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Sample records for reduced residual arabinose

  1. Function of aspartic acid residues in optimum pH control of L-arabinose isomerase from Lactobacillus fermentum.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zheng; Li, Sha; Feng, Xiaohai; Zhan, Yijing; Xu, Hong

    2014-05-01

    L-Arabinose isomerase (L-AI) catalyzes the isomerization of L-arabinose to L-ribulose and D-galactose to D-tagatose. Most reported L-AIs exhibit neutral or alkaline optimum pH, which is less beneficial than acidophilic ones in industrial D-tagatose production. Lactobacillus fermentum L-AI (LFAI) is a thermostable enzyme that can achieve a high conversion rate for D-galactose isomerization. However, its biocatalytic activity at acidic conditions can still be further improved. In this study, we report the single- and multiple-site mutagenesis on LFAI targeting three aspartic acid residues (D268, D269, and D299). Some of the lysine mutants, especially D268K/D269K/D299K, exhibited significant optimum pH shifts (from 6.5 to 5.0) and enhancement of pH stability (half-life time increased from 30 to 62 h at pH 6.0), which are more favorable for industrial applications. With the addition of borate, D-galactose was isomerized into D-tagatose by D268K/D269K/D299K at pH 5.0, resulting in a high conversion rate of 62 %. Based on the obtained 3.2-Å crystal structure of LFAI, the three aspartic acid residues were found to be distant from the active site and possibly did not participate in substrate catalysis. However, they were proven to possess similar optimum pH control ability in other L-AI, such as that derived from Escherichia coli. This study sheds light on the essential residues of L-AIs that can be modified for desired optimum pH and better pH stability, which are useful in D-tagatose bioproduction.

  2. A phosphodiester bridge between two arabinose residues as a structural element of an extracellular glycoprotein of Volvox carteri.

    PubMed

    Holst, O; Christoffel, V; Fründ, R; Moll, H; Sumper, M

    1989-05-01

    The sulphated glycoprotein SSG 185 is the monomeric precursor of a highly aggregated structural element in the extracellular matrix of the multicellular green alga Volvox carteri. A phosphodiester of arabinose was isolated from a saccharide fragment of SSG 185. The structure of this phosphodiester was investigated by methylation analysis, 13C-NMR, photometric methods and enzymatic assays and identified as D-Araiota-5-phospho-5-D-Araiota. The function of this phosphodiester bridge as a crosslink of different carbohydrate chains in SSG 185 is discussed. PMID:2714288

  3. Virulence Gene Regulation by l-Arabinose in Salmonella enterica

    PubMed Central

    López-Garrido, Javier; Puerta-Fernández, Elena; Cota, Ignacio; Casadesús, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Invasion of the intestinal epithelium is a critical step in Salmonella enterica infection and requires functions encoded in the gene cluster known as Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 (SPI-1). Expression of SPI-1 genes is repressed by l-arabinose, and not by other pentoses. Transport of l-arabinose is necessary to repress SPI-1; however, repression is independent of l-arabinose metabolism and of the l-arabinose-responsive regulator AraC. SPI-1 repression by l-arabinose is exerted at a single target, HilD, and the mechanism appears to be post-translational. As a consequence of SPI-1 repression, l-arabinose reduces translocation of SPI-1 effectors to epithelial cells and decreases Salmonella invasion in vitro. These observations reveal a hitherto unknown role of l-arabinose in gene expression control and raise the possibility that Salmonella may use L-arabinose as an environmental signal. PMID:25991823

  4. Virulence Gene Regulation by L-Arabinose in Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    López-Garrido, Javier; Puerta-Fernández, Elena; Cota, Ignacio; Casadesús, Josep

    2015-07-01

    Invasion of the intestinal epithelium is a critical step in Salmonella enterica infection and requires functions encoded in the gene cluster known as Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 (SPI-1). Expression of SPI-1 genes is repressed by L-arabinose, and not by other pentoses. Transport of L-arabinose is necessary to repress SPI-1; however, repression is independent of L-arabinose metabolism and of the L-arabinose-responsive regulator AraC. SPI-1 repression by L-arabinose is exerted at a single target, HilD, and the mechanism appears to be post-translational. As a consequence of SPI-1 repression, l-arabinose reduces translocation of SPI-1 effectors to epithelial cells and decreases Salmonella invasion in vitro. These observations reveal a hitherto unknown role of L-arabinose in gene expression control and raise the possibility that Salmonella may use L-arabinose as an environmental signal.

  5. Engineering of Alicyclobacillus hesperidum L-arabinose isomerase for improved catalytic activity and reduced pH optimum using random and site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chen; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Tao; Zhou, Leon; Jiang, Bo; Mu, Wanmeng

    2015-12-01

    A mutation, D478N, was obtained by an error-prone polymerase chain reaction using the L-arabinose isomerase (L-AI) gene from Alicyclobacillus hesperidum URH17-3-68 as the template. The mutated isomerase showed higher activity for D-galactose isomerization. The mutation site obtained from random mutagenesis was then introduced as a single-site mutation using site-directed mutagenesis. Single-site variants, D478N, D478Q, D478A, D478K, and D478R, were constructed. The optimum temperatures were all higher than 60 °C. D478A, D478N, and D478Q retained more than 80 % of the maximum relative activity of the wild-type L-AI at 75 °C. With the exception of the D478A variant, all variants showed decreased optimum pH values in the acidic range (6.0-6.5). All of the variant L-AIs could be significantly activated by the addition of Co(2+) and Mn(2+). D478N and D478Q showed higher catalytic efficiencies (k cat/K m) toward D-galactose than that of wild-type L-AI. In addition, the D478N and D478Q variants exhibited a much higher conversion ratio of D-galactose to D-tagatose at 6.0 than the wild-type L-AI. According to the molecular model, residue D478 was located on the surface of the enzyme and distant from the active site. It was supposed that the charged state of residue 478 may influence the optimum pH for substrate binding or isomerization.

  6. Microbial production of xylitol from xylose and L-arabinose: conversion of L-arabitol to xylitol using bacterial oxidoreductases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microbial production of xylitol, using hemicellulosic biomass such as agricultural residues, is becoming more attractive for reducing its manufacturing cost. L-arabitol is a particular problem to xylitol production from hemicellulosic hydrolyzates that contain both xylose and L-arabinose because it...

  7. L-arabinose fermenting yeast

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Min; Singh, Arjun; Knoshaug, Eric; Franden, Mary Ann; Jarvis, Eric; Suominen, Pirkko

    2010-12-07

    An L-arabinose utilizing yeast strain is provided for the production of ethanol by introducing and expressing bacterial araA, araB and araD genes. L-arabinose transporters are also introduced into the yeast to enhance the uptake of arabinose. The yeast carries additional genomic mutations enabling it to consume L-arabinose, even as the only carbon source, and to produce ethanol. Methods of producing ethanol include utilizing these modified yeast strains. ##STR00001##

  8. Identification of an L-arabinose reductase gene in Aspergillus niger and its role in L-arabinose catabolism.

    PubMed

    Mojzita, Dominik; Penttilä, Merja; Richard, Peter

    2010-07-30

    The first enzyme in the pathway for l-arabinose catabolism in eukaryotic microorganisms is a reductase, reducing l-arabinose to l-arabitol. The enzymes catalyzing this reduction are in general nonspecific and would also reduce d-xylose to xylitol, the first step in eukaryotic d-xylose catabolism. It is not clear whether microorganisms use different enzymes depending on the carbon source. Here we show that Aspergillus niger makes use of two different enzymes. We identified, cloned, and characterized an l-arabinose reductase, larA, that is different from the d-xylose reductase, xyrA. The larA is up-regulated on l-arabinose, while the xyrA is up-regulated on d-xylose. There is however an initial up-regulation of larA also on d-xylose but that fades away after about 4 h. The deletion of the larA gene in A. niger results in a slow growth phenotype on l-arabinose, whereas the growth on d-xylose is unaffected. The l-arabinose reductase can convert l-arabinose and d-xylose to their corresponding sugar alcohols but has a higher affinity for l-arabinose. The K(m) for l-arabinose is 54 + or - 6 mm and for d-xylose 155 + or - 15 mm.

  9. L-arabinose fermenting yeast

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Min; Singh, Arjun; Suominen, Pirkko; Knoshaug, Eric; Franden, Mary Ann; Jarvis, Eric

    2014-09-23

    An L-arabinose utilizing yeast strain is provided for the production of ethanol by introducing and expressing bacterial araA, araB and araD genes. L-arabinose transporters are also introduced into the yeast to enhance the uptake of arabinose. The yeast carries additional genomic mutations enabling it to consume L-arabinose, even as the only carbon source, and to produce ethanol. A yeast strain engineered to metabolize arabinose through a novel pathway is also disclosed. Methods of producing ethanol include utilizing these modified yeast strains.

  10. L-arabinose fermenting yeast

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Min; Singh, Arjun; Suominen, Pirkko; Knoshaug, Eric; Franden, Mary Ann; Jarvis, Eric

    2013-02-12

    An L-arabinose utilizing yeast strain is provided for the production of ethanol by introducing and expressing bacterial araA, araB and araD genes. L-arabinose transporters are also introduced into the yeast to enhance the uptake of arabinose. The yeast carries additional genomic mutations enabling it to consume L-arabinose, even as the only carbon source, and to produce ethanol. A yeast strain engineered to metabolize arabinose through a novel pathway is also disclosed. Methods of producing ethanol include utilizing these modified yeast strains.

  11. Heterodimers reveal that two arabinose molecules are required for the normal arabinose response of AraC.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Michael E; Schleif, Robert

    2012-10-16

    AraC protein, which regulates expression of the l-arabinose operon in Escherichia coli, is a dimer whose DNA binding affinity for pairs of DNA half-sites is controlled by arabinose. Here we have addressed the question of whether the arabinose response of AraC requires the binding of one or two molecules of arabinose. This was accomplished by measuring the DNA dissociation rates of wild-type AraC and heterodimeric AraC constructs in which one subunit is capable of binding arabinose and the other subunit does not bind arabinose. Solutions consisting entirely of heterodimers were formed by spontaneous subunit exchange between two different homodimers, with heterodimers being trapped by the formation of an intersubunit disulfide bond between cysteine residues strategically positioned within the dimerization interface. We found that the normal arabinose response of AraC requires the binding of two arabinose molecules. These results provide additional constraints on mechanistic models for the action of AraC.

  12. Fractionation of sugar beet pulp into pectin, cellulose, and arabinose by arabinases combined with ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Spagnuolo, M; Crecchio, C; Pizzigallo, M D; Ruggiero, P

    1999-09-20

    Incubation of beet pulp with two arabinases (alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase and endo-arabinase), used singularly or in combination at different units of activity per gram of beet pulp, caused the hydrolysis of arabinan, which produced a hydrolyzate consisting mainly of arabinose. Pectin and a residue enriched with cellulose were subsequently separated from the incubation mixture. The best enzymatic hydrolysis results were obtained when 100 U/g of beet pulp of each enzyme worked synergistically with yields of 100% arabinose and 91.7% pectin. These yields were higher than those obtained with traditional chemical hydrolysis. The pectin fraction showed a low content of neutral sugar content and the cellulose residue contained only a small amount of pentoses. Semicontinuous hydrolysis with enzyme recycling in an ultrafiltration unit was also carried out to separate arabinose, pectin, and cellulose from beet pulp in 7 cycles of hydrolysis followed by ultrafiltration. The yields of separation were similar to those obtained in batch experiments, with an enzyme consumption reduced by 3.5 times and some significant advantages over batch processes.

  13. Fractionation of sugar beet pulp into pectin, cellulose, and arabinose by arabinases combined with ultrafiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Spangnuolo, M.; Crecchio, C.; Pizzigallo, M.D.R.; Ruggiero, P.

    1999-09-20

    Incubation of beet pulp with two arabinases ({alpha}-L-arabinofuranosidase and endo-arabinase), used singularly or in combination at different units of activity per gram of beet pulp, caused the hydrolysis of arabinasn, which produced a hydrolyzate consisting mainly of arabinose. Pectin and a residue enriched with cellulose were subsequently separated from the incubation mixture. The best enzymatic hydrolysis results were obtained when 100 U/g of beet pulp of each enzyme worked synergistically with yields of 100% arabinose and 91.7% pectin. These yields were higher than those obtained with traditional chemical hydrolysis. The pectin fraction showed a low content of neutral sugar content and the cellulose residue contained only a small amount of pentoses. Semicontinuous hydrolysis with enzyme recycling in an ultrafiltration unit was also carried out to separate arabinose, pectin, and cellulose from beet pulp in 7 cycles of hydrolysis followed by ultrafiltration. The yields of separation were similar to those obtained in batch experiments, with an enzyme consumption reduced by 3.5 times and some significant advantages over batch processes.

  14. Fungal arabinan and L-arabinose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Seiboth, Bernhard; Metz, Benjamin

    2011-03-01

    L-Arabinose is the second most abundant pentose beside D-xylose and is found in the plant polysaccharides, hemicellulose and pectin. The need to find renewable carbon and energy sources has accelerated research to investigate the potential of L-arabinose for the development and production of biofuels and other bioproducts. Fungi produce a number of extracellular arabinanases, including α-L-arabinofuranosidases and endo-arabinanases, to specifically release L-arabinose from the plant polymers. Following uptake of L-arabinose, its intracellular catabolism follows a four-step alternating reduction and oxidation path, which is concluded by a phosphorylation, resulting in D-xylulose 5-phosphate, an intermediate of the pentose phosphate pathway. The genes and encoding enzymes L-arabinose reductase, L-arabinitol dehydrogenase, L-xylulose reductase, xylitol dehydrogenase, and xylulokinase of this pathway were mainly characterized in the two biotechnological important fungi Aspergillus niger and Trichoderma reesei. Analysis of the components of the L-arabinose pathway revealed a number of specific adaptations in the enzymatic and regulatory machinery towards the utilization of L-arabinose. Further genetic and biochemical analysis provided evidence that L-arabinose and the interconnected D-xylose pathway are also involved in the oxidoreductive degradation of the hexose D-galactose.

  15. Phosphoketolase flux in Clostridium acetobutylicum during growth on L-arabinose.

    PubMed

    Sund, Christian J; Liu, Sanchao; Germane, Katherine L; Servinsky, Matthew D; Gerlach, Elliot S; Hurley, Margaret M

    2015-02-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum's metabolic pathways have been studied for decades due to its metabolic diversity and industrial value, yet many details of its metabolism continue to emerge. The flux through the recently discovered pentose phosphoketolase pathway (PKP) in C. acetobutylicum has been determined for growth on xylose but transcriptional analysis indicated the pathway may have a greater contribution to arabinose metabolism. To elucidate the role of xylulose-5-phosphate/fructose-6-phosphate phosphoketolase (XFP), and the PKP in C. acetobutylicum, experimental and computational metabolic isotope analyses were performed under growth conditions of glucose or varying concentrations of xylose and arabinose. A positional bias in labelling between carbons 2 and 4 of butyrate was found and posited to be due to an enzyme isotope effect of the thiolase enzyme. A correction for the positional bias was applied, which resulted in reduction of residual error. Comparisons between model solutions with low residual error indicated flux through each of the two XFP reactions was variable, while the combined flux of the reactions remained relatively constant. PKP utilization increased with increasing xylose concentration and this trend was further pronounced during growth on arabinose. Mutation of the gene encoding XFP almost completely abolished flux through the PKP during growth on arabinose and resulted in decreased acetate/butyrate ratios. Greater flux through the PKP during growth on arabinose when compared with xylose indicated the pathway's primary role in C. acetobutylicum is arabinose metabolism.

  16. Structural insights into conserved L-arabinose metabolic enzymes reveal the substrate binding site of a thermophilic L-arabinose isomerase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Jik; Lee, Sang-Jae; Kim, Seong-Bo; Lee, Sang Jun; Lee, Sung Haeng; Lee, Dong-Woo

    2014-03-18

    Structural genomics demonstrates that despite low levels of structural similarity of proteins comprising a metabolic pathway, their substrate binding regions are likely to be conserved. Herein based on the 3D-structures of the α/β-fold proteins involved in the ara operon, we attempted to predict the substrate binding residues of thermophilic Geobacillus stearothermophilus L-arabinose isomerase (GSAI) with no 3D-structure available. Comparison of the structures of L-arabinose catabolic enzymes revealed a conserved feature to form the substrate-binding modules, which can be extended to predict the substrate binding site of GSAI (i.e., D195, E261 and E333). Moreover, these data implicated that proteins in the l-arabinose metabolic pathway might retain their substrate binding niches as the modular structure through conserved molecular evolution even with totally different structural scaffolds.

  17. Arabinose induces pellicle formation by Vibrio fischeri.

    PubMed

    Visick, Karen L; Quirke, Kevin P; McEwen, Sheila M

    2013-03-01

    Biofilms are multicellular communities of bacteria attached to a surface and embedded in a protective matrix. In many cases, the signals that induce biofilm formation are unknown. Here, we report that biofilm formation by the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri can be induced by the addition of arabinose to LBS (Luria-Bertani-salt), a tryptone-based medium. Growth of cells in the presence of 0.2% arabinose, but not other sugars, induced the production of a pellicle at the air/liquid interfaces of static cultures. V. fischeri failed to grow on arabinose as the sole carbon source, suggesting that pellicle production did not occur as a result of increased growth, but experiments using the acid/base indicator phenol red suggested that V. fischeri may partially metabolize arabinose. Pellicle production was independent of the syp polysaccharide locus but was altered upon disruption of the bcs cellulose locus. Through a screen for mutants defective for pellicle production, we found that loss of motility disrupted the formation of the arabinose-induced pellicle. Among the ∼20 mutants that retained motility were strains with insertions in a putative msh pilus locus and a strain with a defect in yidK, which is involved in galactose catabolism. Mutants with the msh gene disrupted grew poorly in the presence of arabinose, while the yidK mutant appeared to be "blind" to the presence of arabinose. Finally, arabinose impaired symbiotic colonization by V. fischeri. This work thus identifies a novel signal and new pathways involved in control of biofilm formation by V. fischeri.

  18. Enhanced stability of Bacillus licheniformis L-arabinose isomerase by immobilization with alginate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye-Wang; Prabhu, Ponnandy; Lee, Jung-Kul; Kim, In-Won

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant Escherichia coli whole cells harboring Bacillus licheniformis L-arabinose isomerase (BLAI) were harvested to prepare alginate-immobilized biocatalysts. The operational conditions for immobilization were optimized according to relative activity and the cell leakage of the immobilized cell. The optimal conditions are as follows: alginate concentration, Ca(2+) concentration, cell mass loading, and curing time were 2% (w/v), 0.1 M, 50 g l(-1), and 4 hours, respectively. After immobilization, cross-linking with 0.1% glutaraldehyde significantly reduced cell leakage. The immobilized whole cells harboring BLAI were very stable with 89% residual activity remaining after 33 days of incubation at 50 degrees C and were much more stable than the free enzyme and cells. The results showed that immobilizing whole cells harboring BLAI is suitable for use as a biocatalyst in the production of L-ribulose, largely due to its high stability and low cost.

  19. Economically optimal nitrogen rate reduces soil residual nitrate.

    PubMed

    Hong, Nan; Scharf, Peter C; Davis, J Glenn; Kitchen, Newell R; Sudduth, Kenneth A

    2007-01-01

    Post-harvest residual soil NO(3)-N (RSN) is susceptible to transfer to water resources. Practices that minimize RSN levels can reduce N loss to the environment. Our objectives were (i) to determine if the RSN after corn (Zea mays L.) harvest can be reduced if N fertilizer is applied at the economically optimal N rate (EONR) as compared to current producer practices in the midwestern USA and (ii) to compare RSN levels for N fertilizer rates below, at, and above the EONR. Six experiments were conducted in producer fields in three major soil areas (Mississippi Delta alluvial, deep loess, claypan) in Missouri over 2 yr. Predominant soil great groups were Albaqualfs, Argiudolls, Haplaquolls, and Fluvaquents. At four transects in each field, six treatment N rates from 0 to 280 kg N ha(-1) were applied, the EONR was determined, and the RSN was measured to a 0.9-m depth from five treatment plots. The EONR at sampling sites varied from 49 to 228 kg N ha(-1) depending on site and year. Estimated average RSN at the EONR was 33 kg N ha(-1) in the 0.9-m profile. This was at least 12 kg N ha(-1) lower than RSN at the producers' N rates. The RSN increased with increasing Delta EONR (total N applied - EONR). This relationship was best modeled by a plateau-linear function, with a low RSN plateau at N rates well below the EONR. A linear increase in RSN began anywhere from 65 kg N ha(-1) below the EONR to 20 kg N ha(-1) above the EONR at the three sites with good data resolution near the EONR. Applying N rates in excess of the EONR produced elevated RSN values in all six experiments. Our results suggest that applying the EONR will produce environmental benefits in an economically sound manner, and that continued attempts to develop methods for accurately predicting EONR are justified. PMID:17255622

  20. A novel transcriptional regulator of L-arabinose utilization in human gut bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Changsoo; Tesar, Christine; Li, Xiaoqing; Kim, Youngchang; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate metabolism plays a crucial role in the ecophysiology of human gut microbiota. Mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of sugar catabolism in commensal and prevalent human gut bacteria such as Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron remain mostly unknown. By a combination of bioinformatics and experimental approaches, we have identified an NrtR family transcription factor (BT0354 in B. thetaiotaomicron, BtAraR) as a novel regulator controlling the arabinose utilization genes. L-arabinose was confirmed to be a negative effector of BtAraR. We have solved the crystal structures of the apo and L-arabinose-bound BtAraR proteins, as well as the complex of apo-protein with a specific DNA operator. BtAraR forms a homodimer with each subunit comprised of the ligand-binding Nudix hydrolase-like domain and the DNA-binding winged-helix-turn-helix (wHTH) domain. We have identified the residues involved in binding of L-arabinose and recognition of DNA. The majority of these residues are well conserved in the AraR orthologs in Bacteroidetes. In the structure of the BtAraR–DNA complex, we found the unique interaction of arginine intercalating its guanidinum moiety into the base pair stacking of B-DNA. L-arabinose binding induces movement of wHTH domains, resulting in a conformation unsuitable for DNA binding. Our analysis facilitates reconstruction of the metabolic and regulatory networks involved in carbohydrate utilization in human gut Bacteroides. PMID:26438537

  1. A novel transcriptional regulator of L-arabinose utilization in human gut bacteria.

    PubMed

    Chang, Changsoo; Tesar, Christine; Li, Xiaoqing; Kim, Youngchang; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2015-12-01

    Carbohydrate metabolism plays a crucial role in the ecophysiology of human gut microbiota. Mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of sugar catabolism in commensal and prevalent human gut bacteria such as Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron remain mostly unknown. By a combination of bioinformatics and experimental approaches, we have identified an NrtR family transcription factor (BT0354 in B. thetaiotaomicron, BtAraR) as a novel regulator controlling the arabinose utilization genes. L-arabinose was confirmed to be a negative effector of BtAraR. We have solved the crystal structures of the apo and L-arabinose-bound BtAraR proteins, as well as the complex of apo-protein with a specific DNA operator. BtAraR forms a homodimer with each subunit comprised of the ligand-binding Nudix hydrolase-like domain and the DNA-binding winged-helix-turn-helix (wHTH) domain. We have identified the residues involved in binding of L-arabinose and recognition of DNA. The majority of these residues are well conserved in the AraR orthologs in Bacteroidetes. In the structure of the BtAraR-DNA complex, we found the unique interaction of arginine intercalating its guanidinum moiety into the base pair stacking of B-DNA. L-arabinose binding induces movement of wHTH domains, resulting in a conformation unsuitable for DNA binding. Our analysis facilitates reconstruction of the metabolic and regulatory networks involved in carbohydrate utilization in human gut Bacteroides.

  2. Development of an arabinose-fermenting Zymomonas mobilis strain by metabolic pathway engineering.

    PubMed Central

    Deanda, K; Zhang, M; Eddy, C; Picataggio, S

    1996-01-01

    The substrate fermentation range of the ethanologenic bacterium Zymomonas mobilis was expanded to include the pentose sugar, L-arabinose, which is commonly found in agricultural residues and other lignocellulosic biomass. Five genes, encoding L-arabinose isomerase (araA), L-ribulokinase (araB), L-ribulose-5-phosphate-4-epimerase (araD), transaldolase (talB), and transketolase (tktA), were isolated from Escherichia coli and introduced into Z. mobilis under the control of constitutive promoters that permitted their expression even in the presence of glucose. The engineered strain grew on and produced ethanol from L-arabinose as a sole C source at 98% of the maximum theoretical ethanol yield, based on the amount of consumed sugar. This indicates that arabinose was metabolized almost exclusively to ethanol as the sole fermentation product, with little by-product formation. Although no diauxic growth pattern was evident, the microorganism preferentially utilized glucose before arabinose, apparently reflecting the specificity of the indigenous facilitated diffusion transport system. This microorganism may be useful, along with the previously developed xylose-fermenting Z. mobilis (M. Zhang, C. Eddy, K. Deanda, M. Finkelstein, and S. Picataggio, Science 267:240-243, 1995), in a mixed culture for efficient fermentation of the predominant hexose and pentose sugars in agricultural residues and other lignocellulosic feedstocks to ethanol. PMID:8953718

  3. L-arabinose pathway engineering for arabitol-free xylitol production in Candida tropicalis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Byoung Hoon; Jeon, Woo Young; Shim, Woo Yong; Kim, Jung Hoe

    2011-04-01

    Xylose reductase (XR) is a key enzyme in biological xylitol production, and most XRs have broad substrate specificities. During xylitol production from biomass hydrolysate, non-specific XRs can reduce L-arabinose, which is the second-most abundant hemicellulosic sugar, to the undesirable byproduct arabitol, which interferes with xylitol crystallization in downstream processing. To minimize the flux from L-arabinose to arabitol, the L-arabinose-preferring, endogenous XR was replaced by a D-xylose-preferring heterologous XR in Candida tropicalis. Then, Bacillus licheniformis araA and Escherichia coli araB and araD were codon-optimized and expressed functionally in C. tropicalis for the efficient assimilation of L-arabinose. During xylitol fermentation, the control strains BSXDH-3 and KNV converted 9.9 g L-arabinose l(-1) into 9.5 and 8.3 g arabitol l(-1), respectively, whereas the recombinant strain JY consumed 10.5 g L-arabinose l(-1) for cell growth without forming arabitol. Moreover, JY produced xylitol with 42 and 16% higher productivity than BSXDH-3 and KNV, respectively.

  4. Utility pump truck; Residual gas problems reduced with innovative equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-04-01

    Residual natural gas trapped in the ground after the repair of a distribution-system leak can be a headache for utility employees and customers. The pump truck, a unique approach to removing residual gas, is described in this paper. Natural gas is lighter than air and naturally tends to rise upward and dissipate in the atmosphere. However, pavement, buildings or soil conditions around a leaking pipe often cause gas to be trapped in the ground. In addition to removing trapped gas, the pump truck is used to help pinpoint leaks where the source is difficult to locate because of soil conditions.

  5. Sugarcane residue management effects in reducing soil erosion from quarter-drains in southern Louisiana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Residue cover is one of the most effective and least expensive methods for reducing soil erosion. Residue protects the soil surface from raindrop impact, thus reducing soil particle detachment. An experiment was conducted following the 2001 sugarcane harvest season in Southern Louisiana to determine...

  6. Protective effects of L-arabinose in high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-induced metabolic syndrome in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Lei; Lu, Xiaoling; Sun, Min; Li, Kai; Shen, Lingmin; Wu, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Background L-Arabinose is a non-caloric sugar, which could affect glucose and lipid metabolism and suppress obesity. However, few reports have described the effect of L-arabinose in metabolic syndrome, a combination of medical disorders that increase the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Objective This study was conducted to explore the effects of L-arabinose in rats with metabolic syndrome induced by a high-carbohydrate, high-fat (HCHF) diet. Methods After the rat model for metabolic syndrome was successfully established, L-arabinose was administrated by oral gavage for 6 weeks. The biochemical index and histological analysis were measured, and the expression levels of genes related to fatty acid metabolism were analyzed using real-time PCR. Results Following treatment with L-arabinose, metabolic syndrome rats had an obvious reduction in body weight, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, serum insulin, TNF-α, and leptin. Further study showed that treatment with L-arabinose significantly increased the expression of mRNA for hepatic CPT-1α and PDK4, but the expression of mRNA for hepatic ACCα was reduced. Conclusions This work suggests that L-arabinose could lower body weight, Lee's index, and visceral index and improve dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, inflammation, and viscera function, which indicate that it might be a promising candidate for therapies combating metabolic syndrome. PMID:26652604

  7. The LacI-Type transcriptional regulator AraR acts as an L-arabinose-responsive repressor of L-arabinose utilization genes in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 31831.

    PubMed

    Kuge, Takayuki; Teramoto, Haruhiko; Yukawa, Hideaki; Inui, Masayuki

    2014-06-01

    The Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 31831 araBDA operon consists of three l-arabinose catabolic genes, upstream of which the galM, araR, and araE genes are located in opposite orientation. araR encodes a LacI-type transcriptional regulator that negatively regulates the l-arabinose-inducible expression of araBDA and araE (encoding an l-arabinose transporter), through a mechanism that has yet to be identified. Here we show that the AraR protein binds in vitro to three sites: one upstream of araBDA and two upstream of araE. We verify that a 16-bp consensus palindromic sequence is essential for binding of AraR, using a series of mutations introduced upstream of araB in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Moreover, the DNA-binding activity of AraR is reduced by l-arabinose. We employ quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses using various mutant strains deficient in l-arabinose utilization genes to demonstrate that the prominent upregulation of araBDA and araE within 5 min of l-arabinose supplementation is dependent on the uptake but independent of the catabolism of l-arabinose. Similar expression patterns, together with the upregulation by araR disruption without l-arabinose, are evident with the apparent galM-araR operon, although attendant changes in expression levels are much smaller than those realized with the expression of araBDA and araE. The AraR-binding site upstream of araB overlaps the -10 region of the divergent galM promoter. These observations indicate that AraR acts as a transcriptional repressor of araBDA, araE, and galM-araR and that l-arabinose acts as an intracellular negative effector of the AraR-dependent regulation.

  8. A novel L-xylulose reductase essential for L-arabinose catabolism in Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Metz, Benjamin; Mojzita, Dominik; Herold, Silvia; Kubicek, Christian P; Richard, Peter; Seiboth, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    L-Xylulose reductases belong to the superfamily of short chain dehydrogenases and reductases (SDRs) and catalyze the NAD(P)H-dependent reduction of L-xylulose to xylitol in L-arabinose and glucuronic acid catabolism. Here we report the identification of a novel L-xylulose reductase LXR3 in the fungus Trichoderma reesei by a bioinformatic approach in combination with a functional analysis. LXR3, a 31 kDa protein, catalyzes the reduction of L-xylulose to xylitol via NADPH and is also able to convert D-xylulose, D-ribulose, L-sorbose, and D-fructose to their corresponding polyols. Transcription of lxr3 is specifically induced by L-arabinose and L-arabitol. Deletion of lxr3 affects growth on L-arabinose and L-arabitol and reduces total NADPH-dependent LXR activity in cell free extracts. A phylogenetic analysis of known L-xylulose reductases shows that LXR3 is phylogenetically different from the Aspergillus niger L-xylulose reductase LxrA and, moreover, that all identified true L-xylulose reductases belong to different clades within the superfamily of SDRs. This indicates that the enzymes responsible for the reduction of L-xylulose in L-arabinose and glucuronic acid catabolic pathways have evolved independently and that even the fungal LXRs of the L-arabinose catabolic pathway have evolved in different clades of the superfamily of SDRs.

  9. A novel transcriptional regulator of L-arabinose utilization in human gut bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Changsoo; Tesar, Christine; Li, Xiaoqing; Kim, Youngchang; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2015-10-04

    We report that carbohydrate metabolism plays a crucial role in the ecophysiology of human gut microbiota. Mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of sugar catabolism in commensal and prevalent human gut bacteria such as Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron remain mostly unknown. By a combination of bioinformatics and experimental approaches, we have identified an NrtR family transcription factor (BT0354 in B. thetaiotaomicron, BtAraR) as a novel regulator controlling the arabinose utilization genes. L-arabinose was confirmed to be a negative effector of BtAraR. We have solved the crystal structures of the apo and L-arabinose-bound BtAraR proteins, as well as the complex of apo-protein with a specific DNA operator. BtAraR forms a homodimer with each subunit comprised of the ligand-binding Nudix hydrolase-like domain and the DNA-binding winged-helix-turn-helix (wHTH) domain. We have identified the residues involved in binding of L-arabinose and recognition of DNA. The majority of these residues are well conserved in the AraR orthologs in Bacteroidetes. In the structure of the BtAraR–DNA complex, we found the unique interaction of arginine intercalating its guanidinum moiety into the base pair stacking of B-DNA. L-arabinose binding induces movement of wHTH domains, resulting in a conformation unsuitable for DNA binding. Furthermore, our analysis facilitates reconstruction of the metabolic and regulatory networks involved in carbohydrate utilization in human gut Bacteroides.

  10. A novel transcriptional regulator of L-arabinose utilization in human gut bacteria

    DOE PAGES

    Chang, Changsoo; Tesar, Christine; Li, Xiaoqing; Kim, Youngchang; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2015-10-04

    We report that carbohydrate metabolism plays a crucial role in the ecophysiology of human gut microbiota. Mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of sugar catabolism in commensal and prevalent human gut bacteria such as Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron remain mostly unknown. By a combination of bioinformatics and experimental approaches, we have identified an NrtR family transcription factor (BT0354 in B. thetaiotaomicron, BtAraR) as a novel regulator controlling the arabinose utilization genes. L-arabinose was confirmed to be a negative effector of BtAraR. We have solved the crystal structures of the apo and L-arabinose-bound BtAraR proteins, as well as the complex of apo-protein with a specificmore » DNA operator. BtAraR forms a homodimer with each subunit comprised of the ligand-binding Nudix hydrolase-like domain and the DNA-binding winged-helix-turn-helix (wHTH) domain. We have identified the residues involved in binding of L-arabinose and recognition of DNA. The majority of these residues are well conserved in the AraR orthologs in Bacteroidetes. In the structure of the BtAraR–DNA complex, we found the unique interaction of arginine intercalating its guanidinum moiety into the base pair stacking of B-DNA. L-arabinose binding induces movement of wHTH domains, resulting in a conformation unsuitable for DNA binding. Furthermore, our analysis facilitates reconstruction of the metabolic and regulatory networks involved in carbohydrate utilization in human gut Bacteroides.« less

  11. Enzymatic saccharification of sugar beet pulp for the production of galacturonic acid and arabinose; a study on the impact of the formation of recalcitrant oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Leijdekkers, A G M; Bink, J P M; Geutjes, S; Schols, H A; Gruppen, H

    2013-01-01

    Enzymatic saccharification of sugar beet pulp was optimized on kg-scale to release the maximum amounts of monomeric galacturonic acid and arabinose with limited concomitant degradation of cellulose, using conditions that are feasible for industrial upscaling. A selected mixture of pectinases released 79% of the galacturonic acid and 82% of the arabinose as monomers from sugar beet pulp while simultaneously degrading only 17% of the cellulose. The recalcitrant structures that were obtained after hydrolysis were characterized using mass spectrometry. The most abundant structures had an average degree of polymerization of 4-5. They were identified as partially acetylated rhamnogalacturonan-oligosaccharides, mostly containing a terminal galacturonosyl residue on both reducing and non-reducing end, partially methyl esterified/acetylated homogalacturonan-oligosaccharides, mostly containing methyl and acetyl esters at contiguous galacturonosyl residues and arabinan-oligosaccharides, hypothesized to be mainly branched. It could be concluded that especially rhamnogalacturonan-galacturonohydrolase, arabinofuranosidase and pectin acetylesterase are lacking for further degradation of recalcitrant oligosaccharides.

  12. Crop residue management to reduce erosion and improve soil quality: Northwest. Conservation research report

    SciTech Connect

    Papendick, R.I.; Moldenhauer, W.C.

    1993-05-01

    Leaving crop residue on the soil surface during cropping has a number of clear advantages over tillage that leaves the soil surface bare. Most obvious is the greatly reduced erosion from wind and water. This advantage alone makes the change worthwhile. Mandated conservation compliance by 1995 is a further incentive to adopt surface-crop-residue management. Other advantages are increased yield due to water conserved by surface residue, lower soil temperatures, higher quality soil over time due to increased soil organic-matter levels, and in many cases, reduced input of time, labor, and fuel. The feasibility of farming while leaving residues on the surface is indicated by the rapid rate at which farmers are adopting these management practices. Success is due in large part to greater efferctiveness and reduced cost of herbicides and the improvement of planting equipment available on the market.

  13. Crop residue management to reduce erosion and improve soil quality: Appalachia and northeast. Conservation research report

    SciTech Connect

    Blevins, R.L.; Moldenhauer, W.C.

    1995-08-01

    Leaving crop residue on the soil surface has a number of clear advantages over tillage that leaves the soil surface bare. Most notable is the greatly reduced erosion; this advantage alone makes the change worthwhile. Mandated conservation compliance by 1995 is a further incentive to adopt surface-crop-residue management. Other advantages are increased yield due to water conserved by surface residue; lower soil temperatures; higher quality soil over time due to increased soil organic-matter levels; and in many cases, reduced input of time, labor, and fuel. The feasibility of surface-residue management has been proven by the increasing rate of acceptance and use by farm operators. Success is due in large part to the greater effectiveness and reduced cost of herbicides and the improvement of planting equipment available on the market.

  14. Metabolism of L-arabinose in plants.

    PubMed

    Kotake, Toshihisa; Yamanashi, Yukiko; Imaizumi, Chiemi; Tsumuraya, Yoichi

    2016-09-01

    L-Arabinose (L-Ara) is a plant-specific sugar accounting for 5-10 % of cell wall saccharides in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and rice (Oryza sativa). L-Ara occurs in pectic arabinan, rhamnogalacturonan II, arabinoxylan, arabinogalactan-protein (AGP), and extensin in the cell walls, as well as in glycosylated signaling peptides like CLAVATA3 and small glycoconjugates such as quercetin 3-O-arabinoside. This review focuses on recent advances towards understanding the generation of L-Ara and the metabolism of L-Ara-containing molecules in plants. PMID:27220955

  15. Metabolism of L-arabinose in plants.

    PubMed

    Kotake, Toshihisa; Yamanashi, Yukiko; Imaizumi, Chiemi; Tsumuraya, Yoichi

    2016-09-01

    L-Arabinose (L-Ara) is a plant-specific sugar accounting for 5-10 % of cell wall saccharides in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and rice (Oryza sativa). L-Ara occurs in pectic arabinan, rhamnogalacturonan II, arabinoxylan, arabinogalactan-protein (AGP), and extensin in the cell walls, as well as in glycosylated signaling peptides like CLAVATA3 and small glycoconjugates such as quercetin 3-O-arabinoside. This review focuses on recent advances towards understanding the generation of L-Ara and the metabolism of L-Ara-containing molecules in plants.

  16. Heterologous expression and characterization of Bacillus coagulans L-arabinose isomerase.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xingding; Wu, Jin Chuan

    2012-05-01

    Bacillus coagulans has been of great commercial interest over the past decade owing to its strong ability of producing optical pure L: -lactic acid from both hexose and pentose sugars including L: -arabinose with high yield, titer and productivity under thermophilic conditions. The L: -arabinose isomerase (L-AI) from Bacillus coagulans was heterologously over-expressed in Escherichia coli. The open reading frame of the L-AI has 1,422 nucleotides encoding a protein with 474 amino acid residues. The recombinant L-AI was purified to homogeneity by one-step His-tag affinity chromatography. The molecular mass of the enzyme was estimated to be 56 kDa by SDS-PAGE. The enzyme was most active at 70°C and pH 7.0. The metal ion Mn(2+) was shown to be the best activator for enzymatic activity and thermostability. The enzyme showed higher activity at acidic pH than at alkaline pH. The kinetic studies showed that the K (m), V (max) and k (cat)/K (m) for the conversion of L: -arabinose were 106 mM, 84 U/mg and 34.5 mM(-1)min(-1), respectively. The equilibrium ratio of L: -arabinose to L: -ribulose was 78:22 under optimal conditions. L: -ribulose (97 g/L) was obtained from 500 g/l of L: -arabinose catalyzed by the enzyme (8.3 U/mL) under the optimal conditions within 1.5 h, giving at a substrate conversion of 19.4% and a production rate of 65 g L(-1) h(-1).

  17. Crop residue management to reduce erosion and improve soil quality: North central. Conservation research report

    SciTech Connect

    Moldenhauer, W.C.; Mielke, L.N.

    1995-11-01

    Leaving crop residue on the soil surface has a number of clear advantages over tillage that leaves the soil surface bare. Most notable is the greatly reduced erosion from wind and water. Mandated conservation compliance by 1995 is an additional incentive for farmers to adopt crop residue management. This is one of six regional publications that assemble research results and experience for use by farmers and their advisers as they consider the factors involved in changing from tillage to a system of crop residue management.

  18. Sugar-metal ion interactions: The coordination behavior of cesium ion with lactose, D-arabinose and L-arabinose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ye; Xue, Junhui; Wen, Xiaodong; Zhai, Yanjun; Yang, Limin; Xu, Yizhuang; Zhao, Guozhong; Kou, Kuan; Liu, Kexin; Chen, Jia'er; Wu, Jinguang

    2016-04-01

    The novel cesium chloride-lactose complex (CsCl·C12H22O10 (Cs-Lac), cesium chloride-D-arabinose and L-arabinose complexes (CsCl·C5H10O5, Cs-D-Ara and Cs-L-Ara) have been synthesized and characterized using X-ray diffraction, FTIR, FIR, THz and Raman spectroscopies. Cs+ is 9-coordinated to two chloride ions and seven hydroxyl groups from five lactose molecules in Cs-Lac. In the structures of CsCl-D-arabinose and CsCl-L-arabinose complexes, two kinds of Cs+ ions coexist in the structures. Cs1 is 10-coordinated with two chloride ions and eight hydroxyl groups from five arabinose molecule; Cs2 is 9-coordinated to three chloride ions and six hydroxyl groups from five arabinose molecules. Two coordination modes of arabinose coexist in the structures. α-D-arabinopyranose and α-L-arabinopyranose appear in the structures of Cs-D-Ara and Cs-L-Ara complexes. FTIR and Raman results indicate variations of hydrogen bonds and the conformation of the ligands after complexation. FIR and THz spectra also confirm the formation of Cs-complexes. Crystal structure, FTIR, FIR, THz and Raman spectra provide detailed information on the structure and coordination of hydroxyl groups to metal ions in the cesium chloride-lactose, cesium chloride-D- and L-arabinose complexes.

  19. Biosynthesis of D-arabinose in mycobacteria - a novel bacterial pathway with implications for antimycobacterial therapy.

    PubMed

    Wolucka, Beata A

    2008-06-01

    Decaprenyl-phospho-arabinose (beta-D-arabinofuranosyl-1-O-monophosphodecaprenol), the only known donor of d-arabinose in bacteria, and its precursor, decaprenyl-phospho-ribose (beta-D-ribofuranosyl-1-O-monophosphodecaprenol), were first described in 1992. En route to D-arabinofuranose, the decaprenyl-phospho-ribose 2'-epimerase converts decaprenyl-phospho-ribose to decaprenyl-phospho-arabinose, which is a substrate for arabinosyltransferases in the synthesis of the cell-wall arabinogalactan and lipoarabinomannan polysaccharides of mycobacteria. The first step of the proposed decaprenyl-phospho-arabinose biosynthesis pathway in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and related actinobacteria is the formation of D-ribose 5-phosphate from sedoheptulose 7-phosphate, catalysed by the Rv1449 transketolase, and/or the isomerization of d-ribulose 5-phosphate, catalysed by the Rv2465 d-ribose 5-phosphate isomerase. d-Ribose 5-phosphate is a substrate for the Rv1017 phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase which forms 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate (PRPP). The activated 5-phosphoribofuranosyl residue of PRPP is transferred by the Rv3806 5-phosphoribosyltransferase to decaprenyl phosphate, thus forming 5'-phosphoribosyl-monophospho-decaprenol. The dephosphorylation of 5'-phosphoribosyl-monophospho-decaprenol to decaprenyl-phospho-ribose by the putative Rv3807 phospholipid phosphatase is the committed step of the pathway. A subsequent 2'-epimerization of decaprenyl-phospho-ribose by the heteromeric Rv3790/Rv3791 2'-epimerase leads to the formation of the decaprenyl-phospho-arabinose precursor for the synthesis of the cell-wall arabinans in Actinomycetales. The mycobacterial 2'-epimerase Rv3790 subunit is similar to the fungal D-arabinono-1,4-lactone oxidase, the last enzyme in the biosynthesis of D-erythroascorbic acid, thus pointing to an evolutionary link between the D-arabinofuranose- and L-ascorbic acid-related pathways. Decaprenyl-phospho-arabinose has been a lead compound for the

  20. Concurrent tailoring of fabrication process and interphase layer to reduce residual stresses in metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.; Morel, M.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology is presented to reduce the residual matrix stresses in continuous fiber metal matrix composites (MMC) by optimizing the fabrication process and interphase layer characteristics. The response of the fabricated MMC was simulated based on nonlinear micromechanics. Application cases include fabrication tailoring, interphase tailoring, and concurrent fabrication-interphase optimization. Two composite systems, silicon carbide/titanium and graphite/copper, are considered. Results illustrate the merits of each approach, indicate that concurrent fabrication/interphase optimization produces significant reductions in the matrix residual stresses and demonstrate the strong coupling between fabrication and interphase tailoring.

  1. Single zymomonas mobilis strain for xylose and arabinose fermentation

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Min; Chou, Yat-Chen; Picataggio, Stephen K.; Finkelstein, Mark

    1998-01-01

    This invention relates to single microorganisms which normally do not ferment pentose sugars which are genetically altered to ferment the pentose sugars, xylose and arabinose, to produce ethanol, and a fermentation process utilizing the same. Examples include Zymomonas mobilis which has been transformed with a combination of E. coli genes for xylose isomerase, xylulokinase, L-arabinose isomerase, L-ribulokinase, L-ribulose 5-phosphate 4-epimerase, transaldolase and transketolase. Expression of added genes are under the control of Z. mobilis promoters. These newly created microorganisms are useful for fermenting glucose, xylose and arabinose, produced by hydrolysis of hemicellulose and cellulose or starch, to produce ethanol.

  2. Single Zymomonas mobilis strain for xylose and arabinose fermentation

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, M.; Chou, Y.C.; Picataggio, S.K.; Finkelstein, M.

    1998-12-01

    This invention relates to single microorganisms which normally do not ferment pentose sugars which are genetically altered to ferment the pentose sugars, xylose and arabinose, to produce ethanol, and a fermentation process utilizing the same. Examples include Zymomonas mobilis which has been transformed with a combination of E. coli genes for xylose isomerase, xylulokinase, L-arabinose isomerase, L-ribulokinase, L-ribulose 5-phosphate 4-epimerase, transaldolase and transketolase. Expression of added genes are under the control of Z. mobilis promoters. These newly created microorganisms are useful for fermenting glucose, xylose and arabinose, produced by hydrolysis of hemicellulose and cellulose or starch, to produce ethanol. 6 figs.

  3. L-Arabinose degradation pathway in the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii involves a novel type of L-arabinose dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Ulrike; Sutter, Jan-Moritz; Zaiß, Henning; Schönheit, Peter

    2013-11-01

    The pathway of L-arabinose degradation was studied in the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii. It is shown that L-arabinose is oxidatively degraded to α-ketoglutarate. During growth on L-arabinose, L-arabinose dehydrogenase (L-AraDH) was induced. The enzyme was purified as a 130 kDa homotetrameric protein catalyzing the oxidation of L-arabinose with both NADP(+) and NAD(+). The gene encoding L-AraDH was identified as HVO_B0032 and recombinant L-AraDH showed similar properties as the native enzyme. The L-AraDH deletion mutant did not grow on L-arabinose, but grew unaffected on glucose and D-xylose, indicating a specific involvement in L-arabinose degradation. Phylogenetic analyses attribute the first archaeal L-AraDH to the extended short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDRe) family, where it is part of a novel cluster and thus differs from known archaeal and bacterial pentose dehydrogenases. Further, cell extracts of H. volcanii catalyzed the NADP(+)-dependent conversion of L-arabinoate to α-ketoglutarate. The genes involved in that conversion were identified by analyses of transcripts and deletion mutants as HVO_B0038A, HVO_B0027 and HVO_B0039 recently reported to be involved in D-xylonate conversion to α-ketoglutarate in H. volcanii (Johnsen et al. 2009).

  4. Cloning of two genes (LAT1,2) encoding specific L: -arabinose transporters of the L: -arabinose fermenting yeast Ambrosiozyma monospora.

    PubMed

    Verho, Ritva; Penttilä, Merja; Richard, Peter

    2011-07-01

    We identified and characterized two genes, LAT1 and LAT2, which encode specific L: -arabinose transporters. The genes were identified in the L: -arabinose fermenting yeast Ambrosiozyma monospora. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae had only very low L: -arabinose transport activity; however, when LAT1 or LAT2 was expressed, L: -arabinose transport was facilitated. When the LAT1 or LAT2 were expressed in an S. cerevisiae mutant where the main hexose transporters were deleted, the L: -arabinose transporters could not restore growth on D: -glucose, D: -fructose, D: -mannose or D: -galactose. This indicates that these sugars are not transported and suggests that the transporters are specific for L: -arabinose.

  5. The effect of various frequencies of ultrasonic cleaner in reducing residual monomer in acrylic resin.

    PubMed

    Charasseangpaisarn, Taksid; Wiwatwarrapan, Chairat

    2015-12-01

    Monomer remaining in denture base acrylic can be a major problem because it may cause adverse effects on oral tissue and on the properties of the material. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of various ultrasonic cleaner frequencies on the amount of residual monomer in acrylic resin after curing. Forty-two specimens each of Meliodent heat-polymerized acrylic resin (M) and Unifast Trad Ivory auto-polymerized acrylic resin (U) were prepared according to their manufacturer's instructions and randomly divided into seven groups: Negative control (NC); Positive control (PC); and five ultrasonic treatment groups: 28 kHz (F1), 40 kHz (F2), 60 kHz (F3) (M=10 min, U=5 min), and 28 kHz followed by 60 kHz (F4: M=5 min per frequency, U=2.5 min per frequency, and F5: M=10 min followed by 5 min per frequency, U=5 min followed by 2.5 min per frequency). Residual monomer was determined by HPLC following ISO 20795-1. The data were analyzed by One-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD. There was significantly less residual monomer in the auto-polymerized acrylic resin in all ultrasonic treatment groups and the PC group than that of the NC group (p<0.05). However, the amount of residual monomer in group F3 was significantly higher than that of the F1, F4, and PC groups (p<0.05). In contrast, ultrasonic treatment did not reduce the amount of residual monomer in heat-polymerized acrylic resin (p>0.05). The amount of residual monomer in heat-polymerized acrylic resin was significantly lower than that of auto-polymerized acrylic resin. In conclusion, ultrasonic treatment at low frequencies is recommended to reduce the residual monomer in auto-polymerized acrylic resin and this method is more practical in a clinical situation than previously recommended methods because of reduced chairside time.

  6. Arabinose 5-phosphate covalently inhibits transaldolase.

    PubMed

    Light, Samuel H; Anderson, Wayne F

    2014-03-01

    Arabinose 5-phosphate (A5P) is the aldopentose version of the ketohexose fructose 6-phosphate (F6P), having identical stereochemistry but lacking atoms corresponding to the 1-carbon and 1-hydroxyl. Despite structural similarity and conservation of the reactive portion of F6P, F6P acts as a substrate whereas A5P is reported to be an inhibitor of transaldolase. To address the lack of A5P reactivity we determined a crystal structure of the Francisella tularensis transaldolase in complex with A5P. This structure reveals that like F6P, A5P forms a covalent Schiff base with active site Lys135. Unlike F6P, A5P binding fails to displace an ordered active site water molecule. Retaining this water necessitates conformational changes at the A5P-protein linkage that possibly hinder reactivity. The findings presented here show the basis of A5P inhibition and suggest an unusual mechanism of competitive, reversible-covalent transaldolase regulation.

  7. Novel stereospecificity of the L-arabinose-binding protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiocho, Florante A.; Vyas, Nand K.

    1984-08-01

    Tertiary structure refinement at 1.7 Å resolution of the liganded form of L-arabinose-binding protein from Escherichia coli has revealed a novel binding site geometry which accommodates both α- and β-anomers of L-arabinose. This detailed structure analysis provides new understanding of protein-sugar interaction, the process by which the binding protein minimizes the difference in the stability of the two bound sugar anomers, and the roles of periplasmic binding proteins in active transport

  8. Transport and metabolism of glucose and arabinose in Bifidobacterium breve.

    PubMed

    Degnan, B A; Macfarlane, G T

    1993-01-01

    Glucose was required for the transport of arabinose into Bifidobacterium breve. The non-metabolisable glucose analogue 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) did not facilitate assimilation of arabinose. Studies using D-[U-14C]-labelled arabinose showed that it was fermented to pyruvate, formate, lactate and acetate, whereas the principal metabolic products of D-[U-14C]-labelled glucose were acetate and formate. In contrast to glucose, arabinose was not incorporated into cellular macromolecules. A variety of metabolic inhibitors and inhibitors of sugar transport (proton ionophores, metal ionophores, compounds associated with electron transport) were used to investigate the mechanisms of sugar uptake. Only NaF, an inhibitor of substrate level phosphorylation, and 2-DG inhibited glucose assimilation. 2-DC had no effect on arabinose uptake, but NaF was stimulatory. High levels of phosphorylation of glucose and 2-DC by PEP and to a lesser degree, ATP were seen in phosphoenolpyruvate: phosphotransferase (PEP:PTS) assays. These data together with strong inhibition of glucose uptake by NaF suggest a role for phosphorylation in the transport process. Arabinose uptake in B. breve was not directly dependent on phosphorylation or any other energy-linked form of transport but may be assimilated by glucose-dependent facilitated diffusion.

  9. THE FUNDAMENTAL METALLICITY RELATION REDUCES TYPE Ia SN HUBBLE RESIDUALS MORE THAN HOST MASS ALONE

    SciTech Connect

    Hayden, Brian T.; Garnavich, Peter M.; Gupta, Ravi R.; Sako, Masao; Mannucci, Filippo; Nichol, Robert C.

    2013-02-20

    Type Ia supernova Hubble residuals have been shown to correlate with host galaxy mass, imposing a major obstacle for their use in measuring dark energy properties. Here, we calibrate the fundamental metallicity relation (FMR) of Mannucci et al. for host mass and star formation rates measured from broadband colors alone. We apply the FMR to the large number of hosts from the SDSS-II sample of Gupta et al. and find that the scatter in the Hubble residuals is significantly reduced when compared with using only stellar mass (or the mass-metallicity relation) as a fit parameter. Our calibration of the FMR is restricted to only star-forming galaxies and in the Hubble residual calculation we include only hosts with log(SFR) > - 2. Our results strongly suggest that metallicity is the underlying source of the correlation between Hubble residuals and host galaxy mass. Since the FMR is nearly constant between z = 2 and the present, use of the FMR along with light-curve width and color should provide a robust distance measurement method that minimizes systematic errors.

  10. Reduced residual conduction gaps and favourable outcome in contact force-guided circumferential pulmonary vein isolation

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Taihei; Kimura, Masaomi; Tomita, Hirofumi; Sasaki, Shingo; Owada, Shingen; Horiuchi, Daisuke; Sasaki, Kenichi; Ishida, Yuji; Kinjo, Takahiko; Okumura, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Aims Although contact force (CF)-guided circumferential pulmonary vein isolation (CPVI) for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF) is useful, AF recurrence at long-term follow-up still remains to be resolved. The purpose of this study was to assess safety and efficacy of CF-guided CPVI and to compare residual conduction gaps during CPVI and long-term outcome between the conventional (non-CF-guided) and the CF-guided CPVI. Methods and results We studied the 50 consecutive PAF patients undergoing CPVI by a ThermoCool EZ Steer catheter (conventional group, mean age 61 ± 10 years) and the other 50 consecutive PAF patients by a ThermoCool SmartTouch catheter (CF group, 65 ± 11 years). The procedure parameters and residual conduction gaps during CPVI, and long-term outcome for 12 months were compared between the two groups. Circumferential pulmonary vein isolation was successfully accomplished without any major complications in both groups. Total procedure and total fluoroscopy times were both significantly shorter in the CF group than in the conventional group (160 ± 30 vs. 245 ± 61 min, P < 0.001, and 17 ± 8 vs. 54 ± 27 min, P < 0.001, respectively). Total number of residual conduction gaps was significantly less in the CF group than in the conventional group (2.7 ± 1.7 vs. 6.3 ± 2.7, P < 0.05). The AF recurrence-free rates after CPVI during 12-month follow-up were 96% (48/50) in the CF group and 82% (41/50) in the conventional group (P = 0.02 by log rank test). Multivariate Cox regression analysis further supported this finding. Conclusion Contact force-guided CPVI is safe and more effective in reducing not only the procedure time but also the AF recurrence than the conventional CPVI, possibly due to reduced residual conduction gaps during CPVI procedure. PMID:26346921

  11. Functional Analysis of Two l-Arabinose Transporters from Filamentous Fungi Reveals Promising Characteristics for Improved Pentose Utilization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingen; Xu, Jing; Cai, Pengli; Wang, Bang; Ma, Yanhe; Benz, J Philipp; Tian, Chaoguang

    2015-06-15

    Limited uptake is one of the bottlenecks for l-arabinose fermentation from lignocellulosic hydrolysates in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This study characterized two novel l-arabinose transporters, LAT-1 from Neurospora crassa and MtLAT-1 from Myceliophthora thermophila. Although the two proteins share high identity (about 83%), they display different substrate specificities. Sugar transport assays using the S. cerevisiae strain EBY.VW4000 indicated that LAT-1 accepts a broad substrate spectrum. In contrast, MtLAT-1 appeared much more specific for l-arabinose. Determination of the kinetic properties of both transporters revealed that the Km values of LAT-1 and MtLAT-1 for l-arabinose were 58.12 ± 4.06 mM and 29.39 ± 3.60 mM, respectively, with corresponding Vmax values of 116.7 ± 3.0 mmol/h/g dry cell weight (DCW) and 10.29 ± 0.35 mmol/h/g DCW, respectively. In addition, both transporters were found to use a proton-coupled symport mechanism and showed only partial inhibition by d-glucose during l-arabinose uptake. Moreover, LAT-1 and MtLAT-1 were expressed in the S. cerevisiae strain BSW2AP containing an l-arabinose metabolic pathway. Both recombinant strains exhibited much faster l-arabinose utilization, greater biomass accumulation, and higher ethanol production than the control strain. In conclusion, because of higher maximum velocities and reduced inhibition by d-glucose, the genes for the two characterized transporters are promising targets for improved l-arabinose utilization and fermentation in S. cerevisiae.

  12. Hydride vapor phase GaN films with reduced density of residual electrons and deep traps

    SciTech Connect

    Polyakov, A. Y.; Smirnov, N. B.; Govorkov, A. V.; Yugova, T. G.; Cox, H.; Helava, H.; Makarov, Yu.; Usikov, A. S.

    2014-05-14

    Electrical properties and deep electron and hole traps spectra are compared for undoped n-GaN films grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) in the regular process (standard HVPE samples) and in HVPE process optimized for decreasing the concentration of residual donor impurities (improved HVPE samples). It is shown that the residual donor density can be reduced by optimization from ∼10{sup 17} cm{sup −3} to (2–5) × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −3}. The density of deep hole traps and deep electron traps decreases with decreased donor density, so that the concentration of deep hole traps in the improved samples is reduced to ∼5 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −3} versus 2.9 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} in the standard samples, with a similar decrease in the electron traps concentration.

  13. A link between arabinose utilization and oxalotrophy in Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Koch, Marion; Delmotte, Nathanaël; Ahrens, Christian H; Omasits, Ulrich; Schneider, Kathrin; Danza, Francesco; Padhi, Barnali; Murset, Valérie; Braissant, Olivier; Vorholt, Julia A; Hennecke, Hauke; Pessi, Gabriella

    2014-04-01

    Rhizobia have a versatile catabolism that allows them to compete successfully with other microorganisms for nutrients in the soil and in the rhizosphere of their respective host plants. In this study, Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110 was found to be able to utilize oxalate as the sole carbon source. A proteome analysis of cells grown in minimal medium containing arabinose suggested that oxalate oxidation extends the arabinose degradation branch via glycolaldehyde. A mutant of the key pathway genes oxc (for oxalyl-coenzyme A decarboxylase) and frc (for formyl-coenzyme A transferase) was constructed and shown to be (i) impaired in growth on arabinose and (ii) unable to grow on oxalate. Oxalate was detected in roots and, at elevated levels, in root nodules of four different B. japonicum host plants. Mixed-inoculation experiments with wild-type and oxc-frc mutant cells revealed that oxalotrophy might be a beneficial trait of B. japonicum at some stage during legume root nodule colonization.

  14. Characteristics of α-L-arabinofuranosidase from Streptomyces sp I10-1 for production of L-arabinose from corn hull arabinoxylan.

    PubMed

    Kurakake, Masahiro; Kanbara, Yoshikazu; Murakami, Yoshiki

    2014-03-01

    Streptomyces sp I10-1 α-L-arabinofuranosidase efficiently produced L-arabinose from high arabinose-content corn hull arabinoxylan (ratio of arabinose to xylose, 0.6). The optimum pH at 40 °C was around 6, and the enzyme was stable from pH 5 to 11. The optimum temperature was 50 °C at pH 5, and the activity was stable at 40 °C. The enzymatic activity against corn hull arabinoxylan was 2.3 times higher than towards p-nitrophenyl-α-L-arabinofuranoside. Approximately 45% L-arabinose recovery was achieved from corn hull arabinoxylan. It was considered that L-arabinose residues not removed by the enzyme were attributable to those linked with ferulic acid. The open reading frame of the enzyme gene consisted of 1,224 bp, and the predicted peptide was 408 amino acids, which corresponded to a molecular size of 45, 248 Da. It was presumed that the smaller molecular size (31,000 Da) estimated on SDS-PAGE resulted from proteolysis by proteases. I10-1 α-L-arabinofuranosidase belongs to the Alpha-L-AF C superfamily, which is associated with glycoside hydrolase family 51, but the properties were unique.

  15. Regulation of the L-arabinose operon of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Schleif, R

    2000-12-01

    Over forty years of research on the L-arabinose operon of Escherichia coli have provided insights into the mechanism of positive regulation of gene activity. This research also discovered DNA looping and the mechanism by which the regulatory protein changes its DNA-binding properties in response to the presence of arabinose. As is frequently seen in focused research on biological subjects, the initial studies were primarily genetic. Subsequently, the genetic approaches were augmented by physiological and then biochemical studies. Now biophysical studies are being conducted at the atomic level, but genetics still has a crucial role in the study of this system.

  16. Fuel ethanol production from L-arabinose: Constraints, challenges, current status and future trends

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, B.C.; Bothast, R.J.

    1995-12-01

    Interest in fermentation of L-arabinose to ethanol has increased in recent years because corn fiber contains 11% L-arabinose and is available in sufficient quantities to serve as a low cost feedstock to produce fuel ethanol. Various L-arabinose utilizing yeasts were screened for cost feedstock to produce fuel ethanol of their ability to ferment L-arabinose to ethanol. Most yeasts produced L-arabitol instead ethanol. The optimal conditions for production of L-arabitol in high yield from L-arabinose alone, in mixed sugars and in corn fiber acid hydrolyzate by certain yeasts will be described. In addition, the fermentative performance of an ethanologenic recombinant organism on L-arabinose will be discussed. Current status of microbial fermentation of L-arabinose to ethanol, problems and prospects of ethanol production from L-arabinose by yeasts and future directions of research will be reviewed.

  17. Reduced parenteral nutrition requirements following anastomosis of a short residual colonic segment to a short jejunum.

    PubMed

    Smith, Katherine H; Saunders, John A; Nugent, Karen P; Jackson, Alan A; Stroud, Michael A

    2011-11-01

    A 22-year-old man suffered an acute small bowel infarct leading to extensive bowel resection, resulting in only 20 cm of jejunum to a jejunostomy, although he also had 50 cm of residual colon with a mucous fistula. The patient was out on long-term home parenteral nutrition (PN) but endured high stomal losses of 5-6 L per day and, despite all conventional measures, required 6.1 L of fluid (including PN) and 555 mmol sodium per day. Although body mass index was maintained, he suffered debilitating malaise and recurrent episodes of catheter-related sepsis and also developed persistently abnormal liver function tests. He was considered a potential intestinal transplant patient, but before taking that step, he opted for reanastomosis of his residual colon to his jejunum, ending in a colostomy. At surgery, only 30 cm of additional bowel lengthening could be achieved, but despite this, the patient's stomal losses reduced to 2.5 L per day, intravenous fluid requirements reduced to 4.1 L per day, and liver function normalized. The patient also gained 7.5 kg despite no change in PN caloric prescription, and his quality of life was dramatically enhanced. The case illustrates that even a small length of colon can grant significant improvements, probably via improvements in small bowel transit and adaptive changes, better sodium and water resorption with decreased hyperaldosteronism, and enhanced energy and nitrogen recovery. Reanastomosis of defunctioned colon should therefore always be considered a management option in short bowel syndrome. PMID:22042049

  18. Ribulokinase and transcriptional regulation of arabinose metabolism in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Leyn, Semen A; Gu, Yang; Jiang, Weihong; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Yang, Chen

    2012-03-01

    The transcription factor AraR controls utilization of L-arabinose in Bacillus subtilis. In this study, we combined a comparative genomic reconstruction of AraR regulons in nine Clostridium species with detailed experimental characterization of AraR-mediated regulation in Clostridium acetobutylicum. Based on the reconstructed AraR regulons, a novel ribulokinase, AraK, present in all analyzed Clostridium species was identified, which was a nonorthologous replacement of previously characterized ribulokinases. The predicted function of the araK gene was confirmed by inactivation of the araK gene in C. acetobutylicum and biochemical assays using purified recombinant AraK. In addition to the genes involved in arabinose utilization and arabinoside degradation, extension of the AraR regulon to the pentose phosphate pathway genes in several Clostridium species was revealed. The predicted AraR-binding sites in the C. acetobutylicum genome and the negative effect of L-arabinose on DNA-regulator complex formation were verified by in vitro binding assays. The predicted AraR-controlled genes in C. acetobutylicum were experimentally validated by testing gene expression patterns in both wild-type and araR-inactivated mutant strains during growth in the absence or presence of L-arabinose.

  19. Microbial Production of Xylitol from L-arabinose by Metabolically Engineered Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An Escherichia coli strain, ZUC99(pATX210), which can produce xylitol from L-arabinose at a high yield has been created by introducing a new bioconversion pathway into cells. This pathway consists of three enzymes: L-arabinose isomerase, which converts L-arabinose to L-ribulose; D-psicose 3-epimer...

  20. Chlorogenic acid-arabinose hybrid domains in coffee melanoidins: Evidences from a model system.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Ana S P; Coimbra, Manuel A; Nunes, Fernando M; Passos, Cláudia P; Santos, Sónia A O; Silvestre, Armando J D; Silva, André M N; Rangel, Maria; Domingues, M Rosário M

    2015-10-15

    Arabinose from arabinogalactan side chains was hypothesized as a possible binding site for chlorogenic acids in coffee melanoidins. To investigate this hypothesis, a mixture of 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid (5-CQA), the most abundant chlorogenic acid in green coffee beans, and (α1 → 5)-L-arabinotriose, structurally related to arabinogalactan side chains, was submitted to dry thermal treatments. The compounds formed during thermal processing were identified by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and characterized by tandem MS (ESI-MS(n)). Compounds composed by one or two CQAs covalently linked with pentose (Pent) residues (1-12) were identified, along with compounds bearing a sugar moiety but composed exclusively by the quinic or caffeic acid moiety of CQAs. The presence of isomers was demonstrated by liquid chromatography online coupled to ESI-MS and ESI-MS(n). Pent1-2CQA were identified in coffee samples. These results give evidence for a diversity of chlorogenic acid-arabinose hybrids formed during roasting, opening new perspectives for their identification in melanoidin structures. PMID:25952851

  1. Chlorogenic acid-arabinose hybrid domains in coffee melanoidins: Evidences from a model system.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Ana S P; Coimbra, Manuel A; Nunes, Fernando M; Passos, Cláudia P; Santos, Sónia A O; Silvestre, Armando J D; Silva, André M N; Rangel, Maria; Domingues, M Rosário M

    2015-10-15

    Arabinose from arabinogalactan side chains was hypothesized as a possible binding site for chlorogenic acids in coffee melanoidins. To investigate this hypothesis, a mixture of 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid (5-CQA), the most abundant chlorogenic acid in green coffee beans, and (α1 → 5)-L-arabinotriose, structurally related to arabinogalactan side chains, was submitted to dry thermal treatments. The compounds formed during thermal processing were identified by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and characterized by tandem MS (ESI-MS(n)). Compounds composed by one or two CQAs covalently linked with pentose (Pent) residues (1-12) were identified, along with compounds bearing a sugar moiety but composed exclusively by the quinic or caffeic acid moiety of CQAs. The presence of isomers was demonstrated by liquid chromatography online coupled to ESI-MS and ESI-MS(n). Pent1-2CQA were identified in coffee samples. These results give evidence for a diversity of chlorogenic acid-arabinose hybrids formed during roasting, opening new perspectives for their identification in melanoidin structures.

  2. The role of arabinokinase in arabinose toxicity in plants.

    PubMed

    Behmüller, Robert; Kavkova, Eva; Düh, Stefanie; Huber, Christian G; Tenhaken, Raimund

    2016-08-01

    Plant cell wall polymers are synthesized by glycosyltransferases using nucleotide sugars as substrates. Most UDP-sugars are synthesized from UDP-glucose via de novo pathways but salvage pathways work in parallel to recycle sugars, which have been released during cell wall polymer and glycoprotein turnover. Here we report on the cloning and biochemical analysis of two arabinokinases in Arabidopsis. Arabinokinase is a 100 kDa protein located in the cytosol with a putative N-terminal glycosyltransferase domain and a C-terminal sugar-1-kinase domain. This unique structure is highly conserved in the plant kingdom. Arabinokinase has a high affinity for l-arabinose, which is the only sugar substrate of this GHMP (galactose; homoserine; mevalonate; phosphomevalonate) kinase. Plants that were knocked-out for arabinokinase and the previously described ara1-1 mutant were characterized. The ARA1-1 mutant form of the enzyme carries a point mutation in an α-helix. The mutation is close to the substrate binding site and changes the Km value for arabinose from 80 μm in the wild type to 17 000 μm in ARA1-1. The previous arabinose toxicity explanation is challenged by knockout plants in arabinokinase that accumulate higher levels of arabinose but do not show signs of arabinose toxicity. Analysis of marker genes from sugar signalling pathways (SnRK1 and Tor) suggest that ara1-1 misinterprets its carbon energy status. Although glucose is present in ara1-1 similar to wild type levels, it constitutively changes gene expression as typically found in wild type plants only under starvation conditions. Furthermore, ara1-1 shows increased expression of marker genes for programmed cell death as found in other lesion mimic mutants.

  3. Comparison between liquid and solid acids catalysts on reducing sugars conversion from furfural residues via pretreatments.

    PubMed

    Lin, Keying; Ma, Baojun; Sun, Yuan; Liu, Wanyi

    2014-09-01

    Liquid sulphuric acid is adopted and compared with carbon-based sulfonated solid acids (coal tar-based and active carbon-based) for furfural residues conversion into reducing sugars. The optimum hydrolysis conditions of liquid acid are at 4% of sulphuric acid, 25:1 of liquid and solid ratio, 175°C of reaction temperature and 120 min of reaction time. The reducing sugar yields are reached over 60% on liquid acid via NaOH/H2O2, NaOH/microwave and NaOH/ultrasonic pretreatments, whereas only over 30% on solid acids. The TOFs (turnover number frequency) via NaOH/H2O2 pretreatments are 0.093, 0.020 and 0.023 h(-1) for liquid sulphuric acid, coal tar-based and active carbon-based solid acids catalysts, respectively. Considering the efficiency, cost and environment factors, the liquid and solid acids have their own advantages of potential commercial application values.

  4. The beta-1,4-endogalactanase A gene from Aspergillus niger is specifically induced on arabinose and galacturonic acid and plays an important role in the degradation of pectic hairy regions.

    PubMed

    De Vries, Ronald P; Parenicová, Lucie; Hinz, Sandra W A; Kester, Harry C M; Beldman, Gerrit; Benen, Jacques A E; Visser, Jaap

    2002-10-01

    The Aspergillus nigerbeta-1,4-endogalactanase encoding gene (galA) was cloned and characterized. The expression of galA in A. niger was only detected in the presence of sugar beet pectin, d-galacturonic acid and l-arabinose, suggesting that galA is coregulated with both the pectinolytic genes as well as the arabinanolytic genes. The corresponding enzyme, endogalactanase A (GALA), contains both active site residues identified previously for the Pseudomonas fluorescensbeta-1,4-endogalactanase. The galA gene was overexpressed to facilitate purification of GALA. The enzyme has a molecular mass of 48.5 kDa and a pH optimum between 4 and 4.5. Incubations of arabinogalactans of potato, onion and soy with GALA resulted initially in the release of d-galactotriose and d-galactotetraose, whereas prolonged incubation resulted in d-galactose and d-galactobiose, predominantly. MALDI-TOF analysis revealed the release of l-arabinose substituted d-galacto-oligosaccharides from soy arabinogalactan. This is the first report of the ability of a beta-1,4-endogalactanase to release substituted d-galacto-oligosaccharides. GALA was not active towards d-galacto-oligosaccharides that were substituted with d-glucose at the reducing end.

  5. A Pro to Gly mutation in the hinge of the arabinose-binding protein enhances binding and alters specificity. Sugar-binding and crystallographic studies.

    PubMed

    Vermersch, P S; Tesmer, J J; Lemon, D D; Quiocho, F A

    1990-09-25

    The L-arabinose-binding protein (ABP) of Escherichia coli consists structurally of two distinct globular domains connected by a hinge of three separate peptide segments. Arabinose is bound and completely sequestered within the deep cleft between the two domains. With reduced affinity, ABP also binds D-galactose (approximately 2-fold reduction) and D-fucose (approximately 40-fold reduction). Experiments have been conducted to explore the role in sugar binding of the hinge connecting the two domains of ABP. To increase the flexibility of the hinge region, a glycine was substituted for a proline at position 254 by site-directed mutagenesis. Unexpectedly, this mutation resulted in the dramatic enhancement of galactose binding over that of arabinose. The affinity of the mutant ABP for galactose increased by over 20-fold, while that for arabinose and fucose remained relatively unchanged. We have measured association and dissociation rates of the Gly-254 ABP with L-arabinose, D-galactose, and D-fucose and have determined the crystallographic structure of the protein complexed with each of the three sugars. Both the ligand-binding kinetic measurements and structure analysis indicate that the altered specificity is due to an effective increase in the rigidity of the hinge in the closed conformation which is induced upon galactose binding. Stabilizing contacts are formed between the strands of the hinge in the Gly-254 ABP when galactose is bound which are not found in complexes with the other sugars or the liganded wild-type protein.

  6. Biotechnological production of L-ribose from L-arabinose.

    PubMed

    Helanto, M; Kiviharju, K; Granström, T; Leisola, M; Nyyssölä, A

    2009-05-01

    L-Ribose is a rare and expensive sugar that can be used as a precursor for the production of L-nucleoside analogues, which are used as antiviral drugs. In this work, we describe a novel way of producing L-ribose from the readily available raw material L-arabinose. This was achieved by introducing L-ribose isomerase activity into L-ribulokinase-deficient Escherichia coli UP1110 and Lactobacillus plantarum BPT197 strains. The process for L-ribose production by resting cells was investigated. The initial L-ribose production rates at 39 degrees C and pH 8 were 0.46 +/- 0.01 g g(-1) h(-1) (1.84 +/- 0.03 g l(-1) h(-1)) and 0.27 +/- 0.01 g g(-1) h(-1) (1.91 +/- 0.1 g l(-1) h(-1)) for E. coli and for L. plantarum, respectively. Conversions were around 20% at their highest in the experiments. Also partially purified protein precipitates having both L-arabinose isomerase and L-ribose isomerase activity were successfully used for converting L-arabinose to L-ribose.

  7. Biofuels from crop residue can reduce soil carbon and increase CO2 emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liska, Adam J.; Yang, Haishun; Milner, Maribeth; Goddard, Steve; Blanco-Canqui, Humberto; Pelton, Matthew P.; Fang, Xiao X.; Zhu, Haitao; Suyker, Andrew E.

    2014-05-01

    Removal of corn residue for biofuels can decrease soil organic carbon (SOC; refs , ) and increase CO2 emissions because residue C in biofuels is oxidized to CO2 at a faster rate than when added to soil. Net CO2 emissions from residue removal are not adequately characterized in biofuel life cycle assessment (LCA; refs , , ). Here we used a model to estimate CO2 emissions from corn residue removal across the US Corn Belt at 580 million geospatial cells. To test the SOC model, we compared estimated daily CO2 emissions from corn residue and soil with CO2 emissions measured using eddy covariance, with 12% average error over nine years. The model estimated residue removal of 6 Mg per ha-1 yr-1 over five to ten years could decrease regional net SOC by an average of 0.47-0.66 Mg C ha-1 yr-1. These emissions add an average of 50-70 g CO2 per megajoule of biofuel (range 30-90) and are insensitive to the fraction of residue removed. Unless lost C is replaced, life cycle emissions will probably exceed the US legislative mandate of 60% reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions compared with gasoline.

  8. Characterization of a F280N variant of L-arabinose isomerase from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans identified as a D-galactose isomerase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Baek-Joong; Hong, Seung-Hye; Shin, Kyung-Chul; Jo, Ye-Seul; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2014-11-01

    The double-site variant (C450S-N475K) L-arabinose isomerase (L-AI) from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans catalyzes the isomerization of D-galactose to D-tagatose, a functional sweetener. Using a substrate-docking homology model, the residues near to D-galactose O6 were identified as Met186, Phe280, and Ile371. Several variants obtained by site-directed mutagenesis of these three residues were analyzed, and a triple-site (F280N) variant enzyme exhibited the highest activity for D-galactose isomerization. The k cat/K m of the triple-site variant enzyme for D-galactose was 2.1-fold higher than for L-arabinose, whereas the k cat/K m of the double-site variant enzyme for L-arabinose was 43.9-fold higher than for D-galactose. These results suggest that the triple-site variant enzyme is a D-galactose isomerase. The conversion rate of D-galactose to D-tagatose by the triple-site variant enzyme was approximately 3-fold higher than that of the double-site variant enzyme for 30 min. However, the conversion yields of L-arabinose to L-ribulose by the triple-site and double-site variant enzymes were 10.6 and 16.0 % after 20 min, respectively. The triple-site variant enzyme exhibited increased specific activity, turnover number, catalytic efficiency, and conversion rate for D-galactose isomerization compared to the double-site variant enzyme. Therefore, the amino acid at position 280 determines the substrate specificity for D-galactose and L-arabinose, and the triple-site variant enzyme has the potential to produce D-tagatose on an industrial scale.

  9. Microbial conversion of L-arabinose to xylitol by coexpression of L-arabinose isomerase, D-tagatose 3-epimerase, and L-xylulose reductase in Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A microbial strain has been developed that can produce xylitol from L-arabinose at a high yield by transforming Escherichia coli with a new xylitol biosynthetic pathway consisting of L-arabinose isomerase, D-tagatose 3-epimerase, and L-xylulose reductase. An E. coli strain that heterologously expre...

  10. Aluminum water treatment residuals as permeable reactive barrier sorbents to reduce phosphorus losses.

    PubMed

    Miller, Matthew L; Bhadha, Jehangir H; O'Connor, George A; Jawitz, James W; Mitchell, Jennifer

    2011-05-01

    Two aluminum water treatment residuals (Al-WTRs) from water treatment plants in Manatee County, FL and Punta Gorda, FL were evaluated as potential permeable reactive barrier (PRB) media to reduce groundwater phosphorus (P) losses. Short-term (<24h) P sorption kinetics and long-term P sorption capacity were determined using batch equilibration studies. Phosphorus desorption was characterized following P loadings of 10, 20, 30, 40 and >70 g kg(-1). Sorption and desorption studies were conducted on the <2.0mm material and three size fractions within the <2.0mm material. The effect of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on P retention was determined by reacting Al-WTRs with P-spiked groundwater samples of varying initial DOC concentrations. Phosphorus sorption kinetics were rapid for all size fractions of both Al-WTRs (>98% P sorption effectiveness at shaking times ≥2 h). The effect of DOC was minimal at <150 mg DOCL(-1), but modest reductions (<22%) in P sorption effectiveness occurred at 587 mg DOC L(-1). The P sorption capacities of the Manatee and Punta Gorda Al-WTRs (<2.0mm) are ∼44 g kg(-1) and >75 g kg(-1), respectively, and the lifespan of an Al-WTR PRB is likely many decades. Desorption was minimal (<2% of the P sorbed) for cumulative P loadings <40 g kg(-l), but increased (<9% of the P sorbed) at cumulative P loads >70 g kg(-1). The <2.0mm Manatee and Punta Gorda Al-WTRs are regarded as ideal PRB media for P remediation.

  11. Tight regulation, modulation, and high-level expression by vectors containing the arabinose PBAD promoter.

    PubMed

    Guzman, L M; Belin, D; Carson, M J; Beckwith, J

    1995-07-01

    We have constructed a series of plasmid vectors (pBAD vectors) containing the PBAD promoter of the araBAD (arabinose) operon and the gene encoding the positive and negative regulator of this promoter, araC. Using the phoA gene and phoA fusions to monitor expression in these vectors, we show that the ratio of induction/repression can be 1,200-fold, compared with 50-fold for PTAC-based vectors. phoA expression can be modulated over a wide range of inducer (arabinose) concentrations and reduced to extremely low levels by the presence of glucose, which represses expression. Also, the kinetics of induction and repression are very rapid and significantly affected by the ara allele in the host strain. Thus, the use of this system which can be efficiently and rapidly turned on and off allows the study of important aspects of bacterial physiology in a very simple manner and without changes of temperature. We have exploited the tight regulation of the PBAD promoter to study the phenotypes of null mutations of essential genes and explored the use of pBAD vectors as an expression system.

  12. Homologous Alkalophilic and Acidophilic L-Arabinose isomerases reveal region-specific contributions to the pH dependence of activity and stability.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Jae; Lee, Sang Jun; Lee, Yong-Jik; Kim, Seong-Bo; Kim, Sung-Kun; Lee, Dong-Woo

    2012-12-01

    To study the pH dependence of l-arabinose isomerase (AI) activity and stability, we compared homologous AIs with their chimeras. This study demonstrated that an ionizable amino acid near the catalytic site determines the optimal pH (pH(opt)) for activity, whereas the N-terminal surface R residues play an important role in determining the pH(opt) for stability.

  13. Mathematical modeling of the low and high affinity arabinose transport systems in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Necmettin

    2012-04-01

    A mathematical model was developed for the low and high affinity arabinose transport systems in E. coli. The model is a system of three ordinary differential equations and takes the dynamics of mRNAs for the araE and araFGH proteins and the internal arabinose into account. Special attention was paid to estimate the model parameters from the literature. Our analysis and simulations suggest that the high affinity transport system helps the low affinity transport system to respond to high concentration of extracellular arabinose faster, whereas the high affinity transport system responds to a small amount of extracellular arabinose. Steady state analysis of the model also predicts that there is a regime for the extracellular concentration of arabinose where the arabinose system can show bistable behavior.

  14. Single cell kinetics of phenotypic switching in the arabinose utilization system of E. coli.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Georg; Megerle, Judith A; Westermayer, Sonja A; Brick, Delia; Heermann, Ralf; Jung, Kirsten; Rädler, Joachim O; Gerland, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Inducible switching between phenotypes is a common strategy of bacteria to adapt to fluctuating environments. Here, we analyze the switching kinetics of a paradigmatic inducible system, the arabinose utilization system in E. coli. Using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of microcolonies in a microfluidic chamber, which permits sudden up- and down-shifts in the inducer arabinose, we characterize the single-cell gene expression dynamics of the araBAD operon responsible for arabinose degradation. While there is significant, inducer-dependent cell-to-cell variation in the timing of the on-switching, the off-switching triggered by sudden removal of arabinose is homogeneous and rapid. We find that rapid off-switching does not depend on internal arabinose degradation. Because the system is regulated via the internal arabinose level sensed by AraC, internal arabinose must be rapidly depleted by leakage or export from the cell, or by degradation via a non-canonical pathway. We explored whether the poorly characterized membrane protein AraJ, which is part of the arabinose regulon and has been annotated as a possible arabinose efflux protein, is responsible for rapid depletion. However, we find that AraJ is not essential for rapid switching to the off-state. We develop a mathematical model for the arabinose system, which quantitatively describes both the heterogeneous on-switching and the homogeneous off-switching. The model also predicts that mutations which disrupt the positive feedback of internal arabinose on the production of arabinose uptake proteins change the heterogeneous on-switching behavior into a homogeneous, graded response. We construct such a mutant and confirm the graded response experimentally. Taken together, our results indicate that the physiological switching behavior of this sugar utilization system is asymmetric, such that off-switching is always rapid and homogeneous, while on-switching is slow and heterogeneously timed at sub-saturating inducer

  15. USING REDUCING AGENTS TO ELIMINATE CHLORINE DIOXIDE AND CHLORITE ION RESIDUALS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    In an effort to determine the viability of various disinfection alternatives, the Evansville, Ind. Water and Sewer Utility is engaged in a pilot-plant investigation to compare chlorine dioxide and ozone pretreatment. As a result of increased speculation that the total residual c...

  16. Crop residue management to reduce erosion and improve soil quality: Northern Great plains. Conservation research report

    SciTech Connect

    Moldenhauer, W.C.; Black, A.L.

    1994-09-01

    This publication summarizes research and experience that show the potential benefits and problems related to decreasing tillage and leaving more residues on the soil surface. Experts discuss the equipment, management practices, crop protection chemicals, crop rotations, cover crops, and cropping systems that will enable farmers to control erosion on their lands-so they are in Federal conservation compliance-while simultaneously optimizing their net returns and improving the environment and natural resources.

  17. Efficiency of light-emitting diode and halogen units in reducing residual monomers

    PubMed Central

    de Assis Ribeiro Carvalho, Felipe; Almeida, Rhita C.; Almeida, Marco Antonio; Cevidanes, Lucia H. S.; Leite, Marcia C. Amorim M.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction In this in-vitro study, we aimed to compare the residual monomers in composites beneath brackets bonded to enamel, using a light-emitting diode (LED) or a halogen unit, and to compare the residual monomers in the central to the peripheral areas of the composite. Methods Twenty bovine teeth preserved in 0.1% thymol were used in this study. Ten teeth were used to standardize the thickness of the composite film, since different thicknesses would cause different absorbance of light. Brackets were bonded to 10 bovine incisors, with the halogen light (n = 5) and the LED (n = 5). The brackets were debonded, and the remaining composite on the enamel surface was sectioned in 2 regions: peripheral (0.8 mm) and central, resulting in 2 subgroups per group: central halogen (n = 5), peripheral halogen (n = 5), central LED (n = 5), and peripheral LED (n = 5). The spectrometric analysis in the infrared region was used to measure the free monomers with the attenuated total reflectance method. Results Normal distribution was tested by using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Data were compared by 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) at P <0.05. The LED group showed fewer residual monomers than did the halogen group (P = 0.014). No differences were found among the regions (P = 0.354), and there were no interactions between light type and region (P = 0.368). Conclusions LED leaves less residual monomer than does the halogen light, even with half of the irradiation time; there were no differences between the central and peripheral regions, and no interaction between light type and region. PMID:21055603

  18. Metabolism of d-Arabinose: a New Pathway in Escherichia coli1

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Donald J.; Mortlock, Robert P.

    1971-01-01

    Several growth characteristics of Escherichia coli K-12 suggest that growth on l-fucose results in the synthesis of all the enzymes necessary for growth on d-arabinose. Conversely, when a mutant of E. coli is grown on d-arabinose, all of the enzymes necessary for immediate growth on l-fucose are present. Three enzymes of the l-fucose pathway in E. coli, l-fucose isomerase, l-fuculokinase, and l-fuculose-l-phospháte aldolase possess activity on d-arabinose, d-ribulose, and d-ribulose-l-phosphate, respectively. The products of the aldolase, with d-ribulose-l-phosphate as substrate, are dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glycolaldehyde. l-Fucose, but not d-arabinose, is capable of inducing these activities in wild-type E. coli. In mutants capable of utilizing d-arabinose as sole source of carbon and energy, these activities are induced in the presence of d-arabinose and in the presence of l-fucose. Mutants unable to utilize l-fucose, selected from strains capable of growth on d-arabinose, are found to have lost the ability to grow on d-arabinose. Enzymatic analysis of cell-free extracts, prepared from cultures of these mutants, reveals that a deficiency in any of the l-fucose pathway enzymes results in the loss of ability to utilize d-arabinose. Thus, the pathway of d-arabinose catabolism in E. coli K-12 is believed to be: d-arabinose ⇌ d-ribulose → d-ribulose-l-phosphate ⇌ dihydroxyacetone phosphate plus glycolaldehyde. Evidence is presented which suggests that the glycolaldehyde is further oxidized to glycolate. PMID:4928018

  19. Epistatic Interactions in the Arabinose Cis-Regulatory Element.

    PubMed

    Lagator, Mato; Igler, Claudia; Moreno, Anaísa B; Guet, Călin C; Bollback, Jonathan P

    2016-03-01

    Changes in gene expression are an important mode of evolution; however, the proximate mechanism of these changes is poorly understood. In particular, little is known about the effects of mutations within cis binding sites for transcription factors, or the nature of epistatic interactions between these mutations. Here, we tested the effects of single and double mutants in two cis binding sites involved in the transcriptional regulation of the Escherichia coli araBAD operon, a component of arabinose metabolism, using a synthetic system. This system decouples transcriptional control from any posttranslational effects on fitness, allowing a precise estimate of the effect of single and double mutations, and hence epistasis, on gene expression. We found that epistatic interactions between mutations in the araBAD cis-regulatory element are common, and that the predominant form of epistasis is negative. The magnitude of the interactions depended on whether the mutations are located in the same or in different operator sites. Importantly, these epistatic interactions were dependent on the presence of arabinose, a native inducer of the araBAD operon in vivo, with some interactions changing in sign (e.g., from negative to positive) in its presence. This study thus reveals that mutations in even relatively simple cis-regulatory elements interact in complex ways such that selection on the level of gene expression in one environment might perturb regulation in the other environment in an unpredictable and uncorrelated manner.

  20. Improved starch recovery from potatoes by enzymes and reduced water holding of the residual fibres.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, Urmila R; Lips, Steef; Bakker, Rob; Gruppen, Harry; Kabel, Mirjam A

    2014-11-26

    During the industrial extraction of starch from potatoes (Seresta), some starch remains within undisrupted potato cells in the fibrous side-stream. The aim of this study was to investigate if enzymatic degradation of cell wall polysaccharides (CWPs) can enhance starch recovery and lower the water holding capacity (WHC) of the "fibre" fraction. The use of a pectinase-rich preparation recovered 58% of the starch present in the "fibre" fraction. Also, the "fibre" fraction retained only 40% of the water present in the non-enzyme treated "fibre". This was caused by the degradation of pectins, in particular arabinogalactan side chains calculated as the sum of galactosyl and arabinosyl residues. PMID:25256483

  1. L-ribose production from L-arabinose by using purified L-arabinose isomerase and mannose-6-phosphate isomerase from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Soo-Jin; Kim, Nam-Hee; Park, Chang-Su; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2009-11-01

    Two enzymes, L-arabinose isomerase and mannose-6-phosphate isomerase, from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans produced 118 g/liter L-ribose from 500 g/liter L-arabinose at pH 7.0, 70 degrees C, and 1 mM Co(2+) for 3 h, with a conversion yield of 23.6% and a volumetric productivity of 39.3 g liter(-1) h(-1).

  2. Engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for efficient anaerobic alcoholic fermentation of L-arabinose.

    PubMed

    Wisselink, H Wouter; Toirkens, Maurice J; del Rosario Franco Berriel, M; Winkler, Aaron A; van Dijken, Johannes P; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2007-08-01

    For cost-effective and efficient ethanol production from lignocellulosic fractions of plant biomass, the conversion of not only major constituents, such as glucose and xylose, but also less predominant sugars, such as l-arabinose, is required. Wild-type strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the organism used in industrial ethanol production, cannot ferment xylose and arabinose. Although metabolic and evolutionary engineering has enabled the efficient alcoholic fermentation of xylose under anaerobic conditions, the conversion of l-arabinose into ethanol by engineered S. cerevisiae strains has previously been demonstrated only under oxygen-limited conditions. This study reports the first case of fast and efficient anaerobic alcoholic fermentation of l-arabinose by an engineered S. cerevisiae strain. This fermentation was achieved by combining the expression of the structural genes for the l-arabinose utilization pathway of Lactobacillus plantarum, the overexpression of the S. cerevisiae genes encoding the enzymes of the nonoxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and extensive evolutionary engineering. The resulting S. cerevisiae strain exhibited high rates of arabinose consumption (0.70 g h(-1) g [dry weight](-1)) and ethanol production (0.29 g h(-1) g [dry weight](-1)) and a high ethanol yield (0.43 g g(-1)) during anaerobic growth on l-arabinose as the sole carbon source. In addition, efficient ethanol production from sugar mixtures containing glucose and arabinose, which is crucial for application in industrial ethanol production, was achieved.

  3. Supramolecular stabilization of acid tolerant L-arabinose isomerase from Lactobacillus sakei.

    PubMed

    Jebors, Said; Tauran, Yannick; Aghajari, Nushin; Boudebbouze, Samira; Maguin, Emmanuelle; Haser, Richard; Coleman, Anthony W; Rhimi, Moez

    2011-12-01

    L-Arabinose isomerase stability is a crucial criterion for the industrial application of this biocatalyst. Noria and NoriaPG are capable of increasing the L-arabinose isomerase stability not only at high temperatures but also at low pH. Such results highlight, for the first time, the use of the Noria series of molecules for protein stabilization and activation.

  4. A KS-type dehydrin and its related domains reduce Cu-promoted radical generation and the histidine residues contribute to the radical-reducing activities

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Masakazu

    2013-01-01

    Dehydrin is a plant disordered protein whose functions are not yet totally understood. Here it is reported that a KS-type dehydrin can reduce the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from Cu. AtHIRD11, which is the Arabidopsis KS-type dehydrin, inhibited generation of hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals in the Cu–ascorbate system. The radical-reducing activity of AtHIRD11 was stronger than those of radical-silencing peptides such as glutathione and serum albumin. The addition of Cu2+ reduced the disordered state, decreased the trypsin susceptibility, and promoted the self-association of AtHIRD11. Domain analyses indicated that the five domains containing histidine showed ROS-reducing activities. Histidine/alanine substitutions indicated that histidine is a crucial residue for reducing ROS generation. Using the 27 peptides which are related to the KnS-type dehydrins of 14 plant species, it was found that the strengths of ROS-reducing activities can be determined by two factors, namely the histidine contents and the length of the peptides. The degree of ROS-reducing activities of a dehydrin can be predicted using these indices. PMID:23382551

  5. Reducing soluble phosphorus in dairy effluents through application of mine drainage residuals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sibrell, Philip L.; Penn, Chad J.; Hedin, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    Three different dairy manure wastewater effluent samples were amended with mine drainage residuals (MDR) to evaluate the suitability of MDR for sequestration of phosphorus (P). Geochemical modeling of the manure wastewater compositions indicated that partially soluble P-bearing minerals including hydroxyapatite, octacalcium phosphate, and vivianite were all oversaturated in each of the manure wastewater samples. Initial MDR amendment test results indicated that these partially soluble P minerals suspended in the wastewater replenished P in the water phase as it was sorbed by the MDR samples. Further investigations revealed that the MDR samples were effective in decreasing soluble P when the amended manure was tested using the water-extractable P procedure. Under these conditions, up to 90 percent of the soluble P in the manure was converted to a sorbed, water-insoluble state. Water contamination and large-scale validation tests of the process were also conducted.

  6. Thermal-hydraulic processes involved in loss of residual heat removal during reduced inventory operation

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, C.D.; McHugh, P.R.; Naff, S.A.; Johnsen, G.W.

    1991-02-01

    This paper identifies the topics needed to understand pressurized water reactor response to an extended loss of residual heat removal event during refueling and maintenance outages. By identifying the possible plant conditions and cooling methods that would be used for each cooling mode, the controlling thermal-hydraulic processes and phenomena were identified. Controlling processes and phenomena include: gravity drain, core water boil-off, and reflux cooling processes. Important subcategories of the reflux cooling processes include: the initiation of reflux cooling from various plant conditions, the effects of air on reflux cooling, core level depression effects, issues regarding the steam generator secondaries, and the special case of boiler-condenser cooling with once-through steam generators. 25 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Galacturonic Acid Inhibits the Growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on Galactose, Xylose, and Arabinose

    PubMed Central

    Huisjes, Eline H.; de Hulster, Erik; van Dam, Jan C.; Pronk, Jack T.

    2012-01-01

    The efficient fermentation of mixed substrates is essential for the microbial conversion of second-generation feedstocks, including pectin-rich waste streams such as citrus peel and sugar beet pulp. Galacturonic acid is a major constituent of hydrolysates of these pectin-rich materials. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the main producer of bioethanol, cannot use this sugar acid. The impact of galacturonic acid on alcoholic fermentation by S. cerevisiae was investigated with anaerobic batch cultures grown on mixtures of glucose and galactose at various galacturonic acid concentrations and on a mixture of glucose, xylose, and arabinose. In cultures grown at pH 5.0, which is well above the pKa value of galacturonic acid (3.51), the addition of 10 g · liter−1 galacturonic acid did not affect galactose fermentation kinetics and growth. In cultures grown at pH 3.5, the addition of 10 g · liter−1 galacturonic acid did not significantly affect glucose consumption. However, at this lower pH, galacturonic acid completely inhibited growth on galactose and reduced galactose consumption rates by 87%. Additionally, it was shown that galacturonic acid strongly inhibits the fermentation of xylose and arabinose by the engineered pentose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strain IMS0010. The data indicate that inhibition occurs when nondissociated galacturonic acid is present extracellularly and corroborate the hypothesis that a combination of a decreased substrate uptake rate due to competitive inhibition on Gal2p, an increased energy requirement to maintain cellular homeostasis, and/or an accumulation of galacturonic acid 1-phosphate contributes to the inhibition. The role of galacturonic acid as an inhibitor of sugar fermentation should be considered in the design of yeast fermentation processes based on pectin-rich feedstocks. PMID:22582063

  8. Galacturonic acid inhibits the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on galactose, xylose, and arabinose.

    PubMed

    Huisjes, Eline H; de Hulster, Erik; van Dam, Jan C; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2012-08-01

    The efficient fermentation of mixed substrates is essential for the microbial conversion of second-generation feedstocks, including pectin-rich waste streams such as citrus peel and sugar beet pulp. Galacturonic acid is a major constituent of hydrolysates of these pectin-rich materials. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the main producer of bioethanol, cannot use this sugar acid. The impact of galacturonic acid on alcoholic fermentation by S. cerevisiae was investigated with anaerobic batch cultures grown on mixtures of glucose and galactose at various galacturonic acid concentrations and on a mixture of glucose, xylose, and arabinose. In cultures grown at pH 5.0, which is well above the pK(a) value of galacturonic acid (3.51), the addition of 10 g · liter(-1) galacturonic acid did not affect galactose fermentation kinetics and growth. In cultures grown at pH 3.5, the addition of 10 g · liter(-1) galacturonic acid did not significantly affect glucose consumption. However, at this lower pH, galacturonic acid completely inhibited growth on galactose and reduced galactose consumption rates by 87%. Additionally, it was shown that galacturonic acid strongly inhibits the fermentation of xylose and arabinose by the engineered pentose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strain IMS0010. The data indicate that inhibition occurs when nondissociated galacturonic acid is present extracellularly and corroborate the hypothesis that a combination of a decreased substrate uptake rate due to competitive inhibition on Gal2p, an increased energy requirement to maintain cellular homeostasis, and/or an accumulation of galacturonic acid 1-phosphate contributes to the inhibition. The role of galacturonic acid as an inhibitor of sugar fermentation should be considered in the design of yeast fermentation processes based on pectin-rich feedstocks. PMID:22582063

  9. Galacturonic acid inhibits the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on galactose, xylose, and arabinose.

    PubMed

    Huisjes, Eline H; de Hulster, Erik; van Dam, Jan C; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2012-08-01

    The efficient fermentation of mixed substrates is essential for the microbial conversion of second-generation feedstocks, including pectin-rich waste streams such as citrus peel and sugar beet pulp. Galacturonic acid is a major constituent of hydrolysates of these pectin-rich materials. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the main producer of bioethanol, cannot use this sugar acid. The impact of galacturonic acid on alcoholic fermentation by S. cerevisiae was investigated with anaerobic batch cultures grown on mixtures of glucose and galactose at various galacturonic acid concentrations and on a mixture of glucose, xylose, and arabinose. In cultures grown at pH 5.0, which is well above the pK(a) value of galacturonic acid (3.51), the addition of 10 g · liter(-1) galacturonic acid did not affect galactose fermentation kinetics and growth. In cultures grown at pH 3.5, the addition of 10 g · liter(-1) galacturonic acid did not significantly affect glucose consumption. However, at this lower pH, galacturonic acid completely inhibited growth on galactose and reduced galactose consumption rates by 87%. Additionally, it was shown that galacturonic acid strongly inhibits the fermentation of xylose and arabinose by the engineered pentose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strain IMS0010. The data indicate that inhibition occurs when nondissociated galacturonic acid is present extracellularly and corroborate the hypothesis that a combination of a decreased substrate uptake rate due to competitive inhibition on Gal2p, an increased energy requirement to maintain cellular homeostasis, and/or an accumulation of galacturonic acid 1-phosphate contributes to the inhibition. The role of galacturonic acid as an inhibitor of sugar fermentation should be considered in the design of yeast fermentation processes based on pectin-rich feedstocks.

  10. Reducing residual risk: modern pharmacochemistry meets old-fashioned lifestyle and adherence improvement.

    PubMed

    Kones, Richard

    2013-06-01

    Despite remarkable advances in identifying and managing coronary heart disease, the global burden of cardiovascular (CV) risk and levels of undetected, subclinical heart disease remain enormous. Substantial numbers of patients do not reach their therapeutic goals, others are unable to tolerate the treatments, half may fail to adhere to their programs, and in those who do attain their targets, major cardiovascular events may continue. Well-known risk factors, such as obesity and diabetes, have now gained the upper hand, with no evidence-based remedy capable of reversing this trend. All told, less than 1% of American adults and adolescents qualify for ideal CV health; world-wide, the growing prevalence of CV risk factors in children is imposing. A number of novel emerging drug therapies are in development, some recently approved for use in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia. Hopefully, they will contribute significantly to the current therapeutic armamentarium. However, for meaningful improvement in total and residual CV risk, an optimal mix of all available modalities will likely be necessary, including earlier and more effective prevention, aggressive medical care, revascularization and device implantation, judicious use of novel agents, and reengineering of the environment. PMID:23389677

  11. Biosynthesis of d-arabinose in Mycobacterium smegmatis: specific labeling from d-glucose.

    PubMed

    Klutts, J Stacey; Hatanaka, Kenichi; Pan, Y T; Elbein, Alan D

    2002-02-15

    d-Arabinose is a major sugar in the cell wall polysaccharides of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other mycobacterial species. The reactions involved in the biosynthesis and activation of d-arabinose represent excellent potential sites for drug intervention since d-arabinose is not found in mammalian cells, and the cell wall arabinomannan and/or arabinogalactan appear to be essential for cell survival. Since the pathway involved in conversion of d-glucose to d-arabinose is unknown, we incubated cells of Mycobacterium smegmatis individually with [1-(14)C]glucose, [3,4-(14)C]glucose, and [6-(14)C]glucose and compared the specific activities of the cell wall-bound arabinose. Although the specific activity of the arabinose was about 25% lower with [6-(14)C]glucose than with other labels, there did not appear to be selective loss of either carbon 1 or carbon 6, suggesting that arabinose was not formed by loss of carbon 1 of glucose via the oxidative step of the pentose phosphate pathway, or by loss of carbon 6 in the uronic acid pathway. Similar labeling patterns were observed with ribose isolated from the nucleic acid fraction. Since these results suggested an unusual pathway of pentose formation, labeling studies were also done with [1-(13)C]glucose, [2-(13)C]glucose, and [6-(13)C]glucose and the cell wall arabinose was examined by NMR analysis. This method allows one to determine the relative (13)C content in each carbon of the arabinose. The labeling patterns suggested that the most likely pathway was condensation of carbons 1 and 2 of fructose 6-phosphate produced by the transaldolase reaction with carbons 4, 5, and 6 (i.e., glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate) formed by fructose-1,6 bisphosphate aldolase. Cell-free enzyme extracts of M. smegmatis were incubated with ribose 5-phosphate, xylulose 5-phosphate, and d-arabinose 5-phosphate under a variety of experimental conditions. Although the ribose 5-phosphate and xylulose 5-phosphate were converted to other pentoses and

  12. l-Arabinose Binding Protein from Escherichia coli B/r

    PubMed Central

    Hogg, R. W.; Englesberg, E.

    1969-01-01

    A protein which is capable of binding l-arabinose-1-14C has been isolated from l-arabinose-induced cultures of Escherichia coli B/r. Analysis for this l-arabinose-binding protein (ABP) in a number of l-arabinose-negative mutants suggests that the ABP is not coded for by any of the known genetic units of the l-arabinose complex yet is under the control of the regulator gene araC. The ABP has been purified and found to bind l-arabinose, d-fucose, d-xylose, and l-ribulose with decreasing affinities. The Km for l-arabinose is 5.7 × 10−6m. The molecular weight, as determined by equilibrium centrifugation, was found to be 32,000. The protein was observed to have many features that liken it to other recently isolated binding proteins that have been implicated in the active transport of small molecules. Images PMID:4899002

  13. Utilization and Transport of L-Arabinose by Non-Saccharomyces Yeasts

    SciTech Connect

    Knoshaug, E. P.; Franden, M. A.; Stambuk, B. U.; Zhang, M.; Singh, A.

    2009-01-01

    L-Arabinose is one of the sugars found in hemicellulose, a major component of plant cell walls. The ability to convert L-arabinose to ethanol would improve the economics of biomass to ethanol fermentations. One of the limitations for L-arabinose fermentation in the current engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains is poor transport of the sugar. To better understand L-arabinose transport and use in yeasts and to identify a source for efficient L-arabinose transporters, 165 non-Saccharomyces yeast strains were studied. These yeast strains were arranged into six groups based on the minimum time required to utilize 20 g/L of L-arabinose. Initial transport rates of L-arabinose were determined for several species and a more comprehensive transport study was done in four selected species. Detailed transport kinetics in Arxula adeninivorans suggested both low and high affinity components while Debaryomyces hansenii var. fabryii, Kluyveromyces marxianus and Pichia guilliermondii possessed a single component, high affinity active transport systems.

  14. Improved xylose and arabinose utilization by an industrial recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain using evolutionary engineering

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cost-effective fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolysate to ethanol by Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires efficient mixed sugar utilization. Notably, the rate and yield of xylose and arabinose co-fermentation to ethanol must be enhanced. Results Evolutionary engineering was used to improve the simultaneous conversion of xylose and arabinose to ethanol in a recombinant industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain carrying the heterologous genes for xylose and arabinose utilization pathways integrated in the genome. The evolved strain TMB3130 displayed an increased consumption rate of xylose and arabinose under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Improved anaerobic ethanol production was achieved at the expense of xylitol and glycerol but arabinose was almost stoichiometrically converted to arabitol. Further characterization of the strain indicated that the selection pressure during prolonged continuous culture in xylose and arabinose medium resulted in the improved transport of xylose and arabinose as well as increased levels of the enzymes from the introduced fungal xylose pathway. No mutation was found in any of the genes from the pentose converting pathways. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that characterizes the molecular mechanisms for improved mixed-pentose utilization obtained by evolutionary engineering of a recombinant S. cerevisiae strain. Increased transport of pentoses and increased activities of xylose converting enzymes contributed to the improved phenotype. PMID:20550651

  15. Engineering L-arabinose metabolism in triacylglycerol-producing Rhodococcus opacus for lignocellulosic fuel production.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Kazuhiko; Plassmeier, Jens; Kalinowski, Jörn; Rückert, Christian; Sinskey, Anthony J

    2015-07-01

    Advanced biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass have been considered as a potential solution for the issues of energy sustainability and environmental protection. Triacylglycerols (TAGs) are potential precursors for the production of lipid-based liquid biofuels. Rhodococcus opacus PD630 can accumulate large amounts of TAGs when grown under physiological conditions of high carbon and low nitrogen. However, R. opacus PD630 does not utilize the sugar L-arabinose present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates. Here, we report the engineering of R. opacus to produce TAGs on L-arabinose. We constructed a plasmid (pASC8057) harboring araB, araD and araA genes derived from a Streptomyces bacterium, and introduced the genes into R. opacus PD630. One of the engineered strains, MITAE-348, was capable of growing on high concentrations (up to 100 g/L) of L-arabinose. MITAE-348 was grown in a defined medium containing 16 g/L L-arabinose or a mixture of 8 g/L L-arabinose and 8 g/L D-glucose. In a stationary phase occurring 3 days post-inoculation, the strain was able to completely utilize the sugar, and yielded 2.0 g/L for L-arabinose and 2.2 g/L for L-arabinose/D-glucose of TAGs, corresponding to 39.7% or 42.0%, respectively, of the cell dry weight. PMID:25936337

  16. Engineering L-arabinose metabolism in triacylglycerol-producing Rhodococcus opacus for lignocellulosic fuel production.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Kazuhiko; Plassmeier, Jens; Kalinowski, Jörn; Rückert, Christian; Sinskey, Anthony J

    2015-07-01

    Advanced biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass have been considered as a potential solution for the issues of energy sustainability and environmental protection. Triacylglycerols (TAGs) are potential precursors for the production of lipid-based liquid biofuels. Rhodococcus opacus PD630 can accumulate large amounts of TAGs when grown under physiological conditions of high carbon and low nitrogen. However, R. opacus PD630 does not utilize the sugar L-arabinose present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates. Here, we report the engineering of R. opacus to produce TAGs on L-arabinose. We constructed a plasmid (pASC8057) harboring araB, araD and araA genes derived from a Streptomyces bacterium, and introduced the genes into R. opacus PD630. One of the engineered strains, MITAE-348, was capable of growing on high concentrations (up to 100 g/L) of L-arabinose. MITAE-348 was grown in a defined medium containing 16 g/L L-arabinose or a mixture of 8 g/L L-arabinose and 8 g/L D-glucose. In a stationary phase occurring 3 days post-inoculation, the strain was able to completely utilize the sugar, and yielded 2.0 g/L for L-arabinose and 2.2 g/L for L-arabinose/D-glucose of TAGs, corresponding to 39.7% or 42.0%, respectively, of the cell dry weight.

  17. Kinetic, structural and molecular docking studies on the inhibition of tyrosinase induced by arabinose.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei-Jiang; Yan, Li; Park, Daeui; Jeong, Hyoung Oh; Chung, Hae Young; Yang, Jun-Mo; Ye, Zhuo Ming; Qian, Guo-Ying

    2012-04-01

    Tyrosinase plays a central role in biological pigment formation, and hence knowledge of tyrosinase catalytic mechanisms and regulation may have medical, cosmetic, and agricultural applications. We found in this study that arabinose significantly inhibited tyrosinase, and this was accompanied by conformational changes in enzyme structure. Kinetic analysis showed that arabinose-mediated inactivation followed first-order kinetics, and single and multiple classes of rate constants were measured. Arabinose displayed a mixed-type inhibitory mechanism with K(i)=0.22±0.07 mM. Measurements of intrinsic and ANS-binding fluorescence showed that arabinose induced tyrosinase to unfold and expose inner hydrophobic regions. We simulated the docking between tyrosinase and arabinose (binding energies were -26.28 kcal/mol for Dock6.3 and -2.02 kcal/mol for AutoDock4.2) and results suggested that arabinose interacts mostly with His61, Asn260, and Met280. The present strategy of predicting tyrosinase inhibition by simulation of docking by hydroxyl groups may prove useful in screening for potential tyrosinase inhibitors, as shown here for arabinose.

  18. Engineering of an L-arabinose metabolic pathway in Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiaochao; Wang, Xi; Chen, Shulin

    2016-07-01

    The oleaginous bacterium, Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 has attracted considerable attention due to its capability to accumulate significant levels of triacylglycerol as renewable hydrocarbon. To enable the strain to utilize arabinose derived from lignocellulosic biomass, the metabolic pathway of L-arabinose utilization was introduced into R. jostii RHA1 by heterogenous expression of the operon, araBAD from Escherichia coli. The results showed that recombinant bearing araBAD could grow on L-arabinose as the sole carbon source, and additional expression of araFGH encoding the arabinose transporter from E. coli could improve the cell biomass yield from high contents of arabinose. We further increased the content of lipid produced from arabinose in the recombinants from 47.9 to 56.8 % of the cell dry weight (CDW) by overexpression of a gene, atf1 encoding a diglyceride acyltransferase from R. opacus PD630. This work demonstrated the feasibility of producing lipid from arabinose by genetic modification of the rhodococci strain.

  19. Polyacrylamide application versus forest residue mulching for reducing post-fire runoff and soil erosion.

    PubMed

    Prats, Sergio Alegre; Martins, Martinho António Dos Santos; Malvar, Maruxa Cortizo; Ben-Hur, Meni; Keizer, Jan Jacob

    2014-01-15

    For several years now, forest fires have been known to increase overland flow and soil erosion. However, mitigation of these effects has been little studied, especially outside the USA. This study aimed to quantify the effectiveness of two so-called emergency treatments to reduce post-fire runoff and soil losses at the microplot scale in a eucalyptus plantation in north-central Portugal. The treatments involved the application of chopped eucalyptus bark mulch at a rate of 10-12 Mg ha(-1), and surface application of a dry, granular, anionic polyacrylamide (PAM) at a rate of 50 kg ha(-1). During the first year after a wildfire in 2010, 1419 mm of rainfall produced, on average, 785 mm of overland flow in the untreated plots and 8.4 Mg ha(-1) of soil losses. Mulching reduced these two figures significantly, by an average 52 and 93%, respectively. In contrast, the PAM-treated plots did not differ from the control plots, despite slightly lower runoff but higher soil erosion figures. When compared to the control plots, mean key factors for runoff and soil erosion were different in the case of the mulched but not the PAM plots. Notably, the plots on the lower half of the slope registered bigger runoff and erosion figures than those on the upper half of the slope. This could be explained by differences in fire intensity and, ultimately, in pre-fire standing biomass.

  20. Air-drying beds reduce the quantities of antibiotic resistance genes and class 1 integrons in residual municipal wastewater solids.

    PubMed

    Burch, Tucker R; Sadowsky, Michael J; LaPara, Timothy M

    2013-09-01

    This study investigated whether air-drying beds reduce antibiotic resistance gene (ARG) concentrations in residual municipal wastewater solids. Three laboratory-scale drying beds were operated for a period of nearly 100 days. Real-time PCR was used to quantify 16S rRNA genes, 16S rRNA genes specific to fecal bacteria (AllBac) and human fecal bacteria (HF183), the integrase gene of class 1 integrons (intI1), and five ARGs representing a cross-section of antibiotic classes and resistance mechanisms (erm(B), sul1, tet(A), tet(W), and tet(X)). Air-drying beds were capable of reducing all gene target concentrations by 1 to 5 orders of magnitude, and the nature of this reduction was consistent with both a net decrease in the number of bacterial cells and a lack of selection within the microbial community. Half-lives varied between 1.5 d (HF183) and 5.4 d (tet(X)) during the first 20 d of treatment. After the first 20 d of treatment, however, half-lives varied between 8.6 d (tet(X)) and 19.3 d (AllBac), and 16S rRNA gene, intI1, and sul1 concentrations did not change (P > 0.05). These results demonstrate that air-drying beds can reduce ARG and intI1 concentrations in residual municipal wastewater solids within timeframes typical of operating practices.

  1. Reducing the impurity incorporation from residual gas by ion bombardment during high vacuum magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, Johanna; Widenkvist, Erika; Larsson, Karin; Kreissig, Ulrich; Mraz, Stanislav; Martinez, Carlos; Music, Denis; Schneider, J. M.

    2006-05-08

    The influence of ion energy on the hydrogen incorporation has been investigated for alumina thin films, deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering in an Ar/O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O environment. Ar{sup +} with an average kinetic energy of {approx}5 eV was determined to be the dominating species in the plasma. The films were analyzed with x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and elastic recoil detection analysis, demonstrating evidence for amorphous films with stoichiometric O/Al ratio. As the substrate bias potential was increased from -15 V (floating potential) to -100 V, the hydrogen content decreased by {approx}70%, from 9.1 to 2.8 at. %. Based on ab initio calculations, these results may be understood by thermodynamic principles, where a supply of energy enables surface diffusion, H{sub 2} formation, and desorption [Rosen et al., J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 17, L137 (2005)]. These findings are of importance for the understanding of the correlation between ion energy and film composition and also show a pathway to reduce impurity incorporation during film growth in a high vacuum ambient.

  2. L-arabinose/D-galactose 1-dehydrogenase of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii characterised and applied for bioconversion of L-arabinose to L-arabonate with Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Aro-Kärkkäinen, Niina; Toivari, Mervi; Maaheimo, Hannu; Ylilauri, Mikko; Pentikäinen, Olli T; Andberg, Martina; Oja, Merja; Penttilä, Merja; Wiebe, Marilyn G; Ruohonen, Laura; Koivula, Anu

    2014-12-01

    Four potential dehydrogenases identified through literature and bioinformatic searches were tested for L-arabonate production from L-arabinose in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The most efficient enzyme, annotated as a D-galactose 1-dehydrogenase from the pea root nodule bacterium Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii, was purified from S. cerevisiae as a homodimeric protein and characterised. We named the enzyme as a L-arabinose/D-galactose 1-dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.-), Rl AraDH. It belongs to the Gfo/Idh/MocA protein family, prefers NADP(+) but uses also NAD(+) as a cofactor, and showed highest catalytic efficiency (k cat/K m) towards L-arabinose, D-galactose and D-fucose. Based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and modelling studies, the enzyme prefers the α-pyranose form of L-arabinose, and the stable oxidation product detected is L-arabino-1,4-lactone which can, however, open slowly at neutral pH to a linear L-arabonate form. The pH optimum for the enzyme was pH 9, but use of a yeast-in-vivo-like buffer at pH 6.8 indicated that good catalytic efficiency could still be expected in vivo. Expression of the Rl AraDH dehydrogenase in S. cerevisiae, together with the galactose permease Gal2 for L-arabinose uptake, resulted in production of 18 g of L-arabonate per litre, at a rate of 248 mg of L-arabonate per litre per hour, with 86 % of the provided L-arabinose converted to L-arabonate. Expression of a lactonase-encoding gene from Caulobacter crescentus was not necessary for L-arabonate production in yeast.

  3. Aerobic production of succinate from arabinose by metabolically engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Zhu, Nianqing; Xia, Huihua

    2014-01-01

    Arabinose is considered as an ideal feedstock for the microbial production of value-added chemicals due to its abundance in hemicellulosic wastes. In this study, the araBAD operon from Escherichia coli was introduced into succinate-producing Corynebacterium glutamicum, which enabled aerobic production of succinate using arabinose as sole carbon source. The engineered strain ZX1 (pXaraBAD, pEacsAgltA) produced 74.4 mM succinate with a yield of 0.58 mol (mol arabinose)(-1), which represented 69.9% of the theoretically maximal yield. Moreover, this strain produced 110.2 mM succinate using combined substrates of glucose and arabinose. To date, this is the highest succinate production under aerobic conditions in minimal medium.

  4. Photocaged Arabinose: A Novel Optogenetic Switch for Rapid and Gradual Control of Microbial Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Binder, Dennis; Bier, Claus; Grünberger, Alexander; Drobietz, Dagmar; Hage-Hülsmann, Jennifer; Wandrey, Georg; Büchs, Jochen; Kohlheyer, Dietrich; Loeschcke, Anita; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Pietruszka, Jörg; Drepper, Thomas

    2016-02-15

    Controlling cellular functions by light allows simple triggering of biological processes in a non-invasive fashion with high spatiotemporal resolution. In this context, light-regulated gene expression has enormous potential for achieving optogenetic control over almost any cellular process. Here, we report on two novel one-step cleavable photocaged arabinose compounds, which were applied as light-sensitive inducers of transcription in bacteria. Exposure of caged arabinose to UV-A light resulted in rapid activation of protein production, as demonstrated for GFP and the complete violacein biosynthetic pathway. Moreover, single-cell analysis revealed that intrinsic heterogeneity of arabinose-mediated induction of gene expression was overcome when using photocaged arabinose. We have thus established a novel phototrigger for synthetic bio(techno)logy applications that enables precise and homogeneous control of bacterial target gene expression.

  5. Improvement of L-arabinose fermentation by modifying the metabolic pathway and transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengqiang; Shen, Yu; Zhang, Yanyan; Suo, Fan; Hou, Jin; Bao, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    The L-arabinose utilization pathway was established in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, by expressing the codon-optimized araA, araB, and araD genes of Lactobacillus plantarum. After overexpressing the TAL1, TKL1, RPE1, RKI1, and GAL2 genes and adaptive evolution, the L-arabinose utilization of the recombinant strain became efficient. The resulting strain displayed a maximum specific growth rate of 0.075 h(-1), a maximum specific L-arabinose consumption rate of 0.61 g h(-1) g(-1) dry cell weight, and a promising ethanol yield of 0.43 g g(-1) from L-arabinose fermentation.

  6. Establishment of an arabinose-inducible system in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi-Wei; Hu, Rouh-Mei; Chiang, Yu-Ting; Chung, Tsao-Chuen; Chung, Tung-Ching; Yang, Tsuey-Ching

    2011-01-01

    A pBBad22T-derived conditioned arabinose (Ara)-inducible expression system was evaluated in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (an opportunistic pathogen and has gained increasing attention as a cause of healthcare-associated infection). S. maltophilia cannot grow well when Ara is the sole available carbon source. The induction kinetic study, optimal inducer concentration determination, and depletion experiment were performed by using a xylE gene fusion construct, pBxylE, to monitor the expression of pBBad22T in S. maltophilia. For induction survey, the expression of catechol 2,3-dioxygenase (C23O), encoded by xylE gene, continuously increases during an 8-h induced course and can be modulated by different inducer concentrations. The applied induction condition of pBBad22T in S. maltophilia is the inducer concentration ranging from 0.1% to 0.5% for an induction time of 4 h. For repression evaluation, the C23O expression is rapidly turned off within 30 min after the removal of Ara. Accordingly, the established Ara-inducible system can provide a convenient tool for the study of S. maltophilia.

  7. Synthesis and biological evaluation of arabinose 5-phosphate mimics modified at position five.

    PubMed

    Cipolla, Laura; Airoldi, Cristina; Sperandeo, Paola; Gianera, Serena; Polissi, Alessandra; Nicotra, Francesco; Gabrielli, Luca

    2014-05-01

    A set of new metabolically stable arabinose 5-phosphate analogues possessing phosphate mimetic groups at position 5 was synthesised. Their ability to interact with arabinose 5-phosphate isomerase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was evaluated by STD-NMR studies. The synthesised compounds were also characterised for their activity in vivo on P. aeruginosa and Escherichia coli strains. Unfortunately, none of the synthesised compounds was able neither to bind API nor to inhibit bacterial growth.

  8. Bioprospecting and evolving alternative xylose and arabinose pathway enzymes for use in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Mi; Jellison, Taylor; Alper, Hal S

    2016-03-01

    Bioprospecting is an effective way to find novel enzymes from strains with desirable phenotypes. Such bioprospecting has enabled organisms such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae to utilize nonnative pentose sugars. Yet, the efficiency of this pentose catabolism (especially for the case of arabinose) remains suboptimal. Thus, further pathway optimization or identification of novel, optimal pathways is needed. Previously, we identified a novel set of xylan catabolic pathway enzymes from a superior pentose-utilizing strain of Ustilago bevomyces. These enzymes were used to successfully engineer a xylan-utilizing S. cerevisiae through a blended approach of bioprospecting and evolutionary engineering. Here, we expanded this approach to xylose and arabinose catabolic pathway engineering and demonstrated that bioprospected xylose and arabinose catabolic pathways from U. bevomyces offer alternative choices for enabling efficient pentose catabolism in S. cerevisiae. By introducing a novel set of xylose catabolic genes from U. bevomyces, growth rates were improved up to 85 % over a set of traditional Scheffersomyces stipitis pathway genes. In addition, we suggested an alternative arabinose catabolic pathway which, after directed evolution and pathway engineering, enabled S. cerevisiae to grow on arabinose as a sole carbon source in minimal medium with growth rates upwards of 0.05 h(-1). This pathway represents the most efficient growth of yeast on pure arabinose minimal medium. These pathways provide great starting points for further strain development and demonstrate the utility of bioprospecting from U. bevomyces.

  9. Biochemical preparation of L-ribose and L-arabinose from ribitol: a new approach.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Z; Shimonishi, T; Bhuiyan, S H; Utamura, M; Takada, G; Izumori, K

    1999-01-01

    L-ribose and L-arabinose were prepared biochemically from ribitol via a two-step reaction, by which the complete oxidation of ribitol to L-ribulose (approximately 98%) was achieved by the reaction of washed cells of Acetobacter aceti IFO 3281. The produced L-ribulose was then used as a substrate for the production of L-ribose and L-arabinose. The isomerization of L-ribulose to L-ribose and L-arabinose was carried out using L-ribose isomerase (L-RI) of Acinetobacter sp. strain DL-28 and L-arabinose isomerase (L-AI) of Mycobacterium smegmatis, respectively. At equilibrium, the ratio of L-ribose: L-ribulose was 70:30 and that of L-arabinose: L-ribulose was 90: 10. After a simple purification treatment, both pentoses could be crystallized without the use of column chromatography. The crystals were confirmed as L-ribose and L-arabinose by High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), Infrared (IR), Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and optical rotation measurements.

  10. Timing and Dynamics of Single Cell Gene Expression in the Arabinose Utilization System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megerle, J.; Fritz, G.; Gerland, U.; Jung, K.; Radler, J.

    2008-08-01

    The arabinose utilization system of E. coli displays a stochastic "all or nothing" response at intermediate levels of arabinose, where the population divides into a fraction catabolizing the sugar at a high rate (ON state) and a fraction not utilizing arabinose (OFF state). Here we study this decision process in individual cells, focusing on the dynamics of the transition from the OFF to the ON state. Using quantitative time-lapse microscopy, we determine the time delay between inducer addition and fluorescence onset of a GFP reporter. Through independent characterization of the GFP maturation process, we can separate the lag time caused by the reporter from the intrinsic activation time of the arabinose system. The resulting distribution of intrinsic time delays scales inversely with the external arabinose concentration, and is compatible with a simple stochastic model for arabinose uptake. Our findings support the idea that the heterogeneous timing of gene induction is causally related to a broad distribution of uptake proteins at the time of sugar addition.

  11. Identification and catalytic residues of the arsenite methyltransferase from a sulfate-reducing bacterium, Clostridium sp. BXM.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei-Pei; Bao, Peng; Sun, Guo-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic methylation is an important process frequently occurring in anaerobic environments. Anaerobic microorganisms have been implicated as the major contributors for As methylation. However, very little information is available regarding the enzymatic mechanism of As methylation by anaerobes. In this study, one novel sulfate-reducing bacterium isolate, Clostridium sp. BXM, which was isolated from a paddy soil in our laboratory, was demonstrated to have the ability of methylating As. One putative arsenite S-Adenosyl-Methionine methyltransferase (ArsM) gene, CsarsM was cloned from Clostridium sp. BXM. Heterologous expression of CsarsM conferred As resistance and the ability of methylating As to an As-sensitive strain of Escherichia coli. Purified methyltransferase CsArsM catalyzed the formation of methylated products from arsenite, further confirming its function of As methylation. Site-directed mutagenesis studies demonstrated that three conserved cysteine residues at positions 65, 153 and 203 in CsArsM are necessary for arsenite methylation, but only Cysteine 153 and Cysteine 203 are required for the methylation of monomethylarsenic to dimethylarsenic. These results provided the characterization of arsenic methyltransferase from anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacterium. Given that sulfate-reducing bacteria are ubiquitous in various wetlands including paddy soils, enzymatic methylation mediated by these anaerobes is proposed to contribute to the arsenic biogeochemical cycling. PMID:25790486

  12. Long Term Sugarcane Crop Residue Retention Offers Limited Potential to Reduce Nitrogen Fertilizer Rates in Australian Wet Tropical Environments

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Elizabeth A.; Thorburn, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    The warming of world climate systems is driving interest in the mitigation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In the agricultural sector, practices that mitigate GHG emissions include those that (1) reduce emissions [e.g., those that reduce nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions by avoiding excess nitrogen (N) fertilizer application], and (2) increase soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks (e.g., by retaining instead of burning crop residues). Sugarcane is a globally important crop that can have substantial inputs of N fertilizer and which produces large amounts of crop residues (‘trash’). Management of N fertilizer and trash affects soil carbon and nitrogen cycling, and hence GHG emissions. Trash has historically been burned at harvest, but increasingly is being retained on the soil surface as a ‘trash blanket’ in many countries. The potential for trash retention to alter N fertilizer requirements and sequester SOC was investigated in this study. The APSIM model was calibrated with data from field and laboratory studies of trash decomposition in the wet tropics of northern Australia. APSIM was then validated against four independent data sets, before simulating location × soil × fertilizer × trash management scenarios. Soil carbon increased in trash blanketed soils relative to SOC in soils with burnt trash. However, further increases in SOC for the study region may be limited because the SOC in trash blanketed soils could be approaching equilibrium; future GHG mitigation efforts in this region should therefore focus on N fertilizer management. Simulated N fertilizer rates were able to be reduced from conventional rates regardless of trash management, because of low yield potential in the wet tropics. For crops subjected to continuous trash blanketing, there was substantial immobilization of N in decomposing trash so conventional N fertilizer rates were required for up to 24 years after trash blanketing commenced. After this period, there was potential to reduce N

  13. Long Term Sugarcane Crop Residue Retention Offers Limited Potential to Reduce Nitrogen Fertilizer Rates in Australian Wet Tropical Environments.

    PubMed

    Meier, Elizabeth A; Thorburn, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    The warming of world climate systems is driving interest in the mitigation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In the agricultural sector, practices that mitigate GHG emissions include those that (1) reduce emissions [e.g., those that reduce nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions by avoiding excess nitrogen (N) fertilizer application], and (2) increase soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks (e.g., by retaining instead of burning crop residues). Sugarcane is a globally important crop that can have substantial inputs of N fertilizer and which produces large amounts of crop residues ('trash'). Management of N fertilizer and trash affects soil carbon and nitrogen cycling, and hence GHG emissions. Trash has historically been burned at harvest, but increasingly is being retained on the soil surface as a 'trash blanket' in many countries. The potential for trash retention to alter N fertilizer requirements and sequester SOC was investigated in this study. The APSIM model was calibrated with data from field and laboratory studies of trash decomposition in the wet tropics of northern Australia. APSIM was then validated against four independent data sets, before simulating location × soil × fertilizer × trash management scenarios. Soil carbon increased in trash blanketed soils relative to SOC in soils with burnt trash. However, further increases in SOC for the study region may be limited because the SOC in trash blanketed soils could be approaching equilibrium; future GHG mitigation efforts in this region should therefore focus on N fertilizer management. Simulated N fertilizer rates were able to be reduced from conventional rates regardless of trash management, because of low yield potential in the wet tropics. For crops subjected to continuous trash blanketing, there was substantial immobilization of N in decomposing trash so conventional N fertilizer rates were required for up to 24 years after trash blanketing commenced. After this period, there was potential to reduce N fertilizer

  14. Long Term Sugarcane Crop Residue Retention Offers Limited Potential to Reduce Nitrogen Fertilizer Rates in Australian Wet Tropical Environments.

    PubMed

    Meier, Elizabeth A; Thorburn, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    The warming of world climate systems is driving interest in the mitigation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In the agricultural sector, practices that mitigate GHG emissions include those that (1) reduce emissions [e.g., those that reduce nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions by avoiding excess nitrogen (N) fertilizer application], and (2) increase soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks (e.g., by retaining instead of burning crop residues). Sugarcane is a globally important crop that can have substantial inputs of N fertilizer and which produces large amounts of crop residues ('trash'). Management of N fertilizer and trash affects soil carbon and nitrogen cycling, and hence GHG emissions. Trash has historically been burned at harvest, but increasingly is being retained on the soil surface as a 'trash blanket' in many countries. The potential for trash retention to alter N fertilizer requirements and sequester SOC was investigated in this study. The APSIM model was calibrated with data from field and laboratory studies of trash decomposition in the wet tropics of northern Australia. APSIM was then validated against four independent data sets, before simulating location × soil × fertilizer × trash management scenarios. Soil carbon increased in trash blanketed soils relative to SOC in soils with burnt trash. However, further increases in SOC for the study region may be limited because the SOC in trash blanketed soils could be approaching equilibrium; future GHG mitigation efforts in this region should therefore focus on N fertilizer management. Simulated N fertilizer rates were able to be reduced from conventional rates regardless of trash management, because of low yield potential in the wet tropics. For crops subjected to continuous trash blanketing, there was substantial immobilization of N in decomposing trash so conventional N fertilizer rates were required for up to 24 years after trash blanketing commenced. After this period, there was potential to reduce N fertilizer

  15. D-arabinose metabolism in Escherichia coli B: induction and cotransductional mapping of the L-fucose-D-arabinose pathway enzymes.

    PubMed

    Elsinghorst, E A; Mortlock, R P

    1988-12-01

    D-Arabinose is degraded by Escherichia coli B via some of the L-fucose pathway enzymes and a D-ribulokinase which is distinct from the L-fuculokinase of the L-fucose pathway. We found that L-fucose and D-arabinose acted as the apparent inducers of the enzymes needed for their degradation. These enzymes, including D-ribulokinase, appeared to be coordinately regulated, and mutants which constitutively synthesized the L-fucose enzymes also constitutively synthesized D-ribulokinase. In contrast to D-arabinose-positive mutants of E. coli K-12, in which L-fuculose-1-phosphate and D-ribulose-1-phosphate act as inducers of the L-fucose pathway, we found that these intermediates did not act as inducers in E. coli B. To further characterize the E. coli B system, some of the L-fucose-D-arabinose genes were mapped by using bacteriophage P1 transduction. A transposon Tn10 insertion near the E. coli B L-fucose regulon was used in two- and three-factor reciprocal crosses. The gene encoding D-ribulokinase, designated darK, was found to map within the L-fucose regulon, and the partial gene order was found to be Tn10-fucA-darK-fucI-fucK-thyA. PMID:3056899

  16. High-level hemicellulosic arabinose predominately affects lignocellulose crystallinity for genetically enhancing both plant lodging resistance and biomass enzymatic digestibility in rice mutants.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengcheng; Zhang, Mingliang; Guo, Kai; Hu, Zhen; Zhang, Ran; Feng, Yongqing; Yi, Xiaoyan; Zou, Weihua; Wang, Lingqiang; Wu, Changyin; Tian, Jinshan; Lu, Tiegang; Xie, Guosheng; Peng, Liangcai

    2015-05-01

    Rice is a major food crop with enormous biomass residue for biofuels. As plant cell wall recalcitrance basically decides a costly biomass process, genetic modification of plant cell walls has been regarded as a promising solution. However, due to structural complexity and functional diversity of plant cell walls, it becomes essential to identify the key factors of cell wall modifications that could not much alter plant growth, but cause an enhancement in biomass enzymatic digestibility. To address this issue, we performed systems biology analyses of a total of 36 distinct cell wall mutants of rice. As a result, cellulose crystallinity (CrI) was examined to be the key factor that negatively determines either the biomass enzymatic saccharification upon various chemical pretreatments or the plant lodging resistance, an integrated agronomic trait in plant growth and grain production. Notably, hemicellulosic arabinose (Ara) was detected to be the major factor that negatively affects cellulose CrI probably through its interlinking with β-1,4-glucans. In addition, lignin and G monomer also exhibited the positive impact on biomass digestion and lodging resistance. Further characterization of two elite mutants, Osfc17 and Osfc30, showing normal plant growth and high biomass enzymatic digestion in situ and in vitro, revealed the multiple GH9B candidate genes for reducing cellulose CrI and XAT genes for increasing hemicellulosic Ara level. Hence, the results have suggested the potential cell wall modifications for enhancing both biomass enzymatic digestibility and plant lodging resistance by synchronically overexpressing GH9B and XAT genes in rice.

  17. Identification of a salvage pathway for D-arabinose in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Wojtkiewicz, B; Szmidzinski, R; Jezierska, A; Cocito, C

    1988-02-15

    Extracts of Mycobacterium smegmatis, which was adapted to growth in synthetic medium containing D-arabinose as sole carbon source, catalyzed the NADPH-mediated reduction of D-arabinose to D-arabitol. When arabinose-adapted bacteria were transferred to glycerol medium, resumption of growth was accompanied by a sharp drop in the specific activity of this enzyme. Moreover, extracts of cells grown in D-arabinose medium contained large amounts of an NAD+-linked pentitol dehydrogenase, as compared to bacteria multiplying in glycerol medium. The specific activity of mycobacterial extracts was ten-fold higher for D-arabitol than for its L-isomer, and eight-fold higher than for xylitol (it was more than forty-fold lower in the case of glycerol-grown cells). The product of the pentitol dehydrogenase reaction was identified as D-xylulose by three different procedures. On the basis of these data, it is suggested that utilization of exogenous D-arabinose in mycobacteria involves two dehydrogenases that catalyze the reactions D-arabinose NADPH----D-arabitol NAD+----D-xylulose, by virtue of which an aldopentose is converted into a ketopentose. The alditol: NADP oxidoreductase was isolated from homogenates of D-arabinose-adapted mycobacteria, and purified by DEAE-cellulose chromatography. The enzymatic activity was restricted to a single band which, under denaturing conditions, comigrated with albumin (approximately 46 kDa). It was insensitive to 2-mercaptoethanol, EDTA and NaF, and was inactivated at 70 degrees C.

  18. Functional identification of MSMEG_6402 protein from Mycobacterium smegmatis in decaprenylphosphoryl-D-arabinose biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Cai, Lina; Zhao, Xiaojiao; He, Lianqi; Ma, Yufang; Zang, Shizhu; Zhang, Cuili; Li, Xinli; Xin, Yi

    2014-11-01

    The arabinogalactan (AG) of the mycobacterial cell wall consists of an arabinan region, a galactan region and a disaccharide linker. Decaprenylphosphoryl-D-arabinose (DPA) is the donor for arabinofuran residues, which are formed from phosphoribose diphosphate (PRPP) and decaprenyl phosphate (DP). DP is sequentially catalyzed by a three-step process that involves a transferase, a phosphatase and an epimerase. Rv3807c is a putative phospholipid phosphatase that might generate the intermediate product of decaprenyl-phosphoryl-ribose (DPR) in DPA biosynthesis. Mycobacterium smegmatis MSMEG_6402 is a homolog gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv3807c and was substituted for the functional identification of Rv3807c. Previously, we generated a conditional MSMEG_6402 gene knockout strain (M. sm-ΔM_6402) that exhibited significantly affected cell wall structure. To understand the function of MSMEG_6402 in DPA biosynthesis, this gene was amplified and expressed, and the resulting protein was identified and purified using a His-tagged approach. A MSMEG_6402 enzymatic reaction system with PRPP and DP as substrates was utilized, and the reaction products were separated using thin layer chromatography (TLC). The results revealed a specific lipid-linked sugar band that appeared in the reaction with the addition of MSMEG_6402. Furthermore, ESI-MS detection was utilized in this study, and the results revealed that the enzymatic reaction products involving MSMEG_6402 included DPPR and a sodium ion adduct of DPR. Additionally, the phosphatase activity of MSMEG_6402 was also determined through phosphate group detection using the colorimetric method. Based on our results together with the results of previous studies, including the functional identification and bioinformatics analysis of M. tuberculosis Rv3807c, we propose that MSMEG_6402, as a phosphatase, has an intimate relationship with DPA biosynthesis.

  19. Production of Acetoin through Simultaneous Utilization of Glucose, Xylose, and Arabinose by Engineered Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Li, Xin-Li; Fu, Jing; Li, Ning; Wang, Zhiwen; Tang, Ya-Jie; Chen, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Glucose, xylose and arabinose are the three most abundant monosaccharide found in lignocellulosic biomass. Effectively and simultaneously utilization of these sugars by microorganisms for production of the biofuels and bio-chemicals is essential toward directly fermentation of the lignocellulosic biomass. In our previous study, the recombinant Bacillus subtilis 168ARSRCPΔacoAΔbdhA strain was already shown to efficiently utilize xylose for production of acetoin, with a yield of 0.36 g/g xylose. In the current study, the Bacillus subtilis168ARSRCPΔacoAΔbdhA strain was further engineered to produce acetoin from a glucose, xylose, and arabinose mixtures. To accomplish this, the endogenous xylose transport protein AraE, the exogenous xylose isomerase gene xylA and the xylulokinase gene xylB from E. coli were co-overexpressed in the Bacillus subtilis 168ARSRCPΔacoAΔbdhA strain, which enabled the resulting strain, denoted ZB02, to simultaneously utilize glucose and xylose. Unexpectedly, the ZB02 strain could simultaneously utilize glucose and arabinose also. Further results indicated that the transcriptional inhibition of the arabinose transport protein gene araE was the main limiting factor for arabinose utilization in the presence of glucose. Additionally, the arabinose operon in B. subtilis could be activated by the addition of arabinose, even in the presence of glucose. Through fed-batch fermentation, strain ZB02 could simultaneously utilize glucose, xylose, and arabinose, with an average sugar consumption rate of 3.00 g/l/h and an average production of 62.2 g/l acetoin at a rate of 0.864 g/l/h. Finally, the strain produced 11.2 g/l acetoin from lignocellulosic hydrolysate (containing 20.6g/l glucose, 12.1 g/l xylose and 0.45 g/l arabinose) in flask cultivation, with an acetoin yield of 0.34 g/g total sugar. The result demonstrates that this strain has good potential for the utilization of lignocellulosic hydrolysate for production of acetoin. PMID:27467131

  20. Production of Acetoin through Simultaneous Utilization of Glucose, Xylose, and Arabinose by Engineered Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jing; Li, Ning; Wang, Zhiwen; Tang, Ya-jie; Chen, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Glucose, xylose and arabinose are the three most abundant monosaccharide found in lignocellulosic biomass. Effectively and simultaneously utilization of these sugars by microorganisms for production of the biofuels and bio-chemicals is essential toward directly fermentation of the lignocellulosic biomass. In our previous study, the recombinant Bacillus subtilis 168ARSRCPΔacoAΔbdhA strain was already shown to efficiently utilize xylose for production of acetoin, with a yield of 0.36 g/g xylose. In the current study, the Bacillus subtilis168ARSRCPΔacoAΔbdhA strain was further engineered to produce acetoin from a glucose, xylose, and arabinose mixtures. To accomplish this, the endogenous xylose transport protein AraE, the exogenous xylose isomerase gene xylA and the xylulokinase gene xylB from E. coli were co-overexpressed in the Bacillus subtilis 168ARSRCPΔacoAΔbdhA strain, which enabled the resulting strain, denoted ZB02, to simultaneously utilize glucose and xylose. Unexpectedly, the ZB02 strain could simultaneously utilize glucose and arabinose also. Further results indicated that the transcriptional inhibition of the arabinose transport protein gene araE was the main limiting factor for arabinose utilization in the presence of glucose. Additionally, the arabinose operon in B. subtilis could be activated by the addition of arabinose, even in the presence of glucose. Through fed-batch fermentation, strain ZB02 could simultaneously utilize glucose, xylose, and arabinose, with an average sugar consumption rate of 3.00 g/l/h and an average production of 62.2 g/l acetoin at a rate of 0.864 g/l/h. Finally, the strain produced 11.2 g/l acetoin from lignocellulosic hydrolysate (containing 20.6g/l glucose, 12.1 g/l xylose and 0.45 g/l arabinose) in flask cultivation, with an acetoin yield of 0.34 g/g total sugar. The result demonstrates that this strain has good potential for the utilization of lignocellulosic hydrolysate for production of acetoin. PMID:27467131

  1. Production of Acetoin through Simultaneous Utilization of Glucose, Xylose, and Arabinose by Engineered Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Li, Xin-Li; Fu, Jing; Li, Ning; Wang, Zhiwen; Tang, Ya-Jie; Chen, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Glucose, xylose and arabinose are the three most abundant monosaccharide found in lignocellulosic biomass. Effectively and simultaneously utilization of these sugars by microorganisms for production of the biofuels and bio-chemicals is essential toward directly fermentation of the lignocellulosic biomass. In our previous study, the recombinant Bacillus subtilis 168ARSRCPΔacoAΔbdhA strain was already shown to efficiently utilize xylose for production of acetoin, with a yield of 0.36 g/g xylose. In the current study, the Bacillus subtilis168ARSRCPΔacoAΔbdhA strain was further engineered to produce acetoin from a glucose, xylose, and arabinose mixtures. To accomplish this, the endogenous xylose transport protein AraE, the exogenous xylose isomerase gene xylA and the xylulokinase gene xylB from E. coli were co-overexpressed in the Bacillus subtilis 168ARSRCPΔacoAΔbdhA strain, which enabled the resulting strain, denoted ZB02, to simultaneously utilize glucose and xylose. Unexpectedly, the ZB02 strain could simultaneously utilize glucose and arabinose also. Further results indicated that the transcriptional inhibition of the arabinose transport protein gene araE was the main limiting factor for arabinose utilization in the presence of glucose. Additionally, the arabinose operon in B. subtilis could be activated by the addition of arabinose, even in the presence of glucose. Through fed-batch fermentation, strain ZB02 could simultaneously utilize glucose, xylose, and arabinose, with an average sugar consumption rate of 3.00 g/l/h and an average production of 62.2 g/l acetoin at a rate of 0.864 g/l/h. Finally, the strain produced 11.2 g/l acetoin from lignocellulosic hydrolysate (containing 20.6g/l glucose, 12.1 g/l xylose and 0.45 g/l arabinose) in flask cultivation, with an acetoin yield of 0.34 g/g total sugar. The result demonstrates that this strain has good potential for the utilization of lignocellulosic hydrolysate for production of acetoin.

  2. Construction of an improved D-arabinose pathway in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Bartkus, J M; Mortlock, R P

    1986-01-01

    A ribitol catabolic pathway was transduced into Escherichia coli K-12 in an effort to determine whether the ribitol pathway would confer an advantage to D-arabinose-positive mutants growing on D-arabinose as the sole carbon source. Competition studies in chemostats showed that ribitol-positive strains, with a selection coefficient of 9%/h, have a significant competitive advantage over ribitol-negative strains. Ribitol-positive strains grown in batch culture also exhibited a shorter lag period than did ribitol-negative strains when transferred from glucose to D-arabinose. Repeated transfer of a ribitol-positive strain of E. coli K-12 on D-arabinose yielded a strain with further improved growth on D-arabinose. This "evolved" strain was found to constitutively synthesize L-fucose permease, isomerase, and kinase but had lost the ability to grow on L-fucose, apparently owing to the loss of a functional aldolase. This constitutive mutation is not linked to the fucose gene cluster and may be similar to an unlinked constitutive mutation described by Chen et al. (J. Bacteriol. 159:725-729, 1984). PMID:3512519

  3. Bifidobacterium longum L-arabinose isomerase--overexpression in Lactococcus lactis, purification, and characterization.

    PubMed

    Salonen, Noora; Nyyssölä, Antti; Salonen, Kalle; Turunen, Ossi

    2012-09-01

    Bifidobacterium longum NRRL B-41409 L-arabinose isomerase (L-AI) was cloned and overexpressed in Lactococcus lactis using a phosphate-depletion-inducible expression system. The purified B. longum L-AI was characterized using D-galactose and L-arabinose as the substrates. The enzyme was active and stable at acidic pH with an optimum at pH 6.0-6.5. The enzyme showed the highest activity at 55 °C during a 20-min incubation at pH 6.5. The K(m) value was 120 mM for L-arabinose and 590 mM for D-galactose. The V(max) was 42 U mg(-1) with L-arabinose and 7.7 U mg(-1) with D-galactose as the substrates. The enzyme had very low requirement for metal ions for catalytic activity, but it was stabilized by divalent metal ions (Mg(2+), Mn(2+)). The enzyme bound the metal ions so tightly that they could not be fully removed from the active site by EDTA treatment. Using purified B. longum L-AI as the catalyst at 35 °C, equilibrium yields of 36 % D-tagatose and 11 % L-ribulose with 1.67 M D-galactose and L-arabinose, respectively, as the substrates were reached.

  4. Is L-arabinose important for the endophytic lifestyle of Pseudomonas spp.?

    PubMed

    Malfanova, Natalia; Kamilova, Faina; Validov, Shamil; Chebotar, Vladimir; Lugtenberg, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Twenty endophytic bacteria were isolated from surface-sterilized stems and roots of cucumber plants. After removal of potential siblings and human pathogens, the remaining seven strains were identified based on their 16S rDNA as Pseudomonas fluorescens (2 strains) and P. putida (5 strains). Three strains, namely P. fluorescens CS1, P. fluorescens CR2 and P. putida CR3, were able to suppress tomato foot and root rot (TFRR). Special attention was paid to the characterization of the BIOLOG carbon oxidation profiles of the isolated pseudomonads in order to identify nutrients which might be important for their endophytic lifestyle. Comparative analysis of the profiles of these seven strains with those of seven rhizospheric Pseudomonas spp. revealed that endophytes were able to oxidize L-arabinose and 2,3-butanediol significantly more often than the rhizospheric group. An independent growth experiment performed in tubes using L-arabinose and 2,3-butanediol as sole carbon sources showed the same results as seen using BIOLOG for L-arabinose, but not for 2,3-butanediol. Since L-arabinose is one of the most abundant sugars in xylem of cucumber plants and was not detected in their rhizosphere, our data suggest that utilization of L-arabinose might be a trait contributing to the endophytic lifestyle of the isolated Pseudomonas endophytes.

  5. Study of the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of residual impurities in hydroxylamine-reduced silver colloid and the effects of anions on the colloid activity.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiao; Gu, Huaimin; Liu, Fangfang

    2012-03-01

    The paper investigated the residual ions in hydroxylamine-reduced silver colloid (HRSC) and the relationship between the condition of HRSC and the enhanced mechanisms of this colloid. We also detected the SERS of MB and studied the effects of anions on the Raman signal. In the case of HRSC, the bands of residual ions diminish while the bands of Ag-anions increase gradually with increasing the concentrations of Cl(-) and NO(3)(-). It means the affinity of residual ions on the silver surface is weaker than that of Cl(-) and NO(3)(-) and the residual ions are replaced gradually by the added Cl(-) or NO(3)(-). The Raman signal of residual ions can be detected by treatment with anions that do not bind strongly to the silver surface, such as SO(4)(2-). The most intense band of Ag-anions bonds can be also observed when adding weakly binding anions to the colloid. However, the anions which make up the Ag-anions bonds are residual Cl(-) and the effect of weakly binding anions is only to aggregate the silver particles. Residual Cl(-) can be replaced by I(-) which has the highest affinity. From the detection of methylene blue (MB), the effects of anions on the enhancement of Raman signal are discussed in detail, and these findings could make the conditions suitable for detecting analytes in high efficiency. This study will have a profound implication to SERS users about their interpretation of SERS spectra when obtaining these anomalous bands.

  6. Random-type scanning patterns in laser shock peening without absorbing coating in 2024-T351 Al alloy: A solution to reduce residual stress anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, C.; Peral, D.; Porro, J. A.; Díaz, M.; Ruiz de Lara, L.; García-Beltrán, A.; Ocaña, J. L.

    2015-10-01

    Laser Shock Peening (LSP) is considered as an alternative technology to shot peening (SP) for the induction of compressive residual stresses in metallic alloys in order to improve their fatigue, corrosion and wear resistance. Since laser pulses generated by high-intensity laser systems cover only a small area, laser pulses are generally overlapped and scanned in a zigzag-type pattern to cover completely the surface to be treated. However, zigzag-type scanning patterns induce residual stress anisotropy as collateral effect. The purpose of this paper is to describe and explain, for the first time and with the aid of the numerical model developed by the authors, the influence of the scanning pattern directionality on the residual stress tensor. As an effective solution, the authors propose the application of random-type scanning patterns instead of zigzag-type in order to reduce the mentioned residual stress anisotropy.

  7. Directed evolution of AraC for improved compatibility of arabinose- and lactose-inducible promoters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Kuk; Chou, Howard H; Pfleger, Brian F; Newman, Jack D; Yoshikuni, Yasuo; Keasling, Jay D

    2007-09-01

    Synthetic biological systems often require multiple, independently inducible promoters in order to control the expression levels of several genes; however, cross talk between the promoters limits this ability. Here, we demonstrate the directed evolution of AraC to construct an arabinose-inducible (P(BAD)) system that is more compatible with IPTG (isopropyl-beta-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside) induction of a lactose-inducible (P(lac)) system. The constructed system is 10 times more sensitive to arabinose and tolerates IPTG significantly better than the wild type. Detailed studies indicate that the AraC dimerization domain and C terminus are important for the increased sensitivity of AraC to arabinose. PMID:17644634

  8. 13C metabolic flux analysis in Clostridium acetobutylicum during growth on L-arabinose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Margaret; Sund, Christian; Liu, Sanchao; Germane, Katherine; Servinsky, Matthew; Gerlach, Elliot

    2015-03-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum's metabolic pathways have been studied for decades due to its metabolic diversity and industrial value, yet many details of its metabolism are continuing to emerge. To elucidate the role of xylulose-5-P/fructose-6-P phosphoketolase (XFP), and the recently discovered Pentose Phosphate Pathway (PKP) in C. acetobutylicum, experimental and computational metabolic isotope analysis was performed under growth on glucose, xylose, and arabinose. Results indicate that PKP utilization increased with increasing xylose concentration and this trend was further pronounced during growth on arabinose. This was confirmed by mutation of the gene encoding XFP, which almost completely abolished flux through the PKP during growth on arabinose and resulted in decreased acetate:butyrate ratios. We discuss these experimental and computational results here, and the implications for our understanding of sugar metabolism in C. acetobutylicum.

  9. High production of D-tagatose, a potential sugar substitute, using immobilized L-arabinose isomerase.

    PubMed

    Kim, P; Yoon, S H; Roh, H J; Choi, J H

    2001-01-01

    An L-arabinose isomerase of Escherichia coli was immobilized using covalent binding to agarose to produce D-tagatose, a bulking sweetener that can be economically used as a sugar substitute. The immobilized L-arabinose isomerase stably produced an average of 7.5 g-tagatose/L.day for 7 days with a productivity exceeding that of the free enzyme (0.47 vs 0.30 mg/U.day). Using a scaled-up immobilized enzyme system, 99.9 g-tagatose/L was produced from galactose with 20% equilibrium in 48 h. The process was repeated two more times with production of 104.1 and 103.5 g-tagatose/L. D-Tagatose production using an immobilized L-arabinose isomerase has a high potential for commercial application.

  10. Web-Based Intervention in Mindfulness Meditation for Reducing Residual Depressive Symptoms and Relapse Prophylaxis: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mindful Mood Balance (MMB) is a Web-based intervention designed to treat residual depressive symptoms and prevent relapse. MMB was designed to deliver the core concepts of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT), a group treatment, which, despite its strong evidence base, faces a number of dissemination challenges. Objective The present study is a qualitative investigation of participants’ experiences with MMB. Methods Qualitative content analysis was conducted via 38 exit interviews with MMB participants. Study inclusion required a current PHQ-9 (Patient Health Questionnaire) score ≤12 and lifetime history ≥1 major depressive episode. Feedback was obtained on specific website components, program content, and administration as well as skills learned. Results Codes were assigned to interview responses and organized into four main themes: MBCT Web content, MBCT Web-based group process, home practice, and evidence of concept comprehension. Within these four areas, participants highlighted the advantages and obstacles of translating and delivering MBCT in a Web-based format. Adding increased support was suggested for troubleshooting session content as well as managing time challenges for completing home mindfulness practice. Participants endorsed developing affect regulation skills and identified several advantages to Web-based delivery including flexibility, reduced cost, and time commitment. Conclusions These findings support the viability of providing MBCT online and are consistent with prior qualitative accounts derived from in-person MBCT groups. While there is certainly room for innovation in the domains of program support and engagement, the high levels of participant satisfaction indicated that MMB can significantly increase access to evidence-based psychological treatments for sub-threshold symptoms of unipolar affective disorder. PMID:24662625

  11. Reduced Nuclease Activity of Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease (APE1) Variants on Nucleosomes: IDENTIFICATION OF ACCESS RESIDUES.

    PubMed

    Hinz, John M; Mao, Peng; McNeill, Daniel R; Wilson, David M

    2015-08-21

    Non-coding apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites are generated at high frequency in genomic DNA via spontaneous hydrolytic, damage-induced or enzyme-mediated base release. AP endonuclease 1 (APE1) is the predominant mammalian enzyme responsible for initiating removal of mutagenic and cytotoxic abasic lesions as part of the base excision repair (BER) pathway. We have examined here the ability of wild-type (WT) and a collection of variant/mutant APE1 proteins to cleave at an AP site within a nucleosome core particle. Our studies indicate that, in comparison to the WT protein and other variant/mutant enzymes, the incision activity of the tumor-associated variant R237C and the rare population variant G241R are uniquely hypersensitive to nucleosome complexes in the vicinity of the AP site. This defect appears to stem from an abnormal interaction of R237C and G241R with abasic DNA substrates, but is not simply due to a DNA binding defect, as the site-specific APE1 mutant Y128A, which displays markedly reduced AP-DNA complex stability, did not exhibit a similar hypersensitivity to nucleosome structures. Notably, this incision defect of R237C and G241R was observed on a pre-assembled DNA glycosylase·AP-DNA complex as well. Our results suggest that the BER enzyme, APE1, has acquired distinct surface residues that permit efficient processing of AP sites within the context of protein-DNA complexes independent of classic chromatin remodeling mechanisms.

  12. ASCORBIC ACID TREATMENT TO REDUCE RESIDUAL HALOGEN-BASED OXIDANTS PRIOR TO THE DETERMINATION OF HALOGENATED DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS IN POTABLE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Treatment of potable water samples with ascorbic acid has been investigated as a means for reducing residual halogen-based oxidants (disinfectants)i.e., HOCl, Cl2, Brw and BrCl, prior to determination of EPA Method 551.1A and 551.1B analytes. These disinfection byproducts include...

  13. The mur4 mutant of arabidopsis is partially defective in the de novo synthesis of uridine diphospho L-arabinose

    SciTech Connect

    Burget, E.G.; Reiter, W.D.

    1999-10-01

    To obtain information on the synthesis and function of arabinosylated glycans, the mur4 mutant of arabidopsis was characterized. This mutation leads to a 50% reduction in the monosaccharide L-arabinose in most organs and affects arabinose-containing pectic cell wall polysaccharides and arabinogalactan proteins. Feeding L-arabinose to mur4 plants restores the cell wall composition to wild-type levels, suggesting a partial defect in the de novo synthesis of UDP-L-arabinose, the activated sugar used by arabinosyltransferases. The defect was traced to the conversion of UDP-D-xylose to UDP-L-arabinose in the microsome fraction of leaf material, indicating that mur4 plants are defective in a membrane-bound UDP-D-xylose 4-epimerase.

  14. Aggregation-based detection of M. smegmatis using D-arabinose-functionalized fluorescent silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jayawardana, Kalana W; Wijesundera, Samurdhi A; Yan, Mingdi

    2015-11-14

    Fluorescein-doped silica nanoparticles (FSNPs) functionalized with D-arabinose (Ara) showed strong interactions with Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis) and caused the bacteria to aggregate. This aggregate formation was used as a means to detect M. smegmatis at the concentration of 10(4) CFU per mL. PMID:26379182

  15. Aggregation-based detection of M. smegmatis using D-arabinose-functionalized fluorescent silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jayawardana, Kalana W; Wijesundera, Samurdhi A; Yan, Mingdi

    2015-11-14

    Fluorescein-doped silica nanoparticles (FSNPs) functionalized with D-arabinose (Ara) showed strong interactions with Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis) and caused the bacteria to aggregate. This aggregate formation was used as a means to detect M. smegmatis at the concentration of 10(4) CFU per mL.

  16. Arabinose is metabolized via a phosphoketolase pathway in Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824.

    PubMed

    Servinsky, M D; Germane, K L; Liu, S; Kiel, J T; Clark, A M; Shankar, J; Sund, C J

    2012-12-01

    In this report, a novel zymogram assay and coupled phosphoketolase assay were employed to demonstrate that Clostridium acetobutylicum gene CAC1343 encodes a bi-functional xylulose-5-P/fructose-6-P phosphoketolase (XFP). The specific activity of purified recombinant XFP was 6.9 U/mg on xylulose-5-P and 21 U/mg on fructose-6-P, while the specific activity of XFP in concentrated C. acetobutylicum whole-cell extract was 0.094 and 0.52 U/mg, respectively. Analysis of crude cell extracts indicated that XFP activity was present in cells grown on arabinose but not glucose and quantitative PCR was used to show that CAC1343 mRNA expression was induced 185-fold during growth on arabinose when compared to growth on glucose. HPLC analysis of metabolites revealed that during growth on xylose and glucose more butyrate than acetate was formed with final acetate:butyrate ratios of 0.72 and 0.83, respectively. Growth on arabinose caused a metabolic shift to more oxidized products with a final acetate:butyrate ratio of 1.95. The shift towards more oxidized products is consistent with the presence of an XFP, suggesting that arabinose is metabolized via a phosphoketolase pathway while xylose is probably metabolized via the pentose phosphate pathway.

  17. In vivo single-molecule kinetics of activation and subsequent activity of the arabinose promoter.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, Jarno; Kandhavelu, Meenakshisundaram; Oliveira, Samuel M D; Chandraseelan, Jerome G; Lloyd-Price, Jason; Peltonen, Juha; Yli-Harja, Olli; Ribeiro, Andre S

    2013-07-01

    Using a single-RNA detection technique in live Escherichia coli cells, we measure, for each cell, the waiting time for the production of the first RNA under the control of PBAD promoter after induction by arabinose, and subsequent intervals between transcription events. We find that the kinetics of the arabinose intake system affect mean and diversity in RNA numbers, long after induction. We observed the same effect on Plac/ara-1 promoter, which is inducible by arabinose or by IPTG. Importantly, the distribution of waiting times of Plac/ara-1 is indistinguishable from that of PBAD, if and only if induced by arabinose alone. Finally, RNA production under the control of PBAD is found to be a sub-Poissonian process. We conclude that inducer-dependent waiting times affect mean and cell-to-cell diversity in RNA numbers long after induction, suggesting that intake mechanisms have non-negligible effects on the phenotypic diversity of cell populations in natural, fluctuating environments.

  18. Metabolism of d-Arabinose: Origin of a d-Ribulokinase Activity in Escherichia coli1

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Donald J.; Mortlock, Robert P.

    1971-01-01

    The kinase responsible for the phosphorylation of d-ribulose was purified 45.5-fold from a strain of Escherichia coli K-12 capable of growth on d-arabinose with no separation of d-ribulo- or l-fuculokinase activities. Throughout the purification, the ratios of activities remained essentially constant. A nonadditive effect of combining both substrates in an assay mixture; identical Km values for adenosine triphosphate with either l-fuculose or d-ribulose as substrate; and, the irreversible loss of activity on both substrates, after removal of magnesium ions from the enzyme preparation, suggest that the dual activity is due to the same enzyme. A fourfold greater affinity of the enzyme for l-fuculose than for d-ribulose, as well as a higher relative activity on l-fuculose, suggest that the natural substrate for this enzyme is l-fuculose. The product of the purified enzyme, with d-ribulose as substrate, was prepared. The ratio of total phosphorous to ribulose phosphate was 1.01:1, indicating that the product was ribulose monophosphate. The behavior of the kinase product in the cysteine-carbazole and orcinol reactions, as well as the results of periodate oxidation assays, provided evidence that it was not d-ribulose-5-phosphate. Reaction of this compound with a cell-free extract of E. coli possessing l-fuculose-l-phosphate aldolase activity resulted in the production of dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glycolaldehyde. The kinase product failed to reduce 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium and possessed a half-life of approximately 1.5 min in the presence of 1 n HCl at 100 C. These properties suggested that the phosphate group was attached to carbon atom 1 of d-ribulose. PMID:4323967

  19. Structure of the thermophilic l-Arabinose isomerase from Geobacillus kaustophilus reveals metal-mediated intersubunit interactions for activity and thermostability.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin Myung; Lee, Yong-Jik; Cao, Thinh-Phat; Shin, Sun-Mi; Park, Min-Kyu; Lee, Han-Seung; di Luccio, Eric; Kim, Seong-Bo; Lee, Sang-Jae; Lee, Sang Jun; Lee, Sung Haeng; Lee, Dong-Woo

    2016-04-15

    Thermophilic l-arabinose isomerase (AI), which catalyzes the interconversion of l-arabinose and l-ribulose, can be used to produce d-tagatose, a sugar substitute, from d-galactose. Unlike mesophilic AIs, thermophilic AIs are highly dependent on divalent metal ions for their catalytic activity and thermostability at elevated temperatures. However, the molecular basis underlying the substrate preferences and metal requirements of multimeric AIs remains unclear. Here we report the first crystal structure of the apo and holo forms of thermophilic Geobacillus kaustophilus AI (GKAI) in hexamer form. The structures, including those of GKAI in complex with l-arabitol, and biochemical analyses revealed not only how the substrate-binding site of GKAI is formed through displacement of residues at the intersubunit interface when it is bound to Mn(2+), but also revealed the water-mediated H-bonding networks that contribute to the structural integrity of GKAI during catalysis. These observations suggest metal-mediated isomerization reactions brought about by intersubunit interactions at elevated temperatures are responsible for the distinct active site features that promote the substrate specificity and thermostability of thermophilic AIs.

  20. Epidemiology of arabinose assimilation in burkholderia pseudomallei isolated from patients and soil in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Trakulsomboon, S; Vuddhakul, V; Tharavichitkul, P; Na-Gnam, N; Suputtamongkol, Y; Thamlikitkul, V

    1999-12-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is an environmental saprophyte that has been isolated widely from soil in Southeast Asia and the relationship between environmental contamination and clinical melioidosis has been established. It has been shown that the arabinose assimilation property of B. pseudonrallei is probably one of the determinants indicating virulence of this organism. Therefore, the distribution of arabinose assimilation biotypes of B. pseudomallei collected from four geographic regions of Thailand was studied in order to determine an association between arabinose assimilation of B. pseudomallei and the uneven distribution of melioidosis found among these four areas. A total of 830 isolates of B. pseudomallei (412 patient isolates and 418 soil isolates) collected from the patients and soil in four regions of Thailand in 1997 were tested for an ability to grow on a minimal agar medium supplemented with L-arabinose. All patient isolates except one could not utilise arabinose (Ara-). For 418 soil isolates, 232 (55.5%) isolates were identified as Ara type. They comprised 180 (62.5%), 36 (46.8%), 6 (35.3%) and 10 (27.8%) isolates derived from northeastern, southern, northern and central regions respectively. The ratios of Ara- to Ara, were 1.7, 0.9. 0.5 and 0.4 among isolates collected from northeastern, southern, northern and central regions respectively. The prevalence of Ara- in soil isolates in northeast is significantly higher than those in other regions. This observation suggests that in addition to the presence of B. pseudomallei in soil which is one of the factors contributing to a burden of melioidosis in northeastern Thailand, the distribution of more virulent biotype (Ara-) soil isolates is a factor contributing to a high prevalence of melioidosis in northeastern Thailand as well.

  1. Cloning, expression, and transcription analysis of L-arabinose isomerase gene from Mycobacterium smegmatis SMDU.

    PubMed

    Takata, Goro; Poonperm, Wayoon; Rao, Devendar; Souda, Akane; Nishizaki, Tomoe; Morimoto, Kenji; Izumori, Ken

    2007-12-01

    The L-arabinose metabolic gene cluster, araA, araB, araD, araG, araH and araR, encoding L-arabinose isomerase (L-AI) and its accessory proteins was cloned from Mycobacterium smegmatis SMDU and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence of araA displayed highest identity with that of Bacillus subtilis (52%). These six genes comprised the L-arabinose operon, and its genetic arrangement was similar to that of B. subtilis. The L-AI gene (araA), encoding a 501 amino acid protein with a calculated molecular mass of 54,888 Da, was expressed in Escherichia coli. The productivity and overall enzymatic properties of the recombinant L-AI were almost same as the authentic L-AI from M. smegmatis. Although the recombinant L-AI showed high substrate specificity, as did L-AI from other organisms, this enzyme catalyzed not only isomerization of L-arabinose-L-ribulose and D-galactose-D-tagatose but also isomerization of L-altrose-L-psicose and L-erythrulose-L-threose. In combination with L-AI from M. smegmatis, L-threose and L-altrose can be produced from cheap and abundant erythritol and D-fructose respectively, indicating that this enzyme has great potential for biological application in rare sugar production. Transcription analysis using various sugars revealed that this enzyme was significantly induced not only by L-arabinose and D-galactose but also by L-ribose, galactitol, L-ribulose, and L-talitol. This different result of transcription mediated by sugars from that of E. coli suggests that the transcriptional regulation of araA from M. smegmatis against sugar is loose compared with that from E. coli, and that it depends on the hydroxyl configuration at C2, C3 and C4 positions of sugars.

  2. FORMATION OF FINE PARTICLES FROM RESIDUAL OIL COMBUSTION: REDUCING ULTRAFINE NUCLEI THROUGH THE ADDITION OF INORGANIC SORBENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of an investigation, using an 82-kW-rated laboratory-scale refractory-lined combustor, of the characteristics of particulate matter emitted from residual oil combustion and the reduction of ultrafine nuclei by postflame sorbent injection. Without sorbent a...

  3. Genetic engineering and improvement of a Zymomonas mobilis for arabinose utilization and its performance on pretreated corn stover hydrolyzate

    DOE PAGES

    Chou, Yat -Chen; Linger, Jeffrey; Yang, Shihui; Zhang, Min

    2015-04-28

    In this paper, a glucose, xylose and arabinose utilizing Zymomonas mobilis strain was constructed by incorporating arabinose catabolic pathway genes, araBAD encoding L-ribulokinase, L-arabinose isomerase and L-ribulose-5-phosphate- 4-epimerase in a glucose, xylose co-fermenting host, 8b, using a transposition integration approach. Further improvement on this arabinose-capable integrant, 33C was achieved by applying a second transposition to create a genomic knockout (KO) mutant library. Using arabinose as a sole carbon source and a selection pressure, the KO library was subjected to a growth-enrichment process involving continuous sub-culturing for over 120 generations. Strain 13-1-17, isolated from such process demonstrated significant improvement in metabolizingmore » arabinose in a dilute acid pretreated, saccharified corn stover slurry. Through Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) analysis, integration sites of the transposons were identified. Furthermore, multiple additional point mutations (SNPs: Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms) were discovered in 13-1-17, affecting genes araB and RpiB in the genome. Finally, we speculate that these mutations may have impacted the expression of the enzymes coded by these genes, ribulokinase and Ribose 5-P-isomerase, thus attributing to the improvement of the arabinose utilization.« less

  4. Improved xylanase production by Trichoderma reesei grown on L-arabinose and lactose or D-glucose mixtures.

    PubMed

    Xiong, H; Turunen, O; Pastinen, O; Leisola, M; von Weymarn, N

    2004-04-01

    Trichoderma reesei Rut C-30 was grown on eight different natural or rare aldopentoses as the main carbon source and on mixtures of an aldopentose with D-glucose or lactose. The fungal cells consumed all aldopentoses tested, except L-xylose and L-ribose. The highest total xylanase and cellulase activities were achieved when cells were grown on L-arabinose as the main carbon source. The total xylanase activity produced by cells grown on L-arabinose was even higher than that produced by cells grown on an equal amount of lactose. In co-metabolism of D-glucose (15 g l(-1)) and L-arabinose (5 g l(-1)), the total volumetric and specific xylanase productivities were improved (derepressed) approximately 23- and 18-fold, respectively, compared to a cultivation on only D-glucose (20 g l(-1)). In a similar experiment, in which cells were grown on a mixture of lactose and L-arabinose, the xylanase productivity was approximately doubled, compared to a cultivation on only lactose. The cellulase productivities, however, were not improved by the addition of L-arabinose. Compared with a typical industrial fungal enzyme production process with lactose as the main carbon source, better volumetric and specific xylanase productivities were achieved both on a lactose/arabinose mixture and on a glucose/arabinose mixture.

  5. Evaluation of a peat moss plus soybean oil (PMSO) technology for reducing explosive residue transport to groundwater at military training ranges under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Mark E; Schaefer, Charles E; Steffan, Robert J

    2009-11-01

    An evaluation of peat moss plus crude soybean oil (PMSO) for mitigation of explosive contamination of soil at military facilities was performed using large soil lysimeters under field conditions. Actual range soils were used, and two PMSO preparations with different ratios of peat moss:soybean oil (1:1, PO1; 1:2, PO2) were compared to a control lysimeter that received no PMSO. PMSO was applied as a 10 cm layer on top of the soil, and Composition B detonation residues from a 55-mm mortar round were applied at the surface of each of the lysimeters. Dissolution of the residues occurred during natural precipitation events over the course of 18 months. Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) emanating from the Composition B residues were significantly reduced by the PO2 PMSO material compared to the untreated control. Soil pore water RDX concentrations and RDX fluxes were reduced over 100-fold compared to the control plots at comparable depths. Residual RDX in the soil profile was also significantly lower in the PMSO treated plots. PO1 PMSO resulted in lower reductions in RDX transport than the PO2 PMSO. The transport of the RDX breakdown product hexahydro-1-nitroso-3,5-dinitro-1,3,5-triazine (MNX) was also greatly reduced by the PMSO materials. Results were in general agreement with a previously developed fate and transport model describing PMSO effectiveness. These results demonstrate the potential effectiveness of the inexpensive and environmentally benign PMSO technology for reducing the subsurface loading of explosives at training ranges and other military facilities.

  6. Arabinan-deficient mutants of Corynebacterium glutamicum and the consequent flux in decaprenylmonophosphoryl-D-arabinose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Alderwick, Luke J; Dover, Lynn G; Seidel, Mathias; Gande, Roland; Sahm, Hermann; Eggeling, Lothar; Besra, Gurdyal S

    2006-11-01

    The arabinogalactan (AG) of Corynebacterianeae is a critical macromolecule that tethers mycolic acids to peptidoglycan, thus forming a highly impermeable cell wall matrix termed the mycolyl-arabinogalactan peptidoglycan complex (mAGP). The front line anti-tuberculosis drug, ethambutol (Emb), targets the Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Corynebacterium glutamicum arabinofuranosyltransferase Mt-EmbA, Mt-EmbB and Cg-Emb enzymes, respectively, which are responsible for the biosynthesis of the arabinan domain of AG. The substrate utilized by these important glycosyltransferases, decaprenylmonophosphoryl-D-arabinose (DPA), is synthesized via a decaprenylphosphoryl-5-phosphoribose (DPPR) synthase (UbiA), which catalyzes the transfer of 5-phospho-ribofuranose-pyrophosphate (pRpp) to decaprenol phosphate to form DPPR. Glycosyl compositional analysis of cell walls extracted from a C. glutamicum::ubiA mutant revealed a galactan core consisting of alternating beta(1-->5)-Galf and beta(1-->6)-Galf residues, completely devoid of arabinan and a concomitant loss of cell-wall-bound mycolic acids. In addition, in vitro assays demonstrated a complete loss of arabinofuranosyltransferase activity and DPA biosynthesis in the C. glutamicum::ubiA mutant when supplemented with p[14C]Rpp, the precursor of DPA. Interestingly, in vitro arabinofuranosyltransferase activity was restored in the C. glutamicum::ubiA mutant when supplemented with exogenous DP[14C]A substrate, and C. glutamicum strains deficient in ubiA, emb, and aftA all exhibited different levels of DPA biosynthesis.

  7. Elastic/plastic analyses of advanced composites investigating the use of the compliant layer concept in reducing residual stresses resulting from processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Arya, Vinod K.; Melis, Matthew E.

    1990-01-01

    High residual stresses within intermetallic and metal matrix composite systems can develop upon cooling from the processing temperature to room temperature due to the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch between the fiber and matrix. As a result, within certain composite systems, radial, circumferential, and/or longitudinal cracks have been observed to form at the fiber-matrix interface. The compliant layer concept (insertion of a compensating interface material between the fiber and matrix) was proposed to reduce or eliminate the residual stress buildup during cooling and thus minimize cracking. The viability of the proposed compliant layer concept is investigated both elastically and elastoplastically. A detailed parametric study was conducted using a unit cell model consisting of three concentric cylinders to determine the required character (i.e., thickness and material properties) of the compliant layer as well as its applicability. The unknown compliant layer mechanical properties were expressed as ratios of the corresponding temperature dependent Ti-24Al-11Nb (a/o) matrix properties. The fiber properties taken were those corresponding to SCS-6 (SiC). Results indicate that the compliant layer can be used to reduce, if not eliminate, radial and circumferential residual stresses within the fiber and matrix and therefore also reduce or eliminate the radial cracking. However, with this decrease in in-plane stresses, one obtains an increase in longitudinal stress, thus potentially initiating longitudinal cracking. Guidelines are given for the selection of a specific compliant material, given a perfectly bonded system.

  8. Boost the electron mobility of solution-grown organic single crystals via reducing the amount of polar solvent residues

    DOE PAGES

    Xue, Guobiao; Xin, Huolin L.; Wu, Jiake; Fan, Congcheng; Liu, Shuang; Huang, Zhuoting; Liu, Yujing; Shan, Bowen; Miao, Qian; Chen, Hongzheng; et al

    2015-10-29

    Enhancing electron transport to match with the development in hole transport is critical for organic electronics in the future. As electron motion is susceptible to extrinsic factors, seeking these factors and avoiding their negative effects have become the central challenge. Here, the existence of polar solvent residues in solution-grown single-crystals of 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)-5,7,12,14-tetraazapentacene is identified as a factor detrimental to electron motion. Field-effect transistors of the crystals exhibit electron mobility boosted by about 60% after the residues are removed. The average electron mobility reaches up to 8.0 ± 2.2 cm2 V–1 s–1 with a highest value of 13.3 cm2 V–1 s–1;more » these results are significantly higher than those obtained previously for the same molecule (1.0–5.0 cm2 V–1 s–1). Furthermore, the achieved mobility is also higher than the maximum reported electron mobility for organic materials (11 cm2 V–1 s–1). As a result, this work should greatly accelerate the advancement of organic electron-transporting materials.« less

  9. Bacterial L-arabinose isomerases: industrial application for D-tagatose production.

    PubMed

    Boudebbouze, Samira; Maguin, Emmanuelle; Rhimi, Moez

    2011-12-01

    D-tagatose is a natural monosaccharide with a low caloric value and has an anti-hyperglycemiant effect. This hexose has potential applications both in pharmaceutical and agro-food industries. However, the use of D-tagatose remains limited by its production cost. Many production procedures including chemical and biological processes were developed and patented. The most profitable production way is based on the use of L-arabinose isomerase which allows the manufacture of D-tagatose with an attractive rate. Future developments are focused on the generation of L-arabinose isomerases having biochemical properties satisfying the industrial applications. This report provides a brief review of the most recent patents that have been published relating to this area.

  10. A novel L-arabinose-responsive regulator discovered in the rice-blast fungus Pyricularia oryzae (Magnaporthe oryzae).

    PubMed

    Klaubauf, Sylvia; Zhou, Miaomiao; Lebrun, Marc-Henri; de Vries, Ronald P; Battaglia, Evy

    2016-02-01

    In this study we identified the L-arabinose-responsive regulator of Pyricularia oryzae that regulates L-arabinose release and catabolism. Previously we identified the Zn2Cys6 transcription factor (TF), AraR, that has this role in the Trichocomaceae family (Eurotiales), but is absent in other fungi. Candidate Zn2Cys6 TF genes were selected according to their transcript profiles on L-arabinose. Deletion mutants of these genes were screened for their growth phenotype on L-arabinose. One mutant, named Δara1, was further analyzed. Our analysis demonstrated that Ara1 from P. oryzae is the functional analog of AraR from A. niger, while there is no significant sequence similarity between them. PMID:26790567

  11. A novel L-arabinose-responsive regulator discovered in the rice-blast fungus Pyricularia oryzae (Magnaporthe oryzae).

    PubMed

    Klaubauf, Sylvia; Zhou, Miaomiao; Lebrun, Marc-Henri; de Vries, Ronald P; Battaglia, Evy

    2016-02-01

    In this study we identified the L-arabinose-responsive regulator of Pyricularia oryzae that regulates L-arabinose release and catabolism. Previously we identified the Zn2Cys6 transcription factor (TF), AraR, that has this role in the Trichocomaceae family (Eurotiales), but is absent in other fungi. Candidate Zn2Cys6 TF genes were selected according to their transcript profiles on L-arabinose. Deletion mutants of these genes were screened for their growth phenotype on L-arabinose. One mutant, named Δara1, was further analyzed. Our analysis demonstrated that Ara1 from P. oryzae is the functional analog of AraR from A. niger, while there is no significant sequence similarity between them.

  12. Use of In Vivo 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy To Elucidate l-Arabinose Metabolism in Yeasts▿

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, César; Neves, Ana Rute; Antunes, Alexandra M. M.; Noronha, João Paulo; Hahn-Hägerdal, Bärbel; Santos, Helena; Spencer-Martins, Isabel

    2008-01-01

    Candida arabinofermentans PYCC 5603T and Pichia guilliermondii PYCC 3012 were shown to grow well on l-arabinose, albeit exhibiting distinct features that justify an in-depth comparative study of their respective pentose catabolism. Carbon-13 labeling experiments coupled with in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used to investigate l-arabinose metabolism in these yeasts, thereby complementing recently reported physiological and enzymatic data. The label supplied in l-[2-13C]arabinose to nongrowing cells, under aerobic conditions, was found on C-1 and C-2 of arabitol and ribitol, on C-2 of xylitol, and on C-1, C-2, and C-3 of trehalose. The detection of labeled arabitol and xylitol constitutes additional evidence for the operation in yeast of the redox catabolic pathway, which is widespread among filamentous fungi. Furthermore, labeling at position C-1 of trehalose and arabitol demonstrates that glucose-6-phosphate is recycled through the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). This result was interpreted as a metabolic strategy to regenerate NADPH, the cofactor essential for sustaining l-arabinose catabolism at the level of l-arabinose reductase and l-xylulose reductase. Moreover, the observed synthesis of d-arabitol and ribitol provides a route with which to supply NAD+ under oxygen-limiting conditions. In P. guilliermondii PYCC 3012, the strong accumulation of l-arabitol (intracellular concentration of up to 0.4 M) during aerobic l-arabinose metabolism indicates the existence of a bottleneck at the level of l-arabitol 4-dehydrogenase. This report provides the first experimental evidence for a link between l-arabinose metabolism in fungi and the oxidative branch of the PPP and suggests rational guidelines for the design of strategies for the production of new and efficient l-arabinose-fermenting yeasts. PMID:18245253

  13. Induction of L-arabinose isomerase in gamma-irradiated Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, A.; Bhattacharya, A.K.

    1986-11-01

    Gamma irradiation of Escherichia coli B/r caused a dose-dependent inhibition of the capacity of the cells to synthesize L-arabinose isomerase in response to the inducer. At higher doses (18 krad and above), postirradiation incubation led to further inhibition of the capacity to synthesize L-arabinose isomerase, whereas cells receiving lower doses recovered from the damage to the enzyme synthesizing system following incubation. Cyclic AMP partially reversed the inhibitory effect on L-arabinose isomerase induction produced immediately after irradiation by all gamma-ray doses (up to 30 krad), but the enhanced inhibitory effect caused by induction in cells irradiated at higher doses could not be reversed by the nucleotide. It is suggested that although catabolite repression is partly responsible for causing the inhibition of the enzyme synthesizing capacity of the cells observed immediately after gamma irradiation, the enhanced inhibition caused by incubating cells irradiated at higher doses is not due to interference with the control mechanism regulated by catabolite repression.

  14. Thermal-hydraulic processes involved in loss of residual heat removal during reduced inventory operation. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, C.D.; McHugh, P.R.; Naff, S.A.; Johnsen, G.W.

    1991-02-01

    This paper identifies the topics needed to understand pressurized water reactor response to an extended loss of residual heat removal event during refueling and maintenance outages. By identifying the possible plant conditions and cooling methods that would be used for each cooling mode, the controlling thermal-hydraulic processes and phenomena were identified. Controlling processes and phenomena include: gravity drain, core water boil-off, and reflux cooling processes. Important subcategories of the reflux cooling processes include: the initiation of reflux cooling from various plant conditions, the effects of air on reflux cooling, core level depression effects, issues regarding the steam generator secondaries, and the special case of boiler-condenser cooling with once-through steam generators. 25 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Structure of the effector-binding domain of the arabinose repressor AraR from Bacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Procházková, Kateřina; Čermáková, Kateřina; Pachl, Petr; Sieglová, Irena; Fábry, Milan; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Řezáčová, Pavlína

    2012-02-01

    The crystal structure of the effector-binding domain of the transcriptional repressor AraR from B. subtilis in complex with the effector molecule (l-arabinose) was determined at 2.2 Å resolution. A detailed analysis of the crystal identified a dimer organization that is distinctive from that of other members of the GalR/LacI family. In Bacillus subtilis, the arabinose repressor AraR negatively controls the expression of genes in the metabolic pathway of arabinose-containing polysaccharides. The protein is composed of two domains of different phylogenetic origin and function: an N-terminal DNA-binding domain belonging to the GntR family and a C-terminal effector-binding domain that shows similarity to members of the GalR/LacI family. The crystal structure of the C-terminal effector-binding domain of AraR in complex with the effector l-arabinose has been determined at 2.2 Å resolution. The l-arabinose binding affinity was characterized by isothermal titration calorimetry and differential scanning fluorimetry; the K{sub d} value was 8.4 ± 0.4 µM. The effect of l-arabinose on the protein oligomeric state was investigated in solution and detailed analysis of the crystal identified a dimer organization which is distinctive from that of other members of the GalR/LacI family.

  16. The Effect of D-(−)-arabinose on Tyrosinase: An Integrated Study Using Computational Simulation and Inhibition Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong-Jian; Ji, Sunyoung; Fan, Yong-Qiang; Yan, Li; Yang, Jun-Mo; Zhou, Hai-Meng; Lee, Jinhyuk; Wang, Yu-Long

    2012-01-01

    Tyrosinase is a ubiquitous enzyme with diverse physiologic roles related to pigment production. Tyrosinase inhibition has been well studied for cosmetic, medicinal, and agricultural purposes. We simulated the docking of tyrosinase and D-(−)-arabinose and found a binding energy of −4.5 kcal/mol for theup-formof D-(−)-arabinose and −4.4 kcal/mol for thedown-form of D-(−)-arabinose. The results of molecular dynamics simulation suggested that D-(−)-arabinose interacts mostly with HIS85, HIS259, and HIS263, which are believed to be in the active site. Our kinetic study showed that D-(−)-arabinose is a reversible, mixed-type inhibitor of tyrosinase (α-value  = 6.11 ± 0.98, Ki = 0.21 ± 0.19 M). Measurements of intrinsic fluorescence showed that D-(−)-arabinose induced obvious tertiary changes to tyrosinase (binding constant K = 1.58 ± 0.02 M−1, binding number n = 1.49 ± 0.06). This strategy of predicting tyrosinase inhibition based on specific interactions of aldehyde and hydroxyl groups with the enzyme may prove useful for screening potential tyrosinase inhibitors. PMID:23365724

  17. Reducing residual stresses and deformations in selective laser melting through multi-level multi-scale optimization of cellular scanning strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Sankhya; Hattel, Jesper H.

    2016-04-01

    Residual stresses and deformations continue to remain one of the primary challenges towards expanding the scope of selective laser melting as an industrial scale manufacturing process. While process monitoring and feedback-based process control of the process has shown significant potential, there is still dearth of techniques to tackle the issue. Numerical modelling of selective laser melting process has thus been an active area of research in the last few years. However, large computational resource requirements have slowed the usage of these models for optimizing the process. In this paper, a calibrated, fast, multiscale thermal model coupled with a 3D finite element mechanical model is used to simulate residual stress formation and deformations during selective laser melting. The resulting reduction in thermal model computation time allows evolutionary algorithm-based optimization of the process. A multilevel optimization strategy is adopted using a customized genetic algorithm developed for optimizing cellular scanning strategy for selective laser melting, with an objective of reducing residual stresses and deformations. The resulting thermo-mechanically optimized cellular scanning strategies are compared with standard scanning strategies and have been used to manufacture standard samples.

  18. Does further clean-up reduce the matrix enhancement effect in gas chromatographic analysis of pesticide residues in food?

    PubMed

    Schenck, F J; Lehotay, S J

    2000-01-28

    Sample extracts of apples, peas, green beans, oranges, raspberries, clementines, carrots, and wheat obtained using the Food and Drug Administration (acetone extraction) and Canadian Pest Management Regulatory Agency (acetonitrile extraction) multiresidue methods for pesticides were subjected to clean-up using different solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges in an attempt to reduce or eliminate the matrix enhancement effect. The matrix enhancement effect is related to the blocking of active sites on the injector liner by matrix components, thereby increasing signal in the presence of matrix versus standards in solvent in which the pesticides themselves interact with the active sites. Graphitized carbon black (GCB) was often used in combination with various anion-exchange SPE cartridges. The extracts were then spiked with organophosphorus insecticides. These process standards were then compared to standards in acetone of the same concentration using gas chromatography with flame photometric detection or ion trap mass spectrometric detection. Sample matrix enhancement varied from little to no effect for some pesticides (e.g. chlorpyrifos, malathion) to >200% in the case of certain susceptible pesticides. The GCB removed color components but showed little effect in reducing matrix enhancement by itself. The anion-exchange cartridges in combination with GCB or not, substantially reduced the matrix enhancement effect but did not eliminate it. PMID:10677079

  19. Multivariate analysis of coconut residues by near infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rambo, M K D; Alves, A R; Garcia, W T; Ferreira, M M C

    2015-06-01

    Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy was used to determine the content of Klason lignin, acid-soluble lignin, total lignin, extractives, ash, acid-insoluble residue, glucose, xylose, rhamnose, galactose, arabinose, mannose and total sugars in coconut residues. The samples were analyzed at several processing stages: wet unground (WU), dried unground (DU) and dried and sieved (DS). Partial least squares models were built, and the models for the analytes exhibited R(2)>0.80, with the exceptions of rhamnose, arabinose, galactose, mannose and ash from all fractions, and the lignin content from the WU fraction, which were predicted poorly (R(2)<0.70). There were some significant differences between the models for the main lignocellulosic components at the various stages of biomass. These results proved that NIR spectroscopy is useful for analysis at biorefineries, and it can be used as a faster and more economical alternative to the standard methods.

  20. Overexpression of hydroxynitrile lyase in cassava roots elevates protein and free amino acids while reducing residual cyanogen levels.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Narayanan N; Ihemere, Uzoma; Ellery, Claire; Sayre, Richard T

    2011-01-01

    Cassava is the major source of calories for more than 250 million Sub-Saharan Africans, however, it has the lowest protein-to-energy ratio of any major staple food crop in the world. A cassava-based diet provides less than 30% of the minimum daily requirement for protein. Moreover, both leaves and roots contain potentially toxic levels of cyanogenic glucosides. The major cyanogen in cassava is linamarin which is stored in the vacuole. Upon tissue disruption linamarin is deglycosylated by the apolplastic enzyme, linamarase, producing acetone cyanohydrin. Acetone cyanohydrin can spontaneously decompose at pHs >5.0 or temperatures >35°C, or is enzymatically broken down by hydroxynitrile lyase (HNL) to produce acetone and free cyanide which is then volatilized. Unlike leaves, cassava roots have little HNL activity. The lack of HNL activity in roots is associated with the accumulation of potentially toxic levels of acetone cyanohydrin in poorly processed roots. We hypothesized that the over-expression of HNL in cassava roots under the control of a root-specific, patatin promoter would not only accelerate cyanogenesis during food processing, resulting in a safer food product, but lead to increased root protein levels since HNL is sequestered in the cell wall. Transgenic lines expressing a patatin-driven HNL gene construct exhibited a 2-20 fold increase in relative HNL mRNA levels in roots when compared with wild type resulting in a threefold increase in total root protein in 7 month old plants. After food processing, HNL overexpressing lines had substantially reduced acetone cyanohydrin and cyanide levels in roots relative to wild-type roots. Furthermore, steady state linamarin levels in intact tissues were reduced by 80% in transgenic cassava roots. These results suggest that enhanced linamarin metabolism contributed to the elevated root protein levels.

  1. An investigation of the equilibria between aqueous ribose, ribulose, and arabinose.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Y B; Goldberg, R N

    1985-08-01

    The thermodynamics of the equilibria between aqueous ribose, ribulose, and arabinose were investigated using high-pressure liquid chromatography and microcalorimetry. The reactions were carried out in aqueous phosphate buffer over the pH range 6.8-7.4 and over the temperature range 313.15-343.75 K using solubilized glucose isomerase with either Mg(NO3)2 or MgSO4 as cofactors. The equilibrium constants (K) and the standard state Gibbs energy (delta G degrees) and enthalpy (delta H degrees) changes at 298.15 K for the three equilibria investigated were found to be: ribose(aq) = ribulose(aq) K = 0.317, delta G degrees = 2.85 +/- 0.14 kJ mol-1, delta H degrees = 11.0 +/- 1.5 kJ mol-1; ribose(aq) = arabinose(aq) K = 4.00, delta G degrees = -3.44 +/- 0.30 kJ mol-1, delta H degrees = -9.8 +/- 3.0 kJ mol-1; ribulose(aq) = arabinose(aq) K = 12.6, delta G degrees = -6.29 +/- 0.34 kJ mol-1, delta H degrees = -20.75 +/- 3.4 kJ mol-1. Information on rates of the above reactions was also obtained. The temperature dependencies of the equilibrium constants are conveniently expressed as R in K = -delta G degrees 298.15/298.15 + delta H degrees 298.15[(1/298.15)-(1/T)] where R is the gas constant (8.31441 J mol-1 K-1) and T the thermodynamic temperature.

  2. A mixed diet supplemented with L-arabinose does not alter glycaemic or insulinaemic responses in healthy human subjects.

    PubMed

    Halschou-Jensen, Kia; Bach Knudsen, Knud E; Nielsen, Søren; Bukhave, Klaus; Andersen, Jens R

    2015-01-14

    In addition to a yet-to-be published study showing arabinose to have an inhibiting effect on maltase, in vitro studies have shown L-arabinose to exert an inhibiting effect on small-intestinal sucrase and maltase and the consumption of a sucrose-rich drink containing L-arabinose to exert positive effects on postprandial blood glucose, insulin and C-peptide responses in humans. However, the effects of adding L-arabinose to mixed meals on the indices of glucose control are unknown. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether the positive effects of L-arabinose added to a sugar drink could be reproduced in subjects consuming a mixed meal containing sucrose and/or starch from wheat flour. A total of seventeen healthy men participated in study 1, a randomised, double-blind, cross-over trial. In this study, the subjects consumed two different breakfast meals containing sucrose and starch from wheat flour (meal A) or starch from wheat flour (meal B) supplemented with 0, 5 and 10 % L-arabinose by weight after a 12 h fast. A total of six healthy men participated in study 2, a randomised, double-blind, cross-over trial. In this study, the subjects also consumed meal B served in two different textures and a liquid meal with maltose supplemented with 0 and 20% L-arabinose. In addition, 1·5 g of paracetamol was chosen as an indirect marker to assess gastric emptying. Postprandial plasma glucose, insulin and C-peptide concentrations were measured regularly for 3 h. The results of the present study showed that the peak plasma concentration, time to reach peak plasma concentration or AUC values of glucose, insulin and C-peptide were not altered after consumption of the test meals. Overall, it was not possible to reproduce the beneficial effects of L-arabinose added to sucrose drinks when L-arabinose was mixed in a solid or semi-solid mixed meal. PMID:25400106

  3. A mixed diet supplemented with L-arabinose does not alter glycaemic or insulinaemic responses in healthy human subjects.

    PubMed

    Halschou-Jensen, Kia; Bach Knudsen, Knud E; Nielsen, Søren; Bukhave, Klaus; Andersen, Jens R

    2015-01-14

    In addition to a yet-to-be published study showing arabinose to have an inhibiting effect on maltase, in vitro studies have shown L-arabinose to exert an inhibiting effect on small-intestinal sucrase and maltase and the consumption of a sucrose-rich drink containing L-arabinose to exert positive effects on postprandial blood glucose, insulin and C-peptide responses in humans. However, the effects of adding L-arabinose to mixed meals on the indices of glucose control are unknown. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether the positive effects of L-arabinose added to a sugar drink could be reproduced in subjects consuming a mixed meal containing sucrose and/or starch from wheat flour. A total of seventeen healthy men participated in study 1, a randomised, double-blind, cross-over trial. In this study, the subjects consumed two different breakfast meals containing sucrose and starch from wheat flour (meal A) or starch from wheat flour (meal B) supplemented with 0, 5 and 10 % L-arabinose by weight after a 12 h fast. A total of six healthy men participated in study 2, a randomised, double-blind, cross-over trial. In this study, the subjects also consumed meal B served in two different textures and a liquid meal with maltose supplemented with 0 and 20% L-arabinose. In addition, 1·5 g of paracetamol was chosen as an indirect marker to assess gastric emptying. Postprandial plasma glucose, insulin and C-peptide concentrations were measured regularly for 3 h. The results of the present study showed that the peak plasma concentration, time to reach peak plasma concentration or AUC values of glucose, insulin and C-peptide were not altered after consumption of the test meals. Overall, it was not possible to reproduce the beneficial effects of L-arabinose added to sucrose drinks when L-arabinose was mixed in a solid or semi-solid mixed meal.

  4. Syntheses of arabinose-derived pyrrolidine catalysts and their applications in intramolecular Diels-Alder reactions.

    PubMed

    Shing, Tony K M; Wu, Kwun W; Wu, Ho T; Xiao, Qicai

    2015-02-14

    Six chiral hydroxylated pyrrolidine catalysts were synthesized from commercially available D-arabinose in seven steps. Various aromatic substituents α to the amine can be introduced readily by a Grignard reaction, which enables facile optimization of the catalyst performance. The stereoselectivities of these catalysts have been assessed by comparing with those of MacMillan's imidazolidinone in a known intramolecular Diels-Alder (IMDA) reaction of a triene. Two additional IMDA reactions of symmetrical dienals with concomitant desymmetrisation further established the potential use of these novel amine catalysts. These pyrrolidines are valuable catalysts for other synthetic transformations. PMID:25503272

  5. Characterization of an L-arabinose isomerase from Bacillus thermoglucosidasius for D-tagatose production.

    PubMed

    Seo, Myung-Ji

    2013-01-01

    L-Arabinose isomerase from Bacillus thermoglucosidasius KCTC 1828 (BTAI) was expressed in Escherichia coli. The optimal temperature and pH for the activity of the purified BTAI were 40 °C and pH 7.0. The Mn(2+) ion was an activator of BTAI activity. The kinetic parameters of BTAI for D-galactose were a K(m) of 175 mM and a k(cat)/K(m) of 2.8 mM(-1)min(-1). The conversion ratio by BTAI to D-tagatose reached 45.6% at 40 °C.

  6. Synthesis of arabinose glycosyl sulfamides as potential inhibitors of mycobacterial cell wall biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Suthagar, Kajitha; Watson, Andrew J A; Wilkinson, Brendan L; Fairbanks, Antony J

    2015-09-18

    A series of arabinose glycosyl sulfamides with varying alkyl chain types and lengths were synthesised as mimics of decaprenolphosphoarabinose (DPA), and as potential inhibitors of mycobacterial cell wall biosynthesis. Unprecedented conversion of the desired furanose to the thermodynamically more stable pyranose form occurred during final de-protection. Biological testing against Mycobacterium smegmatis revealed low to moderate anti-mycobacterial activity with marked dependence on alkyl chain length, which in the case of mono-substituted sulfamides was maximal for a C-10 chain.

  7. Structure of the effector-binding domain of the arabinose repressor AraR from Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Procházková, Kateřina; Cermáková, Kateřina; Pachl, Petr; Sieglová, Irena; Fábry, Milan; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Rezáčová, Pavlína

    2012-02-01

    In Bacillus subtilis, the arabinose repressor AraR negatively controls the expression of genes in the metabolic pathway of arabinose-containing polysaccharides. The protein is composed of two domains of different phylogenetic origin and function: an N-terminal DNA-binding domain belonging to the GntR family and a C-terminal effector-binding domain that shows similarity to members of the GalR/LacI family. The crystal structure of the C-terminal effector-binding domain of AraR in complex with the effector L-arabinose has been determined at 2.2 Å resolution. The L-arabinose binding affinity was characterized by isothermal titration calorimetry and differential scanning fluorimetry; the K(d) value was 8.4 ± 0.4 µM. The effect of L-arabinose on the protein oligomeric state was investigated in solution and detailed analysis of the crystal identified a dimer organization which is distinctive from that of other members of the GalR/LacI family.

  8. Assessment of some straw-derived materials for reducing the leaching potential of Metribuzin residues in the soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cara, Irina Gabriela; Trincă, Lucia Carmen; Trofin, Alina Elena; Cazacu, Ana; Ţopa, Denis; Peptu, Cătălina Anişoara; Jităreanu, Gerard

    2015-12-01

    Biomass (straw waste) can be used as raw to obtain materials for herbicide removal from wastewater. These by-products have some important advantages, being environmentally friendly, easily available, presenting low costs, and requiring little processing to increase their adsorptive capacity. In the present study, some materials derived from agricultural waste (wheat, corn and soybean straw) were investigated as potential adsorbents for metribuzin removal from aqueous solutions. The straw wastes were processed by grinding, mineralisation (850 °C) and KOH activation in order to improve their functional surface activity. The materials surface characteristics were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. The adsorbents capacity was evaluated using batch sorption tests and liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry for herbicide determination. For adsorption isotherms, the equilibrium time considered was 3 h. The experimental adsorption data were modelled by Freundlich and Langmuir models. The activated straw and ash-derived materials from wheat, corn and soybean increased the adsorption capacity of metribuzin with an asymmetrical behaviour. Overall, our results sustain that activated ash-derived from straw and activated straw materials can be a valuable solution for reducing the leaching potential of metribuzin through soil.

  9. Molecular characterization of a thermostable L-fucose isomerase from Dictyoglomus turgidum that isomerizes L-fucose and D-arabinose.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seung-Hye; Lim, Yu-Ri; Kim, Yeong-Su; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2012-09-01

    A recombinant thermostable l-fucose isomerase from Dictyoglomus turgidum was purified with a specific activity of 93 U/mg by heat treatment and His-trap affinity chromatography. The native enzyme existed as a 410 kDa hexamer. The maximum activity for l-fucose isomerization was observed at pH 7.0 and 80 °C with a half-life of 5 h in the presence of 1 mM Mn(2+) that was present one molecular per monomer. The isomerization activity of the enzyme with aldose substrates was highest for l-fucose (with a k(cat) of 15,500 min(-1) and a K(m) of 72 mM), followed by d-arabinose, d-altrose, and l-galactose. The 15 putative active-site residues within 5 Å of the substrate l-fucose in the homology model were individually replaced with other amino acids. The analysis of metal-binding capacities of these alanine-substituted variants revealed that Glu349, Asp373, and His539 were metal-binding residues, and His539 was the most influential residue for metal binding. The activities of all variants at 349 and 373 positions except for a dramatically decreased k(cat) of D373A were completely abolished, suggesting that Glu349 and Asp373 were catalytic residues. Alanine substitutions at Val131, Met197, Ile199, Gln314, Ser405, Tyr451, and Asn538 resulted in substantial increases in K(m), suggesting that these amino acids are substrate-binding residues. Alanine substitutions at Arg30, Trp102, Asn404, Phe452, and Trp510 resulted in decreases in k(cat), but had little effect on K(m).

  10. Identifying the key factors in increasing recycling and reducing residual household waste: a case study of the Flemish region of Belgium.

    PubMed

    Gellynck, X; Jacobsen, R; Verhelst, P

    2011-10-01

    The competent waste authority in the Flemish region of Belgium created the 'Implementation plan household waste 2003-2007' and the 'Implementation plan sustainable management 2010-2015' to comply with EU regulation. It incorporates European and regional requirements and describes strategies, goals, actions and instruments for the collection and treatment of household waste. The central mandatory goal is to reduce and maintain the amount of residual household waste to 150 kg per capita per year between 2010-2015. In literature, a reasonable body of information has been published on the effectiveness and efficiency of a variety of policy instruments, but the information is complex, often contradictory and difficult to interpret. The objective of this paper is to identify, through the development of a binary logistic regression model, those variables of the waste collection scheme that help municipalities to reach the mandatory 150 kg goal. The model covers a number of variables for household characteristics, provision of recycling services, frequency of waste collection and charging for waste services. This paper, however, is not about waste prevention and reuse. The dataset originates from 2003. Four out of 12 variables in the model contributed significantly: income per capita, cost of residual waste collection, collection frequency and separate curbside collection of organic waste.

  11. Urea Hydrogen Peroxide Reduces the Numbers of Lactobacilli, Nourishes Yeast, and Leaves No Residues in the Ethanol Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Narendranath, N. V.; Thomas, K. C.; Ingledew, W. M.

    2000-01-01

    Urea hydrogen peroxide (UHP) at a concentration of 30 to 32 mmol/liter reduced the numbers of five Lactobacillus spp. (Lactobacillus plantarum, L. paracasei, Lactobacillus sp. strain 3, L. rhamnosus, and L. fermentum) from ∼107 to ∼102 CFU/ml in a 2-h preincubation at 30°C of normal-gravity wheat mash at ∼21 g of dissolved solids per ml containing normal levels of suspended grain particles. Fermentation was completed 36 h after inoculation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the presence of UHP, even when wheat mash was deliberately contaminated (infected) with L. paracasei at ∼107 CFU/ml. There were no significant differences in the maximum ethanol produced between treatments when urea hydrogen peroxide was used to kill the bacteria and controls (in which no bacteria were added). However, the presence of L. paracasei at ∼107 CFU/ml without added agent resulted in a 5.84% reduction in the maximum ethanol produced compared to the control. The bactericidal activity of UHP is greatly affected by the presence of particulate matter. In fact, only 2 mmol of urea hydrogen peroxide per liter was required for disinfection when mashes had little or no particulate matter present. No significant differences were observed in the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in normal-gravity wheat mash at 30°C whether the bactericidal agent was added as H2O2 or as urea hydrogen peroxide. NADH peroxidase activity (involved in degrading H2O2) increased significantly (P = 0.05) in the presence of 0.75 mM hydrogen peroxide (sublethal level) in all five strains of lactobacilli tested but did not persist in cells regrown in the absence of H2O2. H2O2-resistant mutants were not expected or found when lethal levels of H2O2 or UHP were used. Contaminating lactobacilli can be effectively managed by UHP, a compound which when used at ca. 30 mmol/liter happens to provide near-optimum levels of assimilable nitrogen and oxygen that aid in vigorous fermentation performance by yeast. PMID:11010858

  12. Immobilization of β-glucosidase from Aspergillus niger on κ-carrageenan hybrid matrix and its application on the production of reducing sugar from macroalgae cellulosic residue.

    PubMed

    Tan, Inn Shi; Lee, Keat Teong

    2015-05-01

    A novel concept for the synthesis of a stable polymer hybrid matrix bead was developed in this study. The beads were further applied for enzyme immobilization to produce stable and active biocatalysts with low enzyme leakage, and high immobilization efficiency, enzyme activity, and recyclability. The immobilization conditions, including PEI concentration, activation time and pH of the PEI solution were investigated and optimized. All formulated beads were characterized for its functionalized groups, composition, surface morphology and thermal stability. Compared with the free β-glucosidase, the immobilized β-glucosidase on the hybrid matrix bead was able to tolerate broader range of pH values and higher reaction temperature up to 60 °C. The immobilized β-glucosidase was then used to hydrolyse pretreated macroalgae cellulosic residue (MCR) for the production of reducing sugar and a hydrolysis yield of 73.4% was obtained. After repeated twelve runs, immobilized β-glucosidase retained about 75% of its initial activity.

  13. Effect of Dietary l-arabinose on the Intestinal Microbiota and Metabolism of Dietary Daidzein in Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Motoi; Kurusu, Yukie; Hori, Sachiko

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of L-arabinose on mouse intestinal microbiota and urinary isoflavonoids. Male mice were randomly divided into two groups: those fed a 0.05% daidzein-2.5% L-arabinose diet (AR group) and those fed a 0.05% daidzein control diet (CO group) for 28 days. The amounts of daidzein detected in urine were significantly lower in the AR group than in the CO group. The ratio of equol/daidzein was significantly higher in the AR group (p<0.01) than in the CO group. The composition of caecal flora differed between the AR and CO groups. The occupation ratios of Prevotella and Lactobacillales were significantly lower in the AR group. This study suggests that dietary L-arabinose has the potential to affect the metabolism of equol from daidzein by altering the metabolic activity of intestinal microbiota.

  14. Analysis of the arabinose-5-phosphate isomerase of Bacteroides fragilis provides insight into regulation of single-domain arabinose phosphate isomerases.

    PubMed

    Cech, David; Wang, Pan Fen; Holler, Tod P; Woodard, Ronald W

    2014-08-01

    Arabinose-5-phosphate isomerases (APIs) catalyze the interconversion of d-ribulose-5-phosphate and D-arabinose-5-phosphate, the first step in the biosynthesis of 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid (Kdo), an essential component of the lipopolysaccharide in Gram-negative bacteria. Classical APIs, such as Escherichia coli KdsD, contain a sugar isomerase domain and a tandem cystathionine beta-synthase domain. Despite substantial effort, little is known about structure-function relationships in these APIs. We recently reported an API containing only a sugar isomerase domain. This protein, c3406 from E. coli CFT073, has no known physiological function. In this study, we investigated a putative single-domain API from the anaerobic Gram-negative bacterium Bacteroides fragilis. This putative API (UniProt ID Q5LIW1) is the only protein encoded by the B. fragilis genome with significant identity to any known API, suggesting that it is responsible for lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis in B. fragilis. We tested this hypothesis by preparing recombinant Q5LIW1 protein (here referred to by the UniProt ID Q5LIW1), characterizing its API activity in vitro, and demonstrating that the gene encoding Q5LIW1 (GenBank ID YP_209877.1) was able to complement an API-deficient E. coli strain. We demonstrated that Q5LIW1 is inhibited by cytidine 5'-monophospho-3-deoxy-D-manno-2-octulosonic acid, the final product of the Kdo biosynthesis pathway, with a Ki of 1.91 μM. These results support the assertion that Q5LIW1 is the API that supports lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis in B. fragilis and is subject to feedback regulation by CMP-Kdo. The sugar isomerase domain of E. coli KdsD, lacking the two cystathionine beta-synthase domains, demonstrated API activity and was further characterized. These results suggest that Q5LIW1 may be a suitable system to study API structure-function relationships.

  15. Computer simulation of protein—carbohydrate complexes: application to arabinose-binding protein and pea lectin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, V. S. R.; Biswas, Margaret; Mukhopadhyay, Chaitali; Balaji, P. V.

    1989-03-01

    The CCEM method (Contact Criteria and Energy Minimisation) has been developed and applied to study protein-carbohydrate interactions. The method uses available X-ray data even on the native protein at low resolution (above 2.4 Å) to generate realistic models of a variety of proteins with various ligands. The two examples discussed in this paper are arabinose-binding protein (ABP) and pea lectin. The X-ray crystal structure data reported on ABP-β- L-arabinose complex at 2.8, 2.4 and 1.7 Å resolution differ drastically in predicting the nature of the interactions between the protein and ligand. It is shown that, using the data at 2.4 Å resolution, the CCEM method generates complexes which are as good as the higher (1.7 Å) resolution data. The CCEM method predicts some of the important hydrogen bonds between the ligand and the protein which are missing in the interpretation of the X-ray data at 2.4 Å resolution. The theoretically predicted hydrogen bonds are in good agreement with those reported at 1.7 Å resolution. Pea lectin has been solved only in the native form at 3 Å resolution. Application of the CCEM method also enables us to generate complexes of pea lectin with methyl-α- D-glucopyranoside and methyl-2,3-dimethyl-α- D-glucopyranoside which explain well the available experimental data in solution.

  16. L-Arabinose isomerase and its use for biotechnological production of rare sugars.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zheng; Li, Sha; Feng, Xiaohai; Liang, Jinfeng; Xu, Hong

    2014-11-01

    L-Arabinose isomerase (AI), a key enzyme in the microbial pentose phosphate pathway, has been regarded as an important biological catalyst in rare sugar production. This enzyme could isomerize L-arabinose into L-ribulose, as well as D-galactose into D-tagatose. Both the two monosaccharides show excellent commercial values in food and pharmaceutical industries. With the identification of novel AI family members, some of them have exhibited remarkable potential in industrial applications. The biological production processes for D-tagatose and L-ribose (or L-ribulose) using AI have been developed and improved in recent years. Meanwhile, protein engineering techniques involving rational design has effectively enhanced the catalytic properties of various AIs. Moreover, the crystal structure of AI has been disclosed, which sheds light on the understanding of AI structure and catalytic mechanism at molecular levels. This article reports recent developments in (i) novel AI screening, (ii) AI-mediated rare sugar production processes, (iii) molecular modification of AI, and (iv) structural biology study of AI. Based on previous reports, an analysis of the future development has also been initiated.

  17. Structural analysis of arabinose-5-phosphate isomerase from Bacteroides fragilis and functional implications

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Grant, Joanna C.; Farr, Carol L.; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W.; Miller, Mitchell D.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    The crystal structure of arabinose-5-phosphate isomerase (API) from Bacteroides fragilis (bfAPI) was determined at 1.7 Å resolution and was found to be a tetramer of a single-domain sugar isomerase (SIS) with an endogenous ligand, CMP-Kdo (cytidine 5′-monophosphate-3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonate), bound at the active site. API catalyzes the reversible isomerization of d-ribulose 5-phosphate to d-arabinose 5-phosphate in the first step of the Kdo biosynthetic pathway. Interestingly, the bound CMP-Kdo is neither the substrate nor the product of the reaction catalyzed by API, but corresponds to the end product in the Kdo biosynthetic pathway and presumably acts as a feedback inhibitor for bfAPI. The active site of each monomer is located in a surface cleft at the tetramer interface between three monomers and consists of His79 and His186 from two different adjacent monomers and a Ser/Thr-rich region, all of which are highly conserved across APIs. Structure and sequence analyses indicate that His79 and His186 may play important catalytic roles in the isomerization reaction. CMP-Kdo mimetics could therefore serve as potent and specific inhibitors of API and provide broad protection against many different bacterial infections. PMID:25286848

  18. Structural analysis of arabinose-5-phosphate isomerase from Bacteroides fragilis and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hsiu Ju; Grant, Joanna C; Farr, Carol L; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W; Miller, Mitchell D; Elsliger, Marc André; Deacon, Ashley M; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A; Wilson, Ian A

    2014-10-01

    The crystal structure of arabinose-5-phosphate isomerase (API) from Bacteroides fragilis (bfAPI) was determined at 1.7 Å resolution and was found to be a tetramer of a single-domain sugar isomerase (SIS) with an endogenous ligand, CMP-Kdo (cytidine 5'-monophosphate-3-deoxy-D-manno-oct-2-ulosonate), bound at the active site. API catalyzes the reversible isomerization of D-ribulose 5-phosphate to D-arabinose 5-phosphate in the first step of the Kdo biosynthetic pathway. Interestingly, the bound CMP-Kdo is neither the substrate nor the product of the reaction catalyzed by API, but corresponds to the end product in the Kdo biosynthetic pathway and presumably acts as a feedback inhibitor for bfAPI. The active site of each monomer is located in a surface cleft at the tetramer interface between three monomers and consists of His79 and His186 from two different adjacent monomers and a Ser/Thr-rich region, all of which are highly conserved across APIs. Structure and sequence analyses indicate that His79 and His186 may play important catalytic roles in the isomerization reaction. CMP-Kdo mimetics could therefore serve as potent and specific inhibitors of API and provide broad protection against many different bacterial infections.

  19. Production of L-arabinose from corn hull arabinoxylan by Arthrobacter aurescens MK5 α-L-arabinofuranosidase.

    PubMed

    Kurakake, Masahiro; Takao, Jyunpei; Asano, Osamu; Tanimoto, Hiroko; Komaki, Toshiaki

    2011-03-01

    Arabinoxylans, which are comprised of a xylan backbone to which are attached glycosyl units that are primarily L-arabinofuranosyl units, are ubiquitous among plant species where it is a constituent of the cell wall. Arabinoxylan has attracted much attention as a potential biomass resource and L-arabinose has recently been reported to possess functional properties that are effective in the treatment of diabetes. Here, we report an α-L-arabinofuranohydrolase, isolated from the soil microbe Arthrobacter aurescens strain MK5, effective in releasing L-arabinose from corn hull arabinoxylan. When A. aurescens strain MK5 was grown in a liquid medium, corn hull arabinoxylan, which has a higher arabinose content (Ara/Xyl = 0.6) than oat spelts xylan (Ara/Xyl = 0.12), induced more efficient arabinoxylan hydrolase production. Analysis of enzyme activity in the culture broth revealed that arabinoxylan hydrolase activity was high, and α-L-arabinofuranosidase and β-xylosidase activities were low. The optimum pH of the MK5 arabinoxylan hydrolase at 40 °C was around 7 and enzyme activity was relatively stable at an alkaline pH up to 9.5. The optimum temperature at pH 7 was around 50 °C and enzyme activity was stable under 50 °C. During the hydrolysis of corn hull arabinoxylan, only L-arabinose was released and 45.1% maximum sugar recovery was achieved. The A. aurescens MK5 enzyme was a typical arabinoxylan α-L-arabinofuranohydrolase and was most effective at releasing L-arabinose from corn hull arabinoxylan, which has a high arabinose content. This enzyme may have important industrial applications.

  20. Burkholderia cenocepacia and Salmonella enterica ArnT proteins that transfer 4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose to lipopolysaccharide share membrane topology and functional amino acids.

    PubMed

    Tavares-Carreón, Faviola; Patel, Kinnari B; Valvano, Miguel A

    2015-06-01

    We recently demonstrated that incorporation of 4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose (l-Ara4N) to the lipid A moiety of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is required for transport of LPS to the outer membrane and viability of the Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia cenocepacia. ArnT is a membrane protein catalyzing the transfer of l-Ara4N to the LPS molecule at the periplasmic face of the inner membrane, but its topology and mechanism of action are not well characterized. Here, we elucidate the topology of ArnT and identify key amino acids that likely contribute to its enzymatic function. PEGylation assays using a cysteineless version of ArnT support a model of 13 transmembrane helices and a large C-terminal region exposed to the periplasm. The same topological configuration is proposed for the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium ArnT. Four highly conserved periplasmic residues in B. cenocepacia ArnT, tyrosine-43, lysine-69, arginine-254 and glutamic acid-493, were required for activity. Tyrosine-43 and lysine-69 span two highly conserved motifs, (42)RYA(44) and (66)YFEKP(70), that are found in ArnT homologues from other species. The same residues in S. enterica ArnT are also needed for function. We propose these aromatic and charged amino acids participate in either undecaprenyl phosphate-l-Ara4N substrate recognition or transfer of l-Ara4N to the LPS.

  1. Enantiomeric organogelators from D-/L-arabinose for phase selective gelation of crude oil and their gel as a photochemical micro-reactor.

    PubMed

    Rajkamal; Chatterjee, Debnath; Paul, Abhijit; Banerjee, Srirupa; Yadav, Somnath

    2014-10-18

    Enantiomeric D- or L-arabinose based low molecular-weight organogelators (LMOGs), accessible in a single synthetic step from D-/L-arabinose have been found to be efficient gelators for aromatic solvents and refined and crude oil. The organogel has also been successfully used as a micro-reactor for a photochemical reaction.

  2. Reduced susceptibility to all neuraminidase inhibitors of influenza H1N1 viruses with haemagglutinin mutations and mutations in non-conserved residues of the neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    McKimm-Breschkin, Jennifer L.; Williams, Janelle; Barrett, Susan; Jachno, Kim; McDonald, Mandy; Mohr, Peter G.; Saito, Takehiko; Tashiro, Masato

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We characterized human H1N1 influenza isolate A/Hokkaido/15/02, which has haemagglutinin and neuraminidase mutations that reduce drug susceptibility to oseltamivir, zanamivir and peramivir. Methods One wild-type and three mutant viruses were isolated by plaque purification. Viruses were tested in MUNANA-based enzyme assays, cell culture and receptor binding assays. Results Two viruses had a neuraminidase Y155H mutation that reduced susceptibility in the enzyme inhibition assay to all inhibitors by 30-fold to >100-fold. The Y155H mutation reduced plaque size and affected the stability, Km and pH activity profile of the enzyme. In contrast to previous mutants, this neuraminidase demonstrated a slower rate of inhibitor binding in the IC50 kinetics assay. One virus had both the Y155H mutation and a haemagglutinin D225G mutation that rescued the small-plaque phenotype of the Y155H virus and affected receptor binding and drug susceptibility in cell culture and binding assays. We also isolated a third mutant virus, with both neuraminidase V114I and haemagglutinin D225N mutations, which affected susceptibility in the enzyme inhibition assay and receptor binding, respectively, but to lesser extents than the Y155H and D225G mutations. Conclusions Neither Y155 nor V114 is conserved across neuraminidase subtypes. Furthermore, Y155 is not conserved even among avian and swine N1 viruses. Structurally, both residues reside far from the neuraminidase active site. D225 forms part of the receptor binding site of the haemagglutinin. We believe this is the first demonstration of a specific haemagglutinin mutation correlating with reduced drug susceptibility in plaque assays in both Madin Darby Canine Kidney and SIAT cells. PMID:23759505

  3. The residual and direct effects of reduced-risk and conventional miticides on twospotted spider mites, Tetranychus urticae (Acari: Tetranychidae) and predatory mites (Acari: Phytoseiidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Liburd, O.E.; White, J.C.; Rhodes, E.M.; Browdy, A.A.

    2007-03-15

    The residual effects of several reduced-risk and conventional miticides were evaluated in strawberries (Fragaria z ananassa Duchesne) on the twospotted spider mite (TSSM), Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae) and on 2 predatory mites, Neoseiulus californicus McGregor and Phytoseiulus persimilis Athias-Henriot (Acari: Phytoseiidae). Experiments were conducted in the laboratory and greenhouse. The greenhouse experiments also tested the direct effects of the miticides on TSSM. The efficacy of conventional and reduced-risk miticides was evaluated on strawberry leaf discs and on whole plants for control of TSSM. Furthermore, the residual effects of these miticides were evaluated on whole strawberry plants against selective predatory mites. For TSSM, 5 treatments were evaluated: a conventional miticide; fenbutatin-oxide (Vendex[reg]) and 3 reduced-risk miticides; binfenazate (Acramite 50WP[reg]), activated garlic extract (Repel[reg]), sesame seed and castor oil (Wipeout[reg]), and a water-treated control. For predatory mites, the residual effects of only Acramite[reg] and Vendex[reg] were evaluated. Acramite[reg] was the most effective acaricide in reducing TSSM populations in both the laboratory and greenhouse experiments. Vendex[reg] and Wipeout[reg] were also effective in the laboratory, but did not cause significant reduction of TSSM in the greenhouse. Repel[reg] was the least effective of the 4 pesticides evaluated. Neither Acramite[reg] nor Vendex[reg] had a significant effect on either predatory mite species. However, there appeared to be more predatory mites on the Vendex[reg]-treated plants than on the Acramite[reg]-treated plants. There were significantly more predatory mites of both species on the cue plants, which were inoculated with TSSM versus the non-cue plants, which were not inoculated. (author) [Spanish] Los efectos residuales en poblaciones de la 'arana roja', Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranichidae) y de los acaros predadores

  4. Product PCNPsurv or the "reduced" evaporation residue cross section σER/σfusion for "hot" fusion reactions studied with the dynamical cluster-decay model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, Sahila; Kaur, Arshdeep; Hemdeep, Gupta, Raj K.

    2016-04-01

    The product PCNPsurv of compound nucleus (CN) fusion probability PCN and survival probability Psurv is calculated to determine the reduced evaporation residue cross section σER/σfusion , denoted σERreduced, with (total) fusion cross section σfusion given as a sum of CN-formation cross section σCN and non-CN cross section σnCN for each reaction, where σCN is the sum of evaporation residue cross section σER and fusion-fission cross section σff and σnCN, if not measured, is estimated empirically as the difference between measured and calculated σfusion. Our calculations of PCN and Psurv, based on the dynamical cluster-decay model, were successfully made for some 17 "hot" fusion reactions, forming different CN of mass numbers ACN˜100 -300 , with deformations of nuclei up to hexadecapole deformations and "compact" orientations for both coplanar (Φc=0∘ ) and noncoplanar (Φc≠0∘ ) configurations, using various different nuclear interaction potentials. Interesting variations of σERreduced with CN excitation energy E*, fissility parameter χ , CN mass ACN, and Coulomb parameter Z1Z2 show that, independent of entrance channel, different isotopes of CN, and nuclear interaction potentials used, the dominant quantity in the product is Psurv, which classifies all the studied CN into three groups of weakly fissioning, radioactive, and strongly fissioning superheavy nuclei, with relative magnitudes of σERreduced˜1 , ˜10-6 , and ˜10-11 , which, like for PCN, get further grouped in two dependencies of (i) weakly fissioning and strongly fissioning superheavy nuclei decreasing with increasing E* and (ii) radioactive nuclei increasing with increasing E*.

  5. Industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yeast Strain Engineered to Convert Glucose, Mannose, Arabinose, and Xylose (GMAX) to Ethanol Anaerobically

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technology for engineering an industrial yeast strain for production of ethanol from glucose, mannose, arabinose, and xylose (GMAX-yeast) using both corn starch and cellulosic feedstocks with simultaneous production of valuable coproducts, including biodiesel, will be discussed. A stable industrial...

  6. Performance testing of Zymomonas mobilis metabolically engineered for cofermentation of glucose, xylose, and arabinose.

    PubMed

    Lawford, Hugh G; Rousseau, Joyce D

    2002-01-01

    IOGEN Corporation of Ottawa, Canada, has recently built a 40t/d biomass-to-ethanol demonstration plant adjacent to its enzyme production facility. It has partnered with the University of Toronto to test the C6/C5 cofermenta-tion performance characteristics of the National Renewable Energy Labora-tory's metabolically engineered Zymomonas mobilis using various biomass hydrolysates. IOGEN's feedstocks are primarily agricultural wastes such as corn stover and wheat straw. Integrated recombinant Z. mobilis strain AX101 grows on D-xylose and/or L-arabinose as the sole carbon/energy sources and ferments these pentose sugars to ethanol in high yield. Strain AX101 lacks the tetracycline resistance gene that was a common feature of other recombinant Zm constructs. Genomic integration provides reliable cofermentation performance in the absence of antibiotics, another characteristic making strain AX101 attractive for industrial cellulosic ethanol production. In this work, IOGEN's biomass hydrolysate was simulated by a pure sugar medium containing 6% (w/v) glucose, 3% xylose, and 0.35% arabinose. At a level of 3 g/L (dry solids), corn steep liquor with inorganic nitrogen (0.8 g/L of ammonium chloride or 1.2 g/L of diammonium phosphate) was a cost-effective nutritional supplement. In the absence of acetic acid, the maximum volumetric ethanol productivity of a continuous fermentation at pH 5.0 was 3.54 g/L x h. During prolonged continuous fermentation, the efficiency of sugar-to-ethanol conversion (based on total sugar load) was maintained at >85%. At a level of 0.25% (w/v) acetic acid, the productivity decreased to 1.17 g/L x h at pH 5.5. Unlike integrated, xylose-utilizing rec Zm strain C25, strain AX101 produces less lactic acid as byproduct, owing to the fact that the Escherichia coli arabinose genes are inserted into a region of the host chromosome tentatively assigned to the gene for D-lactic acid dehydrogenase. In pH-controlled batch fermentations with sugar mixtures, the

  7. Copper-dependent inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase by Abeta(1-42) requires reduced methionine at residue 35 of the Abeta peptide.

    PubMed

    Crouch, Peter J; Barnham, Kevin J; Duce, James A; Blake, Rachel E; Masters, Colin L; Trounce, Ian A

    2006-10-01

    By altering key amino acid residues of the Alzheimer's disease-associated amyloid-beta peptide, we investigated the mechanism through which amyloid-beta inhibits cytochrome c oxidase (EC 1.9.3.1). Native amyloid-beta inhibited cytochrome oxidase by up to 65%, and the level of inhibition was determined by the period of amyloid-beta ageing before the cytochrome oxidase assay. Substituting tyrosine-10 with alanine did not affect maximal enzyme inhibition, but the altered peptide required a longer period of ageing. By contrast, oxidizing the sulfur of methionine-35 to a sulfoxide, or substituting methionine-35 with valine, completely abrogated the peptide's inhibitory potential towards cytochrome oxidase. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that the loss of inhibitory potential towards cytochrome oxidase with the methionine-35-altered peptides did not correlate with a substantially different distribution of amyloid-beta oligomeric species. Although the amyloid-beta-mediated inhibition of cytochrome oxidase was completely dependent on the presence of divalent Cu2+, it was not supported by monovalent Cu+, and experiments with catalase and H2O2 indicated that the mechanism of cytochrome oxidase inhibition does not involve amyloid-beta-mediated H2O2 production. We propose that amyloid-beta-mediated inhibition of cytochrome oxidase is dependent on the peptide's capacity to bind, then reduce Cu2+, and that it may involve the formation of a redox active amyloid-beta-methionine radical. PMID:16987248

  8. Genetic engineering and improvement of a Zymomonas mobilis for arabinose utilization and its performance on pretreated corn stover hydrolyzate

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Yat -Chen; Linger, Jeffrey; Yang, Shihui; Zhang, Min

    2015-04-28

    In this paper, a glucose, xylose and arabinose utilizing Zymomonas mobilis strain was constructed by incorporating arabinose catabolic pathway genes, araBAD encoding L-ribulokinase, L-arabinose isomerase and L-ribulose-5-phosphate- 4-epimerase in a glucose, xylose co-fermenting host, 8b, using a transposition integration approach. Further improvement on this arabinose-capable integrant, 33C was achieved by applying a second transposition to create a genomic knockout (KO) mutant library. Using arabinose as a sole carbon source and a selection pressure, the KO library was subjected to a growth-enrichment process involving continuous sub-culturing for over 120 generations. Strain 13-1-17, isolated from such process demonstrated significant improvement in metabolizing arabinose in a dilute acid pretreated, saccharified corn stover slurry. Through Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) analysis, integration sites of the transposons were identified. Furthermore, multiple additional point mutations (SNPs: Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms) were discovered in 13-1-17, affecting genes araB and RpiB in the genome. Finally, we speculate that these mutations may have impacted the expression of the enzymes coded by these genes, ribulokinase and Ribose 5-P-isomerase, thus attributing to the improvement of the arabinose utilization.

  9. Effect of C-Terminal Protein Tags on Pentitol and l-Arabinose Transport by Ambrosiozyma monospora Lat1 and Lat2 Transporters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Peter; Valkonen, Mari; Viljanen, Kaarina

    2014-01-01

    Functional expression in heterologous hosts is often less successful for integral membrane proteins than for soluble proteins. Here, two Ambrosiozyma monospora transporters were successfully expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as tagged proteins. Growth of A. monospora on l-arabinose instead of glucose caused transport activities of l-arabinose, l-arabitol, and ribitol, measured using l-[1-3H]arabinose, l-[14C]arabitol, and [14C]ribitol of demonstrated purity. A. monospora LAT1 and LAT2 genes were cloned earlier by using their ability to improve the growth of genetically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae on l-arabinose. However, the l-arabinose and pentitol transport activities of S. cerevisiae carrying LAT1 or LAT2 are only slightly greater than those of control strains. S. cerevisiae carrying the LAT1 or LAT2 gene fused in frame to the genes for green fluorescent protein (GFP) or red fluorescent protein (mCherry) or adenylate kinase (AK) exhibited large (>3-fold for LAT1; >20-fold for LAT2) increases in transport activities. Lat1-mCherry transported l-arabinose with high affinity (Km ≈ 0.03 mM) and l-arabitol and ribitol with very low affinity (Km ≥ 75 mM). The Lat2-GFP, Lat2-mCherry, and Lat2-AK fusion proteins could not transport l-arabinose but were high-affinity pentitol transporters (Kms ≈ 0.2 mM). The l-arabinose and pentitol transport activities of A. monospora could not be completely explained by any combination of the observed properties of tagged Lat1 and Lat2, suggesting either that tagging and expression in a foreign membrane alters the transport kinetics of Lat1 and/or Lat2 or that A. monospora contains at least one more l-arabinose transporter. PMID:24561586

  10. Effect of C-terminal protein tags on pentitol and L-arabinose transport by Ambrosiozyma monospora Lat1 and Lat2 transporters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Londesborough, John; Richard, Peter; Valkonen, Mari; Viljanen, Kaarina

    2014-05-01

    Functional expression in heterologous hosts is often less successful for integral membrane proteins than for soluble proteins. Here, two Ambrosiozyma monospora transporters were successfully expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as tagged proteins. Growth of A. monospora on l-arabinose instead of glucose caused transport activities of l-arabinose, l-arabitol, and ribitol, measured using l-[1-(3)H]arabinose, l-[(14)C]arabitol, and [(14)C]ribitol of demonstrated purity. A. monospora LAT1 and LAT2 genes were cloned earlier by using their ability to improve the growth of genetically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae on l-arabinose. However, the l-arabinose and pentitol transport activities of S. cerevisiae carrying LAT1 or LAT2 are only slightly greater than those of control strains. S. cerevisiae carrying the LAT1 or LAT2 gene fused in frame to the genes for green fluorescent protein (GFP) or red fluorescent protein (mCherry) or adenylate kinase (AK) exhibited large (>3-fold for LAT1; >20-fold for LAT2) increases in transport activities. Lat1-mCherry transported l-arabinose with high affinity (Km ≈ 0.03 mM) and l-arabitol and ribitol with very low affinity (Km ≥ 75 mM). The Lat2-GFP, Lat2-mCherry, and Lat2-AK fusion proteins could not transport l-arabinose but were high-affinity pentitol transporters (Kms ≈ 0.2 mM). The l-arabinose and pentitol transport activities of A. monospora could not be completely explained by any combination of the observed properties of tagged Lat1 and Lat2, suggesting either that tagging and expression in a foreign membrane alters the transport kinetics of Lat1 and/or Lat2 or that A. monospora contains at least one more l-arabinose transporter.

  11. Chemical synthesis of Burkholderia Lipid A modified with glycosyl phosphodiester-linked 4-amino-4-deoxy-β-L-arabinose and its immunomodulatory potential.

    PubMed

    Hollaus, Ralph; Ittig, Simon; Hofinger, Andreas; Haegman, Mira; Beyaert, Rudi; Kosma, Paul; Zamyatina, Alla

    2015-03-01

    Modification of the Lipid A phosphates by positively charged appendages is a part of the survival strategy of numerous opportunistic Gram-negative bacteria. The phosphate groups of the cystic fibrosis adapted Burkholderia Lipid A are abundantly esterified by 4-amino-4-deoxy-β-L-arabinose (β-L-Ara4N), which imposes resistance to antibiotic treatment and contributes to bacterial virulence. To establish structural features accounting for the unique pro-inflammatory activity of Burkholderia LPS we have synthesised Lipid A substituted by β-L-Ara4N at the anomeric phosphate and its Ara4N-free counterpart. The double glycosyl phosphodiester was assembled by triazolyl-tris-(pyrrolidinyl)phosphonium-assisted coupling of the β-L-Ara4N H-phosphonate to α-lactol of β(1→6) diglucosamine, pentaacylated with (R)-(3)-acyloxyacyl- and Alloc-protected (R)-(3)-hydroxyacyl residues. The intermediate 1,1'-glycosyl-H-phosphonate diester was oxidised in anhydrous conditions to provide, after total deprotection, β-L-Ara4N-substituted Burkholderia Lipid A. The β-L-Ara4N modification significantly enhanced the pro-inflammatory innate immune signaling of otherwise non-endotoxic Burkholderia Lipid A.

  12. AraC protein, regulation of the l-arabinose operon in Escherichia coli, and the light switch mechanism of AraC action.

    PubMed

    Schleif, Robert

    2010-09-01

    This review covers the physiological aspects of regulation of the arabinose operon in Escherichia coli and the physical and regulatory properties of the operon's controlling gene, araC. It also describes the light switch mechanism as an explanation for many of the protein's properties. Although many thousands of homologs of AraC exist and regulate many diverse operons in response to many different inducers or physiological states, homologs that regulate arabinose-catabolizing genes in response to arabinose were identified. The sequence similarities among them are discussed in light of the known structure of the dimerization and DNA-binding domains of AraC.

  13. Ph+ ALL patients in first complete remission have similar survival after reduced intensity and myeloablative allogeneic transplantation: impact of tyrosine kinase inhibitor and minimal residual disease.

    PubMed

    Bachanova, V; Marks, D I; Zhang, M-J; Wang, H; de Lima, M; Aljurf, M D; Arellano, M; Artz, A S; Bacher, U; Cahn, J-Y; Chen, Y-B; Copelan, E A; Drobyski, W R; Gale, R P; Greer, J P; Gupta, V; Hale, G A; Kebriaei, P; Lazarus, H M; Lewis, I D; Lewis, V A; Liesveld, J L; Litzow, M R; Loren, A W; Miller, A M; Norkin, M; Oran, B; Pidala, J; Rowe, J M; Savani, B N; Saber, W; Vij, R; Waller, E K; Wiernik, P H; Weisdorf, D J

    2014-03-01

    The efficacy of reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for Philadelphia chromosome positive (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is uncertain. We analyzed 197 adults with Ph+ ALL in first complete remission; 67 patients receiving RIC were matched with 130 receiving myeloablative conditioning (MAC) for age, donor type and HCT year. Over 75% received pre-HCT tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), mostly imatinib; 39% (RIC) and 49% (MAC) were minimal residual disease (MRD)(neg) pre-HCT. At a median 4.5 years follow-up, 1-year transplant-related mortality (TRM) was lower in RIC (13%) than MAC (36%; P=0.001) while the 3-year relapse rate was 49% in RIC and 28% in MAC (P=0.058). Overall survival (OS) was similar (RIC 39% (95% confidence interval (CI) 27-52) vs 35% (95% CI 27-44); P=0.62). Patients MRD(pos) pre-HCT had higher risk of relapse with RIC vs MAC (hazard ratio (HR) 1.97; P=0.026). However, patients receiving pre-HCT TKI in combination with MRD negativity pre-RIC HCT had superior OS (55%) compared with a similar MRD population after MAC (33%; P=0.0042). In multivariate analysis, RIC lowered TRM (HR 0.6; P=0.057), but absence of pre-HCT TKI (HR 1.88; P=0.018), RIC (HR 1.891; P=0.054) and pre-HCT MRD(pos) (HR 1.6; P=0.070) increased relapse risk. RIC is a valid alternative strategy for Ph+ ALL patients ineligible for MAC and MRD(neg) status is preferred pre-HCT.

  14. Aerobic Growth of Escherichia coli Is Reduced, and ATP Synthesis Is Selectively Inhibited when Five C-terminal Residues Are Deleted from the ϵ Subunit of ATP Synthase.

    PubMed

    Shah, Naman B; Duncan, Thomas M

    2015-08-21

    F-type ATP synthases are rotary nanomotor enzymes involved in cellular energy metabolism in eukaryotes and eubacteria. The ATP synthase from Gram-positive and -negative model bacteria can be autoinhibited by the C-terminal domain of its ϵ subunit (ϵCTD), but the importance of ϵ inhibition in vivo is unclear. Functional rotation is thought to be blocked by insertion of the latter half of the ϵCTD into the central cavity of the catalytic complex (F1). In the inhibited state of the Escherichia coli enzyme, the final segment of ϵCTD is deeply buried but has few specific interactions with other subunits. This region of the ϵCTD is variable or absent in other bacteria that exhibit strong ϵ-inhibition in vitro. Here, genetically deleting the last five residues of the ϵCTD (ϵΔ5) caused a greater defect in respiratory growth than did the complete absence of the ϵCTD. Isolated membranes with ϵΔ5 generated proton-motive force by respiration as effectively as with wild-type ϵ but showed a nearly 3-fold decrease in ATP synthesis rate. In contrast, the ϵΔ5 truncation did not change the intrinsic rate of ATP hydrolysis with membranes. Further, the ϵΔ5 subunit retained high affinity for isolated F1 but reduced the maximal inhibition of F1-ATPase by ϵ from >90% to ∼20%. The results suggest that the ϵCTD has distinct regulatory interactions with F1 when rotary catalysis operates in opposite directions for the hydrolysis or synthesis of ATP.

  15. Identification of GutQ from Escherichia coli as a D-arabinose 5-phosphate isomerase.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Timothy C; Woodard, Ronald W

    2005-10-01

    The glucitol operon (gutAEBDMRQ) of Escherichia coli encodes a phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system that metabolizes the hexitol D-glucitol (sorbitol). The functions for all but the last gene, gutQ, have been previously assigned. The high sequence similarity between GutQ and KdsD, a D-arabinose 5-phosphate isomerase (API) from the 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonate (KDO)-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthetic pathway, suggested a putative activity, but its role within the context of the gut operon remained unclear. Accordingly, the enzyme was cloned, overexpressed, and characterized. Recombinant GutQ was shown to indeed be a second copy of API from the E. coli K-12 genome with biochemical properties similar to those of KdsD, catalyzing the reversible aldol-ketol isomerization between D-ribulose 5-phosphate (Ru5P) and D-arabinose 5-phosphate (A5P). Genomic disruptions of each API gene were constructed in E. coli K-12. TCM11[(deltakdsD)] was capable of sustaining essential LPS synthesis at wild-type levels, indicating that GutQ functions as an API inside the cell. The gut operon remained inducible in TCM7[(deltagutQ)], suggesting that GutQ is not directly involved in d-glucitol catabolism. The conditional mutant TCM15[(deltagutQdeltakdsD)] was dependent on exogenous A5P both for LPS synthesis/growth and for upregulation of the gut operon. The phenotype was suppressed by complementation in trans with a plasmid encoding a functional copy of GutQ or by increasing the amount of A5P in the medium. As there is no obvious obligatory role for GutQ in the metabolism of d-glucitol and there is no readily apparent link between D-glucitol metabolism and LPS biosynthesis, it is suggested that A5P is not only a building block for KDO biosynthesis but also may be a regulatory molecule involved in expression of the gut operon.

  16. L-Ribose production from L-arabinose by immobilized recombinant Escherichia coli co-expressing the L-arabinose isomerase and mannose-6-phosphate isomerase genes from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Rok; Seo, Eun-Sun; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2014-01-01

    L-Ribose is an important precursor for antiviral agents, and thus its high-level production is urgently demanded. For this aim, immobilized recombinant Escherichia coli cells expressing the L-arabinose isomerase and variant mannose-6-phosphate isomerase genes from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans were developed. The immobilized cells produced 99 g/l L-ribose from 300 g/l L-arabinose in 3 h at pH 7.5 and 60 °C in the presence of 1 mM Co(2+), with a conversion yield of 33 % (w/w) and a productivity of 33 g/l/h. The immobilized cells in the packed-bed bioreactor at a dilution rate of 0.2 h(-1) produced an average of 100 g/l L-ribose with a conversion yield of 33 % and a productivity of 5.0 g/l/h for the first 12 days, and the operational half-life in the bioreactor was 28 days. Our study is first verification for L-ribose production by long-term operation and feasible for cost-effective commercialization. The immobilized cells in the present study also showed the highest conversion yield among processes from L-arabinose as the substrate.

  17. Boric acid as a mobile phase additive for high performance liquid chromatography separation of ribose, arabinose and ribulose.

    PubMed

    De Muynck, Cassandra; Beauprez, Joeri; Soetaert, Wim; Vandamme, Erick J

    2006-01-01

    A new high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method is described for the analysis of ribose, arabinose and ribulose mixtures obtained from (bio)chemical isomerization processes. These processes gain importance since the molecules can be used for the synthesis of antiviral therapeutics. The HPLC method uses boric acid as a mobile phase additive to enhance the separation on an Aminex HPX-87K column. By complexing with boric acid, the carbohydrates become negatively charged, thus elute faster from the column by means of ion exlusion and are separated because the complexation capacity with boric acid differs from one carbohydrate to another. Excellent separation between ribose, ribulose and arabinose was achieved with concentrations between 0.1 and 10 gL(-1) of discrete sugar.

  18. Development and application of an arabinose-inducible expression system by facilitating inducer uptake in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun; Shang, Xiuling; Lai, Shujuan; Zhang, Guoqiang; Liang, Yong; Wen, Tingyi

    2012-08-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is currently used for the industrial production of a variety of biological materials. Many available inducible expression systems in this species use lac-derived promoters from Escherichia coli that exhibit much lower levels of inducible expression and leaky basal expression. We developed an arabinose-inducible expression system that contains the L-arabinose regulator AraC, the P(BAD) promoter from the araBAD operon, and the L-arabinose transporter AraE, all of which are derived from E. coli. The level of inducible P(BAD)-based expression could be modulated over a wide concentration range from 0.001 to 0.4% L-arabinose. This system tightly controlled the expression of the uracil phosphoribosyltransferase without leaky expression. When the gene encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) was under the control of P(BAD) promoter, flow cytometry analysis showed that GFP was expressed in a highly homogeneous profile throughout the cell population. In contrast to the case in E. coli, P(BAD) induction was not significantly affected in the presence of different carbon sources in C. glutamicum, which makes it useful in fermentation applications. We used this system to regulate the expression of the odhI gene from C. glutamicum, which encodes an inhibitor of α-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase, resulting in high levels of glutamate production (up to 13.7 mM) under biotin nonlimiting conditions. This system provides an efficient tool available for molecular biology and metabolic engineering of C. glutamicum.

  19. Estimation of D-Arabinose by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry as Surrogate for Mycobacterial Lipoarabinomannan in Human Urine.

    PubMed

    De, Prithwiraj; Amin, Anita G; Valli, Eloise; Perkins, Mark D; McNeil, Michael; Chatterjee, Delphi

    2015-01-01

    Globally, tuberculosis is slowly declining each year and it is estimated that 37 million lives were saved between 2000 and 2013 through effective diagnosis and treatment. Currently, diagnosis relies on demonstration of the bacteria, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), in clinical specimens by serial sputum microscopy, culture and molecular testing. Commercial immunoassay lateral flow kits developed to detect Mtb lipoglycan lipoarabinomannan (LAM) in urine as a marker of active TB exhibit poor sensitivity, especially in immunocompetent individuals, perhaps due to low abundance of the analyte. Our present study was designed to develop methods to validate the presence of LAM in a quantitative fashion in human urine samples obtained from culture-confirmed TB patients. Herein we describe, a consolidated approach for isolating LAM from the urine and quantifying D-arabinose as a proxy for LAM, using Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry. 298 urine samples obtained from a repository were rigorously analyzed and shown to contain varying amounts of LAM-equivalent ranging between ~10-40 ng/mL. To further substantiate that D-arabinose detected in the samples originated from LAM, tuberculostearic acid, the unique 10-methyloctadecanoic acid present at the phosphatidylinositol end of LAM was also analyzed in a set of samples and found to be present confirming that the D-arabinose was indeed derived from LAM. Among the 144 samples from culture-negative TB suspects, 30 showed presence of D-arabinose suggesting another source of the analyte, such as disseminated TB or from non-tuberculosis mycobacterium. Our work validates that LAM is present in the urine samples of culture-positive patients in small but readily detectable amounts. The study further substantiates LAM in urine as a powerful biomarker for active tuberculosis.

  20. Transcriptional comparison of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa growing on three major monosaccharides D-glucose, D-xylose and L-arabinose

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background D-glucose, D-xylose and L-arabinose are the three major monosaccharides in plant cell walls. Complete utilization of all three sugars is still a bottleneck for second-generation cellulolytic bioethanol production, especially for L-arabinose. However, little is known about gene expression profiles during L-arabinose utilization in fungi and a comparison of the genome-wide fungal response to these three major monosaccharides has not yet been reported. Results Using next-generation sequencing technology, we have analyzed the transcriptome of N. crassa grown on L-arabinose versus D-xylose, with D-glucose as the reference. We found that the gene expression profiles on L-arabinose were dramatically different from those on D-xylose. It appears that L-arabinose can rewire the fungal cell metabolic pathway widely and provoke the expression of many kinds of sugar transporters, hemicellulase genes and transcription factors. In contrast, many fewer genes, mainly related to the pentose metabolic pathway, were upregulated on D-xylose. The rewired metabolic response to L-arabinose was significantly different and wider than that under no carbon conditions, although the carbon starvation response was initiated on L-arabinose. Three novel sugar transporters were identified and characterized for their substrates here, including one glucose transporter GLT-1 (NCU01633) and two novel pentose transporters, XAT-1 (NCU01132), XYT-1 (NCU05627). One transcription factor associated with the regulation of hemicellulase genes, HCR-1 (NCU05064) was also characterized in the present study. Conclusions We conducted the first transcriptome analysis of Neurospora crassa grown on L-arabinose and performed a comparative analysis with cells grown on D-xylose and D-glucose, which deepens the understanding of the utilization of L-arabinose and D-xylose in filamentous fungi. The dataset generated by this research will be useful for mining target genes for D-xylose and L-arabinose utilization

  1. Arabinose-rich polymers as an evolutionary strategy to plasticize resurrection plant cell walls against desiccation.

    PubMed

    Moore, John P; Nguema-Ona, Eric E; Vicré-Gibouin, Mäite; Sørensen, Iben; Willats, William G T; Driouich, Azeddine; Farrant, Jill M

    2013-03-01

    A variety of Southern African resurrection plants were surveyed using high-throughput cell wall profiling tools. Species evaluated were the dicotyledons, Myrothamnus flabellifolia and Craterostigma plantagineum; the monocotyledons, Xerophyta viscosa, Xerophyta schlecterii, Xerophyta humilis and the resurrection grass Eragrostis nindensis, as well as a pteridophyte, the resurrection fern, Mohria caffrorum. Comparisons were made between hydrated and desiccated leaf and frond material, with respect to cell wall composition and polymer abundance, using monosaccharide composition analysis, FT-IR spectroscopy and comprehensive microarray polymer profiling in combination with multivariate data analysis. The data obtained suggest that three main functional strategies appear to have evolved to prepare plant cell walls for desiccation. Arabinan-rich pectin and arabinogalactan proteins are found in the resurrection fern M. caffrorum and the basal angiosperm M. flabellifolia where they appear to act as 'pectic plasticizers'. Dicotyledons with pectin-rich walls, such as C. plantagineum, seem to use inducible mechanisms which consist of up-regulating wall proteins and osmoprotectants. The hemicellulose-rich walls of the grass-like Xerophyta spp. and the resurrection grass E. nindensis were found to contain highly arabinosylated xylans and arabinogalactan proteins. These data support a general mechanism of 'plasticising' the cell walls of resurrection plants to desiccation and implicate arabinose-rich polymers (pectin-arabinans, arabinogalactan proteins and arabinoxylans) as the major contributors in ensuring flexibility is maintained and rehydration is facilitated in these plants.

  2. Translocation and interactions of L-arabinose in OmpF porin: A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Malek, Kourosh

    2007-01-05

    The passage of a natural substrate, L-arabinose (L-ARA) through Escherichia coli porin embedded in an artificial bilayer, is studied by equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. We investigate the early stage of translocation process of L-ARA from intra-cellular to extra-cellular side (Int-to-Ext) across the bilayer. The average trajectory path over all L-ARA molecules along with quantum-mechanical configuration-optimizations at PM3 level predict the existence of at least three trapping zones. The common feature within all these zones is that L-ARA remains perpendicular to the channel axis. It is remarkable how the orientation and translational-rotational motion of L-ARA molecule play a role in its transport through OmpF channel. These simulations are important for better understanding of permeation process in OmpF channel. They also provide an insight into the chiral recognition of translocation process in protein nanochannels from substrate and protein prospects and help interpret experiments on permeation process of small dipolar molecules across biological membranes.

  3. Comparison of histamine and hyperosmotic arabinose infusion on brain capillary permeability to hydrophilic solutes

    SciTech Connect

    Lucchesi, K.J.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of bilateral intracarotid infusion of histamine (HA) on capillary permeability-surface area products (PS) of two metabolically inert tracers was determined and compared to that of L(+)arabinose (ARAB) in rat brain. Ringer's solution alone, or with 1 mg/kg HA diphosphate or 1.6M ARAB added, was infused (0.9 ml over 0.5 min) into each external carotid artery (CA). Five minutes later, a bolus of /sup 14/C-sucrose and /sup 3/H-L-glucose was injected i.v. Estimates of PS for both tracers were computed by the method of Ohno et al after brain concentration was corrected for tracer within cerebral blood vessels. Brain blood volume, based on the /sup 14/C-dextran space, was the same (.016 ml/g) in discrete cortical and midbrain regions of all rats except those treated with ARAB. The latter yielded .033 ml/g, presumably due to dextran extravasation. Infusion of ARAB, HA and Ringer's increased the PS's of sucrose and L-glucose by 10x, 8x, and 3x in brain regions perfused by the internal CA's. The ratio, PS-sucrose/PS-L-glucose was unchanged by any treatment. Both ARAB and HA caused transient falls in arterial pressure, but only ARAB caused deaths (3 of 9 rats). While as effective as ARAB in opening the blood-brain barrier, HA may be safer than hyperosmotic shock to enhance delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to brain tumors.

  4. Validation of the Salmonella (SV50)/arabinose-resistant forward mutation assay system with 26 compounds.

    PubMed

    Xu, J; Whong, W Z; Ong, T

    1984-04-01

    Mutagenic sensitivity of the Salmonella/arabinose-resistant (Arar) assay system using the tester strain SV50 was evaluated with 26 compounds both by the preincubation and the standard plate incorporation tests. The mutagenic activity of all 26 compounds was also tested with TA98 and/or TA100 of the Ames Salmonella/microsome assay system. The results indicate that 13 and 10 of 26 compounds were mutagenic and nonmutagenic, respectively, in both assay systems. PR toxin and hydrogen peroxide were mutagenic only in the Arar assay, while 2-nitrofluorene was mutagenic only in the Ames assay. The results also show that the mutagenic response of SV50 to 13 of 15 mutagenic compounds was much higher (2.1-154-fold) if the compounds were tested with the preincubation rather than the plate incorporation test. The mutagenic activity of 4 compounds (diethyl sulfate, niridazole, PR toxin and hydrogen peroxide) in the Arar assay was detected only with the preincubation test. Since the Arar assay using tester strain SV50 has similar mutagenic sensitivity as the Ames assay to chemicals with different modes of action and since it requires only one tester strain, we find this assay system to be useful for screening environmental mutagens. Based on the effectiveness of the preincubation test in this study, it is recommended that the preincubation test instead of the plate incorporation test be used for the Arar assay system with tester strain SV50. PMID:6371504

  5. Fermentation of D-xylose and L-arabinose to ethanol by Erwinia chrysanthemi

    SciTech Connect

    Tolan, J.S.; Finn, R.K.

    1987-09-01

    Erwinia spp. are gram-negative facultative anaerobes within the family Enterobacteriacae which possess several desirable traits for the conversion of pentose sugars to ethanol, such as the ability to ferment a broad range of carbohydrates and the ease with which they can be genetically modified. Twenty-eight strains of Erwinia carotovora and E. chrysanthemi were screened for the ability to ferment D-xylose to ethanol. E. chrysanthemi B374 was chosen for further study on the basis of its superior (4%) ethanol tolerance. They have characterized the fermentation of D-xylose and L-arabinose by the wild type and mutants which bear plasmids containing the pyruvate decarboxylase gene from Zymomonas mobilis. Expression of the gene markedly increased the yields of ethanol (from 0.7 up to 1.45 mol/mol of xylose) and decreased the yields of formate, acetate, and lactate. However, the cells with pyruvate decarboxylase grew only one-fourth as fast as the wild type and tolerated only 2% ethanol. Alcohol tolerance was stimulated by the addition of yeast extract to the growth medium. Xylose catabolism was characterized by a high saturation constant K/sub s/ (4.5 mM).

  6. A unique arabinose 5-phosphate isomerase found within a genomic island associated with the uropathogenicity of Escherichia coli CFT073.

    PubMed

    Mosberg, Joshua A; Yep, Alejandra; Meredith, Timothy C; Smith, Sara; Wang, Pan-Fen; Holler, Tod P; Mobley, Harry L T; Woodard, Ronald W

    2011-06-01

    Previous studies showed that deletion of genes c3405 to c3410 from PAI-metV, a genomic island from Escherichia coli CFT073, results in a strain that fails to compete with wild-type CFT073 after a transurethral cochallenge in mice and is deficient in the ability to independently colonize the mouse kidney. Our analysis of c3405 to c3410 suggests that these genes constitute an operon with a role in the internalization and utilization of an unknown carbohydrate. This operon is not found in E. coli K-12 but is present in a small number of pathogenic E. coli and Shigella boydii strains. One of the genes, c3406, encodes a protein with significant homology to the sugar isomerase domain of arabinose 5-phosphate isomerases but lacking the tandem cystathionine beta-synthase domains found in the other arabinose 5-phosphate isomerases of E. coli. We prepared recombinant c3406 protein, found it to possess arabinose 5-phosphate isomerase activity, and characterized this activity in detail. We also constructed a c3406 deletion mutant of E. coli CFT073 and demonstrated that this deletion mutant was still able to compete with wild-type CFT073 in a transurethral cochallenge in mice and could colonize the mouse kidney. These results demonstrate that the presence of c3406 is not essential for a pathogenic phenotype.

  7. Crystal Structure of Escherichia coli L-Arabinose Isomerase (ECAI), The Putative Target of Biological Tagatose Production

    SciTech Connect

    Manjasetty,B.; Chance, M.

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli L-arabinose isomerase (ECAI; EC 5.3.1.4) catalyzes the isomerization of L-arabinose to L-ribulose in vivo. This enzyme is also of commercial interest as it catalyzes the conversion of D-galactose to D-tagatose in vitro. The crystal structure of ECAI was solved and refined at 2.6 Angstroms resolution. The subunit structure of ECAI is organized into three domains: an N-terminal, a central and a C-terminal domain. It forms a crystallographic trimeric architecture in the asymmetric unit. Packing within the crystal suggests the idea that ECAI can form a hexameric assembly. Previous electron microscopic and biochemical studies supports that ECAI is hexameric in solution. A comparison with other known structures reveals that ECAI adopts a protein fold most similar to E. coli fucose isomerase (ECFI) despite very low sequence identity 9.7%. The structural similarity between ECAI and ECFI with regard to number of domains, overall fold, biological assembly, and active site architecture strongly suggests that the enzymes have functional similarities. Further, the crystal structure of ECAI forms a basis for identifying molecular determinants responsible for isomerization of arabinose to ribulose in vivo and galactose to tagatose in vitro.

  8. Comparison of a forward and a reverse mutation assay in Salmonella typhimurium measuring L-arabinose resistance and histidine prototrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Rubio, M; Hera, C; Pueyo, C

    1984-01-01

    A forward and a reverse mutation assay designed to detect environmental mutagens have been compared in Salmonella typhimurium. The forward mutation assay scored resistance to L-arabinose and the reverse assay, reversion of histidine auxotrophy. Eighteen chemicals of different structural groups, all known to be mutagenic in the histidine reverse assay, were applied to strains carrying the genetic markers needed to perform both mutation assays. The mutagenicity of each chemical was determined by both plate and liquid tests. The plate test counted absolute numbers of surviving mutants and the liquid test separately measured survival and frequency of mutants among the survivors. All the chemicals used were found to be mutagenic in both mutation assays. The response of the L-arabinose assay was equal to or larger than the response of the histidine assay in the case of 16 chemicals. The two other compounds, 2-nitrofluorene and sodium azide, were detected more efficiently by the histidine assay. Sodium azide, a non-carcinogenic compound, is a potent mutagen in the histidine assay, but very weak in the L-arabinose assay. PMID:6378623

  9. The Cell Wall Arabinose-Deficient Arabidopsis thaliana Mutant murus5 Encodes a Defective Allele of REVERSIBLY GLYCOSYLATED POLYPEPTIDE2.

    PubMed

    Dugard, Christopher K; Mertz, Rachel A; Rayon, Catherine; Mercadante, Davide; Hart, Christopher; Benatti, Matheus R; Olek, Anna T; SanMiguel, Phillip J; Cooper, Bruce R; Reiter, Wolf-Dieter; McCann, Maureen C; Carpita, Nicholas C

    2016-07-01

    Traditional marker-based mapping and next-generation sequencing was used to determine that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) low cell wall arabinose mutant murus5 (mur5) encodes a defective allele of REVERSIBLY GLYCOSYLATED POLYPEPTIDE2 (RGP2). Marker analysis of 13 F2 confirmed mutant progeny from a recombinant mapping population gave a rough map position on the upper arm of chromosome 5, and deep sequencing of DNA from these 13 lines gave five candidate genes with G→A (C→T) transitions predicted to result in amino acid changes. Of these five, only insertional mutant alleles of RGP2, a gene that encodes a UDP-arabinose mutase that interconverts UDP-arabinopyranose and UDP-arabinofuranose, exhibited the low cell wall arabinose phenotype. The identities of mur5 and two SALK insertional alleles were confirmed by allelism tests and overexpression of wild-type RGP2 complementary DNA placed under the control of the 35S promoter in the three alleles. The mur5 mutation results in the conversion of cysteine-257 to tyrosine-257 within a conserved hydrophobic cluster predicted to be distal to the active site and essential for protein stability and possible heterodimerization with other isoforms of RGP. PMID:27217494

  10. The Cell Wall Arabinose-Deficient Arabidopsis thaliana Mutant murus5 Encodes a Defective Allele of REVERSIBLY GLYCOSYLATED POLYPEPTIDE2.

    PubMed

    Dugard, Christopher K; Mertz, Rachel A; Rayon, Catherine; Mercadante, Davide; Hart, Christopher; Benatti, Matheus R; Olek, Anna T; SanMiguel, Phillip J; Cooper, Bruce R; Reiter, Wolf-Dieter; McCann, Maureen C; Carpita, Nicholas C

    2016-07-01

    Traditional marker-based mapping and next-generation sequencing was used to determine that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) low cell wall arabinose mutant murus5 (mur5) encodes a defective allele of REVERSIBLY GLYCOSYLATED POLYPEPTIDE2 (RGP2). Marker analysis of 13 F2 confirmed mutant progeny from a recombinant mapping population gave a rough map position on the upper arm of chromosome 5, and deep sequencing of DNA from these 13 lines gave five candidate genes with G→A (C→T) transitions predicted to result in amino acid changes. Of these five, only insertional mutant alleles of RGP2, a gene that encodes a UDP-arabinose mutase that interconverts UDP-arabinopyranose and UDP-arabinofuranose, exhibited the low cell wall arabinose phenotype. The identities of mur5 and two SALK insertional alleles were confirmed by allelism tests and overexpression of wild-type RGP2 complementary DNA placed under the control of the 35S promoter in the three alleles. The mur5 mutation results in the conversion of cysteine-257 to tyrosine-257 within a conserved hydrophobic cluster predicted to be distal to the active site and essential for protein stability and possible heterodimerization with other isoforms of RGP.

  11. Establishment of L-arabinose fermentation in glucose/xylose co-fermenting recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae 424A(LNH-ST) by genetic engineering.

    PubMed

    Bera, Aloke Kumar; Sedlak, Miroslav; Khan, Aftab; Ho, Nancy W Y

    2010-08-01

    Cost-effective and efficient ethanol production from lignocellulosic materials requires the fermentation of all sugars recovered from such materials including glucose, xylose, mannose, galactose, and L-arabinose. Wild-type strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae used in industrial ethanol production cannot ferment D-xylose and L-arabinose. Our genetically engineered recombinant S. cerevisiae yeast 424A(LNH-ST) has been made able to efficiently ferment xylose to ethanol, which was achieved by integrating multiple copies of three xylose-metabolizing genes. This study reports the efficient anaerobic fermentation of L-arabinose by the derivative of 424A(LNH-ST). The new strain was constructed by over-expression of two additional genes from fungi L-arabinose utilization pathways. The resulting new 424A(LNH-ST) strain exhibited production of ethanol from L-arabinose, and the yield was more than 40%. An efficient ethanol production, about 72.5% yield from five-sugar mixtures containing glucose, galactose, mannose, xylose, and arabinose was also achieved. This co-fermentation of five-sugar mixture is important and crucial for application in industrial economical ethanol production using lignocellulosic biomass as the feedstock.

  12. Structural characterization of (1→2)-β-xylose-(1→3)-α-arabinose-containing oligosaccharide products of extracted switchgrass (Panicum virgatum, L.) xylan after exhaustive enzymatic treatment with α-arabinofuranosidase and β-endo-xylanase.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Michael J; Dien, Bruce S; Vermillion, Karl E; Mertens, Jeffrey A

    2014-10-29

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum, L.) is a potential dedicated biomass crop for use in biocatalytic conversion systems to biofuels. Nearly 30% of switchgrass cell wall material is xylan. The complete depolymerization of xylan is desirable both as an additional carbon source for microbial fermentation and to reduce inhibitory effects xylooligomers may have on cellulolytic glycoside hydrolase enzymes. To identify structural features of switchgrass xylan that are not distinguishable by mass spectrometry alone, a α-arabinofuranosidase enzyme was used to remove the arabinose side chains from alkali-extracted switchgrass xylan from three cultivars with simultaneous hydrolysis by β-endo-xylanase to enrich for oligosaccharide products with extended branching. The two most abundant enzymatic digestion products were separated and characterized by LC-MS(n), linkage analysis, and NMR. These two oligosaccharides were present in all three switchgrass cultivars and found to contain (1→2)-β-xylose-(1→3)-α-arabinose side chains, a linkage not previously reported in switchgrass.

  13. Quantification of glucose, xylose, arabinose, furfural, and HMF in corncob hydrolysate by HPLC-PDA-ELSD.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuejun; Ai, Ning; Zhang, Haiyan; Lu, Meizhen; Ji, Dengxiang; Yu, Fengwen; Ji, Jianbing

    2012-05-15

    Lignocellulose and other carbohydrates are being studied extensively as potential renewable carbon sources for liquid biofuels and other valuable chemicals. In the present study, a simple, sensitive, selective, and reliable HPLC method using a photodiode array (PDA) detector and an evaporative light scattering detector (ELSD) was developed for the simultaneous determination of important sugars (D(+)-cellobiose, glucose, xylose, and arabinose), furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) in lignocellulose hydrolysate. The analysis was carried out on an Aminex HPX-87H column (250 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 μm particle size). Ultra-pure water with 0.00035 M H(2)SO(4) was used as the mobile phase with a flow rate of 0.6 mL/min. The temperature of the ELSD drift tube was kept at 50 °C, the carrier gas pressure was 350 kPa, and the gain was set at 7. Furfural and 5-HMF were quantified on a PDA detector at 275 nm and 284 nm, respectively. The sugar concentrations were determined by ELSD. This method was validated for accuracy and precision. The regression equation revealed a good linear relationship (r(2) = 0.9986 ± 0.0012) within the test ranges. The method showed good reproducibility for the quantification of six analytes in corncob hydrolysate, with intra- and inter-day variations less than 1.12%. This method is also convenient because it allows the rapid analysis of the primary products of biomass hydrolysis and carbohydrate degradation. PMID:22516168

  14. Comparison of the periplasmic receptors for L-arabinose, D-glucose/D-galactose, and D-ribose. Structural and Functional Similarity.

    PubMed

    Vyas, N K; Vyas, M N; Quiocho, F A

    1991-03-15

    The primary sequence of the receptor for L-arabinose or Ara-binding protein (ABP) composed of 306 residues is very different from the D-glucose/D-galactose-binding protein (GGBP) which consists of 309 residues. Nevertheless, superimpositioning of the well-refined high resolution structures of ABP in complex with D-galactose and the GGBP in complex with D-glucose shows very similar structures; 220 of the residues (or about 70%) have a root mean square deviation of 2.0 A. From the superpositioning, nine pairs of continuous segments (consisting of 8-51 residues), mainly alpha-helices and beta-strands that form the core of the two lobes of the bilobate proteins were found to exhibit strong sequence homology. The equivalenced structures and aligned sequences show that many of the polar, as well as aromatic residues, in the sugar-binding sites located in the cleft between the two lobes are highly conserved. Surprisingly, however, the exact mode of binding of the D-galactose in ABP is totally different from that of the D-glucose in GGBP. Using the structurally aligned sequences of the ABP and GGBP as a template, we have matched the sequence of the ribose-binding protein (RBP) which consists of 271 residues with the ABP/GGBP pair. Although the nine aligned segments of all three proteins show little sequence identity, they have significant homology. Four additional segments of RBP were matched only with GGBP, leading to the alignment of about 90% of the RBP sequence with the GGBP sequence. Many of the conserved residues in the binding sites of ABP and GGBP matched with similar residues in RBP. Additional observations indicate that the GGBP/RBP pair is more closely related than the ABP/RBP or ABP/GGBP pair. All three binding proteins, which may have diverged from a common ancestor, serve as primary receptors for bacterial high affinity active transport systems. Moreover, GGBP and RBP, but not ABP, also act as receptors for chemotaxis. An exposed site located in one domain

  15. Microflow liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry--an approach to significantly increase sensitivity, decrease matrix effects, and reduce organic solvent usage in pesticide residue analysis.

    PubMed

    Uclés Moreno, Ana; Herrera López, Sonia; Reichert, Barbara; Lozano Fernández, Ana; Hernando Guil, María Dolores; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo Rodríguez

    2015-01-20

    This manuscript reports a new pesticide residue analysis method employing a microflow-liquid chromatography system coupled to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (microflow-LC-ESI-QqQ-MS). This uses an electrospray ionization source with a narrow tip emitter to generate smaller droplets. A validation study was undertaken to establish performance characteristics for this new approach on 90 pesticide residues, including their degradation products, in three commodities (tomato, pepper, and orange). The significant benefits of the microflow-LC-MS/MS-based method were a high sensitivity gain and a notable reduction in matrix effects delivered by a dilution of the sample (up to 30-fold); this is as a result of competition reduction between the matrix compounds and analytes for charge during ionization. Overall robustness and a capability to withstand long analytical runs using the microflow-LC-MS system have been demonstrated (for 100 consecutive injections without any maintenance being required). Quality controls based on the results of internal standards added at the samples' extraction, dilution, and injection steps were also satisfactory. The LOQ values were mostly 5 μg kg(-1) for almost all pesticide residues. Other benefits were a substantial reduction in solvent usage and waste disposal as well as a decrease in the run-time. The method was successfully applied in the routine analysis of 50 fruit and vegetable samples labeled as organically produced. PMID:25495653

  16. Expression of the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) of Chlamydophila abortus, Chlamydophila pecorum, and Chlamydia suis in Escherichia coli using an arabinose-inducible plasmid vector.

    PubMed

    Hoelzle, L E; Hoelzle, K; Wittenbrink, M M

    2003-10-01

    The ompA genes encoding the 40 kDa major outer membrane protein (MOMP) of Chlamydophila (Ch.) abortus, Ch. pecorum, and Chlamydia (C.) suis were cloned into the arabinose-inducible plasmid vector pBADMycHis, and recombinant MOMPs (rMOMP) from the three chlamydial species were expressed at high levels in Escherichia (E.) coli. The proteins lacking the 22 aa N-terminal signal peptide were expressed as insoluble cytoplasmic inclusion bodies which were readily purified using immobilized metal-affinity chromatography. The rMOMPs including the N-terminal signal peptide were expressed and translocated as a surface-exposed immunoaccessible protein into the outer membrane of E. coli. Transformants expressing this full-length rMOMP were significantly reduced in viability. Purified native elementary bodies (EB) and rMOMPs of the three chlamydial species purified from the E. coli cytoplasm were used for immunization of rabbits. The resulting sera were analysed for their ability to recognize homologous and heterologous rMOMP and native EB. When testing rMOMP antisera against rMOMP and EB antigens, marked cross-reactivities were detected between the three species. Using EB antisera and rMOMPs as antigens, a significant species-specific reactivity was measured.

  17. Novel transporters from Kluyveromyces marxianus and Pichia guilliermondii expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae enable growth on L-arabinose and D-xylose.

    PubMed

    Knoshaug, Eric P; Vidgren, Virve; Magalhães, Frederico; Jarvis, Eric E; Franden, Mary Ann; Zhang, Min; Singh, Arjun

    2015-10-01

    Genes encoding L-arabinose transporters in Kluyveromyces marxianus and Pichia guilliermondii were identified by functional complementation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae whose growth on L-arabinose was dependent on a functioning L-arabinose transporter, or by screening a differential display library, respectively. These transporters also transport D-xylose and were designated KmAXT1 (arabinose-xylose transporter) and PgAXT1, respectively. Transport assays using L-arabinose showed that KmAxt1p has K(m) 263 mM and V(max) 57 nM/mg/min, and PgAxt1p has K(m) 0.13 mM and V(max) 18 nM/mg/min. Glucose, galactose and xylose significantly inhibit L-arabinose transport by both transporters. Transport assays using D-xylose showed that KmAxt1p has K(m) 27 mM and V(max) 3.8 nM/mg/min, and PgAxt1p has K(m) 65 mM and V(max) 8.7 nM/mg/min. Neither transporter is capable of recovering growth on glucose or galactose in a S. cerevisiae strain deleted for hexose and galactose transporters. Transport kinetics of S. cerevisiae Gal2p showed K(m) 371 mM and V(max) 341 nM/mg/min for L-arabinose, and K(m) 25 mM and V(max) 76 nM/mg/min for galactose. Due to the ability of Gal2p and these two newly characterized transporters to transport both L-arabinose and D-xylose, one scenario for the complete usage of biomass-derived pentose sugars would require only the low-affinity, high-throughput transporter Gal2p and one additional high-affinity general pentose transporter, rather than dedicated D-xylose or L-arabinose transporters. Additionally, alignment of these transporters with other characterized pentose transporters provides potential targets for substrate recognition engineering.

  18. The presence of outer arm fucose residues on the N-glycans of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 reduces its activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han Ie; Saldova, Radka; Park, Jun Hyoung; Lee, Young Hun; Harvey, David J; Wormald, Mark R; Wynne, Kieran; Elia, Giuliano; Kim, Hwa-Jung; Rudd, Pauline M; Lee, Seung-Taek

    2013-08-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) inhibits matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) by binding at a 1:1 stoichiometry. Here we have shown the involvement of N-glycosylation in the MMP inhibitory ability of TIMP-1. TIMP-1, purified from HEK 293 cells overexpressing TIMP-1 (293 TIMP-1), showed less binding and inhibitory abilities to MMPs than TIMP-1 purified from fibroblasts or SF9 insect cells infected with TIMP-1 baculovirus. Following deglycosylation of TIMP-1, all forms of TIMP-1 showed similar levels of MMP binding and inhibition, suggesting that glycosylation is involved in the regulation of these TIMP-1 activities. Analysis of the N-glycan structures showed that SF9 TIMP-1 has the simplest N-glycan structures, followed by fibroblast TIMP-1 and 293 TIMP-1, in order of increasing complexity in their N-glycan structures. Further analyses showed that cleavage of outer arm fucose residues from the N-glycans of 293 TIMP-1 or knockdown of both FUT4 and FUT7 (which encode for fucosyltransferases that add outer arm fucose residues to N-glycans) enhanced the MMP-binding and catalytic abilities of 293 TIMP-1, bringing them up to the levels of the other TIMP-1. These results demonstrate that the ability of TIMP-1 to inhibit MMPs is at least in part regulated by outer arm fucosylation of its N-glycans.

  19. Boost the electron mobility of solution-grown organic single crystals via reducing the amount of polar solvent residues

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Guobiao; Xin, Huolin L.; Wu, Jiake; Fan, Congcheng; Liu, Shuang; Huang, Zhuoting; Liu, Yujing; Shan, Bowen; Miao, Qian; Chen, Hongzheng; Li, Hanying

    2015-10-29

    Enhancing electron transport to match with the development in hole transport is critical for organic electronics in the future. As electron motion is susceptible to extrinsic factors, seeking these factors and avoiding their negative effects have become the central challenge. Here, the existence of polar solvent residues in solution-grown single-crystals of 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)-5,7,12,14-tetraazapentacene is identified as a factor detrimental to electron motion. Field-effect transistors of the crystals exhibit electron mobility boosted by about 60% after the residues are removed. The average electron mobility reaches up to 8.0 ± 2.2 cm2 V–1 s–1 with a highest value of 13.3 cm2 V–1 s–1; these results are significantly higher than those obtained previously for the same molecule (1.0–5.0 cm2 V–1 s–1). Furthermore, the achieved mobility is also higher than the maximum reported electron mobility for organic materials (11 cm2 V–1 s–1). As a result, this work should greatly accelerate the advancement of organic electron-transporting materials.

  20. Analysis of organo-chlorine pesticides residue in raw coffee with a modified "quick easy cheap effective rugged and safe" extraction/clean up procedure for reducing the impact of caffeine on the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry measurement.

    PubMed

    Bresin, Bruno; Piol, Maria; Fabbro, Denis; Mancini, Maria Antonietta; Casetta, Bruno; Del Bianco, Clorinda

    2015-01-01

    The control of pesticide residues on raw coffee is a task of great importance due to high consumption of this beverage in Italy and in many other countries. High caffeine content can hamper extraction and measurement of any pesticide residue. A tandem extraction protocol has been devised by exploiting the quick easy cheap effective rugged and safe (QuEChERS) scheme for extraction, coupled to a dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction (DLLME) in order to drastically reduce caffeine content in the final extract. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been used for quantification of organo-chlorine pesticides in single ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Method has been validated and performances meet the criteria prescribed by European Union regulations. PMID:25537171

  1. Arabinose substitution degree in xylan positively affects lignocellulose enzymatic digestibility after various NaOH/H2SO4 pretreatments in Miscanthus.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengcheng; Ren, Shuangfeng; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Zhengdan; Xie, Guosheng; Chen, Yan; Tu, Yuanyuan; Li, Qing; Zhou, Shiguang; Li, Yu; Tu, Fen; Liu, Lin; Wang, Yanting; Jiang, Jianxiong; Qin, Jingping; Li, Shizhong; Li, Qiwei; Jing, Hai-Chun; Zhou, Fasong; Gutterson, Neal; Peng, Liangcai

    2013-02-01

    Xylans are the major hemicelluloses in grasses, but their effects on biomass saccharification remain unclear. In this study, we examined the 79 representative Miscanthus accessions that displayed a diverse cell wall composition and varied biomass digestibility. Correlation analysis showed that hemicelluloses level has a strong positive effect on lignocellulose enzymatic digestion after NaOH or H(2)SO(4) pretreatment. Characterization of the monosaccharide compositions in the KOH-extractable and non-KOH-extractable hemicelluloses indicated that arabinose substitution degree of xylan is the key factor that positively affects biomass saccharification. The xylose/arabinose ratio after individual enzyme digestion revealed that the arabinose in xylan is partially associated with cellulose in the amorphous regions, which negatively affects cellulose crystallinity for high biomass digestibility. The results provide insights into the mechanism of lignocellulose enzymatic digestion upon pretreatment, and also suggest a goal for the genetic modification of hemicelluloses towards the bioenergy crop breeding of Miscanthus and grasses.

  2. Biochar from sugarcane filtercake reduces soil CO2 emissions relative to raw residue and improves water retention and nutrient availability in a highly-weathered tropical soil.

    PubMed

    Eykelbosh, Angela Joy; Johnson, Mark S; Santos de Queiroz, Edmar; Dalmagro, Higo José; Guimarães Couto, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    In Brazil, the degradation of nutrient-poor Ferralsols limits productivity and drives agricultural expansion into pristine areas. However, returning agricultural residues to the soil in a stabilized form may offer opportunities for maintaining or improving soil quality, even under conditions that typically promote carbon loss. We examined the use of biochar made from filtercake (a byproduct of sugarcane processing) on the physicochemical properties of a cultivated tropical soil. Filtercake was pyrolyzed at 575°C for 3 h yielding a biochar with increased surface area and porosity compared to the raw filtercake. Filtercake biochar was primarily composed of aromatic carbon, with some residual cellulose and hemicellulose. In a three-week laboratory incubation, CO2 effluxes from a highly weathered Ferralsol soil amended with 5% biochar (dry weight, d.w.) were roughly four-fold higher than the soil-only control, but 23-fold lower than CO2 effluxes from soil amended with 5% (d.w.) raw filtercake. We also applied vinasse, a carbon-rich liquid waste from bioethanol production typically utilized as a fertilizer on sugarcane soils, to filtercake- and biochar-amended soils. Total CO2 efflux from the biochar-amended soil in response to vinasse application was only 5% of the efflux when vinasse was applied to soil amended with raw filtercake. Furthermore, mixtures of 5 or 10% biochar (d.w.) in this highly weathered tropical soil significantly increased water retention within the plant-available range and also improved nutrient availability. Accordingly, application of sugarcane filtercake as biochar, with or without vinasse application, may better satisfy soil management objectives than filtercake applied to soils in its raw form, and may help to build soil carbon stocks in sugarcane-cultivating regions. PMID:24897522

  3. Use of Interface Treatment to Reduce Emissions from Residuals in Lower Permeability Zones to Groundwater flowing Through More Permeable Zones (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, P.; Cavanagh, B.; Clifton, L.; Daniels, E.; Dahlen, P.

    2013-12-01

    Many soil and groundwater remediation technologies rely on fluid flow for contaminant extraction or reactant delivery (e.g., soil vapor extraction, pump and treat, in situ chemical oxidation, air sparging, enhanced bioremediation). Given that most unconsolidated and consolidated settings have permeability contrasts, the outcome is often preferential treatment of more permeable zones and ineffective treatment of the lower permeability zones. When this happens, post-treatment contaminant emissions from low permeability zone residuals can cause unacceptable long-term impacts to groundwater in the transmissive zones. As complete remediation of the impacted lower permeability zones may not be practicable with conventional technologies, one might explore options that lead to reduction of the contaminant emissions to acceptable levels, rather than full remediation of the lower permeability layers. This could be accomplished either by creating a sustained emission reaction/attenuation zone at the high-low permeability interface, or by creating a clean soil zone extending sufficiently far into the lower permeability layer to cause the necessary reduction in contaminant concentration gradient and diffusive emission. These options are explored in proof-of-concept laboratory-scale physical model experiments. The physical models are prepared with two layers of contrasting permeability and either dissolved matrix storage or nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) in the lower permeability layer. A dissolved oxidant is then delivered to the interface via flow across the higher permeability layer and changes in contaminant emissions from the low permeability zone are monitored before, during, and after oxidant delivery. The use of three oxidants (dissolved oxygen, hydrogen peroxide and sodium persulfate) for treatment of emissions from petroleum hydrocarbon residuals is examined.

  4. Biochar from Sugarcane Filtercake Reduces Soil CO2 Emissions Relative to Raw Residue and Improves Water Retention and Nutrient Availability in a Highly-Weathered Tropical Soil

    PubMed Central

    Eykelbosh, Angela Joy; Johnson, Mark S.; Santos de Queiroz, Edmar; Dalmagro, Higo José; Guimarães Couto, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    In Brazil, the degradation of nutrient-poor Ferralsols limits productivity and drives agricultural expansion into pristine areas. However, returning agricultural residues to the soil in a stabilized form may offer opportunities for maintaining or improving soil quality, even under conditions that typically promote carbon loss. We examined the use of biochar made from filtercake (a byproduct of sugarcane processing) on the physicochemical properties of a cultivated tropical soil. Filtercake was pyrolyzed at 575°C for 3 h yielding a biochar with increased surface area and porosity compared to the raw filtercake. Filtercake biochar was primarily composed of aromatic carbon, with some residual cellulose and hemicellulose. In a three-week laboratory incubation, CO2 effluxes from a highly weathered Ferralsol soil amended with 5% biochar (dry weight, d.w.) were roughly four-fold higher than the soil-only control, but 23-fold lower than CO2 effluxes from soil amended with 5% (d.w.) raw filtercake. We also applied vinasse, a carbon-rich liquid waste from bioethanol production typically utilized as a fertilizer on sugarcane soils, to filtercake- and biochar-amended soils. Total CO2 efflux from the biochar-amended soil in response to vinasse application was only 5% of the efflux when vinasse was applied to soil amended with raw filtercake. Furthermore, mixtures of 5 or 10% biochar (d.w.) in this highly weathered tropical soil significantly increased water retention within the plant-available range and also improved nutrient availability. Accordingly, application of sugarcane filtercake as biochar, with or without vinasse application, may better satisfy soil management objectives than filtercake applied to soils in its raw form, and may help to build soil carbon stocks in sugarcane-cultivating regions. PMID:24897522

  5. Lipid production through simultaneous utilization of glucose, xylose, and L-arabinose by Pseudozyma hubeiensis: a comparative screening study.

    PubMed

    Tanimura, Ayumi; Takashima, Masako; Sugita, Takashi; Endoh, Rikiya; Ohkuma, Moriya; Kishino, Shigenobu; Ogawa, Jun; Shima, Jun

    2016-12-01

    Co-fermentation of glucose, xylose and L-arabinose from lignocellulosic biomass by an oleaginous yeast is anticipated as a method for biodiesel production. However, most yeasts ferment glucose first before consuming pentoses, due to glucose repression. This preferential utilization results in delayed fermentation time and lower productivity. Therefore, co-fermentation of lignocellulosic sugars could achieve cost-effective conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to microbial lipid. Comprehensive screening of oleaginous yeasts capable of simultaneously utilizing glucose, xylose, and L-arabinose was performed by measuring the concentration of sugars remaining in the medium and of lipids accumulated in the cells. We found that of 1189 strains tested, 12 had the ability to co-ferment the sugars. The basidiomycete yeast Pseudozyma hubeiensis IPM1-10, which had the highest sugars consumption rate of 94.1 %, was selected by culturing in a batch culture with the mixed-sugar medium. The strain showed (1) simultaneous utilization of all three sugars, and (2) high lipid-accumulating ability. This study suggests that P. hubeiensis IPM1-10 is a promising candidate for second-generation biodiesel production from hydrolysate of lignocellulosic biomass. PMID:27566647

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of L-arabinose isomerase from thermophilic Geobacillus kaustophilus.

    PubMed

    Cao, Thinh-Phat; Choi, Jin Myung; Lee, Sang-Jae; Lee, Yong-Jik; Lee, Sung-Keun; Jun, Youngsoo; Lee, Dong-Woo; Lee, Sung Haeng

    2014-01-01

    L-arabinose isomerase (AI), which catalyzes the isomerization of L-arabinose to L-ribulose, can also convert D-galactose to D-tagatose, a natural sugar replacer, which is of commercial interest in the food and healthcare industries. Intriguingly, mesophilic and thermophilic AIs showed different substrate preferences and metal requirements in catalysis and different thermostabilities. However, the catalytic mechanism of thermophilic AIs still remains unclear. Therefore, thermophilic Geobacillus kaustophilus AI (GKAI) was overexpressed, purified and crystallized, and a preliminary X-ray diffraction data set was obtained. Diffraction data were collected from a GKAI crystal to 2.70 Å resolution. The crystal belonged to the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 224.12, b = 152.95, c = 91.28 Å, β = 103.61°. The asymmetric unit contained six molecules, with a calculated Matthews coefficient of 2.25 Å(3) Da(-1) and a solvent content of 45.39%. The three-dimensional structure determination of GKAI is currently in progress by molecular replacement and model building.

  7. Lipid production through simultaneous utilization of glucose, xylose, and L-arabinose by Pseudozyma hubeiensis: a comparative screening study.

    PubMed

    Tanimura, Ayumi; Takashima, Masako; Sugita, Takashi; Endoh, Rikiya; Ohkuma, Moriya; Kishino, Shigenobu; Ogawa, Jun; Shima, Jun

    2016-12-01

    Co-fermentation of glucose, xylose and L-arabinose from lignocellulosic biomass by an oleaginous yeast is anticipated as a method for biodiesel production. However, most yeasts ferment glucose first before consuming pentoses, due to glucose repression. This preferential utilization results in delayed fermentation time and lower productivity. Therefore, co-fermentation of lignocellulosic sugars could achieve cost-effective conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to microbial lipid. Comprehensive screening of oleaginous yeasts capable of simultaneously utilizing glucose, xylose, and L-arabinose was performed by measuring the concentration of sugars remaining in the medium and of lipids accumulated in the cells. We found that of 1189 strains tested, 12 had the ability to co-ferment the sugars. The basidiomycete yeast Pseudozyma hubeiensis IPM1-10, which had the highest sugars consumption rate of 94.1 %, was selected by culturing in a batch culture with the mixed-sugar medium. The strain showed (1) simultaneous utilization of all three sugars, and (2) high lipid-accumulating ability. This study suggests that P. hubeiensis IPM1-10 is a promising candidate for second-generation biodiesel production from hydrolysate of lignocellulosic biomass.

  8. Mutagenicity study on pyrazole, seven pyrazole derivatives, and two nitroimidazoles with the L-arabinose resistance test of Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Alejandre-Duran, E.; Ruiz-Rubio, M.; Claramunt, R.M.; Lopez, C.; Pueyo, C.

    1986-01-01

    The mutagenicity of pyrazole and seven pyrazole derivatives (4-nitropyrazole, 4-bromopyrazole, 1-methyl-4-nitropyrazole, 3,5-dimethyl-4-nitropyrazole, 1-methyl-4-bromopyrazole, 4,4'-dinitro-1, 1'-methylene-dipyrazole and 4,4'-dibromo-1,1'-methylene-dipyrazole) has been investigated with the L-arabinose forward mutation assay of Salmonella typhimurium. Two nitroimidazoles (1-methyl-5-nitroimidazole and metronidazole) were included as reference drugs. The mutagenicity of each chemical was determined by both preincubation and liquid tests, in the presence or absence of S9 microsomal fraction. The mutagenic responses was expressed as the absolute number of L-arabinose resistant mutants growing in selective plates, supplemented with traces of D-glucose. Strain BA13 with a wild-type lipopolysaccharide barrier was used as a comparison to the deep rough derivative BA9. No mutagenic effect was detected with pyrazole and two of its derivatives, 1-methyl-4-bromopyrazole and 4,4'-dibromo-1,1'-methylene-dipyrazole. The other five pyrazole derivatives were mutagenic to different degrees, although their mutagenic potencies were always considerably lower than those of the two nitroimidazoles. The results suggest that 4-nitropyrazoles, as well as 4,4'-dinitro-1, 1'-methylene-dipyrazoles, should be investigated further as alternatives to, or even substitutes for, the currently used nitroimidazoles.

  9. Protein purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of L-arabinose isomerase from Lactobacillus fermentum CGMCC2921.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zheng; Li, Sha; Liang, Jinfeng; Feng, Xiaohai; Xu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    L-Arabinose isomerase (AI) catalyzes the isomerization of L-arabinose to L-ribulose, as well as that of D-galactose to D-tagatose. A thermophilic AI derived from Lactobacillus fermentum CGMCC2921 (LFAI) was overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). This enzyme was purified to over 95% purity by nickel affinity, Mono-Q ion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography. The LFAI protein was crystallized from either 0.1 M bis-tris pH 6.5, 23% PEG 3350, 0.3 M NaCl (form 1 crystals) or 0.1 M bis-tris pH 6.0, 25% PEG monomethyl ether 5000 (form 2 crystals). Diffraction data from form 1 LFAI crystals were collected to 2.80 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. The form 1 crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a=85.11, b=184.57, c=186.26 Å, α=β=γ=90°. The asymmetric unit contained six LFAI subunits, corresponding to a calculated Matthews coefficient of 2.29 Å3 Da(-1) and a solvent content of 46.22%.

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of l-arabinose isomerase from thermophilic Geobacillus kaustophilus

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Thinh-Phat; Choi, Jin Myung; Lee, Sang-Jae; Lee, Yong-Jik; Lee, Sung-Keun; Jun, Youngsoo; Lee, Dong-Woo; Lee, Sung Haeng

    2014-01-01

    l-Arabinose isomerase (AI), which catalyzes the isomerization of l-arabinose to l-ribulose, can also convert d-galactose to d-tagatose, a natural sugar replacer, which is of commercial interest in the food and healthcare industries. Intriguingly, mesophilic and thermophilic AIs showed different substrate preferences and metal requirements in catalysis and different thermostabilities. However, the catalytic mechanism of thermophilic AIs still remains unclear. Therefore, thermophilic Geobacillus kaustophilus AI (GKAI) was overexpressed, purified and crystallized, and a preliminary X-ray diffraction data set was obtained. Diffraction data were collected from a GKAI crystal to 2.70 Å resolution. The crystal belonged to the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 224.12, b = 152.95, c = 91.28 Å, β = 103.61°. The asymmetric unit contained six molecules, with a calculated Matthews coefficient of 2.25 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent content of 45.39%. The three-dimensional structure determination of GKAI is currently in progress by molecular replacement and model building. PMID:24419630

  11. L-Arabinose (pyranose and furanose rings)-branched poly (vinylalcohol): enzymatic synthesis of the sugar esters followed by free radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues Borges, Maurício; Balaban, Rosangela de Carvalho

    2014-12-20

    Herein this study reports the successful synthesis of a new poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), containing L-arabinose (L-arabinopyranose and arabinofuranose isomers) branched in only two steps: (1) production of polymerizable monomers of L-arabinose isomers (pyranose and furanose forms) through enzymatic synthesis using alkaline protease from Bacillus subtilis as catalyst and two substrates: L-arabinose and Divinyl Adipate (DVA) in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF); (2) radical polymerization of the monomers, using an initiator system consisting of potassium persulfate and hydrogen peroxide in water. The transesterification of DVA with L-arabinose was monitored via qualitative analysis by TLC, confirming the formation of the vinyl sugar ester. The acylation occurred on the two different cyclic conformations of the L-arabinose which coexist in equilibrium: (α/β) arabinofuranose and (α/β) arabinopyranose. The acylation positions and the chemical structure of the 5-O-vinyl adipoyl L-arabinofuranose and 4-O-vinyl adipolyl L-arabinopyranose formed were determined by 13C NMR. The surface activity of the L-arabinose esters mixture (monomers) was compared with a commercial product based on phenol formaldehyde polyoxyalkylene polyamine, largely used as surfactant in many industries. FTIR spectroscopy of the sugar ester monomers and the respective polymer were compared revealing the disappearance of the vinyl group in the polymer spectrum. The polymer number-average molar mass (Mn) and the weight-average molar mass (Mw) were determined by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) presenting the following results: 2.9 × 10(4) Da and 7.2 × 10(4) Da, respectively, and polydispersity (Mw/Mn) equal to 2.48.

  12. Homo-D-lactic acid fermentation from arabinose by redirection of the phosphoketolase pathway to the pentose phosphate pathway in L-lactate dehydrogenase gene-deficient Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed

    Okano, Kenji; Yoshida, Shogo; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ogino, Chiaki; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2009-08-01

    Optically pure d-lactic acid fermentation from arabinose was achieved by using the Lactobacillus plantarum NCIMB 8826 strain whose l-lactate dehydrogenase gene was deficient and whose phosphoketolase gene was substituted with a heterologous transketolase gene. After 27 h of fermentation, 38.6 g/liter of d-lactic acid was produced from 50 g/liter of arabinose.

  13. L-Arabinose binding, isomerization, and epimerization by D-xylose isomerase: X-ray/neutron crystallographic and molecular simulation study.

    PubMed

    Langan, Paul; Sangha, Amandeep K; Wymore, Troy; Parks, Jerry M; Yang, Zamin Koo; Hanson, B Leif; Fisher, Zoe; Mason, Sax A; Blakeley, Matthew P; Forsyth, V Trevor; Glusker, Jenny P; Carrell, Horace L; Smith, Jeremy C; Keen, David A; Graham, David E; Kovalevsky, Andrey

    2014-09-01

    D-xylose isomerase (XI) is capable of sugar isomerization and slow conversion of some monosaccharides into their C2-epimers. We present X-ray and neutron crystallographic studies to locate H and D atoms during the respective isomerization and epimerization of L-arabinose to L-ribulose and L-ribose, respectively. Neutron structures in complex with cyclic and linear L-arabinose have demonstrated that the mechanism of ring-opening is the same as for the reaction with D-xylose. Structural evidence and QM/MM calculations show that in the reactive Michaelis complex L-arabinose is distorted to the high-energy (5)S1 conformation; this may explain the apparent high KM for this sugar. MD-FEP simulations indicate that amino acid substitutions in a hydrophobic pocket near C5 of L-arabinose can enhance sugar binding. L-ribulose and L-ribose were found in furanose forms when bound to XI. We propose that these complexes containing Ni(2+) cofactors are Michaelis-like and the isomerization between these two sugars proceeds via a cis-ene-diol mechanism.

  14. l-Arabinose production from sugar beet arabinan by immobilized endo- and exo-arabinanases from Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus in a packed-bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeong-Su; Lim, Yu-Ri; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2012-02-01

    The immobilized endo- and exo-arabinanases from Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus produced continuously an average of 16.5 gl(-1)l-arabinose from 20 gl(-1) sugar beet arabinan at pH 5.0 and 75°C for 216 h, with a productivity of 9.9 gl(-1)h(-1) and a conversion yield of 83%.

  15. Arabinose fermentation by Lactobacillus plantarum in sourdough with added pentosans and alphaalpha-L-arabinofuranosidase: a tool to increase the production of acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Gobbetti, M; Lavermicocca, P; Minervini, F; de Angelis, M; Corsetti, A

    2000-02-01

    Sixty-five strains of obligately and facultatively heterofermentative sourdough lactic acid bacteria were screened for their capacity to grow optimally in the presence of arabinose, ribose and xylose as carbon sources. Lactobacillus alimentarius 15F, Lact. brevis 10A, Lact. fermentum 1F and Lact. plantarum 20B showed higher growth rate, cell yield, acidification rate and production of acetic acid when some pentoses instead of maltose were added to the SDB medium. Lactobacillus plantarum 20B used arabinose also in a synthetic medium where complex growth factors such as yeast extract were omitted. Other Lact. plantarum strains did not show the same property. Pentosan extract was treated with alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase from Aspergillus niger or endo-xylanase from Bacillus subtilis to produce hydrolysates containing mainly arabinose and xylose, respectively. In particular, the hydrolysate containing arabinose substantiated the growth and the production of lactic acid and, especially, of acetic acid by Lact. plantarum 20B. Sourdough fermentation by Lact. plantarum 20B with addition of pentosan extract and alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase increased the acidification rate, titratable acidity and acetic acid content compared with traditional sourdough. A facultatively heterofermentative strain, Lact. plantarum 20B, also produced a sourdough with an optimal fermentation quotient.

  16. Investigation of the interconversion of L­arabinose and D­xylose as regulated by candidate pathway genes in Beta vulgaris using comparative genomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arabinose and xylose occur in hemicellulose, a group of polysaccharides present in plant cell walls in all terrestrial plants. Xylose is an aldopentose sugar with uses as a chemical feedstock, and this study sought to explore the possibility of using sugar beet as an industrial source of xylose, wh...

  17. Increased urinary excretion of analogs of Krebs cycle metabolites and arabinose in two brothers with autistic features.

    PubMed

    Shaw, W; Kassen, E; Chaves, E

    1995-08-01

    A marked increase in analogs of Krebs cycle metabolites was found in the urine of two brothers with autistic features. These metabolites included citramalic, tartaric (3-OH-malic), and 3-oxoglutaric acids and compounds tentatively identified as a citric acid analog and partially identified as a phenylcarboxylic acid by the fragmentation pattern of the trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatives of the compounds and mass shifts of the same compounds derivatized with perdeuterated N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide. The molecular mass of the TMS derivative of the tentatively identified citric acid analog was 596 Da, based on a finding of a significant M - 15 ion at m/z 581. The citric acid analog was excreted in quantities as high as 137 mmol/mol creatinine, based on the response factor of citric acid as a surrogate calibrator. A carbohydrate with a retention time and mass spectrum identical to arabinose was also found in high concentrations in the urine of these brothers.

  18. Steroids glycosylated with both D- and L-arabinoses from the South China Sea gorgonian Dichotella gemmacea.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Mei; Sun, Peng; Tang, Hua; Liu, Bao-Shu; Li, Tie-Jun; Li, Cui; Zhang, Wen

    2013-04-26

    Three new 19-hydroxy steroidal glycosides, namely, junceellosides E-G (2-4), were isolated together with the known analogue junceelloside C (1) from the South China Sea gorgonian Dichotella gemmacea. The structures of these compounds were elucidated by a combination of detailed spectroscopic analyses, chemical methods, and comparison with reported data. These glycosides are found to have sugar moieties of both β-l- and β-d-arabinopyranoses by HPLC analysis of their thiocarbamoyl-thiazolidine derivatives and those of authentic d- and l-arabinoses, leading to the structure revision of junceelloside C (1). This is the first report of steroidal glycosides from the gorgonian D. gemmacea and the first report of glycosides with β-l-arabinopyranose from marine sources.

  19. The acid-tolerant L-arabinose isomerase from the mesophilic Shewanella sp. ANA-3 is highly active at low temperatures

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background L-arabinose isomerases catalyse the isomerization of L-arabinose into L-ribulose at insight biological systems. At industrial scale of this enzyme is used for the bioconversion of D-galactose into D-tagatose which has many applications in pharmaceutical and agro-food industries. The isomerization reaction is thermodynamically equilibrated, and therefore the bioconversion rates is shifted towards tagatose when the temperature is increased. Moreover, to prevent secondary reactions it will be of interest to operate at low pH. The profitability of this D-tagatose production process is mainly related to the use of lactose as cheaper raw material. In many dairy products it will be interesting to produce D-tagatose during storage. This requires an efficient L-arabinose isomerase acting at low temperature and pH values. Results The gene encoding the L-arabinose isomerase from Shewanella sp. ANA-3 was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The purified protein has a tetrameric arrangement composed by four identical 55 kDa subunits. The biochemical characterization of this enzyme showed that it was distinguishable by its maximal activity at low temperatures comprised between 15-35°C. Interestingly, this biocatalyst preserves more than 85% of its activity in a broad range of temperatures from 4.0 to 45°C. Shewanella sp. ANA-3 L-arabinose isomerase was also optimally active at pH 5.5-6.5 and maintained over 80% of its activity at large pH values from 4.0 to 8.5. Furthermore, this enzyme exhibited a weak requirement for metallic ions for its activity evaluated at 0.6 mM Mn2+. Stability studies showed that this protein is highly stable mainly at low temperature and pH values. Remarkably, T268K mutation clearly enhances the enzyme stability at low pH values. Use of this L-arabinose isomerase for D-tagatose production allows the achievement of attractive bioconversion rates of 16% at 4°C and 34% at 35°C. Conclusions Here we reported the purification and the

  20. Novel substrate specificity of D-arabinose isomerase from Klebsiella pneumoniae and its application to production of D-altrose from D-psicose.

    PubMed

    Menavuvu, Buetusiwa Thomas; Poonperm, Wayoon; Takeda, Kosei; Morimoto, Kenji; Granström, Tom Birger; Takada, Goro; Izumori, Ken

    2006-11-01

    d-Arabinose isomerase from Klebsiella pneumoniae 40bXX was purified 12-fold with a 62.5% yield indicated by its electrophoretic homogeneity. The purified enzyme showed the highest activities toward d-arabinose and l-fucose as substrates at optimum conditions (50 mM glycine-NaOH, pH 9.0, 40 degrees C). The enzyme had a broad range of substrate specificities toward various d/l-aldoses, i.e., d-arabinose, l-fucose, d/l-xylose, d-mannose, d/l-lyxose, l-glucose, d-altrose and d/l-galactose. The equilibrium ratios between d-arabinose and d-ribulose, l-fucose and l-fuculose, d-altrose and d-psicose, and l-galactose and l-tagatose were 90:10, 90:10, 13:87 and 25:75, respectively. Using a combination of the immobilized d-tagatose 3-epimerase and d-arabinose isomerase, we achieved the production of d-altrose from d-fructose in a batch reactor. We successfully produced approximately 12 g of d-altrose from 200 g of d-fructose in a reaction series with an overall yield of 6%. The product obtained was confirmed to be d-altrose by HPLC and (13)C-NMR. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the production of d-altrose from a cheap sugar, d-fructose, using an enzymatic method.

  1. Assessment of agro-industrial and composted organic wastes for reducing the potential leaching of triazine herbicide residues through the soil.

    PubMed

    Fenoll, José; Vela, Nuria; Navarro, Ginés; Pérez-Lucas, Gabriel; Navarro, Simón

    2014-09-15

    In this study, we examined the effect of four different organic wastes--composted sheep manure (CSM), spent coffee grounds (SCG), composted pine bark (CPB) and coir (CR)--on the sorption, persistence and mobility of eight symmetrical and two asymmetrical-triazine herbicides: atrazine, propazine, simazine, terbuthylazine (chlorotriazines), prometon (methoxytriazine), prometryn, simetryn, terbutryn (methylthiotriazines), metamitron and metribuzin (triazinones). The downward movement of herbicides was monitored using disturbed soil columns packed with a clay loam soil (Hipercalcic calcisol) under laboratory conditions. For unamended and amended soils, the groundwater ubiquity score (GUS) was calculated for each herbicide on the basis of its persistence (as t½) and mobility (as KOC). All herbicides showed medium/high leachability through the unamended soils. The addition of agro-industrial and composted organic wastes at a rate of 10% (w:w) strongly decreased the mobility of herbicides. Sorption coefficients normalized to the total soil organic carbon (KOC) increased in the amended soils. These results suggest that used organic wastes could be used to enhance the retention and reduce the mobility of the studied herbicides in soil.

  2. Ph+ ALL patients in first complete remission have similar survival after reduced intensity and myeloablative allogeneic transplantation: Impact of tyrosine kinase inhibitor and minimal residual disease

    PubMed Central

    Bachanova, Veronika; Marks, David I.; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Wang, Hailin; de Lima, Marcos; Aljurf, Mahmoud D.; Arellano, Martha; Artz, Andrew S.; Bacher, Ulrike; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Chen, Yi-Bin; Copelan, Edward A.; Drobyski, William R.; Gale, Robert Peter; Greer, John P; Gupta, Vikas; Hale, Gregory A.; Kebriaei, Partow; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Lewis, Ian D.; Lewis, Victor A.; Liesveld, Jane L.; Litzow, Mark R.; Loren, Alison W.; Miller, Alan M.; Norkin, Maxim; Oran, Betul; Pidala, Joseph; Rowe, Jacob M.; Savani, Bipin N.; Saber, Wael; Vij, Ravi; Waller, Edmund K.; Wiernik, Peter H.; Weisdorf, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is uncertain. We analyzed 197 adults with Ph+ ALL in first complete remission; 67 patients receiving RIC were matched with 130 receiving myeloablative conditioning (MAC) for age, donor type, and HCT year. Over 75% received pre-HCT tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), mostly imatinib; 39% (RIC) and 49% (MAC) were MRDneg pre-HCT. At a median 4.5 years follow-up, 1-year transplant-related mortality (TRM) was lower in RIC (13%) than MAC (36%;p=0.001) while the 3-year relapse rate was 49% in RIC and 28% in MAC (p=0.058). Overall survival was similar (RIC 39% [95% CI:27–52] vs. 35% [95% CI:270–44];p=0.62). Patients MRDpos pre-HCT had higher risk of relapse with RIC versus MAC (HR 1.97;p=0.026). However, patients receiving pre-HCT TKI in combination with MRD negativity pre-RIC HCT had superior OS (55%) compared to a similar MRDneg population after MAC (33%; p=0.0042). In multivariate analysis, RIC lowered TRM (HR 0.6; p=0.057), but absence of pre-HCT TKI (HR 1.88;p=0.018), RIC (HR 1.891;p=0.054) and pre-HCT MRDpos (HR 1.6; p=0.070) increased relapse risk. RIC is a valid alternative strategy for Ph+ ALL patients ineligible for MAC and MRDneg status is preferred pre-HCT. PMID:23989431

  3. The influence of Aspergillus niger transcription factors AraR and XlnR in the gene expression during growth in D-xylose, L-arabinose and steam-exploded sugarcane bagasse.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Wagner Rodrigo; Maitan-Alfenas, Gabriela Piccolo; de Gouvêa, Paula Fagundes; Brown, Neil Andrew; Savoldi, Marcela; Battaglia, Evy; Goldman, Maria Helena S; de Vries, Ronald P; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique

    2013-11-01

    The interest in the conversion of plant biomass to renewable fuels such as bioethanol has led to an increased investigation into the processes regulating biomass saccharification. The filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is an important microorganism capable of producing a wide variety of plant biomass degrading enzymes. In A. niger the transcriptional activator XlnR and its close homolog, AraR, controls the main (hemi-)cellulolytic system responsible for plant polysaccharide degradation. Sugarcane is used worldwide as a feedstock for sugar and ethanol production, while the lignocellulosic residual bagasse can be used in different industrial applications, including ethanol production. The use of pentose sugars from hemicelluloses represents an opportunity to further increase production efficiencies. In the present study, we describe a global gene expression analysis of A. niger XlnR- and AraR-deficient mutant strains, grown on a D-xylose/L-arabinose monosaccharide mixture and steam-exploded sugarcane bagasse. Different gene sets of CAZy enzymes and sugar transporters were shown to be individually or dually regulated by XlnR and AraR, with XlnR appearing to be the major regulator on complex polysaccharides. Our study contributes to understanding of the complex regulatory mechanisms responsible for plant polysaccharide-degrading gene expression, and opens new possibilities for the engineering of fungi able to produce more efficient enzymatic cocktails to be used in biofuel production.

  4. Agonists of the G protein-coupled receptor 109A-mediated pathway promote antilipolysis by reducing serine residue 563 phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase in bovine adipose tissue explants.

    PubMed

    Kenéz, A; Locher, L; Rehage, J; Dänicke, S; Huber, K

    2014-01-01

    A balanced lipolytic regulation in adipose tissues based on fine-tuning of prolipolytic and antilipolytic pathways is of vital importance to maintain the metabolic health in dairy cows. Antilipolytic pathways, such as the G protein-coupled receptor 109A (GPR109A)-mediated pathway and the insulin signaling pathway in bovine adipose tissues may be involved in prohibiting excessive lipomobilization by reducing triglycerol hydrolysis. This study aimed to evaluate the in vitro antilipolytic potential of the mentioned pathways in bovine adipose tissue explants. Therefore, subcutaneous and retroperitoneal adipose tissue samples (approximately 100mg) of German Holstein cows were treated for 90 min ex vivo with nicotinic acid (2, 8, or 32 μM), nicotinamide (2, 8, or 32 μM), β-hydroxybutyrate (0.2, 1, or 5mM), or insulin (12 mU/L), with a concurrent lipolytic challenge provoked with 1 μM isoproterenol. Lipolytic and antilipolytic responses of the adipose tissues were assessed by measuring free glycerol and nonesterified fatty acid release. To identify molecular components of the investigated antilipolytic pathways, protein abundance of GPR109A and the extent of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) phosphorylation at serine residue 563 were detected by Western blotting. Treatment with nicotinic acid or β-hydroxybutyrate decreased the lipolytic response in adipose tissue explants and concurrently reduced the extent of HSL phosphorylation, but treatment with nicotinamide or insulin did not. Subcutaneous adipose tissue constitutively expressed more GPR109A protein, but no other depot-specific differences were observed. This study provides evidence that the GPR109A-mediated pathway is functionally existent in bovine adipose tissues, and confirms that HSL phosphorylation at serine residue 563 is also important in antilipolytic regulation in vitro. This antilipolytic pathway may be involved in a balanced lipid mobilization in the dairy cow.

  5. Impact of Residual Inducer on Titratable Expression Systems

    PubMed Central

    Afroz, Taliman; Luo, Michelle L.; Beisel, Chase L.

    2015-01-01

    Inducible expression systems are widely employed for the titratable control of gene expression, yet molecules inadvertently present in the growth medium or synthesized by the host cells can alter the response profile of some of these systems. Here, we explored the quantitative impact of these residual inducers on the apparent response properties of inducible systems. Using a simple mathematical model, we found that the presence of residual inducer shrinks the apparent dynamic range and causes the apparent Hill coefficient to converge to one. We also found that activating systems were more sensitive than repressing systems to the presence of residual inducer and the response parameters were most heavily dependent on the original Hill coefficient. Experimental interrogation of common titratable systems based on an L-arabinose inducible promoter or a thiamine pyrophosphate-repressing riboswitch in Escherichia coli confirmed the predicted trends. We finally found that residual inducer had a distinct effect on “all-or-none” systems, which exhibited increased sensitivity to the added inducer until becoming fully induced. Our findings indicate that residual inducer or repressor alters the quantitative response properties of titratable systems, impacting their utility for scientific discovery and pathway engineering. PMID:26348036

  6. Impact of Residual Inducer on Titratable Expression Systems.

    PubMed

    Afroz, Taliman; Luo, Michelle L; Beisel, Chase L

    2015-01-01

    Inducible expression systems are widely employed for the titratable control of gene expression, yet molecules inadvertently present in the growth medium or synthesized by the host cells can alter the response profile of some of these systems. Here, we explored the quantitative impact of these residual inducers on the apparent response properties of inducible systems. Using a simple mathematical model, we found that the presence of residual inducer shrinks the apparent dynamic range and causes the apparent Hill coefficient to converge to one. We also found that activating systems were more sensitive than repressing systems to the presence of residual inducer and the response parameters were most heavily dependent on the original Hill coefficient. Experimental interrogation of common titratable systems based on an L-arabinose inducible promoter or a thiamine pyrophosphate-repressing riboswitch in Escherichia coli confirmed the predicted trends. We finally found that residual inducer had a distinct effect on "all-or-none" systems, which exhibited increased sensitivity to the added inducer until becoming fully induced. Our findings indicate that residual inducer or repressor alters the quantitative response properties of titratable systems, impacting their utility for scientific discovery and pathway engineering. PMID:26348036

  7. Efficacy of sodium hypochlorite and peroxyacetic acid to reduce murine norovirus 1, B40-8, Listeria monocytogenes, and Escherichia coli O157:H7 on shredded iceberg lettuce and in residual wash water.

    PubMed

    Baert, Leen; Vandekinderen, Isabelle; Devlieghere, Frank; Van Coillie, Els; Debevere, Johan; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2009-05-01

    The efficiency of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and peroxyacetic acid (PAA) to reduce murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1), a surrogate for human norovirus, and Bacteroides fragilis HSP40-infecting phage B40-8 on shredded iceberg lettuce was investigated. The levels of removal of viruses MNV-1 and B40-8 were compared with the reductions observed for bacterial pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli O157:H7. Two inoculation levels, one with a high organic load and the other containing a 10-fold lower number of pathogens and organic matter, showed that the effectiveness of NaOCl was greatly influenced by the presence of organic material, which was not observed for PAA. Moreover, the present study showed that 200 mg/liter NaOCl or 250 mg/liter PAA is needed to obtain an additional reduction of 1 log (compared with tap water) of MNV-1 on shredded iceberg lettuce, whereas only 250 mg/liter PAA achieved this for bacterial pathogens. None of the treatments resulted in a supplementary 1-log PFU/g reduction of B40-8 compared with tap water. B40-8 could therefore be useful as an indicator of decontamination processes of shredded iceberg lettuce based on NaOCl or PAA. Neither MNV-1, B40-8, nor bacterial pathogens could be detected in residual wash water after shredded iceberg lettuce was treated with NaOCl and PAA, whereas considerable numbers of all these microorganisms were found in residual wash water consisting solely of tap water. This study illustrates the usefulness of PAA and NaOCl in preventing cross-contamination during the washing process rather than in causing a reduction of the number of pathogens present on lettuce.

  8. Targeted deletion of the ara operon of Salmonella typhimurium enhances L-arabinose accumulation and drives PBAD-promoted expression of anti-cancer toxins and imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hyun; Lim, Daejin; Kim, Geun-Joong; Park, Seung-Hwan; Sik Kim, Hyeon; Hong, Yeongjin; Choy, Hyon E; Min, Jung-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-specific expression of antitumor drugs can be achieved using attenuated Salmonella typhimurium harboring the PBAD promoter, which is induced by L-arabinose. However, L-arabinose does not accumulate because it is metabolized to D-xylulose-5-P by enzymes encoded by the ara operon in Salmonellae. To address this problem, we developed an engineered strain of S. typhimurium in which the ara operon is deleted. Linear DNA transformation was performed using λ red recombinase to exchange the ara operon with linear DNA carrying an antibiotic-resistance gene with homology to regions adjacent to the ara operon. The ara operon-deleted strain and its parental strain were transformed with a plasmid encoding Renilla luciferase variant 8 (RLuc8) or cytolysin A (clyA) under the control of the PBAD promoter. Luciferase assays demonstrated that RLuc8 expression was 49-fold higher in the ara operon-deleted S. typhimurium than in the parental strain after the addition of L-arabinose. In vivo bioluminescence imaging showed that the tumor tissue targeted by the ara operon-deleted Salmonella had a stronger imaging signal (~30-fold) than that targeted by the parental strain. Mice with murine colon cancer (CT26) that had been injected with the ara operon-deleted S. typhimurium expressing clyA showed significant tumor suppression. The present report demonstrates that deletion of the ara operon of S. typhimurium enhances L-arabinose accumulation and thereby drives PBAD-promoted expression of cytotoxic agents and imaging agents. This is a promising approach for tumor therapy and imaging.

  9. Genetics, Transcriptional Profiles, and Catalytic Properties of the UDP-Arabinose Mutase Family from Barley.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yves S Y; Zhang, Qisen; Yap, Kuok; Shirley, Neil J; Lahnstein, Jelle; Nelson, Clark J; Burton, Rachel A; Millar, A Harvey; Bulone, Vincent; Fincher, Geoffrey B

    2016-01-19

    Four members of the UDP-Ara mutase (UAM) gene family from barley have been isolated and characterized, and their map positions on chromosomes 2H, 3H, and 4H have been defined. When the genes are expressed in Escherichia coli, the corresponding HvUAM1, HvUAM2, and HvUAM3 proteins exhibit UAM activity, and the kinetic properties of the enzymes have been determined, including Km, Kcat, and catalytic efficiencies. However, the expressed HvUAM4 protein shows no mutase activity against UDP-Ara or against a broad range of other nucleotide sugars and related molecules. The enzymic data indicate therefore that the HvUAM4 protein may not be a mutase. However, the HvUAM4 gene is transcribed at high levels in all the barley tissues examined, and its transcript abundance is correlated with transcript levels for other genes involved in cell wall biosynthesis. The UDP-l-Arap → UDP-l-Araf reaction, which is essential for the generation of the UDP-Araf substrate for arabinoxylan, arabinogalactan protein, and pectic polysaccharide biosynthesis, is thermodynamically unfavorable and has an equilibrium constant of 0.02. Nevertheless, the incorporation of Araf residues into nascent polysaccharides clearly occurs at biologically appropriate rates. The characterization of the HvUAM genes opens the way for the manipulation of both the amounts and fine structures of heteroxylans in cereals, grasses, and other crop plants, with a view toward enhancing their value in human health and nutrition, and in renewable biofuel production.

  10. Feruloyl-L-arabinose attenuates migration, invasion and production of reactive oxygen species in H1299 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hsin-Yu; Wang, Hui-Min; Chang, Kuo-Feng; Hu, Huei-Ting; Hwang, Lian-Je; Fu, Tzu-Fun; Lin, Yin-Chieh; Chang, Wei-Chiao; Chiu, Tsu-Pei; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Fong, Yao; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Chen, Bing-Hung

    2013-08-01

    Ferulic acid (FA), a phenolic compound, is an abundant dietary antioxidant and exerts the mitogenic effect on cells. Recently, we isolated an active FA derivative, namely feruloyl-L-arabinose (FAA), from coba husk. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of FAA on the proliferation, migration and invasion of H1299 human lung cancer cells. Our results showed a strong antioxidant potential of FAA. Additionally, FAA inhibited the migration and invasion ability, while causing a significant accumulation of G2/M-population, of H1299 tumor cells in a dose-dependent manner, whereas no significant change on cell proliferation was observed. Results from the wound healing assay revealed that cell migration ability was markedly inhibited by FAA treatments. Similarly, results of gelatin zymography study showed that FAA treatments significantly decreased the activities of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, suggesting that FAA-mediated inhibition on migration and invasion of lung cancer cells may be achieved by the down-regulation of the MMPs activities. Taken together, our present work provides a new insight into the novel inhibitory function of FAA on cell migration in H1299 cells, suggesting its promising role in the chemoprevention of lung cancer.

  11. Growth inhibitory effect of D-arabinose against the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans: Discovery of a novel bioactive monosaccharide.

    PubMed

    Sakoguchi, Hirofumi; Yoshihara, Akihide; Shintani, Tomoya; Okuma, Kazuhiro; Izumori, Ken; Sato, Masashi

    2016-02-01

    Biological activities of unusual monosaccharides (rare sugars) have largely remained unstudied until recently. We compared the growth inhibitory effects of aldohexose stereoisomers against the animal model Caenorhabditis elegans cultured in monoxenic conditions with Escherichia coli as food. Among these stereoisomers, the rare sugar D-arabinose (D-Ara) showed particularly strong growth inhibition. The IC50 value for D-Ara was estimated to be 7.5 mM, which surpassed that of the potent glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxy-D-glucose (19.5 mM) used as a positive control. The inhibitory effect of D-Ara was also observed in animals cultured in axenic conditions using a chemically defined medium; this excluded the possible influence of E. coli. To our knowledge, this is the first report of biological activity of D-Ara. The D-Ara-induced inhibition was recovered by adding either D-ribose or D-fructose, but not D-glucose. These findings suggest that the inhibition could be induced by multiple mechanisms, for example, disturbance of D-ribose and D-fructose metabolism. PMID:26791015

  12. Growth inhibitory effect of D-arabinose against the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans: Discovery of a novel bioactive monosaccharide.

    PubMed

    Sakoguchi, Hirofumi; Yoshihara, Akihide; Shintani, Tomoya; Okuma, Kazuhiro; Izumori, Ken; Sato, Masashi

    2016-02-01

    Biological activities of unusual monosaccharides (rare sugars) have largely remained unstudied until recently. We compared the growth inhibitory effects of aldohexose stereoisomers against the animal model Caenorhabditis elegans cultured in monoxenic conditions with Escherichia coli as food. Among these stereoisomers, the rare sugar D-arabinose (D-Ara) showed particularly strong growth inhibition. The IC50 value for D-Ara was estimated to be 7.5 mM, which surpassed that of the potent glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxy-D-glucose (19.5 mM) used as a positive control. The inhibitory effect of D-Ara was also observed in animals cultured in axenic conditions using a chemically defined medium; this excluded the possible influence of E. coli. To our knowledge, this is the first report of biological activity of D-Ara. The D-Ara-induced inhibition was recovered by adding either D-ribose or D-fructose, but not D-glucose. These findings suggest that the inhibition could be induced by multiple mechanisms, for example, disturbance of D-ribose and D-fructose metabolism.

  13. Crystal Structure of Mn2+-bound Escherichia coli L-arabinose Isomerase (ECAI) and Implications in Protein Catalytic Mechanism and Thermo-Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu,W.; Manjasetty, B.; Chance, M.

    2007-01-01

    The functional properties of proteins depend on their three-dimensional shapes. Protein structures can be determined by X-ray crystallography as a tool. The three-dimensional structure of the apo form of the Escherichia coli L-arabinose isomerase (ECAI) has recently been determined. ECAI is responsible for the initial stage of L-arabinose catabolism, converting arabinose into ribulose in vivo. This enzyme also plays a crucial role in catalyzing the conversion of galactose into tagatose (low calorie natural sugar) in vitro. ECAI utilizes Mn{sup 2+} for its catalytic activity. Crystals of the ECAI + Mn{sup 2+} complex helps to investigate the catalytic properties of the enzyme. Therefore, crystals of ECAI + Mn{sup 2+} complex were grown using hanging drop vapor diffusion method at room temperature. Diffraction data were collected at X4C beamline, National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. The structure was solved by the molecular replacement technique and has been refined to Rwork of 0.23 at 2.8 {angstrom} resolution using X3A beamline computational facility. The structure was deposited to Protein Data Bank (PDB ID 2HXG). Mn{sup 2+} ion was localized to the previously identified putative active site with octahedral coordination. Comparison of apo and holo form of ECAI structures permits the identification of structural features that are of importance to the intrinsic activity and heat stability of AI.

  14. Enzymatic conversion of D-galactose to D-tagatose: cloning, overexpression and characterization of L-arabinose isomerase from Pediococcus pentosaceus PC-5.

    PubMed

    Men, Yan; Zhu, Yueming; Zhang, Lili; Kang, Zhenkui; Izumori, Ken; Sun, Yuanxia; Ma, Yanhe

    2014-01-01

    The gene encoding L-arabinose isomerase from food-grade strain Pediococcus pentosaceus PC-5 was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein was purified and characterized. It was optimally active at 50 °C and pH 6.0. Furthermore, this enzyme exhibited a weak requirement for metallic ions for its maximal activity evaluated at 0.6 mM Mn(2+) or 0.8 mM Co(2+). Interestingly, this enzyme was distinguished from other L-AIs, it could not use L-arabinose as its substrate. In addition, a three-dimensional structure of L-AI was built by homology modeling and L-arabinose and D-galactose were docked into the active site pocket of PPAI model to explain the interaction between L-AI and its substrate. The purified P. pentosaceus PC-5 L-AI converted D-galactose into D-tagatose with a high conversion rate of 52% after 24 h at 50 °C, suggesting its excellent potential in D-tagatose production.

  15. Synergistic production of L-arabinose from arabinan by the combined use of thermostable endo- and exo-arabinanases from Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yu-Ri; Yeom, Soo-Jin; Kim, Young-Su; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2011-03-01

    The optimum conditions for the production of L-arabinose from debranched arabinan were determined to be pH 6.5, 75°C, 20 g l(-1) debranched arabinan, 42 Um l(-1) endo-1,5-α-L-arabinanase, and 14 U ml(-1) α-L-arabinofuranosidase from Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus and the conditions for sugar beet arabinan were pH 6.0, 75°C, 20 g l(-1) sugar beet arabinan, 3 U ml(-1) endo-1,5-α-L-arabinanase, and 24 U ml(-1) α-L-arabinofuranosidase. Under the optimum conditions, 16 g l(-1)l-arabinose was obtained from 20 g l(-1) debranched arabinan or sugar beet arabinan after 120 min, with a hydrolysis yield of 80% and a productivity of 8 g l(-1)h(-1). This is the first reported trial for the production of L-arabinose from the hemicellulose arabinan by the combined use of endo- and exo-arabinanases.

  16. The Cell Wall Arabinose-Deficient Arabidopsis thaliana Mutant murus5 Encodes a Defective Allele of REVERSIBLY GLYCOSYLATED POLYPEPTIDE21[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Dugard, Christopher K.; Olek, Anna T.; Cooper, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional marker-based mapping and next-generation sequencing was used to determine that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) low cell wall arabinose mutant murus5 (mur5) encodes a defective allele of REVERSIBLY GLYCOSYLATED POLYPEPTIDE2 (RGP2). Marker analysis of 13 F2 confirmed mutant progeny from a recombinant mapping population gave a rough map position on the upper arm of chromosome 5, and deep sequencing of DNA from these 13 lines gave five candidate genes with G→A (C→T) transitions predicted to result in amino acid changes. Of these five, only insertional mutant alleles of RGP2, a gene that encodes a UDP-arabinose mutase that interconverts UDP-arabinopyranose and UDP-arabinofuranose, exhibited the low cell wall arabinose phenotype. The identities of mur5 and two SALK insertional alleles were confirmed by allelism tests and overexpression of wild-type RGP2 complementary DNA placed under the control of the 35S promoter in the three alleles. The mur5 mutation results in the conversion of cysteine-257 to tyrosine-257 within a conserved hydrophobic cluster predicted to be distal to the active site and essential for protein stability and possible heterodimerization with other isoforms of RGP. PMID:27217494

  17. XacR - a novel transcriptional regulator of D-xylose and L-arabinose catabolism in the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Ulrike; Sutter, Jan-Moritz; Schulz, Anne-Christine; Tästensen, Julia-Beate; Schönheit, Peter

    2015-05-01

    The haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii degrades D-xylose and L-arabinose via oxidative pathways to α-ketoglutarate. The genes involved in these pathways are clustered and were transcriptionally upregulated by both D-xylose and L-arabinose suggesting a common regulator. Adjacent to the gene cluster, a putative IclR-like transcriptional regulator, HVO_B0040, was identified. It is shown that HVO_B0040, designated xacR, encodes an activator of both D-xylose and L-arabinose catabolism: in ΔxacR cells, transcripts of genes involved in pentose catabolism could not be detected; transcript formation could be recovered by complementation, indicating XacR dependent transcriptional activation. Upstream activation promoter regions and nucleotide sequences that were essential for XacR-mediated activation of pentose-specific genes were identified by in vivo deletion and scanning mutagenesis. Besides its activator function XacR acted as repressor of its own synthesis: xacR deletion resulted in an increase of xacR promoter activity. A palindromic sequence was identified at the operator site of xacR promoter, and mutation of this sequence also resulted in an increase and thus derepression of xacR promoter activity. It is concluded that the palindromic sequence represents the binding site of XacR as repressor. This is the first report of a transcriptional regulator of pentose catabolism in the domain of archaea.

  18. Theoretical Study on the Factors Controlling the Stability of the Borate Complexes of Ribose, Arabinose, Lyxose and Xylose

    SciTech Connect

    Sumpter, Bobby G; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel A; Leszczynski, Jerzy; Sponer, Judit; Sponer, Jiri

    2008-01-01

    Recent views on the origin of the "RNA world" suggest that complexation with borate minerals had an indispensable role at stabilizing the cyclic form of aldopentoses that are the potential building blocks of RNA. Experimental investigations by Li Q, Ricardo A, Benner SA, Winefordner JD, Powell DH (2005) Anal Chem 77:4503-4508 and Chapelle S, Verchere J-F (1988) Tetrahedron 44:4469-4482 have shown that stability of the 2:1 complexes formed between ribose and borate is superior to those of the analogous compounds of the other three aldopentoses (xylose, arabinose and lyxose). The distinct stability of the ribose-borate 2:1 complexes is thought to be one of the basic reasons why evolution selected ribose (out of the four aldopentoses) to build up RNA molecules. Here we disclose the factors governing the stability of the aldopentose-borate 2:1 complexes using Density Functional Theory electronic structure calculations with inclusion of solvation effects using a continuum solvent approach. Our results show that the strong electrostatic field of the borate anion leads to the reorientation of the hydroxyl groups of the aldopentoses relative to the geometry adopted in the non-complexed form. The reasons why complex formation between borate and ribose is clearly preferred over the other three aldopentoses is (i) the ribose 3-OH is involved in a H-bond with one of the borate-oxygens and (ii) its 5-CH2OH group is well separated in space from the negatively charged region of the complex and ensures favorable contact with the aqueous medium.

  19. Unitary cause for the exclusion of Na(+) and other solutes from living cells, suggested by effluxes of Na(+), d-arabinose and sucrose from normal, dying and dead muscles

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, G.N.; Walton, C.L.; Ochsenfeld, M.M.

    1983-01-01

    The effluxes of labelled Na(+), D-arabinose, and sucrose from normal muscle and muscle poisoned with low concentrations of iodoacetate were studied. The procedure involved repeated loading with isotope, followed by washing of the same muscle while still normal and at different stages of dying. The rates of Na(+) efflux in both the fast and slow fraction remained either quite constant or showed some unpredictable, minor fluctuations. This was true for both Na(+) and the two sugars studied, confirming earlier conclusions that the steady levels of these solutes were not maintained by pumps. In all cases studied, the efflux curves showed at least two fractions. It is the fast-exchanging fraction that steadily and consistently increased in magnitude as the muscles were dying, until finally the concentration of solute in this fraction reached and sometimes surpassed the labelled solute concentrations in the original labelled solutions in which the muscles were equilibrated. The slow fractions showed only a transient increase or none at all. These observations show that it is the fast fraction that represents solute dissolved in cell water and rate-limited by passage through the cell surface and that the partial exclusion of Na(+) and the sugars have a unitary cause - a reduced solubility in the cell water which in the presence of ATP exists in the state of polarized multilayers.

  20. Identification of lysine 153 as a functionally important residue in UDP-galactose 4-epimerase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Swanson, B A; Frey, P A

    1993-12-01

    The role of lysine 153 in the action of UDP-galactose 4-epimerase from Escherichia coli has been investigated by site specific mutagenesis and kinetic and spectrophotometric analysis of the mutant enzymes. The crystal structure of UDP-galactose 4-epimerase shows that the binding of NAD+ to the coenzyme site includes the hydrogen bonded interaction of the epsilon-ammonium group of lysine 153 with the 2'- and 3'-hydroxyl groups of the nicotinamide riboside. Mutation of this residue to methionine or alanine decreases the catalytic activity of the enzyme by a factor of more than 10(3). The NAD+ associated with the wild type enzyme is subject to UMP-dependent reduction by sugars such as glucose and arabinose, but the mutant proteins K153M and K153A are not reduced by sugars in the presence or absence of UMP. NAD+ associated with the wild type enzyme is also subject to UMP-dependent reduction by sodium cyanoborohydride. However, although the mutant proteins bind UMP very well, the rate at which NAD+ associated with them is reduced by sodium cyanoborohydride is almost insensitive to the presence of UMP. The purified wild type enzyme contains significant amounts of NADH bound to the coenzyme site; however, the purified mutants K153M and K153A contain very little NADH. We conclude that lysine 153 plays an important role in increasing the chemical reactivity of enzyme-bound NAD+ in the uridine nucleotide-dependent conformational change associated with reductive inactivation and the catalytic activity of UDP-galactose 4-epimerase.

  1. Coexpression of β-D-galactosidase and L-arabinose isomerase in the production of D-tagatose: a functional sweetener.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yijing; Xu, Zheng; Li, Sha; Liu, Xiaoliu; Xu, Lu; Feng, Xiaohai; Xu, Hong

    2014-03-19

    The functional sweetener, d-tagatose, is commonly transformed from galactose by l-arabinose isomerase. To make use of a much cheaper starting material, lactose, hydrolization, and isomerization are required to take place collaboratively. Therefore, a single-step method involving β-d-galactosidase was explored for d-tagatose production. The two vital genes, β-d-galactosidase gene (lacZ) and l-arabinose isomerase mutant gene (araA') were extracted separately from Escherichia coli strains and incorporated into E. coli simultaneously. This gave us E. coli-ZY, a recombinant producing strain capable of coexpressing the two key enzymes. The resulted cells exhibited maximum d-tagatose producing activity at 34 °C and pH 6.5 and in the presence of borate, 10 mM Fe(2+), and 1 mM Mn(2+). Further monitoring showed that the recombinant cells could hydrolyze more than 95% lactose and convert 43% d-galactose into d-tagatose. This research has verified the feasibility of single-step d-tagatose fermentation, thereby laying down the foundation for industrial usage of lactose.

  2. UDP-sugar pyrophosphorylase is essential for arabinose and xylose recycling, and is required during vegetative and reproductive growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Geserick, Claudia; Tenhaken, Raimund

    2013-04-01

    Numerous nucleotide sugars are needed in plants to synthesize cell wall polymers and glycoproteins. The de novo synthesis of nucleotide sugars is of major importance. During growth, however, some polymers are broken down to monosaccharides. Reactivation of these sugars into nucleotide sugars occurs in two steps: first, by a substrate-specific sugar-1-kinase and, second, by UDP-sugar-pyrophosphorylase (USP), which has broad substrate specificity. A knock-out of the USP gene results in non-fertile pollen. By using various genetic complementation approaches we obtained a strong (>95%) knock-down line in USP that allowed us to investigate the physiological role of the enzyme during the life cycle. Mutant plants show an arabinose reduction in the cell wall, and accumulate mainly two sugars, arabinose and xylose, in the cytoplasm. The arabinogalactanproteins in usp mutants show no significant reduction in size. USP is also part of the myo-inositol oxygenation pathway to UDP-glucuronic acid; however, free glucuronic acid does not accumulate in cells, suggesting alternative conversion pathways of this monosaccharide. The knock-down plants are mostly sterile because of the improper formation of anthers and pollen sacks.

  3. Optical systolic array processor using residue arithmetic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, J.; Casasent, D.

    1983-01-01

    The use of residue arithmetic to increase the accuracy and reduce the dynamic range requirements of optical matrix-vector processors is evaluated. It is determined that matrix-vector operations and iterative algorithms can be performed totally in residue notation. A new parallel residue quantizer circuit is developed which significantly improves the performance of the systolic array feedback processor. Results are presented of a computer simulation of this system used to solve a set of three simultaneous equations.

  4. AraR, an l-Arabinose-Responsive Transcriptional Regulator in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 31831, Exerts Different Degrees of Repression Depending on the Location of Its Binding Sites within the Three Target Promoter Regions

    PubMed Central

    Kuge, Takayuki; Teramoto, Haruhiko

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 31831, a LacI-type transcriptional regulator AraR, represses the expression of l-arabinose catabolism (araBDA), uptake (araE), and the regulator (araR) genes clustered on the chromosome. AraR binds to three sites: one (BSB) between the divergent operons (araBDA and galM-araR) and two (BSE1 and BSE2) upstream of araE. l-Arabinose acts as an inducer of the AraR-mediated regulation. Here, we examined the roles of these AraR-binding sites in the expression of the AraR regulon. BSB mutation resulted in derepression of both araBDA and galM-araR operons. The effects of BSE1 and/or BSE2 mutation on araE expression revealed that the two sites independently function as the cis elements, but BSE1 plays the primary role. However, AraR was shown to bind to these sites with almost the same affinity in vitro. Taken together, the expression of araBDA and araE is strongly repressed by binding of AraR to a single site immediately downstream of the respective transcriptional start sites, whereas the binding site overlapping the −10 or −35 region of the galM-araR and araE promoters is less effective in repression. Furthermore, downregulation of araBDA and araE dependent on l-arabinose catabolism observed in the BSB mutant and the AraR-independent araR promoter identified within galM-araR add complexity to regulation of the AraR regulon derepressed by l-arabinose. IMPORTANCE Corynebacterium glutamicum has a long history as an industrial workhorse for large-scale production of amino acids. An important aspect of industrial microorganisms is the utilization of the broad range of sugars for cell growth and production process. Most C. glutamicum strains are unable to use a pentose sugar l-arabinose as a carbon source. However, genes for l-arabinose utilization and its regulation have been recently identified in C. glutamicum ATCC 31831. This study elucidates the roles of the multiple binding sites of the transcriptional repressor AraR in the

  5. Soil water evaporation and crop residues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop residues have value when left in the field and also when removed from the field and sold as a commodity. Reducing soil water evaporation (E) is one of the benefits of leaving crop residues in place. E was measured beneath a corn canopy at the soil suface with nearly full coverage by corn stover...

  6. An EBV recombinant deleted for residues 130-159 in EBNA3C can deregulate p53/Mdm2 and Cyclin D1/CDK6 which results in apoptosis and reduced cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    El-Naccache, Darine W.; Robertson, Erle S.

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a gamma herpes virus is associated with B-cell malignancies. EBNA-3C is critical for in vitro primary B-cell transformation. Interestingly, the N terminal domain of EBNA3C which contains residues 130–159, interacts with various cellular proteins, such as p53, Mdm2, CyclinD1/Cdk6 complex, and E2F1. In the current reverse genetics study, we deleted the residues 130-159 aa within EBNA3C open reading frame (ORF) by BACmid recombinant engineering methodology. Our experiments demonstrated that deletion of the 130-159 aa showed a reduction in cell proliferation. Also, this recombinant virus showed with higher infectivity of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) compared to wild type EBV. PBMCs- infected with recombinant EBV deleted for 130-159 residues have differential expression patterns for the p53/Mdm2, CyclinD1/Cdk6 and pRb/E2F1 pathways compared to wild type EBV-infected PBMCs. PBMCs infected with recombinant virus showed increased apoptotic cell death which further resulted in activation of polymerase 1 (PARP1), an important contributor to apoptotic signaling. Interestingly, cells infected with this recombinant virus showed a dramatic decrease in chromosomal instability, indicated by the presence of increased multinucleation and micronucleation. In addition infection with recombinant virus have increased cells in G0/G1 phase and decreased cells in S-G2M phase when compared to wild type infected cells. Thus, these differences in signaling activities due to 29 amino acid residues of EBNA3C is of particular significance in deregulation of cell proliferation in EBV-infected cells. PMID:26908453

  7. The Aspergillus niger D-xylulose kinase gene is co-expressed with genes encoding arabinan degrading enzymes, and is essential for growth on D-xylose and L-arabinose.

    PubMed

    vanKuyk, P A; de Groot, M J; Ruijter, G J; de Vries, R P; Visser, J

    2001-10-01

    The Aspergillus niger D-xylulose kinase encoding gene has been cloned by complementation of a strain deficient in D-xylulose kinase activity. Expression of xkiA was observed in the presence of L-arabinose, L-arabitol and D-xylose. Expression of xkiA is not mediated by XLNR, the xylose-dependent positively-acting xylanolytic regulator. Although the expression of xkiA is subject to carbon catabolite repression, the wide domain regulator CREA is not directly involved. The A. niger D-xylulose kinase was purified to homogeneity, and the molecular mass determined using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry agreed with the calculated molecular mass of 62816.6 Da. The activity of XKIA is highly specific for D-xylulose. Kinetic parameters were determined as Km(D-xylulose) = 0.76 mM and Km(ATP) = 0.061 mM. Increased transcript levels of the genes encoding arabinan and xylan degrading enzymes, observed in the xylulose kinase deficient strain, correlate with increased accumulation of L-arabitol and xylitol, respectively. This result supports the suggestion that L-arabitol may be the specific low molecular mass inducer of the genes involved in arabinan degradation. It also suggests a possible role for xylitol in the induction of xylanolytic genes. Conversely, overproduction of XKIA did not reduce the size of the intracellular arabitol and xylitol pools, and therefore had no effect on expression of genes encoding xylan and arabinan degrading enzymes nor on the activity of the enzymes of the catabolic pathway.

  8. Conversion of hemicellulose sugars catalyzed by formic acid: kinetics of the dehydration of D-xylose, L-arabinose, and D-glucose.

    PubMed

    Dussan, Karla; Girisuta, Buana; Lopes, Marystela; Leahy, James J; Hayes, Michael H B

    2015-04-24

    The pre-treatment of lignocellulosic biomass produces a liquid stream of hemicellulose-based sugars, which can be further converted to high-value chemicals. Formosolv pulping and the Milox process use formic acid as the fractionating agent, which can be used as the catalyst for the valorisation of hemicellulose sugars to platform chemicals. The objective of this study was to investigate the reaction kinetics of major components in the hemicelluloses fraction of biomass, that is, D-xylose, L-arabinose and D-glucose. The kinetics experiments for each sugar were performed at temperatures between 130 and 170 °C in various formic acid concentrations (10-64 wt %). The implications of these kinetic models on the selectivity of each sugar to the desired products are discussed. The models were used to predict the reaction kinetics of solutions that resemble the liquid stream obtained from the fractionation process of biomass using formic acid. PMID:25821128

  9. Characterization of a recombinant L-fucose isomerase from Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus that isomerizes L-fucose, D-arabinose, D-altrose, and L-galactose.

    PubMed

    Ju, Yo-Han; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2010-02-01

    A recombinant L-fucose isomerase from Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus was purified as a single 68 kDa band with an activity of 76 U mg(-1). The molecular mass of the native enzyme was 204 kDa as a trimer. The maximum activity for L-fucose isomerization was at pH 7 and 75 degrees C in the presence of 1 mM Mn(2+). Its half-life at 70 degrees C was 6.1 h. For aldose substrates, the enzyme displayed activity in decreasing order for L-fucose, with a k (cat) of 11,910 min(-1) and a K (m) of 140 mM, D-arabinose, D-altrose, and L-galactose. These aldoses were converted to the ketoses L-fuculose, D-ribulose, D-psicose, and L-tagatose, respectively, with 24, 24, 85, 55% conversion yields after 3 h.

  10. Conversion of hemicellulose sugars catalyzed by formic acid: kinetics of the dehydration of D-xylose, L-arabinose, and D-glucose.

    PubMed

    Dussan, Karla; Girisuta, Buana; Lopes, Marystela; Leahy, James J; Hayes, Michael H B

    2015-04-24

    The pre-treatment of lignocellulosic biomass produces a liquid stream of hemicellulose-based sugars, which can be further converted to high-value chemicals. Formosolv pulping and the Milox process use formic acid as the fractionating agent, which can be used as the catalyst for the valorisation of hemicellulose sugars to platform chemicals. The objective of this study was to investigate the reaction kinetics of major components in the hemicelluloses fraction of biomass, that is, D-xylose, L-arabinose and D-glucose. The kinetics experiments for each sugar were performed at temperatures between 130 and 170 °C in various formic acid concentrations (10-64 wt %). The implications of these kinetic models on the selectivity of each sugar to the desired products are discussed. The models were used to predict the reaction kinetics of solutions that resemble the liquid stream obtained from the fractionation process of biomass using formic acid.

  11. Crystal structures of two monomeric triosephosphate isomerase variants identified via a directed-evolution protocol selecting for L-arabinose isomerase activity.

    PubMed

    Krause, Mirja; Kiema, Tiila Riikka; Neubauer, Peter; Wierenga, Rik K

    2016-06-01

    The crystal structures are described of two variants of A-TIM: Ma18 (2.7 Å resolution) and Ma21 (1.55 Å resolution). A-TIM is a monomeric loop-deletion variant of triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) which has lost the TIM catalytic properties. Ma18 and Ma21 were identified after extensive directed-evolution selection experiments using an Escherichia coli L-arabinose isomerase knockout strain expressing a randomly mutated A-TIM gene. These variants facilitate better growth of the Escherichia coli selection strain in medium supplemented with 40 mM L-arabinose. Ma18 and Ma21 differ from A-TIM by four and one point mutations, respectively. Ma18 and Ma21 are more stable proteins than A-TIM, as judged from CD melting experiments. Like A-TIM, both proteins are monomeric in solution. In the Ma18 crystal structure loop 6 is open and in the Ma21 crystal structure loop 6 is closed, being stabilized by a bound glycolate molecule. The crystal structures show only small differences in the active site compared with A-TIM. In the case of Ma21 it is observed that the point mutation (Q65L) contributes to small structural rearrangements near Asn11 of loop 1, which correlate with different ligand-binding properties such as a loss of citrate binding in the active site. The Ma21 structure also shows that its Leu65 side chain is involved in van der Waals interactions with neighbouring hydrophobic side-chain moieties, correlating with its increased stability. The experimental data suggest that the increased stability and solubility properties of Ma21 and Ma18 compared with A-TIM cause better growth of the selection strain when coexpressing Ma21 and Ma18 instead of A-TIM. PMID:27303904

  12. Crystal structures of two monomeric triosephosphate isomerase variants identified via a directed-evolution protocol selecting for L-arabinose isomerase activity.

    PubMed

    Krause, Mirja; Kiema, Tiila Riikka; Neubauer, Peter; Wierenga, Rik K

    2016-06-01

    The crystal structures are described of two variants of A-TIM: Ma18 (2.7 Å resolution) and Ma21 (1.55 Å resolution). A-TIM is a monomeric loop-deletion variant of triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) which has lost the TIM catalytic properties. Ma18 and Ma21 were identified after extensive directed-evolution selection experiments using an Escherichia coli L-arabinose isomerase knockout strain expressing a randomly mutated A-TIM gene. These variants facilitate better growth of the Escherichia coli selection strain in medium supplemented with 40 mM L-arabinose. Ma18 and Ma21 differ from A-TIM by four and one point mutations, respectively. Ma18 and Ma21 are more stable proteins than A-TIM, as judged from CD melting experiments. Like A-TIM, both proteins are monomeric in solution. In the Ma18 crystal structure loop 6 is open and in the Ma21 crystal structure loop 6 is closed, being stabilized by a bound glycolate molecule. The crystal structures show only small differences in the active site compared with A-TIM. In the case of Ma21 it is observed that the point mutation (Q65L) contributes to small structural rearrangements near Asn11 of loop 1, which correlate with different ligand-binding properties such as a loss of citrate binding in the active site. The Ma21 structure also shows that its Leu65 side chain is involved in van der Waals interactions with neighbouring hydrophobic side-chain moieties, correlating with its increased stability. The experimental data suggest that the increased stability and solubility properties of Ma21 and Ma18 compared with A-TIM cause better growth of the selection strain when coexpressing Ma21 and Ma18 instead of A-TIM.

  13. Residues of profenofos in spring onion.

    PubMed

    Talebi, K; Ghassami, M R

    2004-01-01

    Profenofos is one of the commonly used insecticides in the control of Trips tabaci on spring onion in Iran. Residues of profenofos in spring onion were determined in two different fields under the same conditions. In the first field, onion plants were sprayed with profenofos (40EC) at the rate of 1000 g/ha. Spraying was repeated 2 weeks later. In the second field one spraying was preformed at the same rate. Spring onionwere sampled at different time intervals and analyzed for profenofos residues using a GC equipped with NPD detector. In the first field's samples, the residues were 0.097 and 0.025 mg/kg at 2 and 6 days after spraying, respectively. The residues declined to 0.002 mg/kg on the day twelve. Two days after the second spraying the residues was 0.27 mg/kg, which reduced to 0.032 on the day sixth. However the residues were not detectable 32 days after the second spraying. In the second field, residue levels were 0.193 and 0.043 mg/kg at 2 and 6 days after spraying. Residues, which found after 32 days, were less than 0.001 mg/kg. The rate of residue decay in the first field was higher than the second field. PMID:15756871

  14. Pesticide residues in eagles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichel, W.L.; Cromartie, E.; Lamont, T.G.; Mulhern, B.M.; Prouty, R.M.

    1969-01-01

    Bald and golden eagles found sick or dead in 18 States and Canada during 1964-1965 were analyzed for pesticide residues. Residues in bald eagles were considerably higher than in golden eagles. Residues of DDE, DDD, and dieldrin were detected in all samples of bald eagle carcasses; other compounds found, less frequently were heptachlor epoxide, endrin, and DCBP, a metabolite of DDT. DDE was detected in all samples of golden eagle carcasses; DDD, DDT, dieldrin, and heptachlor epoxide were detected less frequently.

  15. Behavior of peptides combining 1 alanine residue and 8 glycine residues on papain associated with structural fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko

    2011-12-01

    I investigated the behavior of the peptides combining 1 ALA residue and 8 GLY residues on papain associated with structural fluctuations via molecular dynamics and docking simulations. Although the chance of binding to sites near the active center of papain was reduced by replacing the GLY residue in 9GLY with ALA residue, binding stability was improved by the replacement. Furthermore, both the chance and binding stability were greatly affected by positioning of ALA residue in the peptides. Residue in peptides should be replaced in view of the balance between chance of binding to sites near active center and binding stability.

  16. A method for the production of D-tagatose using a recombinant Pichia pastoris strain secreting β-D-galactosidase from Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus and a recombinant L-arabinose isomerase from Arthrobacter sp. 22c

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background D-Tagatose is a natural monosaccharide which can be used as a low-calorie sugar substitute in food, beverages and pharmaceutical products. It is also currently being tested as an anti-diabetic and obesity control drug. D-Tagatose is a rare sugar, but it can be manufactured by the chemical or enzymatic isomerization of D-galactose obtained by a β-D-galactosidase-catalyzed hydrolysis of milk sugar lactose and the separation of D-glucose and D-galactose. L-Arabinose isomerases catalyze in vitro the conversion of D-galactose to D-tagatose and are the most promising enzymes for the large-scale production of D-tagatose. Results In this study, the araA gene from psychrotolerant Antarctic bacterium Arthrobacter sp. 22c was isolated, cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The active form of recombinant Arthrobacter sp. 22c L-arabinose isomerase consists of six subunits with a combined molecular weight of approximately 335 kDa. The maximum activity of this enzyme towards D-galactose was determined as occurring at 52°C; however, it exhibited over 60% of maximum activity at 30°C. The recombinant Arthrobacter sp. 22c L-arabinose isomerase was optimally active at a broad pH range of 5 to 9. This enzyme is not dependent on divalent metal ions, since it was only marginally activated by Mg2+, Mn2+ or Ca2+ and slightly inhibited by Co2+ or Ni2+. The bioconversion yield of D-galactose to D-tagatose by the purified L-arabinose isomerase reached 30% after 36 h at 50°C. In this study, a recombinant Pichia pastoris yeast strain secreting β-D-galactosidase Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus was also constructed. During cultivation of this strain in a whey permeate, lactose was hydrolyzed and D-glucose was metabolized, whereas D-galactose was accumulated in the medium. Moreover, cultivation of the P. pastoris strain secreting β-D-galactosidase in a whey permeate supplemented with Arthrobacter sp. 22c L-arabinose isomerase resulted in a 90% yield of lactose hydrolysis, the

  17. Chemical improvement of chitosan-modified beads for the immobilization of Enterococcus faecium DBFIQ E36 L-arabinose isomerase through multipoint covalent attachment approach.

    PubMed

    Manzo, Ricardo M; de Sousa, Marylane; Fenoglio, Cecilia L; Gonçalves, Luciana Rocha Barro; Mammarella, Enrique J

    2015-10-01

    D-tagatose is produced from D-galactose by the enzyme L-arabinose isomerase (L-AI) in a commercially viable bioprocess. An active and stable biocatalyst was obtained by modifying chitosan gel structure through reaction with TNBS, D-fructose or DMF, among others. This led to a significant improvement in L-AI immobilization via multipoint covalent attachment approach. Synthetized derivatives were compared with commercial supports such as Eupergit(®) C250L and glyoxal-agarose. The best chitosan derivative for L-AI immobilization was achieved by reacting 4 % (w/v) D-fructose with 3 % (w/v) chitosan at 50 °C for 4 h. When compared to the free enzyme, the glutaraldehyde-activated chitosan biocatalyst showed an apparent activity of 88.4 U g (gel) (-1) with a 211-fold stabilization factor while the glyoxal-agarose biocatalyst gave an apparent activity of 161.8 U g (gel) (-1) with an 85-fold stabilization factor. Hence, chitosan derivatives were comparable to commercial resins, thus becoming a viable low-cost strategy to obtain high active L-AI insolubilized derivatives.

  18. [Screening of food-grade microorganisms for biotransformation of D-tagatose and cloning and expression of L-arabinose isomerase].

    PubMed

    Men, Yan; Zhu, Yueming; Guan, Yuping; Zhang, Tongcun; Izumori, Ken; Sun, Yuanxia

    2012-05-01

    L-Arabinose isomerase (L-AI) is an intracellular enzyme that catalyzes the reversible isomerization of D-galactose and D-tagatose. Given the widespread use of D-tagatose in the food industry, food-grade microorganisms and the derivation of L-AI for the production of D-tagatose is gaining increased attention. In the current study, food-grade strains from different foods that can convert D-galactose to D-tagatose were screened. According to physiological, biochemical, and 16S rDNA gene analyses, the selected strain was found to share 99% identity with Pediococcus pentosaceus, and was named as Pediococcus pentosaceus PC-5. The araA gene encoding L-AI from Pediococcus pentosaceus PC-5 was cloned and overexpressed in E. coli BL21. The yield of D-tagatose using D-galactose as the substrate catalyzed by the crude enzyme in the presence of Mn2+ was found to be 33% at 40 degrees C.

  19. D-Tagatose production in the presence of borate by resting Lactococcus lactis cells harboring Bifidobacterium longum L-arabinose isomerase.

    PubMed

    Salonen, Noora; Salonen, Kalle; Leisola, Matti; Nyyssölä, Antti

    2013-04-01

    Bifidobacterium longum NRRL B-41409 L-arabinose isomerase (L-AI) was overexpressed in Lactococcus lactis using a phosphate depletion inducible expression system. The resting L. lactis cells harboring the B. longum L-AI were used for production of D-tagatose from D-galactose in the presence of borate buffer. Multivariable analysis suggested that high pH, temperature and borate concentration favoured the conversion of D-galactose to D-tagatose. Almost quantitative conversion (92 %) was achieved at 20 g L⁻¹ substrate and at 37.5 °C after 5 days. The D-tagatose production rate of 185 g L⁻¹ day ⁻¹ was obtained at 300 g L⁻¹ galactose, at 1.15 M borate, and at 41 °C during 10 days when the production medium was changed every 24 h. There was no significant loss in productivity during ten sequential 24 h batches. The initial D-tagatose production rate was 290 g L⁻¹ day⁻¹ under these conditions.

  20. Evolution of high-level ethambutol-resistant tuberculosis through interacting mutations in decaprenylphosphoryl-β-D-arabinose biosynthetic and utilization pathway genes.

    PubMed

    Safi, Hassan; Lingaraju, Subramanya; Amin, Anita; Kim, Soyeon; Jones, Marcus; Holmes, Michael; McNeil, Michael; Peterson, Scott N; Chatterjee, Delphi; Fleischmann, Robert; Alland, David

    2013-10-01

    To study the evolution of drug resistance, we genetically and biochemically characterized Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains selected in vitro for ethambutol resistance. Mutations in decaprenylphosphoryl-β-D-arabinose (DPA) biosynthetic and utilization pathway genes Rv3806c, Rv3792, embB and embC accumulated to produce a wide range of ethambutol minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) that depended on mutation type and number. Rv3806c mutations increased DPA synthesis, causing MICs to double from 2 to 4 μg/ml in a wild-type background and to increase from 16 to 32 μg/ml in an embB codon 306 mutant background. Synonymous mutations in Rv3792 increased the expression of downstream embC, an ethambutol target, resulting in MICs of 8 μg/ml. Multistep selection was required for high-level resistance. Mutations in embC or very high embC expression were observed at the highest resistance level. In clinical isolates, Rv3806c mutations were associated with high-level resistance and had multiplicative effects with embB mutations on MICs. Ethambutol resistance is acquired through the acquisition of mutations that interact in complex ways to produce a range of MICs, from those falling below breakpoint values to ones representing high-level resistance.

  1. Characterisation of "caramel-type" thermal decomposition products of selected monosaccharides including fructose, mannose, galactose, arabinose and ribose by advanced electrospray ionization mass spectrometry methods.

    PubMed

    Golon, Agnieszka; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2013-07-01

    The chemical analysis of caramel, formed upon heating of carbohydrates, remains a significant challenge due to the complexity of the resulting product mixture. Identification of the products formed upon heating of monosaccharides including fructose, mannose, galactose, arabinose and ribose is essential to understand the composition and properties of carbohydrate-rich processed foods. In this work, we report on the use of combined mass spectrometry techniques, including high performance liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization multi-stage tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS(n)). The composition of the obtained caramel was examined by high resolution mass spectrometry along with van Krevelen and Kendrick analysis. We found that caramel is composed of oligomers with up to six carbohydrate units formed through unselective glycosidic bond formation, their dehydrated products by losing up to eight water molecules, hydrated products and disproportionation products. An accurate mass measurement and subsequent fragment ion studies of all caramel samples (around 40 compounds) can thus be identified. Glycosidic bond and ring cleavages of sugar moieties were the major observable fragmentation pathways during this experiment. The innovative analytical strategies for the complex mixture analysis used provide a comprehensive account of the chemical composition of caramel, one of the most popular dietary materials over the world.

  2. Effects of processing on carbendazim residue in Pleurotus ostreatus.

    PubMed

    Xia, Erdong; Tao, Wuqun; Yao, Xi; Wang, Jin; Tang, Feng

    2016-07-01

    Samples of Pleurotus ostreatus were exposed to fungicide carbendazim to study the effect of processing on the residues. In most cases, processing operations led to a significant decrease in residue levels in the finished products, particularly through washing, drying, and cooking processes. The results indicated that rinsing under running tap water led to more than 70.30% loss in carbendazim residues. When dried under sunlight could remove more than 70.30% residues. There was a 63.90-97.14% reduction after steaming, with processing time extending, the removal rates increased especially for lower initial residue level samples. The residue was almost completely removed by frying combined with microwave heating. Furthermore, boiling the mushrooms reduced the residue in the mushroom and no carbendazim residues were determined in the broth. PMID:27386113

  3. Residue chemistry guidelines.

    PubMed

    Olinger, C L; Schmitt, R D; Zager, E

    1993-01-01

    Residue chemistry guidelines are designed to determine what the potential residues in food are and how much may be present as a result of pesticide application, so that a tolerance level may be established. Some requirements are established to assist in the enforcement of tolerances by the USDA, FDA, and the states. I realize I have given you a quick overview of the residue chemistry requirements. There are many documents which are available if you should require more information, such as the Subdivision O Residue Chemistry Guidelines, Standard Evaluation Procedures (which are used by reviewers when evaluating the studies), the Data Reporting Guidelines (which provide guidance on preparing final reports), and the Technical Guidance from Phase III of Reregistration. We have also released various papers on studies when additional guidance is required. Most of these documents are available from NTIS. I hope you will consider this information when auditing residue chemistry studies. As I see the efforts that you, the QA professionals, have made to educate yourselves on residue chemistry studies through programs such as this meeting, I have a little more confidence in answering the question "Do you trust them?" with a "Yes." Thank you.

  4. Antioxidant properties of roasted coffee residues.

    PubMed

    Yen, Wen-Jye; Wang, Bor-Sen; Chang, Lee-Wen; Duh, Pin-Der

    2005-04-01

    The antioxidant activity of roasted coffee residues was evaluated. Extraction with four solvents (water, methanol, ethanol, and n-hexane) showed that water extracts of roasted coffee residues (WERCR) produced higher yields and gave better protection for lipid peroxidation. WERCR showed a remarkable protective effect on oxidative damage of protein. In addition, WERCR showed scavenging of free radicals as well as the reducing ability and to bind ferrous ions, indicating that WERCR acts as both primary and secondary antioxidants. The HPLC analyses showed that phenolic acids (chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid) and nonphenolic compounds [caffeine, trigonelline, nicotinic acid, and 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfuraldehyde] remained in roasted coffee residues. These compounds showed a protective effect on a liposome model system. The concentrations of flavonoids and polyphenolic compounds in roasted coffee residues were 8,400 and 20,400 ppm, respectively. In addition, the Maillard reaction products (MRPs) remaining in roasted coffee residues were believed to show antioxidant activity. These data indicate that roasted coffee residues have excellent potential for use as a natural antioxidant source because the antioxidant compounds remained in roasted coffee residues. PMID:15796608

  5. Identification of the methyl phosphate substituent at the non-reducing terminal mannose residue of the O-specific polysaccharides of Klebsiella pneumoniae O3, Hafnia alvei PCM 1223 and Escherichia coli O9/O9a LPS.

    PubMed

    Kubler-Kielb, Joanna; Whitfield, Chris; Katzenellenbogen, Ewa; Vinogradov, Evgeny

    2012-01-10

    O-specific polysaccharides of Gram-negative bacteria are synthesized by two different mechanisms: polymerization of the pre-formed O-repeating unit or sequential addition of the monosaccharides to the growing polysaccharide chain. In the second case, growth of the polymer can be further subdivided into two groups depending on the presence or absence of a special monosaccharide or non-sugar substituent that terminates the glycan. A family of polymannose O-polysaccharides provides prototypes for the chain terminating process. Polysaccharides of Klebsiella pneumoniae O3, Hafnia alvei PCM 1223, and Escherichia coli O9 have the same penta-mannose repeating unit. E. coli O9a has tetra-mannose repeat and this structure can be produced by mutants of E. coli O9. The mechanism of biosynthesis of H. alvei 1223 O-polysaccharide has not been reported. Here we show that all above polysaccharides contain the same modification at the non-reducing end; presence of a methyl phosphate group at O-3 of α-mannopyranose, that serves as the signal for termination of the chain elongation. PMID:22169179

  6. The solution structure of double helical arabino nucleic acids (ANA and 2'F-ANA): effect of arabinoses in duplex-hairpin interconversion.

    PubMed

    Martín-Pintado, Nerea; Yahyaee-Anzahaee, Maryam; Campos-Olivas, Ramón; Noronha, Anne M; Wilds, Christopher J; Damha, Masad J; González, Carlos

    2012-10-01

    We report here the first structure of double helical arabino nucleic acid (ANA), the C2'-stereoisomer of RNA, and the 2'-fluoro-ANA analogue (2'F-ANA). A chimeric dodecamer based on the Dickerson sequence, containing a contiguous central segment of arabino nucleotides, flanked by two 2'-deoxy-2'F-ANA wings was studied. Our data show that this chimeric oligonucleotide can adopt two different structures of comparable thermal stabilities. One structure is a monomeric hairpin in which the stem is formed by base paired 2'F-ANA nucleotides and the loop by unpaired ANA nucleotides. The second structure is a bimolecular duplex, with all the nucleotides (2'F-ANA and ANA) forming Watson-Crick base pairs. The duplex structure is canonical B-form, with all arabinoses adopting a pure C2'-endo conformation. In the ANA:ANA segment, steric interactions involving the 2'-OH substituent provoke slight changes in the glycosidic angles and, therefore, in the ANA:ANA base pair geometry. These distortions are not present in the 2'F-ANA:2'F-ANA regions of the duplex, where the -OH substituent is replaced by a smaller fluorine atom. 2'F-ANA nucleotides adopt the C2'-endo sugar pucker and fit very well into the geometry of B-form duplex, allowing for favourable 2'F···H8 interactions. This interaction shares many features of pseudo-hydrogen bonds previously observed in 2'F-ANA:RNA hybrids and in single 2'F-ANA nucleotides.

  7. Cellulose microfibril crystallinity is reduced by mutating C-terminal transmembrane region residues CESA1{sup A903V} and CESA3{sup T942I} of cellulose synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Darby; Corbin, Kendall; Wang, Tuo; Gutierrez, Ryan; Bertolo, Ana; Petti, Caroalberto; Smilgies, Detlef-M; Estevez, Jose Manuel; Bonetta, Dario; Urbanowicz, Breeanna; Ehrhardt, David; Somerville, Chris; Rose, Jocelyn; Hong, Mei; DeBolt, Seth

    2012-01-08

    The mechanisms underlying the biosynthesis of cellulose in plants are complex and still poorly understood. A central question concerns the mechanism of microfibril structure and how this is linked to the catalytic polymerization action of cellulose synthase (CESA). Furthermore, it remains unclear whether modification of cellulose microfibril structure can be achieved genetically, which could be transformative in a bio-based economy. To explore these processes in planta, we developed a chemical genetic toolbox of pharmacological inhibitors and corresponding resistance-conferring point mutations in the C-terminal transmembrane domain region of CESA1{sup A903V} and CESA3{sup T942I} in Arabidopsis thaliana. Using {sup 13}C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, we show that the cellulose microfibrils displayed reduced width and an additional cellulose C4 peak indicative of a degree of crystallinity that is intermediate between the surface and interior glucans of wild type, suggesting a difference in glucan chain association during microfibril formation. Consistent with measurements of lower microfibril crystallinity, cellulose extracts from mutated CESA1{sup A903V} and CESA3{sup T942I} displayed greater saccharification efficiency than wild type. Using live-cell imaging to track fluorescently labeled CESA, we found that these mutants show increased CESA velocities in the plasma membrane, an indication of increased polymerization rate. Collectively, these data suggest that CESA1{sup A903V} and CESA3{sup T942I} have modified microfibril structure in terms of crystallinity and suggest that in plants, as in bacteria, crystallization biophysically limits polymerization.

  8. Chemical Stabilization of Hanford Tank Residual Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Um, Wooyong; Williams, Benjamin D.; Bowden, Mark E.; Gartman, Brandy N.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mausolf, Edward J.

    2014-03-01

    Three different chemical treatment methods were tested for their ability to stabilize residual waste from Hanford tank C-202 for reducing contaminant release (Tc, Cr, and U in particular). The three treatment methods tested were lime addition [Ca(OH)2], an in-situ Ceramicrete waste form based on chemically bonded phosphate ceramics, and a ferrous iron/goethite treatment. These approaches rely on formation of insoluble forms of the contaminants of concern (lime addition and ceramicrete) and chemical reduction followed by co-precipitation (ferrous iron/goethite incorporation treatment). The results have demonstrated that release of the three most significant mobile contaminants of concern from tank residual wastes can be dramatically reduced after treatment compared to contact with simulated grout porewater without treatment. For uranium, all three treatments methods reduced the leachable uranium concentrations by well over three orders of magnitude. In the case of uranium and technetium, released concentrations were well below their respective MCLs for the wastes tested. For tank C-202 residual waste, chromium release concentrations were above the MCL but were considerably reduced relative to untreated tank waste. This innovative approach has the potential to revolutionize Hanford’s tank retrieval process, by allowing larger volumes of residual waste to be left in tanks while providing an acceptably low level of risk with respect to contaminant release that is protective of the environment and human health. Such an approach could enable DOE to realize significant cost savings through streamlined retrieval and closure operations.

  9. Axial residual stresses in boron fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrendt, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    The axial residual stress distribution as a function of radius was determined from the fiber surface to the core including the average residual stress in the core. Such measurements on boron on tungsten (B/W) fibers show that the residual stresses for 102, 142, 203, and 366 micron diameter fibers were similar, being compressive at the surface and changing monotonically to a region of tensile within the boron. At approximately 25 percent of the original radius, the stress reaches a maximum tensile stress of about 860 mn/sq.m and then decreases to a compressive stress near the tungsten boride core. Data were presented for 203 micron diameter B/W fibers that show annealing above 900 C reduces the residual stresses. A comparison between 102 micron diameter B/W and boron on carbon (b/C) shows that the residual stresses were similar in the outer regions of the fibers, but that large differences near and in the core were observed. The effects of these residual stresses on the fracture of boron fibers were discussed.

  10. Structure of the O-specific polysaccharide from the lipopolysaccharide of Psychrobacter cryohalolentis K5(T) containing a 2,3,4-triacetamido-2,3,4-trideoxy-L-arabinose moiety.

    PubMed

    Kondakova, Anna N; Novototskaya-Vlasova, Kseniya A; Arbatsky, Nikolay P; Drutskaya, Marina S; Shcherbakova, Victoria A; Shashkov, Alexander S; Gilichinsky, David A; Nedospasov, Sergei A; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2012-12-28

    A novel constituent of bacterial polysaccharides, 2,3,4-triacetamido-2,3,4-trideoxy-L-arabinose, was found in the O-specific polysaccharide from the lipopolysaccharide of Psychrobacter cryohalolentis K5(T) and identified by 1D and 2D (1)H and (13)C NMR studies of the polysaccharide and a disaccharide obtained by solvolysis of the polysaccharide with triflic acid. The following structure of the branched polysaccharide was established by sugar analysis, triflic acid solvolysis, Smith degradation, and 2D NMR spectroscopy.

  11. Catalytic combustion with incompletely vaporized residual fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosfjord, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    Catalytic combustion of fuel lean mixtures of incompletely vaporized residual fuel and air was investigated. The 7.6 cm diameter, graded cell reactor was constructed from zirconia spinel substrate and catalyzed with a noble metal catalyst. Streams of luminous particles exited the rector as a result of fuel deposition and carbonization on the substrate. Similar results were obtained with blends of No. 6 and No. 2 oil. Blends of shale residual oil and No. 2 oil resulted in stable operation. In shale oil blends the combustor performance degraded with a reduced degree of fuel vaporization. In tests performed with No. 2 oil a similar effect was observed.

  12. Assessing crop residue cover as scene moisture conditions change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop residue or plant litter is the portion of a crop left in the field after harvest. Crop residues on the soil surface provide a first line of defense against water and wind erosion and reduce the amounts of soil, nutrients, and pesticides that reach streams and rivers. Thus, quantification of cro...

  13. Corn cob residue carbon and nutrient dynamics during decomposition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cob fraction of corn (Zea mays L.) residue has characteristics that reduce concerns associated with residue removal making it a potential biofuel feedstock. The contribution the cob fraction makes to soil C and nutrient dynamics is unknown. A litterbag study was conducted in no-tillage plots und...

  14. Residual stresses in material processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kozaczek, K.J.; Watkins, T.R.; Hubbard, C.R.; Wang, Xun-Li; Spooner, S.

    1994-09-01

    Material manufacturing processes often introduce residual stresses into the product. The residual stresses affect the properties of the material and often are detrimental. Therefore, the distribution and magnitude of residual stresses in the final product are usually an important factor in manufacturing process optimization or component life prediction. The present paper briefly discusses the causes of residual stresses. It then adresses the direct, nondestructive methods of residual stress measurement by X-ray and neutron diffraction. Examples are presented to demonstrate the importance of residual stress measurement in machining and joining operations.

  15. 40 CFR 1065.705 - Residual and intermediate residual fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... specifications for fuels meeting the definition of residual fuel in 40 CFR 80.2, including fuels marketed as... for Residual Fuel Characteristic Unit Category ISO-F- RMA 30 RMB 30 RMD 80 RME 180 RMF 180 RMG 380...

  16. 40 CFR 1065.705 - Residual and intermediate residual fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... specifications for fuels meeting the definition of residual fuel in 40 CFR 80.2, including fuels marketed as... for Residual Fuel Characteristic Unit Category ISO-F- RMA 30 RMB 30 RMD 80 RME 180 RMF 180 RMG 380...

  17. SRC Residual fuel oils

    DOEpatents

    Tewari, Krishna C.; Foster, Edward P.

    1985-01-01

    Coal solids (SRC) and distillate oils are combined to afford single-phase blends of residual oils which have utility as fuel oils substitutes. The components are combined on the basis of their respective polarities, that is, on the basis of their heteroatom content, to assure complete solubilization of SRC. The resulting composition is a fuel oil blend which retains its stability and homogeneity over the long term.

  18. Water treatment residuals

    SciTech Connect

    Billings, C.H.

    1994-01-01

    Solutions to an environmental problem often create other environmental problems. That surely is the case in the water supply field. By providing new or expanded water treatment systems to comply with the maximum contaminant levels and treatment mandates of the Safe Drinking Water Act, water purveyors are generating large volumes of residuals that must be managed, ultimately disposed of, or recycled. Numerous federal, state, and local laws govern the management, transport, disposal, and recycling of wastes produced by water treatment systems. Because these laws can result in exorbitant waste disposal costs, restricting some projects entirely, water suppliers need to consider residual disposal early in the siting, selection, and design of treatment projects. To inform water suppliers about residual laws, AWWA commissioned a study published as a Water Industry Technical Action Fund report. In addition to identifying and describing applicable laws at the federal level and in six of the states, the study revealed a series of findings as to the consequences of those laws to water suppliers. This article is a brief overview of the findings of the report.

  19. Sustainable System for Residual Hazards Management

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin M. Kostelnik; James H. Clarke; Jerry L. Harbour

    2004-06-01

    Hazardous, radioactive and other toxic substances have routinely been generated and subsequently disposed of in the shallow subsurface throughout the world. Many of today’s waste management techniques do not eliminate the problem, but rather only concentrate or contain the hazardous contaminants. Residual hazards result from the presence of hazardous and/or contaminated material that remains on-site following active operations or the completion of remedial actions. Residual hazards pose continued risk to humans and the environment and represent a significant and chronic problem that require continuous longterm management (i.e. >1000 years). To protect human health and safeguard the natural environment, a sustainable system is required for the proper management of residual hazards. A sustainable system for the management of residual hazards will require the integration of engineered, institutional and land-use controls to isolate residual contaminants and thus minimize the associated hazards. Engineered controls are physical modifications to the natural setting and ecosystem, including the site, facility, and/or the residual materials themselves, in order to reduce or eliminate the potential for exposure to contaminants of concern (COCs). Institutional controls are processes, instruments, and mechanisms designed to influence human behavior and activity. System failure can involve hazardous material escaping from the confinement because of system degradation (i.e., chronic or acute degradation) or by externalintrusion of the biosphere into the contaminated material because of the loss of institutional control. An ongoing analysis of contemporary and historic sites suggests that the significance of the loss of institutional controls is a critical pathway because decisions made during the operations/remedial action phase, as well as decisions made throughout the residual hazards management period, are key to the longterm success of the prescribed system. In fact

  20. CHARACTERIZING RESIDUE TRANSFER EFFICIENCIES USING A FLUORESCENT IMAGING TECHNIQUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    To reduce the uncertainty associated with current estimates of children's exposure to pesticides by dermal contact and indirect ingestion, residue transfer data are required. Prior to conducting exhaustive studies, a screening study to identify the important parameters for chara...

  1. Mobility of organic carbon from incineration residues

    SciTech Connect

    Ecke, Holger Svensson, Malin

    2008-07-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) may affect the transport of pollutants from incineration residues when landfilled or used in geotechnical construction. The leaching of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) bottom ash and air pollution control residue (APC) from the incineration of waste wood was investigated. Factors affecting the mobility of DOC were studied in a reduced 2{sup 6-1} experimental design. Controlled factors were treatment with ultrasonic radiation, full carbonation (addition of CO{sub 2} until the pH was stable for 2.5 h), liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratio, pH, leaching temperature and time. Full carbonation, pH and the L/S ratio were the main factors controlling the mobility of DOC in the bottom ash. Approximately 60 weight-% of the total organic carbon (TOC) in the bottom ash was available for leaching in aqueous solutions. The L/S ratio and pH mainly controlled the mobilization of DOC from the APC residue. About 93 weight-% of TOC in the APC residue was, however, not mobilized at all, which might be due to a high content of elemental carbon. Using the European standard EN 13 137 for determination of total organic carbon (TOC) in MSWI residues is inappropriate. The results might be biased due to elemental carbon. It is recommended to develop a TOC method distinguishing between organic and elemental carbon.

  2. The magnitude of the sulfa residue problem.

    PubMed

    Van Houweling, C D

    1981-03-01

    Expenditures and losses associated with the so-called sulfa residue problem have totaled about $5 million over the past 6 years. This amount was calculated by recording actual costs when available and by reasonable estimates where actual expenses or losses were not available. It is not conclusive whether the consumers, who are intended to be the benefactors of this program, have received protection commensurate with the expenditures. The losses to producers may be greater if the sulfa problem causes them to discontinue the use of medicated feeds. The problem is the unusually high occurrence of sulfonamide residues in livers of slaughtered swine. In an effort to reduce or eliminate these violative residues, there has been extensive testing of swine livers by the FSQS of the USDA, and inspection of farms from which the pigs were shipped, by the FDA, the Extension Service, and the APHIS. Producers whose pigs are found with violative levels of residue are prohibited from selling more pigs until it has been determined that swine from that farm do not contain violative residues. This restriction can result in serious financial losses to producers.

  3. Preparation of Nucleosides Derived from 2-Nitroimidazole and d-Arabinose, d-Ribose, and d-Galactose by the Vorbrüggen Method and Their Conversion to Potential Precursors for Tracers To Image Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    2-Nitroimidazole was silylated using hexaethyldisilazane and then reacted with 1-O-acetyl derivatives of d-arabinose, d-ribose, and d-galactose in acetonitrile at mild temperatures (−20 °C to rt), catalyzed by triethylsilyl triflate (Vorbrüggen conditions). The α-anomer was formed in the former case and the β-anomers in the latter two cases (highly) selectively. When d-arabinose and d-ribose were silylated with tert-butyldiphenylsilyl chloride in pyridine at the hydroxyl groups at C-5 and acetylated at the other ones in a one-pot reaction, mixtures of anomeric 1-O-acetyl derivatives were obtained. These were coupled by the Vorbrüggen method and then deblocked at C-5 and tosylated to give precursors for tracers to image hypoxia in four steps without using Hg(CN)2 necessary for other methods. The Vorbrüggen conditions enable a shorter route to azomycin nucleoside analogues than the previous coupling procedures. PMID:21905640

  4. Chemical stabilization of Hanford tank residual waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Um, Wooyong; Williams, Benjamin D.; Bowden, Mark E.; Gartman, Brandy; Lukens, Wayne W.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mausolf, Edward J.

    2014-03-01

    Three different chemical treatment methods were tested for their ability to stabilize residual waste from Hanford tank C-202 for reducing contaminant release (Tc, Cr, and U in particular). The three treatment methods tested were lime addition [Ca(OH)2], an in situ Ceramicrete waste form based on chemically bonded phosphate ceramics, and a ferrous iron/goethite treatment. These approaches rely on formation of insoluble forms of the contaminants of concern (lime addition and Ceramicrete) and chemical reduction followed by co-precipitation (ferrous iron/goethite incorporation treatment). The results have demonstrated that release of uranium from tank residual wastes can be dramatically reduced after treatment compared to contact with simulated grout porewater without treatment. All three treatments methods reduced the leachable uranium concentrations by well over three orders of magnitude. In the case of uranium and technetium, released concentrations were well below their respective Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) for the wastes tested. For tank C-202 residual waste, chromium release concentrations were above the MCL but were considerably reduced relative to untreated tank waste.

  5. Optimization of reaction conditions for enzymatic viscosity reduction and hydrolysis of wheat arabinoxylan in an industrial ethanol fermentation residue.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Hanne R; Pedersen, Sven; Meyer, Anne S

    2006-01-01

    This study examined enzyme-catalyzed viscosity reduction and evaluated the effects of substrate dry matter concentration on enzymatic degradation of arabinoxylan in a fermentation residue, "vinasse", resulting from industrial ethanol manufacture on wheat. Enzymatic catalysis was accomplished with a 50:50 mixture of an enzyme preparation from Humicola insolens, Ultraflo L, and a cellulolytic enzyme preparation from Trichoderma reesei, Celluclast 1.5 L. This enzyme mixture was previously shown to exhibit a synergistic action on arabinoxylan degradation. The viscosity of vinasse decreased with increased enzyme dosage and treatment time at pH 5, 50 degrees C, 5 wt % vinasse dry matter. After 24 h of enzymatic treatment, 76-84%, 75-80%, and 43-47%, respectively, of the theoretically maximal arabinose, xylose, and glucose releases were achieved, indicating that the viscosity decrease was a result of enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of arabinoxylan, beta-glucan, and cellulose. In designed response surface experiments, the optimal enzyme reaction conditions with respect to pH and temperature of the vinasse, the vinasse supernatant (mainly soluble material), and the vinasse sediment (mainly insoluble substances) varied from pH 5.2-6.4 and 41-49 degrees C for arabinose release and from pH 4.9-5.3 and 42-46 degrees C for xylose release. Even though only limited hydrolysis of the arabinoxylan in the vinasse sediment fraction was obtained, the results indicated that the same enzyme activities acted on the arabinoxylan in the different vinasse fractions irrespective of the state of solubility of the substrate material. The levels of liberated arabinose and xylose increased with increased dry matter concentration during enzymatic hydrolysis in the vinasse and the vinasse supernatant, but at the same time, increased substrate dry matter concentrations gave corresponding linear decreases in the hydrolytic efficiency as evaluated from levels of monosaccharide release per weight unit dry

  6. The residual caries dilemma.

    PubMed

    Weerheijm, K L; Groen, H J

    1999-12-01

    Restorative dentistry is based on the assumption that bacterial infection of demineralized dentine should prompt operative intervention. One of the concepts of practical dentistry is to create a favourable environment for caries arrest with minimal operative intervention. The progress of remaining primary caries is key to any discussion of this concept. This discussion is important for the atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) approach, since the removal of all carious dentine is sometimes difficult using hand instruments only. In this paper the results of possible measures to guard against the effects of residual carious and its consequences are reviewed, in order to obtain an impression of the justification for (in)complete excavation of occlusal dentinal caries. Three types of measure are considered: isolating the caries process from the oral environment, excavating the carious dentine, and using a cariostatic filling material. Each of these measures contributes to the arrest of the caries process. However, none of these measures can arrest this process by itself. A combination of all three seems necessary. It is concluded that although residual caries does not seem to be the criterion for rerestoration, one has to strive for as complete caries removal as possible. If this cannot be fulfilled the sealing capacities of the filling material seem to be more important than its cariostatic properties. PMID:10600078

  7. Residue upgrading by hydrovisbreaking and hydrotreating

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, S.S.

    1994-12-31

    The effect of hydrovisbreaking (HVB) of Arabian Light vacuum residue on the performance of resid demetalation and desulfurization catalysts was studied. The HVB/HDT combination results in higher conversion with reduced viscosity compared to catalytic hydrotreating alone. This approach can be attractive for the production of low-sulfur heavy fuel oils with reduced cutter stock requirements or when the goal is conversion in combination with hydrodemetalation and desulfurization. However, hydrovisbreaking does not improve performance of the downstream catalysts in terms of desulfurization and demetalation. In addition, hydrovisbreaking at a too high conversion can result in sedimentation which can plug downstream reactors or cause rapid pressure-drop increase. Therefore, the HVB/HDT combination would not be suitable for a fixed-bed residue hydrotreating process where high conversion is not a primary goal.

  8. Reduced-Bandwidth Coding for Mobile Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, F.

    1986-01-01

    Fade-resistant mobile systems use power and spectrum efficiently. Transmission system employs tone-calibrated technique (TCT). Residual carrier used in technique to reduce fading-induced effects and coherently demodulate received signal. TCT potentially efficient in use of power and of frequency spectrum. Coding technique, intended for residual-carrier transmission system, alleviates fading and spectrum crowding that hamper mobile communications.

  9. Recycling of auto shredder residue.

    PubMed

    Nourreddine, Menad

    2007-01-31

    Currently, about 75% of end-of-life vehicle's (ELV) total weight is recycled in EU countries. The remaining 25%, which is called auto shredder residues (ASR) or auto fluff, is disposed of as landfill because of its complexity. It is a major challenge to reduce this percentage of obsolete cars. The European draft directive states that by the year 2006, only 15% of the vehicle's weight can be disposed of at landfill sites and by 2015, this will be reduced to 5%. The draft directive states that a further 10% can be incinerated. The quantities of shredder fluff are likely to increase in the coming years. This is because of the growing number of cars being scrapped, coupled with the increase in the amount of plastics used in cars. In Sweden, some current projects are focusing on recycling of ASR material. In this paper some different alternatives for using this material are reported. The hypothetical injection of ASR into a blast furnace concentrating on ASR's effect to some blast furnace (BF) parameters has been completed using a blast furnace mass balance model. As a result, in principle, ASR can be used as reducing agent in the BF process if certain conditions are met. The particle size of ASR material must be controlled to ensure optimal gasification of the material in the raceway. Regarding the chemical composition of ASR, the non-ferrous content can affect the pig iron quality, which is difficult to rectify at a later point. The most attractive recycling alternative is to use the products obtained from pyrolysis of ASR in appropriate metallurgical processes. PMID:16600493

  10. Residual gas analyzer calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilienkamp, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    A technique which employs known gas mixtures to calibrate the residual gas analyzer (RGA) is described. The mass spectra from the RGA are recorded for each gas mixture. This mass spectra data and the mixture composition data each form a matrix. From the two matrices the calibration matrix may be computed. The matrix mathematics requires the number of calibration gas mixtures be equal to or greater than the number of gases included in the calibration. This technique was evaluated using a mathematical model of an RGA to generate the mass spectra. This model included shot noise errors in the mass spectra. Errors in the gas concentrations were also included in the valuation. The effects of these errors was studied by varying their magnitudes and comparing the resulting calibrations. Several methods of evaluating an actual calibration are presented. The effects of the number of gases in then, the composition of the calibration mixture, and the number of mixtures used are discussed.

  11. Residue harvest effects on irrigated, no-till corn yield and nitrogen response

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn (Zea mays L.) residue harvest is common in Nebraska, primarily for feeding of beef cattle. Applied N immobilization is expected to be less with residue harvest due to reduced microbial activity for digestion of high CN organic material. Residue reduction may affect subsequent crop yield and res...

  12. Residue harvest effects on corn response to applied N and yield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn (Zea mays L.) residue harvest is common in Nebraska, primarily for feeding of beef cattle. Applied N immobilization is expected to be less with residue harvest due to reduced microbial activity for digestion of high CN organic material. Residue reduction may affect subsequent crop yield and res...

  13. Reducing the atmospheric impact of wet slaking

    SciTech Connect

    B.D. Zubitskii; G.V. Ushakov; B.G. Tryasunov; A.G.Ushakov

    2009-05-15

    Means of reducing the atmospheric emissions due to the wet slaking of coke are considered. One option, investigated here, is to remove residual active silt and organic compounds from the biologically purified wastewater sent for slaking, by coagulation and flocculation.

  14. Application of sedimentary carbohydrate residues in a study of organic facies and natural gas occurrences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, F. M.

    Recent aquatic environments and resulting organic facies can be characterized by types and amounts of carbohydrate residues. Characteristics are based on source organisms, degree and type of degradation, and reactions with associated compounds in the mineral-kerogen-humus complex. Selected modern environments are typified by the following presently known carbohydrate suites: (1) deep sea, mid-Pacific, mid-Atlantic Oceans—glucose, galactose, furfurals, low total carbohydrates (TC); (2) deep gulf, Gulf of California—glu, gal, xylose, mannose, furfurals, moderate to high TC; (3) continental shelf, eastern North America—glu, xyl, gal, furfurals, high TC; (5) oligotrophic lake, Minnesota—furfurals, low TC; (6) eutrophic lake, Minnesota—glu, xyl, arabinose, gal, rhamnose, man, ribose, furfurals, glucuronic acid, high TC; (7) bog, Minnesota—glu, ara, xyl, gal, man, rib, very high TC. Polysaccharides are rare to absent in modern deep sea deposits but have been found in Lower Quaternary and younger deep gulf sediments. Cellulose, alpha- and beta-amylose and laminaran are common in shallow marine and lacustrine sediments. Methane, derived from both terrestrial and aquatic higher plant residues is high in yield in freshwater marshes and bogs and in eutrophic lake sediments, moderate in salt-water marshes and estuaries and relatively low in offshore marine sediments. Nitrogen and carbon dioxide are the commonest non-hydrocarbon gases. In many samples studied, xylans appear to predominate over other plant polysaccharide as methane sources. Carbohydrate residues in ancient rocks, based on examples from North America, show a tentative, but as yet poorly investigated, relationship to environmental organic facies and should prove to be useful in natural gas exploration.

  15. Experimental determination of residual stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Milton W.

    1991-01-01

    Residual stresses in finished parts have often been regarded as factors contributing to premature part failure and geometric distortions. Currently, residual stresses in welded structures and railroad components are being investigated. High residual stresses formed in welded structures due primarily to the differential contractions of the weld material as it cools and solidifies can have a profound effect on the surface performance of the structure. In railroad wheels, repeated use of the brakes causes high residual stresses in the rims which may lead to wheel failure and possible derailment. The goals of the study were: (1) to develop strategies for using x-ray diffraction to measure residual stress; (2) to subject samples of Inconel 718 to various mechanical and heat treatments and to measure the resulting stress using x-ray diffraction; and (3) to measure residual stresses in ferromagnetic alloys using magnetoacoustics.

  16. Selenium speciation in flue desulfurization residues.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Liping; Cao, Yan; Li, Wenying; Xie, Kechang; Pan, Wei-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Flue gas from coal combustion contains significant amounts of volatile selenium (Se). The capture of Se in the flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber unit has resulted in a generation of metal-laden residues. It is important to determine Se speciation to understand the environmental impact of its disposal. A simple method has been developed for selective inorganic Se(IV), Se(VI) and organic Se determination in the liquid-phase FGD residues by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). It has been determined that Se(IV), Se(VI) and organic Se can be accurately determined with detection limits (DL) of 0.05, 0.06 and 0.06 microg/L, respectively. The accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated by analyzing the certified reference material, NIST CRM 1632c, and also by analyzing spiked tap-water samples. Analysis indicates that the concentration of Se is high in FGD liquid residues and primarily exists in a reduced state as selenite (Se(IV)). The toxicity of Se(IV) is the strongest of all Se species. Flue gas desulfurization residues pose a serious environmental risk.

  17. Materials recovery from shredder residues

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, E. J.; Jody, B. J.; Pomykala, J., Jr.

    2000-07-24

    Each year, about five (5) million ton of shredder residues are landfilled in the US. Similar quantities are landfilled in Europe and the Pacific Rim. Landfilling of these residues results in a cost to the existing recycling industry and also represents a loss of material resources that are otherwise recyclable. In this paper, the authors outline the resources recoverable from typical shredder residues and describe technology that they have developed to recover these resources.

  18. Residual stress alleviation of aircraft metal structures reinforced with filamentary composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, J. B.; June, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    Methods to eliminate or reduce residual stresses in aircraft metal structures reinforced by filamentary composites are discussed. Residual stress level reductions were achieved by modifying the manufacturing procedures used during adhesive bonding. The residual stress alleviation techniques involved various forms of mechanical constraint which were applied to the components during bonding. Nine methods were evaluated, covering a wide range in complexity. All methods investigated during the program affected the residual stress level. In general, residual stresses were reduced by 70 percent or more from the stress level produced by conventional adhesive bonding procedures.

  19. Glove accumulation of pesticide residues for strawberry harvester exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanhong; Chen, Li; Chen, Zhenshan; Coehlo, Joe; Cui, Li; Liu, Yu; Lopez, Terry; Sankaran, Gayatri; Vega, Helen; Krieger, Robert

    2011-06-01

    We investigated the accumulation of pesticide residues on rubber latex gloves that are used by strawberry harvesters to protect their skin, reduce pesticide exposure and promote food safety. Gloves accumulated residues of 16 active ingredients including azoxystrobin, bifenthrin, boscalid, captan, cyprodinil, fenhexamid, fenpropathrin, fludioxonil, hexythiazox, malathion, methomyl, naled, propiconazole, pyraclostrobin, quinoline, and quinoxyfen at different times. Glove residue accumulation (t(½) 2.8-3.7 d) was very similar to the dissipation of DFRs (t(½) 2.1-3.0 d) during the first 3 weeks after malathion applications. Dermal malathion dose was 0.2 mg/kg at the preharvest interval and declined to trace levels during the following 3 months. Glove accumulation of malathion indicated trace surface residue availability and was used to assess the relationship between dislodgable foliar residues and potential hand exposure. PMID:21503692

  20. Syntheses of 2-keto-3-deoxy-D-xylonate and 2-keto-3-deoxy-L-arabinonate as stereochemical probes for demonstrating the metabolic promiscuity of Sulfolobus solfataricus towards D-xylose and L-arabinose.

    PubMed

    Archer, Robert M; Royer, Sylvain F; Mahy, William; Winn, Caroline L; Danson, Michael J; Bull, Steven D

    2013-02-18

    Practical syntheses of 2-keto-3-deoxy-D-xylonate (D-KDX) and 2-keto-3-deoxy-L-arabinonate (L-KDA) that rely on reaction of the anion of ethyl 2-[(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)oxy]-2-(dimethoxy phosphoryl) acetate with enantiopure glyceraldehyde acetonide, followed by global deprotection of the resultant O-silyl-enol esters, have been developed. This has enabled us to confirm that a 2-keto-3-deoxy-D-gluconate aldolase from the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus demonstrates good activity for catalysis of the retro-aldol cleavage of both these enantiomers to afford pyruvate and glycolaldehyde. The stereochemical promiscuity of this aldolase towards these enantiomeric aldol substrates confirms that this organism employs a metabolically promiscuous pathway to catabolise the C5-sugars D-xylose and L-arabinose.

  1. On tide-induced lagrangian residual current and residual transport: 1. Lagrangian residual current

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feng, Shizuo; Cheng, Ralph T.; Pangen, Xi

    1986-01-01

    Residual currents in tidal estuaries and coastal embayments have been recognized as fundamental factors which affect the long-term transport processes. It has been pointed out by previous studies that it is more relevant to use a Lagrangian mean velocity than an Eulerian mean velocity to determine the movements of water masses. Under weakly nonlinear approximation, the parameter k, which is the ratio of the net displacement of a labeled water mass in one tidal cycle to the tidal excursion, is assumed to be small. Solutions for tides, tidal current, and residual current have been considered for two-dimensional, barotropic estuaries and coastal seas. Particular attention has been paid to the distinction between the Lagrangian and Eulerian residual currents. When k is small, the first-order Lagrangian residual is shown to be the sum of the Eulerian residual current and the Stokes drift. The Lagrangian residual drift velocity or the second-order Lagrangian residual current has been shown to be dependent on the phase of tidal current. The Lagrangian drift velocity is induced by nonlinear interactions between tides, tidal currents, and the first-order residual currents, and it takes the form of an ellipse on a hodograph plane. Several examples are given to further demonstrate the unique properties of the Lagrangian residual current.

  2. Formation of disperse-slurry of H-coal residue

    SciTech Connect

    Yaghmaie, F.; Vasconcellos, S.R.

    1986-03-11

    A process is described for forming a disperse-slurry in aqueous medium of 40-400 mesh particles of a hydrophobic H-coal residue containing phenolic components which are conducive to creaming. The process consists of: contacting the hydrophobic H-coal residue, containing phenolic components which are conducive to creaming, with 0.01-1 parts per 100 parts of residue of an alkali metal salt or an amine salt of an alkylbenzene sulfonic acid wherein the alkyl group contains 10-18 carbon atoms whereby the salt is absorbed onto the particles; and comminuting, in the presence of 50-200 parts of aqueous medium per 100 parts of residue, the hydrophobic H-coal residue, containing phenolic components which are conducive to creaming, in the presence of the alkali metal salt or amine salt of the alkylbenzene sulfonic acid wherein the alkyl group contains 10-18 carbon atoms thereby forming a slurry of comminuted hydrophobic H-coal residue in aqueous medium characterized by decreased creaming, enhanced dispersability, decreased wall adhesion, and reduced phase separation; and recovering the slurry of comminuted hydrophobic H-coal residue in aqueous medium characterized by decreased creaming, enhanced dispersability, decreased wall adhesion, and reduced phase separation.

  3. A manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, T.L.; Yu, C.; Yuan, Y.C.; Zielen, A.J.; Jusko, M.J.; Wallo, A. III

    1989-06-01

    This manual presents information for implementing US Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines for residual radioactive material at sites identified by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) and the Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP). It describes the analysis and models used to derive site-specific guidelines for allowable residual concentrations of radionuclides in soil and the design and use of the RESRAD computer code for calculating guideline values. It also describes procedures for implementing DOE policy for reducing residual radioactivity to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable. 36 refs., 16 figs, 22 tabs.

  4. Perioperative functional residual capacity.

    PubMed

    Wahba, R W

    1991-04-01

    The literature dealing with the magnitude, mechanism and effects of reduced FRC in the perioperative period is reviewed. During general anaesthesia FRC is reduced by approximately 20%. The reduction is greater in the obese and in patients with COPD. The most likely mechanism is the loss of inspiratory muscle tone of the muscles acting on the rib cage. Gas trapping is an additional mechanism. Lung compliance decreases and airways resistance increases, in large part, due to decreased FRC. The larynx is displaced anteriorly and elongated, making laryngoscopy and intubation more difficult. The change in FRC creates or increases intrapulmonary shunt and areas of low ventilation to perfusion. This is due to the occurrence of compression atelectasis, and to regional changes in mechanics and airway closure which tend to reduce ventilation to dependent lung zones which are still well perfused. Abdominal and thoracic operations tend to increase shunting further. Large tidal volume but not PEEP will improve oxygenation, although both increase FRC. Both FRC and vital capacity are reduced following abdominal and thoracic surgery in a predictable pattern. The mechanism is the combined effect of incisional pain and reflex dysfunction of the diaphragm. Additional effects of thoracic surgery include pleural effusion, cooling of the phrenic nerve and mediastinal widening. Postoperative hypoxaemia is a function of reduced FRC and airway closure. There is no real difference among the various methods of active lung expansion in terms of the speed of restoration of lung function, or in preventing postoperative atelectasis/pneumonia. Epidural analgesia does not influence the rate of recovery of lung function, nor does it prevent atelectasis/pneumonia. PMID:2036700

  5. Fungicide residues in strawberry processing.

    PubMed

    Will, F; Krüger, E

    1999-03-01

    The fate of three fungicides (dichlofluanid, procymidone, and iprodione) applied under field conditions was studied during strawberry processing to juice, wine, and jam. An untreated control was compared to raw material treated with fungicides according to recommended doses and to a sample with 6-fold higher application rates. The highest residue values were found in the pomace after pressing. Residue values in readily produced juices and fruit wines were very low and did not exceed legally required maximum residue levels. Generally, processing steps such as pressing and clarification diminished fungicide residues from 50 to 100%. If the whole fruit is processed, as in fruit preparations or jam, the residue levels remain higher due to missing processing steps. PMID:10552381

  6. Sugarcane rice residue biochars and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    production, and reduced greenhouse gas emission. Overall, the conversion of sugarcane harvest residue to biochar as soil amendment improves sugarcane production for both agronomic and environmental benefits. Sugarcane residue biochar also showed the potential of other environmental use for remediation of petroleum hydrocarbons.

  7. Costs for alternative grain-residue-collection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Flaim, S.J.; Neenan, B.; Dauve, J.; Mapp, H.P. Jr.

    1981-06-01

    The costs for alternative grain residue collection systems for corn and soybean production in Iowa are examined. All machinery field operations, fuel, other inputs, and labor requirements are identified for the base case with no residue harvest, and for residue harvest by stacks and large round bales, with the owner's equipment and for custom harvest. These five cases are developed for corn and soybeans for conventional and reduced tillage practices. Harvesting alternatives are compared on the basis of costs, fuel input requirements, and gross energy balances of residues collected less energy inputs. The cost of collecting corn and soybean residues varies widely over the collection and tillage systems examined. Other effects constant, the reduced tillage practice leads to a lower cost of harvest than conventional tillage, and stacks are always cheaper than large round bales; however, the former difference is greater than the latter. The dominating effect, in terms of cost of production, is the tillage employed by the producer. Collection of residues yields an energy equivalent 26 times the amount of energy consumed for conventional tillage and 135 times the amount of energy consumed for reduced tillage practices.

  8. Reducing Dropouts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timpane, Michael; And Others

    A group of three conference papers, all addressing the subject of effective programs to decrease the number of school dropouts, is presented in this document. The first paper, "Systemic Approaches to Reducing Dropouts" (Michael Timpane), asserts that dropping out is a symptom of failures in the social, economic, and educational systems. Dropping…

  9. Impact of corn residue on yield of cool-season crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synergy between dry pea and corn can reduce the density of corn needed for optimum yield. Lower crop density may accrue an additional benefit, as after-harvest residues of corn lying on the soil surface can reduce yield of crops planted the next year. This study evaluated impact of corn residue lev...

  10. Safety assessment of drug residues

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, B.A.

    1980-05-15

    The safety assessment of drug residues is part of the process for defining the conditions for the safe use of drugs in food-producing animals. The information needed to assess the safety of drug residues is provided by chemical and toxicity tests. Toxicity tests are conducted to identify the type of effect produced and to determine the exposure concentrations that would be expected not to produce the effect. These tests include acute, subacute, and chronic toxicity tests, as well as reproduction studies and other special tests. The results are used to find an acceptable daily intake for drug residues that can be used to set a tolerance.

  11. Measurement and correlation of conditions for entrapment and mobilization of residual oil. First annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, N.R.

    1982-09-01

    Substantial progress has been made in four major task areas. The first task is to establish the limits of reliability of laboratory waterflooding as an evaluation tool. Wettability is identified as a key variable. Work is being extended to wetting properties of crude oils and core flooding. The second task concerns the effects of high capillary number flows on trapping phenomena and residual oil saturation. Correlations of capillary number and relative permeability behavior at reduced residual saturations have been developed for displacement in sandstones. The third task deals with mechanisms of mobilization and entrapment of residual oil. Detailed accounts have recently been presented of work on relative permeability at reduced residual oil saturations and for factors which affect the magnitude and distribution of residual oil. Work on the fourth task concerns the detailed structure of residual oil. The size distribution of residual oil blobs, obtained under various displacement conditions, is being measured by various size-analysis methods.

  12. [Development of mono- and associative cultures of sulphate-reducing bacteria and formation of exopolymeric complex].

    PubMed

    Purish, L M; Asaulenko, L H; Ostapchuk, A M

    2009-01-01

    Differences were found in development of the monoculture of sulphate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio sp. Kyiv-10 and artificial associations of cultures of sulphate reducing bacteria with heterotrophic satellites under development in a form of biofilm or plankton. Correlation between exopolymers synthesis in the biofilm and steel corrosion velocity has been found. Glucose, galactose, mannose, xylose, rhibose and nonidentified carbohydrates were found in the composition of exopolymers synthesized by monoculture Desulfovibrio sp. Kyiv-10 under its development in a form of biofilm. The biofilm and plankton cells of associative cultures synthesized exopolysaccharide which included rhamnose, arabinose and fucose. Glucose content in biofilm EPM was considerably higher (41.0055.9%) than in EPM of plankton cells (24.7-32.8).

  13. Effect of Chinese traditional cooking on eight pesticides residue during cowpea processing.

    PubMed

    Huan, Zhibo; Xu, Zhi; Jiang, Wayne; Chen, Zhiqiang; Luo, Jinhui

    2015-03-01

    Thermal processing can concentrate residues or convert residues to more toxic metabolites in food. Chinese traditional cooking pays more attention to thermal processing and more vegetables were eaten after thermal processing. In this study, the effect of Chinese traditional cooking (washing, blanching, stir-frying, frying and combined operations) on eight pesticides residues (pyridaben, procymidone, chlorothalonil, difenoconazole, α-cypermethrin, bifenthrin, S-fenvalerate and λ-cyhalothrin) in cowpea which was one of the most important legume crops in China was examined. Result showed washing and blanching could reduce residues with low Kow while stir-frying and frying were more effective to residues with high Kow; stir-frying and frying could concentrate residues with low Kow; the residue levels in oil increased following increasing frying time and frequency especially the residues with high Kow; one metabolite studied in this paper was not detected. Blanching (5 min) followed by stir-frying (3 min) was the most effective combined operation.

  14. Residual tembotrione and atrazine in carrot.

    PubMed

    Bontempo, Amanda F; Carneiro, Gabriella D P; Guimarães, Fernanda A R; Dos Reis, Marcelo R; Silva, Daniel V; Rocha, Bruno H; Souza, Matheus F; Sediyama, Tocio

    2016-07-01

    Carrot (Daucus carota L.) is a vegetable crop that is grown throughout the year across various regions of Brazil in rotation or in succession to other cultures. Herbicide residual effect has emerged as a concern, because of the possibility of carryover. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of tembotrione and atrazine residues - in mixture and isolated - on carrot planted in succession to corn. The experiment was designed in randomized blocks with five replications. Treatments consisted of tembotrione (50.4 g ha(-1)), tembotrione (100.8 g ha(-1)), tembotrione + atrazine (50.4 g ha(-1)+ 2 L ha(-1)), tembotrione + atrazine (100.8 g ha(-1)+ 2 L ha(-1)), and atrazine (2.00 L ha(-1)) applied eight months before carrot seeding, plus a control treatment with no herbicide application. Investigated variables were shoot dry mass, productivity, and classification of carrot roots. The presence of atrazine and tembotrione decreased dry mass in the area, and only tembotrione reduced total root productivity. Thus, there is a carryover effect to tembotrione application that reduces the dry matter accumulation of shoot and total productivity, and an atrazine + tembotrione (100.8 g ha(-1)) mixture reduces the total productivity after application of these herbicides to soil. PMID:27052932

  15. Fasting, but Not Aging, Dramatically Alters the Redox Status of Cysteine Residues on Proteins in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Menger, Katja E; James, Andrew M; Cochemé, Helena M; Harbour, Michael E; Chouchani, Edward T; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M; Partridge, Linda; Murphy, Michael P

    2015-06-30

    Altering the redox state of cysteine residues on protein surfaces is an important response to environmental challenges. Although aging and fasting alter many redox processes, the role of cysteine residues is uncertain. To address this, we used a redox proteomic technique, oxidative isotope-coded affinity tags (OxICAT), to assess cysteine-residue redox changes in Drosophila melanogaster during aging and fasting. This approach enabled us to simultaneously identify and quantify the redox state of several hundred cysteine residues in vivo. Cysteine residues within young flies had a bimodal distribution with peaks at ∼10% and ∼85% reversibly oxidized. Surprisingly, these cysteine residues did not become more oxidized with age. In contrast, 24 hr of fasting dramatically oxidized cysteine residues that were reduced under fed conditions while also reducing cysteine residues that were initially oxidized. We conclude that fasting, but not aging, dramatically alters cysteine-residue redox status in D. melanogaster.

  16. Demonstration of catalytic combustion with residual fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodds, W. J.; Ekstedt, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to demonstrate catalytic combustion of a residual fuel oil. Three catalytic reactors, including a baseline configuration and two backup configurations based on baseline test results, were operated on No. 6 fuel oil. All reactors were multielement configurations consisting of ceramic honeycomb catalyzed with palladium on stabilized alumina. Stable operation on residual oil was demonstrated with the baseline configuration at a reactor inlet temperature of about 825 K (1025 F). At low inlet temperature, operation was precluded by apparent plugging of the catalytic reactor with residual oil. Reduced plugging tendency was demonstrated in the backup reactors by increasing the size of the catalyst channels at the reactor inlet, but plugging still occurred at inlet temperature below 725 K (845 F). Operation at the original design inlet temperature of 589 K (600 F) could not be demonstrated. Combustion efficiency above 99.5% was obtained with less than 5% reactor pressure drop. Thermally formed NO sub x levels were very low (less than 0.5 g NO2/kg fuel) but nearly 100% conversion of fuel-bound nitrogen to NO sub x was observed.

  17. Residual protein levels on reprocessed dental instruments.

    PubMed

    Smith, A; Letters, S; Lange, A; Perrett, D; McHugh, S; Bagg, J

    2005-11-01

    Reduction of the initial bioburden on instruments, prior to sterilization, is believed to reduce transmission risks of iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Endodontic files are used in the preparation of root canals and are likely to have close contact and become contaminated with neural material from branches of the maxillary and mandibular cranial nerves. This study examined methods used by 22 dental practices to clean endodontic files, and scored visible debris and residual protein levels adhering to 220 dental endodontic files that had been used, cleaned, autoclaved and were deemed ready for re-use. Visible debris was scored after examination under a dissecting light microscope. Residual protein was quantified using a fluorescent assay based on reaction of proteins with o-phthaldialdehyde/N-acetyl cysteine. There was wide variation in the methods used by practices to clean endodontic files. The cleaning process varied from a wipe with an alcohol-impregnated cloth to hand scrubbing and/or use of an ultrasonic bath. Surface debris was visually detected on 98% of files. Residual protein was detected on all the files examined (median amount: 5.4 microg; range: 0.5-63.2 microg). These results demonstrate that the cleaning of some instruments reprocessed routinely in primary care is incomplete, and such instruments cannot be excluded as a potential source of cross-infection.

  18. Americium recovery from reduction residues

    DOEpatents

    Conner, W.V.; Proctor, S.G.

    1973-12-25

    A process for separation and recovery of americium values from container or bomb'' reduction residues comprising dissolving the residues in a suitable acid, adjusting the hydrogen ion concentration to a desired level by adding a base, precipitating the americium as americium oxalate by adding oxalic acid, digesting the solution, separating the precipitate, and thereafter calcining the americium oxalate precipitate to form americium oxide. (Official Gazette)

  19. Effects of Crop Residue on the Persistence of Steinernema carpocapsae

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, David I.; Obrycki, John J.; Lewis, Leslie C.; Jackson, Jan J.

    1999-01-01

    We determined the effects of crop residue on the persistence of an entomopathogenic nematode, Steinernema carpocapsae. During 2 consecutive years, nematodes were applied at rates of 2.5 × 10₄ and 1.0 × 10⁵ infective juveniles/m² to small field plots planted with corn. Nematode persistence was monitored by exposing Galleria mellonella larvae to soil samples from plots with and without crop residue (approximately 75% coverage of soybean stubble). Persistence of S. carpocapsae was significantly greater in crop residue plots than in plots without residue. In crop residue plots that received the higher rate of nematode application, larval mortality did not significantly decrease during the study period (3 to 5 days) and remained above 85%. In nematode-treated plots without crop residue, however, larval mortality fell from over 96% to below 11% and 35% in the first and second trials, respectively. The increased crop residue may have benefited nematode persistence through protection from desiccation or ultraviolet light. We conclude that increased ground cover in cropping systems (e.g., due to reduced tillage) may lead to increased insect pest suppression with entomopathogenic nematodes. PMID:19270924

  20. Effect of household processing on fenazaquin residues in okra fruits.

    PubMed

    Duhan, Anil; Kumari, Beena; Gulati, Rachna

    2010-02-01

    Fenazaquin (4-[[4 (1,1-dimethylethyl) phenyl] ethoxy]quinazoline) is a new acaricide of the quinazoline class. Residue levels of fenazaquin were determined in unprocessed and processed okra fruits to evaluate the effect of different processes (washing, boiling and washing followed by boiling) in reduction of residues of this pesticide in okra. The study was carried out on okra crop (Variety, Varsha Uphar) in research farm of Chaudhary Charan Singh Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar with application of fenazaquin (Magister 10 EC) @ 125 ga.i./ha (Single Dose, T(1)) and 250 g a.i./ha (Double Dose, T(2)). Samples of okra fruits were collected on 0, 3, 7, 15 days after treatment and at harvest (30 days). Residues were estimated by gas chromatograph equipped with capillary column and nitrogen phosphorus detector. Residues reached below maximum residue limit of 0.01 mg/kg at harvest. The residues dissipated with half-life period of 3.13 days at lower dose and 4.43 days at higher dose. Processing is shown to be very effective in reducing the levels of fenazaquin residues in okra fruits. Maximum reduction (60-61%) was observed by washing + boiling followed by boiling/cooking (38-40%) and then by washing (31-32%).

  1. Ideal architecture of residue packing and its observation in protein structures.

    PubMed Central

    Raghunathan, G.; Jernigan, R. L.

    1997-01-01

    A simple model of sphere packing has been investigated as an ideal model for long-range interactions for the packing of non-bonded residues in protein structures. By superposing all residues, the geometry of packing around a central residue is investigated. It is found that all residues conform almost perfectly to this lattice model for sphere packing when a radius of 6.5 A is used to define non-bonded (virtual) interacting residues. Side-chain positions with respect to sequential backbone segments are relatively regular as well. This lattice can readily be used in conformation simulations to reduce the conformational space. PMID:9336831

  2. Process-dependent residual trapping of CO2 in sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Lin; Benson, Sally M.

    2014-04-01

    This paper demonstrates that the nature and extent of residual CO2 trapping depend on the process by which the CO2 phase is introduced into the rock. We compare residual trapping of CO2 in Berea Sandstone by imbibing water into a core containing either exsolved CO2 or CO2 introduced by drainage. X-ray computed tomography measurements are used to map the spatial distribution of CO2 preimbibition and postimbibition. Unlike during drainage where the CO2 distribution is strongly influenced by the heterogeneity of the rock, the distribution of exsolved CO2 is comparatively uniform. Postimbibition, the CO2 distribution retained the essential features for both the exsolved and drainage cases, but twice as much residual trapping is observed for exsolved CO2 even with similar preimbibition gas saturations. Residually trapped exsolved gas also disproportionately reduced water relative permeability. Development of process-dependent parameterization will help better manage subsurface flow processes and unlock benefits from gas exsolution.

  3. Residual Resistance Data from Cavity Production Projects at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Gianluigi Ciovati, Rongli Geng, John Mammosser, Jeffrey Saunders

    2010-11-01

    A fundamental limitation towards achieving high quality factors in superconducting radio-frequency cavities is the so-called residual resistance. Understanding and controlling the residual resistance has important implications towards improving the efficiency and reduce the operating cost of continuous wave superconducting linear accelerators. In this contribution we will report on the residual resistance values obtained from measurements of the quality factor of a large set of cavities, with resonant frequency between 805 MHz and 1.5 GHz, all of them processed and tested at Jefferson Lab. Surface treatments included both buffered chemical polishing and electropolishing. The results indicate an approximate value of the residual resistance of about 7-10 n Omega.

  4. Residual stress measurements of tension leg platform tendon welds

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D.S.; Smith, J.D.

    1994-12-31

    Results of fatigue test of prototype welded tendons showed that fatigue life was greatly reduced for the weld repaired joint. Since tensile residual stresses near the fusion boundary were suspected to cause the fatigue life reduction, these residual stresses were measured. Residual stresses of girth welded tendon pipes for a tension leg platform (TLP) were obtained for various fabrication conditions. The stresses were measured experimentally using the blind hole drilling (BHD) technique, X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique and Barkhausen Noise (BHN) method. The results of these measurements illustrate the reliability of each measurement technique. Effects of joint configuration, weld repair, weld cap grinding, and pre-fatigue test on residual stresses were discussed.

  5. DISSOLUTION OF NEPTUNIUM OXIDE RESIDUES

    SciTech Connect

    Kyser, E

    2009-01-12

    This report describes the development of a dissolution flowsheet for neptunium (Np) oxide (NpO{sub 2}) residues (i.e., various NpO{sub 2} sources, HB-Line glovebox sweepings, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) thermogravimetric analysis samples). Samples of each type of materials proposed for processing were dissolved in a closed laboratory apparatus and the rate and total quantity of off-gas were measured. Samples of the off-gas were also analyzed. The quantity and type of solids remaining (when visible) were determined after post-dissolution filtration of the solution. Recommended conditions for dissolution of the NpO{sub 2} residues are: Solution Matrix and Loading: {approx}50 g Np/L (750 g Np in 15 L of dissolver solution), using 8 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 0.025 M potassium fluoride (KF) at greater than 100 C for at least 3 hours. Off-gas: Analysis of the off-gas indicated nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) as the only identified components. No hydrogen (H{sub 2}) was detected. The molar ratio of off-gas produced per mole of Np dissolved ranged from 0.25 to 0.4 moles of gas per mole of Np dissolved. A peak off-gas rate of {approx}0.1 scfm/kg bulk oxide was observed. Residual Solids: Pure NpO{sub 2} dissolved with little or no residue with the proposed flowsheet but the NpCo and both sweepings samples left visible solid residue after dissolution. For the NpCo and Part II Sweepings samples the residue amounted to {approx}1% of the initial material, but for the Part I Sweepings sample, the residue amounted to {approx}8 % of the initial material. These residues contained primarily aluminum (Al) and silicon (Si) compounds that did not completely dissolve under the flowsheet conditions. The residues from both sweepings samples contained minor amounts of plutonium (Pu) particles. Overall, the undissolved Np and Pu particles in the residues were a very small fraction of the total solids.

  6. Structure of ten free N-glycans in ripening tomato fruit. Arabinose is a constituent of a plant N-glycan.

    PubMed Central

    Priem, B; Gitti, R; Bush, C A; Gross, K C

    1993-01-01

    The concentration-dependent stimulatory and inhibitory effect of N-glycans on tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) fruit ripening was recently reported (B. Priem and K.C. Gross [1992] Plant Physiol 98: 399-401). We report here the structure of 10 free N-glycans in mature green tomatoes. N-Glycans were purified from fruit pericarp by ethanolic extraction, desalting, concanavalin A-Sepharose chromatography, and amine-bonded silica high performance liquid chromatography. N-Glycan structures were determined using 500 MHz 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry, and glycosyl linkage methylation analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A novel arabinosyl-containing N-glycan, Man alpha 1-->6(Ara alpha 1-->2)Man beta 1-->4GlcNAc beta 1-->4(Fuc alpha 1-->3)GlcNAc, was purified from a retarded concanavalin A fraction. The location of the arabinosyl residue was the same as the xylosyl residue in complex N-glycans. GlcNAc[5']Man3(Xyl)GlcNAc(Fuc)GlcNAc and GlcNAc[5']Man2GlcNAc(Fuc)GlcNAc were also purified from the weakly retained fraction. The oligomannosyl N-glycans Man5GlcNAc, Man6GlcNAc, Man7GlcNAc, and Man8GlcNAc were purified from a strongly retained concanavalin A fraction. The finding of free Man5GlcNAc in situ was important physiologically because previously we had described it as a promoter of tomato ripening when added exogenously. Mature green pericarp tissue contained more than 1 microgram of total free N-glycan/g fresh weight. Changes in N-glycan composition were determined during ripening by comparing glycosyl and glycosyl-linkage composition of oligosaccharidic extracts from fruit at different developmental stages. N-Glycans were present in pericarp tissue at all stages of development. However, the amount increased during ripening, as did the relative amount of xylosyl-containing N-glycans. PMID:8108510

  7. Residual stresses in welded plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Edward L.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a simple model which could be used to study residual stress. The mechanism that results in residual stresses in the welding process starts with the deposition of molten weld metal which heats the immediately adjacent material. After solidification of weld material, normal thermal shrinkage is resisted by the adjacent, cooler material. When the thermal strain exceeds the elastic strain corresponding to the yield point stress, the stress level is limited by this value, which decreases with increasing temperature. Cooling then causes elastic unloading which is restrained by the adjoining material. Permanent plastic strain occurs, and tension is caused in the region immediately adjacent to the weld material. Compression arises in the metal farther from the weld in order to maintain overall static equilibrium. Subsequent repair welds may add to the level of residual stresses. The level of residual stress is related to the onset of fracture during welding. Thus, it is of great importance to be able to predict the level of residual stresses remaining after a weld procedure, and to determine the factors, such as weld speed, temperature, direction, and number of passes, which may affect the magnitude of remaining residual stress. It was hoped to use traditional analytical modeling techniques so that it would be easier to comprehend the effect of these variables on the resulting stress. This approach was chosen in place of finite element methods so as to facilitate the understanding of the physical processes. The accuracy of the results was checked with some existing experimental studies giving residual stress levels found from x-ray diffraction measurements.

  8. Sugar composition of the pectic polysaccharides of charophytes, the closest algal relatives of land-plants: presence of 3-O-methyl-d-galactose residues

    PubMed Central

    O’Rourke, Christina; Gregson, Timothy; Murray, Lorna; Sadler, Ian H.; Fry, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims During evolution, plants have acquired and/or lost diverse sugar residues as cell-wall constituents. Of particular interest are primordial cell-wall features that existed, and in some cases abruptly changed, during the momentous step whereby land-plants arose from charophytic algal ancestors. Methods Polysaccharides were extracted from four charophyte orders [Chlorokybales (Chlorokybus atmophyticus), Klebsormidiales (Klebsormidium fluitans, K. subtile), Charales (Chara vulgaris, Nitella flexilis), Coleochaetales (Coleochaete scutata)] and an early-diverging land-plant (Anthoceros agrestis). ‘Pectins’ and ‘hemicelluloses’, operationally defined as extractable in oxalate (100 °C) and 6 m NaOH (37 °C), respectively, were acid- or Driselase-hydrolysed, and the monosaccharides analysed chromatographically. One unusual monosaccharide, ‘U’, was characterized by 1H/13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and also enzymically. Key Results ‘U’ was identified as 3-O-methyl-d-galactose (3-MeGal). All pectins, except in Klebsormidium, contained acid- and Driselase-releasable galacturonate, suggesting homogalacturonan. All pectins, without exception, released rhamnose and galactose on acid hydrolysis; however, only in ‘higher’ charophytes (Charales, Coleochaetales) and Anthoceros were these sugars also efficiently released by Driselase, suggesting rhamnogalacturonan-I. Pectins of ‘higher’ charophytes, especially Chara, contained little arabinose, instead possessing 3-MeGal. Anthoceros hemicelluloses were rich in glucose, xylose, galactose and arabinose (suggesting xyloglucan and arabinoxylan), none of which was consistently present in charophyte hemicelluloses. Conclusions Homogalacturonan is an ancient streptophyte feature, albeit secondarily lost in Klebsormidium. When conquering the land, the first embryophytes already possessed rhamnogalacturonan-I. In contrast, charophyte and land-plant hemicelluloses differ

  9. Effect of residual ozone on membrane fouling reduction in ozone resisting microfiltration (MF) membrane system.

    PubMed

    Lee, S; Jang, N; Watanabe, Y

    2004-01-01

    The effect of residual ozone on reducing the membrane fouling was investigated using ozone resisting microfiltration membrane. It was found out that the fouling was reduced effectively by maintaining residual ozone in the membrane module. To clarify the reason why the residual ozone reduces the membrane fouling, research was focused on the molecular degradation reaction and particle destabilization reaction induced by residual ozone. The major reason of membrane fouling reduction was attributed to the reduction of reversible resistance induced by the cake layer. The reversible resistance was reduced due to degradation of organic substances in the cake layer. In addition to degradation reaction, the increase of fouling particle size due to residual ozone in the cake layer is another important process for fouling reduction. This effect has been referred to as ozone-induced destabilization reaction. The calcium present in the raw water influenced this reaction. The increase of fouling particles size improves the filterability through the cake layer and backwashing efficiency.

  10. Recycling crop residues for use in recirculating hydroponic crop production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackowiak, C. L.; Garland, J. L.; Sager, J. C.

    1996-01-01

    As part of bioregenerative life support feasibility testing by NASA, crop residues are being used to resupply elemental nutrients to recirculating hydroponic crop production systems. Methods for recovering nutrients from crop residues have evolved from water soaking (leaching) to rapid aerobic bioreactor processing. Leaching residues recovered the majority of elements but it also recovered significant amounts of soluble organics. The high organic content of leachates was detrimental to plant growth. Aerobic bioreactor processing reduced the organic content ten-fold, which reduced or eliminated phytotoxic effects. Wheat and potato production studies were successful using effluents from reactors having with 8- to 1-day retention times. Aerobic bioreactor effluents supplied at least half of the crops elemental mass needs in these studies. Descriptions of leachate and effluent mineral content, biomass productivity, microbial activity, and nutrient budgets for potato and wheat are presented.

  11. Recycling crop residues for use in recirculating hydroponic crop production.

    PubMed

    Mackowiak, C L; Garland, J L; Sager, J C

    1996-12-01

    As part of bioregenerative life support feasibility testing by NASA, crop residues are being used to resupply elemental nutrients to recirculating hydroponic crop production systems. Methods for recovering nutrients from crop residues have evolved from water soaking (leaching) to rapid aerobic bioreactor processing. Leaching residues recovered the majority of elements but it also recovered significant amounts of soluble organics. The high organic content of leachates was detrimental to plant growth. Aerobic bioreactor processing reduced the organic content ten-fold, which reduced or eliminated phytotoxic effects. Wheat and potato production studies were successful using effluents from reactors having with 8- to 1-day retention times. Aerobic bioreactor effluents supplied at least half of the crops elemental mass needs in these studies. Descriptions of leachate and effluent mineral content, biomass productivity, microbial activity, and nutrient budgets for potato and wheat are presented.

  12. Dry fermentation of agricultural residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, W. J.; Chandler, J. A.; Dellorto, S.; Fanfoni, K. J.; Fast, S.; Jackson, D.; Kabrick, R. M.

    1981-09-01

    A dry fermentation process is discussed which converts agricultural residues to methane, using the residues in their as produced state. The process appears to simplify and enhance the possibilities for using crop residues as an energy source. The major process variables investigated include temperature, the amount and type of inoculum, buffer requirements, compaction, and pretreatment to control the initial available organic components that create pH problems. A pilot-scale reactor operation on corn stover at a temperature of 550 C, with 25 percent initial total solids, a seed-to-feed ratio of 2.5 percent, and a buffer-to-feed ratio of 8 percent achieved 33 percent total volatile solids destruction in 60 days. Volumetric biogas yields from this unit were greater than 1 vol/vol day for 12 days, and greater than 0.5 vol/vol day for 32 days, at a substrate density of 169 kg/m (3).

  13. Prokaryotic Expression, Identification and Bioinformatics Analysis of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv3807c Gene Encoding the Putative Enzyme Committed to Decaprenylphosphoryl-d-arabinose Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Lina; Zhao, Xiaojiao; Jiang, Tao; Qiu, Juanjuan; Owusu, Lawrence; Ma, Yufang; Wang, Bo; Xin, Yi

    2014-03-01

    Decaprenylphosphoryl-d-arabinofuranosyl (DPA), the immediate donor for the polymerized d-Araf residues of mycobacterial arabinan, is synthesized from 5-phosphoribose-1-diphosphate (PRPP) in three-step reactions. (i) PRPP is transferred to decaprenyl-phosphate (DP) to form decaprenylphosphoryl-d-5-phosphoribose (DPPR). (ii) DPPR is dephosphorylated to form decaprenylphosphoryl-d-ribose (DPR). (iii) DPR is formed to DPA by the epimerase. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv3806c and heteromeric Rv3790/Rv3791 have been identified as the PRPP: decaprenyl-phosphate 5-phosphoribosyltransferase and the epimerase respectively. Rv3807c, however, as the candidate of phospholipid phosphatase, catalyzing the biosynthesis of decapreny-l-phosphoryl-ribose (DPR) from decaprenylphosphoryl-β-d-5-phosphoribose by dephosphorylating, has no direct experimental evidence of its essentiality in any species of mycobacterium. In this study, Rv3807c gene was amplified from the genome of M. tuberculosis H37Rv by PCR, and was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) via the recombinant plasmid pColdII-Rv3807c. The resulting protein with the 6× His-tag was identified by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. The protein was predicted through bioinformatics to contain three transmembrane domains, the N-terminal peptide, and a core structure with phosphatidic acid phosphatase type2/haloperoxidase. This study provides biochemical and bioinformatics evidence for the importance of Rv3807c in mycobacteria, and further functional studies will be conducted for validating Rv3807c as a promising phospholipid phosphatase in the synthetic pathway of DPA.

  14. Total radioactive residues and residues of [36Cl]chlorate in market size broilers.

    PubMed

    Smith, David J; Byrd, James A; Anderson, Robin C

    2007-07-11

    The oral administration of chlorate salts reduces the numbers of Gram-negative pathogens in gastrointestinal tracts of live food animals. Although the efficacy of chlorate salts has been demonstrated repeatedly, the technology cannot be introduced into commercial settings without first demonstrating that chlorate residues, and metabolites of chlorate remaining in edible tissues, represent a negligible risk to consumers. Typically, a first step in this risk assessment is to quantify the parent compound and to identify metabolites remaining in edible tissues of animals treated with the experimental compound. The objectives of this study were to determine the pathway(s) of chlorate metabolism in market broilers and to determine the magnitude of chlorate residues remaining in edible tissues. To this end, 12 broilers (6 weeks; 2.70+/-0.34 kg) were randomly assigned to three treatments of 7.4, 15.0, and 22.5 mM sodium [36Cl]chlorate dissolved in drinking water (n=4 broilers per treatment). Exposure to chlorate, dissolved in drinking water, occurred at 0 and 24 h (250 mL per exposure), feed was withdrawn at hour 38, water was removed at hour 48, and birds were slaughtered at hour 54 (16 h after feed removal and 8 h after water removal). The radioactivity was rapidly eliminated in excreta with 69-78% of the total administered radioactivity being excreted by slaughter. Total radioactive residues were proportional to dose in all edible tissues with chloride ion comprising greater than 98.5% of the radioactive residue for the tissue (9.4-97.8 ppm chlorate equivalents). Chlorate residues were typically greatest in the skin (0.33-0.82 ppm), gizzard (0.1-0.137 ppm), and dark muscle (0.05-0.14 ppm). Adipose, liver, and white muscle tissue contained chlorate concentrations from 0.03 to 0.13 ppm. In contrast, chlorate concentrations in excreta eliminated during the 6 h period prior to slaughter ranged from 53 to 71 ppm. Collectively, these data indicate that broilers rapidly

  15. Total radioactive residues and residues of [36Cl]chlorate in market size broilers.

    PubMed

    Smith, David J; Byrd, James A; Anderson, Robin C

    2007-07-11

    The oral administration of chlorate salts reduces the numbers of Gram-negative pathogens in gastrointestinal tracts of live food animals. Although the efficacy of chlorate salts has been demonstrated repeatedly, the technology cannot be introduced into commercial settings without first demonstrating that chlorate residues, and metabolites of chlorate remaining in edible tissues, represent a negligible risk to consumers. Typically, a first step in this risk assessment is to quantify the parent compound and to identify metabolites remaining in edible tissues of animals treated with the experimental compound. The objectives of this study were to determine the pathway(s) of chlorate metabolism in market broilers and to determine the magnitude of chlorate residues remaining in edible tissues. To this end, 12 broilers (6 weeks; 2.70+/-0.34 kg) were randomly assigned to three treatments of 7.4, 15.0, and 22.5 mM sodium [36Cl]chlorate dissolved in drinking water (n=4 broilers per treatment). Exposure to chlorate, dissolved in drinking water, occurred at 0 and 24 h (250 mL per exposure), feed was withdrawn at hour 38, water was removed at hour 48, and birds were slaughtered at hour 54 (16 h after feed removal and 8 h after water removal). The radioactivity was rapidly eliminated in excreta with 69-78% of the total administered radioactivity being excreted by slaughter. Total radioactive residues were proportional to dose in all edible tissues with chloride ion comprising greater than 98.5% of the radioactive residue for the tissue (9.4-97.8 ppm chlorate equivalents). Chlorate residues were typically greatest in the skin (0.33-0.82 ppm), gizzard (0.1-0.137 ppm), and dark muscle (0.05-0.14 ppm). Adipose, liver, and white muscle tissue contained chlorate concentrations from 0.03 to 0.13 ppm. In contrast, chlorate concentrations in excreta eliminated during the 6 h period prior to slaughter ranged from 53 to 71 ppm. Collectively, these data indicate that broilers rapidly

  16. l-Arabinose Isomerase and d-Xylose Isomerase from Lactobacillus reuteri: Characterization, Coexpression in the Food Grade Host Lactobacillus plantarum, and Application in the Conversion of d-Galactose and d-Glucose

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The l-arabinose isomerase (l-AI) and the d-xylose isomerase (d-XI) encoding genes from Lactobacillus reuteri (DSMZ 17509) were cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The proteins were purified to homogeneity by one-step affinity chromatography and characterized biochemically. l-AI displayed maximum activity at 65 °C and pH 6.0, whereas d-XI showed maximum activity at 65 °C and pH 5.0. Both enzymes require divalent metal ions. The genes were also ligated into the inducible lactobacillal expression vectors pSIP409 and pSIP609, the latter containing a food grade auxotrophy marker instead of an antibiotic resistance marker, and the l-AI- and d-XI-encoding sequences/genes were coexpressed in the food grade host Lactobacillus plantarum. The recombinant enzymes were tested for applications in carbohydrate conversion reactions of industrial relevance. The purified l-AI converted d-galactose to d-tagatose with a maximum conversion rate of 35%, and the d-XI isomerized d-glucose to d-fructose with a maximum conversion rate of 48% at 60 °C. PMID:24443973

  17. Genetic Interaction of Aspergillus nidulans galR, xlnR and araR in Regulating D-Galactose and L-Arabinose Release and Catabolism Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kowalczyk, Joanna E.; Gruben, Birgit S.; Battaglia, Evy; Wiebenga, Ad; Majoor, Eline; de Vries, Ronald P.

    2015-01-01

    In Aspergillus nidulans, the xylanolytic regulator XlnR and the arabinanolytic regulator AraR co-regulate pentose catabolism. In nature, the pentose sugars D-xylose and L-arabinose are both main building blocks of the polysaccharide arabinoxylan. In pectin and arabinogalactan, these two monosaccharides are found in combination with D-galactose. GalR, the regulator that responds to the presence of D-galactose, regulates the D-galactose catabolic pathway. In this study we investigated the possible interaction between XlnR, AraR and GalR in pentose and/or D-galactose catabolism in A. nidulans. Growth phenotypes and metabolic gene expression profiles were studied in single, double and triple disruptant A. nidulans strains of the genes encoding these paralogous transcription factors. Our results demonstrate that AraR and XlnR not only control pentose catabolic pathway genes, but also genes of the oxido-reductive D-galactose catabolic pathway. This suggests an interaction between three transcriptional regulators in D-galactose catabolism. Conversely, GalR is not involved in regulation of pentose catabolism, but controls only genes of the oxido-reductive D-galactose catabolic pathway. PMID:26580075

  18. L-Arabinose isomerase and D-xylose isomerase from Lactobacillus reuteri: characterization, coexpression in the food grade host Lactobacillus plantarum, and application in the conversion of D-galactose and D-glucose.

    PubMed

    Staudigl, Petra; Haltrich, Dietmar; Peterbauer, Clemens K

    2014-02-19

    The L-arabinose isomerase (L-AI) and the D-xylose isomerase (D-XI) encoding genes from Lactobacillus reuteri (DSMZ 17509) were cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The proteins were purified to homogeneity by one-step affinity chromatography and characterized biochemically. L-AI displayed maximum activity at 65 °C and pH 6.0, whereas D-XI showed maximum activity at 65 °C and pH 5.0. Both enzymes require divalent metal ions. The genes were also ligated into the inducible lactobacillal expression vectors pSIP409 and pSIP609, the latter containing a food grade auxotrophy marker instead of an antibiotic resistance marker, and the L-AI- and D-XI-encoding sequences/genes were coexpressed in the food grade host Lactobacillus plantarum . The recombinant enzymes were tested for applications in carbohydrate conversion reactions of industrial relevance. The purified L-AI converted D-galactose to D-tagatose with a maximum conversion rate of 35%, and the D-XI isomerized D-glucose to D-fructose with a maximum conversion rate of 48% at 60 °C.

  19. Genetic Interaction of Aspergillus nidulans galR, xlnR and araR in Regulating D-Galactose and L-Arabinose Release and Catabolism Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Joanna E; Gruben, Birgit S; Battaglia, Evy; Wiebenga, Ad; Majoor, Eline; de Vries, Ronald P

    2015-01-01

    In Aspergillus nidulans, the xylanolytic regulator XlnR and the arabinanolytic regulator AraR co-regulate pentose catabolism. In nature, the pentose sugars D-xylose and L-arabinose are both main building blocks of the polysaccharide arabinoxylan. In pectin and arabinogalactan, these two monosaccharides are found in combination with D-galactose. GalR, the regulator that responds to the presence of D-galactose, regulates the D-galactose catabolic pathway. In this study we investigated the possible interaction between XlnR, AraR and GalR in pentose and/or D-galactose catabolism in A. nidulans. Growth phenotypes and metabolic gene expression profiles were studied in single, double and triple disruptant A. nidulans strains of the genes encoding these paralogous transcription factors. Our results demonstrate that AraR and XlnR not only control pentose catabolic pathway genes, but also genes of the oxido-reductive D-galactose catabolic pathway. This suggests an interaction between three transcriptional regulators in D-galactose catabolism. Conversely, GalR is not involved in regulation of pentose catabolism, but controls only genes of the oxido-reductive D-galactose catabolic pathway.

  20. Residual contact restraints in cryogenics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cretegny, J. F.; Demonicault, J. M.

    The use of residual stress measurements to evaluate the state of cryogenic turbomachines, whose surfaces are worn by the working conductions in dry contact, is addressed. Their contribution to the understanding of the reasons of possible ruptures is considered. It is stated that residual stress measurements should be used as a complementary tool rather than as input data for models. It is shown, thanks to two examples concerning the ball bearings and splines of the liquid hydrogen turbopump of the Vulcain engine, what can be expected from such techniques. Total exploitation of the results has still to be done, but preliminary results are quite encouraging.

  1. Collection of sugarcane crop residue for energy

    SciTech Connect

    Eiland, B.R.; Clayton, J.E.

    1982-12-01

    Crop residue left after sugarcane harvesting was recovered using a forage harvester and a large round baler. The quantity, bulk density and moisture content of the crop residue was determined in four fields. Crop residue from 7 ha was burned in boilers at a sugar mill. Samples of this residue were tested by a laboratory and compared to sugarcane bagasse.

  2. CHARACTERIZING PESTICIDE RESIDUE TRANSFER EFFICIENCIES USING FLUORESCENT TRACER IMAGING TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    To reduce the uncertainty associated with current estimates of children's exposure to pesticides by dermal contact and non-dietary ingestion, residue transfer data are required. Prior to conducting exhaustive studies, a screening study was conducted to identify the important pa...

  3. 40 CFR 266.112 - Regulation of residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... concentration in the normal residue. If changes in raw materials or fuels reduce the statistically-derived... level specified in appendix VII of this part, or the level of detection, whichever is higher. If a... of 0.002 micrograms per kilogram or the level of detection (which must be determined by...

  4. Estimating Crop Residue Distribution Using Airborne and Satellite Remote Sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop residue management and reduced tillage are commonly accepted best management practices that improve soil quality through the sequestration of soil organic carbon. A major goal of this study was to evaluate remote sensing data for rapid quantification of conservation tillage at the field and wa...

  5. Elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide effects on cotton plant residue decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Torbert, H.A.; Prior, S.A.; Rogers, H.H.

    1995-09-01

    Assessing the impact of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration on the global environment is hampered due to a lack of understanding of global C cycling. Carbon fixed within plant biomass ultimately enters the soil via plant residues, but the effects of elevated-CO{sub 2}-grown plant material on decomposition rates and long-term soil C storage are unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the decomposition rate of plant residues grown under an elevated CO{sub 2} environment as affected by soil type. Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. `Delta Pine 77`) samples were collected from a free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment (550 {mu}L L{sup -1}) experiment. The plant residues were incubated under ambient CO{sub 2} conditions to determine decomposition rates of leaves, stems, and roots and potential N and P mineralization-immobilization in three soil series. No significant difference was observed between plant residue grown under CO{sub 2} enrichment vs. ambient CO{sub 2} conditions for soil respiration or P mineralization-immobilization. Significantly greater net N immobilization was observed during the incubation in all soil types for plant residue grown at elevated CO{sub 2}. These results indicate that while decomposition of plant residue may not be reduced by CO{sub 2} enrichment, N dynamics may be markedly changed. 32 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Potent gene-specific inhibitory properties of mixed-backbone antisense oligonucleotides comprised of 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro-D-arabinose and 2'-deoxyribose nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Lok, Chun-Nam; Viazovkina, Ekaterina; Min, Kyung-Lyum; Nagy, Eva; Wilds, Christopher J; Damha, Masad J; Parniak, Michael A

    2002-03-12

    unaffected. Indeed, a PS-FANA oligomer containing a single deoxyribonucleotide residue core retained significant antisense activity. These findings correlated exactly with the ability of the various chimeric antisense molecules to elicit RNase H degradation of the target RNA in vitro, and suggest that this mode of inhibition is likely the most important determinant for potent antisense activity.

  7. Compounding of ultrasound B-scans of a transfemoral residual limb using a genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Tania S.; Lee, Peter; Solomonidis, Stephan E.; Spence, William D.

    1998-06-01

    Ultrasound may be used for imaging the trans-femoral residual limb in order to provide information for the improvement of prosthetic socket design. Compounding of several ultrasound B-scans is required for obtaining transverse images of the residual limb. In this paper, a method is presented by which a genetic algorithm is used to match B-scans taken in a horizontal plane around the residual limb for image compounding in order to reduce the effects of patient motion during scanning.

  8. Formation of disperse-slurry of coal liquefaction residue

    SciTech Connect

    Corbeels, R.J.; Vasconcellos, S.R.

    1986-03-11

    This patent describes a process for forming a disperse-slurry in aqueous medium of comminuted particles of a hydrophobic coal liquefaction residue containing phenolic components which are conducive to creaming. This process consists of: contacting the hydrophobic H-coal residue, containing phenolic components which are conducive to creaming, with 0.001-0.1 parts per 100 parts of aqueous medium of a cationic surfactant R/sup 1/R/sup 2/R/sup 3/R/sup 4/N+X- wherein R/sup 1/ is a C/sub 12/-C/sub 20/ hydrocarbon group; each of R/sup 2/, R/sup 3/ and R/sup 4/ is a C/sub 1/-C/sub 6/ lower hydrocarbon group or a poly(oxyalkylene) group having 12-25 repeating units; and X is an inert anion whereby the surfactant is adsorbed onto the particles; and comminuting, in the presence of aqueous medium, the hydrophobic coal liquefaction residue, containing phenolic components which are conducive to creaming, in the presence of the surfactant thereby forming a slurry of comminuted hydrophobic coal liquefaction residue in aqueous medium characterized by decreased creaming decreased wall adhesion, and reduced phase separation; and recovering the slurry of comminuted hydrophobic coal liquefaction residue in aqueous medium characterized by decreased creaming, enhanced dispersability, decreased wall adhesion, and reduced phase separation.

  9. Potential hazards of fumigant residues.

    PubMed Central

    Fishbein, L

    1976-01-01

    A spectrum of fumigants (primarily ethylene dibromide, 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane, ethylene oxide, symdibromotetetrachloroethane, 1,3-dichloropropene, dichlorovos, carbon tetrachloride, methyl bromide) as well as their degradation products in foodstuffs and soil have been examined mainly in regard to the potential mutagenicity of their residues. PMID:789068

  10. Solidification process for sludge residue

    SciTech Connect

    Pearce, K.L.

    1998-09-10

    This report investigates the solidification process used at 100-N Basin to solidify the N Basin sediment and assesses the N Basin process for application to the K Basin sludge residue material. This report also includes a discussion of a solidification process for stabilizing filters. The solidified matrix must be compatible with the Environmental Remediation Disposal Facility acceptance criteria.

  11. Leptogenesis and residual CP symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Ding, Gui-Jun; King, Stephen F.

    2016-03-01

    We discuss flavour dependent leptogenesis in the framework of lepton flavour models based on discrete flavour and CP symmetries applied to the type-I seesaw model. Working in the flavour basis, we analyse the case of two general residual CP symmetries in the neutrino sector, which corresponds to all possible semi-direct models based on a preserved Z 2 in the neutrino sector, together with a CP symmetry, which constrains the PMNS matrix up to a single free parameter which may be fixed by the reactor angle. We systematically study and classify this case for all possible residual CP symmetries, and show that the R-matrix is tightly constrained up to a single free parameter, with only certain forms being consistent with successful leptogenesis, leading to possible connections between leptogenesis and PMNS parameters. The formalism is completely general in the sense that the two residual CP symmetries could result from any high energy discrete flavour theory which respects any CP symmetry. As a simple example, we apply the formalism to a high energy S 4 flavour symmetry with a generalized CP symmetry, broken to two residual CP symmetries in the neutrino sector, recovering familiar results for PMNS predictions, together with new results for flavour dependent leptogenesis.

  12. Implication of Terminal Residues at Protein-Protein and Protein-DNA Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Martin, Olivier M F; Etheve, Loïc; Launay, Guillaume; Martin, Juliette

    2016-01-01

    Terminal residues of protein chains are charged and more flexible than other residues since they are constrained only on one side. Do they play a particular role in protein-protein and protein-DNA interfaces? To answer this question, we considered large sets of non-redundant protein-protein and protein-DNA complexes and analyzed the status of terminal residues and their involvement in interfaces. In protein-protein complexes, we found that more than half of terminal residues (62%) are either modified by attachment of a tag peptide (10%) or have missing coordinates in the analyzed structures (52%). Terminal residues are almost exclusively located at the surface of proteins (94%). Contrary to charged residues, they are not over or under-represented in protein-protein interfaces, but strongly prefer the peripheral region of interfaces when present at the interface (83% of terminal residues). The almost exclusive location of terminal residues at the surface of the proteins or in the rim regions of interfaces explains that experimental methods relying on tail hybridization can be successfully applied without disrupting the complexes under study. Concerning conformational rearrangement in protein-protein complexes, despite their expected flexibility, terminal residues adopt similar locations between the free and bound forms of the docking benchmark. In protein-DNA complexes, N-terminal residues are twice more frequent than C-terminal residues at interfaces. Both N-terminal and C-terminal residues are under-represented in interfaces, in contrast to positively charged residues, which are strongly favored. When located in protein-DNA interfaces, terminal residues prefer the periphery. N-terminal and C-terminal residues thus have particular properties with regard to interfaces, which cannot be reduced to their charged nature. PMID:27611671

  13. Implication of Terminal Residues at Protein-Protein and Protein-DNA Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Olivier M. F.; Etheve, Loïc; Launay, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Terminal residues of protein chains are charged and more flexible than other residues since they are constrained only on one side. Do they play a particular role in protein-protein and protein-DNA interfaces? To answer this question, we considered large sets of non-redundant protein-protein and protein-DNA complexes and analyzed the status of terminal residues and their involvement in interfaces. In protein-protein complexes, we found that more than half of terminal residues (62%) are either modified by attachment of a tag peptide (10%) or have missing coordinates in the analyzed structures (52%). Terminal residues are almost exclusively located at the surface of proteins (94%). Contrary to charged residues, they are not over or under-represented in protein-protein interfaces, but strongly prefer the peripheral region of interfaces when present at the interface (83% of terminal residues). The almost exclusive location of terminal residues at the surface of the proteins or in the rim regions of interfaces explains that experimental methods relying on tail hybridization can be successfully applied without disrupting the complexes under study. Concerning conformational rearrangement in protein-protein complexes, despite their expected flexibility, terminal residues adopt similar locations between the free and bound forms of the docking benchmark. In protein-DNA complexes, N-terminal residues are twice more frequent than C-terminal residues at interfaces. Both N-terminal and C-terminal residues are under-represented in interfaces, in contrast to positively charged residues, which are strongly favored. When located in protein-DNA interfaces, terminal residues prefer the periphery. N-terminal and C-terminal residues thus have particular properties with regard to interfaces, which cannot be reduced to their charged nature. PMID:27611671

  14. 40 CFR 1065.705 - Residual and intermediate residual fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... specifications for fuels meeting the definition of residual fuel in 40 CFR 80.2, including fuels marketed as... by reference in § 1065.1010). (2) Phosphorus is at or below 15 mg per kg of fuel based on the... 0.15 ISO 6245. Water, max (m3/m3) % 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 ISO 3733. Sulfur, max (kg/kg) % 3.50 4.00...

  15. 40 CFR 1065.705 - Residual and intermediate residual fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... specifications for fuels meeting the definition of residual fuel in 40 CFR 80.2, including fuels marketed as... ISO 6245. Water, max (m3/m3)% 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 ISO 3733. Sulfur, max (kg/kg)% 3.50 4.00 4.50 4.50 4... the elements zinc, phosphorus, or calcium is at or below the specified limits. We consider a fuel...

  16. 40 CFR 1065.705 - Residual and intermediate residual fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... specifications for fuels meeting the definition of residual fuel in 40 CFR 80.2, including fuels marketed as... ISO 6245. Water, max (m3/m3)% 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 ISO 3733. Sulfur, max (kg/kg)% 3.50 4.00 4.50 4.50 4... the elements zinc, phosphorus, or calcium is at or below the specified limits. We consider a fuel...

  17. Alcohol production from agricultural and forestry residues

    SciTech Connect

    Opilla, R.; Dale, L.; Surles, T.

    1980-05-01

    A variety of carbohydrate sources can be used as raw material for the production of ethanol. Section 1 is a review of technologies available for the production of ethanol from whole corn. Particular emphasis is placed on the environmental aspects of the process, including land utilization and possible air and water pollutants. Suggestions are made for technological changes intended to improve the economics of the process as well as to reduce some of the pollution from by-product disposal. Ethanol may be derived from renewable cellulosic substances by either enzymatic or acid hydrolysis of cellulose to sugar, followed by conventional fermentation and distillation. Section 2 is a review of the use of two agricultural residues - corn stover (field stalks remaining after harvest) and straw from wheat crops - as a cellulosic feedstock. Two processes have been evaluated with regard to environmental impact - a two-stage acid process developed by G.T. Tsao of Purdue University and an enzymatic process based on the laboratory findings of C.R. Wilke of the University of California, Berkeley. Section 3 deals with the environmental residuals expected from the manufacture of methyl and ethyl alcohols from woody biomass. The methanol is produced in a gasification process, whereas ethanol is produced by hydrolysis and fermentation processes similar to those used to derive ethanol from cellulosic materials.

  18. Alcohol production from agricultural and forestry residues

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, L; Opilla, R; Surles, T

    1980-09-01

    Technologies available for the production of ethanol from whole corn are reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on the environmental aspects of the process, including land utilization and possible air and water pollutants. Suggestions are made for technological changes intended to improve the economics of the process as well as to reduce some of the pollution from by-product disposal. Ethanol may be derived from renewable cellulosic substances by either enzymatic or acid hydrolysis of cellulose to sugar, followed by conventional fermentation and distillation. The use of two agricultural residues - corn stover (field stalks remaining after harvest) and straw from wheat crops - is reviewed as a cellulosic feedstock. Two processes have been evaluated with regard to environmental impact - a two-stage acid process developed by G.T. Tsao of Purdue University and an enzymatic process based on the laboratory findings of C.R. Wilke of the University of California, Berkeley. The environmental residuals expected from the manufacture of methyl and ethyl alcohols from woody biomass are covered. The methanol is produced in a gasification process, whereas ethanol is produced by hydrolysis and fermentation processes similar to those used to derive ethanol from cellulosic materials.

  19. Managing coal combustion residues in mines

    SciTech Connect

    2006-07-01

    Burning coal in electric utility plants produces, in addition to power, residues that contain constituents which may be harmful to the environment. The management of large volumes of coal combustion residues (CCRs) is a challenge for utilities, because they must either place the CCRs in landfills, surface impoundments, or mines, or find alternative uses for the material. This study focuses on the placement of CCRs in active and abandoned coal mines. The Committee on Mine Placement of Coal Combustion Wastes of the National Research Council believes that placement of CCRs in mines as part of the reclamation process may be a viable option for the disposal of this material as long as the placement is properly planned and carried out in a manner that avoids significant adverse environmental and health impacts. This report discusses a variety of steps that are involved in planning and managing the use of CCRs as minefills, including an integrated process of CCR characterization and site characterization, management and engineering design of placement activities, and design and implementation of monitoring to reduce the risk of contamination moving from the mine site to the ambient environment. Enforceable federal standards are needed for the disposal of CCRs in minefills to ensure that states have adequate, explicit authority and that they implement minimum safeguards. 267 refs., 6 apps.

  20. Mutagenesis of essential functional residues in acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed Central

    Gibney, G; Camp, S; Dionne, M; MacPhee-Quigley, K; Taylor, P

    1990-01-01

    The cholinesterases are serine hydrolases that show no global similarities in sequence with either the trypsin or the subtilisin family of serine proteases. The cholinesterase superfamily includes several esterases with distinct functions and other proteins devoid of the catalytic serine and known esterase activity. To identify the residues involved in catalysis and conferring specificity on the enzyme, we have expressed wild-type Torpedo acetylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.7) and several site-directed mutants in a heterologous system. Mutation of serine-200 to cysteine results in diminished activity, while its mutation to valine abolishes detectable activity. Two conserved histidines can be identified at positions 425 and 440 in the cholinesterase family; glutamine replacement at position 440 eliminates activity whereas the mutation at 425 reduces activity only slightly. The assignment of the catalytic histidine to position 440 defines a rank ordering of catalytic residues in cholinesterases distinct from trypsin and subtilisin and suggests a convergence of a catalytic triad to form a third, distinct family of serine hydrolases. Mutation of glutamate-199 to glutamine yields an enzyme with a higher Km and without the substrate-inhibition behavior characteristic of acetylcholinesterase. Hence, modification of the acidic amino acid adjacent to the serine influences substrate association and the capacity of a second substrate molecule to affect catalysis. Images PMID:2217185

  1. Deuterium Gas Analysis by Residual Gas Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, B. K.; Shukla, R.; Das, R.; Shyam, A.; Rao, A. D. P.

    2012-11-01

    Hydrogen gas is generated by electrolysis method in a compact hydrogen generator. A simple procedure reduces handling and storage of hydrogen cylinders for laboratory applications. In such a system, we are producing deuterium gas from heavy water by electrolysis method. After production of the deuterium gas, we have checked the purity level of the outgoing deuterium from the electrolyser. The test was carried out in a high vacuum system in which one residual gas analyser (RGA) was mounted. The deuterium gas was inserted by one manual gas leak valve in to the vacuum system. In this study, the effect of the emission current of the RGA on the detection of the deuterium was performed. In this paper, we will discuss the detail analysis of the deuterium gas and the effect of the emission current on the partial pressure measurement.

  2. Catalytic combustion of residual fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulzan, D. L.; Tacina, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    A noble metal catalytic reactor was tested using two grades of petroleum derived residual fuels at specified inlet air temperatures, pressures, and reference velocities. Combustion efficiencies greater than 99.5 percent were obtained. Steady state operation of the catalytic reactor required inlet air temperatures of at least 800 K. At lower inlet air temperatures, upstream burning in the premixing zone occurred which was probably caused by fuel deposition and accumulation on the premixing zone walls. Increasing the inlet air temperature prevented this occurrence. Both residual fuels contained about 0.5 percent nitrogen by weight. NO sub x emissions ranged from 50 to 110 ppm by volume at 15 percent excess O2. Conversion of fuel-bound nitrogen to NO sub x ranged from 25 to 50 percent.

  3. Pesticidal residues in animal tissues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeWitt, J.B.; Menzie, C.M.; Adomaitis, V.A.; Reichel, W.L.

    1960-01-01

    Tests with penned starlings, rats, pheasants, and ducks indicated that each species differs in sensitivity to the various pesticides. Residues in tissues are proportional to the degree of exposure during area treatment and they are also found in animals shot six or more months after treatment. The presence of more than 20-30 ppm of DDT, 20 ppm of chlordan, and 6-20 ppm of heptachlor epoxide in quail tissues indicated that the birds had ingested lethal dosages of the pesticides.

  4. Calcination/dissolution residue treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.C.; Creed, R.F.; Patello, G.K.; Hollenberg, G.W.; Buehler, M.F.; O`Rourke, S.M.; Visnapuu, A.; McLaughlin, D.F.

    1994-09-01

    Currently, high-level wastes are stored underground in steel-lined tanks at the Hanford site. Current plans call for the chemical pretreatment of these wastes before their immobilization in stable glass waste forms. One candidate pretreatment approach, calcination/dissolution, performs an alkaline fusion of the waste and creates a high-level/low-level partition based on the aqueous solubilities of the components of the product calcine. Literature and laboratory studies were conducted with the goal of finding a residue treatment technology that would decrease the quantity of high-level waste glass required following calcination/dissolution waste processing. Four elements, Fe, Ni, Bi, and U, postulated to be present in the high-level residue fraction were identified as being key to the quantity of high-level glass formed. Laboratory tests of the candidate technologies with simulant high-level residues showed reductive roasting followed by carbonyl volatilization to be successful in removing Fe, Ni, and Bi. Subsequent bench-scale tests on residues from calcination/dissolution processing of genuine Hanford Site tank waste showed Fe was separated with radioelement decontamination factors of 70 to 1,000 times with respect to total alpha activity. Thermodynamic analyses of the calcination of five typical Hanford Site tank waste compositions also were performed. The analyses showed sodium hydroxide to be the sole molten component in the waste calcine and emphasized the requirement for waste blending if fluid calcines are to be achieved. Other calcine phases identified in the thermodynamic analysis indicate the significant thermal reconstitution accomplished in calcination.

  5. Residue management at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect

    Olencz, J.

    1995-12-31

    Past plutonium production and manufacturing operations conducted at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) produced a variety of plutonium-contaminated by-product materials. Residues are a category of these materials and were categorized as {open_quotes}materials in-process{close_quotes} to be recovered due to their inherent plutonium concentrations. In 1989 all RFETS plutonium production and manufacturing operations were curtailed. This report describes the management of plutonium bearing liquid and solid wastes.

  6. Residue gasification tests at TVA

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, D.

    1984-11-01

    The Texaco gasification process was identified as an attractive way to utilise vacuum bottoms from the Exxon Donor Solvent liquefaction process to generate synthesis gas. This gas can then be upgraded to produce the hydrogen required by the EDS plant. Gasification tests were carried out at TVA's 200 t/day Muscle Shoals plant and are reported here. As a result, Texaco expects that a plant could be designed to handle EDS residue from any high-rank coal.

  7. Strategies for preserving residual renal function in peritoneal dialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Nongnuch, Arkom; Assanatham, Montira; Panorchan, Kwanpeemai; Davenport, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Although there have been many advancements in the treatment of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) over the last 50 years, in terms of reducing cardiovascular risk, mortality remains unacceptably high, particularly for those patients who progress to stage 5 CKD and initiate dialysis (CKD5d). As mortality risk increases exponentially with progressive CKD stage, the question arises as to whether preservation of residual renal function once dialysis has been initiated can reduce mortality risk. Observational studies to date have reported an association between even small amounts of residual renal function and improved patient survival and quality of life. Dialysis therapies predominantly provide clearance for small water-soluble solutes, volume and acid-base control, but cannot reproduce the metabolic functions of the kidney. As such, protein-bound solutes, advanced glycosylation end-products, middle molecules and other azotaemic toxins accumulate over time in the anuric CKD5d patient. Apart from avoiding potential nephrotoxic insults, observational and interventional trials have suggested that a number of interventions and treatments may potentially reduce the progression of earlier stages of CKD, including targeted blood pressure control, reducing proteinuria and dietary intervention using combinations of protein restriction with keto acid supplementation. However, many interventions which have been proven to be effective in the general population have not been equally effective in the CKD5d patient, and so the question arises as to whether these treatment options are equally applicable to CKD5d patients. As strategies to help preserve residual renal function in CKD5d patients are not well established, we have reviewed the evidence for preserving or losing residual renal function in peritoneal dialysis patients, as urine collections are routinely collected, whereas few centres regularly collect urine from haemodialysis patients, and haemodialysis dialysis

  8. Geotechnical characteristics of residual soils

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, F.C.

    1985-01-01

    Residual soils are products of chemical weathering and thus their characteristics are dependent upon environmental factors of climate, parent material, topography and drainage, and age. These conditions are optimized in the tropics where well-drained regions produce reddish lateritic soils rich in iron and aluminum sesquioxides and kaolinitic clays. Conversely, poorly drained areas tend towards montmorillonitic expansive black clays. Andosols develop over volcanic ash and rock regions and are rich in allophane (amorphous silica) and metastable halloysite. The geological origins greatly affect the resulting engineering characteristics. Both lateritic soils and andosols are susceptible to property changes upon drying, and exhibit compaction and strength properties not indicative of their classification limits. Both soils have been used successfully in earth dam construction, but attention must be given to seepage control through the weathered rock. Conversely, black soils are unpopular for embankments. Lateritic soils respond to cement stabilization and, in some cases, lime stabilization. Andosols should also respond to lime treatment and cement treatments if proper mixing can be achieved. Black expansive residual soils respond to lime treatment by demonstrating strength gains and decreased expansiveness. Rainfall induced landslides are typical of residual soil deposits.

  9. Evaluation of residue drum storage safety risks

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, W.V.

    1994-06-17

    A study was conducted to determine if any potential safety problems exist in the residue drum backlog at the Rocky Flats Plant. Plutonium residues stored in 55-gallon drums were packaged for short-term storage until the residues could be processed for plutonium recovery. These residues have now been determined by the Department of Energy to be waste materials, and the residues will remain in storage until plans for disposal of the material can be developed. The packaging configurations which were safe for short-term storage may not be safe for long-term storage. Interviews with Rocky Flats personnel involved with packaging the residues reveal that more than one packaging configuration was used for some of the residues. A tabulation of packaging configurations was developed based on the information obtained from the interviews. A number of potential safety problems were identified during this study, including hydrogen generation from some residues and residue packaging materials, contamination containment loss, metal residue packaging container corrosion, and pyrophoric plutonium compound formation. Risk factors were developed for evaluating the risk potential of the various residue categories, and the residues in storage at Rocky Flats were ranked by risk potential. Preliminary drum head space gas sampling studies have demonstrated the potential for formation of flammable hydrogen-oxygen mixtures in some residue drums.

  10. Residual flexibility test method for verification of constrained structural models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Admire, John R.; Tinker, Michael L.; Ivey, Edward W.

    1994-01-01

    A method is described for deriving constrained modes and frequencies from a reduced model based on a subset of the free-free modes plus the residual effects of neglected modes. The method involves a simple modification of the MacNeal and Rubin component mode representation to allow development of a verified constrained (fixed-base) structural model. Results for two spaceflight structures having translational boundary degrees of freedom show quick convergence of constrained modes using a measureable number of free-free modes plus the boundary partition of the residual flexibility matrix. This paper presents the free-free residual flexibility approach as an alternative test/analysis method when fixed-base testing proves impractical.

  11. HYVAHL-SOLVAHL -- Key processes for upgrading of residues

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, M.E.; Stephens, G. ); Billon, A.; Hennico, A.; Peries, J.P. )

    1994-01-01

    Increasingly severe restrictions for sulfur in gasoline as well as the need to upgrade heavier crudes, provides for increasing interest in FCC pretreatment of residues. Direct hydrotreating of atmospheric topped residue for resid FCC conversion brings gasoline sulfur levels into compliance under many feed situations considered, improves gasoline yields and reduces the amount of SO[sub x] to be removed from fuel gases. A commercial atmospheric residue treater based on the HYVAHL-F[reg sign] process has begun operation at the Total Petroleum, Inc., refinery in Ardmore, Oklahoma. For vacuum topped crudes, a combination of the HYVAHL-F[reg sign] process and SOLVAHL[reg sign], a solvent deasphalting technology, produce products meeting the required specifications with improved yields of lighter products. The processes, HYVAHL-F[reg sign] and SOLVAHL[reg sign], are discussed as well as the new HYVAHL-F[reg sign] plant in Oklahoma.

  12. STUDY TO IDENTIFY IMPORTANT PARAMETERS FOR CHARACTERIZING PESTICIDE RESIDUE TRANSFER EFFICIENCIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    To reduce the uncertainty associated with current estimates of children's exposure to pesticides by dermal contact and non-dietary ingestion, residue transfer data are required. Prior to conducting exhaustive studies, a screening study to identify the important parameters for...

  13. PESTICIDE RESIDUE RECOVERIES FROM SURFACE WIPES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure is a consequence of pesticide use indoors with a primary source resulting from residue deposition on household surfaces. Accurate measurements of surface residues is essential for estimating exposure from different routes. Various procedures have been developed ...

  14. 48 CFR 970.5001 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Residual powers. 970.5001 Section 970.5001 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY....5001 Residual powers....

  15. 48 CFR 250.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Residual powers. 250.104 Section 250.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT... Contractual Actions 250.104 Residual powers....

  16. 48 CFR 970.5001 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Residual powers. 970.5001 Section 970.5001 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY....5001 Residual powers....

  17. 48 CFR 250.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Residual powers. 250.104 Section 250.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT... Contractual Actions 250.104 Residual powers....

  18. 48 CFR 970.5001 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Residual powers. 970.5001 Section 970.5001 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY....5001 Residual powers....

  19. 48 CFR 1850.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Residual powers. 1850.104 Section 1850.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION... 1850.104 Residual powers....

  20. 48 CFR 1850.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Residual powers. 1850.104 Section 1850.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION... 1850.104 Residual powers....

  1. 48 CFR 1850.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Residual powers. 1850.104 Section 1850.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION... 1850.104 Residual powers....

  2. 48 CFR 250.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Residual powers. 250.104 Section 250.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT... Contractual Actions 250.104 Residual powers....

  3. 48 CFR 970.5001 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Residual powers. 970.5001 Section 970.5001 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY....5001 Residual powers....

  4. 48 CFR 250.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Residual powers. 250.104 Section 250.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT... Contractual Actions 250.104 Residual powers....

  5. 48 CFR 970.5001 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Residual powers. 970.5001 Section 970.5001 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY....5001 Residual powers....

  6. 48 CFR 250.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Residual powers. 250.104 Section 250.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT... Contractual Actions 250.104 Residual powers....

  7. Perchlorate Reductase Is Distinguished by Active Site Aromatic Gate Residues.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Maglaqui, Adrian P; Gau-Pan, Phonchien S; Redford, Steven A; Wong, Alan; Tainer, John A; Coates, John D

    2016-04-22

    Perchlorate is an important ion on both Earth and Mars. Perchlorate reductase (PcrAB), a specialized member of the dimethylsulfoxide reductase superfamily, catalyzes the first step of microbial perchlorate respiration, but little is known about the biochemistry, specificity, structure, and mechanism of PcrAB. Here we characterize the biophysics and phylogeny of this enzyme and report the 1.86-Å resolution PcrAB complex crystal structure. Biochemical analysis revealed a relatively high perchlorate affinity (Km = 6 μm) and a characteristic substrate inhibition compared with the highly similar respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI, which has a relatively much lower affinity for perchlorate (Km = 1.1 mm) and no substrate inhibition. Structural analysis of oxidized and reduced PcrAB with and without the substrate analog SeO3 (2-) bound to the active site identified key residues in the positively charged and funnel-shaped substrate access tunnel that gated substrate entrance and product release while trapping transiently produced chlorate. The structures suggest gating was associated with shifts of a Phe residue between open and closed conformations plus an Asp residue carboxylate shift between monodentate and bidentate coordination to the active site molybdenum atom. Taken together, structural and mutational analyses of gate residues suggest key roles of these gate residues for substrate entrance and product release. Our combined results provide the first detailed structural insight into the mechanism of biological perchlorate reduction, a critical component of the chlorine redox cycle on Earth.

  8. Significant residual fluorinated alcohols present in various fluorinated materials.

    PubMed

    Dinglasan-Panlilio, Mary Joyce A; Mabury, Scott A

    2006-03-01

    Polyfluorinated telomer alcohols and sulfonamides are classes of compounds recently identified as precursor molecules to the perfluorinated acids detected in the environment. Despite the detection and quantification of these volatile compounds in the atmosphere, their sources remain unknown. Both classes of compounds are used in the synthesis of various fluorosurfactants and incorporated in polymeric materials used extensively in the carpet, textile, and paper industries. This study has identified the presence of residual unbound fluoro telomer alcohols (FTOHs) in varying chain lengths (C6-C14) in several commercially available and industrially applied polymeric and surfactant materials. NMeFOSE, a perfluoroalkyl sulfonamido alcohol, was also detected in a commercially available carpet protector product. A method was developed to remove these residual compounds from polymeric and surfactant materials by dispersion in water and stripping of the volatiles using a constant flow of air and trapping on XAD resin. Using gas chromatography mass spectrometry analysis, it was determined that the fluorinated materials examined consist of 0.04-3.8% residual alcohols on a fluoro alcohol to dry mass basis. These values indicate that residual alcohols, left unreacted and unbound from the manufacturing process of fluorinated polymers and surfactants, could be a significant source of the polyfluorinated telomer alcohols and sulfonamides released into the environment. This study suggests that elimination or reduction of these residual alcohols from all marketed fluorinated polymers and fluorosurfactants is key in reducing the prevalence of perfluorinated acids formed in the environment.

  9. Perchlorate Reductase Is Distinguished by Active Site Aromatic Gate Residues.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Maglaqui, Adrian P; Gau-Pan, Phonchien S; Redford, Steven A; Wong, Alan; Tainer, John A; Coates, John D

    2016-04-22

    Perchlorate is an important ion on both Earth and Mars. Perchlorate reductase (PcrAB), a specialized member of the dimethylsulfoxide reductase superfamily, catalyzes the first step of microbial perchlorate respiration, but little is known about the biochemistry, specificity, structure, and mechanism of PcrAB. Here we characterize the biophysics and phylogeny of this enzyme and report the 1.86-Å resolution PcrAB complex crystal structure. Biochemical analysis revealed a relatively high perchlorate affinity (Km = 6 μm) and a characteristic substrate inhibition compared with the highly similar respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI, which has a relatively much lower affinity for perchlorate (Km = 1.1 mm) and no substrate inhibition. Structural analysis of oxidized and reduced PcrAB with and without the substrate analog SeO3 (2-) bound to the active site identified key residues in the positively charged and funnel-shaped substrate access tunnel that gated substrate entrance and product release while trapping transiently produced chlorate. The structures suggest gating was associated with shifts of a Phe residue between open and closed conformations plus an Asp residue carboxylate shift between monodentate and bidentate coordination to the active site molybdenum atom. Taken together, structural and mutational analyses of gate residues suggest key roles of these gate residues for substrate entrance and product release. Our combined results provide the first detailed structural insight into the mechanism of biological perchlorate reduction, a critical component of the chlorine redox cycle on Earth. PMID:26940877

  10. A Multi-Factor Analysis of Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Jared Abodeely; David Muth; Paul Adler; Eleanor Campbell; Kenneth Mark Bryden

    2012-10-01

    Agricultural residues have significant potential as a near term source of cellulosic biomass for bioenergy production, but sustainable removal of agricultural residues requires consideration of the critical roles that residues play in the agronomic system. Previous work has developed an integrated model to evaluate sustainable agricultural residue removal potential considering soil erosion, soil organic carbon, greenhouse gas emission, and long-term yield impacts of residue removal practices. The integrated model couples the environmental process models WEPS, RUSLE2, SCI, and DAYCENT. This study uses the integrated model to investigate the impact of interval removal practices in Boone County, Iowa, US. Residue removal of 4.5 Mg/ha was performed annually, bi-annually, and tri-annually and were compared to no residue removal. The study is performed at the soil type scale using a national soil survey database assuming a continuous corn rotation with reduced tillage. Results are aggregated across soil types to provide county level estimates of soil organic carbon changes and individual soil type soil organic matter content if interval residue removal were implemented. Results show interval residue removal is possible while improving soil organic matter. Implementation of interval removal practices provide greater increases in soil organic matter while still providing substantial residue for bioenergy production.

  11. The effectiveness of the head-turn-plus-chin-down maneuver for eliminating vallecular residue.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Ahmed; Peladeau-Pigeon, Melanie; Valenzano, Teresa Josephine; Namasivayam, Ashwini Marini; Steele, Catriona Margaret

    2016-04-01

    Purpose When swallowing efficiency is impaired, residue accumulates in the pharynx. Cued or spontaneous swallows in the head neutral position do not always successfully clear residue. We investigated the impact of a novel maneuver on residue clearance by combining a head turn with the chin down posture. Methods Data were collected from 26 participants who demonstrated persistent vallecular residue after an initial head neutral clearance swallow in videofluoroscopy. Participants were cued to perform a head-turn-plus-chin-down swallow, with the direction of head turn randomized. Pixel-based measures of residue in the vallecular space before and after the maneuver were made on still frame lateral images using ImageJ software. Measures of % full and the Normalized Residue Ratio Scale (NRRS) were extracted. Univariate analyses of variance were used to detect significant reductions in residue. Results On average, pre-maneuver measures showed residue filling 56-73% of the valleculae, depending on stimulus consistency (NRRS scores: 0.2-0.4). More than 80% of pre-swallow measures displayed NRRS ratios > 0.06, a threshold previously linked to increased risk of post-swallow aspiration. Conclusion The head-turn-plus-chin-down maneuver achieved significant reductions in residue for thin and nectar-thick fluids, suggesting that this maneuver can be effective in reducing persistent vallecular residue with these consistencies. PMID:27191873

  12. [Oxytetracycline and oxolinic acid residues in kuruma prawn (Penaeus japonicus) and the effect of cooking procedures on the residues].

    PubMed

    Uno, Kazuaki

    2002-04-01

    Tissue distribution and residue depletion of oxytetracycline (OTC) and oxolinic acid (OA) were studied in the kuruma prawn (Penaeus japonicus). The prawn were kept in tanks with recirculated artificial seawater at a salinity of 22-23@1000. The water temperature was maintained at 25 degrees C. The average body weight was 22.9 +/- 4.9 g for OTC and 22.5 +/- 3.6 g for OA. The drug was mixed with the diet and orally administered through a catheter to the prawn. The doses of OTC and OA, respectively, were 50 mg/kg body weight. At each sample time, four prawns were sacrificed and tissues were sampled. OTC and OA levels were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. At the highest levels, the concentrations of OTC were in the other: shell (13.57 micrograms/g) > hemolymph (12.20 micrograms/mL) > muscle (8.30 micrograms/g). For OA, the order was: shell (20.74 micrograms/g) > hemolymph (7.06 micrograms/mL) > muscle (2.05 micrograms/g). The elimination half-lives of hemolymph and muscle were 44.7 and 46.8 hours for OTC and 55.0 and 107.9 hours for OA, respectively. Residual OTC could not be detected in hemolymph and muscle at 20 days after dosing. Residual OA disappeared from hemolymph and muscle at 25 days after dosing. A 25-day period for OTC and 30-day period for OA could be regarded as the proper withdrawal time established for kuruma prawn by the Pharmaceutical Law in Japan. However, the elimination half-lives of shell for OTC and OA could not be calculated because both drug residues persisted in shell tissues, and the elimination phase was not completed during the experimental period. Residual OTC (14.10 +/- 2.26 micrograms/g, n = 6) and OA (0.32 +/- 0.06 microgram/g, n = 7) were detected in exuviae at 3 days and 4 days after dosing, respectively. Residual OTC was reduced to 50-70% in muscle by the usual methods of cooking (boiling, baking at 200 degrees C and frying at 180 degrees C), whereas reduction levels in shell were only 20-30%. Residual OA was

  13. Escherichia coli Common Pilus (ECP) Targets Arabinosyl Residues in Plant Cell Walls to Mediate Adhesion to Fresh Produce Plants*

    PubMed Central

    Rossez, Yannick; Holmes, Ashleigh; Lodberg-Pedersen, Henriette; Birse, Louise; Marshall, Jacqueline; Willats, William G. T.; Toth, Ian K.; Holden, Nicola J.

    2014-01-01

    Outbreaks of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli are often associated with fresh produce. However, the molecular basis to adherence is unknown beyond ionic lipid-flagellum interactions in plant cell membranes. We demonstrate that arabinans present in different constituents of plant cell walls are targeted for adherence by E. coli common pilus (ECP; or meningitis-associated and temperature-regulated (Mat) fimbriae) for E. coli serotypes O157:H7 and O18:K1:H7. l-Arabinose is a common constituent of plant cell wall that is rarely found in other organisms, whereas ECP is widespread in E. coli and other environmental enteric species. ECP bound to oligosaccharides of at least arabinotriose or longer in a glycan array, plant cell wall pectic polysaccharides, and plant glycoproteins. Recognition overlapped with the antibody LM13, which binds arabinanase-sensitive pectic epitopes, and showed a preferential affinity for (1→5)-α-linked l-arabinosyl residues and longer chains of arabinan as demonstrated with the use of arabinan-degrading enzymes. Functional adherence in planta was mediated by the adhesin EcpD in combination with the structural subunit, EcpA, and expression was demonstrated with an ecpR–GFP fusion and ECP antibodies. Spinach was found to be enriched for ECP/LM13 targets compared with lettuce. Specific recognition of arabinosyl residues may help explain the persistence of E. coli in the wider environment and association of verotoxigenic E. coli with some fresh produce plants by exploitation of a glycan found only in plant, not animal, cells. PMID:25320086

  14. Escherichia coli common pilus (ECP) targets arabinosyl residues in plant cell walls to mediate adhesion to fresh produce plants.

    PubMed

    Rossez, Yannick; Holmes, Ashleigh; Lodberg-Pedersen, Henriette; Birse, Louise; Marshall, Jacqueline; Willats, William G T; Toth, Ian K; Holden, Nicola J

    2014-12-01

    Outbreaks of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli are often associated with fresh produce. However, the molecular basis to adherence is unknown beyond ionic lipid-flagellum interactions in plant cell membranes. We demonstrate that arabinans present in different constituents of plant cell walls are targeted for adherence by E. coli common pilus (ECP; or meningitis-associated and temperature-regulated (Mat) fimbriae) for E. coli serotypes O157:H7 and O18:K1:H7. l-Arabinose is a common constituent of plant cell wall that is rarely found in other organisms, whereas ECP is widespread in E. coli and other environmental enteric species. ECP bound to oligosaccharides of at least arabinotriose or longer in a glycan array, plant cell wall pectic polysaccharides, and plant glycoproteins. Recognition overlapped with the antibody LM13, which binds arabinanase-sensitive pectic epitopes, and showed a preferential affinity for (1→5)-α-linked l-arabinosyl residues and longer chains of arabinan as demonstrated with the use of arabinan-degrading enzymes. Functional adherence in planta was mediated by the adhesin EcpD in combination with the structural subunit, EcpA, and expression was demonstrated with an ecpR-GFP fusion and ECP antibodies. Spinach was found to be enriched for ECP/LM13 targets compared with lettuce. Specific recognition of arabinosyl residues may help explain the persistence of E. coli in the wider environment and association of verotoxigenic E. coli with some fresh produce plants by exploitation of a glycan found only in plant, not animal, cells.

  15. 48 CFR 50.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Residual powers. 50.104... EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 50.104 Residual powers. This section prescribes standards and procedures for exercising residual powers under Pub. L....

  16. 9 CFR 311.39 - Biological residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Biological residues. 311.39 Section... Biological residues. Carcasses, organs, or other parts of carcasses of livestock shall be condemned if it is determined that they are adulterated because of the presence of any biological residues....

  17. 9 CFR 311.39 - Biological residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Biological residues. 311.39 Section... Biological residues. Carcasses, organs, or other parts of carcasses of livestock shall be condemned if it is determined that they are adulterated because of the presence of any biological residues....

  18. 9 CFR 311.39 - Biological residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Biological residues. 311.39 Section... Biological residues. Carcasses, organs, or other parts of carcasses of livestock shall be condemned if it is determined that they are adulterated because of the presence of any biological residues....

  19. 9 CFR 311.39 - Biological residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Biological residues. 311.39 Section... Biological residues. Carcasses, organs, or other parts of carcasses of livestock shall be condemned if it is determined that they are adulterated because of the presence of any biological residues....

  20. 48 CFR 50.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Residual powers. 50.104... EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 50.104 Residual powers. This section prescribes standards and procedures for exercising residual powers under Pub. L....

  1. 48 CFR 50.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Residual powers. 50.104... EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 50.104 Residual powers. This section prescribes standards and procedures for exercising residual powers under Pub. L....

  2. 48 CFR 50.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Residual powers. 50.104... EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 50.104 Residual powers. This section prescribes standards and procedures for exercising residual powers under Pub. L....

  3. 48 CFR 50.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Residual powers. 50.104... EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 50.104 Residual powers. This section prescribes standards and procedures for exercising residual powers under Pub. L....

  4. Chlorpyrifos residual behaviors in field crops and transfers during duck pellet feed processing.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Wei, Wei; He, Liang; Hao, Lili; Ji, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Yu; Wang, Qiang

    2014-10-22

    Chlorpyrifos is a widely used organophosphorus pesticide in agricultural crops (including food) and animal feeds in China, resulting in heavy contamination. Many studies have focused on the food-processing effects on chlorpyrifos removal, but sufficient information is not observed for feed-processing steps. Here, chlorpyrifos residual behaviors in field crops and its transfers in duck pellet feed-processing steps were evaluated. In field trials, the highest residues for rice grain, shelled corn, and soybean seed were 12.0, 0.605, and 0.220 mg/kg, respectively. Residues of all rice grain and about half of shelled corn exceeded the maximum residue limits (MRLs) of China, and five soybean seeds exceeded the MRL of China. Chlorpyrifos residue was reduced 38.2% in brown rice after the raw rice grain was hulled. The residue in bran increased 71.2% after milling from brown rice. During the squashing step, the residue reduced 73.8% in soybean meal. The residues reduced significantly (23.7-36.8%) during the process of granulating for rice, maize, and soybean products. Comparatively, the grinding process showed only limited influence on chlorpyrifos removal (<10%). The residues of duck pellet feeds produced from highly contaminated raw materials of this study were 1.01 mg/kg (maize-soybean feed) and 3.20 mg/kg (rice-soybean feed), which were much higher than the generally accepted value (>0.1 mg/kg) for animal feeding. Chlorpyrifos residues were removed significantly by processing steps of pellet feeds, but the residue of raw materials was the determining factor for the safety of duck feeding. PMID:25310710

  5. Process to recycle shredder residue

    DOEpatents

    Jody, Bassam J.; Daniels, Edward J.; Bonsignore, Patrick V.

    2001-01-01

    A system and process for recycling shredder residue, in which separating any polyurethane foam materials are first separated. Then separate a fines fraction of less than about 1/4 inch leaving a plastics-rich fraction. Thereafter, the plastics rich fraction is sequentially contacted with a series of solvents beginning with one or more of hexane or an alcohol to remove automotive fluids; acetone to remove ABS; one or more of EDC, THF or a ketone having a boiling point of not greater than about 125.degree. C. to remove PVC; and one or more of xylene or toluene to remove polypropylene and polyethylene. The solvents are recovered and recycled.

  6. Automating a residual gas analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrie, W. F.; Westfall, A. H.

    1982-01-01

    A residual gas analyzer (RGA), a device for measuring the amounts and species of various gases present in a vacuum system is discussed. In a recent update of the RGA, it was shown that the use of microprocessors could revolutionize data acquisition and data reduction. This revolution is exemplified by the Inficon 1Q200 RGA which was selected to meet the needs of this update. The Inficon RGA and the Zilog microcomputer were interfaced in order the receive and format the digital data from the RGA. This automated approach is discussed in detail.

  7. Fiber-optic polymer residue monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeifer, K.B.; Jarecki, R.L. Jr.; Dalton, T.J.

    1998-10-01

    Semiconductor processing tools that use a plasma to etch polysilicon or oxides produce residue polymers that build up on the exposed surfaces of the processing chamber. These residues are generally stressed and with time can cause flaking onto wafers resulting in yield loss. Currently, residue buildup is not monitored, and chambers are cleaned at regular intervals resulting in excess downtime for the tool. In addition, knowledge of the residue buildup rate and index of refraction is useful in determining the state of health of the chamber process. The authors have developed a novel optical fiber-based robust sensor that allows measurement of the residue polymer buildup while not affecting the plasma process.

  8. Managing residual limb hyperhidrosis in wounded warriors.

    PubMed

    Pace, Sarah; Kentosh, Joshua

    2016-06-01

    Residual limb dermatologic problems are a common concern among young active traumatic amputee patients who strive to maintain an active lifestyle. Hyperhidrosis of residual limbs is a recognized inciting factor that often contributes to residual limb dermatoses and is driven by the design of the prosthetic liner covering the residual limb. Treatment of hyperhidrosis in this population presents a unique challenge. Several accepted treatments of hyperhidrosis can offer some relief but have been limited by lack of results or side-effect profiles. Microwave thermal ablation has presented an enticing potential for residual limb hyperhidrosis. PMID:27416083

  9. 40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bromide ion and residual bromine... Tolerances § 180.519 Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues. (a) General. The food additives, bromide ion and residual bromine, may be present in water, potable in accordance with...

  10. 40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bromide ion and residual bromine... Tolerances § 180.519 Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues. (a) General. The food additives, bromide ion and residual bromine, may be present in water, potable in accordance with...

  11. 40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bromide ion and residual bromine... Tolerances § 180.519 Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues. (a) General. The food additives, bromide ion and residual bromine, may be present in water, potable in accordance with...

  12. 40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bromide ion and residual bromine... Tolerances § 180.519 Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues. (a) General. The food additives, bromide ion and residual bromine, may be present in water, potable in accordance with...

  13. Inhibited Release of Mobile Contaminants from Hanford Tank Residual Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Heald, Steve M.; Arey, Bruce W.; Lindberg, Michael J.

    2011-03-03

    Investigations of contaminant release from Hanford Site tank residual waste have indicated that in some cases certain contaminants of interest (Tc and Cr) exhibit inhibited release. The percentage of Tc that dissolved from residual waste from tanks 241-C-103, 241-C-106, 241-C-202, and 241-C-203 ranged from approximately 6% to 10%. The percent leachable Cr from residual waste from tanks C-103, C 202, and C-203 ranged from approximately 1.1% to 44%. Solid phase characterization results indicate that the recalcitrant forms of these contaminants are associated with iron oxides. X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis of Tc and Cr in residual waste indicates that these contaminants occur in Fe oxide particles as their lower, less soluble oxidation states [Tc(IV) and Cr(III)]. The form of these contaminants is likely as oxides or hydroxides incorporated within the structure of the Fe oxide. Leaching behavior of U from tank residual waste was studied using deionized water, and CaCO3 and Ca(OH)2 saturated solutions as leachants. The release behavior of U from tank residual waste is complex. Initial U concentrations in water and CaCO3 leachants are high due to residual amounts of the highly soluble U mineral cejkaite. As leaching and dilution occur NaUO2PO4 {center_dot} xH2O, Na2U2O7(am) and schoepite (or a similar phase) become the solubility controlling phases for U. In the case of the Ca(OH)2 leachant, U release from tank residual waste is dramatically reduced. Thermodynamic modeling indicates that the solubility of CaUO4(c) controls release of U from residual waste in the Ca(OH)2 leachants. It is assumed the solubility controlling phase is actually a hydrated version of CaUO4 with a variable water content ranging from CaUO4 to CaUO4 {center_dot} (H2O). The critically reviewed value for CaUO4(c) (log KSP0 = 15.94) produced good agreement with our experimental data for the Ca(OH)2 leachates.

  14. RESIDUAL STRESSES IN 3013 CONTAINERS

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.; Dunn, K.

    2009-11-10

    The DOE Complex is packaging plutonium-bearing materials for storage and eventual disposition or disposal. The materials are handled according to the DOE-STD-3013 which outlines general requirements for stabilization, packaging and long-term storage. The storage vessels for the plutonium-bearing materials are termed 3013 containers. Stress corrosion cracking has been identified as a potential container degradation mode and this work determined that the residual stresses in the containers are sufficient to support such cracking. Sections of the 3013 outer, inner, and convenience containers, in both the as-fabricated condition and the closure welded condition, were evaluated per ASTM standard G-36. The standard requires exposure to a boiling magnesium chloride solution, which is an aggressive testing solution. Tests in a less aggressive 40% calcium chloride solution were also conducted. These tests were used to reveal the relative stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the as fabricated 3013 containers. Significant cracking was observed in all containers in areas near welds and transitions in the container diameter. Stress corrosion cracks developed in both the lid and the body of gas tungsten arc welded and laser closure welded containers. The development of stress corrosion cracks in the as-fabricated and in the closure welded container samples demonstrates that the residual stresses in the 3013 containers are sufficient to support stress corrosion cracking if the environmental conditions inside the containers do not preclude the cracking process.

  15. South Polar Residual Ice Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This mosaic is composed of 18 Viking Orbiter images (6 each in red, green, and violet filters), acquired on September 28, 1977, during revolution 407 of Viking Orbiter 2. The south pole is located just off the lower left edge of the polar cap, and the 0 degree longitude meridian extends toward the top of the mosaic. The large crater near the right edge (named 'South') is about 100 km in diameter. These images were acquired during southern summer on Mars (Ls = 341 degrees); the sub-solar declination was 8 degrees S., and the south polar cap was nearing its final stage of retreat just prior to vernal equinox. The south residual cap is approximately 400 km across, and the exposed surface is thought to consist dominantly of carbon-dioxide frost. This is in contrast to the water-ice surface of the north polar residual cap. It is likely that water ice is present in layers that underlie the south polar cap and that comprise the surrounding layered terrains. Near the top of this image, irregular pits with sharp-rimmed cliffs appear 'etched', presumably by wind. A series of rugged mountains (extending toward the upper right corner of the image) are of unknown origin.

  16. Prediction of residual shear strength of corroded reinforced concrete beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imam, Ashhad; Azad, Abul Kalam

    2016-09-01

    With the aim of providing experimental data on the shear capacity and behavior of corroded reinforced concrete beams that may help in the development of strength prediction models, the test results of 13 corroded and four un-corroded beams are presented. Corrosion damage was induced by accelerated corrosion induction through impressed current. Test results show that loss of shear strength of beams is mostly attributable to two important damage factors namely, the reduction in stirrups area due to corrosion and the corrosion-induced cracking of concrete cover to stirrups. Based on the test data, a method is proposed to predict the residual shear strength of corroded reinforced concrete beams in which residual shear strength is calculated first by using corrosion-reduced steel area alone, and then it is reduced by a proposed reduction factor, which collectively represents all other applicable corrosion damage factors. The method seems to yield results that are in reasonable agreement with the available test data.

  17. Soil nitrous oxide emissions following crop residue addition: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huaihai; Li, Xuechao; Hu, Feng; Shi, Wei

    2013-10-01

    Annual production of crop residues has reached nearly 4 billion metric tons globally. Retention of this large amount of residues on agricultural land can be beneficial to soil C sequestration. Such potential impacts, however, may be offset if residue retention substantially increases soil emissions of N(2)O, a potent greenhouse gas and ozone depletion substance. Residue effects on soil N(2)O emissions have gained considerable attention since early 1990s; yet, it is still a great challenge to predict the magnitude and direction of soil N(2)O emissions following residue amendment. Here, we used a meta-analysis to assess residue impacts on soil N(2)O emissions in relation to soil and residue attributes, i.e., soil pH, soil texture, soil water content, residue C and N input, and residue C : N ratio. Residue effects were negatively associated with C : N ratios, but generally residue amendment could not reduce soil N(2)O emissions, even for C : N ratios well above ca. 30, the threshold for net N immobilization. Residue effects were also comparable to, if not greater than, those of synthetic N fertilizers. In addition, residue effects on soil N(2)O emissions were positively related to the amounts of residue C input as well as residue effects on soil CO(2) respiration. Furthermore, most significant and stimulatory effects occurred at 60-90% soil water-filled pore space and soil pH 7.1-7.8. Stimulatory effects were also present for all soil textures except sand or clay content ≤10%. However, inhibitory effects were found for soils with >90% water-filled pore space. Altogether, our meta-analysis suggests that crop residues played roles beyond N supply for N(2)O production. Perhaps, by stimulating microbial respiration, crop residues enhanced oxygen depletion and therefore promoted anaerobic conditions for denitrification and N(2)O production. Our meta-analysis highlights the necessity to connect the quantity and quality of crop residues with soil properties for predicting

  18. Residual Oxygen on Nb Heated to 500 C

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, R.; King, F.K.; Padamsee, H.; /Cornell U., LEPP

    2005-06-10

    The superconducting accelerating cavities for the International Linear Collider will be constructed of high-residual resistivity ratio (RRR) niobium sheet. Excessive oxygen within the skin depth (several microns) will reduce the RRR and increase resistive losses. We measure the thickness of this oxide layer, following bakeout simulation, to be about 0.5 nm thick. The results suggest that this layer will very slowly disappear from the top five nm at 500 C.

  19. The regulation of flow through residual spray nozzles

    PubMed Central

    Lonergan, Richard P.; Hall, Lawrence B.

    1959-01-01

    Used residual spray nozzles, which have been discarded because of the increase in discharge rates, may be used again if their discharge rates are reduced by a metering orifice placed in the nozzle tip. A suitable orifice in a polyethylene disc is described. On the basis of laboratory test results, such a disc appears to be an inexpensive and satisfactory metering device for use in combination with worn spray nozzles. PMID:14418102

  20. Implication of an unfavorable residue (Thr346) in intrinsic flexibility of firefly luciferase.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Maryam; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Emamzadeh, Rahman

    2012-09-10

    In order to better understand the functional role of an unusual residue (Thr346) of firefly luciferase mutagenesis at this residue was performed. Firefly luciferase, catalyzes the bioluminescence reaction and is an excellent tool as a reporter in nano-system biology studies. Nonetheless, the enzyme rapidly loses its activity at temperatures above 30 °C and this leads to reduced sensitivity and precision in analytical applications. Residue Thr346 in a connecting loop (341-348) of firefly luciferase is located in a disallowed region of Ramachandran plot. In this study, we have substituted this residue (T346) with anomalous dihedral angles with Val, Gly and Pro to clarify the role of this residue in structure and function of the enzyme using site-directed mutagenesis. Substitution of this unfavorable residue (T346) with atypical dihedral angles (ψ, φ) with other residues brought about an increase of thermostability and decrease of specific activity. Structural and functional properties of the mutants were analyzed using different spectroscopic methods. It seems that this residue is a critically conserved residue to support the functional flexibility for a fast kinetic bioluminescence reaction at the expense of lower stability.

  1. The potential of residues of furfural and biogas as calcareous soil amendments for corn seed production.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunchen; Yan, Zhibin; Qin, Jiahai; Ma, Zhijun; Zhang, Youfu; Zhang, Li

    2016-04-01

    Intensive corn seed production in Northwest of China produced large amounts of furfural residues, which represents higher treatment cost and environmental issue. The broad calcareous soils in the Northwest of China exhibit low organic matter content and high pH, which led to lower fertility and lower productivity. Recycling furfural residues as soil organic and nutrient amendment might be a promising agricultural practice to calcareous soils. A 3-year field study was conducted to evaluate the effects of furfural as a soil amendment on corn seed production on calcareous soil with compared to biogas residues. Soil physical-chemical properties, soil enzyme activities, and soil heavy metal concentrations were assessed in the last year after the last application. Corn yield was determined in each year. Furfural residue amendments significantly decreased soil pH and soil bulk density. Furfural residues combined with commercial fertilizers resulted in the greater cumulative on soil organic matter, total phosphorus, available phosphorus, available potassium, and cation exchange capacity than that of biogas residue. Simultaneously, urease, invertase, catalase, and alkaline phosphatase increased even at the higher furfural application rates. Maize seed yield increased even with lower furfural residue application rates. Furfural residues resulted in lower Zn concentration and higher Cd concentration than that of biogas residues. Amendment of furfural residues led to higher soil electrical conductivity (EC) than that of biogas residues. The addition of furfural residues to maize seed production may be considered to be a good strategy for recycling the waste, converting it into a potential resource as organic amendment in arid and semi-arid calcareous soils, and may help to reduce the use of mineral chemical fertilizers in these soils. However, the impact of its application on soil health needs to be established in long-term basis.

  2. The potential of residues of furfural and biogas as calcareous soil amendments for corn seed production.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunchen; Yan, Zhibin; Qin, Jiahai; Ma, Zhijun; Zhang, Youfu; Zhang, Li

    2016-04-01

    Intensive corn seed production in Northwest of China produced large amounts of furfural residues, which represents higher treatment cost and environmental issue. The broad calcareous soils in the Northwest of China exhibit low organic matter content and high pH, which led to lower fertility and lower productivity. Recycling furfural residues as soil organic and nutrient amendment might be a promising agricultural practice to calcareous soils. A 3-year field study was conducted to evaluate the effects of furfural as a soil amendment on corn seed production on calcareous soil with compared to biogas residues. Soil physical-chemical properties, soil enzyme activities, and soil heavy metal concentrations were assessed in the last year after the last application. Corn yield was determined in each year. Furfural residue amendments significantly decreased soil pH and soil bulk density. Furfural residues combined with commercial fertilizers resulted in the greater cumulative on soil organic matter, total phosphorus, available phosphorus, available potassium, and cation exchange capacity than that of biogas residue. Simultaneously, urease, invertase, catalase, and alkaline phosphatase increased even at the higher furfural application rates. Maize seed yield increased even with lower furfural residue application rates. Furfural residues resulted in lower Zn concentration and higher Cd concentration than that of biogas residues. Amendment of furfural residues led to higher soil electrical conductivity (EC) than that of biogas residues. The addition of furfural residues to maize seed production may be considered to be a good strategy for recycling the waste, converting it into a potential resource as organic amendment in arid and semi-arid calcareous soils, and may help to reduce the use of mineral chemical fertilizers in these soils. However, the impact of its application on soil health needs to be established in long-term basis. PMID:26606935

  3. Residue levels of five grain-storage-use insecticides during the production process of sorghum distilled spirits.

    PubMed

    Han, Yongtao; Huang, Baoyong; Liu, Shaowen; Zou, Nan; Yang, Juan; Zhong, Zezhi; Zhang, Xuesong; Song, Le; Qin, Yuhong; Pan, Canping

    2016-09-01

    Residue levels of dichlorvos, fenitrothion, pirimiphos-methyl, malathion and deltamethrin during sorghum distilled spirits production were examined. The analytical method for these pesticides in sorghum, fermented sorghum, rice hull and distilled spirits was validated through linearity, matrix effect, accuracy and precision, limit of quantification (LOQ) and limit of detection (LOD) parameters. The pesticide residue levels before/after each process of soaking, steaming, fermentation, and distillation were determined by gas chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). Results showed that soaking process could obviously reduce dichlorvos residue with 87% decrease as its high vapor pressure. The steaming process reduced pesticide residues by 42-83% mainly due to evaporation or thermal degradation. Also, the fermentation could remove pesticide residues by 40-63% in favor of biological degradation. Moreover, the distillation process was proved to be effective for decreasing the pesticide residues in distilled spirits with the processing factors lower than other processes for each pesticide.

  4. Detecting ketamine in beverage residues: Application in date rape detection.

    PubMed

    Albright, Jessica A; Stevens, Sarah A; Beussman, Douglas J

    2012-05-01

    Ketamine can be used to facilitate date-rape when unknowingly spiked into a victim's beverage. If a biological sample is not available from the victim, the beverage container might be the only remaining source of forensic evidence. We present a rapid, simple analysis method for the detection of ketamine in wet or dry beverage residues based on liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Wet residues consist of the final few drops (<1 ml) in a container while dry residues are the remains once all liquid has evaporated. By using LC-MS, which readily handles aqueous samples, often no derivatization or sample extraction is needed, thus reducing analysis time and lab technician involvement. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) provides an enhancement in both selectivity and sensitivity. We have studied a range of beverages and determined limits of detection between 1.2 × 10-3 and 1.3 × 10-4 mg/ml, compared to 0.21-0.85 mg/ml used in most date-rape scenarios. This paper represents the first published report of using LC-MS/MS for the analysis of beverage residues for the presence of a date-rape drug. This method could replace the current gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) methods and provide a faster, more selective method for the analysis of date-rape drugs, requiring virtually no sample preparation. PMID:22114065

  5. Microwave calcination for plutonium immobilization and residue stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, M.J.; Rising, T.L.; Roushey, W.J.; Sprenger, G.S.

    1995-12-01

    In the late 1980`s development was begun on a process using microwave energy to vitrify low level mixed waste sludge and transuranic mixed waste sludge generated in Building 374 at Rocky Flats. This process was shown to produce a dense, highly durable waste form. With the cessation of weapons production at Rocky Flats, the emphasis has changed from treatment of low level and TRU wastes to stabilizaiton of plutonium oxide and residues. This equipment is versatile and can be used as a heat source to calcine, react or vitrify many types of residues and oxides. It has natural economies in that it heats only the material to be treated, significantly reducing cycle times over conventional furnaces. It is inexpensive to operate in that most of the working components remain outside of any necessary contamination enclosure and therefore can easily be maintained. Limited testing has been successfully performed on cerium oxide (as a surrogate for plutonium oxide), surrogate electrorefining salts, surrogate residue sludge and residue ash. Future plans also include tests on ion exchange resins. In an attempt to further the usefullness of this technology, a mobile, self-contained microwave melting system is currently under development and expected to be operational at Rocky Flats Enviromental Technology Site by the 4th quarter of FY96.

  6. Modeling the oxidation of methionine residues by peroxides in proteins.

    PubMed

    Chennamsetty, Naresh; Quan, Yong; Nashine, Vishal; Sadineni, Vikram; Lyngberg, Olav; Krystek, Stanley

    2015-04-01

    We report the use of molecular modeling to predict the oxidation propensity of methionine residues in proteins. Oxidation of methionine to the sulfoxide form is one of the major degradation pathways for therapeutic proteins. Oxidation can occur during production, formulation, or storage of pharmaceuticals and it often reduces or eliminates biological activity. We use a molecular model based on atomistic simulations called 2-shell water coordination number to predict the oxidation rates for several model proteins and therapeutic candidates. In addition, we implement models that are based on static and simulation average of the solvent-accessible area (SAA) for either the side chain or the sulfur atom in the methionine residue. We then compare the results from the different models against the experimentally measured relative rates of methionine oxidation. We find that both the 2-shell model and the simulation-averaged SAA models are accurate in predicting the oxidation propensity of methionine residues for the proteins tested. We also find the appropriate parameter ranges where the models are most accurate. These models have significant predictive power and can be used to enable further protein engineering or to guide formulation approaches in stabilizing the unstable methionine residues.

  7. Seawater neutralization of alkaline bauxite residue and implications for revegetation.

    PubMed

    Menzies, N W; Fulton, I M; Morrell, W J

    2004-01-01

    Reaction of bauxite residue with seawater results in neutralization of alkalinity through precipitation of Mg-, Ca-, and Al-hydroxide and carbonate minerals. In batch studies, the initial pH neutralization reaction was rapid (<5 min), with further reaction continuing to reduce pH for several weeks. Reaction with seawater produced a residue pH of 8 to 8.5. Laboratory leaching column studies were undertaken to provide information on seawater neutralization of the coarse-textured fraction of the waste, residue sand (RS), under conditions comparable with those that might be applied in the field. An 0.80-m-deep column of RS was neutralized by the application of the equivalent of 2-m depth of seawater. In addition to lowering the pH and Na content of the residue, seawater neutralization resulted in the addition of substantial amounts of the plant nutrients Ca, Mg, and K to the profile. Similar results were also obtained from a field-scale assessment of neutralization. However, the accumulation of precipitate, consisting of hydrotalcite, aragonite, and pyroaurite, in the drainage system may preclude the use of in situ seawater neutralization as a routine rehabilitation practice. Following seawater neutralization, RS remains too saline to support plant growth and would require fresh water leaching before revegetation. PMID:15356249

  8. Dicofol residues in eggs and carcasses of captive American kestrels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiemeyer, Stanley N.; Clark, D.R.; Spann, J.W.; Belisle, A.A.; Bunck, C.M.

    2001-01-01

    American kestrels (Falco sparverius) were fed diets containing 0 (control), 1, 3, 10, and 30 ?g/g (wet wt) of Kelthane?. Residues of dicofol and its metabolites were then analyzed in the eggs and carcasses of females. Significant differences occurred among treatments for residues of both p,p'-dicofol and p,p'-dechlorodicofol (DCD) in both eggs and carcasses and for p,p'-dicholorbenzophenone (DCBP) in eggs. Residue concentrations increased with increasing treatment exposure. Residues of p,p'-dicofol, p,p'-DCD, and p,p'-DCBP in eggs were significantly correlated with eggshell quality parameters. Significant correlations also occurred among contaminants in eggs and for individual contaminants between eggs and carcasses. The lowest-observed-dietary-effect concentration for eggshell thinning was 3 ?g/g, whereas 1 ?g/g may be considered to be near a no-observable-adverse-effect concentration. Concentrations of dicofol in potential prey items and eggs of wild birds generally have been lower than dietary-effect concentrations or concentrations in tissues or eggs associated with eggshell thinning and reduced reproductive success.

  9. Studies Of Residual Flexibility And Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Admire, John R.; Tinker, Michael L.; Bookout, Paul S.; Ivey, Edward W.

    1995-01-01

    Collection of reports presents theoretical and experimental studies in which concept of residual flexibility applied to modal vibration testing and verification of mathematical models of vibrations of flexible structure constrained by another structure. "Residual flexibility" denotes that part of interface flexibility due to mode shapes out of frequency range of test. Studies directed toward assessing residual-flexibility approach as substitute for fixed-base vibrational testing of payloads installed in spacecraft.

  10. Residual stresses in polymer matrix composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, H. T.

    1976-01-01

    Residual stresses in composites are induced during fabrication and by environmental exposure. The theory formulated can describe the shrinkage commonly observed after a thermal expansion test. Comparison between the analysis and experimental data for laminates of various material systems indicates that the residual stress-free temperature can be lower than the curing temperature, depending on the curing process. Effects of residual stresses on ply failure including the acoustic emission characteristics are discussed.

  11. Use of MRF residue as alternative fuel in cement production.

    PubMed

    Fyffe, John R; Breckel, Alex C; Townsend, Aaron K; Webber, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    that using MRF residue to produce SRF for use in cement kilns is likely an advantageous alternative to disposal of the residue in landfills. The use of SRF can offset fossil fuel use, reduce CO2 emissions, and divert energy-dense materials away from landfills. For this test-case, the use of SRF offset between 7700 and 8700 Mg of coal use, reduced CO2 emissions by at least 1.4%, and diverted over 7950 Mg of energy-dense materials away from landfills. In addition, emissions were reduced by at least 19% for SO2, while NOX emissions increased by between 16% and 24%. Changes in emissions of particulate matter, mercury, hydrogen chloride, and total-hydrocarbons were all less than plus or minus 2.2%, however these emissions were not measured at the cement kiln. Co-location of MRFs, SRF production facilities, and landfills can increase the benefits of SRF use even further by reducing transportation requirements.

  12. Use of MRF residue as alternative fuel in cement production.

    PubMed

    Fyffe, John R; Breckel, Alex C; Townsend, Aaron K; Webber, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    that using MRF residue to produce SRF for use in cement kilns is likely an advantageous alternative to disposal of the residue in landfills. The use of SRF can offset fossil fuel use, reduce CO2 emissions, and divert energy-dense materials away from landfills. For this test-case, the use of SRF offset between 7700 and 8700 Mg of coal use, reduced CO2 emissions by at least 1.4%, and diverted over 7950 Mg of energy-dense materials away from landfills. In addition, emissions were reduced by at least 19% for SO2, while NOX emissions increased by between 16% and 24%. Changes in emissions of particulate matter, mercury, hydrogen chloride, and total-hydrocarbons were all less than plus or minus 2.2%, however these emissions were not measured at the cement kiln. Co-location of MRFs, SRF production facilities, and landfills can increase the benefits of SRF use even further by reducing transportation requirements. PMID:26187294

  13. Methods of separating particulate residue streams

    DOEpatents

    Hoskinson, Reed L.; Kenney, Kevin L.; Wright, Christopher T.; Hess, J. Richard

    2011-04-05

    A particulate residue separator and a method for separating a particulate residue stream may include an air plenum borne by a harvesting device, and have a first, intake end and a second, exhaust end; first and second particulate residue air streams that are formed by the harvesting device and that travel, at least in part, along the air plenum and in a direction of the second, exhaust end; and a baffle assembly that is located in partially occluding relation relative to the air plenum and that substantially separates the first and second particulate residue air streams.

  14. Air pollution control residues from waste incineration: current UK situation and assessment of alternative technologies.

    PubMed

    Rani, D Amutha; Boccaccini, A R; Deegan, D; Cheeseman, C R

    2008-11-01

    Current disposal options for APC residues in the UK and alternative treatment technologies developed world-wide have been reviewed. APC residues are currently landfilled in the UK where they undergo in situ solidification, although the future acceptability of this option is uncertain because the EU waste acceptance criteria (WAC) introduce strict limits on leaching that are difficult to achieve. Other APC residue treatment processes have been developed which are reported to reduce leaching to below relevant regulatory limits. The Ferrox process, the VKI process, the WES-PHix process, stabilisation/solidification using cementitious binders and a range of thermal treatment processes are reviewed. Thermal treatment technologies convert APC residues combined with other wastes into inert glass or glass-ceramics that encapsulate heavy metals. The waste management industry will inevitably use the cheapest available option for treating APC residues and strict interpretation and enforcement of waste legislation is required if new, potentially more sustainable technologies are to become commercially viable.

  15. Analytical Method for Reduction of Residual Stress Using Low Frequency and Ultrasonic Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Shigeru; Kurita, Katsumi; Koshimizu, Shigeomi; Nishimura, Tadashi; Hiroi, Tetsumaro; Hirai, Seiji

    Welding is widely used for construction of many structures. It is well known that residual stress is generated near the bead because of locally given heat. Tensile residual stress on the surface degrades fatigue strength. On the other hand, welding is used for repair of mold and die. In this case, reduction of residual stress is required because of protection from crack of welded part in mold and die. In this paper, a new method for reduction of residual stress of welded joint is proposed for repair welding of mold and die. In this method, low frequency and ultrasonic vibrations are used during welding. Thick plates are used as specimens of mold and die. Residual stresses are reduced when low frequency and ultrasonic vibrations are used during welding. Experimental results are examined by simulation method using an analytical model. One mass model considering plastic deformation is used as an analytical model. Experimental results are demonstrated by simulation method.

  16. Bioethanol production from rice straw residues

    PubMed Central

    Belal, Elsayed B.

    2013-01-01

    A rice straw - cellulose utilizing mold was isolated from rotted rice straw residues. The efficient rice straw degrading microorganism was identified as Trichoderma reesei. The results showed that different carbon sources in liquid culture such as rice straw, carboxymethyl cellulose, filter paper, sugar cane bagasse, cotton stalk and banana stalk induced T. reesei cellulase production whereas glucose or Potato Dextrose repressed the synthesis of cellulase. T. reesei cellulase was produced by the solid state culture on rice straw medium. The optimal pH and temperature for T. reesei cellulase production were 6 and 25 °C, respectively. Rice straw exhibited different susceptibilities towards cellulase to their conversion to reducing sugars. The present study showed also that, the general trend of rice straw bioconversion with cellulase was more than the general trend by T. reesei. This enzyme effectively led to enzymatic conversion of acid, alkali and ultrasonic pretreated cellulose from rice straw into glucose, followed by fermentation into ethanol. The combined method of acid pretreatment with ultrasound and subsequent enzyme treatment resulted the highest conversion of lignocellulose in rice straw to sugar and consequently, highest ethanol concentration after 7 days fermentation with S. cerevisae yeast. The ethanol yield in this study was about 10 and 11 g.L−1. PMID:24159309

  17. Partitioning Residue-derived and Residue-induced Emissions of N2O Using 15N-labelled Crop Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, R. E.; Carverhill, J.; Lemke, R.; Knight, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Estimates of N2O emissions in Canada indicate that 17% of all agriculture-based emissions are associated with the decomposition of crop residues. However, research specific to the western Canadian prairies (including Saskatchewan) has shown that the N2O emission factor for N sources in this region typically ranges between 0.2 and 0.6%, which is well below the current IPCC default emission factor of 1.0%. Thus, it stands to reason that emissions from crop residues should also be lower than those calculated using the current IPCC emission factor. Current data indicates that residue decomposition, N mineralization and N2O production are affected by a number of factors such as C:N ratio and chemical composition of the residue, soil type, and soil water content; thus, a bench-scale incubation study was conducted to examine the effects of soil type and water content on N2O emissions associated with the decomposition of different crop residues. The study was carried out using soils from the Black, Dark Brown, Brown, and Gray soil zones and was conducted at both 50% and 70% water-filled pore space (WFPS); the soils were amended with 15N-labeled residues of wheat, pea, canola, and flax, or with an equivalent amount of 15N-labeled urea; 15N2O production was monitored using a Picarro G5101-i isotopic N2O analyzer. Crop residue additions to the soils resulted in both direct and indirect emissions of N2O, with residue derived emissions (RDE; measured as 15N2O) generally exceeding residue-induced emissions (RIE) at 50% WFPS—with RDEs ranging from 42% to 88% (mean = 58%) of the total N2O. Conversely, at 70% WFPS, RDEs were generally lower than RIEs—ranging from 21% to 83% (mean = 48%). Whereas both water content and soil type had an impact on N2O production, there was a clear and consistent trend in the emission factors for the residues; i.e., emissions were always greatest for the canola residue and lowest for the wheat residue and urea fertilizer; and intermediate for pea

  18. Effects of crop residue returning on nitrous oxide emissions in agricultural soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Jun; Yan, Xiaoyuan

    2013-06-01

    Crop residue returning is a common practice in agricultural system that consequently influences nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. Much attention has been focused on the effects of crop residue on N2O release. However, no systematic result has yet been drawn because environmental factors among different studies vary. A meta-analysis was described to integrate 112 scientific assessments of crop residue returning on N2O emissions in this study. Results showed that crop residue returning, when averaged across all studies, had no statistically significant effect on N2O release compared with control treatments. However, the range of effects of crop residue returning on N2O emission was significantly affected by synthetic nitrogen (N) fertilizer application, type of crop residue, specific manner in which crop residue has returned, and type of land-use. N2O release was significantly inhibited by 11.7% and 27.1% (P < 0.05) when crop residue was with synthetic N fertilizer and when type of land-use was paddy, respectively. While N2O emissions were significantly enhanced by 42.1% and 23.5% (P < 0.05) when crop residue was applied alone and when type of land-use was upland, respectively. N2O emissions were likewise increased when crop residue with lower C/N ratio was used, mulching of crop residue was performed, and type of land-use was fallow. Our study provides the first quantitative analysis of crop residue returning on N2O emissions, indicating that crop residue returning has no statistically significant effect on N2O release at regional scale, and underlining that the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change guidelines should take the opposite effects of crop residue returning on upland and paddy into account when estimating the N2O emission factor of crop residue for different land-use types. Given that most of data are dominated by certain types of crop residue and specific application methods, more field data are required to reduce uncertainty.

  19. Effect of fruit and vegetable processing on reduction of synthetic pyrethroid residues.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Reena; Kumari, Beena; Rana, M K

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we emphasize that the advantages associated with applying pesticides to enhance agricultural productivity must be weighed against the possible health hazards arising from the appearance of toxic pesticide residues in food. First and foremost, pesticides should be handled and applied in compliance with good agricultural practices to minimize environmental or food commodity contamination.In developing countries, good agricultural practices are not fully abided by.When vegetables are produced in such countries, pesticides are applied or prospectively applied at each growth stage of the crop. Hence, contamination of vegetables and other food commodities occur. It is well known that processing of food derived from pesticide treated crop commodities can serve to reduce residues that reach consumers. Food safety can therefore partially be enhanced by employing suitable food processing techniques and appropriate storage periods, even in developing countries. Even common and simple household processing techniques for certain foods acquire significance as means to reduce the intake of harmful pesticide food residues.Pesticide residue levels in post-harvest raw agricultural commodities (RAC) are affected by the storage, handling and the processing steps they pass through, while being prepared for human consumption. The review of cogent literature presented in this article demonstrated differences among the pyrethroid insecticide residues present on or in foods, depending on how the RAC from which they came were processed for consumption. Peeling vegetables or fruit reduced pyrethroid residues the most (60-100% ), and juicing was nearly as effective in reducing residues (70-100% ). The least reduction occurred for foodstuffs that were only washed with tap water (I 0-70% ). Washing RACs with saline water and detergent was more effective(34-60%) in reducing residues than was simple washing under tap water. Freezing is also effective in reducing residue levels and

  20. Effect of fruit and vegetable processing on reduction of synthetic pyrethroid residues.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Reena; Kumari, Beena; Rana, M K

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we emphasize that the advantages associated with applying pesticides to enhance agricultural productivity must be weighed against the possible health hazards arising from the appearance of toxic pesticide residues in food. First and foremost, pesticides should be handled and applied in compliance with good agricultural practices to minimize environmental or food commodity contamination.In developing countries, good agricultural practices are not fully abided by.When vegetables are produced in such countries, pesticides are applied or prospectively applied at each growth stage of the crop. Hence, contamination of vegetables and other food commodities occur. It is well known that processing of food derived from pesticide treated crop commodities can serve to reduce residues that reach consumers. Food safety can therefore partially be enhanced by employing suitable food processing techniques and appropriate storage periods, even in developing countries. Even common and simple household processing techniques for certain foods acquire significance as means to reduce the intake of harmful pesticide food residues.Pesticide residue levels in post-harvest raw agricultural commodities (RAC) are affected by the storage, handling and the processing steps they pass through, while being prepared for human consumption. The review of cogent literature presented in this article demonstrated differences among the pyrethroid insecticide residues present on or in foods, depending on how the RAC from which they came were processed for consumption. Peeling vegetables or fruit reduced pyrethroid residues the most (60-100% ), and juicing was nearly as effective in reducing residues (70-100% ). The least reduction occurred for foodstuffs that were only washed with tap water (I 0-70% ). Washing RACs with saline water and detergent was more effective(34-60%) in reducing residues than was simple washing under tap water. Freezing is also effective in reducing residue levels and

  1. A Benchmark Study on Casting Residual Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Eric M.; Watkins, Thomas R; Schmidlin, Joshua E; Dutler, S. A.

    2012-01-01

    Stringent regulatory requirements, such as Tier IV norms, have pushed the cast iron for automotive applications to its limit. The castings need to be designed with closer tolerances by incorporating hitherto unknowns, such as residual stresses arising due to thermal gradients, phase and microstructural changes during solidification phenomenon. Residual stresses were earlier neglected in the casting designs by incorporating large factors of safety. Experimental measurement of residual stress in a casting through neutron or X-ray diffraction, sectioning or hole drilling, magnetic, electric or photoelastic measurements is very difficult and time consuming exercise. A detailed multi-physics model, incorporating thermo-mechanical and phase transformation phenomenon, provides an attractive alternative to assess the residual stresses generated during casting. However, before relying on the simulation methodology, it is important to rigorously validate the prediction capability by comparing it to experimental measurements. In the present work, a benchmark study was undertaken for casting residual stress measurements through neutron diffraction, which was subsequently used to validate the accuracy of simulation prediction. The stress lattice specimen geometry was designed such that subsequent castings would generate adequate residual stresses during solidification and cooling, without any cracks. The residual stresses in the cast specimen were measured using neutron diffraction. Considering the difficulty in accessing the neutron diffraction facility, these measurements can be considered as benchmark for casting simulation validations. Simulations were performed using the identical specimen geometry and casting conditions for predictions of residual stresses. The simulation predictions were found to agree well with the experimentally measured residual stresses. The experimentally validated model can be subsequently used to predict residual stresses in different cast

  2. Gunshot residue preservation in seawater.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Anne-Christine; Hoogewerff, Jurian; Athens, Josie; Obertova, Zuzana; Duncan, Warwick; Waddell, Neil; Kieser, Jules

    2015-08-01

    Little is known about the persistence of gunshot residue (GSR) in soft tissue and bones during decomposition in marine environments. For a better understanding, qualitative and quantitative data were obtained on GSR retention on soft tissue and bony gunshot wounds (GSWs). A quantity of 36 fleshed and 36 defleshed bovine ribs were shot at contact range with 0.22 calibre hollow point ammunition using a Stirling 0.22 calibre long rifle. Bone specimens in triplicate were placed in three environments: submerged, intertidal and in supralittoral zone. Sets of triplicates were recovered on day 3, 10, 24 and 38, and analysed with scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX), and inductive coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The SEM-EDX recorded GSR-indicative particles surrounding the bullet entrance on all bone types (fleshed and defleshed) in all environments throughout the study. GSR-unique particles were only detected on the supralittoral bones. The ICP-MS analysis showed faster GSR loss on submerged than intertidal and supralittoral defleshed specimens. Fleshed specimens showed a faster GSR loss on intertidal than submerged and supralittoral specimens. In conclusion, the GSR disappeared faster from submerged and intertidal than non-submerged specimens. The difference of detection of GSR between analysed specimens (defleshed versus fleshed) disappeared upon defleshing. This study highlights the potential of finding evidence of GSR in a submerged body and the potential of microscopic and analytical methods for examining suspected GSW in highly decomposed bodies in marine habitats.

  3. Thermal Insulation from Hardwood Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sable, I.; Grinfelds, U.; Vikele, L.; Rozenberga, L.; Zeps, M.; Luguza, S.

    2015-11-01

    Adequate heat is one of the prerequisites for human wellbeing; therefore, building insulation is required in places where the outside temperature is not suitable for living. The climate change, with its rising temperatures and longer dry periods, promotes enlargement of the regions with conditions more convenient for hardwood species than for softwood species. Birch (Betula pendula) is the most common hardwood species in Latvia. The aim of this work was to obtain birch fibres from wood residues of plywood production and to form low-density thermal insulation boards. Board formation and production was done in the presence of water; natural binder, fire retardant and fungicide were added in different concentrations. Board properties such as density, transportability or resistance to particulate loss, thermal conductivity and reaction to fire were investigated. This study included thermal insulation boards with the density of 102-120 kg/m3; a strong correlation between density and the binder amount was found. Transportability also improved with the addition of a binder, and 0.1-0.5% of the binder was the most appropriate amount for this purpose. The measured thermal conductivity was in the range of 0.040-0.043 W/(m·K). Fire resistance increased with adding the fire retardant. We concluded that birch fibres are applicable for thermal insulation board production, and it is possible to diversify board properties, changing the amount of different additives.

  4. Catalyst deactivation in residue hydrocracking

    SciTech Connect

    Oballa, M.C.; Wong, C.; Krzywicki, A.

    1994-12-31

    The existence of a computer-controlled bench scale hydrocracking units at the authors site has made cheaper the non-stop running of experiments for long periods of time. It was, therefore possible to show, at minimal costs, when three hydrocracking catalysts in service reach their maximum lifetime. Different parameters which are helpful for catalyst life and activity predictions were calculated, e.g., relative catalyst age and the effectiveness factor. Experimental results compared well with model, giving them the minimum and maximum catalyst lifetime, as well as the deactivation profile with regard to sulfur and metals removal. Reaction rate constants for demetallization and desulfurization were also determined. Six commercial catalysts were evaluated at short term runs and the three most active were used for long term runs. Out of three catalysts tested for deactivation at long term runs, it was possible to choose one whose useful life was higher than the others. All runs were carried out in a Robinson-Mahoney continuous flow stirred tank reactor, using 50/50 volumetric mixture of Cold Lake/Lloydminster atmospheric residue and NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst.

  5. Combining biophysical and bioinformatical approaches for predicting residue's contacts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexov, Emil; Allardice, Amber; Kundrotas, Petras

    2006-03-01

    One of the most important task of the post genomics era is to utilize the enormous sequence information delivered from the genomes and to predict 3D structure of proteins. The quality of the predicted structure depends on many factors including the improvement made in ab initio, threading and homology modeling methods. Here we combine the method of correlated mutations with biophysical restrains in order to predict residue's contacts from amino acids sequence alone. The parameters of the protocol were optimized against a set of 21 proteins with known high resolution 3D structures. The effects of the degree of residue conservation, sequence similarity among the sequences within the multiple sequence alignment and conservation coefficient of two amino acids positions were studied. It was shown that the prediction accuracy of the method of correlated mutations alone is pure, on average only 10% of the contacts are predicted correctly. However, adding biophysical filters greatly improves the accuracy of the predictions. Thus, implying pairing rules for charged, polar and hydrophobic residues significantly reduces the total number of the predictions, e.g. reduces the coverage, however, most of the rejected predictions are false positives. As result, the relative rate of the correct predictions increases.

  6. Characterization Report on Sand, Slag, and Crucible Residues and on Fluoride Residues

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, A.M.

    1999-02-10

    This paper reports on the chemical characterization of the sand, slag, and crucible (SS and C) residues and the fluoride residues that may be shipped from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) to Savannah River Site (SRS).

  7. Use of Combined Uncertainty of Pesticide Residue Results for Testing Compliance with Maximum Residue Limits (MRLs).

    PubMed

    Farkas, Zsuzsa; Slate, Andrew; Whitaker, Thomas B; Suszter, Gabriella; Ambrus, Árpád

    2015-05-13

    The uncertainty of pesticide residue levels in crops due to sampling, estimated for 106 individual crops and 24 crop groups from residue data obtained from supervised trials, was adjusted with a factor of 1.3 to accommodate the larger variability of residues under normal field conditions. Further adjustment may be necessary in the case of mixed lots. The combined uncertainty of residue data including the contribution of sampling is used for calculation of an action limit, which should not be exceeded when compliance with maximum residue limits is certified as part of premarketing self-control programs. On the contrary, for testing compliance of marketed commodities the residues measured in composite samples should be greater than or equal to the decision limit calculated only from the combined uncertainty of the laboratory phase of the residue determination. The options of minimizing the combined uncertainty of measured residues are discussed. The principles described are also applicable to other chemical contaminants. PMID:25658668

  8. Influence of Surface Properties and Impact Conditions on Adhesion of Insect Residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, Christopher J.; Smith, Joseph G.; Connell, John W.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Doss, Jereme R.; Shanahan, Michelle H.; Penner, Ronald K.

    2015-01-01

    Insect residues can cause premature transition to turbulent flow on laminar flow airfoils. Engineered surfaces that mitigate the adhesion of insect residues provide, therefore, a route to more efficient aerodynamics and reduced fuel burn rates. Areal coverage and heights of residues depend not only on surface properties, but also on impact conditions. We report high speed photography of fruit fly impacts at different angles of inclination on a rigid aluminum surface, optical microscopy and profilometry, and contact angle goniometry to support the design of engineered surfaces. For the polyurethane and epoxy coatings studied, some of which exhibited superhydrophobicity, it was determined that impact angle and surface compositions play critical roles in the efficacy of these surfaces to reduce insect residue adhesion.

  9. Effect of Extraction Conditions on the Saccharide (Neutral and Acidic) Composition of the Crude Pectic Extract from Various Agro-Industrial Residues.

    PubMed

    Babbar, Neha; Roy, Sandra Van; Wijnants, Marc; Dejonghe, Winnie; Caligiani, Augusta; Sforza, Stefano; Elst, Kathy

    2016-01-13

    The influence of different extraction methodologies was assessed on the composition of both neutral (arabinose, rhamnose, galactose) and acidic (galacturonic acid) pectic polysaccharides obtained from four agro-industrial residues, namely, berry pomace (BP), onion hulls (OH), pressed pumpkin (PP), and sugar beet pulp (SBP). For acidic pectic polysaccharides, the extraction efficiency was obtained as BP (nitric acid-assisted extraction, 2 h, 62.9%), PP (enzymatic-assisted extraction, 12 h, 75.0%), SBP (enzymatic-assisted extraction, 48 h, 89.8%; and nitric acid-assisted extraction, 4 h, 76.5%), and OH (sodium hexametaphosphate-assisted extraction, 0.5 h, 100%; and ammonium oxalate-assisted extraction, 0.5 h, 100%). For neutral pectic polysaccharides, the following results were achieved: BP (enzymatic-assisted extraction, 24 h, 85.9%), PP (nitric acid-assisted extraction, 6 h, 82.2%), and SBP (enzymatic assisted extraction, 48 h, 97.5%; and nitric acid-assisted extraction, 4 h, 83.2%). On the basis of the high recovery of pectic sugars, SBP and OH are interesting candidates for the further purification of pectin and production of pectin-derived products.

  10. Saccharification of pumpkin residues by coculturing of Trichoderma reesei RUT-C30 and Phanerochaete chrysosporium Burdsall with delayed inoculation timing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Meng, Demei; Hu, Xiaosong; Ni, Yuanying; Li, Quanhong

    2013-09-25

    Trichoderma reesei and Phanerochaete chrysosporium with different lignocellulose-degrading enzyme systems have received much attention due to their ability to biodegrade lignocellulosic biomass. However, the synergistic effect of the two fungi on lignocellulose degradation is unknown. Herein, a cocultivation of T. reesei RUT-C30 and P. chrysosporium Burdsall for biodegradation of lignocellulosic pumpkin residues (PRS) was developed to produce soluble saccharide. Results indicated that a cocultivation of the two fungi with P. chrysosporium Burdsall inoculation delayed for 1.5 days produced the highest saccharide yield of 53.08% (w/w), and only 20.83% (w/w) of PRS were left after one batch of fermentation. In addition, this strategy increased the activities of secreted cellulases (endoglucanase, cellobiohydrolase, and β-glucosidase) and ligninases (lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase), which correlated to the increased saccharide yield. Besides, the resulting monosaccharides including glucose (1.23 mg/mL), xylose (0.13 mg/mL), arabinose (0.46 mg/mL), and fructose (0.21 mg/mL) from cocultures exhibited much higher yields than those from monoculture, which provides basal information for further fermentation research. This bioconversion of PRS into soluble sugars by cocultured fungal species provides a low cost method based on lignocellulose for potential biofuels or other bioproduct production. PMID:24020787

  11. Saccharification of pumpkin residues by coculturing of Trichoderma reesei RUT-C30 and Phanerochaete chrysosporium Burdsall with delayed inoculation timing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Meng, Demei; Hu, Xiaosong; Ni, Yuanying; Li, Quanhong

    2013-09-25

    Trichoderma reesei and Phanerochaete chrysosporium with different lignocellulose-degrading enzyme systems have received much attention due to their ability to biodegrade lignocellulosic biomass. However, the synergistic effect of the two fungi on lignocellulose degradation is unknown. Herein, a cocultivation of T. reesei RUT-C30 and P. chrysosporium Burdsall for biodegradation of lignocellulosic pumpkin residues (PRS) was developed to produce soluble saccharide. Results indicated that a cocultivation of the two fungi with P. chrysosporium Burdsall inoculation delayed for 1.5 days produced the highest saccharide yield of 53.08% (w/w), and only 20.83% (w/w) of PRS were left after one batch of fermentation. In addition, this strategy increased the activities of secreted cellulases (endoglucanase, cellobiohydrolase, and β-glucosidase) and ligninases (lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase), which correlated to the increased saccharide yield. Besides, the resulting monosaccharides including glucose (1.23 mg/mL), xylose (0.13 mg/mL), arabinose (0.46 mg/mL), and fructose (0.21 mg/mL) from cocultures exhibited much higher yields than those from monoculture, which provides basal information for further fermentation research. This bioconversion of PRS into soluble sugars by cocultured fungal species provides a low cost method based on lignocellulose for potential biofuels or other bioproduct production.

  12. High residue amounts of kaolin further increase photosynthesis and fruit color in 'Empire' apple

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Kaolin (Surround WP, NovaSource, Phoenix, AZ, USA) is commonly used to reduce sunburn damage in fruit crops and to reduce heat stress on foliage. It is typically applied at rates of 3% to 6%, resulting in leaf and fruit residue levels of 1-3 g/m2. Crop modeling of the effect of kaolin on leaf/cano...

  13. Residual occurrence and energy property of proteins in HNP model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhou-Ting; Dou, Wen-Hui; Shen, Yu; Sun, Ting-Ting; Xu, Peng

    2015-11-01

    Four categories of globular proteins, including all-α, all-β, α + β, and α/β types, are simplified as the off-lattice HNP model involving the secondary-structural information of each protein. The propensity of three types of residues, i.e., H, N, and P to form a secondary structure is investigated based on 146 protein samples. We find that P residues are easy to form α-helices, whereas H residues have a higher tendency to construct β-sheets. The statistical analysis also indicates that the occurrence of P residues is invariably higher than that of H residues, which is independent of protein category. Changes in bond- and non-bonded potential energies of all protein samples under a wide temperature range are presented by coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The simulation results clearly show a linear relationship between the bond-stretching/bending potential energy and the reduced temperature. The bond-torsional and non-bonded potential energies show distinct transitions with temperature. The bond-torsional energy increases to the maximum and then decreases with the increase of temperature, which is opposite to the change in non-bonded potential energy. The transition temperature of non-bonded potential energy is independent of the protein category, while that of bond-torsional energy is closely related to the protein secondary structure, i.e., α-helix or β-sheet. The quantitatively bonded- and semi-quantitatively non-bonded potential energy of 24 α + β and 23 α/β protein samples are successfully predicted according to the statistical results obtained from MD simulations. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21204078, 11304282, and 11202201) and the Natural Science Foundation of Zhejiang Province, China (Grant No. LY12B04003).

  14. Thermal Stability of Residual Stresses in Ti-6Al-4V components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanojevic, A.; Angerer, P.; Oberwinkler, B.

    2016-03-01

    The need for light weight design while maintaining a high safety is essential for many components, especially in the aircraft industry. Therefore, it's important to consider every aspect to reduce weight, improve fatigue life and maintain safety of crucial components. Residual stresses are a major factor which can positively influence components and fulfil all three requirements. However, due to the inconstancy of the behaviour of residual stresses during the life time of a component, residual stresses are often neglected. If the behaviour of residual stresses could be described reliably over the entire life time of a component, residual stresses could be taken into account and components could be optimized even further. Mechanical and thermal loads are the main reason for relaxation of residual stresses. This work covers the thermal stability of residual stresses in Ti-6Al-4V components. Therefore, exposure tests at raised temperatures were performed on specimens with different surface conditions. Residual stresses were measured by x-ray diffraction before and after testing. Creep tests were also carried out to describe the creep behaviour and thereby the ability for residual stress relaxation. A correlation between the creep rate and amount of relaxed stress was found. The creep behaviour of the material was described by using a combination of the Norton Power law and the Arrhenius equation. The Zener-Wert-Avrami model was used to describe the residual stress relaxation. With these models a satisfying correlation between measured and calculated data was found. Hence, the relaxation of residual stresses due to thermal load was described reliably.

  15. 48 CFR 1450.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Residual powers. 1450.104 Section 1450.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR CONTRACT MANAGEMENT EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 1450.104 Residual powers....

  16. BOOSTER CHLORINATION FOR MANAGING DISINFECTANT RESIDUALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Booster chlorination is an approach to residual maintenance in which chlorine is applied at strategic locations within the distribution system. Situations in which booster chlorination may be most effective for maintaining a residual are explained informally in the context of a ...

  17. Crop Residues: The Rest of the Story

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A recent scientific publication stated that to remove CO2 from the atmosphere, the most permanent and rapid solution would be to sink crop residues to the ocean floor where they would be buried in deep ocean sediments. However, mitigating rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations by removing crop residu...

  18. 40 CFR 240.208 - Residue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Residue. 240.208 Section 240.208 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.208 Residue....

  19. 40 CFR 240.208 - Residue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Residue. 240.208 Section 240.208 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.208 Residue....

  20. 40 CFR 240.208 - Residue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Residue. 240.208 Section 240.208 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.208 Residue....

  1. 40 CFR 240.208 - Residue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Residue. 240.208 Section 240.208 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.208 Residue....

  2. Residuals Management and Water Pollution Control Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Public Affairs.

    This pamphlet addresses the problems associated with residuals and water quality especially as it relates to the National Water Pollution Control Program. The types of residuals and appropriate management systems are discussed. Additionally, one section is devoted to the role of citizen participation in developing management programs. (CS)

  3. Measurment Of Residual Stress In Ferromagnetic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, Min; Yost, William T.; Kushnick, Peter W.; Grainger, John L.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetoacoustic (MAC) and magnetoacoustic emission (MAE) techniques combined to provide complete characterization of residual stresses in ferromagnetic structural materials. Combination of MAC and MAE techniques makes it possible to characterize residual tension and compression without being limited by surface conditions and unavailability of calibration standards. Significant in field of characterization of materials as well as detection of fatigue failure.

  4. THE IMMIGRANT POOR AND THE RESIDUAL POOR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SEGALMAN, RALPH

    AN ANALYSIS OF THE LIVES OF THE POOR IN AMERICA WILL SHOW DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE IMMIGRANT (AND REFUGEE) POOR AND THE RESIDUAL POOR (NEGROES, PUERTO RICANS, LATIN AMERICANS, INDIANS, AND OTHERS). THE IMMIGRANT POOR WERE ACCULTURATED AND ABSORBED INTO THE MAINSTREAM OF AMERICAN LIFE WITHIN THREE GENERATIONS, WHEREAS THE RESIDUAL POOR HAVE BEEN…

  5. 9 CFR 311.39 - Biological residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Biological residues. 311.39 Section 311.39 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... Biological residues. Carcasses, organs, or other parts of carcasses of livestock shall be condemned if it...

  6. Unicystic ameloblastoma arising from a residual cyst

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Amit D; Manjunatha, Bhari Sharanesha; Khurana, Neha M; Shah, Navin

    2014-01-01

    Intraoral swellings involving alveolar ridges in edentulous patients are clinically diagnosed as residual cysts, traumatic bone cysts, Stafne's jaw bone cavity, ameloblastoma and metastatic tumours of the jaw. This case report describes a residual cyst in a 68-year-old edentulous male patient which was enucleated and histopathologically confirmed as a unicystic ameloblastoma. PMID:25199192

  7. 48 CFR 1450.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Residual powers. 1450.104 Section 1450.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR CONTRACT MANAGEMENT EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 1450.104 Residual powers....

  8. 48 CFR 1450.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Residual powers. 1450.104 Section 1450.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR CONTRACT MANAGEMENT EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 1450.104 Residual powers....

  9. 48 CFR 1450.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Residual powers. 1450.104 Section 1450.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR CONTRACT MANAGEMENT EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 1450.104 Residual powers....

  10. 48 CFR 1450.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Residual powers. 1450.104 Section 1450.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR CONTRACT MANAGEMENT EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 1450.104 Residual powers....

  11. Tank 12H residuals sample analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L. N.; Shine, E. P.; Diprete, D. P.; Coleman, C. J.; Hay, M. S.

    2015-06-11

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 12H final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Eleven Tank 12H floor and mound residual material samples and three cooling coil scrape samples were collected and delivered to SRNL between May and August of 2014.

  12. RECOVERY OF URANIUM VALUES FROM RESIDUES

    DOEpatents

    Schaap, W.B.

    1959-08-18

    A process is described for the recovery of uranium from insoluble oxide residues resistant to repeated leaching with mineral acids. The residue is treated with gaseous hydrogen fluoride, then with hydrogen and again with hydrogen fluoride, preferably at 500 to 700 deg C, prior to the mineral acid leaching.

  13. Solidification/stabilisation of air pollution control residues using Portland cement: Physical properties and chloride leaching.

    PubMed

    Lampris, C; Stegemann, J A; Cheeseman, C R

    2009-03-01

    Portland cement (CEMI) was used to solidify air pollution control (APC) residues from an energy-from-waste plant burning municipal solid waste. APC residue/CEMI mixes were prepared with CEMI additions ranging from 0 to 50 weight% (wt%) of total dry mass and water/solids ratios between 0.40 and 0.80. Isothermal conduction calorimetry was used to assess the effect of APC residues on the hydration of CEMI. Although up to 30wt% additions of APC residues accelerated CEMI hydration, the total heat of hydration during the initial 98h was significantly reduced. Higher levels of APC residues severely inhibited CEMI hydration. The consistence, setting time, compressive strength, porosity and chloride leaching characteristics of the solidified products were determined. As might be expected, increasing the CEMI addition and reducing the water content resulted in increased compressive strengths. All mixes achieved compressive strengths greater than 1MPa at 7 and 28days but only 50wt% samples did not show significant strength reduction when tested after immersion in water. Monolithic leaching tests indicated low physical immobilisation of chloride in the CEMI solidified APC residues, with chloride leaching in excess of relevant UK landfill waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The results of this study show that greater than 50% CEMI additions would be required to effectively treat APC residues to meet current WAC limits. PMID:18849156

  14. Residuals and the Residual-Based Statistic for Testing Goodness of Fit of Structural Equation Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foldnes, Njal; Foss, Tron; Olsson, Ulf Henning

    2012-01-01

    The residuals obtained from fitting a structural equation model are crucial ingredients in obtaining chi-square goodness-of-fit statistics for the model. The authors present a didactic discussion of the residuals, obtaining a geometrical interpretation by recognizing the residuals as the result of oblique projections. This sheds light on the…

  15. Presence of metals in biomass residues after pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guehenneux, G.; Varin, S.; Baussand, P.

    2003-05-01

    In contribution to research into renewable energy, pyrolysis tests are run to develop the process of pyrolysis of biomass allowing the production of Hydrogen. Various families of combustibles (oleaginous, lignocellulosics, and seeds) have been tested at different temperatures. The pyrolysis of biomass is hampered by technical problems such as the blockage of the furnace by tars. The residues are collected and treated in a solution of chloric and nitric acid, so that the mineral part is extracted and then analysed by ICP. The first results indicate the presence ofmetals: Ni, Mg, Zn, Mn, Fe... Various proposais for the use of these residues so as to avoid pollution due to their accumulation have been put forward. These ashes can be recombined with fuels, acting as catalysts to reduce the formation of tar and increase the production of hydrogen.

  16. Prediction and Optimization of Residual Stresses on Machined Surface and Sub-Surface in MQL Turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xia; Zou, Pan; Li, Beizhi; Rajora, Manik; Shao, Yamin; Liang, Steven Y.

    Residual stress in the machined surface and subsurface is affected by materials, machining conditions, and tool geometry and can affect the component life and service quality significantly. Empirical or numerical experiments are commonly used for determining residual stresses but these are very expensive. There has been an increase in the utilization of minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) in recent years in order to reduce the cost and tool/part handling efforts, while its effect on machined part residual stress, although important, has not been explored. This paper presents a hybrid neural network that is trained using Simulated Annealing (SA) and Levenberg-Marquardt Algorithm (LM) in order to predict the values of residual stresses in cutting and radial direction on the surface and within the work piece after the MQL face turning process. Once the ANN has successfully been trained, an optimization procedure, using Genetic Algorithm (GA), is applied in order to find the best cutting conditions in order to minimize the surface tensile residual stresses and maximize the compressive residual stresses within the work piece. The optimization results show that the usage of MQL decreases the surface tensile residual stresses and increases the compressive residual stresses within the work piece.

  17. Influence of ion-plasma treatment on residual stress in the microcantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babushkin, A. S.; Uvarov, I. V.; Amirov, I. I.

    2016-08-01

    The influence of ion-plasma treatment on residual stress in the microcantilever is investigated. The ability of treatment with energy below the sputtering threshold to affect the mechanical stress is shown. It is also demonstrated that a preliminary vacuum thermal annealing of samples reduces the influence of ion bombardment on the residual stress. With the increase of the annealing temperature the effect of ion bombardment disappears.

  18. Effect of pretreatment on biomass residue structure and the application of pyrolysed and composted biomass residues in soilless culture.

    PubMed

    Suo, Linna; Sun, Xiangyang; Jiang, Weijie

    2013-01-01

    The changes in the structural characteristics of biomass residues during pyrolysis and composting were investigated. The biomass residues particles were prepared by pyrolysing at temperatures ranging from 350 to 400. For soilless production of the ornamental plant Anthurium andraeanum, pure sphagnum peat moss (P) has traditionally been used as the growing medium. This use of P must be reduced, however, because P is an expensive and nonrenewable resource. The current study investigated the use of biomass residues as substitutes for P in A. andraeanum production. Plants were grown for 15 months in 10 soilless media that contained different proportions of pyrolysed corn cobs (PC), composted corn cobs (C), pyrolysed garden wastes (PG), and P. Although the media altered the plant nutrient content, A. andraeanum growth, development, and yield were similar with media consisting of 50% P+50% PC, 50% P+35% PC+15% PG, and 100% P. This finding indicates that, when pyrolysed, organic wastes, which are otherwise an environmental problem, can be used to reduce the requirement for peat in the soilless culture of A. andraeanum. PMID:23704995

  19. Effect of Pretreatment on Biomass Residue Structure and the Application of Pyrolysed and Composted Biomass Residues in Soilless Culture

    PubMed Central

    Suo, Linna; Sun, Xiangyang; Jiang, Weijie

    2013-01-01

    The changes in the structural characteristics of biomass residues during pyrolysis and composting were investigated. The biomass residues particles were prepared by pyrolysing at temperatures ranging from 350 to 400. For soilless production of the ornamental plant Anthurium andraeanum, pure sphagnum peat moss (P) has traditionally been used as the growing medium. This use of P must be reduced, however, because P is an expensive and nonrenewable resource. The current study investigated the use of biomass residues as substitutes for P in A. andraeanum production. Plants were grown for 15 months in 10 soilless media that contained different proportions of pyrolysed corn cobs (PC), composted corn cobs (C), pyrolysed garden wastes (PG), and P. Although the media altered the plant nutrient content, A. andraeanum growth, development, and yield were similar with media consisting of 50% P+50% PC, 50% P+35% PC+15% PG, and 100% P. This finding indicates that, when pyrolysed, organic wastes, which are otherwise an environmental problem, can be used to reduce the requirement for peat in the soilless culture of A. andraeanum. PMID:23704995

  20. Reduced bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor has a compact structure.

    PubMed

    Amir, D; Haas, E

    1988-12-13

    The conformation of reduced bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (R-BPTI) under reducing conditions was monitored by measurements of nonradiative excitation energy-transfer efficiencies (E) between a donor probe attached to the N-terminal Arg1 residue and an acceptor attached to one of the lysine residues (15, 26, 41, or 46) [Amir, D., & Haas, E. (1987) Biochemistry 26, 2162-2175]. High-excitation energy-transfer efficiencies that approach those found in the native state were obtained for the reduced labeled BPTI derivatives in 0.5 M guanidine hydrochloride (Gdn.HCl) and 4 mM DTT. Unlike the dependence expected for a random coil chain, E does not decrease as a function of the number of residues between the labeled sites. The efficiency of energy transfer between probes attached to residues 1 and 15 in the reduced state is higher than that found for the same pair of sites in the native state or reduced unfolded (in 6 M Gdn.HCl) state. This segment also shows high dynamic flexibility. These results indicate that the overall structure of reduced BPTI under folding (but still reducing) conditions shows a high population of conformers with interprobe distances similar to those of the native state. Reduced BPTI seems to be in a molten globule state characterized by a flexible, compact structure, which probably reorganizes into the native structure when the folding is allowed to proceed under oxidizing conditions. PMID:2466482