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Sample records for reduced scale adaptation

  1. Genome-scale study reveals reduced metabolic adaptability in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Jerby, Livnat; Petäjä, Elina M; Mattila, Ismo; Jäntti, Sirkku; Auvinen, Petri; Gastaldelli, Amalia; Yki-Järvinen, Hannele; Ruppin, Eytan; Orešič, Matej

    2016-02-03

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major risk factor leading to chronic liver disease and type 2 diabetes. Here we chart liver metabolic activity and functionality in NAFLD by integrating global transcriptomic data, from human liver biopsies, and metabolic flux data, measured across the human splanchnic vascular bed, within a genome-scale model of human metabolism. We show that an increased amount of liver fat induces mitochondrial metabolism, lipolysis, glyceroneogenesis and a switch from lactate to glycerol as substrate for gluconeogenesis, indicating an intricate balance of exacerbated opposite metabolic processes in glycemic regulation. These changes were associated with reduced metabolic adaptability on a network level in the sense that liver fat accumulation puts increasing demands on the liver to adaptively regulate metabolic responses to maintain basic liver functions. We propose that failure to meet excessive metabolic challenges coupled with reduced metabolic adaptability may lead to a vicious pathogenic cycle leading to the co-morbidities of NAFLD.

  2. Genome-scale study reveals reduced metabolic adaptability in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Jerby, Livnat; Petäjä, Elina M.; Mattila, Ismo; Jäntti, Sirkku; Auvinen, Petri; Gastaldelli, Amalia; Yki-Järvinen, Hannele; Ruppin, Eytan; Orešič, Matej

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major risk factor leading to chronic liver disease and type 2 diabetes. Here we chart liver metabolic activity and functionality in NAFLD by integrating global transcriptomic data, from human liver biopsies, and metabolic flux data, measured across the human splanchnic vascular bed, within a genome-scale model of human metabolism. We show that an increased amount of liver fat induces mitochondrial metabolism, lipolysis, glyceroneogenesis and a switch from lactate to glycerol as substrate for gluconeogenesis, indicating an intricate balance of exacerbated opposite metabolic processes in glycemic regulation. These changes were associated with reduced metabolic adaptability on a network level in the sense that liver fat accumulation puts increasing demands on the liver to adaptively regulate metabolic responses to maintain basic liver functions. We propose that failure to meet excessive metabolic challenges coupled with reduced metabolic adaptability may lead to a vicious pathogenic cycle leading to the co-morbidities of NAFLD. PMID:26839171

  3. Development of Underwater Laser Scaling Adapter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluss, Kaspars

    2012-12-01

    In this paper the developed laser scaling adapter is presented. The scaling adapter is equipped with a twin laser unit where the two parallel laser beams are projected onto any target giving an exact indication of scale. The body of the laser scaling adapter is made of Teflon, the density of which is approximately two times the water density. The development involved multiple challenges - numerical hydrodynamic calculations for choosing an appropriate shape which would reduce the effects of turbulence, an accurate sealing of the power supply and the laser diodes, and others. The precision is estimated by the partial derivation method. Both experimental and theoretical data conclude the overall precision error to be in the 1% margin. This paper presents the development steps of such an underwater laser scaling adapter for a remotely operated vehicle (ROV).

  4. Balthazar Scales of Adaptive Behavior: II. Scales of Social Adaption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balthazar, Earl E.

    The Balthazar Scales of Adaptive Behavior II (BSAB-II) provides a system for program development and evaluation and for social behavior assessment of profoundly and severely mentally retarded individuals as well as of the younger less retarded and emotionally disturbed individuals. The specimen set consists of six parts: a Manual, a Tally Sheet…

  5. Adaptive h -refinement for reduced-order models: ADAPTIVE h -refinement for reduced-order models

    DOE PAGES

    Carlberg, Kevin T.

    2014-11-05

    Our work presents a method to adaptively refine reduced-order models a posteriori without requiring additional full-order-model solves. The technique is analogous to mesh-adaptive h-refinement: it enriches the reduced-basis space online by ‘splitting’ a given basis vector into several vectors with disjoint support. The splitting scheme is defined by a tree structure constructed offline via recursive k-means clustering of the state variables using snapshot data. This method identifies the vectors to split online using a dual-weighted-residual approach that aims to reduce error in an output quantity of interest. The resulting method generates a hierarchy of subspaces online without requiring large-scale operationsmore » or full-order-model solves. Furthermore, it enables the reduced-order model to satisfy any prescribed error tolerance regardless of its original fidelity, as a completely refined reduced-order model is mathematically equivalent to the original full-order model. Experiments on a parameterized inviscid Burgers equation highlight the ability of the method to capture phenomena (e.g., moving shocks) not contained in the span of the original reduced basis.« less

  6. Neuromuscular Adaptations to Reduced Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the studies done to reduce neuromuscular strength loss during unilateral lower limb suspension (ULLS). Since there are animals that undergo fairly long periods of muscular disuse without any or minimal muscular atrophy, there is an answer to that might be applicable to human in situations that require no muscular use to diminish the effects of muscular atrophy. Three sets of ULLS studies were reviewed indicated that muscle strength decreased more than the muscle mass. The study reviewed exercise countermeasures to combat the atrophy, including: ischemia maintained during Compound muscle action potential (CMAP), ischemia and low load exercise, Japanese kaatsu, and the potential for rehabilitation or situations where heavy loading is undesirable. Two forms of countermeasures to unloading have been successful, (1) high-load resistance training has maintained muscle mass and strength, and low load resistance training with blood flow restriction (LL(sub BFR)). The LL(sub BFR) has been shown to increase muscle mass and strength. There has been significant interest in Tourniquet training. An increase in Growth Hormone(GH) has been noted for LL(sub BFR) exercise. An experimental study with 16 subjects 8 of whom performed ULLS, and 8 of whom performed ULLS and LL(sub BFR) exercise three times per week during the ULLS. Charts show the results of the two groups, showing that performing LL(sub BFR) exercise during 30 days of ULLS can maintain muscle size and strength and even improve muscular endurance.

  7. The Adaptive Multi-scale Simulation Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, William R.

    2015-09-01

    The Adaptive Multi-scale Simulation Infrastructure (AMSI) is a set of libraries and tools developed to support the development, implementation, and execution of general multimodel simulations. Using a minimal set of simulation meta-data AMSI allows for minimally intrusive work to adapt existent single-scale simulations for use in multi-scale simulations. Support for dynamic runtime operations such as single- and multi-scale adaptive properties is a key focus of AMSI. Particular focus has been spent on the development on scale-sensitive load balancing operations to allow single-scale simulations incorporated into a multi-scale simulation using AMSI to use standard load-balancing operations without affecting the integrity of the overall multi-scale simulation.

  8. Multi-scale Adaptive Computational Ghost Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shuai; Liu, Wei-Tao; Lin, Hui-Zu; Zhang, Er-Feng; Liu, Ji-Ying; Li, Quan; Chen, Ping-Xing

    2016-01-01

    In some cases of imaging, wide spatial range and high spatial resolution are both required, which requests high performance of detection devices and huge resource consumption for data processing. We propose and demonstrate a multi-scale adaptive imaging method based on the idea of computational ghost imaging, which can obtain a rough outline of the whole scene with a wide range then accordingly find out the interested parts and achieve high-resolution details of those parts, by controlling the field of view and the transverse coherence width of the pseudo-thermal field illuminated on the scene with a spatial light modulator. Compared to typical ghost imaging, the resource consumption can be dramatically reduced using our scheme. PMID:27841339

  9. Multi-scale Adaptive Computational Ghost Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shuai; Liu, Wei-Tao; Lin, Hui-Zu; Zhang, Er-Feng; Liu, Ji-Ying; Li, Quan; Chen, Ping-Xing

    2016-11-01

    In some cases of imaging, wide spatial range and high spatial resolution are both required, which requests high performance of detection devices and huge resource consumption for data processing. We propose and demonstrate a multi-scale adaptive imaging method based on the idea of computational ghost imaging, which can obtain a rough outline of the whole scene with a wide range then accordingly find out the interested parts and achieve high-resolution details of those parts, by controlling the field of view and the transverse coherence width of the pseudo-thermal field illuminated on the scene with a spatial light modulator. Compared to typical ghost imaging, the resource consumption can be dramatically reduced using our scheme.

  10. Small scale adaptive optics experiment systems engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boykin, William H.

    1993-01-01

    Assessment of the current technology relating to the laser power beaming system which in full scale is called the Beam Transmission Optical System (BTOS). Evaluation of system integration efforts are being conducted by the various government agencies and industry. Concepts are being developed for prototypes of adaptive optics for a BTOS.

  11. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale: Construction, Reliability, and Measurement Equivalence across 13 Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savickas, Mark L.; Porfeli, Erik J.

    2012-01-01

    Researchers from 13 countries collaborated in constructing a psychometric scale to measure career adaptability. Based on four pilot tests, a research version of the proposed scale consisting of 55 items was field tested in 13 countries. The resulting Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS) consists of four scales, each with six items. The four scales…

  12. Entrepreneurial Orientation Scale: Adaptation to Spanish.

    PubMed

    Boada-Grau, Joan; Sánchez-García, José Carlos; Viardot, Eric; Boada-Cuerva, Maria; Vigil-Colet, Andreu

    2016-07-25

    Entrepreneurship is linked to the perception of opportunities, to orientation, to attitudes, to the fear of failure and to entrepreneurial motivations. Entrepreneurial orientation is a fundamental construct for understanding the phenomenon of entrepreneurship. What is more, it is multidimensional and has attracted considerable attention from researchers in recent years. The objective of this study was to adapt the original 12-item English scale to Spanish and to analyze its psychometric properties. The participants in the present study were 925 Spanish employees (48.2% men, 51.5% women, M age = 42.49 years, SD age = 11.25) from the Autonomous Communities of Catalonia and Castilla-León. After applying an ESEM (RMSEA = .06; CFI = .97 and TLI = .95) a structure was determined made up of four factors which corroborated the structure of the original scale: Autonomy (α = .71 and CI = .68 - .73), Innovativeness (α = .70 and CI = .67 - .73), Risk Taking (α = .72 and CI = .68 - .74) and Competitive Aggressiveness (α = .70 and CI = .67 - .73). The four factors displayed suitable reliability. The study also found evidences of validity in relation to a series of external correlates and various scales which refer to workaholism, irritation and burnout. The scale presented here may prove useful for satisfactorily identifying, in Spanish, the entrepreneurial orientation of the working population.

  13. [Spanish adaptation of the Psychological Well-Being Scales (PWBS)].

    PubMed

    Díaz, Darío; Rodríguez-Carvajal, Raquel; Blanco, Amalio; Moreno-Jiménez, Bernardo; Gallardo, Ismael; Valle, Carmen; van Dierendonck, Dirk

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to adapt to Spanish the D. van Direndonck version of Carol Ryff's Psychological Well-Being Scales, and to analyse its consistency and factorial validity. All the scales exhibited good internal reliabilities, with Cronbach alpha's ranging from 0.83 (Self-acceptance) to 0.68 (Personal growth). However, confirmatory factor analyses didn't corroborate the six-factor model (Self-acceptance, Positive relations, Autonomy, Environmental mastery, Purpose in life, and Personal growth) with a second order factor called Psychological Well-Being . To improve the psychometric properties, a new reduced version was proposed that indeed will facilitate the application. The scales of the new version maintain and raise its internal consistency (Cronbach alpha's 0.84 to 0.70). Furthermore, the scales shown an excellent fit to the theoretical model proposed by D. van Dierendonck.

  14. Emotional facial expressions reduce neural adaptation to face identity.

    PubMed

    Gerlicher, Anna M V; van Loon, Anouk M; Scholte, H Steven; Lamme, Victor A F; van der Leij, Andries R

    2014-05-01

    In human social interactions, facial emotional expressions are a crucial source of information. Repeatedly presented information typically leads to an adaptation of neural responses. However, processing seems sustained with emotional facial expressions. Therefore, we tested whether sustained processing of emotional expressions, especially threat-related expressions, would attenuate neural adaptation. Neutral and emotional expressions (happy, mixed and fearful) of same and different identity were presented at 3 Hz. We used electroencephalography to record the evoked steady-state visual potentials (ssVEP) and tested to what extent the ssVEP amplitude adapts to the same when compared with different face identities. We found adaptation to the identity of a neutral face. However, for emotional faces, adaptation was reduced, decreasing linearly with negative valence, with the least adaptation to fearful expressions. This short and straightforward method may prove to be a valuable new tool in the study of emotional processing.

  15. Development and Standardization of the Diagnostic Adaptive Behavior Scale: Application of Item Response Theory to the Assessment of Adaptive Behavior.

    PubMed

    Tassé, Marc J; Schalock, Robert L; Thissen, David; Balboni, Giulia; Bersani, Henry Hank; Borthwick-Duffy, Sharon A; Spreat, Scott; Widaman, Keith F; Zhang, Dalun; Navas, Patricia

    2016-03-01

    The Diagnostic Adaptive Behavior Scale (DABS) was developed using item response theory (IRT) methods and was constructed to provide the most precise and valid adaptive behavior information at or near the cutoff point of making a decision regarding a diagnosis of intellectual disability. The DABS initial item pool consisted of 260 items. Using IRT modeling and a nationally representative standardization sample, the item set was reduced to 75 items that provide the most precise adaptive behavior information at the cutoff area determining the presence or not of significant adaptive behavior deficits across conceptual, social, and practical skills. The standardization of the DABS is described and discussed.

  16. Wind tunnels with adapted walls for reducing wall interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganzer, U.

    1979-01-01

    The basic principle of adaptable wind tunnel walls is explained. First results of an investigation carried out at the Aero-Space Institute of Berlin Technical University are presented for two dimensional flexible walls and a NACA 0012 airfoil. With five examples exhibiting very different flow conditions it is demonstrated that it is possible to reduce wall interference and to avoid blockage at transonic speeds by wall adaptation.

  17. Efficient implementation of the adaptive scale pixel decomposition algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Bhatnagar, S.; Rau, U.; Zhang, M.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Most popular algorithms in use to remove the effects of a telescope's point spread function (PSF) in radio astronomy are variants of the CLEAN algorithm. Most of these algorithms model the sky brightness using the delta-function basis, which results in undesired artefacts when used to image extended emission. The adaptive scale pixel decomposition (Asp-Clean) algorithm models the sky brightness on a scale-sensitive basis and thus gives a significantly better imaging performance when imaging fields that contain both resolved and unresolved emission. Aims: However, the runtime cost of Asp-Clean is higher than that of scale-insensitive algorithms. In this paper, we identify the most expensive step in the original Asp-Clean algorithm and present an efficient implementation of it, which significantly reduces the computational cost while keeping the imaging performance comparable to the original algorithm. The PSF sidelobe levels of modern wide-band telescopes are significantly reduced, allowing us to make approximations to reduce the computational cost, which in turn allows for the deconvolution of larger images on reasonable timescales. Methods: As in the original algorithm, scales in the image are estimated through function fitting. Here we introduce an analytical method to model extended emission, and a modified method for estimating the initial values used for the fitting procedure, which ultimately leads to a lower computational cost. Results: The new implementation was tested with simulated EVLA data and the imaging performance compared well with the original Asp-Clean algorithm. Tests show that the current algorithm can recover features at different scales with lower computational cost.

  18. Adaptive tracking for complex systems using reduced-order models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnigan, Craig R.

    1990-01-01

    Reduced-order models are considered in the context of parameter adaptive controllers for tracking workspace trajectories. A dual-arm manipulation task is used to illustrate the methodology and provide simulation results. A parameter adaptive controller is designed to track a payload trajectory using a four-parameter model instead of the full-order, nine-parameter model. Several simulations with different payload-to-arm mass ratios are used to illustrate the capabilities of the reduced-order model in tracking the desired trajectory.

  19. Adaptive tracking for complex systems using reduced-order models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carignan, Craig R.

    1990-01-01

    Reduced-order models are considered in the context of parameter adaptive controllers for tracking workspace trajectories. A dual-arm manipulation task is used to illustrate the methodology and provide simulation results. A parameter adaptive controller is designed to track the desired position trajectory of a payload using a four-parameter model instead of a full-order, nine-parameter model. Several simulations with different payload-to-arm mass ratios are used to illustrate the capabilities of the reduced-order model in tracking the desired trajectory.

  20. Reducing uncertainty about objective functions in adaptive management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, B.K.

    2012-01-01

    This paper extends the uncertainty framework of adaptive management to include uncertainty about the objectives to be used in guiding decisions. Adaptive decision making typically assumes explicit and agreed-upon objectives for management, but allows for uncertainty as to the structure of the decision process that generates change through time. Yet it is not unusual for there to be uncertainty (or disagreement) about objectives, with different stakeholders expressing different views not only about resource responses to management but also about the appropriate management objectives. In this paper I extend the treatment of uncertainty in adaptive management, and describe a stochastic structure for the joint occurrence of uncertainty about objectives as well as models, and show how adaptive decision making and the assessment of post-decision monitoring data can be used to reduce uncertainties of both kinds. Different degrees of association between model and objective uncertainty lead to different patterns of learning about objectives. ?? 2011.

  1. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale--Icelandic Form: Psychometric Properties and Construct Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vilhjalmsdottir, Guobjorg; Kjartansdottir, Guorun Birna; Smaradottir, Sigriour Briet; Einarsdottir, Sif

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric characteristics and construct validity of the Icelandic form of the Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS-Iceland). The CAAS consists of four scales that measure concern, control, curiosity, and confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks, and work traumas. The…

  2. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale-USA Form: Psychometric Properties and Relation to Vocational Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porfeli, Erik J.; Savickas, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    This article reports construction and initial validation of the United States form of the Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS). The CAAS consists of four scales, each with six items, which measure concern, control, curiosity, and confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks, and work traumas.…

  3. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale--South African Form: Psychometric Properties and Construct Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maree, Jacobus Gideon

    2012-01-01

    The Career Adapt-Abilities Scale--South African Form (CAAS) consists of four scales, each with six items that measure concern, control, curiosity, and confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks and work traumas. Internal consistency estimates for the subscale and total scores ranged from good to…

  4. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale-Belgium Form: Psychometric Characteristics and Construct Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dries, Nicky; Van Esbroeck, Raoul; van Vianen, Annelies E. M.; De Cooman, Rein; Pepermans, Roland

    2012-01-01

    The Dutch version of the Career Adapt-Abilities Scale-Belgium Form (CAAS-Belgium) consists of four scales, each with six items, which measure concern, control, curiosity, and confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks, and work traumas. A pilot survey was administered to 700 high school,…

  5. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale--Taiwan Form: Psychometric Properties and Construct Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tien, Hsiu-Lan Shelley; Wang, Yu-Chen; Chu, Hui-Chuang; Huang, Tsu-Lun

    2012-01-01

    The present study tested the reliability and validity of the Career Adapt-Ability Scale--Taiwan Form (CAAS-Taiwan Form). The CAAS consists of four scales, each with six items, which measure concern, control, curiosity, and confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks, and work traumas. Internal…

  6. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale--Brazilian Form: Psychometric Properties and Relationships to Personality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teixeira, Marco Antonio Pereira; Bardagi, Marucia Patta; Lassance, Maria Celia Pacheco; Magalhaes, Mauro de Oliveira; Duarte, Maria Eduarda

    2012-01-01

    The Career Adapt-Abilities Scale--Brazilian Form (CAASBrazil) consists of four scales which measure concern, control, curiosity, and confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks, and work traumas. Internal consistency estimates for the subscale and total scores ranged from good to excellent. The…

  7. The GO4KIDDS Brief Adaptive Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Adrienne; Taheri, Azin; Ting, Victoria; Weiss, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Accurate measurement of adaptive behaviour is important in both clinical and research contexts. While several good clinical measures exist, as well as brief research measures for adults with intellectual disability, there is need for a brief and efficient measure for research with children and youth. We present preliminary psychometric…

  8. Children with autism spectrum disorder show reduced adaptation to number

    PubMed Central

    Turi, Marco; Burr, David C.; Igliozzi, Roberta; Aagten-Murphy, David; Muratori, Filippo; Pellicano, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Autism is known to be associated with major perceptual atypicalities. We have recently proposed a general model to account for these atypicalities in Bayesian terms, suggesting that autistic individuals underuse predictive information or priors. We tested this idea by measuring adaptation to numerosity stimuli in children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). After exposure to large numbers of items, stimuli with fewer items appear to be less numerous (and vice versa). We found that children with ASD adapted much less to numerosity than typically developing children, although their precision for numerosity discrimination was similar to that of the typical group. This result reinforces recent findings showing reduced adaptation to facial identity in ASD and goes on to show that reduced adaptation is not unique to faces (social stimuli with special significance in autism), but occurs more generally, for both parietal and temporal functions, probably reflecting inefficiencies in the adaptive interpretation of sensory signals. These results provide strong support for the Bayesian theories of autism. PMID:26056294

  9. Adolescent Time Attitude Scale: Adaptation into Turkish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çelik, Eyüp; Sahranç, Ümit; Kaya, Mehmet; Turan, Mehmet Emin

    2017-01-01

    This research is aimed at examining the validity and reliability of the Turkish version of the Time Attitude Scale. Data was collected from 433 adolescents; 206 males and 227 females participated in the study. Confirmatory factor analysis performed to discover the structural validity of the scale. The internal consistency method was used for…

  10. Optimal Control Modification Adaptive Law for Time-Scale Separated Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2010-01-01

    Recently a new optimal control modification has been introduced that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. This modification is based on an optimal control formulation to minimize the L2 norm of the tracking error. The optimal control modification adaptive law results in a stable adaptation in the presence of a large adaptive gain. This study examines the optimal control modification adaptive law in the context of a system with a time scale separation resulting from a fast plant with a slow actuator. A singular perturbation analysis is performed to derive a modification to the adaptive law by transforming the original system into a reduced-order system in slow time. A model matching conditions in the transformed time coordinate results in an increase in the actuator command that effectively compensate for the slow actuator dynamics. Simulations demonstrate effectiveness of the method.

  11. Full-Scale Flight Research Testbeds: Adaptive and Intelligent Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pahle, Joe W.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the adaptive and intelligent control methods used for aircraft survival. The contents include: 1) Motivation for Adaptive Control; 2) Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control Project; 3) Full-scale Flight Assets in Use for IRAC; 4) NASA NF-15B Tail Number 837; 5) Gen II Direct Adaptive Control Architecture; 6) Limited Authority System; and 7) 837 Flight Experiments. A simulated destabilization failure analysis along with experience and lessons learned are also presented.

  12. Recursive architecture for large-scale adaptive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanahara, Kazuyuki; Sugiyama, Yoshihiko

    1994-09-01

    'Large scale' is one of major trends in the research and development of recent engineering, especially in the field of aerospace structural system. This term expresses the large scale of an artifact in general, however, it also implies the large number of the components which make up the artifact in usual. Considering a large scale system which is especially used in remote space or deep-sea, such a system should be adaptive as well as robust by itself, because its control as well as maintenance by human operators are not easy due to the remoteness. An approach to realizing this large scale, adaptive and robust system is to build the system as an assemblage of components which are respectively adaptive by themselves. In this case, the robustness of the system can be achieved by using a large number of such components and suitable adaptation as well as maintenance strategies. Such a system gathers many research's interest and their studies such as decentralized motion control, configurating algorithm and characteristics of structural elements are reported. In this article, a recursive architecture concept is developed and discussed towards the realization of large scale system which consists of a number of uniform adaptive components. We propose an adaptation strategy based on the architecture and its implementation by means of hierarchically connected processing units. The robustness and the restoration from degeneration of the processing unit are also discussed. Two- and three-dimensional adaptive truss structures are conceptually designed based on the recursive architecture.

  13. Reduced rank regression via adaptive nuclear norm penalization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kun; Dong, Hongbo; Chan, Kung-Sik

    2014-01-01

    Summary We propose an adaptive nuclear norm penalization approach for low-rank matrix approximation, and use it to develop a new reduced rank estimation method for high-dimensional multivariate regression. The adaptive nuclear norm is defined as the weighted sum of the singular values of the matrix, and it is generally non-convex under the natural restriction that the weight decreases with the singular value. However, we show that the proposed non-convex penalized regression method has a global optimal solution obtained from an adaptively soft-thresholded singular value decomposition. The method is computationally efficient, and the resulting solution path is continuous. The rank consistency of and prediction/estimation performance bounds for the estimator are established for a high-dimensional asymptotic regime. Simulation studies and an application in genetics demonstrate its efficacy. PMID:25045172

  14. Reducing Waste in Extreme Scale Systems through Introspective Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bautista-Gomez, Leonardo; Gainaru, Ana; Perarnau, Swann; Tiwari, Devesh; Gupta, Saurabh; Engelmann, Christian; Cappello, Franck; Snir, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Resilience is an important challenge for extreme- scale supercomputers. Today, failures in supercomputers are assumed to be uniformly distributed in time. However, recent studies show that failures in high-performance computing systems are partially correlated in time, generating periods of higher failure density. Our study of the failure logs of multiple supercomputers show that periods of higher failure density occur with up to three times more than the average. We design a monitoring system that listens to hardware events and forwards important events to the runtime to detect those regime changes. We implement a runtime capable of receiving notifications and adapt dynamically. In addition, we build an analytical model to predict the gains that such dynamic approach could achieve. We demonstrate that in some systems, our approach can reduce the wasted time by over 30%.

  15. A reduced adaptive observer for multivariable systems. [using reduced dynamic ordering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, R. L.; Lindorff, D. P.

    1973-01-01

    An adaptive observer for multivariable systems is presented for which the dynamic order of the observer is reduced, subject to mild restrictions. The observer structure depends directly upon the multivariable structure of the system rather than a transformation to a single-output system. The number of adaptive gains is at most the sum of the order of the system and the number of input parameters being adapted. Moreover, for the relatively frequent specific cases for which the number of required adaptive gains is less than the sum of system order and input parameters, the number of these gains is easily determined by inspection of the system structure. This adaptive observer possesses all the properties ascribed to the single-input single-output adpative observer. Like the other adaptive observers some restriction is required of the allowable system command input to guarantee convergence of the adaptive algorithm, but the restriction is more lenient than that required by the full-order multivariable observer. This reduced observer is not restricted to cycle systems.

  16. Length Scales in Bayesian Automatic Adaptive Quadrature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Gh.; Adam, S.

    2016-02-01

    Two conceptual developments in the Bayesian automatic adaptive quadrature approach to the numerical solution of one-dimensional Riemann integrals [Gh. Adam, S. Adam, Springer LNCS 7125, 1-16 (2012)] are reported. First, it is shown that the numerical quadrature which avoids the overcomputing and minimizes the hidden floating point loss of precision asks for the consideration of three classes of integration domain lengths endowed with specific quadrature sums: microscopic (trapezoidal rule), mesoscopic (Simpson rule), and macroscopic (quadrature sums of high algebraic degrees of precision). Second, sensitive diagnostic tools for the Bayesian inference on macroscopic ranges, coming from the use of Clenshaw-Curtis quadrature, are derived.

  17. Scale Free Reduced Rank Image Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horst, Paul

    In the traditional Guttman-Harris type image analysis, a transformation is applied to the data matrix such that each column of the transformed data matrix is the best least squares estimate of the corresponding column of the data matrix from the remaining columns. The model is scale free. However, it assumes (1) that the correlation matrix is…

  18. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale--Korea Form: Psychometric Properties and Construct Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tak, Jinkook

    2012-01-01

    The Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS)--Korea Form consists of four subscales, each with six items. The subscales measure concern, control, curiosity, and confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks, and work traumas. Internal consistency estimates for the subscale and total scores ranged from…

  19. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale--China Form: Construction and Initial Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hou, Zhi-Jin; Leung, S. Alvin; Li, Xixi; Li, Xu; Xu, Hui

    2012-01-01

    The Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS)--China Form consists of four subscales, with six items each to measure Concern, Control, Curiosity, and Confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks, and work traumas. This study investigated the construction and validation of its Chinese Form. Results…

  20. A reduced bias delay lock loop for adaptive filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Guangteng; Huang, Yangbo; Su, Yingxue; Li, Jingyuan; Sun, Guangfu

    2017-01-01

    Narrowband interferences (NBIs) severely degrade the quality of a received signal and can hinder the operation of GPS receivers, and therefore, they are commonly excised using an adaptive transversal filter. This filter does not cause code tracking bias in the case of an ideal analog receiver channel when its magnitude and phase response are constant; however, distortion is induced by RF cables, amplifiers, and mixers that results in an asymmetric correlation function. This correlation function is further deformed by the adaptive transversal filter, resulting in a nonzero bias. Given the adaptive nature of this transversal filter, the bias varies based on the jamming pattern. For precision navigation applications, this bias must be mitigated. With this problem in mind, a new technique called amplitude estimating delay lock loop (AEDLL) is presented. By using data related to a known structure of the adaptive transversal filter, the proposed method only needs to estimate the amplitude of the correlation function and revise the correlation function for code tracking. Simulations show that the AEDLL method is capable of reducing the RMSE of code tracking bias to less than 0.12 ns, which is significantly smaller than that achieved using existing methods.

  1. Development of the Navy Computer Adaptive Personality Scales (NCAPS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    237 2- 12 high school students first assessed as juniors, the five- year stability is r = .49 for 91 females first assessed as college seniors...item revision of the Traditional NCAPS scales. 5- 12 Table 5-7 Reliability of Adaptive NCAPS by scale at various points along the posterior...a series of interrelated research projects. This report covers how the personality constructs were selected, items were developed and scaled, and

  2. Validation of an Adapted French Form of the Career Adapt-Abilities Scale in Four Francophone Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Claire S.; Broonen, Jean-Paul; Stauffer, Sarah D.; Hamtiaux, Armanda; Pouyaud, Jacques; Zecca, Gregory; Houssemand, Claude; Rossier, Jerome

    2013-01-01

    This study presents the validation of a French version of the Career Adapt-Abilities Scale in four Francophone countries. The aim was to re-analyze the item selection and then compare this newly developed French-language form with the international form 2.0. Exploratory factor analysis was used as a tool for item selection, and confirmatory factor…

  3. The Classroom Adaptation Scale: A Behavior Rating Scale Designed to Screen Primary Grade Children for School Adaptation Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virbickis, Joseph A.

    After a brief historical review of the background and research, the paper focuses on development of a teacher-administered behavior rating scale to screen for school adaptation problems on a large scale basis using as Ss 15 primary grade teachers and their ratings of 315 primary grade children (ages 6-to-10 years) in their classes. A 16-item…

  4. Adaptive h -refinement for reduced-order models: ADAPTIVE h -refinement for reduced-order models

    SciTech Connect

    Carlberg, Kevin T.

    2014-11-05

    Our work presents a method to adaptively refine reduced-order models a posteriori without requiring additional full-order-model solves. The technique is analogous to mesh-adaptive h-refinement: it enriches the reduced-basis space online by ‘splitting’ a given basis vector into several vectors with disjoint support. The splitting scheme is defined by a tree structure constructed offline via recursive k-means clustering of the state variables using snapshot data. This method identifies the vectors to split online using a dual-weighted-residual approach that aims to reduce error in an output quantity of interest. The resulting method generates a hierarchy of subspaces online without requiring large-scale operations or full-order-model solves. Furthermore, it enables the reduced-order model to satisfy any prescribed error tolerance regardless of its original fidelity, as a completely refined reduced-order model is mathematically equivalent to the original full-order model. Experiments on a parameterized inviscid Burgers equation highlight the ability of the method to capture phenomena (e.g., moving shocks) not contained in the span of the original reduced basis.

  5. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale--Portugal Form: Psychometric Properties and Relationships to Employment Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duarte, M. Eduarda; Soares, M. C.; Fraga, S.; Rafael, M.; Lima, M. R.; Paredes, I.; Agostinho, R.; Djalo, A.

    2012-01-01

    The Career-Adaptabilities Scale (CAAS)--Portugal Form consists of four scales, each with seven items, which measure concern, control, curiosity, and confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks, and work traumas. Internal consistency estimates for the subscale and total scores ranged from good to…

  6. MARIANE: MApReduce Implementation Adapted for HPC Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Fadika, Zacharia; Dede, Elif; Govindaraju, Madhusudhan; Ramakrishnan, Lavanya

    2011-07-06

    MapReduce is increasingly becoming a popular framework, and a potent programming model. The most popular open source implementation of MapReduce, Hadoop, is based on the Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS). However, as HDFS is not POSIX compliant, it cannot be fully leveraged by applications running on a majority of existing HPC environments such as Teragrid and NERSC. These HPC environments typicallysupport globally shared file systems such as NFS and GPFS. On such resourceful HPC infrastructures, the use of Hadoop not only creates compatibility issues, but also affects overall performance due to the added overhead of the HDFS. This paper not only presents a MapReduce implementation directly suitable for HPC environments, but also exposes the design choices for better performance gains in those settings. By leveraging inherent distributed file systems' functions, and abstracting them away from its MapReduce framework, MARIANE (MApReduce Implementation Adapted for HPC Environments) not only allows for the use of the model in an expanding number of HPCenvironments, but also allows for better performance in such settings. This paper shows the applicability and high performance of the MapReduce paradigm through MARIANE, an implementation designed for clustered and shared-disk file systems and as such not dedicated to a specific MapReduce solution. The paper identifies the components and trade-offs necessary for this model, and quantifies the performance gains exhibited by our approach in distributed environments over Apache Hadoop in a data intensive setting, on the Magellan testbed at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC).

  7. The reduced order model problem in distributed parameter systems adaptive identification and control. [adaptive control of flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. R., Jr.; Lawrence, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The reduced order model problem in distributed parameter systems adaptive identification and control is investigated. A comprehensive examination of real-time centralized adaptive control options for flexible spacecraft is provided.

  8. Reducing the time complexity of the derandomized evolution strategy with covariance matrix adaptation (CMA-ES).

    PubMed

    Hansen, Nikolaus; Müller, Sibylle D; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a novel evolutionary optimization strategy based on the derandomized evolution strategy with covariance matrix adaptation (CMA-ES). This new approach is intended to reduce the number of generations required for convergence to the optimum. Reducing the number of generations, i.e., the time complexity of the algorithm, is important if a large population size is desired: (1) to reduce the effect of noise; (2) to improve global search properties; and (3) to implement the algorithm on (highly) parallel machines. Our method results in a highly parallel algorithm which scales favorably with large numbers of processors. This is accomplished by efficiently incorporating the available information from a large population, thus significantly reducing the number of generations needed to adapt the covariance matrix. The original version of the CMA-ES was designed to reliably adapt the covariance matrix in small populations but it cannot exploit large populations efficiently. Our modifications scale up the efficiency to population sizes of up to 10n, where n is the problem dimension. This method has been applied to a large number of test problems, demonstrating that in many cases the CMA-ES can be advanced from quadratic to linear time complexity.

  9. AMC EN-1038: Reduced scale solar simulator supplementary test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biering, Robert C.

    1994-01-01

    The reduced scale solar simulator program conducted by the Advanced Manufacturing Center at Cleveland State University in 1992 provided sufficient data to support the selection of the uniform magnification solar simulator module for the Solar Dynamic Ground Test Demonstrator Program (SDGTD) at NASA LeRC. In 1993, additional testing of the reduced scale solar simulator was conducted to provide information to refine and improve the design of the full scale solar simulator. This report presents the results of these additional tests.

  10. Predicting Adaptive Behavior from the Bayley Scales of Infant Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hotard, Stephen; McWhirter, Richard

    To examine the proportion of variance in adaptive functioning predictable from mental ability, chronological age, I.Q., evidence of brain malfunction, seizure medication, and receptive and expressive language scores, 25 severely and profoundly retarded institutionalized persons (2-19 years old) were administered the Bayley Infant Scale Mental…

  11. Amplitude modulation reduces loudness adaptation to high-frequency tones

    PubMed Central

    Wynne, Dwight P.; George, Sahara E.; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Long-term loudness perception of a sound has been presumed to depend on the spatial distribution of activated auditory nerve fibers as well as their temporal firing pattern. The relative contributions of those two factors were investigated by measuring loudness adaptation to sinusoidally amplitude-modulated 12-kHz tones. The tones had a total duration of 180 s and were either unmodulated or 100%-modulated at one of three frequencies (4, 20, or 100 Hz), and additionally varied in modulation depth from 0% to 100% at the 4-Hz frequency only. Every 30 s, normal-hearing subjects estimated the loudness of one of the stimuli played at 15 dB above threshold in random order. Without any amplitude modulation, the loudness of the unmodulated tone after 180 s was only 20% of the loudness at the onset of the stimulus. Amplitude modulation systematically reduced the amount of loudness adaptation, with the 100%-modulated stimuli, regardless of modulation frequency, maintaining on average 55%–80% of the loudness at onset after 180 s. Because the present low-frequency amplitude modulation produced minimal changes in long-term spectral cues affecting the spatial distribution of excitation produced by a 12-kHz pure tone, the present result indicates that neural synchronization is critical to maintaining loudness perception over time. PMID:26233027

  12. Patterns of adaptation to conflict and schizoid personality scale scores.

    PubMed

    Rubino, I Alex; Mascis, Maria Cristina; Siracusano, Alberto

    2006-02-01

    A previous investigation gave no evidence of a significant relationship of patterns of adaptation to conflict, as measured with the Serial Color-Word Test, with the Schizoid Personality Scale of the Coolidge Axis II Inventory. As a new scoring algorithm has subsequently been proposed for the latter scale, a replication was done with the modified schizoid scale. A group of 75 consecutive nonpsychotic women outpatients was given the Serial Color-Word Test and Coolidge's inventory. Both multiple and logistic regressions selected two significant predictors of schizoid personality, corresponding to high values of linear change in reading times during Trials 3 and 5 of the Serial Color-Word Test, i.e., to an increasingly rigid and inflexible style of the adaptive process. A multivariate analysis of variance yielded an effect size of .22 (partial eta2).

  13. Adaptation of the HIV Stigma Scale in Spaniards with HIV.

    PubMed

    Fuster-RuizdeApodaca, Maria José; Molero, Fernando; Holgado, Francisco Pablo; Ubillos, Silvia

    2015-09-15

    The primary goal of this study was to adapt Berger, Ferrans, & Lahley (2001) HIV Stigma Scale in Spain, using Bunn, Solomon, Miller, & Forehand (2007) version. A second goal assessed whether the four-factor structure of the adapted scale could be explained by two higher-order dimensions, perceived external stigma and internalized stigma. A first qualitative study (N = 40 people with HIV, aged 28-59) was used to adapt the items and test content validity. A second quantitative study analyzed construct and criterion validity. In this study participants were 557 people with HIV, aged 18-76. The adapted HIV Stigma Scale for use in Spain (HSSS) showed a good internal consistency (α = .88) and good construct validity. Confirmatory Factor Analyses yielded a first-order, four-factor structure and a higher-order, bidimensional structure with the two expected factors (RMSEA = .051, 90% CI [.046, .056]; RMR = .073; GFI = .96; AGFI = .96; CFI = .98). Negative relations were found between stigma and quality of life (r = -.39; p < .01), self-efficacy to cope with stigma (r = -.50; p < .01) and the degree of HIV status disclosure (r = -.35; p < .01). Moreover, the people who had suffered AIDS-related opportunistic infections had a higher score in the Perceived External Stigma dimension than those who had not suffered them, t (493) = 3.02, p = .003, d = 0.26.

  14. Advanced Dynamically Adaptive Algorithms for Stochastic Simulations on Extreme Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Xiu, Dongbin

    2016-06-21

    The focus of the project is the development of mathematical methods and high-performance com- putational tools for stochastic simulations, with a particular emphasis on computations on extreme scales. The core of the project revolves around the design of highly e cient and scalable numer- ical algorithms that can adaptively and accurately, in high dimensional spaces, resolve stochastic problems with limited smoothness, even containing discontinuities.

  15. A Holistic Management Architecture for Large-Scale Adaptive Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    MANAGEMENT ARCHITECTURE FOR LARGE-SCALE ADAPTIVE NETWORKS by Michael R. Clement September 2007 Thesis Advisor: Alex Bordetsky Second Reader...TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT from the NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL September 2007 Author: Michael R. Clement Approved by: Dr. Alex ...achieve in life is by His will. Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam. To my parents, my family, and Caitlin: For supporting me, listening to me when I got

  16. Adaptive two-scale edge detection for visual pattern processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Zia-Ur; Jobson, Daniel J.; Woodell, Glenn A.

    2009-09-01

    Adaptive methods are defined and experimentally studied for a two-scale edge detection process that mimics human visual perception of edges and is inspired by the parvocellular (P) and magnocellular (M) physiological subsystems of natural vision. This two-channel processing consists of a high spatial acuity/coarse contrast channel (P) and a coarse acuity/fine contrast (M) channel. We perform edge detection after a very strong nonlinear image enhancement that uses smart Retinex image processing. Two conditions that arise from this enhancement demand adaptiveness in edge detection. These conditions are the presence of random noise further exacerbated by the enhancement process and the equally random occurrence of dense textural visual information. We examine how to best deal with both phenomena with an automatic adaptive computation that treats both high noise and dense textures as too much information and gracefully shifts from small-scale to medium-scale edge pattern priorities. This shift is accomplished by using different edge-enhancement schemes that correspond with the P- and M-channels of the human visual system. We also examine the case of adapting to a third image condition-namely, too little visual information-and automatically adjust edge-detection sensitivities when sparse feature information is encountered. When this methodology is applied to a sequence of images of the same scene but with varying exposures and lighting conditions, this edge-detection process produces pattern constancy that is very useful for several imaging applications that rely on image classification in variable imaging conditions.

  17. Fine-scale adaptation in a clonal sea anemone.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Craig D H; Ayre, David J

    2008-06-01

    Local adaptation in response to fine-scale spatial heterogeneity is well documented in terrestrial ecosystems. In contrast, in marine environments local adaptation has rarely been documented or rigorously explored. This may reflect real or anticipated effects of genetic homogenization, resulting from widespread dispersal in the sea. However, evolutionary theory predicts that for the many benthic species with complex life histories that include both sexual and asexual phases, each parental habitat patch should become dominated by the fittest and most competitive clones. In this study we used genotypic mapping to show that within headlands, clones of the sea anemone Actinia tenebrosa show restricted distributions to specific habitats despite the potential for more widespread dispersal. On these same shores we used reciprocal transplant experiments that revealed strikingly better performance of clones within their natal rather than foreign habitats as judged by survivorship, asexual fecundity, and growth. These findings highlight the importance of selection for fine-scale environmental adaptation in marine taxa and imply that the genotypic structure of populations reflects extensive periods of interclonal competition and site-specific selection.

  18. [Spanish adaptation of the Substance Dependence Severity Scale: preliminar results].

    PubMed

    Vélez-Moreno, Antonio; González-Saiz, Francisco; Ramírez López, Juan; Torrico Linares, Esperanza; Fernández-Calderón, Fermín; Rojas, Antonio J; Lozano, Óscar M

    2013-01-01

    The Substance Dependence Severity Scale -SDSS- is one of the few scales that assesses substance dependence and abuse according DSM criteria in dimensional terms. Several studies have provided evidence of psychometric validity and reliability in its English version, but there is no Spanish version available. The aim of this work was to describe the adaptation process of the English version of the SDSS into Spanish, and provide preliminary results on its reliability and validity evidence. Participants were 146 patients (79.6% male), consumers of alcohol, cocaine, heroin and cannabis admitted to treatment in the Drug Abuse Centre Services of Huelva. Besides the SDSS, the EUROPASI and the Health Related Quality of Life for Drug Abusers test -HRQOLDA- were also administered. The Substance Dependence Severity Scale -SDSS- has shown adequate psychometric properties in terms of the rates of discrimination and internal consistency (α=0.881 for alcohol; α=0.814 for cocaine; α=0.531 for cannabis; α=0.785 for heroin). However, the scale assessing abuse showed poorer results. Concerning the validity evidence, the evidence based on internal structure showed a unidimensional structure. Furthermore, the evidence based from the relationships with other variables empirically support the theoretical relationships postulated. Preliminary results support the use of the Substance Dependence Severity Scale. The severity scale, which evaluates abuse criteria, needs further empirical evidence to assess its utility. Therefore, its current version is not recommended for use.

  19. High protein flexibility and reduced hydration water dynamics are key pressure adaptive strategies in prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, N.; Michoud, G.; Cario, A.; Ollivier, J.; Franzetti, B.; Jebbar, M.; Oger, P.; Peters, J.

    2016-01-01

    Water and protein dynamics on a nanometer scale were measured by quasi-elastic neutron scattering in the piezophile archaeon Thermococcus barophilus and the closely related pressure-sensitive Thermococcus kodakarensis, at 0.1 and 40 MPa. We show that cells of the pressure sensitive organism exhibit higher intrinsic stability. Both the hydration water dynamics and the fast protein and lipid dynamics are reduced under pressure. In contrast, the proteome of T. barophilus is more pressure sensitive than that of T. kodakarensis. The diffusion coefficient of hydration water is reduced, while the fast protein and lipid dynamics are slightly enhanced with increasing pressure. These findings show that the coupling between hydration water and cellular constituents might not be simply a master-slave relationship. We propose that the high flexibility of the T. barophilus proteome associated with reduced hydration water may be the keys to the molecular adaptation of the cells to high hydrostatic pressure. PMID:27595789

  20. High protein flexibility and reduced hydration water dynamics are key pressure adaptive strategies in prokaryotes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, N.; Michoud, G.; Cario, A.; Ollivier, J.; Franzetti, B.; Jebbar, M.; Oger, P.; Peters, J.

    2016-09-01

    Water and protein dynamics on a nanometer scale were measured by quasi-elastic neutron scattering in the piezophile archaeon Thermococcus barophilus and the closely related pressure-sensitive Thermococcus kodakarensis, at 0.1 and 40 MPa. We show that cells of the pressure sensitive organism exhibit higher intrinsic stability. Both the hydration water dynamics and the fast protein and lipid dynamics are reduced under pressure. In contrast, the proteome of T. barophilus is more pressure sensitive than that of T. kodakarensis. The diffusion coefficient of hydration water is reduced, while the fast protein and lipid dynamics are slightly enhanced with increasing pressure. These findings show that the coupling between hydration water and cellular constituents might not be simply a master-slave relationship. We propose that the high flexibility of the T. barophilus proteome associated with reduced hydration water may be the keys to the molecular adaptation of the cells to high hydrostatic pressure.

  1. Reliability and Validity of the Vietnamese Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales with Preschool-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Michael R.; Dill, Charles A.; Shin, Jin Y.; Nhan, Nguyen Viet

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine an adaptation of the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale (VABS) [Sparrow, S. S., Balla, D. A., & Cicchetti, D. V. (1984). "The Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales." Circle Pines, MN: America Guidance Service; Sparrow, S. S., Balla, D. A., & Cicchetti, D. V. (2005). "Vineland Adaptive Behavior…

  2. Scaling up breastfeeding programmes in a complex adaptive world.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael; Hall Moran, Victoria

    2016-07-01

    The 2016 Breastfeeding Lancet Series continues to provide unequivocal evidence regarding the numerous benefits that optimal breastfeeding practices offer to children and women worldwide and the major savings that improving these practices can have as a result of their major public health benefits. Unfortunately, this knowledge remains underutilized as there has been little progress scaling up effective breastfeeding programmes globally. Improving the uptake and scaling up of effective national breastfeeding programmes that are potent enough to improve exclusive breastfeeding duration should be a top priority for all countries. Complex analysis systems longitudinal research is needed to understand how best to empower decision makers to achieve this goal through well-validated participatory decision-making tools to help their countries assess baseline needs, including costs, as well as progress with their scaling-up efforts. Sound systems thinking frameworks and scaling-up models are now available to guide and research prospectively future scaling-up efforts that can be replicated, with proper adaptations, across countries.

  3. Spacecraft Component Adaptive Layout Environment (SCALE): An efficient optimization tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakoor, Mahdi; Ghoreishi, Seyed Mohammad Navid; Sabaghzadeh, Hossein

    2016-11-01

    For finding the optimum layout of spacecraft subsystems, important factors such as the center of gravity, moments of inertia, thermal distribution, natural frequencies, etc. should be taken into account. This large number of effective parameters makes the optimum layout process of spacecraft subsystems complex and time consuming. In this paper, an automatic tool, based on multi-objective optimization methods, is proposed for a three dimensional layout of spacecraft subsystems. In this regard, an efficient Spacecraft Component Adaptive Layout Environment (SCALE) is produced by integration of some modeling, FEM, and optimization software. SCALE automatically provides optimal solutions for a three dimensional layout of spacecraft subsystems with considering important constraints such as center of gravity, moment of inertia, thermal distribution, natural frequencies and structural strength. In order to show the superiority and efficiency of SCALE, layout of a telecommunication spacecraft and a remote sensing spacecraft are performed. The results show that, the objective functions values for obtained layouts by using SCALE are in a much better condition than traditional one i.e. Reference Baseline Solution (RBS) which is proposed by the engineering system team. This indicates the good performance and ability of SCALE for finding the optimal layout of spacecraft subsystems.

  4. Impact of reduced scale free network on wireless sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshri, Neha; Gupta, Anurag; Mishra, Bimal Kumar

    2016-12-01

    In heterogeneous wireless sensor network (WSN) each data-packet traverses through multiple hops over restricted communication range before it reaches the sink. The amount of energy required to transmit a data-packet is directly proportional to the number of hops. To balance the energy costs across the entire network and to enhance the robustness in order to improve the lifetime of WSN becomes a key issue of researchers. Due to high dimensionality of an epidemic model of WSN over a general scale free network, it is quite difficult to have close study of network dynamics. To overcome this complexity, we simplify a general scale free network by partitioning all of its motes into two classes: higher-degree motes and lower-degree motes, and equating the degrees of all higher-degree motes with lower-degree motes, yielding a reduced scale free network. We develop an epidemic model of WSN based on reduced scale free network. The existence of unique positive equilibrium is determined with some restrictions. Stability of the system is proved. Furthermore, simulation results show improvements made in this paper have made the entire network have a better robustness to the network failure and the balanced energy costs. This reduced model based on scale free network theory proves more applicable to the research of WSN.

  5. Observations to support adaptation: Principles, scales and decision-making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulwarty, R. S.

    2012-12-01

    As has been long noted, a comprehensive, coordinated observing system is the backbone of any Earth information system. Demands are increasingly placed on earth observation and prediction systems and attendant services to address the needs of economically and environmentally vulnerable sectors and investments, including energy, water, human health, transportation, agriculture, fisheries, tourism, biodiversity, and national security. Climate services include building capacity to interpret information and recognize standards and limitations of data in the promotion of social and economic development in a changing climate. This includes improving the understanding of climate in the context of a variety of temporal and spatial scales (including the influence of decadal scale forcings and land surface feedbacks on seasonal forecast reliability). Climate data and information are central for developing decision options that are sensitive to climate-related uncertainties and the design of flexible adaptation pathways. Ideally monitoring should be action oriented to support climate risk assessment and adaptation including informing robust decision making to multiple risks over the long term. Based on the experience of global observations programs and empirical research we outline- Challenges in developing effective monitoring and climate information systems to support adaptation. The types of observations of critical importance needed for sector planning to enhance food, water and energy security, and to improve early warning for disaster risk reduction Observations needed for ecosystem-based adaptation including the identification of thresholds, maintenance of biological diversity and land degradation The benefits and limits of linking regional model output to local observations including analogs and verification for adaptation planning To support these goals a robust systems of integrated observations are needed to characterize the uncertainty surrounding emergent risks

  6. Scaled Jump in Gravity-Reduced Virtual Environments.

    PubMed

    Kim, MyoungGon; Cho, Sunglk; Tran, Tanh Quang; Kim, Seong-Pil; Kwon, Ohung; Han, JungHyun

    2017-04-01

    The reduced gravity experienced in lunar or Martian surfaces can be simulated on the earth using a cable-driven system, where the cable lifts a person to reduce his or her weight. This paper presents a novel cable-driven system designed for the purpose. It is integrated with a head-mounted display and a motion capture system. Focusing on jump motion within the system, this paper proposes to scale the jump and reports the experiments made for quantifying the extent to which a jump can be scaled without the discrepancy between physical and virtual jumps being noticed by the user. With the tolerable range of scaling computed from these experiments, an application named retargeted jump is developed, where a user can jump up onto virtual objects while physically jumping in the real-world flat floor. The core techniques presented in this paper can be extended to develop extreme-sport simulators such as parasailing and skydiving.

  7. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale--Netherlands Form: Psychometric Properties and Relationships to Ability, Personality, and Regulatory Focus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Vianen, Annelies E. M.; Klehe, Ute-Christine; Koen, Jessie; Dries, Nicky

    2012-01-01

    The Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS)--Netherlands Form consists of four scales, each with six items, which measure concern, control, curiosity, and confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks, and work traumas. Internal consistency estimates for the subscale and total scores ranged from…

  8. Translation, adaptation, and validation of the Sunderland Scale and the Cubbin & Jackson Revised Scale in Portuguese

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Objective To translate into Portuguese and evaluate the measuring properties of the Sunderland Scale and the Cubbin & Jackson Revised Scale, which are instruments for evaluating the risk of developing pressure ulcers during intensive care. Methods This study included the process of translation and adaptation of the scales to the Portuguese language, as well as the validation of these tools. To assess the reliability, Cronbach alpha values of 0.702 to 0.708 were identified for the Sunderland Scale and the Cubbin & Jackson Revised Scale, respectively. The validation criteria (predictive) were performed comparatively with the Braden Scale (gold standard), and the main measurements evaluated were sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and area under the curve, which were calculated based on cutoff points. Results The Sunderland Scale exhibited 60% sensitivity, 86.7% specificity, 47.4% positive predictive value, 91.5% negative predictive value, and 0.86 for the area under the curve. The Cubbin & Jackson Revised Scale exhibited 73.3% sensitivity, 86.7% specificity, 52.4% positive predictive value, 94.2% negative predictive value, and 0.91 for the area under the curve. The Braden scale exhibited 100% sensitivity, 5.3% specificity, 17.4% positive predictive value, 100% negative predictive value, and 0.72 for the area under the curve. Conclusions Both tools demonstrated reliability and validity for this sample. The Cubbin & Jackson Revised Scale yielded better predictive values for the development of pressure ulcers during intensive care. PMID:23917975

  9. Reduced oxygen utilization in septic shock: disorder or adaptation?

    PubMed

    Steiner, Alexandre A

    2015-01-01

    A fall in oxygen utilization during septic or endotoxic shock is thought to reflect circulatory hypoxia or mitochondrial dysfunction, but these pathology-oriented hypotheses do not explain all clinical observations. Here we discuss an alternative hypothesis of how oxygen utilization could fall as the result of a physiological thermometabolic adaptation.

  10. The reduced order model problem in distributed parameter systems adaptive identification and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. R., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The research concerning the reduced order model problem in distributed parameter systems is reported. The adaptive control strategy was chosen for investigation in the annular momentum control device. It is noted, that if there is no observation spill over, and no model errors, an indirect adaptive control strategy can be globally stable. Recent publications concerning adaptive control are included.

  11. The adaptive observer. [liapunov synthesis, single-input single-output, and reduced observers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The simple generation of state from available measurements, for use in systems for which the criteria defining the acceptable state behavior mandates a control that is dependent upon unavailable measurement is described as an adaptive means for determining the state of a linear time invariant differential system having unknown parameters. A single input output adaptive observer and the reduced adaptive observer is developed. The basic ideas for both the adaptive observer and the nonadaptive observer are examined. A survey of the Liapunov synthesis technique is taken, and the technique is applied to adaptive algorithm for the adaptive observer.

  12. Reducing measurement scale mismatch to improve surface energy flux estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwema, Joost; Rosolem, Rafael; Rahman, Mostaquimur; Blyth, Eleanor; Wagener, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture importantly controls land surface processes such as energy and water partitioning. A good understanding of these controls is needed especially when recognizing the challenges in providing accurate hyper-resolution hydrometeorological simulations at sub-kilometre scales. Soil moisture controlling factors can, however, differ at distinct scales. In addition, some parameters in land surface models are still often prescribed based on observations obtained at another scale not necessarily employed by such models (e.g., soil properties obtained from lab samples used in regional simulations). To minimize such effects, parameters can be constrained with local data from Eddy-Covariance (EC) towers (i.e., latent and sensible heat fluxes) and Point Scale (PS) soil moisture observations (e.g., TDR). However, measurement scales represented by EC and PS still differ substantially. Here we use the fact that Cosmic-Ray Neutron Sensors (CRNS) estimate soil moisture at horizontal footprint similar to that of EC fluxes to help answer the following question: Does reduced observation scale mismatch yield better soil moisture - surface fluxes representation in land surface models? To answer this question we analysed soil moisture and surface fluxes measurements from twelve COSMOS-Ameriflux sites in the USA characterized by distinct climate, soils and vegetation types. We calibrated model parameters of the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) against PS and CRNS soil moisture data, respectively. We analysed the improvement in soil moisture estimation compared to uncalibrated model simulations and then evaluated the degree of improvement in surface fluxes before and after calibration experiments. Preliminary results suggest that a more accurate representation of soil moisture dynamics is achieved when calibrating against observed soil moisture and further improvement obtained with CRNS relative to PS. However, our results also suggest that a more accurate

  13. Scale-adaptive subgrid-scale modelling for large-eddy simulation of turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Changping; Xiao, Zuoli; Li, Xinliang

    2017-03-01

    The proportionality between the subgrid-scale (SGS) drain rate of kinetic energy and the viscous dissipation rate of the resolved motions is studied a priori by filtering a given fully resolved field and evaluating a generic form of the hypothesized energy spectrum. The ratio of the SGS drain to the resolved dissipation, on which a balance condition for the SGS dissipation across an arbitrary grid scale is founded, is shown to be independent of the turbulence Reynolds number, and can be described by a function in terms of the averaged mesh Reynolds number. Such a balance condition can serve as a physical constraint in the SGS modeling to account for the scale effects of the model coefficient(s). Scale-adaptive dynamic Smagorinsky-Lilly model and mixed nonlinear model are formulated for large-eddy simulation of transitional and/or turbulent flows in such a way that the constraint is satisfied. The newly proposed scale-adaptive dynamic SGS models are validated in simulations of homogeneous isotropic turbulence and turbulent channel flow, and prove to be superior over traditional dynamic SGS models.

  14. Self-* and Adaptive Mechanisms for Large Scale Distributed Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragopoulou, P.; Mastroianni, C.; Montero, R.; Andrjezak, A.; Kondo, D.

    Large-scale distributed computing systems and infrastructure, such as Grids, P2P systems and desktop Grid platforms, are decentralized, pervasive, and composed of a large number of autonomous entities. The complexity of these systems is such that human administration is nearly impossible and centralized or hierarchical control is highly inefficient. These systems need to run on highly dynamic environments, where content, network topologies and workloads are continuously changing. Moreover, they are characterized by the high degree of volatility of their components and the need to provide efficient service management and to handle efficiently large amounts of data. This paper describes some of the areas for which adaptation emerges as a key feature, namely, the management of computational Grids, the self-management of desktop Grid platforms and the monitoring and healing of complex applications. It also elaborates on the use of bio-inspired algorithms to achieve self-management. Related future trends and challenges are described.

  15. Scale Adaptive Simulation Model for the Darrieus Wind Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogowski, K.; Hansen, M. O. L.; Maroński, R.; Lichota, P.

    2016-09-01

    Accurate prediction of aerodynamic loads for the Darrieus wind turbine using more or less complex aerodynamic models is still a challenge. One of the problems is the small amount of experimental data available to validate the numerical codes. The major objective of the present study is to examine the scale adaptive simulation (SAS) approach for performance analysis of a one-bladed Darrieus wind turbine working at a tip speed ratio of 5 and at a blade Reynolds number of 40 000. The three-dimensional incompressible unsteady Navier-Stokes equations are used. Numerical results of aerodynamic loads and wake velocity profiles behind the rotor are compared with experimental data taken from literature. The level of agreement between CFD and experimental results is reasonable.

  16. Toward a General Nonlinear Model of Reduced Scale UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chriette, A.; Cheviron, T.; Plestan, F.

    2009-03-01

    This paper proposes, through a survey of models of several UAV-Structures, a generic nonlinear model for reduced scale aerial robotic vehicles (6 DOF)*. Dynamics of an aircraft and some VTOL UAV (quadricopter, ducted fan and classical helicopter) are illustrated. This generic model focuses only on the key physical efforts acting on the dynamics in order to be sufficiently simple to design a controller. The Small Body Forces expression which can introduce a zero dynamics is then discussed.

  17. Multi-Scale SSA or Data-Adaptive Wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiou, P.; Sornette, D.; Sornette, D.; Sornette, D.; Ghil, M.; Ghil, M.

    2001-05-01

    Using multi-scale ideas from wavelet analysis, the singular-spectrum analysis (SSA) is extended to the study of nonstationary time series, including the case where their variance diverges. The wavelet transform is similar to a local Fourier transform within a finite moving window whose width W, proportional to the major period of interest, is varied to explore a broad range of such periods. SSA, on the other hand, relies on the construction of the lag-correlation matrix C on M lagged copies of the time series over a fixed window width W proportional to M to detect the regular part of the variability in that window in terms of the minimal number of oscillatory components. The proposed multi-scale SSA is a local SSA analysis within a moving window of width M<= W <= N, where N is the length of the time series. Multi-scale SSA varies W, while keeping a fixed W/M ratio, and uses the eigenvectors of the corresponding lag-correlation matrix C(M) as data-adaptive wavelets; successive eigenvectors of C(M) correspond approximately to successive derivatives of the first mother wavelet in standard wavelet analysis. Multi-scale SSA thus solves objectively the delicate problem of optimizing the analyzing wavelet in the time-frequency domain, by a suitable localization of the signal's correlation matrix. We present several examples of application to synthetic signals with fractal or power-law behavior which mimic selected features of certain climatic or geophysical time series. The method is applied to the monthly values of the Southern Oscillation index (SOI) which captures major features of the El Niño/Southern Oscillation in the Tropical Pacific. Our methodology highlights an abrupt periodicity shift in the SOI near 1960. This abrupt shift between 5 and 3 years supports the Devil's staircase scenario for the El Niño/Southern Oscillation phenomenon.

  18. Designing for Change: Interoperability in a scaling and adapting environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarmey, L.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth Science cyberinfrastructure landscape is constantly changing. Technologies advance and technical implementations are refined or replaced. Data types, volumes, packaging, and use cases evolve. Scientific requirements emerge and mature. Standards shift while systems scale and adapt. In this complex and dynamic environment, interoperability remains a critical component of successful cyberinfrastructure. Through the resource- and priority-driven iterations on systems, interfaces, and content, questions fundamental to stable and useful Earth Science cyberinfrastructure arise. For instance, how are sociotechnical changes planned, tracked, and communicated? How should operational stability balance against 'new and shiny'? How can ongoing maintenance and mitigation of technical debt be managed in an often short-term resource environment? The Arctic Data Explorer is a metadata brokering application developed to enable discovery of international, interdisciplinary Arctic data across distributed repositories. Completely dependent on interoperable third party systems, the Arctic Data Explorer publicly launched in 2013 with an original 3000+ data records from four Arctic repositories. Since then the search has scaled to 25,000+ data records from thirteen repositories at the time of writing. In the final months of original project funding, priorities shift to lean operations with a strategic eye on the future. Here we present lessons learned from four years of Arctic Data Explorer design, development, communication, and maintenance work along with remaining questions and potential directions.

  19. [Spanish adaptation of a perceived Social Support Scale in sportspeople].

    PubMed

    Pedrosa, Ignacio; García-Cueto, Eduardo; Suárez-Álvarez, Javier; Pérez Sánchez, Blanca

    2012-01-01

    Social support is a variable that has a great influence in the sport context. In fact, this variable not only affects the athlete's performance but it has also shown to be related to psychological disorders such as Burnout Syndrome. The aim of this paper was to illustrate the Spanish adaptation of a social support scale in the sport context. The normative group who took part in the final version of the research was composed of 397 athletes aged between 13 and 64 years old (mean= 19.23 and standard deviation= 6.67). The scale shows: adequate factorial and construct validity, acceptable fit indexes (Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin= 0.785, Root Mean Square Residual= 0.078; Kelly's criterion= 0.075), a negative correlation with the dimensions of burnout and no relationship with respect to self-esteem. In addition, it also shows high reliability (a= 0.88). Furthermore, statistically significant differences have been found in relation to genders - where women require greater social support. In contrast, males tend to display a lower level of social support with team players and international athletes. Moreover, differential item functioning (DIF) was carried out to explore sex bias, however, none of the items exhibit DIF problems.

  20. An assessment of the impact of climate adaptation measures to reduce flood risk on ecosystem services.

    PubMed

    Verburg, Peter H; Koomen, Eric; Hilferink, Maarten; Pérez-Soba, Marta; Lesschen, Jan Peter

    Measures of climate change adaptation often involve modification of land use and land use planning practices. Such changes in land use affect the provision of various ecosystem goods and services. Therefore, it is likely that adaptation measures may result in synergies and trade-offs between a range of ecosystems goods and services. An integrative land use modelling approach is presented to assess such impacts for the European Union. A reference scenario accounts for current trends in global drivers and includes a number of important policy developments that correspond to on-going changes in European policies. The reference scenario is compared to a policy scenario in which a range of measures is implemented to regulate flood risk and protect soils under conditions of climate change. The impacts of the simulated land use dynamics are assessed for four key indicators of ecosystem service provision: flood risk, carbon sequestration, habitat connectivity and biodiversity. The results indicate a large spatial variation in the consequences of the adaptation measures on the provisioning of ecosystem services. Synergies are frequently observed at the location of the measures itself, whereas trade-offs are found at other locations. Reducing land use intensity in specific parts of the catchment may lead to increased pressure in other regions, resulting in trade-offs. Consequently, when aggregating the results to larger spatial scales the positive and negative impacts may be off-set, indicating the need for detailed spatial assessments. The modelled results indicate that for a careful planning and evaluation of adaptation measures it is needed to consider the trade-offs accounting for the negative effects of a measure at locations distant from the actual measure. Integrated land use modelling can help land use planning in such complex trade-off evaluation by providing evidence on synergies and trade-offs between ecosystem services, different policy fields and societal

  1. Development and Standardization of the Diagnostic Adaptive Behavior Scale: Application of Item Response Theory to the Assessment of Adaptive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tassé, Marc J.; Schalock, Robert L.; Thissen, David; Balboni, Giulia; Bersani, Henry, Jr.; Borthwick-Duffy, Sharon A.; Spreat, Scott; Widaman, Keith F.; Zhang, Dalun; Navas, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    The Diagnostic Adaptive Behavior Scale (DABS) was developed using item response theory (IRT) methods and was constructed to provide the most precise and valid adaptive behavior information at or near the cutoff point of making a decision regarding a diagnosis of intellectual disability. The DABS initial item pool consisted of 260 items. Using IRT…

  2. Adaptive motion artifact reducing algorithm for wrist photoplethysmography application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jingwei; Wang, Guijin; Shi, Chenbo

    2016-04-01

    Photoplethysmography (PPG) technology is widely used in wearable heart pulse rate monitoring. It might reveal the potential risks of heart condition and cardiopulmonary function by detecting the cardiac rhythms in physical exercise. However the quality of wrist photoelectric signal is very sensitive to motion artifact since the thicker tissues and the fewer amount of capillaries. Therefore, motion artifact is the major factor that impede the heart rate measurement in the high intensity exercising. One accelerometer and three channels of light with different wavelengths are used in this research to analyze the coupled form of motion artifact. A novel approach is proposed to separate the pulse signal from motion artifact by exploiting their mixing ratio in different optical paths. There are four major steps of our method: preprocessing, motion artifact estimation, adaptive filtering and heart rate calculation. Five healthy young men are participated in the experiment. The speeder in the treadmill is configured as 12km/h, and all subjects would run for 3-10 minutes by swinging the arms naturally. The final result is compared with chest strap. The average of mean square error (MSE) is less than 3 beats per minute (BPM/min). Proposed method performed well in intense physical exercise and shows the great robustness to individuals with different running style and posture.

  3. Barriers to reducing climate enhanced disaster risks in Least Developed Country-Small Islands through anticipatory adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuruppu, N.; Willie, R.

    2015-12-01

    Small Island Developing States (SIDS) classified as Least Developed Countries (LDCs) are particularly vulnerable to the projected impacts of climate change. Given their particular vulnerabilities, climate adaptation investments are being made through both national and international efforts to build the capacity of various sectors and communities to reduce climate risks and associated disasters. Despite these efforts, reducing climate risks is not free of various challenges and barriers. This paper aims to synthesise a set of critical socio-economic barriers present at various spatial scales that are specific to Least Developed Country SIDS. It also aims to identify the processes that give rise to these barriers. Drawing on theories from natural hazards, a systematic literature review method was adopted to identify and organise the set of barriers by focussing both on academic papers and grey literature. The data revealed a notable lack of studies on adaptation within African and Caribbean LDC-SIDS. In general, there was a paucity of academic as well as grey literature being produced by authors from LDC-SIDS to challenge existing discourses related to adaptation barriers. The most common barriers identified included those related to governance, technical, cognitive and cultural. Three key findings can be drawn from this study in relation to formal adaptation initiatives. Firstly, the lack of focus on the adaptive capacity needs of Local Government or Island Councils and communities was a key barrier to ensuring success of adaptation interventions. Secondly, international adaptation funding modalities did little to address root causes of vulnerability or support system transformations. These funds were geared at supporting sectoral level adaptation initiatives for vulnerable natural resource sectors such as water, biodiversity and coastal zones. Thirdly, there is a need to recognise the significance of cultural knowledge and practices in shaping adaptive choices of

  4. An epidemic spreading model on adaptive scale-free networks with feedback mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Liu, Xiongding; Wu, Jie; Wan, Chen; Guan, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Yuanmei

    2016-05-01

    A SIRS epidemic model with feedback mechanism on adaptive scale-free networks is presented. Using the mean field theory the spreading dynamics of the epidemic is studied in detail. The basic reproductive number and equilibriums are derived. Theoretical results indicate that the basic reproductive number is significantly dependent on the topology of the underlying networks. The existence of equilibriums is determined by the basic reproductive number. The global stability of disease-free equilibrium and the epidemic permanence are proved in detail. The feedback mechanism cannot change the basic reproductive number, but it can reduce the endemic level and weaken the epidemic spreading. Numerical simulations confirmed the analytical results.

  5. Adaptive Texture Synthesis for Large Scale City Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despine, G.; Colleu, T.

    2015-02-01

    Large scale city models textured with aerial images are well suited for bird-eye navigation but generally the image resolution does not allow pedestrian navigation. One solution to face this problem is to use high resolution terrestrial photos but it requires huge amount of manual work to remove occlusions. Another solution is to synthesize generic textures with a set of procedural rules and elementary patterns like bricks, roof tiles, doors and windows. This solution may give realistic textures but with no correlation to the ground truth. Instead of using pure procedural modelling we present a method to extract information from aerial images and adapt the texture synthesis to each building. We describe a workflow allowing the user to drive the information extraction and to select the appropriate texture patterns. We also emphasize the importance to organize the knowledge about elementary pattern in a texture catalogue allowing attaching physical information, semantic attributes and to execute selection requests. Roofs are processed according to the detected building material. Façades are first described in terms of principal colours, then opening positions are detected and some window features are computed. These features allow selecting the most appropriate patterns from the texture catalogue. We experimented this workflow on two samples with 20 cm and 5 cm resolution images. The roof texture synthesis and opening detection were successfully conducted on hundreds of buildings. The window characterization is still sensitive to the distortions inherent to the projection of aerial images onto the facades.

  6. Electrostimulation to reduce synaptic scaling driven progression of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Mark S; Neymotin, Samuel A; Lytton, William W

    2014-01-01

    Cell death and synapse dysfunction are two likely causes of cognitive decline in AD. As cells die and synapses lose their drive, remaining cells suffer an initial decrease in activity. Neuronal homeostatic synaptic scaling then provides a feedback mechanism to restore activity. This homeostatic mechanism is believed to sense levels of activity-dependent cytosolic calcium within the cell and to adjust neuronal firing activity by increasing the density of AMPA synapses at remaining synapses to achieve balance. The scaling mechanism increases the firing rates of remaining cells in the network to compensate for decreases in network activity. However, this effect can itself become a pathology, as it produces increased imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory circuits, leading to greater susceptibility to further cell loss via calcium-mediated excitotoxicity. Here, we present a mechanistic explanation of how directed brain stimulation might be expected to slow AD progression based on computational simulations in a 470-neuron biomimetic model of a neocortical column. The simulations demonstrate that the addition of low-intensity electrostimulation (neuroprosthesis) to a network undergoing AD-like cell death can raise global activity and break this homeostatic-excitotoxic cascade. The increase in activity within the remaining cells in the column results in lower scaling-driven AMPAR upregulation, reduced imbalances in excitatory and inhibitory circuits, and lower susceptibility to ongoing damage.

  7. Electrostimulation to reduce synaptic scaling driven progression of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, Mark S.; Neymotin, Samuel A.; Lytton, William W.

    2014-01-01

    Cell death and synapse dysfunction are two likely causes of cognitive decline in AD. As cells die and synapses lose their drive, remaining cells suffer an initial decrease in activity. Neuronal homeostatic synaptic scaling then provides a feedback mechanism to restore activity. This homeostatic mechanism is believed to sense levels of activity-dependent cytosolic calcium within the cell and to adjust neuronal firing activity by increasing the density of AMPA synapses at remaining synapses to achieve balance. The scaling mechanism increases the firing rates of remaining cells in the network to compensate for decreases in network activity. However, this effect can itself become a pathology, as it produces increased imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory circuits, leading to greater susceptibility to further cell loss via calcium-mediated excitotoxicity. Here, we present a mechanistic explanation of how directed brain stimulation might be expected to slow AD progression based on computational simulations in a 470-neuron biomimetic model of a neocortical column. The simulations demonstrate that the addition of low-intensity electrostimulation (neuroprosthesis) to a network undergoing AD-like cell death can raise global activity and break this homeostatic-excitotoxic cascade. The increase in activity within the remaining cells in the column results in lower scaling-driven AMPAR upregulation, reduced imbalances in excitatory and inhibitory circuits, and lower susceptibility to ongoing damage. PMID:24765074

  8. Integrating Systems Health Management with Adaptive Controls for a Utility-Scale Wind Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Susan A.; Goebel, Kai; Trinh, Khanh V.; Balas, Mark J.; Frost, Alan M.

    2011-01-01

    Increasing turbine up-time and reducing maintenance costs are key technology drivers for wind turbine operators. Components within wind turbines are subject to considerable stresses due to unpredictable environmental conditions resulting from rapidly changing local dynamics. Systems health management has the aim to assess the state-of-health of components within a wind turbine, to estimate remaining life, and to aid in autonomous decision-making to minimize damage. Advanced adaptive controls can provide the mechanism to enable optimized operations that also provide the enabling technology for Systems Health Management goals. The work reported herein explores the integration of condition monitoring of wind turbine blades with contingency management and adaptive controls. Results are demonstrated using a high fidelity simulator of a utility-scale wind turbine.

  9. Scaling multiconjugate adaptive optics performance estimates to extremely large telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellerbroek, Brent L.; Rigaut, Francois J.

    2000-07-01

    Multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) is a key technology for extremely large, ground-based telescopes (ELT's) because it enables near-uniform atmospheric turbulence compensation over fields-of-view considerably larger than can be corrected with more conventional AO systems. Quantitative performance evaluation using detailed analytical or simulation models is difficult, however, due to the very large number of deformable mirror (DM) actuators, wave front sensors (WFS) subapertures, and guide stars which might comprise an MCAO system for an ELT. This paper employs more restricted minimal variance estimation methods to evaluate the fundamental performance limits imposed by anisoplanatism alone upon MCAO performance for a range of sample cases. Each case is defined by a atmospheric turbulence profile, telescope aperture diameter, field-of-view, guide star constellation, and set of DM conjugate ranges. For a Kolmogorov turbulence spectrum with an infinite outer scale, MCAO performance for a whole range of aperture diameters and proportional fields-of-view can be computed at once using a scaling law analogous to the (D/dO)5/3 formula for the cone effect. For 30 meter telescopes, useful levels of performance are possible across a 1.0 - 2.0 arc minute square field-of-view using 5 laser guide stars (LGS's) and 3 DM's, and somewhat larger fields can be corrected using 9 guide stars and 4 mirrors. 3 or more tip/tilt natural guide stars (NGS's) are necessary to detect modes of tilt anisoplanatism which cannot be detected using LGS's, however. LGS MCAO performance is a quite weak function of aperture diameter for a fixed field-of-view, and it is tempting to scale these results to larger apertures. NGS MCAO performance is moderately superior to LGS MCAO if the NGS constellation is within the compensated field-of-view, but degrades rapidly as the guide stars move away from the field. The penalty relaxes slowly with increasing aperture diameter, but how to extrapolate this trend

  10. Reduced fine-scale spatial genetic structure in grazed populations of Dianthus carthusianorum.

    PubMed

    Rico, Y; Wagner, H H

    2016-11-01

    Strong spatial genetic structure in plant populations can increase homozygosity, reducing genetic diversity and adaptive potential. The strength of spatial genetic structure largely depends on rates of seed dispersal and pollen flow. Seeds without dispersal adaptations are likely to be dispersed over short distances within the vicinity of the mother plant, resulting in spatial clustering of related genotypes (fine-scale spatial genetic structure, hereafter spatial genetic structure (SGS)). However, primary seed dispersal by zoochory can promote effective dispersal, increasing the mixing of seeds and influencing SGS within plant populations. In this study, we investigated the effects of seed dispersal by rotational sheep grazing on the strength of SGS and genetic diversity using 11 nuclear microsatellites for 49 populations of the calcareous grassland forb Dianthus carthusianorum. Populations connected by rotational sheep grazing showed significantly weaker SGS and higher genetic diversity than populations in ungrazed grasslands. Independent of grazing treatment, small populations showed significantly stronger SGS and lower genetic diversity than larger populations, likely due to genetic drift. A lack of significant differences in the strength of SGS and genetic diversity between populations that were recently colonized and pre-existing populations suggested that populations colonized after the reintroduction of rotational sheep grazing were likely founded by colonists from diverse source populations. We conclude that dispersal by rotational sheep grazing has the potential to considerably reduce SGS within D. carthusianorum populations. Our study highlights the effectiveness of landscape management by rotational sheep grazing to importantly reduce genetic structure at local scales within restored plant populations.

  11. Linear-scaling symmetry-adapted perturbation theory with scaled dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Maurer, Simon A.; Beer, Matthias; Lambrecht, Daniel S.; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2013-11-14

    We present a linear-scaling symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) method that is based on an atomic orbital (AO) formulation of zeroth-order SAPT (SAPT0). The non-dispersive terms are realized with linear-scaling cost using both the continuous fast multipole method (CFMM) and the linear exchange (LinK) approach for integral contractions as well as our efficient Laplace-based coupled-perturbed self-consistent field method (DL-CPSCF) for evaluating response densities. The reformulation of the dispersion term is based on our linear-scaling AO Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation theory (AO-MP2) method, that uses our recently introduced QQR-type screening [S. A. Maurer, D. S. Lambrecht, J. Kussmann, and C. Ochsenfeld, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 014101 (2013)] for preselecting numerically significant energy contributions. Similar to scaled opposite-spin MP2, we neglect the exchange-dispersion term in SAPT and introduce a scaling factor for the dispersion term, which compensates for the error and at the same time accounts for basis set incompleteness effects and intramonomer correlation. We show in extensive benchmark calculations that the new scaled-dispersion (sd-)SAPT0 approach provides reliable results for small and large interacting systems where the results with a small 6-31G** basis are roughly comparable to supermolecular MP2 calculations in a triple-zeta basis. The performance of our method is demonstrated with timings on cellulose fragments, DNA systems, and cutouts of a protein-ligand complex with up to 1100 atoms on a single computer core.

  12. An Adaptive Multiscale Finite Element Method for Large Scale Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-28

    non-linear iterative solution process. Non-linear fine scale solutions are embedded in the global scale using the partition of unity framework of the...process. Non-linear fine-scale solutions are embedded in the global scale using the partition of unity framework of the Generalized FEM. Damage information...iterative solution process. Non-linear fine-scale solutions are embedded in the global scale using the partition of unity framework of the

  13. Investigating Validity Evidence of the Satisfaction with Life Scale Adapted for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadermann, Anne M.; Schonert-Reichl, Kimberly A.; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    2010-01-01

    This study introduces the Satisfaction with Life Scale adapted for Children (SWLS-C) and presents psychometric findings regarding its validation. The SWLS-C was adapted from the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS; Diener et al. 1985), which is one of the most commonly used measures to assess satisfaction with life in adults. Three subject matter…

  14. The Adaptation of Creativity Fostering Primary Teachers Index Scale into Turkish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dikici, Ayhan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to adapt the creativity fostering teacher index scale into Turkish. For the language equivalence, firstly, the English version of the scale was translated by 30 English lecturers and then the Turkish version of the scale retranslated by the same lecturers. Later, the scale was applied to 288 teachers working in Nigde…

  15. The Adaptation of Antisocial Beliefs and Attitudes Scales: Case from Turkish Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurioglu, Lili; Tümkaya, Songül

    2016-01-01

    This study is focused on adapting the scales known as "Antisocial Beliefs and Attitudes Scales" ("ABAS") into Turkish version. The general aim of the study is to propound the Turkish version of the ABAS and to see if the scale functions in a similar fashion in Turkey in terms of its psychometric properties. The scales were…

  16. A comparison of stopping rules for computerized adaptive screening measures using the rating scale model.

    PubMed

    Leroux, Audrey J; Dodd, Barbara G

    2014-01-01

    The current study evaluates three stopping rules for computerized adaptive testing (CAT): the predicted standard error reduction (PSER), the fixed-length, and the minimum SE using Andrich's rating scale model with a survey to identify at-risk students. PSER attempts to reduce the number of items administered and increase measurement precision of the trait. Several variables are manipulated, such as trait distribution and item pool size, in order to evaluate how these conditions interact and potentially help improve the correct classification of students. The findings indicate that the PSER stopping rule may be preferred when wanting to correctly diagnose or classify students at-risk and at the same time alleviate test burden for those taking screening measures based on the rating scale model with smaller item pools.

  17. Fuzzy adaptive strong tracking scaled unscented Kalman filter for initial alignment of large misalignment angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Song, Ningfang; Yang, Gongliu; Jiang, Rui

    2016-07-01

    In the initial alignment process of strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS), large misalignment angles always bring nonlinear problem, which can usually be processed using the scaled unscented Kalman filter (SUKF). In this paper, the problem of large misalignment angles in SINS alignment is further investigated, and the strong tracking scaled unscented Kalman filter (STSUKF) is proposed with fixed parameters to improve convergence speed, while these parameters are artificially constructed and uncertain in real application. To further improve the alignment stability and reduce the parameters selection, this paper proposes a fuzzy adaptive strategy combined with STSUKF (FUZZY-STSUKF). As a result, initial alignment scheme of large misalignment angles based on FUZZY-STSUKF is designed and verified by simulations and turntable experiment. The results show that the scheme improves the accuracy and convergence speed of SINS initial alignment compared with those based on SUKF and STSUKF.

  18. Fuzzy adaptive strong tracking scaled unscented Kalman filter for initial alignment of large misalignment angles.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Song, Ningfang; Yang, Gongliu; Jiang, Rui

    2016-07-01

    In the initial alignment process of strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS), large misalignment angles always bring nonlinear problem, which can usually be processed using the scaled unscented Kalman filter (SUKF). In this paper, the problem of large misalignment angles in SINS alignment is further investigated, and the strong tracking scaled unscented Kalman filter (STSUKF) is proposed with fixed parameters to improve convergence speed, while these parameters are artificially constructed and uncertain in real application. To further improve the alignment stability and reduce the parameters selection, this paper proposes a fuzzy adaptive strategy combined with STSUKF (FUZZY-STSUKF). As a result, initial alignment scheme of large misalignment angles based on FUZZY-STSUKF is designed and verified by simulations and turntable experiment. The results show that the scheme improves the accuracy and convergence speed of SINS initial alignment compared with those based on SUKF and STSUKF.

  19. Future Arctic climate changes: Adaptation and mitigation time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overland, James E.; Wang, Muyin; Walsh, John E.; Stroeve, Julienne C.

    2014-02-01

    The climate in the Arctic is changing faster than in midlatitudes. This is shown by increased temperatures, loss of summer sea ice, earlier snow melt, impacts on ecosystems, and increased economic access. Arctic sea ice volume has decreased by 75% since the 1980s. Long-lasting global anthropogenic forcing from carbon dioxide has increased over the previous decades and is anticipated to increase over the next decades. Temperature increases in response to greenhouse gases are amplified in the Arctic through feedback processes associated with shifts in albedo, ocean and land heat storage, and near-surface longwave radiation fluxes. Thus, for the next few decades out to 2040, continuing environmental changes in the Arctic are very likely, and the appropriate response is to plan for adaptation to these changes. For example, it is very likely that the Arctic Ocean will become seasonally nearly sea ice free before 2050 and possibly within a decade or two, which in turn will further increase Arctic temperatures, economic access, and ecological shifts. Mitigation becomes an important option to reduce potential Arctic impacts in the second half of the 21st century. Using the most recent set of climate model projections (CMIP5), multimodel mean temperature projections show an Arctic-wide end of century increase of +13°C in late fall and +5°C in late spring for a business-as-usual emission scenario (RCP8.5) in contrast to +7°C in late fall and +3°C in late spring if civilization follows a mitigation scenario (RCP4.5). Such temperature increases demonstrate the heightened sensitivity of the Arctic to greenhouse gas forcing.

  20. The Adaptation of Academic Motivation Scale to Turkish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karaguven, M. Hulya Unal

    2012-01-01

    The current study evaluated the psychometric evidence of Turkish form of the Academic Motivation Scale. The scale was based on the tenets of self-determination theory. It was designed to assess an individual's academic motivation if intrinsically or extrinsically driven with 28 questions. University form of the scale was translated into Turkish…

  1. Invasive lionfish reduce native fish abundance on a regional scale.

    PubMed

    Ballew, Nicholas G; Bacheler, Nathan M; Kellison, G Todd; Schueller, Amy M

    2016-08-31

    Invasive lionfish pose an unprecedented threat to biodiversity and fisheries throughout Atlantic waters off of the southeastern United States, the Caribbean, and the Gulf of Mexico. Here, we employ a spatially replicated Before-After-Control-Impact analysis with temporal pairing to quantify for the first time the impact of the lionfish invasion on native fish abundance across a broad regional scale and over the entire duration of the lionfish invasion (1990-2014). Our results suggest that 1) lionfish-impacted areas off of the southeastern United States are most prevalent off-shore near the continental shelf-break but are also common near-shore and 2) in impacted areas, lionfish have reduced tomtate (a native forage fish) abundance by 45% since the invasion began. Tomtate served as a model native fish species in our analysis, and as such, it is likely that the lionfish invasion has had similar impacts on other species, some of which may be of economic importance. Barring the development of a control strategy that reverses the lionfish invasion, the abundance of lionfish in the Atlantic, Caribbean, and Gulf of Mexico will likely remain at or above current levels. Consequently, the effect of lionfish on native fish abundance will likely continue for the foreseeable future.

  2. Invasive lionfish reduce native fish abundance on a regional scale

    PubMed Central

    Ballew, Nicholas G.; Bacheler, Nathan M.; Kellison, G. Todd; Schueller, Amy M.

    2016-01-01

    Invasive lionfish pose an unprecedented threat to biodiversity and fisheries throughout Atlantic waters off of the southeastern United States, the Caribbean, and the Gulf of Mexico. Here, we employ a spatially replicated Before-After-Control-Impact analysis with temporal pairing to quantify for the first time the impact of the lionfish invasion on native fish abundance across a broad regional scale and over the entire duration of the lionfish invasion (1990–2014). Our results suggest that 1) lionfish-impacted areas off of the southeastern United States are most prevalent off-shore near the continental shelf-break but are also common near-shore and 2) in impacted areas, lionfish have reduced tomtate (a native forage fish) abundance by 45% since the invasion began. Tomtate served as a model native fish species in our analysis, and as such, it is likely that the lionfish invasion has had similar impacts on other species, some of which may be of economic importance. Barring the development of a control strategy that reverses the lionfish invasion, the abundance of lionfish in the Atlantic, Caribbean, and Gulf of Mexico will likely remain at or above current levels. Consequently, the effect of lionfish on native fish abundance will likely continue for the foreseeable future. PMID:27578096

  3. Invasive lionfish reduce native fish abundance on a regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballew, Nicholas G.; Bacheler, Nathan M.; Kellison, G. Todd; Schueller, Amy M.

    2016-08-01

    Invasive lionfish pose an unprecedented threat to biodiversity and fisheries throughout Atlantic waters off of the southeastern United States, the Caribbean, and the Gulf of Mexico. Here, we employ a spatially replicated Before-After-Control-Impact analysis with temporal pairing to quantify for the first time the impact of the lionfish invasion on native fish abundance across a broad regional scale and over the entire duration of the lionfish invasion (1990–2014). Our results suggest that 1) lionfish-impacted areas off of the southeastern United States are most prevalent off-shore near the continental shelf-break but are also common near-shore and 2) in impacted areas, lionfish have reduced tomtate (a native forage fish) abundance by 45% since the invasion began. Tomtate served as a model native fish species in our analysis, and as such, it is likely that the lionfish invasion has had similar impacts on other species, some of which may be of economic importance. Barring the development of a control strategy that reverses the lionfish invasion, the abundance of lionfish in the Atlantic, Caribbean, and Gulf of Mexico will likely remain at or above current levels. Consequently, the effect of lionfish on native fish abundance will likely continue for the foreseeable future.

  4. Older adults learn less, but still reduce metabolic cost, during motor adaptation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Helen J; Ahmed, Alaa A

    2014-01-01

    The ability to learn new movements and dynamics is important for maintaining independence with advancing age. Age-related sensorimotor changes and increased muscle coactivation likely alter the trial-and-error-based process of adapting to new movement demands (motor adaptation). Here, we asked, to what extent is motor adaptation to novel dynamics maintained in older adults (≥65 yr)? We hypothesized that older adults would adapt to the novel dynamics less well than young adults. Because older adults often use muscle coactivation, we expected older adults to use greater muscle coactivation during motor adaptation than young adults. Nevertheless, we predicted that older adults would reduce muscle activity and metabolic cost with motor adaptation, similar to young adults. Seated older (n = 11, 73.8 ± 5.6 yr) and young (n = 15, 23.8 ± 4.7 yr) adults made targeted reaching movements while grasping a robotic arm. We measured their metabolic rate continuously via expired gas analysis. A force field was used to add novel dynamics. Older adults had greater movement deviations and compensated for just 65% of the novel dynamics compared with 84% in young adults. As expected, older adults used greater muscle coactivation than young adults. Last, older adults reduced muscle activity with motor adaptation and had consistent reductions in metabolic cost later during motor adaptation, similar to young adults. These results suggest that despite increased muscle coactivation, older adults can adapt to the novel dynamics, albeit less accurately. These results also suggest that reductions in metabolic cost may be a fundamental feature of motor adaptation.

  5. Older adults learn less, but still reduce metabolic cost, during motor adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Helen J.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to learn new movements and dynamics is important for maintaining independence with advancing age. Age-related sensorimotor changes and increased muscle coactivation likely alter the trial-and-error-based process of adapting to new movement demands (motor adaptation). Here, we asked, to what extent is motor adaptation to novel dynamics maintained in older adults (≥65 yr)? We hypothesized that older adults would adapt to the novel dynamics less well than young adults. Because older adults often use muscle coactivation, we expected older adults to use greater muscle coactivation during motor adaptation than young adults. Nevertheless, we predicted that older adults would reduce muscle activity and metabolic cost with motor adaptation, similar to young adults. Seated older (n = 11, 73.8 ± 5.6 yr) and young (n = 15, 23.8 ± 4.7 yr) adults made targeted reaching movements while grasping a robotic arm. We measured their metabolic rate continuously via expired gas analysis. A force field was used to add novel dynamics. Older adults had greater movement deviations and compensated for just 65% of the novel dynamics compared with 84% in young adults. As expected, older adults used greater muscle coactivation than young adults. Last, older adults reduced muscle activity with motor adaptation and had consistent reductions in metabolic cost later during motor adaptation, similar to young adults. These results suggest that despite increased muscle coactivation, older adults can adapt to the novel dynamics, albeit less accurately. These results also suggest that reductions in metabolic cost may be a fundamental feature of motor adaptation. PMID:24133222

  6. An Adaptive Middleware Framework for Scientific Computing at Extreme Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Gosney, Arzu; Oehmen, Christopher S.; Wynne, Adam S.; Almquist, Justin P.

    2010-08-04

    Large computing systems including clusters, clouds, and grids, provide high-performance capabilities that can be utilized for many applications. But as the ubiquity of these systems increases and the scope of analysis being done on them grows, there is a growing need for applications that 1) do not require users to learn the details of high performance systems, and 2) are flexible and adaptive in their usage of these systems to accommodate the best time-to-solution for end users. We introduce a new adaptive interface design and a prototype implementation within the framework of an established middleware framework, MeDICi, for high performance computing systems and describe the applicability of this adaptive design to a real-life scientific workflow. This adaptive framework provides an access model for implementing a processing pipeline using high performance systems that are not local to the data source, making it possible for the compute capabilities at one site to be applied to analysis on data being generated at another site in an automated process. This adaptive design improves overall time-to-solution by moving the data analysis task to the most appropriate resource dynamically, reacting to failures and load fluctuations.

  7. Turkish Adaptation of the Mentorship Effectiveness Scale: A Validity and Reliability Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yirci, Ramazan; Karakose, Turgut; Uygun, Harun; Ozdemir, Tuncay Yavuz

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to adapt the Mentoring Relationship Effectiveness Scale to Turkish, and to conduct validity and reliability tests regarding the scale. The study group consisted of 156 university science students receiving graduate education. Construct validity and factor structure of the scale was analyzed first through exploratory…

  8. Computer Adaptive Testing for Small Scale Programs and Instructional Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudner, Lawrence M.; Guo, Fanmin

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates measurement decision theory (MDT) as an underlying model for computer adaptive testing when the goal is to classify examinees into one of a finite number of groups. The first analysis compares MDT with a popular item response theory model and finds little difference in terms of the percentage of correct classifications. The…

  9. Adaptation of Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge Scale to Turkish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaya, Zehra; Kaya, Osman Nafiz; Emre, Irfan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to adapt "Survey of Pre-service Teachers' Knowledge of Teaching and Technology" in order to assess pre-service primary teachers' Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) to Turkish. 407 pre-service primary teachers (227 female and 180 male) in their final semester in Education Faculties in Turkey…

  10. Integrating adaptive behaviour in large-scale flood risk assessments: an Agent-Based Modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haer, Toon; Aerts, Jeroen

    2015-04-01

    Between 1998 and 2009, Europe suffered over 213 major damaging floods, causing 1126 deaths, displacing around half a million people. In this period, floods caused at least 52 billion euro in insured economic losses making floods the most costly natural hazard faced in Europe. In many low-lying areas, the main strategy to cope with floods is to reduce the risk of the hazard through flood defence structures, like dikes and levees. However, it is suggested that part of the responsibility for flood protection needs to shift to households and businesses in areas at risk, and that governments and insurers can effectively stimulate the implementation of individual protective measures. However, adaptive behaviour towards flood risk reduction and the interaction between the government, insurers, and individuals has hardly been studied in large-scale flood risk assessments. In this study, an European Agent-Based Model is developed including agent representatives for the administrative stakeholders of European Member states, insurers and reinsurers markets, and individuals following complex behaviour models. The Agent-Based Modelling approach allows for an in-depth analysis of the interaction between heterogeneous autonomous agents and the resulting (non-)adaptive behaviour. Existing flood damage models are part of the European Agent-Based Model to allow for a dynamic response of both the agents and the environment to changing flood risk and protective efforts. By following an Agent-Based Modelling approach this study is a first contribution to overcome the limitations of traditional large-scale flood risk models in which the influence of individual adaptive behaviour towards flood risk reduction is often lacking.

  11. Cultural adaptation and validation of Stroke Impact Scale 3.0 version in Uganda: A small-scale study

    PubMed Central

    Kamwesiga, Julius T; von Koch, Lena; Kottorp, Anders; Guidetti, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Background: Knowledge is scarce about the impact of stroke in Uganda, and culturally adapted, psychometrically tested patient-reported outcome measures are lacking. The Stroke Impact Scale 3.0 is recommended, but it has not been culturally adapted and validated in Uganda. Objective: To culturally adapt and determine the psychometric properties of the Stroke Impact Scale 3.0 in the Ugandan context on a small scale. Method: The Stroke Impact Scale 3.0 was culturally adapted to form Stroke Impact Scale 3.0 Uganda (in English) by involving 25 participants in three different expert committees. Subsequently, Stroke Impact Scale 3.0 Uganda from English to Luganda language was done in accordance with guidelines. The first language in Uganda is English and Luganda is the main spoken language in Kampala city and its surroundings. Translation of Stroke Impact Scale 3.0 Uganda (both in English and Luganda) was then tested psychometrically by applying a Rasch model on data collected from 95 participants with stroke. Results: Overall, 10 of 59 (17%) items in the eight domains of the Stroke Impact Scale 3.0 were culturally adapted. The majority were 6 of 10 items in the domain Activities of Daily Living, 2 of 9 items in the domain Mobility, and 2 of 5 items in the domain Hand function. Only in two domains, all items demonstrated acceptable goodness of fit to the Rasch model. There were also more than 5% person misfits in the domains Participation and Emotion, while the Communication, Mobility, and Hand function domains had the lowest proportions of person misfits. The reliability coefficient was equal or larger than 0.90 in all domains except the Emotion domain, which was below the set criterion of 0.80 (0.75). Conclusion: The cultural adaptation and translation of Stroke Impact Scale 3.0 Uganda provides initial evidence of validity of the Stroke Impact Scale 3.0 when used in this context. The results provide support for several aspects of validity and precision but also point

  12. Adapting the SERVQUAL scale to hospital services: an empirical investigation.

    PubMed Central

    Babakus, E; Mangold, W G

    1992-01-01

    Defining and measuring the quality of service has been a major challenge for health care marketers. A comprehensive service quality measurement scale (SERVQUAL) is empirically evaluated for its potential usefulness in a hospital service environment. Active participation by hospital management helped to address practical and user-related aspects of the assessment. The completed expectations and perceptions scales met various criteria for reliability and validity. Suggestions are provided for the managerial use of the scale, and a number of future research issues are identified. PMID:1737708

  13. Adapting the SERVQUAL scale to hospital services: an empirical investigation.

    PubMed

    Babakus, E; Mangold, W G

    1992-02-01

    Defining and measuring the quality of service has been a major challenge for health care marketers. A comprehensive service quality measurement scale (SERVQUAL) is empirically evaluated for its potential usefulness in a hospital service environment. Active participation by hospital management helped to address practical and user-related aspects of the assessment. The completed expectations and perceptions scales met various criteria for reliability and validity. Suggestions are provided for the managerial use of the scale, and a number of future research issues are identified.

  14. Full-Scaled Advanced Systems Testbed: Ensuring Success of Adaptive Control Research Through Project Lifecycle Risk Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlock, Kate M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Dryden Flight Research Center completed flight testing of adaptive controls research on the Full-Scale Advance Systems Testbed (FAST) in January of 2011. The research addressed technical challenges involved with reducing risk in an increasingly complex and dynamic national airspace. Specific challenges lie with the development of validated, multidisciplinary, integrated aircraft control design tools and techniques to enable safe flight in the presence of adverse conditions such as structural damage, control surface failures, or aerodynamic upsets. The testbed is an F-18 aircraft serving as a full-scale vehicle to test and validate adaptive flight control research and lends a significant confidence to the development, maturation, and acceptance process of incorporating adaptive control laws into follow-on research and the operational environment. The experimental systems integrated into FAST were designed to allow for flexible yet safe flight test evaluation and validation of modern adaptive control technologies and revolve around two major hardware upgrades: the modification of Production Support Flight Control Computers (PSFCC) and integration of two, fourth-generation Airborne Research Test Systems (ARTS). Post-hardware integration verification and validation provided the foundation for safe flight test of Nonlinear Dynamic Inversion and Model Reference Aircraft Control adaptive control law experiments. To ensure success of flight in terms of cost, schedule, and test results, emphasis on risk management was incorporated into early stages of design and flight test planning and continued through the execution of each flight test mission. Specific consideration was made to incorporate safety features within the hardware and software to alleviate user demands as well as into test processes and training to reduce human factor impacts to safe and successful flight test. This paper describes the research configuration

  15. Simulated lumped-parameter system reduced-order adaptive control studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. R., Jr.; Lawrence, D. A.; Taylor, T.; Malakooti, M. V.

    1981-01-01

    Two methods of interpreting the misbehavior of reduced order adaptive controllers are discussed. The first method is based on system input-output description and the second is based on state variable description. The implementation of the single input, single output, autoregressive, moving average system is considered.

  16. Method for reducing the drag of blunt-based vehicles by adaptively increasing forebody roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A. (Inventor); Saltzman, Edwin J. (Inventor); Moes, Timothy R. (Inventor); Iliff, Kenneth W. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A method for reducing drag upon a blunt-based vehicle by adaptively increasing forebody roughness to increase drag at the roughened area of the forebody, which results in a decrease in drag at the base of this vehicle, and in total vehicle drag.

  17. Microswitch Clusters Promote Adaptive Responses and Reduce Finger Mouthing in a Boy with Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; O'reilly, Mark F.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Oliva, Doretta; Baccani, Simona; Groeneweg, Jop

    2006-01-01

    The authors assessed new microswitch clusters (i.e., combinations of two microswitches) and contingent stimulation to increase adaptive responses (i.e., foot and head movements) and reduce aberrant behavior (i.e., finger mouthing) in a boy with multiple disabilities. Initially, intervention was directed at increasing the frequency of each adaptive…

  18. A Spanish adaptation of the Parental Stress Scale.

    PubMed

    Oronoz, Beatriz; Alonso-Arbiol, Itziar; Balluerka, Nekane

    2007-11-01

    As a specific measure to assess levels of parental stress is lacking in Spain, the aim of this study was to develop the Spanish version of the Parental Stress Scale (PSS). After translating it from English into Spanish using the forward-backward translation method, it was administered to a sample of 211 first-time parents (105 males and 106 females). A factor analysis was carried out to assess its dimensionality. After refining the scale, we obtained a two-factor solution that accounted for 33.5% of the variance, with the factors Stressors and Parenting Rewards. No gender differences were found either in the scale or in the dimensions. Criterion-related validity was tested by means of correlations with anxiety and depressive symptoms and, with regard to internal consistency, adequate alpha coefficients were obtained for both factors.

  19. Multilevel processes and cultural adaptation: Examples from past and present small-scale societies

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-García, V.; Balbo, A. L.; Gomez-Baggethun, E.; Gueze, M.; Mesoudi, A.; Richerson, P.; Rubio-Campillo, X.; Ruiz-Mallén, I.; Shennan, S.

    2016-01-01

    Cultural adaptation has become central in the context of accelerated global change with authors increasingly acknowledging the importance of understanding multilevel processes that operate as adaptation takes place. We explore the importance of multilevel processes in explaining cultural adaptation by describing how processes leading to cultural (mis)adaptation are linked through a complex nested hierarchy, where the lower levels combine into new units with new organizations, functions, and emergent properties or collective behaviours. After a brief review of the concept of “cultural adaptation” from the perspective of cultural evolutionary theory and resilience theory, the core of the paper is constructed around the exploration of multilevel processes occurring at the temporal, spatial, social and political scales. We do so by examining small-scale societies’ case studies. In each section, we discuss the importance of the selected scale for understanding cultural adaptation and then present an example that illustrates how multilevel processes in the selected scale help explain observed patterns in the cultural adaptive process. We end the paper discussing the potential of modelling and computer simulation for studying multilevel processes in cultural adaptation. PMID:27774109

  20. Application of Feedforward Adaptive Active-Noise Control for Reducing Blade Passing Noise in Centrifugal Fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WU, J.-D.; BAI, M. R.

    2001-02-01

    This paper describes two configurations of feedforward adaptive active-noise control (ANC) technique for reducing blade passing noise in centrifugal fans. In one configuration, the control speaker is installed at the cut-off region of the fan, while in the other configuration at the exit duct. The proposed ANC system is based on the filtered-x least-mean-squares (FXLMS) algorithm with multi-sine synthesized reference signal and frequency counting and is implemented by using a digital signal processor (DSP). Experiments are carried out to evaluate the proposed system for reducing the noise at the blade passing frequency (BPF) and its harmonics at various flow speeds. The results of the experiment indicated that the ANC technique is effective in reducing the blade passing noise for two configurations by using the feedforward adaptive control.

  1. SCALING ANALYSIS OF REPOSITORY HEAT LOAD FOR REDUCED DIMENSIONALITY MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    MICHAEL T. ITAMUA AND CLIFFORD K. HO

    1998-06-04

    The thermal energy released from the waste packages emplaced in the potential Yucca Mountain repository is expected to result in changes in the repository temperature, relative humidity, air mass fraction, gas flow rates, and other parameters that are important input into the models used to calculate the performance of the engineered system components. In particular, the waste package degradation models require input from thermal-hydrologic models that have higher resolution than those currently used to simulate the T/H responses at the mountain-scale. Therefore, a combination of mountain- and drift-scale T/H models is being used to generate the drift thermal-hydrologic environment.

  2. A Systematic Review and Psychometric Evaluation of Adaptive Behavior Scales and Recommendations for Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floyd, Randy G.; Shands, Elizabeth I.; Alfonso, Vincent C.; Phillips, Jessica F.; Autry, Beth K.; Mosteller, Jessica A.; Skinner, Mary; Irby, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive behavior scales are vital in assessing children and adolescents who experience a range of disabling conditions in school settings. This article presents the results of an evaluation of the design characteristics, norming, scale characteristics, reliability and validity evidence, and bias identification studies supporting 14…

  3. Adaptation of Organizational Justice in Sport Scale into Turkish Language: Validity and Reliability Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sayin, Ayfer; Sahin, Mustafa Yasar

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to provide a Turkish adaptation of the Organizational Justice in Sport Scale and perform reliability and validity studies. Answers provided by 260 participants who work as football, male basketball and female basketball coaches in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) were analysed using the original scale that…

  4. Perfectionism and Children's Self-Concept: Further Validation of the Adaptive/Maladaptive Perfectionism Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Kenneth G.; Kubal, Anne E.; Preusser, Karen J.

    2004-01-01

    The Adaptive/Maladaptive Perfectionism Scale (AMPS) for children measures different dimensions of perfectionism. In this study, subscales derived from the AMPS were compared with results of the Piers-Harris Self-Concept Scale (PHSCS) in a sample of fourth- and fifth-grade students (9 to 11 years old). The AMPS dimensions accounted for significant…

  5. Adaptive Haar transforms with arbitrary time and scale splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egiazarian, Karen O.; Astola, Jaakko T.

    2001-05-01

    The Haar transform is generalized to the case of an arbitrary time and scale splitting. To any binary tree we associate an orthogonal system of Haar-type functions - tree-structured Haar (TSH) functions. Unified fast algorithm for computation of the introduced tree-structured Haar transforms is presented. It requires 2(N - 1) additions and 3N - 2 multiplications, where N is transform order or, equivalently, the number of leaves of the binary tree.

  6. The technological influence on health professionals' care: translation and adaptation of scales1

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Carlos Manuel Torres; Almeida, Filipe Nuno Alves dos Santos; Escola, Joaquim José Jacinto; Rodrigues, Vitor Manuel Costa Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: in this study, two research tools were validated to study the impact of technological influence on health professionals' care practice. Methods: the following methodological steps were taken: bibliographic review, selection of the scales, translation and cultural adaptation and analysis of psychometric properties. Results: the psychometric properties of the scale were assessed based on its application to a sample of 341 individuals (nurses, physicians, final-year nursing and medical students). The validity, reliability and internal consistency were tested. Two scales were found: Caring Attributes Questionnaire (adapted) with a Cronbach's Alpha coefficient of 0.647 and the Technological Influence Questionnaire (adapted) with an Alpha coefficient of 0.777. Conclusions: the scales are easy to apply and reveal reliable psychometric properties, an additional quality as they permit generalized studies on a theme as important as the impact of technological influence in health care. PMID:27143537

  7. Adaptation of an Acculturation Scale for African Refugee Women

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Priscilla; Asiedu, Gladys B.; Hedberg, Eric; Breitkopf, Carmen Radecki

    2014-01-01

    Newly-arrived African refugees are a vulnerable group of immigrants for whom no validated acculturation measures exist. A valid measurement tool is essential to understand how acculturative processes impact health and health disparities. We adapted the Bicultural Involvement Questionnaire (BIQ) to characterize its reliability among ethnic Somali women residing in Minnesota, and Somali, Somali Bantu, and Burundian women in Arizona. Surveys were administered to 164 adult women. Analyses were conducted along socio-demographic variables of ethnicity, geographic residence, age, and length of time in the United States through t tests and one-way analysis of variance. Exploratory factor analysis was conducted on the modified BIQ. Exploratory factor analyses yielded five subscales: “Speak Native Language”, “Speak English Language”, “Enjoy Native Activities”, “Enjoy American Activities”, and “Desired Ideal Culture”. The subscales of the modified BIQ possessed Cronbach’s α ranging from 0.68 to 0.92, suggestive that all subscales had acceptable to excellent internal consistency. The modified BIQ maintained its psychometric properties across geographic regions of resettled Central and East African refugees. PMID:24573644

  8. Progressive image data compression with adaptive scale-space quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przelaskowski, Artur

    1999-12-01

    Some improvements of embedded zerotree wavelet algorithm are considere. Compression methods tested here are based on dyadic wavelet image decomposition, scalar quantization and coding in progressive fashion. Profitable coders with embedded form of code and rate fixing abilities like Shapiro EZW and Said nad Pearlman SPIHT are modified to improve compression efficiency. We explore the modifications of the initial threshold value, reconstruction levels and quantization scheme in SPIHT algorithm. Additionally, we present the result of the best filter bank selection. The most efficient biorthogonal filter banks are tested. Significant efficiency improvement of SPIHT coder was finally noticed even up to 0.9dB of PSNR in some cases. Because of the problems with optimization of quantization scheme in embedded coder we propose another solution: adaptive threshold selection of wavelet coefficients in progressive coding scheme. Two versions of this coder are tested: progressive in quality and resolution. As a result, improved compression effectiveness is achieved - close to 1.3 dB in comparison to SPIHT for image Barbara. All proposed algorithms are optimized automatically and are not time-consuming. But sometimes the most efficient solution must be found in iterative way. Final results are competitive across the most efficient wavelet coders.

  9. Adaptive Policies for Reducing Inequalities in the Social Determinants of Health.

    PubMed

    Carey, Gemma; Crammond, Brad; Malbon, Eleanor; Carey, Nic

    2015-09-18

    Inequalities in the social determinants of health (SDH), which drive avoidable health disparities between different individuals or groups, is a major concern for a number of international organisations, including the World Health Organization (WHO). Despite this, the pathways to changing inequalities in the SDH remain elusive. The methodologies and concepts within system science are now viewed as important domains of knowledge, ideas and skills for tackling issues of inequality, which are increasingly understood as emergent properties of complex systems. In this paper, we introduce and expand the concept of adaptive policies to reduce inequalities in the distribution of the SDH. The concept of adaptive policy for health equity was developed through reviewing the literature on learning and adaptive policies. Using a series of illustrative examples from education and poverty alleviation, which have their basis in real world policies, we demonstrate how an adaptive policy approach is more suited to the management of the emergent properties of inequalities in the SDH than traditional policy approaches. This is because they are better placed to handle future uncertainties. Our intention is that these examples are illustrative, rather than prescriptive, and serve to create a conversation regarding appropriate adaptive policies for progressing policy action on the SDH.

  10. Adaptive Policies for Reducing Inequalities in the Social Determinants of Health

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Gemma; Crammond, Brad; Malbon, Eleanor; Carey, Nic

    2015-01-01

    Inequalities in the social determinants of health (SDH), which drive avoidable health disparities between different individuals or groups, is a major concern for a number of international organisations, including the World Health Organization (WHO). Despite this, the pathways to changing inequalities in the SDH remain elusive. The methodologies and concepts within system science are now viewed as important domains of knowledge, ideas and skills for tackling issues of inequality, which are increasingly understood as emergent properties of complex systems. In this paper, we introduce and expand the concept of adaptive policies to reduce inequalities in the distribution of the SDH. The concept of adaptive policy for health equity was developed through reviewing the literature on learning and adaptive policies. Using a series of illustrative examples from education and poverty alleviation, which have their basis in real world policies, we demonstrate how an adaptive policy approach is more suited to the management of the emergent properties of inequalities in the SDH than traditional policy approaches. This is because they are better placed to handle future uncertainties. Our intention is that these examples are illustrative, rather than prescriptive, and serve to create a conversation regarding appropriate adaptive policies for progressing policy action on the SDH. PMID:26673337

  11. A Brazilian Portuguese cross-cultural adaptation of the modified JOA scale for myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Pratali, Raphael R.; Smith, Justin S.; Motta, Rodrigo L.N.; Martins, Samuel M.; Motta, Marcel M.; Rocha, Ricardo D.; Herrero, Carlos Fernando P.S.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop a version of the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA) scale that had been translated into Portuguese and cross-culturally adapted for the Brazilian population. METHODS: The well-established process of forward-backward translation was employed along with cross-cultural adaptation. RESULTS: Three bilingual translators (English and native Portuguese) performed the forward translation of the mJOA scale from English to Portuguese based on iterative discussions used to reach a consensus translation. The translated version of the mJOA scale was then back-translated into English by a native English-speaking translator unaware of the concepts involved with the mJOA scale. The original mJOA scale and the back-translated version were compared by a native North American neurosurgeon, and as they were considered equivalent, the final version of the mJOA scale that had been translated into Portuguese and cross-culturally adapted was defined. CONCLUSION: To facilitate global and cross-cultural comparisons of the severity of cervical myelopathy, this study presents a version of the mJOA scale that was translated into Portuguese and cross-culturally adapted for the Brazilian population. PMID:28273233

  12. A spatial explicit strategy reduces error but interferes with sensorimotor adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Bryan L.; Anguera, Joaquin A.

    2011-01-01

    Although sensorimotor adaptation is typically thought of as an implicit form of learning, it has been shown that participants who gain explicit awareness of the nature of the perturbation during adaptation exhibit more learning than those who do not. With rare exceptions, however, explicit awareness is typically polled at the end of the study. Here, we provided participants with either an explicit spatial strategy or no instructions before learning. Early in learning, explicit instructions greatly reduced movement errors but also resulted in increased trial-to-trial variability and longer reaction times. Late in adaptation, performance was indistinguishable between the explicit and implicit groups, but the mechanisms underlying performance improvements remained fundamentally different, as revealed by catch trials. The progression of implicit recalibration in the explicit group was modulated by the use of an explicit strategy: these participants showed a lower level of recalibration as well as decreased aftereffects. This phenomenon may be due to the reduced magnitude of errors made to the target during adaptation or inhibition of implicit learning mechanisms by explicit processing. PMID:21451054

  13. POD-Galerkin reduced-order modeling with adaptive finite element snapshots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, Sebastian; Rotkvic, Marko; Lang, Jens

    2016-11-01

    We consider model order reduction by proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) for parametrized partial differential equations, where the underlying snapshots are computed with adaptive finite elements. We address computational and theoretical issues arising from the fact that the snapshots are members of different finite element spaces. We propose a method to create a POD-Galerkin model without interpolating the snapshots onto their common finite element mesh. The error of the reduced-order solution is not necessarily Galerkin orthogonal to the reduced space created from space-adapted snapshot. We analyze how this influences the error assessment for POD-Galerkin models of linear elliptic boundary value problems. As a numerical example we consider a two-dimensional convection-diffusion equation with a parametrized convective direction. To illustrate the applicability of our techniques to non-linear time-dependent problems, we present a test case of a two-dimensional viscous Burgers equation with parametrized initial data.

  14. Validity of the Adaptation to Age-related Vision Loss Scale in an Australian Cataract Population

    PubMed Central

    Gothwal, Vijaya K.; Wright, Thomas A.; Lamoureux, Ecosse L.; Pesudovs, Konrad

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The Adaptation to Age-related Vision Loss (AVL) scale was developed to measure the adjustment of older adults who are adapting to late-life vision loss. The purpose of this study was to assess whether the AVL scale satisfies the Rasch model in a cataract population. Methods The 24-item AVL scale (18 negatively and 6 positively coded) was mailed to 436 cataract patients for self-administration whilst they were on the waiting list for cataract surgery at the Flinders Eye Centre, Adelaide, South Australia. Rasch analysis was performed to determine whether the items were measuring a single construct (unidimensionality) as examined with fit statistics and principal components analysis (PCA) of the residuals. The ability of the scale to distinguish between the levels of adaptation of the participants (person separation) was investigated, with a value ≥2.0 established as the minimum acceptable. Results The AVL scale was unable to differentiate sufficiently between participants’ levels of adaptation, indicating poor person separation. One item did not fit the construct, causing misfit. Furthermore, the five positively worded items did not appear either to measure the same construct as other items, resulting in lack of unidimensionality evidenced by PCA. Following the deletion of these items, the AVL scale was one-dimensional but a single item continued to misfit, so it had to be deleted, resulting in an 18-item AVL scale. Even so, the discriminating abilities of the scale continued to be poor. Conclusions The AVL scale is not an appropriate measure of adaptation to vision loss in a cataract population.

  15. An adaptive tracking controller for a brushless DC motor with reduced overparameterization effects

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, J.; Dawson, D.M.; Burg, T.; Vedagarbha, P.

    1994-12-31

    Using the integrator backstepping approach, we develop a full state feedback, adaptive position tracking controller for a brushless DC (BLDC) motor turning a robotic load. The proposed controller ensures global asymptotic tracking for the rotor position and velocity despite the parametric uncertainties throughout the entire electromechanical system. The overparameterization problem commonly associated with backstepping-type controllers is greatly reduced. Experimental results are used to validate the performance of the controller.

  16. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale--Italian Form: Psychometric Properties and Relationships to Breadth of Interests, Quality of Life, and Perceived Barriers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soresi, Salvatore; Nota, Laura; Ferrari, Lea

    2012-01-01

    The Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS)-Italian Form consists of four 6-item scales, which measure concern, control, curiosity, and confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks, and work traumas. The 24-item CAAS-Italian Form is identical to the International Form 2.0. The factor structure was…

  17. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale-France Form: Psychometric Properties and Relationships to Anxiety and Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pouyaud, Jacques; Vignoli, Emmanuelle; Dosnon, Odile; Lallemand, Noelle

    2012-01-01

    The CAAS-France Form consists of four scales, each with six items, which measure concern, control, curiosity, and confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks, and work traumas. Internal consistency estimates for the subscale and total scores ranged from moderate to good. The factor structure was…

  18. Adaptation of abbreviated mathematics anxiety rating scale for engineering students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordin, Sayed Kushairi Sayed; Samat, Khairul Fadzli; Sultan, Al Amin Mohamed; Halim, Bushra Abdul; Ismail, Siti Fatimah; Mafazi, Nurul Wirdah

    2015-05-01

    Mathematics is an essential and fundamental tool used by engineers to analyse and solve problems in their field. Due to this, most engineering education programs involve a concentration of study in mathematics courses whereby engineering students have to take mathematics courses such as numerical methods, differential equations and calculus in the first two years and continue to do so until the completion of the sequence. However, the students struggled and had difficulties in learning courses that require mathematical abilities. Hence, this study presents the factors that caused mathematics anxiety among engineering students using Abbreviated Mathematics Anxiety Rating Scale (AMARS) through 95 students of Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka (UTeM). From 25 items in AMARS, principal component analysis (PCA) suggested that there are four mathematics anxiety factors, namely experiences of learning mathematics, cognitive skills, mathematics evaluation anxiety and students' perception on mathematics. Minitab 16 software was used to analyse the nonparametric statistics. Kruskal-Wallis Test indicated that there is a significant difference in the experience of learning mathematics and mathematics evaluation anxiety among races. The Chi-Square Test of Independence revealed that the experience of learning mathematics, cognitive skills and mathematics evaluation anxiety depend on the results of their SPM additional mathematics. Based on this study, it is recommended to address the anxiety problems among engineering students at the early stage of studying in the university. Thus, lecturers should play their part by ensuring a positive classroom environment which encourages students to study mathematics without fear.

  19. Adaptation to leftward-shifting prisms reduces the global processing bias of healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Bultitude, Janet H; Woods, Jill M

    2010-05-01

    When healthy individuals are presented with peripheral figures in which small letters are arranged to form a large letter, they are faster to identify the global- than the local-level information, and have difficulty ignoring global information when identifying the local level. The global reaction time (RT) advantage and global interference effect imply preferential processing of global-level information in the normal brain. This contrasts with the local processing bias demonstrated following lesions to the right temporo-parietal junction (TPJ), such as those that lead to hemispatial neglect (neglect). Recent research from our lab demonstrated that visuo-motor adaptation to rightward-shifting prisms, which ameliorates many leftward performance deficits of neglect patients, improved the local processing bias of patients with right TPJ lesions (Bultitude, Rafal, & List, 2009). Here we demonstrate that adaptation to leftward-shifting prisms, which can induce neglect-like performance in neurologically healthy individuals, also reduces the normal global processing bias. Forty-eight healthy participants were asked to identify the global or local forms of hierarchical figures before and after adaptation to leftward- or rightward-shifting prisms. Prior to prism adaptation, both groups had greater difficulty ignoring irrelevant global information when identifying the local level (global interference) compared to their ability to ignore irrelevant local-level information when identifying the global level (local interference). Participants who adapted to leftward-shifting prisms showed a significant reduction in global interference, but there was no change in the performance of the rightward-shifting Prism Group. These results show, for the first time, that in addition to previously demonstrated effects on lateralised attention, prism adaptation can influence non-lateralised spatial attention in healthy individuals.

  20. The compensatory health beliefs scale: psychometric properties of a cross-culturally adapted scale for use in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    de Nooijer, Jascha; Puijk-Hekman, Saskia; van Assema, Patricia

    2009-10-01

    This study assesses the psychometric properties of a measuring scale for compensatory health beliefs (CHBs), culturally adapted for use in the Dutch context. CHBs refer to the idea that people can compensate for unhealthy (mostly pleasant) behaviours with healthy behaviours, e.g. 'It is OK to eat a chocolate bar, because I am going to the gym tonight'. We are critical towards such beliefs as they may also be an excuse to justify unhealthy behaviours. Before such effects can be studied, an appropriate tool to measure CHBs must be developed. We adapted a Canadian scale, consisting of four factors relating to beliefs about substance use, eating/sleeping habits, stress and weight regulation, translating it according to guidelines for cross-cultural adaptation and testing it among 145 Dutch students. Factor analysis showed that the structure was not entirely identical in the Dutch context, and the internal consistency of the four subscales was also low. The overall scale showed a high internal consistency (alpha = 0.78), indicating the existence of an underlying construct, and a high Pearson correlation between the first and second measurements (r = 0.82), showing good stability. We recommend using the overall scale and further studying its reliability among other subgroups as well as its validity.

  1. Adaptive multi-scale parameterization for one-dimensional flow in unsaturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayek, Mohamed; Lehmann, François; Ackerer, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    In the analysis of the unsaturated zone, one of the most challenging problems is to use inverse theory in the search for an optimal parameterization of the porous media. Adaptative multi-scale parameterization consists in solving the problem through successive approximations by refining the parameter at the next finer scale all over the domain and stopping the process when the refinement does not induce significant decrease of the objective function any more. In this context, the refinement indicators algorithm provides an adaptive parameterization technique that opens the degrees of freedom in an iterative way driven at first order by the model to locate the discontinuities of the sought parameters. We present a refinement indicators algorithm for adaptive multi-scale parameterization that is applicable to the estimation of multi-dimensional hydraulic parameters in unsaturated soil water flow. Numerical examples are presented which show the efficiency of the algorithm in case of noisy data and missing data.

  2. School Social Behavior Scales: an adaptation study of the Portuguese version of the social competence scale from SSBS-2.

    PubMed

    Raimundo, Raquel; Carapito, Elsa; Pereira, Ana Isabel; Marques Pinto, Alexandra; Lima, Maria Luísa; Ribeiro, Maria Teresa

    2012-11-01

    This study analyses the psychometric proprieties of a Portuguese version of the social competence scale from the School Social Behavior Scales (SSBS-2, Merrell, 2002). It is a rating instrument of children and adolescents behavior, to be used by teachers and other school personnel. This scale includes 3 subscales: self-management/compliance, peer relations and academic behavior. In our first sample, 175 teachers rated 344 students from grade 1 through 12. On the second sample 13 teachers rated 251 3rd and 4th grades students. The results from the Portuguese adaptation support the multidimensional structure of the social competence scale from the SSBS-2, although an alternative model demonstrated a better fit to the data than the model originally proposed by the author. The scale showed good internal consistency and good intercorrelations between subscales, as well as between subscales and the total scale. The final model was well replicated in the second sample. These results encourage us to pursue the SSBS-2 Portuguese adaptation, in order to provide a useful and validated instrument for the assessment of social competence and for educational interventions.

  3. Combined non-adaptive light and smell stimuli lowered blood pressure, reduced heart rate and reduced negative affect.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shan; Jacob, Tim J C

    2016-03-15

    Bright light therapy has been shown to have a positive impact on seasonal affective disorder (SAD), depression and anxiety. Smell has also has been shown to have effects on mood, stress, anxiety and depression. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the combination of light and smell in a non-adaptive cycle. Human subjects were given smell (lemon, lavender or peppermint) and light stimuli in a triangular wave (60scycle) for 15min. Blood pressure and heart rate were monitored before and after each session for 5 consecutive days and a Profile of Mood States (POMS) test was administered before and after the sensory stimulation on days 1, 3 and 5. The light-smell stimulus lowered blood pressure, both systolic and diastolic, and reduced heart rate for all odours compared to control. Of the two sensory stimuli, the odour stimulus contributed most to this effect. The different aromas in the light-smell combinations could be distinguished by their different effects on the mood factors with lemon inducing the greatest mood changes in Dejection-Depression, Anger-Hostility, Tension-Anxiety. In conclusion, combined light and smell stimulation was effective in lowering blood pressure, reducing heart rate and improving mood. The combination was more effective than either smell or light stimuli alone, suggesting that a light-smell combination would be a more robust and efficacious alternative treatment for depression, anxiety and stress.

  4. Online estimation of the wavefront outer scale profile from adaptive optics telemetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guesalaga, A.; Neichel, B.; Correia, C. M.; Butterley, T.; Osborn, J.; Masciadri, E.; Fusco, T.; Sauvage, J.-F.

    2017-02-01

    We describe an online method to estimate the wavefront outer scale profile, L0(h), for very large and future extremely large telescopes. The stratified information on this parameter impacts the estimation of the main turbulence parameters [turbulence strength, Cn2(h); Fried's parameter, r0; isoplanatic angle, θ0; and coherence time, τ0) and determines the performance of wide-field adaptive optics (AO) systems. This technique estimates L0(h) using data from the AO loop available at the facility instruments by constructing the cross-correlation functions of the slopes between two or more wavefront sensors, which are later fitted to a linear combination of the simulated theoretical layers having different altitudes and outer scale values. We analyse some limitations found in the estimation process: (i) its insensitivity to large values of L0(h) as the telescope becomes blind to outer scales larger than its diameter; (ii) the maximum number of observable layers given the limited number of independent inputs that the cross-correlation functions provide and (iii) the minimum length of data required for a satisfactory convergence of the turbulence parameters without breaking the assumption of statistical stationarity of the turbulence. The method is applied to the Gemini South multiconjugate AO system that comprises five wavefront sensors and two deformable mirrors. Statistics of L0(h) at Cerro Pachón from data acquired during 3 yr of campaigns show interesting resemblance to other independent results in the literature. A final analysis suggests that the impact of error sources will be substantially reduced in instruments of the next generation of giant telescopes.

  5. Sulfur isotope fractionation during the evolutionary adaptation of a sulfate-reducing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Pellerin, André; Anderson-Trocmé, Luke; Whyte, Lyle G; Zane, Grant M; Wall, Judy D; Wing, Boswell A

    2015-04-01

    Dissimilatory sulfate reduction is a microbial catabolic pathway that preferentially processes less massive sulfur isotopes relative to their heavier counterparts. This sulfur isotope fractionation is recorded in ancient sedimentary rocks and generally is considered to reflect a phenotypic response to environmental variations rather than to evolutionary adaptation. Modern sulfate-reducing microorganisms isolated from similar environments can exhibit a wide range of sulfur isotope fractionations, suggesting that adaptive processes influence the sulfur isotope phenotype. To date, the relationship between evolutionary adaptation and isotopic phenotypes has not been explored. We addressed this by studying the covariation of fitness, sulfur isotope fractionation, and growth characteristics in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough in a microbial evolution experiment. After 560 generations, the mean fitness of the evolved lineages relative to the starting isogenic population had increased by ∼ 17%. After 927 generations, the mean fitness relative to the initial ancestral population had increased by ∼ 20%. Growth rate in exponential phase increased during the course of the experiment, suggesting that this was a primary influence behind the fitness increases. Consistent changes were observed within different selection intervals between fractionation and fitness. Fitness changes were associated with changes in exponential growth rate but changes in fractionation were not. Instead, they appeared to be a response to changes in the parameters that govern growth rate: yield and cell-specific sulfate respiration rate. We hypothesize that cell-specific sulfate respiration rate, in particular, provides a bridge that allows physiological controls on fractionation to cross over to the adaptive realm.

  6. An adaptive control volume finite element method for simulation of multi-scale flow in heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostaghimi, P.; Percival, J. R.; Pavlidis, D.; Gorman, G.; Jackson, M.; Neethling, S.; Pain, C. C.

    2013-12-01

    Numerical simulation of multiphase flow in porous media is of importance in a wide range of applications in science and engineering. We present a novel control volume finite element method (CVFEM) to solve for multi-scale flow in heterogeneous geological formations. It employs a node centred control volume approach to discretize the saturation equation, while a control volume finite element method is applied for the pressure equation. We embed the discrete continuity equation into the pressure equation and assure that the continuity is exactly enforced. Anisotropic mesh adaptivity is used to accurately model the fine grained features of multiphase flow. The adaptive algorithm uses a metric tensor field based on solution error estimates to locally control the size and shape of elements in the metric. Moreover, it uses metric advection between adaptive meshes in order to predict the future required density of mesh thereby reducing numerical dispersion at the saturation front. The scheme is capable of capturing multi-scale heterogeneity such as those in fractured porous media through the use of several constraints on the element size in different regions of porous media. We show the application of our method for simulation of flow in some challenging benchmark problems. For flow in fractured reservoirs, the scheme adapts the mesh as the flow penetrates through the fracture and the matrix. The constraints for the element size within the fracture are smaller by several orders of magnitude than the generated mesh within the matrix. We show that the scheme captures the key multi-scale features of flow while preserving the geometry. We demonstrate that mesh adaptation can be used to accurately simulate flow in heterogeneous porous media at low computational cost.

  7. Genome-environment association study suggests local adaptation to climate at the regional scale in Fagus sylvatica.

    PubMed

    Pluess, Andrea R; Frank, Aline; Heiri, Caroline; Lalagüe, Hadrien; Vendramin, Giovanni G; Oddou-Muratorio, Sylvie

    2016-04-01

    The evolutionary potential of long-lived species, such as forest trees, is fundamental for their local persistence under climate change (CC). Genome-environment association (GEA) analyses reveal if species in heterogeneous environments at the regional scale are under differential selection resulting in populations with potential preadaptation to CC within this area. In 79 natural Fagus sylvatica populations, neutral genetic patterns were characterized using 12 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, and genomic variation (144 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) out of 52 candidate genes) was related to 87 environmental predictors in the latent factor mixed model, logistic regressions and isolation by distance/environmental (IBD/IBE) tests. SSR diversity revealed relatedness at up to 150 m intertree distance but an absence of large-scale spatial genetic structure and IBE. In the GEA analyses, 16 SNPs in 10 genes responded to one or several environmental predictors and IBE, corrected for IBD, was confirmed. The GEA often reflected the proposed gene functions, including indications for adaptation to water availability and temperature. Genomic divergence and the lack of large-scale neutral genetic patterns suggest that gene flow allows the spread of advantageous alleles in adaptive genes. Thereby, adaptation processes are likely to take place in species occurring in heterogeneous environments, which might reduce their regional extinction risk under CC.

  8. Reducing the effect of respiration in baroreflex sensitivity estimation with adaptive filtering.

    PubMed

    Tiinanen, Suvi; Tulppo, Mikko; Seppänen, Tapio

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac baroreflex is described by baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) from blood pressure and heart rate interval (RRi) fluctuations. However, respiration affects both blood pressure and RRi via mechanisms that are not necessarily of baroreflex origin. To separate the effects of baroreflex and respiration, metronome-guided breathing in a high frequency band (HF, 0.25-0.4 Hz) and a low frequency spectral band (LF, 0.04-0.15 Hz) have therefore been commonly used for BRS estimation. The controlled breathing may, however, change the natural functioning of the autonomic system and interfere BRS estimates. To enable usage of spontaneous breathing, we propose an adaptive LMS-based filter for removing the respiration effect from the BRS estimates. ECG, continuous blood pressure and respiration were measured during 5 min spontaneous and 5 min controlled breathing at 0.25 Hz in healthy males (n = 24, 33+/-7 years). BRS was calculated with spectral methods from the LF band with and without filtering. In those subjects whose spontaneous breathing rate was <0.15 Hz, the BRS(LF) values were overestimated, whereas the adaptive filtering reduced the bias significantly. As a conclusion, the adaptive filter reduces the distorting effect of respiration on BRS values, which enables more accurate estimation of BRS and the usage of spontaneous breathing as a measurement protocol.

  9. From dinosaurs to modern bird diversity: extending the time scale of adaptive radiation.

    PubMed

    Moen, Daniel; Morlon, Hélène

    2014-05-01

    What explains why some groups of organisms, like birds, are so species rich? And what explains their extraordinary ecological diversity, ranging from large, flightless birds to small migratory species that fly thousand of kilometers every year? These and similar questions have spurred great interest in adaptive radiation, the diversification of ecological traits in a rapidly speciating group of organisms. Although the initial formulation of modern concepts of adaptive radiation arose from consideration of the fossil record, rigorous attempts to identify adaptive radiation in the fossil record are still uncommon. Moreover, most studies of adaptive radiation concern groups that are less than 50 million years old. Thus, it is unclear how important adaptive radiation is over temporal scales that span much larger portions of the history of life. In this issue, Benson et al. test the idea of a "deep-time" adaptive radiation in dinosaurs, compiling and using one of the most comprehensive phylogenetic and body-size datasets for fossils. Using recent phylogenetic statistical methods, they find that in most clades of dinosaurs there is a strong signal of an "early burst" in body-size evolution, a predicted pattern of adaptive radiation in which rapid trait evolution happens early in a group's history and then slows down. They also find that body-size evolution did not slow down in the lineage leading to birds, hinting at why birds survived to the present day and diversified. This paper represents one of the most convincing attempts at understanding deep-time adaptive radiations.

  10. Brief Sensation Seeking Scale for Chinese - Cultural Adaptation and Psychometric Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xinguang; Li, Fang; Nydegger, Liesl; Gong, Jie; Ren, Yuanjing; Dinaj-Koci, Veronica; Sun, Huiling; Stanton, Bonita

    2012-01-01

    International behavioral research requires instruments that are not culturally-biased to assess sensation seeking. In this study we described a culturally adapted version of the Brief Sensation Seeking Scale for Chinese (BSSS-C) and its psychometric characteristics. The adapted scale was assessed using an adult sample (n=238) with diverse educational and residential backgrounds. The BSSS-C (Cronbach alpha=0.90) was correlated with the original Brief Sensation Seeking Scale (r = 0.85, p<0.01) and fitted the four-factor model well (CFI=0.98, SRMR=0.03). The scale scores significantly predicted intention to and actual engagement in a number of health risk behaviors, including alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, and sexual risk behaviors. In conclusion, the BSSS-C has adequate reliability and validity, supporting its utility in China and potential in other developing countries. PMID:23316097

  11. Brief Sensation Seeking Scale for Chinese - Cultural Adaptation and Psychometric Assessment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinguang; Li, Fang; Nydegger, Liesl; Gong, Jie; Ren, Yuanjing; Dinaj-Koci, Veronica; Sun, Huiling; Stanton, Bonita

    2013-04-01

    International behavioral research requires instruments that are not culturally-biased to assess sensation seeking. In this study we described a culturally adapted version of the Brief Sensation Seeking Scale for Chinese (BSSS-C) and its psychometric characteristics. The adapted scale was assessed using an adult sample (n=238) with diverse educational and residential backgrounds. The BSSS-C (Cronbach alpha=0.90) was correlated with the original Brief Sensation Seeking Scale (r = 0.85, p<0.01) and fitted the four-factor model well (CFI=0.98, SRMR=0.03). The scale scores significantly predicted intention to and actual engagement in a number of health risk behaviors, including alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, and sexual risk behaviors. In conclusion, the BSSS-C has adequate reliability and validity, supporting its utility in China and potential in other developing countries.

  12. Understanding pathways for scaling up health services through the lens of complex adaptive systems.

    PubMed

    Paina, Ligia; Peters, David H

    2012-08-01

    Despite increased prominence and funding of global health initiatives, efforts to scale up health services in developing countries are falling short of the expectations of the Millennium Development Goals. Arguing that the dominant assumptions for scaling up are inadequate, we propose that interpreting change in health systems through the lens of complex adaptive systems (CAS) provides better models of pathways for scaling up. Based on an understanding of CAS behaviours, we describe how phenomena such as path dependence, feedback loops, scale-free networks, emergent behaviour and phase transitions can uncover relevant lessons for the design and implementation of health policy and programmes in the context of scaling up health services. The implications include paying more attention to local context, incentives and institutions, as well as anticipating certain types of unintended consequences that can undermine scaling up efforts, and developing and implementing programmes that engage key actors through transparent use of data for ongoing problem-solving and adaptation. We propose that future efforts to scale up should adapt and apply the models and methodologies which have been used in other fields that study CAS, yet are underused in public health. This can help policy makers, planners, implementers and researchers to explore different and innovative approaches for reaching populations in need with effective, equitable and efficient health services. The old assumptions have led to disappointed expectations about how to scale up health services, and offer little insight on how to scale up effective interventions in the future. The alternative perspectives offered by CAS may better reflect the complex and changing nature of health systems, and create new opportunities for understanding and scaling up health services.

  13. Adaptive Control of a Utility-Scale Wind Turbine Operating in Region 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Susan A.; Balas, Mark J.; Wright, Alan D.

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive control techniques are well suited to nonlinear applications, such as wind turbines, which are difficult to accurately model and which have effects from poorly known operating environments. The turbulent and unpredictable conditions in which wind turbines operate create many challenges for their operation. In this paper, we design an adaptive collective pitch controller for a high-fidelity simulation of a utility scale, variable-speed horizontal axis wind turbine. The objective of the adaptive pitch controller in Region 3 is to regulate generator speed and reject step disturbances. The control objective is accomplished by collectively pitching the turbine blades. We use an extension of the Direct Model Reference Adaptive Control (DMRAC) approach to track a reference point and to reject persistent disturbances. The turbine simulation models the Controls Advanced Research Turbine (CART) of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. The CART is a utility-scale wind turbine which has a well-developed and extensively verified simulator. The adaptive collective pitch controller for Region 3 was compared in simulations with a bas celliansesical Proportional Integrator (PI) collective pitch controller. In the simulations, the adaptive pitch controller showed improved speed regulation in Region 3 when compared with the baseline PI pitch controller and it demonstrated robustness to modeling errors.

  14. Adapting to a changing environment: non-obvious thresholds in multi-scale systems.

    PubMed

    Perryman, Clare; Wieczorek, Sebastian

    2014-10-08

    Many natural and technological systems fail to adapt to changing external conditions and move to a different state if the conditions vary too fast. Such 'non-adiabatic' processes are ubiquitous, but little understood. We identify these processes with a new nonlinear phenomenon-an intricate threshold where a forced system fails to adiabatically follow a changing stable state. In systems with multiple time scales, we derive existence conditions that show such thresholds to be generic, but non-obvious, meaning they cannot be captured by traditional stability theory. Rather, the phenomenon can be analysed using concepts from modern singular perturbation theory: folded singularities and canard trajectories, including composite canards. Thus, non-obvious thresholds should explain the failure to adapt to a changing environment in a wide range of multi-scale systems including: tipping points in the climate system, regime shifts in ecosystems, excitability in nerve cells, adaptation failure in regulatory genes and adiabatic switching in technology.

  15. Adaptation of Hunter Cynism Scale to Turkish: Validity and Reliability Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiraz, Zafer; Bakioglu, Fuad

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to carry out the adaptation of Hunter Cynicism Scale to Turkish. For this purpose, this study consists of two stages. 311 university students participated in for the first stage and 313 university students participated in for the second stage of this study. In the first stage, translation, exploratory factor analysis,…

  16. Adaptation of Internet Addiction Scale in Azerbaijani Language: A Validity-Reliability and Prevalence Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerimova, Melek; Gunuc, Selim

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to adapt Gunuc and Kayri's (2010) "Internet Addiction Scale," with show validity and reliability for many various sampling groups, into the Azerbaijani language. Another objective of the study is to determine the prevalence of Internet addiction among Azerbaijani adolescents and youth, which…

  17. Scale of Adaptive Information Technology Accessibility for Postsecondary Students with Disabilities (SAITAPSD): A Preliminary Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fichten, Catherine S.; Nguyen, Mai N.; Barile, Maria; Asuncion, Jennison V.

    2007-01-01

    The responses of 81 Canadian junior and community college students with disabilities were used to develop and evaluate the Scale of Adaptive Information Technology Accessibility for Postsecondary Students with Disabilities (SAITAPSD). This is an 18-item self-administered tool that evaluates computing accessibility for and by students with various…

  18. Practical Issues in Large-Scale High-Stakes Computerized Adaptive Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Craig N.; Stocking, Martha L.

    Computerized adaptive testing (CAT), while well-grounded in psychometric theory, has had few large-scale applications for high-stakes, secure tests in the past. This is now changing as the cost of computing has declined rapidly. As is always true where theory is translated into practice, many practical issues arise. This paper discusses a number…

  19. Adaptation of Collective Moral Disengagement Scale into Turkish Culture for Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çapan, Bahtiyar Eraslan; Bakioglu, Fuad

    2016-01-01

    In this study, reliability and validity are assessed for a Turkish culture adaptation of the Collective Moral Disengagement Scale for Adolescents. The study was carried out in two stages. In the first stage, translation, exploratory factor analysis, internal consistency coefficients, and test-retest method were performed; in the second stage,…

  20. Adaptation and Psychometric Properties of the Spanish Version of the Supports Intensity Scale (SIS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verdugo, Miguel-Angel; Arias, Benito; Ibanez, Alba; Schalock, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    The Supports Intensity Scale (SIS) is used to determine the profile and intensity of the supports needed by a person to participate successfully in major life activities. With its publication into 13 languages, a need has arisen to document its reliability and validity across language and cultural groups. Here we explain the adaptation and the…

  1. Use of Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales-II in Children with Autism--An Indian Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manohari, S. M.; Raman, Vijaya; Ashok, M. V.

    2013-01-01

    The Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales-II Edition 2005 (Vineland-II) is useful in assessing abilities in autism spectrum disorder, where an accurate assessment of intelligence using standardized tools is difficult both due to the unique social and communication difficulties that these children present with and the behavioral issues that occur as…

  2. Adapting the Sheehan Disability Scale to Assess Child and Parent Impairment Related to Childhood Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiteside, Stephen P.

    2009-01-01

    This study describes a child adaptation of the Sheehan Disability Scale, a measure of impairment among anxious adults. Parallel child and parent report forms were created to assess the degree to which anxiety interferes with child and parent social, educational/occupational, and family functioning. Data from 267 anxious children (140 boys ages…

  3. Adaptive Fault-Tolerant Control of Uncertain Nonlinear Large-Scale Systems With Unknown Dead Zone.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mou; Tao, Gang

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, an adaptive neural fault-tolerant control scheme is proposed and analyzed for a class of uncertain nonlinear large-scale systems with unknown dead zone and external disturbances. To tackle the unknown nonlinear interaction functions in the large-scale system, the radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) is employed to approximate them. To further handle the unknown approximation errors and the effects of the unknown dead zone and external disturbances, integrated as the compounded disturbances, the corresponding disturbance observers are developed for their estimations. Based on the outputs of the RBFNN and the disturbance observer, the adaptive neural fault-tolerant control scheme is designed for uncertain nonlinear large-scale systems by using a decentralized backstepping technique. The closed-loop stability of the adaptive control system is rigorously proved via Lyapunov analysis and the satisfactory tracking performance is achieved under the integrated effects of unknown dead zone, actuator fault, and unknown external disturbances. Simulation results of a mass-spring-damper system are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive neural fault-tolerant control scheme for uncertain nonlinear large-scale systems.

  4. Trauma Resilience Scale: Validation of Protective Factors Associated with Adaptation following Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madsen, Machelle D.; Abell, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The Trauma Resilience Scale (TRS), assessing protective factors associated with positive adaptation following violence, was tested in three waves of data collection. Empirical and theoretical literature shaped subscale and item formation emphasizing resilience following physical abuse, sexual abuse, intimate partner violence, and/or a…

  5. A Practical Computer Adaptive Testing Model for Small-Scale Scenarios

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tao, Yu-Hui; Wu, Yu-Lung; Chang, Hsin-Yi

    2008-01-01

    Computer adaptive testing (CAT) is theoretically sound and efficient, and is commonly seen in larger testing programs. It is, however, rarely seen in a smaller-scale scenario, such as in classrooms or business daily routines, because of the complexity of most adopted Item Response Theory (IRT) models. While the Sequential Probability Ratio Test…

  6. Psychometric Characteristics of the Korean Version of the Satisfaction with Life Scale Adapted for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Young-Jin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the internal consistency reliability, test-retest reliability, factorial structure validity, and convergent validity of a Korean version of the Satisfaction With Life Scale adapted for children (K-SWLS-C). Participants consisted of 653 elementary school students (48% were male). The internal consistency of the…

  7. Adaptation of Distributed Leadership Scale into Turkish: The Validity and Reliability Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ersozlu, Alpay; Ulusoy, Tarik

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to adapt "Distributed Leadership Scale" originally developed by Davis into Turkish Language. A total of 386 participants including teachers employed in high schools in Tokat participated in the study. Explanatory Factor Analysis (EFA) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) were performed to test the…

  8. Reducing False Negative Reads in RFID Data Streams Using an Adaptive Sliding-Window Approach

    PubMed Central

    Massawe, Libe Valentine; Kinyua, Johnson D. M.; Vermaak, Herman

    2012-01-01

    Unreliability of the data streams generated by RFID readers is among the primary factors which limit the widespread adoption of the RFID technology. RFID data cleaning is, therefore, an essential task in the RFID middleware systems in order to reduce reading errors, and to allow these data streams to be used to make a correct interpretation and analysis of the physical world they are representing. In this paper we propose an adaptive sliding-window based approach called WSTD which is capable of efficiently coping with both environmental variation and tag dynamics. Our experimental results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed approach. PMID:22666027

  9. Hidden attractors without equilibrium and adaptive reduced-order function projective synchronization from hyperchaotic Rikitake system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yu; Pan, Weiquan

    2017-04-01

    By introducing an additional state feedback into classic Rikitake system, a new hyperchaotic system without equilibrium is derived. The proposed system is investigated through numerical simulations and analyses including time phase portraits, Lyapunov exponents, and Poincaré maps. Based on adaptive control and Lyapunov stability theory, we design a reduced-order projective synchronization scheme for synchronizing the hyperchaotic Rikitake system coexisting without equilibria and the original classic Rikitake system coexisting with two non-hyperbolic equilibria. Finally, numerical simulations are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed synchronization scheme.

  10. Use of seagrass meadows as an adaptation measure to climate change for reducing port agitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Arcilla, Agustín; Lin, Jue; Pau Sierra, Joan; Gracia, Vicenç; Casas-Prat, Merce; Virgili, Marc

    2014-05-01

    One of the best-known consequences of the greenhouse effect and the resulting global warming is sea-level rise. However, sea level rise is not the only process of concern to coastal communities. The greenhouse effect and the complex interactions in atmospheric processes is expected to produce changes in near-surface wind and pressure patterns, which in turn can affect the pattern of another important coastal driver: the wave field. Changes in wave conditions can affect the wave pattern within harbours as shown by Casas-Prat and Sierra (2012), increasing port agitation and, as a consequence, reducing the safety and comfort of the users, decreasing operation performance or even generating port inactivity. This effect will be enhanced by an increase in mean sea level. To avoid costly structural measure there are "green" options such as sea-grass that can attenuate wave energy (Koftis et al., 2013), since their roots induce sea bottom roughness and their stems and leaves increase the drag coefficient. The combined effect of vegetation is, thus, to create drag forces that dissipate part of the energy from incoming waves. Casas-Prat and Sierra (2013) showed that wave patterns may change in the future in certain areas of the Catalan Coast (northwestern Mediterranean) and as a consequence port agitation could be affected by changes in wave height or direction as well in those areas. The suggested "green" measures can help to prevent potential negative effects on port operations. The adaptive approach, depending on the downscaled climatic projections, would combine vegetation (as for example the existence of a sea-grass meadow in the vicinity of the harbour entrance) with some structural reinforcement if required. In this paper, the wave projections of Casas-Prat and Sierra (2013) are used together with a Boussinesq-type model to study wave propagation in several harbours of the Catalan Coast. This analysis of harbour oscillations is carried out for present conditions and

  11. Long term post-flood damage assessments to analyze the strategies of adaptation at individual scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brémond, Pauline; Bonte, Bruno; Erdlenbruch, Katrin; Grelot, Frédéric; Richert, Claire

    2015-04-01

    RETINA is a project which studies the opportunity for adaptation in the aftermath of flood events. To handle this research question, we consider adaptation to flood risk at individual and collective scale as well as the influence of the urban planning regulation (Flood risk mapping). For the purpose of this research, collective adaptation means actions that are undertaken at collective scale such as dikes, relocation of collective infrastructures (roads, treatment plant...) and individual adaptation means actions decided at individual level (households, enterprises or farmers) such as relocation, elevation of critical components, new organization.... In this presentation, we focus on individual adaptation and analyse which are the mechanisms that incite or constrain the adaptation to flood risk of individual assets considering their own trajectory. The originality of our approach is to carry out long term post-flood assessments and comprehensive interviews at individual scale. To catch the drivers of adaptation, we sequenced the interview guide in three periods: 1/ the situation before the reference event occurred, 2/ what happened during and just after the flood event, 3/ what happened from the flood event until the moment of the interview. Two case studies have been chosen. The first case study is the Aude department where an exceptional flooding occurred in 1999. The second case study is the Var department where more recent and frequent flood events occurred in 2010, 2011, 2014. On each case study, we plan to conduct about fifty interviews including households and economic activities. In this presentation, we will develop methodological aspects on long term post-flood damage assessments. Carrying out a long term post-flood assessment enabled us to consider adaptation to flood risk among the whole of strategic decisions a household or an enterprise has to take. Moreover, we found out that contrary to what is usually assumed, the fact that the reference event was

  12. [Spanish adaptation of the "Mobile Phone Problem Use Scale" for adolescent population].

    PubMed

    López-Fernández, Olatz; Honrubia-Serrano, Ma Luisa; Freixa-Blanxart, Montserrat

    2012-01-01

    Problematic use of the mobile telephone is an emerging phenomenon in our society, and one which particularly affects the teenage population. Knowledge from research on the problematic use of this technology is necessary, since such use can give rise to a behavioural pattern with addictive characteristics. There are hardly any scales for measuring possible problematic use of mobile phones, and none at all adapted exclusively for the Spanish adolescent population. The scale most widely used internationally is the Mobile Phone Problem Use Scale (MPPUS). The aim of the present study is to adapt the MPPUS for use with Spanish adolescents. The Spanish version of the questionnaire was administered to a sample of 1132 adolescents aged 12 to 18. Reliability and factorial validity were comparable to those obtained in adult population, so that the measure of problematic mobile phone use in Spanish teenagers is one-dimensional. A prevalence of 14.8% of problematic users was detected.

  13. DTCWT based high capacity steganography using coefficient replacement and adaptive scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathisha, N.; Priya, R.; Babu, K. Suresh; Raja, K. B.; Venugopal, K. R.; Patnaik, L. M.

    2013-12-01

    The steganography is used for secure communication. In this paper we propose Dual Tree Complex Wavelet Transform (DTCWT) based high capacity steganography using coefficient replacement and adaptive scaling. The DTCWT is applied on cover image and Lifting Wavelet Transform2 (LWT2) is applied on payload to convert spatial domain into transform domain. The new concept of replacing HH sub band coefficients of DTCWT of cover image by LL sub band coefficients of payload is introduced to generate intermediate stego object. The adaptive scaling factor is used based on entropy of cover image to scale down intermediate stego object coefficient values to generate final stego object. It is observed that the capacity and security are increased in the proposed algorithm compared to existing algorithms.

  14. Adaptive sampling of CT data for myocardial blood flow estimation from dose-reduced dynamic CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modgil, Dimple; Bindschadler, Michael D.; Alessio, Adam M.; La Rivière, Patrick J.

    2015-03-01

    Quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) can aid in the diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD). However, there are no widely accepted clinical methods for estimating MBF. Dynamic CT holds the promise of providing a quick and easy method to measure MBF quantitatively, however the need for repeated scans has raised concerns about the potential for high radiation dose. In our previous work, we explored techniques to reduce the patient dose by either uniformly reducing the tube current or by uniformly reducing the number of temporal frames in the dynamic CT sequence. These dose reduction techniques result in very noisy data, which can give rise to large errors in MBF estimation. In this work, we seek to investigate whether nonuniformly varying the tube current or sampling intervals can yield more accurate MBF estimates. Specifically, we try to minimize the dose and obtain the most accurate MBF estimate through addressing the following questions: when in the time attenuation curve (TAC) should the CT data be collected and at what tube current(s). We hypothesize that increasing the sampling rate and/or tube current during the time frames when the myocardial CT number is most sensitive to the flow rate, while reducing them elsewhere, can achieve better estimation accuracy for the same dose. We perform simulations of contrast agent kinetics and CT acquisitions to evaluate the relative MBF estimation performance of several clinically viable adaptive acquisition methods. We found that adaptive temporal and tube current sequences can be performed that impart an effective dose of about 5 mSv and allow for reductions in MBF estimation RMSE on the order of 11% compared to uniform acquisition sequences with comparable or higher radiation doses.

  15. Database support for adaptation to climate change: An assessment of web-based portals across scales.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Hans; Hilden, Mikael; Russel, Duncan; Dessai, Suraje

    2016-10-01

    The widely recognized increase in greenhouse gas emissions is necessitating adaptation to a changing climate, and policies are being developed and implemented worldwide, across sectors, and between government scales globally. The aim of this article is to reflect on one of the major challenges: facilitating and sharing information on the next adaptation practices. Web portals (i.e., web sites) for disseminating information are important tools in meeting this challenge, and therefore, we assessed the characteristics of select major portals across multiple scales. We found that there is a rather limited number of case studies available in the portals-between 900 and 1000 in total-with 95 that include cost information and 195 that include the participation of stakeholders globally. Portals are rarely cited by researchers, suggesting a suboptimal connection between the practical, policy-related, and scientific development of adaptation. The government portals often lack links on search results between US and European Union (EU) web sites, for example. With significant investments and policy development emerging in both the United States and the European Union, there is great potential to share information via portals. Moreover, there is the possibility of better connecting the practical adaptation experience from bottom-up projects to the science of adaptation. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2016;12:627-631. © 2016 SETAC.

  16. Towards an improved wind speed scale and damage description adapted for Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feuerstein, Bernold; Groenemeijer, Pieter; Dirksen, Erik; Hubrig, Martin; Holzer, Alois M.; Dotzek, Nikolai

    2011-06-01

    We propose an updated wind speed scale description adapted for Central Europe considering wind impact to buildings as well as to vegetation. The scale is motivated by the need of a broadly applicable, accurate and consistent tornado or downburst intensity rating system based on a standardised wind speed scale for the purpose of climatological homogeneity. The description comprises building and vegetation damage characteristics, which can be found in Central Europe - but similar in other parts of the world, occurring with the various classes of the Fujita- and T-scales. The scale description is supplemented by photographs of typical damage. For practical application, an ensemble-based use of a decision matrix for specific building structures and vegetation types is suggested.

  17. Translation, cultural adaptation and reproducibility of the Cochin Hand Functional Scale questionnaire for Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Chiari, Aline; de Souza Sardim, Carla Caires; Natour, Jamil

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To translate, to perform a cultural adaptation of and to test the reproducibility of the Cochin Hand Functional Scale questionnaire for Brazil. METHODS: First, the Cochin Hand Functional Scale questionnaire was translated into Portuguese and was then back-translated into French. These translations were reviewed by a committee to establish a Brazilian version of the questionnaire to be tested. The validity and reproducibility of the Cochin Hand Functional Scale questionnaire was evaluated. Patients of both sexes, who were aged 18 to 60 years and presented with rheumatoid arthritis affecting their hands, were interviewed. The patients were initially interviewed by two observers and were later interviewed by a single rater. First, the Visual Analogue Scale for hand pain, the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Disability questionnaire and the Health Assessment Questionnaire were administered. The third administration of the Cochin Hand Functional Scale was performed fifteen days after the first administration. Ninety patients were assessed in the present study. RESULTS: Two questions were modified as a result of the assessment of cultural equivalence. The Cronbach's alpha value for this assessment was 0.93. The intraclass intraobserver and interobserver correlation coefficients were 0.76 and 0.96, respectively. The Spearman's coefficient indicated that there was a low level of correlation between the Cochin Hand Functional Scale and the Visual Analogue Scale for pain (0.46) and that there was a moderate level of correlation of the Cochin Scale with the Health Assessment Questionnaire (0.66) and with the Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire (0.63). The average administration time for the Cochin Scale was three minutes. CONCLUSION: The Brazilian version of the Cochin Hand Functional Scale was successfully translated and adapted, and this version exhibited good internal consistency, reliability and construct validity. PMID:21789372

  18. Influences on Adaptive Planning to Reduce Flood Risks among Parishes in South Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Paille, Mary; Reams, Margaret; Argote, Jennifer; Lam, Nina S-N; Kirby, Ryan

    2016-02-01

    Residents of south Louisiana face a range of increasing, climate-related flood exposure risks that could be reduced through local floodplain management and hazard mitigation planning. A major incentive for community planning to reduce exposure to flood risks is offered by the Community Rating System (CRS) of the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). The NFIP encourages local collective action by offering reduced flood insurance premiums for individual policy holders of communities where suggested risk-reducing measures have been implemented. This preliminary analysis examines the extent to which parishes (counties) in southern Louisiana have implemented the suggested policy actions and identifies key factors that account for variation in the implementation of the measures. More measures implemented results in higher CRS scores. Potential influences on scores include socioeconomic attributes of residents, government capacity, average elevation and past flood events. The results of multiple regression analysis indicate that higher CRS scores are associated most closely with higher median housing values. Furthermore, higher scores are found in parishes with more local municipalities that participate in the CRS program. The number of floods in the last five years and the revenue base of the parish does not appear to influence CRS scores. The results shed light on the conditions under which local adaptive planning to mitigate increasing flood risks is more likely to be implemented and offer insights for program administrators, researchers and community stakeholders.

  19. Influences on Adaptive Planning to Reduce Flood Risks among Parishes in South Louisiana

    PubMed Central

    Paille, Mary; Reams, Margaret; Argote, Jennifer; Lam, Nina S.-N.; Kirby, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Residents of south Louisiana face a range of increasing, climate-related flood exposure risks that could be reduced through local floodplain management and hazard mitigation planning. A major incentive for community planning to reduce exposure to flood risks is offered by the Community Rating System (CRS) of the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). The NFIP encourages local collective action by offering reduced flood insurance premiums for individual policy holders of communities where suggested risk-reducing measures have been implemented. This preliminary analysis examines the extent to which parishes (counties) in southern Louisiana have implemented the suggested policy actions and identifies key factors that account for variation in the implementation of the measures. More measures implemented results in higher CRS scores. Potential influences on scores include socioeconomic attributes of residents, government capacity, average elevation and past flood events. The results of multiple regression analysis indicate that higher CRS scores are associated most closely with higher median housing values. Furthermore, higher scores are found in parishes with more local municipalities that participate in the CRS program. The number of floods in the last five years and the revenue base of the parish does not appear to influence CRS scores. The results shed light on the conditions under which local adaptive planning to mitigate increasing flood risks is more likely to be implemented and offer insights for program administrators, researchers and community stakeholders. PMID:27330828

  20. The adaptive value of habitat preferences from a multi-scale spatial perspective: insights from marsh-nesting avian species

    PubMed Central

    Brambilla, Mattia

    2017-01-01

    Background Habitat selection and its adaptive outcomes are crucial features for animal life-history strategies. Nevertheless, congruence between habitat preferences and breeding success has been rarely demonstrated, which may result from the single-scale evaluation of animal choices. As habitat selection is a complex multi-scale process in many groups of animal species, investigating adaptiveness of habitat selection in a multi-scale framework is crucial. In this study, we explore whether habitat preferences acting at different spatial scales enhance the fitness of bird species, and check the appropriateness of single vs. multi-scale models. We expected that variables found to be more important for habitat selection at individual scale(s), would coherently play a major role in affecting nest survival at the same scale(s). Methods We considered habitat preferences of two Rallidae species, little crake (Zapornia parva) and water rail (Rallus aquaticus), at three spatial scales (landscape, territory, and nest-site) and related them to nest survival. Single-scale versus multi-scale models (GLS and glmmPQL) were compared to check which model better described adaptiveness of habitat preferences. Consistency between the effect of variables on habitat selection and on nest survival was checked to investigate their adaptive value. Results In both species, multi-scale models for nest survival were more supported than single-scale ones. In little crake, the multi-scale model indicated vegetation density and water depth at the territory scale, as well as vegetation height at nest-site scale, as the most important variables. The first two variables were among the most important for nest survival and habitat selection, and the coherent effects suggested the adaptive value of habitat preferences. In water rail, the multi-scale model of nest survival showed vegetation density at territory scale and extent of emergent vegetation within landscape scale as the most important ones

  1. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale in a French-Speaking Swiss Sample: Psychometric Properties and Relationships to Personality and Work Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossier, Jerome; Zecca, Gregory; Stauffer, Sarah D.; Maggiori, Christian; Dauwalder, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the psychometric properties of the Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS) in a French-speaking Swiss sample and its relationship with personality dimensions and work engagement. The heterogeneous sample of 391 participants (M[subscript age] = 39.59, SD = 12.30) completed the CAAS-International and a short version…

  2. Adapting CEF-Descriptors for Rating Purposes: Validation by a Combined Rater Training and Scale Revision Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harsch, Claudia; Martin, Guido

    2012-01-01

    We explore how a local rating scale can be based on the Common European Framework CEF-proficiency scales. As part of the scale validation (Alderson, 1991; Lumley, 2002), we examine which adaptations are needed to turn CEF-proficiency descriptors into a rating scale for a local context, and to establish a practicable method to revise the initial…

  3. The efficiency of close inbreeding to reduce genetic adaptation to captivity.

    PubMed

    Theodorou, K; Couvet, D

    2015-01-01

    Although ex situ conservation is indispensable for thousands of species, captive breeding is associated with negative genetic changes: loss of genetic variance and genetic adaptation to captivity that is deleterious in the wild. We used quantitative genetic individual-based simulations to model the effect of genetic management on the evolution of a quantitative trait and the associated fitness of wild-born individuals that are brought to captivity. We also examined the feasibility of the breeding strategies under a scenario of a large number of loci subject to deleterious mutations. We compared two breeding strategies: repeated half-sib mating and a method of minimizing mean coancestry (referred to as gc/mc). Our major finding was that half-sib mating is more effective in reducing genetic adaptation to captivity than the gc/mc method. Moreover, half-sib mating retains larger allelic and adaptive genetic variance. Relative to initial standing variation, the additive variance of the quantitative trait increased under half-sib mating during the sojourn in captivity. Although fragmentation into smaller populations improves the efficiency of the gc/mc method, half-sib mating still performs better in the scenarios tested. Half-sib mating shows two caveats that could mitigate its beneficial effects: low heterozygosity and high risk of extinction when populations are of low fecundity and size and one of the following conditions are met: (i) the strength of selection in captivity is comparable with that in the wild, (ii) deleterious mutations are numerous and only slightly deleterious. Experimental validation of half-sib mating is therefore needed for the advancement of captive breeding programs.

  4. Mitigating and adapting to climate change: multi-functional and multi-scale assessment of green urban infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Demuzere, M; Orru, K; Heidrich, O; Olazabal, E; Geneletti, D; Orru, H; Bhave, A G; Mittal, N; Feliu, E; Faehnle, M

    2014-12-15

    In order to develop climate resilient urban areas and reduce emissions, several opportunities exist starting from conscious planning and design of green (and blue) spaces in these landscapes. Green urban infrastructure has been regarded as beneficial, e.g. by balancing water flows, providing thermal comfort. This article explores the existing evidence on the contribution of green spaces to climate change mitigation and adaptation services. We suggest a framework of ecosystem services for systematizing the evidence on the provision of bio-physical benefits (e.g. CO2 sequestration) as well as social and psychological benefits (e.g. improved health) that enable coping with (adaptation) or reducing the adverse effects (mitigation) of climate change. The multi-functional and multi-scale nature of green urban infrastructure complicates the categorization of services and benefits, since in reality the interactions between various benefits are manifold and appear on different scales. We will show the relevance of the benefits from green urban infrastructures on three spatial scales (i.e. city, neighborhood and site specific scales). We will further report on co-benefits and trade-offs between the various services indicating that a benefit could in turn be detrimental in relation to other functions. The manuscript identifies avenues for further research on the role of green urban infrastructure, in different types of cities, climates and social contexts. Our systematic understanding of the bio-physical and social processes defining various services allows targeting stressors that may hamper the provision of green urban infrastructure services in individual behavior as well as in wider planning and environmental management in urban areas.

  5. Adaptation to NaCl Reduces the Susceptibility of Enterococcus faecalis to Melaleuca alternifolia (Tea Tree) Oil.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ee Lin; Hammer, Katherine Ann

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the hypothesis that the salt adaptation response of Enterococcus faecalis alters susceptibility to tea tree oil (TTO). Six E. faecalis isolates were adapted to 6.5 % NaCl, and then exposed to TTO in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). One isolate was also exposed to TTO in Brain Heart Infusion Broth (BHIB). The viability of salt-adapted and non-adapted control cells was determined at 0, 45 and 90 min and compared. MICs for several antibiotics and TTO were also determined by E test and broth microdilution, respectively. Results showed that susceptibility to TTO in PBS was significantly reduced after salt adaptation for five isolates (83 %) (P < 0.05). Mean differences between salt-adapted and non-adapted cell counts were 2.51 log at 45 min and 2.13 log at 90 min. However, when E. faecalis ATCC 19433 was exposed to TTO in BHIB, no significant differences were seen. In conclusion, salt adaptation resulted in reduced susceptibility to TTO in PBS for the majority of isolates, indicating that cross protection had occurred. This effect was absent in BHIB, suggesting that the uptake of compatible solutes from the growth medium protected non-adapted cells from TTO. Whether this has implications for the clinical effectiveness of TTO remains to be determined.

  6. Adapting the Bayley Scales of infant and toddler development in Ethiopia: evaluation of reliability and validity

    PubMed Central

    Medhin, G.; Worku, B.; Tomlinson, M.; Alem, A.; Dewey, M.; Prince, M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background There is a need for valid and reliable observational measures of early child development in low‐income and middle‐income country settings. Methods The aims of the study were to adapt the Bayley Scales of Infant Development (Bayley III) for a rural Ethiopian setting and evaluate reliability and validity. The study was carried out between January 2008 and January 2009 in the Butajira demographic surveillance site, south central Ethiopia. The Bayley III was adapted to be socioculturally appropriate for a rural Ethiopian context. Nurses and high school graduates were trained in administration of the measure for 10 days. Inter‐rater reliability was evaluated (n = 60). Content, construct and convergent validity was then examined on a population‐based cohort of children at the ages of 30 (n = 440) and 42 months (n = 456). Mokken scale analysis was used to determine the scalability of items in unidimensional, hierarchical sub‐scales. The mean score was compared by age of child and by stunting status (less than −2 z scores below the standard height‐for‐age). Results The intra‐class correlations between raters were above 0.90 for all sub‐scales of the child development measure. Some scale items were not contextually relevant and showed poor scalability. However, the majority of items scaled onto the existing sub‐scales of the international measure to form adequate‐to‐strong hierarchical scales with good internal consistency (Cronbach's α above 0.70 except for gross motor and expressive language sub‐scales). Item‐scale coefficients were good. The mean score of all sub‐scales was significantly higher in the older group of children (33.02 higher total score; P < 0.001) and in the children who were stunted (total Bayley score 2.58 (95% confidence interval 0.07 to 5.10) points lower at 30 months and 3.87 (1.94 to 5.81) points lower at 42 months. Conclusions An adapted version of an international

  7. Local Adaptation Interacts with Expansion Load during Range Expansion: Maladaptation Reduces Expansion Load.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Kimberly J; Sharp, Nathaniel P; Angert, Amy L; Conte, Gina L; Draghi, Jeremy A; Guillaume, Frédéric; Hargreaves, Anna L; Matthey-Doret, Remi; Whitlock, Michael C

    2017-04-01

    The biotic and abiotic factors that facilitate or hinder species range expansions are many and complex. We examine the impact of two genetic processes and their interaction on fitness at expanding range edges: local maladaptation resulting from the presence of an environmental gradient and expansion load resulting from increased genetic drift at the range edge. Results from spatially explicit simulations indicate that the presence of an environmental gradient during range expansion reduces expansion load; conversely, increasing expansion load allows only locally adapted populations to persist at the range edge. Increased maladaptation reduces the speed of range expansion, resulting in less genetic drift at the expanding front and more immigration from the range center, therefore reducing expansion load at the range edge. These results may have ramifications for species being forced to shift their ranges because of climate change or other anthropogenic changes. If rapidly changing climate leads to faster expansion as populations track their shifting climatic optima, populations may suffer increased expansion load beyond previous expectations.

  8. Current warming will reduce yields unless maize breeding and seed systems adapt immediately

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challinor, A. J.; Koehler, A.-K.; Ramirez-Villegas, J.; Whitfield, S.; Das, B.

    2016-10-01

    The development of crop varieties that are better suited to new climatic conditions is vital for future food production. Increases in mean temperature accelerate crop development, resulting in shorter crop durations and reduced time to accumulate biomass and yield. The process of breeding, delivery and adoption (BDA) of new maize varieties can take up to 30 years. Here, we assess for the first time the implications of warming during the BDA process by using five bias-corrected global climate models and four representative concentration pathways with realistic scenarios of maize BDA times in Africa. The results show that the projected difference in temperature between the start and end of the maize BDA cycle results in shorter crop durations that are outside current variability. Both adaptation and mitigation can reduce duration loss. In particular, climate projections have the potential to provide target elevated temperatures for breeding. Whilst options for reducing BDA time are highly context dependent, common threads include improved recording and sharing of data across regions for the whole BDA cycle, streamlining of regulation, and capacity building. Finally, we show that the results have implications for maize across the tropics, where similar shortening of duration is projected.

  9. Partial weight suspension: a novel murine model for investigating adaptation to reduced musculoskeletal loading.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Erika B; Granzella, Nicholas P; Saito, Hiroaki; Newman, Dava J; Young, Laurence R; Bouxsein, Mary L

    2010-08-01

    We developed a new model of hypodynamic loading to support mice in chronic conditions of partial weight bearing, enabling simulations of reduced gravity environments and related clinical conditions. The novel hardware allows for reduced loading between 10 and 80% of normal body weight on all four limbs and enables characteristic quadrupedal locomotion. Ten-week-old female BALB/cByJ mice were supported for 21 days under Mars-analog suspension (38% weight bearing) and compared with age-matched and jacketed (100% weight bearing) controls. After an initial adaptation, weight gain did not differ between groups, suggesting low levels of animal stress. Relative to age-matched controls, mice exposed to Mars-analog loading had significantly lower muscle mass (-23% gastrocnemius wet mass, P < 0.0001); trabecular and cortical bone morphology (i.e., trabecular bone volume: -24% at the distal femur, and cortical thickness: -11% at the femoral midshaft, both P < 0.001); and biomechanical properties of the femoral midshaft (i.e., -27% ultimate moment, P < 0.001). Bone formation indexes were decreased compared with age-matched full-weight-bearing mice, whereas resorption parameters were largely unchanged. Singly housed, full-weight-bearing controls with forelimb jackets were largely similar to age-matched, group-housed controls, although a few variables differed and warrant further investigation. Altogether, these data provide strong rationale for use of our new model of partial weight bearing to further explore the musculoskeletal response to reduced loading environments.

  10. On distributed wavefront reconstruction for large-scale adaptive optics systems.

    PubMed

    de Visser, Cornelis C; Brunner, Elisabeth; Verhaegen, Michel

    2016-05-01

    The distributed-spline-based aberration reconstruction (D-SABRE) method is proposed for distributed wavefront reconstruction with applications to large-scale adaptive optics systems. D-SABRE decomposes the wavefront sensor domain into any number of partitions and solves a local wavefront reconstruction problem on each partition using multivariate splines. D-SABRE accuracy is within 1% of a global approach with a speedup that scales quadratically with the number of partitions. The D-SABRE is compared to the distributed cumulative reconstruction (CuRe-D) method in open-loop and closed-loop simulations using the YAO adaptive optics simulation tool. D-SABRE accuracy exceeds CuRe-D for low levels of decomposition, and D-SABRE proved to be more robust to variations in the loop gain.

  11. Psychopathology scale of the Hutt adaptation of the Bender-Gestalt Test: reliability.

    PubMed

    Miller, L J; Hutt, M L

    1975-04-01

    The test-retest reliability of the Hutt Adaptation of the Bender-Gestalt test was explored with a population of 40 process schizophrenics over a two-week interval. The total Psychopathology Scale Score was found to have high retest reliability for both male and female patients (rho = .87 for males and .83 for females). Moreover the three major components for the Scale were found to have high reliability, and fairly high reliabilities were obtained for patients scoring high as well as low on the Scale. Interjudge reliability was also found to be very high (rho = .895), confirming previous studies in this respect. On these grounds, the Scale offers promise both for clinical and research purposes.

  12. Psychometric Properties of the “Sport Motivation Scale (SMS)” Adapted to Physical Education

    PubMed Central

    Granero-Gallegos, Antonio; Baena-Extremera, Antonio; Gómez-López, Manuel; Sánchez-Fuentes, José Antonio; Abraldes, J. Arturo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the factor structure of a Spanish version of the Sport Motivation Scale adapted to physical education. A second aim was to test which one of three hypothesized models (three, five and seven-factor) provided best model fit. 758 Spanish high school students completed the Sport Motivation Scale adapted for Physical Education and also completed the Learning and Performance Orientation in Physical Education Classes Questionnaire. We examined the factor structure of each model using confirmatory factor analysis and also assessed internal consistency and convergent validity. The results showed that all three models in Spanish produce good indicators of fitness, but we suggest using the seven-factor model (χ2/gl = 2.73; ECVI = 1.38) as it produces better values when adapted to physical education, that five-factor model (χ2/gl = 2.82; ECVI = 1.44) and three-factor model (χ2/gl = 3.02; ECVI = 1.53). Key Points Physical education research conducted in Spain has used the version of SMS designed to assess motivation in sport, but validity reliability and validity results in physical education have not been reported. Results of the present study lend support to the factorial validity and internal reliability of three alternative factor structures (3, 5, and 7 factors) of SMS adapted to Physical Education in Spanish. Although all three models in Spanish produce good indicators of fitness, but we suggest using the seven-factor model. PMID:25435772

  13. Iterative learning-based decentralized adaptive tracker for large-scale systems: a digital redesign approach.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jason Sheng-Hong; Du, Yan-Yi; Huang, Pei-Hsiang; Guo, Shu-Mei; Shieh, Leang-San; Chen, Yuhua

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, a digital redesign methodology of the iterative learning-based decentralized adaptive tracker is proposed to improve the dynamic performance of sampled-data linear large-scale control systems consisting of N interconnected multi-input multi-output subsystems, so that the system output will follow any trajectory which may not be presented by the analytic reference model initially. To overcome the interference of each sub-system and simplify the controller design, the proposed model reference decentralized adaptive control scheme constructs a decoupled well-designed reference model first. Then, according to the well-designed model, this paper develops a digital decentralized adaptive tracker based on the optimal analog control and prediction-based digital redesign technique for the sampled-data large-scale coupling system. In order to enhance the tracking performance of the digital tracker at specified sampling instants, we apply the iterative learning control (ILC) to train the control input via continual learning. As a result, the proposed iterative learning-based decentralized adaptive tracker not only has robust closed-loop decoupled property but also possesses good tracking performance at both transient and steady state. Besides, evolutionary programming is applied to search for a good learning gain to speed up the learning process of ILC.

  14. Measuring HIV felt stigma: a culturally adapted scale targeting PLWHA in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Julio Cesar; Puig, Marieva; Ramos, Juan Carlos; Morales, Marangelie; Asencio, Gloria; Sala, Ana Cecilia; Castro, Eida; Velez Santori, Carmen; Santiago, Lydia; Zorrilla, Carmen

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this study was to culturally adapt and validate a scale to measure HIV-related felt stigma in a group of People living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in Puerto Rico. The researchers conducted a two-phase cross-sectional study with 216 participants (60, first phase; 156, second phase). The first phase consisted of the cultural adaptation of the scale; the second evaluated its psychometric properties. After conducting a factor analysis, a 17-item scale, the HIV Felt-Stigma Scale (HFSS), resulted. Participants completed the Puerto Rico Comprehensive Center for the Study of Health Disparities Socio-demographic Questionnaire, the HFSS, the Beck Depression Inventory-II, and the Sexual Abuse dimension of the History of Abuse Questionnaire; the case managers completed the Case Manager Stigma Guide with subjects. The HFSS measures four dimensions: personalized stigma, disclosure concerns, negative self-image, and concern with public attitudes. The alpha and Pearson correlation coefficients (0.91 and 0.68, respectively) indicated satisfactory validity and reliability; the scale suggested adequate convergent validity. The HFSS is a culturally sensitive instrument that fills the existing gap in the measurement of felt stigma in Spanish-speaking PLWHA.

  15. [Social capital in rural areas: adaptation to Spanish and factor validation of a scale].

    PubMed

    Fernández Niño, Julián Alfredo; Pinzón Flórez, Carlos Eduardo; Moreno Montoya, José; Cepeda Gil, Magda Cristiana; Idrovo Velandia, Alvaro Javier

    2014-07-01

    Social capital is considered a structural determinant of social development and wellbeing. Its cognitive component assesses the degree of confidence of the population in their systems for social organization, as well as community interactions to coordinate social responses to social problems. There are few available scales for measuring this construct. This work presents the adaptation to Spanish and psychometric validation of a scale for measuring social capital in a rural setting. The Wang Social Cognitive Scale was also adapted to Spanish. 1200 questionnaires were applied to adults in 12 villages of the municipality of Tierra Alta, (Colombia) recruited by random sampling. Factor analysis of the scale was performed based on a polychoric correlation matrix. Exploratory factor analysis suggests the existence of two principal factors distributed as follows: 7 items for factor 1, trust (eigenvalue 3.23) and 2 items, for factor 2, distrust (eigenvalue 1.40). As observed by Wang, Q9 and Q10 could be ambiguous questions which do not contribute enough to either of the factors. The first factor validation to Spanish language of the Wang Social Capital Scale is presented in the social context of rural Colombia.

  16. Measuring HIV felt stigma: a culturally adapted scale targeting PLWHA in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Julio Cesar; Puig, Marieva; Ramos, Juan Carlos; Morales, Marangelie; Asencio, Gloria; Sala, Ana Cecilia; Castro, Eida; Santori, Carmen Vélez; Santiago, Lydia; Zorrilla, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to culturally adapt and validate a scale to measure HIV-related felt stigma in a group of People living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in Puerto Rico. The researchers conducted a two-phase cross-sectional study with 216 participants (60, first phase; 156, second phase). The first phase consisted of the cultural adaptation of the scale; the second evaluated its psychometric properties. After conducting a factor analysis, a 17-item scale, the HIV Felt-Stigma Scale (HFSS), resulted. Participants completed the Puerto Rico Comprehensive Center for the Study of Health Disparities Socio-demographic Questionnaire, the HFSS, the Beck Depression Inventory-II, and the Sexual Abuse dimension of the History of Abuse Questionnaire; the case managers completed the Case Manager Stigma Guide with subjects. The HFSS measures four dimensions: personalized stigma, disclosure concerns, negative self-image, and concern with public attitudes. The alpha and Pearson correlation coefficients (0.91 and 0.68, respectively) indicated satisfactory validity and reliability; the scale suggested adequate convergent validity. The HFSS is a culturally sensitive instrument that fills the existing gap in the measurement of felt stigma in Spanish-speaking PLWHA. PMID:20665283

  17. Reduced short term adaptation to robot generated dynamic environment in children affected by Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background It is known that healthy adults can quickly adapt to a novel dynamic environment, generated by a robotic manipulandum as a structured disturbing force field. We suggest that it may be of clinical interest to evaluate to which extent this kind of motor learning capability is impaired in children affected by cerebal palsy. Methods We adapted the protocol already used with adults, which employs a velocity dependant viscous field, and compared the performance of a group of subjects affected by Cerebral Palsy (CP group, 7 subjects) with a Control group of unimpaired age-matched children. The protocol included a familiarization phase (FA), during which no force was applied, a force field adaptation phase (CF), and a wash-out phase (WO) in which the field was removed. During the CF phase the field was shut down in a number of randomly selected "catch" trials, which were used in order to evaluate the "learning index" for each single subject and the two groups. Lateral deviation, speed and acceleration peaks and average speed were evaluated for each trajectory; a directional analysis was performed in order to inspect the role of the limb's inertial anisotropy in the different experimental phases. Results During the FA phase the movements of the CP subjects were more curved, displaying greater and variable directional error; over the course of the CF phase both groups showed a decreasing trend in the lateral error and an after-effect at the beginning of the wash-out, but the CP group had a non significant adaptation rate and a lower learning index, suggesting that CP subjects have reduced ability to learn to compensate external force. Moreover, a directional analysis of trajectories confirms that the control group is able to better predict the force field by tuning the kinematic features of the movements along different directions in order to account for the inertial anisotropy of arm. Conclusions Spatial abnormalities in children affected by cerebral palsy may be

  18. A Decentralized Multivariable Robust Adaptive Voltage and Speed Regulator for Large-Scale Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okou, Francis A.; Akhrif, Ouassima; Dessaint, Louis A.; Bouchard, Derrick

    2013-05-01

    This papter introduces a decentralized multivariable robust adaptive voltage and frequency regulator to ensure the stability of large-scale interconnnected generators. Interconnection parameters (i.e. load, line and transormer parameters) are assumed to be unknown. The proposed design approach requires the reformulation of conventiaonal power system models into a multivariable model with generator terminal voltages as state variables, and excitation and turbine valve inputs as control signals. This model, while suitable for the application of modern control methods, introduces problems with regards to current design techniques for large-scale systems. Interconnection terms, which are treated as perturbations, do not meet the common matching condition assumption. A new adaptive method for a certain class of large-scale systems is therefore introduces that does not require the matching condition. The proposed controller consists of nonlinear inputs that cancel some nonlinearities of the model. Auxiliary controls with linear and nonlinear components are used to stabilize the system. They compensate unknown parametes of the model by updating both the nonlinear component gains and excitation parameters. The adaptation algorithms involve the sigma-modification approach for auxiliary control gains, and the projection approach for excitation parameters to prevent estimation drift. The computation of the matrix-gain of the controller linear component requires the resolution of an algebraic Riccati equation and helps to solve the perturbation-mismatching problem. A realistic power system is used to assess the proposed controller performance. The results show that both stability and transient performance are considerably improved following a severe contingency.

  19. A Matter of Scale: Climatic Assessment of Projected Urban Expansion and Adaptation in California 2100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgescu, Matei

    2015-04-01

    Recent projections indicate the U.S. will add about 300 million inhabitants through the end of the current century, leading to roughly 250,000km2 of new urban land use to meet the increase in commercial, housing, and transportation demand. Multi-year and multi-member continental scale numerical simulations are conducted with the WRF model, for the U.S., to assess impacts owing to end of century megapolitan expansion, and to examine consequences of commonly proposed adaptation strategies. Warming of 1-2°C is simulated for all expanding urban areas, with local warming exceeding 3°C for some regions during some seasons. Widespread adoption of adaptation strategies exhibit regionally and seasonally dependent hydroclimatic impacts, displaying intended effects for some urban areas while exhibiting unintended consequences for others. To assess the multi-scale dependency of simulated results, high-resolution (2km grid spacing) seasonal timescale simulations are conducted for urbanizing regions in California (USA). In addition to emphasizing the need for integrated assessment that also incorporates biophysically induced urban impacts, I argue in favor of examining scale dependency of simulated outcomes to comprehensively address tradeoff assessment of various urban adaptation approaches, with important hydroclimatic implications extending to potential impacts for air quality.

  20. Translation and Adaptation of the Genetic Counselling Outcome Scale (GCOS-24) for Use in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Diness, Birgitte Rode; Overbeck, Gritt; Hjortshøj, Tina Duelund; Hammer, Trine Bjørg; Timshel, Susanne; Sørensen, Else; McAllister, Marion

    2017-03-06

    Outcome measurement in clinical genetics is challenging. Robust outcome measures are needed to provide evidence to support service development within genetic counseling. The Genetic Counselling Outcome Scale (GCOS-24), a Patient Reported Outcome Measure (PROM), was developed in English and validated with clinical genetics patients in the British NHS. This study reports the translation and adaptation of the GCOS-24 for use in Denmark. GCOS-24 was translated and back translated, supervised by an expert committee. Feedback on the first version was collected from genetic counseling patients in qualitative interviews focusing on instructions for use, response options and specific items considered semantically difficult. After further adjustment the adapted and translated version was administered to a second sample of patients, with responses analyzed using descriptive statistics. Eighteen interviews were conducted, and led to adjustment of item wording. Sixty-one patients completed the final version GCOS-24dk. Internal consistency is good (Cronbach's α =0.79), with an acceptable number of missing responses and no floor or ceiling effect observed. GCOS-24 has been successfully translated and adapted for use in a Danish setting. The study confirms the feasibility of local adaptation of patient reported outcome measures and stresses the importance of adaptation, even across quite similar populations and health care systems.

  1. Digital redesign of the decentralised adaptive tracker for linear large-scale systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ming-Hong; Sheng-Hong Tsai, Jason; Chen, Chia-Wei; Guo, Shu-Mei; Chu, Che-An

    2010-02-01

    A novel digital redesign of the analogue model-reference-based decentralized adaptive tracker is proposed for the sampled-data large scale system consisting of N interconnected linear subsystems, so that the system output will follow any trajectory specified at sampling instant which may not be presented by the analytic reference initially, and shows that the proposed decentralized controller induces a good robustness on the decoupling of the closed-loop controlled system. The adaptation of the analogue controller gain is derived by using the model-reference adaptive control theory based on Lyapunov's method. In this article, it is shown that using the sampled-data decentralized adaptive control system it is theoretically possible to asymptotically track the desired output with a desired performance. It is assumed that all the controllers share their prior information and the principal result is derived when they cooperate implicitly. Based on the prediction-based digital redesign methodology, the optimal digital redesigned tracker for the sampled-data decentralised adaptive control systems is newly proposed. An illustrative example of interconnected linear system is presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed design methodology.

  2. [Jefferson scale of physician lifelong learning: translation and adaptation for the portuguese medical population].

    PubMed

    Salgueira, Ana Paula; Frada, Tiago; Aguiar, Pedro; Costa, Manuel João

    2009-01-01

    The competence and professionalism of doctors depend on the process of Lifelong Learning (LLL). In the Portuguese settings, in which the re-certification of physicians' skills or knowledge is currently not required, the exercise of LLL is left to personal motivation and initiative. The importance of LLL has been highlighted in numerous international recommendations and has already led, in the United States, to the development and validation of a scale for measuring physician LLL - the Jefferson Scale of Physician Life Long Learning (JSPLL). The lack of valid instruments to measure LLL adapted to the Portuguese contexts was the basis for this work, which presents the translation and adaptation of JSPLL, and the subsequent validation of the translated version to the Portuguese medical community. The translation and validation of the English version of JSPLL (JSPLL-VP) was conducted with physicians of Health Care institutions in the District of Braga, Portugal, in 2007. Methods of both qualitative (translation, assessment of the translation, retro translation) and quantitative nature (internal consistency analysis, factor analysis and analysis of response frequencies) resulted in a factor analysis that replicated, with the exception of three items, the distribution of the original scale by four factors: professional learning beliefs and motivation, scholarly activities, attention to learning opportunities and technical skills in seeking information. The results show that the JSPLL-VP is a valid Scale fit for purpose. Cronbach's alpha coefficients for the whole scale (.89) and for each factor, confirmed the internal consistency of the Scale. Additionally, differences were found between mean and standard deviations for different Scale factors. In summary, this work provides a new validated tool to monitor physician's LLL in Portugal. The transversal characterization of LLL of specific medical professionals - by specialty or by type of institution - or longitudinal

  3. Increased onset of vergence adaptation reduces excessive accommodation during the orthoptic treatment of convergence insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasan, Vidhyapriya; Bobier, William R

    2015-06-01

    This research tested the hypothesis that the successful treatment of convergence insufficiency (CI) with vision-training (VT) procedures, leads to an increased capacity of vergence adaptation (VAdapt) allowing a more rapid downward adjustment of the convergence accommodation cross-link. Nine subjects with CI were recruited from a clinical population, based upon reduced fusional vergence amplitudes, receded near point of convergence or symptomology. VAdapt and the resulting changes to convergence accommodation (CA) were measured at specific intervals over 15 min (pre-training). Separate clinical measures of the accommodative convergence cross link, horizontal fusion limits and near point of convergence were taken and a symptomology questionnaire completed. Subjects then participated in a VT program composed of 2.5h at home and 1h in-office weekly for 12-14 weeks. Clinical testing was done weekly. VAdapt and CA measures were retaken once clinical measures normalized for 2 weeks (mid-training) and then again when symptoms had cleared (post-training). VAdapt and CA responses as well as the clinical measures were taken on a control group showing normal clinical findings. Six subjects provided complete data sets. CI clinical findings reached normal levels between 4 and 7 weeks of training but symptoms, VAdapt, and CA output remained significantly different from the controls until 12-14 weeks. The hypothesis was retained. The reduced VAdapt and excessive CA found in CI were normalized through orthoptic treatment. This time course was underestimated by clinical findings but matched symptom amelioration.

  4. Reduced-dimension space-time adaptive processing based on angle-Doppler correlation coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruiyang; Li, Jun; Zhang, Wei; He, Zishu

    2016-12-01

    Traditional space-time adaptive processing (STAP) is a strategy for clutter suppression in airborne radar, which requires a large number of computational complexity and secondary data. In order to address the problem, reduced-dimension (RD) STAP is generally used. We propose a novel RD STAP through searching the best channels as the auxiliary channels to cancel the interference. Based on the estimation of the clutter Fourier basis vectors offline, a parameter named angle-Doppler correlation coefficient (AD C 2) is constructed to evaluate the capability of each auxiliary channel in clutter suppression, and the best sets of RD channels can be selected. The proposed algorithm can achieve the best detection performance with the fixed number of auxiliary channel. When the degrees of freedom (DOF) are restricted to a small value, only one auxiliary channel is needed to guarantee the SINR loss less than 3 dB. Therefore, the requirement of the training sample can be reduced, which makes the proposed approach more suitable for the heterogeneous clutter environments.

  5. A feed forward adaptive canceller to reduce the occlusion effect in hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Borges, Renata Coelho; Costa, Márcio Holsbach

    2016-12-01

    Hearing aids are essential devices for social integration of hearing impaired people in order to improve their auditory perception. Recent studies have reported significant dissatisfaction factors that tend to reduce their daily use. The occlusion effect is one important source of complaints. This phenomenon stems from the partial or complete closure of the ventilation opening of the ear-mould, usually performed to prevent feedback effects in high-gain devices. This work presents a new adaptive active-noise-control system to reduce the occlusion effect in small- or unvented hearing aids. In contrast to previously developed occlusion-effect cancellers, this system offers a feedforward cancelling structure that permits the analysis of its behaviour as a finite-impulse-response linear-filter identification problem. Deterministic recursive equations were derived with the aim to theoretically predict its mean square error and mean coefficient behaviour, both in transient and steady state conditions. Such models are of particular interest to hearing aid designers as guide tools for setting parameters to obtain a desired performance. Computational simulations accurately agree with theoretical predictions obtained by the derived equations, indicating a mean reduction of 5.4dB of the occlusion effect in the range of 200-500Hz. Subjective experiments with the use of a real prototype corroborate the functionality of the proposed architecture. No perceptual side effects regarding high-frequency amplifications of the original sounds were reported by volunteers.

  6. On Event-Triggered Adaptive Architectures for Decentralized and Distributed Control of Large-Scale Modular Systems.

    PubMed

    Albattat, Ali; Gruenwald, Benjamin C; Yucelen, Tansel

    2016-08-16

    The last decade has witnessed an increased interest in physical systems controlled over wireless networks (networked control systems). These systems allow the computation of control signals via processors that are not attached to the physical systems, and the feedback loops are closed over wireless networks. The contribution of this paper is to design and analyze event-triggered decentralized and distributed adaptive control architectures for uncertain networked large-scale modular systems; that is, systems consist of physically-interconnected modules controlled over wireless networks. Specifically, the proposed adaptive architectures guarantee overall system stability while reducing wireless network utilization and achieving a given system performance in the presence of system uncertainties that can result from modeling and degraded modes of operation of the modules and their interconnections between each other. In addition to the theoretical findings including rigorous system stability and the boundedness analysis of the closed-loop dynamical system, as well as the characterization of the effect of user-defined event-triggering thresholds and the design parameters of the proposed adaptive architectures on the overall system performance, an illustrative numerical example is further provided to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed decentralized and distributed control approaches.

  7. On Event-Triggered Adaptive Architectures for Decentralized and Distributed Control of Large-Scale Modular Systems

    PubMed Central

    Albattat, Ali; Gruenwald, Benjamin C.; Yucelen, Tansel

    2016-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed an increased interest in physical systems controlled over wireless networks (networked control systems). These systems allow the computation of control signals via processors that are not attached to the physical systems, and the feedback loops are closed over wireless networks. The contribution of this paper is to design and analyze event-triggered decentralized and distributed adaptive control architectures for uncertain networked large-scale modular systems; that is, systems consist of physically-interconnected modules controlled over wireless networks. Specifically, the proposed adaptive architectures guarantee overall system stability while reducing wireless network utilization and achieving a given system performance in the presence of system uncertainties that can result from modeling and degraded modes of operation of the modules and their interconnections between each other. In addition to the theoretical findings including rigorous system stability and the boundedness analysis of the closed-loop dynamical system, as well as the characterization of the effect of user-defined event-triggering thresholds and the design parameters of the proposed adaptive architectures on the overall system performance, an illustrative numerical example is further provided to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed decentralized and distributed control approaches. PMID:27537894

  8. The life closure scale: additional psychometric testing of a tool to measure psychological adaptation in death and dying.

    PubMed

    Dobratz, Marjorie C

    2004-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct additional psychometric testing on an instrument designed to measure psychological adaptation in end-of-life populations across a wide spectrum of terminal illnesses. A sample of 20 participants completed initial testing of the Life Closure Scale (LCS); however, its usefulness was limited by the small sample size. A larger sample of 113 home hospice individuals who met established criteria and who gave informed consent completed the 27-item LCS for additional psychometric testing. Cronbach's alphas and correlation coefficients were computed, and factor analysis was conducted to establish internal consistency reliability, theoretical clarity, and criterion-related validity. The number of scale items was reduced to 20, with a total alpha of.87. Cronbach's alphas for the two subscales were.80 (self-reconciled) and.82 (self-restructuring). Item-total correlations for the subscales ranged from a low of.37 to a high of.68, with confirmatory factor analysis yielding two loadings. These findings lend credence to the usefulness of the LCS in measuring psychological adaptation in dying persons.

  9. Adaptation and Evaluation of the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale in India (NEWS-India).

    PubMed

    Adlakha, Deepti; Hipp, J Aaron; Brownson, Ross C

    2016-04-02

    Physical inactivity is the fourth leading risk factor for global mortality, with most of these deaths occurring in low and middle-income countries (LMICs) like India. Research from developed countries has consistently demonstrated associations between built environment features and physical activity levels of populations. The development of culturally sensitive and reliable measures of the built environment is a necessary first step for accurate analysis of environmental correlates of physical activity in LMICs. This study systematically adapted the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale (NEWS) for India and evaluated aspects of test-retest reliability of the adapted version among Indian adults. Cultural adaptation of the NEWS was conducted by Indian and international experts. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with local residents and key informants in the city of Chennai, India. At baseline, participants (N = 370; female = 47.2%) from Chennai completed the adapted NEWS-India surveys on perceived residential density, land use mix-diversity, land use mix-access, street connectivity, infrastructure and safety for walking and cycling, aesthetics, traffic safety, and safety from crime. NEWS-India was administered for a second time to consenting participants (N = 62; female = 53.2%) with a gap of 2-3 weeks between successive administrations. Qualitative findings demonstrated that built environment barriers and constraints to active commuting and physical activity behaviors intersected with social ecological systems. The adapted NEWS subscales had moderate to high test-retest reliability (ICC range 0.48-0.99). The NEWS-India demonstrated acceptable measurement properties among Indian adults and may be a useful tool for evaluation of built environment attributes in India. Further adaptation and evaluation in rural and suburban settings in India is essential to create a version that could be used throughout India.

  10. Adaptation and Evaluation of the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale in India (NEWS-India)

    PubMed Central

    Adlakha, Deepti; Hipp, J. Aaron; Brownson, Ross C.

    2016-01-01

    Physical inactivity is the fourth leading risk factor for global mortality, with most of these deaths occurring in low and middle-income countries (LMICs) like India. Research from developed countries has consistently demonstrated associations between built environment features and physical activity levels of populations. The development of culturally sensitive and reliable measures of the built environment is a necessary first step for accurate analysis of environmental correlates of physical activity in LMICs. This study systematically adapted the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale (NEWS) for India and evaluated aspects of test-retest reliability of the adapted version among Indian adults. Cultural adaptation of the NEWS was conducted by Indian and international experts. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with local residents and key informants in the city of Chennai, India. At baseline, participants (N = 370; female = 47.2%) from Chennai completed the adapted NEWS-India surveys on perceived residential density, land use mix-diversity, land use mix-access, street connectivity, infrastructure and safety for walking and cycling, aesthetics, traffic safety, and safety from crime. NEWS-India was administered for a second time to consenting participants (N = 62; female = 53.2%) with a gap of 2–3 weeks between successive administrations. Qualitative findings demonstrated that built environment barriers and constraints to active commuting and physical activity behaviors intersected with social ecological systems. The adapted NEWS subscales had moderate to high test-retest reliability (ICC range 0.48–0.99). The NEWS-India demonstrated acceptable measurement properties among Indian adults and may be a useful tool for evaluation of built environment attributes in India. Further adaptation and evaluation in rural and suburban settings in India is essential to create a version that could be used throughout India. PMID:27049394

  11. An adaptive scaling and biasing scheme for OFDM-based visible light communication systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaocheng; Wang, Qi; Chen, Sheng; Hanzo, Lajos

    2014-05-19

    Orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) has been widely used in visible light communication systems to achieve high-rate data transmission. Due to the nonlinear transfer characteristics of light emitting diodes (LEDs) and owing the high peak-to-average-power ratio of OFDM signals, the transmitted signal has to be scaled and biased before modulating the LEDs. In this contribution, an adaptive scaling and biasing scheme is proposed for OFDM-based visible light communication systems, which fully exploits the dynamic range of the LEDs and improves the achievable system performance. Specifically, the proposed scheme calculates near-optimal scaling and biasing factors for each specific OFDM symbol according to the distribution of the signals, which strikes an attractive trade-off between the effective signal power and the clipping-distortion power. Our simulation results demonstrate that the proposed scheme significantly improves the performance without changing the LED's emitted power, while maintaining the same receiver structure.

  12. Persian adaptation of Foreign Language Reading Anxiety Scale: a psychometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Baghaei, Purya; Hohensinn, Christine; Kubinger, Klaus D

    2014-04-01

    The validity and psychometric properties of a new Persian adaptation of the Foreign Language Reading Anxiety Scale were investigated. The scale was translated into Persian and administered to 160 undergraduate students (131 women, 29 men; M age = 23.4 yr., SD = 4.3). Rasch model analysis on the scale's original 20 items revealed that the data do not fit the partial credit model. Principal components analysis identified three factors: one related to feelings of anxiety about reading, the second reflected the reverse-worded items, and the third related to general ideas about reading in a foreign language. In a re-analysis, the 12 items that loaded on the first factor showed a good fit with the partial credit model.

  13. Spanish adaptation of the scale of psychological empowerment in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Albar, Maria-Jesús; García-Ramírez, Manuel; López Jiménez, Ana María; Garrido, Rocío

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study is to adapt and translate into Spanish Spreitzer's Psychological Empowerment Scale (1995a). A process of translation and reverse-translation was applied to the scale's items, whose psychometric properties were then examined using a sample of 272 professional nurses at public hospitals in the province of Seville. The data were subjected to confirmatory factor analysis. The significance of the factor loadings demonstrated the need to create a new model eliminating one item. The 11-item model was shown to possess adequate construct validity and internal consistency. The results confirm the original, four-factor structure obtained by Spreitzer, with the exception of item 10, and support the utilization of the Spanish version of this scale in the workplace. Future research should more extensively investigate its construct validity, and test the nomological network of the operationalized construct within the field of psychological well-being and in the context of the workplace.

  14. Costs and benefits of adapting to river floods at the global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Philip; Aerts, Jeroen; Botzen, Wouter; Hallegatte, Stephane; Jongman, Brenden; Kind, Jarl; Scussolini, Paolo; Winsemius, Hessel

    2015-04-01

    It is well known that the economic losses associated with flooding are huge; for example in 2012 alone the economic losses from flooding exceeded 19 billion. As a result, different models have been developed to assess global scale flood risk. Recently, these have been used in several studies to assess current flood risk at the global scale, and to project how risk may increase as a result of climate change and/or socioeconomic development. In most regions, these studies show rapid increases in risk into the future, and therefore call for urgent adaptation. However, to date no studies have attempted to assess the costs of carrying out such adaptation, nor the benefits. In this paper, we therefore present the first global scale estimate of the costs and benefits of adapting to increased river flood risk caused by factors such as climate change and socioeconomic development. For this study, we concentrate on structural adaptation measures, such as dikes, designed to prevent flood hazard up to a certain design standard. We address two questions: 1. What would be the costs and benefits of maintaining current flood protection standards, accounting for future climate and socioeconomic change until 2100? 2. What flood protection standards would be required by 2100 to keep future flood risk constant at today's levels? And what would be the costs and benefits associated with this? In this paper, we will present our first global estimates of the costs and benefits of adaptation to increased flood risk, as well as maps of these findings per country and river basin. We present the results under 4 emission scenarios (RCPs), 5 socioeconomic scenarios (SSPs), and under several assumptions relating to total potential flood damages, discount rates, construction costs, maintenance costs, and so forth. The research was carried out using the GLOFRIS modelling cascade. This global flood risk model calculates flood risk in terms of annual expected damage, and has been developed and

  15. Perceptual suppression revealed by adaptive multi-scale entropy analysis of local field potential in monkey visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Hu, Meng; Liang, Hualou

    2013-04-01

    Generalized flash suppression (GFS), in which a salient visual stimulus can be rendered invisible despite continuous retinal input, provides a rare opportunity to directly study the neural mechanism of visual perception. Previous work based on linear methods, such as spectral analysis, on local field potential (LFP) during GFS has shown that the LFP power at distinctive frequency bands are differentially modulated by perceptual suppression. Yet, the linear method alone may be insufficient for the full assessment of neural dynamic due to the fundamentally nonlinear nature of neural signals. In this study, we set forth to analyze the LFP data collected from multiple visual areas in V1, V2 and V4 of macaque monkeys while performing the GFS task using a nonlinear method - adaptive multi-scale entropy (AME) - to reveal the neural dynamic of perceptual suppression. In addition, we propose a new cross-entropy measure at multiple scales, namely adaptive multi-scale cross-entropy (AMCE), to assess the nonlinear functional connectivity between two cortical areas. We show that: (1) multi-scale entropy exhibits percept-related changes in all three areas, with higher entropy observed during perceptual suppression; (2) the magnitude of the perception-related entropy changes increases systematically over successive hierarchical stages (i.e. from lower areas V1 to V2, up to higher area V4); and (3) cross-entropy between any two cortical areas reveals higher degree of asynchrony or dissimilarity during perceptual suppression, indicating a decreased functional connectivity between cortical areas. These results, taken together, suggest that perceptual suppression is related to a reduced functional connectivity and increased uncertainty of neural responses, and the modulation of perceptual suppression is more effective at higher visual cortical areas. AME is demonstrated to be a useful technique in revealing the underlying dynamic of nonlinear/nonstationary neural signal.

  16. Adaptation of Self-Control and Self-Management Scale (SCMS) into Turkish Culture: A Study on Reliability and Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ercoskun, Muhammet Hanifi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to adapt self-control and self-management scale (SCMS) developed by Mezo into Turkish and to test it considering gender and academic achievement variables. The scale was translated from English to Turkish for linguistic validity and then this scale was translated into English using back translation. The original and…

  17. Fibrin Networks Support Recurring Mechanical Loads by Adapting their Structure across Multiple Scales.

    PubMed

    Kurniawan, Nicholas A; Vos, Bart E; Biebricher, Andreas; Wuite, Gijs J L; Peterman, Erwin J G; Koenderink, Gijsje H

    2016-09-06

    Tissues and cells sustain recurring mechanical loads that span a wide range of loading amplitudes and timescales as a consequence of exposure to blood flow, muscle activity, and external impact. Both tissues and cells derive their mechanical strength from fibrous protein scaffolds, which typically have a complex hierarchical structure. In this study, we focus on a prototypical hierarchical biomaterial, fibrin, which is one of the most resilient naturally occurring biopolymers and forms the structural scaffold of blood clots. We show how fibrous networks composed of fibrin utilize irreversible changes in their hierarchical structure at different scales to maintain reversible stress stiffening up to large strains. To trace the origin of this paradoxical resilience, we systematically tuned the microstructural parameters of fibrin and used a combination of optical tweezers and fluorescence microscopy to measure the interactions of single fibrin fibers for the first time, to our knowledge. We demonstrate that fibrin networks adapt to moderate strains by remodeling at the network scale through the spontaneous formation of new bonds between fibers, whereas they adapt to high strains by plastic remodeling of the fibers themselves. This multiscale adaptation mechanism endows fibrin gels with the remarkable ability to sustain recurring loads due to shear flows and wound stretching. Our findings therefore reveal a microscopic mechanism by which tissues and cells can balance elastic nonlinearity and plasticity, and thus can provide microstructural insights into cell-driven remodeling of tissues.

  18. Gene expression clines reveal local adaptation and associated trade-offs at a continental scale

    PubMed Central

    Porcelli, Damiano; Westram, Anja M.; Pascual, Marta; Gaston, Kevin J.; Butlin, Roger K.; Snook, Rhonda R.

    2016-01-01

    Local adaptation, where fitness in one environment comes at a cost in another, should lead to spatial variation in trade-offs between life history traits and may be critical for population persistence. Recent studies have sought genomic signals of local adaptation, but often have been limited to laboratory populations representing two environmentally different locations of a species’ distribution. We measured gene expression, as a proxy for fitness, in males of Drosophila subobscura, occupying a 20° latitudinal and 11 °C thermal range. Uniquely, we sampled six populations and studied both common garden and semi-natural responses to identify signals of local adaptation. We found contrasting patterns of investment: transcripts with expression positively correlated to latitude were enriched for metabolic processes, expressed across all tissues whereas negatively correlated transcripts were enriched for reproductive processes, expressed primarily in testes. When using only the end populations, to compare our results to previous studies, we found that locally adaptive patterns were obscured. While phenotypic trade-offs between metabolic and reproductive functions across widespread species are well-known, our results identify underlying genetic and tissue responses at a continental scale that may be responsible for this. This may contribute to understanding population persistence under environmental change. PMID:27599812

  19. Icing testing in the large Modane wind-tunnel on full-scale and reduced scale models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charpin, F.; Fasso, G.

    1979-01-01

    Icing tests on full scale models of parts of aircraft (wings, tailplanes, radome) equipped with actual de-icing systems were carried out in the large Modane wind tunnel of ONERA. For studying icing on the Concorde, it was necessary to use a 1/6 scale half model. The equations governing the relevant parameter ratios to obtain reasonably good similitude water catching and ice accretion are recalled. Despite the inherent limitations of this particular kind of testing, i.e., the impossibility of duplicating both the Mach and Reynolds conditions for the main flow pattern, it is possible to obtain on a reduced scale model a reasonably good representation of icing cloud catching and of the shape of resulting ice accretion.

  20. Desensitizing Agent Reduces Dentin Hypersensitivity During Ultrasonic Scaling: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Suda, Tomonari; Akiyama, Toshiharu; Takano, Takuya; Gokyu, Misa; Sudo, Takeaki; Khemwong, Thatawee; Izumi, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Background Dentin hypersensitivity can interfere with optimal periodontal care by dentists and patients. The pain associated with dentin hypersensitivity during ultrasonic scaling is intolerable for patient and interferes with the procedure, particularly during supportive periodontal therapy (SPT) for patients with gingival recession. Aim This study proposed to evaluate the desensitizing effect of the oxalic acid agent on pain caused by dentin hypersensitivity during ultrasonic scaling. Materials and Methods This study involved 12 patients who were incorporated in SPT program and complained of dentin hypersensitivity during ultrasonic scaling. We examined the availability of the oxalic acid agent to compare the degree of pain during ultrasonic scaling with or without the application of the dentin hypersensitivity agent. Evaluation of effects on dentin hypersensitivity was determined by a questionnaire and visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores after ultrasonic scaling. The statistical analysis was performed using the paired Student t-test and Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Results The desensitizing agent reduced the mean VAS pain score from 69.33 ± 16.02 at baseline to 26.08 ± 27.99 after application. The questionnaire revealed that >80% patients were satisfied and requested the application of the desensitizing agent for future ultrasonic scaling sessions. Conclusion This study shows that the application of the oxalic acid agent considerably reduces pain associated with dentin hypersensitivity experienced during ultrasonic scaling. This pain control treatment may improve patient participation and treatment efficiency. PMID:26501012

  1. Reduction in patient burdens with graphical computerized adaptive testing on the ADL scale: tool development and simulation

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Tsair-Wei; Wu, Hing-Man; Wang, Weng-Chung; Castillo, Roberto Vasquez; Chou, Willy

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to verify the effectiveness and efficacy of saving time and reducing burden for patients, nurses, and even occupational therapists through computer adaptive testing (CAT). Methods Based on an item bank of the Barthel Index (BI) and the Frenchay Activities Index (FAI) for assessing comprehensive activities of daily living (ADL) function in stroke patients, we developed a visual basic application (VBA)-Excel CAT module, and (1) investigated whether the averaged test length via CAT is shorter than that of the traditional all-item-answered non-adaptive testing (NAT) approach through simulation, (2) illustrated the CAT multimedia on a tablet PC showing data collection and response errors of ADL clinical functional measures in stroke patients, and (3) demonstrated the quality control of endorsing scale with fit statistics to detect responding errors, which will be further immediately reconfirmed by technicians once patient ends the CAT assessment. Results The results show that endorsed items could be shorter on CAT (M = 13.42) than on NAT (M = 23) at 41.64% efficiency in test length. However, averaged ability estimations reveal insignificant differences between CAT and NAT. Conclusion This study found that mobile nursing services, placed at the bedsides of patients could, through the programmed VBA-Excel CAT module, reduce the burden to patients and save time, more so than the traditional NAT paper-and-pencil testing appraisals. PMID:19416521

  2. Adapting the academic motivation scale for use in pre-tertiary mathematics classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Siew Yee; Chapman, Elaine

    2015-09-01

    The Academic Motivation Scale ( ams) is a comprehensive and widely used instrument for assessing motivation based on the self-determination theory. Currently, no such comprehensive instrument exists to assess the different domains of motivation (stipulated by the self-determination theory) in mathematics education at the pre-tertiary level (grades 11 and 12) in Asia. This study adapted the ams for this use and assessed the properties of the adapted instrument with 1610 students from Singapore. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses indicated a five-factor structure for the modified instrument (the three original ams intrinsic subscales collapsed into a single factor). Additionally, the modified instrument exhibited good internal consistency (mean α = .88), and satisfactory test-retest reliability over a 1-month interval (mean r xx = .73). The validity of the modified ams was further demonstrated through correlational analyses among scores on its subscales, and with scores on other instruments measuring mathematics attitudes, anxiety and achievement.

  3. Adaptation and Validation of the Psychological Need Thwarting Scale in Spanish Physical Education Teachers.

    PubMed

    Cuevas, Ricardo; Sánchez-Oliva, David; Bartholomew, Kimberley J; Ntoumanis, Nikos; García-Calvo, Tomás

    2015-07-20

    Drawing from self-determination theory (SDT; Deci & Ryan, 1985; Ryan & Deci, 2002), the aim of the study was to adapt and validate a Spanish version of the Psychological Need Thwarting Scale (PNTS; Bartholomew, Ntoumanis, Ryan, & Thørgersen-Ntoumani, 2011) in the educational domain. Psychological need thwarting and burnout were assessed in 619 physical education teachers from several high schools in Spain. Overall, the adapted measure demonstrated good content, factorial (χ2/gl = 4.87, p < .01, CFI = .95, IFI = .96, TLI = .94, RMSEA = .08, SRMR = .05), and external validity, as well as internal consistency (α ≥ .81) and invariance across gender. Moreover, burnout was strongly predicted by teachers' perceptions of competence (β = .53, p ≤ .01), autonomy (β = .34, p ≤ .01), and relatedness (β = .31, p ≤ .01) need thwarting. In conclusion, these results support the Spanish version of the PNTS as a valid and reliable instrument for assessing the understudied concept of psychological need thwarting in teachers.

  4. Adaptive fuzzy decentralised control for stochastic nonlinear large-scale systems in pure-feedback form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Shaocheng; Xu, Yinyin; Li, Yongming

    2015-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of adaptive fuzzy decentralised output-feedback control for a class of uncertain stochastic nonlinear pure-feedback large-scale systems with completely unknown functions, the mismatched interconnections and without requiring the states being available for controller design. With the help of fuzzy logic systems approximating the unknown nonlinear functions, a fuzzy state observer is designed estimating the unmeasured states. Therefore, the nonlinear filtered signals are incorporated into the backstepping recursive design, and an adaptive fuzzy decentralised output-feedback control scheme is developed. It is proved that the filter system converges to a small neighbourhood of the origin based on appropriate choice of the design parameters. Simulation studies are included illustrating the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  5. Progesterone-based contraceptives reduce adaptive immune responses and protection against sequential influenza A virus infections.

    PubMed

    Hall, Olivia J; Nachbagauer, Raffael; Vermillion, Meghan S; Fink, Ashley L; Phuong, Vanessa; Krammer, Florian; Klein, Sabra L

    2017-02-08

    In addition to their intended use, progesterone (P4)-based contraceptives promote anti-inflammatory immune responses, yet their effects on the outcome of infectious diseases, including influenza A virus (IAV), are rarely evaluated. To evaluate their impact on immune responses to sequential IAV infections, adult female mice were treated with placebo or one of two progestins, P4 or levonorgestrel (LNG), and infected with mouse adapted (ma) H1N1 virus. Treatment with P4 or LNG reduced morbidity, but had no effect on pulmonary virus titers, during primary H1N1 infection as compared to placebo treatment. In serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, total anti-IAV IgG and IgA titers and virus neutralizing antibody titers, but not hemagglutinin stalk antibody titers, were lower in progestin-treated mice as compared with placebo-treated mice. Females were challenged six weeks later with either a maH1N1 drift variant (maH1N1dv) or maH3N2 IAV. Protection following infection with the maH1N1dv was similar among all groups. In contrast, following challenge with maH3N2, progestin treatment reduced survival as well as numbers and activity of H1N1- and H3N2-specific memory CD8+ T cells, including tissue resident cells, compared with placebo treatment. In contrast to primary IAV infection, progestin treatment increased neutralizing and IgG antibody titers against both challenge viruses compared with placebo treatment. While the immunomodulatory properties of progestins protected naïve females against severe outcome from IAV infection, it made them more susceptible to secondary challenge with a heterologous IAV, despite improving their antibody responses against a secondary IAV infection. Taken together, the immunomodulatory effects of progestins differentially regulate the outcome of infection depending on exposure history.IMPORTANCE The impact of hormone-based contraceptives on the outcome of infectious diseases outside of the reproductive tract is rarely considered. Using a mouse

  6. A miniature high-efficiency fully digital adaptive voltage scaling buck converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hangbiao; Zhang, Bo; Luo, Ping; Zhen, Shaowei; Liao, Pengfei; He, Yajuan; Li, Zhaoji

    2015-09-01

    A miniature high-efficiency fully digital adaptive voltage scaling (AVS) buck converter is proposed in this paper. The pulse skip modulation with flexible duty cycle (FD-PSM) is used in the AVS controller, which simplifies the circuit architecture (<170 gates) and greatly saves the die area and the power consumption. The converter is implemented in a 0.13-μm one-poly-eight-metal (1P8 M) complementary metal oxide semiconductor process and the active on-chip area of the controller is only 0.003 mm2, which is much smaller. The measurement results show that when the operating frequency of the digital load scales dynamically from 25.6 MHz to 112.6 MHz, the supply voltage of which can be scaled adaptively from 0.84 V to 1.95 V. The controller dissipates only 17.2 μW, while the supply voltage of the load is 1 V and the operating frequency is 40 MHz.

  7. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the teamwork climate scale

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Mariana Charantola; Peduzzi, Marina; Sangaleti, Carine Teles; da Silva, Dirceu; Agreli, Heloise Fernandes; West, Michael A; Anderson, Neil R

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To adapt and validate the Team Climate Inventory scale, of teamwork climate measurement, for the Portuguese language, in the context of primary health care in Brazil. METHODS Methodological study with quantitative approach of cross-cultural adaptation (translation, back-translation, synthesis, expert committee, and pretest) and validation with 497 employees from 72 teams of the Family Health Strategy in the city of Campinas, SP, Southeastern Brazil. We verified reliability by the Cronbach’s alpha, construct validity by the confirmatory factor analysis with SmartPLS software, and correlation by the job satisfaction scale. RESULTS We problematized the overlap of items 9, 11, and 12 of the “participation in the team” factor and the “team goals” factor regarding its definition. The validation showed no overlapping of items and the reliability ranged from 0.92 to 0.93. The confirmatory factor analysis indicated suitability of the proposed model with distribution of the 38 items in the four factors. The correlation between teamwork climate and job satisfaction was significant. CONCLUSIONS The version of the scale in Brazilian Portuguese was validated and can be used in the context of primary health care in the Country, constituting an adequate tool for the assessment and diagnosis of teamwork. PMID:27556966

  8. Reduced Daily Recalibration of Myoelectric Prosthesis Classifiers Based on Domain Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianwei; Sheng, Xinjun; Zhang, Dingguo; He, Jiayuan; Zhu, Xiangyang

    2016-01-01

    Control scheme design based on surface electromyography (sEMG) pattern recognition has been the focus of much research on a myoelectric prosthesis (MP) technology. Due to inherent nonstationarity in sEMG signals, prosthesis systems may need to be recalibrated day after day in daily use applications; thereby, hindering MP usability. In order to reduce the recalibration time in the subsequent days following the initial training, we propose a domain adaptation (DA) framework, which automatically reuses the models trained in earlier days as input for two baseline classifiers: a polynomial classifier (PC) and a linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Two novel algorithms of DA are introduced, one for PC and the other one for LDA. Five intact-limbed subjects and two transradial-amputee subjects participated in an experiment lasting ten days, to simulate the application of a MP over multiple days. The experiment results of four methods were compared: PC-DA (PC with DA), PC-BL (baseline PC), LDA-DA (LDA with DA), and LDA-BL (baseline LDA). In a new day, the DA methods reuse nine pretrained models, which were calibrated by 40 s training data per class in nine previous days. We show that the proposed DA methods significantly outperform nonadaptive baseline methods. The improvement in classification accuracy ranges from 5.49% to 28.48%, when the recording time per class is 2 s. For example, the average classification rates of PC-BL and PC-DA are 83.70% and 92.99%, respectively, for intact-limbed subjects with a nine-motions classification task. These results indicate that DA has the potential to improve the usability of MPs based on pattern recognition, by reducing the calibration time.

  9. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  10. Reduced plantar sole sensitivity facilitates early adaptation to a visual rotation pointing task when standing upright

    PubMed Central

    Maxime, Billot; Léandre, Gagné Lemieux; Mathieu, Germain Robitaille; Martin, Simoneau

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Humans are capable of pointing to a target with accuracy. However, when vision is distorted through a visual rotation or mirror-reversed vision, the performance is initially degraded and thereafter improves with practice. There are suggestions this gradual improvement results from a sensorimotor recalibration involving initial gating of the somatosensory information from the pointing hand. In the present experiment, we examined if this process interfered with balance control by asking participants to point to targets with a visual rotation from a standing posture. This duality in processing sensory information (i.e., gating sensory signals from the hand while processing those arising from the control of balance) could generate initial interference leading to a degraded pointing performance. We hypothesized that if this is the case, the attenuation of plantar sole somatosensory information through cooling could reduce the sensorimotor interference, and facilitate the early adaptation (i.e. improvement in the pointing task). Results supported this hypothesis. These observations suggest that processing sensory information for balance control interferes with the sensorimotor recalibration process imposed by a pointing task when vision is rotated. PMID:28149394

  11. Reducing adaptive optics latency using Xeon Phi many-core processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, David; Basden, Alastair; Dipper, Nigel; Schwartz, Noah

    2015-11-01

    The next generation of Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs) for astronomy will rely heavily on the performance of their adaptive optics (AO) systems. Real-time control is at the heart of the critical technologies that will enable telescopes to deliver the best possible science and will require a very significant extrapolation from current AO hardware existing for 4-10 m telescopes. Investigating novel real-time computing architectures and testing their eligibility against anticipated challenges is one of the main priorities of technology development for the ELTs. This paper investigates the suitability of the Intel Xeon Phi, which is a commercial off-the-shelf hardware accelerator. We focus on wavefront reconstruction performance, implementing a straightforward matrix-vector multiplication (MVM) algorithm. We present benchmarking results of the Xeon Phi on a real-time Linux platform, both as a standalone processor and integrated into an existing real-time controller (RTC). Performance of single and multiple Xeon Phis are investigated. We show that this technology has the potential of greatly reducing the mean latency and variations in execution time (jitter) of large AO systems. We present both a detailed performance analysis of the Xeon Phi for a typical E-ELT first-light instrument along with a more general approach that enables us to extend to any AO system size. We show that systematic and detailed performance analysis is an essential part of testing novel real-time control hardware to guarantee optimal science results.

  12. An adaptive strategy for reducing Feral Cat predation on endangered hawaiian birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hess, S.C.; Banko, P.C.; Hansen, H.

    2009-01-01

    Despite the long history of Feral Cats Felis catus in Hawai'i, there has been little research to provide strategies to improve control programmes and reduce depredation on endangered species. Our objective Was to develop a predictive model to determine how landscape features on Mauna Kea, such as habitat, elevation, and proximity to roads, may affect the number of Feral Cats captured at each trap. We used log-link generalized linear models and QAIC c model ranking criteria to determine the effect of these factors. We found that The number of cats captured per trap Was related to effort, habitat type, and Whether traps Were located on The West or North Slope of Mauna Kea. We recommend an adaptive management strategy to minimize trapping interference by non-target Small Indian Mongoose Herpestes auropunctatus with toxicants, to focus trapping efforts in M??mane Sophora chrysophylla habitat on the West slope of Mauna Kea, and to cluster traps near others that have previously captured multiple cats.

  13. Gel-free multiplexed reduced representation bisulfite sequencing for large-scale DNA methylation profiling.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Patrick; Clement, Kendell; Gu, Hongcang; Smith, Zachary D; Ziller, Michael; Fostel, Jennifer L; Holmes, Laurie; Meldrim, Jim; Kelley, Fontina; Gnirke, Andreas; Meissner, Alexander

    2012-10-03

    Sequencing-based approaches have led to new insights about DNA methylation. While many different techniques for genome-scale mapping of DNA methylation have been employed, throughput has been a key limitation for most. To further facilitate the mapping of DNA methylation, we describe a protocol for gel-free multiplexed reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (mRRBS) that reduces the workload dramatically and enables processing of 96 or more samples per week. mRRBS achieves similar CpG coverage to the original RRBS protocol, while the higher throughput and lower cost make it better suited for large-scale DNA methylation mapping studies, including cohorts of cancer samples.

  14. Handling Qualities Evaluations of Low Complexity Model Reference Adaptive Controllers for Reduced Pitch and Roll Damping Scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Curt; Schaefer, Jacob; Burken, John J.; Johnson, Marcus; Nguyen, Nhan

    2011-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) researchers have conducted a series of flight experiments designed to study the effects of varying levels of adaptive controller complexity on the performance and handling qualities of an aircraft under various simulated failure or damage conditions. A baseline, nonlinear dynamic inversion controller was augmented with three variations of a model reference adaptive control design. The simplest design consisted of a single adaptive parameter in each of the pitch and roll axes computed using a basic gradient-based update law. A second design was built upon the first by increasing the complexity of the update law. The third and most complex design added an additional adaptive parameter to each axis. Flight tests were conducted using NASA s Full-scale Advanced Systems Testbed, a highly modified F-18 aircraft that contains a research flight control system capable of housing advanced flight controls experiments. Each controller was evaluated against a suite of simulated failures and damage ranging from destabilization of the pitch and roll axes to significant coupling between the axes. Two pilots evaluated the three adaptive controllers as well as the non-adaptive baseline controller in a variety of dynamic maneuvers and precision flying tasks designed to uncover potential deficiencies in the handling qualities of the aircraft, and adverse interactions between the pilot and the adaptive controllers. The work was completed as part of the Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control Project under NASA s Aviation Safety Program.

  15. Scale deposits in kraft pulp bleach plants with reduced water consumption: a review.

    PubMed

    Huber, Patrick; Burnet, Auphélia; Petit-Conil, Michel

    2014-08-01

    The general tendency in the pulp industry towards reduced fresh water consumption and minimum effluent causes major deposit problems in mills. Chemical pulp bleach plants are affected by several types of mineral deposits, the most frequent being calcite, barite and calcium oxalate. In this review, the phenomena leading to scaling in chemical pulp bleaching are discussed, together with strategies for limiting deposits. The merits of various chemical methods in estimating scaling risks are compared. Chemical speciation methods are used throughout this review to gain a better understanding and prediction of scaling phenomena. Coupled chemical process simulations are anticipated to be a crucial way of solving deposition problems in bleach plants.

  16. Efficacy of adaptation measures to future water scarcity on a global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, S.; Kanae, S.

    2015-12-01

    Water supply sources for all sector are critically important for agricultural and industrial productivity. The current rapid increase in water use is considered unsustainable and threatens human life. In our previous study (Yoshikawa et al., 2014 in HESS), we estimated the time-varying dependence of water requirements from water supply sources during past and future periods using the global water resources model, H08. The sources of water requirements were specified using four categories: rivers, large reservoirs, medium-size reservoirs, and non-local non-renewable blue water (NNBW). We also estimated ΔNNBW which is defined as an increase in NNBW from the past to the future. From the results, we could require the further development of water supply sources in order to sustain future water use. For coping with water scarcity using ΔNNBW, there is need for adaptation measure. To address adaptation measures, we need to set adaptation options which can be divided between 'Supply enhancement' and 'Demand management'. The supply enhancement includes increased storage, groundwater development, inter-basin transfer, desalination and re-use urban waste water. Demand management is defined as a set of actions controlling water demand by reducing water loss, increasing water productivity, and water re-allocation. In this study, we focus on estimating further future water demand under taking into account of several adaptation measures using H08 model.

  17. Academic Motivation Scale: adaptation and psychometric analyses for high school and college students

    PubMed Central

    Stover, Juliana Beatriz; de la Iglesia, Guadalupe; Boubeta, Antonio Rial; Liporace, Mercedes Fernández

    2012-01-01

    The Academic Motivation Scale (AMS), supported in Self-Determination Theory, has been applied in recent decades as well in high school as in college education. Although several versions in Spanish are available, the underlying linguistic and cultural differences raise important issues when they are applied to Latin-American population. Consequently an adapted version of the AMS was developed, and its construct validity was analyzed in Argentine students. Results obtained on a sample that included 723 students from Buenos Aires (393 high school and 330 college students) verified adequate psychometric properties in this new version, solving some controversies regarded to its dimensionality. PMID:22888280

  18. Predicting and adapting to the agricultural impacts of large-scale drought (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, J. W.; Glotter, M.; Best, N.; Ruane, A. C.; Boote, K.; Hatfield, J.; Jones, J.; Rosenzweig, C.; Smith, L. A.; Foster, I.

    2013-12-01

    The impact of drought on agriculture is an important socioeconomic consequence of climate extremes. Drought affects millions of people globally each year, causing an average of 6-8 billion of damage annually in the U.S. alone. The 1988 U.S. drought is estimated to have cost 79 billion in 2013 dollars, behind only Hurricane Katrina as the most costly U.S. climate-related disaster in recent decades. The 2012 U.S. drought is expected to cost about 30 billion. Droughts and heat waves accounted for 12% of all billion-dollar disaster events in the U.S. from 1980-2011 but almost one quarter of total monetary damages. To make matters worse, the frequency and severity of large-scale droughts in important agricultural regions is expected to increase as temperatures rise and precipitation patterns shift, leading some researchers to suggest that extended drought will harm more people than any other climate-related impact, specifically in the area of food security. Improved understanding and forecasts of drought would have both immediate and long-term implications for the global economy and food security. We show that mechanistic agricultural models, applied in novel ways, can reproduce historical crop yield anomalies, especially in seasons for which drought is the overriding factor. With more accurate observations and forecasts for temperature and precipitation, the accuracy and lead times of drought impact predictions could be improved further. We provide evidence that changes in agricultural technologies and management have reduced system-level drought sensitivity in US maize production in recent decades, adaptations that could be applied elsewhere. This work suggests a new approach to modeling, monitoring, and forecasting drought impacts on agriculture. Simulated (dashed line), observed (solid line), and observed linear trend (dashed straight green line) of national average maize yield in tonnes per hectare from 1979-2012. The red dot indicates the USDA estimate for 2012

  19. The adolescent Religious Coping Questionnaire. Translation and cultural adaptation of Pargament's RCOPE Scale for Polish adolescents.

    PubMed

    Talik, Elżbieta B

    2013-03-01

    The paper presents the process of translation and cultural adaptation of the Religious Coping Questionnaire (the RCOPE) by Pargament et al. (2000) for Polish adolescents. The work was driven by the necessity to obtain a structural and measurement equivalence between the American and Polish versions of the instrument. The Polish version was created at the Department of Clinical Psychology of Children and Adolescents at The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Poland. The exploratory factor analysis with the Oblimin oblique rotation was carried out. The principal components method was used as an extraction method of common factors. The results provided input for constructing the scales. The Adolescent Religious Coping Questionnaire consists of 105 items, grouped in 16 scales, which reflects positive and negative religious coping strategies.

  20. [Decision making satisfaction in health scale: instrument adapted and validated to Portuguese].

    PubMed

    Martinho, Maria Júlia Costa Marques; Martins, Maria Manuela Ferreira Pereira da Silva; Angelo, Margareth

    2014-01-01

    Decision making is an area of health research that has gained importance both for the partnership models of care that give prominence to the patient and family, either by growing concern about quality and customer satisfaction with the care provided. So we decided to make the cultural adaptation and to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Portuguese version "The Satisfaction with Decision Scale" de Holmes-Rovner (1996), which aims to assess satisfaction with the decisions taken in health. The sample consisted of 521 nursing students the School of Nursing of Porto. The results of reliability tests show good internal consistency for the total items (Alpha Cronbach = 0.88). The psychometric study allows us to state that the Portuguese version of "The Satisfaction with Decision Scale", we call "Escala da Satisfação com a Decisão em Saúde", is an instrument comparable with the original in terms of validity and reliability.

  1. Forest management under climatic and social uncertainty: trade-offs between reducing climate change impacts and fostering adaptive capacity.

    PubMed

    Seidl, Rupert; Lexer, Manfred J

    2013-01-15

    The unabated continuation of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions and the lack of an international consensus on a stringent climate change mitigation policy underscore the importance of adaptation for coping with the all but inevitable changes in the climate system. Adaptation measures in forestry have particularly long lead times. A timely implementation is thus crucial for reducing the considerable climate vulnerability of forest ecosystems. However, since future environmental conditions as well as future societal demands on forests are inherently uncertain, a core requirement for adaptation is robustness to a wide variety of possible futures. Here we explicitly address the roles of climatic and social uncertainty in forest management, and tackle the question of robustness of adaptation measures in the context of multi-objective sustainable forest management (SFM). We used the Austrian Federal Forests (AFF) as a case study, and employed a comprehensive vulnerability assessment framework based on ecosystem modeling, multi-criteria decision analysis, and practitioner participation. We explicitly considered climate uncertainty by means of three climate change scenarios, and accounted for uncertainty in future social demands by means of three societal preference scenarios regarding SFM indicators. We found that the effects of climatic and social uncertainty on the projected performance of management were in the same order of magnitude, underlining the notion that climate change adaptation requires an integrated social-ecological perspective. Furthermore, our analysis of adaptation measures revealed considerable trade-offs between reducing adverse impacts of climate change and facilitating adaptive capacity. This finding implies that prioritization between these two general aims of adaptation is necessary in management planning, which we suggest can draw on uncertainty analysis: Where the variation induced by social-ecological uncertainty renders measures aiming to

  2. The spread of computer viruses over a reduced scale-free network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lu-Xing; Yang, Xiaofan

    2014-02-01

    Due to the high dimensionality of an epidemic model of computer viruses over a general scale-free network, it is difficult to make a close study of its dynamics. In particular, it is extremely difficult, if not impossible, to prove the global stability of its viral equilibrium, if any. To overcome this difficulty, we suggest to simplify a general scale-free network by partitioning all of its nodes into two classes: higher-degree nodes and lower-degree nodes, and then equating the degrees of all higher-degree nodes and all lower-degree nodes, respectively, yielding a reduced scale-free network. We then propose an epidemic model of computer viruses over a reduced scale-free network. A theoretical analysis reveals that the proposed model is bound to have a globally stable viral equilibrium, implying that any attempt to eradicate network viruses would prove unavailing. As a result, the next best thing we can do is to restrain virus prevalence. Based on an analysis of the impact of different model parameters on virus prevalence, some practicable measures are recommended to contain virus spreading. The work in this paper adequately justifies the idea of reduced scale-free networks.

  3. Reducing swine farm ammonia emission with a full-scale manure treatment system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new full-scale treatment system in its second-generation was implemented at a 5000-head finishing swine farm in North Carolina to improve treatment lagoon water quality and reduce ammonia emissions. The system combined high-rate solid-liquid separation with nitrogen and phosphorus removal process...

  4. Linguistic Adaptation of the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale for a Spanish-Speaking Population

    PubMed Central

    Oquendo-Jiménez, Ilia; Mena, Rafaela; Antoun, Mikhail D.; Wojna, Valerie

    2012-01-01

    Background Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia worldwide. In Hispanic populations there are few validated tests for the accurate identification and diagnosis of AD. The Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) scale is an internationally recognized questionnaire used to stage dementia. This study's objective was to develop a linguistic adaptation of the CDR for the Puerto Rican population. Methods The linguistic adaptation consisted of the evaluation of each CDR question (item) and the questionnaire's instructions, for similarities in meaning (semantic equivalence), relevance of content (content equivalence), and appropriateness of the questionnaire's format and measuring technique (technical equivalence). A focus group methodology was used to assess cultural relevance, clarity, and suitability of the measuring technique in the Argentinean version of the CDR for use in a Puerto Rican population. Results A total of 27 semantic equivalence changes were recommended in four categories: higher than 6th grade level of reading, meaning, common use, and word preference. Four content equivalence changes were identified, all focused on improving the applicability of the test questions to the general population's concept of street addresses and common dietary choices. There were no recommendations for changes in the assessment of technical equivalence. Conclusions We developed a linguistically adapted CDR instrument for the Puerto Rican population, preserving the semantic, content, and technical equivalences of the original version. Further studies are needed to validate the CDR instrument with the staging of Alzheimer's disease in the Puerto Rican population. PMID:20496524

  5. Adaptive control of a millimeter-scale flapping-wing robot.

    PubMed

    Chirarattananon, Pakpong; Ma, Kevin Y; Wood, Robert J

    2014-06-01

    Challenges for the controlled flight of a robotic insect are due to the inherent instability of the system, complex fluid-structure interactions, and the general lack of a complete system model. In this paper, we propose theoretical models of the system based on the limited information available from previous work and a comprehensive flight controller. The modular flight controller is derived from Lyapunov function candidates with proven stability over a large region of attraction. Moreover, it comprises adaptive components that are capable of coping with uncertainties in the system that arise from manufacturing imperfections. We have demonstrated that the proposed methods enable the robot to achieve sustained hovering flights with relatively small errors compared to a non-adaptive approach. Simple lateral maneuvers and vertical takeoff and landing flights are also shown to illustrate the fidelity of the flight controller. The analysis suggests that the adaptive scheme is crucial in order to achieve millimeter-scale precision in flight control as observed in natural insect flight.

  6. Niche divergence facilitated by fine‐scale ecological partitioning in a recent cichlid fish adaptive radiation

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Antonia G. P.; Rüber, Lukas; Newton, Jason; Dasmahapatra, Kanchon K.; Balarin, John D.; Bruun, Kristoffer; Day, Julia J.

    2016-01-01

    Ecomorphological differentiation is a key feature of adaptive radiations, with a general trend for specialization and niche expansion following divergence. Ecological opportunity afforded by invasion of a new habitat is thought to act as an ecological release, facilitating divergence, and speciation. Here, we investigate trophic adaptive morphology and ecology of an endemic clade of oreochromine cichlid fishes (Alcolapia) that radiated along a herbivorous trophic axis following colonization of an isolated lacustrine environment, and demonstrate phenotype‐environment correlation. Ecological and morphological divergence of the Alcolapia species flock are examined in a phylogenomic context, to infer ecological niche occupation within the radiation. Species divergence is observed in both ecology and morphology, supporting the importance of ecological speciation within the radiation. Comparison with an outgroup taxon reveals large‐scale ecomorphological divergence but shallow genomic differentiation within the Alcolapia adaptive radiation. Ancestral morphological reconstruction suggests lake colonization by a generalist oreochromine phenotype that diverged in Lake Natron to varied herbivorous morphologies akin to specialist herbivores in Lakes Tanganyika and Malawi. PMID:27659769

  7. Fine-scale thermal adaptation in a green turtle nesting population

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Sam B.; Broderick, Annette C.; Groothuis, Ton G. G.; Ellick, Jacqui; Godley, Brendan J.; Blount, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of climate warming on the reproductive success of ectothermic animals is currently a subject of major conservation concern. However, for many threatened species, we still know surprisingly little about the extent of naturally occurring adaptive variation in heat-tolerance. Here, we show that the thermal tolerances of green turtle (Chelonia mydas) embryos in a single, island-breeding population have diverged in response to the contrasting incubation temperatures of nesting beaches just a few kilometres apart. In natural nests and in a common-garden rearing experiment, the offspring of females nesting on a naturally hot (black sand) beach survived better and grew larger at hot incubation temperatures compared with the offspring of females nesting on a cooler (pale sand) beach nearby. These differences were owing to shallower thermal reaction norms in the hot beach population, rather than shifts in thermal optima, and could not be explained by egg-mediated maternal effects. Our results suggest that marine turtle nesting behaviour can drive adaptive differentiation at remarkably fine spatial scales, and have important implications for how we define conservation units for protection. In particular, previous studies may have underestimated the extent of adaptive structuring in marine turtle populations that may significantly affect their capacity to respond to environmental change. PMID:21937495

  8. Adaptation and Validation of the Sexual Assertiveness Scale (SAS) in a Sample of Male Drug Users.

    PubMed

    Vallejo-Medina, Pablo; Sierra, Juan Carlos

    2015-04-21

    The aim of the present study was to adapt and validate the Sexual Assertiveness Scale (SAS) in a sample of male drug users. A sample of 326 male drug users and 322 non-clinical males was selected by cluster sampling and convenience sampling, respectively. Results showed that the scale had good psychometric properties and adequate internal consistency reliability (Initiation = .66, Refusal = .74 and STD-P = .79). An evaluation of the invariance showed strong factor equivalence between both samples. A high and moderate effect of Differential Item Functioning was only found in items 1 and 14 (∆R 2 Nagelkerke = .076 and .037, respectively). We strongly recommend not using item 1 if the goal is to compare the scores of both groups, otherwise the comparison will be biased. Correlations obtained between the CSFQ-14 and the safe sex ratio and the SAS subscales were significant (CI = 95%) and indicated good concurrent validity. Scores of male drug users were similar to those of non-clinical males. Therefore, the adaptation of the SAS to drug users provides enough guarantees for reliable and valid use in both clinical practice and research, although care should be taken with item 1.

  9. An adaptation of the Interpersonal Problem Areas Rating Scale: pilot and interrater agreement study

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Ana Claudia Fontes; Frank, Ellen; Neto, Francisco Lotufo; Houck, Patricia R

    2012-01-01

    Objective This article describes the adaptation of a rating scale of interpersonal psychotherapy problem areas to include a fifth problem area appropriate to bipolar disorder and an interrater agreement study in identifying interpersonal problem areas and selecting a primary treatment focus if patients were to engage in treatment. Method Five research interpersonal psychotherapists assessed nine audiotapes of a single interview with five bipolar and four unipolar patients in which the interpersonal inventory and identification of problem areas were undertaken. Results Raters agreed on presence and absence of problem areas in seven tapes. Kappas for identification of problem areas were 1.00 (grief), 0.77 (role dispute), 0.61 (role transition), 0.57 (interpersonal deficits) and 1.00 (loss of healthy self). Kappa for agreement on a primary clinical focus if patients were to engage in interpersonal psychotherapy treatment was 0.64. Conclusions The adaptation of the original scale to include an area pertinent to bipolar disorder proved to be applicable and relevant for use with this population. The results show substantial interrater agreement in identifying problem areas and potential treatment focus. PMID:19142412

  10. Beyond trial-by-trial adaptation: A quantification of the time scale of cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Aben, Bart; Verguts, Tom; Van den Bussche, Eva

    2017-03-01

    The idea that adaptation to stimulus or response conflict can operate over different time scales takes a prominent position in various theories and models of cognitive control. The mechanisms underlying temporal variations in control are nevertheless poorly understood, which is partly due to a lack of appropriate empirical measures. Inspired by reinforcement learning models, we developed a method to quantify the time scale of control behaviorally, by computing trial-by-trial effects that go beyond the preceding trial. Briefly, we extended the congruency sequence effect from 1 trial to multiple trials into the past and quantified the influence of previous trials on current-trial performance as a function of trial distance. The rate at which this influence changes across trials was taken as a measure of the time scale of control. We applied the method to a flanker task with different conflict frequencies and volatility. Results showed that the time scale of control was smaller in rare-conflict and volatile contexts, compared to frequent-conflict and neutral contexts. This is in agreement with theories differentiating transient from sustained control. The method offers new opportunities to reveal temporal differences in control modes and can easily be applied to various empirical paradigms. (PsycINFO Database Record

  11. Speckle-reducing scale-invariant feature transform match for synthetic aperture radar image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianmin; Li, Bo; Xu, Qizhi

    2016-07-01

    The anisotropic scale space (ASS) is often used to enhance the performance of a scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) algorithm in the registration of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. The existing ASS-based methods usually suffer from unstable keypoints and false matches, since the anisotropic diffusion filtering has limitations in reducing the speckle noise from SAR images while building the ASS image representation. We proposed a speckle reducing SIFT match method to obtain stable keypoints and acquire precise matches for the SAR image registration. First, the keypoints are detected in a speckle reducing anisotropic scale space constructed by the speckle reducing anisotropic diffusion, so that speckle noise is greatly reduced and prominent structures of the images are preserved, consequently the stable keypoints can be derived. Next, the probabilistic relaxation labeling approach is employed to establish the matches of the keypoints then the correct match rate of the keypoints is significantly increased. Experiments conducted on simulated speckled images and real SAR images demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. Regional-scale yield simulations using crop and climate models: assessing uncertainties, sensitivity to temperature and adaptation options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challinor, A. J.

    2010-12-01

    Recent progress in assessing the impacts of climate variability and change on crops using multiple regional-scale simulations of crop and climate (i.e. ensembles) is presented. Simulations for India and China used perturbed responses to elevated carbon dioxide constrained using observations from FACE studies and controlled environments. Simulations with crop parameter sets representing existing and potential future adapted varieties were also carried out. The results for India are compared to sensitivity tests on two other crop models. For China, a parallel approach used socio-economic data to account for autonomous farmer adaptation. Results for the USA analysed cardinal temperatures under a range of local warming scenarios for 2711 varieties of spring wheat. The results are as follows: 1. Quantifying and reducing uncertainty. The relative contribution of uncertainty in crop and climate simulation to the total uncertainty in projected yield changes is examined. The observational constraints from FACE and controlled environment studies are shown to be the likely critical factor in maintaining relatively low crop parameter uncertainty. Without these constraints, crop simulation uncertainty in a doubled CO2 environment would likely be greater than uncertainty in simulating climate. However, consensus across crop models in India varied across different biophysical processes. 2. The response of yield to changes in local mean temperature was examined and compared to that found in the literature. No consistent response to temperature change was found across studies. 3. Implications for adaptation. China. The simulations of spring wheat in China show the relative importance of tolerance to water and heat stress in avoiding future crop failures. The greatest potential for reducing the number of harvests less than one standard deviation below the baseline mean yield value comes from alleviating water stress; the greatest potential for reducing harvests less than two

  13. Method for Reducing the Drag of Increasing Forebody Roughness Blunt-Based Vehicles by Adaptively Increasing Forebody Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A. (Inventor); Saltzman, Edwin J. (Inventor); Moes, Timothy R. (Inventor); Iliff, Kenneth W. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A method for reducing drag upon a blunt-based vehicle by adaptively increasing forebody roughness to increase drag at the roughened area of the forebody, which results in a decrease in drag at the base of this vehicle, and in total vehicle drag.

  14. Steps Ahead: Adaptation of physical activity and dietary guidelines for reducing unhealthy weight gain in the Lower Misissippi Delta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of our study was to test the effectiveness of adapting the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2010) (DG), with and without a physical activity (PA) component, in reducing weight gain in the Lower Mississippi Delta region (LMD) of the United States. A sample of 121 White and African-Americ...

  15. Reducing aeration energy consumption in a large-scale membrane bioreactor: Process simulation and engineering application.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianyu; Liang, Peng; Yan, Xiaoxu; Zuo, Kuichang; Xiao, Kang; Xia, Junlin; Qiu, Yong; Wu, Qing; Wu, Shijia; Huang, Xia; Qi, Meng; Wen, Xianghua

    2016-04-15

    Reducing the energy consumption of membrane bioreactors (MBRs) is highly important for their wider application in wastewater treatment engineering. Of particular significance is reducing aeration in aerobic tanks to reduce the overall energy consumption. This study proposed an in situ ammonia-N-based feedback control strategy for aeration in aerobic tanks; this was tested via model simulation and through a large-scale (50,000 m(3)/d) engineering application. A full-scale MBR model was developed based on the activated sludge model (ASM) and was calibrated to the actual MBR. The aeration control strategy took the form of a two-step cascaded proportion-integration (PI) feedback algorithm. Algorithmic parameters were optimized via model simulation. The strategy achieved real-time adjustment of aeration amounts based on feedback from effluent quality (i.e., ammonia-N). The effectiveness of the strategy was evaluated through both the model platform and the full-scale engineering application. In the former, the aeration flow rate was reduced by 15-20%. In the engineering application, the aeration flow rate was reduced by 20%, and overall specific energy consumption correspondingly reduced by 4% to 0.45 kWh/m(3)-effluent, using the present practice of regulating the angle of guide vanes of fixed-frequency blowers. Potential energy savings are expected to be higher for MBRs with variable-frequency blowers. This study indicated that the ammonia-N-based aeration control strategy holds promise for application in full-scale MBRs.

  16. The Universal Patient Centeredness Questionnaire: scaling approaches to reduce positive skew

    PubMed Central

    Bjertnaes, Oyvind; Iversen, Hilde Hestad; Garratt, Andrew M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Surveys of patients’ experiences typically show results that are indicative of positive experiences. Unbalanced response scales have reduced positive skew for responses to items within the Universal Patient Centeredness Questionnaire (UPC-Q). The objective of this study was to compare the unbalanced response scale with another unbalanced approach to scaling to assess whether the positive skew might be further reduced. Patients and methods The UPC-Q was included in a patient experience survey conducted at the ward level at six hospitals in Norway in 2015. The postal survey included two reminders to nonrespondents. For patients in the first month of inclusion, UPC-Q items had standard scaling: poor, fairly good, good, very good, and excellent. For patients in the second month, the scaling was more positive: poor, good, very good, exceptionally good, and excellent. The effect of scaling on UPC-Q scores was tested with independent samples t-tests and multilevel linear regression analysis, the latter controlling for the hierarchical structure of data and known predictors of patient-reported experiences. Results The response rate was 54.6% (n=4,970). Significantly lower scores were found for all items of the more positively worded scale: UPC-Q total score difference was 7.9 (P<0.001), on a scale from 0 to 100 where 100 is the best possible score. Differences between the four items of the UPC-Q ranged from 7.1 (P<0.001) to 10.4 (P<0.001). Multivariate multilevel regression analysis confirmed the difference between the response groups, after controlling for other background variables; UPC-Q total score difference estimate was 8.3 (P<0.001). Conclusion The more positively worded scaling significantly lowered the mean scores, potentially increasing the sensitivity of the UPC-Q to identify differences over time and between providers. However, none of the groups exhibited large positive skew and ceiling effects, implying that such effects might not be a big

  17. Intellectual Achievement Responsibility Scale: Child's Work Copy and Examiner's Copy for Use with Third Grade. [Stanford Research Institute Adaptation].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Research Inst., Menlo Park, CA.

    This test was adapted from the Intellectual Achievement Responsibility Scale by V.C. Crandall, Walter Katkovsky, and Vaughan C. Crandall. It is a scale for assessing children's beliefs that they, rather than external forces, are responsible for their intellectual academic successes and failures. Previous data indicates that self responsibility is…

  18. Reduced error signalling in medication-naive children with ADHD: associations with behavioural variability and post-error adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Plessen, Kerstin J.; Allen, Elena A.; Eichele, Heike; van Wageningen, Heidi; Høvik, Marie Farstad; Sørensen, Lin; Worren, Marius Kalsås; Hugdahl, Kenneth; Eichele, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Background We examined the blood-oxygen level–dependent (BOLD) activation in brain regions that signal errors and their association with intraindividual behavioural variability and adaptation to errors in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Methods We acquired functional MRI data during a Flanker task in medication-naive children with ADHD and healthy controls aged 8–12 years and analyzed the data using independent component analysis. For components corresponding to performance monitoring networks, we compared activations across groups and conditions and correlated them with reaction times (RT). Additionally, we analyzed post-error adaptations in behaviour and motor component activations. Results We included 25 children with ADHD and 29 controls in our analysis. Children with ADHD displayed reduced activation to errors in cingulo-opercular regions and higher RT variability, but no differences of interference control. Larger BOLD amplitude to error trials significantly predicted reduced RT variability across all participants. Neither group showed evidence of post-error response slowing; however, post-error adaptation in motor networks was significantly reduced in children with ADHD. This adaptation was inversely related to activation of the right-lateralized ventral attention network (VAN) on error trials and to task-driven connectivity between the cingulo-opercular system and the VAN. Limitations Our study was limited by the modest sample size and imperfect matching across groups. Conclusion Our findings show a deficit in cingulo-opercular activation in children with ADHD that could relate to reduced signalling for errors. Moreover, the reduced orienting of the VAN signal may mediate deficient post-error motor adaptions. Pinpointing general performance monitoring problems to specific brain regions and operations in error processing may help to guide the targets of future treatments for ADHD. PMID:26441332

  19. Locomotor adaptation and aftereffects in patients with reduced somatosensory input due to peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Bunday, Karen L; Bronstein, Adolfo M

    2009-12-01

    We studied 12 peripheral neuropathy patients (PNP) and 13 age-matched controls with the "broken escalator" paradigm to see how somatosensory loss affects gait adaptation and the release and recovery ("braking") of the forward trunk overshoot observed during this locomotor aftereffect. Trunk displacement, foot contact signals, and leg electromyograms (EMGs) were recorded while subjects walked onto a stationary sled (BEFORE trials), onto the moving sled (MOVING or adaptation trials), and again onto the stationary sled (AFTER trials). PNP were unsteady during the MOVING trials, but this progressively improved, indicating some adaptation. During the after trials, 77% of control subjects displayed a trunk overshoot aftereffect but over half of the PNP (58%) did not. The PNP without a trunk aftereffect adapted to the MOVING trials by increasing distance traveled; subsequently this was expressed as increased distance traveled during the aftereffect rather than as a trunk overshoot. This clear separation in consequent aftereffects was not seen in the normal controls suggesting that, as a result of somatosensory loss, some PNP use distinctive strategies to negotiate the moving sled, in turn resulting in a distinct aftereffects. In addition, PNP displayed earlier than normal anticipatory leg EMG activity during the first after trial. Although proprioceptive inputs are not critical for the emergence or termination of the aftereffect, somatosensory loss induces profound changes in motor adaptation and anticipation. Our study has found individual differences in adaptive motor performance, indicative that PNP adopt different feed-forward gait compensatory strategies in response to peripheral sensory loss.

  20. Multicomponent reduced scale seismic modelling: upgrade of the MUSC laboratory with application to polarization observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raphaël, Valensi; Donatienne, Leparoux; Olivier, Durand; François, Bretaudeau; Philippe, Côte

    2015-09-01

    Reduced scale physical modelling is a useful intermediate step to fill the gap between field measurements and numerical simulations. In many different areas of seismology, multicomponent measurements are now commonly recorded and processed. However, up to now, laboratory facilities providing flexible and accurate reproduction of large multicomponent seismic experiments have not reached maturity. Within this context, we present an improvement of a measurement facility (MUSC) developed previously to enable the flexible and versatile reproduction of seismic experiments at reduced scale. This new measurement system provides simultaneous measurements of the vertical and the horizontal components of seismic wavefields by taking advantage of recent developments in laser ultrasonic sensing technologies. Reference measurements on an aluminum block are carried out in order to quantitatively evaluate multicomponent measurements. Noise characterization, surface wave ellipticity analysis and waveform comparisons with a semi-analytical model are presented. To enable the simultaneous comparison of phase and polarization attributes, we also introduce a regularized version of the polarization attributes and apply it to synthetic and experimental data. These comparisons demonstrate that high fidelity multicomponent reduced scale physical modelling is possible with this new facility. An illustrative example with a model containing a shallow cavity is presented. In this case, multicomponent measurements help to identify the cavity signature but multiples have a detrimental effect on regularized instantaneous polarization attributes. By assessing the reliability of the MUSC measurement facility in the performance of massive high-quality multicomponent data acquisition at the laboratory scale, this study highlights the interesting potentials of reduced scale modelling of seismic wave propagation for a large variety of applications.

  1. Translation, cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Diabetes Empowerment Scale – Short Form

    PubMed Central

    Chaves, Fernanda Figueredo; Reis, Ilka Afonso; Pagano, Adriana Silvina; Torres, Heloísa de Carvalho

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To translate, cross-culturally adapt and validate the Diabetes Empowerment Scale – Short Form for assessment of psychosocial self-efficacy in diabetes care within the Brazilian cultural context. METHODS Assessment of the instrument’s conceptual equivalence, as well as its translation and cross-cultural adaptation were performed following international standards. The Expert Committee’s assessment of the translated version was conducted through a web questionnaire developed and applied via the web tool e-Surv. The cross-culturally adapted version was used for the pre-test, which was carried out via phone call in a group of eleven health care service users diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The pre-test results were examined by a group of experts, composed by health care consultants, applied linguists and statisticians, aiming at an adequate version of the instrument, which was subsequently used for test and retest in a sample of 100 users diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus via phone call, their answers being recorded by the web tool e-Surv. Internal consistency and reproducibility of analysis were carried out within the statistical programming environment R. RESULTS Face and content validity were attained and the Brazilian Portuguese version, entitled Escala de Autoeficácia em Diabetes – Versão Curta, was established. The scale had acceptable internal consistency with Cronbach’s alpha of 0.634 (95%CI 0.494– 0.737), while the correlation of the total score in the two periods was considered moderate (0.47). The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.50. CONCLUSIONS The translated and cross-culturally adapted version of the instrument to spoken Brazilian Portuguese was considered valid and reliable to be used for assessment within the Brazilian population diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The use of a web tool (e-Surv) for recording the Expert Committee responses as well as the responses in the validation tests proved

  2. Increasing temperature forcing reduces the Greenland Ice Sheet's response time scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applegate, Patrick J.; Parizek, Byron R.; Nicholas, Robert E.; Alley, Richard B.; Keller, Klaus

    2015-10-01

    Damages from sea level rise, as well as strategies to manage the associated risk, hinge critically on the time scale and eventual magnitude of sea level rise. Satellite observations and paleo-data suggest that the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) loses mass in response to increased temperatures, and may thus contribute substantially to sea level rise as anthropogenic climate change progresses. The time scale of GIS mass loss and sea level rise are deeply uncertain, and are often assumed to be constant. However, previous ice sheet modeling studies have shown that the time scale of GIS response likely decreases strongly with increasing temperature anomaly. Here, we map the relationship between temperature anomaly and the time scale of GIS response, by perturbing a calibrated, three-dimensional model of GIS behavior. Additional simulations with a profile, higher-order, ice sheet model yield time scales that are broadly consistent with those obtained using the three-dimensional model, and shed light on the feedbacks in the ice sheet system that cause the time scale shortening. Semi-empirical modeling studies that assume a constant time scale of sea level adjustment, and are calibrated to small preanthropogenic temperature and sea level changes, may underestimate future sea level rise. Our analysis suggests that the benefits of reducing greenhouse gas emissions, in terms of avoided sea level rise from the GIS, may be greatest if emissions reductions begin before large temperature increases have been realized. Reducing anthropogenic climate change may also allow more time for design and deployment of risk management strategies by slowing sea level contributions from the GIS.

  3. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  4. Robust Impacts of Climate Change in Europe and Why Study Scale is Important for Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, C.; Andersson, J.; Olsson, J.; Bosshard, T.; Yang, W.; Berg, P.; Arheimer, B.

    2015-12-01

    for climate change impact studies where the regional-scale results and their known uncertainties are considered together with local-scale studies designed specifically for the changes to which a system must be adapted. We illustrate the value of the new method in a number of real case studies for various societal sectors.

  5. Vida PURA: A Cultural Adaptation of Screening and Brief Intervention to Reduce Unhealthy Drinking among Latino Day Laborers

    PubMed Central

    Ornelas, India J.; Allen, Claire; Vaughan, Catalina; Williams, Emily C.; Negi, Nalini

    2014-01-01

    Background Brief intervention is known to reduce drinking in primary care, however because health care access is limited for Latino immigrants, traditional brief interventions are unlikely to reach this population. Methods Using Barrera and Castro’s framework, our study aims to culturally adapt a screening and brief intervention program to reduce unhealthy alcohol use among Latino day laborers, a particularly vulnerable group of Latino immigrant men. We conducted 18 interviews with Latino day laborers and 13 interviews with mental health and substance use providers that serve Latino immigrant men. Interviews were conducted until saturation of themes was reached. Themes from interviews were used to identify sources of mismatch between traditional screening and brief intervention and our target population. Results Unhealthy alcohol use was common, culturally accepted, and helped relieve immigration-related stressors. Men had limited knowledge about how to change their behavior. Men preferred to receive information from trusted providers in Spanish. Men faced significant barriers to accessing health and social services, but were open to receiving brief interventions in community settings. Findings were used to design Vida PURA, a preliminary adaptation design of brief intervention for Latino day laborers. Key adaptations include providing brief intervention at a day labor worker center, by promotores trained to incorporate the social and cultural context of drinking for Latino immigrant men. Conclusions Culturally adapted brief intervention may help reduce unhealthy drinking in this underserved population. PMID:25153904

  6. Robust Scale Adaptive Tracking by Combining Correlation Filters with Sequential Monte Carlo

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Junkai; Luo, Haibo; Hui, Bin; Chang, Zheng

    2017-01-01

    A robust and efficient object tracking algorithm is required in a variety of computer vision applications. Although various modern trackers have impressive performance, some challenges such as occlusion and target scale variation are still intractable, especially in the complex scenarios. This paper proposes a robust scale adaptive tracking algorithm to predict target scale by a sequential Monte Carlo method and determine the target location by the correlation filter simultaneously. By analyzing the response map of the target region, the completeness of the target can be measured by the peak-to-sidelobe rate (PSR), i.e., the lower the PSR, the more likely the target is being occluded. A strict template update strategy is designed to accommodate the appearance change and avoid template corruption. If the occlusion occurs, a retained scheme is allowed and the tracker refrains from drifting away. Additionally, the feature integration is incorporated to guarantee the robustness of the proposed approach. The experimental results show that our method outperforms other state-of-the-art trackers in terms of both the distance precision and overlap precision on the publicly available TB-50 dataset. PMID:28273840

  7. Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction Using Three Dimensional Processing (AIDR3D) Improves Chest CT Image Quality and Reduces Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Yamashiro, Tsuneo; Miyara, Tetsuhiro; Honda, Osamu; Kamiya, Hisashi; Murata, Kiyoshi; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Tomiyama, Noriyuki; Moriya, Hiroshi; Koyama, Mitsuhiro; Noma, Satoshi; Kamiya, Ayano; Tanaka, Yuko; Murayama, Sadayuki

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the advantages of Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction using Three Dimensional Processing (AIDR3D) for image quality improvement and dose reduction for chest computed tomography (CT). Methods Institutional Review Boards approved this study and informed consent was obtained. Eighty-eight subjects underwent chest CT at five institutions using identical scanners and protocols. During a single visit, each subject was scanned using different tube currents: 240, 120, and 60 mA. Scan data were converted to images using AIDR3D and a conventional reconstruction mode (without AIDR3D). Using a 5-point scale from 1 (non-diagnostic) to 5 (excellent), three blinded observers independently evaluated image quality for three lung zones, four patterns of lung disease (nodule/mass, emphysema, bronchiolitis, and diffuse lung disease), and three mediastinal measurements (small structure visibility, streak artifacts, and shoulder artifacts). Differences in these scores were assessed by Scheffe's test. Results At each tube current, scans using AIDR3D had higher scores than those without AIDR3D, which were significant for lung zones (p<0.0001) and all mediastinal measurements (p<0.01). For lung diseases, significant improvements with AIDR3D were frequently observed at 120 and 60 mA. Scans with AIDR3D at 120 mA had significantly higher scores than those without AIDR3D at 240 mA for lung zones and mediastinal streak artifacts (p<0.0001), and slightly higher or equal scores for all other measurements. Scans with AIDR3D at 60 mA were also judged superior or equivalent to those without AIDR3D at 120 mA. Conclusion For chest CT, AIDR3D provides better image quality and can reduce radiation exposure by 50%. PMID:25153797

  8. Locomotor Adaptation Improves Balance Control, Multitasking Ability and Reduces the Metabolic Cost of Postural Instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Peters, B. T.; Mulavara, A. P.; Brady, R. A.; Batson, C. D.; Miller, C. A.; Ploutz-Snyder, R. J.; Guined, J. R.; Buxton, R. E.; Cohen, H. S.

    2011-01-01

    During exploration-class missions, sensorimotor disturbances may lead to disruption in the ability to ambulate and perform functional tasks during the initial introduction to a novel gravitational environment following a landing on a planetary surface. The overall goal of our current project is to develop a sensorimotor adaptability training program to facilitate rapid adaptation to these environments. We have developed a unique training system comprised of a treadmill placed on a motion-base facing a virtual visual scene. It provides an unstable walking surface combined with incongruent visual flow designed to enhance sensorimotor adaptability. Greater metabolic cost incurred during balance instability means more physical work is required during adaptation to new environments possibly affecting crewmembers? ability to perform mission critical tasks during early surface operations on planetary expeditions. The goal of this study was to characterize adaptation to a discordant sensory challenge across a number of performance modalities including locomotor stability, multi-tasking ability and metabolic cost. METHODS: Subjects (n=15) walked (4.0 km/h) on a treadmill for an 8 -minute baseline walking period followed by 20-minutes of walking (4.0 km/h) with support surface motion (0.3 Hz, sinusoidal lateral motion, peak amplitude 25.4 cm) provided by the treadmill/motion-base system. Stride frequency and auditory reaction time were collected as measures of locomotor stability and multi-tasking ability, respectively. Metabolic data (VO2) were collected via a portable metabolic gas analysis system. RESULTS: At the onset of lateral support surface motion, subj ects walking on our treadmill showed an increase in stride frequency and auditory reaction time indicating initial balance and multi-tasking disturbances. During the 20-minute adaptation period, balance control and multi-tasking performance improved. Similarly, throughout the 20-minute adaptation period, VO2 gradually

  9. Adaptive scaling model of the main pycnocline and the associated overturning circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuckar, Neven-Stjepan

    This thesis examines a number of crucial factors and processes that control the structure of the main pycnocline and the associated overturning circulation that maintains the ocean stratification. We construct an adaptive scaling model: a semi-empirical low-order theory based on the total transformation balance that linearly superimposes parameterized transformation rate terms of various mechanisms that participate in the water-mass conversion between the warm water sphere and the cold water sphere. The depth of the main pycnocline separates the light-water domain from the dense-water domain beneath the surface, hence we introduce a new definition in an integral form that is dynamically based on the large-scale potential vorticity (i.e., vertical density gradient is selected for the kernel function of the normalized vertical integral). We exclude the abyssal pycnocline from our consideration and limit our domain of interest to the top 2 km of water column. The goal is to understand the controlling mechanisms, and analytically predict and describe a wide spectrum of ocean steady states in terms of key large-scale indices relevant for understanding the ocean's role in climate. A devised polynomial equation uses the average depth of the main pycnocline as a single unknown (the key vertical scale of the upper ocean stratification) and gives us an estimate for the northern hemisphere deep water production and export across the equator from the parts of this equation. The adaptive scaling model aims to elucidate the roles of a limited number of dominant processes that determine some key upper ocean circulation and stratification properties. Additionally, we use a general circulation model in a series of simplified single-basin ocean configurations and surface forcing fields to confirm the usefulness of our analytical model and further clarify several aspects of the upper ocean structure. An idealized numerical setup, containing all the relevant physical and dynamical

  10. [Reduced version of the scale of attitudes towards alcohol, alcoholism, and alcoholics: primary results].

    PubMed

    de Vargas, Divane

    2011-08-01

    This study aimed to analyze the items of the Scale of Attitudes toward Alcohol, alcoholism and alcoholics in order to prepare a reduced version keeping the instrument's psychometric properties. The preliminary version of the Scale composed by 165 items was tested in a sample with 144 nursing student. The evaluation process of the items consisted of the total-item coefficient correlation and reliability of the instrument was estimated by Cronbach's alpha coefficient. Results indicate the permanence of 83 items, divided into five factors that showed satisfactory values in the different coefficients of internal consistency. Further studies are needed with larger samples in order to give continuity to the process of scale validation among health professionals.

  11. Influence of adaptive control on vortex-driven instabilities in a scaled model of solid propellant motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthoine, J.; Mettenleiter, M.; Repellin, O.; Buchlin, J.-M.; Candel, S.

    2003-05-01

    Aeroacoustic instabilities occur in many applications of technological interest and have undesirable effects on the steady operation of the system. Passive and active means are sought to reduce the level of oscillation and eliminate the instability. In the case of segmented solid rocket motors, observations indicate that low-frequency oscillations are generated by a coupling between vortex shedding in shear regions established in the flow and the acoustic eigenmodes of the system. This process is investigated in this article on a model-scale configuration representing the geometry of the motor. An active control loop is exploited to obtain resonant and non-resonant conditions for the same operating point. Adaptive techniques are used to stabilize the flow and the experiment serves as a testbed for active control. It is shown that an adaptive system may be applied to essentially suppress the pressure oscillations. The instability mechanism is then studied by analyzing the flow field with particle image velocimetry. It is found that control noticeably modifies the mean flow structure. Detailed studies of the vortex pattern in the shedding region indicate that the concentrated vorticity and the corresponding circulation values remain in the same range but that vorticity is shed more randomly when the resonance is eliminated by the controller. This indicates that control is achieved by reducing the level of organization in the vortex pattern. Under resonant conditions the level of pressure fluctuations results from coherent interactions between vortices and the downstream nozzle. This process feeds energy in one of the acoustic modes of the system enhancing the pressure level. It is made less effective by the control loop.

  12. Cultural Adaptation and Psychometric Properties of the Persian Version of the Circumstances, Motivation, and Readiness Scale

    PubMed Central

    Norozi, Ensiyeh; Miri, Mohammad Reza; Soltani, Raheleh; Eslami, Ahmad Ali; Harivandi, Ali Reza; Dastjerdi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background Treatment motivation has always been an important issue in substance abuse treatment. In recent decades, several instruments have been developed to measure this concept. Objectives In this study, cultural adaptation and psychometric properties of the Persian version of the circumstances, motivation and readiness scale (CMR) are illustrated in a sample of Iranian addicts. Materials and Methods The translation process followed Beaton et al.’s (2000) guideline for the cross-cultural adaptation of self-administered questionnaires, including the steps of translation, synthesis, back translation, expert committee review, and pre-testing. The final version of the Persian CMR was assessed for internal consistency and construct validity (n = 203). Results There was one eliminated item in the cross-cultural adaptation process. Also, four items that had low correlation with the total score were excluded from the questionnaire during the initial analysis. Using the remaining items, Principle axis factoring with Promax rotation was performed and three factors, circumstance, motivation, and readiness, were identified. The secondary order three factor model provided a good statistical and conceptual fit for the data. Internal consistency met the criterion for a reliable measure (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.840). The α range for these identified factors was 0.597 to 0.837. Conclusions Although the CMR was originally designed for use in TC treatment, this study suggests that it is also applicable, with some modifications, in short-term residential camps. Also, it is concluded that the Persian translation of the CMR can be applied for studies among Persian addicts. PMID:27622165

  13. Habitat-specific pigmentation in a freshwater isopod: adaptive evolution over a small spatiotemporal scale.

    PubMed

    Hargeby, Anders; Johansson, Jonas; Ahnesjö, Jonas

    2004-01-01

    Pigmentation in the freshwater isopod Asellus aquaticus (Crustacea) differed between habitats in two Swedish lakes. In both lakes, isopods had lighter pigmentation in stands of submerged vegetation, consisting of stoneworts (Chara spp.), than in nearby stands of reed (Phragmites australis). Experimental crossings of light and dark isopods in a common environment showed that pigmentation had a genetic basis and that genetic variance was additive. Environmental effects of diet or chromatophore adjustment to the background had minor influence on pigmentation, as shown by laboratory rearing of isopods on stonewort or reed substrates, as well as analyses of stable isotope ratios for isopods collected in the field. In both study lakes, the average phenotype became lighter with time (across generations) in recently established stonewort stands. Taken together, these results indicate that altered phenotype pigmentation result from evolutionary responses to local differences in natural selection. Based on the assumption of two generations per year, the evolutionary rate of change in pigmentation was 0.08 standard deviations per generation (haldanes) over 20 generations in one lake and 0.22 haldanes over two generations in the other lake. This genetic change occurred during an episode of population growth in a novel habitat, a situation known to promote adaptive evolution. In addition, stonewort stands constitute large and persistent patches, characteristics that tend to preserve local adaptations produced by natural selection. Results from studies on selective forces behind the adaptive divergence suggest that selective predation from visually oriented predators is a possible selective agent. We found no indications of phenotype-specific movements between habitats. Mating within stonewort stands was random with respect to pigmentation, but on a whole-lake scale it is likely that mating is assortative, as a result of local differences in phenotype distribution.

  14. Translation and Cultural Adaptation of the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support for Greece

    PubMed Central

    Theofilou, Paraskevi

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there is a surge of interest in the use of the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS) to measure perceived social support across cultures. The objective of this study was to translate and make the cultural adaptation of the Greek version of the MSPSS. The study counted with a sample of 10 patients diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. The process involved the following steps of translation back translation and semantic evaluation. The former revealed good acceptance of the translated version of the instrument, which participants considered having items of easy understanding. After completing the process of validation in the country, the instrument will become available to Greek researchers to measure social support, as well as to compare results from Greece to that of other cultures in which the instrument has already been validated. PMID:26973954

  15. Scale-adaptive simulation of a hot jet in cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duda, B. M.; Menter, F. R.; Hansen, T.; Esteve, M.-J.

    2011-12-01

    The simulation of a hot jet in cross flow is of crucial interest for the aircraft industry as it directly impacts aircraft safety and global performance. Due to the highly transient and turbulent character of this flow, simulation strategies are necessary that resolve at least a part of the turbulence spectrum. The high Reynolds numbers for realistic aircraft applications do not permit the use of pure Large Eddy Simulations as the spatial and temporal resolution requirements for wall bounded flows are prohibitive in an industrial design process. For this reason, the hybrid approach of the Scale-Adaptive Simulation is employed, which retains attached boundary layers in well-established RANS regime and allows the resolution of turbulent fluctuations in areas with sufficient flow instabilities and grid refinement. To evaluate the influence of the underlying numerical grid, three meshing strategies are investigated and the results are validated against experimental data.

  16. Adaptive consensus of scale-free multi-agent system by randomly selecting links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Jinping; Ge, Huafeng

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates an adaptive consensus problem for distributed scale-free multi-agent systems (SFMASs) by randomly selecting links, where the degree of each node follows a power-law distribution. The randomly selecting links are based on the assumption that every agent decides to select links among its neighbours according to the received data with a certain probability. Accordingly, a novel consensus protocol with the range of the received data is developed, and each node updates its state according to the protocol. By the iterative method and Cauchy inequality, the theoretical analysis shows that all errors among agents converge to zero, and in the meanwhile, several criteria of consensus are obtained. One numerical example shows the reliability of the proposed methods.

  17. Aeroelastic Deformation: Adaptation of Wind Tunnel Measurement Concepts to Full-Scale Vehicle Flight Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, Alpheus W.; Lokos, William A.; Barrows, Danny A.

    2005-01-01

    The adaptation of a proven wind tunnel test technique, known as Videogrammetry, to flight testing of full-scale vehicles is presented. A description is presented of the technique used at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center for the measurement of the change in wing twist and deflection of an F/A-18 research aircraft as a function of both time and aerodynamic load. Requirements for in-flight measurements are compared and contrasted with those for wind tunnel testing. The methodology for the flight-testing technique and differences compared to wind tunnel testing are given. Measurement and operational comparisons to an older in-flight system known as the Flight Deflection Measurement System (FDMS) are presented.

  18. Multiple time scales of adaptation in the auditory system as revealed by human evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Costa-Faidella, Jordi; Grimm, Sabine; Slabu, Lavinia; Díaz-Santaella, Francisco; Escera, Carles

    2011-06-01

    Single neurons in the primary auditory cortex of the cat show faster adaptation time constants to short- than long-term stimulus history. This ability to encode the complex past auditory stimulation in multiple time scales would enable the auditory system to generate expectations of the incoming stimuli. Here, we tested whether large neural populations exhibit this ability as well, by recording human auditory evoked potentials (AEP) to pure tones in a sequence embedding short- and long-term aspects of stimulus history. Our results yielded dynamic amplitude modulations of the P2 AEP to stimulus repetition spanning from milliseconds to tens of seconds concurrently, as well as amplitude modulations of the mismatch negativity AEP to regularity violations. A simple linear model of expectancy accounting for both short- and long-term stimulus history described our results, paralleling the behavior of neurons in the primary auditory cortex.

  19. Cellular adaptation to biomechanical stress across length scales in tissue homeostasis and disease.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Penney M; Weaver, Valerie M

    2016-09-15

    Human tissues are remarkably adaptable and robust, harboring the collective ability to detect and respond to external stresses while maintaining tissue integrity. Following injury, many tissues have the capacity to repair the damage - and restore form and function - by deploying cellular and molecular mechanisms reminiscent of developmental programs. Indeed, it is increasingly clear that cancer and chronic conditions that develop with age arise as a result of cells and tissues re-implementing and deregulating a selection of developmental programs. Therefore, understanding the fundamental molecular mechanisms that drive cell and tissue responses is a necessity when designing therapies to treat human conditions. Extracellular matrix stiffness synergizes with chemical cues to drive single cell and collective cell behavior in culture and acts to establish and maintain tissue homeostasis in the body. This review will highlight recent advances that elucidate the impact of matrix mechanics on cell behavior and fate across these length scales during times of homeostasis and in disease states.

  20. Locomotor Adaptation and Aftereffects in Patients With Reduced Somatosensory Input Due to Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Bunday, Karen L.

    2009-01-01

    We studied 12 peripheral neuropathy patients (PNP) and 13 age-matched controls with the “broken escalator” paradigm to see how somatosensory loss affects gait adaptation and the release and recovery (“braking”) of the forward trunk overshoot observed during this locomotor aftereffect. Trunk displacement, foot contact signals, and leg electromyograms (EMGs) were recorded while subjects walked onto a stationary sled (BEFORE trials), onto the moving sled (MOVING or adaptation trials), and again onto the stationary sled (AFTER trials). PNP were unsteady during the MOVING trials, but this progressively improved, indicating some adaptation. During the after trials, 77% of control subjects displayed a trunk overshoot aftereffect but over half of the PNP (58%) did not. The PNP without a trunk aftereffect adapted to the MOVING trials by increasing distance traveled; subsequently this was expressed as increased distance traveled during the aftereffect rather than as a trunk overshoot. This clear separation in consequent aftereffects was not seen in the normal controls suggesting that, as a result of somatosensory loss, some PNP use distinctive strategies to negotiate the moving sled, in turn resulting in a distinct aftereffects. In addition, PNP displayed earlier than normal anticipatory leg EMG activity during the first after trial. Although proprioceptive inputs are not critical for the emergence or termination of the aftereffect, somatosensory loss induces profound changes in motor adaptation and anticipation. Our study has found individual differences in adaptive motor performance, indicative that PNP adopt different feed-forward gait compensatory strategies in response to peripheral sensory loss. PMID:19741105

  1. Broad-scale adaptive genetic variation in alpine plants is driven by temperature and precipitation

    PubMed Central

    MANEL, STÉPHANIE; GUGERLI, FELIX; THUILLER, WILFRIED; ALVAREZ, NADIR; LEGENDRE, PIERRE; HOLDEREGGER, ROLF; GIELLY, LUDOVIC; TABERLET, PIERRE

    2014-01-01

    Identifying adaptive genetic variation is a challenging task, in particular in non-model species for which genomic information is still limited or absent. Here, we studied distribution patterns of amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) in response to environmental variation, in 13 alpine plant species consistently sampled across the entire European Alps. Multiple linear regressions were performed between AFLP allele frequencies per site as dependent variables and two categories of independent variables, namely Moran’s eigenvector map MEM variables (to account for spatial and unaccounted environmental variation, and historical demographic processes) and environmental variables. These associations allowed the identification of 153 loci of ecological relevance. Univariate regressions between allele frequency and each environmental factor further showed that loci of ecological relevance were mainly correlated with MEM variables. We found that precipitation and temperature were the best environmental predictors, whereas topographic factors were rarely involved in environmental associations. Climatic factors, subject to rapid variation as a result of the current global warming, are known to strongly influence the fate of alpine plants. Our study shows, for the first time for a large number of species, that the same environmental variables are drivers of plant adaptation at the scale of a whole biome, here the European Alps. PMID:22680783

  2. CLAss-Specific Subspace Kernel Representations and Adaptive Margin Slack Minimization for Large Scale Classification.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yinan; Diamantaras, Konstantinos I; McKelvey, Tomas; Kung, Sun-Yuan

    2016-12-07

    In kernel-based classification models, given limited computational power and storage capacity, operations over the full kernel matrix becomes prohibitive. In this paper, we propose a new supervised learning framework using kernel models for sequential data processing. The framework is based on two components that both aim at enhancing the classification capability with a subset selection scheme. The first part is a subspace projection technique in the reproducing kernel Hilbert space using a CLAss-specific Subspace Kernel representation for kernel approximation. In the second part, we propose a novel structural risk minimization algorithm called the adaptive margin slack minimization to iteratively improve the classification accuracy by an adaptive data selection. We motivate each part separately, and then integrate them into learning frameworks for large scale data. We propose two such frameworks: the memory efficient sequential processing for sequential data processing and the parallelized sequential processing for distributed computing with sequential data acquisition. We test our methods on several benchmark data sets and compared with the state-of-the-art techniques to verify the validity of the proposed techniques.

  3. Decentralized Adaptive Neural Output-Feedback DSC for Switched Large-Scale Nonlinear Systems.

    PubMed

    Long, Lijun; Zhao, Jun

    2016-03-08

    In this paper, for a class of switched large-scale uncertain nonlinear systems with unknown control coefficients and unmeasurable states, a switched-dynamic-surface-based decentralized adaptive neural output-feedback control approach is developed. The approach proposed extends the classical dynamic surface control (DSC) technique for nonswitched version to switched version by designing switched first-order filters, which overcomes the problem of multiple ``explosion of complexity.'' Also, a dual common coordinates transformation of all subsystems is exploited to avoid individual coordinate transformations for subsystems that are required when applying the backstepping recursive design scheme. Nussbaum-type functions are utilized to handle the unknown control coefficients, and a switched neural network observer is constructed to estimate the unmeasurable states. Combining with the average dwell time method and backstepping and the DSC technique, decentralized adaptive neural controllers of subsystems are explicitly designed. It is proved that the approach provided can guarantee the semiglobal uniformly ultimately boundedness for all the signals in the closed-loop system under a class of switching signals with average dwell time, and the tracking errors to a small neighborhood of the origin. A two inverted pendulums system is provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method proposed.

  4. Adaptive multiwavelets via two-scale similarity transforms for rotating machinery fault diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jing; He, Zhengjia; Zi, Yanyang; Lei, Yaguo; Li, Zhen

    2009-07-01

    Fault diagnosis of rotating machinery is very important and critical to avoid serious accidents. However, the complex and non-stationary vibration signals with a large amount of noise make the fault detection to be challenging, especially at the early stage. Based on the inner product principle, fault detection using wavelet transforms is to match fault features most correlative to basis functions, and its effectiveness is determined by the construction and choice of wavelet basis function. In this paper, a new method based on adaptive multiwavelets via two-scale similarity transforms (TSTs) is proposed. Multiwavelets can offer multiple wavelet basis functions and so have the possibility of matching various fault features preferably. TSTs are simple and straightforward methods to design a series of new biorthogonal multiwavelets with some desirable properties. Using TSTs, a changeable and adaptive multiwavelet library is established so as to provide various ascendant multiple basis functions for inner product operation. By the rule of kurtosis maximization principle, optimal multiwavelets most similar to the fault features of a given signal are searched for. The applications to a rolling bearing of outer-race fault and a flue gas turbine unit of rub-impact fault show that the proposed method is an effective approach to detecting the impulse feature components hidden in vibration signals and performs well for rotating machinery fault diagnosis.

  5. Leveraging Large-Scale Semantic Networks for Adaptive Robot Task Learning and Execution.

    PubMed

    Boteanu, Adrian; St Clair, Aaron; Mohseni-Kabir, Anahita; Saldanha, Carl; Chernova, Sonia

    2016-12-01

    This work seeks to leverage semantic networks containing millions of entries encoding assertions of commonsense knowledge to enable improvements in robot task execution and learning. The specific application we explore in this project is object substitution in the context of task adaptation. Humans easily adapt their plans to compensate for missing items in day-to-day tasks, substituting a wrap for bread when making a sandwich, or stirring pasta with a fork when out of spoons. Robot plan execution, however, is far less robust, with missing objects typically leading to failure if the robot is not aware of alternatives. In this article, we contribute a context-aware algorithm that leverages the linguistic information embedded in the task description to identify candidate substitution objects without reliance on explicit object affordance information. Specifically, we show that the task context provided by the task labels within the action structure of a task plan can be leveraged to disambiguate information within a noisy large-scale semantic network containing hundreds of potential object candidates to identify successful object substitutions with high accuracy. We present two extensive evaluations of our work on both abstract and real-world robot tasks, showing that the substitutions made by our system are valid, accepted by users, and lead to a statistically significant reduction in robot learning time. In addition, we report the outcomes of testing our approach with a large number of crowd workers interacting with a robot in real time.

  6. Translation and cultural adaptation of the Piper Fatigue Scale for use in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Ostlund, Ulrika; Gustavsson, Petter; Fürst, Carl-Johan

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this study was to translate and culturally adapt the revised Piper Fatigue Scale to Swedish. For translation, guidelines for cross-cultural adaptation were used. Two teams independently translated the instrument and two other teams produced back-translations, after which a multidisciplinary committee decided on a Swedish version. In pre-test interviews, ten cancer patients were encouraged to think out loud while completing the Swedish version. Their verbal responses were analysed and used for a second revision. The initial translations varied in words, expressions and grammar, shown in a lack of equivalence to the original instrument after back-translation. In order to establish semantic equivalence, the committee changed some grammatical constructions, and some words were replaced for experiential and conceptual equivalence. When analysing the pre-test, obscurities due to the phrasing of some items were revealed and dealt with in the second revision. This study does not fulfil the process of validation for a translated instrument but offers a sound basis for further accumulation of evidence for validity, and facilitates the choice of an appropriate instrument for studying cancer-related fatigue in Sweden.

  7. Adaptation, Validation, Reliability and Factorial Equivalence of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale in Colombian and Spanish Population.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Lugo, Mayra; Espada, José P; Morales, Alexandra; Marchal-Bertrand, Laurent; Soler, Franklin; Vallejo-Medina, Pablo

    2016-10-14

    The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale is the most widely used instrument to assess self-esteem. In light of the absence of adaptations in Colombia, this study seeks to validate and adapt this scale in the Colombian population, and perform factorial equivalence with the Spanish version. A total of 1,139 seniors (633 Colombians and 506 Spaniards) were evaluated; the individuals answered the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and sexual self-esteem scale. The average score of the items was similar to the questionnaire's theoretical average, and standard deviations were close to one. The psychometric properties of the items are generally adequate with alphas of .83 and .86 and significant (CI = .95) and correlations with the sexual self-esteem scale ranging from .31 and .41. Factorial equivalence was confirmed by means of a structural equation model (CFI = .912 and RMSEA = .079), thus showing a strong level of invariance.

  8. The Effectiveness of Adapted Versions of an Evidence-based Prevention Program in Reducing Alcohol Use among Alternative School Students

    PubMed Central

    Hopson, Laura M.; Holleran Steiker, Lori K.

    2010-01-01

    Although there is a strong evidence base for effective substance abuse prevention programs for youth, there is a need to facilitate the implementation and evaluation of these programs in real world settings. This study evaluates the effectiveness of adapted versions of an evidence-based prevention program, keepin’ it REAL (kiR), with alternative school students. Programs are often adapted when used in schools and other community settings for a variety of reasons. The kiR adaptations, developed during an earlier phase of this study, were created to make the curriculum more appropriate for alternative high school youth. The adaptations were evaluated using a quasi-experimental design in which questionnaires were administered at pretest, posttest, and follow-up, and focus groups were conducted at posttest. MANOVA analyses indicate significantly reduced intentions to accept alcohol and, for younger participants, reduced alcohol use. Focus group data support the need for age appropriate prevention content. The authors discuss implications for practitioners implementing prevention programs in schools. PMID:20622971

  9. Walking with a Backpack using Load Distribution and Dynamic Load Compensation Reduces Metabolic Cost and Adaptations to Loads.

    PubMed

    Park, Joon-Hyuk; Stegall, Paul; Zhang, Haohan; Agrawal, Sunil

    2016-11-09

    In this study, we showed a way of reducing the metabolic cost of walking with a backpack using load distribution and dynamic load compensation, provided by a wearable upper body device. This device distributes the backpack load between the shoulders and the pelvis, senses the vertical motion of the pelvis, and provides gait synchronized compensatory forces to reduce the dynamic loads from a backpack. It was hypothesized that by reducing dynamic loads from a backpack during load carriage, the users gait and postural adaptation, muscular effort and metabolic cost would be reduced. This hypothesis was supported by biomechanical and physiological measurements on a group of young healthy subjects, as they walked on a treadmill under 4 different conditions: unloaded; with a backpack, loaded with 25% of their body weight, supported on the shoulders; with the same load distributed between the shoulders and the pelvis; and with dynamic load compensation in addition to load distribution. The results showed reductions in gait and postural adaptations, muscle activity, vertical and braking ground reaction forces, and metabolic cost while carrying the same backpack load with the device. We conclude that the device can potentially reduce the risk of musculoskeletal injuries and muscle fatigue associated with carrying heavy backpack loads while reducing the metabolic cost of loaded walking.

  10. Adaptive radiation by waves of gene transfer leads to fine-scale resource partitioning in marine microbes

    PubMed Central

    Hehemann, Jan-Hendrik; Arevalo, Philip; Datta, Manoshi S.; Yu, Xiaoqian; Corzett, Christopher H.; Henschel, Andreas; Preheim, Sarah P.; Timberlake, Sonia; Alm, Eric J.; Polz, Martin F.

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive radiations are important drivers of niche filling, since they rapidly adapt a single clade of organisms to ecological opportunities. Although thought to be common for animals and plants, adaptive radiations have remained difficult to document for microbes in the wild. Here we describe a recent adaptive radiation leading to fine-scale ecophysiological differentiation in the degradation of an algal glycan in a clade of closely related marine bacteria. Horizontal gene transfer is the primary driver in the diversification of the pathway leading to several ecophysiologically differentiated Vibrionaceae populations adapted to different physical forms of alginate. Pathway architecture is predictive of function and ecology, underscoring that horizontal gene transfer without extensive regulatory changes can rapidly assemble fully functional pathways in microbes. PMID:27653556

  11. Adaptation of the Communication Skills Attitude Scale (CSAS) to dental students.

    PubMed

    Laurence, Brian; Bertera, Elizabeth M; Feimster, Tawana; Hollander, Roberta; Stroman, Carolyn

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to adapt the twenty-six-item Communication Skills Attitude Scale (CSAS) developed for medical students for use among dental students and to test the psychometric properties of the modified instrument. The sample consisted of 250 students (an 80.1 percent response rate) in years D1 to D4 at a dental school in Washington, DC. The mean age of participants was 26.6 years with a range from twenty-one to forty-two years. Slightly more than half of the participants were female (52.4 percent) and were African American or of African descent (51.7 percent). Principal components analysis was used to test the psychometric properties of the instrument. The index that resulted measured both positive and negative attitudes toward learning communications skills. The final twenty-four-item scale had good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha=0.87), and the study obtained four important factors-Learning, Importance, Quality, and Success-that explained a significant portion of the variance (49.1 percent). Stratified analysis by demographic variables suggested that there may be gender and ethnic differences in the students' attitudes towards learning communication skills. The authors conclude that the CSAS modified for dental students, or DCSAS, is a useful tool to assess attitudes towards learning communication skills among dental students.

  12. Automated Detection of Microaneurysms Using Scale-Adapted Blob Analysis and Semi-Supervised Learning

    SciTech Connect

    Adal, Kedir M.; Sidebe, Desire; Ali, Sharib; Chaum, Edward; Karnowski, Thomas Paul; Meriaudeau, Fabrice

    2014-01-07

    Despite several attempts, automated detection of microaneurysm (MA) from digital fundus images still remains to be an open issue. This is due to the subtle nature of MAs against the surrounding tissues. In this paper, the microaneurysm detection problem is modeled as finding interest regions or blobs from an image and an automatic local-scale selection technique is presented. Several scale-adapted region descriptors are then introduced to characterize these blob regions. A semi-supervised based learning approach, which requires few manually annotated learning examples, is also proposed to train a classifier to detect true MAs. The developed system is built using only few manually labeled and a large number of unlabeled retinal color fundus images. The performance of the overall system is evaluated on Retinopathy Online Challenge (ROC) competition database. A competition performance measure (CPM) of 0.364 shows the competitiveness of the proposed system against state-of-the art techniques as well as the applicability of the proposed features to analyze fundus images.

  13. Real-time scale-adaptive correlation filters tracker with depth information to handle occlusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, Jiatian; Gu, Yuzhang; Hu, Keli; Cheng, Xiaoliu; Zhan, Yunlong; Wang, Yingguan

    2016-07-01

    In visual object tracking, occlusions significantly undermine the performance of tracking algorithms. RGB-D cameras, such as Microsoft Kinect or the related PrimeSense camera, are widely available to consumers. Great attention has been focused on exploiting depth information for object tracking in recent years. We propose an algorithm that improves the existing correlation filter-based tracker for scale-adaptive tracking. Moreover, we utilize depth information provided by the Kinect camera to handle various types of occlusions. First, the optimal location of the target is obtained by the conventional kernelized correlation filter tracker. Then, we make use of the discriminative correlation filter for scale estimation as an independent part. At last, to further improve the tracking performance under occlusions, we present a simple yet effective occlusion handling mechanism to detect occlusion and recovery. In this mechanism, cluster analysis and object segmentation by K-means method have been applied to depth data. Numerous experiments on Princeton RGB-D tracking dataset demonstrate that the proposed algorithm outperforms several state-of-the-art trackers by successfully dealing with occlusions.

  14. Received sensitivity: adapting Ainsworth's scale to capture sensitivity in a multiple-caregiver context.

    PubMed

    Mesman, Judi; Minter, Tessa; Angnged, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    A network of multiple caregivers contributing to the care of an infant is the norm in many non-Western cultural contexts. Current observational measures of caregiver sensitive responsiveness to infant signals focus on single caregivers, failing to capture the total experience of the infant when it comes to the sensitive responsiveness received from multiple sources. The current paper aims to introduce the construct of received sensitivity that captures the sensitivity that an infant experiences from multiple sources in cultural contexts where simultaneous multiple caregiving is common. The paper further presents an adaptation of Ainsworth's Sensitivity versus Insensitivity observation scale to allow for the assessment of sensitivity as received by the infant regardless of who is providing the sensitive responses to its signals. The potential usefulness of the Received Sensitivity scale is illustrated by two case studies of infants from an Agta forager community in the Philippines where infants are routinely taken care of by multiple caregivers. The case studies show that the infants' total experience of being responded to sensitively cannot be simply derived from the sum of individual caregiver sensitivity scores, demonstrating the potential added value of the new Received Sensitivity observation measure.

  15. An adaptive scale factor based MPPT algorithm for changing solar irradiation levels in outer space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, Trevor Hocksun; Wu, Xiaofeng

    2017-03-01

    Maximum power point tracking (MPPT) techniques are popularly used for maximizing the output of solar panels by continuously tracking the maximum power point (MPP) of their P-V curves, which depend both on the panel temperature and the input insolation. Various MPPT algorithms have been studied in literature, including perturb and observe (P&O), hill climbing, incremental conductance, fuzzy logic control and neural networks. This paper presents an algorithm which improves the MPP tracking performance by adaptively scaling the DC-DC converter duty cycle. The principle of the proposed algorithm is to detect the oscillation by checking the sign (ie. direction) of the duty cycle perturbation between the current and previous time steps. If there is a difference in the signs then it is clear an oscillation is present and the DC-DC converter duty cycle perturbation is subsequently scaled down by a constant factor. By repeating this process, the steady state oscillations become negligibly small which subsequently allows for a smooth steady state MPP response. To verify the proposed MPPT algorithm, a simulation involving irradiances levels that are typically encountered in outer space is conducted. Simulation and experimental results prove that the proposed algorithm is fast and stable in comparison to not only the conventional fixed step counterparts, but also to previous variable step size algorithms.

  16. High-resolution LES of the rotating stall in a reduced scale model pump-turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacot, Olivier; Kato, Chisachi; Avellan, François

    2014-03-01

    Extending the operating range of modern pump-turbines becomes increasingly important in the course of the integration of renewable energy sources in the existing power grid. However, at partial load condition in pumping mode, the occurrence of rotating stall is critical to the operational safety of the machine and on the grid stability. The understanding of the mechanisms behind this flow phenomenon yet remains vague and incomplete. Past numerical simulations using a RANS approach often led to inconclusive results concerning the physical background. For the first time, the rotating stall is investigated by performing a large scale LES calculation on the HYDRODYNA pump-turbine scale model featuring approximately 100 million elements. The computations were performed on the PRIMEHPC FX10 of the University of Tokyo using the overset Finite Element open source code FrontFlow/blue with the dynamic Smagorinsky turbulence model and the no-slip wall condition. The internal flow computed is the one when operating the pump-turbine at 76% of the best efficiency point in pumping mode, as previous experimental research showed the presence of four rotating cells. The rotating stall phenomenon is accurately reproduced for a reduced Reynolds number using the LES approach with acceptable computing resources. The results show an excellent agreement with available experimental data from the reduced scale model testing at the EPFL Laboratory for Hydraulic Machines. The number of stall cells as well as the propagation speed corroborates the experiment.

  17. Reducing weight precision of convolutional neural networks towards large-scale on-chip image recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Zhengping; Ovsiannikov, Ilia; Wang, Yibing; Shi, Lilong; Zhang, Qiang

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we develop a server-client quantization scheme to reduce bit resolution of deep learning architecture, i.e., Convolutional Neural Networks, for image recognition tasks. Low bit resolution is an important factor in bringing the deep learning neural network into hardware implementation, which directly determines the cost and power consumption. We aim to reduce the bit resolution of the network without sacrificing its performance. To this end, we design a new quantization algorithm called supervised iterative quantization to reduce the bit resolution of learned network weights. In the training stage, the supervised iterative quantization is conducted via two steps on server - apply k-means based adaptive quantization on learned network weights and retrain the network based on quantized weights. These two steps are alternated until the convergence criterion is met. In this testing stage, the network configuration and low-bit weights are loaded to the client hardware device to recognize coming input in real time, where optimized but expensive quantization becomes infeasible. Considering this, we adopt a uniform quantization for the inputs and internal network responses (called feature maps) to maintain low on-chip expenses. The Convolutional Neural Network with reduced weight and input/response precision is demonstrated in recognizing two types of images: one is hand-written digit images and the other is real-life images in office scenarios. Both results show that the new network is able to achieve the performance of the neural network with full bit resolution, even though in the new network the bit resolution of both weight and input are significantly reduced, e.g., from 64 bits to 4-5 bits.

  18. The effect of redox conditions and adaptation time on organic micropollutant removal during river bank filtration: A laboratory-scale column study.

    PubMed

    Bertelkamp, C; Verliefde, A R D; Schoutteten, K; Vanhaecke, L; Vanden Bussche, J; Singhal, N; van der Hoek, J P

    2016-02-15

    This study investigated the redox dependent removal and adaptive behaviour of a mixture of 15 organic micropollutants (OMPs) in laboratory-scale soil columns fed with river water. Three separate pilot systems were used consisting of: (1) two columns, (2) ten columns and (3) twenty two columns to create oxic, suboxic (partial nitrate removal) and anoxic (complete nitrate removal). The pilot set-up has some unique features--it can simulate fairly long residence times (e.g., 45 days using the 22 column system) and reduced conditions developed naturally within the system. Dimethoate, diuron, and metoprolol showed redox dependent removal behaviour with higher biodegradation rates in the oxic zone compared to the suboxic/anoxic zone. The redox dependent behaviour of these three OMPs could not be explained based on their physico-chemical properties (hydrophobicity, charge and molecular weight) or functional groups present in the molecular structure. OMPs that showed persistent behaviour in the oxic zone (atrazine, carbamazepine, hydrochlorothiazide and simazine) were also not removed under more reduced conditions. Adaptive behaviour was observed for five OMPs: dimethoate, chloridazon, lincomycin, sulfamethoxazole and phenazone. However, the adaptive behaviour could not be explained by the physico-chemical properties (hydrophobicity, charge and molecular weight) investigated in this study and only rough trends were observed with specific functional groups (e.g. ethers, sulphur, primary and secondary amines). Finally, the adaptive behaviour of OMPs was found to be an important factor that should be incorporated in predictive models for OMP removal during river bank filtration.

  19. Adaptive control of gait stability in reducing slip-related backward loss of balance.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, T; Wening, J D; Pai, Y-C

    2006-03-01

    The properties of adaptation within the locomotor and balance control systems directed towards improving one's recovery strategy for fall prevention are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to examine adaptive control of gait stability to repeated slip exposure leading to a reduction in backward loss of balance (and hence in protective stepping). Fourteen young subjects experienced a block of slips during walking. Pre- and post-slip onset stability for all slip trials was obtained as the shortest distance at touchdown (slipping limb) and lift-off (contralateral limb), respectively, between the measured center of mass (COM) state, that is, position and velocity relative to base of support (BOS) and the mathematically predicted threshold for backward loss of balance. An improvement in pre- and post-slip onset stability correlated with a decrease in the incidence of balance loss from 100% (first slip) to 0% (fifth slip). While improvements in pre-slip stability were affected by a proactive anterior shift in COM position, the significantly greater post-slip onset improvements resulted from reductions in BOS perturbation intensity. Such reactive changes in BOS perturbation intensity resulted from a reduction in the demand on post-slip onset braking impulse, which was nonetheless influenced by the proactive adjustments in posture and gait pattern (e.g., the COM position, step length, flat foot landing and increased knee flexion) prior to slip onset. These findings were indicative of the maturing process of the adaptive control. This was characterized by a shift from a reliance on feedback control for postural correction to being influenced by feedforward control, which improved pre-slip stability and altered perturbation intensity, leading to skateover or walkover (>0.05 m or <0.05 m displacement, respectively) adaptive strategies. Finally, the stability at contralateral limb lift-off was highly predictive of balance loss occurrence and its subsequent rapid

  20. Preparation of Reduced Iron Powders from Mill Scale with Microwave Heating: Optimization Using Response Surface Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Qianxu; Zhu, Hongbo; Peng, Jinhui; Srinivasa Kannan, C.; Chen, Jian; Dai, Linqing; Liu, Peng

    2013-12-01

    Preparation of the reduced iron powder has been attempted with mill scale as the iron-bearing material and with wood charcoal as the reducing agent through microwave heating. The response surface methodology (RSM) is used to optimize the process conditions, with wood charcoal, process temperature, and holding time being the three process parameters. The regressed model equation eliminating the insignificant parameters through an analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to optimize the process conditions. The optimum process parameters for the preparation of reduced iron powders have been identified to be the wood charcoal of 13.8 pct, a process temperature of 1391 K (1118 °C), and a holding time of 43 minutes. The optimum conditions resulted in reduced iron powders with a total iron content of 98.60 pct and a metallization ratio of 98.71 pct. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) was used to estimate the elemental contents of the reduced iron powder, which meets the specification of the HY100.23 first-class iron powder standard. Additionally X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis were performed and the results are compiled.

  1. Family Impact Scale (FIS): Cross-cultural Adaptation and Psychometric Properties for the Peruvian Spanish Language.

    PubMed

    Abanto, Jenny; Albites, Ursula; Bönecker, Marcelo; Paiva, Saul M; Castillo, Jorge L; Aguilar-Gálvez, Denisse

    2015-12-01

    The lack of a Family Impact Scale (FIS) in Spanish language limits its use as an indicator in Spanish-speaking countries and precludes comparisons with data from other cultural and ethnic groups. The purpose of this study was therefore to adapt the FIS cross-culturally to the Peruvian Spanish language and assess its reliability and validity. In order to translate and adapt the FIS cross-culturally, it was answered by 60 parents in two pilot tests, after which it was tested on 200 parents of children aged 11 to 14 years who were clinically examined for dental caries experience and malocclusions. Internal consistency was assessed by Cronbach's alpha coefficient while repeat administration of the FIS on the same 200 parents enabled the test-retest reliability to be assessed via intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Construct and discriminant validity were based on associations of the FIS with global ratings of oral health and clinical groups, respectively. Mean (standard deviation) FIS total score was 5.20 (5.86). Internal consistency was confirmed by Cronbach's alpha 0.84. Test-retest reliability revealed excellent reproducibility (ICC = 0.96). Construct validity was good, demonstrating statistically significant associations between total FIS score and global ratings of oral health (p=0.007) and overall wellbeing (p=0.002), as well as for the subscale scores (p<0.05) with exception of the financial burden subscale. The FIS was also able to discriminate between children with and without dental caries experience and malocclusions (p<0.05). Satisfactory psychometric results for the Peruvian Spanish FIS confirm it as a reliable, valid instrument for assessing the impact on the family caused by children's oral conditions.

  2. Managing Small-Scale Commercial Fisheries for Adaptive Capacity: Insights from Dynamic Social-Ecological Drivers of Change in Monterey Bay

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Stacy E.; Cole, Jennifer; Finkbeiner, Elena M.; Le Cornu, Elodie; Ban, Natalie C.; Carr, Mark H.; Cinner, Joshua E.; Crowder, Larry B.; Gelcich, Stefan; Hicks, Christina C.; Kittinger, John N.; Martone, Rebecca; Malone, Daniel; Pomeroy, Carrie; Starr, Richard M.; Seram, Sanah; Zuercher, Rachel; Broad, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Globally, small-scale fisheries are influenced by dynamic climate, governance, and market drivers, which present social and ecological challenges and opportunities. It is difficult to manage fisheries adaptively for fluctuating drivers, except to allow participants to shift effort among multiple fisheries. Adapting to changing conditions allows small-scale fishery participants to survive economic and environmental disturbances and benefit from optimal conditions. This study explores the relative influence of large-scale drivers on shifts in effort and outcomes among three closely linked fisheries in Monterey Bay since the Magnuson-Stevens Fisheries Conservation and Management Act of 1976. In this region, Pacific sardine (Sardinops sagax), northern anchovy (Engraulis mordax), and market squid (Loligo opalescens) fisheries comprise a tightly linked system where shifting focus among fisheries is a key element to adaptive capacity and reduced social and ecological vulnerability. Using a cluster analysis of landings, we identify four modes from 1974 to 2012 that are dominated (i.e., a given species accounting for the plurality of landings) by squid, sardine, anchovy, or lack any dominance, and seven points of transition among these periods. This approach enables us to determine which drivers are associated with each mode and each transition. Overall, we show that market and climate drivers are predominantly attributed to dominance transitions. Model selection of external drivers indicates that governance phases, reflected as perceived abundance, dictate long-term outcomes. Our findings suggest that globally, small-scale fishery managers should consider enabling shifts in effort among fisheries and retaining existing flexibility, as adaptive capacity is a critical determinant for social and ecological resilience. PMID:25790464

  3. Managing small-scale commercial fisheries for adaptive capacity: insights from dynamic social-ecological drivers of change in Monterey Bay.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Stacy E; Cole, Jennifer; Finkbeiner, Elena M; Le Cornu, Elodie; Ban, Natalie C; Carr, Mark H; Cinner, Joshua E; Crowder, Larry B; Gelcich, Stefan; Hicks, Christina C; Kittinger, John N; Martone, Rebecca; Malone, Daniel; Pomeroy, Carrie; Starr, Richard M; Seram, Sanah; Zuercher, Rachel; Broad, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Globally, small-scale fisheries are influenced by dynamic climate, governance, and market drivers, which present social and ecological challenges and opportunities. It is difficult to manage fisheries adaptively for fluctuating drivers, except to allow participants to shift effort among multiple fisheries. Adapting to changing conditions allows small-scale fishery participants to survive economic and environmental disturbances and benefit from optimal conditions. This study explores the relative influence of large-scale drivers on shifts in effort and outcomes among three closely linked fisheries in Monterey Bay since the Magnuson-Stevens Fisheries Conservation and Management Act of 1976. In this region, Pacific sardine (Sardinops sagax), northern anchovy (Engraulis mordax), and market squid (Loligo opalescens) fisheries comprise a tightly linked system where shifting focus among fisheries is a key element to adaptive capacity and reduced social and ecological vulnerability. Using a cluster analysis of landings, we identify four modes from 1974 to 2012 that are dominated (i.e., a given species accounting for the plurality of landings) by squid, sardine, anchovy, or lack any dominance, and seven points of transition among these periods. This approach enables us to determine which drivers are associated with each mode and each transition. Overall, we show that market and climate drivers are predominantly attributed to dominance transitions. Model selection of external drivers indicates that governance phases, reflected as perceived abundance, dictate long-term outcomes. Our findings suggest that globally, small-scale fishery managers should consider enabling shifts in effort among fisheries and retaining existing flexibility, as adaptive capacity is a critical determinant for social and ecological resilience.

  4. Toothbrush Handles Individually Adapted for Use by Elderly Patients to Reduce Biofilm on Complete Dentures: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kammers, Ana Cristina Esteves; Zanetti, Artemio Luiz; Lacerda, Tânia E Silva Pulicano; Aroca, Janaina Paula; Camilotti, Veridiana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Reduction of biofilm on dentures is important for maintaining denture wearers’ health. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of toothbrush handles individually adapted in reducing of biofilm on dentures. Materials and Methods Study participants were 16 residents of the condo for the elderly, denture wearers, functionally independent and without cognitive impairment. Participants were randomly divided into two groups: Group 1 (adapted toothbrush handles) and Group 2 (conventional toothbrush). Biofilm from the inner surface of the basal area of the denture was observed using 5% erythrosine. Images obtained before starting the use of toothbrushes, after 7 and 21 days were sent for computer analysis. Results The average amount of biofilm on the first day was considered severe in both groups. At the end of the experiment, the average biofilm coverage in Group 1 was 44.7% (13.1% reduction) and in Group 2 it was 48.6% (4.8% reduction). However, the Friedman analysis of variance test showed that the reduction was statistically significant (p< 0.05) only in Group 1, demonstrating the effectiveness of the adapted brushes. Conclusion The findings of this pilot study indicated that for the reduction of biofilm on dentures the adapted toothbrush handles were superior to the conventional type. PMID:26155573

  5. Adaptive Multi-Scale Pore Network Method for Two-Phase Flow in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, D. W.; Khayrat, K.; Jenny, P.

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic pore network simulators are important tools in studying macroscopic quantities in two-phase flow through porous media. However, these simulators have a time complexity of order N2 for N pore bodies, which limits their usage to small domains. Quasi-static pore network simulators, which assume capillary dominated flow, are more efficient with a time complexity of order N log(N), but are unable to capture phenomena caused by viscous effects such as viscous fingering and stable displacement. It has been experimentally observed that, in several flow scenarios, capillary forces are dominant at the pore scale and viscous forces at larger scales. In order to take advantage of this behaviour and to reduce the time complexity of existing dynamic pore network simulators, we propose a multi-scale pore-network method for two phase flow. In our solution algorithm, the pore network is first divided into smaller subnetworks. The algorithm to advance the fluid interfaces within each subnetwork consists of three steps: 1) The saturation rate of each subnetwork is obtained by solving a two-phase meso-scale mass balance equation over the domain of subnetworks. Here, a multi-point flux scheme is used. 2) Depending on the local capillary number computed in the subnetwork, either an invasion percolation algorithm or a dynamic network algorithm is used to locally advance the fluid-fluid interfaces within each subnetwork until a new saturation value is matched. 3) The transmissibilities for the meso-scale equation are updated based on the updated fluid configurations in each subnetwork. For this purpose the methodoloy of the existing multi-scale finite volume (MSFV) method is employed. An important feature of the multi-scale pore-network method is that it maintains consistency of both fluid occupancy and fluxes at subnetwork interfaces. Viscous effects such as viscous fingering (see figure) can be captured at a decreased computational cost compared to dynamic pore network

  6. Data-adaptive wavelets and multi-scale singular-spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiou, Pascal; Sornette, Didier; Ghil, Michael

    2000-08-01

    Using multi-scale ideas from wavelet analysis, we extend singular-spectrum analysis (SSA) to the study of nonstationary time series, including the case where intermittency gives rise to the divergence of their variance. The wavelet transform resembles a local Fourier transform within a finite moving window whose width W, proportional to the major period of interest, is varied to explore a broad range of such periods. SSA, on the other hand, relies on the construction of the lag-correlation matrix C on M lagged copies of the time series over a fixed window width W to detect the regular part of the variability in that window in terms of the minimal number of oscillatory components; here W= MΔ t with Δ t as the time step. The proposed multi-scale SSA is a local SSA analysis within a moving window of width M≤ W≤ N, where N is the length of the time series. Multi-scale SSA varies W, while keeping a fixed W/ M ratio, and uses the eigenvectors of the corresponding lag-correlation matrix C(M) as data-adaptive wavelets; successive eigenvectors of C(M) correspond approximately to successive derivatives of the first mother wavelet in standard wavelet analysis. Multi-scale SSA thus solves objectively the delicate problem of optimizing the analyzing wavelet in the time-frequency domain by a suitable localization of the signal’s correlation matrix. We present several examples of application to synthetic signals with fractal or power-law behavior which mimic selected features of certain climatic or geophysical time series. The method is applied next to the monthly values of the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) for 1933-1996; the SOI time series is widely believed to capture major features of the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in the Tropical Pacific. Our methodology highlights an abrupt periodicity shift in the SOI near 1960. This abrupt shift between 5 and 3 years supports the Devil’s staircase scenario for the ENSO phenomenon (preliminary results of this study

  7. MapReduce Based Personalized Locality Sensitive Hashing for Similarity Joins on Large Scale Data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingjing; Lin, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Locality Sensitive Hashing (LSH) has been proposed as an efficient technique for similarity joins for high dimensional data. The efficiency and approximation rate of LSH depend on the number of generated false positive instances and false negative instances. In many domains, reducing the number of false positives is crucial. Furthermore, in some application scenarios, balancing false positives and false negatives is favored. To address these problems, in this paper we propose Personalized Locality Sensitive Hashing (PLSH), where a new banding scheme is embedded to tailor the number of false positives, false negatives, and the sum of both. PLSH is implemented in parallel using MapReduce framework to deal with similarity joins on large scale data. Experimental studies on real and simulated data verify the efficiency and effectiveness of our proposed PLSH technique, compared with state-of-the-art methods.

  8. MapReduce Based Personalized Locality Sensitive Hashing for Similarity Joins on Large Scale Data

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingjing; Lin, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Locality Sensitive Hashing (LSH) has been proposed as an efficient technique for similarity joins for high dimensional data. The efficiency and approximation rate of LSH depend on the number of generated false positive instances and false negative instances. In many domains, reducing the number of false positives is crucial. Furthermore, in some application scenarios, balancing false positives and false negatives is favored. To address these problems, in this paper we propose Personalized Locality Sensitive Hashing (PLSH), where a new banding scheme is embedded to tailor the number of false positives, false negatives, and the sum of both. PLSH is implemented in parallel using MapReduce framework to deal with similarity joins on large scale data. Experimental studies on real and simulated data verify the efficiency and effectiveness of our proposed PLSH technique, compared with state-of-the-art methods. PMID:26089861

  9. Tolerance of acid-adapted and non-adapted Escherichia coli O157:H7 cells to reduced pH as affected by type of acidulant.

    PubMed

    Deng, Y; Ryu, J H; Beuchat, L R

    1999-02-01

    A study was carried out to determine if three strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 grown (18 h) in Tryptic Soy Broth (TSB) and TSB supplemented with 1.25% glucose (TSBG), i.e. unadapted and acid-adapted cells, respectively, exhibited changes in tolerance to reduced pH when plated on Tryptic Soy Agar (TSA) acidified (pH 3.9, 4.2, 4.5, 4.8, 5.1 and 5.4) with acetic, citric or malic acids. All test strains grew well on TSA acidified with acetic acid at pH > or = 5.4 or malic acid at pH > or = 4.5; two strains grew on TSA acidified with citric acid at pH > or = 4.5, while the third strain grew at pH > or = 4.8. Acid-adapted and control (unadapted) cells differed little in their ability to form visible colonies on TSA containing the same acid at the same pH. However, on plates not showing visible colonies, acid-adapted cells retained higher viability than unadapted cells when plated on acidified TSA. Growth of acid-adapted and control cells of E. coli O157:H7 inoculated into TSB containing acetic acid (pH 5.4 and 5.7) and citric or malic acids (pH 4.2 and 4.5) was also studied. There was essentially no difference in growth characteristics of the two types of cells in TSB acidified at the same pH with a given acid. Tolerance of acid-adapted and control cells on subsequent exposure to low pH is influenced by the type of acidulant. The order of sensitivity at a given pH is acetic > citric > malic acid. When performing acid challenge studies to determine survival and growth characteristics of E. coli O157:H7 in foods, consideration should be given to the type of acid to which cells have been exposed previously, the procedure used to achieve acidic environments and possible differences in response among strains. The use of strains less affected by pH than type of acidulant or vice versa could result in an underestimation of the potential for survival and growth of E. coli O157:H7 in acid foods.

  10. Ribosome profiling reveals an adaptation strategy of reduced bacterium to acute stress.

    PubMed

    Fisunov, Gleb Y; Evsyutina, Daria V; Garanina, Irina A; Arzamasov, Alexander A; Butenko, Ivan O; Altukhov, Ilya A; Nikitina, Anastasia S; Govorun, Vadim M

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria of class Mollicutes (mycoplasmas) feature significant genome reduction which makes them good model organisms for systems biology studies. Previously we demonstrated, that drastic transcriptional response of mycoplasmas to stress results in a very limited response on the level of protein. In this study we used heat stress model of M. gallisepticum and ribosome profiling to elucidate the process of genetic information transfer under stress. We found that under heat stress ribosomes demonstrate selectivity towards mRNA binding. We identified that heat stress response may be divided into two groups on the basis of absolute transcript abundance and fold-change in the translatome. One represents a noise-like response and another is likely an adaptive one. The latter include ClpB chaperone, cell division cluster, homologs of immunoblocking proteins and short ORFs with unknown function. We found that previously identified read-through of terminators contributes to the upregulation of transcripts in the translatome as well. In addition we identified that ribosomes of M. gallisepticum undergo reorganization under the heat stress. The most notable event is decrease of the amount of associated HU protein. In conclusion, only changes of few adaptive transcripts significantly impact translatome, while widespread noise-like transcription plays insignificant role in translation during stress.

  11. The Role of Scale and Model Bias in ADAPT's Photospheric Eatimation

    SciTech Connect

    Godinez Vazquez, Humberto C.; Hickmann, Kyle Scott; Arge, Charles Nicholas; Henney, Carl

    2015-05-20

    The Air Force Assimilative Photospheric flux Transport model (ADAPT), is a magnetic flux propagation based on Worden-Harvey (WH) model. ADAPT would be used to provide a global photospheric map of the Earth. A data assimilation method based on the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF), a method of Monte Carlo approximation tied with Kalman filtering, is used in calculating the ADAPT models.

  12. Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales: II Profile of Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Sabrina; Paynter, Jessica M.; Gilmore, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive behaviour is a crucial area of assessment for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). This study examined the adaptive behaviour profile of 77 young children with ASD using the Vineland-II, and analysed factors associated with adaptive functioning. Consistent with previous research with the original Vineland a distinct autism…

  13. Cultural Adaptation, Psychometric Properties, and Outcomes of the Native American Spirituality Scale

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, Brenna L.; Hallgren, Kevin A.; Venner, Kamilla L.; Hagler, Kylee J.; Simmons, Jeremiah D.; Sheche, Judith N.; Homer, Everett; Lupee, Donna

    2015-01-01

    Spirituality is central to many Native Americans (NAs) and has been associated with recovery from substance use disorders (SUDs). However, no published questionnaire uniquely taps tribal-specific spiritual beliefs and practices. This hinders efforts to integrate traditional NA spirituality into SUD treatment and track spiritual outcomes. As part of a randomized controlled trial examining SUD treatment for NAs, we adapted the Daily Spiritual Experience Scale (DSES) in collaboration with members of a Southwest tribe to create the Native American Spirituality Scale (NASS) and measured changes in the NASS over the course of treatment. The 83 participants (70% male) were from a single Southwest tribe and seeking SUD treatment. They completed the NASS at baseline, four-, eight-, and 12-months. Exploratory factor analysis of the NASS was conducted and its temporal invariance, construct validity, and longitudinal changes in the factor and item scores were examined. The NASS yielded a two-factor structure that was largely invariant across time. Factor 1 reflected behavioral practices, while Factor 2 reflected more global beliefs. Both factors significantly increased across 12 months, albeit at different assessment points. At baseline, Factor 1 was negatively related to substance use and positively associated with measures of tribal identification while Factor 2 was unrelated to these measures. Given the importance of tribal spirituality to many NAs, the development of this psychometrically sound measure is a key precursor and complement to the incorporation of tribal spirituality into treatment, as well as research on mechanisms of change for SUD treatment among NAs and assessment of NA spirituality in relation to other aspects of health. PMID:25961648

  14. Cultural adaptation, psychometric properties, and outcomes of the Native American Spirituality Scale.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, Brenna L; Hallgren, Kevin A; Venner, Kamilla L; Hagler, Kylee J; Simmons, Jeremiah D; Sheche, Judith N; Homer, Everett; Lupee, Donna

    2015-05-01

    Spirituality is central to many Native Americans (NAs) and has been associated with recovery from substance use disorders (SUDs). However, no published questionnaire uniquely taps tribal-specific spiritual beliefs and practices. This hinders efforts to integrate traditional NA spirituality into SUD treatment and track spiritual outcomes. As part of a randomized controlled trial examining SUD treatment for NAs, we adapted the Daily Spiritual Experience Scale (DSES) in collaboration with members of a Southwest tribe to create the Native American Spirituality Scale (NASS) and measured changes in the NASS over the course of treatment. The 83 participants (70% male) were from a single Southwest tribe and seeking SUD treatment. They completed the NASS at baseline, 4, 8, and 12 months. Exploratory factor analysis of the NASS was conducted and its temporal invariance, construct validity, and longitudinal changes in the factor and item scores were examined. The NASS yielded a 2-factor structure that was largely invariant across time. Factor 1 reflected behavioral practices, while Factor 2 reflected more global beliefs. Both factors significantly increased across 12 months, albeit at different assessment points. At baseline, Factor 1 was negatively related to substance use and positively associated with measures of tribal identification while Factor 2 was unrelated to these measures. Given the importance of tribal spirituality to many NAs, the development of this psychometrically sound measure is a key precursor and complement to the incorporation of tribal spirituality into treatment, as well as research on mechanisms of change for SUD treatment among NAs and assessment of NA spirituality in relation to other aspects of health.

  15. Cross-Cultural adaptation of the General Functioning Scale of the Family

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Thiago; de Assis, Simone Gonçalves; Avanci, Joviana Quintes; Pesce, Renata Pires

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe the process of cross-cultural adaptation of the General Functioning Scale of the Family, a subscale of the McMaster Family Assessment Device, for the Brazilian population. METHODS The General Functioning Scale of the Family was translated into Portuguese and administered to 500 guardians of children in the second grade of elementary school in public schools of Sao Gonçalo, Rio de Janeiro, Southeastern Brazil. The types of equivalences investigated were: conceptual and of items, semantic, operational, and measurement. The study involved discussions with experts, translations and back-translations of the instrument, and psychometric assessment. Reliability and validity studies were carried out by internal consistency testing (Cronbach’s alpha), Guttman split-half correlation model, Pearson correlation coefficient, and confirmatory factor analysis. Associations between General Functioning of the Family and variables theoretically associated with the theme (father’s or mother’s drunkenness and violence between parents) were estimated by odds ratio. RESULTS Semantic equivalence was between 90.0% and 100%. Cronbach’s alpha ranged from 0.79 to 0.81, indicating good internal consistency of the instrument. Pearson correlation coefficient ranged between 0.303 and 0.549. Statistical association was found between the general functioning of the family score and the theoretically related variables, as well as good fit quality of the confirmatory analysis model. CONCLUSIONS The results indicate the feasibility of administering the instrument to the Brazilian population, as it is easy to understand and a good measurement of the construct of interest. PMID:27355464

  16. The Adaptation of the Mathematics Anxiety Rating Scale-Elementary Form into Turkish, Language Validity, and Preliminary Psychometric Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baloglu, Mustafa; Balgalmis, Esra

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to adapt the Mathematics Anxiety Rating Scale- Elementary Form (MARS-E, Suinn, 1988) into Turkish by first doing the translation of its items and then the preliminary psychometric investigation of the Turkish form. The study included four different samples: 30 bilingual language experts, 50 Turkish language…

  17. Comparison between Dichotomous and Polytomous Scoring of Innovative Items in a Large-Scale Computerized Adaptive Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiao, Hong; Liu, Junhui; Haynie, Kathleen; Woo, Ada; Gorham, Jerry

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the impact of partial credit scoring of one type of innovative items (multiple-response items) in a computerized adaptive version of a large-scale licensure pretest and operational test settings. The impacts of partial credit scoring on the estimation of the ability parameters and classification decisions in operational test…

  18. Adaptation and Validation of Self-Perceived Employability Scale: An Analysis of Sports Department Students and Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karli, Unal

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: first, to adapt and test the construct validity of the Self- Perceived Employability Scale; and second, to analyze the employability perceptions of students and graduates of sports departments according to their gender, level of education, ability to communicate in a foreign language, and work experience. A…

  19. A Short Version of SIS (Support Intensity Scale): The Utility of the Application of Artificial Adaptive Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomiero, Tiziano; Croce, Luigi; Grossi, Enzo; Luc, De Vreese; Buscema, Massimo; Mantesso, Ulrico; De Bastiani, Elisa

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a shortened version of the SIS (support intensity scale) obtained by the application of mathematical models and instruments, adopting special algorithms based on the most recent developments in artificial adaptive systems. All the variables of SIS applied to 1,052 subjects with ID (intellectual disabilities)…

  20. Psychometric Validation of the Brief Adaptation to Disability Scale-Revised for Persons with Spinal Cord Injury in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Chen-Ping; Wang, Chia-Chiang; Fujikawa, Mayu; Brooks, Jessica; Eastvold-Walton, Lissa; Maxwell, Kristin; Chan, Fong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the measurement structure of the Brief Adaptation to Disability Scale-Revised (B-ADS-R). Measure: A 12-item measure of disability acceptance based on the four value changes (enlarging the scope of values, containing the effects of the disability, subordinating the physique, and transforming comparative-status values to asset…

  1. The Psychometric Properties of the Hospital Anxiety and Depressions Scale Adapted for Use with People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dagnan, D.; Jahoda, A.; McDowell, K.; Masson, J.; Banks, P.; Hare, D.

    2008-01-01

    Background: There is increasing recognition of depression in people with intellectual disabilities (ID). There is a need to develop well-standardised self-report measures for both clinical and research purposes. This paper presents some psychometric properties of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) adapted for use with people with ID.…

  2. Cross-cultural adaptation and psychometric properties of the Korean Scale for Internet Addiction (K-Scale) in Japanese high school students.

    PubMed

    Mak, Kwok-Kei; Nam, JeeEun Karin; Kim, Dongil; Aum, Narae; Choi, Jung-Seok; Cheng, Cecilia; Ko, Huei-Chen; Watanabe, Hiroko

    2017-03-01

    The Korean Scale for Internet Addiction (K-Scale) was developed in Korea for assessing addictive internet behaviors. This study aims to adopt K-Scale and examine its psychometric properties in Japanese adolescents. In 2014, 589 (36.0% boys) high school students (Grade 10-12) from Japan completed a survey, including items of Japanese versions of K-Scale and Smartphone Scale for Smartphone Addiction (S-Scale). Model fit indices of the original four-factor structure, three-factor structure obtained from exploratory factor analysis, and improved two-factor structure of K-Scale were computed using confirmatory factor analysis, with internal reliability of included items reported. The convergent validity of K-Scale was tested against self-rated internet addiction, and S-Scale using multiple regression models. The results showed that a second-order two-factor 13-item structure was the most parsimonious model (NFI=0.919, NNFI=0.935, CFI=0.949, and RMSEA=0.05) with good internal reliability (Cronbach's alpha=0.87). The two factors revealed were "Disturbance of Adaptation and Life Orientation" and "Withdrawal and Tolerance". Moreover, the correlation between internet user classifications defined by K-Scale and self-rating was significant. K-Scale total score was significantly and positively associated with S-Scale total (adjusted R(2)=0.440) and subscale scores (adjusted R(2)=0.439). In conclusion, K-Scale is a valid and reliable assessment scale of internet addiction for Japanese high school students after modifications.

  3. Adaptation of Mycobacterium smegmatis to an Industrial Scale Medium and Isolation of the Mycobacterial PorinMspA

    PubMed Central

    Wendel, Sebastian O; Perera, Ayomi S; Pfromm, Peter H; Czermak, Peter; Bossmann, Stefan H

    2013-01-01

    The adaptation of the organism to a simple and cost-effective growth medium is mandatory in developing a process for large scale production of the octamericporinMspA, which is isolated from Mycobacterium smegmatis. A fermentation optimization with the minimal nutrients required for growth has been performed. During the fermentation, the iron- and ammonium chloride concentrations in the medium were varied to determine their impact on the observed growth rates and cell mass yields. Common antibiotics to control contamination were eliminated in favor of copper sulfate to reduce costs. MspA has been successfully isolated from the harvested M. smegmatisusing aqueous nOPOE (n-octyloligooxyethylene) at 65°C. Because of the extraordinary stability of MspA, it is possible to denature and precipitate virtually all other proteins and contaminants by following this approach. To further purify the product, acetone is used for precipitation. Gel electrophoresis confirmed the presence and purity of MspA. A maximum of 840µg (via Bradford assay) of pure MspA per liter of the optimized simple growth medium has been obtained. This is a 40% increase with respect to the previously reported culture medium for MspA. PMID:23802026

  4. Fast 3-D large-scale gravity and magnetic modeling using unstructured grids and an adaptive multilevel fast multipole method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhengyong; Tang, Jingtian; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Maurer, Hansruedi

    2017-01-01

    A novel fast and accurate algorithm is developed for large-scale 3-D gravity and magnetic modeling problems. An unstructured grid discretization is used to approximate sources with arbitrary mass and magnetization distributions. A novel adaptive multilevel fast multipole (AMFM) method is developed to reduce the modeling time. An observation octree is constructed on a set of arbitrarily distributed observation sites, while a source octree is constructed on a source tetrahedral grid. A novel characteristic is the independence between the observation octree and the source octree, which simplifies the implementation of different survey configurations such as airborne and ground surveys. Two synthetic models, a cubic model and a half-space model with mountain-valley topography, are tested. As compared to analytical solutions of gravity and magnetic signals, excellent agreements of the solutions verify the accuracy of our AMFM algorithm. Finally, our AMFM method is used to calculate the terrain effect on an airborne gravity data set for a realistic topography model represented by a triangular surface retrieved from a digital elevation model. Using 16 threads, more than 5800 billion interactions between 1,002,001 observation points and 5,839,830 tetrahedral elements are computed in 453.6 s. A traditional first-order Gaussian quadrature approach requires 3.77 days. Hence, our new AMFM algorithm not only can quickly compute the gravity and magnetic signals for complicated problems but also can substantially accelerate the solution of 3-D inversion problems.

  5. A Map-Reduce-enabled SOLAP cube for large-scale remotely sensed data aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiyuan; Meng, Lingkui; Wang, Frank Z.; Zhang, Wen; Cai, Yang

    2014-09-01

    Spatial On-Line Analytical Processing (SOLAP) is a powerful decision support systems tool for exploring the multidimensional perspective of spatial data. In recent years, remotely sensed data have been integrated into SOLAP cubes, and this improvement has advantages in spatio-temporal analysis for environment monitoring. However, the performance of aggregations in SOLAP still faces a considerable challenge from the large-scale dataset generated by Earth observation. From the perspective of data parallelism, a tile-based SOLAP cube model, the so-called Tile Cube, is presented in this paper. The novel model implements Roll-Up/Drill-Across operations in the SOLAP environment based on Map-Reduce, a popular data-intensive computing paradigm, and improves the throughput and scalability of raster aggregation. Therefore, the long time-series, wide-range and multi-view analysis of remotely sensed data can be processed in a short time. The Tile Cube prototype was built on Hadoop/Hbase, and drought monitoring is used as an example to illustrate the aggregations in the model. The performance testing indicated the model can be scaled along with both the data growth and node growth. It is applicable and natural to integrate the SOLAP cube with Map-Reduce. Factors that influence the performance are also discussed, and the balance of them will be considered in future works to make full use of data locality for model optimisation.

  6. CMAQ (Community Multi-Scale Air Quality) atmospheric distribution model adaptation to region of Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lázár, Dóra; Weidinger, Tamás

    2016-04-01

    For our days, it has become important to measure and predict the concentration of harmful atmospheric pollutants such as dust, aerosol particles of different size ranges, nitrogen compounds, and ozone. The Department of Meteorology at Eötvös Loránd University has been applying the WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) model several years ago, which is suitable for weather forecasting tasks and provides input data for various environmental models (e.g. DNDC). By adapting the CMAQ (Community Multi-scale Air Quality) model we have designed a combined ambient air-meteorological model (WRF-CMAQ). In this research it is important to apply different emission databases and a background model describing the initial distribution of the pollutant. We used SMOKE (Sparse Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions) model for construction emission dataset from EMEP (European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme) inventories and GEOS-Chem model for initial and boundary conditions. Our model settings were CMAQ CB05 (Carbon Bond 2005) chemical mechanism with 108 x 108 km, 36 x 36 km and 12 x 12 km grids for regions of Europe, the Carpathian Basin and Hungary respectively. i) The structure of the model system, ii) a case study for Carpathian Basin (an anticyclonic weather situation at 21th September 2012) are presented. iii) Verification of ozone forecast has been provided based on the measurements of background air pollution stations. iv) Effects of model attributes (f.e. transition time, emission dataset, parameterizations) for the ozone forecast in Hungary are also investigated.

  7. [Cross-cultural adaptation and Argentine validation of the Lower Extremity Functional Scale Questionnaire].

    PubMed

    Dell'Era, Silvina; Dimaro, Mariana; Gamboa, Anabella; Spath, María Belén; Salzberg, Sandra; Hernández, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS) is a self-report questionnaire created to evaluate a patient's functional status in a wide spectrum of lower extremity musculoskeletal conditions. Thus far, there is no valid version in Argentina. The aims of this study were to translate the LEFS, cross-culturally adapt it for use in the Argentine population, and validate it in our country by determining its psychometric properties in patients over the age of 18 with lower extremity musculoskeletal conditions, comparing it with the SF-36 and the following functional tests: step test and timed up and go. One hundred and thirty three patients were included between July 2010 and January 2012. The test-retest reliability was high, with an ICC of 0.91 (95% CI 0.85 - 0.94). The correlation of the LEFS with the physical functioning subscale and the physical component summary score of the SF-36 was high (p < 0.001) and showed moderate response with the timed up and go and step test at the baseline (p < 0.001). This version of the LEFS is a valid, reliable tool used in Argentina to measure functional status in patients with lower extremity musculoskeletal conditions that we recommend for future clinical research projects and daily clinical use.

  8. Time-Varying, Multi-Scale Adaptive System Reliability Analysis of Lifeline Infrastructure Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Gearhart, Jared Lee; Kurtz, Nolan Scot

    2014-09-01

    The majority of current societal and economic needs world-wide are met by the existing networked, civil infrastructure. Because the cost of managing such infrastructure is high and increases with time, risk-informed decision making is essential for those with management responsibilities for these systems. To address such concerns, a methodology that accounts for new information, deterioration, component models, component importance, group importance, network reliability, hierarchical structure organization, and efficiency concerns has been developed. This methodology analyzes the use of new information through the lens of adaptive Importance Sampling for structural reliability problems. Deterioration, multi-scale bridge models, and time-variant component importance are investigated for a specific network. Furthermore, both bridge and pipeline networks are studied for group and component importance, as well as for hierarchical structures in the context of specific networks. Efficiency is the primary driver throughout this study. With this risk-informed approach, those responsible for management can address deteriorating infrastructure networks in an organized manner.

  9. Soft adaptive fusion of sensor energy for large-scale sensor networks (SAFE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rababaah, Haroun; Shirkhodaie, Amir

    2009-04-01

    Target tracking for network surveillance systems has gained significant interest especially in sensitive areas such as homeland security, battlefield intelligence, and facility surveillance. Most of the current sensor network protocols do not address the need for multi-sensor fusion-based target tracking schemes, which is crucial for the longevity of the sensor network. In this paper, we present an efficient fusion model for target tracking in a cluster-based large sensor networks. This new scheme is inspired by the image processing techniques by perceiving a sensor network as an energy map of sensor stimuli and applying typical image processing techniques on this map such as: filtering, convolution, clustering, segmentation, etc to achieve high-level perceptions and understanding of the situation. The new fusion model is called Soft Adaptive Fusion of Sensor Energies (SAFE). SAFE performs soft fusion of the energies collected by a local region of sensors in a large-scale sensor network. This local fusion is then transmitted by the head node to a base-station to update the common operation picture with evolving events of interest. Simulated scenarios showed that SAFE is promising by demonstrating a significant improvement in target tracking reliability, uncertainty, and efficiency.

  10. Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Psychometric Properties Testing of the Arabic Anterior Knee Pain Scale.

    PubMed

    Alshehri, Abdullah; Lohman, Everett; Daher, Noha S; Bahijri, Khalid; Alghamdi, Abdulmohsen; Altorairi, Nezar; Arnons, Arin; Matar, Abdullah

    2017-04-01

    BACKGROUND PFPS is one of the most frequently occurring overuse injuries affecting the lower limbs. A variety of functional and self-reported outcome measures have been used to assess clinical outcomes of patients with PFPS, however, only the Anterior Knee Pain Scale (AKPS) has been designed for PFPS patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS We followed international recommendations to perform a cross-cultural adaptation of the AKPS. The Arabic AKPS and the Arabic RAND 36-item Health Survey were administered to 40 patients who were diagnosed with PFPS. Participants were assessed at baseline and after 2 to 3 days assessed with the Arabic AKPS only. The measurements tested were reliability, validity, and feasibility. RESULTS The Arabic AKPS showed high reliability for both temporal stability, internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha was 0.81 for the first assessment and 0.75 for the second), excellent test-retest reliability (Intraclass Correlation Coefficients ICC=0.96; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.93, 0.98) and good agreement (standard error of measurement SEM=1.8%). The Arabic AKPS was significantly correlated with physical components of the RAND 36-Item Health Survey (Spearman's rho=0.69: p<0.001). No ceiling or floor effects were observed. CONCLUSIONS The Arabic AKPS is a valid and reliable tool and is comparable to the original English version and other translated versions.

  11. The Portuguese adaptation of the Gudjonsson Suggestibility Scale (GSS1) in a sample of inmates.

    PubMed

    Pires, Rute; Silva, Danilo R; Ferreira, Ana Sousa

    2014-01-01

    This paper comprises two studies which address the validity of the Portuguese adaptation of the Gudjonsson Suggestibility Scale, GSS1. In study 1, the means and standard deviations for the suggestibility results of a sample of Portuguese inmates (N=40, Mage=37.5 years, SD=8.1) were compared to those of a sample of Icelandic inmates (Gudjonsson, 1997; Gudjonsson & Sigurdsson, 1996). Portuguese inmates' results were in line with the original results. In study 2, the means and standard deviations for the suggestibility results of the sample of Portuguese inmates were compared to those of a general Portuguese population sample (N=57, Mage=36.1 years, SD=12.7). The forensic sample obtained significantly higher scores in suggestibility measures than the general population sample. ANOVA confirmed that the increased suggestibility in the inmates sample was due to the limited memory capacity of this latter group. Given that the results of both studies 1 and 2 are in keeping with the author's original results (Gudjonsson, 1997), this may be regarded as a confirmation of the validity of the Portuguese GSS1.

  12. Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Psychometric Properties Testing of the Arabic Anterior Knee Pain Scale

    PubMed Central

    Alshehri, Abdullah; Lohman, Everett; Daher, Noha S.; Bahijri, Khalid; Alghamdi, Abdulmohsen; Altorairi, Nezar; Arnos, Arin; Matar, Abdullah

    2017-01-01

    Background PFPS is one of the most frequently occurring overuse injuries affecting the lower limbs. A variety of functional and self-reported outcome measures have been used to assess clinical outcomes of patients with PFPS, however, only the Anterior Knee Pain Scale (AKPS) has been designed for PFPS patients. Material/Methods We followed international recommendations to perform a cross-cultural adaptation of the AKPS. The Arabic AKPS and the Arabic RAND 36-item Health Survey were administered to 40 patients who were diagnosed with PFPS. Participants were assessed at baseline and after 2 to 3 days assessed with the Arabic AKPS only. The measurements tested were reliability, validity, and feasibility. Results The Arabic AKPS showed high reliability for both temporal stability, internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha was 0.81 for the first assessment and 0.75 for the second), excellent test-retest reliability (Intraclass Correlation Coefficients ICC=0.96; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.93, 0.98) and good agreement (standard error of measurement SEM=1.8%). The Arabic AKPS was significantly correlated with physical components of the RAND 36-Item Health Survey (Spearman’s rho=0.69: p<0.001). No ceiling or floor effects were observed. Conclusions The Arabic AKPS is a valid and reliable tool and is comparable to the original English version and other translated versions. PMID:28364114

  13. Reduced risk insecticides to control scale insects and protect natural enemies in the production and maintenance of urban landscape plants.

    PubMed

    Frank, Steven D

    2012-04-01

    Armored scale insects are among the most difficult to manage and economically important arthropod pests in the production and maintenance of urban landscape plants. This is because of morphological traits that protect them from contact insecticides. I compared initial and season-long control of euonymus scale, Unaspis euonymi Comstock (Hemiptera: Diaspidae), by reduced-risk insecticides (insect growth regulators [IGRs], neonicotinoids, spirotetramat) to determine if they controlled scale as well as more toxic insecticides such as the organophosphate, acephate, and pyrethroid, bifenthrin. I also evaluated how these insecticides affected natural enemy abundance on experimental plants and survival when exposed to insecticide residue. All insecticides tested reduced first generation euonymus scale abundance. In 2009, reinfestation by second generation euonymus scale was highest on plants treated with acetamiprid and granular dinotefuran. In 2010, systemic neonicotinoids and spirotetramat prevented cottony cushion scale infestation 133 d after treatment whereas scale readily infested plants treated with bifenthrin and horticultural oil. Encarsia spp. and Cybocephalus spp. abundance was related to scale abundance. These natural enemies were generally less abundant than predicted by scale abundance on granular dinotefuran treated plants and more abundant on granular thiamethoxam treated plants. Bifenthrin residue killed 90-100% of O. insidiosus and E. citrina within 24 h. My results indicate that reduced risk insecticides can provide season-long scale control with less impact on natural enemies than conventional insecticides. This could have economic and environmental benefits by reducing the number of applications necessary to protect nursery and landscape plants from scale.

  14. Reducing maternal mortality on a countrywide scale: The role of emergency obstetric training.

    PubMed

    Moran, Neil F; Naidoo, Mergan; Moodley, Jagidesa

    2015-11-01

    Training programmes to improve health worker skills in managing obstetric emergencies have been introduced in various countries with the aim of reducing maternal mortality through these interventions. In South Africa, based on an ongoing confidential enquiry system started in 1997, detailed information about maternal deaths is published in the form of regular 'Saving Mothers' reports. This article tracks the recommendations made in successive Saving Mothers reports with regard to emergency obstetric training, and it assesses the impact of these recommendations on reducing maternal mortality. Since 2009, South Africa has had its own training package, Essential Steps in the Management of Obstetric Emergencies (ESMOE), which the last three Saving Mothers reports have specifically recommended for all doctors and midwives working in maternity units. A special emphasis has been placed on the need for the simulation training component of ESMOE, also called obstetric 'fire drills', to be integrated into the clinical routines of all maternity units. The latest Saving Mothers report (2011-2013) suggests there has been little progress so far in improving emergency obstetric skills, indicating a need for further scale-up of ESMOE training in the country. The example of the KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa is used to illustrate the process of scale-up and factors likely to facilitate that scale-up, including the introduction of ESMOE into the undergraduate medical training curriculum. Additional factors in the health system that are required to convert improved skills levels into improved quality of care and a reduction in maternal mortality are discussed. These include intelligent government health policies, formulated with input from clinical experts; strong clinical leadership to ensure that doctors and nurses apply the skills they have learnt appropriately, and work professionally and ethically; and a culture of clinical governance.

  15. Prediction of a Francis turbine prototype full load instability from investigations on the reduced scale model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alligné, S.; Maruzewski, P.; Dinh, T.; Wang, B.; Fedorov, A.; Iosfin, J.; Avellan, F.

    2010-08-01

    The growing development of renewable energies combined with the process of privatization, lead to a change of economical energy market strategies. Instantaneous pricings of electricity as a function of demand or predictions, induces profitable peak productions which are mainly covered by hydroelectric power plants. Therefore, operators harness more hydroelectric facilities at full load operating conditions. However, the Francis Turbine features an axi-symmetric rope leaving the runner which may act under certain conditions as an internal energy source leading to instability. Undesired power and pressure fluctuations are induced which may limit the maximum available power output. BC Hydro experiences such constraints in a hydroelectric power plant consisting of four 435 MW Francis Turbine generating units, which is located in Canada's province of British Columbia. Under specific full load operating conditions, one unit experiences power and pressure fluctuations at 0.46 Hz. The aim of the paper is to present a methodology allowing prediction of this prototype's instability frequency from investigations on the reduced scale model. A new hydro acoustic vortex rope model has been developed in SIMSEN software, taking into account the energy dissipation due to the thermodynamic exchange between the gas and the surrounding liquid. A combination of measurements, CFD simulations and computation of eigenmodes of the reduced scale model installed on test rig, allows the accurate calibration of the vortex rope model parameters at the model scale. Then, transposition of parameters to the prototype according to similitude laws is applied and stability analysis of the power plant is performed. The eigenfrequency of 0.39 Hz related to the first eigenmode of the power plant is determined to be unstable. Predicted frequency of the full load power and pressure fluctuations at the unit unstable operating point is found to be in general agreement with the prototype measurements.

  16. Trauma adapted family connections: reducing developmental and complex trauma symptomatology to prevent child abuse and neglect.

    PubMed

    Collins, Kathryn S; Strieder, Frederick H; DePanfilis, Diane; Tabor, Maureen; Freeman, Pamela A Clarkson; Linde, Linnea; Greenberg, Patty

    2011-01-01

    Families living in urban poverty, enduring chronic and complex traumatic stress, and having difficulty meeting their children's basic needs have significant child maltreatment risk factors. There is a paucity of family focused, trauma-informed evidence-based interventions aimed to alleviate trauma symptomatology, strengthen family functioning, and prevent child abuse and neglect. Trauma Adapted Family Connections (TA-FC) is a manualized trauma-focused practice rooted in the principles of Family Connections (FC), an evidence supported preventive intervention developed to address the glaring gap in services for this specific, growing, and underserved population. This paper describes the science based development of TA-FC, its phases and essential components, which are based on theories of attachment, neglect, trauma, and family interaction within a comprehensive community-based family focused intervention framework.

  17. Mitochondrial uncoupling reduces exercise capacity despite several skeletal muscle metabolic adaptations.

    PubMed

    Schlagowski, A I; Singh, F; Charles, A L; Gali Ramamoorthy, T; Favret, F; Piquard, F; Geny, B; Zoll, J

    2014-02-15

    The effects of mitochondrial uncoupling on skeletal muscle mitochondrial adaptation and maximal exercise capacity are unknown. In this study, rats were divided into a control group (CTL, n = 8) and a group treated with 2,4-dinitrophenol, a mitochondrial uncoupler, for 28 days (DNP, 30 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) in drinking water, n = 8). The DNP group had a significantly lower body mass (P < 0.05) and a higher resting oxygen uptake (Vo2, P < 0.005). The incremental treadmill test showed that maximal running speed and running economy (P < 0.01) were impaired but that maximal Vo2 (Vo2max) was higher in the DNP-treated rats (P < 0.05). In skinned gastrocnemius fibers, basal respiration (V0) was higher (P < 0.01) in the DNP-treated animals, whereas the acceptor control ratio (ACR, Vmax/V0) was significantly lower (P < 0.05), indicating a reduction in OXPHOS efficiency. In skeletal muscle, DNP activated the mitochondrial biogenesis pathway, as indicated by changes in the mRNA expression of PGC1-α and -β, NRF-1 and -2, and TFAM, and increased the mRNA expression of cytochrome oxidase 1 (P < 0.01). The expression of two mitochondrial proteins (prohibitin and Ndufs 3) was higher after DNP treatment. Mitochondrial fission 1 protein (Fis-1) was increased in the DNP group (P < 0.01), but mitofusin-1 and -2 were unchanged. Histochemical staining for NADH dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase activity in the gastrocnemius muscle revealed an increase in the proportion of oxidative fibers after DNP treatment. Our study shows that mitochondrial uncoupling induces several skeletal muscle adaptations, highlighting the role of mitochondrial coupling as a critical factor for maximal exercise capacities. These results emphasize the importance of investigating the qualitative aspects of mitochondrial function in addition to the amount of mitochondria.

  18. Temperature and pressure adaptation of a sulfate reducer from the deep subsurface

    PubMed Central

    Fichtel, Katja; Logemann, Jörn; Fichtel, Jörg; Rullkötter, Jürgen; Cypionka, Heribert; Engelen, Bert

    2015-01-01

    Microbial life in deep marine subsurface faces increasing temperatures and hydrostatic pressure with depth. In this study, we have examined growth characteristics and temperature-related adaptation of the Desulfovibrio indonesiensis strain P23 to the in situ pressure of 30 MPa. The strain originates from the deep subsurface of the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge (IODP Site U1301). The organism was isolated at 20°C and atmospheric pressure from ~61°C-warm sediments approximately 5 m above the sediment–basement interface. In comparison to standard laboratory conditions (20°C and 0.1 MPa), faster growth was recorded when incubated at in situ pressure and high temperature (45°C), while cell filamentation was induced by further compression. The maximum growth temperature shifted from 48°C at atmospheric pressure to 50°C under high-pressure conditions. Complementary cellular lipid analyses revealed a two-step response of membrane viscosity to increasing temperature with an exchange of unsaturated by saturated fatty acids and subsequent change from branched to unbranched alkyl moieties. While temperature had a stronger effect on the degree of fatty acid saturation and restructuring of main phospholipids, pressure mainly affected branching and length of side chains. The simultaneous decrease of temperature and pressure to ambient laboratory conditions allowed the cultivation of our moderately thermophilic strain. This may in turn be one key to a successful isolation of microorganisms from the deep subsurface adapted to high temperature and pressure. PMID:26500624

  19. Reduced-complexity algorithms for data assimilation of large-scale systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekar, Jaganath

    Data assimilation is the use of measurement data to improve estimates of the state of dynamical systems using mathematical models. Estimates from models alone are inherently imperfect due to the presence of unknown inputs that affect dynamical systems and model uncertainties. Thus, data assimilation is used in many applications: from satellite tracking to biological systems monitoring. As the complexity of the underlying model increases, so does the complexity of the data assimilation technique. This dissertation considers reduced-complexity algorithms for data assimilation of large-scale systems. For linear discrete-time systems, an estimator that injects data into only a specified subset of the state estimates is considered. Bounds on the performance of the new filter are obtained, and conditions that guarantee the asymptotic stability of the new filter for linear time-invariant systems are derived. We then derive a reduced-order estimator that uses a reduced-order model to propagate the estimator state using a finite-horizon cost, and hence solutions of algebraic Riccati and Lyapunov equations are not required. Finally, a reduced-rank square-root filter that propagates only a few columns of the square root of the state-error covariance is developed. Specifically, the columns are chosen from the Cholesky factor of the state-error covariance. Next, data assimilation algorithms for nonlinear systems is considered. We first compare the performance of two suboptimal estimation algorithms, the extended Kalman filter and unscented Kalman filter. To reduce the computational requirements, variations of the unscented Kalman filter with reduced ensemble are suggested. Specifically, a reduced-rank unscented Kalman filter is introduced whose ensemble members are chosen according to the Cholesky decomposition of the square root of the pseudo-error covariance. Finally, a reduced-order model is used to propagate the pseudo-error covariance, while the full-order model is used to

  20. Warming reduces metabolic rate in marine snails: adaptation to fluctuating high temperatures challenges the metabolic theory of ecology.

    PubMed

    Marshall, David J; McQuaid, Christopher D

    2011-01-22

    The universal temperature-dependence model (UTD) of the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) proposes that temperature controls mass-scaled, whole-animal resting metabolic rate according to the first principles of physics (Boltzmann kinetics). Controversy surrounds the model's implication of a mechanistic basis for metabolism that excludes the effects of adaptive regulation, and it is unclear how this would apply to organisms that live in fringe environments and typically show considerable metabolic adaptation. We explored thermal scaling of metabolism in a rocky-shore eulittoral-fringe snail (Echinolittorina malaccana) that experiences constrained energy gain and fluctuating high temperatures (between 25°C and approximately 50°C) during prolonged emersion (weeks). In contrast to the prediction of the UTD model, metabolic rate was often negatively related to temperature over a benign range (30-40°C), the relationship depending on (i) the temperature range, (ii) the degree of metabolic depression (related to the quiescent period), and (iii) whether snails were isolated within their shells. Apparent activation energies (E) varied between 0.05 and -0.43 eV, deviating excessively from the UTD's predicted range of between 0.6 and 0.7 eV. The lowering of metabolism when heated should improve energy conservation in a high-temperature environment and challenges both the theory's generality and its mechanistic basis.

  1. Warming reduces metabolic rate in marine snails: adaptation to fluctuating high temperatures challenges the metabolic theory of ecology

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, David J.; McQuaid, Christopher D.

    2011-01-01

    The universal temperature-dependence model (UTD) of the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) proposes that temperature controls mass-scaled, whole-animal resting metabolic rate according to the first principles of physics (Boltzmann kinetics). Controversy surrounds the model's implication of a mechanistic basis for metabolism that excludes the effects of adaptive regulation, and it is unclear how this would apply to organisms that live in fringe environments and typically show considerable metabolic adaptation. We explored thermal scaling of metabolism in a rocky-shore eulittoral-fringe snail (Echinolittorina malaccana) that experiences constrained energy gain and fluctuating high temperatures (between 25°C and approximately 50°C) during prolonged emersion (weeks). In contrast to the prediction of the UTD model, metabolic rate was often negatively related to temperature over a benign range (30–40°C), the relationship depending on (i) the temperature range, (ii) the degree of metabolic depression (related to the quiescent period), and (iii) whether snails were isolated within their shells. Apparent activation energies (E) varied between 0.05 and −0.43 eV, deviating excessively from the UTD's predicted range of between 0.6 and 0.7 eV. The lowering of metabolism when heated should improve energy conservation in a high-temperature environment and challenges both the theory's generality and its mechanistic basis. PMID:20685714

  2. Genome-scale comparison and constraint-based metabolic reconstruction of the facultative anaerobic Fe(III)-reducer Rhodoferax ferrireducens

    PubMed Central

    Risso, Carla; Sun, Jun; Zhuang, Kai; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; DeBoy, Robert; Ismail, Wael; Shrivastava, Susmita; Huot, Heather; Kothari, Sagar; Daugherty, Sean; Bui, Olivia; Schilling, Christophe H; Lovley, Derek R; Methé, Barbara A

    2009-01-01

    Background Rhodoferax ferrireducens is a metabolically versatile, Fe(III)-reducing, subsurface microorganism that is likely to play an important role in the carbon and metal cycles in the subsurface. It also has the unique ability to convert sugars to electricity, oxidizing the sugars to carbon dioxide with quantitative electron transfer to graphite electrodes in microbial fuel cells. In order to expand our limited knowledge about R. ferrireducens, the complete genome sequence of this organism was further annotated and then the physiology of R. ferrireducens was investigated with a constraint-based, genome-scale in silico metabolic model and laboratory studies. Results The iterative modeling and experimental approach unveiled exciting, previously unknown physiological features, including an expanded range of substrates that support growth, such as cellobiose and citrate, and provided additional insights into important features such as the stoichiometry of the electron transport chain and the ability to grow via fumarate dismutation. Further analysis explained why R. ferrireducens is unable to grow via photosynthesis or fermentation of sugars like other members of this genus and uncovered novel genes for benzoate metabolism. The genome also revealed that R. ferrireducens is well-adapted for growth in the subsurface because it appears to be capable of dealing with a number of environmental insults, including heavy metals, aromatic compounds, nutrient limitation and oxidative stress. Conclusion This study demonstrates that combining genome-scale modeling with the annotation of a new genome sequence can guide experimental studies and accelerate the understanding of the physiology of under-studied yet environmentally relevant microorganisms. PMID:19772637

  3. Low-dose leptin reverses skeletal muscle, autonomic, and neuroendocrine adaptations to maintenance of reduced weight

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, Michael; Goldsmith, Rochelle; Bloomfield, Daniel; Magnano, Anthony; Weimer, Louis; Heymsfield, Steven; Gallagher, Dympna; Mayer, Laurel; Murphy, Ellen; Leibel, Rudolph L.

    2005-01-01

    Maintenance of a reduced body weight is accompanied by decreased energy expenditure that is due largely to increased skeletal muscle work efficiency. In addition, decreased sympathetic nervous system tone and circulating concentrations of leptin, thyroxine, and triiodothyronine act coordinately to favor weight regain. These “weight-reduced” phenotypes are similar to those of leptin-deficient humans and rodents. We examined metabolic, autonomic, and neuroendocrine phenotypes in 10 inpatient subjects (5 males, 5 females [3 never-obese, 7 obese]) under 3 sets of experimental conditions: (a) maintaining usual weight by ingesting a liquid formula diet; (b) maintaining a 10% reduced weight by ingesting a liquid formula diet; and (c) receiving twice-daily subcutaneous doses of leptin sufficient to restore 8 am circulating leptin concentrations to pre–weight-loss levels and remaining on the same liquid formula diet required to maintain a 10% reduced weight. During leptin administration, energy expenditure, skeletal muscle work efficiency, sympathetic nervous system tone, and circulating concentrations of thyroxine and triiodothyronine returned to pre–weight-loss levels. These responses suggest that the weight-reduced state may be regarded as a condition of relative leptin insufficiency. Prevention of weight regain might be achievable by strategies relevant to reversing this leptin-insufficient state. PMID:16322796

  4. Adaptation and Extension of the Framework of Reducing Abstraction in the Case of Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raychaudhuri, Debasree

    2014-01-01

    Although there is no consensus in regard to a unique meaning for abstraction, there is a recognition of the existence of several theories of abstraction, and that the ability to abstract is imperative to learning and doing meaningful mathematics. The theory of "reducing abstraction" maps the abstract nature of mathematics to the nature…

  5. Psychological Sense of University Membership: An Adaptation Study of the PSSM Scale for Turkish University Students.

    PubMed

    Alkan, Neşe

    2016-01-01

    The Psychological Sense of School Membership Scale (PSSM) is a widely used instrument to assess the sense of belonging to a school among adolescents. Despite its widespread use in middle and high school students, to date no particular adaptation study has been conducted for its use among university students. For this reason, the present study conducted an adaptation of the PSSM scale for these students. Five hundred and nine students at a Turkish university voluntarily participated in the study, and the PSSM Scale's factor structure was examined by exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, identifying three factors representing the students' sense of university membership with acceptable internal consistencies: acceptance by faculty members (.70), belonging (.75), and acceptance by students (.76). The internal consistency of the 18-item scale was calculated as .84. As hypothesized, the convergent and discriminant validity of the scale was also tested. The self-report sense of belonging and degree of satisfaction with the university were positively correlated with the three dimensions of the scale. Also, the scores regarding the students' intention to drop out of university along with loneliness were negatively correlated with all the dimension of the PSSM scale.

  6. Adaptation and reliability of neighborhood environment walkability scale (NEWS) for Iran: A questionnaire for assessing environmental correlates of physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Hakimian, Pantea; Lak, Azadeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: In spite of the increased range of inactivity and obesity among Iranian adults, insufficient research has been done on environmental factors influencing physical activity. As a result adapting a subjective (self-report) measurement tool for assessment of physical environment in Iran is critical. Accordingly, in this study Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale (NEWS) was adapted for Iran and also its reliability was evaluated. Methods: This study was conducted using a systematic adaptation method consisting of 3 steps: translate-back translation procedures, revision by a multidisciplinary panel of local experts and a cognitive study. Then NEWS-Iran was completed among adults aged 18 to 65 years (N=19) with an interval of 15 days. Intra-Class Coefficient (ICC) was used to evaluate the reliability of the adapted questionnaire. Results: NEWS-Iran is an adapted version of NEWS-A (abbreviated) and in the adaptation process five items were added from other versions of NEWS, two subscales were significantly modified for a shorter and more effective questionnaire, and five new items were added about climate factors and site-specific uses. NEWS-Iran showed almost perfect reliability (ICCs: more than 0.8) for all subscales, with items having moderate to almost perfect reliability scores (ICCs: 0.56-0.96). Conclusion: This study introduced NEWS-Iran, which is a reliable version of NEWS for measuring environmental perceptions related to physical activity behavior adapted for Iran. It is the first adapted version of NEWS which demonstrates a systematic adaptation process used by earlier studies. It can be used for other developing countries with similar environmental, social and cultural context. PMID:28210592

  7. Adaptation and reliability of neighborhood environment walkability scale (NEWS) for Iran: A questionnaire for assessing environmental correlates of physical activity.

    PubMed

    Hakimian, Pantea; Lak, Azadeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: In spite of the increased range of inactivity and obesity among Iranian adults, insufficient research has been done on environmental factors influencing physical activity. As a result adapting a subjective (self-report) measurement tool for assessment of physical environment in Iran is critical. Accordingly, in this study Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale (NEWS) was adapted for Iran and also its reliability was evaluated. Methods: This study was conducted using a systematic adaptation method consisting of 3 steps: translate-back translation procedures, revision by a multidisciplinary panel of local experts and a cognitive study. Then NEWS-Iran was completed among adults aged 18 to 65 years (N=19) with an interval of 15 days. Intra-Class Coefficient (ICC) was used to evaluate the reliability of the adapted questionnaire. Results: NEWS-Iran is an adapted version of NEWS-A (abbreviated) and in the adaptation process five items were added from other versions of NEWS, two subscales were significantly modified for a shorter and more effective questionnaire, and five new items were added about climate factors and site-specific uses. NEWS-Iran showed almost perfect reliability (ICCs: more than 0.8) for all subscales, with items having moderate to almost perfect reliability scores (ICCs: 0.56-0.96). Conclusion: This study introduced NEWS-Iran, which is a reliable version of NEWS for measuring environmental perceptions related to physical activity behavior adapted for Iran. It is the first adapted version of NEWS which demonstrates a systematic adaptation process used by earlier studies. It can be used for other developing countries with similar environmental, social and cultural context.

  8. Complexity and Pilot Workload Metrics for the Evaluation of Adaptive Flight Controls on a Full Scale Piloted Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Curt; Schaefer, Jacob; Burken, John J.; Larson, David; Johnson, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Flight research has shown the effectiveness of adaptive flight controls for improving aircraft safety and performance in the presence of uncertainties. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA)'s Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control (IRAC) project designed and conducted a series of flight experiments to study the impact of variations in adaptive controller design complexity on performance and handling qualities. A novel complexity metric was devised to compare the degrees of simplicity achieved in three variations of a model reference adaptive controller (MRAC) for NASA's F-18 (McDonnell Douglas, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois) Full-Scale Advanced Systems Testbed (Gen-2A) aircraft. The complexity measures of these controllers are also compared to that of an earlier MRAC design for NASA's Intelligent Flight Control System (IFCS) project and flown on a highly modified F-15 aircraft (McDonnell Douglas, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois). Pilot comments during the IRAC research flights pointed to the importance of workload on handling qualities ratings for failure and damage scenarios. Modifications to existing pilot aggressiveness and duty cycle metrics are presented and applied to the IRAC controllers. Finally, while adaptive controllers may alleviate the effects of failures or damage on an aircraft's handling qualities, they also have the potential to introduce annoying changes to the flight dynamics or to the operation of aircraft systems. A nuisance rating scale is presented for the categorization of nuisance side-effects of adaptive controllers.

  9. Robust Wave-front Correction in a Small Scale Adaptive Optics System Using a Membrane Deformable Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y.; Park, S.; Baik, S.; Jung, J.; Lee, S.; Yoo, J.

    A small scale laboratory adaptive optics system using a Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor (WFS) and a membrane deformable mirror (DM) has been built for robust image acquisition. In this study, an adaptive limited control technique is adopted to maintain the long-term correction stability of an adaptive optics system. To prevent the waste of dynamic correction range for correcting small residual wave-front distortions which are inefficient to correct, the built system tries to limit wave-front correction when a similar small difference wave-front pattern is repeatedly generated. Also, the effect of mechanical distortion in an adaptive optics system is studied and a pre-recognition method for the distortion is devised to prevent low-performance system operation. A confirmation process for a balanced work assignment among deformable mirror (DM) actuators is adopted for the pre-recognition. The corrected experimental results obtained by using a built small scale adaptive optics system are described in this paper.

  10. Human impacts flatten rainforest-savanna gradient and reduce adaptive diversity in a rainforest bird.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Adam H; Buermann, Wolfgang; Mitchard, Edward T A; Defries, Ruth S; Smith, Thomas B

    2010-09-30

    Ecological gradients have long been recognized as important regions for diversification and speciation. However, little attention has been paid to the evolutionary consequences or conservation implications of human activities that fundamentally change the environmental features of such gradients. Here we show that recent deforestation in West Africa has homogenized the rainforest-savanna gradient, causing a loss of adaptive phenotypic diversity in a common rainforest bird, the little greenbul (Andropadus virens). Previously, this species was shown to exhibit morphological and song divergence along this gradient in Central Africa. Using satellite-based estimates of forest cover, recent morphological data, and historical data from museum specimens collected prior to widespread deforestation, we show that the gradient has become shallower in West Africa and that A. virens populations there have lost morphological variation in traits important to fitness. In contrast, we find no loss of morphological variation in Central Africa where there has been less deforestation and gradients have remained more intact. While rainforest deforestation is a leading cause of species extinction, the potential of deforestation to flatten gradients and inhibit rainforest diversification has not been previously recognized. More deforestation will likely lead to further flattening of the gradient and loss of diversity, and may limit the ability of species to persist under future environmental conditions.

  11. Host adaptations reduce the reproductive success of Varroa destructor in two distinct European honey bee populations.

    PubMed

    Locke, Barbara; Conte, Yves Le; Crauser, Didier; Fries, Ingemar

    2012-06-01

    Honey bee societies (Apis mellifera), the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor, and honey bee viruses that are vectored by the mite, form a complex system of host-parasite interactions. Coevolution by natural selection in this system has been hindered for European honey bee hosts since apicultural practices remove the mite and consequently the selective pressures required for such a process. An increasing mite population means increasing transmission opportunities for viruses that can quickly develop into severe infections, killing a bee colony. Remarkably, a few subpopulations in Europe have survived mite infestation for extended periods of over 10 years without management by beekeepers and offer the possibility to study their natural host-parasite coevolution. Our study shows that two of these "natural" honey bee populations, in Avignon, France and Gotland, Sweden, have in fact evolved resistant traits that reduce the fitness of the mite (measured as the reproductive success), thereby reducing the parasitic load within the colony to evade the development of overt viral infections. Mite reproductive success was reduced by about 30% in both populations. Detailed examinations of mite reproductive parameters suggest these geographically and genetically distinct populations favor different mechanisms of resistance, even though they have experienced similar selection pressures of mite infestation. Compared to unrelated control colonies in the same location, mites in the Avignon population had high levels of infertility while in Gotland there was a higher proportions of mites that delayed initiation of egg-laying. Possible explanations for the observed rapid coevolution are discussed.

  12. Host adaptations reduce the reproductive success of Varroa destructor in two distinct European honey bee populations

    PubMed Central

    Locke, Barbara; Conte, Yves Le; Crauser, Didier; Fries, Ingemar

    2012-01-01

    Honey bee societies (Apis mellifera), the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor, and honey bee viruses that are vectored by the mite, form a complex system of host–parasite interactions. Coevolution by natural selection in this system has been hindered for European honey bee hosts since apicultural practices remove the mite and consequently the selective pressures required for such a process. An increasing mite population means increasing transmission opportunities for viruses that can quickly develop into severe infections, killing a bee colony. Remarkably, a few subpopulations in Europe have survived mite infestation for extended periods of over 10 years without management by beekeepers and offer the possibility to study their natural host–parasite coevolution. Our study shows that two of these “natural” honey bee populations, in Avignon, France and Gotland, Sweden, have in fact evolved resistant traits that reduce the fitness of the mite (measured as the reproductive success), thereby reducing the parasitic load within the colony to evade the development of overt viral infections. Mite reproductive success was reduced by about 30% in both populations. Detailed examinations of mite reproductive parameters suggest these geographically and genetically distinct populations favor different mechanisms of resistance, even though they have experienced similar selection pressures of mite infestation. Compared to unrelated control colonies in the same location, mites in the Avignon population had high levels of infertility while in Gotland there was a higher proportions of mites that delayed initiation of egg-laying. Possible explanations for the observed rapid coevolution are discussed. PMID:22833790

  13. Italian translation, cultural adaptation and validation of the "American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society's (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot scale".

    PubMed

    Leigheb, Massimiliano; Janicka, Paulina; Andorno, Silvano; Marcuzzi, Augusto; Magnani, Corrado; Grassi, Federico

    2016-05-06

    Background and Aim of the workAnkle and hindfoot injuries are common and may lead to functional impairment, disability, exclusion from occupational and daily activities. It's necessary a standardized method for assessing treatment outcomes in people with same condition and disease.American-Orthopaedics-Foot-and-Ankle-Society's-Ankle-Hindfoot-Evaluation-Scale (AOFAS-AHES) is specific to estimate clinical problems of the ankle-hindfoot.Outcome evaluation scales should be translated and culturally adapted into the language of the investigated patient.Our purpose was to translate and culturally adapt into Italian AOFAS-AHES, and to check its reproducibility and validity.MethodsAn Italian translation of the AOFAS-scale was retranslated into English by a native English and compared to the original to define a second correct Italian-version, that was submitted to 50 randomized patients operated at their ankle or hindfoot with a minimum follow-up of 6 months for cultural adaptation, and to 10 healthcare professionals to check comprehension of the medical part.To check intra and inter-observer reproducibility each patient underwent 2 interviews by interviewer-A and 1 by B. ShortForm(SF)-36-questionnaire for quality of life and Visual-Analogue-Scale (VAS) for pain were also compared for validation. The Pearson's-Correlation-Coefficient and the Intra-Class-Correlation coefficient were calculated to check inter and intra-observer reproducibility for validation.ResultsCultural adaptation revealed to be good. We obtained a good correlation of the inter and intra-observer reproducibility. Further validation of the Italian-AOFAS-AHES was obtained comparing AOFAS results to SF-36.ConclusionsItalian translation, cultural adaptation and validation of the AOFAS-AHES has been performed successfully and could be useful to improve assistance quality in care practice.

  14. A new algorithm for high-dimensional uncertainty quantification based on dimension-adaptive sparse grid approximation and reduced basis methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Quarteroni, Alfio

    2015-10-01

    In this work we develop an adaptive and reduced computational algorithm based on dimension-adaptive sparse grid approximation and reduced basis methods for solving high-dimensional uncertainty quantification (UQ) problems. In order to tackle the computational challenge of "curse of dimensionality" commonly faced by these problems, we employ a dimension-adaptive tensor-product algorithm [16] and propose a verified version to enable effective removal of the stagnation phenomenon besides automatically detecting the importance and interaction of different dimensions. To reduce the heavy computational cost of UQ problems modelled by partial differential equations (PDE), we adopt a weighted reduced basis method [7] and develop an adaptive greedy algorithm in combination with the previous verified algorithm for efficient construction of an accurate reduced basis approximation. The efficiency and accuracy of the proposed algorithm are demonstrated by several numerical experiments.

  15. Can principal components yield a dimension reduced description of protein dynamics on long time scales?

    PubMed

    Lange, Oliver F; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2006-11-16

    The suitability of principal component analysis (PCA) to yield slow collective coordinates for use within a dimension reduced description of conformational motions in proteins is evaluated. Two proteins are considered, T4 lysozyme and crambin. We present a quantitative evaluation of the convergence of conformational coordinates obtained with principal component analysis. Detailed analyses of (>200 ns) molecular dynamics trajectories and crystallographic data suggests that simulations of a few nanoseconds should generally provide a stable and statistically reliable definition of the essential and near constraints subspaces. Moreover, a systematic assessment of the density of states of the dynamics of all principal components showed that for an optimal separation of time scales it is crucial to include also side chain atoms in the PCA.

  16. Study of HF behaviour of railway power substation in reduced scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouaddi, H.; Baranowski, S.; Nottet, G.; Demoulin, B.; Koné, L.

    2011-03-01

    The study presented in this paper is a first step of an EMC (Electromagnetic Compatibility) analysis of the behaviour of a railway power substation at high frequency. Before on site intensive experimentation, the approach is performed with a reduced scale model. The mock-up of the substation is powered by a 220 V three-phase voltage supplied by a 15 kV A power transformer, a rectifier and loads. The study consists in designing an equivalent electrical circuit of power transformer in high frequency, available over a large panel of loads. The model of power transformer was deduced from measurements in frequency domain within the range 40 Hz to 30 MHz.

  17. Laser coupling to reduced-scale targets at NIF Early Light

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkel, D E; Schneider, M B; Young, B K; Holder, J P; Langdon, A B; Baldis, H A; Bonanno, G; Bower, D E; Bruns, H C; Campbell, K M; Celeste, J R; Compton, S; Costa, R L; Dewald, E L; Dixit, S N; Eckart, M J; Eder, D C; Edwards, M J; Ellis, A D; Emig, J A; Froula, D H; Glenzer, S H; Hargrove, D; Haynam, C A; Heeter, R F; Henesian, M A; Holtmeier, G; James, D L; Jancaitis, K S; Kalantar, D H; Kamperschroer, J H; Kauffman, R L; Kimbrough, J; Kirkwood, R K; Koniges, A E; Landen, O L; Landon, M; Lee, F D; MacGowan, B J; Mackinnon, A J; Manes, K R; Marshall, C; May, M J; McDonald, J W; Menapace, J; Moses, S I; Munro, D H; Murray, J R; Niemann, C; Pellinen, D; Power, G D; Rekow, V; Ruppe, J A; Schein, J; Shepherd, R; Singh, M S; Springer, P; Still, C H; Suter, L J; Tietbohl, G L; Turner, R E; VanWonterghem, B M; Wallace, R J; Warrick, A; Watts, P; Weber, F; Wegner, P J; Williams, E A; Young, P E

    2005-08-31

    Deposition of maximum laser energy into a small, high-Z enclosure in a short laser pulse creates a hot environment. Such targets were recently included in an experimental campaign using the first four of the 192 beams of the National Ignition Facility [J. A. Paisner, E. M. Campbell, and W. J. Hogan, Fusion Technology 26, 755 (1994)], under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These targets demonstrate good laser coupling, reaching a radiation temperature of 340 eV. In addition, the Raman backscatter spectrum contains features consistent with Brillouin backscatter of Raman forward scatter [A. B. Langdon and D. E. Hinkel, Physical Review Letters 89, 015003 (2002)]. Also, NIF Early Light diagnostics indicate that 20% of the direct backscatter from these reduced-scale targets is in the polarization orthogonal to that of the incident light.

  18. ASDF: A New Adaptable Data Format for Seismology Suitable for Large-Scale Workflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krischer, L.; Smith, J. A.; Spinuso, A.; Tromp, J.

    2014-12-01

    Increases in the amounts of available data as well as computational power opens the possibility to tackle ever larger and more complex problems. This comes with a slew of new problems, two of which are the need for a more efficient use of available resources and a sensible organization and storage of the data. Both need to be satisfied in order to properly scale a problem and both are frequent bottlenecks in large seismic inversions using ambient noise or more traditional techniques.We present recent developments and ideas regarding a new data format, named ASDF (Adaptable Seismic Data Format), for all branches of seismology aiding with the aforementioned problems. The key idea is to store all information necessary to fully understand a set of data in a single file. This enables the construction of self-explaining and exchangeable data sets facilitating collaboration on large-scale problems. We incorporate the existing metadata standards FDSN StationXML and QuakeML together with waveform and auxiliary data into a common container based on the HDF5 standard. A further critical component of the format is the storage of provenance information as an extension of W3C PROV, meaning information about the history of the data, assisting with the general problem of reproducibility.Applications of the proposed new format are numerous. In the context of seismic tomography it enables the full description and storage of synthetic waveforms including information about the used model, the solver, the parameters, and other variables that influenced the final waveforms. Furthermore, intermediate products like adjoint sources, cross correlations, and receiver functions can be described and most importantly exchanged with others.Usability and tool support is crucial for any new format to gain acceptance and we additionally present a fully functional implementation of this format based on Python and ObsPy. It offers a convenient way to discover and analyze data sets as well as making

  19. Brassica rapa plants adapted to microgravity with reduced photosystem I and its photochemical activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiao, Shunxing; Hilaire, Emmanuel; Paulsen, Avelina Q.; Guikema, James A.

    2004-01-01

    The photosynthetic apparatus contains several protein complexes, many of which are regulated by environmental conditions. In this study, the influences of microgravity on PSI and PSII in Brassica rapa plants grown aboard the space shuttle were examined. We found that Brassica plants grown in space had a normal level of growth relative to controls under similar conditions on Earth. Upon return to Earth, cotyledons were harvested and thylakoid membranes were isolated. Analysis of chlorophyll contents showed that the Chl a/b ratio (3.5) in flight cotyledons was much higher than a ratio of 2.42 in the ground controls. The flight samples also had a reduction of PSI complexes and a corresponding 30% decrease of PSI photochemical activity. Immunoblotting showed that the reaction centre polypeptides of PSI were more apparently decreased (e.g. by 24-33% for PsaA and PsaB, and 57% for PsaC) than the light-harvesting complexes. In comparison, the accumulation of PSII complex was less affected in microgravity, thus only a slight reduction in D1, D2 and LHCII was observed in protein blots. However, there was a 32% decrease of OEC1 in the flight samples, indicating a defective OEC subcomplex. In addition, an average 54% increase of the 54 kDa CF1-beta isoform was found in the flight samples, suggesting that space-grown plants suffered from certain stresses, consistent with implications of the increased Chl a/b ratio. Taken together, the results demonstrated that Brassica plants can adapt to spaceflight microgravity, but with significant alterations in chloroplast structures and photosynthetic complexes, and especially reduction of PSI and its activity.

  20. Radon induced hyperplasia: effective adaptation reducing the local doses in the bronchial epithelium.

    PubMed

    Madas, Balázs G

    2016-09-01

    There is experimental and histological evidence that chronic irritation and cell death may cause hyperplasia in the exposed tissue. As the heterogeneous deposition of inhaled radon progeny results in high local doses at the peak of the bronchial bifurcations, it was proposed earlier that hyperplasia occurs in these deposition hot spots upon chronic radon exposure. The objective of the present study is to quantify how the induction of basal cell hyperplasia modulates the microdosimetric consequences of a given radon exposure. For this purpose, computational epithelium models were constructed with spherical cell nuclei of six different cell types based on histological data. Basal cell hyperplasia was modelled by epithelium models with additional basal cells and increased epithelium thickness. Microdosimetry for alpha-particles was performed by an own-developed Monte-Carlo code. Results show that the average tissue dose, and the average hit number and dose of basal cells decrease by the increase of the measure of hyperplasia. Hit and dose distribution reveal that the induction of hyperplasia may result in a basal cell pool which is shielded from alpha-radiation. It highlights that the exposure history affects the microdosimetric consequences of a present exposure, while the biological and health effects may also depend on previous exposures. The induction of hyperplasia can be considered as a radioadaptive response at the tissue level. Such an adaptation of the tissue challenges the validity of the application of the dose and dose rate effectiveness factor from a mechanistic point of view. As the location of radiosensitive target cells may change due to previous exposures, dosimetry models considering the tissue geometry characteristic of normal conditions may be inappropriate for dose estimation in case of protracted exposures. As internal exposures are frequently chronic, such changes in tissue geometry may be highly relevant for other incorporated radionuclides.

  1. Wafer scale integration of reduced graphene oxide by novel laser processing at room temperature in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaumik, Anagh; Narayan, Jagdish

    2016-09-01

    Physical properties of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) strongly depend on the ratio of sp2 to sp3 hybridized carbon atoms, the presence of different functional groups, and the characteristics of the substrates. This research for the very first time illustrates successful wafer scale integration of 2D rGO with Cu/TiN/Si, employing pulsed laser deposition followed by laser annealing of carbon-doped copper layers using nanosecond excimer lasers. The XRD, SEM, and Raman spectroscopy measurements indicate the presence of large area rGO onto Si having Raman active vibrational modes: D, G, and 2D. A high resolution SEM depicts the morphology and formation of rGO from zone-refined carbon formed after nanosecond laser annealing. Temperature-dependent resistance data of rGO thin films follow the Efros-Shklovskii variable range hopping (VRH) model in the low-temperature region and Arrhenius conduction in the high-temperature regime. The photoluminescence spectra also reveal a less intense and broader blue fluorescence spectra, indicating the presence of miniature sized sp2 domains in the near vicinity of π* electronic states which favor the VRH transport phenomena. This wafer scale integration of rGO with Si employing a laser annealing technique will be useful for multifunctional integrated electronic devices and will open a new frontier for further extensive research in these functionalized 2D materials.

  2. Adaptive control of satellite EIRP to reduce outage caused by fading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakken, P. M.; Maseng, T.

    1983-05-01

    The effectiveness of dynamic satellite EIRP allocation in reducing the effects of up and downlink fading is assessed. Analytical methods using numerical convolution performed by fast Fourier transforms are used to evaluate the performance of allocation techniques in terms of the probability distribution of the satellite link quality obtained from the link fading statistics at the terminal sites. The results are presented in the form of outage statistics for particular systems and allocation methods. They represent the entire range of performance which can be envisaged, ranging from CTP to ASEIRP.

  3. The reduced order model problem in distributed parameter systems adaptive identification and control. [large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. R., Jr.; Lawrence, D.

    1981-01-01

    The basic assumption that a large space structure can be decoupled preceding the application of reduced order active control was considered and alternative solutions to the control of such structures (in contrast to the strict modal control) were investigated. The transfer function matrix from the actuators to the sensors was deemed to be a reasonable candidate. More refined models from multivariable systems theory were studied and recent results in the multivariable control field were compared with respect to theoretical deficiencies and likely problems in application to large space structures.

  4. An Investigation of the Validity and Reliability of the Adapted Mathematics Anxiety Rating Scale-Short Version (MARS-SV) among Turkish Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baloglu, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    This study adapted the Mathematics Anxiety Rating Scale-Short Version (MARS-SV) into Turkish and investigated the validity and reliability of the adapted instrument. Twenty-five bilingual experts agreed on the language validity, and 49 Turkish language experts agreed on the conformity and understandability of the scale's items. Thirty-two subject…

  5. Cultural adaptation into Spanish of the generalized anxiety disorder-7 (GAD-7) scale as a screening tool

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a prevalent mental health condition which is underestimated worldwide. This study carried out the cultural adaptation into Spanish of the 7-item self-administered GAD-7 scale, which is used to identify probable patients with GAD. Methods The adaptation was performed by an expert panel using a conceptual equivalence process, including forward and backward translations in duplicate. Content validity was assessed by interrater agreement. Criteria validity was explored using ROC curve analysis, and sensitivity, specificity, predictive positive value and negative value for different cut-off values were determined. Concurrent validity was also explored using the HAM-A, HADS, and WHO-DAS-II scales. Results The study sample consisted of 212 subjects (106 patients with GAD) with a mean age of 50.38 years (SD = 16.76). Average completion time was 2'30''. No items of the scale were left blank. Floor and ceiling effects were negligible. No patients with GAD had to be assisted to fill in the questionnaire. The scale was shown to be one-dimensional through factor analysis (explained variance = 72%). A cut-off point of 10 showed adequate values of sensitivity (86.8%) and specificity (93.4%), with AUC being statistically significant [AUC = 0.957-0.985); p < 0.001]. The scale significantly correlated with HAM-A (0.852, p < 0.001), HADS (anxiety domain, 0.903, p < 0.001), and WHO-DAS II (0.696, p > 0.001). Limitations Elderly people, particularly those very old, may need some help to complete the scale. Conclusion After the cultural adaptation process, a Spanish version of the GAD-7 scale was obtained. The validity of its content and the relevance and adequacy of items in the Spanish cultural context were confirmed. PMID:20089179

  6. Systematic cultural adaptation of cognitive-behavioral therapy to reduce alcohol use among HIV-infected outpatients in western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Papas, Rebecca K; Sidle, John E; Martino, Steve; Baliddawa, Joyce B; Songole, Rogers; Omolo, Otieno E; Gakinya, Benson N; Mwaniki, Michael M; Adina, Japheth O; Nafula, Tobista; Owino-Ong'or, Willis D; Bryant, Kendall J; Carroll, Kathleen M; Goulet, Joseph L; Justice, Amy C; Maisto, Stephen A

    2010-06-01

    Two-thirds of those with HIV worldwide live in sub-Saharan Africa. Alcohol use is associated with the HIV epidemic through risky sex and suboptimal ARV adherence. In western Kenya, hazardous drinking was reported by HIV (53%) and general medicine (68%) outpatients. Cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT) has demonstrated strong efficacy to reduce alcohol use. This article reports on a systematic cultural adaptation and pilot feasibility study of group paraprofessional-delivered CBT to reduce alcohol use among HIV-infected outpatients in Eldoret, Kenya. Following adaptation and counselor training, five pilot groups were run (n = 27). Overall attendance was 77%. Percent days abstinent from alcohol (PDA) before session 1 was 52-100% (women) and 21-36% (men), and by session 6 was 96-100% (women) and 89-100% (men). PDA effect sizes (Cohen's d) between first and last CBT session were 2.32 (women) and 2.64 (men). Participants reported treatment satisfaction. Results indicate feasibility, acceptability and preliminary efficacy for CBT in Kenya.

  7. Adaptive optics for reduced threshold energy in femtosecond laser induced optical breakdown in water based eye model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Anja; Krueger, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo

    2013-03-01

    In ophthalmic microsurgery tissue dissection is achieved using femtosecond laser pulses to create an optical breakdown. For vitreo-retinal applications the irradiance distribution in the focal volume is distorted by the anterior components of the eye causing a raised threshold energy for breakdown. In this work, an adaptive optics system enables spatial beam shaping for compensation of aberrations and investigation of wave front influence on optical breakdown. An eye model was designed to allow for aberration correction as well as detection of optical breakdown. The eye model consists of an achromatic lens for modeling the eye's refractive power, a water chamber for modeling the tissue properties, and a PTFE sample for modeling the retina's scattering properties. Aberration correction was performed using a deformable mirror in combination with a Hartmann-Shack-sensor. The influence of an adaptive optics aberration correction on the pulse energy required for photodisruption was investigated using transmission measurements for determination of the breakdown threshold and video imaging of the focal region for study of the gas bubble dynamics. The threshold energy is considerably reduced when correcting for the aberrations of the system and the model eye. Also, a raise in irradiance at constant pulse energy was shown for the aberration corrected case. The reduced pulse energy lowers the potential risk of collateral damage which is especially important for retinal safety. This offers new possibilities for vitreo-retinal surgery using femtosecond laser pulses.

  8. Self adaptive multi-scale morphology AVG-Hat filter and its application to fault feature extraction for wheel bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Feiyue; Yang, Shaopu; Tang, Guiji; Hao, Rujiang; Zhang, Mingliang

    2017-04-01

    Wheel bearings are essential mechanical components of trains, and fault detection of the wheel bearing is of great significant to avoid economic loss and casualty effectively. However, considering the operating conditions, detection and extraction of the fault features hidden in the heavy noise of the vibration signal have become a challenging task. Therefore, a novel method called adaptive multi-scale AVG-Hat morphology filter (MF) is proposed to solve it. The morphology AVG-Hat operator not only can suppress the interference of the strong background noise greatly, but also enhance the ability of extracting fault features. The improved envelope spectrum sparsity (IESS), as a new evaluation index, is proposed to select the optimal filtering signal processed by the multi-scale AVG-Hat MF. It can present a comprehensive evaluation about the intensity of fault impulse to the background noise. The weighted coefficients of the different scale structural elements (SEs) in the multi-scale MF are adaptively determined by the particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm. The effectiveness of the method is validated by analyzing the real wheel bearing fault vibration signal (e.g. outer race fault, inner race fault and rolling element fault). The results show that the proposed method could improve the performance in the extraction of fault features effectively compared with the multi-scale combined morphological filter (CMF) and multi-scale morphology gradient filter (MGF) methods.

  9. Adaptive Control of Fast-Scale Bifurcation in Peak Current Controlled Buck-Boost Inverter via One-Cycle Compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Dong, Shuai; Guan, Weimin; Yi, Chuanzhi; He, Bo

    In this paper, one-cycle compensation (OCC) method is proposed to realize adaptive control of fast-scale bifurcation in the peak current controlled buck-boost inverter because the proposed control method can adjust the slope of the integrator’s output voltage automatically through extracting a sinusoidal signal from the absolute value of the reference voltage. In order to reveal their underlying mechanisms of fast-scale bifurcations, a modified averaged model which can capture the sample-and-hold effect is derived in detail to describe the fast-scale dynamics of the buck-boost inverter. Based on the proposed model, a theoretical analysis is performed to identify both the fast-scale period-doubling bifurcation and the fast-scale Hopf one by judging in what way the poles loci move. It has been shown that the OCC method can be used not only to discover the unknown dynamical behaviors (i.e. fast-scale Hopf bifurcation), but also to enlarge the stable region in peak current controlled buck-boost inverter. In addition, the critical bifurcation angles and the parameter behavior boundary are given to verify the effectiveness of the adaptive bifurcation control method. Finally, PSpice circuit experiments are performed to verify the above theoretical and numerical results.

  10. Increasing Adaptive Responses and Reducing Finger Mouthing in an Adolescent with Multiple Disabilities: Evaluation of an Upgraded Microswitch-Cluster Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Oliva, Doretta; Cingolani, Eleonora; D'Oro, Lega F.

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated an upgraded version of a microswitch-cluster program used for promoting adaptive foot and head responses and reducing finger mouthing with a boy with multiple disabilities. The boy had been exposed to an early version of the program, which ensured that positive stimulation followed only adaptive responses occurring free from finger…

  11. Assessing the weighted multi-objective adaptive surrogate model optimization to derive large-scale reservoir operating rules with sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingwen; Wang, Xu; Liu, Pan; Lei, Xiaohui; Li, Zejun; Gong, Wei; Duan, Qingyun; Wang, Hao

    2017-01-01

    The optimization of large-scale reservoir system is time-consuming due to its intrinsic characteristics of non-commensurable objectives and high dimensionality. One way to solve the problem is to employ an efficient multi-objective optimization algorithm in the derivation of large-scale reservoir operating rules. In this study, the Weighted Multi-Objective Adaptive Surrogate Model Optimization (WMO-ASMO) algorithm is used. It consists of three steps: (1) simplifying the large-scale reservoir operating rules by the aggregation-decomposition model, (2) identifying the most sensitive parameters through multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) for dimensional reduction, and (3) reducing computational cost and speeding the searching process by WMO-ASMO, embedded with weighted non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm II (WNSGAII). The intercomparison of non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGAII), WNSGAII and WMO-ASMO are conducted in the large-scale reservoir system of Xijiang river basin in China. Results indicate that: (1) WNSGAII surpasses NSGAII in the median of annual power generation, increased by 1.03% (from 523.29 to 528.67 billion kW h), and the median of ecological index, optimized by 3.87% (from 1.879 to 1.809) with 500 simulations, because of the weighted crowding distance and (2) WMO-ASMO outperforms NSGAII and WNSGAII in terms of better solutions (annual power generation (530.032 billion kW h) and ecological index (1.675)) with 1000 simulations and computational time reduced by 25% (from 10 h to 8 h) with 500 simulations. Therefore, the proposed method is proved to be more efficient and could provide better Pareto frontier.

  12. Oral tungstate (Na2WO4) exposure reduces adaptive immune responses in mice after challenge.

    PubMed

    Osterburg, Andrew R; Robinson, Chad T; Mokashi, Vishwesh; Stockelman, Michael; Schwemberger, Sandy J; Chapman, Gail; Babcock, George F

    2014-01-01

    Tungstate (WO²⁻₄) has been identified as a ground water contaminant at military firing ranges and can be absorbed by ingestion. In this study, C57BL6 mice were exposed to sodium tungstate (Na2WO4·2H2O) (0, 2, 62.5, 125, and 200 mg/kg/day) in their drinking water for an initial 28-day screen and in a one-generation (one-gen) model. Twenty-four hours prior to euthanasia, mice were intraperitoneally injected with Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) (20 μg/mouse) or saline as controls. After euthanasia, splenocytes and blood were collected and stained with lymphocyte and/or myeloid immunophenotyping panels and analyzed by flow cytometry. In the 28-day and one-gen exposure, statistically significant reductions were observed in the quantities of activated cytotoxic T-cells (TCTL; CD3(+)CD8(+)CD71(+)) and helper T-cells (TH; CD3(+)CD4(+)CD71(+)) from spleens of SEB-treated mice. In the 28-day exposures, CD71(+) TCTL cells were 12.87 ± 2.05% (SE) in the 0 tungstate (control) group compared to 4.44 ± 1.42% in the 200 mg/kg/day (p < 0.001) group. TH cells were 4.85 ± 1.23% in controls and 2.76 ± 0.51% in the 200 mg/kg/day (p < 0.003) group. In the one-gen exposures, TCTL cells were 7.98 ± 0.49% and 6.33 ± 0.49% for P and F1 mice after 0 mg/kg/day tungstate vs 1.58 ± 0.23% and 2.52 ± 0.25% after 200 mg/kg/day of tungstate (p < 0.001). Similarly, TH cells were reduced to 6.21 ± 0.39% and 7.20 ± 0.76%, respectively, for the 0 mg/kg/day P and F1 mice, and 2.28 ± 0.41% and 2.85 ± 0.53%, respectively, for the 200 mg/kg/day tungstate P and F1 groups (p < 0.001). In delayed-type hypersensitivity Type IV experiments, tungstate exposure prior to primary and secondary antigen challenge significantly reduced footpad swelling at 20 and 200 mg/kg/day. These data indicate that exposure to tungstate can result in immune suppression that may, in turn, reduce host defense against

  13. Water supply sustainability and adaptation strategies under anthropogenic and climatic changes of a meso-scale Mediterranean catchment.

    PubMed

    Collet, Lila; Ruelland, Denis; Estupina, Valérie Borrell; Dezetter, Alain; Servat, Eric

    2015-12-01

    Assessing water supply sustainability is crucial to meet stakeholders' needs, notably in the Mediterranean. This region has been identified as a climate change hot spot, and as a region where water demand is continuously increasing due to population growth and the expansion of irrigated areas. The Hérault River catchment (2500 km2, France) is a typical example and a negative trend in discharge has been observed since the 1960s. In this context, local stakeholders need to evaluate possible future changes in water allocation capacity in the catchment, using climate change, dam management and water use scenarios. A modelling framework that was already calibrated and validated on this catchment over the last 50 years was used to assess whether water resources could meet water demands at the 2030 horizon for the domestic, agricultural and environmental sectors. Water supply sustainability was evaluated at the sub-basin scale according to priority allocations using a water supply capacity index, frequency of unsatisfactory years as well as the reliability, resilience and sustainability metrics. Water use projections were based on the evolution of population, per-unit water demand, irrigated areas, water supply network efficiency, as well as on the evaluation of a biological flow. Climate projections were based on an increase in temperature up to 2°C and a decrease in daily precipitation by 20%. Adaptation strategies considered reducing per-unit water demand for the domestic sector and the importation of water volume for the agricultural sector. The dissociated effects of water use and climatic constraints on water supply sustainability were evaluated. Results showed that the downstream portions would be the more impacted as they are the most exploited ones. In the domestic sector, sustainability indicators would be more degraded by climate change scenarios than water use constraints. In the agricultural sector the negative impact of water use scenarios would be

  14. [Stigmatization in HIV/AIDS: first German adaptation of the HIV-stigma scale (HSS-D)].

    PubMed

    Dinkel, Andreas; Nather, Christina; Jaeger, Hans; Jaegel-Guedes, Eva; Lahmann, Claas; Steinke, Christina; Wolf, Eva; Ronel, Joram

    2014-01-01

    Despite improvements in medical treatment and numerous public health campaigns stigmatization remains a potent stressor for people living with HIV/ AIDS. This study provides an initial German adaptation of the HIV Stigma Scale (HSS-D). Participants were 167 HIV-positive homosexual men aged 22-74 years. Exploratory factor analysis replicated the original four-factor structure (subscales: enacted stigma, disclosure concerns, negative self-image, concern with public attitudes). Further psychometric analysis led to a revised version comprising 21 items (HSS-D21). The scale showed high reliability (α=0.90). Significant associations with anxiety, depres-sion, life satisfaction and perceived social support confirmed for construct validity. The majority of the respondents expressed high acceptance of the stigma measure. In order to eslish a thorough German adaptation further research with diverse samples is needed.

  15. The masticatory system under varying functional load. Part 1: Structural adaptation of rabbit jaw muscles to reduced masticatory load.

    PubMed

    Vreeke, Marloes; Langenbach, Geerling E J; Korfage, Joannes A M; Zentner, Andrej; Grünheid, Thorsten

    2011-08-01

    Skeletal muscle fibres can change their myosin heavy-chain (MyHC) isoform and cross-sectional area, which determine their contraction velocity and maximum force generation, respectively, to adapt to varying functional loads. In general, reduced muscle activity induces transition towards faster fibres and a decrease in fibre cross-sectional area. In order to investigate the effect of a reduction in masticatory load on three functionally different jaw muscles, the MyHC composition and the corresponding cross-sectional area of fibres were determined in the superficial masseter, superficial temporalis, and digastric muscles of male juvenile New Zealand White rabbits that had been raised on a soft diet (n=8) from 8 to 20 weeks of age and in those of normal diet controls (n=8). Differences between groups were tested for statistical significance using a Mann-Whitney rank sum test. The proportion and cross-sectional area of fibres co-expressing MyHC-I and MyHC-cardiac alpha were significantly smaller in the masseter muscles of the animals that had been fed soft food than in those of the controls. In contrast, the proportions and cross-sectional areas of the various fibre types in the temporalis and digastric muscles did not differ significantly between the groups. The results suggest that reducing the masticatory load during development affects the contraction velocity and maximum force generation of the jaw-closing muscles that are primarily responsible for force generation during chewing. These muscles adapt structurally to the reduced functional load with changes in the MyHC composition and cross-sectional area mainly within their slow fibre compartment.

  16. Cross-cultural adaptation of the Chilean version of the Voice Symptom Scale - VoiSS.

    PubMed

    Ruston, Francisco Contreras; Moreti, Felipe; Vivero, Martín; Malebran, Celina; Behlau, Mara

    This research aims to accomplish the cross-cultural equivalence of the Chilean version of the VoiSS protocol through its cultural and linguistic adaptation. After the translation of the VoiSS protocol to Chilean Spanish by two bilingual speech therapists and its back translation to English, we compared the items of the original tool with the previous translated version. The existing discrepancies were modified by a consensus committee of five speech therapists and the translated version was entitled Escala de Sintomas Vocales - ESV, with 30 questions and five answers: "Never", "Occasionally", "Sometimes", "Most of the time", "Always". For cross-cultural equivalence, the protocol was applied to 15 individuals with vocal problems. In each question the option of "Not applicable" was added to the answer choices for identification of the questions not comprehended or not appropriate for the target population. Two individuals had difficulty answering two questions, which made it necessary to adapt the translation of only one of them. The modified ESV was applied to three individuals with vocal problems, and there were incomprehensible inappropriate questions for the Chilean culture. The ESV reflects the original English version, both in the number of questions and the limitations of the emotional and physical domains. There is now a cross-cultural equivalence of VoiSS in Chilean Spanish, titled ESV. The validation of the ESV for Chilean Spanish is ongoing. RESUMEN Este estudio tuvo como objetivo realizar la equivalencia cultural de la versión Chilena del protocolo Voice Symptom Scale - VoiSS por medio de su adaptación cultural y lingüística. Después de la traducción del VoiSS para el Español Chileno, por dos fonoaudiólogos bilingües, y de la retro traducción para el inglés, se realizó una comparación de los ítems del instrumento original con la versión traducida, surgiendo discrepancias; tales divergencias fueron resueltas por un comité compuesto por

  17. Heatwave Early Warning Systems and Adaptation Advice to Reduce Human Health Consequences of Heatwaves

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Dianne; Ebi, Kristie L.; Forsberg, Bertil

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: With climate change, there has been an increase in the frequency, intensity and duration of heatwave events. In response to the devastating mortality and morbidity of recent heatwave events, many countries have introduced heatwave early warning systems (HEWS). HEWS are designed to reduce the avoidable human health consequences of heatwaves through timely notification of prevention measures to vulnerable populations. Objective: To identify the key characteristics of HEWS in European countries to help inform modification of current, and development of, new systems and plans. Methods: We searched the internet to identify HEWS policy or government documents for 33 European countries and requested information from relevant organizations. We translated the HEWS documents and extracted details on the trigger indicators, thresholds for action, notification strategies, message intermediaries, communication and dissemination strategies, prevention strategies recommended and specified target audiences. Findings and Conclusions: Twelve European countries have HEWS. Although there are many similarities among the HEWS, there also are differences in key characteristics that could inform improvements in heatwave early warning plans. PMID:22408593

  18. Micro-scale piezoelectric vibration energy harvesting: From fixed-frequency to adaptable-frequency devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Lindsay Margaret

    hundred milliwatts and are falling steadily as improvements are made, it is feasible to use energy harvesting to power WSNs. This research begins by presenting the results of a thorough survey of ambient vibrations in the machine room of a large campus building, which found that ambient vibrations are low frequency, low amplitude, time varying, and multi-frequency. The modeling and design of fixed-frequency micro scale energy harvesters are then presented. The model is able to take into account rotational inertia of the harvester's proof mass and it accepts arbitrary measured acceleration input, calculating the energy harvester's voltage as an output. The fabrication of the micro electromechanical system (MEMS) energy harvesters is discussed and results of the devices harvesting energy from ambient vibrations are presented. The harvesters had resonance frequencies ranging from 31 - 232 Hz, which was the lowest reported in literature for a MEMS device, and produced 24 pW/g2 - 10 nW/g2 of harvested power from ambient vibrations. A novel method for frequency modification of the released harvester devices using a dispenser printed mass is then presented, demonstrating a frequency shift of 20 Hz. Optimization of the MEMS energy harvester connected to a resistive load is then presented, finding that the harvested power output can be increased to several microwatts with the optimized design as long as the driving frequency matches the harvester's resonance frequency. A framework is then presented to allow a similar optimization to be conducted with the harvester connected to a synchronously switched pre-bias circuit. With the realization that the optimized energy harvester only produces usable amounts of power if the resonance frequency and driving frequency match, which is an unrealistic situation in the case of ambient vibrations which change over time and are not always known a priori, an adaptable-frequency energy harvester was designed. The adaptable

  19. [Development, adaptation and validation of silhouette scales for self-assessment of nutritional status: a systematic review].

    PubMed

    Moraes, Cristiane; Anjos, Luiz Antonio dos; Marinho, Sandra Mara Silva de Azevedo

    2012-01-01

    Self-assessment of body image is a multidimensional construction by which individuals describe the internal representations of their body structure and physical appearance in relation to themselves and others. Silhouette scales have been used to for self-assessment of nutritional status, due to their low cost and ease of administration, especially in field surveys. This study aimed to identify the various silhouette scales that have been developed or adapted since 1983 and to conduct a systematic review of the validation of such scales against objective measures of nutritional status. A total of 33 publications were found and showed moderate to good correlation between nutritional status and both adapted (0.66 to 0.87) and developed silhouette scales (0.59 to 0.94) in adults, but much lower correlation in children and adolescents. Most of the studies used inappropriate statistical analysis. The data indicated that silhouette scales should be used with caution to predict nutritional status with or without anthropometric measures.

  20. [Evaluation of pedagogic effects: adaptation of goal attainment scales to the needs of a juvenile penal system].

    PubMed

    Singer, Hanneke; Prestel, Anja; Schmid, Marc; Keller, Ferdinand; Fegert, Jörg M; Kölch, Michael

    2009-01-01

    In youth welfare quality management increasingly gains in importance over the last decades. Tools used for quality assurance have to be broadly acceptable in everyday practical work. To meet that precondition it is essential that everyday practice and the different problem situations of children and adolescents are accordingly represented by these assessment scales. On the other hand they also require good methodical quality and generalization, thus, allowing to provide information about the effectiveness in a multiplicity of different residential institutions. Therefore, goal attainment scales have to be adapted to specific pedagogic settings as well as to the particular clientele. However, universal goals of pedagogic processes should be assessed as well. At the university hospital of Ulm, department child and adolescent psychiatry and psychotherapy, a scale was developed to measure the attainment of social competence and individual goals (PädZi). With the intention of an application of these scales in youth forensic context within a project (MAZ) in Switzerland the scales were adapted and expanded based on qualitative interviews with experts from the forensic and educational fields. Interrater agreement was shown to be good.

  1. Pilot-scale continuous ultrasonic cleaning equipment reduces Listeria monocytogenes levels on conveyor belts.

    PubMed

    Tolvanen, Riina; Lundén, Janne; Hörman, Ari; Korkeala, Hannu

    2009-02-01

    Ultrasonic cleaning of a conveyor belt was studied by building a pilot-scale conveyor with an ultrasonic cleaning bath. A piece of the stainless steel conveyor belt was contaminated with meat-based soil and Listeria monocytogenes strains (V1, V3, and B9) and incubated for 72 h to allow bacteria to attach to the conveyor belt surfaces. The effect of ultrasound with a potassium hydroxide-based cleaning detergent was determined by using the cleaning bath at 45 and 50 degrees C for 30 s with and without ultrasound. The detachment of L. monocytogenes from the conveyor belt caused by the ultrasonic treatment was significantly greater at 45 degrees C (independent samples t test, P < 0.001) and at 50 degrees C (independent samples t test, P = 0.04) than without ultrasound. Ultrasonic cleaning efficiency was tested with different cleaning durations (10, 15, 20, and 30 s) and temperatures (30, 45, and 50 degrees C). The differences in the log reduction between cleaning treatments were analyzed by analysis of variance with Tamhane's T2 posthoc test using SPSS (Chicago, IL). The lengthening of the treatment time from 10 to 30 s did not significantly increase the detachment of L. monocytogenes (ANOVA 0.633). At 30 degrees C and at the longest time tested (30 s), the treatment reduced L. monocytogenes counts by only 2.68 log units. However, an increase in temperature from 30 to 50 degrees C improved the effect of the ultrasonic treatment significantly (P < 0.01). Ultrasonic cleaning for 10 s at 50 degrees C reduced L. monocytogenes counts by more than 5 log units. These results indicate that ultrasonic cleaning of a conveyor belt is effective even with short treatment times.

  2. Conservation in the face of climate change: The roles of alternative models, monitoring, and adaptation in confronting and reducing uncertainty

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conroy, M.J.; Runge, M.C.; Nichols, J.D.; Stodola, K.W.; Cooper, R.J.

    2011-01-01

    The broad physical and biological principles behind climate change and its potential large scale ecological impacts on biota are fairly well understood, although likely responses of biotic communities at fine spatio-temporal scales are not, limiting the ability of conservation programs to respond effectively to climate change outside the range of human experience. Much of the climate debate has focused on attempts to resolve key uncertainties in a hypothesis-testing framework. However, conservation decisions cannot await resolution of these scientific issues and instead must proceed in the face of uncertainty. We suggest that conservation should precede in an adaptive management framework, in which decisions are guided by predictions under multiple, plausible hypotheses about climate impacts. Under this plan, monitoring is used to evaluate the response of the system to climate drivers, and management actions (perhaps experimental) are used to confront testable predictions with data, in turn providing feedback for future decision making. We illustrate these principles with the problem of mitigating the effects of climate change on terrestrial bird communities in the southern Appalachian Mountains, USA. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Environmental Adaptation: Genomic Analysis of the Piezotolerant and Psychrotolerant Deep-Sea Iron Reducing Bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3

    PubMed Central

    Jian, Huahua; Zhang, Bing; Li, Shengkang; Wang, Feng; Zeng, Xiaowei; Gao, Lei; Bartlett, Douglas Hoyt; Yu, Jun; Hu, Songnian; Xiao, Xiang

    2008-01-01

    Shewanella species are widespread in various environments. Here, the genome sequence of Shewanella piezotolerans WP3, a piezotolerant and psychrotolerant iron reducing bacterium from deep-sea sediment was determined with related functional analysis to study its environmental adaptation mechanisms. The genome of WP3 consists of 5,396,476 base pairs (bp) with 4,944 open reading frames (ORFs). It possesses numerous genes or gene clusters which help it to cope with extreme living conditions such as genes for two sets of flagellum systems, structural RNA modification, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) biosynthesis and osmolyte transport and synthesis. And WP3 contains 55 open reading frames encoding putative c-type cytochromes which are substantial to its wide environmental adaptation ability. The mtr-omc gene cluster involved in the insoluble metal reduction in the Shewanella genus was identified and compared. The two sets of flagellum systems were found to be differentially regulated under low temperature and high pressure; the lateral flagellum system was found essential for its motility and living at low temperature. PMID:18398463

  4. Adaptive immune response in JAM-C-deficient mice: normal initiation but reduced IgG memory.

    PubMed

    Zimmerli, Claudia; Lee, Boris P L; Palmer, Gaby; Gabay, Cem; Adams, Ralf; Aurrand-Lions, Michel; Imhof, Beat A

    2009-04-15

    We have recently shown that junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-C-deficient mice have leukocytic pulmonary infiltrates, disturbed neutrophil homeostasis, and increased postnatal mortality. This phenotype was partially rescued when mice were housed in ventilated isolators, suggesting an inability to cope with opportunistic infections. In the present study, we further examined the adaptive immune responses in JAM-C(-/-) mice. We found that murine conventional dendritic cells express in addition to Mac-1 and CD11c also JAM-B as ligand for JAM-C. By in vitro adhesion assay, we show that murine DCs can interact with recombinant JAM-C via Mac-1. However, this interaction does not seem to be necessary for dendritic cell migration and function in vivo, even though JAM-C is highly expressed by lymphatic sinuses of lymph nodes. Nevertheless, upon immunization and boosting with a protein Ag, JAM-C-deficient mice showed decreased persistence of specific circulating Abs although the initial response was normal. Such a phenotype has also been observed in a model of Ag-induced arthritis, showing that specific IgG2a Ab titers are reduced in the serum of JAM-C(-/-) compared with wild-type mice. Taken together, these data suggest that JAM-C deficiency affects the adaptive humoral immune response against pathogens, in addition to the innate immune system.

  5. Environmental adaptation: genomic analysis of the piezotolerant and psychrotolerant deep-sea iron reducing bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fengping; Wang, Jianbin; Jian, Huahua; Zhang, Bing; Li, Shengkang; Wang, Feng; Zeng, Xiaowei; Gao, Lei; Bartlett, Douglas Hoyt; Yu, Jun; Hu, Songnian; Xiao, Xiang

    2008-04-09

    Shewanella species are widespread in various environments. Here, the genome sequence of Shewanella piezotolerans WP3, a piezotolerant and psychrotolerant iron reducing bacterium from deep-sea sediment was determined with related functional analysis to study its environmental adaptation mechanisms. The genome of WP3 consists of 5,396,476 base pairs (bp) with 4,944 open reading frames (ORFs). It possesses numerous genes or gene clusters which help it to cope with extreme living conditions such as genes for two sets of flagellum systems, structural RNA modification, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) biosynthesis and osmolyte transport and synthesis. And WP3 contains 55 open reading frames encoding putative c-type cytochromes which are substantial to its wide environmental adaptation ability. The mtr-omc gene cluster involved in the insoluble metal reduction in the Shewanella genus was identified and compared. The two sets of flagellum systems were found to be differentially regulated under low temperature and high pressure; the lateral flagellum system was found essential for its motility and living at low temperature.

  6. Evaluation of the impacts of cooperative adaptive cruise control on reducing rear-end collision risks on freeways.

    PubMed

    Li, Ye; Wang, Hao; Wang, Wei; Xing, Lu; Liu, Shanwen; Wei, Xueyan

    2017-01-01

    Although plenty of studies have been conducted recently about the impacts of cooperative adaptive cruise control (CACC) system on traffic efficiency, there are few researches analyzing the safety effects of this advanced driving-assistant system. Thus, the primary objective of this study is to evaluate the impacts of the CACC system on reducing rear-end collision risks on freeways. The CACC model is firstly developed, which is based on the Intelligent Driver Model (IDM). Then, two surrogated safety measures, derived from the time-to-collision (TTC), denoting time exposed time-to-collision (TET) and time integrated time-to-collision (TIT), are introduced for quantifying the collision risks. And the safety effects are analyzed both theoretically and experimentally, by the linear stability analysis and simulations. The theoretical and simulation results conformably indicate that the CACC system brings dramatic benefits for reducing rear-end collision risks (TET and TIT are reduced more than 90%, respectively), when the desired time headway and time delay are set properly. The sensitivity analysis indicates there are few differences among different values of the threshold of TTC and the length of a CACC platoon. The results also show that the safety improvements weaken with the decrease of the penetration rates of CACC on the market and the increase of time delay between platoons. We also evaluate the traffic efficiency of the CACC system with different desired time headway.

  7. Environmental Affective Dispositions Scale (EADS): The Study of Validity and Reliability and Adaptation to Turkish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fettahlioglu, Pinar; Timur, Serkan; Timur, Betül

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to conduct a research under circumstances of Turkey about the validity and reliability of the Affective Tendencies towards Environmental Scale prepared by Yavetz, Goldman and Pe'er (2009). The translation of this scale to Turkish was done by the researchers and language specialists. And then, the scale was evaluated by the…

  8. 99Tc(VII) Retardation, Reduction, and Redox Rate Scaling in Naturally Reduced Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Liu, Chongxuan; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; McKinley, James P.; Zachara, John M.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Miller, Micah D.; Varga, Tamas; Resch, Charles T.

    2015-10-15

    Abstract: An experimental and modeling study was conducted to investigate pertechnetate (Tc(VII)) retardation, reduction, and rate scaling in three sediments from Ringold formation at U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford site, where 99Tc is a major contaminant in groundwater. Tc(VII) was reduced in all the sediments in both batch reactors and diffusion columns, with a faster rate in a sediment containing a higher concentration of HCl-extractable Fe(II). Tc(VII) migration in the diffusion columns was reductively retarded with retardation degrees correlated with Tc(VII) reduction rates. The reduction rates were faster in the diffusion columns than those in the batch reactors, apparently influenced by the spatial distribution of redox-reactive minerals along transport paths that supplied Tc(VII). X-ray computed tomography and autoradiography were performed to identify the spatial locations of Tc(VII) reduction and transport paths in the sediments, and results generally confirmed the newly found behavior of reaction rate changes from batch to column. The results from this study implied that Tc(VII) migration can be reductively retarded at Hanford site with a retardation degree dependent on reactive Fe(II) content and its distribution in sediments. This study also demonstrated that an effective reaction rate may be faster in transport systems than that in well-mixed reactors.

  9. Biogeochemistry of a Field-Scale Sulfate Reducing Bioreactor Treating Mining Influenced Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drennan, D.; Lee, I.; Landkamer, L.; Figueroa, L. A.; Webb, S.; Sharp, J. O.

    2012-12-01

    Acidity, metal release, and toxicity may be environmental health concerns in areas influenced by mining. Mining influenced waters (MIW) can be remediated through the establishment of Sulfate Reducing Bioreactors (SRBRs) as part of engineered passive treatment systems. The objective of our research is an enhanced understanding of the biogeochemistry in SRBRs by combining molecular biological and geochemical techniques. Bioreactor reactive substrate, settling pond water, and effluent (from the SRBR) were collected from a field scale SRBR in Arizona, which has been in operation for approximately 3 years. Schematically, the water passes through the SRBR; combines with flow that bypasses the SRBR into the and goes into the mixing pond, and finally is released as effluent to aerobic polishing cells. High throughput sequencing of extracted DNA revealed that Proteobacteria dominated the reactive substrate (61%), settling pond (93%), and effluent (50%), with the next most abundant phylum in all samples (excluding uncultured organisms) being Bacteriodes (1-17%). However, at the superclass level, the three samples were more variable. Gammaproteobacteria dominated the reactive substrate (35%), Betaproteobacteria in the settling pond (63%) and finally the effluent was dominated by Epsilonproteobacteria (Helicobacteraceae) (43%). Diversity was most pronounced in association with the reactor matrix, and least diverse in the settling pond. Putative functional analysis revealed a modest presence of sulfate/sulfur reducing bacteria (SRB) (>5%) in both the matrix and settling pond but a much higher abundance (43%) of sulfur reducing bacteria in the effluent. Interestingly this effluent population was composed entirely of the family Helicobacteraceae (sulfur reduction II via polysulfide pathway). Other putative functions of interest include metal reduction in the matrix (3%) and effluent (3%), as well as polysaccharide degradation, which was largely abundant in all samples (21

  10. Adaptation of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-IV (WISC-IV) for Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Dang, Hoang-Minh; Weiss, Bahr; Pollack, Amie; Nguyen, Minh Cao

    2012-12-01

    Intelligence testing is used for many purposes including identification of children for proper educational placement (e.g., children with learning disabilities, or intellectually gifted students), and to guide education by identifying cognitive strengths and weaknesses so that teachers can adapt their instructional style to students' specific learning styles. Most of the research involving intelligence tests has been conducted in highly developed Western countries, yet the need for intelligence testing is as or even more important in developing countries. The present study, conducted through the Vietnam National University Clinical Psychology CRISP Center, focused on the cultural adaptation of the WISC-IV intelligence test for Vietnam. We report on (a) the adaptation process including the translation, cultural analysis and modifications involved in adaptation, (b) present results of two pilot studies, and (c) describe collection of the standardization sample and results of analyses with the standardization sample, with the goal of sharing our experience with other researchers who may be involved in or interested in adapting or developing IQ tests for non-Western, non-English speaking cultures.

  11. Adaptation and Fidelity: a Recipe Analogy for Achieving Both in Population Scale Implementation.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Lynn

    2016-05-01

    Balancing adherence to fidelity of evidence-based programs and adaptation to local context is one of the key debates in the adoption and implementation of effective programs. Concern about maintaining fidelity to achieve outcomes can result in replication of research-based models that can be a poor fit with the real world. Equally, unplanned adaptation can result in program drift away from the core elements needed to achieve outcomes. To support implementation of the Maternal Early Childhood Sustained Home-visiting (MECSH) program in multiple sites in three countries, an analogy was developed to identify how both fidelity and adaptation can be managed and successfully achieved. This article presents the Commonsense Cookery Book Basic Plain Cake with Variations recipe analogy to articulate the dual requirements of both fidelity and adaptation to achieve quality implementation of the MECSH program. Components classified by the analogy include identification of core ingredients, methods, and equipment that contribute to fundamental outcomes and fidelity to the evidence-based program, and a planned, collaborative approach to identification of needed variations to suit locally sourced capacity, needs, and tastes. Quality is achieved by identifying and measuring the core ingredients and the variations. Sourcing local ingredients and honoring of context support sustainability of quality practice. Using this analogy has assisted adopters of the MECSH program to understand that effective implementation requires uncompromised commitment to expectations of fidelity to the core components and methods; planned, proactive adaptation; systematic monitoring of both core program and agreed variations; and local ownership and sustainability.

  12. Genomic Evidence of Rapid and Stable Adaptive Oscillations over Seasonal Time Scales in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Bergland, Alan O.; Behrman, Emily L.; O'Brien, Katherine R.; Schmidt, Paul S.; Petrov, Dmitri A.

    2014-01-01

    In many species, genomic data have revealed pervasive adaptive evolution indicated by the fixation of beneficial alleles. However, when selection pressures are highly variable along a species' range or through time adaptive alleles may persist at intermediate frequencies for long periods. So called “balanced polymorphisms” have long been understood to be an important component of standing genetic variation, yet direct evidence of the strength of balancing selection and the stability and prevalence of balanced polymorphisms has remained elusive. We hypothesized that environmental fluctuations among seasons in a North American orchard would impose temporally variable selection on Drosophila melanogaster that would drive repeatable adaptive oscillations at balanced polymorphisms. We identified hundreds of polymorphisms whose frequency oscillates among seasons and argue that these loci are subject to strong, temporally variable selection. We show that these polymorphisms respond to acute and persistent changes in climate and are associated in predictable ways with seasonally variable phenotypes. In addition, our results suggest that adaptively oscillating polymorphisms are likely millions of years old, with some possibly predating the divergence between D. melanogaster and D. simulans. Taken together, our results are consistent with a model of balancing selection wherein rapid temporal fluctuations in climate over generational time promotes adaptive genetic diversity at loci underlying polygenic variation in fitness related phenotypes. PMID:25375361

  13. Scaling and efficiency of PRISM in adaptive simulations of turbulent premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Tonse, Shaheen R.; Bell, J.B.; Brown, N.J.; Day, M.S.; Frenklach, M.; Grcar, J.F.; Propp, R.M.

    1999-12-01

    The dominant computational cost in modeling turbulent combustion phenomena numerically with high fidelity chemical mechanisms is the time required to solve the ordinary differential equations associated with chemical kinetics. One approach to reducing that computational cost is to develop an inexpensive surrogate model that accurately represents evolution of chemical kinetics. One such approach, PRISM, develops a polynomial representation of the chemistry evolution in a local region of chemical composition space. This representation is then stored for later use. As the computation proceeds, the chemistry evolution for other points within the same region are computed by evaluating these polynomials instead of calling an ordinary differential equation solver. If initial data for advancing the chemistry is encountered that is not in any region for which a polynomial is defined, the methodology dynamically samples that region and constructs a new representation for that region. The utility of this approach is determined by the size of the regions over which the representation provides a good approximation to the kinetics and the number of these regions that are necessary to model the subset of composition space that is active during a simulation. In this paper, we assess the PRISM methodology in the context of a turbulent premixed flame in two dimensions. We consider a range of turbulent intensities ranging from weak turbulence that has little effect on the flame to strong turbulence that tears pockets of burning fluid from the main flame. For each case, we explore a range of sizes for the local regions and determine the scaling behavior as a function of region size and turbulent intensity.

  14. Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales: II Profile of Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sabrina; Paynter, Jessica M; Gilmore, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive behaviour is a crucial area of assessment for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). This study examined the adaptive behaviour profile of 77 young children with ASD using the Vineland-II, and analysed factors associated with adaptive functioning. Consistent with previous research with the original Vineland a distinct autism profile of Vineland-II age equivalent scores, but not standard scores, was found. Highest scores were in motor skills and lowest scores were in socialisation. The addition of the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule calibrated severity score did not contribute significant variance to Vineland-II scores beyond that accounted for by age and nonverbal ability. Limitations, future directions, and implications are discussed.

  15. Cell Walls of Tobacco Cells and Changes in Composition Associated with Reduced Growth upon Adaptation to Water and Saline Stress 1

    PubMed Central

    Iraki, Naim M.; Singh, Narendra; Bressan, Ray A.; Carpita, Nicholas C.

    1989-01-01

    The relative mass of the cell walls of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) cells adapted to grow in medium containing 30% polyethylene glycol 8000 or 428 millimolar NaCl was reduced to about 50% of that of the walls of unadapted cells. Cellulose synthesis was inhibited substantially in adapted cells. The proportions of total pectin in walls of unadapted and adapted cells were about the same, but substantial amount of uronic acid-rich material from walls of cells adapted to either NaCl or polyethylene glycol was more easily extracted with cold sodium ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid solutions (NM Iraki et al. [1989] Plant Physiol. 91: 39-47). We examined the linkage composition of the pectic and hemicellulosic polysaccharides to ascertain chemical factors that may explain this difference in physical behavior. Adaptation to stress resulted in the formation of a loosely bound shell of polygalacturonic acid and rhamnogalacturonan. Pectins extracted from walls of adapted cells by either cold sodium ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid or hot ammonium oxalate were particularly enriched in rhamnose. Compared to pectins of unadapted cells, rhamnosyl units of the rhamnogalacturonans of adapted cells were more highly substituted with polymers containing arabinose and galactose, but the side groups were of greatly reduced molecular size. Possible functional roles of these modifications in cell wall metabolism related to adaptation to osmotic stress are discussed. PMID:16667041

  16. Cross-cultural adaptation and reliability testing of Polish adaptation of the European Heart Failure Self-care Behavior Scale (EHFScBS)

    PubMed Central

    Uchmanowicz, Izabella; Łoboz-Rudnicka, Maria; Jaarsma, Tiny; Łoboz-Grudzień, Krystyna

    2014-01-01

    Background Development of simple instruments for determination of self-care levels in heart failure (HF) patients is a subject of ongoing research. One such instrument, gaining growing popularity worldwide, is the European Heart Failure Self-care Behavior Scale (EHFScBS). The aim of this study was to adapt and to test reliability of the Polish version of EHFScBS. Method A standard guideline was used for translation and cultural adaptation of the English version of EHFScBS into Polish. The study included 100 Polish HF patients aged between 24 and 91 years, among them 67 men and 33 women. Cronbach’s alpha was used for analysis of the internal consistency of EHFScBS. Results Mean total self-care score in the study group was 34.2±8.1 points. Good or satisfactory level of self-care were documented in four out of 12 analyzed EHFScBS domains. Cronbach’s alpha for the entire questionnaire was 0.64. The value of Cronbach’s alpha after deletion of specific items ranged from 0.55 to 0.65. Conclusion Polish HF patients present significant deficits of self-care, which are to a large extent associated with inefficacy of the public health care system. Apart from cultural characteristics, the socioeconomic context of the target population should be considered during language adaptation of EHFScBS, as well as during interpretation of data obtained with this instrument. A number of self-care–related behaviors may be optimized as a result of appropriate educational activities, also those offered by nursing personnel. PMID:25382973

  17. Mixed evidence for reduced local adaptation in wild salmon resulting from interbreeding with escaped farmed salmon: complexities in hybrid fitness

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Dylan J; Cook, Adam M; Eddington, James D; Bentzen, Paul; Hutchings, Jeffrey A

    2008-01-01

    Interbreeding between artificially-selected and wild organisms can have negative fitness consequences for the latter. In the Northwest Atlantic, farmed Atlantic salmon recurrently escape into the wild and enter rivers where small, declining populations of wild salmon breed. Most farmed salmon in the region derive from an ancestral source population that occupies a nonacidified river (pH 6.0–6.5). Yet many wild populations with which escaped farmed salmon might interbreed inhabit acidified rivers (pH 4.6–5.2). Using common garden experimentation, and examining two early-life history stages across two generations of interbreeding, we showed that wild salmon populations inhabiting acidified rivers had higher survival at acidified pH than farmed salmon or F1 farmed-wild hybrids. In contrast, however, there was limited evidence for reduced performance in backcrosses, and F2 farmed-wild hybrids performed better or equally well to wild salmon. Wild salmon also survived or grew better at nonacidified than acidified pH, and wild and farmed salmon survived equally well at nonacidified pH. Thus, for acid tolerance and the stages examined, we found some evidence both for and against the theory that repeated farmed-wild interbreeding may reduce adaptive genetic variation in the wild and thereby negatively affect the persistence of depleted wild populations. PMID:25567731

  18. Niche expansion leads to small-scale adaptive divergence along an elevation gradient in a medium-sized passerine bird

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, John E; Smith, Thomas B

    2008-01-01

    Niche expansion can lead to adaptive differentiation and speciation, but there are few examples from contemporary niche expansions about how this process is initiated. We assess the consequences of a niche expansion by Mexican jays (Aphelocoma ultramarina) along an elevation gradient. We predicted that jays at high elevation would have straighter bills adapted to feeding on pine cones, whereas jays at low elevation would have hooked bills adapted to feeding on acorns. We measured morphological and genetic variation of 95 adult jays and found significant differences in hook length between elevations in accordance with predictions, a pattern corroborated by analysis at the regional scale. Genetic results from microsatellite and mtDNA variation support phenotypic differentiation in the presence of gene flow coupled with weak, but detectable genetic differentiation between high- and low-elevation populations. These results demonstrate that niche expansion can lead to adaptive divergence despite gene flow between parapatric populations along an elevation gradient, providing information on a key precursor to ecological speciation. PMID:18544512

  19. Psychometric Properties of the Portuguese Version of the Adaptive Behavior Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Sofia; Morato, Pedro; Luckasson, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    The adaptive behavior construct has gained prominent attention in human services over the last several years in Portugal, and its measurement has become an integral part of the assessment of populations with intellectual disability. In Portugal, diagnosis remains exclusively based on IQ measures, although some attention recently has been given to…

  20. Adaptive Remodeling of Achilles Tendon: A Multi-scale Computational Model

    PubMed Central

    Rubenson, Jonas; Umberger, Brian

    2016-01-01

    While it is known that musculotendon units adapt to their load environments, there is only a limited understanding of tendon adaptation in vivo. Here we develop a computational model of tendon remodeling based on the premise that mechanical damage and tenocyte-mediated tendon damage and repair processes modify the distribution of its collagen fiber lengths. We explain how these processes enable the tendon to geometrically adapt to its load conditions. Based on known biological processes, mechanical and strain-dependent proteolytic fiber damage are incorporated into our tendon model. Using a stochastic model of fiber repair, it is assumed that mechanically damaged fibers are repaired longer, whereas proteolytically damaged fibers are repaired shorter, relative to their pre-damage length. To study adaptation of tendon properties to applied load, our model musculotendon unit is a simplified three-component Hill-type model of the human Achilles-soleus unit. Our model results demonstrate that the geometric equilibrium state of the Achilles tendon can coincide with minimization of the total metabolic cost of muscle activation. The proposed tendon model independently predicts rates of collagen fiber turnover that are in general agreement with in vivo experimental measurements. While the computational model here only represents a first step in a new approach to understanding the complex process of tendon remodeling in vivo, given these findings, it appears likely that the proposed framework may itself provide a useful theoretical foundation for developing valuable qualitative and quantitative insights into tendon physiology and pathology. PMID:27684554

  1. Global adaptation in networks of selfish components: emergent associative memory at the system scale.

    PubMed

    Watson, Richard A; Mills, Rob; Buckley, C L

    2011-01-01

    In some circumstances complex adaptive systems composed of numerous self-interested agents can self-organize into structures that enhance global adaptation, efficiency, or function. However, the general conditions for such an outcome are poorly understood and present a fundamental open question for domains as varied as ecology, sociology, economics, organismic biology, and technological infrastructure design. In contrast, sufficient conditions for artificial neural networks to form structures that perform collective computational processes such as associative memory/recall, classification, generalization, and optimization are well understood. Such global functions within a single agent or organism are not wholly surprising, since the mechanisms (e.g., Hebbian learning) that create these neural organizations may be selected for this purpose; but agents in a multi-agent system have no obvious reason to adhere to such a structuring protocol or produce such global behaviors when acting from individual self-interest. However, Hebbian learning is actually a very simple and fully distributed habituation or positive feedback principle. Here we show that when self-interested agents can modify how they are affected by other agents (e.g., when they can influence which other agents they interact with), then, in adapting these inter-agent relationships to maximize their own utility, they will necessarily alter them in a manner homologous with Hebbian learning. Multi-agent systems with adaptable relationships will thereby exhibit the same system-level behaviors as neural networks under Hebbian learning. For example, improved global efficiency in multi-agent systems can be explained by the inherent ability of associative memory to generalize by idealizing stored patterns and/or creating new combinations of subpatterns. Thus distributed multi-agent systems can spontaneously exhibit adaptive global behaviors in the same sense, and by the same mechanism, as with the organizational

  2. Cross-Cultural Adaptation of the Intelligibility in Context Scale for South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pascoe, Michelle; McLeod, Sharynne

    2016-01-01

    The Intelligibility in Context Scale (ICS) is a screening questionnaire that focuses on parents' perceptions of children's speech in different contexts. Originally developed in English, it has been translated into 60 languages and the validity and clinical utility of the scale has been documented in a range of countries. In South Africa, there are…

  3. [Adaptation of the Sydney Attribution Scale in a Spanish college population].

    PubMed

    Inglés, Cándido J; Rodríguez-Marín, Jesús; González-Pienda, Julio A

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the psychometric properties of the Sydney Attribution Scale in a sample of 1,508 college students. Factor analysis identified six factors: Success/Ability, Success/Effort, Success/External Causes, Failure/Ability, Failure/Effort, and Failure/External Causes. Success and failure factors accounted for an adequate percentage of the variance. Internal consistency was acceptable, similar in the success scales and in the failure scales, and higher in the internal scales than in the external scales. The results also showed a clear predictable pattern of relationships between dimensions of self-attribution, and between these dimensions and several measures of general self-efficacy, intrinsic motivation, extrinsic motivation, satisfaction with the studies, satisfaction with performance, and satisfaction with knowledge, which supports the construct validity of the SAS.

  4. Spatio-temporal behaviour of atomic-scale tribo-ceramic films in adaptive surface engineered nano-materials.

    PubMed

    Fox-Rabinovich, G; Kovalev, A; Veldhuis, S; Yamamoto, K; Endrino, J L; Gershman, I S; Rashkovskiy, A; Aguirre, M H; Wainstein, D L

    2015-03-05

    Atomic-scale, tribo-ceramic films associated with dissipative structures formation are discovered under extreme frictional conditions which trigger self-organization. For the first time, we present an actual image of meta-stable protective tribo-ceramics within thicknesses of a few atomic layers. A mullite and sapphire structure predominates in these phases. They act as thermal barriers with an amazing energy soaking/dissipating capacity. Less protective tribo-films cannot sustain in these severe conditions and rapidly wear out. Therefore, a functional hierarchy is established. The created tribo-films act in synergy, striving to better adapt themselves to external stimuli. Under a highly complex structure and non-equilibrium state, the upcoming generation of adaptive surface engineered nano-multilayer materials behaves like intelligent systems - capable of generating, with unprecedented efficiency, the necessary tribo-films to endure an increasingly severe environment.

  5. Translation, adaptation, and validation of the behavioral pain scale and the critical-care pain observational tools in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Hsiung, Nai-Huan; Yang, Yen; Lee, Ming Shinn; Dalal, Koustuv; Smith, Graeme D

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the cultural adaptation and testing of the behavioral pain scale (BPS) and the critical-care pain observation tools (CPOT) for pain assessment in Taiwan. The cross-cultural adaptation followed the steps of translation, including forward translation, back-translation, evaluation of the translations by a committee of experts, adjustments, and then piloting of the prefinal versions of the BPS and the CPOT. A content validity index was used to assess content validities of the BPS and the CPOT, with 0.80 preset as the level that would be regarded as acceptable. The principal investigator then made adjustments when the content validity index was <0.80. The pilot test was performed with a sample of ten purposively selected patients by 2 medical staff from a medical care center in Taiwan. The BPS and the CPOT are adequate instruments for the assessment of pain levels in patients who cannot communicate due to sedation and ventilation treatments. PMID:27695360

  6. Kisspeptin inhibits a slow afterhyperpolarization current via protein kinase C and reduces spike frequency adaptation in GnRH neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunguang

    2013-01-01

    Kisspeptin signaling via its cognate receptor G protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) in gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons plays a critical role in regulating pituitary secretion of luteinizing hormone and thus reproductive function. GPR54 is Gq-coupled to activation of phospholipase C and multiple second messenger signaling pathways. Previous studies have shown that kisspeptin potently depolarizes GnRH neurons through the activation of canonical transient receptor potential channels and inhibition of inwardly rectifying K+ channels to generate sustained firing. Since the initial studies showing that kisspeptin has prolonged effects, the question has been why is there very little spike frequency adaption during sustained firing? Presently, we have discovered that kisspeptin reduces spike frequency adaptation and prolongs firing via the inhibition of a calcium-activated slow afterhyperpolarization current (IsAHP). GnRH neurons expressed two distinct IsAHP, a kisspeptin-sensitive and an apamin-sensitive IsAHP. Essentially, kisspeptin inhibited 50% of the IsAHP and apamin inhibited the other 50% of the current. Furthermore, the kisspeptin-mediated inhibition of IsAHP was abrogated by the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor calphostin C, and the PKC activator phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate mimicked and occluded any further effects of kisspeptin on IsAHP. The protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors H-89 and the Rp diastereomer of adenosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphorothioate had no effect on the kisspeptin-mediated inhibition but were able to abrogate the inhibitory effects of forskolin on the IsAHP, suggesting that PKA is not involved. Therefore, in addition to increasing the firing rate through an overt depolarization, kisspeptin can also facilitate sustained firing through inhibiting an apamin-insensitive IsAHP in GnRH neurons via a PKC. PMID:23548613

  7. Improved gait adjustments after gait adaptability training are associated with reduced attentional demands in persons with stroke.

    PubMed

    van Ooijen, Mariëlle W; Heeren, Anita; Smulders, Katrijn; Geurts, Alexander C H; Janssen, Thomas W J; Beek, Peter J; Weerdesteyn, Vivian; Roerdink, Melvyn

    2015-03-01

    After stroke, the ability to make step adjustments during walking is reduced and requires more attention, which may cause problems during community walking. The C-Mill is an innovative treadmill augmented with visual context (e.g., obstacles and stepping targets), which was designed specifically to practice gait adaptability. The objective of this study was to determine whether C-Mill gait adaptability training can help to improve gait adjustments and associated attentional demands. Sixteen community-ambulating persons in the chronic stage of stroke (age: 54.8 ± 10.8 years) received ten sessions of C-Mill training within 5-6 weeks. Prior to and after the intervention period, participants performed an obstacle-avoidance task with and without a secondary attention-demanding auditory Stroop task to assess their ability to make gait adjustments (i.e., obstacle-avoidance success rates) as well as the associated attentional demands (i.e., Stroop success rates, stratified for pre-crossing, crossing, and post-crossing strides). Obstacle-avoidance success rates improved after C-Mill training from 52.4 ± 16.3 % at pretest to 77.0 ± 16.4 % at posttest (p < 0.001). This improvement was accompanied by greater Stroop success rates during the obstacle-crossing stride only (pretest: 62.9 ± 24.9 %, posttest: 77.5 ± 20.4 %, p = 0.006). The observed improvements in obstacle-avoidance success rates and Stroop success rates were strongly correlated (r = 0.68, p = 0.015). The ability to make gait adjustments and the associated attentional demands can be successfully targeted in persons with stroke using C-Mill training, which suggests that its underlying assumptions regarding motor control are appropriate. This study lends support and guidance for designing a randomized controlled trial to further examine the potential of C-Mill training for improving safe community ambulation after stroke.

  8. Matching Social and Biophysical Scales in Extensive Livestock Production as a Basis for Adaptation to Global Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayre, N. F.; Bestelmeyer, B.

    2015-12-01

    Global livestock production is heterogeneous, and its benefits and costs vary widely across global contexts. Extensive grazing lands (or rangelands) constitute the vast majority of the land dedicated to livestock production globally, but they are relatively minor contributors to livestock-related environmental impacts. Indeed, the greatest potential for environmental damage in these lands lies in their potential for conversion to other uses, including agriculture, mining, energy production and urban development. Managing such conversion requires improving the sustainability of livestock production in the face of fragmentation, ecological and economic marginality and climate change. We present research from Mongolia and the United States demonstrating methods of improving outcomes on rangelands by improving the fit between the scales of social and biophysical processes. Especially in arid and semi-arid settings, rangelands exhibit highly variable productivity over space and time and non-linear or threshold dynamics in vegetation; climate change is projected to exacerbate these challenges and, in some cases, diminish overall productivity. Policy and governance frameworks that enable landscape-scale management and administration enable range livestock producers to adapt to these conditions. Similarly, livestock breeds that have evolved to withstand climate and vegetation change improve producers' prospects in the face of increasing variability and declining productivity. A focus on the relationships among primary production, animal production, spatial connectivity, and scale must underpin adaptation strategies in rangelands.

  9. Maternal Antenatal Attachment Scale (MAAS): adaptation to Spanish and proposal for a brief version of 12 items.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Aresti, Lucía; Iraurgi, Ioseba; Iriarte, Leire; Martínez-Pampliega, Ana

    2016-02-01

    The psychometric properties of the adapted Spanish version of the Maternal Antenatal Attachment Scale were examined. The main goal was to investigate the reliability and construct validity of the conceptual structure of Condon's proposal. Five hundred twenty-five pregnant women, attending maternal education classes in Bizkaia (Spain), answered the translated and back-translated version of the Maternal Antenatal Attachment Scale. This scale comprises 19 items with five answer choices divided into two subscales: quality of attachment and intensity of attachment. Participants also answered a questionnaire about the reproductive history that was developed ad hoc for the present study. The Spanish adaptation of the Maternal Antenatal Attachment Scale final version comprises 12 items: seven items have been removed due to their inadequate psychometric properties. Internal consistency of the inventory is moderate-high (.73) and it ranges from .68 (intensity of attachment) to .75 (quality of attachment) for the dimensions. Three alternative structural models were proven using a confirmatory factor analysis. Lastly, the two-related-factor model was chosen, as it obtained suitable fit indexes (χ (2) = 102.28; p < .001; goodness-of-fit index (GFI) = .92; comparative fit index (CFI) = .95; root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) = .042, 90 % CI [.030-.054]). Due to its adequate psychometric properties, the Spanish version of the Maternal Antenatal Attachment Scale can be proposed as a suitable instrument for the purpose of measuring antenatal attachment. The study of antenatal attachment helps to detect possible difficulties for the mother in establishing an affective relationship with the foetus. This may affect the foetus growth, delivery and the future mother-child relationship.

  10. Small-Scale Habitat-Specific Variation and Adaptive Divergence of Photosynthetic Pigments in Different Alkali Soils in Reed Identified by Common Garden and Genetic Tests

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Tian; Jiang, LiLi; Li, ShanZhi; Yang, YunFei

    2017-01-01

    Flexibility of photosynthetic pigment traits is an important adaptive mechanism through which plants can increase mean fitness in a variable environment. Unlike morphological traits in plants, photosythesis has been shown to exhibit phenotypic plasticity, responding rapidly to environmental conditions. Meanwhile, local adaptation at small scales is considered to be rare. Thus, detecting the small-scale adaptive divergence of photosynthetic pigments presents a challenge. Leaf concentrations of photosynthetic pigments under stressful conditions may be reduced or maintained. Concentrations of some pigments and/or ratio of Chlorophyll a (Chla) to Chlorophyll b (Chlb) do not change markedly in some species, such as the common reed, Phragmites australis, a cosmopolitan grass and common invader. Little is known about photosynthetic responses of this plant to varying levels of alkali salt. Few studies have attempted to account for the relationship between pigment accumulation and leaf position in wild plant populations in grasslands. In this study, photosynthetic pigment concentrations and the total Chl(a+b)/Car ratio decreased as the growing season progressed and were shown to be significantly lower in the habitat with a higher soil pH value and less moisture when compared between habitats. The Chla/Chlb ratio did not differ significantly between habitats, although it increased significantly over time. Leaves in the middle position may be functionally important in the response to soil conditions because only pigment concentrations and the Chl(a+b)/Car ratio of those leaves varied between habitats significantly. The outlier loci, used to evaluate molecular signatures of selection, were detected by Arlequin, Bayescan, and Bayenv analyses. In the simulated habitats of common garden, the local genotypes had higher values of Chla, Chlb, Chl(a+b), Car in their home habitat than did genotypes originating from the other habitat. QST–FST comparisons provided evidence of

  11. Small-Scale Habitat-Specific Variation and Adaptive Divergence of Photosynthetic Pigments in Different Alkali Soils in Reed Identified by Common Garden and Genetic Tests.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Tian; Jiang, LiLi; Li, ShanZhi; Yang, YunFei

    2016-01-01

    Flexibility of photosynthetic pigment traits is an important adaptive mechanism through which plants can increase mean fitness in a variable environment. Unlike morphological traits in plants, photosythesis has been shown to exhibit phenotypic plasticity, responding rapidly to environmental conditions. Meanwhile, local adaptation at small scales is considered to be rare. Thus, detecting the small-scale adaptive divergence of photosynthetic pigments presents a challenge. Leaf concentrations of photosynthetic pigments under stressful conditions may be reduced or maintained. Concentrations of some pigments and/or ratio of Chlorophyll a (Chla) to Chlorophyll b (Chlb) do not change markedly in some species, such as the common reed, Phragmites australis, a cosmopolitan grass and common invader. Little is known about photosynthetic responses of this plant to varying levels of alkali salt. Few studies have attempted to account for the relationship between pigment accumulation and leaf position in wild plant populations in grasslands. In this study, photosynthetic pigment concentrations and the total Chl(a+b)/Car ratio decreased as the growing season progressed and were shown to be significantly lower in the habitat with a higher soil pH value and less moisture when compared between habitats. The Chla/Chlb ratio did not differ significantly between habitats, although it increased significantly over time. Leaves in the middle position may be functionally important in the response to soil conditions because only pigment concentrations and the Chl(a+b)/Car ratio of those leaves varied between habitats significantly. The outlier loci, used to evaluate molecular signatures of selection, were detected by Arlequin, Bayescan, and Bayenv analyses. In the simulated habitats of common garden, the local genotypes had higher values of Chla, Chlb, Chl(a+b), Car in their home habitat than did genotypes originating from the other habitat. QST-FST comparisons provided evidence of divergent

  12. Translation, adaptation, and validation of the Stanford Hypnotic Clinical Scale in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Deynes-Exclusa, Yazmin; Sayers-Montalvo, Sean K; Martinez-Taboas, Alfonso

    2011-04-01

    The only hypnotizability scale that has been translated and validated for the Puerto Rican population is the Barber Suggestibility Scale (BSS). In this article, the Stanford Hypnotic Clinical Scale (SHCS) was translated and validated for this population. The translated SHCS ("Escala Stanford de Hipnosis Clinica" [ESHC]) was administered individually to 100 Puerto Rican college students. There were no significant differences found between the norms of the original SHCS samples and the Spanish version of the SHCS. Both samples showed similar distributions. The Spanish version's internal reliability as well as the item discrimination index were adequate. The authors conclude that the ESHC is an adequate instrument to measure hypnotizability in the Puerto Rican population.

  13. Rape Myths and the Cross-Cultural Adaptation of the Illinois Rape Myth Acceptance Scale in China.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jia; Fang, Gang; Huang, Hui; Cui, Naixue; Rhodes, Karin V; Gelles, Richard

    2016-06-05

    The study examines the similarities and differences between China and the United States with regard to rape myths. We assessed the individual level of rape myth acceptance among Chinese university students by adapting and translating a widely used measure of rape myth endorsement in the United States, the Illinois Rape Myth Acceptance (IRMA) scale. We assessed whether the IRMA scale would be an appropriate assessment of attitudes toward rape among young adults in China. The sample consisted of 975 Chinese university students enrolled in seven Chinese universities. We used explorative factor analysis to examine the factor structure of the Chinese translation of the IRMA scale. Results suggest that the IRMA scale requires some modification to be employed with young adults in China. Our analyses indicate that 20 items should be deleted, and a five-factor model is generated. We discuss relevant similarities and differences in the factor structure and item loadings between the Chinese Rape Myth Acceptance (CRMA) and the IRMA scales. A revised version of the IRMA, the CRMA, can be used as a resource in rape prevention services and rape victim support services. Future research in China that employs CRMA will allow researchers to examine whether individual's response to rape myth acceptance can predict rape potential and judgments of victim blaming and community members' acceptance of marital rape.

  14. Adaptation and evaluation of the Liverpool Seizure Severity Scale and Liverpool Quality of Life battery for American epilepsy patients.

    PubMed

    Rapp, S; Shumaker, S; Smith, T; Gibson, P; Berzon, R; Hoffman, R

    1998-05-01

    The Liverpool Seizure Severity Scale (LSSS) and the Liverpool Quality of Life (LQOL) battery were developed in Great Britain to assess the severity of seizure symptoms and the impact of epilepsy on patients' quality of life. The scales have been validated on British patients, but have not been validated for use with American patients. The objectives of this study were to adapt the scales to the American population and to evaluate their reliability and validity. After modifications recommended by focus groups with patients and epilepsy specialists, the scales were administered to a sample of 90 epilepsy patients who had experienced seizures within the previous 4 weeks. Comparisons of patients with generalized tonic-clonic seizures (n = 58) and partial seizures (n = 32) revealed significant differences on 12 of the 20 items on the LSSS as well as the total score. None of the six LQOL subscales (negative drug effects, positive drug effects, affect balance, sense of mastery, life fulfillment and impact of epilepsy) distinguished patients with different seizure types but five of the six subscales were significantly correlated with seizure severity. The internal consistency and test-retest reliability were adequate for both the LSSS and LQOL. Finally, five of the six LQOL scales were significantly correlated with independent measures of mental health, physical health and role functioning.

  15. Adaptation and evaluation of the Liverpool Seizure Severity Scale and Liverpool Quality of Life battery for American epilepsy patients.

    PubMed

    Rapp, S; Shumaker, S; Smith, T; Gibson, P; Berzon, R; Hoffman, R

    1998-08-01

    The Liverpool Seizure Severity Scale (LSSS) and the Liverpool Quality of Life (LQOL) battery were developed in Great Britain to assess the severity of seizure symptoms and the impact of epilepsy on patients' quality of life. The scales have been validated on British patients, but have not been validated for use with American patients. The objectives of this study were to adapt the scales to the American population and to evaluate their reliability and validity. After modifications recommended by focus groups with patients and epilepsy specialists, the scales were administered to a sample of 90 epilepsy patients who had experienced seizures within the previous 4 weeks. Comparisons of patients with generalized tonic-clonic seizures (n = 58) and partial seizures (n = 32) revealed significant differences on 9 of the 20 items on the LSSS as well as the total score. None of the six LQOL subscales (negative drug effects, positive drug effects, affect balance, sense of mastery, life fulfilment and impact of epilepsy) distinguished patients with different seizure types but five of the six subscales were significantly correlated with seizure severity. The internal consistency and test-retest reliability were adequate for both the LSSS and LQOL. Finally, five of the six LQOL scales were significantly correlated with independent measures of mental health, physical health and role functioning.

  16. Factorial and Hierarchical Cluster Analysis of the Adaptive Behavior Scales (Part I & II) in a Population of Older People (50 Years +) with Severe Intellectual Impairment (Mental Handicap).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, S. C.; Hogg, J.

    1990-01-01

    Principal components analysis was employed on the Adaptive Behavior Scales with scores of 122 older (mean age 63.5) individuals with severe intellectual impairment living in England. The study found the structure of adaptive skills and interpersonal maladaptive behaviors similar to that found for younger retarded adults. Two factors, personal…

  17. Human cooperation shows the distinctive signatures of adaptations to small-scale social life.

    PubMed

    Tooby, John; Cosmides, Leda

    2016-01-01

    The properties of individual carbon atoms allow them to chain into complex molecules of immense length. They are not limited to structures involving only a few atoms. The design features of our evolved neural adaptations appear similarly extensible. Individuals with forager brains can link themselves together into unprecedentedly large cooperative structures without the need for large group-beneficial modifications to evolved human design. Roles need only be intelligible to our social program logic, and judged better than alternatives.

  18. Spanish Adaptation of the Collett-Lester Fear of Death Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomas-Sabado, Joaquin; Limonero, Joaquin; Abdel-Khalek, Ahmed

    2007-01-01

    The Collett-Lester Fear of Death Scale (CL-FODS) consists of 4 subscales: Death of Self, Dying of Self, Death of Others, and Dying of Others. The aim of this study was to develop a Spanish version of the CL-FODS and to explore its psychometric properties. The revised version of the scale was translated into Spanish from English. Then, the back…

  19. The Turkish Adaptation, Validity, and Reliability of the Internal States Scale

    PubMed Central

    MAÇKALI, Zeynep; AKKAYA, Cengiz; AYDEMİR, Ömer

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Internal State Scale (ISS) was developed to simultaneously assess manic and depressive symptoms in bipolar disorder. In the present study, the validity and reliability of the Turkish version of ISS (ISS-TR) were examined. The present study aimed to present the psychometric properties of this scale. Methods The sample consisted of 200 outpatients with bipolar disorder and 49 healthy controls. Participants completed the Turkish Internal State Scale (ISS-TR), the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), and the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS). Results Reliability analyses revealed that the Cronbach alfa coefficient of ISS was 0.88 for the whole sample. Item-total correlations ranged from 0.15 to 0.78. Two factors emerged as a result of factor analysis: “mania” and “depression-well-being.” Test–retest correlations were determined for the mania subscale as r=0.654, p<0.01 and for the depression-well-being subscale as r=0.356, p<0.01. The correlations between BPRS and both subscales were quite high. The correlation between HDRS and the depression-well-being subscale was higher (r=0.475) than that between HDRS and the mania subscale, whereas the correlation between YMRS and the mania subscale was higher (r=0.818) than that between YMRS and the depression-well-being subscale. It was seen that ISS could discriminate between the clinical and healthy control samples. In addition, it was observed that the mania subscale predicted a manic period more strongly, while the depression-well-being subscale predicted a depressive period better. Conclusion ISS is a valid and reliable scale that can be used to simultaneously assess manic and depressive symptoms. It is thought that ISS will be useful in the recognition of prodromal symptoms and in the process of maintenance treatment. PMID:28373798

  20. Large Scale Hierarchical K-Means Based Image Retrieval With MapReduce

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-27

    LARGE SCALE HIERARCHICAL K-MEANS BASED IMAGE RETRIEVAL WITH MAPREDUCE THESIS William E. Murphy, Second Lieutenant, USAF AFIT-ENG-14-M-56 DEPARTMENT...RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED The views expressed in this thesis are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the...subject to copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENG-14-M-56 LARGE SCALE HIERARCHICAL K-MEANS BASED IMAGE RETRIEVAL WITH MAPREDUCE THESIS

  1. Autistic traits are linked to reduced adaptive coding of face identity and selectively poorer face recognition in men but not women.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Gillian; Jeffery, Linda; Taylor, Libby; Ewing, Louise

    2013-11-01

    Our ability to discriminate and recognize thousands of faces despite their similarity as visual patterns relies on adaptive, norm-based, coding mechanisms that are continuously updated by experience. Reduced adaptive coding of face identity has been proposed as a neurocognitive endophenotype for autism, because it is found in autism and in relatives of individuals with autism. Autistic traits can also extend continuously into the general population, raising the possibility that reduced adaptive coding of face identity may be more generally associated with autistic traits. In the present study, we investigated whether adaptive coding of face identity decreases as autistic traits increase in an undergraduate population. Adaptive coding was measured using face identity aftereffects, and autistic traits were measured using the Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ) and its subscales. We also measured face and car recognition ability to determine whether autistic traits are selectively related to face recognition difficulties. We found that men who scored higher on levels of autistic traits related to social interaction had reduced adaptive coding of face identity. This result is consistent with the idea that atypical adaptive face-coding mechanisms are an endophenotype for autism. Autistic traits were also linked with face-selective recognition difficulties in men. However, there were some unexpected sex differences. In women, autistic traits were linked positively, rather than negatively, with adaptive coding of identity, and were unrelated to face-selective recognition difficulties. These sex differences indicate that autistic traits can have different neurocognitive correlates in men and women and raise the intriguing possibility that endophenotypes of autism can differ in males and females.

  2. Geminal-spanning orbitals make explicitly correlated reduced-scaling coupled-cluster methods robust, yet simple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavošević, Fabijan; Neese, Frank; Valeev, Edward F.

    2014-08-01

    We present a production implementation of reduced-scaling explicitly correlated (F12) coupled-cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) method based on pair-natural orbitals (PNOs). A key feature is the reformulation of the explicitly correlated terms using geminal-spanning orbitals that greatly reduce the truncation errors of the F12 contribution. For the standard S66 benchmark of weak intermolecular interactions, the cc-pVDZ-F12 PNO CCSD F12 interaction energies reproduce the complete basis set CCSD limit with mean absolute error <0.1 kcal/mol, and at a greatly reduced cost compared to the conventional CCSD F12.

  3. Extreme robustness of scaling in sample space reducing processes explains Zipf’s law in diffusion on directed networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corominas-Murtra, Bernat; Hanel, Rudolf; Thurner, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    It has been shown recently that a specific class of path-dependent stochastic processes, which reduce their sample space as they unfold, lead to exact scaling laws in frequency and rank distributions. Such sample space reducing processes offer an alternative new mechanism to understand the emergence of scaling in countless processes. The corresponding power law exponents were shown to be related to noise levels in the process. Here we show that the emergence of scaling is not limited to the simplest SSRPs, but holds for a huge domain of stochastic processes that are characterised by non-uniform prior distributions. We demonstrate mathematically that in the absence of noise the scaling exponents converge to -1 (Zipf’s law) for almost all prior distributions. As a consequence it becomes possible to fully understand targeted diffusion on weighted directed networks and its associated scaling laws in node visit distributions. The presence of cycles can be properly interpreted as playing the same role as noise in SSRPs and, accordingly, determine the scaling exponents. The result that Zipf’s law emerges as a generic feature of diffusion on networks, regardless of its details, and that the exponent of visiting times is related to the amount of cycles in a network could be relevant for a series of applications in traffic-, transport- and supply chain management.

  4. Compulsive use of Internet-based sexually explicit media: Adaptation and validation of the Compulsive Internet Use Scale (CIUS).

    PubMed

    Downing, Martin J; Antebi, Nadav; Schrimshaw, Eric W

    2014-06-01

    Despite evidence that viewing sexually explicit media (SEM) may contribute to greater numbers of sexual partners, sexual risk taking, greater interest in group sex, and lower self-esteem among men who have sex with men (MSM), research has not addressed compulsive use of Internet-based SEM due to the lack of a validated measure for this population. This report investigates the psychometric properties of the 14-item Compulsive Internet Use Scale (CIUS; Meerkerk, van den Eijnden, Vermulst, & Garretsen, 2009) adapted to assess the severity of compulsive Internet SEM use. A total of 265 Internet SEM-viewing MSM participated in an online survey about their SEM preferences, viewing habits, and recent sexual behaviors. A principal components analysis revealed a single-component, 13-item scale to adequately assess the cognitive, emotional, and behavioral aspects of this phenomenon, with a high internal consistency (α=.92). Greater compulsive use of Internet SEM was positively correlated with several relevant variables including boredom, sexual frustration, time spent viewing Internet SEM, and number of recent male sexual partners. The results offer preliminary evidence for the reliability and validity of using an adapted version of the CIUS to understand compulsive Internet SEM use, and allow for more research into the potential negative consequences of compulsive SEM use.

  5. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Nursing Student Satisfaction Scale for use with Brazilian nursing students

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Carolina Domingues; Barlem, Edison Luiz Devos; Barlem, Jamila Geri Tomaschewski; Dalmolin, Graziele de Lima; Pereira, Liliane Alves; Ferreira, Amanda Guimarães

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to cross-culturally adapt and validate the Nursing Student Satisfaction Scale (NSSS) for use with nursing students in the Brazilian context. Method: this was a quantitative exploratory and descriptive study using a cross-sectional design conducted with 123 undergraduate nursing students studying at a public university in the south of Brazil. The cross-cultural adaptation was performed according to international guidelines. Validation for use in a Brazilian context was performed using factor analysis and Cronbach's alpha. Results: based on the expert committee assessment and pre-test, face and content validity were considered satisfactory. Factor analysis resulted in three constructs: curriculum and teaching; professional social interaction, and learning environment. The internal consistency of the instrument was satisfactory: the value of Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 0.93 for the instrument as a whole, and between 0.88 and 0.89 for the constructs. Conclusion: the Brazilian version of the Nursing Student Satisfaction Scale was shown to be reliable and validated for the evaluation of student satisfaction with undergraduate nursing programs, considering the aspects teaching activities, curriculum, professional social interaction, and learning environment. PMID:27579931

  6. Cultural Adaptation and Reliability of the Compliance with Standard Precautions Scale (CSPS) for Nurses in Brazil 1

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Fernanda Maria Vieira; Lam, Simon Ching; Gir, Elucir

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: this study aimed to carry of the cultural adaptation and to evaluate the reliability of the Compliance with Standard Precautions Scale (CSPS) for nurses in Brazil. Method: the adaptation process entailed translation, consensus among judges, back-translation, semantic validation and pretest. The reliability was evaluated by internal consistency (Cronbach alpha) and stability (test-retest). The instrument was administered to a sample group of 300 nurses who worked in a large hospital located in the city of São Paulo/SP, Brazil. Results: through the semantic validation, the items from the scale were considered understandable and deemed important for the nurse´s clinical practice. The CSPS Brazilian Portuguese version (CSPS-PB) revealed excellent interpretability. The Cronbach`s alpha was 0.61 and the intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.85. Conclusion: the initial study showed that CSPS-PB is appropriate to assess compliance with standard precautions among nurses in Brazil. The reliability was considered acceptable. Furhter study is necessary to evaluate its comprehensive psychometric properties. PMID:28301030

  7. Climate change and agricultural development: adapting Polish agriculture to reduce future nutrient loads in a coastal watershed.

    PubMed

    Piniewski, Mikołaj; Kardel, Ignacy; Giełczewski, Marek; Marcinkowski, Paweł; Okruszko, Tomasz

    2014-09-01

    Currently, there is a major concern about the future of nutrient loads discharged into the Baltic Sea from Polish rivers because they are main contributors to its eutrophication. To date, no watershed-scale studies have properly addressed this issue. This paper fills this gap by using a scenario-modeling framework applied in the Reda watershed, a small (482 km²) agricultural coastal area in northern Poland. We used the SWAT model to quantify the effects of future climate, land cover, and management changes under multiple scenarios up to the 2050s. The combined effect of climate and land use change on N-NO3 and P-PO4 loads is an increase by 20-60 and 24-31 %, respectively, depending on the intensity of future agricultural usage. Using a scenario that assumes a major shift toward a more intensive agriculture following the Danish model would bring significantly higher crop yields but cause a great deterioration of water quality. Using vegetative cover in winter and spring (VC) would be a very efficient way to reduce future P-PO4 loads so that they are lower than levels observed at present. However, even the best combination of measures (VC, buffer zones, reduced fertilization, and constructed wetlands) would not help to remediate heavily increased N-NO3 loads due to climate change and agricultural intensification.

  8. Large-scale adaptive divergence in Boechera fecunda, an endangered wild relative of Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Leamy, Larry J; Lee, Cheng-Ruei; Cousins, Vanessa; Mujacic, Ibro; Manzaneda, Antonio J; Prasad, Kasavajhala; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas; Song, Bao-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Many biological species are threatened with extinction because of a number of factors such as climate change and habitat loss, and their preservation depends on an accurate understanding of the extent of their genetic variability within and among populations. In this study, we assessed the genetic divergence of five quantitative traits in 10 populations of an endangered cruciferous species, Boechera fecunda, found in only several populations in each of two geographic regions (WEST and EAST) in southwestern Montana. We analyzed variation in quantitative traits, neutral molecular markers, and environmental factors and provided evidence that despite the restricted geographical distribution of this species, it exhibits a high level of genetic variation and regional adaptation. Conservation efforts therefore should be directed to the preservation of populations in each of these two regions without attempting transplantation between regions. Heritabilities and genetic coefficients of variation estimated from nested ANOVAs were generally high for leaf and rosette traits, although lower (and not significantly different from 0) for water-use efficiency. Measures of quantitative genetic differentiation, QST, were calculated for each trait from each pair of populations. For three of the five traits, these values were significantly higher between regions compared with those within regions (after adjustment for neutral genetic variation, FST). This suggested that natural selection has played an important role in producing regional divergence in this species. Our analysis also revealed that the B. fecunda populations appear to be locally adapted due, at least in part, to differences in environmental conditions in the EAST and WEST regions. PMID:25473471

  9. Adaptations to migration in birds: behavioural strategies, morphology and scaling effects.

    PubMed

    Hedenström, Anders

    2008-01-27

    The annual life cycle of many birds includes breeding, moult and migration. All these processes are time and energy consuming and the extent of investment in any one may compromise the others. The output from breeding is of course the ultimate goal for all birds, while the investment in moult and migration should be selected so that lifetime fitness is maximized. In particular, long-distance migrants breeding at high latitudes face severe time pressures, which is a probable reason why natural selection has evolved efficient behaviours, physiological and morphological adaptations allowing the maximum possible migration speed. Optimal migration theory commonly assumes time minimization as an overall strategy, but the minimization of energy cost and predation risk may also be involved. Based on these assumptions, it is possible to derive adaptive behaviours such as when and at which fuel load a stopover site should be abandoned. I review some core components of optimal migration theory together with some key predictions. A review of accumulated empirical tests of the departure rule indicates that time minimization is an important component of the overall migration strategy, and hence gives support to the assumption about time-selected migration. I also briefly discuss how the optimal policy may be implemented by the bird by applying a set of simple rules. The time constraints on migrants increase with increasing body size. Some consequences of this are discussed.

  10. Adaptive Sampling in Hierarchical Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Knap, J; Barton, N R; Hornung, R D; Arsenlis, A; Becker, R; Jefferson, D R

    2007-07-09

    We propose an adaptive sampling methodology for hierarchical multi-scale simulation. The method utilizes a moving kriging interpolation to significantly reduce the number of evaluations of finer-scale response functions to provide essential constitutive information to a coarser-scale simulation model. The underlying interpolation scheme is unstructured and adaptive to handle the transient nature of a simulation. To handle the dynamic construction and searching of a potentially large set of finer-scale response data, we employ a dynamic metric tree database. We study the performance of our adaptive sampling methodology for a two-level multi-scale model involving a coarse-scale finite element simulation and a finer-scale crystal plasticity based constitutive law.

  11. Translation and Cultural Adaptation of the Supports Intensity Scale in French

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamoureux-Hebert, Melanie; Morin, Diane

    2009-01-01

    The Supports Intensity Scale (SIS) was translated into French. The French version was then validated using a sample of 245 persons with intellectual disabilities between the ages of 16 and 75 years. The internal consistency was excellent (0.98). Correlations with age and levels of intellectual disabilities were evidence of good construct validity.…

  12. Adaptation and Validation of Aricak's Professional Self-Esteem Scale for Use in the Pakistani Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iqbal, Hafiz Muhammad; Bibi, Fariha; Gul, Asma

    2016-01-01

    One of the characteristics of teachers having great bearing upon students' learning is their professional self-esteem. Various instruments are available for measuring general self-esteem and professional self-esteem of teachers. For the present study it was deemed appropriate to use a Turkish professional self-esteem scale developed by Aricak…

  13. Adapting the Academic Motivation Scale for Use in Pre-Tertiary Mathematics Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Siew Yee; Chapman, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    The Academic Motivation Scale (AMS) is a comprehensive and widely used instrument for assessing motivation based on the self-determination theory. Currently, no such comprehensive instrument exists to assess the different domains of motivation (stipulated by the self-determination theory) in mathematics education at the pre-tertiary level (grades…

  14. An Examination and Validation of an Adapted Youth Experience Scale for University Sport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathwell, Scott; Young, Bradley W.

    2016-01-01

    Limited tools assess positive development through university sport. Such a tool was validated in this investigation using two independent samples of Canadian university athletes. In Study 1, 605 athletes completed 99 survey items drawn from the Youth Experience Scale (YES 2.0), and separate a priori measurement models were evaluated (i.e., 99…

  15. Adaptation of a pattern-scaling approach for assessment of local (village/valley) scale water resources and related vulnerabilities in the Upper Indus Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsythe, Nathan; Kilsby, Chris G.; Fowler, Hayley J.; Archer, David R.

    2010-05-01

    The water resources of the Upper Indus Basin (UIB) are of the utmost importance to the economic wellbeing of Pakistan. The irrigated agriculture made possible by Indus river runoff underpins the food security for Pakistan's nearly 200 million people. Contributions from hydropower account for more than one fifth of peak installed electrical generating capacity in a country where widespread, prolonged load-shedding handicaps business activity and industrial development. Pakistan's further socio-economic development thus depends largely on optimisation of its precious water resources. Confident, accurate seasonal predictions of water resource availability coupled with sound understanding of interannual variability are urgent insights needed by development planners and infrastructure managers at all levels. This study focuses on the challenge of providing meaningful quantitative information at the village/valley scale in the upper reaches of the UIB. Proceeding by progressive reductions in scale, the typology of the observed UIB hydrological regimes -- glacial, nival and pluvial -- are examined with special emphasis on interannual variability for individual seasons. Variations in discharge (runoff) are compared to observations of climate parameters (temperature, precipitation) and available spatial data (elevation, snow cover and snow-water-equivalent). The first scale presented is composed of the large-scale, long-record gauged UIB tributary basins. The Pakistan Water and Power Development Authority (WAPDA) has maintained these stations for several decades in order to monitor seasonal flows and accumulate data for design of further infrastructure. Data from basins defined by five gauging stations on the Indus, Hunza, Gilgit and Astore rivers are examined. The second scale presented is a set of smaller gauged headwater catchments with short records. These gauges were installed by WAPDA and its partners amongst the international development agencies to assess potential

  16. Fine-scale geographic variation in photosynthetic-related traits of Picea glauca seedlings indicates local adaptation to climate.

    PubMed

    Benomar, Lahcen; Lamhamedi, Mohammed S; Villeneuve, Isabelle; Rainville, André; Beaulieu, Jean; Bousquet, Jean; Margolis, Hank A

    2015-08-01

    Climate-related variations in functional traits of boreal tree species can result both from physiological acclimation and genetic adaptation of local populations to their biophysical environment. To improve our understanding and prediction of the physiological and growth responses of populations to climate change, we studied the role of climate of seed origin in determining variations in functional traits and its implications for tree improvement programs for a commonly reforested boreal conifer, white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss). We evaluated growth, root-to-shoot ratio (R/S), specific leaf area (SLA), needle nitrogen (N(mass)), total non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) and photosynthetic traits of 3-year-old seedlings in a greenhouse experiment using seed from six seed orchards (SO) representing the different regions where white spruce is reforested in Québec. Height and total dry mass (TDM) were positively correlated with photosynthetic capacity (A(max)), stomatal conductance (g(s)) and mesophyll conductance (g(m)). Total dry mass, but not height growth, was strongly correlated with latitude of seed origin (SO) and associated climate variables. A(max), g(s), g(m) and more marginally, photosynthetic nitrogen-use efficiency (PNUE) were positively associated with the mean July temperature of the SO, while water use efficiency (WUE) was negatively associated. Maximum rates of carboxylation (V(cmax)), maximum rates of electron transport (J(max)), SLA, N(mass), NSC and R/S showed no pattern. Our results did not demonstrate a higher Amax for northern seed orchards, although this has been previously hypothesized as an adaptation mechanism for maintaining carbon uptake in northern regions. We suggest that gs, gm, WUE and PNUE are the functional traits most associated with fine-scale geographic clines and with the degree of local adaptation of white spruce populations to their biophysical environments. These geographic patterns may reflect in situ adaptive genetic

  17. Large-Scale Assessment of a Fully Automatic Co-Adaptive Motor Imagery-Based Brain Computer Interface

    PubMed Central

    Acqualagna, Laura; Botrel, Loic; Vidaurre, Carmen; Kübler, Andrea; Blankertz, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    In the last years Brain Computer Interface (BCI) technology has benefited from the development of sophisticated machine leaning methods that let the user operate the BCI after a few trials of calibration. One remarkable example is the recent development of co-adaptive techniques that proved to extend the use of BCIs also to people not able to achieve successful control with the standard BCI procedure. Especially for BCIs based on the modulation of the Sensorimotor Rhythm (SMR) these improvements are essential, since a not negligible percentage of users is unable to operate SMR-BCIs efficiently. In this study we evaluated for the first time a fully automatic co-adaptive BCI system on a large scale. A pool of 168 participants naive to BCIs operated the co-adaptive SMR-BCI in one single session. Different psychological interventions were performed prior the BCI session in order to investigate how motor coordination training and relaxation could influence BCI performance. A neurophysiological indicator based on the Power Spectral Density (PSD) was extracted by the recording of few minutes of resting state brain activity and tested as predictor of BCI performances. Results show that high accuracies in operating the BCI could be reached by the majority of the participants before the end of the session. BCI performances could be significantly predicted by the neurophysiological indicator, consolidating the validity of the model previously developed. Anyway, we still found about 22% of users with performance significantly lower than the threshold of efficient BCI control at the end of the session. Being the inter-subject variability still the major problem of BCI technology, we pointed out crucial issues for those who did not achieve sufficient control. Finally, we propose valid developments to move a step forward to the applicability of the promising co-adaptive methods. PMID:26891350

  18. Cultural adaptation of an intervention to reduce sexual risk behaviors among patients attending a STI clinic in St. Petersburg, Russia.

    PubMed

    Grau, Lauretta E; Krasnoselskikh, Tatiana V; Shaboltas, Alla V; Skochilov, Roman V; Kozlov, Andrei P; Abdala, Nadia

    2013-08-01

    Cultural adaptation is an important step in the process of implementing health promotion interventions that, having been proven to be effective in one culture, are being applied in another. This study describes the results of a formative investigation to culturally adapt a STI/HIV risk reduction intervention for use in St. Petersburg, Russia. Analyses of data from brief elicitation interviews, focus groups, community experts, and a pilot test of the adapted intervention identified environmental, cognitive-information processing, and affect-motivation factors that needed to be addressed during the adaptation process. The participant/counselor relationship was adapted to reflect a hierarchical (cf. collaborative) relationship in order to accommodate Russian expectations about patient interactions with healthcare experts. Key skills building activities (e.g., identification of personal risk behaviors, role-playing) were approached gradually or indirectly in order to maintain participants' engagement in the intervention, and close-ended questions were added to assist participants in understanding unfamiliar concepts such as "triggers" and self-efficacy. Information about the prevalence of HIV/STI infections and alcohol use included data specific to St. Petersburg to increase the personal relevance of these materials and messages. Intervention components were tailored to participants' risk reduction and informational needs. No gender differences that would have justified adaptation of the intervention approach or content were noted. Examples of specific adaptations and the key issues to attend to when adapting behavioral interventions for use in Russian clinical settings are discussed.

  19. Reducing Mercury Pollution from Artisanal and Small-Scale Gold Mining

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    To reduce airborne mercury emissions from these Gold Shops, EPA and the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have partnered to design a low cost, easily constructible technology called the Gold Shop Mercury Capture System (MCS).

  20. Spectral solver for multi-scale plasma physics simulations with dynamically adaptive number of moments

    SciTech Connect

    Vencels, Juris; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Johnson, Alec; Peng, Ivy Bo; Laure, Erwin; Markidis, Stefano

    2015-06-01

    A spectral method for kinetic plasma simulations based on the expansion of the velocity distribution function in a variable number of Hermite polynomials is presented. The method is based on a set of non-linear equations that is solved to determine the coefficients of the Hermite expansion satisfying the Vlasov and Poisson equations. In this paper, we first show that this technique combines the fluid and kinetic approaches into one framework. Second, we present an adaptive strategy to increase and decrease the number of Hermite functions dynamically during the simulation. The technique is applied to the Landau damping and two-stream instability test problems. Performance results show 21% and 47% saving of total simulation time in the Landau and two-stream instability test cases, respectively.

  1. Spectral solver for multi-scale plasma physics simulations with dynamically adaptive number of moments

    DOE PAGES

    Vencels, Juris; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Johnson, Alec; ...

    2015-06-01

    A spectral method for kinetic plasma simulations based on the expansion of the velocity distribution function in a variable number of Hermite polynomials is presented. The method is based on a set of non-linear equations that is solved to determine the coefficients of the Hermite expansion satisfying the Vlasov and Poisson equations. In this paper, we first show that this technique combines the fluid and kinetic approaches into one framework. Second, we present an adaptive strategy to increase and decrease the number of Hermite functions dynamically during the simulation. The technique is applied to the Landau damping and two-stream instabilitymore » test problems. Performance results show 21% and 47% saving of total simulation time in the Landau and two-stream instability test cases, respectively.« less

  2. Application of DDES and IDDES with shear layer adapted subgrid length-scale to separated flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guseva, E. K.; Garbaruk, A. V.; Strelets, M. Kh

    2016-11-01

    A comparative study is conducted of the original versions of Delayed Detached- Eddy Simulation (DDES) and Improved DDES (IDDES) and these approaches combined with “shear-layer-adapted” (SLA) subgrid length-scale proposed recently for resolving the issue of delayed RANS-to-LES transition in separated shear layers in global hybrid RANS-LES approaches. Computations were carried out of two separated flows: a transonic flow past M 219 cavity and a subsonic flow over NASA wall mounted hump. Results of the computations suggest that the use of the SLA subgrid length-scale considerably accelerates transition to resolved three-dimensional turbulence in the separated shear layers and substantially improves agreement with the experimental data.

  3. Translation and adaptation of the fatigue severity scale for use in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Laranjeira, Carlos António

    2012-08-01

    The Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) is a widely used instrument to measure the impact of fatigue on specific types of functioning. This study aims to translate and test the reliability and validity of the Portuguese version of the FSS. The questionnaire was administered to a worker sample of 424 nurses. Reliability analysis showed satisfactory results (Cronbach's alpha coefficient = .87). The test-retest reliability was .85. The principal component analysis showed that the FSS was a measure with a one-factor structure. The construct validity of the total FSS score was assessed by correlation with Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) score, Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS) score, and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score. Each of the corresponding correlation coefficients among the total FSS score and MBI score, DASS score, and perceived fatigue score (VAS) were .55 (p < .01), .62 (p < .01), and .68 (p < .01), respectively, which shows sufficient construct validity. To measure the discriminant validity of FSS, we examined the differences in scores between groups in terms of the number of hours of sleep and overtime. The less nurses slept and the longer they worked, the higher their total FSS score became. This preliminary validation study of the Portuguese version of FSS proved that it is an acceptable, reliable, and valid measure of fatigue in the working population.

  4. Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale-12, translation, adaptation and validation for the Persian language population.

    PubMed

    Nakhostin Ansari, Noureddin; Naghdi, Soofia; Mohammadi, Roghaye; Hasson, Scott

    2015-02-01

    The Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale-12 (MSWS-12) is a multi-item rating scale used to assess the perspectives of patients about the impact of MS on their walking ability. The aim of this study was to examine the reliability and validity of the MSWS-12 in Persian speaking patients with MS. The MSWS-12 questionnaire was translated into Persian language according to internationally adopted standards involving forward-backward translation, reviewed by an expert committee and tested on the pre-final version. In this cross-sectional study, 100 participants (50 patients with MS and 50 healthy subjects) were included. The MSWS-12 was administered twice 7 days apart to 30 patients with MS for test and retest reliability. Internal consistency reliability was Cronbach's α 0.96 for test and 0.97 for retest. There were no significant floor or ceiling effects. Test-retest reliability was excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] agreement of 0.98, 95% CI, 0.95-0.99) confirming the reproducibility of the Persian MSWS-12. Construct validity using known group methods was demonstrated through a significant difference in the Persian MSWS-12 total score between the patients with MS and healthy subjects. Factor analysis extracted 2 latent factors (79.24% of the total variance). A second factor analysis suggested the 9-item Persian MSWS as a unidimensional scale for patients with MS. The Persian MSWS-12 was found to be valid and reliable for assessing walking ability in Persian speaking patients with MS.

  5. Adaptive Telemetry Multiplexer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinderson, R. L.; Salazar, G. A.; Haddick, C. M., Jr.; Spahn, C. J.; Venkatesh, C. N.

    1989-01-01

    Telemetry-data-acquisition unit adjusted remotely to produce changes in sampling rate, sampling channels, measurement scale, and output-bias level. Functional configuration adapted to changing conditions or new requirements by distant operator over telemetry link. Reconfiguration done in real time, without removing equipment from service. Bus-interface unit accepts reprogramming commands and translates them for low-rate adaptive multiplexer. Reprogrammable equipment reduces need for spare parts, since not necessary to stock variety of hardware with fixed characteristics. Adaptive multiplexer performs well in tests, amplitude errors less than 0.5 percent, distortion less than 0.25 percent, and crosstalk and common-mode rejection indiscernible.

  6. Rural area in a European country from a health care point of view: an adaption of the Rural Ranking Scale

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In many countries, rural areas are facing a shortage of general practitioners (GPs). Appropriate strategies to address this challenge are needed. From a health care delivery point of view, the term rural area is often poorly defined. However rural areas have to be adequately defined to ensure specific strategies are tailored to these environments. The aims of this study were to translate the New Zealand 6-item Rural Ranking Scale (RRS), to culturally adapt it and to implement it to identify rural areas from a health care delivery perspective. Therefore we aimed to validate the RRS by defining cut-off scores for urban, semi-rural and rural areas in Germany. Methods After receiving permission, two researchers independently translated the RRS. In a consensus meeting, four items were identified that had to be culturally adapted. The modified RRS-Germany (mRRS-G) was sent to 724 GPs located in urban, semi-rural and rural areas to validate the “rurality” scoring system for conditions in Germany. Results Four items, “travelling time to next major hospital”, “on-call duty”, “regular peripheral clinic” and “on-call for major traumas” had to be adapted due to differences in the health care system. The survey had a response rate of 33.7%. A factor analysis showed a three dimensional structure of the mRRS-G scale with a poor internal consistency. Nevertheless, the three items regarding “on-call duty”, “next major hospital” and “most distant boundary covered by your practice” were identified as significant predictors for rurality. The adapted cut-off point for rurality in Germany was 16. From this study’s participants, 9 met the RRS cut-off point for rurality (a score of 35 or more). Conclusion Compared with New Zealand rurality scores based on this tool, German scores are far less rural from a health care delivery point of view. We consider that the construct of rurality has more aspects than those assessed by the m

  7. Technology demonstration for reducing mercury emissions from small-scale gold refining facilities.

    SciTech Connect

    Habegger, L. J.; Fernandez, L. E.; Engle, M.; Bailey, J. L.; Peterson, D. P.; MacDonell, M. M.; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

    2008-06-30

    Gold that is brought from artisanal and small-scale gold mining areas to gold shops for processing and sale typically contains 5-40% mercury. The uncontrolled removal of the residual mercury in gold shops by using high-temperature evaporation can be a significant source of mercury emissions in urban areas where the shops are located. Emissions from gold shop hoods during a burn can exceed 1,000 mg/m{sup 3}. Because the saturation concentration of mercury vapor at operating temperatures at the hood exhaust is less than 100 mg/m{sup 3}, the dominant component of the exhaust is in the form of aerosol or liquid particles. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), with technical support from Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne), has completed a project to design and test a technology to remove the dominant aerosol component in the emissions from gold shops. The objective was to demonstrate a technology that could be manufactured at low cost and by using locally available materials and manufacturing capabilities. Six prototypes designed by Argonne were locally manufactured, installed, and tested in gold shops in Itaituba and Creporizao, Brazil. The initial prototype design incorporated a pebble bed as the media for collecting the mercury aerosols, and a mercury collection efficiency of over 90% was demonstrated. Though achieving high efficiencies, the initial prototype was determined to have practical disadvantages such as excessive weight, a somewhat complex construction, and high costs (>US$1,000). To further simplify the construction, operation, and associated costs, a second prototype design was developed in which the pebble bed was replaced with slotted steel baffle plates. The system was designed to have flexibility for installation in various hood configurations. The second prototype with the baffle plate design was installed and tested in several different hood/exhaust systems to determine the optimal installation configuration. The significance of

  8. The mechanism of reducing scale during magnetic water treatment in heat-power devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshoridze, S. I.; Levin, Yu. K.

    2013-03-01

    A model describing the mechanism of the magnetic treatment of the water flow based on the Deryagin-Landau-Ferway-Overbeck theory is refined. The effect of homogeneous generation of new nuclei during the coagulation of critical-size particles in the colloid solution that lost stability is taken into account. This allowed us to approach the qualitative evaluations of efficiency of the scale-proof treatment of the water flow to the actual experimental data.

  9. Scaling Task Management in Space and Time: Reducing User Overhead in Ubiquitous-Computing Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-28

    limitation of this approach is that it does not easily scale to large numbers of tasks over extended periods. Busy users may intermittently touch on...dozens of different tasks over the course of a workweek, and this strategy keeps all the applications consuming resources and cluttering the workspace...RETSINA framework, with applications in domains such as financial portfolio management, ecommerce and military logistics [88]; and more recently Carnegie

  10. Use of Polyacrylamide to Reduce Seepage From Unlined Irrigation Canals: Initial Results From Small Scale Test Troughs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susfalk, R. B.; Young, M. H.; Schmidt, M.; Epstein, B. J.; Goreham, J.; Swhihart, J.; Smith, D.

    2005-12-01

    Polyacrylamide (PAM) is a class of long-chain synthetic polymers that are used extensively in food packaging, paper manufacturing, wastewater treatment, and as a soil amendment to reduce erosion. Recent empirical evidence has shown that applying linear, anionic PAM seepage can also reduce seepage from unlined irrigation canals. A diverse set of experiments has been initiated to understand the efficacy of PAM usage in ditch environments. The experiments span multiple scales, from small-scale bench top and artificial furrow experiments, to larger engineered furrows and irrigation ditches. Our objective was to assess the effectiveness of different PAM application methods and concentrations on seepage reductions in small scale, artificial Test Troughs (TT). The TT consists of two 24 m long, 10 cm deep furrows formed from native ASTM C-33 sand. During water application, inflows, outflows, and seepage from under the furrows were continuously measured. PAM in either granular or partially hydrated form was applied at various rates. The results presented here cover one facet of the research program. The application of granular PAM to the TT reduced seepage from 49 L/min to less than 22 L/min, depending on treatment. A PAM application rate of 44 kg/(canal ha) reduced seepage by 69+/-9 percent, and was more effective than an application rate of 11 kg/(canal ha) that reduced seepage by 56+/-22 percent. Seepage reduction was calculated using flow rates between 400 and 600 elapsed minutes. Inclusion of later data (up to 1440 min) into seepage calculations was complicated by a reduction in seepage at the control trough caused either by a reduction in head or deposition of suspended sediment. We hypothesize that the PAM-sediment layer present in the treated trough exerted a greater control on seepage than sediment deposition alone. However, heavy suspended sediment loads associated with hydrologic events reduced seepage rates within both the control and treated troughs, somewhat

  11. Validation of the Narcissistic Grandiosity Scale and creation of reduced item variants.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Michael; Carter, Nathan T; Campbell, W Keith; Miller, Joshua D

    2016-12-01

    The Narcissistic Grandiosity Scale (NGS) is a short adjective-based measure of narcissistic grandiosity (Rosenthal, Hooley, & Steshenko, 2007). The NGS has already shown promise as a measure of grandiose narcissism, but it has never been the subject of a formal validation study. In the current study (N = 870 across 3 samples), the factor structure of NGS was examined and item response theory analyses were used to generate abbreviated versions of the scale. The NGS scales' relations to measures of grandiose and vulnerable narcissism, the five-factor model (FFM), the interpersonal circumplex, self-esteem, and the Personality Inventory of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders-Fifth Edition (DSM-5, PID-5) were assessed. The correlation profile of the NGS was also correlated with expert ratings of prototypical cases of narcissistic personality disorder using both the FFM and PID-5 trait profiles. Overall, the NGS was found to be a unidimensional measure of narcissistic grandiosity with good convergent, discriminant, and criterion validity. The abbreviated versions of the NGS manifested strong reliability and associations entirely consistent with the full version. (PsycINFO Database Record

  12. The PhytoSCALE project: calibrating phytoplankton cell size as a proxy for climatic adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderiks, Jorijntje; Gerecht, Andrea; Hannisdal, Bjarte; Liow, Lee Hsiang; Reitan, Trond; Schweder, Tore; Edvardsen, Bente

    2013-04-01

    The Cenozoic fossil record reveals that coccolithophores (marine unicellular haptophyte algae) were globally more common and widespread, larger, and more heavily calcified before 34 million years ago (Ma), in a high-CO2 greenhouse world. We have recently demonstrated that changes in atmospheric CO2 have, directly or indirectly, exerted an important long-term control on the ecological prominence of coccolithophores as a whole [1]. On closer inspection, this macroevolutionary pattern primarily reflects the decline in abundance and subsequent extinction of large-celled and heavily calcified lineages, while small-sized species appear to have been more successful in adapting to the post-34 Ma "icehouse" world. Coccolith size (length) is a proxy for cellular volume-to-surface ratios (V:SA), as determined from fossil coccosphere geometries. Algal V:SA provides physiological constraints on carbon acquisition and other resource uptake rates, affecting both photosynthesis and calcification, and is therefore considered to be a key indicator of adaptation. As a general rule, small cells have faster growth rates than large cells under similar environmental conditions, giving small species a competitive advantage when resources become limiting. Our research aims to bridge the gap between short-term experimental observations of physiological and phenotypic plasticity in the modern species Emiliania huxleyi and Coccolithus pelagicus, and time series of the long-term phenotypic variability of their Cenozoic ancestors. Single-clone growth experiments revealed significant plasticity in cell size and coccolith volume under growth-limiting conditions. However, the range in coccolith size (length) remained relatively constant for single genotypes between various growth conditions. With these new data we test to what extent the size variation observed in the fossil time series is a reflection of anagenetic changes (i.e. evolution of an ancestral species to a descendant species without

  13. Fine-scale local adaptation of weevil mouthpart length and camellia pericarp thickness: altitudinal gradient of a putative arms race.

    PubMed

    Toju, Hirokazu

    2008-05-01

    Although coevolutionary theory predicts that evolutionary interactions between species are spatially hierarchical, few studies have examined coevolutionary processes at multiple spatial scales. In an antagonistic system involving a plant, the Japanese camellia (Camellia japonica), and its obligate seed predator, the camellia weevil (Curculio camelliae), I elucidated the local adaptation of a camellia defensive armament (pericarp thickness) and a weevil offensive armament (rostrum length) within Yakushima Island (ca. 30 km in diameter), compared to a larger-scale variation in those traits throughout Japan reported in previous studies. Results showed that camellia pericarp thickness and weevil rostrum length vary remarkably within several kilometers on this island. In addition, geographic variation in each camellia and weevil armament was best explained by the armament size of the sympatric participant than by abiotic environmental heterogeneity. However, I also found that camellia pericarp thickness significantly decreased in cool-temperate (i.e., highland) areas, suggesting the contributions of climate on the spatial structuring of the weevil-camellia interaction. Interestingly, relatively thin pericarps occurred not only in the highlands but also in some low-altitude areas, indicating that other factors such as nonrandom or asymmetric gene flow play important roles in the metapopulation processes of interspecific interactions at small spatial scales.

  14. Full-scale experiments with an ejector to reduce jet engine exhaust noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B. J.

    1973-01-01

    Experiments with a modified J65 turbojet engine and ejector resulted in noise power reductions as large as 13 decibels in the low-frequency range. High-frequency noise power, which appeared to originate mainly from the mixing processes within the ejector, increased. Peak velocities at the ejector exit were reduced by one-half to two-thirds, although survey rakes showed that mixing was not complete. Acoustical lining inside the ejector would reduce the perceived noise level (in PNdB) by removing much of the high-frequency noise.

  15. Large-scale synthesis of reduced graphene oxides with uniformly coated polyaniline for supercapacitor applications.

    PubMed

    Salunkhe, Rahul R; Hsu, Shao-Hui; Wu, Kevin C W; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2014-06-01

    We report an effective route for the preparation of layered reduced graphene oxide (rGO) with uniformly coated polyaniline (PANI) layers. These nanocomposites are synthesized by chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline monomer in the presence of layered rGO. SEM, TEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), FTIR, and Raman spectroscopy analysis results demonstrated that reduced graphene oxide-polyaniline (rGO-PANI) nanocomposites are successfully synthesized. Because of synergistic effects, rGO-PANI nanocomposites prepared by this approach exhibit excellent capacitive performance with a high specific capacitance of 286 F g(-1) and high cycle reversibility of 94 % after 2000 cycles.

  16. Optimal-adaptive filters for modelling spectral shape, site amplification, and source scaling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, Erdal

    1989-01-01

    This paper introduces some applications of optimal filtering techniques to earthquake engineering by using the so-called ARMAX models. Three applications are presented: (a) spectral modelling of ground accelerations, (b) site amplification (i.e., the relationship between two records obtained at different sites during an earthquake), and (c) source scaling (i.e., the relationship between two records obtained at a site during two different earthquakes). A numerical example for each application is presented by using recorded ground motions. The results show that the optimal filtering techniques provide elegant solutions to above problems, and can be a useful tool in earthquake engineering.

  17. Lack of Cross-Scale Linkages Reduces Robustness of Community-Based Fisheries Management

    PubMed Central

    Cudney-Bueno, Richard; Basurto, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Community-based management and the establishment of marine reserves have been advocated worldwide as means to overcome overexploitation of fisheries. Yet, researchers and managers are divided regarding the effectiveness of these measures. The “tragedy of the commons” model is often accepted as a universal paradigm, which assumes that unless managed by the State or privatized, common-pool resources are inevitably overexploited due to conflicts between the self-interest of individuals and the goals of a group as a whole. Under this paradigm, the emergence and maintenance of effective community-based efforts that include cooperative risky decisions as the establishment of marine reserves could not occur. In this paper, we question these assumptions and show that outcomes of commons dilemmas can be complex and scale-dependent. We studied the evolution and effectiveness of a community-based management effort to establish, monitor, and enforce a marine reserve network in the Gulf of California, Mexico. Our findings build on social and ecological research before (1997–2001), during (2002) and after (2003–2004) the establishment of marine reserves, which included participant observation in >100 fishing trips and meetings, interviews, as well as fishery dependent and independent monitoring. We found that locally crafted and enforced harvesting rules led to a rapid increase in resource abundance. Nevertheless, news about this increase spread quickly at a regional scale, resulting in poaching from outsiders and a subsequent rapid cascading effect on fishing resources and locally-designed rule compliance. We show that cooperation for management of common-pool fisheries, in which marine reserves form a core component of the system, can emerge, evolve rapidly, and be effective at a local scale even in recently organized fisheries. Stakeholder participation in monitoring, where there is a rapid feedback of the systems response, can play a key role in reinforcing

  18. Reducing Benzene and Cresol Levels in National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Pilot-Scale Biorefinergy Scrubber Water

    SciTech Connect

    Buzek, M.L.; Phillips, S.

    2004-01-01

    The Thermochemical Process Development Unit at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory converts biomass into energy by gasification or pyrolysis. The aqueous effluent generated in these processes must be disposed of as hazardous waste according to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act because certain components exceed the regulatory concentration limit. Gas stripping of the scrubber water was investigated as a method of reducing benzene and cresol levels. A custom-designed packed-bed column was built and a half-factorial experimental design was implemented to determine the effects of gas flow rate, liquid flow rate, and column packing height on the final benzene concentration in the liquid. The experimental results show that packing height had a significant effect on final benzene concentration; gas flow rate and liquid flow rate had little effect. The effects of each design variable on final cresol concentration were not determined. Although the current column design did significantly reduce the benzene and cresol levels in the scrubber water, it did not reduce the concentrations below the regulatory limits. A full-factorial experimental design will be implemented with an increased packing height. Other variables, including column diameter and packing type, will be investigated to determine their effects on final benzene and cresol concentrations. Once the packed-bed column is determined to be effective in reducing contaminant concentrations below the regulatory limit, photocatalytic oxidation will be explored for remediating the benzene and cresol from the gas stream.

  19. Adapting the Propensity for Angry Driving Scale for use in Australian research.

    PubMed

    Leal, Nerida L; Pachana, Nancy A

    2008-11-01

    Road rage is a topic that receives consistent attention in both the road safety literature and media. Before Australian research can address the underlying factors associated with road rage, there is a need for a valid instrument appropriate for use in this context. The present program of research consisted of two studies. Study 1 used a university sample to adjust the scoring technique and response options of a 19-item American measure of the propensity for angry driving with acceptable reliability and validity. In Study 2, Factor Analysis confirmed a one-factor solution and resulted in a 15-item scale, the Australian Propensity for Angry Driving Scale (Aus-PADS), with a coefficient alpha of .82 (N=433). The Aus-PADS may be used in future research to broaden the Australian road rage literature and to improve our understanding of the underlying processes associated with road rage in order to prevent the problem. Future research should also confirm the factor structure and generate normative data with a more representative sample.

  20. Genome Scale Evolution of Myxoma Virus Reveals Host-Pathogen Adaptation and Rapid Geographic Spread

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Peter J.; Rogers, Matthew B.; Fitch, Adam; DePasse, Jay V.; Cattadori, Isabella M.; Twaddle, Alan C.; Hudson, Peter J.; Tscharke, David C.; Read, Andrew F.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2013-01-01

    The evolutionary interplay between myxoma virus (MYXV) and the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) following release of the virus in Australia in 1950 as a biological control is a classic example of host-pathogen coevolution. We present a detailed genomic and phylogeographic analysis of 30 strains of MYXV, including the Australian progenitor strain Standard Laboratory Strain (SLS), 24 Australian viruses isolated from 1951 to 1999, and three isolates from the early radiation in Britain from 1954 and 1955. We show that in Australia MYXV has spread rapidly on a spatial scale, with multiple lineages cocirculating within individual localities, and that both highly virulent and attenuated viruses were still present in the field through the 1990s. In addition, the detection of closely related virus lineages at sites 1,000 km apart suggests that MYXV moves freely in geographic space, with mosquitoes, fleas, and rabbit migration all providing means of transport. Strikingly, despite multiple introductions, all modern viruses appear to be ultimately derived from the original introductions of SLS. The rapidity of MYXV evolution was also apparent at the genomic scale, with gene duplications documented in a number of viruses. Duplication of potential virulence genes may be important in increasing the expression of virulence proteins and provides the basis for the evolution of novel functions. Mutations leading to loss of open reading frames were surprisingly frequent and in some cases may explain attenuation, but no common mutations that correlated with virulence or attenuation were identified. PMID:24067966

  1. Genome scale evolution of myxoma virus reveals host-pathogen adaptation and rapid geographic spread.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Peter J; Rogers, Matthew B; Fitch, Adam; Depasse, Jay V; Cattadori, Isabella M; Twaddle, Alan C; Hudson, Peter J; Tscharke, David C; Read, Andrew F; Holmes, Edward C; Ghedin, Elodie

    2013-12-01

    The evolutionary interplay between myxoma virus (MYXV) and the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) following release of the virus in Australia in 1950 as a biological control is a classic example of host-pathogen coevolution. We present a detailed genomic and phylogeographic analysis of 30 strains of MYXV, including the Australian progenitor strain Standard Laboratory Strain (SLS), 24 Australian viruses isolated from 1951 to 1999, and three isolates from the early radiation in Britain from 1954 and 1955. We show that in Australia MYXV has spread rapidly on a spatial scale, with multiple lineages cocirculating within individual localities, and that both highly virulent and attenuated viruses were still present in the field through the 1990s. In addition, the detection of closely related virus lineages at sites 1,000 km apart suggests that MYXV moves freely in geographic space, with mosquitoes, fleas, and rabbit migration all providing means of transport. Strikingly, despite multiple introductions, all modern viruses appear to be ultimately derived from the original introductions of SLS. The rapidity of MYXV evolution was also apparent at the genomic scale, with gene duplications documented in a number of viruses. Duplication of potential virulence genes may be important in increasing the expression of virulence proteins and provides the basis for the evolution of novel functions. Mutations leading to loss of open reading frames were surprisingly frequent and in some cases may explain attenuation, but no common mutations that correlated with virulence or attenuation were identified.

  2. Xylanase and laccase based enzymatic kraft pulp bleaching reduces adsorbable organic halogen (AOX) in bleach effluents: a pilot scale study.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Abha; Thakur, Vasanta Vadde; Shrivastava, Anita; Jain, Rakesh Kumar; Mathur, Rajeev Mohan; Gupta, Rishi; Kuhad, Ramesh Chander

    2014-10-01

    In present study, xylanase and laccase were produced in a cost-effective manner up to 10 kg substrate level and evaluated in elemental chlorine free bleaching of Eucalyptus kraft pulp. Compared to the pulp pre-bleached with xylanase (15%) or laccase (25%) individually, the ClO2 savings were higher with sequential treatment of xylanase followed by laccase (35%) at laboratory scale. The sequential enzyme treatment when applied at pilot scale (50 kg pulp), resulted in improved pulp properties (50% reduced post color number, 15.71% increased tear index) and reduced AOX levels (34%) in bleach effluents. The decreased AOX level in effluents will help to meet AOX discharge limits, while improved pulp properties will be value addition to the paper.

  3. Semiautomated head-and-neck IMRT planning using dose warping and scaling to robustly adapt plans in a knowledge database containing potentially suboptimal plans

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Matthew Grzetic, Shelby; Lo, Joseph Y.; Lutzky, Carly; Brizel, David M.; Das, Shiva K.

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: Prior work by the authors and other groups has studied the creation of automated intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans of equivalent quality to those in a patient database of manually created clinical plans; those database plans provided guidance on the achievable sparing to organs-at-risk (OARs). However, in certain sites, such as head-and-neck, the clinical plans may not be sufficiently optimized because of anatomical complexity and clinical time constraints. This could lead to automated plans that suboptimally exploit OAR sparing. This work investigates a novel dose warping and scaling scheme that attempts to reduce effects of suboptimal sparing in clinical database plans, thus improving the quality of semiautomated head-and-neck cancer (HNC) plans. Methods: Knowledge-based radiotherapy (KBRT) plans for each of ten “query” patients were semiautomatically generated by identifying the most similar “match” patient in a database of 103 clinical manually created patient plans. The match patient’s plans were adapted to the query case by: (1) deforming the match beam fluences to suit the query target volume and (2) warping the match primary/boost dose distribution to suit the query geometry and using the warped distribution to generate query primary/boost optimization dose-volume constraints. Item (2) included a distance scaling factor to improve query OAR dose sparing with respect to the possibly suboptimal clinical match plan. To further compensate for a component plan of the match case (primary/boost) not optimally sparing OARs, the query dose volume constraints were reduced using a dose scaling factor to be the minimum from either (a) the warped component plan (primary or boost) dose distribution or (b) the warped total plan dose distribution (primary + boost) scaled in proportion to the ratio of component prescription dose to total prescription dose. The dose-volume constraints were used to plan the query case with no human intervention

  4. Accelerated seeded precipitation pre-treatment of municipal wastewater to reduce scaling.

    PubMed

    Sanciolo, Peter; Zou, Linda; Gray, Stephen; Leslie, Greg; Stevens, Daryl

    2008-05-01

    Membrane based treatment processes are very effective in removing salt from wastewater, but are hindered by calcium scale deposit formation. This study investigates the feasibility of removing calcium from treated sewage wastewater using accelerated seeded precipitation. The rate of calcium removal was measured during bench scale batch mode seeded precipitation experiments at pH 9.5 using various quantities of calcium carbonate as seed material. The results indicate that accelerated seeded precipitation may be a feasible option for the decrease of calcium in reverse osmosis concentrate streams during the desalination of treated sewage wastewater for irrigation purposes, promising decreased incidence of scaling and the option to control the sodium adsorption ratio and nutritional properties of the desalted water. It was found that accelerated seeded precipitation of calcium from treated sewage wastewater was largely ineffective if carried out without pre-treatment of the wastewater. Evidence was presented that suggests that phosphate may be a major interfering substance for the seeded precipitation of calcium from this type of wastewater. A pH adjustment to 9.5 followed by a 1-h equilibration period was found to be an effective pre-treatment for the removal of interferences. Calcium carbonate seed addition at 10 g l(-1) to wastewater that had been pre-treated in this way was found to result in calcium precipitation from supersaturated level at 60 mg l(-1) to saturated level at 5 mg l(-1). Approximately 90% reduction of the calcium level occurred 5 min after seed addition. A further 10% reduction was achieved 30 min after seed addition.

  5. Reduced adaptability, but no fundamental disruption, of norm-based face-coding mechanisms in cognitively able children and adolescents with autism.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Gillian; Ewing, Louise; Jeffery, Linda; Avard, Eleni; Taylor, Libby

    2014-09-01

    Faces are adaptively coded relative to visual norms that are updated by experience. This coding is compromised in autism and the broader autism phenotype, suggesting that atypical adaptive coding of faces may be an endophenotype for autism. Here we investigate the nature of this atypicality, asking whether adaptive face-coding mechanisms are fundamentally altered, or simply less responsive to experience, in autism. We measured adaptive coding, using face identity aftereffects, in cognitively able children and adolescents with autism and neurotypical age- and ability-matched participants. We asked whether these aftereffects increase with adaptor identity strength as in neurotypical populations, or whether they show a different pattern indicating a more fundamental alteration in face-coding mechanisms. As expected, face identity aftereffects were reduced in the autism group, but they nevertheless increased with adaptor strength, like those of our neurotypical participants, consistent with norm-based coding of face identity. Moreover, their aftereffects correlated positively with face recognition ability, consistent with an intact functional role for adaptive coding in face recognition ability. We conclude that adaptive norm-based face-coding mechanisms are basically intact in autism, but are less readily calibrated by experience.

  6. Math Anxiety Assessment with the Abbreviated Math Anxiety Scale: Applicability and Usefulness: Insights from the Polish Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Cipora, Krzysztof; Szczygieł, Monika; Willmes, Klaus; Nuerk, Hans-Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Math anxiety has an important impact on mathematical development and performance. However, although math anxiety is supposed to be a transcultural trait, assessment instruments are scarce and are validated mainly for Western cultures so far. Therefore, we aimed at examining the transcultural generality of math anxiety by a thorough investigation of the validity of math anxiety assessment in Eastern Europe. We investigated the validity and reliability of a Polish adaptation of the Abbreviated Math Anxiety Scale (AMAS), known to have very good psychometric characteristics in its original, American-English version as well as in its Italian and Iranian adaptations. We also observed high reliability, both for internal consistency and test-retest stability of the AMAS in the Polish sample. The results also show very good construct, convergent and discriminant validity: The factorial structure in Polish adult participants (n = 857) was very similar to the one previously found in other samples; AMAS scores correlated moderately in expected directions with state and trait anxiety, self-assessed math achievement and skill as well temperamental traits of emotional reactivity, briskness, endurance, and perseverance. Average scores obtained by participants as well as gender differences and correlations with external measures were also similar across cultures. Beyond the cultural comparison, we used path model analyses to show that math anxiety relates to math grades and self-competence when controlling for trait anxiety. The current study shows transcultural validity of math anxiety assessment with the AMAS. PMID:26648893

  7. A two Turbulence Kinetic Energy model as a scale-adaptive approach to modeling the planetary boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Ritthik; Stevens, Bjorn

    2016-03-01

    A two Turbulence Kinetic Energy (2TKE) model is developed to address the boundary layer "grey zone" problem. The model combines ideas from local and nonlocal models into a single energetically consistent framework. By applying the Reynolds averaging to the large eddy simulation (LES) equations that employ Deardorff's subgrid TKE, we arrive at a system of equations for the boundary layer quantities and two turbulence kinetic energies: one which encapsulates the TKE of large boundary-layer-scale eddies and another which represents the energy of eddies subgrid to the vertical grid size of a typical large-scale model. These two energies are linked via the turbulent cascade of energy from larger to smaller scales and are used to model the mixing in the boundary layer. The model is evaluated for three dry test cases and found to compare favorably to large eddy simulations. The usage of two TKEs for mixing helps reduce the dependency of the model on the vertical grid scale as well as on the free tropospheric stability and facilitates a smoother transition from convective to stable regimes. The usage of two TKEs representing two ranges of scales satisfies the prerequisite for modeling the boundary layer in the "grey zone": an idea that is explored further in a companion paper.

  8. MapReduce Based Parallel Neural Networks in Enabling Large Scale Machine Learning.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Yang, Jie; Huang, Yuan; Xu, Lixiong; Li, Siguang; Qi, Man

    2015-01-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) have been widely used in pattern recognition and classification applications. However, ANNs are notably slow in computation especially when the size of data is large. Nowadays, big data has received a momentum from both industry and academia. To fulfill the potentials of ANNs for big data applications, the computation process must be speeded up. For this purpose, this paper parallelizes neural networks based on MapReduce, which has become a major computing model to facilitate data intensive applications. Three data intensive scenarios are considered in the parallelization process in terms of the volume of classification data, the size of the training data, and the number of neurons in the neural network. The performance of the parallelized neural networks is evaluated in an experimental MapReduce computer cluster from the aspects of accuracy in classification and efficiency in computation.

  9. GraphReduce: Processing Large-Scale Graphs on Accelerator-Based Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, Dipanjan; Song, Shuaiwen; Agarwal, Kapil; Schwan, Karsten

    2015-11-15

    Recent work on real-world graph analytics has sought to leverage the massive amount of parallelism offered by GPU devices, but challenges remain due to the inherent irregularity of graph algorithms and limitations in GPU-resident memory for storing large graphs. We present GraphReduce, a highly efficient and scalable GPU-based framework that operates on graphs that exceed the device’s internal memory capacity. GraphReduce adopts a combination of edge- and vertex-centric implementations of the Gather-Apply-Scatter programming model and operates on multiple asynchronous GPU streams to fully exploit the high degrees of parallelism in GPUs with efficient graph data movement between the host and device.

  10. GraphReduce: Large-Scale Graph Analytics on Accelerator-Based HPC Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, Dipanjan; Agarwal, Kapil; Song, Shuaiwen; Schwan, Karsten

    2015-09-30

    Recent work on real-world graph analytics has sought to leverage the massive amount of parallelism offered by GPU devices, but challenges remain due to the inherent irregularity of graph algorithms and limitations in GPU-resident memory for storing large graphs. We present GraphReduce, a highly efficient and scalable GPU-based framework that operates on graphs that exceed the device’s internal memory capacity. GraphReduce adopts a combination of both edge- and vertex-centric implementations of the Gather-Apply-Scatter programming model and operates on multiple asynchronous GPU streams to fully exploit the high degrees of parallelism in GPUs with efficient graph data movement between the host and the device.

  11. MapReduce Based Parallel Neural Networks in Enabling Large Scale Machine Learning

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie; Huang, Yuan; Xu, Lixiong; Li, Siguang; Qi, Man

    2015-01-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) have been widely used in pattern recognition and classification applications. However, ANNs are notably slow in computation especially when the size of data is large. Nowadays, big data has received a momentum from both industry and academia. To fulfill the potentials of ANNs for big data applications, the computation process must be speeded up. For this purpose, this paper parallelizes neural networks based on MapReduce, which has become a major computing model to facilitate data intensive applications. Three data intensive scenarios are considered in the parallelization process in terms of the volume of classification data, the size of the training data, and the number of neurons in the neural network. The performance of the parallelized neural networks is evaluated in an experimental MapReduce computer cluster from the aspects of accuracy in classification and efficiency in computation. PMID:26681933

  12. Changes in thermal resistance of three Salmonella serovars in response to osmotic shock and adaptation at water activities reduced by different humectants.

    PubMed

    Peña-Meléndez, Marilia; Perry, Jennifer J; Yousef, Ahmed E

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of osmotic shock and adaptation at low water activity (aw) and the type of humectant used to lower the aw, on heat resistance of three Salmonella enterica serovars (Saintpaul 02-109, Tennessee 2053H, and Elmsbuettel 1236H). The serovars were grown (adapted) or transferred (osmotic shocked) in low-aw broths and subjected to heat treatment at 55°C for up to 45 min; samples were removed at 5-min intervals and immediately placed in an ice-water bath until plating. The aw of tryptic soy broth (TSB) was lowered by the addition of 20% (wt/wt) glycerol (aw 0.94), 4% (wt/wt) sodium chloride (NaCl; aw 0.97), or 35% sucrose (wt/wt) (aw 0.95). The type of humectant and cell adaptation significantly affected the D55°C-value. Cells merely suspended in 20% glycerol broth (i.e., nonadapted) prior to heat treatment showed a larger D55°C-value (3.0 to 3.9 min), when compared with that of cells adapted in the same medium (D55°C-values of 0.86 to 0.98 min). Interestingly, cells adapted to TSB plus glycerol were not more resistant to heat than were the controls. NaCl and sucrose showed a net protective effect for all serovars under both the adapted and nonadapted conditions, with sucrose providing the most protection. Highest D55°C-values were obtained for cultures adapted to TSB plus sucrose. Based on these results, the effect of reduced aw on thermal resistance of Salmonella serovars varies greatly, depending on medium constituents and adaptation of the pathogen in these media.

  13. Evaluating the accuracy of finite element models at reduced length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Connor

    Finite element models are used frequently in both engineering and scientific research. While they can provide useful information as to the performance of materials, as length scales are decreased more sophisticated model descriptions are required. It is also important to develop methods by which existing models may be verified against experimental findings. The present study evaluates the ability of various finite element models to predict materials behaviour at length scales ranging from several microns to tens of nanometers. Considering this motivation, this thesis is provided in manuscript form with the bulk of material coming from two case studies. Following an overview of relevant literature in Chapter 2, Chapter 3 considers the nucleation of delta-zirconium hydrides in a Zircaloy-2 matrix. Zirconium hydrides are an important topic in the nuclear industry as they form a brittle phase which leads to delayed hydride cracking during reactor start-up and shut-down. Several FE models are used to compare present results with literature findings and illustrate the weaknesses of standard FE approaches. It is shown that standard continuum techniques do not sufficiently capture the interfacial effects of an inclusion-matrix system. By using nano-scale material descriptions, nucleation lattice strains are obtained which are in good agreement with previous experimental studies. The motivation for Chapter 4 stems from a recognized need to develop a method for modeling corrosion behaviour of materials. Corrosion is also an issue for reactor design and an ability to predict failure points is needed. Finite element models could be used for this purpose, provided model accuracy is verified first. In Chapter 4 a technique is developed which facilitates the extraction of sub-micron resolution strain data from correlation images obtained during in-situ tensile deformation. By comparing image correlation results with a crystal plasticity finite element code it is found that good

  14. Sparse maps—A systematic infrastructure for reduced-scaling electronic structure methods. II. Linear scaling domain based pair natural orbital coupled cluster theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riplinger, Christoph; Pinski, Peter; Becker, Ute; Valeev, Edward F.; Neese, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Domain based local pair natural orbital coupled cluster theory with single-, double-, and perturbative triple excitations (DLPNO-CCSD(T)) is a highly efficient local correlation method. It is known to be accurate and robust and can be used in a black box fashion in order to obtain coupled cluster quality total energies for large molecules with several hundred atoms. While previous implementations showed near linear scaling up to a few hundred atoms, several nonlinear scaling steps limited the applicability of the method for very large systems. In this work, these limitations are overcome and a linear scaling DLPNO-CCSD(T) method for closed shell systems is reported. The new implementation is based on the concept of sparse maps that was introduced in Part I of this series [P. Pinski, C. Riplinger, E. F. Valeev, and F. Neese, J. Chem. Phys. 143, 034108 (2015)]. Using the sparse map infrastructure, all essential computational steps (integral transformation and storage, initial guess, pair natural orbital construction, amplitude iterations, triples correction) are achieved in a linear scaling fashion. In addition, a number of additional algorithmic improvements are reported that lead to significant speedups of the method. The new, linear-scaling DLPNO-CCSD(T) implementation typically is 7 times faster than the previous implementation and consumes 4 times less disk space for large three-dimensional systems. For linear systems, the performance gains and memory savings are substantially larger. Calculations with more than 20 000 basis functions and 1000 atoms are reported in this work. In all cases, the time required for the coupled cluster step is comparable to or lower than for the preceding Hartree-Fock calculation, even if this is carried out with the efficient resolution-of-the-identity and chain-of-spheres approximations. The new implementation even reduces the error in absolute correlation energies by about a factor of two, compared to the already accurate previous

  15. Sparse maps--A systematic infrastructure for reduced-scaling electronic structure methods. II. Linear scaling domain based pair natural orbital coupled cluster theory.

    PubMed

    Riplinger, Christoph; Pinski, Peter; Becker, Ute; Valeev, Edward F; Neese, Frank

    2016-01-14

    Domain based local pair natural orbital coupled cluster theory with single-, double-, and perturbative triple excitations (DLPNO-CCSD(T)) is a highly efficient local correlation method. It is known to be accurate and robust and can be used in a black box fashion in order to obtain coupled cluster quality total energies for large molecules with several hundred atoms. While previous implementations showed near linear scaling up to a few hundred atoms, several nonlinear scaling steps limited the applicability of the method for very large systems. In this work, these limitations are overcome and a linear scaling DLPNO-CCSD(T) method for closed shell systems is reported. The new implementation is based on the concept of sparse maps that was introduced in Part I of this series [P. Pinski, C. Riplinger, E. F. Valeev, and F. Neese, J. Chem. Phys. 143, 034108 (2015)]. Using the sparse map infrastructure, all essential computational steps (integral transformation and storage, initial guess, pair natural orbital construction, amplitude iterations, triples correction) are achieved in a linear scaling fashion. In addition, a number of additional algorithmic improvements are reported that lead to significant speedups of the method. The new, linear-scaling DLPNO-CCSD(T) implementation typically is 7 times faster than the previous implementation and consumes 4 times less disk space for large three-dimensional systems. For linear systems, the performance gains and memory savings are substantially larger. Calculations with more than 20 000 basis functions and 1000 atoms are reported in this work. In all cases, the time required for the coupled cluster step is comparable to or lower than for the preceding Hartree-Fock calculation, even if this is carried out with the efficient resolution-of-the-identity and chain-of-spheres approximations. The new implementation even reduces the error in absolute correlation energies by about a factor of two, compared to the already accurate

  16. Sparse maps—A systematic infrastructure for reduced-scaling electronic structure methods. II. Linear scaling domain based pair natural orbital coupled cluster theory

    SciTech Connect

    Riplinger, Christoph; Pinski, Peter; Becker, Ute; Neese, Frank E-mail: evaleev@vt.edu; Valeev, Edward F. E-mail: evaleev@vt.edu

    2016-01-14

    Domain based local pair natural orbital coupled cluster theory with single-, double-, and perturbative triple excitations (DLPNO-CCSD(T)) is a highly efficient local correlation method. It is known to be accurate and robust and can be used in a black box fashion in order to obtain coupled cluster quality total energies for large molecules with several hundred atoms. While previous implementations showed near linear scaling up to a few hundred atoms, several nonlinear scaling steps limited the applicability of the method for very large systems. In this work, these limitations are overcome and a linear scaling DLPNO-CCSD(T) method for closed shell systems is reported. The new implementation is based on the concept of sparse maps that was introduced in Part I of this series [P. Pinski, C. Riplinger, E. F. Valeev, and F. Neese, J. Chem. Phys. 143, 034108 (2015)]. Using the sparse map infrastructure, all essential computational steps (integral transformation and storage, initial guess, pair natural orbital construction, amplitude iterations, triples correction) are achieved in a linear scaling fashion. In addition, a number of additional algorithmic improvements are reported that lead to significant speedups of the method. The new, linear-scaling DLPNO-CCSD(T) implementation typically is 7 times faster than the previous implementation and consumes 4 times less disk space for large three-dimensional systems. For linear systems, the performance gains and memory savings are substantially larger. Calculations with more than 20 000 basis functions and 1000 atoms are reported in this work. In all cases, the time required for the coupled cluster step is comparable to or lower than for the preceding Hartree-Fock calculation, even if this is carried out with the efficient resolution-of-the-identity and chain-of-spheres approximations. The new implementation even reduces the error in absolute correlation energies by about a factor of two, compared to the already accurate

  17. Treatment of acid mine drainage by sulfate reducing bacteria with iron in bench scale runs.

    PubMed

    Bai, He; Kang, Yong; Quan, Hongen; Han, Yang; Sun, Jiao; Feng, Ying

    2013-01-01

    In order to treat acid mine drainage (AMD) effectively using sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) at high concentration of sulfate and heavy metals, Fe(0) was added to enhance the activity of SRB. When AMD was treated by SRB and Fe(0) at 25 °C, more than 61% of sulfate was removed and the effluent pH was improved from 2.75 to 6.20 during the operation. Cu(2+) was removed effectively with the removal efficiency at 99%, while only 86% of Fe(2+) was removed during the AMD treatment, without conspicuous change of Mn(2+) in the effluent in the process.

  18. Validation of three adaptations of the Meaningful Auditory Integration Scale (MAIS) to German, English and Polish.

    PubMed

    Weichbold, Viktor; Anderson, Ilona; D'Haese, Patrick

    2004-03-01

    The Meaningful Auditory Integration Scale (MAIS) is a parent-report questionnaire for assessing auditory behaviour in aurally habilitated children. This study addressed the reliability and convergent validity of three different language versions of the MAIS: English, German, and Polish. In total, 114 parents (English, n = 27: Polish, n = 37; German, n = 50) completed the MAIS preoperatively and at 6 months after cochlear implantation. Internal reliability (Cronbach's alpha) ranged from 0.92 to 0.95 preoperatively, and from 0.87 to 0.93 at 6 months. Split-half reliability was at least 0.90 preoperatively, and ranged from 0.76 to 0.89 at 6 months. Corrected item-total correlation coefficients were significant (p < 0.05) for all items except for item 1, which showed poor correlations in the Polish version. Correlation of the MAIS with the Listening Progress Profile (LP), as a measure for convergent validity, yielded coefficients between 0.81 and 0.73 preoperatively, and between 0.79 and 0.61 at 6 months. These findings demonstrate high reliability and convergent validity of the three MAIS versions.

  19. Enacted Sexual Stigma, Stigma Consciousness, and Subjective Happiness Scale Adaptation: A Two-Country Study.

    PubMed

    Strizzi, Jenna; Fernández-Agis, Inmaculada; Parrón-Carreño, Tesifon; Alarcón-Rodríguez, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Violence against people due to their sexual orientation is a phenomenon that exists within a framework of sexual stigma and sexual prejudice that can result in enacted stigma. The present study primarily aimed to validate the Stigma Consciousness Questionnaire (SCQ) and the Subjective Happiness Scale (SHS; for lesbian, gay, and bisexual [LGB] populations) in the Spanish context by using samples from two countries (Spain [N = 157] and the United States [N = 83]). Also, to examine how the construct of stigma consciousness correlates with anti-LGBQ (anti-lesbian, gay, bisexual, and queer) hate crime victimization and violent incidents, as well as examine whether the former influences subjective happiness. The population from the United States reported higher stigma consciousness and received more anti-LGBQ threats and insults. Hate crime victimization was the same across the two samples and positively correlated with violent incidents in both samples. Subjective happiness was negatively correlated with SCQ, although its subscales it did not correlate with enacted stigma measures.

  20. Adaptive fusion of multisensor precipitation using Gaussian-scale mixtures in the wavelet domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebtehaj, Ardeshir Mohammad; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

    2011-11-01

    The past decades have witnessed a remarkable emergence of new sources of multiscale multisensor precipitation data, including global spaceborne active and passive sensors, regional ground-based weather surveillance radars, and local rain gauges. Optimal integration of these multisensor data promises a posteriori estimates of precipitation fluxes with increased accuracy and resolution to be used in hydrologic applications. In this context, a new framework is proposed for multiscale multisensor precipitation data fusion which capitalizes on two main observations: (1) non-Gaussian statistics of precipitation images, which are concisely parameterized in the wavelet domain via a class of Gaussian-scale mixtures, and (2) the conditionally Gaussian and weakly correlated local representation of remotely sensed precipitation data in the wavelet domain, which allows for exploiting the efficient linear estimation methodologies while capturing the non-Gaussian data structure of rainfall. The proposed methodology is demonstrated using a data set of coincidental observations of precipitation reflectivity images by the spaceborne precipitation radar aboard the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission satellite and by ground-based weather surveillance Doppler radars.

  1. Measuring Negative and Positive Thoughts in Children: An Adaptation of the Children's Automatic Thoughts Scale (CATS).

    PubMed

    Hogendoorn, Sanne M; Wolters, Lidewij H; Vervoort, Leentje; Prins, Pier J M; Boer, Frits; Kooij, Emelie; de Haan, Else

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the factor structure and psychometric properties of an extended version of the Children's Automatic Thoughts Scale (CATS), the CATS-Negative/Positive (CATS-N/P). The CATS was originally designed to assess negative self-statements in children and adolescents. However, positive thoughts also play a major role in childhood disorders such as anxiety and depression. Therefore, positive self-statements were added to the CATS. The CATS-N/P was administered to a community sample of 554 children aged 8-18 years. The results of a confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the positive self-statements formed a separate and psychometrically sound factor. Internal and short-term test-retest reliability was good. Boys reported more hostile and positive thoughts than girls; and younger children reported more negative thoughts concerning physical threat, social threat, and failure than older children. In conclusion, the results of the current study support the use of the CATS-N/P for the measurement of positive and negative thoughts in children. The application of the CATS-N/P can facilitate further research on cognitive factors in different childhood disorders.

  2. Scaling and adaptations of incisors and cheek teeth in caviomorph rodents (Rodentia, Hystricognathi).

    PubMed

    Becerra, Federico; Vassallo, Aldo I; Echeverría, Alejandra I; Casinos, Adrià

    2012-10-01

    The South American hystricognath rodents are one of the most diverse mammalian clades considering their occupied habitats, locomotor modes and body sizes. This might have been partly evolved by diversification of their masticatory apparatus' structure and its ecological commitment, for example, chisel-tooth digging. In this phylogeny-based comparative study, we test the relationship between ecological behavior and mechanical features of their incisors and molariforms. In 33 species of nine families of caviomorph rodents, we analyze incisor attributes related to structural stress resistance and molar features related with grinding capacity, for example, second moment of inertia and enamel index (EI) (enamel band length/occlusal surface area), respectively. Most of these variables scaled isometrically to body mass, with a strong phylogenetic effect. A principal component analysis discrimination on the EI clustered the species according to their geographic distribution. We presume that selective pressures in Andean-Patagonian regions, on particular feeding habits and chisel-tooth digging behaviors, have modeled the morphological characteristics of the teeth. Subterranean/burrower ctenomyids, coruros, and plains viscachas showed the highest bending/torsion strength and anchorage values for incisors; a simplified enamel pattern in molariforms would be associated with a better grinding of the more abrasive vegetation present in more open and drier biomes.

  3. Population genomics of an endemic Mediterranean fish: differentiation by fine scale dispersal and adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Carreras, Carlos; Ordóñez, Víctor; Zane, Lorenzo; Kruschel, Claudia; Nasto, Ina; Macpherson, Enrique; Pascual, Marta

    2017-01-01

    The assessment of the genetic structuring of biodiversity is crucial for management and conservation. For species with large effective population sizes a low number of markers may fail to identify population structure. A solution of this shortcoming can be high-throughput sequencing that allows genotyping thousands of markers on a genome-wide approach while facilitating the detection of genetic structuring shaped by selection. We used Genotyping-by-Sequencing (GBS) on 176 individuals of the endemic East Atlantic peacock wrasse (Symphodus tinca), from 6 locations in the Adriatic and Ionian seas. We obtained a total of 4,155 polymorphic SNPs and we observed two strong barriers to gene flow. The first one differentiated Tremiti Islands, in the northwest, from all the other locations while the second one separated east and south-west localities. Outlier SNPs potentially under positive selection and neutral SNPs both showed similar patterns of structuring, although finer scale differentiation was unveiled with outlier loci. Our results reflect the complexity of population genetic structure and demonstrate that both habitat fragmentation and positive selection are on play. This complexity should be considered in biodiversity assessments of different taxa, including non-model yet ecologically relevant organisms. PMID:28262802

  4. Alkaline textile wastewater biotreatment: A sulfate-reducing granular sludge based lab-scale study.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qian; Hao, Tianwei; Mackey, Hamish Robert; Wei, Li; Guo, Gang; Chen, Guanghao

    2017-03-06

    In this study the feasibility of treating dyeing wastewater with sulfate reducing granular sludge was explored, focusing on decolorization/degradation of azo dye (Procion Red HE-7B) and the performance of microbial consortia under alkaline conditions (pH=11). Efficiency of HE-7B degradation was influenced strongly by the chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentration which was examined in the range of 500-3000mg/L. COD removal efficiency was reduced at high COD concentration, while specific removal rate was enhanced to 17.5 mg-COD/gVSSh(-1). HE-7B removal was also improved at higher organic strength with more than 90% removal efficiency and a first-rate removal constant of 5.57h(-1) for dye degradation. Three dye-degradation metabolites were identified by HPLC-MS. The granular structure provided enhanced removal performance for HE-7B and COD in comparison to a near-identical floc SRB system and the key functional organisms were identified by high throughput sequencing. This study demonstrates an example of a niche application where SRB granules can be applied for high efficient and cost-effective treatment of a wastewater under adverse environmental conditions.

  5. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions and adapting agricultural management for climate change in developing countries: providing the basis for action.

    PubMed

    Ogle, Stephen M; Olander, Lydia; Wollenberg, Lini; Rosenstock, Todd; Tubiello, Francesco; Paustian, Keith; Buendia, Leandro; Nihart, Alison; Smith, Pete

    2014-01-01

    Agriculture in developing countries has attracted increasing attention in international negotiations within the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change for both adaptation to climate change and greenhouse gas mitigation. However, there is limited understanding about potential complementarity between management practices that promote adaptation and mitigation, and limited basis to account for greenhouse gas emission reductions in this sector. The good news is that the global research community could provide the support needed to address these issues through further research linking adaptation and mitigation. In addition, a small shift in strategy by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and ongoing assistance from agricultural organizations could produce a framework to move the research and development from concept to reality. In turn, significant progress is possible in the near term providing the basis for UNFCCC negotiations to move beyond discussion to action for the agricultural sector in developing countries.

  6. Emotional Development and Adaptive Abilities in Adults with Intellectual Disability. A Correlation Study between the Scheme of Appraisal of Emotional Development (SAED) and Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale (VABS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    La Malfa, Giampaolo; Lassi, Stefano; Bertelli, Marco; Albertini, Giorgio; Dosen, Anton

    2009-01-01

    The importance of emotional aspects in developing cognitive and social abilities has already been underlined by many authors even if there is no unanimous agreement on the factors constituting adaptive abilities, nor is there any on the way to measure them or on the relation between adaptive ability and cognitive level. The purposes of this study…

  7. Pilot-scale evaluation the enological traits of a novel, aromatic wine yeast strain obtained by adaptive evolution.

    PubMed

    Cadière, Axelle; Aguera, Evelyne; Caillé, Soline; Ortiz-Julien, Anne; Dequin, Sylvie

    2012-12-01

    In the competitive context of the wine market, there is a growing interest for novel wine yeast strains that have an overall good fermentation capacity and that contribute favorably to the organoleptic quality of wine. Using an adaptive evolution strategy based on growth on gluconate as sole carbon source, we recently obtained wine yeasts with improved characteristics in laboratory-scale fermentations. The characteristics included enhanced fermentation rate, decreased formation of acetate and greater production of fermentative aroma. We report an evaluation of the potential value of the evolved strain ECA5™ for winemaking, by comparing its fermentation performance and metabolite production to those of the parental strain in pilot-scale fermentation trials, with various grape cultivars and winemaking conditions. We show that the evolved strain has outstanding attributes relative to the parental wine yeast strain, and in particular the production of less volatile acidity and greater production of desirable volatile esters, important for the fruity/flowery character of wines. This study highlights the potential of evolutionary engineering for the generation of strains with a broad range of novel properties, appropriate for rapid application in the wine industry.

  8. The signature of fine scale local adaptation in Atlantic salmon revealed from common garden experiments in nature

    PubMed Central

    O'Toole, Ciar L; Reed, Thomas E; Bailie, Deborah; Bradley, Caroline; Cotter, Deirdre; Coughlan, Jamie; Cross, Tom; Dillane, Eileen; McEvoy, Sarah; Ó Maoiléidigh, Niall; Prodöhl, Paulo; Rogan, Ger; McGinnity, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the extent, scale and genetic basis of local adaptation (LA) is important for conservation and management. Its relevance in salmonids at microgeographic scales, where dispersal (and hence potential gene flow) can be substantial, has however been questioned. Here, we compare the fitness of communally reared offspring of local and foreign Atlantic salmon Salmo salar from adjacent Irish rivers and reciprocal F1 hybrid crosses between them, in the wild ‘home’ environment of the local population. Experimental groups did not differ in wild smolt output but a catastrophic flood event may have limited our ability to detect freshwater performance differences, which were evident in a previous study. Foreign parr exhibited higher, and hybrids intermediate, emigration rates from the natal stream relative to local parr, consistent with genetically based behavioural differences. Adult return rates were lower for the foreign compared to the local group. Overall lifetime success of foreigners and hybrids relative to locals was estimated at 31% and 40% (mean of both hybrid groups), respectively. The results imply a genetic basis to fitness differences among populations separated by only 50 km, driven largely by variation in smolt to adult return rates. Hence even if supplementary stocking programs obtain broodstock from neighbouring rivers, the risk of extrinsic outbreeding depression may be high. PMID:26495041

  9. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Injury-Psychological Readiness to Return to Sport scale to Persian language.

    PubMed

    Naghdi, Soofia; Nakhostin Ansari, Noureddin; Farhadi, Yasaman; Ebadi, Safoora; Entezary, Ebrahim; Glazer, Douglas

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop and provide validation statistics for the Persian Injury-Psychological Readiness to Return to Sport scale (I-PRRS) following a cross-sectional and prospective cohort study design. The I-PRRS was forward/back-translated and culturally adapted into Persian language. The Persian I-PRRS was administered to 100 injured athletes (93 male; age 26.0 ± 5.6 years; time since injury 4.84 ± 6.4 months) and 50 healthy athletes (36 male; mean age 25.7 ± 6.0 years). The Persian I-PRRS was re-administered to 50 injured athletes at 1 week to examine test-retest reliability. There were no floor or ceiling effects confirming the content validity of Persian I-PRRS. The internal consistency reliability was good. Excellent test-retest reliability and agreement were demonstrated. The statistically significant difference in Persian I-PRRS total scores between the injured athletes and healthy athletes provides an evidence of discriminative validity. The Persian I-PRRS total scores were positively correlated with the Farsi Mood Scale (FARMS) total scores, showing construct validity. The principal component analysis indicated a two-factor solution consisting of "Confidence to play" and "Confidence in the injured body part and skill level". The Persian I-PRRS showed excellent reliability and validity and can be used to assess injured athletes' psychological readiness to return to sport among Persian-speaking populations.

  10. A novel adaptive synchronization control of a class of master-slave large-scale systems with unknown channel time-delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Qikun; Zhang, Tianping

    2015-05-01

    The paper addresses a practical issue for adaptive synchronization in master-slave large-scale systems with constant channel time-delay., and a novel adaptive synchronization control scheme is proposed to guarantee the synchronization errors asymptotically converge to the origin, in which the matching condition as in the related literatures is not necessary. The real value of channel time-delay can be estimated online by a proper adaptation mechanism, which removes the conditions that the channel time-delay should be known exactly as in existing works. Finally, simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach.

  11. Evidence from a large-scale meta-analysis indicates eczema reduces the incidence of glioma

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Chao; Dong, Jing; Chu, Yudong; He, Guijuan; Xu, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between eczema and the risk of primary glioma. Relevant studies were selected through electronic searches of PubMed and EMBASE. A meta-analysis of 12 case-control studies and one cohort study was performed. A fixed effect model was applied to analyze 13 studies consisting of 10,897 glioma cases and 56,081 controls. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to assess the strength of the associations. The data demonstrate that eczema significantly reduces the risk of glioma (OR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.61–0.78, P < 0.001). Additional studies with larger patient cohorts are required to validate our findings. PMID:27566584

  12. Sub-micrometer scale surface roughness of titanium reduces fibroblasts function.

    PubMed

    Migita, Satoshi; Okuyama, So; Araki, Kunitaka

    2016-04-06

    Titanium and its alloys are conventionally used to produce medical devices, but their biocompatibility has not yet been optimized. Surface modification, especially control of the surface roughness of titanium, is one strategy for improving biocompatibility and providing effective binding to hard tissue. However, the soft tissue compatibility of metallic materials is currently poorly understood, and effective techniques for tight binding between metal surfaces and soft tissue are still under development. Therefore, we here investigated whether the surface roughness of titanium affects fibroblast adhesion and proliferation. Our results showed that a surface roughness of ~100 nm reduces fibroblast function. On such surfaces, distinct focal adhesion was not observed. These findings improve the general understanding of the binding compatibility between soft tissues and metallic materials.

  13. Ferromagnetic inks facilitate large scale paper recycling and reduce bleach chemical consumption.

    PubMed

    Zeltner, Martin; Toedtli, Laura M; Hild, Nora; Fuhrer, Roland; Rossier, Michaël; Gerber, Lukas C; Raso, Renzo A; Grass, Robert N; Stark, Wendelin J

    2013-04-23

    Deinking is a fundamental part of paper recycling. As the global paper consumption rises and exceeds even the annual paper production, recycling of this raw material is of high importance. Magnetic ink based on carbon coated magnetic nanoparticles enables an alternative approach to state of the art paper deinking. Magnetic deinking comprises three steps (preselection, washing, and magnetic separation of fibers). Preseparation of printed from nonprinted scraps of paper is feasible and reduces the paper mass which has to be fed into a deinking process. A consecutive washing process removes surficial magnetic ink that can be collected by application of a permanent magnet. Still, printed parts are subjected to a further continuous magnetic deinking step, where magnetic and nonmagnetic paper fibers can be separated. Magnetic deinking of a model print allows recovery of more than 80% of bright fibers without any harsh chemical treatment and the re-collection of more than 82% of magnetic ink.

  14. Full-scale simulation and reduced-order modeling of a thermoacoustic engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalo, Carlo; Lin, Jeff; Lele, Sanjiva; Hesselink, Lambertus

    2013-11-01

    We have carried out the first three-dimensional numerical simulation of a thermoacoustic Stirling heat-engine. The goal is to lay the groundwork for full-scale Navier-Stokes simulations to advance the state-of-the-art low-order modeling and design of such devices. The model adopted is a long resonator with a heat-exchanger/regenerator (HX/REG) unit on one end - the only component not directly resolved. A temperature difference across the HX/REG unit of 200 K is sufficient to initiate the thermoacoustic instability. The latter is a Lagrangian process that only intensifies acoustic waves traveling in the direction of the imposed temperature gradient. An acoustic network of traveling waves is thus obtained and compared against low-order prediction tools such as DeltaEC. Non-linear effects such as system-wide streaming flow patterns are rapidly established. These are responsible for the mean advection of hot fluid away from the HX/REG (i.e. thermal leakage). This unwanted effect is contained by the introduction of a second ambient heat-exchanger allowing for the establishment of a dynamical thermal equilibrium in the system. A limit cycle is obtained at +178 dB.

  15. Identifying vegetation's influence on multi-scale fluvial processes based on plant trait adaptations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manners, R.; Merritt, D. M.; Wilcox, A. C.; Scott, M.

    2015-12-01

    Riparian vegetation-geomorphic interactions are critical to the physical and biological function of riparian ecosystems, yet we lack a mechanistic understanding of these interactions and predictive ability at the reach to watershed scale. Plant functional groups, or groupings of species that have similar traits, either in terms of a plant's life history strategy (e.g., drought tolerance) or morphology (e.g., growth form), may provide an expression of vegetation-geomorphic interactions. We are developing an approach that 1) identifies where along a river corridor plant functional groups exist and 2) links the traits that define functional groups and their impact on fluvial processes. The Green and Yampa Rivers in Dinosaur National Monument have wide variations in hydrology, hydraulics, and channel morphology, as well as a large dataset of species presence. For these rivers, we build a predictive model of the probable presence of plant functional groups based on site-specific aspects of the flow regime (e.g., inundation probability and duration), hydraulic characteristics (e.g., velocity), and substrate size. Functional group traits are collected from the literature and measured in the field. We found that life-history traits more strongly predicted functional group presence than did morphological traits. However, some life-history traits, important for determining the likelihood of a plant existing along an environmental gradient, are directly related to the morphological properties of the plant, important for the plant's impact on fluvial processes. For example, stem density (i.e., dry mass divided by volume of stem) is positively correlated to drought tolerance and is also related to the modulus of elasticity. Growth form, which is related to the plant's susceptibility to biomass-removing fluvial disturbances, is also related to frontal area. Using this approach, we can identify how plant community composition and distribution shifts with a change to the flow

  16. Two Children with Multiple Disabilities Increase Adaptive Object Manipulation and Reduce Inappropriate Behavior via a Technology-Assisted Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Didden, Robert; Oliva, Doretta; Campodonico, Francesca

    2010-01-01

    Persons with severe to profound multiple disabilities, such as intellectual, visual, and motor disabilities, may be characterized by low levels of adaptive engagement with the environment. They may also display forms of inappropriate, stereotypical behavior (like hand mouthing, that is, putting their fingers into or over their mouths) or…

  17. Clinical transplantation of individualized recipient serum-adapted cornea reduces the risk of graft rejection after keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    Thanos, Solon; Gatzioufas, Zissis; Schallenberg, Maurice; König, Simone; Meyer-Rüsenberg, Hans-Werner; Busse, Holger

    2013-01-01

    Corneal diseases cause severe visual impairment that necessitates corneal transplantation and frequently repetitive procedures due to graft rejection. We tested the hypothesis that exposure of donor corneas to recipient serum-derived factors during eye banking triggers a preoperative adaptation that is beneficial for postoperative tolerance. Donor corneas were incubated in a medium containing human serum (HS) obtained in each case from the prospective graft recipient in order to individually expose the donor cornea to the recipient's serum. All recipient serum-adapted corneas (RSACs) fulfilled the clinical criteria required by the national law and were transplanted successfully. The postoperative ophthalmological examination extended up to 8 years. All RSACs were tolerated by their recipients and did not cause postoperative complications and no rejection. Proteomic analysis of corneas cultivated in culture medium containing either fetal calf serum (FCS) that is routinely used for cornea banking or HS revealed different patterns of proteins. HS-cultured corneas showed a greater proteomic similarity with native human corneas than did the FCS-cultured corneas, indicating a differential nutrification of the cultured corneal tissue by HS-derived factors. The clinical results show for the first time that postoperative complications such as tissue intolerance and graft rejection might be managed if the corneal tissue is individually adapted to the recipient's serum trophic factors. This new donor tissue treatment procedure offers incontrovertible advantages and could be adapted for low-risk eyes as well as other transplantable tissues.

  18. Scaling cost-sharing to wages: how employers can reduce health spending and provide greater economic security.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Christopher T

    2014-01-01

    In the employer-sponsored insurance market that covers most Americans; many workers are "underinsured." The evidence shows onerous out-of-pocket payments causing them to forgo needed care, miss work, and fall into bankruptcies and foreclosures. Nonetheless, many higher-paid workers are "overinsured": the evidence shows that in this domain, surplus insurance stimulates spending and price inflation without improving health. Employers can solve these problems together by scaling cost-sharing to wages. This reform would make insurance better protect against risk and guarantee access to care, while maintaining or even reducing insurance premiums. Yet, there are legal obstacles to scaled cost-sharing. The group-based nature of employer health insurance, reinforced by federal law, makes it difficult for scaling to be achieved through individual choices. The Affordable Care Act's (ACA) "essential coverage" mandate also caps cost-sharing even for wealthy workers that need no such cap. Additionally, there is a tax distortion in favor of highly paid workers purchasing healthcare through insurance rather than out-of-pocket. These problems are all surmountable. In particular, the ACA has expanded the applicability of an unenforced employee-benefits rule that prohibits "discrimination" in favor of highly compensated workers. A novel analysis shows that this statute gives the Internal Revenue Service the authority to require scaling and to thereby eliminate the current inequities and inefficiencies caused by the tax distortion. The promise is smarter insurance for over 150 million Americans.

  19. A site-specific farm-scale GIS approach for reducing groundwater contamination by pesticides

    SciTech Connect

    Mulla, D.J.; Perillo, C.A.; Cogger, C.G.

    1996-05-01

    It has been proposed to vary pesticide applications by patterns in surface organic C to reduce the potential for contamination of groundwater. To evaluate the feasibility of this {open_quotes}precision farming{close_quotes} approach, data for carbofuran concentrations from 57 locations sampled to a depth of 180 cm were fit to the convective-dispersive equation. Fitted values for pore water velocity (v) ranged from 0.17 to 1.92 cm d{sup -1}, with a mean of 0.68 cm d{sup -1}. Values for dispersion (D) ranged from 0.29 to 13.35 cm{sup 2} d{sup -1}, with a mean of 2.57. With this data, risks of pesticide leaching were estimated at each location using the attenuation factor (AF) model, and a dispersion based leached factor (LF) model. Using the AF model gave two locations with a very high pesticide leaching risk, 6 with a low risk, and 2 with no risk. Using the LF model, 6 had a high risk, 13 had a medium risk, 18 had a low risk, and 20 had no risk. Pesticide leaching risks were not correlated with any measured surface soil properties. Much of the variability in leaching risk was because of velocity variations, so it would be incorrect to assume that surface organic C content controls the leaching risk. 30 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  20. The tensor hypercontracted parametric reduced density matrix algorithm: coupled-cluster accuracy with O(r(4)) scaling.

    PubMed

    Shenvi, Neil; van Aggelen, Helen; Yang, Yang; Yang, Weitao; Schwerdtfeger, Christine; Mazziotti, David

    2013-08-07

    Tensor hypercontraction is a method that allows the representation of a high-rank tensor as a product of lower-rank tensors. In this paper, we show how tensor hypercontraction can be applied to both the electron repulsion integral tensor and the two-particle excitation amplitudes used in the parametric 2-electron reduced density matrix (p2RDM) algorithm. Because only O(r) auxiliary functions are needed in both of these approximations, our overall algorithm can be shown to scale as O(r(4)), where r is the number of single-particle basis functions. We apply our algorithm to several small molecules, hydrogen chains, and alkanes to demonstrate its low formal scaling and practical utility. Provided we use enough auxiliary functions, we obtain accuracy similar to that of the standard p2RDM algorithm, somewhere between that of CCSD and CCSD(T).