip has required advanced two dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic simulations. For 1D spherical bubble expansion a simplified and useful Rayleigh-type model can be applied. For 2D bubble evolution, such a model does not exist. The present work proposes a Rayleigh-type model for 2D bubble expansion that is faster and simpler than the 2D hydrodynamic simulations. The model is based on a flow potential representation of the hydrodynamic motion controlled by a Laplace equation and a moving boundary condition. We show that the 1D Rayleigh equation is a specific case of our model. The Laplace equation is solved for each time step by a finite element solver using a triangulation of the outside bubble region by a fast unstructured mesh generator. Two problems of vapor bubbles generated by short-pulse lasers near a fiber tip-are considered: (a) the outside region has no boundaries except the fiber, (b) the fiber and the bubble are confined in a long channel, which simulates a fiber in a vessel wall. Our simulations for problems of type (a) include features of bubble evolution as seen in experiments, including a collapse away from the fiber tip. A different behavior was obtained for problems of type (b) when the channel boundary is close to the fiber. In this case the bubble's expansion and collapse are both extremely slow in the direction normal to this boundary and distortion of the bubble is observed.

  16. Idealized three-dimensional modeling of seasonal variation in the Alaska Coastal Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, William J.; Weingartner, Thomas J.; Hermann, Albert J.

    2007-07-01

    Seasonal variation of the buoyancy- and downwelling-wind-forced Alaska Coastal Current (ACC) and the fate of freshwater contained in it is considered using idealized analytical and numerical models of the ACC formed from a half-line source of buoyant inflow. The coastal current initially develops two-dimensionally but becomes three-dimensional from a balance between coastal influx of buoyancy and its downstream transport, which leads to a coastal current depth limit Hmax = (?)1/2, where x is along-shelf distance, Q is the line source strength for unit length, f is the Coriolis frequency, and g' is the reduced gravity of the buoyant inflow. This limit is unchanged under downwelling wind stress and is reached on timescales of less than 1 month for the ACC. The coastal current width is roughly constant in x and increases in time at the same rate as the two-dimensional solution. Imposition of a downwelling wind stress τ results in an approximate balance among wind stress and along- and cross-shelf momentum advection so that the current width is reduced to Ywind ≈ LD (?)1/2, where LD is the Rossby radius of deformation, τ is the wind stress and ρ0 is a reference density. Waves/eddying motions eventually grow in the half-line source coastal current with wavelengths proportional to the coastal current width and with a downstream phase speed slower than the maximum current speed. These features cause an offshore flux of buoyant water, a broader coastal current, and further accumulation of buoyancy on the shelf. Increasing downwelling wind stress reduces the effects of the instabilities. Continual accumulation of buoyancy on the shelf occurs during all model runs but is nearly absent under maximum winter downwelling wind stress. It is suggested that freshwater accumulation on the shelf during spring, summer, and fall may be largely lost downstream during winter.

  17. Toward a General Nonlinear Model of Reduced Scale UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chriette, A.; Cheviron, T.; Plestan, F.

    2009-03-01

    This paper proposes, through a survey of models of several UAV-Structures, a generic nonlinear model for reduced scale aerial robotic vehicles (6 DOF)*. Dynamics of an aircraft and some VTOL UAV (quadricopter, ducted fan and classical helicopter) are illustrated. This generic model focuses only on the key physical efforts acting on the dynamics in order to be sufficiently simple to design a controller. The Small Body Forces expression which can introduce a zero dynamics is then discussed.

  18. Multi-dimensional profiling of medical students' cognitive models about learning.

    PubMed

    Askell-Williams, Helen; Lawson, Michael J

    2006-02-01

    In current constructivist paradigms, learners' previous subject-matter knowledge, or cognitive models, provide the foundations for the construction of new knowledge. Learners' cognitive models about learning also mediate students' capacities to learn in their chosen topics of study. The diverse backgrounds of students entering medicine suggest that they might come to medical studies equipped with a wide variety of cognitive models about learning. Some current theories tend to reduce students' cognitions about learning to parsimonious representations, such as surface-deep approaches or mastery-performance goals. It is possible that such reduced representations underrepresent, or misrepresent, the complexity of students' cognitive models about learning. Good quality teaching needs to take account of learners' cognitive models, not just about subject matter, but also about learning. This study investigated the diversity and complexity of medical students' cognitive models about learning. A total of 7 graduate entry, clinical-year medical students volunteered for in-depth interviews about learning. NUD*IST text analysis software and correspondence analysis were employed to identify dimensions and to profile students' responses. The correspondence analysis identified a significant 4-dimensional solution that illustrates the contributions of multiple variables to students' cognitive models about learning. Individual profiles highlight diversity between participants. This study provides evidence that students' cognitive models about learning are complex and highly differentiated. Representations of what students know about learning need to take account of such complexity in order to inform instructional practice more adequately.

  19. Effective Reduced Diffusion-Models: A Data Driven Approach to the Analysis of Neuronal Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Deco, Gustavo; Martí, Daniel; Ledberg, Anders; Reig, Ramon; Sanchez Vives, Maria V.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce in this paper a new method for reducing neurodynamical data to an effective diffusion equation, either experimentally or using simulations of biophysically detailed models. The dimensionality of the data is first reduced to the first principal component, and then fitted by the stationary solution of a mean-field-like one-dimensional Langevin equation, which describes the motion of a Brownian particle in a potential. The advantage of such description is that the stationary probability density of the dynamical variable can be easily derived. We applied this method to the analysis of cortical network dynamics during up and down states in an anesthetized animal. During deep anesthesia, intracellularly recorded up and down states transitions occurred with high regularity and could not be adequately described by a one-dimensional diffusion equation. Under lighter anesthesia, however, the distributions of the times spent in the up and down states were better fitted by such a model, suggesting a role for noise in determining the time spent in a particular state. PMID:19997490

  20. Reduced-order modeling of unsteady aerodynamics of a flapping wing based on the Volterra theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kai; Li, Daochun; Xiang, Jinwu

    Flapping flight mechanisms offers a power-efficient and highly manoeuvrable basis for the development of micro air vehicles. The aerodynamic knowledge and prediction tools of the flapping wing are quite important for the design of micro air vehicles. In this paper, the unsteady aerodynamics of a flapping wing is investigated by numerical simulations and the generation of reduced-order model based on the Volterra theory for predicting the unsteady aerodynamic of a flapping wing is described. The three dimensional aerodynamic calculation is performed by solving the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and the user-defined functions were employed to simulate the flapping motion. The training maneuver is a flapping motion with a linearly increasing flapping frequency. Based on the Volterra theory and numerical simulation results, a reduced-order model is generated to predict the unsteady aerodynamics of a flapping wing. The system identification method is employed to generate the Volterra theory reduced-order model. The results show that the Volterra theory reduced-order model agrees well with the training data and the Volterra theory reduced-order model works well to predict the unsteady aerodynamics of a flapping wing.