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Sample records for reduces virion infectivity

  1. Increased expression of LDL receptor-related protein 1 during human cytomegalovirus infection reduces virion cholesterol and infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Gudleski-O’Regan, Nicole; Greco, Todd M.; Cristea, Ileana M.; Shenk, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    In response to virus infection, cells can alter protein expression to modify cellular functions and limit viral replication. To examine host protein expression during infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), an enveloped DNA virus, we performed a semi-quantitative, temporal analysis of the cell surface proteome in infected fibroblasts. We determined that resident low density lipoprotein related receptor 1 (LRP1), a plasma membrane receptor that regulates lipid metabolism, is elevated early after HCMV infection, resulting in decreased intracellular cholesterol. siRNA knockdown or antibody-mediated inhibition of LRP1 increased intracellular cholesterol, and concomitantly increased the infectious virus yield. Virions produced under these conditions contained elevated cholesterol, resulting in increased infectivity. Depleting cholesterol from virions reduced their infectivity by blocking fusion of the virion envelope with the cell membrane. Thus, LRP1 restricts HCMV infectivity by controlling the availability of cholesterol for the virion envelope and increased LRP1 expression is likely a defense response to infection. PMID:22817990

  2. GANP interacts with APOBEC3G and facilitates its encapsidation into the virions to reduce HIV-1 infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shailendra Kumar; Eid, Mohammed Mansour Abbas; Shimoda, Mayuko; Ikeda, Terumasa; Koito, Atsushi; Pham, Phuong; Goodman, Myron F.; Sakaguchi, Nobuo

    2013-01-01

    The single-stranded DNA-dependent deoxycytidine deaminase APOBEC3G (A3G) is a potent restrictive factor against HIV-1 virus lacking viral-encoded infectivity factor (Vif) in CD4+ T cells. A3G antiretroviral activity requires its encapsulation into HIV-1 virions. Here we show that germinal center-associated nuclear protein (GANP) is induced in activated CD4+ T cells and physically interacts with A3G. Overexpression of GANP augments the A3G encapsidation into the virion-like particles and ΔVif HIV-1 virions. GANP is encapsidated in HIV-1 virion and modulates A3G packaging into the cores together with cellular RNAs including 7SL RNA, and with unspliced HIV-1 genomic RNA. GANP upregulation leads to a significant increase in A3G-catalyzed G→A hypermutation in the viral genome and suppression of HIV-1 infectivity in a single-round viral infection assay. Conversely, GANP knockdown caused a marked increase in HIV-1 infectivity in a multiple rounds infection assay. The data suggest that GANP is a cellular factor that facilitates A3G encapsidation into HIV-1 virions to inhibit the viral infectivity. PMID:24198285

  3. A novel mosquito ubiquitin targets viral envelope protein for degradation and reduces virion production during dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Troupin, Andrea; Londono-Renteria, Berlin; Conway, Michael J; Cloherty, Erin; Jameson, Samuel; Higgs, Stephen; Vanlandingham, Dana L; Fikrig, Erol; Colpitts, Tonya M

    2016-09-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that causes significant human disease and mortality in the tropics and subtropics. By examining the effects of virus infection on gene expression, and interactions between virus and vector, new targets for prevention of infection and novel treatments may be identified in mosquitoes. We previously performed a microarray analysis of the Aedes aegypti transcriptome during infection with DENV and found that mosquito ubiquitin protein Ub3881 (AAEL003881) was specifically and highly down-regulated. Ubiquitin proteins have multiple functions in insects, including marking proteins for proteasomal degradation, regulating apoptosis and mediating innate immune signaling. We used qRT-PCR to quantify gene expression and infection, and RNAi to reduce Ub3881 expression. Mosquitoes were infected with DENV through blood feeding. We transfected DENV protein expression constructs to examine the effect of Ub3881 on protein degradation. We used site-directed mutagenesis and transfection to determine what amino acids are involved in Ub3881-mediated protein degradation. Immunofluorescence, Co-immunoprecipitation and Western blotting were used to examine protein interactions and co-localization. The overexpression of Ub3881, but not related ubiquitin proteins, decreased DENV infection in mosquito cells and live Ae. aegypti. The Ub3881 protein was demonstrated to be involved in DENV envelope protein degradation and reduce the number of infectious virions released. We conclude that Ub3881 has several antiviral functions in the mosquito, including specific viral protein degradation. Our data highlights Ub3881 as a target for future DENV prevention strategies in the mosquito transmission vector. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Prostaglandin E2 Reduces the Release and Infectivity of New Cell-Free Virions and Cell-To-Cell HIV-1 Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Serramía, María Jesús; Martínez-Bonet, Marta; Muñoz-Fernández, María Ángeles

    2014-01-01

    Background The course of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection is influenced by a complex interplay between viral and host factors. HIV infection stimulates several proinflammatory genes, such as cyclooxigense-2 (COX-2), which leads to an increase in prostaglandin (PG) levels in the plasma of HIV-1-infected patients. These genes play an indeterminate role in HIV replication and pathogenesis. The effect of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) on HIV infection is quite controversial and even contradictory, so we sought to determine the role of PGE2 and the signal transduction pathways involved in HIV infection to elucidate possible new targets for antiretrovirals. Results Our results suggest that PGE2 post-infection treatment acts in the late stages of the viral cycle to reduce HIV replication. Interestingly, viral protein synthesis was not affected, but a loss of progeny virus production was observed. No modulation of CD4 CXCR4 and CCR5 receptor expression, cell proliferation, or activation after PGE2 treatment was detected. Moreover, PGE2 induced an increase in intracellular cAMP (cyclic AMP) levels through the EP2/EP4 receptors. PGE2 effects were mimicked by dbcAMP and by a specific Epac (exchange protein directly activated by cyclic AMP) agonist, 8-Cpt-cAMP. Treatment with PGE2 increased Rap1 activity, decreased RhoA activity and subsequently reduced the polymerization of actin by approximately 30% compared with untreated cells. In connection with this finding, polarized viral assembly platforms enriched in Gag were disrupted, altering HIV cell-to-cell transfer and the infectivity of new virions. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that PGE2, through Epac and Rap activation, alters the transport of newly synthesized HIV-1 components to the assembly site, reducing the release and infectivity of new cell-free virions and cell-to-cell HIV-1 transfer. PMID:24586238

  5. Virion-targeted viral inactivation: new therapy against viral infection.

    PubMed

    Okui, N; Kitamura, Y; Kobayashi, N; Sakuma, R; Ishikawa, T; Kitamura, T

    2001-01-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is resistant to all current therapy. Gene therapy is an attractive alternative or additive to current, unsatisfactory AIDS therapy. To develop an antiviral molecule targeting viral integrase (HIV IN), we generated a single-chain antibody, termed scAb, which interacted with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) IN and inhibited virus replication at the integration step when expressed intracellularly. To reduce infectivity from within the virus particles, we made expression plasmids (pC-scAbE-Vpr, pC-scAbE-CA, and pC-scAbE-WXXF), which expressed the anti-HIV IN scAb fused to the N-terminus of HIV-1-associated accessory protein R (Vpr), capsid protein (CA), and specific binding motif to Vpr (WXXF), respectively. All fusion proteins were tagged with a nine-amino acid peptide derived from influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) at the C terminus. The fusion molecules, termed scAbE-Vpr, scAbE-CA, and scAbE-WXXF, interacted specifically with HIV IN immobilized on a nitrocellulose membrane. Immunoblot analysis showed that scAbE-Vpr, scAbE-CA, and scAbE-WXXF were incorporated into the virions produced by cotransfection of 293T cells with HIV-1 infectious clone DNA (pLAI) and pC-scAbE-Vpr, pC-scAbE-WXXF. A multinuclear activation galactosidase indicator (MAGI) assay revealed that the virions released from 293T cells cotransfected with pLAI and pC-scAbE-Vpr, pC-scAbE-WXXF had as little 1000-fold of the infectivity of the control wild-type virions, which were produced from the 293T cells transfected with pLAI alone. Furthermore, the virions produced from the 293T cells cotransfected with pLAI and an scAb expression vector (pC-scAb) showed only 1% of the infectivity of the control HIV-1 in a MAGI assay, although scAb was not incorporated into the virions. In either instance, the total quantity of the progeny virions released from the transfected 293T cells and the patterns of the virion proteins were hardly affected by the presence of

  6. Palmitoylations on murine coronavirus spike proteins are essential for virion assembly and infectivity.

    PubMed

    Thorp, Edward B; Boscarino, Joseph A; Logan, Hillary L; Goletz, Jeffrey T; Gallagher, Thomas M

    2006-02-01

    Coronavirus spike (S) proteins are palmitoylated at several cysteine residues clustered near their transmembrane-spanning domains. This is achieved by cellular palmitoyl acyltransferases (PATs), which can modify newly synthesized S proteins before they are assembled into virion envelopes at the intermediate compartment of the exocytic pathway. To address the importance of these fatty acylations to coronavirus infection, we exposed infected cells to 2-bromopalmitate (2-BP), a specific PAT inhibitor. 2-BP profoundly reduced the specific infectivities of murine coronaviruses at very low, nontoxic doses that were inert to alphavirus and rhabdovirus infections. 2-BP effected only two- to fivefold reductions in S palmitoylation, yet this correlated with reduced S complexing with virion membrane (M) proteins and consequent exclusion of S from virions. At defined 2-BP doses, underpalmitoylated S proteins instead trafficked to infected cell surfaces and elicited cell-cell membrane fusions, suggesting that the acyl chain adducts are more critical to virion assembly than to S-induced syncytial developments. These studies involving pharmacologic inhibition of S protein palmitoylation were complemented with molecular genetic analyses in which cysteine acylation substrates were mutated. Notably, some mutations (C1347F and C1348S) did not interfere with S incorporation into virions, indicating that only a subset of the cysteine-rich region provides the essential S-assembly functions. However, the C1347F/C1348S mutant viruses exhibited relatively low specific infectivities, similar to virions secreted from 2-BP-treated cultures. Our collective results indicate that the palmitate adducts on coronavirus S proteins are necessary in assembly and also in positioning the assembled envelope proteins for maximal infectivity.

  7. Hepatitis A virus subviral particles: purification, accumulation, and relative infectivity of virions, provirions and procapsids.

    PubMed

    Bishop, N E; Anderson, D A

    1997-01-01

    Virus-specific particles were isolated from hepatitis A virus (HAV)-infected cells and the role of each particle type in the replicative cycle assessed. Mature virions, provirions (immature virions) and empty capsids (procapsids) were detected in cell lysates, and both virions and provirions were found in the culture supernatant. Particle types were separated by isopycnic caesium chloride gradient or linear sucrose density gradient-ultracentrifugation, and their capsid proteins characterised. Virions, provirions and procapsids containing both VP1 and varying levels of the VP1 precursor protein PX were found, suggesting that trimming of PX is not essential for particle formation. Provirions (containing VP0) and virions (containing VP2) could not be clearly separated with these techniques, but sucrose gradients allowed greater separation of particle pools with distinct VP0 contents and specific infectivities which could be used for further studies of the biological role of VP0 cleavage. Virions, with a higher sedimentation coefficient and buoyant density presumably reflecting a more compact structure, had a higher relative infectivity when compared to provirions. HAV-infected cells therefore contain a heterogenous mixture of RNA-containing viral particles with characteristics between those of true provirions and virions, but all such particles are released from the cell and can participate in further rounds of infection.

  8. Stochastic theory of early viral infection: continuous versus burst production of virions.

    PubMed

    Pearson, John E; Krapivsky, Paul; Perelson, Alan S

    2011-02-03

    Viral production from infected cells can occur continuously or in a burst that generally kills the cell. For HIV infection, both modes of production have been suggested. Standard viral dynamic models formulated as sets of ordinary differential equations can not distinguish between these two modes of viral production, as the predicted dynamics is identical as long as infected cells produce the same total number of virions over their lifespan. Here we show that in stochastic models of viral infection the two modes of viral production yield different early term dynamics. Further, we analytically determine the probability that infections initiated with any number of virions and infected cells reach extinction, the state when both the population of virions and infected cells vanish, and show this too has different solutions for continuous and burst production. We also compute the distributions of times to establish infection as well as the distribution of times to extinction starting from both a single virion as well as from a single infected cell for both modes of virion production.

  9. Induced Packaging of Cellular MicroRNAs into HIV-1 Virions Can Inhibit Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Bogerd, Hal P.; Kennedy, Edward M.; Whisnant, Adam W.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Analysis of the incorporation of cellular microRNAs (miRNAs) into highly purified HIV-1 virions revealed that this largely, but not entirely, mirrored the level of miRNA expression in the producer CD4+ T cells. Specifically, of the 58 cellular miRNAs detected at significant levels in the producer cells, only 5 were found in virions at a level 2- to 4-fold higher than that predicted on the basis of random cytoplasmic sampling. Of note, these included two miRNAs, miR-155 and miR-92a, that were reported previously to at least weakly bind HIV-1 transcripts. To test whether miRNA binding to the HIV-1 genome can induce virion incorporation, artificial miRNA target sites were introduced into the viral genome and a 10- to 40-fold increase in the packaging of the cognate miRNAs into virions was then observed, leading to the recruitment of up to 1.6 miRNA copies per virion. Importantly, this high level of incorporation significantly inhibited HIV-1 virion infectivity. These results suggest that target sites for cellular miRNAs can inhibit RNA virus replication at two distinct steps, i.e., during infection and during viral gene expression, thus explaining why a range of different RNA viruses appear to have evolved to avoid cellular miRNA binding to their genome. PMID:28096489

  10. Modulation of HIV-1 infectivity by MAPK, a virion-associated kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Jacqué, J M; Mann, A; Enslen, H; Sharova, N; Brichacek, B; Davis, R J; Stevenson, M

    1998-01-01

    Infection of a cell by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) results in the formation of a reverse transcription complex in which viral nucleic acids are synthesized. Efficient disengagement of the reverse transcription complex from the cell membrane and subsequent nuclear translocation require phosphorylation of reverse transcription complex components by a virion-associated kinase. In this study, we identify the virion-associated kinase as mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK). Upon density gradient fractionation, MAPK, but not its activating kinase MEK, co-sedimented with viral particles. Expression of a constitutively active, but not kinase-inactive, MEK1 in virus producer cells was able to activate virion-associated MAPK in trans. Stimulation of virion-associated MAPK activity in trans by the mitogen phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) increased viral infectivity. Conversely, suppression of virion-associated MAPK by specific inhibitors of the MAPK cascade markedly impaired viral infectivity. These studies demonstrate regulation of an early step in HIV-1 infection by the host cell MAPK signal transduction pathway. PMID:9564043

  11. Virion half-life in chronic hepatitis B infection is strongly correlated with levels of viremia.

    PubMed

    Dandri, Maura; Murray, John M; Lutgehetmann, Marc; Volz, Tassilo; Lohse, Ansgar W; Petersen, Joerg

    2008-10-01

    Analysis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) kinetics with mathematical models may disclose new aspects of HBV infection and host response mechanisms. To determine the kinetics of virion decay from the blood of patients in different phases of chronic infection, we applied mathematical modeling to real-time polymerase chain reaction assays, which enable quantification of viremia and intrahepatic HBV productivity by measuring both copy number and activity of covalently closed circular DNA (relaxed circular DNA/covalently closed circular DNA) in the liver of 80 untreated chronically active HBV carriers (38 hepatitis B e antigen [HBeAg]-positive and 42 HBeAg-negative individuals). We found that the half-life of circulating virions is very fast (median 46 and 2.5 minutes in HBeAg-positive and HBeAg-negative individuals, respectively) and strongly related to viremia, with clearance rates significantly accelerating as viral loads decrease. To investigate whether immune components can influence the kinetics of virion decay, we analyzed viral dynamics in immunodeficient urokinase-type plasminogen activator chimera mice. Virion half-life in mice (range, 44 minutes to >4 hours) was comparable to estimates determined in high viremic carriers, implying that clearance rates in these patients are mostly determined by common nonspecific mechanisms. Notably, the lack of correlation between virion half-life and viremia in mice indicated that immune components significantly accelerate virion clearance rates in individuals with low titers. Our analyses suggest that both host defense mechanisms and levels of circulating virions affect the kinetics of HBV decay assessed in the serum of chronic carriers. Identification of the factors affecting clearance rates will be important for future antiviral drug developments and it may give insights into the mechanisms involved in clearance of other chronic infections, such as human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus.

  12. A rev1-vpu polymorphism unique to HIV-1 subtype A and C strains impairs envelope glycoprotein expression from rev-vpu-env cassettes and reduces virion infectivity in pseudotyping assays

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, Matthias H.; Parrish, Nicholas F.; Shaw, Katharina S.; Decker, Julie M.; Keele, Brandon F.; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Grayson, Truman; McPherson, David T.; Ping, Li-Hua; Anderson, Jeffrey A.; Swanstrom, Ronald; Williamson, Carolyn; Shaw, George M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.

    2010-02-20

    Functional studies of HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Envs) commonly include the generation of pseudoviruses, which are produced by co-transfection of rev-vpu-env cassettes with an env-deficient provirus. Here, we describe six Env constructs from transmitted/founder HIV-1 that were defective in the pseudotyping assay, although two produced infectious virions when expressed from their cognate proviruses. All of these constructs exhibited an unusual gene arrangement in which the first exon of rev (rev1) and vpu were in the same reading frame without an intervening stop codon. Disruption of the rev1-vpu fusion gene by frameshift mutation, stop codon, or abrogation of the rev initiation codon restored pseudovirion infectivity. Introduction of the fusion gene into wildtype Env cassettes severely compromised their function. The defect was not due to altered env and rev transcription or a dominant negative effect of the expressed fusion protein, but seemed to be caused by inefficient translation at the env initiation codon. Although the rev1-vpu polymorphism affects Env expression only in vitro, it can cause problems in studies requiring Env complementation, such as analyses of co-receptor usage and neutralization properties, since 3% of subtype A, 20% of subtype C and 5% of CRF01{sub A}/E viruses encode the fusion gene. A solution is to eliminate the rev initiation codon when amplifying rev-vpu-env cassettes since this increases Env expression irrespective of the presence of the polymorphism.

  13. The Tripartite Virions of the Brome Mosaic Virus Have Distinct Physical Properties That Affect the Timing of the Infection Process

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Robert; Tragesser, Brady; Ni, Peng; Ma, Xiang; Dragnea, Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The three subsets of virions that comprise the Brome mosaic virus (BMV) were previously thought to be indistinguishable. This work tested the hypothesis that distinct capsid-RNA interactions in the BMV virions allow different rates of viral RNA release. Several results support distinct interactions between the capsid and the BMV genomic RNAs. First, the deletion of the first eight residues of the BMV coat protein (CP) resulted in the RNA1-containing particles having altered morphologies, while those containing RNA2 were unaffected. Second, subsets of the BMV particles separated by density gradients into a pool enriched for RNA1 (B1) and for RNA2 and RNA3/4 (B2.3/4) were found to have different physiochemical properties. Compared to the B2.3/4 particles, the B1 particles were more sensitive to protease digestion and had greater resistivity to nanoindentation by atomic force microscopy and increased susceptibility to nuclease digestion. Mapping studies showed that portions of the arginine-rich N-terminal tail of the CP could interact with RNA1. Mutational analysis in the putative RNA1-contacting residues severely reduced encapsidation of BMV RNA1 without affecting the encapsidation of RNA2. Finally, during infection of plants, the more easily released RNA1 accumulated to higher levels early in the infection. IMPORTANCE Viruses with genomes packaged in distinct virions could theoretically release the genomes at different times to regulate the timing of gene expression. Using an RNA virus composed of three particles, we demonstrated that the RNA in one of the virions is released more easily than the other two in vitro. The differential RNA release is due to distinct interactions between the viral capsid protein and the RNAs. The ease of RNA release is also correlated with the more rapid accumulation of that RNA in infected plants. Our study identified a novel role for capsid-RNA interactions in the regulation of a viral infection. PMID:24672042

  14. Quantitative Correlation between Infectivity and Gp120 Density on HIV-1 Virions Revealed by Optical Trapping Virometry.

    PubMed

    DeSantis, Michael C; Kim, Jin H; Song, Hanna; Klasse, Per Johan; Cheng, Wei

    2016-06-17

    The envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120/gp41 is required for HIV-1 infection of host cells. Although in general it has been perceived that more Env gives rise to higher infectivity, the precise quantitative dependence of HIV-1 virion infectivity on Env density has remained unknown. Here we have developed a method to examine this dependence. This method involves 1) production of a set of single-cycle HIV-1 virions with varied density of Env on their surface, 2) site-specific labeling of Env-specific antibody Fab with a fluorophore at high efficiency, and 3) optical trapping virometry to measure the number of gp120 molecules on individual HIV-1 virions. The resulting gp120 density per virion is then correlated with the infectivity of the virions measured in cell culture. In the presence of DEAE-dextran, the polycation known to enhance HIV-1 infectivity in cell culture, virion infectivity follows gp120 density as a sigmoidal dependence and reaches an apparent plateau. This quantitative dependence can be described by a Hill equation, with a Hill coefficient of 2.4 ± 0.6. In contrast, in the absence of DEAE-dextran, virion infectivity increases monotonically with gp120 density and no saturation is observed under the experimental conditions. These results provide the first quantitative evidence that Env trimers cooperate on the virion surface to mediate productive infection by HIV-1. Moreover, as a result of the low number of Env trimers on individual virions, the number of additional Env trimers per virion that is required for the optimal infectivity will depend on the inclusion of facilitating agents during infection.

  15. During Infection, Theiler's Virions Are Cleaved by Caspases and Disassembled into Pentamers

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Sevim Yildiz; Son, Kyung-No

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infected macrophages in spinal cords of mice persistently infected with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) undergo apoptosis, resulting in restricted virus yields, as do infected macrophages in culture. Apoptosis of murine macrophages in culture occurs via the intrinsic pathway later in infection (>10 h postinfection [p.i.]) after maximal virus titers (150 to 200 PFU/cell) have been reached, with loss of most infectious virus (<5 PFU/cell) by 20 to 24 h p.i. Here, we show that BeAn virus RNA replication, translation, polyprotein processing into final protein products, and assembly of protomers and pentamers in infected M1-D macrophages did not differ from those processes in TMEV-infected BHK-21 cells, which undergo necroptosis. However, the initial difference from BHK-21 cell infection was seen at 10 to 12 h p.i., where virions from the 160S peak in sucrose gradients had incompletely processed VP0 (compared to that in infected BHK-21 cells). Thereafter, there was a gradual loss of the 160S virion peak in sucrose gradients, with replacement by a 216S peak that was observed to contain pentamers among lipid debris in negatively stained grids by electron microscopy. After infection or incubation of purified virions with activated caspase-3 in vitro, 13- and 17-kDa capsid peptide fragments were observed and were predicted by algorithms to contain cleavage sites within proteins by cysteine-dependent aspartate-directed proteases. These findings suggest that caspase cleavage of sites in exposed capsid loops of assembled virions occurs contemporaneously with the onset and progression of apoptosis later in the infection. IMPORTANCE Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) infection in mice results in establishment of virus persistence in the central nervous system and chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease, providing an experimental animal model for multiple sclerosis. Virus persistence takes place primarily in macrophages recruited into the

  16. Virion encapsidated HIV-1 Vpr induces NFAT to prime non-activated T cells for productive infection

    PubMed Central

    Höhne, Kristin; Businger, Ramona; van Nuffel, Anouk; Bolduan, Sebastian; Koppensteiner, Herwig; Baeyens, Ann; Vermeire, Jolien; Malatinkova, Eva; Verhasselt, Bruno; Schindler, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The majority of T cells encountered by HIV-1 are non-activated and do not readily allow productive infection. HIV-1 Vpr is highly abundant in progeny virions, and induces signalling and HIV-1 LTR transcription. We hence hypothesized that Vpr might be a determinant of non-activated T-cell infection. Virion-delivered Vpr activated nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) through Ca2+ influx and interference with the NFAT export kinase GSK3β. This leads to NFAT translocation and accumulation within the nucleus and was required for productive infection of unstimulated primary CD4+ T cells. A mutagenesis approach revealed correlation of Vpr-mediated NFAT activation with its ability to enhance LTR transcription and mediate cell cycle arrest. Upon NFAT inhibition, Vpr did not augment resting T-cell infection, and showed reduced G2/M arrest and LTR transactivation. Altogether, Vpr renders unstimulated T cells more permissive for productive HIV-1 infection and stimulates activation of productively infected as well as virus-exposed T cells. Therefore, it could be involved in the establishment and reactivation of HIV-1 from viral reservoirs and might have an impact on the levels of immune activation, which are determinants of HIV-1 pathogenesis. PMID:27383627

  17. Virion encapsidated HIV-1 Vpr induces NFAT to prime non-activated T cells for productive infection.

    PubMed

    Höhne, Kristin; Businger, Ramona; van Nuffel, Anouk; Bolduan, Sebastian; Koppensteiner, Herwig; Baeyens, Ann; Vermeire, Jolien; Malatinkova, Eva; Verhasselt, Bruno; Schindler, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The majority of T cells encountered by HIV-1 are non-activated and do not readily allow productive infection. HIV-1 Vpr is highly abundant in progeny virions, and induces signalling and HIV-1 LTR transcription. We hence hypothesized that Vpr might be a determinant of non-activated T-cell infection. Virion-delivered Vpr activated nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) through Ca(2+) influx and interference with the NFAT export kinase GSK3β. This leads to NFAT translocation and accumulation within the nucleus and was required for productive infection of unstimulated primary CD4(+) T cells. A mutagenesis approach revealed correlation of Vpr-mediated NFAT activation with its ability to enhance LTR transcription and mediate cell cycle arrest. Upon NFAT inhibition, Vpr did not augment resting T-cell infection, and showed reduced G2/M arrest and LTR transactivation. Altogether, Vpr renders unstimulated T cells more permissive for productive HIV-1 infection and stimulates activation of productively infected as well as virus-exposed T cells. Therefore, it could be involved in the establishment and reactivation of HIV-1 from viral reservoirs and might have an impact on the levels of immune activation, which are determinants of HIV-1 pathogenesis. © 2016 The Authors.

  18. The phosphorylation of HIV-1 Gag by atypical protein kinase C facilitates viral infectivity by promoting Vpr incorporation into virions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag is the main structural protein that mediates the assembly and release of virus-like particles (VLPs) from an infected cell membrane. The Gag C-terminal p6 domain contains short sequence motifs that facilitate virus release from the plasma membrane and mediate incorporation of the viral Vpr protein. Gag p6 has also been found to be phosphorylated during HIV-1 infection and this event may affect virus replication. However, the kinase that directs the phosphorylation of Gag p6 toward virus replication remains to be identified. In our present study, we identified this kinase using a proteomic approach and further delineate its role in HIV-1 replication. Results A proteomic approach was designed to systematically identify human protein kinases that potently interact with HIV-1 Gag and successfully identified 22 candidates. Among this panel, atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) was found to phosphorylate HIV-1 Gag p6. Subsequent LC-MS/MS and immunoblotting analysis with a phospho-specific antibody confirmed both in vitro and in vivo that aPKC phosphorylates HIV-1 Gag at Ser487. Computer-assisted structural modeling and a subsequent cell-based assay revealed that this phosphorylation event is necessary for the interaction between Gag and Vpr and results in the incorporation of Vpr into virions. Moreover, the inhibition of aPKC activity reduced the Vpr levels in virions and impaired HIV-1 infectivity of human primary macrophages. Conclusion Our current results indicate for the first time that HIV-1 Gag phosphorylation on Ser487 is mediated by aPKC and that this kinase may regulate the incorporation of Vpr into HIV-1 virions and thereby supports virus infectivity. Furthermore, aPKC inhibition efficiently suppresses HIV-1 infectivity in macrophages. aPKC may therefore be an intriguing therapeutic target for HIV-1 infection. PMID:24447338

  19. Guanylate binding protein 5: Impairing virion infectivity by targeting retroviral envelope glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Hotter, Dominik; Sauter, Daniel; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2017-01-02

    Guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) are interferon-inducible cellular factors that belong to the superfamily of guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) and play important roles in the cell-intrinsic defense against bacteria, protozoa and viruses. In a recent report in Cell Host & Microbe, we identify GBP5 as novel restriction factor of HIV-1 that reduces the infectivity of progeny virions by interfering with processing and incorporation of the viral envelope (Env) glycoprotein. The inhibitory activity of GBP5 requires C-terminal isoprenylation, mediating Golgi-association, but not its GTPase function. Notably, GBP5 expression levels vary considerably in human macrophages and inversely correlate with infectious virus yield. We demonstrate that GBP5 can be evaded by an unusual tradeoff mechanism: Naturally occurring mutations in the start codon of the viral accessory gene vpu attenuate GBP5 inhibition by increasing Env expression at the cost of Vpu function. Whether direct counteraction mechanisms or more subtle changes balancing Vpu and Env expression also affect HIV-1 inhibition by GBP5 remains to be clarified. Other open questions are whether GBP5 restricts HIV-1 in CD4(+) T cells and if other GBP family members also decrease infectivity of HIV and/or additional enveloped viruses.

  20. Guanylate binding protein 5: Impairing virion infectivity by targeting retroviral envelope glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Hotter, Dominik; Sauter, Daniel; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) are interferon-inducible cellular factors that belong to the superfamily of guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) and play important roles in the cell-intrinsic defense against bacteria, protozoa and viruses. In a recent report in Cell Host & Microbe, we identify GBP5 as novel restriction factor of HIV-1 that reduces the infectivity of progeny virions by interfering with processing and incorporation of the viral envelope (Env) glycoprotein. The inhibitory activity of GBP5 requires C-terminal isoprenylation, mediating Golgi-association, but not its GTPase function. Notably, GBP5 expression levels vary considerably in human macrophages and inversely correlate with infectious virus yield. We demonstrate that GBP5 can be evaded by an unusual tradeoff mechanism: Naturally occurring mutations in the start codon of the viral accessory gene vpu attenuate GBP5 inhibition by increasing Env expression at the cost of Vpu function. Whether direct counteraction mechanisms or more subtle changes balancing Vpu and Env expression also affect HIV-1 inhibition by GBP5 remains to be clarified. Other open questions are whether GBP5 restricts HIV-1 in CD4+ T cells and if other GBP family members also decrease infectivity of HIV and/or additional enveloped viruses. PMID:27275775

  1. Bacteriophage-encoded virion-associated enzymes to overcome the carbohydrate barriers during the infection process.

    PubMed

    Latka, Agnieszka; Maciejewska, Barbara; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Briers, Yves; Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna

    2017-04-01

    Bacteriophages are bacterial viruses that infect the host after successful receptor recognition and adsorption to the cell surface. The irreversible adherence followed by genome material ejection into host cell cytoplasm must be preceded by the passage of diverse carbohydrate barriers such as capsule polysaccharides (CPSs), O-polysaccharide chains of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecules, extracellular polysaccharides (EPSs) forming biofilm matrix, and peptidoglycan (PG) layers. For that purpose, bacteriophages are equipped with various virion-associated carbohydrate active enzymes, termed polysaccharide depolymerases and lysins, that recognize, bind, and degrade the polysaccharide compounds. We discuss the existing diversity in structural locations, variable architectures, enzymatic specificities, and evolutionary aspects of polysaccharide depolymerases and virion-associated lysins (VALs) and illustrate how these aspects can correlate with the host spectrum. In addition, we present methods that can be used for activity determination and the application potential of these enzymes as antibacterials, antivirulence agents, and diagnostic tools.

  2. A Single Amino Acid Mutation in the Carnation Ringspot Virus Capsid Protein Allows Virion Formation but Prevents Systemic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sit, Tim L.; Haikal, Patrick R.; Callaway, Anton S.; Lommel, Steven A.

    2001-01-01

    A Carnation ringspot virus (CRSV) variant (1.26) was identified that accumulates virions but is incapable of forming a systemic infection. The 1.26 capsid protein gene possesses a Ser→Pro mutation at amino acid 282. Conversion of 1.26 amino acid 282 to Ser restored systemic infection, while the reciprocal mutation in wild-type CRSV abolished systemic infection. Similar mutations introduced into the related Red clover necrotic mosaic virus capsid protein gene failed to induce the packaging but nonsystemic movement phenotype. These results provide additional support for the theory that virion formation is necessary but not sufficient for systemic movement with the dianthoviruses. PMID:11533217

  3. Proteomic analysis of the herpes simplex virus 1 virion protein 16 transactivator protein in infected cells.

    PubMed

    Suk, Hyung; Knipe, David M

    2015-06-01

    The herpes simplex virus 1 virion protein 16 (VP16) tegument protein forms a transactivation complex with the cellular proteins host cell factor 1 (HCF-1) and octamer-binding transcription factor 1 (Oct-1) upon entry into the host cell. VP16 has also been shown to interact with a number of virion tegument proteins and viral glycoprotein H to promote viral assembly, but no comprehensive study of the VP16 proteome has been performed at early times postinfection. We therefore performed a proteomic analysis of VP16-interacting proteins at 3 h postinfection. We confirmed the interaction of VP16 with HCF-1 and a large number of cellular Mediator complex proteins, but most surprisingly, we found that the major viral protein associating with VP16 is the infected cell protein 4 (ICP4) immediate-early (IE) transactivator protein. These results raise the potential for a new function for VP16 in associating with the IE ICP4 and playing a role in transactivation of early and late gene expression, in addition to its well-documented function in transactivation of IE gene expression.

  4. Preferential immune response to virion surface glycoproteins by caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus-infected goats.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, G C; Barbet, A F; Klevjer-Anderson, P; McGuire, T C

    1983-01-01

    Six months after inoculation with caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus, the serum and synovial fluid of virus-infected goats had antibodies to [35S]methionine-labeled viral proteins with apparent molecular weights of 125,000, 90,000, 28,000, and 15,000. The 125,000-, 90,000-, and 15,000-molecular-weight methionine-labeled proteins were identified as virion surface glycoproteins by lactoperoxidase iodination and galactose oxidase-boro[3H]hydride reduction labeling techniques. Radioimmunoassay antibody titers to purified p28, the most abundant viral structural protein, averaged 1:182 in synovial fluid and 1:67 in serum 6 months after inoculation. High dilutions of serum and synovial fluid reacted with gp90 and gp125 electroblotted onto nitrocellulose paper from polyacrylamide gels. Anti-gp90 activity was detected at dilutions with an immunoglobulin G content of 0.02 to 11 micrograms, whereas antibody to p28, when detectable on Western blots, was present in samples with an immunoglobulin G content of 0.1 to 2 mg, representing 100- to 1,000-fold-greater titers of antibody to the surface glycoprotein. Synovial fluids often contained more anti-gp90 antibody than did sera. Immunoprecipitation of lactoperoxidase-iodinated virus confirmed the presence of high antibody titers to the two virion surface glycoproteins. Because antiviral gp90 and gp125 antibody is abundant in the synovial fluid of infected goats, it probably contributes to the high immunoglobulin G1 concentrations seen at this site 6 months after caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus infection. Images PMID:6307878

  5. VZV infection of keratinocytes: production of cell-free infectious virions in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gershon, Michael D; Gershon, Anne A

    2010-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is the cause of varicella (chickenpox) and zoster (shingles). Varicella is a primary infection that spreads rapidly in epidemics while zoster is a secondary infection that occurs sporadically as a result of the reactivation of previously acquired VZV. Reactivation is made possible by the establishment of latency during the initial episode of varicella. The signature lesions of both varicella and zoster are cutaneous vesicles, which are filled with a clear fluid that is rich in infectious viral particles. It has been postulated that the skin is the critical organ in which both host-to-host transmission of VZV and the infection of neurons to establish latency occur. This hypothesis is built on evidence that the large cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (MPR(ci)) interacts with VZV in virtually all infected cells, except those of the suprabasal epidermis, in a way that prevents the release of infectious viral particles. Specifically, the virus is diverted in an MPR(ci)-dependent manner from the secretory pathway to late endosomes where VZV is degraded. Because nonepidermal cells are thus prevented from releasing infectious VZV, a slow process, possibly involving fusion of infected cells with their neighbors, becomes the means by which VZV is disseminated. In the epidermis, however, the maturation of keratinocytes to give rise to corneocytes in the suprabasal epidermis is associated uniquely with a downregulation of the MPR(ci). As a result, the diversion of VZV to late endosomes does not occur in the suprabasal epidermis where vesicular lesions occur. The formation of the waterproof, chemically resistant barrier of the epidermis, however, requires that constitutive secretion outlast the downregulation of the endosomal pathway. Infectious VZV is therefore secreted by default, accounting for the presence of infectious virions in vesicular fluid. Sloughing of corneocytes, aided by scratching, then aerosolizes the virus, which can

  6. HIV-1 gag proteins in virions and in infected cell fractions.

    PubMed

    Sharova, N K; Grigor'ev, V B; Bukrinskaya, A G

    1991-01-01

    The relation of the initial products of the HIV-1 gag gene to the final products was determined in virus samples and cell fractions of infected H9 and Jurkat-tat cell cultures. The proteins were identified by immunoblotting with pooled sera from AIDS patients or monoclonal antibodies. The proportion in the virions of gag precursor proteins and the products of their proteolytic cleavage varied according to the maturity of the virus particles as determined by electron microscopy. The distribution of viral gag proteins in the cell fractions was determined 2, 4, and 24 h after infection. Treatment of cells with cycloheximide to block de novo protein synthesis did not significantly affect the results. Gag proteins containing the N terminus of the precursor p55 (including p55, the intermediate precursors p41(45) and p39, and mature protein p17) were found in the cell nuclei up to 24 h after infection. The major core protein p24 was located in the cytoplasmic fraction. These data strongly suggest that gag precursors from the p55 N terminus and the matrix protein p17 enter the infected cell separately from the major core protein p24, or become separated from it in the cytoplasm.

  7. Virion-associated phosphatidylethanolamine promotes TIM1-mediated infection by Ebola, dengue, and West Nile viruses.

    PubMed

    Richard, Audrey Stéphanie; Zhang, Adam; Park, Sun-Jin; Farzan, Michael; Zong, Min; Choe, Hyeryun

    2015-11-24

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) receptors contribute to two crucial biological processes: apoptotic clearance and entry of many enveloped viruses. In both cases, they recognize PS exposed on the plasma membrane. Here we demonstrate that phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) is also a ligand for PS receptors and that this phospholipid mediates phagocytosis and viral entry. We show that a subset of PS receptors, including T-cell immunoglobulin (Ig) mucin domain protein 1 (TIM1), efficiently bind PE. We further show that PE is present in the virions of flaviviruses and filoviruses, and that the PE-specific cyclic peptide lantibiotic agent Duramycin efficiently inhibits the entry of West Nile, dengue, and Ebola viruses. The inhibitory effect of Duramycin is specific: it inhibits TIM1-mediated, but not L-SIGN-mediated, virus infection, and it does so by blocking virus attachment to TIM1. We further demonstrate that PE is exposed on the surface of apoptotic cells, and promotes their phagocytic uptake by TIM1-expressing cells. Together, our data show that PE plays a key role in TIM1-mediated virus entry, suggest that disrupting PE association with PS receptors is a promising broad-spectrum antiviral strategy, and deepen our understanding of the process by which apoptotic cells are cleared.

  8. Virion-associated phosphatidylethanolamine promotes TIM1-mediated infection by Ebola, dengue, and West Nile viruses

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Audrey Stéphanie; Zhang, Adam; Park, Sun-Jin; Farzan, Michael; Zong, Min; Choe, Hyeryun

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) receptors contribute to two crucial biological processes: apoptotic clearance and entry of many enveloped viruses. In both cases, they recognize PS exposed on the plasma membrane. Here we demonstrate that phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) is also a ligand for PS receptors and that this phospholipid mediates phagocytosis and viral entry. We show that a subset of PS receptors, including T-cell immunoglobulin (Ig) mucin domain protein 1 (TIM1), efficiently bind PE. We further show that PE is present in the virions of flaviviruses and filoviruses, and that the PE-specific cyclic peptide lantibiotic agent Duramycin efficiently inhibits the entry of West Nile, dengue, and Ebola viruses. The inhibitory effect of Duramycin is specific: it inhibits TIM1-mediated, but not L-SIGN-mediated, virus infection, and it does so by blocking virus attachment to TIM1. We further demonstrate that PE is exposed on the surface of apoptotic cells, and promotes their phagocytic uptake by TIM1-expressing cells. Together, our data show that PE plays a key role in TIM1-mediated virus entry, suggest that disrupting PE association with PS receptors is a promising broad-spectrum antiviral strategy, and deepen our understanding of the process by which apoptotic cells are cleared. PMID:26575624

  9. Pseudorabies virus glycoprotein L is necessary for virus infectivity but dispensable for virion localization of glycoprotein H.

    PubMed Central

    Klupp, B G; Fuchs, W; Weiland, E; Mettenleiter, T C

    1997-01-01

    Herpesviruses contain a number of envelope glycoproteins which play important roles in the interaction between virions and target cells. Although several glycoproteins are not present in all herpesviruses, others, including glycoproteins H and L (gH and gL), are conserved throughout the Herpesviridae. To elucidate common properties and differences in herpesvirus glycoprotein function, corresponding virus mutants must be constructed and analyzed in different herpesvirus backgrounds. Analysis of gH- mutants of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and pseudorabies virus (PrV) showed that in both viruses gH is essential for penetration and cell-to-cell spread and that its presence is required for virion localization of gL. Since gH homologs are found complexed with gL, it was of interest to assess the phenotype of gL- mutant viruses. By using this approach, HSV-1 gL has been shown to be required for entry and for virion localization of gH (C. Roop, L. Hutchinson, and D. Johnson, J. Virol. 67:2285-2297, 1993). To examine whether a similar phenotype is associated with lack of gL in another alphaherpesvirus, PrV, we constructed two independent gL- PrV mutants by insertion and deletion-insertion mutagenesis. The salient findings are as follows: (i) PrV gL is required for penetration of virions and cell-to-cell spread; (ii) unlike HSV-1, PrV gH is incorporated into the virion in the absence of gL; (iii) virion localization of gH in the absence of gL is not sufficient for infectivity; (iv) in the absence of gL, N-glycans on PrV gH are processed to a greater extent than in the presence of gL, indicating masking of N-glycans by association with gL; and (v) an anti-gL polyclonal antiserum is able to neutralize virion infectivity but did not inhibit cell-to-cell spread. Thus, whereas PrV gL is essential for virus replication, as is HSV-1 gL, gL- PrV mutants exhibit properties strikingly different from those of HSV-1. In conclusion, our data show an important functional role for

  10. RNA helicase A modulates translation of HIV-1 and infectivity of progeny virions

    PubMed Central

    Bolinger, Cheryl; Sharma, Amit; Singh, Deepali; Yu, Lianbo; Boris-Lawrie, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    Retroviruses rely on host RNA-binding proteins to modulate various steps in their replication. Previously several animal retroviruses were determined to mediate Dhx9/RNA helicase A (RHA) interaction with a 5′ terminal post-transcriptional control element (PCE) for efficient translation. Herein PCE reporter assays determined HTLV-1 and HIV-1 RU5 confer orientation-dependent PCE activity. The effect of Dhx9/RHA down-regulation and rescue with siRNA-resistant RHA on expression of HIV-1NL4–3 provirus determined that RHA is necessary for efficient HIV-1 RNA translation and requires ATPase-dependent helicase function. Quantitative analysis determined HIV-1 RNA steady-state and cytoplasmic accumulation were not reduced; rather the translational activity of viral RNA was reduced. Western blotting determined that RHA-deficient virions assemble with Lys-tRNA synthetase, exhibit processed reverse transcriptase and contain similar level of viral RNA, but they are poorly infectious on primary lymphocytes and HeLa cells. The results demonstrate RHA is an important host factor within the virus-producer cell and within the viral particle. The identification of RHA-dependent PCE activity in cellular junD RNA and in six of seven genera of Retroviridae suggests conservation of this translational control mechanism among vertebrates, and convergent evolution of Retroviridae to utilize this host mechanism. PMID:20007598

  11. HIV-1 dynamics in vivo: Virion clearance rate, infected cell life-span, and viral generation time

    SciTech Connect

    Perelson, A.S.; Neumann, A.U.; Markowitz, M.; Ho, D.D.; Leonard, J.M.

    1996-03-15

    A new mathematical model was used to analyze a detailed set of human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1) viral load data collected from five infected individuals after the administration of a potent inhibitor of HIV-1 protease. Productively infected cells were estimated to have, on average, a life-span of 2.2 days (half-life t{sub 1/2} = 1.6 days), and plasma virions were estimated to have, on average, a mean life-span of 0.3 days (t{sub 1/2} = 0.24 days). The estimated average total HIV-1 production was 10.3 x 10{sup 9}virions per day, which is substantially greater than previous minimum estimates. The results also suggest that the minimum duration of the HIV-1 life cycle in vivo is 1.2 days on average, and that the average HIV-1 generation time-defined as the time from release of a virion until it infects another cell and causes the release of a new generation of viral particles-is 2.6 days. These findings on viral dynamics provide not only a kinetic picture of HIV-1 pathogenesis, but also theoretical principles to guide the development of treatment strategies. 22 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  12. Comparative thermodynamic analysis of zinc binding to the His/Cys motif in virion infectivity factor.

    PubMed

    Ghimire-Rijal, Sudipa; Maynard, Ernest L

    2014-05-05

    HIV-1 virion infectivity factor (Vif) is an accessory protein that induces the proteasomal degradation of the host restriction factor, apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3G (APOBEC3G). Degradation of APOBEC3G requires the interaction of Vif with Cul5, the scaffold for an E3 ubiquitin ligase. A highly conserved region in HIV-1 Vif termed the HCCH motif binds zinc and is critical for recruitment of Cul5 and degradation of APOBEC3G. To gain thermodynamic and mechanistic insight into zinc binding to diverse Vif proteins, we have employed a combination of isothermal titration calorimetry, analytical ultracentrifugation, and Cul5 pull down assays. The proton linkage of zinc binding to HIV-1 Vif was analyzed under different buffer conditions and consistent with the release of two Cys-thiol protons upon zinc binding, supporting earlier EXAFS studies. Zinc binding to Vif proteins from HIV-1, SIVAgm, HIV-2, and SIVMac followed a trend in which the enthalpy of zinc binding became less favorable and the entropy of zinc binding became more favorable. Using AUC, we determined that zinc induced oligomerization of Vif proteins from HIV-1 and SIVAgm but had little or no effect on the oligomeric properties of Vif proteins from HIV-2 and SIVMac. The zinc dependence of Cul5 recruitment by Vif was investigated. All Vif proteins except HIV-2 Vif required zinc to stabilize the interaction with Cul5. The trends in enthalpy-entropy compensation, zinc-induced oligomerization, and Cul5 recruitment are discussed in terms of the apo conformation of the HCCH motif and the role of zinc in stabilizing the structure of Vif.

  13. Early events in herpes simplex virus type 1 infection: photosensitivity of fluorescein isothiocyanate-treated virions

    SciTech Connect

    DeLuca, N.; Bzik, D.; Person, S.; Snipes, W.

    1981-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 is photosensitized by treatment with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC). The inactivation of FITC-treated virions upon subsequent exposure to light is inhibited by the presence of sodium azide, suggesting the involvement of singlet oxygen in the process. Sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that treatment with FITC plus light induces crosslinks in viral envelope glycoproteins. Treatment of virions with high concentrations of FITC (50 ..mu..g/ml) plus light causes a reduction in the adsorption of the virus to monolayers of human embryonic lung cells. For lower concentrations of FITC (10 ..mu..g/ml) plus light, treated virions adsorb to the host cells, but remain sensitive to light until entry occurs. The loss of light sensitivity coincides with the development of resistance to antibodies. These results are most consistent with a mechanism of entry for herpes simplex virus involving fusion of the viral membrane with the plasma membrane of the host cell.

  14. Estimating the fraction of progeny virions that must incorporate APOBEC3G for suppression of productive HIV-1 infection

    SciTech Connect

    Thangavelu, Pulari U.; Gupta, Vipul; Dixit, Narendra M.

    2014-01-20

    The contest between the host factor APOBEC3G (A3G) and the HIV-1 protein Vif presents an attractive target of intervention. The extent to which the A3G–Vif interaction must be suppressed to tilt the balance in favor of A3G remains unknown. We employed stochastic simulations and mathematical modeling of the within-host dynamics and evolution of HIV-1 to estimate the fraction of progeny virions that must incorporate A3G to render productive infection unsustainable. Using three different approaches, we found consistently that a transition from sustained infection to suppression of productive infection occurred when the latter fraction exceeded ∼0.8. The transition was triggered by A3G-induced hypermutations that led to premature stop codons compromising viral production and was consistent with driving the basic reproductive number, R{sub 0}, below unity. The fraction identified may serve as a quantitative guideline for strategies targeting the A3G–Vif axis. - Highlights: • We perform simulations and mathematical modeling of the role of APOBEC3G in suppressing HIV-1 infection. • In three distinct ways, we estimate that when over 80% of progeny virions carry APOBEC3G, productive HIV-1 infection would be suppressed. • Our estimate of this critical fraction presents quantitative guidelines for strategies targeting the APOBEC3G–Vif axis.

  15. BST2/CD317 counteracts human coronavirus 229E productive infection by tethering virions at the cell surface

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shiu-Mei; Huang, Kuo-Jung; Wang, Chin-Tien

    2014-01-20

    Bone marrow stromal antigen 2 (BST2), an interferon-inducible antiviral factor, has been shown to block the release of various enveloped viruses from cells. It has also been identified as an innate immune system component. Most enveloped viruses subject to BST2 restriction bud at the plasma membrane. Here we report our findings that (a) the production of human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E) progeny viruses, whose budding occurs at the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC), markedly decreases in the presence of BST2; and (b) BST2 knockdown expression results in enhanced HCoV-229E virion production. Electron microscopy analyses indicate that HCoV-229E virions are tethered to cell surfaces or intracellular membranes by BST2. Our results suggest that BST2 exerts a broad blocking effect against enveloped virus release, regardless of whether budding occurs at the plasma membrane or intracellular compartments. - Highlights: • BST2 knockdown expression results in enhanced HCoV-229E egress. • HCoV-229E virions are tethered to cell surfaces or intracellular membranes by BST2. • HCoV-229E infection at high MOI can significantly downregulate HeLa BST2 and rescue HIV-1 egress.

  16. Wheat streak mosaic virus Infects Systemically despite Extensive Coat Protein Deletions: Identification of Virion Assembly and Cell-to-Cell Movement Determinants

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, Frank; French, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Viral coat proteins function in virion assembly and virus biology in a tightly coordinated manner with a role for virtually every amino acid. In this study, we demonstrated that the coat protein (CP) of Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV; genus Tritimovirus, family Potyviridae) is unusually tolerant of extensive deletions, with continued virion assembly and/or systemic infection found after extensive deletions are made. A series of deletion and point mutations was created in the CP cistron of wild-type and/or green fluorescent protein-tagged WSMV, and the effects of these mutations on cell-to-cell and systemic transport and virion assembly of WSMV were examined. Mutants with overlapping deletions comprising N-terminal amino acids 6 to 27, 36 to 84, 85 to 100, 48 to 100, and 36 to 100 or the C-terminal 14 or 17 amino acids systemically infected wheat with different efficiencies. However, mutation of conserved amino acids in the core domain, which may be involved in a salt bridge, abolished virion assembly and cell-to-cell movement. N-terminal amino acids 6 to 27 and 85 to 100 are required for efficient virion assembly and cell-to-cell movement, while the C-terminal 65 amino acids are dispensable for virion assembly but are required for cell-to-cell movement, suggesting that the C terminus of CP functions as a dedicated cell-to-cell movement determinant. In contrast, amino acids 36 to 84 are expendable, with their deletion causing no obvious effects on systemic infection or virion assembly. In total, 152 amino acids (amino acids 6 to 27 and 36 to 100 and the 65 amino acids at the C-terminal end) of 349 amino acids of CP are dispensable for systemic infection and/or virion assembly, which is rare for multifunctional viral CPs. PMID:24227854

  17. The adenovirus major core protein VII is dispensable for virion assembly but is essential for lytic infection

    PubMed Central

    Suomalainen, Maarit; Zheng, Yueting; Boucke, Karin

    2017-01-01

    The Adenovirus (Ad) genome within the capsid is tightly associated with a virus-encoded, histone-like core protein—protein VII. Two other Ad core proteins, V and X/μ, also are located within the virion and are loosely associated with viral DNA. Core protein VII remains associated with the Ad genome during the early phase of infection. It is not known if naked Ad DNA is packaged into the capsid, as with dsDNA bacteriophage and herpesviruses, followed by the encapsidation of viral core proteins, or if a unique packaging mechanism exists with Ad where a DNA-protein complex is simultaneously packaged into the virion. The latter model would require an entirely new molecular mechanism for packaging compared to known viral packaging motors. We characterized a virus with a conditional knockout of core protein VII. Remarkably, virus particles were assembled efficiently in the absence of protein VII. No changes in protein composition were evident with VII−virus particles, including the abundance of core protein V, but changes in the proteolytic processing of some capsid proteins were evident. Virus particles that lack protein VII enter the cell, but incoming virions did not escape efficiently from endosomes. This greatly diminished all subsequent aspects of the infectious cycle. These results reveal that the Ad major core protein VII is not required to condense viral DNA within the capsid, but rather plays an unexpected role during virus maturation and the early stages of infection. These results establish a new paradigm pertaining to the Ad assembly mechanism and reveal a new and important role of protein VII in early stages of infection. PMID:28628648

  18. Effect of host cell lipid metabolism on alphavirus replication, virion morphogenesis, and infectivity.

    PubMed

    Ng, Ching G; Coppens, Isabelle; Govindarajan, Dhanasekaran; Pisciotta, John; Shulaev, Vladimir; Griffin, Diane E

    2008-10-21

    The alphavirus Sindbis virus (SINV) causes encephalomyelitis in mice. Lipid-containing membranes, particularly cholesterol and sphingomyelin (SM), play important roles in virus entry, RNA replication, glycoprotein transport, and budding. Levels of SM are regulated by sphingomyelinases (SMases). Acid SMase (ASMase) deficiency results in the lipid storage disease type A Niemann-Pick disease (NPD-A), mimicked in mice by interruption of the ASMase gene. We previously demonstrated that ASMase-deficient mice are more susceptible to fatal SINV encephalomyelitis, with increased viral replication, spread, and neuronal death. To determine the mechanisms by which ASMase deficiency enhances SINV replication, we compared NPD-A fibroblasts (NPAF) to normal human fibroblasts (NHF). NPAF accumulated cholesterol- and sphingolipid-rich late endosomes/lysosomes in the perinuclear region. SINV replication was faster and reached higher titer in NPAF than in NHF, and NPAF died more quickly. SINV RNA and protein synthesis was greater in NHF than in NPAF, but virions budding from NPAF were 26 times more infectious and were regular dense particles whereas virions from NHF were larger particles containing substantial amounts of CD63. Cellular regulation of alphavirus morphogenesis is a previously unrecognized mechanism for control of virus replication and spread.

  19. The Use of Nanotrap Particles Technology in Capturing HIV-1 Virions and Viral Proteins from Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sampey, Gavin; Shafagati, Nazly; Van Duyne, Rachel; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Liotta, Lance; Petricoin, Emanuel; Young, Mary; Lepene, Benjamin; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 infection results in a chronic but incurable illness since long-term HAART can keep the virus to an undetectable level. However, discontinuation of therapy rapidly increases viral burden. Moreover, patients under HAART frequently develop various metabolic disorders and HIV-associated neuronal disease. Today, the main challenge of HIV-1 research is the elimination of the residual virus in infected individuals. The current HIV-1 diagnostics are largely comprised of serological and nucleic acid based technologies. Our goal is to integrate the nanotrap technology into a standard research tool that will allow sensitive detection of HIV-1 infection. This study demonstrates that majority of HIV-1 virions in culture supernatants and Tat/Nef proteins spiked in culture medium can be captured by nanotrap particles. To determine the binding affinities of different baits, we incubated target molecules with nanotrap particles at room temperature. After short sequestration, materials were either eluted or remained attached to nanotrap particles prior to analysis. The unique affinity baits of nanotrap particles preferentially bound HIV-1 materials while excluded albumin. A high level capture of Tat or Tat peptide by NT082 and NT084 particles was measured by western blot (WB). Intracellular Nef protein was captured by NT080, while membrane-associated Nef was captured by NT086 and also detected by WB. Selective capture of HIV-1 particles by NT073 and NT086 was measured by reverse transcriptase assay, while capture of infectious HIV-1 by these nanoparticles was demonstrated by functional transactivation in TZM-bl cells. We also demonstrated specific capture of HIV-1 particles and exosomes-containing TAR-RNA in patients' serum by NT086 and NT082 particles, respectively, using specific qRT-PCR. Collectively, our data indicate that certain types of nanotrap particles selectively capture specific HIV-1 molecules, and we propose to use this technology as a platform to enhance HIV-1

  20. Cholesterol Flux Is Required for Endosomal Progression of African Swine Fever Virions during the Initial Establishment of Infection.

    PubMed

    Cuesta-Geijo, Miguel Ángel; Chiappi, Michele; Galindo, Inmaculada; Barrado-Gil, Lucía; Muñoz-Moreno, Raquel; Carrascosa, José L; Alonso, Covadonga

    2015-11-25

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is a major threat for porcine production that has been slowly spreading in Eastern Europe since its first appearance in the Caucasus in 2007. ASFV enters the cell by endocytosis and gains access to the cytosol to start replication from late endosomes and multivesicular bodies. Cholesterol associated with low-density lipoproteins entering the cell by endocytosis also follows a trafficking pathway similar to that of ASFV. Here we show that cholesterol plays an essential role in the establishment of infection as the virus traffics through the endocytic pathway. In contrast to the case for other DNA viruses, such as vaccinia virus or adenovirus 5, cholesterol efflux from endosomes is required for ASFV release/entry to the cytosol. Accumulation of cholesterol in endosomes impairs fusion, resulting in retention of virions inside endosomes. ASFV also remodels intracellular cholesterol by increasing its cellular uptake and redistributes free cholesterol to viral replication sites. Our analysis reveals that ASFV manipulates cholesterol dynamics to ensure an appropriate lipid flux to establish productive infection. Since its appearance in the Caucasus in 2007, African swine fever (ASF) has been spreading westwards to neighboring European countries, threatening porcine production. Due to the lack of an effective vaccine, ASF control relies on early diagnosis and widespread culling of infected animals. We investigated early stages of ASFV infection to identify potential cellular targets for therapeutic intervention against ASF. The virus enters the cell by endocytosis, and soon thereafter, viral decapsidation occurs in the acid pH of late endosomes. We found that ASFV infection requires and reorganizes the cellular lipid cholesterol. ASFV requires cholesterol to exit the endosome to gain access to the cytoplasm to establish productive replication. Our results indicate that there is a differential requirement for cholesterol efflux for vaccinia

  1. A new avian hepadnavirus infecting snow geese (Anser caerulescens) produces a significant fraction of virions containing single-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Chang, S F; Netter, H J; Bruns, M; Schneider, R; Frölich, K; Will, H

    1999-09-15

    We describe the identification and functional analysis of an evolutionary distinct new avian hepadnavirus. Infection of snow geese (Anser caerulescens) with a duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV)-related virus, designated SGHBV, was demonstrated by detection of envelope proteins in sera with anti-DHBV preS and S antibodies. Comparative sequence analysis of the PCR-amplified SGHBV genomes revealed unique SGHBV sequence features compared with other avian hepadnaviruses. Unlike DHBV, SGHBV shows an open reading frame in an analogous position to orthohepadnavirus X genes. Four of five cloned genomes were competent in replication, gene expression, and virus particle secretion in chicken hepatoma cells. Primary duck hepatocytes were permissive for infection with SGHBV, suggesting a similar or identical host range. SGHBV was found to secrete a significant fraction of virion-like particles containing single-stranded viral DNA. This was observed both in cell culture medium of SGHBV DNA-transfected LMH cells and in viremic sera of several birds, suggesting that it is a stable trait of SGHBV. Taken together, SGHBV has several unique features that expand the knowledge of the functional and evolutionary diversity of hepadnaviruses and offers new experimental opportunities for studies on the life cycle of hepadnaviruses. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  2. TIM-family proteins promote infection of multiple enveloped viruses through virion-associated phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed

    Jemielity, Stephanie; Wang, Jinyize J; Chan, Ying Kai; Ahmed, Asim A; Li, Wenhui; Monahan, Sheena; Bu, Xia; Farzan, Michael; Freeman, Gordon J; Umetsu, Dale T; Dekruyff, Rosemarie H; Choe, Hyeryun

    2013-03-01

    Human T-cell Immunoglobulin and Mucin-domain containing proteins (TIM1, 3, and 4) specifically bind phosphatidylserine (PS). TIM1 has been proposed to serve as a cellular receptor for hepatitis A virus and Ebola virus and as an entry factor for dengue virus. Here we show that TIM1 promotes infection of retroviruses and virus-like particles (VLPs) pseudotyped with a range of viral entry proteins, in particular those from the filovirus, flavivirus, New World arenavirus and alphavirus families. TIM1 also robustly enhanced the infection of replication-competent viruses from the same families, including dengue, Tacaribe, Sindbis and Ross River viruses. All interactions between TIM1 and pseudoviruses or VLPs were PS-mediated, as demonstrated with liposome blocking and TIM1 mutagenesis experiments. In addition, other PS-binding proteins, such as Axl and TIM4, promoted infection similarly to TIM1. Finally, the blocking of PS receptors on macrophages inhibited the entry of Ebola VLPs, suggesting that PS receptors can contribute to infection in physiologically relevant cells. Notably, infection mediated by the entry proteins of Lassa fever virus, influenza A virus and SARS coronavirus was largely unaffected by TIM1 expression. Taken together our data show that TIM1 and related PS-binding proteins promote infection of diverse families of enveloped viruses, and may therefore be useful targets for broad-spectrum antiviral therapies.

  3. Effective binding of a phosphatidylserine-targeting antibody to Ebola virus infected cells and purified virions.

    PubMed

    Dowall, S D; Graham, V A; Corbin-Lickfett, K; Empig, C; Schlunegger, K; Bruce, C B; Easterbrook, L; Hewson, R

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus is responsible for causing severe hemorrhagic fevers, with case fatality rates of up to 90%. Currently, no antiviral or vaccine is licensed against Ebola virus. A phosphatidylserine-targeting antibody (PGN401, bavituximab) has previously been shown to have broad-spectrum antiviral activity. Here, we demonstrate that PGN401 specifically binds to Ebola virus and recognizes infected cells. Our study provides the first evidence of phosphatidylserine-targeting antibody reactivity against Ebola virus.

  4. Mutational analysis of hepatitis E virus ORF1 "Y-domain": Effects on RNA replication and virion infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Parvez, Mohammad Khalid

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the role of non-structural open reading frame 1 “Y-domain” sequences in the hepatitis E virus (HEV) life cycle. METHODS Sequences of human HEV Y-domain (amino acid sequences 216-442) and closely-related viruses were analyzed in silico. Site-directed mutagenesis of the Y-domain (HEV SAR55) was carried out and studied in the replicon-baculovirus-hepatoma cell model. In vitro transcribed mRNA (pSK-GFP) constructs were transfected into S10-3 cells and viral RNA replicating GFP-positive cells were scored by flow cytometry. Mutant virions’ infectivity was assayed on naïve HepG2/C3A cells. RESULTS In silico analysis identified a potential palmitoylation-site (C336C337) and an α-helix segment (L410Y411S412W413L414F415E416) in the HEV Y-domain. Molecular characterization of C336A, C337A and W413A mutants of the three universally conserved residues showed non-viability. Further, of the 10 consecutive saturation mutants covering the entire Y-domain nucleotide sequences (nts 650-1339), three constructs (nts 788-994) severely affected virus replication. This revealed the indispensability of the internal sequences but not of the up- or downstream sequences at the transcriptional level. Interestingly, the three mutated residues corresponded to the downstream codons that tolerated saturation mutation, indicating their post-translational functional/structural essentiality. In addition, RNA secondary structure prediction revealed formation of stable hairpins (nts 788-994) where saturation mutation drastically inhibited virion infectivity. CONCLUSION This is the first demonstration of the critical role of Y-domain sequences in HEV life cycle, which may involve gene regulation and/or membrane binding in intracellular replication complexes. PMID:28216965

  5. A conserved carboxy-terminal domain in the major tegument structural protein VP22 facilitates virion packaging of a chimeric protein during productive herpes simplex virus 1 infection

    SciTech Connect

    Schlegel, Elisabeth F.M.; Blaho, John A.

    2009-05-10

    Recombinant virus HSV-1(RF177) was previously generated to examine tegument protein VP22 function by inserting the GFP gene into the gene encoding VP22. During a detailed analysis of this virus, we discovered that RF177 produces a novel fusion protein between the last 15 amino acids of VP22 and GFP, termed GCT-VP22. Thus, the VP22 carboxy-terminal specific antibody 22-3 and two anti-GFP antibodies reacted with an approximately 28 kDa protein from RF177-infected Vero cells. GCT-VP22 was detected at 1 and 3 hpi. Examination of purified virions indicated that GCT-VP22 was incorporated into RF177 virus particles. These observations imply that at least a portion of the information required for virion targeting is located in this domain of VP22. Indirect immunofluorescence analyses showed that GCT-VP22 also localized to areas of marginalized chromatin during RF177 infection. These results indicate that the last fifteen amino acids of VP22 participate in virion targeting during HSV-1 infection.

  6. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 viral protein R localization in infected cells and virions.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y L; Spearman, P; Ratner, L

    1993-01-01

    The subcellular localization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viral protein R (Vpr) was examined by subcellular fractionation. In HIV-1-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells, Vpr was found in the nuclear and membrane fractions as well as the conditioned medium. Expression of Vpr without other HIV-1 proteins, in two different eukaryotic expression systems, demonstrated a predominant localization of Vpr in the nuclear matrix and chromatin extract fractions. Deletion of the carboxyl-terminal 19-amino-acid arginine-rich sequence impaired Vpr nuclear localization. Indirect immunofluorescence confirmed the nuclear localization of Vpr and also indicated a perinuclear location. Expression of Vpr alone did not result in export of the protein from the cell, but when coexpressed with the Gag protein, Vpr was exported and found in virus-like particles. A truncated Gag protein, missing the p6 sequence and a portion of the p9 sequence, was incapable of exporting Vpr from the cell. Regulation of Vpr localization may be important in the influence of this protein on virus replication. Images PMID:8411357

  7. Zinc binding to the HCCH motif of HIV-1 virion infectivity factor induces a conformational change that mediates protein–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Indrani; Cui, Jian; Maynard, Ernest L.

    2006-01-01

    Virion infectivity factor (Vif) is an accessory protein encoded by HIV-1 and is critical for viral infection of the host CD4+ T cell population. Vif induces ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of Apo3G, a cytosolic cytidine deaminase that otherwise targets the retroviral genome. Interaction of Vif with the cellular Cullin5-based E3 ubiquitin ligase requires a conserved BC box and upstream residues that are part of the conserved H-(Xaa)5-C-(Xaa)17–18-C-(Xaa)3–5-H (HCCH) motif. The HCCH motif is involved in stabilizing the Vif–Cullin 5 interaction, but the exact role of the conserved His and Cys residues remains elusive. In this report, we find that full-length HIV-1 Vif, as well as a HCCH peptide, is capable of binding to zinc with high specificity. Zinc binding induces a conformational change that leads to the formation of large protein aggregates. EDTA reversed aggregation and regenerated the apoprotein conformation. Cysteine modification studies with the HCCH peptide suggest that C114 is critical for stabilizing the fold of the apopeptide, and that C133 is located in a solvent-exposed region with no definite secondary structure. Selective alkylation of C133 reduced metal-binding specificity of the HCCH peptide, allowing cobalt to bind with rates comparable to that with zinc. This study demonstrates that the HCCH motif of HIV-1 Vif is a unique metal-binding domain capable of mediating protein–protein interactions in the presence of zinc and adds to a growing list of examples in which metal ion binding induces protein misfolding and/or aggregation. PMID:17132731

  8. The 5' cap of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is required for virion attachment to the actin/endoplasmic reticulum network during early infection.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Nynne; Tilsner, Jens; Bell, Karen; Hammann, Philippe; Parton, Richard; Lacomme, Christophe; Oparka, Karl

    2009-05-01

    Almost nothing is known of the earliest stages of plant virus infections. To address this, we microinjected Cy3 (UTP)-labelled tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) into living tobacco trichome cells. The Cy3-virions were infectious, and the viral genome trafficked from cell to cell. However, neither the fluorescent vRNA pool nor the co-injected green fluorescent protein (GFP) left the injected trichome, indicating that the synthesis of (unlabelled) progeny viral (v)RNA is required to initiate cell-to-cell movement, and that virus movement is not accompanied by passive plasmodesmatal gating. Cy3-vRNA formed granules that became anchored to the motile cortical actin/endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network within minutes of injection. Granule movement on actin/ER was arrested by actin inhibitors indicating actin-dependent RNA movement. The 5' methylguanosine cap was shown to be required for vRNA anchoring to the actin/ER. TMV vRNA lacking the 5' cap failed to form granules and was degraded in the cytoplasm. Removal of the 3' untranslated region or replicase both inhibited replication but did not prevent granule formation and movement. Dual-labelled TMV virions in which the vRNA and the coat protein were highlighted with different fluorophores showed that both fluorescent signals were initially located on the same ER-bound granules, indicating that TMV virions may become attached to the ER prior to uncoating of the viral genome.

  9. How do cell-free HIV virions avoid infecting dead-end host cells and cell fragments?

    PubMed

    Lyengar, Sujatha; Schwartz, David H

    2004-01-01

    HIV faces the challenge of identifying and entering suitable host cells (i.e. activated and viable) among a wide array of receptor-positive but unsuitable targets. Lymph nodes contain resting cells, activated cells destined for apoptosis within 24 h, and cell fragments, all of which represent replicative dead ends. We postulate that 1) HIV virions have evolved the ability to probe the internal status of potential host cells from the external cell membrane by assessing the ability of cells to co-cap CD4 and chemokine receptors, and 2) the requirement for dual receptor binding in a concerted manner by three gp120 molecules is the molecular mechanism by which virions stochastically ensure high density co-capping of receptors. Cell-associated HIV accomplishes the same selective process by targeting cells capable of participating in immunological synapse formation.

  10. Essential Roles for Soluble Virion-Associated Heparan Sulfonated Proteoglycans and Growth Factors in Human Papillomavirus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Surviladze, Zurab; Dziduszko, Agnieszka; Ozbun, Michelle A.

    2012-01-01

    A subset of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections is causally related to the development of human epithelial tumors and cancers. Like a number of pathogens, HPV entry into target cells is initiated by first binding to heparan sulfonated proteoglycan (HSPG) cell surface attachment factors. The virus must then move to distinct secondary receptors, which are responsible for particle internalization. Despite intensive investigation, the mechanism of HPV movement to and the nature of the secondary receptors have been unclear. We report that HPV16 particles are not liberated from bound HSPG attachment factors by dissociation, but rather are released by a process previously unreported for pathogen-host cell interactions. Virus particles reside in infectious soluble high molecular weight complexes with HSPG, including syndecan-1 and bioactive compounds, like growth factors. Matrix mellatoproteinase inhibitors that block HSPG and virus release from cells interfere with virus infection. Employing a co-culture assay, we demonstrate HPV associated with soluble HSPG-growth factor complexes can infect cells lacking HSPG. Interaction of HPV-HSPG-growth factor complexes with growth factor receptors leads to rapid activation of signaling pathways important for infection, whereas a variety of growth factor receptor inhibitors impede virus-induced signaling and infection. Depletion of syndecan-1 or epidermal growth factor and removal of serum factors reduce infection, while replenishment of growth factors restores infection. Our findings support an infection model whereby HPV usurps normal host mechanisms for presenting growth factors to cells via soluble HSPG complexes as a novel method for interacting with entry receptors independent of direct virus-cell receptor interactions. PMID:22346752

  11. Resistance of a vaccinia virus A34R deletion mutant to spontaneous rupture of the outer membrane of progeny virions on the surface of infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Husain, Matloob; Weisberg, Andrea S.; Moss, Bernard

    2007-09-30

    The extracellular form of vaccinia virus is referred to as an enveloped virion (EV) because it contains an additional lipoprotein membrane surrounding the infectious mature virion (MV) that must be discarded prior to cell fusion and entry. Most EVs adhere to the surface of the parent cell and mediate spread of the infection to adjacent cells. Here we show that some attached EVs have ruptured envelopes. Rupture was detected by fluorescence microscopy of unfixed and unpermeabilized cells using antibodies to the F13 and L1 proteins, which line the inner side of the EV membrane and the outer side of the MV membrane, respectively. The presence of ruptured EV membranes was confirmed by immunogold transmission electron microscopy. EVs with broken membranes were present on several cell lines examined including one deficient in glycosaminoglycans, which are thought to play a role in breakage of the EV membrane prior to fusion of the MV. No correlation was found between EVs with ruptured membranes and actin tail formation. Studies with several mutant viruses indicated that EV membranes lacking the A34 protein were unbroken. This result was consistent with other properties of A34R deletion mutants including resistance of the EV membrane to polyanions, small plaque formation and low infectivity that can be increased by disruption of the EV membrane by freezing and thawing.

  12. HIV-1 Infection Leads to Increased Transcription of Human Endogenous Retrovirus HERV-K (HML-2) Proviruses In Vivo but Not to Increased Virion Production

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Neeru; Maldarelli, Frank; Mellors, John

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent studies suggest that human endogenous retrovirus group K (HERV-K) provirus expression plays a role in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection. In particular, RNA from the HML-2 subgroup of HERV-K proviruses has been reported to be highly expressed at the cellular level and detectable in the plasma of HIV-1-infected patients, suggestive of virion production and, perhaps, replication. In this study, we developed an HML-2-specific quantitative-PCR assay that detects 51 of the 89 known HML-2 proviruses in the human genome. Plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from HIV-negative controls and HIV-1-infected patients were collected for analysis of HML-2 RNA expression. Contrary to previous reports, we did not detect high levels of HML-2 RNA in the plasma of HIV-1-infected patients, but we did observe a significant increase of HML-2 RNA in total PBMCs compared to HIV-negative controls. The level of HML-2 expression in PBMCs does not appear to be related to patient use of antiretrovirals or to HIV-1 plasma RNA, cellular RNA, or cellular DNA levels. To investigate the source of HML-2 RNA expression, patient PBMCs were sorted into CD3+ CD4+, CD3+ CD8+, CD3− CD14+, and CD3− CD20+ cell subsets and then analyzed for HML-2 RNA levels. No single cell subset was enriched for HML-2 RNA expression in HIV-1-infected patients, but there appears to be substantial variability in the level of HML-2 expression depending on the cell type. IMPORTANCE Here, we report that human endogenous retrovirus group K (HERV-K) (HML-2) proviruses are expressed at significantly higher levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with HIV-1 infection than in those from uninfected individuals. However, contrary to previous reports, this expression did not lead to detectable virions in the plasma of these patients. In addition, we found that HML-2 proviruses were expressed in multiple blood cell types from HIV-1-infected individuals, and the magnitude of

  13. Dengue virus infection induces broadly cross-reactive human IgM antibodies that recognize intact virions in humanized BLT-NSG mice

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Smita; Smith, Kenneth; Ramirez, Alejandro; Woda, Marcia; Pazoles, Pamela; Shultz, Leonard D; Greiner, Dale L; Brehm, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    The development of small animal models that elicit human immune responses to dengue virus (DENV) is important since prior immunity is a major risk factor for developing severe dengue disease. This study evaluated anti-DENV human antibody (hAb) responses generated from immortalized B cells after DENV-2 infection in NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice that were co-transplanted with human fetal thymus and liver tissues (BLT-NSG mice). DENV-specific human antibodies predominantly of the IgM isotype were isolated during acute infection and in convalescence. We found that while a few hAbs recognized the envelope protein produced as a soluble recombinant, a number of hAbs only recognized epitopes on intact virions. The majority of the hAbs isolated during acute infection and in immune mice were serotype-cross-reactive and poorly neutralizing. Viral titers in immune BLT-NSG mice were significantly decreased after challenge with a clinical strain of dengue. DENV-specific hAbs generated in BLT-NSG mice share some of the characteristics of Abs isolated in humans with natural infection. Humanized BLT-NSG mice provide an attractive preclinical platform to assess the immunogenicity of candidate dengue vaccines. PMID:25125497

  14. Inhibition of SERPINe1 reduces rhabdoviral infections in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Estepa, Amparo; Coll, Julio

    2015-11-01

    While exploring the molecular mechanisms behind the fin hemorrhages that follow zebrafish (Danio rerio) early infection with viral haemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), we discovered that most serpin (serine protease inhibitor) gene transcripts were upregulated, except those of serpine1. Surprisingly, only SERPINe1-derived 14-mer peptide and low molecular weight drugs targeting SERPINe1 (i.e. tannic acid, EGCG, tiplaxtinin) inhibited in vitro infections not only of VHSV, but also of other fish rhabdoviruses such as infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) and spring viremia carp virus (SVCV). While the mechanisms that inhibited rhabdoviral infections remain speculative, these and other results suggested that SERPINEe1-derived peptide specifically targeted viral infectivity rather than virions. Practical applications might be developed from these studies since preliminary evidences showed that tannic acid could be used to reduce VHSV-caused mortalities. These studies are an example of how the identification of host genes targeted by viral infections using microarrays might facilitate the identification of novel prevention drugs in aquaculture and illuminate viral infection mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cleavage of the HPV16 Minor Capsid Protein L2 during Virion Morphogenesis Ablates the Requirement for Cellular Furin during De Novo Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Linda; Biryukov, Jennifer; Conway, Michael J.; Meyers, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Infections by high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) are the causative agents for the development of cervical cancer. As with other non-enveloped viruses, HPVs are taken up by the cell through endocytosis following primary attachment to the host cell. Through studies using recombinant pseudovirus particles (PsV), many host cellular proteins have been implicated in the process. The proprotein convertase furin has been demonstrated to cleave the minor capsid protein, L2, post-attachment to host cells and is required for infectious entry by HPV16 PsV. In contrast, using biochemical inhibition by a furin inhibitor and furin-negative cells, we show that tissue-derived HPV16 native virus (NV) initiates infection independent of cellular furin. We show that HPV16 L2 is cleaved during virion morphogenesis in differentiated tissue. In addition, HPV45 is also not dependent on cellular furin, but two other alpha papillomaviruses, HPV18 and HPV31, are dependent on the activity of cellular furin for infection. PMID:26569287

  16. Enhancing Virion Tethering by BST2 Sensitizes Productively and Latently HIV-infected T cells to ADCC Mediated by Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Tram N. Q.; Lukhele, Sabelo; Dallaire, Frédéric; Perron, Gabrielle; Cohen, Éric A.

    2016-01-01

    Binding of anti-HIV antibodies (Abs) to envelope (Env) glycoproteins on infected cells can mark them for elimination via antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). BST2, a type I interferon (IFN)-stimulated restriction factor that anchors nascent Env-containing virions at the surface of infected cells has been shown to enhance ADCC functions. In a comprehensive analysis of ADCC potency by neutralizing anti-HIV Abs (NAbs), we show in this study that NAbs are capable of mediating ADCC against HIV-infected T cells with 3BNC117, PGT126 and PG9 being most efficient. We demonstrate that HIV-induced BST2 antagonism effectively attenuates Ab binding and ADCC responses mediated by all classes of NAbs that were tested. Interestingly, IFNα treatment can reverse this effect in a BST2-dependent manner. Importantly, while reactivated latent T cell lines display some susceptibility to ADCC mediated by broadly NAbs, inactivating BST2 viral countermeasures and/or exogenous IFNα augment their elimination. Overall, our findings support the notion that NAbs can induce ADCC. They highlight that while BST2 antagonism by HIV promotes ADCC evasion, strategies aimed at restoring BST2 restriction could improve anti-HIV responses and potentially provide a means to eliminate reactivated cells in latent reservoirs. PMID:27853288

  17. Elimination of contaminating cap genes in AAV vector virions reduces immune responses and improves transgene expression in a canine gene therapy model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Halbert, C L; Lee, D; Butts, T; Tapscott, S J; Storb, R; Miller, A D

    2014-04-01

    Animal and human gene therapy studies utilizing AAV vectors have shown that immune responses to AAV capsid proteins can severely limit transgene expression. The main source of capsid antigen is that associated with the AAV vectors, which can be reduced by stringent vector purification. A second source of AAV capsid proteins is that expressed from cap genes aberrantly packaged into AAV virions during vector production. This antigen source can be eliminated by the use of a cap gene that is too large to be incorporated into an AAV capsid, such as a cap gene containing a large intron (captron gene). Here, we investigated the effects of elimination of cap gene transfer and of vector purification by CsCl gradient centrifugation on AAV vector immunogenicity and expression following intramuscular injection in dogs. We found that both approaches reduced vector immunogenicity and that combining the two produced the lowest immune responses and highest transgene expression. This combined approach enabled the use of a relatively mild immunosuppressive regimen to promote robust micro-dystrophin gene expression in Duchenne muscular dystrophy-affected dogs. Our study shows the importance of minimizing AAV cap gene impurities and indicates that this improvement in AAV vector production may benefit human applications.

  18. Deficient incorporation of spike protein into virions contributes to the lack of infectivity following establishment of a persistent, non-productive infection in oligodendroglial cell culture by murine coronavirus

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yin; Herbst, Werner; Cao Jianzhong; Zhang Xuming

    2011-01-05

    Infection of mouse oligodendrocytes with a recombinant mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) expressing a green fluorescence protein facilitated specific selection of virus-infected cells and subsequent establishment of persistence. Interestingly, while viral genomic RNAs persisted in infected cells over 14 subsequent passages with concomitant synthesis of viral subgenomic mRNAs and structural proteins, no infectious virus was isolated beyond passage 2. Further biochemical and electron microscopic analyses revealed that virions, while assembled, contained little spike in the envelope, indicating that lack of infectivity during persistence was likely due to deficiency in spike incorporation. This type of non-lytic, non-productive persistence in oligodendrocytes is unique among animal viruses and resembles MHV persistence previously observed in the mouse central nervous system. Thus, establishment of such a culture system that can recapitulate the in vivo phenomenon will provide a powerful approach for elucidating the mechanisms of coronavirus persistence in glial cells at the cellular and molecular levels.

  19. Rapid dissociation of HIV-1 from cultured cells severely limits infectivity assays, causes the inactivation ascribed to entry inhibitors, and masks the inherently high level of infectivity of virions.

    PubMed

    Platt, Emily J; Kozak, Susan L; Durnin, James P; Hope, Thomas J; Kabat, David

    2010-03-01

    By using immunofluorescence microscopy to observe and analyze freshly made HIV-1 virions adsorbed onto cells, we found that they are inherently highly infectious, rather than predominantly defective as previously suggested. Surprisingly, polycations enhance titers 20- to 30-fold by stabilizing adsorption and preventing a previously undescribed process of rapid dissociation, strongly implying that infectivity assays for many viruses are limited not only by inefficient virus diffusion onto cells but also by a postattachment race between entry and dissociation. This kinetic competition underlies inhibitory effects of CCR5 antagonists and explains why adaptive HIV-1 mutations overcome many cell entry limitations by accelerating entry.

  20. Detection of L1, infectious virions and anti-L1 antibody in domestic rabbits infected with cottontail rabbit papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiafen; Budgeon, Lynn R; Cladel, Nancy M; Culp, Timothy D; Balogh, Karla K; Christensen, Neil D

    2007-12-01

    Shope papillomavirus or cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) is one of the first small DNA tumour viruses to be characterized. Although the natural host for CRPV is the cottontail rabbit (Sylvilagus floridanus), CRPV can infect domestic laboratory rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) and induce tumour outgrowth and cancer development. In previous studies, investigators attempted to passage CRPV in domestic rabbits, but achieved very limited success, leading to the suggestion that CRPV infection in domestic rabbits was abortive. The persistence of specific anti-L1 antibody in sera from rabbits infected with either virus or viral DNA led us to revisit the questions as to whether L1 and infectious CRPV can be produced in domestic rabbit tissues. We detected various levels of L1 protein in most papillomas from CRPV-infected rabbits using recently developed monoclonal antibodies. Sensitive in vitro infectivity assays additionally confirmed that extracts from these papillomas were infectious. These studies demonstrated that the CRPV/New Zealand White rabbit model could be used as an in vivo model to study natural virus infection and viral life cycle of CRPV and not be limited to studies on abortive infections.

  1. Aqueous extracts from peppermint, sage and lemon balm leaves display potent anti-HIV-1 activity by increasing the virion density.

    PubMed

    Geuenich, Silvia; Goffinet, Christine; Venzke, Stephanie; Nolkemper, Silke; Baumann, Ingo; Plinkert, Peter; Reichling, Jürgen; Keppler, Oliver T

    2008-03-20

    Aqueous extracts from leaves of well known species of the Lamiaceae family were examined for their potency to inhibit infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Extracts from lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.), peppermint (Mentha x piperita L.), and sage (Salvia officinalis L.) exhibited a high and concentration-dependent activity against the infection of HIV-1 in T-cell lines, primary macrophages, and in ex vivo tonsil histocultures with 50% inhibitory concentrations as low as 0.004%. The aqueous Lamiaceae extracts did not or only at very high concentrations interfere with cell viability. Mechanistically, extract exposure of free virions potently and rapidly inhibited infection, while exposure of surface-bound virions or target cells alone had virtually no antiviral effect. In line with this observation, a virion-fusion assay demonstrated that HIV-1 entry was drastically impaired following treatment of particles with Lamiaceae extracts, and the magnitude of this effect at the early stage of infection correlated with the inhibitory potency on HIV-1 replication. Extracts were active against virions carrying diverse envelopes (X4 and R5 HIV-1, vesicular stomatitis virus, ecotropic murine leukemia virus), but not against a non-enveloped adenovirus. Following exposure to Lamiaceae extracts, the stability of virions as well as virion-associated levels of envelope glycoprotein and processed Gag protein were unaffected, while, surprisingly, sucrose-density equilibrium gradient analyses disclosed a marked increase of virion density. Aqueous extracts from Lamiaceae can drastically and rapidly reduce the infectivity of HIV-1 virions at non-cytotoxic concentrations. An extract-induced enhancement of the virion's density prior to its surface engagement appears to be the most likely mode of action. By harbouring also a strong activity against herpes simplex virus type 2, these extracts may provide a basis for the development of novel virucidal topical

  2. Aqueous extracts from peppermint, sage and lemon balm leaves display potent anti-HIV-1 activity by increasing the virion density

    PubMed Central

    Geuenich, Silvia; Goffinet, Christine; Venzke, Stephanie; Nolkemper, Silke; Baumann, Ingo; Plinkert, Peter; Reichling, Jürgen; Keppler, Oliver T

    2008-01-01

    Background Aqueous extracts from leaves of well known species of the Lamiaceae family were examined for their potency to inhibit infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Results Extracts from lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.), peppermint (Mentha × piperita L.), and sage (Salvia officinalis L.) exhibited a high and concentration-dependent activity against the infection of HIV-1 in T-cell lines, primary macrophages, and in ex vivo tonsil histocultures with 50% inhibitory concentrations as low as 0.004%. The aqueous Lamiaceae extracts did not or only at very high concentrations interfere with cell viability. Mechanistically, extract exposure of free virions potently and rapidly inhibited infection, while exposure of surface-bound virions or target cells alone had virtually no antiviral effect. In line with this observation, a virion-fusion assay demonstrated that HIV-1 entry was drastically impaired following treatment of particles with Lamiaceae extracts, and the magnitude of this effect at the early stage of infection correlated with the inhibitory potency on HIV-1 replication. Extracts were active against virions carrying diverse envelopes (X4 and R5 HIV-1, vesicular stomatitis virus, ecotropic murine leukemia virus), but not against a non-enveloped adenovirus. Following exposure to Lamiaceae extracts, the stability of virions as well as virion-associated levels of envelope glycoprotein and processed Gag protein were unaffected, while, surprisingly, sucrose-density equilibrium gradient analyses disclosed a marked increase of virion density. Conclusion Aqueous extracts from Lamiaceae can drastically and rapidly reduce the infectivity of HIV-1 virions at non-cytotoxic concentrations. An extract-induced enhancement of the virion's density prior to its surface engagement appears to be the most likely mode of action. By harbouring also a strong activity against herpes simplex virus type 2, these extracts may provide a basis for the development of

  3. RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase Activity in Influenza Virions

    PubMed Central

    Penhoet, Edward; Miller, Henry; Doyle, Michael; Blatti, Stanley

    1971-01-01

    An RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity has been detected in purified preparations of influenza virus. In contrast to the replicase activity induced in influenza-infected cells, the virion-associated enzyme has an absolute requirement for Mn++. Most of the RNA synthesized in vitro is complementary to virion RNA. PMID:5288388

  4. Reovirus Variants with Mutations in Genome Segments S1 and L2 Exhibit Enhanced Virion Infectivity and Superior Oncolysis

    PubMed Central

    Gujar, Shashi A.; Ahn, Dae-Gyun; Mohamed, Adil

    2012-01-01

    Reovirus preferentially replicates in transformed cells and is being explored as a cancer therapy. Immunological and physical barriers to virotherapy inspired a quest for reovirus variants with enhanced oncolytic potency. Using a classical genetics approach, we isolated two reovirus variants (T3v1 and T3v2) with superior replication relative to wild-type reovirus serotype 3 Dearing (T3wt) on various human and mouse tumorigenic cell lines. Unique mutations in reovirus λ2 vertex protein and σ1 cell attachment protein were associated with the large plaque-forming phenotype of T3v1 and T3v2, respectively. Both T3v1 and T3v2 exhibited higher infectivity (i.e., a higher PFU-to-particle ratio) than T3wt. A detailed analysis of virus replication revealed that virus cell binding and uncoating were equivalent for variant and wild-type reoviruses. However, T3v1 and T3v2 were significantly more efficient than T3wt in initiating productive infection. Thus, when cells were infected with equivalent input virus particles, T3v1 and T3v2 produced significantly higher levels of early viral RNAs relative to T3wt. Subsequent steps of virus replication (viral RNA and protein synthesis, virus assembly, and cell death) were equivalent for all three viruses. In a syngeneic mouse model of melanoma, both T3v1 and T3v2 prolonged mouse survival compared to wild-type reovirus. Our studies reveal that oncolytic potency of reovirus can be improved through distinct mutations that increase the infectivity of reovirus particles. PMID:22532697

  5. Blockage of CD59 Function Restores Activities of Neutralizing and Nonneutralizing Antibodies in Triggering Antibody-Dependent Complement-Mediated Lysis of HIV-1 Virions and Provirus-Activated Latently Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kai; Lan, Jie; Shepherd, Nicole; Hu, Ningjie; Xing, Yanyan; Byrd, Daniel; Amet, Tohti; Jewell, Corlin; Gupta, Samir; Kounga, Carole

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Both HIV-1 virions and infected cells use their surface regulators of complement activation (RCA) to resist antibody-dependent complement-mediated lysis (ADCML). Blockage of the biological function of RCA members, particularly CD59 (a key RCA member that controls formation of the membrane attack complex at the terminal stage of the complement activation cascades via all three activation pathways), has rendered both HIV-1 virions and infected cells sensitive to ADCML mediated by anti-Env antibodies (Abs) or sera/plasma from patients at different stages of viral infection. In the current study, we used the well-characterized anti-HIV-1 neutralizing Abs (nAbs), including 2G12, 2F5, and 4E10, and non-nAbs, including 2.2C, A32, N5-i5, and N12-i15, to investigate whether the enhancement of ADCML by blockage of CD59 function is mediated by nAbs, non-nAbs, or both. We found that all nAbs and two non-nAbs (N5-i5 and A32) strongly reacted to three HIV-1 laboratory strains (R5, X4, and R5/X4), six primary isolates, and provirus-activated ACH-2 cells examined. In contrast, two non-nAbs, 2.2C and N12-i15, reacted weakly and did not react to these targets, respectively. After blockage of CD59 function, the reactive Abs, regardless of their neutralizing activities, significantly enhanced specific ADCML of HIV-1 virions (both laboratory strains and primary isolates) and provirus-activated latently infected cells. The ADMCL efficacy positively correlated with the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-reactive intensity of those Abs with their targets. Thus, blockage of RCA function represents a novel approach to restore activities of both nAbs and non-nAbs in triggering ADCML of HIV-1 virions and provirus-activated latently infected cells. IMPORTANCE There is a renewed interest in the potential role of non-nAbs in the control of HIV-1 infection. Our data, for the first time, demonstrated that blockage of the biological function of RCA members rendered both HIV-1 virions and

  6. Blockage of CD59 Function Restores Activities of Neutralizing and Nonneutralizing Antibodies in Triggering Antibody-Dependent Complement-Mediated Lysis of HIV-1 Virions and Provirus-Activated Latently Infected Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kai; Lan, Jie; Shepherd, Nicole; Hu, Ningjie; Xing, Yanyan; Byrd, Daniel; Amet, Tohti; Jewell, Corlin; Gupta, Samir; Kounga, Carole; Gao, Jimin; Yu, Qigui

    2015-09-01

    Both HIV-1 virions and infected cells use their surface regulators of complement activation (RCA) to resist antibody-dependent complement-mediated lysis (ADCML). Blockage of the biological function of RCA members, particularly CD59 (a key RCA member that controls formation of the membrane attack complex at the terminal stage of the complement activation cascades via all three activation pathways), has rendered both HIV-1 virions and infected cells sensitive to ADCML mediated by anti-Env antibodies (Abs) or sera/plasma from patients at different stages of viral infection. In the current study, we used the well-characterized anti-HIV-1 neutralizing Abs (nAbs), including 2G12, 2F5, and 4E10, and non-nAbs, including 2.2C, A32, N5-i5, and N12-i15, to investigate whether the enhancement of ADCML by blockage of CD59 function is mediated by nAbs, non-nAbs, or both. We found that all nAbs and two non-nAbs (N5-i5 and A32) strongly reacted to three HIV-1 laboratory strains (R5, X4, and R5/X4), six primary isolates, and provirus-activated ACH-2 cells examined. In contrast, two non-nAbs, 2.2C and N12-i15, reacted weakly and did not react to these targets, respectively. After blockage of CD59 function, the reactive Abs, regardless of their neutralizing activities, significantly enhanced specific ADCML of HIV-1 virions (both laboratory strains and primary isolates) and provirus-activated latently infected cells. The ADMCL efficacy positively correlated with the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-reactive intensity of those Abs with their targets. Thus, blockage of RCA function represents a novel approach to restore activities of both nAbs and non-nAbs in triggering ADCML of HIV-1 virions and provirus-activated latently infected cells. There is a renewed interest in the potential role of non-nAbs in the control of HIV-1 infection. Our data, for the first time, demonstrated that blockage of the biological function of RCA members rendered both HIV-1 virions and infected cells

  7. Hepatitis C Virus Strain-Dependent Usage of Apolipoprotein E Modulates Assembly Efficiency and Specific Infectivity of Secreted Virions.

    PubMed

    Weller, Romy; Hueging, Kathrin; Brown, Richard J P; Todt, Daniel; Joecks, Sebastian; Vondran, Florian W R; Pietschmann, Thomas

    2017-09-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is extraordinarily diverse and uses entry factors in a strain-specific manner. Virus particles associate with lipoproteins, and apolipoprotein E (ApoE) is critical for HCV assembly and infectivity. However, whether ApoE dependency is common to all HCV genotypes remains unknown. Therefore, we compared the roles of ApoE utilizing 10 virus strains from genotypes 1 through 7. ApoA and ApoC also support HCV assembly, so they may contribute to virus production in a strain-dependent fashion. Transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) revealed abundant coexpression of ApoE, ApoB, ApoA1, ApoA2, ApoC1, ApoC2, and ApoC3 in primary hepatocytes and in Huh-7.5 cells. Virus production was examined in Huh-7.5 cells with and without ApoE expression and in 293T cells where individual apolipoproteins (ApoE1, -E2, -E3, -A1, -A2, -C1, and -C3) were provided in trans All strains were strictly ApoE dependent. However, ApoE involvement in virus production was strain and cell type specific, because some HCV strains poorly produced infectious virus in ApoE-expressing 293T cells and because ApoE knockout differentially affected virus production of HCV strains in Huh-7.5 cells. ApoE allelic isoforms (ApoE2, -E3, and -E4) complemented virus production of HCV strains to comparable degrees. All tested strains assembled infectious progeny with ApoE in preference to other exchangeable apolipoproteins (ApoA1, -A2, -C1, and -C3). The specific infectivity of HCV particles was similar for 293T- and Huh-7.5-derived particles for most strains; however, it differed by more than 100-fold in some viruses. Collectively, this study reveals strain-dependent and host cell-dependent use of ApoE during HCV assembly. These differences relate to the efficacy of virus production and also to the properties of released virus particles and therefore govern viral fitness at the level of assembly and cell entry.IMPORTANCE Chronic HCV infections are a major cause of liver disease. HCV is highly variable

  8. The human alpha defensin HD5 neutralizes JC polyomavirus infection by reducing endoplasmic reticulum traffic and stabilizing the viral capsid.

    PubMed

    Zins, Stephen R; Nelson, Christian D S; Maginnis, Melissa S; Banerjee, Rahul; O'Hara, Bethany A; Atwood, Walter J

    2014-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a fatal disease with limited treatment options, both clinically and in the research pipeline. Potential therapies would target and neutralize its etiologic agent, JC polyomavirus (JCPyV). The innate immune response to JCPyV infection has not been studied, and little is known about the initial host response to polyomavirus infection. This study examined the ability of a human alpha defensin, HD5, to neutralize JCPyV infection in human fetal glial cells. We show that HD5, by binding to the virion, blocks infection. The JCPyV-HD5 complexes bind to and enter host cells but are reduced in their ability to reach the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where virions are normally uncoated. Furthermore, HD5 binding to the virion stabilizes the capsid and prevents genome release. Our results show that HD5 neutralizes JCPyV infection at an early postentry step in the viral life cycle by stabilizing the viral capsid and disrupting JCPyV trafficking. This study provides a naturally occurring platform for developing antivirals to treat PML and also expands on the known capabilities of human defensins.

  9. The Human Alpha Defensin HD5 Neutralizes JC Polyomavirus Infection by Reducing Endoplasmic Reticulum Traffic and Stabilizing the Viral Capsid

    PubMed Central

    Zins, Stephen R.; Nelson, Christian D. S.; Maginnis, Melissa S.; Banerjee, Rahul; O'Hara, Bethany A.

    2014-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a fatal disease with limited treatment options, both clinically and in the research pipeline. Potential therapies would target and neutralize its etiologic agent, JC polyomavirus (JCPyV). The innate immune response to JCPyV infection has not been studied, and little is known about the initial host response to polyomavirus infection. This study examined the ability of a human alpha defensin, HD5, to neutralize JCPyV infection in human fetal glial cells. We show that HD5, by binding to the virion, blocks infection. The JCPyV-HD5 complexes bind to and enter host cells but are reduced in their ability to reach the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where virions are normally uncoated. Furthermore, HD5 binding to the virion stabilizes the capsid and prevents genome release. Our results show that HD5 neutralizes JCPyV infection at an early postentry step in the viral life cycle by stabilizing the viral capsid and disrupting JCPyV trafficking. This study provides a naturally occurring platform for developing antivirals to treat PML and also expands on the known capabilities of human defensins. PMID:24198413

  10. Reducing urinary tract infections in catheterised patients.

    PubMed

    Howe, Pam; Adams, John

    2015-01-20

    Urinary tract infections in catheterised patients continue to present a challenge in reducing healthcare-associated infection. In this article, an infection prevention and control team in one NHS trust reports on using audit results to focus attention on measures to reduce bacterial infections. Educational initiatives have an important role in reducing infection, but there is no single solution to the problem. Practice can be improved using a multi-targeted approach, peer review and clinical audit to allow for shared learning and experiences. These, along with informal education in the clinical area and more formal classroom lectures, can ultimately lead to improved patient outcomes.

  11. Wheat streak mosaic virus infects systemically despite extensive coat protein deletions: identification of virion assembly and cell-to-cell movement determinants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Viral coat proteins function in virion assembly and virus biology in a tightly coordinated manner with a role for virtually every amino acid. In this study, we demonstrated that the coat protein (CP) of Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) (genus Tritimovirus; family Potyviridae) is unusually tolerant o...

  12. The vaccinia virus E6 protein influences virion protein localization during virus assembly

    PubMed Central

    Condit, Richard C.; Moussatche, Nissin

    2015-01-01

    Vaccinia virus mutants in which expression of the virion core protein gene E6R is repressed are defective in virion morphogenesis. E6 deficient infections fail to properly package viroplasm into viral membranes, resulting in an accumulation of empty immature virions and large aggregates of viroplasm. We have used immunogold electron microscopy and immunofluorescence confocal microscopy to assess the intracellular localization of several virion structural proteins and enzymes during E6R mutant infections. We find that during E6R mutant infections virion membrane proteins and virion transcription enzymes maintain a normal localization within viral factories while several major core and lateral body proteins accumulate in aggregated virosomes. The results support a model in which vaccinia virions are assembled from at least three substructures, the membrane, the viroplasm and a “pre-nucleocapsid”, and that the E6 protein is essential for maintaining proper localization of the seven-protein complex and the viroplasm during assembly. PMID:25863879

  13. Innate Nuclear Sensor IFI16 Translocates into the Cytoplasm during the Early Stage of In Vitro Human Cytomegalovirus Infection and Is Entrapped in the Egressing Virions during the Late Stage

    PubMed Central

    Dell'Oste, Valentina; Gatti, Deborah; Gugliesi, Francesca; De Andrea, Marco; Bawadekar, Mandar; Lo Cigno, Irene; Biolatti, Matteo; Vallino, Marta; Marschall, Manfred; Gariglio, Marisa

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intrinsic immune mechanisms mediated by constitutively expressed proteins termed “restriction factors” provide frontline antiviral defense. We recently demonstrated that the DNA sensor IFI16 restricts human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replication by downregulating viral early and late but not immediate-early mRNAs and their protein expression. We show here that at an early time point during the in vitro infection of low-passage-number human embryonic lung fibroblasts, IFI16 binds to HCMV DNA. However, during a later phase following infection, IFI16 is mislocalized to the cytoplasmic virus assembly complex (AC), where it colocalizes with viral structural proteins. Indeed, upon its binding to pUL97, IFI16 undergoes phosphorylation and relocalizes to the cytoplasm of HCMV-infected cells. ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport) machinery regulates the translocation of IFI16 into the virus AC by sorting and trafficking IFI16 into multivesicular bodies (MVB), as demonstrated by the interaction of IFI16 with two MVB markers: Vps4 and TGN46. Finally, IFI16 becomes incorporated into the newly assembled virions as demonstrated by Western blotting of purified virions and electron microscopy. Together, these results suggest that HCMV has evolved mechanisms to mislocalize and hijack IFI16, trapping it within mature virions. However, the significance of this IFI16 trapping following nuclear mislocalization remains to be established. IMPORTANCE Intracellular viral DNA sensors and restriction factors are critical components of host defense, which alarm and sensitize immune system against intruding pathogens. We have recently demonstrated that the DNA sensor IFI16 restricts human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replication by downregulating viral early and late but not immediate-early mRNAs and their protein expression. However, viruses are known to evolve numerous strategies to cope and counteract such restriction factors and neutralize the first line of host

  14. Cytomegalovirus UL103 controls virion and dense body egress.

    PubMed

    Ahlqvist, Jenny; Mocarski, Edward

    2011-05-01

    Human cytomegalovirus UL103 encodes a tegument protein that is conserved across herpesvirus subgroups. Mutant viruses lacking this gene product exhibit dramatically reduced accumulation of cell-free virus progeny and poor cell-to-cell spread. Given that viral proteins and viral DNA accumulate with normal kinetics in cells infected with mutant virus, UL103 appears to function during the late phase of replication, playing a critical role in egress of capsidless dense bodies and virions. Few dense bodies were observed in the extracellular space in mutant virus-infected cells in the presence or absence of the DNA encapsidation inhibitor 2-bromo-5,6-dichloro-1-(β-d-ribofuranosyl)benzimidazole. Upon reversal of encapsidation inhibition, UL103 had a striking impact on accumulation of cell-free virus, but not on accumulation of cell-associated virus. Thus, UL103 plays a novel and important role during maturation, regulating virus particle and dense body egress from infected cells.

  15. Interaction of Poliovirus with Its Receptor Affords a High Level of Infectivity to the Virion in Poliovirus Infections Mediated by the Fc Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Arita, Minetaro; Horie, Hitoshi; Arita, Mineo; Nomoto, Akio

    1999-01-01

    Poliovirus infects susceptible cells through the poliovirus receptor (PVR), which functions to bind virus and to change its conformation. These two activities are thought to be necessary for efficient poliovirus infection. How binding and conformation conversion activities contribute to the establishment of poliovirus infection was investigated. Mouse L cells expressing mouse high-affinity Fcγ receptor molecules were established and used to study poliovirus infection mediated by mouse antipoliovirus monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) (immunoglobulin G2a [IgG2a] subtypes) or PVR-IgG2a, a chimeric molecule consisting of the extracellular moiety of PVR and the hinge and Fc portion of mouse IgG2a. The antibodies and PVR-IgG2a showed the same degree of affinity for poliovirus, but the infectivities mediated by these molecules were different. Among the molecules tested, PVR-IgG2a mediated the infection most efficiently, showing 50- to 100-fold-higher efficiency than that attained with the different MAbs. A conformational change of poliovirus was induced only by PVR-IgG2a. These results strongly suggested that some specific interaction(s) between poliovirus and the PVR is required for high-level infectivity of poliovirus in this system. PMID:9882307

  16. Cyclin F/FBXO1 Interacts with HIV-1 Viral Infectivity Factor (Vif) and Restricts Progeny Virion Infectivity by Ubiquitination and Proteasomal Degradation of Vif Protein through SCF(cyclin F) E3 Ligase Machinery.

    PubMed

    Augustine, Tracy; Chaudhary, Priyanka; Gupta, Kailash; Islam, Sehbanul; Ghosh, Payel; Santra, Manas Kumar; Mitra, Debashis

    2017-03-31

    Cyclin F protein, also known as FBXO1, is the largest among all cyclins and oscillates in the cell cycle like other cyclins. Apart from being a G2/M cyclin, cyclin F functions as the substrate-binding subunit of SCF(cyclin F) E3 ubiquitin ligase. In a gene expression analysis performed to identify novel gene modulations associated with cell cycle dysregulation during HIV-1 infection in CD4(+) T cells, we observed down-regulation of the cyclin F gene (CCNF). Later, using gene overexpression and knockdown studies, we identified cyclin F as negatively influencing HIV-1 viral infectivity without any significant impact on virus production. Subsequently, we found that cyclin F negatively regulates the expression of viral protein Vif (viral infectivity factor) at the protein level. We also identified a novel host-pathogen interaction between cyclin F and Vif protein in T cells during HIV-1 infection. Mutational analysis of a cyclin F-specific amino acid motif in the C-terminal region of Vif indicated rescue of the protein from cyclin F-mediated down-regulation. Subsequently, we showed that Vif is a novel substrate of the SCF(cyclin F) E3 ligase, where cyclin F mediates the ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of Vif through physical interaction. Finally, we showed that cyclin F augments APOBEC3G expression through degradation of Vif to regulate infectivity of progeny virions. Taken together, our results demonstrate that cyclin F is a novel F-box protein that functions as an intrinsic cellular regulator of HIV-1 Vif and has a negative regulatory effect on the maintenance of viral infectivity by restoring APOBEC3G expression.

  17. RNA Polymerase in Mumps Virion

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Jacqueline P.; Northrop, Robert L.

    1974-01-01

    Mumps virions of the Enders' strain were examined for polymerase activity in vitro. An RNA-dependent RNA polymerase was found to be associated with the virion. The general properties of the reaction appear to be similar to those described for other paramyxoviruses. PMID:4836602

  18. Vaccine Reduces HPV Infections in Young Men

    Cancer.gov

    An international randomized clinical trial has shown that the vaccine Gardasil can reduce the incidence of anogenital human papillomavirus (HPV) infections in young men 16 to 26 years of age at the time of vaccination.

  19. Glutathione is required for efficient production of infectious picornavirus virions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Allen D. . E-mail: smitha@ba.ars.usda.gov; Dawson, Harry . E-mail: dawsonh@ba.ars.usda.gov

    2006-09-30

    Glutathione is an intracellular reducing agent that helps maintain the redox potential of the cell and is important for immune function. The drug L-buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) selectively inhibits glutathione synthesis. Glutathione has been reported to block replication of HIV, HSV-1, and influenza virus, whereas cells treated with BSO exhibit increased replication of Sendai virus. Pre-treatment of HeLa cell monolayers with BSO inhibited replication of CVB3, CVB4, and HRV14 with viral titers reduced by approximately 6, 5, and 3 log{sub 1}, respectively. The addition of glutathione ethyl ester, but not dithiothreitol or 2-mercaptoethanol, to the culture medium reversed the inhibitory effect of BSO. Viral RNA and protein synthesis were not inhibited by BSO treatment. Fractionation of lysates from CVB3-infected BSO-treated cells on cesium chloride and sucrose gradients revealed that empty capsids but not mature virions were being produced. The levels of the 5S and 14S assembly intermediates, however, were not affected by BSO treatment. These results demonstrate that glutathione is important for production of mature infectious picornavirus virions.

  20. M2BP inhibits HIV-1 virion production in a vimentin filaments-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qin; Zhang, Xiaolin; Han, Yuling; Wang, Xinlu; Gao, Guangxia

    2016-01-01

    M2BP (also called 90K) is an interferon-stimulated gene product that is upregulated in HIV-1 infection. A recent study revealed that M2BP reduces the infectivity of HIV-1 by inhibiting the processing of the viral envelope protein. Here we report that in addition to reducing viral infectivity, M2BP inhibits HIV-1 virion production. We provide evidence showing that M2BP inhibits HIV-1 Gag trafficking to the plasma membrane in a vimentin-dependent manner. When vimentin filaments were collapsed by treating cells with acrylamide or by overexpression of a dominant-negative mutant of vimentin, M2BP inhibition of HIV-1 virion production was significantly relieved. We further show that M2BP interacts with both HIV-1 Gag and vimentin and thereby mediates their interactions. We propose that M2BP traps HIV-1 Gag to vimentin filaments to inhibit the transportation of HIV-1 Gag to the plasma membrane. These findings uncover a novel mechanism by which a host antiviral factor inhibits HIV-1 virion production. PMID:27604950

  1. RNAs in the virion of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Bechtel, Jill; Grundhoff, Adam; Ganem, Don

    2005-08-01

    De novo infection of cultured cells with Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) typically results in a latent infection. Recently, however, it has been reported that a subset of lytic mRNAs can be detected in cells shortly after KSHV infection; this expression is transient and eventually subsides, leading to latent infection (H. H. Krishnan et al., J. Virol 78:3601-3620, 2004). Since it has been shown that viral RNAs can be packaged into other herpesvirus virions, we sought to determine if KSHV virions contained RNAs and, if so, whether these RNAs contributed to the pool of lytic transcripts detected immediately after infection. Using DNA microarray, reverse transcription (RT)-PCR, and Northern blotting analyses, we identified 11 virally encoded RNAs in KSHV virions. These corresponded in size to the full-length mRNAs found in cytoplasmic RNA, and at least one was directly demonstrated to be translated upon infection in the presence of actinomycin D. Ten of these RNAs correspond to transcripts reported by Krishnan et al. at early times of infection, representing ca. 30% of such RNAs. Thus, import of RNAs in virions can account for some but not all of the early-appearing lytic transcripts. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of infected-cell RNA demonstrated that most of the virion RNAs were very abundant at late times of infection, consistent with nonspecific incorporation during budding. However, the intracellular levels of one virion mRNA, encoding the viral protease, were much lower than those of transcripts not packaged in the virus particle, strongly suggesting that it may be incorporated by a specific mechanism.

  2. Chromosome of the mature virion of simian virus 40 contains H1 histone.

    PubMed Central

    Nedospasov, S A; Bakayev, V V; Georgiev, G P

    1978-01-01

    In addition to free SV40 minichromosomes in the compact form, complete virions were obtained from the nuclear extract of productively infected cells. Capsid proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3, as well as histones, were observed on electrophoregrams of proteins prepared from virions. In contrast to the widely accepted view, histone H1 was found in virions in stoichiometric amounts with respect to other histones. The same is true for virions isolated by a conventional method. Free minichromosomes present in infected cells contain all histones and practically no viral proteins. Images PMID:211487

  3. Disruption of the baculovirus core gene ac78 results in decreased production of multiple nucleocapsid-enveloped occlusion-derived virions and the failure of primary infection in vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Sai-Nan; Wang, Jin-Yu; Yuan, Mei-Jin; Yang, Kai

    2014-10-13

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ac78 gene is one of the baculovirus core genes. Recent studies showed that ac78 is essential for budded virion (BV) production and the embedding of occlusion-derived virion (ODV) into occlusion body during the AcMNPV life cycle. Here, we report that an ac78-knockout AcMNPV (vAc78KO) constructed in this study had different phenotypes than those described in the previous studies. A few infectious BVs were detected using titer assays, immunoblot analyses and plaque assays, indicating that ac78 is not essential for BV formation. Electron microscopy confirmed that the ac78 deletion did not affect nucleocapsid assembly and ODV formation. However, the numbers of multiple nucleocapsid-enveloped ODVs and ODV-embedded occlusion bodies were significantly decreased. Subsequently, the highly conserved amino acid residues 2-25 and 64-88 of Ac78, which are homologous to an oxidoreductase and cytochrome c oxidase, respectively, were demonstrated to play a crucial role in the morphogenesis of multiple nucleocapsid-enveloped ODV. Immunoblot analysis found that Ac78 was an ODV envelope-associated protein. Consistently, amino acid residues 56-93 of Ac78 were identified as an inner nuclear membrane sorting motif, which may direct the localization of Ac78 to the ODV envelope. In vivo infectivity assays showed that the occlusion bodies of vAc78KO were unable to establish primary infection in the midgut of Trichoplusia ni larvae. Taken together, our results suggest that ac78 plays an important role in BV production and proper multiple nucleocapsid-enveloped ODV formation, as well as AcMNPV primary infection in vivo.

  4. Oligovalent Amyloid-Binding Agents Reduce SEVI-Mediated Enhancement of HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Capule, Christina C.; Brown, Caitlin; Olsen, Joanna S.; Dewhurst, Stephen; Yang, Jerry

    2012-01-01

    This paper evaluates the use of oligovalent amyloid-binding molecules as potential agents that can reduce the enhancement of HIV-1 infection in cells by SEVI fibrils. These naturally occurring amyloid fibrils found in semen have been implicated as mediators that can facilitate the attachment and internalization of HIV-1 virions to immune cells. Molecules that are capable of reducing the role of SEVI in HIV-1 infection may, therefore, represent a novel strategy to reduce the rate of sexual transmission of HIV-1 in humans. Here, we evaluated a set of synthetic, oligovalent derivatives of BTA (a known amyloid-binding molecule) for their capability to bind cooperatively to aggregated amyloid peptides and to neutralize the effects of SEVI in HIV-1 infection. We demonstrate that these BTA derivatives exhibit a general trend of increased binding to aggregated amyloids as a function of increasing valence number of the oligomer. Importantly, we find that oligomers of BTA show improved capability to reduce SEVI-mediated infection of HIV-1 in cells compared to a BTA monomer, with the pentamer exhibiting a 65-fold improvement in efficacy compared to a previously reported monomeric BTA derivative. These results, thus, support the use of amyloid-targeting molecules as potential supplements for microbicides to curb the spread of HIV-1 through sexual contact. PMID:22239120

  5. Exogenous and endogenous hyaluronic acid reduces HIV infection of CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Peilin; Fujimoto, Katsuya; Bourguingnon, Lilly; Yukl, Steven; Deeks, Steven; Wong, Joseph K

    2014-10-01

    Preventing mucosal transmission of HIV is critical to halting the HIV epidemic. Novel approaches to preventing mucosal transmission are needed. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a major extracellular component of mucosa and the primary ligand for the cell surface receptor CD44. CD44 enhances HIV infection of CD4(+) T cells, but the role of HA in this process is not clear. To study this, virions were generated with CD44 (HIVCD44) or without CD44 (HIVmock). Exogenous HA reduced HIV infection of unstimulated CD4(+) T cells in a CD44-dependent manner. Conversely, hyaluronidase-mediated reduction of endogenous HA on the cell surface enhanced HIV binding to and infection of unstimulated CD4(+) T cells. Exogenous HA treatment reduced activation of protein kinase C alpha via CD44 on CD4(+) T cells during infection with HIVCD44. These results reveal new roles for HA during the interaction of HIV with CD4(+) T cells that may be relevant to mucosal HIV transmission and could be exploitable as a future strategy to prevent HIV infection.

  6. Reducing infection rates after prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Wagenlehner, Florian M E; Pilatz, Adrian; Waliszewski, Przemyslaw; Weidner, Wolfgang; Johansen, Truls E Bjerklund

    2014-02-01

    Over the years, prostate biopsy has become the gold-standard technique for diagnosing prostate carcinoma. Worldwide, several million prostate biopsies are performed every year, most commonly using the transrectal approach. Preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis with fluoroquinolones has been shown to be effective for reducing infection rates. However, in recent years, an increase in febrile infection rates after transrectal prostate biopsy (from 1% to 4%) has been reported in retrospective and prospective studies. The predominant risk factor for infection seems to be the presence of fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria in faeces. Patients at risk of fluoroquinolone resistance should receive carefully selected antibiotics at sufficient concentrations to be effective. Targeted prophylaxis after rectal flora swabbing has been shown to be efficacious compared with empirical antibiotic prophylaxis. Several forms of bowel preparations are under investigation, although none have yet been shown to significantly reduce infection rates. Perineal prostate biopsy is currently being evaluated as a strategy for preventing the inoculation of rectal flora, but limited data support this approach at present.

  7. Mechanism of Human Influenza Virus RNA Persistence and Virion Survival in Feces: Mucus Protects Virions From Acid and Digestive Juices.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Ryohei; Nakaya, Takaaki; Naito, Yuji; Daidoji, Tomo; Watanabe, Yohei; Yasuda, Hiroaki; Konishi, Hideyuki; Itoh, Yoshito

    2017-07-01

    Although viral RNA or infectious virions have been detected in the feces of individuals infected with human influenza A and B viruses (IAV/IBV), the mechanism of viral survival in the gastrointestinal tract remains unclear. We developed a model that attempts to recapitulate the conditions encountered by a swallowed virus. While IAV/IBV are vulnerable to simulated digestive juices (gastric acid and bile/pancreatic juice), highly viscous mucus protects viral RNA and virions, allowing the virus to retain its infectivity. Our results suggest that virions and RNA present in swallowed mucus are not inactivated or degraded by the gastrointestinal environment, allowing their detection in feces. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Bacteriophage virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolases: potential new enzybiotics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolases (VAPGH) are phage-encoded lytic enzymes that locally degrade the peptidoglycan (PG) of the bacterial cell wall during infection. Their action usually generates a small hole through which the phage tail crosses the cell envelope to inject the phage genetic m...

  9. Hog cholera virus: molecular composition of virions from a pestivirus.

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, H J; Stark, R; Weiland, E; Rümenapf, T; Meyers, G

    1991-01-01

    Virions from hog cholera virus (HCV), a member of the genus Pestivirus, were analyzed by using specific antibodies. The nucleocapsid protein was found to be a 14-kDa molecule (HCV p14). An equivalent protein could also be demonstrated for virions from another pestivirus, bovine viral diarrhea virus. The HCV envelope is composed of three glycoproteins, HCV gp44/48, gp33, and gp55. All three exist in the form of disulfide-linked dimers in virus-infected cells and in virions; HCV gp44/48 and gp55 each form homodimers, whereas gp55 is also found dimerized with gp33. Such complex covalent interactions between structural glycoproteins have not been described so far for any RNA virus. Images PMID:1870198

  10. Reducing surgical site infections in hepatopancreatobiliary surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ceppa, Eugene P; Pitt, Henry A; House, Michael G; Kilbane, E Molly; Nakeeb, Attila; Schmidt, C Max; Zyromski, Nicholas J; Lillemoe, Keith D

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Patients undergoing complex hepatopancreatobiliary (HPB) operations are at high risk for surgical site infection (SSI). Factors such as biliary obstruction, operative time and pancreatic or biliary fistulae contribute to the high SSI rate. The purpose of this study was to analyse whether a multifactorial approach would reduce the incidence and cost of SSI after HPB surgery. Methods From January 2007 to December 2009, 895 complex HPB operations were monitored for SSI through the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP). In 2008, surgeon-specific SSI rates were provided to HPB surgeons, and guidelines for the management of perioperative factors were established. Observed SSI rates were monitored before and after these interventions. Hospital cost data were analysed and cost savings were calculated. Results Observed SSI for hepatic, pancreatic and complex biliary operations decreased by 9.6% over a 2-year period (P < 0.03). The excess cost per SSI was US$11 462 and was driven by increased length of stay and hospital readmission for infection. Surgeons rated surgeon-specific feedback on SSI rate as the most important factor in improvement. Conclusions High SSI rates following complex HPB operations can be improved by a multifactorial approach that features process improvements, individual surgeon feedback and reduced variation in patient management. PMID:23557410

  11. Electron Tomography of HIV-1 Infection in Gut-Associated Lymphoid Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Ladinsky, Mark S.; Kieffer, Collin; Olson, Gregory; Deruaz, Maud; Vrbanac, Vladimir; Tager, Andrew M.; Kwon, Douglas S.; Bjorkman, Pamela J.

    2014-01-01

    Critical aspects of HIV-1 infection occur in mucosal tissues, particularly in the gut, which contains large numbers of HIV-1 target cells that are depleted early in infection. We used electron tomography (ET) to image HIV-1 in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) of HIV-1–infected humanized mice, the first three-dimensional ultrastructural examination of HIV-1 infection in vivo. Human immune cells were successfully engrafted in the mice, and following infection with HIV-1, human T cells were reduced in GALT. Virions were found by ET at all stages of egress, including budding immature virions and free mature and immature viruses. Immuno-electron microscopy verified the virions were HIV-1 and showed CD4 sequestration in the endoplasmic reticulum of infected cells. Observation of HIV-1 in infected GALT tissue revealed that most HIV-1–infected cells, identified by immunolabeling and/or the presence of budding virions, were localized to intestinal crypts with pools of free virions concentrated in spaces between cells. Fewer infected cells were found in mucosal regions and the lamina propria. The preservation quality of reconstructed tissue volumes allowed details of budding virions, including structures interpreted as host-encoded scission machinery, to be resolved. Although HIV-1 virions released from infected cultured cells have been described as exclusively mature, we found pools of both immature and mature free virions within infected tissue. The pools could be classified as containing either mostly mature or mostly immature particles, and analyses of their proximities to the cell of origin supported a model of semi-synchronous waves of virion release. In addition to HIV-1 transmission by pools of free virus, we found evidence of transmission via virological synapses. Three-dimensional EM imaging of an active infection within tissue revealed important differences between cultured cell and tissue infection models and furthered the ultrastructural understanding

  12. Serial type-specific human papillomavirus (HPV) load measurement allows differentiation between regressing cervical lesions and serial virion productive transient infections.

    PubMed

    Depuydt, Christophe E; Jonckheere, Jef; Berth, Mario; Salembier, Geert M; Vereecken, Annie J; Bogers, Johannes J

    2015-08-01

    Persistent high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is strongly associated with the development of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) or cancer. Not all persistent infections lead to cancer. Viral load measured at a single time-point is a poor predictor of the natural history of HPV infections. However the profile of viral load evolution over time could distinguish nonprogressive from progressive (carcinogenic) infections. A retrospective natural history study was set up using a Belgian laboratory database including more than 800,000 liquid cytology specimens. All samples were submitted to qPCR identifying E6/E7 genes of 18 HPV types. Viral load changes over time were assessed by the linear regression slope. Database search identified 261 untreated women with persistent type-specific HPV DNA detected (270 infections) in at least three of the last smears for a average period of 3.2 years. Using the coefficient of determination (R²) infections could be subdivided in a latency group (n = 143; R² < 0.85) and a regressing group (n = 127; R² ≥ 0.85). In (≥ 3) serial viral load measurements, serial transient infections with latency is characterized by a nonlinear limited difference in decrease or increase of type-specific viral load (R² < 0.85 and slopes between 2 measurements 0.0010 and -0.0010 HPV copies/cell per day) over a longer period of time (1553 days), whereas regression of a clonal cell population is characterized by a linear (R² ≥ 0.85) decrease (-0.0033 HPV copies/cell per day) over a shorter period of time (708 days; P < 0.001). Using serial HPV type-specific viral load measurements we could for the first time identify regressing CIN2 and CIN3 lesions. Evolution of the viral load is an objective measurable indicator of the natural history of HPV infections and could be used for future triage in HPV-based cervical screening programs.

  13. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) virion induced cancer and subfertility, two sides of the same coin.

    PubMed

    Depuydt, T; Beert, J; Bosmans, E; Salembier, G

    2016-12-01

    In the natural history of HPV infections, the HPV virions can induce two different pathways, namely the infec- tious virion producing pathway and the clonal transforming pathway. An overview is given of the burden that is associated with HPV infections that can both lead to cervical cancer and/or temporal subfertility. That HPV infections cause serious global health burden due to HPV-associated cancers is common knowledge, but that it is also responsible for a substantial part of idiopathic subfertility is greatly underestimated. The bulk of the detected HPV DNA whether in men or women is however infectious from origin. Because the dissociation between HPV viruses and HPV virions or infection and disease remains difficult for clinicians as well as for HPV detection, we propose a review of the different effects caused by the two different HPV virion induced pathways, and highlight the mechanisms that are responsible for causing transient subfertility and cancer.

  14. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) virion induced cancer and subfertility, two sides of the same coin

    PubMed Central

    Depuydt, CE; Beert, J; Bosmans, E; Salembier, G

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In the natural history of HPV infections, the HPV virions can induce two different pathways, namely the infec- tious virion producing pathway and the clonal transforming pathway. An overview is given of the burden that is associated with HPV infections that can both lead to cervical cancer and/or temporal subfertility. That HPV infections cause serious global health burden due to HPV-associated cancers is common knowledge, but that it is also responsible for a substantial part of idiopathic subfertility is greatly underestimated. The bulk of the detected HPV DNA whether in men or women is however infectious from origin. Because the dissociation between HPV viruses and HPV virions or infection and disease remains difficult for clinicians as well as for HPV detection, we propose a review of the different effects caused by the two different HPV virion induced pathways, and highlight the mechanisms that are responsible for causing transient subfertility and cancer. PMID:28210481

  15. Reduction of virion-associated σ1 fibers on oncolytic reovirus variants promotes adaptation toward tumorigenic cells.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Adil; Teicher, Carmit; Haefliger, Sarah; Shmulevitz, Maya

    2015-04-01

    Wild-type mammalian orthoreovirus serotype 3 Dearing (T3wt) is nonpathogenic in humans but preferentially infects and kills cancer cells in culture and demonstrates promising antitumor activity in vivo. Using forward genetics, we previously isolated two variants of reovirus, T3v1 and T3v2, with increased infectivity toward a panel of cancer cell lines and improved in vivo oncolysis in a murine melanoma model relative to that of T3wt. Our current study explored how mutations in T3v1 and T3v2 promote infectivity. Reovirions contain trimers of σ1, the reovirus cell attachment protein, at icosahedral capsid vertices. Quantitative Western blot analysis showed that purified T3v1 and T3v2 virions had ∼ 2- and 4-fold-lower levels of σ1 fiber than did T3wt virions. Importantly, using RNA interference to reduce σ1 levels during T3wt production, we were able to generate wild-type reovirus with reduced levels of σ1 per virion. As σ1 levels were reduced, virion infectivity increased by 2- to 5-fold per cell-bound particle, demonstrating a causal relationship between virion σ1 levels and the infectivity of incoming virions. During infection of tumorigenic L929 cells, T3wt, T3v1, and T3v2 uncoated the outer capsid proteins σ3 and μ1C at similar rates. However, having started with fewer σ1 molecules, a complete loss of σ1 was achieved sooner for T3v1 and T3v2. Distinct from intracellular uncoating, chymotrypsin digestion, as a mimic of natural enteric infection, resulted in more rapid σ3 and μ1C removal, unique disassembly intermediates, and a rapid loss of infectivity for T3v1 and T3v2 compared to T3wt. Optimal infectivity toward natural versus therapeutic niches may therefore require distinct reovirus structures and σ1 levels. Wild-type reovirus is currently in clinical trials as a potential cancer therapy. Our molecular studies on variants of reovirus with enhanced oncolytic activity in vitro and in vivo now show that distinct reovirus structures promote

  16. Identification of Human Cytomegalovirus Genes Important for Biogenesis of the Cytoplasmic Virion Assembly Complex

    PubMed Central

    Das, Subhendu; Ortiz, Daniel A.; Gurczynski, Stephen J.; Khan, Fatin

    2014-01-01

    infected cells to build a factory for assembling new infectious particles (virions), the cytoplasmic virion assembly complex (cVAC). Here, we identified three HCMV genes (UL48, UL94, and UL103) as important contributors to cVAC development. In addition, we found that mutant viruses that express an unstable form of the UL103 protein have defects in cVAC development and production of infectious virions and produce small plaques and intracellular virions with aberrant appearances. Of these, only the reduced production of infectious virions is not eliminated by chemically stabilizing the protein. In addition to identifying new functions for these HCMV genes, this work is a necessary prelude to developing novel antivirals that would block cVAC development. PMID:24899189

  17. The vaccinia virus E6 protein influences virion protein localization during virus assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Condit, Richard C. Moussatche, Nissin

    2015-08-15

    Vaccinia virus mutants in which expression of the virion core protein gene E6R is repressed are defective in virion morphogenesis. E6 deficient infections fail to properly package viroplasm into viral membranes, resulting in an accumulation of empty immature virions and large aggregates of viroplasm. We have used immunogold electron microscopy and immunofluorescence confocal microscopy to assess the intracellular localization of several virion structural proteins and enzymes during E6R mutant infections. We find that during E6R mutant infections virion membrane proteins and virion transcription enzymes maintain a normal localization within viral factories while several major core and lateral body proteins accumulate in aggregated virosomes. The results support a model in which vaccinia virions are assembled from at least three substructures, the membrane, the viroplasm and a “pre-nucleocapsid”, and that the E6 protein is essential for maintaining proper localization of the seven-protein complex and the viroplasm during assembly. - Highlights: • Mutation of E6 disrupts association of viral membranes with viral core proteins • Mutation of E6 does not perturb viral membrane biosynthesis • Mutation of E6 does not perturb localization of viral transcription enzymes • Mutation of E6 causes mis-localization and aggregation of viral core proteins • Vaccinia assembly uses three subassemblies: membranes, viroplasm, prenucleocapsid.

  18. mRNA decay during herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections: mutations that affect translation of an mRNA influence the sites at which it is cleaved by the HSV virion host shutoff (Vhs) protein.

    PubMed

    Shiflett, Lora A; Read, G Sullivan

    2013-01-01

    During lytic infections, the herpes simplex virus (HSV) virion host shutoff (Vhs) endoribonuclease degrades many host and viral mRNAs. Within infected cells it cuts mRNAs at preferred sites, including some in regions of translation initiation. Vhs binds the translation initiation factors eIF4H, eIF4AI, and eIF4AII, suggesting that its mRNA degradative function is somehow linked to translation. To explore how Vhs is targeted to preferred sites, we examined the in vitro degradation of a target mRNA in rabbit reticulocyte lysates containing in vitro-translated Vhs. Vhs caused rapid degradation of mRNAs beginning with cleavages at sites in the first 250 nucleotides, including a number near the start codon and in the 5' untranslated region. Ligation of the ends to form a circular mRNA inhibited Vhs cleavage at the same sites at which it cuts capped linear molecules. This was not due to an inability to cut any circular RNA, since Vhs cuts circular mRNAs containing an encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) internal ribosome entry site (IRES) at the same sites as linear molecules with the IRES. Cutting linear mRNAs at preferred sites was augmented by the presence of a 5' cap. Moreover, mutations that altered the 5' proximal AUG abolished Vhs cleavage at nearby sites, while mutations that changed sequences surrounding the AUG to improve their match to the Kozak consensus sequence enhanced Vhs cutting near the start codon. The results indicate that mutations in an mRNA that affect its translation affect the sites at which it is cut by Vhs and suggest that Vhs is directed to its preferred cut sites during translation initiation.

  19. Bacteriophage Infection of Model Metal Reducing Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, K. A.; Bender, K. S.; Gandhi, K.; Coates, J. D.

    2008-12-01

    Microbially-mediated metal reduction plays a significant role controlling contaminant mobility in aqueous, soil, and sedimentary environments. From among environmentally relevant microorganisms mediating metal reduction, Geobacter spp. have been identified as predominant metal-reducing bacteria under acetate- oxidizing conditions. Due to the significance of these bacteria in environmental systems, it is necessary to understand factors influencing their metabolic physiology. Examination of the annotated finished genome sequence of G. sulfurreducens PCA, G. uraniumreducens Rf4, G. metallireduceans GS-15 as well as a draft genome sequence of Geobacter sp. FRC-32 have identified gene sequences of putative bacteriophage origin. Presence of these sequences indicates that these bacteria are susceptible to phage infection. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer sets designed tested for the presence of 12 of 25 annotated phage-like sequences in G. sulfurreducens PCA and 9 of 17 phage-like sequences in FRC- 32. The following genes were successfully amplified in G. sulfurreducens PCA: prophage type transcription regulator, phage-induced endonuclease, phage tail sheath, 2 phage tail proteins, phage protein D, phage base plate protein, phage-related DNA polymerase, integrase, phage transcriptional regulator, and Cro-like transcription regulator. Nine of the following sequences were present in FRC-32: 4 separate phage- related proteins, phage-related tail component, viron core protein, phage Mu protein, phage base plate, and phage tail sheath. In addition to the bioinformatics evidence, incubation of G. sulfurreducens PCA with 1 μg mL-1 mytomycin C (mutagen stimulating prophage induction) during mid-log phase resulted in significant cell lysis relative to cultures that remained unamended. Cell lysis was concurrent with an increase in viral like particles enumerated using epifluorescent microscopy. In addition, samples collected following this lytic event (~44hours) were

  20. VirD - A Virion Display Array For Profiling Functional Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shaohui; Feng, Yingzhu; Henson, Brandon; Wang, Bochu; Huang, Xiaofang; Li, Min; Desai, Prashant; Zhu, Heng

    2013-01-01

    To facilitate high-throughput biochemical analyses of membrane proteins, we have developed a novel display technology in a microarray format. Both a single-pass (CD4) and a multiple-pass (GPR77) human transmembrane proteins were engineered to be displayed in the membrane envelop of herpes simplex virions. These viruses produce large spherical virions displaying multiple copies of envelop proteins. Our aim was to engineer this virus to express these human proteins during the virus productive cycle and incorporate the human proteins into the virion during the assembly process. Another strategy presented includes engineering a fusion of glycoprotein C (gC), a major constituent of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) virions, by hijacking the cis-acting signals to direct incorporation of the chimeric protein into the virion. The expression of the human proteins in infected cells, at the cell surface and in purified virions, is in the correct transmembrane orientation and the proteins are biochemically functional. Purified virions printed on glass slides form a high-density Virion Display (VirD) Array and the displayed proteins were demonstrated to retain their native conformations and interactions on the VirD Array judging by similar assays, such as antibody staining, as well as lectin and ligand binding. This method can be readily scaled or tailored for different modalities including to a high-content, high-throughput platform for screening ligands and drugs of human membrane proteins. PMID:23941274

  1. GP3 is a structural component of the PRRSV type II (US) virion

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, M. de; Ansari, I.H.; Das, P.B.; Ku, B.J.; Martinez-Lobo, F.J.; Pattnaik, A.K.; Osorio, F.A.

    2009-07-20

    Glycoprotein 3 (GP3) is a highly glycosylated PRRSV envelope protein which has been reported as being present in the virions of PRRSV type I, while missing in the type II PRRSV (US) virions. We herein present evidence that GP3 is indeed incorporated in the virus particles of a North American strain of PRRSV (FL12), at a density that is consistent with the minor structural role assigned to GP3 in members of the Arterivirus genus. Two 15aa peptides corresponding to two different immunodominant linear epitopes of GP3 derived from the North American strain of PRRSV (FL12) were used as antigen to generate a rabbit monospecific antiserum to this protein. The specificity of this anti-GP3 antiserum was confirmed by radioimmunoprecipitation (RIP) assay using BHK-21 cells transfected with GP3 expressing plasmid, MARC-145 cells infected with FL12 PRRSV, as well as by confocal microscopy on PRRSV-infected MARC-145 cells. To test if GP3 is a structural component of the virion, {sup 35}S-labelled PRRSV virions were pelleted through a 30% sucrose cushion, followed by a second round of purification on a sucrose gradient (20-60%). Virions were detected in specific gradient fractions by radioactive counts and further confirmed by viral infectivity assay in MARC 145 cells. The GP3 was detected in gradient fractions containing purified virions by RIP using anti-GP3 antiserum. Predictably, the GP3 was less abundant in purified virions than other major structural envelope proteins such as GP5 and M. Further evidence of the presence of GP3 at the level of PRRSV FL12 envelope was obtained by immunogold staining of purified virions from the supernatant of infected cells with anti-GP3 antiserum. Taken together, these results indicate that GP3 is a minor structural component of the PRRSV type II (FL12 strain) virion, as had been previously described for PRRSV type I.

  2. Mutations in the catalytic core or the C-terminus of murine leukemia virus (MLV) integrase disrupt virion infectivity and exert diverse effects on reverse transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Steinrigl, Adolf; Nosek, Dagmara; Ertl, Reinhard; Guenzburg, Walter H.; Salmons, Brian; Klein, Dieter . E-mail: dieter.klein@vu-wien.ac.at

    2007-05-25

    Understanding of the structures and functions of the retroviral integrase (IN), a key enzyme in the viral replication cycle, is essential for developing antiretroviral treatments and facilitating the development of safer gene therapy vehicles. Thus, four MLV IN-mutants were constructed in the context of a retroviral vector system, harbouring either a substitution in the catalytic centre, deletions in the C-terminus, or combinations of both modifications. IN-mutants were tested for their performance in different stages of the viral replication cycle: RNA-packaging; RT-activity; transient and stable infection efficiency; dynamics of reverse transcription and nuclear entry. All mutant vectors packaged viral RNA with wild-type efficiencies and displayed only slight reductions in RT-activity. Deletion of either the IN C-terminus alone, or in addition to part of the catalytic domain exerted contrasting effects on intracellular viral DNA levels, implying that IN influences reverse transcription in more than one direction.

  3. A virus capsid component mediates virion retention and transmission by its insect vector

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Angel Y. S.; Walker, Gregory P.; Carter, David; Ng, James C. K.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous pathogens of humans, animals, and plants are transmitted by specific arthropod vectors. However, understanding the mechanisms governing these pathogen–vector interactions is hampered, in part, by the lack of easy-to-use analytical tools. We investigated whitefly transmission of Lettuce infectious yellows virus (LIYV) by using a unique immunofluorescent localization approach in which we fed virions or recombinant virus capsid components to whiteflies, followed by feeding them antibodies to the virions or capsid components, respectively. Fluorescent signals, indicating the retention of virions, were localized in the anterior foregut or cibarium of a whitefly vector biotype but not within those of a whitefly nonvector biotype. Retention of virions in these locations strongly corresponded with the whitefly vector transmission of LIYV. When four recombinant LIYV capsid components were individually fed to whitefly vectors, significantly more whiteflies retained the recombinant minor coat protein (CPm). As demonstrated previously and in the present study, whitefly vectors failed to transmit virions preincubated with anti-CPm antibodies but transmitted virions preincubated with antibodies recognizing the major coat protein (CP). Correspondingly, the number of insects that specifically retained virions preincubated with anti-CPm antibodies were significantly reduced compared with those that specifically retained virions preincubated with anti-CP antibodies. Notably, a transmission-defective CPm mutant was deficient in specific virion retention, whereas the CPm-restored virus showed WT levels of specific virion retention and transmission. These data provide strong evidence that transmission of LIYV is determined by a CPm-mediated virion retention mechanism in the anterior foregut or cibarium of whitefly vectors. PMID:21930903

  4. A virus capsid component mediates virion retention and transmission by its insect vector.

    PubMed

    Chen, Angel Y S; Walker, Gregory P; Carter, David; Ng, James C K

    2011-10-04

    Numerous pathogens of humans, animals, and plants are transmitted by specific arthropod vectors. However, understanding the mechanisms governing these pathogen-vector interactions is hampered, in part, by the lack of easy-to-use analytical tools. We investigated whitefly transmission of Lettuce infectious yellows virus (LIYV) by using a unique immunofluorescent localization approach in which we fed virions or recombinant virus capsid components to whiteflies, followed by feeding them antibodies to the virions or capsid components, respectively. Fluorescent signals, indicating the retention of virions, were localized in the anterior foregut or cibarium of a whitefly vector biotype but not within those of a whitefly nonvector biotype. Retention of virions in these locations strongly corresponded with the whitefly vector transmission of LIYV. When four recombinant LIYV capsid components were individually fed to whitefly vectors, significantly more whiteflies retained the recombinant minor coat protein (CPm). As demonstrated previously and in the present study, whitefly vectors failed to transmit virions preincubated with anti-CPm antibodies but transmitted virions preincubated with antibodies recognizing the major coat protein (CP). Correspondingly, the number of insects that specifically retained virions preincubated with anti-CPm antibodies were significantly reduced compared with those that specifically retained virions preincubated with anti-CP antibodies. Notably, a transmission-defective CPm mutant was deficient in specific virion retention, whereas the CPm-restored virus showed WT levels of specific virion retention and transmission. These data provide strong evidence that transmission of LIYV is determined by a CPm-mediated virion retention mechanism in the anterior foregut or cibarium of whitefly vectors.

  5. Role of Human Cytomegalovirus Tegument Proteins in Virion Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rebecca Marie; Kosuri, Srivenkat; Kerry, Julie Anne

    2014-01-01

    Like other herpesviruses, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) contains a unique proteinaceous layer between the virion envelope and capsid, termed the tegument. Upon infection, the contents of the tegument layer are delivered to the host cell, along with the capsid and the viral genome, where they facilitate the initial stages of virus replication. The tegument proteins also play important roles in virion assembly and this dual nature makes them attractive potential targets for antiviral therapies. While our knowledge regarding tegument protein function during the initiation of infection has been the subject of intense study, their roles in assembly are much less well understood. In this review, we will focus on recent studies that highlight the functions of HCMV tegument proteins during assembly, and pose key questions for further investigation. PMID:24509811

  6. Safeguards May Be Reducing Serious Catheter Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... They include using sterile gloves, covering catheters with antimicrobial dressings and checking catheters daily for signs of movement or infection. Many hospitals have also added extra training, equipment and supplies. For this study, Nuckols and her colleagues analyzed ...

  7. Isolation and preliminary characterization of herpes simplex virus 1 primary enveloped virions from the perinuclear space.

    PubMed

    Padula, Maryn E; Sydnor, Mariam L; Wilson, Duncan W

    2009-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) nucleocapsids exit the nucleus by budding into the inner nuclear membrane, where they exist briefly as primary enveloped virions. These virus particles subsequently fuse their envelopes with the outer nuclear membrane, permitting nucleocapsids to then enter the cytoplasm and complete assembly. We have developed a method to isolate primary enveloped virions from HSV-1-infected cells and subjected the primary enveloped virion preparation to MALDI-MS/MS (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-tandem mass spectrometry) analyses. We identified most capsid proteins, a tegument protein (VP22), a glycoprotein (gD), and a cellular protein (annexin A2) in the primary enveloped virion preparation. We determined that annexin A2 does not play an essential role in infection under our experimental conditions. Elucidating the structure and biochemical properties of this unique virus assembly intermediate will provide new insights into HSV-1 biology.

  8. Reducing Surgical Site Infections: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Reichman, David E; Greenberg, James A

    2009-01-01

    Infection at or near surgical incisions within 30 days of an operative procedure contributes substantially to surgical morbidity and mortality each year. The prevention of surgical site infections encompasses meticulous operative technique, timely administration of appropriate preoperative antibiotics, and a variety of preventive measures aimed at neutralizing the threat of bacterial, viral, and fungal contamination posed by operative staff, the operating room environment, and the patient’s endogenous skin flora. It is the latter aspect of contamination, and specifically mechanical methods of prevention, on which this review focuses. PMID:20111657

  9. External ventricular drain infection: improved technique can reduce infection rates.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, William J; Singh, Navneet; Hulme, Sharon; Galea, James; Patel, Hiren C; King, Andrew T

    2011-10-01

    The placement of external ventricular drain (EVD) is a common neurosurgical procedure to drain cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in many acute neurosurgical conditions that disrupt the normal CSF absorption pathway. Infection is the primary complication with infection rates ranging between 0% and 45%, and this is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, prolonged hospital stay and increased hospital costs.This article compares and discusses the differences in rates of EVD CSF infection between clinical neurosurgical practice and the infection rates in a group of research patients where EVDs were sampled frequently as part of the study. Patients who had EVD placed were identified by review of theatre logs from 2005-2008. A retrospective case-note review was performed with the primary end point being those patients treated with intrathecal antibiotics. Patients within the research group were identified from established data and the same primary endpoint was used. A standard silicone catheter was the EVD used in both cohorts. Patients were excluded if the EVD was placed for diagnoses other than hydrocephalus associated with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). Ninety-four patients had 156 EVDs placed within the clinical group, 49 patients were treated giving an infection rate within this group of 52.1% per patient and 31.4% per EVD. Thirty-nine patients had 39 EVDs placed within the research group, four patients were treated, the infection rate within this group was 10.3% per EVD, p = 0.0001. Sampling or irrigating ventricular drainage systems does not increase the risk of CNS infection providing the operator has appropriate experience and has used theatre standard aseptic technique.

  10. Reducing infections through nanotechnology and nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Erik; Webster, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    The expansion of bacterial antibiotic resistance is a growing problem today. When medical devices are inserted into the body, it becomes especially difficult for the body to clear robustly adherent antibiotic-resistant biofilm infections. In addition, concerns about the spread of bacterial genetic tolerance to antibiotics, such as that found in multiple drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), have significantly increased of late. As a growing direction in biomaterial design, nanomaterials (materials with at least one dimension less than 100 nm) may potentially prevent bacterial functions that lead to infections. As a first step in this direction, various nanoparticles have been explored for improving bacteria and biofilm penetration, generating reactive oxygen species, and killing bacteria, potentially providing a novel method for fighting infections that is nondrug related. This review article will first examine in detail the mechanisms and applications of some of these nanoparticles, then follow with some recent material designs utilizing nanotechnology that are centered on fighting medical device infections. PMID:21796248

  11. Nanoparticle-based flow virometry for the analysis of individual virions

    PubMed Central

    Arakelyan, Anush; Fitzgerald, Wendy; Margolis, Leonid; Grivel, Jean-Charles

    2013-01-01

    While flow cytometry has been used to analyze the antigenic composition of individual cells, the antigenic makeup of viral particles is still characterized predominantly in bulk. Here, we describe a technology, “flow virometry,” that can be used for antigen detection on individual virions. The technology is based on binding magnetic nanoparticles to virions, staining the virions with monoclonal antibodies, separating the formed complexes with magnetic columns, and characterizing them with flow cytometers. We used this technology to study the distribution of two antigens (HLA-DR and LFA-1) that HIV-1 acquires from infected cells among individual HIV-1 virions. Flow virometry revealed that the antigenic makeup of virions from a single preparation is heterogeneous. This heterogeneity could not be detected with bulk analysis of viruses. Moreover, in two preparations of the same HIV-1 produced by different cells, the distribution of antigens among virions was different. In contrast, HIV-1 of two different HIV-1 genotypes replicating in the same cells became somewhat antigenically similar. This nanotechnology allows the study of virions in bodily fluids without virus propagation and in principle is not restricted to the analysis of HIV, but can be applied to the analysis of the individual surface antigenic makeup of any virus. PMID:23925291

  12. Reduced Risk of Disease During Postsecondary Dengue Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Olkowski, Sandra; Forshey, Brett M.; Morrison, Amy C.; Rocha, Claudio; Vilcarromero, Stalin; Halsey, Eric S.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.; Scott, Thomas W.; Stoddard, Steven T.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Antibodies induced by infection with any 1 of 4 dengue virus (DENV) serotypes (DENV-1–4) may influence the clinical outcome of subsequent heterologous infections. To quantify potential cross-protective effects, we estimated disease risk as a function of DENV infection, using data from longitudinal studies performed from September 2006 through February 2011 in Iquitos, Peru, during periods of DENV-3 and DENV-4 transmission. Methods. DENV infections before and during the study period were determined by analysis of serial serum samples with virus neutralization tests. Third and fourth infections were classified as postsecondary infections. Dengue fever cases were detected by door-to-door surveillance for acute febrile illness. Results. Among susceptible participants, 39% (420/1077) and 53% (1595/2997) seroconverted to DENV-3 and DENV-4, respectively. Disease was detected in 7% of DENV-3 infections and 10% of DENV-4 infections. Disease during postsecondary infections was reduced by 93% for DENV-3 and 64% for DENV-4, compared with primary and secondary infections. Despite lower disease rates, postsecondary infections constituted a significant proportion of apparent infections (14% [for DENV-3 infections], 45% [for DENV-4 infections]). Conclusions. Preexisting heterotypic antibodies markedly reduced but did not eliminate the risk of disease in this study population. These results improve understanding of how preinfection history can be associated with dengue outcomes and DENV transmission dynamics. PMID:23776195

  13. Filarial Worms Reduce Plasmodium Infectivity in Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Aliota, Matthew T.; Chen, Cheng-Chen; Dagoro, Henry; Fuchs, Jeremy F.; Christensen, Bruce M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Co-occurrence of malaria and filarial worm parasites has been reported, but little is known about the interaction between filarial worm and malaria parasites with the same Anopheles vector. Herein, we present data evaluating the interaction between Wuchereria bancrofti and Anopheles punctulatus in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Our field studies in PNG demonstrated that An. punctulatus utilizes the melanization immune response as a natural mechanism of filarial worm resistance against invading W. bancrofti microfilariae. We then conducted laboratory studies utilizing the mosquitoes Armigeres subalbatus and Aedes aegypti and the parasites Brugia malayi, Brugia pahangi, Dirofilaria immitis, and Plasmodium gallinaceum to evaluate the hypothesis that immune activation and/or development by filarial worms negatively impact Plasmodium development in co-infected mosquitoes. Ar. subalbatus used in this study are natural vectors of P. gallinaceum and B. pahangi and they are naturally refractory to B. malayi (melanization-based refractoriness). Methodology/Principal Findings Mosquitoes were dissected and Plasmodium development was analyzed six days after blood feeding on either P. gallinaceum alone or after taking a bloodmeal containing both P. gallinaceum and B. malayi or a bloodmeal containing both P. gallinaceum and B. pahangi. There was a significant reduction in the prevalence and mean intensity of Plasmodium infections in two species of mosquito that had dual infections as compared to those mosquitoes that were infected with Plasmodium alone, and was independent of whether the mosquito had a melanization immune response to the filarial worm or not. However, there was no reduction in Plasmodium development when filarial worms were present in the bloodmeal (D. immitis) but midgut penetration was absent, suggesting that factors associated with penetration of the midgut by filarial worms likely are responsible for the observed reduction in malaria parasite infections

  14. Herpes Simplex Virus 1 UL37 Protein Tyrosine Residues Conserved among All Alphaherpesviruses Are Required for Interactions with Glycoprotein K, Cytoplasmic Virion Envelopment, and Infectious Virus Production

    PubMed Central

    Chouljenko, Dmitry V.; Jambunathan, Nithya; Chouljenko, Vladimir N.; Naderi, Misagh; Brylinski, Michal; Caskey, John R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) UL37 protein functions in virion envelopment at trans-Golgi membranes, as well as in retrograde and anterograde transport of virion capsids. Recently, we reported that UL37 interacts with glycoprotein K (gK) and its interacting partner protein UL20 (N. Jambunathan, D. Chouljenko, P. Desai, A. S. Charles, R. Subramanian, V. N. Chouljenko, and K. G. Kousoulas, J Virol 88:5927–5935, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.00278-14), facilitating cytoplasmic virion envelopment. Alignment of UL37 homologs encoded by alphaherpesviruses revealed the presence of highly conserved residues in the central portion of the UL37 protein. A cadre of nine UL37 site-specific mutations were produced and tested for their ability to inhibit virion envelopment and infectious virus production. Complementation analysis revealed that replacement of tyrosines 474 and 480 with alanine failed to complement the UL37-null virus, while all other mutated UL37 genes complemented the virus efficiently. The recombinant virus DC474-480 constructed with tyrosines 474, 476, 477, and 480 mutated to alanine residues produced a gK-null-like phenotype characterized by the production of very small plaques and accumulation of capsids in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Recombinant viruses having either tyrosine 476 or 477 replaced with alanine produced a wild-type phenotype. Immunoprecipitation assays revealed that replacement of all four tyrosines with alanines substantially reduced the ability of gK to interact with UL37. Alignment of HSV UL37 with the human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus UL37 homologs revealed that Y480 was conserved only for alphaherpesviruses. Collectively, these results suggest that the UL37 conserved tyrosine 480 residue plays a crucial role in interactions with gK to facilitate cytoplasmic virion envelopment and infectious virus production. IMPORTANCE The HSV-1 UL37 protein is conserved among all herpesviruses, functions in both

  15. Reducing periprosthetic joint infection: what really counts?

    PubMed Central

    SOLARINO, GIUSEPPE; ABATE, ANTONELLA; VICENTI, GIOVANNI; SPINARELLI, ANTONIO; PIAZZOLLA, ANDREA; MORETTI, BIAGIO

    2015-01-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) remains one of the most challenging complications after joint arthroplasty. Despite improvements in surgical techniques and in the use of antibiotic prophylaxis, it remains a major cause of implant failure and need for revision. PJI is associated with both human host-related and bacterial agent-related factors that can interact in all the phases of the procedure (preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative). Prevention is the first strategy to implement in order to minimize this catastrophic complication. The present review focuses on the preoperative period, and on what to do once risk factors are fully understood and have been identified. PMID:26904527

  16. T cell antigen discovery using soluble vaccinia proteome reveals recognition of antigens with both virion and non-virion association*

    PubMed Central

    Davies, D. Huw; Chun, Sookhee; Hermanson, Gary; Tucker, Jo Anne; Jain, Aarti; Nakajima, Rie; Pablo, Jozelyn; Felgner, Philip L.; Liang, Xiaowu

    2014-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is a useful model system for understanding the immune response to a complex pathogen. Proteome-wide antibody profiling studies reveal the humoral response to be strongly biased towards virion associated antigens, and several membrane proteins induce antibody-mediated protection against VACV challenge in mice. Some studies have indicated the CD4 response is also skewed toward proteins with virion association, whereas the CD8 response is more biased toward proteins with early expression. In this study, we have leveraged a VACV-WR plasmid expression library, produced previously for proteome microarrays for antibody profiling, to make a solubilized full VACV-WR proteome for T cell antigen profiling. Splenocytes from VACV-WR-infected mice were assayed without prior expansion against the soluble proteome in assays for Th1 and Th2 signature cytokines. The response to infection was polarized toward a Th1 response, with the distribution of reactive T cell antigens comprising both early and late VACV proteins. Interestingly, the proportions of different functional subsets were similar to that present in the whole proteome. In contrast, the targets of antibodies from the same mice were enriched for membrane and other virion components, as described previously. We conclude that a ‘non-biasing’ approach to T cell antigen discovery reveals a T cell antigen profile in VACV that is broader and less skewed to virion-association than the antibody profile. The T cell antigen mapping method developed here should be applicable to other organisms where expressible ‘ORFeome’ libraries are also available, and is readily scalable for larger pathogens. PMID:25024392

  17. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide binding enhances virion stability and promotes environmental fitness of an enteric virus.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Christopher M; Jesudhasan, Palmy R; Pfeiffer, Julie K

    2014-01-15

    Enteric viruses, including poliovirus and reovirus, encounter a vast microbial community in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, which has been shown to promote virus replication and pathogenesis. Investigating the underlying mechanisms, we find that poliovirus binds bacterial surface polysaccharides, which enhances virion stability and cell attachment by increasing binding to the viral receptor. Additionally, we identified a poliovirus mutant, VP1-T99K, with reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding. Although T99K and WT poliovirus cell attachment, replication, and pathogenesis in mice are equivalent, VP1-T99K poliovirus was unstable in feces following peroral inoculation of mice. Consequently, the ratio of mutant virus in feces is reduced following additional cycles of infection in mice. Thus, the mutant virus incurs a fitness cost when environmental stability is a factor. These data suggest that poliovirus binds bacterial surface polysaccharides, enhancing cell attachment and environmental stability, potentially promoting transmission to a new host.

  18. SMART approaches for reducing nosocomial infections in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Kollef, Marin

    2008-08-01

    Nosocomial infections are problematic in the ICU because of their frequency, morbidity, and mortality. The most common ICU infections are pneumonia, bloodstream infection, and urinary tract infection, most of which are device related. Surgical site infection is common in surgical ICUs, and Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea is occurring with increasing frequency. Prospective observational studies confirm that use of evidence-based guidelines can reduce the rate of these ICU infections, especially when simple tactics are bundled. To increase the likelihood of success, follow the specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time bound (SMART) approach. Choose specific objectives that precisely define and quantify desired outcomes, such as reducing the nosocomial ICU infection rate of an institution by 25%. To measure the objective, monitor staff adherence to tactics and infection rates, and provide feedback to ICU staff. Make objectives achievable and relevant by engaging stakeholders in the selection of specific tactics and steps for implementation. Nurses and other stakeholders can best identify the tactics that are achievable within their busy ICUs. Unburden the bedside provider by taking advantage of new technologies that reduce nosocomial infection rates. Objectives should also be relevant to the institution so that administrators provide adequate staffing and other resources. Appoint a team to champion the intervention and collaborate with administrators and ICU staff. Provide ongoing communication to reinforce educational tactics and fine-tune practices over time. Make objectives time bound; set dates for collecting baseline and periodic data, and a completion date for evaluating the success of the intervention.

  19. Spacecraft Environment May Reduce Resistance To Infection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Ott, C. Mark; Castro, V. A.; Leal, Melanie; Mehta, Satish K.

    2006-01-01

    conditions. Data indicates that space flight is a unique stress environment that may produce stress-induced changes in the host-microbe relationship resulting in increased risk of infection.

  20. Spacecraft Environment May Reduce Resistance To Infection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Ott, C. Mark; Castro, V. A.; Leal, Melanie; Mehta, Satish K.

    2006-01-01

    conditions. Data indicates that space flight is a unique stress environment that may produce stress-induced changes in the host-microbe relationship resulting in increased risk of infection.

  1. Structure/Function Analysis of the Vaccinia Virus F18 Phosphoprotein, an Abundant Core Component Required for Virion Maturation and Infectivity▿

    PubMed Central

    Wickramasekera, Nadi T.; Traktman, Paula

    2010-01-01

    Poxvirus virions, whose outer membrane surrounds two lateral bodies and a core, contain at least 70 different proteins. The F18 phosphoprotein is one of the most abundant core components and is essential for the assembly of mature virions. We report here the results of a structure/function analysis in which the role of conserved cysteine residues, clusters of charged amino acids and clusters of hydrophobic/aromatic amino acids have been assessed. Taking advantage of a recombinant virus in which F18 expression is IPTG (isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside) dependent, we developed a transient complementation assay to evaluate the ability of mutant alleles of F18 to support virion morphogenesis and/or to restore the production of infectious virus. We have also examined protein-protein interactions, comparing the ability of mutant and WT F18 proteins to interact with WT F18 and to interact with the viral A30 protein, another essential core component. We show that F18 associates with an A30-containing multiprotein complex in vivo in a manner that depends upon clusters of hydrophobic/aromatic residues in the N′ terminus of the F18 protein but that it is not required for the assembly of this complex. Finally, we confirmed that two PSSP motifs within F18 are the sites of phosphorylation by cellular proline-directed kinases in vitro and in vivo. Mutation of both of these phosphorylation sites has no apparent impact on virion morphogenesis but leads to the assembly of virions with significantly reduced infectivity. PMID:20392848

  2. Mixed genotype transmission bodies and virions contribute to the maintenance of diversity in an insect virus

    PubMed Central

    Clavijo, Gabriel; Williams, Trevor; Muñoz, Delia; Caballero, Primitivo; López-Ferber, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    An insect nucleopolyhedrovirus naturally survives as a mixture of at least nine genotypes. Infection by multiple genotypes results in the production of virus occlusion bodies (OBs) with greater pathogenicity than those of any genotype alone. We tested the hypothesis that each OB contains a genotypically diverse population of virions. Few insects died following inoculation with an experimental two-genotype mixture at a dose of one OB per insect, but a high proportion of multiple infections were observed (50%), which differed significantly from the frequencies predicted by a non-associated transmission model in which genotypes are segregated into distinct OBs. By contrast, insects that consumed multiple OBs experienced higher mortality and infection frequencies did not differ significantly from those of the non-associated model. Inoculation with genotypically complex wild-type OBs indicated that genotypes tend to be transmitted in association, rather than as independent entities, irrespective of dose. To examine the hypothesis that virions may themselves be genotypically heterogeneous, cell culture plaques derived from individual virions were analysed to reveal that one-third of virions was of mixed genotype, irrespective of the genotypic composition of the OBs. We conclude that co-occlusion of genotypically distinct virions in each OB is an adaptive mechanism that favours the maintenance of virus diversity during insect-to-insect transmission. PMID:19939845

  3. Cell Surface Antigen Induced by Friend Murine Leukemia Virus Is also in the Virion

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Maureen; Lilly, Frank; Nathenson, Stanley G.

    1974-01-01

    Intact particles of Friend leukemia virus derived from infectious mouse serum absorb only trace amounts of cytotoxic anti-FMR antibodies, but physical disruption of the virions by freezing and thawing, by ether extraction or by detergent treatment releases large amounts of FMR antigenic activity. Thus this antigen, previously considered to occur mainly as a neo-antigen on the surfaces of virus-infected cells and as a soluble substance in the serum of infected mice, may be primarily a virion component. PMID:4431079

  4. The YXXL Sequences of a Transmembrane Protein of Bovine Leukemia Virus Are Required for Viral Entry and Incorporation of Viral Envelope Protein into Virions

    PubMed Central

    Inabe, Kazunori; Nishizawa, Masako; Tajima, Shigeru; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Aida, Yoko

    1999-01-01

    The cytoplasmic domain of an envelope transmembrane glycoprotein (gp30) of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) has two overlapping copies of the (YXXL)2 motif. The N-terminal motif has been implicated in in vitro signal transduction pathways from the external to the intracellular compartment and is also involved in infection and maintenance of high viral loads in sheep that have been experimentally infected with BLV. To determine the role of YXXL sequences in the replication of BLV in vitro, we changed the tyrosine or leucine residues of the N-terminal motif in an infectious molecular clone of BLV, pBLV-IF, to alanine to produce mutated proviruses designated Y487A, L490A, Y498A, L501A, and Y487/498A. Transient transfection of African green monkey kidney COS-1 cells with proviral DNAs that encoded wild-type and mutant sequences revealed that all of the mutated proviral DNAs synthesized mature envelope proteins and released virus particles into the growth medium. However, serial passages of fetal lamb kidney (FLK) cells, which are sensitive to infection with BLV, after transient transfection revealed that mutation of a second tyrosine residue in the N-terminal motif completely prevented the propagation of the virus. Similarly, Y498A and Y487/498A mutant BLV that was produced by the stably transfected COS-1 cells exhibited significantly reduced levels of cell-free virion-mediated transmission. Analysis of the protein compositions of mutant viruses demonstrated that lower levels of envelope protein were incorporated by two of the mutant virions than by wild-type and other mutant virions. Furthermore, a mutation of a second tyrosine residue decreased the specific binding of BLV particles to FLK cells and the capacity for viral penetration. Our data indicate that the YXXL sequences play critical roles in both viral entry and the incorporation of viral envelope protein into the virion during the life cycle of BLV. PMID:9882334

  5. Conserved and host-specific features of influenza virion architecture.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Edward C; Charles, Philip D; Hester, Svenja S; Thomas, Benjamin; Trudgian, David; Martínez-Alonso, Mónica; Fodor, Ervin

    2014-09-16

    Viruses use virions to spread between hosts, and virion composition is therefore the primary determinant of viral transmissibility and immunogenicity. However, the virions of many viruses are complex and pleomorphic, making them difficult to analyse in detail. Here we address this by identifying and quantifying virion proteins with mass spectrometry, producing a complete and quantified model of the hundreds of host-encoded and viral proteins that make up the pleomorphic virions of influenza viruses. We show that a conserved influenza virion architecture is maintained across diverse combinations of virus and host. This 'core' architecture, which includes substantial quantities of host proteins as well as the viral protein NS1, is elaborated with abundant host-dependent features. As a result, influenza virions produced by mammalian and avian hosts have distinct protein compositions. Finally, we note that influenza virions share an underlying protein composition with exosomes, suggesting that influenza virions form by subverting microvesicle production.

  6. Conserved and host-specific features of influenza virion architecture

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Edward C; Charles, Philip D; Hester, Svenja S; Thomas, Benjamin; Trudgian, David; Martínez-Alonso, Mónica; Fodor, Ervin

    2014-01-01

    Viruses use virions to spread between hosts, and virion composition is therefore the primary determinant of viral transmissibility and immunogenicity. However, the virions of many viruses are complex and pleomorphic, making them difficult to analyse in detail. Here we address this by identifying and quantifying virion proteins with mass spectrometry, producing a complete and quantified model of the hundreds of viral and host-encoded proteins that make up the pleomorphic virions of influenza viruses. We show that a conserved influenza virion architecture is maintained across diverse combinations of virus and host. This ‘core’ architecture, which includes substantial quantities of host proteins as well as the viral protein NS1, is elaborated with abundant host-dependent features. As a result, influenza virions produced by mammalian and avian hosts have distinct protein compositions. Finally we note that influenza virions share an underlying protein composition with exosomes, suggesting that influenza virions form by subverting microvesicle production. PMID:25226414

  7. Patients' Hand Washing and Reducing Hospital-Acquired Infection.

    PubMed

    Haverstick, Stacy; Goodrich, Cara; Freeman, Regi; James, Shandra; Kullar, Rajkiran; Ahrens, Melissa

    2017-06-01

    Hand hygiene is important to prevent hospital-acquired infections. Patients' hand hygiene is just as important as hospital workers' hand hygiene. Hospital-acquired infection rates remain a concern across health centers. To improve patients' hand hygiene through the promotion and use of hand washing with soap and water, hand sanitizer, or both and improve patients' education to reduce hospital-acquired infections. In August 2013, patients in a cardiothoracic postsurgical step-down unit were provided with individual bottles of hand sanitizer. Nurses and nursing technicians provided hand hygiene education to each patient. Patients completed a 6-question survey before the intervention, at hospital discharge and 1, 2, and 3 months after the intervention. Hospital-acquired infection data were tracked monthly by infection prevention staff. Significant correlations were found between hand hygiene and rates of infection with vancomycin-resistant enterococci (P = .003) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (P = .01) after the intervention. After the implementation of hand hygiene interventions, rates of both infections declined significantly and patients reported more staff offering opportunities for and encouraging hand hygiene. This quality improvement project demonstrates that increased hand hygiene compliance by patients can influence infection rates in an adult cardiothoracic step-down unit. The decreased infection rates and increased compliance with hand hygiene among the patients may be attributed to the implementation of patient education and the increased accessibility and use of hand sanitizer. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  8. Human Erythrocytes Selectively Bind and Enrich Infectious HIV-1 Virions

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Zoltan; Brown, Bruce K.; Wieczorek, Lindsay; Peachman, Kristina K.; Matyas, Gary R.; Polonis, Victoria R.; Rao, Mangala; Alving, Carl R.

    2009-01-01

    Although CD4(+) cells represent the major target for HIV infection in blood, claims of complement-independent binding of HIV-1 to erythrocytes and the possible role of Duffy blood group antigen, have generated controversy. To examine the question of binding to erythrocytes, HIV-1 was incubated in vitro with erythrocytes from 30 healthy leukapheresis donors, and binding was determined by p24 analysis and adsorption of HIV-1 with reduction of infectivity for CD4(+) target cells. All of the cells, regardless of blood group type, bound HIV-1 p24. A typical preparation of erythrocytes bound <2.4% of the added p24, but erythrocytes selectively removed essentially all of the viral infectivity as determined by decreased infection of CD4(+) target cells; however, cell-associated HIV-1 was approximately 100-fold more efficient, via trans infection, than unadsorbed virus for infection of CD4(+) cells. All of the bound HIV-1 p24 was released by treatment of the cells with EDTA, and binding was optimized by adding Ca2+ and Mg2+ during the washing of erythrocytes containing bound HIV-1. Although the small number of contaminating leukocytes in the erythrocyte preparation also bound HIV-1 p24, there was no significant binding to CD4, and it thus appears that the binding occurred on leukocytes at non-CD4 sites. Furthermore, binding occurred to erythrocyte ghosts from which contaminating leukocytes had been previously removed. The results demonstrate that erythrocytes incubated in vitro with HIV-1 differentially adsorb all of the infectious HIV-1 virions (as opposed to non-infectious or degraded virions) in the absence of complement and independent of blood group, and binding is dependent on divalent cations. By analogy with HIV-1 bound to DC-SIGN on dendritic cells, erythrocyte-bound HIV-1 might comprise an important surface reservoir for trans infection of permissive cells. PMID:20011536

  9. How to reduce the risk of surgical site infection.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jennie

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are an important cause of healthcare- associated infection and are associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Although intrinsic factors in patients--such as age, underlying illness and site of the procedure--increase the risk, the quality of care delivered during the perioperative period is critical to preventing SSI. This article explores what is known about the epidemiology and pathogenesis of SSI, and practices that are effective in reducing the risk of SSI.

  10. Reducing preventable harm: observations on minimizing bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Pronovost, Peter J; Weaver, Sally J; Berenholtz, Sean M; Lubomski, Lisa H; Maragakis, Lisa L; Marsteller, Jill A; Pham, Julius Cuong; Sawyer, Melinda D; Thompson, David A; Weeks, Kristina; Rosen, Michael A

    2017-03-20

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to provide a practical framework that health care organizations could use to decrease preventable healthcare-acquired harms. Design/methodology/approach An existing theory of how hospitals succeeded in reducing rates of central line-associated bloodstream infections was refined, drawing from the literature and experiences in facilitating improvement efforts in thousands of hospitals in and outside the USA. Findings The following common interventions were implemented by hospitals able to reduce and sustain low infection rates. Hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) leaders demonstrated and vocalized their commitment to the goal of zero preventable harm. Also, leaders created an enabling infrastructure in the way of a coordinating team to support the improvement work to prevent infections. The team of hospital quality improvement and infection prevention staff provided project management, analytics, improvement science support, and expertise on evidence-based infection prevention practices. A third intervention assembled Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program teams in ICUs to foster local ownership of the improvement work. The coordinating team also linked unit-based safety teams in and across hospital organizations to form clinical communities to share information and disseminate effective solutions. Practical implications This framework is a feasible approach to drive local efforts to reduce bloodstream infections and other preventable healthcare-acquired harms. Originality/value Implementing this framework could decrease the significant morbidity, mortality, and costs associated with preventable harms.

  11. Proteomics of HCV virions reveals an essential role for the nucleoporin Nup98 in virus morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lussignol, Marion; Kopp, Martina; Molloy, Kelly; Vizcay-Barrena, Gema; Fleck, Roland A.; Bell, Kierstin L.; Chait, Brian T.; Rice, Charles M.; Catanese, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a unique enveloped virus that assembles as a hybrid lipoviral particle by tightly interacting with host lipoproteins. As a result, HCV virions display a characteristic low buoyant density and a deceiving coat, with host-derived apolipoproteins masking viral epitopes. We previously described methods to produce high-titer preparations of HCV particles with tagged envelope glycoproteins that enabled ultrastructural analysis of affinity-purified virions. Here, we performed proteomics studies of HCV isolated from culture media of infected hepatoma cells to define viral and host-encoded proteins associated with mature virions. Using two different affinity purification protocols, we detected four viral and 46 human cellular proteins specifically copurifying with extracellular HCV virions. We determined the C terminus of the mature capsid protein and reproducibly detected low levels of the viral nonstructural protein, NS3. Functional characterization of virion-associated host factors by RNAi identified cellular proteins with either proviral or antiviral roles. In particular, we discovered a novel interaction between HCV capsid protein and the nucleoporin Nup98 at cytosolic lipid droplets that is important for HCV propagation. These results provide the first comprehensive view to our knowledge of the protein composition of HCV and new insights into the complex virus–host interactions underlying HCV infection. PMID:26884193

  12. RhoA Signaling Is Required for Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Induced Syncytium Formation and Filamentous Virion Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Gower, Tara L.; Pastey, Manoj K.; Peeples, Mark E.; Collins, Peter L.; McCurdy, Lewis H.; Hart, Timothy K.; Guth, Alex; Johnson, Teresa R.; Graham, Barney S.

    2005-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important human pathogen that can cause severe and life-threatening respiratory infections in infants, the elderly, and immunocompromised adults. RSV infection of HEp-2 cells induces the activation of RhoA, a small GTPase. We therefore asked whether RhoA signaling is important for RSV replication or syncytium formation. The treatment of HEp-2 cells with Clostridium botulinum C3, an enzyme that ADP-ribosylates and specifically inactivates RhoA, inhibited RSV-induced syncytium formation and cell-to-cell fusion, although similar levels of PFU were released into the medium and viral protein expression levels were equivalent. Treatment with another inhibitor of RhoA signaling, the Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632, yielded similar results. Scanning electron microscopy of C3-treated infected cells showed reduced numbers of single blunted filaments, in contrast to the large clumps of long filaments in untreated infected cells. These data suggest that RhoA signaling is associated with filamentous virus morphology, cell-to-cell fusion, and syncytium formation but is dispensable for the efficient infection and production of infectious virus in vitro. Next, we developed a semiquantitative method to measure spherical and filamentous virus particles by using sucrose gradient velocity sedimentation. Fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy confirmed the separation of spherical and filamentous forms of infectious virus into two identifiable peaks. The C3 treatment of RSV-infected cells resulted in a shift to relatively more spherical virions than those from untreated cells. These data suggest that viral filamentous protuberances characteristic of RSV infection are associated with RhoA signaling, are important for filamentous virion morphology, and may play a role in initiating cell-to-cell fusion. PMID:15827147

  13. Secondary metabolites in floral nectar reduce parasite infections in bumblebees.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Leif L; Adler, Lynn S; Leonard, Anne S; Andicoechea, Jonathan; Regan, Karly H; Anthony, Winston E; Manson, Jessamyn S; Irwin, Rebecca E

    2015-03-22

    The synthesis of secondary metabolites is a hallmark of plant defence against herbivores. These compounds may be detrimental to consumers, but can also protect herbivores against parasites. Floral nectar commonly contains secondary metabolites, but little is known about the impacts of nectar chemistry on pollinators, including bees. We hypothesized that nectar secondary metabolites could reduce bee parasite infection. We inoculated individual bumblebees with Crithidia bombi, an intestinal parasite, and tested effects of eight naturally occurring nectar chemicals on parasite population growth. Secondary metabolites strongly reduced parasite load, with significant effects of alkaloids, terpenoids and iridoid glycosides ranging from 61 to 81%. Using microcolonies, we also investigated costs and benefits of consuming anabasine, the compound with the strongest effect on parasites, in infected and uninfected bees. Anabasine increased time to egg laying, and Crithidia reduced bee survival. However, anabasine consumption did not mitigate the negative effects of Crithidia, and Crithidia infection did not alter anabasine consumption. Our novel results highlight that although secondary metabolites may not rescue survival in infected bees, they may play a vital role in mediating Crithidia transmission within and between colonies by reducing Crithidia infection intensities.

  14. Secondary metabolites in floral nectar reduce parasite infections in bumblebees

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Leif L.; Adler, Lynn S.; Leonard, Anne S.; Andicoechea, Jonathan; Regan, Karly H.; Anthony, Winston E.; Manson, Jessamyn S.; Irwin, Rebecca E.

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of secondary metabolites is a hallmark of plant defence against herbivores. These compounds may be detrimental to consumers, but can also protect herbivores against parasites. Floral nectar commonly contains secondary metabolites, but little is known about the impacts of nectar chemistry on pollinators, including bees. We hypothesized that nectar secondary metabolites could reduce bee parasite infection. We inoculated individual bumblebees with Crithidia bombi, an intestinal parasite, and tested effects of eight naturally occurring nectar chemicals on parasite population growth. Secondary metabolites strongly reduced parasite load, with significant effects of alkaloids, terpenoids and iridoid glycosides ranging from 61 to 81%. Using microcolonies, we also investigated costs and benefits of consuming anabasine, the compound with the strongest effect on parasites, in infected and uninfected bees. Anabasine increased time to egg laying, and Crithidia reduced bee survival. However, anabasine consumption did not mitigate the negative effects of Crithidia, and Crithidia infection did not alter anabasine consumption. Our novel results highlight that although secondary metabolites may not rescue survival in infected bees, they may play a vital role in mediating Crithidia transmission within and between colonies by reducing Crithidia infection intensities. PMID:25694627

  15. Reducing Pediatric Sternal Wound Infections: A Quality Improvement Project.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Corcoran, Claudia; Van Dorn, Charlotte S; Pribble, Charles; Thorell, Emily A; Pavia, Andrew T; Ward, Camille; Smout, Randall; Bratton, Susan L; Burch, Phillip T

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate whether a quality improvement intervention reduces sternal wound infection rates in children after cardiac surgery. This is a pre- and postintervention quality improvement study. A 16-bed cardiac ICU in a university-affiliated pediatric tertiary care children's hospital. All patients undergoing cardiac surgery via median sternotomy from January 2010 to December 2014 are included. The sternal wound infection rates for primary closure and delayed sternal closure are reported per 100 sternotomies. The hospital-acquired infection records were used to identify preintervention cases, while postintervention cases were collected prospectively. Implementation of a sternal wound prevention bundle during the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative periods for cardiac surgical cases. During the preintervention period, 32 patients (3.8%) developed sternal wound infection, whereas only 19 (2.1%) developed sternal wound infection during the postintervention period (p = 0.04). The rates of sternal wound infection following primary closure were not significantly different pre- and postintervention (2.4% vs 1.6%; p = 0.35). However, patients with delayed sternal closure had significantly lower postintervention infection rates (10.6% vs 3.9%; p = 0.02). Implementation of a sternal wound prevention bundle during the perioperative period was associated with lower sternal wound infection rates in surgeries with delayed sternal closure.

  16. Endemic infection reduces transmission potential of an epidemic parasite during co-infection

    PubMed Central

    Randall, J.; Cable, J.; Guschina, I. A.; Harwood, J. L.; Lello, J.

    2013-01-01

    Endemic, low-virulence parasitic infections are common in nature. Such infections may deplete host resources, which in turn could affect the reproduction of other parasites during co-infection. We aimed to determine whether the reproduction, and therefore transmission potential, of an epidemic parasite was limited by energy costs imposed on the host by an endemic infection. Total lipids, triacylglycerols (TAG) and polar lipids were measured in cockroaches (Blattella germanica) that were fed ad libitum, starved or infected with an endemic parasite, Gregarina blattarum. Reproductive output of an epidemic parasite, Steinernema carpocapsae, was then assessed by counting the number of infective stages emerging from these three host groups. We found both starvation and gregarine infection reduced cockroach lipids, mainly through depletion of TAG. Further, both starvation and G. blattarum infection resulted in reduced emergence of nematode transmission stages. This is, to our knowledge, the first study to demonstrate directly that host resource depletion caused by endemic infection could affect epidemic disease transmission. In view of the ubiquity of endemic infections in nature, future studies of epidemic transmission should take greater account of endemic co-infections. PMID:23966641

  17. Packageable antiviral therapeutics against human immunodeficiency virus type 1: virion-targeted virus inactivation by incorporation of a single-chain antibody against viral integrase into progeny virions.

    PubMed

    Okui, N; Sakuma, R; Kobayashi, N; Yoshikura, H; Kitamura, T; Chiba, J; Kitamura, Y

    2000-03-01

    To determine their activities as an antiviral agent packageable within virions and suitable for continued expression in cells, we tested a single-chain antibody (scAb) against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase and its three fusion proteins: fused to viral protein R (scab-Vpr), a double-cassette of the WXXF motif binding to Vpr (scAb-WXXF), and viral major capsid protein (scAb-CA), respectively. Cotransfection of human 293T cells with expression plasmid for scAb-Vpr or -WXXF along with HIV-1 clone pLAI resulted in the production of a normal amount of progeny virions with infectivity decreased by more than 10(3)-fold. Immunoblot analyses showed that scAb-Vpr or -WXXF was associated with virions, whereas scAb or scAb-CA was not, suggesting that scAb-Vpr or -WXXF was incorporated into virions. The incorporation of scAb-WXXF appeared to be Vpr dependent, because the fusion protein was associated with the wild-type but not with Vpr-truncated HIV-1 virions. Since G418-selected HeLa clones carrying expression plasmid for scAb-WXXF were obtained much more frequently than those for scAb-Vpr, scAb-WXXF was inferred to be less toxic to cells than scAb-Vpr. These results suggest that scAb-WXXF may serve as a novel class of antiviral therapeutic that inactivates progeny HIV virions from within.

  18. Parasite treatment reduced Flavobacterium columnare infection in tilapia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterium Flavobacterium columnare and parasite Trichodina are common pathogens of cultured fish. The authors conducted a study to evaluate whether treatment of Trichodina parasitized tilapia with formalin would improve fish survival and reduce F. columnare infection in fish. Tilapia parasitized by...

  19. Detection of the Potyviral Genome-Linked Protein VPg in Virions and Its Phosphorylation by Host Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Puustinen, Pietri; Rajamäki, Minna-Liisa; Ivanov, Konstantin I.; Valkonen, Jari P. T.; Mäkinen, Kristiina

    2002-01-01

    The multifunctional genome-linked protein (VPg) of Potato virus A (PVA; genus Potyvirus) was found to be phosphorylated as a part of the virus particle by a cellular kinase activity from tobacco. Immunoprecipitation, immunolabeling, and immunoelectron microscopy experiments showed that VPg is exposed at one end of the virion and it is accessible to protein-protein interactions. Substitution Ser185Leu at the C-proximal part of VPg reduces accumulation of PVA in inoculated leaves of the wild potato species Solanum commersonii and delays systemic infection, which is not observed in tobacco plants. Our data show that kinases of S. commersonii differentially recognize the VPg containing Ser or Leu at position 185, whereas both forms of VPg are similarly recognized by tobacco kinases. Taken together, our data imply that the virion-bound VPg may interact with host proteins and that phosphorylation of VPg may play a role in the VPg-mediated functions during the infection cycle of potyviruses. PMID:12438596

  20. Dynamics of HIV-Containing Compartments in Macrophages Reveal Sequestration of Virions and Transient Surface Connections

    PubMed Central

    Gaudin, Raphaël; Berre, Stefano; Cunha de Alencar, Bruna; Decalf, Jérémie; Schindler, Michael; Gobert, François-Xavier; Jouve, Mabel; Benaroch, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    During HIV pathogenesis, infected macrophages behave as “viral reservoirs” that accumulate and retain virions within dedicated internal Virus-Containing Compartments (VCCs). The nature of VCCs remains ill characterized and controversial. Using wild-type HIV-1 and a replication-competent HIV-1 carrying GFP internal to the Gag precursor, we analyzed the biogenesis and evolution of VCCs in primary human macrophages. VCCs appear roughly 14 hours after viral protein synthesis is detected, initially contain few motile viral particles, and then mature to fill up with virions that become packed and immobile. The amount of intracellular Gag, the proportion of dense VCCs, and the density of viral particles in their lumen increased with time post-infection. In contrast, the secretion of virions, their infectivity and their transmission to T cells decreased overtime, suggesting that HIV-infected macrophages tend to pack and retain newly formed virions into dense compartments. A minor proportion of VCCs remains connected to the plasma membrane overtime. Surprisingly, live cell imaging combined with correlative light and electron microscopy revealed that such connections can be transient, highlighting their dynamic nature. Together, our results shed light on the late phases of the HIV-1 cycle and reveal some of its macrophage specific features. PMID:23922713

  1. Expression of the highly conserved vaccinia virus E6 protein is required for virion morphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Resch, Wolfgang; Weisberg, Andrea S.; Moss, Bernard

    2009-04-10

    The vaccinia virus E6R gene (VACVWR062) is conserved in all members of the poxvirus family and encodes a protein associated with the mature virion. We confirmed this association and provided evidence for an internal location. An inducible mutant that conditionally expresses E6 was constructed. In the absence of inducer, plaque formation and virus production were severely inhibited in several cell lines, whereas some replication occurred in others. This difference could be due to variation in the stringency of repression, since we could not isolate a stable deletion mutant even in the more 'permissive' cells. Under non-permissive conditions, viral late proteins were synthesized but processing of core proteins was inefficient, indicative of an assembly block. Transmission electron microscopy of sections of cells infected with the mutant in the absence of inducer revealed morphogenetic defects with crescents and empty immature virions adjacent to dense inclusions of viroplasm. Mature virions were infrequent and cores appeared to have lucent centers.

  2. Putative site for the acquisition of human herpesvirus 6 virion tegument.

    PubMed Central

    Roffman, E; Albert, J P; Goff, J P; Frenkel, N

    1990-01-01

    The virion of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) contains a very distinct tegument layer, occupying the space between the nucleocapsid and the virion envelope. Ultrastructural analyses of thymocytes infected with HHV-6 revealed the presence of intranuclear spherical compartments, approximately 1.5 microns in diameter, in which tegumentation seems to take place. These compartments, termed tegusomes, were bounded by two membranes and contained ribosomes, consistent with their derivation by cytoplasmic invagination into the nucleus. Capsids located within the nucleus outside the tegusomes were all naked, while those located in the cytoplasm were uniformly tegumented. In contrast, capsids present inside the tegusomes contains teguments of variable thicknesses. In addition, nucleocapsids were documented in the process of budding into the tegusomes. We thus suggest that the tegusomes represent a cellular site in which HHV-6 virions acquire their tegument. Images PMID:2173796

  3. Reducing surgical site infection in arthroplasty of the lower limb

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, R.; Jameson, S. S.; Sanders, R. D.; Sargant, N. J.; Muller, S. D.; Meek, R. M. D.; Reed, M. R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To review the current best surgical practice and detail a multi-disciplinary approach that could further reduce joint replacement infection. Methods Review of relevant literature indexed in PubMed. Results Surgical site infection is a major complication following arthroplasty. Despite its rarity in contemporary orthopaedic practice, it remains difficult to treat and is costly in terms of both patient morbidity and long-term health care resources. Conclusions Emphasis on education of patients and all members of the health-care team and raising awareness in how to participate in preventative efforts is imperative. PMID:23610703

  4. Predicting first traversal times for virions and nanoparticles in mucus with slowed diffusion.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Austen M; Henry, Bruce I; Murray, John M; Klasse, Per Johan; Angstmann, Christopher N

    2015-07-07

    Particle-tracking experiments focusing on virions or nanoparticles in mucus have measured mean-square displacements and reported diffusion coefficients that are orders of magnitude smaller than the diffusion coefficients of such particles in water. Accurate description of this subdiffusion is important to properly estimate the likelihood of virions traversing the mucus boundary layer and infecting cells in the epithelium. However, there are several candidate models for diffusion that can fit experimental measurements of mean-square displacements. We show that these models yield very different estimates for the time taken for subdiffusive virions to traverse through a mucus layer. We explain why fits of subdiffusive mean-square displacements to standard diffusion models may be misleading. Relevant to human immunodeficiency virus infection, using computational methods for fractional subdiffusion, we show that subdiffusion in normal acidic mucus provides a more effective barrier against infection than previously thought. By contrast, the neutralization of the mucus by alkaline semen, after sexual intercourse, allows virions to cross the mucus layer and reach the epithelium in a short timeframe. The computed barrier protection from fractional subdiffusion is some orders of magnitude greater than that derived by fitting standard models of diffusion to subdiffusive data. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Predicting First Traversal Times for Virions and Nanoparticles in Mucus with Slowed Diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Austen M.; Henry, Bruce I.; Murray, John M.; Klasse, Per Johan; Angstmann, Christopher N.

    2015-01-01

    Particle-tracking experiments focusing on virions or nanoparticles in mucus have measured mean-square displacements and reported diffusion coefficients that are orders of magnitude smaller than the diffusion coefficients of such particles in water. Accurate description of this subdiffusion is important to properly estimate the likelihood of virions traversing the mucus boundary layer and infecting cells in the epithelium. However, there are several candidate models for diffusion that can fit experimental measurements of mean-square displacements. We show that these models yield very different estimates for the time taken for subdiffusive virions to traverse through a mucus layer. We explain why fits of subdiffusive mean-square displacements to standard diffusion models may be misleading. Relevant to human immunodeficiency virus infection, using computational methods for fractional subdiffusion, we show that subdiffusion in normal acidic mucus provides a more effective barrier against infection than previously thought. By contrast, the neutralization of the mucus by alkaline semen, after sexual intercourse, allows virions to cross the mucus layer and reach the epithelium in a short timeframe. The computed barrier protection from fractional subdiffusion is some orders of magnitude greater than that derived by fitting standard models of diffusion to subdiffusive data. PMID:26153713

  6. Virion Background and Efficiency of Virion Incorporation Determine Susceptibility of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Env-Driven Viral Entry to Inhibition by IFITM Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wrensch, Florian; Hoffmann, Markus; Gärtner, Sabine; Nehlmeier, Inga; Winkler, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Interferon-induced transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) can inhibit the cellular entry of several enveloped viruses, including simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). The blockade of SIV by IFITMs is isolate specific, raising the question of which parameters impact sensitivity to IFITM. We show that the virion context in which SIV-Env is presented and the efficiency of virion incorporation determine Env susceptibility to inhibition by IFITMs. Thus, determinants other than the nature of the envelope protein can impact the IFITM sensitivity of viral entry. IMPORTANCE The host cell-encoded IFITM proteins can block viral entry and are an important component of the innate defenses against viral infection. However, the determinants controlling whether a virus is susceptible to blockade by IFITM proteins are incompletely understood. Our study shows that the amount of envelope proteins incorporated into virions as well as the nature of the virion particle itself can impact the sensitivity of viral entry to IFITMs. These results show for the first time that determinants other than the viral envelope protein can impact sensitivity to IFITM and have implications for the interpretation of previously published data on inhibition of viruses by IFITM proteins. Moreover, our findings might help to define the mechanism underlying the antiviral activity of IFITM proteins. PMID:27807233

  7. Virion Background and Efficiency of Virion Incorporation Determine Susceptibility of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Env-Driven Viral Entry to Inhibition by IFITM Proteins.

    PubMed

    Wrensch, Florian; Hoffmann, Markus; Gärtner, Sabine; Nehlmeier, Inga; Winkler, Michael; Pöhlmann, Stefan

    2017-01-15

    Interferon-induced transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) can inhibit the cellular entry of several enveloped viruses, including simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). The blockade of SIV by IFITMs is isolate specific, raising the question of which parameters impact sensitivity to IFITM. We show that the virion context in which SIV-Env is presented and the efficiency of virion incorporation determine Env susceptibility to inhibition by IFITMs. Thus, determinants other than the nature of the envelope protein can impact the IFITM sensitivity of viral entry. The host cell-encoded IFITM proteins can block viral entry and are an important component of the innate defenses against viral infection. However, the determinants controlling whether a virus is susceptible to blockade by IFITM proteins are incompletely understood. Our study shows that the amount of envelope proteins incorporated into virions as well as the nature of the virion particle itself can impact the sensitivity of viral entry to IFITMs. These results show for the first time that determinants other than the viral envelope protein can impact sensitivity to IFITM and have implications for the interpretation of previously published data on inhibition of viruses by IFITM proteins. Moreover, our findings might help to define the mechanism underlying the antiviral activity of IFITM proteins. Copyright © 2017 Wrensch et al.

  8. Metam sodium reduces viability and infectivity of Eimeria oocysts.

    PubMed

    Fetterer, R H; Jenkins, M C; Miska, K B; Cain, G D

    2010-06-01

    Metam sodium (MS, sodium N-methyldithiocarbamate) is a widely used soil pesticide. Fumigation or chemical sterilization of poultry litter containing infectious oocysts could be an effective strategy to block the transmission of avian coccidia. In the current study, the effect of MS on the viability and infectivity of ocysts was investigated. The development of isolated, unsporulated oocysts of both Eimeria tenella and Eimeria maxima was inhibited, in a dose-related manner (IC(50) 8 to 14 microg/ml), by exposure to aqueous MS. Most treated oocysts failed to develop beyond early stages of sporulation. To determine the effect of MS on infectivity, isolated oocysts of E. tenella , Eimeria acervulina , and E. maxima were exposed for 24 hr to aqueous concentrations of MS ranging from 0 to 1,000 microg/ml. Treated oocysts were inoculated into chickens, and parameters of coccidiosis infection were compared to chickens inoculated with equal numbers of untreated oocysts. In a dose-related manner, MS significantly reduced the infectivity of oocysts with maximum effect observed at a dose of 300 microg/ml. When a mixture of oocysts containing 3 coccidian species was exposed to 300 microg/ml MS, from 0 to 24 hr, infectivity of oocysts was significantly reduced after a minimum of 12 hr of exposure. Treatment of aqueous slurries of litter samples obtained from commercial poultry houses, with 300 microg/ml MS for 24 hr, prevented the sporulation of eimerian oocysts in the litter samples relative to untreated control samples. The results indicate that MS could be used to reduce coccidial contamination of poultry litter.

  9. Interactions between HIV-1 Gag and Viral RNA Genome Enhance Virion Assembly.

    PubMed

    Dilley, Kari A; Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Galli, Andrea; Burdick, Ryan C; Levine, Louis; Li, Kelvin; Rein, Alan; Pathak, Vinay K; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2017-08-15

    Most HIV-1 virions contain two copies of full-length viral RNA, indicating that genome packaging is efficient and tightly regulated. However, the structural protein Gag is the only component required for the assembly of noninfectious viruslike particles, and the viral RNA is dispensable in this process. The mechanism that allows HIV-1 to achieve such high efficiency of genome packaging when a packageable viral RNA is not required for virus assembly is currently unknown. In this report, we examined the role of HIV-1 RNA in virus assembly and found that packageable HIV-1 RNA enhances particle production when Gag is expressed at levels similar to those in cells containing one provirus. However, such enhancement is diminished when Gag is overexpressed, suggesting that the effects of viral RNA can be replaced by increased Gag concentration in cells. We also showed that the specific interactions between Gag and viral RNA are required for the enhancement of particle production. Taken together, these studies are consistent with our previous hypothesis that specific dimeric viral RNA-Gag interactions are the nucleation event of infectious virion assembly, ensuring that one RNA dimer is packaged into each nascent virion. These studies shed light on the mechanism by which HIV-1 achieves efficient genome packaging during virus assembly.IMPORTANCE Retrovirus assembly is a well-choreographed event, during which many viral and cellular components come together to generate infectious virions. The viral RNA genome carries the genetic information to new host cells, providing instructions to generate new virions, and therefore is essential for virion infectivity. In this report, we show that the specific interaction of the viral RNA genome with the structural protein Gag facilitates virion assembly and particle production. These findings resolve the conundrum that HIV-1 RNA is selectively packaged into virions with high efficiency despite being dispensable for virion assembly

  10. Vaccinia extracellular virions enter cells by macropinocytosis and acid-activated membrane rupture

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Florian Ingo; Bleck, Christopher Karl Ernst; Helenius, Ari; Mercer, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV), the model poxvirus, produces two types of infectious particles: mature virions (MVs) and extracellular virions (EVs). EV particles possess two membranes and therefore require an unusual cellular entry mechanism. By a combination of fluorescence and electron microscopy as well as flow cytometry, we investigated the cellular processes that EVs required to infect HeLa cells. We found that EV particles were endocytosed, and that internalization and infection depended on actin rearrangements, activity of Na+/H+ exchangers, and signalling events typical for the macropinocytic mechanism of endocytosis. To promote their internalization, EVs were capable of actively triggering macropinocytosis. EV infection also required vacuolar acidification, and acid exposure in endocytic vacuoles was needed to disrupt the outer EV membrane. Once exposed, the underlying MV-like particle presumably fused its single membrane with the limiting vacuolar membrane. Release of the viral core into the host cell cytosol allowed for productive infection. PMID:21792173

  11. Herpes Simplex Virus Virion Host Shutoff (vhs) Activity Alters Periocular Disease in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tracy J.; Ackland-Berglund, Cathleen E.; Leib, David A.

    2000-01-01

    During lytic infection, the virion host shutoff (vhs) protein of herpes simplex virus (HSV) mediates the rapid degradation of RNA and shutoff of host protein synthesis. In mice, HSV type 1 (HSV-1) mutants lacking vhs activity are profoundly attenuated. HSV-2 has significantly higher vhs activity than HSV-1, eliciting a faster and more complete shutoff. To examine further the role of vhs activity in pathogenesis, we generated an intertypic recombinant virus (KOSV2) in which the vhs open reading frame of HSV-1 strain KOS was replaced with that of HSV-2 strain 333. KOSV2 and a marker-rescued virus, KOSV2R, were characterized in cell culture and tested in an in vivo mouse eye model of latency and pathogenesis. The RNA degradation kinetics of KOSV2 was identical to that of HSV-2 333, and both showed vhs activity significantly higher than that of KOS. This demonstrated that the fast vhs-mediated degradation phenotype of 333 had been conferred upon KOS. The growth of KOSV2 was comparable to that of KOS, 333, and KOSV2R in cell culture, murine corneas, and trigeminal ganglia and had a reactivation frequency similar to those of KOS and KOSV2R from explanted latently infected trigeminal ganglia. There was, however, significantly reduced blepharitis and viral replication within the periocular skin of KOSV2-infected mice compared to mice infected with either KOS or KOSV2R. Taken together, these data demonstrate that heightened vhs activity, in the context of HSV-1 infection, leads to increased viral clearance from the skin of mice and that the replication of virus in the skin is a determining factor for blepharitis. These data also suggest a role for vhs in modulating host responses to HSV infection. PMID:10729135

  12. Coxsackievirus B3 infection reduces female mouse fertility

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Hye Min; Hwang, Ji Young; Lee, Kyung Min; Kim, Yunhwa; Jeong, Daewon; Roh, Jaesook; Choi, Hyeonhae; Hwang, Jung Hye; Park, Hosun

    2015-01-01

    Previously we demonstrated coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) infection during early gestation as a cause of pregnancy loss. Here, we investigated the impacts of CVB3 infection on female mouse fertility. Coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR) expression and CVB3 replication in the ovary were evaluated by immunohistochemistry or reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). CAR was highly expressed in granulosa cells (GCs) and CVB3 replicated in the ovary. Histological analysis showed a significant increase in the number of atretic follicles in the ovaries of CVB3-infected mice (CVBM). Estrous cycle evaluation demonstrated that a higher number of CVBM were in proestrus compared to mock mice (CVBM vs. mock; 61.5%, 28.5%, respectively). Estradiol concentration in GC culture supernatant and serum were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Baseline and stimulated levels of estradiol in GC were decreased in CVBM, consistent with significantly reduced serum levels in these animals. In addition, aromatase transcript levels in GCs from CVBM were also decreased by 40% relative to the mock. Bone mineral density evaluated by micro-computed tomography was significantly decreased in the CVBM. Moreover, the fertility rate was also significantly decreased for the CVBM compared to the mock (CVBM vs. mock; 20%, 94.7%, respectively). This study suggests that CVB3 infection could interfere with reproduction by disturbing ovarian function and cyclic changes of the uterus. PMID:26062767

  13. The Equine Herpesvirus 1 US2 Homolog Encodes a Nonessential Membrane-Associated Virion Component

    PubMed Central

    Meindl, Alexandra; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    1999-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to analyze the equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) gene 68 product which is encoded by the EHV-1 US2 homolog. An antiserum directed against the amino-terminal 206 amino acids of the EHV-1 US2 protein specifically detected a protein with an Mr of 34,000 in cells infected with EHV-1 strain RacL11. EHV-1 strain Ab4 encodes a 44,000-Mr Us2 protein, whereas vaccine strain RacH, a high-passage derivative of RacL11, encodes a 31,000-Mr Us2 polypeptide. Irrespective of its size, the US2 protein was incorporated into virions. The EHV-1 US2 protein localized to membrane and nuclear fractions of RacL11-infected cells and to the envelope fraction of purified virions. To monitor intracellular trafficking of the protein, the green fluorescent protein (GFP) was fused to the carboxy terminus of the EHV-1 US2 protein or to a truncated US2 protein lacking a stretch of 16 hydrophobic amino acids at the extreme amino terminus. Both fusion proteins were detected at the plasma membrane and accumulated in the vicinity of nuclei of transfected cells. However, trafficking of either GFP fusion protein through the secretory pathway could not be demonstrated, and the EHV-1 US2 protein lacked detectable N- and O-linked carbohydrates. Consistent with the presence of the US2 protein in the viral envelope and plasma membrane of infected cells, a US2-negative RacL11 mutant (L11ΔUS2) exhibited delayed penetration kinetics and produced smaller plaques compared with either wild-type RacL11 or a US2-repaired virus. After infection of BALB/c mice with L11ΔUS2, reduced pathogenicity compared with the parental RacL11 virus and the repaired virus was observed. It is concluded that the EHV-1 US2 protein modulates virus entry and cell-to-cell spread and appears to support sustained EHV-1 replication in vivo. PMID:10074198

  14. The equine herpesvirus 1 Us2 homolog encodes a nonessential membrane-associated virion component.

    PubMed

    Meindl, A; Osterrieder, N

    1999-04-01

    Experiments were conducted to analyze the equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) gene 68 product which is encoded by the EHV-1 Us2 homolog. An antiserum directed against the amino-terminal 206 amino acids of the EHV-1 Us2 protein specifically detected a protein with an Mr of 34,000 in cells infected with EHV-1 strain RacL11. EHV-1 strain Ab4 encodes a 44,000-Mr Us2 protein, whereas vaccine strain RacH, a high-passage derivative of RacL11, encodes a 31,000-Mr Us2 polypeptide. Irrespective of its size, the Us2 protein was incorporated into virions. The EHV-1 Us2 protein localized to membrane and nuclear fractions of RacL11-infected cells and to the envelope fraction of purified virions. To monitor intracellular trafficking of the protein, the green fluorescent protein (GFP) was fused to the carboxy terminus of the EHV-1 Us2 protein or to a truncated Us2 protein lacking a stretch of 16 hydrophobic amino acids at the extreme amino terminus. Both fusion proteins were detected at the plasma membrane and accumulated in the vicinity of nuclei of transfected cells. However, trafficking of either GFP fusion protein through the secretory pathway could not be demonstrated, and the EHV-1 Us2 protein lacked detectable N- and O-linked carbohydrates. Consistent with the presence of the Us2 protein in the viral envelope and plasma membrane of infected cells, a Us2-negative RacL11 mutant (L11DeltaUs2) exhibited delayed penetration kinetics and produced smaller plaques compared with either wild-type RacL11 or a Us2-repaired virus. After infection of BALB/c mice with L11DeltaUs2, reduced pathogenicity compared with the parental RacL11 virus and the repaired virus was observed. It is concluded that the EHV-1 Us2 protein modulates virus entry and cell-to-cell spread and appears to support sustained EHV-1 replication in vivo.

  15. Periodic Presumptive Treatment for Vaginal Infections May Reduce the Incidence of Sexually Transmitted Bacterial Infections.

    PubMed

    Balkus, Jennifer E; Manhart, Lisa E; Lee, Jeannette; Anzala, Omu; Kimani, Joshua; Schwebke, Jane; Shafi, Juma; Rivers, Charles; Kabare, Emanuel; Scott McClelland, R

    2016-06-15

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) may increase women's susceptibility to sexually transmitted infections (STIs). In a randomized trial of periodic presumptive treatment (PPT) to reduce vaginal infections, we observed a significant reduction in BV. We further assessed the intervention effect on incident Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Mycoplasma genitalium infection. Nonpregnant, human immunodeficiency virus-uninfected women from the United States and Kenya received intravaginal metronidazole (750 mg) plus miconazole (200 mg) or placebo for 5 consecutive nights each month for 12 months. Genital fluid specimens were collected every other month. Poisson regression models were used to assess the intervention effect on STI acquisition. Of 234 women enrolled, 221 had specimens available for analysis. Incidence of any bacterial STI (C. trachomatis, N. gonorrhoeae, or M. genitalium infection) was lower in the intervention arm, compared with the placebo arm (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 0.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], .32-.91). When assessed individually, reductions in STI incidences were similar but not statistically significant (IRRs, 0.50 [95% confidence interval {CI}, .20-1.23] for C. trachomatis infection, 0.56 [95% CI, .19-1.67] for N. gonorrhoeae infection, and 0.66 [95% CI, .38-1.15] for M. genitalium infection). In addition to reducing BV, this PPT intervention may also reduce the risk of bacterial STI among women. Because BV is highly prevalent, often persists, and frequently recurs after treatment, interventions that reduce BV over extended periods could play a role in decreasing STI incidence globally. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Structural Lability of Barley Stripe Mosaic Virus Virions

    PubMed Central

    Semenyuk, Pavel I.; Abashkin, Dmitry A.; Kalinina, Natalya O.; Arutyunyan, Alexsandr M.; Solovyev, Andrey G.; Dobrov, Eugeny N.

    2013-01-01

    Virions of Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) were neglected for more than thirty years after their basic properties were determined. In this paper, the physicochemical characteristics of BSMV virions and virion-derived viral capsid protein (CP) were analyzed, namely, the absorption and intrinsic fluorescence spectra, circular dichroism spectra, differential scanning calorimetry curves, and size distributions by dynamic laser light scattering. The structural properties of BSMV virions proved to be intermediate between those of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), a well-characterized virus with rigid rod-shaped virions, and flexuous filamentous plant viruses. The BSMV virions were found to be considerably more labile than expected from their rod-like morphology and a distant sequence relation of the BSMV and TMV CPs. The circular dichroism spectra of BSMV CP subunits incorporated into the virions, but not subunits of free CP, demonstrated a significant proportion of beta-structure elements, which were proposed to be localized mostly in the protein regions exposed on the virion outer surface. These beta-structure elements likely formed during virion assembly can comprise the N- and C-terminal protein regions unstructured in the non-virion CP and can mediate inter-subunit interactions. Based on computer-assisted structure modeling, a model for BSMV CP subunit structural fold compliant with the available experimental data was proposed. PMID:23613760

  17. Reducing bloodstream infection with a chlorhexidine gel IV dressing.

    PubMed

    Jeanes, Annette; Bitmead, James

    The use of vascular access devices (VAD) is common in healthcare provision but there is a significant risk of acquiring an infection. Central venous catheters (CVC) are associated with the highest risk of intravenous catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI). 3M™ Tegaderm™ CHG IV dressing is a semi-permeable transparent adhesive dressing with an integrated gel pad containing chlorhexidine gluconate 2%. This product was reviewed by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in 2015, recommending that Tegaderm CHG could be used for CVC and arterial line dressings in high-dependency and intensive-care settings. This article discusses issues around CRBSI, interventions to reduce the risk of CRBSI, and the use of Tegaderm CHG dressing.

  18. Subcellular Localization of HIV-1 gag-pol mRNAs Regulates Sites of Virion Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Jordan T.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Full-length unspliced human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNAs serve dual roles in the cytoplasm as mRNAs encoding the Gag and Gag-Pol capsid proteins as well as genomic RNAs (gRNAs) packaged by Gag into virions undergoing assembly at the plasma membrane (PM). Because Gag is sufficient to drive the assembly of virus-like particles even in the absence of gRNA binding, whether viral RNA trafficking plays an active role in the native assembly pathway is unknown. In this study, we tested the effects of modulating the cytoplasmic abundance or distribution of full-length viral RNAs on Gag trafficking and assembly in the context of single cells. Increasing full-length viral RNA abundance or distribution had little-to-no net effect on Gag assembly competency when provided in trans. In contrast, artificially tethering full-length viral RNAs or surrogate gag-pol mRNAs competent for Gag synthesis to non-PM membranes or the actin cytoskeleton severely reduced net virus particle production. These effects were explained, in large part, by RNA-directed changes to Gag's distribution in the cytoplasm, yielding aberrant subcellular sites of virion assembly. Interestingly, RNA-dependent disruption of Gag trafficking required either of two cis-acting RNA regulatory elements: the 5′ packaging signal (Psi) bound by Gag during genome encapsidation or, unexpectedly, the Rev response element (RRE), which regulates the nuclear export of gRNAs and other intron-retaining viral RNAs. Taken together, these data support a model for native infection wherein structural features of the gag-pol mRNA actively compartmentalize Gag to preferred sites within the cytoplasm and/or PM. IMPORTANCE The spatial distribution of viral mRNAs within the cytoplasm can be a crucial determinant of efficient translation and successful virion production. Here we provide direct evidence that mRNA subcellular trafficking plays an important role in regulating the assembly of human immunodeficiency

  19. Antibody-Mediated Internalization of Infectious HIV-1 Virions Differs among Antibody Isotypes and Subclasses

    PubMed Central

    McRaven, Michael D; Sawant, Sheetal; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Xu, Thomas T.; Dennison, S. Moses; Liao, Hua-Xin; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence; Alam, S. Munir; Haynes, Barton F.; Tomaras, Georgia D.

    2016-01-01

    Emerging data support a role for antibody Fc-mediated antiviral activity in vaccine efficacy and in the control of HIV-1 replication by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Antibody-mediated virus internalization is an Fc-mediated function that may act at the portal of entry whereby effector cells may be triggered by pre-existing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 acquisition. Understanding the capacity of HIV-1 antibodies in mediating internalization of HIV-1 virions by primary monocytes is critical to understanding their full antiviral potency. Antibody isotypes/subclasses differ in functional profile, with consequences for their antiviral activity. For instance, in the RV144 vaccine trial that achieved partial efficacy, Env IgA correlated with increased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. decreased vaccine efficacy), whereas V1-V2 IgG3 correlated with decreased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. increased vaccine efficacy). Thus, understanding the different functional attributes of HIV-1 specific IgG1, IgG3 and IgA antibodies will help define the mechanisms of immune protection. Here, we utilized an in vitro flow cytometric method utilizing primary monocytes as phagocytes and infectious HIV-1 virions as targets to determine the capacity of Env IgA (IgA1, IgA2), IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies to mediate HIV-1 infectious virion internalization. Importantly, both broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. PG9, 2G12, CH31, VRC01 IgG) and non-broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. 7B2 mAb, mucosal HIV-1+ IgG) mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions. Furthermore, we found that Env IgG3 of multiple specificities (i.e. CD4bs, V1-V2 and gp41) mediated increased infectious virion internalization over Env IgG1 of the same specificity, while Env IgA mediated decreased infectious virion internalization compared to IgG1. These data demonstrate that antibody-mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions depends on antibody specificity and isotype. Evaluation of the phagocytic potency of vaccine

  20. Antibody-Mediated Internalization of Infectious HIV-1 Virions Differs among Antibody Isotypes and Subclasses.

    PubMed

    Tay, Matthew Zirui; Liu, Pinghuang; Williams, LaTonya D; McRaven, Michael D; Sawant, Sheetal; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Xu, Thomas T; Dennison, S Moses; Liao, Hua-Xin; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence; Alam, S Munir; Moody, M Anthony; Hope, Thomas J; Haynes, Barton F; Tomaras, Georgia D

    2016-08-01

    Emerging data support a role for antibody Fc-mediated antiviral activity in vaccine efficacy and in the control of HIV-1 replication by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Antibody-mediated virus internalization is an Fc-mediated function that may act at the portal of entry whereby effector cells may be triggered by pre-existing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 acquisition. Understanding the capacity of HIV-1 antibodies in mediating internalization of HIV-1 virions by primary monocytes is critical to understanding their full antiviral potency. Antibody isotypes/subclasses differ in functional profile, with consequences for their antiviral activity. For instance, in the RV144 vaccine trial that achieved partial efficacy, Env IgA correlated with increased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. decreased vaccine efficacy), whereas V1-V2 IgG3 correlated with decreased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. increased vaccine efficacy). Thus, understanding the different functional attributes of HIV-1 specific IgG1, IgG3 and IgA antibodies will help define the mechanisms of immune protection. Here, we utilized an in vitro flow cytometric method utilizing primary monocytes as phagocytes and infectious HIV-1 virions as targets to determine the capacity of Env IgA (IgA1, IgA2), IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies to mediate HIV-1 infectious virion internalization. Importantly, both broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. PG9, 2G12, CH31, VRC01 IgG) and non-broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. 7B2 mAb, mucosal HIV-1+ IgG) mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions. Furthermore, we found that Env IgG3 of multiple specificities (i.e. CD4bs, V1-V2 and gp41) mediated increased infectious virion internalization over Env IgG1 of the same specificity, while Env IgA mediated decreased infectious virion internalization compared to IgG1. These data demonstrate that antibody-mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions depends on antibody specificity and isotype. Evaluation of the phagocytic potency of vaccine

  1. Management strategies to reduce risk of postoperative infections.

    PubMed

    Galor, Anat; Goldhardt, Raquel; Wellik, Sarah R; Gregori, Ninel Z; Flynn, Harry W

    2013-12-01

    Postoperative infections, although rare, are still of great concern to the ophthalmologist. The incidence of post-cataract endophthalmitis is low, with a range of .28 per 1,000 to 2.99 per 1000. In addition to intraoperative considerations such as poor wound construction, vitreous loss, topical anesthesia, and prolonged surgical time, other risk factors include preoperative factors such as a diseased ocular surface and systemic immunosuppression. Potential methods of reducing risk of endophthalmitis after anterior segment surgery are discussed and available literature is summarized.

  2. Management strategies to reduce risk of postoperative infections

    PubMed Central

    Galor, Anat; Goldhardt, Raquel; Wellik, Sarah R.; Gregori, Ninel Z.; Flynn, Harry W.

    2013-01-01

    Postoperative infections, although rare, are still of great concern to the ophthalmologist. The incidence of post-cataract endophthalmitis is low, with a range of .28 per 1,000 to 2.99 per 1000. In addition to intraoperative considerations such as poor wound construction, vitreous loss, topical anesthesia, and prolonged surgical time, other risk factors include preoperative factors such as a diseased ocular surface and systemic immunosuppression. Potential methods of reducing risk of endophthalmitis after anterior segment surgery are discussed and available literature is summarized. PMID:24319649

  3. New molecular strategies for reducing implantable medical devices associated infections.

    PubMed

    Holban, Alina Maria; Gestal, Monica Cartelle; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai

    2014-01-01

    Due to the great prevalence of persistent and recurrent implanted device associated-infections novel and alternative therapeutic approaches are intensely investigated. For reducing complications and antibiotic resistance development, one major strategy is using natural or synthetic modulators for targeting microbial molecular pathways which are not related with cell multiplication and death, as Quorum Sensing, virulence and biofilm formation. The purpose of this review paper is to discuss the most recent in vitro approaches, investigating the efficiency of some novel antimicrobial products and the nano-technologic progress performed in order to increase their effect and stability.

  4. The virion of Cafeteria roenbergensis virus (CroV) contains a complex suite of proteins for transcription and DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Matthias G; Kelly, Isabelle; Foster, Leonard J; Suttle, Curtis A

    2014-10-01

    Cafeteria roenbergensis virus (CroV) is a giant virus of the Mimiviridae family that infects the marine phagotrophic flagellate C. roenbergensis. CroV possesses a DNA genome of ~730 kilobase pairs that is predicted to encode 544 proteins. We analyzed the protein composition of purified CroV particles by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and identified 141 virion-associated CroV proteins and 60 host proteins. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000993. Predicted functions could be assigned to 36% of the virion proteins, which include structural proteins as well as enzymes for transcription, DNA repair, redox reactions and protein modification. Homologs of 36 CroV virion proteins have previously been found in the virion of Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus. The overlapping virion proteome of CroV and Mimivirus reveals a set of conserved virion protein functions that were presumably present in the last common ancestor of the Mimiviridae.

  5. A complex of seven vaccinia virus proteins conserved in all chordopoxviruses is required for the association of membranes and viroplasm to form immature virions

    SciTech Connect

    Szajner, Patricia; Jaffe, Howard; Moss, Bernard . E-mail: bmoss@nih.gov

    2004-12-20

    Early events in vaccinia virus (VAC) morphogenesis, particularly the formation of viral membranes and their association with viroplasm, are poorly understood. Recently, we showed that repression of A30 or G7 expression results in the accumulation of normal viral membranes that form empty-looking immature virions (IV), which are separated from large masses of electron-dense viroplasm. In addition, A30 and G7 physically and functionally interact with each other and with the F10 protein kinase. To identify other proteins involved in early morphogenesis, proteins from cells that had been infected with vaccinia virus expressing an epitope-tagged copy of F10 were purified by immunoaffinity chromatography and analyzed by gel electrophoresis. In addition to F10, A30, and G7, viral proteins A15, D2, D3, and J1 were identified by mass spectrometry of tryptic peptides. Further evidence for the complex was obtained by immunopurification of proteins associated with epitope-tagged A15, D2, and D3. The previously unstudied A15, like other proteins in the complex, was expressed late in infection, associated with virus cores, and required for the stability and kinase activity of F10. Biochemical and electron microscopic analyses indicated that mutants in which A15 or D2 expression was regulated by the Escherichia coli lac operator system exhibited phenotypes characterized by the presence of large numbers of empty immature virions, similar to the results obtained with inducible A30 and G7 mutants. Empty immature virions were also seen by electron microscopy of cells infected with temperature-sensitive mutants of D2 or D3, though the numbers of membrane forms were reduced perhaps due to additional effects of high temperature.

  6. Culture-Independent Evaluation of Nonenveloped-Virus Infectivity Reduced by Free-Chlorine Disinfection

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Takatomo; Nakamura, Arata; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Nakagomi, Osamu; Okabe, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    The inability of molecular detection methods to distinguish disinfected virions from infectious ones has hampered the assessment of infectivity for enteric viruses caused by disinfection practices. In the present study, the reduction of infectivity of murine norovirus S7-PP3 and mengovirus vMC0, surrogates of human noroviruses and enteroviruses, respectively, caused by free-chlorine treatment was characterized culture independently by detecting carbonyl groups on viral capsid protein. The amount of carbonyls on viral capsid protein was evaluated by the proportion of biotinylated virions trapped by avidin-immobilized gel (percent adsorbed). This culture-independent approach demonstrated that the percent adsorbed was significantly correlated with the logarithm of the infectious titer of tested viruses. Taken together with the results of previous reports, the result obtained in this study indicates that the amount of carbonyls on viral capsid protein of four important families of waterborne pathogenic viruses, Astroviridae, Reoviridae, Caliciviridae, and Picornaviridae, is increased in proportion to the received oxidative stress of free chlorine. There was also a significant correlation between the percent adsorbed and the logarithm of the ratio of genome copy number to PFU, which enables estimation of the infectious titer of a subject virus by measuring values of the total genome copy number and the percent adsorbed. The proposed method is applicable when the validation of a 4-log reduction of viruses, a requirement in U.S. EPA guidelines for virus removal from water, is needed along with clear evidence of the oxidation of virus particles with chlorine-based disinfectants. PMID:25681178

  7. Phosphorylation of Bovine Herpesvirus 1 VP8 Plays a Role in Viral DNA Encapsidation and Is Essential for Its Cytoplasmic Localization and Optimal Virion Incorporation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kuan; Brownlie, Robert; Snider, Marlene

    2016-01-01

    alphaherpesviruses. Interestingly, lack of phosphorylation of VP8 by CK2 and US3 resulted in reduced incorporation of viral DNA into capsids during mutant BoHV-1 infection, as well as lower numbers of extracellular virions. Furthermore, mutant VP8 remained nuclear throughout infection, in contrast to WT VP8, which is nuclear at early stages and Golgi apparatus associated late during infection. This correlates with smaller amounts of mutant VP8 in virions and suggests for the first time that VP8 may be assembled into the virions at two stages, with the latter dependent on phosphorylation. PMID:26889039

  8. Scaling, crumpled wires, and genome packing in virions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Holanda, V. H.; Gomes, M. A. F.

    2016-12-01

    The packing of a genome in virions is a topic of intense current interest in biology and biological physics. The area is dominated by allometric scaling relations that connect, e.g., the length of the encapsulated genome and the size of the corresponding virion capsid. Here we report scaling laws obtained from extensive experiments of packing of a macroscopic wire within rigid three-dimensional spherical and nonspherical cavities that can shed light on the details of the genome packing in virions. We show that these results obtained with crumpled wires are comparable to those from a large compilation of biological data from several classes of virions.

  9. Hepatitis C Virus Envelope Glycoprotein E1 Forms Trimers at the Surface of the Virion

    PubMed Central

    Falson, Pierre; Bartosch, Birke; Alsaleh, Khaled; Tews, Birke Andrea; Loquet, Antoine; Ciczora, Yann; Riva, Laura; Montigny, Cédric; Montpellier, Claire; Duverlie, Gilles; Pécheur, Eve-Isabelle; le Maire, Marc; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected cells, the envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 assemble as a heterodimer. To investigate potential changes in the oligomerization of virion-associated envelope proteins, we performed SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions but without thermal denaturation. This revealed the presence of SDS-resistant trimers of E1 in the context of cell-cultured HCV (HCVcc) as well as in the context of HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpp). The formation of E1 trimers was found to depend on the coexpression of E2. To further understand the origin of E1 trimer formation, we coexpressed in bacteria the transmembrane (TM) domains of E1 (TME1) and E2 (TME2) fused to reporter proteins and analyzed the fusion proteins by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. As expected for strongly interacting TM domains, TME1–TME2 heterodimers resistant to SDS were observed. These analyses also revealed homodimers and homotrimers of TME1, indicating that such complexes are stable species. The N-terminal segment of TME1 exhibits a highly conserved GxxxG sequence, a motif that is well documented to be involved in intramembrane protein-protein interactions. Single or double mutations of the glycine residues (Gly354 and Gly358) in this motif markedly decreased or abrogated the formation of TME1 homotrimers in bacteria, as well as homotrimers of E1 in both HCVpp and HCVcc systems. A concomitant loss of infectivity was observed, indicating that the trimeric form of E1 is essential for virus infectivity. Taken together, these results indicate that E1E2 heterodimers form trimers on HCV particles, and they support the hypothesis that E1 could be a fusion protein. IMPORTANCE HCV glycoproteins E1 and E2 play an essential role in virus entry into liver cells as well as in virion morphogenesis. In infected cells, these two proteins form a complex in which E2 interacts with cellular receptors, whereas the function of E1 remains poorly understood. However, recent structural data suggest that E1

  10. Virion Structure of Black Queen Cell Virus, a Common Honeybee Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Spurny, Radovan; Přidal, Antonín; Pálková, Lenka; Kiem, Hoa Khanh Tran; de Miranda, Joachim R; Plevka, Pavel

    2017-03-15

    Viral diseases are a major threat to honeybee (Apis mellifera) populations worldwide and therefore an important factor in reliable crop pollination and food security. Black queen cell virus (BQCV) is the etiological agent of a fatal disease of honeybee queen larvae and pupae. The virus belongs to the genus Triatovirus from the family Dicistroviridae, which is part of the order Picornavirales Here we present a crystal structure of BQCV determined to a resolution of 3.4 Å. The virion is formed by 60 copies of each of the major capsid proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3; however, there is no density corresponding to a 75-residue-long minor capsid protein VP4 encoded by the BQCV genome. We show that the VP4 subunits are present in the crystallized virions that are infectious. This aspect of the BQCV virion is similar to that of the previously characterized triatoma virus and supports the recent establishment of the separate genus Triatovirus within the family Dicistroviridae The C terminus of VP1 and CD loops of capsid proteins VP1 and VP3 of BQCV form 34-Å-tall finger-like protrusions at the virion surface. The protrusions are larger than those of related dicistroviruses.IMPORTANCE The western honeybee is the most important pollinator of all, and it is required to sustain the agricultural production and biodiversity of wild flowering plants. However, honeybee populations worldwide are suffering from virus infections that cause colony losses. One of the most common, and least known, honeybee pathogens is black queen cell virus (BQCV), which at high titers causes queen larvae and pupae to turn black and die. Here we present the three-dimensional virion structure of BQCV, determined by X-ray crystallography. The structure of BQCV reveals large protrusions on the virion surface. Capsid protein VP1 of BQCV does not contain a hydrophobic pocket. Therefore, the BQCV virion structure provides evidence that capsid-binding antiviral compounds that can prevent the replication of

  11. Virion Structure of Black Queen Cell Virus, a Common Honeybee Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Spurny, Radovan; Přidal, Antonín; Pálková, Lenka; Kiem, Hoa Khanh Tran; de Miranda, Joachim R.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viral diseases are a major threat to honeybee (Apis mellifera) populations worldwide and therefore an important factor in reliable crop pollination and food security. Black queen cell virus (BQCV) is the etiological agent of a fatal disease of honeybee queen larvae and pupae. The virus belongs to the genus Triatovirus from the family Dicistroviridae, which is part of the order Picornavirales. Here we present a crystal structure of BQCV determined to a resolution of 3.4 Å. The virion is formed by 60 copies of each of the major capsid proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3; however, there is no density corresponding to a 75-residue-long minor capsid protein VP4 encoded by the BQCV genome. We show that the VP4 subunits are present in the crystallized virions that are infectious. This aspect of the BQCV virion is similar to that of the previously characterized triatoma virus and supports the recent establishment of the separate genus Triatovirus within the family Dicistroviridae. The C terminus of VP1 and CD loops of capsid proteins VP1 and VP3 of BQCV form 34-Å-tall finger-like protrusions at the virion surface. The protrusions are larger than those of related dicistroviruses. IMPORTANCE The western honeybee is the most important pollinator of all, and it is required to sustain the agricultural production and biodiversity of wild flowering plants. However, honeybee populations worldwide are suffering from virus infections that cause colony losses. One of the most common, and least known, honeybee pathogens is black queen cell virus (BQCV), which at high titers causes queen larvae and pupae to turn black and die. Here we present the three-dimensional virion structure of BQCV, determined by X-ray crystallography. The structure of BQCV reveals large protrusions on the virion surface. Capsid protein VP1 of BQCV does not contain a hydrophobic pocket. Therefore, the BQCV virion structure provides evidence that capsid-binding antiviral compounds that can prevent the

  12. Spectrum of Physical Properties Among the Virions of a Whole Population of Vaccinia Virus Particles

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, D. G.; McGuire, Peter M.

    1970-01-01

    Populations of virions released from cultures of L cells infected with vaccinia virus are composed of particles which differ substantially from each other in sedimentation rate and buoyant density. Clumps of two and three virions sediment enough faster than single particles so that fractions containing only singles and others with predominantly pairs can be isolated. The observed velocity range for single particles is much greater than that attributable to diffusion and convection in the centrifuge. Plaquing efficiency is three times higher in a small fraction of the slowest-moving virions than in the major part of the population, even though no size difference can be seen in the electron microscope. Isopycnic densities in potassium tartrate range from 1.15 to 1.23, enough to account for the observed range in velocities. Centrifugation was done in the BXIV zonal rotor at very low virion concentration (less than 108 per ml at any point in the spectrum). Virus count and state of aggregation were determined by electron microscopy. Images PMID:5438106

  13. Interaction of virions with membrane glycolipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, M.; Dimitrievski, K.; Larson, G.; Zhdanov, V. P.; Höök, F.

    2012-04-01

    Cellular membranes contain various lipids including glycolipids (GLs). The hydrophilic head groups of GLs extend from the membrane into the aqueous environment outside the cell where they act as recognition sites for specific interactions. The first steps of interaction of virions with cells often include contacts with GLs. To clarify the details of such contacts, we have used the total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to explore the interaction of individual unlabelled virus-like particles (or, more specifically, norovirus protein capsids), which are firmly bound to a lipid bilayer, and fluorescent vesicles containing glycosphingolipids (these lipids form a subclass of GLs). The corresponding binding kinetics were earlier found to be kinetically limited, while the detachment kinetics were logarithmic over a wide range of time. Here, the detachment rate is observed to dramatically decrease with increasing concentration of glycosphingolipids from 1% to 8%. This effect has been analytically explained by using a generic model describing the statistics of bonds in the contact area between a virion and a lipid membrane. Among other factors, the model takes the formation of GL domains into account. Our analysis indicates that in the system under consideration, such domains, if present, have a characteristic size smaller than the contact area between the vesicle and the virus-like particle.

  14. Myristoylation of the Arenavirus Envelope Glycoprotein Stable Signal Peptide Is Critical for Membrane Fusion but Dispensable for Virion Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    York, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Arenaviruses are responsible for severe and often fatal hemorrhagic disease. In the absence of effective antiviral therapies and vaccines, these viruses pose serious threats to public health and biodefense. Arenaviruses enter the host cell by fusion of the viral and endosomal membranes, a process mediated by the virus envelope glycoprotein GPC. Unlike other class I viral fusion proteins, GPC retains its stable signal peptide (SSP) as an essential third subunit in the mature complex. SSP spans the membrane twice and is myristoylated at its cytoplasmic N terminus. Mutations that abolish SSP myristoylation have been shown to reduce pH-induced cell-cell fusion activity of ectopically expressed GPC to ∼20% of wild-type levels. In order to examine the role of SSP myristoylation in the context of the intact virus, we used reverse genetics to generate Junín viruses (Candid #1 isolate) in which the critical glycine-2 residue in SSP was either replaced by alanine (G2A) or deleted (ΔG2). These mutant viruses produced smaller foci of infection in Vero cells and showed an ∼5-fold reduction in specific infectivity, commensurate with the defect in cell-cell fusion. However, virus assembly and GPC incorporation into budded virions were unaffected. Our findings suggest that the myristate moiety is cryptically disposed in the prefusion GPC complex and may function late in the fusion process to promote merging of the viral and cellular membranes. IMPORTANCE Hemorrhagic fever arenaviruses pose significant threats to public health and biodefense. Arenavirus entry into the host cell is promoted by the virus envelope glycoprotein GPC. Unlike other viral envelope glycoproteins, GPC contains a myristoylated stable signal peptide (SSP) as an essential third subunit. Myristoylation has been shown to be important for the membrane fusion activity of recombinantly expressed GPC. Here, we use reverse genetics to study the role of SSP myristoylation in the context of the intact

  15. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ac66 is required for the efficient egress of nucleocapsids from the nucleus, general synthesis of preoccluded virions and occlusion body formation

    SciTech Connect

    Ke Jianhao Wang Jinwen; Deng Riqiang; Wang Xunzhang

    2008-05-10

    Although orf66 (ac66) of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) is conserved in all sequenced lepidopteran baculovirus genomes, its function is not known. This paper describes generation of an ac66 knockout AcMNPV bacmid mutant and analyses of the influence of ac66 deletion on the virus replication in Sf-9 cells so as to determine the role of ac66 in the viral life cycle. Results indicated that budded virus (BV) yields were reduced over 99% in ac66-null mutant infected cells in comparison to that in wild-type virus infected cells. Optical microscopy revealed that occlusion body synthesis was significantly reduced in the ac66 knockout bacmid-transfected cells. In addition, ac66 deletion interrupted preoccluded virion synthesis. The mutant phenotype was rescued by an ac66 repair bacmid. On the other hand, real-time PCR analysis indicated that ac66 deletion did not affect the levels of viral DNA replication. Electron microscopy revealed that ac66 is not essential for nucleocapsid assembly, but for the efficient transport of nucleocapsids from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. These results suggested that ac66 plays an important role for the efficient exit of nucleocapsids from the nucleus to the cytoplasm for BV synthesis as well as for preoccluded virion and occlusion synthesis.

  16. A simple infection-control protocol to reduce serious cardiac device infections.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, Syed Y; Saberwal, Bunny; Lambiase, Pier D; Koo, Chieh Y; Lee, Simon; Gopalamurugan, Aerokondal B; Rogers, Dominic P; Lowe, Martin D; Chow, Anthony W C

    2014-10-01

    Device infection is a serious complication and is considered procedure-related if occurring within 12 months of an intervention. We analysed the effectiveness of a simple infection-control protocol (ICP) at reducing cardiac device infections (CDIs) in a tertiary referral centre. Prior to the introduction of a new ICP, we retrospectively analysed all simple and complex device implants, related procedures, and infections over a 3-year period. A new protocol was implemented from November 2007, including antibiotic prophylaxis determined by risk stratification, improved glycaemic control, specific skin preparation, and closure techniques, as well as different diathermy settings. Follow-up data for all patients were collected. Risk factors for infection were compared between pre- and post-intervention groups to ensure that the populations were comparable. A cost analysis of CDI and a review of the commonly identified micro-organisms were also undertaken. One thousand seven hundred and ninety-eight procedures were performed between November 2004 and November 2007 and 981 procedures between November 2007 and May 2009. There were no significant differences in the risk factors for infection between the two groups. Following the introduction of the ICP, there was a 54% reduction in the incidence of CDI from 1.3 to 0.6% (P < 0.03; CI 0.25, 1.36). Most patients with CDI had negative blood cultures or grew Staphylococcus sp. The average cost was £30 958.40 per infection incident and the cost of the new ICP was minimal. A significant reduction in CDI can be achieved with the introduction of a simple ICP with substantial cost savings. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Infection prevention and control in the operating theatre: reducing the risk of surgical site infections (SSIs).

    PubMed

    Weaving, Paul; Cox, Felicia; Milton, Sherran

    2008-05-01

    Continuing advances in surgical techniques, asepsis, operating theatre protocols and ventilation systems that ensure an uninterrupted supply of clean air, should allow all patients to undergo both invasive and minimally-invasive procedures with reduced risk. Patients having surgery in the United Kingdom are probably less vulnerable to surgical site infections (SSIs) than ever before--despite persisting concerns about meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and increasing antibiotic resistance in other organisms such as vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE).

  18. Herpes simplex virus VP16 forms a complex with the virion host shutoff protein vhs.

    PubMed Central

    Smibert, C A; Popova, B; Xiao, P; Capone, J P; Smiley, J R

    1994-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) virions contain at least two regulatory proteins that modulate gene expression in infected cells: the transcriptional activator VP16 and the virion host shutoff protein vhs. VP16 stimulates transcription of the HSV immediate-early genes, and vhs suppresses host protein synthesis and induces accelerated turnover of cellular and viral mRNAs. We report here that vhs binds directly to VP16: vhs and VP16 were coprecipitated from infected cells by an anti-vhs antiserum, and vhs and VP16 protein A fusions each bound intact versions of the other protein in a solid-phase capture assay. In addition, vhs and VP16 interacted in the two-hybrid activator system when coexpressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. vhs residues 238 to 344 were sufficient for the interaction, and the VP16 acidic transcriptional activation domain was not required. vhs blocked the ability of VP16 to enter a multiprotein complex on an immediate-early TAATGARATTC consensus sequence, indicating that vhs interacts with one or more regions of VP16 required for promoter recognition. We suggest that this interaction may play a structural role in the assembly of HSV virions and modulate the activity of vhs during infection. Images PMID:8139019

  19. The ns12.9 Accessory Protein of Human Coronavirus OC43 Is a Viroporin Involved in Virion Morphogenesis and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ronghua; Wang, Kai; Ping, Xianqiang; Yu, Wenjing

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT An accessory gene between the S and E gene loci is contained in all coronaviruses (CoVs), and its function has been studied in some coronaviruses. This gene locus in human coronavirus OC43 (HCoV-OC43) encodes the ns12.9 accessory protein; however, its function during viral infection remains unknown. Here, we engineered a recombinant mutant virus lacking the ns12.9 protein (HCoV-OC43-Δns12.9) to characterize the contributions of ns12.9 in HCoV-OC43 replication. The ns12.9 accessory protein is a transmembrane protein and forms ion channels in both Xenopus oocytes and yeast through homo-oligomerization, suggesting that ns12.9 is a newly recognized viroporin. HCoV-OC43-Δns12.9 presented at least 10-fold reduction of viral titer in vitro and in vivo. Intriguingly, exogenous ns12.9 and heterologous viroporins with ion channel activity could compensate for the production of HCoV-OC43-Δns12.9, indicating that the ion channel activity of ns12.9 plays a significant role in the production of infectious virions. Systematic dissection of single-cycle replication revealed that ns12.9 protein had no measurable effect on virus entry, subgenomic mRNA (sgmRNA) synthesis, and protein expression. Further characterization revealed that HCoV-OC43-Δns12.9 was less efficient in virion morphogenesis than recombinant wild-type virus (HCoV-OC43-WT). Moreover, reduced viral replication, inflammatory response, and virulence in HCoV-OC43-Δns12.9-infected mice were observed compared to the levels for HCoV-OC43-WT-infected mice. Taken together, our results demonstrated that the ns12.9 accessory protein functions as a viroporin and is involved in virion morphogenesis and the pathogenesis of HCoV-OC43 infection. IMPORTANCE HCoV-OC43 was isolated in the 1960s and is a major agent of the common cold. The functions of HCoV-OC43 structural proteins have been well studied, but few studies have focused on its accessory proteins. In the present study, we demonstrated that the ns12.9 protein

  20. High-Throughput Small Interfering RNA Screening Identifies Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Class II Alpha as Important for Production of Human Cytomegalovirus Virions

    PubMed Central

    Polachek, William S.; Moshrif, Hanan F.; Franti, Michael; Coen, Donald M.; Sreenu, Vattipally B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT High-throughput small interfering RNA (siRNA) screening is a useful methodology to identify cellular factors required for virus replication. Here we utilized a high-throughput siRNA screen based on detection of a viral antigen by microscopy to interrogate cellular protein kinases and phosphatases for their importance during human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replication and identified the class II phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase class II alpha (PI3K-C2A) as being involved in HCMV replication. Confirming this observation, infected cells treated with either pooled or individual siRNAs targeting PI3K-C2A mRNA produced approximately 10-fold less infectious virus than the controls. Western blotting and quantitative PCR analysis of infected cells treated with siRNAs indicated that depletion of PI3K-C2A slightly reduced the accumulation of late but not immediate early or early viral antigens and had no appreciable effect on viral DNA synthesis. Analysis of siRNA-treated cells by electron microscopy and Western blotting indicated that PI3K-C2A was not required for the production of viral capsids but did lead to increased numbers of enveloped capsids in the cytoplasm that had undergone secondary envelopment and a reduction in the amount of viral particles exiting the cell. Therefore, PI3K-C2A is a factor important for HCMV replication and has a role in the production of HCMV virions. IMPORTANCE There is limited information about the cellular factors required for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replication. Therefore, to identify proteins involved in HCMV replication, we developed a methodology to conduct a high-throughput siRNA screen of HCMV-infected cells. From our screening data, we focused our studies on the top hit from our screen, the lipid kinase phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase class II alpha (PI3K-C2A), as its role in HCMV replication was unknown. Interestingly, we found that PI3K-C2A is important for the production of HCMV virions and is involved in virion production

  1. Bacteriophage virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolases: potential new enzybiotics.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rubio, Lorena; Martínez, Beatriz; Donovan, David M; Rodríguez, Ana; García, Pilar

    2013-11-01

    Virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolases (VAPGH) are phage-encoded lytic enzymes that locally degrade the peptidoglycan (PG) of the bacterial cell wall during infection. In contrast to endolysins, PGHs that mediate lysis of the host bacteria at the end of the lytic cycle to release of phage progeny, the action of VAPGHs generates a small hole through which the phage tail tube crosses the cell envelope to eject the phage genetic material at the beginning to the infection cycle. The antimicrobial activity of VAPGHs was first discovered through the observation of the phenomenon of 'lysis from without', in which the disruption of the bacterial cell wall occurs prior to phage production and is caused by a high number of phages adsorbed onto the cell surface. Based on a unique combination of properties of VAPGHs such as high specificity, remarkable thermostability, and a modular organization, these proteins are potential candidates as new antibacterial agents, e.g. against antibiotic-resistant bacteria in human therapy and veterinary as well as biopreservatives in food safety, and as biocontrol agents of harmful bacteria in agriculture. This review provides an overview of the different VAPGHs discovered to date and their potential as novel antimicrobials.

  2. Multifunctional roles for the N-terminal basic motif of Alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein: nucleolar/cytoplasmic shuttling, modulation of RNA-binding activity, and virion formation.

    PubMed

    Herranz, Mari Carmen; Pallas, Vicente; Aparicio, Frederic

    2012-08-01

    In addition to virion formation, the coat protein (CP) of Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) is involved in the regulation of replication and translation of viral RNAs, and in cell-to-cell and systemic movement of the virus. An intriguing feature of the AMV CP is its nuclear and nucleolar accumulation. Here, we identify an N-terminal lysine-rich nucleolar localization signal (NoLS) in the AMV CP required to both enter the nucleus and accumulate in the nucleolus of infected cells, and a C-terminal leucine-rich domain which might function as a nuclear export signal. Moreover, we demonstrate that AMV CP interacts with importin-α, a component of the classical nuclear import pathway. A mutant AMV RNA 3 unable to target the nucleolus exhibited reduced plus-strand RNA synthesis and cell-to-cell spread. Moreover, virion formation and systemic movement were completely abolished in plants infected with this mutant. In vitro analysis demonstrated that specific lysine residues within the NoLS are also involved in modulating CP-RNA binding and CP dimerization, suggesting that the NoLS represents a multifunctional domain within the AMV CP. The observation that nuclear and nucleolar import signals mask RNA-binding properties of AMV CP, essential for viral replication and translation, supports a model in which viral expression is carefully modulated by a cytoplasmic/nuclear balance of CP accumulation.

  3. UV-Sensitivity of Shiga Toxin-Converting Bacteriophage Virions Φ24B, 933W, P22, P27 and P32.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Sylwia; Nejman-Faleńczyk, Bożena; Topka, Gracja; Dydecka, Aleksandra; Licznerska, Katarzyna; Narajczyk, Magdalena; Necel, Agnieszka; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2015-09-21

    Shiga toxin-converting bacteriophages (Stx phages) are present as prophages in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains. Theses phages can be transmitted to previously non-pathogenic E. coli cells making them potential producers of Shiga toxins, as they bear genes for these toxins in their genomes. Therefore, sensitivity of Stx phage virions to various conditions is important in both natural processes of spreading of these viruses and potential prophylactic control of appearance of novel pathogenic E. coli strains. In this report we provide evidence that virions of Stx phages are significantly more sensitive to UV irradiation than bacteriophage λ. Following UV irradiation of Stx virions at the dose of 50 J/m², their infectivity dropped by 1-3 log10, depending on the kind of phage. Under these conditions, a considerable release of phage DNA from virions was observed, and electron microscopy analyses indicated a large proportion of partially damaged virions. Infection of E. coli cells with UV-irradiated Stx phages resulted in significantly decreased levels of expression of N and cro genes, crucial for lytic development. We conclude that inactivation of Stx virions caused by relatively low dose of UV light is due to damage of capsids that prevents effective infection of the host cells.

  4. UV-Sensitivity of Shiga Toxin-Converting Bacteriophage Virions Φ24B, 933W, P22, P27 and P32

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, Sylwia; Nejman-Faleńczyk, Bożena; Topka, Gracja; Dydecka, Aleksandra; Licznerska, Katarzyna; Narajczyk, Magdalena; Necel, Agnieszka; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Shiga toxin-converting bacteriophages (Stx phages) are present as prophages in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains. Theses phages can be transmitted to previously non-pathogenic E. coli cells making them potential producers of Shiga toxins, as they bear genes for these toxins in their genomes. Therefore, sensitivity of Stx phage virions to various conditions is important in both natural processes of spreading of these viruses and potential prophylactic control of appearance of novel pathogenic E. coli strains. In this report we provide evidence that virions of Stx phages are significantly more sensitive to UV irradiation than bacteriophage λ. Following UV irradiation of Stx virions at the dose of 50 J/m2, their infectivity dropped by 1–3 log10, depending on the kind of phage. Under these conditions, a considerable release of phage DNA from virions was observed, and electron microscopy analyses indicated a large proportion of partially damaged virions. Infection of E. coli cells with UV-irradiated Stx phages resulted in significantly decreased levels of expression of N and cro genes, crucial for lytic development. We conclude that inactivation of Stx virions caused by relatively low dose of UV light is due to damage of capsids that prevents effective infection of the host cells. PMID:26402701

  5. Reducing HIV infection in people who inject drugs is impossible without targeting recently-infected subjects

    PubMed Central

    Vasylyeva, Tetyana I.; Friedman, Samuel R.; Lourenco, Jose; Gupta, Sunetra; Hatzakis, Angelos; Pybus, Oliver G.; Katzourakis, Aris; Smyrnov, Pavlo; Karamitros, Timokratis; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; Magiorkinis, Gkikas

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Although our understanding of viral transmission among people who inject drugs (PWID) has improved, we still know little about when and how many times each injector transmits HIV throughout the duration of infection. We describe HIV dynamics in PWID to evaluate which preventive strategies can be efficient. Design: Due to the notably scarce interventions, HIV-1 spread explosively in Russia and Ukraine in 1990s. By studying this epidemic between 1995 and 2005, we characterized naturally occurring transmission dynamics of HIV among PWID. Method: We combined publicly available HIV pol and env sequences with prevalence estimates from Russia and Ukraine under an evolutionary epidemiology framework to characterize HIV transmissibility between PWID. We then constructed compartmental models to simulate HIV spread among PWID. Results: In the absence of interventions, each injector transmits on average to 10 others. Half of the transmissions take place within 1 month after primary infection, suggesting that the epidemic will expand even after blocking all the post–first month transmissions. Primary prevention can realistically target the first month of infection, and we show that it is very efficient to control the spread of HIV-1 in PWID. Treating acutely infected on top of primary prevention is notably effective. Conclusion: As a large proportion of transmissions among PWID occur within 1 month after infection, reducing and delaying transmissions through scale-up of harm reduction programmes should always form the backbone of HIV control strategies in PWID. Growing PWID populations in the developing world, where primary prevention is scarce, constitutes a public health time bomb. PMID:27824626

  6. Pathogenesis of herpes simplex virus type 2 virion host shutoff (vhs) mutants.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tracy J; Morrison, Lynda A; Leib, David A

    2002-03-01

    During lytic infection, the virion host shutoff (vhs) protein mediates the rapid degradation of mRNA and the shutoff of host protein synthesis. In vivo, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) mutants lacking vhs activity are profoundly attenuated. Homologs of vhs exist in all of the neurotropic herpesviruses, and the goal of this study was to determine the virulence of HSV-2 mutants lacking vhs. Two HSV-2 recombinants were used in this study: 333-vhsB, which has a lacZ cassette inserted into the N terminus of vhs, and 333d41, which has a 939-bp deletion in vhs. As expected, both 333-vhsB and 333d41 failed to induce the cellular RNA degradation characteristic of HSV. Corneal, vaginal, and intracerebral routes of infection were used to study pathogenesis. Both viruses grew to significantly lower titers in the corneas, trigeminal ganglia, vaginas, dorsal root ganglia, spinal cords, and brains of mice than wild-type and rescue viruses, with a correspondingly reduced induction of disease. Both viruses, however, reactivated efficiently from explanted trigeminal ganglia, showing that vhs is dispensable for reactivation. The lethality of 333d41 following peripheral infection of mice, however, was significantly higher than that of 333-vhsB, suggesting that some of the attenuation of 333-vhsB may be due to the presence of a lacZ cassette in the vhs locus. Taken together, these data show that vhs represents an important determinant of HSV-2 pathogenesis and have implications for the design of HSV-2 recombinants and vaccines.

  7. Virion Structure of Israeli Acute Bee Paralysis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Mullapudi, Edukondalu; Přidal, Antonín; Pálková, Lenka; de Miranda, Joachim R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The pollination services provided by the western honeybee (Apis mellifera) are critical for agricultural production and the diversity of wild flowering plants. However, honeybees suffer from environmental pollution, habitat loss, and pathogens, including viruses that can cause fatal diseases. Israeli acute bee paralysis virus (IAPV), from the family Dicistroviridae, has been shown to cause colony collapse disorder in the United States. Here, we present the IAPV virion structure determined to a resolution of 4.0 Å and the structure of a pentamer of capsid protein protomers at a resolution of 2.7 Å. IAPV has major capsid proteins VP1 and VP3 with noncanonical jellyroll β-barrel folds composed of only seven instead of eight β-strands, as is the rule for proteins of other viruses with the same fold. The maturation of dicistroviruses is connected to the cleavage of precursor capsid protein VP0 into subunits VP3 and VP4. We show that a putative catalytic site formed by the residues Asp-Asp-Phe of VP1 is optimally positioned to perform the cleavage. Furthermore, unlike many picornaviruses, IAPV does not contain a hydrophobic pocket in capsid protein VP1 that could be targeted by capsid-binding antiviral compounds. IMPORTANCE Honeybee pollination is required for agricultural production and to sustain the biodiversity of wild flora. However, honeybee populations in Europe and North America are under pressure from pathogens, including viruses that cause colony losses. Viruses from the family Dicistroviridae can cause honeybee infections that are lethal, not only to individual honeybees, but to whole colonies. Here, we present the virion structure of an Aparavirus, Israeli acute bee paralysis virus (IAPV), a member of a complex of closely related viruses that are distributed worldwide. IAPV exhibits unique structural features not observed in other picorna-like viruses. Capsid protein VP1 of IAPV does not contain a hydrophobic pocket, implying that capsid

  8. Virion Structure of Israeli Acute Bee Paralysis Virus.

    PubMed

    Mullapudi, Edukondalu; Přidal, Antonín; Pálková, Lenka; de Miranda, Joachim R; Plevka, Pavel

    2016-09-15

    The pollination services provided by the western honeybee (Apis mellifera) are critical for agricultural production and the diversity of wild flowering plants. However, honeybees suffer from environmental pollution, habitat loss, and pathogens, including viruses that can cause fatal diseases. Israeli acute bee paralysis virus (IAPV), from the family Dicistroviridae, has been shown to cause colony collapse disorder in the United States. Here, we present the IAPV virion structure determined to a resolution of 4.0 Å and the structure of a pentamer of capsid protein protomers at a resolution of 2.7 Å. IAPV has major capsid proteins VP1 and VP3 with noncanonical jellyroll β-barrel folds composed of only seven instead of eight β-strands, as is the rule for proteins of other viruses with the same fold. The maturation of dicistroviruses is connected to the cleavage of precursor capsid protein VP0 into subunits VP3 and VP4. We show that a putative catalytic site formed by the residues Asp-Asp-Phe of VP1 is optimally positioned to perform the cleavage. Furthermore, unlike many picornaviruses, IAPV does not contain a hydrophobic pocket in capsid protein VP1 that could be targeted by capsid-binding antiviral compounds. Honeybee pollination is required for agricultural production and to sustain the biodiversity of wild flora. However, honeybee populations in Europe and North America are under pressure from pathogens, including viruses that cause colony losses. Viruses from the family Dicistroviridae can cause honeybee infections that are lethal, not only to individual honeybees, but to whole colonies. Here, we present the virion structure of an Aparavirus, Israeli acute bee paralysis virus (IAPV), a member of a complex of closely related viruses that are distributed worldwide. IAPV exhibits unique structural features not observed in other picorna-like viruses. Capsid protein VP1 of IAPV does not contain a hydrophobic pocket, implying that capsid-binding antiviral compounds

  9. A proteomic approach to the identification of the major virion structural proteins of the marine cyanomyovirus S-PM2.

    PubMed

    Clokie, Martha R J; Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Boulanger, Pascale; Slade, Susan E; Stoilova-McPhie, Svetla; Cane, Matt; Scrivens, James H; Mann, Nicholas H

    2008-06-01

    In this study, an MS-based proteomics approach to characterizing the virion structural proteins of the novel marine 'photosynthetic' phage S-PM2 is presented. The virus infects ecologically important cyanobacteria of the genus Synechococcus that make a substantial contribution to primary production in the oceans. The S-PM2 genome encodes 236 ORFs, some of which exhibit similarity to known phage virion structural proteins, but the majority (54%) show no detectable homology to known proteins from other organisms. Using public and in-house bioinformatics tools the proteome of S-PM2 was predicted and a database compatible with MS-based search engines was constructed. S-PM2 virion proteins were resolved by SDS-PAGE, excised, tryptically digested and analysed by LC-ESI-MS/MS. The resulting MS data were searched against the database. A parallel control study was undertaken on the well-characterized coliphage T4 in order to assess the sensitivity and efficiency of this approach. In total, 11 of the 15 S-PM2 proteins, predicted to be virion proteins by bioinformatics approaches, were confirmed as such, together with the identification of a further 12 novel structural proteins. In the case of T4, 24 of the 39 known virion structural proteins were identified, including the major tail-fibre proteins. This approach has wide-ranging applicability and can be applied to any novel organism whose genome encodes ORFs with few detectable homologies in the public databases.

  10. A LC3-interacting motif in the influenza A virus M2 protein is required to subvert autophagy and maintain virion stability.

    PubMed

    Beale, Rupert; Wise, Helen; Stuart, Amanda; Ravenhill, Benjamin J; Digard, Paul; Randow, Felix

    2014-02-12

    Autophagy recycles cellular components and defends cells against intracellular pathogens. While viruses must evade autophagocytic destruction, some viruses can also subvert autophagy for their own benefit. The ability of influenza A virus (IAV) to evade autophagy depends on the Matrix 2 (M2) ion-channel protein. We show that the cytoplasmic tail of IAV M2 interacts directly with the essential autophagy protein LC3 and promotes LC3 relocalization to the unexpected destination of the plasma membrane. LC3 binding is mediated by a highly conserved LC3-interacting region (LIR) in M2. The M2 LIR is required for LC3 redistribution to the plasma membrane in virus-infected cells. Mutations in M2 that abolish LC3 binding interfere with filamentous budding and reduce virion stability. IAV therefore subverts autophagy by mimicking a host short linear protein-protein interaction motif. This strategy may facilitate transmission of infection between organisms by enhancing the stability of viral progeny.

  11. Skin antisepsis for reducing central venous catheter-related infections.

    PubMed

    Lai, Nai Ming; Lai, Nai An; O'Riordan, Elizabeth; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn; Taylor, Jacqueline E; Tan, Kenneth

    2016-07-13

    The central venous catheter (CVC) is a device used for many functions, including monitoring haemodynamic indicators and administering intravenous medications, fluids, blood products and parenteral nutrition. However, as a foreign object, it is susceptible to colonisation by micro-organisms, which may lead to catheter-related blood stream infection (BSI) and in turn, increased mortality, morbidities and health care costs. To assess the effects of skin antisepsis as part of CVC care for reducing catheter-related BSIs, catheter colonisation, and patient mortality and morbidities. In May 2016 we searched: The Cochrane Wounds Specialised Register; The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library); Ovid MEDLINE (including In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations and Epub Ahead of Print); Ovid EMBASE and EBSCO CINAHL Plus. We also searched clinical trial registries for ongoing and unpublished studies. There were no restrictions with respect to language, date of publication or study setting. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that assessed any type of skin antiseptic agent used either alone or in combination, compared with one or more other skin antiseptic agent(s), placebo or no skin antisepsis in patients with a CVC in place. Two authors independently assessed the studies for their eligibility, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. We expressed our results in terms of risk ratio (RR), absolute risk reduction (ARR) and number need to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) for dichotomous data, and mean difference (MD) for continuous data, with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Thirteen studies were eligible for inclusion, but only 12 studies contributed data, with a total of 3446 CVCs assessed. The total number of participants enrolled was unclear as some studies did not provide such information. The participants were mainly adults admitted to intensive care units, haematology oncology units or general wards

  12. Residue 41 of the Eurasian Avian-Like Swine Influenza A Virus Matrix Protein Modulates Virion Filament Length and Efficiency of Contact Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Patricia J.; Kyriakis, Constantinos S.; Marshall, Nicolle; Suppiah, Suganthi; Seladi-Schulman, Jill; Danzy, Shamika; Lowen, Anice C.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Position 41 of the influenza A virus matrix protein encodes a highly conserved alanine in human and avian lineages. Nonetheless, strains of the Eurasian avian-like swine (Easw) lineage contain a change at this position: position 41 of A/swine/Spain/53207/04 (H1N1) (SPN04) encodes a proline. To assess the impact of this naturally occurring polymorphism on viral fitness, we utilized reverse genetics to produce recombinant viruses encoding wild-type M1 41P (rSPN04-P) and consensus 41A (rSPN04-A) residues. Relative to rSPN04-A, rSPN04-P virus displayed reduced growth in vitro. In the guinea pig model, rSPN04-P was transmitted to fewer contact animals than rSPN04-A and failed to infect guinea pigs that received a low-dose inoculum. Moreover, the P41A change altered virion morphology, reducing the number and length of filamentous virions, as well as reducing the neuraminidase activity of virions. The lab-adapted human isolate, A/PR/8/34 (H1N1) (PR8), is nontransmissible in the guinea pig model, making it a useful background in which to identify certain viral factors that enhance transmissibility. We assessed transmission in the context of single-, double-, and triple-reassortant viruses between PR8 and SPN04; PR8/SPN04 M, PR8/SPN04 M+NA, and PR8/SPN04 M+NA+HA, encoding either matrix 41 A or P, were generated. In each case, the virus possessing 41P transmitted less well than the corresponding 41A-encoding virus. In summary, we have identified a naturally occurring mutation in the influenza A virus matrix protein that impacts transmission efficiency and can alter virion morphology and neuraminidase activity. IMPORTANCE We have developed a practical model for examining the genetics underlying transmissibility of the Eurasian avian-like swine lineage viruses, which contributed M and NA segments to the 2009 pandemic strain. Here, we use our system to investigate the impact on viral fitness of a naturally occurring polymorphism at matrix (M1) position 41 in an Easw

  13. Vaccinia Virus Uses Retromer-Independent Cellular Retrograde Transport Pathways To Facilitate the Wrapping of Intracellular Mature Virions during Virus Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Kate; Haga, Ismar R.; Pechenick Jowers, Tali; Jasim, Seema; Cintrat, Jean-Christophe; Gillet, Daniel; Schmitt-John, Thomas; Digard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Poxviruses, such as vaccinia virus (VACV), undertake a complex cytoplasmic replication cycle which involves morphogenesis through four distinct virion forms and includes a crucial wrapping step whereby intracellular mature virions (IMVs) are wrapped in two additional membranes to form intracellular enveloped virions (IEVs). To determine if cellular retrograde transport pathways are required for this wrapping step, we examined VACV morphogenesis in cells with reduced expression of the tetrameric tethering factor known as the GARP (Golgi-associated retrograde pathway), a central component of retrograde transport. VACV multistep replication was significantly impaired in cells transfected with small interfering RNA targeting the GARP complex and in cells with a mutated GARP complex. Detailed analysis revealed that depletion of the GARP complex resulted in a reduction in the number of IEVs, thereby linking retrograde transport with the wrapping of IMVs. In addition, foci of viral wrapping membrane proteins without an associated internal core accumulated in cells with a mutated GARP complex, suggesting that impaired retrograde transport uncouples nascent IMVs from the IEV membranes at the site of wrapping. Finally, small-molecule inhibitors of retrograde transport strongly suppressed VACV multistep growth in vitro and reduced weight loss and clinical signs in an in vivo murine model of systemic poxviral disease. This work links cellular retrograde transport pathways with the morphogenesis of poxviruses and identifies a panel of novel inhibitors of poxvirus replication. IMPORTANCE Cellular retrograde transport pathways traffic cargo from endosomes to the trans-Golgi network and are a key part of the intracellular membrane network. This work reveals that the prototypic poxvirus vaccinia virus (VACV) exploits cellular retrograde transport pathways to facilitate the wrapping of intracellular mature virions and therefore promote the production of extracellular virus

  14. Vaccinia virus uses retromer-independent cellular retrograde transport pathways to facilitate the wrapping of intracellular mature virions during viral morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Kate; Haga, Ismar R; Pechenick Jowers, Tali; Jasim, Seema; Cintrat, Jean-Christophe; Gillet, Daniel; Schmitt-John, Thomas; Digard, Paul; Beard, Philippa M

    2016-08-31

    Poxviruses such as Vaccinia virus (VACV) undertake a complex cytoplasmic replication cycle which involves morphogenesis through four distinct virion forms, and includes a crucial "wrapping" step whereby intracellular mature virions (IMVs) are wrapped in two additional membranes to form intracellular enveloped virions (IEVs). To determine if cellular retrograde transport pathways were required for this wrapping step we examined VACV morphogenesis in cells with reduced expression of the tetrameric tethering factor complex GARP (Golgi-associated retrograde pathway complex), a central component of retrograde transport. VACV multi-step replication was significantly impaired in cells transfected with siRNA targeting the GARP complex or in cells with a mutated GARP complex. Detailed analysis revealed that depletion of the GARP complex resulted in a reduction in the number of IEVs, thereby linking retrograde transport with the wrapping of IMVs. In addition foci of viral wrapping membrane proteins without an associated internal core accumulated in cells with a mutated GARP complex, suggesting that impaired retrograde transport uncouples nascent IMVs from the IEV membranes at the site of wrapping. Finally, small molecule inhibitors of retrograde transport strongly suppressed VACV multi-step growth in vitro and reduced weight loss and clinical signs in an in vivo murine model of systemic poxviral disease. This work links cellular retrograde transport pathways with morphogenesis of poxviruses and identifies a panel of novel inhibitors of poxvirus replication. Cellular retrograde transport pathways traffic cargo from endosomes to the trans-Golgi network and are a key part of the intracellular membrane network. This work reveals the prototypic poxvirus Vaccinia virus (VACV) exploits cellular retrograde transport pathways to facilitate the wrapping of intracellular mature virions and therefore promote the production of extracellular virus. Inhibition of retrograde transport by

  15. RNA polymerase activity in purified virions of avian reticuloendotheliosis viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, S; Temin, H M

    1976-01-01

    An RNA polymerase activity that synthesizes a U-rich RNA hydrogen bonded to a large viral RNA molecule was found in the cores of virions of avian reticuloendotheliosis viruses (REV). The RNA polymerase activity was separable from the DNA polymerase activity of REV virions. The 5'-terminus of the newly synthesized RNA was A. In addition, a tRNA nucleotidyl transferase activity, which added -CpCpA ends to tRNA, appears to be present in the REV virions. Images PMID:183017

  16. Natural malaria infection reduces starvation resistance of nutritionally stressed mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Lalubin, Fabrice; Delédevant, Aline; Glaizot, Olivier; Christe, Philippe

    2014-07-01

    In disease ecology, there is growing evidence that environmental quality interacts with parasite and host to determine host susceptibility to an infection. Most studies of malaria parasites have focused on the infection costs incurred by the hosts, and few have investigated the costs on mosquito vectors. The interplay between the environment, the vector and the parasite has therefore mostly been ignored and often relied on unnatural or allopatric Plasmodium/vector associations. Here, we investigated the effects of natural avian malaria infection on both fecundity and survival of field-caught female Culex pipiens mosquitoes, individually maintained in laboratory conditions. We manipulated environmental quality by providing mosquitoes with different concentrations of glucose-feeding solution prior to submitting them to a starvation challenge. We used molecular-based methods to assess mosquitoes' infection status. We found that mosquitoes infected with Plasmodium had lower starvation resistance than uninfected ones only under low nutritional conditions. The effect of nutritional stress varied with time, with the difference of starvation resistance between optimally and suboptimally fed mosquitoes increasing from spring to summer, as shown by a significant interaction between diet treatment and months of capture. Infected and uninfected mosquitoes had similar clutch size, indicating no effect of infection on fecundity. Overall, this study suggests that avian malaria vectors may suffer Plasmodium infection costs in their natural habitat, under certain environmental conditions. This may have major implications for disease transmission in the wild.

  17. Antiretroviral therapy reduces neurodegeneration in human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Alex K.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Umlauf, Anya; Gouaux, Ben; Soontornniyomkij, Virawudh; Letendre, Scott L.; Achim, Cristian L.; Masliah, Eliezer; Grant, Igor; Moore, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of virally-suppressive antiretroviral therapy on cortical neurodegeneration and associated neurocognitive impairment. Design Retrospective, postmortem observational study. Methods Clinical neuropsychological and postmortem neuropathology data were analyzed in 90 human immunodeficiency virus-infected volunteers from the general community who had never undergone antiretroviral therapy (n=7, “naïve”) or who had undergone antiretroviral therapy and whose plasma viral load was detectable (n = 64 “unsuppressed”) or undetectable (n = 19, “suppressed”) at the last clinical visit prior to death. Subjects were predominately male (74/90, 82%) with a mean age of 44.7 years (SD 9.8). Cortical neurodegeneration was quantified by measuring microtubule-associated protein (MAP2) and synaptophysin (SYP) density in midfrontal cortex tissue sections. Results The suppressed group had higher SYP density than the naïve group (p = 0.007) and higher MAP2 density than the unsuppressed group (p = 0.04). The suppressed group had lower odds of human immunodeficiency virus-associated neurocognitive disorders than naïve (OR 0.07, p = 0.03). Higher SYP was associated with lower likelihood of human immunodeficiency virus-associated neurocognitive disorders in univariable (OR 0.8, p=0.03) and multivariable models after controlling for antiretroviral treatment and brain human immunodeficiency virus p24 protein levels (OR 0.72, p=0.01). Conclusions We conclude that virally suppressive antiretroviral treatment protects against cortical neurodegeneration. Further, we find evidence supporting the causal chain from treatment-mediated peripheral and central nervous system viral load suppression to reduced neurodegeneration and improved neurocognitive outcomes. PMID:25686681

  18. Novel High-throughput Approach for Purification of Infectious Virions

    PubMed Central

    James, Kevin T.; Cooney, Brad; Agopsowicz, Kate; Trevors, Mary Ann; Mohamed, Adil; Stoltz, Don; Hitt, Mary; Shmulevitz, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Viruses are extensively studied as pathogens and exploited as molecular tools and therapeutic agents. Existing methods to purify viruses such as gradient ultracentrifugation or chromatography have limitations, for example demand for technical expertise or specialized equipment, high time consumption, and restricted capacity. Our laboratory explores mutations in oncolytic reovirus that could improve oncolytic activity, and makes routine use of numerous virus variants, genome reassortants, and reverse engineered mutants. Our research pace was limited by the lack of high-throughput virus purification methods that efficiently remove confounding cellular contaminants such as cytokines and proteases. To overcome this shortcoming, we evaluated a commercially available resin (Capto Core 700) that captures molecules smaller than 700 kDa. Capto. Core 700 chromatography produced virion purity and infectivity indistinguishable from CsCl density gradient ultracentrifugation as determined by electron microscopy, gel electrophoresis analysis and plaque titration. Capto Core 700 resin was then effectively adapted to a rapid in-slurry pull-out approach for high-throughput purification of reovirus and adenovirus. The in-slurry purification approach offered substantially increased virus purity over crude cell lysates, media, or high-spin preparations and would be especially useful for high-throughput virus screening applications where density gradient ultracentrifugation is not feasible. PMID:27827454

  19. Terminal repetitive sequences in herpesvirus saimiri virion DNA.

    PubMed

    Bankier, A T; Dietrich, W; Baer, R; Barrell, B G; Colbère-Garapin, F; Fleckenstein, B; Bodemer, W

    1985-07-01

    The H-DNA repeat unit of Herpesvirus saimiri strain 11 was cloned in plasmid vector pAGO, and the nucleotide sequence was determined by the dideoxy chain termination method. One unit of repetitive DNA has 1,444 base pairs with 70.8% G+C content. The structural features of repeat DNA sequences at the termini of intact virion M-DNA (160 kilobases) and orientation of reiterated DNA were analyzed by radioactive end labeling of M-DNA, followed by cleavage of the end fragments with restriction endonucleases. The termini appeared to be blunt ended with a 5'-phosphate group, probably generated during encapsidation by cleavage in the immediate vicinity of the single ApaI recognition site in the H-DNA repeat unit. The sequence did not reveal sizeable open reading frames, the longest hypothetical peptide from H-DNA being 85 amino acids. There was no evidence for an mRNA promoter or terminator element, and H-DNA-specific transcription could not be found in productively infected cells.

  20. Rhadinovirus Host Entry by Co-operative Infection

    PubMed Central

    May, Janet S.; Stevenson, Philip G.

    2015-01-01

    Rhadinoviruses establish chronic infections of clinical and economic importance. Several show respiratory transmission and cause lung pathologies. We used Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4) to understand how rhadinovirus lung infection might work. A primary epithelial or B cell infection often is assumed. MuHV-4 targeted instead alveolar macrophages, and their depletion reduced markedly host entry. While host entry was efficient, alveolar macrophages lacked heparan - an important rhadinovirus binding target - and were infected poorly ex vivo. In situ analysis revealed that virions bound initially not to macrophages but to heparan+ type 1 alveolar epithelial cells (AECs). Although epithelial cell lines endocytose MuHV-4 readily in vitro, AECs did not. Rather bound virions were acquired by macrophages; epithelial infection occurred only later. Thus, host entry was co-operative - virion binding to epithelial cells licensed macrophage infection, and this in turn licensed AEC infection. An antibody block of epithelial cell binding failed to block host entry: opsonization provided merely another route to macrophages. By contrast an antibody block of membrane fusion was effective. Therefore co-operative infection extended viral tropism beyond the normal paradigm of a target cell infected readily in vitro; and macrophage involvement in host entry required neutralization to act down-stream of cell binding. PMID:25790477

  1. Vaccinia Virus Extracellular Enveloped Virion Neutralization In Vitro and Protection In Vivo Depend on Complement▿

    PubMed Central

    Benhnia, Mohammed Rafii-El-Idrissi; McCausland, Megan M.; Moyron, Juan; Laudenslager, John; Granger, Steven; Rickert, Sandra; Koriazova, Lilia; Kubo, Ralph; Kato, Shinichiro; Crotty, Shane

    2009-01-01

    Antibody neutralization is an important component of protective immunity against vaccinia virus (VACV). Two distinct virion forms, mature virion and enveloped virion (MV and EV, respectively), possess separate functions and nonoverlapping immunological properties. In this study we examined the mechanics of EV neutralization, focusing on EV protein B5 (also called B5R). We show that neutralization of EV is predominantly complement dependent. From a panel of high-affinity anti-B5 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), the only potent neutralizer in vitro (90% at 535 ng/ml) was an immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a), and neutralization was complement mediated. This MAb was the most protective in vivo against lethal intranasal VACV challenge. Further studies demonstrated that in vivo depletion of complement caused a >50% loss of anti-B5 IgG2a protection, directly establishing the importance of complement for protection against the EV form. However, the mechanism of protection is not sterilizing immunity via elimination of the inoculum as the viral inoculum consisted of a purified MV form. The prevention of illness in vivo indicated rapid control of infection. We further demonstrate that antibody-mediated killing of VACV-infected cells expressing surface B5 is a second protective mechanism provided by complement-fixing anti-B5 IgG. Cell killing was very efficient, and this effector function was highly isotype specific. These results indicate that anti-B5 antibody-directed cell lysis via complement is a powerful mechanism for clearance of infected cells, keeping poxvirus-infected cells from being invisible to humoral immune responses. These findings highlight the importance of multiple mechanisms of antibody-mediated protection against VACV and point to key immunobiological differences between MVs and EVs that impact the outcome of infection. PMID:19019965

  2. Tumour susceptibility gene 101 and the vacuolar protein sorting pathway are required for the release of hepatitis E virions.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Shigeo; Takahashi, Masaharu; Jirintai, Suljid; Tanaka, Toshinori; Nishizawa, Tsutomu; Yasuda, Jiro; Okamoto, Hiroaki

    2011-12-01

    We have previously demonstrated that an intact PSAP motif in the ORF3 protein is required for the formation and release of membrane-associated hepatitis E virus (HEV) particles with ORF3 proteins on their surface. In this study, we investigated the direct interaction between the ORF3 protein and tumour susceptibility gene 101 (Tsg101), a cellular factor involved in the budding of viruses containing the P(T/S)AP late-domain, in PLC/PRF/5 cells expressing the wild-type or PSAP-mutated ORF3 protein and Tsg101 by co-immunoprecipitation. Tsg101 bound to wild-type ORF3 protein, but not to the PSAP-inactive ORF3 protein. To examine whether HEV utilizes the multivesicular body (MVB) pathway to release the virus particles, we analysed the efficiency of virion release from cells upon introduction of small interfering RNA (siRNA) against Tsg101 or dominant-negative (DN) mutants of Vps4 (Vps4A and Vps4B). The relative levels of virus particles released from cells depleted of Tsg101 decreased to 6.4 % of those transfected with negative control siRNA. Similarly, virion egress was significantly reduced by the overexpression of DN forms (Vps4AEQ or Vps4BEQ). The relative levels of virus particles released from cells expressing Vps4AEQ and Vps4BEQ were 19.2 and 15.6 %, respectively, while the overexpression of wild-type Vps4A and Vps4B did not alter the levels of virus release. These results indicate that the ORF3 protein interacts with Tsg101 through the PSAP motifs in infected cells, and that Tsg101 and the enzymic activities of Vps4A and Vps4B are involved in HEV release, thus suggesting that HEV requires the MVB pathway for egress of virus particles.

  3. Acceleration of adenovirus replication and increased virion production by treatment with the steroid hormone 17 beta-estradiol.

    PubMed

    James, C B; Vanderpool, E A; Roane, P

    1992-01-01

    We report here that concentration of an estrogen known to promote enhanced transformation and to increase oncogenicity of rat embryo cells, accelerate the production and increase the yield of progeny virions in adenovirus type 12 (Ad 12)-infected HEp-2 cells. Further, measurement of the incorporation of radioactive RNA and DNA precursors indicated that macromolecular synthesis in the estrogen-treated, infected cells was accelerated. Possible explanations for this observation are discussed.

  4. The T7-Related Pseudomonas putida Phage ϕ15 Displays Virion-Associated Biofilm Degradation Properties

    PubMed Central

    Cornelissen, Anneleen; Ceyssens, Pieter-Jan; T'Syen, Jeroen; Van Praet, Helena; Noben, Jean-Paul; Shaburova, Olga V.; Krylov, Victor N.; Volckaert, Guido; Lavigne, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Formation of a protected biofilm environment is recognized as one of the major causes of the increasing antibiotic resistance development and emphasizes the need to develop alternative antibacterial strategies, like phage therapy. This study investigates the in vitro degradation of single-species Pseudomonas putida biofilms, PpG1 and RD5PR2, by the novel phage ϕ15, a ‘T7-like virus’ with a virion-associated exopolysaccharide (EPS) depolymerase. Phage ϕ15 forms plaques surrounded by growing opaque halo zones, indicative for EPS degradation, on seven out of 53 P. putida strains. The absence of haloes on infection resistant strains suggests that the EPS probably act as a primary bacterial receptor for phage infection. Independent of bacterial strain or biofilm age, a time and dose dependent response of ϕ15-mediated biofilm degradation was observed with generally a maximum biofilm degradation 8 h after addition of the higher phage doses (104 and 106 pfu) and resistance development after 24 h. Biofilm age, an in vivo very variable parameter, reduced markedly phage-mediated degradation of PpG1 biofilms, while degradation of RD5PR2 biofilms and ϕ15 amplification were unaffected. Killing of the planktonic culture occurred in parallel with but was always more pronounced than biofilm degradation, accentuating the need for evaluating phages for therapeutic purposes in biofilm conditions. EPS degrading activity of recombinantly expressed viral tail spike was confirmed by capsule staining. These data suggests that the addition of high initial titers of specifically selected phages with a proper EPS depolymerase are crucial criteria in the development of phage therapy. PMID:21526174

  5. Exocytosis of Alphaherpesvirus Virions, Light Particles, and Glycoproteins Uses Constitutive Secretory Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hogue, Ian B.; Scherer, Julian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many molecular and cell biological details of the alphaherpesvirus assembly and egress pathway remain unclear. Recently we developed a live-cell fluorescence microscopy assay of pseudorabies virus (PRV) exocytosis, based on total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and a virus-encoded pH-sensitive fluorescent probe. Here, we use this assay to distinguish three classes of viral exocytosis in a nonpolarized cell type: (i) trafficking of viral glycoproteins to the plasma membrane, (ii) exocytosis of viral light particles, and (iii) exocytosis of virions. We find that viral glycoproteins traffic to the cell surface in association with constitutive secretory Rab GTPases and exhibit free diffusion into the plasma membrane after exocytosis. Similarly, both virions and light particles use these same constitutive secretory mechanisms for egress from infected cells. Furthermore, we show that viral light particles are distinct from cellular exosomes. Together, these observations shed light on viral glycoprotein trafficking steps that precede virus particle assembly and reinforce the idea that virions and light particles share a biogenesis and trafficking pathway. PMID:27273828

  6. Proteomic Analysis of Mamestra Brassicae Nucleopolyhedrovirus Progeny Virions from Two Different Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Dianhai; Chen, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Mamestra brassicae nucleopolyhedrovirus (MabrNPV) has a wide host range replication in more than one insect species. In this study, a sequenced MabrNPV strain, MabrNPV-CTa, was used to perform proteomic analysis of both BVs and ODVs derived from two infected hosts: Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera exigua. A total of 82 and 39 viral proteins were identified in ODVs and BVs, respectively. And totally, 23 and 76 host proteins were identified as virion-associated with ODVs and BVs, respectively. The host proteins incorporated into the virus particles were mainly involved in cytoskeleton, signaling, vesicle trafficking, chaperone and metabolic systems. Some host proteins, such as actin, cyclophilin A and heat shock protein 70 would be important for viral replication. Several host proteins involved in immune response were also identified in BV, and a C-type lectin protein was firstly found to be associated with BV and its family members have been demonstrated to be involved in entry process of other viruses. This study facilitated the annotation of baculovirus genome, and would help us to understand baculovirus virion structure. Furthermore, the identification of host proteins associated with virions produced in vivo would facilitate investigations on the involvement of intriguing host proteins in virus replication. PMID:27058368

  7. TRIM5α associates with proteasomal subunits in cells while in complex with HIV-1 virions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The TRIM5 proteins are cellular restriction factors that prevent retroviral infection in a species-specific manner. Multiple experiments indicate that restriction activity requires accessory host factors, including E2-enzymes. To better understand the mechanism of restriction, we conducted yeast-two hybrid screens to identify proteins that bind to two TRIM5 orthologues. Results The only cDNAs that scored on repeat testing with both TRIM5 orthologues were the proteasome subunit PSMC2 and ubiquitin. Using co-immunoprecipitation assays, we demonstrated an interaction between TRIM5α and PSMC2, as well as numerous other proteasome subunits. Fluorescence microscopy revealed co-localization of proteasomes and TRIM5α cytoplasmic bodies. Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) analysis indicated that the interaction between TRIM5 and PSMC2 was direct. Previous imaging experiments demonstrated that, when cells are challenged with fluorescently-labeled HIV-1 virions, restrictive TRIM5α orthologues assemble cytoplasmic bodies around incoming virion particles. Following virus challenge, we observed localization of proteasome subunits to rhTRIM5α cytoplasmic bodies that contained fluorescently labeled HIV-1 virions. Conclusions Taken together, the results presented here suggest that localization of the proteasome to TRIM5α cytoplasmic bodies makes an important contribution to TRIM5α-mediated restriction. PMID:22078707

  8. Identification and Characterization of Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus K8.1 Virion Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengtao; MacKey, John; Czajak, Susan C.; Desrosiers, Ronald C.; Lackner, Andrew A.; Jung, Jae U.

    1999-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) has been consistently identified in Kaposi’s sarcomas (KS), body cavity-based lymphomas (BCBL), and some forms of Castleman’s disease. Previous serological tests with KS patient sera have detected lytic-cycle polypeptides from KSHV-infected BCBL cells. We have found that these polypeptides are predominantly encoded by the K8.1 open reading frame, which is present in the same genomic position as virion envelope glycoproteins of other gammaherpesviruses. The cDNA of K8.1 from BCBL-1 cells was found to encode a glycosylated protein with an apparent molecular mass of 37 kDa. K8.1 was found to be expressed during lytic KSHV replication in BCBL-1 cells and was localized on the surface of cells and virions. The results of immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy suggest that KSHV acquires K8.1 protein on its virion surface during the process of budding at the plasma cell membrane. When KSHV K8.1 derived from mammalian cells was used as an antigen in immunoblot tests, antibodies to K8.1 were detected in 18 of 20 KS patients and in 0 of 10 KS-negative control subjects. These results demonstrate that the K8.1 gene encodes a KSHV virion-associated glycoprotein and suggest that antibodies to K8.1 may prove useful as contributory serological markers for infection by KSHV. PMID:9882339

  9. Kynurenine pathway inhibition reduces neurotoxicity of HIV-1-infected macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kerr, S J; Armati, P J; Pemberton, L A; Smythe, G; Tattam, B; Brew, B J

    1997-12-01

    The AIDS dementia complex (ADC) is a consequence of excessive immune activation driven at least in part by systemic HIV infection and probably brain infection. Quinolinic acid (QUIN) is a neurotoxic tryptophan metabolite produced by macrophages in response to stimulation with cytokines or infection with HIV-1. Consequently it has been implicated in ADC pathogenesis. However, macrophages infected with HIV-1 synthesize numerous neurotoxic substances. Therefore we conducted experiments using human fetal brain tissue to determine the relative importance of QUIN as a neurotoxin in ADC. Human macrophages were infected with HIV-1 in vitro using a viral isolate from a demented patient. 6-Chloro-D-tryptophan, an inhibitor of QUIN biosynthesis, was added to half the macrophage cultures to block formation of QUIN. Supernatants containing QUIN (SQpos) or in which QUIN biosynthesis had been inhibited (SQneg) were then added to human fetal brain aggregate cultures. Toxicity was evaluated using lactate dehydrogenase efflux, trypan blue exclusion, immunohistochemistry, image analysis, and electron microscopy. Each technique showed a reduction of toxicity in SQneg-treated cultures. These studies confirm the significance of QUIN as a neurotoxin in ADC and suggest that neuroprotective strategies may have a place in the treatment of this disease.

  10. Herpes simplex virus 1 Us3 deletion mutant is infective despite impaired capsid translocation to the cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Wild, Peter; Leisinger, Sabine; de Oliveira, Anna Paula; Schraner, Elisabeth M; Kaech, Andres; Ackermann, Mathias; Tobler, Kurt

    2015-01-12

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) capsids are assembled in the nucleus bud at the inner nuclear membrane into the perinuclear space, acquiring envelope and tegument. In theory, these virions are de-enveloped by fusion of the envelope with the outer nuclear membrane and re-enveloped by Golgi membranes to become infective. Us3 enables the nucleus to cytoplasm capsid translocation. Nevertheless, Us3 is not essential for the production of infective progeny viruses. Determination of phenotype distribution by quantitative electron microscopy, and calculation per mean nuclear or cell volume revealed the following: (i) The number of R7041(∆US3) capsids budding at the inner nuclear membrane was significantly higher than that of wild type HSV-1; (ii) The mean number of R7041(∆US3) virions per mean cell volume was 2726, that of HSV-1 virions 1460 by 24 h post inoculation; (iii) 98% of R7041(∆US3) virions were in the perinuclear space; (iv) The number of R7041(∆US3) capsids in the cytoplasm, including those budding at Golgi membranes, was significantly reduced. Cell associated R7041(∆US3) yields were 2.37×10(8) and HSV-1 yields 1.57×10(8) PFU/mL by 24 h post inoculation. We thus conclude that R7041(∆US3) virions, which acquire envelope and tegument by budding at the inner nuclear membrane into the perinuclear space, are infective.

  11. Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Us3 Deletion Mutant is Infective Despite Impaired Capsid Translocation to the Cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Peter; Leisinger, Sabine; de Oliveira, Anna Paula; Schraner, Elisabeth M.; Kaech, Andres; Ackermann, Mathias; Tobler, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) capsids are assembled in the nucleus bud at the inner nuclear membrane into the perinuclear space, acquiring envelope and tegument. In theory, these virions are de-enveloped by fusion of the envelope with the outer nuclear membrane and re-enveloped by Golgi membranes to become infective. Us3 enables the nucleus to cytoplasm capsid translocation. Nevertheless, Us3 is not essential for the production of infective progeny viruses. Determination of phenotype distribution by quantitative electron microscopy, and calculation per mean nuclear or cell volume revealed the following: (i) The number of R7041(∆US3) capsids budding at the inner nuclear membrane was significantly higher than that of wild type HSV-1; (ii) The mean number of R7041(∆US3) virions per mean cell volume was 2726, that of HSV-1 virions 1460 by 24 h post inoculation; (iii) 98% of R7041(∆US3) virions were in the perinuclear space; (iv) The number of R7041(∆US3) capsids in the cytoplasm, including those budding at Golgi membranes, was significantly reduced. Cell associated R7041(∆US3) yields were 2.37 × 108 and HSV-1 yields 1.57 × 108 PFU/mL by 24 h post inoculation. We thus conclude that R7041(∆US3) virions, which acquire envelope and tegument by budding at the inner nuclear membrane into the perinuclear space, are infective. PMID:25588052

  12. Nucleosome positioning in the regulatory region of SV40 chromatin correlates with the activation and repression of early and late transcription during infection.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Meera Ajeet; Christensen, Kendra; Woods, Benjamin; Dettlaff, Ashley; Perley, Danielle; Scheidegger, Adam; Balakrishnan, Lata; Milavetz, Barry

    2017-03-01

    The location of nucleosomes in SV40 virions and minichromosomes isolated during infection were determined by next generation sequencing (NGS). The patterns of reads within the regulatory region of chromatin from wild-type virions indicated that micrococcal nuclease-resistant nucleosomes were specifically positioned at nt 5223 and nt 363, while in minichromosomes isolated 48 h post-infection we observed nuclease-resistant nucleosomes at nt 5119 and nt 212. The nucleosomes at nt 5223 and nt 363 in virion chromatin would be expected to repress early and late transcription, respectively. In virions from the mutant cs1085, which does not repress early transcription, we found that these two nucleosomes were significantly reduced compared to wild-type virions confirming a repressive role for them. In chromatin from cells infected for only 30min with wild-type virus, we observed a significant reduction in the nucleosomes at nt 5223 and nt 363 indicating that the potential repression by these nucleosomes appeared to be relieved very early in infection.

  13. Hepatitis C Virus p7 Protein Is Crucial for Assembly and Release of Infectious Virions

    PubMed Central

    Steinmann, Eike; Penin, Francois; Kallis, Stephanie; Patel, Arvind H; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Pietschmann, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with chronic liver disease and currently affects about 3% of the world population. Although much has been learned about the function of individual viral proteins, the role of the HCV p7 protein in virus replication is not known. Recent data, however, suggest that it forms ion channels that may be targeted by antiviral compounds. Moreover, this protein was shown to be essential for infectivity in chimpanzee. Employing the novel HCV infection system and using a genetic approach to investigate the function of p7 in the viral replication cycle, we find that this protein is essential for efficient assembly and release of infectious virions across divergent virus strains. We show that p7 promotes virus particle production in a genotype-specific manner most likely due to interactions with other viral factors. Virus entry, on the other hand, is largely independent of p7, as the specific infectivity of released virions with a defect in p7 was not affected. Together, these observations indicate that p7 is primarily involved in the late phase of the HCV replication cycle. Finally, we note that p7 variants from different isolates deviate substantially in their capacity to promote virus production, suggesting that p7 is an important virulence factor that may modulate fitness and in turn virus persistence and pathogenesis. PMID:17658949

  14. Protein Primary Structure of the Vaccinia Virion at Increased Resolution

    PubMed

    Ngo, Tuan; Mirzakhanyan, Yeva; Moussatche, Nissin; Gershon, Paul David

    2016-11-01

    Here we examine the protein covalent structure of the vaccinia virus virion. Within two virion preparations, >88% of the theoretical vaccinia virus-encoded proteome was detected with high confidence, including the first detection of products from 27 open reading frames (ORFs) previously designated "predicted," "uncharacterized," "inferred," or "hypothetical" polypeptides containing as few as 39 amino acids (aa) and six proteins whose detection required nontryptic proteolysis. We also detected the expression of four short ORFs, each of which was located within an ORF ("ORF-within-ORF"), including one not previously recognized or known to be expressed. Using quantitative mass spectrometry (MS), between 58 and 74 proteins were determined to be packaged. A total of 63 host proteins were also identified as candidates for packaging. Evidence is provided that some portion of virion proteins are "nicked" via a combination of endoproteolysis and concerted exoproteolysis in a manner, and at sites, independent of virus origin or laboratory procedures. The size of the characterized virion phosphoproteome was doubled from 189 (J. Matson, W. Chou, T. Ngo, and P. D. Gershon, Virology 452-453:310-323, 2014, doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.virol.2014.01.012) to 396 confident, unique phosphorylation sites, 268 of which were within the packaged proteome. This included the unambiguous identification of phosphorylation "hot spots" within virion proteins. Using isotopically enriched ATP, 23 sites of intravirion kinase phosphorylation were detected within nine virion proteins, all at sites already partially occupied within the virion preparations. The clear phosphorylation of proteins RAP94 and RP19 was consistent with the roles of these proteins in intravirion early gene transcription. In a blind search for protein modifications, cysteine glutathionylation and O-linked glycosylation featured prominently. We provide evidence for the phosphoglycosylation of vaccinia virus proteins.

  15. Population-based biomedical sexually transmitted infection control interventions for reducing HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Ng, Brian E; Butler, Lisa M; Horvath, Tara; Rutherford, George W

    2011-03-16

    The transmission of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) is closely related to the sexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Similar risk behaviours, such as frequent unprotected intercourse with different partners, place people at high risk of HIV and STIs, and there is clear evidence that many STIs increase the likelihood of HIV transmission. STI control, especially at the population or community level, may have the potential to contribute substantially to HIV prevention.This is an update of an existing Cochrane review. The review's search methods were updated and its inclusion and exclusion criteria modified so that the focus would be on one well-defined outcome. This review now focuses explicitly on population-based biomedical interventions for STI control, with change in HIV incidence being an outcome necessary for a study's inclusion. To determine the impact of population-based biomedical STI interventions on the incidence of HIV infection. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Web of Science/Social Science, PsycINFO, and Literatura Latino Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS), for the period of 1 January1980 - 16 August 2010. We initially identified 6003 articles and abstracts. After removing 776 duplicates, one author (TH) removed an additional 3268 citations that were clearly irrelevant. Rigorously applying the inclusion criteria, three authors then independently screened the remaining 1959 citations and abstracts. Forty-six articles were chosen for full-text scrutiny by two authors. Ultimately, four studies were included in the review.We also searched the Aegis database of conference abstracts, which includes the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI), the International AIDS Conference (IAC), and International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (IAS) meetings from their inception dates (1993, 1985 and

  16. Exocytosis of Varicella-Zoster Virus Virions Involves a Convergence of Endosomal and Autophagy Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Buckingham, Erin M.; Jarosinski, Keith W.; Jackson, Wallen; Carpenter, John E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is an extremely cell-associated herpesvirus with limited egress of viral particles. The induction of autophagy in VZV-infected monolayers is easily detectable; inhibition of autophagy leads to decreased VZV glycoprotein biosynthesis and diminished viral titers. To explain how autophagic flux could exert a proviral effect on the VZV infectious cycle, we postulated that the VZV exocytosis pathway following secondary envelopment may converge with the autophagy pathway. This hypothesis depended on known similarities between VZV gE and autophagy-related (Atg) Atg9/Atg16L1 trafficking pathways. Investigations were carried out with highly purified fractions of VZV virions. When the virion fraction was tested for the presence of autophagy and endosomal proteins, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain (MAP1LC3B) and Ras-like GTPase 11 (Rab11) were detected. By two-dimensional (2D) and 3D imaging after immunolabeling, both proteins also colocalized with VZV gE in a proportion of cytoplasmic vesicles. When purified VZV virions were enumerated after immunoelectron microscopy, gold beads were detected on viruses following incubation with antibodies to VZV gE (∼100%), Rab11 (50%), and LC3B (30%). Examination of numerous electron micrographs demonstrated that enveloped virions were housed in single-membraned vesicles; viral particles were not observed in autophagosomes. Taken together, our data suggested that some viral particles after secondary envelopment accumulated in a heterogeneous population of single-membraned vesicular compartments, which were decorated with components from both the endocytic pathway (Rab11) and the autophagy pathway (LC3B). The latter cytoplasmic viral vesicles resembled an amphisome. IMPORTANCE VZV infection leads to increased autophagic flux, while inhibition of autophagy leads to a marked reduction in virus spread. In this investigation of the proviral role of autophagy, we found evidence for an

  17. The Plant Host Can Affect the Encapsidation of Brome Mosaic Virus (BMV) RNA; BMV Virions Are Surprisingly Heterogeneous

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Peng; Vaughan, Robert C.; Tragesser, Brady; Hoover, Haley; Kao, C. Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Brome mosaic virus (BMV) packages its genomic and subgenomic RNAs into three separate viral particles. BMV purified from barley, wheat and tobacco have distinct relative abundances of the encapsidated RNAs. We seek to identify the basis for the host-dependent differences in viral RNA encapsidation. Sequencing of the viral RNAs revealed recombination events in the 3′ untranslated region of RNA1 of BMV purified from barley and wheat, but not from tobacco. However, the relative amounts of the BMV RNAs that accumulated in barley and wheat are similar and RNA accumulation is not sufficient to account for the difference in RNA encapsidation. Virions purified from barley and wheat were found to differ in their isoelectric points, resistance to proteolysis, and contacts between the capsid residues and the RNA. Mass spectrometric analyses revealed that virions from the three hosts had different post-translational modifications that should impact the physiochemical properties of the virions. Another major source of variation in RNA encapsidation was due to the purification of BMV particles to homogeneity. Highly enriched BMV present in lysates had a surprising range of sizes, buoyant densities, and distinct relative amounts of encapsidated RNAs. These results show that the encapsidated BMV RNAs reflect a combination of host effects on the physiochemical properties of the viral capsids and the enrichment of a subset of virions. The previously unexpected heterogeneity in BMV should influence the timing of the infection and also the host innate immune responses. PMID:24036424

  18. Expression of Aedes trypsin-modulating oostatic factor on the virion of TMV: A potential larvicide.

    PubMed

    Borovsky, Dov; Rabindran, Shailaja; Dawson, William O; Powell, Charles A; Iannotti, Donna A; Morris, Timothy J; Shabanowitz, Jeffry; Hunt, Donald F; DeBondt, Hendrik L; DeLoof, Arnold

    2006-12-12

    We report the engineering of the surface of the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) virion with a mosquito decapeptide hormone, trypsin-modulating oostatic factor (TMOF). The TMV coat protein (CP) was fused to TMOF at the C terminus by using a read-through, leaky stop codon that facilitated expression of CP and chimeric CP-TMOF (20:1 ratio) that were coassembled into virus particles in infected Nicotiana tabacum. Plants that were infected with the hybrid TMV RNA accumulated TMOF to levels of 1.3% of total soluble protein. Infected tobacco leaf discs that were fed to Heliothis virescens fourth-instar larvae stunted their growth and inhibited trypsin and chymotrypsin activity in their midgut. Purified CP-TMOF virions fed to mosquito larvae stopped larval growth and caused death. Because TMV has a wide host range, expressing TMV-TMOF in plants can be used as a general method to protect them against agricultural insect pests and to control vector mosquitoes.

  19. Soybean Resistance to Cercospora sojina Infection Is Reduced by Silicon.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Kelly Juliane Telles; Debona, Daniel; França, Sueny Kelly Santos; Gonçalves, Mariana Gabriele Marcolino; DaMatta, Fábio Murilo; Rodrigues, Fabrício Ávila

    2014-11-01

    Frogeye leaf spot, caused by Cercospora sojina, is one of the most important leaf diseases of soybean worldwide. Silicon (Si) is known to increase the resistance of several plant species to pathogens. The cultivars Bossier and Conquista, which are susceptible and resistant, respectively, to frogeye leaf spot, supplied and nonsupplied with Si were examined for the activities of defense enzymes and the concentrations of total soluble phenolics (TSP) and lignin-thioglycolic acid (LTGA) derivatives at 8, 14, and 16 days after inoculation (dai) with C. sojina. The importance of cell wall degrading enzymes (CWDE) to the infection process of C. sojina and the effect of Si on their activities were also determined. Soybean plants were grown in hydroponic culture containing either 0 or 2 mM Si (-Si and +Si, respectively) and noninoculated or C. sojina inoculated. Severity of frogeye leaf spot was higher in cultivar Bossier plants than cultivar Conquista and also in the +Si plants compared with their -Si counterparts. Except for the concentrations of TSP and LTGA derivatives, activities of defense enzymes and the CWDE did not change for +Si noninoculated plants regardless of the cultivar. The activities of lipoxygenases, phenylalanine ammonia-lyases, chitinases, and polyphenoloxidases as well as the activities of CWDE decreased for the +Si inoculated plants. The results from this study demonstrated that defense enzyme activities decreased in soybean plants supplied with Si, which compromised resistance to C. sojina infection.

  20. Supplemental Perioperative Oxygen to Reduce Surgical Site Infection After High Energy Fracture Surgery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0588 TITLE: Supplemental Perioperative Oxygen to Reduce Surgical Site Infection After High Energy Fracture Surgery...3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 30 Sep 2015 – 29 Sep 2016 30129/29/124. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Supplemental Perioperative Oxygen to Reduce Surgical Site...prospective randomized treatment trial investigating if supplemental perioperative oxygen use will reduce surgical site infection after surgery on fractures

  1. Designing a protocol to reduce catheter-associated urinary tract infections among hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Gokula, Murthy; Smolen, Dianne; Gaspar, Phyllis M; Hensley, Sandra J; Benninghoff, Mary C; Smith, Mindy

    2012-12-01

    Hospital-acquired urinary tract infections comprise 40% of hospital-acquired infections with over 80% of these hospital-acquired urinary tract infections associated with the use of urinary catheters. The process that was used to establish a new hospital protocol using the "IAIMS" (identifying, assessing, implementing, modifying/maintaining, spread/surveillance) model to reduce the incidence of catheter-associated urinary tract infections is described. The example is intended to serve as a framework for the development of protocols to address other hospital-acquired infections.

  2. Retroviral env glycoprotein trafficking and incorporation into virions.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Together with the Gag protein, the Env glycoprotein is a major retroviral structural protein and is essential for forming infectious virus particles. Env is synthesized, processed, and transported to certain microdomains at the plasma membrane and takes advantage of the same host machinery for its trafficking as that used by cellular glycoproteins. Incorporation of Env into progeny virions is probably mediated by the interaction between Env and Gag, in some cases with the additional involvement of certain host factors. Although several general models have been proposed to explain the incorporation of retroviral Env glycoproteins into virions, the actual mechanism for this process is still unclear, partly because structural data on the Env protein cytoplasmic tail is lacking. This paper presents the current understanding of the synthesis, trafficking, and virion incorporation of retroviral Env proteins.

  3. Incorporation of Spike and Membrane Glycoproteins into Coronavirus Virions

    PubMed Central

    Ujike, Makoto; Taguchi, Fumihiro

    2015-01-01

    The envelopes of coronaviruses (CoVs) contain primarily three proteins; the two major glycoproteins spike (S) and membrane (M), and envelope (E), a non-glycosylated protein. Unlike other enveloped viruses, CoVs bud and assemble at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC). For efficient virion assembly, these proteins must be targeted to the budding site and to interact with each other or the ribonucleoprotein. Thus, the efficient incorporation of viral envelope proteins into CoV virions depends on protein trafficking and protein–protein interactions near the ERGIC. The goal of this review is to summarize recent findings on the mechanism of incorporation of the M and S glycoproteins into the CoV virion, focusing on protein trafficking and protein–protein interactions. PMID:25855243

  4. How malaria merozoites reduce the deformability of infected RBC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Majid; Feng, James

    2011-11-01

    This talk presents a three-dimensional particle-based model for the red blood cell (RBC), and uses it to explore the changes in the deformability of RBC due to presence of malaria parasite. The cell membrane is represented by a set of discrete particles connected by nonlinear springs that represent shear and bending elasticity. The cytoplasm and the external liquid are modeled as homogeneous Newtonian fluids, and discretized by particles as in standard smoothed-particle-hydrodynamics models. The merozoite is modeled as an aggregate of particles constrained to rigid-body motion. The fluid flow and membrane deformation are computed, via the particle motion, by a two-step explicit scheme, with model parameters determined from experiments. The stretching of healthy and infected RBC by optical tweezers has been simulated to investigate the contribution of rigid merozoites to the decrease in deformability. Department of Mathematics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z2, Canada.

  5. A collaborative approach to reduce healthcare-associated infections.

    PubMed

    Su, Guizhen

    Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) continue to be an ongoing issue for patients in acute hospital settings. Effectively preventing and controlling HAIs requires a collaborative approach compelling all healthcare staff to take up responsibilities and be involved. A surgical ward in an acute hospital aimed to implement comprehensive HAI prevention strategies by applying both Kotter's eight-step change model and the practice development principles into its current system. The project motivated staff to be involved and engaged in the assessment, implementation and evaluation of the project processes, and take ownership of the practice change. It focused on ensuring a clean environment, improving hand hygiene compliance, increasing staff's knowledge base regarding HAIs and enhancing active surveillance. The project achieved success in the reduction and prevention of HAIs as well as the development of a sustainable workplace culture.

  6. Saccharomyces boulardii reduces infection intensity of mice with toxocariasis.

    PubMed

    de Avila, Luciana Farias da Costa; Conceição, Fabricio Rochedo; Telmo, Paula de Lima; Dutra, Gisele Ferreira; de los Santos, Diego Gil; Martins, Lourdes Helena Rodrigues; Berne, Maria Elisabeth Aires; da Silva, Pedro Eduardo Almeida; Scaini, Carlos James

    2012-06-08

    Several studies have shown the benefit of the use of probiotics in the prevention and treatment of diseases; however, few of them have investigated the effect of probiotics on parasitosis. In this study, the effect of Saccharomyces boulardii on the intensity of infection of mice with toxocariasis was evaluated. The animals were fed with a diet supplemented with S. boulardii for 15 days before inoculation with Toxocara canis eggs and for 2 or 60 days post-inoculation. S. boulardii promoted a reduction of approximately 36% in the average number of recovered T. canis larvae, suggesting that it can be used as an alternative to help control toxocariasis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Synaptic transmission and the susceptibility of HIV infection to anti-viral drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarova, Natalia L.; Levy, David N.; Wodarz, Dominik

    2013-07-01

    Cell-to-cell viral transmission via virological synapses has been argued to reduce susceptibility of the virus population to anti-viral drugs through multiple infection of cells, contributing to low-level viral persistence during therapy. Using a mathematical framework, we examine the role of synaptic transmission in treatment susceptibility. A key factor is the relative probability of individual virions to infect a cell during free-virus and synaptic transmission, a currently unknown quantity. If this infection probability is higher for free-virus transmission, then treatment susceptibility is lowest if one virus is transferred per synapse, and multiple infection of cells increases susceptibility. In the opposite case, treatment susceptibility is minimized for an intermediate number of virions transferred per synapse. Hence, multiple infection via synapses does not simply lower treatment susceptibility. Without further experimental investigations, one cannot conclude that synaptic transmission provides an additional mechanism for the virus to persist at low levels during anti-viral therapy.

  8. Estradiol Reduces Susceptibility of CD4+ T Cells and Macrophages to HIV-Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Garcia, Marta; Biswas, Nabanita; Patel, Mickey V.; Barr, Fiona D.; Crist, Sarah G.; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Fahey, John V.; Wira, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    The magnitude of the HIV epidemic in women requires urgent efforts to find effective preventive methods. Even though sex hormones have been described to influence HIV infection in epidemiological studies and regulate different immune responses that may affect HIV infection, the direct role that female sex hormones play in altering the susceptibility of target cells to HIV-infection is largely unknown. Here we evaluated the direct effect of 17-β-estradiol (E2) and ethinyl estradiol (EE) in HIV-infection of CD4+ T-cells and macrophages. Purified CD4+ T-cells and monocyte-derived macrophages were generated in vitro from peripheral blood and infected with R5 and X4 viruses. Treatment of CD4+ T-cells and macrophages with E2 prior to viral challenge reduced their susceptibility to HIV infection in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of E2 2 h after viral challenge however did not result in reduced infection. In contrast, EE reduced infection in macrophages to a lesser extent than E2 and had no effect on CD4+ T-cell infection. Reduction of HIV-infection induced by E2 in CD4+ T-cells was not due to CCR5 down-regulation, but was an entry-mediated mechanism since infection with VSV-G pseudotyped HIV was not modified by E2. In macrophages, despite the lack of an effect of E2 on CCR5 expression, E2–treatment reduced viral entry 2 h after challenge and increased MIP-1β secretion. These results demonstrate the direct effect of E2 on susceptibility of HIV-target cells to infection and indicate that inhibition of target cell infection involves cell-entry related mechanisms. PMID:23614015

  9. Estradiol reduces susceptibility of CD4+ T cells and macrophages to HIV-infection.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Garcia, Marta; Biswas, Nabanita; Patel, Mickey V; Barr, Fiona D; Crist, Sarah G; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Fahey, John V; Wira, Charles R

    2013-01-01

    The magnitude of the HIV epidemic in women requires urgent efforts to find effective preventive methods. Even though sex hormones have been described to influence HIV infection in epidemiological studies and regulate different immune responses that may affect HIV infection, the direct role that female sex hormones play in altering the susceptibility of target cells to HIV-infection is largely unknown. Here we evaluated the direct effect of 17-β-estradiol (E2) and ethinyl estradiol (EE) in HIV-infection of CD4(+) T-cells and macrophages. Purified CD4(+) T-cells and monocyte-derived macrophages were generated in vitro from peripheral blood and infected with R5 and X4 viruses. Treatment of CD4(+) T-cells and macrophages with E2 prior to viral challenge reduced their susceptibility to HIV infection in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of E2 2 h after viral challenge however did not result in reduced infection. In contrast, EE reduced infection in macrophages to a lesser extent than E2 and had no effect on CD4(+) T-cell infection. Reduction of HIV-infection induced by E2 in CD4(+) T-cells was not due to CCR5 down-regulation, but was an entry-mediated mechanism since infection with VSV-G pseudotyped HIV was not modified by E2. In macrophages, despite the lack of an effect of E2 on CCR5 expression, E2-treatment reduced viral entry 2 h after challenge and increased MIP-1β secretion. These results demonstrate the direct effect of E2 on susceptibility of HIV-target cells to infection and indicate that inhibition of target cell infection involves cell-entry related mechanisms.

  10. The Primary Enveloped Virion of Herpes Simplex Virus 1: Its Role in Nuclear Egress.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, William W; Fontana, Juan; Winkler, Dennis C; Cheng, Naiqian; Heymann, J Bernard; Steven, Alasdair C

    2017-06-13

    Many viruses migrate between different cellular compartments for successive stages of assembly. The HSV-1 capsid assembles in the nucleus and then transfers into the cytoplasm. First, the capsid buds through the inner nuclear membrane, becoming coated with nuclear egress complex (NEC) protein. This yields a primary enveloped virion (PEV) whose envelope fuses with the outer nuclear membrane, releasing the capsid into the cytoplasm. We investigated the associated molecular mechanisms by isolating PEVs from US3-null-infected cells and imaging them by cryo-electron microscopy and tomography. (pUS3 is a viral protein kinase in whose absence PEVs accumulate in the perinuclear space.) Unlike mature extracellular virions, PEVs have very few glycoprotein spikes. PEVs are ~20% smaller than mature virions, and the little space available between the capsid and the NEC layer suggests that most tegument proteins are acquired later in the egress pathway. Previous studies have proposed that NEC is organized as hexamers in honeycomb arrays in PEVs, but we find arrays of heptameric rings in extracts from US3-null-infected cells. In a PEV, NEC contacts the capsid predominantly via the pUL17/pUL25 complexes which are located close to the capsid vertices. Finally, the NEC layer dissociates from the capsid as it leaves the nucleus, possibly in response to pUS3-mediated phosphorylation. Overall, nuclear egress emerges as a process driven by a program of multiple weak interactions.IMPORTANCE On its maturation pathway, the newly formed HSV-1 nucleocapsid must traverse the nuclear envelope, while respecting the integrity of that barrier. Nucleocapsids (125 nm in diameter) are too large to pass through the nuclear pore complexes that conduct most nucleocytoplasmic traffic. It is now widely accepted that the process involves envelopment/de-envelopment of a key intermediate-the primary enveloped virion. In wild-type infections, PEVs are short-lived, which has impeded study. Using a mutant

  11. Ribonucleic Acid Polymerase Activity in Sendai Virions and Nucleocapsid

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, William S.

    1971-01-01

    After dissociation of purified Sendai virus with the neutral detergent Nonidet P-40 and 2-mercaptoethanol, it catalyzed the incorporation of ribonucleoside triphosphates into an acid-insoluble product. The enzyme activity was associated with viral nucleocapsid as well as whole virions. The reaction product was ribonucleic acid (RNA) which annealed specifically with virion RNA. Sedimentation of the 3H-RNA reaction product revealed two components, a 45S component with properties of double-stranded RNA and 4 to 6S component which appeared to be mostly single-stranded RNA. PMID:4328418

  12. Inhibition of the receptor-mediated virion attachment to a lipid membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2012-10-01

    The forefront of the anti-viral defence is sometimes aimed at virion attachment to a host membrane. This step or, more specifically, virion contacts with cellular membrane receptors (or, e.g., glycolipids) can be inhibited by antibodies (or specially chosen or designed compounds) via their association with virions. In this case, the full-scale attachment of virions to a host membrane occurs via a subtle interplay of the formation and rupture of multiple virion-inhibitor and virion-receptor bonds. We present a kinetic model describing this interplay and illustrating general trends in the process under consideration.

  13. Picornavirus RNA is protected from cleavage by ribonuclease during virion uncoating and transfer across cellular and model membranes

    PubMed Central

    Groppelli, Elisabetta; Sun, Eileen; Strauss, Mike; Gold, Sarah; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Tuthill, Tobias J.; Hogle, James M.

    2017-01-01

    Picornaviruses are non-enveloped RNA viruses that enter cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis. Because they lack an envelope, picornaviruses face the challenge of delivering their RNA genomes across the membrane of the endocytic vesicle into the cytoplasm to initiate infection. Currently, the mechanism of genome release and translocation across membranes remains poorly understood. Within the enterovirus genus, poliovirus, rhinovirus 2, and rhinovirus 16 have been proposed to release their genomes across intact endosomal membranes through virally induced pores, whereas one study has proposed that rhinovirus 14 releases its RNA following disruption of endosomal membranes. For the more distantly related aphthovirus genus (e.g. foot-and-mouth disease viruses and equine rhinitis A virus) acidification of endosomes results in the disassembly of the virion into pentamers and in the release of the viral RNA into the lumen of the endosome, but no details have been elucidated as how the RNA crosses the vesicle membrane. However, more recent studies suggest aphthovirus RNA is released from intact particles and the dissociation to pentamers may be a late event. In this study we have investigated the RNase A sensitivity of genome translocation of poliovirus using a receptor-decorated-liposome model and the sensitivity of infection of poliovirus and equine-rhinitis A virus to co-internalized RNase A. We show that poliovirus genome translocation is insensitive to RNase A and results in little or no release into the medium in the liposome model. We also show that infectivity is not reduced by co-internalized RNase A for poliovirus and equine rhinitis A virus. Additionally, we show that all poliovirus genomes that are internalized into cells, not just those resulting in infection, are protected from RNase A. These results support a finely coordinated, directional model of viral RNA delivery that involves viral proteins and cellular membranes. PMID:28166307

  14. Picornavirus RNA is protected from cleavage by ribonuclease during virion uncoating and transfer across cellular and model membranes.

    PubMed

    Groppelli, Elisabetta; Levy, Hazel C; Sun, Eileen; Strauss, Mike; Nicol, Clare; Gold, Sarah; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Tuthill, Tobias J; Hogle, James M; Rowlands, David J

    2017-02-01

    Picornaviruses are non-enveloped RNA viruses that enter cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis. Because they lack an envelope, picornaviruses face the challenge of delivering their RNA genomes across the membrane of the endocytic vesicle into the cytoplasm to initiate infection. Currently, the mechanism of genome release and translocation across membranes remains poorly understood. Within the enterovirus genus, poliovirus, rhinovirus 2, and rhinovirus 16 have been proposed to release their genomes across intact endosomal membranes through virally induced pores, whereas one study has proposed that rhinovirus 14 releases its RNA following disruption of endosomal membranes. For the more distantly related aphthovirus genus (e.g. foot-and-mouth disease viruses and equine rhinitis A virus) acidification of endosomes results in the disassembly of the virion into pentamers and in the release of the viral RNA into the lumen of the endosome, but no details have been elucidated as how the RNA crosses the vesicle membrane. However, more recent studies suggest aphthovirus RNA is released from intact particles and the dissociation to pentamers may be a late event. In this study we have investigated the RNase A sensitivity of genome translocation of poliovirus using a receptor-decorated-liposome model and the sensitivity of infection of poliovirus and equine-rhinitis A virus to co-internalized RNase A. We show that poliovirus genome translocation is insensitive to RNase A and results in little or no release into the medium in the liposome model. We also show that infectivity is not reduced by co-internalized RNase A for poliovirus and equine rhinitis A virus. Additionally, we show that all poliovirus genomes that are internalized into cells, not just those resulting in infection, are protected from RNase A. These results support a finely coordinated, directional model of viral RNA delivery that involves viral proteins and cellular membranes.

  15. Non-plaque-forming virions of Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara express viral genes.

    PubMed

    Lülf, Anna-Theresa; Freudenstein, Astrid; Marr, Lisa; Sutter, Gerd; Volz, Asisa

    2016-12-01

    In cell culture infections with vaccinia virus the number of counted virus particles is substantially higher than the number of plaques obtained by titration. We found that standard vaccine preparations of recombinant Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara produce only about 20-30% plaque-forming virions in fully permissive cell cultures. To evaluate the biological activity of the non-plaque-forming particles, we generated recombinant viruses expressing fluorescent reporter proteins under transcriptional control of specific viral early and late promoters. Live cell imaging and automated counting by fluorescent microscopy indicated that virtually all virus particles can enter cells and switch on viral gene expression. Although most of the non-plaque-forming infections are arrested at the level of viral early gene expression, we detected activation of late viral transcription in 10-20% of single infected cells. Thus, non-plaque-forming particles are biologically active, and likely contribute to the immunogenicity of vaccinia virus vaccines.

  16. Reducing hospital associated infection: a role for social marketing.

    PubMed

    Conway, Tony; Langley, Sue

    2013-01-01

    Although hand hygiene is seen as the most important method to prevent the transmission of hospital associated infection in the UK, hand hygiene compliance rates appear to remain poor. This research aims to assess the degree to which social marketing methodology can be adopted by a particular organisation to promote hand hygiene compliance. The research design is based on a conceptual framework developed from analysis of social marketing literature. Data collection involved taped interviews given by nursing staff working within a specific Hospital Directorate in Manchester, England. Supplementary data were obtained from archival records of the hand hygiene compliance rates. Findings highlighted gaps in the Directorate's approach to the promotion of hand hygiene compared to what could be using social marketing methodology. Respondents highlighted how the Directorate failed to fully optimise resources required to endorse hand hygiene practice and this resulted in poorer compliance. From the experiences and events documented, the study suggests how the emergent phenomena could be utilised by the Directorate to apply a social marketing approach which could positively influence hand hygiene compliance. The paper seeks to explore the use of social marketing in nursing to promote hand hygiene compliance and offer a conceptual framework that provides a way of measuring the strength of the impact that social marketing methodology could have.

  17. Garlic Organosulfur Compounds Reduce Inflammation and Oxidative Stress during Dengue Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Hall, Alex; Troupin, Andrea; Londono-Renteria, Berlin; Colpitts, Tonya M

    2017-06-23

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that causes significant global human disease and mortality. One approach to develop treatments for DENV infection and the prevention of severe disease is through investigation of natural medicines. Inflammation plays both beneficial and harmful roles during DENV infection. Studies have proposed that the oxidative stress response may be one mechanism responsible for triggering inflammation during DENV infection. Thus, blocking the oxidative stress response could reduce inflammation and the development of severe disease. Garlic has been shown to both reduce inflammation and affect the oxidative stress response. Here, we show that the garlic active compounds diallyl disulfide (DADS), diallyl sulfide (DAS) and alliin reduced inflammation during DENV infection and show that this reduction is due to the effects on the oxidative stress response. These results suggest that garlic could be used as an alternative treatment for DENV infection and for the prevention of severe disease development.

  18. Garlic Organosulfur Compounds Reduce Inflammation and Oxidative Stress during Dengue Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Hall, Alex; Troupin, Andrea; Londono-Renteria, Berlin; Colpitts, Tonya M

    2017-06-22

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that causes significant global human disease and mortality. One approach to develop treatments for DENV infection and the prevention of severe disease is through investigation of natural medicines. Inflammation plays both beneficial and harmful roles during DENV infection. Studies have proposed that the oxidative stress response may be one mechanism responsible for triggering inflammation during DENV infection. Thus, blocking the oxidative stress response could reduce inflammation and the development of severe disease. Garlic has been shown to both reduce inflammation and affect the oxidative stress response. Here, we show that the garlic active compounds diallyl disulfide (DADS), diallyl sulfide (DAS) and alliin reduced inflammation during DENV infection and show that this reduction is due to the effects on the oxidative stress response. These results suggest that garlic could be used as an alternative treatment for DENV infection and for the prevention of severe disease development.

  19. Garlic Organosulfur Compounds Reduce Inflammation and Oxidative Stress during Dengue Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Alex; Troupin, Andrea; Londono-Renteria, Berlin; Colpitts, Tonya M.

    2017-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that causes significant global human disease and mortality. One approach to develop treatments for DENV infection and the prevention of severe disease is through investigation of natural medicines. Inflammation plays both beneficial and harmful roles during DENV infection. Studies have proposed that the oxidative stress response may be one mechanism responsible for triggering inflammation during DENV infection. Thus, blocking the oxidative stress response could reduce inflammation and the development of severe disease. Garlic has been shown to both reduce inflammation and affect the oxidative stress response. Here, we show that the garlic active compounds diallyl disulfide (DADS), diallyl sulfide (DAS) and alliin reduced inflammation during DENV infection and show that this reduction is due to the effects on the oxidative stress response. These results suggest that garlic could be used as an alternative treatment for DENV infection and for the prevention of severe disease development. PMID:28644404

  20. Human Toxoplasma gondii-specific secretory immunoglobulin A reduces T. gondii infection of enterocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mack, D G; McLeod, R

    1992-12-01

    Whey from 17 women (four acutely infected with Toxoplasma gondii, eight chronically infected, and five uninfected) was studied. T. gondii-specific secretory IgA antibodies were demonstrated by ELISA in whey from acutely infected and one of eight chronically infected women. Such antibodies to tachyzoite proteins of < or = 14, 22, 26-28, 30, 46, 60, 70-80, and > 100 kD (eliminated by protease but not periodate or neuraminidase treatment) were demonstrated in whey from acutely infected subjects when Western blots were probed with their whey and antibodies to human secretory IgA or IgA or secretory piece. Secretory IgA from four of eight chronically infected women recognized the 46- and 69-kD epitopes. Other whey samples were negative. Incubation of T. gondii tachyzoites with whey or purified secretory IgA from acutely infected (but not seronegative) women caused 50-75% reduction in infection of enterocytes in vitro. Whey reactive with the 46-kD epitope from three of six chronically infected women caused less (> or = 40%) inhibition. Whey and purified secretory IgA from two of three acutely infected women agglutinated tachyzoites. Whey did not result in complement-dependent lysis of T. gondii. These results indicate that it may be possible to produce human secretory IgA to T. gondii capable of reducing initial infection of enterocytes, as such IgA is present during natural infection. They also demonstrate candidate epitopes for such protection.

  1. Egress of budded virions of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus does not require activity of Spodoptera frugiperda HSP/HSC70 chaperones.

    PubMed

    Lyupina, Yulia V; Orlova, Olga V; Abaturova, Svetlana B; Beljelarskaya, Svetlana N; Lavrov, Andrey N; Mikhailov, Victor S

    2014-11-04

    The induction of heat shock proteins in baculovirus infected cells is well documented. However a role of these chaperones in infection cycle remains unknown. The observation that HSP70s are associated with virions of different baculoviruses reported by several researchers suggests that HSPs might be structural components of viruses or involved in virion assembly. These hypotheses were examined by using a novel inhibitor of the ATPase and chaperoning activity of HSP/HSC70s, VER-155008. When VER-155008 was added early in infection, the synthesis of viral proteins, genome replication and the production of budded virions (BV) were markedly inhibited indicating the dependence of virus reproduction on host chaperones. However, BV production was unaffected when VER-155008 was added in the mid-replication phase which is after accumulation of products required for completion of the viral DNA replication. These results suggest that the final stages in assembly of BV and their egress from cells do not depend on chaperone activity of host HSP/HSC70s.

  2. Reduced ERPs and theta oscillations underlie working memory deficits in Toxoplasma gondii infected seniors.

    PubMed

    Gajewski, Patrick D; Falkenstein, Michael; Hengstler, Jan G; Golka, Klaus

    2016-10-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is one of the most widespread infections in humans. Recent studies give evidence for memory deficits in infected older adults. To investigate working memory dysfunction in infected elderly, a double-blinded electrophysiological study was conducted. 84 persons derived from a sample of 131 healthy participants with the mean age of 70 years were assigned to two groups of 42 non-infected and 42 infected individuals. The outcome measures were behavioral performance, target and response-related ERPs, and time-frequency wavelets during performance in a n-back working-memory task. The infected individuals showed a reduced rate of detected targets and diminished P3b amplitude both in target-locked as well as response-locked data compared to the non-infected group. Time-frequency decomposition of the EEG-signals revealed lower evoked power in the theta frequency range in the target-locked as well as in the response-locked data in infected individuals. The reported effects were comparable with differences between healthy young and old adults described previously. Taking together, the reduced working-memory performance accompanied by an attenuated P3b and frontal theta activity may suggest neurotransmitter imbalance like dopamine and norepinephrine in T. gondii infected individuals. In face of a high prevalence of T. gondii infection and the increasing ratio of older population their accelerated memory decline may have substantial socioeconomic consequences.

  3. Host and viral proteins in the virion of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Bechtel, Jill T; Winant, Richard C; Ganem, Don

    2005-04-01

    Infection of cultured cells with Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) typically establishes a latent infection, in which only a few viral genes are expressed. Recently, it has been reported that a subset of lytic genes are transiently expressed very early after viral entry but that this burst of abortive lytic gene expression is terminated with the supervention of latency (H. H. Krishnan, P. P. Naranatt, M. S. Smith, L. Zeng, C. Bloomer, and B. Chandran, J. Virol. 78:3601-3620, 2004). To identify molecules imported into cells by KSHV that might influence this gene expression program, we have examined the protein composition of the KSHV particle. Immunoblotting of virus particles demonstrated that RTA, the lytic switch protein, and RAP, a viral protein that is a transcriptional and cell cycle modulator, were both incorporated into virus particles. In a second approach, polypeptides isolated from purified virions were identified by mass-spectrometric analysis of their constituent tryptic peptides. With this approach we were able to identify 18 major virion proteins, including structural, regulatory, and signaling proteins of both viral and cellular origin.

  4. Ultrafast Tracking of a Single Live Virion During the Invagination of a Cell Membrane.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yangang; Wang, Shaowen; Shan, Yuping; Zhang, Dinglin; Gao, Jing; Zhang, Min; Liu, Shuheng; Cai, Mingjun; Xu, Haijiao; Li, Guohui; Qin, Qiwei; Wang, Hongda

    2015-06-01

    The first step in most viral infections is the penetration of the cell membrane via endocytosis. However, the underlying mechanism of this important process has not been quantitatively characterized; for example, the velocity and force of a single virion during invagination remain unknown. Here, the endocytosis of a single live virion (Singapore grouper iridovirus, SGIV) through the apical membranes of a host cell is monitored by developing and using a novel ultrafast (at the microsecond level) tracking technique: force tracing. For the first time, these results unambiguously reveal that the maximum velocity during the cell entry of a single SGIV by membrane invagination is approximately 200 nm s(-1), the endocytic force is approximately 60.8 ± 18.5 pN, and the binding energy density increases with the engulfment depth. This report utilizing high temporospatial resolution (subnanometer and microsecond levels) approaches provides new insight into the dynamic process of viral infection via endocytosis and the mechanism of membrane invagination at the single-particle level. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Interleukin-22 reduces lung inflammation during influenza A virus infection and protects against secondary bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Stoyan; Renneson, Joelle; Fontaine, Josette; Barthelemy, Adeline; Paget, Christophe; Fernandez, Elodie Macho; Blanc, Fany; De Trez, Carl; Van Maele, Laurye; Dumoutier, Laure; Huerre, Michel-René; Eberl, Gérard; Si-Tahar, Mustapha; Gosset, Pierre; Renauld, Jean Christophe; Sirard, Jean Claude; Faveeuw, Christelle; Trottein, François

    2013-06-01

    Interleukin-22 (IL-22) has redundant, protective, or pathogenic functions during autoimmune, inflammatory, and infectious diseases. Here, we addressed the potential role of IL-22 in host defense and pathogenesis during lethal and sublethal respiratory H3N2 influenza A virus (IAV) infection. We show that IL-22, as well as factors associated with its production, are expressed in the lung tissue during the early phases of IAV infection. Our data indicate that retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor-γt (RORγt)-positive αβ and γδ T cells, as well as innate lymphoid cells, expressed enhanced Il22 transcripts as early as 2 days postinfection. During lethal or sublethal IAV infections, endogenous IL-22 played no role in the control of IAV replication and in the development of the IAV-specific CD8(+) T cell response. During lethal infection, where wild-type (WT) mice succumbed to severe pneumonia, the lack of IL-22 did not accelerate or delay IAV-associated pathogenesis and animal death. In stark contrast, during sublethal IAV infection, IL-22-deficient animals had enhanced lung injuries and showed a lower airway epithelial integrity relative to WT littermates. Of importance, the protective effect of endogenous IL-22 in pulmonary damages was associated with a more controlled secondary bacterial infection. Indeed, after challenge with Streptococcus pneumoniae, IAV-experienced Il22(-/-) animals were more susceptible than WT controls in terms of survival rate and bacterial burden in the lungs. Together, IL-22 plays no major role during lethal influenza but is beneficial during sublethal H3N2 IAV infection, where it limits lung inflammation and subsequent bacterial superinfections.

  6. IL-10 Reduces Levels of Apoptosis in Toxoplasma gondii-Infected Trophoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Haixia; Zhai, Xiaoyu; Hu, Xuemei

    2013-01-01

    Background To analyze the effects of IL-10 on the HLA-G expression and the apoptosis of trophoblasts infected with Toxoplasma gondii. Methods T. gondii-infected or uninfected human trophoblasts and immortalized human placental BeWo cells were cultured with or without human IL-10. Uninfected and infected cells without IL-10 cells served as controls. HLA-G expression was measured by real-time PCR and flow cytometry, respectively. Cells apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. Apoptosis associated moleculars were measured by real-time PCR and Western bolt. Results HLA-G expression was increased in the infected trophoblasts and BeWo cells compared to uninfected cells. Treatment of infected cells with IL-10 decreased HLA-G expression compared to infected cells while no change in treatment of uninfected cells compared with uninfected cells. Levels of apoptosis and apoptosis associated caspase-3 and caspase-8 decreased and c-FLIP levels increased in treated infected cells with IL-10 compared to infected cells and no difference in IL-10 treated uninfected cells compared to uninfected cells. Conclusions IL-10 regulates HLA-G expression in T. gondii-infected trophoblasts. IL-10 treatment of infected trophoblasts reduced levels of apoptosis. This may contribute to the improvement in pregnancy outcomes when women infected with T. gondii treated with IL-10. PMID:23418570

  7. Efficacy of an infection control programme in reducing nosocomial bloodstream infections in a Senegalese neonatal unit.

    PubMed

    Landre-Peigne, C; Ka, A S; Peigne, V; Bougere, J; Seye, M N; Imbert, P

    2011-10-01

    Neonatal nosocomial infections are public health threats in the developing world, and successful interventions are rarely reported. A before-and-after study was conducted in the neonatal unit of the Hôpital Principal de Dakar, Senegal to assess the efficacy of a multi-faceted hospital infection control programme implemented from March to May 2005. The interventions included clustering of nursing care, a simple algorithm for empirical therapy of suspected early-onset sepsis, minimal invasive care and promotion of early discharge of neonates. Data on nosocomial bloodstream infections, mortality, bacterial resistance and antibiotic use were collected before and after implementation of the infection control programme. One hundred and twenty-five infants were admitted immediately before the programme (Period 1, January-February 2005) and 148 infants were admitted immediately after the programme (Period 2, June-July 2005). The two groups of infants were comparable in terms of reason for admission and birth weight. After implementation of the infection control programme, the overall rate of nosocomial bloodstream infections decreased from 8.8% to 2.0% (P=0.01), and the rate of nosocomial bloodstream infections/patient-day decreased from 10.9 to 2.9/1000 patient-days (P=0.03). Overall mortality rates did not differ significantly. The proportion of neonates who received antimicrobial therapy for suspected early-onset sepsis decreased significantly from 100% to 51% of at-risk infants (P<0.001). The incidence of drug-resistant bacteria was significantly lower after implementation of the programme (79% vs 12%; P<0.001), and remained low one year later. In this neonatal unit, simple, low-cost and sustainable interventions led to the control of a high incidence of bacterial nosocomial bloodstream infections, and the efficacy of these interventions was long-lasting. Such interventions could be extended to other low-income countries. Copyright © 2011 The Healthcare Infection

  8. Presence of nucleoside triphosphate phosphohydrolase activity in purified virions of reovirus.

    PubMed

    Borsa, J; Grover, J; Chapman, J D

    1970-09-01

    A nucleoside triphosphate phosphohydrolase activity has been discovered in reovirus virions. This activity converts nucleoside triphosphates to nucleoside diphosphates in vitro. Properties of this enzyme are presented, with evidence that this activity is an integral part of the virion core.

  9. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase activity reduces rotavirus infection at a postbinding step.

    PubMed

    Rossen, John W A; Bouma, Janneke; Raatgeep, Rolien H C; Büller, Hans A; Einerhand, Alexandra W C

    2004-09-01

    Elevated levels of prostaglandins (PGs), products of cyclooxygenases (COXs), are found in the plasma and stool of rotavirus-infected children. We sought to determine the role of COXs, PGs, and the signal transduction pathways involved in rotavirus infection to elucidate possible new targets for antiviral therapy. Human intestinal Caco-2 cells were infected with human rotavirus Wa or simian rotavirus SA-11. COX-2 mRNA expression and secreted PGE2 levels were determined at different time points postinfection, and the effect of COX inhibitors on rotavirus infection was studied by an immunofluorescence assay (IFA). To reveal the signal transduction pathways involved, the effect of MEK, protein kinase A (PKA), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and NF-kappaB inhibitors on rotavirus infection was analyzed. In infected Caco-2 cells, increased COX-2 mRNA expression and secreted PGE2 levels were detected. Indomethacin (inhibiting both COX-1 and COX-2) and specific COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitors reduced rotavirus infection by 85 and 50%, respectively, as measured by an IFA. Indomethacin reduced virus infection at a postbinding step early in the infection cycle, inhibiting virus protein synthesis. Indomethacin did not seem to affect viral RNA synthesis. Inhibitors of MEK, PKA, p38 MAPK, and NF-kappaB decreased rotavirus infection by at least 40%. PGE2 counteracted the effect of the COX and PKA inhibitors but not of the MEK, p38 MAPK, and NF-kappaB inhibitors. Conclusively, COXs and PGE2 are important mediators of rotavirus infection at a postbinding step. The ERK1/2 pathway mediated by PKA is involved in COX induction by rotavirus infection. MAPK and NF-kappaB pathways are involved in rotavirus infection but in a PGE2-independent manner. This report offers new perspectives in the search for therapeutic agents in treatment of severe rotavirus-mediated diarrhea in children.

  10. Antigenic Properties of the HIV Envelope on Virions in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Mengistu, Meron; Lewis, George K.; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2014-01-01

    The structural flexibility found in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope glycoproteins creates a complex relationship between antigenicity and sensitivity to antiviral antibodies. The study of this issue in the context of viral particles is particularly problematic as conventional virus capture approaches can perturb antigenicity profiles. Here, we employed a unique analytical system based on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), which measures antibody-virion binding with all reactants continuously in solution. Panels of nine anti-envelope monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and five virus types were used to connect antibody binding profiles with neutralizing activities. Anti-gp120 MAbs against the 2G12 or b12 epitope, which marks functional envelope structures, neutralized viruses expressing CCR5-tropic envelopes and exhibited efficient virion binding in solution. MAbs against CD4-induced (CD4i) epitopes considered hidden on functional envelope structures poorly bound these viruses and were not neutralizing. Anti-gp41 MAb 2F5 was neutralizing despite limited virion binding. Similar antigenicity patterns occurred on CXCR4-tropic viruses, except that anti-CD4i MAbs 17b and 19e were neutralizing despite little or no virion binding. Notably, anti-gp120 MAb PG9 and anti-gp41 MAb F240 bound to both CCR5-tropic and CXCR4-tropic viruses without exerting neutralizing activity. Differences in the virus production system altered the binding efficiencies of some antibodies but did not enhance antigenicity of aberrant gp120 structures. Of all viruses tested, only JRFL pseudoviruses showed a direct relationship between MAb binding efficiency and neutralizing potency. Collectively, these data indicate that the antigenic profiles of free HIV particles generally favor the exposure of functional over aberrant gp120 structures. However, the efficiency of virion-antibody interactions in solution inconsistently predicts neutralizing activity in vitro. PMID:24284318

  11. Variola and Monkeypox Viruses Utilize Conserved Mechanisms of Virion Motility and Release That Depend on Abl and Src Family Tyrosine Kinases▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Patrick M.; Smith, Scott K.; Olson, Victoria A.; Thorne, Steve H.; Bornmann, William; Damon, Inger K.; Kalman, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VacV) enters mammalian cells, replicates extranuclearly, and produces virions that move to the cell surface along microtubules, fuse with the plasma membrane, and move from infected cells toward apposing cells on actin-filled membranous protrusions or actin tails. To form actin tails, cell-associated enveloped virions (CEV) require Abl and Src family tyrosine kinases. Furthermore, release of CEV from the cell requires Abl but not Src family tyrosine kinases and is blocked by imatinib mesylate (STI-571; Gleevec), an Abl family kinase inhibitor used to treat chronic myelogenous leukemia in humans. Here we demonstrate that the Poxviridae family members monkeypox virus (MPX) and variola virus (VarV) use conserved mechanisms for actin motility and extracellular enveloped virion (EEV) release. Furthermore, we show that imatinib mesylate is effective in a mouse model of infection with VacV, whether delivered prophylactically or postinfection, and restricts spread of virions from the site of inoculation. While inhibitors of both Src and Abl family kinases, such as dasatinib (BMS-354825; Sprycel), are effective in limiting dissemination of VacV, VarV, and MPX in vitro, members of this class of drugs appear to have immunosuppressive effects in vivo that preclude their use as anti-infectives. Together, these data suggest a possible utility for imatinib mesylate in treating smallpox or MPX infections or complications associated with vaccination. PMID:20962097

  12. Life-shortening Wolbachia infection reduces population growth of Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Suh, Eunho; Mercer, David R; Dobson, Stephen L

    2017-08-01

    Wolbachia bacteria are being introduced into natural populations of vector mosquitoes, with the goal of reducing the transmission of human diseases such as Zika and dengue fever. The successful establishment of Wolbachia infection is largely dependent on the effects of Wolbachia infection to host fitness, but the effects of Wolbachia infection on the individual life-history traits of immature mosquitoes can vary. Here, the effects of life-shortening Wolbachia (wMelPop) on population growth of infected individuals were evaluated by measuring larval survival, developmental time and adult size of Aedes aegypti in intra- (infected or uninfected only) and inter-group (mixed with infected and uninfected) larval competition assays. At low larval density conditions, the population growth of wMelPop infected and uninfected individuals was similar. At high larval densities, wMelPop infected individuals had a significantly reduced population growth rate relative to uninfected individuals, regardless of competition type. We discuss the results in relation to the invasion of the wMelPop Wolbachia infection into naturally uninfected populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Copper treatment during storage reduces Phytophthora and Halophytophthora infection of Zostera marina seeds used for restoration.

    PubMed

    Govers, Laura L; van der Zee, Els M; Meffert, Johan P; van Rijswick, Patricia C J; Man In 't Veld, Willem A; Heusinkveld, Jannes H T; van der Heide, Tjisse

    2017-02-22

    Restoration is increasingly considered an essential tool to halt and reverse the rapid decline of vital coastal ecosystems dominated by habitat-forming foundation species such as seagrasses. However, two recently discovered pathogens of marine plants, Phytophthora gemini and Halophytophthora sp. Zostera, can seriously hamper restoration efforts by dramatically reducing seed germination. Here, we report on a novel method that strongly reduces Phytophthora and Halophytophthora infection of eelgrass (Zostera marina) seeds. Seeds were stored in seawater with three different copper sulphate concentrations (0.0, 0.2, 2.0 ppm) crossed with three salinities (0.5, 10.0, 25.0 ppt). Next to reducing seed germination, infection significantly affected cotyledon colour: 90% of the germinated infected seeds displayed a brown cotyledon upon germination that did not continue development into the seedling stage, in contrast to only 13% of the germinated non-infected seeds. Copper successfully reduced infection up to 86% and the 0.2 ppm copper sulphate treatment was just as successful as the 2.0 ppm treatment. Infection was completely eliminated at low salinities, but green seed germination was also dramatically lowered by 10 times. We conclude that copper sulphate treatment is a suitable treatment for disinfecting Phytophthora or Halophytophthora infected eelgrass seeds, thereby potentially enhancing seed-based restoration success.

  14. Copper treatment during storage reduces Phytophthora and Halophytophthora infection of Zostera marina seeds used for restoration

    PubMed Central

    Govers, Laura L.; van der Zee, Els M.; Meffert, Johan P.; van Rijswick, Patricia C. J.; Man in ‘t Veld, Willem A.; Heusinkveld, Jannes H. T.; van der Heide, Tjisse

    2017-01-01

    Restoration is increasingly considered an essential tool to halt and reverse the rapid decline of vital coastal ecosystems dominated by habitat-forming foundation species such as seagrasses. However, two recently discovered pathogens of marine plants, Phytophthora gemini and Halophytophthora sp. Zostera, can seriously hamper restoration efforts by dramatically reducing seed germination. Here, we report on a novel method that strongly reduces Phytophthora and Halophytophthora infection of eelgrass (Zostera marina) seeds. Seeds were stored in seawater with three different copper sulphate concentrations (0.0, 0.2, 2.0 ppm) crossed with three salinities (0.5, 10.0, 25.0 ppt). Next to reducing seed germination, infection significantly affected cotyledon colour: 90% of the germinated infected seeds displayed a brown cotyledon upon germination that did not continue development into the seedling stage, in contrast to only 13% of the germinated non-infected seeds. Copper successfully reduced infection up to 86% and the 0.2 ppm copper sulphate treatment was just as successful as the 2.0 ppm treatment. Infection was completely eliminated at low salinities, but green seed germination was also dramatically lowered by 10 times. We conclude that copper sulphate treatment is a suitable treatment for disinfecting Phytophthora or Halophytophthora infected eelgrass seeds, thereby potentially enhancing seed-based restoration success. PMID:28225072

  15. Envelope protein requirements for the assembly of infectious virions of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Wissink, E H J; Kroese, M V; van Wijk, H A R; Rijsewijk, F A M; Meulenberg, J J M; Rottier, P J M

    2005-10-01

    Virions of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) contain six membrane proteins: the major proteins GP5 and M and the minor proteins GP2a, E, GP3, and GP4. Here, we studied the envelope protein requirements for PRRSV particle formation and infectivity using full-length cDNA clones in which the genes encoding the membrane proteins were disrupted by site-directed mutagenesis. By transfection of RNAs transcribed from these cDNAs into BHK-21 cells and analysis of the culture medium using ultracentrifugation, radioimmunoprecipitation, and real-time reverse transcription-PCR, we observed that the production of viral particles is dependent on both major envelope proteins; no particles were released when either the GP5 or the M protein was absent. In contrast, particle production was not dependent on the minor envelope proteins. Remarkably, in the absence of any one of the latter proteins, the incorporation of all other minor envelope proteins was affected, indicating that these proteins interact with each other and are assembled into virions as a multimeric complex. Independent evidence for such complexes was obtained by coexpression of the minor envelope proteins in BHK-21 cells using a Semliki Forest virus expression system. By analyzing the maturation of their N-linked oligosaccharides, we found that the glycoproteins were each retained in the endoplasmic reticulum unless expressed together, in which case they were collectively transported through the Golgi complex to the plasma membrane and were even detected in the extracellular medium. As the PRRSV particles lacking the minor envelope proteins are not infectious, we hypothesize that the virion surface structures formed by these proteins function in viral entry by mediating receptor binding and/or virus-cell fusion.

  16. A viable simian virus 40 variant with a deletion in the overlapping genes for virion proteins VP1, VP2 and VP3.

    PubMed

    Norkin, L C; Piatak, M

    1982-12-01

    Nucleotide sequence analysis was used to determine the exact location of a deletion in the late region of the SP2 mutant of simian virus 40 (SV40), a viable small-plaque variant isolated from a persistent infection of rhesus monkey kidney cells. The results indicate that six base pairs are deleted from that part of the SV40 genome in which the coding regions for the three virion proteins, VP1, VP2 and VP3, overlap. This implies that all three virion proteins are affected by the deletion. This finding is discussed with respect to the viability of SP2.

  17. Antigenic Properties of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Envelope Glycoprotein Gp120 on Virions Bound to Target Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mengistu, Meron; Ray, Krishanu; Lewis, George K.; DeVico, Anthony L.

    2015-01-01

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, undergoes multiple molecular interactions and structural rearrangements during the course of host cell attachment and viral entry, which are being increasingly defined at the atomic level using isolated proteins. In comparison, antigenic markers of these dynamic changes are essentially unknown for single HIV-1 particles bound to target cells. Such markers should indicate how neutralizing and/or non-neutralizing antibodies might interdict infection by either blocking infection or sensitizing host cells for elimination by Fc-mediated effector function. Here we address this deficit by imaging fluorescently labeled CCR5-tropic HIV-1 pseudoviruses using confocal and superresolution microscopy to track the exposure of neutralizing and non-neutralizing epitopes as they appear on single HIV-1 particles bound to target cells. Epitope exposure was followed under conditions permissive or non-permissive for viral entry to delimit changes associated with virion binding from those associated with post-attachment events. We find that a previously unexpected array of gp120 epitopes is exposed rapidly upon target cell binding. This array comprises both neutralizing and non-neutralizing epitopes, the latter being hidden on free virions yet capable of serving as potent targets for Fc-mediated effector function. Under non-permissive conditions for viral entry, both neutralizing and non-neutralizing epitope exposures were relatively static over time for the majority of bound virions. Under entry-permissive conditions, epitope exposure patterns changed over time on subsets of virions that exhibited concurrent variations in virion contents. These studies reveal that bound virions are distinguished by a broad array of both neutralizing and non-neutralizing gp120 epitopes that potentially sensitize a freshly engaged target cell for destruction by Fc-mediated effector function and/or for direct neutralization at a post-binding step. The elucidation of

  18. Similar uptake but different trafficking and escape routes of reovirus virions and infectious subvirion particles imaged in polarized Madin–Darby canine kidney cells

    PubMed Central

    Boulant, Steeve; Stanifer, Megan; Kural, Comert; Cureton, David K.; Massol, Ramiro; Nibert, Max L.; Kirchhausen, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Polarized epithelial cells that line the digestive, respiratory, and genitourinary tracts form a barrier that many viruses must breach to infect their hosts. Current understanding of cell entry by mammalian reovirus (MRV) virions and infectious subvirion particles (ISVPs), generated from MRV virions by extracellular proteolysis in the digestive tract, are mostly derived from in vitro studies with nonpolarized cells. Recent live-cell imaging advances allow us for the first time to visualize events at the apical surface of polarized cells. In this study, we used spinning-disk confocal fluorescence microscopy with high temporal and spatial resolution to follow the uptake and trafficking dynamics of single MRV virions and ISVPs at the apical surface of live polarized Madin–Darby canine kidney cells. Both types of particles were internalized by clathrin-mediated endocytosis, but virions and ISVPs exhibited strikingly different trafficking after uptake. While virions reached early and late endosomes, ISVPs did not and instead escaped the endocytic pathway from an earlier location. This study highlights the broad advantages of using live-cell imaging combined with single-particle tracking for identifying key steps in cell entry by viruses. PMID:23427267

  19. An Ensemble Method to Distinguish Bacteriophage Virion from Non-Virion Proteins Based on Protein Sequence Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lina; Zhang, Chengjin; Gao, Rui; Yang, Runtao

    2015-09-09

    Bacteriophage virion proteins and non-virion proteins have distinct functions in biological processes, such as specificity determination for host bacteria, bacteriophage replication and transcription. Accurate identification of bacteriophage virion proteins from bacteriophage protein sequences is significant to understand the complex virulence mechanism in host bacteria and the influence of bacteriophages on the development of antibacterial drugs. In this study, an ensemble method for bacteriophage virion protein prediction from bacteriophage protein sequences is put forward with hybrid feature spaces incorporating CTD (composition, transition and distribution), bi-profile Bayes, PseAAC (pseudo-amino acid composition) and PSSM (position-specific scoring matrix). When performing on the training dataset 10-fold cross-validation, the presented method achieves a satisfactory prediction result with a sensitivity of 0.870, a specificity of 0.830, an accuracy of 0.850 and Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.701, respectively. To evaluate the prediction performance objectively, an independent testing dataset is used to evaluate the proposed method. Encouragingly, our proposed method performs better than previous studies with a sensitivity of 0.853, a specificity of 0.815, an accuracy of 0.831 and MCC of 0.662 on the independent testing dataset. These results suggest that the proposed method can be a potential candidate for bacteriophage virion protein prediction, which may provide a useful tool to find novel antibacterial drugs and to understand the relationship between bacteriophage and host bacteria. For the convenience of the vast majority of experimental Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2015, 16,21735 scientists, a user-friendly and publicly-accessible web-server for the proposed ensemble method is established.

  20. An Ensemble Method to Distinguish Bacteriophage Virion from Non-Virion Proteins Based on Protein Sequence Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lina; Zhang, Chengjin; Gao, Rui; Yang, Runtao

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophage virion proteins and non-virion proteins have distinct functions in biological processes, such as specificity determination for host bacteria, bacteriophage replication and transcription. Accurate identification of bacteriophage virion proteins from bacteriophage protein sequences is significant to understand the complex virulence mechanism in host bacteria and the influence of bacteriophages on the development of antibacterial drugs. In this study, an ensemble method for bacteriophage virion protein prediction from bacteriophage protein sequences is put forward with hybrid feature spaces incorporating CTD (composition, transition and distribution), bi-profile Bayes, PseAAC (pseudo-amino acid composition) and PSSM (position-specific scoring matrix). When performing on the training dataset 10-fold cross-validation, the presented method achieves a satisfactory prediction result with a sensitivity of 0.870, a specificity of 0.830, an accuracy of 0.850 and Matthew’s correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.701, respectively. To evaluate the prediction performance objectively, an independent testing dataset is used to evaluate the proposed method. Encouragingly, our proposed method performs better than previous studies with a sensitivity of 0.853, a specificity of 0.815, an accuracy of 0.831 and MCC of 0.662 on the independent testing dataset. These results suggest that the proposed method can be a potential candidate for bacteriophage virion protein prediction, which may provide a useful tool to find novel antibacterial drugs and to understand the relationship between bacteriophage and host bacteria. For the convenience of the vast majority of experimental scientists, a user-friendly and publicly-accessible web-server for the proposed ensemble method is established. PMID:26370987

  1. Effectiveness and cost of failure mode and effects analysis methodology to reduce neurosurgical site infections.

    PubMed

    Hover, Alexander R; Sistrunk, William W; Cavagnol, Robert M; Scarrow, Alan; Finley, Phillip J; Kroencke, Audrey D; Walker, Judith L

    2014-01-01

    Mercy Hospital Springfield is a tertiary care facility with 32 000 discharges and 15 000 inpatient surgeries in 2011. From June 2009 through January 2011, a stable inpatient elective neurosurgery infection rate of 2.15% was observed. The failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) methodology to reduce inpatient neurosurgery infections was utilized. Following FMEA implementation, overall elective neurosurgery infection rates were reduced to 1.51% and sustained through May 2012. Compared with baseline, the post-FMEA deep-space and organ infection rate was reduced by 41% (P = .052). Overall hospital inpatient clean surgery infection rates for the same time frame did not decrease to the same extent, suggesting a specific effect of the FMEA. The study team believes that the FMEA interventions resulted in 14 fewer expected infections, $270 270 in savings, a 168-day reduction in expected length of stay, and 22 fewer readmissions. Given the serious morbidity and cost of health care-associated infections, the study team concludes that FMEA implementation was clinically cost-effective. © 2013 by the American College of Medical Quality.

  2. Functional Hierarchy of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Viral Glycoproteins in Cytoplasmic Virion Envelopment and Egress

    PubMed Central

    Chouljenko, Dmitry V.; Kim, In-Joong; Chouljenko, Vladimir N.; Subramanian, Ramesh; Walker, Jason D.

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) viral glycoproteins gD (carboxyl terminus), gE, gK, and gM, the membrane protein UL20, and membrane-associated protein UL11 play important roles in cytoplasmic virion envelopment and egress from infected cells. We showed previously that a recombinant virus carrying a deletion of the carboxyl-terminal 29 amino acids of gD (gDΔct) and the entire gE gene (ΔgE) did not exhibit substantial defects in cytoplasmic virion envelopment and egress (H. C. Lee et al., J. Virol. 83:6115–6124, 2009). The recombinant virus ΔgM2, engineered not to express gM, produced a 3- to 4-fold decrease in viral titers and a 50% reduction in average plaque sizes in comparison to the HSV-1(F) parental virus. The recombinant virus containing all three mutations, gDΔct-ΔgM2-ΔgE, replicated approximately 1 log unit less efficiently than the HSV-1(F) parental virus and produced viral plaques which were on average one-third the size of those of HSV-1(F). The recombinant virus ΔUL11-ΔgM2, engineered not to express either UL11 or gM, replicated more than 1 log unit less efficiently and produced significantly smaller plaques than UL11-null or gM-null viruses alone, in agreement with the results of Leege et al. (T. Leege et al., J. Virol. 83:896-907, 2009). Analyses of particle-to-PFU ratios, relative plaque size, and kinetics of virus growth and ultrastructural visualization of glycoprotein-deficient mutant and wild-type virions indicate that gDΔct, gE, and gM function in a cooperative but not redundant manner in infectious virion morphogenesis. Overall, comparisons of single, double, and triple mutant viruses generated in the same HSV-1(F) genetic background indicated that lack of either UL20 or gK expression caused the most severe defects in cytoplasmic envelopment, egress, and infectious virus production, followed by the double deletion of UL11 and gM. PMID:22318149

  3. A standardized protocol to reduce pediatric spine surgery infection: a quality improvement initiative.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Sheila L; Sen, Anish; Staggers, Kristen; Luerssen, Thomas G; Jea, Andrew

    2014-09-01

    Quality improvement methods are being implemented in various areas of medicine. In an effort to reduce the complex (instrumented) spine infection rate in pediatric patients, a standardized protocol was developed and implemented at an institution with a high case volume of instrumented spine fusion procedures in the pediatric age group. Members of the Texas Children's Hospital Spine Study Group developed the protocol incrementally by using the current literature and prior institutional experience until consensus was obtained. The protocol was prospectively applied to all children undergoing complex spine surgery starting August 21, 2012. Acute infections were defined as positive wound cultures within 12 weeks of surgery, defined in alignment with current hospital infection control criteria. Procedures and infections were measured before and after protocol implementation. This protocol received full review and approval of the Baylor College of Medicine institutional review board. Nine spine surgeons performed 267 procedures between August 21, 2012, and September 30, 2013. The minimum follow-up was 12 weeks. The annual institutional infection rate prior to the protocol (2007-2011) ranged from 3.4% to 8.9%, with an average of 5.8%. After introducing the protocol, the infection rate decreased to 2.2% (6 infections of 267 cases) (p = 0.0362; absolute risk reduction 3.6%; relative risk 0.41 [95% CI 0.18-0.94]). Overall compliance with data form completion was 63.7%. In 4 of the 6 cases of infection, noncompliance with completion of the data collection form was documented; moreover, 2 of the 4 spine surgeons whose patients experienced infections had the lowest compliance rates in the study group. The standardized protocol for complex spine surgery significantly reduced surgical site infection at the authors' institution. The overall compliance with entry into the protocol was good. Identification of factors associated with post-spine surgery wound infection will allow

  4. Herpes Simplex Virus 2 Virion Host Shutoff Endoribonuclease Activity Is Required To Disrupt Stress Granule Formation

    PubMed Central

    Finnen, Renée L.; Zhu, Mingzhao; Li, Jing; Romo, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We previously established that cells infected with herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) are disrupted in their ability to form stress granules (SGs) in response to oxidative stress and that this disruption is mediated by virion host shutoff protein (vhs), a virion-associated endoribonuclease. Here, we test the requirement for vhs endoribonuclease activity in disruption of SG formation. We analyzed the ability of HSV-2 vhs carrying the point mutation D215N, which ablates its endoribonuclease activity, to disrupt SG formation in both transfected and infected cells. We present evidence that ablation of vhs endoribonuclease activity results in defects in vhs-mediated disruption of SG formation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that preformed SGs can be disassembled by HSV-2 infection in a manner that requires vhs endoribonuclease activity and that, befitting this ability to promote SG disassembly, vhs is able to localize to SGs. Together these data indicate that endoribonuclease activity must be maintained in order for vhs to disrupt SG formation. We propose a model whereby vhs-mediated destruction of SG mRNA promotes SG disassembly and may also prevent SG assembly. IMPORTANCE Stress granules (SGs) are transient cytoplasmic structures that form when a cell is exposed to stress. SGs are emerging as potential barriers to viral infection, necessitating a more thorough understanding of their basic biology. We identified virion host shutoff protein (vhs) as a herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) protein capable of disrupting SG formation. As mRNA is a central component of SGs and the best-characterized activity of vhs is as an endoribonuclease specific for mRNA in vivo, we investigated the requirement for vhs endoribonuclease activity in disruption of SG formation. Our studies demonstrate that endoribonuclease activity is required for vhs to disrupt SG formation and, more specifically, that SG disassembly can be driven by vhs endoribonuclease activity. Notably, during the course of

  5. Reovirus intermediate subviral particles constitute a strategy to infect intestinal epithelial cells by exploiting TGF-β dependent pro-survival signaling.

    PubMed

    Stanifer, Megan L; Rippert, Anja; Kazakov, Alexander; Willemsen, Joschka; Bucher, Delia; Bender, Silke; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Binder, Marco; Boulant, Steeve

    2016-12-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) constitute the primary barrier that separates us from the outside environment. These cells, lining the surface of the intestinal tract, represent a major challenge that enteric pathogens have to face. How IECs respond to viral infection and whether enteric viruses have developed strategies to subvert IECs innate immune response remains poorly characterized. Using mammalian reovirus (MRV) as a model enteric virus, we found that the intermediate subviral particles (ISVPs), which are formed in the gut during the natural course of infection by proteolytic digestion of the reovirus virion, trigger reduced innate antiviral immune response in IECs. On the contrary, infection of IECs by virions induces a strong antiviral immune response that leads to cellular death. Additionally, we determined that virions can be sensed by both TLR and RLR pathways while ISVPs are sensed by RLR pathways only. Interestingly, we found that ISVP infected cells secrete TGF-β acting as a pro-survival factor that protects IECs against virion induced cellular death. We propose that ISVPs represent a reovirus strategy to initiate primary infection of the gut by subverting IECs innate immune system and by counteracting cellular-death pathways. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Perioperative high inspired oxygen fraction therapy reduces surgical site infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in rats.

    PubMed

    Kroin, Jeffrey S; Li, Jinyuan; Goldufsky, Josef W; Gupta, Kajal H; Moghtaderi, Masoomeh; Buvanendran, Asokumar; Shafikhani, Sasha H

    2016-08-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) remains one of the most important causes of healthcare-associated infections, accounting for ~17 % of all hospital-acquired infections. Although short-term perioperative treatment with high fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) has shown clinical benefits in reducing SSI in colorectal resection surgeries, the true clinical benefits of FiO2 therapy in reducing SSI remain unclear because randomized controlled trials on this topic have yielded disparate results and inconsistent conclusions. To date, no animal study has been conducted to determine the efficacy of short-term perioperative treatments with high (FiO2>60 %) versus low (FiO2<40 %) oxygen in reducing SSI. In this report, we designed a rat model for muscle surgery to compare the effectiveness of short-term perioperative treatments with high (FiO2=80 %) versus a standard low (FiO2=30 %) oxygen in reducing SSI with Pseudomonas aeruginosa - one of the most prevalent Gram-negative pathogens, responsible for nosocomial SSIs. Our data demonstrate that 5 h perioperative treatment with 80 % FiO2 is significantly more effective in reducing SSI with P. aeruginosa compared to 30 % FiO2 treatment. We further show that whilst 80 % FiO2 treatment does not affect neutrophil infiltration into P. aeruginosa-infected muscles, neutrophils in the 80 % FiO2-treated and infected animal group are significantly more activated than neutrophils in the 30 % FiO2-treated and infected animal group, suggesting that high oxygen perioperative treatment reduces SSI with P. aeruginosa by enhancing neutrophil activation in infected wounds.

  7. Reducing the risk of infection associated with vascular access devices through nanotechnology: a perspective

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Keogh, Samantha; Rickard, Claire M

    2013-01-01

    Intravascular catheter-related infections are still a major problem in health care and are associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and additional cost. The formation of microbial biofilm on catheters makes these infections particularly complicated, as microbial cells that detach from the biofilm can lead to infection, and because these microorganisms are highly resistant to many antimicrobial agents; thus, catheter removal is often required to successfully treat infection. To reduce the risks of catheter-related infections, many strategies have been applied, such as improvements in aseptic insertion and post-insertion care practices, implantation techniques, and antibiotic coated or impregnated materials. However, despite significant advances in using these methods, it has not been possible to completely eradicate biofilm infections. Currently, nanotechnology approaches seem to be among the most promising for preventing biofilm formation and resultant catheter-related bloodstream infection (especially with multi-resistant bacterial strains). In this review, current knowledge about catheter technology and design, the mechanisms of catheter-related bloodstream infection, and the insertion and care practices performed by medical staff, are discussed, along with novel, achievable approaches to infection prevention, based on nanotechnology. PMID:24293997

  8. Orsay virus utilizes ribosomal frameshifting to express a novel protein that is incorporated into virions

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Hongbing; Franz, Carl J.; Wu, Guang; Renshaw, Hilary; Zhao, Guoyan; Firth, Andrew E.; Wang, David

    2014-02-15

    Orsay virus is the first identified virus that is capable of naturally infecting Caenorhabditis elegans. Although it is most closely related to nodaviruses, Orsay virus differs from nodaviruses in its genome organization. In particular, the Orsay virus RNA2 segment encodes a putative novel protein of unknown function, termed delta, which is absent from all known nodaviruses. Here we present evidence that Orsay virus utilizes a ribosomal frameshifting strategy to express a novel fusion protein from the viral capsid (alpha) and delta ORFs. Moreover, the fusion protein was detected in purified virus fractions, demonstrating that it is most likely incorporated into Orsay virions. Furthermore, N-terminal sequencing of both the fusion protein and the capsid protein demonstrated that these proteins must be translated from a non-canonical initiation site. While the function of the alpha–delta fusion remains cryptic, these studies provide novel insights into the fundamental properties of this new clade of viruses. - Highlights: • Orsay virus encodes a novel fusion protein by a ribosomal frameshifting mechanism. • Orsay capsid and fusion protein is translated from a non-canonical initiation site. • The fusion protein is likely incorporated into Orsay virions.

  9. Immunogenicity studies of bivalent inactivated virions of EV71/CVA16 formulated with submicron emulsion systems.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Wei; Liu, Chia-Chyi; Lu, Tsung-Chun; Liu, Shih-Jen; Chow, Yen-Hung; Chong, Pele; Huang, Ming-Hsi

    2014-01-01

    We assessed two strategies for preparing candidate vaccines against hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) caused mainly by infections of enterovirus (EV) 71 and coxsackievirus (CV) A16. We firstly design and optimize the potency of adjuvant combinations of emulsion-based delivery systems, using EV71 candidate vaccine as a model. We then perform immunogenicity studies in mice of EV71/CVA16 antigen combinations formulated with PELC/CpG. A single dose of inactivated EV71 virion (0.2 μg) emulsified in submicron particles was found (i) to induce potent antigen-specific neutralizing antibody responses and (ii) consistently to elicit broad antibody responses against EV71 neutralization epitopes. A single dose immunogenicity study of bivalent activated EV71/CVA16 virion formulated with either Alum or PELC/CpG adjuvant showed that CVA16 antigen failed to elicit CVA16 neutralizing antibody responses and did not affect EV71-specific neutralizing antibody responses. A boosting dose of emulsified EV71/CVA16 bivalent vaccine candidate was found to be necessary to achieve high seroconversion of CVA16-specific neutralizing antibody responses. The current results are important for the design and development of prophylactic vaccines against HFMD and other emerging infectious diseases.

  10. Hypothesis: Impregnated school uniforms reduce the incidence of dengue infections in school children.

    PubMed

    Wilder-Smith, A; Lover, A; Kittayapong, P; Burnham, G

    2011-06-01

    Dengue infection causes a significant economic, social and medical burden in affected populations in over 100 countries in the tropics and sub-tropics. Current dengue control efforts have generally focused on vector control but have not shown major impact. School-aged children are especially vulnerable to infection, due to sustained human-vector-human transmission in the close proximity environments of schools. Infection in children has a higher rate of complications, including dengue hemorrhagic fever and shock syndromes, than infections in adults. There is an urgent need for integrated and complementary population-based strategies to protect vulnerable children. We hypothesize that insecticide-treated school uniforms will reduce the incidence of dengue in school-aged children. The hypothesis would need to be tested in a community based randomized trial. If proven to be true, insecticide-treated school uniforms would be a cost-effective and scalable community based strategy to reduce the burden of dengue in children.

  11. Capacity for Infectious HIV-1 Virion Capture Differs by Envelope Antibody Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pinghuang; Williams, LaTonya D.; Shen, Xiaoying; Bonsignori, Mattia; Vandergrift, Nathan A.; Overman, R. Glenn; Moody, M. Anthony; Liao, Hua-Xin; Stieh, Daniel J.; McCotter, Kerrie L.; French, Audrey L.; Hope, Thomas J.; Shattock, Robin; Haynes, Barton F.

    2014-01-01

    Antibody capacity to recognize infectious virus is a prerequisite of many antiviral functions. We determined the infectious virion capture index (IVCI) of different antibody specificities. Whereas broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs), except for an MPER bNAb, selectively captured infectious virions, non-bNAbs and mucosal human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-positive IgG captured subsets of both infectious and noninfectious virions. Infectious virion capture was additive with a mixture of antibodies, providing proof of concept for vaccine-induced antibodies that together have improved capacity to recognize infectious virions. PMID:24554654

  12. Antibiotic and Antiinflammatory Therapy Transiently Reduces Inflammation and Hypercoagulation in Acutely SIV-Infected Pigtailed Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Pandrea, Ivona; Xu, Cuiling; Stock, Jennifer L.; Frank, Daniel N.; Ma, Dongzhu; Policicchio, Benjamin B.; He, Tianyu; Kristoff, Jan; Cornell, Elaine; Haret-Richter, George S.; Trichel, Anita; Ribeiro, Ruy M.; Tracy, Russell; Wilson, Cara; Landay, Alan L.; Apetrei, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    Increased chronic immune activation and inflammation are hallmarks of HIV/SIV infection and are highly correlated with progression to AIDS and development of non-AIDS comorbidities, such as hypercoagulability and cardiovascular disease. Intestinal dysfunction resulting in microbial translocation has been proposed as a lead cause of systemic immune activation and hypercoagulability in HIV/SIV infection. Our goal was to assess the biological and clinical impact of a therapeutic strategy designed to reduce microbial translocation through reduction of the microbial content of the intestine (Rifaximin-RFX) and of gut inflammation (Sulfasalazine-SFZ). RFX is an intraluminal antibiotic that was successfully used in patients with hepatic encephalopathy. SFZ is an antiinflammatory drug successfully used in patients with mild to moderate inflammatory bowel disease. Both these clinical conditions are associated with increased microbial translocation, similar to HIV-infected patients. Treatment was administered for 90 days to five acutely SIV-infected pigtailed macaques (PTMs) starting at the time of infection; seven untreated SIVsab-infected PTMs were used as controls. RFX+SFZ were also administered for 90 days to three chronically SIVsab-infected PTMs. RFX+SFZ administration during acute SIVsab infection of PTMs resulted in: significantly lower microbial translocation, lower systemic immune activation, lower viral replication, better preservation of mucosal CD4+ T cells and significantly lower levels of hypercoagulation biomarkers. This effect was clear during the first 40 days of treatment and was lost during the last stages of treatment. Administration of RFX+SFZ to chronically SIVsab–infected PTMs had no discernible effect on infection. Our data thus indicate that early RFX+SFZ administration transiently improves the natural history of acute and postacute SIV infection, but has no effect during chronic infection. PMID:26764484

  13. Human Toxoplasma gondii-specific secretory immunoglobulin A reduces T. gondii infection of enterocytes in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Mack, D G; McLeod, R

    1992-01-01

    Whey from 17 women (four acutely infected with Toxoplasma gondii, eight chronically infected, and five uninfected) was studied. T. gondii-specific secretory IgA antibodies were demonstrated by ELISA in whey from acutely infected and one of eight chronically infected women. Such antibodies to tachyzoite proteins of < or = 14, 22, 26-28, 30, 46, 60, 70-80, and > 100 kD (eliminated by protease but not periodate or neuraminidase treatment) were demonstrated in whey from acutely infected subjects when Western blots were probed with their whey and antibodies to human secretory IgA or IgA or secretory piece. Secretory IgA from four of eight chronically infected women recognized the 46- and 69-kD epitopes. Other whey samples were negative. Incubation of T. gondii tachyzoites with whey or purified secretory IgA from acutely infected (but not seronegative) women caused 50-75% reduction in infection of enterocytes in vitro. Whey reactive with the 46-kD epitope from three of six chronically infected women caused less (> or = 40%) inhibition. Whey and purified secretory IgA from two of three acutely infected women agglutinated tachyzoites. Whey did not result in complement-dependent lysis of T. gondii. These results indicate that it may be possible to produce human secretory IgA to T. gondii capable of reducing initial infection of enterocytes, as such IgA is present during natural infection. They also demonstrate candidate epitopes for such protection. Images PMID:1469104

  14. US probes: risk of cross infection and ways to reduce it--comparison of cleaning methods.

    PubMed

    Fowler, C; McCracken, D

    1999-10-01

    After their use at ultrasonography (US) in the intensive therapy unit, probes were used to directly inoculate blood agar plates before and after various cleaning procedures. The uncleaned probes transmitted large numbers of clinically important microbes. Simple cleaning methods were effective in reducing transmission among certain patients: fit patients, double paper wipe; patients at risk of contracting infection, single paper wipe followed by alcohol wipe; patients with a potential source of infection, single paper wipe followed by alcohol wipe.

  15. Does Preadmission Cutaneous Chlorhexidine Preparation Reduce Surgical Site Infections After Total Hip Arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Jauregui, Julio J; Murray, Daniel P; Mont, Michael A

    2016-07-01

    Periprosthetic hip infections are among the most catastrophic complications after total hip arthroplasty (THA). We had previously proven that the use of chlorhexidine cloths before surgery may help decrease these infections; hence, we increased the size of the previously reported cohort. (1) Does a preadmission chlorhexidine cloth skin preparation protocol decrease the risk of surgical site infection in patients undergoing THA? (2) When stratified using the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) risk categories, which categories are associated with risk reduction from the preadmission chlorhexidine preparation protocol? Between 2007 and 2013, a group of 998 patients used chlorhexidine cloths before surgery, whereas a group of 2846 patients did not use them and underwent standard perioperative disinfection only. Patient records were reviewed to determine the development of periprosthetic infection in both groups of patients. Patients without the preoperative chlorhexidine gluconate disinfection protocol had a higher risk of infections (infections with protocol: six of 995 [0.6%]; infections in control: 46 of 2846 [1.62%]; relative risk: 2.68 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.15-0.26]; p = 0.0226). When stratified based on risk category, no differences were detected; preadmission chlorhexidine preparation was not associated with reduced infection risk for low, medium, and high NHSN risk categories (p = 0.386, 0.153, and 0.196, respectively). The results of our study suggest that this cloth application appears to reduce the risk of infection in patients undergoing THA. When stratified by risk categories, we found no difference in the infection rate, but these findings were underpowered. Although future multicenter randomized trials will need to confirm these preliminary findings, the intervention is inexpensive and is unlikely to be risky and so might be considered on the basis of this retrospective, comparative study. Level III, therapeutic study.

  16. Vaccinia virions deficient in transcription enzymes lack a nucleocapsid

    SciTech Connect

    McFadden, Baron D.H.; Moussatche, Nissin; Kelley, Karen; Kang, Byung-Ho; Condit, Richard C.

    2012-12-05

    The poxvirus virion contains an inner tubular nucleocapsid structure. The nucleocapsid is apparently labile to conventional electron microscopy fixation procedures and has therefore been largely ignored for decades. Advancements in electron microscopy sample preparation, notably high pressure freezing, better preserve the nucleocapsid structure. Using high pressure freezing and electron microscopy, we have compared the virion structures of wt virus and mutant viruses known to be deficient in packaging of viral transcription enzymes. We show that the mutant viruses lack a defined nucleocapsid. These results support the hypothesis that the nucleocapsid contains the viral DNA genome complexed with viral transcription enzymes and structural proteins. The studies open the door to further investigation of the composition and ultrastructure of the poxvirus nucleocapsid.

  17. Dermal mast cells reduce progressive tissue necrosis caused by subcutaneous infection with Streptococcus pyogenes in mice.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Hidenori; Sekiya, Yukie; Takahashi, Tetsufumi; Nakamura, Masahiko; Imanishi, Ken'ichi; Yoshida, Haruno; Murayama, Somay Yamagata; Takahashi, Takashi; Tsuchimoto, Kanji; Uchiyama, Takehiko; Ubukata, Kimiko

    2011-01-01

    A single subcutaneous (s.c.) infection with 1×10(7) c.f.u. GAS472, a group A streptococcus (GAS) serotype M1 strain isolated from the blood of a patient suffering from streptococcal toxic shock syndrome, led to severe damage of striated muscle layers in the feet of mast cell (MC)-deficient WBB6F(1)-Kit(W)/Kit(W-v) (W/W(v)) mice 72 h after infection. In contrast, no damage was recognized in striated muscle layers in the feet of the control WBB6F(1)-Kit(+/+) (+/+) mice 72 h after infection. In addition, adoptively transferred MCs reduced progressive tissue necrosis of the feet of W/W(v) mice after infection. However, there was no significant difference in the mortality rates between the W/W(v) and +/+ mice, or between the human CD46-expressing transgenic (Tg) mouse bone marrow-derived cultured MC-reconstituted W/W(v) and non-Tg mouse bone marrow-derived cultured MC-reconstituted W/W(v) mice after infection. Consequently, although MCs can help to reduce the severity of necrosis of the feet caused by s.c. infection with GAS472, such reduction of tissue necrosis scarcely improves the mortality rates of these mice. Moreover, human CD46 does not play a crucial role in the MC-mediated innate immune defence against GAS infection.

  18. PD-1 blockade during chronic SIV infection reduces hyperimmune activation and microbial translocation in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Dyavar Shetty, Ravi; Velu, Vijayakumar; Titanji, Kehmia; Bosinger, Steven E; Freeman, Gordon J; Silvestri, Guido; Amara, Rama Rao

    2012-05-01

    Hyperimmune activation is a strong predictor of disease progression during pathogenic immunodeficiency virus infections and is mediated in part by sustained type I IFN signaling in response to adventitious microbial infection. The immune inhibitory receptor programmed death-1 (PD-1) regulates functional exhaustion of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells during chronic infections, and in vivo PD-1 blockade has been shown to improve viral control of SIV. Here, we show that PD-1 blockade during chronic SIV infection markedly reduced the expression of transcripts associated with type I IFN signaling in the blood and colorectal tissue of rhesus macaques (RMs). The effect of PD-1 blockade on type I IFN signaling was durable and persisted even under conditions of high viremia. Reduced type I IFN signaling was associated with enhanced expression of some of the junction-associated genes in colorectal tissue and with a profound decrease in plasma LPS levels, suggesting a possible repair of gut-associated junctions and decreased microbial translocation into the blood. PD-1 blockade enhanced immunity to gut-resident pathogenic bacteria, control of gut-associated opportunistic infections, and survival of SIV-infected RMs. Our results suggest PD-1 blockade as a potential novel therapeutic approach to enhance combination antiretroviral therapy by suppressing hyperimmune activation in HIV-infected individuals.

  19. A new Hydrocephalus Clinical Research Network protocol to reduce cerebrospinal fluid shunt infection.

    PubMed

    Kestle, John R W; Holubkov, Richard; Douglas Cochrane, D; Kulkarni, Abhaya V; Limbrick, David D; Luerssen, Thomas G; Jerry Oakes, W; Riva-Cambrin, Jay; Rozzelle, Curtis; Simon, Tamara D; Walker, Marion L; Wellons, John C; Browd, Samuel R; Drake, James M; Shannon, Chevis N; Tamber, Mandeep S; Whitehead, William E

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT In a previous report by the same research group (Kestle et al., 2011), compliance with an 11-step protocol was shown to reduce CSF shunt infection at Hydrocephalus Clinical Research Network (HCRN) centers (from 8.7% to 5.7%). Antibiotic-impregnated catheters (AICs) were not part of the protocol but were used off protocol by some surgeons. The authors therefore began using a new protocol that included AICs in an effort to reduce the infection rate further. METHODS The new protocol was implemented at HCRN centers on January 1, 2012, for all shunt procedures (excluding external ventricular drains [EVDs], ventricular reservoirs, and subgaleal shunts). Procedures performed up to September 30, 2013, were included (21 months). Compliance with the protocol and outcome events up to March 30, 2014, were recorded. The definition of infection was unchanged from the authors' previous report. RESULTS A total of 1935 procedures were performed on 1670 patients at 8 HCRN centers. The overall infection rate was 6.0% (95% CI 5.1%-7.2%). Procedure-specific infection rates varied (insertion 5.0%, revision 5.4%, insertion after EVD 8.3%, and insertion after treatment of infection 12.6%). Full compliance with the protocol occurred in 77% of procedures. The infection rate was 5.0% after compliant procedures and 8.7% after noncompliant procedures (p = 0.005). The infection rate when using this new protocol (6.0%, 95% CI 5.1%-7.2%) was similar to the infection rate observed using the authors' old protocol (5.7%, 95% CI 4.6%-7.0%). CONCLUSIONS CSF shunt procedures performed in compliance with a new infection prevention protocol at HCRN centers had a lower infection rate than noncompliant procedures. Implementation of the new protocol (including AICs) was associated with a 6.0% infection rate, similar to the infection rate of 5.7% from the authors' previously reported protocol. Based on the current data, the role of AICs compared with other infection prevention measures is unclear.

  20. Protein Composition of the Vaccinia Virus Mature Virion

    SciTech Connect

    Resch, Wolfgang; Hixson, Kim K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Lipton, Mary S.; Moss, Bernard

    2007-02-05

    The protein content of vaccinia virus mature virions, purified by rate zonal and isopycnic centrifugation and solubilized by SDS or a solution of urea and thiourea, was determined by the accurate mass and time tag technology which uses both tandem mass spectrometry and Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry to detect tryptic peptides separated by high-resolution liquid chromatography. Eighty vaccinia virus-encoded proteins representing 37% of the 218 genes annotated in the complete genome sequence were detected in at least three analyses. Ten proteins accounted for approximately 80% of the mass, while the least abundant proteins made up 1% or less of the mass. Thirteen identified proteins were not previously reported as components of virions. On the other hand, 8 previously described virion proteins were not detected here, presumably due to technical reasons including small size and hydrophobicity. In addition to vaccinia virus-encoded proteins, 24 host proteins omitting isoforms were detected. The most abundant of these were cytoskeletal proteins, heat shock proteins, and proteins involved in translation.

  1. Advance pre-operative chlorhexidine reduces the incidence of surgical site infections in knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Zywiel, Michael G; Daley, Jacqueline A; Delanois, Ronald E; Naziri, Qais; Johnson, Aaron J; Mont, Michael A

    2011-07-01

    Surgical site infections following elective knee arthroplasties occur most commonly as a result of colonisation by the patient's native skin flora. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of deep surgical site infections in knee arthroplasty patients who used an advance cutaneous disinfection protocol and who were compared to patients who had peri-operative preparation only. All adult reconstruction surgeons at a single institution were approached to voluntarily provide patients with chlorhexidine gluconate-impregnated cloths and a printed sheet instructing their use the night before and morning of surgery. Records for all knee arthroplasties performed between January 2007 and December 2008 were reviewed to determine the incidence of deep incisional and periprosthetic surgical site infections. Overall, the advance pre-operative protocol was used in 136 of 912 total knee arthroplasties (15%). A lower incidence of surgical site infection was found in patients who used the advance cutaneous preparation protocol as compared to patients who used the in-hospital protocol alone. These findings were maintained when patients were stratified by surgical infection risk category. No surgical site infections occurred in the 136 patients who completed the protocol as compared to 21 infections in 711 procedures (3.0%) performed in patients who did not. Patient-directed skin disinfection using chlorhexidine gluconate-impregnated cloths the evening before, and the morning of, elective knee arthroplasty appeared to effectively reduce the incidence of surgical site infection when compared to patients who underwent in-hospital skin preparation only.

  2. Triclosan-coated sutures reduce wound infections after spinal surgery: a retrospective, nonrandomized, clinical study.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Masaki; Saito, Wataru; Yamagata, Megumu; Imura, Takayuki; Inoue, Gen; Nakazawa, Toshiyuki; Takahira, Naonobu; Uchida, Kentaro; Fukahori, Nobuko; Shimomura, Kiyomi; Takaso, Masashi

    2015-05-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a serious postoperative complication. The incidence of SSIs is lower in clean orthopedic surgery than in other fields, but it is higher after spinal surgery, reaching 4.15% in high-risk patients. Several studies reported that triclosan-coated polyglactin 910 sutures (Vicryl Plus; Ethicon, Inc., Somerville, NJ, USA) significantly reduced the infection rate in the general surgical, neurosurgical, and thoracic surgical fields. However, there have been no studies on the effects of such coated sutures on the incidence of SSIs in orthopedics. To compare the incidence of wound infections after spinal surgery using triclosan-coated suture materials with that of noncoated ones. A retrospective, nonrandomized, and clinical study. From May 2010 to April 2012, 405 patients underwent a spinal surgical procedure in the Department of Orthopedic Surgery of two university hospitals. The primary outcome was the number of wound infections and dehiscences. Two hundred five patients had a conventional wound closure with polyglactin 910 suture (Vicryl) between May 2010 and April 2011 (Time Period 1 [TP1]), and 200 patients underwent wound closure with triclosan-coated polyglactin 910 suture (Vicryl Plus) between May 2011 and April 2012 (TP2). Statistical comparisons of wound infections, dehiscence, and risk factors for poor wound healing or infection were performed. None of the authors has any conflict of interest associated with this study. There were two cases of wound dehiscence in TP1 and one in TP2 (p=.509). Using noncoated sutures in TP1, eight patients (3.90%) had wound infections, whereas one patient (0.50%) had wound infections in TP2 (using triclosan-coated sutures); the difference was significant (p=.020). The use of triclosan-coated polyglactin 910 sutures instead of polyglactin 910 sutures may reduce the number of wound infections after spinal surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Virion Stability Is Important for the Circulative Transmission of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Sardinia Virus by Bemisia tabaci, but Virion Access to Salivary Glands Does Not Guarantee Transmissibility▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Caciagli, Piero; Medina Piles, Vicente; Marian, Daniele; Vecchiati, Manuela; Masenga, Vera; Mason, Giovanna; Falcioni, Tania; Noris, Emanuela

    2009-01-01

    The capsid protein (CP) of the monopartite begomovirus Tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus (TYLCSV), family Geminiviridae, is indispensable for plant infection and vector transmission. A region between amino acids 129 and 152 is critical for virion assembly and insect transmissibility. Two previously described mutants, one with a double Q129P Q134H mutation (PNHD) and another with a further D152E change (PNHE), were found nontransmissible (NT). Another NT mutant with a single N130D change (QDQD) was retrieved from a new mutational analysis. In this study, these three NT mutants and the wild-type (wt) virus were compared in their relationships with the whitefly vector Bemisia tabaci and the nonvector Trialeurodes vaporariorum. Retention kinetics of NT mutants were analyzed by quantitative dot blot hybridization in whiteflies fed on infected plants. The QDQD mutant, whose virions appeared nongeminate following purification, was hardly detectable in either whitefly species at any sampling time. The PNHD mutant was acquired and circulated in both whitefly species for up to 10 days, like the wt virus, while PNHE circulated in B. tabaci only. Using immunogold labeling, both PNHD and PNHE CPs were detected in B. tabaci salivary glands (SGs) like the wt virus, while no labeling was found in any whitefly tissue with the QDQD mutant. Significant inhibition of transmission of the wt virus was observed after prior feeding of the insects on plants infected with the PNHE mutant, but not on plants infected with the other mutants. Virion stability and ability to cross the SG barrier are necessary for TYLCSV transmission, but interactions with molecular components inside the SGs are also critical for transmissibility. PMID:19321611

  4. Isolation of a herpes simplex virus type 1 mutant with a deletion in the virion host shutoff gene and identification of multiple forms of the vhs (UL41) polypeptide.

    PubMed Central

    Read, G S; Karr, B M; Knight, K

    1993-01-01

    The virion host shutoff (vhs) gene (UL41) of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) encodes a virion component that induces degradation of host mRNAs and the shutoff of most host protein synthesis. Subsequently, the vhs protein accelerates the turnover of all kinetic classes of viral mRNA. To identify the vhs (UL41) polypeptide within infected cells and virions, antisera raised against a UL41-lacZ fusion protein were used to characterize the polypeptides encoded by wild-type HSV-1 and two mutants: vhs1, a previously characterized mutant that lacks detectable virion host shutoff activity, and vhs-delta Sma, a newly constructed mutant containing a deletion of 196 codons from UL41. Two forms of the vhs (UL41) polypeptide were identified in cells infected with the wild-type virus or vhs1. Wild-type HSV-1 produced a major 58-kDa polypeptide, as well as a less abundant 59.5-kDa form of the protein, while vhs1 produced 57- and 59-kDa polypeptides that were approximately equally abundant. Although for either virus, both forms of the protein were phosphorylated, they differed in the extent of phosphorylation. While both vhs polypeptides were found in infected cells, only the faster migrating, less phosphorylated form was incorporated into virions. vhs-delta Sma encoded a smaller, 31-kDa polypeptide which, although present in infected cells, was not incorporated into virions. The results identify multiple forms of the vhs (UL41) polypeptide and suggest that posttranslational processing affects its packaging into virions, as well as its ability to induce mRNA degradation. Images PMID:8230437

  5. Unique region of the minor capsid protein of human parvovirus B19 is exposed on the virion surface.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, S J; Yoshimoto, K; Kajigaya, S; Anderson, S; Young, N S; Field, A; Warrener, P; Bansal, G; Collett, M S

    1992-01-01

    Capsids of the B19 parvovirus are composed of major (VP2; 58 kD) and minor (VP1; 83 kD) structural proteins. These proteins are identical except for a unique 226 amino acid region at the amino terminus of VP1. Previous immunization studies with recombinant empty capsids have demonstrated that the presence of VP1 was required to elicit virus-neutralizing antibody activity. However, to date, neutralizing epitopes have been identified only on VP2. Crystallographic studies of a related parvovirus (canine parvovirus) suggested the unique amino-terminal portion of VP1 assumed an internal position within the viral capsid. To determine the position of VP1 in both empty capsids and virions, we expressed a fusion protein containing the unique region of VP1. Antisera raised to this protein recognized recombinant empty capsids containing VP1 and VP2, but not those containing VP2 alone, in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The antisera immunoprecipitated both recombinant empty capsids and human plasma-derived virions, and agglutinated the latter as shown by immune electron microscopy. The sera contained potent neutralizing activity for virus infectivity in vitro. These data indicate that a portion of the amino terminus of VP1 is located on the virion surface, and that this region contains intrinsic neutralizing determinants. The external location of the VP1-specific tail may provide a site for engineered heterologous epitope presentation in novel recombinant vaccines. Images PMID:1376332

  6. Interactions of peptide triazole thiols with Env gp120 induce irreversible breakdown and inactivation of HIV-1 virions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We examined the underlying mechanism of action of the peptide triazole thiol, KR13 that has been shown previously to specifically bind gp120, block cell receptor site interactions and potently inhibit HIV-1 infectivity. Results KR13, the sulfhydryl blocked KR13b and its parent non-sulfhydryl peptide triazole, HNG156, induced gp120 shedding but only KR13 induced p24 capsid protein release. The resulting virion post virolysis had an altered morphology, contained no gp120, but retained gp41 that bound to neutralizing gp41 antibodies. Remarkably, HIV-1 p24 release by KR13 was inhibited by enfuvirtide, which blocks formation of the gp41 6-helix bundle during membrane fusion, while no inhibition of p24 release occurred for enfuvirtide-resistant virus. KR13 thus appears to induce structural changes in gp41 normally associated with membrane fusion and cell entry. The HIV-1 p24 release induced by KR13 was observed in several clades of HIV-1 as well as in fully infectious HIV-1 virions. Conclusions The antiviral activity of KR13 and its ability to inactivate virions prior to target cell engagement suggest that peptide triazole thiols could be highly effective in inhibiting HIV transmission across mucosal barriers and provide a novel probe to understand biochemical signals within envelope that are involved in membrane fusion. PMID:24330857

  7. Interactions of peptide triazole thiols with Env gp120 induce irreversible breakdown and inactivation of HIV-1 virions.

    PubMed

    Bastian, Arangassery Rosemary; Contarino, Mark; Bailey, Lauren D; Aneja, Rachna; Moreira, Diogo Rodrigo Magalhaes; Freedman, Kevin; McFadden, Karyn; Duffy, Caitlin; Emileh, Ali; Leslie, George; Jacobson, Jeffrey M; Hoxie, James A; Chaiken, Irwin

    2013-12-13

    We examined the underlying mechanism of action of the peptide triazole thiol, KR13 that has been shown previously to specifically bind gp120, block cell receptor site interactions and potently inhibit HIV-1 infectivity. KR13, the sulfhydryl blocked KR13b and its parent non-sulfhydryl peptide triazole, HNG156, induced gp120 shedding but only KR13 induced p24 capsid protein release. The resulting virion post virolysis had an altered morphology, contained no gp120, but retained gp41 that bound to neutralizing gp41 antibodies. Remarkably, HIV-1 p24 release by KR13 was inhibited by enfuvirtide, which blocks formation of the gp41 6-helix bundle during membrane fusion, while no inhibition of p24 release occurred for enfuvirtide-resistant virus. KR13 thus appears to induce structural changes in gp41 normally associated with membrane fusion and cell entry. The HIV-1 p24 release induced by KR13 was observed in several clades of HIV-1 as well as in fully infectious HIV-1 virions. The antiviral activity of KR13 and its ability to inactivate virions prior to target cell engagement suggest that peptide triazole thiols could be highly effective in inhibiting HIV transmission across mucosal barriers and provide a novel probe to understand biochemical signals within envelope that are involved in membrane fusion.

  8. Influenza A whole virion vaccine induces a rapid reduction of peripheral blood leukocytes via interferon-α-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ato, Manabu; Takahashi, Yoshimasa; Fujii, Hideki; Hashimoto, Shu-ichi; Kaji, Tomohiro; Itamura, Shigeyuki; Horiuchi, Yoshinobu; Arakawa, Yoshichika; Tashiro, Masato; Takemori, Toshitada

    2013-04-19

    Infection with single strand RNA (ssRNA) viruses, such as influenza A virus, is known to induce protective acquired immune responses, including the production of neutralizing antibodies. Vaccination also causes a reduction in the number of peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) shortly after inoculation, a result which may have undesirable adverse effects. The cellular mechanisms for this response have not been elucidated so far. Here we report that formalin-inactivated influenza A whole virus vaccine (whole virion) induces a significant decrease in PBL in mice 5-16 h after administration, whereas an ether-split vaccine (HA split) made from the same influenza virus strain does not induce a similar loss of PBL. Concordant with this reduction in the number of PBL, a rapidly induced and massive production of interferon (IFN)-α is observed when mice are injected with whole virion, but not with HA split vaccines. The role of Toll-like receptors (TLR), which are involved in signal transduction of influenza virus, and the subsequent induction of IFNα were confirmed using mice lacking TLR7, MyD-88, or IFNα/β receptor. We further demonstrated that the observed PBL loss is caused by apoptosis in an IFNα-dependent manner, and not by leukocyte redistribution due to chemokine signaling failure. These findings indicate that RNA-encapsulated whole virion vaccines can rapidly induce a loss of leukocytes from peripheral blood by apoptosis, which may modulate the subsequent immune response.

  9. The Use of Collatamp G, Local Gentamicin-Collagen Sponge, in Reducing Wound Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Clement L. K.; Shelat, Vishal G.; Low, Wilson; George, Sheena; Rao, Jaideepraj

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective study to examine the role of Collatamp G in reducing postoperative surgical site infection (SSI) in patients with different wound classes. Ninety-two patients (62 men and 30 women; mean age, 58 years; range, 29–88 years) who had undergone surgery between December 2009 and November 2011 in Tan Tock Seng Hospital and who had application of Collatamp G in their wound before closure were included in the study. The primary endpoint was the development of any superficial wound infection within 1 month postoperatively. Of 92 patients studied, 9 (10%) developed a superficial wound infection. Two of 43 patients with clean-contaminated wounds (5%), 2 of 19 with contaminated wounds (11%), and 5 of 30 with dirty-infected wounds (16%) developed infection. Use of the larger size Collatamp G (10 × 10 cm) also appears to have a lower incidence of SSI compared with the smaller Collatamp G (5 × 5 cm); 4% and 12%, respectively. Our data suggest that postoperative SSI was reduced in the group of patients with dirty-infected wound class. SSI appears to be decreased with use of the larger size Collatamp G. PMID:25216422

  10. Autograft soaking in vancomycin reduces the risk of infection after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Prieto, Daniel; Torres-Claramunt, Raúl; Gelber, Pablo E; Shehata, Tamer M A; Pelfort, Xavier; Monllau, Joan Carles

    2016-09-01

    To determine whether the bathing of an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) autograft in vancomycin reduces the rate of infection following an ACL reconstruction. Retrospective analysis of all ACL reconstructions over an 8-year period in two University Hospitals. In the initial 4-year period, all patients were operated on under classical antibiotic intravenous prophylaxis (group 1). Over the last 4-year period, this prophylaxis was supplemented with presoaking of the autograft (group 2). Presoaking was performed with sterile gauze previously saturated with a vancomycin solution (5 mg/ml). There were 810 and 734 patients in group 1 and 2, respectively. Fifteen cases of knee joint infections were identified in the series (0.97 %). All of these infections occurred in group 1, representing a rate of infection of 1.85 % in comparison with 0 % in group 2 (p < 0.001). Autograft presoaking with vancomycin in combination with classical intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis reduced the rate of knee joint infection following an ACLR in comparison with antibiotic prophylaxis alone. This technique could be of relevance in daily clinical practice to prevent infection after ACLR. Case control study, retrospective comparative study, Level III.

  11. Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Protein UL37 Interacts with Viral Glycoprotein gK and Membrane Protein UL20 and Functions in Cytoplasmic Virion Envelopment

    PubMed Central

    Jambunathan, Nithya; Chouljenko, Dmitry; Desai, Prashant; Charles, Anu-Susan; Subramanian, Ramesh; Chouljenko, Vladimir N.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have shown that glycoprotein K (gK) and its interacting partner, the UL20 protein, play crucial roles in virion envelopment. Specifically, virions lacking either gK or UL20 fail to acquire an envelope, thus causing accumulation of capsids in the cytoplasm of infected cells. The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) UL37 protein has also been implicated in cytoplasmic virion envelopment. To further investigate the role of UL37 in virion envelopment, the recombinant virus DC480 was constructed by insertion of a 12-amino-acid protein C (protC) epitope tag within the UL37 amino acid sequence immediately after amino acid 480. The DC480 mutant virus expressed full-size UL37 as detected by the anti-protC antibody in Western immunoblots, accumulated unenveloped capsids in the cytoplasm of infected cells, and produced very small plaques on African green monkey kidney (Vero) cells that were similar in size to those produced by the UL20-null and UL37-null viruses. The DC480 virus replicated nearly 4 log less efficiently than the parental wild-type virus when grown on Vero cells. However, DC480 mutant virus titers increased nearly 20-fold when the virus was grown on FRT cells engineered to express the UL20 gene in comparison to the titers on Vero cells, while the UL37-null virus replicated approximately 20-fold less efficiently than the DC480 virus on FRT cells. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments and proximity ligation assays showed that gK and UL20 interact with the UL37 protein in infected cells. Collectively, these results indicate that UL37 interacts with the gK-UL20 protein complex to facilitate cytoplasmic virion envelopment. IMPORTANCE Herpes simplex viruses acquire their final envelopes by budding into cytoplasmic membranes derived from the trans-Golgi network (TGN). The tegument proteins UL36 and UL37 are known to be transported to the TGN sites of virus envelopment and to function in virion envelopment, since mutants lacking UL37 accumulate capsids in the

  12. Diphenyl diselenide modulates nucleotidases, reducing inflammatory responses in the liver of Toxoplasma gondii-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Doleski, Pedro H; Leal, Daniela B R; Machado, Vanessa S; Bottari, Nathieli B; Manzoni, Alessandra G; Casali, Emerson A; Moritz, Cesar E J; Rocha, Ana C A; Camillo, Giovana; Vogel, Fernanda F; Stefani, Lenita M; Mendes, Ricardo E; da Silva, Aleksandro Schafer

    2017-08-16

    The aim of this study was to verify the effect of diphenyl diselenide (PhSe)2 on hepatic nucleotidases and on the concentration of purines in mice infected by Toxoplasma gondii. The animals were divided into four groups: Group A (uninfected), Group B (uninfected and treated with (PhSe)2), Group C (infected), and Group D (infected and treated with (PhSe)2). The inoculation (groups C and D) was performed with 50 cysts of T. gondii (ME-49 strain). Mice from groups B and D were treated with 5 μmol kg(-1) of (PhSe)2. Liver tissue from infected mice showed less severe inflammation, elevated ATP/ADO ratio, elevated NTPDase, 5'nucleotidase, and ADA activities compared to the uninfected group (Group A; P < 0.05). However, infected and treated mice showed decreased ATP levels and elevated ADO levels, as well as higher NTPDase and 5'nucleotidase activities and decreased ADA activity in the hepatic tissue compared to the infected group (P < 0.05). Moreover, the (PhSe)2 treatment of infected mice reduced the hepatic inflammation and showed an immunomodulatory effect on ectonucleotidases of hepatic lymphocytes, which it returned to basal levels. Therefore, chronic infection by T. gondii induces hepatic inflammation in mice, and it is possible that purine levels and nucleotidase activities in hepatic tissue are related to the pathogenesis of the infection in this tissue. The treatment with (PhSe)2 was able to reverse the hepatic inflammation in mice chronically infected, possibly due to the modulation of purinergic enzymes that produce an anti-inflammatory profile through the purinergic system in the liver tissue.

  13. Structure and role of the terminal repeats of Epstein-Barr virus in processing and packaging of virion DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, J; Hammerschmidt, W

    1995-01-01

    The linear virion Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA is terminated at both ends by a variable number of direct, tandemly arranged terminal repeats (TRs) which are approximately 500 bp in size The number of TRs at each terminus can vary. After infection of host cells, the EBV DNA circularizes via the TRs by an unknown mechanism, and replication of the viral DNA during the lytic phase of the EBV life cycle leads to large DNA concatemers which need to be cleaved into virion DNA units, eventually. This cleavage event occurs at an unknown locus within the TRs of EBV, which are the cis-acting elements essential for cleavage of the concatemers and encapsidation of the virion DNA. To investigate the mechanism of DNA processing during genome circularization and cleavage of concatemeric DNA, the genomic termini of EBV were cloned, sequenced, and analyzed by direct labeling of the virion DNA. Both termini ended with identical 11-bp elements; the right end has acquired an additional 9-bp stretch that seemed to originate from the leftmost unique sequences. The left terminus is blunt, whereas the right terminus appears to have a 3' single-base extension. In a transient packaging assay, a single terminal repeat was found to be sufficient for encapsidation of plasmid DNA, and mutagenesis of the TR element defined a region of 159 bp, including the 11-bp element, which is essential for packaging. These results indicate that the genomic termini of EBV are not generated by a simple cut of a hypothetical terminase. The mechanism for cleavage of concatemers seems to involve recombination events. PMID:7707542

  14. [Care bundle to reduce central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection: an integrative review].

    PubMed

    Brachine, Juliana Dane Pereira; Peterlini, Maria Angélica Sorgini; Pedreira, Mavilde da Luz Gonçalves

    2012-12-01

    This is an integrative review of literature aimed to identify evidence-based interventions which make up care bundles to reduce central venous catheter-related or associated bloodstream infections. To collect data in Brazilian and international databases were used the key word bundle and the descriptors catheter-related infection, infection control and central venous catheterization, resulting in fifteen articles, after inclusion criteria application. This work showed five interventions as those commonly employed in the bundles methods: hand hygiene, chlorhexidine gluconate for skin antisepsis, use of maximal sterile barrier precaution during the catheter insertion, avoid the femoral access and daily review of catheter necessity with prompt removal as no longer essential. The majority of the studies showed a significant reduction in bloodstream infection related to or associated with central venous catheters.

  15. Chronic Schistosoma japonicum Infection Reduces Immune Response to Vaccine against Hepatitis B in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Liu, Wen-qi; Lei, Jia-hui; Guan, Fei; Li, Man-jun; Song, Wen-jian; Li, Yong-long; Wang, Ting

    2012-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B and schistosomiasis are most prevalent in Africa and Asia, and co-infections of both are frequent in these areas. The immunomodulation reported to be induced by schistosome infections might restrict immune control of hepatitis B virus (HBV) leading to more severe viral infection. Vaccination is the most effective measure to control and prevent HBV infection, but there is evidence for a reduced immune response to the vaccine in patients with chronic schistosomiasis japonica. Methodology/Principal Findings In this paper, we demonstrate in a mouse model that a chronic Schistosoma japonicum infection can inhibit the immune response to hepatitis B vaccine (HBV vaccine) and lead to lower production of anti-HBs antibodies, interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-2 (IL-2). After deworming with Praziquantel (PZQ), the level of anti-HBs antibodies gradually increased and the Th2-biased profile slowly tapered. At 16 weeks after deworming, the levels of anti-HBs antibodies and Th1/Th2 cytokines returned to the normal levels. Conclusions/Significance The results suggest that the preexisting Th2-dominated immune profile in the host infected with the parasite may down–regulate levels of anti-HBs antibodies and Th1 cytokines. To improve the efficacy of HBV vaccination in schistosome infected humans it may be valuable to treat them with praziquantel (PZQ) some time prior to HBV vaccination. PMID:23272112

  16. Supplemental Perioperative Oxygen to Reduce Surgical Site Infection After High Energy Fracture Surgery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Perioperative Oxygen compared to those treated without Supplemental Perioperative Oxygen . 2.1 Finalize Study Protocol The general progress and timing of...1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0588 TITLE: Supplemental Perioperative Oxygen to Reduce Surgical Site Infection After High Energy Fracture Surgery...Annual 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 30 Sep 2014 – 29 Sep 2015 30129/29/124. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Supplemental Perioperative Oxygen to Reduce Surgical

  17. Current Evidence for the Use of Laminar Flow in Reducing Infection Rates in Total Joint Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    James, M; Khan, W.S; Nannaparaju, M.R; Bhamra, J.S; Morgan-Jones, R

    2015-01-01

    Since the introduction of laminar air flow in orthopaedic theatres by Sir John Charnley, it has widely become accepted as the standard during orthopaedic procedures such as joint arthroplasty. We present a review of available current literature for the use of laminar flow operating theatre ventilation during total joint arthroplasty and examines the effectiveness of laminar flow ventilated operating theatres in preventing post-operative wound infection. Results of our findings suggest that while bacterial and air particulate is reduced by laminar air flow systems, there is no conclusive effect on the reduction of post-operative wound infections following total joint arthroplasty. We conclude that a combination of strict aseptic technique, prophylactic antibiotics and good anaesthetic control during surgery remains crucial to reduce post-operative surgical infections. PMID:26587068

  18. Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol treatment during human monocyte differentiation reduces macrophage susceptibility to HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Williams, Julie C; Appelberg, Sofia; Goldberger, Bruce A; Klein, Thomas W; Sleasman, John W; Goodenow, Maureen M

    2014-06-01

    The major psychoactive component of marijuana, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), also acts to suppress inflammatory responses. Receptors for THC, CB1, CB2, and GPR55, are differentially expressed on multiple cell types including monocytes and macrophages, which are important modulators of inflammation in vivo and target cells for HIV-1 infection. Use of recreational and medicinal marijuana is increasing, but the consequences of marijuana exposure on HIV-1 infection are unclear. Ex vivo studies were designed to investigate effects on HIV-1 infection in macrophages exposed to THC during or following differentiation. THC treatment of primary human monocytes during differentiation reduced HIV-1 infection of subsequent macrophages by replication competent or single cycle CCR5 using viruses. In contrast, treatment of macrophages with THC immediately prior to or continuously following HIV-1 exposure failed to alter infection. Specific receptor agonists indicated that the THC effect during monocyte differentiation was mediated primarily through CB2. THC reduced the number of p24 positive cells with little to no effect on virus production per infected cell, while quantitation of intracellular viral gag pinpointed the THC effect to an early event in the viral life cycle. Cells treated during differentiation with THC displayed reduced expression of CD14, CD16, and CD163 and donor dependent increases in mRNA expression of selected viral restriction factors, suggesting a fundamental alteration in phenotype. Ultimately, the mechanism of THC suppression of HIV-1 infection was traced to a reduction in cell surface HIV receptor (CD4, CCR5 and CXCR4) expression that diminished entry efficiency.

  19. Both interferon alpha and lambda can reduce all intrahepatic HDV infection markers in HBV/HDV infected humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Giersch, Katja; Homs, Maria; Volz, Tassilo; Helbig, Martina; Allweiss, Lena; Lohse, Ansgar W; Petersen, Jörg; Buti, Maria; Pollicino, Teresa; Sureau, Camille; Dandri, Maura; Lütgehetmann, Marc

    2017-06-16

    Co-infection with hepatitis B (HBV) and D virus (HDV) is associated with the most severe course of liver disease. Interferon represents the only treatment currently approved. However, knowledge about the impact of interferons on HDV in human hepatocytes is scant. Aim was to assess the effect of pegylated interferon alpha (peg-IFNα) and lambda (peg-IFNλ), compared to the HBV-polymerase inhibitor entecavir (ETV) on all HDV infection markers using human liver chimeric mice and novel HDV strand-specific qRT-PCR and RNA in situ hybridization assays, which enable intrahepatic detection of HDV RNA species. Peg-IFNα and peg-IFNλ reduced HDV viremia (1.4 log and 1.2 log, respectively) and serum HBsAg levels (0.9-log and 0.4-log, respectively). Intrahepatic quantification of genomic and antigenomic HDV RNAs revealed a median ratio of 22:1 in untreated mice, resembling levels determined in HBV/HDV infected patients. Both IFNs greatly reduced intrahepatic levels of genomic and antigenomic HDV RNA, increasing the amounts of HDAg- and antigenomic RNA-negative hepatocytes. ETV-mediated suppression of HBV replication (2.1-log) did not significantly affect HBsAg levels, HDV productivity and/or release. In humanized mice lacking adaptive immunity, IFNs but not ETV suppressed HDV. Viremia decrease reflected the intrahepatic reduction of all HDV markers, including the antigenomic template, suggesting that intracellular HDV clearance is achievable.

  20. Double-stranded DNA viruses: 20 families and only five different architectural principles for virion assembly.

    PubMed

    Krupovic, Mart; Bamford, Dennis H

    2011-08-01

    The number of viral particles in the biosphere is enormous. Virus classification helps to comprehend the virosphere and to understand the relationship between different virus groups. However, the evolutionary reach of the currently employed sequence-based approaches in virus taxonomy is rather limited, producing a fragmented view of the virosphere. As a result, viruses are currently classified into 87 different families. However, studies on virion architectures have unexpectedly revealed that their structural diversity is far more limited. Here we describe structures of the major capsid proteins of double-stranded DNA viruses infecting hosts residing in different domains of life. We note that viruses belonging to 20 different families fall into only five distinct structural groups, suggesting that optimal virus classification approach should equally rely on both sequence and structural information.

  1. Potyvirus virion structure shows conserved protein fold and RNA binding site in ssRNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Zamora, Miguel; Méndez-López, Eduardo; Agirrezabala, Xabier; Cuesta, Rebeca; Lavín, José L.; Sánchez-Pina, M. Amelia; Aranda, Miguel A.; Valle, Mikel

    2017-01-01

    Potyviruses constitute the second largest genus of plant viruses and cause important economic losses in a large variety of crops; however, the atomic structure of their particles remains unknown. Infective potyvirus virions are long flexuous filaments where coat protein (CP) subunits assemble in helical mode bound to a monopartite positive-sense single-stranded RNA [(+)ssRNA] genome. We present the cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) structure of the potyvirus watermelon mosaic virus at a resolution of 4.0 Å. The atomic model shows a conserved fold for the CPs of flexible filamentous plant viruses, including a universally conserved RNA binding pocket, which is a potential target for antiviral compounds. This conserved fold of the CP is widely distributed in eukaryotic viruses and is also shared by nucleoproteins of enveloped viruses with segmented (−)ssRNA (negative-sense ssRNA) genomes, including influenza viruses.

  2. Identification of Novel Antipoxviral Agents: Mitoxantrone Inhibits Vaccinia Virus Replication by Blocking Virion Assembly▿

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Liang; Dai, Peihong; Ciro, Anthony; Smee, Donald F.; Djaballah, Hakim; Shuman, Stewart

    2007-01-01

    The bioterror threat of a smallpox outbreak in an unvaccinated population has mobilized efforts to develop new antipoxviral agents. By screening a library of known drugs, we identified 13 compounds that inhibited vaccinia virus replication at noncytotoxic doses. The anticancer drug mitoxantrone is unique among the inhibitors identified in that it has no apparent impact on viral gene expression. Rather, it blocks processing of viral structural proteins and assembly of mature progeny virions. The isolation of mitoxantrone-resistant vaccinia strains underscores that a viral protein is the likely target of the drug. Whole-genome sequencing of mitoxantrone-resistant viruses pinpointed missense mutations in the N-terminal domain of vaccinia DNA ligase. Despite its favorable activity in cell culture, mitoxantrone administered intraperitoneally at the maximum tolerated dose failed to protect mice against a lethal intranasal infection with vaccinia virus. PMID:17928345

  3. Potyvirus virion structure shows conserved protein fold and RNA binding site in ssRNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Zamora, Miguel; Méndez-López, Eduardo; Agirrezabala, Xabier; Cuesta, Rebeca; Lavín, José L; Sánchez-Pina, M Amelia; Aranda, Miguel A; Valle, Mikel

    2017-09-01

    Potyviruses constitute the second largest genus of plant viruses and cause important economic losses in a large variety of crops; however, the atomic structure of their particles remains unknown. Infective potyvirus virions are long flexuous filaments where coat protein (CP) subunits assemble in helical mode bound to a monopartite positive-sense single-stranded RNA [(+)ssRNA] genome. We present the cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) structure of the potyvirus watermelon mosaic virus at a resolution of 4.0 Å. The atomic model shows a conserved fold for the CPs of flexible filamentous plant viruses, including a universally conserved RNA binding pocket, which is a potential target for antiviral compounds. This conserved fold of the CP is widely distributed in eukaryotic viruses and is also shared by nucleoproteins of enveloped viruses with segmented (-)ssRNA (negative-sense ssRNA) genomes, including influenza viruses.

  4. Hand hygiene in the dental setting: reducing the risk of infection.

    PubMed

    Fluent, Marie T

    2013-09-01

    Hand hygiene remains the single most important measure for reducing the risk of healthcare-associated infections. In the past 20 years, hand-washing recommendations and guidelines have become increasingly complex, and a plethora of products have become available. This article aims to discuss and clarify the fundamentals of appropriate hand hygiene in dentistry.

  5. Type I Interferons and NK Cells Restrict Gammaherpesvirus Lymph Node Infection.

    PubMed

    Lawler, Clara; Tan, Cindy S E; Simas, J Pedro; Stevenson, Philip G

    2016-10-15

    Gammaherpesviruses establish persistent, systemic infections and cause cancers. Murid herpesvirus 4 (MuHV-4) provides a unique window into the early events of host colonization. It spreads via lymph nodes. While dendritic cells (DC) pass MuHV-4 to lymph node B cells, subcapsular sinus macrophages (SSM), which capture virions from the afferent lymph, restrict its spread. Understanding how this restriction works offers potential clues to a more comprehensive defense. Type I interferon (IFN-I) blocked SSM lytic infection and reduced lytic cycle-independent viral reporter gene expression. Plasmacytoid DC were not required, but neither were SSM the only source of IFN-I, as IFN-I blockade increased infection in both intact and SSM-depleted mice. NK cells restricted lytic SSM infection independently of IFN-I, and SSM-derived virions spread to the spleen only when both IFN-I responses and NK cells were lacking. Thus, multiple innate defenses allowed SSM to adsorb virions from the afferent lymph with relative impunity. Enhancing IFN-I and NK cell recruitment could potentially also restrict DC infection and thus improve infection control. Human gammaherpesviruses cause cancers by infecting B cells. However, vaccines designed to block virus binding to B cells have not stopped infection. Using a related gammaherpesvirus of mice, we have shown that B cells are infected not via cell-free virus but via infected myeloid cells. This suggests a different strategy to stop B cell infection: stop virus production by myeloid cells. Not all myeloid infection is productive. We show that subcapsular sinus macrophages, which do not pass infection to B cells, restrict gammaherpesvirus production by recruiting type I interferons and natural killer cells. Therefore, a vaccine that speeds the recruitment of these defenses might stop B cell infection. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Human cytomegalovirus specifically controls the levels of the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone BiP/GRP78, which is required for virion assembly.

    PubMed

    Buchkovich, Nicholas J; Maguire, Tobi G; Yu, Yongjun; Paton, Adrienne W; Paton, James C; Alwine, James C

    2008-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone BiP/GRP78 regulates ER function and the unfolded protein response (UPR). Human cytomegalovirus infection of human fibroblasts induces the UPR but modifies it to benefit viral replication. BiP/GRP78 protein levels are tightly regulated during infection, rising after 36 h postinfection (hpi), peaking at 60 hpi, and decreasing thereafter. To determine the effects of this regulation on viral replication, BiP/GRP78 was depleted using the SubAB subtilase cytotoxin, which rapidly and specifically cleaves BiP/GRP78. Toxin treatment of infected cells for 12-h periods beginning at 36, 48, 60, and 84 hpi caused complete loss of BiP but had little effect on viral protein synthesis. However, progeny virion formation was significantly inhibited, suggesting that BiP/GRP78 is important for virion formation. Electron microscopic analysis showed that infected cells were resistant to the toxin and showed none of the cytotoxic effects seen in uninfected cells. However, all viral activity in the cytoplasm ceased, with nucleocapsids remaining in the nucleus or concentrated in the cytoplasmic space just outside of the outer nuclear membrane. These data suggest that one effect of the controlled expression of BiP/GRP78 in infected cells is to aid in cytoplasmic virion assembly and egress.

  7. Interleukin-21 combined with ART reduces inflammation and viral reservoir in SIV-infected macaques

    PubMed Central

    Micci, Luca; Ryan, Emily S.; Fromentin, Rémi; Bosinger, Steven E.; Harper, Justin L.; He, Tianyu; Paganini, Sara; Easley, Kirk A.; Chahroudi, Ann; Benne, Clarisse; Gumber, Sanjeev; McGary, Colleen S.; Rogers, Kenneth A.; Deleage, Claire; Lucero, Carissa; Byrareddy, Siddappa N.; Apetrei, Cristian; Estes, Jacob D.; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Piatak, Michael; Chomont, Nicolas; Villinger, Francois; Silvestri, Guido; Brenchley, Jason M.; Paiardini, Mirko

    2015-01-01

    Despite successful control of viremia, many HIV-infected individuals given antiretroviral therapy (ART) exhibit residual inflammation, which is associated with non–AIDS-related morbidity and mortality and may contribute to virus persistence during ART. Here, we investigated the effects of IL-21 administration on both inflammation and virus persistence in ART-treated, SIV-infected rhesus macaques (RMs). Compared with SIV-infected animals only given ART, SIV-infected RMs given both ART and IL-21 showed improved restoration of intestinal Th17 and Th22 cells and a more effective reduction of immune activation in blood and intestinal mucosa, with the latter maintained through 8 months after ART interruption. Additionally, IL-21, in combination with ART, was associated with reduced levels of SIV RNA in plasma and decreased CD4+ T cell levels harboring replication-competent virus during ART. At the latest experimental time points, which were up to 8 months after ART interruption, plasma viremia and cell-associated SIV DNA levels remained substantially lower than those before ART initiation in IL-21–treated animals but not in controls. Together, these data suggest that IL-21 supplementation of ART reduces residual inflammation and virus persistence in a relevant model of lentiviral disease and warrants further investigation as a potential intervention for HIV infection. PMID:26551680

  8. Reducing infection risk in implant-based breast-reconstruction surgery: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Adrian SH; Song, David H

    2016-01-01

    Implant-based procedures are the most commonly performed method for postmastectomy breast reconstruction. While donor-site morbidity is low, these procedures are associated with a higher risk of reconstructive loss. Many of these are related to infection of the implant, which can lead to prolonged antibiotic treatment, undesired additional surgical procedures, and unsatisfactory results. This review combines a summary of the recent literature regarding implant-related breast-reconstruction infections and combines this with a practical approach to the patient and surgery aimed at reducing this risk. Prevention of infection begins with appropriate reconstructive choice based on an assessment and optimization of risk factors. These include patient and disease characteristics, such as smoking, obesity, large breast size, and immediate reconstructive procedures, as well as adjuvant therapy, such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy. For implant-based breast reconstruction, preoperative planning and organization is key to reducing infection. A logical and consistent intraoperative and postoperative surgical protocol, including appropriate antibiotic choice, mastectomy-pocket creation, implant handling, and considered acellular dermal matrix use contribute toward the reduction of breast-implant infections. PMID:27621667

  9. Effectiveness of body wipes as an adjunct to reducing skin infections in high school wrestlers.

    PubMed

    Anderson, B J

    2012-09-01

    To compare soap-and-water body wipes and 70% isopropyl alcohol (IPA) body wipes to a CONTROL (no treatment) in reducing skin infections in high school wrestlers competing in weekend tournaments. Repeated measures study evaluating a soap-and-water body wipe, a 70% IPA body wipe, and no-treatment CONTROL during 2 weekend tournaments. High school wrestling tournaments in Minneapolis-St Paul and surrounding communities of Minnesota. Each team was randomly assigned to use either wipe or serve as CONTROL during each tournament. Presence of skin infections that developed the following week after a weekend tournament. A total of 151 athletes competed in a total of 474 individual matches. Thirteen athletes tested positive afterward for skin infections. The odds of infection for the tested group compared with the CONTROL group were 0.089 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.01-0.75; P = 0.026] for the soap-and-water group and 0.44 (95% CI, 0.11-1.69; P = 0.23) for 70% IPA group. Soap-and-water wipes seem to be more effective in reducing skin infections compared with the no-treatment group.

  10. Capacitive coupling reduces instrumentation-related infection in rabbit spines: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Gilotra, Mohit; Griffith, Cullen; Schiavone, Jason; Nimmagadda, Naren; Noveau, Jenna; Ludwig, Steven C

    2012-06-01

    Postoperative spine infections cause considerable morbidity. Patients are subjected to long-term antibiotic regimens and may require further surgery. Delivery of electric current through instrumentation can detach biofilm, allowing better antibiotic penetration and assisting in eradicating infection. We asked (1) whether capacitive coupling treatment in combination with a single dose of antibiotics would reduce infection rates when compared with antibiotics alone in a rabbit spine infection model, (2) whether it would decrease the overall bacterial burden, and (3) whether there was a time-dependent response based on days treated with capacitive coupling. Thirty rabbits were subjected to a well-established spine infection model with a single dose of intravenously administered systemic ceftriaxone (20 mg/kg of body weight) prophylaxis. Two noncontiguous rods were implanted inside dead space defects at L3 and L6 challenged with 10(6) colony-forming units of Staphylococcus aureus. Rabbits were randomly treated with a capacitive coupling or control device. Instrumentation and soft tissue bacterial growth were assessed after 7 days. Sites treated with capacitive coupling showed a decrease in the incidence of positive culture: 36% versus 81% in the control group. We observed no difference in the soft tissue's infectious burden. Overall bacterial load was not decreased with capacitive coupling. Capacitive coupling in conjunction with antibiotics reduced the instrumentation-related infection rate compared with antibiotics alone. Capacitive coupling noninvasively delivers an alternating current that may detach biofilm from instrumentation. Treatment of infection may be successful without removal of instrumentation, allowing for improved stability and overall decreased morbidity.

  11. Hand hygiene to reduce community transmission of influenza and acute respiratory tract infection: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Warren-Gash, Charlotte; Fragaszy, Ellen; Hayward, Andrew C

    2013-09-01

    Hand hygiene may be associated with modest protection against some acute respiratory tract infections, but its specific role in influenza transmission in different settings is unclear. We aimed to review evidence that improving hand hygiene reduces primary and secondary transmission of (i) influenza and (ii) acute respiratory tract infections in community settings. We searched Medline, Embase, Global Health and Cochrane databases up to 13 February 2012 for reports in any language of original research investigating the effect of hand hygiene on influenza or acute respiratory tract infection where aetiology was unspecified in community settings including institutions such as schools, and domestic residences. Data were presented and quality rated across outcomes according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Sixteen articles met inclusion criteria. There was moderate to low-quality evidence of a reduction in both influenza and respiratory tract infection with hand hygiene interventions in schools, greatest in a lower-middle-income setting. There was high-quality evidence of a small reduction in respiratory infection in childcare settings. There was high-quality evidence for a large reduction in respiratory infection with a hand hygiene intervention in squatter settlements in a low-income setting. There was moderate- to high-quality evidence of no effect on secondary transmission of influenza in households that had already experienced an index case. While hand hygiene interventions have potential to reduce transmission of influenza and acute respiratory tract infections, their effectiveness varies depending on setting, context and compliance. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Evaluating vaccination strategies for reducing infant respiratory syncytial virus infection in low-income settings.

    PubMed

    Poletti, Piero; Merler, Stefano; Ajelli, Marco; Manfredi, Piero; Munywoki, Patrick K; Nokes, D; Melegaro, Alessia

    2015-03-10

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of lower respiratory tract disease and related hospitalization of young children in least developed countries. Individuals are repeatedly infected, but it is the first exposure, often in early infancy, that results in the vast majority of severe RSV disease. Unfortunately, due to immunological immaturity, infants are a problematic RSV vaccine target. Several trials are ongoing to identify a suitable candidate vaccine and target group, but no immunization program is yet in place. In this work, an individual-based model that explicitly accounts for the socio-demographic population structure is developed to investigate RSV transmission patterns in a rural setting of Kenya and to evaluate the potential effectiveness of alternative population targets in reducing RSV infant infection. We find that household transmission is responsible for 39% of infant infections and that school-age children are the main source of infection within the household, causing around 55% of cases. Moreover, assuming a vaccine-induced protection equivalent to that of natural infection, our results show that annual vaccination of students is the only alternative strategy to routine immunization of infants able to trigger a relevant and persistent reduction of infant infection (on average, of 35.6% versus 41.5% in 10 years of vaccination). Interestingly, if vaccination of pregnant women boosts maternal antibody protection in infants by an additional 4 months, RSV infant infection will be reduced by 31.5%. These preliminary evaluations support the efforts to develop vaccines and related strategies that go beyond targeting vaccines to those at highest risk of severe disease.

  13. Vaccination with proteins involved in tick-pathogen interactions reduces vector infestations and pathogen infection.

    PubMed

    Merino, Octavio; Antunes, Sandra; Mosqueda, Juan; Moreno-Cid, Juan A; Pérez de la Lastra, José M; Rosario-Cruz, Rodrigo; Rodríguez, Sergio; Domingos, Ana; de la Fuente, José

    2013-12-02

    Tick-borne pathogens cause diseases that greatly impact animal health and production worldwide. The ultimate goal of tick vaccines is to protect against tick-borne diseases through the control of vector infestations and reducing pathogen infection and transmission. Tick genetic traits are involved in vector-pathogen interactions and some of these molecules such as Subolesin (SUB) have been shown to protect against vector infestations and pathogen infection. Based on these premises, herein we characterized the efficacy of cattle vaccination with tick proteins involved in vector-pathogen interactions, TROSPA, SILK, and Q38 for the control of cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus infestations and infection with Anaplasma marginale and Babesia bigemina. SUB and adjuvant/saline placebo were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. The results showed that vaccination with Q38, SILK and SUB reduced tick infestations and oviposition with vaccine efficacies of 75% (Q38), 62% (SILK) and 60% (SUB) with respect to ticks fed on placebo control cattle. Vaccination with TROSPA did not have a significant effect on any of the tick parameters analyzed. The results also showed that vaccination with Q38, TROSPA and SUB reduced B. bigemina DNA levels in ticks while vaccination with SILK and SUB resulted in lower A. marginale DNA levels when compared to ticks fed on placebo control cattle. The positive correlation between antigen-specific antibody titers and reduction of tick infestations and pathogen infection strongly suggested that the effect of the vaccine was the result of the antibody response in vaccinated cattle. Vaccination and co-infection with A. marginale and B. bigemina also affected the expression of genes encoding for vaccine antigens in ticks fed on cattle. These results showed that vaccines using tick proteins involved in vector-pathogen interactions could be used for the dual control of tick infestations and pathogen infection. Copyright © 2013

  14. Vasoactive intestinal peptide reduces the inflammatory profile in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Higyno, Pulchéria Maria Silva; Mendes, Priscila Fagundes; Miranda, Marina Barcelos de; Pereira, Dario Elias; Mota, Ana Paula Lucas; Nogueira, Katiane de Oliveira Pinto Coelho; Caldas, Ivo Santana; Moura, Sandra Aparecida de Lima; Menezes, Cristiane Alves da Silva

    2015-12-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) has gained great prominence because of its therapeutic potential, which is ascribed to its ability to regulate innate immunity, inhibit antigen-specific Th1 cell responses, and generate T regulatory cells. Additionally, VIP may act as a natural antimicrobial peptide, killing bacteria, fungi, and infective forms of Trypanosoma brucei. Despite the possible relevance of VIP during the course of Chagas disease, studies regarding this in human and experimental Trypanosoma cruzi infections remain poorly characterized. In this work, we evaluated the effects of VIP on systemic and cardiac immune responses during experimental acute infection. C57BL/6 mice were infected with 5000 trypomastigotes of the VL-10 strain of T. cruzi and treated with intraperitoneal VIP injection every other day for one month. After 30 days, we observed no reduction in parasitemia levels. However, we observed a reduction in serum levels of IFN-gamma and IL-2 and an increase in that of IL-4. These data suggest that VIP treatment modified immune responses to favor the Th2 response, which had no impact on parasitemia levels although the serum level of IFN-gamma was reduced. However, this change in immune balance reduced heart damage, as noted by the smaller cardiac volume and the moderate inflammatory infiltrate observed in VIP-treated mice. Our results indicate that VIP treatment reduced the inflammatory response at the cardiac site of mice that were experimentally infected with T. cruzi. These data suggest a protective role for VIP in the heart of infected mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Filter-feeding bivalves can remove avian influenza viruses from water and reduce infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Faust, Christina; Stallknecht, David; Swayne, David; Brown, Justin

    2009-01-01

    Avian influenza (AI) viruses are believed to be transmitted within wild aquatic bird populations through an indirect faecal–oral route involving contaminated water. This study examined the influence of filter-feeding bivalves, Corbicula fluminea, on the infectivity of AI virus in water. Clams were placed into individual flasks with distilled water inoculated 1:100 with a low pathogenic (LP) AI virus (A/Mallard/MN/190/99 (H3N8)). Viral titres in water with clams were significantly lower at 24 and 48 h post-inoculation compared to LPAI-infected water without clams. To determine whether clams affected the infectivity of AI viruses, 18 wood ducks (Aix sponsa) were divided into test groups and inoculated with a variety of treatments of clam supernatants, whole clams and water exposed to a high pathogenic (HP) AI (A/whooper swan/Mongolia/244/05 (H5N1)). None of the wood ducks inoculated with HPAI-infected water that was filtered by clams or that was inoculated with or fed tissue from these clams exhibited morbidity or mortality. All wood ducks exposed to either HPAI-infected water without clams or the original viral inoculum died. These results indicate that filter-feeding bivalves can remove and reduce the infectivity of AI viruses in water and demonstrate the need to examine biotic environmental factors that can influence AI virus transmission. PMID:19656788

  16. Filter-feeding bivalves can remove avian influenza viruses from water and reduce infectivity.

    PubMed

    Faust, Christina; Stallknecht, David; Swayne, David; Brown, Justin

    2009-10-22

    Avian influenza (AI) viruses are believed to be transmitted within wild aquatic bird populations through an indirect faecal-oral route involving contaminated water. This study examined the influence of filter-feeding bivalves, Corbicula fluminea, on the infectivity of AI virus in water. Clams were placed into individual flasks with distilled water inoculated 1:100 with a low pathogenic (LP) AI virus (A/Mallard/MN/190/99 (H3N8)). Viral titres in water with clams were significantly lower at 24 and 48 h post-inoculation compared to LPAI-infected water without clams. To determine whether clams affected the infectivity of AI viruses, 18 wood ducks (Aix sponsa) were divided into test groups and inoculated with a variety of treatments of clam supernatants, whole clams and water exposed to a high pathogenic (HP) AI (A/whooper swan/Mongolia/244/05 (H5N1)). None of the wood ducks inoculated with HPAI-infected water that was filtered by clams or that was inoculated with or fed tissue from these clams exhibited morbidity or mortality. All wood ducks exposed to either HPAI-infected water without clams or the original viral inoculum died. These results indicate that filter-feeding bivalves can remove and reduce the infectivity of AI viruses in water and demonstrate the need to examine biotic environmental factors that can influence AI virus transmission.

  17. Do antibacterial-coated sutures reduce wound infection in head and neck cancer reconstruction?

    PubMed

    Chen, S Y; Chen, T M; Dai, N T; Fu, J P; Chang, S C; Deng, S C; Chen, S G

    2011-04-01

    Surgical wound infection is a common complication, which increases the hospital stay and costs after surgery for head and neck cancer. In this study, we evaluated the effect of Triclosan-coated sutures on surgical wounds and analyzed the risk factors for wound infections in head and neck cancer surgery. From January 2007 to December 2009, 253 consecutive patients underwent wide excision of a head or neck cancer and reconstructive procedures. All patient data were collected prospectively. Of these, 241 patients were included in this study, divided into two groups. The Triclosan group contained 112 patients, whose surgical wounds were closed with Triclosan-coated sutures (Vicryl Plus). The control group included the remaining 129 patients, whose surgical wounds were closed with conventional Vicryl sutures. We conducted a retrospective, multivariate analysis to determine independent risk factors for the cervical wound infection. The cervical wound infection rate was 14.9% (17/112) in the Triclosan group and 14.7% (19/129) in the control group, and these rates were not significantly different. Tumour stage and delayed intra-oral flap healing were independent risk factors for cervical wound infection. In this preliminary study, Triclosan-coated Vicryl sutures did not reduce the infection rate of cervical wounds after head or neck cancer surgery. The effectiveness of this suture material in head and neck cancer surgery should be considered with caution. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Preoperative oral antibiotics reduce surgical site infection following elective colorectal resections.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Jamie A; Altom, Laura K; Deierhoi, Rhiannon J; Morris, Melanie; Richman, Joshua S; Vick, Catherine C; Itani, Kamal M F; Hawn, Mary T

    2012-11-01

    Surgical site infection is a major cause of morbidity after colorectal resections. Despite evidence that preoperative oral antibiotics with mechanical bowel preparation reduce surgical site infection rates, the use of oral antibiotics is decreasing. Currently, the administration of oral antibiotics is controversial and considered ineffective without mechanical bowel preparation. The aim of this study is to examine the use of mechanical bowel preparation and oral antibiotics and their relationship to surgical site infection rates in a colorectal Surgical Care Improvement Project cohort. This retrospective study used Veterans Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program preoperative risk and surgical site infection outcome data linked to Veterans Affairs Surgical Care Improvement Project and Pharmacy Benefits Management data. Univariate and multivariable models were performed to identify factors associated with surgical site infection within 30 days of surgery. This study was conducted in 112 Veterans Affairs hospitals. Included were 9940 patients who underwent elective colorectal resections from 2005 to 2009. The primary outcome measured was the incidence of surgical site infection. Patients receiving oral antibiotics had significantly lower surgical site infection rates. Those receiving no bowel preparation had similar surgical site infection rates to those who had mechanical bowel preparation only (18.1% vs 20%). Those receiving oral antibiotics alone had an surgical site infection rate of 8.3%, and those receiving oral antibiotics plus mechanical bowel preparation had a rate of 9.2%. In adjusted analysis, the use of oral antibiotics alone was associated with a 67% decrease in surgical site infection occurrence (OR=0.33, 95% CI 0.21-0.50). Oral antibiotics plus mechanical bowel preparation was associated with a 57% decrease in surgical site infection occurrence (OR=0.43, 95% CI 0.34-0.55). Timely administration of parenteral antibiotics (Surgical Care Improvement

  19. So Near and Yet So Far: Harmonic Radar Reveals Reduced Homing Ability of Nosema Infected Honeybees

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Stephan; McMahon, Dino P.; Lim, Ka S.; Pull, Christopher D.; Clark, Suzanne J.; Paxton, Robert J.; Osborne, Juliet L.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogens may gain a fitness advantage through manipulation of the behaviour of their hosts. Likewise, host behavioural changes can be a defence mechanism, counteracting the impact of pathogens on host fitness. We apply harmonic radar technology to characterize the impact of an emerging pathogen - Nosema ceranae (Microsporidia) - on honeybee (Apis mellifera) flight and orientation performance in the field. Honeybees are the most important commercial pollinators. Emerging diseases have been proposed to play a prominent role in colony decline, partly through sub-lethal behavioural manipulation of their hosts. We found that homing success was significantly reduced in diseased (65.8%) versus healthy foragers (92.5%). Although lost bees had significantly reduced continuous flight times and prolonged resting times, other flight characteristics and navigational abilities showed no significant difference between infected and non-infected bees. Our results suggest that infected bees express normal flight characteristics but are constrained in their homing ability, potentially compromising the colony by reducing its resource inputs, but also counteracting the intra-colony spread of infection. We provide the first high-resolution analysis of sub-lethal effects of an emerging disease on insect flight behaviour. The potential causes and the implications for both host and parasite are discussed. PMID:25098331

  20. So near and yet so far: harmonic radar reveals reduced homing ability of Nosema infected honeybees.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Stephan; McMahon, Dino P; Lim, Ka S; Pull, Christopher D; Clark, Suzanne J; Paxton, Robert J; Osborne, Juliet L

    2014-01-01

    Pathogens may gain a fitness advantage through manipulation of the behaviour of their hosts. Likewise, host behavioural changes can be a defence mechanism, counteracting the impact of pathogens on host fitness. We apply harmonic radar technology to characterize the impact of an emerging pathogen--Nosema ceranae (Microsporidia)--on honeybee (Apis mellifera) flight and orientation performance in the field. Honeybees are the most important commercial pollinators. Emerging diseases have been proposed to play a prominent role in colony decline, partly through sub-lethal behavioural manipulation of their hosts. We found that homing success was significantly reduced in diseased (65.8%) versus healthy foragers (92.5%). Although lost bees had significantly reduced continuous flight times and prolonged resting times, other flight characteristics and navigational abilities showed no significant difference between infected and non-infected bees. Our results suggest that infected bees express normal flight characteristics but are constrained in their homing ability, potentially compromising the colony by reducing its resource inputs, but also counteracting the intra-colony spread of infection. We provide the first high-resolution analysis of sub-lethal effects of an emerging disease on insect flight behaviour. The potential causes and the implications for both host and parasite are discussed.

  1. Immunization with L. sigmodontis Microfilariae Reduces Peripheral Microfilaraemia after Challenge Infection by Inhibition of Filarial Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ziewer, Sebastian; Hübner, Marc P.; Dubben, Bettina; Hoffmann, Wolfgang H.; Bain, Odile; Martin, Coralie; Hoerauf, Achim; Specht, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    Background Lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis are two chronic diseases mediated by parasitic filarial worms causing long term disability and massive socioeconomic problems. Filariae are transmitted by blood-feeding mosquitoes that take up the first stage larvae from an infected host and deliver it after maturation into infective stage to a new host. After closure of vector control programs, disease control relies mainly on mass drug administration with drugs that are primarily effective against first stage larvae and require many years of annual/biannual administration. Therefore, there is an urgent need for alternative treatment ways, i.e. other effective drugs or vaccines. Methodology/Principal Findings Using the Litomosoides sigmodontis murine model of filariasis we demonstrate that immunization with microfilariae together with the adjuvant alum prevents mice from developing high microfilaraemia after challenge infection. Immunization achieved 70% to 100% protection in the peripheral blood and in the pleural space and furthermore strongly reduced the microfilarial load in mice that remained microfilaraemic. Protection was associated with the impairment of intrauterine filarial embryogenesis and with local and systemic microfilarial-specific host IgG, as well as IFN-γ secretion by host cells from the site of infection. Furthermore immunization significantly reduced adult worm burden. Conclusions/Significance Our results present a tool to understand the immunological basis of vaccine induced protection in order to develop a microfilariae-based vaccine that reduces adult worm burden and prevents microfilaraemia, a powerful weapon to stop transmission of filariasis. PMID:22413031

  2. Statins are ineffective at reducing neuroinflammation or prolonging survival in scrapie-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Carroll, James A; Race, Brent; Phillips, Katie; Striebel, James F; Chesebro, Bruce

    2017-08-01

    Neuroinflammation is a prominent component of several neurodegenerative diseases, including multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, tauopathies, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and prion diseases. In such conditions, the ability to decrease neuroinflammation by drug therapy may influence disease progression. Statins have been used to treat hyperlipidemia as well as reduce neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in various tissues. In previous studies, treatment of scrapie-infected mice with the type 1 statins, simvastatin or pravastatin, showed a small beneficial effect on survival time. In the current study, to increase the effectiveness of statin therapy, we treated infected mice with atorvastatin, a type 2 statin that has improved pharmacokinetics over many type 1 statins. Treatments with either simvastatin or pravastatin were tested for comparison. We evaluated scrapie-infected mice for protease-resistant PrP (PrPres) accumulation, gliosis, neuroinflammation and time until advanced clinical disease requiring euthanasia. All three statin treatments reduced total serum cholesterol ≥40 % in mice. However, gliosis and PrPres deposition were similar in statin-treated and untreated infected mice. Time to euthanasia due to advanced clinical signs was not changed in statin-treated mice relative to untreated mice, a finding at odds with previous reports. Expression of 84 inflammatory genes involved in neuroinflammation was also quantitated. Seven genes were reduced by pravastatin, and one gene was reduced by atorvastatin. In contrast, simvastatin therapy did not reduce any of the tested genes, but did slightly increase the expression of Ccl2 and Cxcl13. Our studies indicate that none of the three statins tested were effective in reducing scrapie-induced neuroinflammation or neuropathogenesis.

  3. Enterovirus 71 Virion-Associated Galectin-1 Facilitates Viral Replication and Stability

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Pei-Huan; Liu, Chia-Ming; Ho, Tzong-Shiann; Tsai, Yi-Che; Lin, Chi-Cheng; Wang, Ya-Fang; Chen, Yuh-Ling; Yu, Chun-Keung; Wang, Shih-Min; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Shiau, Ai-Li; Lei, Huan-Yao; Chang, Chih-Peng

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection causes a myriad of diseases from mild hand-foot-and-mouth disease or herpangina to fatal brain stem encephalitis complicated with pulmonary edema. Several severe EV71 endemics have occurred in Asia-Pacific region, including Taiwan, and have become a serious threat to children’s health. EV71 infection is initiated by the attachment of the virion to the target cell surface. Although this process relies primarily upon interaction between viruses and cell surface receptors, soluble factors may also influence the binding of EV71 to host cells.Galectin-1 has been reported to participate in several virus infections, but is not addressed in EV71. In this study, we found that the serum levels of galectin-1 in EV71-infected children were higher than those in non-infected people. In EV71 infected cells, galectin-1 was found to be associated with the EV71 VP1 and VP3 via carbohydrate residues and subsequently released and bound to another cell surface along with the virus. EV71 propagated from galectin-1 knockdown SK-N-SH cells exhibited lower infectivity in cultured cells and less pathogenicity in mice than the virus propagated from parental cells. In addition, this galectin-1-free EV71 virus was sensitive to high temperature and lost its viability after long-term storage, which could be restored following supplement of recombinant galectin-1. Taken together, our findings uncover a new role of galectin-1 in facilitating EV71 virus infection. PMID:25706563

  4. [Does nasal decontamination reduce the incidence of infections after cardiac surgery?].

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Hisham; Madi-Jebara, Samia; Jabbour, Khalil; Yazigi, Alexandre; Haddad, Fadia; Hayek, Gemma; Yazbeck, Patricia; Antakly, Marie-Claire

    2010-01-01

    Mupirocin applied to the anterior nares four times daily usually eliminates Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin resistant, within 48 hours. Prophylactic intranasal mupirocin is safe, inexpensive and effective in reducing the overall sternal wound infection after open-heart surgery. This study was designed to determine whether decreasing nasal bacterial colonization by applying mupirocin intra nasally decreases mediastinal, sternal, pulmonary and cutaneous infections after open-heart surgery. After institutional approval and informed consent, 392 patients were included in a randomized, prospective study. Nasal cultures were taken for all patients before surgery. Patients were divided in two groups: Group I (n = 190) receiving mupirocin in the anterior nares 4 times daily for 48 hours before surgery; Group II (n = 202) was the control group. Patients were followed for a month after surgery. All mediastinal, sternal, pulmonary and cutaneous infections were documented and treated with appropriate antibiotics. A Student test for quantitative data and a chi2 test for qualitative data were used for statistical analysis. p < or = 0.05 was considered significant. The two groups had the same demographic characteristics and risk factors. Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus was 36.2% in the two groups. Neither mediastinitis nor sternitis were noticed in any of the two groups. There was no statistical difference between the groups according to the frequency of the cutaneous infections (Group I: 19/190 - Group II: 13/202) and pneumonia (Group I: 7/190 - Group II: 13/202). In patients who had nasal carriage of Staphylococcus, nasal decontamination has not shown a statistical difference of cutaneous infections of the lower limbs nor pneumonia. Although nasal decontamination reduced the incidence of sternal wound infection (Gr I 0/190 - Gr II 4/202 ; p = 0.017). Staphylococcus aureus, in the control group, induced more cutaneous infections (30.8% vs 11.7% ; p = 0.048). The

  5. Reduced dose of foscarnet as preemptive therapy for cytomegalovirus infection following reduced-intensity cord blood transplantation.

    PubMed

    Narimatsu, H; Kami, M; Kato, D; Matsumura, T; Murashige, N; Kusumi, E; Yuji, K; Hori, A; Shibata, T; Masuoka, K; Wake, A; Miyakoshi, S; Morinaga, S; Taniguchi, S

    2007-03-01

    Although foscarnet is a promising alternative for the treatment of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, its toxicity can be significant in patients with advanced age. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 123 patients (median age of 55; range, 17-79) who received reduced-intensity cord blood transplantation (RI-CBT). Patients preemptively received reduced-dose foscarnet 30 mg/kg twice daily when CMV antigenemia exceeded 10/50,000. Sixty-three patients developed CMV antigenemia on a median of day 34, and 29 received foscarnet preemptively. The median level of CMV antigenemia at the initiation of foscarnet was 30. Median duration of foscarnet administration was 24 days. Adverse effects included electrolyte abnormalities (n=19), renal impairment (n=13), and skin eruption requiring discontinuation of foscarnet (n=1). Preemptive therapy of foscarnet was completed in 18 patients. Seven patients died during foscarnet use without developing CMV disease. The remaining 3 developed CMV enterocolitis 5, 14, and 17 days after initiation of foscarnet. All of them were successfully treated with ganciclovir or foscarnet. Reduced dose of foscarnet is beneficial to control CMV reactivation following RI-CBT; however, it has considerable toxicities in RI-CBT recipients with advanced age. Further studies are warranted to minimize toxicities and identify optimal dosages.

  6. Reducing hospital-acquired infection by quantitative risk modeling of intravenous bag preparation.

    PubMed

    Tidswell, Edward C; Rockwell, Jim; Wright, Marc-Oliver

    2010-01-01

    Vascular access of patients by peripheral and central venous catheters for the delivery of sterile or aseptically manufactured parenterals is commonly regarded as one of the major causes of blood stream infections. Rigorous evaluation and management of the risks of microbial infection originating from the administration of aseptically manufactured therapies remain imperative to reduce patient infection risks. Healthcare clinicians are continually faced with choosing intravenous (IV) parenteral administration strategies to minimize patient blood stream infection risk. Data facilitating such decisions are often difficult to obtain. Analysis and interpretation of the available, reported hospital infection rate data to evaluate medical device- and therapy-associated infection rates are constrained by the variability and uncertainty associated with each individual administration scenario. Moreover, clinical trials quantifying infection risk are constrained by their practicality, cost, and the control of the exacting requisite trial criteria. Furthermore, it is ethically inappropriate to systematically conduct clinical evaluations incorporating conditions that do not favor the best possible patient outcomes. Quantitative risk modeling (QRM) is a unique tool offering an alternative and affective means of assessing design and clinical use in the context of the clinical environment on medical device and combinatorial therapy infection rates. Here, we report the generation of QRMs and the evaluation of manual admixing IV bags for use in IV administration sets upon patient infection rates. The manual admixing of IV bags was assessed for the opportunity and risk of microbial ingress accessing across the sterile barrier during clinical preparation and contaminating the IV solution. The risk of microbial contamination was evaluated under (a) ISO 5 compounding conditions adopting ideal aseptic technique (in compliance with USP 〈797〉) and (b) realistic worst-case point

  7. Capillarity-induced disassembly of virions in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaobin; Barclay, J. Elaine; Peng, Wenchao; Li, Yang; Li, Xianyu; Zhang, Guoliang; Evans, David J.; Zhang, Fengbao

    2008-04-01

    Studying the transport and fate of viruses through nanochannels is of great importance. By using the nanochannel of a carbon nanotube (CNT) as an ideal model, we evaluated the possibility of capillarity-induced viral transport through a closely fitting nanochannel and explored the mechanisms involved. It is shown both experimentally and theoretically that Cowpea mosaic virus can enter CNTs by capillarity. However, when introduced into a nanotube the protein capsid may disassemble. During the initial capillary filling stage, anomalous needle-shaped high pressure exists in the centre of the nanotube's entrance. This high pressure, combining with the significant negative pressure within the nanotube, may account for the disassembly of the virions.

  8. α1-Antitrypsin reduces rhinovirus infection in primary human airway epithelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Berman, Reena; Jiang, Di; Wu, Qun; Chu, Hong Wei

    2016-01-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV) infections target airway epithelium and are the leading cause of acute exacerbations of COPD. Cigarette smoke (CS) increases the severity of viral infections, but there is no effective therapy for HRV infection. We determined whether α1-antitrypsin (A1AT) reduces HRV-16 infection in CS-exposed primary human airway epithelial cells. Brushed bronchial epithelial cells from normal subjects and patients diagnosed with COPD were cultured at air-liquid interface to induce mucociliary differentiation. These cells were treated with A1AT or bovine serum albumin for 2 hours and then exposed to air or whole cigarette smoke (WCS) with or without HRV-16 (5×10(4) 50% Tissue Culture Infective Dose [TCID50]/transwell) infection for 24 hours. WCS exposure significantly increased viral load by an average of fivefold and decreased the expression of antiviral genes interferon-λ1, OAS1, and MX1. When A1AT was added to WCS-exposed cells, viral load significantly decreased by an average of 29-fold. HRV-16 infection significantly increased HRV-16 receptor intercellular adhesion molecule-1 messenger RNA expression in air-exposed cells, which was decreased by A1AT. A1AT-mediated reduction of viral load was not accompanied by increased epithelial antiviral gene expression or by inhibiting the activity of 3C protease involved in viral replication or maturation. Our findings demonstrate that A1AT treatment prevents a WCS-induced increase in viral load and for the first time suggest a therapeutic effect of A1AT on HRV infection.

  9. Uukuniemi Phlebovirus assembly and secretion leave a functional imprint on the virion glycome.

    PubMed

    Crispin, Max; Harvey, David J; Bitto, David; Halldorsson, Steinar; Bonomelli, Camille; Edgeworth, Matthew; Scrivens, James H; Huiskonen, Juha T; Bowden, Thomas A

    2014-09-01

    Uukuniemi virus (UUKV) is a model system for investigating the genus Phlebovirus of the Bunyaviridae. We report the UUKV glycome, revealing differential processing of the Gn and Gc virion glycoproteins. Both glycoproteins display poly-N-acetyllactosamines, consistent with virion assembly in the medial Golgi apparatus, whereas oligomannose-type glycans required for DC-SIGN-dependent cellular attachment are predominant on Gc. Local virion structure and the route of viral egress from the cell leave a functional imprint on the phleboviral glycome.

  10. Enhancement of the Musca domestica hytrosavirus infection with orally delivered reducing agents.

    PubMed

    Boucias, D; Baniszewski, J; Prompiboon, P; Lietze, V; Geden, C

    2015-01-01

    House flies (Musca domestica L.) throughout the world are infected with the salivary gland hypertrophy virus MdSGHV (Hytrosaviridae). Although the primary route of infection is thought to be via ingestion, flies that are old enough to feed normally are resistant to infection per os, suggesting that the peritrophic matrix (PM) is a barrier to virus transmission. Histological examination of the peritrophic matrix of healthy flies revealed a multilaminate structure produced by midgut cells located near the proventriculus. SEM revealed the PM to form a confluent sheet surrounding the food bolus with pores/openings less than 10nm in diameter. TEM revealed the PM to be multilayered, varying in width from 350 to 900 nm, and generally thinner in male than in female flies. When flies were fed on the reducing agents dithiothetriol (DTT) or tris (2-caboxyethyl)phosphine hydrochloride (TCEP) for 48 h before per os exposure to the virus, infection rates increased 10- to 20-fold compared with flies that did not receive the reducing agent treatments. PM's from flies treated with DTT and TCEP displayed varying degrees of disruption, particularly in the outer layer, and lacked the electron-dense inner layer facing the ectoperitrophic space. Both drugs were somewhat toxic to the flies, resulting in>40% mortality at doses greater than 10mM (DTT) or 5 mM (TCEP). DTT increased male fly susceptibility (55.1% infected) more than that of females (7.8%), whereas TCEP increased susceptibility of females (42.9%) more than that of males (26.2%). The cause for the sex differences in response to oral exposure the reducing agents is unclear. Exposing flies to food treated with virus and the reducing agents at the same time, rather than pretreating flies with the drugs, had no effect on susceptibility to the virus. Presumably, the reducing agent disrupted the enveloped virus and acted as a viricidal agent. In summary, it is proposed that the reducing agents influence integrity of the PM barrier

  11. Risk factors and outcomes associated with vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus infections with reduced susceptibilities to linezolid.

    PubMed

    Santayana, Elena M; Grim, Shellee A; Janda, William M; Layden, Jennifer E; Lee, Todd A; Clark, Nina M

    2012-09-01

    A retrospective matched case-control study of hospitalized patients with vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) infection with reduced susceptibility to linezolid was performed in order to identify risk factors for this infection and describe patient outcomes. Forty-eight linezolid nonsusceptible VRE cases were identified between January 1, 2000, and September 30, 2008, and compared to 96 controls with linezolid-susceptible VRE, matched based on culture date and anatomic site of infection. Demographic, clinical and microbiological data were collected. On univariable analysis, risk factors for reduced linezolid susceptibility included allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant and/or solid organ transplant (odds ratio [OR]: 2.63; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.13-6.15; P = 0.025), receipt of immunosuppressive medications (OR: 2.39; 95% CI: 1.08-5.29; P = 0.032) including corticosteroids (OR: 2.40; 95% CI: 1.03-5.58; P = 0.042) and noncorticosteroid immunosuppressives (OR: 2.31; 95% CI: 1.00-5.30; P = 0.049), and receipt of linezolid within 1 year prior to infection (OR: 34.50, 95% CI: 4.60-259.02; P < 0.001). On multivariable analysis, only receipt of linezolid within 1 year remained an independent risk factor for reduced linezolid susceptibility (OR: 31.84; 95% CI: 4.20-241.39; P < 0.001), although most patients with VRE with reduced linezolid susceptibility had not received linezolid in the year prior. Reduced linezolid susceptibility did not impact patient outcomes including clinical or microbiological cure, hospital length of stay, or all-cause mortality.

  12. Progesterone-based contraceptives reduce adaptive immune responses and protection against sequential influenza A virus infections.

    PubMed

    Hall, Olivia J; Nachbagauer, Raffael; Vermillion, Meghan S; Fink, Ashley L; Phuong, Vanessa; Krammer, Florian; Klein, Sabra L

    2017-02-08

    In addition to their intended use, progesterone (P4)-based contraceptives promote anti-inflammatory immune responses, yet their effects on the outcome of infectious diseases, including influenza A virus (IAV), are rarely evaluated. To evaluate their impact on immune responses to sequential IAV infections, adult female mice were treated with placebo or one of two progestins, P4 or levonorgestrel (LNG), and infected with mouse adapted (ma) H1N1 virus. Treatment with P4 or LNG reduced morbidity, but had no effect on pulmonary virus titers, during primary H1N1 infection as compared to placebo treatment. In serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, total anti-IAV IgG and IgA titers and virus neutralizing antibody titers, but not hemagglutinin stalk antibody titers, were lower in progestin-treated mice as compared with placebo-treated mice. Females were challenged six weeks later with either a maH1N1 drift variant (maH1N1dv) or maH3N2 IAV. Protection following infection with the maH1N1dv was similar among all groups. In contrast, following challenge with maH3N2, progestin treatment reduced survival as well as numbers and activity of H1N1- and H3N2-specific memory CD8+ T cells, including tissue resident cells, compared with placebo treatment. In contrast to primary IAV infection, progestin treatment increased neutralizing and IgG antibody titers against both challenge viruses compared with placebo treatment. While the immunomodulatory properties of progestins protected naïve females against severe outcome from IAV infection, it made them more susceptible to secondary challenge with a heterologous IAV, despite improving their antibody responses against a secondary IAV infection. Taken together, the immunomodulatory effects of progestins differentially regulate the outcome of infection depending on exposure history.IMPORTANCE The impact of hormone-based contraceptives on the outcome of infectious diseases outside of the reproductive tract is rarely considered. Using a mouse

  13. Purification of HIV-1 virions by subtilisin digestion or CD45 immunoaffinity depletion for biochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Ott, David E

    2009-01-01

    The presence of cellular proteins outside and inside retroviruses can indicate the roles they play in viral biology. However, experiments examining retroviruses can be complicated by the contamination of even highly purified virion preparations with nonviral particles (either microvesicles or exosomes). Two useful methods have been developed that can remove contaminating particles from virus stocks to produce highly pure virus preparations. One approach, the subtilisin digestion procedure, enzymatically removes the proteins outside the virions. While this method is well suited for the analysis of the interior proteins in the virions, it removes the extracellular domains of the integral membrane proteins on the virion. To preserve the proteins on the exterior of the virion for biochemical studies, a CD45 immunoaffinity depletion procedure that removes vesicles by capture with antibody-linked microbeads is employed. These methods allow for the isolation of highly purified virion preparations that are suitable for a wide variety of experiments, including the biochemical characterization of cellular proteins both on and in HIV virions, examination of virion/cell interactions, and imaging of virions.

  14. Antibodies elicited by yeast glycoproteins recognize HIV-1 virions and potently neutralize virions with high mannose N-glycans

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Fu, Hu; Luallen, Robert J.; Liu, Bingfen; Lee, Fang-Hua; Doms, Robert W.; Geng, Yu

    2015-01-01

    The glycan shield on the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) envelope (Env) glycoprotein has drawn attention as a target for HIV-1 vaccine design given that an increasing number of potent and broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) recognize epitopes entirely or partially comprised of high mannose type N-linked glycans. In an attempt to generate immunogens that target the glycan shield of HIV-1, we previously engineered a triple mutant (TM) strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that results in exclusive presentation of high mannose type N-glycans, and identified five TM yeast glycoproteins that support strong binding of 2G12, a bNAb that targets a cluster of high mannose glycans on the gp120 subunit of Env. Here, we further analyzed the antigenicity and immunogenicity of these proteins in inducing anti-HIV responses. Our study demonstrated that the 2G12-reactive TM yeast glycoproteins efficiently bound to recently identified bNAbs including PGT125–130 and PGT135 that recognize high mannose glycan-dependent epitopes. Immunization of rabbits with a single TM yeast glycoprotein (Gp38 or Pst1), when conjugated to a promiscuous T-cell epitope peptide and coadministered with a Toll-like receptor 2 agonist, induced glycan-specific HIV-1 Env cross-reactive antibodies. The immune sera bound to both synthetic mannose oligosaccharides and gp120 proteins from a broad range of HIV-1 strains. The purified antibodies recognized and captured virions that contain both complex- and high mannose-type of N-glycans, and potently neutralized virions from different HIV-1 clades but only when the virions were enforced to retain high mannose N-glycans. This study provides insights into the elicitation of anti-carbohydrate, HIV-1 Env-cross reactive antibodies with a heterologous glycoprotein and may have applications in the design and administration of immunogens that target the viral glycan shield for development of an effective HIV-1 vaccine. PMID:26277072

  15. Reduced Responsiveness of Blood Leukocytes to Lipopolysaccharide Does not Predict Nosocomial Infections in Critically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    van Vught, Lonneke A; Wiewel, Maryse A; Hoogendijk, Arie J; Scicluna, Brendon P; Belkasim-Bohoudi, Hakima; Horn, Janneke; Schultz, Marcus J; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-08-01

    Critically ill patients show signs of immune suppression, which is considered to increase vulnerability to nosocomial infections. Whole-blood stimulation is frequently used to test the function of the innate immune system. We here assessed the association between whole-blood leukocyte responsiveness to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and subsequent occurrence of nosocomial infections in critically ill patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). All consecutive critically ill patients admitted to the ICU between April 2012 and June 2013 with two or more systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria and an expected length of ICU stay of more than 24 h were enrolled. Age- and sex-matched healthy individuals were included as controls. Blood was drawn the first morning after ICU admission and stimulated ex vivo with 100 ng/mL ultrapure LPS for 3 h. Tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and IL-6 were measured in supernatants. Seventy-three critically ill patients were included, of whom 10 developed an ICU-acquired infection. Compared with healthy subjects, whole-blood leukocytes of patients were less responsive to ex vivo stimulation with LPS, as reflected by strongly reduced tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 levels in culture supernatants. Results were not different between patients who did and those who did not develop an ICU-acquired infection. The extent of reduced LPS responsiveness of blood leukocytes in critically ill patients on the first day after ICU admission does not relate to the subsequent development of ICU-acquired infections. These results argue against the use of whole-blood stimulation as a functional test applied early after ICU admission to predict nosocomial infection.

  16. Reducing mortality and infections after congenital heart surgery in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Kathy J; Castañeda, Aldo R; Cherian, K M; Couser, Chris A; Dale, Emily K; Gauvreau, Kimberlee; Hickey, Patricia A; Koch Kupiec, Jennifer; Morrow, Debra Forbes; Novick, William M; Rangel, Shawn J; Zheleva, Bistra; Christenson, Jan T

    2014-11-01

    There is little information about congenital heart surgery outcomes in developing countries. The International Quality Improvement Collaborative for Congenital Heart Surgery in Developing World Countries uses a registry and quality improvement strategies with nongovernmental organization reinforcement to reduce mortality. Registry data were used to evaluate impact. Twenty-eight sites in 17 developing world countries submitted congenital heart surgery data to a registry, received annual benchmarking reports, and created quality improvement teams. Webinars targeted 3 key drivers: safe perioperative practice, infection reduction, and team-based practice. Registry data were audited annually; only verified data were included in analyses. Risk-adjusted standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) and standardized infection ratios among participating sites were calculated. Twenty-seven sites had verified data in at least 1 year, and 1 site withdrew. Among 15,049 cases of pediatric congenital heart surgery, unadjusted mortality was 6.3% and any major infection was 7.0%. SMRs for the overall International Quality Improvement Collaborative for Congenital Heart Surgery in Developing World Countries were 0.71 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.62-0.81) in 2011 and 0.76 (95% CI 0.69-0.83) in 2012, compared with 2010 baseline. SMRs among 7 sites participating in all 3 years were 0.85 (95% CI 0.71-1.00) in 2011 and 0.80 (95% CI 0.66-0.96) in 2012; among 14 sites participating in 2011 and 2012, the SMR was 0.80 (95% CI 0.70-0.91) in 2012. Standardized infection ratios were similarly reduced. Congenital heart surgery risk-adjusted mortality and infections were reduced in developing world programs participating in the collaborative quality improvement project and registry. Similar strategies might allow rapid reduction in global health care disparities. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  17. Drug Treatment Combined with BCG Vaccination Reduces Disease Reactivation in Guinea Pigs Infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Shaobin; Shanley, Crystal A.; Caraway, Megan L.; Orme, Eileen A.; Henao-Tamayo, Marcela; Hascall-Dove, Laurel; Ackart, David; Orme, Ian M.; Ordway, Diane J.; Basaraba, Randall J.

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus-Calmette-Guerin (BCG), the only human tuberculosis vaccine, primes a partially protective immune response against M. tuberculosis infection in humans and animals. In guinea pigs, BCG vaccination slows the progression of disease and reduces the severity of necrotic granulomas, which harbor a population of drug-tolerant bacilli. The objective of this study was to determine if reducing disease severity by BCG vaccination of guinea pigs prior to M. tuberculosis challenge enhanced the efficacy of combination drug therapy. At 20 days of infection, treatment of vaccinated and non-vaccinated animals with rifampin, isoniazid, and pyrizinamide (RHZ) was initiated for 4 or 8 weeks. On days 50, 80 and 190 of infection (10 weeks after drug were withdrawn), treatment efficacy was evaluated by quantifying clinical condition, bacterial loads, lesion severity, and dynamic changes in peripheral blood and lung leukocyte numbers by flow cytometry. In a separate, long-term survival study, treatment efficacy was evaluated by determining disease reactivation frequency post-mortem. BCG vaccination alone delayed pulmonary and extra-pulmonary disease progression, but failed to prevent dissemination of bacilli and the formation of necrotic granulomas. Drug therapy either alone or in combination with BCG, was more effective at lessening clinical disease and lesion severity compared to control animals or those receiving BCG alone. Fewer residual lesions in BCG vaccinated and drug treated animals, equated to a reduced frequency of reactivation disease and improvement in survival even out to 500 days of infection. The combining of BCG vaccination and drug therapy was more effective at resolving granulomas such that fewer animals had evidence of residual infection and thus less reactivation disease. PMID:22244979

  18. N-terminal basic amino acid residues of Beet black scorch virus capsid protein play a critical role in virion assembly and systemic movement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Zhao, Xiaofei; Zhang, Yanjing; Niu, Shaofang; Qu, Feng; Zhang, Yongliang; Han, Chenggui; Yu, Jialin; Li, Dawei

    2013-06-20

    Beet black scorch virus (BBSV) is a small single-stranded, positive-sense RNA plant virus belonging to the genus Necrovirus, family Tombusviridae. Its capsid protein (CP) contains a 13 amino acid long basic region at the N-terminus, rich in arginine and lysine residues, which is thought to interact with viral RNA to initiate virion assembly. In the current study, a series of BBSV mutants containing amino acid substitutions as well as deletions within the N-terminal region were generated and examined for their effects on viral RNA replication, virion assembly, and long distance spread in protoplasts and whole host plants of BBSV. The RNA-binding activities of the mutated CPs were also evaluated in vitro. These experiments allowed us to identify two key basic amino acid residues in this region that are responsible for initiating virus assembly through RNA-binding. Proper assembly of BBSV particles is in turn needed for efficient viral systemic movement. We have identified two basic amino acid residues near the N-terminus of the BBSV CP that bind viral RNA with high affinity to initiate virion assembly. We further provide evidence showing that systemic spread of BBSV in infected plants requires intact virions. This study represents the first in-depth investigation of the role of basic amino acid residues within the N-terminus of a necroviral CP.

  19. Herpes simplex virus VP16 rescues viral mRNA from destruction by the virion host shutoff function.

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Q; Smibert, C A; Koop, K E; Lavery, C; Capone, J P; Weinheimer, S P; Smiley, J R

    1996-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) virions contain two regulatory proteins that facilitate the onset of the lytic cycle: VP16 activates transcription of the viral immediate-early genes, and vhs triggers shutoff of host protein synthesis and accelerated turnover of cellular and viral mRNAs. VP16 and vhs form a complex in infected cells, raising the possibility of a regulatory link between them. Here we show that viral protein synthesis and mRNA levels undergo a severe decline at intermediate times after infection with a VP16 null mutant, culminating in virtually complete translational arrest. This phenotype was rescued by a transcriptionally incompetent derivative of VP16 that retains vhs binding activity, and was eliminated by inactivating the vhs gene. These results indicate that VP16 dampens vhs activity, allowing HSV mRNAs to persist in infected cells. Further evidence supporting this hypothesis came from the demonstration that a stably transfected cell line expressing VP16 was resistant to host shutoff induced by superinfecting HSV virions. Thus, in addition to its well known function as a transcriptional activator, VP16 stimulates viral gene expression at a post-transcriptional level, by sparing viral mRNAs from degradation by one of the virus-induced host shutoff mechanisms. Images PMID:8665865

  20. Abortive replication of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus in Sf9 and High Five cells: Defective nuclear transport of the virions

    SciTech Connect

    Katou, Yasuhiro; Ikeda, Motoko; Kobayashi, Michihiro . E-mail: michihir@agr.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2006-04-10

    Despite close genetic relationship, Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) and Autographa californica multicapsid NPV (AcMNPV) display a distinct host range property. Here, BmNPV replication was examined in Sf9 and High Five cells that were nonproductive for BmNPV infection but supported high titers of AcMNPV replication. Recombinant BmNPV, vBm/gfp/lac, containing bm-ie1 promoter-driven egfp showed that few Sf9 and High Five cells infected with vBm/gfp/lac expressed EGFP, while large proportion of EGFP-expressing cells was observed when transfected with vBm/gfp/lac DNA. Immunocytochemical analysis showed that BmNPV was not imported into the nucleus of these two cell lines, while recombinant BmNPV, vBm{delta}64/ac-gp64 possessing AcMNPV gp64 was imported into the nucleus, yielding progeny virions in High Five cells, but not Sf9 cells. These results indicate that the defective nuclear import of infected virions due to insufficient BmNPV GP64 function is involved in the restricted BmNPV replication in Sf9 and High Five cells.

  1. Abortive replication of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus in Sf9 and High Five cells: defective nuclear transport of the virions.

    PubMed

    Katou, Yasuhiro; Ikeda, Motoko; Kobayashi, Michihiro

    2006-04-10

    Despite close genetic relationship, Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) and Autographa californica multicapsid NPV (AcMNPV) display a distinct host range property. Here, BmNPV replication was examined in Sf9 and High Five cells that were nonproductive for BmNPV infection but supported high titers of AcMNPV replication. Recombinant BmNPV, vBm/gfp/lac, containing bm-ie1 promoter-driven egfp showed that few Sf9 and High Five cells infected with vBm/gfp/lac expressed EGFP, while large proportion of EGFP-expressing cells was observed when transfected with vBm/gfp/lac DNA. Immunocytochemical analysis showed that BmNPV was not imported into the nucleus of these two cell lines, while recombinant BmNPV, vBmDelta64/ac-gp64 possessing AcMNPV gp64 was imported into the nucleus, yielding progeny virions in High Five cells, but not Sf9 cells. These results indicate that the defective nuclear import of infected virions due to insufficient BmNPV GP64 function is involved in the restricted BmNPV replication in Sf9 and High Five cells.

  2. In vivo treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection with liposomal linolenic acid reduces colonization and ameliorates inflammation.

    PubMed

    Thamphiwatana, Soracha; Gao, Weiwei; Obonyo, Marygorret; Zhang, Liangfang

    2014-12-09

    Helicobacter pylori infection is marked by a vast prevalence and strong association with various gastric diseases, including gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric cancer. Because of the rapid emergence of H. pylori strains resistant to existing antibiotics, current treatment regimens show a rapid decline of their eradication rates. Clearly, novel antibacterial strategies against H. pylori are urgently needed. Here, we investigated the in vivo therapeutic potential of liposomal linolenic acid (LipoLLA) for the treatment of H. pylori infection. The LipoLLA formulation with a size of ∼ 100 nm was prone to fusion with bacterial membrane, thereby directly releasing a high dose of linolenic acids into the bacterial membrane. LipoLLA penetrated the mucus layer of mouse stomach, and a significant portion of the administered LipoLLA was retained in the stomach lining up to 24 h after the oral administration. In vivo tests further confirmed that LipoLLA was able to kill H. pylori and reduce bacterial load in the mouse stomach. LipoLLA treatment was also shown to reduce the levels of proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin 1β, interleukin 6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha, which were otherwise elevated because of the H. pylori infection. Finally, a toxicity test demonstrated excellent biocompatibility of LipoLLA to normal mouse stomach. Collectively, results from this study indicate that LipoLLA is a promising, effective, and safe therapeutic agent for the treatment of H. pylori infection.

  3. In vivo treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection with liposomal linolenic acid reduces colonization and ameliorates inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Thamphiwatana, Soracha; Gao, Weiwei; Obonyo, Marygorret; Zhang, Liangfang

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is marked by a vast prevalence and strong association with various gastric diseases, including gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric cancer. Because of the rapid emergence of H. pylori strains resistant to existing antibiotics, current treatment regimens show a rapid decline of their eradication rates. Clearly, novel antibacterial strategies against H. pylori are urgently needed. Here, we investigated the in vivo therapeutic potential of liposomal linolenic acid (LipoLLA) for the treatment of H. pylori infection. The LipoLLA formulation with a size of ∼100 nm was prone to fusion with bacterial membrane, thereby directly releasing a high dose of linolenic acids into the bacterial membrane. LipoLLA penetrated the mucus layer of mouse stomach, and a significant portion of the administered LipoLLA was retained in the stomach lining up to 24 h after the oral administration. In vivo tests further confirmed that LipoLLA was able to kill H. pylori and reduce bacterial load in the mouse stomach. LipoLLA treatment was also shown to reduce the levels of proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin 1β, interleukin 6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha, which were otherwise elevated because of the H. pylori infection. Finally, a toxicity test demonstrated excellent biocompatibility of LipoLLA to normal mouse stomach. Collectively, results from this study indicate that LipoLLA is a promising, effective, and safe therapeutic agent for the treatment of H. pylori infection. PMID:25422427

  4. Ibogaine reduces organ colonization in murine systemic and gastrointestinal Candida albicans infections.

    PubMed

    Yordanov, M; Dimitrova, P; Patkar, S; Falcocchio, S; Xoxi, E; Saso, L; Ivanovska, N

    2005-07-01

    In the present study the effect of the indole alkaloid ibogaine on the in vitro lipolytic activity and adherence to epithelial cells of Candida albicans was investigated. The substance was administered intraperitoneally at a dose of 5 mg kg(-1) day(-1) in mice with disseminated and gastrointestinal C. albicans infections. Ibogaine significantly decreased the rate of mortality and the number of C. albicans c.f.u. recovered from the kidney, liver and spleen. Ibogaine interfered with the early stages of both disseminated and gastrointestinal C. albicans infections but did not reduce the number of C. albicans c.f.u. in the organs at the late phase of infections. The development of a specific immune response was not influenced by ibogaine, since the delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction to C. albicans and the production of interferon (IFN)-gamma were similar in control and ibogaine-treated mice. The combined use of amphotericin B plus ibogaine in the treatment of mice with gastrointestinal infection reduced organ colonization more strongly than each substance alone.

  5. Reduced survivorship of Himasthla (Trematoda, Digenea)-infected cockles ( Cerastoderma edule) exposed to oxygen depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegeberg, Anne Margrethe; Jensen, K. Thomas

    1999-12-01

    Bivalve populations from inshore waters often accommodate a diverse trematode fauna that may have a variety of effects on host specimens. In particular, larval trematodes that grow or reproduce within their host are known to be severe pathogens, whereas trematodes utilising bivalves only for encystment are thought to be relatively benign. Yet this may depend on the environmental conditions, and it can be expected that such trematodes in concert with other stress agents can be detrimental to host organisms. To examine the impact of such larval trematodes on hosts subjected to stress, we studied the digenetic trematode Himasthla elongata and one of its second intermediate hosts, the bivalve Cerastoderma edule. Experimentally infected cockles and non-infected cockles were exposed to oxygen depletion, whereupon we measured their burrowing ability and survivorship. After 30 h of hypoxia, the survival of infected cockles was significantly reduced compared to non-infected cockles, whereas no effect of parasites on cockles under normoxic conditions was found. In addition, parasites tended to reduce the burrowing ability of cockles exposed to hypoxia but the effect was not clear. The effect of parasites and possible ecological consequences are discussed and it is suggested that the combined effects of parasites and oxygen deficiency may explain some hitherto unexplained cases of mass mortalities in bivalve populations.

  6. Cellular VPS4 Is Required for Efficient Entry and Egress of Budded Virions of Autographa californica Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhaofei

    2012-01-01

    Membrane budding is essential for the egress of many enveloped viruses, and this process shares similarities with the biogenesis of multivesicular bodies (MVBs). In eukaryotic cells, the budding of intraluminal vesicles (IVLs) is mediated by the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery and some viruses require ESCRT machinery components or functions to bud from host cells. Baculoviruses, such as Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV), enter host cells by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Viral DNA replication and nucleocapsid assembly occur within the nucleus. Some progeny nucleocapsids are subsequently trafficked to, and bud from, the plasma membrane, forming budded virions (BV). To determine whether the host ESCRT machinery is important or necessary for AcMNPV replication, we cloned a cDNA of Spodoptera frugiperda VPS4, a key regulator for disassembly and recycling of ESCRT III. We then examined viral infection and budding in the presence of wild-type (WT) or dominant negative (DN) forms of VPS4. First, we used a viral complementation system, in combination with fluorescent tags, to examine the effects of transiently expressed WT or DN VPS4 on viral entry. We found that dominant negative VPS4 substantially inhibited virus entry. Entering virus was observed within aberrant compartments containing the DN VPS4 protein. We next used recombinant bacmids expressing WT or DN VPS4 proteins to examine virus egress. We found that production of infectious AcMNPV BV was substantially reduced by expression of DN VPS4 but not by WT VPS4. Together, these results indicate that a functional VPS4 is necessary for efficient AcMNPV BV entry into, and egress from, insect cells. PMID:22072775

  7. PPEY motif within the rabies virus (RV) matrix protein is essential for efficient virion release and RV pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Wirblich, Christoph; Tan, Gene S; Papaneri, Amy; Godlewski, Peter J; Orenstein, Jan Marc; Harty, Ronald N; Schnell, Matthias J

    2008-10-01

    Late (L) domains containing the highly conserved sequence PPXY were first described for retroviruses, and later research confirmed their conservation and importance for efficient budding of several negative-stranded RNA viruses. Rabies virus (RV), a member of the Rhabdoviridae family, contains the sequence PPEY (amino acids 35 to 38) within the N terminus of the matrix (M) protein, but the functions of this potential L-domain in the viral life cycle, viral pathogenicity, and immunogenicity have not been established. Here we constructed a series of recombinant RVs containing mutations within the PPEY motif and analyzed their effects on viral replication and RV pathogenicity. Our results indicate that the first proline at position 35 is the most important for viral replication, whereas P36 and Y38 have a lesser but still noticeable impact. The reduction in viral replication was most likely due to inhibition of virion release, because initially no major impact on RV RNA synthesis was observed. In addition, results from electron microscopy demonstrated that the M4A mutant virus (PPEY-->SAEA) displayed a more cell-associated phenotype than that of wild-type RV. Furthermore, all mutations within the PPEY motif resulted in reduced spread of the recombinant RVs as indicated by a reduction in focus size. Importantly, recombinant PPEY L-domain mutants were highly attenuated in mice yet still elicited potent antibody responses against RV G protein that were as high as those observed after infection with wild-type virus. Our data indicate that the RV PPEY motif has L-domain activity essential for efficient virus production and pathogenicity but is not essential for immunogenicity and thus can be targeted to increase the safety of rabies vaccine vectors.

  8. Implementing quality improvement strategies to reduce healthcare-associated infections: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mauger, Barbara; Marbella, Anne; Pines, Elizabeth; Chopra, Ryan; Black, Edgar R; Aronson, Naomi

    2014-10-01

    Comprehensive incidence estimates indicate that 1.7 million healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) and 99,000 HAI-associated deaths occur in US hospitals. Preventing HAIs could save $25.0 to $31.5 billion. Identifying effective quality improvement (QI) strategies for promoting adherence to evidence-based preventive interventions could reduce infections. We searched MEDLINE, CINAHL, and EMBASE from 2006-2012 for English-language articles with ≥ 100 patients that described an implementation strategy to increase adherence with evidence-based preventive interventions and that met study design criteria. One reviewer abstracted and appraised study quality, with verification by a second. QI strategies included audit and feedback; financial incentives, regulation, and policy; organizational change; patient education; provider education; and provider reminder systems. We evaluated data on HAIs from 30 articles reporting adherence and infection rates that accounted for confounding or secular trends. Many of the measures improved significantly, especially adherence. Results varied by QI strategy(s). Moderate strength of evidence supports improvement in adherence and infection rates when audit and feedback plus provider reminder systems or audit and feedback alone is added to organizational change and provider education. Strength of evidence is low when provider reminder systems alone are added to organizational change and provider education. There were no studies on HAIs in nonhospital settings that met the selection criteria. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Therapeutic Chlamydophila abortus and C. pecorum vaccination transiently reduces bovine mastitis associated with Chlamydophila infection.

    PubMed

    Biesenkamp-Uhe, Carolin; Li, Yihang; Hehnen, Hans-Robert; Sachse, Konrad; Kaltenboeck, Bernhard

    2007-02-01

    Infections with Chlamydophila abortus and C. pecorum are highly prevalent in cattle and have been associated with bovine mastitis. A prospective cohort study was conducted with a herd of 140 Holstein dairy cows to investigate the influence of Chlamydophila infection on subclinical inflammation of the bovine mammary gland as characterized by somatic cell numbers in milk. PCR detection of C. abortus and low serum antibody levels against Chlamydophila spp. were significantly associated with subclinical mastitis. To examine the effect of the infection by response modification, immune perturbation was done by two subcutaneous administrations of an experimental vaccine preparation of inactivated C. abortus and C. pecorum elementary bodies. Vaccination against Chlamydophila highly significantly decreased milk somatic cell numbers, thus reducing bovine mastitis, and increased antibody levels against Chlamydophila but did not eliminate shedding of C. abortus in milk as detected by PCR. The protective effect peaked at 11 weeks after vaccination and lasted for a total of 14 weeks. Vaccination with the Chlamydophila vaccine, a mock vaccine, or a combination vaccine against bovine viral diseases highly significantly increased C. abortus shedding in milk for 1 week, presumably mediated by the vaccine adjuvant. In summary, this study shows an etiological involvement of the widespread Chlamydophila infections in bovine mastitis, a herd disease of critical importance for the dairy industry. Furthermore, this investigation shows the potential for temporary improvement of chlamydial disease by therapeutic vaccination. Chlamydophila vaccination of cattle might serve as a testing ground for vaccines against human chlamydial infections.

  10. Does Preadmission Cutaneous Chlorhexidine Preparation Reduce Surgical Site Infections After Total Knee Arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Zhou, Peter L; Jauregui, Julio J; Mont, Michael A

    2016-07-01

    Many preventive methodologies seek to reduce the risk of surgical site infections after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), including the use of preoperative chlorhexidine baths and cloths. Although we have demonstrated in previous studies that this may be an efficacious method for infection prevention, our study was underpowered and we therefore set out to evaluate this with a larger sample size. (1) Does a preadmission chlorhexidine cloth skin preparation protocol decrease the risk of surgical site infection in patients undergoing TKA? (2) When stratified using the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) risk categories, which categories are associated with risk reduction from the preadmission chlorhexidine preparation protocol? In our study, all patients (3717 total) who had undergone primary or revision TKA at a single institution between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2013, were identified, of whom 991 patients used the chlorhexidine cloths before surgery and 2726 patients did not. All patients were provided cloths with instructions before surgery; however, as a result of a lack of compliance, we were able to substratify patients into treatment and control cohorts. Additionally, we substratified patients by NHSN risk category to determine differences in infection between the two cohorts (cloth versus no cloth). Patient medical records and an infection-tracking database were reviewed to determine the development of periprosthetic infection (patients who had superficial infections were excluded from our study) in both groups after 1 year surveillance. We then calculated relative risk reductions with use of chlorhexidine gluconate and stratified results based on NHSN risk category. Use of a preoperative chlorhexidine cloth skin preparation protocol is associated with reduced relative risk of periprosthetic infection after TKA (infections with protocol: three of 991 [0.3%]; infections in control: 52 of 2726 [1.9%]; relative risk [RR]: 6.3 [95% confidence interval

  11. Dapagliflozin‐lowered blood glucose reduces respiratory Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Åstrand, Annika; Wingren, Cecilia; Benjamin, Audra; Tregoning, John S; Garnett, James P; Groves, Helen; Gill, Simren; Orogo‐Wenn, Maria; Lundqvist, Anders J; Walters, Dafydd; Smith, David M; Taylor, John D; Baker, Emma H

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose Hyperglycaemia increases glucose concentrations in airway surface liquid and increases the risk of pulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. We determined whether reduction of blood and airway glucose concentrations by the anti‐diabetic drug dapagliflozin could reduce P. aeruginosa growth/survival in the lungs of diabetic mice. Experimental Approach The effect of dapagliflozin on blood and airway glucose concentration, the inflammatory response and infection were investigated in C57BL/6J (wild type, WT) or leptin receptor‐deficient (db/db) mice, treated orally with dapagliflozin prior to intranasal dosing with LPS or inoculation with P. aeruginosa. Pulmonary glucose transport and fluid absorption were investigated in Wistar rats using the perfused fluid‐filled lung technique. Key Results Fasting blood, airway glucose and lactate concentrations were elevated in the db/db mouse lung. LPS challenge increased inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from WT and db/db mice with and without dapagliflozin treatment. P. aeruginosa colony‐forming units (CFU) were increased in db/db lungs. Pretreatment with dapagliflozin reduced blood and bronchoalveolar lavage glucose concentrations and P. aeruginosa CFU in db/db mice towards those seen in WT. Dapagliflozin had no adverse effects on the inflammatory response in the mouse or pulmonary glucose transport or fluid absorption in the rat lung. Conclusion and Implications Pharmacological lowering of blood glucose with dapagliflozin effectively reduced P. aeruginosa infection in the lungs of diabetic mice and had no adverse pulmonary effects in the rat. Dapagliflozin has potential to reduce the use, or augment the effect, of antimicrobials in the prevention or treatment of pulmonary infection. PMID:28192604

  12. Localization of the Houdinisome (Ejection Proteins) inside the Bacteriophage P22 Virion by Bubblegram Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weimin; Leavitt, Justin C.; Cheng, Naiqian; Gilcrease, Eddie B.; Motwani, Tina; Teschke, Carolyn M.; Casjens, Sherwood R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The P22 capsid is a T=7 icosahedrally symmetric protein shell with a portal protein dodecamer at one 5-fold vertex. Extending outwards from that vertex is a short tail, and putatively extending inwards is a 15-nm-long α-helical barrel formed by the C-terminal domains of portal protein subunits. In addition to the densely packed genome, the capsid contains three “ejection proteins” (E-proteins [gp7, gp16, and gp20]) destined to exit from the tightly sealed capsid during the process of DNA delivery into target cells. We estimated their copy numbers by quantitative SDS-PAGE as approximately 12 molecules per virion of gp16 and gp7 and 30 copies of gp20. To localize them, we used bubblegram imaging, an adaptation of cryo-electron microscopy in which gaseous bubbles induced in proteins by prolonged irradiation are used to map the proteins’ locations. We applied this technique to wild-type P22, a triple mutant lacking all three E-proteins, and three mutants each lacking one E-protein. We conclude that all three E-proteins are loosely clustered around the portal axis, in the region displaced radially inwards from the portal crown. The bubblegram data imply that approximately half of the α-helical barrel seen in the portal crystal structure is disordered in the mature virion, and parts of the disordered region present binding sites for E-proteins. Thus positioned, the E-proteins are strategically placed to pass down the shortened barrel and through the portal ring and the tail, as they exit from the capsid during an infection. PMID:27507825

  13. Improved cell survival by the reduction of immediate-early gene expression in replication-defective mutants of herpes simplex virus type 1 but not by mutation of the virion host shutoff function.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, P A; Wang, M J; Friedmann, T

    1994-01-01

    42-VP16 double mutant, in 1850 delta 42, showed reduced toxicity only at low multiplicities of infection. To test the role of the virion host shutoff function as an additional candidate to influence virus-induced CPE, we have introduced a large insertion mutation into the virion host shutoff gene of an IE 3 deletion mutant and the double mutant 14H delta 3.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) Images PMID:8083974

  14. Do delayed prescriptions reduce antibiotic use in respiratory tract infections? A systematic review.

    PubMed Central

    Arroll, Bruce; Kenealy, Tim; Kerse, Ngaire

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is concern about the increasing resistance of antibiotics to common bacteria. Delayed prescribing for respiratory tract infections is a strategy that may reduce the use of antibiotics. AIM: To systematically review controlled trials of delayed prescriptions to establish their capacity to reduce antibiotic intake. DESIGN OF STUDY: A systematic review of the literature. SETTING: Four studies were conducted in the United Kingdom and one in New Zealand. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE from 1966 to April 2003, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register using the following terms: 'delayed', 'antibiotics', 'prescriptions', and 'back-up' (as in back-up prescription). We included controlled trials of studies in which the intervention was a delayed prescription compared to an immediate prescription for patients with upper respiratory tract infections. The studies were selected independently and the results compared. Disagreements were resolved by discussion. The data and quality of the studies were extracted and assessed independently by two of the authors. RESULTS: Four randomised controlled trials and one before-after controlled trial contributed to the review. The relative risk in the randomised trials for lower antibiotic usage when a delayed prescription was given ranged from 0.54 for the common cold to 0.25 for otitis media. CONCLUSION: The consistent reduction in antibiotic usage in the five controlled trials included in this review suggests that delayed prescription is an effective means of reducing antibiotic usage for acute respiratory infections. The duration of delay for prescriptions ranged widely, from 1 to 7 days. PMID:14702908

  15. Simple and elegant design of a virion egress structure in Archaea.

    PubMed

    Quax, Tessa E F; Lucas, Soizick; Reimann, Julia; Pehau-Arnaudet, Gerard; Prevost, Marie-Christine; Forterre, Patrick; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Prangishvili, David

    2011-02-22

    Some viruses of Archaea use an unusual egress mechanism that involves the formation of virus-associated pyramids (VAPs) on the host cell surface. At the end of the infection cycle, these structures open outward and create apertures through which mature virions escape from the cell. Here we describe in detail the structure and composition of VAPs formed by the Sulfolobus islandicus rod-shaped virus 2 (SIRV2) in cells of its hyperthermophilic archaeal host. We show that the VAPs are stable and autonomous assemblies that can be isolated from membranes of infected cells and purified without affecting their structure. The purified VAPs are heterogeneous in size, reflecting the dynamics of VAP development in a population of infected cells; however, they have a uniform geometry, consisting of seven isosceles triangular faces forming a baseless pyramid. Biochemical and immunoelectron microscopy analyses revealed that the 10-kDa P98 protein encoded by the SIRV2 virus is the sole component of the VAPs. The VAPs were produced in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and Escherichia coli by heterologous expression of the SIRV2-P98 gene. The results confirm that P98 is the only constituent of the VAPs and demonstrate that no other viral protein is involved in the assembly of pyramids. P98 was able to produce stable structures under conditions ranging from moderate to extremely high temperatures (80 °C) and from neutral to extremely acidic pH (pH 2), demonstrating another remarkable property of this exceptional viral protein.

  16. Regulation of Hepatitis C Virion Production via Phosphorylation of the NS5A Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tellinghuisen, Timothy L.; Foss, Katie L.; Treadaway, Jason

    2008-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a significant pathogen, infecting some 170 million people worldwide. Persistent virus infection often leads to cirrhosis and liver cancer. In the infected cell many RNA directed processes must occur to maintain and spread infection. Viral genomic RNA is constantly replicating, serving as template for translation, and being packaged into new virus particles; processes that cannot occur simultaneously. Little is known about the regulation of these events. The viral NS5A phosphoprotein has been proposed as a regulator of events in the HCV life cycle for years, but the details have remained enigmatic. NS5A is a three-domain protein and the requirement of domains I and II for RNA replication is well documented. NS5A domain III is not required for RNA replication, and the function of this region in the HCV lifecycle is unknown. We have identified a small deletion in domain III that disrupts the production of infectious virus particles without altering the efficiency of HCV RNA replication. This deletion disrupts virus production at an early stage of assembly, as no intracellular virus is generated and no viral RNA and nucleocapsid protein are released from cells. Genetic mapping has indicated a single serine residue within the deletion is responsible for the observed phenotype. This serine residue lies within a casein kinase II consensus motif, and mutations that mimic phosphorylation suggest that phosphorylation at this position regulates the production of infectious virus. We have shown by genetic silencing and chemical inhibition experiments that NS5A requires casein kinase II phosphorylation at this position for virion production. A mutation that mimics phosphorylation at this position is insensitive to these manipulations of casein kinase II activity. These data provide the first evidence for a function of the domain III of NS5A and implicate NS5A as an important regulator of the RNA replication and virion assembly of HCV. The ability to

  17. A Glutaredoxin, Encoded by the G4L Gene of Vaccinia Virus, Is Essential for Virion Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    White, Christine L.; Weisberg, Andrea S.; Moss, Bernard

    2000-01-01

    Vaccinia virus encodes two glutaredoxins, O2L and G4L, both of which exhibit thioltransferase and dehydroascorbate reductase activities in vitro. Although O2L was previously found to be dispensable for virus replication, we now show that G4L is necessary for virion morphogenesis. RNase protection and Western blotting assays indicated that G4L was expressed at late times after infection and was incorporated into mature virus particles. Attempts to isolate a mutant virus with a deleted G4L gene were unsuccessful, suggesting that the protein was required for virus replication. This interpretation was confirmed by the construction and characterization of a conditional lethal recombinant virus with an inducible copy of the G4L gene replacing the original one. Expression of G4L was proportional to the concentration of inducer, and the amount of glutaredoxin could be varied from barely detectable to greater than normal amounts of protein. Immunogold labeling revealed that the induced G4L protein was associated with immature and mature virions and adjacent cytoplasmic depots. In the absence of inducer, the production of infectious virus was severely inhibited, though viral late protein synthesis appeared unaffected except for decreased maturation-dependent proteolytic processing of certain core components. Electron microscopy of cells infected under nonpermissive conditions revealed an accumulation of crescent membranes on the periphery of electron-dense globular masses but few mature particles. We concluded that the two glutaredoxin homologs encoded by vaccinia virus have different functions and that G4L has a role in virion morphogenesis, perhaps by acting as a redox protein. PMID:10982364

  18. Lymphotropic Virions Affect Chemokine Receptor-Mediated Neural Signaling and Apoptosis: Implications for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Associated Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jialin; Ghorpade, Anuja; Niemann, Douglas; Cotter, Robin L.; Thylin, Michael R.; Epstein, Leon; Swartz, Jennifer M.; Shepard, Robin B.; Liu, Xiaojuan; Nukuna, Adeline; Gendelman, Howard E.

    1999-01-01

    Chemokine receptors pivotal for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in lymphocytes and macrophages (CCR3, CCR5, and CXCR4) are expressed on neural cells (microglia, astrocytes, and/or neurons). It is these cells which are damaged during progressive HIV-1 infection of the central nervous system. We theorize that viral coreceptors could effect neural cell damage during HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD) without simultaneously affecting viral replication. To these ends, we studied the ability of diverse viral strains to affect intracellular signaling and apoptosis of neurons, astrocytes, and monocyte-derived macrophages. Inhibition of cyclic AMP, activation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, and apoptosis were induced by diverse HIV-1 strains, principally in neurons. Virions from T-cell-tropic (T-tropic) strains (MN, IIIB, and Lai) produced the most significant alterations in signaling of neurons and astrocytes. The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, induced markedly less neural damage than purified virions. Macrophage-tropic (M-tropic) strains (ADA, JR-FL, Bal, MS-CSF, and DJV) produced the least neural damage, while 89.6, a dual-tropic HIV-1 strain, elicited intermediate neural cell damage. All T-tropic strain-mediated neuronal impairments were blocked by the CXCR4 antibody, 12G5. In contrast, the M-tropic strains were only partially blocked by 12G5. CXCR4-mediated neuronal apoptosis was confirmed in pure populations of rat cerebellar granule neurons and was blocked by HA1004, an inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, protein kinase A, and protein kinase C. Taken together, these results suggest that progeny HIV-1 virions can influence neuronal signal transduction and apoptosis. This process occurs, in part, through CXCR4 and is independent of CD4 binding. T-tropic viruses that traffic in and out of the brain during progressive HIV-1 disease may play an important role in HAD neuropathogenesis. PMID:10482576

  19. Riboflavin and ultraviolet light reduce the infectivity of Babesia microti in whole blood.

    PubMed

    Tonnetti, Laura; Thorp, Aaron M; Reddy, Heather L; Keil, Shawn D; Goodrich, Raymond P; Leiby, David A

    2013-04-01

    Babesia microti is the parasite most frequently transmitted by blood transfusion in the United States. Previous work demonstrated the efficacy of riboflavin (RB) and ultraviolet (UV) light to inactivate B.microti in apheresis plasma and platelet units. In this study we investigated the effectiveness of RB and UV light to reduce the levels of B.microti in whole blood (WB). WB units were spiked with B. microti-infected hamster blood. Spearman-Karber methods were used to calculate infectivity of each sample in terms of hamster infectious dose 50% (HID50 ) value. After RB addition, the units were illuminated with 80 J/mLRBC UV light. Two samples were collected: one before illumination and one after illumination. The samples were serially diluted and dilutions injected into a group of five naive hamsters. Four weeks postinoculation (PI), blood was collected from the animals and evaluated by microscopic observation. One pilot study showed a good dose response in the animals and demonstrated that sample infectivity could be calculated in terms of an HID50 . Three additional replicates were performed in the same manner as the pilot study, but with fewer dilutions. Infectivity values were consistent between the experiments and were used to calculate log reduction. The posttreatment reduction of B. microti for all the experiments was more than 5 log. The data collected indicate that use of RB and UV is able to decrease the parasite load in WB units thus reducing the risk of transfusion-transmitted B. microti from blood components containing B. microti-infected RBCs. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  20. Nosema ceranae Can Infect Honey Bee Larvae and Reduces Subsequent Adult Longevity.

    PubMed

    Eiri, Daren M; Suwannapong, Guntima; Endler, Matthew; Nieh, James C

    2015-01-01

    Nosema ceranae causes a widespread disease that reduces honey bee health but is only thought to infect adult honey bees, not larvae, a critical life stage. We reared honey bee (Apis mellifera) larvae in vitro and provide the first demonstration that N. ceranae can infect larvae and decrease subsequent adult longevity. We exposed three-day-old larvae to a single dose of 40,000 (40K), 10,000 (10K), zero (control), or 40K autoclaved (control) N. ceranae spores in larval food. Spores developed intracellularly in midgut cells at the pre-pupal stage (8 days after egg hatching) of 41% of bees exposed as larvae. We counted the number of N. ceranae spores in dissected bee midguts of pre-pupae and, in a separate group, upon adult death. Pre-pupae exposed to the 10K or 40K spore treatments as larvae had significantly elevated spore counts as compared to controls. Adults exposed as larvae had significantly elevated spore counts as compared to controls. Larval spore exposure decreased longevity: a 40K treatment decreased the age by which 75% of adult bees died by 28%. Unexpectedly, the low dose (10K) led to significantly greater infection (1.3 fold more spores and 1.5 fold more infected bees) than the high dose (40K) upon adult death. Differential immune activation may be involved if the higher dose triggered a stronger larval immune response that resulted in fewer adult spores but imposed a cost, reducing lifespan. The impact of N. ceranae on honey bee larval development and the larvae of naturally infected colonies therefore deserve further study.

  1. Nosema ceranae Can Infect Honey Bee Larvae and Reduces Subsequent Adult Longevity

    PubMed Central

    Eiri, Daren M.; Suwannapong, Guntima; Endler, Matthew; Nieh, James C.

    2015-01-01

    Nosema ceranae causes a widespread disease that reduces honey bee health but is only thought to infect adult honey bees, not larvae, a critical life stage. We reared honey bee (Apis mellifera) larvae in vitro and provide the first demonstration that N. ceranae can infect larvae and decrease subsequent adult longevity. We exposed three-day-old larvae to a single dose of 40,000 (40K), 10,000 (10K), zero (control), or 40K autoclaved (control) N. ceranae spores in larval food. Spores developed intracellularly in midgut cells at the pre-pupal stage (8 days after egg hatching) of 41% of bees exposed as larvae. We counted the number of N. ceranae spores in dissected bee midguts of pre-pupae and, in a separate group, upon adult death. Pre-pupae exposed to the 10K or 40K spore treatments as larvae had significantly elevated spore counts as compared to controls. Adults exposed as larvae had significantly elevated spore counts as compared to controls. Larval spore exposure decreased longevity: a 40K treatment decreased the age by which 75% of adult bees died by 28%. Unexpectedly, the low dose (10K) led to significantly greater infection (1.3 fold more spores and 1.5 fold more infected bees) than the high dose (40K) upon adult death. Differential immune activation may be involved if the higher dose triggered a stronger larval immune response that resulted in fewer adult spores but imposed a cost, reducing lifespan. The impact of N. ceranae on honey bee larval development and the larvae of naturally infected colonies therefore deserve further study. PMID:26018139

  2. Moderate physical exercise reduces parasitaemia and protects colonic myenteric neurons in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Neide M; Santos, Franciele d N; Toledo, Max Jean d O; Moraes, Solange M F d; Araujo, Eduardo J d A; Sant'Ana, Debora d M G; Araujo, Silvana M d

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of moderate physical exercise on the myenteric neurons in the colonic intestinal wall of mice that had been infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. Parasitology and immunological aspects of the mice were considered. Forty-day-old male Swiss mice were divided into four groups: Trained Infected (TI), Sedentary Infected (SI), Trained Control (TC), and Sedentary Control (SC). The TC and TI were subjected to a moderate physical exercise program on a treadmill for 8 weeks. Three days after finishing exercise, the TI and SI groups were inoculated with 1,300 blood trypomastigotes of the Y strain-T. cruzi. After 75 days of infection results were obtained. Kruskal-Wallis or Analyze of variance (Tukey post hoc test) at 5% level of significance was performed. Moderate physical exercise reduced both the parasite peak (day 8 of infection) and total parasitemia compared with the sedentary groups (P < 0.05). This activity also contributed to neuronal survival (P < 0.05). Exercise caused neuronal hypertrophy (P < 0.05) and an increase in the total thickness of the intestinal wall (P < 0.05). The TI group exhibited an increase in the number of intraepithelial lymphocytes (P > 0.05). In trained animals, the number of goblet cells was reduced compared with sedentary animals (P < 0.05). Physical exercise prevented the formation of inflammatory foci in the TI group (P < 0.05) and increased the synthesis of TNF-α (P < 0.05) and TGF-β (P > 0.05). The present results demonstrated the benefits of moderate physical exercise, and reaffirmed the possibility of that it may contribute to improving clinical treatment in Chagas' disease patients. PMID:24205797

  3. Does Heparin Coating Improve Patency or Reduce Infection of Tunneled Dialysis Catheters?

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Gaurav; Allon, Michael; Saddekni, Souheil; Barker, Jill-Finkel

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Tunneled dialysis catheters are prone to frequent malfunction and infection. Catheter thrombosis occurs despite prophylactic anticoagulant locks. Catheter thrombi may also serve as a nidus for catheter infection, thereby increasing the risk of bacteremia. Thus, heparin coating of catheters may reduce thrombosis and infection. This study evaluated whether heparin-coated hemodialysis catheters have fewer infections or greater cumulative survival than noncoated catheters. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: We retrospectively queried a prospective access database to analyze the outcomes of 175 tunneled dialysis catheters placed in the internal jugular vein, including 89 heparin-coated catheters and 86 noncoated catheters. The primary outcome was cumulative catheter survival, and the secondary outcome was infection-free catheter survival. Results: The two patient groups were similar in demographics and clinical and catheter features. Catheter-related bacteremia occurred less frequently with heparin-coated catheters than with noncoated catheters (34 versus 60%, P < 0.001). Cumulative catheter survival was similar in heparin-coated and noncoated catheters (hazard ratio, 0.87; 95% confidence interval, 0.55 to 1.36; P = 0.53). On multiple variable survival analysis including catheter type, age, sex, diabetes, coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, catheter location, and previous catheter, only catheter location predicted cumulative catheter survival (hazard ratio, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.27 to 3.25, with the right internal jugular location being the reference group, P = 0.003). The frequency of thrombolytic instillation was 1.8 per 1000 catheter-days in both groups. Conclusions: Heparin coating decreases the frequency of catheter-related bacteremia but does not reduce the frequency of catheter malfunction. PMID:19729425

  4. Collagen implant with gentamicin sulphate reduces surgical site infection in vascular surgery: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Costa Almeida, Carlos Eduardo Perdigão; Reis, Luis; Carvalho, Luis; Costa Almeida, Carlos Manuel

    2014-10-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a common complication after vascular surgery. It may cause exposure of the underlying prosthesis causing graft infection, which may require the removal of the vascular graft, increasing amputation and mortality risks. Graft contamination usually occurs during operative procedure or by direct spread from an infected wound. It is therefore advisable to a strong effort in reducing SSI. Topic antibiotics have not been fully studied in vascular surgery, but collagen implant with gentamicin sulphate has shown to reduce SSI in cardiac surgery, orthopaedics, and general surgery procedures. Sixty (60) non-diabetic and non-obese patients with lower limb ischaemia with indication for femoropopliteal PTFE prosthetic bypass were allocated into 2 groups of 30 patients. A collagen implant impregnated with gentamicin sulphate (Collatamp(®)) was applied in the groin incision adjacent to the prosthesis in one group, and the other was a control group. The same surgical team operated all patients. Szilagyi classification was used. There was no SSI (0% - 0/30) in the collagen implant with gentamicin sulphate group, contrasting with 6 cases (20% - 6/30) of SSI (grade I and II) in the control group (p = 0.024). In-hospital day's data shows a significant difference between the two groups (p = 0.004) with a mean of 5.66 days for implant group and 8.10 days for control group. There was no SSI grade III. Collagen implant with gentamicin sulphate (Collatamp(®)) reduces SSI in the groin incision in ischaemic patients submitted to femoropopliteal PTFE prosthetic bypass. Days of hospitalization are also reduced. Decreasing SSI rate and in-hospital days, this implant may also reduce health care costs. Because this is a small pilot study, a multicentre RCT is necessary for validation. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Differential Incorporation of CD45, CD80 (B7-1), CD86 (B7-2), and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I and II Molecules into Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Virions and Microvesicles: Implications for Viral Pathogenesis and Immune Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Esser, Mark T.; Graham, David R.; Coren, Lori V.; Trubey, Charles M.; Bess, Julian W.; Arthur, Larry O.; Ott, David E.; Lifson, Jeffrey D.

    2001-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection results in a functional impairment of CD4+ T cells long before a quantitative decline in circulating CD4+ T cells is evident. The mechanism(s) responsible for this functional unresponsiveness and eventual depletion of CD4+ T cells remains unclear. Both direct effects of cytopathic infection of CD4+ cells and indirect effects in which uninfected “bystander” cells are functionally compromised or killed have been implicated as contributing to the immunopathogenesis of HIV infection. Because T-cell receptor engagement of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules in the absence of costimulation mediated via CD28 binding to CD80 (B7-1) or CD86 (B7-2) can lead to anergy or apoptosis, we determined whether HIV type 1 (HIV-1) virions incorporated MHC class I (MHC-I), MHC-II, CD80, or CD86. Microvesicles produced from matched uninfected cells were also evaluated. HIV infection increased MHC-II expression on T- and B-cell lines, macrophages, and peripheral blood mononclear cells (PBMC) but did not significantly alter the expression of CD80 or CD86. HIV virions derived from all MHC-II-positive cell types incorporated high levels of MHC-II, and both virions and microvesicles preferentially incorporated CD86 compared to CD80. CD45, expressed at high levels on cells, was identified as a protein present at high levels on microvesicles but was not detected on HIV-1 virions. Virion-associated, host cell-derived molecules impacted the ability of noninfectious HIV virions to trigger death in freshly isolated PBMC. These results demonstrate the preferential incorporation or exclusion of host cell proteins by budding HIV-1 virions and suggest that host cell proteins present on HIV-1 virions may contribute to the overall pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection. PMID:11390619

  6. Naïve B cells reduce fungal dissemination in Cryptococcus neoformans infected Rag1(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Dufaud, Chad; Rivera, Johanna; Rohatgi, Soma; Pirofski, Liise-Anne

    2017-08-24

    IgM and B-1 cell deficient mice exhibit early C. neoformans dissemination from lungs to brain, but a definitive role for B cells in conferring resistance to C. neoformans dissemination has not been established. To address this question, we developed an intranasal (i.n.) C. neoformans infection model in B and T cell deficient Rag1(-/-) mice and found they also exhibit earlier fungal dissemination and higher brain CFU than wild-type C57Bl/6 (wild-type) mice. To probe the effect of B cells on fungal dissemination, Rag1(-/-) mice were given splenic (intravenously) or peritoneal (intraperitoneally) B cells from wild-type mice and infected i.n. with C. neoformans 7 d later. Mice that received B cells had lung histopathology resembling wild type mice 14 d post-infection, and B-1, not B-2 or T cells in their lungs, and serum and lung IgM and IgG 21 d post-infection. Lung CFU were comparable in wild-type, Rag1(-/-,) and Rag1(-/-) mice that received B cells 21 d post-infection, but brain CFU were significantly lower in mice that received B cells than Rag1(-/-) mice that did not. To determine if natural antibody can promote immunity in our model, we measured alveolar macrophage phagocytosis of C. neoformans in Rag1(-/-) mice treated with naive wild-type IgM-sufficient or sIgM(-/-) IgM-deficient sera before infection. Compared to IgM-deficient sera, IgM-sufficient sera significantly increased phagocytosis. Our data establish B cells are able to reduce early C. neoformans dissemination in mice and suggest natural IgM may be a key mediator of early antifungal immunity in the lungs.

  7. Diphenyl Diselenide Reduces Oxidative Stress and Toxicity Caused by HSV-2 Infection in Mice.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Gláubia; Jardim, Natália Silva; Sari, Marcel Henrique Marcondes; Flores, Eduardo F; Prigol, Marina; Nogueira, Cristina W

    2017-05-01

    Herpes simplex viruses can cause uncommon systemic complications as acute liver failure (ALT) or urinary tract dysfunctions. Diphenyl diselenide, (PhSe)2 , a classical studied organic selenium compound, has a novel antiviral action against HSV-2 infection and well-known antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. This study aimed to investigate if (PhSe)2 reduces oxidative stress and systemic toxicity caused by HSV-2 infection in mice. Adult BALB/c mice were pre-treated with (PhSe)2 (5 mg kg(-1) /day, intragastric, i.g.) during 5 days; at day 6 mice were infected with HSV-2 (10 μl-10(5) PFU/mL(-1) ) and post-treated with (PhSe)2 for more 5 days. At day 11, they were killed and samples of liver and kidney were obtained to determine: reactive species (RS); malondialdehyde (MDA), and non-protein thiols (NPSH) levels; the activities of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT). The activities of adenosine deaminase (ADA), Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase (liver and kidney); alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and the levels of urea (plasma) were determined as markers of hepatic and renal toxicity. The results revealed that (PhSe)2 treatment was effective against the increase of renal and hepatic oxidative stress in infected mice and also normalized hepatic and renal ADA activity. It recovered the activity of Na(+) /K(+) - and was not effective against the increase in urea levels in infected mice. Different from (PhSe)2 , acyclovir (positive control), caused an increase in ADA activity and a decrease in hepatic CAT activity. Considering the interest of alternative therapies to treat HSV-2 infections and secondary complications, (PhSe)2 become a notable candidate. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1028-1037, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Reduced Expression of IRF7 in Nasal Epithelial Cells from Smokers after Infection with Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Jaspers, Ilona; Horvath, Katherine M.; Zhang, Wenli; Brighton, Luisa E.; Carson, Johnny L.; Noah, Terry L.

    2010-01-01

    Smokers are more susceptible to respiratory viral infections, including influenza virus, but the mechanisms mediating this effect are unknown. To determine how epithelial cells contribute to the enhanced susceptibility seen in smokers, we established an in vitro model of differentiated nasal epithelial cells (NECs) from smokers, which showed enhanced mucin expression. The NECs from smokers responded to influenza infection with greater cytotoxicity, release of interleukin-6, and viral shedding than NECs from nonsmokers. Focusing on type I interferon (IFN) expression, we observed that influenza-infected NECs from smokers produced significantly less IFN-α than NECs from nonsmokers. Similarly, the expression of IRF7, a key transcription factor controlling the expression of IFN-α, was significantly decreased in influenza-infected and IFN-β–stimulated NECs from smokers. Furthermore, our data indicate that the DNA methylation of the IRF7 gene and expression of the DNA (cytosine-5-)-methyltransferase 1 was enhanced in NECs from smokers. To confirm these findings in vivo, we initiated a study in which smoking and nonsmoking healthy volunteers were inoculated nasally with the live-attenuated influenza virus (LAIV) vaccine, and nasal biopsies were obtained before and after the administration of LAIV. The LAIV-induced expression of IRF7 was lower in the nasal epithelium from smokers, supporting our in vitro observations. These data demonstrate that infection with influenza results in the reduced expression of transcription factor IRF7 in NECs from smokers, and that these effects may be mediated by an epigenetic modification of the IRF7 gene, thus providing a potential mechanism rendering smokers more susceptible to respiratory virus infections. PMID:19880818

  9. Immunotherapy of HIV-infected patients with Gc protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF).

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Ushijima, Naofumi; Koga, Yoshihiko

    2009-01-01

    Serum Gc protein (known as vitamin D3-binding protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of HIV-infected patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein is deglycosylated by alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from HIV-infected cells. Therefore, macrophages of HIV-infected patients having deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be activated, leading to immunosuppression. Since Nagalase is the intrinsic component of the envelope protein gp120, serum Nagalase activity is the sum of enzyme activities carried by both HIV virions and envelope proteins. These Nagalase carriers were already complexed with anti-HIV immunoglobulin G (IgG) but retained Nagalase activity that is required for infectivity. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent macrophage activating factor (termed GcMAF), which produces no side effects in humans. Macrophages activated by administration of 100 ng GcMAF develop a large amount of Fc-receptors as well as an enormous variation of receptors that recognize IgG-bound and unbound HIV virions. Since latently HIV-infected cells are unstable and constantly release HIV virions, the activated macrophages rapidly intercept the released HIV virions to prevent reinfection resulting in exhaustion of infected cells. After less than 18 weekly administrations of 100 ng GcMAF for nonanemic patients, they exhibited low serum Nagalase activities equivalent to healthy controls, indicating eradication of HIV-infection, which was also confirmed by no infectious center formation by provirus inducing agent-treated patient PBMCs. No recurrence occurred and their healthy CD + cell counts were maintained for 7 years.

  10. Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Campylobacter Infections Associated with Reduced Growth in Peruvian Children

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gwenyth; Pan, William; Peñataro Yori, Pablo; Paredes Olortegui, Maribel; Tilley, Drake; Gregory, Michael; Oberhelman, Richard; Burga, Rosa; Chavez, Cesar Banda; Kosek, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Background Although diarrheal illnesses are recognized as both a cause and effect of undernutrition, evidence for the effect of specific enteropathogens on early childhood growth remains limited. We estimated the effects of undernutrition as a risk factor for campylobacteriosis, as well as associations between symptomatic and asymptomatic Campylobacter infections and growth. Methodology/Principal Findings Using data from a prospective cohort of 442 children aged 0–72 months, the effect of nutritional status on the incidence of Campylobacter infection was estimated using uni- and multivariate Poisson models. Multivariate regression models were developed to evaluate the effect of Campylobacter infection on weight gain and linear growth. Overall, 8.3% of diarrheal episodes were associated with Campylobacter (crude incidence rate = 0.37 episodes/year) and 4.9% of quarterly asymptomatic samples were Campylobacter positive. In univariate models, the incidence of Campylobacter infection was marginally higher in stunted than non-stunted children (IRR 1.270, 95% CI (0.960, 1.681)(p = 0.095). When recent diarrheal burdens were included in the analysis, there was no difference in risk between stunted and unstunted children. Asymptomatic and symptomatic Campylobacter infections were associated with reduced weight gain over a three-month period (65.5 g (95% CI: −128.0, −3.0)(p = 0.040) and 43.9 g (95% CI:−87.6, −1.0)(p = 0.049) less weight gain, respectively). Symptomatic Campylobacter infections were only marginally associated with reduced linear growth over a nine month period (−0.059 cm per episode, 95% CI: −0.118, 0.001)(p = 0.054), however relatively severe episodes were associated with reduced linear growth (−0.169 cm/episode, 95% CI −0.310, −0.028)(p = 0.019). Conclusions/Significance Our findings suggest that Campylobacter is not as benign as commonly assumed, and that there is evidence to support expanding the indications for

  11. Suppression of IRG-1 Reduces Inflammatory Cell Infiltration and Lung Injury in Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection by Reducing Production of Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Ke; Lv, Yuanzi; Zhuo, Yujie; Chen, Changmai; Shi, Hengfei; Guo, Lin; Yang, Guang; Hou, Yayi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is a common cause of lower respiratory tract illness in infants and children. RSV is a negative-sense, single-strand RNA (ssRNA) virus that mainly infects airway epithelial cells. Accumulating evidence indicates that reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is a major factor for pulmonary inflammation and tissue damage of RSV disease. We investigated immune-responsive gene-1 (IRG1) expression during RSV infection, since IRG1 has been shown to mediate innate immune response to intracellular bacterial pathogens by modulating ROS and itaconic acid production. We found that RSV infection induced IRG1 expression in human A549 cells and in the lung tissues of RSV-infected mice. RSV infection or IRG1 overexpression promoted ROS production. Accordingly, knockdown of IRG1 induction blocked RSV-induced ROS production and proinflammatory cytokine gene expression. Finally, we showed that suppression of IRG1 induction reduced immune cell infiltration and prevented lung injury in RSV-infected mice. These results therefore link IRG1 induction to ROS production and immune lung injury after RSV infection. IMPORTANCE RSV infection is among the most common causes of childhood diseases. Recent studies identify ROS production as a factor contributing to RSV disease. We investigated the cause of ROS production and identified IRG1 as a critical factor linking ROS production to immune lung injury after RSV infection. We found that IRG1 was induced in A549 alveolar epithelial cells and in mouse lungs after RSV infection. Importantly, suppression of IRG1 induction reduced inflammatory cell infiltration and lung injury in mice. This study links IRG1 induction to oxidative damage and RSV disease. It also uncovers a potential therapeutic target in reducing RSV-caused lung injury. PMID:27252532

  12. Microsporidia infection impacts the host cell's cycle and reduces host cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Martín-Hernández, Raquel; Higes, Mariano; Sagastume, Soledad; Juarranz, Ángeles; Dias-Almeida, Joyce; Budge, Giles E; Meana, Aránzazu; Boonham, Neil

    2017-01-01

    Intracellular parasites can alter the cellular machinery of host cells to create a safe haven for their survival. In this regard, microsporidia are obligate intracellular fungal parasites with extremely reduced genomes and hence, they are strongly dependent on their host for energy and resources. To date, there are few studies into host cell manipulation by microsporidia, most of which have focused on morphological aspects. The microsporidia Nosema apis and Nosema ceranae are worldwide parasites of honey bees, infecting their ventricular epithelial cells. In this work, quantitative gene expression and histology were studied to investigate how these two parasites manipulate their host's cells at the molecular level. Both these microsporidia provoke infection-induced regulation of genes involved in apoptosis and the cell cycle. The up-regulation of buffy (which encodes a pro-survival protein) and BIRC5 (belonging to the Inhibitor Apoptosis protein family) was observed after infection, shedding light on the pathways that these pathogens use to inhibit host cell apoptosis. Curiously, different routes related to cell cycle were modified after infection by each microsporidia. In the case of N. apis, cyclin B1, dacapo and E2F2 were up-regulated, whereas only cyclin E was up-regulated by N. ceranae, in both cases promoting the G1/S phase transition. This is the first report describing molecular pathways related to parasite-host interactions that are probably intended to ensure the parasite's survival within the cell.

  13. Microsporidia infection impacts the host cell's cycle and reduces host cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Higes, Mariano; Sagastume, Soledad; Juarranz, Ángeles; Dias-Almeida, Joyce; Budge, Giles E.; Meana, Aránzazu; Boonham, Neil

    2017-01-01

    Intracellular parasites can alter the cellular machinery of host cells to create a safe haven for their survival. In this regard, microsporidia are obligate intracellular fungal parasites with extremely reduced genomes and hence, they are strongly dependent on their host for energy and resources. To date, there are few studies into host cell manipulation by microsporidia, most of which have focused on morphological aspects. The microsporidia Nosema apis and Nosema ceranae are worldwide parasites of honey bees, infecting their ventricular epithelial cells. In this work, quantitative gene expression and histology were studied to investigate how these two parasites manipulate their host’s cells at the molecular level. Both these microsporidia provoke infection-induced regulation of genes involved in apoptosis and the cell cycle. The up-regulation of buffy (which encodes a pro-survival protein) and BIRC5 (belonging to the Inhibitor Apoptosis protein family) was observed after infection, shedding light on the pathways that these pathogens use to inhibit host cell apoptosis. Curiously, different routes related to cell cycle were modified after infection by each microsporidia. In the case of N. apis, cyclin B1, dacapo and E2F2 were up-regulated, whereas only cyclin E was up-regulated by N. ceranae, in both cases promoting the G1/S phase transition. This is the first report describing molecular pathways related to parasite-host interactions that are probably intended to ensure the parasite’s survival within the cell. PMID:28152065

  14. Extraintestinal Helminth Infection Reduces the Development of Colitis-Associated Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    León-Cabrera, Sonia; Callejas, Blanca E.; Ledesma-Soto, Yadira; Coronel, Jossimar; Pérez-Plasencia, Carlos; Gutiérrez-Cirlos, Emma B.; Ávila-Moreno, Federico; Rodríguez-Sosa, Miriam; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Marquina-Castillo, Brenda; Chirino, Yolanda I.; Terrazas, Luis I.

    2014-01-01

    Colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC) is one of the most common cancers and is closely related to chronic or deregulated inflammation. Helminthic infections can modulate inflammatory responses in some diseases, but their immunomodulatory role during cancer development remains completely unknown. We have analyzed the role of Taenia crassiceps-induced anti-inflammatory response in determining the outcome of CAC. We show that extraintestinal T. crassiceps infection in CAC mice inhibited colonic inflammatory responses and tumor formation and prevented goblet cell loss. There was also increased expression of IL-4 and alternatively activated macrophages markers in colonic tissue and negative immunomodulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. In addition, T. crassiceps infection prevented the upregulation of β-catenin and CXCR2 expression observed in the CAC mice, which are both markers associated with CAC-tumorigenesis, and reduced the numbers of circulating and colonic CD11b+Ly6ChiCCR2+ monocytes. Thus, immunomodulatory activities induced by helminth infections may have a role in the progression of CAC. PMID:25210492

  15. Extraintestinal helminth infection reduces the development of colitis-associated tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    León-Cabrera, Sonia; Callejas, Blanca E; Ledesma-Soto, Yadira; Coronel, Jossimar; Pérez-Plasencia, Carlos; Gutiérrez-Cirlos, Emma B; Ávila-Moreno, Federico; Rodríguez-Sosa, Miriam; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Marquina-Castillo, Brenda; Chirino, Yolanda I; Terrazas, Luis I

    2014-01-01

    Colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC) is one of the most common cancers and is closely related to chronic or deregulated inflammation. Helminthic infections can modulate inflammatory responses in some diseases, but their immunomodulatory role during cancer development remains completely unknown. We have analyzed the role of Taenia crassiceps-induced anti-inflammatory response in determining the outcome of CAC. We show that extraintestinal T. crassiceps infection in CAC mice inhibited colonic inflammatory responses and tumor formation and prevented goblet cell loss. There was also increased expression of IL-4 and alternatively activated macrophages markers in colonic tissue and negative immunomodulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. In addition, T. crassiceps infection prevented the upregulation of β-catenin and CXCR2 expression observed in the CAC mice, which are both markers associated with CAC-tumorigenesis, and reduced the numbers of circulating and colonic CD11b(+)Ly6C(hi)CCR2(+) monocytes. Thus, immunomodulatory activities induced by helminth infections may have a role in the progression of CAC.

  16. CpG oligodeoxynucleotides with crude parasite antigens reduce worm recovery in Opisthorchis viverrini infected hamsters.

    PubMed

    Kaewraemruaen, Chamraj; Sermswan, Rasana W; Wongratanacheewin, Surasakdi

    2016-12-01

    Opisthorchis viverrini, a human liver fluke, is still an endemic parasitic infection in Thailand and nearly all countries in Southeast Asia. O. viverrini induces a chronic stage of infection in hamsters. During the first 2 weeks of infection, Th1 inducing cytokine, IL-12, increased but was down regulated in chronic infection. In this study it was found that unmethylated-CpG ODN (oligodeoxynucleotides) 1826 increased hamster mononuclear cell proliferation and stimulated IFN-γ production in vitro. The IFN-γ levels in hamster sera were significantly increased in hamsters injected with CpG ODN 1826 alone or plus crude somatic antigens (CSAg). Further investigation using the flow cytometer found that CD4(+)T cells and IFN-γ(+) CD4(+)T cells (Th1-like cells) in the hamster blood were significantly increased. The role of these cells in the protective responses in hamsters was evaluated by challenging with 25 metacercaria and observation for 3 months. The number of worms recovered was significantly reduced in the hamsters injected with CpG ODN 1826 with CSAg, but not in CpG ODN 1826 alone groups when compared to PBS control. The percent of reduction in hamsters against this parasite were 32.95% and 21.49% in the CpG ODN 1826 with CSAg and CpG ODN 1826 alone. This study indicates that CpG ODN 1826 plus parasite antigens elicit a Th1-like response that leads to the enhancement of worm reduction.

  17. HIV-2 infection and chemokine receptors usage - clues to reduced virulence of HIV-2.

    PubMed

    Azevedo-Pereira, José Miguel; Santos-Costa, Quirina; Moniz-Pereira, José

    2005-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and type 2 (HIV-2) are the causative agents of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Without therapeutic intervention, HIV-1 or HIV-2 infections in humans are characterized by a gradual and irreversible immunologic failure that ultimately leads to the onset of a severe immunodeficiency that constitutes the hallmark of AIDS. In the last two decades AIDS has evolved into a global epidemic affecting millions of persons worldwide. Although sharing several identical properties, HIV-1 and HIV-2 have shown some important differences in vivo. In fact, a significant amount of epidemiologic, clinical and virologic data suggest that HIV-2 is in general less virulent than HIV-1. This reduced virulence is revealed by the longer asymptomatic period and the smaller transmission rate that characteristically are observed in HIV-2 infection. In this context, studies using HIV-2 as a model of a naturally less pathogenic infection could bring important new insights to HIV pathogenesis opening to new strategies to vaccines or therapeutic design. The reasons underlying the reduced pathogenicity of HIV-2 are still essentially unknown and surely are the outcome of a combination of distinct factors. In this review we will discuss the importance and the possible implications in HIV-2 pathogenesis, particularly during the asymptomatic period, of a less fitted interaction between viral envelope glycoproteins and cellular receptors that have been described in the way HIV-2 and HIV-1 use these receptors.

  18. Horn fly larval survival in cattle dung is reduced by endophyte infection of tall fescue pasture.

    PubMed

    Parra, Leonardo; Mutis, Ana; Chacón, Manuel; Lizama, Marcelo; Rojas, Claudio; Catrileo, Adrián; Rubilar, Olga; Tortella, Gonzalo; Birkett, Michael A; Quiroz, Andrés

    2016-07-01

    The potential for using endophytic microorganisms in pest control has increased during the last 40 years. In this study, we investigated the impact of endophyte (Neotyphodium coenophialum) infection of cattle pasture upon the survival of the horn fly, Haematobia irritans, a major agricultural pest affecting livestock in many parts of the world. In laboratory assays, where cattle dung collected from endophyte-infected (E+) tall fescue cultivar K-31 was used as the oviposition substrate, larval development was significantly reduced compared with development on cattle dung from steers that grazed uninfected (E-) tall fescue. Furthermore, studies with cattle dung supplemented with the alkaloid fraction extracted from the endophytic fungi revealed significant larval mortality, and HPLC analysis identified two alkaloids, peramine and lolitrem B. The development of larvae was shown to be significantly reduced in field-collected cattle dung. These results suggest that part of the toxicity of alkaloids contained in endophytes is transferred to faecal matter, causing an increase in mortality of H. irritans. These data suggest that endophyte infection of cattle pasture, i.e. modified pasture management, can significantly affect horn fly development. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Ultraviolet-ozone treatment reduces levels of disease-associated prion protein and prion infectivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.J.; Gilbert, P.; McKenzie, D.; Pedersen, J.A.; Aiken, Judd M.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases caused by novel infectious agents referred to as prions. Prions appear to be composed primarily, if not exclusively, of a misfolded isoform of the cellular prion protein. TSE infectivity is remarkably stable and can resist many aggressive decontamination procedures, increasing human, livestock and wildlife exposure to TSEs. Findings. We tested the hypothesis that UV-ozone treatment reduces levels of the pathogenic prion protein and inactivates the infectious agent. We found that UV-ozone treatment decreased the carbon and prion protein content in infected brain homogenate to levels undetectable by dry-ashing carbon analysis or immunoblotting, respectively. After 8 weeks of ashing, UV-ozone treatment reduced the infectious titer of treated material by a factor of at least 105. A small amount of infectivity, however, persisted despite UV-ozone treatment. When bound to either montmorillonite clay or quartz surfaces, PrPTSE was still susceptible to degradation by UV-ozone. Conclusion. Our findings strongly suggest that UV-ozone treatment can degrade pathogenic prion protein and inactivate prions, even when the agent is associated with surfaces. Using larger UV-ozone doses or combining UV-ozone treatment with other decontaminant methods may allow the sterilization of TSE-contaminated materials. ?? 2009 Aiken et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  20. Fine structure of the vaccinia virion determined by controlled degradation and immunolocalization

    SciTech Connect

    Moussatche, Nissin Condit, Richard C.

    2015-01-15

    The vaccinia virion is a membraned, slightly flattened, barrel-shaped particle, with a complex internal structure featuring a biconcave core flanked by lateral bodies. Although the architecture of the purified mature virion has been intensely characterized by electron microscopy, the distribution of the proteins within the virion has been examined primarily using biochemical procedures. Thus, it has been shown that non-ionic and ionic detergents combined or not with a sulfhydryl reagent can be used to disrupt virions and, to a limited degree, separate the constituent proteins in different fractions. Applying a controlled degradation technique to virions adsorbed on EM grids, we were able to immuno-localize viral proteins within the virion particle. Our results show after NP40 and DTT treatment, membrane proteins are removed from the virion surface revealing proteins that are associated with the lateral bodies and the outer layer of the core wall. Combined treatment using high salt and high DTT removed lateral body proteins and exposed proteins of the internal core wall. Cores treated with proteases could be disrupted and the internal components were exposed. Cts8, a mutant in the A3 protein, produces aberrant virus that, when treated with NP-40 and DTT, releases to the exterior the virus DNA associated with other internal core proteins. With these results, we are able to propose a model for the structure the vaccinia virion.

  1. Fine structure of the vaccinia virion determined by controlled degradation and immunolocalization

    PubMed Central

    Moussatche, Nissin; Condit, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    The vaccinia virion is a membraned, slightly flattened, barrel-shaped particle, with a complex internal structure featuring a biconcave core flanked by lateral bodies. Although the architecture of the purified mature virion has been intensely characterized by electron microscopy, the distribution of the proteins within the virion has been examined primarily using biochemical procedures. Thus, it has been shown that non-ionic and ionic detergents combined or not with a sulfhydryl reagent can be used to disrupt virions and, to a limited degree, separate the constituent proteins in different fractions. Applying a controlled degradation technique to virions adsorbed on EM grids, we were able to immuno-localize viral proteins within the virion particle. Our results show after NP40 and DTT treatment, membrane proteins are removed from the virion surface revealing proteins that are associated with the lateral bodies and the outer layer of the core wall. Combined treatment using high salt and high DTT removed lateral body proteins and exposed proteins of the internal core wall. Cores treated with proteases could be disrupted and the internal components were exposed. Cts8, a mutant in the A3 protein, produces aberrant virus that, when treated with NP-40 and DTT, release to the exterior the virus DNA associated with other internal core proteins. With these results, we are able to propose a model for the structure the vaccinia virion. PMID:25486587

  2. Herpesvirus gB-induced fusion between the virion envelope and outer nuclear membrane during virus egress is regulated by the viral US3 kinase.

    PubMed

    Wisner, Todd W; Wright, Catherine C; Kato, Akihisa; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Mou, Fan; Baines, Joel D; Roller, Richard J; Johnson, David C

    2009-04-01

    Herpesvirus capsids collect along the inner surface of the nuclear envelope and bud into the perinuclear space. Enveloped virions then fuse with the outer nuclear membrane (NM). We previously showed that herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoproteins gB and gH act in a redundant fashion to promote fusion between the virion envelope and the outer NM. HSV mutants lacking both gB and gH accumulate enveloped virions in herniations, vesicles that bulge into the nucleoplasm. Earlier studies had shown that HSV mutants lacking the viral serine/threonine kinase US3 also accumulate herniations. Here, we demonstrate that HSV gB is phosphorylated in a US3-dependent manner in HSV-infected cells, especially in a crude nuclear fraction. Moreover, US3 directly phosphorylated the gB cytoplasmic (CT) domain in in vitro assays. Deletion of gB in the context of a US3-null virus did not add substantially to defects in nuclear egress. The majority of the US3-dependent phosphorylation of gB involved the CT domain and amino acid T887, a residue present in a motif similar to that recognized by US3 in other proteins. HSV recombinants lacking gH and expressing either gB substitution mutation T887A or a gB truncated at residue 886 displayed substantial defects in nuclear egress. We concluded that phosphorylation of the gB CT domain is important for gB-mediated fusion with the outer NM. This suggested a model in which the US3 kinase is incorporated into the tegument layer (between the capsid and envelope) in HSV virions present in the perinuclear space. By this packaging, US3 might be brought close to the gB CT tail, leading to phosphorylation and triggering fusion between the virion envelope and the outer NM.

  3. Topical Nanoemulsion Therapy Reduces Bacterial Wound Infection and Inflammation Following Burn Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hemmila, Mark R.; Mattar, Aladdein; Taddonio, Michael A.; Arbabi, Saman; Hamouda, Tarek; Ward, Peter A.; Wang, Stewart C.; Baker, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Nanoemulsions are broadly antimicrobial oil-in-water emulsions containing nanometer-sized droplets stabilized with surfactants. We hypothesize that topical application of a nanoemulsion compound (NB-201) can attenuate burn wound infection. In addition to reducing infection, nanoemulsion therapy may modulate dermal inflammatory signaling and thereby lessen inflammation following thermal injury. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent a 20% total body surface area (TBSA) scald burn to create a partial thickness burn injury. Animals were resuscitated with Ringer’s lactate and the wound covered with an occlusive dressing. Eight hours after injury, the burn wound was inoculated with 1×106 CFU of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. NB-201, NB-201 placebo, 5% mafenide acetate solution or 0.9% saline (control) was applied onto the wound at 16 and 24 hrs following burn injury. Skin was harvested 32 hrs post-burn for quantitative wound culture and determination of inflammatory mediators in tissue homogenates. Results NB-201 reduced mean bacterial growth in the burn wound by a thousand fold, with only 11% animals having P. aeruginosa counts greater than 105 CFU/g tissue versus 91% in the control group (p<0.0001). Treatment with NB-201 attenuated neutrophil sequestration in the treatment group as measured by myeloperoxidase assay and by histology. It also, significantly reduced levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and IL-6) and the degree of hair follicle cell apoptosis in skin when compared to saline-treated controls. Conclusions Topical NB-201 substantially reduced bacterial growth in a partial thickness burn model. This reduction in the level of wound infection was associated with an attenuation of the local dermal inflammatory response and diminished neutrophil sequestration. NB-201 represents a novel potent antimicrobial and antiinflammatory treatment for use in burn wounds. PMID:20189619

  4. PPARγ Agonists as an Anti-Inflammatory Treatment Inhibiting Rotavirus Infection of Small Intestinal Villi

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Dory; Muñoz, Natalia; Guerrero, Rafael; Acosta, Orlando; Guerrero, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus infection has been reported to induce an inflammatory response in the host cell accompanied by the increased expression or activation of some cellular molecules including ROS, NF-κB, and COX-2. PPARγ stimulation and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) treatment have been found to interfere with viral infections including rotavirus infection. Small intestinal villi isolated from in vivo infected mice with rotavirus ECwt were analyzed for the percentage of ECwt-infected cells, the presence of rotavirus antigens, and infectious virion yield following treatment with pioglitazone. Isolated villi were also infected in vitro and treated with PPARγ agonists (PGZ, TZD, RGZ, DHA, and ALA), all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), and NAC. After treatments, the expression of cellular proteins including PPARγ, NF-κB, PDI, Hsc70, and COX-2 was analyzed using immunochemistry, ELISA, immunofluorescence, and Western blotting. The results showed that rotavirus infection led to an increased accumulation of the cellular proteins studied and ROS. The virus infection-induced accumulation of the cellular proteins studied and ROS was reduced upon pioglitazone treatment, causing also a concomitant reduction of the infectious virion yield. We hypothesized that rotavirus infection is benefiting from the induction of a host cell proinflammatory response and that the interference of the inflammatory pathways involved leads to decreased infection. PMID:27382365

  5. Trafficking of Bluetongue Virus Visualized by Recovery of Tetracysteine-Tagged Virion Particles

    PubMed Central

    Du, Junzheng; Bhattacharya, Bishnupriya; Ward, Theresa H.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bluetongue virus (BTV), a member of the Orbivirus genus in the Reoviridae family, is a double-capsid insect-borne virus enclosing a genome of 10 double-stranded RNA segments. Like those of other members of the family, BTV virions are nonenveloped particles containing two architecturally complex capsids. The two proteins of the outer capsid, VP2 and VP5, are involved in BTV entry and in the delivery of the transcriptionally active core to the cell cytoplasm. Although the importance of the endocytic pathway in BTV entry has been reported, detailed analyses of entry and the role of each protein in virus trafficking have not been possible due to the lack of availability of a tagged virus. Here, for the first time, we report on the successful manipulation of a segmented genome of a nonenveloped capsid virus by the introduction of tags that were subsequently fluorescently visualized in infected cells. The genetically engineered fluorescent BTV particles were observed to enter live cells immediately after virus adsorption. Further, we showed the separation of VP2 from VP5 during virus entry and confirmed that while VP2 is shed from virions in early endosomes, virus particles still consisting of VP5 were trafficked sequentially from early to late endosomes. Since BTV infects both mammalian and insect cells, the generation of tagged viruses will allow visualization of the trafficking of BTV farther downstream in different host cells. In addition, the tagging technology has potential for transferable application to other nonenveloped complex viruses. IMPORTANCE Live-virus trafficking in host cells has been highly informative on the interactions between virus and host cells. Although the insertion of fluorescent markers into viral genomes has made it possible to study the trafficking of enveloped viruses, the physical constraints of architecturally complex capsid viruses have imposed practical limitations. In this study, we have successfully genetically engineered

  6. Deletion of the Vaccinia Virus I2 Protein Interrupts Virion Morphogenesis, Leading to Retention of the Scaffold Protein and Mislocalization of Membrane-Associated Entry Proteins.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Seong-In; Weisberg, Andrea; Moss, Bernard

    2017-08-01

    The I2L open reading frame of vaccinia virus (VACV) encodes a conserved 72-amino-acid protein with a putative C-terminal transmembrane domain. Previous studies with a tetracycline-inducible mutant demonstrated that I2-deficient virions are defective in cell entry. The purpose of the present study was to determine the step of replication or entry that is affected by loss of the I2 protein. Fluorescence microscopy experiments showed that I2 colocalized with a major membrane protein of immature and mature virions. We generated a cell line that constitutively expressed I2 and allowed construction of the VACV I2L deletion mutant vΔI2. As anticipated, vΔI2 was unable to replicate in cells that did not express I2. Unexpectedly, morphogenesis was interrupted at a stage after immature virion formation, resulting in the accumulation of dense spherical particles instead of brick-shaped mature virions with well-defined core structures. The abnormal particles retained the D13 scaffold protein of immature virions, were severely deficient in the transmembrane proteins that comprise the entry fusion complex (EFC), and had increased amounts of unprocessed membrane and core proteins. Total lysates of cells infected with vΔI2 also had diminished EFC proteins due to instability attributed to their hydrophobicity and failure to be inserted into viral membranes. A similar instability of EFC proteins had previously been found with unrelated mutants blocked earlier in morphogenesis that also accumulated viral membranes retaining the D13 scaffold. We concluded that I2 is required for virion morphogenesis, release of the D13 scaffold, and the association of EFC proteins with viral membranes.IMPORTANCE Poxviruses comprise a large family that infect vertebrates and invertebrates, cause disease in both in humans and in wild and domesticated animals, and are being engineered as vectors for vaccines and cancer therapy. In addition, investigations of poxviruses have provided insights into many

  7. Quantitative real-time single particle analysis of virions

    PubMed Central

    Heider, Susanne; Metzner, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Providing information about single virus particles has for a long time been mainly the domain of electron microscopy. More recently, technologies have been developed—or adapted from other fields, such as nanotechnology—to allow for the real-time quantification of physical virion particles, while supplying additional information such as particle diameter concomitantly. These technologies have progressed to the stage of commercialization increasing the speed of viral titer measurements from hours to minutes, thus providing a significant advantage for many aspects of virology research and biotechnology applications. Additional advantages lie in the broad spectrum of virus species that may be measured and the possibility to determine the ratio of infectious to total particles. A series of disadvantages remain associated with these technologies, such as a low specificity for viral particles. In this review we will discuss these technologies by comparing four systems for real-time single virus particle analysis and quantification. PMID:24999044

  8. Sample preparation for single virion atomic force microscopy and super-resolution fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Jeffery A; Saffarian, Saveez

    2014-01-02

    Immobilization of virions to glass surfaces is a critical step in single virion imaging. Here we present a technique adopted from single molecule imaging assays which allows adhesion of single virions to glass surfaces with specificity. This preparation is based on grafting the surface of the glass with a mixture of PLL-g-PEG and PLL-g-PEG-Biotin, adding a layer of avidin, and finally creating virion anchors through attachment of biotinylated virus specific antibodies. We have applied this technique across a range of experiments including atomic force microscopy (AFM) and super-resolution fluorescence imaging. This sample preparation method results in a control adhesion of the virions to the surface.

  9. HIV-1 Integrase Binds the Viral RNA Genome and Is Essential during Virion Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kessl, Jacques J; Kutluay, Sebla B; Townsend, Dana; Rebensburg, Stephanie; Slaughter, Alison; Larue, Ross C; Shkriabai, Nikoloz; Bakouche, Nordine; Fuchs, James R; Bieniasz, Paul D; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2016-08-25

    While an essential role of HIV-1 integrase (IN) for integration of viral cDNA into human chromosome is established, studies with IN mutants and allosteric IN inhibitors (ALLINIs) have suggested that IN can also influence viral particle maturation. However, it has remained enigmatic as to how IN contributes to virion morphogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that IN directly binds the viral RNA genome in virions. These interactions have specificity, as IN exhibits distinct preference for select viral RNA structural elements. We show that IN substitutions that selectively impair its binding to viral RNA result in eccentric, non-infectious virions without affecting nucleocapsid-RNA interactions. Likewise, ALLINIs impair IN binding to viral RNA in virions of wild-type, but not escape mutant, virus. These results reveal an unexpected biological role of IN binding to the viral RNA genome during virion morphogenesis and elucidate the mode of action of ALLINIs.

  10. Vitamin E reduces hepatic fibrosis in mice with Schistosoma japonicum infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuefeng; Zhang, Rongbo; Du, Jiuwei; Hu, Youying; Xu, Lifa; Lu, Jun; Ye, Song

    2012-02-01

    To investigate whether vitamin E protects against hepatic fibrosis in mice with Schistosoma japonicum infection, 24 pathogen-free Kunming mice were selected and randomly divided into four groups: control (uninfected, untreated), model (infected, untreated), low-dose intervention (infected, vitamin E-treated, 30 mg/g bodyweight/day) and high-dose intervention (infected, vitamin E-treated, 60 mg/g bodyweight/day). Mice were infected with Schistosoma japonicum by inoculating abdominal skin with snail hosts. The activities of malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase (CAT) were detected in hepatic tissue by colorimetry. The expression levels of laminin (LN), hyaluronic acid (HA), procollagen type Ⅲ (PC-III) and type Ⅳ collagen (IV-C) were detected in the serum by radioimmunoassay. Finally, areas and numbers of granulomas were assessed through histopathology 42 days following treatment. The results revealed that mean areas of granulomas were smaller in the low- and high-dose intervention groups compared to those in the model group. Furthermore, the higher dose of vitamin E resulted in smaller granulomas than the low dose. The levels of LN, HA, PC-III and IV-C in the serum were lower following vitamin E treatment than in the model group. By contrast, activity of SOD, GPx and CAT in hepatic tissue was higher following vitamin E treatment compared to the model group. The activity of MDA was lower in hepatic tissue following vitamin E treatment compared to the model group, but was higher compared to controls. In general, the higher dose of vitamin E affected measurements to a greater extent than the lower dose. In conclusion, vitamin E treatment may reduce the growth of granulomas, slowing the process of hepatic fibrosis, and this effect may be the result of the altered activity of the oxidation-reduction enzyme system.

  11. Herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoprotein K is not essential for infectious virus production in actively replicating cells but is required for efficient envelopment and translocation of infectious virions from the cytoplasm to the extracellular space.

    PubMed Central

    Jayachandra, S; Baghian, A; Kousoulas, K G

    1997-01-01

    We characterized the glycoprotein K (gK)-null herpes simplex virus type 1 [HSV-1] (KOS) delta gK and compared it to the gK-null virus HSV-1 F-gKbeta (L. Hutchinson et al., J. Virol. 69:5401-5413, 1995). delta gK and F-gKbeta mutant viruses produced small plaques on Vero cell monolayers at 48 h postinfection. F-gKbeta caused extensive fusion of 143TK cells that was sensitive to melittin, a specific inhibitor of gK-induced cell fusion, while delta gK virus did not fuse 143TK cells. A recombinant plasmid containing the truncated gK gene specified by F-gKbeta failed to rescue the ICP27-null virus KOS (d27-1), while a plasmid with the delta gK deletion rescued the d27-1 virus efficiently. delta gK virus yield was approximately 100,000-fold lower in stationary cells than in actively replicating Vero cells. The plaquing efficiencies of delta gK and F-gKbeta virus stocks on VK302 cells were similar, while the plaquing efficiency of F-gKbeta virus stocks on Vero cells was reduced nearly 10,000-fold in comparison to that of delta gK virus. Mutant delta gK and F-gKbeta infectious virions accumulated within Vero and HEp-2 cells but failed to translocate to extracellular spaces. delta gK capsids accumulated in the nuclei of Vero but not HEp-2 cells. Enveloped delta gK virions were visualized in the cytoplasms of both Vero and HEp-2 cells, and viral capsids were found in the cytoplasm of HEp-2 cells within vesicles. Glycoproteins B, C, D, and H were expressed on the surface of delta gK-infected Vero cells in amounts similar to those for KOS-infected Vero cells. These results indicate that gK is involved in nucleocapsid envelopment, and more importantly in the translocation of infectious virions from the cytoplasm to the extracellular spaces, and that actively replicating cells can partially compensate for the envelopment but not for the cellular egress deficiency of the delta gK virus. Comparison of delta gK and F-gKbeta viruses suggests that the inefficient viral replication

  12. Efficacy of Clonostachys rosea and Duddingtonia flagrans in Reducing the Haemonchus contortus Infective Larvae

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Manoel Eduardo; Braga, Fabio Ribeiro; de Gives, Pedro Mendoza; Uriostegui, Miguel Angel Mercado; Reyes, Manuela; Soares, Filippe Elias de Freitas; de Carvalho, Lorendane Millena; Rodrigues, Francielle Bosi; de Araújo, Jackson Victor

    2015-01-01

    The biocontrol is proven effective in reducing in vitro and in situ free-living stages of major gastrointestinal helminths, allowing progress in reducing losses by parasitism, maximizing production, and productivity. This study aimed at evaluating the predatory activity of fungal isolates of Duddingtonia flagrans and Clonostachys rosea species and its association on infective larvae (L3) of H. contortus in microplots formed by grasses and maintained in a protected environment. All groups were added with 10 mL of an aqueous suspension with 618 H. contortus L3 approximately. Group 1 was used as control and only received the infective larvae. Groups 2 and 3 received D. flagrans chlamydospores and C. rosea conidia at doses of 5 × 106. Group 4 received the combination of 5 × 106 D. flagrans chlamydospores + 5 × 106 C. rosea conidia. D. flagrans and C. rosea showed nematicidal effectiveness reducing by 91.5 and 88.9%, respectively, the population of H. contortus L3. However, when used in combination efficiency decreased to 74.5% predation of H. contortus L3. These results demonstrate the need for further studies to determine the existence of additive effects, synergistic or antagonistic, between these species. PMID:26504809

  13. New, Combined, and Reduced Dosing Treatment Protocols Cure Trypanosoma cruzi Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Juan M.; Craft, Julie M.; Crowe, Byron D.; Ketchie, Sarah A.; Tarleton, Rick L.

    2014-01-01

    The development of treatment protocols with reduced toxicity and equivalent or improved efficacy for Trypanosoma cruzi infection is a priority. We tested the effectiveness of benznidazole (BZ), nifurtimox (NFX), other prospective drugs in intermittent and combined treatment protocols to cure T. cruzi infection initiated with susceptible and drug-resistant parasite strains. A 40-day course of BZ, NFX, or the oxaborale AN4169 cured 100% of mice, whereas posaconazole (POS), and NTLA-1 (a nitro-triazole) cured approximately 90% and 20% of mice, respectively. Reducing the overall dosage of BZ or NFX by using an intermittent (once every 5 days) schedule or combining 5 daily doses of POS with 7 intermittent doses of BZ also provided approximately 100% cure. T. cruzi strains resistant to BZ were also found to be resistant to other drugs (POS), and extending the time of treatment or combining drugs did not increase cure rates with these isolates. Thus, dosing schedules for anti–T. cruzi compounds should be determined empirically, and compounds targeting different pathways may be combined to yield effective therapies with reduced toxicity. This work also suggests that standard treatment protocols using BZ and NFX may be significantly overdosing patients, perhaps contributing to the adverse events. PMID:23945371

  14. An intraoperative irrigation regimen to reduce the surgical site infection rate following adolescent idiopathic scoliosis surgery.

    PubMed

    van Herwijnen, B; Evans, N R; Dare, C J; Davies, E M

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of a gentamicin antibiotic intraoperative irrigation regimen (regimen A) with a povidone-iodine intraoperative irrigation regimen (regimen B) and to evaluate the ability of adjunctive local vancomycin powder (regimen C) to reduce the surgical site infection (SSI) rate following idiopathic scoliosis correction. This was a retrospective, single centre, two-surgeon cohort study of paediatric scoliosis procedures involving 118 patients under the age of 18 years who underwent correction for idiopathic scoliosis over a period of 42 months. Patients' baseline characteristics, pseudarthrosis and rates of SSI were compared. Baseline characteristics were comparable in all three groups, with the exception of sex distribution. Over a quarter (27%) of patients with regimen B were male compared with 13% and 6% for regimens A and C respectively. Patients were mostly followed up for a minimum of 12 months. The SSI rate for both superficial and deep infections was higher with regimen A (26.7%) than with regimens B and C (7.0% and 6.3% respectively). The SSI rates for regimens B and C were comparable. No patients developed complications related to vancomycin toxicity, metalwork failure or pseudarthrosis. Wound irrigation with a povidone-iodine solution reduces SSIs following adolescent idiopathic scoliosis surgery. The direct application of vancomycin powder to the wound is safe but does not reduce the SSI rate further in low risk patients. Additional studies are needed to elucidate whether it is effective at higher doses and in high risk patient groups.

  15. Thioridazine in PLGA nanoparticles reduces toxicity and improves rifampicin therapy against mycobacterial infection in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Vibe, Carina Beatrice; Fenaroli, Federico; Pires, David; Wilson, Steven Ray; Bogoeva, Vanya; Kalluru, Raja; Speth, Martin; Anes, Elsa; Griffiths, Gareth; Hildahl, Jon

    2016-08-01

    Encapsulating antibiotics such as rifampicin in biodegradable nanoparticles provides several advantages compared to free drug administration, including reduced dosing due to localized targeting and sustained release. Consequently, these characteristics reduce systemic drug toxicity. However, new nanoformulations need to be tested in complex biological systems to fully characterize their potential for improved drug therapy. Tuberculosis, caused by infection with the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis, requires lengthy and expensive treatment, and incomplete therapy contributes to an increasing incidence of drug resistance. Recent evidence suggests that standard therapy may be improved by combining antibiotics with bacterial efflux pump inhibitors, such as thioridazine. However, this drug is difficult to use clinically due to its toxicity. Here, we encapsulated thioridazine in poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid nanoparticles and tested them alone and in combination with rifampicin nanoparticles, or free rifampicin in macrophages and in a zebrafish model of tuberculosis. Whereas free thioridazine was highly toxic in both cells and zebrafish embryos, after encapsulation in nanoparticles no toxicity was detected. When combined with rifampicin nanoparticles, the nanoparticles loaded with thioridazine gave a modest increase in killing of both Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis in macrophages. In the zebrafish, the thioridazine nanoparticles showed a significant therapeutic effect in combination with rifampicin by enhancing embryo survival and reducing mycobacterial infection. Our results show that the zebrafish embryo is a highly sensitive indicator of drug toxicity and that thioridazine nanoparticle therapy can improve the antibacterial effect of rifampicin in vivo.

  16. Reducing surgical site infections after hysterectomy: metronidazole plus cefazolin compared with cephalosporin alone.

    PubMed

    Till, Sara R; Morgan, Daniel M; Bazzi, Ali A; Pearlman, Mark D; Abdelsattar, Zaid; Campbell, Darrell A; Uppal, Shitanshu

    2017-08-01

    Organisms that are isolated from vaginal cuff infections and pelvic abscesses after hysterectomy frequently include anaerobic vaginal flora. Metronidazole has outstanding coverage against nearly all anaerobic species, which is superior to both cefazolin and second-generation cephalosporins. Cefazolin plus metronidazole has been demonstrated to reduce infectious morbidity compared with either cefazolin or second-generation cephalosporins in other clean-contaminated procedures, which include both as colorectal surgery and cesarean delivery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the combination of cefazolin plus metronidazole before hysterectomy was more effective in the prevention of surgical site infection than existing recommendations of cefazolin or second-generation cephalosporin. This was a retrospective cohort study of patients in the Michigan Surgical Quality Collaborative from July 2012 through February 2015. The primary outcome was surgical site infection. Patients who were >18 years old and who underwent abdominal, vaginal, laparoscopic, or robotic hysterectomy for benign or malignant indications were included if they received 1 of the following prophylactic antibiotic regimens: cefazolin, second-generation cephalosporin, or cefazolin plus metronidazole. Multivariate logistic regression modeling was performed to evaluate the independent effect of an antibiotic regimen, and propensity score matching was used to validate the findings. The study included 18,255 hysterectomies. The overall rate of surgical site infection was 1.8% (n=329). The unadjusted rate of surgical site infection was 1.8% (n=267) for cefazolin, 2.1% (n=49) for second-generation cephalosporin, and 1.4% (n=13) for cefazolin plus metronidazole. After adjustment for differences in patient and operative factors among the antibiotic cohorts, compared with cefazolin plus metronidazole, we found the risk of surgical site infection was significantly higher for patients who received

  17. Effectiveness of interventions to screen and manage infections during pregnancy on reducing stillbirths: a review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Infection is a well acknowledged cause of stillbirths and may account for about half of all perinatal deaths today, especially in developing countries. This review presents the impact of interventions targeting various important infections during pregnancy on stillbirth or perinatal mortality. Methods We undertook a systematic review including all relevant literature on interventions dealing with infections during pregnancy for assessment of effects on stillbirths or perinatal mortality. The quality of the evidence was assessed using the adapted Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach by Child Health Epidemiology Reference Group (CHERG). For the outcome of interest, namely stillbirth, we applied the rules developed by CHERG to recommend a final estimate for reduction in stillbirth for input to the Lives Saved Tool (LiST) model. Results A total of 25 studies were included in the review. A random-effects meta-analysis of observational studies of detection and treatment of syphilis during pregnancy showed a significant 80% reduction in stillbirths [Relative risk (RR) = 0.20; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.12 - 0.34) that is recommended for inclusion in the LiST model. Our meta-analysis showed the malaria prevention interventions i.e. intermittent preventive treatment (IPTp) and insecticide-treated mosquito nets (ITNs) can reduce stillbirths by 22%, however results were not statistically significant (RR = 0.78; 95% CI: 0.59 – 1.03). For human immunodeficiency virus infection, a pooled analysis of 6 radomized controlled trials (RCTs) failed to show a statistically significant reduction in stillbirth with the use of antiretroviral in pregnancy compared to placebo (RR = 0.93; 95% CI: 0.45 – 1.92). Similarly, pooled analysis combining four studies for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis (3 for oral and 1 for vaginal antibiotic) failed to yield a significant impact on perinatal mortality (OR = 0.88; 95% CI: 0.50

  18. High Dietary Folate in Mice Alters Immune Response and Reduces Survival after Malarial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Meadows, Danielle N.; Bahous, Renata H.; Best, Ana F.; Rozen, Rima

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is a significant global health issue, with nearly 200 million cases in 2013 alone. Parasites obtain folate from the host or synthesize it de novo. Folate consumption has increased in many populations, prompting concerns regarding potential deleterious consequences of higher intake. The impact of high dietary folate on the host’s immune function and response to malaria has not been examined. Our goal was to determine whether high dietary folate would affect response to malarial infection in a murine model of cerebral malaria. Mice were fed control diets (CD, recommended folate level for rodents) or folic acid-supplemented diets (FASD, 10x recommended level) for 5 weeks before infection with Plasmodium berghei ANKA. Survival, parasitemia, numbers of immune cells and other infection parameters were assessed. FASD mice had reduced survival (p<0.01, Cox proportional hazards) and higher parasitemia (p< 0.01, joint model of parasitemia and survival) compared with CD mice. FASD mice had lower numbers of splenocytes, total T cells, and lower numbers of specific T and NK cell sub-populations, compared with CD mice (p<0.05, linear mixed effects). Increased brain TNFα immunoreactive protein (p<0.01, t-test) and increased liver Abca1 mRNA (p<0.01, t-test), a modulator of TNFα, were observed in FASD mice; these variables correlated positively (rs = 0.63, p = 0.01). Bcl-xl/Bak mRNA was increased in liver of FASD mice (p<0.01, t-test), suggesting reduced apoptotic potential. We conclude that high dietary folate increases parasite replication, disturbs the immune response and reduces resistance to malaria in mice. These findings have relevance for malaria-endemic regions, when considering anti-folate anti-malarials, food fortification or vitamin supplementation programs. PMID:26599510

  19. BCG vaccination reduces risk of tuberculosis infection in vaccinated badgers and unvaccinated badger cubs.

    PubMed

    Carter, Stephen P; Chambers, Mark A; Rushton, Stephen P; Shirley, Mark D F; Schuchert, Pia; Pietravalle, Stéphane; Murray, Alistair; Rogers, Fiona; Gettinby, George; Smith, Graham C; Delahay, Richard J; Hewinson, R Glyn; McDonald, Robbie A

    2012-01-01

    Wildlife is a global source of endemic and emerging infectious diseases. The control of tuberculosis (TB) in cattle in Britain and Ireland is hindered by persistent infection in wild badgers (Meles meles). Vaccination with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has been shown to reduce the severity and progression of experimentally induced TB in captive badgers. Analysis of data from a four-year clinical field study, conducted at the social group level, suggested a similar, direct protective effect of BCG in a wild badger population. Here we present new evidence from the same study identifying both a direct beneficial effect of vaccination in individual badgers and an indirect protective effect in unvaccinated cubs. We show that intramuscular injection of BCG reduced by 76% (Odds ratio = 0.24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.11-0.52) the risk of free-living vaccinated individuals testing positive to a diagnostic test combination to detect progressive infection. A more sensitive panel of tests for the detection of infection per se identified a reduction of 54% (Odds ratio = 0.46, 95% CI 0.26-0.88) in the risk of a positive result following vaccination. In addition, we show the risk of unvaccinated badger cubs, but not adults, testing positive to an even more sensitive panel of diagnostic tests decreased significantly as the proportion of vaccinated individuals in their social group increased (Odds ratio = 0.08, 95% CI 0.01-0.76; P = 0.03). When more than a third of their social group had been vaccinated, the risk to unvaccinated cubs was reduced by 79% (Odds ratio = 0.21, 95% CI 0.05-0.81; P = 0.02).

  20. High Dietary Folate in Mice Alters Immune Response and Reduces Survival after Malarial Infection.

    PubMed

    Meadows, Danielle N; Bahous, Renata H; Best, Ana F; Rozen, Rima

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is a significant global health issue, with nearly 200 million cases in 2013 alone. Parasites obtain folate from the host or synthesize it de novo. Folate consumption has increased in many populations, prompting concerns regarding potential deleterious consequences of higher intake. The impact of high dietary folate on the host's immune function and response to malaria has not been examined. Our goal was to determine whether high dietary folate would affect response to malarial infection in a murine model of cerebral malaria. Mice were fed control diets (CD, recommended folate level for rodents) or folic acid-supplemented diets (FASD, 10x recommended level) for 5 weeks before infection with Plasmodium berghei ANKA. Survival, parasitemia, numbers of immune cells and other infection parameters were assessed. FASD mice had reduced survival (p<0.01, Cox proportional hazards) and higher parasitemia (p< 0.01, joint model of parasitemia and survival) compared with CD mice. FASD mice had lower numbers of splenocytes, total T cells, and lower numbers of specific T and NK cell sub-populations, compared with CD mice (p<0.05, linear mixed effects). Increased brain TNFα immunoreactive protein (p<0.01, t-test) and increased liver Abca1 mRNA (p<0.01, t-test), a modulator of TNFα, were observed in FASD mice; these variables correlated positively (rs = 0.63, p = 0.01). Bcl-xl/Bak mRNA was increased in liver of FASD mice (p<0.01, t-test), suggesting reduced apoptotic potential. We conclude that high dietary folate increases parasite replication, disturbs the immune response and reduces resistance to malaria in mice. These findings have relevance for malaria-endemic regions, when considering anti-folate anti-malarials, food fortification or vitamin supplementation programs.

  1. Development of a hybrid simulation course to reduce central line infections.

    PubMed

    Clapper, Timothy

    2012-05-01

    Clinical educators are continually looking at ways to effectively deliver large amounts of information to their learners. Whether as a part of pre-course work or as a separate phase of training, there are numerous benefits to making information available to learners before conducting sessions that allow the learners to practice the skills. Hybrid courses consist of a mixture of online and on-site instruction and offer a viable option for clinical educators to consider, especially when their intended audience consists of thousands of learners. This article describes the experiences of a medical simulation center and the use of a hybrid curriculum technique to reduce central line infections.

  2. Effectiveness of Interventions in Reducing Antibiotic Use for Upper Respiratory Infections in Ambulatory Care Practices

    PubMed Central

    Linkin, Darren R.; Localio, A. Russell; Leonard, Charles E.; Teal, Valerie L.; Fishman, Neil O.; Hennessy, Sean

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The objective was to evaluate the effect of separate interventions on antimicrobial prescribing for uncomplicated upper respiratory tract infections. The authors conducted a quasi-experimental pre-post study with concurrent control groups for each intervention. Academic detailing led to a significant reduction in unnecessary antibiotic prescribing. However, there was no significant change in antibiotic prescribing in response to educational mailings to providers or to provider involvement in patient mailings. Organizations that seek to reduce inappropriate use of antibiotics should use proven approaches, even when they are more expensive. (Population Health Management 2013;16:22–27) PMID:23113630

  3. Amino acid substitutions in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 V3 loop that change viral tropism also alter physical and functional properties of the virion envelope.

    PubMed Central

    Willey, R L; Theodore, T S; Martin, M A

    1994-01-01

    The third variable (V3) region within the gp120 envelope glycoprotein of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been reported to be an important determinant of viral tropism. In this study a series of isogenic recombinant HIV-1 viruses, containing V3 regions from fresh isolates, were examined to ascertain if a relationship exists between viral tropism and specific properties of the virion-associated envelope. All of the viruses were able to infect CD4+ primary lymphocytes, although with different infection kinetics. Several recombinants, however, were unable to infect a continuous CD4+ T-cell line permissive for the parental virus and exhibited a marked decrease in the kinetics of virion-associated gp120 binding to a soluble form of CD4. A known macrophage-tropic HIV-1 isolate, also unable to infect the T-cell line, bound CD4 with similarly slow reaction kinetics. Although the inability to infect T-cell lines is a commonly observed property of macrophage-tropic isolates of HIV-1, the loss of T-cell line tropism by the V3 recombinants was not accompanied by a substantial infectivity for monocyte-derived macrophages, as monitored by reverse transcriptase production. Additional analyses of the recombinant virion gp120s indicated that most of the V3 substitutions increased the inherent stability of the virion gp120-gp41 envelope complex. These results indicate that V3-induced alterations in viral tropism are associated with changes in physical and functional properties of the virion envelope. Images PMID:7515973

  4. Use of a patient hand hygiene protocol to reduce hospital-acquired infections and improve nurses' hand washing.

    PubMed

    Fox, Cherie; Wavra, Teresa; Drake, Diane Ash; Mulligan, Debbie; Bennett, Yvonne Pacheco; Nelson, Carla; Kirkwood, Peggy; Jones, Louise; Bader, Mary Kay

    2015-05-01

    Critically ill patients are at marked risk of hospital-acquired infections, which increase patients' morbidity and mortality. Registered nurses are the main health care providers of physical care, including hygiene to reduce and prevent hospital-acquired infections, for hospitalized critically ill patients. To investigate a new patient hand hygiene protocol designed to reduce hospital-acquired infection rates and improve nurses' hand-washing compliance in an intensive care unit. A preexperimental study design was used to compare 12-month rates of 2 common hospital-acquired infections, central catheter-associated bloodstream infection and catheter-associated urinary tract infection, and nurses' hand-washing compliance measured before and during use of the protocol. Reductions in 12-month infection rates were reported for both types of infections, but neither reduction was statistically significant. Mean 12-month nurse hand-washing compliance also improved, but not significantly. A hand hygiene protocol for patients in the intensive care unit was associated with reductions in hospital-acquired infections and improvements in nurses' hand-washing compliance. Prevention of such infections requires continuous quality improvement efforts to monitor lasting effectiveness as well as investigation of strategies to eliminate these infections. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  5. Secondary Defense Chemicals in Milkweed Reduce Parasite Infection in Monarch Butterflies, Danaus plexippus.

    PubMed

    Gowler, Camden D; Leon, Kristoffer E; Hunter, Mark D; de Roode, Jacobus C

    2015-06-01

    In tri-trophic systems, herbivores may benefit from their host plants in fighting parasitic infections. Plants can provide parasite resistance in two contrasting ways: either directly, by interfering with the parasite, or indirectly, by increasing herbivore immunity or health. In monarch butterflies, the larval diet of milkweed strongly influences the fitness of a common protozoan parasite. Toxic secondary plant chemicals known as cardenolides correlate strongly with parasite resistance of the host, with greater cardenolide concentrations in the larval diet leading to lower parasite growth. However, milkweed cardenolides may covary with other indices of plant quality including nutrients, and a direct experimental link between cardenolides and parasite performance has not been established. To determine if the anti-parasitic activity of milkweeds is indeed due to secondary chemicals, as opposed to nutrition, we supplemented the diet of infected and uninfected monarch larvae with milkweed latex, which contains cardenolides but no nutrients. Across three experiments, increased dietary cardenolide concentrations reduced parasite growth in infected monarchs, which consequently had longer lifespans. However, uninfected monarchs showed no differences in lifespan across treatments, confirming that cardenolide-containing latex does not increase general health. Our results suggest that cardenolides are a driving force behind plant-derived resistance in this system.

  6. Reducing the global burden of HTLV-1 infection: An agenda for research and action.

    PubMed

    Willems, Luc; Hasegawa, Hideki; Accolla, Roberto; Bangham, Charles; Bazarbachi, Ali; Bertazzoni, Umberto; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna Barbara de Freitas; Cheng, Hua; Chieco-Bianchi, Luigi; Ciminale, Vincenzo; Coelho-Dos-Reis, Jordana; Esparza, José; Gallo, Robert C; Gessain, Antoine; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Hall, William; Harford, Joseph; Hermine, Olivier; Jacobson, Steven; Macchi, Beatrice; Macpherson, Calum; Mahieux, Renaud; Matsuoka, Masao; Murphy, Edward; Peloponese, Jean-Marie; Simon, Viviana; Tagaya, Yutaka; Taylor, Graham P; Watanabe, Toshiki; Yamano, Yoshihisa

    2017-01-01

    Even though an estimated 10-20 million people worldwide are infected with the oncogenic retrovirus, human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), its epidemiology is poorly understood, and little effort has been made to reduce its prevalence. In response to this situation, the Global Virus Network launched a taskforce in 2014 to develop new methods of prevention and treatment of HTLV-1 infection and promote basic research. HTLV-1 is the etiological agent of two life-threatening diseases, adult T-cell leukemia and HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis, for which no effective therapy is currently available. Although the modes of transmission of HTLV-1 resemble those of the more familiar HIV-1, routine diagnostic methods are generally unavailable to support the prevention of new infections. In the present article, the Taskforce proposes a series of actions to expand epidemiological studies; increase research on mechanisms of HTLV-1 persistence, replication and pathogenesis; discover effective treatments; and develop prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Disassembly and reassembly of human papillomavirus virus-like particles produces more virion-like antibody reactivity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qinjian; Modis, Yorgo; High, Katrina; Towne, Victoria; Meng, Yuan; Wang, Yang; Alexandroff, Jaime; Brown, Martha; Carragher, Bridget; Potter, Clinton S; Abraham, Dicky; Wohlpart, Dave; Kosinski, Mike; Washabaugh, Mike W; Sitrin, Robert D

    2012-02-22

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines based on major capsid protein L1 are licensed in over 100 countries to prevent HPV infections. The yeast-derived recombinant quadrivalent HPV L1 vaccine, GARDASIL(R), has played an important role in reducing cancer and genital warts since its introduction in 2006. The L1 proteins self-assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs). VLPs were subjected to post-purification disassembly and reassembly (D/R) treatment during bioprocessing to improve VLP immunoreactivity and stability. The post-D/R HPV16 VLPs and their complex with H16.V5 neutralizing antibody Fab fragments were visualized by cryo electron microscopy, showing VLPs densely decorated with antibody. Along with structural improvements, post-D/R VLPs showed markedly higher antigenicity to conformational and neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) H16.V5, H16.E70 and H263.A2, whereas binding to mAbs recognizing linear epitopes (H16.J4, H16.O7, and H16.H5) was greatly reduced. Strikingly, post-D/R VLPs showed no detectable binding to H16.H5, indicating that the H16.H5 epitope is not accessible in fully assembled VLPs. An atomic homology model of the entire HPV16 VLP was generated based on previously determined high-resolution structures of bovine papillomavirus and HPV16 L1 pentameric capsomeres. D/R treatment of HPV16 L1 VLPs produces more homogeneous VLPs with more virion-like antibody reactivity. These effects can be attributed to a combination of more complete and regular assembly of the VLPs, better folding of L1, reduced non-specific disulfide-mediated aggregation and increased stability of the VLPs. Markedly different antigenicity of HPV16 VLPs was observed upon D/R treatment with a panel of monoclonal antibodies targeting neutralization sensitive epitopes. Multiple epitope-specific assays with a panel of mAbs with different properties and epitopes are required to gain a better understanding of the immunochemical properties of VLPs and to correlate the observed changes

  8. Wolbachia Reduces the Transmission Potential of Dengue-Infected Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Yixin H.; Carrasco, Alison M.; Frentiu, Francesca D.; Chenoweth, Stephen F.; Beebe, Nigel W.; van den Hurk, Andrew F.; Simmons, Cameron P.; O’Neill, Scott L.; McGraw, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Dengue viruses (DENV) are the causative agents of dengue, the world’s most prevalent arthropod-borne disease with around 40% of the world’s population at risk of infection annually. Wolbachia pipientis, an obligate intracellular bacterium, is being developed as a biocontrol strategy against dengue because it limits replication of the virus in the mosquito. The Wolbachia strain wMel, which has been introduced into the mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti, has been shown to invade and spread to near fixation in field releases. Standard measures of Wolbachia’s efficacy for blocking virus replication focus on the detection and quantification of virus in mosquito tissues. Examining the saliva provides a more accurate measure of transmission potential and can reveal the extrinsic incubation period (EIP), that is, the time it takes virus to arrive in the saliva following the consumption of DENV viremic blood. EIP is a key determinant of a mosquito’s ability to transmit DENVs, as the earlier the virus appears in the saliva the more opportunities the mosquito will have to infect humans on subsequent bites. Methodology/Principal Findings We used a non-destructive assay to repeatedly quantify DENV in saliva from wMel-infected and Wolbachia-free wild-type control mosquitoes following the consumption of a DENV-infected blood meal. We show that wMel lengthens the EIP, reduces the frequency at which the virus is expectorated and decreases the dengue copy number in mosquito saliva as compared to wild-type mosquitoes. These observations can at least be partially explained by an overall reduction in saliva produced by wMel mosquitoes. More generally, we found that the concentration of DENV in a blood meal is a determinant of the length of EIP, saliva virus titer and mosquito survival. Conclusions/Significance The saliva-based traits reported here offer more disease-relevant measures of Wolbachia’s effects on the vector and the virus. The lengthening of EIP highlights

  9. Wolbachia Reduces the Transmission Potential of Dengue-Infected Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yixin H; Carrasco, Alison M; Frentiu, Francesca D; Chenoweth, Stephen F; Beebe, Nigel W; van den Hurk, Andrew F; Simmons, Cameron P; O'Neill, Scott L; McGraw, Elizabeth A

    2015-01-01

    Dengue viruses (DENV) are the causative agents of dengue, the world's most prevalent arthropod-borne disease with around 40% of the world's population at risk of infection annually. Wolbachia pipientis, an obligate intracellular bacterium, is being developed as a biocontrol strategy against dengue because it limits replication of the virus in the mosquito. The Wolbachia strain wMel, which has been introduced into the mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti, has been shown to invade and spread to near fixation in field releases. Standard measures of Wolbachia's efficacy for blocking virus replication focus on the detection and quantification of virus in mosquito tissues. Examining the saliva provides a more accurate measure of transmission potential and can reveal the extrinsic incubation period (EIP), that is, the time it takes virus to arrive in the saliva following the consumption of DENV viremic blood. EIP is a key determinant of a mosquito's ability to transmit DENVs, as the earlier the virus appears in the saliva the more opportunities the mosquito will have to infect humans on subsequent bites. We used a non-destructive assay to repeatedly quantify DENV in saliva from wMel-infected and Wolbachia-free wild-type control mosquitoes following the consumption of a DENV-infected blood meal. We show that wMel lengthens the EIP, reduces the frequency at which the virus is expectorated and decreases the dengue copy number in mosquito saliva as compared to wild-type mosquitoes. These observations can at least be partially explained by an overall reduction in saliva produced by wMel mosquitoes. More generally, we found that the concentration of DENV in a blood meal is a determinant of the length of EIP, saliva virus titer and mosquito survival. The saliva-based traits reported here offer more disease-relevant measures of Wolbachia's effects on the vector and the virus. The lengthening of EIP highlights another means, in addition to the reduction of infection frequencies and DENV

  10. Improving awareness of best practices to reduce surgical site infection: a multistakeholder approach.

    PubMed

    Skoufalos, Alexandria; Clarke, Janice L; Napp, Marc; Abrams, Kenneth J; Berman, Bettina; Armellino, Donna; Schilling, Mary Ellen; Pracilio, Valerie

    2012-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is recognized as a focus area by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the Joint Commission, the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, and the Institute of Medicine. An estimated 47% to 84% of SSIs present after discharge from the hospital or ambulatory care facility and, as a result, go undetected by standard SSI surveillance programs. Evidence-based processes and practices that are known to reduce the incidence of SSIs tend to be underused in routine practice. This article describes a multistakeholder process used to develop an educational initiative to raise awareness of best practices to reduce SSIs. The goal was to create a patient-centric educational initiative that involved an active partnership among all stakeholders-medical professional organizations, hospitals/health systems, health insurers, employers and other purchasers, and consumers/patients-to provide the climate necessary to create and sustain a culture of safety.

  11. Reducing fungal infections and testing tag loss in juvenile Pacific lampreys implanted with passive integrated transponders.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christiansen, H.E.; Gee, L.P.; Mesa, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Pacific lamprey Entosphenus tridentatus are facing severe population declines, yet little is known about juvenile lamprey passage, life history, or adult return rates because until now, these small fish could not be tagged for unique identification of live individuals. Previously, we developed a simple and effective method for tagging juvenile lampreys with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags and showed that tagging per se did not affect survival. Mortality in tagged and untagged control fish, however, was frequently associated with fungal infection. In this study, we addressed two outstanding issues related to handling and tagging juvenile lampreys. First, we tried to mitigate freshwater fungal infections by reducing irritation and stress from anesthesia and by treating tagged fish briefly with a prophylactic immediately after tagging. We tested four anesthetics at three concentrations each and determined that 100 mg/L MS-222 and 60 mg/L BENZOAK® (benzocaine) were the most effective for anesthetizing juvenile lampreys to handleable while minimizing irritation. We also showed that fish anesthetized with BENZOAK® may have lower rates of fungal infection than those anesthetized with MS-222 or AQUI-S® 20E (eugenol). When fish anesthetized with MS-222 or BENZOAK® were given a 30 min prophylactic treatment with Stress Coat®, hydrogen peroxide, or salt immediately after tagging, few fish presented with fungal infections. However, untreated, tagged control fish also showed few fungal infections, making it difficult to determine if the prophylactic treatments were successful. The second question we addressed was whether activity would increase tag loss in PIT-tagged lampreys. We found that active swimming did not cause tag loss if fish were first held for 20–24 h after tagging. Therefore, we recommend anesthesia with MS-222 or BENZOAK® and then tagging with a 20–24 h recovery period followed by immediate release. If field studies show that lampreys are not

  12. Dissemination of a simulation-based mastery learning intervention reduces central line-associated bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Barsuk, Jeffrey H; Cohen, Elaine R; Potts, Steven; Demo, Hany; Gupta, Shanu; Feinglass, Joe; McGaghie, William C; Wayne, Diane B

    2014-09-01

    Approximately 41,000 central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) occur annually in US hospitals. We previously developed a simulation-based mastery learning (SBML) curriculum in central venous catheter (CVC) insertion that significantly reduced CLABSI rates. In this study, we evaluated the effect of dissemination of the SBML curriculum on trainee skills and CLABSI rates at a community hospital. The authors performed a cohort study of residents who rotated in the intensive care unit (ICU) at Mercy Hospital and Medical Center from September 2010 to May 2012. Residents underwent an SBML CVC insertion curriculum and were required to meet or exceed a minimum passing score on a simulated internal jugular (IJ) and subclavian (SC) CVC insertion before ICU patient care. Infection control personnel measured CLABSI rates in the ICU before and after the educational intervention. Residents scored a mean IJ pretest of 35.5% (10.29/29, SD=8.30) compared with a post-test mean of 93.0% (26.96/29, SD=1.50; p<0.001). Their mean SC pretest score was 23.0% (6.68/29; SD=9.58) and increased to 96.1% (27.88/29, SD=1.41) at post-test (p<0.001). Patients experienced 3.82 infections per 1000 catheter-days (20 infections in 5235 catheter-days) in the ICU in the 23 months before the educational intervention. During the 21 months after the intervention, there were 1.29 infections per 1000 catheter-days (six infections in 4670 catheter-days (p=0.019)). The incidence rate ratio derived from the Poisson regression was 0.26 (95% CI 0.09 to 0.74) after controlling for Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III score indicating that there was a 74% reduction in the incidence of CLABSI in the medical ICU after the intervention. This study demonstrates successful dissemination and implementation of a CVC SBML curriculum and shows that rigorous medical education is a powerful quality improvement tool. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not

  13. Highly diluted medication reduces tissue parasitism and inflammation in mice infected by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Carina Ribeiro; Falkowski, Gislaine Janaina Sanchez; Brustolin, Camila Fernanda; Massini, Paula Fernanda; Ferreira, Érika Cristina; Moreira, Neide Martins; Aleixo, Denise Lessa; Kaneshima, Edilson Nobuyoshi; de Araújo, Silvana Marques

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the effects of Kalium causticum, Conium maculatum, and Lycopodium clavatum 13cH in mice infected by Trypanosoma cruzi. In a blind, controlled, randomized study, 102 male Swiss mice, 8 weeks old, were inoculated with 1400 trypomastigotes of the Y strain of T. cruzi and distributed into the following groups: CI (treated with 7% hydroalcoholic solution), Ca (treated with Kalium causticum 13cH), Co (treated with Conium maculatum 13cH), and Ly (treated with Lycopodium clavatum 13cH). The treatments were performed 48 h before and 48, 96, and 144 h after infection. The medication was repertorized and prepared in 13cH, according to Brazilian Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia. The following parameters were evaluated: infectivity, prepatent period, parasitemia peak, total parasitemia, tissue tropism, inflammatory infiltrate, and survival. Statistical analysis was conduced considering 5% of significance. The prepatent period was greater in the Ly group than in the CI group (p = 0.02). The number of trypomastigotes on the 8th day after infection was lower in the Ca group than in the CI group (p < 0.05). Total parasitemia was significantly lower in the Ca, Co, and Ly groups than in the CI group. On the 12th day after infection, the Ca, Co, and Ly groups had fewer nests and amastigotes/nest in the heart than the CI group (p < 0.05). Decreases in the number of nests and amastigotes in the intestine were observed in the Ly group compared with the CI group (p < 0.05). In the liver (day 12), Ly significantly prevented the formation of inflammatory foci compared with the other groups. In skeletal muscle, Co and Ly decreased the formation of inflammatory foci compared with CI (p < 0.05). Ly afforded greater animal survival compared with CI, Ca, and Co (p < 0.05). The animals in the Co group died prematurely compared with the CI group (p = 0.03). Ly with 13cH potency had significantly more benefits in the treatment of mice infected with T. cruzi, reducing the number

  14. Supplementation with vitamin A reduces watery diarrhoea and respiratory infections in Mexican children.

    PubMed

    Long, Kurt Z; Rosado, Jorge L; DuPont, Herbert L; Hertzmark, Ellen; Santos, Jose Ignacio

    2007-02-01

    Previous clinical vitamin A trials have found no consistent effect on diarrhoeal disease and respiratory tract infection. These inconsistent results may be due to the distinct effects vitamin A supplementation has among children stratified by factors related to socio-economic status, nutritional status and season. We evaluated the effect of supplementation on the overall incidence of diarrhoeal disease and respiratory tract infections and on the incidence among children stratified by these factors. A total of 188 children, aged 6-15 months, from periurban, marginalized communities of Mexico City were assigned to receive vitamin A ( < 12 months of age, 20,000 IU retinol; >or= 12 months, 45,000 IU retinol) or a placebo every 2 months, and were followed for up to 15 months. Project personnel visited households twice a week to determine the onset and duration of diarrhoeal disease and respiratory tract infections. Vitamin A supplementation had no significant effect on risk of overall diarrhoeal disease but reduced mild watery diarrhoea (incidence rate ratio (RR) 0.69; 95 % CI 0.50, 0.93) and cough with fever (RR 0.69; 95 % CI 0.48, 0.98). Vitamin A supplementation decreased diarrhoeal disease during the summer (RR 0.74; 95 % CI 0.57, 0.94), among non-stunted children (RR 0.69; 95 % CI 0.52, 0.93) and among children from households with better socio-economic measures. Heterogeneity in the response to vitamin A supplementation may reflect heterogeneity in the aetiology and epidemiology of diarrhoeal disease and respiratory tract infections and the impact that supplementation has on the immune response.

  15. Reduced neutrophil chemotaxis and infiltration contributes to delayed resolution of cutaneous wound infection with advanced age.

    PubMed

    Brubaker, Aleah L; Rendon, Juan L; Ramirez, Luis; Choudhry, Mashkoor A; Kovacs, Elizabeth J

    2013-02-15

    Advanced age is associated with alterations in innate and adaptive immune responses, which contribute to an increased risk of infection in elderly patients. Coupled with this immune dysfunction, elderly patients demonstrate impaired wound healing with elevated rates of wound dehiscence and chronic wounds. To evaluate how advanced age alters the host immune response to cutaneous wound infection, we developed a murine model of cutaneous Staphylococcus aureus wound infection in young (3-4 mo) and aged (18-20 mo) BALB/c mice. Aged mice exhibit increased bacterial colonization and delayed wound closure over time compared with young mice. These differences were not attributed to alterations in wound neutrophil or macrophage TLR2 or FcγRIII expression, or age-related changes in phagocytic potential and bactericidal activity. To evaluate the role of chemotaxis in our model, we first examined in vivo chemotaxis in the absence of wound injury to KC, a neutrophil chemokine. In response to a s.c. injection of KC, aged mice recruited fewer neutrophils at increasing doses of KC compared with young mice. This paralleled our model of wound infection, where diminished neutrophil and macrophage recruitment was observed in aged mice relative to young mice despite equivalent levels of KC, MIP-2, and MCP-1 chemokine levels at the wound site. This reduced leukocyte accumulation was also associated with lower levels of ICAM-1 in wounds from aged mice at early time points. These age-mediated defects in early neutrophil recruitment may alter the dynamics of the inflammatory phase of wound healing, impacting macrophage recruitment, bacterial clearance, and wound closure.

  16. Yoga lifestyle intervention reduces blood pressure in HIV-infected adults with cardiovascular disease risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Cade, Todd; Reeds, Dominic N.; Mondy, Kristin E.; Overton, Turner; Grassino, Joseph; Tucker, Shawn; Bopp, Coco; Laciny, Erin; Hubert, Sara; Lassa-Claxton, Sherry; Yarasheski, Kevin E.

    2009-01-01

    People living with human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV) are at increased risk for developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). Safe and effective interventions for lowering CVD risk in HIV are high priorities. Objective We conducted a prospective, randomized, controlled study to evaluate whether a yoga lifestyle intervention improves CVD risk factors, virologic or immunologic status, or quality of life in HIV-infected adults more than in a matched control group. Methods Sixty HIV-infected adults with mild-moderate CVD risk were assigned to 20 wks of supervised yoga practice or standard of care treatment. Baseline and week 20 measures were; 2hr-oral glucose tolerance test with insulin monitoring, body composition, fasting serum lipid/lipoprotein profile, resting blood pressures, CD4+ T-cell number and plasma HIV RNA, and the Medical Outcomes Study SF-36 health-related quality of life inventory. Results Resting systolic and diastolic blood pressures were reduced more (p=0.04) in the yoga group (−5±2 and −3±1 mmHg) than in the standard of care group (+1±2 and +2±2 mmHg), despite no greater reduction in body weight, fat mass, proatherogenic lipids, or improvements in glucose tolerance or overall quality of life after yoga. Immune and virologic status was not adversely affected. Conclusion Among traditional lifestyle modifications, yoga is a low cost, simple to administer, non-pharmacological, popular behavioral intervention that can lower blood pressure in pre-hypertensive HIV-infected adults with mild-moderate CVD risk factors. PMID:20059570

  17. The efficacy of noble metal alloy urinary catheters in reducing catheter-associated urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Aljohi, Alanood Ahmed; Hassan, Hanan Elkefafy; Gupta, Rakesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) is the most common device-related healthcare-acquired infection. CAUTI can be severe and lead to bacteremia, significant morbidity, prolonged hospital stay, and high antibiotic consumption. Patients and Methods: In this study, we evaluated the CAUTI-reducing efficacy of noble metal alloy catheters in sixty patients (thirty per group) in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) at the King Fahad Hospital in Saudi Arabia. The study was a single-blinded, randomized, single-centered, prospective investigation that included patients using urinary catheters for 3 days. Results: A 90% relative risk reduction in the rate of CAUTI was observed with the noble metal alloy catheter compared to the standard catheter (10 vs. 1 cases, P = 0.006). When considering both catheter-associated asymptomatic bacteriuria and CAUTI, the relative risk reduction was 83% (12 vs. 2 cases, P = 0.005). In addition to CAUTI, the risk of acquiring secondary bacteremia was lower (100%) for the patients using noble metal alloy catheters (3 cases in the standard group vs. 0 case in the noble metal alloy catheter group, P = 0.24). No adverse events related to any of the used catheters were recorded. Conclusion: Results from this study revealed that noble metal alloy catheters are safe to use and significantly reduce CAUTI rate in ICU patients after 3 days of use. PMID:28057985

  18. Reduced itraconazole concentration and durations are successful in treating Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis infection in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Brannelly, Laura A

    2014-03-14

    Amphibians are experiencing the greatest decline of any vertebrate class and a leading cause of these declines is a fungal pathogen, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), which causes the disease chytridiomycosis. Captive assurance colonies are important worldwide for threatened amphibian species and may be the only lifeline for those in critical threat of extinction. Maintaining disease free colonies is a priority of captive managers, yet safe and effective treatments for all species and across life stages have not been identified. The most widely used chemotherapeutic treatment is itraconazole, although the dosage commonly used can be harmful to some individuals and species. We performed a clinical treatment trial to assess whether a lower and safer but effective dose of itraconazole could be found to cure Bd infections. We found that by reducing the treatment concentration from 0.01-0.0025% and reducing the treatment duration from 11-6 days of 5 min baths, frogs could be cured of Bd infection with fewer side effects and less treatment-associated mortality.

  19. Reducing HIV infections at circuit parties: from description to explanation and principles of intervention design.

    PubMed

    Ghaziani, Amin; Cook, Thomas D

    2005-06-01

    Circuit parties are weekend-long, erotically charged, drug-prevalent dance events attended by up to 25,000 self-identified gay and bisexual men who socialize and dance nonstop, sometimes for 24 hours or longer. Although these parties started originally as part of the gay community's response to raise HIV/AIDS awareness and to build community and cultural identity, they may have become a site for transmitting HIV across geographical regions and socioeconomic groups of gay and bisexual men. This article reviews the descriptive published studies on circuit parties. The authors use these studies and the literature on drug use and high-risk sexual behavior in gay and bisexual communities, along with sociological and social psychological research, to propose a causal model of why circuit parties may contribute to unsafe sexual practices that increase HIV infection risk. The authors abstract 5 prevention messages relevant to circuit parties and review intervention studies in nonparty settings for insight into how to reduce risky sexual behavior within circuit events. These intervention studies help to identify 5 context-specific groups that can effectively carry the prevention messages. The 5-by-5 matrix represents a first stage in developing a causal model for reducing HIV infections, along with evaluable principles of intervention, at circuit parties.

  20. Standardizing preoperative preparation to reduce surgical site infections among pediatric neurosurgical patients.

    PubMed

    Schaffzin, Joshua K; Simon, Katherine; Connelly, Beverly L; Mangano, Francesco T

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Surgical site infections (SSIs) are costly to patients and the health care system. Pediatric neurosurgery SSI risk factors are not well defined. Intraoperative protocols have reduced, but have not eliminated, SSIs. The effect of preoperative intervention is unknown. Using quality improvement methods, a preoperative SSI prevention protocol for pediatric neurosurgical patients was implemented to assess its effect on SSI rate. METHODS Patients who underwent a scheduled neurosurgical procedure between January 2014 and December 2015 were included. Published evidence and provider consensus were used to guide preoperative protocol development. The Model for Improvement was used to test interventions. Intraoperative and postoperative management was not standardized or modified systematically. Staff, family, and overall adherence was measured as all-or-nothing. In addition, SSI rates among eligible procedures were measured before and after protocol implementation. RESULTS Within 4 months, overall protocol adherence increased from 51.3% to a sustained 85.7%. SSI rates decreased from 2.9 per 100 procedures preintervention to 0.62 infections postintervention (p = 0.003). An approximate 79% reduction in SSI risk was identified (risk ratio 0.21, 95% CI 0.08-0.56; p = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Clinical staff and families successfully collaborated on a standardized preoperative protocol for pediatric neurosurgical patients. Standardization of the preoperative phase of care alone reduced SSI rates. Attention to the preoperative in addition to the intraoperative and postoperative phases of care may lead to further reduction in SSI rates.

  1. Quorum-Quenching Acylase Reduces the Virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Caenorhabditis elegans Infection Model▿

    PubMed Central

    Papaioannou, Evelina; Wahjudi, Mariana; Nadal-Jimenez, Pol; Koch, Gudrun; Setroikromo, Rita; Quax, Wim J.

    2009-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 gene pvdQ encodes an acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) acylase capable of degrading N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone by cleaving the AHL amide. PvdQ has been proven to function as a quorum quencher in vitro in a number of phenotypic assays. To address the question of whether PvdQ also shows quorum-quenching properties in vivo, an infection model based on the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was explored. In a fast-acting paralysis assay, strain PAO1(pMEpvdQ), which overproduces PvdQ, was shown to be less virulent than the wild-type strain. More than 75% of the nematodes exposed to PAO1(pMEpvdQ) survived and continued to grow when using this strain as a food source. Interestingly, in a slow-killing assay monitoring the survival of the nematodes throughout a 4-day course, strain PAO1-ΔpvdQ was shown to be more virulent than the wild-type strain, confirming the role of PvdQ as a virulence-reducing agent. It was observed that larval stage 1 (L1) to L3-stage larvae benefit much more from protection by PvdQ than L4 worms. Finally, purified PvdQ protein was added to C. elegans worms infected with wild-type PAO1, and this resulted in reduced pathogenicity and increased the life span of the nematodes. From our observations we can conclude that PvdQ might be a strong candidate for antibacterial therapy against Pseudomonas infections. PMID:19721066

  2. Does Leaving the Biopsy Needle in Povidone-Iodine Solution Reduce Infective Complications after Biopsy?

    PubMed Central

    Cirakoglu, Abdullah; Ogreden, Ercan; Cetinkol, Yeliz; Calgin, Mustafa Kerem; Ayyildiz, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether leaving the biopsy needle used during prostate needle biopsy in 10% povidone-iodine (betadine) solution affects the infectious complications forming after biopsy. Material and Method. This study retrospectively evaluated the data of 176 patients with prostate biopsy performed between December 2012 and April 2014. Patients in Group 1 (n = 89) were given ofloxacin as a prophylactic antibiotic before biopsy. Patients in Group 2 (n = 87) had the biopsy needle left in povidone-iodine solution for 1 minute before each use, in addition to antibiotic prophylaxis. The two groups were compared in terms of infective complications developing after biopsy. Results were analyzed using the Mann–Whitney U test and Fisher's exact test. Results. The distribution of infective complications after biopsy according to group was as follows. Group 1, not using betadine, had 15.7% fever, 13.5% hospital stay, 12.4% urinary retention, 10.1% prostatitis, and 5.6% sepsis. The distribution of the same complications in Group 2 using betadine was identified as 5.7% fever, 4.6% hospital stay, 3.4% urinary retention, 2.3% prostatitis, and 0% sepsis. The use of betadine was found to significantly reduce the infectious complications after biopsy compared to the control group (p < 0.05). Conclusion. At the end of this study leaving the prostate needle in povidone-iodine solution before each use during prostate biopsy was found to reduce the infective complications and hospital stay after biopsy. PMID:28096812

  3. Identification of bacteriophage virion proteins by the ANOVA feature selection and analysis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hui; Feng, Peng-Mian; Chen, Wei; Lin, Hao

    2014-08-01

    The bacteriophage virion proteins play extremely important roles in the fate of host bacterial cells. Accurate identification of bacteriophage virion proteins is very important for understanding their functions and clarifying the lysis mechanism of bacterial cells. In this study, a new sequence-based method was developed to identify phage virion proteins. In the new method, the protein sequences were initially formulated by the g-gap dipeptide compositions. Subsequently, the analysis of variance (ANOVA) with incremental feature selection (IFS) was used to search for the optimal feature set. It was observed that, in jackknife cross-validation, the optimal feature set including 160 optimized features can produce the maximum accuracy of 85.02%. By performing feature analysis, we found that the correlation between two amino acids with one gap was more important than other correlations for phage virion protein prediction and that some of the 1-gap dipeptides were important and mainly contributed to the virion protein prediction. This analysis will provide novel insights into the function of phage virion proteins. On the basis of the proposed method, an online web-server, PVPred, was established and can be freely accessed from the website (http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/PVPred). We believe that the PVPred will become a powerful tool to study phage virion proteins and to guide the related experimental validations.

  4. Mass Determination of Rous Sarcoma Virus Virions by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Volker M.; Simon, Martha N.

    1999-01-01

    The internal structural protein of retroviruses, Gag, comprises most of the mass of the virion, and Gag itself can give rise to virus-like particles when expressed in appropriate cells. Previously the stoichiometry of Gag in virions was inferred from indirect measurements carried out 2 decades ago. We now have directly determined the masses of individual particles of the prototypic avian retrovirus, Rous sarcoma virus (RSV), by using scanning transmission electron microscopy. In this technique, the number of scattered electrons in the dark-field image integrated over an individual freeze-dried virus particle on a grid is directly proportional to its mass. The RSV virions had a mean mass of 2.5 × 108 Da, corresponding to about 1,500 Gag molecules per virion. The population of virions was not homogeneous, with about one-third to two-thirds of the virions deviating from the mean by more than 10% of the mass in two respective preparations. The mean masses for virions carrying genomes of 7.4 or 9.3 kb were indistinguishable, suggesting that mass variability is not due to differences in RNA incorporation. PMID:10400808

  5. Propofol Increases Host Susceptibility to Microbial Infection by Reducing Subpopulations of Mature Immune Effector Cells at Sites of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Visvabharathy, Lavanya; Xayarath, Bobbi; Weinberg, Guy; Shilling, Rebecca A.; Freitag, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Anesthetics are known to modulate host immune responses, but separating the variables of surgery from anesthesia when analyzing hospital acquired infections is often difficult. Here, the bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) was used to assess the impact of the common anesthetic propofol on host susceptibility to infection. Brief sedation of mice with physiologically relevant concentrations of propofol increased bacterial burdens in target organs by more than 10,000-fold relative to infected control animals. The adverse effects of propofol sedation on immune clearance of Lm persisted after recovery from sedation, as animals given the drug remained susceptible to infection for days following anesthesia. In contrast to propofol, sedation with alternative anesthetics such as ketamine/xylazine or pentobarbital did not increase susceptibility to systemic Lm infection. Propofol altered systemic cytokine and chemokine expression during infection, and prevented effective bacterial clearance by inhibiting the recruitment and/or activity of immune effector cells at sites of infection. Propofol exposure induced a marked reduction in marginal zone macrophages in the spleens of Lm infected mice, resulting in bacterial dissemination into deep tissue. Propofol also significantly increased mouse kidney abs